Page 1

10 C E N T S A COPY

ILLUSTRATIONS IN COLOR

$1.00 A YEAR

McCLURES MAGAZINE FOR

FEBRUARY


ft

This only is the witchcraft I have us'd"


MCCLURE'S MAGAZINE

Armour and Co Chicago

A P L A T E of C L E A R S O U P made

from

Armour'sextrac has its place at beginning

of

the

every

dinner for a reason not a fad: IT

IS

A

V A L U A B L E

Highest AWARD PHILADELPHIA EXPORT EXPOSITION

-I

1699

A

A P P E T I Z E R Copyright 1899 by ArmourandC o . _

tmnn VHT7E CAI END A R OFFER: Above February design in colors (size l u x i t ; , same as puonsnea i n T R U T H will be m i n e d to any address on receipt of metal cap from Extract of Beef jar. Please mention Mcclure's when you write to advertisers I


McCLURE'S C O N T E N T S I

Cover

II

The

MAGAZINE

F O R

F E B R U A R Y ,

D e s i g n e d by F r a n k V . D u

Temptation.

Mond.

R e p r o d u c t i o n in

Color.

P a i n t e d expressly for M C C L U K E ' S M A G A Z I N E by C o r w i n K n a p p

III T h e

1900:

Frontispiece

Linson

L i f e o f t h e M a s t e r . Part I I . J o h n the B a p t i s t . — T h e Baptism and T e m p t a t i o nofJesusThe Rev. John Watson, D.D.

295

W i t h five illustrations i n color and pictures in black-and-white, by C o r w i n K n a p p L i n s o n .

IV.

T o m Tail-rope's

Exploit.

A Story of

Mining

Life

Phil

More

W i t h pictures by H . S. W a t s o n .

v. The Race for the North Pole. A Chapter of Recent Personal Experience in the Arctic Walter Wellman 318 j W i t h portraits, map, and illustrations from drawings by W . R . L e i g h .

VI.

T h e M a s t e r - k e y of N e w g a t e .

T h e StoryofanEnglishPrisonerandhisGuardTigheHopkins

W i t h pictures by H a r r y F e n n .

VII.

A Few

F a c t s A b o u t the C o l o n i e s of the

Great

Powers

Alleyne

Ireland

334

Illustrated.

VIII.

T h e C a p t a i n o f t h e " A p h r o d i t e . " A StoryoftheGeorgiaCoast 339

E

l

m

o

r

e

E l l i o t t

P

e

a

k

e

W i t h pictures by H . C. E d w a r d s .

IX.

Frederic A. Lucas

T h e T r u t h about the M a m m o t h

W i t h pictures of the W a r d restoration of the m a m m o t h , the complete skeleton i n the R o y a l M u s e u m , and other scientific specimens.

X.

349 St.

Petersburg

General G r a n t s Administration,fromtheStandpointofaMemberofhisCabinetTheHon.Georg

XI. The Inside of the Earth. Professor Milne's Observations and Conclusions as to the Interior of our Planet Cleveland Moffett 363 W i t h diagrams.

XII.

General

Leonard

Wood.

A Character

Sketch

Ray

W i t h a new portrait of General W o o d taken expressly for M C C L U R E ' S M A G A Z I N E , and other portraits.

XIII. The Million-dollar Freight Train. The Story of a Young Engineer on his First Run Frank H. Spearman 380 W i t h pictures by C h a r l e s B r o u g h t o n .

XIV.

Editorial Notes

387

T e r m s : $1.00 a Y e a r in A d v a n c e ; 10 Cents a N u m b e r . Subscriptions are received by a l l Newsdealers and Booksellers, or may be sent direct to the Publishers. B O U N D V O L U M E X I I I . ( M a y - O c t o b e r , 1899) is NOW R E A D Y FOR D E L I V E R Y . I n dark green l i n e n and g o l d , postpaid, $1.25; i n blue buckram and g o l d , $1.50. A l l other bound volumes supplied at the same prices except V o l u m e I. V O L U M E I . (long out of print) has been reprinted in a limited edition, and can be supplied at $2.50 in blue b u c k r a m , and $2.25 i n green l i n e n . B a c k numbers, returned postpaid, w i l l be exchanged for corresponding bound volumes, in l i n e n at 75 cents per volume, and i n b u c k r a m at $1.00, post­ paid ; but we can not make this exchange unless the returned numbers retain cover and a d v e r t i s i n g pages, a n d are i n every w a y whole and complete. Indexes supplied to those who wish to do their o w n b i n d i n g . A CAUTfON.—Subscribers to the Magazine should be very careful to whom they pay money. We have frequent com­ plaints of money paid to pretended agents of the Magazine which we have never received. No agent or collector is authorized to receipt to subscribers in our name. W&lake every precaution we can to save subscribers from deception and fraud, but we must have their co-operation to the extent of being fairly prudent and cautious for themselves. S. S. M c C L U R E , P r e s i d e n t F . N . D O U B L E D A Y , Vice-President J O H N S. P H I L L I P S , T r e a s u r e r A L B E R T B . B R A D Y , Secretary

THE 141-155 E a s t

S. S. M c C L U R E CO. Twenty-fifth

Street, N e w

E n t e r e d as Second-Class M a t t e r at the N e w Y o r k ( N . Y . ) Post-Office, J u n e 9, 1893 C o p y r i g h t , 1900. bv T H E S. S. M C C L U R E C O . A l l rights reserved. 1

York

City


Mcclure's Magazine

MAKERS °f HISTORY These thirty-two interesting volumes provide the way for all to become acquaint ed with the makers of the world's history. They are not d u l l - h a r d - t o - r e a d books, but, on the contrary, most instructive, and written in an exceptionally entertaining style. That these are books whose ownership Charles I. Alfred the Great is appreciated is best evidenced by their Hortense Margaret of Anjou I unequalled sale of over Josephine Richard I. Richard II. William the Conqueror Alexander the Great Cyrus the Great Darius the Great Genghis Khan Peter the Great Xerxes Hannibal Julius Caesar Nero Pyrrhus Romulus

Madame Roland Marie Antoinette Henry IV. Hernando Cortez Joseph Bonaparte King Philip Louis X I V . Louis Philippe Charles II. Mary Queen of Scots Queen Elizabeth Richard III. Cleopatra

650,000 VOLUMES

This publication, Abbott's Biograph­ ical Histories, has been adopted by Boards of Education in many states, and no library can be termed complete without this work. The complete set, thirty-two volumes, well printed upon extra quality of paper, illustrated, durably and artistically bound in buckram, with appropriate design in two colors on cover, will be forwarded for inspection upon request. If, upon examina­ tion, you decide to retain the work, remit us one dollar a month for sixteen months. If not satisfactory you return at our expense.

HARPER'S HISTORY CLUB, 142 Fifth Ave., New York

Complete Set Delivered at Once. 32 volumes, only 50 cents each, pay= able $1.00 a month for 16 months. Present

Terms

not Guaranteed

3

after

March

1st.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

EVERY PIANIST, EVERY SINGER w i l l b e g l a d o f the o p p o r t u n i t y t o secure, i n a s u p e r b , u n i f o r m e d i t i o n , the m o s t c e l e b r a t e d a n d m o s t m e l o d i o u s v o c a l a n d i n s t r u ­ mental compositions that h a v e e v e r been written. S u c h a n o p p o r t u n i t y is n o w a f f o r d e d i n t h e m a g n i f i c e n t n e w a n d e n l a r g e d e d i t i o n , i n e i g h t v o l u m e s , w h i c h c o n t a i n o v e r 2,200 p a g e s , n e a r l y s h e e t m u s i c s i z e , o f the

Library of t h e

W O R L D ' S B E S T MUSIC

instrumental selections for the p i a n o ,

1,100 pages

( '{

songs for all voices, w i t h piano accompaniment,

Over 2,200 Pages f 3 5 0

1,100 pages

T W E N T Y EDITORS AND S P E C I A L C O N T R I B U T O R S .

$200.00

Worth of Sheet Music for the Piano at One-Tenth Value.

"The

most complete and valuable M u s i c a l L i b r a r y ever published." — The Keynote. " N o t h i n g s o fine a n d w e l l w o r t h h a v i n g i n o n e ' s h o m e . ' " — M a r g a r e t E . S a n g s t e r , E d i t o r Harper $ Bazar.

"It

is a p u b l i c a t i o n

i n t e r e s t a l l . " — The

w e can recommend.

T h e r e is something

" A vocal and instrumental library o f rare excellence and n e s s . — The

that

will

Etude. comprehensive­

Pianist.

A Complete Musical Library for the Home In 8 Volumes, 4 Vocal, 4 Instrumental, containingI n s t r u m e n t a l selections b y t h e greatest c o m p o s e r s ; m e l o d i o u s , not too difficult, a n d i n c l u d i n g p o p u l a r a n d operatic melodies, classic a n d r o m a n t i c piano music. T h e best o l d a n d n e w s o n g s , d u e t s , t r i o s , q u a r t e t s , a n d choruses u p o n every subject. 400 p o r t r a i t s a n d i l l u s t r a t i o n s , o v e r 500 b i o g ­ r a p h i e s o f m u s i c i a n s , a n d m o r e t h a n 100 n e w a n d c o p y r i g h t e d s e l e c t i o n s b y A m e r i c a n musicians. T h e w o r k is p l a n n e d for cultured homes a n d s y m p a ­ thetic performers.

I All these I and over 400 other Composers represented in this matchless I collection:

Strauss Mozart Beethoven Schumann Schubert Lange Chopin

Moore Taubert Saint-Saens Gottschalk Grieg Chaminade Bendel

Chwatal Cowen Brahms Paderewski Haydn Verdi Bizet

Leschetizky Hensel Rubinstein Balfe Sullivan Liszt Bishop

MARVEL0USLY LOW PRICE. WT H EO R L LD I' BS R AB RE YS T O MF UTS IHC E is r e a l l y T W O S E T S o f s u b s c r i p t i o n b o o k s , b o u n d t o g e t h e r i n a n e w , uniform edition. T h e s u b s c r i p t i o n prices for t h e two sets w e r e n e v e r less t h a n $30.00 i n c l o t h a n d $40.00 i n h a l f - l e a t h e r . O u r l o w c l u b prices are $18.00 i n fine c l o t h b i n d i n g , a n d $21.00 i n h a l f - l e a t h e r b i n d i n g . We pay transportation charges. We a r e s o c o n f i d e n t these books w i l l please y o u , that we are w i l l i n g to s e n d t h e m on a p p r o v a l .

Rameau Erkel Rachmaninoff Goldmark Wagner Gounod Handel

Benedict Kreutzer Mattei Czibulka Molloy Kelley Arditi

Emmett i Buck r Damrosch i De K o v e n ^ Faure 4 Gilbert k Weber S

THF ^ F T ° * ^ Volumes, com= n n u C I C T C P ' S « " g - 2 0 0 pages, u U N o J o l o nearly sheet music size; dimensions of volumes, 9 x 1 2 inches; one inch thick. r

2

F R E E FOR EXAMINATION. THE U N I V E R S I T Y S O C I E T Y , 78 F i f t h A v e . , N e w Y o r k . Gentlemen : Please send me on approval a set 0/ the " WORLD'S MUSIC" in half-leather. If satisfactory, I agree to pay Sf within and $1 per month thereafter for 20 months ; if not satisfactory, to return them within is days.

ABOUT BEST / J days I agree

Signed—

Illustrated Specimen Pages s e n t o n receipt of p o s t a l

McClure's. A

ddress-

I n o r d e r i n g c l o t h , c h a n g e 20 m o n t h s to 17 m o n t h s . NOT

N E C E S S A R Y

ONE-HALF SUBSCRIPTION PRICE. WE PA Y TRANSPORTATION. NO RISK INCURRED.

T O R E T U R N

C O U P O N

I F M C C L U H e ' s

IS

M E N T I O N E D .

tfooks ivflf he sent more promptly if you give reference or- business position.

T H E UNIVERSITY S O C I E T Y , ?8 Fifth Avenue - New York.

Please mention MC^/'urt'? when you write t o a d v e r t i s e r s .

4


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

HISTORIAN ESSAYIST NOVELIST

IRVING

FREE is DAYS

A S H I N G T O N I R V I N G enjoys the proud distinction of being the FIRST A M E R I C A N W R I T E R to turn the eyes of literary Europe sharply toward the New World. Though forty years have passed since he was laid to rest at Sunnyside, each year has lent an added lustre to his fame. His literary reputation rests upon sure foundations—-broad, deep, well settled and immut­ able. TO-DAY, even in the midst of a generation of brilliant literary achievement, the name of no one of our writers stands higher, A T H O M E OR A B R O A D , than that of this many-sided man of letters.

W

1 1

Few, very few, so pure,

can show a long succession

so graceful,

of

volumes, Mitfoud.

and so varied."—Miss

If y o u h a v e not I r v i n g , y o u r l i b r a r y l a c k s a set o f b o o k s w h i c h no o t h e r set of books e v e r w r i t t e n c a n s u p p l y . T r u e , y o u m a y have T h e Sketch Book," but t h a t is n o t Irving. 1 1

YOU

S H O U L D

O W NHIS

C O M P L E T E

W O R K S

la Whatever Realm You Celve, You Find A Master. W I T Salmagundi ' formed a school of wit of a character superior to I f I I anything our country has witnessed."—EDWARD E V E R E T T . U 11 M 0 D " Irving-'s ' History of New York ' is the most elaborate piece II U III U II of humor in our language."—H. T . T U C K E R M A N . D R M A M P C " In ' T h e Conquest of Granada ' he surrounds us with the r i U I T I H 1 1 U C air of romance, yet he has substantial foundation for his most extraordinary incidents."—London Quarterly Review. A m / C M T I I D C Adventures of Captain Bonneville ' are full of H U V C r| I U ft £ exciting incidents and possess the power and charm of r o m a n c e . " — C h a n c e l l o r K e n t . T

h

D f l C T D V r U C I n I

n

" * ' T h e Sketch Ro.-k' the touches of poetry are everywhere."—JuHN N o e l in Blackwood's. " ' A Tour <>f the Prairies ' is a sentimental journey, a romantic e x c u r s i o n . " — E d w a r d E v e r e t t . " Irving's ' Life of Columbus * is the noblest monument to the memory of the great admiral."—W. H . I ' K E S C O T T . " It supersedes ad former works and never will be itself superseded."—Lord J e f f r e y .

SENTIMENT HISTORY onrl •illy

e

BIOGRAPHY

"'

r v

n

' ^

s

' ,L-i

fe

Washington ' should be read by

Orders Filled while They Last from REMAINING SETS OF SPECIAL HOLIDAY EDITION Ten Superb Volumes f 0 0 0 Pages Beautifully Illustrated T h i s is a s p l e n d i d semi-de-luxe e d i t i o n o f I r v i n g . It c o n t a i n s his c o m = p l e t e w o r k s , s u p e r b l y i l l u s t r a t e d with p h o t o g r a v u r e s a n d h a l t - t o n e plates. It is b e a u t i f u l l y p r i n t e d o n a fine q u a l i t y of p a p e r w i t h l a r j e c l e a r t y p e . The v o l u m e s are h a n d s o m e l y a n d s t r o n g l y bound. It is an e d i t i o n y o u w i l l b e proud to s h o w to y o u r friends.

For A Limited Time Only we a r e o f f e r i n g t h i s t e n - v o l u m e e d i t i o n , Size o f V o l u m e s , 8 x 5 ^ Inches Inches T h i c k . b o u n d i n h a l f - l e a t h e r a n d c l o t h , for a b o u t h a l f s u b s c r i p t i o n p r i c e , o u r l o w C l u b prices b e i n g $ 2 0 for the h a l f - l e a t h e r , a n d $ 1 7 for t h e c l o t h b i n d i n g . B o o k s are sent o n a p p r o v a l w i t h o u t c h a r g e , a n d m a y be r e t u r n e d if n o t satisfactc :y. W e p a y t r a n s p o r t a t i o n c h a r g e s . S

P

E

C

I

A

L

O

F

F

E

*

T

O

"

M

c

THE

C

UNIVERSITY SOCIETY, 78 Fifth A venue, New York. Gentlemen: Please send me on approval a set of IRVING'S WORKS in half leather binding. If satisfactory I agree to pay $1.00 within IS days, and $1.00 per month thereafter for iq months ; if not satisfactory I agree to return them within r$ days.

L

U

R

E

"

Address

E

A

D

E

R

S

ONE-HALF SUBSCRIPTION PRICE WE PA Y EXPRESSAGE NO RISK INCURRED

Signed_ McClure's.

R

ABOUT

Illustrated

Specimen

sent o n receipt

of

Pages

postal....

The University Society

I n o r d e r i n g c l o t h , c h a n g e 19 m o n t h s to 16 m o n t h s . Books will be sent more promptly if you give reference or business position.

%WNot necessary to return Coupon if McClure's is mentioned.? 8

F I F T H

P l e a s e m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to a d v e r t i s e r s . 5

A V E . ,N E W Y O R K


McCL,UKE'S

MA.UA.ZWHi.

The MILLION-DOLLAR at the Wanamaker Store is N E A R I N G

THE END!

of these volumes (at regular retail prices) have been Century

Club

has reached nearly $ 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 !

The

work for moneyed folks has, during this H a l f - P r i c e set, eclipsed a l l records k n o w n

i n a l l the

history

1 1

1 h a v e c o m e to r e g a r d m y C e n t u r y D i c t i o n a r y a n d C y c l o p e d i a as so i n d i s p e n s a b l e that I w o u l d not k n o w how to get o n w i t h o u t it.*' GROVER

CLEVELAND.

" T h e C e n t u r y has first place on m y s h e l v e s a n d is indis­ pensable to m e . F o r m e r l y it was m y last ' C o u r t of A p p e a l ' w h e n i n d o u b t ; n o w it is the first a n d l a s t . "

JUST

L E W

W A L L A C E , A u t h o r of '* B e n H u r . " " T h e C e n t u r y D i c t i o n a r y a n d C y c l o p e d i a a n d A t l a s is a master­ piece of c o n d e n s a t i o n . Its c o n s t a n t use has filled me with a s t r o n g sense of the care bestowed to insure a c c u r a c y . " JAMES A. BRYCE, A u t h o r of " T h e A m e r i c a n C o m m o n w e a l t h . " 1 1

1 was a n e a r l y s u b s c r i b e r for T h e C e n t u r y at the f u l l price. It is a n i n v a l u a b l e w o r k , b e i n g e x a c t l y w h a t it professes to be— a n a u t h o r i t y w h i c h to a n y s t u d e n t or i n v e s t i g a t o r is i n d i s p e n s a b l e . T o all such I cordially recommend it." E.

BENJAMIN

ANDREWS.

" T accept information from T h e C e n t u r y D i c t i o n a r y and C y c l o ­ p e d i a w i t h b l i n d f a i t h w h i c h I h a v e yet to find m i s p l a c e d . M y B r i t a n n i c a is s e l d o m c o n s u l t e d now, as T h e C e n t u r y , in its c o n ­ v e n i e n t f o r m , is at m y e l b o w . It has been a f a i t h f u l p r e c e p t o r , a n d if, l i k e a t r u l y honest o n e , it has s h a t t e r e d m a n y a n i d o l , it h a s i n e v e r y i n s t a n c e left me a wiser, if a s a d d e r m a n . " A . S. L E C K I E , M a n a g e r C i t y Press A s s o c i a t i o n .

HAVE

A FEW FROM ALREADY

RECEIVED

THEIR

" T h i s c o m b i n a t i o n of dictionary and cyclope­ d i a , g a z e t t e e r a n d atlas and biographical dic­ tionary, etc., has been p r e p a r e d w i t h so m u c h care and painstaking, by s u c h l e a r n e d a n d a c c u r a t e m e n , a n d on s u c h a wise p . it w i l l n e v e r be s u p e r s e d e d b v a n o t h e r w o r k . " D A N I E L P. G I L M A N , LL.D., President Johns H o p k i n s U n i v e r s i t y .

Acquire

the a

n

t

n

a

t

" I s h o u l d s a y to e v e r y b o d y who reads or w r i t e s : — ' B u y the C e n t u r y D i c t i o n a r y a n d C y c l o p e d i a a n d A t l a s , no m a t t e r w h a t else y o u b u y . ' " PROF. A. W . GRABAU, M a s s . Inst, of T e c h n o l o g y . " T h e C e n t u r y D i c t i o n a r y a n d C y c l o p e d i a a n d A t l a s represents the s u b d i v i s i o n of a l l k n o w l e d g e b y w o r d s . It c o n t a i n s the k n o w l ­ e d g e of e n c y c l o p e d i a s , f u s e d , refined a n d recast i n t o s h a p e s t h a t , w i t h its e n d l e s s cross-references, place a l l k n o w l e d g e at one's c o m m a n d , t h o u g h the q u e s t i o n be s t a r t e d b v a s i n g l e w o r d . " J.

H O W to Order First you join the Wanamaher "Century" Club—that means, send a Dollar for Membership Fee—which entitles you to the price-saving. Then, by return mail, you '11 receive full details of the Half-Price Offer, specimen pages of the work itself, colored sample map, etc., and descrip­ tion of the bindings to aid you in choosing. By the time this is printed there'll not be many left, so it's NOT SAFE TO WAIT!

AMONG THE

S.

PILLSBURY,

the F l o u r K i n g .

" In the C e n t u r y the child*, the s t u d e n t , the b u s y m a n , t h e specialist, a n d , last a n d best, the m o t h e r a n d h u r r i e d h o u s e w i f e , find the a c m e of r e a d y r e f e r e n c e . Its a r r a n g e m e n t is as s i m p l e as the a l p h a b e t , a n d so a t t r a c t i v e t h a t not o n l y is it e a s y to get ' the r u n of the s t o r y , ' but h a r d to find a s t o p p i n g p l a c e . " W.

W .

BARTLETT,

LL.D.

" T h e C e n t u r y has its s p e c i a l a d v a n t a g e o v e r a d i c t i o n a r y in t h a t it f u r n i s h e s a scientific t r e a t m e n t for its i m p o r t a n t t e r m s . It has a n a d v a n t a g e over c y c l o p e d i a s in the fact t h a t it h a s d e f i n e d , i l l u s t r a t e d , p r o n o u n c e d a n d g i v e n the e t y m o l o g y of a l l t e c h n i c a l terms used in the s e v e r a l sciences. T h e book c a n n o t be s p a r e d f r o m a n y reference l i b r a r y , nor f r o m the desk of a s c h o l a r . " W. T. HARRIS, U . S. C o m m i s s i o n e r of E d u c a t i o n . " I a m c o n s t a n t l y a n d s u c c e s s f u l l y a p p e a l i n g to it to m e e t c u r r e n t needs, a n d a p p r e c i a t e its m e r i t s v e r v h i c h l v . " RICHARD

Write to us for

N e w

YorK

P l e a s e m e n t i o n M c C I u r e ' s w h e n y o u w r i t e to a d v e r t i s e r s .

my

OLNEYi LL.D., E x - S e c r e t a r y of S t a t e .

detaiis-

JOHN


MCUIJUKE'IS

MA.UA.ZUSIM).

S A L E of the "CENTURY" A l r e a d y three-quarters o f a m i l l i o n

dollars' worth

sold, and the saving to the members o f the

Wanamaker

C e n t u r y D i c t i o n a r y & C y c l o p e d i a & Atlas, hitherto a Sale, w h i c h has made it easy for any one to o w n a of

book-selling i n this

country.

" C o n s t a n t use of T h e C e n t u r y has t a u g h t m e to v a l u e it v e r y h i g h l y . I n the n e w e d i t i o n y o u h a v e c e r t a i n l y a d d e d g r e a t l y to its m e r i t s . " CHAS.

MANY

" CENTURY " OWNERS W H O

VOLUMES AND HAVE HAD TIME TO

W . ELIOT, LL.D., President H a r v a r d U n i v e r s i t y .

" I r e g a r d T h e C e n t u r y as the best m e d i c a l a n d b o t a n i c a l d i c ­ t i o n a r y a n d c y c l o p e d i a I h a v e e v e r seen, to s a y n o t h i n g m< re of its various other excellences." P A U L R. B R O W N M a j o r a n d S u r g e o n , U . S. A r m y .

"In this day of

Century

Habit!

vestigate, and y e t m u s t be c e r t a i n as to t h e m e a n i n g o f w o r d s t h e y use a n d the a c c u r a c y of t h e facts t h e y s t a t e , t h e r e is n o t h i n g i n o u r l a n g u a g e w h i c h w i l l so f u l l y s a t i s f y the d e m a n d for i n f o r m a t i o n — a c c u r a t e , full a n d complete—as this new w o r k . " DAVID J. B R E W E R , A s s o c i a t e J u s t i c e U . S. S u p r e m e C o u r t . " I find m y s e l f c o n t i n u a l l y r e f e r r i n g to T h e C e n t u r y for i n f o r m a ­ t i o n ' a n d g u i d a n c e , b u t i n a d d i t i o n to this I t a k e it u p a n d r e a d it w i t h p l e a s u r e a n d c o n s t a n t e n t e r t a i n m e n t , i n d e p e n d e n t of its bearing on m y studies a n d literary w o r k . " M O R G A N DIX, Rector Trinity Church, N e w York.

" O u r p r o o f r e a d e r s find its v o c a b u l a r y so e x t e n s i v e a n d r i c h , its definitions so f u l l a n d c o m p r e h e n s i v e , its e t y m o l o g i e s so s e a r c h i n g a n d s c h o l a r l y , its l i t e r a r y i l l u s t r a t i o n s so c o p i o u s a n d v a r i e d t h a t in f r e q u e n c y of use a n d w e i g h t of a u t h o r i t y it is fast s u p p l a n t i n g every other work with them. T h e t y p o g r a p h i c a l e x e c u t i o n o f the book is b e y o n d praise, w h i l e the presswork is s i m p l y p e r f e c t . " JOHN WILSON & SON, T h e U n i v e r s i t y Press, C a m b r i d g e . " T h e C e n t u r y is of great service to o u r s t u d e n t s i n o u r r e f e r e n c e l i b r a r y , a n d is the s t a n d a r d at C h a u t a u q u a . " GEO. E . VINCENT, T h e C h a u t a u q u a S y s t e m of E d u c a t i o n . " T h e better a c q u a i n t e d that I b e c o m e w i t h T h e C e n t u r y the better I l i k e it. I a m p r e t t y well p r o v i d e d with r e f e r e n c e w o r k s , b u t I find m y s e l f c o n s u l t i n g T h e C e n t u r y oftener t h a n a l l others put together. It is the best L a w D i c t i o n a r y in e x i s t e n c e , a n d the best d i c t i o n a r y for a l a w y e r . " L E EMONTGOMERY, L L . D .

1 1

I c a n say without qualification that I consider T h e C e n t u r y D i c t i o n a r y a n d E n c y c l o p e d i a a n d A t l a s the most useful single w o r k of r e f e r e n c e e i t h e r i n E n g l i s h or a n y o t h e r l a n g u a g e w i t h w h i c h I a m a c q u a i n t e d ; a n d m y w o r k h a s m a d e it n e c e s s a r y for m e to use d i c t i o n a r i e s a n d e n c y c l o p e d i a s in n e a r l y a l l the l a n g u a g e s of E u r o p e . " JOHN FISKE, Harvard, A u t h o r of " A m e r i c a n R e v o l u t i o n , " etc. " T h e C e n t u r y is a l w a y s on m y table, a n d I a m c o n s t a n t l y r e f e r r i n g to it. Its e n c y c l o p e d i c f e a t u r e s a r e to m e e s p e c i a l l y h e l p f u l . T h e a c c u r a c y of the w o r k a p p e a l s to me m o r e s t r o n g l y w i t h m y more d e t a i l e d a c q u a i n t a n c e w i t h its pages. It w o u l d c e r t a i n l y s e e m t h a t it is as c o m p l e t e as s k i l l a n d a b i l i t y c o u l d m a k e i t . " W I L L I A M R. H A R P E R , P r e s i d e n t U n i v e r s i t y of C h i c a g o . " I n s t e a d o f w a n d e r i n g t h r o u g h l i b r a r i e s to find or miss i m p o r t a n t fact, or d i s ­ c o v e r y , or d i s c u s s i o n , or c o n t r o v e r s y , a l l y o u h a v e to d o is to t u r n to T h e C e n t u r y , r e c a l l the first two or three letters of the s u b j e c t y o u are e l a b o r a t i n g , a n d put y o u r h a n d o n t h e v o l u m e t h a t c o n t a i n s a l l y o u w a n t to k n o w . F o r a l l the h u r r i e d a n d h a r d - w o r k e d t h i n k e r s of the c o u n t r y T h e C e n t u r y I H c t i o n a r y a n d C y c l o p e d i a a n d A t l a s is a r e s c u e a n d a r e i n f o r c e m e n t . ' p_ [ ) g W I T T T A L M A G E . 1

promptly,

please—mentioning

i

"McClure's."

WANAMAKER P l e a s e m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n v o u writp to

Anyone wit T e n

C e n t o

a day to spare, can own this best-of-all reference work. A Dollar down and the complete set is delivered promptly. You complete the pur­ chase afterwards— leisurely—in little pay­ ments—fij.oo monthly.

J advertisers.


JIcCLDRE'S

MAGAZINE.

New Biographical Edition of T

h

a

c

k

e

r

C O M P L E T E

a

y

'

s

W R I T I N G S

Edited by his daughter, M R S . A N N E T H A C K E R A Y R I T C H I E . Illustrated in the most complete manner by artists of reputation. Acknowledged to be the edition of Thackeray's complete works that is of more value than any other.

D E C E M B E R - C H R I S T M A S

BUSTLE.

T h i s is one of the famous C r u i k s h a n k d r a w i n g s that so i n t e r e s t i n g l y illustrate T h a c k e r a y ' s 1 'eUaivphu.h Papers. Anthony T r o l l o p e w r o t e : " I r e m e m b e r w e l l m y own deiight with Yeltowplush, a n d how 1 i n q u i r e d who was the a u t h o r . It was t h e n I first h e a r d T h a c k e r a y ' s n a m e . "

M R S . R I T C H I E ' S introductions are a unique and interesting record of her father's life, containing delightful extracts from his letters, notes, and diaries. The informal way in which M r s . Ritchie places all the valuable information before the reader is charming, and brings Thackeray close to us. T h e edition is artistically illustrated by George Cruikshank, Richard Dovle, Georee du Maurier, Frederick Walker, J. E . Millais, P . R . A . , L . Fildes, Charles Keene, Frank Dicksee, R . A . , F . Barnard, and the author, and contains many steel engravings, wood-cuts, half-tones, and etchings of rare value. T h e type work is clear, the paper of extra quality, the binding attractive. It is the finest edition of Thackeray ever published, and yet the price is moderate and the monthly payments, if one desires, very small. F u l l particulars and sample pages will be sent to all who inquire.

HARPER'S BIOGRAPHICAL

C L U B , 142 F i f t h A v e . , N e w Y o r k 8


McCLURE'S

BOOK

MAGAZINE.

MONEY

How can I make my book money go farthest?

T h i s is a q u e s t i o n that e v e r y b o o k l o v e r i s c o n s t a n t l y g r a p p l i n g w i t h . T h e Union L i b r a r y A s s o = C i a t i o n solves this p e r p l e x i n g q u e s t i o n i n an ideal m a n n e r , for the A s s o c i a t i o n was o r g a n i z e d for the d i s t i n c t p u r p o s e o f s u p p l y i n g d i r e c t to the people at w h o l e s a l e p r i c e any and all books that are s o l d i n the trade. I n s h o r t , the A s s o c i a t i o n is a U n i o n of L i b r a r y Builders a n d Reading C l u b s , associated together for the p u r p o s e of m o n e y - s a v i n g i n book b u y i n g , the A s s o c i a t i o n a c t i n g as wholesale p u r c h a s i n g agents for its m e m b e r s a n d p r o c u r i n g whatever they m a y desire i n the B o o k , S t a t i o n e r y o r P e r i o d i c a l l i n e . W e offer as a n i l l u s t r a t i o n o f the

MONEY SAVING w e are a b l e to effect f o r o u r m e m b e r s , the f o l l o w i n g letter f r o m M r . G e o r g e H . W a r n e r , A s s o c i a t e E d i t o r of A L i b r a r y of the W o r l d ' s B e s t L i t e r a t u r e , o f w h i c h h i s b r o t h e r , M r . C h a r l e s D u d l e y W a r n e r , is E d i t o r in-Chief. M r . W a r n e r w r i t e s as f o l l o w s : " T h e U n i o n Library Association, N e w York C i t y . " G e n t l e m e n :—In the course of tne past two years I have had frequent occasion to buy books of y o u r Association, and I wish to say that 1 have been very m u c h surprised at the low prices at w h i c h you sell books. Some of the dis­ counts from the regular prices w h i c h 1 have obtained are really s t a r t l i n g i n amount. " I n order to fully test y o u r prices, 1 recently selected a dozen standard publications and submitted a list of them to four of the largest book-selling establishments in N e w Y o r k , i n c l u d i n g a department store, a second-hand establish­ ment, a n d two r e g u l a r bookstores. M y list aggregated at retail prices, $ 6 3 . 7 5 , and the best offer I got from any of the four sources was $ 4 7 . 7 5 , more than double y o u r price, for I bought them of y o u r Association for $ 2 2 . 4 7 . M y list was selected from different departments of literature, and I regard i t as a good test of the s a v i n g that may be made by b u y i n g of the A s s o c i a t i o n . " K n o w i n g the management and the w o r k i n g s of the Association as I do, I fully recommend book-buvers to become members of i t . V e r y truly yours, GEORGE H. WARNER." In order to further introduce the A s s o c i a t i o n into e v e r y section of the c o u n t r y , we offer, for a l i m i t e d time, a M E M ­ B E R S H I P F R E E to all who will order from us a n y o n e of the following standard and well-known books. T h e y are i n a l l cases the r e g u l a r c o p y r i g h t editions, and are published by such leading publishers as T h e C e n t u r y C o . . T h e M a c m i l l a n C o . , D o u b l e d a y & M c C l u r e C o . , H o u g h t o n , Mifflin & C o . , D . A p p l e t o n & C o . , C h a r l e s Scribner's Sons, etc. Both For :ular Price. M e m b e r s h i p Fee. $1.50 $3.00 $1.50 I..SO 3-oo 1.50 I.50 3.00 1.50 1.50 300 1.50 I.50 3.00 1.50 l-SO 3.00 1.50 1.50 3-0O 1.50 ISO 3.00 1.50 1.80 1.50 3.00 1.50 3.00 1.50 ••50 3.00 1.50 1.35 3.00 '•25 350 3-00 3-50 ••25 3.00 1.25 3-oo 2.00 2.00 3-oo 1.50 1.50 1.50 3-00 1.50 1.25 300 1-25 T h e above books i n a l l cases to be sent postage or expressage paid by the Association. I t w i l l readily be seen how liberal is our proposition—you s i m p l y purchase one of the above-named works at a retail price and obtain a membership, when you w i l l be enabled to purchase a n y of the tens of thousands of other books at wholesale price. B y wholesale we mean at discounts a v e r a g i n g from -,o to 60 per cent, d e p e n d i n g upon the book, the publisher, and the conditions of purchase. T h e A s s o c i a t i o n has inaugurated a series of Special Sales and issues several special-sale catalogues every year, w h i c h are sent free to members. Special Sale N o . 20 w i l l be issued the latter part of this month and w i l l contain hundreds of standard books from m a n y of the best publishers at discounts r a n g i n g a l l the w a y up to 80 per cent. I t w i l l , therefore, be readily seen how important it is that y o u s h o u l d become a member i m m e d i a t e l y i n order that y o u may be able to take advantage of this Special Sale.

I Red P o t t a g e . B y M a r y C h o l m o n d e l a y . n m o , cloth G r e a t B o o k s as Life T e a c h e r s . B y D r . H i i l i s . C l o t h P r i s o n e r s of Hope. B y M a r y J o h n s t o n . 121110, cloth D j v i d Harum. B y E . N. Westcott. 121110, cloth . . . . Janice Meredith. B y P a u l L . F o r d . i 2 m o , cloth . . . . R i c h a r d C a r v e l . B y W i n s t o n C h u r c h i l l . 121110, c l o t h , i l l u s t r a t e d Red R o c k . B y T h o m a s Nelson P a g e . i 2 m o , c l o t h , illustrated . W h e n Knighthood W a s in Flower. B y E . Caskoden, i2mo, cloth, ill'd No. 5 J o h n Street. B y R i c h a r d W h i t e i n g . 121110, cloth . V i a C r u c i s . B y Marion Crawford. i 2 m o , c l o t h , illustrated L i f e of A d m i r a l D e w e y . B y M u r a t Halstead. Q u a r t o , c l o t h , illustrated M r . Dooley : In t h e H e a r t s of His C o u n t r y m e n . i2mo, cloth . F o l l o w i n g t h e E q u a t o r . B y M a r k T w a i n . 8 v o , cloth T a l e s from M c C l u r e ' s . 5 v o l u m e s . i 6 m o , c l o t h . Per set W i l d A n i m a l s I H a v e K n o w n . B y E . S. T h o m p s o n . 8vo, c l o t h T h e G e n t l e m a n f r o m Indiana. B y Booth T a r k i n g t o n . 121110, c l o t h . T r a m p i n g w i t h T r a m p s . B y Josiah F l y n t . i2mo, cloth, illustrated . B r i t o n and Boer. B y J a m e s B r y c e and O t h e r s . 12010, c l o t h , i l l u s t r a t e d

T h e Association also does an immense business in S T A T I O N E R Y and furnishes a l l kinds of w r i t i n g papers, w e d d i n g invitations and other engraved work at wholesale rates, our prices i n m a n y cases being o n l y about one-half those charged by retail stationers. M o r e o v e r , orders for a l l the leading Periodicals are taken, our prices being i n a l l cases on the lowest wholesale basis.

CATALOGUES T h e A s s o c i a t i o n fuis prepared, at a large expense, one of the BEST C A T A L O G U E S of S T A N D A R D books in existence. I t covers t h e entire range o f literature. It also includes P e r i o d i c a l s , Stationery and various Specialties. Wholesale prices are affixed to each item. This catalogue w i l l be sent to members o n l y , postpaid, for 25 cents, to help pay the cost of production, w r a p p i n g and postage. T h e Association's S P E C I A L C A T A L O G U E w i l l be sent to a l l members free of charge. T h e A s s o c i a t i o n has also prepared a wholesale discount sheet of a l l the leading publishers of the U n i t e d States, a n d this w i l l be sent to a l l members. I t gives the address of each of these p u b l i s h i n g houses so that a member can at a l l times inform himself of the wholesale price of a n y book published, whether i n our catalogues or not. T h e A s s o c i a t i o n is NOT AN EXPERIMENT, h a v i n g been in existence for over ffteen years. T h e proprietors and managers are old and experienced publishers and booksellers, w i t h large capital and exceptional facilities for b u y i n g , so that the Association is i n a position to fully c a r r y out its agreement w i t h its members ; i n short, t o sell books direct to the people a t l o w e r prices t h a n a n y concern i n t h e United States. O u r members receive prompt, careful and intelligent attention, and our establishment is one of the best equipped and busiest i n a l l of busy Greater N e w Y o r k . A l l orders s h o u l d be addressed to

THE

UNION LIBRARY ASSOCIATION

References: COMMERCIAL AGENCIES 9 i and 93 F i f t h A v e n u e , N E W Y O R K p 5 — N o t w i t h s t a n d i n g the above very liberal proposition, all McClure readers who send in their order prior to March ist^ with 50 cents extra, will receive a T h r e e - Y e a r Certificate 0/ Membership instead of for only one year. m

Please mention M c C l u r e ' s w h e n you write to advertisers.

9


Mcclure's Magazine

Doubleday & McClure Co. ARE

For

you interested in any of these boohs? Write to us and we will see that they are in your hands, postpaid, by the next mail. If you want them, after examination, remit the price; if not, return the books.

particulars of the interesting Photographers' Contest, with $175 and 5 medals as prizes for the best Photographic Illustrations, see any issue of The Photographic Times.

ABRAHAM

Co." Illustrated,

MISS TARBELL'S fine life o f the A m e r i c a n states­ man par excellence is now complete. It is drawn from original sources and contains hundreds of speeches, letters, and telegrams now first published. It gives the man, A b r a ­ ham L i n c o l n , in a final and masterly presen­ tation. Illustrated,

2

Vols.,

Tarkington's

Kipling's "Stalky &

LINCOLN

By I d a M . T a r b e l l

JOth

sand,

O l l i v a n t ' s " B o b , S o n of B a t t l e . 20th Thousand, $1.25.

Thou­

$1^0. Markham's

Kipling's "The B r u s h ­ wood B o y . " Illustrated Lowell,

Thousand, $2.00.

2

' T h e M a n w i t h the Hoe and O t h e r P o e m s . ijth Thousand, $1.00 net.

W h i t e ' s " T h e C o u r t of B o y v i l l e . " Illustrated by Lowell, 7th Thousand, $1.50.

by Orson $1.50.

Blix. F r a n k Norris's $'•25. M a c M a n u s ' s " In C h i m n e y C o r n e r s . " Colored Illustrations, bth Thousand, $/.J0 net.

K i p l i n g ' s " F r o m Sea to S e a . " JJth

" T h e G e n t l e m a n from Indiana.' 20th Thousand, $1.50.

Vols.,

S o n s of S t r e n g t h . ' fi.25.

Lighton's

Hauptmann's " T h e Sunken Bell." and Frontispiece, $1.OO net.

Music SHAKESPEARE:

By

THE

MAN

G o l d w i n Smith

D o u b l e d a y ' s " Cattle R a n c h to C o l l e g e . " 100 Pictures, bth Thousand, S/.jO.

T h i s is " an attempt to find traces o f the dram­ atist's personal character in his Dramas." Every a d m i r e r of P r o f e s s o r G o l d w i n Smith's w o r k can imagine with what acuteness and ability this f a s c i n a t i n g s u b j e c t is handled.

$j.oo.

Hill's " S t o r i e s of the R a i l r o a d . ' Illustrated, 3d Thousand, J a r r o l d ' s " M i c k e y F i n n Idylls.' $1.25M a c G r a t h ' s " A r m s and the W o m a n . " $1.25Weeden's " B a n d a n n a Ballads. Illustrated, bth Thousand, $r.oo net.

Size,

5 x 7 ;

Price

73 cents,

net.

W e l l s ' s " T a l e s of Space and T i m e . " $1.50. B a k e r ' s " B o y ' s B o o k of Inventions." 200 Pictures, yth Thousa nd, $2.00.

Gibson's " Sketches i n E g y p t . " bo Pictures, $J.OO net. Bloch's " T h e F u t u r e of W a r . ' Illustrated, $2.00. Music

S m i t h ' s " T h e Golden V a n i t y . " and Colored Stencil Pictures, $2.30 'Our

Lusk's

F l e m i n g ' s " How to S t u d y S h a k e s p e a r e . " Series I. and II. Per Volume, $1.00 net. Jokai's

1

Hamblen's " W e W i n . ' Illustrated, 3d Thousand,

net.

Foes at H o m e . ' $1.00.

The Poor $r.2 .

Plutocrats.

5

Stoker's " D r a c u l a . " $1.50.

$r.so. Crockett's " T h e Black Douglas." Illustrated, tSth Thousand, $1.50. Heron's " A M o d e r n Mercenary."

B r a d y ' s " T a l e s of the T e l e g r a p h . " Illustrated, $1.25.

A

MAN'S

By

WOMAN

Frank

Norris

MR. N O R R I S has a r r i v e d , " said Mr.W.D. Howells the other day; and the critics a l l agree that his w o r k is to be reckoned w i t h . T h i s new story is most dramatic, con­ taining some tremen­ dous pictures o f Arctic exploration— indeed i t a l l hinges u p o n the d a r i n g o f the m e n w h o are try­ ing to reach the P o l e . Size,

By Blix,

FRANK

NORRIS:

$1.23

M c T e a g u e . 5th Printing. M o R A N

OF T H E

L A D V

L f . T T V .

$1.50 $1.00

Doubleday & M c C l u r e C o . , 34 U n i o n Sq. E a s t , N e w Y o r k TO


Mcclure's Magazine

Abraham Lincoln A NEW BOOK The Genealogy Great

of the

Emancipator

Traced,

with marbled edges. Price* 7 5 c , Publisher, B r y s o n C i t y , N . C .

By J AS. H . C A T H E Y . With 15 splendid H a l f - T o n e Cuts, illustrating the Sub­ ject-Matter. 185 pages, bound in neat, red cloth, postpaid. Address J . H . C A T H E Y ,

It is an interesting and remarkable revelation, and is written by an en­ thusiastic admirer of Mr. L i n c o l n . It is kind in motive and classic in style. — M a t . C H A S . H . S M I T H (Bill A r p ) , Veteran Correspondent Atlanta Con­ stitution. It is intensely interesting throughout. Mr. Cathey's tribute to M r . Lincoln is one of the finest things that has ever been written about that remarkable man. It surpasses Inerersoll's eulogy in some respects, showing a keener insight into Lincoln's character, being written from the standpoint of a Southern admirer.—COL. J O H N R . W e b s t e r , Editor Webster's Weekly and ex-Speaker of the House of Representatives of N . C . It is a book that will interest every reader. It deserves to be read by every student of history.— The Raleigh ( N . C.) News and Observer. Mr. Cathey has done the stude.it of history and the general subject a real service.— The North Carolina Jcurnal of Education. The book as a whole is well written. T h e chapter on Abraham Lincoln is masterly. T h e portrait of that great man is drawn with a steady hand, with much vigor, and with real insight.— The Wilmington ( N . C.) Messenger. We have in this story the undoubted unravelling of the mystery—forever settling the question of a great and good man's parentage. In this book is pronou need one of the m ost beautiful eulogies of the dead President we have ever read.—The Western Republican. Instruction by mail, adapted to everyone. Original. Approved. Experienced and competent i n ­ structors. Takes spare time only. Three courses: Preparatory and College Law Course, also Business Law Course. ,/ Improve your condition f*/^ and prospects. Graduates everywhere. Ten years of success. F u l l particulars free. Sprague Correspondence S c h o o l of L a w , 4 0 M a j e s t i c B l d g

A Chance f o r Story Tellers The Shortstory Publishing Company, Bos­ t o n , M a s s . , w i l l p a y $4,200 i n c a s h p r i z e s , r a n g ­ i n g f r o m $100 t o $500 e a c h , t o t h o s e w h o w i l l tell i n w r i t i n g some unusual experience, t h r i l l i n g a d v e n t u r e , o r f a s c i n a t i n g f r e a k of the i m a g i n a t i o n i n a style that w i l l interest t h e h u n d r e d s of t h o u s a n d s of r e a d e r s of T h e B l a c k C a t , the unique shortstory magazine w h i c h has w o n t h e t i t l e of " T h e s t o r y - t e l l i n g h i t of t h e c e n t u r y . " T h i s p r i z e c o m p e t i t i o n i s o p e n t o a l l , a n d e a c h s t o r y w i l l be j u d g e d solely u p o n its merits without regard to the n a m e c r r e p u t a t i o n of its w r i t e r ; but no story will be c:nsidered at all un~ less it is sent strictly in accordance w i t h the printed conditions,which w i l l be m a i l e d f r e e , p o s t ­ age p a i d , t o a n y o n e , t o ­ gether w i t h 5 complete specimen stories, and m a n y o f t h e n a m e s a n d a d d r e s s e s , as r e f e r ­ e n c e s , o f t h e m e n a n d w o m e n i n a l l p a r t s of A m e r i c a who have received more than

$30,000 Cash for B l a c k C a t s t o r i e s . S e n d y o u r a d d r e s s at o n c e , as t h e c o n t e s t c l o s e s M a r c h 31st. The S h o r t s t o r y P u b l i s h i n g C o . , 141-151 H i g h S t . Boston, Mass.

STUDY

LAW

AT HOME

$

S e n d ten c e n t s for three m o n t h s trial s u b s c r i p t i o n to

THE Detroit,

WHERE"

O n l y Magazine for which W i l l C a r l e t o n , Jowl it h A l l e n ' s W i f e (Marietta Hoiley), F a n n y Crosby (World's greatest hymn-writer), and other famous authors write in every number. Best of additional literature.

3

50 Cents a Tear. ^ r " SPECIAL. O F F E R if you mention M c C l t j r e ' S M A G A Z I N E . Address Dept. B 1. M

8

AMERICAN BOY

Mich.

W I L L C A R L E T O N ' S MAGAZINE "EVERY

I000.,B0YS

IOC.

EVERYWHERE PUBLISHING CO.,Brooklyn,N.Y.

ILLUSTRATING TAUGHT BY MAIL N e w s p a p e r S k e t c h i n g , M a g a z i n e Illustrating taught successfully. A d a p t e d to all. Individual instruction a n d c r i t i c i s m same as in our resident school. Best methods. Prepares quickly for profit­ able work. Students enthusiastic over their suc­ cess. Send for B o o k l e t I. National Correspondence School of Illustrating 27 N . Penn Street, INDIANAPOLIS, IND. C O U R S E B Y M A I L preparesfor ad mission to the bar and degree from ident school, Indianapolis College of Law. Individ nr. I by s c h o l a r l y men. Elective courses. In­ ternational patronage. Graduates practising. Send for L a w C a t a l o g u e . LAW

National Correspondence School of Law 27 N Penn Street, INDIANAPOLIS, IND.

a practical magazine for boys. Departments: Short Stories, Suc­ cessful Boys, What Boys are do­ ing, Talks on Business — (Insur­ ance, Savings Banks, Book Keep­ ing, etc.) Boys as money-makers, WM. U. d l ' K A O U E , Editor The Boy in the office, store, fac­ tory, home, church and school, Games and Sport, The Boys' Library, The Boy Journalist, Print­ er, Collector,—(Stamps, coins, curios, etc.,) Photographer, Me­ chanic, Artisan, Orator and Debater, Boys and Animals, Prizes and Puzzles. Interesting, instructive, pure, elevating, inspiring. S 1 0 0 0 in C a s h P r i z e s and a choice from 300 elegant prem­ iums given for subscribers. The magazine canvasses for itself. You need but show it. The best paper ever issued for boys. References in every city. $1.00 a year. Trial 3 mos. sub. for 10c. S P R A G U E P U B ' C C O . 1 0 4 M a J . B l d g . Detroit, M i c h .

JOURNALISM

offers a

b r i l l i a n t c a r e e r to I n t e l l i g e n t , t r a i n e d y o u n g m e n and women. A l l b r a n c h e s o f j o u r n a l i s m , r e p o r t i n g , edit­ ing, story writing, editorial a n d political writing, are thoroughly a n d practically

TAUGHT BY MAIL U n d e r the direction of Mr. Henry Litchfield West, formerly manag­ ing e d i t o r o f t h e Washington Post. C o u r s e In s h o r t s t o r y w r i t i n g a n d magazineliteratureunderspecial, experienced instructors. W r i t e for booklet. NATIONAL

CORRESPONDENCE

I N S T I T U T E (Inc.), 21-48 Second N a t ' l B o n k B l d g . , W A S H I N G T O N , 1>. C .


McClure's MAGAZINE. Connecticut,

The

New

Stamford.

Catharine A i k e n School for Girls

Academic, College Preparatory a n d Special Courses. I n q u i r e of Mrs. H a r r i e t B e e c h e r S c o v i l i . k D e v a n , Principal.

Mrs.

York,

New

York.

Leslie Morgan's

13 a n d 15 W e s t 86th S t . , N e w Y o r k . Thorough English, Languages, A r t , Kindergarten C o l l e g e P r e p a r a t o r y . H o m e for s p e c i a l s t u d e n t s . N e w York,

through

N e w Y o r k , 1440 B r o a d w a y .

Stanhope=Wheatcroft Dramatic School Elocution, A c t i n g and all Dramatic Work. Class and Private Lessons. Student Matinees. H i g h l y endorsed. Write fur Pros­ pectus. A D E L I N E S T A N H O P E - W H E A T C R O F T , Director.

American Academy of Dramatic

W a s h i n g t o n College

For Young Ladles.

3d a n d T S t s . , N . F , . , W a s h i n g t o n , D . C . L o c a t e d w i t h i n ^the N a t i o n a l C a p i t a l ; c h a r m i n g : park of ten acres ;< enlarged b u i l d i n g ; elegantly furnished rooms; college - physician. P r e p a r a t o r y , certificate, c o l l e g e courses ; m u s i c , art, e l o c u t i o n . Ruifdings and grounds valued at $250,000. C a t a l o g u e a r . i a p p l i c a t i o n for e n t r a n c e sent o n request. F . N . ' E N E F E E , President.

STUDY LAW AT H O M E

FRENCH, SPANISH, GERMAN w i t h o r w i t h o u t a m a s t e r , e a c h l a n g u a g e 2 v o l u m e s , $1.00 per v o l ­ ume. P r a c t i c a l S m a t t e r i n g of S p a n i s h , 30c. E x c e l l e n t books for self-instruction. B E R L I T Z «fc C O . , 1 1 2 2 B r o a d w a y , N e w Y o r k .

ELECTRICITY

Massachusetts,

Boston,

Franklin

,

O

I P

1

^ »

T

=

OVERALLS

D E F E C T S

taught to deaf or hardof-hearing adults.

OFF

York.

I

EDUCATION

BY

MAIL

inEIectrical, Mechanical, Steam, Mining and Civil E n g i ­ neering; Metallurgy. Art. Architecture, Practical News­ paper Work, English Branches, Stenography, Machine Design and Mechanical Drawing. Low price ; easy terms. Sent free to those who enroll now. a com­ plete drawing outfit worth $11.10, or other premiums. Mention subjects you are interested in when writing to

Square.

( F o u n d e d 1853 b y D r . E b e n T o u r j e e . ) G e o r g e W . C h a d w i c k , M u s i c a l D i r e c t o r . S e n d for P r o s p e c ­ tus, g i v i n g f u l l i n f o r m a t i o n . F r a n k W . H a l e , Gen'I Manager.

THE

UNITED CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS, 154-96-58 Fifth Avenue. New Y o r k , for crilaloir

L

A

Arbor.

University School of Music

E

R

N

T

O

I

L

L

U

S

T

R

A

T

E

and to sketch, letter and design for newspapers, magazines, a d ­ vertisers, etc., by mail or in our classes. Successful students by o u r methods. Teachers well k n o w n illustrators. A practical school, terms m o d ­ erate. W r i t e for catalog.

Albert A . Stanley, A . M . , Director. U n u s u a l advantages f r o m c o n n e c t i o n w i t h the U n i v e r s i t y of M i c h i g a n . For Calendar or d e t a i l e d i n f o r m a t i o n address the S e c r e t a r y . Jersey,

S P E E C H

R

P P A D I l V r i I V U r t L / i n U

Y o u c a n rise to a h i g h p o s i t i o n if y o u w i l l . A l l it r e q u i r e s is a m b i t i o n a n d willingness on y o u r p a r t to s t u d y " b e t w e e n t i m e s . " O u r booklet, What Students Say, s h o w s w h a t is b e i n g d o n e for t h o u s a n d s o f people through our course of

England Conservatory of Music

Ann

I

1

M a n y Y e a r s ' Experience here and in E u r o p e . G R E E N E , 1188 B r o a d w a y , J e n

" EFFINGHAM, ILLINOIS. HIGH GRtilE PHOTOGRAPHY TAUGHT. GOOD POSITIONS SECURED f0» GRADUATES

Pennington.

Pennington Seminary for both Sexes 1

6rst y e a r . " N o b i l i t y of c h a r a c t e r o u r constant a i m . ' F i n e loca­ t i o n ; h o m e c o m f o r t s ; p u r e s p r i n g water; g o o d h e a l t h ; g y m n a s i u m . N e w illustrated catalog. T h o m a s O ' H a n l o n , D . D . , Pres.

Mt.

1

CORRECTED.

S T A M M E R I N G

LEARN

New York,

T

Chicago Correspondence School of Law,508 Reaper Blk., CHICAGO.

Taught according to the wtTi most approved methods, in the shortest possiblev£y ^£ time and at smallest expense. For full parmfj+f^ _ ticulars and finely illustrated catalogue

New

B

_ Instruction at home; adapted to everyone. Electrical or Mechanical E n g i n e e r i n g ; Mechanical Drawing. Guidance of experienced, able instructors. Takes spare time only. Thos. A . Edison and others endorse Institute. Catalogue free. ELECTRICAL E N G I N E E R I N S T I T U T E , Dept. B , 120 Liberty Street, New Y o r k .

THE ART SCIENCE o f PHOTOGRAPHY

Michigan,

T A U C H T

Landing school m correspond­ e n t instruction. Course leads to L L . B . a n d prepares f o r a d ­ m i s s i o n to B a r i n a l l States. Also a Business Course. Aide professors. Eighth year. Full particulars free.

DAVID

New

Arts

F r a n k l i n H . S a r g e n t , President. A practical training school in conjunction with M r . C h a s . F r o h m a n ' s E m p i r e T h e a t r e and travelling companies. A p p l y to E . P. S T E P H E N S O N , C a r n e g i e H a l l , N e w Y o r k .

N.

Y . S c h o o l of I l l u s t r a t i n g ,

114 West 34th St., N. Y.

Sing-Sing-on-Hudson.

Pleasant Military Academy

DOUBLE

84th year. References: H o n . Joseph H . Choate, H a m i l t o n \ V . M a b i e , L . H . D . , C h a r l e s B. H u b b e l l , formerly President Board of E d u c a t i o n ,

ENTRY

BOOK-KEEPING

B U S I N E S S - A R I T H M E T I C p p r o v e d S y s t e m , t a u g h t t h o r o u g h l y by m a i l . Send for particulars E N R V V O N D E V L E N . 3 I 4 C l i f t o n P l a c e , B R O O K L Y N , INr. V .

EASY

SHORTHAND

McKEE'S SHORTHAND TAUGHT BY MAIL. Weekly I'aymonl.. OlcKEE I'lIH.ISIIlNi: C O . , Circulars Free. E l l l c o t t Square, U l ' F F A L O , N . T .

UNITARIAN

LITERATURE

TELEGRAPHY

FREE

offering- unsurpassed opportunities. T u i t i o n , b o a r d a n d r o o m s i x m o n t h s c o u r s e , « ? « . T h i - o n n b e ^ e X e e d o n e "ml"' School organized 1874. Catalogue free

A p p l y to M I S S V A U G H N , 133 B r i d g h a m Street, Providence, R. I. Please mention M c C l u r e ' s

o

DODCE'S

when you

write to

INSTITUTE, Valparaiso,

advertisers.

n

Ind.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

That Word Elgin

'

on a w a t c h d e n o t e s that the t i m e p i e c e is the W o r l d ' s S t a n d a r d — A c c u r a c y of p e r f o r m a n c e and great d u r a b i l i t y are the p r o v e n m e r i t s o f the

Full Ruby Jeweled Elgin. P » p p rl

C C

O u r booklet—"The W a y s of a Watch"—sent ou request,

A n E l g i n w a t c h always has II

Elgin National Watch Co.,

FREE.

CASH

Address M . C , Arlington Street C h u r c h , Boston, Mass.

for acceptable ideas. State if patented. THE PATENT RECORD, Baltimore, Md.

Subscription price of the P a t e n t R e c o b d $ 1 . 0 8 p e r a n n u m . Samples free.

-t r\ f\r\r\

on

the

B O O K S AT L I B E R A L DISCOUNTS F.

T f l I U

T a u g h t by m a i l Thoroughly,Practically

\A#DITF W

i

l

l

**A

ADO

demand CHICAGO

L e a r n this noble profession at home, t h r o u g h the Desberger M e t h o d , also Elocution, O r a t o r y a n d the M e m o r y to retain v o l u m e s . " T h e A r t of A c t i n g , " w i t h fifty portraits of l e a d i n g actors a n d actresses, sent F R E E to all addressing . . .

C i t y , the

The Educational Institute of Drama D e p t . F , St. L o u i s , M o . Thorough, scientific course adapted to inoroi individal needs. Long-established. Responsible. Successful. Prac­ tical. Instructors experi­ enced and competent. Editors of 5 popular Our ' ' O 'C>. r # ^/ jM (w. publications, students ^OA contributions are given preference ' iXjj. at liberal rates. Students _ successful and pleased. DeArVu scriptive catalogue free. Address r S p r a g u e C o r r e s p o n d e n c e S c h o o l of J o u r n a l i s m No. 108 Majestic Building, Detroit. Mich. ^

Before buying books, write for quotations. A n assortment of catalogues and special Blips of books at reduced prices, sent for lOeent stamp.

E . G R A N T , B o o k s , 23 W e s t 424 S t r e e t , N E W Y O R K . Mention this advertisement and receive a discount.

mm

Big

a d B i g Salaries. Page-Davis S e n d (or p a r tSchool iculars.

ACTOR OR ACTRESS

B E

W h e n c a l l i n g , please a s k for M r . G r a n t . W h e n e v e r y o u need a book, address Mr. Grant.

T Ttw^Studu

E l g i n , III.

LEARN

i ' l a t s and boc

F I 5 E N U H , 2 4 W e s t 2 2 d S t r e e t , Ne»v Y o r k Largest T h e a t r i c a l T u b l i s h e r i n the W o r l d .

"Elgin'*

guaranteed.

=

P L A Y S AND BOOKS F O R H O M E Charades, Children's H a y s , A M U S E M E N T ; Cha Negro Plays, Duologues, Monologues, M r s . JarL«V« W a x w o r k s , M u s i c a ^ S k e . c h e ^ Tokt= " o o k , O n e ™ . { a , . S h ^ o v

1 U .* U U U

works—fully

=

UNITARIAN PUBLICATIONS SENT

engraved

t h e word

w

Of

Shorthand

Write at once tor o u r new 2UU-page b o o t . T h e O r i g i n a n d T r e a t m e n t of S t a m m e r i n g .

Do you stammer?

S E N T F R E E . Instructive booklet for everyone inter­ ested in Shorthand. Valuable alike to beginners and experienced stenographers. The BURROWS BROS. COi (Dept. B) Cleveland Geo,

AnrUflw beviff

Sent f r e e to any addressfor6cts. In stamps to cover postage. A s k a l s o f o r a f r e e sample copy of The Phono-Meter, a monthly paper exclu slvely for persons who stammer. Address The L E W I S S C H O O L FOR S T A M M E R E R S £1 Adelaide St., Petrol*. Mich.


IF Y O U A R E C O N T E M P L A T I N G A T R I P T O

LONDON, PARIS EXPOSITION, or O B E R A M M E R G A U send f o r the b e a u t i f u l l y i l l u s t r a t e d p a m p h l e t s g i v i n g i t i n e r a r i e s , cost, a n d d e t a i l s o f

THE

CRAWFORD

TOURS

T h e s e tours are so a r r a n g e d as to e m b r a c e e v e r y d e s i r a b l e feature o f a E u r o p e a n t r i p . T h e y are m a n a g e d u p o n the b r o a d e s t lines and are e x c e e d i n g l y p o p u l a r a n d , e c o n o m i c a l . Everything thoroughly first-class. O n l y the best steamers a n d hotels p a t r o n i z e d . A l i b e r a l s a v i n g i n s u r e d . S

lliV^roL TSSt III H / ° J Z J r

AMI

1 arts

CRAWFORD & FLOYD,

a

WKetStO Of the ft Orllt.

Boston, Tremont Bide. N e w ' Y o r k . 220 B r o a d w a y P h i l a d e l p h i a , lOll Chestnut St. C h i c a g o , Marquette B l d g

a winter cruise in summer WATERS

IN

THE

FAR-OFF OF

THE

ISLANDS PACIFIC

A g e n t s of the N e w Y o r k C e n t r a l L i n e s are a r r a n g ­ ing

for t r a v e l across this C o n t i n e n t v i a C h i c a g o ,

St. L o u i s a n d C i n c i n n a t i to N e w Y o r k a n d B o s t o n , in c o n n e c t i o n w i t h the great O c e a n F e r r i e s . other

American

line

stands

so w e l l

No

at h o m e o r

abroad as the To

J A M A I C A (TWO W E E K S

S P E C I A L T Y " N E W

A N D A L L P O I N T S O NT H E C A R I B B E A N SEA,

Y O R K

CENTRAL."

BY T H E COMMODIOUS STEAMERS OF THE

A T L A S LINE LEAVING WW YORK Send tot Illustrated Pm £0MoopjSf£uo^

EVERY Booklet

F o r a copy of the " L u x u r y of M o d e r n R a i l w a y T r a v e l , " send a i-cent stamp to George H . D a n i e l s , G e n e r a l Passenger A g e n t , G r a n d C e n t r a l Station, N e w Y o r k .

SATURDAY c free,

:

Please mention Scribner's when you write to advertisers 14


McClure's Magazine T H E

M

O

D

E

R

STOVE

N

POLISH

ENAMELINE P A S T E , C A K E O R L I Q U I D A B r i l l i a n t Polish without L a b o r D u s t o r Odor. .

P

R

E

S

C

O

T

T

<Sc_ C O . ,

STUDY ENGINEERING TAUGHT

ENTIRELY

NATIONAL

of Works of A r t and X Views from all Parts of • the World. Catalogues X of 18,000 subjects, 15 • t ^ ^ T ^ Illustrated f Catalogue of 3600 Mod- * ern Paintings sent on J receipt of $5.00, which X amount will be refunded or credited • against purchases on its return. Lantern J slides and Bromide enlargements. Albums • • supplied and mounting carefully done. J

Write for free illustrated book describing these courses. It will point out one surely profitable way to employ your spare time. Fees moderate. Monthly pay­ ments if you desire.

trained instruc­ tors and spe­ cially prepared texts you can become a rail­ road, electrical^ structural^ mechanical or steam engineer, CORRESPONDENCE

Y O R K .

Unmounted Photographs

B Y MAIL

One step at a time, with

M E . W

c e n t s

N

e

w

82

ST

Soule Photograph Co., Z^X". " X

INSTITUTE,

21-47 Snconil Nailoiml Bank Building, Washington, D. <*.

of

Home study

BOOK-KEEPING BUSINESS FORMS, PENMANSHIP, SHORTHAND, Etc. I P r i v a t e Len..- B Y M A I L

Are You on

t

Of

Men

up to Young and W o m

good

paying

positions,

afford­

ing chances for pro­ motion. Gives just the training- needed

i

:

• - -•

I for s u c c e s s i n

business. O n l y spare time required. N o interference with daily occupa­ tion. T h e cheapest and best method of study; H i g h l y endorsed. Established 40 years. National reputation. W e also teach all E n g l i s h and C i v i l Service branches B Y M A I L . T r i a l lesson only iocts., showing how thorough our system is. Interesting Catalogue free. Write to

a

Dead Center?

BRYANT 4 STRATTON'S COLLEGE, 135 College Bldg., Buffalo, N. Y,

Are you. at a standstill in yonr career like the driving 6 h a f t of an

engine when its force is all exerted against the axle? It needs only the right kind of a shove to set the engine V working. A start in the right direction * will enable you to use the power yon \ I possess so as to do more valuable work, and gain a higher salary, you can be . trained b y m a i l a t h o m e , to

DO NOT STAMMER Russell H . C o n w e l l , D . D . , P h i l a d e l p h i a , the celebrated Lecturer, Philanthropist, D i v i n e , writes to E d w i n S. J o h n s t o n : " I have seen so many people who are ac­ quainted with your work a n d with your institution, and have heard such favorable c o m m e n d a t i o n f r o m those cured by y o u , that I a m very glad to a d d any word of r e c o m m e n d a t i o n w h i c h may be needed to establish your institution in the esteem of the p u b l i c . " E n d o r s e d also by H o n . J o h n E D W I N S. J O H N S T O N . W a n a m a k e r , ex-Postmaster-General U . S . Send for new Illustrated B o o k to the

P H I L A D E L P H I A INSTITUTE, 1033 Spring Garden Street, Philadelphia, P a .

1

Take a New Position no

Select the study that attracts you: E l e c t r l - / f eat. Mechanical, or Steam E n e l n - / • —• WW erring:. Architectural or Mechanical ' Drawing, Surveying, C i v i l Engineering, Stenography, Bookkeeping and E n g - • lie*. The terms of payment llsb. Branch* will suit everybody: Established • 1891. 130,000 students and graduates. Write for circulars. The IoterDAtlnnnl Correspondence Schools, Box b i t , bcranlon, Ya.

Established 1884. E D W I N S. J O H N S T O N , Founder and Principal. Please mention M C C L U R E ' S

when writing for book.

Please mention M c C l u r e ' s when vou write to advertisers. 1$

/


Mcclure's

MAGAZINE.

What You Can Learn in a Minute

F r o m the A M E R I C A N N E W S P A P E R A N N U A L A b o u t a Newspaper—The circulation,, age, size, issue, price, politics, or other leading feature, of any newspaper or magazine published in A m e r i c a and the new possessions of the U n i t e d States.

A b o u t a County—The location, population, political complexion, principal in­ dustries, chief products, physical features and newspaper towns of any county in the U n i t e d States and Canada.

A b o u t a Town—The means of communication—rail or water, express, telegraph and banking facilities; proximity to business centers, and location of any town in the U n i t e d States and Canada.

A b o u t Class Papers—A complete catalogue of religious, agricultural, scientific, foreipn and special trade papers.

M a p s for all—Fifty-six specially engraved full-page railway maps, showing every newspaper town in the U n i t e d States and the Canadian provinces. A l s o new and accurate maps of Porto Rfco, H a w a i i , the Philippines, and West India Islands. T h e American Newspaper A n n u a l is a

Complete Reference W o r k for Business School, College and L i b r a r y .

People,

A shelf of costly books would give partially what is contained in the Annual; many of its most valuable features can not he found outside of its covers. Any advertiser who sends advertisements beyond the limits of his town may save the cost of the book by one reference to it. The Annual saves money ; it saves time, which is more thau money ; it makes business more certain. Pros­ pectus, sample pages and maps on request.

N . W. A Y E R & S O N , Publishers Newspaper Advertising Magazine Advertising

PHILADELPHIA

Please mention M c C l u r e ' s when y o u write to advertisers.

16


P A I N T E D B Y C. K .

THE

LINSON.

TEMPTATION.

A n d he was there in the wilderness forty days tempted of S a t a n ; and was with the wild beasts.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;MARK, i . 13.


MCCLURE'S MAGAZINE. VOL.

VIEW

FROM

NAZARETH

Mt. Carmel.

A u t h o r of

John

WESTWARD

L I F E

B Y

II.—

LOOKING

TOWARD

CARMEL A N DTHE

MEDITERRANEAN.

Haifa.

T H E

PART

N o . 4.

F E B R U A R Y , 1900.

X I V

Acre.

OF

T H E

T H E R E V E R E N D

J O H N

M A S T E R .

W A T S O N ,

D.D.,

T h e M i n d of the Master,"' " Beside the B o n n i e B r i e r B u s h , " etc.

T H E BAPTIST,.—The E OF

BAPTISM

AND

TEMPTATION

JESUS.

IT were true to say that Jesus appeared without expectation, since none knew whence He would come; it were also true to say that He came with expectation, since a nation waited for H i m . None could have

guessed His birth—the child of a village maiden, or His position—a workman of Naz­ areth; but every pious Jew was persuaded He would appear, and had seen His signs. For eight centuries heralds had been going

T H E T E M P T A T I O N (opposite page).—It w a s not ray pur­ pose to p r e s e n t the t r a d i t i o n a l T e m p t a t i o n , n o r to f o l l o w l i t ­ e r a l l y the s t o r y o f the v i s i t s o f the S p i r i t o f E v i l as a v i s i b l e b e i n g . J e s u s is i n the w i l d e r n e s s . H e is Hearing the e n d o f H i s f o r t v d a y s ' fast, a n d , w a n a n d w o r n out, H e is absorbed i n H i s m e d i t a t i o n s , h e e d i n g n e i t h e r the descent of n i g h t , n o r

the beasts t h a t s n a r l at H i m , b u t dare Hot a p p r o a c h . The bare, red h i l l s are l o s i n g t h e last of the d a y at t h e i r t i p s ; b u t J e s u s is j u s t w i n n i n g H i s battle, a n d , perhaps, t o - m o r r o w H e w i l l go d o w n f r o m the desert s o l i t u d e , to reveal to H i s first d i s c i p l e s t h a t w h i c h w i l l b i n d their souls i r r e v o c a b l y to t h e Messiah.—ARTIST'S N O T E .

C o p y r i g h t , 1900, b y the S. S. M C C L U R E C O .

A l l rights reserved.


THE

C A L L I N G OF

FOUR

DISCIPLES.

PAINTED BY C . K. LINSON.


NAZARETH

FROM

T H E EAST.

N a z a r e t h lies o n the edge o f a b r o a d h o l l o w , c l i m b i n g the h i g h h i l l to the n o r t h w e s t . S i n c e the t i m e of C h r i s t it has h a d a v a r i e d h i s t o r y . I t has felt the h a n d i n t u r n of the M o h a m m e d a n s , the C r u s a d e r s , the M o h a m m e ­ d a n s a g a i n , a n d a g a i n the C r u s a d e r s , a n d then yet a g a i n the M o h a m m e d a n s , w i t h w h o m i t n o w r e m a i n s , b e i n g i n possession o f the T u r k s . I n 1B20 came the F r a n c i s c a n m o n k s , a n d to-day t h e f a i t h o f I s l a m is a c k n o w l e d g e d b y less t h a n one-quarter o f the p o p u l a ­ t i o n , a n d not a J e w is to be seen there. F o r a l l t h i s ap­ parent c h a n g e a n d m o v e m e n t , N a z a r e t h has r e m a i n e d the o b s c u r e , retired place of the G o s p e l s . I t is not easy to reach, a n d does not offer m u c h w o r t h s t r u g g l i n g for w h e n r e a c h e d . I t is capable o f fine gardens, i n the b o t t o m of the b a s i n , where are real shade, green grass, fig a n d o l i v e g r o v e s — d e l i c i o u s refuge f r o m the heat of the d a y . E l s e w h e r e are glare a n d unrest. F r o m the o u t s i d e , the t o w n l o o k s a t t r a c t i v e i n its w h i t e dress w i t h e d g i n g o f green, b u t w i t h i n i t is d i r t y , u n s a n i t a r y , p r i m ­ i t i v e . B u t J e s u s c o u l d have h a d a m o s t h a p p y c h i l d h o o d here. N o matter w h a t the t o w n was, H e h a d the h i l l s , the great s k y over H i s h e a d , a n d H i s w o r l d spread out before H i m u n t i l b o t h w o r l d a n d s k y m e r g e d into one i m p a l p a b l e d i s t a n c e . N e a r l y a l l o f P a l e s t i n e , w i t h its f a m i l i a r h i s t o r y , w o u l d be u n d e r H i s eye. T h e life o f Greece a n d R o m e was w i t h i n sight, a n d f r o m H i s v a n ­ tage p o i n t w h a t c o u l d H e not see to i n c i t e H i s m i n d to a c t i v i t y a l o n g the l i n e s o f a l l h u m a n t h o u g h t o f that d a y ? H e , a h i g h l a n d e r , w e n t to the l o w c o u n t r y to l i v e as a m a n ; b u t w h a t m e m o r i e s H e m u s t a l w a y s have car­ r i e d w i t h H i m o f those d r e a m y heights o f H i s c h i l d h o o d . T h e l o w e r p i c t u r e represents A W O M A N O P N A Z A ­ RETH. T h e N a z a r e t h w o m e n have the u s u a l n a t i v e grace o f c a r r i a g e f r o m t h e i r h a b i t o f c a r r y i n g burdens on t h e i r heads. T h e y are g o o d - n a t u r e d , a m i a b l e , a l l t h a t is k i n d l y ; b u t I c o u l d never c a l l t h e m l o v e l y as to f e a t u r e . — A R T I S T ' S

NOTE.

THE C A L L I N G O F F O U R D I S C I P L E S (opposite page).—And straightway he called them: and they left their father Zebedee in the ship with the hired servants, and went after him.—MARK, i . 16-20. F o r a b o u t t w o m o n t h s J e s u s h a d been alone, i n retirement, H i s d i s c i p l e s h a v i n g left H i m to go b a c k to their affairs. But now, J o h n the'Baptist being imprisoned, H e must b e g i n H i s a c t i v e labors, a n d needs H i s d i s c i p l e s . P a s s ­ ing a l o n g the shore o f the l a k e , at the p l a i n o f G e n n e s a r e t h , H e sees P e t e r a n d A n d r e w fishing. H e c a l l s to t h e m ; they f o l l o w . A l i t t l e further o n , i n a boat w i t h Zebedee, t h e i r father, he finds J a m e s a n d J o h n . T h e y , too, f o l l o w at o n c e ; a n d t h i s readiness to leave a l l , f a m i l y a n d business, at the c a l l o f the M a s t e r , i n d i c a t e s if n o t a p r e v i o u s u n d e r s t a n d i n g ( w h i c h is p r o b a b l e ) , then a present r e a l i z i n g o f H i s need o f t h e m , a n d the m a g ­ netism of a powerful personality.—ARTIST'S N O T E .


298

THE LIFE

OF THE

before H i m and making a pathway in the faith of the Hebrew Church. A s often as their hearts sickened at the failure of human goodness, the Prophets beheld in the future the ideal figure of the Messiah; as often as they were reenforced by the spectacle of conspicuous virtue, they imagined its unrevealed perfection. When the heritage of God was spoiled and laid waste, they saw the Messiah gird His sword upon His t h i g h ; and when the sun shone on Israel, it way the promise of the coming glory. From gener­ ation to generation the most spiritual and heroic patriots ever granted to a people fed the imagination of their brethren with the coming of a holy K i n g and the establishment of a universal kingdom. This noble succession seemed to cease, and the voice of the prophet was no longer heard in the land; but the Messianic hope still lived in the national heart, and found new forms of expression. When some despaired of God's commonwealth, and others saw nothing for it but to die sword i n hand, unknown writers hid themselves behind great names of the past—saints, prophets, sages—and poured out their souls, some in pessimistic satires, some in apocalyptic imaginations. The au­ thor of Ecclesiastes bewails the weariness of human life and the corruption of society with a bitterness of regret which is an un­ conscious cry for Christ, and the author of Daniel declares in a cryptogram the fall of foreign tyrannies and the victory of the Son of man. A nation, beaten and crushed by overwhelming force, yet unconquerable in spirit and immovable in faith, had an i n ­ ward conviction, begotten by the word of the Prophets and born of the hostility of circum­ stances, that the promise given to the fathers must be near fulfilment. The people began to look for the sudden redness in the east, and the forerunner of the dawn was John Baptist. John Baptist was a commanding personal­ ity, who could not be ignored in his own day or any other, for he was distinguished from other men first of all by his calling. A s the poet differs from other men of letters be­ cause, while they may have ability and cul­ ture, he has the fire which cometh from JESUS I X T H E S Y N A G O G U E A T N A Z A R E T H (opposite page).— This day is this Scripture fulfilled in your ears. And all wondered at the gracious words which proceeded out of his mouth. -LUKE IV. 21-22. B o t h the t a l l i l h and the c i s s i t h , s h o w n in the picture, a m i the m y s t i c i s m e n s h r o u d i n g their use, have g r o w n out of the s i m p l e verse i n D E U T . x x i i . 12 : Thou Shalt make thee fringes upon the four quarters of thy resture, wherewith thou coverest thyself. T h e t a l l i l h is the c l o t h w o r n over the bead d u r i n g p r a y e r : the c i s s i t h is the s m a l l fringed garment of the same device, for the hack and for the front of the body. W h e n a J e w i s h boy arrives ill the age o f thirteen (or i f he has lust his father, at twelve), he becomes a " m a n

MASTER.

heaven, so the prophet is raised above other teachers of religion because, while they may have knowledge and devotion, he has the divine fire. No voice of man can call a prophet, no machinery can make him fit. The Spirit of God descends upon and sets him apart; a prophet he must be now, and, in spite of all hindrances, a prophet he w i l l be. He is himself helpless in this matter, and his fellow-men are also helpless. A prophet is an unanswerable evidence of the sovereignty of God, and this is the meaning of the story of John. He was promised unto his parents when they had despaired of chil­ dren, and his father was stricken dumb be­ cause he believed not the word. He was named according to the angelic intimation, and the mouth of Zacharias was opened that he might call him John. Before he was born he did homage to his mighty Kinsman, before whose face he was to run. Signs and wonders attended the child, and marked him off from the herd of men as one on whom the hand of the Eternal was surely resting. His father was one of the lower order of priests, and John was born into a quiet, con­ ventional home; his birth provided for his future, and he could have served in his turn at the Temple. But there is no caging an eagle nor compelling him into ordinary ways, and while still a lad, John forsook his father's house and hid himself in the wilderness of Judea. There was i n him an instinct of his vocation, which made a commonplace environ­ ment impossible for him, which drove him forth into a wider sphere. So early did this prophet hear the Divine voice, so early was he separated from his fellows. When art represents the Baptist a man old before his time, austere, careworn, wasted, as i n the fresco of Angelico, the figure is true and commanding; when he stands out a lad i n the freshness of youth, strong, fresh, enthu­ siastic, as in the John Baptist of del Sarto, one has the necessary complement of the other picture. The Baptist was also the subject of a com­ plete prophetical training, for when he came forth and witnessed unto his generation he was the result of three forces, and the first was asceticism. It is not needful that every of the c o v e n a n t , " at w h i c h t i m e the s p i r i t u a l r e s p o n s i b i l i t y o f his parents for h i m erases, l i e then may wear the p h y l a c t e r i e s and with great j o y is vested w i t h the c i s s i t h . w h i c h he m u s t never thereafter be w i t h o u t . T h e phylacteries are w o r n every tune the J e w s say their prayers on week d a y s , in the s y n a g o g u e or at home. T h e t a l l i t h is w o r n over these at m o r n i n g p r a y e r s and only at m o r n i n g prayers, except o n A t o n e m e n t "Day w h e n it is w o r n also at e v e n i n g prayers. A n y J e w m i g h t be a s k e d to c o m m e n t o n toe sacred w r i t i n g s . H e stood w h i l e r e a d i n g from the s c r o l l . Then, after h a n d i n g it h a c k to h i m w h o s e d u t y i t was to care f o r it, he w o u l d seat h i m s e l f to teach — ARTIST'S

NOTE.


PAINTED B Y C. K.

JESUS

IN THE SYNAGOGUE

AT

NAZARETH.

LINSON.


300

THE LIFE

OF THE

MASTER.

politics, that it be ready for the possession of the Messiah. By an instinct of his office John chose his solitude in the wilderness of Judea, whose awful desolation of barren hills and waterless valleys stretches along the val­ ley of the Dead Sea and thrusts itself to within a few miles of Jerusalem. His library in his retreat was chiefly to be found with­ i n h i s own soul and in the picture of that forsaken des­ ert, but he was not without his teacher of the ancient time. If he was to be the real Elijah in his coming and office, he was to be the echo of the two Isaiahs in his thought and preaching. A s the former took up the L o r d ' s contro­ versy against His people and rated Jerusa­ lem soundly for her hollow ritualism and this end he refused the priesthood, and aban­ elaborate hy­ doned his home and lived as a hermit, and pocrisy, which preached repentance in the wilderness of made " many Judea, and watched for the Messiah as they who watch for the morning. prayers," but her hands were " f u l l of b l o o d , " John was also formed by solitude, and could so the Baptist laid his indictment against his not have been the prophet we know nor have generation for their vain show of religion and shaken Jerusalem with terror had he spent their hardness of heart. F r o m that heroic his early days amid the gossip of the village witness of the eighth century John learned his and the little affairs of his home. His ear self-abnegation, his single-heartedness, his must be trained to catch the first sound of spiritual patriotism, and his unshaken cour­ Jesus' feet, and the babel of earth's mixed age. F r o m the second Isaiah, the most Evan­ noises must be hushed into stillness. Amid gelical of the whole succession, John received the coming and going of priests at their a more gracious and yet more effective mes­ empty ritual, and the gabble of Pharisees at sage, f r r it is evident that John knew not their theology, he had been deaf to the high­ only the beginning of the Book of Isaiah, est things. His heart must be cleansed from but also its fifty-third chapter. A f t e r a day the likeness of other faces, however dear and of sad reflection on the ungodliness of his good, that from its clear, unpossessed sur­ people and of righteous indignation he would face the countenance of the Messiah might sit down, and in the fading light, when the one day look at him. His mind must be fierce glare of the day was over, content emptied of present-day religion and earthly himself with the thought of the Servant of

servant of God should be an ascetic, and for some work this discipline would be a hin­ drance ; but in every age some are called to the last sacrifices. For the brief awful min­ istry of the Baptist, the breaking up of the iron soil for Jesus, he only was sufficient who had been cut off from all human ties and had denied himself all law­ ful ease. Clad in the coarsest of garments, e a t i n g the meanest of foods, devoted to poverty and chastity, this man was a fig­ ure and sign of religious in­ tensity. Be­ hind the cam­ els' hair and the l o c u s t s ' food, and the wasted face, and the strong, fierce words, was one un­ quenchable de­ sire—to obtain the Kingdom of God for him­ self and his nation. For


THE REVEREND God on whom the L o r d would lay the ini­ quities of Israel, and who would be led as a lamb to the slaughter. A s he meditated w i t h softening heart on the Holy V i c t i m and the L o r d ' s mercy, then the bare and stony land would change before his eyes, and, be­ hold, green grass and fountains of water, and the promise regarding the Kingdom of

IN

JOHN

WATSON.

301

Any day and, for that matter, any hour the romance of faith might culminate, and the Hope of Israel appear. Every morning the hermit would rise and leave his home hewn out of the rock, which tradition gives him for a dwelling-place, to wait for the break­ ing of the day, since the rising of the sun might be the shining of H i s face, and he

A JERUSALEM

SYNAGOGUE.

The synagogue dates from the captivity. In the absence of their Temple, it grew to be the custom of the Jews to assemble in small companies to worship. The first synagogues were but square rooms, plain, with flat roofs. The Holy of Holies was reduced to a niche in the wall in which was kept the roll of the Laic, behind a curtain. There was a raised platfoi-m in the center for the elders; and a high desk between this and the curtained niche, for the reader's use. The rest of the space was taken up by seats. These arc still the main features of the synagogues in Palestine. The women are shut off by wooden lattice-work from the rest of the congregation.—ARTIST'S NOTE.

God was fulfilled: "The wilderness and the solitary place shall be glad for them, and the desert shall rejoice and blossom like the rose." The meeting of Jesus and John, and the recognition of the Messiah by His forerun­ ner, is one of the picturesque situations i n the Gospel history, and i t is perfect i n its spontaneity. A s the Baptist brooded i n the wilderness over the prophecies of the ancient time, and as he declared unto the multitude with strong conviction that the ' ' kingdom of G o d " was at hand, the one passion of his life rose to white heat, and his eager heart was eaten up with expectation. The atmos­ phere of the day was charged with the sense of the Messiah, and the lonely prophet strained his ears to catch the first sound of H i s feet.

would lie down with sad reluctance, and hardly dare to sleep lest the darkness be the shadow of his L o r d . Was the Christ already in the land, hidden and unknown, or would He come from afar with sudden glory ? Would He show Himself by infallible signs, so that all men should be compelled to own H i m , or would He appear secretly, putting all men to the test by His presence, and already, before He was recognized, doing the part of a hus­ bandman, with His fan separating the wheat from the chaff ? It is certain that the Bap­ tist had been saved from one vain delusion by his study of Isaiah: he did not expect the Imperial Messiah of the gross Jewish imag­ ination, but as little was he prepared to rec­ ognize his L o r d , before whom he had run, and whose voice he had been among the crowd


T h e absolutely- authenticated Route from J e r u s a l e m to N a z a r e t h . There i s nothing definite about t h e e x a c t r o u t e of t h e s e v a r i o u s j o u r n e y i n g o f C h r i s t , but t h e routes so indicated are over the o l d highways of t r a v e l -which have hardly changed to t h i s date. MAP

OP T H E PALESTINE

OP CHRIST,

Redrawn

by J. Hart.

M A D E E X P R E S S L Y F O R McCLURE'S MAGAZINE BY MR. G. W . ARMSTRONG,

CARTOGRAPHER

OP T H E P A L E S T I N E

EXPLORATION

FUND.


THE REVEREND

JOHN

WATSON.

303

who heard his message of repentance and submitted to the sacrament of peni­ tence. Y e t it was in these circumstances that the Baptist one day iden­ tified Jesus of Nazareth as the Christ, and knew that his work had not been in vain. It may be suggested, w i t h some reason, that John had surely known for years the b i r t h and calling of Jesus, and ought not to have waited as in a mystery. Was he not the kinsman of Jesus ? and had not a tender confidence passed between Elizabeth his mother and Mary the mother of Jesus ? When John separated himself from his home and his peo­ ple, and gave himself in his youth to be the herald of the Messiah, and Jesus declared to His mother that He had come to do the work of His Father in heaven, would not other confidences pass between the holy women, and Elizabeth rejoice that as she had done homage to Mary her son was prepar­ ing the way for Jesus ? A s we weave this romance of the Holy Family we set it in the light of after­ TYPE OF MAN—NAZARETH. A STUDY FROM LIFE. wards, and forget how the most sacred and vivid spiri­ tual experiences fade and lose their meaning that He was the Lamb of God, he proved at even with saintly souls, so that Jesus once once his own fine spiritual perception and the gently chided His mother because she forgot inherent glory of Jesus. A s he lived alone the mystery of His annunciation and nativity, in the wilderness and studied the outlines of s a y i n g , ' ' W i s t ye not ? ' ' A n d John had evi­ the Messiah's likeness in the mirror of Isaiah, dently learned nothing of his august Kinsman it had grown real and living before his eyes, from Elizabeth, for he once declared unto the and the very face was printed on his soul. One day that which he had imagined flashed Pharisees, " I knew H i m n o t . " The Baptist had never, so far as we know, on him in all its spiritual loveliness, and the seen Jesus before, and it was a gain, and not Baptist did the Messiah instant homage. When the day of H i s discovering to Israel a loss, that he did not know the Messiah after the flesh, for i n that moment of revelation he had fully come, just as i n a lower world birds knew H i m , with the vision of the soul, after know the seasons of their coming and going, the spirit. When John was arrested by the Jesus, moved by the infallible instinct of the visible holiness of Jesus, and identified H i m Messiahship, left His home, where from child­ as the Christ on whose head rested the mys­ hood to manhood He had done the w i l l of tical Dove, and afterwards declared boldly God in quietness; took His way by the road


304

THE

LIFE

OF THE

MASTER.

which crosses the plain of Jezreel and fol­ back with pious horror. Unto the Baptist, lows the mountains of Samaria and Judea, the Savonarola of his day, came the ignorant and came at last to the place where John was people, sordid and greedy through the strug­ baptizing i n the Jordan. It could not have gle for l i f e ; the publicans swollen with the gains of oppres­ been by chance sion ; the rough that the prophet soldiers, w h o chose this font w rought their for the sacra­ unchecked will ment of peni­ on the helpless; tence, for i t was the m i s e r a b l e s a n c t i o n e d by w omen, who ancient history, were the open full of instruc­ ulcer of society; tion and inspira­ and even the tion. Here, as Pharisees, shak­ the Catholic his­ en out of their torian of the pride for a space. Master points A great wave of out, the children religious emo­ of Israel crossed tion had swept with Joshua into this mixed mass the promised of evil-doers to land, and here the feet of the Elijah, the pio­ prophet and the neer of proph­ laver of the Jor­ ecy, smote the dan. W h a t had waters with his brought H i m mantle. To-day who was holy, the ford is called harmless, and the " P l a c e of undefiled? Noth­ Passage," and ing less than the the western bank sacred waters of is g r e e n , a n d the Jordan could covered with w i l ­ avail for this lows and tam­ mass of rascal­ arisks. Whole A NAZARETH HOME OF TO-DAY. dom and hypoc­ flocks of woodrisy. W h a t could By good fortune, I was permitted to make the study for this picture when the pigeons find here room was in its ordinary state—not set in special order for the stranger. The any water do for a home. So here raised stonen'ork is a feature of every Syrian house. It is the place set apart or H i s are a l l the signs for the family bedroom ; the donkey, chickens, and, perhaps, goats occupying H i m the ground. It is the only sign of the elevation of the human above the brute. of the great af­ It seems to be a distinguishing trait of the so.called half-civilized jieoples, that whiteness ? F o r the hands, they maintain the brotherhood of the animal kingdom, with the exclusion of fair of regenera­ dogs. The roll of matting in the corner is the bed. " Take u]) thy bed and walk," tion — the pure is not so difficult an injunction in the East as with us. The mother is picking themselves sinf u1 , w h i c h water, the pas­ over the wheat for the grinding. The grain is stored in the box-like structure on the right, which is made of baked nitid and straw ; and it is drawn out from the publi­ sage from old plugged holes at the bottom. These granaries rary in size, sometimes being plunged cans and harlots things to new, nearly as high as the room. The houses arc often damp,always dirty, blackened into the flowing ivith the daily smoke from the little fires, never of a sn'eet savor, A variety of and the gentle garments, the donkey's bedding, cooking utensils, vegetables, implements, ashes, water, to touch white dove, water-jars, and skins littered the earthen floor, while amongst it all half a dozen the holiness of chickens scratched and scrambled. Only the platform in the corner (lit by a w h i c h is the window that was ever being darkened by the spiders) offered acceptable accom­ Jesus was an i m ­ symbol of the modation.—ARTIST'S N O T E . possible sacri­ Holy Ghost. lege, and the dismay of the Baptist was so It was most fitting, like everything else in manifest that Jesus could only ask h i m to Jesus' life, that where sinful men had gath­ suffer His desire. ered i n contrition and were waiting for God's kingdom, the Anointed of God should ap­ When Jesus gave H i s reason to H i s ser­ pear ; but when Jesus not only was a hearer vant and declared that H i s baptism would of the new Gospel, but also desired to have f u l f i l " all righteousness," i t was i n the very the sinner's baptism, one is not astonished sound a s t r i k i n g utterance; but i t is not that the Baptist was staggered and shrank quite clear on first sight what the Master i n -


THE REVEREND tended. It is no explana­ tion to read righteousness i n a strictly legal sense, and to see i n the bap­ tism another illustration of the Master's respectful re­ gard for the laws of His national religion, since this lustration of penitence was not an ancient regulation of Judaism, and had no binding force; i t was a voluntary r i t e and not a universal commandment. Still less is it to be suggested that Jesus had any moral need for such a cleansing because He had sinned i n thought or deed, for it was H i s whiteness against their blackness which moved the Baptist to his indignant refusal. N o r could the baptism of the Jordan be a ceremony introducing Jesus to His Messianic office, since the greater could not be blessed o f the lesser, the servant instal his L o r d . It was not indeed possible that Jesus could gain b y this rite of humility, but i t is possible that H e could g i v e ; and as Jesus submits to the waters of the Jordan i n the company of sin­ ners, we see an act of utter self-surrender and a public acceptance of His calling. It was a deliberate emptying of Himself and the first step to the Cross. W h a t Jesus desired was to forget His per­ fect purity and Divine dignity, which were their own evidence and protection, and to plunge into the very depths of ordinary sin­ ning, sorrowful human life in His pity and sympathy, in His power and grace, that He might lift the burden, which would be on His shoulders, but could be no part of Himself. A c c o r d i n g to the excusable idea of the Bap­ tist, his L o r d should have gathered His white garments around H i m with fastidious care and stood alone on the bank, while at His feet the waters were stained with the sin of poor struggling humanity; but according to the heart of Jesus, He must descend into the midst of the river t i l l in the end what neither the water of the Jordan nor any other could do would be accomplished by H i s lifelong Passion and H i s death. This baptism was a sacrament of the Messianic love—a pledge of utter devotion to H i s fellow-men, a sym­ bol of identification with Humanity. It might seem at the time a mere mistake and a vain sacrifice, but now one can see that no act could more fitly open the mission of Jesus, and none could be a surer prophecy of its final success. He was not to take H i s way through pleasant circumstances and among good people w i t h reverence and ad­ miration and honor and applause waiting on

JOHN

WATSON

305

P I C T O R I A L M A P O F N A Z A R E T H A N D ITS E N V I R O N S T O W A R D S T H E WEST.

DRAWN

BY

MR. LINSON

O N T H E SPOT.

H i m . He was to dine at publicans' tables, and live i n their houses; to talk at well-sides with disreputable women, and to have harlots following H i m into respectable houses; to be classed with illiterate folk and despised provincials; to be cast out of the Church as a heretic, and to be counted a blasphemer. He was to be mixed up with the dregs of the people, and it was to be suggested that He was Himself no better than the worst. The waters of H i s baptism were ever to be on His head, so that the Pharisees standing on their high bank could condemn H i m , and the mis­ erable below would claim H i m . He would be condemned that He might save, and stoop­ ing He would conquer. Between the hand­ ful of righteous and the mass of sinners He cast in H i s lot with the sinner; so He lost the righteous, who needed no Saviour, and He found the sinners, who did. Baptized into shame and suffering that day by John's austere hands, our Master was also baptized unto power and glory, and the drops of Jor­ dan water glistening i n the sun were the diadems of an eternal crown. When we read i n the Gospels that after Jesus was baptized of John He was led into the wilderness to be tempted, the order of events is not merely temporal; it is also spir­ itual. I f any one be moved to dedicate him­ self without reserve to the cause of God and the service of his fellow-men, it is an act of immense significance, and it must needs be followed by a retreat. It had not been fit­ ting that as soon as Jesus had come up from the Jordan, with the water still on His head, He should begin to preach the Kingdom. He would have been without any plan of work


THE

306

LIFE

OF THE

and without possession of Himself for the Messianic enterprise. Before Jesus pre­ sented Himself to the people or called H i s first disciples, He must realize within H i s consciousness not only that He is the Hope of the Prophets, but also must determine the appointed lines of the Messiah's career, as One i n whom is stored unused and unknown resources. F o r forty days—a number of sacred tradition—Jesus secluded Himself i n the wilderness, that H i s soul, being freed from the hindrance of the body and the tur­ moil of life, might enter into the will of God. No man can come through a spiritual crisis without physical reaction, and according to the intensity of the soul will be the exhaus­ tion of the body. On such occasions i t seems as i f the blood had been drained through a wound, as i f the nerves had been stretched unto the breaking. Never is the strongest soul more depressed, never does i t lie more open to attack. A n d i t was at the close of the forty days that Jesus, who may have been lightly tried before i n Nazareth, passed through His first great temptation. A s the Kingdom of God, with its hopes and visions,

A

S T R E E T

IN

N A Z A R E T H .

The Mohammedan women of the higher classes, when going into the streets, cover themselves with a while, sheet-like drapery. In certain towns the Christian women also have to protect themselves thus, but this is not their custom in Nazareth or Bethlehem. The lower classes do not veil themselves.—ARTIST'S NOTE.

MASTER.

had in those days been opened unto H i m , and His eyes had seen its unclouded brightness, with its hosts of angels, its redeemed souls, its victories of holiness, i t s morning song of joy, so now H e must, with H i s human eyes, behold the kingdom of evil, hardly suspected as He lived with Mary i n Nazareth, w i t h its suggestions of evil, its hatred of goodness, its pitiful persecution of the soul, its hideous shapes of sin, its black despair. F o r the Son of man must know good and evil, that being thoroughly prepared H e may be the Saviour of His brethren. Three times was Jesus attacked i n this classical battle—on each occasion through a different avenue—and the first approach was laid through the body. F o r t y days had this man, i n the fullness of H i s strength, de­ nied Himself ordinary food, and lived i n a state of high spiritual tension, and now H i s body—the body not of an ascetic, but of a strong workman—asserted itself, and H e was an hungered. N o appetite is more i m ­ perious than hunger, for from its stimulus has sprung the first energy of the race. None is more innocent, since to deny i t s satisfaction, i n ordinary circumstances, were suicide. Round Jesus, as He came out from His spiritual trance and became conscious of physical things, lay the white stones of the desert, mocking H i m by their color and shape with the suggestion of the homely bread H i s mother baked i n Nazareth, and which H e ate with honest zest at the close of a hard day's work. If indeed He were endowed with the power of God, so that whatsoever He pleased He could do, and whatsoever He desired H e could have, why should H e not change the unprofitable stones into loaves of bread, as the Baptist declared God could make them into sons of Abraham, and eat and go on to His work i n the strength thereof ? It was the most reasonable and practical of temp­ tations. The days were near at hand when Jesus would use His Divine power to feed a hungry multitude, to heal the loathsome dis­ ease of leprosy, to raise a man three days dead. W h y not to revive His own strength ? Because i n this case He had used H i s power to relieve Himself from one of the conditions of human life, and to secure His own ease; and because, had He made this concession to Himself, why should He not afterwards have employed the same power to clothe Himself in purple and fine linen ? to escape the weari­ ness of a poor man's travel ? to shield H i m ­ self from the cruelties of H i s enemies ? After a l l , as Jesus answered, the chief good of life is not meat—to satisfy one's self, but


THE

REVEREND

VIEW

JOHN

OP B E T H L E H E M

FROM

WATSON

A

307

GARDEN.

The town is situated on the eastern limit of a ridge that lies east and west, about a mile long. This ridge overlooks a deep valley on the south, and another one on the north, and commands a view that reaches to the hills of Moab, over the Judean wilderness, Jericho, and the Dead Sea. The peculiarly shaped hill in the middle distance is the so-called Frank Mountain, the burial place of Herod the Great, the upper part of the hill being artificial. Mt. Nebo is seen from Bethlehem as a slight prominence on the Moab horizon. The ancient Bethle­ hem probably was not nearly as large as the modern town. It suffered much with every other sacred place during Crusading times, being destroyed and rebuilt again and again. Some writers have inaccurately mentioned the " Jews of Bethlehem.' As a matter of fact, Jews do not now exist here any more than at Nazareth. Bethlehem is almost entirely Christian in population, of the different sects of the Latin and Eastern churches; there are less than tivo hundred Moslems in eight thousand inhabitants. The town has Latin and Greek monas­ teries and hospices, boys' and girls' schools, and a number of churches; and there are also an English school for girls ami a German Protestant school for both sexes.—ARTIST'S NOTE. 1

the words which come from the mouth of God—to fulfill spiritual ends; not to live for the senses, but for the soul. Jesus' next temptation shifted the field from the body to the soul, and had a fair show of religion, as the last had of reason. Is not the very heart of religion faith in God, a faith so unreserved and unquestioning, so trustful and loving, that i t will leave the per­ son absolutely i n the hands of God ? Ought not such faith to vindicate itself at a trial, and put God to the test by some daring act of confidence ? Suppose that Jesus should cast Himself from the highest point of the Father's House i n face of all the people, and allow God to bear H i m up on angels' wings —would not this be a fitting evidence of His faith on the threshold of the Master's public c a r e e r ? Apparently it was an appeal to Jesus' filial s p i r i t ; really i t was an invitation to spiritual pride and unholy presumption upon the favor of God—the very sin which by its arrogance and self-complacency had

created Pharisaism and devastated the re­ ligious life of Israel. What was represented as a loyal acceptance of one of the most gracious of the Divine promises Jesus de­ clared to be sheer blasphemy, and a straining of the Divine patience unto the breaking. W i t h this new rebuff to the E v i l One, Jesus added to His abnegation a humility of faith which was never to fail t i l l from the tragic height of the Cross, Avhere God's will had placed H i m , into the depths of the grave, whither He was willing to go, He committed His soul to H i s Father, and H i s Father did not put H i m to confusion. Once more at this time Satan tried the Master, and now it is neither through H i s body, nor His soul, but through His work he makes his attempt. F r o m a high mountain the Tempter shows unto this young Man all the kingdoms of the world of which i n the seclusion of Nazareth Jesus may have heard, and their glory, which He could not have imagined. This is the world—not that world


308

THE

LIFE

OF THE

of sin, and shame, and sorrow, and pain, in its immense pathos, which God loved and Jesus was to save; but that world of luxury, and pageantry, and cruelty, and unbelief, i n its proud insolence, which would flout God and crucify Jesus. W i t h the same outlook the Master saw His task and His hindrance, and i n this meeting was begotten the Temp­ tation. How altogether noble was the task! Was the hindrance inevitable ? If Jesus would only do one act of homage to the prince of this world, then he would lay all those kingdoms at Jesus' feet, who then might do His will without suffering or oppo­ sition. One imagines that Jesus may have been tempted again and again after this fashion i n H i s life—to come to terms with the world, and the more quickly accomplish His work. Suppose that by courteous con­ cession the world, in its priests and Phari­ sees and rulers, could be disarmed and con­ ciliated, would i t be wrong, and would it not be worth the making ? What enmity and bloodshed, what martyrdoms and controver­ sies, what sins against light and goodness, (To be

MASTER.

would be averted! How swiftly and how smoothly the Kingdom of God might come! Had Jesus only been more careful about the Sabbath rules, had H e only been silent on certain occasions, had H e only paid some heed to prejudices, had He kept at a dis­ tance from sinners! A few compromises, a handful of incense on the altar of the world, and neither He nor any of H i s disciples need have suffered. H i s Church has not turned a deaf ear to this insidious advice, or been disinclined to take an evil road to a good end. She has gratefully received tainted gold, and therewith established missions; she has made alliances with kings, and trafficked with her own freedom; she has condescended to cunning and violence to advance her sphere of influence. These things have the servants done, but not the Master. Where the choice was to hold the world from H i s Father on condition of the Cross, or to receive a show of power from Satan on condition of an act of homage, Jesus made a swift, final de­ cision. A n d Satan, thrice defeated, de­ parted for a season.

continued.)

BETHLEHEM FROM MAR ELIAS, IN WINTER. Snow in southern Palestine is a rare enough sight to be remarkable. In all my experience, I saw it but once—for a short week. I seized the opportunity to make studies, from which this picture of Bethlehem at Christmas time was painted. It is a view of the village from the ridge of Mar Ellas, halfway between Jerusalem and Bethlehem, from the top of which both towns can be seen three miles away on either side. It shows the road winding southward,the vineyard terraces icith light snow, the olive trees, and Bethlehem in the distance in a sunlit space.—ARTIST'S NOTE.


TOM A

TAIL-ROPE'S STORY B Y

Oh

OF MINING P H I L

the mysteries of the mines quite overcomes me when­ ever I sits down to think of them, as I often does, or standing up either, for that matter. Our mines is the kind where all of the cars are moved i n and out by ropes—miles of them, count­ ing them all up, inside and outside; and when a car of coal starts from a breast and finally stops at the tip-up alongside of the railroad, i t ' s been pulled and yanked around so that some­ times it runs off the track from sheer ex­ haustion; and then some one hooks another rope onto i t , and i t ' s hauled along over the ties t i l l i t jumps on again for peace' sake. A n d the ropes is just as bad as the cars. Seems like there is a grudge between them; and i f a rope gets slack, along comes, a trip of cars, and runs over it, and cuts it i n two or gets it all tangled up. So it takes me most of my time keeping the ropes up, and they looks after the cars. I often wonders that the ropes and cars don't get lost somewhere inside after they have left daylight behind, and never show up a g a i n ; but they don't, for I often sits by the track at the tunnel entrance watching them and the two ropes running over the pulleys, and about every ten or fifteen min­ utes I sees a splice or so coming out that went i n that long ago, and them moving all the time i n the dark, and the darkest kind of dark that is known to man's eyes—the kind that you can see, but can't penetrate. Then, sometimes, when everything is goinggood, I watches the cable tram, or, to put it in good catalogue style, the aerial rope rail­ way. Y o u see, after we has got through yanking the cars into the mines and out again, we hangs them up on a big steel ca­ ble, and runs them on it through the air to the tip-up, pretty near two miles away, along­ side of the railroad, as I said before. They're helpless enough then, swinging around; but away they goes, up hill and down, over a

EXPLOIT. LIFE.

M O R E .

mountain, and across Tularosa valley, as soon as the transmission rope grips them. Daggert, our superintender, says it is a caution, and I says so too, whenever I watches them. H e ' s the head man out here in New Mexico. Came from Pennsylvania, same as I did. I looks after the ropes, and he looks after the whole t h i n g ; and between us the Alama Gorda Tunnel and Mining Company has a good thing of it, staying at home back East and drawing their dividends regular like. Our office is at the tip-up. To get back and forth between the mines and office there is two routes—in a car in the air, or on the ground, walking. I prefers to ride, and so does Daggert, especially when he's in a hurry to rip some one up the back for what he's done or hasn't done, like it says in the prayer-book, and he's most always in a hurry. I usually takes the car following his. Com­ panionship is a nice thing under some con­ ditions, and there are some when it isn't. When he's in good humor, we rides together. And that ain't oftener than once a month, around pay-days. The Alama Gorda Tunnel is a regular gashouse, too, which accounts for some of Daggert's unpleasant moods. When the ropes hauls a trip of cars through a door that ought to have been opened and wasn't, there's a regular generator set going inside in the breasteses, and he curses me and my ropes till he finds some one more directly respon­ sible. Y o u see smashing a door on the i n ­ take or return checks ventilation t i l l i t ' s re­ paired, which don't take l o n g ; but the gas is always ready, and new doors ain't. W e has a big fan and engine to draw good air in, and bad air, gas, and dust out; but they don't give us any trouble. It's mostly men's carelessness—and then we has an explosion, like enough, and maybe a fire, and some one is burned that hadn't ought to be, and the one that ought to be gets the run. Daggert is a good superintender, though, and looks after the men close; but they do forget once in a while, and then, " Where's Tom ? " F o r you see I looks after the pipe-


310

TOM TAIL-ROPE'S

lines that carries water to all the breasteses, too. I'm afraid to go to bed till the m'ght shift's out, because if I does, I'm most sure to be called, and it ain't pleasant to ride over the rope tram in the dark with Daggert and a car full of company men. We has to do this, as all of us lives at the tip-up end of the line, being the only place we can live; and at " all-over " time every day there's a regular excursion of men coming home on the rope, a hundred feet in the air. The day that I performed my exploit, as Daggert calls it, though I don't, I didn't start out with the intention of doing any­ thing more than I ordinarily does, such as splicing ropes, repairing electric signal lines and bells, or putting some of the telephones in order. I was working at a pocket trans­ mitter up-stairs in my shop, over the com­ pany's office, while Daggert was laying some one out cold down-stairs, as I could plainly tell by the words that came up through the floor, when his voice stops sudden; I lifts up my head and listens. Some one is at the door talking, talking fast and excited. " T o m — w h e r e ' s T o m ? " Daggert yells, stamping to the stairs in a hurry. I expected it. " H e r e , " I hollers back, and goes down two steps at a time. " Come o n , " he says, without waiting for me, and starts for the tip-up trestle on a run. I follows, and reaches the top out of breath, and dodges cars and swallows dust to keep up to him. The first empty that comes along he jumps into, and I after him. It runs to the cable tram, the gripman hooks us on, and with a jerk we slams off into the air. Ahead of us is the long perspective of ropes, cars, and towers, roasting in the scin­ tillating landscape, disappearing out there in the midair toward the mountains. Daggert stands in the front end, looking that way and working his hands nervously. " Thunderat i o n ! " he growls. I looks ahead, too; but all I can see is a string of loads swinging toward us, and an­ other string of empties, which we are fol­ lowing. Then it occurs to me that we're going too slow to suit him. Speed's the one object to Daggert when he is in a hurry. The more of it the better. I looks at the ground passing rapidly away beneath us, and knows we are going a good gait, plenty fast enough for safety, with him tramping around and keeping the car swinging like she would jump off the rope and drop us to the hard-baked earth.

EXPLOIT.

"Five." I sees the number, automatically, I might say. It's painted on the tower we just passed on the dead run. " Six." That's another one. Tularosa valley's right ahead. The next tower stands like a sentinel at its edge. The outstretched arms supporting the cable are in relief against the sky. From it the ropes dips into space, disappearing from sight below the crest. A s we climb the cable, the valley opens. The far bank unfolds foot by foot until I sees the bottom, like an abyss, below us, with the slender-looking ropes spanning. We passes the tower, and takes the nine­ teen hundred feet dip. Down, down, we goes, hanging above the depths like birds— like eagles. It's a great span at a great height. A loaded car as it passes drops a chunk of coal. It falls over the edge with a clang, and I peers over the edge of mine and watches its flight downward. I holds my breath. M y ! It's a long ways down. W e starts up the ascent. Daggert has a firm grip on the frame-work, and is looking side­ ways into the valley. F o r the time he has forgotten everything but the terrible height. As the earth approaches, he relaxes his tense grasp, and so does I. " T o m , " he asks sud­ den, ' ' is there any water in number four level, west ? " " Yes." That question answers mine—there's been an explosion, and Alama Gorda Tunnel is afire. The car carries us swiftly up and over the mountain, and we sees the entrance to the workings and the power-houses and build­ ings on the down slope. Croups of men are moving around, and more men coming out from the tunnel. W o r k is at a standstill, with steam flying in the air, and smoke as­ cending from the stacks. D a g g e r t ' s face sets. It's been a bad one when the men all comes out. Two mine stretchers, and men carrying them, tells part c f the tale. - " How many burned ? " Daggert asks of the first man he meets. " F o u r ; two of them seriously." This from the miner, who is too excited to know that his lamp's still burning. " A r e they out ? " " A l l that can get o u t . " Daggert eyes him sternly. " W h a t do you mean ? ' ' " T h e y says as I come out that number four lift's closed up, and the men on it are behind the fire." " Where's W e i r ? "


TOM TAIL-ROPE'S

" DOWN,

DOWN,

WE

GOES,

HANGING

"Inside." Daggert's eyes encounters mine, and he strides to a car and gets into i t . It is on the rope. The engineer is watching us back there i n the power-house, and I presses together the two signal wires running over our heads, and we disappears in the black entrance of A l a m a Gorda. We has to sit down in the bottom of the car to keep from strikjng against the roof, and I takes my Davy

EXPLOIT.

ABOVE

T H E DEPTHS

311

LIKE

BIRDS."

off my belt and lights i t . It glows like, a fire-bug, and lights up the car and a square patch of roof above us. W e have gone 500 yards, perhaps, when the fire sends out a messenger to meet us. It comes i n a cloud of dust, an oppressive concussion, and the car goes on clanging through choking air. I looks at the halo of coal particles around my lamp, " Not a bad one," says Daggert, through the noise and dirt.


312

TOM TAIL-ROPE'S

The car stops, too, about this time, and jerks back and forth as i f asking a question. That's the engineer's way of asking i f we are still in it and alive, and I reaches up and bells him that we are, and on we goes again. It's a mad rush through the dark, with more noises than we can 'hear at once; and lights appears ahead when we go around a curve. Daggert cries, " Stop! " " D a g g e r t ? " some one asks. It's Weir, the foreman. " Don't go any farther. The damp's driven us back to here." " H o w far ahead is number four lift ? " Daggert asks, climbing out. " T w o hundred yards. The fire's in num­ ber seven breast, under a gob. Everything inside of us is choked u p . " " B u r n i n g much ? " " Y e s . Wet your handkerchief and tie it over your face, and come in the counter. You can see it through an old wall that's blown o u t . " W e i r ' s the only one in Alama Gorda that tells Daggert what to do. We waits there as quiet as the mine itself, and watches their lights disappear. In about two minutes they comes back, coughing and choking. ' ' They can't be alive,'' Daggert says when he can speak. " I think they are. I've been following the air-currents since the explosion, and they are in good air. They are safe for four or five hours." Weir speaks with conviction. " Got a t r a c i n g ? " Weir pulls one out of his pocket, and un­ folds i t . I holds my lamp to show light on it and see for myself, too. " T h e r e , " Weir says, with his pencil showing where, as it moves around the labyrinth of workings, " is where she was lit, and the air is now mov­ i n g — " and the pencil seems to wander aim­ lessly over the cloth in showing the present course of the air. Daggert is a man of quick decision. " I must get nearer the fire and see for myself," he says. " Weir, you and Tom come with me. Y o u men stop here. W e ' l l ride in op­ posite lift four, enter the lift, and return as we go. If in five minutes after the rope stops it doesn't start back, one of you—you, Sandy —start outside for help, and you others start in for us. W e ' l l need h e l p . " And he climbs into the car. We wets our handkerchiefs while he is talking, big red bandanas, and ties them over our mouths and noses. This makes the damp less noxious. I gives the signal, after a preliminary cautionary one, and the car moves ahead. Well, I thinks, here's three

EXPLOIT.

men smothered, for I feels and tastes the stuff I ' m breathing, and i t ' s rank—takes you in the legs, sudden-like, when it gets y o u ; that's the acid and the oxide mixed, W e i r says—and after that we says nothing and breathes as little as we can. If we could have stopped breathing altogether, w e ' d a-been better off. Even our Davys blinks hard. Daggert coughs, and looks at us. No re­ treat in his eyes. So thinking my lungs as good as his, I fills them with the mixture that sieves through the wet bandana. A t the branch opposite number four lift I bells the engineer to stop. I also tells him with the wires that he's to hold the car there. W e could never get back alive now without i t . Number four opens on our right, a square block of black cut out of the coal. Daggert leads, holding his lamp waist high. I being in the rear, tries mine to see where it will burn the best; no difference, high or low, that I can see. Y o u ' d never believe the noise our feet be­ gins to make once we enters the lift. They throb, throb, throb in my ears as they goes along the road, and there's a clinking ring goes with their steps. I never feels my neck so big nor my heart so strong. I'm all pulse, but the worst is at my windpipe and temples. It doesn't beat; it clangs like an anvil under a hammer along w i t h my foot­ steps. Then along comes another noise to pound into my ears. I realize instantly that i t ' s the fire I hears. It's roaring and moan­ ing fit to make you tremble. Daggert stops, and holds his lamp up. He has heard it, too, and is t r y i n g for gas. And he finds i t . H i s light burns dim, and the gas " caps " the flame and fills the in­ side of the gauze with its blue blaze. What a compound we are breathing! A n d what a generator we are i n ! W h a t ain't one kind of gas is another kind, just as dangerous, and all kills i n , t h e i r own ways, given the chance. One is taking its t u r n now. The other kind—one of them—may take next turn, and w e ' l l be blowed out on the main road and into the car perhaps. There's the fire. W e comes on it while climbing up a heap of fallen rock, and sits down on top of the pile and looks at it in helpless wonder, too exhausted to stand up. A n d it continues to spoil what l i t t l e air reaches it, and passes the poorer article on to us. W e gasps there like fishes. It's right in the road at the entrance to abreast, which it clogs up effectually, as it does the heading. There's a pile of rock on it bigger than what's under us, and the " b l o w e r s "


TOM TAIL-ROPE'S feeding it roars loud and low, and stops, and roars again in a different key. Its flames a r e blue, and shoots up and dies down, but through the interstices the mass is incandes­ cent. It is no regular conflagration. It's a blast furnace underground, going slow on account of bad air, and its dull glow sheds an evil-looking glare on us. Daggert sits there ten seconds, trying the air, and then gives a nod. H e ' s seen enough. It's a retreat now. When I tries to move my legs, I finds that they're heavier than they was and don't be­ long to me. Leastwise I can't move them, but crawls down on my hands and drags them after me, the same as Daggert and W e i r ' s a-doing. A n d thus we goes down the lift called number four, w i t h the bells of eter­ nity ringing i n our ears and eternity itself looming up ahead, vast and incomprehensible. Blue stars shoots from its blue horizon to its

" WHAT TAKES ME, THOUGH, IS THE WOMEN

EXPLOIT.

313

blue zenith. Its blue is deep and unknown, and I fears to look upon i t . I dreads what it hides. I encounters something suspended in this heaven, and dimly recognizes Weir, prone. I crawls over him, and forgets all about him lying there. This same eternity is closing down upon him. He grasps my leg as I passes, and it closes down upon me. It crushes me into the dirt between the rails. Weir crawls over me. I grasps him. The sky and stars are crowding nearer. One shoots up from the horizon, and bursts over­ head with a crash, filling the heavens with flames. Its breath is hot, and licks down close to us. W e lie there i n the intense dark­ ness that succeeds, three suffocated, singed men, without motion. I hears a shout: " H u r r y up, boys; here they a r e . " " How do you feel, Tom ? " " Oh, first r a t e . "

.

.

.

THREE OF THEM IS GOING ON AWFUL."


314

TOM TAIL-ROPE'S

I looks around. I am just aware that I feels at a l l . Alama Gorda's sun is shining down on us, and we are surrounded by anx­ ious, inquiring faces. I tries to sit up, and finds that I do not feel so good as I thought. My head throbs, and every joint and muscle is sore. " Close call, T o m , " Daggert says. He's lying near me. His hands and neck are bound in cotton. A n d then I discovers that I'm tied up, too. " Where's W e i r ? " I asks. " Here." Sure enough; and they have him swaddled. " D i d she go off ? " ' " Just as we reached y o u , " Allen, the fireboss, answers. " We got there just in time. L u c k y you was down with the damp, or you'd all have been burned." He holds out his hands. " It barely touched us—scorched." I feels and smarts like a chicken getting his pin-feathers singed, but the excitement in the air sets me quivering. The women of Tularosa are there, and them that has their men safe are trying to comfort the few that has their husbands in the tunnel. " Boys," Daggert says, sitting up, " there's ten men in there as good as we a r e . " "Goodness alive, that's s o ! " I hollers, and stands right up. M y neck and hands smart, and my head rolls independent on my shoulders, but I comes up fast, and feels ready for anything. Weir struggles to his feet, and feels of his head. Being bald-headed, he has a couple of red spots on top that hurts, and one of the men steps up with a can of carron-oil, and pours a little on them and a good deal down his neck. " That's enough," he says, wiping it out of his whiskers. Daggert starts for the office, calling out the names of those he wants to see. Mine being one, I follows. There's a good deal of talking going on among the groups of men, women, and children, and the trammen stands on the trestle looking down at us with curiosity. What takes me, though, is the women. I never could stand to see them cry, and three of them is going on awful. " I t ' s a c a u t i o n , " Daggert says, on the office porch, same as he always does when he is worried or pleased. We all goes in and shuts the door, and the crowd outside moves up close, and looks in at the windows. They knows there is a de­ cision to be made for or against the impris­ oned men. Daggert starts out by saying that the fire

EXPLOIT.

will keep a large force busy several weeks to put it out, because all of the rock and coal must be loaded out to quench i t . Y o u see we has all got beyond the point, in our experience at Alama Corda, of t r y i n g to ex­ tinguish a mine fire like a house fire, by squirting water on i t . It simply won't do; no matter now why. That's a plain state­ ment. A n d what about the men in the mean­ while ? Daggert asks this, and looks us all in the eyes. That's a poser for him and for us, too, and the women outside waiting. ' ' There were ten men in there before the fire," he says, quiet like, " and there's ten men in there now. They may be dead— smothered—'but the chances are that they're alive. Before the sun sets they will be dead if something ain't done. W h a t ' s the best thing to do ? Is there anything we can do in time to save them ? " There's a deep silence. One, two, three minutes passes, and I shoves my hands in my coat pockets, and goes to the window and looks up across the hills above Alama Gorda Tunnel. There's a derrick standing there, outlined against the afternoon sky. " I t ' s a cau­ t i o n , " I thinks .to myself; and stops thinking right there. " D a g g e r t , " I says, turning around, and letting out each word slow and careful, and trying to keep the quiver out of my voice, " the bore-hole's on number four l i f t . " " B o r e - h o l e ? " he says, as i f i t hadn't given him enough trouble driving i t . " Yes, an eighteen-inch one for a pump column—to pump water up through from the new slope and Wilkinson's d i p . " " T o m ' s got i t , " W e i r shouts, jumping up. Daggert looks at us both, perplexed. " Tom's hit the only means at our command. He means to go down through the bore-hole and hoist the men up through i t , don't you, Tom ? " I nods. Daggert appears to be turning the idea over in his mind, and looks me hard i n the eyes, and me looking at him just as hard. Then he heaves a long breath, and says, " Come on ; w e ' l l t r y i t . " The derrick, built up there before the hole was driven and used to drive it, stands wait­ ing for us. Every one of us looks up at it as we passes out. Daggert and W e i r leads, talking earnestly; we follows; and the crowd watches us, wondering, and then starts after us. We finds everything as the drillers last left it, with the windlass, rone, and sheave they


TOM TAIL-ROPE'S had used for pulling the bit. These I i n ­ spects carefully. Then I goes into the shed built under the derrick, and looks at the hole. It shows the projection of a huge iron pipe which had been driven through the soil to the rock strata as a casing. I holds my hand over this, and feels the air draw­ ing down. Daggert orders the rope reeved through the sheave at the top of the derrick,

" I

PULLS

T H E DOOR

OPEN,

AND

STANDS

LOOKING THE

315

blackness closes around me. I hears a deep sigh from the crowd as I disappears. It's tight on all sides. Even the air I breathe seems cramped. I descends stead­ ily, and feels the smooth rock rubbing against my body. Down—down—down—slowly, a patch of light leading my sight and showing the bit-marks in the sandstone. I hears W e i r ' s words of command to the men at the

DOWN LIVID

choosing four men to man the crab. I rigs up a sling, and fastens it to the rope when it comes dangling down, and am more con­ fused by the scrutiny of the peoples than by the task before me. " I t ' s a little over 300 feet d o w n , " W e i r says in my ear; " 3 1 7 , exact, to the vein. I ' l l listen at the top. If you shout I can hear y o u . A r e you ready ? " "Yes." The sling hangs above the pipe. I runs my arms through it, and hangs full length, arms and legs free. M y lamp I hooks in my belt in front. " Lower a w a y , " I says, and my feet, body, head, enters the hole, and its

EXPLOIT.

AT

THE

GROUP

SEATED

THERE,

OUTLINED

AGAINST

FIRE."

crab. His voice comes to me muffled and hollow, but I understands what he says. This reassures me somewhat, for as I descends far­ ther into the hole a nervous feeling comes over me. I imagines all sorts of probable and improbable things; and then the dreads cease, and I feels my legs hanging free, and my body drops into the heading, and I stands on the gangway floor of number four lift, west, back of the fire. I draws a long breath—I am down. I looks up, and sees a small disk of daylight far above. That's the top of the hole. I slips my arms out of the sling, and unfastens my lamp from my belt. The dull, dead silence


316

TOM TAIL-HOPE'S

of the mine is about me. I peers around in the darkness, and sees nothing. I have walked past this exact spot before. Now, it seems, I have entered a strange mine. The air is good, with but a slight current. Yonder is the fire—I faces toward it. The men,, I reasons, will be away from i t . I turns and starts toward the faces of the breasteses. I follows the track, and notes every branch turning off from i t . I hears a sound ahead, and holds up my lamp. A mule team stands there, hooked to a trip of loaded cars, where the driver had left them when the explosion took place. They cocks their ears, and turns their heads as I walks past them and the cars. Here's panic, I thinks, picking up a whip and lamp dropped by the driver and his " patcher." And here's two that were not accounted for. " It's a c a u t i o n , " I says aloud, look­ ing around. " Where be they now ? " My eyes are getting used to the dark, and the rays from my Davy lights up more on that account, but I sees no indication of the men. So I keeps on up the heading. Once in a while I stops to listen, and when the hollow echoes of my own footsteps dies away, profound silence succeeds. A t the face of the gangway I takes a look around. The tools are lying just where the miners dropped them —two picks, a shovel, a twist-drill, and a powder cartridge. " He's been going to fire a h o l e , " I thinks, backing away from the paper sausage, " and when she went off, he just drops and runs. I wishes I knew which way, and I ' d run after h i m ; " and I does, unbeknowingly, for I starts straight back toward the fire, passes the cars and mules, and peeps up the bore­ hole once more. " I t ain't likely they're gone down the rock slope," I says, facing toward it and the electric hoist at the top. " T o o wet down there. I ' l l have a look at the fire first, any­ how, and then go through the breasteses." As near as I can reckon, it ain't more than 300 yards to number seven chamber. On my way there I comes to a wrecked door. " M y , she ripped it when she went off," I exclaims; " and some one's closed it again after it was blowed open." This appears strange. " Maybe " My mouth drops open, and I ' m rigid, lis­ tening. Some one is singing. I recognizes " Bethany." They starts out, more voices than one, on the second verse: " Though like the wanderer, D a y l i g h t a l l gone,

EXPLOIT. Darkness be over me, My rest a stone ; Y e t in my dreams I'd be Nearer, my G o d , to Thee, Nearer to Thee ! "

A shiver runs down my back. I pulls the door open, and stands looking down at the group seated there, outlined against the livid fire further on. There's a shout, and then a scramble toward me. "Tom! T o m ! Bliss me, i t ' s Tom Tailr o p e , " Duggan, the foremost, cries in his Irish brogue. " I t ' s a first-class prayermeeting ye've interrupted, me b ' y . " " Du, d u , " Reese puffs, staring hard. The others crowds up close. " Y e ' v e come in time to save me from em­ barrassment," Duggan continues, jovially. " It was me next turn, and nary a hair did I know phat to say. Where did ye come from, Tom ? " " Down the bore-hole." " Down the bore-hole ? Bless me, but ye're famous. A n d do ye return by the same route ? " " After you have gone up ahead of i n ( . " " D o ye hear him, f e l l o w s ? " Duggan shouts, looking around. " H e ' s come down the bore-hole, and up it we g o ! W e l l , it's better than toastin' our shins at the fire beyant." " Is it true what you're sayin', Thomas ? " Wilkinson, the gangway-man, asks seriously. " Just as I says it, W i l k i n s o n , " I answers. " Come and see." They follows through the door and up the road to the bore-hole, where I stops by the dangling rope. " God bless you, l a d , " Wilkinson ejacu­ lates, grasping my hands. " I told them an hour sin' that nothing but the Almighty could save us, and asked them to prepare to meet Him. I've faced death before, but never till now looked him in the eye; and after biddin' my wife and bairns farewell and com­ mending them to H i s care, through His inter­ ference I ' l l see them again. W h o ' s first ? " " Y o u , " Duggan answers for us. " I ' m the oldest," he says simply. " Show me how, Thomas." I slips myself into the sling and out again, and then helps him adjust it across his broad shoulders. " Draw yessel in, W i l k i n s o n , " Duggan sug­ gests. " I t ' s the smallest shaft ye iver rode up. Hist away, Tom. How de ye start ? " I bears my weight on the slack rope. The signal is quickly answered by its t a k i n g W i l ­ kinson up and out of our sight.


TOM TAIL-ROPE'S " D o ye moind that n o w , " says Duggan, standing under and looking up. " I never gave a Welsher credit for knowin' enough for that. There's Irish blood in Tom, Reese." " N o t a drop, not a d r o p , " Reese asserts stoutly. " Then he must be a b a r d , " with a broad grin. " I t ' s all right, Tom. I ' l l say no more against the Welsh, so help me. I've heard them sing and pray this night, and in me own foolish heart I wished I could. I wonder can I go up it ? " " Y o u ' r e the last but one, D u g g a n , " I answers. " I ' m l a s t . " " A l l r i g h t , " he says cheerfully. " A n d to-morrow Daggert and W e i r ' l l have us the other side of the fire, loadin' it out. H o w ' s the air over beyant, Tom ? " " B a d . It draws that way. We was in there a couple of hours a g o . " " What did I tell ye ? I heard ye, and says to mesel', ' N o t yet, Duggan; they're after y e . ' " " W e thought it was some of his foolish­ ness, ' ' Reese says apologetically; ' ' maybe he was r i g h t . " " A v course, I was. Here, Reese, yer wind's bad. Hook him in, T o m . " Reese enters the sling, and as he disappears Duggan calls out a-laughing, " Good-by. Don't get stuck, moind, and kape us down here to smother. H e ' s a good old sowl, Tom. H i m an' Wilkinson's all that kep' us from goin' where we'd niver got out. I was for climbin' over the foire and bein' done wid it, but Reese says to wait, and I waited. Gildea, here, drops and runs, and foinds me an' Wilkinson an' Reese in the gangway, havi n ' a discusshion over our chances for escape or rescue, an' we come to the conclusion that there was nothin' for, art' everythin' against, us. L e t the b ' y go up next, Tom. His mom's waitin' for him above. Here, Gildea,

EXPLOIT.

317

and tell her we're all right. Up ye go like a swallow to its nest. A h , but i t ' s g r e a t ! " turning to me with a broad grin of approval when Gildea's hob-nails disappears. " It's a great day for Alama Gorda this, and a greater wan for ye, Tom. Whin we came to that conclusion, we s'arched the lift to find out how many had drawn the lucky number, and then marched in a procession to the foire. Wilkinson, ould experience, said there'd be no more explosions. There'd been three, two light wans after the first, which was to the quane's taste. Because, said he, the damp from the fire kapes the gas from that same. We made oursel's comfortable and waited; nary a hair do I know what for, but we waited. Faith, our frien's are workin' up there," grasping the rope as it comes clump­ ing down. " Listen to that now. They're cheerin'. H u r r y now, Bainbridge, so I can get up and cheer wid them. Look at h i m ; he takes to the rope like a sailor. A h , but i t ' s great! " A n d thus Duggan talks them all into the rope and up the bore-hole, and finally himself. " I ' l l be waitin' for ye above, T o m , " he then says, slipping the sling over his broad shoulders; and giving a parting kick at me with his feet, he too disappears. A muffled, unintelligible sound comes down from him, and then silence. That's all there is to it, except that after I got up the hole there was a great fuss made, the men and women crowding around me that close that I was glad when Daggert comes pushing through, actually smiling, and says, " C o m e , T o m ; W e i r and I are going inside again. If you're able, I'd like to have you come with u s . " He'd like to have me come, when he don't generally consider your feelings when he wants you to do anything or go anywhere; and I, feeling more used up by that than by the noise and cheering, follows him through the crowd.


FORT

THE

RACE

M'KINLEY.

FOR THE NORTH BY WALTER

A

CHAPTER

OF

R E C E N T

POLE.

WELLMAN.

PERSONAL

E X P E R I E N C E

IN

T H E

ARCTIC.

and in a week met the pack-ice at the sev­ enty-seventh parallel of latitude. Our first onslaught upon the frigid bulwarks with which the well-nigh impregnable Pole is sur­ rounded was not encouraging. We found no opening, but did soon discover that our bunkers were running low of coal, and so we steamed back to Norway for reinforce­ ments. Then north again, and soon we were once more struggling with the pack-ice. A week o f ramming, shoving, crowding, shiver­ ing through leads and openings, forcing them often where they did not exist, varied by fre­ quent fogs in which it was necessary to lie to because we could not see a ship's length ahead, brought us at last near the shores of Franz Josef Land. Happy indeed were we all when, on July 27th, we first beheld the glaciercapped mountains of this remote region. To our imaginations it presented itself as a para­ dise of opportunity. N e x t day, w i t h anxious hearts, we anchored at Cape F l o r a , which for three years had been the headquarters of the From Archangel we steamed northward Jackson-Harmsworth (English) expedition. through the White Sea to the A r c t i c Ocean, Here it was that Nansen and Jackson had

THE Wellman Polar Expedition of 1898-9 was characterized by one of the most remark­ able tragedies and one of the finest deeds of human cour­ age ever recorded. The hero who did this rare deed lives in the little town of Tromso, N o r w a y ; and it was at this far northern port that the mem­ bers of the expedition, four Americans and five Norwegians, assembled in June, 1898. On the 26th day of that month we sailed in the expedition steamer " F r i t h j o f , " a stanch ship specially built for hard work in heavy ice. A t Archangel, Russia, we took on board eighty-three draught dogs which Alexander Trontheim, of Tobolsk, had procured for us in sub-Arctic Siberia, among the Ostiaks, who live near the mouth of the River Ob. A two-thousand-mile journey across mountains, tundras, steppes, and rivers had the faithful Trontheim brought his pack, assisted by others and a caravan of reindeer.


BIDDING

FAREWELL

TO THE SHIP

had their dramatic meeting two years before —a chance encounter which doubtless saved the lives of Nansen and his faithful comrade, Lieutenant Johansen. Here, too, we had hoped for another meeting. When last heard from, Andree's balloon was drifting in this direction from Spitzbergen, and as he knew of the existence at this point of a good house amply stocked with provisions, i t was not i m ­ possible he had been able to make his way hither the previous autumn. Grievous was our disappointment when we saw the doors and windows of Jackson's house all boarded and barred, for we realized that thus ended all reasonable expectation that the brave Swedes were to be seen again among the living. F r o m Cape F l o r a we vainly endeavored to

' SUDDENLY

THEY

WERE

IN LATITUDE

C0.05

NORTH.

319

push our ship northward through a strait, and later tried to steam round the southeast­ ern islands where the Austro-Hungarian ship " Tegetthoff " was lost in 1874, and thus to the north. But finding the way everywhere blocked with heavy ice, we finally decided to establish our headquarters at Cape Teget­ thoff, H a l l Island, latitude 8 0 . 0 5 ; and there we set up our little hut, and landed our stores, equipment, and dogs. This was the last of July. In three days the ship sailed for Norway, and we were left alone for at least a year in the wilderness of ice. W e were the only human inhabitants of that vast region, and our nearest neighbors were Russians and Samoyedes in Nova Zembla, 500 miles to the southward. A month or two of working weather remained before the win-

S U R R O U N D E D B Y F I V E OR S I X B I G B U L L S , R O A R I N G

.

.

.

IN

THEIR

ANGER/'


320

THE RACE

FOR THE NORTH

POLE.

ter should come down upon us, and we lost no winter of 1895-6 in a little hut or cave. Our time in setting our column in motion. Two men at once set to work to establish a post. days after the ship left us, a party under the The first thing was to build a hut. F o r this command of the meteorologist, M r . E . B . Bald­ work they had better tools than Nansen and win, of the United States Weather Bureau, set his comrade, but no better materials—only out to establish an outpost farther north, the such as the country afforded. They gathered farther the better. They started with sledges, rocks and piled up the rough walls of a house. two small boats, dogs, and provisions, travers­ Two pieces of drift-wood, brought from Si­ ing a solid sheet of comparatively smooth ice berian rivers by current and tide, formed upon bay and strait. The outlook was prom­ the ridge-pole. The dried skins of walrus ising. But conditions often change with sur­ which were killed i n the bay served for a prising rapidity in the A r c t i c , and in less roof. A chimney was built at one side, and than forty-eight hours this party found the upon a hearth of flat rocks small bits of apparently sound dried drift-wood and safe ice a n d h u n k s of breaking up un­ w a l r u s blubber der their feet and were burned, not drifting rapidly for purposes of out to sea i n heating, but to strong off-shore boil the coffee and winds. They had soup and fry the to leap from one savory steaks of floating floe to polar bear. Tons another, now and of walrus meat then hurriedly were cut in small launching their squares out of small boats, only the huge car­ to pull them up casses of fifteen again as quickly of the sea-horses, as p o s s i b l e t o and stored away save them from in an ice-house being crushed in (good refrigera­ the ice. Nothing tor) for the sus­ but d e s p e r a t e , tenance of the even heroic, work forty dogs during enabled them to the long winter. escape with their A t o n of con­ lives and outfit densed food for and r e a c h the human use was solid land. Along accumulated WALTER WELLMAN. the shore, over here, most of it rough s t o n e s F r o m a p h o t o g r a p h hy L . S z a c i n s k i , t a k e n i n J u n e , 1898, before the designed for the departure o f the W e l l m a n E x p e d i t i o n . and precipitous sledging parties glacier-debris, now moving a part of their the next spring. W i t h blocks of snow and loads short distances by boat in open water, ice the men built huge walls around the hut, again taking to the ice-covered mountain­ side for a hazardous journey over fissures to afford some protection from the winter's and crevasses, they struggled for fully a storms, making the camp look very much in­ month. Then the on-coming winter and the deed like a fort ; and so they named it Fort broken, drifting ice which filled the channel McKinley. In getting our supplies our men had some before them compelled a halt for good. lively adventures hunting walrus i n the bay This was at Cape Heller, a little south of near F o r t M c K i n l e y . A s a rule the walrus the eighty-first parallel of latitude. Only is a harmless brute. H i s attentions to the hu­ once had human feet trod these shores, and man beings who invade his realm are usually that was a quarter of a century before, when confined to swimming about the boat for Payer, the discoverer of Franz Josef Land, half an hour or longer, alternately diving passed near by on a sledge trip. A few miles and coming to the surface again. When­ to the westward, on the other side of the ever his ugly head appears above the water, sound, Nansen and Johansen had spent the curiosity and good-nature are seen bulging


A FIGHT

WITH ENRAGED

from his little round eyes. He acts as i f this visitation of human beings, with their boat and oars and things, was a sort of circus got up for his special amusement. But wound a cow or calf, and you may have a different story to t e l l . That is what our men did one day. They shot a mother walrus that had a calf under her flippers, and they were- trying their best to secure the two carcasses before they should sink i n the bay. Suddenly they were surrounded by five or six b i g bulls, roaring and snorting in their anger at this

MR.

WELLMAN

AFTER

321

with the oars, and sent the boat flying so that the enemy might not all be able to board at the same instant. Paul Bjoervig, who knows walrus as well as he knows his own children, told M r . Baldwin, who had the one gun in the party, when and where to shoot, that not an instant or a bullet might be wasted; and he, good shot, quick as a cat, emptied the chamber of his Winchester with telling effect. Bull after bull retreated with a ball in his eye, the only spot worth hitting in a walrus, for his skin is an armor-plate of

THIRTEEN

murderous attack upon their tribe. One bull walrus, with his weight of from twelve hundred to fifteen hundred pounds, which he is able to throw half out of water, and with his huge tusks, a foot and a half in length, which may r i p the boat and cap­ size it, is a dangerous foe when you are out in a craft only fifteen feet long. But here were half a dozen, all ferociously angry, and all making for the one small boat in which our three men sat. The lives of those men depended upon the manner in which they met the onslaught. Fortunately they were experienced walrus-hunters, and not a man of them lost his nerve. Bernt Bentzen, he of the mighty shoulders, gave a few strokes

WALRUSES.

MONTHS

IN

T H E ARCTIC.

gristle and blubber four inches in thickness. The bay was red with blood, the waters were lashed into foam, and the bellowing of the bulls filled the air with a horrid din. They came finally faster than M r . Baldwin could take care of them. Then Bernt and Paul rose up, each with an oar in his hands, and beat the beasts over the head. Every time one of the ugly snouts rose by the side of the boat, with the wicked tusks gleaming white, there was an oar to meet it, or perchance a leaden ball. F o r fully a quarter of an hour the battle raged, and then, to the great relief of our weary men, the enemy sud­ denly withdrew, one by one, leaving two of their number floating lifeless upon the bay.


322

THE RACE

FOR THE NORTH

summer for twenty years, and with the Wellman expedition of 1894 and other parties had earned reputation as a daring, faithful ice-pilot. Bentzen had already passed three years in the white north as a member of Dr. Nansen's crew on the " F r a m . " On the last day of October, M r . Baldwin and his three men arrived at headquarters, and the seven of us settled down for the winter in a little canvas-covered, decagonal house about fifteen feet i n diameter. Our beds were reindeer-skin sleeping-bags spread out upon the floor. Our dining table was the top of a biscuit box, and our dishes a plate and mug for each man. Plenty of good food we had, including American flapjacks and oatmeal every morning, and fresh bear-meat in stews or steaks every evening. Finally the darkness came on and many storms and the great cold. For 126 days and nights the sun was below the horizon. Throughout December it was just possible to distinguish midday from mid­ night. Our hut was drifted over with snow. Seen from the outside, there were just two things about it which indicated a human habitation—a diminutive black stove-pipe protruding from the apex of the rounded,snow-heaped roof, and a black, y a w n i n g hole in " the front y a r d . " Through this hole we crawled like foxes to their burrow, in order to m a k e o u r w a y through two sheds, or storehouses, and f o u r d o o r s t o the living-room within. How cheery were the sparks flying from that bit of a stove­ pipe through the long night ! A n d right comfortable were we in our lair, though at times the tiny stove in the center of it A ROUGH HUMAN FIGURE EMERGED FROM THE MOUTH OF A T U N ­ had to struggle NEL LEADING. DOWN INTO THE, SNOW-BANK." against a zero tem-

Late in October, pursuant to his instruc­ tions, M r . Baldwin prepared to return to Harmsworth House, our headquarters at Cape Tegetthoff. He called for two volunteers to remain at the outpost during the winter to care for the dogs and guard the stores and equipment. A l l the men offered themselves. Paul Bjoervig and Bernt Bentzen were chosen, whereat Emil and Olaf Ellefsen and Daniel Johansen were grievously disappointed. A s for Bjoervig and Bentzen, they were de­ lighted. Neighbors and comrades at home, adventurous spirits both, this chance of spend­ ing an A r c t i c winter together in a snug little hut, well stocked with things to eat and plenty of tobacco to smoke, was to them the realiza­ tion of a dream. Nor was their ardor the out­ growth of any callow inexperience. Bjoer­ vig had been in the A r c t i c almost every

" T H A T INSTANT

POLE.


BEGINNING

THE SLEDGE

JOURNEY

NORTHWARD.

323

"AS I TOOK MY PLACE AT THE HEAD OP THE GRAVE . . . THE MEN STOOD ROUND WITH BARED HEADS."

perature at the outer edges of the apart­ ment. The much-dreaded A r c t i c night passed quickly. If any one suffered in spirits, he managed to conceal his misfortune. There was plenty to do. W e had both work and sport. Many bears fell before our rifles. In the bright moonlight it was fine to strap on a pair of ski and take a run over the crisp snow or coast down the glaciers on the moun­ tain slopes near by. The scientific work demanded attention—meteorology, observa­ tions in magnetism, studies of the brilliant aurora borealis. There was the housekeep­ ing to be attended to, and the dogs to look

after. Above a l l , the sledge journeys were to be prepared for. To make ready for a sledge t r i p seems a, simple thing, but it is like organizing an army corps for campaigns far from base in an enemy's country. Day or night the leader of the expedition had but one thought, one dream, and that was to arrange the count­ less details for the field work with the fewest possible mistakes and the greatest possible number of things that made for strength and security. A thousand pictu­ resque or interesting incidents of this win­ ter in the darkness were almost forgotten in the concentration of mind and effort upon


324

THE RACE

FOR THE NORTH

the arrangements for the sleigh trips. One journey was to be made to F o r t McKinley and beyond, straight northward, as far as we could go before diminution of supplies and advancing summer commanded return. This was " the dash for the North P o l e " which formed one part of our general expedition­ ary plan. The other journey, subsequently successfully carried out, compassed the sec­ ond part of our general plan, which was to explore the then unknown eastern part of the Franz Josef Land archipelago. Acutely did we realize that, i f we were to beat all records in our approach to the Pole and have our chance actually to reach it in case we found unusually favorable conditions, we must get up right early in the A r c t i c morning. The records of the past had been established by trips from bases much farther north. Thus Lockwood and Brainard, of the Greely party, who had carried the stars and stripes to 83.24, had set out from head­ quarters at 81.40. D r . Nansen and Lieu­ tenant Johansen, who had reached 86.14, had started from the ' ' Fram " at 84.04. To eclipse the latter achievement, we should have to travel 440 miles. But this much at least we all believed we should do, barring acci­ dent, i f only we could get an early start. Consequently, on the morning of February 18th, while I was standing i n the hut for a last flash-light photograph, one of my Nor­ wegians stuck his head i n at the door and called out : " Everything is ready, s i r . " " And so am I . " Saying good-by to my American comrades, not quite sure that I should ever see them again, I went out, and took my place at the head of the little caravan. Each of the three Norwegians had a sledge and team of dogs in charge. A snowstorm was raging, but we were ready to start, and could not stop for a little storm. I led the way, " tracking " for the dogs as best I could in the semidarkness and snow-laden air. The sun had not yet risen, but in the middle of the day was near enough to the horizon to give us a gray, hazy dawn-light. The snow was soft, and we sank into it to the ankles and often to the knees. Underneath there were fre­ quent ridges and protuberances of rough ice to trip the weary feet. A strange experience it was, this stumbling along like drunken men in the gloom, unable much of the time to see far enough ahead to make course by land­ mark, and compelled, therefore, to pick our way with compass constantly in hand. Where it was smooth enough we used Norwegian ski with advantage, but in the rougher spots

POLE.

snowshoes were of no avail. Upon our feet we had finsko, or moccasins of reindeer skin; and though these are the best of all foot­ wear for A r c t i c use, their soles are so slip­ pery that, traveling such a road as ours, one was lucky if he did not fall sprawling oftener than once in ten minutes. Still, we made progress. A n d though we had set out in the midst of the A r c t i c winter, fully a month earlier than the earliest sledging start hith­ erto made in high latitudes (that of D r . Nan­ sen from t h e ' ' F r a m " ) , and though we had all sorts of weather, from blinding snowstorms to drifting blizzards, the sun finally showed his smiling face above the horizon, the hours of light lengthened, and we struggled pa­ tiently on. F o r t M c K i n l e y was our first goal. There we were to take on more sledges and dogs, and increase our load of provisions. How had our men there passed the winter of their exile ? Was all well with them ? These were important questions, for upon the dogs and stores at the outpost we depended for an increase of our sledging strength in the race against time and distance to the North. The plan was to send Bjoervig and Bentzen back to headquarters, and i n the early days of March to set out with four teams and sledges, and my present party, toward the Pole. Bjoervig and Bentzen had been promised that we would raise their siege in February, and eager were we a l l to keep our word. The storms delayed us, and at one or two camps the wind blew so hard that pitching our tent was out of the question, and we had to be content with pegging down its corners and crawling under—any place to escape the fury of the icy blasts. When better weather came, we made hard marches, and on the afternoon of the 27th we had the satisfaction of seeing the ridge behind the F o r t loom up in the white distance. Soon the dogs at the F o r t set up a shout of welcome to their approaching brethren, and the latter, just to show what they could do when they had a personal object i n view, started off at a rapid run, dragging sledges, men, and a l l after them, although hitherto they had crawled at a snail's pace and had made progress at a l l only when,helped by their drivers. A t the foot of the hill the men stopped and held the excited teams, that I might walk on before and be the first to greet the two exiles. But aside from an overturned boat, half-buried in the snow, a collection of empty biscuit and provision tins, and a group of dogs chained to the top of a


LIVING

TWO

MONTHS

ALONE

BESIDE

A

DEAD

COMPANION.

325

bank of ice, I could see nothing whatever ing. The mother dog licked B j o e r v i g ' s hand, indicating a human habitation. and growled at me. N o w we went down " T h e hut is just before you, sir, r i g h t be­ upon our hands and knees, and crawled through an opening i n the rock wall of the hind the d o g s , " said E m i l Ellefsen. There is not an atom of superstition in my hut. A bearskin was hung there for a door. mental composition. I never had a presenti­ Once inside, I tried to stand erect, and ment or anything of that sort. But it is the bumped my head against the ice with which plain t r u t h that, as I picked my way up the the ceiling was covered. It was so dark i n there I could see nothing, and rough snow-bank and through an Bjoervig led me to a seat, array of shaggy dogs a l l howl­ N O R T H POLE ing and leaping and straining at "Sit down, sir, sit down and their leashes, I knew something rest yourself, and I ' l l have the had gone wrong at the hut. coffee ready i n a moment." A t one side of the hut, in a That instant a rough human niche in the rocky wall, a bit of figure emerged from the mouth fire was smoldering. Bjoervig of a tunnel leading down into the put on a few pieces of dried drift­ snow-bank. The man held a rifle wood and a big hunk in his hand. H e was of walrus blubber, dressed in furs. H i s and the flames burst face was as black as out. V e r y cheerful a stoker's. and bright the fire " B j o e r v i g , how looked, but not a par­ are you ? ' ' ticle of heat did we " I am well, sir, get from i t . What but—but poor Bentwas not used in boil­ zen is d e a d . " ing the coffee went We stood silent up the c h i m n e y . for a moment, hands Three feet from the grasped, and looking flames the rocks were into one another's white with a thick eyes. A tear t r i c k l e d coat of frost, and all down upon Bjoer­ the walls and the roof v i g ' s black cheek and glittered like a bed froze there. Then of diamonds. It was his countrymen came a strange little den, up, and when he told and to me it seemed them the news, colder than out of these simple-hearted doors. The brilliant fellows were as dumb fire was but mockery. as I had been. It F a i r l y well illumined was B j o e r v i g who did was the end of the the t a l k i n g . We hut where we sat, only l i s t e n e d and but beyond was a watched him, being but dimly conscious M A P S H O W I N G T H E R O U T E O P T H E W E L L M A N E X P E ­ gloomy recess from which the light of D I T I O N O F 1898-99, F R O M T R O M S O , N O R W A Y , TO of the true nature the flames was cut FRANZ JOSEF LAND A N D RETURN. of the tragedy within off by a pier of rocks the shadow of which we stood. B j o e r v i g talked and laughed and which served as a support for the roof. cried by turns. But he did not forget his There was no window. hospitality. " C o m e i n , sir, come i n and Bjoervig told me about Bentzen. The poor have some hot coffee. Y o u must be tired fellow had been taken i l l early in November. from your j o u r n e y . " A l l through that month and December he had He dived down into the mouth of the tun­ been unable to get out of the house, and Occa­ nel, pulling me after him. F i r s t we entered most of the time he lay in his bag. a little cavern where a mother dog lay nurs­ sionally he was delirious. Death came the ing a hairy, squeaking brood. Hardy puppies day after New Y e a r ' s . Paul paused, and for these, opening their eyes and gulping milk i n lack of something else to say I asked him a temperature seventy degrees below freez- where he had buried the body.


326

THE

RACE

FOR

THE

" ' I have not buried him, s i r , " was the re­ ply. " H e lies i n t h e r e , " pointing to the dark end of the hut. " W h y did you not bury him, Paul ? " " Because, sir, I promised him I w o u l d n ' t . " I shall never forget that moment. A t first the words did not appear to me to mean very much—only that a dead man had not been buried. Gradually the full proportions of the tragedy dawned upon my conscious­ ness. This man with the black face who was cutting up walrus meat and feeding the fire had been compelled to pass two months of the A r c t i c night in this cavern with no other companion than the body of his friend. I lit a little oil-lamp—a bicycle lamp it was— and made my way into the dark end of the hut. On the floor at my feet lay a one-man sleeping-bag, empty, with a blanket tumbled over it, and showing signs of occupancy the night before. Just beyond, within arm's reach, lay a similar bag. This one was occupied. The flap at the top had been pulled carefully over the face of the sleeper within. B a g and contents were frozen as hard as a rock. There, side by side, the quick and the dead had slept for eight weeks. A s I looked at this weird scene amid the shadows under the scintillating roof of hoar­ frost, and thought of the long days that were as nights and the long nights that were no darker than the days, and of the ordeal it is for any one of us when compelled at home to sit even for a single night with com­ panions in a brilliantly lighted apartment by the side of a dead friend, and of this living man who had for months lain there abso­ lutely alone by the dead, I marveled that Paul Bjoervig was still sane. Just then the men came in from giving the dogs their supper, and I heard Bjoervig talk­ ing to them. He had not known what was the matter with Bentzen. In his delirium the sick man had talked of his home and wife in Norway, of the green hills there, of D r . Nansen and Captain Sverdrup and the cruise of the " F r a m " ; at times he was once more in the ward-room of that famous ship ; again he was after bear or walrus with Bjoervig and the boys i n our little Lapp boat ; now he was on a sledge trip to the Pole ' ' with Mr. Wellman." ' ' That was the hardest of all for m e , " said Bjoervig, " when poor Bentzen was out of his head and I couldn't do anything for him. Once he caught me crying, though I tried not to let him see, and he brightened up and s a i d : ' P a u l , what's the matter w i t h you? I ' m all r i g h t . I ' l l be well in a week

NORTH

POLE.

or two. See what an appetite I have.' And he got up and boiled some coffee and cooked some bacon, and sat here eating and laugh­ ing, just to cheer me up, and then he fell over in a faint. I dragged him to his bag, and—and he's there y e t . " ' ' A n d how did you happen to promise him not to bury him ? ' ' " Oh, he was low-spirited one day, and he called to me. ' Say, Paul, I ' m not going to die up here, but i f I do, old fellow, promise me you won't try to bury me out in the snow.' ' I'll promise you that on one condition, Bernt,' said I, ' and that is that, i n case I die first, and my chances are just as good as yours, y o u ' l l not bury m e , either.' Bernt smilingly agreed, and so we made our bargain. He was silent for a few minutes, and then he looked over at me and said : ' Paul, I don't want the bears and foxes to get me.' " ' ' A n d what could induce you to go through such an experience again, P a u l ? " asked Olaf. " W e l l , i f i t ' s money you're talking about, there isn't enough in the Bank of England. But i f I had to do it over as a matter of duty, why, I ' d just do i t , that's a l l . " My heart went out to this brave fellow who had kept his promise through such an unpre­ cedented ordeal. I felt as i f it were my duty to say something to him, to give some ex­ pression to the homage that was deep i n my soul. B u t I could not put my thoughts into words, and so I took his hand in mine there before his comrades, and said nothing. A n d one after another we all shook his hand, with­ out speaking, and we felt rather queer, and the silence was becoming painful, when Bjoervig himself spoke up : " The coffee is ready, s i r . " A f t e r supper we brought i n our sleepingbags and spread them on the floor, crawled in, and were soon asleep. D u r i n g the night I chanced to get awake, and looking out of the corner of the bag I saw B j o e r v i g sitting by the niche in the wall, now and then put­ t i n g a piece of blubber on the fire, smoking his l i t t l e pipe, and his eyes fixed on the flames. H e did not sleep any that night, and the next night I gave him morphine. N e x t day we found a spot by the side of a b i g rock where the wind had scooped out a pocket. In it we laid the body of Bernt Bentzen. We built a cairn of rocks over it, t a k i n g care to make the wall t h i c k and heavy. A s I took my place at the head of the grave to speak a few words of tribute to the bravery and faithfulness of the dead man, who had met his fate and was now to


A

SERIOUS

CATASTROPHE

find eternal rest i n the A r c t i c which he so well loved, the men stood round w i t h bared heads and two or three of our dogs nestled against the black grave set i n the all-white landscape. The mercury fell to forty-four below zero that day, and a strong wind was blowing from off the mountain. The weather was too bitter to work outdoors, and so we kept i n shelter. M i s s i n g Bjoervig and feel­ i n g a little anxious about him, I went out to the grave, and found him there, hard at w o r k . H e had put up a neat cross and marked i t , " B . Bentzen—Dod 2 / 1 , ' 9 9 . " F o r hours he kept at his self-appointed task, patiently chinking up a l l the little interstices between the rocks which covered the grave, " Because I want to make sure the bears and foxes d o n ' t get h i m , " he said. Though only a sailorman, Paul Bjoervig has a great love for poetry. There are few good bits of verse i n the Scandinavian lan­ guages w i t h which he is not familiar. He has an extraordinary memory, too, and he told us that i n his long v i g i l through those two dark and dreadful months he had calmed and comforted himself by r e c i t i n g aloud, over and over, a l l the poetry he could remember. He did not admit, but nevertheless we a l l be­ lieved, that but for this solace of poesy, this vent for an overwrought consciousness, we should have found upon our arrival at F o r t M c K i n l e y one dead man and one mad one. W e took Paul w i t h us when, on M a r c h 7th, we set out on our northern sledge journey. It was a hard life, this sledge-traveling in the far n o r t h . F o r eleven successive days we had continuous temperatures ranging from forty to forty-eight below zero. The winds were worse than the cold. One needs all his vitality, a l l his endurance and resolution, to work w i t h might and main in the rough ice throughout the day and then sleep at night i n a frost-filled bag, which in an hour or two becomes puddly and soggy from the thawing produced by the heat of the body. B u t for myself, I felt better day by day, hardier, bet­ ter able to cope w i t h the work and the ex­ posure. It was glorious thus to feel one's strength, to fear nothing in the way of hard­ ship or exertion, to carry a consciousness of superiority to a l l the obstacles which nature had placed i n our path. I was never happier than i n these hard days. March 20th had come, and we were neari n g the eighty-second parallel on the east coast of Crown Prince Rudolph L a n d . From this on we should have plenty of light, and everything was going w e l l . We had made the expected rate of travel. Our loads were

AT

82 NORTH

LATITUDE.

327

getting lighter and more easily handled. The dogs were better trained and much more ser­ viceable than at the beginning of the journey. Better s t i l l , ahead of us, glistening i n the sun, we could plainly see the outlines of islands hitherto unexplored and unknown. Eager in­ deed were we to get to them, and beyond them out upon the great A r c t i c Sea, to 84°, 87°, 88°,—and even ninety did not seem wholly impossible i n case we were willing to take a little risk about ever getting back again. But pride goeth before a f a l l . On this very morning which marked the end of the A r c t i c night and the dawn of the brighter day, a little accident happened. It was a trivial thing i n itself, tremendous i n its conse­ quences. M y sledge, c a r r y i n g 500 pounds of weight, had stuck i n a rough place. A s usual, I called to the dogs and threw my weight into the harness. A lunge forward, and down into a little crack i n the ice—a tiny little crack such as we had crossed every day by the scores—went my right l e g . The momentum threw me forward upon my face, and my shin-bone received the full force of the thrust. A t first I thought the leg was broken i n two or three places, so great was the pain. F o r a few moments I felt faint. But when I had picked myself up and found that I had nothing worse than a bruise and sprain, I counted myself very lucky, and went on my way as contented as i f nothing had hap­ pened. N e x t morning of course I was sore and lame, and the prudent thing would have been to stop for a week or ten days and get all r i g h t again. But I kept going, the leg getting worse and worse, and I suppose I should have been rash enough to go so far that I never could have gotten back had not something else happened. Fortunately, this other thing did happen, and i t came down upon us like a thief i n the night, in the shape of an ice-pressure which acted just like an earthquake under our camp and destroyed sledges, dogs, stores, and instruments in the twinkling of an eye, and came within an ell of getting all of us. It is easy to fight. It is glorious to strug­ gle. The hardest thing i n the world to do is to surrender. B u t there was just one course left open for us, and that was a re­ treat to headquarters as speedily as possible. By heroic work, rapid progress was made; and though delayed by a three days' storm at F o r t M c K i n l e y , we arrived at Harmsworth House on A p r i l 9th, and to at least one of our party the little hovel seemed a palace. A f t e r a fortnight's rest, the Norwegians took to the field again, i n charge of M r . Bald-


THE

328

RACE

FOR

THE

win, the meteorologist. Up to this time the eastward frontiers of the archipelago were unknown, and their extent was a moot ques­ tion among geographers. A s a result of M r . Baldwin's trip the map is complete. Upon the new lands found by my party in the ex­ treme north, upon those found by M r . Bald­ win in the east, and also upon a number of islands surveyed the following July in our steamer, we had the pleasure of placing the names of a few American scientists and public men who had in one way or another displayed a friendly interest in the expedi­ tion. Another important part of our work was the correction of the maps made by Payer and Jackson. The former had ex­ tended Wilczek Land much too far north, and was unaware of the separate existence of Whitney Island. Running far northward from Wilczek Land, Payer thought he saw an enormous glacier—Dove glacier—indicating

NORTH

POLE.

a land of continental dimensions to the east­ ward. D r . Nansen had in part disproved this conjecture; we disproved i t wholly, and completed the map of that region with approximate accuracy. In the southwest, where Frederick Jackson thought he saw from a distance two islands, named Brady and Royal Societies, we found nine islands. From A p r i l 9th to July 27th was a long and dreary wait, especially for the man who was compelled to lie a l l the time upon the floor and who could get out-doors only when on rare good days he was carried out to bask in the sunshine while lying upon the roof of the storehouse. But everything save the universe itself comes to an end, and one bright, happy morning the good steamer " C a p e l l a , " chartered by my brother Arthur, steamed up to Harmsworth House. In a few hours we were aboard, reading letters from home, and on the way thither ourselves.

Track of Sleamer "Capella."1899.which brought hack the Expedition. Track of Sledge Journeys of the Wellman Expedition, 1898-'99. The Northernmost Point Reached by the Expedition. (565 Miles from the Pole) THE

N E W M A P O P F R A N Z JOSEF SECURED

LAND, PREPARED

B Y T H E W E L L M A N EXPEDITION.

B Y WALTER W E L L M A N FROM T H E DATA THIS M A P CORRECTS

A N DEXTENDS

A N D OBSERVATIONS

A L L EARLIER

MAPS.


THE MASTER-KEY BY

TIGHE

OP N E W G A T E . HOPKINS,

A u t h o r o f " F o r F r e e d o m , ' ' etc.

THE

STORY

OF A N ENGLISH

PRISONER

A N D HIS

GUARD.

E D I T O R ' S N O T E . — T h i s is the first of a very remarkable series of stories by Mr. Tighe Hopkins, presenting with verisimilitude and with sympathy, yet without sentimentality, some aspects of English prison life. While the stories are drawn from real life, they have all the dramatic and picturesque interest of the pure romance. They get at the human impulses—the good and the bad—the mastering desires, and the ideas of the men who spend years within prison walls, and depict a life that is full of thrilling incidents and of the most elemental types of human character. They also have that remarkable quality of presenting prison life from the point of view of prison officials, as well as of convicts. While they have the successive interest of being one and all about prison life, yet each story is complete in itself.

All

London sounded the name of D r . Ashmole. A man so gifted, and so d a r i n g ; what would become of him ? In a week, half of what was known of him was in the newspapers, and the other half was the tabletalk of the clubs. H i m ­ self invisible, he focussed the gaze of the town. N o one could get speech of him, and whispers returned upon the whisperer; for D r . Ashmole, in his cell in Newgate, was " a t h o m e " only to his solicitor. He had been committed for t r i a l , bail refused; and, in the quiet of the prison, he sat upon the croup of ugly expectation. H i s solicitor ex­ cepted, he was the only person in London who doubted that the jurv would acquit him.

He stood within the danger of the gallows; evading the gallows, he could not, i f con­ victed, escape a sentence of penal servitude; and conviction seemed to him a certainty. A t thirty-five years of age—successful, handsome, envied, and admired—he had sunk to this sordid pass. Acquitted even, what were his hereafter ? So fastidious and vain he was, he had already in resolve broken with his world, though there were women who, were he doubly and trebly dishonored, would have broken with theirs to have him to friend again. W i t h his solicitor he was cool, precise, and calculating; but his grati­ tude for the care with which his case was being elaborated was not unmingled with con­ tempt. The day came when the solicitor said the case was complete, and he need trouble his client no further; and Ashmole,

Copyright, 1900, by Tighe Hopkins.

All rights reserved.

320


330

THE

MASTER-KEY

left alone, dwelt for a time in the darkest places of the human spirit. The silence of the prison began to be ap­ palling. Ashmole had read of life in prison, but this did not tally with the books. He "knew that, as an unconvicted prisoner, he would not be associated with felons; that he would have no task to perform, and that, while restrained by the lock, his time would be principally his own. But was there no life around him ? He had read of a host of warders perpetually coming and g o i n g ; of the turning out of prisoners for inspection; of periods of exercise in crowded yards ; of summonses to chapel; of the ceaseless clash­ ing of doors; of the turning of keys in locks — a l l that monotonous, dull, unvaried bustle which is the outward life of prison. B u t here were no sights nor sounds like these. The only human footfall Ashmole-ever heard was that of the man who tended him, and this man's was the only human face he saw. It was upon inquiry of him that Ashmole learned how extraordinary was the situation he lay i n . He was the last prisoner in Newgate.

OF

NEWGATE.

tions of some intimacy. Alone with him in that uncanny solitude—the pair being iso­ lated utterly, locked and walled in within a few yards of the ceaseless marts of London —the old man felt a more human interest in his prisoner than he would have done in cir­ cumstances nearer to the normal. He did his j a i l e r ' s offices with a tact, and even with a kind of softness, hinted at this and that for dinner, rapped often to know i f Ashmole needed him, and made him understand that he was ready for a call at any hour.

It was September, and very sultry; he showed Ashmole how to keep his cell as cool as possible, and insisted on having him out for exercise three or four times in the day. There are two deep well-like yards in New­ gate, one of which, leading directly into the gallows-shed (a fact, however, which no pris­ oner would have cognizance of), is the usual place of exercise for prisoners under sen­ tence of death. Here, for the reason that the sun scarcely touched it, Catlin most often brought his prisoner; i n this also showing a kindly feeling, for the old fellow himself The Newgate of this date had passed out loved to bask i n the rays. Ashmole gave of the category of prisons; a place of exe­ him rarely a thought. cution, as i t is to-day, but otherwise no more Old Catlin had paced this yard with men than a horrid shell, teeming with horrid mem­ who would enter i t again only on their path ories. The old castle at Holloway, the j a i l to the scaffold, but who had gossiped with set apart for persons awaiting trial, was him of things cheerful or indifferent, had being patched anew, and the rest of it was even passed a joke. Ashmole, for whom no full to the gates; so Ashmole, rejected of doom had sounded, who had life's incalcula­ Holloway, went into the shades of Newgate, ble chances still to dally with, was dark, and one live prisoner among the ghosts of count­ fierce-eyed, and heavy-worded. Y e t , despite less dead ones. He and his warder were a few days' beard, black as his glossy hair, alone in Newgate. he kept a fine appearance. If the eyes were The warder was an old man, Catlin by a little too close set in the oval face, the name, enfeebled by years of exposure in the outline of the profile was almost perfect; quarries of a convict prison, and expecting and he was as graceful i n action as in form. without eagerness the pension which had be­ He wore the frock coat in which he had been come his due. The service, he told Ashmole, arrested, fastidiously buttoned. had taken too much out of h i m ; he was, His mind had begun to dwell almost inces­ moreover, a widower and childless, and when santly upon one fact, that Catlin and he were his release came he hardly knew where he alone in Newgate. Brooding over this, he should go. The prison was patrolled at night grew curious to know more of his surround­ by a second warder, who relieved Catlin at ings ; and one day he asked i f there were, no ten o'clock. Of this other man Ashmole saw other place of exercise than the sunless wellnothing. He had brought breakfast to him yard. Catlin, eager for the sun, took him on the morning after his a r r i v a l ; and A s h ­ into a more open place, a square yard beyond mole, offended by his manner, had refused which could be seen one of the boundary to be served by him again. He told Catlin walls of the prison. F r o m this spot Ash­ he would wait for his first meal until ten, mole was able to estimate precisely the enor­ when the old man himself came on duty; and mous strength of N e w g a t e ; but he perceived, thereafter he saw the second warder once also, that its dimensions were by no means so and once only. great as he had supposed. He remembered The strange position they shared—a posi­ the wonderful escape of Jack Sheppard, and tion without parallel in Newgate's history— asked a question about i t ; but C a t l i n , reti­ brought Ashmole and his keeper into rela­ cent on all dangerous topics, said merely that


THE

STORY

OF AN

ENGLISH

Sheppard's dungeon had been destroyed years ago. The stillness that might be felt was as absolute here as i n every other spot within the p r i s o n ; and very strange i t was, under that golden sky, and so near to men, to hear no single sound. B u t to Ashmole the oppres­ sion of it was less than it had been; or rather, the silence of the empty prison had a new meaning for h i m . Suppose a thing should hap­ pen there—the hour well found ? W h a t voice would reach the w o r l d — w h i c h sent no voice into the prison ? A t first, he tried an argument of sophis­ t r y . A n old man, childless and poor, is of little use to society; and this old man had scarcely any zest of life, and would doubt­ less leave i t w i t h very scant regret. B u t he put that argument behind him, realizing that he cared no jot for C a t l i n ' s fate. He saw himself, past and to come, i n a flash. H i s brilliant, gross, and selfish life had reached on a sudden its worst and highest c r i s i s ; and in his extremity—for he never swerved from the conviction that the j u r y would condemn him—his mind accepted murder readily as the easiest way to freedom. W i t h the gal­ lows threatening him, the mere animal seek­ i n g escape became the monster, willing and eager to inflict the death it would avoid. He settled that point quite coolly with him­ self, and then considered only how best to do i t . Remembering his own strength, for his sensualism was merely of the fancy, and he was always finely nerved, he took a plea­ sure i n considering himself not too great a match for Catlin, who, i f a veteran, was a stout one. The old man had told him how he had throttled a convict who had attacked him with a p i c k a x . A skeptic i n word, Ashmole was a man who lived much i n his subjective self; who saw things that the eye is not aware of, and heard things spoken which do not enter by the ear. F o r good or evil, he had been guided a l l his life from a scene invisible, and at a crisis he waited always for the sign. Sometimes it was an instantaneous quicken­ ing of the eye; sometimes i t was a hand which impelled him this way or that. Turning his plan over in mind, his glance was caught by the shed i n the corner of the y a r d . H e had passed i t twenty times without observing i t . H i s mind fastened on it for a day. H e asked Catlin, knowing what his answer would be. Catlin lied consider­ a t e l y : it was a lumber shed, he replied. " Y o u are m i s t a k e n , ' ' said Ashmole. " The gallows is i n there; I have seen it p l a i n l y . " It was, i n effect, the shelter of boards

PRISONER

AND

HIS

GUARD.

331

which kept the gallows out of sight. In the well-yard on the other side, he had passed again and again—the voice not hav­ ing reached him yet—the door which sealed the shed. This vision of the gallows was his warning. While Catlin led his prisoner up the stairs that evening to the cell on the first landing, which he had fitted for him i n the afternoon as an ease from the heat below, Ashmole measured his distance step by step. Two feet from the landing, he caught the warder around the waist, and swung him down. Cat­ l i n fell with a crash, but not a groan escaped him. Ashmole peered down at him quietly. The lantern, not extinguished, was turned upon the face; and Ashmole waited t i l l the skin had whitened. Then he went down to the foot of the stairs, and bent over the body. " C o n c u s s i o n of the b r a i n , " he said. " The old man has had a bad f a l l . " Safe at last, it amused him that he could carry out his part of murderer with so l i t t l e feeling. Cat­ lin lay i n a heap, as i f he had pitched head­ long from the landing. H e was cold already. Ashmole stooped over him again, and took off his belt. To the steel chain suspended from it were attached the keys of Newgate. Then, with the keys i n one hand and the dead man's lantern i n the other, he stepped from the ward into the first yard. It struck seven from the great clock of St. P a u l ' s . D u r i n g fifteen days that intermittent voice of the cathedral clock had been the only sig­ nal which had reached him from the outer world. It had grown a torment to him (there are few pains i n prison equal to the striking of a clock at the quarter; fifteen minutes gone from the sentence which may be for l i f e ! ) ; but now, as he stood and listened to the beats, his heart throbbed wildly with a sense of j o y : the clock awoke him from the tomb, and called him to a new existence. It was a delicious n i g h t ; a star or two twinkling down upon the prison; and A s h ­ mole, a few paces from the huddled heap at the stair's foot, was utterly content. H e had three hours of perfect safety, but his plan was to escape at eight, when the streets immediately around the prison would be quiet. Setting the lantern inside the door of the ward, he walked from the well-yard to the one he had but just quitted in Catlin's company. The drab-colored execution-shed looked immense i n the surrounding blackness; and the murderer crossed over to where i t stood, and examined it curiously. He could see that a wide shutter was let into it at one side, just beneath the sloping roof; and he


332

THE

MASTER-KEY

OF

NEWGATE.

F o r a moment he stood motionless as a statue, then began again to struggle madly with the door. He wrenched at the key as a panther at the bars of a cage, beat with his hands upon the door, and dashed himself against i t ; t i l l at last, witless under stress of horror, a scream broke from him which ended i n a w a i l , and he sank upon the floor in an agony of suffocation. H i s hour of freedom chimed from the cathedral, but he did not hear. The c r y with which hope, yield­ He surveyed his dress, which was neat ing the ghost, had fled from him, reverberated enough—nothing there to betray h i m ; and through the prison, and died unanswered. Had i t found response, and had the prison he thought how difficult i t must be for an es­ caping convict to fly i n the livery of prison. been forced at that moment, the murderer, A quarter to eight; freedom i n fifteen crouched against the door, would have seemed, minutes. He went leisurely back in the dark like Catlin, to be the victim of a crime; for to where he had left the lantern, threw the he lay just as Catlin lay, and in the same flame for an instant upon the huddle of white guise of death. The prostration which clothes on the mat, and set forth. He had succeeds to the paroxysm of terror had over­ barely twenty yards to go, and he was pretty taken h i m . H o w long he lay against the door, inert and sweating coldly, he did not clear as to the path. Here was a door which was locked; he re­ k n o w ; but his extremity of peril was such membered standing at it, while Catlin fumbled that instinct dared not slumber, and once with his keys, on the day that he was brought more he was bidden from within to take into Newgate. It yielded to the second key action of some sort.

imagined that this would be thrown open when a man was to be hanged, for the bene­ fit of the sheriff and the officers of the j a i l . He wondered how many men Catlin had helped to lead pinioned into the shed. The timbers of justice were invisible behind the shutter, and Ashmole turned from the shed and paced to and fro i n the yard, swinging the keys at the end of the chain. The quarter and the half struck from St. P a u l ' s ; i n t h i r t y minutes he would walk quietly out of Newgate.

that Ashmole tried, and he knew that he was now very near the prison gate. Unbutton­ ing his coat, he hid the lantern underneath it, allowing himself just a glimmer. One other short passage, and he stood i n the small square entrance-room, with the gate of Newgate facing him. He took his keys up softly, and crossed the room on tip­ toe. Footsteps were half audible in the Old Bailey, and Ashmole turned the lantern down until the light dwindled to a pencil-point. He selected a key at random, and as he thrust i t into the lock, i t gave to his hand. He held it there a moment with a pricking pulse, re­ volving his future as they say a drowning man revolves his past; then drew i t towards him. Twice and three times he pulled, and at the fourth essay he put his strength into the t u g ; but the door held. G o o d : i t was double-locked; there was a second key to find. He felt above and beneath the central lock, until he touched a tiny hole an inch or two to the left. A tremor seized him, but he ran his hand again over the keys. There was no key upon the chain which would match that pigmy l o c k ; and with a gasp which milked the breath out of his lungs, Ashmole recoiled from the door, defeated. The first quickening sense of terror revealed a situa­ tion lost beyond retrieve. Behind him the murdered warder, and the gate of Newgate immovable in front. He had flung open for himself the shutters of the gallows.

He crawled from the entrance-room, trail­ ing the lantern w i t h him, and reaching the corridor he rose up feebly, and tried to nerve his w i l l again. H i s teeth were chattering, and from head to foot he trembled and shook with cold. H e had lost count of time; but he knew that i t was barely eight when he started from the ward, and he listened fear­ fully for the next admonition of the clock. It came, s t r i k i n g three-quarters. Three-quarters from what ? After eight— after nine ? H a d he more than an hour left, or but a single quarter ? He felt the approach of another of those transports of mad, uncon­ trollable fear, and dug his nails into his flesh to prevent himself from screaming again. The hour began to s t r i k e : One—two— three—O, the pause that followed Nine! Ashmole clung to the wall, his head fallen forward; gasping, choking. B u t the stroke of death—ten—was stayed; i t was but nine o ' c l o c k ; and with that certainty came back the exquisite rush of life. H e arose from out of the sepulcher. One whole hour was enough to reshape a universe. After that ecstasy of anguish, his strength of body was now indeed s m a l l ; but the hurri­ cane had swept the inmost places of his mind, and left i t clear. The night might yet be his. He found the warder's room, and searched it desperately; but the master-key, i f it lay there, refused the l i g h t . H a d i t , perchance, detached itself from the rest i n some way


THE

STORY

OF AN

.ENGLISH

when Catlin f e l l ? Ashmole's heart was not so high now that he could think without a shudder of the spot where he had let out life and let the ghostly i n , but he did not dare to spare himself that final scrutiny. W i t h the lantern i n his hand, he set out to r e t u r n to the w a r d . The black prison seemed more than ever dream-like i n its stillness; his footfall frightened him, and he crept stealthily along the wall. He began to face himself with the thought that complete escape was now at best a pros­ pect quite equivocal. F a i l i n g to accomplish flight, did any way remain of screening him­ self from complicity i n Catlin's murder ? Y e s ! Y e s ! The voice that had lured him to the act awoke again, whispering him he need not die for Catlin. Escape from that doom—why, what simpler ? Ashmole car­ ried upon him no mark of murder; his hands were bloodless, his clothes were whole. This was the first point. The second was, that his cell on the upper landing stood open; and there was no key i n the door; it would lock i f he closed it sharply behind him. H e had but to enter, fasten himself i n , un­ dress and go to b e d ; he could be released only from without. The t h i r d point, which was not less i n his favor, was that Catlin when discovered would present the appear­ ance of having fallen from the head of the stairs. L o c k e d i n his cell, nothing but sur­ mise could connect Ashmole w i t h the deed: suspicion there might be, proof there could be none. A n d now, for the last time, to the quest of the master-key. Since nine he had lost but a quarter of an hour. The ward opened from one end of the long well-yard, and Ashmole quaked and his feet were heavy as lie passed into the yard again. H e remembered how coolly he had looked upon his work two hours before. But for the instinct of preservation which goaded him, he would still have .hung back. He crept on, f o r c i n g himself to think only how the minutes were running out, and that sal­ vation lay i n a l i t t l e key, which might be hidden just inside the w a r d . H e got quite close to the door, an uncertain sense of dan­ ger to come impeding him and yet thrusting him onward; and then, at a pace or two from the threshold, he was caught, as it were, by the feet and stood stock s t i l l . The sound issued from the ward. It was so faint that i t dissolved almost before i t reached his ear, but i t was human. The murderer i n Ashmole whispered him of noth­ i n g but the key, the key which must be almost within reach, the key which would pass him

PRISONER

AND

HIS

GUARD.

333

in an instant into the street; but the man in him, newly quickened by suffering, gathered the cry into his wretched heart. He went forward, and held the light up at the door. Catlin lay there, but not quite as Ashmole had abandoned him. He had come back to some feeble pulse of life, but his eyes were closed, and his face ashen and cold. With the seconds of his own life rushing past, Ashmole stood beside his v i c t i m , t i l l what was better in him gained the mastery, and pity for the other rose above his own pas­ sionate longing to escape. W i t h this, his surgeon's science, the desire to win back the life he had so nearly ended, took sudden pos­ session of him. He thrust his hand into the warder's tunic, and distinguished an infini­ tesimal throbbing of the heart. Y e s , but that was not all his hand discovered. Just over the warder's heart lay the master-key, and Ashmole quivered as he touched i t . A n impulse to see and handle the passport to salvation overbore him, and he drew it out. It was the key beyond a doubt, and as he beheld it shining i n his hand, Ashmole felt all his finer purposes turning into water. There was still time for flight; he was sure that now at last he held the easy means; and Catlin scarcely l i v e d : the ward already smelled of death. Then once again his inner ear drew in the labor of the old man's heart, treading feebly to the infinite; and letting fall the key, he took the almost lifeless head upon his knees, and gazed into the face, over which the mask of death—so terrible, so beautiful—was even then beginning to be molded. It held him fascinated. He laid his hand gently again upon the heart; its beats responded fainter than before, and Ashmole felt his own heart ebbing with i t . What ransom would he pay could he be l y i n g there in Catlin's place! The key shone in the lantern's light where it had fallen at the murderer's foot, but he never looked at i t ; his eyes did not move from Catlin. A legion of black thoughts came about him—avengers of the spirit of a wasted life—and he sat quiet, stroking Catlin's face, and let the stings assail h i m . Less w i t h his lips than with his heart, he tried to pray for Catlin. The clock called him once and once again, but it sounded very far away; its summons could not be for him. In the warm night an infinite coldness came upon the w a r d ; and after the cold, the dark. Footsteps drew near, and the second warder, entering to relieve his friend, found a dead man sleeping on a dead man's knees.


VALUE PER ANNUM OF THE IMPORTS OF ENGLAND, FRANCE AND GERMANY FROM THEIR RESPECTIVE COLONIES . A F E W F A C T S A B O U T T H E C O L O N I E S O F T H E GREAT POWERS. BY ALLEYNE Author of "Tropical

A L T H O U G H the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland —referred to throughout this article as England, for the sake of brevity—is not the oldest of the colonial powers, being outclassed i n that re­ spect by Spain, France, H o l ­ land, and Portugal, her colo­ nies are to-day by far the most important, both i n re­ gard to their extent and population, whilst the commerce of the British colonies is greater in volume than that of all the col­ onies of all other powers put together. If we include India, the colonies of E n g ­ land cover an area of 9,000,000 square miles; and i f to this we add the area of British pro­ tectorates and spheres of influence, the total area subject to British rule is 11,000,000 square miles. The smaller area, that of the colonies and India alone, supports a popula­ tion of 367,000,000; the larger area about 420,000,000, or, roughly speaking, six times the population of the United States. A s a colonial power France comes next to E n g ­ land, but at a great distance behind. The French colonies, including Algeria, Tunis, and all protectorates and spheres of influ­ ence, have an area of 3,500,000 square miles and a population of 53,000,000. N e x t comes Germany, whose colonies and protectorates have an area of 1,000,000 square miles and a population of 11,000,000. The Dutch col­ onies have an area of 800,000 square miles and a population of 33,000,000. 334

IRELAND, Colonization.''

pared with these, the colonies of the United States cover an area of 125,000 square miles, and have a population of 9,000,000. The details a r e : Hawaii Puerto Rico Philippines

Area. 6,640 square miles. 3,668 " 115,000 "

Population. 117,000 813,000 8,000,000

A most interesting point i n connection with the colonies of the European powers is whether they are a source of profit or of loss to the sovereign state. This may be looked at i n two w a y s : first, whether they are di­ rectly a source of profit or loss, or, in other words, whether they pay revenue into the treasury of the sovereign state or are a cause of actual expense to the mother country; second, whether the home country succeeds in securing such a proportion of trade from her colonies as to amount to a real national advantage.

In regard to this point we may compare the colonies of England, France, and Ger­ many. The British colonies receive nothing from the imperial treasury and contribute nothing to i t . This does not, of course, im­ ply that under special circumstances, such as those created by the disastrous hurricane in the West Indies last year, no financial aid is given by England to her colonies, but merely that each colony raises i t s own rev­ enue without depending on England i n any way. Both Germany and France, however, pay out annually large sums of money for the administrative expenses of their colonies, A s com- scarcely any of which are self-supporting.


A FEW

FACTS

ABOUT

THE

COLONIES

OF THE

GREAT

POWERS.

335

VALUE PER ANNUM OF THE EXPORTS OF ENGLAND, FRANCE AND GERMANY TO THEIR RESPECTIVE COLONIES France pays yearly about $14,000,000, and her colonies goods to the value of $70,000,Germany about $5,000,000. It has been 000, her total imports being valued at about stated that, although England's colonies are $750,000,000. That is to say, she received not a source of direct expense to the mother less than one-tenth of her imports from her country, they are so indirectly, for it is the colonies. Germany received, i n 1896, i m ­ possession of colonies which necessitates such ports from her colonies to the value of enormous expenditures for the British N a v y . $2,000,000, her total imports being worth $1,000,000,000. This is a mistaken That is, she received idea. E v e n i f E n g ­ about one-five-hun­ land owned no colo­ dredth part of her nies, she would still imports from her have to keep her colonies. navy at its present strength, for two reaTurning now to ex­ sons—because it is ports, we find that in her first line of de­ 1897 England export­ fense, and because ed British and Irish prod­ her c a r r y i n g trade, uce to the total value of which forms about sixty $1,170,000,000, of which per cent, of the c a r r y i n g $400,000,000 worth went trade of the world, must to the British colonies— be protected. roughly, one-third of her total exports. In 1896, It is seen, then, that the value of exports of so far from colonies being French merchandise a source of direct rev­ amounted to $680,000,enue to the sovereign 000, of which $68,000,state, they are i n the case 000, or one-tenth, went of both France and Ger­ to the French colonies. many a source of great Germany exported, in expense. 1896, home merchandise But what of trade ? to the value of $700,000,Does not the possession 000, of which $2,000,000 of colonies imply a very worth, or one-three-hun­ important commercial COST OF COLONIES dred and fiftieth part, went development i n which P E R A N N U M to the German colonies. the m o t h e r country If we consider these reaps great profit? figures for a moment, we shall perceive sev­ Here again we w i l l compare France, Germany, eral curious facts. England exported to the and E n g l a n d . F i r s t , in regard to imports British colonies goods to a value six times as from colonies. In 1897, England imported great as that of the exports from France and from her colonies goods to the value of $470,- Germany to their respective colonies; and 000,000, her total imports from all countries, she also imported from her colonies six including her colonies, being valued at $2,- times more goods than France and Germany 250,000,000. In other words, she received put together imported from their colonies. more than one-fifth of her imports from her Now, both France and Germany strive to own colonies. In 1896, France imported from


336

A FEW

FACTS

ABOUT

THE

COLONIES

OF THE

GREAT

POWERS,

secure a monopoly of the trade of their own child in England's non-tropical colonies sends colonies by erecting formidable tariffs against annually to England about $23.18 worth of the goods'of other nations. England, on the goods, whilst each man, woman, and child in the tropical colonies other hand, throws sends only $0.66 open the trade of her worth. Similarly in colonies to the whole regard to exports of world, and any one British goods. Each can thus compete person i n the non­ with her for the t r o p i c a l colonies trade of her own pos­ consumes $12.32 sessions ; yet it is w o r t h of British seen that England se­ goods, whilst each cures an immense person in the tropi­ trade with her colo­ cal colonies con­ nies. This is not sumes only $0.71 because the colonies worth. In other are under the British words, taking im­ flag (since there is ports and exports to­ no preferential treat­ gether, it pays Eng­ ment of British goods land better that one in the British colo­ child should be born nies), but because in Canada than that she is highly efficient twenty-five children commercially. E n g ­ should be born in land's commercial Ceylon. e f f i c i e n c y is w e l l shown by the follow­ L e t me put this in ing table: yet another way. England . . United States France . . . Germany . .

Population. Exports. 40,000,000 $1,170,000,000 70,000,000 1,210,000,000 39,000,000 680,000,000 53,000,000 700,000,000

Taking V i c t o r i a i n Australia as a t y p i c a l non-tropical colony, and comparing it with the aver­ age of twelve tropical colonies — B r i t i s h Guiana, Mauritius, Trinidad, Jamaica, Barbados, St. K i t t s - N e v i s , Antigua, Gre­ nada, St. L u c i a , St. Vincent, Montserrat, and Dominica— we get the following results, the figures being based on the average returns of ten years : V i c t o r i a , the non­ tropical colony, exports yearly per head of her pop­ ulation goods to the value of $70, whilst the tropical colonies export only $25.80 worth per head of their population.

Roughly speaking, England produces for export a little less than twice as much per head of her population as the United States, France, or Germany. But to return to colonies. Colonies may be divided into two great classes, tropical and non-tropical. The dif­ ference between tropical and non-tropical colonies from the commercial standpoint is most striking. During the five-year period, 1893-1897, England imported from her non-tropical colonies annu­ But the tropical colonies ally goods to the value of themselves vary very $230,000,000, and from TERRITORIAL AREA AND POPULATION greatly i n their produc­ her tropical colonies OF THE COLONIES OF SEVERAL NATIONS tive efficiency, as meas­ goods to the value of ured by their exports, $239,000,000. What this means will be seen some exporting as much as $45 per head, when it is remembered that the population of whilst others export only $13 per head, an­ the non-tropical colonies during the five nually. This wide difference is easily ex­ years was about 9,500,000, whilst that of the plained. The value of exports from these tropical colonies was 346,500,000. To put colonies is regulated by the efficiency of it i n another w a y : each man, woman, and their labor supply—a good labor supply


A FEW

FACTS

ABOUT

THE

COLONIES

OF THE

GREAT

POWERS.

337

means b i g exports, a poor labor supply small he does not work. Where there is a pres­ exports. In r e g a r d to their labor supply, we sure of population, things are different. Take can divide tropical colonies into three classes: Barbados as an example. There every inch 1. Those i n which imported contract labor is of soil is occupied. There are no forests in used. 2. Those i n which there is such a which the negro can build his hut, and no spare lands on which he can cul­ dense population that the natives must ei­ tivate his patch of corn or plan­ ther work or starve. 3. Those in which there tains. A n d there are about is no pressure of population and in which im­ 1,200 souls to the square mile. ported contract labor is Under these circumstances i t is not used. easy to understand that there is In order to compare the a moderately good labor supply. productive efficiency of Lastly, there are the col­ these three classes of colo­ onies employing imported nies, I select three of each contract labor. Their c l a s s : Mauritius, B r i t i s h high productive efficiency Guiana, and Trinidad, which is due to the presence of employ imported contract a large body of laborers l a b o r ; Barbados, A n t i g u a , who are under contract to V A L U E PER CAPITA O F T H E Y E A R L Y and Grenada, i n which work five days a week and there is a pressure of pop­ E X P O R T S O F B R I T I S H NONTROPI­ seven hours a day for five u l a t i o n ; and St. Vincent, C A L A N D T R O P I C A L C O L O N I E S years. Montserrat, and Dominica, T O T H E M O T H E R C O U N T R Y . I may close this article i n which there is no pres­ sure of population and in which there is no with a very brief description of the manner imported contract labor. If I take the av­ in which the system of imported contract erage value of the annual exports of these labor is worked i n the British colonies. I colonies during the ten-year period 1 8 8 2 - select British Guiana as an example. The 1891, I get the following results: The colo­ laborers are recruited in India by voluntary nies of the first class export yearly $45.51 enlistment. The agent of British Guiana worth of goods per head of their population; resides in Calcutta, and sends out recruiting the colonies of the second class, $26.40 agents who make known to the people the terms offered by the British Guiana w o r t h ; and the colonies of the third planters. Those men and women class, only $11.66 w o r t h . who express their willingness to go It is not difficult to understand why to the colony are called before a this should be so. In the colonies magistrate, and the terms of where there is no the contract are read over pressure of popu­ to them i n their own lan­ lation, there is no guage. If any wish to with­ need for the na­ draw at the last tives to work, for moment, they are they can supply a l l allowed to do so, their wants from and are then sent the bounty of na­ b a c k to t h e i r ture. The forest homes at the ex­ furnishes them pense of the B r i t ­ with excellent ish Guiana gov­ material for a ernment. Those V A L U E P E R C A P I T A O F BRITISH PRODUCT house and food i n who sign the con­ C O N S U M E D Y E A R L Y BY H E R NON-TROPICAL abundance, whilst tract are then put A N D TROPICAL COLONIES . a little desultory on board a sailinglabor w i l l soon vessel for the voyage. E a c h vessel carrying establish a small garden which w i l l grow a few laborers is provided with a medical man, who bananas or plantains to be sold i n the near­ has to see that a l l the regulations in regard est town, thus supplying what little money to sanitation and food are observed during is necessary for clothing. Under these cir­ the passage. The laborers get the passage cumstances the ordinary dweller in the tropics free of cost, as also food and clothing. Those is content to live. H i s wants are few and who wish to carry young children w i t h them simple, and he can gratify them without the are allowed to do so. wages which the white man offers him. So


338

A FEW

FACTS

ABOUT

THE

COLONIES

OF THE

GREAT

POWERS.

On arrival in British Guiana, the laborers provision, 38,000 immigrants returned to In­ are allotted to the different estates. The dia during the past twenty-five years, carry­ terms of the contract are as follows: The ing with them money and jewelry to the value laborer contracts to reside on the estate and of about $2,800,000. The interests of the contract laborers are to work five days a week for seven hours a day for five years, at the end of which time under the care of a special department of he becomes absolutely free to go where he the government—the Immigration Depart­ A l l employees of this department pleases. The planter contracts to supply ment. each laborer with a well-built, well-venti­ must pass examinations in the native dia­ lated house, with a good water-supply. He lects of the immigrants. Inspectors from must also provide on his estate a hospital for this department visit the estates frequently, the use of sick laborers, and must employ a and examine the pay-lists in order to see if medical man to visit the estate at least once the laborers are getting their fair wages. every forty-eight hours and examine and pre­ These officers also hear and investigate any scribe for all laborers presenting themselves. complaints that may be made to them, and He must also build a school on his estate for if i t is necessary, they may issue all process the education of the children of the laborers. of law free to the laborers. A l l the above are provided free of cost to the The Immigration Department can always laborers. In addition to this, he must pay enforce any demands it may make, for if a each man not less than twenty-four cents a planter refuses to remedy any defect in his day and each arrangements, woman not less or declines to than sixteen perform any cents a day. act suggested AVhen it is reby the Immi­ membered gration Agent that the ordi­ General, that nary laborer official has the can buy all the power to re­ food he can eat fuse further for eight cents supplies of la­ PRODUCTIVE EFFICIENCY O F T H R E E C L A S S E S a day, the b o r e r s , and O F T R O P I C A L C O L O N I E S — P E R C A P I T A V A L U E may also take wages seem very fair. A s OF EXPORTS PER A N N U M . away from the a m a t t e r of estate what la­ fact, the laborers save considerable sums of borers it has. A s this would mean ruin to money, and frequently after their term of i n ­ the planter, he cannot disregard the orders denture is over they set up small shops on the he gets from the Immigration Department. estates, and eventually in many cases become Should any planter be convicted of an offense prosperous citizens. It should be noted that against a laborer, the Immigration Depart­ the planters are not allowed to sell goods of any ment demands his dismissal from the estate, kind to their laborers, under a very heavy pen­ and warns a l l other estates that i f they em­ alty. In 1897, there were 4,444 East Indian ploy him they w i l l not be furnished with any depositors in the British Guiana Government more laborers. A s no punishment of any kind Savings Bank, with a total sum of $413,351 can be inflicted on a laborer except by the le­ to their credit. A t the end of the five years' gal authorities of the colony, it will be readily contract the laborer becomes free and can­ perceived that the lot of the indentured not be engaged under contract again, a pro­ laborer in B r i t i s h Guiana is not a hard one. vision intended to protect the immigrant from Of course there are systems of indentured any influence which might be brought to bear labor which, when not under proper govern­ on him to forgo his rights to entire freedom after his contract is out. If an immigrant ment supervision, give rise to great abuses, remains five years in the colony after his i n ­ but this need not necessarily be so, and if denture expires, even though he does no work the United States finds i t expedient to sanc­ during that time, he becomes entitled to a tion the employment of imported contract free grant of land from the government. U n ­ labor i n its new possessions, i t w i l l undoubt­ til quite recently, he was entitled to a passage edly establish the system on lines similar to back to India on paying one-half of the ac­ those adopted in the B r i t i s h colonies, which tual cost of transport. Under this latter insure strict government control and high protection for the interests of the laborers.


T H E C A P T A I N OF T H E " A P H R O D I T E . " BY

A

STORY

ELMORE ELLIOTT

PEAKE.

OF T H E GEORGIA

COAST.

ONE

hour after midnight a yawl, rigged with self, at the same time washing the face and a square sail and containing seven or soaking the shirt-front-of the smoker. The eight dark figures, moved slowly and silently latter neither moved nor spoke. He quietly out of the har­ tossed the bor of Bruns­ drenched c i ­ wick, Georgia. garette over N o t a word his shoulder was spoken or into the water, scarcely a drew a gleam­ movement ing revolver made until one from his pock­ of the figures, et, and laid it leaning lazily across his against the knees ; after side of the which he took boat, w i t h his out a fresh c i ­ knees drawn garette and up i n front, leisurely deliberately lighted it. lit a cigarette. The big man at The yellow his side again flame of the chuckled. match momen­ "What's tarily revealed the use of a young, re­ sneakin' out fined face, of the harbor touched with at midnight, daring and if you are fearlessness. goin' to run Then a l l was fireworks ?" dark again. demanded the " Heave that skipper, i n a young fool voice of impo­ overboard i f tent passion. he makes another break " When I bargained to haul like that, and pinch the you two fellows out o' this coal off that coffinfever-hole and land you safe tack ! ' ' angrily com­ and sound i n Savannah, I manded a coarse, sup­ thought you had some respect pressed voice from the for my rights. When every A C O U P L E O F STOUT SAILORS SEIZED tiller i n the stern. railroad train was tied up out HIM A N D QUICKLY ENCIRCLED HIS o' Brunswick, and you found WRISTS WITH A PAIR OP COLD IRONS." A heavy man that sat out that every cow-path into next to the ' ' young Savannah was shot-gun quarantined, you was f o o l , " and seemed not amenable to the skip­ glad enough to have me take y o u . " per's orders, merely chuckled. None of the others made any move either, while the young ' ' Y o u are getting your p r i c e , ' ' answered smoker calmly puffed away. Thereupon the the young man, in a low, musical voice, and skipper dipped up a quart cup of salt water one could have wagered, from the tone, that and deftly quenched the glowing coal him­ he was smiling. 330


340

THE

CAPTAIN

OF

THE

" M y price didn't cover g e t t i n ' hauled up with a shot across my bows from a revenoo cutter and landed in a pesthouse for ten days, for runnin' in fever refugees," growled the skipper. " N o t refugees, D a g g e t t , " said the other pleasantly. "Refugee implies haste and fright. We leave Brunswick at the command of our chief, quietly and decorously, in the ' Pedro N o . 2 . ' But that is a much more reasonable, a much more gentlemanly, protest than you made before, with that quart cup. If this cigarette jeopardizes our safety, or yours, I will forego the pleasure, though I am dead for a s m o k e . " " W e l l , it does," said Daggett, gruff but mollified. The next moment the cigarette disappeared in the dark water with a faint, instantaneous hiss. The boat crept along under the light night breeze, taking what is known as the ' ' inland" course, which lies between the low, marshy mainland on the left, and the long, narrow " s e a - i s l a n d s " on the right, beyond which lies the broad Atlantic. After about an hour it grew darker, the wind freshened, and a misty rain began to powder the boat and its occupants. The skipper, who seemed still in a savage mood, uttered a low, vehement curse at this turn of the weather, and then returned to his dogged silence. The thick­ ening gloom soon blotted out the low head­ lands by which he was steering; the wind continued to strengthen until the water was sharply slapping the yawl's broad sides; and in less than twenty minutes they were driving furiously along through pitchy blackness, their sail reduced to a mere ribbon. " A bottle of ink would be lucidity itself compared with this, M a r k l e y , " said the young fellow to the heavy man next to him. " I don't see how he steers," returned Markley, who had not chuckled for some time. " I don't do i t with my e y e s , " said Dag­ gett, with a touch of rough pride. For half an hour there was silence again, at the end of which time the waves, on which the boat was dancing like a nutshell, had perceptibly increased in violence. So much water was shipped that one man had to bail continuously. " I didn't suppose i t ever got as rough as this on these shallow sounds," observed the young passenger, as an extra heavy wave drenched him to the skin. " There's lots of things that some people never supposes," commented Daggett, un­ graciously.

"APHRODITE."

" Is i t often as rough ? " asked the other, significantly. " N o t o f t e n , " growled the skipper. " I s i t ever as r o u g h ? " he demanded, with distinct suspicion now. The skipper was silent a moment, and then he answered, with something like a grin in his tones: ' ' Seein' as you seem to know so much about i t , M r . Hutchinson, I don't mind tellin' you that i t ain't." " W h i c h means that we've been blown out to sea ? ' ' " W e a i n ' t been blowed in to l a n d . " A l l night long they tossed on the troubled bosom of the deep, wet and chilled. If a watery grave stared them i n the face, no one was unkind enough to speak of the fact. The wind fell about four o'clock, and when the day broke, bright and clear, they were surrounded by a hummocky desert of water, with no land i n sight. B u t less than five miles away lay a long white hull, glistening in the sunlight like a shaft of polished steel. A long t r a i l of smoke lay behind it. A l l eyes were turned in that direction, and then Dag­ gett ordered the sail hoisted again, that they might be more easily seen. " She'll see us soon enough, though, I guess," he grumbled. " F o r i f my eyes hain't as useless as two bungholes in one end of a b a r ' l , that's the revenoo cutter. Still I don't know what i n tar she's doin' out here, when she's supposed to be guardin' Savannah agen fever refugees. She sees us a l r e a d y , " he added. " S h e ' s puttin' about." " Revenue cutter or no revenue cutter," said Hutchinson, " not a word about Bruns­ wick, or back t h e y ' l l dump us into this mudscow. W e are working down the coast from Savannah, fishing. Remember t h a t . " " A likely enough yarn, t o o , " said Dag­ gett, with an ironical g r i n . " We got so much tackle with u s . " " W e threw i t overboard to lighten the b o a t , " retorted Hutchinson. A s the stranger bore swiftly and grace­ fully down upon them, i t soon became ap­ parent, i n spite of D a g g e t t ' s reference to his eyes, that she was not the revenue cut­ ter. She had the appearance, rather, of a private y a c h t ; and when she came to a stop within ten yards of them, this opinion was further strengthened by the trimness and completeness everywhere in evidence. After a short parley between Hutchinson and a uni­ formed officer who leaned over the polished brass r a i l — i n which Hutchinson accounted for their predicament so adroitly that Mark-


A

STORY

OF

THE

ley winked at Daggett - p e r m i s s i o n was given them to come aboard. Hutchinson, the first man up, was barely over the rail when, to his amazement, a couple of stout sailors seized him and quickly encircled his wrists w i t h a pair of cold irons.

GEORGIA

COAST.

34

i

breakfast, which I am in hopes they w i l l . M r . M a t e , ' ' turning to the officer with a hu­ morous grin, " i f it is not asking too much of a host, would you kindly explain the drift of these hospitalities ? " " I don't think they need much explana­ tion, ' ' answered the mate. " I f they do, the c a p t a i n w i l l make i t . " He led the way below at once, into a warm, richly fur­ nished saloon, the luxuriousness of which did more, ap­ p a r e n t l y , to awe D a g g e t t and h i s rough crew than the irons on their wrists, which they wore w i t h considerable equanimity, i f not familiarity. "Send the captain in, t h e n , " said Hut­ chinson, dropping into a comfortable chair. ' ' The captain is not up y e t , " quietly answered the mate, who was a grave man of forty or thereabouts. "Don't disturb him on our account then," said Hutchin­ son, with mock hu­ mility. " But after he has breakfasted — and smoked — I s h o u l d l i k e the favor of a short interview. That r e m i n d s me t h a t our cook on the yawl got up rather " ' M A Y B E Y O U A R E N O T M Y COUSIN, A F T E R A L L ? ' " late this morning, too, and he was just The rest of the party, as they ascended one skinning our quail when we received your by one, met w i t h a similar reception. F o r invitation to come aboard." " Y o u will be fed s h o r t l y , " said the mate, a moment even Hutchinson's presence of mind failed h i m ; then, catching sight of obstinately refusing to smile, though every­ Markley's woebegone face, he burst into body else was in a broad g r i n . A t breakfast the handcuffs were removed a ringing laugh. " C h e e r up, old m a n ! " he said. " O u r from the prisoners, and their office was taken throats are safe, I guess, unless they should up by five natty sailors, armed with carbines. attempt to choke us with a double-sized After the meal, which was ridiculously sump-


342

THE

CAPTAIN

OF

THE

tuous for prisoners and to which everybody did ample justice, especially Daggett's men, they returned to the saloon, where they re­ sumed their irons and were left alone. Hut­ chinson, who suspected that the arrest might not be entirely unjust, sharply questioned Daggett; but the old man most solemnly de­ clared that i t was a " cussed, high-handed, piratin' o u t r a g e " on innocent men. In about an hour the mate appeared again, and announced that the captain would see the leader, whoever he was. " T h a t ' s either you or I, D a g g e t t , " said Hutchinson, drolly. " You g o , " said Daggett, a little uneasily. " You got the gift o' gab in a higher degree than m e . " Hutchinson arose, and followed the mate out. In the main saloon, through which they passed, sat half a dozen stylish young women—society girls beyond a doubt—and as many young men. From their curious, expectant faces, they had evidently been awaiting the prisoner's appearance; and a little ripple of excitement swept over them at his gentlemanly and refined aspect. Hutchin­ son flushed momentarily at their unexpected

"HE D I S C O V E R E D , F U R T H E R , WELL

THAT S H E W A S CAPTAIN AS I N N A M E . "

"APHRODITE:'

presence; then, gaining possession of him­ self immediately, he passed them with an open, half-mischievous smile, looking them squarely in the eyes. One little woman in an exquisite yachting costume so far forgot herself as to give him back a coquettish glance. A t the captain's room, the mate threw open the polished walnut door, stood aside while Hutchinson entered, and then shut himself outside. A t a little roller-top desk sat a wellbuilt, fresh-faced, independent-looking young woman of probably twenty-two, with a most glorious head of dark auburn hair. Over her shirt-waist she wore a tight-fitting jacket of navy blue, of which material her skirt was also made. A cap denoting her rank i n gold letters lay on the top of the desk. F o r a moment she made a pretense of writing, though Hut­ chinson saw well enough that her steady blue eyes were slightly dilated with excitement.

" I beg your p a r d o n , " he began, " but I am looking for the captain. Or, rather, he is looking " " I am the captain,'' interrupted the young woman haughtily, as i f rebuking his easy manner. The tone nettled him. "Without attempt­ ing to hide the indignation that kindled in his eyes, he looked at her gravely and steadily, until she stirred uneasily in her chair, and, to hide her embarrassment, pressed back the hair from her brow with a hand very small and white. " What have you to say ? " she asked, forced at last to speak first. Her voice was considerably gentler. " N o t h i n g , " answered he, with dignity. " I am not in the habit of responding to such a contemptuous tone as you have just seen fit to use. If your excuse for i t was these," holding aloft his i r o n s , . " I would call your attention to the fact that they were put there un­ lawfully and by force, presumably at your o r d e r . " Her soft, beautiful eyes filled with surprise, and an added color that might have been the blood of shame crept into her cheeks. " I cannot discuss a point of etiquette with y o u , " she said politely, but with a proper reserve. " I don't ask t h a t , " he returned. " I merely insist on the courtesy IN FACT AS due me from a woman of your evi­ dent breeding."


A

STORY

OF

THE

A g a i n she looked at him with curious, puz­ zled eyes. Her humiliation was so evident that he pressed the question no further. " Would you be kind enough to tell me what you intend to do with us ? " he asked. " I intend to deliver you to the police at Savannah," she said, without flinching. " On what charge ? " " D o n ' t you know ? " she asked, earnestly, looking w i t h something like pain into his clear, ingenuous eyes. Perhaps the depravity that she fancied lurked behind that innocent veil shocked her sensitive woman's nature. " N o more than the man in the m o o n , " he declared. She lifted a telegram from her desk. " T w o days ago, at Cumberland Island, a tender and some hunting and fishing traps were stolen from this yacht. This telegram is from the chief of police at Fernandina. ' Your boat and goods undoubtedly stolen by Seaweed Daggett and gang. They own sloop " Pedro " and yawl " Pedro N o . 2 . " Have gone back to Georgia waters, out of my jur­ isdiction. Run them down i f you can. If they resist, shoot them. Well-dressed young crook, stranger to us, offered some of your goods for sale here. Is probably with gang now.' " She folded the telegram, and looked at Hutchinson for an answer. After a moment's thought he asked quietly: " W h a t may I call y o u ? " " M y name is V i r g i n i a P o w e r s , " she an­ swered. A t the answer he started so perceptibly that she asked curiously: " I s there any­ thing strange about it ? " " N o , " said he; " b u t , Miss Powers, I should like to ask you i f I look like a ' welldressed young crook ' ? " He looked her so boldly and confidently in the eyes that she drew back a little with maidenly reserve as she answered: " Y o u don't look like a liar, either; yet you told my mate you left Savannah yesterday morning i n that yawl, when I know, by my own eyes, that it lay at Fernandina at eight o'clock yesterday m o r n i n g . " Hutchinson flushed, yet not exactly like a guilty man. A f t e r studying the carpet a moment—or possibly the toe of the fair captain's little tan shoe—he s a i d : " M i s s Powers, this is a strange coincidence. I know your uncle, Jonathan West. I have heard something of his unwillingness for you to go cruising around in a yacht, in this i n ­ dependent manner. I am well acquainted with your cousin, Bartley Hutchinson. I worked with him on the ' San Francisco E x ­

GEORGIA

COAST.

343

aminer.' I saw him off at the station when he came East, ostensibly to visit you. I, perhaps, am the only man who knew that he, from certain reports he had received, re­ garded you as a coquette; and that his in­ tention, in spite of your uncle's kind invita­ tion to come on to Newport, was to stop off at New,York, and secure a position on a paper there—which intention he carried out. He was almost immediately sent South to handle the yellow-fever epidemic at B r u n s w i c k . " Miss Powers at first flushed scarlet, but when he finished she was pale. "Believe m e , " said she, in a voice trembling with in­ dignation, ' ' that I was no party to my uncle's invitation to Bartley Hutchinson. A n d at the very hour when he was to arrive at our home in Newport I was a hundred miles away, i n this yacht. But I do not see how this concerns y o u , ' ' said she, catching her­ self. " However much I may admire M r . Hutchinson's bravery in exposing himself to fever, i f he would make public such a story as that, about his own cousin, I cannot im­ agine him a man who is very choice about his associates. I cannot see how this story clears you." " Only this—I am Bartley H u t c h i n s o n , " said he, laughing. " I t is i m p o s s i b l e ! " she exclaimed, stiffening. " No—simply strange," he said, enjoying her discomfiture. " Then why are you with this band of thieves—for thieves I am confident they are. And why—oh, why did you lie about Savan­ nah ? ' ' she asked reproachfully, blushing for him. " Before I tell you wouldn't it be a little more—cousinly, say, to remove these ? " he asked, holding up his manacled hands. She lifted a key from the desk, and in­ serted it in the lock of one of the bracelets. " B u t maybe you are not my cousin, after all? " said she, pausing prudently, but halfashamed of her doubts. " I should be sorry to think n o t , " said he; and she, flushing a little, set him free. Briefly, he told her that he and his fellowcorrespondent had been ordered home by their superiors, on the almost complete depopula­ tion of Brunswick by flight from the fever. He explained the necessity of leaving clan­ destinely, in order to escape detention at the first line of quarantine, and pointed out the superiority of the water route over any other. " I knew Daggett's unsavory reputation," he concluded, " and haven't a doubt that he


344

THE

CAPTAIN

OF

stole your tender. But it was Daggett or nobody to take us o u t . " " Then you may be inoculated with yellowfever germs n o w , " said she, with wide-open eyes. " Yes." " A r e n ' t you afraid ? " " A r e n ' t you?" he asked. ' ' I nursed papa until he died with the small-pox," said she, simply. A n d Bartley, as he gazed musingly at her modestly averted eyes and the sweet, firm lips, wondered i f he had made such a brilliant move, after a l l , when he stoppped short of Newport. " But I forget that you fled from m e , " said she, with sudden reserve. ' ' I shall land you at Savannah as soon as possible, but we have to go to Port Royal first. Two of our party go North by rail from there. It won't take much l o n g e r , " she added, with much dignity. ' ' Y o u also forget that you fled from me,'' said Bartley, smiling. ' ' You are a man,'' said she, as though that ended i t . •" There was no excuse for y o u . " " Why ? " he asked, amused. " Because i f you didn't—if you didn't like me, you could have left m e . " " And i f you didn't like me, couldn't you have left ? " he asked. " My own home—and you a guest ? " she asked, arching her smooth, glossy brows in surprise. " N o — I can never forgive you for t h a t , " she added, tragically. ' ' This is ridiculous, Cousin V i r g i n i a , ' ' said he. " I had never seen you then, not even your picture. I didn't know whether you were tall or short, blonde or brune. I came South simply as the result of a foolish desire to get into a fever camp, more than to escape you. I am vastly sorry now that I did it, I can tell y o u . " " I accept your apology, of course," said Virginia demurely, quietly overlooking his little compliment. " But you mustn't ex­ pect me to treat you just as I should have done, otherwise—not y e t . " She paused, while Bartley, fearful of hurting her pride, repressed a smile. " I don't know how to introduce you here," said she in perplexity. " Y o u r being my cousin, and coming with these dreadful men, is nothing. But they— some of them—know something about that —other t h i n g . " " A r e you a woman who would make such a story public about your own cousin ? " he demanded severely, and she, in her perturba­ tion, did not see that he was only mimicking her.

THE

"

APHRODITE."

" I—I—they found i t o u t , " she faltered No one would have suspected such weak­ ness in her, though, when, her cheek as cool and white as the petal of a lily, she intro­ duced Hutchinson to the party, without men­ tioning their cousinship, as they had agreed. A l l day she stood more or less on her dig­ nity with him, while he quietly studied her and abided his time. He feared once—when she ordered scrubbed a portion of the deck that seemed scarcely to need it—that she was mannish. But when a young sailor smashed his finger under the holystone, and she, in­ stantly forgetting her rank, gave a little cry of sympathy and wrapped the wounded mem­ ber in her own handkerchief, with her own hands, he took it all back. He discovered, further, that she was cap­ tain in fact as well as in name. The mate clearly respected her seamanship, and cheer­ fully looked to her for orders. Bartley se­ cretly held him in contempt for this, but that was nothing against V i r g i n i a . That she was a little puffed up with her nautical knowledge was undeniable; but she carried i t off in such a pretty way—being a woman—that Markley did little else all day but breathe foolish, old-bachelor remarks about her into Bartley's ear. The wind, which had veered around sharply to the northeast about ten o'clock, strength­ ened all day long. B y four o'clock i t was blowing furiously, and the " A p h r o d i t e , " whose course held her squarely in the trough of the sea, rose and .fell under the foamcrested ridges of water like a porpoise at play. Every square inch of her deck and upper works had been wet thrice over by the flying salt spray, which cut the flesh like whip-lashes. The sailors, in their oilskins and sou'westers, fighting their way forward in the teeth of the gale, streamed with water. Below, everything was snug and warm. The motion, though, was too violent for the comfort of most of the guests. Captain Powers sat apart from them, with the mate, in her owm room, from which she could see what went on outside. She was a little pale from the tension, but perfectly composed. The mate, however, was decidedly nervous— at least so Bartley Hutchinson decided as he entered the room. " Miss Powers, far be it from me to inter­ fere with the handling of this y a c h t , " said he, " but Daggett, who was born and raised in these waters, says this is their annual Gulf storm, and that i t will continue until twelve or one o'clock to-night, by which time the wind may attain a velocity of eighty miles an


" B A R T L E Y HAD

JUST

TAKEN LOOKING

HOLD OF INTO

VIRGINIA'S

H A N D TO H E L P

T H E M U Z Z L E OF

DAGGETT'S

HER

DOWN,

WHEN

HEAVY REVOLVER."

H E FOUND

HIMSELF


346

THE

CAPTAIN

OF

THE

hour. If all goes well, we'll be safe at Port Royal long before that; but in this heavy sea the derangement of machinery or steeringgear is more than a possibility. Daggett suggests that you steer for shore, which will give you the wind over your quarter and ease the boat. Y o u can then make P o r t Royal by the inland course." " A n d get aground in those s h a l l o w s ? " asked the mate, sarcastically. ' ' Daggett says he can put you into the inland course without difficulty, and take you through i t , " continued Bartley, without vouchsafing the mate a glance, " and, thief that he is, I believe h i m . " The captain hesitated, and after some talk asked of the mate: " What do you think, M r . Kennedy ? ' ' " I think that i f we always counted on a shaft breaking, we should never put to sea at a l l . " " Brave talk, M r . Kennedy," said Hutchin­ son sharply, " but i f a shaft does break, how many of these helpless lives will you agree to save ? Miss Powers, I most earnestly pro­ test against any foolhardiness in this matter. You have no right to risk either your own life or those of your guests in order to show your courage or the seaworthiness of your craft. Certainly you have no excuse for re­ maining out here, forty miles from shore, in a blow that is likely to reach a fatal velocity." " Put about! " said Virginia to the mate. After he had left to execute her order, she said to Bartley: " He thinks you are a cow­ ard." " I know he's o n e , " said Bartley stoutly. " He's afraid to be prudent." And he turned on his heel. Six miles from shore, where the mud from the shallow bottom began to discolor the water, Daggett, after being unironed, took the wheel. Darkness had already set in, and the rain was falling in driving sheets. Re­ luctant as Hutchinson was to leave his cozy quarters, where he and Markley were smoking and spinning yarns, he called for an oil-skin and made his way to the wheel-house, after shoving his revolver in an outside pocket. Daggett's loyalty would bear watching. To his surprise, he found his cousin in the wheel-house, wrapped to the throat, the heavy, moist coils of her hair glistening with drops of rain. She glanced at him inquir­ ingly as he entered, but said nothing; and for some time they stood in silence, listening to the wild roar of the storm. " Is it necessary for you to stay here and

"APHRODITE:'

get wet ? " he asked finally, in a low tone that Daggett could not overhear. " Some one has to stay here—he does not understand the signals to the engine-room," said she, i n the same guarded tone. "I couldn't be content inside, anyway," she added, less stiffly. " W h y are you here ? " Bartley nodded toward Daggett's big bulk. " I have decided to go N o r t h from Port R o y a l , " he added after a moment. " You will have to take your prisoners to Savan­ nah, though, to deliver them to the Georgia authorities. I don't know when we shall meet again, and I may not see you alone again, here on the yacht. I should like to know that I am forgiven before I go. We are cousins, you k n o w . " He spoke gravely enough, though there was a whimsical twinkle in his eyes. ' ' Y o u are making fun of m e , ' ' said she, with sober prettiness. ' ' A n d I should like you to say that you are sorry you ran away from m e , " he con­ tinued, not heeding her complaint, " as I say now I am sorry that I ran away from y o u . " ' ' Do you suppose I would wait to see a man who boasts that no woman ever yet stirred his pulse ? " she asked, indignantly. He laughed softly, for that had been his idle boast, but only asked: " Do you suppose I would cross a continent to see a woman who boasts that no man has ever been in her presence over fifteen minutes without mak­ ing something of a fool of himself ? " She flushed a little, and then laughed mus­ ingly. ' ' Was that the reason ? ' ' she asked, in a softer tone, coyly turning her eyes up to his. ' ' N o other,'' said he. " I can never make my boast a g a i n , " he added, subtly. " Take care that I can't make m i n e , " she returned warningly, turning her head to glance out on to the tumultuous bosom of the enraged deep. A f t e r a moment she went on in a subdued tone: ' ' Cousin Bart­ ley, i f you are jesting with me, there is some­ thing sacrilegious in i t at this moment, when God is displaying H i s awful majesty in this storm, yet holding us secure, as in the hol­ low of H i s h a n d . " She sank down upon the seat, and pulled her wrap a little closer. The act left her white, damp hand exposed, and Bartley laid his own upon i t . " Just to show that I am not jesting, V i r ­ g i n i a , " said he, seriously. She let him have his way, and when, after a little, he slipped his fingers under the soft palm and gently tightened his hold, she gave him a little pressure in return. Meanwhile Daggett was bending at the


A

STORY

OF

THE

GEORGIA

COAST.

347

wheel and straining his eyes out over the to the bottom; consequently, the terrors of black, watery waste. The occasional flashes a wreck at sea were not present. With of lightning, which simply blinded Bartley, i t a l l , though, there was danger, and no were as welcome to him as beacon lights. time to be lost. Quickly, but coolly, the Finally, without warning, he threw the wheel boats were lowered; the passengers, with heavily to p o r t ; and just as the anxious cap­ what light valuables they could readily pick tain sprang to her feet i n alarm, he an­ up, were handed down. The two large boats nounced, " Inside! " in a tone that betrayed of the " Aphrodite " were thus loaded, and considerable pride i n the fact. vanished in the darkness. Then Daggett's The low island behind which they now crept yawl was brought alongside. Daggett and along at one-third speed effectually shielded four of his men, three of the " Aphrodite's " them from the mighty in-rolling billows of crew, and the mate, Bartley, and V i r g i n i a — the ocean; but the wind still roared over all that were left aboard—made ready to de­ them like the hoarse bellowing of a thousand scend. Daggett, with a grotesque bow to angry sea-monsters, and the shallow water the captain, requested that his men be unof the passage was whipped into a foam. ironed, in view of the possibility of their The rain had ceased to fall, and the sky was having yet to swim; and the captain ordered the mate to release them. The smugglers growing l i g h t e r . Their troubles seemed to be at an end, and at once tumbled down, followed by the sailors V i r g i n i a had just drawn a long breath of re- and the mate. Bartley had just taken hold ' lief, when a most terrific shock spread over the of V i r g i n i a ' s hand to help her down, when vessel, throwing both her and Bartley with he found himself looking into the muzzle of great violence against the wheel and Daggett. Daggett's heavy revolver. The mate and " S n a p p i n ' Turtle R o o s t ! ' ' cried Dag­ gett, aghast, drop­ ping the wheel and turning to them. " D a g g e t t , " said Hutchinson quickly, his hand i n his outside pocket and his eyes gleaming dangerous­ ly, " i f I thought this was intentional, I ' d make a snapping tur­ tle roost out of your skull." " I ' v e been a-watchin' for i t , " protested Daggett. "It ought to be more'n four feet above water at this tide, but this wind has drove the water in so i t fooled m e . " There was no time for dispensing jus­ tice. The yacht was rapidly filling from the great hole in her bow. Still the water was scarcely deep enough, Daggett said, to more than wash her hurricane deck when she TWENTY MINUTES LATER THEY WERE STEAMING BEFORE A BLAZING FIRE." should have settled


348

THE

CAPTAIN

OF

the sailors, at the same instant, found them­ selves similarly situated. " Fall on your faces in the bottom of the boat, and don't move t i l l you're o r d e r e d ! " commanded Dagget, with a triumphant grin, and his victims discreetly obeyed. " A r e you going to leave us here to drown ? " demanded Bartley, as Daggett cut the painter and pushed off. " You won't drown," said Daggett. " You'll have standing-room until the mate here can get back to you with one o' your boats. If you don't want to wait, there's your tender." The pair stood still until the night and the storm had swallowed the yawl. If the yacht settled evenly, they would be safe. Y e t i t might be hours before they were taken off. The island on their right was only a few rods distant; but it was destitute of any shelter, and the boats had made for the mainland, a mile away. " A r e you afraid to go with me in the tender ? " asked Bartley. " N o , " said she steadily. Five minutes later the little tender, with its two souls aboard, was dancing over the choppy water. Bartley pulled a fair oar, but in spite of his efforts the frail craft took on water at both bow and stern, and Virginia steadily bailed. " Can you swim, Virginia? " he asked. " Y e s , " said she, without looking up. She had need of her accomplishment. Three successive waves came combing over the stern, drenching her through and through, and then they found themsel ves in water to their waists. Following Bartley's example, Virginia threw herself over the side, and for a moment they supported themselves by a hand on the gun­ wale. " They can never hear us call in this w i n d , " gasped Bartley, " and we may chill to death before they find us. The shore can't be very far now. Can you swim for it ? " She bravely answered yes, and they struck off side by side. He soon saw, though, that her skirts were proving a fatal drag to her. Swimming a little closer, he commanded her to put her arms around h i m ; and she, too weary to think for herself, blindly obeyed. He swam slowly, depending in part upon the wind and waves for propulsion, and reserv­ ing his strength for any emergency. With every stroke of his left hand, which was made over her shoulder, as he swam on his side, V i r g i n i a ' s long, wet hair wrapped itself around his hand in clinging strands. But he made no effort to put it out of the way. A t last he felt the tops of rushes. With a good bottom, he could have waded thence, but he felt too tired to " let down " to ascer­ tain whether mud or sand was under them.

THE

"APHRODITE"

The chances were it was mud, so he swam on. When dry land was finally reachedthough it was far from dry—he was almost too exhausted to lift himself out, and an in­ tense desire to sleep came over him, but he resolutely shook it off. " V i r g i n i a ! " said he, for she, too, seemed stricken with the unnatural stupor. " Y e s , " she murmured sleepily. " Wake up, Virginia, wake u p ! " he called. She quickly opened her eyes at this, and stared up into his face, startled and bewil­ dered. Then, seeming partly to compre­ hend their situation, she asked, plaintively: " Where are we, Bartley ? " " Safe and sound, on shore," he answered, blithely. ' ' A n d the ' A p h r o d i t e ' is g o n e ! ' ' she mur­ mured, with tears in her eyes. " N o t a bit of i t ! Once she is pumped out and raised, she'll be as good as ever." " How wicked of me to think of a boat when we are s a f e ! ' ' she exclaimed, peni­ tently. " B a r t l e y , you are a noble b o y ! " she added, fervently. " Y o u saved m e . " " What less could a cousin do, Virginia ? " he asked smiling, but with glistening eyes. " A n d being my cousin, I love you for it, and want to show my g r a t i t u d e . " A n d she showed i t by wrapping her round arms about his neck, and softly kissing him. " I for­ give you e v e r y t h i n g . " Twenty minutes later they were steaming before a blazing fire i n the little cabin of a negro truck-gardener, while the worthy black himself and his two boys were traversing the sedgy shore with lanterns, to find the other boatloads. In less than an hour they were all in, wet and cold, but happy. A s V i r g i n i a and Bartley sat side by side in the luxurious seat of a sleeping-car the next day, flying N o r t h as fast as steam could carry them, she s a i d : " Bartley Hutchinson, if you were to receive another invitation to come and visit your cousin, do you think you would succeed in seeing her ? " " Yes, I think I should—seeing that her yacht is lying in the mud off Snapping Tur­ tle R o o s t , " he answered, laughing. " T r y me." " I ' m afraid you wouldn't feel free to leave me now, i n case you didn't like m e . " " N o , I'm afraid I shan't feel free to leave you, V i r g i n i a d e a r . " V i r g i n i a was very, very quiet for several minutes, and then she said softly: " A t school I used to write in my copy-book, ' Never trouble trouble, till trouble troubles you.' "


The Ward restoration

of the mammoth

THE

in the Museum of Natural History, University photograph by L. W. Humphreys.

of

Virginia,

Charlottesville,

Virginia.

From

a

TRUTH ABOUT THE MAMMOTH. BY

FREDERIC A.

LUCAS.

E D I T O R ' S N O T E . — I N THE OCTOBER NUMBER OF M C C L U R E ' S M A G A Z I N E WAS PUBLISHED A SHORT STORY, "THE KILLING OF THE MAMMOTH," BY " H. TUKEMAN," WHICH, TO THE AMAZEMENT OF THE EDITORS, WAS TAKEN BY MANY READ­ ERS NOT AS FICTION, BUT AS A CONTRIBUTION TO NATURAL HISTORY. EVER SINCE THE APPEARANCE OF THAT NUMBER OF THE MAGAZINE, THE AUTHORITIES OF THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION, IN WHICH THE AUTHOR HAD LOCATED THE REMAINS OF THE BEAST OF HIS FANCY, HAVE BEEN BESET WITH VISITORS TO SEE THE STUFFED MAMMOTH, AND OUR DAILY MAIL, AS WELL AS THAT OF THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION, HAS BEENFILLEDWITH INQUIRIES FOR MORE INFORMATION AND FOR REQUESTS TO SETTLE WAGERS AS TO WHETHER IT WAS A TRUE STORY OR NOT. THE CONTRIBUTION IN QUESTION WAS PRINTED PURELY AS FIC­ TION, WITH NO IDEA OF MISLEADING THE PUBLIC, AND WAS ENTITLED A STORY IN OUR TABLE OF CONTENTS. WE DOUBT IF ANY WRITER OF REALISTICFICTIONEVER HAD A MORE GENERAL AND CONVINCING PROOF OF SUCCESS. THE VERY GENERAL INTER­ EST THAT HAS BEEN SHOWN IN THE SUBJECT HAS CONVINCED US THAT OUR READERS WOULD BE GLAD TO KNOW THE TRUTH ABOUT THE MAMMOTH, AND, ACCORDINGLY, WE HAVE ASKED MR. F. A . LUCAS, OF THE NATIONAL MUSEUM, TO PREPARE THE FOLLOW­ ING ARTICLE. IF THE MAMMOTH AS MR. LUCAS KNOWS HIM IS LESS IN SIZE AND BELONGS TO AN EARLIER DATE THAN THE MAMMOTH AS MR. TUKEMAN PAINTED HIM, WE BELIEVE OUR READERS WILLFINDHIM NO LESS INTERESTING.

A B O U Tthree centuries ago, in 1696, a Russian, one Ludloff by name, de­ scribed some bones belonging to what the Tartars called a " Mamantu " ; later on, Blumenbach pressed the common name into scientific use as " M a m m u t , " and Cuvier gallicized this into " M a m m o u t h , " whence by an easy transition we get our familiar mammoth. W e are so accustomed to use the word to describe anything of remarkable size that it would be only natural to suppose that the name Mammoth was given to the

extinct elephant because of its extraordinary bulk. E x a c t l y the reverse of this is true, however, for the word came to have its pres­ ent meaning because the original possessor of the name was a huge animal. The Sibe­ rian peasants called the creature " Mamantu," or " ground-dweller," because they believed it to be a gigantic mole, passing its life be­ neath the ground and perishing when by any accident it saw the light. The reasoning that led to this belief was very simple and the logic very good; no one had ever seen


350

THE

TRUTH

ABOUT

a live Mamantu, but there were plenty of its bones lying at or near the surface; conse­ quently, i f the animal did not live above the ground, it must dwell below. To-day, nearly every one knows that the mammoth was a sort of big, hairy elephant, now extinct, and nearly every one has a gen­ eral idea that it lived in the N o r t h . There is some uncertainty as to whether the mam­ moth was a mastodon, or the mastodon a mammoth, and there is a great deal of miscon­ ception as to the size and abundance of this big beast. It may be said in passing that the mastodon is only a second or third cousin of the mammoth, but that the existing elephant of A s i a is a very near relative, certainly as near as a first cousin, possibly a very great grandson. Popularly, the mammoth is sup­ posed to have been a colossus somewhere from twelve to twenty feet i n height, beside whom modern elephants would seem insig­ nificant; but as " trout lose much in dress­ i n g , " so mammoths shrink in measuring, and while there were doubtless Jumbos among them in the way of individuals of exceptional magnitude, the majority were decidedly under Jumbo's size. The only mounted mammoth skeleton in this country, that i n the Chicago Academy of Sciences, is one of the largest, the thigh-bone measur­ ing five feet, one inch in length, or a foot more than that of Jumbo; and as Jumbo stood eleven feet high, the rule of three ap­ plied to this thigh-bone would give the living animal a height of thirteen feet, eight inches. The height of this specimen is given as thir­ teen feet in its bones, with an estimate of fourteen feet in its clothes; but as the skele­ ton is obviously mounted altogether too high, it is pretty safe to say that thirteen feet is a good, fair allowance for the height of this animal when alive. A s for the majority of mammoths, they would not average more than nine or ten feet high. Sir Samuel Baker tells us that he has seen plenty of wild A f r i ­ can elephants that would exceed Jumbo by a foot or more, and while this must be ac­ cepted with caution, since unfortunately he neglected to put a tape line on them, yet M r . Thomas Baines did measure a specimen twelve feet high. This, coupled with Sir Samuel's statement, indicates that there is not so much difference between the mammoth and the elephant as there might be. This ap­ plies to the mammoth par excellence, the species known scientifically as Elephas primigenius, whose remains are found in many parts of the Northern Hemisphere and occur abun­ dantly in Siberia and Alaska. There were

THE

MAMMOTH.

other elephants than the mammoth, and some that exceeded him in size;* but even the largest cannot positively be asserted to have exceeded a height of thirteen feet, and it is to be greatly doubted i f any one of them could have tossed a twenty-five foot log over his shoulder. Tusks offer convenient terms of comparison, and those of an average fully grown mammoth are from eight to ten feet in l e n g t h ; those of the famous St. Peters­ burg specimen and those of the huge speci­ men in Chicago measuring respectively nine feet, three inches, and nine feet, eight inches. So far as the writer is aware, the largest tusks actually measured are two from Alaska, one twelve feet, ten inches long, weight unknown, reported by M r . Jay Beach; and another eleven feet long, weighing 200 pounds, noted by M r . T. L . Brevig. Com­ pared with these we have the big tusk that used to stand on Fulton Street, New York, just an inch under nine feet long, and weigh­ ing 184 pounds, or the largest shown at Chicago in 1893, which was seven feet, six inches long, and weighed 176 pounds. For our knowledge of the external appear­ ance of the mammoth we are indebted to the more or less entire examples which have been found at various times i n Siberia, but mainly to the noted specimen found in 1799 near the Lena, embedded in the ice, where it had been reposing, so geologists tell us, anywhere from 10,000 to 50,000 years. How the crea­ ture gradually thawed out of its icy tomb, and the tusks were taken by the discoverer and sold for i v o r y ; how the dogs fed upon the flesh in summer, while bears and wolves feasted upon it i n w i n t e r ; how the animal was within an ace of being utterly lost to science when, at the last moment, the muti­ lated remains were rescued by M r . Adams, is an old story, often told and retold. Suf­ fice it to say that, besides the bones, enough of the beast was preserved to tell us exactly what was the covering of this ancient ele­ phant, and to show that i t was a creature adapted to withstand the northern cold and fitted for living on the branches of the birch and hemlock. The exact birthplace of the mammoth is as uncertain as that of many other great characters; but his earliest known restingplace is in the Cromer Forest Beds of Eng­ land, a country inhabited by him at a time when the German Ocean was dry land and * Notably Elephas meridionalis of Southern Europe and Elephas columbi of the southern United States and Mexico. It is extremely probable that the Chicago skeleton belongs to this latter species, which ranged northwesterly almost to Alaska.


REPRODUCTION

OF A PAINTING

OF

THE

M A M M O T H B Y C.

R.

FOR MCCLURE'S M A G A Z I N E , A N D P R E S E N T E D INSTITUTION.

KNIGHT, MADE EXPRESSLY

BY

THE

EDITOR

TO

THE

SMITHSONIAN


352

THE

TRUTH

ABOUT

THE

MAMMOTH.

Great Britain part of a peninsula. Here his remains are found to-day, while from the depths of the North Sea the hardy trawlers have dredged hundreds, aye thousands, of mammoth teeth in company with soles and turbot. If, then, the mammoth originated in Western Europe, and not in that great grave­ yard of fossil elephants, northern India, east­ ward he went spreading over all Europe north of the Pyrenees and Alps, save only Scandi­ navia, whose glaciers offered no attractions, scattering his bones abundantly by the way­ side to serve as marvels for future ages. Strange indeed have been some of the tales to which these and other elephantine remains have given rise when they came to light in the good old days when knowledge of anat­ omy was small and credulity was great. The least absurd theory concerning them was that they were the bones of the elephants which Hannibal brought from A f r i c a . Occasionally they were brought forward as irrefutable evi­

grew in oure regioun afore they were effeminat with lust and intemperance of mouth." More than this, these bones have been ven­ erated in Greece and Rome as the' remains of pagan heroes, and later on worshipped as relics of Christian saints. Did not the church of Valencia possess an elephant tooth which did duty as that of St. Christopher, and, so late as 1789, was not a thigh-bone, figuring as the arm-bone of a saint, carried in pro­ cession through the streets in order to bring rain ?

dences of the deluge; but usually they fig­ ured as the bones of giants, the most famous of them being known as Teutobochus, K i n g of the Cimbri, a lusty warrior said to have had a height of nineteen feet. Somewhat smaller, but still of respectable height, four­ teen feet, was " L i t t e l l Johne " of Scotland, whereof Hector Boece wrote, concluding in a moralizing tone, " Be quilk (which) it ap­ pears how extravegant and squaire pepill

of years ago, while remains so situated that they have been subjected to varying conditions of dryness and moisture are al­ ways in a fragmentary state. A s pre­ viously noted, several more or less entire carcasses of the mammoth have been dis-

Out of Europe eastward into Asia the mammoth took his way, and having peopled that vast region, took advantage of a land connection then existing between Asia and N o r t h America and walked over into Alaska, in company with the forerunners of the bison and the ancestors of the mountain sheep and Alaskan brown bear. Still eastward and southward he went, until he came to the Atlantic coast, the latitude of southern New Y o r k roughly marking the southern boundary of the broad domain over which the mam­ moth roamed undis­ turbed.* Not that of necessity all this vast area was occupied at one t i m e ; but this was the range of the mam­ moth during Pleisto­ cene time, for over all this region his bones and teeth are found in greater or less abun­ dance and i n varying conditions of preserva­ tion. In regions like parts of Siberia and Alaska, where the bones are entombed in a wet and cold, often icy, soil, the bones and Parts of a skeleton of A MAMMOTH T H A T W E R E F O U N D I N 1897 I N T H E tusks are almost as U R A L MOUNTAINS. perfectly preserved as N o w preserved in the museum at E k a t e r i n b u r g , R u s s i a . T h e p h o t o g r a p h was taken in the though they had been yard o f one o f the peasants w h o made the find, a n d it is lie w h o appears in the picture. deposited but a. score

* This must tie taken as a very general statement, as the distinction between and habitats of Elenhas primiqeniw and Klephat eolumbi, the southern mammoth, are not satisfactorily determined ; moreover the two species overlap through a wide area of the West and Northwest.


THE

THE

MAMMOTH

IN

TRUTH

THE ROYAL

ABOUT

MUSEUM

THE

OF N A T U R A L

T h i s is t h e s p e c i m e n f o u n d e n t i r e o n the b a n k s o f the L e n a R i v e r , S i b e r i a .

MAMMOTH.

HISTORY

AT ST.

353

PETERSBURG.

A l t h o u g h it is b e l i e v e d to h a v e l a i n e m b e d d e d

in

t h e ice f r o m 10,000 to 50,000 y e a r s , s o m e o f t h e s k i n s t i l l a d h e r e s to t h e s k u l l .

covered i n Siberia, only to be lost; and while no entire animal has so far been found in Alaska, some day one may yet come to light. That there is some possibility of this is shown by the discovery, recorded by M r . Dall, of the partial skeleton of a mammoth in the bank of the Y u k o n with some of the fat still present, and although this had been partially converted into adipocere, it was fresh enough to be used by the natives for greasing, not their boots, but their boats. A n d up to the present time this is the nearest approach to finding a live mammoth in A l a s k a ; and a small piece of fat, obtained by M r . Dall, is the nearest the United States National M u ­ seum has come to securing a stuffed mam­ moth. A s to why the mammoth became extinct, we know absolutely nothing, although vari­ ous theories, some much more ingenious than plausible, have been advanced to account for their extermination—they perished of starva­ t i o n ; they were overtaken by floods on their supposed migrations and drowned in detach­ ments ; they fell through the ice, equally i n

detachments, and were swept out to sea. But all we can safely say is that long ages ago the last one perished off the face of the earth. Strange i t is, too, that these mighty beasts, whose bulk was ample to protect them against four-footed foes and whose woolly coat was proof against the cold, should have utterly vanished. They ranged from England eastward to New Y o r k , almost around the w o r l d ; from the Alps to the A r c t i c Ocean; and in such numbers that to-day their tusks are articles of commerce and fossil ivory has its price current as well as wheat. That many were swept out to sea by the flooded rivers of Siberia is certain, for some of the low islands off the coast are said to be formed of sand, ice, and bones of the mammoth, and thence, for hundreds of years, have come the tusks which are sold in the market beside those of the African and Indian elephants. That man was contemporary with the mam­ moth in Southern Europe is fairly certain, for not only are the remains of the mammoth and man's flint weapons found together, but in a few instances some primeval Landseer


354

THE

TRUTH

ABOUT

graved on slate, ivory, or reindeer antler a sketchy outline of the beast, somewhat i m ­ pressionistic perhaps, but still, like the work of a true artist, preserving the salient fea­ tures. We see the curved tusks, the snaky trunk, and the shaggy coat that we know belonged to the mammoth, and we may feel assured that i f early man did not conquer the clumsy creature with fire and flint, he yet gazed upon him from the safe vantage point of some lofty tree or inaccessible rock, and then went home to tell his wife and neighbors how the animal escaped because his bow missed fire. That man and mammoth lived together in North America is uncertain; so far there is no evidence to show that they did, although the absence of such evidence is no proof that they did not. That any live mammoth has for centuries been seen on the Alaskan tundras is utterly improbable, and on M r . C. H . Townsend seems to rest the responsibility of having, though quite un­ intentionally, introduced the Alaskan Live Mammoth into the columns of the daily press. It befell in this wise: Among the varied du­ ties of our revenue marine is that of patrol­ ling and exploring the shores of arctic Alaska and the waters of the adjoining sea, and it is not so many years ago that the cutter " Corw i n , " i f memory serves aright, held the rec­ ord of farthest north on the Pacific side. On one of these northern trips, to the Kotzebue Sound region, famous for the abundance of its deposits of mammoth bones,* the ' ' Corw i n " carried M r . Townsend, then naturalist to the United States Fish Commission. A t Cape Prince of Wales some natives came on board bringing a few bones and tusks of the mammoth, and upon being questioned as to whether or not any of the animals to which they pertained were living, promptly replied that all were dead, inquiring in turn i f the white men had ever seen any and i f they knew how these animals, so vastly larger than a reindeer, looked. Fortunately, or unfortunately, there was on board a text-book of geology containing the well-known cut of the St. Petersburg mammoth, and this was brought forth, greatly to the edification of the natives, who were delighted at recognizing the curved tusks and the bones they knew so well. N e x t the natives wished to know what the outside of the creature looked like, and as M r . Townsend had been at W a r d ' s establishment in Rochester when the first copy of the Stutt* Elephant Point, at the mouth of the B u c k l a n d R i v e r , is so named from the numbers o f m a m m o t h bones w h i c h have accumulated there.

THE

MAMMOTH.

gart restoration was made, he rose to the emergency, and made a sketch. This was taken ashore, together with a copy of the cut of the skeleton that was laboriously made by an Innuit sprawled out at full length on the deck. Now the Innuits, as M r . Townsend tells us, are great gadabouts, making long sledge journeys in winter and equally long trips by boat in summer, while each season they hold a regular fair on Kotzebue Sound, where a thousand or two natives gather to barter and gossip. On these jour­ neys and at these gatherings the sketches were no doubt passed about, copied, and recopied, until a large number of Innuits had become well acquainted with the appearance of the mammoth, a knowledge that naturally they were well-pleased to display to any white visitors. Also, like the Celt, the Alaskan native delights to give a " soft answer," and is always ready to furnish the kind of information desired. Thus in due time the newspaper man learned that the Alaskans could make pictures of the mammoth, and that they had some knowledge of its size and habits; so with inference and logic quite as good as that of the Tungusian peasant, the reporter came to the conclusion that some­ where in the frozen wilderness the last sur­ vivor of the mammoths must still be at large. A n d so, starting on the Pacific coast, the Live Mammoth story wandered from paper to paper, until it had spread throughout the length and breadth of the United States, when it was captured by M r . Tukeman, who, with much artistic color and some realistic touches, transferred it to M C C L U R E ' S M A G A Z I N E , and—unfortunately for the offi­ cials thereof—to the Smithsonian Institu­ tion. A n d now, once for a l l , i t may be said that there is no mounted mammoth to awe the vis­ itor to the national collections; and yet there seems no good and conclusive reason why there should not be. True, there are no live mammoths to be had at any p r i c e ; neither are their carcasses to be had on demand; still there is good reason to believe that a much smaller sum than that said to have been paid by M r . Conradi for the mammoth which is not i n the Smithsonian Institution, would place one there. It probably could not be done in one year; it might not be possible in five years; but should any man of means wish to secure enduring fame by showing the world the mammoth as i t stood i n life, a hundred centuries ago, before the dawn cf even tradition, he could probably accomplish the result by the expenditure of a far less


GENERAL

GRANT'S

ADMINISTRATION.

sum than i t would cost to participate i n an international yacht race. Who will be the PRIMITIVE

PICTURE

OF A MAMMOTH

355

first to despatch an expedition to seek a frozen mammoth ?

ENGRAVED

ON A FRAGMENT

OF MAMMOTH'S

TUSK.

The picture is so well done that one must believe that the artist, a cave-dweller in Southern France, had seen the animal, if he did not make the drawing from real life. The original engraving, which is about three times the size of the reproduction, is in the Museum d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris.

GENERAL F R O M

T H E

GRANT'S

S T A N D P O I N T

BY

O F

GEORGE

M A Y say with some degree of truth that my acquaintance with General Grant antedates our meeting by nearly three years. In the early summer of 18621 received an appoint­ ment from President L i n c o l n as a member of a military commission constituted for the purpose of auditing the claims that had arisen in the Department of Missouri, then under the com­ mand of General Fremont. The sessions of the commission were held at Cairo, Illinois, which place had been the headquarters of General Grant during the preceding winter. In the intervening time General Grant had become the hero of the war by the capture of Forts Henry and Donelson, and by his let­ ter of February 16th to General Buckner, i n which he demanded " an immediate and un­ conditional surrender" of the Confederate forces. In after years I received from Gen­ eral Grant the statement that the peculiar and emphatic character of that letter was due to his knowledge of General Buckner, gained from their fellowship at West Point. Our quarters were with General Strong, who was i n command, and who had come from Cairo, E g y p t , to serve as a volunteer in the army of the United States. Our thoughts

ADMINISTRATION.

A

M E M B E R

S.

BOUTWELL.

O F

H I S

C A B I N E T .

and our conversations were directed quite constantly to General Grant, to his services, his career, and his prospects for the future. Upon my return to Washington, and in the first five minutes of my interview with Presi­ dent Lincoln, he said : " What did you hear about General Grant's h a b i t s ? " I said at once : " I did not hear the subject men­ tioned."

ON

A

COMMISSION

WITH

CHARLES

A.

DANA.

Charles A . Dana, who afterward was A s ­ sistant Secretary of War, was the chairman of the commission. W e were called to ex­ amine about sixteen hundred claims due to Fremont's operations in the States of Mis­ souri, Kentucky, Illinois, Ohio, and Indiana. The investigations diminished my respect for Fremont as a business man. There were no indications of wrong-doing, but there was much evidence of lack of system in plan and of care in execution. Upon the death of General Fremont, the preparation of a memoir was exacted of me by the American Academy of A r t s and Sciences, of which he was an honorary member. The researches which I then made led my mind to two important conclusions. H i s expeditions over the Rocky Mountains are free from cause for criticism, on the one hand, and they give


356

GENERAL

GRANT'S

evidence of the possession of talents of a high order. His care of his men, his negotiations with the Indians by which he secured peace for the most part, and his contests with them when his efforts for peace were ineffectual, and, finally, his position in the controversy over the command of our forces in California, including his trial by court-martial and his resignation from the army, are acts and pro­ ceedings worthy of high praise. In singular and disagreeable contrast is the fact that he failed to attain marked success i n any other public undertaking. My work at Cairo and my association with Mr. Dana gave me a high opinion of his in­ tegrity and of his capacity in business affairs, the consequences of which were felt in Gen­ eral Grant's administration. When the selec­ tion of a Collector of Customs at the port of New Y o r k was under consideration, I advised the appointment of Mr. Dana. The merchants and others in the city had commended Moses H . Grinnell. Beyond this fact, I found that the President did not look with favor upon M r . Dana. He had been in the South during the war as the representative of the W a r De­ partment, and in some way his doings or his reports had displeased General Grant. W i t h the authority of the President, I offered M r . Dana the place of Chief Appraiser. That office he declined, and when he obtained the control of " The Sun," which he did not then own, he attacked General Grant in a manner not justified by any accepted code of personal or political warfare. That conduct separated me from M r . Dana, and there was no renewal of our acquaintance, except for one interview, which took place after the death of General Grant. On a time there appeared an editorial in "The S u n " upon the degeneracy of leader­ ship in the Republican party, and a compari­ son was instituted between the men of the then present time and the men of the Civil War. M y name appeared among those who had led in the better days of the Republican party. The article led me to write a personal letter to M r . Dana, in which 1 congratulated him on his ability to recognize either good­ ness or greatness in the men of "the Grant dynasty," as it had been called. In return, I received from M r . Dana a letter marked by expressions of kindness such as I might not have anticipated from my best friend. He urged me to advise him of my coming to New York, when he would call upon me.

ADMINISTRATION. best friend upon his return after an absence of twenty years in foreign parts. General Grant's name was not mentioned at our in­ terview, and it has been a satisfaction to me to notice the absence of words of dis­ paragement of General Grant in M r . Dana's Memoirs." The greatness of General Grant in war, in civil affairs, and in personal qualities which at once excite our admiration and deserve our commendation, was not fully appreciated by the generation to which he belonged, nor can it be appreciated by the generations that can know of him only as his life and char­ acter may appear upon the written record. He had weaknesses, and of some of them I may speak ; but they do not qualify in any essen­ tial manner his claim to greatness in the particulars named. He was not fortunate in the circumstances incident to the organiza­ tion of his cabinet. The appointment of Mr. Washburne as Secretary of State for the brief period of one or two weeks was not a wise opening of the administration, if the arrangement was designed, and was a mis­ fortune, i f the brief term was due to events not anticipated. The selection of M r . Fish compensated, and more than compensated, for the errors which preceded his appoint­ ment. The country can never expect an administration of the affairs of the Depart­ ment of State more worthy of approval and eulogy than the administration of M r . Fish. Apparently we were then on the verge of war with Great Britain, and demands were made in very responsible quarters which of­ fered no alternative but war. The treaty of 1871, which was the outcome of M r . Fish's diplomacy, reestablished our relations of friendship with Great Britain, and the treaty was then accepted as a step in the direction of general peace.

In the month of February, 1869,1 received an invitation from General Grant to call upon him on an evening named and at an hour specified. A t the interview General Grant asked me to take the office of Secretary of the Interior. As reasons for declining the place, I said that my duties and position in the House were agreeable to me and that my services there might be as valuable to the Administration as my services in the cabinet. General Grant then said that he intended to give a place to Massachusetts, and it might be the Secretary of the Interior or the Attorney-Generalship. He then asked for my advice as to persons, and said that if When I was in New York, I called at the office of " T h e Sun," where I was received he named an Attorney-General from Massa­ by M r . Dana as he might have received his chusetts, he had in mind Governor Clifford,


FROM

THE

STANDPOINT

OF A

whom he had met. Governor Clifford was my personal friend, he had been the AttorneyGeneral of the State during my term as Gov­ ernor, he was a gentleman of great urbanity of manner, a well-equipped lawyer, and as an advocate he had secured and maintained a good standing i n the profession and through many years. He had come into the Repub­ lican party from the Webster w i n g of the W h i g party. To me he was a conservative, and I was apprehensive that his views upon questions arising, or that might arise, from our plan of reconstruction might not be i n harmony w i t h the policy of the party. Upon this ground, which I stated to General Grant, I advised against his appointment. I named Judge Hoar for Attorney-General and Gov­ ernor Claflin for the Interior Department. I wrote the full address of Judge Hoar upon a card, which I gave to General Grant. Judge Hoar was nominated and confirmed. A.

T. STEWART'S

RELATIONS

WITH

GRANT.

A t the same time, Alexander T. Stewart, of New Y o r k , was nominated and confirmed as Secretary of the Treasury. It was soon discovered that M r . Stewart, being an im­ porter, was ineligible to the office. Mr. Conkling said there were nine statutes i n his way. A more effectual bar was i n the reason on which the statutes rested, namely, that no man should be put in a situation to be a judge i n his own cause. The President made a vain effort to secure legislation for the removal of the bar. N e x t , Judge Hilton, then M r . Stewart's attorney, submitted a deed of trust by which M r . Stewart relinquished his interest in the business during his term of office. The President submitted that paper to Chief Justice Cartter of the Supreme Court of the D i s t r i c t of Columbia. The Chief Jus­ tice gave a brief, adverse, oral opinion, and in language not quotable upon a printed page. We have no means of forming an opinion of M r . Stewart's capacity for administrative work, and I do not indulge i n any conjec­ tures. His nomination was acceptable to the leading business interests of the country, and in the city of N e w Y o r k it was supported generally. He was a successful man of busi­ ness and an accumulator of wealth, and at that time General Grant placed a high esti­ mate upon the presence of talents by which men acquire wealth. F o l l o w i n g these events, there were early indications that M r . Stewart's interest i n the President had been diminished, and gradually he took on a dislike to me. W h e n I knew of

MEMBER

OF HIS

CABINET.

357

his nomination, or when I knew that i t was to be made, I met him in Washington and assured him of my disposition to give my support to his administration. On two oc­ casions when I was in New Y o r k I made calls of civility upon him, but, as he made no rec­ ognition i n return, my efforts i n that direc­ tion came to an end. A t a dinner given by merchants and bank­ ers in the early part of September, 1869, at which I was a guest, M r . Stewart made a speech i n which he criticised my administra­ tion of the Treasury. In the canvass of 1872 the rumor went abroad that M r . Stew­ art had given $25,000 to the Greeley cam­ paign fund. In the month of October of that year, the twenty-eighth day, perhaps, I spoke at the Cooper Union. Upon my arri­ val i n New Y o r k , I received a call from a friend who came with a message from M r . Stewart. M r . Stewart would not be at the meeting, although except for the false rumor i n regard to his subscription to the Greeley fund, he should have taken pleasure in being present. A s General Grant was to be elected, his attendance at the meeting might be treated by the public as an at­ tempt to curry favor with General Grant and the incoming Administration. As I was passing to the hall, a paper was placed i n my hands by a person who gave no other means of recognizing his presence. When I reached the hall and opened the paper, I found that it was a summons to ap­ pear as defendant in an action brought by a man named Galvin, who claimed damages in the sum of $3,000,000. A t the close of the meeting and when the fact became known, one gentleman said to me: " I do not see how you could have spoken after such a sum­ mons." I said i n reply : " I f the suit had been for $3,000 only, i t might have given me some uneasiness, as a recovery would have i n ­ volved payment. A judgment of $3,000,000 implies impossibility of payment." I had no knowledge of Galvin, but his let­ ters of advice were found on the files of the Treasury. Even after the suit, I did not ex­ amine them for the purpose of forming an opinion of their value or want of value. Galvin alleged in his declaration that he had furnished the financial policy that I had adopted, that it had benefited the country to the amount of $300,000,000 and more, and that a claim of $3,000,000 was a moderate claim. Under the statute, the Department of Justice assumed the defense. The case l i n ­ gered, Galvin died, and the case followed.


358

GENERAL

GRANT'S

ADMINISTRATION.

A t the election of 1872, I voted at Groton in the morning, and i n the afternoon I went to New Y o r k , to find that General Grant had been reelected by a sufficient majority. On the morning of the next day, I left the hotel with time for a call upon General D i x , who had been elected Governor, and for a call upon Thurlow Weed. General D i x was not at home. Notwithstanding the criticisms of Thurlow Weed as a manager of political affairs in the State of New Y o r k and in the country, I had reasons for regarding him with favor, although I had never favored the aspirations of M r . Seward, his chief. When I was organizing the Internal Revenue Office i n 1862-3, M r . Weed gave me infor­ mation in regard to candidates for office i n the State of New Y o r k , including their rela­ tions to the factions that existed—usually Seward and anti-Seward—and with as much fairness as he could have commanded i f he had had no relation to either faction.

say that President Grant was attached to Judge Hoar, and, as far as I know, his at­ tachment never underwent any abatement. Whatever bond there may be i n the smoking habit, i t was formed without delay at the beginning of their acquaintance. While General Grant was not a teller of stories, he enjoyed listening to good ones, and of these Judge H o a r had a large stock, and always at command. General Grant enjoyed the society of intellectual men, and Judge Hoar was far up i n that class. General Grant had regrets for the retirement of Judge Hoar from his cabinet, and for the circumstances which led to his retirement. H i s appoint­ ment of Judge Hoar upon the Joint High Commission and the nomination of Judge Hoar to a seat upon the bench of the Su­ preme Court may be accepted as evidence of General Grant's continuing friendship, and of his disposition to recognize it, notwith­ standing the break in official relations.

A s I had time remaining at the end of my call upon M r . Weed, and as I had in mind M r . Stewart's message at the Cooper Union meeting, I drove to his down-town store, where I found him. He received me with cordiality, but i n respect to his health he seemed to be already a doomed man. He was anxious chiefly to give me an opportunity to comprehend the nature and magnitude of his business. A s I was about to leave, he took hold of my coat button and said: " When you see the President, you give my love to him, and say to him that I am for him and that I always have been for him." Still holding me by the button, he said : " Who buys the car­ pets for the Treasury ?" I said : " Mr. Saville is the chief clerk, and he buys the carpets." M r . Stewart s a i d : " Tell him to come to me ; I will sell him carpets as cheap as any­ body." When I repeated M r . Stewart's message to the President he made no reply, and he gave no indication that he was hearing what I was saying.

Judge Hoar's professional life had been passed i n Massachusetts, and he had no per­ sonal acquaintance with the lawyers of the circuit from which Justices Strong and Brad­ ley were appointed. Strong and Bradley were at the head of the profession in the States of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, and in truth there was no debate as to the fitness of their appointment. Judge Hoar was not responsible for their appointment, and I am of the opinion that the nominations would have been made even against his advice, which assuredly was not so given. Judge Strong, as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, had sustained the constitutionality of the L e g a l Tender act, and i t was understood that Bradley was of the same opinion. A s the President and cabinet were of a like opinion, i t may be said that there could have been no " packing " of the Supreme Court except by the exclusion of the two most prominent lawyers in the circuit and the appointment of men whose opinions upon a vital question were not in harmony w i t h the opinion of the persons making the appointment.

GRANT

AND ATTORNEY-GENERAL

HOAR.

The public has been invited to accept sev­ eral errors in regard to Judge Hoar's rela­ tions to President Grant, the appointment to the bench of the Supreme Court of Jus­ tices Bradley and Strong, by whose votes the first decision of the court in the L e g a l Tender cases was overruled, and the circum­ stances which led to the retirement of Judge Hoar from the cabinet. F i r s t of a l l I may

A s to myself, I had never accepted the original decision as sound law under the Constitution, nor as a wise public policy, if there had been no constitution. B y the de­ cision the government was shorn of a part of its financial means of defense in an exigency. When the Supreme Court had reached a conclusion, Chief Justice Chase called upon me and informed me of that fact, about two weeks in advance of the delivery of the opinion. He gave as a reason his


CHASE'S

OPINION

OF

THE

apprehension of serious financial difficulties due to a demand for gold by the creditor class. Not sharing i n that apprehension, I said : " The business men are a l l debtors as well as creditors, and they cannot engage i n a strug­ gle over gold payments, and the small class of creditors who are not also debtors w i l l not venture upon a policy i n which they must suffer ultimately." The decision did not cause a ripple i n the finances of the country. Pursuing the conversation, I asked the Chief Justice where he found authority i n the Constitution for the issue of non-legaltender currency. He answered i n the power to borrow money and i n the power given to Congress to provide for the " g e n e r a l wel­ fare of the United States." I then said, having i n mind the opinion i n the case of MacCulloch and Maryland, i n which the court held that where a power was given to Con­ gress, its exercise was a matter of discretion unless a limitation could be found i n the Constitution : " Where do you find a limita­ tion to the power to borrow money by any means that to Congress may appear wise ?" The Chief Justice was unable to specify a limitation, and the question remains unan­ swered to this day. When the case of Hepburn and Griswold was overruled i n the L e g a l Tender cases, the Chief Justice was very much disturbed, and w i t h the exhibition of considerable feeling, he said : " W h y did you consent to the ap­ pointment of judges to overrule m e ? " I assured him that there was no personal feel­ ing on the part of the President, and that as to my own unimportant part i n the busi­ ness, he had known from the time of our interview i n regard to the former action of the court that I entertained the opinion that the decision operated as a limitation of the constitutional powers of Congress and that its full and final recognition might prove injurious to the country whenever all its resources should be required. A t the time of the reversal, the Chief Justice did not conceal his dissatisfaction w i t h his life and labors on the bench, and at the interview last mentioned he said that he should be glad to exchange positions with me, i f i t were possible to make the exchange. Various reasons have been assigned for the step which was taken by President Grant in asking Judge H o a r to retire from the cabinet. Some have assumed that the Presi­ dent was no longer w i l l i n g to tolerate the presence of two members from the same State. That consideration had been passed

LEGAL-TENDER

DECISION.

359

upon by the President at the outset, and he had overruled it or set i t aside. In my in­ terview with M r . Washburne the Sunday be­ fore my nomination, I had said to him that Judge H o a r and I were not only from the same State, but that we were residents of the same county, and within twenty miles of each other. Moreover, any public dis­ satisfaction which had existed at the begin­ ning had disappeared. In the meantime the President had become attached to Judge Hoar. N o r is there any justifying founda­ tion for the conjecture that a vacancy was created for the purpose of giving a place in the cabinet to another person, or to an­ other section of the country. General Grant's attachment to his friends was near to a weakness, and the suggestion that he sacri­ ficed Judge H o a r to the low purpose of giv­ ing a place to some other person is far away from any true view of his character. Judge Hoar had had no administrative experience on the political side of the gov­ ernment, and he underestimated the claims, and he undervalued the rights, of members of Congress. A s individuals the members of Congress are of the government, and in a final test the two Houses may become the government. More than elsewhere the seat of power is i n the Senate, and the Senate and Senators are careful to exact a recog­ nition of their rights. They claim, what from the beginning they have enjoyed, the r i g h t to be heard by the President and the heads of department in regard to appoint­ ments i n their respective States. They do not claim to speak authoritatively, but as members of the government having a right to advise, and under a certain responsibility to the people for what may be done. It was claimed by Senators that the A t ­ torney-General seemed not to admit their r i g h t to speak in regard to appointments, and that appointments were made of which they had no knowledge, and of which neither they nor their constituents could approve. These differences reached a crisis when Sena­ tors (I use the word in the plural) notified the President that they should not visit the Department of Justice while Judge Hoar was Attorney-General. Thus was a disagreeable alternative presented to the President, and a first impression would lead to the conclu­ sion that he ought to have sustained the Attorney-General. Assuming that the com­ plaints were well founded, i t followed that the A t t o r ley-General was denying to Sena­ tors the c onsideration which the President himself was recognizing daily.


GENERAL

360 REMINISCENCES

OF CHARLES

GRANT'S SUMNER.

M r . Sumner's removal from the chairman­ ship of the Committee on Foreign Relations was due to the fact that a time came when he did not recognize the President, and when he declined to have any intercourse w i t h the Secretary of State outside of official business. Such a condition of affairs is always a hindrance in the way of good gov­ ernment, and it may become an obstacle to success. Good government can be secured only through conferences with those who are responsible, by conciliation, and not infre­ quently by concessions to the holders of ad­ verse opinions. The time came when such a condition was no longer possible between Mr. Sumner and the Secretary of State. The President and his cabinet were i n ac­ cord in regard to the controversy with Great Britain as to the Alabama Claims. M r . Sum­ ner advocated a more exacting policy. M r . Motley appeared to be following M r . Sumner's lead, and the opposition to M r . Sumner ex­ tended to Mr. Motley. It had happened that the President had taken on a prejudice to M r . Motley at their first interview. This I learned when I said something to the Presi­ dent in the line of conciliation. The Presi­ dent said : " Such was my impression of Mot­ ley when I saw him that I should have withheld his appointment i f I had not made a promise to Sumner." M y acquaintance with Mr. Motley began i n the year 1849, when we were members of the Massachusetts House of Representatives, and I had a high regard for him, although it h a i been charged that I had had some part in driving him from politics into literature. When we consider the natures and the training of the two men, it is not easy to imagine agreeable cooperation in public af­ fairs by Mr. Sumner and General Grant. M r . Sumner never believed i n General Grant's fitness for the office of President, and General Grant did not recognize i n M r . Sumner a wise and safe leader in the business of gov­ ernment. General Grant's notion of M r . Sumner, on one side of his character, may be inferred from his answer when, being asked if he had heard M r . Sumner converse, he said : " No, but I have heard him lecture." As I am to speak of M r . Sumner in our personal relations, which for thirteen years before his death were intimate, I shall use some words of preface. Never on more than two occasions did we have differ uces that caused any feeling on either side. M r . Sum­ ner was chairman i n the Senate of the Com­

ADMINISTRATION mittee on the Freedmen's Bureau, and Mr. E l i o t was chairman of the Committee of the House. A report was made i n each House, and each bill contained not less than twenty sections. E a c h House passed its own bill. A committee of conference was appointed. Its report was rejected. I was appointed a member of the second committee. I examined the bills, and I marked out every section that was not essential to the working of the measure. F o u r sections re­ mained. I then added a section which pro­ vided for the lease and ultimate sale of the confiscated lands to the freedmen and refu­ gees. President Johnson's restoration of those lands made that section non-operative. The committee, upon the motion of General Schenck, transferred the jurisdiction of the Bureau from the Treasury to the W a r De­ partment. The bill was accepted by the committee, and passed by the two Houses. When within a few days I was in the Sen­ ate Chamber, M r . Sumner came to me, and said i n substance : " T h e F r e e d m e n ' s Bureau B i l l as it passed is of no value. I have spent six months upon the bill, and my work has gone for nothing. Y o u and General Schenck cannot pretend to know as much as I know about the measure." W i t h some feeling, which was not justifi­ able, I said : " I have not spent six hours upon the measure, but after what you have said I w i l l say that the fifth Section is of more value than a l l the sections which you have written." I did not wait for a reply. The subject was not again mentioned ; our friendly relations were not disturbed, and it is to M r . Sumner's credit on the score of toleration that he passed over my rough re­ marks, even though he had given some rea­ son for a retort. My next difference with M r . Sumner was a more serious difference, but i t passed with­ out any break in our relations. He had not acquired the church-going habit, or he had renounced it, and my church-going was spas­ modic rather than systematic. Thus it be­ came possible and agreeable for me to spend some small portion of each Sunday in his rooms. The controversy over M r . Motley and his removal from the post of minister to Great B r i t a i n excited M r . Sumner to a point far beyond any excitement to which he yielded, arising from his own troubles or from the misfortunes of the country. To him i t was the topic of conversation at a l l times and in all places. That habit I accepted at his house w i t h as much complacency as I could command. Indeed, I was not much disturbed


SUMNER'S

QUARREL

by what he said to me i n private, and cer­ tainly not by what he said i n his own house, where I went from choice, and without any obligation to remain resting upon me. In all his conversations he made General Grant responsible for the removal of Motley, ac­ companied, usually, w i t h language of censure and condemnation. On two occasions that were i n a measure public, one of which was a dinner given to me by M r . F r a n k l i n Haven, a personal friend of twenty years' standing, he insisted upon holding the Motley incident as the topic of conversation. On one of these occasions, and i n excitement, he turned to me and said : " Boutwell, you ought to have resigned when Motley was removed." I said only in reply : " I am the custodian of my own duty." This was the only personal remark that I ever made to M r . Sumner i n connection with the removal of Motley. The removal was the only reasonable solution of the difficulty in which Motley was involved ; but I sympa­ thized w i t h him i n the disaster which had overtaken him, and I was not disposed to discuss the subject. The incident at the din­ ner led me to make a resolution. I called upon M r . Sumner, and without accepting a seat, I said : " Senator, i f you ever mention General Grant's name in my presence, I w i l l never again cross your threshold." W i t h o u t the delay of a half minute he said : " A g r e e d . " There the matter ended, and the promise was kept. In 1872, and not many days be­ fore he left for Europe, he said : " I want to ask you a question about General G r a n t . " I said : " Y o u know that that is a forbid­ den topic." " Yes, but I am not going to speak con­ troversially." I said : " Say on." He said : " W h a t do you think of Grant's election ?" I said : " I think he w i l l be elected." He held up his hands, and in a tone of grief said : " Y o u and Wilson are the only ones who tell me that he has any chance." Upon his return from Europe i t was ap­ parent that his feelings in regard to the Republican party, and especially i n regard to General Grant, had undergone a great change. Our conversations concerning Gen­ eral Grant were resumed free from a l l restric­ tions and without any disturbance of feeling on my part. N o t many months before his death M r . Sumner made a speech i n executive session that was conciliatory and just i n a marked degree. I urged him to repeat i t i n

WITH

GRANT.

361

public session. H e seemed to regard the suggestion with favor, but the speech was not made. For many years M r . Sumner had been borne down under the resolutions of censure passed by the State of Massachusetts in dis­ approval of his position i n regard to the return of Confederate flags. That resolu­ tion was rescinded at the winter session of 1874. The act brought to M r . Sumner the highest degree of satisfaction that it was possible for him to realize. Above all things else of a public nature, he cherished the good name of the commonwealth, and for himself there was nothing more precious than her approval. The blow was unex­ pected, its weight was great, and its weight was never lessened until i t was wholly re­ moved. The rescinding resolutions came to me the Saturday next preceding the Wed­ nesday when M r . Sumner died. I was then in i l l health, so i l l that my attendance at the Senate did not exceed one half of each day's session through many weeks. M r . Sumner called upon me to inquire, and anxious to know, whether I could attend the session of Monday and present the resolutions. I gave him the best assurance that my condition permitted. When the resolutions had been presented, and when I was leaving the cham­ ber, M r . Sumner came to me, and, putting his arm over my shoulder, he walked with me into the lobby, where, after many thanks by him, and with good wishes for my health, we parted, without a thought by me that he had not before him many years of rugged life. For several years previous to 1874, M r . Sum­ ner had been accustomed to speak of himself as an old man, and on more than one occasion he spoke of life as a burden. To these ut­ terances I gave but little heed. The chief assurance for any considerable well-doing in the world is to be found in good purposes and i n fixedness of purpose when a purpose has been formed. These character­ istics were M r . Sumner's possessions, but in him they were subject to very important limitations as powers i n practical affairs. He did not exhibit respect or deference for the opinions of others even when the parties were upon a plane of equality, as is the usual situation in legislative bodies. He could not concede small points for the sake of a great result. Hence i t was that measures in which he had an interest took on a form at the end that was not agreeable to him. Hence it is that he has left only one piece of legislation that is distinctly the work of his hand. When the bill was under consideration which


362

GENERAL

GRANT'S

denied to colored persons the privilege of naturalization in the United States, he secured an amendment by which the exclusion was limited to the Mongolian race. H i s declara­ tion as to the status of the States that had been i n rebellion was not far away from the policy that was adopted finally, but he did not accept as wise and necessary measures the amendments to the Constitution which were designed to make that policy permanent. Indeed, it was his opinion, at one period of the controversy over the question of negro suffrage, that a legislative declaration would be sufficient. The field of his success is to be found in the argumentative power that he possessed and in its use for the overthrow of slavery. Of the anti-slavery advocates who entered the Senate previous to the opening of the war, he was the best equipped in learn­ ing, and his influence i n the country was not surpassed by the influence of any one of his associates. In his knowledge of diplomacy, he had the first rank i n the Senate for the larger part of his career. H i s influence i n the Senate was measured, however, by his influence i n the country. His speeches, es­ pecially in the period of national controversy, were addressed to the country. He relied upon authorities and precedents. H i s powers as a debater were limited, and it followed inevitably that in purely parliamentary con­ tests he was not a match for such masters as Fessenden and Conkling, who in learning were his inferiors. My means for information are so limited that I do not express an opinion upon the question whether M r . Sumner's ambitions i n public life were or were not gratified. On one or two occasions he let fall remarks which indicated a willingness to be trans­ ferred to the Department of State. Major Ben : Perley Poore had received the impression that there was a time when M r . Sumner looked to the Presidency as a possibility. A t an accidental meeting with Major Poore, he said to me : " I have dined with Sumner, and he gave me an account of the conversation he had with you this morning, in which you consoled him for not gaining the Presidency." I recalled the conversation. It was a Sunday-morning talk, and there was no special purpose on my part, however my remarks may have been received by M r . Sumner. He spoke of the opportunity furnished to M r . Jefferson for the exposition of his views in his first inaugural address. I then proceeded to say that, omitting the incumbent of the

ADMINISTRATION. office, of whom nothing could then be said, not more than three or four men had gained in standing by their elevation to the Presi­ dency, beyond the fact that their names were upon the r o l l . The exceptions were, first of all, L i n c o l n , who had gained most. Then Jackson, who had gained something—indeed, a good deal by his defense of the Union when compared w i t h what he might have lost by neglect of duty in the days of nullification. Washington had gained much by demonstrat­ i n g his capacity for civil affairs, by the legacy of his farewell address, and by the shaping of the new government under the Constitu­ tion i n a manner calculated to strengthen the quality of perpetuity. A t the end, I claimed that the other occupants of the Presi­ dential office had not gained appreciably by their promotion. In two important particulars, Samuel Adams and Charles Sumner are parallel characters i n American history. M r . Adams was a leader i n the contest that the colonies carried on against Great B r i t a i n . Our legal standing i n the controversy with the mother country has never elsewhere been presented as forcibly and logically as it was stated by M r . Adams in his letters to the royal gover­ nors in the name of the Massachusetts House of Representatives, between the years 1764 and 1775. When the contest of words and of arms was over he was not only not an aid in the organization of the new government, but he was an obstacle to its success. He ac­ cepted the Constitution w i t h hesitation and under constraint. A f t e r the overthrow of slavery and the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution, M r . Sumner gave no wise aid to the work of reconstruct­ ing the government upon the basis of the new conditions that had been created by the war and by the abolition of slavery. A s every guarantee for freedom contains some ele­ ment of enslavement over or against some who are not within the guarantee, men some­ times hesitate as to the wisdom of accepting guarantees of rights i n one direction which work a limitation of rights or privileges in other directions. The Constitution of the United States, while it gave power to the body of States and guaranteed- security to each, yet deprived the individual States of many of the privileges and powers that they had enjoyed as colonies. E v e r y amendment to the Constitution, from the first to the last, has limited the application of the doctrine of home rule i n the government.


THE

INSIDE BY

P R O F E S S O R

M I L N E ' S T H E

OF T H E E A R T H .

CLEVELAND

MOFFETT.

O B S E R V A T I O N S I N T E R I O R

O F

A N D

O U R

C O N C L U S I O N S

A S

T O

P L A N E T .

IT was at the Shide Observatory, Isle of W i g h t , i n Professor Milne's study, booklined, paper-strewn, fragrant with odors of Japan. On a shelf at one side an electric watch ticked patiently (perhaps the only elec­ tric watch i n the world), its long forefinger sending off hourly signals to the instruments outside, as it does a l l day long and all night long, year after year. F o r hours now I had been listening for the automatic bell-call to announce some earthquake in Iceland or South A m e r i c a or off the tortured coast of New­ foundland, but the bell kept silent. No news through the earth this day of Borneo's crust caving i n or of the West Pacific bottom shift­ ing. The old ground of seismology was pretty well talked over by now; so we shifted to new ground—to that region which lies under a l l ground—the interior of the earth. Was there anything to say about it ? Could anything be known about i t ?

p i e ; the thicker the crust the slower the loss of heat. With several hundred miles of crust you might get almost no c o o l i n g . " " But the law of regular increase i n tem­ perature ? " " One degree Fahrenheit for every fiftyone feet you go down ? I know But that law applies only a certain distance. Figure it out for yourself. One mile down gives an increase of 100 degrees, ten miles down 1,000 degrees, t h i r t y miles down 3,000 de­ grees—that's about the highest temperature we know anything about. It's the temper­ ature of the oxy-hydrogen flame. Platinum melts there, wrought iron melts there, gold evaporates there; all our surface rocks would melt there. Go down forty miles, and you get a temperature of 4,000 degrees; go down fifty miles, and you get 5,000 degrees; and so on until at a depth of 1,000 miles you might expect to reach a temperature of 100,000 degrees— which is absurd. It is a generally accepted view that the earth's temper­ ature decreases more and more slowly as you go deeper and deeper into it, and, after a cer­ tain point, say 200 miles, SHOWING T H E COURSES OF E A R T H ­ the rate of increase is QUAKE TREMORS. hardly appreciable."

The Professor smiled. " W e know i t ' s h o t , " he said. " H o w hot ? " " Perhaps as hot as the sun, when you get well inside. Y o u know i t was flung off from the sun, since which DIAGRAM time it has been con­ densing and c o o l i n g . " A n earthquake occurs at J . The first tremors travel " A n d beyond that " A n d how long has from J to S, C, B , A , through the earth. Later waves travel on the surface from A , B , C, to S. point you come to a the cooling taken ? " great molten sea ? ' ' ' ' L o r d K e l v i n says ' ' On the contrary, you leave a small molten twenty million years, but geologists and paleontologists ask for at least a hundred sea behind you, and come to a great rigid core." million." I stared at this. " To a great rigid core ? ' ' " A n d you think it may have kept its orig­ ' ' Y e s ; my experiments and those of others inal heat a l l these years ? " " W h y not ? W e find molten lava to-day in recording earthquake tremors indicate that inside rocks that have been cooling fifty years our earth is at least twice as r i g i d as steel. on a volcano's side. I t ' s the same princi- F o r instance, seismic waves through the body 7

363


364

THE

INSIDE

OF

of the world starting, say, from Japan, reach the Isle of W i g h t in sixteen minutes, which is nearly twice as fast as they would come the same distance through solid steel. The greater the rigidity, you know, the faster the rate of wave transmission." ' ' Do these seismic waves travel through the earth in straight lines, or do they follow around its surface ? ' ' " I am inclined to think that they radiate from their point of origin in all directions through our earth and over its surface. I will show you some seismograms that lead to this conclusion, and also throw light on the condition of the earth's i n t e r i o r . " The Professor produced a book pasted full of seismogram tapes, each bearing its straight blank line, broken into loops and jagged points where the earthquake tremors had set the needle swinging. It has been explained in a previous a r t i c l e * how the quiverings and swayings of these seismic pendulums are registered photographically on moving bands of paper. ' ' N o w , ' ' continued the Professor, ' ' here is a seismogram from the South Indian Ocean which shows what I may call seismic echoes; but before going into that let me tell you that waves through our earth reach Shide eighteen minutes after they leave Borneo, which is not very much i n excess of the time required for similar waves to travel from the West Indies, though Borneo is more than 2,000 miles farther away. A n d the reason of this is that the Borneo waves come through the earth at a greater depth than the West In­ dian waves, and therefore travel more quickly, which leads to the conclusion that the earth becomes more elastic as you approach the center. F r o m such observations as are at our disposal D r . C . G . Knott infers that the elas­ ticity which governs the propagation of a certain class of vibrations increases at the rate of 1.2 per cent, for each mile of descent. It is difficult to explain this greater speed of transmission on any other theory. W e a l ­ ways find that seismic waves from points on the globe nearly opposite us travel much faster than any other waves, simply because they pass nearer to the earth's center or re­ gion of maximum rigidity. On the other hand, we find that waves from points on our own side of the globe travel to us more slowly, since they come along shallow chords in a less rigid region. These phenomena, invari­ ably noted at all our seismic observatories, entirely upset the old theory that the earth's * " J o h n Milne, Observer of Earthquakes," by Cleveland Moffett, M C C L U K E ' S M A G A Z I N E for May,

1898.

THE

EARTH

interior is a freely moving liquid, and dem­ onstrate apparently that the earth-orange, under its peel of crust, is a mass very much more rigid than the crust i t s e l f . " " Y e t extremely hot ? " " Of c o u r s e . " " So hot that everything melts ? " " So hot that everything would melt if it could. A n d everything does melt in a cer­ tain limited region, a sort of viscous layer, pasty i n its upper parts and solid down below." " W h y not molten a l l the way down ? " " Because of the pressure above. A t a depth of 200 miles this would amount to about 600 tons to the square inch, probably enough to squeeze the molten rock and metal back into a solid state. A t any rate, a depth must soon be reached where the pressure is great enough to effect that result. You know the general l a w : that heat expands and cold contracts. W e l l , there are strong reasons for believing that most metals and rocks can be prevented from melting under heat i f you prevent them from expanding. Or, i f you have a quantity of molten metal which has already expanded i n melting, you can bring i t back to the solid state by great pressure, just as you can solidify liquid air by putting it under great pressure. The interior of the earth—the ball of the orange under­ neath the peel—though potentially liquid, is actually solid and extremely dense. It would immediately become liquid i f the pressure were removed. It is hot enough to become liquid, but by the laws of matter cannot do so without expanding, and it cannot expand so long as i t is squeezed down under the great weight upon i t . Y o u must understand that the earth, originally liquid, became solid under two influences: i t began to solidify at the surface by cooling, the crust growing thicker and t h i c k e r ; and i t began to solidify at the center by pressure, the core growing larger and larger. This double phenomenon of solidifying continued until a solid outer shell and a solid inner core came close to­ gether i n what may be called the critical region of the earth, a region that feeds lava to volcanoes." Professor Milne went on to consider what takes place in this c r i t i c a l region, this sub­ terranean and intermittently collapsing bat­ tlefield, where pressure and heat are ever fighting with changing fortune to make solid liquid and liquid solid. A s the crust cools it shrinks into countless wrinkles, just as an orange withers, these wrinkles being moun­ tain ranges and deep-cut valleys; for a con-


THE

SOURCE

AND

COURSE

tracting sphere must somehow squeeze to足 gether and readjust its superficial covering. A n d when an insufficiently supported area caves i n , when one of the girders of a conti足 nental frontier crashes into the sub-viscous layer beneath, like a Switzerland sliding into the Pacific Ocean, the shock goes v i b r a t i n g through the earth (we call it an earthquake), and it lifts the crust up i n long waves, like portions of a raft upon an ocean swell. These

SEISMOGRAMS OF A MEXICAN

OF

1.

FIG.

2. 1899,

AT T H E I S L E O F WIGHT

earth-waves, after traveling great distances, so Professor Milne has calculated, measure between crests from twenty to forty miles, and the crowns of their swells lift two or three feet above the level, so that a whole mountain range or a whole plain or a whole city heaves up two or three feet, then settles down as m u c h ; but a l l together and so evenly that only the seismic instruments can feel i t . London, N e w Y o r k , and all the cities i n the world are i n this way raised and lowered many times a year. A n d after a severe shock, these l o n g earth-swells persist for many hours before subsiding, about ten or twenty seconds being occupied by the lifting of one of them and ten or twenty seconds by the sinking.

365

" Then the surface of our earth is really quite elastic ? " I remarked. " The surface rocks are as you say. But the assumption of a liquid interior and a solid shell leads to the absolute absurdity that there are no tides in the ocean, for it is a matter of mathematical demonstration that even a shell of solid steel 500 kilometers (312 miles) thick would yield under the enormous pull of sun and moon (this is L o r d K e l v i n ' s cal-

FlQ.

E A R T H Q U A K E , J A N U A R Y 24,

EARTHQUAKES.

A S R E C O R D E D A T S W A R T H M O R E , P A . ( F I G . 1), A N D (FIG. 2).

culation) as i f it were India rubber, while a crust of any thickness assumed by those who hold the shell theory would buckle up under the moon's attraction i n a great land-wave that would accompany the moon around, car足 r y i n g the water up and down so that it would be apparently undisturbed. W e should have land-tides, but none of w a t e r . " " A s a matter of fact, is there no buck足 ling up of the earth under the moon's pull ? " " None that our instruments have as yet revealed with any certainty. It is likely, however, that more delicate instruments will show that there is a regularly recurring moonwave through the land with a lift of about one inch in 300 miles. But that, although


THE

366

INSIDE

OF

of interest in itself, is insignificant compared to the seismic pulsations we are considering." Coming back now to our book of seismograms, Professor Milne pointed out a further indication that the earth's interior is more r i g i d than its surface. " If you look clearly at these tapes," he said, ' ' you w i l l be struck by a repetition of the same figure or pattern in the needle trac­ ings. The seismograms of nearly all impor-

SEISMOGRAM

OF T H E EARTHQUAKE OF J U N E

29,

1898,

THE

EARTH

page 363], and here is the Shide observatory at S. N o w let us suppose an earthquake in Japan at J . Then the first seismic record will come to us on a path that is nearly straight, deep through the line of densest and most r i g i d medium, J S. But other seismic waves go forth from J by many paths, as J A , J B , J C ; and these, reaching the surface succes­ sively, may be carried along after emergence on the surface at a slower rate of transmission

I N T H E SOUTH INDIAN

OCEAN, AS RECORDED AT THE

ISLE OF WIGHT.

E N L A R G E M E N T O P P A R T S O F T H E A B O V E , S H O W I N G H O W T H E E C H O E S 1', 2', 3', E T C . , T R A V E L I N G O V E R T H E S U R F A C E , R E S E M B L E I N S H A P E T H E V I B R A T I O N S 1, 2, 3, E T C . , W H I C H T R A V E L E D T H R O U G H T H E E A R T H .

tant earthquakes contain such repetitions, or, as I styled them just now, seismic echoes. For several minutes the pendulum will oscil­ late through a certain number of loops and zigzags, recording, as it were, an earthquake signature—and many earthquakes carry with them what might be called the post-mark of their origin—and then presently it will re­ peat the very same loops and zigzags on a smaller scale, a miniature copy. A n d often there will follow one or two more repetitions, the record running off finally so far in dimin­ uendo that a magnifying glass is needed to show the resemblance between the last tiny autograph and the original. N o w I think we have here several seismic records of the same disturbance, these having traveled through the earth to different stations by different paths. I will show you what I mean by a dia­ gram. Here is the earth [see diagram on

and come to S one after another, each in its turn affecting the instruments. These are the precursors of the initial movement or shock of the earthquake, the main portion of which travels from the place of origin to the observ­ ing station as surface undulations. Following the shock are the echoes, reverberations, or earthquake followers, but whence these rhythmical repetitions are reflected we do not know. W e cannot say that there is music within our world, but perhaps, i n consequence of surgings at its point of origin, as an earth­ quake dies, music-like groupings of vibra­ tions are recorded at stations distant from the point of o r i g i n . " " Do a l l seismic disturbances originate," I asked, " in what you call the earth's criti­ cal region ? ' ' " B y no means. Earthquakes are dis­ tinctly of two kinds. There are those due


THE

EARTH'S

CENTER

to collapse i n the critical region, which cause the surface of our earth to heave and throb deeply; and there are those which originate by fracture due to excessive bending of the crust. These latter, which comprise at least ninety-five per cent, of the earthquakes felt, merely cause an elastic shiver, and are never propagated to great distances." " A r e there none that start at the center of the earth or near the center ? ' ' " None that we have detected. Were there any such, it is evident that they would reach a l l our seismic stations at precisely the same or nearly the same moment, hav­ ing equal distances to t r a v e l ; but that has never happened. There are always marked differences i n time for a given lot of seismograms, corresponding to the varying dis­ tances of our twenty-five stations from the point of disturbance. It is by comparing these different seismograms that we get the pre­ cise location of any particular earthquake." " Then you conclude that the interior of the earth below the critical region is in a state of rest; is just a silent, solid ball intensely hot. Does i t glow w i t h the heat red or white ?" " It can't show a glow so long as i t is cov­ ered up by a layer of gross material that does not transmit l i g h t ; but had we the means of seeing into the earth's interior at the time when any readjustment took place i n the critical region, its luminosity might flicker, and although we cannot see through a brick wall, it is not impossible that a something accompanying the phenomena of light on one side of the same may be rendered evident on the o t h e r . " " Would i t show a glow i f the crust were stripped off ? " " U n d o u b t e d l y ; only i f the crust were stripped off, it would cease to be a silent, solid ball. It would become a ball spread over with an ocean of molten fires. Y o u see, i f the crust were stripped off, the pressure would be relieved that keeps the inner ball solid, and what had been potentially liquid would at once become really liquid—to a depth where the weight of liquid ocean would give sufficient pressure to maintain the solid state. Then would begin again the process of surfacecooling and crust-wrinkling, and gradually there would form another earth like our pres­ ent one, only smaller by the thickness of the old shell. Y o u must know that we get our volcanoes through the buckling of the outer crust. In the shrinking of the earth's surface as it cools, there is a tendency to create cav­ ernous spaces in the crust above some c r i t i ­ cal region. These spaces may remain quiet

A

HOT,

SOLID

BALL.

367

for centuries; but so soon as water filters into one of them from the earth above or gets into i t by capillary action from the ocean alongside, conditions are reached which cul­ minate i n explosions of steam, and the ordi­ nary phenomena of violent convulsions and eruptions as we know them i n volcanoes." " Then i t does not follow that a l l the vol­ canoes in a certain region are fed from the same molten sea ? ' ' " Not at a l l , although there might be sev­ eral vents to one steam-driven lava lake. W e have an example in the Hawaiian Islands of two volcanoes close together, Kilauea and Mauna L o a , the former on the flanks of the l a t t e r ; yet the lava column in Kilauea stands 10,000 feet lower than i t stands in Mauna L o a . Here, plainly, each volcano is fed from its individual reservoir of lava, w i t h no com­ munication between the two, and each one represents a distinct pocket of liquid formed in the earth's crust by release of pressure." Passing down now below the region of earthquakes and volcano pools, we talked about the steadily increasing density of the inner ball and the significance of this. The conclusions drawn from seismogram records are supported by calculations and deductions of geologists and astronomers, the general opinion being that the earth's whole mass has a specific gravityof about 5.5 against a specific gravity in the crust of 2 . 5 ; i n other words, that the earth as we know i t is like a can­ non-ball covered with wood or leather, the outer part being light and flimsy compared to what is within. Furthermore, it is cal­ culated that the earth's central core must' have a specific gravity of at least 10 to bring the average up to 5.5. I asked Professor Milne for the explanation of this. " There are two w a y s , " he said, " of ac­ counting for the great density and weight of the earth's central core. If we assume that it is made up of elements as we have them on the surface and in the same proportions, we must conclude that these elements are so packed together at the center that a given bulk of surface earth weighs only one-fourth as much as the same bulk of center earth. But since solids as we know them are only very slightly compressible, the idea that the density at the center of the earth is due to mere packing of the components together has to be abandoned. Pressure has some effect in increasing the density of solids, but comparatively l i t t l e . A more reasonable hy­ pothesis is that the earth's core has great weight and density because the densest and heaviest elements arranged themselves there


368

GENERAL

LEONARD

in the planet's earliest period of formation. It is a rational assumption that when the earth was liquid, metals with great specific gravity, like platinum (21), gold (19), silver (10), lead (11), iron (7), sank below such lighter ele­ ments as silicon (2.4), aluminium (2.5), so­ dium (.97), carbon (3.3), and others which form the chief constituents of our surface rocks, clays, and sands. This arrangement corresponds with what the spectroscope shows to exist in other heavenly bodies—that is, heavier layers toward the center—and corre­ sponds with what geologists have actually found to be true of our earth so far as their researches go. The black basalt rocks in Utah and Nevada, for instance, are among the heaviest we have, and are known to have been thrown up from a great d e p t h . " " T h e n , " said I, " there may be great de­ posits of the heavier metals at the earth's center ? " " That is the view of many scientists, and there is nothing improbable in i t . W e should account then for the comparative scarcity of gold, platinum, and the more precious metals on the surface by assuming that the light crust contains only such occasional deposits of them as have leaked up somehow out of their proper lower layer, to be precipitated in the rock-scum of the surface. B y the same reasoning, it is likely that the lighter

GENERAL A

elements of the crust are very rare in the central core. A n d i f we could imagine people living there, we should probably find them making wedding-rings out of alumi­ nium, and building barns w i t h gold alloy. By the way, you may not know what an enormous quantity of aluminium there is on the earth's crust. It is by far the most abundant of all our metals, since it is the basis of all our earth and clay. In an ordinary brick there is over a pound of pure aluminium, and in every workman's back yard there is enough of it to build a battleship. It is merely a question of getting it out c h e a p l y . " " Is it l i k e l y , " I asked, " that the various metals and elements i n the earth's interior are arranged evenly in layers as you go down according to specific gravity ? " " N o ; there is probably only a general ten­ dency toward such an arrangement, for we must assume that there were internal dis­ turbances, just as there were disturbances in the crust. Besides, there is no more likelihood that a l l the metals and elements are distinctly themselves at the earth's center than at the surface. They must be blended together in a great number of alloys and chemical unions." Here our talk turned to more general con­ siderations regarding the constitution of the earth, considerations of the highest interest, but into which I cannot go now.

LEONARD

C H A R A C T E R BY

WOOD.

R A Y STANNARD

TO one who has seen General Leonard Wood at his work i n Santiago the popular esti­ mate of the man seems curi­ ously inadequate. H i s fame in the United States has rested almost wholly on what he has accomplished i n the material rehabilitation of a war-worn and turbulent prov­ ince, and yet this work reveals only one side of General Wood's character, and i n no wise explains the extraordinary personal ascendancy which he has attained in eastern Cuba. There are not many men in this or i n any other country who could have gone into the Santiago of August, 1898, with its thousands of dead and d j i n g , its reeking

WOOD.

S K E T C H . BAKER.

filth, its starvation, its utter prostration, and made of i t i n four months' time a clean, healthy, orderly city. Another soldier might have been chosen who could have preserved order as well as did General Wood, a lawyer might have reorganized the judicial system, and a physician reestablished the hospitals; but it would not have been easy to find an­ other man w i t h the varied mental equipment and the requisite physical endurance to serve in a tropical country as lawmaker, judge, and governor all in one; to build roads and sewers; to establish hospitals; to organize a school system and devise a scheme of finance; to deal amicably with a powerful church influence, and yet to remain, i n spite of such autoc­ racy, the most popular man i n the province. Y e t one cannot stay long i n Cuba without


A

CHARACTER

being convinced that i t was not so much what General W o o d did i n Santiago as what he was. He stood f o r Americanism. F o r years the Cubans had been looking to the great nation of the N o r t h for succor i n their struggle. They had at last been rescued, and the Spaniards had been driven from the island. Their ideal of the bravery, the hon­ esty, the power, the wisdom of the A m e r i c a n was high. H e must be everything that the Spanish oppressor was not. A n d here they had General Wood, the A m e r i c a n . H e was calm, firm, simple, accessible to poor as well as to r i c h . H e was direct and absolutely truthful i n what he said. He had none of the airs of the Spanish governors—a sturdy man in a k h a k i suit, who went everywhere, saw everything, and could be neither flattered, nor cajoled, nor deceived; a man who quelled riots w i t h his riding-whip. That was the American they knew. To this day the visitor at Santiago won­ ders at the apathy of the Cubans over the marvelous improvements i n their c i t y — i t s beautiful pavements, its clean alleys, its en­ larged water system, and its reorganized hospitals. These things make an acute i m ­ pression on the cleanly A m e r i c a n ; but the average Cuban, who has never known any­ thing but dirt and disease, simply does not understand such conditions. He himself never suffers from yellow fever—then why all this fuss about quarantine, this fumigat­ ing and burning—thousands of dollars of Cuban money spent to protect the foreigner from disease? " Y e s , the pavements are good," a Cuban said to me g r u d g i n g l y ; but most of our people are just as well off without them. The asphalt hurts their heels." Some day, indeed, the splendid rock roads which General W o o d has been driving east and west and north and south, through jun­ gles and over mountains, w i l l earn their ap­ preciation; but to-day, when the four-wheeled wagon is unknown, when the burro-train is the accepted means of c a r r y i n g freight, the average Cuban cannot see the utility of such improvements, except as a means of provid­ ing work for the unemployed. He is merely vaguely jealous, feeling somehow that the American is repairing Cuba so that it w i l l be habitable for himself. These really wonderful public works, prosecuted i n spite of many difficulties, have made General Wood famous wherever English is spoken ; but they have not added appreciably to his glory among the Cubans. It is Wood the man and the Amer­ ican whom they love and respect; and it is

SKETCH.

369

Wood who has won their confidence more fully, perhaps, than any other American. It sometimes happens that a man of extra­ ordinary activity stands in the shadow of his own achievements. In a measure that is what General Wood has been doing, so far as his own countrymen are concerned. He is known in America mainly for the roads he has built, but in Santiago he is respected for the man he is. Those who know him best—and it is fortunate for the country that some of them are i n high places—know that it is the im­ mense personal force of the man, the rare ability to win the absolute confidence of every one w i t h whom he comes i n contact, that has won him his successes and has so per­ sistently suggested his name for still higher places. General Wood comes early to his fame. H e is now only thirty-nine years old. Eighteen months ago he was unknown outside of the limited circle of his personal acquaintance. A t the beginning of May, 1898, he was an army surgeon w i t h the rank of captain. Two months later he was commanding a brigade at San Juan, and his name was known in every hamlet in the United States. Before the year was out he had risen to the rank of major-general, and he held what was then one of the most im­ portant foreign commands i n the gift of the government. Because of this quick pro­ motion he has been called a man of oppor­ tunity ; but he is rather the man always ready for the opportunity. W i t h i n eight months after he received his army commis­ sion, back i n the middle '80's, he had earned a Congressional medal for gallant and haz­ ardous service, and he was then only a con­ tract surgeon, green from the schools. A n d it was not mere chance that made him colo­ nel of the Rough Riders and led his regiment first of a l l the troops into the jungle at L a s Guasimas. There is a glitter of brilliancy about such sudden rises i n fortune that frequently blinds a careless public to the generations of high breeding and the unremitting self-develop­ ment and self-preparation which have made such a career a possibility. General Wood's success dates back to the " Mayflower " ; for he is a direct descendant of Susanna White, whose son, Peregrine White, was the first white child born in New England. Nine years after the coming of the " Mayflower," the first of the Wood family, W i l l i a m Wood, landed in Massachusetts, and there, within a day's journey from Plymouth Rock, the family has grown and developed, although General Wood himself was born at Winchester, N e w Hamp-


370

GENERAL

LEONARD

shire (October 9, 1860), where his parents temporarily resided. H i s mother, who is still living, comes of the old Massachusetts fami­ lies Hager, Cutler, and N i x o n . H i s immedi­ ate ancestors were nearly all farmers, of the stiff, stern stock that wrung a hard l i v i n g from the rocky farms of Wayland, Sudbury, and Weston. H i s father was D r . Charles Jewett Wood, a man of brilliant attainments, sturdy individuality, great physical energy, and, although strangely taciturn, a man who attracted and won the confidence of every one he met. F o r years he drove by day and night over the hills between Buzzard's Bay and Cape Cod, following the rigorous, under­ paid practice of a country doctor, and many are the little homes of the fisher folk where he called and forgot to leave his bill. The old Wood homestead at Barlow Landing, i n Pocasset, where the boy Leonard lived be­ tween the years of six and eighteen, has now been swept away to make room for a summer cottage. It stood only a stone's throw from the waters of Buzzard's B a y — a plain little two-story house sided with shingles and looking out at the old wharf where generations of Barlows have tied their vessels. It was young Wood's first ambition to follow the sea; the longing for adventure burned in his blood and drove him into a l ­ most recklessly venturesome voyages down the coast. A little later he was planning for a voyage in the A r c t i c ; and he even went so far as to pack his clothing, ready for i n ­ stant departure. D u r i n g the winter he at­ tended the district school, where he fared only moderately in his studies, but won a reputation for strength and daring. A n old schoolmate describes him as a square-built, stocky boy, with blue eyes and hair like caulking-tow. He was shy, sensitive, and s i l e n t ; and persevering rather than ready. For three years he attended an old-fashioned academy at Middleboro. He was fond of the languages and of history ; mathematics did not appeal to him. H i s reading was mostly of books of travel, history, and adventure, with an occasional novel. After the death of his father, in August, 1880, Wood entered the Harvard Medical School. He was almost without means ; but by earning what he could in tutoring and with the money from a hard-won scholarship he managed to pay his way, and came out third in his class at the examination for admission to the city hospital. D r . E . G . Brackett, of Boston, who was a classmate of his at the Medical School, describes him as " a boy of

WOOD.

fine clean countenance." " A t that time," Dr. Brackett told me further, " Wood gave one the impression of being shy and back­ ward, just as any country boy might be on coming to the city to college. He seemed self-distrustful, for he had not learned his own strength ; but i t was self-distrust in assertion rather than i n action. He talked then as he does to-day, i n a low, steady voice, saying very little, but that little always direct and frank." Dr. E . H . Bradford, who was superinten­ dent of the Boston City Hospital while Wood was there as an intern, says of him : " He was one of the most satisfactory assistants I ever had—if not the most satisfactory. He was indefatigable i n his work, and when he was told to do a thing, he could be counted upon absolutely to do it, and do i t immediately. And he knew how to hold his tongue." D u r i n g his last year i n the medical school his shyness wore off somewhat—although to this day he gives a marked impression of re­ serve, i f not of diffidence—and he became immensely popular among those who knew him. It was not the homage paid to a bril­ liant student, although Wood was always near the top of his class ; but i t came to him because he was W o o d — a broad-minded, cool-headed, generous, unpretentious fellow. One of his classmates told me that Wood was more sought after than any other intern, notwithstanding a bold directness of speech (when he spoke at all) that never minced an opinion of things or of men. This directness remains w i t h him. He has the rare gift of looking a man i n the eye, telling him a dis­ agreeable truth, and being better friends w i t h him afterwards than he was before. He made i t a rule throughout his course to keep himself in perfect physical t r i m . He ran and walked hundreds of miles a month, and he boxed i n the amphitheater of the hospital until his muscles were like steel. A t twenty-four, Wood began the practice of medicine i n a l i t t l e office in Staniford Street, Boston, where the people were poor and pay was slow. There he spent nearly a year in a bitter struggle to get a start. By the aid of dispensary work and tutoring, he managed to pay expenses ; but that was all. The old longing for greater activity— the fever of the seaman and fighter in his blood—again took possession of him, and in A p r i l , 1885, he packed his satchel, and with­ out informing any of his friends, he went to New Y o r k to take an examination for ad­ mission as a surgeon i n the army. To his surprise, he passed second i n a competitive


A

CHARACTER

class of fifty-nine ; and there being no va­ cancies, he accepted a contract position, which he held until he was commissioned, January 5, 1886. H i s first service was on an assignment for two days at F o r t Warren, Massachusetts. IN

PURSUIT

O F GERONIMO.

In June, 1885, he was ordered to Arizona. He determined even before he left Boston that, i f an opportunity should ever present itself, he would enter the active branch of the service. He did not then know how soon his desire i n this regard was to be gratified. On the night of J u l y 4, 1885, he arrived at F o r t Huachuca, i n Arizona. There he met Captain H . W . L a w t o n of the Fourth Cavalry, now Major-General L a w t o n . Lawton had been at Harvard, and the two at once became friends. L a w t o n was leaving at four o'clock the next morning on what was to become one of the most famous of Indian campaigns—the pursuit of Geronimo, and Wood was ordered to report to him for duty. There was only one unassigned horse in the troop—a vicious, unreliable animal— and Wood knew next to nothing of riding. The instant he was mounted, the horse rushed into some heavy trees, to the damage of the young surgeon's clothing, but the rider never let go. That day he rode t h i r t y miles, through some of the roughest country i n Arizona, in the heat and dust of midsummer, and for five days afterward he was i n the saddle eighteen hours a day. It was what a cavalryman calls " healing i n the saddle," and a man who can do i t and live to ride any further has the mettle of a soldier i n him. F r o m July, 1885, u n t i l March, 1887, the young surgeon was almost continuously in the field, chasing Apaches through A r i ­ zona, New Mexico, and 400 miles into old Mexico. Before he had been commissioned three months, and even then he was not a line officer, he was assigned to command a l l the i n ­ fantry of the expedition, and sometimes the Indian scouts. B u t that was the way of the man—he went up by sheer personal force. I t w a s Wood's opinion that a well-trained white man could endure more than any In­ dian, and he set about deliberately to prove it. Governor Theodore Roosevelt, who knows him as well, perhaps, as any one, recently said of him : " No soldier could outwalk him, could live w i t h greater indifference on hard and scanty fare, could endure hardship better, or do better without sleep." Perhaps there never was an expedition so

SKETCH.

371

remarkable for its hardships and the extra­ ordinary endurance and fortitude of the men who took part i n i t as this chase for Geronimo and his Apaches among the cactus and chap­ arral of their own burning hills. Of t h i r t y picked frontiersmen who started out, only fourteen lasted to the end, and only two of these were officers—Lawton and Wood. B u t they brought i n Geronimo. The spirit of the wildest of a l l the Indian tribes had been broken by the relentless determination of a handful of white men. A t another time Wood was detailed with a force of twenty-seven Indian scouts to follow a straggling minor t r a i l . A l l they carried with them was little sacks of coffee and salt. There were only six tin cups i n the party. B u t they killed and ate deer, and these, with prickly pears and roots that the Indians dug, sufficed them for food. A s for water, they found it when they could, on those parched hills. A n d Wood slept and ate and marched with the Indians ; managed them, too, as he has since managed the Cubans ; and so severe was the expedition that two of these hardy scouts died from the effects of it, after they returned. Once, sleep­ ing half-clad on the ground, Wood was stung by a tarantula, and yet marched on foot, though suffering exquisitely, for two days, when finally he fell delirious. A t another time, arriving at a stockaded ranch, he bought a large steer, and such was the hun­ ger of the party that the twenty-eight men ate the animal to the bones i n two meals. " In this remarkable pursuit," writes Gen­ eral Miles, i n his report, " he [Captain L a w ton, w i t h his command] pursued them from one range of mountains to another, over the highest peaks, often 9,000 and 10,000 feet above the level of the sea and frequently in the depths of the canons, where the heat i n July and August was of tropical intensity. A portion of the command leading on the t r a i l were without rations for five days, three days being the longest continuous period. They subsisted on two or three deer killed by the scouts and mule meat without salt. These men made marches where i t was impossible to move cavalry or pack-trains ; but their la­ borious and painful efforts were crippled by the miserable shoes made at and furnished by the military prison at F o r t Leavenworth. The worthless material fell to pieces i n three or four days' marching. The troops suffered somewhat from fever, but fortunately they were very strong men and endured their hard­ ships with commendable fortitude. When on the Y a q u i River and i n the district of Moctezuma, the hostile camp was surprised and


372

GENERAL

LEONARD

attacked by Captain Lawton's command. The Indians escaped among the rocks, but their entire property, with the exception of what they could carry, was captured, including a l l their horses. They scattered i n every direc­ tion ; but whenever this occurred the troops followed the t r a i l of a single Indian until they came together again. . . . I enclose herewith the report of Assistant Surgeon Leonard Wood, who accompanied Lawton's command from the beginning to the end. He not only fulfilled the duties of his profession in his skillful attention to disabled officers and sol­ diers, but at times performed satisfactorily the duties of a line officer, and, during the whole extraordinary march, by his example of physical endurance, greatly encouraged others, having voluntarily made many of the longest and most difficult marches on foot." After Geronimo, finding himself cornered, had consented to go back and surrender to General Miles, Lawton's party and the Apaches marched northward, i t being the understand­ ing that there should be a truce between them. Wood and two officers were detailed to march with Geronimo's warriors as hos­ tages, and this they did for several days, sleep­ i n g and eating with the murderous Apaches, often miles away from their companions. In his report of the campaign, Captain L a w t o n said : " I desire to invite the attention of the department commander to Assistant Surgeon Leonard Wood, the only officer who has been with me through the whole campaign. H i s courage, energy, and loyal support during the whole time, his encouraging example to the command when work was the hardest and prospects darkest, his thorough confidence and belief in the final success of the expedi­ tion, and his untiring efforts to make i t so, have placed me under obligations so great that I cannot express them." The young surgeon had improved his first opportunity. He was recommended to Con­ gress for a medal of honor, and he received it—ten years later. But the people of the Southwest who had lived next to the Apaches and knew better of what they were r i d gave a three weeks' celebration at Albuquerque in honor of the men who had brought Geronimo to terms. Before these festivities were well over, General Miles despatched Wood, with eight picked men, into Mexico, to run down a band of Indians that had escaped the first expedition. A t one time i n this remarkable expedition, which covered more than 2,000 miles of the wildest regions of Mexico, Wood and his men traveled for forty-seven days without seeing a human habitation or a trail.

WOOD.

While the trip did not result i n the capture of the missing Apaches, i t served as stern train­ i n g for the service of later years. In spite of the hardships of these expeditions, to a man of General Wood's magnificent physique, love of adventure, and intense activity they were full of the keenest enjoyment. To this day he cannot speak of his frontier campaign­ i n g without a note of regret in his voice. " There is no life like i t , " I once heard him say. In the spring of 1887, Wood went to Los Angeles, the headquarters of the department of Arizona, as one of the staff surgeons—a reward for his service i n Mexico—and here he found a new opportunity awaiting him which should prove his unusual capacity in another line, that of his profession. Gen­ eral Miles had been thrown from his horse, and his leg had been badly broken. The surgeons who examined him feared the probability of amputation or permanent dis­ a b i l i t y — a catastrophe which would close his career i n the army. Then the General sent for Wood. N o man would feel the responsibility of deciding the fate of his commanding officer more keenly than Wood ; but young as he was, and knowing the judg­ ment of the senior surgeons, he gave the opinion that the leg could be saved. Miles unhesitatingly placed himself in the hands of the young surgeon, and the leg was saved, so that the commanding general of the armies of America walks to-day without a limp. A year later, in 1888, Wood was serving with the Tenth Cavalry i n the K i d outbreak in New Mexico, and later he was engaged in the exacting and difficult work of the heliographic survey of Arizona, i n which General Miles was then deeply engrossed. There are probably few men i n the army who know every valley and mountain of that rugged wilderness better than does General Wood. A f t e r this service, there was a year at F o r t McDowell, and then a return to Cali­ fornia, where, i n 1889, he met Louise A . Condet Smith, a niece of IT. S. Justice Field, whom he married a year later, at Washington. It was during his service at the California posts, and at F o r t McPherson, near Atlanta, Georgia, that he became an expert foot-ball player. Foot-ball appealed to him strongly as furnishing the strenuously active element of his life which had dropped out of i t when he quit the Indian service of the Southwest. The team of which he was captain at Fort McPherson lost only one game i n two years. He continued to play foot-ball actively until


A

MAJOR-GENERAL

CHARACTER

LEONARD

SKETCH.

WOOD,

THE NEW

On December 1 3 , 1 8 9 9 , General Wood was promoted from the Principe to the command of the entire military division of Cuba, At the time of his promotion he was in this country on a brief by Miss Ben-Yusuf, taken especially for M C C L U R E ' S M A G A Z I N E , December ICth.

he was past thirty-seven years old, a few months before the outbreak of the Spanish war. A n incident of a game played at F o r t McPherson throws a l i g h t on the sterner side of his character. He came home one after­ noon w i t h a deep cut over one eye. It was bleeding profusely; but he calmly changed his clothes, and went to his office, where he laid out his surgical instruments, and, standing

GOVERNOR

373

OF

CUBA.

office of governor of the provinces of Santiago and Puerto and to the office of military governor of the whole island. official visit, and the above portrait is from a photograph the morning General W o o d sailed on his return to Cuba,

before a mirror, quietly took four stitches in the wound, afterwards dressing i t properly. To an army surgeon, Washington is a place full of the possibilities of honor, but also a place of much hard work. He must attend as medical adviser all active and re­ tired officers of the army and their families ; he is official physician to the Secretary of War, and he shares with a navy surgeon the


GENERAL

LEONARD

responsibility of attending the President. General Wood was ordered to duty in Wash­ ington in September, 1895, and it was not long before he became a frequent visitor to President Cleveland and his family. A n d here in the White House, as on the plains, he won friends. WOOD'S

FIRST

MEETING

WITH

ROOSEVELT.

When the administration changed and President McKinley came into power, D r . Bates of the navy was, until his death, attend­ ing surgeon at the White House. One night in the fall of 1897, Wood received a summons from the President, and from that time for­ ward he was the regular medical adviser to M r . and M r s . McKinley, as he was already attendant on General Alger, the Secretary of War. It was about this time that he met Theodore Roosevelt, then Assistant Secre­ tary of the Navy. They were guests at din­ ner of the Lowndes family, and they walked home together in the evening. Their friend­ ship was instant. Both were men of ex­ traordinary vitality and activity. Both loved hunting and fishing, sailing, and all the vigorous out-door sports which do so much toward making good men. Both knew the wild W e s t ; both were born with the blood of fighters hot within them. In each of them was bred the best of American tradi­ tions—for Roosevelt had come from the ancient Dutch stock of Manhattan and Wood was from the oldest blood of New England. And, more than anything else, both were men of high ideals and splendid ambitions. Straightway the two young Americans, not so famous then as they were soon to be, were tramping together in the country, each walk­ ing at a gait to outdo the other and each pretending that he was doing nothing at all unusual. They also ran foot races, and dur­ ing the winter, on many a blustery afternoon, they went to the hills in their sweaters and coasted on Norwegian ski. Occasionally they persuaded Senator Lodge, of Massachusetts, or some army officer to go with them ; but there were not many men who could stand the pace they set. On pleasant Sunday after­ noons they would walk out Georgetown way with their children. In these excursions, they led in scaling steep hills, crossing l o g bridges, exploring ravines, and climbing trees. Sometimes the children pretended to be sol­ diers tracking Indians, and sometimes to be the Indians who were tracked—all of which was not only a jolly pastime, but a vigorous training in fearlessness and endurance.

WOOD. ORGANIZING

T H E ROUGH

RIDERS.

In the spring of 1898 came the talk of war with Spain. Both Wood and Roosevelt were fired at once with the prospect. Wood's keenest ambition had always been to get into the line of the army and see active service. He was a tried and experienced soldier, a man of acknowledged judgment and personal force. The President believed in him and in Roosevelt; they were, indeed, his personal friends. He called them the " w a r party," and when Wood came i n of a morning he would ask, " Have you and Theodore declared war yet ?" It was inevitable that they should go into the fight. They first planned to raise regiments in their respective States, Roosevelt i n New Y o r k and Wood i n Mass­ achusetts. This, however, was likely to be attended by much red tape and not a little delay—things that neither of the men could brook. It was perfectly natural, therefore, that they should seize upon the idea of a regiment such as the Rough Riders—an idea suggested by Senator Warren. Wood had himself been a rough rider ; he knew inti­ mately every phase of the service, and he felt that it was the dash and boldness of attack of an Indian campaign that would avail most in the jungles of Cuba. Roosevelt w as offered the colonelcy, with authority to recruit such a regiment, but declined it, and said that he would accept the lieutenant-colonelcy if Wood was appointed colonel. The Secretary of W a r approved, and Wood was commis­ sioned to raise the regiment. General Alger, indeed, gave Wood a desk in the corner of his office. " N o w don't let me hear from you again," he said, " u n t i l your regiment is raised.". r

It is not necessary here to repeat the fa­ miliar story of the Rough Riders. Within twenty-one days from the time permission was given to begin the recruiting, the famous regiment was ready to march. A n d not the least of the task which confronted Wood and Roosevelt was the selection of 1,200 rough riders from 23,000 applicants, from every part of the Union. Never before had there been such a record i n military organization. In the battle of L a s Guasimas Wood was the same steady, low-voiced man that he was in the drawing-rooms of Washington, abso­ lutely fearless in a hail of bullets, now calling up a nervous captain and asking him to re­ peat his orders, now walking along the line, up and down, where every soldier was hugging the ground, and now calmly cautioning his men : " Don't swear, men ; shoot." A lieu-


A

CHARACTER

SKETCH.

tenant of the Rough Riders said to m e : " I f there was any prevailing spirit of courage in that march from Daiquiri and i n the battle that followed, that spirit and inspiration was Colonel Leonard Wood." " N o officer," writes Governor Roosevelt, " ever showed more ceaseless energy i n pro­ viding for his soldiers, i n reconnoitering, i n overseeing, personally, a l l the countless de­ tails of life in camp, in patrolling the trenches at night, i n seeing by personal inspection that the outposts were doing their duty, i n attending personally to a l l the thousand and one things to which a commander should attend, and to which only those commanders of marked and exceptional mental and bodily vigor are able to attend." General Wood told me that he felt from the first the pressing necessity of haste i n conquering the Spaniards. " I t was a race between malaria and the constitution of our men," he said, and that was the principle on which the rush of the army was made. It is the accepted opinion that the extraordinary attack at L a s Guasimas, of which the Span­ iards said, " They tried to catch us with their hands," had more to do w i t h demoraliz­ ing the enemy and making possible the sub­ sequent victories than any other one thing. The Rough Riders paid dearly for their vic­ tories ; of 500 men who landed at Daiquiri one hundred and forty-two were killed or wounded. GOVERNOR OF SANTIAGO.

375

was black with buzzards. Of government and police there were none, or of courts or schools. The jails were choked with pris­ oners, the hospitals were full, and, to cap the sum of woe, yellow fever was raging. There were a thousand difficult problems, and every problem was acute. In the ab­ sence of any laws or precedents, the gov­ ernor must answer every one of countless clamorers and decide unnumbered questions. It was the first time that an American had been delegated to reconstruct a captured foreign city, and yet General Wood was not flurried for a moment, nor did he hesitate or waver. Here, as never before, he had need for steadiness, judgment, force; but even in those t r y i n g early days he never seemed to use more than half of his strength, nor to exert half of his rightful authority. When he moved, men and things moved irresistibly before him—because they must. A n d the governor himself worked night and day, be­ cause he could. He gathered up the first hundred men he met i n the streets and set them to work i n spite of themselves ; he opened stations to feed the s t a r v i n g ; he impressed every suitable vehicle in the city to carry away the filth ; he started a police force, established a yellow fever h o s p i t a l ; he put down the looters and robbers with an iron hand, and he started the doctors on a house-to-house visitation to relieve the sick. A n d while he worked, a black cloud of smoke rose for days above the city to the eastward, where thousands of dead were being piled and burned because there were not helpers to bury them fast enough. S i t t i n g personally as the judge of a summary court, he cleared the jails ; he made the laws, and then he ex^etttt^ themi<cS^hen the butchers charged

Two months from the day on which W o o d received his commission as colonel o l the Rough Riders he was appointed a brigadfie^ general of volunteers (July 8, 189SWatfd eleven days later he was governor of tVk ®sty of Santiago. H i s appointment as getffernofr came naturally to him ; he was the mafi°#f ajb ? t e O p r ^ w ^ b f c n ^ / t v % e J p j X fflht. others who had made an extraordinary " r ^ e o ^ in the field, and he was one of the Jpw^mejji who were as vigorous, physically, at-rafe | M of that terrible tropical campaign as^#4hej$|-" fadprn^^Mrffifetoti of fim%r^*alting ginning. He went at the task of t,'en%iljb^fcg ing the stricken city with cool juJgm^nti/glucomconquerable energy, and a real j o V g O T P f t i q ^ ^ ' te»njO^Ifeefeaxfirifcjsd % « e ? g y i r e city fi^WWne^he orSantiago was thronged w i t h stffflfci^fiw: W&tfMm t®M destitute people ; i t was a g i t a t e o j W t f e ^ f s - | ^ g | d " a § a p 3 ^ e ^ ^ t e s t a W i s i ^ 4 school banding Spanish army, and s u r r r t U m i e t i ^ t y ^ s y s t o u « ^ s © d ^ e ^ i n a S ^ 4 ^ ( ? f / t a x ^ i o n , forand out by undisciplined hordes of C u ' ^ a n s t f M e r e fi^^u*-%h^in| ^d^(^|te^i^iins, were 15,000 sick i n a population, o f - ^ , G M / w ^ l ^ ^ . % i ^ e ^ t h ^ ) W Q n ( f e ^ 9 Q l J p to the ym&W the e x and people were dying at the ra^e ci!fcqpQ^a« fir^rl^m^^pS^^^m day. The streets were k n e e - d ^ e p ^ ^ m i i p 9&$se|i 6 ¥ % i ^ Q ^ T O r ^ f t 3 ) e B t o Q i f t M i ^ i e ordinary had acand filth, and thousands of dead vMl&fpleSP e e f ^ u f e ^ a ^ h ^ tered in the areaways, so that tlntf-Si© aftovg ^Us^kiM^^^rQ^^Vim he appro£

H

s

n

B

a

r

1

e

9

{

C

f

1

1


376

GENERAL

LEONARD

priated for public improvements, and under his direct supervision, there were constructed five miles of asphalt pavement, fifteen miles of country pike, and six miles of macadam ; and 200 miles of country road were opened up. A quarter of a mile of macadam pavement which the Spaniards had laid along the water front a year before had cost $180,000 ; Wood's engineers paved a large proportion of the city's streets with asphalt, five miles in all, for less than $175,000. General Wood's methods of dealing with affairs were as characteristic as tb^" were suggestive. Early one mn*-' 'anted to see the chief e r ^ ' orks, and he r p " mein-

1

\

WOOD.

actly like the other men of the party, in a brown khaki suit. He wore a peaked cavalry hat and buff leather riding-leggings and spurs. His only distinguishing mark was the star on his shoulder, the insignia of a briga­ dier-general, and that was too high up for any of the little Cubans to see. Guantanamo is a typical east Cuban town of some 10,000 inhabitants. On this Sunday morning i t was swimming in clay mud, and wore an indescribable air of apathy and disheartenment. The faces at the doors were tired and lusterless, and even the clinking of the spurred heels of the Americans on the narrow flag walks failed to arouse any marked interest. Perhaps they didn't know that it was the governor who passed. In a big, bare, dilapidated room with barred windows a con­ ference was held with the mayor and the city council. The mayor was a small, dry, brown Id man, very smugly clad in a black suit. i his curl-brim straw hat he wore the lored cockade of a Cuban general—the 7 bit of color about him—and he carried arious tortoise-shell cane, on which he ed with both hands. He sat next the •ican governor, and, oddly enough, exbeneath a picture of Admiral Dewey, olemnly watched each speaker. The city •oil was made up very like an American ige board—of the apothecary, the wheel"•ht, the doctor, and so on ; but the memvaried in color from the pure olive of Spaniard to the shiny black of the full­ ed negro. , governor rose and greeted each man came i n with serious politeness, for 3ss. is the bread of existence to the MtPr they were all seated and the uga i w 4 frgps, i n walked that typical nstitution, Wi agitating editor. H e .th an indescribable bustle of imporj i d opposition, a dramatic effect unate by any Anglo-Saxofl. His note-book .cil were clearly i n evidence, and he the chair which was offered him. old mayor looked at him w i t h a k of interest; the American goverim not at a l l . The chief of the 1 was also there, a big, handsome straight and lithe as a bamboo, stol tipped up the skirts of his; 'ore black patent-leather leggings,. i, and a white linen uniform with inga, which set him off w i t h jaunty se. the talk (through an interpreter) Oney. They had not yet received wance from the customs fund, and


GENERAL WOOD AS A FOOT-BALL PLAYER. The picture shows General Wood in the uniform of the Olympic Foot-ball Team of San Francisco, of which he was a member during his service in California.

Later, in 1893 and 1894, he was a famous guard and half-back

and the captain of a team at Fort McPherson, near Atlanta, Georgia. team lost but one game.

During the two years of his captaincy his


378

GENERAL

LEONARD

General Wood explained why it was delayed. The apothecary then reported that they had decided to build a fine yellow-fever hospital of stone ; but General Wood advised a wooden structure, with a wide veranda, and he ex­ plained with the ready knowledge of a skilled physician how difficult it was to disinfect a stone building. The grave old mayor nodded his head ; the American governor was wise. " T e l l them," said General Wood, " that they should get together and build a good schoolhouse. They would have the honor of con­ structing the first one in Cuba." But the mayor and council were silent— school-houses did not interest them. They discussed the new water-works system, on which the Americans were spending $100,000 ; and they wanted a stable for the horses of the rural guard, a subject which the gov­ ernor referred to the local American com­ mandant for investigation. " T e l l them," said General Wood, " t h a t I haven't heard any complaints from here," at which compliment the council nodded in deep appreciation, and the mayor even smiled. " They wish to thank you," said the inter­ preter, " f o r the interest which you take i n the town," and then it was the governor's turn to bow graciously. The immediate busi­ ness being now completed, the governor shook hands all around, addressing those about him readily in Spanish. A n d with this the con­ ference ended. When General Wood left Santiago for his first visit to the United States, in the spring of 1899, all Santiago came down to see him off and cheered him lustily. They presented him with a diploma of regard, a beautiful hand-work scroll written in Spanish—" The People of the city of Santiago de Cuba to General Leonard Wood. . . . The great­ est of all your successes is to have won the confidence and esteem of a people in trouble." He went N o r t h in the heat of the year for rest and relief, and to his astonishment and acute discomfort the country tried to receive him as a returned hero. He was feasted and interviewed and called upon for ad­ dresses, and his alma mater, Harvard Univer­ sity, made him the lion of her commence­ ment and conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Laws. But he had hardly begun to rest when news came that Santiago was down again with yellow fever and that the American soldiers were dying like sheep. Without a moment's delay or a thought of the danger involved, Wood set sail for Cuba, but not before he had purchased a ton of cor­ rosive sublimate and other disinfecting mate­

WOOD.

rial to take with him. He arrived at Santiago on July 9th, with his plan of campaign clearly marked out. The next day every American in Santiago was on his way to the mountains whether he wanted to go or not. Indeed, the entire American garrison left in the city consisted of just six soldiers, and they were all sick in the hospital. Y e t so much con­ fidence did General Wood place i n his Cuban guards, that he felt not the slightest fear of trouble. Santiago was given such a clean­ ing as no other city, perhaps, ever had. The streets were sprinkled with corrosive subli­ mate, chlorate of lime was sprayed even un­ der the tiles of the roofs, infected furniture and buildings were ruthlessly burned, and the whole city was washed as i f it were a toy town. Three months later, when I stepped on the wharf at Santiago, the first smell that greeted my nostrils was that of chlorate of lime, and the yellow flags were still flying. The measures were the measures of a strong man, and there was grumbling among those who were removed from their business; but six days after Wood landed, the epidemic was conquered—a victory as remarkable in its way for the governor-surgeon as that of Las Guasimas. General Wood's home is at The Guao, the country seat formerly occupied by the British Consul, Ramsden. It is a large and airy, though unpretentious, building w i t h a tall thatched roof. The view from amidst the tropical verdure of the grounds in front, across the bay of Santiago and to the mag­ nificent blue mountains beyond, is one to be long remembered. It w as here that Mrs. Wood and her two boys, one seven and one a baby two years old, spent last winter. Since then General Wood has had with him Major J . E . Runcie, his legal adviser and friend, and part of the time Lieutenant Hanna of his personal staff. H e lives very simply, usually riding into town, a distance of a mile, with a single orderly. He is out early i n the morning, and often reaches the palace at eight o'clock, and that after having visited the jail or the market or some one of half a dozen hospitals and homes i n which he takes especial interest. H i s office is in a little bare room at the back of the palace, facing San Tomas Street. Over him two American flags are draped. Two huge paint­ ings of Spanish subjects linger to represent a regime that is past, and a portrait of Gov­ ernor Roosevelt represents the new. It is typical of the rule of the Spaniards, that these old paintings, together w i t h all the others in the palace, were once beautir


A

CHARACTER

fully framed i n gilt and g o l d ; but some covetous official, needing money, disposed of the frames and left the bare canvases to ornament the walls. Swinging shutters lead into General Wood's office, and more than once I saw wan-looking Cuban women push­ ing through them w i t h their children. Wood surrounds himself w i t h Cubans, and trusts them absolutely—perhaps that is why they all trust him. H i s private secretary, through whom go all his official despatches and reports, is a Cuban who was once secre­ tary to General Gomez, and many of the clerks i n the palace are Cubans. He gives, also, great credit for his successes to his staff, and especially to Lieut. E . C. Brooks and Lieut. M . E . Hanna, who have been w i t h him from the first. Personally, General Wood gives the im­ pression of being a large man, although he lacks at least an inch of being six feet tall. He is what an athlete would call " well put up"—powerful of shoulders and arms, w i t h a large head and short neck. He stoops slightly, and steps w i t h a long, swift stride, rolling somewhat, seamanlike, in his walk. His face is one of great strength—large featured, calm, studious, and now lean and

SKETCH.

bronzed from serving in the tropics. He rarely smiles, and ordinarily has very little to say, and that in a low, even voice ; and yet, when i n the mood, he tells a story with great spirit and with a certain fine direct­ ness. He enjoys keenly a quiet social gath­ ering ; but a function i n which he must appear as the guest of honor is an undis­ guised terror to him. He dresses always, whether i n khaki or i n army blue, with trim neatness, and he makes a strikingly powerful figure in the saddle. A t thirty-nine General Wood is i n the prime of a vigorous manhood and at the beginning of a notable career. If he remains i n the army—and his ambitions are all military— he has twenty-five years of active service still before him. H i s countrymen may rest assured that whatever may be the task to which he is assigned, whether the governor­ ship of a foreign people or the command of a great army, that task will be performed with the fidelity and distinction becoming a tried American soldier. [Since the foregoing article was made ready for the press, Gen­ eral Wood has been appointed by the Presi­ dent to be governor of the whole island of Cuba.—Editor.]

Lieut. R. L . Hamilton. Lieut. M. E . H a n n a .

379

J . Curtis Gilmore.

Capt. W . S. Scott.

Lieut. E . C. Brooks.

General W o o d . GENERAL

WOOD,

AS

GOVERNOR

OF SANTIAGO,

A N D HIS O F F I C I A L

STAFF.


'Bartholomew stuck to his levers like a m a n . '

THE

MILLION-DOLLAR

FREIGHT

TRAIN.

B Y F R A N K H . SPEARMAN, Author of " B u c k s " and other stories.

THE

STORY

OF A YOUNG

ENGINEER

IT was the second month of the strike, and not a pound of freight had been moved. Things did look smoky on the West E n d . The General Superintendent happened to be with us when the news came. " Y o u can't handle

O N HIS FIRST R U N .

it, b o y s , " said he nervously. " What you'd better do is to turn i t over to the Columbian Pacific." Our contracting freight agent on the Coast at that time was a fellow so erratic that he


THE

STORY

OF A

YOUNG

ENGINEER

was nicknamed " Crazy-horse." R i g h t in the midst of the strike Crazy-horse wired that he had secured a b i g silk shipment for New Y o r k . W e were paralyzed. W e had no engineers, no firemen, and no motive power to speak of. The strikers were pounding our men, w r e c k i n g our trains, and giving us the worst of it generally; that is, when we couldn't give i t to them. W h y the fellow displayed his activity at that par­ ticular juncture still remains a mystery. Perhaps he had a grudge against the r o a d ; if so, he took an artful revenge. Everybody on the system w i t h ordinary railroad sense knew that our struggle was to keep clean of freight business until we got r i d of our strike. Anything valuable or perishable was especially unwelcome. But the stuff was docked, and loaded, and consigned in our care before we knew i t . After that, a re­ fusal to carry it would be like hoisting the white flag; and that is something which never yet flew over the West E n d . " Turn it over to the C o l u m b i a n , " said the General Superintendent; but the General Su­ perintendent was not looked up to on our division. He hadn't enough sand. Our head was a fighter, and he gave tone to every man under him. " N o , " he thundered, bringing down his fist. " N o t in a thousand years. W e ' l l move it ourselves. W i r e Montgomery [the General Manager] that we will take care of i t . A n d wire him to fire Crazy-horse— and to do it right off." A n d before the silk was turned over to us Crazy-horse was look­ ing for another job. It is the only case on record where a freight hustler was discharged for getting business. There were twelve carloads; it was in­ sured for $85,000 a c a r ; you can figure how far the title is wrong, but you never can estimate the worry the stuff gave us. It looked as b i g as twelve million dollars' worth. In fact, one scrub car-tink, with the glory of the West E n d at heart, had a fight over the amount w i t h a skeptical hostler. He maintained that the actual money value was a hundred and twenty millions; but I give you the figures just as they went over the wire, and they are right. What bothered us most was that the strikers had the tip almost as soon as we had i t . Having friends on every road i n the country, they knew as much about our busi­ ness as we ourselves. The minute it was announced that we should move the silk, they were after us. It was a defiance; a last one. I f we could move freight—for we were already moving passengers after a

ON HIS

FIRST

RUN.

381

fashion—the strike might be well accounted beaten. Stewart, the leader of the local contin­ gent, together with his followers, got after me at once. " Y o u don't show much sense, R e e d , " said he. " Y o u fellows here are breaking your necks to get things moving, and when this strike's over, i f our boys ask for your discharge, t h e y ' l l get i t . This road can't run without our engineers. We're going to beat you. If you dare try to move this silk, w e ' l l have your scalp when i t ' s over. Y o u ' l l never get your silk to Zanesville, I ' l l promise you that. A n d i f you ditch it and make a million-dollar loss, y o u ' l l get let out anyway, my b u c k . " " I ' m here to obey orders, S t e w a r t , " said I. What was the use of more ? I felt un­ comfortable ; but we had determined to move the silk; there was no more to be said. When I went over to the round-house and told Neighbor the decision, he said never a w o r d ; but he looked a great deal. Neigh­ bor's task was to supply the motive power. A l l that we had, uncrippled, was in the pas­ senger service, because passengers should be taken care of first of a l l . In order to win a strike, you must have public opinion on your side. "Nevertheless, N e i g h b o r , " said I, after we had talked a while, " we must move the silk a l s o . " Neighbor studied; then he roared at his foreman. ' ' Send Bartholomew Mullen here.'' He spoke with a decision that made me think the business was done. I had never hap­ pened, it is true, to hear of Bartholomew Mullen i n the department of motive power; but the impression the name gave me was of a monstrous fellow, big as Neighbor, or old man Sankey, or Dad Hamilton. " I ' l l put Bartholomew ahead of i t , " said Neighbor tightly. I saw a boy walk into the office. " M r . Garten said you wanted me, s i r , " said he, addressing the Master Mechanic. " I do, Bartholomew," responded Neigh­ bor. The figure in my mind's eye shrunk i n a twinkling. Then it occurred to me that it must be this boy's father who was wanted. " Y o u have been begging for a chance to take out an engine, Bartholomew," began Neighbor coldly; and I knew it was on. " Yes, s i r . " " Y o u want to get killed, Bartholomew." Bartholomew smiled as i f the idea was not altogether displeasing. " How would you like to go pilot to-mor-


382

THE

MILLION-DOLLAR

row for McCurdy ? Y o u to take the 44 and run as first Seventy-eight. McCurdy will run as second Seventy-eight." " I know I could run an engine all r i g h t , " ventured Bartholomew, as i f Neighbor were the only one taking the chances i n giving him an engine. " I know the track from here to Zanesville. I helped McNeff fire one week." " Then go home, and go to bed; and be over here at six o'clock to-morrow morning. And sleep sound, for it may be your last chance." It was plain that the Master Mechanic hated to do i t : it was simply sheer neces­ sity. " H e ' s a w i p e r , " mused Neighbor as Bartholomew walked springily away. " I took him in here sweeping two years ago. He ought to be firing now, but the union held him back; that's why he don't like them. He knows more about an engine now than half the lodge. They'd better have let him i n , " said the Master Mechanic grimly. ' ' He may be the means of breaking their backs yet. If I give him an engine and he runs it, I ' l l never take him off, union or no union, strike or no s t r i k e . " " How old is that boy ? " I asked. ' ' Eighteen; and never a k i t h or a kin that I know of. Bartholomew M u l l e n , " mused Neighbor, as the slight figure moved across the flat, " big name—small boy. W e l l , Bar­ tholomew, you'll know something more by to-morrow night about running an engine, or a whole lot less: that's as it happens. If he gets killed, it's your fault, R e e d . " He meant that I was calling on him for men when he couldn't supply them. " I heard once," he went on, " about a fellow named Bartholomew being mixed up in a massacree. But I take it he must have been an older man than our Bartholomew— nor his other name wasn't Mullen, neither. I disremember just what it was; but it wasn't Mullen." " Well, don't say I want to get the boy killed, N e i g h b o r , " I protested. " I've got plenty to answer for. I'm here to run trains —when there are any to r u n ; that's murder enough for me. Y o u needn't send Bartholo­ mew out on my account." " Give him a slow schedule, and I ' l l give him orders to jump early; that's all we can do. If the. strikers don't ditch him, he'll get through somehow." It stuck in my crop—the idea of put­ ting that boy on a pilot engine to take all the dangers ahead of that particular t r a i n ; but I had a good deal else to think of be­

FREIGHT

TRAIN.

sides. F r o m the minute the silk got into the McCloud yards, we posted double guards around. About twelve o'clock that night we held a council of war, which ended in our running the train into the out freight-house. The result was that by morning we had a new train made up. It consisted of fourteen refrigerator cars loaded with oranges which had come i n mysteriously the night before. It was announced that the silk would be held for the present and the oranges rushed through at once. Bright and early the re­ frigerator train was run down to the ice­ houses, and twenty men were put to work icing the oranges. A t seven o'clock, McCurdy pulled i n the local passenger with engine 105. Our plan was to cancel the local and run him right out with the oranges. When he got in, he reported that the 105 had sprung a t i r e ; this threw us out entirely. There was a hurried conference in the round-house. ' ' What can you do ? " asked the Super­ intendent i n desperation. " There's only one thing I can do. Put Bartholomew Mullen on it with the 44, and put McCurdy to bed for Number Two to­ n i g h t , " responded Neighbor. We were running first in first out; but we took care always to have somebody for One and Two who at least knew an injector from an air-pump. It was eight o'clock. I looked into the locomotive stalls. The first—the only—man in sight was Bartholomew Mullen. He was very busy polishing the 44. He had good steam on her, and the old tub was wheezing away as i f she had the asthma. The 44 was o l d ; she was homely; she was r i c k e t y ; but Bartholomew Mullen wiped her battered nose as deferentially as i f she had been a spickspan, spider-driver, tail-truck mail-racer. She wasn't much—the 44. But in those days Bartholomew wasn't much: and the 44 was Bartholomew's. " How is she steaming, B a r t h o l o m e w ? " I sang out; he was right in the middle of her. Looking up, he fingered his waste mod­ estly and blushed through a dab of crud? petroleum over his eye. " H u n d r e d and thirty pounds, sir. She's a terrible free steamer, the old 44. I ' m all ready to run her o u t . " " Who's marked up to fire for you, Bar­ tholomew ? ' ' Bartholomew Mullen looked at me frater­ nally. ' ' Neighbor couldn't give me anybody but a wiper, s i r , ' ' said Bartholomew, in a sort of a wouldn't-tbat-kill-you tone. The unconscious arrogance of the boy quite


THE

STORY

" There stood

OF A

YOUNG

ENGINEER

ON HIS

FIRST

RUN.

383

Bartholomew."

knocked me: so soon had honors changed his point of view. L a s t night a de­ spised w i p e r ; at daybreak, an engineer; and his nose i n the air at the idea of taking on a wiper for fireman. A n d all so innocent. " Would you object, Bartholomew," I suggested gently, " t o a train-master for fireman ? ' ' " I don't—think so, s i r . " ' ' Thank y o u ; because I am going down to Zanesville this morning myself, and I thought I'd ride w i t h you. Is it all right ? " " Oh, yes, s i r — i f Neighbor doesn't c a r e . " I smiled: he didn't know whom Neighbor took orders f r o m ; but he thought, evidently, not from me.

" Then run her down to the oranges, Bar­ tholomew, and couple on, and w e ' l l order ourselves out. See ? " The 44 looked like a baby-carriage when we got her in front of the refrigerators. How­ ever, after the necessary preliminaries, we gave a very sporty toot, and pulled out. In a few minutes we were sailing down the valley. F o r fifty miles we bobbed along with our cargo of iced silk as easy as old shoes; for I need hardly explain that we had packed the silk into the refrigerators to confuse the strikers. The great risk was that they would try to ditch us.


384

THE

MILLION-DOLLAR

I was watching the track as a mouse would a cat, looking every minute for trouble. W e cleared the gumbo cut west of the Beaver at a pretty good clip, in order to make the grade on the other side. The bridge there is hidden in summer by a grove of hackberries. I had just pulled open to cool her a bit when I noticed how high the back-water was on each side of the track. Suddenly I felt the fill going soft under the drivers; felt the 44 wobble and slew. Bartholomew shut off hard, and threw the air as I sprang to the window. The peaceful little creek ahead looked as angry as the Platte in A p r i l water, and the bottoms were a lake. Somewhere up the valley there had been a cloudburst, for overhead the sun was bright. The Beaver was roaring over its banks, and the bridge was out. Bartholo­ mew screamed for brakes; it looked as i f we were against it—and hard. A soft track to stop on; a torrent of storm-water ahead, and ten hundred thousand dollars' worth of silk behind, not to mention equipment. I yelled at Bartholomew, and motioned for him to jump; my conscience is clear on that point. The 44 was stumbling along, trying like a drunken man to hang to the rotten track. " B a r t h o l o m e w ! " I yelled; but he was head out and looking back at his train while he jerked frantically at the air-lever. I un­ derstood: the air wouldn't w o r k ; it never will on those old tubs when you need i t . The sweat pushed out on me. I was thinking of how much the silk would bring us after the bath in the Beaver. Bartholomew stuck to his levers like a man in a signal-tower, but every second brought us closer to open water. Watching him intent only on saving his first train—heedless of his life—I was actually ashamed to jump. While I hesitated he somehow got the brakes to set; the old 44 bucked like a bronco. It wasn't too soon. She checked her train nobly at the last, but I saw nothing could keep her from the drink. I gave Bartholo­ mew a terrific slap, and again I yelled; then turning to the gangway, I dropped into the soft mud on my side: the 44 hung low, and it was easy lighting. Bartholomew sprang from his seat a second later; but his blouse caught in the teeth of the quadrant. He stooped quick as thought, and peeled the thing over his head. Then he was caught fast by the wristbands, and the ponies of the 44 tipped over the broken abutment. Pull as he would he couldn't get free. The pilot dipped into the torrent slowly.

FREIGHT

TRAIN.

But losing her balance, the 44 kicked her heels into the air like lightning, and shot with a frightened wheeze plump into the creek, dragging her engineer with her. The head car stopped on the brink. Run­ ning across the track, I looked for Bartholo­ mew. He wasn't there; I knew he must have gone down with his engine. Throwing off my gloves, I dived, just as I stood, close to the tender, which hung half submerged. I am a good bit of a fish under water, but no self-respecting fish would be caught in that yellow mud. I realized, too, the instant I struck the water, that I should have dived on the upstream side. The current took me away w h i r l i n g ; when I came up for air, I was fifty feet below the pier. I scrambled out, feeling it was all up with Bartholomew; but to my amazement, as I shook my eyes open the train crew were running forward, and there stood Bartholomew on the track above me, looking at the refrigerators.' When I got to him, he explained how he was dragged under and had to tear the sleeves out of his blouse under water to get free. The surprise is how little fuss men make about such things when they are busy. It took only five minutes for the conductor to hunt up a coil of wire and a sounder for me, and by the time he got forward with it, Bar­ tholomew was half-way up a telegraph pole to help me cut i n on a live wire. Fast as I could, I rigged a pony, and began calling the McCloud despatches It was rocky sending, but after no end of pounding, I got him and gave orders for the wrecking gang, and for one more of Neighbor's rapidly decreasing supply of locomotives. Bartholomew, sitting on a strip of fence which still rose above water, looked forlorn. To lose in the Beaver the first engine he ever handled w as tough, and he was evidently speculating on his chances of ever getting another. If there weren't tears in his eyes, there was storm-water certainly. But after the relief engine had pulled what was left of us back six miles to a siding, I made it my first business to explain to Neighbor, who was nearly beside himself, that Bartholomew not only was not at fault, but that by his nerve he had actually saved the train. r

" I ' l l tell you, N e i g h b o r , " I suggested, when we got straightened around. " G i v e us the 109 to go ahead as pilot, and run her around the river division with Foley and the 2 1 6 . " "What'11 you do with Number S i x ? " growled Neighbor. Six was the local pas­ senger west.


THE

STORY

OF A

YOUNG

ENGINEER

" A n n u l i t west of M c C l o u d , " said I i n ­ stantly. " W e ' v e got this silk on our hands now, and I ' d move it i f i t tied up every pas­ senger train on the division. If we can get the stuff through, it w i l l practically beat the strike. I f we fail, i t w i l l beat the com­ pany." By the time we had backed to Newhall Junction, Neighbor had made up his mind my way. Mullen and I climbed into the 109, and Foley, with the 216, and none too good a grace, coupled on to the silk, and flying red signals, we started again for Zanesville over the river division. Foley was always full of mischief. He had a better engine than ours, and he took great satisfaction the rest of the afternoon in crowding us. E v e r y mile of the way he was on our heels. I was throwing the coal, and have reason to re­ member. It was after dark when we reached the Beverly H i l l , and we took i t at a lively pace. The strikers were not on our minds then; i t was Foley who bothered. When the long parallel steel lines of the upper yards spread before us, flashing under the arc lights, -we were away above yard speed. Running a locomotive into one of those big yards is like shoot­ ing a rapid i n a canoe. There is a bewildering maze of tracks, lighted by red and green lamps, which must be watched the closest to keep out of trouble. The hazards are multiplied the minute you pass the throat, and a yard wreck is a dreadful tan­ gle; i t makes everybo dy from roadmaster to flag­ man furious, and not even Bartholomew wanted to face an inquiry on a yard wreck. On the other hand, he c o u l d n ' t af­ f o r d to be

ON HIS

FIRST

RUN.

385

caught by Foley, who was chasing him out of pure caprice. I saw the boy holding the throttle at a half and fingering the air anxiously as we jumped over the frogs; but the roughest riding on track so far beats the ties as a cushion, that when the 109 suddenly stuck her paws through an open switch we bounced against the roof of the cab like foot-balls. I grabbed a brace with one hand, and with the other reached instinctively across to Bar­ tholomew's side to seize the throttle. But as I tried to shut him off, he jerked i t wide open i n spite of me, and turned with light­ ning i n his eye. " N o ! " he cried, and his

1

Away

we went across the

yard."


386

THE

MILLION-DOLLAR

voice rang hard. The 109 took the tremen­ dous shove at her back, and leaped like a frightened horse. Away we went across the yard, through the cinders, and over the ties; my teeth have never been the same since. I don't belong on an engine, anyway, and since then I have kept off. A t the moment, I was convinced that the strain had been too much, that Bartholomew was stark crazy. He sat clinging like a lobster to his levers and bouncing clear to the roof. But his strategy was dawning on me; in fact, he was pounding it into me. Even the shock and scare of leaving the track and tearing up the yard had not driven from Bartholomew's noddle the most important feature of our situation, which was, above everything, to keep out of the way of the silk train.

I felt every moment more mortified at my attempt to shut him off. I had done the trick of the woman who grabs the reins. It was even better to tear up the yard than to stop for Foley to smash into and scatter the silk over the coal chutes. Bartholomew's decision was one of the traits which make the runner: instant perception coupled to instant resolve. The ordinary dub thinks what he should have done to avoid disaster after it is all over; Bartholomew thought before. On we bumped, across frogs, through switches, over splits, and into target rods, when—and this is the miracle of it all—the 109 got her forefeet on a split switch, made a contact, and after a slew or two, like a bogged horse, she swung up sweet on the rails again, tender and a l l . Bartholomew shut off with an under cut that brought us up stuttering, and nailed her feet with the air right where she stood. We had left the track and plowed a hundred feet across the yards and jumped on to another track. It is the only time I ever heard of its happen­ ing anywhere, but I was on the engine with Bartholomew Mullen when it was done. Foley choked his train the instant he saw our hind lights bobbing. W e climbed down,

FREIGHT

TRAIN.

and ran back. He had stopped just where we should have stood i f I had shut off. Bartholomew ran to the switch to examine it. The contact light (green) still burned like a false beacon; and lucky it did, for it showed that the switch had been tampered with and exonerated Bartholomew Mullen completely. The attempt of the strikers to spill the silk i n the yards had only made the reputation of a new engineer. Thirty min­ utes later, the million-dollar train was turned over to the East E n d to wrestle with, and we breathed, all of us, a good bit easier. Bartholomew Mullen, now a passenger run­ ner who ranks with Kennedy and Jack Moore and Foley and George Sinclair himself, got a personal letter from the General Manager complimenting him on his pretty w i t ; and he was good enough to say nothing whatever about mine. We registered that night and went to sup­ per together: Foley, Jackson, Bartholomew, and I. Afterwards we dropped into the despatcher's office. Something was coming from McCloud, but the operator to save his life couldn't catch i t . I listened a minute; it was Neighbor. Now, Neighbor isn't great on despatching trains. He can make himself understood over the poles, but his sending is like a boy's sawing wood—sort of uneven. However, though I am not much on running yards, I claim to be able to take the wildest ball that was ever thrown along the wire, and the chair was tendered me at once to catch Neighbor's extraordinary passes at the McCloud key. They came something like this: " T o Opr. Tell Massacree "—that was the word that stuck them all, and I could per­ ceive that Neighbor was talking emphatically. He had apparently forgotten Bartholomew's last name, and was t r y i n g to connect with the one he had ' ' disremembered'' the night before. " T e l l Massacree," repeated Neigh­ bor, " that he is al-1-1 right. Tell hi-m I give him double mileage for to-day all the way through. A n d to-morrow he gets the 109 to k e e p . — N e i g h b - b - o r . "


EDITORIAL THE

S. S. M c C L U R E

COMPANY

BOOK

DEPARTMENT. ONE of the first results of the success and continued growth of M c C l u r e ' s M a g a ­ zine was the publication i n book form of works which had appeared as serials in the Magazine, or which had come to us naturally through our relations with authors. Such was the demand for our " Life of Napoleon," which appeared i n the fourth and fifth vol­ umes of the Magazine (1894 and 1895), that we found it necessary to issue i t i n book form, and up to date fully 100,000 copies have been sold. The " L i f e of N a p o l e o n " was followed i n 1897 by our " E a r l y L i f e of Abraham L i n c o l n . " Two years ago a separate corporation, known as the Doubleday and McClure Com­ pany, was organized, i n order to handle books which were coming to us through the Magazine. Believing that this will prove more advantageous to authors and to our­ selves, these books will i n the future be handled directly by the S. S. McClure Com­ pany. B y this arrangement a closer connec­ tion between the editing and publishing of the Magazine and the books can be maintained, and thus we shall be able to render our pa­ trons a service far more extensive and varied than we could otherwise hope to render. We shall endeavor i n our book publications, as we always have, to cover the entire field of wholesome and intelligent human interest. In extending our list we shall adhere to two principles: No book w i l l be published that we do not believe to be a real contribution to human knowledge and human l i f e ; the form of the books thus scrupulously chosen, will be the very best of which the printer's art and skill are now capable. Thus, we shall aim to have a list that i n both matter and beauty of presentation will have the highest distinction and the widest and most enduring interest. The character of literature that we have published during the past thirteen years through M c C l u r e ' s Syndicate and M c C l u r e ' s Magazine is the best index of what our read­ ers may expect from us i n the future. In that time we have published much of the best work of Robert Louis Stevenson, Rudyard K i p l i n g , and Anthony Hope. H a v i n g been

NOTES.

for so many years i n pleasant and trusted relations with the great authors of both con­ tinents, we may rightfully hope to number as many of them among the contributors to the book department as we have had among the contributors to the Magazine. Perhaps even constant readers of the Magazine hardly realize what a large and distinguished circle these contributors form. In it are included such present or recent leaders of thought and molders of events as Gladstone, Henry Drummond, Herbert Spencer, Tyndall, H u x ­ ley, Charles A . Dana, Secretary Hay, Theo­ dore Roosevelt, Henry Cabot Lodge, General Miles, Lieutenant Peary, Captain Mahan, Archibald Forbes, Archdeacon F a r r a r , Sir Robert Ball, Professor Simon Newcomb, and Henry M . Stanley. A n d in it are included also such masters of literature as Robert Louis Stevenson, Rudyard K i p l i n g , Thomas Hardy, Mark Twain, J . M . Barrie, Ian Maclaren, Bret Harte, Anthony Hope, W . D . Howells, James Whitcomb Riley, Frank R . Stockton, Joel Chandler Harris, Octave Thanet, Conan Doyle, A . T. Quiller-Couch ( " Q " ) , Sarah Orne Jewett, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Stanley J . Weyman, William E . Henley, Robert Barr, Hamlin Garland, and Clark Russell. While counting on the enlargement of these noted connections, it will also be a constant policy for the book department, as i t has been for the Magazine, to extend every encouragement to new and unknown writers. Indeed, not a few of the best known authors of to-day were comparatively unknown when we first published their w o r k ; and their work was taken, not because of the name of the writer, but because of the quality of the work itself. That will con­ tinue to be the primary standard of ac­ ceptability. W o r k that shows the requisite interest and significance will be cordially welcomed, and the endeavor will be to make the way easy for any new writer who gives promise of supplying such work. THE

McCLURE

ENCYCLOPEDIA.

The largest new enterprise of the S. S. McClure Company will be the McClure E n ­ cyclopaedia a household library of learning based upon, the same ideas that have given special character to the Magazine. That is to say, the information which it offers will


388

EDITORIAL

NOTES.

number, speak for themselves, asking our readers to consider that M c C l u r e ' s Maga­ zine, selling at the popular price of ten cents, presents to its readers, with this issue of color illustrations of the ' ' Life of the M a s t e r , ' ' the most important achievement in the magazine world which the past twentyfive years have witnessed. It is the first time absolute reproductions of pictorial originals are given i n any magazine. The French, who have led the world i n the matter of art —the English and the Germans, as well as ourselves in America—have had in the past some reproductions in many colors, the best of which were beyond the reach of anybody but the r i c h . But even these reproductions do not compare with those now appearing in McClure's Magazine. F o r here no en­ graver has touched the plates, but the purely mechanical process of three colors has been guided by thoroughly trained and artistic hands. This is, indeed, the first wholly satisfactory example of that process which has been perfecting slowly during the last decade. GENEROUS A P P R O V A L FOR " T H E L I F E A s a sample of the appreciation shown for OF T H E M A S T E R . " the first installment of these pictures, we quote from the Chicago " Times-Herald " : We are deeply appreciative of the con­ There is no doubt that illustrations made after a study stantly growing friendship accorded to the of the Holy Land as it exists to-day will give a very Magazine, a striking proof of which we have perfect conception of what it was in the time of Christ. just had. Only a brief introductory chapter Rightly has the East been named " the unchangeable." While the West is forging ahead and seething with of D r . Watson's " Life of the Master " ap­ restless activity and the spirit of change, the Orient is peared in the December number of the Maga­ building and thinking as it did 2,000 years ago, and is zine, the beginning of the Life proper being still cooling its water in porous bottles. And Mr. Lin­ reserved for the January number. Y e t no son has found hints for his costumes and types of faces have lingered on in Palestine from the time of sooner was this preliminary installment pub­ that Christ. He has made use of his observation in this lished than we began to receive a tide of first installment in the beautiful color plate, " The Visit letters commending the work. It was im­ of Mary to Elizabeth," and in the study of the head of mediately recognized as an achievement in the boy John. . . . But the picture of which we wish particularly to magazine editing of the widest significance. From the day of its first issue, M c C l u r e ' s speak, the one which will open the eyes of many who were hitherto ignorant of the real quality of Mr. LinMagazine has never lacked for hearty ap­ son's genius, is the colored plate entitled " The Vision proval of its larger features. But to nothing of the Shepherds." It is a sublime poem in form and else that we have offered has there been so color, the best possible illustration of Keats's famous immediate and enthusiastic response as to dictum, " Beauty is Truth." For the first and last effect produced on the mind is its extraordinarily convincing D r . Watson's reverent, humane " Life of the quality. You feel that the artist must have had an Master,'' with its unequalled illustrations by apocalyptic vision or an inspiration. " If it ever was M r . Linson. One subscriber writes, " I feel at all," you say, " so it must have been." The shep­ that your readers owe you a debt of grati­ herds are sitting upon the ground, gazing upward at a giant splendor-diffusing wing that stretches across the tude for giving to them such reading matter stars. All the idea of power, glory, mystery, awe-in­ as this, and I wish personally to express spiring wisdom, shine from that passing wing. So a many thanks for this magnificent publica­ great cloud wing, shot through with light, might wave t i o n . " A n d this feeling is repeated, in one and flame across the bars of sunset. A feebler artist would have depicted an angel entire or would have form and another, in letters from hundreds filled the heavens with angels. But Mr. Linson leaves of others. to the imagination the splendor of a being who over­ be of the highest authority and the utmost timeliness, presented in the most interesting and readable fashion. The scholars of two continents are already being enlisted in the preparation of this work. A n d through the connections thus forming we expect to secure also a large number of important books in science, biography, history, and other fields. In short, i n developing our book-publish­ ing business we shall follow confidently the same conviction that prompted and guided us in founding and developing M c C l u r e ' s Magazine. That conviction is that really good matter makes the most interesting reading, i f it is presented in good English and published in attractive form. The suc­ cess of the Magazine seems to prove that the conviction is a just one. A t all events we shall follow it in our future publishing enter­ prises, with the fullest confidence that the public will show the same appreciation of our endeavors to do things that are really in themselves worth doing.

We will let the eight full-page color pic­ tures by M r . Linson in the January number, and the five color pictures in the present

awes us when we do not even look upon his face. Never has the conception of the difference between mortal beings and the powers of light been more luminously depicted. Tissot has hardly come up to this mark.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

HOW A MELON M A K E S STEAM Here's Some Free Advice to Dyspeptics: Dyspepsia kills more people every year than bullets. can.

Bullets can't be stopped but dyspepsia Here's w h y w e suffer;

we eat t o o m u c h ; w e

exercise t o o l i t t l e ; w e o v e r w o r k the gastric juices; the stomach gets clogged — w e ' r e dyspeptic.

N o w the gastric juices are Nature's steam in the stomach.

Here is our w a y to prevent and cure

dyspepsia

u

'.

s

e

a

w

s

'

e

a

n

d perfect

digestive

several t o choose from, b u t pepsin's the best. pepsin because it's pure. many

abattoirs that's

T h e best pepsin is vegetable

( T h e y make a pepsin

very g o o d — f o r

—the best steam-maker, fermenter

pigs.)

stimulant—there are

from a pig's stomach in

T h e best vegetable

pepsin

a n d stimulant t o the weakened

gastric

juices is made from a Brazilian melon into

T H E

KIND T H A T

If y o u Iiave on Ask

the for

D I G E S T

Dyspepsia send to=day for a free

subject.

Sent free.

D O

booklet

It's on

booklet

all science, but i n plain words. " Melon=Steam for

Dyspeptics."

Address

BRUNSWICK P H A R M A C A L CO., New

Brunswick, N . J .

P l e a s e m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write t o a d v e r t i s e r s .

17


MCCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

without 5oap

Pearline mmmmmm IffliMwmisiaitH THE

ONLY

Electric Massage Rol.er Patented in United States, England, France, Canada, Germany, Cuba, etc. Ready for Use at n i l Times. No Chargine. W i l l last forever. S I L V E R , #8.00 E A C H . C(ll,l>. #4.00 E A C H . M a l l o r OUlce. Mostetfectual in Muscle — ^ A PERFECT COMPLEXand Tissue building; also ^^SiH^r^ 'ON B E A L T l F l f c R . for Reduction of Corpulency. Will Remove Will develop or reduce any part \V rinLleN and of the body. For Rheumatism and Mi Facial all Circulatory and Nervous Diseases • > IciiiIhIich a specific. The reputation and profes ]>OHUi\C sional standing of the inventor (you referred to the public press for the past 1 5 yrs.) with the approval of this country and Europe, is a perfect guarantee. Circular upon applitatior Dr. JOHN WILSON (JlltltS CO., 1370 IPwny, N. V. 1

" A new beautifier whi< li is warranted to ^ ^ 9 H 0 7 jTert complexion, removing wrinkles and ^ ^ H ^ ishes. It is most effectual in building up tissues, as well as ^ ^ ^ ^ reducing unsightly corpulence. A very pretty addition to the toilet tabic." —Chicago Tribune. (Rollers magni•li/.-il or attached to batteries are not electric rollers.) A I.l.o Mil us \\\v. FRAU­ DULENT IMITATIONS.... " This delicate Electric Massage Beautifier removes all facial blemishes. // is the only positive remover of wrinkles and craw's feet. It never fails to perform all that is expected."—Chicago Times-Herald. " T h e Electric Massage Roller is certainly productive of good results. / believe it the best 0/any appliances. It is safe and effective." —Harriet Huiirard A y r r . New York World.

THE ONLY ELECTRIC ROLLER

" Can take a pound a day off a patient, or put it on."—New York Sun. August 3 0 . 1 8 9 1 . Send for lecture on •' Great Subject of Fat," and Blank. No Dieting,

DR.

JOHN

WILSON

No Hard

GIBBS'

Work.

OBESITY

CURE

f j i r l & t t o pay postage THE RBSULT

F o r the P e r m a n e n t R e d u c t i o n a n d C u r e o f O b e s i t y . Purely Vegetable. Harmless and Positive. NO ¥ \ 1 L I K E . Your reduction is assured—reduce to stay. One month's treatment, $ 5 . 0 0 - Mail, or office, 1.170 Broadway, New York. R E D U C T I O N HV \K A N T E E D . " The cure is based on Nature's laws."—TV. Y. Herald, July 0. X893. " On obesity, D r . Gibbs is the recognized authority."—A> y. Press, 1899. B e w a r e o f Imitator*.

M I L SURPRISE

YOU

GERSTENDORFER BROS. "•WtfeEARKtPlAr.F.NY.

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers.

18

,l/-5>EyRAND0LPH ST..CHICAGO'


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

We have no agents or b r a n c h stores.

A l l orders should be sent direct to us.

New Spring Suits, *5.l° Our Spring Catalogue of Tailor-Made Suits a n d S k i r t s is n o w r e a d y . W e picture i n it all of the newest styles, and w i l l m a i l it free, t o g e t h e r with samples of the materials, to the lady w h o wishes to dress w e l l at m o d e r a t e cost. No ready-made garments, but e v e r y t h i n g is made to order ; we show y o u exelusive things that cannot be found

SENT FREE : Our Catalogue ana Samples upon request.

elsewhere.

O u r new S p r i n g Catalogue trates :

illus­ '

Tailor-Made Suits, $5 up. New Skirts in the latest Paris cut, $4 up. Wash Suits, $4 up. W a s h Skirts, $3 up. R a i n y D a y Suits and Skirts made of double-face materials. Bicycle Suits, Capes, Jackets, Riding Habits, Golf Suits and Skirts. We also make finer garments

and send samples of all grades. If, when w r i t i n g , y o u w i l l m e n t i o n any particular k i n d o r color of samples that y o u prefer, we s h a l l be g l a d to send y o u an assortment of the k i n d y o u w i s h . Write to-day for C a t a l o g u e a n d S a m p l e s — w e w i l l send them to y o u free by return m a i l .

We

P a y Express Charges E v e r y w h e r e .

THE

NATIONAL

CLOAK

C O . , U9 and \2\

West 23d Street, N e w Y o r k .

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers.

19


MrCEURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Systematize your Clothes Closets T h e most orderly house may have disorderly clothes closets. Often two or three gar­ ments are h u n g on one hook or nail. T h i s pulls garments out of shape, hides the very one y o u want, tears the l i n i n g , and promotes general disorder.

GOODFORM CLOSET SETS change the ordinary clothes closet into the G O O D F O R M C L O S E T shown i n the engraving. It holds twice as m u c h as before. E v e r y garment is i n place, i n sight and reach, and ready to wear without pressing. Y o u r money back if you want it. GOODFORM

Automatic NICKEL PLATED

ROUSERS

SETS

are

$ 3 . 0 0 each, prepaid, by

express; two sets in one shipment, $5.50. F o r G e n t l e m e n , t h e y are—12 Garment Yokes, 6

Hanger

nickel-plated Trousers Hangers, 2 Shelf Bars, 1 Loop. F o r L a d i e s , th»y are—12 Garment Yokes, 12 Skirt

Hangers, 2 Shelf Bars, 2 Loops. Sample Ladies' or Gentlemen's Sets—$1 each by express, prepaid—includes about one-third of complete set. Sample T r o u s e r s Hanger—by mail, prepaid, 30c.. or 4 for .• 1. 6 and 1 Loop. $1.50.

Sold i n first-class D r y Goods Stores and by Clothiers and Furnishers. If your dealer hasn't them we w i l l supply y o u . B o o k l e t free. Send no money to us i f we have an agency i n your city. SELLING AGENTS: Washington, D . C . — E . H . Morsel). Boston—R. H . White & Co. Hartford—Brown, Thomson & Co. Pittsburg—lames Phelan. Providence—Callender McAuslan Detroit—Hunter A: Hunter. Chicago—Marshall Field & Co. & Troup Co. Browning, K i n g & Co. Brooklyn— Fred'k Loeser & Co. Omaha—Hayden Bros. Buffalo—Win. HengererCo.

New Orleans—A. Shwartz & Son. Denver—Daniels & Fisher. San Francisco—Palace Hardware Co. L o s Angeles—The Hub. Butte, Mont.—D. J . Hennessy Merc. Co.

CHICAGO F O R M CO., 8 3 - 1 2 5 L a Salle Street, Chicago, U . S. A.

COLLARS DIFFER ! WHY? Because the essence of good workmanship is brains. W e use brains as well as other material in making our collars. A l l collars are not alike, because the brains and other material differ. W e make collars and cuffs exclusively, and our sixty years' experience will benefit you. Learn a lesson by buying the Corliss-Coon collars, 2 for 25 cents. Your dealer will supply you. If not, write us, stating size. Write for our handsome D E P T . B, new catalogue of " Correct Dress," sent free. TROY, N. Y.

Corliss, Coon and Co.

Please mention M c C l u r e ' s when you write to advertisers.

20


McClure's

MAGAZINE.

"LINENE"Collarsandcuffs

It is not the price alone that sells the Ostermoor Patent Elastic Felt Mattress. If that were all, every one would buy the imitation so-called " felt " stuff offered by mail and at stores complete at $ 5 , $6.50, $ 8 5 0 — almost any price. Do you want to sleep on ordinary cotton wadding which may give comfort for a week and then misery till you throw it out the window?

(Reg. Trade Mark)

ALWAYS SATISFACTORY S t y l i s h , convenient, e c o n o m i c a l , made of hue c l o t h and finished alike on both sides. T h e turn d o w n collars are reversible a m i give double service.

NO

LAUNDRY WORK

The Ostermoor

W h e n soiled on both sides,discard. T e n C o l l a r s or five pairs of Cuffs, 2 5 c ; by mail, 30c. Send 6c. in stamps for sample collar and pair of cuffs. N a m e size and style.

REVERSIBLE COLLAR CO., Dept. 10, Boston

Patent Elastic Felt Mattress,

$

15.

is not only inexpensive but good. W i l l these bold imitators dare to offer such a binding guarantee as this :

Tumbled

Hair

S L E E P O N IT 3 0 N I G H T S , and if it is not even a l l y o u have hoped for,\{ you don't believe it to be the equal in cleanli­ ness, durability and comfort of any $50 hair mattress ever made, you can get your money back by return mail — ' " n o questions asked.' T h e r e w i l l be no unpleasantness about it at a l l .

is an enemy to neatness. Keep your tresses tightly bound with hairpins that stay where you put them and never fall out.

Express Charges Prepaid to Any Point.

Holdfast

Our handsome book, "The Test of Time," is yours for the asking. Send y o u r name on a postal, whether y o u need a mattress now cr not. It w i l l interest y o u , a n y w a y , to know about a hand-filled mattress as soft as the best hair, but w h i c h will not pack or lose its shape, and costs only one-quarter as m u c h .

Hairpins

2 3 3 4 4

CANNOT S L I P NOR F A L L OUT 3#

and

3%

inches, w h i t e ,

black, brown

or

Also 4% inches, w i t h heavy prongs for braid or bonnet use. If your dealer w i l l not s u p p l y y o u , send i c e . in stamps for s-imple of six s m a l l or one large, stating whether hair is See that c a r d bears name

OSTERMOOR & CO., 112

C O N S O L I D A T E D S A F E T Y P I N CO.

We

Box

18

::

Bloomfield,

25 lbs. . $ 8.35 A L L . . 10.00 6 FEET 35 lbs. . 11.70 3 I N C H E S . . 13-35 LONG. 45 lbs. . 15.00 1 parts, 50 cents extra.

Take care ! Don't be deceived ! T h e r e is not a single store i n the country that carries our mattress ; almost every store now has an imitation so-called " Felt,*' w h i c h is kept in stock to sell on our advertising. Our guaran­ tee on every mattress. Patent Elastic F e l t Mattresses can be bought only direct from us. Send to-day for our book " The Test of Time."

auburn.

heavy or l i g h t .

6 inches wide, wide, 30 lbs. 6 inches wide, wide, 40 lbs. 6 inches wide, M a d e in t w o

"Sent on Suspicion."

L i g h t e r than bone, w i l l neither warp, split nor break. Sizes 2 # ,

feet feet feet feet feet

N.J.

Please mention M c C l u r e ' s when you write to advertisers. 21

Elizabeth St., New

have cushioned 25.000 churches. Send for book Church

York. Cushio


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

The REGAL HENLEY. B l a c k K i n g Calf, lace Imported E n a m e l , lace B l a c k King- Calf, button

Double Soles Double Soles Single Soles

Price $3

50

.

per pair.

D e l i v e r e d , p r e p a i d , t o a n y address i n the U n i t e d States u p o n receipt of $ 3 75 per pair. If y o u w a n t t o r e a c h t h e h e i g h t o f economy and s a t i s f a c t i o n i n shoes b u y t w o p a i r s of U c g a l Shoes f o r $ 7 — t h e p r i c e u s u a l l y c h a r g e d f o r c n e r e a l l y g o o d p a i r o f shoes. T h e n b u y a p a i r c f R e g a l B o o t T r e e s v.L c h w i l l cost y o u b u t 7 5 cents ( d e l i v e r e d f o r $ 1 0 0 per pair), a n d w h i c h w i l l be g u a r a n t e e d t o be y o u r exact last. B y w e a r i n g each p a i r c f shoes o n alternate d a y s each p a i r w i l l last t w i c e as l o n g ar> they o r d i n a r i l y w o u l d , w i l l keep t h e i r shape a n d look as elegant, s h a p e l y a n d d r e s s y as a n y n e w shoe y o u e v e r had o n y o u r foot. W h i l e t h e R e g a l Shoes h a v e n o s u p e r i o r either i n point of m a t e r i a l , s t y l e , w o r k m a n s h i p , o r dura­ b i l i t y , i t is true o f t h e m as ot o t h e r shoes that they w i l l last t w i c e as l o n g if n o t w o r n continu­ o u s l y b u t ^ i v e n a c h a n c e to " r e s t " a n d r e g a i n their n o r m a l shape o n boot trees. R e g a l Shoes a r e sold o n l y i n R e g a l stores a n d b y i:-.ail. I f crtc c f o u r stores is n< t c o n v e n i e n t to you our perfectly organized M a i l O r d e r Depart­ ment w i l l serve y o u t o y o u r p c i e e t s r t i s f a c t i c n or r e f u n d y o u r m o n e y . C o m p l e t e rules f r r selfm e a s u r e m e n t w i l l b e eent i f y o u a r c u n c e r t a i n as to y o u r exact size. SEND P C S T A L

FOR C A T A L O G U E T , and

B O O K L E T " T H E C A R E CF S H O E S . "

L. C. BLISS &CO., Mail Order Department, 109 S u m m e r St.,

BOSTON, MASS.

S T O R E S . — B o s t o n , 109 Summer St. ; Providence. 22c Westminster St. ; N e w Y o r k , 115 N a s s a u St., 1347 Broadway, 291 B r o a d w a y ; B i u o k l y n , 357 Fulton St., 111 B r o a d w a y ; Baltimore, 219 East Baltimuie .St.; Philadelphia, I 2 l » Market St , 8th a n d Chestnut Sts. ; W a s h i n g t o n , j j . C , 1003 Penn Ave. ; litlsburt,', 309 F i l t h A v e , ; Buffalo, 362 M a i n S t . ; C i n c i n n a t i , 13-1"; Fountain Sq. ; St. Louis, 618 Olive St. ; Chicaeo 103 Dearborn St., 215 Dearborn St. ; Detroit, 122 Woodward Ave. ; Cleveland, 17 E u c l i d Ave. ; Denver, 423 Sixteenth S t . ; A l h a n v , N . Y . , 34 M a i d e n L a n e ; Atlanta (ia , 6 Whitehall S t . ; M i l w a u k e e , W i s . , 212 C r a i : d A v e . Factory, W h i t m a n , Mass. R e g a l D r e s s i n g is the finest leather preservat ive and beautifier that it is possible to make. O f course it is to our interest to furnish only a dressing of the high­ est possible character and to make Regal Shoes last longer and look better than other shoes. Regal Dress­ ing is made of pure, refined oils which will give \ o i i better satisfaction than any other dressing you can find. Our Traveler's Package will be sent f y mail, nnstpaid, or with Regal Shoes, upon receipt of 1 ^ cents. L a r g e size, 30 cents.

Please m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to a d v e r t i s e r s .

22


McCLURE'S

T

MAGAZINE.

H

E

A E O L I A N IF Y O U are a lover c f g o o d music, there is n o t h i n g y o u can possibly purchase that w i l l give y o u the same amount o f pleasure that can be derived from an A e o l i a n . T h e A e o l i a n will enable y o u to play any piece o f music ever composed without waiting to study or practice. I f y o u want a program o f operatic music, y o u have s i m p l y to m a k e y o u r selection and insert that particular roll o f music i n the instrument and y o u can render it as y o u wish to hear it rendered. I f y o u r m o o d or the occasion calls for dancing, y o u can play waltzes, lancers, two-steps, and polkas w i t h perfect time and r h y t h m . T h e A e o l i a n is really a solo orchestra. T h e rich field o f orchestral music is open to it. A s its technical capacity is u n l i m i t e d , it enables the player to execute every note o f the score — an achievement w h i c h it is next to impossible for two hands to accomplish. W h i l e the A e o l i a n has technical powers immeasurably b e y o n d those o f the most skilful technician, the performer is

complete master of the expression. T h i s is the secret o f the A e o l i a n ' s fascination. It is responsive to the player's every feeling. H e renders the music just as he thinks it should be played. H e controls the slightest change o f tone and tempo. H e can play j u s t what he v/ants to he'ar, and he can play it just when he wants to hear it. H e is independent o f every one. A c o l i a n s arc shown to the merely curious as well as to i n t e n d i n g purchasers.

The

Hcrriing & C a r n r i c k Tress, New

York

C o m p a n y

Aeolian

18 W E S T

23H

If unable to c a l l , send for lite aturc g i v i n g full detailc 1 description.

NEW

ST.,

YORK

CITY

Chicago—Lyon & Hcaly. Detroit;—F. J . Schwankovsky. San F r a n c i s c o — K o h l c r & Chase. P o n h . n d — M . B. Wells C o . , Aeolian M u s i c C o . M o n t r e a l — L . E . N . Pratie & Co. Salt L a k e C i t y — D a y n e s Music C o . K-nsai Cily — J . W . Jenk n s ' Sons M u s i c C o . St. P a d — W . J . D y e r & Dro,

London—TheOrehcstrclle C o . , I i ; R e g e n t bt. Boston — T h e M . Stcincrt & Sons C o . , i j i B o y l ston St. P h i l a d e l p h i a — C . J . IIeppe & Son. Baltimore — V / n . ICnabe & Co. Washington, D. C . - W m . Knabc & C o . Cleveland — T h e B . Drclicr s S -ns C o . Cincinnati — D . H . Bald­ win c*c C o .

;

A e o l i a n Style C o l o n i a l . P r i c e , 5600 Other styles from $75 to £2500

Please mention M c C l u r e ' s when y o u write to advertisers. 23


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

The Woman's Century. 1800-1900. N no c o u n t r y i n the w o r l d is the diffusion of w e l l b e i n g so general as a m o n g the w o m e n of the U n i t e d S t a t e s ; this is large­ ly due to their ready u s e of m e c h a n i c a l , labor-saving

Recreation of 1900.

Recreation of 1800.

ultimate perfection s e e m s to have been attained. T h e r e are now three distinct types of S i n g e r machines for f a m i l y sewing, t w o m a k i n g the double thread lock­ stitch a n d one the " A u t o m a t i c " single t h r e a d chain-stitch. T h e p r i n c i p a l differ­ e n c e b e t w e e n the l o c k - s t i t c h ma­ c h i n e s lies in the form of shuttle used a n d its m o v e m e n t ;

c o n t r i v a n c e s . It is In the i n v e n t i o n of such m a c h i n e r y that A m e r i c a n i n ­ genuity excels; a n d che S i n g e r s e w i n g m a c h i n e is one of its most c o n s p i c ­ uous e x a m p l e s . For half-a-cen­ tury it has b e e n a most potent factor in p r o m o t i n g the happiness of w o ­ men. D u r i n g this time its m a n u ­ facture has been improved until .iiillllSlillliSliltoll:!,,,

The Singer of Today

(Lock-Stitch.)

both are d i s t i n g u i s h e d for s i m p l i c i t y a n d good c o n s t r u c t i o n . E a c h costs the s a m e b e c a u s e only one quality is made, a n d that is the best. Sold on Instalments. Old Machines Exchanged. Made and S o l d only by

The Singer Manufacturing C o . The B u s y Woman of 1800.

S A L E S R O O M S IN E V E R Y CITY. The B u s y Woman of 1900. (Copyright, 18^9, by The Singer Mfg. Co.) Please m e n t i o n M e C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to advertisers.

24


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Pettijohn's Breakfast Food All the wheat but A GO Othe D overcoat B R E A K F A S T BRINGS A GOOD D A Y . P e t t i j o h n ' s Breakfast F o o d is steadily c r o w d i n g meat o f f the A m e r i c a n breakfast table because it is healthier, cheaper and better t h a n meat. It s h o u l d be eaten freely as it contains a l l o f the n o u r i s h i n g qualities o f the best w h e a t w i t h no indigestible matter. I t stimulates the organs o f digestion a n d e l i m i n a t i o n . B e s i d e s b e i n g a n easily a n d q u i c k l y p r e p a r e d breakfast dish, delicate, a p p e t i z i n g a n d n o u r i s h i n g , P e t t i j o h n ' s B r e a k f a s t P o o d makes u n e q u a l l e d G r i d d l e C a k e s , G e m s , M u f f i n s and Puddings. A l s o a n e x c e l l e n t t h i c k e n i n g for S o u p s . C o l d Pettijohn's P o r r i d g e is delicious w h e n f r i e d l i k e c o r n m e a l m u s h W r i t e for o u r C e r e a l C o o k B o o k , edited b y Mrs. Rorrr. It tells a l l about c o o k i n g a l l k i n d s of cereals a l l sorts of ways. F r e e , postpaid.

T h e American Cereal Co.,

Monadnock B l d g . . Chicago, 111.

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 25


McCLUIiE'S

MAGAZINE.

Alfred Peats Wall Paper

Our New Designs are Now Ready

T h e leather is so soft and tough that it has no tendency to crack. A n d it is the dressiest leather that ever went into shoes. N o one else makes it or can make it. V i c i is the Standard K i d of the world.

Samples Mailed k. to you Free

VICI F R I C T I O N P O L I S H will add to the life of any leather a n d keep it like n e w . VICI P A S T E P O L I S H gives the easy shine. ASK

One and

price we

pay

ANY SHOE

DEALER

R O B E R T H . F O E R D E R E R , Philadelphia

O u r line this year represents the largest and handsomest assortment of wall papers ever shown in the U n i t e d States. Y o u cannot obtain the new styles in your local market or buy half as cheap.

SHOE BUYINGandSHOE SAVING Free

everywhere the

freight

If you have only one room to decorate, see our new patterns before you select the paper.

An

Agent Wanted

™ T7<> ovl

take orders from our large sample books, showing hundreds of beautiful patterns. Every design new, none of which can be found at your local deal­ ers. H e furnish free handsome advertising signs, illustrated c i r c u ­ lars, and refer customers to our agents who write us for samples. T h e business pays well from the start, for no one can compete with you in variety, quality or price. (Over 11,000 igents are now selling our papers.) For samples 01 particulars about the agency, write to nearest address.

Alfred Peats and Co. WARNER'S RUST PROOF

h

4 1 - 4 3 W. 14* ST., N E W Y O R K . 143-145 WABASH AVE., CHICAGO.

Please mention McClure's when you write to

26

adt7^rr;=»


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

THE PRACTICAL

TROUSERS HANGERANDPRESS. is absolute;!)' indispensable It saves c l o t h i n g , patience and time, keeping the trousers "smooth as if ironed," a n d , while d o u b l i n g the capacity nt the closets, it also g i v i s m a x i m u m convenience, r e n d e r i n g each garment separately "get-atable." It is an absolutely perfect device i n d e s i g n , c o n s t r u c t i o n a n d finish. Its merits are u n u s u a l , a n d its s u p e r i o r i t y u n q u e s t i o n e d . It has been o;i the market O v e r seven years. It has u n i v e r s a l l y satisfied the most exacting-; meets every requirement a n d is e q u a l l y valuable whether the wardrobe be moderate or extensive.

Black Cat Stockings for Boys Warranted to Out-wear Two Pairs of Ordinary Stockings A s k y o u r d e a l e r f o r B l a c k C a t S t o c k i n g s . I f y o u c a n ' t get t h e m , s a m p l e s s e n t f o r 2 5 cents a p a i r . G i v e s i z e a n d state if f o r b o y , g i r l , l a d y o r g e n t l e m a n . Address

Chicago-Rockford Hosiery Co. K E N O S H A , WIS.

RALSTON HEALTH SHOES f I

I

i

H a v e y o u already tried a p a i r of these h y g i e n i c shoes ? If y o u h a v e , y o u a r e o u r friend and c u s t o m e r . T h e w o n d e r f u l success of these shoes surpasses o u r m o s t cenguine expectation. These goods are ju3t as advertised, h e a l t h p r e s e r v i n g , c o m f o r t - g i v i n g shoes.

OUR 1 0 0 P A O E illustrated descriptive b o o k (free o n request) contains the endorsements of our device by more than 3000 w e l l - k n o w n gentlemen, every one of w h o m is u s i n g at least one of o u r $ 5 . 0 0 sets.

X.aCe o n n e w - f o r m e d lasts, upon new principles, yet stylish and up t o date. M a d e i n three classes, w a t e r p r o o f f o r w e t weather, w a l k i n g shoes for street wear, W drees shoes for dress occasions. If y o u r dealer does n o t c a r r y t h e m i n stock, send direct to the f a c t o r y for t h e m . HEALTH CHOES F O R

T h e Five»Dollar Set, w h i c h c o n s i s t s o f 6 " P r a c t i c a l " 1 rousers H a n g e r s a n d 3 " P r a c t i c a l " C l o s e t R o d s , is sent express p r e p a i d o n receipt of price. T h e closet s h o w n is fitted w i t h a $ 5 . o o s e t . It m e e t s t h e a v e r a g e r e q u i r e m e n t s . F o r $1.00 w e w i l l s e n d p r e p a i d o n e h a n g e r a n d o n e r o d a n d a f t e r w a r d w h e n w a n t e d t h e r e m a i n d e r o f t h e $y=;.oo s e t f o r S4.00. S i n g l e h a n g e r s . 7 5 e l s . : s i n g l e r o d s , 25 c t s .

MEN,

S4.00 This "The shoe I Send

i s o u r daily m a i l , m o s t comforiabie ever w o r e . " for catalogue, free.

GUARANTEE OFFER. return it at our expense;

win

a«<* w e i m m e d i a t e l y refund the l u l l purchase price.

RALSTON HEALTH SHOE

PRACTICAL NOVELTY CO

MAKERS, C A M P E L L O , MASS.

4 3 5 W A L N U T ST. PHIL A , P A . Please

mention McClure's

when

27

y o u write to advertisers.


McClure's

MAGAZINE. FOR

BINDING D R E S S E S T H E R E IS N O T H I N G EQUAL, T O A GOOD B R A I D .

GOFF'S BRAIDS are the BEST MADE Ask For a n d Insist o n Having

Goff's angora Braid

D. Goff and Sons, Pawtucket, R. I.

Feder's Pompadour SKIRT

Keep Your Shoes Where Yon Can F i n d Them. K e e p y o u r shoes free of dust, m o i s t ­ ure, abrasions,keep yourshoes i n their p r o p e r shape, i n c l e a n l y c o n d i t i o n . G e t a n Kveready Shoe a n d Slipper Holder. It h o l d s a n y size shoe; tits a n y size closet d o o r ; u t i l i z e s waste space; k e e p s I closet floors c l e a n , does not deface d o o r s . Price (1.3U prepaid ; money b-.ck if you're not pleased. WM.

PROTECTOR

{Covered by United States and Foreign

FEDER'S IS THE ORIGINAL

P . O. B o x

808.

Wymote.

GILBERT'S HEEL CUSHIONS

Patents)

Soars h i g h above a l l other skirt b i n d i n g s . Is u n a p p r o a c h a b l e in quality a n d d u r a b i l i t y . Is guaranteed to last as l o n g as the S k i r t .

w o r n inside the shoe for E a s y W a l k i n g . A r c h e d Instep, Increased H e i g h t . Better F i t t i n g Shoes, E a s e and Comtort. Simply placed in the heel, felt down. D o not require larger shoes. % in. 25c; % in. 3*c; 1 in. 50c per pair. L a d i e s ' or Men's. R E A D . Send name, size of shoe, height desired, and 2C stamp for pair on 10 days' trial.

G I L B E R T M F G . C O . , 63 E l m St., Roclir«ter. N. V.

as it is also the Best, a n d it

RETAILS AT 7c. PER YARD The Genuine has the name of F E D E R ' S stamped on every y a r d , and is w o u n d o n spools as here illustrated. D o n ' t accept fraudulent i m i t a t i o n s at any price, for it is impossible to make a n y t h i n g better than F E D E R ' S , w h i c h is itself the best.

Collar Button Insurance GIVEN WITH

One-Piece Collar Button M a d e of O n e P i e c e of Metal W i t h o u t S e a m or J o i n t Best for Ladies' Shirt Waists and Children's Dresses

J. W. GODDARD & SONS, New York 1847.

EVERY

KREMENTZ

A t all F i r s t - C l a s s D r y G o o d s Stores, or write to

Established

S. H A L L O W E L L .

You

pet a new one w i t h o u t c h a r g e in case of a c c i d e n t of any kind.

The

S t o r y of a C o l l a r B u t t o n gives a l l p a r t i c u l a r s .

for it.

Postal us

A l l jewelers sell K r e m e n t z buttons

K R E M E N T Z & C O . , 51 Chestnut St., Newark, N. J .

"Spun-Glass" Suspender each p a i r of

Rusil Finish

T r o u s e r s w i t h the G e n ­ uine

Dress Linings

Guyots.

They

combine H e a l t h , C o m ­

More Brilliant than 5ilk in (olor<m<i lustre

«iso

Stronger

SGincfes wide * BE HAD , « A H « ? L O | $

fort

and

receipt of 5 0 cents.

Ostheimer

ftlDNIGHT FAST B L A C K J. W. GoddardandSons New York

Durability.

S a m p l e pair mailed o n

621

Brothers

Broadway

New

Y o r k City

Please mention M c C l u r e ' s when you write to advertiser 28


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

H.andI.Co

Correct M o r n i n g Collar T h i s p i c t u r e represents the latest a n d most fashionable H . k I . collar for m o r n i n g wear. It is not o n l y the a b s o l u t e l y proper c o l l a r i n style, b u t l i k e a l l the H . & I . c o l l a r s , it represents fine m a t e r i a l , careful w o r k m a n s h i p , c o m f o r t a n d d u r a b i l i t y . It is not o n l y made to look w e l l a n d wear w e l l , but to feel perfectly easy and c o m f o r t a b l e . O f course it is o n l y one of o u r m a n y a n d v a r i e d styles representing e v e r y t h i n g i n c o l l a r s that m a y p r o p e r l y be w o r n . A s k y o u r dealer for H . & I . c o l l a r s . I f he does not sell them send us 2 5 cents, g i v i n g the style, size a n d height y o u prefer, and we w i l l send y o u t w o of the most perfectly satisfactory collars y o u ever wore. I f y o u d o not l i k e them y o u are w e l c o m e to y o u r money back. A s k us for o u r free " S t y l e B o o k for M e n " w h i c h tells all about collars and shows pictures of a l l the latest c o l l a r creations.

H O L M E S & IDE, Department B, T R O Y , N . Y .

Please mention M c C l u r e ' s when van write t o advertisers.

29


McCLUKE'S

MAGAZINE.

JUST

ONE

SUPPORTER Thai makes the waist rouna

Wide W e b fancy frilled. black, white, ^ c a r d i n a l , blu«r'7C« or pink

To O E T and keep a PERFECT F I G U R E you

H e a v y Silk W e b , , l a r g e p a d $1 25 A if desired, " A

HOME N E E D L E W O R K

MAGAZINE

is admitted to be the best paper devoted to Fancy Work, A r t Needlework, Lace Making, C r o c h e t i n g and K n i t t i n g . It is p u b l i s h e d in J a n u a r y , A p r i l , J u l y and O c t o b e r . Fine Illus­ trations, S p l e n d i d C o l o r e d Plates, Instructions a n d E m b r o i d e r y Lessons by expert teachers. Subscribers have the p r i v i l e g e of a s k i n g any questions desired of the editors. D e s i g n s are g i v e n for beginners as well as experienced workers. It w i l l keep y o u posted o n the latest ideas and the newest style of work. The J u l y '99 number treats Renaissance and B a t t e n b e r g L a c e s , besides E m b r o i d e r y . T e l l s how to make a l l the different stitches. The October '99 number has nine S p l e n ­ d i d C o l o r e d Plates a n d gives designs for center­ pieces, doilies, pincushions, s h o p p i n g bags, photo frames, sofa p i l l o w s , c h i l d ' s crocheted cap, D r a w n W o r k and M o r r i s E m b r o i d e r y . D o n ' t miss this number. The January 1900 number, just out. besides the latest designs contains a valuable article o n " S h a d i n g , " illustrated by C o l o r e d Plates. Read M r s . L . Barton Wilson's " Les­ son in E m b r o i d e r y . " Subjects this month : "Double Rose' and "Morning Glory." F i n e l y Illustrated. Decore and C r a v a t C a s e designs A l s o R u l e s for N e w Crocheted Silk Purses and Chatelaine B a g . A splendid n u m ­ ber. S i n g l e copies cost 10 cents each. S P E C I A L O F F E R : Send us twenty-five cents, stamps o r silver, before A p r i l 1, 1900, and we w i l l send y o u the J u l y , O c t o b e r and J a n u a r y numbers as above by return m a i l and the A p r i l n u m b e r when it comes out. Your money back if you don't like them. T h i s offer good o n l y to A p r i l 1st. rooo. A f t e r that date the price w i l l be 35 cents per year. Subscribe now at the l o w rate. Address

FLORENCE

MUST , WEAR

the

Combined Belt and Front Pad Foster Hose Supporter ted D e c . 5, 1895.)

See that the name FOSTER

is on every pair.

First-class Dealers sell them; if not, write us. W h e n ordeiinc be sure to give your h e i g h t and w a i s t measure.

THE

FOSTER

1• • ii • • • ••

HOSE

SUPPORTER

COMPANY,

^'•'•'•» Cottage tirore Ave.. Chicago, HI

Don't Tear Napkins

B y fastening

them with

child's

to

neck

make

constantly in his plate.

NAPKIN

Made

pins. him

N e i t h e r t u c k t h e m m the uncomfortable

and

to

fall

F a s t e n t h e m s e c u r e l y w i t h the

HOLDER

w i t h t h e W a s h b u r n e ' s I m p r o v e d P a t e n t Fasteners.

H o l d s w i t h a firm g r i p . little l e v e r .

I n s t a n t l y r e l e a s e d b y l i f t i n g the

M a d e w i t h a silk cord t w o inches long.

h i

e a s y t o s u b s t i t u t e a l o n g e r c o r d o r a n e l a s t i c i f desired

BY MAIL,

P U B L I S H I N G CO.,

25 Chestnut St., Florence,

>

M a d e of satin wit four bands best l i s l e 01 silk elastic

Illustrated

Mass.

booklet of

T H E

the

Washburne

AMERICAN Box

Please mention M c C l u r e ' s when y o u write to advertisers.

30

20c. attachments,

RING

free

on requ

CO.,

K , W a t e r b u r y , Conn

s


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

The Improved

Best and Co.

BOSTON GARTER The Standard for Gentlemen.

This Dress 50c Shows h o w econom­ ically a n d tastefully children can be cloth­ ed at the " children's store." Mothers a l l over the United States find

ALWAYS EASY. The Name " B O S T O N G A R T E R " is stamped on every loop.

The Velvet Grip

our catalogue a great help. you. It

It may help

CUSHION BUTTON

w i l l cost 4 C f o r

CLASP

p o s t a g e to t r y . Has

over 1 0 0 0 Illustrations.

Made of good quality nains 'ok, gathered full from the ne^k. T h e sleeves and neck are daintily finished with embroidery ruffle and the skirt with a deep hem. Sizes, six months, one and two years, 53 cents. (Either

by mail;

Lies flat to the l e g — never Slips, tears nor unfastens.

S a m e s t y l e , b e t t e r qualitynainsook, neck a n d sleeves t r i m m e d with a hemstitched rum_ — skirt has h e m ; itched he.11, 63c.

postage paid, 5 c .

extra.)

New

60-62 West 2 3 i Street,

Every Pair W a r r a n t e d . S O L D E V E R Y W H E R E . Sample Pair, Silk 5(>c, Cotton 25c. Mailed on receiptor price. G E O . F R O S T C O . , Makers Boston, Mass

York,

W e have a size of H o o k s and Eyes To fasten cobweb lawns and laces; The k i n d that clings at fastenings A n d snugly holds what it embraces

WARM EXTREMITIES WARM ALL OVER Warm,

may

D u r a b l e , H a n d s o m e , a r e o u r $3

Fur Gloves, by mail

be said of o u r Dollar-quarter

gloves See

Strong,

Gauntlet Black

i n a l l colors

for women,

prepaid. genuine

same

Mocha

K i d

a n d our Dollar-half,

Seventy-five, and Two-dollar unlined and silk-lined

that

Large

The

Mocha

and Reindeer gloves for men. Our

illustrated booklet " G l o v e

free b y m e n t i o n i n g

h u m p ?

of

mittens.

W e also b u y r a w furs.

Black Galloway and Frisian F u r Coats and Robes we

are h e a d q u a r t e r s .

DeLong

Bros.,

Mfrs.

Also

coats.

In

C u s t o m F u r T a n n i n g of all kinds of hides and skins;

Rug

and Robe work ; T a x i d e r m y and H e a d M o u n t i n g we

are a t h o m e . Richardson & D e L o n g

l

Get o u r *M o t h - P r o o f " booklet.

coon, dog, wombat, Russian calf

Hook a n d E y e

It will give you alot

i n f o r m a t i o n about dress, d r i v i n g a n dw o r k gloves a n d

In

The

P o i n t e r s " m a y be h a d

this magazine.

Get our custom tan " Folder."

THE CROSBY FRISIAN FUR COMPANY

Philadelphia, P a . . U . S . A .

116 M I L L S T R E E T ,

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 31

ROCHESTER,

N. Y .


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

High-Grade Flower Seeds. A f % P A C K A G E S , making a I A .

LL

MAGNIFICENT COLLECTION U IG K I N D S

K I N D S

POPPIES Pansy . . Phlox . . Sweet Peas Salvia . . Balsam Pinks . .

.

18

.

IO

.

13

.

.

12

.

10

2

K I N D S

Aster . . . . i5 Candytuft . . 10 Sunflower . . 2 Xennia . . 12 Larkspur . . 6 Verbena . . . 10 F o r g e t mc- n o t . — S w e e t M isTionette

DEWEY SWEET PEAS Manila W Nasturtium

Portulaca . . . F o u r O'clock . . Marigold . . .

20 — 13

Sweet A l y s s u m . Nasturtium...

— 10

Calliopsis

( One \ package } One ( p a c k a ;e

.

.

large postpaid large postpaid

.

8

i 10c

! 10c

W e h a v e m a d e y o u t h r e e d i s t i n c t offers a b o v e , a n d s i n c e r e l y b e l i e v e w e a r e g i v i n g y o u i n e a c h c a s e f o r 1 0 cents u n u s u a l q u a n t i t y a n d l a r g e r v a r i e t y t h a n o f f e r e d y o u e l s e w h e r e ; b u t as a special i n d u c e m e n t i o r y o u to g r o w o u r seeds this year, we w i l l s e n d to a n y p e r s o n m e n t i o n i n g this p u b l i c a t i o n , p o s t p a i d ,

ALL

OF T H E A B O V E

FOR

25c.

i n s i l v e r , o r 13 t w o - c e n t s t a m p s . W e d o t h i s to i n t r o d u c e our &eeds i n t o n e w h o m e s . Order E a r l y . Address,

Somerville

This Beautiful

Nursery

C o . , Somerville,

Mass.

MAY'S RARE

SEED BOOK FREE

25c

BUYS

MAY'S

Celebrated $ 1 . 0 0 Collection of English

SHOW PANSIES T h i s "Wonder Offer is for pre­ c i s e l y s a m e c o l l e c t i o n univer­ s a l l y s o l d f o r SI.00, a n d is the finest s t r a i n o f E n g l i s h Pansy n o v e l t i e s offered. F l o w e r s p r o d i g i o u s size, m a g n i f i c e n t colo r i i i g , s u p e r b m a r k i n g . S e e d selected f r o m l a r g e s t a n d most b e a u t i f u l f l o w e r s , n e v e r f a i l s to g i v e s a t i s f a c t i o n . Collection includes t h e f o l l o w i n g n a m e d v a r i e t i e s : May O i e e e n - L a r g e p u r e w h i t e flowers. ( R e g u l a r price 16c) Excelsior—Rich b l u e w i t h y e l l o w eye. " " 15c Harlequin—Finely m a r k e d and blotched. " " 15c Diablo—Dark p u r p l i s h black. " " 15c Beauty of Kent—Lemon yellow. *• 20c Mixed English Shoic—Grand mixture. " " 20c May*s Imperial Collection T h e f o l l o w i n g 7 v a r i e t i e s a r e o f the l a r g e f r e e - f l o w e r i n g c l a s s , u n e q u a l l e d b y a n y o f the high p r i c e d s o r t s s o l d a t 15 t o 25c p k t . C r e a m o f new a n d older sorts. F o r 25c w e w i l l m a i l 1 p k t . e a c h : America—Scarlet a n d c r i m s o n . Grace May—White. Miss Eckford—Yellow. Captain of the Sines. Monarch— maroon. Coxtntess Radnor—Mauve. Apple Blossom—Flashed a n d clouded. Mammoth 20th Century Catalogue m a i l e d free o n request. M o s t c o m p l e t e o f t h e y e a r , c o n t a i n i n g numbers of p l a t e s p a i n t e d f r o m n a t u r e . A c o m p l e t e g u i d e for all.

Our New Catalogue f o r igjo is p r o n o u n c e d the b r i g h t e s t a n d best Seed B o o k of the y e a r . It c o n t a i n s h u n d r e d s o f i l l u s t r a ­ t i o n s , f o u r c o l o r e d p l a t e s , up-to-date c u l t u r a l d i r e c t i o n s , a n d ^2,500.00 i n c a s h p r i z e s . I f y o u w a n t the finest g a r d e n i n y o u r n e i g h b o r h o o d i n 1900 y o u m u s t p l a n t

u

SWEET PEAS

Maule's Seeds

1

M a u l e ' s Seeds l e a d a l l , a n d e n j o y a n a t i o n a l r e p u t a t i o n s e c o n d to n o o t h e r b r a n d . Y o u should have our new c a t a l o g u e b e f o r e p u r c h a s i n g y o u r s u p p l y of flower, v e g e t a b l e o r f a r m seeds, flowering b u l b s , etc. It is free. W r i t e for it to-day. Address

L.L.MAYandCo.Seedgrowers.St. Paul, Minn

W M . HENRY M A U L E

P A N S I E S

PHILADELPHIA

Please mention McClure's when y o u write to advertisers.

32


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Planters

IN EVERY TESTIFY

TO

CLIME

THE

SUPERIORITY

OF

HENDERSON'S SEEDS " EVERTHING FOR THE GARDEN " Is the title of our Catalogue for 1900, and it is really a book of one hundred a n d ninety (190) pages, weighing a pound, containing over seven hundred (700) engravings and six superb colored plates of seeds and plants, and as each was d r a w n from nature, they show "as in a looking-glass," the best of the old and the latest of the new. M u c h valuable information is also contained i n " E v e r y t h i n g for the Garden," such as " H o w to grow flower a n d vegetable seeds," "Cold-frames and hot-beds, their construction and management," " H o w to grow large crops of smooth potatoes," " H o w to make fruit trees bear every year," "Injurious insects and diseases of plants and trees, the remedies and h o w to use them," etc., etc. To trace advertising, and give our Catalogue the largest possible we make the following unusually liberal offer:

EVERY

EMPTY COUNTS

distribution,

ENVELOPE

AS

CASH.

T o every one w h o w i l l state where this ^dvertisement was seen, and w h o encloses us IO c e n t s (in stamps), we w i l l mail the Catalogue, and also send, f r e e o f c h a r g e , our famous 5 0 - c e n t " H a r v e s t "

Collec­

t i o n of seeds, containing one packet each of N e w Large-flowering Sweet Peas, N e w Giant Pansy, N e w Giant Comet Asters, "White P l u m e Celery, French Breakfast Radish and N e w Freedom T o m a t o , in a r e d e n v e l o p e , w h i c h when emptied and returned w i l l be a c c e p t e d a s a

25-cent

c a s h p a y m e n t on a n y order of goods selected from Catalogue to the amount of $1.00 and u p w a r d .

Peter Henderson and co.

Cortland

St. COPr/t/bfi/

/&oa

NEW Y O R K . ay PETER

ftEAIDÂŁffSON

Please mention M c C l u r e ' s when y o u write to advertisers.

33

& CO.


McCLURE'S

Palms

MAGAZINE.

F o r Home Adornment W e will send P R E P A I D to any E X P R E S S or P O S T O F F I C E in the United States, the

5 Choice Palms

Shown i n Illustration

for 11 $$

Safe a r r i v a l g u a r a n t e e d . E a c h p l a n t Is a n i c e l y characterized s p e c i m e n a n d n o t a s m a l l s e e d l i n g s u c h as a r e u s u a l l y sent out b y m a i l , a n d a r e w o r t h 81.80 at r e g u l a r c a t a l o g u e rates. A n d to e a c h p u r c h a s e r o r a p p l i c a n t w h o mentions t h e n a m e o f t h i s m a g a z i n e w e w i l l s e n d F R E E , OUR N E W G A R D E N C A L E N D A R F O R 1900. T h e hand­ s o m e s t S e e d , P l a n t a n d B u l b c a t a l o g e v e r published.

HENRY A. DREER, 714 Chestnut St., Philadelphia.

WE O F F E R 60,000 Apple Trees In 60 choice varieties 80,000 Stan'd Pear Trees 50,000 P l u m Trees and 75,000 Dwarf Pear Trees :*v -xtra large, medium and small sizes, at a •real bargain. Our leading specialty Is

DandCROSES

RED CROSS

CURRANT

Buy direct and save half your money. We I sell everything for the orchard, garden a D d I a r k . Send to-day for onr New Fruit and I Ornamental Catalogue F R E E .

ON THEIR OWN ROOTS m a k e rose g r o w i n g e a s y . N o f a i l u r e s . F r a g r a n t flowers a l l S u m m e r , f r o m J u n e u n t i l severe frost. T h e G o l d e n W e d d i n g e d i t i o n of " Our New Guide

Green's Nursery Co., Rochester.H.Y

to Rose Culture" for 1900, the l e a d i n g Rose Catalogue of A m e r i c a , gives y o u t h e benefit o f a l i f e - t i m e e x p e r i ­ ence i n g r o w i n g Roses a n d a l l other d e s i r a b l e flowers. 130 pages, p r o f u s e l y i l l u s t r a t e d , fve o n request. Also s a m p l e c o p y o f o u r floral m o n t h l y , "Success w i t h F l o w e r s . " Free for t h e a s k i n g . S e n d to-day. THE DINGEE & COWARD C O . , W e s t Grove, P a .

THE

K I N - K A N or K U M Q U A T

ORANGE

EARN A BICYCLE!

F r o m J a p a n . Bears i n m a r v e l o u s profusion little g o l d e n Oranges no larger than a dam-on plum. T h e whole f r u i t , rind and all, is eaten. De­ l i c i o u s p r e s e r v e d a n d erystali z e d . A most elegant little window p l a n t p r o d u c i n g real oramre Ummmh In b l o o m or fruit all the time, d r a f t ­ ed o n dwarf stock a n d need not be­ c o m e o v e r 18 inches h i g h . F i ne b u s h y p l a n t s 40e. e a c h , postpaid. Printed directions for culture with ench order i K i i . fine 64-pnge catalogue of HAKE FLORIDA FLOWERS A.M> FRUITS. THE JESSAMINE GARDENS, JESSAMINE. FLORIDA

Have Hundreds of Carloads

By selling Baker's Teas, etc., among youi friends. A total of $60.00 to $100.00 worth for a Bicycle. Watches, Furniture, Crock ery. Cameras for smaller sales. Express prepaid. Write for Catalog, Order Sheets etc. W . G . B A K E R . (Dept. M . t , Springfield, Mass.

of Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Shrubs, Roses, Plants, Bulbs, Seeds. Choicest new and old. Mall size post­ paid, safe arrival and satisfaction guaranteed, larger by express or freight. T h e best are cheapest, try us. Elegant Catalog free. 46th year. 1000 acres. 41 greenhouses.

T

Gardeners

H E comforts and products of a c o u n t r y home are i n * creased by a c o m p e t e n t g a r ­ dener. If y o u want t o e n g a g e — one write totis. W e h a v e been s u p p l y i n g t h e m f o r y e a r s to t h e best people everywhere. No fee asked. S E E D S M E N A N D FLORISTS, 16 & 87 CORTLANDT S T . , NEW YORK.

PETER HENDERSONandCO,,

TheStorrs & Harrison Co., Box584, Painesville.O.

best by Test—74 Y E A R S . Largest a n n u a l sale. H i g h q u a l i t y — N O T h i g h price. F I N E S T sorts. W e B U D 4 m i l l i o n A p p l e trees, whole-root graft 5 m i l lion—1- a n d 2-yr. Other Trees, Vines, etc., i n proportion. 1100 acres N u r s e r y D A V ITDE"i/ IJTr 43,000 acres O r c h a r d s . F R U I T B O O K free. TT " I /% I I It L I I? II | t a n d p a c k free, ask no money till S A F E arrival,—guarantee S A T I S F A C T I O N ' VA/Vt D A V CASH each W E E K a n d w a n t more H O M E a n d t r a v e l i n g salesmen TVe r / \ I Stark M a r k e t a n d Quality K i n g s P A Y : CTADK LOUISIANA* MO A p p l e of Commerce, B l a c k B e n Davis, C h a m p i o n , Delicious, jjAKftS D a n s v i l l e N Y ' Senator, S t a y m a n Winesap; G o l d p l u m ; Kieffer; E l b e r t a . - V i s i t u sStarkBros.S t a r k , Mo'., etc. Please m e n t i o n M c C I u r e 3 when y o u write to advertisers. 34

STARK

TREES

>


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

TREES F r u i t Trees—standards for orchards; dwarfs for gardens. S m a l l F r u i t s — a l l k i n d s , i n c l u d i n g grapes. Ornamental Trees, E v e r g r e e n s a n d S h r u b s — f o r the e m b e l l i s h m e n t o f pub­ l i c a n d private grounds, o f l a r g e a n d s m a l l extent, parks, ceme­ teries, etc. S h a d e Trees—for avenues a n d streets. Hardy Roses—the finest collection i n t h i s c o u n t r y o f l a r g e two-year-old plants for i m m e d i a t e effect, H a r d y P l a n t s , C l i m b e r s , etc. O u r new catalogue, carefully revised, beautifully Illustrated w i t h half-tone engravings, w i t h cover o f e x q u i s i t e design, c o n t a i n s accurate a n d trustworthy descriptions of the m o s t v a l u a b l e v a r i e t i e s i n c u l t i v a t i o n , a n d is r e p l e t e w i t h p r a c t i c a l h i n t s i n d i s p e n s a b l e to p l a n t e r s . A l t h o u g h p r e p a r e d at g r e a t e x p e n s e , i t w i l l be sent free t o o u r r e g u l a r c u s t o m e r s ; to o t h e r s , o n receipt of ten cents.

ELLWANGERandBARRY,

Mt. Hope Nurseries Established 60 T e a r s

R O C H E S T E R , N. Y .

BURPEES Seeds Grow

A Joy of Spring-

and are always the

1

IS NEW

Best that G r o w !

OUR CENTURY

as proved by thousands of trials at our famous Fordhook Farms,—the largest t r i a l grounds i n A m e r i c a .

Garden and Farm Manual.

BURPEE'S

It tells of many new and choice seeds and plants. It differs from a l l other catalogues i n that it is illustrated by direct p h o t o g r a p h s free from exaggeration. Free to all w h o plant seeds. W r i t e n o w . JOHNSON & STOKES\ 217-219 Market St. Philadelphia Penna.

Farm Annual f o r 1900

mailed F R E E to all.

A handsome new book of 140 pages,—tells the p l a i n t r u t h about Seeds, i n c l u d i n g rare Novelties w h i c h cannot be had elsewhere. Beautiful colored plate and hundreds of i l l u s ­ trations from nature. Gives practical infor­ mation of real value to a i l who w o u l d raise the choicest Vegetables and most beautiful F l o w e r s . W r i t e a postal card TO=DAY i

W . A T L E E B U R P E E & CO., P h i l a d e l p h i a Please

mention

McClure's

when

35

you

write

to a d v e r t i s e r s .


McCLVIlE-S

MAGAZINE.

Farming on. business principles! simply means lhat the farmer shall get all that it is possible to get out of every acre of land. It means that when he has har­ vested a good crop he shall take such care of it that none of it shall be wa.sted. It means that he shall apply to his farm the principles that have made manufacturers successful, viz.: The proper use of power, the concentration of energy under proper direction and an appreciation of the fact that much that has been thrown away can be made a source of profit. W e H i - i i d f r e e Information how our poodh best All

Smalley

farmer's

Co. (Dept. A)

requirements.

Manitowoc,

Wis.

Best b y Test—74 Y E A R S . Largest a n n u a l sale. Hlgfi quant} — N O T h i g h price. F I N E S T sorts. W e B L * D 4 m i l l i o n A p p l e trees, whole-root graft 5 million—1- a n d 2-yr. Other Trees, Vines, etc., i n proportion. 1400 acres N u r - M / _ D A Y k sery. 43,000 acres Orchards. T Y C I A I I l A L I U I l I B O X a n d P A C K free, ask No Money u n t i l S A F E arrival,— guarantee S A T I S F A C T I O N . F r u i t Book free. W r i t e u s , — V I S I T U= Win D A V CASH each W E E K a n d want more H O M E and T I C r / \ l t r a v e l i n g salesmen. S T A R K M a r k e t a n d Qual. / , ity K i n g s P A Y : A p p l e of Commerce, fTARK LOUISIANA, MO. W / B l a c k B e n Davis, Stayman Winesan, Delicious, W M r g n S Dansville, N. Y . Senator, C h a m p i o n ; Gold plum; Kieffer; E l b e r t a wfiKU" Stark, Mo., e t c

Stark Trees Bear Fruit

FRFIfiHT

STARK ITRADE MARK

Beautiful

new

t h e [ radical

Mfg.

GROUNDS A N D

Gardens

W e c a n give y o u great h e l p i n s e c u r i n g these e c o n o m i c a l l y a n d successfully. I n d i s p e n s a b l e p l a n s a n d expert a d v i c e as to g a r d e n a r r a n g e m e n t , p l a n t i n g , a n d s e l e c t i o n F R E E to every inquirer. F o r e x c e p t i o n a l b a r g a i n s i n first-class stock every o w n e r of Gardens and Grounds should write us. O u r N u r s e r i e s , i n q u a n t i t y a n d v a r i e t y of b o t h o l d a n d trees, etc., are u n e q u a l l e d . W e send F R E E a c a t a l o g u e of e x t r a o r d i n a r y value to every plant lover.

THE

SHADY HILL N U R S E R Y C O . , 102 State Street, Boston, Mass. FREE

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA For reliable information, enclose 5-cent stamp to C H A M B E R O F C O M M E R C E , Los Angeles, Cal.

43

You can easily and quickly earn a

FLOWERS

BICYCLE, CAMERA, W A T C H , SEWING MACHINE, Mackintosh, Ladles' Shoes, Jacket, Cape, Dress Skirt or some other premium by selling a few boxes of our highgrade Toilet Soap to your friends and neighbors. It sells on its merits. N O M O N E Y R E Q U I R E D IN A D V A N C E . We have the best plan for Boys, Girls ami Women. Our premiums are absolutely the best. Large illustrated list of premiums including Ladies'and Chil­ dren's Clothing. Furniture, Guns, Guitars. Mandolins, etc. mailed F R E E . Write to-day for full particulars. DAWSON SOAP CO.. 56 Fifth Ave.. De"t. 92.Chlcago,Ill.

20 Pkts. Seeds, 23 Bulbs Most popular varieties, postpaid. 1 pkt. Mary Semple Asters,4 colors, 1 " Alyssum, Little Gem. [mixed. 1 " Beautiful Hybrid Begonias. 1 " Bouquet Chrysanthemum. 1 « Umbrella Plant. 1 " Carnation Marguerite. 1 " Double Chinese Piuk. 1 " Heliotrope, mixed. 1 " Forget-me-not Victoria. 1 " California Golden Bella. 1 " Petunia Hybrid Mixed. 1 " Phlox Drummondii. 1 " Poppy, New Shirley. 1 " Sunshine Pansy. 1 " California Sweet Pens. 1 " Lovely Butterfly Flower. 1 " Giant Verbena mixed. 1 " Diamond Flower. 1 " Washington Weeping Palm. 1 " Japan Morning Glory. 00 DIIWRC T w o grand new C a r i n a CO DUCBO J.ilies, "Scarlet K i n g ' and Variegated ; 1 double Tuberose; 2 Hybrid Gladiolus ; 2 Butterfly do.; 4 Spanish Iris ; 2 Tuberous climb­ ing Wistaria ; 10 lovely mixed Oxalis. N E W F L O R A L GVI IMC—184 puges, F K E E with every ori" *" BOX . . West

CALIFORNIA LANDS WITH WATER at Hemet, near L o s A n g e l e s , garden spot of California. Soil and climate suitable to the cultivation of either citrus or decid­ uous trees. A l l other products successfully grown. Good market. E d u c a t i o n a l a n d religious advantages. W i l l send

;

FREE

HEMET Dept. D-

1

THE CONARD & JONES CO.,

T O ANY A D D R E S S

our large illustrated p a m p h l e t g i v i n g reliable, instructive, interesting facts a n d figures about good C a l i f o r n i a irrigable lands, in tracts to suit, on easy payments. T i t l e perfect. Address

LAND COMPANY Hemet, Riverside C o . , Cal.

Grove, Pa.

P l e a s e mention M c C l u r e ' s w h e n you write to advertisers. 36


MCCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Stark Trees Bear Fruit Stark Trademark Best by Test—74 YEARS. Largest annual sale. H i g h quality—not h i g h price. Finest sorts. W e b u d 4 m i l l i o n A p p l e trees, whole-root graft 5 million—now 1- a n d 2-yr. Other Trees, V i n e s , etc., i n proportion. 1400 acres Nursery ' f l l l l ^ U l II I It I 11 I

S t aSr k5F .k u iWe t B o o k PAY free. Write u s , — V i s i t us «W/n. FREIGHT D A V CASH each W E E K a n d w a n t

box a n d p a c k free, ask No Money u n t i l H o m e SATISFACTION a n d traveling S A F E arrival,—MORE Guarantee salesmen. O u t f i t f r e e . S T A R K M a r k e t a n d Quality K i n g s P A Y : A p p l e of Commerce, \\/V B l a c k B e n Davis, Champion, Delicious, Ingram, Gano, Prizetaker, SenaLOUISIANA, MO. • • ~ t o r , S t a y m a n W i n e s a p ; Gold A l / o h S Dansvllle, N . Y . p l u m : Kiefferpear; Elberta.Poole F a v . , E m m a p e a c h e s , e t c . Stark Bros. S t a r k , M o . , e t c

CTARK

P A P E R , i l l u s t r a t e d ^ 20 p a g e s , 25 c e n t s p e r y e a r . 4 m o n t h s ' t r i a l 10 c e n t s . Sample Free. 64-page p r a c t i c a l p o u l t r y b o o k free t o y e a r l y s u b ­ s c r i b e r s . B o o k a l o n e 10 c e n t s . Catalogue o f p o u l t r y b o o k s free. POULTRY ADVOCATE,

POULTRY

Wild Flowers Ferns

Syracuse, N« Y«

SEEDDuebillFREE

A l l the best h a r d y p e r e n n i a l s f o r c o l d c l i m a t e s . L a r g e s t collection of home g r o w n lilies i n the U n i t e d States. P l a n t s , S h r u b s , T r e e s a n d V i n e s f o r the S h a d y C o r n e r , O p e n B o r d e r , Bog" o r W a t e r G a r den. M a n y old-fashioned flowers. I f interested in h a r d y o r n a m e n t a l s , m y S p r i n g c a t a l o g u e f o r 1900, w i t h standard botanical a n d c o m m o n names, w i l l h e l p y o u i n s e l e c t i n g t h e best k i n d s , a n d enable y o u to choose the p l a n t s s u i t a b l e f o r w e t o r d r y s o i l . I t c o n t a i n s d e s c r i p t i o n s of a t h o u s a n d different v a r i e t i e s . P r i c e s v e r y l o w a n d s t o c k o f t h e best q u a l i t y . C a t a ­ l o g u e m a i l e d to a n y address f o r zc. s t a m p .

To get new customers* to test my S e e d s , I will mail my 1 9 0 0 C a t a l o g u e , filled with more bargains than ever and a 1 0 c D u e B i l l good for l O e w o r t h o f S e e d s for trial a b s o l u t e l y f r e e . A l l the ISest S e e d s , B u l b s , P l a n t s , R o s e s , F a r m S e e d s , P o t a t o e s , e t c . , at lowest prices. Nine Great N o v e l t i e s offered without names. I will pay $ 5 0 . F O R A N A M E f ° each. Many other novelties offered, including G i n ­ s e n g , the great money making plant. Over 20 varieties shown in colors. # 1 1 0 0 I n c a s h p r e m i u m s o f f e r e d , Don't give your order until you see this new catalogue. Y o u ' l l b e s u r p r i s e d at my bargain offers. Send your name on a postal for catalogue to. day. I t Is F R E E t o a l l . Tel I your friends to send too. F . B . M I L L S , Box 7 6 , R o s e h i l l , Onondaga Co., N . T . r

FRED'K H. HORSFORD, Charlotte, Vermont. <

Ferry's Seeds

A l w a y s cheaper i n t h e end t h a n a n y s e e d s t h a t only c o s t h a l f a s m u c h . T e s t e d , t r u e t o n a m e , f r e s h and r e l i a b l e . A l w a y s the best. A s k .for F e r r y ' s — t a k e n o others. W r i t e "for 1900 S e e d A n n u a l . D. M . F E R R Y

& CO.,

Detroit, Mich.

SrfcrNewLnd

GRAND PANSIES

D i d y o u e v e r see 7 s t r a i g h t o r c i r c u l a r r o w s o f P a n s i e s , side b y side, each a different color? I f s o , y o u k n o w t h a t t h e e f f e c t is charming beyond conception. D i dy o u ever see Childs* G i a n t Pansies, m a r v e l s i n beauty a n d true to c o l o r ? I f not, y o u have not seen t h e beautv a n d perfection n o w attained.

SENDFOR V i c k ' s seeds i f you want real satisfaction from your sowing. It will pay you whether you set out a few flowers for pleasure or "plant a garden for profit. V i c k ' s vigorous varieties include many of the most re­ markable and successful growers for flower or vegetable garden ever offered.

AS A TRIAL OFFER, W E WILL MAIL FOR 25 CENTS:

SO seeds Pansy SO SO SO SO SO SO

Giant,

Pure Snow White, Coal Black, Cardinal Red, Bright Yellow, Azure Blue, Bright Violet, Striped, Variegated.

A little book o n Pansies, t e l l i n g a l l about c u l t u r e , etc. A b o o k l e t o f 95 p a g e s o n H o u s e P l a n t s ; t e l l s j u s t h o w t o c a r e f o r e v e r y k i n d of w i n d o w p l a n t . T H EM A Y F L O W E R magazine 3 months; finest p u b l i c a t i o n o n E l o w e r s a n d G a r d e n i n g . A n d o u r C a t a l o g u e o f 156 p a g e s a n d o C o l o r e d P l a t e s .

V I C K ' S SEEDS

T h e 7 P a n s i e s , 2 B o o k s , M a y f l o w e r a n d C a t a l o g u e , 25c. OUR CATALOGUE FOR / 9 O 0 - 2 t h A n n i v e r s a r y E d i t i o n greatest B o o k of F l o w e r a n d V e g e t a b l e Seeds, B u l b s , P l a n t s a n d New F r u i t s , 156 p a g e s , 500 i l l u s t r a t i o n s , 9 c o l o r e d p l a t e s , w i l l b e m a i l e d free t o a n y w h o a n t i c i p a t e p u r c h a s i n g . Great Novelties in Sweet Scented a n d T u b e r o u s R e x B e g o n i a s , G e r a n i u m s , F r a ­ grant Calla, Treasure Vine, Gooseflower, Caladiums, E v e r b l o o m ing T r i t o m a , Cannas, Gladiolus, Roses, Phloxes, G i a n t Paeony, Lilies, Palms, Carnations, Primroses, Asters, Pansies, Sweet Peas' Verbenas, Tomatoes, Strawberries, etc.

S e e d s are s o l d u n d e r t h e n e w p l a n o f g i v i n g d e f i n i t e q u a n t i t i e s i n eacli p a c k a g e . > e w G a r d e n a n d F l o r a l G u i d e d e s c r i b e s this m o d e r n m e t h o d i n seed s e l l i n g . G i v e s v a l ­ uable tables a n d suggestions. W e ' l l send i t free i f y o u t e l l u s w h a t y o u w i s h to g r o w , fames Tick's Sons, 6 E l m St.,Ro«he8tcr,K.Y.

5

JOHN LEWIS CHILDS, Please mention M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to advertisers.

37

Floral Park, N . Y .


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

A Pleasant Pastime and

a Source of Profit

have never tried it, ilo not know the pleasure there is In Poultry Raising by Modern Methods. Busy people, as well as those People who

with abundant leisure find it a most facinatlng occupation.

Cyphers

If you ose a

Incubator

no Many ladies "Ifon

It runs itself. of pin money

for hatching, you have no trouble, worry, no failure. Moreover it is profitable. earn a tidy sum with it. Our manual, to Make. Money uHth Poultry ana Mncubators" Is a handsome book of 192 pages (9x11 inches) containing nearlv 200 illustrations, and a score of copyrighted articles by leading poultry experts on every phase of profitable poultry keeping. The first edition cost us tl 000 A copy sent to any address for 15c. postage. It is interesting and enter-

^rXlrlS^mc^-

' Ventilating. Way land, N . Y . ii»i<.«(«»i«tc.t«if.ig

Boston, Mass.

The Cyphers Incubator Co.,

f i t n t » w t t t t t t t t » t m t n t n r t t t « « i * » » * * " " " » " " '

l

" " » "

,

M

l

Not One Cent to be Paid Until Tried. PREMIER INCUBATOR centB

p ^ , U n « n e t o u r NEW SMonS?'* after thev are satisfied as to what it will do. Only A G O O D M AC1IIN E can be sold this way. Send 5 for handsome, illustrated catalogue. COLUMBIA INCUBATOR CO., 33 Adams St., Delaware City. Delaware. 0

n

e

O n

T r i a l ! THE

SAME

DON'TS E T HENS OLD WAY., The Natural Hen Incubator beats old plant

BIG

a bitelli g monheoywm er. Send for catahut log" toakget

3tol. Little In prire Agent* wanted. .g one free. N;i1 iirul Hen Inrubator Co., B 77 Columbus, Neb. Kcv. H. Heuaer made a 100 Egg Hatcher at a cost of 11.00 A MILLION

°

tsocon

:s lold arrt fuljy Tells tIre<a-utmttnryt hinouses,

TESTIMONIALS

30 DAYS'TRIAL FREE

. .ncing as the g o A e offer on every incubator we make tf-v/self-regulating and guaranteed. - y V / O v e r 15,uuu B A N T A SIS in use; C ^ i / h a t c h i n g 45 to 50 chicks from 60 • / e g g s . Send 4 cents for No. D catalog. B U C K E Y E INCUBATOR CO.,Springfield, O

Every one

T H E

wanted.

1

of fowls,

F O X

R A Z O R

Best that experience and skill can produce! F u l l hollow ground, ready for use. Utmost satisfac­ t i o n guaranteed or money chewfully refunded. Thousands of un­ solicited testimonials. No risk to you. State wide or narrow blade, square or round point Send and we pay express charges.

$2.00

F O X C U T L E R Y C O . , 48 C e n t e r Street Western Depot: g28 Main St., Dubuque, Iowa. New York

A h i g h - c l a s s self"regulating incu­ bator on a s m a l l scale. Fifty-egg capacity. Heat, m o i s t u r e and v e n t i l a t i o n auto­ m a t i c a l l y a n d perfectly controlled. P r i c e , only$7. S e n d for t h e W o o d e n H e n B o o k ) m a i l e d free, w i t h a b o o k a b o u t t h e E X C E L S I O R I N C U ­ B A T O R , to those w h o n a m e this paper. OEO.

MONEY

IN POULTRY V you have the right kind and know how to handle it. The best kind and the beet way to make money with them illustrated Pfjy[tr» GUldB. in nor JInmniMh all about 3u varieties and their health and disease; plans for 1 recipes treating all diseases, etc Gives lowest prices on etock. Sent tor lot* John Bauscher, Jr., Box 78. Freeport, I

IT C O S T S NOTHING to try our Sewing Machines. He jfship direct from factory to consumer. Saveagents profits. 30 days free trial. 117.500 sold. Warranted 20 Years. A l l attachments free. #40.00 Arlington for S14.00 #45.00 Arlington for #16.00 • 60.00 Kenwood for #31.50 Other Machines at #8, *9 A#11.50 \ Illustrated catalogue and testimonials free. Write at once for our special freight offer. Address, C A S H B U Y E R S ' U N I O N . 158-164 W.VanBurenSt.,B-164,Chicag:o,IIl.

H . S T A H L . Q u l n c y , Illinois.

A

SURE PAYING BUSINESS. OLD,

S I L V E R , N I C K E L A N DM E T A L H i t , K E E D M A D E #88 F 1 K S T 8 D A Y S .

*I25

M O N T H

EASY.

P L A T I N G . N E W Q U I C K M r . Cox writes! do.

P R O C E S S .

"Get allonIeycan 30 sets a day, Elegant business. Mr. Woodward earns }i7o a month. Agents all maki ngom m .traveling So canPlate you. Gents or Ladle., you can positively make #5 to #15 a day. at h e or taking orders, using and Bray's Platers. Unequaled for plating watches, jewelry, tableware, bicycles, all metal goods. Heavselling y plate.1 rot. Vt nrrnntcd. Jio experience necessary. L E T US 8 T A K T Y O l ' I K B I S 1 N E W . W e do'pAll lating ourselves. HavReeaexperience. ture the only practical outfits, including all tools, lathes and materials. sizes complete. dy for workM wahnenufacreceived. Guar anteed, new modern methods.

T u i f n A S »¥ ^ ^ V ^ J r ^ T , ^ . ^ £

l

p

,

^SK5S .I

M n

n

d t

r

a

*

e

secrets F R E E .

F a i l u r e Impossible.

111*. R O Y A L , O U R N E W D I P P I N G P R O C E S S . Quick. Easy. Latest method. Goods dipped in melted metal, taken out lto Bo!i!i ',' est.most brilliant plate, ready to deliver. Thick plate every time. Guaranteed S to 10 years. A boy plates from 400 OO pieces tableware dully. No polishing, grinding or work necessary. D E M A N D F O R P L A T I N G IS E N O R M O U S . Every family, hotel and restaurant have goods plated instead ofdo.buyiP negopnew. It's it.cheaVpoeur can and hire better. o u w i l l not need to canvass. Our agents have all the work tSih™ ey can leSiS.bring band oyYslegitimate. cheap to C dousyour same as Wwe.EandA Rsolicitors to gather «°W. J . J ™f. Keplating is h o n e s t tomersplating, alwaysthedelighted. E AN OLD E S T A B L i s l I E D F I R M , Been in business for years. Know what is required. Our customers have the benefit of our experience. W E A R E R E S P O N S I B L E and Guarantee E v e r y t h i n g . Reader, here is a chance of a lifetime to go in bW usRineI s'sI EforTyourself. W E START YOU Now Is the time to moke money. O-DAY. O u r new P l a n . Samples. Testimonials and Circulars F R E E . Don't wait. Send us your address ahv way. Address, B. F . G R A Y & CO.. P L A T I N G W O R K S . 505 E L M S T . , C I N C I N N A T I , OHIO. ns

y

fin

n

th

S

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers.


McCLURE'S

The

MAGAZINE.

Leader in the race for public favor is easily the

General Arthur Cigar Y o u o u g h t to give it a trial. It is m a d e f r o m c h o i c e , c a r e f u l l y s e l e c t e d Havana tobacco, purchased direct by our representatives in C u b a . T h e u t m o s t p a i n s are t a k e n to s e c u r e o n l y t h e finest m i l d , fragrant H a v a n a , a n d t h e G e n e r a l A r t h u r g i v e s y o u a s m o k e o f p e r f e c t flavor a n d s a t i s f a c t i o n w h i c h w i l l not h a r m y o u i n a n y w a y , a s t h e s t r o n g , i m p o r t e d cigars are sure to do. Give the G e n e r a l A r t h u r a trial. $t.oo for a dozen packed i n a t i nb o x .

If your

dealer doesn't sell it, send us

KERBS, W E R T H E I M & SCHIFFER NEW

YORK

S e n d a two-cent s t a m p for a new a n d n o v e l l i t t l e

folder.

GENERAL Arthur Cigar Please mention M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to advertisers. 39


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

AH Essentia Pierce Cycles

Racycles

xstylexeaseX 0

W

TRIED><mJALin><TRUIi >|0NF0i>3roTlX

E O R I G I N A T E - J , rievee. IfAiTAre *

GRANK w w ^ % t e w

n

ChainlessCushion Frame $75°-° CushionFrame $55°-°Raccrl50Special $50°~ ReJIar$40 -°

MAMGER^). . . „

00

$35 $40

o

Miami cycle and Mfg. Co. Middletown, O.

o

The George N. PierceCo. BUFFALO,

HAVE

YOUR

FITTED

YORK.DENVER.

A l l the l a r g e s t and fastest Ofas-propelled yachts on the Great Lakes are equipped with

CYCLE

WITH

THE

B O S T O N . N E W

MORROW

Sintz

COASTER-HUB

BRAKE

SINTZ

FITS A N Y CYCLE WITH

G A S ENGINE C O .

G o d f r e y Avenue

The

THIS Y O U

Grand

Hand=Made Tire.

M o s t pneumatic tires are made by f o r m i n g rubber mixed with quantities o f s u l p h u r o r s i m i l a r substance around a lining of cotton c l o t h , and then c u r i n g the rubber portion of the tire by subjecting the whole tire, cotton and a l l , to the heat of a vulcan­ ize r. It cures the rubber a l l right, but it kills the cotton.

RIDE 50 M I L E S B U T P E D A L O N L Y 35

Wheel Always Under Control

The D u n l o p T i r e is not made that way. By our " hand-made " process we preserve the cotton in a l l its original strength a n d elasticity, producing a comfortable and resilient tire, and not a dead a n d flabby one.

T h o u s a n d s in use in all parts o f the world. I s no experiment. A Cyclist using the Morrow for a few weeks would give up cycling rather than give up the Coaster-brake. Ladies' skirts keep down when coasting. Feet always on pedals. When ordering your new wheel be S U R E to specify the M o r r o w Coaster-Brake. F o r sale by alt dealers. Our Acetylene Bicycle L u m p is superior to any yet offered. Illia*rated regarding

Our booklet tells all about it. To bt had of all dealers or of us. ^Bta These arc the only tools you'll need.

Pamphlet, giving detailed information Brake and Lamp, sent on application. The

ECLIPSE

Rapids.Mich.

B I C Y C L E C O . , B o x P, E l m i r a , N . Y .

American

Dunlop

Belleville, N . J .

Please m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u w r i t e t o a d v e r t i s e r s . 40

Tire

Company,

C h i c a g o , III.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Constant adaptation ot the best means to the best ends, has earned for our machines their recognized superiority. But we have never allowed success to act as a bar to progress. Our machines for 1900 are an exemplification of this policy. New Frames, new Hubs and Spokes, new Seat Post Binder, reduction in weight are improvements common to both Chainless and Chain models. Our new Coaster Brake permits the cyclist to enjoy the pleasure of coasting while retaining full control of the wheel. It does not require re­ moval of the feet from the pedals and the speed of the bicycle can be regulated no matter how steep the grade. The brake is applicable to both Chainless and Chain models, and is furnished for $5.00. The C O L U M B I A CHAINLESS, reduced in weight and other­ wise greatly improved, is the ideal mount for road or track. CALENJ2AR. C o l u m b i a , H a r t f o r d , Stormer and Pennant B i c y c l e s .

$75, $60, $50, $35, $30, $25. Columbia and Stormer catalogues free from any Columbia or Stormer dealer, or by mail for 2-cent stamp each.

A M E R I C A N

POPE

BICYCLE

SALES

COMPANY

DEPARTMENT

Hartford, Conn.

Please mention M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to advertisers. 41

FOR

5

2 cm*/ STAMF


McCL

CUE'S

MAGAZINE.

WAKEFIELD'S Golden O i n t m e n t W h e r e an external a p p l i c a t i o n of a

SOOTHING, ^

^

Has For

CLEANSING, —

HEALING,

.

o r softening; nature '= needed

no Superior

Cuts, Burns, Scalds, Bruises, Boils, Felons, Chapped Hands, Old Sores,

or a n y k i n d o f a s o r e c o n t a i n i n g e i t h e r i n f l a m m a t i o n o r a s o f t o r flabby c o n d i t i o n of the skin. C o n t a i n s n o p o i s o n o u s s u b s t a n c e s , a n d c a n be t a k e n i n w a r d l y w i t h g o o d effect. An excellent r e m e d y for Sore T h r o a t , Cold in the H e a d , C a t a r r h , Q u i n s y , a n d Erysipelas.

W A K E F I E L D ' S G O L D E N O I N T M E N T is put up in a neat jar, and will be sent, prepaid, to any address on receipt of $ 1 . 0 0 . . A Small Bottle will be sent, prepaid,

for 25 Cents.

WAKEFIELD'S LIVER PILLS do not gripe, but act p r o m p t l y o n the L i v e r , K i d n e y s , S t o m a c h , a n d B o w e l s . Costiveness, Jaundice, Sick Headache, Indigestion, a n d Biliousness. If

not for

sale by your

druggist,

send 25 Cents for a box, prepaid. pill is preferred.

WAKEFIELD'S //

State whether

BLACKBERRY

Invuiuable for

large or small size

BALSAM

is a positive cure for Cholera M o r b u s , Diarrhoea, D y s e n t e r y , o r Cholera Infantum. Pleasant to the taste. H i g h l y r e c o m m e n d e d b y P h y s i c i a n s , Professional N u r s e s , a n d First-class Drug­ gists for more than half a century. N o t excelled i n c u r i n g a l l relaxed c o n d i t i o n s of the bowels. It is cleansing, r e g u l a t i n g , q u i e t i n g , a n d h e a l i n g . F.qually good for adults or c h i l d r e n . not on sale by your druggist, a full-size bottle will be sent, prepaid, on receipt of 35 Cents.

Wakefield's Cough Syrup

p r o m p t l y a n d e f f e c t u a l l y c u r e s C o u g h s , Colds, Croup,

Measles,

Cough,

L a Grippe,

and Price

^rSltu^~~>{ WAKEFIELD'S

USED

REMEDIES

have

FOR

been

MORE

and are manufactured only

endorsed

Lung 25

Bronchitis,

Troubles.

C e n t s and

50

Cents.

by your druggist, it will prepaid, on receipt of by

THAN

Whooping-

A s t h m a , a n d all Throat

thousands,

HALF

i n whose families

A

If

not on sale

be sent, price. they

have been

CENTURY

by

Dr. C. W A K E F I E L DandCO.,established1846Bloom ington, ILL. Please

m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to a d v e r t i s e r s .

42


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Cutircura Soa

For the Complexion

For Red Rough Hands

To p u r i f y and beautify the s k i n and prevent S o a k the hands, on r e t i r i n g , i n a strong, hot p i m p l e s , blotches, blackheads, lather of C u t i c u r a redness, roughness, c h a p p i n g , Soap. D r y , and anoint y e l l o w , o i l y , m o t h y s k i n , no w i t h C u t i c u r a , the other soap is to be compared s k i n cure. W e a r d u r i n g w i t h C u t i c u r a Soap, because ght old,loose k i d gloves. no other soap reaches the cause, v i z . , the clogged, I r r i ­ F o r red, r o u g h , chapped hands, d r y , cracked, i t c h ­ t a t e d , or I n f l a m e d c o n d i ­ ing, feverish palms, shapeless nails w i t h painful t i o n of the P o r e s . finger ends, this one n i g h t cure is w o n d e r f u l .

For Hair and Scalp

For Sanative Uses

Shampoo w i t h C u t i c u r a S o a p and w a r m w a ­ ter, d r y , a n d a p p l y a l i g h t dressing of C u t i c u r a , pur­ est of emollients, g e n t l y rubbed into the scalp. T h i s treatment w i l l at once stop f a l l i n g h a i r , clear the scalp of crusts, scales, and dan­ druff, s u p p l y the roots w i t h e n e r g y and nourishment, soothe i r r i t a t e d and i t c h i n g surfaces, a n d m a k e the hair g r o w w h e n a l l else fails

Its remarkable emollient, cleansing, and p u r i f y ­ i n g properties, derived from C u t i CURA, w a r r a n t the use of C u t i c u r a Soap i n the f o r m of baths for annoy­ i n g irritations, inflammations, and chafings, for too free or offensive perspirations, and i n the form of i n ­ t e r n a l washes for ulcerative weak­ nesses, and for m a n y sanative antiseptic purposes w h i c h r e a d i l y suggest themselves to women, and especially to mothers. T h e use of C u t i c u r a O i n t m e n t w i l l be of advantage i n the severer cases.

For Tender Faces

For Baby Humors

S h a v e w i t h C u t i c u r a Soap. After shaving, and before b a t h i n g the face, gently rub on a little C u t i ­ c u r a O i n t m e n t , and then w a s h a l l off w i t h H o t W a t e r a n d C u t i c u r a Soap. G e n ­ t l e m e n w i t h tender, easily i r r i t a t e d skins w i l l find this treatment removes a l l r o u g h ­ ness, dryness, i r r i t a t i o n , and prevents barber's h u m o r s . Complete

External

and

Internal

A h o t bath w i t h C u t i c u r a Soap and a single application of C u t i c u r a , the great i s k i n cure, w i l l afford instant relief i n the most distressing forms of i t c h i n g , b u r n i n g , scaly and crusted humors, rashes, and irritations of infancy and c h i l d h o o d , permit rest and sleep to both parent and c h i l d , and point to a speedy cure i n the severest cases, w h e n a l l other remedies f a i l .

Treatment

f o r E v e r y H u m o r , consisting of c u t i c u r a

, 1 Cuticura

S o a p P ' o c ) to cleanse the s k i n of crusts a n d scales a n d soften the thickened cuticle, C u t i c u r a O i n t m e n t (SOc), to instantly allay itching, inflammation, and irritation, and soothe and heal, I it a n d C u t i c u r a . R e s o l v e n t (50c), to cool a n d cleanse the blood. A S i n g l e S e t is often \14HVM**« Riiffioient to cure the most torturing, disfiguring, a n d humiliating skin, scalp, and blood •rn£ nrr tft or humors, with loss of hair, w h e n all else tails P o t t e r D r u g a n d C h e m . C o r p . , Sole THE SET $125 P r o p s , Boston. S e n d for " A l l about S k i n , Scalp, H a i r , a n d H a n d s , " free. Please mention M c C l u r e ' s when y o u write to advertisers, 43


MCCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Piles Cured

Free to the Ruptured no Operation necessary

Dr. W . S. Rice, the Well-known Author­ ity, Sends a T r i a l of H i s Famous

urgtcal o p e r a t i o n s for relief f r o m piles are not o n l y u n n e c e s s a r y but d a n g e r o u s . H e a l i n g H e m o r r h o n e s will give i m m e d i a t e relief from the pain a n d s p a s m , and i n a short time work a permanent cure. T h e y enable the patient to treat h i m s e l f , a n d c a n be a p p l i e d w i t h o u t the s l i g h t e s t difficulty, pain or danger. T h e y are little soluble, m e d i c a t e d suppositories. As t h e v c o n t a i n a s u r e s p e c i f i c f o r p i l e s , a n d as t h e y a r e a p p l i e d j u s t w h e r e t h e m e d i c i n e is n e e d e d , t h e y n e v e r fail to cure. D o not suffer from the torments of piles w h e n y o u c a n be c u r e d so q u i c k l y a n d e a s i l y .

Method Free to A l l . Anyone

Can

Now

Cure

Themselves

at

Home W i t h o u t P a i n , Danger, Oper­ ation or an Hour's Loss of Time F r o m Work.

P r i c e per Box, $ 1 . 0 0 . B y M a i l , $ 1 . 0 5 . Sufficient for 3 weeks' use.

T o the t h o u s a n d s u p o n t h o u s a n d s o f r u p t u r e d people w h o are t o r t u r i n g themselves with trusses and in m o m e n t a r y d a n g e r of death from s t r a n g u ­ l a t i o n , D r . \ V . S. R i c e , 303 L . M a i n Street, A d a m s , N . Y . , w i l l s e n d free to all a t r i a l o f his f a m o u s m e t h o d t h a t h a s s a v e d so m a n y l i v e s a n d m a d e so many men, w o m e n and children well and strong ami permanently cured of old a n d difficult ruptures. Do n o t be backward a b o u t w r i t i n g f o r the free trial. It w i l l c o s t y o u nothing and will enable y o u t o see h o w e a s i l y y o u can cure yourself in a very short time without M. K. L Y M A N . losing an h o u r from work. D r . R i c e is d e t e r m i n e d t h a t e v e r y s u f f e r i n g m a n or w o m a n s h a l l k n o w the w o n d e r f u l t r u t h that r u p t u r e c a n be c u r e d , a n d he t h e r e f o r e g e n e r ­ ously sends, p r e p a i d by m a i l , his m e t h o d , abso­ l u t e l y free, a n d y o u c a n m a k e a free t r i a l o f i t . W r i t e t o - d a y w i t h o u t f a i l , as y o u c a n n o t a f f o r d t o m i s s t h i s free a n d g e n e r o u s offer.

S p e c i a l t r i a l size p a c k a g e to a n y address, i n sealed e n v e l o p e , w i t h full d i r e c t i o n s f o r use, o n r e c e i p t o f one dime. Address

THE

MEDICORA

COMPANY

1016 Cherry Street, Philadelphia

A breath of Pine Balsam in every cake. Pimples, blotches, etc. are often c a u s e d b y soaps m a d e f r o m ani­ m a l fats w h i c h i r r i t a t e o r poi­ son the skin.

Harfina Harfina soaps Soap noth­ Medicated for bath, hair, complexion, contains and toilet ing objection

IIM/imitD,rOR

M r . M . K . L y m a n , a highly esteemed citizen of D e l r a y , F l a . , s a y s : — " T h e D r . R i c e m e t h o d is a remarkable cure. I had an old rupture that de­ fied e v e r y t h i n g , b u t i n t h r e e w e e k s t h e r e w a s n o protrusion and I have remained sound and well ever since. I h e a r t i l y r e c o m m e n d D r . R i c e to every sufferer." D o n o t f a i l to w r i t e at o n c e f o r t h e free t r i a l a n d t h u s c u r e y o u r s e l f at h o m e w i t h o u t pain, d a n g e r or detention from the day's work. W r i t e at o n c e . C o m m e n c e n o w , a n d b e ­ fore t h e h e a v y w o r k o f S p r i n g b e g i n s y o u w i l l b e c u r e d s o u n d as a d o l l a r .

B A T H , HAIR, COMPLEXION £5I> T O I L E T P R I C E

25

C E N T S

able to be disg u i s e d by deceptive per­ fume, It pos sesses the high­ est antisepic and healing properties, ana is especially beneficial to the complexion, scalp, hair and skin. It clarifies the skin and keeps the hair perfectly f r e e from disease parasites, mak­ ing the hairline, soft, luxuriant, and the scalp healthy and free from dandruff. If it is desired to restore gray or faded hair to youthful color, a p p l y Hay's Hair-Health after shampoo­ ing with Har­ fina Soap.

26c. cakes* at leading drug shops, or 3 cakes, 65c. Mailed on receipt of price by L O N D O N SUPPLY C o . , 853 Broadway, New Y o r k .

W r i t e to D r . W . S . R i c e , 3 0 3 L . M a i n S t r e e t , A d a m s , N . Y . ; y o u w i l l n e v e r regret h a v i n g d o n e so.

Urlir

DeafnessandHEAD NOIS

by m y invisible Tubular E a r Cushions. W h i s p e r s heard. * " Warranted to help more cases than all similar devices combined. Help ears as glasses help eyes. Sold by F . H i s c o x r o c C I only, 858 Broadway, New Y o r k . Send or call for book of proofs MfEE P l e a s e m e n t i o n . M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u w r i t e to a d v e r t i s e r s . r

44


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

TWO FINE SPECIMENS OF

PHYSICAL

A GREA T NA TIONAL

MANHOOD.

N o form o f athletic exercise d e m a n d s such perfect p h y s i c a l con­ d i t i o n a s p r i z e - f i g h t i n g . E v e r y m u s c l e i n t h e b o d y m u s t be f u l l y developed a n d supple, a n d the heart, lungs a n d stomach must act to p e r f e c t i o n . Whether we endorse prize-fighting or not,it is nevertheless in­ teresting to k n o w the m a n n e r b y w h i c h m e n arrive a t s u c h p h y s i ­ cal p e r f e c t i o n . James Jefferies, the present c h a m p i o n h e a v y w e i g h t o f the world, a n d his gallant opponent, T o m S h a r k e y , i n the greatest pugilistic encounter that has ever taken place, both pursued m u c h t h e s a m e c o u r s e o f t r a i n i n g a n d t h e first a n d m o s t i m p o r t a n t p a r t ot t h i s t r a i n i n g w a s t o g e t t h e s t o m a c h i n c o n d i t i o n , a n d k e e p t h e digestion a b s o l u t e l y perfect, so t h a t e v e r y m u s c l e a n d nerve w o u l d be a t i t s h i g h e s t c a p a b i l i t i e s . T h i s was not done b y a secret patent m e d i c i n e , b u t both o f these great p u g i l i s t s used a w e l l - k n o w n n a t u r a l d i g e s t i v e tablet s o l d b y druggists under name o f Stuart's D y s p e p s i a T a b l e t s a n d c o m ­ posed o f t h e d i g e s t i v e f e r m e n t s w h i c h e v e r y s t o m a c h r e q u i r e s f o r healthy digestion. C h a m p i o n Jefferies says : Stuart's D y s p e p s i a Tablets prevent acidity, strengthen t h e s t o m a c h a n d insure perfect digestion. T h e y k e e p a m a n i n fine p h y s i c a l c o n d i t i o n . " S i g n e d , J a m e s J . Jefferies, c h a m p i o n o f t h e w o r l d . The gallant fighter, Sharkey, says: "Stuart's Dyspepsia Tab­ lets r e m o v e a l l d i s c o m f o r t a f t e r e a t i n g . T h e y rest t h e s t o m a c h and restore it to a h e a l t h f u l c o n d i t i o n . I heartily recommend them." Signed, Thos. J . Sharkey. The advantage o f the daily use o f Stuart's D y s p e p s i a T a b l e t s is t h a t t h e y k e e p t h e p e o p l e w e l l a n d w a r d o f f s i c k n e s s a n d a r e equally valuable to well persons as to t h e d y s p e p t i c s . Another a d v a n t a g e is t h a t these tablets c o n t a i n n o c a t h a r t i c s , o r p o i s o n s o f any character, but s i m p l y digestive ferments w h i c h are found i n every h e a l t h y s t o m a c h , a n d w h e n d i g e s t i o n is imperfect it is because t h e s t o m a c h l a c k s s o m e o f these e l e m e n t s a n d S t u a r t ' s Digestive Tablets supply it. T h e y a r e n o c h e a p c a t h a r t i c , b u t a p e r f e c t l y safe a n d efficient digestive a n d the d e m a n d for t h e m is greater t h a n t h e sale o f a l l other so-called d y s p e p s i a cures c o m b i n e d . N o r e m e d y c o u l d pos­ sibly reach s u c h a place i n p u b l i c esteem e x c e p t as t h e result o f positive merit. F u l l sized packages are sold b y all druggists at 50c, a n d t h e best h a b i t y o u c a n p o s s i b l y f o r m i s t o t a k e a S t u a r t ' s Tablet after each m e a l . T h e y make weak stomachs strong a n d keep strong s t o m a c h s v i g o r o u s .

BOTH

SIDES

ON

THE BEST AND SAFEST FAMILY MEDICINE FOR A L L

»

Bilious and Nervous Disorders, Sick Headache, Constipation, Weak Stomach, Impaired Di­ gestion, and Disordered Liver. T h e y cure Restlessness and

a n d Insomnia, a n d give sound

refreshing sleep, remove

the result of indiscretion i n

eating a n d drinking, a n d are specially suitable for the diseases a n d a i l m e n t s c o m m o n to females o f a l l ages, a n d they r e m o v e t h e cause o f m u c h suffering to t h e sex.

A n n u a l Sale E x c e e d s 6 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 B o x e s . 10

cents a n d 25 cents, at a l l d r u g stores.

MAHLER ELECTRIC APPARATUS

Your Arm can be e n l a r g e d 1 inch a n d s t r e n g t h e n e d 5 0 p e r c e n t , i n one m o n t h b y u s i n g t h e Hercules Graduated Gymnastic C l u b a n d Strength Tester 5 minutes each day. It

Copyright.

S U P E R F L U O U S HAIR

This is the only apparatus ever invented which ladies can oper­ ate1 n the privacy of their homes. Results Positive. S i m p l e — » a f e — E c o n o m i c a l . Also permanently removes moles, warts, red veins, etc.

dential.

FAMED

ATLANTIC.

BEECHAM'S PILLS

4 1

movaiof

MEDICINE

OF THE

Send for descriptive circ'r.

Correspondence

Confi­

HERCULES,

D . J . M A H L E R , ;J71 Westminster St., Providence, R. I.

Brown's Bronchial Troches Please

mention McClure's

w i l l develop a n d strengthen t h e arms, chest, back a n d waist i n less t h a n o n e - h a l f t h e t i m e r e q u i r e d b y a n y o t h e r a p p a r a t u s known. T h e busiest m a n m a y become strong a n d healthy by i t s use. Write for descriptive pamphlet and price-list to

Box 3559 A , Boston,

Mass.

World-Renowned as a superior edy

for

Coughs,

Hoarseness,

Sore

Throat,

and

chial

Affections.

Fac-Simile Signature of w h e n y o u write to advertisers.

45

rem­

Bron­ on wrapper of box.


McCLVRE-S

MAGAZINE.

EUCALOL Cures Catarrh Says Sir Morell Moisture as For

twenty-five

treatment

of

b e e n i n the and

Mackenzie

of the mucous membrane of the nose is essential to the sense of smell as that of the tongue is to taste.

and

Hospitals.

and

most

throat

New York and

Throat

servation

years the

nasal

successful

catarrh

has

P h i l a d e l p h i a Nose

Y e a r s of

experiment

led

careful

them

to

ob­ put

s u p r e m e c o n f i d e n c e i n the t r e a t m e n t of clean­ liness a n d

antisepsis.

Eucalol is a t r e a t m e n t b a s e d o n a n t i s e p t i c c l e a n l i n e s s as used i n these hospitals. N o c a t c h p e n n y quack r e m e d y , but the e s s e n c e of the c o m b i n e d k n o w l ­ e d g e o f the g r e a t e s t p h y s i c i a n s o f the w o r l d . It is p l e a s a n t to use, the effect i n s t a n t a n e o u s , and is a s u r e c u r e for N a s a l C a t a r r h , D r y C a t a r r h , G r i p p e a n d C o l d s i n the H e a d .

Used NightandMorning

H C F E u c a l o l has cured thou• f l t f i \Mm a Lll sands a n d will cure y c u . T o prove its merits we will send free, on request, a large package of E u c a l o l . D o n ' t d e l a y ; write at once.

It Insures a sweet breath

THE EUCALOL COMPANV, 108 Fulton Street, New York.

I Send for Free Sample.

Trade Mark

registered.

Adopted 1885

\Off/6/fML

s w I s s

SWISS E L E C T R O - C H E M I C A L Positively Cures X

RING.

Rheumatism In all its forms—Neuralgia, L u m b a g o , G o u t , etc. These ailments are due to the presence of U r i c A c i d in the B l o o d . The Ring—in connection with the acidity of the blood—create an E l e c t r o - C h e m i ­ cal action, removing the acid and curing the disease. O v e r 250,000 S o l d . Endorsed by 5,000 P h y s i c i a n s bR. T . A . B u r n e t t , 127 W . Columbia Street, Springfield, O , writes : " Y o u r Ring cured me of Rheumatism, and 1 consider it one of my most valuable possessions. I never lose an opportu­ nity to recommend it." To demonstrate the remarkable curative properties of our Ring we will sell it on F i v e W e e k s ' T r i a l . Money refunded if not satisfactory. We know what our Ring has done in thousands of cases—some pronounced incurable. Price $2. by M a i l or C . O . D . E x p . For size, cut hole in card that fits finger snugly. Sold only in W o o d ­ en Abrasive Case. A l l o t h e r s are imitations. SEND FOR BOOKLET.

A TURKISH B A T H A T HOME. W r i t e at once for full particulars of a

$12.00 Bath Cabinet for $5.00 R E M E M B E R : T h e R O B I N S O N C A B I N E T is the only Lawful Screen-folding patented cabinet made. DANGEROUS: lYrsnns buving infringements are liable. Suit has been filed in the U . S. Court against four companies for infringing on Robinson Cabinet. (to n r k R n n i / r p r r to patrons.—Prof. Robinson lias recently$ Z . U U DUUrV. r n t t j f E u r o p e where he has visited all the leading water cures. M u c h information is contained in his N e w Book pertaining to the treatment of all chronic ailments at } i such as R h e u m a t i s m , L i v e r and K i d n e y trouble. Dropsy, Catarrh, in­ digestion, Impure Blood, S k i n T r o u b l e , General Debility, Etc. Also how to secure a B e a u t i f u l C o m p l e x i o n . Don't be deceived by misleading advertisements. W e send you literature and samples of goods free. W E WANT GOOD AGENTS EVERYWHERE. W r i t e at once for Special Agent's " jooo Proposition." r c U i r n e {

r o m

ll0n

The Swiss American Co. D E T R O I T , MICH. Or W I N D S O R , Ont.

ROBINSON T H E R M A L B A T H C O . , 702-717 Jefferson Street, T O L E D O , OHIO. 4

6

c


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Needs no Disguise because it is free from a l l disagreeable taste a n d odor.

Peter Moller's Cod Liver Oil, always of the highest standard of quality, is now

prepared b y a new process, whereby

the O i l is kept from

atmospheric

contact

from the b e g i n n i n g of the process of m a n u ­ facture until it is safely c o r k e d up i n bottles, thus preventing contamination o f a n y k i n d and

THE

Give this new Oil a trial. Ask for Peter Holler's Oil and see that the bottle—a flat, oval one—bears our name as agents. Notice the date in perforated letters at bottom of the label. Schieffelin and Co., New

COLD

BEST PERFUMES

m a d e i n the w h o l e w i d e w o r l d are those w h i c h bear this trade mark. T h e y are the products of t h e house o f V i o l e t ( p r o n o u n c e d V e - o - l a y ) , and a r e t h e result o f years o f e x p e r i e n c e ' a n d study i n the art of m a k i n g dainty, lasting and acceptable perfumes. These perfumes are not sold everywhere. T h e y are not bought by everyone. T h e y a r e s o l d i n first-class d i u g s t o r e s . T h e y are bought b y particular people.

e x c l u d i n g a l l impurities.

York.

AMBRE

ROYAL

is t h e n a m e o f a p l e a s i n g o d o r m a d e b y t h i s house. I t is l a s t i n g a n d r e f i n e d . It m a y n o t be y o u r f a v o r i t e o d o r . It is o n l y o n e o f h a l f a h u n d r e d w h i c h w e make. S e n d 10 c e n t s f o r a s m a l l s a m p l e b o t t l e o f A m b r e R o y a l , o r s e n d 50 c e n t s a n d g e t five s a m p l e b o t t l e s o f five s e l e c t e d p e r f u m e s . A m b r e R o y a l orany other perfume we make is s o l d i n a c u t g l a s s s t o p p e r e d b o t t l e , o n e a n d one-half ounce, for S e n t b y m a i l post­ paid.

FEET

$1.50.

MAGNETIC FOOT BATTERY

MAISON

VIOLET

29, B o u l d . des I t a l i a n s , P a r i s , F r a n c e Sole A g e n t s for the Ui.ited States: F r a n k M . Prindle & C o . , 8 T h o m a s St. (adjoining 317 B r o a d u a y ) , N e w Y o r k .

WARMED. OUR MAGNETIC FOOT BATTERIES

(INSOLES,

are veritable BLOOD P U M P E R S . T h e y reduce slug­ gish, thick blood to natural circulation, they insulate the feet, l i m b s a n d b o d y a n d p r o t e c t t h e m f r o m l o s s o f v i t a l ­ ity. T h e y k e e p t h e feet

W a r m All the T i m e . D o n ' t continue t o suffer aches a n d pains, t r y a p a i r of t h e s e wonderful warmers. Thousands and thou­ sands o f people a r e w e a r i n g t h e m to day. Millions would i fthey were to banish prejudice. T h e y DO m a g ­ n e t i z e ! T h e y DO w a r m t h e feet. O u r statements are verified b y people o f e m i n e n c e - s t a t e s m e n , physicians, citizens. W e cannot claim too much for them. They never lose their p o w e r — y o u c a n a l w a y s feel t h e g e n t l e tingle of their genuine magnets a n d a w a r m genial g l o w throughout the body. S e n d $1.00 f o ra pair, quick ! 3 pairs for G i v e size o f y o u r shoe. Defy Rheuma­ tism, C h i l b l a i n s a n d a l l t h e ills that result from cold, d a m p feet. O u r 100-page b o o k , " A Plain Road to Health," discloses the wonders o f magnetism, bend for it. M a i l e d F r e e .

$2.00.

THACHER MAGNETIC SHIELD COMPANY, 1429 M a s o n i c T e m p l e , C h i c a g o . Please mention M c C l u r e ' s when

47

y o u write to advertisers.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

A GODSEND TO ALL HUMANITY. A l l o u r readers w h o want to have perfect h e a l t h , a clear s k i n , beauti­ ful c o m p l e x i o n , prevent Colds, Sev­ ers, L a g r i p p e a n d Disease, a n d enjoy all the marvelous, c l e a n s i n g, beauti­ f y i n g a n d c u r a t i v e e l e m e n t s o f the famous, T u r k i s h R u s s i a n , S u l p h u r V a p o r Baths, p e r f u m e d or m e d i c a t e d i f desired, at home, i n y o u r own r o o m for 3 cents each, s h o u l d have one o f the r e m a r k a b l e 1902 Style Square Q u a k e r T u r k i s h Bath Cabinets. Water Baths s i m p l y wash the surface. T h e C a b i n e t B a t h , per­ fectly safe both S u m m e r a n d W i n t e r , opens the 5,000,000 pores of the s k i n , sweats out a l l the poisons a n d effete matter w h i c h cause disease, cleanses y o u i n ­ wardly and outwardly, puiifies v o u r blood, m a k e s y o u r eyes j b r i g h t , y o u r s k i n clear, y o u r nerves strong, sleep s o u n d , ap­ petite good. One week's use w i l l m a k e a new b e i n g of y o u . T h i s is a g e n u i n e Cabinet w i t h a real d o o r ; h a n d s o m e l y m a d e ; best m a t e r i a l s ; rubber l i n e d ; heavy steel f r a m e ; top c u r t a i n s ; i n fact, a l l the latest improve­ m e n t s ; w i l l last 20 years; not a cheap flimsy affair, but s t r o n g , s u b s t a n i a l , ready for use w h e n received. Over 27,000 P h y s i c i a n s a n d 1,000,000 h a p p y users r e c o m m e n d t h i s C a b i n e t for b a t h i n g purposes. D r . A . B . S t o c k h a m , C h i c a g o , edi­ tor Tokology, recommends it h i g h l y , as also does H o n . B. F . S h i p l e y , M o roa, 111. Rev. H . C a r d n e r , well k n o w n E v a n g e l i s t . M . C. G r o p p n e r , M . D . , 375 Centre St., B o s t o n . C o n g r e s s m a n

T

J o h n J . L e n t z a n d t h o u s a n d s o f others. M r s . S. H . T r i p l e r , 3 6 P a r k R o w , N e w Y o r k C i t y , had R h e u m a t i s m and o t h e r t r o u b l e s 20 years, was c u r e d i n one week, says this C a b i n e t is a G o d - s e n d to every w o m a n , w o r t h $1,000. G . M . Lafferty, C o v i n g t o n , K y . , was c o m p e l l e d to q u i t business, w a l k e d on

crutches, d r u g s and doctors failed, was relieved by the first b a t h , e n t i r e l y cured i n 14 days. J . W . V a n Tassel c u r e d h i m s e l f o f L u m b a g o , and h i s friends o f B l o o d and S k i n diseases, K i d n e y Affections, N e r ­ vousness, P i l e s , etc., a n d made $1,500 s e l l i n g this C a b i n e t i n 5 m o n t h s . No one afflicted can afford to be w i t h o u t this C a b i n e t for a s i n g l e day.

Seeley's Hard Rubber R U S S E HARD

R U B B E R

Usethe

T h e makers guarantee results and assert positively as do thousands of users that t h i s C a b i n e t w i l l cure Nervousness, Weakness, Aches, P a i n s , C o l d s a n d R h e u m a t i s m , (they offer $50.00 r e w a r d for a case not re­ lieved.) P u r i f i e s the B l o o d , cures Sleeplessness, L a G r i p p e , Neuralgia, Headaches, I n d i g e s t i o n , Piles, D r o p s y , a l l B l o o d , S k i n , Liver, K i d n e y a n d U r i n a r y trouble?. H a s w o n d e r f u l p o w e r to prevent and cure W o m e n ' s complaints. A F a c e a n d H e a d Steamer is furnished if desired, which cleanses the skin, beautifies c o m p l e x i o n , removes pimples, black-heads, e r u p t i o n s , and is a sure cure for a l l s k i n diseases, E c z e m a , C a t a r r h , A s t h m a , Bron­ c h i t i s a n d T h r o a t troubles. T h e price is w o n d e r f u l l y low. It is a r e g u l a r $12.00 Cabinet for o n l y $5.00, c o m p l e t e w i t h stove, f o r m u l a s for baths and various a i l m e n t s , a n d p l a i n directions. Face Steamer, $1.00 extra. W r i t e today to T h e W o r l d Mfg. Co., 1084 W o r l d B u i l d i n g , Cincin­ n a t i , O h i o , for v a l u a b l e book and t e s t i m o n i a l s ; o r , better still, order a C a b i n e t at once. T h i s firm is p e r f e c t l y reliable; c a p i t a l $100,000.00, a n d ship same d a y y o u r r e m i t t a n c e is received, and r e f u n d y o u r m o n e y after 30 days' use i f the C a b i n e t is n o t j u s t as repre­ sented. S e n d for B o o k l e t anyway. T h i s C a b i n e t is a w o n d e r f u l seller for agents, a n d the firm offers special i n d u c e m e n t s to both m e n and women u p o n request, a n d to o u r knowledge m a n y are m a k i n g f r o m $100 to J150 every m o n t h a n d expenses.

G r e a t E n g l i s h R e m e d yforGoutandRheumatis

BLAIR'S CURE R U P T U RPILLS E.

S

Safe, Sure, Effective. DRCGGISTS, £f%

^ P ^ ^

11

~ f t

or

zzj

BOc. A

E9&ft ^^fc^^f/ ill (fEJjjIfall

W i l l i a m St.. X . V.

^ %

tr\

Sendusvouri4iire5,

llOU VllVA

."m-lwewillshoivyou howtom.ke»8.d.y * absolutely sure; furnish the work and teach you free; you work in the locality where you live. Send us your address and we will exolain the business fully; remember we guarantee a clear pro­ fit of |3 for every day's work, absolutely sure, write at .-nee ROYAL M A N l F A C T L K L V e CO., B o x 5 9 , DETROIT, 9HCH' A _ V U J T MLjflr

Tetter, Salt R h e u m , Barber's E C Z E M A Itch, Scald Head, R i n g W o r m , I t c h i n g Piles, Sore E y e l i d s , and a l l S k i n Diseases p r o m p t l y cured by Spencer's O i n t m e n t . Sent to a n y address, O N re­ ceipt of 25 cents. A . O . P I L S O N , P h a r m a c i s t , 1327 W . B a l t i m o r e Street, B a l t i m o r e , Aid.

BATES'

Q

U d l

O i l

16

R H E U M A T I C

FOOT

DRAFTS

and flnuntsin H e r b C o m p o u n d positively C n r e R h e u m a t i s m . T h e Drafts can be worn in an,y__ " shoes, and will draw out pain from { any part of the system. O n e P a l r

Blindness Prevented and Cured

M a i l e d F R E E . Address B a t e s R h e u m a t i c C a r e C o . S o u t h B o s t o n , Bass.

Guaranteed NO PAY.

B y the G r e a t " A c t l n a , " a n E l e c ­ trical Pocket Battery which removes C a t a r a c t s , P t e r y g i u m s , etc. Cures G r a n u l a t e d L i d s . R e s t o r e s V i s i o n . P o s i t i v e p r o o f o f cures given. \<> i u i 1 I n K o r D r u t f K l n g . Eighteenyears'success. W r i t e f o r o u r 80-page D i c t i o n a r y of D i s e a s e s . F R E E . A d d r e s s New York and London Electric Ass'n Dept. la. H1» l V : i l n i i t S t . , K a n s a s C i t y , M o .

to

cure

P . O . B o x 755.

DIABETES. R. P O R T E R ,

X O CUKE O T T U M W A , IOWA.

paralysis:

i Locomotor Ataxia con1 quered at last. Doctors ' puzzled. Specialists amazed at recovery of patients thought incurable, by DR. C H A S E ' S B L O O D A N D N E R V E FOODWrite me about your case. Advice and proof of enree FREE. DR. CHASE, 2 2 4 N . l O t h S t . , PHILADELPHIA, PA.

SUPERFLUOUS

HAIR ON THE FACE We will send F K E E securely sealed full information how to remove successfully superflu­ ous hair from the face, neck, arms or any part of the person, without the slightest injury to the skin. Write today. Enclose stamp. It is F R E E . Address.

SUPERFLUOUS T H E

MONOGRAM CO., 107 P e a r l Sr., New

T O I L E T I M P O R T I N G C O . ,C . 6 8, K a l a n m z o u , M l c h . Please mention

HAIR.

O u r c i r c u l a r is s e n t o n a p p l i c a t i o n in "plain, sealed e n v e l o p e . If y o u d o n ' t r e c e i v e it, write again. Com­ m o n sense t r e a t m e n t for h a i r d e s t r u c t i o n b y absorption.

M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write

48

to

advertisers.

York.


MCCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Simplex health Camp

A Message

Steam V a p o r i z e r , Formaldehyde S t e r i l i z e r , and Complexion Steamer. Size 5 x 8 inches, nickeled.

to ye w h o

Monger Words

Endorsed by leading phy­ sicians in the United States for the treatment of Coughs. Colds in the H e a d , Neural­ gia, Bronchitis, Whooping C o u g h , Catarrh, Asthma, Headache, Weak L u n g s

and

Grey Matter

Face steaming makes clear skin, beautiful complexion, cures and prevents pimples, blotches, blackheads and skin eruptions.

M a n y of y o u r craft are h i g h l y organized and c a n n o t stand the a c t i o n of c o m m o n coffee on the c o m p l e x nervous s y s t e m .

You can perfume your home with Pine, Extract of V i o ­ lets or Disinfectants. USED B YMR.

break d o w n

If y o u r m a c h i n e is w o r k i n g perfectly, go i t and G o d s p e e d to y o u . If p h y s i c a l a i l s h a n d i c a p y o u from d o i n g y o u r best, q u i t coffee ten days, and our w o r d for i t , y o u w i l l t a k e on added a b i l i t y .

RUDYARD KIPLING DURING HIS

You can m a k e the shift w i t h o u t m i s s i n g a cog if y o u use P o s t u m C e r e a l Coffee. Y e s , it w i l l taste g o o d i f y o u i n s i s t on h a v i n g it made a c c o r d i n g to directions. It c e r t a i n l y does b l e n d w i t h the a l ­ b u m e n of y o u r food, a n d t h a t ' s the c o m b i n a t i o n N a t u r e uses from w h i c h to r e b u i l d b r a i n . If y o u have a use for b r a i n s , use P O S T U M C O F F E R .

SEVERE ILLNESS.

Druggists sell it. If yours does not, send J1.50 and his name for L a m p prepaid. Complete directions with each lamp, booklet free. Agents Wanted.

E. A. S I E G E L , St. J a m e s B u i l d i n g , Dept. B , New Y o r k

THE

All

Sell

It

D R . EGGLESTON The Blood of the Grape

Method of C u r i n g

RUPTURE

T h a t ' s what Welch's Grape Juice is —"The pure

IMPROVED

ELASTIC

of

the

Grape." a

Just

drop

If

you

know

the

taste of

of

luscious

Concord grapes y o u can appreciate wonderfully natural flavor and

the

aroma

of Welch's Grape Juice.

A greater number of cures has been effected by DR. EGGLESTON

Blood

grape Juice, without

water or a particle of alcohol.

is that approved by the most eminent physicians and surgeons in the world, including D R . W M . T . B U L L . D R . W M . B . C O L E Y , and J O N A T H A N F . C . M A C R E A D Y , F . R . C. S., three of the world's highest authorities on H e r n i a :

THE

Grocers

There's no other beverage like it—

TRUSS

but

it

is

more

than a beverage—it's

than by all other trusses combined, in severe cases of long standing, as well as in simple cases and those of recent origin. Besides, it is the most comfortable to wear of all trusses.

food and drink in one.

Hundreds of stories of cures like the following are on file in our office:

" run d o w n " people.

people, it's

It's

for

tired

for thirsty people, it's

for

Welch's Grape Juice is recommended J U D G E

W O K D E S ' S E X P E R I E N C E . " W A S H B U R N , W I S . , November 23,1896. In 1880 I bought one of D r . Eggleston's Trusses. I wore it twenty-six months, and to-day I believe I am as sound a man physically as walks in Bayfield County. JUDGE A . M. WORDEN.

by Physicians.

C U R E D A T T H E A G EOF S I X T Y - S E V E N . I am happy to say that I no longer need a truss. T h e one I bought of you cured me. Was sixty-seven years old when truss was ordered. W M . B R O A D U P , Dayton, Ohio. A

M A N E I G H T Y - S E V E N

Y E A R S

A

for JO cents.

Booklet free.

be­

O L D C U R E D .

The Welch Grape Juice Co. WESTFIELD, N. Y.

Eggleston's book on Rupture and its cure mailed free on application.

DR. C. H. EGGLESTON & CO., Room 400,

label

3-oz. bottle, b y m a i l ,

If your dealer will not supply you, send us $ 3 for 12 full pints (% case), shipped express prepaid anywhere in United States east of Omaha.

The truss that I obtained from you last year has effected a complete cure. As I was in my eighty-seventh year when I first applied the truss, it seems as if it was a pretty severe test of its capabilities, and I would recommend it to any one afflicted as I was. R O B E R T O ' B R I E N , 604 E . Capitol St., Washington, D . C .

Dr.

L o o k at the

fore b u y i n g .

69 Dearborn St., Chicago, III. Please mention McCIure's when you write to advertisers. 49


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

A Coin like this is worth

I N S U R E in...

TRAVELERS of

"NUMISMATIC"

Hartford, Conn. a PROFITABLE

OLDEST, LARGEST, and BEST

Life, Endowment,

The C O M M E R C I A L A N D

IMPORTANT.... T O INVESTORS

OF A L L FORMS.

Health Policies. Indemnity for Disability caused by Sickness.

Liability Insurance. Manufacturers and Mechanics, Contractors, and Owners of Buildings, Horses, and Vehicles can all be protected by policies in T H E T R A V E L E R S INSURANCE COMPANY.

Paid-up Cash Capital, - $1,000,000.00 ASSETS - - - 26,499,822.74 Liabilities, - - - - 22,708,701.82 EXCESS, 3i i basis, - - 3,791,120.92 G A I N S : rJ Months, January to July, 1899.

Premiums, Interest, and Rents, 6 Months.

$1,184,380.28 1,478,549.62 -

3.782,423.85

J . G . B A T T E R S O N , President. S. C . D U N H A M , Vice-President. J O H N E . M O R R I S , Secretary. H . J . M E S S E N G E R , Actuary. E . V . P R E S T O N , Sup't of Agencies. Please

mention

McCIure's

F I N A N C I A L N E W S says: " T h e Numismatic Bank ii

N u m i s m a t i c B a n k , ( D e p t . m. c.) B o s t o n , Mass.

. . Insurance

-

Science.

not only the largest institution of its kind, but as reliable, safe and trustworthy to deal with as any National Bank. T h e enormous business done by them u the result of S U t A R E W E A R I N G and liberality." Sendtwotwocent stamps for our illustrated circular on rare coins and stamps. It will fin you information on a subject of most importance to y o u .

and Accident .

In A s s e t s , Increase in Reserves (both dep'ts),

but N E G L E C T E D

W H I L E there are some people that have a vague idea that coins issued 100 or 1000 years ago are worth fabulous gums, yet vcryfcw know that coini issued only a few years ago are at a large premium, F O T instance, the flint Columbian half-dollar issued l ÂŁ 9 2 , sold for $1,000. A l l the half-dollars from 1879 to 18UO are at a premium, also Isabella quarters of 1893, twenty-cent pieces 1876 to 1878; five and three-rent pieces of 1877; last issue of the two-cent copper and three-cent silver pieces; first issue of the nickel cents, all gold dollarsand three-dollar gold pieces; all Territorial and California coins from 1849 to 1880, and thousands of earlier American And Foreign coins. Thereii also a premium on some coins with M 1 X T M A R K S O , S , C , D o r C C ; also on fractional currency, colonial, continental and Confederate bills and old P O S T A G E S T A M P . * * . T H E G L O B E reports that* coin was found in Galveston worth $5,000. T H E N E W Y O R K J O U R N A L sayi that a cent was plowed up at A u r o r a , N . Y . , worth $1,200, and that Mr. Castle paid 8 4 , 4 0 O F O K A S T A M P found at Louisville, K y . T H I " W O R L D says: " M a n y people have become wealthy by looking after old coins and stamps.*" T H E H O M E J O U R N A L says: "Coin and stamp collecting is a profitable business, as there are but few in it. T h e Numismatic Ban! buys from Agents all over the country, and pays them big sums." Coins thtf are very hard to find in one section are often easily found in others. A Boston baker sold 116 coppers for $6,915, 2 9 silver coins for $4,713, and 4 gold coini for $1,700, and others have done nearly as well. M R . F . W . A Y E E sold recently a lot of stamps, collected since 1S92, to Stanley Gibbons for 8 2 5 0 , 0 0 0 .

F o r the past two years we have been urging our clients to invest a portion of their money in first-class gold mining propositions. D u r i n g that time we have recommended several different gold stocks a n d now while industrials and other inflated stocks are falling by the wayside and millions of investments are being wiped out by liquidation, every single one of the gold stocks we have recommended are steadily increasing i n price a n d today, notwithstanding the tight money market, are higher than they have been at any time in the past. T h i s is a record that ought to attract any investor's attention. W e have had years of experience in the mining business and claim to understand our business and to select the best class of investments o n such terms as will insure large profits. W e have sold stocks the past year at from 20 cents to 4 0 cents per share which have more intrinsic value than many of the m i n i n g stocks promoted by eastern concerns and offered on the eastern market at from $ 2 . 5 0 to $20 per share. W e are on the g r o u n d a n d able to get inside bargains for our clients. C o l o r a d o produced about 4 0 Millions i n precious metals last year a n d paid over 10 Millions i n dividends. Many gold stocks advanced over 5 0 0 % , some of them over 1500%W e have for sale some first-class gold and copper stocks, which are good for large advances no matter how tight the money market may be. W e furnish the highest references and guarantee every statement made in regard to any enterprise we r e c o m m e n d . W r i t e for particulars to

THE KENDRICK DENVER, Capital S u r p l u s , $200,000. when y o u w r i t e

50

to advertisers.

PROMOTION CO. COLORADO Mention McCIure's Magazine.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

WERN C IKE ELASTC I BOOKCASE "A

S Y S T E M OF

UNITS.'

A l w a y s complete but never finished. S m a l l enough for 10, large enough for 10,000 books. Varieties to suit every taste and require­ ment. D u s t proof glass doors, and every feature of a perfect and beautiful bookcase. Sent anywhere on trial and approval. Wernicke THE

pays

the

freight.

W E R N I C K E CO., 183 Bartlett St.,

Grand Rapids, M i c h . , U . S. F R E E B O O K L E T A N D LIST O F D E A L E R S F O R T H E

A.

ASKING.

Write One and Copy the Rest Y o u can produce 1000

letters an

hour, each a

lac-simile copy

the

but

original,

only

on

of the

Edison Mimeograph A

:

S

Invented by Thomas A . Edison.

For daily office use in duplicating both handwriting and t y p e w r i t i n g . A n y b o d y can operate it Simple. Compact. C l e a n l y . Cheap. Endorsed by over 200,000 Users. Descriptive Catalogue for the ask.ng. Made

only

by

A. B. DICK COMPANY, Please

mention McCIure's

when

51

152154

Lake Street,

47 Nassau Street,

y o u w r i t e to

advertisers.

CHICAGO.

NEW YORK.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

The "Macey" C A R D INDEX

3 per cent, discount for remittance; with order. Made of se­ lected oak, quarter sawed front. Has 4 oak front file boxes, 17 pigeon holes, z complete letter files, 2 legal blank drawers, 1 insurance blank drawer, legal docu­ ment file, 3 extension slides, 4 book stalls, closed and paneled back, full base, heavy round corners, auto­ matic locks, etc., just as illustrated. 50 in. long, 30 in. deep, 49 in. high. Golden-Oak finish. Very convenient. W e l l suited for home or office. Easily worth $25.00. Ask for Desk Catalogue 69, House Furniture Catalogue o. E.H. stafford and Bros., 26 Van Buren St., chicago, ILL.

mnsm Side-Locked Cards have no punctures to break their writing surface. There is no rod to pull out every time it is desired to insert or remove a card.—You alinply t u r n a knob to fasten or wnfasten the cards. Ask for Catalogue No. 5.

7

T h i s d e s k is 48 in. long, 30 in. wide, 48 i n . high. It has a fine quartersawed oak front, closed back, front base mould, 22 pigeon - holes, 9 file boxes, 2 arm rests, ball bearing cast­ ers , and 8 com plete letter flies. This desk has I a good polish ' finish, and from a dealer w o u l d cost $28.00 to *35-oo.

Letters Copied While Writing P A T E N T

A P P L I E D

Keep a copy of all letters; no press; no water; no brush; no work. Arty ink; any p e n ; any paper. Our Pen-Carbon never smuts; our clip holds paper hrm. Write with no extra pressure, and our Pen-Carbon Letter Book produces aferfeci copy. Can be used anywhere. If your stationers do not keep it, write for free sample. Dept. D .

FOR.

Write for our Complete Catalogue No. " £ - 2 . "

THE FRED MACEY CO., G r a n d

Rapids, M i c h .

M a k e r s of Office a n d L i b r a r y F u r n i t u r e .

TYPEWRITER*

P E N - C A R B O N M A N I F O L D C O . , 221-227 C a n a l St., N.Y. I

S E L F T H R E A D I N G S E W I N G N E E D L E S , weak sighted 01 blind can thread them, one kind thread springs in on end, o t h e r o n side. C A N T - B E N U - E M P I N S , Needle points, blackorwhite, % forcollara !etc. One paper of either kind, pinsor needles lOcts. 2for 15c. 4 for 25c 12 for 60ccs. post-paid. Agents Catlg. free. Address C. K . M A R S H A L L , M f r . L O C K P O R T . N . Y . Box A .

M A K E S

A L L T H E S T A N D A R D M A C H I N E S F O B S a l e or R e n t at H a l f M A N U F A C T U R E R S ' PRICES. ANTEED. SHIPPED WITH W R I T E FOR CATALOGUE.

EACH MACHINE FULLY 0 P A E PRIVILEGE OF EXAMINATION.

.

Typewriter Emporium, ° C H I C A G O . 2

TYPEWRITER

Dialogues, Speakers, Amusement Books. Catalog free. T . 8. Denison Publisher, Dept. 48, CHICAGO.

PLAYS

HEADQUARTERS,

J02 F u l t o n S t . , N e w Y o r k , sell a l l makes under h a l f price. Don't buy before w r i t i n g t h e m for u n p r e j u d i c e d advice a n d p r i c e s . Exchanges. Immense stock for s e l e c t i o n . S h i p p e d for t r i a l . G u a r a n t e e d first class. Dealers supplied. 52-page i l l u s . cat. free.

CASH

And saver. Print y o u r o w n cards, circu­ lar, b o o k , n e w s p a p e r , w i t h o u r $5 or $18 p r i n t i n g press. T y p e setting easy, p r i n t e d rules sent. F o r m a n or boy. S e n d for c a t a l o g , presses, t y p e , p a p e r , to f a c t o r y .

n Money Maker THE

All

Problems solved rapidly and accurately by the .Comptometer. Saves CO per cent of time and entirely relieves nervous and mental strain. Adapted to all com* mercial and scientific computation. Every office should hare one. Write for Pamphlet. FELTandTARRANT MFG. CO.. Chicago,

THE PATENT RECORD, Baltimore, Md.

S u b s c r i p t i o n price o f the P A T E N T R E C O R D per a n n u m . S a m p l e s free.

EUROPEAN

$1.00

TOURS

19th Y e a r . Select parties. Terms reasonable. Con­ ducted by D R . & M R S . H . S . P A I N E , Glens Kalis, N. Y.

P R E S S CO., Meriden, Conn.

Arithmetical

| for acceptable Ideas. State If patented.

for all. Celebrated I N ' i n i l l method. Q u i c k l y learned; no shading; no po­ sition; connective vowels; highest award W o r l d ' s F a i r ; self taught or by m a i l ; text-book on approval. W r i t e H . M . PERNIN, A u t h o r , Detroit.Mich.

SHORTHAND

TYPEWRITER

BARGAINS

A l l makes at prices defying competition. Shipped everywhere for camination and trial. Send for catalogue, specimen work and prices. M E T R O P O L I T A N T Y P E W R I T E R EXCHANGE 2 8 ? B r o a d w a y , N e w Y o r k City

A GOOD T Y P E W R I T E R IN Y O U R OFFICE

The typewriter Exchange

w i l l d e m o n s t r a t e its

advantages.

S e n d f o r s a m p l e s o f w r i t i n g , w i t h prices, etc. L a r g e s t a n d m o s t c o m p l e t e s t o c k o f s e c o n d - h a n d T y p e w r i t e r s o f a n y house in tlie t r a d e . Machines shipped, privilege of inspection. 8 \ V . K n l t l m o r e St., B a l t i m o r e , Md. 81? W y a n d o t t e S t r e e t , k m i n u s City. 3 0 8 N o r t h N i n t h S t r e e t . S t . I.onls. H a t - c l a y S t r e e t , N e w Y o r k4. 8 S D i a m o n d S t . , P i t t s b u r g h , P a , « • » B r o m f l e l d Street, .{...ton. O I uni_0 ^-g-,,C h i c a g o , 111.

T i t l e to e v e r y m a c h i n e g u a r a n t e e d .

SEVEN O U V 1.11

______^ tiy, STORES <

r

4

52

s

t

>

>


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

" S e e the Jewett H a n g e r . " Every wants better

employer w h o purchases a typewriter one that will last—one that will w e a r t h a n a n y other. T h e Jewett has the

Strongest and Most Serviceable Hanger employed i n any typewriter. T h e hanger is t h a t p a r t o f t h e t y p e w r i t e r m o s t u s e d , so i t fol­ l o w s that t h e J e w e t t lasts l o n g e r t h a n others. The b o o k l e t illustrates a n d ex­ plains everything. Write for it. Jewett T y p e w r i t e r C o . , 6 0 4 Locust S t . Des M o i n e s , l a .

B e s t in

the

World'

1 9 0 0

1 9 0 0 p

a

n

s

.

Indispensable to Travelers.

W

Diamond Shape Posts

I

a

d

t

e

e

a

r

m

a

n

'

s

^

l

receive the d i a m o n d shape holes p u n c h e d in the leaves of

the

F

Razall Loose Leaf Ledger squarely

on

each

of

T h i s results i n a

the

four

perfect edge—a

o

u

n

t

a

i

n

P

e

n

surfaces. special

Useful at all times, but

feature of o u r b o o k .

never more so

Leaf

L e d g e r S y s t e m is ac­

than w h e n in Steamer chair, on Parlor

cepted as the

most

advanced

accounting.

It

Car,

Our'Loose

method

f r o m 40 t o 60 p e r c e n t , b o o k c o s t ; i n dition

thereto

balancing and

of

accomplishes a saving of it

saves

time

in

ad­

or in C a m p . Ask your dealer or send for catalogue.

posting,

reference.

Exhibited in A m e r i c a n

A n o t h e r i n t e r e s t i n g feature is the l o w ness o f o u r price. A

h a n d s o m e circular tells a l l about i t —

it w i l l b e sent THE

H.

382-384

E.

immediately upon G.

RAZALL

Water

St.,

MFG.

Paris

L. E . Waterman Co.,

request.

Largest

CO.,

Milwaukee,

Section,

International Exposition,

I

Wis.

manufacturers of

F o u n t a i n Pens i n the

world,

McClure's—2—*oo.

/

T h e r e are F a b e r Pencils w h i c h are A .

W

.

F

A

B

E

R

P

E

not N

C

I

L

A. W . F A B E R ' S Round Gilt, Hexagon Gilt, and Siberian Drawing Pencils have been sold for thirty years and more, and constantly improved E

A

D

S

A. W. F A B E R ' S Station­ er's Rubber G o o d s , Inks, Rulers, etc., are as reliable as A. W. F A B E R ' S Lead pencils

See that all goods are initial­ led " A . W . " before the name of " FABER," in order to get THE BEST from the original factory, established 1761

L

]p

= ,

5 5 5 7 Broadway, New Y o r k .

P E N C I L

M A N U F A C T O R Y

E S T A B L I S H E D

P l e a s e m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u w r i t e to a d v e r t i s e r s

53

1 7 6 1


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

There is MUCH in the TOUCH!

Remington TYPEWRITERS H a v e the L i g h t e s t T o u c h — that S a v e s L a b o r ; a n d d o the Q u i c k e s t "Work—that S a v e s T i m e

I t i s s a i d b y u s e r s o f t h e W e l l i n g t o n t h a t i f t h e $100 t y p e ­ w r i t e r s e o u l d b e h a d f o r S60, a n d t h e p r i c e o f t h e W e l i i n t r t o n w a s S100 i n s t e a d o f $60, t h e y w o u l d p a y t h e $100 e v e r y t i m e a » d g e t the W e l l i n g t o n , a n d y o u w i l l feel t h e s a m e w a y a f t e r testing the W e l l i n g t o n . 10 D A Y S * T 1 I I A L F R E E . Money returned if not satisfactory i n every detail.

Illustrated Catalog Free. THE WL I LA I MS MFG. CO., LTD. B O X

4 0

P L A T T 8 B U R G ,

W Y C K O F F , S E A M A N S & B E N E D I C T 327 Broadway, New York.

N . Y .

" S a v e T w e n t y P e r C e n t , of a B o o k k e e p e r ' s T i m e . "

O N E

SMITH'S A D J U S T A B L E INDEX T A G S

H U N D R E D copies of a letter, piece of m u s i c , drawing, or a n y w r i t i n g c a n be m a d e on a

400 kinds of Printed Tags kept in stock. ALPHABET TAG.

Lawton Simplex Printer. , N o w a s h i n g . N o wetting of paper. for circulars a n d samples of w o r k .

Send

AGENTS WANTED. LAWTON

& C O . . 3 0 V e s e y S t . , N e w Y o r k ; 5 9 D e a r b o r n S t . , Chicago.

STYLE

Instantly applied or moved-stay-don't tear. USED BY: POPE MFG. CO., Hartford; CARNEGIE STEEL CO., LTD.. Pittslmrg; CONTINENTAL NA'_ IONAL BANK, Chicago, etc. (latalog and Price List F R E E .

Sample Tag:, 5

cents.

Dept. B, CHAS. C. SMITH, Mfr., Exeter, Nebraska. Canadian Representatives. GRAND & TOY, Toronto.

Please mention M c C l u r e ' s when y o u write to

54

advertisers.


McCLURE'S

worn

MAGAZINE.

I 0 * 0 * 0 0 t y 0 9 0 0 9 * 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 m

A

F R E E

P A T T E R N

B e l e

N O

C O L L I S I O N S

£25 ° t i o n ) to every subscriber. Beautiful col­ ored lithographed plates a n d illustrations. Original latest, artistic, exquisite a n d s t r i c t l y up-to-date designs

!

in the

M ' C A L L S ^ i M A G A Z I N E W Dressmaking economies, fancy w o r k , household hints, short stories, c u r r e n t topics, etc. Subscribe to-day. O n l y 50c. y e a r l y . L a d y a g e n t s w a n t e d . S e n d f o r t e r m s .

F o r l a d i e s , misses, g i r l s a n d l i t t l e c h i l d r e n . T h a t cer­ t a i n s t y l i s h " c h i c " effect n o t a t t a i n e d b y t h e u s e o f a n v o t h e r p a t t e r n s . H a v e n o e q u a l f o r s t y l e a n d p e r f e c t fit.

Operators w i l l appreciate this great advantage. There are a score of other • advanced features. I f y o u are think- s \ i n g of g e t t i n g a typewriter or desire € * the Best, write us. A M E R I C A N 316

W R I T I N G

M A C H I N E

B r o a d w a y ,

E a s i l y p u t t o g e t h e r . O n l y 10 a n d 15 c e n t s e a c h — n o n e higher. Sold i n nearly every city a n d t o w u . or b y mail. A s k l o r t h e m . A b s o l u t e l y v e r y latest up-to-date styles.

C O M P A N Y ,

N e w York.

T H E McCALIi COMPANY, 138-146 West H t h Street,

A A A A A A

A A

A A

A

A

A A A A

E h a v e been

01

* «

obliged to..

*

+ «

« *

A * *

A A

increase

A

*

o u r m e c h a n i c a l p l a n t 50% in order to meet the

growing demand

* ** *

A A A

N e w Y o r k C i t y , S . Y.

* * ift

FOR

Smith

Premier

typewriters T h i s simply means of S m i t h Premiers everywhere.

S E N D FOR ILLUSTRATED

••••

more users

Premier popularity

*

grows.... daily

* rfr

* »

m v •

+l

CATALOGUE.

Smith Premier typewriter g o . SYRACUSE, N. Y., U. S . A .

a a

• •\^a mmw

way

a %

>^ines*preemin(mt

For Catalogue & Full Particulars Address COLUMBIA TYPEWRITER AVFG. G> ^39 WEST 116 TH STREET, /VEW YORK'

* *

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

^>m m

I 55


McCLURE'S

If

it

isn't an Eastman,

it

isn't

a

MAGAZINE.

Kodak.

K O D A K

V E L O X CARTRIDGES

A n

after-supper-paper

Prints

i n a

gaslight. seconds

f o rt h e a m a t e u r .

f e w seconds D e v e l o p s

b y t h e s a m e

i n

b y a

light.

l a m p

f e w

o r

more

Requires

NO D A R K R O O M For 2 or for 6 Exposures can now be obtained from all Kodak dealers.

and

renders

like

effects. G E N E R A L

N E P E R A For

sale

A For work at home then, as well as for one's outings, the Kodak becomes more con­ venient than the plate camera. No dark room except for development, no bother­ some plate holders or dark slides.

L E N G T H

x 3!4. N o . 1 Folding Pocket, - $ .20 3]4 x 3'A, N o . 2 B u l l s - E y e , etc., .30 4 x 5 , N o . 4 Bulls-Eye, etc. .45 5 x 4, No. 4 Cartridge Kodak, .45 7 x 5 , N o . 5 Cartridge Kodak, .80

N e p e r a

by

o f

4-'/2

$ .25 .35 .35 .60

BUT

Kodaks, $5.00 to $35.00. sale by all dealers.

I N C H E S

10. Stereoscope. 11. Glass Breaker. 12. Ruler. 13. Cartridge Extractor. • 4. Buttonhole Scissors. 15. Gas Pipe Tongs. 16. Nail File. 17. Cigar Box Opener. 18. Measure.

H T O V ,

A USEFUL

ARTICLE.

O n r e c e i p t o f c a s h o r p o s t a l o r d e r f o r ONE DOLLAR w i l l send y o u one postpaid. Agents wanted. F o r s a l e b y a l l firstclass S t a t i o n e r y , F a n c y G o o d s , D r u g , D r y G o o d s , a n d Cutlery stores.

K O D A K C O . Rochester,

Y .

S c i s s o r s

• . Screw Driver. 2. Tracing Pattern Wheel. 3. Scissors. 4. Cigar Cutter. 5. Glass Cutter. 6 . Hammer. 7. Wire Cutter. 8. Erasing Knife. 9. Pen Knife.

N O T

EASTMAN

Park, N .

dealers,

Can Actually Be P u t to the Following Uses:

2M

For

to

C H E M I C A L C O .

R e m a r k a b l e

P a i r

6 Exposure Packages Film 2 Cartridges, Cartridges. 2 bx.each.

platinum­

A R I S T O C O . ,

Successors

all

PRICE.

beautifully soft,

I I . Y .

The Universal Scissor, Tool and Novelty Co., Please

mention

M c C l u r e ' s w h e n v n n wrir#.

56

648 Broadway, New York City. tr. 3^.r.^;.—


McCLURE'S

P o n y

MAGAZINE.

P r e m o N

o

.

b

Is t h e m o s t p e r f e c t H a n d C a m e r a made. H a s R e v e r s i b l e Back, S w i n g , S l i d i n g F r o n t and Rack and Pinion. A l s o the B e l l o w s is l o n g e n o u g h for copying and enlarging. The d i m e n s i o n s o f 4x5 size are o n l y 2J4 x 6}i x dyk i n c h e s . lens and Shatter acknowledged finest furnished C a t a l o g u e

sent o n application, describing the above, c o m p l e t e

line,

r a n g i n g f r o m $8

with any

a n d also

the

Camera.

o u r

u p w a r d .

R O C H E S T E R O P T I C A L CO., 4 2 South St., Rochester, N . Y.

A

A

s t a n t

H a w k = E y e

a n d t h i n g

C a m e r a

for $ 5 . 2 2

T

e

h

e

W

n

p r o f i t . i n

i n 27 s t y l e s , the elaborate

t h e

o f W e

w i l l

a l w a y s

p l e a s u r e , m a k e

t h e

p h o t o g r a p h i c

b e

a

c o n ­

i m p r o v e m e n t b e s t l i n e

o f

e v e r y ­

a n d

c a n

b e g i n n i n g w i t h the l o w priced snap shot b o x tc professional style, with a range of prices from

$

t o

$

80

E v e r y part of o u r cameras, i n c l u d i n g lenses a n d shutters, are m a d e i n o u r factory, i n w h i c h respect we are the exception, hence the u n r i v a l l e d pre-eminence o f M a n h a t t a n P r o d u c t s .

Hawk-Eye Cameras

MANHATTAN LENSES

f r o m $ 5 . 0 0 t o $25.00.

are m a d e i n s e v e n series (each s c i e n t i f i c a l l y a d j u s t e d to d o w i t h precision its particular work), a n d give results heretofore unattain­ able b y other lenses.

For sale by all dealers.

B L A I R C A M E R A CO. R o c h e s t e r , of

C a m e r a

s o u r c e

o

This camera is Hawk-Eye quality all through. It uses our famous perforated sys­ tem daylight loading Sunlight films, has a fine achromatic lens, an accurate shutter which is adjustable for time and for three speeds of instantaneous exposures; has three stops, a square finder, socket for tripod screw, is cov­ ered with fine leather and makes pictures 3^ x 3\i inches. NO G U E S S W O R K IN C U T T I N G UP OUR S U N L I C H T FILMS FOR DEVELOPMENT. The perforations show exactly where to cut.

Formerly

g o o d

J

Our catalogue tells more about Manhattan may be had Jor the asking by mentioningMcClure's

Products, and Magazine.

N . Y . M A N H A T T A N

Boston.

O P T I C A L

C O . of

n.v.

Address Factory, C R E S S K I L L , Please m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to advertisers.

57

N . J .


McCLURE'S

T h e

MAGAZINE,

" A n g e l u s "

P I A N O P L A Y E R It p l a y s

any

Piano—Anyone

can

play

it

applied to any piano: grand, square or upright, making it a self-playing instrument. No musical talent on the part of performer required. A child that has never before seen a piano can with the aid of the A n g e l u s Orchestral Piano Player render the most difficult compositions in a manner possible to only the most accomplished pianists. Contains (in addition to piano-playing mechanism) two full sets of organ reeds which may be played sep­ arately or in connection with the piano I N S T A N T L Y

A full description of the A n as Orchestral Piano P l a y e contained in illustrated boo " C " w h i c h w i l l be sent to address upon application.

T

H

gel­ r is klet any

E

"

S Y M P H O N Y

1

ORCHESTRAL SELF-PLAYING ORGAN Produce* with the Perfection of a Good Orchestra both Classical and Popular Music. ^ • H E " Symphony " is endorsed b y noted musicians and musical critics 4 . the world over. T h e absolute control of expression, b y the performer, its voicing, and the principle upon which it is constructed place it in a class all its own, not equaled by any other instrument made. H e a r it and convince yourself of this fact. Symphonies," from $75 to $1,500. Send for Illustrated Catalogue " C . "

WILCOX & WHITE COMPANY Manufacturers op "Symphonies" and " Angelus" Piano Players. Mala Office and Factory: MRIUDKN, CONN.

vose

W

E P

PIANOS

^ 1

are r e c e i v i n g m o r e f a v o r a b l e c o m m e n t s d a y f r o m a n artistic s t a n d p o i n t t h a n other makes combined.

1 f

New York Salesrooms : 14G FIFTH ATF.Sl'E.

toall

"A

I

B

E

R

A

N

O

h a r m o n i o u s " A n

inspiration

m u s i c a l

W E

"Supports

creation

the

S

of

to

a r t ? a

t e m p e r a m e n t ? voice

most

a d m i r a b l y ?

Challenge 1 1

Comparisons.

Senior,

J

vose & SONS PIANO CO.

\

Boylston Street,

-

-

-

Boston.

i n

duction,

B y o u r easy p a y m e n t p l a n , every f a m i l y i n m o d e r a t e c i r c u m s t a n c e s c a n o w n a fine piano. W e allow a liberal price for o l d in­ struments i n exchange, a n d deliver the piano i n your house free of expense. Y o u can d e a l w i t h u s at a d i s t a n t p o i n t t h e s a m e as in Boston. S e n d for catalogue a n d full information.

160

T h e a c h i e v e m e n t s o f A l b e r t

of

the

like

C r e m o n a ,

r e a l m

t h e

violin

still

o f

tone

pro­

masterpieces

s t a n d

S e n d for

W e b e r ,

unrivalled."

catalogue. m

T

WAREROOMS; Fifth

A v e n u e

268 W a b a s h 181 T r e m o n t

a n d

A v e n u e , Street,

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers.

5S

1 6 t h

Street,

C h i c a g o . Boston*

N e w - Y o r k .


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

G a b l e r P i a n o s are absolutely and unquestionably the best pianos sold at a moderate price. M u s i c i a n s everywhere recognize this fact and out of the thousands of dealers in A m e r i c a y o u w i l l h a r d l y find one who will say a word against the G a b l e r . T h e G a b l e r is not a " c o m m e r c i a l p i a n o " made to make a noise and to s e l l at a low price. It i s an honestly made musical instrument, made just as well as forty years of experience can make it, and sold at a reasonable m a r g i n of profit. N o better piano is made at any price and many poorer ones are sold at h i g h e r prices. Before y o u purchase any piano you owe it to yourself to learn the f a c t s about the Gabler. B o o k l e t s and catalogs free. E R N E S T 2 1 4

A M ,

Steinert & E , lames

B .

F E W

G A B L E R E a s t

2 2 d

&

S t r e e t ,

G A B L E R

B R O T H E R

N e w

R E P R E S E N T A T I V E S

Sons C o . ,Boston, N e w H a v e n , Providence F .

D r o o p

Bradford,

&

Y o r k

Sons, W a s h i n g t o n

M i l w a u k e e

James

B o l l m a n M c K a n n o n

Bros. Bros.

Bellak Sons, Philadelphia C o . , St. M u s i c

Louis C o . ,

D e n v e r

CHARLES,AUSTIN BATES N VI Please

mention McClure's

w h e n y o u w r i t e to

59

advertisers.


McCLUEE'S

MAGAZINE.

Goodby

1

WHEN

to

Sees the T R A D E = M A R K below on Enameled - Ware Cooking Utensils, it is Safe to Buy, and not till then. from

U.

S.

Health

Report

June

You

15, \<?9.]

when

be

buying

you

1

don't &

B y m a i l , 35 c e n t s e a c h . A

Money-Maker

«

a

the r

k

the e n a m e l .

find

i t , ask

for

A g a t e

A Great Comfort for the Sick IN K O l ' R S T Y L E S — B l a c k E n a m e l l e d . Si.2.3; W h i t e E n a m e l l e d , $4.75; N i c k e l plated,$6.75; A n t i q u e C o p p e r P l a t e d (very handsome),$7.85. F R E I G H T P R E P A I D east of C o l o r a d o . B y ex­ press, p r e p a i d , 50 cents e x t r a . P r o m p t ship­ m e n t a n d safe d e l i v e r y g u a r a n t e e d . M o n e y b a c k i f n o t s a t i s f i e d . D E S l ICIPT1YE B O O K L E T I I! l i t . S e n d Tor i t .

DDES NOT TOUCH THE BED.

sold

by

J. R, BAKER I SONS CO,

THE

all

THE

CALDWELL

11

the

i

S

&

NICKEL-STEEL dealers

Chicago. Please

A

S

H

manufac­

B

be obtained.

WARE

A

L

A

N

C

E

10 Y e a r s S u c c e s s h a s m a d e i t the standard substitute for w e i g h t s and cords, for b a l a n c i n g w i n d o w sash. C a n be ap­ plied to o l d w i n d o w s which have no w e i g h t pockets. Write for c a t a l o g a n d p r i c e list.

is'

everywhere.

Lalance & Grosjean Mfg. Co. New Y o r k .

K e n d a l l v i l l e , Ind.

LOST CHORD.

™ I

Nickel-

reputable

6 5 W a y n e St.,

'

w i l l tell y o u w h e r e t h e y can

AGATE

Canvassers

A D J U S T A B L E for s e r v i n g meals, r e a d i n g , w r i t i n g , etc. A d a p t e d for use over B e d , L o u n g e , C h a i r , etc. F i n e l y p o l i s h e d quartered-oa~k T o p , can be e x t e n d e d , r a i s e d , l o w e r e d , or t i l t e d either way. B o o k - h o l d e r s a t t a c h e d to each s i d e . F r a m e is steel t u b i n g . T a b l e w e i g h s 15 lbs.; height, 3S i n . A d o p t e d b y TJ. S. G o v e r n m e n t Institutions.

Send for special pamphlet of vital importance to every housewife. & G."

S O N S

BAKERS Bedside and Reading Table

Steel W a r e C o o k i n g U t e n s i l s , o r w r i t e the

•• L.

&

Good

1

trade-

J r .

Circular upon application.

for

careful

for

G . "

turers, w h o

A D A M S ,

T h e s e n i o r m e m b e r o f this firm is tiie A d a m s o f " T u t t i F r u t t i " fame.

Utensils

L O O K " L .

T H O S .

102-104 Flatbush A v e . , B r o o k l y n , New Y o r k

your

Cooking T

too

Lighting

• I f you burn g a s you should Sljjijlit not be without it

, ;

cannot

Gas

Most wonderful invention of the age Requires no matches to ligrht your gas T u r n on gas, the lighter does the rest Makes life and property safe Reduces fire r i s k s where gas is used It is not an electric device Can be attached to any gas fixture

" I n the m o n t h of A p r i l , 1 8 9 9 , " ^ "there occurred near Boston a" " series of severe p o i s o n i n g cases " w h i c h baffled the p h y s i c i a n s " "for a longtime. About 20" "cases were reported by the", "physicians, and from several' " towns. A f t e r careful investi­ g a t i o n it w a s f o u n d t h a t a l l o f " t h e victims had eaten cream "cakes purchased from a certain " b a k e r in a t o w n near B o s - " "ton. W e promptly took " t h e matter up,and found, " b y a careful analysis o f "the so-called 'enameled'' " kettle in w h i c h the c r e a m ' " w a s c o o k e d , that it c o n - ' " tained antimony, w h i c h " " f u l l y explained the w h o l e ' " mystery." 5 " T h e production of articles 'of unscrupulous m a n u - " ' f a c t u r e r s a n d d e a l e r s '" "cannot, unfortunate-' ' M y , be s t o p p e d o r r e - " ' s t r i c t e d at present, o r ' 'until our State L e g i s - ' latures c a n be i n d u c e d 'to pass such s u i t a b l e " ' a n d stringent l a w s a s " " w i l l effectually prevent" 'their manufacture. In" ' the meantime the people" ' m u s t look out for t h e m - " ' selves and carefully scru­ t i n i z e before purchasing" ' all such articles." " O u r investigations of the h i g h ' grade goods called the ' L . & G . ' ' A g a t e Nickel-Steel W a r e have " b e e n v e r y r i g i d , a n d the cone" ' s i o n s o f o u r experts, as u n a n i - ' " mously approved by our medical' "staff, s h o w conclusively their' " s u p e r i o r excellence, a n d w e are " " pleased to e x t e n d to t h e m the " official r e c o g n i t i o n o f the U . S . " Health Reports." ;

for

Adams' No Match Self-Lighting Gas Lighter

A

HOUSEWIFE

[Extract

Matches

Boston.

Sold Hardware

mention McClure's when

6o

by Dealers.

y o u w r i t e to

C A L D W E L L MFC. CO., I I Jones St., Rochester, N. Y.

advertisers.


McCLUBE'S

MAGAZINE.

HARTSHORN'S^

SHADE ROLLERS

\

B a t t e r y H a n g i n g L a m p s , J10.00 Telephone, complete, . 5.95 Electric Door Bells, . . 1.00 Electric Carriage Light, 8 95 Battery F a n Motor, . . 5.95 Electric H a n d Lanterns, 2.00 Pocket Flash Lights, . 1.50 M i n i a t u r e E l e c t r i c L a m p s , .40 58 M e d i c a l B a t t e r i e s , . . 3.95 GenuineElectric Belts, . 1.00 $12 B e l t w i t h S u s p e n s o r y , 2.50 G e n u i n e E l e c t r i c Insoles, .25 T e l e g r a p h Outfits, . . . 2.25 B a t t e r y M o t o r s f r o m $1 t o 12.00 Battery Table Lamps, . 8 00 N e c k t i e L i g h t s , 7 5 c t s . t o 8.00 $6 B i c y c l e E l e c t r i c L i g h t s , 2 . 7 5 Electric Cap Lights, . . 1.75 Electric Railway, . . . 2.95 B a t t e r y S t u d e n t L a m p , . 4.00 D r y B a t t e r i e s , p e r d o z e n , 2.25 A l l E l e c t r i c a l B o o k s at l o w prices. W e undersell all on Everything Electrical.

This is

never

o n

roller from

D

a

a n d a

poor

n e v e r

g o o d

ON'T

n a v e

s

shade a b s e n t

one. o

m

e

poor imitation p a l m e d off o n y o u , b u t see t h a t y o u get t h e g e n u i n e , w i t h t h e S t e w a r t H a r t s h o r n a u t o g r a p h o n label. V

4

1

1

J H E " HARTSHORN " X S S d i r e c t i o n o f s p r i n g r o l l e r s , a n d has e a s i l y k e p t t h e lead. O f course t h e r e are i m i t a t i o n s , b u t the l a b e l t e l l s the s t o r y .

OHIO E L E C T R I C W O R K S CLEVELAND, O. Headquarters for Electric- Nov­ elties a n d Supplies. Agents wanted. Send for New Catalogue just out.

N O B O D Y

Autograph

WOOD ROLLERS

A P P R E C I A T E S

*

UN

ROLLERS

W A T E R

more than those people who having sanitary appliances in their houses find their water supply uncertain. If they had a

Rider z Ericsson Hot Air Pumping Engine certainty would take the place of uncertainty. Catalogue

"Q"

on

application

to nearest

office.

RlDER=ERICSSON E N G I N E CO. 22 Cortlandt Street, New York. 86 Lake St., Chicago. 40 N . 7th St., P h i l .

239 and 241 Franklin St., Boston.*

22a, Pitt S t . , S y d n e y , N . S. W . Dr.

692 Craig St., Montreal, P . Q.

O . P. D I L L O N writes:

Rushville, Ind., March 23, 1899. " Other agents tried to influence me but six years with

on my house is good enough forme. So here is my order again." Send f o r s a m p l e b o a r d s a n d c o l o r p l a t e s t o 55

EDGAR A MATHEWS, Architect, San Francisco.

anD 57 JBroao Street, JBoston,

m a s s .

The followingfirmsact as our Agents: H. M. Hooker Co., 57 W . Randolph St. Chicago," 111. ; W. S. Hueston, 45 Clfff Street, New York • W . W . Lawrence & Co. Pittsburgh, Pa, ; Smith & Young, San Francisco, Cal: The L.J. Mattison Co., Cleve­ land Ohio • Henry Seim & Co., Baltimore, Md. ; Gerald Lomcr, Montreal, Can. Curtis & Bartlett Co., Lincoln, Neb.; Porter & Viall, Rochester, N. \ .; Samuel Bettle Jr., 5H Wah.ut Street, Philadelphia, Pa.

P l e a s e m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u w r i t e to 6l

advertisers.


Mc CL

URE'S

MA

GAZ1NE.

H A S BUILT T H I S S E A S H O R E C O T T A G E

T h o R i i i l r l i n o - n f I t " 128-page b o o k , i l l u s t r a t e d ; ec• 11C U U I l u m g w a b l i n g y o u to s u p e r v i s e the erection of your o w n h o m e ; to r e c o g n i z e a n d r e m e d y f a u l t y work. Language simple, technical terms avoided. A perfect guide $1.00

out an i n f e r i o r design when, by a wise selection o f v o u r a r c h i t e c t , y o u c a n g e t , a t t h e s a m e c o s t , t h e a r t i s t i c t o u c h t h a t w i l l double the value o f y o u r p r o p e r t y . M P o r c n m l A t t e n t i o n r e s e r v e d f o r speaal studies o f m y K e r S O n a i A l i e i l U U I I bright, original and attractive h o m e s , i n c o r p o r a t i n g y o u r own original ideas a s keynote o f t h e d e s i g n .

4

k ^ i t h ' c H n m * » = R l l i l d e r m a g a z i n e illustratingmont),;, i s . e i x n i» n o m e - D u i i u c r a m p i e s o f Moderate Cost Homes, e t c . A l l n e w s s t a n d s , l l l c c o p y . Y r . , $ L 0 a

v

M Y LATEST BOOKS OF PLANS,

T I M E S

G i v i n g V i e w s , Sizes, Costs, Descriptions, E t c . , are: 6 8 Studies of S u m . Cottages. . $ . 6 0 25 Hrlck & < i.nili'u H o u s e s . . . . . 5 0 17 P r a c t i c a l Stables 50 10 H»del Schoolhouseg 1.00 23 M o d e r n Churches . . 2.00 50 Cottages, less than $ S 0 0 . .50 62 Costing $ H 0 O to $ 1 2 0 0 . . .50 70 C o s t i n g $ 1 2 0 0 to $ 1 6 0 0 . . .50 114 " $ 1 6 0 0 to $ 2 0 0 0 . 1.00 126 " $ 2 0 0 0 to $ 2 5 0 0 . . 1.00 110 " $ 2 5 0 0 to $ 3 0 0 0 . 1.00 106 " $ 3 0 0 0 to $ 4 0 0 0 . . 1.00 80 " $ 4 0 0 0 & u p w a r d . 1.00 100 m o s t l y $ 1 5 0 0 to $ 3 5 0 0 . . 1.00 SUPERVISION W H E N

O F

T H I S

500

t

IS

T H E

$ 2 0 0 0

H

O

S

E

T I M E S

t i m e s a n d is o n l y o n e o f o v e r 500 s t u d ­ ies o f Moderate Cost H o m e s found i n m y books.

Published i n the M a r c h , '97, Ladies' Home Jour­ nal. I t h a s b e e n built o v e r 5 0 0

t l l e

fafe8(

a

n

(

1

b

e

s

t

e

i

2 5 p l a t e s , s h o w i n g h o w to emb e l f i s h s m a l l s u b u r b a n lots i n a n e c o n o m i c a l , a r t i s t i c a n d ef­ f e c t i v e m a n n e r , w i t h f u l l de­ s c r i p t i o n s a n d suggestions, $ 1 .

PORTABLE HOUSES

208

K E I T H — A r c h i t e c t .

Lumber

Exch.,

Minneapolis, Minn.

ACETYLENE

Ask your Decorator for

" A B R I L L I A N T AND FASCINATING LIGHT."

RICHARD E . T H I B A U T ' S 2 0 t h

f

^ | O C for a 3room ^ I 0 « f P o r t a b l e H o u s e , a l l p u t t o g e t h e r i n sec­ t i o n s r e a d y to erect. T h o r o u g h l y w e a t h e r proof 1 Painted i n and out! Floor, 8 bunks. P o r c h , 6 ^ x 1 6 fee;. " W e i g h t a b o u t 5000 l b s . Complete W o r k i n g Drawings Details, usual construction, $ 3 .

W O R K

J .

o

O n l y

DESIRED.

W A L T E R

n

"QUARTER-ACRE POSSIBILITIES."

500 U

e

T h i s is a p o r t a b l e H O U S E L A M P with automatic pressure regulator. A p r a c t i c a l , d u r a b l e a n d attractive acetylene l a m p — n o odor. E a s y to fill a n d c l e a n . F o r full particulars s e n d f o r d e s c r i p t i v e c i r c u l a r a n d half­ tone engraving;. P r i c e , complete with s h a d e w i t h f u l l d i r e c t i o n s for using, $7.50 C h i c a g o d e l i v e r y .

Century

WALL PAPERS

A G E N T S

W A N T E D .

A L L E N WINCH, 606 Boylston Building:,

000 artistic designs in the newest colorings to select from. It will pay you to look at our sam­ ples before you buy. Prices range from 5c, 6c, 7c. and up to 40c. per roll. A

Representative

our Wall

Papers

are

not

from large sample books.

W a n t e d handled

in every town

C H I C A G O ,

OLD FLOORS M A D E NEW

where

The only preparation made that will suc­ cessfully fill cracks in shrunken floors and produce a wearing condition as good as new.

to sell on c o m m i s s i o n

W r i t e for Particulars.

GRIPPING Wood, CrackknbGrevice

Established for over 2 0 Years. RICHARD

E.

THIBAUT

48-50-52 E . 13th Street, near Broadway

N E W YORK The Largest Wall Paper House in the World

Please

mention

I L L .

&ASTICJDHE.SWC

• H • •

McClure's when

62

Filler

A non-shrinkable, tough, elasticfiller,that will not crack and make old floors air-tight, water and ver­ min proof. EASILY APPLIED. Send for booklet telling all about it.

GRIPPIN M F G . N e w a r k , y o u w r i t e to

advertisers.

N e w

CO.,

York.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Hammar's House Painting Styles f.rl900 W e

will place o n t h e m a r k e t

These tints c o m b i n e w i t h surroundings of to

b e a u t i f u l effect,

the h o u s e — k n o w n b y t h e artist

created a d e p a r t m e n t , attention

for 1900 a line of stylish a n d entirely n e w tints for use i n house

the most

g u i d i n g

house, a n d a p p l y i n g

i n charge y o u a n d

the paint

of a

your

talented painter

W e

will

y o u r cost

capital

m a k e

y o u the

house,

y o u less b e h i n d

our

c l a i m s are

we

say or not.

a

t h a n

a n y other

g u a r a n t e e

n o t

p r o v e n .

T h e r e

business

H a m m a r

the

is

that A

too

it

m u c h

at

be

g r o u n d " a n d

selection

of

painter, color

used the

without

painting.

reference

" p e r s p e c t i v e . "

w h o will devote

to

W e

their

the have

exclusive

c o m b i n a t i o n s t o fit y o u r

individual

Paint p r o p o s i t i o n :

l e a d

will

g l a n c e

c a n

results.

P a i n t to y o u at paint,

colors

artist a n d a master i n

to get the best

f o l l o w i n g

f u r n i s h

n o

as the " b a c k

H a m m a r for

b u t

a n d o i l , or

last

five

D u n

nonsense

W e

will

g i v e y o u a n exclusive,

$1.25 p e r g a l l o n

o r

any

other

y e a r s — k e e p B r a d s t r e e t

a b o u t

paint,

( w h e n

materials,

y o u r will

a n d

m o n e y

s h o w

w e

are

stylish

m i x e d ) , g u a r a n t e e

y o u

color that

p l a n

its

a n d p u t o u r $200,000 i n trust

to return

w h e t h e r

g o i n g

to

w e

to y o u i f

c a n d o

e x p l o d e

use c a s h

s o m e

w h a t o f

W r i t e full Information about the house y o umean to paint—size, location, style o f architecture, p r o x i m i t y to other houses a n d foliage—on a h i l l o r the level—(send photo, i f possible), a n d we w i l l send y o u a n u m b e r of beautifully colored reproductions o f similar houses painted w i t h o u r n e w line of stylish tints a n d a copy of o u r guarantee. W e w i l l a l s o i n c l o s e b l a n k s f o r f u r t h e r i n f o r m a t i o n , o n t h e r e c e i p t o f w h i c h w e w i l l s u g g e s t a n exclusive c o l o r p l a n for y o u r house F R E E O F C H A R G E , w i t h e s t i m a t e o f c o s t o f p a i n t i n g .

Don't write unless you mean to paint.

F. HAMMAR PAINT COMPANY, 1221 Spruce St., ST. LOUIS, MO.

THE ANGLE LAMP "The light t h a i never fa i b " is o f f e r e d t o y o u o n a b a s i s w h e r e a t r i a l w i i n v o l v e a b s o l u t e l y n o r i s k , It m a k e s g o o d every c l a i m w e advance o r y o u c a n h a v e y o u r m o n e y b a c k . W h i l e <o u r c l a i m s a r e n o t m o d e s t , they are true. W e s i m p l y s a y that it is a b s o l u t e l y s u p e r i o r t o e v e r y o t h e r l a m p e v e r m a d e o r s o l d , a n d a- p~e r. f^e cw t substitute for gas or electricitv substitute for gas or electricitv. While m o r e b r i l l i a n t t h a n e i t h e r , iitt n e v e r s m o k e s , s m e l l s , o r g i v e s a n y t r o u b' l'e , i s l i g h t e d a n d e x t i n g u i s h e d as e a s iliy a s g a s , m a y be filled w h i l e l i g h t e d a n d w i t h o u t b e i n g m o v e d , a n d b u r n s b u t K

EIGHTEEN

CENTS

w o r t h o f o i l a m o n t h , a n e c o n o m y w h i c h soon m a k e s up the entire investment. I t i s a b s o l u t e l y safe u n d e r a l l c o n d i t i o n s , w h i c h m a k e s it d i s t i n c t l y u n l i k e acetylene, gasolene a n d some o t h e r n e w m e t h o d s that are hie-hlv explosive a n d have other most objectionable features. H a v i n g the unique advantage

" NO-UNDER-SHADOW " all the l i g h t falls d i r e c t l y d o w n w a r d a n d o u t w a r d just w h e r e needed. T h o u s a n d s are i n use in homes s t o r e s , offices, c h u r c h e s , h a l l s , f a c t o r i e s , e t c . , a n d l a s t y e a r w e r e c e i v e d o v e r o n e t h o u s a n d l e t t e r s ' c o n t a i n i n g the strongest praise. If the i l l u m i n a t i o n y o u are n o w u s i n g does not suit y o u i n every p a r t i c u l a r , w e c a n g i v e you s o m e t h i n g that w i l l . A s k for o u r c a t a l o g u e D s h o w i n g a l l styles from SiSoup T H E A N G L E IjA'THP 76 P a r k P l a c e , N e w Y o r k C i t y

A

CO.,

Byron K. Whitney, B uAt t e ,F MEoWn t a n La , EwTr iTt eEs R: —S Y: o u r l a m p is e m i n e n t l y satisfactory i e v e r y respect a n d e x a c t l y as r e p r e s e n t e d b y y o u . I t a k e great pleasure i n r e c o m m e n d i n g it.

L.A nO . PETERSON, K e n s e t , l a . , w r i t e s :— A f t e r a y e a r ' s t r i a l o f the g l e L a m p I have found it so perfect i n a l l respects that I w i s h to purchase a n o t h e r o n e .

I" AUSTIN HEftLY S C O N . V Please mention M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to advertisers. 6

3

it.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

" A Home After Your Own Heart"

iteiy Expands Chest, strengthens Lungs, Develops Bust, takes that stoop out of shoulders, brings perfect p h y s i c a l development.

TOT E v e r y Member.

T h e W h l t e l y is r e c o g n i z e d as t h e standard exercis­ i n g a p p a r a t u s o*: the W o r l d — over h a l f a m i 11 i o n u s e r s attest its worth. Recommended by physicians every­ where. O u r new styles greatly i m ­ proved i n construc­ tion and finish; light,co in pact, dur­ able, noiseless..

Do you want to know how a modern house should be built containing all the advantages of superior construction and elegancy of finish? Our new book-. " JIODKR.K H O M K S , " show many different plans for all kind^ of houses; no two alike. Each house has distinctive features and perfect floor plans. Views of exteriors, ideas of exquisite interior effects and exact guaranteed i ost. S E N D F O R T H E M . We prepare special plans frori your own ideas for any kind of a building you may desire, at any cost and have a large corps of experts at our different offices so as to give complete architectural service including superintendence in anv direction. We can please you. Write for our books to-day. " M O D E R N H O M E S ' " one book for $1.00; two for $1.50; three for $2.00.

C a n be a t t a c h e d t o d o o r o r w a l l without tools. M a d e In four grade*— *3, $S, #4 m i d #5. Each Exerciser Guaran­ teed. Money refunded if f o u n d u n s a t i s f a c t o r y . W e t a k e a l l chances of pleasing y o u . b u y s t h a t g r e a t 50c book, ''Physical E d u c a t i o n , " by P r o f . A n d e r s o n , o f Y a l e , 125th thousand. O u r n e w A r t C a t a l o g free. I

V

;

L

W H I T E L Y E X E R C I S E R CO.,154 L a k e S t . , C h i c a g o .

Century Architectural Company

t

Main

Don't imagine

all

Some

alike.

cause look

first, b u t not

the

at

first

faulty

that

Manufacturers of

GRAND

be­

could

less

we

can

satisfy

y o u on this

we

ask

that

reasonable and

our

floors

may

ever

afford to do this

our

care.

brushes

order. these

not

for

W e will things

Catalogue

if

work

they serving as Models to the entire Piano-making in­ dustry, the Steinway system having been copied and adopted by almost every piano-maker. They are pre­ eminently the best instruments at present made ; ex­ ported to and sold in all art centers of the world, and preferred for private and public use by the greatest living artists and scientists.

W e

point.

the

floors

W e

furnish

:knowledged

T H E STANDARD PIANOS OF THE WORLD,

un­

well.

keeping

UPRIGHT

The Steinway Pianos are universe to be

material or w o r k ­

W e

A N D

P I A N O S

to

honest­

m a n s h i p , a n d o u r g u a r a n t e e is g o o d .

is

0.

Others

t h e y are

all defects

did

Bldg., CLEVELAND,

look

give out

made.

W e guarantee

from

Trust

S T E I N W A Y

contrary. Some

and continue

because

ly made. against

soon

honestly

well

look well

arise

Quite

never look well.

w e l l at

807 A m e r i c a n

that

HARDWOOD FLOORS are

Office:

All have wax

floors

tell

you

all

you

will

write

Illustrated

in

Catalogues mailed free on application.

about us.

S T E I N W A Y

free.

&

S O N S ,

Warerooms: Steinway Hall, 107-109 E. 14th St.

W O O D - M O S A I C CO., Rochester, N . Y .

NEW

Please mention .McClure's w h e n y o u write to advertisers.

64

YORK.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

wM I d e a l , g a s B r o i l e r & t o a s t e r . For Broiling and Toasting to Perfection

M a j e s t i c Combination

Range,

For Natural or Fuel Gas and Hard or Soft Coal or Wood. New Brighton, Pa., A u g . 23, 1899. A T D E P A R T M E N T S T O R E S »•><* H O U S E F U R N I S H E R S or T K l i G A S S T O V E UTENSIL CO. J3 J M C R R A T S T . i w Y o r h

Gentlemen :—Pennsylvania gas R a n g e w o r k tog-ether lessened. T h e broiler, toaster a n d T h e cooking and pleasure to o n e u s i n g the r a n g e .

tion

a n d the Majestic C o m b i n a ­ G a s bills are m a t e r i a l l y baker all give are d o n e i n a w a y w h i c h is Yours truly,

perfectly.

water heating

fine results. a

Abkam Bentley.

W e have Others as Perfect This is a cut of our No. 247 fitted with our patent pin extension mal­ leable iron water front, the most powerful made. This range is ex­ actly the same as the coal section of the Combination Range—will do as perfect and economical work.

MAJESTIC RANGES are entirely distinct from all other cooking appar­ atus—made of malleable iron and wrought steel, 10% to $0% heavier than used in any other range, and flues lined with pure asbestos board. OUT B o o k l e t

A

" Model Kitchen," sent free. Half

t h e b a d c o o k i n g is t h e f a u l t o f d e f e c t i v e flue a n d r a n g e a r r a n g e m e n t . T h i s b o o k l e t tells " H o w a K i t c h e n S h o u l d be A r r a n g e d " to g e t t h e best c o o k i n g results from a n y range, a n d tells a l l about M A J E S T I C R A N G E S . Postal brings it.

MAJESTIC MANUFACTURING COMPANY 2020 Morgan Street, St. Louis, Mo. New York Salesroom, 45 Cliff Street. Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 65


McOLVRE'S

MAGAZINE.

That S u m m e r Cottage which you will build next Spring, calls for the soft, artistic colors of

Cabot's Creosote Shingle Stains to make it harmonize with the landscape. They are 50 per cent, cheaper than paint, and 100 per cent, hand­ somer ; and they've proved their practical value, in eighteen years' use, from Bar Harbor to San Diego. Samples of Stained W o o d , with color-chart of sixteen combinations,

henry 1'astun Clakk.

s e n t free o n r e q u e s t .

A r a . i t e u , liu3u.11.

S A M U E L C A B O T , Sole Manufacturer, 68 Kilby Street, Boston, Mass. CABOT'S SHEATHING QUILT—the house warmer.

j

r..i—

y

^

A

T H E RIGHT MANTEL

\ (

In the right place i m p a r t s a t o u c h o f ( l u x u r y to t h e h o m e t h a t f u r n i t u r e w i l l not s u p p l y . T h e m a n t e l of w o o d ' s t a n d s first i n a r t i s t i c v a l u e — b e c a u s e , o f i t s p e r f e c t . a d a p t a t i o n to t h e c h a r ­ acter a n d color of any surroundings. It r e p r e s e n t s t h e g r e a t e s t beauty ; the m o s t s a t i s f a c t i o n at t h e least ( c o s t . It is n o m o r e o f a l u x u r y t h a n . any other a r t i c l e of furniture, if y o u buy it d i r e c t f r o m t h e m a r k e r . S e n d f o r c a t a l o g u e i l l u s t r a t i n g the 1 most desirable designs at the most < ^ r e m a r k a b l e prices. W E P R E P A Y " F R E I G H T t o a l l p o i n t s e a s t o f the M i s s i s s i p p i River and north" of S o u t h C a r o l i n a .

B A T H

Agents a h Over the Country.

F O R 2 C E N T S Is Furnished by the

Victor

Instantaneous

Water

Heater

w h i c h occupies but lit­ tle r o o m ; is r e a d y for use n i g h t o r d a y ; f u r n ­ ishes hot water i n s t a n t l y for b a t h i n g , s h a v i n g , sickness a n d all domes­ tic purposes w h e n hot w a t e r is r e q u i r e d . Gas or Gasoline. A s k your dealers for it, o r s e n d f o r free catalogue. W. J. ADAM, JOLIET, ILL.

A L C O T T , R O S S dt S C U L L Y C O , , 2 9 1 7 N , B r o a d S t , , P h i l a , , P a ,

Pierce Vapor

Launches

Safe, Reliable and Guaranteed. No Fire. No Government Inspection. Send for Catalogue. PIERCE ENGINE CO., Box 8, Racine Jct.,Wis.

CAN'T WE DO BUSINESS TOGETHER? TOXJ W A N T A N A U T I S T I C H O U S E A T E I T T E E E X P E N S E . I design these a n d want to m a k e y o u r p l a n s . Beauty i n a house does not m e a n e x p e n s e : it means that it has been c o r r e c t l y d e s i g n e d a n d p l a n n e d . M a n y an artistic a n d picturesque home has costless than s o m e architectural horror. G e t m y b o o k s a n d see what I m e a n , a n d what m y clients say about m y houses, a n d t h e n you w i l l want me to m a k e y o u r p l a n s . 1*1 < T 1 R K S Q l ' K C O T T A G E S , 57 D e s i g n s for houses from j w o to 52.SCO. B y m a i l , 50 cts, P I C T T R K S Q l ' E I I O l ' S K S ( N e w ) , D e s i g n s for houses from $2,500 to Sis.ooo. B y mail, $1. P I C T U R E S Q U E S U M M E R C O T T A G E S , c o n t a i n i n g D e s i g n s for Summer Homes, C a m p s , L o g C a b i n s , C l u b a n d R o a d H o u s e s . T h e best b o o k o f the k i n d ever published. By m a i l , $1. S p e c i a l d e s i g n s a n d sketches made to order. E . E . 1 I O E M A X , A r c h i t e c t , 1 0 3 0 C h e s t n u t St., P h i l a d e l p h i a , P a .

A HOME-LIKE BEAUTIFUL HOUSE See i n t e r i o r . H o w c o n v e n i e n t ! Costs n o w to b u i l d it from # 8 . 5 0 0 to # 8 , 8 0 0 ( d e p e n d i n g o n l o c a t i o n ) , m o d e r n p l u m b i n g and h a r d w o o d finish. F u l l c e l l a r . Y o u find this d e s i g n i n B o o k N o . I S that is f u l l of n e w up-to-date D e s i g n s . D o n ' t f a l l to see it it y o u I n t e n d b u i l d i n g a h o u s e c o s t i n g o v e r # 3 , 0 0 0 . Send 2-cent stamp for figured floor p i hum o f this d e s i g n i f interested. S e n d m e a n y s k e t c h t d e n of y o u r o w n a n d I w i l l s c a l e i t u p into practical shape, g i v i n g a l l the u p - t o - d a t e new tilings. S e e l i s t o f five other classified h o o k s full o f gr o 1 t h i n g s . Select books ac­ c o r d i n g to cost o f house d e s i r e d . R e m e m ­ ber N o . 13. B o o k N o . 6 has 5 6 designs from # 3 5 0 to # 1 , 5 0 0 B o o k N o . 7 has 5 * designs from # 1 , 0 0 0 to # 3 , 5 0 0 B o o k N o . 8 has 5 4 d e s i g n s from $ 2 , 4 1 0 0 to # 8 . 5 0 0 B o o k N o . 1» has 8 0 (12 stables) designs # S , 4 » 0 0 to # 1 0 , 0 0 0 B o o k N o . 1 0 has 8 ? (20 nne-story) ^ # 4 5 0 to # 8 , 0 0 0 B o o k N o . 1 3 has 4 5 ( C o l o n i a l New '00) Second E d i t i o n # 1 , 3 0 0 to # 5 , 0 0 0 V i e w s , p l a n s , d e s c r i p t i o n s , dimensions, es­ t i m a t e s , w i t h m o d i f i c a t i o n s to each. Price, H o w to Start R i g h t a n d Save Money," 25 ' A

1ST. FLOOR

c t s

#1 e a c h ; a n y two, # 1 . 5 0 : anv four, $ 3 ; a n y five, # 3 . ill s i x , $ 8 . B o o k l e t o f 30 s a m p l e d e s i g n s , ( s i l v e r ) . B o o k l e t a n d 55 other d e s i g n s , 50 cts., a l l p o s t p a i d . S. H O P K I N S , A r c h i t e c t , 7 4 M o n r o e S t . , G r a n d R a p i d s , M i c h , P l e a s e m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u w r i t e to a d v e r t i s e r s .

66


McCLURETS

MAGAZINE.

The above picture taken from life shows the BERRY BROTHERS' TOY WAGON in use. ASK YOUR DEALER IN PAINTS AND VARNISHES ABOUT IT OR DROP US A LINE AND WE WILL MAIL YOU COPY OF ABOVE PICTURE AND PARTICULARS. New YokK, 252 Pearl St. Chicago, 15 and 17 Lake St. Boston, 520 Atlantic Ave. Cincinnati, 304 Main St. Philadelphia, 26 and 28 N. Fourth St. St. Louis, 704 N. Fourth St. Baltimore, 22 E. Lombard St. San Francisco, 117 and nq Market St.

B E R R Y

B R O T H E R S ,

L i m i t e d ,

Varnish

Manufacturers,

DETROIT, MICH.

In plain or ornamental designs. Send for catalogue telling all about them to P H E L P S B R O S . & C O . , W e l l i n g t o n , O.

Game of

Flowers.

YOUR FAGE ON A BUTTON

A good game for a l l w h o like games a n d an unusually attractive game for all •who l o v e f l o w e r s — f o r e v e r y b o d y . It b r i n g s the breath of the g a r d e n to the fireside o n Winter afternoons a n d evenings. C a n be p l a y e d b y any number. XA/t± C o n d C » o o a h a n d s o m e b o o k l e t in VVe S e n u r r e e c o l o r s a n d C o u p o n R o o d f o r 10 c e n t s in p a r t p a y m e n t for s a m p l e g a m e at y o u r dealers.

For 10c. Coin* S e n d p h o t o (cabinet preferred) a n d receive p o s t - p a i d , p i n - b a c k C e l l u ­ l o i d Medallion-with y o u r Photo on game. T h i s l o w p r i c e g i v e n to i n ­ troduce goods. Photos returned. FUFF. S e n d five orders w i t h 5 0 c t s . c o i n a n d w e w i l l set one 0* t h e m i u h a n d s o m e , easel b a c k , metal f r a m e . A g e n t s "Wanted. IT. A. TATWITH & CO. 149 Devonshire &t. Hoston,

The Fireside Game Co., Dept. D, Cincinnati,O.

t

«_

THROUGH TOURIST SLEEPING C A R S B E R T H

T O LEAVE

C A L I F O R N I A CHICAGO

EVERY

EMJPAY

NIGHT

VIA

4

R A T E

O O CHICAG0.M1LWAUKEE & S T . P A U L R Y . Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 67


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Enamel your w o o d w o r k and doors with

'Keats t

h

Enamel=

e

G

e

n

u

i

n

e

Y o u c a n d o it y o u r s e l f , u s i n g s p a r e t i m e . Y o u h a v e a c h o i c e o f b e a u t i f u l t i n t s â&#x20AC;&#x201D; B r i l l i a n t B l u e , I v o r y , C r e a m , W i l d R o s e , G r e e n , a n d m a n y m o r e , a s y o u w i l l see by c o l o r c a r d . T h e r e is n o t n i n g n o r e s t y l i s h t h a n e n a m e l e d w o o d w o r k ; n o t h i n g e a s i e r to c l e a n . It n o t at y o u r d e a l e r ' s , w r i t e us. D e p a r t m e n t " D , " A C M E W I I I T E L E A D <fe C O L O R W O R K S , D e t r o i t , M i c h . 'ENAMELS AND ENAMELING" O U R B O O K L E T , w i t h s a m p l e s o f colors, etc.. S E N T F R E E .

r d

h

2 3- ST., & 6'- AVE., NEW YORK. J49.I50 MICHIGAN AVE. CHICAGO. W H A T you selling y o u r

/V

s a m p l e

A r t i s t i c M a d e of O r n a m e n t a l

1

E a s i l y

Economy is t h e r o a d to wealth."

T h e far

N o as

Y o u

it

can will

w a n t

to-day.

our

find

free

M o u n d W i l l

cannot

furnish t h e m .

City

y o u

friend

booklet,

City

only.

Mound

tell

a

F l o o r

Mass.

where

Paint

get

every dollar City

sold

Co.,

St.

be

to

if y o u r

as

Paint.

W r i t e best

C l e a r

go

Floor

b y

our goods

Address, D e p a r t m e n t

& Color

will

a n d

Kept

" H o w to P a i n t . "

to

represent

can equal our line or H a l f

particulars.

Painted

to m a k e

is

dealer

W r i t e

i n M o u n d

Paint

b o o k s ?

low.

t o w n

Easily

thrifty housewife w h o wants as

to

large

us

-

We carry the stock and pay the freight

Phila. & Boston Face Brick Co. Boston,

Paper our

c A f o capital required §Ko experience necessary

Red B r i c k

Square,

pay than

i n e v e r y t o w n

T h i s pretty design combines simple richness with small cost. O u r mantels are the newest a n d best. O u r customers s a y so. T h e y d o n ' t cost a n y m o r e t h a n o t h e r k i n d s , a n d c a n be e a s i l y set b y l o c a l b r i c k - m a s o n s . W e have Colonial, Elizabethan, Empire, Renaissance, O l d Vienna, and other styles. W h e n you build or remodel s e n d f o r S k e t c h B o o k o f 59 d e s i g n s o f m a n t e l s c o s t i n g f r o m $12 u p .

212 L i b e r t y

W a l l

f r o m

We W a n t t o An Agent

$ 2 6

M a n t e l

neighbors

will

better

for

it

dealers dealer

A ,

Louis,

Mo.

P l e a s e m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n v o u w r i t e to a d v e r t i s e r s .

68

o u r

the

houses

repapered nearest

sell

in

your

this

year.

store

for


McGLUBE'S

MAGAZINE.

T h e W a t c h Case Atomize* A n Atomizerfor

spraying t h e nose and throat which

Made entirely of hard rubber and easily cleaned and kept aseptic.

can be carried i n the vest

pocket.

Suited for apply­ ing all

standard

s p r a y i n g fluids f o r nasal a n d laryngeal affec­ tions, and re­ com­ mended by phy­ sicians, for use with

F O O L

special reme­ dies

T

pre­ scribed

H

F

S k i l l y

by them.

Style Style

It's a rare paint that fools t h e s u n; h e h a s n o mercy fort h e dishonest kinds, a n d n o c o m m o n paint escapes h i s ravages. There i so n e paint t h a t f o o l s h i m . I t i s P a t t o n ' s Sun Proof P a i n t . T h i s paint effectually preserves y o u r b u i l d i n g s from decay, a n d i s its o w n protection against sun a n dstorm. T h emakers of

No. 10 ( f i n e s p r a y ) to b e u s e d f o r t h i n fluids. Mo. 11 ( c o a r s e s p r a y ) f o r t h i c k fluids o r o i l s .

S u p p l i e d b y y o u r d r u g g i s t at f » 0 c e n t s each, or m a i l e d d i r e c t o n receipt o f abuvo _ . . i o - i . t . AMERICAN HARD RUBBER C O . ,

13 M e r c e r S t . , New Y o r k .

T h i s beats W i n d , S t e a m , o r H o r s e P o w e r . W e offer the W E B S T E R 2% a c t u a l horse power G A S S U N T O I UNTIE for $ 1 5 0 , less 10 p e r cent, d i s c o u n t for c a s h . B u i l t on i n t e r c h a n g e a b l e p l a n . B u i l t o f best m a t e r i a l . M a d e i n lots o f 100, therefore we c a n m a k e t h e p r i c e . B o x e d for s h i p m e n t , w e i g h t 800 l b s . M a d e for G a s o r G a s o l i n e . A l s o H o r i z o n t a l E n g i n e s , 4 to 30 h . p .

PATTON'S Sun Proof

W E U S T E I t M F G . C O . , 1 0 8 1 W e s t 15til S t . ,Chicago. E a s t e r n B r a n c h : 38-D D e y Street, N e w Y o r k C i t y . Southern A g e n t s : Roland & G s c h w i n d C o . , L t d . So. Peter a n d Lafayette Sts., N e w Orleans, L a .

EXTERIORSand|ntERIORS

g u a r a n t e e i tf o r five full y e a r s — o t h e r r e c k o n e d g o o d that last three.

o f

1

'ft oMELHtf homes ' Rice's PortfoliO"PlansforI90o I

- P R I C E

O

N

Paint paints are

Practical knowledge o f paint a n d painting, indispensable to the property owner, m a y be gained from o u r book w h i c h , w i t h a model t h a t m a k e s s e l e c t i o n o f colors easy, i s sent free.

E D O L L A R -

J a s . E . P a t t o n C o . , 215 L a k e S t . , M i l w a u k e e , W i s .

lSketch Book, showing large NUMBER

1

OF S A M P L E V I E W S * " " PLANS

TWENTY F l V E

CENTS.

Josiah L.Rice. Architect. Dept. L. Clinton,Iowa.

Artistic monuments

• • • •

COST P L A I N

N OM O R E ONES

T H A N

IN

WHITE

BRONZE

M a r b l e i sentirely out o f date. Granite soon gets moss-grown, discolored, requires con­ stant expense a n d care, a n d eventually crumbles back t o M o t h e r E a r t h . Besides, it is very expensive.

....WHITE BRONZE.... is strictly e v e r l a s t i n g . I t c a n n o t c r u m b l e w i t h t h e a c t i o n o f frost. Moss-growth is a n i m p o s s i b i l i t y . I t i s m o r e a r t i s t i c t h a n a n y stone. T h e n w h y not investigate it ? I t h a s been a d o p t e d f o r n e a r l y o n e h u n d r e d p u b l i c m o n u m e n t s , a n d b y thousands o f delighted customers i na l l parts o f the country. I t h a s been o n t h e m a r k e t over t w e n t y years a n d is a n established success. W e have designs from $4.00 t o $4,000.00. W r i t e a t o n c e f o r f r e e d e s i g n s a n d i n f o r m a t i o n . It puts y o u under no obligations. W e deal direct a n d deliver everywhere. Special induce­ m e n t s offered f o r w i n t e r o r d e r s t o be d e l i v e r e d i n t h e s p r i n g . T H E

M O N U M E N T A L

B R O N Z E

C O . ,

Please

mention

354

H o w a r d

M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write t o advertisers.

69

A v e n u e ,

Bridgeport,

C o n n ,


McCLUIiE'S

P0Cket

Electric 1 0 0 , 0 0 0 the

now

in

use,

U n i t e d States A r m y and

wires

to

order, spill,

get

out

danger

N

=}

F o r '

or continuous

Practical, useful, mail,

Navy.

s '

even

a m o n g explosives. flash

includes

o f -

no chemicals to no

Light

Search which

MAGAZINE.

light.

A

child

economical.

can

Price,

operate

it.

complete,

by

$ 3 . 3 0 .

Lionel Photographer's Flash Light. Portable, Simple, Substantial, Neat. Only

7

inches

long

closed, weighs but can

be

made is

for

use

The

ignited

battery

(Closed)

when ounces,

carried in pocket ready

ment's notice. der

io at

and

a

mo足

flash

pow足

by spark

from

inside

the

handle.

S i m p l y press the button

when

r e a d y .

Free.

Particulars

Agents Wanted. in

U . S.,

JAMES

$ 2 . 7 5 ,

S.

G E N E R A L

Price, complete, by postage

BARRON E L E C T R I C A L

c;ule M a n u f a c t u r e r s

mail

paid.

& CO.,

Jones Furniture

24*30 Hudson St., N e w

Co.

S y r a c u s e , N . T.

SUPPLIES

No/0/

York

A

Screw-Driver W i t h Four Interchangeable Blades of Different Sizes. Hollow B r a s s Handle. A Handy Pocket Tool. S e n t , p r e p a i d , o n r e c e i p t o f 75 c e n t s , SMITH & WESSON, 16 S t o c k b r i d g e S t . , S p r i n g f i e l d , M a s s

1 E v e r y

H e n

<

O w n e r

<

s h o u l d send at once for the largest and most profusely illustrated inenbator book ever printed. It contains descriptions and pictureB of the f u l l l i n e of

<

PRAIRIE S T A T E

i J

INCUBATORS

besides 50 colored plates and scores of i l l u s t r a t i o n s of p o u l t r y . p l a n t s , etc. F u l l of valuable i n f o r m a t i o n for a l l w h o raise, or i n t e n d to raise, p o u l t r y . Mai I'd free, P R A I R LB S T A T E I N C U B A T O R CO., H o m e r C i t y , P a .

THE PARIS EXPOSITION

<

1 1

Escorted parties; moderate prices; all expenses included. C h o i c e of sailings, routes, a n d rates. A l l L u r o p e a n countries visited. L o n g or short tours. G r a n d cruise this Summer to N o r w a y , the N o r t h C a p e , a n d the L a n d o f t h e M i d 足 night Sun. S e n d for b e a u t i f u l i l l u s t r a t e d p r o g r a m free, THE

E U R O P E A N 156

Fifth

TOURIST

Avenue, New

C O M P A N Y York

<

A GOOD B E D d e p e n d s u p o n a g o o d mattress. O f a l l mattress m a t e r i a l n o t h i n g has ever been f o u n d to e q u a l c u r l e d hair. The

R O S S HAIR M A T T R E S S at S S 1 5 , d e l i v e r e d ( m a d e i n t w o pieces u n l e s s p r e f e r r e d In one). V e r y elastic. C l e a n l y , lasting, sanitary. The maker of m i l l i o n s o f m a t t r e s s e s o f f e r s i t t o y o u d i r e c t f r o m h i s fac足 t o r y o n t h i r t y d a y . ' t r i a l o u y o u r b e d before acceptance, thus s a v i n g y o u two profits between m a k e r a n d you, and a l l o w i n g y o u to p r o v e its m e r i t s before purchase. T h e best hair mattiess in the world, for the price. S e n d for free book, " A G o o d B e d . " Address G E O R G E Q . R O S S , M a k e r , 56 E a s t

Prospect S t . , Cleveland, Ohio.

O v e r t w e n t y years In the m a t t r e s s m a k i n g P . e a s e m e n t i o n M c C I u r e ' s w h e n y o u w r i t e to 70

advertisers.

business.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

••©•••••••••••©•••••••••ft*©

T o a n y P e r s o n w h o i n t e n d s t o b u y nice f u r n i t u r e i t w i l l pay, a n d p a y w e l l , to s e n d f o r o u r c a t a l o g u e a n d i n v e s t i g a t e the p o s i t i v e a d v a n t a g e s o f b u y i n g " D i r e c t f r o m F a c t o r y a t Factory Prices."

I HARDWOOD MANTELS |

T h i s space is t o o s m a l l t o g i v e full details, b u t t h e f o l l o w i n g w i l l g i v e a n idea of t h e e x t r e m e l y l o w prices at which wesell strictly H I G H - G R A D E furniture.

J J x A

b u y s this restful T u r k i s h R o c k e r , N o . 677, from factory, sent " O n A p p r o v a l , " t o be re­ turned at our expense i f n o t positively the best leather r o c k e r ever sold at so low a p r i c e .

$29.50

COVKHKD w i t h best q u a l i t y machine-buffed G E N U I N E leath­ er. H a s g e n u i n e h a i r c u s h i o n s , tufted back, s p r i n g r o c k e r s , b a l l - b e a r i n g casters. C h o i maroon, o l i v e g r e e n , o r russet color leather. A t r e t a i l a s i m i l a r rocker costs $45 to $60.

$22.50

b u y s this beautifulhomedesk, d i r e c t from the factory, sent " O n A p p r o v a l , " to be r e t u r n e d at our expense i f not p o s i t i v e l y the best obtainable at so l o w a p r i c e . T H E I I K S W N o . t h i s d e s k is a l m o s t perfection for a " h o m e " d e s k . I t c o m b i n e s a l l the prac­ t i c a l features o f a r e g u l a r office d e s k — r o l l t o p , letter file, book s t a l l s , s l i d i n g arm-rest, p l e n t y o f drawers, pigeon holes,ball-bearing casters, etc.—and i n .1 way that is g r a c e f u l , a r t i s t i c , a n d full o f s t y l e . A t r e t a i l it w o u l d cost from $30 to

$45.

Write for our Catalogue No. E.

I THE FRED MACEY CO.

, G r a n d Rapids, M a k e r s of Office a n d L i b r a r y F u r n i t u r e

Mich.

It's a very simple matter to have your mantel, whate v e r its cost, i n the best o f taste a n d i n h a r m o n y w i t h its surroundings. T h i s is important, as p r o b a b l y the most attractive feature i n t h e r o o m is the mantel. Our s k i l l e d workmanship, artistic designs, best out-door seasoned woods ^a m o s t i m p o r ­ tant p o i n t , a s mantelsare sub­ ject to extremes of t e m p e r a t u r e ) , and o u r experi­ e n c e o f 64 y e a r s of manufactur­ ing, being the pioneer w o o d mantel builders in the U n i t e d States, e n a b l e u s t o o f f e r e.x c e p t i o n a l rc sources and ability to meet the wants of every C o m p l e t e Outfits, S"o to f^oo. pur­ S p e c i a l d e s i g n s at any p r i c e . chaser of W o o d

M a n t e l s ,

F i r e - p l a c e

G r a t e s ,

F i t t i n g s ,

G a s

a n d

W • J

o • •

• 5

T i l e s ,

L o g s ,

e t c .

We deal direct w i t h the consumer only, at lowest prices. O u rphotos a n d illustrations g l a d l y submitted on request, w i t h full particulars a n d prices quoted at your depot.

FURNITURE Our large stock includes great varieties o f newest, most artistic, a n d best-made furniture for H a l l , P a r ­ lor, D i n i n g - R o o m , C h a m b e r , L i b r a r y , e t c . L e t us k n o w y o u r r e q u i r e m e n t s a n d w e w i l l g l a d l y s u b m i t

i

T h e " U N I V E R S I T Y " is t h e n a m e o f t h i s , o n e o f o u r l a t ­ est R e c l i n i n g C h a i r s . It's a brain worker's chair. T h e back is a d j u s t a b l e . T h e a r m s lift u p a n d t u r n over, f o r m i n g shelves for w r i t i n g , h o l d i n g books, e t c . W e a l s o m a k e five o t h e r l i n e s o f R e c l i n i n g C h a i r s , t h e Regent, Columbine, Siesta, M a n h a t t a n and Oriental, meeting every d e m a n d of necessity or l u x u r y . O u r Catalogue C describes t h e m a l l . R o l l i n g C h a i r s . — W e m a k e o v e r 50 s t y l e s , a n d c a n f u r n i s h a suitable chair for a n y case. Catalogue B .

78 inches I o n ? . 30 inches deep, 34 inches h i g h . G e n u i n e M a h o g a n y , i n best L e a t h e r , f60 : as per c u t . G e n u i n e M a h o g a n y , i n good T a p e s t r y , S45. G e n u i n e M a h o g a n v . i n g o o d V e l o u r , S35. In Q u a r t e r e d O a k or I m i t a t i o n M a h o g a n y $5 less. illustrations a n d photos, q u o t i n g prices at y o u r depot. We sell d i r e c t t o t h e c o n s u m e r only. Corre­ spondence invited. Information freely g i v e n .

Sargent's Economic Sysiem of Devices for Brain Workers

T h e

is a l s o s o m e t h i n g w o r t h k n o w i n g a b o u t . It embraces Sar= g e n t ' s U n r i v a l e d R o t a r y B o o k Cases, R e a d i n g Stands, D i c ­ tionary, A t l a s a n d F o l i o ' H o l d e r s , A d j u s t a b l e R e a d i n g D e s k s attachable to chairs, e t c . C a t a l o g u e D . In w r i t i n g p a r t i c u l a r i z e . N o charge for catalogues.

GEO. F . S A R G E N T COMPANY, Please

R o b e r t

M i t c h e l l

Established^.

2 3 W . 4 t h St., Cincinnati,

0

mention

C o . ,

M A N U F A C T U R E R S ,

^ J^ ^"": t

F u r n i t u r e

K

McClure's when

71

y o u write to

advertisers.

i

i i 9

0.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

The Great Nations are

r e p r e s e n t e d

the

- -Si-

h o l d e r s

T h e

o f

a m o n g s t P o l i c i e s

i n

Prudential w h i c h

n u m b e r

o v e r

3,500,000 I n s u r i n g

$ 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 . 0 0 Life Insuranceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Both Sexes Ages 1 - 7 0 Amounts

$ 1 5

Write fcr

to

$ 1 0 0 , 0 0 0 .

Particulars

THE PRUDENTIAL INSURANCE C O . OF AMERICA J O H N F. D R Y D E N ,

Pres

Home

N . J.

Office,

Please

N E W A R K ,

m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u w r i t e to

72

advertisers.


McCLURE'S

tsJ&+ CvJjg» o^ca»

Cs*-*

MAGAZINE.

W M ^ " *

€)Jri*

9>±zZ+

*sJe>o

g i > 2 e

£

WONDERLAND 1900 1900

1804

inns I

I

I

G R E A T

I

C

I

I I I

I

I

1 H

E X P L O R A T I O N

O F

A

I

E

N

N E A R L Y

T

U

R

Y

A

O

° *

FORMS THE PRINCIPAL CHAPTER OF W O N D E R L A N D 1900. THE BOOK WILL BE READY SOON AFTER APRIL IV AND WILL BE SENT TO ANY ADDRESS ON RE­ CEIPT OF SIX CENTS. . ~ * ¥ r r * ILLUSTRATED FROM PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN SPECIALLY FOR THIS PUR­ POSE. CHAS.S.FEE. GEH.PASS. AGENT,ST.PAUL,MINN. r

i «<rj

•^r*

**r* Please mention McClure's

w h e n y o u w r i t e to advertisers. 73

*^r* **r*


McGLUBE'S

MAGAZINE.

E

v

f

m

s

o

i

T t l L

w

W a t c h '

S

o

THE of One one

Dollar

and

means

of

American. vising GENUINE

M A H O G A N Y R O C K E R

for

$7.50

in

making

from

express prepaid to Ohio and Mississippi rivers (other points pro­ portionately), to be returned at our expense if not suited. The C O L O N I A L F U R N I T U R E C O . ' S n a m e stands for E x c l u ­ sive Designs, Superior Flnlah, Perfect Workmanship. C h a i r * a n d T a b l c w o n l y , but they are the best in the market.

Mich.

it

is

American ingenuity,

marvelous

machinery,

a W a t c h

the

typically

for

de­ has

$1.00—a handsome

appearance a n d guaranteed to r u n

„ppfss R O B T . H , I N G E R 5 0 U L

Have no other.

Grand Rapid*,

Yankee us ;

Sold throughout the country by over 10,000 dealers or sent postpaia in U. S. and Canada for $1.00 by

factory

2 5 6 . IMyIhIoii S t r e e t ,

a

with

perfectly.

««« COLONIAL CHAItoRusSer—AND TABLES no middle men's profits—by direct

purely

real, accurate time-keeper,

Richly carved,finelyupholstered in silk damask, hand-rubbed and polished. We will send, free, our artistic catalogue, showing our com­ plete line of high-grade . . . wold

is

originated

made possible The above

IDEA

making- a W a t c h to sell for

Colonial Furniture Co.

DEPT. 74

8 BRD.

49.67 ( O R T L A N D T ST.New Y6RK.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

P H O T O ­ E N G R A V I N G If

y o u use half-tones,

zinc etchings, engravings will

w o o d cuts o f

o f any k i n d ,

it

pay y o u t o k n o w us

and have o u r new S p e c i m e n Book. W e are the f o r e m o s t photo-engravers

in Amer­

ica, j u d g e d b y v o l u m e o f business o r the character o f the concerns we w o r k f o r . Our our

strength

preparedness.

is i n We

have the capacity and t h e people t o handle

anything

i n t r u s t e d t o us, and i n a way t o t h r o w new l i g h t o n t h e matter o f service quality

and

of work.

If

y o u want

draw­

ings, designs, i l l u s t r a t i o n s for

any purpose there are

sixty A r t i s t s here at y o u r disposal. We

can furnish t h e

ideas, w r i t e , illustrate, make the plates, d o a l l the w o r k or

We tisements,

any part o f i t .

lead t h e c o u n t r y i n effective i l l u s t r a t i o n and engraving f o r C a t a l o g u e s , A d v e r ­ Books,

Newspapers,

Souvenir Editions, E t c .

W e have special facilities f o r

handling large orders o f r e p r o d u c t i o n w o r k .

BARNES-CROSBY P H O T O

ARTISTS

TIMES Southwestern

Branch —

Please

ELECTROTYPERS

ENGRAVERS

BUILDING,

610-611

Mermod

CHICAGO,

U . S. A .

& Jaccard

Building,

mention M c C l u r e ' s when y o u write to 75

CO.

St. Louis,

advertisers.

Missouri.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

California Has no Winter. T h e

season

o f

ice a n d of

s n o w

leafage

i n the

a n d

N o r t h

is

its

period

bloom.

T h e r e is no more delicious climate under heaven than that of California in F e b r u a r y . It heals the sick, refuges the delicate, restores the over-worked, and entrances the

T h e

Santa

F e

R o u t e

California,

is

the

shortest

line

the best

service

a n d affords

every

class o f General

pleasure-seeker.

Passenger

travelers. Office

The Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway C H I C A G O

Please

mention

M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to

76

advertisers.

to

Southern to


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Train Loads of People go

into

them

California

go

there

to

every day in

the

stay.

of

More

t h e y ' d t u r n n o r t h at S a c r a m e n t o Sacramento —with

railways

t h r o u g h its

entire

and

where

s o i l is

soil ; land don't

losses

the

the

fruit

districts

from

the

and

in

choose

the

statement blows ?

a

In

A l m o n d

T r e e

at

wide

running

Valley for

is

the

there

the

i r r i g a t i o n is

not and

reports

but

are

district.

their

don't

come

several

other

they're

all

different

Sen.

immense

Stanford

orchards

In

Valley

straw—do

about

the

for

you

and

fact, a b o u t

center,

and

way

This

the

wind

unquestionably is located

all

state,

fruit raising.

see w h i c h

best part of the S a c r a m e n t o V a l l e y , F i v e - Y e a r - O l d

miles

line

familiar with all sections of that

Sacramento is

if

great

fruit-crop failures,

Sacramento Valley.

Californians,

of

40

money,

There

Valley

planted

v i n e y a r d s i n the the

Valley.

California,

Hearst

and

cost m u c h , a n d

Sacramento

Sen.

make

business, such

Sacramento

and

steamboat

y o u hear about

fruit

from

most

waulti s t a y

a n d see the

Sacramento

fruit-growers

W h e n in

a

length.

place

needed.

City,

Valley—120 miles long

two

year, them

the

the

M a y w o o d

M a y w o o d Colony of

18,000 acres,

or

1800

ten-acre

fruit trees planted ; w i t h tween

1000

bought

and

land

in

living there

1100

residents.

M a y w o o d

yet.

If

farms ; with

154 miles of

1200

Colony,

360,000

avenues,

but

and

they're

have

not

all

they were, with their families,

the

population of the settlement w o u l d be about 6000. the n u m b e r of buyers g r o w s

every week.

where

acres

it w i l l

stop.

13,000

passed to colonists.

T h e other

to

sell this w i n t e r at

$50

10

and

20

acres.

an

Terms

of

H a r d

the

feature

of

our

acres we're

going 2-J, 5,

easy—so

easy that

proposition

selling

This and

the

phase

crops,

makes

for

is

our

non-resident

M a y w o o d

a

as c a n

of big oaks on

g r o w in poor soil. and

T h e age of

100

the crop, a n d $28

Maywood,

are not

It's

$107

T h e r e are

the

profit

cost

trees for per

acre.

orchard.

If

so, w e

Our

know.

5

sold

90

of

such

of

harvest­

the

season,

& Eastern

1135

can

get out,

y o u if you're

twice a

in stamps,

you

money. F R E E .

W O O D S O N . NEW month,

interested

in

a

YORK. paper

that

will

It

tells

California.

everything that's worth k n o w i n g about 24 cents

you'd

help

Office,

BROADWAY,

N . B . — W e interest

about

M a y b e

p r o s p e c t u s is interesting, instructive, a n d

F O S T E R

years,

that

Just

p e r cent, o n the cost of the o r c h a r d . an

but

S u c h trees could

a n d the

for

hoe."

feet, there

get it b y a w a y t h a t w e ' l l b o t h m a k e

77

women orchard

the oak we don't

or $1.50.

caring

per acre.

like to o w n s u c h

Big Oak at Maywooa

6

i n S e p t e m b e r i t y i e l d e d 12 p o u n d s o f n u t s

trees to the acre at was

is

age o f the a l m o n d tree w e d o k n o w .

at 1 2 \ cents a p o u n d , ing

owners.

M a y w o o d

several that he can't reach across. The

land

" the m a n w i t h the reach

for

harvesting

colony in which

D E D U C T I O N S . — W o o d s o n ' s a m o n g the h u n d r e d s

The

plan

professional people can o w n and operate an

to as g o o d a d v a n t a g e

any­

earth.

p l a n t i n g a n d d e v e l o p i n g o r c h a r d s , as w e l l as and

tell have

acre, a n d i n lots of

are

5000

A n d to

Colony

b o d y w h o w a n t s to c a n o w n a piece o f the strongest

be­

people

that state.

y o u c a n h a v e it for o n e

year.

For


McCLURE'S

R

I

K

E

MAGAZINE.

ELECTRIC VEHICLES

R

Represent the last step in the perfection of Automobiles. Vib­ ration has been completely over­ come; absolute control of speed and direction has been secured. The minimum cost of operation and the highest degree of dura­ bility has been attained. Every requirement of pleasure or busi­ ness, every demand for beauty and service is supplied by a Riker Electric Vehicle— Kikcr liiectric Delivery Wagon.

The

Perfect

A u t o m o b i l e .

If you will tell us whether you want a carriage for pleasure or a wagon for business we will catalogue accurately describing them in pictures and words.

mail you a

THE R I K E R ELECTRIC V E H I C L E CO., Elizabethport, N . J .

T H E R E IS A R E A S O N W h y

:

the

WINTON MOTOR CARRIAGE is a s c e n d i n g

so s u r e l y into p o p u l a r

favor.

Its simplicity, great service qualities a n d construction sides

it

beauty.

strength,

durability, speed

B e ­

The water supply is under easy con­ trol. amount ot 1 arbide needed is readily gauged. No other lamp is so easily lighted.

and

Write f o r C a t a l o g .

THE W I N T O N MOTOR C A R R I A G E C O . , 472-478

The reflector is protected by glass, keeping it always clean. Both tl e reflector and the glass protector easily re movable.

superior

are distinct features i n its favor.

combines

^ B i c y c l e Lamp

Belden St.,

Cleveland,

Ohio.

Eastern Department: No. 120 Broadway, New York City. Carriage on Exhibition.

THESE

FOUR

FEATURES

are among those that go t o m a k e t h e M A J E S T I C t h e most satisfactory gas lamp. A s k your dealer t o s h o w M A J E S T I C , or write for booklet, telling all about i t , t o

best a i d y o u the

E D W . M I L L E R & C O . , Dept. b, M e r i d e n , Conn. Please mention McClure^s when you write to advertisers.

78


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

MM

':'€>^Cillir<9||i^^

T h e

" L o c o m o b i l e "

The best scientists in the country have declared in favor of steam as the best power for motor carriages. The "Locomobile" is pro­ pelled by steam, and has ascended and descended Mt. Washington. Send

for catalogue,

particulars. paired

which

will

give

full

T h e " L o c o m o b i l e " c a n be re­

b y a n y machinist.

Delivery

in thirty

days.

"company

Locomobile

OF A M E R I C A I I Broadway, New York American Automobile and Motor Company, I.im'd, 10 Rue Duret. Paris. E.J. Halsey, 52 Sussex St., So. Kensington. London.

'The Coming Flyer,'' Copyright, /Sgtp, by the Locomobile Company of America. Please mention

McClure's when

79

y o u write to advertisers.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

The girl who tells fortunes is an interesting figure at bazaars, l a w n fetes a n d house parties. H e r art appeals to a distinct phase of h u m a n nature, more or less m a r k e d i n every i n d i v i d u a l . S h e is a most p o p u l a r entertainer. NEW

Fortune Telling is Easy

IDEA IN TRUNKS

The S r n l l n m i i

Dresser

Trunk

is constructed on new principles. Drawers instead of trays. A place for everything and everything in its place. The bottom as accessible as the top. Defies the bag足 gage smasher. Costs no more than a goo box trunk. Sent 1 .CD. with privilege of examination. Send 2c stamp for illus足 trated catalogue.

W i t h the fortune cards b e l o n g i n g to o u r F a s h i o n Series of P l a y i n g C a r d s . F o r t u n e T e l l i n g Parties are described i n our new 64-page book, " E n t e r t a i n i n g w i t h C a r d s , " a c o p y of w h i c h every lady of social position should possess. Sent post-paid ( d u r i n g J a n u a r y , F e b r u a r y a n d M a r c h ) on receipt of four cents i n stamps or of t w o pack wrappers of F a s h i o n Series C a r d s .

Y. A . S T A L L M A N , 5tt W . S p r i n g S t . , C o l u m b u s , 0.

7/Vw

Fashion Series Playing Cards A r e used i n gentlemen's clubs, a m o n g the most fastidious players, a n d by ladies w h o are accomplished entertainers a n d k n o w that elegant a n d satisfactory c a r d parties can not be given unless the cards are new, crisp, t h i n , flexible a n d handsome, w h i c h are the characteristics of our cards.

If You W i l l Sell our J E W E L R Y N O V E L T I E S we will give y o u W a t c h e s , C a m e r a s , B r a c e l e t s a n d G o l d R i l l g S for y o u r trouble.

No money is required. Send us your name and full address and we w ill send \-ou 18 gold-plate scarf and stick pins all set with different colored stones, to sell for 10 cents each. When you have sold them we will send you your choice of the above articles and many other premi足 ums on our large illustrated list which we send you with the pins.

Fashion Series Playing Cards are sold by dealers every足 where. If your dealer does not sell these cards, send us his name and yours, we will see that you are supplied.

N O V E L T Y M F G . C O , , 91 B a i l e y S t . , A t t l e b o r o , M a s s .

T h e U n i t e d States P l a y i n g C a r d Co., D e p t . i 3 , Cincinnnati, 0.

Please mention M c C l u r e ' s when y o u write to advertisers. 80


McCLURES

HOW

r

A

R a r e

MAGAZINE.

TO B E

Chance

to

Obtain

a

BEAUTIFUL

Perfect

C o m p l e x i o n for

One

Dollar

F O U L D ' S M E D I C A T E D A R S E N I C C O M P L E X I O N S O A P , sufficient for S I X T Y D A Y S ' daily t r e a t m e n t B u t w e w i l l d o still better for sufferers f r o m long­ standing skin diseases and complexion blemishes. T h o u g h w h e n treated by these W o r l d - F a m o u s Reme­ dies, P I M P L E S , F R E C K L E S , W R I N K L E S , B L A C K ­ H E A D S , M O T H A N D L I V E R P A T C H E S , o n or under the skin, T A N ,Y E L L O W a n d M U D D Y SKIN rapidly disappear, most of t h e m w i t h i n a week, nearly all within a m o n t h , yet if T H E W O R S T C O M P L E X I O N is n o t m a d e P E R F E C T L Y Y O U T H F U L , C L E A R a n d B R I L L I A N T L Y L O V E L Y w i t h i n sixty days, we w i l l c o n t i n u e t o s u p p l y t h e W a f e r s a n d S o a p at this E X T R E M E L Y l o w d o l l a r rate, till a C L E A R , L O V E ­ L Y c o m p l e x i o n is o b t a i n e d a n d a l l b l e m i s h e s hav» disappeared. W H Y A R E W E A B L E T O M A K E T H I S U N P A R A L L E L E D O F F E R ? B E C A U S E w e e x p e c t t o s e n d o u t n o t l e s s t h a n 50,000 p a c k a g e s of D r . Campbell's Safe Arsenic W a f e r s and Fould's A r s e n i c S o a p , i n a n s w e r to as m a n y satisfied ladies, w h o will certainly each and all enthusiastically recommend us to their friends. W e w i l l certainly sell half a million packages of our complexion remedies A T F U L L R A T E S , through their indorsement.

Y o u made

can begin

perfectly

n o w , and

clear, rosy a n d

dollar o n l y , for s i x t y d a y s ' T H A T of O N E D supply of S A F E A R

have

your

I M P O R T A N T . T A K E A D V A N T A G E O F T H I S D O L L A R O F F E R n o w o r c u t t h i s o u t a n d s e n d a t y o u r earliest convenience, as this ad. m a y not a p p e a r again. O N E D O L L A R F O R S I X T Y D A Y S ' T R E A T M E N T at office o r b y m a i l . T H I S A D . M U S T B E S E N T W I T H Y O U R O R D E R . A d d r e s s a l l orders to H . B . F O U L D , D e p t . A , 214 S i x t h A v e n u e , N e w Y o r k . S O L D B Y D R U G G I S T S E V E R Y W H E R E .

complexion

transparent, for

one

treatment.

M E A N S , that for the merely n o m i n a l s u m O L L A R we will all but give away an ample D R . C A M P B E L L ' S W O R L D - F A M O U S S E N I C C O M P L E X I O N W A F E R S and ,

,

n

,

,i"'S.<*'i,»'».«'»«*».«W»V»***.*"V.»'

it ili ili T h e ili

*m ili * *

m

* 5

* «ili

m m ili ili ili ili ili ili ili ili ili 3

ill ili ili ili ill S ili ili

s ili ili ili ili ili ili ili

N

e

w

B u c k e y e

F o l d i n g

B a t h

C a b i n e t

In p r e s e n t i n g the B u c k e y e F o l d i n g B a t h C a b i n e t to o u r p a t r o n s w e offer t h e m o s t c o m p l e t e a n d p e r e c t b a t h cabinet made. W e w e r e the first to p l a c e u p o n the m a r k e t a first-class b a t h c a b i n e t at a p o p u l a r price, a n d the testimony of m a n y t h o u s a n d s of purchasers w a r r a n t s us i n c l a i m i n g for our b a t h cabinet the highest standard of excellence. T h e B u c k e y e Folding B a t h Cabinet is m a n u f a c t u r e d at our o w n factory under personal supervision. O w i n g to its p e c u l i a r c o n ­ struction it is the most e c o n o m i c a l a n d the q u i c k e s t to heat. T h e c a b i n e t is supplied w i t h a door a n d a n o p e n i n g for the a r m has been added, c o n v e n i e n t for the bather i n r e m o v i n g perspiration f r o m the face or otherwise a d d i n g to the c o m f o r t of the occupant. T h e cabinet is e l o n g a t e d i n s h a p e w h i c h g i v e s c o m f o r t a n d ease to the l i m b s . T h e g a l v a n ­ ized steel f r a m e supports the C a b i n e t i n s u c h a m a n n e r as to p r e v e n t c o n t a c t w i t h the b o d y at a n y point. It is a b s o l u t e l y g e r m p r o o f a n d needs n o care further t h a n p l a c i n g it b e h i n d a door w h e n not i n use.

OPENS T H E PORES R E A D Y FOR U S E .

T h i s is the secret o f the w o n d e r f u l c u r a t i v e p o w e r of the B u c k e y e F o l d i n g B a t h Cabinet. Y o u r p h y s i ­ c i a n w i l l tell y o u that there is n o t h i n g so effectual as a g o o d " s w e a t " or v a p o r b a t h to d i s p e l the i m p u r i t i e s , s y m p t o m s o f f e v e r o r b r e a k u p a h a r d c o l d . P r o p ­ erly taken, every pore is opened a n d the medicated vapors are n a t u r a l l y ab­ IN USE. sorbed, t o n i n g a n d strengthening the entire s y s t e m i n a m a r v e l o u s manner. T h e C a b i n e t is effectual i n c a s e s o f c h r o n i c R h e u m a t i s m o r Clout. It frees t h e b l o o d f r o m a l l i m p u r i t i e s , quiets the nerves a n d g i v e s to the body perfect cleanliness a n d a v i g o r a n d freshness t h a t c a n be h a d i n no other w a y . A l l the l u x u r y a n d b e n e f i c i a l effects of T u r k i s h , V a p o r a n d M e d i c a t e d B a t h s m a y be h a d at h o m e at a trill­ ing cost. W e are so confident that y o u w i l l be entirely pleased w i t h the B u c k e y e B a t h Cabinet that we will s e l l i t o n a p p r o v a l t o b e r e t u r n e d a t o u r e x p e n s e i f n o t s a t i s f a c t o r y . P r i c e $5.00 i n c l u d i n g - A l c o h o l S a f e t y S t o v a and Receipts for a l l k i n d s of medicated baths. Ladles should have our C o m p l e x i o n Steamer, used i n conjunc­ tion w i t h the Cabinet, i n w h i c h the face is g i v e n the s a m e v a p o r t r e a t m e n t as the b o d y . T h e o n l y harmless a n d s u r e m e t h o d o f d r a w i n g a w a y all i m p u r i t i e s , l e a v i n g the s k i n c l e a r a n d soft a s v e l v e t . It i s the o n l y safe c u r e f o r P i m p l e s , B l o t c h e s , a n d o t h e r d i s f i g u r i n g s o r e s a n d b l e m i s h e s . I n v a l u a b l e f o r t h e s u c c e s s f u l treat­ m e n t o f C a t a r r h a n d A s t h m a . P r i c e $1.00 e x t r a . AGENTS a n d SALESMEN.—We w a n t a g e n t s a n d s a l e s m e n t o represent us i n e v e r y section a n d we offer m o n e y - m a k i n g t e r m s to a c t i v e m e n a n d w o m e n . FREE—Descrip­ t i v e B o o k l e t a n d T e s t i m o n i a l s to a l l w h o w r i t e . NOTICE. W e have no connection w i t h a n y other firm. Address M O L L E N K O P P & M c C R E E R V , 9 I O D o r r S t . , T o l e d o , O h i o .

1 Please mention M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to

32

advertisers

If •

5

i i


McCLURE'S

t

MAGAZINE.

HYGIENIC C O O L E R

HYGIENIC FILTER

Pure

Showing

Water

SHOWING

PARTS.

FILTER A T T A C H E D . Patented

April

26,

1898.

Appliances.

Patented i n U S a n d f o r e i g n countries.

A n

entirely

C o o l i n g

Factories. C o o l e r office

new method

W a t e r

Better

m a d e

of

furniture,

O n y x ,

results

w o o d N i c k e l

F i l t e r e d water

a n d

never

a n y

foreign

b e c o m e

c o m e s

for Filtering

Residences, f r o m

to

o r where

M a r b l e ,

desired.

for

half

o r

of

a n y

with

m a d e

o f

material

a l w a y s i n plain w i t h

o r

the ice.

c o r r e s p o n d preferred

i n contact

substance,

a n d

Offices

the

view

i c e

consequently

o r

cannot

contaminated.

O u r H y g i e n i c F i l t e r s , 2x9 inches, like cut, N i c k e l Plate, P o r c e l a i n Tube, a l l parts complete as shown (except Sink Faucet) sent to a n y address i n the U n i t e d States b y express o r mail, postage o r express charges prepaid, on receipt of $ 3 . 5 0 . O u r N o G e r m F i l t e r , Stone Tube, $ 3 . 0 0 . C a n

2x6>/

p u t u p either o n e in

m e c h a n i c a l S e n d

skill

2

five

inches,

Tripoli

minutes.

N o

required.

for o u r n e w catalogue.

F r e e

for t h e

asking; H Y G I E N I C ^^iii

2 3 4

F I L T E R

L a Salle Street,

&

C O O L E R C O . . -

C h i c a g o , III.

YOU ARE JSOTHIISG

Cut the Cost

OUT —

i f n o t satisfied. W e s h i p f o r e x a m i ­ n a t i o n , a n d i f , a f t e r a c a r e f u l i n s p e c t i o n o f t be g o o d s o r d e r e d , you are n o t satisfied, w e will take the shipment back.

of a C a r r i a g e

WE DO ISOT

by b u y i n g it of the m a k e r s . P a y only o n e , i n ­ stead o f t w o or t h r e e profits. N o o t h e r fac­ tory c a n build finer, h a n d ­ somer o r more substantial ve­ h i c l e s t h a n those w h i c h w e L2—Canopy Top S u r r e y P r i c e , |S9.75. s h i p direct to buyers—instead of selling t h r o u g h dealers. O u r great facili­ ties a n d l o n g e x p e r i e n c e enable u s t o secure the highest quality o f material a n d work­ m a n s h i p at the lowest cost. W e m a k e harness as well as carriages, a n d sell great quantities o f robes, blankets, a n d all horse accessories—all at prices that will save y o udollars. T h e purchaser m a y return a n y t h i n g w i t h w h i c h he is n o t satisfied, a n a get h i s m o n e y b a c k .

E l k h a r t C a r r i a g e S G. B . P R A T T ,

Sec'y.

COLUMBUS,

Ab fine every way aa others sell

for*™.

COMPANY,

OHIO.

Please mention

H a r n e s s

M T § . C o . ,

E L K H A R T ,

INDIANA.

T h e c u t b e l o w Is o u r N o . 8 1 P n e u m a t i c T i r e W a g o n . Axles are ball-bearing; wheels 34 and 36 inches w i t h 2-in. pneumatic tires; open rubber head springs; rubber covered stepa; track 4 ft. 2 i n .

O u r complete catalogue-free o n request - p l a i n l y pictures a n d fully describes o u r entire line. W r i t e forit. THE COLUMBUS CARRIAGE &HARNESS

SELL

t h r o u g h agents o r dealers. W e w i l l sell t o y o u direct a t as low a price as a dealer w o u l d pay. T h i s saves y o u the several profits u s u a l l y added between the m a n u f a c t u r e r a n d the con­ s u m e r , w h i c h m e a n s a b o u t 35 p e r c e n t . T h i s h a s b e e n o u r m e t h o d of selling l o r the past twenty-seven years, a n dw e are today the largest manufacturers of Vehicles a n d H a r ­ ness i n t h e w o r l d s e l l i n g t o t h e user e x c l u s i v e l y . W e m a k e 178 s t y l e s o f v e h i c l e s a n d 65 s t y l e s o f h a r n e s s . S e n d f o r f r e e catalogue s h o w i n g all the styles w e make.

M c C l u r e ' s when you write to advertisers.

8j

jffMTSJM*

mvm

n

Pr,ce

>

$115.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

"First in war, first in peace, first in the hearts of his countrymen."

SCOTT'S EMULSION is a Food Medicine 44

First in ivar, first in peace, first in the hearts of its countrymen."

It is used in the hospital; it is used in the home; it is the STANDARD throughout the world. SCOTT'S EMULSION is FIRST IN WAR, because as a food it gives more strength, flesh and vitality than any other known preparation; and because as a medicine It heals and cures quicker than anything else. SCOTT'S EMULSION is FIRST IN PEACE, because it F A T H E R OF HIS COUNTRY. brings health and happiness when all else has fatted. It is the one STANDARD remedy i n the treatment of CONSUMPTION, BRONCHITIS, GRIPPE, PNEUMONIA, and all wasting diseases. It is the best remedy for COUGHS and COLDS, whether simple or of long standing. Thousands of delicate babies, feeble mothers and anemic boys and girls have grown fat, strong and rosy under its.use; thousands of rapidly growing, overworked school chil­ dren and tired brain-workers have received from it vigor and vitality. That is why it is "FIRST IN THE HEARTS OF ITS COUNTRYMEN."

, At all Druggists; 50c. and $1.00. SCOTT & BOWNE, Chemists, New York.

B E A U T I F Y Y O U R

V O I C E

BT USING

BELLEVOIX THE VOICE BEAUTIFIER It is the only preparation of its kind in the world, be­ ing used by the most prom­ inent singers, speakers and voice users for the last 20 years, in America and all foreign countries. "Bellevoix's" effect on the vocal organs, chords, etc., ia IN­ STANTANEOUS, giving brilliancy, clearness and flex­ ibility to the voice, and protects against colds, and wear through Jong singing and speaking. It is pleasant to take. Once used, always used. "Bellevoix'' Tablets are harmless and contain no poisonous drugs. We guarantee the above statement. "Bellevoix" Tablets packed 40 in box, 50 ctfl. Packed 100 in box, $1. Send stamps or money order. Our '.booklet "Voice advice** free. Address A BELLEVOIX TABLET CO., N.W. Cor. 47th & State Sts., Chicago.

GLASSES RENDER DEFECTIVE VISION CHRONIC. Write lor our ILLUSTRATED TREATISE, mailed free. THE IDEAL COMPANY, 239 Broadway W E NO T E HS I ITrLlAS< S IS New York D S IE FG IU R E DUT M W H D IE O SW GLASSES^

FASHION

IN HAIR.

" Give a woman a beautiful head of hair and half the battle of beauty's won." Never before in the historvof the world has woman gloried in such beautiful hair as to-day. Wherever you go those beautiful Titian tints rich bronze shades, mellow gold effects, warm chestnut hues, in fact whenever you are attracted bv lovely tresses you will know that the color and delightful condition of the hair is produced by the

I

M

P

E

R

I

A

L

H A I R

R

E

G

E

N

E

R

A

T

O

R

,

THE STANDARD HAIR COLORINC FOR CRAY AND BLEACHED HAIR. tf is easilv aoolied is clean, durable and natural, absolutely harmless, and the only preparation that restores gray hair to its original color and makes bleached hair any uniform shade, from black to the lightest ash blond without injury to health or scalp. Its use makes the hair glossy, soft and silky, is unaffected by baths, permits curling, and . . - „ _ , . „

O N E

APPLICATION

L A S T S

M O N T H S .

Samole of your hair colored and returned free, correspondence confidential. I M P E R I A L H A I R R E C E N E R A T O R sold by Druggists and Hairdressers everywhere. I M P E R I A L V I C O R O S I S is a marvellous hair grower and tonic. Stimulates the hair follicles. SOLE MANUFACTURERS AND PATENTEES,

IMPERIAL CHEMICAL MANUFACTURING CO., 22 West 23d St., New York. Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 83


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

CLOTHING S A L E S M E N

WANTED

< & i K n n n d p d m O N T U a n d hxpfvsks h a v e b y a l l o i j : g l O U t W " t i f f I Y I \ J W • n A C T I V E M E N . W E FAY MANY F A R MORE. W E W A N T M E N PIN E V E R Y C O U N T Y IN T H E UNITED S T A T E S . " j o u r r e r e r ^ n c e i t w . l i h f f t r u r , we w i l l s t a r t y o u mt onee. N O K X I ' K . l C l h M K NKCHSSaRY. M l C A P I T A L K K Q I ' I K K D . H i - furnish u full line o r hample*, stationery, e t c . , a n d t a l l o r s - t o - t b e - t r a d e complete outBt r e a d y for business. NO C 0 M M I 8 H I 0 N F L A N . Y o u r e g u l a t e y o o r profits t « Miit jourself. NO IliM s K T O IIOI 8 E C A N V A S S . T h i s Is n o t one o r the maoy catchy ndterl U e m e n l s for agents, b u t o n e o r t h e v e r y few advertisements offering a r a r e o p p o r t u ­ n i t y t o s e c u r e ft s t r i c t l y II!(• II O i l ADR M l 1 ' L O Y H K N T a t BIG W A G E S . WE A R ET H EWORLD'S LARGEST TAILORS. t l t U K S T A!fi kkk'A !S A M ) R i i c o i ' E A N M I L L S . W e c o n t r o l t h e e n t i r e o u t p u t o f s e v e r a l o f t h e s e m i I N . W e o w n o u r m a t e r i a l s a t t h e lowest possible cost, a n d o p e r a t e t h e m o s t e x t e n s i v e a n d e c o n o m i c t a i l o r i n g p l a n t i n e x i s t e n c e , a n d c u t to measure and m a k e to o r d e r s u i t * a n d O v e r ­ c o a t * f r o m $ f i . 0 0 t o $ 1 5 . 0 0 ( m o s t l y 85.00 t o 810.00). P a n t * f r o m $ 1 . 5 0 t o $G.uO. F a n c y V e s t s f r o m $ 2 . 0 0 u p . T h e d a y s o f r e a d y m a d e c l o t h i n g a r e n u m b e r e d . AT t i i r s r PRICES everyone w i l l prefer t o have his garments c u t to his measure a n d made to his order. NO DIFFICULTY IN GETTING O R D E K S . flllR P I A M Lfyourreferencesaresatisfactory w e s t a r t y o u out - " » t once. W e f u r n i s h y o u F R E E a c o m p l e t e AGENT'S SAMPLE BOOK A N D OUTFIT. O u r large, handsome, leather bound S a m p l e B o o k c o n t a i n s o u r e n t i r e - l i n e o f Suitings, Overcoatings, Trous­ e r i n g s and Ves l i n g s ; f u l l i n s t r u c t i o n s f o r t a k i n g m e a s u r e m e n t s ' , w h i c h you c a n l e a r n i n S m i n u t e s f r o m the large photographicillustrat i o n s i n t h e b o o k ) , c o l o r e d lithographed fashion plates, f u l l d e s c r i p t i o n of the m a t e r i a l underneath each sample, a n d prices left blank f o r 10 y o u t o fill In, fixing y o u r profit t o s u i t yourself. T h i s S a m p l e Book is p u t u p i n a F i n e Canvas C a r r y i n g Case, w h i c h a l s o c o n t a i n s T a p e Measure, •V O r d e r B l a n k s , B u s i n e s s C a r d s , S t a t i o n e r y , A d v e r t i s i n g Blatter a n d Agents* G u i d e and I n s t r u c t i o n B o o k , w i t h N e t Confidential P r i c e L i s t , a l s o c o m p l e t e " S a l e s m a n ' s T a l k . " O u r i n s t r u c t i o n s a r e so p l a i n , o u rsuggestions t o t h e salesman so t h o r o u g h , t h a t a n y o n e c a n i m m e d i a t e l y m a k e a success o f t h e w o r k . Y O U R E Q U I R E NOTHING. Just take t h e ordersand send them to us;we make the'garments p r o m p t l y a n d send t h e m b y express, C . O. D . subject to exami­ nation, a n d I f n o t perfectly satisfactory they c a n be returned to us at c u r e x p e n s e . N e i t h e r t h e a g e n t n o r h i s c u s t o m e r a s s u m e t h e s l i g h t e s t r i s k . » E T A K E A L L T H E CHANCES O F T H E T R A N S ­ ACTION. W e e i t h e r s h i p d i r e c t t o y o u r c u s t o m e r s , c o l l e c t i n g y o u r f u l l s e l l i n g p r i c e a n d send y o u w e e k l y c h e c k f o r a l l y o u r profit; or, i f y o uprefer, w e ship d i r e c t t o y o ua t y o u r n e t confidential price, a l l o w i n g y o u t o m a k e y o u r o w n collections. u

u

n

r

i

H

a

Y O U C A N ADD A L I B E R A L P R O F I T T O YOTJR C O N F I D E N T I A L P R I C E .

N E A R L Y A L LO U R M E N M A K E $ 4 0 . 0 0 E V E R Y W E E K I N T H E Y E A R . T U F O lI T I T I T I C A D C H I I I T a C I V C D r P W e make n o e h n i ^ Tor o u r complete A g e n t ' s Sample Book • n & V W i r i l l w * \ P v V • 1—1- • r n c t i Outfit, b u t i n o r d e r t o p r o t e c t o u r s e l v e s a g a i n s t m a n y w h o m i g h t i m p o s e o n u s b y s e n d i n g f o r t h e o u t f i t ( w h i c h c o s t s u s b e t w e e n 85.00 a n d 86.00), w i t h n o i n t e n t i o n o f w o r k ­ i n g , b u t m e r e l y o u t o f i d l e c u r i o s i t y , w e r e q u i r e e a c h a p p l i c a n t to c u t t h i s a d o u t a n d m a l l t o n s , g i v i n g t h e names o f a t least t w o p a r t i e s as reference, a c d further a g r e e t o p a y a t e m p o r a r y d e p o s i t o r One D o l l a r a n d express charges for the outfit when received, i f round e x a c t l y as repre­ sented a o d r e a l l y a M a ; m o n e y m a k e r . W h i l e t h i s n o m i n a l deposit o f $ 1 . 0 0 f o r t h e outfit Is not one-fifth o f Its cost It insures the good faith o f a p p l i c a n t s , a n d we p r o m p t l y refund y o u r $ 1 . 0 0 as soon a s y o u r s a l e s a m o u n t t o $ 2 5 . 0 0 , w h i c h amount y o n c a n t a k e the first d a y o n t . IF YOU W I S H T O M A K E $ 5 . 0 0 T O S 2 0 . 0 0 E V E R Y D A Y c u t t h i s n o t i c e o u t a n d m a i l t o u s a t o n c e , g i v i n g u s t h e n a m e s of t w o o r m o r e m e nas reference. Address, fcnd

references:

e

ll?i^T XZX\

AMERICAN

s

A n y business m a n o r resident)

W2S

West Side

W O O L E N

Enterprise Bldg.,

MILLS C O .

C H I C A G O . I L L .

of Chicago.

KID GLOVES

««CENTEMERI» are t h e best. Sold i n principal cities. Catalogues free.

P ,

C E N T E M E R I

&

C O . ,911 Broadway, N . Y .

2 0 t h

I

No Fire. Smoke or Heat. Absolutely Safe. St-ndfivestamps for Catalogue. TRUSCOTT BOAT MFG. CO., ST. JOSEPH, MICH. <

C

E

N

T

U

R

Y

t

L

E

L A U N C H

P

0

R

This idea! Gentleman's launch elegantlyfinished,simple, seaworthy, safe, reliable. Seats 8. Speed 6 miles. Guaranteed for one year. P r i c e $200.00. Order now, avoid Spring rush. Send 10c for handsome 76 p a g e catalogue of Steam and Sail Yachts, Launches, Row Boats, Canoe R A C I N E

B O A T

H A Y ' S

M F G . C O .( R i v e r f r o n t ) R a c i n e , W i s .

Water-Proof

DRESS FACING Protects from mud, wet, dirt and slush, and gives that perfect finish that insures a graceful hang to your skirt. For sale at all dry goods stores. HAY'S WATER-PROOF BINDING CO. 3t7

B r o a d w a y , N e w

564 W a s h i n g t o n S t . , B o s t o n 320 F r a n c i s St., S t . Joseph

Y o r k

78 M o n r o e S t . , C h i c a g o 524 M a r k e t S t . , S a n Francisco


McCLUHE'S

r

MAGAZINE.

A n E X A M P L E of

Spoon

and

Fork

PROGRESSION The spoons and forks of the X V I Century were not fashioned for anything except use. Now-a-days great care is taken to make them of proper shape, weight and stiffness for practical use, with an outline convenient to handle and of a design of artistic merit and genuine worth. A l l these features, together with great wearing qualities, are found in the brand stamped with the trade-mark

"

1

8

4

7

1

°

^

which has for half a century been the standard of quality. Remember as there are other "Rogers." The "Berkshire" is one \ \ of our recent designs; others are w \ shown in our catalogue No. 53 A V,\ Sent Free.

"1847^"

nternational Silver C o . , Successor to

MERIDEN BRITANNIA CO., Meriden, C e n t u r y Fork & Spoon

Conn.

X X

Century

Sold 61/ leading dealert.

hjrk & Spoon. BERKSHIRE' Design.

From the Metropolitan M u s e u m Collection.

Co-Operative

JOIN T H E AMERICAN WATCH

Members

Plan secure

Wholesale

i

Cash and

$1

Prices Weekly

Payments

CLUB

Any

China

and

Glass

Right

^.IGG!N§§§EITElU FINE

CHINA*

fi/CffCUT

GLASs.

Engraved

Monogram

to

Special

without

ject o r

"Buy

Sub Emblem

Extra

Order

Charge

Club "G — ' 14 karat, 25 year case, with full 15 ruby jeweled Elgin or Walthain movement, made in any size, hunting- or open face, any style of engraving, or society emblem engraved to order without extra charge. $2.00 cash, $1,00 per week, 23 weeks. Club " H "—3-8 to 7-16 karat diamond, according to quality, any style mounting. J5.00 cash, 35 ft weekly payments. Club " J —Finest 14 karat gold rilled watch that money can buy. Any size, any style. Has solid gold trimmings, warranted 3? years, with high Jfrade 17 ruby jeweled, adjusted Elgin, Waltham or Remington movement. I5.00 cash, $1.00 per week, 30 weeks. Join now and-have the use of an elegant watch or diamond while paying for it by our easy plan. Watch or diamond shipped on receipt of first payment and references. Catalogue and testimonial letters tell all about it. Address

Everything iri china and glnss neces­ sary for the well-appointed table is hown in our new illustrated catalogue io-M. Mailed free to all those who wish to avail themselves-no matter where they live— of the metropolitan privilege of buying all their glass and china ne-quarter less than elsewhere. 5 0 = 5 4

W e s t

2 2 d

The Walker-Edmund Co., Mgrs., 60 Oriel Building, Cincinnati, Ohio, Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers.

S t r e e t ,

N

E

W

Y O R K


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

WHEN YOU T R Y T H E BENEDICT you w i l l p r o b a b l y be s u r p r i s e d a t its e x c e l l e n c e . Y o u will probably be a g o o d d e a l s u r p r i s e d . I n spite o f a l l of o u r a s s u r a n c e s , we find that most o f the s m o k e r s w h o s e n d for t r i a l boxes do not h a v e their e x p e c t a t i o n s h i g h e n o u g h . A b o u t h a l f of the m a i l orders we are n o w r e c e i v i n g are second and t h i r d orders, a n d n e a r l y a l l of these second a n d t h i r d orders are from t w o to ten t i m e s as l a r g e as the first o r d e r s . T h e B e n e d i c t is t h e o n l y r e a l l y h i g h - g r a d e c i g a r t h a t s e l l s for o n e cent. It is inches l o n g , proportionately slender, a n d has a clear H a v a n a filler.

100

for

$1.00,

prepaid.

T h e dollar back i f y o u say so.

BENEDICT & COMPANY, 321 East First St., Dayton, Ohio

BOYS

l f

D A D L T P E E tou will Bend the names or6 boy I M l t i l frienda over 12 j ' r s of age wo will Bend joa the 8t»r for 3 mo'a free. It La the greatest boys paper published.

Address with stamp. The STA&,10M&rioa bi. ,0ak P a r k J I L

w i t h NEW P E R F E C T I O N

M E

fcew aye book F K E E .

N e w or second hand Safes. Y o u can save money and get the best from

THE

476

Safes

E x c h a n g e d , Telephone

Repaired 392

or

393

or

BY T H E

HOMES

BROADWAY, N E W

C U S H I N G & C O . , F O X C R O FT, M A I N E .

SEA.

Protected by Beautiful Islands. Game, Oysters, and Fish in abundance. Lemons, Oranges, P i n e a p p l e s , a n d all Subtropical F r u i t s a n d F l o w e r s are g r o w n to p e r f e c t i o n . C l i m a t e delightful, Summer and Winter. L a n d fertile, h i g h a n d dry. A **•> . | % | . . comparatively unknown, t h a t offers to nook p | s e t t l e r s a n d to W i n t e r v i s i t o r s a d v a n t a g e ! in * fcwIIIUfl n o t f o u n d e l s e w h e r e . S e e k e r s a f t e r health, p l e a s u r e o r p r o f i t , s h o u l d r e a d o u r b o o k l e t , s e n t free b y T h e L e m o n B a y C o m p a n y , E n g l e w o o d , Florida.

M O S L E R S A F E CO.,

Bet. Grand and Broome Sts.

OYESandqett

Bright, Even Colors K A S T to Light, A i r , Soap and Adda. Strong! Simple! Sure! A large pkg.,&OT color, mailed for 1<I eta.; 3 for 25 cts.; 6 for 40 eta. Agents wanted,

(jRlfjA

Y O R K .

R e m o v e d .

Spring.

STEREOPTICONS and VIEWS for Public Exhibitions, Church Entertainment*, ' o r i l l u s t r a t i n g s e r m o n s . M a n y s i z e s , a l l p r i c e s . C h a n c e for men w i t h h t t t e c a p i t a l to m a k e m o n e y . 256 p a g e c a t a l o g free*

Larkin Premiums FREE.

MCALLISTER,

SOAPS.

DAYS' F R E E

Hew York.

BAND

, VAPOR ENGINES ti LAUNCHES.*^

B n m n

TRIAL.

T U T T L E

Beautifully illustrated booklet free to all who ask. It tells how to earn the Larkin Premiums. THE

Nassau St.,

I n s t r u m e n t s , D r u m s , r n l f o r m i a n d S u p p l i e s . W r i t e for Catalog, * « illustrations, F R E E ; it gives MusLo and Instructions for N e w B a n d s . I . Y O N «te H E A L T , 4 0 A d a m s Street, C H I C A G O .

Choice of Writing Desk, Morris Chair, Bookcase, Brass and Steel Bed, Sliver Tea Set, Oil Heater, Lamps, Watch, etc. 30

49

BRASS

HANDSOME PREMIUMS, Value SIO.00 each, for selling or using SIO.OO worth of the

LARKIN

M f g . Optician,

L A R K I N S O A P M F G . C O . , Buffalo, N . V .

C O . - C A N A 5 T O X A X Y . . CATALOGUE F R 8

00D or M E T A U Workers Without Steam Power should use o u r F o o t a n d H a n d P o w e r Machinery. S e n d for Catalogues

PATENTS GUARANTEED

A—Wood-working Machinery, B—Lathes, etc.

Our fee returned if we fail. Any one sending sketch and description of any invention will promptly receive our opinion free concerning the patentability of same. " How to Obtain a Patent" sent upon request. Patents secured through us advertised for sale at our expense. Patents taken out through us receive special notice, without charge, in T h e P a t e n t R e c o r d , an illustrated and widely circulated journal, consulted by Manufacturers and Investors. Send for sample copy FREE. Address, VICTOR J . EVANS & CO. (Patent Attorneys,) Evans Building, WASHINGTON, D. C

SENECA F A L L S M F G . CO. 679 W a t e r S t . , S e n e c a F a l l s ,

N.Y.

L

A

T

H

E

S

For E l e c t r i c a l a n d Experiment*! Work. F o r G u n s m i t h s and Tool Makers. F o r G e n e r a l Machine Shop Work. F o r Bicycle Re­ pairing.

J0STSendfor Catalogue and Prices. W . F, & J O H N B A R N E S C O . , 2 0 0 Ruby St., . Rockford, III. 86


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

T e l e p h o n e

Bonds

issued under proper restrictions by Licensee Companies of the

American Bell Telephone Company are desirable investments for trust funds.

We make a specialty of the bonds of such companies as have been

first

subjected on our behalf to a thorough

lost of the C u r e s

made by Oxydonor are after doctors and drugs have completely failed. If you are a sufferer from disease, and have tried drugs and doctors without effect, Oxydonor will cure you at any reasonable stage by placing the body in a condition that compels it to absorb large quantities of Oxygen from the air. Thus disease is conquered and robust health is the result. These claims are re-enforced by letters from thou­ sands of persons who have cured themselves of all forms of disease, some of which are in our book which we mail free. One Oxydonor,rightlyused, will keep a family in good health. Large book of instructions with each Oxydonor. HON.

a

•RIGHT'S DISEASE. Austin Blakey, Leadville, Col., writes December

1899: " I have been a sufferer from Bright's Disease and ronic Catarrh of the Stomach for years. After doctoring a great deal and getting worse, on January 1st, 1898, I ordered an Oxydonor. It helped me at once and in six months from the time I commenced using it, I considered myself a well man. If I could not get another I would not part with my Oxydonor for a warranty deed of the State of Colorado."

FIBROID TUMOR.

legal, physical, and

financial

nation

of

by

experts

exami­

established

reputation, and we are prepared to furnish full data regarding the prop­ erties of several prominent companies whose bonds we have purchased and offer

for

sale

at

prices

to

yield

an attractive income upon the invest­ ment. M a n y million's of telephone bonds are owned by

financial

trustees of estates, and throughout

the

United

institutions, individuals States

and

D o m i n i o n of Canada.

Mrs. Frank M. Brewster, Westfield, Mass., writes Nov.

87, 1890: "Oxydonor found me an invalid suffering intense pain from a Fibroid Tumor. Doctors all said it had been years coming and that an operation within a month was abso­ lutely necessary. In one hour's use of Oxydonor I was relieved of the pain I had not been free from forfiveweeks. In about four months the tumor had passed away, through natural chan­ nels, and in six months I was well. Now I am strong. I have used no medicine of any kind, and had no physician except Oxydonor.' CAUTION.—Imitations of Oxydonor are dangerous to use. Refuse to accept them. Dr. H. Sanehe is the Inventor and Originator, and has obtainedfinaldecision in Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., against imitators. Also on Oct. 16, 1890, the United States Court granted us an injunction restraining Agents from selling an imitation of Oxydonor. Write us a full statement of your case. All letters carefully read and answered. We will send you full particulars of Oxydonor, and how to use it. Address either of our offices:

We

have prepared a brief history

of the " Growth of the Telephone in the U n i t e d

States, 1880-1899," con­

taining statistics relative to the vast sums of money invested in this indus­ try as a basis of security for bond issues, and shall be pleased to mail copies to any address upon request.

Dr. H. SANCHE & COMPANY 61 FIFTH STREET, DETROIT, MICH. 261 Fifth Avenue, New York City. 57 State Street, Chicago, III. Canada Office : aa68 ST. CATHERINE ST., MONTREAL, QUE.

H. W. POOR & GO. Members N. Y. Stock Exchange, 18 Wall Street, New York.

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 87

H. W. POOR & CO. Investment Securities, 52 Devonshire Street, Boston.


McCLUBE'S

H e r e

is

MAGAZINE.

a

Beauty Secret

R E V O L V E R

Remarkable Discovery Whereby Every Liidy May Now Attain the Per­ fect Bloom of Youth.

A Free T r i a l

Package Sent by Mail

Prepaid and Sealed in P l a i n Wrapper to A l l Who Send Name and Address.

F O R E H A N D "PERFECTION"

$4.50

It has remained for a Cincinnati woman to dis­ cover the secret of a perfect skin. She has at last found the key to feminine beauty. All the sighs and heartaches over a poor appearance may now be banished, for it is within the means of every lady, young or middle aged, to have the clearest and most refined complexion so dear to a woman's

• • • • •

• • •

• • • • •

why that o l d s a y i n g

is

O w n one a n d realize

' ' F o r e w a r n e d

• • • • •

F o r e a r m e d ' '

has been changed to

• MRS. BERT KILEY.

"FOREHAND IS

FOREARMED

99

F u l l details and cuts of this beautiful revolver, also of our other revolvers a n d g u n s , m a y be found i n our catalogue w h i c h is n o w ready. If y o u want it let us k n o w a n d y o u w i l l receive it

FREE. A r e v o l v e r sent prepaid o n receipt of price if

y o u r dealer does not have them.

FOREHAND

WORCESTER,

A R M S

MASS.,

CO.

V. S. A.

• heart. And what is still more pleasing and con­ • vincing, Mme. M. Ribault. who discovered this great secret, sends free to every woman who writes • a sufficient quantity of the beautifier to show her how easy it is to attain beauty when you know the • simple truth and the right remedies. Mrs. Bert Kiley, 103 Ward Ave . Bellevue. Ky, obtained a free trial of Mme. Ribault and this is what she says of it:—"I am perfectly delighted with the result. My complexion from the time I was a little girl was always a source of vexation, and as 1 grew in years those horrid pimples, blackheads and other blemishes got worse and worse. When I became a young lady in long dresses, and began to think of beaux and parties, there was many a bitter disap­ pointment for me, all because of my horrid, freckled and unsightly skin. The past few years have seen wonderful changes and all on account of Mme. Ribault's complexion beautifier. 1 have a beauti­ ful home and my husband never fails to remark about my clear and charming complexion. Every ladv ought to send at once and get a free trial " Write to Mme. M. Ribault, 174 Elsa Building, Cincinnati, Ohio, and she will mail free, prepaid, in a plain sealed wrapper, a free package of her wonderful beautifiers and you will always bless the day you wrote. Do not fail to write to-day.

Please mention McClure's when yon write to advertisers. 88

• • • • • • • • • •


McCLURE'S Vive

Focusing

Tourist

M a g a z i n e

and

M

P

Cameras

C

Print O u t

~

MAGAZINE. and

Developing

Papers

X900

V I

M a h o g a n y

Folding

Cameras

V

E

S

Every dealer should know of our

Liberal and Progressive 1900 Policy i n o r d e r to i n t e l l i g e n t l y d e c i d e w h a t his s h a l l b e for the c o m i n g s e a s o n . I t i s not n e c e s s a r y t o b e p l a c e d u n d e r r e s t r i c t i o n s , a s w e h a v e p r e p a r e d o u r ­ s e l v e s t o s u p p l y y o u NOW w i t h an elegant f o l d i n g line a n d two complete lines of h a n d m a g a z i n e cameras, also print-out a n d d e v e l o p i n g papers, a n d a l l classes of p h o t o g r a p h i c s u p p l i e s , a l l of w h i c h w i l l f u l l y m e e t a n y c o m p e t i t i o n . E v e r y d e a l e r a n d a m a t e u r s h o u l d n o t f a i l to s e n d f o r o u r n e w f r e e A r t C a t a l o g u e , n o w r e a d y , a l s o o u r n e w 1 9 0 0 B r o c h u r e , f u l l y i l l u s t r a t i n g f o r t h e first t i m e V i v e c o m ­ b i n e d D a y l i g h t L o a d i n g a d v a n t a g e s for G l a s s P l a t e s , C u t F i l m s a n d C a r t r i d g e R o l l

Drop us a postal for detailed information

Films.

Viv€

C a m e r a C o m p a n y , , manfrs. cameras and photo, supplies Home Office, N. W. Cor. State and Washington Sts.. CHICAGO

PRESERVE YOUR LINENS USE

§ M 2

THE

MILLER BUTTONHOLE MOISTENER SAVES YOUR TEMPER AND PATIENCE. Of great usefulness a n d c o n v e n i e n c e to all w e a r e r s o f c o l l a r s a n d c u f f s It OPENS T H E B U T T O N H O L E S , perfnmes the collars and cuff*, R E M O V E S T H E S T A R C H a s i f b y magic, permits BUTTONING WITH EASE, saves wear and tear of collars and cuffs a»d\ breaking of finger nails; a d a p t e d t o the! use o f e i t h e r lady o r gentleman, a n d i s a most useful a r t i c l e f o r the dressing case. C a n t°i u s e d t h e s a m e a s a n v o t h e r p e r f u m e bottle, a n d refilled a t a n y t i m e . Mailed to a n y a d d r e s s o n r e c e i p t o f 2 5 c e n t s . Home Novelty Co., 239-241 F o u r t h A v e . , N e w Y o r k .

AGENTS WANTED

f REALOLD VIOLINS

VOflu^Jst EST'b.1838

G«niiinacr&Sons 4 2

D O L L A R

T H I S M A C K I N T O S H is m a d e of b l a c k o r blue g e n u i n e WILCOX ENG­ LISH CASHMERE WATERPROOF CLOTH, fancy p l a i d R n i n g , velvet c o l l a r , d o u b l e detachable cape, f u l l sweep cape a n d s k i r t , latest style a n d finest t a i l o r m a d e . B u s t size 32 to 4 2 .

1

V

O N E

C u t t h i s a d . o u t a n d s e n d t o u s , mention No. - 1 4 1 , s t a t e y o u r H e i g h t , Weight, B u s t " e a s u r e . L e n g t h o f garment from c o l l a r down b a c r 10 w a i s t l i n e , and wnlst l i n e to bottom of s k i r t , state B L A C K O R B L U E , a n d w e will send y o u this W a t e r p r o o f M a c k i n t o s h b y express C. O . D . , subject to e x a m i n a t i o n . E x a m i n e a n d t r y it o n at y o u r nearest express o f f i c e a n d i f f o u n d e x a c t l y as r e p r e ­ sented, a n d t h e greatest value y o u ever »aw, p a y y o u r e x p r e s s a g e n t OUR S P E C I A L P R I C E $ 3 . 7 5 , l e s s t h e 11.00 o r $2.7 5-and express c h a r g e s .

6ast23i5!H.i:

A C M E F O L D I N G B O A T C O . , M t A M I S B U K G , O,

YOU

M E N A N D W O M E N to take orders for W a t e r p r o o f Garments, Men's Mackintoshes $ 3 . 0 0 u p , Lauieti' M a c k i n t o s h e s $ 3 . 5 0 u p . S k i r t s and Capes from $ 2 . 2 5 up. WE FURNISH big book of samples and complete o u t f i t . W i t h o u t p r e v i o u s e x p e r i e n c e y o u c a n make $ 5 . 0 0 l o $ 1 0 . 0 0 every day i n the y e a r . W r i t e f o r f u l l p a r t i c u l a r s . A d d r e s s ,

On tune pay'ts. Exchanged,ren­ ted and repair­ ed. Read"The Violin World," a monthly. 50c a year.

a

DUNDEE

RUBBER

CORPORATION, Chicago, I 22B

A d o p t e d b y G o v e r n m e n t s of C a n a d a , U . S., a n d E n g l a n d . I n d o r s e d b y C o m m o d o r e B o u r k e British N a v y ; Compt. White, N . W . M . Police; M a j . W a l s h , Ex-Gov. Klondike; D r . D a w s o n , C a n a d a G e o l . Survey, and others. 16 It. b o a t , h o l d s 1500 l b s . , f o l d s i n t o c y l i n d e r 5ft. x 10 i n . d i a m . A l s o s m a l l e r s i z e s . H a n d s o m e s m o o t h m o d e l . P e r f e c t for p l e a s u r e use. E n t i r e l y s a f e . C a t a l o g u e free. A C M E F O L D I N G B O A T C O . , M I A M I S B U R G , O H I O .

CAN

EASILY

EARN

bicycles, s e w i n g machines, house f u r n i s h i n g s , ladies' or gentlemen s watches, cameras, m a n d o l i n s , g u i t a r s , v i o l i n s , s i l v e r w a r e , d i n n e r sets, guns, a n d your choice of a h u n d r e d other articles, a l l g u a r a n t e e d . S i m p l y introduce a few boxes of our u n e x c e l l e d toilet soaps a n d a n y i>f them are yours. Send no money. We (rust y o u . G i r l s a n d boys do as w e l l as older people. W r i t e at once for f u l l i n f o r m a t i o n . We m a i l handsome illustrated catalog free. Address G r o u t N o r t h e r n S o a p W o r k * . 6 4 L i t k e S t . , Oak P a r k , III.

BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. It Cost Fifty Thousand Dollars

i d t o o k 12 y e a r s to m a k e B a c h e l d e r ' s ($50,000) £2 m i o u s steel e n g r a v i n g " Battle of G e t t y s ­ burg." I t is 1 1 2 t i m e s a s l a r g e a s t h i s m i n i a t u r e r e p r o ­ d u c t i o n , w h i c h shows but a s m a l l portion of the picture. T h e whole battlefield, f i v e m i l e s l o n g a n d f i v e miles wide, is s h o w n i n t h e o r i g i n a l s t e e l w h i c h w e o f f e r s o l o w . I t is t h e g r a n d e s t w o r k o f a r t e v e r c u t i n s t e e l , a n d w i l l i n ­ crease in value each year i n a n y home, college or school. G e n s ; M e a d e , ' H a n c o c k , a n d L o n g s t r e e t s a i d : " I t is correct i n landscape and position of troops." Capt. L o n g a n d L u t h e r M i n n i g h , the official g u i d e s o f the b a t t l e f i e l d , s a y : " It is h i s t o r i c a l l y c o r r e c t i n a l l its fea­ t u r e s , a n d is t h e m o s t i n t e r e s t i n g a n d b e a u t i f u l w a r p i c ­ ture in the w o r l d . " W i t h each e n g r a v i n g we send k e y g i v i n g 200 r e f e r e n c e s , s h o w i n g l o c a t i o n s a n d m o v e ­ ments of Generals, R e g i m e n t s , C o m p a n i e s , C a v a l r y , I n ­ fantry, a n d A r t i l l e r y at time of P i c k e t t ' s charge. O r i g i n a l nellins price, $ 1 0 0 ; present price, sent o n a p p r o v a l . # 2 . 5 0 ; o r c a s h w l t l i o r d e r , $ 3 . 0 0 , exprCBft p a i d b y i i . . H I S T O R I C A L 36

P i ease

mention M c C l u r e ' s

w h e n y o u w r i t e to

Bromfield

advertisers.

A

R

T

C O M P A N Y ,

St., Boston, M a s s .


McCLURE'S

$ 9

MAGAZINE.

0 0 W o r t h of B O O K S F R E E !

I l f _ ^ • ^ r Jli^^B •

\_ J

For the purpose of introducing our great illustrated literary and family paper. Good Eiterature, into thousands of homes where it is not already taken, we make the lollowing Special, Limited and Extraordinary Offer: Vponrecelpt of only Thirty-five Cents (the regu­

lar subscription prlcefwe will send Good Literature for One Year, ami to each subscriber we will also semi, Free and Two Dollars' Worth of our Best and Most Popular Books, to be selected by yourself from the list printed below be figured at the regular retail prices as given: No. Books at 25 Cents Each. Price. M l . East Lynne, by Mrs. Henry Wood 25 cts. . . . . 142. Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte 25 cts. 143. John Halifax, Gentleman, by Miss Mulock 25 cts. IH. The Woman in White, by Wilkie Collins 7.25 cts. (46. Lady Audley's Secret, by Miss M. E. Braddon 25 cts. 146. The Three Guardsmen, by Alexander Dumas 25 cts. 1106. Adam Bede, by George Eliot 25 cts. 1152. Dora Thorne, by Charlotte M. Braeme 25 cts. . . . 1219. Tempest and Sunshine, by Mrs. Mary J. Holmes 25 cts. 1220. Inez, by Augusta J. Evans 25 cts. 1221. 'Lena Kivers, by Mrs. Mary J. Holmes 25 cts. o i l . Uncle Tom's Cabin, by Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe—25 cts. No. Books at lO Cents Each. Frice. o l . The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne 10 cts. o2. The Mystery of Colde Fell, by Charlotte M. Braeme 10 cts. . . . . o 3 . Under the Bed Flag, oy Miss M. E. Braddon 10 cts. o4. King Solomon's Mines, by H. Rider Haggard 10 cts. o 5 . Around the World in Eighty Days, by Jules Verne 10 cts. a6. TheCorsiean Brothers, by Alexander Dumas 10 cts. a7. Lady Grace, by Mrs. Henry Wood 10 cts. 08. Averil, by Rosa Nouchette Carey 10 cts. o9. The Black Dwarf, by Sir Walter Scott 10 cts. o i l . The Belle of Lynn, by Charlotte M. Braeme 10 cts. o l 2 . The Black Tulip, by Alexander Dumas 10 cts. al3. The Duchess, by "Tbe Duchess" 10 cts. al4. Nurse Revel's Mistake, by Florence Warden 10 cts. o l 5 . Merle's Crusade, by Rosa Nouchette Carey — 1 0 cts. 016. A Study in Scarlet, by A. Conan Doyle 10 cts. ol8. Lord Lisle's Daughter, by Charlotte M. Braeme .10 cts. o l 9 . The Armorer of Tjre, by Sylvanus Cobb, Jr 10 cts. o21. A Scarlet Sin, by Florence Marryat 10 cts. o22. The Sea King, by Captain Marryat 10 cts. o24. Mr. Meeson's Will, by H. Rider Haggard 10 cts. o25. Jenny Harlowe, by W. Clark Russell 10 cts. o26. Beaton's Bargain, by Mrs. Alexander 10 cts. o27. The Squire's Darling, by Charlotte M. Braeme 10 cts. a28. The Russian Gypsy, by Alexander Dumas 10 cts. o29. The Wandering Heir, by Charles Reade 10 cts. o30. Flower and Weed, by Miss M. E. Braddon 10 cts. o34. Hilda; or, The False Vow, by Charlotte M. Braeme 10 cts. o36. A Trip to the Moon, by Jules Verne 10 cts. .. .038. A Little Rebel, by " The Duchess " 10 cts. o39. Master Rockafellar's Voyage, by W. Clark Russell 10 cts. o40. Tbe Heiress of Hilldrop, by Charlotte M. Braeme 10 cts. ... .042. Hickory Hall, by Mrs. Emma D. E. N. Southworth 10 cts. o43. Meeting Her Fate, by Miss M. E. Braddon 10 cts. o44. In Durance Vile, by "The Duchess" 10 cts. o45. Danesbury House, by Mrs. Henry Wood 10 cts. o46. The Twin Lieutenants, by Alexander Dumas 10 cts. 047. Repented at Leisure, by Charlotte M. Braeme 10 cts. o48. The Red Hill Tragedy,by Mrs.Emma D.E.N.Southworth.10 cts. o49. Aunt Diana, by Rosa Nouchette Carey 10 cts. a60. Treasure Island, by Robert Louis Stevenson 10 cts. o52. Lady Diana's Pride, by Charlotte M. Braeme 10 cts. a53. Grace Darnel, by Miss M. E. Braddon 10 cts. a54. Allan Quatermaio, by H. Rider Haggard 10 cts. 056. Lady Latimer's Escape, by Charlotte M. Braeme 10 cts.

No. Books at l O Cents Each (Continued). Price. ..057. Allan's Wife, by H. Rider Haggard 10cts. . .058. The Sign of the Four, by A. Conan Doyle 10 cts. . o59. Pretty Miss Smith, by Florence Warden 10 cts. . .a60. Christie Johnstone, by Charles Reade 10 cts. . .061. A Dark Night's Work, by Mrs. Gaskell 10 cts. . .a62. The Tragedy of Lime Hall, by Charlotte M. Braeme 10 cts. . .o63. Sybil Brotherton, by Mrs. Emma D. E. N. Southworth..10 cts. . a64. The Risen Dead, by Florence Marryat 10 cts. .. a65. Sweet Is True Love, by " The Duchess " 10 cts. . .o66. At Bay, by Mrs. Alexander 10 cts. . .067. At War with Herself, by Charlotte M. Braeme 10 cts. . . a 7 0 . Cranford, by Mrs. Gaskell 10cts. . .a71. A Fatal Temptation, by Charlotte M. Braeme 10 cts. . .a73. The Man in Black, by Stanley J. Weyman 10 cts. . .a74. The Ghost of Riverdale Hall, by Mrs.MayAgnes Fleming.10 cts. . a75. Beyond the City, by A. Conan Doyle 10 cts. . .a76. Lady Ethel's Whim, by CharlotteM. Braeme 10 cts. . . a 7 7 . The House of the Wolf, by Stanley J. Weyman 10 cts. . .078. The Mystery of Cloomber, by A. Conan Doyle 10 cts. . .o79. The Haunted Homestead,by Mrs. E.D.E.N. Southworth. 10 cts. . .o80. She's All the World to Me, by Hall Caine 10 cts. . . a 8 1 . The Artist's Love, by Mrs. Emma D.E.N. Southworth..10 cts. . .o82. Beside the Bonnie Brier Bush, by Ian Maclaren 10 cts. . . o 8 4 . The Homestead on tbe Hillside, by Mrs. Mary J. Holmes.10 cts. . .a86. The Shadow of a Sin, by Charlotte M. Braeme 10 cts. . .aS7. The Light that Failed, by Rudyard Kipling 10 cts. . .a88. Lord Lyune's Choice, by Charlotte M. Braeme 10 cts. . .a89. The Broken Engagement, by Mrs. Southworth 10 cts. . ,a90. The Haunted Chamber, by "The Duchess" 10 cts. No. Books at 5 Cents Each. Price. ..1217. A Pleasure Exertion, by Josiab Allen's Wife 5 cts. . .(224. Tbe Gable-Roofed House at Snowdon, by Mrs. Holmes.. 5 cts. ..(225. The Crime and the Curse, by Mrs. Southworth 5 cts. . .1226. Hinton Hall, by Mrs. May Agnes Fleming 5 cts. . .(227. The Surgeon of Gaster Fell, by A. Conan Doyle 5 cts. . .(228. Glen's Creek, by Mrs. Mary J. Holmes 5 cts. . .(229. The Wife's Victory, by Mrs. E. D. E.N. Southworth 5 cts. . (230. What Gold Cannot Buy, by Mrs. Alexander 5 cts. . (231. Missing—A Young Girl, by Florence Warden 5 cts. . .(232. Maiwa's Revenge, by H. Rider Haggard 5 cts. .. (233. A Troublesome Girl, by " Tbe Duchess " 5 cts. . .(234. Moat Grange, by Mrs. Henry Wood 5 cts. . .1236. Her Manifest Destiny, by Amanda M. Douglas 5 cts. . .(237. Clouds and Sunshine, by Charles Reade 5 cts. . .(238. The Lawyer's Secret, by Miss M. E. Braddon 5 cts. . .(239. Two Kisses, by Charlotte M. Braeme 5 cts. . .(240. Sir Noel's Heir, by Mrs. May Agnes Fleming 5 cts. . (241. The Pearl of the Orient, by Sylvanus Cobb, Jr 5 cts. . .(242. From tbe Earth to the Moon, by Jules Verne 5 cts. . .(243. Mildred Trevanion, by " The Duchess" 5 cts. ..(244. Wall Flowers, by Marion Harland 5 cts. . .(245. The Last of the Ruthvens, by Miss Mulock 5 cts. . .(246. Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, by Stevenson.5 cts. . .(249. A Modern Cinderella, by Charlotte M. Braeme 5 cts. . .(253. The Poison of Asps, by Florence Marryat 5 cts. . .(254. The Little Old Man of the Batignolles, uy Gaboriau 5 cts. . .(255. Under the Lilacs, by Charlotte M. Braeme 5 cts.

Make your own selection of books from the above list to the value of two dollars, figuring the same at the regular retail prices, as given Put a cross, X, in ink, not in pencil, over the dotted line preceding the number of each book that you select. Cut out tbe entire list and enclose it, together with thirty-Jive cents, in a letter like the following : " F. M. Lupton, Publisher, Nos. 23, 25 and 27 City Hall Place, New York.—Dear Sir: Enclosedfind35 cents, for which please send me G OOD Literature for one year, and the two dollars' worth of books mark on the enclosed list." (Sign your name, post office, county and State.) Upon receipt of this letter we will send you, by mail, post paid, the two dollars' worth of books selected, and also Good Literature for one year. Remember, you pay only the regular subscription price of Good Literature ; the two dollars' worth of books are given absolutely free. GOOD Literature is a large and handsome publication of 20 to 24 pages each issue, including a beautiful cover printed in colors. It is profusely illustrated, and contains Serial and Short Stories, Sketches, Poems and other contributions by the most famous authors of the day. It is one of tbe largest, handsomest and most interesting literary and family papers published ; you will be delighted with it. This is the most extraordinary offer ever made by any reliable publish­ ing house in the world, and is possible only from the fact that we possess exceptional facilities in the economical production of books, and of the further fact that we desire, regardless of cost, to secure a mammoth subscription list for Good Literature, believing that those w subscribe now will be so much pleased with the paper that they will continue to take it for many years to come. Perfect satisfaction gu anteed or money refunded. Our house has been established twenty-four years, and we refer to the Mercantile Agencies and to all the lea

newspapers as to our reliability and commercial standing. Tills special offer will hold good only until June 1st, 1900. Address: F . M . L U P T O N , P u b l i s h e r , N o s . 2 3 , 2 5 and* 2 7 G t y H a l l P l a c e , N e w Y o r k . Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers,

go


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

F r e e C u r e for

B a l d n e s s

Prevents Hair Falling Out, Removes Dandruff, Restores Prematurely Gray Hair to Natural Color, Stops Itching and Restores Luxuriant Growth to Eyebrows, Eyelashes and Shining Scalps —A Trial Package Free.

Those w h o are losing their h a i r or h a v e p a r t ­ ed with their locks c a n have it restored b y a remedy that is sent free to all. A Cincinnati A r m h a s concluded that the best w a y to convince people that hair c a n be g r o w n o n any h e a d is to let t h e m try it,and see for t h e m ­ selves. A l l sorts o f theories have been advanced to account for falling h a i r b u t after a l l , i t i s the remedy we are after and not the theory. People, who need m o r e hair, or are anxious to save what they have o r from sickness, d a n d ­ ruff or other causes have lost their h a i r should at once send their name a n d a d d r e s s to the A l t e n h e i m M e d ­ ical Dispensary, 904 Butterfield B l d g . , C i n ­ cinnati, Ohio.enclosing a 2-cent stamp to cover postage and they will forward p r e p a i d by mail, a sufficient free trial package of their r e m e d y to fully prove its r e m a r k a b l e action i n quickly re­ moving a l l trace o f dandruff a n d scalp dis­ eases a n d f o r c i n g a new growth of hair.

M B S . J . S. W E E D , N e w A l b a n y , P a . I S A A C A D A M S , L a k e C i t y . Iowa, MISS E M M A E M O N D . CHAS. W. BISHOP. T h e portraits of M i s s E m m a E m o n d show what a striking T h e experience of C h a s . W . B i s h o p of L a t h r o p , M i c h . , will difference is m a d e i n a p e r s o n w h e n the b a l d h e a d is covered doubtless encourage m a n y another b a l d h e a d to "go thou with hair. M i s s E m o n d was totally b a l d , the h a i r follicles and do likewise." M r . B i s h o p sent for a free t r i a l of the not only u p o n her h e a d but u p o n h e r eyebrows being com­ F o s o R e m e d y , a n d by diligent application has secured a fine pletely contracted not the sign of a h a i r b e i n g f o u n d . She growth of h a i r as shown i n his portrait above. M r . B i s h o p sent for a free trial of the F o s o R e m e d i e s a n d was r e w a r d e d y _ " A l t h o u g h I a m 57 years old a n d h a d a shining c r o w n by a growth of h a i r w h i c h for thickness, quality a n d luxuri­ for m a n y years I a m glad to say that this wonderful remedy ance was as r e m a r k a b l e as the result was gratifying. M i s s has made m y h a i r grow out i n a most r e m a r k a b l e m a n n e r . E m o n d lives i n S a l e m , M a s s . , at 276 W a s h i n g t o n St. It began w i t h a fine fuzz gradually getting stronger a n d t h i c k e r u n t i l I could c o m b a n d b r u s h It as i n the days of m y ISAAC H . ADAMS. y o u t h . I c a n honestly recommend it to everyone." Isaac H . A d a m s , of L a k e C i t y , I o w a , is a conspicious ex­ ample of the fact that baldness c a n be c u r e d . H e says:— " M y h a i r c a m e out so b a d that I got b a l d a l l over the top W R I T E F O BF R E E TRIAL. of m y h e a d a n d the scalp got shiny. I used the F o s o T r e a t ­ T h e thousands of people w h o are b a l d or are losing t h e i r ment, a n d i n forty-eight h o u r s the r e m a i n d e r of m y h a i r h a i r a n d t h i n k the condition is incurable should send t h e i r stopped f a l l i n g out a n d i n a few weeks I h a d as fine a g r o w t h name a n d address to the A l t e n h e i m M e d i c a l D i s p e n s a r y , of h a i r as a n y m a n would want." M r . A d a m s sent his photo­ 904 Butterfield B l d g . , C i n c i n n a t i , O h i o , enclosing a 2-cent graphs to the proprietors of the F o s o R e m e d i e s to show what stamp to cover postage,for a free trial of this w o n d e r f u l h a l r a r e m a r k a b l e change has been p r o d u c e d . grower. I t is not a patent medicine product b u t the discov­ M B S . J . S. W E E D . ery of a w e l l k n o w n and chemist author, Prof. Stokes, on the M r s . J . S. W e e d , T r e a s u r e r of Swartz Corps N o . 91, W . R . C . subject of h a i r a n d its growth. It has h a d a most r e m a r k ­ with h e a d q u a r t e r s at N e w A l b a n y , B r a d f o r d C o . , P a . , owes a able success a n d has fully settled the fact that h a i r c a n be l u x u r i a n t g r o w t h of h a i r to the famous F o s o R e m e d i e s a n d m a d e to grow on the baldest h e a d , no matter what caused It although past fifty years of age, h e r h a i r grew out w i t h astonishing l u x u r i a n c e . M r s . W e e d k i n d l y consented to to fall out o r how m a n y years the scalp has been shiny. S e n d p e r m i t h e r photographs to be sketched, one t a k e n some time for the free trial today a n d m a k e a test of this t r u l y m a r v e l ­ ago w h e n she was p r e m a t u r e l y b a l d a n d a later one t a k e n ous h a i r grower. S e n d for it whether y o u have a n y f a i t h o r recently s h o w i n g the beautiful effects of this r e m a r k a b l e not. It will astonish y o u w i t h its wonderful effect on the scalp. h a i r grower. s a

S :

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 91


McVEVUE'S

iIA.GA.ZlJSE.

W o r n W i t h o r W i t h o u t C o r s e t . E n d o r s e d by every P h y s i c i a n w h o h a s u s e d i t It y o u w a u t T H E B E S T R E M E D Y t h a t t h e combined experience a n d skill o f a l l ages lias D E V E L O P E D t o r t h e discomforts a n d diseases of w o m e n — a r o t i u d y w h i c h rarely fails, w h i c h is a l w a y s helpful, w h i c h avoids publicity, pain a n dexpense—then y o u want o u r Brace. I t is a b o o n to a n yw e a k l y w o m a n , a b o o n to t h e f a m i l y w h o s e h a p p i n e s s is modified b y h e r h e a l t h a n d temper. W eTake the Risk of itsP l e a s i n g Y o u . T h o u s a n d s o f letters like this prove o u r assertions: " I suffered over t w e n t y y e a n w i t h a l l t h a t " F e m a l e TronMe*' meant— prolapsus, g i v i n g away o f l i i u h s , iiiiinlineBB, hackache, hearing d o w n , k n i f e - l i k e i n t e r n a l pains, etc. P h y s i c i a n s a n d supporters a l w a y s f a i l e d l o c u r e i i i e . I huuglit a N A T U R A L B O D Y B R A C K a few years ago when I c o u l d nut stand w i t h o u t f a i n t i n g . I t made a n e w w o m a n of ute, b r i n g i n g uia s p l e n d i d health and happiness. M r s . I d a M . F u l t o n , H e b r o n . N e b r a s k a . M a r c h IT,, 1S09. M O N E Y R E F U N D E D IF B R A C E IS N O T S A T I S F A C T O R Y . W r i t e today f o rfull information a n d illustrated book, MAILED In plain, sealed envelope.

FREE,

Address N A T U R A L B O D Y B R A C E C O . , B o x '38 Salina, K a n s a s . E v e r y w o m a n anticipating m o t h e r h o o d should have this B r a c e .

SIMPLE

IN

CONSTRUCTION

COMFORTABLE

ADJUSTABLE TO ANY FIGURE.

CHILDREN TEETHING. Mrs. Winsi.ow's Soothing Syrl'p h a s b e e n u s e d f o r

over F I F T Y Y E A R S b y M I L L I O N S o f M O T H E R S f o r their C H I L D R E N W H I L E T E E T H I N G , with P E R F E C T SUCCESS. It S O O T H E S the C H I L D . S O F T E N S the G U M S , A L L A Y S a l l P A I N ; C U R E S W I N D C O L I C , a n d is t h e best r e m e d y f o r D I A R R H C E A . Sold b y Druggists in every part of the world. B e sure a n d ask for " ' M r s . W i n s l o w ' s Soothing- S y r u p , " a n d take n o other kind. T w e n t y - f i v e cents a bottle.

FAY

STOCKINGS for Ladies and Children.

N o garters. N o supporters. B u t t o n t o waist. U p t o s t a y . M o s t c o m f o r t a b l e , summer or winter. Best, cheapest, a n d most durable. 1d e a l s t o c k i n g for bicycling, atbletic sports, a n d for e v e r y d a y use. C h i l d r e n ' s s i z e s , 2 5 c . t o 4. )C L a d i e s ' , 6 0 c . Satisfaction guaranteed o r m o n e y refunded. Mail orders solicited. W e p a y postage. C i r c u l a r s free. r

DRUNKENNESS

T H E F A Y S T O C K I N G C O . , 66 B S t . , E l y r i a , 0. T h e s p e c i f i c O K E S T T 1 N E re­ d u c e s f a t e v e n after r e p e a t e d f a i l ­ ures w i t h s o - c a l l e d other cures. R e s p i r a t i o n i m p r o v e d at o n c e ; safe; n o d i e t i n g ; n o p u r g e . 9!i cents ?nd $ 1 . 5 0 . G O O D R I C H & C O . , l ^ e p t . K , 935 A r c h S t r e e t , P h i l a d e l p h i a , P a . Samples and Circulars FREE.

Oh! So Fat! ^ M ^ M .^^L £ | ^^fl

CURED.

It is N o w W i t h i n t h e R e a c h o fE v e r y W o m a n to Save the U r u n k a n l . - A T r i a l P a c k a g e Free. B y a new d i s c o v e r y w h i c h c a n be g i v e n i n tea, coffee o r food. It does its worn so s i l e n t l y a n d s u r e l y t h a t w h i l e the d e v u t e d wife, sis­ t e r o r d a u g h t e r looks o n . the d r u n k a r d i s r e c l a i m e d e v e n against his w i l l a n d w i t h o u t h i s k n o w ' e d g e o r c o - o p e r a t i o n . Send y o u r name a n d address to D r . J . W . H a i n e s , 128y G l e n n B l d g . , C i n c i n n a t i , Ohio, a n d he w i l l m a i l e n o u g h o f the r e m e d y free to show h o w i t is used in tea, coffee o r f o o d a n d t h a t i t w i l l c u r e the dreaded h a b i t q u i e t l y a n d p e r m a n e n t l y , a l s o f u l l d i r e c t i o n s h o w t o use it, books a n d testimon­ i a l s f r o m h u n d r e d s w h o h a v e been c u r e d , a n d e v e r y t h i n g needed to aid y o u i n s a v i n g those n e a r a n d d e a r to y o u f r o m a life o f degrada­ tion and ultimate poverty a n d disgrace.

CASH

I for acceptable Ideas* State if patented. I THE PATENT RECORD, Baltimore, Md. Patent Record

Subscription price o f the per a n n u m . Samples free.

fl.00

M L ^ S Itri«4 f^ervj knormV«atmtrft and device yrWKou-t 2[ h«.fr- Finally I eared rnyisl} \>j QaUnic EltCTric'iVy don\

>*tt**t Vtmft and monty as I did _ \TYi\e rtxt and.

Hair L i k e

T h i s

W E W I L L M A I L F R E E on application, to any address, full information how to grow hair upon the baldest head, stop hair falling, cure weak eyebrows and eyelashes, scanty partings, scurf, dandruff, itching scalp, and restore gray and faded hair to its natural color, after all other remedies have failed. Enclose 2 cent stamp for sealed package. Address G . L O R R I M E R & C O . 3 3 4 N . H o w a r d S t . , B a l t i m o r e , Md. Please mention McCTure's when you write to advertisers. 92


MCCLURE'S

i * $ * i i i

ii i

F O O D

MAGAZINE.

D a i s y

t h a t m a k e s

Q u e e n "

O n e of the latest a n d m o s t l a s t i n g of perfumes.

|

Electricity, 1 G R A P E = N U T S

i A famous electrical engineer, Foote, who con­ structed the 3,000 horse-power electric plant which supplies Battle Creek, Kalamazoo and other Michi­ gan cities, says there is no food known that will supply him with the vitality and mental vigor from breakfast to noon that Grape=Nuts will.

are of

Mr. Foote, in conversation, said : " There is no doubt left in my mind of these facts. I have tried all sorts of food, and kept track of the results. I gain steadily in reserve force when I use GrapeNuts, notwithstanding my occupation requires long-continued and concentrated brain work." There is no artificial stimulant in Grape=Nuts. Nothing but the stimulus of good food that is scientifically prepared for immediate assimilation into blood and tissue, especially brain tissue.

highest quality, selection matter

Brain workers can get sure and understandable results by using G r a p e - N u t s .

OPIUM

MORPHINE

is

Sold by nil dealers, or will In* sent, prepaid, on receipt ot $1.00.

a

I.ADD <fr C O F F I W . 24 Barclay St., New Ybrfcj

ARNICA

BORATED TALCUM

TOOTH SOAP Beautifies, cleanses, pre­ serves and whitens the teeth, strengthens the cruras and sweetens the breath. The World's Standard Dentifrice for 30 years. Used ir, a million homes. Put up in neat and handy boxes—the ideal package for the traveler. N o dust, no powder, no liquid to waste, or to stain or soli garments. 25c at a l l Druicifl.t*. C. H. STRONG & CO., Proprietors. Chicago, U. S. A.

A Positive Relief for CHAPPED MAUDS, CHAFING,

and all afflictions of the skin.

"A little higher in price per­ haps than worthless substi­ tutes, but a reason for it"

Delightful after shaving. Sold every­ where or mailed on receipt of 25c.

Get Mermen's (the original). Sample Free. E K N K S C O . . N e w a r k , fr. J . lit

TRADE-—

P

simply

Habit and

J P W D E R

tiF.IClIAKi>

a

of preference.

Neurasthenia CURED at Home (no Pain) w i t h D E N A K C O , S a m p l e »nd book free. TheComstock Remedy Co., Dept.M,LaFayette,lnd.

ENNEN'S

and

T H E O N L Y

MARK. -

D A N D R U F F

C U R E

and Positive Preventive of Baldness. E s s e n t i a l l y a n Ideal H A I R T O N I C f o r L A D I E S , a s it is free f r o m a l l o i l y o r fatty s u b s t a n c e s . Invented by D r . P.J. Eichhoff. P r o f e s s o r of D e r m a t o l o g y , E l b e r f e l d . G e r m a n y . Send for instructive pampttlet on treatment of the HAIR. Sole U . S. Agents, M U L H E N S & K R O P F F , 35 a n d 37 White Street, New Y o r k , ease mention McClure's when yon write to aclvsrtisers.

93


McCLUHE'S

MAGAZINE.

4 » F I V E

T R A I N S

T O T H E

EVERY

D A Y VIA

SOUTHERN THE

R A I L W A Y

POPULAR

ROUTE

ATLANTA, NEW ORLEANS $ MEMPHIS, TEXAS $ MEXICO and CALIFORNIA | and all points ciy SOUTH and SOUTHWEST $

FLORIDA, CUBA, NASSAU AIKEN, AUGUSTA, SAVANNAH PINEHURST,N.C, and CHARLESTON WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA "THE LAND OF THE SKY"

X * 9 X jk

T H E

NEW

YORK

& FLORIDA

R O U T E

EXPRESS

S O U T H

OF

T H E

WASHINGTON

«* SOUTHWESTERN

WASHINGTON

& CHATTANOOGA

kii

LIMITED LIMITED

}K

w is

Perfect d i n i n g a n d s l e e p i n g c a r service o n a l l trains. T o u r i s t sleeping car, W a s h i n g t o n t o S a n fJSS F r a n c i s c o . See that y o u r tickets read : Via Southern Railway.

I

ALEX. S. THWEATT, E. P. A., 271 Broadway, New York J)/ J. M. CULP, Traffic Mgr. W. A. TURK, Qen'l Pass. Agt. WASHINGTON, D. C.

DITMAN'S

C U R E S

SEA-SALT

The Natural Salt of Pure Sea Water TONIC, STRENGTHENING, INVICORATINC Used for Quarter Century

T o b a c c o Habit

Address Dltman, 2 Barclay street* New York

GERE

F R E E ! A n e w d i s c o v e r y , o d o r l e s s a n d taBteless, that L a d l e s c a n give i n c o f f e e o r a n y k i n d o f f o o d , q u i c k l y c u r i n g : t h e p a t i e n t w i t h o u t his k n o w l e d g e . A n y o n e c a n h a v e a free trial package b vaddressing Rogers D r u g & C h e m i c a l C o . , 655 F i f t h a n d R a c e S t s . , C i n c i n n a t i , Ohio, and easily drive foul tobacco smoke a n d dirty spittoons f r o m the home.

BOATJNgiNEp,

"GEO.n' ."gc'R1°YaV^At"* -"LAUNCH WKS. 6RAN0-RADI0S MICH.

PATENTS GUARANTEED O u r f e er e t u r n e d i f w e f a i l . A n y one sending sketch a n d description of a n y invention will p r o m p t l y receive o u r o p i n i o n free concerning the patentability o f same. " H o w to Obtain a P a t e n t " sent u p o n request. Patents secured through u sadvertised for sale a t our expense. P a t e n t s t a k e n o u t t h r o u g h u s r e c e i v e special notice, w i t h o u t c h a r g e , i n an illustrated a n d widely circulated journal, consulted b yManufacturers a n d Investors. S e n d f o r s a m p l e c o p y FREE. Address,

A S T H M A 0 n P K > I f y o u suffer f r o m a n y f o r m o f A s t h m a w e w a n t t o s e n d y o u free b y m a i l , pre­ paid, a Bottle o fthe famous K o l a P l a n t C o m p o u n d . It i s Nature's S u r e B o t a n i c C u r e for t h e disease, a n d w e g u a r a n t e e t h a t i t w i l l f o r e v e r s t o p a l ly o u r suffer­ ing. W e a r e s e n d i n g o u t 50,000 B o t t l e s f r e e b y m a i l t o Sufferers, t o p r o v e t h ew o n d e r f u l p o w e r o f t h i s N e w D i s c o v e r y , a n dw e w i l l b e pleased to send o n e to y o u . S e n d y o u r n a m e a n d address b y postal card o r letter. Address, T h eK O L A i m P O B I I N G C O . , N o . 1164 B r o a d w a y , N e w Y o r k .

r K t t i

The Patent Record,

VICTOR J . EVANS & CO. (Patent

Evans Building,

Attorneys,)

WASHINGTON, D. 6 . F R O M

T H E

F A C E ,

N E C K

A N D

A R M S ,

PAnd other A parts D ofOthe N A instantiynamom H A I R body without the slightest injury, and leaves the skin white, soft and beautiful. Padona is easily applied and certain in effect, as attested by large numbers of persons of culture and refinement who have used it successfully. Try it after all other remedies have failed. 81,000.00

F O B F E I T

U P .

P A D O N A

N E V E R

F A I L S .

Padona is compounded on strictly scientific principles by expert chemists. There is no element of chance in its use. Each package is absolutely guaranteed. Padona is sent postage paid, securely sealed from observation, in safety mailing case, on receipt of »1.00 per package. All correspondeuce strictly confidential. Cut this out as it may not appear again. Mention this paper. i f l i m s

The Please Padona Company, Dept. c<» Cincinnati, Ohio. mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 94

wanted.


McCLURE'S

Below

y o u

will

find

important

and

L E A V E S — T H E

NEW-GROWTH

Lucke's

the

IN T H E T E N D E R

TROPICAL

Lucke

Cigars. the

high

first

and

DELICATE

TOBACCO

LOAM

SOIL.

IT

W O R T H

IS

K N O W I N G

only

TROPIC-

FROM

A B O U T .

authoritative

recognition any in

GROWN

about

Rolled It is

I T IS A L L

official

testimony Rolls

MAGAZINE.

make this

ever

given

of

cigars

country.

Q Q 0 D (

United states h e a l t h O N

ttenoTttf

T H E H Y G I E N I C

V A L U E

O F

CIGARS.

With reference to cigars, as is well known they contain more or less nicotine, which is poison ; however, if the tobacco is of proper grade and correctly cured and cleanly manufactured, there will be found in such properly made cigars just enough nicotine to be of hygienic value in preventing the smoker from catching contagious diseases and also frequently cure membranous mucous disease germs. Therefore the U n i t e d S t a t e s H e a l t h R e p o r t s go on record as declaring that cigars can be made (and in tnis instance have been found made) so as to be h e a l t h f u l , s a n i t a r y and of h y g i e n i c v a l u e . Inasmuch as we are looked to for unbiased reports on such matters, solely for the public welfare, as an instituted and depend­ able authority on matters of health for the benefit of the American public —and inasmuch as we have received many inquiries on this subject - and have instituted an examination into this matter and have investigated a great number of the various brands of cigars offered the public, we have found that the '• Lucke R o l l s " and " Lucke's Rolled Cigars," made by J . H . Lucke & C o , of Cincinnati. Ohio, were perfect and came up to every exacting qualification. T h e y are made of finest tropical tobacco, hygienically handled from the very start, and manufactured according to the best methods known to science. Extreme cleanliness is required in every handling and they reach the consumer with the absolute guarantee that they combine the very best qualities possible to be contained in a cigar. K n o w i n g the wholesomeness of this product, we advise the use of these goods by all who wish a healthful smoke. Upon the highly favorable reDort of our Hygienic Experts and Medical Staff we cordially extend to the Lucke Cigars and Rolls our editorial and official endorsement. T H E UNITED STATES H E A L T H REPORTS, Washington, D . C . Jan. 2nd, 1900. By A . N . M.D.

(Signed)

Talley, THE ABOVE REVEALS ONLY ONE REASON WHY YOU SHOULD CALL FOR AND INSIST UPON GETTING ROLLS OR ROLLED CIGARS FROM YOUR DEALER. THERE ARE

FOUR 1. 2.

3. 4.

OTHER

REASONS:

T h e highest form of pleasing, satisfying taste is in them. T h e quick make and absence of binder brings the price down to pay-for-value-only—no paying for useless carefulness in shaping, binding and finishing. T h e y look O . K . in the mouth,—are full cigar size.—and are a neat smoke, holding the ash without flecky droppings-off on one's clothes. These goods.—by reason of their close price,—have no champions except among consumers. There is no urging or effort to sell them, by dealers.

PLEASE DO US THE FAVOR T O REMEMBER THESE POINTS UNTIL YOU HAVE T H E OPPORTUNITY T O T R Y T H E M W e send box 100 L u c k e ' s R o l l s (small) prepaid to a n y address in U . S. for $1, or box 50 Raited

By mail

C i g a r s full size; for $1.25 p r e p a i d .

W e refund a n y r e m i t t a n c e if p u r c h a s e r is not f u l l y pleased

w i t h goods.

C O . , L U C K E

J

#

H

#

L U C K E

&

B L O C K ,

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 95

C I N C I N N A T I ,

O H I O .


MoCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

I E N V I R QN M E N X 5

IF Y O U W A N T N E W I D E A S on beautifying y o u r home with artistic wall coverings write for " E N V I R O N M E N T S , " o u r latest a n d best b o o k l e t . B e s i d e s o f f e r i n g s u g g e s t i o n s f o r the c o r r e c t a d o r n m e n t o f the h o m e and d e s c r i b i n g m a n y o r i g i n a l s c h e m e s f o r

INTERIOR

DECORATION

It c o n t a i n s i n t e r e s t i n g m a t t e r f r o m the h i s t o r y o f the m o s t p o p u l a r s t y l e s of d e c o r a t i o n , i n c l u d i n g O r i e n t a l , L o u i s X V I a n d C o l o n i a l . It c o n s i d e r s d e c o r a t i o n as a n a r t i n a c c o r d a n c e w i t h the m o s t a d v a n c e d taste a n d e c o n o m y a n d w i l l a s s i s t y o u to c h o o s e a p p r o p r i a t e h a n g i n g s for the d e n , a y o u n g l a d i e s ' r o o m , t h e n u r s e r y i s w e l l a s f o r the n e c e s s a r y rooms. T h e i l l u s t r a t i o n s a r e in c o l o r s s h o w i n g s o m e up-to-date i n t e r i o r s . " E N V I R O N M E N T S " w i l l be s e n t free. It is w o r t h d r o p p i n g « p o s t a l for b e c a u s e it i s w r i t t e n b y m a s t e r c r a f t s m e n .

W. P. NELSON CO. 197

W A B A S H AVENUE. CHICAGO

P

Ak pR IS— 1 9 0 0 £5£7.£&. ecfally c h a r t e r e d for P a r i s Exposition,

O b e r a m m e r g a u P a s s i o n P l a y a n d T o u r of E u r o p e , start J u n e 30; b o o k i n g n o w . A l s o T h i r t y other S p r i n g a n d S u m m e r E x c u r s i o n s . S p e c i a l features : exceptional advantages. Fit A N K C. C ' l . A K K . I l l B R O A D W A Y . N . Y .

SEND O N E

HEALTH A t

HOME... H O R 1 N E L L S V I L L E ,

N . Y .

D O L L A R

Cu c thin ad. o u t a n d send to us, mention No. 12*2,state jour MM(.111 and WEIGHT, Main num­ ber Inches around body at BREAST taken over regular coat, close up under arms, and we will send you this coat b*# express C O . D., S U B J E C T T O EXAMINATION. Examine and try It on at y o u r nearest ex­ press office, a n d i f f o u n d perfectly satis­ factory, the greatest value you ever saw or heard of and such a mackintosh as sells In finest city stores at double our price, pay *-ur express agent O u r 4*7 O O Special Offer Price, i• ill.- #1. tut, <>r $6.00and e\pre«.sclift'ge5. THIS WATERPROOF MACKINTOSH RAIN nflAT theverv latest style, made from very — line GENUINE CHESTERTON all wool dark brown or tan waterproof COVERT < MDII. one of the finest English weaves, l i n e d w i t h Chesterton Mackintosh Lining, • n'y highest grade English Rubber Com|.uund Is used, d o u b l e breasted, velvet c o l l a r , v e n t i l a t e d a r m holes, deep fac­ i n g s , w a t e r p r o o f pockets, waterproof sewed, strapped and cemented seamB. Size: Breast measure, 3* to 48 inches. F o r a w jit r r p r o o t f r u i n c o a t o r o v T c o a t y o u c a n ' t g e t a b e t t e r lrariiitiit at double t h e price. c

Cbe

Steuben

Sanitarium

p

/

,

y

j

y

j

t s

u

WEARY

A PLACE FOR THE TO R E S T A N D T H E SICK TO G E T

PROMINENT

W E L L

FEATURES 1

1,400 Feftt a b o v e the L e v e l of the S e a . 200 F e e t a b o v e the C i t y . B e a u t i f u l P a r k of T e n A c r e s . Fire-proof B r i c k and ] Stone Structures Perfectly H e a t e d and Ventilated w i t h 1 the F a n S y s t e m . Natural Gas Power. Private Electric Plant. Safety E l e v a t o r . Commodious Parlors, Reception [ R o o m s . Offices. V e r a n d a s . B a l c o n i e s , etc. L o n g Distance 1 Telephone. General Electrical Apparatus. Galvanic, ' K a r a d i c . Static and X R a y . Perfectly Constructed Bath R o o m s , w h e r e E v e r y F o r m of B a t h is g i v e n Thoroughly Equipped Operating Rooms. Experienced H o u s e Staff. Sixteen E m i n e n t Consultants. T r a i n e d Nurses and A t ­ tendants Excellent Hygienic Cuisine. S e n d f o r l i t e r a t u r e to Dr.

J .

E . W A L K E R ,

i

ACENTS

W A N T E D

MEN AND WOMEN to take orders for Waterproof Garments, Men's Mackintoshes fit. OO up, Ladles' Mackintoshes $11. 50 up, Skirls and tapes from » 2 . 2 5 up. WE FURNISH a b i g b o o k o f samples and complete o u t l i t . W i t h o u t p r e v i o u s e x p e r i e n c e you, can m a k e to.00 t o M0.00 e v e r y d a y i n t h e y e a r . W r i t e f o r f u l l particulars. Address, DUNDEE R U B B E R CORPORATION,CHICAGO, ILL. 25C

S u p e r i n t e n d e n t

Please m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n v o u w r i t e to advertisers. Of)


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Ladies! Look

for

That

Mark

when buying dinner ware.

The EA CLE

and. LION

years,

stamp has, for

borne upon the finest made in America.

crackle

been

of

china

When you find that

mark you may KNOW reliable;

grade

that the ware is

that it will not

''craze,"

or

m use.

Furthermore,

it embodies

taste in design and the

the

highest

finest

skill

m

manufacture. The best merchants dorse the dealer

LAUGHLIN

will

cheerfully

carry line,

and

en­

and

your

order for

you

any of our goods not in stock. Homer

t5J

E.

Laughhn Liverpool,

China Ohio.

Co. M

Screw-Driver With Four Interchangeable Blades of Different Sizes. H o l l o w Brass Handle. A Handy Pocket Tool. Sent, prepaid, on receipt of 75 cents. SMITH & WESSON, 16 S t o c l c b r i d g e S t . , S p r i n g f i e l d , M a s s

™£ BURRELL ENGINE

What 30 Cents W i l l Do. It will bring you an elegant STI..IV N E C K T I E (The Elgin), ladies' or gents'. The only necktie made that will not get out of shape. The lining will not twist, slip or pull out. Made to sell for a I X ) L L A It. To introduce them we will, for thirty days, send you one of these elegant ties—latest style—free on receipt of 30 cents in silver. State color desired. Agents wanted. Write at once. THE E U U N TTE CO. E L G T N , JYtJi,

T H E 1900 T Y P E USES GAS OR GASOLINE. Compact. Simple. Reliable and Artistic. Built in Quantities. Parts Interchangeable. Material and Workmanship the Best. Ac. H.P. Weight. Time Price. Spot Cash. l'A 600 *140.O0 $125.00 8 900 16O.00 145.00 All Engines Guaranteed. Sole Makers. SKILLIN A R I C H A R D S M F G . CO., 2 4 5 S. J e f f e r s o n St., C h i c a g o , I l l s .

Complete Line of Bath Cabinets in the World N E W E S T DESIGNS; L A T E S T I M P R O V E M E N T S AND

PATENTS.

Be sure to send for our catalogue before buying a Batli Cabinet if you ivant to have the best. T h e N e w a n d I m p r o v e d T r w i n B a t h C a b i n e t s c o n t a i n all the best features o f all the o t h e r cabinets w i t h several e n t i r e l y new ones, f u l l y p r o t e c t e d b y patents, m a k i n g t h e m the " o n l y p e r f e c t B a t h C a b i n e t s . " T h e y are a b s o l u t e l y the o n l y C a b i n e t s a u t o m a t i c a l l y c o n s t r u c t e d so t h a t y o u c a n s u p p l y y o u r s e l f w i t h d r i n k i n g w a t e r a n d m o p o r sponge y o u r face w i t h o u t assistance. T h e y are s e l f - p u r i f y i n g , the n o x i o u s gases f r o m pores b e i n g p r o m p t l y r e m o v e d and replaced b y f r e s h heat, c a r r y i n g its f u l l q u o t a of o x y g e n , w h i c h equalizes a n d stimulates its effect. B e t t e r results at l o w e r t e m p e r a t u r e a n d w i t h o u t oppression. Latest i m p r o v e d heating apparatus. These Cabinets place the benefits of Turkish Baths and alt'kinds of medicated Vapor Baths, within the reach of every one in their own home at a cost of only J cents per bath. Will cure or relieve most any disease. W e M a k e C a b i n e t s F r o m $ 3 . 5 0 to $12.50. Special prices where we have no representative. W e give better value for same money than any one. Beware of catch-penny methods. Book " Health and Beauty" free. A G E N T S W A N T E O s one sold 1,000 in four months.

E. I R W I N M A N U F A C T U R I N G CO., 123 Chambers St., N e w Y o r k . 96a


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

TF

you are going to California, and economy, comfort and exquisite scen­ ery will influence your route, kindly investigate our personally conducted oncea-week parties.

Burlington Route

A

They leave every Tuesday from Boston via Niagara Falls and Chicago, joining at Den­ ver a similar party from St. Louis. A special conductor is in charge. Pullman Tourist cars are used. They lack only the expensive finish of Palace cars, while the cost per berth is about one-third. Send for a folder giving par­ ticulars. ' • C o l o r a d o B E S T

L I N E

C H I C A G O

O R

S T .

L O U I S

T O

DIABETES AND KIDNEY TROUBLE CURE

E n c l o s e

Before Buying

5

C e n t s

McClure's IS

Oak-Tanned Leather Harness,

y e a r s '

UNITED STATES AND FOREIGN PATENTS

M I N E R A L S , FOSSILS, INDIAN RELICS. Great stock. Collector, school, museum. 24 pp. Catalogue fur stamp. Fifteenth year. W . L . S t i l w e l l , Deadwood (Black Hills), S. Dak.

e x p e r i e n c e .

K I N G H A R N E S S

W O L V E R I N E "

C 0 . , M f r s .

G A S O L I N E

O u r E n g i n e s are R e v e r s i b l e , and our T ' i r e e C y l i n d e r is the o n l y " S E L F S T A R T I N G " M a r i n e E n g i n e made.

Send for Catalogue.

w i l l strengthen y o u r wrist, steady y o u r nerves, d evelop enormous strength i n y o u r ringers; it cures i n s o m n i a , writer's c r a m p , bicycle cramp, c o l d hands a n d t r e m b l i n g hands. U s e it while y o u talk or w o r k or w h e n l y i n g wakeful—an infallible sleep producer, concentrating m i n d and nervous force a n d d r a w i n g sur­ plus b l o o d from the b r a i n . I n v a l u a b l e to g o l f e r s , b o x e r s , s u r g e o n s , m u ­ sicians a n d artisans of all k i n d s . P r i c e 50c. a pair. N i c k e l e d m e t a l , cork g r i p s , $1 a pair. HENDRICKSON WRIST MACHINE CO. Bldg., New

York

E N G I N E S

One, Two and Three Cylinders

Hendrickson Grip Machine

Park Row

Ink

If you have an invention upon w h i c h vou desire to obtain a patent, consult the reliable firm of A l e x a n d e r *fc U o w e l l , Patent Lawyers, Washington, D. C.

2 i i Church St., Owego, N . Y .

D e p t . A , 1131

W I T H

Ault & Wiborg's

direct to the consumer from the manufacturer, at wholesale prices. W e can save you money. 2 0

Magazine

P R I N T E D

in

stamps to pay postage on 208-page Illustrated C a t a ­ logue of Custom Made

The

"

A r e the titles of r e a l l y v a l u a b l e descrip­ tive b o o k l e t s w h i c h can be h a d for six cents i n postage each b y s e n d i n g to P . S. E u s t i s , General Passenger Agent, C . B . & Q . R . R . , CHICAGO.

California I will guarantee to cure Diabetes. No Cure, No Pay. Would thank you in advance for names and P. O. Addresses of persons that are afflicted with Dia­ betes, also with Briglit's Disease and with other Kidney Troubles. "Write for terms. State age, and how h.ng you have been afflicted. Address K . f O K l E K , V. O . B o x 8 T S . O t t i . m w n . I o w a .

O u t i n g r s

" C a l i f o r n i a "

\

WOLVERINE MOTOR WORKS 3 H u r o n Street G r a n d R a p i d s , M i c h . , U . S. A .

c% MAKE BIG MONEY.,,.

TO

a

u

u

ENTERTAINING THE PUBLIC.

$30.00 to $300.00 „^ r P

20 vious experlenee. N o o t h e r business ijipays such large returns for the ^ . l i t t l e effort r e q u i r e d . W e f u r n i s h c o m p l e t e outfits. T h e w o r k is easy, s t r i c t l y h i g h class a u d a n y m a n c a n operate the outfit by f o l l o w i n g our instructions. "Write f o r p a r t i c u l a r s a n d c o p i e s o f l e t t e r s f r o m those w h o a r e m a k i n g BIO MONET o n o u r p l a n . E N T E R T A I N M E N T S U P P L Y C O . , Dept. 2 » 5G Fifth Avenue, CHICAGO, I L L .

Please m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n you

96b

w r i t e to

advertisers,

week with-

roper


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

T h e highest degree o f excellence is achieved only by effort and experience. F o r fifteen years we have made gas and gasoline engines, always improving, until n o w we present the most reliable, economical, durable, simple and safe engines on the market adapted to all uses. I n 1880 we used a few feet o f floor space. I n 1900 we use four and one half acres o f floor space, filled w i t h improved machinery. O l d s Motors are made only by the Olds people, under the O l d s patents. W e have the largest capacity o f any manufactory o f motors using gasoline or gas. O u r motor vehicles, i n constant use since 1 8 9 6 , prove so satisfactory that we believe our model the most practical yet produced. Send for catalogue w h i c h explains every detail o f construction and carries conviction.

SIMPLEX L A U N C H ENGINES

Burn Naphtha or Gasoline. Excel in Safety, Simplicil and Design. Most Reliable Motors for Small Boats. F A I R B A N K S , MORSE & C O . , Chicago, St. L o u i s . St. P a u l , L o u i s v i l l e , C l e v e l a n d , D e n v i Cincinnati, San Francisco, Portland, Ore. A l l Y O U S e e is s t y l e , b e a u t y , figure ;

A

K N I F E

W h a t Y O U F e e l is c o m f o r t , ease, s a t i s f a c t i o n ,

T H A T WILL CUT AND HOLD A N EDGE

WITH

BRAIDED B u s t l e s and

5

No°: IU l Wats ,' til

Forms

B R A I D E D W I R E H A I R R O L L S can't heat the head. M a t c h a n y shade o f hair.

C u t is t w o - t h i r d s size of Senator s t y l e . Blades are hand-forged from the finest razor steel and every Unife w a r r a n t e d . H a n d l e is an indestructible transparent composition more b e a u t i f u l than pearl. P.eneath handles are placed name, address, photos, society emblems, etc. SENATOR STYLE. N o . 118, 2 blades, $ 1 . 2 0

WIRE

SOLD IN A L L STORES A l w a y s nsk for " B r a i d e d W i r e . " H y o u don't find them w e w i l l send, postpaid, o n receipt of price.

AGENTS WANTED EVERYWHERE

WRITE

FOR OUR BOOKLET,"HIDDEN

HELPS"

The Weston & Wells M f g . Co.

Send 2-cent stamp for c i r c u l a r a n d terms. N O V E L T Y C U T L E R Y C O . , 5 B a r Street, Canton,

1112 Noble Street,

Please m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s when y o u write to advertisers.

96c

-

Philadelphia


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Dr. J . Parker

Pray's RENOWNED and UNEQUALLED

ROSALINE for t i n t i n g c h e e k s a n d lips a r o s y h u e , true to nature as w e l l as a s k i n beautifier; cont a i n s h i g h m e d i c a l qualities ; is w o n d e r f u l i n e m o l l i e n t a n d a b s o r b e n t q u a l i t i e s ; guaran­ teed perfectly h a r m l e s s ; i n i m ­ i t a b l e a n d u n l i k e a n y other c o l o r i n g for t h e s k i n . Jars, 25c. a n d 50c.

CREAM VANOLA a s u p e r i o r s k i n food which w h i t e n s a n d sottens the com­ p l e x i o n a n d h a n d s ; does not p r o d u c e a d o w n y g r o w t h upon t h e face. J a r s , 25c. a n d 50c.

DIAMOND NAIL ENAMEL the q u i c k e s t , most b r i l l i a n t a n d l a s t i n g N a i l P o l i s h , free from g r i t , does n o t stain, fra­ g r a n t perfume, w a s h i n g does not affect the p o l i s h , SUPERIOR TO A L L N A I L VARNISHES s o l d as n a i l p o l i s h . Boxes, 50c a n d 25c.

Sold everywhere by Reliable Dealers both In America and Europe S e n d s t a m p for Illustrated C a t a l o g u e w i t h prices.

Beivare 0/ imitations bearing similar name and labels ; insist on hav­ ing the Dr. Pray goods manufactured only by y

Real W o r t h in a b i c y c l e must not only be seen, i n the style a n d m o d e s t

\ Dr. J . Parker

Pray

JUST

Co.,

^ T ^ & T '

R E A D Y

r i c h finish, but should be felt, in the r u n n i n g , easy r u n n i n g .

NATHAN HALE BY CLYDE FITCH T h e First Successful^

BICYCLES '' see the extra reinforced frame,'' h a v e a l w a y s h a d the r e p u t a t i o n of b e i n g the easiest r u n n i n g , h i l l c l i m b i n g and coasting wheels.be­ c a u s e of their a c c u r a t e b e a r i n g s a n d t h e c a r e f u l attention g i v e n to d e s i g n i n g a n d adjusting the i m p o r t a n t " little d e t a i l s . "

REVOLUTIONARY PLAY ever produced, is a strong historical novel. Illustrated by full page pictures of N a t Goodwin and Maxine Elliott in the prin­ cipal scenes of the play J* <M Size., 5 K x 8 i n .

Price, $1.25

Rambler Price $40 Agencies everywhere.

Catalog free-

American Bicycle Company Gormully & Jeffery Sales CHICAGO

Dept.

NEW

EDITIONS

P I C T U R E S O F P E O P L E . . B y C . D . Gibson Price, $5.00 D R A W I N G S by C . D . Gibson . . . Price, $5.00 K E M B L E ' S S K E T C H B O O K . . Price, $1.25 For sale at all bookstores, or sent prepaid by the publisher on receipt of price . . . .

R. H. RUSSELL, 3 West 29th St., NEW YORK Please mention McClure's when vou write to advertisers. g6d


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

H e a r i n g Restored by 0

l i ! I

s

the

use

PRICES $5 TO $12, EXPRESS OR FREIGHT PREPAID.

Racine

of

Ear Drums

For Turkish

The o n l y scientific sound conductors. I n v i s i b l e , c o m f o r t a b l e , e f f i c i e n t . T h e y fit in the ear. Doctors recommend them. T h o u s a n d s t e s t i f y to their efficiency.

T

E A R D R U M C O . , Louisville, K y ,

L O S T

4

0l b s . OF FAT. A r e

M r s . H e l e n " W e b e r of Marietta, O., says: "It reduced my weight 40lbs. with* ut sickness or any inconvenience whatever.

Y o u T o o

S t o u t ?

If so, why not reduce your weight and be comfortable ? Obesity predisposes to Heart Trouble, Paralysis, Liver Dis­ eases, Constipation, Rheuma­ tism, Apoplexy, etc., and is not only dangerous but extremely annoying- to people of refined taste. W e do notcarehow many R E D U C T I O N remedies you may have taken without success, we have a treatment that will re­ duce weight, as thousands can testify. T h e following are a few who have been reduced in weight and greatly improved in health by its useMrs. C . Bliss, 50 Hudson B k, Rochester, N . Y . , reduced 3 0 lbs. Mrs. L a u r a L . Martin, Buck Creek, Ind., reduced 6 5 lbs. Mrs. M . M . Cummins, Ottawa, 111., reduced 78 lbs. Miss M . Hoisington, L a k e view, M i c h . , reduced 5 0 lbs. M r . W . A . Pollock Har tin gton, Neb., reduced & U ms.

We are going to give away barrels and

DADDCI C DMHiILLO

o f

S a m

P

Baths

H E R A C I N E CABINET i s a s t r o n g double-walled room, rubbercoated inside a n d outside and fitted w i t h a door. W h e n r e a d y for use, the w a l l s are r i g i d , yet b y m e r e l y tipping the cabinet y o u fold i t i n a second i n t o a 6-incli space.

Information and Booklet Free.

W I L S O N 108 T r u s t B l d g . ,

Cabinet

| e

B o x e s F r e e , just to prove how effective, pleasant and safe this remedy is, to reduce weight. II you want one, send us your name and address and 4 cents to cover postage. Each box is mailed in a plain sealed package with no advertising on it to indicate what it contains. Price, large size box, Ji.oo. postpaid. Correspondence strictly confidential.

A patent alcohol stove heats the cab­ i n e t t o 150 d e g r e e s i n t h r e e m i n u t e s . F o r a vapor bath, pour a pint of water into t h e v a p o r i z e r . F o r m e d i c a t e d "baths, p u t the proper drugs i n the water. W e send 35 f o r m u l a s w i t h t h e c a b i n e t . T h e R a c i n e cabinet places i n y o u r h o m e a l l the benefits of the best T u r k i s h bath rooms. N o t a n essent i a l f e a t u r e is lacking. Y o u save breathing hot air, save the r i s k of exposure a f t e r w a r d , save time a n d expense. T h e cost is b u t 3 cents per bath. F o r the c u r e of r h e u m a t i s m , k i d n e y a n d b l o o d diseases, n o other t r e a t m e n t c a n a p p r o a c h it. T h e hot a i r b a t h forces the i m p u r i t i e s that cause the disease out f r o m five m i l l i o n pores at once. In all s a n i t a r i u m s the T u r k i s h b a t h is the m o s t important treatment. All who value cleanliness, complexion a n d health w i l l e v e n t u a l l y o w n one of these cabinets. T h e quieting, refreshing, invigorating effects o f t h e b a t h a r e t h e p l e a s a n t e s t sensations possible. One bath w i l l al­ w a y s stop a cold. The Eaclne Cabinet is guaranteed to be the best one on the market. Not in any way sim­ ilar to tue worthless affairs now advertised for this purpose. We sell on approval, to be returned at our expense if not satisfactory. Sold direct to users at from $5 to $12, express or freight prepaid; alcohol stove, vaporizer and face steaming attachment Included. Send to-day for our handsome illustrated catalogue, and order from that.

R a c i n e B a t h C a b i n e t Co.,

p

BOX A , RACINE, WIS.

HALL CHEMICAL CO., Dept. N . E *

St. Louis,

M o .

Please mention M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write t o advertisers.

97


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Impure Blood, Pimples, Tetter, Eczema and Acne A r e permanently cured b y

Sulph P r i c e

time

$ i ,e x p r e s s

p a i d .

SULPHUME

is p u r e s u l p h u r i n liquid form, — a new chemical discovery. S u l p h u r here­ tofore was considered insoluble. Sulphume w h e n taken i n t e r n a l l y , a n d a p p l i e d as a lotion, w i l l c u r e a n y s k i n disease.

SULPHUME

B A T H S can be taken

at home, h a v i n g a l l the advantages (and more) o f the most famous S u l p h u r S p r i n g s . One bottle o f S u l p h u m e m a k e s 12 s t r o n g s u l p h u r baths, o r 1200 doses. S U L P H U M E S O A P is the o n l y soap i n the w o r l d made with L i q u e f i e d s u l p h u r . T h a t is w h y it is a G e n u i n e S u l p h u r Soap. It stops i t c h i n g and all s k i n irritations, softens a n d whitens the s k i n , a n d has no equal for the toilet a n d bath. P r i c e p e r box (3 cakes), 75 cents, express prepaid. O n e cake for trial m a i l e d o n receipt o f 25 cents. SULPHUME

P I L L S act directly o n the liver, k i d n e y s a n d bowels, b u t do n o t g r i p e o r nauseate.

P r i c e 25 cents.

A L L intelligent people k n o w what valuable r e m e d i a l properties s u l p h u r possesses, b u t F E W realize what wonder­ ful cures are effected by l i q u i d s u l p h u r , S u l p h u m e . G a r g l i n g once w i l l c u r e a n o r d i n a r y sore throat.

Drop a postal card and well mail you our SULPHUME BOOK and SKIN BOOK both FREE—in them you will find solid facts about the care of your skin and blood. Correspondence invited. Consultation FREE, and strictly confidential. SULPHUME COMPANY,

111 f l a r i n e B u i l d i n g , C H I C A 0 0 .

L y m a n , Sons & C o . , M o n t r e a l , C a n a d i a n Depot.

NOT A PILL but a That puts you to sleep. THE SLEEPWELL PILLOW charged with extract from the green boughs of BALSAM FIR.

THE

SLEEPWELL

REMEDIES

are so strong that one drop will perfume a whole room, and yet so mild that they will not irritate the most delicate mucous surfaces. T h e y con­ stitute T h e H n U u i i i F i r T i - e n t i n e n r f o r H A V F E V E R , A S T H M A , C A T A R R H and CONSUMPTION. H a s any remedy other than pitch, in some form, ever cured C o n s u m p ­ tion or healed the mucous membranes ? Pitch is harmless. T h e S l e e p w e l l G n r g l e cures throat difficulties.

Sleepwell Pillow, with medicines Sleepwell

.

Vaporizer, with medicines

.

.

$2.00

.

.

2.50

Sleepwell Gargle Sleepwell Discutient (prepaid)

1.00 50

State whether Pillow is for nervous or catarrhal affections. S e n d 1 0 C e n t s a n d ten names of friends afflicted with nervnus or respiratory diseases, for an " Out-of-Sight " Inhaler, prepaid, and we will also prepay trial packages of our remedies free. A *> «• nc i c -» Wanted.

T H E S L E E P W E L L CO. Union Bank B l d g . Oshkosh, W i s .

WITHOUT T H E U S E O F T H E KNIFE. T I I E L A R G E S T ANI> B E S T F O F I P P E D P R I V A T E I N S T I T U T I O N I NTI3E WORLD. For the exclusive treatment o f cancer, tumors and all other forms of malignant a n d benign new growths, exrept cant er and tumors with­ in the abdominal cavity T h e Berkshire Mills Sinatoriurn is conducted by a graduate of the regular school o f medicine. Remedies are not withheld as secret from physicians ofstanding. A s k your family phys­ ician to make a personal investigation. H e will be given every oppor­ tunity to gain a knowledge of our method and its success. When writ­ ing fur information please describe the case as clearly as is possible and state its situation. Address l > r * . Y ¥ . K . B R O W N &, S O N , N o r t h A d a m * . M a s t *

P l e a s e m e n t i o n M c C l u r e ' s w h e n y o u write to a d v e r t i s e r s .

1


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

9

WILLIAMS'

SHAVING

SOAPS

are S I M P L Y

INCOMPARABLE

for their Rich, Cream-like, " never- drying" Lather, the peculiar, softening action on the beard, and the wonderfully soothing, refreshing effect upon the face. T h e y have been the standard for half a century, and are so recognized all over the world. W i l l i a m s ' Shaving Soaps are used by all first-class barbers and are sold everywhere. By mail if your dealer does not supply you. Williams Shaving Stick, 25 cents. Luxury Shaving Tablet, 25 cents. Genuine Yankee Shaving Soap, 10 cents. White Glycerine Toilet Soap, 10 cents. Williams' Shaving Soap (Barbers'), 6 round cakes, 1 lb., 40 cents. Exquisite also for toilet. Trial tablet for 2-cent stamp. LONDON.

T H E J . B. W I L L I A M S CO.,

Glastonbury,

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 99

Conn.

SVDNEY

N


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

GOOD FOR LITTLE FOLK CANDY CATHARTIC

ALL DRUGGISTS.

10 f. 25*. 50*.

B A L D N E S S is the result of a diseased scalp. N i n e times out of ten it is dandruff. A t first the hair falls very little, but g r a d u a l l y continues until one spot is bald, t h e n follows baldness.

Coke Dandruff Cure

Hundreds of thousands, all over the world, use VanoCreeolene. D o y o u ? C r e s o l c n e cures W h o o p i n g C o t m l i every time; stops C r o u p almost Immediately. C o l d s , A s t h m a and C a t a r r h cannot resist its healing virtues. I. N . Love, M. D., of St. Louis, says: " I have In­ structed every family under my direction to secure It." Mrs. Balllngton Booth says: "I recommend that no family where there are young children should he wltbout it." Anthony Comstocltsays:"iHalienaiit D i p h t h e r i a In my bouse: Cresolene used: case recovered In two weeKs; no others were affected " Descriptive booklet with testimonials free. Sold by all druggists.

a p p l i e d at the b e g i n n i n g would have saved the hair, by cleansing the seal]?, removing the dandruff, keep­ i n g the scalp in a healthy state, a n d the hair firm at the roots. A few days' use w i l l prove its virtue. If it fails to cure we w i l l return your money.

Druggists sell it. Barbers use it. If yours does not, send ono dollar ami his name for a buttle, prepaid, by express.

M a n y so-called ' ' H a i r Restoratives" contain pois­ onous minerals that cause paralysis. A v o i d them. A. R. Bremer Co., 23 L a Salle Street, Chicago

VAPO-CRESOLENE CO., 180 Fulton St., NEW YORK.

Canadian Depot—Lyman Bros. & Co., Ltd., Toronto,

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. IOO


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Free! W e w a n t to c o n v i n c e y o u that F A I R Y S O A P is different from any other floating w h i t e soapâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;purer, more scientific and delicate, made o f better materials, a n d b y latest perfected methods. I f your o w n grocer has n o t F A I R Y S O A P o n sale, send us his name a n d address, as w e l l as y o u r o w n , and we w i l l send y o u a full-sized cake, absolutely free of charge. I n a n s w e r i n g , address DEPT. N , T H E N . K . F A I R B A N K C O M P A N Y , CHICAGO.

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. IOI


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

C A L D E R ' S Sa/> o n a c e o vc s

D E N T I N E nmkes b e a u t i f u l Teeth. I'Tis^ye ideal Dentifrice b e ce^u/e i t i s y e ^ > u r e / L Hx-jy* moft c a h o l e / o m e . \ \ ^ h i t e , ' f o u n d T e e t h , fr a.c> r cvn t S e n t V B r e a t h cvnd f i r m , r e d Gums follow its faithful ufe.

p

oft

I t ft2v,nds toda^y;

a^s f o r 3 0 Yecvrs, w i t h ­ o u t 'Xis

c v . P e e r . Told e v e r y w h e r e . A Pimple o n r w p e l l

A l b e r t

L . C o l d e r , Efq., P r o v i d e n c e , R - I

; Gcwe A. d\r g. A gey - Pro v. R -1

BOOTH'S

HYOHEI

Ct&am\

ANTISEPTIC

SKIN SOAP MADE FROHTHE FRESH GREEN LEAVES OF THE TASK AN IAN BLUE CUM TREE HEALING REFRESH­ ING BEAUTIFYING::: SOLD BY A L L DRUGGISTS, OR S E N T BY M A I L ON RECEIPT O F PRICE, 2 5 $

THE R.T.BOOTH CO. 20

A V E .

B

I T H A C A ,

N.Y.

Is a peculiar a n d d e l i g h t f u l toilet article i n w h i c h the mysterious q u a l i t y of the l e m o n as a skin tonic is f u l l y developed. It w i l l quickly cure chapping, frost bite a n d roughness of the s k i n . I t soothes w h i l e it heals, a n d is both CM. a cleanser a n d beautifier. If y o u r dealer does not keep i t , write today for a tube of the w o n d e r f u l C a l i ­ fornia C r e a m of L e m o n . 3-oz. Tubes, 15c. 6-oz. Tubes. 25c. Sent prepaid on receipt of price. Agents Wanted. CALIFORNIA CREAM OF LEMON COMPANY Wilcox Building, L o b Angeles, Col.

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 102


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

KNOX'S GELATINE wishes to make your personal acquaintance in a taslyinanner. Let this be our introduction: S e n d me a 2=cent s t a m p and I w i l l m a i l y o u , free, "Daiiity Desserts for Dainty People," a c o m ­ plete book of 3 2 pages, telling how to make seventy delicious, appetiz­ ing, inexpensive desserts. Send me 5 cents in stamps

This Baby's Mother writes: A f t e r trying; other Infant F o o d s a n d f a i l i n g , the baby suffering terribly, u p o n advice of our family p h y s i c i a n we put her o n E S K A Y ' S F O O D . She was then thin a n d sallow, but from that time on she commenced to thrive. She is n o w 20 months o l d , perfectly healthy, a n d has hac'. no other F o o d but E S K A Y ' S . [ have not d u r i n g the second summer lost one night's rest, though she was teething. I advise a l l mothers to use E S K A Y ' S , as it saved m y baby's life. M r s . M . S m i l e r , Philadelphia. Nourishes from Infancy to Old Age Send for a Free Sample 0/ Eskay's Food. SMITH, KLINE & FRENCH CO. P H I L A D E L P H I A , PA.

(for postage a n d p a c k i n g only) a n d the name of your grocer, a n d I w i l l send you the book a n d full pint sample. S e n d m e 15 c e n t s i n s t a m p s for the b o o k a n d a full 2-quart packet. W e prefer to have y o u buy it of y o u r grocer ; i f he does not keep it, send us his name a n d we w i l l inclose, FREE, a package of P i n k Gelatine for fancy desserts. T w o 2-quart packets a n d book for 2 5 cents. CHARLES

iijmiiii

B.

KNOX,

No. 1 Knox Avenue, Johnstown, N . Y .

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. I03


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

DURKEE'S SALAD DRESSING

While invaluable for all Salads, try on the left over odds and ends i n your refrigerator; you w i l l be surprised to see what palatable dishes m a y be made. <M^vl* D i d you ever try it as a Sauce foundation i n the making of " T A R T A R S A U C E , " " C O L D S A U C E R O B E R T , " and other Sauces, or i n " D e v i l e d " Dishes? Jtjtjtjtjtjt Send for free booklet on "Salads; H o w to M a k e and Dress T h e m , " giving m a n y valuable and novel recipes for Salads, Sandwiches, Sauces, Luncheon F R E E Dishes, etc.= S A M P L E JOc.

E . R . D U R K E E & C O . < M 538 Washington St. jfi*

NEW YORK

Pork a n d Beans The best beansâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;baked the bestâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;in famous N e w England " home baked " style, producing a flavor so delicious that the more you eat the more you want. Put up i n convenient size key-opening cans. Drop a postal and we'll send you free our " H o w to M a k e Good Things to E a t " book (new edition) which tells all about how to serve Libby's "natural flavor" canned meats.

LIBBY, McNEILL & LIBBY, C H I C A G O , ILL. Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 104


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

fir: ,-.

Fruit Ralston perfect

m a k e 15

Breakfast Ralston Breakfast Food possesses an appetizing flavor which gives it a warm welcome to the best tables of the land. Gluterean Wheat, from which Ralston is scientifically milled, is grown in only one section of the world, and that's the reason Ralston Breakfast Food possesses a pleasant flavor peculiarly its own. If you have any difficulty in obtaining Ralston Breakfast Food from your grocer, send us his name and a 2c. stamp for a sample, enough for a breakfast.

P U R I N A

M I L L S ,

W H E R E P U R I T Y IS P A R A M O U N T 7 3 5

G R A T I O T

ST.,

S T .

LOUIS,

M O .

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers.

105


McCLURE'S

SEVILLE

MAGAZINE.

C O M P A N Y - NEW YORK

PACKING

PURITY-ABSOLUTE

M A D E AND BOTTLED IN

NICE, F R A N C E ,

FLAVOR"~

solely from SELE€TED"S0UND' MATURE OLIVES

UNIQUE

BRILLIANCY-SUPREME NOTHING FINER

PRODUCIBLE

Wfvlte SEofcT Q u e e n

x

F O R T Y

© t l v e s

P O U N D S

of lean beef free from fat and bone,, are used i n Soufh America to make one pound of

r

COTVIP.AJNrY'S E X T R A C T O F BEEF. That is w h y it is so efficient i n the s i c k room and goes so far in the k i t c h e n ® Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers.

106


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

B O S T O N

B A K E D

P O R K

&

B E A N S —Prepared with Tomato Sauce.

AT A L L GROCERS

Van Camp Packing Co., 308 Kentucky Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana.

EACH

CAN

CONTAINS A WHOLE

MEAL

f T T T T T T T T T T 11.1.3.13.1.1.111.11.3.113.1.3.11.11111111X13.1.3.

SAMPLE C A N AND BOOKLET FOR 6 CENTS IN STAMPS

T T TTT T U K

Avoid "Peddled" Vanilla D

ON'T be allured into buying an; any of the hundred and one brands is of " V a n i l l a " preparations that canvas­ sers offer at your door. The few cents saved will not atone for spoilt puddings, sauces, cakes, jellies and ice-cream, aside from the risk of sickness. You can always rely upon BURNETT'S EXTRACTS because they are pure and of great strength.

JOSEPH BURNETT CO., 36 India St., Boston, Mass. E s t a b l i s h e d 50 T e a r s .

Burnett's

^TTTTTTYTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTYYYYTTTYTT'r'rTTTTTTTTTTTTTF; Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers.

107


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

A S a v i n g of O n e - F i f t h F l o u r . Pillsbury's Best Flour is the cheapest flour also with which to make Pies and Cakes. Pastry recipes usually are made for flour containing much less gluten than does Pillsbury's Best Flour. In following recipes, except such as are made especially for Pillsbury's Best Flour, use one-fifth less flour than such recipes call for. Think for a moment what it means to save one-fifth of a barrel of flour and yet get as much food out of it 1 P I L L S B U R Y - W A S H B U R N F L O U R M I L L S Co., L T D . , M I N N E A P O L I S , M A K E R S OF P I L L S B U R Y ' S V I T O S . Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. 108

MINN.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

Prominent Hostelries Of the United States. (No.

12.)

Battery Park B A T T E R Y

P A R K

E.

P.

HOTEL,

A S H E V I L L E .

MoKISSICK,

N. C .

Ashevillc, N . C .

Prop.

Asheville, N . C , is the most famous mountain resort for summer or winter on this c o n t i n e n t highest peaks east of the Rockies, made accessible by excellent roads. T h e principal hostelry of Asheville, and one of the famous ones of the U n i t e d States, is the Battery Park, 2500feet above sea level, situated where a Confederate battery during the c i v i l war commanded the city and sur­ rounding country. T h e most equable temperature i n the country, m a k i n g possible a l l out-door sports. Golf a l l the year on fine links, fine livery, tennis, billiards, pool, bowling alley—every equipment for out door or in-door sport in connection with the hotel. Its cuisine is one of the famous ones of the U n i t e d States, and on their tables they serve exclusively

BLANK'S

FAUST BLEND

COFFEE

Precisely the same coffee, i n air-tight cans of a l l sizes, is on sale generally throughout the U n i t e d States, i f your dealer hasn't it i n stock, and w i l l not get it for you, send us his name and $1.30 (the regular price) for a 3-lb. can by express prepaid. (Mention whether you desire it whole, ground or pulverized.) If your family is small, S E N D 50c. F O R 1 lb. S A M P L E C A N B Y MAIL PREPAID.

A

Famous

Coffee

Expert*

A simple illustration of the reason Blanke's coffees are always uniform is t h i s : — M r . C . F . B l a n k e can make a cup of coffee from any blend and d r i n k it, and i n 12 hours produce a cup from his own stock identical i n strength—identical i n flavor—identical i n aroma. In the greater part this is nicety of taste ; i n part it is skill in blending , i n part available coffees i n quantity and variety. W h e n any one of his seventy-five brands of high-grade coffees r u n low, he makes up a cup of coffee from it, and by the time the brand is exhausted he has produced its d r i n k i n g qualities with another blend.

Faust Blend is also served exclusively at

Faust Cafe, St. Louis Grand Pacific, Chicago Schenley Hotel, Pittsburgh Arlington, Hot Springs, A r k . St. James, Jacksonville, F l a . Hotel Pfister, Milwaukee Russell House, Detroit Wabash R . R . Dining Cars B . & O. S. W . Dining Car Service

Booklet, giving Blanke's recipe, listing: Blanke's coffee pots, and telling how to economize the cof fee, how to care for the coffee pot, and other valu­ able information for coffee users, sent free on request.

Most Complete Coffee Plant in the World.

308 to 318 S. 7th Street,

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers.

110

-

St. Louis.


McCLURE'S

MAGAZINE.

QuakerOats

The above illustrati07i is a reproduction of a photograph of the Quaker Oats exhibit at the National Export Exposition held recently in Philadelphia. It is designed to illustrate the world-wide popularity of Quaker Oats, presenting at the same time a careful ethnological study by means of four life-size groups of colored statuary representing the four great divisions of mankind. As usual Quaker Oats received the highest award at the Exposition.

Quaker Oats, wherever introduced, leaps at once into public favor. Thought­ ful people are coming more and more to realize that less meat and more Quaker Oats means better breakfasts, better health and better economy. Physicians and food specialists have long recommended it, and the popularity of Quaker Oats to-day among millions of the most intelligent people in this and foreign countries, is a guarantee of its manifest superiority. Q U A K E R O A T S makes not only the best breakfast porridge in the world, but alsodelicious.wholesome b r e a d , m u t r i i i s . c a k e s , s o u p s a n d p u d d i n g s . Write for ourCereat Cook Book,editedby Mrs.Rorer. Sent Free,postpaid. THE

AMERICAN

M o n a d n o c k B u i l d i n g , Chicago, 111.

CEREAL CO.

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers. Ill


McCLURE'S

|

IN T H E HOMES

MAGAZINE.

O F T H E PEOPLE."]

| T is significant that in homes of wealth where the very best is demanded, Ivory Soap is used in the nursery. A t the same time, in hundreds of families where economy decides the choice, Ivory Soap is selected. Thus its purity attracts the rich; its economy attracts the poor. High quality and low cost: is there any better combination? COPYRIGHT 1899 BY T H E PROCTER & GAMBLE CO. CINCINNATI

Please mention McClure's when you write to advertisers.


The New 3500-ton Steamers "

P

O

N

C

E

"

give tourists an unequalled opportunity to visit

I

C

O

our country's new colony. T h e round trip can be done in about twenty days, and tourists can use steamers as a hotel while visiting the various ports.

ENTIRE

COST

O F T R I P , $90

to

$120

A l l rooms on deck a m i d s h i p s , w i t h e v e r y k n o w n c o m f o r t ; y a c h t - l i k e appointments ; perfect service. S E C O N D = C A B I N R A T E S , $55 to $90 Steamship " P o n c e " sails S a t u r d a y , F e b r u a r y i o t h , S a t u r d a y , M a r c h roth. Steamship " S a n J u a n " sails S a t u r d a y , F e b r u a r y 17th, M o n d a y , M a r c h 19th. Send for Beautifully Illustrated Book on Porto Rico.

N E W MILLER,

PaeSBREyTAOVe

AGENCY, MY.

YORK

& PORTO

RICO

S.S. C O .

B U L L & K N O W L T O N , G e n e r a l A g e n t s , 32 B r o a d w a y , N e w Y o r k or R a y m o n d & W h i t c o m b , 25 U n i o n Square, N e w Y o r k


"Preserves

Health," •' Prolongs

Life.''

BAKER S' "j BREAKFAST COCOA 1 " It i s at once a d e l i g h t f u l f o o d a n d n o u r ­ i s h i n g d r i n k , a n d it w o u l d be w e l l f o r h u ­ m a n i t y i f there were m o r e o f i t c o n s u m e d a n d less t e a o r coffee."— The Homn-opatkic Recorder.

Walter Baker & Co. Limited DORCHESTER,

MASS.

Established 1720

A b s o t u l e l y V u t e . Reject A l u m Baking: P o w d e r s — T h e y D e s t r o y H e a l t h

o@i soap

You'll look old enough soon enough. Why keep 1 your gray hair and ij add twenty years to your looks? And why hate such short, thin hair ?

Halls Wool Soap is the best soap for washing fine underwear. Garments washed with Wool Soap will feel soft and comfortable, and wear twice as long as garments washed with cheap laundry soap. Wool Soap is made of the purest soap-making materials, and is just as good for the toilet and bath as any high-priced toilet soap. A l l grocer:; sell it. M a d e by S w i f t a n d C o m p a n y , C h i c a g o

Vegetable Sicilian

Hair Renewer

always restores color to gray hair, all the dark, rich color you used to have. Your hair grows rapidly, stops coming out, and all dandruff disappears. If your druggist cannot supply you, send S1.00 to K . P . H a l l & Co., Nashua, N H .

Profile for ㅤㅤㅤㅤ

McClure’s Magazine 04-1900 vintage  

McClure’s Magazine 04-1900 vintage  

Profile for 98517886
Advertisement