Winter 2021-22 Issue of Extreme Team News

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Jayci Lee Byler 2021 THSRA ALL AROUND COWGIRL

SPONSOR SPOTLIGHTS:

PRSRT STD STD PRSRT US POSTAGE POSTAGE US PAID PAID BRYAN TX TX 77802 77802 BRYAN PERMIT ## 23 23 PERMIT

PRESRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FULTEK

Christmas Wish List EQUINE PROFESSIONALS ISSUE


AYY

2020

Call us today to discuss your trophy needs!

877.717.8225 2



Animals speak louder than words. TM

If there’s greatness on the inside, it shows on the outside. purinamills.com/horse-feed

© 2016 Purina Animal Nutrition LLC. All rights reserved.


EXECUTIVE BOARD STATE PRESIDENT KEN BRAY

PO Box 1634 • Granbury, TX 76048 817.219.0436 • kbray@equibrand.com

1ST VICE PRESIDENT JOHN SCHUENEMAN

PO Box 1177 • Madisonville, TX 77864 979.268.4994 • john.schueneman@gmail.com

2ND VICE PRESIDENT BRENT CHARLESWORTH

PO Box 362 • Marathon, TX 79842 432.386.6214 • brent@crcompany.net

SECRETARY/TREASURER SUSAN BALDWIN

722 Southview Circle • Center, TX 75935 936.590.4447 texashighschoolrodeo@gmail.com

In This Issue

EXTREME TEAM NEWS Official Publication of the Texas High School Rodeo Association

EQUINE PROFESSIONALS ISSUE

HOLLY DeLAUNE Marketing Director

210.632.3208 • delaune.holly@gmail.com

LAUREN TUTTLE STUMBERG Graphics/Layout Director lauren@distinct-graphics.com 830.249.8020

BRIAN ROBERTS

Computer Programmer brian.roberts53@att.net 281.213.9143

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NATIONAL DIRECTOR MIKE GHORMLEY

ARIAT PERFORMANCE REPORTERS

PO Box 1177 • Madisonville, TX 77864 281.785.0077 mghormley@gmail.com

Region I

202 2 TH S R A F IN A L S ANN OU N CE ME N T

JUNIOR HIGH NATIONAL DIRECTOR JOHN SCHUENEMAN 979.268.4994 john.schueneman@gmail.com

MARKETING HOLLY DELAUNE

361.894.5749 rachel.robbins3690@gmail.com

DELEGATES AT LARGE MICHAEL AKINS

Region II

LUKE CARPENTER Region III

GEORGIA SHIELDS Region IV

LULU EAKES

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73 Breeze Way, Boerne, TX 78006 210.632.3208 delaune.holly@gmail.com

QUEEN COORDINATOR RACHEL ROBBINS

KATIE HARTER

Region V

LIEZA KLEIN Region VI

Christmas Wish List

2449 West Line Road • Whitesboro, TX 76273 9410.368.9390 • makins1@yahoo.com

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LARRY DOWELL

TABER GARCIA Region VII

JAYCI LEE BYLER Region VIII

LYNLEY WRIGHT Region IX

TYLIE MCDONALD Region X

RILEY ARRINGTON

THSRA OFFICIAL SPONSORS

370 CR 220 • Marlin, TX 76661 254.715.8814 • fivedowell@gmail.com

JEFF PARSLEY

SPONSOR SPOTLIGHTS

655 CR 4703 • Troup, TX 75789 903.574.3910 • jparselygeraniums@earthlink.net

JOE RICHARDS

5101 Hwy 214 • Hereford, TX 79045 806.676.5970 • joe@diamondcattlefeeders.com

BRANDON SMITH

6800 E FM 476 • Pleasanton, TX 78064 830.570.7157 • bmsmith1996@sbcglobal.net

STUDENT OFFICERS

thsraofficers@hotmail.com STUDENT PRESIDENT Quay Lloyd STUDENT VICE PRESIDENT Garrett Talamantes STUDENT SECRETARY Riley Otwell QUEEN Vie Vie Blanchard

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Region

news

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REGION REGION REGION REGION REGION

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I 12 REGION II 13 REGION III 14 REGION IV 28 REGION V 20 REGION JUNIOR HIGH 50

VI VII VIII IX X

31 32 36 38 44

DR. TANDY FREEMAN

THSRA is a non-profit organization (501-C). Production of this publication was funded by membership dues and is provided complimentary to members of THSRA. Non-members may purchase annual subscriptions for $25.00

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What Can a Prebiotic Do for Your Horse? Kelly Vineyard, M.S., Ph.D. Senior Nutritionist, Equine Technical Solutions

PROBIOTICS, PREBIOTICS, ENZYMES, GUT HEALTH, MICROFLORA AND MICROBIOMES. HORSE HEALTH TERMINOLOGY CAN BE COMPLEX, ESPECIALLY WHEN IT COMES TO HORSE FEEDS AND SUPPLEMENTS INCLUDING PROBIOTICS AND PREBIOTICS.

H

ave you ever wondered what these ingredients are doing for your horse?

WHAT ARE PROBIOTICS FOR HORSES?

Probiotics, also known as direct-fed microbials, are ingredients that deliver live bacteria to your horse’s digestive tract. Ideally, the bacteria colonize the digestive tract and help improve your horse’s overall health and digestion. But it’s important to remember there are countless strains of microbes living in your horse’s digestive tract, and it’s difficult to tell which probiotics for horses are beneficial. Some probiotics for horses can even be dangerous. A 2005 study by Weese and Rousseau showed that specific probiotics caused diarrhea and clinical disease in foals. Purina continues to investigate and research the use of probiotics in horses. At this point, we have not identified the best strains and supplementation levels for a positive benefit to the horse. However, prebiotics have proven promising during research.

WHAT ARE PREBIOTICS FOR HORSES?

Prebiotics are ingredients that promote the health and growth of microorganisms already living in your horse’s digestive tract. Prebiotics essentially act as a

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food source for your horse’s existing gut microbes. Unlike probiotics, Learn more about senior horse health and ways Equine Senior® and prebiotics for horses do not introduce new bacteria to the digestive tract. Equine Senior Active® horse feeds with ActivAge® prebiotic can help There are many kinds of prebiotics. Prebiotics come from numerous senior horses thrive throughout the aging process. sources and interact with your horse’s gut flora and intestinal lining in different ways. Team Purina and University of Kentucky research teams worked together to study a specific type of yeast-derived prebiotic called ActivAge®.

WHAT IS PURINA’S ACTIVAGE® PREBIOTIC?

When horses start to age, inflammation may increase and immune function can decline. ActivAge® is a proprietary, yeast-derived prebiotic scientifically proven to support the immune system of aging horses. In addition to promoting a balanced gut microflora, ActiveAge supports the response to flu vaccinations and overall immune function in senior horses. ActivAge® is derived from a multi-stage fermentation process that produces beneficial metabolites containing vitamins, minerals, amino acids and antioxidants. It’s also heat-stable and can withstand the stresses and temperature changes in the feed manufacturing process, something that can be damaging to many pre and probiotic additives.

Equine Professionals Index ANIMAL IMAGING PAGE 08,09 Irving

REATA EQUINE HOSPITAL Weatherford

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BRACKEN EQUINE CLINIC PAGE 34 San Antonio

RETAMA EQUINE HOSPITAL Selma

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HORSE SWIM - BYLER PERFORMANCE EQUINE Bellville

TEXAS EQUINE HOSPITAL Bryan

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OUTLAW EQUINE PAGE 24 Decatur

WEEMS & STEPHENS EQUINE HOSPITAL Aubrey PAGE 33

PURINA PAGE 04, 06

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USE OF ADVANCED IMAGING FOR FASTER RETURN TO COMPETITION AFTER INJURY IN THE EQUINE ATHLETE by Wade Friedeck, M.S., R.T. (MR)

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arrel racing is one of the most popular and spectacular displays of athleticism from our equine partners in the rodeo industry. These horses and riders display teamwork through navigating the run using extreme bursts of speed, abrupt deceleration, and sharp turns. While the rider and horse become more accustomed to one another, the teamwork and mutual understanding must continue to grow to compete at higher levels. A thousandth of a second can make a difference between a winning run or coming in second. Like any athlete, both humans and horses can experience injuries during training and competition. However, teamwork must also come into play when recognizing, diagnosing,

and treating injuries in the equine patient. The rider must be able to see the signs that the horse is not performing at their best. Some of the most common signs that indicate a barrel horse may be experiencing a sports injury are the horse refusing to turn sharply, a decrease in speed or even hesitation to enter the arena. *If some of these signs start showing up, allowing your veterinarian to perform a workup and develop a plan to get the horse back to top performing status is essential. As in most sports, certain injuries are more common than others and that is no exception for our barrel racing horses. In a research project published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, the top five musculoskeletal problems for barrel racing horses are: ● Forelimb foot pain ● Osteoarthritis of lower hock joints ● Suspensory ligament injury ● Combination of foot pain and osteoarthritis of lower hock joints; and ● Bruised feet During your horse’s examination by your veterinarian, a diagnostic imaging technique will likely be needed to help properly identify the cause of the soreness. The ability to provide high quality diagnostics have come a long way in the last twenty years in that our horses can now receive the same or better diagnostic care that we would if we had an injured joint. The veterinarian can use digital radiographs, ultrasound, nuclear medicine, CT, and even MRI for these potential injuries. A combination of any of these imaging modalities may help your veterinarian build the best treatment plan for your horse. Even if your veterinarian’s practice doesn’t offer some of these imaging modalities, they have access to them at specialty imaging facilities such as Animal Imaging in North Texas. Currently the imaging modality that provides the most information about an underlying cause of injury in barrel horses is an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). This modality may come at a higher cost than other diagnostic procedures, however MRI should not be considered a last resort. Having the veterinarian gain access to the most accurate and timely information allows for faster recovery times for your horse. According to veterinary researchers and practitioners at Colorado State University, MRI should not be overlooked despite the price tag associated with the procedure. **Researchers stated specifically that MRI should be considered early in the diagnostic process rather than as a last resort. This recommendation was proposed after the researchers followed 95 horses with acute (≤ 12 weeks) or chronic (> 12 weeks) lameness located below the fetlock joint. All horses underwent MRI and were followed for a minimum of continued on page 10

*Dabareiner, R.M., N.D. Cohen, G.K. Carter, S. Nunn, and W. Moyer. 2005. Musculoskeletal problems associated with lameness and poor performance among horses used for barrel racing: 118 cases (2000-2003). Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association 227(10):1646-1650. **Koch, D.W., M.F. Barrett, B.R. Jackman, et al. Comparison of lameness outcomes in horses with acute or chronic digital lameness that underwent magnetic resonance imaging. N Z Vet J. In press.

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Providing solutions through diagnostic imaging. CT | 3 TESLA MRI | STANDING MRI NUCLEAR MEDICINE | RADIOGRAPHS | ULTRASOUND animalimaging.net 9



continued from page 8

12 months after the scan. Results showed that significantly more horses with acute lameness were able to return to work compared to those with chronic lameness. The authors concluded that horses with digital lameness that undergo MRI when the lameness is acute may have an improved prognosis due to accurate diagnosis and earlier application of appropriate therapy.** In summary barrel racing is a grand sport with a great bond between horse and rider. If both are in alignment, blistering fast runs can occur and both can celebrate. However, if either party acquires an injury during the process, developing a comprehensive treatment plan using the best diagnostics will help get both of you back in the arena the fastest.

ANIMALIMAGING.NET

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DAVID CHRISTIAN 10200 S Blessen Rd • Amarillo, TX 79119 806.674.1397 • david.christian@11ranch.com

STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - WYATT MASK VICE PRESIDENT- JAYDA JAMESON SECRETARY/HISTORIAN - RIDLEY TIMBERLAKE STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS

JERAD STOKER

SECRETARY - MARCY SESSIONS 1611 El Paso • Wellington, Texas 79095 806.205.0350 • thsra1@yahoo.com

Region I

RANDY MARTIN PO Box 334 • Vega, Texas 79092 806-670-2113 • randyleemartin@hotmail.com RANDY MARTIN PO Box 334 • Vega, Texas 79092 806-670-2113 • randyleemartin@hotmail.com

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PERFORMANCE REPORT

goat runs, and quick breakaway runs. Jaylee Lane was a 7.2 and a 7.4 in the goat tying to win the rodeo both days. In the breakaway Shay Clements was a 2.8 to win the breakaway on Saturday, and Ridley Timberlake was a 2.7 to win the breakaway on Sunday. These girls were on fire, and did their By KATIE HARTER – Performance Reporter best. I got to talk to Kelli Frazier and see how she was feeling about ending the fall semester. Kelli stated that she is feeling “pretty great” about this first s we approach the holidays, semester of her senior year of rodeo. She says she knows she has not done region one is finishing up exactly what she has needed to, but she is confident that with a little time their fall rodeos. Region off and more practice the one’s last rodeo will next semester will be even be November 6th better. A lot of these kids and 7th in Amarillo. have worked so hard for So far region one’s this first semester and look rodeos have been forward to a very rewarding very successful and break for the holidays. Even a lot of fun! The though I call it a “break,” contestants have put it is not much of one. A lot together some of the of these kids just use this best runs and contintime to do as much practicue to be successful in ing as the weather allows. and out of the arena. This ensures that they will The number of girl be able to come back stronentries has gone up ger and more prepared than since previous years they were when they started making the competithe rodeo season. I know I tion even more comhave been very impressed at petitive. The boys how competitive everyone events are still very has been this year, and I competitive, but the am excited to see how this number of entries semester will end. has stayed somewhat With the weather here in the same. The conCLOCKWISE FROM TOP: SHAY CLEMENTS, RIDLEY TIMBERLAKE, JAYLEE LANE AND KELLI FRAZIER the Panhandle getting cold, testants have worked Region One winds down very hard and have their fall semester this upcoming weekend. I am excited to see all these super shown no mercy in the arena. Here competitive contestants go out with a bang! recently we had a rodeo in Vernon where there were some smoking fast

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PO Box 62862 • San Angelo, Texas 76904 512.618.9233 • csbaize@yahoo.com

STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - MADALYN RICHARDS VICE PRESIDENT - EMMA KENT SECRETARY - ALLISON VAUGHN STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS CASEY BAIZE

Region II

SECRETARY - JODY MCELROY Box 224 • Balmorhea, Texas 79718 432-940-0385 • secretary@thsra2.com

JODY MCELROY Box 224 • Balmorhea, Texas 79718 432.448.7810 • rodeosecretary1@gmail.com CHUCK SENTER 6698 Tiger Road • Ropesville, Texas 79358 806.392.3487 • csenter@armlend.com PRESIDENT- CASEY BAIZE PO Box 62862 • San Angelo, Texas 76904 512.618.9233 • csbaize@yahoo.com

PERFORMANCE REPORT

Winter Horse Health A

By LUKE CARPENTER – Performance Reporter

s the holiday season is just around the corner many of us have set down our ropes and picked up a ball. The post season of most football is firing up in the coming weeks. Girls basketball is soon to be starting as well. With so many extra curricular sports being played, your time can get lost fast. The hard work that's being put in late at night after ball games is really going to show come spring. Staying in top condition throughout the winter is definitely a struggle. We pride ourselves on working hard through anything everyday to get to that next level, but we also know how hard it is to get out when the

snow has fallen and the bitter west Texas wind is biting. Throughout the weather and the frantic holidays, many of us tend to fall short on general maintenance and catering to our animals in the colder months. Horse health is one of the key components that keep us ready for the spring. Region II member Emilee Charlesworth of Marathon, Texas tells us her favorite winter time horse care strategies. “I like to keep blankets on my horses any time it gets cold,” says Charlesworth. “The lights work too, keeping them slicked off and pretty.” When we do find ourselves at winter rodeos Emilee can be found loping in many circles and lugging around buckets of warm water to keep those horses hydrated. Health is the most important part of our game. Without our animals we would get nowhere. These crucial tips are ones that everyone can and should use. For any extra great tips go check out West Texas Equine Clinic on facebook so you are on top of the wellness of your animal. We are all excited to see what the winter brings us. Hopefully with these few horse tips we can come back better than ever. The second semester of region rodeos are firing up in the spring and we have no time to waste. #regionIItougherthanever

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ERIC HUSTON PO Box 945 • Decatur, Texas 76234 817.368.0159 • ehuston1972@gmail.com

STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - DUSTIN MONTGOMERY VICE PRESIDENT - GRACIE GAMBINO SECRETARY - LARAMIE DEARING

Region III

817.706.8236• redhotregion3@gmail.com STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS

KEVIN STEWART PO Box 1308 • Glen Rose, Texas 76043 817.307.7303 • thekevinstewart@live.com 7217 Denver City Dr. • Fort Worth, Texas 76179

SECRETARY - KELLEY WILLIAMS

13196 Burns Branch Rd • Krum, Texas 776249 940.255.0738 • dshelton@rdoequipment.com

DARYL SHELTON

PRESIDENT - ERIC HUSTON PO Box 945 • Decatur, TX 76234 817.368.8885 • ehuston1972@gmail.com

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PERFORMANCE REPORT

Shad Mayfield A Legend in the Making

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By GEORGIA SHIELDS

– Performance Reporter

owboy Christmas is just around the corner, and I got to visit with my good friend Shad Mayfield. As many know, Shad has had an exciting past three years. Starting in 2019 Shad’s senior year of high school, he won the calf roping title in Region, State, and National in high school rodeo. During that year he filled his permit in the PRCA, and was able to complete a long time goal of making the NFR the same year he filled his permit. Shad said that was his best memory, as it was his first NFR, but it was a bit overwhelming. He always wanted to compete in the NFR at the Thomas and Mack arena, but as Shad states, “it is nothing like you see on TV”. Just like any new experience you have to learn the routines and expectations while at the NFR. Shad said that with all of the obligations to sponsors and autograph sessions, he had very little downtime for himself, let alone trying to take care of his horses and trying to get ready to compete every night. During the 2020 year Shad set the world on fire. He was on a mission.

Shad won the American in March and had set an unprecedented run amassing over $100,000 dollars in winnings before the summer run. Shad made his second appearance at the NFR in Arlington and was able to seal his first World Calf Roping Championship. Shad stated that his second appearance at the finals did not feel the same as The Thomas and Mack. The energy from the crowd did not feel the same. This year (2021), Shad has taken the lessons he has learned over the years and is able to become more consistent with his practices and competition. Shad states that moving to Lipan, Tx has proved to be a great move for him. He is able practice more consistently and it is somewhat easier to get various ropings and rodeos. Shad also said that his confidence is huge this year as he was able to acquire new horses this year. As he said, “I feel like I have more horse power, and that that will set me up to make good runs. This gives me a huge boost of confidence. He feels that he is better prepared heading into the NFR this year. As for his hometown of Clovis, NM, he still comes home often to trade cattle, work on young horses and to practice with his dad. Region lll is very proud to call him a past member, and legend in the making. Good luck from Region lll.


TEAM CINCH: 2021/2022 Kiley Hargrave-Batten Lane Picklo Tylie McDonald Kash Martin Brooklyn Balch Landon Cook Ty Burgess Brayze Schill Lizzy Webb Walker Akins Matt Glover Jasleigh Montagne Colton Payne Samantha Perko

CLASSICROPE.COM

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THSRA FINALS NEWS H THSRA FINALS NEWS H THSRA FINALS NEWS

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2022 THSRA Finals to get major upgrade

THSRA and its Corporate Sponsor Team just turned up the heat on our 2022 State Finals. What can state finalist expect? Get ready for the most added money and biggest payout to ever be experienced at the state level, not to mention first-class awards usually only seen awarded at the professional level. The chart-topping news is that this year, for the first time in history, Texas will be adding $100,000 to the finals making the total payout reach $244,000 (based on last year’s entries). The richest payout to date means that contestants will be going home with a lot more green in their pockets. Winning an event (where entries are full), a Go Round will pay $1,247 and winning the average will pay $4,550 (for more payout breakout information visit our website THSRA.org and click on State Finals/General Information). Paying six places in each go round and short round and paying eight places in the average. We are also introducing a State Champion Legacy Design that will remain and be recognizable for years to come. THSRA is the largest and most prestigious rodeo association in Texas and beyond, so winning a state championship buckle really means something. Our desire is that the design will be immediately recognized whether you won it in 2022 or in 2042. Gist will be producing 17 sterling silver and 10K gold legacy buckles for our rodeo State Champions, Queen and All Around champions. Gist is not only a National Sponsor, but they are known for creating stunning buckles that are timeless. We promise that these buckles will be jaw dropping. Kelly Slover Custom Buckles will be creating original designs for the 233

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buckles given to Go Round Winners, National Team Qualifiers, Queen Runner Up, average winners and shooting awards. Cowboy Classic Saddlery will create beautiful saddles that will be awarded to the Queen and All Arounds. Top 15 back numbers and awards by Yeti will also be given. Also, don’t forget about the major dollars in college scholarships awarded! Based on last year’s numbers and intent for this year the state will be giving $145,000 in scholarships. When adding region level scholarships, the state total approaches $300,000 in scholarships given. As we step back and look at the landscape of it all, we are so very fortunate as an association to have been given the opportunity to decide how we get to spend more money on our members, we are blessed. A special thank you goes out to our corporate sponsor team (whose names you can find throughout this publication). Sponsors matter to our organization and this announcement is a direct reflection of their generosity. We ask that you make yourself familiar with their names and brands. Remember that they support you when you shop and that your loyalty to their


brands matters a lot to them. for young people, a love for family and a passion for the sport of Another group that deserves recognition is the THSRA Board of rodeo. They want to see student athletes have greater opportunities Directors. Each director works selflessly toward the common good to compete and win in the competition arena and in the arena of life. of the membership and association. They have a deep appreciation

$100,000 Added Money $244,000 Total Payout $145,000 in State Scholarships $68,000 in prizes to include:

17 Gist Sterling Silver & 10K Gold Legacy Buckles

3 Cowboy Classic Saddles

233 Kelly Slover Custom Buckles

Stock Contractor - J&J Rodeo Company

Reined Cow Horse Secretary - Anne Dollery

Arena Director - Richard Baldwin

Points Analysts - Jody McElroy & Kelley Williams

Rodeo Secretary - Susan Baldwin

Photographer - Jennings Photography

Announcer - Chris Rankin

Judges - Teddy Alleman, Gip Allen & Bobby Flores Cutting Secretary - Angie Key

Rodeo Timers - Angie Key & Pam Ghormley Information Booth - Kelly Wood

Videographer - D&C Productions

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DR. TANDY FREEMAN

BARRY BRADEN PO Box 549 • Horatio, AR 71842 870.584.2308 • tbbraden@earthlink.net

STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - BRYLEE BRADEN VICE PRESIDENT - MARY BETH BEAM SECRETARY - DIXIE TABB STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS

GUY YARBROUGH

Region IV

SECRETARY - KATHY JOHNSON 4941 FM 269 • Pickton, Texas 75471 903.245.2725 • thsra4@yahoo.com

DAVID SCHRECK 209 Sarah Way • Murphy, TX 75094 214.403.5606 • dschreck@intelemedia.com MICHAEL AKINS 2449 West Line Road • Whitesboro, TX 76273 makins1@yahoo.com • 904.368.9390

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PERFORMANCE REPORT

Region IV Student Officers

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By LULU EAKES – Performance Reporter

et’s get to know a few of our 2021-2022 student officers! Brylee Braden, Our high school president has been a member of Region IV for six years now. brylee is a senior, and has many opportunities open to her and her future looks bright. Brylee runs barrels, poles, and ropes at region IV. Last year Brylee stepped off of her horse “paint“ and on to her young horse “Dibber.” Her new

horse “Dibber will launch her to college and beyond. Brylee’s calf horse “Paint”, is who brought her to another level in rodeo. Brylee even said that “ He is the reason I compete at the level I do today.” Brylee can be found helping other region kids and in the office with her fellow student officers. Being the region IV president Brylee strives to be an example for younger generations of rodeo athletes. Let’s get to know our vice president Mary Beth Beam. Mary Beth has been rodeoing since she

BRYLEE BRADEN photo by Jennings

MARY BETH BEAM photo by Jennings

was five but started rodeoing for region IV since her sixth-grade year. Mary Beth’s favorite motto is to be Brave! Mary Beth looks up to Lari Dee guy and Donene Taylor. She believes that, “they are both amazing athletes and have helped me with my mental game, horsemanship, and roping.” With Mary Beth in office, she hopes to make everyone feel a part of the family. One of Marybeth‘s favorite memories was in October 2021. Mary Beth was able to rope in the finals of the women’s rodeo world championship for a chance at 60K in the WCRA at only 16 years old. Mary Beth said “


it was an unbelievable moment for me and for the sport of breakaway.I am pumped to see what the future has in store for women in rodeo!” Marybeth would also like to say thank you to Cathi Woods. Cathi works the back gate at every region rodeo, is always there for encouragement, and is willing to help with anything the Region needs. Marybeth is a big help to our region making sure everything runs according to plan and helping out wherever she can. Let’s get to know our secretary Dixie Tabb. Dixie is A sophomore and has been a member of Region IV for five years now. A motto she lives by is to ride fast, work hard, laugh harder. In the rodeo world, Dixie looks up to JJ Hampton. JJ Hampton is a breakaway roper that has won the world title in breakaway many times. Dixie looks up to Her because she constantly gives back to the community, is humble, and is an amazing role model. Dixie believes she is paving the way for future contestants and is someone to look up to whether you rope or not. With Dixie‘s position as our student officer, she hopes to Bring the members of Region IV together and get sponsors to fund this amazing rodeo association. Dixie’s favorite memory from regions is when it snowed, and all the kids threw snowballs at balls at each other and created friendships that will last a lifetime. Dixie would also like to thank Michael Akins for all he has done for not only the kids but for the region as a whole. Regions are in full swing and Dixie is helping our new secretary, Mrs. Kathy Johnson, and the other student officers in making sure everything goes smoothly and efficiently.

DIXIE TABB photo by Jennings

PERFECT PRACTICE

THE MOST REALISTIC TRAINING SYSTEMS ON THE MARKET 888-HEELING | heelomatic.com

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PRESIDENT - ABI DePRIEST VICE PRESIDENT - RILEY JAY OTWELL SECRETARY - PEYTON MATHIS

STUDENT OFFICERS

JUSTIN KLEIN PO Box 2107 • Center, TX 75935 936.590.0229 • sendtojustin@yahoo.com

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS

BILL WHITE 277 Billy White Rd • Singer, LA 70660 337.304.0748 • whiteacres55@yahoo.com

Region V

SECRETARY - SUSAN BALDWIN 722 Southview Circle • Center, Texas 75935 936.590.4330 • regionvsecretary@gmail.com

SHANE PASCHAL PO Box 123 • Nome, Texas 77629 409.253.2553 • spaschal@paschalweld.com

PRESIDENT- KIRK MATHIS 777 Freeman Cemetery Rd • Lufkin, TX75904 936.676.3495 • kmathis@cmzlaw.net

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PERFORMANCE REPORT

To Keep a Legend Alive By LIEZA KLEIN – Performance Reporter

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o keep a legend alive, it must be so epic, so amazing that it’s passed down from generation to generation. A legend is described as a “larger than life” character. Legends touch lives, they are remembered, and they are cherished. Legend Kel Williamson, a TJHRA Reg V Cowboy, had a smaller time frame here on Earth than anyone could have expected. Legend’s name was not given to him by mistake and his purpose on Earth for these brief 10 years, were planned by a higher power, his path was no mistake and the lives touched had hearts already prepared to listen. Legend Williamson, big brother to Maverick, his parents Kelly and Reagan, all reside in Lufkin Texas. He was a great student, a great asset on the family farm and was the social media guru for his dad’s feed store. He loved his family, he loved to rodeo, and he loved the Lord. His

favorite scripture was “Love thy neighbor as you love yourself.” Matthew 22:39 He had a servant’s heart at a very young age. Because of his captivating personality, he could suck you in, keep you listening for long periods of time and then have you walk away with a smile on your face. To the elderly man that spoke to Legend every time he picked up his feed or the young teen that listened to a Legend tale as he made his way through the feed store, Legend left his mark on your heart. With a faith that hadn’t been tried, and “God molded hearts” they didn’t know they possessed, Legend’s parents started down an unknown “bend in the road” that October Sunday in Deridder La. By the way, if you have never heard of Legend Kel Williamson, your “bend in the road” just happened. I’m sorry I didn’t’ give you any forewarning, but us (and I mean thousands) didn’t get a forewarning either. Don’t ever underestimate the power of a Godfearing little boy, parents with a fire for Christ and thousands of prayer warriors that will continue on this movement. Thousands will be touched, and souls will be saved. I invite everyone to follow the Facebook page, “A True Legend.” It will give you a glimpse of what strength and bravery looks like. Here is something from Legend’s mom. “Though the storms may come and the winds may blow, I'll remain steadfast And let my heart learn when You speak a word, it will come to pass.


GREAT IS YOUR FAITHFULNESS TO ME. I put my faith in Jesus My anchor to the ground My hope and firm foundation He'll never let me down.” Faith: Complete trust or confidence in someone or something. Have you ever walked by faith and not by sight? I didn’t until October 3, 2021. Before then, it honestly scared me to give up all control of something that in the end I have no control over and will never have control over. Have you ever fought the Holy Spirit? I have and did for many years. On October 3, 2021, I learned to live by the guidance of the Holy Spirit. I learned to be silent and listen to the Holy Spirit. Being filled with the Holy Spirit is euphoric, it’s the best feeling. Why do we fight the Holy Spirit? Good question. The worldly ways are strong but the Holy Spirt, our creator, Jesus Christ holds the entire world in His hands. Have you ever been in a storm and been scared and maybe felt helpless because the circumstances or the winds around you were strong and out of your control? For me, it’s every single day. But you know what?? My God will never leave me nor forsake me. He always sends a rainbow, sunshine or clear skies after a storm. He is my anchor to the ground. He is my float when I am drowning. He is my oxygen when I am suffocating. He is and always has been the only thing that has ever kept me going. When I have felt lesser than, he reminds me that I am the daughter of the King most high,

I am royalty, I am enough. He is always there, after every storm to help rebuild the damage. Through every storm, I will not run and hide. I will face them head on, feet planted and rooted so firmly and deeply on the foundation, anchored to the ground. I will lift my hands and praise Him. I will tell Him thank you and that I trust Him. I will love him until he calls me home. There is no storm that God can’t get you through. He never promised us that it will be easy, but I can promise you that Heaven will be worth it. ~Reagan Williamson #livelikeLegend

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CHRISTMAS MOVIE CHECKLIST A Christmas Story A Charlie Brown Christmas Arthur Christmas Christmas with the Cranks Deck the Halls Elf Ernest Saves Christmas Frosty the Snowman Holiday Inn Home Alone Home Alone 2 How the Grinch Stole Christmas I’ll Be Home for Christmas It’s a Wonderful Life Jack Frost Jingle All the Way Mickey’s Christmas Carol Muppet’s Christmas Carol

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Miracle on 34th Street Prancer Prancer Returns Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer The Bishop’s Wife The Little Drummer Boy The Muppets Christmas Carol The Nativity The Night Before Christmas The Polar Express The Santa Clause The Santa Clause 2 The Year Without A Santa Claus While Your Were Sleeping White Christmas


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TESS UNDERBRINK OF REGION VIII by Ashtyn Carr

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The Whataburger Whatakid is selected due to their ability to excel both in and out of the rodeo arena. Whataburger is proud to recognize a THSRA member from each of the ten Regions who truly upholds the title “Whatakid!” One of the nominees will be chosen at the State Final Rodeo in June as the Whatakid of the Year. In recognition of this accomplishment they will receive free Whataburgers for an entire year!

ongratulations to Tess Underbrink for being named this month’s “WHATAKID!”. Tess is a member of Region 8 and resides in Pleasanton, TX with her parents, Tammie and Jason, and her two older brothers, Hunter and Fisher. As a kid, Tess was interested in gymnastics and softball. Though she was active in extracurriculars, she did not become interested in the rodeo world until the age of seven. Tess was invited to ride horses at a family friend’s house. She loaded up in the truck with her parents and brothers. After enjoying their time riding, they headed back home. Tess said as soon as they got in the truck her dad asked if they wanted to start rodeoing. The family dove head first from that moment. Now a senior in high school, Tess has an extensive list of awards under her belt. In 2019, Tess was THSRA’s Region 8 Champion AllAround Cowgirl, Champion Rookie All-Around Cowgirl, Champion Pole Bender, Reserve Champion Breakaway Roper, and was a state qualifier in barrels, goats, ples, and breakaway. Last year, she took home the titles of Reserve Champion Pole Bender at the Texas High School Rodeo Founders Invitational and THSRA’ Region 8 Champion Pole Bender. 2021 has been her most awarded year yet! Tess was THSRA’s Region 8 Champion AllAround Cowgirl and Champion Pole Bender. She also was a state qualifier in poles, breakaway, goats, and team roping. She competed again at the Texas High School Rodeo Founders Invitational and was Reserve Champion Breakaway Roper. At the San Antonio

Youth Rodeo, Tess was a short round qualifier in pole bending and recognized as the Reserve Champion heeler. Finally, Tess was a two time American semifinals breakaway qualifier. Tess has a hard time deciding which event is her favorite. But, she said she believes that most people see her as a pole bender. She credits this to her horse, Stella. Tess and Stella have been together since 10 years old. Their time together has been a wild ride. “She liked her buck almost every time I got on her,” Tess said. “People thought I was insane for, you know, even riding her. In junior high, my sixth grade year, she literally bucked 10 out of the 12 rodeos we had.” These days Tess said Stella is “probably one of the most consistent and best for horses that [she has] seen out there”. In September of this year, Tess was elected for president of the Region 8 high school officer team. At the region’s second rodeo in September, Tess and the rest of the Region 8 officer team coordinated a snack drive for the Uvalde police department. Tess said that, as a town, Uvalde “opens their arms to Region 8”. So, the officer team wishes to continue to give back. Region 8 also does a Sunday church service before rodeos, which is another event that Tess participates in. The service is 100 percent student led. It starts with music played by contestants. Worship is followed by prayer and words from other students. “I just think everyone really needs to tune in and see what we're doing,” Tess said. “Hopefully, the other regions can see what we're doing and if they want to do incorporate it into that in their rodeos that would be great. Because it has done amazing things for our region.” Although Tess stays busy with rodeo and her presidency, she still finds time to dedicate to school and other activities. Tess plays volleyball for her school and represents as a team captain. Similarly, she is a member of her school’s National Honor Society, Fellowship of Christian Athletes and FFA chapters. Tess does not go at her busy schedule alone. In fact, her parents are some of her biggest supporters. Tammie is on the booster club for both Tess’s volleyball team and FFA chapter. Likewise, Tammie is in the box at the region rodeos, making announcements and taking times. Jason also lends a helping hand! He picks up cattle, helps practice and devotes time to work horses. Tess said it is an amazing feeling to have her parents support her in the ways they do. It is evident that rodeo has had an impact on Tess and her family. So much so that Tess hopes to continue her rodeo career at Texas A & M University upon graduating from high school! Additionally, the rodeo industry has had a big impact on the way Tess sees and navigates the world. She said that the rodeo industry is one that welcomes others warmly, gives help to those who need it and makes everyone feel loved. “Through volleyball and other things I've done, I’ve never seen a community rally together like the rodeo industry does,” Tess said. “I feel like if everyone just did more things like the rodeo industry did this world might just be a little bit better.”

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he definition of Elite is stated as a select group that is superior in terms of ability or qualities to the rest of a group or society. Now in its third year, the primary goal our Priefert Junior Elite (PJE) program is to develop future leaders in the sport of rodeo. With a strong focus on leadership training and character building, Priefert also offers members a unique look at the industry through the eyes of the Priefert Pro Team Athletes and industry partners. There is no doubt that rodeo has a strong future with the number of remarkable young people who are participating in and growing the sport, and we are excited to continue to share their stories through this program. We are excited to embark on our fourth year of the PJE in 2022 with applications available as of the 1st of December. Selected PJE applicants will receive a oneyear partnership agreement and a variety of benefits from Priefert. Team members and ambassadors will get to wear an exclusive team sponsor patch, participate in monthly team conference calls, and will be featured on Priefert’s social media accounts. Additionally, Junior Elite team members will have the opportunity to attend a 3-day training camp held on the Priefert Ranch, featuring instructors from the Priefert Pro Team.

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There is limited availability on the Jr Elite Team and our goal is to have a broad representation of ages, events, and geography in our program. We want to ensure that each member represents the true spirit of the Priefert family, and that each member will take away valuable experiences from their year on the team. Visit the Priefert Jr Elite website at www.jrelite.priefert.com for a list of the 2021 team members and alumni as well as how to apply to be a member of our 2022 PJE Team. About Priefert Priefert is one of the largest rodeo and ranch equipment manufacturers in the world. Founded in 1964 by Marvin Priefert and located in Mt. Pleasant, Texas, Priefert is considered the leading innovator in the livestock handling industry. With 1,000 employees and a dealer network of over 1200 dealers around the world, Priefert is recognized as having the highest quality equipment on the market. Priefert is proud to have its equipment used and endorsed by the top cattle, equine, rodeo and roping associations in the country. For more information, visit www.priefert.com.


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PRESIDENT - MEKENNA DAVIS VICE PRESIDENT - BAYLEE BURLESON SECRETARY - BRADI FREEMEAN

STUDENT OFFICERS

STATE DIRECTORS MATT CRAINER PO Box 32 • Carrizo Springs, TX 78834 830.876.6010 • mattcrainer@yahoo.com

JUSTINE HUNT 2433 Witte Rd • Bellville, TX 77418 979.525.7098 • rodeohuntboys@gmail.com

Region VI

SECRETARY - ANNE DOLLERY P.O. BOX 866 • Caldwell, Texas 77836 936.412.2551 • region6thsra@gmail.com

DAVID FREEMAN 1039 Mockingbird Lane • Eagle Lake, TX 77434 832.221.1253 • chlfreeman@yahoo.com PRESIDENT - DAVID FREEMAN 1039 Mockingbird Lane • Eagle Lake, TX 77434 832.221.1253 • chlfreeman@yahoo.com

PERFORMANCE REPORT

Stem Cell Treatments in Horses

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By TABER GARCIA

– Performance Reporter

tem cell treatments are undifferentiated cells that can replicate into a diverse range of cell types. There are two primary types of stem cells: hematopoietic and mesenchymal. The mesenchymal has the most potential to help injured tissue heal along with other organs throughout the body. You can find the mesenchymal stem cells in bone marrow, fat, umbilical cord blood, tissues, and other organs. The younger cells are more likely to be used because they have more potential. The cells have an increased ability to heal and regenerate tissue compared to the adult cells (Black 3). This kicked off the interest of storing umbilical cord blood in horses. Stem cell treatments offer the possibility for successful treatments for previously life-threatening or career-ending injuries. Stem cells are able to differentiate into multiple cells that produce cartilage and tendon fibers. For joints, there is an injection of stem cells and then an experimental injury that demonstrates the ability to help early cartilage repair. According to studies, stem cells could improve tissue healing following tendon (superficial digital flexor) and ligament (suspensory) injuries. On the other hand, different studies showed improved tendon architecture, fiber organization, and biomechanical characteristics with the stem cell treatment. In a large series of clinical tendon injuries, the rate of re-injuries has significantly decreased (Black 3). Stem cells are harvested from bone marrow which is generally acquired from the

sternum or the tuber coxae. Once the bone marrow is collected, it then gets sent to the lab where it is cultured and expanded into millions of stem cells. This process can take up to three to four weeks. The average dose ranges from ten to twenty-five million stem cells per treatment. After, they are then injected into the affected tendon, ligament, or joint (Black 4). Many studies have shown to be very successful. According to a study, 77-98% of Thoroughbreds with naturally occurring tendinopathy (tendon disease or injury) showed improvements on ultrasound examinations after a stem cell treatment. The reinjury rate was less than 30%. For horses with naturally occurring osteoarthritis, 78% have returned to work after the treatment along with horses that have meniscal injuries in the stifles, 76% were able to return to work (“Stem Cell Therapy for Sport Horses). I recently had an encounter with one of my horses having to have surgery and stem cell treatments due to a tear deep in the right front digital flexor tendon. She had received one stem cell treatment prior to having her surgery. After her surgery she needs to have two additional stem cell treatments these next two months. She will be on stall rest till February but was said to have a full recovery. Since I have had an experience with a horse having a torn tendon and had stem cell treatments, I feel like I support this procedure. Although there have been successful stem cell treatments, there are still various amounts of uncertainty towards the stem cell treatments due to there being many questions unanswered. Practitioners need to be aware of the factors that may influence MSCs from the tissue harvesting. The time, temperature, and shipping media during the transports are very critical points to slow down reductions in cell viability. 18G and 20G needles need to be used to homogenise the MSC suspension and to perform the injection, respectively. The MSCs can be combined with other products such as hyaluronic acid or polysulphated glycosaminoglycans and should not be administered in a combination of local anesthetics, antibiotics, or corticosteroids (Barrachina et al). Another reason for hesitation is the price of the treatment. The normal cost for a stem cell harvest, lab expansion to 10 million cells, and the implantation will be approximately $2500 to $4000. Depending on whether the injury will need a larger cell expansion, or if the cells are frozen and stored for additional treatments, the price will increase (Black 4). Stem cells have brought new hope for veterinary regenerative medicine. According to Kornicka et al, the cells are becoming an increasingly promising clinical tool. Stem cells are finally starting to hold great promises for their therapeutic uses in horses (Koch et al). The benefits of stem cell treatments outweigh the many risks. Works Cited Barrachina, L., et al. “Practical Considerations for Clinical Use of Mesenchymal Stem Cells: From the Laboratory to the Horse.” The Veterinary Journal, W.B. Saunders, 17 July 2018, https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1090023318303794?via%3Dihub. Black, Mike. “Regenerative Medicine Mike Black.” Regenerative Medicine, 2015, https://www.nebraskaequine.com/storage/app/media/ Regenerative_Medicine_Nov_2015.pdf. Hopper, Scott A. “Regenerative Medicine â€" Understanding IRAP, PRP and Stem Cell Therapies.” Rood & Riddle Equine Hospital, https://www.roodandriddle.com/news/education-articles/regenerative-medicine--understanding-irap-prp-and-stem-cell-therapies#:~:text=The%20younger%20stem%20cells%20have,umbilical%20cord%20blood%20in%20horses. Koch, Thomas G, et al. “Concepts for the Clinical Use of Stem Cells in Equine Medicine.” The Canadian Veterinary Journal = La Revue Veterinaire Canadienne, Canadian Veterinary Medical Association, Oct. 2008, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2553494/. Kornicka, Katarzyna, et al. “Stem Cells in Equine Veterinary Practice-Current Trends, Risks, and Perspectives.” Journal of Clinical Medicine, MDPI, 14 May 2019, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6572129/. “Stem Cell Therapy for Sport Horses.” The Horse, 22 Jan. 2021, https://thehorse.com/167109/stem-cell-therapy-for-sport-horses/.

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PRESIDENT - KERA LAMB VICE PRESIDENT - CARLI RAWLINSON SECRETARY - PAISLEY PIERCE

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS AMBER BASS 6808 Cedar Hill Road • Brenham, Texas 77833 979.851.9553 amberbass@greatertexasfoundation.org

STUDENT OFFICERS

DAN SIMPTON 24543 SH 6 • Navasota, Texas 77868 936.870.5779 • dansimpton@yahoo.com

Region VII

SECRETARY - NENA BOETTCHER PO Box 833 • East Bernard, Texas 77435 281.468.8973 • region7thsra@gmail.com

SCOTT SHOOK 5750 FM 360 • Needville, Texas 77461 713.851.9553 • sshook@troyconstruction.com SCOTT SHOOK 5750 FM 360 • Needville, Texas 77461 713.851.9553 • sshook@troyconstruction.com

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PERFORMANCE REPORT Helping Our Teammate

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By JAYCI LEE BYLER

– Performance Reporter

one are the days of a horse never having to see the vet. Over the years, we have bred horses up to be equivalent as a fine tuned race car. As they show remarkable speed, agility, and higher performance. Like a race car after every race, each horse needs to be checked over and their overall health analyzed. A horse’s health is every contestant’s number one priority while on the rodeo trail. We all want our horses to be in their best condition, in and out of the arena. But when they’re not fully 100% to compete, their owners have advanced medical technology that has come from the human medical industry. One of the coolest is hyperbaric oxygen therapy or better known as HBOT for short. In humans, it has been known to help treat burn victims, strokes, acute respiratory distress, and migraines. ESMS in Weatherford offers the Equine HBOT for equine. They have been treating horses with such issues as pneumonia, pulmonary hemorrhage, immune distressed, and wound care. This medical procedure uses concentrated oxygen to help heal chronic and acute injuries, wounds,

as well as infections. During treatment, the horse is placed in a chamber that has barometric pressure and allows them to breathe in the oxygen. Horses are prepped by removing their horse shoes and feet taped so no risk of a spark that can cause the 100% oxygen to ignite. They are sedated so they will stay still in the chamber throughout the treatment session. This procedure takes about 45 to 60 minutes and the amount of treatments the horse needs depends on the horse’s condition. The price of getting the treatment is about $420 per day but the cost also depends on the horse’s condition and how many treatments the horse gets. The effects of this treatment includes the reduction of tissue swelling, pain from swelling and inflammation, and enhances the connective tissue repair process. This procedure is very useful when it comes to healing our horses. Health is the name of the game to keep our equine athletes competing on top. There’s new technology that has been converted over from the human medical field to the equine field to help your horse to stay healthy or recover from an illness. By asking your vets and reading up on equine veterinary journals, you will be able to know what advancements they have in the equine medical field. Every horse is different. Some may need a little more help than others to stay healthy or to recover, but in the end, all we ever want is the best for our teammate in the rodeo arena. Hebrews 13:16 “Don’t forget to do good and to share what you have because God is pleased with these kinds of sacrifices.”


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Farm & Ranch Family The folks at McCoy’s Building Supply understand that it takes a lot of hard work and the whole family pitching in to get things done on a farm or ranch. That’s why we’d like to take some time out to salute Texas High School Rodeo Association families who are farmers and ranchers. In our monthly Farm & Ranch Family Spotlight, we’ll feature one family, sharing their story of how they work together as a family to make their farm or ranch successful.The spotlight will run for 10 months; each month will feature a different Region. Each Regional McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family will receive a $100 McCoy’s Gift Card. The McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family of the Year will receive a $500 McCoy’s Gift Card and will be announced at the 2022 THSRA State Finals.

The Thigpen Family of Region VIII

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by Ashtyn Carr

ongratulations to the Thigpen family for being named the McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family this month! Jen and Kelley Thigpen reside in Pearsall, Texas with their three sons, Dillon, Paden and Hudson. Jen and Kelley are junior high sweethearts. Kelley grew up in Hondo, Texas. In his words, Jen’s family were transplants to the area. Jen’s grandparents owned a dairy and moved it to the country, as San Antonio was quickly expanding. Her parents followed suit and moved to Hondo when Jen and Kelley were in seventh and eighth grade, respectively. From then on, Kelley said Jen could not stay away from him. Jen and Kelley continued to date throughout high school. After the couple graduated from Texas A & M University, they got married. Back in 1994, Kelley’s grandfather established the Pearsall Livestock Auction. Kelley has been working at the sale barn since he graduated from college. A new generation is now in charge as Jen and Kelley took ownership of the business four years ago. Not much has changed as it is still a family run auction! Jen, Kelley, Kelley’s mom, and their three boys all play a part. Especially on Wednesday’s as it is sale day. The auction offers sale barn, ranching and consulting services. Aside from the auction, the family runs cattle on 20,000 acres across South Texas. The Thigpen’s have cattle in East Texas, too! Although the operation is mainly cow-calf, Kelley said they will sometimes work yearlings. The ranching side of the family business ties into the auction well.

“We breed a lot of heifers and calve a lot of heifers out,” Kelley said. “It kind of ties into our sell barn business. We have special replacement females sales that we do several times a year. So, we are always needing cattle to supply those sales. We sell a lot of females, bred heifers, bred cow-calf pairs. Then, run our cow calf deal as well.” Whenever they are not helping with the cattle or at the sale barn, the Thigpen boys stay busy. Dillon, who is the oldest of the three, is a 17-year-old high school senior. In junior high, Dillon competed in all rodeo events available to him. These days, he sticks to team roping and calf roping. Dillon also enjoys playing the piano, dancing, hunting, fly fishing, playing cards, and more. Kelley even boasts on Dillon praline making abilities! Paden is the middle child. He is a 16-year-old sophomore. Like his older brother, Paden competed in all the rodeo events in junior high. As a high schooler, he ropes calves. Paden also team ropes as Dillon’s partner. When he isn’t competing in rodeo events in his free time, you can catch Paden fishing on the coast or cooking a good family meal. Unlike the average teenage boy, Paden also enjoys working cattle with his family. “That is just what we do,” Paden said. “So, that is what I like doing.” Lastly, there is 13-year-old Hudson. Now in the eighth grade, Hudson has been rodeoing for two years. He competes in chute dogging and all the junior high events, except for breakaway. Like his brothers, he is multifaceted! Hudson takes a liking to doing custom leather projects, working cattle and fixing up trucks. Raising three boys is not for the weak. In fact, Jen is a mom of all trades. Apart from running the office at the auction, she also homeschools the kids. Being together almost 24/7 can make for a pretty chaotic household. But, Jen admits that is it their own kind of organized chaos! “It reminds me of like whenever you see puppies all balled up wrestling with each other,” Jen said. “That is what it's like in our house a lot. Just rough and tough but they're also really good, kind young men as well.” Even though life gets crazy, the Thigpen’s try to remain grounded in the Lord in one another. Each member of the family said they cherish the time they spend together. From rodeoing to the sale barn to the “classroom”, their days are full of family matters. Through all the hustle and bustle, the Thigpens’ still find the time to sit around the dinner table as a family at the end of the day. No matter the hour. “It has been a great joy to me to be able to to be with these boys and, you know, see them grow up and get to work with them,” Kelley said. “I would rather be working with them than than anybody. It just makes me proud.” The Thigpen’s are very family oriented, which is one of the reasons why they enjoy the rodeo industry. Jen described the world of rodeo as one that is full of like minded families and comradery. Likewise, she said the family enjoys being together at events. Since the boys are homeschooled, rodeos are also where they are able to socialize with their friends! “That's their their outlet for friends,” Jen said. “So, we love that about it just as much of the as the competition part.”

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STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - KATE MCNEIL VICE PRESIDENT - RYLEE DODSON SECRETARY - SYDNEY BLAIR PO Box 787 • Asherton, TX 78837 830-999-3344 • tom@catarosaranch.com

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS TOM AASBO

Region VIII

SECRETARY - CELINA FETTY

3005 Santa Ana St. • Corpus Christi, Texas 78415 361.739.9858 • region8thsra@gmail.com

BEN ELLIS PO Box 1845 • Orange Grove, Texas 78372 361.701.1886 • ben.ellis78@yahoo.com JASON UNDERBRINK 520 Phillips Rd • Pleasanton, Texas 78064 210.854.7718 • jasonunderbrink@yahoo.com PO Box 787 • Asherton, TX 78837 830-999-3344 • tom@catarosaranch.com

PRESIDENT- TOM AASBO

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PERFORMANCE REPORT

REGION VIII FOUNDERS INVITATIONAL RESULTS

By LYNLEY WRIGHT – Performance Reporter

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ool weather and good family holidays mark the official end of summer and start of fall, with October proving an eventful month for Region 8. At the annual THSRA Founders Invitation rodeo, barrel racing champion Eryn Ellis and steer wrestling champion Clay Tom Hurt did a fantastic job of representing Region 8, while bringing home a good wad of cash and plenty of bragging rights for their efforts. Others who did well from Region 8 include Bryce Henderson, who won the short round, and finished up 3rd

FOUNDERS HIGH SCHOOL RODEO

overall in tie down, while Tess Underbrink ended up 2nd in the breakaway. Congratulations to the four seniors who made the most of their final trip to Founder. For those of you who are unaware of what the Founders Invitational is, it is a rodeo for the top 4 in each event in every region that makes up THSRA. People can qualify for Founders their freshman year till their junior year, and once they are seniors they can no longer make it. It is a well ran, fun rodeo with a good pay out to those who win. At our Region rodeo, President Tess Underbrink, Vice President Maddie Aasbo and Secretary Eryn Ellis came together and did something new for our community service project we have every October. This year, rodeo participants were required to donate one snack item apiece, which were then put together in baskets and donated to the local police stations and sheriffs offices, as a way of saying thank you for all they do for the town of Uvalde, Texas, where Region 8 calls home. I hope all of you have a fantastic holiday season, do well at your upcoming rodeos, and enjoy your time with family and friends. REGION 8 OFFICERS AT FOUNDERS INVITATIONAL, “As iron sharpens iron, so one person sharpens another” LYNLEY WRIGHT, MADDIE AASBO, ERYN ELIS AND TESS UNDERBRINK (LEFT TO RIGHT) Proverbs 27:17.


YOUTH RODEO ASSOCIATION 2021 - 2022 YRA SEASON

The 2021-2022 rodeo year is the 50th Anniversary of the YRA. At the 2021 YRA Finals All-Around saddles, Year End saddles and Finals Average saddles were awarded in each event along with belt buckles through 6th Place for Year End.

To qualify for the Finals you only have to enter 6 rodeos in each event you wish to compete in at finals.

2021 Awards: 1 – Aluminum Trailer, 2-Three Horse Trailers, 66 Saddles, 180 Belt Buckles, and Scholarships

YEAR END ALL AROUNDS EACH DREW FOR A CHANCE TO WIN AN ALUMINUM TRAILER AND $1000 WAS GIVEN TO EACH ALL AROUND CONTESTANT THAT DID NOT DRAW THE WINNING KEY. Membership Applications, Entry Blanks and the Schedule are available on the YRA website: www.yratx.com or call 713-501-8843. $100 membership and NO RAFFLE TICKETS. NEVER too late to join or enter!

AGE GROUPS (AS OF 9/1/21) Group Pee Wee: ages 8 & under Sub Junior: ages 9 – 12 Juniors: ages 13 – 15 Seniors: ages 16 – 19

Like the Youth Rodeo Association Facebook Page!!

www.yratx.com

SCHEDULE: #1 August 20,21,22 – Bryan – Short Go 8/22 Hooey Jr. Patriot Qualifier #2 September 17, 18 – Edna #3 October 22, 23 – Bellville Rodeo #1 postmark August 9th. If you miss #4 November 12, 13 – Hitchcock postmark deadline then #5 November 19, 20 – Halletsville call in August 17th from #6 January 14, 15, 2022 – Hitchcock 5-9pm at 713-501-8843. #7 February 11, 12 – Giddings #8 February 25, 26 – Rosenberg #9 March 11 ,12, 13 – Gonzales – Short Go 3/13 Vegas Tuffest Qualifier #10 April 22, 23 – Caldwell #11 May 6, 7 – Giddings #12 May 13,14,15 – Edna Short Go 5/15 Vegas Tuffest Qualifier June 15-18 – YRA Finals – Edna

Friday Perf 7:00 PM * Saturday Perf 11:00 PM * Short Go - 10:00 AM for #1, #9 & #12 Roughstock only at #1, #9, #12 Mail In Only

EVENTS AGE

Bareback Boys - 15 – 19 Calf Riding Boys - 9 & under Steer (Jr. Bull Riding) Boys - 10 – 14 Bull Riding Boys - 15 – 19 Chute Dogging Boys - 15 & under Pee Wee Poles Boys & Girls - 8 & under Sub Jr. Poles Boys & Girls - 9 – 12 Jr. Poles Girls - 13 – 15 Sr. Poles Girls - 16 – 19 Sub Jr. Tiedown Boys - 12 & under Jr. Tiedown Boys - 13 -15 Sr. Tiedown Boys - 16 – 19 Pee Wee Barrels Boys & Girls – 8 & under Sub Jr. Barrels Boys & Girls – 9 – 12 Jr. Barrels Girls - 13 – 15 Sr. Barrels Girls - 16 – 19 Sub Jr. Ribbons Boys & Girls – 12 & under Jr. Ribbons Boys & Girls – 13 – 15 Jr./Sr. Girls Ribbons Girls – 13 - 19 Sr. Ribbons Boys – 16 – 19 Pee Wee Figure 8s Boys & Girls - 8 & under Sub Jr. Figure 8s Boys & Girls – 9 – 12 Steer Wrestling Boys – 16 – 19 Sub Jr. Girls Breakaway Girls - 12 & under Sub Jr. Boys Breakaway Boys – 12 & under Jr. Girls Breakaway Girls – 13 – 15 Sr. Girls Breakaway Girls – 16 -19 Jr. Boys Breakaway Boys – 13 – 15 Pee Wee Goat Tying Boys & Girls – 8 & under Sub Jr. Goat Tying Boys & Girls – 12 & under Jr. Goat Tying Girls – 13 – 15 Sr. Goat Tying Girls – 16- 19 Team Roping 19 & Under Enter 2x

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PRESIDENT - RILEY JO CHEATHAM VICE PRESIDENT - BOYD HANAGRIFF SECRETARY - CHASE MCBEE

STUDENT OFFICERS

149 Willow Creek • Huntsville, Texas 77340 832.928.1647 • braddyer@live.com

979.251.4131 • reionixsecretary@gmail.com

Region IX

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS BRAD DYER

MIKE YARGO

SECRETARY - LACEY AUBIHL 1326 PR 5011 • Ledbetter, Texas 78946

PO Box 551 • New Waverly, Rexas 77358 936.581.0527mjyargo!@yahoo.com

198 Pool Road • Richards, Texas 77873 936.661.4163 • rhanagriff@gmail.com

ROGER HANAGRIFF

198 Pool Road • Richards, Texas 77873 936.661.4163 • rhanagriff@gmail.com

PRESIDENT- ROGER HANAGRIFF

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PERFORMANCE REPORT

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By TYLIE

MCDONALD – Performance Reporter

he first weekend of rodeo for Region IX was nothing short of successful. It was such a delight reuniting with our rodeo family after a long break and welcoming new members into our clan. Family is what rodeo is all about and Region IX decided to dedicate our Saturday rodeo to a family member that had passed away in a tragic horse accident. Legend Williamson was a light to this world that spread kindness to every person he met. He was a member of Region V but his life made an

TYLER CALHOUN photo by Jennings

impact on all ten regions across the state. Legend, you will be missed and will forever hold a special place in all of our hearts. On the competition side of things, the competitors came to win. Our returning members that excelled at both the state and national level continued to dominate a set themselves up for another great year. Returning Region IX competitors and 2021 national qualifiers such as Tyler Calhoun, Brooklyn Balch, Kiley Hargrave-Batten and myself placed either first and/or second in the events that qualified us to the NHSFR back in July. However, the freshman were not a force to be reckon with. Will and Walker Smith won the team roping both days. This partnership is exciting to watch and will do nothing but continue to put the pressure on in the team roping event. Braylee Dyer, also a freshman, placed in the breakaway and the goat tying both days. Consistency wasn't the only thing we witnessed at our first rodeo. We saw some smoking fast runs that you had to see to believe. Zaili Saculla tied the fastest goat run of the entire weekend with a 6.93. Jordan Jackson made her duet in the poles but was the one to watch on Sunday running the fastest time of the entire rodeo with a 17.0. And let's not forget about the boys; Bryce Jensen also had a stellar weekend competing in multiple events, but most importantly, throwing his Saturday steer in a 5.6. Aside from the competition, there are some housekeeping things I'd like to address. Our November rodeo will be held at Bryan along with BROOKLYN BALCH the rest of our rodeos this season. We ask our member to wear Blue to photo by Jennings


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877.FARM.BUREAU TXFB-INS.COM ZAILI SACULLA photo by Jennings Coverage and discounts are subject to qualifications and policy terms, and may vary by situation. Life insurance products are offered through Southern Farm Bureau® Life Insurance Company. ©2021 Texas Farm Bureau Insurance Companies.

the Saturday rodeo November 20 for pictures. We have one more rodeo this semester and then we will pick back up January 8 and 9. Please make sure you are regularly checking the Region IX Facebook page where we will frequently post important dates and information. Also, remember that we will do dress up days/themed rodeos so check Region IX's officers' social media pages to know what to wear each weekend. We are so excited for the upcoming year and hope the rest of the regions had a great start to their season as well.

BRYCE JENSEN photo by Jennings

SEE YOUR LOCAL TEXAS KUBOTA DEALER FOR EXCITING DETAILS ON OUR FULL LINE OF TRACTORS AND HAY TOOLS!

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Farm & Ranch Family The folks at McCoy’s Building Supply understand that it takes a lot of hard work and the whole family pitching in to get things done on a farm or ranch. That’s why we’d like to take some time out to salute Texas High School Rodeo Association families who are farmers and ranchers. In our monthly Farm & Ranch Family Spotlight, we’ll feature one family, sharing their story of how they work together as a family to make their farm or ranch successful.The spotlight will run for 10 months; each month will feature a different Region. Each Regional McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family will receive a $100 McCoy’s Gift Card. The McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family of the Year will receive a $500 McCoy’s Gift Card and will be announced at the 2022 THSRA State Finals.

The Leathers Family of Region X

C

by Ashtyn Carr

ongratulations to the Leathers family of Waco, TX! The Leathers are this month’s McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family. Melissa and Brian Leathers operate Big L Ranch with the help of their sons Luke and Levi. Melissa and Brian met back in their teenage years. Melissa was still in high school, while Brian was freshly graduated and worked for Melissa’s parents. Melissa’s family owned and operated a seed and fertilizer company in Hubbard, TX. After Melisa went off to college, the couple got married. Brian “still kind of did the fertilizer thing”. But, he was also a cowboy and roped cattle professionally in the PRCA. Brian grew up riding. He even competed in region 10 of the THSRA, just like his son Luke. Luke, who is a 17-year-old high school senior, is a team roper and has competed in ranch rodeos. Luke has also taken to roping calves during his senior year, which is an event he has not done since seventh grade. The couples youngest son, Levi, is a 12-year-old seventh grader who spends his time traveling the U.S. to play baseball. Together, the family runs Big L Ranch. When Brian was first getting started, he bought out his grandfather’s cows. Brian leased out his grandfather’s land until his grandfather passed away. Then, the Leather’s started buying their own land. From there, Big L Ranch was born. In 2000, the same year Brian and Melissa married, the couple registered their brand. These days, they run the cow-calf operation and bale hay with the help of their sons. Melissa said that everyone does chores. From hauling in hay to feeding horses to driving the tractor, each member of the family lends a helping hand. “Our whole life plan is around the farming and the ranching,” Melissa said. “You know, we all can't leave at the same time. Somebody has to feed, we have horses. So, we divide and conquer a lot. When we're all here, we're all working.” In 2017, the family bought 170 acres to live on. Before that, they lived on 20 acres and leased all their land. Now, they lease four properties where they run cattle. The Leather’s built their home in 2018. During the building process, they made many stops at their local McCoy’s to gather fencing materials and other supplies.

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Things have not been easy since putting down roots. Especially in 2021. It’s been a crazy year for ranchers across the country. And the Leathers saw first hand how hard it’s been. From the freeze back in February to a wet spring, the family faced many trials. Typically, they begin cutting hay by the end of April. This year, Brian did not start moving in the field until June. Even then, the wettest parts of the land were not cut until August. Despite the weather, the crop still

yielded well. The Leathers saw the impact of the wild weather events nonetheless. “Thankfully, it did make a lot,” Melissa said. “So, we have a lot of hay to sell but it's been a tough year. With the freeze and all that, [Brian] was wiped clean. Because everybody needs hay, the cows don't have anything to eat. So, feeding our own and feeding everybody else's we were wiped clean from what we had put back in hay. It's definitely been a trying year for sure.” Now that they are through hay cutting season, the Leathers have their attention set on Luke’s senior year. Luke is hoping to attend a school that would allow him to continue his rodeo career at the collegiate level. Melissa predicts that Luke will carry his love for cowboying down whatever path he goes down. But, he may not be getting in a tractor any time soon. “I don't know that he wants to drive a tractor ever again once he gets grown,” Melissa said in between laughs. “Because he's done so much baling hay. So, as far as that goes, I don’t know.” The future for Big L Ranch remains uncertain. Melissa said she was not sure where the family will end up. However, once the boys are both out of the house, the ranch will most likely downsize. Big L Ranch has made it 21 years in the business. It continues to adapt to industry changes and push forward to provide for its customers. “Everything affects, I think, the farming and ranching business,” Melissa said. “Everything from weather to politics to the cost of supply and demand. Everything affects this. So it definitely keeps you on your toes.”


Sell 3 Bloomer Tickets and Get One Free That's right, if you sell 3 Bloomer Tickets, your family will get to enter one time for free! Claim this offer when your turn in your Bloomer tickets to your Region Secretary and she will give you a free ticket to put your families name on!

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BRANDON JONES 194 CR 427 • Lorena, Texas 76655 254.833.0251 • crystal_jones1991@yahoo.com

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS

817.648.2728 • texasregion10@gmail.com

SECRETARY - STEPHANIE SHOEMAKER 6500 CR 1202 • Cleburne, Texas 76031

PRESIDENT - LARRY DOWELL 370 CR 220 • Marlin, Texas 76661 254.715.8814 • fivedowell@gmail.com

STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - SAIGE SEALY VICE PRESIDENT - MAKENZIE DOWELL SECRETARY - CHAINEY WEITZ

PERFORMANCE REPORT

Taking Care Of Your Best Friend Bottom Up

By RILEY ARRINGTON

Y

– Performance Reporter

ou know the saying “No hoof, No horse”? Often times, we overlook the importance of a good horseshoer. You maybe surprised how much sounder your horse is with the right shoer. Or shaving a few tenths off with the right shoes on them. It’s important to have a shoer who will work with your veterinarian and one who is willing to continue their education. Be able to communicate with your horseshoer any concerns you might have or issues you feel you might have in a run. This helps them to put the best shoes on for that horse. Just like people, no two horses are alike, so why do we often try to shoe them all the same? Food for thought. Just as important as their feet, so are the lungs. Simple things to help your partner breath easier are cleaning their stall twice a day and turning them out for fresh air, if possible. Minimizing the dust and shaving particles they breath in help keep their lungs healthier. Dampening your shavings when you put them in the trailer or stall will help minimize dust particles. Another practice is an

equine nebulizer to help reduce allergies, heaves, EIPH, or IAD. You should consult your veterinarian before you begin using a nebulizer. How well do you handle stress or compete when your stomach hurts? Ulcers are another common problem often overlooked. There are many daily or competition supplements to help in the prevention of this as we change their daily habits. Succeed, Gastroplex, Gastrogaurd(for treatment), Ulcergard, Jailbreak to name a few. Things to look for is a change in eating habits, a change in disposition when saddling or competing and overall health of the coat. Prevention or early identification of this can prevent major issues such as the dreaded colic. Other ways to take care of your equine friend and help keep them at their best are alternative therapies such as PEMF, Cold Laser Therapy, or Acuscope. These therapies help the body heal and recover faster in a variety of ways and are often found at many of the competitions you attend. They can also help you pinpoint an issue faster to know if a visit to the vet is needed sooner than later. PEMF is an electromagnetic pulse which help cells heal faster by expanding


and relaxing the cells and releasing toxins and inflammation for quicker healing. How the muscles respond can tell you if you may have an issue or some general soreness. Cold Lasers work by passing light through the horse’s skin into the body. It stimulates the energy and respiration in the cells for faster healing. Acuscope uses micro currents to help heal injuries, reduce inflammation, and increase blood flow. An Acuscope specialist can determine by the numbers if they feel you might have an issue and need to visit your veterinarian. These are just a few of the many therapies to prevent injuries and help heal them when they are. These are just a few ideas of the many things you can do to help your best friend. I could go on and on about saltwater therapy, rehab facilities, XLR8, Back on Track, PHT, supplements, injections and so on. The best thing to do is to know your best friend. They will tell you when something is not right. Mr. Ed style or otherwise.

follow us on facebook, instagram, twitter & tiktok Texas high school rodeo social media: YOUR SOURCE FOR INSIDER INFORMATION! 45


JORDYN KOONSMAN OF REGION X by Ashtyn Carr

C

The Whataburger Whatakid is selected due to their ability to excel both in and out of the rodeo arena. Whataburger is proud to recognize a THSRA member from each of the ten Regions who truly upholds the title “Whatakid!” One of the nominees will be chosen at the State Final Rodeo in June as the Whatakid of the Year. In recognition of this accomplishment they will receive free Whataburgers for an entire year!

ongratulations to Jordyn Koonsman, this month’s “WHATAKID!” Jordyn is a member of the THSRA Region 10, where she resides in Blum, TX. Jordyn began rodeoing from a young age. It’s a family thing! Her father, James, also grew up rodeoing. So, Jordyn has been in the saddle almost all her life. Today, Jordyn competes in barrel racing, pole bending and breakaway roping. Jordyn says that one day she would like to enter into the world of team roping. But, for now, she’ll stick to what she knows! It’s certain that James is proud of the daughter and rodeo contestant that Jordyn has grown to be. He said that he was honored that someone “thought enough of [Jordyn] to take their time” to nominate her for this award. Jordyn’s list of goals extends beyond competing in different events. She hopes to one day qualify for the National High School Rodeo. Eventually, she wants to also qualify for and compete at the National Finals Rodeo and the American. In order to achieve these dreams, Jordyn practices day in, day out. “I practice a lot,” Jordyn said. “Then I take lessons and learn from other people that have been there and that have experienced things. I kind of pick up on some of their techniques and just kind of adjust it to my own.” Jordyn rotates riding between three horses, Nellie, Laura and Ice. Jordyn describes Nellie as her main horse, her baby. She is the horse that Jordyn runs barrels and poles on. Jordyn credits Nellie, saying that the horse helps her to be her best. On the other hand, Laura also runs barrels and Ice is Jordyn’s breakaway horse. When it comes to her horses, Jordyn takes things pretty seriously. In fact, Jordyn believes that a good horse should be one that will protect her in the ring. “I think, for me, I've always liked to quiet horse,” Jordyn said. “The horse that doesn't have a lot of quirks and isn't gonna try and

46

be stupid. You know, of course, all of them have a mind of their own. But a horse that I know will take care of me is always a good horse.” In 2021 Jordyn was a Women’s World Championship qualifier and was awarded the All-Around at the Open Range Cowboy Church Youth Rodeo and All-Around Champion at the Cleburne Youth Rodeo. Over the past few year, she was also in the 2020 Mike and Sherrylynn Johnson’s Vegas Tuffest Junior World Championship top ten barrels and a qualifier for the 2019 KK Race to Vegas qualifier. The rodeo lifestyle is one rooted in family. This rings true for Jordyn! Whenever she is not riding, Jordyn likes spending time with her family. They even come to watch her events. Jordyn noted that even though she is capable of doing things by herself, she likes to have the comfort of her support system around. Her family’s support does not stop there. Jordyn also shows steers, which is something her mother’s side of the family participates in. Jordyn mentioned that they are helpful in the cattle barn and travel with her to shows, as well. Whenever Jordyn is not working with her animals, she keeps her schedule full! On a day to day basis, Jordyn attends morning or afternoon athletics. She is a softball player and remains active. Even on her busiest days, Jordyn somehow finds the time to socialize with friends and family. She also stays busy with her involvement with her youth group. There is no doubt that she is a hardworking girl! Jordyn endures through the hustle and bustle to continue to perfect her skills. Likewise, Jordyn still lends a helping hand to those who need it. She credits some of this to her mother, Robyn. Like her mom, Jordyn is headstrong yet compassionate. Which is why her mom is someone who Jordyn has always looked up to. Although Robyn lost her battle to breast cancer in 2015, her legacy lives on through her daughter. “She was always a big inspiration to me and still is,” Jordyn said. “She was a real big fighter and fought to the end. But that didn't stop her from showing her love and compassion to everybody and being there and lending a helping hand whenever somebody needed it. So, I think I try and live every day like her and spread love and joy to everybody. Even if it's hard and I'm struggling too.”


(972) 571-5269 | Kaci@OutlawSpirit.com | OutlawSpirit.com 47



THSRA 2021-22 Student President

vie vie blanchard Howdy! My name is Vie Vie Blanchard and I am your current Miss Texas High School Rodeo Queen! My rodeo events include barrel racing and pole bending. I am so honored to serve the Texas High School Rodeo Association and travel across the state to promote this great organization. As Miss THSRA I will visit all 10 regions that make up the THSRA, visit sponsors and thank them for their support, make appearances at other places such as the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas and Rodeo Houston, and so much more! I am most looking forward to traveling with my fellow state officers and making friendships that will last a lifetime. I am so thankful for this opportunity to serve you and I hope to see you on my journey. Happy Trails, Vie Vie Blanchard – Miss THSRA 2021

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JUNIOR HIGH 50

region III Update

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egion III is having one of the most exciting years ever! Our membership this season is at an all time high and rodeo entries at our first four events were over 1300 runs. Our home facility for the past 19 years has been the Young County Arena in Graham, Texas. The Krum Volunteer Fire Department has also been with Region III for 19 years keep our members safe and cared for. We greatly appreciate the support of both. Our Region Family would also like to recognize our judges. Pulling double duties as a Judge and Goat Contractor for 19 years is David R. Larner. We would like to welcome back a Texas Cowboy Hall of Famer, 8 time IPRA World Champion Bareback Rider and previous Region 3 President, Ronnie Williams as our Arena Director. New to the Region this year as a Judge is Clint Corey, Pro Rodeo Hall Of Famer and World Champion Bareback Rider. We also extend a special thank you to Marty and

Quincy Kueckelhan of Kueckelhan Ranch Rodeo for not only bringing top quality livestock to our Rodeo but they also put on a benefit breakaway and team roping on Saturday nights with the proceeds benefiting Region III Board Member Shane Criswell. Shane is undergoing treatment at MD Anderson. Tragedy recently touched one of our special Region 3 families, the Larners. Jodi Larner is a Region 3 Announcer/Timer and as previously mentioned, David R Larner is a Judge and Goat stock contractor. Daughter and niece, Lariat Lynn passed away after an auto accident. At Rodeo 6, Region III held and silent and live auction in loving memory of Lariat Lynn which raised and astonishing amount of over $58,000. We ask for continued prayers for Shane Criswell and the Larners. As we approach the holidays we would like to wish everyone a Blessed and Happy Holiday Season!


2021-2022 TJHRA PRINCESS

Dallee Mae Robison

D

allee Mae Robison is your 2021 Miss TJHRA. She is 14 years old and Is a freshman at Stephenville High School in Stephenville, Texas. Dallee competes in barrels, poles and goat tying in Region X. Dallee is a member of the Stingerette’s Dance Team and is in Varsity Theatre. In her spare time, Dallee likes to train horses, practice roping and hang out with her grand parents. Dallee is an active member of the Cowboy Church of Erath County.

2021-2022 JUNIOR HIGH STATE DIRECTORS EXECUTIVE BOARD NATIONAL DIRECTOR JOHN SCHUENEMAN PRESIDENT SCOTT SHOOK

979-268-4994

john.schueneman@gmail.com

281-437-8214

scottcshook@yahoo.com

1st VICE PRESIDENT ERIC HUSTON

817-368-0159

duaneoverton6113@gmail.com

2nd VICE PRESIDENT CHARLES HENRY EXEC BOARD AT LARGE DELEGATE 2 YEAR TERM: DELEGATE 2 YEAR TERM: DELEGATE 2 YEAR TERM: DELEGATE 1 YEAR TERM: DELEGATE 1 YEAR TERM:

CHAD CURRINGTON (SERVING 2ND YEAR) LANDON EHLINGER (SERVING 2ND YEAR) DAVID FREEMAN (SERVING 2ND YEAR) JUSTIN CLINTON WESTLEY WHITE

MARKETING HOLLY DELAUNE MACI MEYER SECRETARY ANNE DOLLERY 979-412-2551 texasjuniorhighrodeo@gmail.com PRINCESS CORD DONNA ODOM, RACHEL ROBBINS, SARAH ROWLANDS

STATE DIRECTORS Region I MONROE TIMBERLAKE CASEY ARMSTRONG KYLE ANDERSON

806-344-6846

Region II COY IRWIN CADE SCHNEEMANN KELLY WOOD 432-940-1136 Region III JOHN ROBERTSON 817-475-6377 SHANE CRISWELL 325-347-2656 WESLEY WHITE

monroetimberlake@gmail.com

woodrodeogirls@yahoo.com jrober5729@att.net kodyhorses@yahoo.com

Region IV JASEY DAVID TOBY ROGERS JR YOUNG Region V RICHARD BALDWIN 936-332-5466 STACEY MARTIN 225-505-7645 CODY ODELL Region VI ANN WENTZEL DENNY PATTERSON 832-330-3054 CLAY OHRT 361-571-1040

pattersondenny@gmail.com ohrt6@hotmail.com

Region VII DUSTIN FRANKUM ROSS IVEY DAN SIMPTON

dansimpton@yahoo.com

936-870-5779

r.baldwin147@icloud.com nextlevelgoattying@gmail.com

Region VIII ERIC DURBIN JUSTIN SPEER CASS RINGLESTEIN 210-885-0902 cass.oasis@yahoo.com Region IX JARED ANDERSON BOBBY JACOBS BO WILLIAMS 979-220-5898 dwilliams@midsouthenergy.com Region X TREY JOHNSON TRACY SWAN ZAC THOMPSON

STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT AVERY ARMSTRONG VICE PRESIDENT KYE TOMLINSON SECRETARY PAIGE WILLIAMS PRINCESS DALLEE MAE ROBISON

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MAKE YOUR OWN CHRISTMAS PLAYLIST WITH THESE TOP SONGS: The Christmas Song Nat King Cole

White Christmas Bing Crosby

I’ll Be Home For Christmas Amy Grant

It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year Andy Williams

All I Want For Christmas is You Mariah Carey

I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus The Jackson 5

A Holly Jolly Christmas Burl Ives

Run Rudolph Run Chuck Berry

I’ve Got My Love To Keep Me Warm Frank Sinatra

Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Dean Martin

Carol of the Bells Mykola Leontovych

Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer Gene Autry

Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas Judy Garland

(There’s No Place Like) Home For The Holidays Carpenters

Rockin’ Around The Christmas Tree Brenda Lee

Christmas (Baby Please Come Home) Michael Bublé

It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas Perry Como

The Christmas Waltz Johnny Mathis

Here Comes Santa Claus Elvis Presley

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Sleigh Ride Ella Fitzgerald Last Christmas Wham! You’re A Mean One, Mr. Grinch Thurl Ravenscroft



The book that will

CHANGE YOUR LIFE – Lari Dee Guy

9X WPRA WORLD CHAMPION

GET YOUR COPY TODAY ON THE MENTAL PERFORMANCE PLAYBOOK

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