Winter 2020 Extreme Team News, Official News of Texas High School and Junior High Rodeo

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SPONSOR SPOTLIGHTS:

FOUNDERS INVITATIONAL 2020 ALL AROUND COWBOY BRYCE JENSON

FOUNDERS INVITATIONAL 2020 ALL AROUND COWGIRL JAYCI BYLER

PRSRT STD STD PRSRT US POSTAGE POSTAGE US PAID PAID BRYAN TX TX 77802 77802 BRYAN PERMIT ## 23 23 PERMIT

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Christmas Wish List EQUINE PROFESSIONALS ISSUE


Animals speak louder than words. TM

If there’s greatness on the inside, it shows on the outside. purinamills.com/horse-feed

Š 2016 Purina Animal Nutrition LLC. All rights reserved.


fort worth convention center booth 407

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EXECUTIVE BOARD STATE PRESIDENT KEN BRAY

PO Box 1634 • Granbury, TX 76048 817.219.0436 • kbray@equibrand.com

1ST VICE PRESIDENT MIKE GHORMLEY

PO Box 1177 • Madisonville, TX 77864 281.785.0077 • mghormley@me.com

2ND VICE PRESIDENT JOHN SCHUENEMAN

PO Box 1177 • Madisonville, TX 77864 281.785.0077 • john.schueneman@gmail.com

SECRETARY/TREASURER SUSAN BALDWIN

722 Southview Circle • Center, TX 75935 936.590.4447 texashighschoolrodeo@gmail.com

In This Issue

EQUINE PROFESSIONALS ISSUE PAGE 06

NATIONAL DIRECTOR COTTON GEORGE

PO Box 30 • Martinsville, TX 75958 936.564.8993 (home) cottongeorgetx@gmail.com

JUNIOR HIGH NATIONAL DIRECTOR CHRIS WOLFE

EXTREME TEAM NEWS

SPONSOR SPOTLIGHTS

214.770.5302 • thomas.brockway@woodpartners.com

BRENT CHARLESWORTH

PO Box 362 • Marathon, TX 79842 432.386.6214 • brent@crcompany.net

Graphics/Layout Director lauren@distinct-graphics.com 830.249.8020

BRIAN ROBERTS

Computer Programmer brian.roberts53@att.net 281.213.9143

Region II

JACOB WALTERS Region III

RILEE PARKER Region IV

LULU EAKES Region V

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SIERRA SCHUENEMAN

PAGE 24

Region VI

BRADI FREEMAN Region VII

JAYCI LEE BYLER

936.590.1855 tablackwell@yahoo.com

THOMAS BROCKWAY

LAUREN TUTTLE STUMBERG

Region I

QUEEN COORDINATOR ANN BLACKWELL

8016 CR 2419 • Royse City, TX 75189

Marketing Director

210.632.3208 • delaune.holly@gmail.com

TAYLIN WRIGHT

MARKETING HOLLY DELAUNE

DELEGATES AT LARGE

HOLLY DeLAUNE

ARIAT PERFORMANCE REPORTERS

630 E FM 813 • Palmer, TX 75152 214.403.4638 • cwwolfe630@gmail.com

73 Breeze Way, Boerne, TX 78006 210.632.3208 delaune.holly@gmail.com

Official Publication of the Texas High School Rodeo Association

Region VIII

Christmas Wish List

BAILEY GUBERT Region IX

MONTANA BROWN Region X

KATY WEBB

THSRA OFFICIAL SPONSORS

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LARRY DOWELL

370 CR 220 • Marlin, TX 76661 254.715.8814 • fivedowell@gmail.com

JEFF PARSLEY

655 CR 4703 • Troup, TX 75789 903.574.3910 • bmsmith1996@sbcglobal.net

BRANDON SMITH

2020 FOUNDERS INVITATIONAL RESULTS

6800 E FM 476 • Pleasanton, TX 78064 830.570.7157 • bmsmith1996@sbcglobal.net

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STUDENT OFFICERS

thsraofficers@hotmail.com STUDENT PRESIDENT Dalton Stripling STUDENT VICE PRESIDENT Brooklyn Balch STUDENT SECRETARY Abi DePriest QUEEN Laramie Dearing

Region

news

REGION REGION REGION REGION REGION

I 11 REGION II 12 REGION III 20 REGION IV 22 REGION V 26 REGION JUNIOR HIGH 44

VI VII VIII IX X

27 28 30 32 36

DR. TANDY FREEMAN

THSRA is a non-profit organization (501-C). Production of this publication was funded by membership dues and is provided complimentary to members of THSRA. Non-members may purchase annual subscriptions for $25.00

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THE STANDING EQUINE MRI

hen I was asked to write a veterinary article for the Texas High School Rodeo Association, there were a number of topics that came to mind. I thought of subjects ranging from standing CT scans to ultrasounds to radiographs (x-rays). I eventually settled on an imaging device that we are very proud to offer here at Animal Imaging: the standing equine MRI. Unfortunately, the equine rodeo athlete is especially suspectable to problems that involve the lower limb of the horse. The wear and tear of the speed we ask our horses to travel at can take a toll on the bones, tendons and ligaments of the leg. When they come up lame, you need to get a diagnosis that is quick, safe and accurate to help them get back in the arena as soon as possible. (A big disclaimer here judged event guys; this article is written about horses that compete in the timed events. But keep reading, you might learn something that will impress your barrel racing friends.)

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There are dozens of structures in the foot and leg of a horse that can cause lameness, and a great way to image those is with MRI, or Magnetic Resonance Imaging. This imaging technique is superior at times to ultrasound or x-rays because it can see pathology, or changes, that would otherwise be missed with conventional imaging. The history of MRI dates back to the 1970s when the first scans were being done. Back then, it could take as long as 5 hours to generate 1 image. Now, we can get hundreds of images is less than one hour! The first MRI on a horse was done at Washington State University back in the 90’s. (Fun fact, our two equine radiologists, Dr. Biscoe and Dr. Neelis, both did their radiology residencies there.) Without getting into too much detail, MRI works by manipulating the magnetic field found in hydrogen atoms. Different structures (bone, tendon, ligaments and nerves) all have different amounts of hydrogen atoms and it is that difference that allows the machine to distinguish between a tendon, a ligament, bone etc. The standing MRI here at Animal Imaging is the only advanced imaging machine built specifically for the horse. Many of our clients and referring veterinarians elect to do a standing, or low field MRI, versus a high field MRI because it does not require general anesthesia (similar to when a horse undergoes major surgery like for colic). Although we have a great anesthesia team led by a board-certified anesthesiologist Dr. Carrie Davis, general anesthesia does have its risks, particularly in recovery when the horse is waking up. With the standing MRI, the horse is still vertical and is no more sedated than when they get their teeth floated. A few weeks ago, we did an MRI on heel horse that was almost 20! The only company in the world that makes the standing MRI is called Hallmarq. More information on their groundbreaking technology can be found at www.hallmarq.net/us/ I hope you found this information informative and useful; you can read more about our clinic at www.animalimaging.co – Cody Wohlman DVM


Equine Professionals Index ANIMAL IMAGING PAGE 15 Irving BRACKEN EQUINE CLINIC PAGE 25 San Antonio

PURINA PAGE 03, 51 REATA EQUINE HOSPITAL Weatherford

PAGE 10 PAGE 54 PAGE 04

BRAZOS VALLEY EQUINE HOSPITAL Navasota - Stephenville - Salado - Brazil

PAGE 23

RETAMA EQUINE HOSPITAL Selma

HORSE SWIM - BYLER PERFORMANCE EQUINE Bellville

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TEXAS EQUINE HOSPITAL Bryan

OUTLAW EQUINE PAGE 14 Decatur

WEEMS & STEPHENS EQUINE HOSPITAL Aubrey PAGE 09

PERFECT PRACTICE

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PREVENT RESPIRATORY STRESS ON YOUR HORSES IN COLD WEATHER

BASIC HORSE CARE TIPS TO HELP IMPROVE RESPIRATORY HEALTH IN THE BARN DURING THE WINTER MONTHS

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Karen E. Davison, Ph.D. – Director, Nutritionist, Equine Technical Solutions

hile we certainly feel more comfortable bundled up inside on a cold winter day, our horses may not. A significant amount of effort goes into keeping our horses’ toasty in their stalls, but their respiratory health may be negatively affected. Prevent decreased performance, coughing and breathing trouble by taking a few simple measures when caring for horses in cold weather: Horse barn ventilation Provide plenty of turnout Limit working horses in cold weather Proper equine nutrition Feeding horses in winter for a healthy respiratory system The most effective way to reduce the effects or prevent horse non-infectious respiratory disease is decreasing exposure to respirable irritants and working horses in freezing temperatures on a limited basis. If horses cannot be kept outdoors, then the focus needs to be on reducing airborne particles in your feeding program. Here are a few tips: Feed low-dust feed Feeding hay in feeders at ground level as opposed to hay racks above the grain Thoroughly soak the hay in water and feed wet to reduce dust and molds adequately In many cases, horses affected by respiratory irritants don’t show improvement until the hay is entirely replaced by feeding a complete feed with built-in forage. Purina® Omolene® 400 and Equine Senior® horse feeds are low-dust feeds with quality fiber sources included to replace hay. Many horses with respiratory problems cannot tolerate any hay, even wet hay, and do much better eating one of these products. Keep in mind that horses eating hay in adjoining stalls can still cause

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problems for affected horses. Horse barn ventilation is a critical component in winter horse care Barns are often built for warmth and protection more than for airflow and ventilation. The measurement of particulate matter in horse barns has shown potential danger for horses stabled in barns. Everyday barn chores can potentially contain damaging levels of airborne organic dust. Here are a few things to keep in mind: Horse barn ventilation design Storing hay in the barn Storing bedding in or near the barn Equipment exhaust Cleaning stalls Sweeping or blowing barn aisles Dust from an attached indoor arena When evaluating air quality, airborne particles in numbers greater than 2.4 mg/cubic meter (M3) of air have been shown to increase the incidence of airway disease. All these airborne particles can begin to wreak havoc on respiratory function in stabled horses. Non-infectious respiratory disease with airway inflammation in horses is a common clinical problem when horses are stabled. Some studies suggest that 25–80 percent of stabled horses suffer from Recurrent Airway Obstruction (RAO), commonly known as heaves, and Inflammatory Airway Disease (IAD). Horses may suffer from chronic coughing, decreased performance, difficulty breathing, and abnormal lung sounds. Signs do not become apparent until a large number of airways are affected and, therefore, may affect more horses than realized. Once this particulate matter is in the airways, the body sees it as foreign material and mounts an inflammatory response. As the airways thicken, there is reduced oxygenation of blood, breathing becomes more labored and horses with RAO will begin to develop a “heave line” along the lower abdomen. This heave line is the result of increased muscle development as horses work harder to force air out of the lungs with each exhale. Working horses in cold weather Horses have an amazing respiratory system that is exceptionally equipped to function during exercise. When the air being inhaled contains high numbers of respirable organic particles, the potential for irritation elevates. Add exercise on top of that, such as training in an indoor arena during the winter, the increased respiration rate has the ability to cause deeper penetration of particulate matter in the lungs. In addition to air quality concerns, winter also brings frigid air temperatures. Research by Elfman, Pringle, Raine, and Riihimäki (2008) has shown that cold weather exercise can cause asthma-like airway disease in performance horses. Repeated work in frigid cold temperatures can also lead to chronic airway inflammation. Any time you notice coughing or labored breathing in your horse, make an appointment with your veterinarian for a thorough exam to determine the cause and the appropriate course of action to provide relief. Ready to try a Purina® feed with your horse? Sign up for the Feed Greatness® Challenge.*


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Cal Davis, DVM ~ Justin High, DVM Christine Sutherland, DVM Mary Bumgarner, DVM LAMENESS ~ SURGERY ~ REPRODUCTION GENERAL MEDICINE ~ PODIATRY CHIROPRACTICS ~ EMERGENCY CARE

817-599-9635 www.reataequinehospital.com 6516 Granbury Hwy ~ Weatherford, TX


STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - WYATT MASK VICE PRESIDENT- JAYDA JAMESON SECRETARY/HISTORIAN - RIDLEY TIMBERLAKE STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS

DAVID CHRISTIAN 10200 S Blessen Rd • Amarillo, TX 79119 806.674.1397 • david.christian@11ranch.com

RANDY MARTIN PO Box 334 • Vega, Texas 79092 806-670-2113 • randyleemartin@hotm SECRETARY - BRANDY WRIGHT 11555 US HWY 83 • Canadian, Texas 79014 806.255.0034 • tristaterodeo@yahoo.com

Region I

TREY JOHNSON Box 501 • Hapy, Texas 79042 806-433-7382 • tjohnsoncattle@gmail.com DAVID CHRISTIAN 10200 S Blessen Rd • Amarillo, TX 79119 806.674.1397 • david.christian@11ranch.com

PERFORMANCE REPORT HEALTHY, HAPPY HORSES WITH THE HELP OF PEMF THERAPY

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By TAYLN WRIGHT

– Performance Reporter

he sport of rodeo wouldn’t be possible without the help of our equine partners. These performance horses are athletes and it is essential that they are cared for and treated as such for them to be as competitive as possible. Proper care includes good nutrition, consistent exercise, dentistry, hoof and leg care, and regular grooming. Many equine owners have also turned to alternative therapies coupled with chiropractic care to keep their horse feeling and performing at their absolute best, and to promote complete overall wellness. Pulse Electromagnetic Field Therapy or PEMF is a fairly new technology in

TAYLN AND HER AQHA 2020 HORSE OF THE YEAR

North America but has been used throughout Europe and other countries for more than 50 years. PEMF is widely used as a supportive modality for general well being and to enhance athletic performance. Coils are placed by a certified practitioner and a gently pulsing electromagnetic field restores the health of your TAYLN’S HORSE RECEIVING horse on a cellular level by stimulating the PEMF THERAPY cells metabolism. This creates a systemic response like fine tuning or turbo charging the horses whole body that can affect several issues. PEMF therapy is soothing modality that stimulates and exercises the cells to address cellular dysfunction and support overall wellness in multiple areas. It helps to decrease inflammation and increases TAYLN RUNNING BARRELS range of motion. It also enhances muscle function, endurance, strength and reduces recovery time from injuries. One of the most basic functions magnetic fields have on the body is to increase the circulation without increasing the heart rate or blood pressure. It does however, open and dilate the arteries and capillaries improving blood flow. Good circulation promotes tissue healing, regeneration, and reduces swelling in affect areas. PEMF sessions work to improve the quality of calcium produced to mend bones in onethird the normal time require. It can also provide a relaxing, stress reducing deep tissue massage through pulsating muscle stimulation. Horses love the way the PEMF therapy feels and it shows in their body actions. During a session you might notice your equine athletes head begins to drop, eyes might close, you might also see them lick their lips and begin to chew. Certain responses that are often the result of the electromagnetic field stimulating acupuncture points and activating the parasympathetic nervous system. They tell us the horse is truly relaxed and is no longer holding tension in certain areas of their body. The more relaxed a horse is the less likely they are to pull or tear a muscle and risk injury. Pulsed Electromagnetic Field therapy can assist and provide support for a wide range of equine issues. It generates energy at a cellular level without invasive procedures. It assists with pain relief without the use of medication and often with an almost immediate, but lasting response. Used in conjunction with proper care and nutrition PEMF therapy can give your equine athlete the competitive edge they need to help you be a winner!

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PO Box 62862 • San Angelo, Texas 76904 512.618.9233 • csbaize@yahoo.com

STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - MADALYN RICHARDS VICE PRESIDENT - EMMA KENT SECRETARY - ALLISON VAUGHN STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS CASEY BAIZE

Region II

SECRETARY - JODY MCELROY Box 224 • Balmorhea, Texas 79718 432-940-0385 • secretary@thsra2.com

JODY MCELROY Box 224 • Balmorhea, Texas 79718 432.448.7810 • rodeosecretary1@gmail.com JOE RICHARDS 5101 Hwy 214 • Hereford, Texas 79045 806.676.5970 • joe@diamondcattlefeeders.com PRESIDENT- CASEY BAIZE PO Box 62862 • San Angelo, Texas 76904 512.618.9233 • csbaize@yahoo.com

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PERFORMANCE REPORT

TOUGHER THAN EVER By JACOB WALTERS – Performance Reporter

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egion 2 has finished up its first semester of rodeos and it truly was “tougher than ever”. With four weekends this semester, each contestant had eight opportunities to put a run or ride together and position themselves to make state, or throw their name in the hat to be in the race for a region title. With everybody looking to get off to a good start, we have seen the creation of a few close races as well as some absolutely dominant individual performances. The Region 2 tie-down ropers have put on a show in the first semester of competition. Seniors, Colten Wallis and Jacob Walters, have both put together solid performances placing deep and winning on multiple occasions landing them the second and third place positions going into the second semester. However, the standout among the tie down ropers this semester has been sophomore Brogan Rankin. Placing deep at over half of the first semester rodeos, and finishing the first semester first place in the standings, Brogan attributes this early success to his support system, saying that his Grandad Harold Parks, as

well as the rest of his family have helped him along the way and kept him in good horses. Brogan also shares that his game plan coming into the year was fairly simple, stating, “I just wanted to stay solid and have a good mindset about everything.” This plan has clearly worked JORDAN DRIVER well for Brogan. When asked if there were any adjustments or changes he plans on making before the next semester he responded, “No, I’m just going to make sure my horses are working good, and staying healthy, and keep working hard.” Shifting gears, we have seen an absolutely dominant performance in the barrel race from senior BROGAN RANKIN Jordan Driver. Jordan is the front-runner with a twenty-one-point lead in the standings. Jordan says that much of her early this year can be attributed to the experience she has acquired over the last three years. Rather than worrying so much about the points and standings as she has done in the past, Jordan has adopted the mindset of trusting her practice and knowing that she has the ability to perform at her best in any given circumstance. Jordan shares her thoughts on having all of the momentum moving forward. “It feels good, but I’m definitely not going to get ahead of myself. I plan on keeping my head down, and working while we have this break, and keep the ball rolling going into my last season. The only thing I will be working on is focusing more on staying consistent throughout both rodeos.” We are looking forward to watching Jordan finish this year strong. Region 2 also has seen strong senior performances in Pole Bending and Goat Tying as well. Reigning national champion goat tier Madalyn Richards has


placed deep or won six out eight of the rodeos of the first semester. This performance has earned her the top spot in the region going into the second semester. In the poles, senior Logan Moore has placed at or won 5 of the eight rodeos in the first semester earning her the number one spot as well. While the seniors have put together some outstanding performances, a “Battle of the Underclassmen” is underway in the breakaway roping. A mere three points separate sophomore Jessi Everett and sophomore Emilee Charlesworth at the top of the standings. Both these girls have shown that they are extremely talented, and have proven their ability to win. This should be a fun race to watch unfold. As if a three-point difference in one event wasn’t close enough, only one point separates the top three teams in the team roping. Levyan Gonzalez and Cason Hatley have roped outstanding, as have Emilee Charlesworth and Kelby Frizzell. These two teams are tied for first and second in the region. And just one point behind them is the team of Caden Tinsley and Cowboy Porras, who really hit their stride toward the end of the semester, and will look to keep the ball rolling coming into the second semester. The spring semester promises excitement in every event as the race for region champions and state qualifiers intensifies. I think I speak for all of Region 2 when I say that we will enter the second semester tougher than ever.

ADVERTISE IN THE SPRING 2021 ISSUE!! Contact Us at 210-632-3208 for More Info!

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NFR COMES TO TEXAS

DON'T MISS A MOMENT! SCHEDULE OF EVENTS:

WRANGLER NFR PERFORMANCE TIMES THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo — First Performance 6:45 p.m. at Globe Life Field • Performance Sponsor: Pendleton Whisky Night 1 Buckle Ceremony 10:30 p.m. at Texas Live FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo — Second Performance 6:45 p.m. at Globe Life Field • Performance Sponsor: Coors Night 2 Buckle Ceremony 10:30 p.m. at Texas Live SATURDAY, DECEMBER 5 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo — Third Performance 6:45 p.m. at Globe Life Field • Performance Sponsor: Hesston by Massey Ferguson Night 3 Buckle Ceremony 10:30 p.m. at Texas Live SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo — Fourth Performance — Memorial Night 6:45 p.m. at Globe Life Field • Performance Sponsor: Polaris Ranger Night 4 Buckle Ceremony 10:30 p.m. at Texas Live MONDAY, DECEMBER 7 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo —

Fifth Performance — Tough Enough to Wear Pink Night 6:45 p.m. at Globe Life Field • Performance Sponsor: Montana Silversmiths Night 5 Buckle Ceremony 10:30 p.m. at Texas Live TUESDAY, DECEMBER 8 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo — Sixth Performance — Resistol Rookie Night 6:45 p.m. at Globe Life Field • Performance Sponsor: Resistol Night 6 Buckle Ceremony 10:30 p.m. at Texas Live WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo — Seventh Performance 6:45 p.m. at Globe Life Field • Performance Sponsor: Tarleton State Night 7 Buckle Ceremony 10:30 p.m. at Texas Live THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo — Eighth Performance — Canadian Night 6:45 p.m. at Globe Life Field • Performance Sponsor: Justin Boots Night 8 Buckle Ceremony 10:30 p.m. at Texas Live FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo — Ninth Performance 6:45 p.m. at Globe Life Field • Performance Sponsor: RAM Night 9 Buckle Ceremony 10:30 p.m. at Texas Live

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo — Tenth Performance — Wrangler National Patriot Night 6:45 p.m. at Globe Life Field • Performance Sponsor: Wrangler Night 10 Buckle Ceremony 10:30 p.m. at Texas Live

WRANGLER NFR 9 TO 5 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3 Country Christmas Starting at 8 a.m. daily • Fort Worth Stockyards • Free Admission/Open to the Public THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3 TO SATURDAY DECEMBER 12 Cowboy Christmas — It’s All Here 10 a.m. — 7 p.m. • Fort Worth Convention Center • Free Admission/Open to the Public

WRANGLER NFR AFTER DARK RECURRING NIGHTLY EVENTS

Hooey Fest • December 3 — 12 • 3:00 p.m. — 4 p.m. • Cowtown Coliseum • Fort Worth Stockyards • NFR Watch party, live music, and more nighty.

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ERIC HUSTON PO Box 945 • Decatur, Texas 76234 817.368.0159 • ehuston1972@gmail.com

STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - DUSTIN MONTGOMERY VICE PRESIDENT - GRACIE GAMBINO SECRETARY - LARAMIE DEARING

Region III

817.706.8236• kelley.williams@thsra3.com STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS

KEVIN STEWART PO Box 1308 • Glen Rose, Texas 76043 817.307.7300 • thekevinstewart@live.com PO Box 122448 • Fort Worth, Texas 76121

SECRETARY - KELLEY WILLIAMS

13196 Burns Branch Rd • Krum, Texas 776249 940.255.0738 • dshelton@rdoequipment.com

DARYL SHELTON

PRESIDENT - ERIC HUSTON PO Box 945 • Decatur, TX 76234 817.368.8885 • ehuston1972@gmail.com

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PERFORMANCE REPORT

HORSE HEALTH F

By RILEE PARKER

– Performance Reporter

ollowing the reopening of most businesses in America, rodeos, barrel races, ropings, and most other equine performance competitions have as well. While getting back on the rodeo trail is exciting, it's important to remember that your horse's health is kept in check. Horse health is an integral part of equine performance success. On the road, stress, injuries, and general illness is a constant occurrence. It is important to keep a vet box on hand in preparation for these situations, and a general Veterinary knowledge. Dr. Gregory Ford, DVM is a specialist in Equine Performance medicine, and has been in the Veterinary field for over 30 years. When asked about some travel tips and recommendations for horses performing while on the road, Ford was quick to answer with some helpful tips.

While traveling emergencies can happen at any time, especially far away from home, it is imperative to have supplies that will allow your horse to continue to perform at one-hundred percent. Ford recommends having a vet box on hand at all times. Some of the items he personally recommended are, “A thermometer, Banamine paste or injectable, dexamethasone, phenylbutazone paste, and some rolls of cotton and vet wrap.” These items are crucial for all horses, and should be kept in your truck or trailer Becoming sore while continuing to travel without going home is almost inevitable. It is strenuous to constantly be on the go, and you cannot expect your horse to consistently be performing at their peak. Dr. Ford also expressed how crucial it is to have “periodic trailer stops, lots of shavings in stalls, soft ride boots, and getting the horse out of the stall at all shows to stretch out mentally and physically”, all of these exercises and activities will help your horse to avoid soreness while on the road. Performance horses should also all be put on routine supplements while on a rigorous schedule; this keeps their strength and stamina up. There are a variety of brands you can come across whilst looking for the perfect addition to your Horse’s feed. When asked about supplements he recommends for horses constantly on the road, Ford elaborated on his thoughts on what makes a supplement and product stand out to him and what he recommends to his clients. “A tested and true joint supplement- seeing the mg strength and whether or not they are quality ingredients is super important.” While off of the road and resting at home, your horse should be well rested before being put back on the road. These exercises ensure your horse their mental and physical relaxation while away from the arena. Ford advocates for “Lots of walking, several offerings of cool, clean watering, monitoring manure for dryness and amount, and constant rechecking of the height of a hay net so your horse doesn't step through. Constant 360 degree look overs is important to keeping your horse in the best condition, looking over their head, legs, etc. is essential”. Treatment and rehabilitation are a critical point in all equine performance


sports these days, there will continue to be new and changing treatments that will be encouraged at events that may or may not work. It is important to understand the therapy and exactly what is happening to your horse during and after, and all the details that go into what you’re spending your money on. “Always have an expert veterinary opinion to guide you, today’s modern medicine and therapies offer amazing opportunities and modalities to heal your horse”, Ford expresses. All of these tips and pieces of advice will help you get your horse at pinnacle performance shape. High School rodeo season will be tuff this year, with all the time we’ve had to stay home and practice. It is important to remember the things your horse needs to win, Good Luck all High School rodeo Athletes on the upcoming season!

Sell 3 Bloomer Tickets and Get One Free That's right, if you sell 3 Bloomer Tickets, your family will get to enter one time for free! Claim this offer when your turn in your Bloomer tickets to your Region Secretary and she will give you a free ticket to put your families name on!

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STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - BRYLEE BRADEN VICE PRESIDENT - MAKENZIE MAYES SECRETARY - DIXIE TAB

DR. TANDY FREEMAN

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS MICHAEL AKINS 2449 West Line Road • Whitesboro, TX 76273 makins1@yahoo.com • 904.368.9390

DAVID SCHRECK 209 Sarah Way • Murphy, TX 75094 214.403.5606 • dschreck@intelemedia.com

Region IV

SECRETARY - TINA BRADEN PO Box 549 • Horatio, AR 71842 870.832.3149 • tbbraden@earthlink.net

BARRY BRADEN PO Box 549 • Horatio, AR 71842 870.584.2308 • tbbraden@earthlink.net MICHAEL AKINS 2449 West Line Road • Whitesboro, TX 76273 makins1@yahoo.com • 904.368.9390

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PERFORMANCE REPORT

New & Exciting

CHANGES

President, and Dixie Tab is our Secretary. Also, we appreciate all our members that eagerly volunteered for the student director positions. We have a great group! This year our Region 4 Whataburger What-AKid is Elizabeth Barta. Elizabeth is a Sr. She By Lilly Eakes – Performance Reporter has competed in barrels and poles at region 4 since 2016. Elizabeth is not only a tough competitor in egion 4 has just finished a whirlthe arena but in the classroom as well. Elizabeth wind fall semester for our 2020is in the top 10% of her high school class. She 2021 season. We have a lot of plans to attend Tarleton University in the fall 2021 new and exciting changes this year. and has been accepted into the Honors Program. We have an amazing student board this Our region elected a new President, Mr. year. Brylee Brayden is our President, ELIZABETH BARTA Michael Akins for the 2020-2012 season. He MacKenzie Mayes is our Vice and his wife, Jana Akins, have been involved with Region 4 for five years. They are always there to lend a helping hand, or words of encouragement to our members and their families. They have two sons, Walker and Jhett, that compete at our region in the calf roping, and a daughter Paizlee that never misses a chance to cheer on her favorite competitors. Mr. Akins’ ties to THSRA run deep! He competed in THSRA as a part of Region 3, alongside his 2 brothers. He won the calf roping his Jr. and Sr. year of his school. Michael went on to attend North Texas Central College, where he continued his education and his passion for rodeo. Mr. Akins got his PRCA card at the age of 19. Although, he was a tough competitor in the PRCA circuit for many years, his proudest accomplishment is winning the Windy Ryan, an Elite calf roping in Fort Worth, Texas. Mr. Akins passion for rodeo still runs strong. He spends his days in the arena with his own kids and any others that ask for help, coaching them to do their best. Michael has been a supporter, both in and out of the arena, for all rodeo kids, regardless of their event. Mr. Akins’ advice to our region 4 rodeo families, “Set goals, work hard, put in the time it takes to do your best, THE AKINS FAMILY: MICHAEL , JANA, and always show up ready to win”. Our region 4 family is PAIZLEE, WALKER AND JHETT thankful to have the entire Akins family!

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PRESIDENT EDDIE PRIEFERT REPRESENTS THIRD GENERATION OF LEADERSHIP IN THE FAMILY BUSINESS – PRIEFERT MANUFACTURING

T

he Priefert family has been raising kids, cows, and quarter horses on their ranch in Mt. Pleasant, TX for many years. In January of 2020, their contributions to the Cowboy way of life were publicly recognized with their induction into the Texas Cowboy Hall of Fame. President Eddie Priefert represents the third generation of leadership in the family

business – Priefert Manufacturing. Eddie is a key player in inventing and improving products at Priefert. He was lead on creating the adjustable roping box, on updating the most popular manual roping chute in the industry, and on updating the Priefert stripping chute. In fact, back in 2005, Eddie was the one who pushed Priefert into the roughstock end of the rodeo


business when he agreed to build bucking chutes for the PBR. Eddie is currently developing the 4th generation of family leadership as the proud parent of 5 kids. Ethan(19), Landon(17) and Collin(14), all compete in team roping, while his youngest son Ayden(12) competes in team, tie down, breakaway and ribbon roping. Eddie and his wife, Randa, also have a daughter Preslee(3) who they are raising in the western way of life on the family ranch. Eddie played a crucial role in launching the Priefert Junior Elite program. In PJE’s inaugural year, there were 85 team members. That grew to 110 team members this year, representing 26 states, 3 Canadian provinces, and even 1 member from Australia. To be selected, team members had to fill out an extensive application that covered their rodeo accomplishments, school involvement, and grades. Applicants also had to write an essay about why they want to be a team member and provide two letters of recommendation. Once accepted into the program, PJE members receive leadership training and tips from Priefert’s Pro Team and other industry leaders. Eddie’s overall goal was not to have a “Junior Rodeo Team”, but to provide a program that helps create better leaders for the future of our industry. These kids will ultimately become the leaders in the western world, and he recognized that we need better leaders tomorrow than we have today because they will face more and bigger challenges that the ones we currently face. Building rodeo and ranch equipment is not just a job; it’s his lifestyle and integral part of who Eddie Priefert is. Hard work, good people, a willingness to step “outside the box,” and abundant blessings from God have not only allowed him and the family business to grow and prosper, but also to earn a strong reputation in the industry for integrity, quality, and reliability.

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PRESIDENT - ABI DePRIEST VICE PRESIDENT - RILEY JAY OTWELL SECRETARY - PEYTON MATHIS

STUDENT OFFICERS

JOE GLENN KAHLA 612 FM 1747 • Jasper, Texas 75951 409.384.0921 • jgk@mklawyers.com

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS

BILL WHITE 277 Billy White Rd • Singer, LA 70660 337.304.0748 • whiteacres55@yahoo.com

Region V

SECRETARY - SUSAN BALDWIN 722 Southview Circle • Center, Texas 75935 936.590.4330 • regionvsecretary@gmail.com

JUSTIN KLEIN PO Box 2107 • Center, TX 75935 936.590.0229 • sendtojustin@yahoo.com

PRESIDENT- KIRK MATHIS 777 Freeman Cemetery Rd • Lufkin, TX75904

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PERFORMANCE REPORT

TEMPORARY

O

By SIERRA SCHUENEMAN – Performance Reporter

ne thousand four hundred and sixty-one days make up our high school experience. Out of those, we spend anywhere from twelve to one hundred and four days at a National High School Rodeo sanctioned event. If you are one of the lucky ones, you get to experience more of what the NHSRA and THSRA have to offer. The two weeks of the National High School Finals and the Texas High School Finals are where we all strive to be the best we can be. We are all focused on big wins and memorable moments. However, what we so often seem to forget is that rodeo, much like high school and life is temporary. We all too often base our success or failure on the outcome in the arena. As rodeo athletes we prioritize success, competition, and the desire to be the best to extreme levels. The insatiable need to win is the biggest hinderance we usually face. The truth is, we all have the desire in our hearts to be crowned champion; if we didn’t, I highly doubt any of us would enter another

rodeo. The heartbreaking truth is that you won’t win every time you enter. In fact, there will be more losses than wins. You might not understand why falling short happens, but that’s a good thing! I’m sorry to tell you this but winning much like losing gets old. That’s why champions are crowned at the end of a season as opposed to after a day. When things get challenging you have two options 1. To quit or 2. To persevere and come out stronger on the other side- the choice is up to you. Perhaps the last three rodeos haven’t been in your favor, maybe they have. If they have keep your nose to the grindstone and keep working diligently toward your goals. For those of you who haven’t done as well as hoped, take a step back, breathe, readjust your approach, and prepare for the next one. We all have a lot riding on the outcome of rodeos. Potential collegiate scholarships and hopeful sponsorships can be granted or stripped away in one run. Just be aware, most college rodeo coaches know that success in the rodeo arena is cyclical and temporary. High school is a time where we grow, learn, and if we are one of the lucky ones where we find our passion. Rodeo may be your passion; just know the road to the top is long, hard, expensive, and full of ups and downs. If you’re still unsure about where your passion lies don’t feel bad or like you’re behind. Timelines are great when visiting history not living in the present. I pray that whatever your passion may be, you pursue it wholeheartedly and it rewards you bountifully. If after high school, you choose to step away from rodeo to devote yourself to your education, do not let others make you feel poorly about your decision-ultimately it is all up to you. I know this article has been heavy. I have used it more as a reflective purpose for myself as opposed to an informational source for you all. However, I hope it has challenged you to look differently at the outcome of a rodeo. We are only in high school for so long, there have been many notable World Champions who failed to make the Texas National Team. There have been many High School National Champions who have failed to win at the Collegiate Level but go on to dominate in the PRCA ranks. You see, its not so much about on your performance on one specific day, instead how will you reflect over your career when its over? If you have been struggling with your mental game-read a book, listen to mental mastery experts talk, consult your friends (if they’re no help seek out friends), journal and be honest, take the time to get out of your own head! “If you live your life dependent on the outcome of the rodeo arena, you will be disappointed a lot more than not.”


STUDENT OFFICERS

STATE DIRECTORS MATT CRAINER PO Box 32 • Carrizo Springs, TX 78834 830.876.6141 • mattcrainer@yahoo.com

PRESIDENT - MEKENNA DAVIS VICE PRESIDENT - BAYLEE BURLESON SECRETARY - BRADI FREEMEAN

GARY MOBBS 9076 FM 443 • Shiner, TX 77984 830.857.1418 • gary.mobbs@southstatebank.com SECRETARY - ANNE DOLLERY P.O. BOX 1818 • Gonzales, TX 78629 979.412.2551 • texasjuniorhighrodeo@gmail.com

Region VI

JUSTINE HUNT 2433 Witte Rd • Bellville, TX 77418 979.525.7098 • rodeohuntboys@gmail.com PRESIDENT - DAVID FREEMAN 1039 Mockingbird Lane • Eagle Lake, TX 77434 832.221.1253 • chlfreeman@yahoo.com

PERFORMANCE REPORT

TEAM

T

By BRADI FREEMAN

– Performance Reporter

he dictionary defines the term ‘team’ as “a group of players forming one side in a competitive game or sport”. Rodeo is in fact a team sport, to say the least. It’s you and your horse working together, both your hearts’ pounding to the same rhythm, the synchronized huffs of both your deep breathing as you sit in the box or walk into the alleyway. Your horse is your partner and together you are a team, so it’s important to always make sure your teammate is properly taken care of at all times. Taking care of a 2,000 pound animal is not the easiest job to have and it comes with a lot of responsibility. Many rodeo athletes often have more than one horse that they take care of, so that can mean double, triple, or even quadruple the amount of work you have to do.

Even fulfilling the basic needs for these hardworking animals can sometimes be quite difficult and can even cost a pretty penny. Whether it’s trying to stay on top of all the grooming, buying the proper feed and supplements, having the best tack for your horse, or making sure they have a good place to stay in between rodeos, it can all seem overwhelming at times, but it’s so incredibly worth it. Getting to own these amazing creatures is a privilege that some people are very fortunate to have. It’s important to always appreciate how hard they work. Every time you step into that arena, your horse is giving you 110% of all it has. They put their hearts out there with every single run. Even when mistakes are made, these animals are all heart. They give their all to YOU, they do it for YOU, so just that alone is something all athletes should appreciate and hold dearly. This sport is something that shapes so many people and impacts many lives. With all the factors that go into just being able to compete, or just being able to show up, it’s more like a lifestyle. It comes with its ups and downs, like many other sports, but the highs are sky-scraping and the lows can seem to be rock-bottom. In the end, we all share a common love for our teammates and this great sport that we so graciously get to compete in.

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STUDENT OFFICERS

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS CRAIG MILLER 11603 Anders Lane • Santa Fe, NM 77510 409.682.5427 • craigwmiller80@yahoo.com

PRESIDENT - KERA LAMB VICE PRESIDENT - CARLI RAWLINSON SECRETARY - PAISLEY PIERCE

DAN SIMPTON 24543 SH 6 • Navasota, Texas 77868 936.870.5779 • dansimpton@yahoo.com SECRETARY - NENA BOETTCHER PO Box 833 • East Bernard, Texas 77435 281.468.8973 • region7thsra@gmail.com

Region VII

SCOTT SHOOK 5750 FM 360 • Needville, Texas 77461 713.851.9553 • scotctshook@yahoo.com PRESIDENT- CRAIG MILLER 11603 Anders Lane • Santa Fe 77510 409-682-5427 • craigwmiller80@yahoo.com

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PERFORMANCE REPORT TAKING CARE OF OUR EQUINE PARTNERS

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By JAYCI LEE BYLER

– Performance Reporter

hen it comes to taking care of your equine partners there is a huge market of products out there targeting the health of our horses. When you glance over horse magazines, you see products such as Platinum & Oxygen to supplement your horses diet for vitamins, joints and minerals. How do I know if my horse needs any of these? First option is to have a Veterinarian perform blood work and hair analysis on the horse in question. Second option is to discuss the needs of your horse with a nutritionist to look over your feeding program and see if they are lacking

anything in diet. Most useful part of our barn is an allergy test. This will detect things that can be harmful to your horses. (see picture of test results) Owners are amazed to find that their horses are allergic to shavings that they use, trees that their horses graze under, and even the grass and the weeds that grow around their property. Then there is the injectable joint medications. Some of the more popular ones with veterinarians are: Adequan given IM, it is the only FDA-approved equine PSGAG (polysulfated glycosaminoglycan) for degenerative joint disease. Legend given IV, it is pure hyaluronic acid that lubricate and protect soft tissue and cartilage, just like your horses’s normal joint fluid. Newest to market is Summit Joint, it is the form of chondroitin sulfate and is given in the muscle. Chondroitin sulfate is a chemical that is normally found in cartilage around joints in the body. It is used to reduce joint inflammation. So in discussions with veterinarians, some suggest one product over the other for joints or soft tissue. All depending on your horses age and condition of joints. Furosemide- brand name Lasix is diuretic used to reduce the risk of exercised-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH), more commonly known as “bleeding,” This medication is given IV, IM or orally. The all natural route in horse treatments has been on the rise with several medications being banned in the AQHA. Bleeding in speed horses has become a big discussion in every forum or Veterinary magazine. Yunnan Baiyao: a chinese herb is believed to work by activating the platelets, which are the small blood components that help make blood clot. Silverhorsecare Colloidal silver is an anti microbial & anti-fungal. Essential oils like eucalyptus clears mucus (opens the pipes) All natural resources is solving some health issues or helping to reduce problems posed by Allergies, Bleeding, Respiratory. These products give owners the option to use all natural forms of treatments. I see benefits on both medical and all natural sides to keep horses healthy and performing. “Say to him: ‘Long life to you! Good health to you and your household! And good health to all that is yours!” - Samual 25:6.


DALTON STRIPLING

THSRA STUDENT PRESIDENT

M

y name is Dalton Stripling, I am your current THSRA and NHSRA President, I live in Montgomery Texas and I attend Lake Creek High school where I have played varsity football for the last three years. I am a senior this year and I plan on pursuing a business degree after high school. My passion in rodeo is calf roping and steer wrestling, when I’m not in the arena you can find me working on the ranch bailing hay, working cows, riding colts or pursuing my many other interest such as participating in Business Professionals of America program. Religion is an important part of my life, through my Church I have gone on mission trips throughout many states and have enjoyed serving lower socioeconomic youth, elderly and homeless populations. I have attended multiple Texas political conventions, worked election polls, attended Teen Pact in Austin and worked with Senators at the Capital in Austin. I urge each of you to become educated in our political system. We are the future of this Great State and one day the burden will be ours to facilitate our way of life and many of the issues faced today have a direct impact on our future. We as the high school rodeo body are the roots of rodeo and we are the key to growth at all levels of rodeo. I will constantly be looking for ways to improve each Region Rodeo and our State Finals. I would like to invite anyone who has a suggestion or idea to contact me via: (936) 900-7757or (Instagram: dalton__stripling) . We have a great organiza-

TEAM CINCH: 2020/2021 Katlyn Barnett Canyon Bass Charles Bushaw Abi DePriest Chris Dixon Rylee Hardin Mary McLiney

tion that we should all be proud of. I made a promise to be your voice and I stand by that promise. I now need your ideas and suggestions to make your voice heard. Please join me in thanking our directors, sponsors and the many parents that work tirelessly to support Texas High School Rodeo.

DRAGSTEER ECT PERF TMAS S CHRI SENT! PRE

Josue Molina Meirabella Rouane Dalton Stripling Caitlyn Warren Sydney Williams Elijah Youngblood Dragsteer available at NRS – 3 Sizes Now Available! www.nrsworld.com For more information find us on facebook or email us at dragsteer@ymail.com

29


PO Box 787 • Asherton, TX 78837 830-999-3344 • tom@catarosaranch.com

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS TOM AASBO

STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - KATE MCNEIL VICE PRESIDENT - RYLEE DODSON SECRETARY - SYDNEY BLAIR

JASON UNDERBRINK 520 Phillips Rd • Pleasanton, Texas 78064 210.854.7718 • jasonunderbrink@yahoo.com 3005 Santa Ana St. • Corpus Christi, Texas 78415 361.739.9858 • region8thsra@gmail.com

Region VIII

SECRETARY - CELINA FETTY

KIM NICHOLSON 8434 N. US Hwy 183 • Goliad, Texas 77963 830.570.7302 • kim_nicholson@att.net PO Box 787 • Asherton, TX 78837 830-999-3344 • tom@catarosaranch.com

PRESIDENT- TOM AASBO

30

PERFORMANCE REPORT

NFR: By BAILEY GUBERT – Performance Reporter

BREAKAWAY ROPERS Breakaway Ropers hearing it from a pro, 19X WPRA World Champion Jackie Crawford! I had the opportunity to have some Q and A with Jackie in between rodeos. As a youth breakaway roper, I am personally on the runaway train taking Breakaway to the PRCA. This event has given women an opportunity to show how salty we are in the roping box. The rush is like no other, when backing into the box and nodding your head. Here we go….. *Jackie began roping at the age of 12, she has been roping for 24 years now. She started swinging a rope with her mom, Annette Hobbs. There have been many grooming her to become a Champion. I asked her what her daily schedule was like when she was at home. She begins her day by working out, office work, lessons and then ropes the rest of the day. *Jackie said, her most monumental win was Chicago-The Windy City Round Up. Chicago was the first rodeo

History in the Making

to payout $50,000 in the breakaway! *Jackie and I discussed, when does she see Breakaway being an event at the NFR? She stated, it’s here this year! The top 15 will compete in 3 performances at the NFR on December 8-10, 2020. *I also asked Jackie, do you have any superstitions? She said, “Well, I don’t go looking for them.” Example, when I set my hat down, I will set it on something else besides the bed or beside it. I don’t push it on superstition. *I asked Jackie, what is the next goal on your list? She said, “She hopes to win the Breakaway at the first PRCA in November.” Jackie’s words of advice to those getting started Don’t rush it, set your foundation. Roping the dummy is very imperative. When I began roping, I stuck a calf head on a bale of hay. I roped the bale of hay until there was nothing left on that end and then, put the calf head on the other end and roped until there was nothing left. With that said, you need to do all the ground work, before swinging a leg over your horse. I asked Jackie about the Future of Breakaway It’s about to “Bust Loose”. She said, “She is so proud of the upcoming youth; the talent is top notch. We are really making Breakaway a stand out event at the youth level.” Ladies read that again…. The pro-level is watching and they like what they see. We have to keep working hard and keep breakaway on the forefront, so all the opportunities will continue to grow! HOW WELL DO YOU KNOW YOUR HORSE? Ulcers… I think we have all heard about ulcers and/or deal with them in our performance horses. Ulcers can be very painful in a horse’s gut. All horses have them, it just depends on how many ulcers a horse has, and the amount of gastric fluid (acid) that releases on their gut, during high levels of stress. There are many signs that warn you of potential ulcer(s): *Sour disposition JACKIE & BAILEY *Eating, but losing weight *Unwilling to work *Dull hair coat The best way to confirm if your horse does have ulcers, is to have them scoped by a veterinarian. Ulcers do occur in the glandular portion of the stomach, but this is less common. The top portion of the stomach is designed for mixing the contents of the stomach and does not have as much protection from the acid. There are many applications available to heal ulcers. “Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway”- John Wayne


Farm & Ranch Family The folks at McCoy’s Building Supply understand that it takes a lot of hard work and the whole family pitching in to get things done on a farm or ranch. That’s why we’d like to take some time out to salute Texas High School Rodeo Association families who are farmers and ranchers. In our monthly Farm & Ranch Family Spotlight, we’ll feature one family, sharing their story of how they work together as a family to make their farm or ranch successful.The spotlight will run for 10 months; each month will feature a different Region. Each Regional McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family will receive a $100 McCoy’s Gift Card. The McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family of the Year will receive a $500 McCoy’s Gift Card and will be announced at the 2021 THSRA State Finals.

The Andrews Family of Region IV C

by Jacqueline Knox

ongratulations to this month’s McCoys Farm and Ranch Family, the Andrews! Their family business, Andrews Rodeo Company, is such a success that it has been in business for three generations of Andrews’. James and Pepper have three children: Summer (20), Kelon (16) and Alee (13). In order for the business to be a success, the entire family helps out where they can! The ranch spreads out over 2,200 acres in Addielou, Texas (Region IV). It functions as the headquarters for the family’s rodeo company and a cattle ranch. Pepper shared that they have 200 bucking horses, 100 bucking bulls and 450 cattle on the ranch. The rodeo company is also famous for one of its bucking bulls, Bodacious. “Bodacious has been round for a long time,” Pepper said. “He is buried on the ranch and a lot of our bloodlines go back to him.” Every day, the animals have to be fed and cared for, which is an all-day affair. The ranch is unique in the fact that it is laid out in a circle. This is so that everything comes up to one central set of feed pens. James and his father Sammy feed the bulls in the morning and then start haying. They usually get to the cattle and commercial

cows towards the end of the day. Since Summer is away at school, Kelon and Alee help out their dad and grandfather on the ranch or with rodeos when they aren’t in school. They usually help with the day to day work of taking care of the livestock. Additionally, the kids each have a few cows and help raise calves. Pepper said that the kids favorite thing to do is bucking the calves. Pepper and James are really proud of their children, not just for their work ethic around the ranch and in rodeo, but also at school. In fact, Summer is on a full academic scholarship at UT Tyler and Kelon and Alee are straight A students. “Not only do they work hard at rodeo, they also work really hard at school,” Pepper said. While Pepper does actually work a 9 to 5 job as a nurse, the family chose the ranching lifestyle because of the freedom and independence that it provides. Both Pepper and James have also grown up in the ranching and rodeo environment and wanted that for their kids. “This ranch has been in the family for three generations and we hope to leave it to our kids someday,” Pepper said. “It is a calm escape from a commercial world.” They hope that the ranching lifestyle has taught their kids responsibility and work ethic. “I believe that kids that grow up on ranch, grow up learning to take care of things,” Pepper said. “Their sense of responsibility is a little different because if they don’t feed the animals then the animals don’t get fed. They are working with living things and that is a huge responsibility.” When they are not on the ranch, the family can usually be found at a rodeo! While Alee is a member of TJHRA and competes in barrels, poles, goats, breakaway and ribbon roping, Kelon competes in team roping for THSRA. Since their business also centers around rodeos, Pepper and James are thankful that THSRA and TJHRA have allowed their kids to be part of the competing side of rodeo. They also love the friends and relationships they have made through THSRA. “In THSRA, everybody is just like family,” Pepper said. “We have gained a whole lot of friends and met tons of families that are similar to us.” The family also loves working cows together and family meals. Luckily, the Andrews have a McCoys close to them in Paris, Texas and they shop there occasionally. They usually shop there for materials that would be needed to build and mend fences and barns or tools to do other repair work. The family is honored to be named this month’s McCoys Farm and Ranch Family!

31


PRESIDENT - RILEY JO CHEATHAM VICE PRESIDENT - BOYD HANAGRIFF SECRETARY - CHASE MCBEE

Ready for the WINTER SEASON

STUDENT OFFICERS

149 Willow Creek • Huntsville, Texas 77340 832.928.1647 • braddyer@live.com

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS BRAD DYER

240 Pool Road • Richards, TX 77873 936.661.8988 • announcer.mcmahon@gmail.com

DAVE MCMAHON

SECRETARY - LACEY AUBIHL 1326 PR 5011 • Ledbetter, Texas 78946

Region IX

979.251.4131 • laceyaubihl@thsra9.com

198 Pool Road • Richards, Texas 77873 936.661.4163 • rhanagriff@gmail.com

ROGER HANAGRIFF

198 Pool Road • Richards, Texas 77873 936.661.4163 • rhanagriff@gmail.com

PRESIDENT- ROGER HANAGRIFF

32

PERFORMANCE REPORT

A

By MONTANA BROWN

– Performance Reporter

s the Region IX rodeo season begins to take full swing, many contestants have goals as to how they want their rodeo season to play out, although mindset and draw make up 90% of the outcome, you need to be sure your equine athletes are in the best shape possible. As the winter season approaches, horses are susceptible to common colds, just like humans. Weather changes can leave horses with a runny nose, nasty cough, and fever. It is a must that you are always aware that your horse is in a healthy condition, up to date on vaccinations, and are on a regular

deworming schedule. One of the best ways to knock out a common horse cold is by a powder antibiotic, a powder is easier to give because it can be given in the horse's feed and there is no hassle with needles or pastes. My personal veterinarian always recommends giving the powder twice a day for ten days. By following these tips, you and your equine athlete can be in tip top running condition and ready for the winter rodeo season. Speaking of winter rodeo seasons, Region IX rodeo is in full swing and member numbers are bigger than ever! The first rodeo weekend brought in some smoking times and scores from the toughest contestants in Texas. Here are the winners from the first rodeo: Breakaway- Macy Akins, Goat Tying- Tylie McDonald, Bareback- Rhody Niles, Bull Riding- Hagen Helmcamp, Poles- Carson Rutherford, Steer Wrestling- Keller McDougald, Team Roping- Kyle Karins & Brice Beene, and Tie-down- Tyler Calhoun. Region IX 2020-2021 season has brought in well over 150 members, having a smooth rodeo with this many contestants is not easy but the Region IX officers and directors make it work and make it work well. On behalf of the whole region, I would like to thank Mr. Roger Hannagriff and his team of officers and directors for all they do. Rodeo #2 began with an awesome church service by pastor Jimmy Cotton and worship music by Dave McMahon Just remember this, although not everyone was able to win this weekend, we were all blessed to spend another weekend doing what we love. These times can be hard but I’d rather be surrounded by the people I love.

KELLER MCDOUGALD

photo by Jennings

TYLIE MCDONALD

photo by Jennings


YOUTH RODEO ASSOCIATION 2020 - 2021 YRA SEASON

The 2020-2021 rodeo year is the 49th Anniversary of the YRA. At the 2020 YRA Finals All-Around saddles, Year End saddles and Finals Average saddles were awarded in each event along with belt buckles through 6th Place for Year End.

To qualify for the Finals you only have to enter 6 rodeos in each event you wish to compete in at finals.

2020 Awards: 1 – Aluminum Trailer, 2-Three Horse Trailers, 66 Saddles, 170 Belt Buckles, and Scholarships

YEAR END ALL AROUNDS WILL EACH DRAW FOR A CHANCE TO WIN ALUMINUM TRAILER

Membership Applications, Entry Blanks and the Schedule are available on the YRA website: www.yratx.com or call 713-501-8843. NEVER too late to join or enter!

AGE GROUPS (AS OF 9/1/20) Group PeeWee: ages 8 & under Sub Junior: ages 9 – 12 Juniors: ages 13 – 15 Seniors: ages 16 – 19

REMINDER INFO TEXTS PeeWee & Subs text @yrapw to 81010 Jr and Sr text @yraj to 81010

Like the Youth Rodeo Association Facebook Page!!

www.yratx.com

SCHEDULE: #1 August 14, 15, 16 – Bryan – Short Go 8/16 Jr. American Qualifier #2 September 18, 19 – Edna Rodeo #2 postmark #3 October 16, 17 – Bellville Sept. 8th. If you miss #4 November 13, 14 – Hitchcock postmark deadline #5 November 20, 21 – Halletsville then call in Sept. 15th #6 January 15, 16 – Hitchcock from 5-9pm at 713-501-8843. #7 February 12, 13 – Giddings #8 February 26, 27 – Rosenberg #9 March 12 ,13, 14 – Gonzales – Short Go 3/14 Vegas Tuffest Qualifier #10 April 23, 24 – Caldwell #11 May 7, 8 – Giddings #12 May 14,15,16 – Edna Short Go 5/16 Vegas Tuffest Qualifier June 16-19 – YRA Finals – Edna

Friday Perf 7:00 PM * Saturday Perf 11:00 PM * Short Go - 10:00 AM for #1, #9, #11 Roughstock only at #1, #9, #12 Mail In Only.

EVENTS AGE

Bareback Boys - 15 – 19 Calf Riding Boys - 9 & under Steer (Jr. Bull Riding) Boys - 10 – 14 Bull Riding Boys - 15 – 19 Chute Dogging Boys - 15 & under PeeWee Poles Boys & Girls - 8 & under Sub Jr. Poles Boys & Girls - 9 – 12 Jr. Poles Girls - 13 – 15 Sr. Poles Girls - 16 – 19 Sub Jr. Tiedown Boys - 12 & under Jr. Tiedown Boys - 13 -15 Sr. Tiedown Boys - 16 – 19 PeeWee Barrels Boys & Girls – 8 & under Sub Jr. Barrels Boys & Girls – 9 – 12 Jr. Barrels Girls - 13 – 15 Sr. Barrels Girls - 16 – 19 Sub Jr. Ribbons Boys & Girls – 12 & under Jr. Ribbons Boys & Girls – 13 – 15 Jr./Sr. Girls Ribbons Girls – 13 - 19 Sr. Ribbons Boys – 16 – 19 PeeWee Figure 8s Boys & Girls - 8 & under Sub Jr. Figure 8s Boys & Girls – 9 – 12 Jr. Figure 8s Girls – 13 -15 Steer Wrestling Boys – 16 – 19 Sub Jr. Girls Breakaway Girls - 12 & under Sub Jr. Boys Breakaway Boys – 12 & under Jr. Girls Breakaway Girls – 13 – 15 Sr. Girls Breakaway Girls – 16 -19 Jr. Boys Breakaway Boys – 13 – 15 Sub Jr. Goat Tying Boys & Girls – 12 & under Jr. Goat Tying Girls – 13 – 15 Sr. Goat Tying Girls – 16- 19 Team Roping 19 & Under

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STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - SAIGE SEALY VICE PRESIDENT - MAKENZIE DOWELL SECRETARY - CHAINEY WEITZ BRANDON JONES 194 CR 427 • Lorena, Texas 76655 254.833.0251 • crystal_jones1991@yahoo.com

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS

RENEE WEITZ PO Box 40 • London, Texas 76854 512.332.6731 • weitzrr@gmail.com

SECRETARY - STEPHANIE SHOEMAKER 6500 CR 1202 • Cleburne, Texas 76031

817.648.2728 • texasregion10@gmail.com

SHELLEY TOWNSEND 900 Quarter Horse Dr. • Kingsland, TX 78639 830.798.7755 • sarrington36@yahoo.com PRESIDENT - JERRY WRIGHT 434 CR 315 • Oglesby, Texas 76561 254.290.4965 • jerrywrighthomes@hughes.net

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PERFORMANCE REPORT

FEELING THE BEST, GETS YOU THE BEST

W By KATY

WEBB – Performance Reporter

hen it comes to taking care of our animal athletes, we go above and beyond to make sure that our horses are feeling and looking their best so they can work their best. Whether it is Team Roping, Barrels,Poles, Calf Roping, Steer Wrestling, or even Goat Tying every horse gets sore after a long week of practice along with a weekend on the road. One of my favorite ways to get my horses feeling right again is to treat them with a pulsed electromagnetic treatment or the (PEMF). What is a PEMF treatment ? This treatment is a natural healing process that sends small waves of electromagnetic pulses through the body towards the cells to the placement of injury. It is painless and drug-free and is stress free treatment. When the pulses reach the area of pain it will carefully expand and relax the cell membranes that are damaged. When the cells start to relax the body then begins to release toxins and inflammation. This makes the overall well being of our equines feel and perform better.

What are the benefits of using PEMF? After just a 40 minute relaxing treatment your horse can improve up to 70%. There are multiple benefits to using electromagnetic pulses to treat your equine athlete like improving performance, stamina, speed, range of motion, balance, reducing inflammation and recovery time, swelling, relieving pain and it just improves the overall health of an equine. One of these things could be what's keeping me from pulling that number 1 check and all it

takes is one treatment. By knowing that your equine is ready to go and can give it there all without any pain or injury can also give you the confidence to trust your horse more. By helping them, you help yourself!


RILEY WEBB OF REGION X by Katy Webb

The Whataburger Whatakid is selected due to their ability to excel both in and out of the rodeo arena. Whataburger is proud to recognize a THSRA member from each of the ten Regions who truly upholds the title “Whatakid!” One of the nominees will be chosen at the State Final Rodeo in June as the Whatakid of the Year. In recognition of this accomplishment they will receive free Whataburgers for an entire year!

C

ongratulations to this months What-A-Kid, Riley Webb! This region 10 junior has been swinging a rope ever since he started to walk and roped his first calf when he was just six years old. Riley has sure figured some things out since then, in the 2020 season alone Riley qualified for the for the Americans Finalist, the WCRA Stampede at the E Champion, was the Texas High School Reserve State Tiedown Champion, and even made region 10 and Team Texas look good at the National High School Finials by winning the tiedown roping world Title! Riley has been tiedown roping as a member of the THSRA and TJHRA for (blank years.) One person that Riley said has helped him a lot in his career is Clint Cooper, (“ Clint really helped me when I was just getting my start by making sure I was doing all of the basic flanking and tying the right way and he even helped me find my first good horse.”) It doesn’t matter whether it’s the big or small rodeos for Riley, he stated (“I treat them all the same, go back to the fundamentals and run a few practice runs to make insure my tack and horse are ready. I make sure I feel confident in what I have practiced for and just go do what I do best.”) Throughout the many long years of rodeoing, Riley has learned many lessons including that things do not always go your way but when the don’t you have to keep your head up and keep working hard. He also said (“taking care of your responsibilities is the first thing you do before doing anything else.”) with always being on the road going to rodeo after rode Riley has to overcome all

of the late nights and early morning that often run together. With the late nights and early mornings, you can bet that there are even longer days that come to follow, but Riley stated (“you just have to remember why you are there and push through it and focus on what drives you”) As much as Riley is on the road it is extremely hard to ever be home with his family and friends for a long amount of time. So, when he does have time off that is exactly what he likes to do, spend time with his family and friends.

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JUNIOR HIGH 44

REGION II: Tougher than Ever

H

owdy from Jr. High Region 2. Here at Region 2 we are tougher than ever. Everytime you step into the arena you have to be on your game and ready to ride. Our Spring Rodeo's start March 27-28, 2021 in Andrews. We are planning on having a team roping on Saturday, March 27th following the rodeo for a fundraiser. Region 2's finals are going to be in Sweetwater, April 9-11, 2021. Can't wait to see everyone at the 1st Jr High Rodeo in 2021! - Raelyn Clinton


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like us on facebook, instagram & twitter Texas high school rodeo social media: YOUR SOURCE FOR INSIDER INFORMATION! 45


REGION IX:

Looking Forward to a Great Season

R

egion 9 Junior High Rodeo kicked off in Caldwell at the beginning of October. It was great to get the season going and welcoming so many new members to Region 9. We had our second weekend in Bryan, where the rest of our rodeos will be held. At the first rodeo we voted for student officers and student event directors. Our 2020-21 Student Officers are as follows: President – Emma McCarthy, Vice President – Kamryn Robison, and Secretary – Drew Ellen Stewart. Our event directors are as follows: Boys Breakaway – Ta’Colton Calhoun, Girls Breakaway – Chesney Calhoun, Boys Goat Tying – Maverick Mizell, Girls Goat Tying – Drew Ellen Stewart, Tiedown – Cameron Tullos, Team Roping – Cooper Imhoff & Ty Williams, Barrels – Abbey Anderson, Ribbon Roping – Ta’Colby Calhoun & Kamryn Robison, Poles – Claire Sechelski, Rough Stock – Burk Bronson,

46

and Chute Dogging – Emma McCarthy. Region 9 is the second biggest junior high region and our competition is very strong. We look forward to having a great season this year and bringing a great team to the state finals. We would like to thank all the parents for jumping in at the rodeos and helping everywhere they are needed. Without the help of our parents we would not be able to run the rodeo so efficiently. We would also like to thank our sponsors that we have so far this year: Bill Fick Ford, Texas Truck Works, Standley Feed and Seed, Inc. and Texas Truck Works. We always welcome more sponsors. Last but not lest we want to thank our adult officers, they are doing a great job! President – Rusty McCarthy, Vice President – Poppa Calhoun, State Directors – Poppa Calhoun, Rusty McCarthy, and Bo Williams, Executive Board Member – Brad Dyer and Secretary – Anne Dollery.

2020-2021 JUNIOR HIGH STATE DIRECTORS EXECUTIVE BOARD NATIONAL DIRECTOR CHRIS WOLFE

214-403-4638

cwwolfe630@gmail.com

PRESIDENT SCOTT SHOOK

281-437-8214

scottcshook@yahoo.com

1st VICE PRESIDENT JOE RICHARDS

806-676-5970

joe@diamondcattlefeeders.com

2nd VICE PRESIDENT SHANE HANCOCK

254-379-3516

shanehancock74@yahoo.com

DELEGATE 2 YEAR TERM DAVID FREEMAN

832-221-1253

chlfreeman@yahoo.com

DELEGATE 2 YEAR TERM LANCE GAILLARD

806-898-3748

lsgaillard@yahoo.com

DELEGATE 2 YEAR TERM ERIC HUSTON

817-368-0159

duaneoverton6113@gmail.com

DELEGATE 1 YEAR TERM BRAD DYER

832-928-1647

braddyer@live.com

DELEGATE 1 YEAR TERM JILL MURRAY 903-348-4356 murrayarena@hotmail.com SECRETARY ANNE DOLLERY 979-412-2551 texasjuniorhighrodeo@gmail.com

STATE DIRECTORS

Region I MONROE TIMBERLAKE KEVIN MCCREARY KYLE ANDERSON

monroetimberlake@gmail.com kevin@mccrearysales.com

806-344-6846 806-674-5601

Region II JUSTIN CLINTON 432-631-0300 KELLY WOOD 432-940-1136 CHAD CURRINGTON 806-786-9016 Region III JOHN ROBERTSON 817-475-6377 SHANE CRISWELL 325-347-2656 WESLEY WHITE Region IV JOHNNY YOUNG, JR PAIGE ALMON BRIAN LOGAN

903-249-1647 903-681-6592 903-348-1740

jlquarterh@gmail.com woodrodeogirls@yahoo.com ccurrington@sundowwnsb.com jrober5729@att.net kodyhorses@yahoo.com

jpyoung75486@gmail.com epaigealmon@yahoo.com

Region V RICHARD BALDWIN 936-332-5466 STACEY MARTIN 225-505-7645 SHANE PASCHAL 409-673-1676 Region VI CHARLES HENRY 979-221-4450 DENNY PATTERSON 832-330-3054 CLAY OHRT 361-571-1040

crossfireexpress@att.net pattersondenny@gmail.com ohrt6@hotmail.com

Region VII AMBER BASS LANDON EHLINGER DAN SIMPTON

landon@6Econstruction.com dansimpton@yahoo.com

979-255-2458 281-389-2784 936-870-5779

r.baldwin147@icloud.com nextlevelgoattying@gmail.com spaschal@paschalweld.com

amberbass@greatertexasfoundation.org

Region VIII BEN ELLIS 361-701-1886 ben_ellis78@yahoo.com JUSTIN SPEERS CASS RINGLESTEIN 210-885-0902 cass.oasis@yahoo.com Region IX POPPA CALHOUN 979-422-3105 calhounpoppa@yahoo.com RUSTY MCCARTHY 936-206-4051 rust@RDMContracting.com BO WILLIAMS 979-220-5898 dwilliams@midsouthenergy.com Region X SISSY PENNINGTON MATT SILAR 254-472-0133 matt.silar@patriotinsp.com ZAC THOMPSON STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT BRYCE EHLINGER V.PRES KAMRYN ROBISON SECRETARY DREW ELLEN STEWART PRINCESS DIXIE TABB


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CALF ROPING CLINIC WORLD CHAMPION CALF ROPER

Equine Champions for Christ was formed and created in early 2008. These clinics will help youth from all over acheive their goals, learn skills in thier field, benefit as future rodeo stars and experience a new walk of life in Christianity.

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SLADE BAUMANN OF REGION I by Jacqueline Knox

The Whataburger Whatakid is selected due to their ability to excel both in and out of the rodeo arena. Whataburger is proud to recognize a THSRA member from each of the ten Regions who truly upholds the title “Whatakid!” One of the nominees will be chosen at the State Final Rodeo in June as the Whatakid of the Year. In recognition of this accomplishment they will receive free Whataburgers for an entire year!

C

ongratulations to the Whatakid of the month, Slade Baumann! Slade, a 17-year-old senior from Canyon, Tx, is a force to be reckoned with. He competes in team roping and calf roping. While he enjoys both of them, he does tend to team rope a little more because there simply is more team ropings available to go. He currently rides two different horses: Rolex and Smack. Rolex is his head horse, while Smack is his calf horse. He mentioned how both of the horses just work well with him and he really enjoys riding them. Slade has grown up in rodeo. He attended his first junior rodeo in kindergarten at age five. At the time, Slade had no idea how much he would come to love rodeo. “I just liked the idea of it,” Slade said about his junior rodeo days. “I didn’t really think about doing it my entire life, but here I am still roping.” He is currently a member of THSRA. Slade’s favorite rodeos have been the Vegas Junior NFR and Spicer Gripp Memorial. Last year, Slade won the pro-am team roping and scholarship roping at the Spicer Gripp. He also won a round in team roping at the Junior NFR in 2018. His greatest accomplishment is qualifying for nationals in team roping out of Texas this year. “It was kind of surprising honestly,” Slade said. “That had been my goal for a while but when you finally get there it’s like holy cow you actually did it this time.” Rodeo is Slade’s favorite because it combines his two favorite things: competition and horses. “Rodeo is a sport where you can have both, which is why I have always been drawn to it,” Slade said. He is thankful that rodeo has taught him how to set and accomplish goals and how to be a hard worker.

One of his favorite rodeo memories is from the Spicer Gripp in 2018. The rodeo was the day after his grandad’s funeral, and he roped in the Junior NFR qualifier roping. “He would always come watch me and really enjoyed being at my rodeos,” Slade said. “I won first and second in the average that day. It was a cool way to honor him.” Not only does Slade compete in rodeo, but he is also a member of the varsity football team, Future Farmers of America and National Honor Society at Canyon High School. He mentioned that he really enjoys football because of the intense competition and FFA because of the learning aspect involved with the club. In addition, he also takes his academics very seriously. Slade has been awarded the superintendent scholar all four years of high school and is in the top 10% of his class. His favorite class is currently biology because he “finds it interesting and wants to major in something related to biology.” In his free time, Slade can probably be found hunting coyotes or fishing. “My parents have always told me to go be great every day,” Slade said when asked what his motto on life is. “I just try to be great at whatever I have lined up that day. I think it is important to try as hard as you can no matter what you are doing.” Slade is constantly reminded of this by his dad, David Baumann. “Every day, when my dad sees us in the morning, he tells us to go be great today.” Someone that Slade looks up to is his dad. “He has always given me a great example to look up to,” Slade said. “He taught me the right way to be.” In addition to just being a great example, Slade admires how hard his dad works. In the future, Slade plans to attend Texas A&M University with the goal of one day becoming a dentist or orthodontist. He plans to continue rodeoing at Texas A&M. Slade is honored to be this month’s Whatakid. “It feels really good,” Slade said. “It gives you something to hold on to. It lets you know that someone recognizes the work and time you have been putting in.”

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Hallettsville 2020 Founders Invitational Rodeo

photography by: Jennings Rodeo Photography

T

he Founders Invitational began in 2014 to bring THSRA elite competitors back to where high school rodeo all started in Hallettsville, Texas in 1946. The top four in every event from each region are invited to compete in October at the Lavaca Exposition Center, where not only the Invitational Champion Title is up for grabs, but so is $15,000 in added money.

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Where It All Began


WHERE IT ALL BEGAN: Claude Mullins, Alton Allen and Leon Kahanek were all locals of Hallettsville back in the 1946 and these three men started what we now know as Texas High School and National High School Rodeo. They began with a goal of enriching the lives of agricultural youth and encouraging them to stay in school. Today, their investment has paid off with an association whose members know the value of dedication, hard work and tough competition. During the invitational rodeo, many families visited the Lavaca Historical

Museum, which showcases some of the station champion saddles won by competitors in the early years of THSRA and the “Hallettsville Barrier.” Alton Allen revolutionized the hand pulled barrier by making it a mechanical operating system, which is triggered off of the calves breaking to give everyone a fair shot created the barrier. To this day we are thankful for these men who had a huge impact on rodeo. Thank you to the City of Hallettsville and Lavaca Exposition Center and its board of directors who work tirelessly to hold this event each year.

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Farm & Ranch Family The folks at McCoy’s Building Supply understand that it takes a lot of hard work and the whole family pitching in to get things done on a farm or ranch. That’s why we’d like to take some time out to salute Texas High School Rodeo Association families who are farmers and ranchers. In our monthly Farm & Ranch Family Spotlight, we’ll feature one family, sharing their story of how they work together as a family to make their farm or ranch successful.The spotlight will run for 10 months; each month will feature a different Region. Each Regional McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family will receive a $100 McCoy’s Gift Card. The McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family of the Year will receive a $500 McCoy’s Gift Card and will be announced at the 2021 THSRA State Finals.

The Albracht Family of Region I C by Jacqueline Knox

ongratulations to this month’s Farm and Ranch Family, the Albrachts! Their ranch, Slash A, has been such a success that they have been in business for over 40 years. While their oldest son, Hadley (19), is currently judging livestock at South Plains College in Levelland, Sammy and Tara work at the ranch alongside their other children, Harris (17), Hance (16) and Hollis (13). Hadley is back at the ranch in the summer to help out! The ranch spreads over a couple thousand acers in Wildorado, Texas (Region 1). Their ranch functions as a both a cow calf and feeder stocker operation. Sammy shared that they have around 500 cattle and 15 horses on the ranch. They also farm wheat and sorghum, which is mainly used to keep the cattle fed. Additionally, they have a small feed yard of about 2,000 head. Every day, the cattle have to be fed and doctored, as well as processed and managed. While the work may pick up during calving season, they are always getting cattle in and shipping them out. Working on the ranch is a family affair for the Albrachts. The three boys still at home are vital to the ranch operations. When they aren’t in school, they are usually helping out around the ranch. The boys help out with the feeding, doctoring, processing and really anything that goes into taking

52

care of the livestock. “Basically, everyone pitches in where needed,” Sammy said. “The older kids take a little more initiative to do things like pulling the sick cattle or giving the shots. The younger ones do more things like cleaning water tanks, putting out haybales and other things of that nature.” He also joked that branding is a national holiday in their family, and one of the boys’ favorite things to help out with. “One of them said once that it was better than Easter,” Sammy said. “And he likes candy a lot.” Both Tara and Sammy grew up in the ranching lifestyle and wanted to raise their kids in the same environment. “It is where our hearts are,” Sammy said. In addition to ranching, Tara teaches 1st grade at the local school and Sammy sells Mack and Volvo trucks to “help keep the wheels on the bus.” They hope that ranching has taught their boys hard work and perseverance, as well as the ability to trust in family and in God. “There are a lot of ups and downs because you never know what the future holds in terms of weather,” Sammy said. “It takes a lot of prayers to make it to the end of the year, and the next year and the years to come.” When they are not on the ranch, their favorite thing to do as a family is head to a rodeo or stock show. Harris and Hance are currently members of THSRA and compete in calf roping and team roping. Hollis is a member of TJHRA and competes in ribbon roping, goat tying and breakaway. The Albrachts love that rodeo surrounds them with “like-minded people that have the same values as us. We call them our rodeo family,” Sammy said. They also love how rodeo is a great avenue for scholarships and encourages kids to go get a higher education. The family is thankful for the positive effect THSRA has had on their lives. Not only has THSRA provided them great friends, it has also taught their kids that lots of time needs to be dedicated in order to compete successfully. Unfortunately, the Albrachts do not have a McCoy’s that is close to them, but they really wish there was one. The family is honored to be names this month’s McCoy’s farm and ranch family!


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