Spring 2021 Extreme Team News, Official News of Texas High School and Junior High Rodeo

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SPONSOR SPOTLIGHTS:

CO - CHAMPION ALL AROUND COWGIRLS:

Robbin Rice & Jayci Lee Byler PRSRT STD STD PRSRT US POSTAGE POSTAGE US PAID PAID BRYAN TX TX 77802 77802 BRYAN PERMIT ## 23 23 PERMIT

PRESRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FULTEK

COLLEGE RODEO EDITION

GUIDE TO SPRING FASHION


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WRANGLER.COM

DUST SETTLES.

COWBOYS DON’T.

Statler Wright Saddle Bronc Rider

Jake Wright 7X Wrangler NFR Qualifier


EXECUTIVE BOARD STATE PRESIDENT KEN BRAY

PO Box 1634 • Granbury, TX 76048 817.219.0436 • kbray@equibrand.com

1ST VICE PRESIDENT MIKE GHORMLEY

PO Box 1177 • Madisonville, TX 77864 281.785.0077 • mghormley@me.com

2ND VICE PRESIDENT JOHN SCHUENEMAN

PO Box 1177 • Madisonville, TX 77864 281.785.0077 • john.schueneman@gmail.com

SECRETARY/TREASURER SUSAN BALDWIN

In This Issue

PO Box 30 • Martinsville, TX 75958 936.564.8993 (home) cottongeorgetx@gmail.com

JUNIOR HIGH NATIONAL DIRECTOR CHRIS WOLFE

EDITION

73 Breeze Way, Boerne, TX 78006 210.632.3208 delaune.holly@gmail.com

SPRING FASHION PAGE 39

Region I

TAYLIN WRIGHT Region II

Region III

RILEE PARKER Region IV

LULU EAKES

SPONSOR SPOTLIGHTS

Region V

SIERRA SCHUENEMAN Region VI

BRADI FREEMAN Region VII

JAYCI LEE BYLER

PAGE 39, 56

Region VIII

PAGE 22, 23

BAILEY GUBERT Region IX

MONTANA BROWN Region X

THOMAS BROCKWAY

KATY WEBB

214.770.5302 • thomas.brockway@woodpartners.com

THSRA OFFICIAL SPONSORS

BRENT CHARLESWORTH LARRY DOWELL

ARIAT PERFORMANCE REPORTERS

JACOB WALTERS

8016 CR 2419 • Royse City, TX 75189

370 CR 220 • Marlin, TX 76661 254.715.8814 • fivedowell@gmail.com

LAUREN TUTTLE STUMBERG

BRIAN ROBERTS

DELEGATES AT LARGE

PO Box 362 • Marathon, TX 79842 432.386.6214 • brent@crcompany.net

Marketing Director

210.632.3208 • delaune.holly@gmail.com

Computer Programmer brian.roberts53@att.net 281.213.9143

QUEEN COORDINATOR ANN BLACKWELL 936.590.1855 tablackwell@yahoo.com

HOLLY DeLAUNE

Graphics/Layout Director lauren@distinct-graphics.com 830.249.8020

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630 E FM 813 • Palmer, TX 75152 214.403.4638 • cwwolfe630@gmail.com

MARKETING HOLLY DELAUNE

Official Publication of the Texas High School Rodeo Association

COLLEGE RODEO

722 Southview Circle • Center, TX 75935 936.590.4447 texashighschoolrodeo@gmail.com

NATIONAL DIRECTOR COTTON GEORGE

EXTREME TEAM NEWS

ELIZABETH BARTA PAGE 38

JACK KAHLA PAGE 51

JEFF PARSLEY

655 CR 4703 • Troup, TX 75789 903.574.3910 • bmsmith1996@sbcglobal.net

BRANDON SMITH

6800 E FM 476 • Pleasanton, TX 78064 830.570.7157 • bmsmith1996@sbcglobal.net

OHRT FAMILY PG 31 RANCH FAMILIES: THE THE LANKFORD FAMILY PG 52

STUDENT OFFICERS

thsraofficers@hotmail.com STUDENT PRESIDENT Dalton Stripling STUDENT VICE PRESIDENT Brooklyn Balch STUDENT SECRETARY Abi DePriest

Region

news

REGION REGION REGION REGION REGION

I 11 REGION II 12 REGION III 20 REGION IV 24 REGION V 26 REGION JUNIOR HIGH 45

VI VII VIII IX X

27 28 30 32 36

DR. TANDY FREEMAN

THSRA is a non-profit organization (501-C). Production of this publication was funded by membership dues and is provided complimentary to members of THSRA. Non-members may purchase annual subscriptions for $25.00

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2021 COLLEGE RODEO EDITION 6

TAKING THE NEXT STEP: INSIDE COLLEGE RODEO

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by Holly DeLaune any THSRA and TJHRA members have aspirations of college rodeoing after their high school career. To help our members understand how the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association (NIRA) is structured and what our members can be doing now to prepare for that next step, we visited with Dr. Al Wagner, Texas A&M University’s Rodeo Coach. The first decision a high school Senior will make is where they want to attend college. If you are planning on attending a college or university in Texas then you will either be in the Southern or Southwest Region of the NIRA. These regions are divided by the I-35 corridor with the schools on the East belonging to the Southern Region and the schools on the West side belonging to the Southwest Region. Each rodeo year is comprised of approximately 10 rodeos that are hosted by different member schools. Member schools are designated as school that have joined the NIRA, have 5-6 competitors and pay a member fee. Students who do not attend a member school can still rodeo as an independent athlete; an example would be Blinn Junior College in Bryan. This year a NIRA membership card was $260 for a competing membership. “Everyone who buys their NIRA card can enter and go to the rodeos, but there are 6 men and 4 women that are designated as team members for their school. These team member’s points earned at rodeos will be the only points that will count towards the overall school’s team points. Any point you win at the rodeo (whether you are on the team or not) will go to your individual point standing,” says Wagner. There are a few differences from rodeoing in high school. One of the biggest differences would be the team aspect. “Students enjoy being a part of a team, it gives them a sense of belonging and community.” In a big university atmosphere you are one of thousands, but being a member of the rodeo team gives you the ability to develop friendships that will last a lifetime. “The team atmosphere is also promoted at rodeos by students wearing vests identifying their school and by team point standings,” said Wagner. As in most rodeo associations, points become very important at the end of the year. The top 3 in each event qualify for the College National Finals Rodeo (CNFR) and the top 2 men’s and women’s team members in the region will also qualify for nationals. Dr. Wagner says, “Travel money is different for every school. Some schools give money if you are on the designated team for that rodeo and some award money after the rodeo according to who earned the most points.” The approximate entry fee is $80 for the first event and $60 for each event after for both men and women. “I always emphasize to every athlete that you are a STUDENT athlete. That is, student comes before athlete. You are in school to get an education and rodeo should always come second.” In the NIRA you have to maintain a 2.0 and complete 12 academic

If you are interested in learning more about the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association,

email us at nira@bmi.net

or visit our website: www.collegerodeo.com


hours each semester (PE doesn’t count as an hour) to rodeo. The NIRA also has specific rules when it comes to transferring colleges that can sometimes be confusing. Dr. Wagner helped us understand the guidelines. If transferring from a junior college to a 4-year school you must have 48 hours completed, otherwise there is a transfer penalty of missing 3 rodeos. There is also an automatic 3-rodeo penalty for transferring from a 4-year school to a 4-year school. However, there is no penalty if you transfer from a nonmember school to a member school. Don’t worry if you already have college hours accrued during high school, these rules only apply to card holders. College rodeo is also different because athletes are expected to be responsible for themselves. Parents are not allowed in the arena, so athletes rely on their teammates for help. Athletes are also responsible for making sure their coach has entered them in the rodeos. The days of dad pushing your calf and mom entering you in all your rodeos

has passed once become a NIRA member. The NIRA also has a list of fines that can be given to athletes, so rodeo coaches advise each member review the rulebook to avoid getting a fine. Common fines are losing hat, parent in arena, drag rule, profanity, not wearing vest, no circle in front of the box, delay of rodeo rattling the chute and a few more. When asked what our high school students should be doing now to prepare for college and college rodeo, Dr. Wagner said, “It is very important if you are taking college courses as high school student, that you make sure you get an original transcript (not a copy) and bring with you when you come to school in the Fall. The NIRA office requires an original transcript from any place you took a course for credit (if your college credit came from multiple schools you will need one from each of them). Another idea to avoid problems is to send the transcript directly to the coach as soon as you receive it, so you do not have to keep up with it.” “Dr. Wagner suggests

that if you are enrolling into college in the Fall, then make an appointment to visit the rodeo coach and the school the Fall before your Freshman year. Make sure you are aware of admission application deadlines so that you have everything in on time. Ultimately, it is never too early to start inquiring with rodeo coaches about their programs!” Thank you to Dr. Al Wagner for taking the time to share this important information with our high school and junior high members as they prepare for their next step. For more information on the NIRA go to collegerodeo.com.

COLLEGE RODEO TEAM STANDINGS southern & southwestern regions

SOUTHERN REGION

Standings as of Feb 01, 2021 MEN’S TEAM 1.PANOLA JUNIOR COLLEGE 2. HILL COLLEGE 3. SAM HOUSTON STATE UNIVERSITY WOMEN’S TEAM 1. MCNEESE STATE UNIVERSITY 2. SAM HOUSTON STATE UNIVERSITY 3. TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY COMMERCE

SOUTHWEST REGION Standings as of Mar 1, 2021

MEN’S TEAM 1. CLARENDON COLLEGE 2. SUL ROSS STATE UNIVERSITY 3. WESTERN TEXAS COLLEGE WOMEN’S TEAM 1. SOUTH PLAINS COLLEGE 2. TEXAS TECH UNIV. - LUBBOCK 3. WEATHERFORD COLLEGE

CHECK OUT YOUR AMAZING COLLEGE RODEO OPTIONS!

MAKE SURE TO TAKE A LOOK AT ALL OF OUR PARTICIPATING COLLEGES & THE RODEO PROGRAMS AVAILABLE! Hill College Howard College Odessa College Sam Houston State University Trinity Valley Community College Texas A&M University Texas Tech University Vernon College Wharton County Jr. College

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National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association Region Locations BIG SKY REGION

Montana; and also Northwest Community College - Powell, WY.

CENTRAL PLAINS REGION

Kansas; Oklahoma; and also Northwest Missouri State University - Maryville, MO.

CENTRAL ROCKY MOUNTAIN REGION

Wyoming; Colorado; and also Chadrom State College Chadron NE.

GRAND CANYON REGION

Arizona; and also New Mexico State University - Las Cruces, NM; San Juan College - Farmington, NM.; Western New Mexico University - Silvercity, NM.

GREAT PLAINS REGION

North Dakota; South Dakota; Nebraska; Minnesota; Iowa; Wisconsin

NORTHWEST REGION Washington; Oregon; Northern Idaho

OZARK REGION

Missouri; Arkansas; Kentucky; Tennessee; Mississippi; Alabama; Indiana; Eastern; Louisiana; Michigan; Ohio; Illinois; Georgia; and Michigan State University - East Lansing, MI.

ROCKY MOUNTAIN REGION Southern Idaho; Utah

SOUTHERN REGION Eastern Texas; Western Louisiana

SOUTHWEST REGION New Mexico: Western Texas

WEST COAST REGION California; Nevada

Rodeo Events

MEN'S EVENTS: BAREBACK, SADDLE BRONC, BULL RIDING, STEER WRESTLING, CALF ROPING WOMEN'S EVENTS: BARREL RACING, BREAKAWAY ROPING, GOAT TYING MEN'S & WOMEN'S EVENTS: TEAM ROPING

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College rodeo tips from thsra alumni SHYANNE BAUERLE Ranger Junior College - Freshman Within the past semester of college I’ve learned a lot of things about life in general. A couple of things you will need to know about college: 1. When choosing your college make sure it’s somewhere you like and enjoy. You won’t be successful in a place where you are miserable. 2. Find a good group of friends that have the same goals as you do. In order to succeed, you need to surround yourself amongst goal oriented people. 3. It won’t always be easy, this is the first time you will be off from home. This means being away from your parents and rules. You need to make yourself a schedule that you follow. Set time aside for practice sessions, time to study, and time for yourself. No matter how tough things are looking, just keep pressing forward because things will get better. A good friend of mine once told me a bad day has 24 hours but so does a good day. A verse I live by is “But as for you, be strong and do not give up, for your work will be rewarded. 2 Chronicles 15:7. LARAMIE WEDEMEYER Texas Aggie Rodeo Team If I could give someone interested in college rodeoing advice, it would be not to worry through any situation. College rodeo is hard, school is hard, and they are hard to do together, but if you put your mind to it, you can accomplish the goals you set whether those are small goals or large goals. There are times everyone messes up but that does not define who you are, how you handle the situation defines who you are.

LYNDIE DUNN Western Texas College - Sophomore My advice to anyone thinking about becoming a college rodeo athlete is to learn time management! Going to schooland trying to rodeo is extremely hard. It’s very important to set aside time to study and do homework. Also, remember that school should be your first priority!

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CONTINUED ON PAGE 19


Texas Tech Rodeo Team

* 3 Outdoor practice arenas * Indoor practice arena * Practice stock year round * Access to horse pens at practice

Coach: Jerrad Hofstetter Office: (806)792-4682 Cell: (903) 316-4136 jerrad.hofstetter@ttu.edu

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sponsors


STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - WYATT MASK VICE PRESIDENT- JAYDA JAMESON SECRETARY/HISTORIAN - RIDLEY TIMBERLAKE STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS

DAVID CHRISTIAN 10200 S Blessen Rd • Amarillo, TX 79119 806.674.1397 • david.christian@11ranch.com

RANDY MARTIN PO Box 334 • Vega, Texas 79092 806-670-2113 • randyleemartin@hotm SECRETARY - BRANDY WRIGHT 11555 US HWY 83 • Canadian, Texas 79014 806.255.0034 • tristaterodeo@yahoo.com

Region I

TREY JOHNSON Box 501 • Hapy, Texas 79042 806-433-7382 • tjohnsoncattle@gmail.com DAVID CHRISTIAN 10200 S Blessen Rd • Amarillo, TX 79119 806.674.1397 • david.christian@11ranch.com

PERFORMANCE REPORT

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By TAYLN WRIGHT

– Performance Reporter

oving into the 2nd half of our 20202021 season, most of us are just looking forward to getting to rodeo again and the possibility of making it to state finals in Abilene. However, our seniors have much more to be focused on. They are busy filling out scholarship applications, visiting prospective colleges, and preparing for the next chapter of their rodeo career if they choose to pursue it. As they get ready to embark on their new adventures, I asked Emery Mask, former Region 1 Reporter, for some words of wisdom to help them prepare for this transition from the High School ranks to College. Emery Mask is currently attending South Plains College working on an Associate’s degree in Agricultural Communications. Emery grew up in the rodeo atmosphere, with her mother being a horse trainer as well as a barrel racer and her father being a bull rider. She has always liked horses, but didn’t get serious about rodeo until the end of her sophomore year when she started riding her main horse, Ferrari. At this time, Emery knew rodeoing was what she was meant to do. She followed her dream into the next stages and is now chasing her first CNFR, and she would like to pass on to the future freshman some of the things she has learned on this journey and what to

expect next year. College rodeo is somewhat different than High School, not only do you have individual points, but there are also team points. Your rodeo coach will choose 4 girls and 6 boys, for a total of 10, to compete for your College as a team over the 3 days of rodeo. In those 3 days there will be several performances, including slack, and a short go. You will accumulate points as an individual if you place in an event and gain points for the team if you are talented enough to get picked. At the end of the year, the #1 men’s and the #1 women’s team will have to ability to send contestants to Nationals. As for the individual competition, points are collected throughout the year and at the end of the season, the top 3 from each event is sent to nationals. When starting college rodeo, expect to be the low man on the totem pole. Don’t be cocky and think you’re just going to go in and dominate because you were successful in high school. As a rookie you have to earn others respect through hard work and commitment to the program. This kind of dedication will eventually payoff in the arena. College rodeoing is completely different from THSRA, because you are the adult, and you must be responsible and take care of business, mom and dad are no longer there to do it for you. Self-discipline is extremely important for success in college. Competition at the collegiate level is also much more challenging. One could potentially be contending against participants that have their permits and are going professionally already. The number of actual contestants also contributes to steeper competition. Instead of there only being 5-10 tough kids in each event like at a Region rodeo of High School, there are about 20-30, if not more, that can win at any given time at a college rodeo. You are also competing against champions from all over, that have past experiences and know what it takes to win. When choosing a college to rodeo for, one of the most important things to consider is getting along with your soon to be coach. Your relationship with your coach is a huge part of college rodeo. Don’t just choose a college because that’s where “the best” attend. Not being able to get along with your coach can hinder the opportunities you may have to do well. After that be sure and attend one of the college practices at the school you are looking at to make sure it aligns with what you accustom to. Also, be sure and consider the events that school concentrates on, for example you don’t want to be a team roper going to a school that is more focused on rough stock. For Region 1 seniors, Emery has some words of advice about college. “Don’t stress out over picking the perfect school or making sure that everything is perfect, because everything will fall into place the way it’s meant to be. Just enjoy the last bits of your high school rodeo career and do great things!”

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PO Box 62862 • San Angelo, Texas 76904 512.618.9233 • csbaize@yahoo.com

STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - MADALYN RICHARDS VICE PRESIDENT - EMMA KENT SECRETARY - ALLISON VAUGHN STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS CASEY BAIZE

Region II

SECRETARY - JODY MCELROY Box 224 • Balmorhea, Texas 79718 432-940-0385 • secretary@thsra2.com

JODY MCELROY Box 224 • Balmorhea, Texas 79718 432.448.7810 • rodeosecretary1@gmail.com JOE RICHARDS 5101 Hwy 214 • Hereford, Texas 79045 806.676.5970 • joe@diamondcattlefeeders.com PRESIDENT- CASEY BAIZE PO Box 62862 • San Angelo, Texas 76904 512.618.9233 • csbaize@yahoo.com

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PERFORMANCE REPORT

PREPARATION

S

By JACOB WALTERS – Performance Reporter

pring is almost upon us here in Texas, and in Region II contestants are preparing themselves for our second semester of rodeos in

a variety of ways. Take the word preparation, the importance that lies behind this word is truly astronomical. To quote Alan Armstrong, “Champions do not become champions when they win the event, but in the hours, weeks, months and years they spend preparing for it. The victorious performance itself is merely the demonstration of their championship character.” I spoke with a few Region 2 contestants to see just how they were preparing for the tough competition coming this spring. Lane Reed, a three event cowboy from Clint, Texas, is going the extra mile to ensure that he is the best physical shape he can be for the upcoming rodeos by going to the gym everyday and eating right. As for his equine partners, Lane says that when he does not have time to exercise or practice on

ALLISON VAUGH

them he puts them on a walker. While these two things are sure to help immensely, Lane has gone even further in his preparation by sharpening up his mental game. He tells us, “I put every run together in the practice pen as if I was at the rodeo. I am also reading a book called Psycho Cybernetics that is supposed to help you mentally.” Allison Vaughn from Christoval, Texas is an excellent competitor both in and out of the rodeo arena as she is a state qualifier in both cross country and track, and is a member of Christoval’s very RILEY JENKINS successful Basketball program. Becoming such an accomplished athlete does not happen by accident. “As a student athlete, the physical preparation is already implemented into my daily life,” Allison tells us, “Being involved in cross country, basketball, and track keeps me physically active which all bleeds over into the sport of rodeo.” While this amount of preparation is impressive, it is definitely not the extent of it. Her mental preparation is also significant to her success as an athlete. Allie finds confidence in repetition. “I constantly remind myself to picture the perfect run, and in the practice pen I mentally engage in what I am doing so that when it comes to the rodeo it’s just like the practice pen,” she says, “I believe the root of a good mental LANE REED game comes from confidence, and you earn confidence from the work you put in during practice.” Riley Jenkins is a team roper and tie down roper from Big Spring, Texas and his physical preparation differs from the conventional methods of staying in shape. He tells us, “Time in the practice pen helps a ton, but I get most of my conditioning from tying from the post and hauling hay, since we have a hay company.” Riley also ensures his horses are working sharp by logging them, doing a little practicing on them, and exercising them in the wheatfield next to his house. Riley also takes his mental game very seriously. He says, “I run the same calf over and over again in my head on the drive to wherever we’re going, and visualize what needs to be done before I ever set foot in the arena. I believe that the roping can be won before you even get on your horse, it’s just about not getting flustered or ahead of yourself.” As you can see, each and every person prepares a little bit differently for the rodeo. Whether they hit the gym every morning, or stack hay every afternoon, whether you make 20 runs a day on your horse or just exercise them and train a little, whether you keep your plan relaxed and simple or plan every little step, we all have something that works for us. Region Two’s spring rodeos are right around the corner, starting back on March ninth. So with spring rodeo upon us and State Finals just a few short months away, ask yourself, “ What am I doing to make sure I’m ready?” I’ll leave you with my personal favorite quote, “Winning happens when an overwhelming amount of preparation meets a single moment of opportunity.” Good luck and God bless.


WCJC RODEO ALUMNI Caleb Smidt Calf Roper/Team Roper

2018/2015 PRCA World Champion Calf Roper 7-time PRCA WNFR Qualifier/ PRCA Rookie of the Year 2010 NIRA All Around & Reserve Champion Calf Roper – WCJC

Trey Benton Bull Riding

2017 PRCA Reserve World Champion Bull Rider 6-time PRCA WNFR Qualifier 2012 NIRA CNFR – 4th in Bull Riding – WCJC

Taylor Broussard

2019 WNFR Bareback Riding Qualifier

Bradley Harter Saddle Bronc Riding

11-time PRCA WNFR Qualifier/ CNFR Qualifier 2-time NIRA Southern Region All-Around Champion

Cade Goodman Steer Wrestling

2015 NIRA Southern Region Champion 2014 NIRA National Champion

Reid Barker Bull Riding

2-time PRCA WNFR Qualifier 2012 NIRA CNFR Qualifier

Douglas Duncan Bull Riding

6-time PBR World Finals Qualifier 2-time PRCA WNFR Qualifier

Justin Hendrick Team Roping Heeler

2009 PRCA Rookie of the Year 2006 NIRA South Region Champion/ CNFR Qualifier

Matt Prichard Calf Roper

2006 NIRA National Champion/ CNFR Qualifier

D.J. Domangue Bull Riding

3-time PRCA WNFR Qualifier/ CNFR Qualifier

Contact us today to learn more about our Pioneer Rodeo Team, more than 40 programs of study, and various student support services. Contact Coach Sean Amestoy at seana@wcjc.edu or 979.532.6453

Stephanie Jacks Goat Tying

2005 NIRA National Champion 2004 Southern Region Champion/ CNFR Qualifier

Justin Mass Calf Roping

Plan. Achieve. Transfer or Work. wcjc.edu | 1.800.561.WCJC WHARTON | SUGAR LAND | RICHMOND | BAY CITY

WCJC_THSRAExtrTeamNews.indd 1

8-time PRCA WNFR Qualifier/ CNFR Qualifier College National Finals Rodeo (CNFR) Wrangler National Finals Rodeo (WNFR) National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association (NIRA) Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA) Women’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA)

2/26/21 3:42 PM

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R O D E O

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• Covered arena & practice stock. Located in the Heart of Texas where we are close to everything! Transferability to all major universities. 24/7 practice arena, practice stock, stalls, covered practice facility, paid travel for team memberships plus other benefits.

For more information contact: Paul Brown, Head Coach 254.659.7860 | 254.205.4055 (mobile) | pdbrown@hillcollege.edu Hill College -112 Lamar Dr., Hillsboro, TX 76645 | www.hillcollege.edu


Come Rodeo With Some of the BEST in the NIRA Southwest Region! Building Tomorrow’s Champions, Today! $$$ Scholarships Available $$$ 2-Year Degree Plans - Transfer Options 3 Arena Facilities / 73 Stalls & Feed Rooms Excellent Practice Stock Conveniently Located in Big Spring, Texas The Cross-Roads of West Texas Tradition Rides Strong With Hawk Rodeo Start YOUR Future With Us! Mike Yeater - Head Coach myeater@howardcollege.edu www.howardcollege.edu www.hchawk.com www.facebook/HCHawkAthletics www.facebook/HCBigSpring

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Champions aren’t born they are made! Come join the long list of champions! Numerous National College Titles and World Champions! To name a few: Lari Dee Guy, Jackie Hobbs(Crawford), Cody Ohl, Trevor Brazile, Cade Swor, Stran Smith, Sterling Smith, Will Lowe, Justin McDaniel, Isaac Diaz, Kelly Armstrong and many more!

Coach Marty Eakin 806-736-0475 meakin@vernoncollege.edu

vernoncollege.edu 17



College rodeo tips from thsra alumni SONORA SCHUENEMAN Texas Aggie Rodeo Team “Explore your options. There is nothing saying you have to go to a certain college or get a specific degree; be open minded about the experience. Go tour schools, meet various coaches and professors, get to know the current team. Ask if you can come practice, there isn’t a coach that will tell you “no.” Test out the waters and see if you mesh before you commit. It’s only 4 years of your life, but it dictates your future. Choose a school that inspires you to achieve great things and surround yourself with a team of people who want to see you be successful!”

JACK WRIGHT Southwestern Oklahoma State in Weatherford “My first semester I was really just kind of getting my feet wet. My college rodeo experience has not been normal, but I don’t think anything has been normal for anyone lately. I’m grateful for the camaraderie of our team, making new friends, and getting to live in and experience a different part of the country. It’s totally different from high school rodeo, but great in its own right. I would suggest really getting to know your coach beforehand. See if you’re comfortable with their way of doing things. Visit more than once, talk to alumni if you can. I had pretty much verbally committed to another school, but after I got to know my coach, and the first time I visited Weatherford and the campus, I just really felt in my gut like I was home and it was where I belonged. Can’t wait to get rolling with this semester! And I want to add a big thanks to THSRA for the great scholarship opportunities they provide. It’s part of why I’m able to go to school.”

The Trinity Valley Community College Rodeo Team allows students who are involved in the sport of rodeo to continue the pursuit of their rodeo goals while achieving sound academic goals. We offer competition opportunities on men’s and women’s teams under the guidance of a full-time coach. The TVCC Rodeo Team also: H Encourages rodeo athletes

H Provides rodeo scholarships

H Provides travel money H Small team size allows for

H Provides programs and

H Provides practice facilities for both rough stock and men’s and women’s timed events

to excel in their academics, as well as athletics activities that enhance a student's learning, growth and development

H Maintains our own weight room and has Mighty Broncy and a Heelomatic for practice

one-on-one coaching

www2.tvcc.edu/rodeo

For More Information Contact BRENT BRATTON 100 Cardinal Drive Athens, TX 75751

903-675-6354 bbratton@tvcc.edu www.tvcc.edu/rodeoteam

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ERIC HUSTON PO Box 945 • Decatur, Texas 76234 817.368.0159 • ehuston1972@gmail.com

STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - DUSTIN MONTGOMERY VICE PRESIDENT - GRACIE GAMBINO SECRETARY - LARAMIE DEARING

Region III

817.706.8236• kelley.williams@thsra3.com STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS

KEVIN STEWART PO Box 1308 • Glen Rose, Texas 76043 817.307.7300 • thekevinstewart@live.com PO Box 122448 • Fort Worth, Texas 76121

SECRETARY - KELLEY WILLIAMS

13196 Burns Branch Rd • Krum, Texas 776249 940.255.0738 • dshelton@rdoequipment.com

DARYL SHELTON

PRESIDENT - ERIC HUSTON PO Box 945 • Decatur, TX 76234 817.368.8885 • ehuston1972@gmail.com

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PERFORMANCE REPORT

UNSPOKEN HEROS:

Region III President, Eric Huston

A

By RILEE PARKER

– Performance Reporter

s our rodeo school season nears its end, it is time to appreciate our staff and board members as the unspoken heroes behind all rodeos throughout the year. From organizing our points, to the awards we receive at the end of the year, our board members are consistently helping us to achieve our goals through Texas High School rodeo, more specifically, Region III. One of the significant figures behind all of the events and activities, is our Region III President, Eric Huston. Huston became involved in Region III through his two sons Clayton Huston, who competes as a sophomore, doing Tie-down-roping as well as Team Roping; and Dalton Huston, who currently competes as an 8th grader, doing Goat tying, Tie-down-roping, Breakaway, and Team Roping. Huston became a board member of our Region III association four years ago, and became president two years ago. Being the President, Huston is an integral part of the way our region is run, with productivity and consistency. “We

have a great facility, and great stock, in Graham, the staff never fails to be extremely dynamic in keeping our organization running smoothly,” Huston says. Huston gives credit to stock contractor Marty Kokalhand saying, “Our stock that we have is great, he does an awesome job at putting stock together that is age-appropriate for these kids, we have to give kudos to him for that.” Along with the importance of our stock staff inside the arena, it is important to acknowledge the board members as well. “We have nine board members, an awesome group of people, who are all about the kids, everyone wants the best and to support all of the competitors in any way.” Huston explains. Growing up, Huston competed in North Texas High School Rodeo, competing in Bareback riding and Team roping, and his favorite events to watch being “Calf-roping and Team-roping, that’s what the boys do, and I like to watch good barrel horses as well.” Huston’s favorite rodeo memories come along with being a rodeo parent, “Having the blessing of watching the boys win the all around, and watching all of the hard-work pay off, through all the challenges that have been endured.” Through these challenges of keeping up with the lifestyle that is competitive rodeo, Huston reminds parents and kids of the importance of being “all-in” and “enjoying the ride”. “Cherishing these memories is so important, kids grow up so fast, and you blink an eye and it's over,” Huston says. “These memories, even the ones in the horse trailer or the practice pen, of the fam-


ily being together, are irreplaceable.” Huston explains, “It’s all about family.” In the end, Huston explains how these practices they spend together are some of the most significant moments in life as a parent, saying “At the end of the day teaching, and practicing with them are one of the most important things a parent can do, along with getting them to know Christ.” Concerning Region III itself, it is only growing, “In competitors and excitement every rodeo. Proving itself to be one of the most successful, competitive regions in Texas.” Huston says, “At the NFR this year, I counted 12 members that were from Region III, reflecting back on the competitors that are built within our association.” Through these dedicated members who put their very best into our organization is the only way we have continued to achieve greatness every year, best of luck this qualifying season competitors! Board members and staff thank you for all that you do!

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STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - BRYLEE BRADEN VICE PRESIDENT - MAKENZIE MAYES SECRETARY - DIXIE TABB STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS MICHAEL AKINS 2449 West Line Road • Whitesboro, TX 76273 makins1@yahoo.com • 904.368.9390

DR. TANDY FREEMAN

DAVID SCHRECK 209 Sarah Way • Murphy, TX 75094 214.403.5606 • dschreck@intelemedia.com SECRETARY - TINA BRADEN PO Box 549 • Horatio, AR 71842 870.832.3149 • tbbraden@earthlink.net

Region IV

BARRY BRADEN PO Box 549 • Horatio, AR 71842 870.584.2308 • tbbraden@earthlink.net MICHAEL AKINS 2449 West Line Road • Whitesboro, TX 76273 makins1@yahoo.com • 904.368.9390

24

PERFORMANCE REPORT GETTING TO KNOW

Region IV Secretary, Mrs. Tina Braden from Texas A&M Texarkana. Mrs. Braden and her husband, Barry Braden, have three kids and rodeo is a family lifestyle. Mr. and Mrs Braden rodeoed in college and each of their kids still compete. As if a full time job, three kids, being rodeo secretary doesn’t keep her busy enough she runs a t-shirt business and does gorgeous beadwork on the side. Mrs. Braden’s favorite thing about highschool rodeo is that she gets to meet new people and see all of her kids compete . She would like to tell our members and their families, “to be more involved with our region and help By Lilly Eakes – Performance Reporter et’s get to know our region 4 out at the state level. Do what you can because it takes dedication, people, secretary! Mrs. Tina Braden and lots of time to make the events work.” We are very fortunate to have has been with us for thirteen Mrs. Braden as our secretary! On region weekends you can find her in the years, 5 of those being our secre- office from sun up, to well after sun down. She makes sure each contestant tary. She has been with Region IV is taken care of, and works diligently with our state office to make sure that since her oldest son was a freshman Region IV is run smoothly. in highschool. Mrs. Braden lives in Horatio, Arkansas and teach- STUDENT OFFICER SPOTLIGHT: Dixie Tabb, our high school stues Algebra 2 at DeQueen High school. She earned her bachelors dent Secretary, has been a member of degree from Southern Arkansas Region IV for four years. Her favorUniversity and Masters degree ite memory from THSRA is State 2020, when she won the title of Miss TJHRA princess, and Reserve Average champion. This allowed her to make it to Nationals with Clayton Jones in the ribbon roping. Dixie Competes in Poles and Barrels at region IV. A horse that took Dixie to the next level is Chex. Chex was Dixie's step up horse. “She showed me how to really hustle, and what it was like to win.” Dixie believes THE BRADEN FAMILY

L


that she wouldn't be the rider or person she is today if it wasn't for chex. Brylee Braden, our high school student President, has been a member of Region IV for five years. Brylee competes in barrels, poles, and breakaway. When she graduates she wants to go to Weatherford College to get a degree, and then get her Real Estate license. Brylee’s calf horse “Paint”, is who brought her to another level in rodeo. Brylee even said that “ He is the reason I compete at the level I do today” Makenzie Mayes, our high school student Vice President has been a member ofRegion IV for six years. One of her favorite memories is when her school basketball coach, and friends would come to watch and cheer her on. Mackenzie's favorite non rodeo memory is “being a part of the Lady Raiders Varsity basketball team, and making 3A State Playoffs at the Alamo Dome as a sophBRYLEE BRADEN omore!” “Flamenflit” photo by Jennings

MAKENZIE MAYES photo by Jennings

or “Margret,” is a 13 year old mare that Makenzie’s grandma, Nancy Mayes raised and trained. “Margaret has taught me dedication, hard work, and has forced me to be a better rider.”

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PRESIDENT - ABI DePRIEST VICE PRESIDENT - RILEY JAY OTWELL SECRETARY - PEYTON MATHIS

STUDENT OFFICERS

JOE GLENN KAHLA 612 FM 1747 • Jasper, Texas 75951 409.384.0921 • jgk@mklawyers.com

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS

BILL WHITE 277 Billy White Rd • Singer, LA 70660 337.304.0748 • whiteacres55@yahoo.com

Region V

SECRETARY - SUSAN BALDWIN 722 Southview Circle • Center, Texas 75935 936.590.4330 • regionvsecretary@gmail.com

JUSTIN KLEIN PO Box 2107 • Center, TX 75935 936.590.0229 • sendtojustin@yahoo.com

PRESIDENT- KIRK MATHIS 777 Freeman Cemetery Rd • Lufkin, TX75904

26

PERFORMANCE REPORT

By SIERRA SCHUENEMAN – Performance Reporter

S

ince October I have listened to Matthew McConaughey’s selfnarrated memoir, Greenlights, more than ten times. In fact, the book has become the soundtrack to my road trips. Initially, I listened for the narration, because who doesn’t want to feel like Matthew is speaking directly to them? However, as time progressed, I became infatuated with the content he synthesized from the journals of his life. Each time I listen, I find myself hearing something new for the first time. So, what do rodeo kids and a successful actor have in common? More than you would ever assume. “When we mentally give a person, place, or point in time more credit than ourselves, we create a fictitious ceiling. A restriction over the expectations that we have over our own performance in that moment. We get tense. We focus on the outcome instead of the activity and we miss the doing of the deed. We either think the world depends on the result or it's too good to be true. But it doesn't and it isn't. And it's not our right to believe it does or is.

Don't create imaginary constraints. A leading role, a blue ribbon, a winning score, a great idea, the love of our life, euphoric bliss... Who are we to think we don't deserve these fortunes when they're in our grasp? Who are we to think we haven't earned them? If we stay and process within ourselves, in the joy of the doing, we will never choke at the finish line. Why? Because we're not thinking of the finish line. We're not looking at the clock. We’re not watching ourselves on the Jumbotron performing. We are performing in real time where the approach is the destination.” MM As rodeo contestants, we perceive success to be measured as the tangible trinkets we tote home. We set ambitious goals at the beginning of the season and see the end result either materialize or distance itself at each nod of the head or run down the alley. Focusing our intentions on the end result makes achieving goals that much more difficult. We are no longer willing to take risks. If you find yourself winning the region now, I guarantee your mindset at the next rodeos will be, “what I have done thus far has worked, why change now?” Your success is relative to your own mentality. If you do not see the opportunity for growth, you will not break the “glass ceiling” and reach your fullest potential. Unlike other athletes, we have two opponents: the clock and fellow contestants. One can take the fun out of competition and the other can inspire us to better ourselves; if you cannot distinguish which, reevaluate your circumstance.

“Sometimes you gotta go back to go forward.” MM


STUDENT OFFICERS

STATE DIRECTORS MATT CRAINER PO Box 32 • Carrizo Springs, TX 78834 830.876.6141 • mattcrainer@yahoo.com

PRESIDENT - MEKENNA DAVIS VICE PRESIDENT - BAYLEE BURLESON SECRETARY - BRADI FREEMEAN

GARY MOBBS 9076 FM 443 • Shiner, TX 77984 830.857.1418 • gary.mobbs@southstatebank.com SECRETARY - ANNE DOLLERY P.O. BOX 1818 • Gonzales, TX 78629 979.412.2551 • texasjuniorhighrodeo@gmail.com

Region VI

JUSTINE HUNT 2433 Witte Rd • Bellville, TX 77418 979.525.7098 • rodeohuntboys@gmail.com PRESIDENT - DAVID FREEMAN 1039 Mockingbird Lane • Eagle Lake, TX 77434 832.221.1253 • chlfreeman@yahoo.com

PERFORMANCE REPORT

The Best of the Best By BRADI FREEMAN

A

– Performance Reporter

s we get ready to wrap up another successful season over at Region IV, we want to take the time to appreciate all the awesome people who made it possible. Everyone was forced to quickly adjust to the new ways of the world, and many thought this season wouldn't even be possible. There were many difficult decisions to be made throughout the year, but despite it all, our leaders put in the time and effort to make sure we would get to rodeo. I can confidently say, when it comes to rodeo secretaries, we have the best of the best. The one and only, Mrs. Anne Dollery! She’s the one who makes it all happen. Mrs. Anne and her husband Steve have helped manage numerous regions over the years, including regions 7, 8, 9, and 6! Mrs. Dollery was first introduced to THSRA when her sons, Kody and Shawn, first started to compete. Dollery has been involved with high school rodeo for 19 years! She did not participate in rodeo growing up, instead, she spent her time showing heifers and steers, but she managed

to marry into the rodeo world. While being a rodeo secretary for 18 years, Mrs. Anne says the biggest challenge she's been faced with thus far, is Covid. She hopes to see this organization grow in the next 5 years, and she’s grateful that through all the craziness, getting to rodeo on the weekends brought a sense of normalcy. When asked the question, “What advice would you give to parents and THSRA members about how to best enjoy their hs rodeo experience”, she answered, “To do it! I would not trade the years I had with my boys while in high school rodeo. Yes, I will be the first to say that it is a very expensive hobby, but in the long run it was the best years of my life to have my boys with us every weekend when they were in school.” Mrs. Dollery’s favorite thing about high school rodeo is that it teaches the contestants about making that next step into the rodeo world. She says she loves how the rodeo families bond, and that she's met some of the best people who always step up when you need them. The other person behind the scenes is one that I know pretty well! Our Region VI president, and my dad, David Freeman. He’s held a leadership position in the region for around 8 years. He was first introduced to high school rodeo when his oldest daughter, Brinlee Freeman, first started to compete. From being a region president, and a dad of 4 girls; he’s also a detective in Rosenberg, TX. His oldest daughter is a freshman in college and a member of the Texas A&M rodeo team! His second oldest daughter, Bradi (me), is currently a sophomore competing in high school rodeo, and his third born, Breelyn, is in 7th grade competing in junior high rodeo. And lastly, his youngest daughter, Bristol, currently in 4th grade, is really looking forward to getting to compete in this association in a couple of years! David is never afraid to step up to make sure everyone has help with whatever event is going on. You’ll always catch him working the chute, sorting calves, or helping in the alley. Mr. Freeman did not participate in high school rodeo growing up, but he did spend some time riding horses while working cattle. He loves seeing his girls ride and he enjoys supporting them in whatever they're doing, whether it’s rodeo, sports, or academics. David has done so much to benefit our region throughout the years. Although being the president comes with a lot of responsibility, he handles it well and always seems to know what he's doing. Everyone in our region is super grateful to have these amazing leaders. They never fail to keep things running smoothly, even as life throws crazy obstacles at them. We are also very blessed to have great volunteers who always step up to help keep things going. From the people who set the barrels and poles, the guys that sort the calves in the back, and the people who help announce at every rodeo, it's always a team effort and just by doing these little things, they make it possible for us to get to do what we love!

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PRESIDENT - KERA LAMB VICE PRESIDENT - CARLI RAWLINSON SECRETARY - PAISLEY PIERCE

STUDENT OFFICERS

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS CRAIG MILLER 11603 Anders Lane • Santa Fe, NM 77510 409.682.5427 • craigwmiller80@yahoo.com

DAN SIMPTON 24543 SH 6 • Navasota, Texas 77868 936.870.5779 • dansimpton@yahoo.com

Region VII

SECRETARY - NENA BOETTCHER PO Box 833 • East Bernard, Texas 77435 281.468.8973 • region7thsra@gmail.com

SCOTT SHOOK 5750 FM 360 • Needville, Texas 77461 713.851.9553 • scotctshook@yahoo.com PRESIDENT- CRAIG MILLER 11603 Anders Lane • Santa Fe 77510 409-682-5427 • craigwmiller80@yahoo.com

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PERFORMANCE REPORT

Th e N ext Chapte r

T

By JAYCI LEE BYLER

– Performance Reporter

he 2020/21 School year for Texas High School Rodeo Contestants is drawing to an end. The next three months the senior class will be sorting through what they want to do with their life after high school and where they want the next chapter of life to lead them. These decisions are for some, scary, confusing and for some easy. All in all they are setting a whole new turn of events in motion. One decision may be picking which college to attend. Another decision that may be weighing heavy on their mind is about rodeoing while attending college. In Texas we have a huge variety of colleges to choose from. If you are looking for that small campus to make the transition from high school to college there is several junior colleges to pick from. For the student who is looking for a college offering a certain career choice there are several universities with masters programs for that career minded Cowboy or Cowgirl. Both choices offer outstanding rodeo programs to help the THSRA contestants bloom into professional level athletes or help them financially pay for college. The SouthWest Region which consist of seventeen rodeo teams. 5 being uni-

versities and 12 being junior colleges. The current top three men’s and women’s team in the SouthWest Region standings: Top three men’s team 1.Clarendon College 2.Sul Ross State University 3.Tarleton State University. Top three women’s team 1.South Plains College 2. Weatherford College 3.Texas Tech University-Lubbock This region map has rodeos from Alpine, Texas, Portales, NM to Gainesville, TX. The longest haul in this region is 524 miles apart. Making that an seven to eight hour haul. The Southern Region currently consists of 11 rodeo teams, 5 universities and 6 junior colleges. The current top three men’s and women’s teams are Top three Men’s team 1.Panola College 2.Hill College 3.Sam Houston State University Top three Women’s team 1.McNeese State University 2.Sam Houston State University 3.Texas A&M University - Commerce This region map has rodeos from Uvalde, TX , Mount Pleasant, TX to Lake Charles, LA making the longest haul 473 miles apart in this region. This region you may be traveling five to seven hours to a college rodeo. When I asked past Texas Champion AA Cowgirl Paige Dawson; What did Texas


High School rodeo do for you? She replied very quickly “Being apart of Texas High School Rodeo was the best decision I ever made. It helped me develop the skills I needed to go into college! It helped me learn to juggle school and rodeo, to strive to keep good grades while rodeoing.” Did THSRA help prepare you for life away from home? “It gave me all the skills to be able to go out on my own and succeed and handle everything that was thrown at me! Not to mention the tough competition in THSRA really helped prepare me for the tough competition in college rodeo!” Paige attended Ulvalde in the Southern Region for two years after high school and is now in the South West Region attending Tarleton State University in Stephenville, Texas for a Bachelors of Agribusiness. The choices of Texas colleges can take you across this vast State. There are new adventures to have and friends to meet. One thing these schools all have in common is Texas pride. So whether you’re going to be giving everybody a big “GigEm” or “Guns Up” the path that helped you get there was through THSRA. “For we are God‘s handiwork, created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do.” Ephesians 2:10

GO TO PAGE 7 TO COMPARE STANDINGS OF THE SOUTHERN AND SOUTHWESTERN COLLEGE RODEO REGIONS!

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PO Box 787 • Asherton, TX 78837 830-999-3344 • tom@catarosaranch.com

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS TOM AASBO

STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - KATE MCNEIL VICE PRESIDENT - RYLEE DODSON SECRETARY - SYDNEY BLAIR

JASON UNDERBRINK 520 Phillips Rd • Pleasanton, Texas 78064 210.854.7718 • jasonunderbrink@yahoo.com 3005 Santa Ana St. • Corpus Christi, Texas 78415 361.739.9858 • region8thsra@gmail.com

Region VIII

SECRETARY - CELINA FETTY

KIM NICHOLSON 8434 N. US Hwy 183 • Goliad, Texas 77963 830.570.7302 • kim_nicholson@att.net PO Box 787 • Asherton, TX 78837 830-999-3344 • tom@catarosaranch.com

PRESIDENT- TOM AASBO

30

PERFORMANCE REPORT

HERE’S TO 12 NEW CHAPTERS

so proud of each you and will miss you. Most of our Seniors have already planned the next step in their future. Some of our seniors will be on college rodeo teams and others will focus on just their studies. I wish you all good luck and never stop reaching for your goals!

2021 GRADUATING SENIORS

S

By BAILEY GUBERT – Performance Reporter

pring is Here: 2020 will definitely be a year to remember. Our lives, as we know it are forever changed in many ways. As the youth, we have learned to be a little more gracious and humble when it comes to others. As a society, we have learned to social distance and have our extracurricular activities taken away from us. Luckily for rodeo, committees have strived to keep the youth events on going. It was so amazing for Texas to host the NFR this year!! Have you planned your 2021 year? Have you started making a calendar of all of your events and places you want to go? The calendar in my family, is the Bible. As a Senior this year, I didn’t want to have any regrets and wanted to attend all the youth events possible. We are only this age once and we get to compete in a youth age group, where the payout is great. Don’t miss it! SPONSOR SPOTLIGHT: This year, region 8 has 28 graduating seniors! Each one of these individuals are unique in their own way and have many talents. Our region is

• Rymond Haby • Kadi Fretwell • Tyler Bauerle • Kylie Mask • Joel Cavazos • Kelan Bode • Pablo DeLaGarza • Rylee Dodson • Victoria Brewer • Jacquelyn Graff • Victoria Vela • Isabelle Picklo • Fallon Bridges • Chance Little • Madison Brown • Cameran Cantu • Dannie Davison • Bailey Gubert • Garrett Koch • Camry Mangum • Chase Montague • Christina Moore • Kennidy Nicholson • Brooke Peterson • Katherine Stokes • Taryl Topperwein • Valentin Trujillo • McKenna Tschirhart ROLE MODEL: What do you think makes a good role model? The biggest money earner in the PRCA/WPRA? Examples: Who rides the best looking horse? The best looking competitor? There are many factors that make a good role model……The example of this prestigious person should take a lot of thought and raise the bar for you as a competitor. My thoughts are; does this person have a great work ethic? Do they possess greatness, honesty and integrity? Are they a gracious winner and a gracious loser? Make sure your role model makes you want to be better and rise up to the competition. You are only as good as your competition! “My hope and prayer is that everyone know and love our country for what she really is and what she stands for.” ― John Wayne


Farm & Ranch Family The folks at McCoy’s Building Supply understand that it takes a lot of hard work and the whole family pitching in to get things done on a farm or ranch. That’s why we’d like to take some time out to salute Texas High School Rodeo Association families who are farmers and ranchers. In our monthly Farm & Ranch Family Spotlight, we’ll feature one family, sharing their story of how they work together as a family to make their farm or ranch successful.The spotlight will run for 10 months; each month will feature a different Region. Each Regional McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family will receive a $100 McCoy’s Gift Card. The McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family of the Year will receive a $500 McCoy’s Gift Card and will be announced at the 2021 THSRA State Finals.

The Ohrt Family of Region VI C

by Jacqueline Knox

ongratulations to this month’s McCoys Farm and Ranch Family, the Ohrts! Clay and Wendy have two children, Kyler (15) and Natalie (13). The entire family works together to make their three businesses—Ohrt Farms, CW Cattle Company and Ohrt Cattle Company—such a success! Their ranch spreads out over thousands of acres with their home base located in Victoria, Texas (Region 6). Ohrt cattle has been in business for roughly ten years and is comprised of Clay, his brother and mother. CW Cattle is Clay and Wendy’s cattle company that they started together about three years ago. Both cattle companies are cow calf operations. Clay shared that they have around 1,040 cattle and 20 horses on the ranch. Clay has been farming for over 18 years, but Ohrt Farms was formed just three years ago. For the farming operation, they farm roughly 4,000 acres of corn and cotton. They have also planted some sorghum in the past. Every day, the cattle and horses have to be fed, watered and checked on. The farming work varies based on the season. Right now, they are starting to plant and then they will care for the crops before they are ready to be harvested. Wendy joked that it is always

“early rise, late nights” around the Ohrt ranch. Working on the ranch is a family affair for the Ohrts, as everyone pitches in where they can. While Wendy works an outside job a generation and transmission company, she helps out around the ranch whenever she can. Clay, Kyler and Natalie all work together on a daily basis, whether that’s feeding or helping with the crops. “This creates a really unique bond between them,” Wendy said. Kyler and Natalie are mainly in charge of taking care of the animals, which usually includes mixing the feed and feeding the horses and cattle. While talking to Wendy, Kyler was driving the tractor and doing some planting work. “Natalie is a go-getter,” Wendy said. “She makes sure everything gets fed. She keeps her brother and her dad in line with everything that needs to get done.” Wendy and Clay both grew up in the ranching lifestyle and knew it was something that they wanted their children to experience. When they got married, both Clay and Wendy had outside jobs. However, their ranching grew so much that they could no longer both have an outside job and maintain the ranching operation. So, Clay chose to quit his job and start the cattle and farming business full-time. Ranching has taught Wendy and Clay that it takes a team to make something successful. They have also learned that when it comes to doing the ranch chores, it is more fun to do something together than alone. They hope that ranching has taught their children that nothing comes easy and that it takes hard work to be successful. “I want them to know that the family is the backbone and is what makes us who we are today, but the most important thing to remember is to always have God in their life,” Wendy said. When they aren’t on the ranch, the family’s favorite thing to do is go to rodeos. Currently, Kyler is a member of THSRA, and Natalie is a member of TJHRA. While Kyler competes in both tie down and team roping, Natalie competes in poles, barrels, breakaway, goats and ribbon roping. They love the community that surrounds the rodeo world and how rewarding the relationships are that they have made through rodeo. They also love getting to watch their kids compete. “At the end of the day, when you see kids go out there and they are successful and they enjoy what they are doing, it makes it all worthwhile,” Wendy said. Luckily, the Ohrt family has a McCoys close to them and they shop there often. They can find all sorts of ranching supplies there, like water troughs, lumber and even parts to fix their wells after the recent winter storm. The Ohrts are honored to be named this month’s McCoys Farm and Ranch Family! Additionally, “we are so thankful for a company like McCoys that supports our youth because our youth is our future,” Wendy said.

31


PRESIDENT - RILEY JO CHEATHAM VICE PRESIDENT - BOYD HANAGRIFF SECRETARY - CHASE MCBEE

Detours

STUDENT OFFICERS

149 Willow Creek • Huntsville, Texas 77340 832.928.1647 • braddyer@live.com

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS BRAD DYER

240 Pool Road • Richards, TX 77873 936.661.8988 • announcer.mcmahon@gmail.com

DAVE MCMAHON

SECRETARY - LACEY AUBIHL 1326 PR 5011 • Ledbetter, Texas 78946

Region IX

979.251.4131 • laceyaubihl@thsra9.com

198 Pool Road • Richards, Texas 77873 936.661.4163 • rhanagriff@gmail.com

ROGER HANAGRIFF

198 Pool Road • Richards, Texas 77873 936.661.4163 • rhanagriff@gmail.com

PRESIDENT- ROGER HANAGRIFF

32

PERFORMANCE REPORT

M

By MONTANA BROWN

– Performance Reporter

ost regions are at least halfway done with their season and most competitors are getting mentally prepared for state. Region IX is winding down with only four rodeos to go, unfortunately this crazy winter weather led to a lastminute cancellation and reschedule. The last four rodeos for region IX are remarkably busy, with a rodeo prom and awards banquet, the officers and board are working hard to ensure that the contestants are good to go. The last-minute cancellation was a very hard decision for the board, originality region IX had planned to see the rodeo through. The board decided with the awful Ft. Worth car pileup and the winter storm advisory that the contestant’s safety was the most important thing on the table. Luckily, the board was able to reschedule the rodeo in April to give the members a fair go. Just like contestant safety, horse safety is important too. With the Jr. American just around the corner, it is important to keep your horse in tip top competitive shape. There are a few things you can do to keep your

horse happy and healthy. The most important is to make sure your horse is a comfortable temperature in the trailer. Depending on the weather outside will decide if your windows need to be up or down, and if the top vents need to be opened or closed. If you are traveling a longer journey, you need to let your MACY AKINS horse stretch their legs every 6 hours. Over twenty Region IX members have qualified for the Jr. American in several events. Right now is the time to be in junior rodeo, there is such a platform for the kids to show their talents. Just ten years ago, there were only a handful of youth rodeos kids could participate in, now you can find 5-10 every RHODY NILES weekend. Region IX is very proud of all of their qualifying members and wishes them the best in all their endeavors. I will leave you with this, for some of you this year has not gone as planned, but just like spring, showers bring flowers. What you are going through right now simply cannot compare to what you are about to accomplish. Stay strong, be bold, and laugh often. I am sure what we are suffering now cannot compare to the glory that will be shown to us -Romans 8:18


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STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - SAIGE SEALY VICE PRESIDENT - MAKENZIE DOWELL SECRETARY - CHAINEY WEITZ BRANDON JONES 194 CR 427 • Lorena, Texas 76655 254.833.0251 • crystal_jones1991@yahoo.com

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS

RENEE WEITZ PO Box 40 • London, Texas 76854 512.332.6731 • weitzrr@gmail.com

SECRETARY - STEPHANIE SHOEMAKER 6500 CR 1202 • Cleburne, Texas 76031

817.648.2728 • texasregion10@gmail.com

SHELLEY TOWNSEND 900 Quarter Horse Dr. • Kingsland, TX 78639 830.798.7755 • sarrington36@yahoo.com PRESIDENT - JERRY WRIGHT 434 CR 315 • Oglesby, Texas 76561 254.290.4965 • jerrywrighthomes@hughes.net

PERFORMANCE REPORT

THE RIGHT DIRECTION

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By KATY

WEBB – Performance Reporter

s the last few rodeos for the 2020-2021 season are coming quickly so is spring time! After all of the recent cold weather that has brought a lot of power outages, record setting cold temperatures and heavy snow and ice I think that I can speak for everyone when I say we will be happy to have some warmer weather. With only a few more

rodeos left before state the A Game will be brought. The Region X scholarship was postponed to

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February 26th; I hope all of the seniors try to apply for this amazing scholarship. A few days ago I heard a sermon that the preacher of the Carthage Cowboy Church spoke about. He related how getting ready for the winter storms was the same as how we need to prepare and be ready for the return of Christ. Mathew 24: 44 says that “ therefore you also must be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an hour you do not expect.” The bible tells us that Jesus is coming when we least expect it and we have to be prepared. Just like we prepare and get ready for the cold weather we need to start living by God’s word and preparing for when the return of Jesus happens. With all the many signs that are occurring with our country and its unpredictable future, we should pray that God leads us in the right direction. We all need to try to encourage each other to be the best we can be not only in the arena, but in everyday life. It’s up to us to make the best of not only this year but each and every day. Good luck to all Region X contestants along with all other THSRA contestants as we wrap up the 2020-2021 rodeo season!


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ELIZABETH BARTA OF REGION IV by Jacqueline Knox

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The Whataburger Whatakid is selected due to their ability to excel both in and out of the rodeo arena. Whataburger is proud to recognize a THSRA member from each of the ten Regions who truly upholds the title “Whatakid!” One of the nominees will be chosen at the State Final Rodeo in June as the Whatakid of the Year. In recognition of this accomplishment they will receive free Whataburgers for an entire year!

ongratulations to the Whatakid of the month, Elizabeth Barta! This eighteen-year-old senior from Fort Worth, Texas is a beast in competitions. In the arena, she competes in barrel racing and pole bending. Of the two, she likes competing in barrels more. Elizabeth rides two horses, Dobie and Cupid. Dobie, a 22-year-old quarter horse, is her barrel horse and one of the biggest reasons she is still riding today. She recalled how Dobie once jumped out of his stall while she was cleaning it and she had to chase him all the way across the building. Elizabeth rides poles on Cupid, a 16-year-old quarter horse. She loves how both of her horses have their own big personality, and that she can have fun with them. Elizabeth got involved in rodeo because of her cousin, Jared Barta. “I grew up around that side of my family a lot and was always around horses. I thought that I might as well just do it too,” Elizabeth said. So, she started practicing and competed in her first rodeo when she was in eighth grade. At that time, she had no idea how much she would grow to love rodeo. “It is one of those things that you start just for fun,” Elizabeth said. “But then it just gets to the point where you are so competitive and want to be the best. I didn’t expect to get as far I have.” In addition to THSRA, Elizabeth also competes with the Barrel Racing Association of Texas (BRAT). Elizabeth said that her favorite rodeo is always the state finals. She has qualified for state three times in pole-bending. This year, she is currently sitting second for barrels with only two rodeos left and is hungry to compete again at the state finals. Elizabeth also mentioned that her greatest achievement is placing in the top 20 average for poles her freshman year of high school.

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Elizabeth is so thankful to THSRA for bringing her some of her best friends. “We have all grown so close,” Elizabeth said. “Most times when I go to region rodeos, I don’t stay in my own trailer. I stay with the girls I have met and known the last four or five years. That’s as much family as we could be.” She also talked about how willing everyone is to help out those that they are competing against. “I had half of my tack break on me during my pole run at the last rodeo, and I had countless people offer me whatever I needed to make safe runs,” Elizabeth said. In addition to rodeo, Elizabeth takes her academic very seriously. She is in the top 10% of her class and has consistently been on honor roll throughout high school. Elizabeth is also a threetime student of the year for her high school. At school, her agriculture classes are always her favorite. Currently, she is taking practicum in agriculture, which is how she has an internship at an equine vet clinic in Grandview, Texas. Additionally, Elizabeth is a member of National Honor Society, FFA, and A.V.I.D. (advancement via individual determination) club at her high school, Mansfield Legacy High School. She also does some community service through her school. During her free time, Elizabeth loves to play around with photography and take photos. Because of her schedule, Elizabeth chose to go virtual with her high school this year. She usually starts her day by doing her online classes, both the ones through her high school and the ones through her local community college. After that, she will either work horses or go to work at the equine vet clinic. Then she works on her homework to finish out the day. When asked what her motto on life is, Elizabeth said it is “do no harm but take no bull.” She saw this on social media her freshman year of high school and knew that’s what she wanted her life motto to be. “I am very outgoing and will stand up for myself without a doubt, but I also have gone through things that make me turn into a little more of a timid person where I won’t stand up for myself,” Elizabeth said. “So, it is a wakeup call to me to remember that I can protect myself and stand up for myself.” Elizabeth really looks up to her mom, Rachelle Barta. When Elizabeth was two years old, Rachelle beat stage three pancreatic cancer. “Stage three has about a 5% chance of living,” Elizabeth said. “And she did it with a toddler none the less.” Rachelle is now going on her 17th year cancer free! Elizabeth talked about how her mom is always there for her. “We are really close,” Elizabeth said. “My mom is the thing that has kept me going over the years.” Elizabeth recognizes the sacrifices that come along with having horses. “I have sacrificed a lot of my time and energy from a social standpoint,” Elizabeth said. “I don’t get to spend the night with my friends or hangout during the weekend as much as others do. But horses is what I chose and what I love to do.” In the future, Elizabeth plans to attend Tarleton State University and major in animal science. She hopes to get her vetineray tech and equine reproduction certification, so she can work as a vet tech for a breeding center. “I want to help further the sport of rodeo and give back to the horses and the community that made me the person that I am,” Elizabeth said. Elizabeth is honored to be this month’s Whatakid!


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SPRING FASH ION N Nothing like a major Texas snowstorm to get us counting down the days until Spring and Summer have officially arrived! With everyone trading in their warm clothes for fashion made for the sun, we rounded up the hottest trends of 2021 with a little help from some of the brands we love the most.

Lone Star Love 10X Straw hat from Charlie 1 Horse in 3 ½” downturn Brim with a yellow velvet ribbon and antique Star pin. $65 | Charlie1Horsehats.com Men’s Wrangler® Contrast Trim Western Two Snap Flap Pocket Shirt in Blue $49 | wrangler.com

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Hooey Recess Backpack 25 Liters, Fits Most 15” Laptops, Patented Hat Strap, Rain Cover, Side Pockets, Organizer Pockets $34.99 | getyourhooey.com

Here is a quick list of what to look for: • Sorbet inspired pastel tones • Head scarves for the ladies • Yellow and bright blue will be your accent pops of color this year from handbags, hats and shoes • Bring on the fringe and put it on our bags this Summer • Bubble gum colored shirts • Draped jewelry means lots of layering • Bridgerton inspired florals • Eyelet blouses • White boots • 80s are coming in hot with bubble sleeves making a comeback • Athleisure wear continued on pg 42


Shop Bailee’s look online! photo by: madi wagner photography

We offer wedding and baby registries! Find this cute couple’s in store and online!


Hooey Lunchbox Soft construction to compact, Insulated & wipeable interior, Internal mesh pocket, Adjustable shoulder strap $19.99 | getyourhooey.com

Bracelets outlawspirit.com THSRA Logo Cap $20 | chgraphics.com

Moab Crew Loose Fit, cropped dolman long sleeve knit sweater with drawstring hem. $72 | Kimesranch.com

Hy O Silver Buckle hyosilver.com

Everly Boots buckfergesonoriginals.com

Leather Backpack outlawspirit.com Boots from Bottom to Top: Dan Post, Idyllwind, Dingo, Idyllwind bootbarn.com

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Cowboy Cut® Work Western Chambray Long Sleeve Shirt $29-$32 | wrangler.com

Wrangler® 20X® 01 Competition Jean in River Wash $54-$56 | wrangler.com


Hy O Silver Cross hyosilver.com

Wrangler® Blanket Lined Denim Jacket in Faded Indigo $79 | wrangler.com Hooey Lunchbox Soft construction to compact, Insulated & wipeable interior, Internal mesh pocket, Adjustable shoulder strap $19.99 | getyourhooey.com

20X Dakota Ridge Straw hat 4 ¼” brim available in precreased or open crown styles. Features an all around 2 tone vent pattern and a drilex cloth sweatband. $140 | Resistol.com 20X Cedar Canyon Straw hat 4 ¼” brim available in precreased or open crown styles. Features an all around sawtooth vent pattern and a drilex cloth sweatband. $140 | Resistol.com

Azetec Hoodie Pullover hood with drawcords and pouch front pocket. Raw edge detailing with small horn embroidery at lower left chest. $82 | kimesranch.com

Farrah Driftwood Pants buckfergesonoriginals.com

continued on pg 44

SPRING FASH ION Ad Index American Hat Company 55 Buck Fergeson 41 Boot Barn 37 CH Graphics 25 Hooey 29,39,56 Hy O Silver 48 Kimes 47 Outlaw Spirit 44 Resistol 35 Wrangler 04

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Layton Hood Long sleeve, hooded pullover with unique dip-dye color blocking. Embroidered outlier at chest with leather patch and draw cord stops. $80 | Kimesranch.com

Shirt: Shyanne Vest: Understated Leather1 Pants: Show Me Your MuMu Boots: Idyllwind bootbarn.com Hooey OX Backpack 40 Liters, Fits Most 15” Laptops, Patented Hat Strap, Rain Cover, Side Pockets, Reflective Daisy Loops $64.99 | getyourhooey.com

Hard to Handle 10X Straw hat from Charlie 1 Horse in 3 ½” downturn Brim with a green velvet ribbon and antique Cactus pin. $65 | Charlie1Horsehats.com

Find Your Outlaw Spirit Custom Silver & L eather G oods

(972) 571-5269 | outlawspirittexas@outlook.com | OutlawSpirit.com

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JUNIOR HIGH

RODEO IS UNSTOPPABLE

By CASPER

T

RINGELSTEIN – TJHRA Region VIII

he Spring of 2020 really changed our lives. The rodeo world was buzzing, and we were just getting started. State finals and nationals were in our sights and we were focused. Unfortunately, the global pandemic had different plans for the rest of the world. COVID came through in full force and continues to haunt us still. Many have recovered but this nasty virus has broken our hearts and claimed the lives of many friends, family and loved ones. I try to be a “glass half full” kind of guy and I try to see that the pandemic has taught us a lot of valuable lessons. When the world went on lockdown, it was truly a

time of forced family fun. Many of us learned what was most enjoyable. And what was most important. We learned to slow down and take time to appreciate the little things. You see, sometimes the roadblocks make us stronger. They teach us to look outside the box and create new ways to accomplish the goals that we set out to achieve. While at home, where we were staying safe, we kept busy perfecting and sharpening our skills. We didn’t let a pandemic stop us, we kept going pushing along. We are unstoppable. Rodeos were rescheduled, reinvented and even cancelled yet it didn’t stop us. We accepted the fact our state finals looked very different than it ever had before. We accepted the fact that Junior High Nationals were cancelled. We just kept pushing on. Why? Because we won’t let a roadblock stop us – we adjust to the changing times. Look at the National Finals Rodeo (NFR). Did we ever think the most prestigious rodeo of all would be moved out of the bright lights of Las Vegas? Now, I know we all loved a little Texas NFR but there was just something missing without the bright lights and ringing of slot machines. The Junior World Finals and Vegas Tuffest Rodeos were held but not without lots of changes and rules that were necessary for the events to occur. What did we do? We adapted to the changing times because we kept our eye on the prize. We kept pushing along. We are unstoppable. We are grateful to the sponsors, the volunteers, the parents, the stock contractors and so many others for keeping going. They made changes and adaptations so that we could all chase our dreams and for that we are grateful. If there is one thing I have learned, the rodeo way of life is very different determined. We are resilient and we chase after our dreams no matter how big or how small. We chase after our dreams no matter what gets in our way. We are unstoppable. As we venture on through this new “normal” that we all face, we will adapt to the changes and the regulations because we have respect. We are thankful for the men and women have made sacrifices so that we can chase our dreams. We will keep pushing along. We don’t quit. We don’t give up. Why? Because we are unstoppable!

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STUDENT OFFICER SPOTLIGHT:

TJHRA VICE PRESIDENT

H

Kamryn Robison

i, my name is Kamryn Robison, I am 14 years old and I am Texas Junior High Rodeo Associations Vice President. I started competing in rodeo when I was 9 years old. In TJHRA region IX, I compete in breakaway, team roping, and ribbon roping. This year is my last year in Junior High and I have enjoyed all three years. This year I have really enjoyed being Vice president, even though we have not had the same experience because of Covid, I have met many people and have made a lot of friends. I have attended one board meeting and all the officers got to pick the saddle and buckle sponsor, which I thought was so cool, because I got to be behind the scenes. Even though this past year has been difficult, I have still had many fun memories with my rodeo family. I want to thank all the board members and sponsors for everything you have done for our rodeo team we all really appreciate it.

STUDENT OFFICER SPOTLIGHT:

TJHRA PRINCESS

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Dixie Tabb

ey y’all, it’s your 20-21 TJHRA Princess from Region IV, Dixie Tabb! This past year has definitely been one for the books. Being the TJHRA princess has been even better than I had imagined. I have had the opportunity to meet so many great people and traveled all over Texas and surrounding states representing the TJHRA. So far I have traveled to 7 of the 10 regions, meeting new people and catching up with old friends. Brice, Kamryn, Drew, and I all attended the Texas Junior High board meeting in Halletsville, Texas. There we picked out Buckle and saddle for TJHRA 2021 state Champions. In November, I attended the United Professional Rodeo Association finals in Sulphur Springs, Texas to cheer on the competitors. COVID-19 has definitely made this year different and more challenging than I think any of us could have imagined. However, one of the coolest things I have been able to do as Miss TJHRA is all thanks to COVID itself! I attend the 2020 National Finals Rodeo, Junior NFR, and 1st annual National Finals Breakaway competition in Fort Worth/Arlington, Texas. This was my first NFR trip making it that much more special. More recently, I traveled to Oklahoma City, Oklahoma to represent at the Miss Rodeo USA competition. I will be attending Region 8 and Region 6 in February and Region 5 in March. Thank

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you to all the Sponsors we would not be where we are today if it wasn't for y’all. I am so excited to see what these last few months of my reign of Miss Texas Junior High Princess has in store for me. I am wishing you all Good Luck for the remainder of your season!


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STUDENT OFFICER SPOTLIGHT:

TJHRA SECRETARY

Drew Ellen Stewart

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rew Ellen is a 7th grader at Normangee Middle School where she participates in basketball, volleyball and track. She is also a straight A honor roll student and a member of the principal’s leadership counsel. She was also been selected as a student of the month and Prestigious Panther in the past. She is a member of the Franklin Track Club where she has qualified for state 3 years and medaled several times including winning the gold medal in 10u girls High Jump in 2018. Drew is also a member of the Normangee 4H club where she participates in Photography and showing swine projects. She has won Grand Champion Swine 2 times and has been either Grand or Reserve Champion Junior Showman every year since she started showing pigs. Currently the Region 9 TJHRA Secretary and the TJHRA State Secretary HER HORSE LINEUP INCLUDES: Barrel horse “Nikki” KN Showmethemoney | Pole horse “Rosie” Peptos Pink Lemonade Goat Tying and Breakaway horse “Dewey “ Pocos Hickory Joe THE FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF HER MOST RECENT RODEO ACCOMPLISHMENTS: 2020 Vegas Tuffest World Champion 12u Barrels. 2020 National Quailfier TJHRA barrels 2020 All around rookie of the year Region 9 TJHRA 2020 Pole and Barrel Champion Region 9 TJHRA 2020 Qualifier Mike and Sherrylyn Johnson Vegas Tuffest in 12u barrels 19u barrels and 12u goat tying 2019 Qualifier Mike and Sherrylyn Johnson Vegas Tuffest in 12u goat tying 3X Junior world finals qualifier in Barrels (2018-2020) 2X Junior American Qualifier in Barrels (2020- 2021) 2021 Junior American qualifier 19u goat tying , 15U Goat Tying and 19U Poles 2020 and 2018 KKRFV champion junior division - Texarkana Qualifier 2019 KKRFV champion junior division - Marshall Qualifier Patriot Young Guns Reserve Champion 2020 2020 Reserve Champ Wrapn3 Extreme Youth Super Stakes

2020-2021 JUNIOR HIGH STATE DIRECTORS EXECUTIVE BOARD NATIONAL DIRECTOR CHRIS WOLFE

214-403-4638

cwwolfe630@gmail.com

PRESIDENT SCOTT SHOOK

281-437-8214

scottcshook@yahoo.com

1st VICE PRESIDENT JOE RICHARDS

806-676-5970

joe@diamondcattlefeeders.com

2nd VICE PRESIDENT SHANE HANCOCK

254-379-3516

shanehancock74@yahoo.com

DELEGATE 2 YEAR TERM DAVID FREEMAN

832-221-1253

chlfreeman@yahoo.com

DELEGATE 2 YEAR TERM LANCE GAILLARD

806-898-3748

lsgaillard@yahoo.com

DELEGATE 2 YEAR TERM ERIC HUSTON

817-368-0159

duaneoverton6113@gmail.com

DELEGATE 1 YEAR TERM BRAD DYER

832-928-1647

braddyer@live.com

DELEGATE 1 YEAR TERM JILL MURRAY 903-348-4356 murrayarena@hotmail.com SECRETARY ANNE DOLLERY 979-412-2551 texasjuniorhighrodeo@gmail.com

STATE DIRECTORS

Region I MONROE TIMBERLAKE KEVIN MCCREARY KYLE ANDERSON

monroetimberlake@gmail.com kevin@mccrearysales.com

806-344-6846 806-674-5601

Region II JUSTIN CLINTON 432-631-0300 KELLY WOOD 432-940-1136 CHAD CURRINGTON 806-786-9016 Region III JOHN ROBERTSON 817-475-6377 SHANE CRISWELL 325-347-2656 WESLEY WHITE Region IV JOHNNY YOUNG, JR PAIGE ALMON BRIAN LOGAN

903-249-1647 903-681-6592 903-348-1740

jlquarterh@gmail.com woodrodeogirls@yahoo.com ccurrington@sundowwnsb.com jrober5729@att.net kodyhorses@yahoo.com

jpyoung75486@gmail.com epaigealmon@yahoo.com

Region V RICHARD BALDWIN 936-332-5466 STACEY MARTIN 225-505-7645 SHANE PASCHAL 409-673-1676 Region VI CHARLES HENRY 979-221-4450 DENNY PATTERSON 832-330-3054 CLAY OHRT 361-571-1040

crossfireexpress@att.net pattersondenny@gmail.com ohrt6@hotmail.com

Region VII AMBER BASS LANDON EHLINGER DAN SIMPTON

landon@6Econstruction.com dansimpton@yahoo.com

979-255-2458 281-389-2784 936-870-5779

r.baldwin147@icloud.com nextlevelgoattying@gmail.com spaschal@paschalweld.com

amberbass@greatertexasfoundation.org

Region VIII BEN ELLIS 361-701-1886 ben_ellis78@yahoo.com JUSTIN SPEERS CASS RINGLESTEIN 210-885-0902 cass.oasis@yahoo.com Region IX POPPA CALHOUN 979-422-3105 calhounpoppa@yahoo.com RUSTY MCCARTHY 936-206-4051 rust@RDMContracting.com BO WILLIAMS 979-220-5898 dwilliams@midsouthenergy.com Region X SISSY PENNINGTON MATT SILAR 254-472-0133 matt.silar@patriotinsp.com ZAC THOMPSON STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT BRYCE EHLINGER V.PRES KAMRYN ROBISON SECRETARY DREW ELLEN STEWART PRINCESS DIXIE TABB

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PERFECT PRACTICE

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JACK KAHLA OF REGION V by Jacqueline Knox

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The Whataburger Whatakid is selected due to their ability to excel both in and out of the rodeo arena. Whataburger is proud to recognize a THSRA member from each of the ten Regions who truly upholds the title “Whatakid!” One of the nominees will be chosen at the State Final Rodeo in June as the Whatakid of the Year. In recognition of this accomplishment they will receive free Whataburgers for an entire year!

ongratulations to the Whatakid of the month, Jack Kahla! This 17-year-old senior from Jasper, Texas is a force to be reckoned with. He competes in calf roping and bulldogging. Of the two, he likes bulldogging a little bit more because it feels more natural to him. For calf roping, he rides a horse named Boosie. “He is a fantastic horse,” Jack said. “I couldn’t ask for a better horse.” For bulldogging, Jack recently got a team of horses named Polly and Ernie. He said that they are both phenomenal horses that make an incredible team and he loves that they take care of him as much as he takes care of them. Jack went on to add that his favorite thing about his bulldogging team is that they cannot go anywhere without each other. “If you take one away from the other, they can’t stand it,” Jack said. Jack said that he has been roping a dummy ever since he was four years old. “My dad rodeoed a lot when he was younger,” Jack said. “So did my grandpa and it just is a family deal. It is a sport that our family has loved for a long time” As he got older, he continued to rodeo and now he doesn’t ever want to get away from it. He is currently a member of THSRA. When asked why he loves rodeo, Jack said that it is just the way he was raised. “It is who I am,” Jack said. “Being a cowboy is the majority of my life and it was what I was raised to do, what I love to do and what I will continue to do. It’s that simple; I love it.” He loves that rodeo has taught him that no matter what

happens there is always another day, another performance and another rodeo to make up for what happened. “If you don’t do good, dust yourself off and go at it again because it is not that big of a deal,” Jack said. “Everyone fails and everyone succeeds at some point.” Jack said that his favorite rodeo was Shawnee 2018. He competed in both bulldogging and calf roping at the rodeo and said it was a phenomenal experience. “I had been in high school rodeo for two years already. So, I knew everyone, and everyone knew me. It was just a lot of friends and a lot of fun going on.” He added that in his opinion the main part of rodeo is enjoying yourself. Jack feels like that at this point in his rodeo career he hasn’t really accomplished anything that is “out of this world. It is what I feel like I am going to accomplish that excites me more than what I have already done.” In addition to rodeo, Jack takes his academics very seriously and is already taking college level classes. He said that his favorite subject is any type of science. “Rodeoing as much as we do, you don’t really have a whole lot of time for anything else, but I really enjoy hunting, especially duck hunting and bow fishing,” Jack said. He also works as a farrier and enjoys riding dirt bikes. On a normal day, Kahla starts his day early, waking up at around 5:45 a.m. He feeds all of the horses and checks on the ranch before heading to school at Jasper High School. Kahla is part of the work program so he gets out of school around 11:20 a.m. and then heads back to the ranch to exercise horses, shoe horses and do whatever else needs to be done at the ranch that day. When asked what his motto on life is, Jack said it is “just go at it.” He explained that this helps him calm himself down before a run. “Whatever competition you are at or wherever you are, if you are nervous you just got to take a second and relax. I think ‘I am me. I know what I am capable of.’ and then I just go out there a do the best I can.” Jack really looks up to his father, Joe Glenn Kahla, and would consider him his hero. “My dad has given me all of the tools that I need to be successful and he is a fantastic dad,” Kahla said. Jack recognizes that he has made a lot of sacrifices to perform how he has in the rodeo arena. “Everybody has to make sacrifices to do what they love to do,” Kahla said. “To me that’s going to bed early so I can wake up early to take care of my chores on the ranch, or not hanging out with friends to stay at the house to practice. It is all things that are going to make me better in the long run.” In the future Jack plans to attend college with the hopes of one day becoming a veterinarian and opening up his own equine facility. While he is not yet sure where he wants to attend college, he does know that he wants to continue competing in rodeos in college. Jack feels really honored to be named this month’s Whatakid!

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Farm & Ranch Family The folks at McCoy’s Building Supply understand that it takes a lot of hard work and the whole family pitching in to get things done on a farm or ranch. That’s why we’d like to take some time out to salute Texas High School Rodeo Association families who are farmers and ranchers. In our monthly Farm & Ranch Family Spotlight, we’ll feature one family, sharing their story of how they work together as a family to make their farm or ranch successful.The spotlight will run for 10 months; each month will feature a different Region. Each Regional McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family will receive a $100 McCoy’s Gift Card. The McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family of the Year will receive a $500 McCoy’s Gift Card and will be announced at the 2021 THSRA State Finals.

The Lankford Family of Region V C by Jacqueline Knox

ongratulations to this month’s McCoys Farm and Ranch Family, the Lankfords! While their eldest daughter Chasidy (26) no longer lives at home, Rocky and Ashlia work alongside their son Dawson (15) in order to make their family business, Lankford Farm and Cattle, a success. It is such a success that they have been in business for roughly 18 years! The ranch spreads over 225 acres in Rusk, Texas (Region Five). Additionally, they lease around 2500 acres. Originally starting with three cows, Rocky shared that they now have about 250 cattle on the ranch and bale around 1,800-2,000 bales of hay each year. They also do custom cow work, hay baling, and pasture mowing and spraying. Additionally, Rocky partners with Trey Hassell on an 800 head custom feed yard called L&H Feeders. The everyday work varies depending on the season. In the winter, they are mainly focused on mixing feed for the yearlings and making sure they get fed. In the springtime, they usually start spraying. The family has no hired help on the ranch, so everyone is vital part of the ranch operations. Even though Ashlia works a 9 to 5 job in town, she helps out where she can. “Pretty much every afternoon and every weekend, or anytime she has free she is helping out on the

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ranch,” Rocky said. Dawson is also a huge help on the ranch. “He is a little farm kid,” Rocky said. “He likes just about all of it.” While he helps out his dad with a lot of different ranch tasks, Dawson’s favorite is penning cows. Rocky commented that is probably because it is the most fun out of everything that they do. Rocky started working on his grandfather’s farm when he was seven years old. He believes that he never had the chance to choose the ranching lifestyle because it chose him first. “I think (this lifestyle) chose me really,” Rocky said. “It is all I know.” Rocky shared that in this lifestyle he has learned a lot about the cow business over the years, but a lot of his knowledge came from trial and error. Rocky hopes that the ranching lifestyle has taught his children hard work and the importance of keeping their word. “Most farmers and ranchers are people of their word and that is something we have to carry on,” Rocky said. “That’s the way our grandparents and parents were. I mean if they told you something that’s the way it was.” The Lankford’s favorite thing to do as a family is either working cattle or going to rodeos. “That’s about all we do,” Rocky said jokingly. He added that they love doing that so much because both him and his wife grew up rodeoing. The whole family loves horses, so getting to ride horses all together is so special. They also love going to rodeos and have been for a long time. When she was younger, Chasidy competed in both TJHRA and THSRA. Currently, Dawson is a member of THSRA. He competes in team roping, calf roping and cutting. Rocky said that they love going to rodeos and staying the night. They also love the people they have met through THSRA. “The rodeo families and rodeo people are the best you can be around,” Rocky said. Luckily, the Lankfords have two McCoys close to them in Palestine, Texas and Nacogdoches, Texas and they shop there occasionally. They usually shop there for lumber and other materials that would be used to mend fences and gates. The family is honored to be named this month’s McCoys Farm and Ranch Family!


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(Trainers are subject to change.)

Please return this portion filled out with a non-refundable $200 deposit payable to:

Name: Birthday:

Female or Male

Full Address: Phone Number: Is your horse trained? Y or N Horse’s Name: Email: Class you currently show in: Have you ever attended our Camp? Y or N

T-Shirt Size:

HORSEMEN FOR CHRIST PO Box 9524, Wichita Falls, TX 76308

For Questions: horsemenforchrist@gmail.com or 940-541-2359