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Spring Fashion

SPONSOR SPOTLIGHT:

Tanner Woodard

2019 THSRA STATE CHAMPION STEER WRESTLER

PRSRT STD STD PRSRT US POSTAGE POSTAGE US PAID PAID BRYAN TX TX 77802 77802 BRYAN PERMIT ## 23 23 PERMIT

PRESRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FULTEK

COLLEGE RODEO EDITION


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HFC’s Greg & Whitney Welch Memorial Bible & Cutting Horse Camp at Silverado in Weatherford, TX

June 1-4, 2020

4 Days for $800 Includes: Hotel Room, Stall for One Horse, Fresh Cows, and Meals Bible Studies led by: Joe Howard Williamson & Brian Bond

Amateurs - Non Pros Trainers - Youth All skill levels are welcome to attend.

!

Cutting with Christian NCHA Trainers with over 250 Years of Experience!

Bruce Morine

Brett McGlothlin

Bronc Willoughby

Ben Prater and his band will be back this year to lead worship. Lee Francois

Josh King

(Trainers are subject to change.)

Boyd Rice

—--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Name: _____________________________________

Birthday: ____________

Full Address: _______________________________________________________ T-Shirt Size: _______

Is your horse trained? Yes or No

Email: _________________________

Female or Male

Phone Number: _______________________

Horse’s Name: ____________________________

Class you currently show in:______________________

Have your ever attended our Camp? ____

Please return this bottom portion filled out with a non refundable $200 deposit payable to, Horsemen for Christ PO Box 9524, Wichita Falls, TX 76308. For questions: horsemenforchrist@gmail.com or (940) 541-2359

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EXECUTIVE BOARD STATE PRESIDENT KEN BRAY

PO Box 1634 • Granbury, TX 76048 817.219.0436 • kbray@equibrand.com

1ST VICE PRESIDENT COLE SEALY

PO Box 566 • San Saba, TX 76877 325.247.0545 • colesealy@yahoo.com

2ND VICE PRESIDENT MIKE GHORMLEY

PO Box 1177 • Madisonville, TX 77864 281.785.0077 • mghormley@me.com

SECRETARY/TREASURER SUSAN BALDWIN

In This Issue

PO Box 30 • Martinsville, TX 75958 936.564.8993 (home) cottongeorgetx@gmail.com

JUNIOR HIGH NATIONAL DIRECTOR CHRIS WOLFE

EDITION

73 Breeze Way, Boerne, TX 78006 830.815.1800 delaune.holly@gmail.com

BRIAN ROBERTS

SPRING FASHION

ARIAT PERFORMANCE REPORTERS

PAGE 33

Region I

EMERY MASK Region II

MADALYN RICHARDS Region III

MADELYN FERRIS Region IV

LILLY EAKES

SPONSOR SPOTLIGHTS

Region V

HARLEY JO PERKINS Region VI

HADLEY HARRIS Region VII

JAYCI LEE BYLER Region VIII

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DELEGATES AT LARGE

RYLEE HOWTON Region IX

BOYD HANAGRIFF Region X

THOMAS BROCKWAY

CHAINEY WEITZ

8016 CR 2419 • Royse City, TX 75189 214.770.5302 thomas.brockway@woodpartners.com

THSRA OFFICIAL SPONSORS

BRAD CRONE

1039 Mickingbird Lane • Eagle Lake, TX 77434 832.221.1253 • chlfreeman@yahoo.com

LAUREN TUTTLE STUMBERG

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936.590.1855 tablackwell@yahoo.com

DAVID FREEMAN

Marketing Director

830.815.1800 • delaune.holly@gmail.com

Graphics/Layout Director lauren@distinct-graphics.com 830.249.8020

INTERIM QUEEN COORDINATOR ANN BLACKWELL

2410 McBride Devillier • Winne, TX 77665 409.351.1983 • chlfreeman@yahoo.com

HOLLY DeLAUNE

Computer Programmer brian.roberts53@att.net 281.213.9143

630 E FM 813 • Palmer, TX 75152 214.403.4638 • cwwolfe630@gmail.com

MARKETING HOLLY DELAUNE

Official Publication of the Texas High School Rodeo Association

COLLEGE RODEO

704 1/2 Southview Circle • Center, TX 75935 936.590.4447 texashighschoolrodeo@gmail.com

NATIONAL DIRECTOR COTTON GEORGE

EXTREME TEAM NEWS

LARAMIE CHADWICK PAGE 08

CLAYE ANN SULLIVAN PAGE 38

JOHN SCHUENEMAN

6717 FM 1452 W • Madisonville, TX 77864 979.268.4994 • john.schueneman@gmail.com

BRANDON SMITH

6800 E FM 476 • Pleasanton, TX 78064 830.570.7157 • bmsmith1996@sbcglobal.net

LLOYD FAMILY PG 27 RANCH FAMILIES: THE THE YOUNG FAMILY PG 44

STUDENT OFFICERS

thsraofficers@hotmail.com STUDENT PRESIDENT Jake Kahla STUDENT VICE PRESIDENT Rylee Dodson STUDENT SECRETARY Shyanne Bauerle QUEEN Taylor Mobbs

Region

news

REGION REGION REGION REGION REGION

I 17 REGION II 18 REGION III 19 REGION IV 20 REGION V 22 REGION JUNIOR HIGH 41

VI VII VIII IX X

24 28 30 32 37

DR. TANDY FREEMAN

THSRA is a non-profit organization (501-C). Production of this publication was funded by membership dues and is provided complimentary to members of THSRA. Non-members may purchase annual subscriptions for $25.00

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2020 COLLEGE RODEO EDITION 6

TAKING THE NEXT STEP: INSIDE COLLEGE RODEO

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very month in the extreme team news you will read about our many impressive Seniors. You will learn more about who they are and where they are going. Most of those Seniors are focused on their next step past high school rodeo, which for many will include their membership into the national intercollegiate rodeo association (NIRA). Much like THSRA, the NIRA has seen steady growth since its inception. Today, a Senior can choose from many College Rodeo Programs across the country. We encourage you to check out their website and learn more about their association, scholarships they offer and to see current standings. This month we wanted to give you some insight into your next step of college rodeo. Many of the top college rodeo programs are being featured throughout the paper this month. They are interested in you and encourage students and parents to call them and ask questions about their program. THE FIRST 50 YEARS OF THE NIRA As we embark on the next 50 years of college rodeo, it is appropriate to take a look at the 50 that have brought us to where we are now. Sort of a History 101 lesson, without a final. Let us take you back to the days of horned rim glasses, Pearl Harbor, and college rodeos earliest beginnings... With World War II coming to an end, and college rodeo popularity on the rise, the need for a sanctioning body was upon us. At a meeting on November 6th, 1948, in Alpine, Texas, twelve schools came together to discuss the creation of the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association. Decided at that meeting was the need for a constitution, which was then established at a second meeting held in February 1949. Hank Finger, then Sul Ross State Universities Rodeo Club President and chairman of the constitutional committee, worked with that committee on developing eligibility guidelines, scholastic standards, and rodeo structure. The committee created a format for intercollegiate rodeo that would remain consistent throughout the country and provide national recognition for their constituents. August 1949 marked the official, legal birth of NIRA when they filed for non-profit status. The first College National Finals Rodeo was held the same year in San Francisco, California. The first NIRA All Around Champion crowned that year was Harley May of Sul Ross State University. The next decade, the era of bobby socks and poodle skirts, was one of difficulty for the NIRA. The 1950s brought problems with structure and finance for college rodeo. The 1956 National Convention addressed these problems by creating a Secretary/Manager position within the NIRA. Alvin G. Davis of Bownfield, Texas, was hired to fill that position. Entering into the 60s, the Sonny Sikes family led college rodeo into consistent membership growth and the television boom. The 1962 College National Finals Rodeo appeared on ABC’s Wide World of Sports. NBC aired the 1965 finals, and ABC, again aired the event in 1967. Rodeo at this time was experiencing a huge growth in several arenas, professional and college, the television airtime was a welcomed partner in the growth. Member schools totaled 97 in 1966. Vietnam, and computers, were the topics of the 70s in college rodeo. National sponsors began joining the college rodeo forces. Vietnam didn’t slow the growth of NIRA. Member schools totaled 116 in 1970 with 41of those two-year institutions. The first national sponsor was the U.S. Tobacco Co. Scholarship Awards Program which was created in 1975,

If you are interested in learning more about the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association,

email us at nira@bmi.net

or visit our website: www.collegerodeo.com


offering $70,000 in scholarships to regional and national champions. In 1979, Miller Brewing Company offered scholarships to the ten winning teams in NIRA’s regions, as well as the CNFR winning teams. In 1970 the NIRA Public Relations Director, Del Higham, predicted further NIRA growth in the Southeast, which at that time included McNeese State University and Northwestern State University. This was a prediction that proved true as an eighth region joined that year, the Ozark region, including Arkansas, Northern Mississippi, and Southern Missouri. With dedicated forces behind the NIRA, growth was still apparent. Higher enrollments at colleges and universities was also an asset in the 70s. During the silver anniversary year of the NIRA, Tim Corfield, Northwest Faculty Director, joined the Board of Directors. Corfield, a coach at Walla Walla Community College, accepted the Executive Secretary position in 1979, when Sonny and Joanne Sikes retired from their long held posts. The office then moved from Texas to Washington state. By the 80s college rodeo was at an all time high, with member schools totaling 155. Wrangler Jeans & Shirts signed on as a national sponsor in 1982. The inception of the Wrangler Officials Program was created. NIRA officials now received payment from an official’s judging fund. Feathered hair and bell bottoms behind us, the 90s has been a time of change for the NIRA. The college finals moved in 1997 from a 24-year home in Bozeman, Montana, to Rapid City, South Dakota. New national sponsors have allied, and continue to do so. The National Intercollegiate Rodeo Foundation was created, offering relief for injured athletes, scholarships, historical preservation, and the wellness program “RAWHIDE.” Over the years, NIRA’s history has read like a Who’s Who in the sport of rodeo. Roy Cooper, Chris LeDoux, Ty Murray, Tuff Hedeman, Dan Mortensen, and many more, are all champions in college rodeo, as well as professional rodeo. They have added to the success of college rodeo, and created some of it’s rich western history. “Preserving Western heritage through collegiate rodeo”, has been a theme repeated over the course of fifty years. Today these efforts are being made through over 100 college rodeos a year, over 3,500 student members annually and 137 member schools and universities. College rodeo has yet to its peak. What will the next fifty years offer? - Article provided by NIRA Website

BIG SKY REGION

COLLEGE RODEO TEAM STANDINGS

Montana; and also Northwest Community College - Powell, WY.

southern & southwestern regions SOUTHERN REGION

Standings as of February 25, 2020

National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association Region Locations

SOUTHWEST REGION

Standings as of February 24, 2020

Men’s Team Points 1. McNeese State University MCNSU 3,578.50 2. Hill College HILL 3,029.00 3. Sam Houston State University SAMSU 2,976.50

Men’s Team Points 1. Tarleton State University TARLET 3,020.00 2. Western Texas College WTXC 2,390.00 3. Clarendon CLAREN 2,275.00

Women’s Team Points 1. Texas A&M University - Commerce TXAMUC 2,660.29 2. McNeese State University MCNSU 2,262.83 3. Sam Houston State University SAMSU 980.83

Women’s Team 1. Tarleton State University TARLET 2. Texas Tech University-Lubbock TXTUL 3.South Plains College SPLNS

Points 994.84 915.00 900.00

CENTRAL PLAINS REGION

Kansas; Oklahoma; and also Northwest Missouri State University - Maryville, MO.

CENTRAL ROCKY MOUNTAIN REGION

Wyoming; Colorado; and also Chadrom State College Chadron NE.

GRAND CANYON REGION

Arizona; and also New Mexico State University - Las Cruces, NM; San Juan College - Farmington, NM.; Western New Mexico University - Silvercity, NM.

GREAT PLAINS REGION

North Dakota; South Dakota; Nebraska; Minnesota; Iowa; Wisconsin

NORTHWEST REGION Washington; Oregon; Northern Idaho

OZARK REGION

CHECK OUT YOUR AMAZING COLLEGE RODEO OPTIONS!

MAKE SURE TO TAKE A LOOK AT ALL OF OUR PARTICIPATING COLLEGES & THE RODEO PROGRAMS AVAILABLE! Sam Houston State University Vernon College Odessa College Wharton County Jr. College Texas Tech University Ranger College Howard College Trinity Valley Community College Texas A&M University Hill College

Page Page Page Page Page Page Page Page Page Page

02 09 10 12 13 14 15 21 26 40

Missouri; Arkansas; Kentucky; Tennessee; Mississippi; Alabama; Indiana; Eastern; Louisiana; Michigan; Ohio; Illinois; Georgia; and Michigan State University - East Lansing, MI.

ROCKY MOUNTAIN REGION Southern Idaho; Utah

SOUTHERN REGION Eastern Texas; Western Louisiana

SOUTHWEST REGION New Mexico: Western Texas

WEST COAST REGION California; Nevada

Rodeo Events

MEN'S EVENTS: BAREBACK, SADDLE BRONC, BULL RIDING, STEER WRESTLING, CALF ROPING WOMEN'S EVENTS: BARREL RACING, BREAKAWAY ROPING, GOAT TYING MEN'S & WOMEN'S EVENTS: TEAM ROPING

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LARAMIE CHADWICK OF REGION IV by Jacqueline Knox

The Whataburger Whatakid is selected due to their ability to excel both in and out of the rodeo arena. Whataburger is proud to recognize a THSRA member from each of the ten Regions who truly upholds the title “Whatakid!” One of the nominees will be chosen at the State Final Rodeo in June as the Whatakid of the Year. In recognition of this accomplishment they will receive free Whataburgers for an entire year!

Congratulations to the Whatakid of the month, Laramie Chadwick! This eighteen-year-old senior is a force to be reckoned with. In the arena, he competes in tie down, team roping, and reining cow horse. He also recently added trap shooting to his list of events. Of all of his events, tie down is his favorite. Laramie currently rides two different horses. Gomez, his main horse, is a bay horse that Laramie rides for tie down and reining. His team roping horse, Little Wayne, is actually borrowed from a friend of the Chadwick’s, Michael Akins. Michael is also one of Laramie’s tie down coaches who helps him in the arena. Laramie says, “I have been lucky to ride good horses that we have raised, borrowed or had trained for him to ride in and out of the arena.” Laramie remarked on one of his favorite moments with Gomez: “A long time ago, my Dad and I were working a pen of cattle with our pastor and his crew. I was around eight. They told me I couldn’t get off of my horse for anything. Well, I had to go to the restroom really bad, so I just stood up and took care of business off the side of Gomez. I mean I did what I was told. My dad and my pastor said I could not get off my horse and I didn’t.” Wendy Chadwick, Laramie’s mom noted, “Laramie’s cattle working ways have been in a few sermons about being respectful and being obedient; no matter what the circumstance. “He has literally been horseback since birth,” mentioned Wendy. Brent Chadwick, Laramie’s dad, was a team roper when Laramie was a baby. So, Laramie attended his first US roping event at three weeks old. He began rodeoing at age four and hasn’t stopped since. He also has spent most of his life working cattle with his dad and church family. Region rodeos are Laramie’s favorite but “all of my rodeos are pretty

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good,” remarked Laramie. He has been really successful in his events. He qualified for state in tie down and reining cow horse his freshman and sophomore year. However, Laramie’s junior year held a lot of sacrifice and bumps in the road. He was born with a hip impingement, which was unknown until the beginning of his junior season. “They gave me a choice,” Laramie said. “I could have the surgery and then go through the recovery, or I could not have the surgery, keep rodeoing, but risk further injury/pain which would keep me from rodeoing later in life.” Laramie chose to have the surgery in order to continue rodeoing in the long run. So, his junior season was spent undergoing extensive hip surgery which left him unable to ride for almost a year. Brent has been the region president for the past three years, as well as a member of the state board since Laramie was in sixth grade. Wendy mentioned, “Laramie had to endure long weekends at the rodeo last season but was an excellent arena helper even on crutches.” Laramie did have an amazing junior year even with the injury. About six weeks before state, Laramie began training for trap shooting. He was given the opportunity to join the Texas team and finished in the top 25 at NHSRA finals where Texas and Texas Boys were the National Champions for 2019. In addition to rodeo, Laramie has been involved in a lot of arena and ministry events at his church, Cross Brand Cowboy Church, which is located in Tyler, Texas. In fact, he has been an American Fellowship of Cowboy Church “Cowboy Camp” counselor or clinician assistant for the last 5 years. He loves to share the Word with other kids involved in the Western Heritage World. Laramie is known in the Texas High School Rodeo world as “Batman.”. When he was younger, Laramie watched the old school Batman movies with his parents. From there, Batman just stuck, and he has been collecting Batman memorabilia from signs to old collectible toys. His favorite items are the Batman t-shirts which he wears under his official rodeo shirts to each rodeo. You can always find Laramie in something Batman every day. Dwight Hathaway was someone that Laramie counts as his hero. Papa D, as the Chadwick’s called him, was like a grandfather to Laramie. “Being a homeschooled kid, he spends a lot of time with grownups,” Wendy said. “Dwight always guided Laramie through everything from hunting to horses to how be a gentleman. He was an old PRCA Steer Wrestler, so

he knew the rodeo world and the horse world.” Unfortunately, Dwight unexpectedly passed away in August of 2019. “He was the one I looked up to the most,” said Laramie. “He was goofy as can be. He was one of those guys that even if he was trying to be serious, you couldn’t look at him serious. You were always laughing at him or with him.” Laramie also talked about how giving Papa D was: “Dwight would give you the shirt off of his back, but more than that he was just a good Christian man. He taught me how to be a Christian cowboy gentleman in this crazy world.” “He was a real good role model. Whenever he left us here on earth, he left a big legacy,” Laramie said about Dwight. “Treat others how you would treat yourself.” This is Laramie’s motto on life. This saying became his motto because of his buddy Dwight. “He was always kind to other people and it’s just hard to be mean to someone who is being so kind to you,” Laramie said. When asked why he rodeos, Laramie responded saying, “Because I love it. It’s the cowboy way.” Rodeo has taught Laramie a lot about being patient and humble in life. In addition to life, Laramie has also gained a lot of friends through rodeo. “Since I am homeschooled, all of my friends my age are through rodeo. Whenever I am working or piddling around the house, I am usually hanging out with old farts that always try and give me knowledge about the old days,” Laramie said. Laramie is grateful for the Rodeo Family Life we have in Texas High School Rodeo. “I have lifelong friends and a ‘rodeo family’ because of THSRA. I can’t imagine my life without those who have been with me during these rodeo years,” Laramie stated. In the future, Laramie plans to rodeo in Junior College and then onto Tarleton or Texas Tech. He is considering a degree in kinesiology and then going on to become either a licensed physical therapist or choosing a military career. He does know that no matter what career path he chooses, horses and roping will always be a part of his life. Laramie is honored to be this month’s Whatakid! Of course, HE LOVES EATING WHATABURGER…


Champions aren’t born they are made! Come join the long list of champions! Numerous National College Titles and World Champions! To name a few: Lari Dee Guy, Jackie Hobbs(Crawford), Cody Ohl, Trevor Brazile, Cade Swor, Stran Smith, Sterling Smith, Will Lowe, Justin McDaniel, Isaac Diaz, Kelly Armstrong and many more!

Coach Marty Eakin 806-736-0475 meakin@vernoncollege.edu

vernoncollege.edu 9


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Shyanne Bauerle

H

THSRA STUDENT SECRETARY

ey y’all! My name is Shyanne Bauerle and I was recently elected as your new THSRA secretary. I am from Mineral, Texas and have competed at Region VIII for the past 4 years. I compete in breakaway, poles, and goat tying. I will be a senior in the fall at Jourdanton High School where I play volleyball, basketball, and run track. I am also the class of 2020’s Vice President, Vice President of the Spanish club, member of our schools robotics team, and our FCA program. Throughout the years, rodeo has brought to me some of my greatest moments along with some of the biggest let downs. It has taught me that no matter the outcome God still loves you and still has a plan for you even if it doesn’t make since in that exact moment. Rodeo has also opened the door for me to have met some of my greatest lifelong friends. THSRA has allowed me to compete against some of the greatest competitors in our sport so serving as secretary helps me give back to those who have helped me so much. I plan on attending college next year and majoring in business/marketing so that I can continue to help others.

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WCJC20EXTtmNWS10x9.5Fo.indd 1

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2/28/20 2:55 PM


Texas Tech Rodeo Team

* 3 Outdoor practice arenas * Indoor practice arena * Practice stock year round * Access to horse pens at practice

Coach: Jerrad Hofstetter Office: (806)792-4682 Cell: (903) 316-4136 jerrad.hofstetter@ttu.edu

Wreck ‘Em


R

anger College is located in the small town of Ranger Texas and is located 80 miles west of Fort Worth on Interstate 20. It sits in the heart of rodeo country. Established in 1925, the school has a rich history of academics, sports and community involvement. With a little over 2000 students, the facility/student ratio is small and personalized. Head coach Llew Rust, a previous NIRA member, attended the College National finals (CNFR) three times. As a member of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association, he competed in the calf roping, steer wrestling, and team roping. This experience enables him to assist his team members in their different events while allowing them to continue to develop their own skills. Assistant coach Dayton Adams participates in steer wrestling, team roping, and calf roping. In 2015 Ranger College was proud to have a national champion in bull riding, and in 2016 a national champion in team roping. As past national champions, we strive to uphold our winning tradition. Here at Ranger College, success is promoted not only in the arena, but in the classroom as well.

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Come Rodeo With Some of the BEST in the NIRA Southwest Region! Building Tomorrow’s Champions, Today! $$$ Scholarships Available $$$ 2-Year Degree Plans - Transfer Options 3 Arena Facilities / 73 Stalls & Feed Rooms Excellent Practice Stock Conveniently Located in Big Spring, Texas The Cross-Roads of West Texas Tradition Rides Strong With Hawk Rodeo Start YOUR Future With Us! Mike Yeater - Head Coach myeater@howardcollege.edu www.howardcollege.edu www.hchawk.com www.facebook/HCHawkAthletics www.facebook/HCBigSpring

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PRESIDENT - COOPER NORRIS VICE PRESIDENT- SLADE BAUMANN SECRETARY/HISTORIAN - CARSEN NORRIS DAVID CHRISTIAN 10200 S Blessen Rd • Amarillo, TX 79119 806.674.1397 • david.christian@11ranch.com

STUDENT OFFICERS

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS

TREY JOHNSON Box 501 • Hapy, Texas 79042 806-433-7382 • tjohnsoncattle@gmail.com SECRETARY - BRANDY WRIGHT 11555 US HWY 83 • Canadian, Texas 79014 806.255.0034 • tristaterodeo@yahoo.com

Region I

KEVIN HUDDLESTON PO Box 750 • Memphis, Texas 79245 806.259.3139 • huddcottonkevin@gmail.com DAVID CHRISTIAN 10200 S Blessen Rd • Amarillo, TX 79119 806.674.1397 • david.christian@11ranch.com

PERFORMANCE REPORT

Tough Little Tee Thompson

I

By EMERY MASK

– Performance Reporter

t has been six months since our last Tough Tee Rawyzn update and a lot of things have happened since then, from Christmas Day, to January 9th, to Tee turning 8 months old on February 8th. Everything had started to become somewhat normal for the Thompson family after his first surgery. Tee was able to start going to more rodeos and events with his big brother Tate Thompson and the rest of the family, he also had less regulations around what he was able to do, he was starting to roll over, and Tee even gave his mother Jody the best pres-

ent she could ask for, saying “Mama” for the very first time on Christmas Day. On January 9th, Tee had his second open heart surgery: the Glenn Procedure. The Glenn Procedure is a surgery that helps to redirect blood from the upper body straight to the lungs which then allows the blood to pick up oxygen without having to pass through the heart, which then results in taking away some of the extra work from the right ventricle (since Tee is only a single ventricle baby). While doing the surgery, Tee’s doctor, Dr. Tam, found an opportunity to help Tee become a double ventricle baby by trying to open up his left ventricle, this was done so by cutting a piece of muscle from his heart. After the surgery Tee was supposed to remain in the hospital for 4-6 weeks, but by the Grace of God and through the power of prayer Tee was able to be back in his home after only 10 days in Cook’s Children’s Hospital in Ft. Worth! Tough Little Tee Thompson Tough Little Tee Thompson Everything at home is starting to become as normal as it can be once again. Tee is still under many restrictions for 8 more weeks, but he remains in high spirits. Jody said that since the Glenn, he has developed quite the personality, wanting to start to roll over again, talking to anyone who will listen and smiling every chance he gets. She also said that he should start growing (currently he is 12 pounds at 8 months old, very much below the standard because his heart was having to work more than 10x harder than a regular heart has to) since the surgery helped to relieve some of the work that his heart has to do. In other exciting news, Tee’s physical therapist, Region One’s very own Mrs. Tiffany Blount, said that to help strengthen him he is going to be able to ride the horses with his big brother and dad! Tee is doing better than well and his next (and hopefully last) surgery will be the Fontan, at around the age of 3 or 4. However, with the muscle that was found during the Glenn, Tee might not even have to have the Fontan. So with that, Region One continues to ask for prayers and support for the Thompson family and Tough Tee Rawzyn.

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PO Box 62862 • San Angelo, Texas 76904 512.618.9233 • csbaize@yahoo.com

STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - COLEE CHARLESWORTH VICE PRESIDENT - MADALYN RICHARDS SECRETARY - ALLISON VAUGHN STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS CASEY BAIZE

Region II

SECRETARY - JODY MCELROY Box 224 • Balmorhea, Texas 79718 432-940-0385 • secretary@thsra2.com

PO Box 364 • Marathon, TX 79842 432.386.6214 • brent@crcompany.net JODY MCELROY Box 224 • Balmorhea, Texas 79718 432.448.7810 • rodeosecretary1@gmail.com

BRENT CHARLESWORTH

PRESIDENT- KENNY STEWART 2347 FM 829 • Stanton, Texas 79782 432.661.5084 • kstewart93@gmail.om

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PERFORMANCE REPORT

W

By MADALYN RICHARDS – Performance Reporter

ith spring region rodeos starting back up, our schedules are about to get very busy. Region 2’s first High School rodeo is on the 22nd of February. On the 21st, the Friday before our first rodeo, there will be a breakaway jackpot in the new Abilene arena. The jackpots are WCRA approved and open to anyone. On Saturday, the 22nd, at 6:00, an 11 slide team roping will take place. It is progressive after 1 and there is no limit on entries. The roping is open to the public. At the High School Rodeo in San Angelo, on March 15th, Region 2 will have our cowboy prom at the Buffalo Social Club. Also, senior scholarship applications are due at Abilene. The application forms are on the website. Finally, do not forget to nominate your high school rodeos for the WCRA youth division. Until earlier this year, in order to nominate WCRA rodeos, athletes had to be entered in an open rodeo to receive points. This means that High School rodeos did not count toward the WCRA. But recently, the WCRA announced the addition of a youth division for athletes 13 years

or older. Any youth rodeos with verifiable results, including region rodeos, can be nominated. Points are awarded to the people that nominated and won. If the rodeo athletes are inside of the top 24 on the leaderboard, the youth members of the WCRA can qualify for the youth stampede at the semi-finals. Once at the youth stampede, the athletes compete in two rounds. The winner of the average in each discipline qualifies for the Major Event and has the chance to compete against the other, older competitors for $50,000! On top of this, the NHSRA and the WCRA are alliances, so there is no reason not to nominate High School Rodeos. For more information go to https://wcrarodeo.com/wcrayouth-division/. Good luck and safe travels!

The gossip around the barn... Strategy now supports gastric comfort. ®

© 2018 Purina Animal Nutrition LLC. All rights reserved.


940.682.6113 • duaneoverton6113@gmail.com

STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - DUSTIN MONTGOMERY VICE PRESIDENT - GRACIE GAMBINO SECRETARY - LARAMIE DEARING DUANE OVERTON 2110 FM 3027 • Mineral Wells, TX 76067

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS

Kaitlyn Kasterke

K

By MADELYN FERRIS

– Performance Reporter

aitlyn Kasterke is a 17 year old all around cowgirl from Weatherford, Texas. She competes in the goat tying, breakaway, and barrel racing. In February of 2019, Kaitlyn suffered what could have been a career ending injury while tying goats at a rodeo in Saginaw,

Texas. She had grade 3 tears in both her ACL and MCL. Kaitlyn said she had a “7 month long recovery that didn’t end until September of 2019”. Instead of giving up like most would, Kaitlyn kept hustling and kept working at it as soon as she was cleared in September. It wasn’t an easy road for her. Having a tear like that will mess with your mental game like no other. Kaitlyn explained how it affected her by saying “It really torn my confidence down and I was constantly questioning why it happened to me”. I’ve personally seen the long road Kaitlyn has had to get to where she is now and how she had to completely start over. She gave the credit to a goat tier from Clarksville, Texas “Ashleigh Young helped me get back, without her I wouldn’t be where I’m at. She gave me a new horse to use and a new sense of confidence”. Kaitlyn tied a 8.5 the first day to win it and an 8.7 the 2nd day to place third! People who knows Kaitlyn, knows it’s a very well deserved win! Everyone at region three couldn’t be more proud of her for how she keep pushing and keep persevering! We hope to see big things from you in the future!

Region III

817.706.8236• kelley.williams@thsra3.com

ERIC HUSTON PO Box 945 • Decatur, Texas 76234 817.368.0159 • ehuston1972@gmail.com PO Box 122448 • Fort Worth, Texas 76121

SECRETARY - KELLEY WILLIAMS

KEVIN STEWART PO Box 1308 • Glen Rose, Texas 76043 817.307.7300 • thekevinstewart@live.com PRESIDENT - ERIC HUSTON PO Box 945 • Decatur, TX 76234 817.368.8885 • ehuston1972@gmail.com

PERFORMANCE REPORT

19


STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - BRYLEE BRADEN VICE PRESIDENT - MAKENZIE MAYES SECRETARY - GRACEY BROCKAWAY STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS MICHAEL AKINS 2449 West Line Road • Whitesboro, TX 76273 makins1@yahoo.com • 904.368.9390

DR. TANDY FREEMAN

MARK KELLEY 155 Pole Bridge Road • Combine, Texas 75159 214.316.6770 • kkcarroll1218@gmail.com SECRETARY - TINA BRADEN PO Box 549 • Horatio, AR 71842 870.832.3149 • tbbraden@earthlink.net

Region IV

BRENT CHADWICK 2915 N US HWY 69 • Mineola, TX 75773 903.569.1569 • brentchadwick87@gmail.com PRESIDENT- SEAN SUNDBERG 5113 CR 862 • McKinney, TX 75071 919-518-6670 • sundberg.sean@yahoo.com

20

PERFORMANCE REPORT Looking Forward to the Finals!

rodeo. Dylan Stevenson rode both of his saddle bronc horses this weekend to win both rodeos! Then, Saturday in the breakaway, Lilly Eakes was a 1.87 to win the rodeo. We are so proud of our High School And Jr. High contestants and how far they have come this year and we cannot wait to see everyone back in Sulphur Springs for our finals on March 21-23!

By Lilly Eakes – Performance Reporter

H

ello, the 2020 Spring season has been a great one for Region IV! We are continuing to grow closer and are starting to realize that our seniors only have two rodeos left with us. This past weekend we had rodeos 9&10. We also had our region rodeo prom! The contestants had so much fun and we are so thankful to everyone that helped make it possible for us. In addition, we also had some our fastest times that we have had all year! Reagan Laney had a smoking fast run to win the rodeo on Sunday with a 14.1, Makenzie Mayes had a super speedy pole run Sunday morning to win the rodeo with a 20.6. Sunday in the team roping Brennen Wilson and Landon Priefert were a 4.7 to win the

MAKENZIE MAYES photo by Jennings

BRENNEN WILSON & LANDON PRIEFERT photo by Jennings


For More Information Contact

The Trinity Valley Community College Rodeo Team allows students who are involved in the sport of rodeo to continue the pursuit of their rodeo goals while achieving sound academic goals. We offer competition opportunities on men’s and women’s teams under the guidance of a full-time coach. The TVCC Rodeo Team also: H Encourages rodeo athletes

to excel in their academics, as well as athletics H Provides programs and

activities that enhance a student's learning, growth and development

H Provides rodeo scholarships

H Provides travel money

H Provides practice facilities for

H Small team size allows for

both rough stock and men’s and women’s timed events

one-on-one coaching

H Maintains our own weight room

and has Mighty Broncy and a Heelomatic for practice

www2.tvcc.edu/rodeo

BRENT BRATTON 100 Cardinal Drive Athens, TX 75751

903-675-6354 bbratton@tvcc.edu www.tvcc.edu/rodeoteam

PERFECT PRACTICE

PROUD SPONSOR Of THSRA & TJHRA

THE MOST REALISTIC TRAINING SYSTEMS ON THE MARKET 888-HEELING | heelomatic.com

21


PRESIDENT - CADE COGBILL VICE PRESIDENT - SYDNI CAIN SECRETARY - JAYSE TETTENHORST

STUDENT OFFICERS

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS JEFF PARSLEY 655 CR 4703 • Troup, Texas 75789 903.842.4720 • jparsleygeraniums@earthlink.net

BILL WHITE 277 Billy White Rd • Singer, LA 70660 337.304.0748 • whiteacres55@yahoo.com

Region V

SECRETARY - SUSAN BALDWIN 704 1/2 Southview Circle • Center, Texas 75935 936.590.4330 • regionvsecretary@gmail.com

JOE GLENN KAHLA 612 FM 1747 • Jasper, Texas 75951 409.384.0921 • jgk@mklawyers.com

PRESIDENT- JEFF PARSLEY 655 CR 4703 • TROUP, TX 75789 903-574-3910 • jparsleygeraniums@earthlink.net

22

PERFORMANCE REPORT

Let’s Get Conversational

O

By HARLEY JO PERKINS – Performance Reporter

ur world is advancing in technology at an amazing rate and we are becoming more and more involved in the digital world. Here are some facts that show us just how involved we are in our phones and social medias… · In 2019, teenagers spent 9 hours per day online or on social media · The average teen spends more than 7 hours and 22 minutes on their phones per day · Only 32% of teens say that talking face-to-face is their preferred way of communicating In the warm-up pen or just walking

around, almost every kid has their ear buds in. Not only is it close to impossible to get a conversation in, it creates a very stale atmosphere where no one talks and makes new friends. No one says a kind word or asks how your morning is going because we’re all so focused on the tiny little world in our phone instead of engaging in the one that we are physically a part of. Spending so much time on our phones creates a barrier between you and the people around you. Instead of being on our phones checking out the latest TikTok or listening to the latest album, why don’t we give it a try to talk to the people around us and interact in their lives in a positive way. Let’s stop being social media friends and really get to know one another better than just our Instagram usernames. In Ephesians 5:18-19 the Bible gives the best advice on how we should communicate with one another. “Instead, be filled with the Holy Spirit, singing psalms and hymns and spiritual songs among yourselves, and making music to the Lord in your hearts.” Face to face communication can be a lot more challenging than being behind a screen but talking to someone and interacting with them is a lot more rewarding for your heart. Being someone’s friend means that we laugh with them and listen to them when their struggling, not just liking their posts. I encourage everyone to really communicate with one another whether you find yourself in the arena or out of the arena. True communication stretches us and grows us into better people. It’s not always easy and it’s not always comfortable, but then again growth and change never is. I hope by simply starting the conversation with “Hey, how are you?” and a smile, you can begin to build real relationships with the people God has placed in your life.


ON THE ROAD WITH MISS THSRA

T

he past few months have been quite the adventure. After I arrived back home from Nationals, I attended the TYRA state finals, rode in the Half-Moon holiday parade with the Republican Women’s group and traveled to Dallas for a state board meeting. I made an appearance at Tejas Rodeo Company where I roped and ran barrels. I attended the Fort Bend County parade and Queen Contest, and attended another state meeting at the Founder’s Day rodeo. During Founders Day, my officer team and I chose the prizes for the state finals. I conducted interviews with all event winners, carried flags with my officer team, and competed in the breakaway and goat tying. I have been traveling from region to region helping out and being a part of their rodeos. As of right now, I have visited regions 7, 8, and 9, along with my own region, 6. I would like to say a personal thank you to all the region directors and student athletes for welcoming me and letting me be a part of your rodeo. I was honorably invited to the Cowgirl Hall of Fame Inductions. This was one of the most incredible events I have ever experienced in my life. Getting to personally meet the inductees for this year and past inductees, was a dream come true. These women are courageous and so inspiring. I will forever be honored to have been part of such an incredible event. One of the last events that I attended in the 2019 year was our THSRA Queen clinic. The clinic was a great success and I was so happy to be able to help and be part of all of the girl’s journeys to the crown. In the upcoming months I will be attending the Fort Worth Rodeo, San Antonio rodeo, and the Huston rodeo with my officer team. I hope everyone had a successful and prosperous new year! Miss THSRA 2019 – Taylor Mobbs

YRA RODEO: MAY 15, 16, 17 Brackenridge Recreational Complex 284 Brackenridge Parkway – Edna, Texas 77957

Mike & Sherrylynn Johnson’s Vegas Tuffest Jr. World Championship

Vegas Qualifier

www.yratx.com maryjaneyra@aol.com For more info call: 713-501-8843 Postmark Deadline – 5/4/20 or call in to enter 5/12/20 from 5-9pm

HOW TO QUALIFY FOR MIKE & SHERRYLYNN JOHNSON’S VEGAS TUFFEST JR. WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP 1. Buy Membership—Memberships can be purchased online at www.Johnsonsportline.com or at qualifying events prior to competing. 2. Enter a Vegas Tuffest qualifier event--$150 entry fee ($100 EF to Vegas Tuffest & $50 optional jackpot or $100 without sidepot) 3. Qualifying events will send the following number of qualifiers to the Vegas Tuffest Jr. World Championship. (if event offers more than 1 go, qualifiers will be decided on the average placings): 5 Entries—1 qualifier 6-15 entries—2 qualifiers 16-25 entries— 3 qualifiers 26 and over—4 qualifiers 4. Events offered: 12 & under Boys & Girls Barrels, 19 & under Girls Barrels 10 & Under Boys & Girls Breakaway 12 & Under Boys & Girls Tie Down 12 & Under Boys & Girls Goat Tying 15 & Under Boys Tie Down 15 & Under Girls Breakaway 15 & Under Girls Goat Tying 19 & Under Boys Tie Down 19 & Under Girls Breakaway 19 & Under Girls Goat Tying 5. Once qualified, contestant must enter Vegas Tuffest Jr. World Championship by October 1, 2020

DO NOT HAVE TO BE A YRA MEMBER TO ENTER

EVENTS OFFERED:

12 & under Boys & Girls Barrels 19 & under Girls Barrels 10 & Under Boys & Girls Breakaway 12 & Under Boys & Girls Tie Down 12 & Under Boys & Girls Goat Tying 15 & Under Boys Tie Down 15 & Under Girls Breakaway 15 & Under Girls Goat Tying 19 & Under Boys Tie Down 19 & Under Girls Breakaway 19 & Under Girls Goat Tying

23


STUDENT OFFICERS

STATE DIRECTORS MATT CRAINER PO Box 32 • Carrizo Springs, TX 78834 830.876.6141 • mattcrainer@yahoo.com

PRESIDENT - BRINLEE FREEMAN VICE PRESIDENT - SAGE SPIVEY SECRETARY - BRADI FREEMEAN

GARY MOBBS 9076 FM 443 • Shiner, TX 77984 830.857.1418 • gary.mobbs@southstatebank.com SECRETARY - ANNE DOLLERY P.O. BOX 1818 • Gonzales, TX 78629 979.412.2551 • texasjuniorhighrodeo@gmail.com

Region VI

JUSTINE HUNT 2433 Witte Rd • Bellville, TX 77418 979.525.7098 • rodeohuntboys@gmail.com PRESIDENT - DAVID FREEMAN 1039 Mockingbird Lane • Eagle Lake, TX 77434 832.221.1253 • chlfreeman@yahoo.com

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PERFORMANCE REPORT

seniors O

By HADLEY HARRIS

– Performance Reporter

ur 2019-2020 rodeo season is starting to wind down. We just completed rodeos 9 & 10 in beautiful Gonzales, TX. That means our seniors only have two more regular season rodeos to go. With a little luck, they will get three more runs in June. Finally, we sure hope they wind up with their last 3 high school runs in Lincoln, NE this coming July. We are enjoying our time

with them as they finish up their high school rodeo careers and get ready to move on to college, technical school, or the dreaded “real world.” It’s extra special to me because my brother is a senior. I’m happy for him and sad for me. We’ll definitely miss him at the region HIGH SCHOOL KIDS HANGING OUT rodeos next year. I bet AT THE REGION RODEO we can get him to come back if there’s a steer wrestler or two that need a haze though. Well, enough about me. On behalf of THSRA-R6, Congrats to our seniors. You’ll always have a special place in the heart of Region Seis. Good luck in your future endeavors, and most of all, thanks for the friendships and wonderful memories. I hope you enjoy the quotes and pictures of some of our seniors. Vaya con Dios!

SOME OF THE REGION VI SENIORS


Trace Harris “Look at all the stars. You look up and you think, God made all this and He remembered to make a little speck like me. It's kind of flattering, really” - Morgan Earp

Delany Oates "You should never take more than you give" - Elton John Clint Orht “When the going gets tough, the tough get going.” - Joseph Kennedy

Sage Spivey “What’s coming is better than what is gone”

Cole Maples “By this all men will know that you ride for me, if you take care and love one another.” John 13:35

Brinlee Freeman “The Lord is good, a refuge in times of trouble. He cares for those who trust in Him.” Nahum 1-7

Shelby Eklund “The Lord is my strength and my shield; my heart trusts in him, and he helps me. My heart leaps for joy and with my song I praise him” Psalm 28:7

Hayes Henke “Courage is being scared to death-but saddling up anyway.” John Wayne Ella Lenox “Find out who you are and do it on purpose” -Dolly Parton

Kate Kibby Therefore, put on every piece of God’s armor so you will be able to resist the enemy in the time of evil. Then after the battle you will still be standing firm”. Ephesians 6:13 NLT

Kamryn Saegert For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the LORD, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future. Jeremiah 29:11

Sadie Thibodeaux “Boots weren’t made for sitting by the door.” Kasey Musgraves

25


Congratulations to the Shelton Family - Winners of the #CheckerboardChallenge - They won $300 in Purina Feed!!

Fightin' Texas Aggie Rodeo Team

Rodeo Team Advisor Dr. Al Wagner Office:(979)845-7023 a-wagner@tamu.edu

26

W

Scholarships Available!

ith a history that extends back over 60 years, Texas A&M Rodeo Team is steeped in tradition. Join our team and receive a world class education. *2002 Women's Team National Champions Southern Region Champion / Reserve Women's team 9 times in last 15 years

www.texasaggierodeo.com


Farm & Ranch Family The folks at McCoy’s Building Supply understand that it takes a lot of hard work and the whole family pitching in to get things done on a farm or ranch. That’s why we’d like to take some time out to salute Texas High School Rodeo Association families who are farmers and ranchers. In our monthly Farm & Ranch Family Spotlight, we’ll feature one family, sharing their story of how they work together as a family to make their farm or ranch successful.The spotlight will run for 10 months; each month will feature a different Region. Each Regional McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family will receive a $100 McCoy’s Gift Card. The McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family of the Year will receive a $500 McCoy’s Gift Card and will be announced at the 2020 THSRA State Finals.

The Lloyd Family of Region X C by Catelyn Felts

ongratulations to the McCoy’s Farm and Ranch family of the month, the Lloyd’s! Cory and Brandy Lloyd, along with their four kids, Dryden, Wyatt, Mayci and Rainen own and operate the 7 Cross Farm & Ranch located in Juno, Texas. Most farmers and ranchers would agree that what they do is more than just an occupation; it’s a way of living, and the Lloyd’s are no exception. The family business consists of ranching long hair sheep, goats and cattle; breeding, raising and training horses with 15 brood mares and their own studs; and raising kelpie dogs. They also own and operate CL Fence Construction building fence and barns all over Texas and New Mexico. The family said they are constantly bouncing back and forth between fencing and ranching every day. On the days that consist of ranching, the family said they enjoy rounding up cattle with their dogs and horses. In fact, instead of hiring outside help, they rely on their kelpies for extra support. This way of ranching and the hours they spend in the saddle plays a big role in the success they have seen in their horse training program. “Each of us may go through two to four colts in a day when we are gathering stock at the ranch,” the family said. “Hours upon hours are put in to make outstanding horses.” This way of life is not for the faint of heart, but it does run in Cory and Brandy’s blood. They both grew up farming and ranching, and continue to help out on each of their family’s operations. Brandy’s family farms wheat

and hay, and raises sheep and cattle in Bronte, Texas; while Cory’s family farms cotton and raises sheep and cattle in Eldorado, Texas. Between the fencing and multiple ranch locations, the Lloyd’s manage to keep themselves busy. Accomplishing the amount of work they do on a daily basis definitely requires all hands on deck. Everyone in the family has a role and plays a huge part in every day operations. “It’s sun up till way past sundown,” Brandy said. Dryden is a sophomore at Weatherford Junior College, and pitches for the baseball team. He spends most of his summers helping drive a tractor getting ready for the next crop. Wyatt, a high school sophomore and THSRA calf roper and team roper, does his home schooling for the day, and then works with the fence crew or at the ranch. Rainen is a third grader attending public school, so as soon as he gets home and finishes his homework, he heads to the barn to feed and water all of the dogs. When the family isn’t ranching they said they love to spend their time together in the practice pen, at a high school rodeo, a baseball game or a team roping. “This is our therapy,” Brandy said. “Getting to leave the ranch to go compete is our vacation!” The family is very familiar with McCoy’s as they built their own home using mostly supplies from McCoy’s. “Everyone in the San Angelo McCoy’s knows us by name!” Brandy said. “They are our friends, always going above and beyond in customer service and quality in their products.” The Lloyd’s said they are honored to be selected as the McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family of the month!

27


PRESIDENT - KERA LAMB VICE PRESIDENT - CARLI RAWLINSON SECRETARY - PAISLEY PIERCE

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS RORY KOEHN 1669 CR 230 • Weimar, Texas 78962 979.263.5644 • koehnranch@cvctx.com

STUDENT OFFICERS

SCOTT SHOOK 5750 FM 360 • Needville, Texas 77461 713.851.9553 • scotctshook@yahoo.com

Region VII

SECRETARY - NENA BOETTCHER PO Box 833 • East Bernard, Texas 77435 281.468.8973 • region7thsra@gmail.com

CRAIG MILLER 11603 Anders Lane • Santa Fe, NM 77510 409.682.5427 • craigwmiller80@yahoo.com PRESIDENT- CRAIG MILLER 11603 Anders Lane • Santa Fe 77510 409-682-5427 • craigwmiller80@yahoo.com

28

PERFORMANCE REPORT

Let It Roll

S

By JAYCI LEE BYLER

– Performance Reporter

ometimes ya gotta let it roll.... and that’s what several kids did at our last seasonal Region VII rodeo. We met up in Edna, TX on February 15 & 16 to determine the top ten that would represent us at state finals in Abilene. It was a tough battle to keep your spot in the top ten. We had a battle in the Barrels with a tie for 1st & 2nd, Breakaway had 3 girls roping it off for top honors, the Team Roping was a close race at the top with the bottom holes stacked. The Calf roping had a 4 way tie and a 1 point difference for top 10. As the dust cleared and the points were being

calculated, we gathered to eat Pizza and share God’s word at church service given by Robbin Rice and Madison Outhier. This year ended with us growing closer as a Rodeo Family for we lost another loved one in January, with the passing of Harlan Boettcher, husband to our secretary, Nena. Saturday evening we had a fundraiser for Harlan Boettcher Memorial with crawfish and barbecue platters being served and a live auction. The attendance was in abundance as we sold out of crawfish and the generosity of the bidders was heart warming. Region VII presented the team roping saddles in memory of Harlan Boettcher, the winners were Rylee Reina & Logan Moore. The Will Byler Memorial Scholarship was awarded to Connor Atkinson & Landris White won the Steer Wrestling saddle given in memory of Will Byler, a past Region 7 Champion. Will and Harlan touched so many at Region VII, the stories shared throughout the weekend bought tears of laughter where there had been sorrow. As the smallest region, we are all family, look no further for there is always a shoulder to lean on when times get tough. A story to be shared to bring a smile to a face, a chuckle of laughter or even a hug shared between one another. “Be strong and of good courage do not fear nor be afraid of them; for the Lord your God, He is the One who goes with you. He will not leave you nor forsake you.”-Deuteronomy 31:6. Our Region VII President Craig Miller & Scott Shook started the awards banquet by honoring the student officers with custom hatboxes designed by Marissa Atkinson for their dedication of putting up banners and promoting our Region VII. Our region Champions are Team Roping: Rylee Reina and Logan Moore, Steer Wrestling: Landris White, Saddle Bronc: Jake Bazar, Reined Cow Horse:

LEFT TO RIGHT: JR HIGH AA & ROOKIE: KAITLYN TORTES; REINED COW HORSE: ROBBIN RICE; BILL & KERRI BYLER PRESENTING CONNOR ATKINSON WITH THE WILL BYLER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP


GIRLS CUTTING: CHAMPION SAMANTHA PERKO, RESV JAYCI LEE BYLER, ROBBIN RICE, MADISON OUTHIER, HANNAH BASS

REGION OFFICERS CARLI, KERA, JAYCI & ROBBIN

Robbin Rice, Pole Bending: Jayci Byler, Goat Tying: Makenna Shook, Girls Cutting: Samantha Perko, Calf Roping: Nick Achille, Bull Riding: Toby Carpenter, Breakaway Roping: Aspen Miller, Boys Cutting: Carson Ray, Barrel Racing: Split between Hannah Bass and Reagan Goudeau, Bareback Riding: Hunter GreatHouse. The All-Around Champion for the boys: Nick Achille, the All-Around Champion for the girls: Jayci Byler, the AllREGION VII AA CHAMPIONS: NICK ACHILLE Around Rookie Champion for AND JAYCI LEE BYLER, ROOKIE: HANNAH the boys: Colin Fox, the AllBASS & COLIN FOX , JR HIGH ROOKIE: BRYCE EHLINGER Around Rookie for the girls: Hannah Bass. This High school year has been an amazing year. But now we have to gear up and get down to business for the state finals in Abilene. See y’all down the rodeo trail. #GodIsStillGood

SEE YOUR LOCAL TEXAS KUBOTA DEALER FOR EXCITING DETAILS ON OUR FULL LINE OF TRACTORS AND HAY TOOLS!

WWW.KUBOTA.COM

29


PO Box 787 • Asherton, TX 78837 830-999-3344 • tom@catarosaranch.com

PRESIDENT- TOM AASBO

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS

STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - KATE MCNEIL VICE PRESIDENT - RYLEE DODSON SECRETARY - SYDNEY BLAIR

JASON UNDERBRINK 520 Phillips Rd • Pleasanton, Texas 78064 210.854.7718 • jasonunderbrink@yahoo.com 3005 Santa Ana St. • Corpus Christi, Texas 78415 361.739.9858 • region8thsra@gmail.com

Region VIII

SECRETARY - CELINA FETTY

KIM NICHOLSON 8434 N. US Hwy 183 • Goliad, Texas 77963 830.570.7302 • kim_nicholson@att.net PO Box 787 • Asherton, TX 78837 830-999-3344 • tom@catarosaranch.com

PRESIDENT- TOM AASBO

30

PERFORMANCE REPORT

Rodeo for the Community!

J

By Rylee

Howton – Performance Reporter

anuary was chilly but a great opportunity for Rodeo kids to show love to their community. The selfless members of Texas High School Rodeo Association Region VIII wholeheartedly donated items for our community service project. Our enormous gratitude goes to Kate McNeill, who helped in coordinating the project and collecting the items. We managed to donate several things, including saddles, bridles, and clothing. Rodeo, like most sports tasks the body, keeping it strong. Strength of the body, the mind and character form an almost inseparable trio. As members of THSRA, we are privileged to partake of this wholesomeness. The horses are as sturdy as they are gentle, and it is imbued in our conscience that if the beast can be congenial to the less strong human, then much is required of us in our interactions with fellow humans. You can now clearly understand why Region VIII is so endeared to the community. Man has a duty to serve fellow man, in so doing the servant gains immense strength. We as a club are enjoined to those who have realized the gem of

service, the likes of the esteemed Miracle Farm. The TJHRA is committed to the betterment of the community, augmenting the organization’s mission statement to offer the youth of tomorrow in grades 6th – 8th a chance to be competitive student-athletes while expecting the highest of scholastic achievement. Eventually, the kids turn out to sportsmen worthy of a mention in the arena. The club is proud to mentor and guide our members to achieve good morals while learning a work ethic in and out of the arena. With a clear vision of the future, and a successful past we will continue to be a pillar of strength supporting the youth of Texas. As mentioned earlier, the Miracle Farm is our companion in the noble mission of giving a second leaf of life to boys who have faced diverse challenges in their lives. The mission has an extended arm for these boys, beckoning to them where they think that the hurdle is insurmountable. The Miracle Farm has been a valued bosom friend since 1989. Hats off for the Miracle Farm, for it has seen boys who had thereto been hapless become men of strong minds, body and character. THSRA Region VIII is immeasurably privileged to be associated with the Miracle Farm. Little wonder then that the club is never hesitant to join hands with the Miracle Club. Today, the Miracle farm is incorporated as an independent 501(c)(3) nonprofit entity. It is also an integral affiliate of the Children at Heart family of ministries.

REPLACE PIC OF NHSRA STUDENT ATHLETE OF MONTH WITH THIS PIC OF REGION VIII SERVING AT MIRACLE FARM


Miracle Farm is based on the Christian faith and the pillars of its existence are anchored on the living doctrine. As such, showing utmost regard for human life is an indispensable tenet in its charter and mission. Contemporarily, Miracle Farm is unmistakably mindful about tomorrow’s society, and its perpetuity, and leadership. In young boys, the stewards of the Miracle Farm envision robust men who will be the protectors of the posterity. Life is a journey fraught by innumerable perils, once in a while, boys are tossed into the thorny terrain, by virtue of their descent or environment or nurture. The auspicious Miracle Farm has duty hastened to the rescue of the young souls. The mature folks there tenderly condition the lads to learn to look up to the cross for solitude; along they are indoctrinated to value servitude and solidarity. What a better landing for these young souls, for whom the popular culture lacked a soft spot, leaving them to just bob up and down as if tossed by the perilous sea of insecurity. A soft landing is an understatement as we forage for the apt diction of

what the Miracle Farm has so far accomplished. It is only suitable to call it a home for the boys, for it abounds in acceptance and a sense of significance for the scathed souls. As the adage goes, birds of the same feather flock together, THSRA and the Miracle Farm have many a times found a reason to come together for the benefit of the community. Sports have a way of bulldozing the inertia of inconsiderate conscience and stabilizing the resolve to make a positive impact. When the club got a window to extend their vitality, the members did so compassionately, almost compulsively. There are many parallels between the Miracle Farm and THSRA; most outstanding is the fact that the two beacons of humaneness are as serious about today’s life as they are about tomorrows. The boys, who were in the Miracle Farm, now men of substance, must look back to the past shared at their former home with a sense of nostalgia. I came to this conclusion when I bumped into an erstwhile member of THSRA Region VIII, Shelby Herrmann. She was as enthusiastic about the activities of the club as during her hey-

days. Shelby has recently been seen mentoring some of our youth at our regional rodeos and is a 2X THSRA National Qualifier, College National Finalist, 2X American Qualifier, and in 2015 finished just outside the bubble in the top 25 in the 2015 WPRA World Pro Rodeo Standings. She is an awesome person, has great demeanor and doesn’t mind being a role model for others. THSRA hopes that their gesture will be emulated by others. The Miracle Farm is receptive to all those who want to be involved with its mission to build a warm home for the needy boys. Those willing to donate should not hesitate in their good deeds. There is no donation that the Miracle Farm will not appreciate; finished head horse saddles and tack as well as western styled clothing. There is a single last regional rodeo in the offing prior to the awards ceremony to be held in March, thankfully, Region VIII has been my family as well as home. To the Miracle Farm, let us keep serving our community in earnest. Good luck to everyone competing at The Patriot, Jr American and the first ever Jr NFR!

31


PRESIDENT - CLAYE ANN SULLIVAN VICE PRESIDENT - RHEAGAN COTTON SECRETARY - MONTANA BROWN

Priefert Junior Elite Program

STUDENT OFFICERS

198 Pool Road • Richards, Texas 77873 936.661.4163 • rhanagriff@gmail.com

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS ROGER HANAGRIFF

240 Pool Road • Richards, TX 77873 936.661.8988 • announcer.mcmahon@gmail.com

DAVE MCMAHON

SECRETARY - LACEY AUBIHL 1326 PR 5011 • Ledbetter, Texas 78946

Region IX

979.251.4131 • laceyaubihl@thsra9.com

460 Bishop Road • Huntsville, Texas 77320 713.417.6042 • donjackson321@gmail.com

DON JACKSON

PO Box 1177 • Madisonville, Texas 77864 281.785.0077 • mghormley@me.com

PRESIDENT- MIKE GHORMLEY

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PERFORMANCE REPORT

H

By Boyd

Hanagriff – Performance Reporter

ave you ever had to pay for you entry fees and if you do you would know that this stuff aint cheap. Most all of you have had help from someone and once that runs out you know that you will need some financial support to keep entering. That is what the Priefert Junior Elite program will teach you, it will show you how to treat your rodeo carrier like a business so it can last, the mental side of the sport to the importance of an education, financial preparedness to the importance of character. Last year I was fortunate to be selected to be a part of the Priefert Junior Elite program. Most people know the brand and its line of dependable products. Recently, they started a program focusing on the development of youth in the area dealing with potential sponsors and how to represent them well. Each month Representatives of the Priefert Pro Team of endorsees. such as Tyson Durfey, Kacey Feild, or various corporate leaders and people dealing with sponsorships in other major companies take time to visit with us on these calls. These guest speakers are selected by

the directors of the program. Based on the topic of that months call there will be at least one pro team member and one from the industry like this month’s call focusing on “What it means to be and Endorsee” with Corey Wiese who handles sponsorships for YETI. The PJE members listen to what they have to say and we can ask questions as well. Afterwards, we are required to answer a few questions and submit those to our Priefert coordinator. Each year they have two meetings called “Roundups” where team members are given the opportunity to tour the facility and see the process of making the Priefert products. The Roundup last two and a half days with FOOD and photoshoots where the camera people tried to get me to take at least one good picture. There are also sessions where team members can listen and ask questions to guest speakers like Trevor Bazile, Bobby Mote, and Speed Williams, among other very notable personalities in our sport. But behind all of the programs are the directors and the team leaders, they help run the program and I had the opportunity to ask one of the directors, Cortney Dyer, a few questions about the program. Cortney Dyer said that this program was the brainchild of Eddie Priefert who wanted a program to develop the youth for the future of rodeo and give them the tools to succeed in the future. The program was announced in October of 2018 at the NFR and the team was announced February of 2019. Cortney said that the programs main goal is keeping rodeo performance second only tp building character and helping the members gain the skills they need to successfully make deals on sponsorships and being a good Endorsee. Cortney also brought up the long term goal of this program is to build leaders that can positively represent the western lifestyle and show what it really is to a population that wishes to remove itself of traditional way and rid itself of our event. This is why this program is really important because in the future keeping rodeo alive will require educated well-spoken leaders to keep our tradition alive. If you have read this far, sadly, I will inform you that applications have closed for this year and they will not open again until 2021. If you are the kind of person who wants to add longevity to your rodeo carrier or have success, in general, this program will teach you how to do that. Priefert has always been a great company but the more I learned about them through this program the more respect I had for this company. Something that stuck out to me is that before every meal we blessed the meal in Jesus name which in a company that big and successful they kept to that and they earned my respect and the respect of man, if not all of the team members. If this is a program you consider entering then next year they will open the applications and you need to apply. They will give you the financial intel to keep going and stuff isn’t getting any cheaper with $3.15 for a gallon for diesel. Before I end this, I would like to thank Cortney Dyer for answering my questions, Priefert and the PJE directors for putting this on to arm the youth to succeed for the future.


Spring Fashion

Denim Mule Backpack $29.99

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Rope Like A Girl Hat | $29.99

continued on pg 34

Short Go Women’s Tee | $26.99

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Resistol RR “Rawlins” Dark Denim Shirt $44 | resistol.com

Charlie 1 Horse “Let’s Rodeo” $150 | resistol.com

Idyllwind Women's Snake My Way Western Boots - Snip Toe $179.50 bootbarn.com

hyosilver.com

Look for the retro western look this spring when you are adding boots and accessories to your old favorites. Our Buckaroo Wild Rag is a nod to the 50’s with classic details and colors that add a vintage touch to your outfit. 21” 100% Silk Wild Rag $49.00 | thefort-tx.com

Find this look at www.buck-fergeson-originals.myshopify.com This spring watch for girls wearing their wild rags styled as tops. They can be worn by themselves or even under a denim jacket. It is a great way to add a pop of color to your favorite jacket or dress up your favorite jeans and boots. 42” 100% Silk Wild Rag $89.00 www.thefort-tx.com

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Black/White Shorts w/ THSRA logo. $25.95 | chgraphics.com Candy Chambray $84.00 | kimesranch.com Shyanne Women’s Python Print Flare Pants $59.99 | bootbarn.com Resistol 20X “Desert Range” Straw $130 | resistol.com

Arrow Pendant w/ Rose Gold Scrolls $165 hyosilver.com


Leather Backpack outlawspirit.com

Show Me Your Mumu Women's Casablanca Stripe Find this look at Berkeley Bells www.buck-fergeson-originals.myshopify.com $145.99 | bootbarn.com

Idyllwind Women's Charmed Life Western Boots - Round Toe $189.50 | bootbarn.com

Lack Of Color Women's Dusty Mauve The Fleur Wool Hat $99.00 | bootbarn.com

Spring Fashion Looks Index

Resistol 20X “Forester” $130 | resistol.com Blaze Hood $72.00 | kimesranch.com

Find this look at buck-fergeson-originals.myshopify.com

Charlie 1 Horse “Hawaii Ya” $32 | resistol.com

Bracelets outlawspirit.com

Hooey 35,48 The For t 45 Hyo Silver 14 Outlaw Spirit 40 Corral Boots 39 Buck Fergeson 36 Boot Barn 29 Kimes 16 Wrangler 03

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STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - SAIGE SEALY VICE PRESIDENT - MAKENZIE DOWELL SECRETARY - CHAINEY WEITZ LARRY DOWELL 370 CR 220 • Marlin, Texas 76661 254.715.8814 • fivedowell@gmail.com

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS

817.648.2728 • texasregion10@gmail.com

RENEE WEITZ PO Box 40 • London, Texas 76854 512.332.6731 • weitzrr@gmail.com

SECRETARY - STEPHANIE SHOEMAKER 6500 CR 1202 • Cleburne, Texas 76031

MATT SILAR 104 CR 867 N • Teague, Texas 75860 903.388.2531 • matt.silar@patriotinsp.com PRESIDENT - JERRY WRIGHT 434 CR 315 • Oglesby, Texas 76561 254.290.4965 • jerrywrighthomes@hughes.net

PERFORMANCE REPORT

Saddled Up & Ready to Compete!

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By CHAINEY

WEITZ – Performance Reporter

ow that spring is about to start everybody is getting into their second semester rodeos. For region X we only have one more region rodeo left. The finals. The finals are the most competitive region rodeo of the year. Anything could change with some people only having a point separating each other. Only taking ten spots to state is so competitive in region X, with everyone having that vengeance to make it to state or win the region. Wanting to win takes a lot of work, for rodeo kids should know. Taking care of your horses is a lot of a bigger job than people think. Having to keep them in shape and have them tuned up to do the best of their ability takes hours of your day. Something that also gets in the

way of this huge responsibility especially for me is school. With school you aren't home most of the day and then have loads of homework when you get home, even on the road you will have homework to do. Not only does homework get in the way but also the multiple sports I do. When I get home at 7pm with my whole body hurting from track and tennis, I still have to turn the lights on and practice. Rodeo takes a lot of want, and having want is what makes you win. One fun event coming up for region X is the rodeo prom! It is a fun rodeo with your friends when the rodeo prom happens; everybody looking nice and having a great time. The spring is one of the busiest times for Jr High and High School rodeos. Before we know it state will be here and everyone will be ready to go. Just be saddled up and ready to compete!

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CLAYE ANN SULLIVAN OF REGION IX by Catelyn Felts

C

The Whataburger Whatakid is selected due to their ability to excel both in and out of the rodeo arena. Whataburger is proud to recognize a THSRA member from each of the ten Regions who truly upholds the title “Whatakid!” One of the nominees will be chosen at the State Final Rodeo in June as the Whatakid of the Year. In recognition of this accomplishment they will receive free Whataburgers for an entire year!

ongratulations to the Region IX Whatakid of the Month, Claye Ann Sullivan. The Anderson-Shiro High School senior resides in Anderson, Texas and has been a Texas High School Rodeo Association member for four years. She competes in the breakaway roping and pole bending. Throughout her involvement in THSRA, Claye said she “has learned how to be responsible, become a better leader, overcome struggles and to accept defeat when you don’t always win.” She has carried the leadership skills she has learned into office, as she served as the Region IX student president her junior year, and is currently serving as the student president this year. Some of her favorite takeaways from the organization include the competition, the relationships and memories she has made, and the rodeo family she has gained. “Rodeo family are there for you in or outside of the arena,” Claye said. “If it’s a pep talk to encourage you before your event and give you pointers, or to be there afterwards with a congrats or a kind word if it didn’t go as planned. I’ve learned that there are ups and downs, not only in the arena, but in life as well.” She explained how rodeo is more than just a sport. “It is

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also about the commitment you make, the responsibilities you have to take care of your horses, and the practice hours you put in.” She spends quite a bit of time with her horses Dolly, Gus, and Peewee. Dolly, although not quite living up to her name as a “Doll” according to Claye, is a pole horse, while Gus and Peewee are both breakaway horses. Gus is 24 years old this year, and though he has had many highs in his career, including eight THSRA state competitions and two National High School Finals competitions, Claye said Gus will officially be retiring this year. “My favorite memory with Gus is when I caught my first calf on him; it was a great feeling knowing we were finally clicking,” she said. Outside of rodeo, Claye is a varsity volleyball player, student council member, and 4-H member. She is also a National Honor Society member, in the top 10% of her class and has been awarded Academic Allstate, TGCA Academic All-State List for Volleyball. Throughout all of her endeavors, in and out of the arena, Claye said she likes to stick to two key mottos. ‘Always be humble and kind’ and ‘A life spent helping others is a life filled with purpose’ because “when you follow this, you will always be a winner in everything you do,” Claye said. With young wisdom often comes a wise source of inspiration. Claye said she has a few people she looks up to. One of which is Terry Winfrey who helped Claye start roping. “All of the hours and the days spent in the roping arena with him have really helped me get to where I am today,” Claye said. “He always taught me that if I fail, keeping trying and pick my head up because there’s always next time.” Additionally, Claye said she looks up to her parents, and is forever appreciative of the support they have shown her and their continuous belief in her and her capabilities. “I know that I can always rely on them to take me to any rodeo and be there,” Claye said. “Even when I didn’t have the best day.” In the future, Claye said she plans to attend Sam Houston State University and major in ag business so she can become an agricultural sales representative. In the meantime, Claye said she is honored to be selected as the Whatakid of the Month for Region IX. We wish Claye all the best in her final semester of high school rodeo and beyond!


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• 38 teams competed in the CNFR in the past 20 years • 40+ rodeo members every year • 9 National Champions/10 Reserve Champions • 2019 NIRA Reserve National Champion Men’s Team • Covered arena & practice stock Located in the Heart of Texas where we are close to everything! Transferability to all major universities. 24/7 practice arena, practice stock, stalls, covered practice facility, paid travel for team memberships plus other benefits. For more information contact: Paul Brown, Head Coach 254.659.7860 | 254.205.4055 (mobile) | pbrown@hillcollege.edu Hill College -112 Lamar Dr., Hillsboro, TX 76645 | www.hillcollege.edu

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2019-20 Rebels Rodeo Team


JUNIOR HIGH

Kinley Shook

TJHRA STATE SECRETARY

K

inley Shook is 13 years old and attends Needville Junior High where she is a cheerleader and plays volleyball. She is involved with my community, several youth rodeo associations, and Region VII. She competes in barrel racing, breakaway roping, pole bending, ribbon running, and goat tying. Her favorite event is goat tying. She competed her first year at the Junior High finals in barrel racing and goat tying. She is a member of Needville FFA, UIL, All A Honor Roll and attends Parkway United Methodist Church. When she is not rodeoing she enjoys practicing and training her young horses and hanging out with her friends. She is very excited about serving as the TJHRA State Secretary.

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THSRA / TJHRA Student Officer Trip

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n an effort to improve awareness about Texas High School and Junior High Rodeo Associations, the officer teams traveled to the Dallas/Ft. Worth area to meet sponsors, rodeo officials and potential members. Officials from Ft. Worth Stockshow and our sponsors made this a trip to remember! Some of the officers wrote highlights from each trip on what they learned and accomplished during their tours.

CLASSIC ROPES/EQUIBRAND TOUR by Garrett Talamantes – President- Texas Junior High Rodeo Association

What’s the secret to making a Powerline, Viper or Spitfire rope? We’ll we headed up to North Texas to find out for ourselves. As we pulled up to our destination, I noticed there were no fancy signs, store front, or even a reception area. In fact, the building sitting behind the locked gate looked like nothing more than a shipping warehouse. Why? You may ask. Well we went inside to find out. We started our tour of the Classic Ropes facility with a welcome and introduction by Equibrand CEO Ken Bray and Chief Operating Officer Craig Bray. It was interesting to learn the simple beginnings of one of the most wellknown and respected manufacturers in the western industry. From their humble start, to their rise in the industry and then the major setback of a devastating fire, the Equibrand Family has persevered and continued to pioneer the art of rope making. So what makes them so special? I mean, a rope, is a rope, is a rope right? Well, we quickly learned a Classic is more than a roll of pre-waxed rope, wheeled off a truck, cut to length and tied. This process also required a year of curing before the rope could ever be used. Who’s got a year to wait? On the contrary, every rope in the Classic line-up is individually spun to length in-house, using high-tech nylon and polyester fibers, then waxed and tied. The result is better memory, feel and immediate usability. Classic has spent years developing their unique process, designing proprietary means of spinning materials together and taken considerable measures to protect their intellectual innovations. However, even with all this research and innovation, the big secret to Classic Ropes isn’t their one of kind machines spinning materials hidden behind chain link and closed doors. It’s not the process by which they wax, how they stretch or even how they tie their ropes. We found the real secret is their people. The resiliency to overcome devastating loss, rebuild and forge ahead. It’s the pride that exudes in their words, their craftsmanship, and in their passion to not only to make a better product, but to make the sport better as a whole. Thank you Equibrand for your continued sponsorship and Thank You for teaching us the secret to making a great product. It’s called heart.

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RESISTOL by Emma McCarthy, TJHRA Vice President

Resistol is such a great place to tour! It was founded in 1927 by E.R Byer so Resistol has been running strong for 93 years and counting. There are so many hands that touch every hat. They do things like putting designs on the hats, putting sweatbands in, making the shape of the hat and so much more. It is interesting how so many people have worked there for over forty years. They are working every day to make sure that everything is perfect to be shipped out. One type of hat that they make is the straw hat that is typically worn during the summer. It was crazy to learn how straw harts are made! They are hand-made in a style called the basketweave then shipped out to the factory. When they arrive at the factory they are pressed to the right size, a wire is sewn into them, sweatbands placed and then finally dipped in lacquer ready to be sold. The other type of hat that is commonly worn during the winter are felt hats. The way they are made is very similar to straw hats but there are a few differences. Unlike straw used


in straw hats they take the fur and make it into a tall and kind of round shape. Then they are pressed down into the appropriate size. After that, they shape the crown and then sew the hat band in. Finally, it will be inspected multiple times then put into its own individual box to be ship all across the world. Overall Resistol was a lot of fun to visit and I learned so much about the hats that so many people wear! The people there are fantastic and so nice. The hats are amazing from how they are made to the quality that you see in the stores. If you ever get the chance to go to a Resistol factory I really encourage it. If you don’t have time to visit the factory, then put it on your bucket list to at least find one of the closest stores carrying their hats and try some on, you might even find yourself taking one home! THSRA/TJHRA STUDENT OFFICERS VISIT FT. WORTH STOCKSHOW AND RODEO by Vie Vie Blanchard, Miss TJHRA

Arena dirt was flying with exciting rodeo performances at the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo! At 102 years old, their slogan, ‘This thing is legendary’ still rings true and the rodeo didn’t disappoint, even with the move to the new Dickies Arena! Texas Junior High and High School Rodeo Association student officers including Miss TJHRA, Vie Vie Blanchard and Miss THSRA, Taylor Mobbs got a behind the scenes tour of the new Dickies arena, even stepping foot on the soft sand and snapping a few pictures in front of the bucking shoots! While on the special tour, we learned old history still continues as they kept the look the same for the bucking chutes as well as the arena fencing. They even hauled in arena dirt from the grounds at the previous venue the Will Rodgers Coliseum. There are other big transformations, including updated 21st century technology, with the nation’s second largest center--one map-- big screen and twelve camera angles that bring the vividness of all the action and replays to whatever seat you’ve chosen. And that’s not the only big change you will see—they’ve added one of the big-

2019-2020 JUNIOR HIGH STATE DIRECTORS EXECUTIVE BOARD NATIONAL DIRECTOR CHRIS WOLFE

214-403-4638

cwwolfe630@gmail.com

PRESIDENT SCOTT SHOOK

281-437-8214

scottcshook@yahoo.com

1st VICE PRESIDENT JOE RICHARDS

806-676-5970

joe@diamondcattlefeeders.com

2nd VICE PRESIDENT SHANE HANCOCK

254-379-3516

shanehancock74@yahoo.com

DELEGATE 2 YEAR TERM DAVID FREEMAN

832-221-1253

chlfreeman@yahoo.com

DELEGATE 2 YEAR TERM LANCE GAILLARD

806-898-3748

lsgaillard@yahoo.com

DELEGATE 2 YEAR TERM ERIC HUSTON

817-368-0159

duaneoverton6113@gmail.com

DELEGATE 1 YEAR TERM BRAD DYER

832-928-1647

braddyer@live.com

DELEGATE 1 YEAR TERM JILL MURRAY 903-348-4356 murrayarena@hotmail.com SECRETARY ANNE DOLLERY 979-412-2551 texasjuniorhighrodeo@gmail.com

gest growing women’s events—women’s breakaway roping to the rodeo lineup! As we strolled the corridors in the basement of the arena, we bumped into the Justin Sports Medicine team and THSRA Sponsor, Dr. Tandy Freeman. He was kind enough to answer all of our questions about how he treats and diagnoses rodeo athletes—without the use of any x-ray or diagnostic technology available—except for his own two hands! From there the student officers were whisked away into the Cactus room for a dinner sponsored by the FWSSR. We all got the chance to talk about how incredible the new arena was and how excited we were to be able to be some of the first people to walk and set foot on the arena floor. It was an experience we will never forget, including being able to sit in those brand-new seats and experience the amazing Fort Worth Rodeo first hand, lights, camera, cowboys, cowgirls and all!

STATE DIRECTORS

Region I MONROE TIMBERLAKE KEVIN MCCREARY JUSTIN LANE

monroetimberlake@gmail.com kevin@mccrearysales.com shannon.lane@region16.net

806-344-6846 806-674-5601 806-733-5149

Region II BRANDI RICHARDS 806-676-2386 KELLY WOOD 432-940-1136 CHAD CURRINGTON 806-786-9016 Region III JEFF JORDAN 940-642-4372 SHANE CRISWELL 325-347-2656 DARRYL SHELTON 940-255-0738 Region IV JOHNNY YOUNG, JR PAIGE ALMON BRIAN LOGAN

903-249-1647 903-681-6592

Region V RICHARD BALDWIN 936-332-5466 JUSTIN KLEIN 936-590-0229 BRADY SCARBER 936-590-0585 Region VI CHARLES HENRY 979-221-4450 DENNY PATTERSON 832-330-3054 CLAY OHRT 361-571-1040 Region VII AMBER BASS LANDON EHLINGER DAN SIMPTON

979-255-2458 281-389-2784 936-870-5779

brandirichards@yahoo.com woodrodeogirls@yahoo.com ccurrington@sundowwnsb.com jjordan4372@gmail.com kodyhorses@yahoo.com dshelton@rdoequipment.com jpyoung75486@gmail.com epaigealmon@yahoo.com

r.baldwin147@icloud.com sendtojustin@yahoo.com brady@spartain-LLC.com crossfireexpress@att.net pattersondenny@gmail.com ohrt6@hotmail.com amberbass@greatertexasfoundation.org

landon@6Econstruction.com dansimpton@yahoo.com

Region VIII BEN ELLIS 361-701-1886 ben_ellis78@yahoo.com MATT SCIBA 361-571-7888 scibaadjuster@gmail.com CASS RINGLESTEIN 210-885-0902 cass.oasis@yahoo.com Region IX DAVID COLEMAN 936-661-3411 david@colemanandpatterson.com RUSTY MCCARTHY 936-206-4051 rust@RDMContracting.com BRAD DYER 832-928-1647 braddyer@live.com Region X SHELLEY TOWNSEND 830-798-7755 sarrington36@yahoo.com MATT SILAR 254-472-0133 matt.silar@patriotinsp.com BRANDON VACULIN 979-814-0351 bvaculin@gmail.com STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT GARRETT TALAMANTES V.PRES EMMA MCCARTHY SECRETARY KINLEY SHOOK PRINCESS VIE VIE BLANCHARD

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Farm & Ranch Family The folks at McCoy’s Building Supply understand that it takes a lot of hard work and the whole family pitching in to get things done on a farm or ranch. That’s why we’d like to take some time out to salute Texas High School Rodeo Association families who are farmers and ranchers. In our monthly Farm & Ranch Family Spotlight, we’ll feature one family, sharing their story of how they work together as a family to make their farm or ranch successful.The spotlight will run for 10 months; each month will feature a different Region. Each Regional McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family will receive a $100 McCoy’s Gift Card. The McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family of the Year will receive a $500 McCoy’s Gift Card and will be announced at the 2020 THSRA State Finals.

The Young Family of Region VI C

by Ava Anderson

ongratulations to the Young Family, Region VI’s McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family! This family is horse back almost every day running their cattle operation out of Rosanky, TX. On a combination of family land and leased pastures they run cattle and usually keep about 15 head of horses (most of which are handy not only as rodeo performance horses, but can be used to work cattle on a daily basis). The Young Family are also called on by several clients in the county to come and work and haul their cattle as well. “We all have a day job, but this is what we love to do,” Amanda Young said. Tab and Amanda have two children who both rodeo in our organization and attend Smithville schools. Nick, age 16, is the “2019 Rookie of the Year!” Young competes in calf roping and

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team roping, and for the record, competed in his first rodeo when he was only three years old. The 16-year-old sophomore attends Smithville High School, and lives in Rosanky, Texas. For the past several years, Nick has been on a winning streak racking up such other notable awards as the “2018 Goat-tying Champion”, and the “2018 LSYRA All Around Champion”. Most, recently he won in the (13-15 age group) in boys breakaway roping at the 2020 San Antonio Rodeo, and placed 3rd in the (13-15 age group) in the tie down roping. “Rodeo has taught me to handle pressure and never give up,” as Nick further stated, “I make sure that I pick up a rope every day. I’ve learned that you have good days and bad days and I always try to learn from my mistakes and to do better on my next run.”

Nick also looks up to his Grandpa, Carlos Wilhelm. “I enjoy spending a lot of time with my grandpa working cattle and roping. He has a great sense of humor, and we always have a good time roping at his house. Grandpa was a calf roper and team roper that roped for years in the PRCA, and I’ve gleaned a lot from him.” Rodeo is a family affair for the Young family. Nick has a little sister named Devin Young (13 years old, 7th grade), and she hails as the “2019 Texas Junior High State Champion Barrel Racer!” She also competes in poles and goat tying. At school she is in the 7th grade and is a cheerleader and is in the national honor society. “Devin is in the middle of it all when we are working cattle, in fact she is the one making sure we do everything right,” Amanda recalls. From vaccinating cattle to going out and catching them, this 7th grader is handy! In fact, when we did this interview, the family was in Ft. Worth at the Junior American getting ready to watch Devin compete. As a family, they spend a lot of time together in the arena and on the rodeo trail. Nick considers himself lucky that he has family and friends that he can practice with and according to him, “it makes practicing fun!” Nick feels honored that his family has been chosen as this month’s McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family, as he humbly states “There are so many families in Region 6 to choose from, and for us to be selected is a great honor!”


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