Extreme Team News - May 2023

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PRESRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FULTEK PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID BRYAN TX 77802 PERMIT # 23 PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID BRYAN TX 77802 PERMIT # 23 SPONSOR SPOTLIGHTS: YOUR GUIDE TO SUMMER FASHION 2023 TEXAS JUNIOR HIGH STATE FINALS 2022 TJHRA ROOKIE ALL AROUND COWGIRL JOSIE WHITTINGTON CHANCE ANDERSON 2022 TJHRA ROOKIE ALL AROUND COWBOY
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EXECUTIVE BOARD

STATE PRESIDENT

KEN BRAY

PO Box 1634 • Granbury, TX 76048 817.219.0436 • kbray@equibrand.com

1ST VICE PRESIDENT

JOHN SCHUENEMAN

PO Box 1177 • Madisonville, TX 77864 979.268.4994 • john.schueneman@gmail.com

2ND VICE PRESIDENT

BRENT CHARLESWORTH

PO Box 362 • Marathon, TX 79842 432.386.6214 • brent@crcompany.net

SECRETARY/TREASURER

SUSAN BALDWIN

722 Southview Circle • Center, TX 75935 936.590.4447 texashighschoolrodeo@gmail.com

NATIONAL DIRECTOR

MIKE GHORMLEY

PO Box 1177 • Madisonville, TX 77864 281.785.0077 mghormley@gmail.com

JUNIOR HIGH NATIONAL DIRECTOR

JOHN SCHUENEMAN 979.268.4994 john.schueneman@gmail.com

MARKETING

HOLLY DELAUNE

73 Breeze Way, Boerne, TX 78006 210.632.3208 delaune.holly@gmail.com

QUEEN COORDINATOR

RACHEL ROBBINS 361.894.5749 rachel.robbins3690@gmail.com

DELEGATES AT LARGE

MICHAEL AKINS

2449 West Line Road • Whitesboro, TX 76273 9410.368.9390 • makins1@yahoo.com

LARRY DOWELL

370 CR 220 • Marlin, TX 76661 254.715.8814 • fivedowell@gmail.com

JEFF PARSLEY 655 CR 4703 • Troup, TX 75789 903.574.3910 • jparselygeraniums@earthlink.net

JOE RICHARDS 5101 Hwy 214 • Hereford, TX 79045 806.676.5970 • joe@diamondcattlefeeders.com

BRANDON SMITH

6800 E FM 476 • Pleasanton, TX 78064 830.570.7157 • bmsmith1996@sbcglobal.net

STUDENT OFFICERS

thsraofficers@hotmail.com

STUDENT PRESIDENT

Garrett Talamantes

STUDENT VICE PRESIDENT

Tierney Myers

STUDENT SECRETARY

Abby McCreary

QUEEN

Sophia Zimmerman

MARYBETH BEAM

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CEILY SIMPTON

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RANCH FAMILIES:

THE SMITH FAMILY PG 25

THE BARANOWSK FAMILY PG 28

THE FRITSCH FAMILY PG 49

HOLLY DeLAUNE

Marketing Director

210.632.3208 • delaune.holly@gmail.com

LAUREN TUTTLE STUMBERG Graphics/Layout Director lauren@distinct-graphics.com

830.249.8020

BRIAN ROBERTS Computer Programmer brian.roberts53@att.net

281.213.9143

ARIAT PERFORMANCE REPORTERS

Region I

KASHLEE SCHUMACHER

Region II

BROOKE MADILL

Region III

COLTON WALTERS

Region IV

DIXIE TABB

Region V

GRACELANN BROWN

Region VI

BARRETT SHELTON

Region VII

SHELBY BRENT

Region VIII

SAMANTHA CORTINAS

Region IX

TYLIE MCDONALD

Region X

CORLEY CALLAHAN

THSRA OFFICIAL SPONSORS

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THSRA is a non-profit organization (501-C). Production of this publication was funded by membership dues and is provided complimentary to members of THSRA. Non-members may purchase annual subscriptions for $25.00
EXTREME TEAM NEWS Official Publication of the Texas High School Rodeo Association
Region news REGION I 29 REGION II 30 REGION III 31 REGION IV 32 REGION V 36 REGION VI 38 REGION VII 44 REGION VIII 46 REGION IX 48 REGION X 50 DR. TANDY FREEMAN
In This Issue
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PAGE
PAGE 12 PAGE 12
PHILLIPS
SPONSOR SPOTLIGHTS PAGE 56 GUIDE TO THE 2023 TJHRA STATE FINALS GUIDE TO SUMMER FASHION AUDREE
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With hundreds of our families getting ready to pack up their horse trailers and head to Gonzales this month, we thought that you would like to know more about visiting this beautiful and historical part of Texas. With a whole week to explore the area here is a great look at the history that can be found in Gonzales and a few businesses that would love for you to visit. Don’t be afraid to venture out of Gonzales and visit the charming towns of Shiner and Yoakum because they all have great things to experience too!

✯ ✯ ✯ ✯

GUIDE TO GONZALES GUIDE TO GONZALES GUIDE TO GONZALES

Gateway to Texas history...Gonzales, Texas

Gonzales is one of the earliest Anglo-American settlements in Texas, the first west of the Colorado River. It was established by Empresario Green DeWitt as the capital of his colony in August 1825. DeWitt named the community for Rafael Gonzáles, governor of Coahuila y Tejas. The 49 original blocks and seven public squares laid out in the shape of a Greek cross withstood the test of time and form the first Texas History Museum District.

Gonzales is most famous because it was the site of the first skirmish of the Texas Revolution. In 1831, the Mexican government gave the settlers a small cannon for protection against Indian attacks. At the outbreak of settler hostilities, a contingent of Mexican soldiers was sent from San Antonio to retrieve the cannon. On 2 October 1835, Texians under the command of John H. Moore confronted them. The Texans had fashioned a flag with the words “Come and take it”. The Texans successfully resisted the federal troops in what became known as the Battle of Gonzales. Gonzales later contributed thirty-two men from the Gonzales Ranging Company to the ill-fated defense of the Alamo. It was to Gonzales that Susanna Dickinson, widow of one of the Alamo defenders, and Joe, the slave of William B. Travis, fled with news of the Alamo massacre. General Sam Houston was here organizing the Texas army and anticipated the town would be the next target of General Antonio López de Santa Anna and the Mexican army. He had the town burned and ordered a retreat, thus precipitating the Runaway Scrape.

If you go visit the Gonzales Memorial Museum which serves a memorial to these 32 men you will see actual artifacts from this period in time. The real Come and Take It cannon is located in the museum to see up close and you can even touch it! Beautiful building full of Texas history and well worth a visit.

Some of the historical sites you may want to visit are the Old Jail Museum which is a hidden

treat. Located across from the fire station, the old Jailhouse staff will take you on a free personal tour of the first and second floors and allow you inside the jail cells. The walls have graffiti from former prisonsers. There is a gallows like the original that was in there on the second floor. Worth a visit and free!

There is a driving tour with signs located around the town. The tour goes in a loop and you can enter at any point so you will not miss any of the historical focus points of the town. The tour is free and you can download an app from Itunes with narration. It is called TOUR GONZALES. There are many historical homes and buildings that have been beautifully maintained and will take you back in time. This year the JB Wells facility has added a convention expo center where approximately 60 booths will be located. These booths will include boutique style shopping and agriculture and equine products. There is something for everyone so don’t miss out. The expo center is air conditioned so it will be a popular hangout in between performances.

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Information Courtesey of the City of Gonzales
Yoakum Gonzales Shiner

TJHRA Contestants,

Mname is Kinsley Scott and I am your 20222023 TJHRA state secretary. It is truly an honor to serve as your secretary and I want to begin by congratulating each of you for making it to the state competition. As one of your officers I have been privileged to participate in some exciting adventures. We have traveled to Dallas, Fort Worth, San Antonio, Houston and even out of state to Oklahoma. On one of our adventures, we met Joey and Lauren Austin of Spring Branch, Texas. The Austins are the owners of the Hooey Brand, a well-known brand among cowboys and cowgirls.

The Austins shared with us their story of how their brand and business got started. They also shared their new designs

and where their business is headed in the future. It was cool to listen as Mr. Austin shared how Hooey got started, how designs are created, what inspires those designs, and most of all who those customers are and what they want from the brand.

Their headquarters is in Spring Branch just outside San Antonio. In a look inside the warehouse, we saw just how many hats they had. At the warehouse we were shown their crossfit gym and we even participated in some fun competitions. They treated us all to lunch and we shared stories about ourselves and heard more stories about The Austins and the Hooey Brand that others may not know.

When lunch was over, we were treated to a trip to the arena. Yes, behind the warehouse was an arena where all things cowboy and cowgirl happen. There were horses saddled, calves for roping, and goats for tying. We spent most of that time in competition among the officers and learning more about the brand. We were all given bags full of goodies and Hooey T-shirts. We were all very grateful for the fun and educational day we had at the Hooey Distribution and appreciate the sponsorship and generosity of The Austins and their company.

TJHRA has been so generous to the officers and our sponsors have gone above and beyond to help junior high rodeo in any way they can. Rodeoing would be impossible without our sponsors and all the prizes they provide. Hooey has been one of our amazing sponsors. Their rodeo attire is made to fit what is best for us as cowboys and cowgirls. Their love for kids is obvious as they also sponsor THSRA and other associations. We cannot say thank you enough for Hooey and all sponsors of TJHRA.

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JUNIOR HIGH

THURSDAY, MAY 18

6:00PM - TJHRA/THSRA – Check in of JR High and High School Queen Contestants

6:00-9:00PM - TJHRA/THSRA Open Arena for Queen Contestants

FRIDAY, MAY 19

8:00AM-7:00PM - Gates will be open from 8am till 7 PM for trailer and horses. At 7 PM gates will be closed until Saturday morning at 7:00 AM

9:00AM -TJHRA/THSRA –Horsemanship Contest - Indoor Arena

4:00PM - TJHRA Princess Contestant Test

5:00PM - TJHRA/THSRA Queen Social/Meet-N-Greet

7:00PM - GATES CLOSE UNTIL 7AM SATURDAY

SATURDAY, MAY 20

7:00 AM - Contestants can start arriving 24 hour check in

9:00 AM - TJHRA/THSRA

– Queen Interviews

9:00 AM - 4:00PM - Light Rifle

Contestants NRA Light Rifle

Contest in Memory of Mike Myers

Check in at Rodeo Office

- Light Rifle Competition begins.

*Arrive 30 minutes before shooting times.

1:00 PM - TJHRA/THSRA Queen Luncheon (into/impromptu/ speech/modeling)

3:00 PM - LIGHT RIFLE SHORT GO WILL BEGIN AT 3PM

2023 TEXAS JUNIOR HIGH STATE FINALS RODEO SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

7:00 PM - Barrel and Pole Bending

Exhibitions – Indoor arena

- $10 a run Contestants

Only - stakes will be on different pattern

SUNDAY, MAY 21

HOOEY & KUBOTA TRACTORS SPONSORS OF THE DAY

9:00 AM - If needed conclusion of Light Rifle Contest City of Gonzales Firing Range

9:00 AM – 12:00PM - CONTESTANT CHECK IN - EXPO

9:00 AM – 4:00 PM - Vendors Open at Expo

10:00 AM - Church Service with Trey Johnson - Arena Stands

12:00 PM - ALL CONTESTANTS MUST BE CHECKED IN

12:30 PM - ROUGH STOCK EQUIPMENT CHECK – in the arena

1:30 PM - Regional State Qualifier Pictures – BEFORE meeting CONTESTANT’S MEETING

– Arena – ALL CONTESTANTS MUST ATTEND

Contestants must be in dress code

- Introduction of Sponsors, Rodeo Officials, and Rodeo Personnel

- Crowning of 2023 Princess

- Presentation of Bailee

Ackerman Byler Spirit Award

- Trey Johnson Motivational Message

4:00 PM - Parent/Member Ribbon

Roping Entries due in the office

5:00 PM - First Performance and

Beginning of 1st Go Round

1ST round BB Sunday PM

- Following perf - Jackpot at Outdoor Arena (All information on all jackpots will be posted at jackpot arena for the entire week) Goat Tying, Tie Down, Breakaway, and Team Roping

- Pole & Barrel Exhibition - Indoor arena $10 a run Contestants Only - stakes will be on different pattern

MONDAY, MAY 22

BOOT BARN, McCOY’S FARM & RANCH AND PRIEFERT SPONSORS OF THE DAY

7:15 AM – 7:45 AM - Bible Study in the Arena Stands with Trey Johnson and Robert Till

8:15 AM - Grand Entry – All Regions (be lined up at 8:00am)

8:30 AM - Second Performance of 1st Go Round

2ND round BB Monday AM

10:00 AM - 6:30 PM - Vendors

Open at Expo

2:15 PM - Grand Entry – All Regions (be lined up at 2:00pm)

2:30 PM - Third Performance of 1st Go Round

1st round SB Monday PM

10:00 AM – 6:30 PM - Vendors Open at Expo 30 Min afternoon Perf

- Volleyball Tournament

9:00 PM - 12:00AM Dance in front of Expo – Sponsored by City of Gonzales

- Jackpot at Outdoor Arena

- Pole & Barrel Exhibition - Indoor arena $10 a run Contestants

Only - stakes will be on different pattern

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TUESDAY, MAY 23

CLASSIC, RATTLER ROPES SPONSORS OF THE DAY

7:15 AM – 7:45 AM - Bible Study in the Arena Stands with Trey Johnson and Robert Till

8:15 AM - Grand Entry – All Regions

(be lined up at 8:00am)

8:30 AM - Fourth Performance of 1st Go Round

2nd round SB Tuesday AM

Vote for Student officer @ entrance of rodeo

10:00 AM - 6:30 PM - Vendors Open at Expo

2:15 PM - Grand Entry – All Regions

(be lined up at 2:00pm)

2:30 PM - Fifth Performance end of 1st Go Round

Beginning Bulls 1st round

Vote for Student officer @ entrance of rodeo

After Rodeo - First Go Awards in the arena.

After Awards - Rattler Rope Q&A Clinic with Justin Maas behind the Roping Chutes.

8:00 PM – Dog Races in the arena –- Jackpot at Outdoor Arena

- Pole & Barrel Exhibition - Indoor arena $10 a run Contestants (following dog races)

WEDNESDAY, MAY 24

PURINA, WHATABURGER, & SAY WHOA SPONSORS OF THE DAY

7:15 AM – 7:45 AM - Bible Study in the Arena Stands with Trey Johnson and Robert Till

8:15 AM - Grand Entry – All Regions

(please be lined up at 8:00am)

Announce 2023-24 Student Officers

8:30 AM - Sixth Performance beginning of 2nd Go RoundCont. Bulls 1st round WhataRodeo Day

10:00 AM - 6:30 PM - Vendors Open at Expo

2:15 PM - Grand Entry – All Regions (be lined up at 2:00pm)

2:30 PM - Seventh Performance of 2nd Go Round

End of 1st Round of Bulls

7:30 PM - PARENT/MEMBER RIBBON ROPING (arena)

- Sponsored – JENNINGS

PHOTOGRAPHY & J&J RODEO

- Jackpot at Outdoor Arena

- Pole & Barrel Exhibition

- Indoor arena $10 a run

Contestants

Only - stakes will be on different pattern

THURSDAY, MAY 25

RESISTOL & DY WCRA SPONSORS OF THE DAY – PINK DAY

7:15 AM – 7:45 AM - Bible Study in the Arena Stands with Trey Johnson and Robert Till

8:15 AM - Grand Entry – All Regions

(please be lined up at 8:00am)

8:30 AM - Eighth Performance of 2nd Go Round

Beginning of 2nd round of Bull Riding

10:00 AM - 6:30 PM - Vendors Open at Expo

2:15 PM - Grand Entry – All Regions

(please be lined up at 2:00pm)

2:30 PM - Ninth Performance of

TJHRA State Finals Expo Hours

SUNDAY, MAY 21ST: 9:00AM TO 4:00PM

MONDAY - THURSDAY, MAY 22ND - MAY 27TH: 10:00AM TO 6:30 PM

FRIDAY, MAY 28TH: 10:00AM TO 4:00PM

2nd Go Round

- Jackpot at Outdoor Arena

- Pole & Barrel Exhibition

- Indoor arena $10 a run

Contestants

Only - stakes will be on different pattern

30 Min after Perf - Tug Of War

FRIDAY, MAY 26

CH GRAPHICS, TEXAS FARM BUREAU

INSURANCE, LONESTAR TRANSMISSION SPONSORS OF THE DAY

8:15 AM - Grand Entry – All Regions (be lined up at 8:00am)

8:30 AM - Tenth Performance end of 2nd Go Round

After Rodeo - Second Go Awards in the arena

10:00 AM - 4:00 PM - Vendors Open at Expo

30 MIN After Awards - TJHRA Board of Directors Meeting – Elks Lodge

9:00 PM - 12:00AM - DJ – Sponsored by TJHRA

- Jackpot at Outdoor Arena

SATURDAY, MAY 27

BILL FICK FORD & BLOOMER TRAILERS SPONSORS OF THE DAY

10:00 AM - Short Go Awards

11:00 AM - Short Go Performance

4:00 PM - Champions Dinner – 2023 National Team @ Expo State Champion Awards

- Mandatory Meeting & Sign Up for Nationals

PLEASE NOTE: Due to unseen conflicts, this schedule is subject to change. Please check the OFFICIAL DAILY SCHEDULE posted outside the rodeo office. It is the responsibility of each contestant to be in the arena and ready when their respective event is underway.

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IMPORTANT!!!! IMPORTANT!!!!

MUST READ (If you don’t read anything READ THE CHECK IN DEADLINE)

TO ALL CONTESTANTS:

I want to welcome each and every one of you and congratulate you on qualifying for the State Finals. I hope your week with us is fun and memorable. Last year was a little different for everyone but we are going to make up for that this year!

STALLS AND HOOK UPS:

All regions will be placed together depending upon numbers. If you want to park next to someone in your region you must arrive together. Some of the areas have to be parked in the order they come in, this is why we CANNOT save spaces! If you are coming in and out you may run the generator during the day NO GENERATORS MAY BE RAN OVERNIGHT!

You should have already ordered your stalls. If you show up with extra horses there will be NO STALLS! All horses must be stalled overnight. NO EXCEPTONS!

You must have PRE ORDERED RV HOOK and STALLS!!! Do not show up with extras there will not be room!

GOLF CARTS:

We will have golf carts for rent this year. YOU MUST MAKE A RESERVATION so they will have you one! The City of Gonzales signed a contract making the golf cart company the exclusive transportation for the finals. No other golf cart, gator, mules, etc. may be brought onto the grounds. You must be 18 years of age to rent a cart and have a credit card. No drivers are allowed under the age of 16. If anyone under the age of 16 is caught driving, you will be asked to leave the grounds immediately and your back number will be pulled. IT MAY BE TOO LATE – BUT CHECK WITH THE COMPANY – THEY HANDLE ALL RESERVATIONS!

GOLF CART RESERVATIONS: (TIP – they do not bring extras) www.richmondequipment.com or call (281) 341-7755

MOST IMPORTANT:

This year you may come in on Friday, May 19, 2023 until 7:00pm at that time the gate will be locked and then the gates will re-open at 7:00 am beginning Saturday morning May 20, 2023 (they will remain open 24 hours after re-opening).

If you are driving south on Hwy 183 you will take a right; as soon as you pass the Guadalupe River.

If you are driving north on Hwy 183 you will be pass the arena and take a right; before the Guadalupe River and go underneath

the bridge.

If you are driving on Hwy 97 you will pass the main entrance to arena and come to a stop sign. Take a left onto Hwy 183 and go past the arena; take a right; before the Guadalupe River and go underneath the bridge.

BLEACHERS:

Each Region will have space in bleachers to decorate; but you cannot use electricity. Do not block the handicap seating areas. WE ARE GOING TO ASK THAT YOU REMOVE YOUR BLEACHER CHAIRS NIGHTLY SO THE STANDS MAY BE CLEANED!

WOOD SHAVINGS:

There will be wood shavings for sale on site for $10.00 per bag. If your stalls are not on dirt the City will provide the first two bags in your stall. You may bring your own shavings as well.

There is a full coin operated laundry mat on the grounds this year as well. They will be located at the check in the portable building.

The office will serve as the UPS/FedEX drop off. The physical address is 2301 CR 197, Gonzales, TX 78629

CONTESTANT/RIBBON ROPING:

These forms may be found on the TJHRA website www.tjhra. net on the forms.

GRAND ENTRIES:

We will have the same grand entry if you are in the performance you participate in the grand entry. You will ride in with your region, stop in a horseshoe, tip your hat and ride out in an orderly fashion.

LIGHT RIFLE CONTEST:

The shooting contest will be Saturday May 20 at the City shooting range, we will have directions in the office. The draw will be posted as we get closer to the contest. We will post on the www.tjhra.net website.

CHECKLIST FOR STATE CONTESTANTS:

REPORT CARD - this can be your last six weeks (5th six weeks report card), final report card or a letterhead letter from your school. DO NOT FORGET THIS!

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CURRENT COGGINS PAPERS - YOU MUST BRING A COPY OF COGGINS –THEY WILL BE TAKING THE COPY AT THE FRONT GATE, the only reason for health papers if you are crossing the state line. DUE TO SOME ACTIVITY OF COGGINS –YOU WILL HAVE TO TURN IN A COPY OF YOUR COGGINS AT THE FRONT GATE! Remember the gates open Saturday, May 20, 2023 at 7 am and will be open 24 hours. You may come in on Friday as long as you are there before 7:00 pm – if you can not be there by then wait until Saturday – the gates will be locked on Friday at 7:00 pm.

SUNDAY – MAY 21, 2023 EVERYONE!!! MUST COME TO THE EXPO BETWEEN 9 AM AND NOON I cannot stress this enough!!!!!!!!!!!!! If you have car trouble or something of the sort you must call Anne Dollery at 979-412-2551 before 1pm. You will be asked to bring a copy of a receipt! DO NOT BE LATE!!! NOON SUNDAY, MAY 21, 2023 IS THE DEADLINE TO BE CHECKED INTO THE OFFICE (this does not mean the trailer and stall check in – must come in and receive your back number)

CHUTE DOGGING STEERS: will be thrown Friday night, May 21, 2023 beginning at 8:00pm (contestants may watch but NOT PARTICIPATE) – this is subject to change and we will post on facebook and email

CALVES: Tie Down Ropers if you are entered in the event you may actually tie the calves down as they are tied to a post on Saturday morning, May 20, 2023 beginning at 8:00 am – they will be ran through that morning as well, by adults.

TEAM ROPING STEERS: will be ran through on Saturday morning, May 20, 2023 (contestants may watch but NOT PARTICIPATE)

GOATS: will be tied on Saturday morning 9:30 am, May 20, 2023 contestants will not be allowed to tie the goats this year. We will have qualified people conditioning the goats and that will be the only ties on them before competition.

Dogs are welcome at your trailers (leashed), but PLEASE DO NOT BRING TO THE ARENA – THERE IS NOT ENOUGH ROOM!

See you soon, if you need anything please call 979-412-2551 or email me at texasjuniorhighrodeo@gmail.com

MAKE A COPY OF YOUR COGGINS PAPERS AND BE READY TO TURN IN A COPY OF THEM AT THE FRONT GATE!

2022-2023 JUNIOR HIGH STATE DIRECTORS

EXECUTIVE BOARD

NATIONAL DIRECTOR

JOHN SCHUENEMAN 979-268-4994 john.schueneman@gmail.com

PRESIDENT JUSTIN CLINTON 432-631-0300 jlquarterh@gmail.com

1st VICE PRESIDENT DAN SIMPTON 936-870-5779 dansimpton@yahoo.com

2nd VICE PRESIDENT CODY ODELL 936-641-4222 codyrachelodell@gmail.com

EXEC BOARD AT LARGE

DELEGATE 2 YEAR TERM: CADE SCHNEEMANN (SERVING 2ND YEAR)

DELEGATE 2 YEAR TERM: LANDON EHLINGER (SERVING 2ND YEAR)

DELEGATE 2 YEAR TERM: DAVID FREEMAN (SERVING 2ND YEAR)

DELEGATE 1 YEAR TERM: CASEY ARMSTRONG

DELEGATE 1 YEAR TERM: BOBBY JACOBS

MARKETING HOLLY DELAUNE

MACI MEYER

PAST PRESIDENT SCOTT SHOOK 281-437-8214 scottcshook@yahoo.com

SECRETARY ANNE DOLLERY 979-412-2551 texasjuniorhighrodeo@gmail.com

PRINCESS CORD

DONNA ODOM, RACHEL ROBBINS, SARAH ROWLANDS

STATE DIRECTORS Region HEGAN LAMB 806-681-6557 heganlamb@yahoo.com

CLAY CAMERON 806-679-8132 claycameron09@yahoo.com

CW CATHEY 580-339-1469 cw.cathey11@gmail.com

Region II

MARK FOLEY

WESLEY BEAN 325-226-3905 wes@redstagop.com

KELLY WOOD 432-940-1136 woodrodeogirls@yahoo.com

Region III

TOMMY DELUNA 940-733-5755 t.ldeluna@yahoo.com

COLT MUNDEN 817-629-1073 cmundenbull@hotmail.com

WESLEY WHITE 254-434-1367

Region IV

CORY CONSTABLE 214-399-4539 coryconstable@hotmail.com

CALEB HODGES meganrose155@yahoo.com

DUKE ONEAL 903-453-7466 circle_d_ranch82@yahoo.com

Region V

AMANDA MERRIWETHER 936-546-6076 amanda_merriwether@hotmail.com

JACK THOMPSON 936-414-1217 jakethompson.RT1@gmail.com

CODY ODELL 936-641-4222 codyrachelodell@gmail.com

Region VI

CRAIG BOYD 281-889-3492 cbradleyboyd@yahoo.com

YANCY JAMES 830-377-4017 yancy@tejasrodeo.com

ANN WENTZEL 832-967-7329 annwentzel2020@yahoo.com

Region VII

DUSTIN FRANKUM 979-533-3675 dustinfrankum@yahoo.com

ROSS IVEY 361-455-6094 wrossivey@gmail.com

MORGAN KLEPAC 979-429-0483 morganklepac@gmail.com

Region VIII

ERIC DURBIN 830-480-2870 donalddericdurbin@yahoo.com

ANDREA WEEKLEY 210-844-4403 andiweekley@msn.com

CASS RINGLESTEIN 210-885-0902 cass.oasis@yahoo.com

Region IX

ERIC SCOTT 936-241-2501 ericscott290@hotmail.com

JARED ANDERSON BO WILLIAMS 979-220-5898 dwilliams@midsouthenergy.com

Region X

JAYME EMMONS 254-366-8198 jaymeemons@gmail.com

TRACY SWAN 254-592-6406 tracywswan@gmail.com

RICCI JONES 325-456-3123 silerran@yahoo.com

STUDENT OFFICERS

PRESIDENT TREVOR BENTLEY

VICE PRESIDENT

RYAN EHLINGER

SECRETARY

KINSLEY SCOTT

PRINCESS

TILDEN SHOFNER

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If you were to survey the general public and ask them to describe a rancher, the first word they would likely utter is the pronoun "he." Although most associate agriculture with men, women have long since held an integral role on ranches and farms. Though, it wasn’t until the mid-1980s when women’s contributions on the ranch and farm were gathered and documented by the Department of Agriculture, at which point they discovered nearly fifty percent of women who lived on a farm or ranch also helped work it in some capacity. It took another three decades for the Census of Agriculture to revise the demographic questionnaire to more accurately represent multiple on-farm/on-ranch decision makers. This resulted in nearly a seven percent increase—with the majority of these newly identified food producers being female.

The increase of women food producers is not only a byproduct of more accurate data. Women ranchers are on the rise. Over the decades, female ranchers as a whole have transitioned from some of the more traditional roles of bookkeeping and marketing to a wide range of physically demanding jobs including working cattle, which is currently the second largest category female food producers specialize in. "Cattle driving is my happy place," Caroline Nelson rancher and owner of Little Creek Lamb & Beef in Montana told us. "I am like an animal that finally found my right ecosystem. Sleeping outdoors, riding horses all day, moving cattle, not showering, feeling the sun and the wind on my face—I am in my natural habitat."

Upon observation, researchers discovered that women are not only attracted to being stewards of the land but they are drawn to the idealistic lifestyle of the American West. “The Western lifestyle is a humble culture,” said Darcy

Douglas, cowgirl out of Montana. “This lifestyle is about making things better. You close the gates when you come in. You leave it better than you found it. You pick up after yourself. You’re always helping. These strong family values in the Western culture are especially important raising my kids here.”

This way of life is not a fad for women that will soon end. In just five years alone, from 2012 to 2017, female ranchers and farmers increased by twenty-seven percent. Women are actively seeking careers in this field. Of the rising number of students achieving degrees in agriculture, women comprise more than half of the graduates in all agricultural programs, curving the trend on what has historically been a male dominated industry. “I’ve worked for a few different ranches and in my personal experience, it has not been easy being the only female for months at a time,” said Kristen Schurr, cattle rancher. “But I’ve definitely become a tougher person. I just go out there and do the job like one of the guys; hold my head high. I watch some of these old cowboys and learn with respect. It’s the best way and it has really helped me in my ranching career.”

Not only are female ranchers quickly absorbing the more physically demanding aspects of ranching, but they are learning the

"It is a matter of education, honesty, and mutual respect. It is about a strong bond between people. The Western world is welcoming. It is about community."

continued on page 24

13
presents

If you were to survey the general public and ask them to describe a rancher, the first word they would likely utter is the pronoun "he." Although most associate agriculture with men, women have long since held an integral role on ranches and farms. Though, it wasn’t until the mid-1980s when women’s contributions on the ranch and farm were gathered and documented by the Department of Agriculture, at which point they discovered nearly fifty percent of women who lived on a farm or ranch also helped work it in some capacity. It took another three decades for the Census of Agriculture to revise the demographic questionnaire to more accurately represent multiple on-farm/ on-ranch decision makers. This resulted in nearly a seven percent increase—with the majority of these newly identified food producers being female.

The increase of women food producers is not only a byproduct of more accurate data. Women ranchers are on the rise. Over the decades, female ranchers as a whole have transitioned from some of the more traditional roles of bookkeeping and marketing to a wide range of physically demanding jobs

including working cattle, which is currently the second largest category female food producers specialize in. "Cattle driving is my happy place," Caroline Nelson rancher and owner of Little Creek Lamb & Beef in Montana told us.

"I am like an animal that finally found my right ecosystem. Sleeping outdoors, riding horses all day, moving cattle, not showering, feeling the sun and the wind on my face—I am in my natural habitat."

Upon observation, researchers discovered that women are not only attracted to being stewards of the land but they are drawn to the idealistic lifestyle of the American West.

“The Western lifestyle is a humble culture,” said Darcy Douglas, cowgirl out of Montana.

“This lifestyle is about making things better. You close the gates when you come in. You leave it better than you found it. You pick up after yourself. You’re always helping. These strong family values in the Western culture are especially important raising my kids here.”

This way of life is not a fad for women that will soon end. In just five years alone, from 2012 to 2017, female ranchers and farmers increased by twenty-seven percent. Women are actively seeking careers in this

14
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J & J Rodeo Company’s Jackpot & Practice Arena

Texas Jr. High Finals Gonzales, TX

NIGHTLY JACKPOTS

Sunday 10:00 pm

Goat Tying

Break-Away Roping

Tie-Down Roping

Team Roping

Monday - Thursday 7:30 pm

Goat Tying

Break-Away Roping

Tie-Down Roping

Team Roping

Entry Fees - $50.00 / 1 head

Team Roping - $100.00/team (unlimited entries)

60% PAYBACK

Books open one hour prior to start of jackpot (1st to enter last to rope)

Books close at the start of each event

Jackpots will be in the outdoor arena, IF it is raining they will be moved to the indoor pen.

MORNING PRACTICES

7:00-8:30 am

MONDAY-FRIDAY

7:00 Break-Away Roping (must have a breakaway honda)

7:30 Tie-Down Roping

8:00-8:30 Team Roping

$15.00 per run or 3 runs for $40

For more information contact Heather Murray 903-461-4335

CASH ONLY PLEASE

JUNIOR

HIGH STATE FINALS WILL BE LIVE ON OUR OWN WEBSITE www.tjhra.net

You will be able to watch the TJHRA state finals on our website live....we will have many ways to advertise during those rodeo performances.

WOULD

YOU LIKE TO SHOWCASE YOUR CONTESTANT?

The first 100 to place an order will be showcased during the rodeos to the side. These spots are going fast - all you have to do is contact Anne at www.texasjuniorhighrodeo.com or call her at 979-412-2551. We will put it together for you once you scan a picture to us......let the world see your child for only $100 for the whole week. We will have a place on the side that will showcase all the contestants!

**MUST BE A TJHRA FINALS CONTESTANT TO PARTICIPATE**

rodeo personnel:

RODEO OFFICIALS EVENT STATE DIRECTORS

Arena Director Barrel Racing

Bobby Flores Region 10

Rodeo Secretaries Boy’s Breakaway Roping

Nena Boettcher Region 5

Anne Dollery

Jessalyn Pierce Boy’s Goat Tying Region 1

Announcer

Chris Rankin Bull Riding

Time Keepers Region 1

Cadi Wood

Kelly Wood Chute Dogging Region 9

Judges

Teddy Alleman Girl’s Breakaway Roping

Gip Allen Region 5

Doug Staton

Girl’s Goat Tying

Bullfighters Region 8

Hunter Allen

Cagney Anderson Pole Bending

Ryan Kirk Region 3

Stock Contractor/Jackpots

J & J Rodeo Co. – Cooper, TX Ribbon Roping Region 2

Photographer

Jennings Photography Team Roping Region 4

Video

Jennings Photography Tiedown Roping Region 7

Ground & Tractor

Mike Berberich

Sound – Music

Garrison Panzer

11TH ANNUAL TJHRA PARENT/MEMBER RIBBON ROPING

Sponsored by Jennings Photography & JJ Rodeo Company

When: Wednesday, May 24, 2023 30 minutes after 2:30pm perf (teams will pay entry fees in the Rodeo Arena office by 2pm on Wednesday, May 24, 2023)

Where: Rodeo Arena

Who: State Qualifiers and a parent or guardian. Entries should be turned in to the Rodeo Office (in Gonzales) and 50 teams will be randomly drawn to compete

How: A qualified state finals contestant and a parent or guardian can enter the parent/member ribbon roping. The team must be a coed team with the contestant roping and parent/guardian running. Entries will be taken in the Rodeo Office until 4:00 pm Sunday night (May 21st). 50 random teams will be drawn and posted in the rodeo office at 9:am Monday morning (May 22nd). The 50 teams who have been drawn will pay their entry fees in the Rodeo Office by 2pm Wednesday, May 24th , after 2pm we will begin roll ups to participate. Fees must be paid to compete.

Cost per team is $50.00. Entry fees will be paid at the jackpot arena. Jackpot will be donated to the scholarship fund for the Junior High.

Ropers will receive custom headstalls for Grand and Reserve Champion ropers. Runners will receive custom belt buckles for Grand and Reserve Champion runners. Dress Code will not be in effect!

2023 PARENT/MEMBER RIBBON ROPING OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM

If you want to enter this event – NOTICE!!!!

PLEASE READ CAREFULLY!!!

This form must be filled out and turned int the Rodeo Office on grounds in Gonzales, Texas BEFORE 4pm on Sunday, May 21!! NO LATE ENTRIES WILL BE ACCEPTED! DO NOT MAIL THIS FORM IN TO THE STATE OFFICE – IT WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED THERE!!!!

Roper must be a State Finals Qualifier. Runner must be a parent (or guardian). Random draw will be done in the Rodeo Office after the entry deadline has passed (4pm Sunday, May 21). Event is limited to 50 teams. The 50 teams that have been drawn will be posted in the Rodeo Office by 9am on Monday, May 22nd. Teams that have been drawn will need to pay fees in the Rodeo Office by 2pm Wednesday, May 24th, roll ups will begin after 2pm. The roping will start at 30 minutes after the 2:30pm perf on Wednesday in the Rodeo Arena.

Roper:_____________________________________________

Runner:____________________________________________

If you do not check in and pay your entry fees you won’t rope! We will not attempt to contact you so PLEASE BE ON TIME SO WE DON’T HAVE TO LEAVE YOU OUT OF THE FUN! Dress Code will not be in effect.

20

ALL AROUND & ROOKIES

REG ALL AROUND BOY ALL AROUND GIRL ROOKIE BOY ROOKIE GIRL

I Hagen Spiva Kesslye Fuller

II Dylan Page Brooke Adams

III Bowie Eakin Braylin Miller

IV Copper Stevens Wylie Jo Hodges

Cye Franzen Lainey McDaniel

Gage Jourdan Brielee Bennett

Teagan Stermer Laynie Munden

Kolten Reunard Storey Myers

V Bill Cody Odell Charley Ann Merriwether Gus Harris Dallee DeLaFosse & Kathryn Ellender

VI Stetson Springs Hadley Herndon Jace James Jacqueline Harkins

VII Trevor Bentley Maci Cook

VIII Enoch Hall Caylee Durbin

IX Ta’Colton Calhoun Lane Thibodeaux

X Devon Eakin Corley Tilson

Gunner Hightower Presley Harkness

Rhody Smith Payden Hedrick

Konnor Greer Presley Jacobs

Bowen Sanchez Jolie Morton

21

2023 TJHRA STATe FinAlS GRAnd enTRy

Region 6 will be in charge of the grand entry this year. We carry flags before each performance (morning and afternoon). Each region will be assigned a day to be in charge of sending at least 15 members to carry flags. The student officers for 2022-23 will help carry flags Monday through Wednesday night, the new officers will begin carrying flags Thursday through Saturday.

Sunday Performances will begin at 5:00pm please be ready to run flags at 4:45pm

Morning Performances will begin at 8:30 am please be ready to run flags at 8:15 am.

Afernoon Performances grand entries will begin at 2:30 please be ready to run flags at 2:15 pm.

Short Go will begin at 11:00 am please be ready to run flags at 10:45 am.

Region Assignment – morning and night performance: (please send 10 contestants per region)

SUNDAY - Region 5 & Region 8

MONDAY – Region 6 & Region 9

TUESDAY – Region 2 & Region 7

WEDNESDAY – Region 1 & Region 10

THURSDAY – Region 3 & Region 4

FRIDAY – Region 5 & Region 8

SHORT GO – Please send at least 1 from each region.

2023 TEXAS JUNIOR HIGH DIVISION STATE FINALS RODEO ORDER OF EVENTS

FIRST ROUND TO BEGIN SUNDAY AT 5:00PM THEN

MONDAY – TUESDAY 8:30 AM AND 2:30 PM

SECOND ROUND BEGIN WEDNESDAY – THURSDAY 8:30 AM AND 2:30PM CONCLUDING FRIDAY 8:30 AM

SHORT GO ON SATURDAY AT 11:00 AM

BAREBACK – 1ST ROUND SUN 5PM - 2ND ROUND MON 2:30PM (ALL FIRST EVENT)

SADDLE BRONC - 1ST ROUND SUN 5PM (LAST EVENT), MON 8:30AM (FIRST EVENT) - 2ND ROUND MON 2:30PM (LAST EVENT), TUE 8:30AM (FIRST EVENT)

BULL RIDING –1ST ROUND TUE 2:30M, WED 8:30AM WED 2:30PM

– 2ND ROUND THURS 8:30AM, THURS 2:30PM, FRI 8:30AM (ALL FIRST EVENT)

RIBBON ROPING BARREL RACING CHUTE DOGGING

TIEDOWN

GIRL’S BREAKAWAY

BOY’S BREAKAWAY

GIRL’S GOAT TYING

BOY’S GOAT TYING POLE BENDING

TEAM ROPING

***TENTATIVE ORDER OF EVENTS*** (SUBJECT TO CHANGE)

22
23 For All of Your Rodeo Assosciation Award Needs Discounts on Year End Awards: Gift Certificates Custom Chaps Pro Riding Boots Custom Bull Ropes Custom Bareback Riggings Custom Embroidery on All Sizes of Gear Bags 800-255-0105 903-874-3995 www.barstowprorodeo.com P.O. Box 1516 Corsicana, TX 75151 Texas Jr. High Finals – Gonzales, TX – May 20-21, 2023 NIGHTLY EXHIBITIONS $10 A RUN Tickets WILL BE SOLD AT THE ARENA | Stakes will be set off the arena running pattern CASH ONLY PLEASE barrel & pole exhibitions Saturday – 4pm Poles | Barrels Sunday – Thursday Following Afternoon Rodeo Poles | Barrles

POLK COUNTY YOUTH RODEO ASSOCIATION, Inc.

62nd Annual 4th of JULY RODEO

JULY 5th – 8th, 2023

$7,500AddedMoney

Jr. World Finals Qualifier for Bareback, Saddlebronc & Bulls

Barney Wiggins Arena

101 Fair St., Livingston, TX

See our Website: pcyratx.net & our Facebook page: Polk County Youth Rodeo Association, Inc.

For Details

Sell 3 Bloomer Tickets and Get One Free

That's right, if you sell 3 Bloomer Tickets, your family will get to enter one time for free! Claim this offer when your turn in your Bloomer tickets to your Region Secretary and she will give you a free ticket to put your families name on!

24

Farm & Ranch Family

The folks at McCoy’s Building Supply understand that it takes a lot of hard work and the whole family pitching in to get things done on a farm or ranch. That’s why we’d like to take some time out to salute Texas High School Rodeo Association families who are farmers and ranchers. In our monthly Farm & Ranch Family Spotlight, we’ll feature one family, sharing their story of how they work together as a family to make their farm or ranch successful. The spotlight will run for 10 months; each month will feature a different Region. Each Regional McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family will receive a $100 McCoy’s Gift Card. The McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family of the Year will receive a $500 McCoy’s Gift Card and will be announced at the 2023 THSRA State Finals.

Smith Family of Region IV

Congratulations to the Smith family of Athens, TX for being named this month’s McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family!

The Smith’s may not run an expansive cattle operation or raise crops, but they have a long-established passion for horses and seeing them develop from the breeding stage to being finished working cow horses or competitive horses for their daughters.

Nathan Smith and his wife Jodi have two daughters, Kurtlee and Swayze who compete in Region IV. Kurtlee is a junior in high school and competes in the goat tying, breakaway roping and reined cow horse. Swayze is in eighth grade and competes in the breakaway roping, pole bending and ribbon roping.

Like any operation, family is a massive part of the ranching lifestyle for the Smiths. Nathan’s grandfather had a lot of cattle and grew watermelons when Nathan was a kid. Nathan was able to experience what it meant to work hard growing up, whether he was working cows or riding a tractor baling hay.

Jodi’s family was not a ranching family, but she always had horses growing up and competed in high school rodeos. Over time, her dad began a small breeding program for his kids and grandkids to pick horses from. Little did he know that one nice brood mare about 25 years ago would lay the foundation for his granddaughters to experience a lifetime of raising, training and competing on their horses.

“Our love for horses, agriculture and the outdoors definitely led us to this ranching lifestyle,” explained Jodi. Her and her husband had a desire for their kids to be raised in an agricultural environment without the major influence of technology effecting their lives.

After inheriting some family land, Nathan and Jodi had a place to call home and raise their daughters in a way that was agriculturally based. Nathan’s grandfather owned and leased multiple properties around Athens and the piece of land passed down to Nathan and Jodi was what they always called the “red gate place.”

The stand-alone piece of land was known for its old wooden red gate in a corner of the property. Jodi explained that the nickname stuck with them when they built their home there and if they

had to pick a specific name for their ranch, it would probably be called The Red Gate Ranch.

Combining the agriculture background and land from Nathan’s family and the breeding and raising of horses from Jodi’s family, formed a lifestyle they do not take for granted. One of the most important lessons that the Smiths hope to pass down to their daughters is that of an appreciative heart that glorifies God.

Jodi and Nathan hope “that their daughters learn to appreciate what they have been given and be good stewards of what the Lord has blessed them with. Not to take things for granted and to use what God has given them to glorify Him.”

Some of their favorite moments shared together always include horses. Whether it’s going to rodeos, ranch horse shows, working with the young horses, or just working cows on the ranch, their lives pretty much revolve around horses.

The Smiths get to spend time working cattle for neighbors or surrounding ranches that may need some day work done. While their ranching focus is primarily based on horses, cattle are a vital part of their working and training programs. Every horse that stays on their place gets used to work cows. Even the rodeo horses spend more time outside of the arena than in it.

Being able to take a rodeo horse to drag and brand calves gives them better qualities and a better mind, explained Jodi. “The horses are an integral tool in the success of all the cow work we do as a family. Not all of the horses end up in the rodeo or cow horse arena, but they all go to the ranch and get used.”

Kurtlee and Swayze are homeschooled, so they can spend time horseback every day, go work cattle, and compete at different rodeos. They have learned how to have a strong work ethic by helping maintain the ranch and take care of chores when their dad is working shifts at the fire station.

With Nathan working fireman hours, the girls take responsibility for getting everything ready when they need to load up and work cattle. They will have horses fed, caught, saddled and ready to go when their dad gets home from a shift. They make sure the trucks are hooked up and any medicines or other essentials needed are ready to go.

When it comes to the colts, Nathan starts most of them himself and lets his daughters finish them out. Him and Jodi see this as a way to teach their kids perseverance and for them to become better horsemen. Going through highs and lows with young horses can be extremely rewarding when the hard work pays off and they can see the fruits of their labor, Jodi explained.

You can find Kurtlee and Swayze in the middle of the work that is taking place whether it is working cattle or horses and anything else their day may entail. The work doesn’t end outside though, both girls are very diligent about getting their schoolwork done and working on their horse judging skills through 4-H.

Jodi plays such a big part in the success her daughters have in and out of the arena,

too. With Nathan’s strict working hours, she is able to haul the girls to the rodeos or keep things running if he is not home. She also fuels their dreams and encourages them to keep after what they are wanting to achieve knowing the hard work they are willing to put in.

It is easy to say that neither girl is afraid to continue learning and growing. They agreed that competing in the Texas High School Rodeo Association has taught them many valuable lessons. “One of the best things is being a part of something bigger, something where we can grow as a person and a competitor,” Kurtlee and Swayze said. “It is a place where we learn to get outside of our box, meet new people and compete against the best of the best.”

The Smith family is extremely honored to be chosen as the Region IV McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family. “It is very humbling and special to know that someone would think that our family should be recognized in the farming and ranching industry,” expressed Jodi.

25
27

Farm & Ranch Family

The folks at McCoy’s Building Supply understand that it takes a lot of hard work and the whole family pitching in to get things done on a farm or ranch. That’s why we’d

Baranowsk Family of Region VII

Congratulations to the Baranowsk family, McCoy's Farm, and Ranch Family of the Month from Region 7. Jeff and Tina Baranowsk have two children Braxton (18), and Brooke (9). This ranch family is from Hallettsville, Texas.

Jeff Baranowsk runs a ranch in Hallettsville, Texas. On the side, Jeff breaks colts. Jeff was a bull rider, Braxton followed in his father's footsteps and started to ride calves. “Thank goodness we went to the other end of the arena and got away from bulls”, said Tina. Both Braxton and Brooke started rodeoing at a young age, and haven’t stopped since.

Tina Baranowsk has been an information technology officer at a bank for the past 19 years. She loves being able to watch Braxton and Brooke thrive in their ranch lifestyle.” That's my favorite part of going out to the ranch is watching all the new babies”, said Tina. Spring is Tina’s favorite time of year with all the colts and fillies hitting the ground along with the baby calves

Along with the love for rodeo Braxton took an interest in his father's work and broke his current calf when he was 15. “Braxton has great horsemanship. I mean, that's one of the things I admire about watching him,”said Tina.

Brooke started her rodeo career when she was only three years old. Now the nine-year-old runs barrels, poles, and she’s begun to work on breakaway. Brooke is a member of TYRA and YRA, and soon TJHSRA. When asked what she wants to do when she grows up, Brooke said a Pro Rodeo.

Braxton is an 18-year-old senior, who attends

Hallettsville High School and is a member of THSRA where he competes in Steer wrestling, calf roping, and team roping. After graduation, Braxton will attend Wharton County Junior College for the first two years of his college career. After two years Braxton plans to transfer to a 4-year university where he will study business.

Braxton received a rodeo scholarship from Wharton where he will continue his rodeo career. “I plan to continue my rodeo career after getting a business degree out of college," said Braxton.

When asked if Braxton had any advice for future generations his response was “I guess some advice I’d give is just to be respectful and be a gentleman to everybody. I feel like there's not enough respect or manners in the world anymore,” said Braxton.

Jeff and Tina share their love for the ranch and rodeo lifestyle with Braxton and Brooke. Both Braxton and Brooke started rodeoing at a young age, and haven’t stopped since. “Hard work pays off. You gotta work hard in order to get what,” said Tina.

When this ranch family is in need of supplies for ranching they run to their local McCoy’s Building Supply to get all they're looking for. The Baranowsk are incredibly honored to be selected as this Month’s McCoy's Farm, and Ranch Family.

28
like to take some time out to salute Texas High School Rodeo Association families who are farmers and ranchers. In our monthly Farm & Ranch Family Spotlight, we’ll feature one family, sharing their story of how they work together as a family to make their farm or ranch successful. The spotlight will run for 10 months; each month will feature a different Region. Each Regional McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family will receive a $100 McCoy’s Gift Card. The McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family of the Year will receive a $500 McCoy’s Gift Card and will be announced at the 2023 THSRA State Finals.

Getting Ready for State

This past weekend the Jr high concluded their year off region rodeos and are ready to head off to state. Everyone did a great job this year but there were a few athletes I wanted to highlight.

All Around Boys Champion

The 2023 all-around champion cowboy is Hagen Spiva! Hagen was on fire this year winning the team roping, ribbon roping, and tie down. He was the reserve champion of the goat tying and the chute dogging. Hegan said that he is “excited about competing at state and doing his best for himself and his partners.” Gonzales better watch out for this dedicated cowboy because he says he plans on going to nationals in all his events. I want to wish Hagen

IAll Around Girls Champion

The 2023 all-around champion cowgirl is Kesslye Fuller! Kesslye also had a great year winning the goat tying. She is also going to state in the Breakaway, ribbon roping, and team roping. Kesslye says she is “most looking forward to goat tying and hanging out with her friends.” She also mentions loves getting to spend time with her rodeo family. Wishing good luck to thing cowgirl in Gonzales.

EVENT WINNERS

I want to congratulate all the Junior Highevent champions of this year!

Team Roping- Hagen Spiva and Rylan Lamb

Steer Saddle bronc- Cye Franzen

Steer Bareback- Cye Franzen

Ribbon Roping – Hagen Spiva and Stoney Decker

Pole Bending – Lainey Mcdaniel

Girls Goat Tying- Kesslye Fuller

Girls Breakaway- Ella Hanes

Chute Dogging- Sterling Bruce

Calf Roping- Hagen Spiva

Bull Riding- Samuel Britten

Boys Goat Tying- Taos Armstrong

Boys Breakaway- Slayde Stalls

Barrel Racing- Tailyn Kimble

We are super proud of all our members and all the hard work they put in this year! I want to wish luck and safe travels down south to all the state qualifiers this year. Go make Region 1 Proud!

29 By
PRESIDENTJERAD STOKER PO Box 1693 • Canyon, Texas 79015 806-676-6969 • jared_stoker@cargill.com SECRETARYMARCY SESSIONS 1611 El Paso • Wellington, Texas 79095 806.205.0350 • thsra1@yahoo.com STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS KEVIN MCCREARY 6101 CR 298 • Canyon, Texas 79015 806.674.5601 • kevin@mccrearysales.com RANDY MARTIN PO Box 334 • Vega, Texas 79092 806-670-2113 • randyleemartin@hotmail.com JERAD STOKER PO Box 1693 • Canyon, Texas 79015 806-676-6969 • jared_stoker@cargill.com
OFFICERS PRESIDENT -
Region
STUDENT
RIDLEY TIMBERLAKE VICE PRESIDENTAVERY ARMSTRONG SECRETARY/HISTORIANABBY MCCREARY
PERFORMANCE REPORT
HAGEN SPIVA KESSLYE FULLER

Region II

REgion II: Ready for state

Regular season rodeos have come to an end for the 202223 season. Region 2 is sending 71 outstanding student-athletes to Abilene in June to represent our region at the state finals. 40 of our region 2 competitors will be graduating in May to go onto college or the workforce. After 13 years of being the region 2 secretary, Jody McElroy has announced her retirement.

Jodi will be very missed, as she made our region rodeos a smoothrunning operation. The region is happy to announce that Kelly Wood will be the new high school secretary along with maintaining the position of junior high secretary.

Emilee Charlesworth has struck again and won All Around Cowgirl for region 2. She will be competing in barrels, poles, breakaway and cow horse at the 2023 Texas State Finals. Charlesworth will be attending Cisco College starting in the fall. She is excited to be part of an amazing rodeo team and excel in her career.

Benny Proffitt is your region 2 All Around Cowboy! Benny will be representing region 2 at state in the calf roping, steer wrestling, and saddle

bronc riding. Benny looks forward to the great competition and having a fun and memorable week with his friends from all over texas. Proffitt will be attending Clarendon College in the fall. He looks forward to bettering his education and growing as an athlete by competing against great competition.

Meet your 2023-24 region 2 Ariat Reporter- Kaitlee Wyatt

Kaitlee is 17 years old and will be a senior at Miles High School in the fall. Her hobbies include team roping, riding horses, putting together cute outfits, doing hair and makeup. After her sophomore year of high school she decided to focus on team roping and put away her breakaway rope. Kaitlee loved the team roping community and getting to compete alongside her dad, uncles, grandpa, and her sister. Kaitlee and her family can be found at a jackpot or rodeo almost every weekend. On top of being successful in the rodeo world she is also a business woman. She owns The Lone Wrangler, a jewelry business. She said not only is it fun, and pays for entries, she has gained knowledge in the business world that will help her in the real world.

30
PRESIDENTJOE RICHARDS 5101 Hwy 214 • Hereford, Texas 79045 806.676.5970 • joe@diamondcattlefeeders.com SECRETARYJODY MCELROY Box 224 • Balmorhea, Texas 79718 432.940.0385 • secretary@thsra2.com STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS CADE SCHNEEMANN PO Box 523 • Iraan, Texas 79744 432.940.5859 • cadeschneemann@yahoo.com JODY MCELROY Box 224 • Balmorhea, Texas 79718 432.940.0385 • rodeosecretary1@gmail.com CHUCK SENTER 6698 Tiger Road • Ropesville, Texas 79358 806.392.3487 • csenter@armlend.com STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENTEMILEE CHARLESWORTH VICE PRESIDENTKELBY FRIZZELL SECRETARYCADE WATKINS PERFORMANCE REPORT
By BROOKE MADILL – Performance Reporter EMILEE CHARLESWORTH BENNY PROFFITT KAITLEE WYATT

It’s Time to Prepare for State & Summer Rodeos!

daily exercise routine, regular shoeing schedule, and annual vet checks which often include hock and stifle injections.

Region III

March and April find everyone preparing for region and state finals. We spend extra time tuning ourselves and our horses up in the practice pen while balancing the busy world of spring sports and activities at school. So with Region titles and state qualifications on the line, I caught up with a few Region III members to see what they are doing to prepare themselves and their equine partners for the finals as well as for the spring/summer rodeos.

Hadley White who competes in the Steer Wrestling, Tie Down, and the Team Roping says he likes to give his horses a mental break from the arena by riding in the pasture checking cows. He also includes regular PEMF treatments to help with overall soundness in all his horses. Breakaway roper and team roper, Channing Wescott, takes her horses to a chiropractor regularly and uses ice boots to help with joint and muscle recovery. Pecos Tatum, who is currently leading the region in the tie down roping, feeds his horses bone and joint supplements along with hemp seed oil and coconut oil. He maintains a

DVM, Candace Kendrick of Colorado City, stresses the importance of integrating routine maintenance such as shoeing, a regular worming schedule, the upkeep of equine dentistry, chiropractic treatment, and regular vet checks to ensure soundness and administer annual vaccinations. One of the most important horse care points is the need to keep continuous access to clean water. Proper hydration aids in the digestive process, blood circulation, and helps stabilize body temperature while also reducing the risk for colic. Kendrick also suggests taking measures to prevent and/ or treat ulcers. “While all horses can develop ulcers simply due to the acid that is continuously secreted in their stomach, competition horses are at greater risk due to the physical and mental stress endured during training, hauling and competing.” Ulcers can cause weight loss, a decline in performance, and overall irritability. One of the most simple prevention measures is to provide constant forage to help absorb acid in the horse’s stomach. This forage can come in the most natural form of grazing in the pasture on grass to keeping hay available for consumption at all times. As we prepare ourselves for state and the summer rodeos, remember to also prepare your horses to achieve their peak performance.

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PRESIDENTERIC HUSTON PO Box 945 • Decatur, TX 76234 817.368.0159 • ehuston1972@gmail.com SECRETARYKELLEY WILLIAMS 7217 Denver City Dr. • Fort Worth, Texas 76179 817.773.5514 • redhotregion3@gmail.com STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS ERIC HUSTON PO Box 945 • Decatur, Texas 76234 817.368.0159 • ehuston1972@gmail.com DALE SNOW 467 Gilbert Rd • Nocona, Texas 76255 940.841.1403 • dsnow@qualitytransferservices.com KELLEY WILLIAMS 7217 Denver City Dr. • Fort Worth, Texas 76179 817.773.5514 • redhotregion3@gmail.com STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENTKREECE DEARING VICE PRESIDENTJADA TROSPER SECRETARYBILOXI SHULTZ PERFORMANCE
REPORT

Region IV

TEXAS is TOUGH

Each region is coming to their final rodeo before state finals.

DR. TANDY FREEMAN

Region IV is very proud of the Jr. High contestants that will be advancing to Gonzales for the Texas Junior High State Finals. Year after year we have watched Texas dominate at Nationals. It all starts right here with Jr. High division. We have kids that can tie a calf in 8 seconds, ride for 90, can run 19 second pole runs, rope in 1.9’s, and tie goats in in a low 6. When we say Texas is tough this is what we mean. Kids joining TJHRA understand the level of competition, so they work hard daily to rise to the top. Region IV is always proud to send some fierce competitors to state every year. Among the group this year are 8th grade siblings, Copper Stevens and Wylie Jo Hodges of Bloomburg, TX. Who are the reigning Region IV All Around champions.

Unlike most rodeo kids who literally grew up on the back of a horse. Copper started riding a horse in January of 2020 and didn’t start competing until May that year. He has quickly made up for lost time winning 4 saddles in his young career. In

TJHRA Region IV, he competes in 6 events; Tie Down, Ribbon Roping, Chute Dogging, Breakaway and Team Roping. Alongside, winning the All Around title, he won the Boys Goat Tying and Tie Down titles. He also finished reserve champion ribbon roper, 4th in the chute dogging, and 4th place header. Out of all the events, Tie Down and Heeling are his favorites because they get his adrenaline running and, “are just fun and exciting” quoted Copper. His future plans are to make it to the NFR one day, he’d also like to train and sell horses. He looks up to Kincade Henry and Ty Hairris, “because they are both really good and don’t mind helping someone else learn” stated Copper. Vegas, his Tie Down horse, was raised and trained by his grandparents at Hodges Farms. He says that, “Vegas is his favorite horse because she's fun and consistent and he helped train her.”

Coppers sister Wylie Jo Hodges, is not a stranger to the game, competing since she was 5 years old and winning 9 saddles. At Region IV she competes in 6 events; Barrels, Poles, Breakaway, Ribbon Roping, Goat Tying and Team Roping. Out of all of those she most enjoys Barrels and Breakaway. Wylie Jo advanced to

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MICHAEL AKINS 2449 West Line Road • Whitesboro, TX 76273 makins1@yahoo.com • 904.368.9390 SECRETARYKATHY JOHNSON 4941 FM 269 • Pickton, Texas 75471 903.245.2725 • thsra4@yahoo.com STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS JENNIFER SANDERS 6313 FM 1395 • Wills Point, Texas 75169 JODI SMITH 14100 CR 3900 • Athens, Texas 75752 903.245.3036 • njkssmith@gmail.com GUY YARBROUGH 438 Oates Rd • Palmer, Texas 75152 214.906.1595 • guyamy97@yahoo.com STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENTMARY BETH BEAM
PERFORMANCE
REPORT
WYLIE JO HODGES

State Finals in all of her events. She stats, “her future plans are to qualify for the American in barrels and breakaway roping.” She plans to pro rodeo while still following her calling to mission trips. One of Wylie Jo’s biggest accomplishments was winning 3rd at the Run for Roses High Stakes race. “Winning the All around saddle at Region IV was a huge goal of mine”,stated Wylie Jo. Her rodeo idols are Jana Brown and Hope Thompson. Jules “DH Jess Stellar”, raised by her grandparents at Hodges Farms, trained by Jana Brown and ridden by Hailey Kinsel, is her heart horse. “Jules likes rolling in the dirt after she runs

and LOVES rice crispy treats”, she said. Copper and Wylie Jo along with older brother, Howard Green, younger siblings Dooley and Texi spend at least 4-5 hours everyday in the practice pen. While watching the Junior High State competition be on the lookout for these two and the rest of the Region IV contestants. The competition has been exciting to watch this year in the Jr. High division. Good luck to all the state finalists.

Fearless Region IV, “COME AND TAKE IT”, Gonzales style.

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COPPER STEVENS

MARYBETH BEAM OF REGION IV

The Whataburger Whatakid is selected due to their ability to excel both in and out of the rodeo arena. Whataburger is proud to recognize a THSRA member from each of the ten Regions who truly upholds the title “Whatakid!” One of the nominees will be chosen at the State Final Rodeo in June as the Whatakid of the Year. In recognition of this accomplishment they will receive free Whataburgers for an entire year!

Congratulations to this month’s “WHATAKID,” MaryBeth Beam!

The Region IV, cowgirl from Poetry, Texas is blazing her own trail as a breakaway roper, businesswoman, and rancher. It is hard to find a more driven and passionate person than MaryBeth. Whether she is the arena, processing cattle on the ranch, or advocating for women in agriculture and rodeo, you will see a smile on her face, a heart to serve, and a fiery passion.

From a young age, she discovered a love to rodeo and rope. Growing up on a ranch taught her many valuable life lessons and is where she found a passion for wanting to rope at the rodeos.

MaryBeth explained that “ranching is where I got my roping ability from and a lot of other people along the way but outside of the arena, you have to learn how get a cow stopped when there aren’t any fences.”

At the age of five, she began competing in every event she could through Lone Star High School Rodeo Association and started region rodeoing her sixth grade year. She competed as an all-around cowgirl until it narrowed down to just breakaway roping and team roping.

MaryBeth competed in the breakaway roping and the team roping, heading and heeling, at regions this year. While she loves roping in general, she mentioned that breakaway roping is her favorite because of the excitement that comes from it and knowing it is just her and her horse getting the job done together.

The 18-year-old discovered her goals and is chasing after them full force. While people see the great accomplishments she is achieving, she has not had an easy road getting to this point. Overcoming many feats in her life has provided her with a greater sense of gratitude and purpose for what she gets to do.

On September 9, 2022, MaryBeth found herself in a freak accident where she got bucked off a horse in the pasture while working cattle. “When I hit the ground, my hip popped really loud and I knew it was broken,” she said. Her no quit attitude kept her working on it the rest of the day and the following day.

She kept telling herself she was fine, and it wasn’t that bad until she could no longer complete normal tasks or ride her horses without feeling excruciating pain. This was all leading up to the first region rodeo of the weekend. Fighting the pain, she competed that weekend, winning the breakaway during the Saturday rodeo and realizing something was really wrong on Sunday.

Like any major injury, MaryBeth was faced with the dreaded time off to let herself heal and recover. For someone extremely active every day and with bold goals set for the year, this was a tough pill to swallow.

After the doctor told her she would need to spend weeks in a wheelchair and months off a horse, she said, “it felt like all my dreams had just stopped for a few weeks. I felt really defeated and sitting in a wheelchair, much less the house for weeks was a terrible idea for me.”

Any athlete faces a moment where they have to make a decision of how they are going to respond in the face of hardship and curveballs being thrown into their paths.

MaryBeth said, “I told my mom I am either going to be determine or be defeated and I got really determined and learned ways to rope the dummy out of my wheelchair and sitting on a bucket or a ball so that I would not hurt myself.”

The week of her 18th birthday, she was released to get back on a horse and take it slow. If you know MaryBeth, slow is not in her vocabulary and a week later she entered her first roping back, on Thanksgiving weekend. Her determination during her time off and the ways she worked to be better set her up to rope multiple calves in under two seconds and win rounds immediately coming back off what could have been a career-ending injury.

Fast forward five months from her injury and MaryBeth is burning up the rodeo trail, chasing after a WPRA Rookie of the Year dream in the breakaway roping. Her mindset is one of the sharpest tools she has and it has allowed her to set bold goals and not be scared to chase them.

Not only does she practice in the arena and work on her roping, but practicing having a sharp mentality is a vital part of her daily routine. It is thanks to her mental coach, Donene Taylor, that she has learned how to have a mental plan before, during, and after each practice session, rodeo run, and daily occurrence in life, explained MaryBeth.

During the past year, she also started up her own business, Roping Gypsy. Roping Gypsy is an online retail store that she began by selling hats and t-shirts. The business grew overtime, especially during the period she was injured, to sale breakaway string, jewelry, handmade items for women and their horses, and more.

This became something that she could really tell her story through and share her love a Jesus in, also. She explained that it really caters towards the female roper and cowgirls in general.

Having a schedule as busy as she does and pursuing such large dreams, it is easier for MaryBeth to be homeschooled and complete her schoolwork at different times of the day or on the road as she travels.

After graduation, MaryBeth wants to attend school online to pursue an agricultural degree. When it comes to college rodeo, though, she is going to sit her first year out. With the goals she has set already, she explained that she would not be able to devote all her time to a team and that would be unfair to them.

“Pro Rodeos are my main priority right now because winning Rookie of the Year has been a big goal of mine

for a long time and I am gonna catch my goal first before I add on a whole different side of rodeo,” MaryBeth said.

Along with her pursuit in rodeo, managing her business, and completing schoolwork, she has started up her own breeding program that she plans to continue advancing. The road ahead looks bright for MaryBeth. Setting bold goals is a big deal for her and no matter what they may be, she plans on chasing them down.

When she does have a moment of downtime, you can find her jumping in to lend a helping hand anywhere it is needed. Whether it is the arena, helping doctor a horse or cow, or volunteering in the community, she said she “loves any opportunity to serve others and wants to be the first one to step up to do it.”

A lot of her heroes and mentors come from the rodeo community, such as Martha Angelone, Lari Dee Guy and Donene Taylor, but her closest friend and biggest support is her mom.

“If it wasn’t for my mom, I don’t know what I would do,” exclaimed MaryBeth. “She is a really strong, fearless person and God-driven. The bond we have, a lot of people don’t get to have with their parents, and I am super blessed to have it with my mom. I wouldn’t change that for anything.”

MaryBeth shows so much gratitude and love for her region and region family. Being selected as the Region IV Whatakid was extremely special for her, especially considering it is her senior year and she was able to serve them even during the time she was hurt.

“I respect all of the adults in our region and for them to look upon me and know there are a thousand other kids in our region that they could have picked, and they picked me just made it so special,” expressed MaryBeth. “I felt very honored to be selected knowing that they recognized the hard work I put in even when I was hurt.”

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2022-2023 THSRA State Secretary: Abby McCreary

Hi, My name is Abby McCreary and I am the 2022-23 THSRA State Secretary. I am a member of region 1 where I compete in the Breakaway roping, Team roping, and goat tying. I am from Canyon Texas and attended Happy High School. I’m the sentinel of my chapters FFA, my class student council representative, and are a member of FCCLA and FCA. I am a competitor for Happy high school’s Varsity basketball, track, and cross country. As state secretary I will travel with my fellow state officers to places such as The San Antonio rodeo, Rodeo Houston, and more to proudly represent THSRA. I’m looking forward to the experiences and memories I will gain from this journey. Thank you to all the sponsors and everyone who presented me with this opportunity.

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These kids have put their blood, sweat and tears into both their practice and their animals to preform at the top of their game as a team. All of their hard work payed off when they heard their name called for one of the coveted top 10 spots to go to state finals after competing at Region Finals at Tin Top Arena in Orange Texas.

These kids can advance in many different events; such as, Bareback Bronc Steer Riding, Saddle Bronc Steer Riding, Bull Riding, Barrel Racing, Chute Dogging, Pole Bending, Boys Goat Tying, Girls Goat Tying, Boys Breakaway Roping, Girls Breakaway Roping, Tie Down Roping, Ribbon Roping, or Team Roping.

Let’s congratulate the champions and reserve champions of their events, Jaxson McNutt was the champion in the Bareback Bronc Steer Riding along with reserve champion Gus Thompson will make their way to state finals. Kinley Walker on her way as champion of the barrel racing with reserve being Jessa Montagne.

Moving into the boys breakaway roping, Hudson Skinner took the first place title with Jacob Griffin as your

GET READY GONZALES, REGiON V iS ON THEiR WAY!

reserve champion. Annie Vick won the girls breakaway with Kali Bannister in the resevre. Cooper Fregia took the win in the bull riding and will head to Gonzales with Gavin Glover and the rest of the top ten. Bill Odell won the chute dogging and Gus Thompson was second. Carson Gates won the title in the boys goat tying and will head to state along with Bill Odell in the reserve position.

Allie Calcote won the girls goat tying and accompanying her to state will be Charley Ann Merriwether. Emma Evans was champion in the pole bending and will head to state with Presley Simino close behind.

The ribbon roping will be represented by Bill Odell roping with Charley Ann Merriwether running and the reserve roper and runner will be Jacob Griffin and Emma Evans. Gus Thompson won the Saddle Bronc Steer riding and the reserve champion was Orrin Pinner. In the team roping there will be Bill Odell on the head side with Hudson Skinner on the heels, and your reserve header is Colt Sanders and your reserve heeler is Kutter Richardson. Carson Gates soon the tie down roping leaving with Bill Odell as the reserve champion.

Let's cheer on all of our State Finals qualifiers as they will represent Region V against 9 other tough Texas regions and compete for a chance to represent Texas at the national level.

Along with the individual event winners and the other top ten that are heading to state, there are also some more amazing kids that we call “All Around Champions”; the athletes that are able to win these coveted titles must compete in more than one event, and all of their points from winnings in any of their events will determine who brings home this title. One tough cowboy brought home both the all around cowboy and the champion over all athlete and his name is Bill Odell; the champion all around cowgirl is Charley Ann Merriwether. All of these kids have spent their entire year, practicing on their riding, horsemanship, and working to improve on whatever they can.

While there is only a certain number that make it to state each year, all of these kids deserve some cheer for all of the work they put into the little thing that we call rodeo.

36 Region
By
PRESIDENTKIRK MATHIS 777 Freeman Cemetery Rd • Lufkin, TX75904 936.676.3495 • kmathis@cmzlaw.net SECRETARYSUSAN BALDWIN 722 Southview Circle • Center, Texas 75935 936.590.4330 • regionvsecretary@gmail.com S TATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS JUSTIN KLEIN PO Box 2107 • Center, TX 75935 936.590.0229 • sendtojustin@yahoo.com SHANE PASCHAL PO Box 123 • Nome, Texas 77629 409.253.2553 • spaschal@paschalweld.com BILL WHITE 277 Billy White Rd • Singer, LA 70660 337.304.0748 • whiteacres55@yahoo.com STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENTKP MATHIS VICE PRESIDENTLIELA KLEIN SECRETARYTYCE SCARBER PERFORMANCE REPORT
V
GRACELANN BROWN – Performance Reporter

Miss Texas High School Rodeo Association

Queen and Miss Texas Junior High Rodeo Princess Contest

Wednesday, May 17, 2023

• 6-9pm Queen/Princess Contestants- Open Arena~ JB Wells Arena (1653 CR 197 Gonzales, TX)

Thursday, May 18, 2023

• 8:45am Queen/Princess Test Roll Call~ JB Wells Arena (1653 CR 197 Gonzales, Tx)

• 9:00am Princess Test ~ JB Wells Arena

• 11:00am Judges Meeting ~ Office at JB Wells Arena

• 11:45am Queen/Princess Horsemanship Roll Call~ JB Wells Arena (1653 CR 197 Gonzales, TX)

• 12:00pm Horsemanship ~ JB Wells Arena

• 5:45pm Queen/Princess Contestants, Roll Call~ The Gonzales Crystal Theatre (543 St Lawrence, Gonzales, TX)

• 6:00pm Judges, Contestants, Family, Friends Dinner and Social~ The Gonzales Crystal Theatre

Friday, May 19, 2023

• 8:45am Princess Contestants, Roll Call for Interviews~ The Gonzales Crystal Theatre

• 9:00am Princess Interviews

• 9:45am- Queen Contestants, Roll Call for Interviews ~ The Gonzales Crystal Theatre

• 10:00am- Queen Contestant Interviews

• 5:45pm Doors open for Miss THSRA/TJHRA Pageant & Dinner~ The Gonzales Crystal Theatre (543 St Lawrence, Gonzales, TX)

• 6:00pm Miss THSRA/TJHRA Pageant and Dinner

Sunday, May 21, 2023

• 1:15pm Princess Roll Call at the Alley Way ~ JB Wells Arena

• 1:30pm- 2022 Miss TJHRA Farewell ride~ JB Wells Arena

• 1:30pm- 2023 Miss TJHRA Coronation~ JB Wells Arena

• Following the mandatory meeting- 2023 Miss TJHRA Award Ceremony- Texian Heritage Conference and Center

Sunday, June 4, 2023

• 11:45pm Queen Contestants Roll Call~ Taylor Telecom Arena- Round Building Abilene, TX

• 12:00-pm Queen Contestants Test

• 2:00pm Queen Contestants Roll Call at the Alley Way~ Taylor Telecom Arena

• 2:30pm- 2022 Miss THSRA Farewell Ride~ Taylor Telecom Arena

• 2:30pm- 2023 Miss THSRA Coronation~ Taylor Telecom Area

• Following the Coronation- 2022 Miss THSRA Award Ceremony~ Round building

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2023

VI

GONZALES TO HOST 18TH TJHSRA AT J.B.WELLS PARK

Junior High State finals is here with 550+/- rodeo contestants!! Gonzales

is proud to host TJHSRA for the 18th year in a row. As Gonzales was the first and only city in 2005 to pick up the idea of Junior High State and it is still hosted here in Gonzales every year since then.

The contract is up for grabs after this year and Gonzales hopes to keep Junior High State here. There are many other contestants and parents who hope it stays in Gonzales with J B Wells park being the only place in Texas with over 400 full rv hookups and the Guadalupe river within walking distance. J. B. Wells Arena will house over 900+ stalls during the week of finals. This leaves the city of Gonzales to rent over 700 stalls and tents for all the contestants. Due to the fact that J B Wells only has 200+ stalls that were built in 2003 when the arena was first built.

Many voices have all stressed the need for another arena and more stall barns. With a second arena and more stalls J. B. Wells and the City of Gonzales would have a fighting chance to keep the Junior High State contract also allowing J. B. Wells and

the City of Gonzales to be able to submit a contract offer for High School State Finals.

A new arena has been discussed to be just a timed event arena. Leaving Barrel Racing and Rough Stock in the original larger arena. J. B. Wells will have to find a grant, sponsorship, donation or fundraiser to help fund a second arena.

J. B. Wells would be able to have bigger or more events just like Junior High State finals with the completion of the discussed second arena.

I personally know from other contestants, parents and all who have attended Junior High Finals how they miss the small town and accommodations, from J. B. Wells and the City of Gonzales when they are moved to Abilene the following week for High School Finals.

The history of J. B. Wells park and arena hold the most historic site for Texas, in the field, next to the river, where the first shot of the Texas Revolution began and where the famous words ``Come and Take It” were shouted.

38 Region
PRESIDENTDAVID FREEMAN 1039 Mockingbird Lane • Eagle Lake, TX 77434 832.221.1253 • chlfreeman@yahoo.com SECRETARYANNE DOLLERY P.O. BOX 866 • Caldwell, Texas 77836 936.412.2551 • region6thsra@gmail.com STATE DIRECTORS DAVID FREEMAN 1039 Mockingbird Lane • Eagle Lake, TX 77434 832.221.1253 • chlfreeman@yahoo.com CLAY OHRT 2462 Berger Road • Victoria, Texas 77905 361.571.1040 • wendyohrt@hotmail.com TOMMY OHRT 8971 Lower Mission Valley Rd • Victoria, TX 77905 361.550.5202 • t07cattle@yahoo.com STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENTBRAYDEN BLOEMER VICE PRESIDENTSKYLAR TORR SECRETARYBLAINE BURLESON PERFORMANCE
REPORT
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57th Annual Burleson

County Youth Rodeo

July 21-23rd, 2023

Buddy & Edile Lightsey Covered Arena

South Hwy 36 – Rodeo Drive, Caldwell, Texas 77836

60% Payback = 30% long go, 10 % short go, 60% average Stalls and hookups available when you arrive (no reservations)

25 Event Buckles | 6 All Around Custom-Made Spurs

SHORT GO FOR TOP 10 IN EACH EVENT WILL BE @10:00AM ON SUNDAY, JULY 23RD

Free Admission to Rodeo Families and Public

To Download an Entry Form Go to: www.burlesoncountysaddleclub.com

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42 (972) 571-5269 | Orders@OutlawSpirit.com | OutlawSpirit.com Award Line • BANGLES • PENDANTS • CUSTOM BELTS • DUFFLE BAGS • ROPE CANS & BAGS • BUCKLES • BRONC HALTERS • SHAVE BAGS • ROPE CANS • KNIVES Custom Gifts

CEILY SIMPTON OF REGION VII

Congratulations to this month’s “WHATAKID,” Ceily Simpton! The Region VII, cowgirl from Navasota, Texas has a passion for rodeo and her sights set on big things ahead. The 18-year-old competes in the barrel racing and breakaway roping.

While she has many accolades in both events, she explained that barrel racing is her favorite due to the hard work and dedication it has taken to get to a place of winning on her horse Twister. She has been able to see the fruits of her labor after putting in years of work.

Ceily comes from a prominent rodeo background, where both of her parents rodeoed and so did her grandparents. Rodeo is in her blood, and she explained “rodeo has been a lifestyle for me growing up, and I truly don’t know who I would be without it.”

Her great horse, Twister, an 8-year-old palomino gelding, has carried her to the pay window many times. Twister has been in her family since he was born and is out of her mom’s previous pro rodeo mare.

After starting Twister on the barrels young, Ceily was able to finish him out through junior high rodeos and become extremely competitive in high school. Some of her sweetest memories on him are qualifying to state all four years and being shy of making it to nationals her junior year by just a few points.

“Even though I did not make it to nationals, I was extremely proud of what we accomplished,” Ceily said. “We gave it our all and ended up placing fourth in the average in a state as hard as Texas, but with how points fell, we ended up placing fifth in the standings for nationals.”

When it comes to breakaway roping, she rides her 14-year-old bay mare, Chanel. Ceily said, “she has the attitude of a pony but definitely has the heart of a big horse and always tries her hardest. Even though she is not the biggest, she gives it her all each time.”

Ceily has competed on Chanel since her freshman year of high school and qualified for many rodeos and ropings. Her most memorable moment was winning reserve champion in the break-

away roping at the Hooey Junior Patriot in 2020.

Outside of THSRA, she competes in the World Champions Rodeo Alliance (WCRA), the Cowboys Professional Rodeo Association (CPRA), and has recently bought her Women’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA) permit.

Her plans for the summer are to continue rodeoing and try and fill her WPRA permit before she goes to college. She also qualified to compete at the WCRA major in Corpus Christi, Texas.

Ceily is a senior at Navasota High School and is graduating sixth in her class. Being involved in the school has helped her become a better, well-rounded person in life, she explained. Her involvement has included being a part of the National Honor Society and serving in her FFA chapter.

Rodeo and FFA have shared a large part of her life growing up. Ceily began showing her third grade year as a junior FFA member. Throughout her time in FFA, she has shown market goats, served as secretary and vice president for her chapter, and competed on the livestock judging team, agricultural advocacy team and in job interview.

Her dad’s family is in the goat business, raising market goats, so Ceily took up showing from a young age. She has competed at major stock shows such as Houston, San Antonio and Austin where she won a class in Houston and placed at one in Austin before her showing career slowed down due to COVID.

“I have always been more involved in rodeo, but it is hard trying to do the two together because there have been times I have been entered in the San Antonio Youth Rodeo and also shown goats within the same couple of days.”

Being a part of FFA and something larger than herself has taught her many life lessons about being a selfless servant and working hard. She was recognized as a recipient of the Shelby Binford Memorial Award in honor of a previous member of her FFA chapter that passed away due to cancer.

“It was an honor to be a recipient because Shelby was recognized for being a selfless member

and devoting a lot of her time to making sure FFA was enjoyable to all members,” said Ceily.

After high school, Ceily will be attending Texas A&M University and competing on the rodeo team in the barrel racing and breakaway roping. She plans to pursue a degree in Agribusiness and seek a career in marketing after college.

She explained that she found a niche in the marketing world because “you can see how much something can grow from it and benefit a business.” This originally stemmed from making fun videos on her personal TikTok and creating a large following to making an account for her parent’s business, Stampede Conversions and Trailer Sales.

Being able to help her mom and dad’s business grow through social media is special for her knowing how much they support her in rodeoing and showing. Ceily said that her mom is her biggest hero and inspiration because of her love for rodeo and sacrifices she made in her own rodeo career to allow Ceily and her sister to be able to compete. “She has also just taught me how to carry myself as a person in and out of the arena.”

Reflecting on a motto in life, Ceily said hers would have to be “live life to the fullest and never live in regret because you never know what God has planned for you.”

“I am very honored to be selected as the Region 7 Whatakid,” Ceily expressed. “Whataburger has been a huge supporter of THSRA and without their contributions, these opportunities would not be possible. Thank you!”

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The Whataburger Whatakid is selected due to their ability to excel both in and out of the rodeo arena. Whataburger is proud to recognize a THSRA member from each of the ten Regions who truly upholds the title “Whatakid!” One of the nominees will be chosen at the State Final Rodeo in June as the Whatakid of the Year. In recognition of this accomplishment they will receive free Whataburgers for an entire year!

The battle for the title of State Champion

What an exciting time to be a Texas Junior High Rodeo contestant! The state finals in Gonzales, Texas are just around the corner. The past weeks have been filled with countless late nights in the practice pen, preparation, and nights lying awake, dreaming of the finals.

For the junior high rodeo world, May is what everyone waits for. All the work of the past year has been in preparation for this time. Many miles are traveled as the top ten of every event from every region gather in Gonzales, Texas, to battle for the title of State Champion, and a qualifying spot to the Junior High National Finals.

In Region VII, we are sending our top athletes to show up and show out for the region. Some of these top athletes include Region VII’s All- Around Cowboy –Trevor Bentley, All-Around Cowgirl – Maci Cook, and Rookie of the Year – Connor

Bounds! Congratulations to you cowboys and cowgirl who worked so hard to achieve this goal.

Our Texas Junior High State President surely did not let his presidential duties stop him from coming out on top. Trever Bently sure did earn his keep in the Bentley household, bringing home his awards after the region finals. In earning his spot as All-Around Cowboy, Trever not only won one of his events, but qualified to the state finals in 5 events! Trevor was the boy’s breakaway champion, reserve champion in the chute dogging, 3rd in the ribbon roping, 3rd in the boy’s goat tying, and 9th place heeler in the team roping! Wow, you got quite the resume going for yourself Trevor! Congratulations Cowboy!

Our Girl’s All-Around Champion, Maci Cook, showed just how tough cowgirls can be, qualifying for state in 6 events! Maci was the girl’s breakaway champion, reserve champion ribbon runner, 3rd in the pole bending, 5th in the goat tying, 7th in the barrel racing, and 8th place header in the team roping! Wow,

44 Region VII SCOTT SHOOK 5750 FM 360 • Needville, Texas 77461 713.851.9553 • sshook@troyconstruction.com SECRETARYNENA BOETTCHER PO Box 833 • East Bernard, Texas 77435 281.468.8973 • region7thsra@gmail.com STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS AMBER BASS 6808 Cedar Hill Road • Brenham, Texas 77833 979.851.9553 amberbass@greatertexasfoundation.org SCOTT SHOOK 5750 FM 360 • Needville, Texas 77461 713.851.9553 • sshook@troyconstruction.com DAN SIMPTON 24543 SH 6 • Navasota, Texas 77868 936.870.5779 • dansimpton@yahoo.com STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENTGUY RAASCH VICE PRESIDENTRYAN JOHNSON SECRETARYRAZZI
PERFORMANCE REPORT
NAVARRO By SHELBY BRENT – Performance Reporter
CONNOR BOUNDS

Maci, you have really been working haven’t you!

It takes a lot to win the title of All-Around Champion. Not only do you have to pay the fees for all those events, but you also must put in the work and practice every event. Also, you barely get a break throughout the day, especially on those days where we run two rodeos in one day. I think there should be an award to the parents of the all-around winner, because they are the pit-crew behind the whole thing. Having a horse saddled, kid prepared, and all the right tools in the right place at the right time is a full-time job! Congratulations to all of those involved as well. Lastly, congratulations to our Region VII Rookie of the year, Connor Bounds. Connor, qualified for state in the Team Roping with his partner Sutton Wood. Rookie of the year is a great accomplishment as a young cowboy. Congratulations Connor!

All of Region VII is wishing out junior high contestants all the luck and safe travels as you head to the finals. Good luck and represent well! We are all cheering for our Region XI family!

45
MACI COOK TREVOR BENTLEY

Region VIII

Our season has been filled with joy, many struggles, and strength.

Team members worked hard with one another, and were also fierce in the arena. As our season closes and seniors leave, our JH kids will begin to fill in and become the next group of top competitors to represent Region 8. We finish the year with strong words from our Vice President Kelsey Harms “As an officer this season, I felt like this season was extremely special not only to make new friends, but being able to voice everyone’s opinions together to make an idea. Passing out awards to our top 10 qualifiers to congratulate them for something they worked hard for all season was definitely a touching moment.”

Region 8 will always be a place where people can have fun and be competitive.

We interviewed some of our top qualifiers and here’s what they had to say. Kelsey Harms went in with a great mindset, “I can learn or do anything I put my mind to.” Getting ready for a run may be overwhelming but nothing to this cowgirl. She sits

FINISHING THE YEAR STRONG

in the back to visualize and connect with her horse, while listening to music to keep her breathing steady. She also prays for protection over herself and all other contestants. Harms loves to ride bareback across the fields, and when she gets home she goes to the barn to do her homework and read to her horses for a little extra bonding time. Harms had a wonderful season being our Vice President and put her best foot forward in the arena. She would like to thank her mom, dad, brother, the Farrell family, and her best friends for always making sure she’s okay, that she’s where she needs to be, is always practicing, and for their constant encouragement. Congratulations! We can’t wait to see this cowgirl at state!

Whitt Lowery has always had a passion for this sport and we know the people who’ve encouraged him and his work ethic have only strengthened that passion. Nothing comes easy; everyone goes tough times but this cowboy finally got his first steer down! That takes a lot of courage! Lowery practices every chance he gets, and since he doesn’t have any bulldogging steers, the Shoffners always lend a helping hand. He had an outstanding season, qualifying for state,

46
PRESIDENTJUSTIN SPEER 1627 CR 101 • Uvalde, Texas 78801 830.591.8036 • jspeer04@hotmail.com SECRETARYCELINA FETTY 3005 Santa Ana St. • Corpus Christi, Texas 78415 361.739.9858 • region8thsra@gmail.com STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS JUSTIN SPEER 1627 CR 101 • Uvalde, Texas 78801 830.591.8036 • jspeer04@hotmail.com BEN ELLIS PO Box 1845 • Orange Grove, Texas 78372 361.701.1886 • ben.ellis78@yahoo.com CASS RINGELSTEIN 4308 FM 1784 • Pleasanton, Texas 78064 210.885.0902 • cass.oasis@yahoo.com STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENTSYDNEY BLAIR VICE PRESIDENTKENNA
SECRETARYGRACIE
THOMAS
GREENE
PERFORMANCE REPORT
KELSEY HARMS

and would like to thank a few people. “Mom, Dad, and sisters, nothing would be possible without you guys. The Shoffners for bringing out the best practices in me. And Mr. Farrell; without him I would have never made it to state.” Congratulations cowboy! We’ll see you at state!

Ryan Farrell ended this season on a great note by placing top 5 in barrels, poles, and breakaway roping. Farrell is currently preparing for state and is also looking forward to next year’s season. She has always looked up to Madison Outhier because of her work ethic and passion for the sport. Farrell knows that struggles come and go and that learning from them is what matters most. She always analyzes her strengths and failures, which has helped her get to the point she’s at today. This strong cowgirl is also our secretary and we truly appreciate all of her hard work. She would like to thank her number one supporters, her mom, dad, and family, for encouraging her to make it to state! We can’t wait to watch you, Ryan! Congratulations, cowgirl!

Enoch Hall had a wonderful season and along the way his horse taught him manylessons, the most valuable of those, being responsible and never taking anything for granted. After a great weekend’s work, Hall gives his horse a few days off in the pasture to breath in the fresh air. This cowboy had wonderful words of advice for all the athletes trying to make it to state in the years to come. “Always be consistent; if you want it, go get it, and always work hard for what you believe in.” Hall stood strong through his whole season and was thankful to hear his name in the top 10. When asking who he would like to thank he said, “First and foremost my Lord and savior Jesus Christ, my family, and all my great sponsors that stand behind me during the good and bad times”. Congratulations cowboy! We’re all looking forward to seeing you at state!

We wish our cowgirls and cowboys the best of luck as we send them to state in Abilene, Texas, May 21-27, 2023. We’re all rooting for you back home!

47
ENOCH HALL

Region IX

JUNIOR HIGH STATE QUALIFIER

preseley jacobs

The 2022-2023 rodeo season has come to a close for the members of TJHRA and THSRA Region IX. Many athletes across both associations are beginning to prepare for their state finals. While high school athletes will make the trip to Abilene in June, junior high athletes will head south to Gonzales, May 21-27, to have a chance to punch their ticket to the National Junior High Finals Rodeo. Among Region IX’s junior high state qualifiers is the girls rookie all-around champion, Preseley Jacobs.

Presley comes from a family of champions, including her older sister, Reese Jacobs. Reese is a former TJHRA Team Texas member, where she represented in the girls goat tying and became the world champion at the 2021 NJHFR. Presley looks to follow in her sibling’s footsteps as she has already made it her goal to “make it to nationals as a sixth

grader.” Jacobs sets her standards high and is known to never back down from a challenge. While she has qualified for the state finals in all her events - goat tying, breakaway roping, and ribbon running - she is most fond of her rookie all-around title. “One of my biggest goals over the course of the year was to win the rookie all-around saddle, because it was a saddle my sister never won,” Presley said. When asked how she plans to prepare for the state finals, Jacobs stated, “I plan to improve my skill and speed in each of my events and keep my mental game strong.” With so much success, it is clear that Presley has a good crew in her corner. “My parents and sister are always so helpful and push me to be my best,” she proclaimed. In addition to her family, Jacobs expresses gratitude toward Stephanie Saculla and Lacy Bruening, who have both played a large part in molding Presley into the athlete she is today. Along with her supporters, Presley is blessed to have two equine athletes, Mia and Bandit, who help her get the job done. Mia is Presley’s goat horse who is “always faithful” and never lets her down. Bandit is her rope horse who makes Jacobs's job easy and “does his best” every run. Aside from being a cowgirl, Jacobs represents New Waverly ISD, where she enjoys playing volleyball. Her athleticism shines both in the arena and on the court.

Presley’s first year of junior high rodeo was everything she expected and more. “I have made many new friends and competed against tough competition, which has helped better my skill level,” Presley stated. Jacobs and all other Region IX contestants will be exciting to watch at the 2023 TJHRA State Finals. On behalf of Region IX, we would like to wish all of the junior high contestants safe travels and a blessed experience in Gonzales.

48 PRESIDENTSTAN MCDONALD 7121 East OSR • Bryan, Texas 77808 979.229.5963 • stanmcdranch@aol.com SECRETARYLACEY AUBIHL 1326 PR 5011 • Ledbetter, Texas 78946 979.251.4131 • reionixsecretary@gmail.com STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS BRAD DYER 149 Willow Creek • Huntsville, Texas 77340 832.928.1647 • braddyer@live.com STAN MCDONALD 7121 East OSR • Bryan, Texas 77808 979.229.5963 • stanmcdranch@aol.com LYLE SMITH 25798 Hwy 90 North • Bedias, Texas 77831 936.581.4255 STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENTAUDREE PHILLIPS VICE PRESIDENTMAGGIE MCCARTHY SECRETARYSYDNEY WILLIAMS
PERFORMANCE
REPORT

Farm & Ranch Family

The folks at McCoy’s Building Supply understand that it takes a lot of hard work and the whole family pitching in to get things done on a farm or ranch. That’s why we’d like to take some time out to salute Texas High School Rodeo Association families who are farmers and ranchers. In our monthly Farm & Ranch Family Spotlight, we’ll feature one family, sharing their story of how they work together as a family to make their farm or ranch successful. The spotlight will run for 10 months; each month will feature a different Region. Each Regional McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family will receive a $100 McCoy’s Gift Card. The McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family of the Year will receive a $500 McCoy’s Gift Card and will be announced at the 2023 THSRA State Finals.

The Fritsch Family of Region IX

Congratulations to the Fritsch’s, McCoy's Farm and Ranch Family of the Month! Ryan “Bubba” Fritsch, his wife Angie Fritsch, their two children Chet Fritsc, and Paige Fritsch are members of Region 9. The Fritsch family owns and operates Fritsch Cattle Company, a stocker yearling operation in Burton, Texas.

Over 50 years ago, Bubba's father, Gary Fritsch started the Fritsch Cattle Company. Three generations later and several hundred acres the Fritsch Cattle Company continues to thrive. “Bubba’s father is a great teacher who never complains about his work.”, said Angie

Along with helping out with her husband's family business, Angie is a 3rd generation egg farmer. She owns Kieke Egg Farm, a commercial Egg production facility with her family. “We are carrying on the family legacy," said Angie.

As a whole the Fritsch Family work on their ranch. Each member has a role to play. Chet and Pagie responsibilities are feeding, doctoring sick cattle, working the processing chutes, fixing fence, hauling out cattle, penning, and loading the bull wagon.Angie stated, “Every family member knows how each aspect of the business works because they learned at a young age.” This ranch family day to day constive of riding through traps, doctoring sick cattle, feeding, watering, fixing finance, and working on other chores. Along with the everyday duties the Fritsch’s head off to their local sell barn to buy calves. After the calves are bought and hauled back to their ranch the Fritsch’s work their calves and turn them out into traps for 45-60 days before shipping them off to feedlots.

Angie and Bubba have taught Chet and Paige the value of a dollar, and what it means to have a strong work ethic. “We want our kids to know the importance of agriculture and how we need to advocate for it and educate others who do not understand”, said Angie and Bubba. “Pagie is our sports girl”, said Angie. Pagie attends Burton High School along with her brother, she is a freshman. Chet is a senior in high school and is a member of Region 9 THSRA. He competes in team roping as a heeler. Chet was the Reserve Champion Heeler for 2022.

Along with ranching, the Fritsch family enjoys going to team ropings together as well as sporting events, and showing their market steers at livestock shows. Since becoming a member of THSRA Chet has gained “It has allowed our son Chet to compete in something that he loves and does every day.” , said Angie. “It’s simply in our blood and we love

what we do!”, said Bubba. Agriculture is a larger part of who the Fritsch Family is, and as the next generation grows so will their love for all things Agriculture. “Our McCoy's is about 20 minutes down the road.. When the need arises we head that way.”, said the Fritsch Family. When the Fritsch Family are in need of supplies for their ranch they head over to their local McCoy's Building Supply where they find all their ranching needs. They are very humbled to be the McCoy's Building Supply Ranch Family!

49

Asuccessful team of ribbon roping partners not only won their event, but also captured both the boys’ and girls’ All Around titles in Region X Jr. High Rodeo. This dream team of Corley Tilson and Devon Eakin both had impressive rodeo seasons with Corley winning the breakaway roping, ribbon roping, goat tying and third in the barrels. Devon was the champion calf roper, champion ribbon roper, won second in the boys’ goat tying, fifth in the team roping, and fifth in the chute dogging.

These true all-around competitors have proven that hard work and having a game plan pays off. The managed to excel in each event, and let the All Around take care of itself. Corley said, ¨It was amazing to win the All Around with so many great competitors, but to win it with my ribbon roping partner was even better!”

When asked about his year, Devon said, “At the beginning of the year I did not do very well, but I kept working hard and tried to stick to my game plan and do what I practice. I knew I needed to finish strong and was happy all my grandparents were at the last rodeo to watch me rope and win it all.” He continued, “I was new to Region X and lucky to have great partners like Corley in the ribbons and Sterling in the team roping. Region X was

DYNAMIC DUO Captures the Boys and Girls All Around!

fun, and I had a great last year in junior high rodeo. The only thing better than winning is winning with the support of your friends and family.”

Region X Jr. High contestants had a great season, and the support and memories they made will be unforgettable. As they begin preparing and training for the State Finals in Gonzales, they are focused on working hard, surrounding themselves with positive people, and most of all, having fun! Region X Rides to Win!

50 PRESIDENTRENE WEITZ 512.217.8165 SECRETARYSTEPHANIE SHOEMAKER 6500 CR 1202 • Cleburne, Texas 76031 817.648.2728 • texasregion10@gmail.com STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS BRANDON JONES 194 CR 427 • Lorena, Texas 76655 254.833.0251 • crystal_jones1991@yahoo.com SISSY PENNINGTON 655 CR 431 • Stephenville, Texas 76401 254.485.6702 • realestatesissy@yahoo.com SHELLEY TOWNSEND 900 Quarter Horse Dr • Kingsland, Texas 78639 830.798.7755 • sarrington36@yahoo.com STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENTRILEY ARRINGTON VICE PRESIDENTSPRING PENNINGTON SECRETARYCORLEY CALLAHAN
PERFORMANCE REPORT

AUDREE PHILLIPS OF REGION IX

The Whataburger Whatakid is selected due to their ability to excel both in and out of the rodeo arena. Whataburger is proud to recognize a THSRA member from each of the ten Regions who truly upholds the title “Whatakid!” One of the nominees will be chosen at the State Final Rodeo in June as the Whatakid of the Year. In recognition of this accomplishment they will receive free Whataburgers for an entire year!

Congratulations to Audree Phillips, the Whatakid of the month from Region 7. Audree is an 18-year-old Senior at Madisonville High School. “As a kid from a ranching family, rodeo to me is an extension of the everyday work that comes with ranching”, Said Audree. She ties goats, and ropes breakaway for THSRA.

Audree rides 2 horses, a little bay mare named Miss Kat which is her breakaway horse. “She has a lot of attitudes and loves her job. Miss Kat makes my job easy by doing her job to the best of her ability on every run.”, said Audree. Then there are Pockets, he is a gray gelding Audree uses as her goat horse. Audree said, “He likes to be right beside me, and nudges often to see what I’m doing, hence the name: Pockets.”

This hard-working senior is currently the President of Region IX, and previously served as the Vice President. Audree is an active member of the Madisonville FFA, National Honor Society, Beta Club Vice President, and a Captain of the Volleyball team. She has earned her Texas FFA Lone Star Degree and has been voted the class clown.

During the school year, Audree wakes up bright and early to take care of her horses, and goats.Her day starts around 6 am to feed, water, and situate her animals. Then it is off to school for her, after a day of classes, and athletics, Audree heads home to practice her events. Once her horses and goats have been fed and taken care of she heads inside to wind down.

Audree has a couple of heroes she looks up to in life. First are her grandparents Ray Lee and Billie Reding. Audree said, “They have paved the way to make sure every single one of their 4 children and 10 grandchildren has had opportunities to become successful through hardwork.”. She also looks up to Hailey Kinsel. Kinsel’s talent and hard work, along with her personality

are what Audree is drawn to. “Hailey Kinsel is one of the most down-to-earth, humble, and kind people I know.”, Said Audree.

“Sacrifice comes with rodeo… It is hard at times, but it has taught me that if you want something bad enough, you’re going to miss out on some things.”, said Audree. Being a member of THSRA has taught Audree life lessons that she will carry with her for the rest of her life. Audree stated, “I love the organization and the opportunities it brings.”.

Audree has a love for rodeo, and agriculture along with her nephew Blake. After graduating from Madisonville High School this year, Audree will attend Texas A&M University where she will be majoring in Agirculutcluar Business. “I do not know what specific job I want to have but I know I want to do something to help promote the agricultural industry,” said Audree. Audree is very honored to be this month’s Whatakid!

51
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Articles inside

AUDREE PHILLIPS OF REGION IX

2min
pages 51-55

The Fritsch Family of Region IX

3min
pages 49-50

Farm & Ranch Family

1min
page 49

Region IX JUNIOR HIGH STATE QUALIFIER preseley jacobs

2min
page 48

FINISHING THE YEAR STRONG

2min
pages 46-47

Region VIII

1min
page 46

The battle for the title of State Champion

2min
pages 44-45

CEILY SIMPTON OF REGION VII

4min
page 43

GONZALES TO HOST 18TH TJHSRA AT J.B.WELLS PARK

1min
pages 38-41

GET READY GONZALES, REGiON V iS ON THEiR WAY!

1min
page 36

2022-2023 THSRA State Secretary: Abby McCreary

1min
pages 35-36

MARYBETH BEAM OF REGION IV

5min
page 34

TEXAS is TOUGH

2min
pages 32-33

Region III

1min
page 31

REgion II: Ready for state

1min
page 30

Getting Ready for State

1min
page 29

Baranowsk Family of Region VII

2min
pages 28-29

Smith Family of Region IV

4min
pages 25-27

Farm & Ranch Family

1min
page 25

rodeo personnel:

2min
page 20

JUNIOR

1min
page 19

2023 TEXAS JUNIOR HIGH STATE FINALS RODEO SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

14min
pages 8-15, 18-19

TJHRA Contestants,

2min
pages 7-8

Gateway to Texas history...Gonzales, Texas

2min
page 6
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