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SPONSOR SPOTLIGHTS:

Aspen Miller

2018 FOUNDERS INVITATIONAL CHAMPION BARREL RACER AND ALL-AROUND COWGIRL

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CALF ROPING CLINIC WORLD CHAMPION CALF ROPER

Equine Champions for Christ was formed and created in early 2008. These clinics will help youth from all over acheive their goals, learn skills in thier field, benefit as future rodeo stars and experience a new walk of life in Christianity.

STRAN SMITH 3 Day Event: March 8th ,9th, and 10th

SIGN UP ONLINE NOW!

THIS CLINIC IS TOTALLY

FREE

Includes all lodging, meals and stalls for participants Campers only need to bring their own horse and feed. EQUINE CHAMPIONS FOR CHRIST PO BOX 1359 BASTROP, TEXAS 78602

PHONE: 512-619-4795 512-619-5634 FAX: 254-386-0079

KCROOKEDCREEK@GMAIL.COM

To be held at Crooked Creek Ranch | Hamilton, TX

Open to youth 12-18 years of age The first 35 applicants that sign up will be accepted www.EquineChampionsforChrist.com

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I NTROD U C I NG RE L E NT L E S S F ROM ARIAT 23-TIME W OR L D CHA M PIO N TR E VO R BR A Z IL E & A R IAT PUSH THE L IM IT S OF I N N OVAT I ON

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WATC H T H E V I D E O AT A R I AT R E L E N T L E S S . C O M

8/30/17 4:51 PM


EXECUTIVE BOARD STATE PRESIDENT KEN BRAY

PO Box 1634 • Granbury, TX 76048 817.219.0436 • kbray@equibrand.com

1ST VICE PRESIDENT MIKE ISELT

1656 E CR 327 • Lincoln, TX 78948 979.540.8863 • iseltpaint@aol.com

2ND VICE PRESIDENT COLE SEALY

PO Box 566 • San Saba, TX 76877 325.247.0545 • colesealy@yahoo.com

SECRETARY/TREASURER SUSAN BALDWIN

704 1/2 Southview Circle • Center, TX 75935 936.590.4447 texashighschoolrodeo@gmail.com

NATIONAL DIRECTOR COTTON GEORGE

PO Box 30 • Martinsville, TX 75958 936.564.8993 (home) cottongeorgetx@gmail.com

JUNIOR HIGH NATIONAL DIRECTOR JOHN BLAND 921 A FM 656 • Northfield, TX 79201 940.537.1354 • jeblandnspade@yahoo.com

In This Issue

EXTREME TEAM NEWS

Christmas Wish List PAGE 15

Marketing Director

830.815.1800 • delaune.holly@gmail.com

LAUREN TUTTLE STUMBERG

BRIAN ROBERTS

Computer Programmer brian.roberts53@att.net 281.213.9143

ARIAT PERFORMANCE REPORTERS Region I

JADYN DUGGAN Region II

MADALYN RICHARDS Region III

KYLEE SCRIBNER

PAGE 22

73 Breeze Way, Boerne, TX 78006 830.815.1800 delaune.holly@gmail.com

HOLLY DeLAUNE

Graphics/Layout Director lauren@distinct-graphics.com 830.249.8020

EQUINE PROFESSIONALS ISSUE

MARKETING HOLLY DELAUNE

Official Publication of the Texas High School Rodeo Association

Region IV

JESSEE YOUNG Region V

HARLEY JO PERKINS

SPONSOR SPOTLIGHTS

Region VI

SAGE SPIVEY Region VII

QUEEN COORDINATOR ANN BLACKWELL

JACEY LEE BYLER Region VIII

936.590.1855 tablackwell@yahoo.com

MACKENZIE BRYCE

DELEGATES AT LARGE

ALY GHORMLEY

DAVID FREEMAN

Region IX

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Region X

PAGE 22

BRITNE THOMAS

1039 Mickingbird Lane • Eagle Lake, TX 77434 832.221.1253 • chlfreeman@yahoo.com

THSRA OFFICIAL SPONSORS

MIKE GHORMLEY

PO Box 1177 • Madisonville, TX 77864 281.785.0077 • mghormley@me.com

JASON KEY

17547 N Hwy 59 • Garrison, TX 75946 936.564.0668 • key.jason@ymail.com

JOHN SCHUENEMAN

6717 FM 1452 W • Madisonville, TX 77864 979.268.4994 • john.schueneman@gmail.com

BRANDON SMITH

6800 E FM 476 • Pleasanton, TX 78064 830.570.7157 • bmsmith1996@sbcglobal.net

STUDENT OFFICERS

thsraofficers@hotmail.com STUDENT PRESIDENT Jack Wright STUDENT VICE PRESIDENT Lyndie Dunn STUDENT SECRETARY Brinlee Freeman QUEEN Aubrie Fields

WYATT BRAY

LAYTON BUTLER

PAGE 32

PAGE 47

STEWART FAMILY RANCH FAMILIES: THE THE HARTER FAMILY

Region

news

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06 08 10 14 31

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VI VII VIII IX X

TEXAS JUNIOR HIGH DIVISION 50

35 38 43 44 45

DR. TANDY FREEMAN

THSRA is a non-profit organization (501-C). Production of this publication was funded by membership dues and is provided complimentary to members of THSRA. Non-members may purchase annual subscriptions for $25.00

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KEVIN HUDDLESTON PO Box 750 • Memphis, Texas 79245 806.259.3139 • huddcottonkevin@gmail.com

STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - KARLIE HARTER VICE PRESIDENT- CARSEN NORRIS SECRETARY/HISTORIAN - HADLEY ALBRACHT

Region I

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS

ROB WELLS 521 Willow Lane • Hereford, Texas 79045 806.346.5109 • robb_wells45@yahoo.com SECRETARY - BRANDY WRIGHT 11555 US HWY 83 • Canadian, Texas 79014 806.255.0034 • tristaterodeo@yahoo.com

TREY JOHNSON Box 501 • Hapy, Texas 79042 806-433-7382 • tjohnsoncattle@gmail.com ROB WELLS 521 Willow Lane • Hereford, Texas 79045 806.346.5109 • robb_wells45@yahoo.com

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PERFORMANCE REPORT

National Finals Rodeo By Jadyn Duggan

– Performance Reporter

t’s that time of the year! It’s time for the National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas, Nevada. A time to be with family and to watch the best of the best compete for that famous Gold Buckle and the title of Miss Rodeo America. While we may not know all of those who will be competing, Region One has several alumni who will be living their dream this December alongside two men who will be reliving their dream. Region One is proud to announce that Zach Hibler, Lane Ivy, Kory Koontz, Reese Riemer and Hunter Cure will be making history this year. Zack Hibler was named the 2017-2018 Pro Rodeo Cowboys Association Rookie of the Year. Koory Koontz and Lane Ivy will both be competing at this years NFR in the Team Roping. Reese Riemer, who qualified for the 2016 NFR, will be making his way back in the Tie Down. As a child Reese got his start in rodeo from his family, “Both my mom and dad rodeoed as did my sister, so I grew up around rodeo and at a young age fell in love with the sport and lifestyle of rodeo.” Reese grew up on a

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small ranch in the Texas Panhandle allowing him to be apart of the Texas High School Rodeo Association Region One. When asked what his favorite part of Region One was, Reese replied, “My favorite thing about Region One were the friendship that I made. To this day some of my closest friendships are people that I rodeoed with in Region One.” After graduating Reese went on to further his education at Weatherford Junior College and Tarleton State. Soon after he began his rookie season in 2012, where Reese says “I began working my way to achieving my dreams and goals that I had set for myself a long time ago.” As Reese prepares for the upcoming finals he says he will have to stay focused on his “ability to handle the fast setup.” Hunter Cure has qualified for the NFR several times in the past and will be headed back once again this year in the Steer Wrestling. Hunter learned the ropes of rodeo from his step father Jeff Williamson. However Jeff was not the only one who got Hunter where he is today. Hunter says, “Without men like Larry Dawson, Dennis Gee, Charlie Fox and Mike Thompson, I wouldn't be where I am today.” As a part of the Region One family Hunter says his favorite thing about the region is the people and the different arenas, “The diversity of arenas, primarily, big pens was probably the biggest thing that Region One provided that helped me become a professional.” As Hunter prepares for the NFR he will be focusing on, one allowing his horses time off, and the second will be his physical condition. “If my horse is working and I'm strong and healthy, the mental side will take care of itself.” As many across the state will travel to watch the National Finals Rodeo in person, Region One wishes you all safe travels. We also would like to wish the best of luck to Zach Hibler, Lane Ivy, Kory Koontz, Reese Riemer and Hunter Cure in all they do. Region one is so proud to have you as apart of our rodeo family and honored to call Region One Alumni. “Anybody can make it. If you dream big enough and work hard enough and trust the process you can achieve your dreams and do not let anybody tell you different.” - Reese Riemer “I would say to those in Region One trying to make the NFR that success has very little to do with where you come from. It has more to do with the 4 D's; desire, determination, dedication, and discipline. Those that are willing to work and sacrifice are those that get ahead of the pack.” - Hunter Cure


Our thoughts, prayers and love goes out to the Byler and Ackerman families. We love you, The Texas High School and Junior High Rodeo Family

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PO Box 62862 • San Angelo, Texas 76904 512.618.9233 • csbaize@yahoo.com

STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - SAYER SENTER VICE PRESIDENT - ALLISON BAIZE SECRETARY - MADALYN RICHARDS

JODY MCELROY Box 224 • Balmorhea, Texas 79718 432.448.7810 • rodeosecretary1@gmail.com SECRETARY - JODY MCELROY Box 224 • Balmorhea, Texas 79718 432.448.7810 • rodeosecretary1@gmail.com

Region II

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS CASEY BAIZE

PO Box 7238 • Midland, Texas 79708 432.296.2205 • mattandkayladickey@yahoo.com

MATT DICKEY

PRESIDENT- KENNY STEWART 2347 FM 829 • Stanton, Texas 79782 432.661.5084 • kstewart93@gmail.om

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PERFORMANCE REPORT

Mental Game

By MADALYN RICHARDS – Performance Reporter

f your house is like mine, then it’s been raining non stop! With the muddy arenas and cold weather, there are few opportunities to get good practice in. So, it’s important to make the most of your time. Especially since spring rodeos will be here before you know it. You must know how to prepare MENTALLY when you can’t PHYSICALLY practice.

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Your mental game is very important in the sport of rodeo. So, why not make the most of our time spent trapped indoors? Visualization can be very helpful in times like these. When visualizing, you can put yourself in ANY situation. A region rodeo, the state finals, or anything else that you want to win. For example: Lanny Bassham, Olympic/World Champion Rifle Shooter and author of the book, “With Winning In Mind”, said that before he won the gold medal at the Olympics, he had visualized winning the rifle shooting competition THOUSANDS of times in his head. You can do the same thing for your rodeo events. I’ve found that mentally rehearsing perfect goat tying runs can help me stay on top of my game, even when the weather doesn’t allow me to physically practice tying. Once you have mentally rehearsed something many, many times, it will make you more confident and calmer when it comes time to compete. You can imagine far more than you can currently achieve. If you consistently visualize what you want to accomplish, then what you imagine can become your reality.


Jack Wright

J

THSRA STUDENT PRESIDENT

ack Dalton Wright is a senior at East Beauregard High School in DeRidder, Louisiana. Jack is a 4 year member of THSRA and 11 year member of the NLBRA. He competes in Region V of Texas and has been the Region V Champion Saddle Bronc Rider. In the inaugural year when the NJHRA added steer saddle bronc riding, Jack was the first Region V champion and the first Texas State Champion Steer Saddle Bronc Rider. Jack is also an avid team roper and competes in high school, but his one true love is riding bucking horses. He is a fourth generation cowboy. His great-grandfather worked ranches all over the Texas/New Mexico area, and retired after breaking his last colt at age 68, for the infamous Bell Ranch. Jack’s grandfather and brothers also worked the ranches along with their dad, breaking colts and rodeoing whenever they could sneak away from work. Jack was seemingly destined for bronc riding. His dad was the Texas High School State Champion Saddle Bronc rider and also the

National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association Champion Saddle Bronc Rider. Jack grew up on the PRCA circuit, traveling and watching as his dad competed day in and day out and eventually retired from the PRCA with his Gold Card, after winning the Southeastern Circuit. Jack’s dad resides and works on the largest ranch in Louisiana, the Gray Ranch located in south Louisana. In true fashion, Jack has followed in the ranching footsteps, and is now helps oversee his mom’s family ranch, Fontenot Farms. In addition to school, practice, and rodeo, Jack oversees 150 or so momma cows, calves, and pasture on a day to day basis. Outside of rodeo and ranching he enjoys: Duck, squirrel and dove hunting and learning to play the French accordion. He also enjoys day-working and working out. At school, Jack is the vice-president of the student council, President of FBLA, Reporter for FFA, and competes on the FFA and 4-H horse judging, livestock judging, and forestry teams. Jack has a work ethic like no other, and is fiercely loyal to God, his family and the occasional Underdog. After graduation, he plans to attend Clarendon Junior College, then Oklahoma Panhandle State University and continue his rodeo career.

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DUANE OVERTON 2110 FM 3027 • Mineral Wells, TX 76067

940.682.6113 • duaneoverton6113@gmail.com

STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - LARAMIE DEARING VICE PRESIDENT - KYLEE COOK SECRETARY - SYDNEY MUNSTER

Region III

817.706.8236• kelley.williams@thsra3.com STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS

JOE TOMEU 360 CR 2788 • Sunset, Texas 76270 941.809.7333 • joe@tomeu.com PO Box 122448 • Fort Worth, Texas 76121

SECRETARY - KELLEY WILLIAMS

KEVIN STEWART PO Box 1308 • Glen Rose, Texas 76043 817.307.7300 • thekevinstewart@live.com PRESIDENT - KEN BRAY PO Box 1634 • Granbury, Texas 76048 817.219.0436 • kbray@equibrand.com

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PERFORMANCE REPORT

A Star on the Rise

By KYLEE SCRIBNER

– Performance Reporter

s another wave of freshmen students roll into the high school division, the competition continues to exceed all expectations. As in every region there are always a few star athletes that come to mind. As for Region III, everyone has their eyes on Riley Webb, an incoming freshman from Denton, who has many titles under his belt and is scouring for more. Just at Region III alone Webb won the Jr. High Calf Roping, Jr. High Ribbon Roping, Jr. High Boys Goat Tying, as well as the Jr. High All Around! Riley continued on to win the Boys Jr. High Goat Tying not only at state, but brought home the National title. As you see Riley obtained numerous titles from Region III alone. However he did not back down there. Webb continued on to win the Cody Ohl 13-15 Calf Roping Champion, Ultimate Calf Roping Association #9 Champion, as well as the three-time Jr. NFR Champion Calf Roper (2015, 2016, 2017). As you can see this young man shows a promising future inside the rodeo arena, but he never shows a hint of being too prideful in his talent. As

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one of Riley’s closet friends, it has become very evident to me that he not only carries himself as a very humble person but he strongly displays his faith in God as well. If you ever get the chance to see Mr.Webb in his rodeo attire you will recognize his shirt is covered in sponsorship patches, but also what will stand out is his favorite bible verse; John 3:16, confidently embroidered on the collar of his shirt. When asked what he does in order to be as successful as himself in the arena Riley named off a few things. First off Riley ropes every day, whether it is live calves or the dummy this dedicated, young man works every day at his skill. Secondly, Riley believes that his parents, grandparents, and sponsors have helped get him as far as he is in his rodeo career and would like to give them a huge thank you for always supporting him through not only the highs but also the lows. Lastly, Riley would like to say a thank you to the man upstairs, “without him I could not be where I am today”. As it has become evident, Riley Webb is a focused young man who anyone should be hoping to meet this year at Region III. Riley will be on the hunt for more titles as this season approaches, and he will be more determined than before to overcome any obstacles that come his way to achieve his goals. Not only should you keep an eye on Riley Webb at Region III this year, but be on the lookout for him in a few years at the NFR. Riley Webb has many plans set out and with a character such as his own there is no doubt that this rising star will one day be a World Champion in Las Vegas, Nevada.


Farm & Ranch Family The folks at McCoy’s Building Supply understand that it takes a lot of hard work and the whole family pitching in to get things done on a farm or ranch. That’s why we’d like to take some time out to salute Texas High School Rodeo Association families who are farmers and ranchers. In our monthly Farm & Ranch Family Spotlight, we’ll feature one family, sharing their story of how they work together as a family to make their farm or ranch successful.The spotlight will run for 10 months; each month will feature a different Region. Each Regional McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family will receive a $100 McCoy’s Gift Card. The McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family of the Year will receive a $500 McCoy’s Gift Card and will be announced at the 2019 THSRA State Finals.

The Stewart Family of Region III

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by Macy Conant

ongratulations to the McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family of the Month; the Stewart’s! Kevin, Ember, Tegan and Sterling Stewart all own and work on their family ranch, Casa Roja Ranch, located in Glenn Rose, Texas. The Stewart ranch has been in business training horses for the last 20 years and continues to train team roping and barrel racing horses to this day! The ranch began as a family affair as Kevin grew up competing in team roping and met his wife, Ember, while competing at Nationals. Kevin competed 11 times at Nationals, and knew the rodeo lifestyle was what he wanted to pursue as a career. Kevin and Ember have been working with teams who want to succeed in team roping and barrel racing at their ranch, Casa Roja, for 20 years and Kevin has been teaching lessons for the past 30 years! The family is responsible for 18 horses and own 263 acres of land for training horses in preparation for competitions. Working together as a family in order to ensure their livelihood has taught the Stewarts’s how to rely on each other’s strengths, which has allowed their ranch to continue to succeed year after year. Kevin and Ember work together to make sure their horses are in the best condition to compete. Kevin will go up to the barrel racing barn to rope and ride the barrel horses, while Ember has a keen eye for horses and helps Kevin pick out issues he might be having with the roping horses. Tegan and Sterling both compete in rodeos

around Texas. Tegan, 16, competes in team roping, while Sterling, 8, competes in barrel racing. Tegan will help train and ride horses alongside his parents in the summer, as he likes to see the progress of the family horses. Sterling loves to ride barrels with her mom, and has good timing with her horses. As her dad affectionately says, “She’s 8, and she’s not afraid of anything. She just goes and goes and goes.” Owning and operating a family business is difficult, yet the Stewarts’s make it look easy. They even make time to go to Top Golf as a family, which they all really enjoy because they are pretty competitive with each other. While training and competing tends to dominate the Stewart’s time, they love taking time to be together when they can. Plus, the rodeo lifestyle is for them as they love spending time being a part of THSRA and TJHRA. As Kevin said, “I enjoy it because I feel like I’m giving back to what has given me the life I have of rodeoing and horses. It keeps us busy working rodeos on the weekends, but I enjoy it because I’m giving back to the rodeo community.” Congratulations Stewart family on being chosen as the McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family of the Month!

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Miss T HSRA 2018 Aubrie Fields

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t doesn’t seem real that half a year of my reign as miss THSRA is coming to an end. It has been some of the most fun months I have had. I want to take this time to tell many of the members about the National High School Finals Rodeo and how it has impacted me. While I was en route to Rock Springs I met many people from California to New York. I was so excited to

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get to talk to people about what the big banner on my trailer meant and where I was going. When I arrived in at the grounds and got checked in I was met by many of my state queen friends. The entire week was one like none other. I was so exhausted, but I would do it again in heartbeat. In just a week I made connections with sponsors, college age rodeo kids and people across the United States and even a few Australians and Canadians. I did not leave with the title, but I am proud to say that I was 5th place and was a part of the National Team Winners!! After I got home, I did not get a break by any means. Within days I was riding in parades and going to rodeos. There is no other way I would have rather spent my summer than representing such a great rodeo association. Through the week I was awarded close to $2000 in scholarships that I have already began taking advantage of in paying for dual credit courses. I say all these things to not only inform people of the duties of the Texas High School Rodeo Queen, but also to show girls that being a rodeo queen is more fun than work. I would encourage any girl who loves rodeo and advocating for something they love while still getting to be a cowgirl to consider entering the Miss THSRA pageant. Packets are available now and are easily accessed through the website or your region secretary. Don’t forget to follow me through my journey by following misstexashsrodeo on instagram and on facebook as well! I am extremely lucky to represent y’all and God bless.


ENTRIES OPEN FOR 2019 MISS THSRA QUEEN CONTEST Entry packets are now available for the 2019 Miss THSRA Queen contest. The contest is open to all THSRA girl members in grades 9-11. The reigning Miss THSRA Aubrie Fields from Region 2 was awarded over $7,500 in awards and scholarships this past June. All contestants received numerous gifts and awards just for entering the contest. Awards are given for each of the 8 scored categories plus Miss Congeniality and Photogenic. The deadline for entry is January 1, 2019. There will not be a clinic

2018-2019 AJRA 67th Rodeo Schedule

this year, but one-on-one sessions to guide you are available with the coordinator. We would love to see all 10 regions have a representative as their Region Queen, as well as the opportunity to represent the State Team at Nationals. This is truly the opportunity of a lifetime. For an entry packet or questions, please contact Ann Blackwell, Queen Coordinator at 936-590-1855 or 936-598-3581 or 936-590-9126. Email is tablackwell@yahoo.com .

**12 rodeos! Best 10 rodeo results used for year end plus the finals! **Must compete at 4 rodeos to compete at the AJRA NFR! **Breakaway for G13-15, B13-15 and G16-19 is bell collar catch **G16-19 will have two Breakaway Roping events. Each will count towards World Championship and All-Around.

**All rough stock events will be co-sanctioned with Tommy Green’s Rodeo Company but will compete at the NFR in Sweetwater, Texas **Roy Cooper Junior NFR Roping Invitations **2020 The RFD American Semi-Finals Exemptions in 8&U, G09-12, G13-15, & G16-19 Barrels, B16-19 Tie-Down, 16-19 Team Roping Header-Heeler, B16-19 Steer Wrestling, G09-12, G13-15, & G16-19 Breakaway

RODEO #1 & #2

NOVEMBER 9-11, 2018

STEPHENVILLE, TX LONE STAR ARENA

RODEO #3 & #4

NOVEMBER 16-18, 2018

HAMILTON, TX CIRCLE T ARENA

RODEO #5 & #6

MARCH 22-24, 2019

MIDLAND, TX HORSE SHOE ARENA

RODEO #7 & #8

APRIL 26-28, 2019

ABILENE, TX COVERED OUTDOOR & NEW ARENA @ TAYLOR EXPO

RODEO #9 & #10 MAY 10-12, 2019

SWEETWATER, TX NOLAN COUNTY COLISEUM

RODEO #11

GOLDTHWAITE, TX T. A. HEAD ARENA

JUNE 20-21, 2019

RODEO #12 JUNE 21-22, 2019 EDEN, TX RAY DOCKERY ARENA

JULY 24-27, 2019

67TH AJRA NFR NOLAN COUNTY COLISEUM, SWEETWATER, TEXAS

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STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - RAINEY JOHNSON VICE PRESIDENT -KAITLYN BURKHAM SECRETARY - JESSEE YOUNG STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS THOMAS BROCKWAY 8016 CR 2419 • Royse City, 75189 thomas.brockway@woodpartners.com 214.770.5302

DR. TANDY FREEMAN

MARK KELLEY 155 Pole Bridge Road • Combine, Texas 75159 214.316.6770 • kkcarroll1218@gmail.com SECRETARY - TINA BRADEN PO Box 549 • Horatio, AR 71842 870.832.3149 • tbbraden@earthlink.net

Region IV

BRENT CHADWICK 2915 N US HWY 69 • Mineola, TX 75773 903.569.1569 • brentchadwick87@gmail.com PRESIDENT- BRENT CHADWICK 2915 N US 69 • Mineola, Texas 75773 903.569.1569 • chadbr2@aol.com

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PERFORMANCE REPORT

SETTING GOALS By JESSEE YOUNG – Performance Reporter

etting goals are one of the key functions in the development of training routines. Good routines prepare the athlete physically and mentally which keeps them competitive and successful which requires both commitment and follow through. First, you have to set goals you can achieve “set a path”. Second, you must stay focused and maintain motivation. Third, learn from your mistakes, keep striving to do better and move forward. Goals are the stepping stones to help organize your dreams and expectations. I took a moment to ask a couple of our region 4 seniors how they stay focused and competitive. Cutter Carpenter tells how he sets his goals and stays focused. “I look at roping like it’s my job, it is not a hobby for

S

CUTTER CARPENTER

me. I prepare all week so I know when I get to the rodeo I am mentally and physically ready to compete. I am only concerned with making the best run I can on the calf I have drawn. I do not worry about what anyone else does.” Cutter stated “yes, you have to set goals in order to push yourself to be better. Some of the goals I have for this season are to win Region’s in calf roping, qualify for state in calf roping, team roping and make nationals.” CONGRATULATIONS 2018-19 REGION 4 OFFICERS AS PICTURED: Rainey Johnson a senior in Region PRESIDENT- RAINEY JOHNSON, 4 tells how she prepares for her events SECRETARY -JESSEE YOUNG, VICE PRESIDENT- KAITLYN BURKHAM “I spend a lot of time in the practice pen, either working horses or myself, most of the time –I’m doing both. I think to be successful you have to set goals. Goals give you something to work for. Without something to work for it can be hard to keep up.” It’s important when you’re setting goals to set meaningful ones that are both reasonable and achievable and goals that you can succeed with and build upon. It’s important to focus on the outRAINEY JOHNSON come, not the obstacle and never be afraid to push your limits. When an obstacle arises you can change your direction to reach the goal and your decision to get there. Goals are the tools used to motivate your desire or willingness to follow through on to your dreams.

“Mindset is the platform that can fuel your growth." - unknown


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CHRISTMAS MOVIE CHECKLIST A Christmas Story A Charlie Brown Christmas Arthur Christmas Christmas with the Cranks Deck the Halls Elf Ernest Saves Christmas Frosty the Snowman Holiday Inn Home Alone Home Alone 2 How the Grinch Stole Christmas Iʻll Be Home for Christmas Itʻs a Wonderful Life Jack Frost Jingle All the Way Mickeyʻs Christmas Carol Muppetʻs Christmas Carol

Miracle on 34th Street Prancer Prancer Returns Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer The Bishopʻs Wife The Little Drummer Boy The Muppets Christmas Carol The Nativity The Night Before Christmas The Polar Express The Santa Clause The Santa Clause 2 The Year Without A Santa Claus While Your Were Sleeping White Christmas

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25 FAMILY CHRISTMAS TRADITIONS

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article courtesy of www.sixsistersstuff.com

he whole month of December is always busy for our family. Between family parties and our usual festivities, the month seems to fly by! Here are 25 Christmas traditions to help spread a little holiday cheer! 1. Have a cookie exchange party. Every guest brings their favorite holiday cookie to share with the rest of the party guests. 2. Go Christmas caroling. Bring along some hot chocolate and spread Christmas cheer to all your neighbors! 3. Elf on the Shelf. Each day your kids will look for Santa’s little helper and see what silly antics he has been up to. 4. Check out a local light display. Most cities have a light display in the city park or down main street! You can even stay in your car and drive through them if it is too cold outside. 5. Pick out a new ornament for each child. My son loves hanging his own special ornament on the tree every year! 6. Angel Tree. Many department stores have an angel tree where they give information about a child in need. Purchase presents for the “angel” you choose from the tree. 7. Donate food to your local food bank. Food banks are very busy this time a year and are always in need. Donate non-perishable items to your local food bank. 8. Make Christmas candy. Our Crock Pot Nut Clusters are so easy to make and make enough to supply all your neighbors with a special treat! 9. Write letters to Santa. Let each child write a letter to Santa and mail it off to the North Pole! 10. Have a gingerbread house making contest. If you want to make it a little simpler, you can use graham crackers. 11. Go to a Christmas concert. Most cities have special concerts during the holiday season, and many of them are free! Bring your family to hear the beautiful songs of the Christmas season.

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12. Watch a Christmas movie. 13. Make a countdown to Christmas chain. Let the kids cut strips of paper and hook them together to create a countdown chain. Take turns taking a ring off of the chain each day. 14. Make some holiday fudge. 15. Have a Christmas campfire. Make a fire in the fireplace and share your favorite Christmas memories. 16. Have an ornament exchange. Each year all of the girls get together and bring an ornament to exchange. You will have quite the collection in years to come! 17. Have a “crazy dinner”. Every year, our family would go to the store and each child got $3-$5 to spend on any food they want. We would come home and prepare all the food and eat by candlelight. 18. Make some Homemade Caramels. 19. Decorate Christmas sugar cookies. We love this recipe for delicious, moist sugar cookies. Let the kids decorate the cookies with frosting and candy! 20. Bring dinner to a less fortunate family. Every Christmas Eve, our family would bring a turkey dinner to a family in need. 21. Visit Santa Claus. Kids love being able to visit Santa and tell them what is on their wishlist! 22. Have a Christmas talent show. Every year, our family gets together and each person shares a talent. Most of them are funny and we spend the whole year thinking about what we will do at the next talent show! 23. Christmas book advent calendar. Unwrap a book each day of the month and read it together as a family each evening. 24. Have a hot chocolate bar. Make a big batch of hot chocolate and arrange lots of toppings and treats to flavor your drinks! 25. Read the Christmas Story and remember the real reason we celebrate. You can invite your children to act out the nativity.


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We Wish You and Your Family A

Merry Christmas & Happy New Year! 21


The Annual Equine Professionals Issue

Starches, Sugars, Carbohydrates, Oh My! Kelly Vineyard, M.S., Ph.D. Senior Nutritionist, Equine Technical Solutions

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ow sugar and starch. Low carb. Non-structural carbohydrates. Metabolic needs. With the rise in popularity of feeding specialized diets to horses with various metabolic concerns, there seems to be a lot of discussion about these terms. But, what do they mean and how does it affect you, your horse and your horse’s feeding program? Carbohydrates in horse feeds Non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) and structural carbohydrates in horse feeds are important when determining sugar and starch levels in your horse’s feed. There are two primary forms of carbohydrates found in horse feed ingredients: Non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) Structural carbohydrates Non-structural carbohydrates Non-structural carbohydrates, or NSC, are the simple sugars and starches present in horse feed ingredients. Simple sugars (such as glucose and fructose) and starches (simple sugars that are attached together as a chain) are readily digested and absorbed in the small intestine. This results in a rise in blood glucose, and subsequently, blood insulin levels. Glucose derived from non-structural carbohydrate digestion serves as an important energy source in the diet of performance horses, providing the horse does not have a dietary carbohydrate sensitivity, such as with insulin resistance or PPID. As long as concentrate meal sizes are appropriate, horses will digest and utilize NSC quite efficiently. As a general rule of thumb, keep concentrate meals to 0.5% bodyweight or less. However, if a horse consumes an excessive amount of NSC in a meal (such

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as when a horse gets into the feed room and gorges himself on feed), the small intestine can become overwhelmed and NSC will be delivered to the hindgut. This situation should be avoided at all costs, as excessive NSC in the hindgut can lead to major problems such as hindgut acidosis, colic, and laminitis. Feed ingredients such as beet pulp and alfalfa meal are lower in NSC, while grain ingredients such as corn, oats, and barley are higher in NSC. STRUCTURAL CARBOHYDRATES IN HORSE FEEDS Structural carbohydrates in horse feeds are found in the cell wall portion of plants and serve as important fiber sources. Structural carbohydrates are prevalent in forages but are also present in higher fiber feed ingredients such as soy hulls and beet pulp. Structural carbohydrates are digested in the horse’s hindgut through microbial fermentation and serve as another important energy source, but they do not result in a rise in blood glucose or insulin. Both non-structural and structural carbohydrates play a vital role in providing energy in a horse’s diet, every horse is unique and it’s important to develop a diet based on your individual horse’s metabolic needs. LOW SUGAR/STARCH DIETS FOR HORSES For horses with carbohydrate sensitivities, managing their sugar and starch intake is critical. Horses with insulin dysregulation, laminitis, PPID or other veterinary-diagnosed conditions need diets with controlled starch and sugar. Diets that have low NSC levels, like WellSolve L/S® or Enrich Plus® horse feed can support normal glucose and insulin responses to feeding. continued on page 25


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continued from page 22

Purina® Strategy® Healthy Edge® horse feed is a controlled starch and sugar formula containing fewer calories that can be helpful to optimize body condition while supporting the needs of the performance horse. With the new inclusion of Outlast® Gastric Support Supplement, Strategy® Health Edge® horse feed is a great choice to support the needs of horses with a history of gastric concerns. It’s important to understand that individual horses will have variable responses to feeding of similar diets. A horse’s response to sugar and starch can be impacted by a variety of factors including: Age Gender Body condition Fitness level Metabolic status Wellness and/or disease What’s in the bag? Recent research at the Purina Animal Nutrition Center found that five healthy horses fed a 4 lb meal of Purina® Strategy® Healthy Edge® had a low glucose and insulin response to feeding1. When these values are compared to existing research, they are even more striking as they are lower than those found previously when horses consumed oats2 or even good quality grass hay3, further highlighting the low starch and sugar characteristics of Purina® Strategy® Healthy Edge® horse feed. The higher fat and fiber content of Strategy® Health Edge® horse feed supplies a controlled number of calories from sources with lower starch and sugar content, which can result in a lower glucose and insulin response to feeding. This creates an appropriate diet for horses that may benefit from this type of concentrate feed. It is important to understand that individual horses will have variable responses to feedings of similar diets and this response can be impacted by a variety of factors including age, gender, body condition, fitness level, and health. Purina features a full line of complete feeds and supplements specially formulated to provide low starch and sugar content while meeting the nutrient and calorie requirements for horses at any stage of life. It is important to work closely with a veterinarian to understand what a horse’s blood test results mean and how diet influences the results. Want to learn more? Check out this video about carbohydrates in horse feed. 1HR 272- Strategy and Strategy Healthy Edge Glycemic Index. RD Jacobs and ME Gordon. 2018. 2Glycemic Index of ten common horse feeds. AV Rodiek and CL Stull. Journal of Equine Veterinary Science. May 2007. 3HR 233- Physiological responses of horses to Standlee Timothy Hay. RD Jacobs and ME Gordon. 2018.

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A History of Experience With A Vision For The Future Chiropractics

Lameness Evaluations

Farrier Services

Dentistry Mare and Stallion Management General Medicine/Wellness

24 hour Emergency/ICU Care

Dr. Cal Davis Dr. Christine Sutherland

Dr. Justin High Dr. Mary Bumgarner

6516 Granbury Hwy ~ Weatherford, TX ~ 817-599-9635 www.reataequinehospital.com

Equine Professionals Index ANIMAL IMAGING PAGE 24

RETAMA EQUINE HOSPITAL Selma

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BOEHRINGER INGELHEIM

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BRACKEN EQUINE CLINIC San Antonio

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SETX EQUINE AND VETERINARY HOSPITAL Sour Lake PAGE 42

FOSSIL CREEK EQUINE CENTER Boerne

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TEXAS EQUINE HOSPITAL Bryan

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PAGE 33 & 39 WEEMS & STEPHENS EQUINE HOSPITAL Aubrey PAGE 24 PURINA PAGE 22, 27 FULTON QUIEN SABE RANCH

REATA EQUINE HOSPITAL Weatherford

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Animals speak louder than words. TM

If there’s greatness on the inside, it shows on the outside.

Š 2018 Purina Animal Nutrition LLC. All rights reserved.

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How Advanced Imaging Helps Barrel Racer Tiany Schuster article by Animal Imaging

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ike any baseball, football or basketball star, equine athletes can encounter sports injuries that can affect their performance in the arena. Unlike their human counterparts, horses cannot communicate what is bothering them, which can be a challenge to the rider especially at competition time. Nationally ranked barrel racer, Tiany Schuster, has certainly faced her share of challenges when it comes to the performance of her horses. Along with a veterinarian’s exam, advanced imaging has often been an important resource to help diagnose what is causing her horses’ performance issues. Tiany has used both nuclear scintigraphy (bone scan evaluation) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) as resources to obtain a diagnosis and develop a treatment plan with her veterinarian. She recently sat down with the staff at Animal Imaging in Irving, Texas to answer a few questions about how advanced imaging has helped her equine athletes. AI Staff: Nuclear scintigraphy or bone scans are valuable when trying to diagnose an obscure lameness issue. You have used this test for several of your horses. Is this the predominant reason you have used bone scans, or do you use it more as a screening test prior to purchases, a competition or to help make decisions on increasing training? Tiany: The bone scans, or nuclear scintigraphy, that Animal Imaging offers has been such a game changer

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for ALL my horses. From the youngest ones starting, to top level finished horses, and everything in between. A bone scan allows me to get an opportunity to "not guess" per say, when we are looking for problems and potential issues. Bone scans save us money by showing us "to look here" instead of guessing and wasting time & money by thinking “somewhere else” is the problem. With the bone scan technology that Animal Imaging offers, it gives me a safe way to find obscure and often hidden areas that need attention. The biggest misconception is that the horse is laid down for this procedure. This is not true. And for me, having my horses awake and standing makes this the best, wisest and most informative diagnostic tool that is available. AI Staff: Do you limit cases to obviously lame horses or are some just not performing as well as expected? Tiany: No. I try to utilize the services at Animal Imaging and the opportunity to have bone scans done on all my horses that are competing. And more importantly, if it is feasible, I do follow ups scans yearly. For prevention, we can see what is healthy and what is changing and then address our training, rest, or competitive schedule accordingly, before something is overloaded and then a horse quits working. AI Staff: Was there ever a time that the results of a bone scan revealed an issue that you were not expecting and if so, what was found? Tiany: One of the very first ones I ever did. Red Headed Jonesy... he had a history of chronically sore ankles and we were always injecting his lower hocks. I knew he had a big spur on his lower right hock, so walks like a duck, quacks like a duck? Right? Umm wrong. Long story short... he had a long-curved hairline fracture of his cannon bone. Guessing the ankle injections (that only lasted a few weeks) would cool off that soreness from the fracture. The bone scan lit up per say and said look here.... and we did and found the fracture. That spur.... well, his lower hocks were totally normal on the bone scan. Now his upper hocks


were so insanely reactive, not even funny. I learned right then, just because you see a problem on x-ray, doesn't mean it is an active painful issue. All that time we had been treating that spur and his upper hocks were hurting so bad. Red Headed Jonesy was an eye opener for me and the way I saw and learned to diagnose what I think are problems, and what we know are problems. AI Staff: What role do bone scans play, or now standing MRIs in feet, play in pre-purchase exams? Tiany: The best money I spend now is on pre-purchase bone scans. I go straight there, sometimes before even test riding a horse. Some have failed straight out by finding ankles that are about to fracture... and other times they have found so many things we just stopped while we are ahead. lol. And the best part is when one is good, and the peace of mind is worth every penny when you learn what problems you don’t have! AI Staff: Does MRI help you in any way to formulate a correct treatment plan or otherwise assist you in making performance decisions? Tiany: The accessibility to the MRI services at Animal Imaging is like no other! What sets Animal Imaging apart from everyone else? The eyes of the experienced personnel of staff. No other facility has this. The staff at animal imaging has the trained eyes to read the MRI and see active issues and even the slightest of problems. MRI is such an important tool to know, go on, rest, or what to do and how to get there. AI Staff: Is MRI only useful in foot abnormalities? Tiany: MRI is great because it allows up a blueprint image if you can imagine of so much more than the foot. We worked on JSYK I’m Famous and it helped us locate his hard to find fracture in his hock and follow its progression before and after surgery. He was sound and not sound and sound again.... and went and won $65,000 all while having a fractured hock years ago. We did put a screw in it to stabilize and he went on to the NFR and set many arena records all afterwards. And MRI and Animal Imaging were a huge part in his life and success. AI Staff: Does advanced imaging help you make correct choices down the road or do you only find them useful when acquired? Tiany: Both. Both Animal Imaging and myself.... I would like to think of us as synergy.... where we all work together to make things complete. If I know my horse is good with no current changes on a bone scan, I can be more confident that there is less likely chance of injury. And I will not be wasting money on unnecessary injections or trips to the vet to "make myself feel better". AI Staff: How do you utilize the results of advanced imaging studies when speaking to veterinarians around the country in regard to managing your horses? Tiany: The luxury of the detailed informative reports being emailed to me are a great asset. While you don’t have to be a vet, when and if you do go to the vet.... you can pull that up and the information you will have will help with what is going on. A full history be it humans or horses gives doctors the knowledge to have full information of what is, and was, and what may or may not be going on. Remember... knowledge is power. And the worst thing is not knowing what you don't know.... Take if from Tiany Shuster, someone who is competing at the highest levels with her horses year after year; advanced imaging is critical to the success of her equine athletes. Bone scans and MRI are key tools in diagnosing existing problems and identifying issues that may become a lameness if training, or competition levels are not adjusted. Working with the board-certified radiologists and anesthesiologists at Animal Imaging gives Tiany the peace of mind for the soundness of her horses.

The gossip around the barn... Strategy now supports gastric comfort. ®

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www.retamaequinehospital.com 30


PRESIDENT - REAGAN DAVIS VICE PRESIDENT - LYNDIE DUNN SECRETARY - KAITLYN WOODMAN

STUDENT OFFICERS

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS BRAD CRONE 2410 McBride Devillier • Winnie, Texas 77665 409.351.1983 • dps2422@aol.com

Region V

SECRETARY - SUSAN BALDWIN 704 1/2 Southview Circle • Center, Texas 75935 936.590.4330 • regionvsecretary@gmail.com

JOE GLENN KAHLA 612 FM 1747 • Jasper, Texas 75951 409.384.0921 • jgk@mklawyers.com JEFF LUMMUS PO Box 646 • Orangefield, Texas 77639 409.313.7765 • jeff.t.lummus-1@dupont.com

PRESIDENT- JASON KEY 17547 N Hwy 59 • Garrison, Texas 75946 936.564.0668 • key.jason@ymail.com

PERFORMANCE REPORT

Maintenance Matters By HARLEY JO PERKINS – Performance Reporter

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s rodeo athletes, we understand the importance of maintaining a healthy horse who can withstand the pressure of being hauled down the road. Whether its yearly, monthly, weekly, or daily maintenance, we all know the cost of keeping our equine counterparts on top of their game. So, what are the things to keep in check while wanting to keep your horse happy and healthy? Here are a few things that need to be maintained… · Physical well being (good feed and exercise) · Mental preparation · Feet · Teeth · Hocks, stifles, knees, SI joints, backs, etc. · Regular vaccinations/ deworming Doing maintenance on your horse brings about huge benefits that are visible in the horse’s attitude, performance, and health. Keeping your horse in the best shape possible is a key element in how well their hooves grow. A horse with

regular exercise typically has better hoof growth and better nutrients in their feet than a horse that receives little exercise. Another major thing that needs to be maintained is your horse’s teeth. If their teeth are not cleaned and filed properly, it can cause pain and serious discomfort. When the horse’s teeth are sharp and jagged, the bit will sit in a sensitive position. There will be a constant irritation in the horse’s mouth, making them sore and anxious to feel any contact from the bit. Their performance will suffer from not having the necessary dental work they need. As children of God, we also need to keep ourselves in check and see if we require maintenance from time to time. As crucial as it is for our equine partners to sustain good health, we too need to watch over the conditions of our heart, soul, mind, and strength. If these four things are not lining up with the Word of God, we must take hold of our actions and seek after the Lord’s plan for our lives. Just as the horse requires regular activity for hoof growth, we need to spend daily time in our Bibles to receive spiritual growth. Without daily time with Jesus, we will not grow in our relationship with Him, hindering us of reaching our full potential in being a loving Christian to those around us. If we leave a negative attitude or bad habit unaddressed like a horse’s sharp tooth, we will feel a constant struggle to follow God’s will for our lives. There will be a battle in our hearts to pursue our own ways and desires over God’s grace. For us to be the light God wants us to be, we need to seek Jesus daily and allow Him to be the center of our lives. We may require some maintenance, but the benefits of living a life for Jesus will be evident to us and the ones in need of an everlasting love.

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WYATT BRAY OF REGION III by Jacqueline Knox

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The Whataburger Whatakid is selected due to their ability to excel both in and out of the rodeo arena. Whataburger is proud to recognize a THSRA member from each of the ten Regions who truly upholds the title “Whatakid!” One of the nominees will be chosen at the State Final Rodeo in June as the Whatakid of the Year. In recognition of this accomplishment they will receive free Whataburgers for an entire year!

ongratulations to the Whatakid of the month, Wyatt Bray! Competing in calf roping and team roping this eighteen-year-old senior cannot be stopped. “I love the challenges of the sport of rodeo. No matter how good you are, you can always get better,” Wyatt said. Wyatt’s favorite calf horse is named Big Red. “Everyone laughs about his name when they see him because he is only 14 hands tall, but his heart and try is bigger than most big horses,” Wyatt said. “He has a great personality, anyone can ride him, and he works every time.” Big Red has been in the family for a long time as both Wyatt and his brother have rode him in youth, junior high, high school, and amateur rodeo events. Wyatt loves that, occasionally, Big Red will lay down like a dog so you can scratch his belly. Growing up in a rodeo family, Wyatt competed in his first rodeo at age seven. “At first I wasn’t extremely competitive. I was just following in my brothers and dads footsteps. I didn’t really get into it until junior high and when that happened rodeo was about all I did,” explained Wyatt. Wyatt’s favorite rodeo memory would have to be the 2015 USTRC Finals. Wyatt and his partner, Kirby Blankenship, roped their final steer in 6.3 seconds to move from the 15th hole and become the USTRC Reserve Champions. “I knew we had made a good run so we really put the pressure on everyone else. At first, I thought we were just going to place, but when I found out we were in second I was shocked. It was a big moment in my career,” said Wyatt.

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In addition, Wyatt has an extensive number of awards under his belt. He got the Region III sportsmanship award in 2017. His favorite competitions have been the NHSRA state and national finals, USTRC Finals, and the Best of the Best Timed Event Championships. “I am thankful to have been able to qualify for the junior high and high school state finals every year and qualify to both the NJHRA Finals and NHSRA Finals,” Wyatt said. In fact, Wyatt would count qualifying for the NJHRA and NHSRA Finals his greatest achievement. “Texas is tough. Over 100 athletes compete in each event at the state finals and only four advance to nationals. Qualifying in junior high and high school was a big achievement for me,” Wyatt explained. He went on to add, “winning the Best of the Best team roping title was another goal of mine. My brother won it three years ago and this past summer, Zant Lewis and I were fortunate to win it. Some of the best ropers across the nation compete there so winning that title means a lot to me.” Alongside rodeo, Wyatt is a member of the varsity basketball team for a homeschool sports program. He loves basketball, but also recognizes that it is really the only high school sport he can fit in since it occurs during winter when the rodeo season slows down. “To be competitive in rodeo events, you can’t have too many outside distractions,” Wyatt explained. However, he helps out with multiple rodeos throughout the year, including two special needs rodeos. “It is humbling to help kids that have no other chance to experience rodeo and be a part of something I love and something I am so fortunate to do every day,” Wyatt said. In his free time, Wyatt enjoys to fish and hunt any type of wild game. Wyatt also takes his academics very seriously. He is a member of the National Honor Society and has been on the A Honor Roll since the sixth grade. One teacher he really admires is Ms. Irick, who taught him how to read. “When I was in grade school, I really struggled to read and write. She coached me through a difficult time and because of her help, I now love to read,” Wyatt said. A quote that has always stuck with Wyatt is a Tim Tebow quote: “Hard work beats talent when talent doesn’t work hard.” Wyatt explained how his motto came to be: “my mom brought it home and told me to read it. After I did, I adopted it. It helps me a lot when it’s cold outside and I don’t really want to practice. It helps me be better.” Rickey Green was someone that Wyatt really admired. “When I was little, he would come pick me up and we would rope the dummy and watch westerns. He was a great teacher and he did so much helping people get started in the sport of team roping. Rickey was a great role model. He was a devout Christian and he was not afraid to share his faith with others,” Wyatt said. In the future, Wyatt plans on pursuing a business degree with a focus on marketing and management. He wants to continue competing in rodeos in college and already has multiple scholarship offers. He has already started competing at some amateur rodeos and his goal for next year is to make UPRA finals. “I plan to rodeo and jackpot during and after college, but I hope my degree will help me be prepared for a good job and career,” Wyatt explained. Wyatt is extremely honored to be this month’s Whatakid! “It feels amazing. I am really excited and humbled to be chosen and I just want to say thanks. It’s a really cool opportunity and I am glad I get to be part of it.”


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2019 TEXAS FCA RODEO CAMP AT COWBOY FELLOWSHIP BAREBACK:

Bobby Mote, 4X World Champion Justin McDaniel, World Champion

SADDLE BRONC: Isaac Diaz, 6X WNFR Qualifier Joey Sonnier, NFR Qualifier February 15th-17th, 2019 Cowboy Fellowship Cowboy Church Arena in Jourdanton, TX

Early Registration: $200 until Midnight January 10th Regular Registration: $250 until midnight February 10th (Books close)

(936) 320-8740 | to register: txfcarodeo.org and click on ‘camps’ 34


STUDENT OFFICERS

SECRETARY - NENA BOETTCHER PO Box 833 • East Bernard, Texas 77435 281.468.8973 • Region6thsra@gmail.com

Region VI

STATE DIRECTORS SHANNA NETTLE LOGAN PO Box 1882 • Brenham, TX 77834 979.421.2912 • samlogan89@yahoo.com

PRESIDENT - BRINLEE FREEMAN VICE PRESIDENT - SAGE SPIVEY SECRETARY - MARY MCLINEY

MISTY SMITH 1701 FM 99 • Whitsett, Texas 78075 512.848.6343 • rdmssmith@yahoo.com PRESIDENT - DAVID FREEMAN 1039 Mockingbird Lane • Eagle Lake, TX 77434 832.221.1253 • chlfreeman@yahoo.com

PERFORMANCE REPORT STUDENT DI RECTORS

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By SAGE SPIVEY

– Performance Reporter

n the 2018-2019 season, Brinlee Freeman, Sage Spivey and Mary McLiney were nominated for the Region 6 board of directors. Mary McLiney, secretary, says, “We ran for office together knowing that our voice would be heard”. Brinlee Freeman, president, backs it up by saying, “… the three of us will try our hardest to better our region for every contestant and listen to members feedback”. This year there have been many ideas presented to the table through the directors. The Sunday of the October rodeo, we decided the have a “pink out” day for breast cancer

awareness month. Even if it’s just wearing a pink shirt, the idea of brining our region together is the main goal. The objective this year, as student directors, is to get everyone involved and keep our region on top! President Brinlee Freeman is a junior from Eagle Lake, Texas that competes in barrels, poles, breakaway and goat tying. Outside of rodeo she enjoys cheerleading, running and spending time with her friends and family. Secretary Mary McLiney is a sophomore from San Antonio, Texas that competes in barrels and poles. Outside of rodeo she enjoys school, photography, horse judging and being a social butterfly. Vice president Sage Spivey is a junior from Victoria, Texas who competes in poles and goat tying. Outside of school she enjoys traveling, school events and making new friends. Their plan is to bring together their outside skills in and apply them in every area of their region. They explained that if you want to be a student officer you have to step up to the plate. People are going to complain, ask questions, present new ideas, ask for volunteers, etc. and you must be able to provide for their needs. You always have to be on your toes and willing to lend a helping hand. “When I signed up to run for student officer, I did not expect to be taking times during events, hanging/taking down banners, etc.” says Mary McLiney, “Now that I have that job, I wouldn’t want it any other way. I have met so many new people and have gotten so involved and now have a whole new outlook on region rodeos”. Having the opportunity to be chosen as student officers was a blessing. In the 2019-2020 season, it is strongly encouraged to run for office! You never know what it may bring into your life or what you may bring into someone else’s. Remember, if ever you need help or just someone

CONTESTANTS, FRIENDS AND FAMILY AT COWBOY CHURCH BEFORE THE “PINK OUT” RODEO.

STUDENT OFFICERS: BRINLEE FREEMAN- PRESIDENT, SAGE SPIVEY- VICE PRESIDENT AND MARY MCLINEY- SECRETARY

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Hallettsville 2018 Founders Invitational Rodeo

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photography by: Texas Rodeo Photography

Where It All Began

he Founders Invitational began in 2014 to bring THSRA elite competitors back to where high school rodeo all started in Hallettsville, Texas in 1946. The top four in every event from each region are invited to compete in October at the Lavaca Exposition Center, where not only the Invitational Champion Title is up for grabs, but so is $20,500 in added money. In addition to the rodeos, the THSRA & TJHRA State Boards held their meetings in Hallettsville. The majority of those meetings were state finals planning and reviewing and awarding bids to state finals contractors. The weekend is also an opportunity to celebrate our association and its early beginnings. WHERE IT ALL BEGAN: Claude Mullins, Alton Allen and Leon Kahanek were all locals of Hallettsville back in

CADE COGBILL

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ZANE KELLEY

GAVIN FRENCH

EMMA SMITH

ASPEN MILLER

the 1946 and these three men started what we now know as Texas High School and National High School Rodeo. They began with a goal of enriching the lives of agricultural youth and encouraging them to stay in school. Today, their investment has paid off with an association whose members know the value of dedication, hard work and tough competition. During the invitational rodeo, many families visited the Lavaca Historical Museum, which showcases some of the station champion saddles won by competitors in the early years of THSRA and the “Hallettsville Barrier.� Alton Allen revolutionized the hand pulled barrier by making it a mechanical operating system, which is triggered off of the calves breaking to give everyone a fair shot created the barrier. To this day we are thankful for these men who had a huge impact on rodeo. Thank you to the City of Hallettsville and Lavaca Exposition Center and its board of directors who work tirelessly to hold this event each year.


ALL AROUND CHAMPIONS, ASPEN MILLER AND COLE FRANKS

ASPEN MILLER ALL AROUND COWGIRL

MAX MATHIS & CHRISTOPHER DE LA CRUZ TEAM ROPING CHAMPIONS

KRISTIN REAVES GOAT TYING CHAMPION

JACK WRIGHT SADDLE BRONC CHAMPION

GAVIN FRENCH BAREBACK CHAMPION

ZANE KELLEY CALF ROPING CHAMPION

EMMA SMITH POLE BENDING CHAMPION

HADLEY MILLER BULL RIDING CHAMPION

STEER WRESTLING CHAMPION

KRISTIN REAVES

RYLIE SMITH

MAX MATHIS & CHRISTOPHER DE LA CRUZ

HADLEY MILLER

CADE COGBILL

JACK WRIGHT

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Rule Book

PRESIDENT - HALEY PHILLIPS VICE PRESIDENT - HANNAH PHILLIPS SECRETARY - NIKI CARTER

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS RORY KOEHN 1669 CR 230 • Weimar, Texas 78962 979.263.5644 • koehnranch@cvctx.com

STUDENT OFFICERS

SCOTT SHOOK 5750 FM 360 • Needville, Texas 77461 713.851.9553 • scotctshook@yahoo.com

Region VII

SECRETARY - NENA BOETTCHER PO Box 833 • East Bernard, Texas 77435 281.468.8973 • region7thsra@gmail.com

DEE RAWLINSON 12432 N SH 71 • El Campo, Texas 77437 979.543.8906 • drawlinson@reatarealty.com PRESIDENT- CLINT RAWLINSON 12432 N. SH 71 • El Campo, Texas 77437 979.637.0500 • rawlinsonclint@gmail.com

PERFORMANCE REPORT

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By JAYCI LEE BYLER

– Performance Reporter

hy do we have a NHSRA rule book? As it pertains in our rule book, Article 1: To maintain order and standards set up by the NHSRA among members at their functions. My interpretation of this is that every contestant gets the same opportunity to compete. Rules ensures that everybody has a safe and fair environment to be competing in the arena. Some rules don’t always make sense to me at the time but when I take a step back and think it over, the purpose of the rule becomes clearer. If I don’t understand a rule I find myself seeking advice from my directors. Some rules seem

bothersome, some over protective of our actions, and some not the easiest to follow but in the end its what helps keep us safe. I believe the rule book also gives my peers and I a voice to challenge anything we have a discrepancy with. August 11, found Region 7 having their first two cuttings in Gonzales,Texas. Day 1 the boys Cutting was one by Michael Stansbury, the girls cutting was one by Iris Baker. Day 2 Boys cutting was won by Carson Ray and the girls Cutting was won by Robin Rice. On September 16 we had our first official rodeo of the 2018/2019 season in Edna Texas. The bareback riding was won by Hunter Greathouse, barrel racing was won by Reagan Goudeau 16.671, breakaway roping was won by Madison Outhier 3.01, Bull riding was won by Jose Luis Camacho 65, Calf roping was won by Connor Atkinson 11.90, goat tying was won with a rapid 6.82 by Brooke Krolczyk, Pole bending was won by Jayci Lee Byler 20.6, Saddlebronc riding was won by Jake Bazar. 62, steer wrestling was a fast get down & shape of the steer by Landris White 3.84, team roping winners Kolby Petrich and Tanner Tomlinson of Sealy 6.190 Saturday night following the first high school rodeo we had a benefit team roping with a #9 and #12 slide. It was put on by the parents and directors of Region 7 from the junior high and high school rodeo. The money helps Region 7 awards and travel expenses. Nena and Denise kept the office running smoothly and at a fast pace. When the arena had cleared there was 229 teams who had entered. The #9 Champions were Matt Mills and Will Farris and the #12 slide Champions were Cade Boettcher and Hunter Wells it paid $715 a man. We had barrel/Pole exhibitions Friday night $5 each run. We will be having these at the Next Edna rodeo on Friday night at 6pm and another Team Roping Jan 20 & Feb 3 - All 3 for $60 #9 Jackpot #12Slide (1 Up 1 down.)

ROBBIN RICE photo by Jennings

CARSON RAY photo by Jennings


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STEER WRESTLING CLINIC ROPE AND CASH MEYERS Equine Champions for Christ was formed and created in early 2008. These clinics will help youth from all over acheive their goals, learn skills in thier field, benefit as future rodeo stars and experience a new walk of life in Christianity.

3 Day Event: April 26th, 27th and 28th

SIGN UP ONLINE NOW!

THIS CLINIC IS TOTALLY FREE!! Includes all lodging, meals and stalls for participants

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PHONE: 512-619-4795 512-619-5634 FAX: 254-386-0079

KCROOKEDCREEK@GMAIL.COM

Campers only need to bring their own horse and feed.

To be held at Crooked Creek Ranch | Hamilton, TX Open to youth 12-18 years of age The first 35 applicants that sign up will be accepted www.EquineChampionsforChrist.com

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STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - MACKENZIE BRYCE VICE PRESIDENT - EMMA SMITH SECRETARY - KATE MCNEIL KIM NICHOLSON 8434 N. US Hwy 183 • Goliad, Texas 77963 830.570.7302 • kim_nicholson@att.net

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS

JASON UNDERBRINK 520 Phillips Rd • Pleasanton, Texas 78064 210.854.7718 • jasonunderbrink@yahoo.com 3005 Santa Ana St. • Corpus Christi, Texas 78415 361.739.9858 • region8thsra@gmail.com

Region VIII

SECRETARY - CELINA FETTY

385 ECR 401 • Falfurrias, Texas 78355 361.813.7078 • masolomon1962@gmail.com

PRESIDENT- MIKE SOLOMON

385 ECR 401 • Falfurrias, Texas 78355 361.813.7078 • masolomon1962@gmail.com

PRESIDENT- MIKE SOLOMON

PERFORMANCE REPORT

THE GAME WE PLAY By Mackenzie

Bryce – Performance Reporter

he game we play is a very humbling game. Missed calves, down barrels, slipped legs, uncovered bulls, it’s all part of it. The game we play is called rodeo. To most of us it’s more than a game, it’s a lifestyle. This is all we know, this is all we know how to do. We don’t give up when it’s tuff, we stay moving forward, because we are addicted to the game. Dr. Terry Stimson says “winning is 60% mental and 40% ability.” To be a winner you have to have the right mindset, along with the practice & dedication. Keep a positive attitude, have gratitude when you’re having success and happiness for others when it’s not you. Having the right mindset is hard, but it is a key trait to have when wanting to be successful in the arena. “We have to remember that everyone’s situation is different, so we can’t become caught up in comparing ourselves with others” says Sherry Cervi. Wait the struggles out. Find the blessing and the joy in the moments of struggle, just as we find them in the moments of achievements. “It does you no good to be down. You got to

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pick yourself up and do it again” said Wade Sundell. Keep working. Stay reaching for your goals. Don’t let a bad day in the arena keep you from going for what you want. Always do the best you can do with what you have. Learn from the challenges. When you have a bad day, go back think about what happened. Seek help & guidance from others, learn from them and your mistakes. My mom has always told me “you can always learn something, you may learn what not to do, but if you don’t listen you may miss the chance to learn the right thing to do.”

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PRESIDENT - SPIN EDWARDS VICE PRESIDENT - JESSICA GARRETT SECRETARY - LYNDIE DUNN

New Beginnings

STUDENT OFFICERS

204 CR 6763 • Dayton, Texas 77535 713.553.6421 • eddiedyson@thsra9.com

979.251.4131 • laceyaubihl@thsra9.com

Region IX

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS EDDIE DYSON

JONATHAN LAWSON

SECRETARY - LACEY AUBIHL 1326 PR 5011 • Ledbetter, Texas 78946

838 SH 150 • New Waverly, Texas 77358 936.520.1401 • fivedowell@gmail.com

460 Bishop Road • Huntsville, Texas 77320 713.417.6042 • donjackson321@gmail.com

DON JACKSON

PO Box 1177 • Madisonville, Texas 77864 281.785.0077 • mghormley@me.com

PRESIDENT- MIKE GHORMLEY

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PERFORMANCE REPORT

By ALY GHORMLEY– Performance Reporter

new year means a new beginning and a fresh start, and I’m not just talking about the New Year that is approaching fast. I’m talking about the start of a new high school rodeo season. Region IX’s first rodeo was on October 13 and I’m telling you that the competition is already on fire. From the looks of it, Region IX athletes are going to have to stay in the practice pen and on top of their game to emerge as an event champion this year. Stormy Stokes won the Breakaway with a 3.30; Lacy Bruening was an 8.4 in the goat tying to take an early lead in the goat tying; Rhody Niles was the champion bareback rider at the first rodeo with a 54; Ashyln Wright won the barrels with a 16.738; freshman Bradlee Miller was the champion bull rider with a score of 75 points; Kysan Buckner sure didn’t hold back one bit running a 19.901 to start off the year in pole bending; Tanner Woodard had a little bit of tough luck with a barrier, but still went home with the first place check in the steer wrestling; Colby

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Boettcher and his partner Jordan Lewis started off the team roping with a 6.11 and last but not least the champion tie down roper with a 9.17 was Gatlin Peck. As you can tell above, our first rodeo was tough, and the other competitors were not far behind. Every single one of these cowboys and cowgirls have worked long days and hours to get where they are, and I can tell you personally that none of this talent came overnight. It has taken years to perfect their skills to get to the level of taking home the first place check. Some of these contestants were in the winner’s circle last year, but some have really come on strong with the new year. The talent that was exhibited by these contestants has been developed and perfected throughout the summer and over the early years of their careers. For some it was just a matter of clicking with that “new” horse but for certain it has been hard work that has caused them to be successful and hard work that will continue to carry them through the year. For those that didn’t do as well as they had hoped, this rodeo is an indication that they will have to stay in the practice pen and continue to work hard to get to the top of their respective event. Don’t get the wrong impression, these students had plenty of tough competition as the runners up for the day weren’t far behind the leaders in each event. For Region IX, “new beginnings” has another meaning as well. Last year the region graduated almost forty seniors. With that many kids moving to the next phase of their lives there was some concern that our membership might be down a bit but I am thankful that as of now our membership is just slightly above what we had last year and we hope to have more join our ranks. Besides the competition, there is also an opportunity to create new friendships that will hopefully last a lifetime. It is a chance for the returning contestants to mentor new contestants. It is a time for new helpers to step forward and NEW OFFICERS POSTING THE FLAGS take the place of those that preceded them. It is TO GET THE RODEO KICKED OFF. also a time to renew friendships with folks that you may not have seen all summer. Yes, it is a new year and all the excitement that it brings. By the time that this publication is released it will be even closer to the New Year. Please keep those in need in your thoughts and prayers during the upcoming Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year holidays. You may never know what sort of new year you may create for someone with a little thoughtfulness, kindness and generosity in this season. Always remember, 1 Corinthians 10;31, “whatever you do, do it for the glory of God.”


Senior Spotlights!

STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - SAIGE SEALY VICE PRESIDENT - AINSLEE MORRIS SECRETARY - BRITTNE THOMAS LARRY DOWELL 370 CR 220 • Marlin, Texas 76661 254.715.8814 • fivedowell@gmail.com

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS

COLE SEALY PO Box 566 • San Saba, Texas 76877 325.247.0545 • colesealy@yahoo.com

SECRETARY - STEPHANIE SHOEMAKER 6500 CR 1202 • Cleburne, Texas 76031

817.648.2723 • texasregion10@gmail.com

MATT SILAR 104 CR 867 N • Teague, Texas 75860 903.388.2531 • matt.silar@patriotinsp.com PRESIDENT - JERRY WRIGHT 434 CR 315 • Oglesby, Texas 76561 254.290.4965 • jerrywrighthomes@hughes.net

PERFORMANCE REPORT

By BRITTNE

THOMAS – Performance Reporter

loan Townsend is a senior this year. She competes in breakaway and in barrel racing at Region X. She plans on attending college at A&M. Sadly, Sloan is not going to compete in rodeo after her senior year this year. She plans on focusing all of her attention in her major, journalism. Sloan is an amazing athlete that Region X is proud of, and

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grateful she decided to compete at Region X this year. Sloan’s experience at Region X has been amazing. One of her favorite things about Region X is the people. Sloan loves the competition at our region, and loves the support she gets from Region X. She could not ask for better people to be surrounded by. She wouldn’t trade anything for the experience she has had throughout her rodeo career. She has made many memories and she will cherish them forever. Sloan Townsend, we know you will do magnificent things after you graduate. Brody Baugh is a Senior from Menard High School. At Region X Brody competes in calf roping and team roping. His plans are to go to Cisco College to compete in rodeo and finish his basics there. After he finishes getting his basics done he intends on going to a four-year college to get a degree in business. His high school experience has been one for the books. He has been very busy from the start. Brody not only competes in rodeo he also competes in football, basketball, and track. Rodeo has taught him many things, but it has mainly taught him responsibility and lots of patients. Rodeo has helped Brody in multiple ways in life and is very grateful. Brody has made many memories that he will not forget. Good luck Brody Baugh, we know you will do outstanding things in your life.

BRODY BAUGH

SLADE TOWNSEND

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LAYTON BUTLER OF REGION I by Jacqueline Knox

The Whataburger Whatakid is selected due to their ability to excel both in and out of the rodeo arena. Whataburger is proud to recognize a THSRA member from each of the ten Regions who truly upholds the title “Whatakid!” One of the nominees will be chosen at the State Final Rodeo in June as the Whatakid of the Year. In recognition of this accomplishment they will receive free Whataburgers for an entire year!

Congratulations to the Whatakid of the month, Layton Butler! Layton, a seventeen-year-old senior, is a force to be reckoned with. In the past she has solely competed in breakaway, but she figured might as well go for it her senior year and will be competing in poles, barrels and team roping as well. Layton rides two different horses. When Layton first got Spook, her breakaway horse, “he didn’t know much. He didn’t know his leads so I was frustrated with him at first. However, I worked really hard training him. I am so proud of how far he has come. Now, he is actually my number 1 breakaway horse and my old breakaway horse is now my barrel horse,” Butler said. Turtle is Layton’s other horse. “Don’t let his name fool you, he can fly,” Butler said. “I started him on barrels probably two weeks before our first rodeo and then the first rodeo he ran an 18.6.” The two make a perfect team. She first began riding at the age of three and was competing in her fist rodeo in Quanah, Texas at the age of four. “I remember trotting through the barrels and then telling my dad how fast I had gone,” Butler said. Layton’s favorite competition was the Texas State Rodeo last year. She got 3rd in breakaway in Abilene and made it to nationals. “I was setting 10th going into the

short round and I didn’t really think I could even make it to nationals, so I told myself I was just going to go for it. I ended up winning the short round which secured me a spot to nationals,” Butler explained. Competing at the state competition every year of high school so far, it is no surprise that Layton plans on returning to state her senior year. Rodeo isn’t the only activity Layton competes in. She is also a member of the varsity basketball team and student council at Duke High School in Duke, OK. Making it to state in basketball is one of Layton’s proudest accomplishments. She was also part of the highest academically ranked basketball team in the state in 2017. In addition, Layton also works two jobs in order to be able to compete in rodeo. Whenever she has free time, she likes to go fishing, work on beadwork or work cattle with her family. Her days are action packed and she is always busy doing something. “Work to become and not to acquire” is a saying that Layton always has in the back of her mind. During basketball the team went through this a lot as they learned that championships aren’t just handed to you, you have to work for them; the phrase stuck with Layton and became her life motto. “Life isn’t going to hand you what you want, you are going to have to work for it,” Butler added. Rick Wilson, Layton’s basketball coach, is someone who really inspires her. On November 14th, 2017, he had a stroke during one of their basketball games. He was so dedicated to the team that he didn’t let the stroke slow him down. “We had another game three days after his stroke. He was scouting the other team and calling us to tell us all their plays. A month later, in a wheelchair, he was still coaching. He is just a huge inspiration,” Butler said. Layton also greatly looks up to her parents. “My mom and dad are always there for me and have taught me pretty much everything I know,” Butler explained. Grateful for everything she has gained through rodeo, Layton knows the benefits of the sacrifice she has made in order to be able to rodeo. “Honestly, rodeo has taught me a lot. I have learned so much about responsibility. It also gives me an opportunity to travel and meet new people. I have made amazing friends though rodeo,” Butler said. In the future, Layton would like to rodeo through her college years while pursuing a degree in dental hygiene. “There are a lot of other great kids that deserve to be the Whatakid. I am grateful and honored that they chose me,” Butler said. Layton is honored to be this month’s Whatakid!

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Farm & Ranch Family The folks at McCoy’s Building Supply understand that it takes a lot of hard work and the whole family pitching in to get things done on a farm or ranch. That’s why we’d like to take some time out to salute Texas High School Rodeo Association families who are farmers and ranchers. In our monthly Farm & Ranch Family Spotlight, we’ll feature one family, sharing their story of how they work together as a family to make their farm or ranch successful.The spotlight will run for 10 months; each month will feature a different Region. Each Regional McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family will receive a $100 McCoy’s Gift Card. The McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family of the Year will receive a $500 McCoy’s Gift Card and will be announced at the 2018 THSRA State Finals.

The Harter Family of Region I

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by Catelyn Felts

ongratulations to the McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family of the Month, the Harter’s! Dan and Robbie, along with their kids; Cody, Karlie and Katie manage a herd of yearlings and FFA heifers in Amarillo, Texas. Not only does the family ranch a herd of cattle, they also have full-time jobs and fulltime school outside of the ranching lifestyle. During the week, Dan works for a pharmaceutical company, Robbie is a school teacher, Cody is a freshman in college, and Karlie and Katie are a freshman and sophomore in high school. The family works together to keep all of their horses exercised, and all of the cattle fed and well taken care of on a regular basis. Even though the family is not currently fulltime ranching, the responsibility of having cattle is instilling meaningful character traits in the Harter kids. “I want to become a vet one day,” Katie said. “Being involved in this industry, the FFA, and taking care of the heifers has helped me in getting prepared for vet school.” In addition to career preparation, big responsibilities allow for big growth opportunities. “Every day we get horses out and exercise them,” the girls explained. “We practice one event a day and if we have a rodeo that weekend, we will really work on prioritizing rodeo and still take care of the heifers.” They explained how rodeo, along with their herd of heifers, has helped them learn how to prioritize tasks and recognize the most important things. They also mentioned how time management is a trait they have heavily

improved on throughout their experiences with Texas High School Rodeos and FFA. Dan and Robbie grew up with a ranching background and were certain they wanted their kids to be exposed to the same type of lifestyle. “Robbie and I made a conscious decision that this is a lifestyle we want our kids to grow up in,” Dan said. “The lessons they have learned; our son has gotten a full ride scholarship for school, and he works a day job. I think [the ranching lifestyle] does a good job at creating good contributing members of society.” Many would agree, the ranching lifestyle creates a foundation for continuous growth. “What Robbie and I get out of it is getting to see our family learn life lessons as opposed to solely academic lessons,” Dan said. In addition to ranching, FFA and the THSRA have played a part in impacting the lives of the Harter’s as well. Both Katie and Karlie are FFA and THSRA members and participate in the barrel racing, pole bending, breakaway roping, goat tying, and Katie also team ropes. They explained how they write down their goals for rodeo and school to help them set priorities. “It’s not even about winning or losing,” the girls said. “It’s about putting the work in; if you aren’t working hard, you are losing.” That is not a life motto the Harter girls take lightly as they are both basketball players, A-honor students and are only enrolled in Advanced Placement classes. “Their day starts far earlier than a normal high school kid,” Robbie said. “They have all of their horses and cattle to feed before school, and they go to school an hour earlier to prepare for FFA events coming up. School work also cuts into time so some days they are up really late and get up really early.” In addition to the work they put in throughout the week, the family dedicates most of their weekends to rodeos or tending to the herd of yearlings whether it be doctoring sick cattle, shipping, mending fence or whatever task might need tending to. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to see how much hard work must go into the western way of life, but the work is something that can often be overlooked and underestimated from an outsider’s perspective. Don’t forget to thank a farmer or rancher next time you speak to one! The Harter family said they are honored to be chosen and nominated for the McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family of the month, and they are thankful for the support McCoy’s shows to the THSRA.

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JUNIOR HIGH 50

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ear Junior High Contestants and Families: This year is zooming by, as we head into November we will finally have all the regions busy with their rodeos. I love the month of November, because it is usually family time for me. I might be missing one of my boys this Thanksgiving, he may have to stay and keep working in Maryland, but he will be in my heart. We all did get to enjoy being together in Canada at the CFR, so that was a blessing in disguise! I hope and pray that everyone will be able to enjoy your families during Thanksgiving, I know several will be roping or riding but these are always great family times. We had our board meeting in Halletsville during the month of October, and made big plans for the State Finals. The judges this year will be brining Teddy Alleman back, Tommy Zant, along with a new judge at state Ben Crabb, he has judged several rodeos at Region 6, 7 and 8. We will also have Bobby Flores back this year as our arena director. Chris Rankin is coming back to announce and run the sound board. The student officers listened and looked at many vendors saddle and buckle bids. After looking at everything that was presented to them, your officer team has decided to get the saddles from Slone Saddles this year and the buckles will come from Kelly Slover. The Princess contest is coming along, and if you are interested in running please contact Dawn Tripp at 432-770-2508 and she will mail you a package out. Hope everyone is doing well in the region rodeos. If you are struggling a little, remember do not ever give up! Take some time to get in the practice pen and figure out what can make you do better. Wishing everyone a Happy Thanksgiving! Anne Dollery


TEXAS JUNIOR HIGH RODEO ASSOCIATION NEWS

region vII

where has the time gone?

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by Kinley Shook | TJHRA Region VII

here has the time gone it seems like we just kicked off the 2018-2019 rodeo season and before you know it the year will be over and we will be preparing for the state finals. We have a lot of new faces at Region 7 and our new President Craig Miller and Vice President Dan Simpton are doing a great job. Our great Secretary Nena Boettcher is keeping everything rolling smoothly like always. We just finished our rodeos 5 and 6 and the competition is just as tough as it has always been. After 6 rodeos this is what the leaders are looking like half way through: Guy Raasch and Cade Muegge-Team Roping, Blaze Byler is winning the Saddle Bronc, Chute Dogging, and Goat Tying, Colin Fox-Calf Roping, Hailee Lowman/Cade Muegge-Ribbon Roping, Kyla Shay Casey-Barrels, and Brayze Schill is winning the Bareback. It’s been a tough all around race so far with Hannah Bass winning the poles, Breakaway and Girls All Around. In the boys Colin Fox is winning the Calf Roping, Bull Riding and the Boys All Around. From Region 7 we want to wish everyone a Happy Thanksgiving and Merry Christmas. See ya down the road, Kinley Shook

2018-2019 JUNIOR HIGH STATE DIRECTORS EXECUTIVE BOARD NATIONAL DIRECTOR JOHN E. BLAND

806-679-2037

jeblandnspade@yahoo.com

PRESIDENT SCOTT SHOOK

281-437-8214

scottshook@yahoo.com

1st VICE PRESIDENT BRENT CHARLESWORTH

432-386-6214

brent@crcompany.net

2nd VICE PRESIDENT JOE RICHARDS

806-676-5970

joe@diamondcattlefeeders.com

DELEGATE 2 YEAR TERM DAVID FREEMAN

832-221-1253

chlfreeman@yahoo.com

DELEGATE 2 YEAR TERM SHANE HANCOCK

254-379-3516

shanehancock74@yahoo.com

DELEGATE 2 YEAR TERM ERIC HUSTON

817-368-0159

duaneoverton6113@gmail.com

DELEGATE 1 YEAR TERM STAN MCDONALD

979-229-5963

stanmcdranch@aol.com

DELEGATE 1 YEAR TERM MARIE SMITH 830-570-7058 bmsmith1996@sbcglobal.net SECRETARY ANNE DOLLERY 979-412-2551 texasjuniorhighrodeo@gmail.com

STATE DIRECTORS

Region I MATT HOGANSON GUY ELLIOTT LANCE GAILLARD

flyingM79@hotmail.com glelliott@wilbargercscd.com lsgaillard@yahoo.com

806-440-1961 940-839-6354 806-898-3748

Region II CASEY BAIZE 512-618-9233 KEITH KENT 325-665-8100 SHANE HANCOCK 254-379-3516 Region III VENITA DEARING 817-223-5355 KEVIN STEWART 817-307-7303 ERIC HUSTON 817-368-0159

coolchickroper@yahoo.com meb522@yahoo.com duaneoverton6113@gmail.com

Region IV AMY BEAM SEAN SUNDBERG JAMES TETTENHORST

LJRanchGRL@aol.com sundberg.sean@yahoo.com JamesTettenhorst@gmail.com

214-435-1579 919-518-6690 903-521-1511

csbaize@yahoo.com keith@johnroleylevelland.com shanehancock74@yahoo.com

Region V RICHARD BALDWIN 936-332-5466 DERIS MARTIN 936-366-1568 BILL WHITE 337-304-0748 Region VI CLAY OHRT 361-571-1040 GARRET OHRT 361-649-4060 TOMMY OHRT 361-550-5202

ohrt6@hotmail.com Julesoh@hotmail.com 1107cattle@yahoo.com

Region VII KIMMI BYLER CODY KENNEY DAN SIMPTON

bcross1@aol.com Cody.Kenney28@gmail.com dansimpton@yahoo.com

979-472-0034 979-922-9534 936-870-5779

r.baldwin147@icloud.com derismartin@yahoo.com whiteacresranch1@yahoo.com

Region VIII BEN ELLIS 361-701-1886 ben_ellis78@yahoo.com MATT SCIBA 361-571-7888 scibaadjuster@gmail.com MARIE SMITH 830-570-7058 bmsmith1996@sbcglobal.net Region IX STAN MCDONALD 979-229-5963 stanmcdranch@aol.com JOHN SCHUENEMAN 979-268-4994 john.schueneman@gmail.com BRAD DYER 832-928-1647 braddyer@live.com Region X JAMES KOONSMAN 254-717-6211 jamesk74@yahoo.com BRANT WARD 325-895-1662 ward23@gte.net RENEE WEITZ 512-217-8165 weitzrr@gmail.com STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT JESSI EVERETT V.PRES CEILY SIMPTON SECRETARY ZOEY HORTENSTINE PRINCESS AMBER SIMONS

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TEXAS JUNIOR HIGH RODEO ASSOCIATION NEWS

Lessons in Sign Cutting

By GARRETT TALAMANTES – TJHRA Region VIII

A

lthough my Dad’s days as a Border Patrol brush tracker are now behind him, not a day goes by he’s not looking at the ground. Always looking for a shoe print, a broken branch, or a blade of grass that’s been laid over. “Sign Cutting” is what agents call it. It’s not very often he doesn’t recognize someone has been by the house or my Grandpa has been in his shop. It seems he poured so much of himself into that part of his life that it just won’t ever leave him. “People always want to hear about the group of twenty or bigger that we caught. The big trophy numbers always get the most attention. Those are easy. It’s like following a herd of elephants, he said. Instead, personal satisfaction was being alone on a 100 thousand acres, tracking one lone individual. It was a test of will, a test of skill, but often a lesson in humility. After all, no one really cares to hear about how you tracked one guy, sometimes the same guy over and over (you knew him by his shoe print) and never caught him. And when you did, most often, you were the only one it even

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mattered to.” He said many times they would get off on the wrong trail and find themselves having to double back and “reverse cut” to find the piece of the puzzle missed along the way. “You might have to look on the other side of a different bush for a scuff mark, or on a branch for a piece of cloth, he added. It makes you begin to doubt your ability and question why you are even wasting your time on this one person, when there is surely a larger, easier group to track. That big group that management will pat you on the back and the guys will give you a high five for bringing in. Yet you push on and ultimately your skills get sharper, your vision keener and your senses almost take over the track. You worry less about the trophy and more about individual accomplishment.” When you think about it, shouldn’t this be the same approach we take in the arena? Too often we are focused on winning the gold buckle or that fancy trailer that we miss the personal victories we accomplish each and every day. We measure our success with Championships. All the while knowing we can’t win the All Around at every rodeo or always take home the saddle for the fastest time. And really, is that the goal? I’ve done enough interviews now to realize most World Champions do not count their success simply by their victories in the arena. They all seem to go back to a time when things weren’t exactly going their way. Yet they found the faith to stop what they were doing wrong and start the trail again. To focus less on the “elephant trails”, and take the route that would push the limit of their abilities. Along the way, they all have seemed to learn more about themselves and appreciate the small victories that helped them complete their journey. So next time you miss your dally or bobble your string, “reverse cut’ to the beginning and find that piece of the puzzle you may have missed. Chances are, there are plenty of personal victories to celebrate down that trail.


kimesranch.com

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Profile for Texas High School Rodeo, Extreme Team News

Winter 2018-2019 Extreme Team News, Official News of Texas High School and Junior High Rodeo  

The Winter Edition of the Extreme Team News, Texas High School and Junior High Rodeo's official newspaper. This is the annual Equine Profess...

Winter 2018-2019 Extreme Team News, Official News of Texas High School and Junior High Rodeo  

The Winter Edition of the Extreme Team News, Texas High School and Junior High Rodeo's official newspaper. This is the annual Equine Profess...

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