__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

T a n ne r G r e e n NATIONAL CHAMPION & TEXAS ALL AROUND ROOKIE COWBOY

OUR NEEDS OW

SPONSOR SPOTLIGHTS:

RANCH FAMILY: THE SWAIM FAMILY

m Bureau Insurance Companies.

CHEYENNE BRITAIN LOGAN COOK PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID BRYAN TX 77802 PERMIT # 23

PRESRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID FULTEK

EQUINE PROFESSIONALS EDITION


Introducing the Catalyst VX.

Champion roper Brady Norman knows that Ariat’s revolutionary new technology will give him a running start.

2

Catalyst VX boot and M5 denim

Š 2014 Ariat Inte I rnational, Inc. I


3


5-YEAR/100,000-MILE POWERTRAIN WARRANTY 1

RAMTRUCKS.COM

when other trucks stop,

RAM 1500 best-in-class ®

OF ANY

2

full-size pickup BETTER THAN FORD ECOBOOST Ramtrucks.com 1 See dealer for details and a copy of Limited Warranty. 2 2014 model year comparison. Based on all pickup classes. EPA est. 28 mpg hwy based on available EcoDiesel V6 4x2. 5.7L gas V8 shown 22 mpg hwy. Ram is a registered trademark of Chrysler Group LLC.

4

75979_SWBC Ram Rodeo

Trim - 10”w x 9.5”h


EXECUTIVE BOARD STATE PRESIDENT STEVE DICKEY

In This Issue

EXTREME TEAM NEWS Official Publication of the Texas High School Rodeo Association

PO Box 862, Centerville, TX 75833 903.536.4098 (home) steve@txriatarealty.com

HOLLY DeLAUNE Marketing Director

1ST VICE PRESIDENT MIKE COOK

830.815.1800 • delaune.holly@gmail.com

375 Tokio Loop • West, TX 76691 254.829.1788 • scarface@kencook.net

LAUREN TUTTLE STUMBERG Graphics/Layout Director lauren@distinct-graphics.com 830.249.8020

2ND VICE PRESIDENT ALAN BOHLEN

PO Drawer 468 • Hondo, TX 78861 830.741.4485 • alanbohlen@yahoo.com

SECRETARY/TREASURER SUSAN BALDWIN

704 1/2 Southview Circle • Center, TX 75935 936.590.4447 texashighschoolrodeo@gmail.com

NATIONAL DIRECTOR COTTON GEORGE

PO Box 30 • Martinsville, TX 75958 936.564.8993 (home) cottongeorgetx@gmail.com

JUNIOR HIGH NATIONAL DIRECTOR JOHN BLAND PO Box 112 • Turkey, TX 79261 806.220.7108 • jeblandnspade@yahoo.com

QUEEN COORDINATOR DEE DEE DUNDA

8819 Holiday Drive • Odessa, TX 79765 432-413-2358 • prettywoman1965@hotmail.com

AVA ANDERSON

Advertising ava.anderson@yahoo.com 830.540.3737(H) • 512.576.2275(C)

SPONSOR SPOTLIGHT – PAGE 6

BRIAN ROBERTS

Computer Programmer brian.roberts53@att.net 281.213.9143

LOGAN COOK - PAGE 11

ARIAT PERFORMANCE REPORTERS REGION I

KENNADY JOHNSON

EQUINE PROFESSIONALS EDITION

REGION II

BRENNA HARTLEY REGION III

CHEYENNE BRITTAIN REGION IV

McKENZIE RAY REGION V

HANNAH HEMPHILL

PAGE 18-29

MARKETING HOLLY DELAUNE

73 Breeze Way, Boerne, TX 78006 830.815.1800 delaune.holly@gmail.com

REGION VI

CIERA GOODE REGION VII

RANCH FAMILY: THE SWAIM FAMILY

DELEGATES AT LARGE

SKYLER STONE REGION VIII

MONTANA COX REGION IX

PAGE 31

MIKEY DUGGAN

PO Box 1414 • Canyon, TX 79015 806.655.9910 • m.j.duggan@att.net

KELSEY THOMPSON REGION X

BROOKE BOILES

STEVE MCCONNELL

THSRA OFFICIAL SPONSORS

425 CR 510 • Hereford, TX 79405 806.276.5671 • lindam@wtrt.net

CHRIS WOLFE

630 E FM 813 • Palmer, TX 75152 214.403.4638 • chris.wolfe@bldr.com

SPONSOR SPOTLIGHT – PAGE 42

BUBBA BENNIGHT

143 Bailey Blvd. • Bastrop, TX 78602 512.461.6091 • bubbabennight@yahoo.com

ROBERT SBRUSCH

821 Manor Drive • Angleton, TX 77515 979.848.3805 • sbrusch@sbcglobal.net

STUDENT OFFICERS

thsraofficers@hotmail.com STUDENT PRESIDENT CHEYENNE BRITAIN STUDENT VICE PRESIDENT MCKENNA GREENE STUDENT SECRETARY KADIE BETH WISENER QUEEN KENNADY JOHNSON

CHEYENNE BRITAIN - PAGE 44

REGION

news

REGION REGION REGION REGION REGION

I II III IV V

08 10 12 14 16

REGION REGION REGION REGION REGION

VI VII VIII IX X

TEXAS JUNIOR HIGH DIVISION 38

28 30 32 34 36

TEXAS RAM DEALERS

THSRA is a non-profit organization (501-C). Production of this publication was funded by membership dues and is provided complimentary to members of THSRA. Non-members may purchase annual subscriptions for $25.00

5


100% TEXAN. 100% TEXAS. Discover why over 500,000 Texas families use Texas Farm Bureau Insurance so they can focus on the moments in life that truly matter. We offer our member families a range of products and services: Auto. Because sometimes you have to drive a good distance to stay close, competitive rates and discounts for every moment of every mile. Home/Property. Whether you catch sunrise from your kitchen window, your idyllic patch of country grass, or across your 40-acre spread, complete home and property insurance tailored to your special part of Texas. Life. For goals set and milestones reached, life insurance , retirement, medical, and so much more. Health. For birthdays, getaways, and the everyday, protection to keep you and your family healthy for the moments that make life worth living. Plus, enjoy discounts and other benefits as part of your Texas Farm Bureau membership!

877.FARM.BUREAU TXFB-INS.COM

Texas Farm Bureau Insurance received the highest numerical score among auto insurance providers in Texas in the proprietary J.D. Power 2012-2014 U.S. Auto Insurance StudiesSM (Central Region in 2012). 2014 study based on 44,661 total responses measuring 8 providers in Texas and Texas Farm Bureau Insurance received the highest numerical score among auto insurance providers in Texas in the proprietary J.D. Power 2012-2014 U.S. Auto Insurance StudiesSM (Central Region in 2012). 2014 study based on 44,661 total responses measuring 8 providers in Texas and measures opinions of co measures opinions of consumers with their auto insurance provider. Proprietary study results are based on experiences and perceptions of consumers surveyed March-April 2014. Your experiences may vary. Visit jdpower.com. Š 2015 Texas Farm Bureau Insurance Companies.

6


Thank you for rating us “Highest Customer Satisfaction Among Auto Insurers in Texas.” Three Years in a Row. Call today for a FREE 360 Review®.

s and measures opinions of consumers with their auto insurance provider. Proprietary study results are based on experiences and perceptions of consumers surveyed March-April 2014. Your experiences may vary. Visit jdpower.com. © 2015 Texas Farm Bureau Insurance Companies.

7


PRESIDENT - SHELBY SPIELMAN VICE PRESIDENT 1- KORY MCCONNELL VICE PRESIDENT 2- DYLAN MYERS SECRETARY/HISTORIAN - SIERRA WHITE JOEL KIRKPATRICK 2388 HWY 82 • Crosbyton, Texas 79322 806.697.2336 • jrtzkirkpatrick@hotmail.com

STUDENT OFFICERS

REGION I

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS

TED WHITE PO Box 341 • Happy, Texas 79042 806.764.3469 • ted.white99@yahoo.com SECRETARY - MIKEY DUGGAN PO Box 1414 • Canyon, Texas 79015 806.655.9910 • m.j.duggan@att.net

MICHELE SPIELMAN 12036 FM3139 • Dalhart, Texas 79022 806.570.7470 • spielman@xit.net PRESIDENT- STEVE MCCONNELL 425 CR 510 • Hereford, Texas 79045 806.346.2492 • stevem@wtrt.net

8

PERFORMANCE REPORT

Spring Rodeos By Kennady Johnson

– ARIAT Performance Reporter

lthough the weather may still be below freezing here in the Texas Panhandle, the spring rodeo semester is about to be underway. After a long winter break everyone in Region I is excited to pick right back up where we left off. Our regional board of directors just met to make sure everything runs smoothly and efficiently for this new semester. For some it’s a chance to redeem themselves from last semester, and others it’s a fight to stay on top. However

A

you put it, we’re ready to get this rodeo season underway. So many new and exciting things are in the works. This year the National High School Rodeo Association added a new event, the Reining Cow Horse competition. Region I is excited for this new event and the possible new members we can reach through it. We will be hosting a clinic on February 28th, in Clarendon, Texas, for our members that are interested, but might be skeptical to just dive in. We encourage anyone who has the slightest curiosity in this new event to come and participate. The topic of prizes is always an exciting discussion, because it means we are getting that much closer to winning them. Our regional student officer team had the opportunity to pick out what saddles and buckles we are going to award at our region finals. Not only does being a student officer award you scholarship funds, it also gives you the voice of all the members. With great responsibility comes great fun. I encourage anyone who wants to be a leader to step out and run for a region or state office. We need young influential people being the voice for our student body. On behalf of everyone in region I, I would like to extend a huge thank you to everyone who works so hard and selflessly to make sure our rodeos go off smoothly. Each person on our board gives so much, expecting nothing in return. So much goes on behind the scenes that we don’t even know about. When rodeos start back, make an effort to personally thank the leaders of our region. Without them none of this would be possible. Let the spring rodeo semester begin!


www.getalittletwisted.com 9


10

Competeing Through the Break

PO Box 843 • Andrews, Texas 79714 817.371.8882 • hooper9319@yahoo.com

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS MELISSA HOOPER

STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - CADI WOOD VICE PRESIDENT - DELANI WOOD SECRETARY - MEGAN POWELL

2522 CR C3500 • Stanton, Texas 79782 432.940.1136 • woodrodeogirls@yahoo.com

KELLY WOOD

REGION II

SECRETARY - JODY MCELROY Box 224 • Balmorhea, Texas 79718 432.940.0385 • secretary@thsra2.com

2347 FM 829 • Stanton, Texas 79782 432.458.3439 • kwstewart93@gmail.com

KENNY STEWART

PRESIDENT- KENNY STEWART 2347 FM 829 • Stanton, Texas 79782 432.661.5084 • kwstewart93@gmail.com

PERFORMANCE REPORT

By BRENNA HARTLEY – ARIAT Performance Reporter

H

ere in Region 2, we have several members who choose to participate in sports and activities other than rodeo. Because we choose to respect that there are in fact other priorities besides rodeo, our region allows contestants a four-month break splitting the two semesters of rodeos. During this break, members can simply sit back and enjoy some time off from their busy schedules, or they can choose to step out of the saddle and into another recreational activity. Even though there are no high school rodeos going on at this point, there are still several members who choose to continue working to improve themselves as rodeo athletes and compete throughout the break. Ty Robbins, a junior from Midland, chooses to focus solely on rodeo and is constantly working to improve his skills. “Physically, I’m always practicing and making sure that my horses are in the best shape and are well taken care of,” said Robbins. “Mentally, I’m always working to build my confidence both

inside and outside of the arena. By building up confidence in myself and my roping abilities, I will be able to perform better in the long run.” Robbins feels that if he can continue to improve both of these areas, he will be successful in the end. He is a prime example of what a truly dedicated athlete is, and will stop at nothing to get the results he wants to see. Another competitor, Tyler-Rose Smith, chooses to do a little less competing and a little more relaxing over the break. “I honestly think that escaping the rodeo scene for a couple of months does a lot for not only you as the rider but also your horse.” Smith says that letting the horses have a break from all of the travel and stress gives them an opportunity to recover, rest, and just be a horse for a little while. “As for myself, I always love spending time with my rodeo friends, but I also love spending time with my friends back home and my family.” Being away from the competition gives contestants the perfect opportunity to slow down, go back to the basics, and build the stamina, strength, and good fundamentals needed for the season ahead. For many contestants like Smith, taking time off from rodeo is the perfect thing to do in order to regroup and prepare for the next semester. Every competitor in the sport of rodeo must have a desire to win if he or she truly wants to be competitive. For some, this means continuing to persevere and work hard even when it is not absolutely required. For others, taking the time to relax and enjoy their time off is extremely beneficial to them as an athlete. No matter what preference we may have as individuals, we are all fighting for the same greatness in the end, and will persevere in any way possible to be the best that we can be.

TY ROBBINS (HEADER)

REGION II 2014-2015 THSRA Rodeo Schedule

TYLER-ROSE SMITH

3/7 & 3/8/2015 | Sweetwater 3/14 & 3/15/2015 | Midland 3/27 - 3/29/2015 | Midland | Finals


LOGAN COOK by Ava Anderson

The Whataburger Whatakid is selected due to their ability to excel both in and out of the rodeo arena. Whataburger is proud to recognize a THSRA member from each of the ten regions who truly upholds the title “Whatakid!� One of the nominees will be chosen at the State Final Rodeo in June as the Whatakid of the Year. In recognition of this accomplishment they will receive free Whataburgers for an entire year!

HARD WORK PAYS OFF Logan Cook of Alto, Texas is an All American Sportsman that enjoys rodeo, football, hog hunting and duck hunting. He is an avid THSRA competitor haling from Region 5, and he's been nominated as this month's WHATAKID! Thus far, over the course of his junior high and high school rodeo tenure, Logan Cook has been honored five times with the coveted award title of 'All Around Cowboy' of Region 5. In addition, he is a 3-time National Junior High Rodeo Association Qualifier, and a National High School Rodeo Association Qualifier, in the Tiedown and Saddle Bronc Divisions. Cook has won a number of other professional titles to his name includ-

ing Rising Stars Tie Down Champion, Future Stars Tie Down Champion, and State Breakaway Champion. His memorable and cherished collection of awards consists of many buckles and over forty saddles to his name. His favorite rodeo experiences, "Just being around good friends and good competition, says Logan, and my favorite competition is the THSRA State Finals in Abilene." His favorite calf horse, is named Truckstop, as Logan elaborates, "A friend of mine, sent me this horse for 30 days of riding, but I ended up liking this horse so much, that I decided to buy him, and right now he's is my main horse." As far as rodeo competition goes, Logan says, "My

heroes have always been Trevor Brazile and Cody Ohl. What my heroes and my family have taught me is that hard work pays off, and there are always plenty of sacrifices to make while striving to be the best you can be." It takes a huge sacrifice of time and effort to be a rodeo contender, Logan said, "I would not have been able to achieve any of this without the many sacrifices, which my entire family has made and that they continue to make on my behalf." "I really look up to my Uncle Phillip Reynolds too. He has taught me much about roping and about being a cowboy, but more importantly, my uncle has taught me much about life and how to be a good person." A normal day for this sixteen year old consists of a full day of academics and sports activities at Alto High School. Logan is an A-B Honor Roll student, and his favorite class is Ag. Besides being involved in the sport of rodeo, Cook plays football for the Alto Yellow Jackets. His schedule can be quite demanding and challenging in having to juggle multiple sports and practice events, "During football season, I stay late after school for practice and then arrive home, only to head straight to the practice pen, where I'm always busy preparing for the three events that I compete in for THSRA," said Logan. This is Cook's junior year of high school, and he has plans to attend college in the near future. He quips, "Hopefully, I can continue with rodeoing after graduation." In the meantime, Logan is looking forward to racking up some more awards this year and next, at the THSRA State Finals in Abilene, Texas. Congratulations to WHATAKID Logan Cook - WHAT-A-COWBOY!

11


STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - TILLAR MURRAY VICE PRESIDENT - CHEYENNE BRITAIN SECRETARY - CATHERINE CLAYTON

REGION III

MIKE BRITAIN 645 CR 393 • Stephenville, Texas 76401 254.485.1170 • mjbfarmsinc@aol.com

FULTON MURRAY 7 Westover Road • Fort Worth, Texas 76107 214.789.4884 • jfmurray3@mac.com

940.365.1548 • mhairford@matadorresources.com

MATT HAIRFORD 6464 Paradise Drive • Aubrey, Texas 76227

PRESIDENT - MIKE BRITAIN 645 CR 393 • Stephenville, Texas 76401 254.595.0563 • mjbfarmsinc@aol.com SECRETARY - KELLEY WILLIAMS 8853 Greenhaven Dr. • Fort Worth, Texas 76179 817.706.8236• kelley.williams@thsra3.com STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS

12

PERFORMANCE REPORT

STEPPING UP TO THE NEXT LEVEL By CHEYENNE BRITAIN

A

– ARIAT Performance Reporter

s high school rodeo athletes, we are always looking for ways to improve and step up our game in each of our events, because as we get older our level of competition only gets tougher! Stepping up to the next level of competition is sometimes easier said than done, though. It takes a lot of hard work and dedication, but sometimes it takes some extra help from someone who’s at a little higher level than you, and asking for that help might just be the hardest part for some of us! We sometimes get caught in the same rut, thinking that we have it all figured out and that we know how to fix our own problems and improve

JACKIE CRAWFORD AT A BREAKAWAY ROPING IN LOUISIANA!

ourselves, but that’s sometimes when we start creating more problems and bad habits! It’s not always easy to go and get the right help, because sometimes it’s hard to swallow your pride and admit that you don’t know exactly how to fix your problem, but when you go out to ask for help, you need to make sure you’re getting it from the right people! I got the opportunity to interview World Champion and clinician Jackie Crawford on the importance of getting help from the right people to help you improve your skills the most, and one thing she emphasized on was, “It’s important that when you go to someone for help, you go to someone who’s good at their event, but has also acquired the ability to teach it.” Another thing people need to think about when going to get private lessons or going to a clinic is, even REGION III though they may cost quite a bit of money, 2014-2015 THSRA Rodeo Schedule you’re really not spending any more than you would if you entered a rodeo and didn’t win anything by not being able to perform to the 2/28 & 3/1/2015 | Stephenville best of your abilities! So as our winter break comes to an end and we prepare to start our 3/20 thru 3/22/2014 | Stephenville | Finals rodeo season back up, remember that even Friday night before Rodeos | Cuttings the World Champions say “No matter how good you are, you can never quite learning!”


PROUD SPONSOR Of THSRA & TJHRA

TEXAS YOUTH RODEO ASSOCIATION We are just starting our season! Are you looking for a rodeo to stay in tuned for TJHRA and THSRA State Competitions - this is the association for you! You must be a member to come to the benefits but any other rodeo you can pay a $25 day pass. Our Benefits will have $10,000.00 added to the jackpot - they are a long go and short go on Sunday (you pick when you run the long go) They are in Gonzales - and the arena will be staked as it will be for the FINALS! You may find forms on www.texasyouthrodeo.com or contact Anne Dollery at 979-412-2551 or adollery@aol.com

13


CHUCK SINKS 555 Sinks Road • Rockwall, Texas 75032 214.869.4719 • ssbarexcavating@aol.com

STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - CAL WOLFE VICE PRESIDENT - CHEYENNE SWOOPE SECRETARY - KOLTON WHITE

SECRETARY - JULIE WHITE 2469 CR 33100 • Sumner, Texas 75486 903.737.7750 • julzjo66@yahoo.com

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS BILL CHINNERS 740 Jim Jones Rd • Van Alstyne, Texas 75495 903.482.0544 • wchhinners@aol.com

REGION IV

CHAD FOLMAR 406 Briarwood Trail • Sulphur Springs, 75482 903.439.6412 • cwfolmar@gmail.com PRESIDENT- CHRIS WOLFE 630 E FM 813 • Palmer, Texas 75152 214.403.4638 • chris.wolfe@bldr.com

14

PERFORMANCE REPORT

Winter

By MCKENZIE RAY– ARIAT Performance Reporter

W

inter. It's the season that most teenagers dread. To many of us that rodeo, it becomes a threemonth long routine; consisting mostly of breaking ice water in troughs, putting horse blankets on and taking them off, practicing in as many layers as we can stand, and hoping for a break in the cold and rain so that horses can be ridden.

Though there are a

CHEYENNE SWOOP

lot of great things about Winter, it's also a very difficult time to be competing in the sport of rodeo. A lot of us tend to underestimate how much the weather in this time of year can change our daily routines. Practice sessions might become fewer, and farther between. Exercising horses becomes more difficult as well. Because of this, a lot of us don't feel quite as prepared as we might during the summer time, when we're able to practice nearly every day. The best way to overcome these things is to start thinking outside the box."I try to practice earlier in the afternoon, and for shorter periods of time." Says Cheyenne Swoope, "When the weather keeps me from practicing outside, I'll most likely bring my dummies inside and rope and tie until I'm satisfied with my performance." TIMBER LYON


Tandy R. Freeman, M.D.

The Official Orthopedic Doctor of the THSRA

Expertise • Innovation • Education Experts in leading-edge orthopedic treatment, the physicians at Dallas Orthopedic Center (DOC) are committed to delivering the highest standard of care to each patient. At DOC, the medical staff – surgeons, orthopedists, physical therapists and athletic trainers – draws upon decades of experience to offer the very latest methods and techniques. From treating Little Leaguers and weekend warriors to Olympians, the medical team specializes in providing the least invasive treatment whenever possible.

214.265.3200 • 214.265.3274 (fax) www.txorthopaedic.com 7115 Greenville Ave, Ste#310 • Dallas, TX 75231

SPECIALIZING IN THE TREATMENT OF SPORTSRELATED INJURIES

Expertise. It is the only medical practice in the country that has had two physicians chosen to serve as the prestigious Head Physician for the Olympic Games. Other accolades include "Best Doctor" awards in America, Texas and Dallas as well as Outstanding Teacher honors from UT Southwestern Medical School.

Provides the Most Realistic Calf Roping Practice

Most Realistic Portable Heading Dummy

LONG NECK

HORN WRAP

Ensures you will practice roping the neck and make your curl kick back up

For a more realistic rope action and feel

ANGLE OF HEAD

Three horn sizes included

Forces you to keep your tip down

DURABLE, MOLDED PLASTIC

ADJUSTABLE HORNS

X MARKS THE SPOT Optimum target for rope placement and finish

“When realistic practice is everything, compromise is not an option. That’s why I practice with Heel-O-Matic.”

Innovation. The practice utilizes the most advanced technology available both in its office and as part of the Texas Institute for Surgery located on the campus of Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas.

LARI DEE GUY 5X WPRA World Champ

Education. A well-informed patient is likely to recover faster with less risk of re-injury. That's why in-depth information is provided by our medical team and online at www.dallasorthocenter.com.

When you aren't able to practice as often, the horses get a change in routine as well. When it's cold outside, it takes a little more time to get their muscles loose before a run, and a lot of horse's eating and drinking habits can change as well. This time of year, Timber Lyon takes extra care to keep her horses healthy and working, "I make my practice sessions longer." She says, "I usually have to warm my horses up slower and longer so they don't hurt themselves. But I don't stay outside much longer than I have to!" That's another thing that we all dread about this time of year; those cold rodeos. On those days, we have no choice but to stay outside in the elements. Even though most everyone is happy to be competing, it's pretty hard to think about making a run when you can hardly feel the reins in your hands. Staying warm on those days comes in the form of layers. Lot's of them. "To stay warm I use 'Hot Hands'" Says Beth Nichols, "And Under Armour, and Wild Rags of course!" Though there are trials that present themselves during the coldest time of year, there are also a lot of great memories to be made with friends and family. So make the most of every minute!

888-HEELING | 888-433-5464 | heelomatic.com

FINANCING L AND OWNERSHIP

Grow with us. Let us finance your country getaway FINANCING

NMLS493828

SERVICES

Rural Land Real Estate Appraisal Homes Crop Insurance Farms & Ranches Leasing Operating Capital CapitalFarmCredit.com Livestock & Equipment Improvements proud member of the Farm Credit System Agribusiness

830.741.2040

15


16

REGION V MEMBERS ---BRING ON THE ATTITUDES!!!

PRESIDENT - SHELLIE LUMMUS VICE PRESIDENT - CK WRIGHT SECRETARY - SHAYLON ELMS

STUDENT OFFICERS

REGION V

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS GENE ARCENEAUX 13448 Coon Road • Winnie, Texas 77665 409.296.3818 • garceneaux@sigindserv.com

JEFF LUMMUS PO Box 646 • Orangefield, Texas 77639 409.313.7765 • jhlummus@yahoo.com

CARTER ELLIOTT 17125 FM 850 • Arp, Texas 75750 903.521.2034 • candjcattle@gmail.com

PRESIDENT- GENE ARCENEAUX 13448 Coon Rd • Winnie, Texas 77665 409.296.3818 • garceneaux@sigindserv.com SECRETARY - PHYLLIS ARCENEAUX 13448 Coon Rd • Winnie, Texas 77665 409.656.8088• regionvsecretary@gmail.com

PERFORMANCE REPORT

By HANNAH HEMPHILL – ARIAT Performance Reporter

I

t seems that Christmas and New Year’s brought new tack, new horses, and new attitudes to some Region V members. Rain and freezing cold set the scene for our first rodeo back from the holidays but the BIGGEST, BADDEST AND BEST Region V competition soon heated up the coliseum in Nacogdoches. Kacee Richard dominated the breakaway roping in our first rodeo with a smoking 2.29 loop and Cooper Clinton had one around the neck in 2.64 seconds to

DALTON GRIMES

TAYLIN ANTONICK

win our second rodeo (this is Cooper’s first rodeo back since surgery last year to repair a knee injury she sustained goat tying ) so I would say her attitude was definitely on track. Tyler Crone put on a tie-down clinic with a smooth and fast 9.4 calf roping run while Logan Cook moved to the head of the class in rodeo #2 with a 9.7 second run. Addie Liles our current All -Around Rookie leader KAYCEE RICHARD came back from the break with her winning attitude in place and posted a flawless 20.88 run in the poles. Not to be outdone Jessica Lewis competed against 62 other girls and horses to post the fastest barrel run of our two rodeos with a wicked fast 15.09 run. With new goats to start off the New Year, Taylin Antonick made a great run of 8.56 to win the first rodeo and I got lucky and won the second rodeo with an 8.63 run. The cold weather definitely played a part in our steer wrestling, those crazy dogging horses where ready to go which helped Tanner Jenkins throw one down in a smoking 4.9 second run. Team ropers, Tyler Chapin and Adolfo Garcia brought that lets get it done attitude and got it done in 6.2 seconds which was the fastest time of our two rodeos. The bareback horses and bulls seemed to tolerate the cold a lot better than our cowboys but DJ LaFleur and Dalton Grimes brought the heat and

REGION V 2014-2015 THSRA Rodeo Schedule 2/21 & 2/22/2015 | Nacogdoches 4/11 & 4/12/2015 | Marshall | Finals


COOPER CLINTON

TYLER CRONE

came up with qualified rides to win the bull riding As we all know ATTITUDE DICTATES OUTCOME, too often we dwell on the negative instead of deciding what needs to be done to accomplish our goals. With the New Year and new goals in place we should all have a winner’s attitude, make the choice to move beyond the excuses and push yourself to ACHIEVE and SUCCEED. As we pass the half way point in our rodeo season I encourage each of you to practice to WIN, let your attitude guide you to your full potential, take away the negativity and reach for your goals. I will leave you with one of my favorite quotes….”Ability is what you’re capable of doing, Motivation determines what you do, and Attitude determines how well you do it….Lou Holtz” So until next time…..LET GO AND LET GOD!

17


2015 EQUINE PROFESSIONALS ISSUE

Diagnostic Imaging in the Western Sport Horse

T

article courtesy of Animal Imaging and Dr. Jake Hersman, DVM

he demands on today’s equine athletes are great. As we ask our equine competitor to go faster, turn sharper, compete on variable footing or stop harder, things can go wrong. Thankfully, we now have several new exciting tools to better diagnose problems in the equine athlete. Healthcare, in regards to athletic injuries in both the human and the equine, have grown by leaps and bounds over the past 10 years. One area of rapid growth has been an improvement in diagnostic imaging. The horse owner may realize that their companion is no longer competing as effectively as in the past or there is an obvious gait abnormality. The first order of business should be a complete physical exam by your veterinarian. He or she may be able to identify areas of pain that may be contributing to poor athletic performance or an obvious lameness. Diagnostic imaging may then be utilized to help determine what may be causing the problem(s). The following diagnostic tools are now at the veterinarian’s disposal. Regional Anesthesia Nerve blocks, although not always 100 percent accurate, are very important for trying to localize pain. In many cases, nerve blocks are performed in an attempt to localize the soreness prior to any further diagnostic imaging.

has been remarkable. X-Ray machines with high KV and MA are available in many practices and can image big body parts such as backs, necks and the pelvis. Not only has image quality improved, but the image is now readily visible for interpretation. The digital format allows for rapid transfer of images to board certified radiologists for interpretation. These specialists have spent years in training to better understand the nuances of radiographs. They also have experience with the equine athlete and what that horse is asked to do in the arena, which is critical for a complete interpretation of the radiographs. ULTRASOUND Ultrasound dates back to the 1980s; however over the past 10 years, ultrasound has proven to be very effective in answering soft tissue questions. There may be limitations to its efficacy, such as evaluating the equine foot, but this imaging modality can be essential in evaluating tendon and ligament injuries, evaluating joints, looking at bumps and swellings and evaluating the chest and abdomen. The equipment and expertise have greatly improved over the last several years. CT CT has been extremely helpful for better characterization of bony pathology (i.e. fractures) and abnormalities of the equine skull. Images can be obtained in very thin slices and reformatted in 3 planes. A CT of the skull greatly enhances our ability to evaluate diseased teeth, sinuses, possible fractures and swellings. Additionally, CT exams of the skull can be acquired while the horse is standing. MRI MRI has recently been more widely accepted as a very efficient tool in diagnosing subtle performance problems. A complete lameness exam is essential prior to MRI evaluation to ensure that the proper area of anatomy is imaged. An MRI exam allows veterinarians to thoroughly evaluate soft tissue and bony Radiology injuries. The ability to evaluate tendons, ligaments and bone is critical to arrive After nerve blocks, the lameness exam often progresses to radiographs of a at a definitive diagnosis in many cases. For years, veterinarians were able given area. The rapid development of digital radiology over the past 10 years to localize a lameness to the foot; however, they may not have had adequate

continued on page 21

18


Equine Professional's Index Weems & Stephens Equine Hospital page 19 Peak Performance Equine Hospital page 19 Pro Vision Equine Surveillance page 20 Kendall County Veterinary Center page 21 Reata Equine Hospital page 21 Animal Imaging page 22 Bracken Equine Clinic page 23 Texas Equine Hospital page 24 JD Norris, DVM / Equine Dentistry page 25 Seahorse Equine Conditioning & Rehab page 25 Elgin Veterinary Hospital page 26

Selway Equine Therapy Brazos Valley Equine Hospital

page 27 page 29

5960 Hospital Road | Aubrey, Tx 76227 (940) 365 9632 | www.wseh.net

Raising the Standard in Equine Care. Weems and Stephens Equine Hospital is a full-service equine hospital established in 1988 as a 24-hour a day referral center for horses requiring specialized medical and surgical care. We provide veterinary services for horses located in northern Texas, southern Oklahoma, and western Louisiana. The hospital facility offers a full range of services including surgery, internal medicine, reproduction, sports medicine, advanced diagnostic imaging, and podiatry. The practice also provides ambulatory services for emergencies, routine treatment, preventative care, general reproduction, and medical care without having to leave the farm. We strive to provide premier quality care to our patients and have committed our professional attention to raising the standard of equine care.

Peak Performance Equine Hospital is a full service primary care and referral hospital located in Granbury, TX. We provide specialized surgical, medical, and reproductive services. Our veterinarians, including our board certified surgeon, are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Tim Lammers, DVM, DACVS-LA | Matt Imel, DVM | Alton Price, DVM 817-579-0287 • F 817-579-0948 • www.ppehtx.com 3658 W. Hwy 377 • Granbury, Texas 76048

SERVICES: LAMENESS/SPORTS MEDICINE SURGERY INTERNAL MEDICINE 24 HOUR CARE REPRODUCTION PRE-PURCHASE EXAMINATION PREVENTIVE CARE/DENTISTRY LABORATORY FIELD MEDICINE

19


Pro Vision Equine Surveillance Becomes THSRA / TJHRA Sponsor

P

ro Vision Equine Surveillance, a division of Pro Vision Global Digital Surveillance, has become an official partner of the Texas High School Rodeo Association. “Pro Vision Equine Surveillance has been a natural progression in digital surveillance services for our company,” said owner Bert Steindorf. “Now with Pro Vision Equine Surveillance, horse owners will be able to safely watch their horses while traveling and keep tabs on their property at home or away.” For most horse trailers, Pro Vision Equine Surveillance installs four cameras, with two outside and two inside the trailer. A unique access address is provided to the user who, through the use of a simple phone or tablet app or on their computer, can view each screen individually or all four at once. “We’re looking forward to introducing our product to the members of the Texas High School Rodeo Association,” said Pro Vision Business Development Manager Bob Tallman. “As a member of the rodeo community myself, I am very aware of how important keeping their kids safe on the road is to moms, dads and grandparents. Pro Vision is here to help them do that.” With Pro Vision Equine Digital Surveillance, you can rest assured that your family, as well as valuable horses and equipment are being watched by you, and only you, when you want and how you want. Tallman pointed out that horse owners will experience a higher sense of security with the use of Pro Vision Equine Surveillance in a number of ways. “We’ve already learned from our endorsers, champion calf roper Tyson Durfey and champion barrel racer Fallon Taylor, that having the system give them a greater peace of mind,” he said. “Many times, they are required to park their trailers a distance from the rodeo arena and they have been able to check on their trailer and any horses tied to the trailer from wherever they might be.” Furthermore, family and friends who are given the access information are also able to monitor the travels of their loved ones, be it human or horse. For more information, go to provisionequine.com or contact Paul Riggs at paul@provisionequine.com. Pro Vision Digital Surveillance is a division of Pro Vision Global Digital Surveillance, a leading provider of video surveillance at oil field and well sites across the country.

20


continued from page 18

information to understand that the deep digital flexor tendon or other support structures adjacent to the navicular bone may be injured as well as the possible injury to the navicular bone itself. Bone abnormalities, such as bruising, were not able to be diagnosed prior to MRI. Being able to understand the complexity of the problem can greatly change how the case is managed. A tesla is a measurement of magnetic strength. The greater the tesla magnetic strength, the quicker the images are acquired and the more detailed the images generated by the exam will be. Treating the lameness without a complete understanding of the etiology of the lameness is not in the best interest of our equine athletes. Being able to better understand the prognosis of the given injury is also critical, which is why MRI has become such a valuable diagnostic tool.

K

endall County Veterinary Center has been serving the Boerne and surrounding communities for over 20 years. Our mission is to provide you with the highest quality veterinary care for not only your highly competitive athlete but also your backyard friend. Our team of veterinarians, technicians, and friendly office staff are committed to providing you with exceptional veterinary care and service. Our veterinarians attend regular continuing education classes and often communicate with specialists locally and at referral centers.

Equine Services: • Pre-Purchase Examinations • Wellness Care • Lameness Examination • Surgery • Reproduction • Time of Need Care • Digital X-Rays • Ultrasound • Endoscopy

Companion Animal Services:

Wellness and Preventative Care • Medicine and Surgery • In-House Lab

Farm Animal Services: Cosmetic Dehorning • Castration • Brucellosis Vaccination and Testing • Pregnancy Diagnosis and Reproductive Emergencies

Travis Nichols, DVM • Alison Harper, DVM Seth Jones, DVM • Michelle Shaw, DVM • Rick Rodenbeck, DVM Robert Quinn, DVM • Meghan Kirkpatrick ,DVM

141 Hwy 46 East – Boerne Texas, 78006 830-336-2041 | www.kendallcountyveterinarycenter.com

A History of Experience With A Vision For The Future Chiropractics

SCINTIGRAPHY Bone scans (scintigraphy) are an excellent tool to help localize and possibly better understand a complicated lameness or a poor performance issue. A lameness that blocks to the foot may not need a bone scan. However, pain in the pelvis, cervical spine, or undiagnosed pain or disease in the extremities may greatly benefit from scintigraphy. A radioactive isotope is injected intravenously which binds to reactive bone undergoing a particular cellular change called osteoblastic activity. Those areas of increased uptake, or hot spots, may shed light on a given area that needs further investigation or treatment. Hoof testers and a critical eye are still of utmost importance in solving lameness and or performance issues; however, advances in technology have helped to shed a new light on age old problems.

Lameness Evaluations

Farrier Services

Dentistry Mare and Stallion Management General Medicine/Wellness Dr. MC Baker

24 hour Emergency/ICU Care

Dr. Cal Davis Dr. Christine Sutherland

Dr. Justin High

6516 Granbury Hwy ~ Weatherford, TX ~ 817-599-9635 www.reataequinehospital.com

21


3-Tesla MRI 3- Tesla MR imaging provides en-

hanced image quality to facilitate a more accurate diagnosis. Unsurpassed imaging quality in the equine foot, fetlock, proximal suspensory carpus and hock.

CT Imaging

The first facility in the United States to offer standing CT exams for the equine. CT of the equine head is ideal for sinus or dental diagnostic imaging. Foals under 500 pounds can be imaged under general anesthesia for soft tissue or bone conditions.

About Us Animal Imaging is an outpatient referral diagnostic imaging facility which provides state-of-the-art veterinary diagnostic imaging services to veterinarians and their equine and companion animal patients.

Our Goal Our goal is to enhance the role of imaging in the practice of veterinary medicine and to provide referring veterianarians with exceptional service, unsurpassed imaging quality and timely reporting. We strive to make the imaging services provided by Animal Imaging an extension of your veterinary practice.

Nuclear Bone Scan Equine Scintigraphy is often the

best diagnostic choice for subtle lameness of performance limiting conditions that are difficult to diagnose with conventional diagnostic modalities and is particularly well suited for pathologies involving the pelvis, back, cervical spine and head.

Our Radiologists

Ultrasound Ultrasound can be an extremely

effective tool to evaluate joints, tendons and the axial and appendicular skeleton.

6112 RIVERSIDE DRIVE | IRVING, TX | 75039 972.869.2180 WWW.ANIMALIMAGING.NET

22

Our radiologist are board certified by the American College of Veterinary Radiology. This includes specialized training in ultrasound, MRI, nuclear medicine as well as radiographic and CT interpretation.

Meet our doctors and support staff on www.animalimaging.net Our radiologists are board certified by the American College of Veterinary Radiology.

Radiographs Radiographs Animal Imaging uses

a high powered digital system that effectively images large body parts including the pelvis, head, abdomen and thorax as well as the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine.


Blanketing, and Other Colorful Considerations

S

Posted on January 3, 2015 by DrRamey in General Information, Musings by Dr. Ramey, Preventative Medicine

o, I was walking up to this barn, and I see a client strolling down the aisle, shaking her head, obviously concerned about something. “What’s the matter?” I asked. “I had my horse talk to the psychic,” she said. This is the sort of instance where you can easily blow a doctor:client relationship by saying something like, “Oh, geez, what an utter and complete waste of time and money!” Being somewhat wizened to client psychology at this point, instead, I wondered, “What did she say?” “Well,” my client offered, “my horse hates the color red.” Perplexed, for among other reasons, because I know that horses are mostly colorblind, I asked, (somewhat reluctantly, because I knew that some answer would be forthcoming), “Why is this a problem?” Turns out that the horse had red leg bandages, in which his legs could be wrapped at night. Worse: he had a matching red blanket. The poor beast was covered in red. Fortunately, there was a solution. “I’m going to have to go out and buy blue leg wraps and a blue blanket this afternoon,” she said. “It’s the only way he’ll be happy.” At once nodding sympathetically, and pinching my forearm as hard as I could so as to maintain my composure, I offered her some obviously needed support. I held up pretty well until she said, “Doctor Ramey, I never knew horses were so materialistic.” “Neither did I,” I said, moving quickly towards a quiet spot where I could lie down and hold my sides. Actually, the whole idea of blanketing horses is mostly pretty silly. Horses originated in some of the coldest parts of the world, tthe central Asian steppes. If they hadn’t figured how to stay warm, they would have frozen out long before we started riding them. See, they’ve got a nice coat of dense hair to provide insulation, in

addition to their body mass. The body mass of a horse actually makes it fairly hard for them to get rid of heat. In fact, getting rid of body heat is the main problem for most large-bodied animals. Horses have less body surface, relative to their size, than do smaller animals. So, for example, if you’re an elephant (not making any weight comments, I’m talking about the animal), you’ve got a very big body with relatively little surface area exposed from which you can radiated heat. On the other hand, if you’re a canary, well, cold weather is a big problem. *(Does anyone sell canary blankets?) GRAPHIC EXAMPLE: When I worked at Iowa State University, after I graduated from veterinary school, a horse died in the barns at about 10 p.m. It was 22 degrees below zero outside. All horses that died in the clinic had to have a postmortem exam. Unfortunately, the pathology lab was closed, so, to keep the horse in a state where a good post-mortem exam could be performed, we moved him from inside the barn outside. About 12 hours later, we did the exam. And the horse was still quite warm inside. What I’m saying is that if dead horses can stay warm in 22 below weather, live horses can SURE do it. Who knew your horse had something in common with sharks and tuna? Horses also generate a lot of heat, mostly through digestive activity. So if, for example, you’re feeding hay to your horse in the winter… WAIT – You are feeding hay to your horse in the winter, right? I mean, if not, your horse will have a lot worse problems than getting cold. … then he’s going to be generating a lot of heat on his own. Hay, or any feed, adds fuel to your horse’s internal fire, as it were. Now, if you live in Finland, and it’s January, and you’ve body clipped your horse, and you insist on keeping your horses outside all of the time, by all means go ahead and blanket continued on page 29

23


24


40 ft Diameter Equine Pool 6 Horse Priefert Panel Walker Theraplate Vibration Therapy

SEAHORSE EQUINE

Boarding PRECONDITIONING FOR COMPETITION • POST SURGICAL REHAB • CONDITIONING AFTER LAYOFF SeahorseEquine@gmail.com

3339 MORRIS RANCH RD. • FREDERICKSBURG, TX

830-329-8700

FOR MORE PHOTOS & VIDEOS, LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

25


Doctors / Owners: Robert D. Lewis, DVM Tommy Hays, DVM

Brian Brandon, DVM Gary Warner, DVM

Marty Tanner, DVM

Associate Vets:

Lara Shreve, DVM

Kristi Underwood, DVM

Cody Johnson, DVM

512-285-3395 office | 512-285-3398 fax email: evhequine@yahoo.com

Visit on the web

www.elginveterinaryhospital.com Connect with us on Facebook

Go Where the Pros Go!

Specalizing in Equine Lameness, Medicine and Surgery. Offering 24 care for your athlete’s needs.

Now Available: The Only Standing MRI in Texas!

26


27


PRESIDENT - BAILEY BENNIGHT VICE PRESIDENT - LINDSEI HARVEY SECRETARY - MORGAN FAJKUS

STUDENT OFFICERS

STATE DIRECTORS WESLEY CALDWELL 3918 Kerr Creek Drive • Gonzales, TX 78629 830.672.3902 • wcaldwell@gvec.org

RIEDE MYRICK 154 Center Cove • Giddings, Texas 78942 979.542.2306 • riedemyrick@yahoo.com SECRETARY - NENA BOETTCHER PO Box 833 • East Bernard, Texas 77435 281.468.8973 • region6thsra@gmail.com

REGION VI

MATT MUELLER 1344 CR 203 • Paige, Texas 78659 979.966.9548 • circlemranch2008@yahoo.com PRESIDENT - BUBBA BENNIGHT 143 Bailey Blvd • Bastrop, Texas 78602 512.461.6091 • bubbabennight@yahoo.com

28

PERFORMANCE REPORT

Couldn’t Do It Without Them! By CIERRA GOODE

– ARIAT Performance Reporter

W

ithout our parents, some of us wouldn’t be where we are at today. Our parents are a big part of rodeo here at region 6. Without them we would not of been able to put on our cowboy prom. With the help of the parents and a few contestants they made it possible to put on such a great event. Region 6 started off the New Year right! The theme of our cowboy prom this year was winter wonderland. And what’s a prom without a king and queen? The 2015 king was Logan McCasland and the queen was McKenna Greene. From the decorations to

the dresses and starched jeans, the contestants were ready to have a great time. For some seniors this would be their last prom and the parents made sure to make it one to remember. But not only do the parents the prom going, they also make sure region 6 has all the help we need to run the rodeos smoothly. Our parents are the ones who make sure our fees are paid and they are the reason we get from rodeo to rodeo. Parents sometimes don’t get enough credit for everything they do. Sometime we forget how important they really are. They are our number one supporters. They are the ones that make sure we get to every rodeo we enter up in. All in all, region 6 had a successful rodeo weekend to start off the New Year. We just want to send a big thank you to all the parents who made cowboy prom successful. Also, a thank you for all you parents do for us contestants when it comes to rodeo. We are ready to see what the rest of the year bring for region 6!

REGION VI 2014-2015 THSRA Rodeo Schedule

2/14 & 2/15/2015 | Gonzales 3/14 & 3/15/2015 | Gonzales


continued from page 23

him. But the idea that horses might ever get cold in the warmer climes – say southern California – is fairly hard to understand, at least from a horse physiology standpoint. NOTE: Well, it’s not all that hard to understand, when you think about it a little bit more. It’s not that blanketing is necessarily benign, either. One of the things bad things that blankets do is compress the horse’s hair coat. With a blanket on, they can’t fluff up their hair and help insulate themselves. In addition, if it gets wet under the blanket – as it can in a winter storm, or, when a horse is sweating under the blanket – the blanket keeps the water from evaporating, making the horse even colder (as you probably know, cold and wet is a pretty miserable thing to be). So, mostly, there’s not really any reason to blanket your horse. However, blanketing certainly does do a couple of things. It may help keep some dirt off of your horse, which can be helpful if you’re at a show. Maybe it’ll save you some grooming time. If you’ve decided that the perfect time to body clip your horse is just before the latest blast of arctic air comes your way, putting a blanket on him probably won’t hurt. Blankets certainly adorn horses in a delightful color of your choice, which not only allows you to express your latent interior design talents, but it allows you do so without much embarrassment for your horse, since horses are mostly color blind. However, blanketing does NOT do anything to limit the growth of the coat – coat growth is controlled mostly by day length (as the days get shorter, the coat gets longer, and vice versa). I’ve seen catalogs that try to sell you on the fact that not only does your horse need blanketing, he needs a different blanket for just about every conceivable temperature range. I haven’t seen the slightly chilly, light westerly breeze, 60% humidity model being marketed yet, but I’m sure it’s coming. What I’m saying is that if you are bound and determined to blanket your horse, at least don’t see how many of the darn things you can own. They take up a lot of storage space, too. All this said, my experience has been that no matter the facts, a lot of people are going to blanket their horses anyway, because, well, just because (or, revisit the cartoon, above). And, mostly, that’s fine – it certainly doesn’t hurt them, unless they get their legs wrapped up in it (it happens). And I won’t criticize you at all, because I know you’re doing it because

you love your horse. But even so, there’s this nagging fact. When it comes to blanketing, it’s mostly for you, not for them. Dr. David Ramey is a 1983 graduate of the Colorado State University School of Veterinary Medicine. In addition to being a full-time equine veterinary practitioner in Encino, California, Dr. Ramey is also an internationally recognized author, lecturer and blogger. Dr. Ramey is a vocal advocate for the application of science to medicine, and—as such—for the welfare of the horse. He blogs at doctorramey.com or on Facebook at David Ramey, DVM.

BRAZOS VALLEY EQUINE HOSPITAL LEADERS IN EQUINE MEDICINE NAVASOTA 936-825-2197

STEPHENVILLE 254-968-7898

• Dr. Terrell Buchanan – Sports Medicine

• Dr. Wyatt Winchell – Board Certified Surgeon

• Dr. Ben Buchanan – Board Certified Internal Medicine Board Certified Critical Care

• Dr. Semira Mancill – Board Certified Reproduction Specialist • Dr. Sarah Sampson – Board Certified Surgeon • Dr. Clayton Smith – Ambulatory Services

SALADO 254-947-1292 • Dr. John Janicek – Sports Medicine • Dr. Beau Whitaker – Sports Medicine • Dr. Theresa Dwyer – Reproduction • 24 HOUR ON-CALL EMERGENCY AND ICU

• Dr. Charlie Buchanan Sports Medicine • Dr. Ricky Osterloh Sports Medicine • Dr. David Ricks Reproduction • Dr. Jay Bickers Board Certified Surgeon Acupuncture & Chiropractics • Dr. Christine Boeckh Reproduction and Sports Medicine

• CUTTING EDGE SPORTS MEDICINE THERAPY

WWW.BVEH.COM

• CARING FOR EQUINE ATHLETES SINCE 1966

29


30

DON’T BEAT YOURSELF

PRESIDENT - KASSIE KERSH VICE PRESIDENT - BRADY BARHAM SECRETARY - MARCI RALEY

STUDENT OFFICERS

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS JOHN ATKINSON PO Box 540 • Anderson, Texas 77830 979.482.2018 • johnstephenatkinson@hotmail.com

MELISSA RALEY 6100 Hoddeville School Rd • Brenham, Texas 77823 979.830.0878 • melissaraley@texasbb.com

REGION VII

SECRETARY - ANNE DOLLERY PO Box 886 • Caldwell, Texas 77836 979.272.2249 • adollery@aol.com

RUSSELL BARHAM 8389 Oxford Cemetary Rd., Madisonville, Tx 77864 936.348.5994 • barham1965@gmail.com PRESIDENT- CLINT RAWLINSON 12432 N. SH 71 • El Campo, Texas 77437 979.637.0500 • rawlinsonclint@gmail.com

PERFORMANCE REPORT

any time in any competition, who are capable of making a great run. Your focus should be placed on making your good, consistent run then it’s out of your hands and up to the rest of By SKYLER STONE – ARIAT Performance Reporter the competition to beat it. You also have to let go of any ideas that someone is better eading a book written by 4 time National than you or has a better horse, a nicer practice pen, etc. You Finals Qualifier have to have confidence that you are great at what you do Sharon Camarillo, she said, and you are there to win. Don’t beat yourself with negative thoughts. “Don’t beat yourself.” Another way to not beat yourself is to never stop learning. A When arriving at a competition, try not to be too quote from Dr. Phil says, “Never miss an opportunity to shut concerned with checking the up.” In an article by Stran Smith, he said, “The more time I existing times of anyone who can spend with my mouth shut and my ears open the better I has gone before you. Rodeo am. Remember you need to know what you know. But more is so competitive that your importantly, you need to know what you don’t know.” Never have to make a whale of a run stop listening and learning. You can always better yourself. The greatest thing to remember is that skill and luck have regardless of what the other little to do with success as a competitor. The biggest success competitors have done. Don’t beat yourself. Your comes from giving the glory to God. Through him all things job is to make your best run are possible. He should be given the glory when you win, as by planning the run and run- well as the glory when you lose. Putting your trust and faith ning the plan. There are a in him, making him first in your life, will help you in all number of competitors, at things you do. The next time you are entered up, plan your run and run your plan and ask God to ride with REGION VII you. With him as your co-pilot there 2014-2015 THSRA Rodeo Schedule should be no way to beat yourself except by beating (bettering) an 2/21 & 2/22/2015 | Edna existing run or time. Trust God and trust your animal. Good luck and 2/7 & 2/8/2015 | Brenham | cutting God Bless.

R


The folks at McCoy’s Building Supply understand that it takes a lot of hard work and the whole family pitching in to get things done on a farm or ranch. That’s why we’d like to take some time out to salute Texas High School Rodeo Association families who are farmers and ranchers. In our monthly Farm & Ranch Family Spotlight, we’ll feature one family, sharing their story of how they work together as a family to make their farm or ranch successful. The spotlight will run for 10 months; each month will feature a different region. Each Regional McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family will receive a $100 McCoy’s Gift Card. The McCoy’s Farm and Ranch Family of the Year will receive a $500 McCoy’s Gift Card and will be announced at the 2015 THSRA State Finals.

T

The Swaim Family of Region VIII by Hailey Kinsel

he Swaimarosa Ranch is home to Michael and Sandra Swaim, and their three daughters, Bailey, Carly, and Lindy Swaim. Bailey (24) and Carly (22) are both former members of Texas High School Rodeo Region VIII, and Lindy (18) is a current member. Lindy is a senior at McMullen County High School and competes in THSRA Region VIII in barrel racing, pole bending, and cutting. She served as the Region VIII queen for her first two years in THSRA, and has been the Region VIII Student President for the past two years. Lindy has qualified for the State Finals all four years of high school in either the queen competition, pole bending, or cutting. Her equine partners are “Dynamite” for poles and barrels, “Crash” for barrels and cutting, as well as “Shorty” and “Deets,” also for cutting. After high school, Lindy plans to attend Tarleton State University for a degree in Education, as she aspires to be a Kindergarten teacher. Michael and Sandra Swaim are fifth generation ranchers. Although the family ranch operation was primarily cattle, Michael and Sandra decided to focus on raising cutting and roping

horses. The Swaims stand six stallions, some of whose ancestors trace back to Peptoboonsmal, Doc Bar, Gay Bar King, and Colonel Freckles. The family’s busiest time of year is the fall when it is time to wean the colts. Every member of the Swaim family has a job to do, whether it is halter-breaking colts, feeding horses, feeding roping cattle, working with horses, cleaning stalls, welding or doing repair work. The Swaims lost two family members this past year who were instrumental in the Swaim girls’ involvement in rodeo. Ruth Dean Swaim, Michael’s mother, always donated a buckle to Region VIII, and when poor health kept her from attending her granddaughters’ rodeos, she still called afterwards for the “rodeo report.” Sandra’s father, Pat Atkinson, passed away from cancer complicated by a bout with pneumonia. He loved rodeo and often came to watch his granddaughters compete. He enjoyed sharing his rodeo stories and talking about his sons, Glenn and Jeff, qualifying for the National High School Finals. “The hardest part of losing him was after my first rodeo without him, because on my way home I’m waiting for that call to come in and hear, ‘How’d my baby do?’” says Lindy

about her grandfather. “I’m thankful for my rodeo family here at Region VIII who has helped my family through this tough time, because everyone in the region knew how special he was.” The Swaim’s are thankful for THSRA and the role its played in their lives. They believe THSRA gives students the chance to compete in a sport they love and make friends that will last a lifetime. Michael and Sandra “enjoyed our years in rodeo and that’s something we wanted for our girls.” Sandra is grateful for THSRA’s support of breast cancer awareness, as her mother has battled breast cancer for twenty-eight years and continues to. The Swaims state that the best part of THSRA is the scholarships it provides so that students can further their education. McCoy’s Building Supply is the Swaim family’s go-to store for the equipment and materials they need on the ranch. Joey Borjas of McCoy’s Building Supply in Beeville, Texas is very helpful in ordering and delivering the products they need. “Thanks to McCoy’s for helping to keep our ranch operating well and for people like Joey Borjas who go above and beyond for [McCoy’s] photos (top to bottom): Lindy Swaim competing in the THSRA customers,” says Sandra. cutting event; Bailey and Carly Congratulations to the Swaim Family of Swaim win the all girl team ropTilden, Texas and Region VIII -- McCoy’s Farm ing in Pleasanton, TX, Bailey won the high point saddle. And Ranch Family of the Month!

31


STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - LINDY SWAIM VICE PRESIDENT - ABBY SLAGLE SECRETARY - MATT GUTIERREZ KELLIE BEALL PO Box 1107 • Woodsboro, Texas 78393 361.220.2533 • cowgirlkellie@gmail.com

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS

KIM STEGMAN 5202 Foerster School • Needville, Tx 77461 979.793.6067 •kimstegman@aol.com

REGION VIII

PO Box 833 • East Bernard, Texas 77435 281.468.8973 • region8thsra@gmail.com

SECRETARY - NENA BOETTCHER

KEN SLAGLE 954 CR 140 • Floresville, Texas 78114 254.424.5833 • slaglekl@yahoo.com 115 Thompson Rd. • Jourdanton, Texas 78026 830.570.7754 • randy.watt@f-e-t.com

PRESIDENT- RANDY WATT

32

PERFORMANCE REPORT

Region 8,

It’s Livestock Show Time! By Montana

A

Cox – ARIAT Performance Reporter

lthough some rodeo contestants find it hard to find time to practice their events with sports, academic activities, and multiple other activities going on. Most of our contestants still find and dedicate time into raising an livestock animal for their County Fair. Showing an livestock show animal takes a lot of time and effort, people that are showing and also competing in the region 8 rodeos are very dedicated to both of their animals, show animals and horses. Showing livestock animals and rodeo teaches responsibility that a person has to gain to be able

to live an healthy live. For example. Whitlee Whitlow had over 12 goats and 8 sheep in her barn at the beginning of the year. Whitlee tells me “Besides rodeo, showing my animals is my life, I love it and wouldn’t trade it for anything. To me showing animals combined with competing at region 8 in Barrels, Poles and Goat tying, has taught me responsibility and it has taught me how to be more outgoing and how to take care of my animals. Getting up at 5:30 every morning and staying out till REGION VIII 10 a clock at night isn't easy but, I love it. 2014-2015 THSRA Rodeo Schedule The hard work that I have put into all my rodeo events and with my animals sure does pay out.” 2/14/2015 | Sinton | 2 rodeos Another person from out region that also shows is Eric Atckinson, he and 1/3 & 1/4/2015 | Gonzales | cutting his brothers show steers. He tells me 1/24 & 1/25/2015 | Gonzales | cutting “Showing my steers takes a lot of time and hard work. Showing my steers helps 2/7 & 2/8/2015 | Brenham | cutting me earn enough money to go to the


college of my dream and earn my degree in Registered Nursing. When not working with my steer “Steak” I am out in the arena working on my roping.” To these cowboys and cowgirls that are dedicated to many things such as stock shows and rodeo we wish you luck and admire you and also hope you have a successful season this year. Like Whitlee says “You have to train like a champion to be a champion!”

like us on facebook! Texas high school rodeo facebook page YOUR SOURCE FOR INSIDER INFORMATION!

33


34

Thanks to Our Sponsors

TEXAS RAM DEALERS

6717 FM 1452 • W. Madisonville, Texas 77864 979.268.4994 • jschueneman@shorthornres.com

PRESIDENT - JAKE HUGHES VICE PRESIDENT - MEGAN WRIGHT SECRETARY - HAILEY BRUENING

STUDENT OFFICERS

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS JOHN SCHUENEMAN

3951 CR 3385 • Lovelady, Texas 75851 936.348.0220 • starnsranch@windstream.net

CHRIS STARNS

SECRETARY - KIM ACKEL PO Box 67• Hamshire, Texas 77622

REGION IX

409.781.3902 • kimackel@thsra9.com

119 CR 451 • Buffalo, Texas 75831 903.388.6164 • j_w_westbrook@yahoo.com

PRESIDENT- EDDIE DYSON

JULIE JORDAN

204 CR 6763 • Dayton, Texas 77535 713.553.6421 • eddiedyson@thsra9.com

PERFORMANCE REPORT

By KELSEY THOMPSON– ARIAT Performance Reporter

T

he first month of 2015 is almost to a end... How crazy does that sound? A start of a new year is a very precious thing, you have a chance to completely start over and

make it whatever year you want it to be. Fresh start's are sometimes wanted and for others, needed. Region IX kicked off our year and fresh start at a Board Meeting in Huntsville on the 9th, we discussed old business to get to the new! Like voting on different brands of saddles and buckles to be given out in March for our Region Finals, as well as for silent auctions idea's for that awesome final rodeo! Another thing that was brought up and discussed was sponsorships, as student officers were sitting listening and being involved in the conversation as well. I know we all realized how much our region, state, and national sponsors do for us. Without them we wouldn't get the AMAZING prizes we work hard all year for nor our chance to compete against the best of the best at State. With that being said, I would like to give a shoutout to all our region sponsors that make Region IX the "Oh so fine region nine"! Mitchum Industries Robinson's Country Store JB Roping Wiesner Huntsville Sirman Drilling and Construction LLC Branded for Christ Cowboy Church Huntsville Air Conditioning Company Hat Brand Rodeo R&M Rodeo Photos Community Service Credit Union Red Hot Rodeo K&E Konstruxion & Dezign Inc. Veterinary Hospital of New Waverly HBI Office Solutions Henson Family Dealership Bill Fick Ford KK-Kelly Kaminski Sam Houston Electric Hal R. Ridley Straight Line Metal Buildings Heartfield Florist New Image Salon & Spa Huntsville Farm Supply The Trailer Store


If you are passing by and see one of these amazing business, please stop by and give back what they have done for us! On top of all that, we are also preparing for our next Rodeos #8 & #9 in Buffalo! We pray for a safe runs/rides, a sunny day, preferably clean runs, memories with friends, and most of all, FUN. Because isn't that rodeo is about? Enjoying yourself and having fun? I believe so. I hope when we say our last words, we could all honestly say "I had the best time of my life while being involved in High School Rodeo". If you could, you're doing it right; if not, go to more High School Rodeo's... You'll change your mind soon enough. (: Good luck to all on your new year and fresh starts! Remember, like Pete Zamperini said in fantastic movie Unbroken... "A moment of pain is worth a lifetime of glory."

REGION IX 2014-2015 THSRA Rodeo Schedule 2/15/2015 | Caldwell | 2 rodeos 3/21/2015 | Crockett | Finals

35


STUDENT OFFICERS PRESIDENT - CLINT WEBSTER VICE PRESIDENT - KATIE KEITH SECRETARY/TRES. - KAMBRIA MCDOUGAL VANESSA HALFORD 1817 CR 177 • Stephenville, TX 76401 254.595.1211 • vanessa.halford@sville.us

JOSEPH THOMAS 4312 Conveyor Drive • Burleson, Tx 76028 817.454.2059 • jthomas@chemical.com SECRETARY - ANGELIA CUDD 150 CR 327 • Gatesville, Texas 76528 254.394.3888• cuddranch@yahoo.com

STATE DIRECTORS / REGION OFFICERS

JAMIE MCDOUGAL 3046 Dusk Drive • Weatherford, Tx 76088 817.598.9560 • jthomas@chemical.com PRESIDENT - JERRY WRIGHT 434 CR 315 • Oglesby, Texas 76561 254.290.4965 • jerrywrighthomes@hughes.net

PERFORMANCE REPORT

By BROOKE

BOILES– ARIAT Performance Reporter

s the time has gone by, we hope so many of you have got a running start at 2015! Sadly we could not meet January 10th and 11th for our rodeos due to the weather, but we are so eagerly ready to see everybody February 14th and 15th. Many of our contestant participated in the Waco USTRC back in January. We would like to recognize and congratulate Ross Ashford for winning 2nd in the number 12, Wyatt Inderman and Mathew George for winning 4th in the number 11 and winning the number 11 incentive, Garett Chick for winning 4th in the number 10 and 6th in the number 9, and Jace Wright, a region X Jr. high contestant, for winning the number 8 and 2nd in the number 9 incentive.

GARETT CHICK AT THE USTRC

Not only do we wish you all the best of skills at our region rodeos, but outside of them as you go down the road to other functions. I would like to close this article out quoting Isaac Kubvoruno with an inspiring message to remind everybody the best is yet to come. "The Devil Specializes in Digging up Your Past. He is the excavator and archaeologist of your painful history. He brings up your past mistakes, past failures, past disappointments and past heartbreaks. The devil wants you to dwell in the dumpster of broken dreams and broken promises. But, I'm here to tell you that 'Greater is he that is within you that he that is in the world.' Jesus came so you can break free from the shackles of the past. With God your best days are always ahead not behind. Whenever the Devil reminds you of your past, remind him of his future in hell fire. Let go of the past and embrace the future that God has prepared for you. Trust God, let go of the past and step into the future by faith. "...forgetting what lies behind and reaching forward to what lies ahead, I press on toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus." Philippians 3:13, 14. Your God is alive and because He lives you can face tomorrow."

REGION X 2014-2015 THSRA Rodeo Schedule 2/14 & 2/15/2015 | Hamilton 3/7 & 3/8/2015 | Hamilton | Finals 36


THE PERFECT PLACE FOR A FAMILY VACATION!

THE REATA

• Custom Built Home • Sleeps 16 • 4 Bedroom, 3 Bath • Swimming Pool • Outdoor Fire Pit • Barbecue Pit • Flat Screen Satellite TV • Fully Equipped Kitchen • Washer / Dryer • WiFi • Outdoor TV Lounge • Horseshoe Pit Designed to accommodate your particular goals: Floating the Frio River, Family Reunions, Hunting Trips, Corporate Retreats

(830) 232-6118 for Reservations Book This House Online at www.NealsLodges.com

37


JUNIOR HIGH

TEXAS JUNIOR HIGH RODEO ASSOCIATION NEWS LETTER FROM THE TJHRA SECRETARY

J

r High Contestants and Families The new year has began with a bang! We are off and running and getting prepared for the state finals in May. I am getting calls and messages each day on the dates of the state finals. Everyone needs to be very sensitive to the dates of the state finals, the dates are May 24 thru May 30, 2015 – yes I know school will more than likely still be in session! PREPARE NOW….get to those schools and explain what you have been working for and get your grades in order now to not have any problems. Rough stock riders this will be new to you but you will be required to be there the whole week just like everyone else. We truly wish we could change the dates of the finals but we are sort of stuck in the middle. When you think about it, just think we you leave Gonzales you have just about one month to attend the National Finals. The Junior High National Finals are June 21-27th, 2015 in Des Moines, IA, then we also have the Texas High School State Finals in Abilene during June 6 – 13, 2015 so taking this all into consideration the dates of the Junior High finals cannot change until things change above. So please bear with us and get to those schools now. I do not mind sending you a letter from our office to explain what the state finals mean either – just contact me!!! Next week, the student officers, our National Director and I are headed to Denver, Colorado for midwinter conference. This is where everyone from each state comes together and has a weeklong meeting and the officers get to be a part of all the planning of the future of NHSRA. It is a place we get to mingle with others that are interested in the same thing we are in a relaxed atmosphere. If you are interested in becoming an officer and getting the chance of meeting others it is time to start thinking about running for a student officer position at the state finals. There will be a form in your state package when you sign up for state and if you did not make it to state and are interested we will also post it to the website. Everyone try to stay warm and start reaching those goals of making it to Gonzales. If you know of anyone that might be interested in coming to the finals for vendor spaces please give them my information. Happy Valentines, Anne Dollery

www.tjhra.org 38


TEXAS JUNIOR HIGH RODEO ASSOCIATION NEWS

REGION I IS ON FIRE!

R

By KATE JOHNSON – TJHRA Region I

egion I Junior High School Rodeo is on fire! The competition is bigger and better than ever, and everyone’s on got their eye on the prize. During these cold Texas Panhandle winter months we took a break from rodeos, but with the spring soon approaching everyone is eagerly awaiting our first rodeo this semester. It’s a chance for some to redeem themselves and others it

will be a fight to stay on top. In the end it’ll be a close race for our Region Year End Champions. But two individuals stand out from the crowd and are willing to do anything to stay at the top. Two members know exactly what it’s like to be on the top, but they also know the pressure that comes with having to stay there. Quade Hiatt and Gracie Tucker are our current leaders in the Boy’s All- Around and the Girl’s All-Around race. Quade is an 8th grader from Canyon, Texas. He is the 2014 TJHRA Calf Roping Champion and two time National Junior High Finals Rodeo qualifier. As well as currently leading the All-Around, he also is sitting first in the Boy’s Goat Tying. If Quade clenches this All-Around title for the 20142015 year, he will be Region I’s back to back All-Around Cowboy. Gracie Tucker is currently leading the Girl’s All-Around race. She is a two year member of Region I Junior High Rodeo and is a 7th grader at Canyon Junior High School. Gracie has had a great first rodeo semester. She is winning the goats and sitting second in the barrels. Last year Gracie was the reserve All-Around Cowgirl. Having this experience is fueling her to fight even harder to stay at the top. But nothing is set in stone just yet. We have five more rodeos that could change everything. It is all up to who works the hardest and wants it bad enough. Our Regional finals will be in Levelland, Texas March 21-22. There we will crown our new Year End Champions and see which top ten cowboys and cowgirls in each event make it to State Rodeo Finals in Gonzales May 23-30th. Everything is on the line and everyone is willing to put everything out there for a chance to be on top. Let’s get this new semester underway!

QUADE HIATT photo by Jennings

GRACIE TUCKER photo by Jennings

39


#4CL1H Makeup Case So Many Colors... So Many Choices... Call Today & Discuss Breast Collar Options

5 #BC1reast Collar red B Contou #4NE4 Nylon Bronc Halter

#2458BR Wool Blanket w/Corner Plates... $42.00

#4J-sm Small Flap-Over Judge Book

#45SS One Ear Headstall

www.customtackshop.com 1-877-717-tack

40


See your local Kubota dealer for exciting offers on these products!

•High fat content to meet the energy needs of performance horses •Copper, zinc, and organic selenium for an improved immune system •Fortified with probiotics for improved digestion, health, appearance, and overall performance •Soybean oil for a high linoleic acid content with contributes to an improved hair coat •Chelated Minerals which are more easily absorbed into the bloodstream than inorganic mineral sources •Great cherry flavor that horses love

NEW THIS YEAR!

Sell 3 Bloomer Tickets and Get One Free That's right, if you sell 3 Bloomer Tickets, your family will get to enter one time for free! Claim this offer when your turn in your Bloomer tickets to your Region Secretary and she will give you a free ticket to put your families name on!

41


Kubota Supports Texas High School Rodeo and Junior High Rodeo Rodeo Athletes by Committing Their Resources for the 2015 Season.

A

big thank you goes out to the over 70 Texas Kubota Dealers who came together last year to invest individually into our association. “We feel what THSRA and TJHRA does in furthering education through scholarships and preserving our western heritage is important and we are excited to be a part of this great association. We are also looking forward to having our local dealers get to know the members and their families in their areas. We hope that through this sponsorship your families will get a chance to know more about the quality and products behind the Kubota name,� said David Murry, Kubota Regional Sales Manager. Holly DeLaune, THSRA Marketing Director said, "We want to make sure that our members and their families continue to seek out and thank their local Kubota dealers. Let them know how thankful we are that they have decided to invest once again in our members" The Kubota Corporation of Japan was established in 1890 and has become an international brand leader with a focus on contributing to society by offering environmentally compatible equipment designed to improve quality of life. Kubota Corporation has subsidiaries and affiliates that manufacture and/or market products that are sold in more than 130 countries. Murry adds to that saying, "Kubota's product line is a leader all of the world, with our mini excavators being

42

the #1 selling excavator in the world for each of the last 12 years." The Kubota tractor might have its roots on the Japanese farm where farms are traditionally smaller than those in America, but the need for high performance and powerful maneuverability is the same. Kubota Corporation introduced its first tractor to the United States in 1969. Filling a product void in the American marketplace, the Kubota 21 horsepower L200 was an overnight success. As a result, Kubota Tractor Corporation (KTC) was formed in 1972 and the company introduced its first 12 h.p. four-wheel drive tractor in 1974. Although four-wheel drive was common among larger American


tractors, it was unheard of in the compact sector and became a benchmark for the industry. Over the past four decades, KTC has continued to expand its product line, with four lines of tractors, the BX, B, L and M Series. Kubota has successfully introduced compact construction equipment, compact track loaders, turf equipment, lawn and garden equipment, utility vehicles and a variety of Performance-Matched implements and attachments. KTC is now a leading marketer and distributor of under 120h.p. tractors in the United States, offering more than 80 tractor models. Murry says, "Kubota is producing more and more models here in the United States and that we are the largest private sector employer in the state of Georgia." Kubota equipment is sold and serviced in the United States through a nationwide network of more than 1,100 authorized Kubota dealers supported by the company’s corporate headquarters in Torrance, California and four division offices and warehouses located in Lodi, California; Fort Worth, Texas; Groveport, Ohio; and Suwanee, Georgia.

Thank You Kubota Dealers!

ABILENE NEW HOLLAND, LC AG EQUIP., INC. ALBA TRACTOR, LLC ALVIN EQUIPMENT COMPANY, LLC AMIGO POWER EQUIPMENT ANGELO PELLETS, LTD. ATHENS TRACTOR & EQUIPMENT, LLC BAGLEY TRACTOR & EQUIPMENT BAR H EQUIPMENT SERVICES BEAUMONT TRACTOR COMPANY, INC. BEREND TURF & TRACTOR, LP BOB EVANS EQUIPMENT, INC. CASS COUNTY EQUIPMENT EASTEX TRACTOR & POWERSPORTS ELK TRACTORS & EQUIPMENT, INC. ELLIS TOPLINE EQUIPMENT, LTD. EWALD TRACTOR, INC. DEALERSHIPS FARM COUNTRY, INC. FIVE STAR RENTALS/SALES, INC. FMH KUBOTA FULLER TRACTOR COMPANY DEALERSHIPS GULF TRACTOR CO. HAMMER EQUIPMENT, LLC. HEART OF TEXAS KUBOTA HOUSTON COUNTY EQUIPMENT CO. LLC HUNT COUNTY FARM SUPPLY HUNTSVILLE TRUCK & TRACTOR, INC. JAMES BROS. IMPLEMENT COMPANY, INC. DEALERSHIPS

JASPER FARM AND RANCH SUPPLY JOHNSON FEED AND WESTERN WEAR, INC. LANFORD EQUIPMENT CO., INC. LANSDOWNE-MOODY COMPANY DEALERSHIPS LANSDOWNE-MOODY COMPANY - EAST HOUSTON LOWE TRACTOR & EQUIPMENT, INC. METRO EQUIPMENT CO., INC. MITCHELL EQUIPMENT, INC. MOORE’S SERVICE CENTER PANHANDLE IMPLEMENT CO., INC. PARIS FARM & RANCH CENTER, INC. PETERS TRACTOR AND EQUIPMENT CO. PITTSBURG TRACTOR, INC. ROSE COUNTRY TRACTOR & EQUIPMENT SIX & MANGO EQUIPMENT, LLP DEALERSHIPS TAYLOR EQUIPMENT TERRY COUNTY TRACTOR, INC. TEXARKANA TRACTOR COMPANY TEXSTAR KUBOTA NEW HOLLAND THE HLAVINKA EQUIPMENT COMPANY DEALERSHIPS TIPTON INTERNATIONAL, INC. DEALERSHIPS VICTORIA OLIVER COMPANY, INC. DEALERSHIPS W. A. VIRNAU & SONS, INC. WC TRACTOR WESTERN IMPLEMENT COMPANY, LLC WOWCO EQUIPMENT CO. ZIMMERER KUBOTA & EQUIPMENT, INC. DEALERSHIPS

43


CHEYENNE BRITAIN

The Whataburger Whatakid is selected due to their ability to excel both in and out of the rodeo arena. Whataburger is proud to recognize a THSRA member from each of the ten regions who truly upholds the title “Whatakid!” One of the nominees will be chosen at the State Final Rodeo in June as the Whatakid of the Year. In recognition of this accomplishment they will receive free Whataburgers for an entire year!

Cheyenne Britain is a 17-year-old senior, enrolled in Midwest Christian Academy’s homeschooled program out of Bloomington, Illinois. She was born and raised in Yuma, Arizona until the end of her third grade year, at which time her family made the move to their current home in Stephenville, Texas. Before becoming homeschooled she attended public school in Stephenville until the end of her freshman year, which gave her the opportunity to participate in the FFA and some other UIL competitions. While in FFA, she qualified to the state level on the quiz team as well as the chapter conducting team, which really helped her improve her public speaking skills, which she now uses fulfilling her elected position of THSRA State President. Besides staying busy with school, she has dedicated many hours to practicing and competing at rodeos across the state. Some of her rodeo accomplishments include winning the Region 3 youth pole bending title her 5th grade year, Region 3 Jr. High Girls breakaway title her 8th grade year, Region 3 Sr. Girls breakaway title her junior year, winning second in the Charlie 1 Horse All-Girl team roping in 2014, as well as 2 All-Around saddles from different associations

44

CHEYENNE DURING HER SECOND ROUND RUN AT THE 2014 REGION 3 FINALS TO WIN SENIOR GIRLS YEAR -END BREAKAWAY TITLE

and numerous buckles. Cheyenne feels that to be successful in the rodeo arena, you not only have to have a great work ethic and the drive to be the best, but you need to have good athletes under you to compete with, and she feels blessed with some of the best horses out there. “The horses I’m currently competing on are Tequila, Dexter, Quicksie, Chewy, and Tejas,” says Cheyenne. Having multiple horses means that you will have unexpected bumps in the road when it comes to soundness. Over the past few years whenever one has been out of commission due to health issues Cheyenne says, “I’ve been fortunate enough to have such great friends who let me ride their horse while my mare has been crippled. I would really like to say a big thank you to the Bray’s for allowing me to get to heel on such a wonderful horse this season, which has allowed me to stay competitive and even improve in the team roping even without having my mare to ride.” Cheyenne believes that you have to work hard and be dedicated to improving your skills every day, which is why her motto in life is “Success occurs when opportunity meets preparation!” Another thing that she feels is very important is to have a great role models to look up to in life and follow in their footsteps. Her biggest heroes and role models are her parents. She says they have always been there for her and her brother and have always done whatever they could to make sure she had what she needed to succeed. “Another role model of mine is Jackie Crawford, not only because of her great successes in the rodeo arena, but also because of her positive attitude and wonderful personality on a daily basis. The first time I got to meet Jackie was at an Ultimate Calf Roping in Stephenville and Billie Bray introduced me to her before the roping started. Not once did she make me feel like I wasn’t, or couldn’t be as good as her, and she even made it a point to come talk to me before my runs to see what calves I had and see if I needed any help. The impression she made on me that day will stick with me forever, and remind me that no matter how much you have accomplished, or how great you are, you are still human and at some point, you started at the bottom, just like everybody else,” says Cheyenne. After she graduates high school, she plans to attend Weatherford Junior College where she will begin to get a degree in business and/or marketing, and join the college rodeo team. Congratulations Cheyenne on being Region III’s Whatakid!


www.getalittletwisted.com 45


CINCHJEANS.COM

46


SEE YOUR LOCAL KUBOTA DEALER FOR EXCITING OFFERS ON THESE PRODUCTS!

47


MEETING YOUR NEEDS AS THEY GROW Every moment of every day. From life-changing events to everyday miracles, we’re here to help you protect the people, places and things that matter most. For great rates and no-hassle service, contact us for a FREE 360 Review® today.

877.FARM.BUREAU TXFB-INS.COM

Coverage and discounts are subject to qualifications and policy terms, and may vary by situation. ©2015 Texas Farm Bureau Insurance Companies.

Profile for Texas High School Rodeo, Extreme Team News

February 2015 Extreme Team News, Texas High School and Junior High Rodeo's Official Newspaper  

The Equine Professionals Issue of the Extreme Team News, Texas High School and Junior High Rodeo's official newspaper. Find the best Equine...

February 2015 Extreme Team News, Texas High School and Junior High Rodeo's Official Newspaper  

The Equine Professionals Issue of the Extreme Team News, Texas High School and Junior High Rodeo's official newspaper. Find the best Equine...

Profile for 979202
Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded