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91 MAGAZINE

interiors / vintage / crafts

SEPTEMBER 2014


91 MAGAZINE IN PRINT!

The first ever print issue of 91 Magazine is now available! Inside the latest Mollie Makes Home bookazine you will find the first ever print issue of 91 Magazine! Our editor Caroline collaborated with the fabulous team at Mollie Makes to produce this inspiring package filled with gorgeous homes, craft projects and interviews with creative people. Get yours now at all good newsagents & supermarkets or online at www.myfavouritemagazines.co.uk for just ÂŁ7.99. More info on our blog: www.patchworkharmony.co.uk/blog


91 TEAM

Editor’s Letter Hi readers!

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Caroline Rowland

Editor & Art Director

Hannah Bishop

Sub Editor & Researcher

Pippa Blenkinsop

Editorial Assistant

charlotte hughes

Design Assistant

Gillian mackenzie Sub Editor

The last few months have been pretty eventful and very exciting here at no. 91! July saw the arrival of my baby daughter Ruby. She is an absolute doll and while parenthood has been a steep learning curve, it is just so special to wake up to her beautiful little face every morning! Even if we have been up half the night! August has brought one of the most exciting events in 91 Magazine’s history - our first ever print issue was published! As you can see on the previous page it was in collaboration with Mollie Makes which was an absolute honour. If you haven’t picked up a copy yet, it is still available in the shops, or you can order your copy online. Details can be found on our blog. But in the meantime, enjoy this - our latest issue, and don’t forget to tweet us and tell us what you think! Lots of Love,

Caroline x x x new venture award winner 2012

91 Magazine is a Patchwork Harmony publication. All content is copyright of 91 Magazine and its individual contributors. Images can be used only with a link back to www.91magazine.co.uk and where possible, the contributors website. Cover Photograph : Hege Morris

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contributors

JOANNA COPESTICK Lifestyle writer www.veryenglish.co.uk

NICOLA DAVIDSON

Illustrator www.papermoonillustration.com

SHEENA FLEET

Writer @homedesignetc

MICHELLE GRADY

Writer and blogger www.eclecticthreads.wordpress.com

Corinne Lee-Cooke Illustrator www.violetlakestudio.co.uk

JESS LONG

Designer / maker www.longstoryco.com

LEIGH METCALF

Blogger www.foundnowhome.blogspot.co.uk

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HEGE MORRIS

Blogger www.hegeinfrance.com

TERI MUNCEY KATY ORME

Designer & crafter www.thelovelydrawer.com

Interiors blogger and crafter www.apartmentapothecary.com

CELESTE NOCHE

Photographer www.celestenoche.com

KATHARINE PEACHEY

Photographer www.katharinepeachey.co.uk

ZOE PEARSON

HELEN RUFF

Writer and blogger www.conversationpieces.co.uk

Event manager and stylist www.doilydays.co.uk

SOPHIE WARREN-SMITH

Writer & stylist www.sophiewarrensmith.wordpress.com

JESSI WHITBY Freelance writer

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Contents Page 8

Page 54

91 News

Interiors: Once upon a time...

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Page 60

Shopping: Classy Kitsch

Page 12

Vintage Lovers Guide to Norwich

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Folksy Seller Spotlight: Red Hand Gang

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Style Notes... Collections

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History of Vintage: Wallpaper

Page 32 Interiors: A muted rainbow

Page 42

Designer Makes: Embroidered Liberty napkins

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Crafts: Spray it style

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Creative Business: Growing an independent business

Page 64

Vintage Days: Fair reviews in West Sussex, UK and Portland, USA

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Ladies Online: Kiran Ravilious


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Folksy Seller Spotlight: Red Hand Gang Interiors: A muted rainbow

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History of Vintage: Wallpaper

Designer Makes: Embroidered Liberty napkins Interiors: Once upon a time

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Crafts: Spray it style

Vintage Days: fair reviews

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NEWS

Rowan & Wren have three continuing collections: Refined Rural; ideal for the neutral palette, Distant Home; a well travelled look, and Timeless Living; past influences with a modern twist. New for autumn is their Pippin brass flower rack, £28, part of their Distant Home Collection. www.rowenandwren.co.uk

Our top picks of the latest, most stylish buys for your home this season By Sophie Warren Smith

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Who doesn’t love a pretty floral? We certainly do, and Cath Kidston’s new Clifton Rose print fits the bill. The design is available across their china range, such as these plates, (left) £28 for four, and in a variety of fabric sold by the metre. It also appears on tea towels, stationery, cute tins, bowls, cookware and clothing. www.cathkidston.com


SHOPPING

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St. Jude’s have teamed up with illustrator Mark Hearld to produce this delightful new Squirrel and Sunflower wallpaper. Mark took inspiration from Grinling Gibbons’ carvings that can be seen at St Paul’s Cathedral, Blenheim Palace and Hampton Court Palace, with their abundance of fruits, flowers and peapods. Seen here in Green Sedge, it also comes in Hazel Brown, Clay Bisque and Angus Red, £60 per 10m roll. www.stjudes.co.uk

Clarissa Hulse has launched two new bedlinen designs for this autumn. Inspired by wintry seas, Patchwork in Aqua (above), combines aqua, peacock and verdigris to create a light seaside feel with bursts of chartreuse to keep it fresh and modern. Patchwork in Plum with a palette of plums, greys, wines and grapes, is inspired by autumnal walls and childhood memories of blackberry picking. Prices start from £65 for a single duvet cover, £25 for a pair of pillowcases. The collections are available from John Lewis. www.johnlewis.com

Designer maker Mary Kilvert is from Somerset and her endearing illustrations perfectly encapsulate her surroundings. Known for her Colourful Sheep print - a flock of sheep in colourful coats, Mary has launched Pack of Proud Pooches - a variety of different dog breeds in her signature style that can be seen on cushions, mugs, trays, notebooks, cotton tote bags, giftwrap and cards. Cushions are priced at £45 each. www.marykilvert.com

Cox & Cox have long been one of our favourite online home stores. For autumn the current trend for copper runs through their range, in the form of antlers, bowls and pretty picture frames. We particularly love this stunning giant sized Tore floor lamp, priced at £175, it’s the perfect statement piece for a living room or bedroom. 9 www.coxandcox.co.uk


Classy Kitsch

Incorporate kitsch without losing your cool

Swan Vase, ÂŁ45, Rose & Grey


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Ceramic parrots, £15, The Other Duckling

Pineapple wall sconce, £99, Caravan

Framed picture, £15, The OK Corral Cat rug, £395, Caravan

Dog figurine, £12, The Other Duckling

Tray, £30, Winter’s Moon

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Joanna Copestick takes us on a tour through The Lanes district and beyond in the East Anglian city of Norwich. Illustrations by Corinne Lee-Cooke

Biddy’s Vintage Tearoom A delightful tea house and vintage emporium that is like stepping back in time to the 1940s. You’ll find two cafe spaces: one on the ground floor with comfy leather Chesterfield sofas, and a first floor tea room that doubles up as an events space for reading groups and tea parties. On the ground floor is a takeaway tea and cake counter, as well as an area where you can browse and buy vintage homewares and accessories.

www.biddystearoom.com- 15-15A Lower Goat Lane, Norwich, NR2 1EL

Goldfinches Ltd A Norwich vintage mainstay since 2010, Goldfinches is packed to the rafters with hand-picked vintage garments and accessories. Trawl through a whole wall display of retro handbags and enjoy a rifle through racks of stunning tea dresses, before finishing off with a rummage amid a fabulous collection of 1960s homewares and accessories.

www.goldfinchesvintage.co.uk 4 St Gregory’s Alley, Norwich, NR2 1ER 12


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Make Place Make Place was set up by the owners of a long-established local fabric shop. It offers sewing workshops and a regular craft market to showcase the work of local designer makers. Creative workshops include beginners’ sewing, knitting and embroidery skills through to advanced techniques.

www.makeplacenorwich.co.uk 33 Magda len Street, Norwich, NR3 1LQ

Looses Emporium It’s easy to pass a pleasant hour or more rummaging through the vast emporium that is Looses. You’ll come across a truly eclectic mix of vintage, antique, retro and modern furniture set over two large floors. Look out for stacks of kitchenalia, clothing and collectables, as well as acres of furniture, china and glassware – all at reasonable prices. Best to set aside a good chunk of browsing time for this one.

www.loosesemporium.co.uk 23-25 Magdalen Street, Norwich, NR3 1LP

The Granary The Granary - despite its Grade II listed building that boasts exposed brick, reclaimed fireplaces and historic oak beams – is today a haven for smart contemporary furniture and accessories. Spread over two floors are European designer brands such as Marimekko from Finland, Ferm Living from Denmark, and Natuzzi from Italy. There is also a good selection of fabrics, Nancy and Betty stationery, and clean-lined glassware from LSA and Iittala.

www.jarrold.co.uk/our-stores/the-granary 5 Bedford Street, Norwich, NR2 1AL

Lisa Angel In the thriving area of The Lanes, Lisa Angel’s shop window overflows with vintage typewriters and colourful scarves. Inside she stocks jewellery (and a wide range of jewellery storage), vintage style homewares and accessories, animal cushions, and stationery. Well worth a look.

www.lisaangel.co.uk- 3 Lower Goat Lane, Norwich, NR2 1EL 13


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loves.... jasmine white pom pom galore

warm pixie Finest Imaginary

melody rose

Nicolarius


CREATIVE BUSINESS

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seller spotlight

Red Hand Gang Interview by Pippa Blenkinsop

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his issue we are shining the spotlight on the pretty and playful children’s brand Red Hand Gang. Bursting with fun and colour, Red Hand Gang’s wares are loved by kids and adults alike and are far too stylish to be tidied away in the toy box. We chatted to creator and mum of two, Abi Simmons, whose kitchen table is no longer just the heart of the household, but the headquarters of a kids’ design emporium!


Tell us a bit about yourself. My name is Abi, I live in a 1930s house in Oxford with my two girls and their dad. From here I run my little company, Red Hand Gang, designing and making kids’ gifts and accessories from the comfort of my kitchen table. What led you to start your own online business? It all began when my eldest was about three. She started drawing a lot, so I made her some sketchbooks that she could draw in and I could keep. Then I made a few for friends’ kids and it occurred to me that I might be able to make something of this if I opened an online shop. It was a great decision for me, as I have been able to grow the business on my own terms and stay at home with my girls.

Is there a story behind the name Red Hand Gang? I wanted my business to have a memorable yet personal name, so I revisited my childhood. I feel very lucky to have grown up in the 70s and 80s. Life was so simple: no phones, no social media – just hanging out with my brother and sister and our mates! The TV show that encapsulated all of that for me was The Red Hand Gang. It makes me smile, and that’s what I want my products to do, so it had to be Red Hand Gang! Why did you choose to specialise in children’s products and what is it you enjoy about designing for kids? Designing kids’ stuff was definitely driven by my girls; most of the products started life as presents for them and then were adapted into products I could sell. Kids


CREATIVE BUSINESS

are a tough crowd – they either love stuff or they don’t! The same goes for parents too! I love being able to make products that both kids and parents appreciate. How do you see through their eyes? I am not sure I do to be honest. I know what my girls like, but my designs are adjusted to suit my taste too. I can’t cope with living in a sea of pink fairies and unicorns! Sorry girls! Where do you draw your inspiration? Oh wow! There is so much amazing design everywhere; it can be a bit overwhelming - I can easily get lost in Pinterest! I love Japanese product and packaging design, Yoshitomo Nara, vintage Galt puzzles, 50s illustration, Scandinavian style - the list could go on.

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Talk us through a typical day for you. At the moment my day is all about the school run – three trips a day to be exact. When the girls are both at school there is always a post office trip, then home for a cuppa, maybe a quick look on Instagram. Basically I try and do all the jobs I can’t do in the evening, such as sanding and going to the wood merchant. The evenings are when I do most of my work. Painting, packaging, emails and paperwork are all done when the girls are in bed. Tell us about your creative space. At the moment it is definitely a shared space. I work at the kitchen table, which means I have to be very organised with my tools, paints and varnishes. Everything is to hand but hidden away (kind of). I get to flit between work,

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"Love what you make. If you are going to work silly hours and make the same product over and over you have to enjoy it"


CREATIVE BUSINESS

the computer, the kitchen and the telly! I love it, even if the distractions mean I have to work really late! Why do you like selling through Folksy? I think it is really important to support small businesses in the UK. Cottage industries are rarely recognised for their contribution to business and society, but the Folksy team are really passionate about the tiny independents out there. They work really hard to champion us and support us. I really enjoy being part of that community. All this makes me feel much better about spending my earnings on pretty things from other Folksy shops! What’s the best advice you were

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given when starting out? Love what you make. If you are going to work silly hours and make the same product over and over you have to enjoy it, or it is going to become a chore very quickly. What’s in store for Red Hand Gang? I am trying to be patient. I have one year left before my little one goes to school full time and I don’t want to wish it away. But, when that time comes, I will have more time than I could ever have imagined – I will work all day, not all night! I’m hoping to design new ranges of hangers, new plywood toys, make more cushions, and will perhaps be able to supply hangers to all the shops abroad that want them – that would be amazing.

Visit Red Hang Gang’s Folksy shop


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ADVERTISING

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loves.... The Wise House

Love Like Red pygmy cloud

LOLLY AND BOO

heart vintage


INTERIORS

Style notes... on collecting & displaying

Lovers of vintage and bric-a-brac are quite often collectors, but how do you arrange your beloved items to create striking vignettes and displays? Leigh Metcalf shares some tips on styling your cherished collections.

A variety of ceramic jugs in complementary colours make for a pretty display Image: . GAP Interiors/House & Leisure

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N ever stop to think, ‘do I have a place for this?’” says Mary Randolph Carter in A Perfectly Kept House is the Sign of a Misspent Life. The thrill of the hunt often takes hold of the collector in all of us. If you have a passion for one treasured decorative item in your home, it’s likely you have quite a few of them. Why stop at one when you can have many? And by doing so create and display a beautiful collection. Not only do collections bring order to a space, they make a visual impact as well as provide an insight into your personal style and interests. A wall of family photos in a hallway, for example, draws attention and catches the eye, but also lets visitors know

family is something you hold dear. Much of what makes a house a home are our possessions: the pieces of art, flea market bric-a-brac, and store bought pieces all say something about who we are. Collections can tell a story of our personal history or hobbies, or simply reveal our favourite colour. Collections are generally most effective when grouped by theme or colour. The theme can be anything you love, or something that just takes your fancy: flowers, portraits, mirrors, taxidermy, sea life and sporting memorabilia are just a few possible themes for collections. A grouping of floral paintings or portraits together on one

ABOVE: A collection of colourful china displayed in a relaxed manner. (china available from Oliver Bonas) RIGHT: A collection of vintage scissors hangs on the wall of designer Lotta Jansdotter’s studio. Photo by Jenny Hallengren. 22


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Collections don’t have to be costly. Found items such as feathers can make a simple and striking display. Image from Gypsy by Sibella Court (Hardie Grant, £26.99) Photography: Chris Court


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Jeska from Lobster & Swan has grouped together these colourful paper lanterns to brighten up the corner of a room.

wall can give a cosy salon effect in a lounge, while a cluster of sporting memorabilia – such as vintage trophies on a shelf in a child’s room – can bring a sense of order to an often untidy space. If a room in your home is dark or small, hanging an assortment of framed mirrors is a great way to bring in light and create the illusion of additional space. As well as subject matter, another effective way to arrange a collection is by colour. You can easily weave together unlike items when this is the common thread. A workspace, for example, topped with a planter, lamp, artwork and various office supplies, achieves visual harmony when all the

items are in the same hue. Similarly, a group of items on a kitchen shelf: vintage food tins, tea cups, vases, linens, cookbooks and a few framed prints one particular shade make for a striking display. Rooms that often have small bits here and there – like craft or hobby rooms – can quickly look cluttered, but stacking fabric and arranging spools and yarns according to colour will help bring order to your creative space. If you’d like to start a collection, but don’t know where to begin, the best place might actually be in your own cupboards. Repurposing things you already have is not only functional, but is a budget-friendly way to make a statement display. and can be equally 25


functional. Simply using items in a new way can create impact. Try using salt and pepper shakers, decanters or jam jars as vases, or teapots, tea cups and emptied food cans with attractive labels as planters. Displaying your jewellery is another way to breathe life into a dull corner of a room using something beautiful that you already have. Old frames strung with wire or twigs make eye-catching displays for jewellery in a bedroom or bathroom.

your pieces and opt for varied styles of objects for an eclectic look. Don’t forget to consider negative space, too. Sometimes a collection looks great clustered together; other times it looks best when items are spaced apart. You might find your collection needs that one special piece to tie it all together. Keep your eyes peeled at charity shops, car boot sales and flea markets as these will likely be the best places to source a unique gem. If you see something you love but are not sure how it will fit in at the time, if your budget allows, buy it The art of display takes time and is usually achieved after multiple attempts anyway. That one special piece, after all, could simply be the start of a new at arranging your collections. Play collection! with different heights and levels of

These pretty hanging frames (Cox and Cox ÂŁ25) offer a more ordered way for displaying found items.

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Advertise

your small business or blog in the next issue of

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Prices from just ÂŁ20 www.91magazine.co.uk


History of Vintage

walls of nostalgia Leigh Metcalf peels back the layers on the history of wallpaper and discovers why those vintage designs are still so desirable today


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tumbling upon a warehouse filled with wallpaper was what started Charlene Bergbower’s prolific collection and eventual business selling vintage wallpaper. “It’s the nostalgia of remembering the wallpaper my Grandma had in her kitchen, and wanting to help my customers replicate that era in their own homes”. Stephanie Smith, owner of Spinster’s Emporium says “I often gets customers who recognise a vintage wallpaper I’m selling from their childhood. They automatically start to tell me about where it was, what the furniture looked

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like, what they were wearing, what the dog was doing!” It’s no surprise that wallpaper instills nostalgia in us. Domestic historian, Lesley Hoskins editor of The Papered Wall, points out, “it’s the social aspect of wallpaper that can reveal so much of our history.” As early as prehistoric times, people have been adorning their walls with art. Whether it was intended for communication or decoration is uncertain, nonetheless evidence shows that people created art on walls at least 40,000 years ago. But it wasn’t until the end of the 15th century that wallpaper first made its appearance.

LEFT: a papered wall in the home of Tif Fussell AKA Dottie Angel / ABOVE: Nina van de Goor’s studio

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Wallpaper as we know it today began as individual decorative sheets of paper, which were used to cover household items such as boxes or to line drawers. When lined up together, the patterned papers often repeated. People began piecing the papers together to cover larger surfaces: wallpaper was born. From the 16th to the 17th century,

wallpaper often took inspiration from textiles and ranged from wood grain effects, to floral motifs, and religious scenes. Most commonly produced by a woodblock printing method, wooden rollers were carved by hand and needed to repeat seamlessly. “Wallpaper with multiple colours, required its own carved wooden roller per colour, creating a depth of pattern

Vintage wallpapers from Rosie’s Vintage Wallpaper 30


INTERIORS

and a hand-painted look that cannot be recreated with today’s digital processes” explains avid wallpaper collector, Marilyn Krehbiel. Another method which created a similar effect was stenciling, where certain design features were highlighted in various colours over a block printed base. Flock wallpaper, which has a raised wool texture and designed to imitate silk damask fabric and hand-painted Chinese wallpapers were some of most popular styles in the 18th century. The skill required to make these papers meant they weren’t for the masses but for the aristocracy. Towards the latter part of the century and into the early 19th century, wallpaper became no longer just an upperclass luxury. In fact manufacturing made a giant leap at the end of the 18th century as wallpaper began being printed in multiple colours on continuous rolls, bringing affordable prints and styles to the middle and lower classes. In the 19th century, designs such as simple geometric and floral motifs by Pugin, and the nature-inspired designs by William Morris were favoured and wallpaper’s popularity continued into the 20th century until the ‘80s and ‘90s when wallpaper fell victim to the trend for paint and its numerous colours and ranges. However, interest in wallpaper has resurged in the last decade, and in

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many respects has come full circle with renewed interest in taking a handmade approach. Designs from the likes of designer Claire Coles who embroiderers wallpapers and Abigail Borg who hand paints original wallpaper designs prove popular. The current DIY movement also encourages creativity and resourcefulness. Not only are wallpapers making an appearance on walls, but on all manner of household surfaces. Decoupaging with pretty papers is a simple, effective way to breathe new life into something old. It is equally a great way to use leftover scrap wallpaper too. As Lauren Smith and Derek Fagerstrom (authors of Wallpaper Projects) point out, “with a bit of crafty ingenuity you can beautifully accent different areas in your home, create personalised stationery and accessories, revamp tired pieces of furniture, create frameworthy works of art, and make one-ofa-kind gifts.” For those keen to give their walls and craft projects a timely touch, check out these online stores stocking vintage wallpapers such as Hannah’s Treasures, Rosie’s Vintage Wallpaper, and Spinster’s Emporium. What’s more, some companies now offer reproductions of vintage prints, such as Graham and Brown’s wonderful V&A archive collection. Surrounded by surfaces covered in a sea of print and pattern, it won’t be long before you’ll be feeling right at home with wallpaper.

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a muted rainbow Norwegian blogger Inger Lill Skagen fills her home with colour in a subtle and considered way that creates a calming yet fun and quirky space

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Words and photography by Hege Morris

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hen teacher and blogger Inger Lill Skagen and her family lost out on the home of their dreams, it took her a long time to recover. Convinced she would never find the perfect home again, she reluctantly continued her search. But when they viewed their current home, she laid eyes on its sliding doors – something she had always wanted, and it was instant love. All was forgotten. The wooden house she shares with husband and two sons aged 11 and 12, is from the 1930s

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and located just a 5 minute walk from the town centre of Sandefjord, Norway – a stone’s throw away from where she grew up. Over the years the home has been transformed many times but today it is fresh and eclectic. The space benefits from high ceilings, original features and lots of natural light, which Inger Lill has enhanced by painting both the floor and walls bright white. Yet despite its plain stark canvas the interior is warm and welcoming. Inger


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Lill has cleverly accessorised the plain backdrop by furnishing the home with a carefully selected assortment of car boot sale finds mixed with antique furniture and contemporary designer pieces. The grey Hay chair at the head of the dining table fits perfectly next to an old industrial stool, whilst contemporary cushions from Hay and Ferm Living are mixed with her own homemade textiles. One particular theme running throughout the home is a love for typography, pattern and graphic shapes. For fear of making

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the space appear too sweet, Inger Lill has incorporated large letters and numbers to give it a more masculine feel. Adding to this graphic style are numerous educational wall charts, which can be found in almost every room – even outside! It was clear Inger Lill would grow to be passionate about interior design from an early age, when she once decided to paint her parent’s kitchen while they were out for a few hours! She found some paint in the garage and got to

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work. When her parents came home and discovered they now had a brown kitchen they just accepted it and didn’t make a fuss. It stayed like this for many years!

range of furniture and can fit up to 30 people. With original fireplaces in both the dining room and living room, it’s both a great entertaining space, as well as a cosy family home.

As well as brimming with style and character, the Skagen family home is perfectly suited to their lifestyle. In the dining room, a large table is the centerpiece for dinner parties, and they have a TV and games room in the basement that is great for the boys and their friends, and is used by the whole family in the evenings. There is also a large covered area outside which again houses an eclectic

Upstairs accommodates three bedrooms, a home office and the bathroom. Inger Lill wanted her bedroom to be a peaceful retreat, so has given the room a calming muted scheme. One of the room’s statement pieces – an old dresser – was found at a car boot sale for just £5. It only had three legs, so most buyers were dismissing it, but Inger Lill’s husband investigated more closely: there inside


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one of the drawers was the missing leg! They bought the dresser, fitted the leg and painted it, proving that bargains are out there to be had if you’re willing to put in a little work. Other rescued items include an old filing cabinet from a school where Inger Lill once worked. It was getting thrown out, but she could see its potential and asked if she could have it. It now sits proudly in their upstairs hallway.

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As well as breathing new life into big pieces of furniture, Inger Lill loves to focus on the smaller details – whether it’s a free postcard picked up at a café, some vintage photos, or the original Kay Bojesen wooden figures they inherited from her father-in-law. Inger Lill recalls how she was both shocked and overjoyed to receive such a special gift, which, along with a collection of other precious keepsakes, are now on permanent display.


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Colour too plays an important part in Inger Lill’s style, with similar hues used throughout the home, but in a number of different ways. It might be a book, a cushion, a strip of washi tape holding up a print, or a simple scarf thrown over a chair, but all are carefully chosen to complement each other. However one colour you will never find in her home is yellow – she hates it!

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It’s not possible to create a home like this in a hurry; it takes time to amass such an intriguing collection of artifacts. But with a mixture of styles, old treasures and designer pieces you can achieve a similar look. You simply need to be comfortable with your choices and select colours you love. Make your interior personal, as Inger Lill has done, and use your space to reflect who you are.

Inger Lill’s started blogging in 2008. The title for the blog came from her grandmother’s name, Kaspara, combined with Inger Lill’s love of colour - Kaspara’s Regnbue - which means Kaspara’s Rainbow. The blog is well known both in Norway and internationally. www.kasparasregnbue.blogspot.com


Designer Makes... Embroidered Liberty napkins

` by Katy Orme

Photos by Katharine Peachey


CRAFTS

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ive a vintage touch to plain napkins by adding an embroidered floral motif and pretty Liberty prints. These napkins may be the only thing that get more attention than the cakes at a wondrous vintage tea party!


CRAFTS

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What you’ll need: • A set of four plain napkins OR 40cm x 40cm pieces of white cotton fabric for each napkin (or even an old cotton bed sheet) • Four pieces of Tana Lawn Liberty print of an equal size to your napkins/white cotton • Embroidery hoop, needle and floss in a variety of colours • Sewing machine and thread • Fabric scissors and pins • Pencil

Step 1

If you are recycling old napkins, then press well and use fabric scissors to cut four matching pieces of Liberty print fabric - these will form the back of each napkin. If you are using white cotton, cut pieces of this and your Liberty fabric to approx. 40cm x 40cm. Get creative! Find inspiration from your favourite flower or floral fabric to help design a floral motif for each napkin. Draw your embroidery design with pencil onto the left hand corner of each piece of white cotton, or wherever you would like to sew it. You can do a different design on each napkin or the same in different colours.

Step 2

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Step 3

Decide which embroidery stitch best suits the petals and leaves of each flower. If you are unsure about embroidery stitches, try watching video tutorials online. It’s much easier than it looks, I promise! I used ‘French Knots’ for the petals of this design and a ‘Lazy Daisy’ stitch for the leaves. I took inspiration from one of my favourite flowers, the Hydrangea, so used a variety of faded blues.

Step 4

Step 5

Once you have completed your design, pin the white cotton fabric and Liberty fabric right sides together.

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Sew the two pieces of fabric together leaving a 5cm gap open on one side so you can turn it inside out. Turn inside out and press the napkin well.

Finally, using a contrasting thread, top stitch around all four sides of the napkin, ensuring to sew up the 5cm gap.


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Spray it Style Long gone are the days when spray paint was assigned only to the street artist. Today these versatile cans of colour are used increasingly for creating statement pieces for the home, whether it’s revamping large pieces of furniture, or simply updating a junk shop vase. We share three simple ways to use this much loved medium for a stylish table setting. Projects, styling and photography by Teri Muncey


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what you need: • Sturdy white cotton measuring the length of your table • Plasti-kote spray paint in gloss smoke infusion • Masking tape • Pencil • Scissors • Ruler • White thread • A sewing machine (optional) • Iron

patterned table runner instructions 1. Cut the white fabric to your preferred length and width dependent on your table size. 2. To hem the table runner, fold down both longer sides and pin. 3. Thread your sewing machine with the white thread and follow the pins with a straight stitch down both lengths, removing each pin as you go. Once sewn, trim the excess fabric. 4. Pin and sew the shorter edges in the same way. 5. Iron any creases and press the edges to ensure they’re nice and crisp. 49


6. Spread the length of fabric on a flat surface and start marking out your pattern with masking tape. Our design is 3 lines of tape with 4 inches between them. Then leave a gap of 6 inches and repeat again and again. Press the tape down firmly, smoothing it out. 7. Mark out the arrow head shapes with the tape within the 4 inch gaps. Use faint pencil dots to mark evenly. You can fill in some of the arrow head shapes in with tape and leave some as an outline. Make sure the tape completely overlaps where it should, leaving no unwanted gaps. 8. In a well-ventilated area – such as a garage with the door open (outside may be too windy) – lay down old sheets, plastic or paper to protect the surface or floor. 9. Shake your spray paint thoroughly and apply all over, remembering that several thin coats are better than one very heavy one. When you’ve achieved an even colour, leave your fabric to dry. 10. Finally, peel off the tape to reveal your pattern. If you need to iron the table runner then make sure you iron on the reverse.


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Textured Vases

what you need: • Drinking glasses in different shapes • Glass outliner paint (try Pebeo Cerne relief outliner) • Plasti-kote spray paint in gloss white ral

instructions 1. Start by washing and drying your glasses. 2. Paint on a pattern with the glass outliner. It doesn’t need to be complicated but make sure it is made up of dots and dashes. Apply enough so that each dot sits out in relief from the glass. Try not to smudge it by standing the glass on a table rather than holding it. Leave to dry overnight. 3. It’s important to use a gloss spray paint for this project. In a ventilated area - and on top of protective sheets such as plastic or paper - spray a few thin coats of paint covering all areas of the glasses except the inside. Leave to dry. 51


Pear Place Names what you need: • Pears (one per place) • Belton Molotow Premium spray paint in melon yellow, piglet pink light, telemagenta, riviera pastel • Patterned leaf download • Glue or double sided tape • Paper and printer • Scissors • White paint • Fine paintbrush • Knife

instructions 1. Use the knife to slice the bottoms off the pears – this will ensure they stay upright. Leave lying on their sides to allow the bottoms to dry out. 2. In a ventilated area, with surfaces protected, spray thin, even coats all over the pears. Leave to dry. 3. Once dry you can paint the names on each pear with the white paint. Allow to dry.

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4. Meanwhile, download and print the patterned leaves. Cut each one out. 5. Fold each double-sided leaf in half and put a thin layer of glue or doublesided tape on the reverse. Wrap around the pear stalks and press together, making sure the edges line up.

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INTERIORS

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Words: Zoë Pearson Photos: Jess Long

Once upon a time... … a girl named Jess and a boy named Jonny lived in a colourful converted Victorian school building in Leeds. Here we share the story of their happily ever after home

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e’ll start this tale inside a flat, inside part of an old school building, not so far, far away. With wooden floors, large windows and exposed brick walls; a swoon-worthy colour palette of cheesecake lime, strawberry milkshake pink and lemon sorbet yellow, and

a good measure of marvellous midcentury finds, it’s picture book perfect. Here, live and work Jess and Jonny… and a whole lot of potted friends. (Yes, some stories have seven dwarfs, this one has a plethora of succulents as Jess and Jonny’s tiny companions.) Jess 55


is a visual merchandiser and runs the adorable Long Story Co, while Jonny is a freelance designer, illustrator and artist. (The succulents are undecided as to their future careers.) If you’ve not discovered Long Story Co yet, prepare to go weak at the knees for their paper, textile and hand printed goods, including gorgeous illustrative prints and sailor plush toys. The couple met and fell in love seven and half years ago at art college, then five years later, they fell in love all over again – this time with their current home. Only 15 minutes from the centre of Leeds, it’s a homely, bright space that they knew was ‘the one’ as soon as they stepped through the door, and with its high ceilings, exposed red brick,

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and those large windows that let light spill into their home, it’s easy to see why. The flat, of course, had to be more than a home – it had to function as a work space too. So, they’ve cleverly split their place in two, so that the main living area is downstairs and their studio is upstairs on a mezzanine floor overlooking the main space. When they first moved into the flat, Jess confesses that they could barely afford rent, so everything was done on a budget. But while money may not have been in abundance, creativity certainly was, so they went hunting for pieces to furnish their home. Luckily, there are some great places around their local


INTERIORS

area to pick up cheap retro furniture. Good old eBay came in handy too. Glancing around their home you can spot many of the treasures they’ve found, from the 70s sugar and flour shakers and red enamel coffee pots, to floral Meakin jugs and a green Anglepoise. Then there are the things that they’ve customised – like the wooden crate shelf, with its perfectly painted pink interior, and the marshmallow blue dining table with yellow and pink chairs. One of Jess’s most prized possessions and finds is her bedroom dressing table. Now happily nestled in the corner of their bedroom under a vintage Union Jack flag, they found the table online at a local junkyard for £20. (Yes, really!) Once they got the table home, they gave it a good clean, a lick of paint, and then the finishing touch – they covered the doors with some vintage wallpaper that Jess had lying around. Along with her envy inducing dressing table, Jess’s other favourite piece is her sunshine yellow kitchen dresser which, as well as being a thing of beauty, is also extremely practical. Not only is it perfect for hiding away those unsightly but essential items, but it has painted chalkboard sides – a great spot for shopping lists and doodles! Jess finds it quite difficult to define the style of their home: “it’s like a bit of a

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INTERIORS

patchwork of possessions, keepsakes and treasured finds… I guess it’s a mixture of retro, midcentury modern with a dash of scandi style. We didn’t need to do much because it already had such wonderful features.” And that’s exactly why it’s so easy to fall in love with: it’s homely and stylish, cosy and cool, dreamy and practical, all rolled into one.

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For now, we leave Jess in her creative space, busily designing something beautiful, telling us: “The best days are spent with our windows wide open, the radio on and we’ll be printing away in our studio upstairs.” Sounds like the perfect way to spend happily ever after…

www.longstoryco.com 59


CREATIVE BUSINESS

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GROWING AN INDEPENDENT BUSINESS For many independent designers, getting their products into the right shop windows is a sign they’ve truly made it. Yet it can be a game-changer, affecting everything from the manufacturing to the design process. Three designer-makers offer advice on staying true to your small brand’s identity as it grows and evolves. WORDS: MICHELLE GRADY / ILLUSTRATIONS: NICOLA DAVIDSON

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very designer has a vision for their brand and for some, this can include eventually selling their products through large retailers. Seeing your own designs on the shelves next to those from well-known names is a pinchme moment, but the road to retailers isn’t always a smooth one, and there are a whole host of factors to consider before you take the plunge. Getting your pricing spot on is imperative, and the more your business grows, the more complicated this can be. If you’re looking to sell your products to retailers, you’ll need to work out your wholesale and retail price, which can be something of a shock to the system if you’ve only sold through your own website or smaller shops. Gillian Kyle (www.gilliankyle.com), whose eponymous label is stocked in John Lewis and Liberty, says, ‘I was

completely stumped trying to set prices for my first trade fair. A lot of things were still printed by me, and selling them at trade price seemed pretty horrific.’ Before you approach retailers or go to trade shows, it’s worth getting in touch with other designers, as Camilla Westergaard, homeware designer and founder of Butterscotch & Beesting (www.butterscotchandbeesting. com), did before her first show. She says: ‘Friends who are designers were kind enough to share their tips. Even so, I wasn’t totally prepared, as I had been working on a mark-up of 2 and I soon discovered that almost all the retailers were only interested if their mark-up was 2.4. I also learned I needed an RRP as well as a wholesale price.’ There is also the issue of cash flow; receiving your first substantial order is an exciting milestone, but you may not get a return on your initial outlay for some time. Add to this the possible 61


extra costs involved in fulfilling large orders, and you might find yourself in a sticky spot. Gillian admits, ‘Retailers are often a little oblivious to the challenges small businesses face. They sometimes have strict policies for labelling, packaging and delivery which can add massive costs and endless admin, and often they want to negotiate discounts and may take 90 days to pay.’ Margarita Lorenzo, founder of Chocolate Creative (www. chocolatecreative.co.uk), suggests enlisting the help of investors: ‘A lot of small businesses have benefited from external investors, as capital is essential for growth. Any business can grow with the appropriate investment, but that may also mean losing part of the control you have over your brand.’ For those who don’t want to go down the investor route, Camilla, who still makes almost all of her pieces by hand, offers this advice: ‘Be very clear with your lead

Seeing your own designs on the shelves next to those from well-known names is a pinch-me moment.

times. I also had backup plans in place – I researched companies who could make my cushions as well as print and fire large batches of ceramics. I made sure my prices would cover those extra expenses too.’ Of course, outsourcing production brings its own challenges. Camilla continues, ‘I’ve heard of instances where designers have had so many orders that the quality of their products has suffered, and they’ve felt their brand has been damaged. I’ve also spoken to designers who have been let down by their new suppliers and lost orders.’ She is, however, open to the idea of adapting her manufacturing process: ‘I’m thinking of splitting my work into two ranges: one that I’ve designed – but is made out-of-house – and the other featuring textiles and ceramics made by me.’ With so many practicalities to think about, it can be hard to keep in mind why you started your business in the first place: your love of designing and creating. This can feel like a catch-22 situation – to continue to grow your brand you need time to be creative, but you also need to devote a big chunk of your week to running the business. Gillian has


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your work becomes more well-known, the risk of being copied increases.’ She advises staying one step ahead by continuing to come up with new things: ‘The copyright issues regarding designs and creative work are very complex. I believe part of my job as a designer is to move on and come up with the next However, it’s not all bad news – as their idea.’ brands have grown, Camilla, Gillian So, can an independent business to get and Margarita have all retained too big? Gillian puts it perfectly: ‘It full creative control and still do the very much depends on the nature of the designing themselves. Gillian offers individual business. If you started out her explanation: ‘I’ve always felt the as an artisan crafter and that is part need to create designs that I feel of the identity of your brand, there is really proud of, more than things that probably a certain point beyond which are commercial. I think that’s a good philosophy and hopefully a strategy for it’s very difficult to go without losing all longterm success.’ What’s more, they’ve that you hold dear.’ The key, she says, yet to come across any copyright issues, is deciding whether your business is scalable; whether, despite the changes though Camilla says she knows people that growing your brand might bring, who have had their ideas stolen. you’ll still be able to produce designs Margarita points out the downside of that are true to your vision. increasing your brand’s exposure: ‘As found it hard to combine these two aspects: ‘Both could easily be fulltime jobs. I try to spend chunks of time doing one or the other so I can really focus. It’s hard to be creative when you’re preoccupied with payments or negotiations with a supplier!’

S P I T TOP

1. Do your RESEARCH and know your pricing limits. Make sure you study the market and, as Camilla advises, find your pricing ‘sweet spot’. 2. Consider NEW WAYS OF MANUFACTURING your products, but remember maintaining quality as well as quantity is key. 3. Make time to BE CREATIVE. Your design skills are what attracted retailers and customers to your brand in the first place. 4. Never lose sight of your brand’s IDENTITY. Stay loyal to your initial ideas. 5. Consider what a RETAILER can do for you and weigh up whether it’s worth the extra time and investment.

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vintage days

91 Magazine gets out of the office to check out some of the best handmade and vintage events happening around the country - and for a spot of shopping too of course!


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Johnny Loves June Vintage Fair WHEN: 10 May 2014 WHERE: The Shoreham Centre, Shoreham, West Sussex Website: www.johnnylovesjune.co.uk

Review by HELEN RUFF / Photos by Clare Ozkan

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’ve been attending the Johnny Loves June vintage fairs since their first event in a small church hall a couple of years ago. They’ve come a long way since then. Organiser, Faye Spiller, is now a well respected player on the vintage scene and has recently taken over the local franchise for The Vintage Directory. On my most recent visit I immediately got into the mood when greeted by a lovely lady dressed in a 1950s tea dress with her hair in victory rolls and shiny red lips, and by the jaunty tunes courtesy of The Vintage Music Company. Entry is £1 – a small price to pay for what they have in store: a vintage tearoom, approximately 40 traders, hair and make-up stalls and a programme of entertainment. These fairs seem to attract those people who live and breathe vintage on a daily basis - the true vintage aficionados – I love spotting the teddy boys with their quiffs quaffing a brew in the tearoom!

Perusing the stalls, I listened to Amy Baker’s dulcet tones as she purred into the microphone on stage. I browsed authentic vintage and reproduction clothing including swimsuits from Quirky Turtle and some fantastic wiggle dresses from Emma Gregory. A huge fan of retro style soft furnishings, I fell in love with a cushion made from 1960s fabric by Point to the Window. I also spied a small Paddington Bear cushion, beautifully made and so nostalgic of my childhood. Later on, Curtis Skinner took to the stage, romancing shoppers with some smooth Sinatra numbers. I could have listened to him all day while marvelling at more vintage delights and quirky finds - cacti planted in dolls heads from Bella Does Brighton were a highlight. These fairs are not just about shopping, it is a true ‘step back in time’ moment that is sure to ignite all of your vintage senses!

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PORTLAND FLEA WHEN: 18 May 2014 WHERE: 525 SE PINE STREET PORTLAND, OR 97214 Website: www.pdxflea.com

Review by jessi whitby / Photos by Celeste noche

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hen asked about the the motivation behind the Portland Flea, founder Kate Sullivan energetically replies, “getting to know people in Portland; getting to know people who are doing cool things in the area.�

back home to Portland a few years ago, she quickly created here what she felt was missing from the vintage scene. Now two years old, the event boasts around two-dozen vendors who gather on the last Sunday of every month at Union Pine. This converted warehouse space with its soaring light-filled wood interiors is the perfect Pacific Northwest backdrop for this unique local market.

Kate spent some time living in London and fell in love with the bustling vintage and antique market in Camden Passage, Islington. So when Kate moved Inside, shoppers enjoy live music,

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refreshments, and the unofficial mascot of the flea, a sweet Corgi dog named Millie. Outside, booths and local food trucks line the streets, while a steady stream of shoppers browse and chat with sellers about their wares. Booth partners Jillian Punska and Kym Condron’s outdoor stall specialises in natural fibres and colours, stoneware, and dreamy vintage clothing pieces that comprise what they call an “earthy art teacher vibe”.

from salvaged materials. Sellers are carefully curated, and those who are chosen are grateful that limited space promotes quality. “There’s something about it not being able to get too big at this location that’s great,” says bookseller Rachelle Markley. Rachelle also has an online shop, but relishes the opportunities of talking to customers in person, making recommendations and community connections that face to face selling allows.

Imaginatively reused and lovingly restored items with a storied past abound at the flea. In fact, the general guidelines for vintage items up for sale are that they can’t be less than 20 years old, and handmade goods need to be repurposed or made

Portland Flea recently launched a second location in the St. Johns neighbourhood of Portland, and will soon expand to a third spot, each open on different dates. At this rate, it won’t be long until treasure hunters have a flea to visit every weekend! 67


j Kiran Ravilious


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Ladies Online Kiran Ravilious designs graphic, nature inspired textiles and homewares. We find out more about how she finds selling online Interview by Sheena Fleet

When did you decide to become a designer? As a child, I used to draw a lot. I loved doodling (I still do, all my bits of paper – invoices, receipts etc. – have little doodles all over them), and I even got into trouble at school for drawing all over my text books. My Dad used to draw with me all the time; I remember he once drew a beautiful tree on my school folio and we coloured it in together. This is how it developed for me. After my GCSEs in Singapore, I went to art college and university, and specialised in graphic design.

hand printing on fabric, and it evolved over the years to become something more serious. I’ve always been interested in printmaking; I tried it at art college and really liked the results. About five years ago, I picked up a book on hand printing and decided to try printing some cushions for our house. I liked it so much that I started to blog about it and people started asking if they could buy my designs! Last year, I produced a range of wallpapers and fabrics and that’s now the route I’ve taken with the business.

Where do you find your inspiration? From nature: the lines, the shapes, the What inspired you to set up your business? sizes, but mostly the simplicity of it. I’m For me, it started as an experiment with drawn to bold patterns, but also to

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those that have a subtle feel. I try and work my ideas into my designs, which aren’t specific plants or flowers, more a stylisation of them. What do you love most about what you do? I love designing the most. Coming up with new patterns and carving them is the best part for me. I don’t always get to do a lot of that because of all the other aspects of the business I have to deal with, like orders, emails, and printing - basically everything! I might hire an assistant this year so I get more time to do what I love most. You grew up in Singapore, what brought about your move to the UK? Life in Singapore wasn’t always as free as I would’ve liked it to be. In many ways, it was constraining to 70

a free-spirited person like myself who wanted to sit and draw all day. Instead, the focus at school was on the other ‘important’ subjects. However, getting into art college was my first step towards being able to express my creativity. Singapore is a beautiful place – the streets are lined with trees and flowering plants, and my designs are definitely influenced by my tropical upbringing. I used to spend time at the botanical gardens photographing the plants and always visit when I’m back. Soon after graduating, I decided to embark on an adventure: I packed my bags, said a painful goodbye to my family and friends, and boarded a 13 hour flight to the UK. Almost 11 years on, I’m still here and England is now my home. You’re part of a very creative family,


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has that inspired you? Yes, definitely, I’m very lucky. I knew nothing about the artists Eric and Tirzah Ravilious when I met my husband Ben, their grandson. I am quite often asked how Eric’s work has influenced me, but I think being part of the family, and all the support and encouragement they’ve given me, has been of more importance. How important is social media to your online business? I use Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest. I like the subtle approach of Twitter – it’s a good place to follow people of relevance to my work. It’s also a good place to promote my website and I occasionally post photos of my new designs, and if they are seen by the right people, that can lead to magazine features and other opportunities.

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What advice would you give to anyone considering setting up their own online business? I designed my website and my husband runs a web programming company, so they did the hard work of building and programming it – usually the most expensive part of setting up an online business. However, when I first started printing, I was selling on Etsy, which is a great place for start-ups. Good product photography (something I still need to master) definitely helps. The best piece of advice given to me was that people want to know who made, designed and created the things that are for sale, so an “About” page is essential. Then it’s just a case of telling people about it!

www.kiranravilious.com 71


Pattern design: Nicola Davidson / Papermoon Illustration

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91 Magazine - issue 10  

Home tours, how to display your collections and craft tutorials including some pretty Liberty fabric napkins. Published by Patchwork Harmony...

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