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Dear friends, Wow, what a year it has been! It was truly a journey to get to where we are now. After over a decade of programming at our namesake center in the Mission District, we had reached our full capacity—running programs seven days a week, from morning to night, and in multiple schools. We knew we had to dream big if we wanted to extend our reach even further. The idea of building a new center in the Tenderloin, a neighborhood that is home to 3,000 low-income children, was born.  PHOTO BY KAVITHA LOTUN

As we worked to garner support for this big dream, we were overwhelmed with the outpouring of goodwill we received, which only grew over time. It was a deluge of love. People from every sector deeply understood the vision of creating a magical, beautiful space for kids to learn, think, and write. They saw the need to amplify these young people’s voices, and that publishing them would be transformative. They were philanthropic, they volunteered to work with our students, and they supported us with pro bono expertise. All were champions for this organization and helped us leverage resources on behalf of our kids. And they helped us learn about the neighborhood, its strengths and challenges, and how we could best serve the families that lived there. These love-drenchers committed their talents, time, money, and knowledge to help us build a place that I couldn’t be more proud of, and we are forever grateful.  While the building and opening of the new 826 Valencia Tenderloin Center was our biggest news of last year, I have to say that there were great successes across all our programs. We served more students, in deeper ways, with the help of committed volunteers and generous donors — and all our great programs became even stronger.  As you read on, I hope you are as inspired as I am every day. With gratitude,

Bita Nazarian, Executive Director 1


ABOUT US

Our Mission 826 Valencia is a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting under-resourced students ages six to eighteen with their creative and expository writing skills and to helping teachers inspire their students to write. Our services are structured around the understanding that great leaps in learning can happen with one-on-one attention and that strong writing skills are fundamental to future success. Named for its street address in San Francisco, 826 Valencia was founded in 2002 by educator Nínive Calegari and author Dave Eggers. 826 Valencia comprises two writing centers—our flagship location in the Mission District and a new center in the Tenderloin neighborhood — and three satellite classrooms at nearby public schools. All of our programs are offered free of charge to make them accessible to the students who stand to benefit most from our help.  Due to the success of 826 Valencia’s model, a separate organization called 826 National was founded in 2008 to help other cities launch their own writing and tutoring centers. We are now one of seven official 826 chapters in the United States, inspiring many other like-minded groups around the world.

The Need

W

riting is empowerment. It’s a tool for telling your story, processing experiences, and bringing imagination to life. And as the National Center on Education and the Economy notes, we live in a world where strong writing skills are “an indispensable foundation for the workforce.” But many students lack confidence and skills when it comes to writing, for a host of reasons—the challenge of learning English as a second language, financial and housing instability, and a lack of one-on-one attention during the school day, to name a few. A 2016 study conducted

PHOTO BY SETH GOLUB

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by San Francisco’s Department of Children, Youth, and Their Families found that just 53% of SFUSD students meet or exceed expectations for Language Arts proficiency, and this number drops to 27% of Hispanic/Latino students and 18% of black/African American students. It is crucial that we support these young people, not just by building critical skills for success in the workforce, but also by amplifying their voices and helping them share their stories, replacing frustration and shame around writing with confidence and pride.

Our Vision

A

t 826 Valencia, we believe that all students should experience wonder, creativity, and pride as part of the writing process. We know that access to individualized support, authentic end products, and safe, beautiful spaces can transform a young person’s relationship to writing, which will in turn open doors to new possibilities and empower them to share their stories with the world. We partner with under-served schools, families, and communities to provide free programs that build confidence, skills, and an affinity for writing. Our programs aim to enrich students’ lives through writing and help them find their creative voices, while also preparing them for success in college and in any career they choose.

How We Do It

I have stories that deserve to be

remembered, but it’s not easy for me to

Our approach is based on four key methods that make our programs successful.

say all that I feel and think. Writing

*

helps me express my thoughts, feelings,

PROVIDING ONE-ON-ONE SUPPORT

We know the best way to help students learn is to sit down beside them and give them the individualized attention of a caring adult. We train and organize hundreds of volunteers each year to give students this one-on-one attention, helping teachers do their difficult jobs more effectively and giving students the support they need to thrive.

and emotions. Writing makes me feel confident about what I can accomplish in my life.” CARLOS GOMEZ, AGE 18, MISSION HIGH SCHOOL 

3


ABOUT US

*

RESPONDING TO THE NEEDS OF TEACHERS, SCHOOLS, AND FAMILIES

We take a partnership role, rather than a vendor role in developing our programs. Through collaboration with teachers, administrators, parents, and partner organizations, we create learning opportunities that are responsive to and aligned with the work that is already happening in our schools and communities.

*

CULMINATING IN TANGIBLE END PRODUCTS

We honor and amplify our students’ voices by professionally publishing their writing and giving it an audience. Whether the end product is a performance, a podcast, a magazine, or a beautiful book, this encourages students to work hard and feel proud of an authentic end product, and gives them a unique sense of ownership over the writing process.

PHOTO BY JUDY HART

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*

KEEPING IT WEIRD AND WONDERFUL

All of our learning spaces and publications are designed to transport students to other worlds and inspire creativity. This spirit of wonder is most notably embodied in the storefronts that serve as portals to our centers. At the Pirate Supply Store on Valencia Street we purvey, yes, supplies for pirates. King Carl’s Emporium, the new storefront to our Tenderloin Center, supplies tools for exploration of worlds both real and imaginary. Both stores also sell the many publications of our students’ writing. Their proceeds go right back into our programs, creating and supporting beautiful spaces for kids to to write, wonder, and dream.

2015– 2016 BY THE NUMBERS

1:3

AVG. ADULT TO STUDENT RATIO

864 VOLUNTEERS 118,154 DONATED HRS 433 384 219 47

RETURNING NEW CORPORATE CREATIVES

2511

4 5 51 2 32 TOTAL NUMBER OF STUDENTS SERVED

TOTAL HOURS OF

PROGRAMMING

TEACHERS & COMMUNITY

PARTNERS

THIRTY

SIX PUBLICATIONS

OUR IMPACT In surveys of over 1,000 students, parents, and teachers, respondents reported the following outcomes for our students:

GREATER

GREATER CONFIDENCE

INCREASED

assignments

toward writing

PRIDE

tackling writing

88%

82%

in their writing

AFFINITY

76%

STRONGER

writing SKILLS

88%

5


PROGRAMS

In-School Programs

E

very year we bring hundreds of volunteers into public schools around the city to work with students on their writing skills during the school day. Our In-Schools Program supports teachers by lowering the adult-to-student ratio in the classroom, as our tutors provide one-on-one or small group assistance to students tackling writing projects ranging from the academic to the creative. During the 2015–2016 school year, we supported students as they wrote science fiction stories, newspaper articles, letters to Congress, research papers, and more.

It’s nearly impossible to give

enough individualized feedback during the writing process to guide every student myself. 826 makes it possible! Tutors for every student!”

PAUL M c CARTHY, TEACHER AT SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL

WRITERS’ ROOMS

We have a special presence at three nearby schools where we staff dedicated Writers’ Rooms — whimsical spaces where students get support from 826 tutors during their school day. In the 2015–2016 school year, we worked with 1,100 students in our Writers’ Rooms at Mission High School and Everett Middle School. 2015 also saw the opening of our third Writers’ Room at Buena

IN-SCHOOLS TUTORING BY THE NUMBERS

THIRTY-FIVE TEACHERS SUPPORTED

TOTAL NO. OF PROGRAM HOURS

FIFTEEN PUBLICATIONS

TOTAL NO. OF VOLUNTEERS

1 0 0 7 77%

327

QUALIFYING FOR

FREE OR REDUCED COST LUNCH

6


PHOTO BY LISA BETH ANDERSON

Vista Horace Mann K–8 School, where in addition to being the home of our satellite after-school writing program, we tutored every sixth-grader in the school during their school day.

Working with the 826 Valencia

volunteers allowed me to connect with

another person and help me think outside the box. There were days when I just did

TEACHER OF THE MONTH

not feel like writing, however, 826 was

A big part of 826 Valencia’s goal has always been to support teachers in doing their difficult and crucial jobs. Every month, we receive letters from students, parents, and educators nominating outstanding teachers for our Teacher of the Month award, which comes with a $1,500 honorarium.

always there to make me find what I was passionate about! For me that was the best and most important part about working with 826 Valencia.” NYKOLE CASTELLANOS, GRADE 12, DOWNTOWN HIGH SCHOOL

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PROGRAMS

After-School Tutoring

D

uring the school year, 826 Valencia’s Mission Center is packed five days a week with students who come in after school and in the evenings for tutoring in all subject areas, with a special emphasis on creative writing and publishing. AfterSchool Tutoring supports students’ academic success by providing one-on-one tutoring while they complete their homework assignments, daily creative writing practice, and structured discussion about what they’re reading. We also host drop-in tutoring on Sundays, which is open to all.

Twice a week, our tutoring hours extend into the evenings to support the unique needs of middle and high school students. Tutors come prepared to help with more complex homework assignments, and creative writing prompts for after homework is done are geared toward helping our older students practice creativity and self-expression.

PHOTO BY JUDY HART

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SURVEY SAYS... 94% of parents report that their child’s writing skills have improved as a result of 826 Valencia. 98% said that their child completes all of their homework when they are at 826. 96% said that the support their child receives at 826 results in more quality family time at home.

My favorite thing about 826 Valencia is

the people that smile at me when I go there.

It makes me feel like I’m home.” ABIGAIL GIRON, AGE 10, ALVARADO ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

AFTER-SCHOOL TUTORING BY THE NUMBERS

TOTAL NO. of

PROGRAM HOURS

AVERAGE NO.

OF STUDENTS PER

TOTAL NO. of

STUDENTS

SESSION

SERVED

AVG. HOURS PER STUDENT 103

211

669

THIRTY FOUR

DEAR FUTURE SELF BY LILIANA MONROY-CRUZ, AGE 12

Dear Future Self,

ts of m Studen s Progra from the Pathway Wri ting ncia’s 826 Vale

Fall 2015

I hope that by this time you know what you want to do and are able to focus on that. Remember that nothing is impossible and that the amount you put into your work is the outcome you will get. Be the person who never gives up and who keeps going no matter what. Think that you can do anything. Even if you are not doing your best, that does not mean you cannot do better in the future. You have many options in life, you just have to know how to find them. Sincerely, Young You

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GROWING SKILLS

Aaron Diaz and the Voyagers Program Aaron Diaz, an energetic and always friendly face in our After-School Tutoring Program, was struggling in school. He was reading far below his grade level, and would often get frustrated and shut down when faced with reading and writing tasks. Aaron was among a group of students who inspired us to launch Voyagers, a new, targeted intervention program for those with the greatest needs in the After-School Tutoring Program. In fact, he inspired its name. One day Aaron was reading with his tutor, and kept struggling with the word “voyage.” Through sticking with it together, writing it down, sounding it out, and lots of practice, he eventually nailed it. The term “Voyagers” was born. Working in partnership with these students’ parents and teachers, we developed a system for better understanding each of their unique strengths and needs, and tailored our tutoring with the specific strategies that work for them. Aaron became a natural leader among the Voyagers—he started to help his friends with reading, and would make up writing prompts of his own. As his confidence grew, so did his skills—Aaron is now reading at grade level. He also takes great pride in the stories he writes, which he types up in wild fonts and bright colors and hangs on his wall at home. “He is much more confident now. He raises his hand in school even if he doesn’t know the answer,” says Aaron’s mom, Cecelia. She believes that the customized tutoring Aaron received at 826 helped him make the leap, both in reading levels and in confidence. When asked what advice he has for students who have a hard time with school, Aaron says, “Keep trying until you get it, and don’t give up.”


11 PHOTO BY SARAH MARTIN


PROGRAMS

Workshops

W

orkshops are designed to foster creativity and strengthen writing skills in a wide variety of areas, from playwriting to personal essays to starting a ’zine. All workshops, from the playful to the practical, are project-based and are taught by experienced, accomplished professionals. In the 2015–2016 school year, our workshop offerings included perennial favorites like The Valencia Bay-farer, 826 Valencia’s in-house newspaper, and exciting new offerings like a mock trial workshop, a collaboration with an artists’ collective in which imaginary worlds were brought to life through travel brochures and posters, and a sketch comedy writing workshop in which students got to see their work performed by professional comedians.

PHOTO BY KEKO JACKSON

WORKSHOPS BY THE NUMBERS

TOTAL PROGRAM

TOTAL NUMBER OF WORKSHOPS

200

TOTAL NO. of

HOURS

12

STUDENTS

SERVED

38

199

TOTAL NO. of

INDIVIDUAL VOLUNTEERS

FIFTY EIGHT


PHOTO BY LISA BETH ANDERSON

LENC

ISSUE 54: FALL, 2015

IA

VA

826 VALENCIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

I LIVE IN THE SKY BY MAX CHU, AGE 15

WRITTEN BY STUDENTS. READ BY ALL.

FREE FOR KIDS AND OCEAN-GOING MARAUDERS

The walls are made of blankets, the towers are made of pillows. Here in my castle, we have a quiet TV. We have warm tea and apple slices,

Photo courtesy of wikipedia.org

BY ROSA MURPHY, AGE 13

European migrant crisis. These three words describe a problem affecting millions of people. The “European migrant crisis” refers to the influx of refugees fleeing war, violence, and terrorist groups in Africa and the Middle East to Europe. It is not a pretty, funny, or happy issue, but it certainly is a very big issue.

Last year, according to the Telegraph, “more than 260,000 people entered Europe” through “three routes.” The three routes Phoebe Weston writes about in this article are the Central Mediterranean, the Eastern Mediterranean, and the Western Balkan routes, which are the main routes for refugees. In 2014, 170,800 refugees fled to Europe through

YOUNG WRITERS TAKE A BITE OUT OF THE TENDERLOIN

Chinatown, and the painted skies of the Sunset. But a place with a most interesting past and present is the Tenderloin! Although it doesn’t have the best reputation, this neighborhood is becoming a trend for our youth, and it’s changing for the community’s children. An 826 will soon be open in the Tenderloin! But here is a thought provoking question: How exactly did it begin? According to a FoundSF article, “The Tender-

BY JULIA REIKER, AGE 12

San Francisco is filled with amazing neighborhoods with hidden urban culture. If you’re young and you live in the Bay Area, this is the place to be. You have the great food of the Mission, the vibrant history within Presidio, the crowded streets of

Friend

I live in a castle.

54

THE MIGRANT CRISIS: A MESSAGE TO EU LEADERS

ain is a

The R

the Central Mediterranean alone. This is a drastic increase from 2013, where this route saw 40,000 people, which is still an outrageous number. The process of immigrating is risky and expensive, with no guarantee of success. After paying outrageous sums of money to secure their spot, the refugees must often risk their lives to get to where the boat is going to leave. From there, the journey often includes a perilous ride in a boat that is usually much longer than the smugglers say, continued on p. 3

loin in the 20th Century”, the rebuilding of this neighborhood was after the San Francisco fire

continued on p. 8

INSIDE: POLITICS

2

HEALTH TECHNOLOGY LIFESTYLE

3 4 5

POP CULTURE SPORTS

6 8

we have a novel and a large notebook. There’re lots of crayons and markers. It’s the best castle. My castle is always warm and safe from intruders. My castle makes me happy.

nal of ces The Jour ng Apprenti lishi ting & Pub FALL 2015

The Wri


PROGRAMS

Field Trips

I

n our Field Trips Program, up to four classes a week come from public schools around San Francisco to visit our writing center for a morning of high-energy learning about the craft of storytelling. Our Storytelling and Bookmaking Field Trips lead students to collaboratively write an original story, end the story with a cliffhanger, and then write their own endings. Students are motivated to perform at their highest levels through the urging of a cranky editor whom they never see (but who somehow, mysteriously, never fails to grumpily praise their stories). Meanwhile, a professional artist illustrates the story, and volunteers bind a book for each student to take home with them that day, providing a tangible Q. What is the most effective part of end product and infusing creativity, collaboration, the 826 Valencia Field Trip Program? and the arts into students’ regular school day.

A. I love how everyone’s voice is

heard. All ideas are validated. Also, the team writing experience is so fun! TEACHER AT SHERMAN ELEMENTARY

14

PHOTO BY SETH GOLUB


Some recent Field Trip titles include... Dave and the Unstoppable Villains on the Cloud Pirate Ship in the Sky Legend of Owlzooz: Will Bubbles End? Looking for Friends in the Hot Sauce Ocean The Mighty Mayflower’s Mysterious Mission The Life of Pizza in 2066 Candy Storm Surprise! The Fourth Transformation of Friendship Quest for Treasure in Spooky Blue Forest

ILLUSTRATION BY SARAH CLARK

FIELD TRIPS BY THE NUMBERS

TOTAL NO. of

2313 SERVED STUDENTS

TOTAL NUMBER OF

FIELD TRIPS ONE HUNDRED AND FIVE

TOTAL NO. of

SCHOOLS

SERVED

53

TOTAL NO. OF

INDIVIDUAL VOLUNTEERS

126 15


PROGRAMS

College and Career Readiness

I

n 2015–2016 we grew and deepened our College and Career Readiness programs. This roster of programs aims to build leadership skills and pathways to deeper engagement for students, help them feel more confident and supported in the college application process, and to build writing and communication skills that will serve them in college and in any career they choose.

PERSONAL STATEMENT WEEKEND

The 2015 Personal Statement Weekend served 171 students tutored by 169 volunteers for an average of 2.6 hours of undivided attention on their college application essays. 98% of the students said that they received help they could not have gotten elsewhere, and 100% reported feeling more confident about their essay at the end of the weekend. I learned a lot from these students, not just

academically. I learned how to break down

YOUTH LEADERSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

In 2015, 826 Valencia re-launched the Youth Leadership Advisory Board, an opportunity extra patient. Some of them really look up to me for middle school students who have grown up in our programs to take on a leadership role for support, and this makes me especially happy in the organization and learn to be tutors in considering I’m just a high school student myself.” our After-School Tutoring program. Through JOHN-PAUL MACKEY, HIGH SCHOOL INTERN participation in this program, the Youth Leaders gain confidence, tutoring skills, and access to information about college and careers. We also hosted eight Alumni Interns, who served as role models for our younger students. assignments that seemed overwhelming and to be

SCHOLARSHIPS

Every year we award six $15,000 scholarships to college-bound seniors who have participated in 826 Valencia programs. In 2016 we saw the depth of engagement our scholars had with the organization increase, as many of our applicants and winners had worked with us for a full school year at Mission High School. We’re proud of these remarkable students and look forward to seeing the great things they accomplish!

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2016 SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS

Pricila Rosillo

Mateo Rosales-Cisneros

Binyam Teklegiorgis

TOM SAVIGNANO SCHOLARSHIP

YOUNG AUTHORS’ SCHOLARSHIP

ART BERLINER & MARIAN LEVER

When Pricila realized that financial instability and family struggles were impacting her grades, she learned to ask for support from her teachers and counselors. She persevered and made the honor roll.

Mateo is proud to be attending UC Berkeley, and looks forward to it “as an opportunity to continue my work in health and wellbeing and to use my newfound voice to advocate for the silenced.”

SCHOLARSHIP

Silvia Mejia

Tofik Mohamed

Gonzalo Duque

FLORENCE & IRVING HOCHMAN

TAYLOR RENFREW INGHAM

TOM SAVIGNANO SCHOLARSHIP

MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

A director of his school’s Peace Club and an active organizer in his school’s Gay-Straight Alliance Club, Gonzalo has shown his deep commitment to issues of equity and social justice.

One Mission High School faculty member described Silvia, the first in her family to graduate high school, as “one of the most resilient, dedicated, hard-working, and persistent students” she has ever worked with.

Tofik writes that his dream is to “become a successful surgeon so that I can give back to the poor who are seeking help.”

Binyam moved to the U.S. from Ethiopia at age fifteen. His family struggled to maintain stable housing in San Francisco, but Binyam remained dedicated to his school work, his soccer team, and his community.

PHOTOS BY SCHMOO THEUNE

17


GROWING LEADERSHIP

Chelsea Rodriguez and the Youth Leadership Advisory Board This year we re-launched and re-imagined our Youth Leadership Advisory Board (YLAB). This group of students, who have grown up in our programs, convened throughout the semester to talk about their experiences with 826, to gain access to information about college and careers, and to build tutoring and leadership skills. One of these students is Chelsea, a bright, funny, and kind presence in our programs whose leadership blossomed in this program. Chelsea has said that she used to be embarrassed if she had to ask for help. But when she started tutoring, she realized that seeking support is actually part of what makes someone a good teacher and leader. Chelsea writes, “As a tutor, I learned to not be scared to ask for help. One day I was helping someone and I didn’t know the answer. I asked another tutor to help me. Then I explained to the student how to do the problem. At first I felt scared, but then that feeling went away.” Leadership entails influencing people and outcomes, and Chelsea had an opportunity to do this in big ways as a YLAB participant. To inform our programming and help us better understand the student experience, Chelsea participated in a panel about what makes a good tutor for an audience of our staff and board members. She also had the opportunity to host the Minister of Education from the Netherlands on a visit to 826, and she proudly shared both her writing and her ideas about effective teaching and learning. Chelsea believes that the opportunity to reflect in YLAB was an important part of her growth in the last year. She writes, “Reflection is important because you notice where you can improve. Once you figure that out, you can make a plan that will help you reach your goals.”


PROGRAMS

Summer Programs

S

chool might let out for the summer, but the learning doesn’t stop at 826 Valencia. We offer a variety of programs to reduce summer learning loss, and keep students writing and thinking creatively.

EXPLORING WORDS

In the summer of 2015, we offered our sixth annual and largest ever Exploring Words Summer Camp for third- through fifth-grade students enrolled in our school year programs. The camp focused on creative writing paired with a science curriculum developed and led in partnership with the SURVEY SAYS... Exploratorium, and students grew their writing and science 86% of students reported learning skills in an atmosphere filled with rigor and fun. new things about how to be a good writer in Exploring Words Summer Camp.

89% of parents noticed a positive change in their child’s attitudes toward science and writing.

A

TR

EEHO

USE GR OW S

IN THE

TENDERLOIN

PHOTO BY KONA LAI

This year 826 Valencia grew in the biggest way yet. TAKE A LOOK INSIDE!

PHOTO BY JUDY HART


THE YOUNG AUTHORS’ WORKSHOP

Each year we offer a two-week intensive writing camp for high school students called the Young Authors’ Workshop. Our 2015 Young Authors’ Workshop was the longest and largest ever; twenty-two students joined us for ten full days of writing together, led by guest speakers who were poets, journalists, oral historians, and artists. We saw the students grow their confidence and skills as they became a strong community of writers.

PENCIL BY ASHLY NAVA, AGE 10

Pencil, what can I do without you? I use you for everything. I use you to think, to write, to draw, and right now I’m using you. You make my world

e Turquois g Is Waitin until Midnight

happy because if you weren’t there next to me I would be bored and playing video games all day long. Well, thank you for being next to me my whole life!

ncia 826 Vale Camp 2015 Sum mer g Words Writing Explorin Stud ent Selected

SUMMER PROGRAMS BY THE NUMBERS

DAYS OF SUMMER STUDENTS SPENT LEARNING, EXPLORING, & WRITING 39

TOTAL NO. OF

STUDENTS SERVED STUDENT : TUTOR

RATIO

63 2: 1 2 0 0

TOTAL NO. OF PROGRAM HOURS

19


PROGRAMS

Summer Programs

S

chool might let out for the summer, but the learning doesn’t stop at 826 Valencia. We offer a variety of programs to reduce summer learning loss, and keep students writing and thinking creatively.

EXPLORING WORDS

In the summer of 2015, we offered our sixth annual and largest ever Exploring Words Summer Camp for third- through fifth-grade students enrolled in our school year programs. The camp focused on creative writing paired with a science curriculum developed and led in partnership with the SURVEY SAYS... Exploratorium, and students grew their writing and science 86% of students reported learning skills in an atmosphere filled with rigor and fun. new things about how to be a good writer in Exploring Words Summer Camp.

89% of parents noticed a positive change in their child’s attitudes toward science and writing.

A

TR

EEHO

USE GR OW S

IN THE

TENDERLOIN

PHOTO BY KONA LAI

This year 826 Valencia grew in the biggest way yet. TAKE A LOOK INSIDE!

PHOTO BY JUDY HART


PROGRAMS

Summer Programs

S

chool might let out for the summer, but the learning doesn’t stop at 826 Valencia. We offer a variety of programs to reduce summer learning loss, and keep students writing and thinking creatively.

EXPLORING WORDS

In the summer of 2015, we offered our sixth annual and largest ever Exploring Words Summer Camp for third- through fifth-grade students enrolled in our school year programs. The camp focused on creative writing paired with a science curriculum developed and led in partnership with the SURVEY SAYS... Exploratorium, and students grew their writing and science 86% of students reported learning skills in an atmosphere filled with rigor and fun. new things about how to be a good writer in Exploring Words Summer Camp.

89% of parents noticed a positive change in their child’s attitudes toward science and writing.

A

TR

EEHO

USE GR OW S

IN THE

TENDERLOIN

PHOTO BY KONA LAI

This year 826 Valencia grew in the biggest way yet. TAKE A LOOK INSIDE!

PHOTO BY JUDY HART


W

WE

HY TH E

LCOM E TO T H E

TENDERLOIN This year we published nearly 100 student authors in the Tenderloin neighborhood. JJ is one of them, and he proudly read the below poem at the launch of our first Tenderloin programs compilation, Five Quarts of Kindness.

TENDERLOIN CENTER

W

e chose to open our second center in the Tenderloin neighborhood for two big reasons: a great need for our services, and overwhelming support from the local community. The Tenderloin is San Francisco’s most densely populated neighborhood, and the home of 3,000 of our city’s children. It has the second highest incidence of food stamp use in the city, with a median household income of $23,804. While social services are abundant, until this year I CANNOT THINK OF A GREATER GIFT there were no programs that focused on TO THE TENDERLOIN THAN THE OPENING OF the essential skill of writing. THIS NEW CENTER. IT IS A TRIBUTE TO THE

OPEN WINDOW

VISION OF 826 VALENCIA’S EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR BITA NAZARIAN AND HER ENTIRE BOARD AND STAFF THAT THEY COULD SEE THE POTENTIAL OF

TRANSFORMING A

RUN-DOWN CORNER MARKET INTO THE BEAUTIFUL SPACE THAT NOW EXISTS ON GOLDEN GATE AND LEAVENWORTH.” RANDY

SHAW,

HOUSING CLINIC

DIRECTOR

OF

THE

TENDERLOIN

BY JJ ALEMAN, AGE 13 DEMARILLAC ACADEMY

I live in a doorway between ghetto and school life

The corner of Golden Gate and Leavenworth used to be home to Big Boy Market, a corner store notorious as a location for drug trafficking and criminal activity. We’re proud to have created a space of wonder and imagination there, that welcomes the community and offers free, crucial support and a space for students to write and dream. MAP BY JOHN ELLIS

Quiet in class, dogs barking on every corner Staying inside, cracked sidewalks Lectures being given, being broken down PHOTOS BY MATTHEW MILLMAN

“SAN FRANCISCO HAS BEEN GOOD TO US. IT WAS TIME TO GIVE BACK.”

The rush to work, the rush to home I hear gun shots and screaming Conversations being held, buttons of a laptop

2015–2016

MIKE SCRIBNER, PRESIDENT OF BCCI CONSTRUCTION

OUR FIRST YEAR IN THE TENDERLOIN

he build team for the center and store consisted of five design and architecture firms donating the majority of their services for free and working in collaboration to create a magical, whimsical space to inspire writing and learning. We could not have brought this dream to life without this incredible team.

the gates being shut, the music being played

Jonas Kellner served as lead architect. BCCI Construction Company served as general contractor and liaison for subcontractor contributions. Office worked on the store branding, exteriors, and product design. Gensler designed the retail space and interior finishes. INTERSTICE drew up plans for the exterior. MKThink took the lead on interior architecture. Valerie Veronin served as project manager. BBDO San Francisco supported branding and marketing.

I act different in both places

W

hile the center was under construction, we started offering our programming in the neighborhood through partnerships with local community-based organizations in September of 2015.

332

242

4

17

STUDENTS SERVED

VOLUNTEERS

PUBLICATIONS

COMMUNITY PARTNERS

T

the dragging of a pencil, the screams of kids

I live in the ghetto but transfer to school life But I’m still the same person.  


W

WE

HY TH E

LCOM E TO T H E

TENDERLOIN This year we published nearly 100 student authors in the Tenderloin neighborhood. JJ is one of them, and he proudly read the below poem at the launch of our first Tenderloin programs compilation, Five Quarts of Kindness.

TENDERLOIN CENTER

W

e chose to open our second center in the Tenderloin neighborhood for two big reasons: a great need for our services, and overwhelming support from the local community. The Tenderloin is San Francisco’s most densely populated neighborhood, and the home of 3,000 of our city’s children. It has the second highest incidence of food stamp use in the city, with a median household income of $23,804. While social services are abundant, until this year I CANNOT THINK OF A GREATER GIFT there were no programs that focused on TO THE TENDERLOIN THAN THE OPENING OF the essential skill of writing. THIS NEW CENTER. IT IS A TRIBUTE TO THE

OPEN WINDOW

VISION OF 826 VALENCIA’S EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR BITA NAZARIAN AND HER ENTIRE BOARD AND STAFF THAT THEY COULD SEE THE POTENTIAL OF

TRANSFORMING A

RUN-DOWN CORNER MARKET INTO THE BEAUTIFUL SPACE THAT NOW EXISTS ON GOLDEN GATE AND LEAVENWORTH.” RANDY

SHAW,

HOUSING CLINIC

DIRECTOR

OF

THE

TENDERLOIN

BY JJ ALEMAN, AGE 13 DEMARILLAC ACADEMY

I live in a doorway between ghetto and school life

The corner of Golden Gate and Leavenworth used to be home to Big Boy Market, a corner store notorious as a location for drug trafficking and criminal activity. We’re proud to have created a space of wonder and imagination there, that welcomes the community and offers free, crucial support and a space for students to write and dream. MAP BY JOHN ELLIS

Quiet in class, dogs barking on every corner Staying inside, cracked sidewalks Lectures being given, being broken down PHOTOS BY MATTHEW MILLMAN

“SAN FRANCISCO HAS BEEN GOOD TO US. IT WAS TIME TO GIVE BACK.”

The rush to work, the rush to home I hear gun shots and screaming Conversations being held, buttons of a laptop

2015–2016

MIKE SCRIBNER, PRESIDENT OF BCCI CONSTRUCTION

OUR FIRST YEAR IN THE TENDERLOIN

he build team for the center and store consisted of five design and architecture firms donating the majority of their services for free and working in collaboration to create a magical, whimsical space to inspire writing and learning. We could not have brought this dream to life without this incredible team.

the gates being shut, the music being played

Jonas Kellner served as lead architect. BCCI Construction Company served as general contractor and liaison for subcontractor contributions. Office worked on the store branding, exteriors, and product design. Gensler designed the retail space and interior finishes. INTERSTICE drew up plans for the exterior. MKThink took the lead on interior architecture. Valerie Veronin served as project manager. BBDO San Francisco supported branding and marketing.

I act different in both places

W

hile the center was under construction, we started offering our programming in the neighborhood through partnerships with local community-based organizations in September of 2015.

332

242

4

17

STUDENTS SERVED

VOLUNTEERS

PUBLICATIONS

COMMUNITY PARTNERS

T

the dragging of a pencil, the screams of kids

I live in the ghetto but transfer to school life But I’m still the same person.  


W

WE

HY TH E

LCOM E TO T H E

TENDERLOIN This year we published nearly 100 student authors in the Tenderloin neighborhood. JJ is one of them, and he proudly read the below poem at the launch of our first Tenderloin programs compilation, Five Quarts of Kindness.

TENDERLOIN CENTER

W

e chose to open our second center in the Tenderloin neighborhood for two big reasons: a great need for our services, and overwhelming support from the local community. The Tenderloin is San Francisco’s most densely populated neighborhood, and the home of 3,000 of our city’s children. It has the second highest incidence of food stamp use in the city, with a median household income of $23,804. While social services are abundant, until this year I CANNOT THINK OF A GREATER GIFT there were no programs that focused on TO THE TENDERLOIN THAN THE OPENING OF the essential skill of writing. THIS NEW CENTER. IT IS A TRIBUTE TO THE

OPEN WINDOW

VISION OF 826 VALENCIA’S EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR BITA NAZARIAN AND HER ENTIRE BOARD AND STAFF THAT THEY COULD SEE THE POTENTIAL OF

TRANSFORMING A

RUN-DOWN CORNER MARKET INTO THE BEAUTIFUL SPACE THAT NOW EXISTS ON GOLDEN GATE AND LEAVENWORTH.” RANDY

SHAW,

HOUSING CLINIC

DIRECTOR

OF

THE

TENDERLOIN

BY JJ ALEMAN, AGE 13 DEMARILLAC ACADEMY

I live in a doorway between ghetto and school life

The corner of Golden Gate and Leavenworth used to be home to Big Boy Market, a corner store notorious as a location for drug trafficking and criminal activity. We’re proud to have created a space of wonder and imagination there, that welcomes the community and offers free, crucial support and a space for students to write and dream. MAP BY JOHN ELLIS

Quiet in class, dogs barking on every corner Staying inside, cracked sidewalks Lectures being given, being broken down PHOTOS BY MATTHEW MILLMAN

“SAN FRANCISCO HAS BEEN GOOD TO US. IT WAS TIME TO GIVE BACK.”

The rush to work, the rush to home I hear gun shots and screaming Conversations being held, buttons of a laptop

2015–2016

MIKE SCRIBNER, PRESIDENT OF BCCI CONSTRUCTION

OUR FIRST YEAR IN THE TENDERLOIN

he build team for the center and store consisted of five design and architecture firms donating the majority of their services for free and working in collaboration to create a magical, whimsical space to inspire writing and learning. We could not have brought this dream to life without this incredible team.

the gates being shut, the music being played

Jonas Kellner served as lead architect. BCCI Construction Company served as general contractor and liaison for subcontractor contributions. Office worked on the store branding, exteriors, and product design. Gensler designed the retail space and interior finishes. INTERSTICE drew up plans for the exterior. MKThink took the lead on interior architecture. Valerie Veronin served as project manager. BBDO San Francisco supported branding and marketing.

I act different in both places

W

hile the center was under construction, we started offering our programming in the neighborhood through partnerships with local community-based organizations in September of 2015.

332

242

4

17

STUDENTS SERVED

VOLUNTEERS

PUBLICATIONS

COMMUNITY PARTNERS

T

the dragging of a pencil, the screams of kids

I live in the ghetto but transfer to school life But I’m still the same person.  


W

WE

HY TH E

LCOM E TO T H E

TENDERLOIN This year we published nearly 100 student authors in the Tenderloin neighborhood. JJ is one of them, and he proudly read the below poem at the launch of our first Tenderloin programs compilation, Five Quarts of Kindness.

TENDERLOIN CENTER

W

e chose to open our second center in the Tenderloin neighborhood for two big reasons: a great need for our services, and overwhelming support from the local community. The Tenderloin is San Francisco’s most densely populated neighborhood, and the home of 3,000 of our city’s children. It has the second highest incidence of food stamp use in the city, with a median household income of $23,804. While social services are abundant, until this year I CANNOT THINK OF A GREATER GIFT there were no programs that focused on TO THE TENDERLOIN THAN THE OPENING OF the essential skill of writing. THIS NEW CENTER. IT IS A TRIBUTE TO THE

OPEN WINDOW

VISION OF 826 VALENCIA’S EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR BITA NAZARIAN AND HER ENTIRE BOARD AND STAFF THAT THEY COULD SEE THE POTENTIAL OF

TRANSFORMING A

RUN-DOWN CORNER MARKET INTO THE BEAUTIFUL SPACE THAT NOW EXISTS ON GOLDEN GATE AND LEAVENWORTH.” RANDY

SHAW,

HOUSING CLINIC

DIRECTOR

OF

THE

TENDERLOIN

BY JJ ALEMAN, AGE 13 DEMARILLAC ACADEMY

I live in a doorway between ghetto and school life

The corner of Golden Gate and Leavenworth used to be home to Big Boy Market, a corner store notorious as a location for drug trafficking and criminal activity. We’re proud to have created a space of wonder and imagination there, that welcomes the community and offers free, crucial support and a space for students to write and dream. MAP BY JOHN ELLIS

Quiet in class, dogs barking on every corner Staying inside, cracked sidewalks Lectures being given, being broken down PHOTOS BY MATTHEW MILLMAN

“SAN FRANCISCO HAS BEEN GOOD TO US. IT WAS TIME TO GIVE BACK.”

The rush to work, the rush to home I hear gun shots and screaming Conversations being held, buttons of a laptop

2015–2016

MIKE SCRIBNER, PRESIDENT OF BCCI CONSTRUCTION

OUR FIRST YEAR IN THE TENDERLOIN

he build team for the center and store consisted of five design and architecture firms donating the majority of their services for free and working in collaboration to create a magical, whimsical space to inspire writing and learning. We could not have brought this dream to life without this incredible team.

the gates being shut, the music being played

Jonas Kellner served as lead architect. BCCI Construction Company served as general contractor and liaison for subcontractor contributions. Office worked on the store branding, exteriors, and product design. Gensler designed the retail space and interior finishes. INTERSTICE drew up plans for the exterior. MKThink took the lead on interior architecture. Valerie Veronin served as project manager. BBDO San Francisco supported branding and marketing.

I act different in both places

W

hile the center was under construction, we started offering our programming in the neighborhood through partnerships with local community-based organizations in September of 2015.

332

242

4

17

STUDENTS SERVED

VOLUNTEERS

PUBLICATIONS

COMMUNITY PARTNERS

T

the dragging of a pencil, the screams of kids

I live in the ghetto but transfer to school life But I’m still the same person.  


FINANCIALS

Financial Overview

T

his was our biggest year yet, with an epic group of donors coming forward to support our ongoing programs and expansion into the Tenderloin neighborhood. Below is a snapshot of our income and expenditures (pending audit) in the 2015 fiscal year. Additionally, campaign supporters pledged more than $700,000 toward future years’ expenses, providing a foundation to help us grow sustainably and achieve unprecedented reach and impact.

2015 – 2016

SOURCES

INCOME

Contributions from individuals

$ 1,359,812

Contributions from organizations

$ 2,008,803

Special events

$ 437,000

Other (includes stores)

$ 204,332

total income

$ 4,009,947

a

34% INDIVIDUALS 31% GRANTS 16% CORPORATIONS 11% SPECIAL EVENTS 5% STORE AND OTHER 3% GOVERNMENT

EXPENSES

Programming

$ 1,441,644

Fundraising

$ 129,378

Administrative

$ 184,826

Retail Stores

$

Capital

$ 1,043,908

USES

92,413 a

50% PROGRAMMING

total expenses

$ 2,892,169

36% CAPITAL 6% ADMINISTRATIVE 5% FUNDRAISING 3% STORES

20


Our Growth

8

26 Valencia has achieved remarkable growth in the last two years, from a budget of $1.7 million in 2014–2015 to a budget of $2.2 million in 2015–2016. We have increased our programming hours, the number of students we serve, and—bolstered by amazing generosity—added a second writing center.

In 2016–2017, we aspire to serve 7,000 students, a 40% increase over prior years, and will need sustained support to make that happen. Thank you for being along for the journey.

2014–2015

2015–2016

2016–2017

4,991 students

5,132 students

7,000 students

720 volunteers

864 volunteers

1,100 volunteers

2,161 program hours

2,511 program hours

2,831 program hours

$2.2 mil

$2.5 mil

$1.7 mil

21


Financials

22 PHOTO BY MATTHEW MILLMAN


Supporters

826 Valencia Supporters We’d like to extend our deepest gratitude to the following members of our Shipmates Society for their generous investment in our programs during the 2015–2016 fiscal year.

CAPTAIN

826 National Anonymous (4) Kirsten & Michael Beckwith Art Berliner & Marian Lever The Brin Wojcicki Foundation City Arts & Lectures Dolby Laboratories Lee & Russ Flynn, Teachers Housing Cooperative GGS Foundation Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation Google.org Walter & Elise Haas Fund Daniel Handler & Lisa Brown Hellman Foundation Frances Hellman & Warren Breslau The Kimball Foundation Kochi Foundation Lampert/Byrd Family Fund Levi Strauss & Co. Coltrane & Christopher Lord Maverick Capital Foundation Matt Middlebrook & Lisa Presta Mosser Companies, Inc. Panta Rhea Foundation Dave & Gina Pell Pincus Family Fund of Silicon Valley Community Foundation Arthur & Toni Rembe Rock Saint Francis Foundation

San Francisco Arts Commission San Francisco Department of Children,Youth, and Their Families Tom Savignano Severns Family Foundation Brad & Ali Singer Michael & Shauna Stark Andrew Strickman & Michal Ettinger Laurie & Jeff Ubben Advisors of the Walnut Fund FIRST MATE

50 Fund Sundri Alim Charitable Fund The Isabel Allende Foundation The Amster Family Fund Anonymous (3) AT&T Foundation John Baldessari Family Foundation Joya Banerjee & Harris Cohen Burnett Fund CISCO Systems Foundation Cleo Foundation The Comis Foundation craigslist Charitable Fund Rose and David Dortort Foundation ExCEL After School Programs Fleishhacker Foundation The Futures Project The Hosono/Axelrod Family & Sundri Alim

23


Supporters

Vy & Matthew Hyman Kimberly & Zachary Hyman Philip Jackson Diana Kapp & David Singer David L. Klein, Jr. Fund Stanley S. Langendorf Foundation George C. Lee Jim & Tricia Lesser Michael Moritz & Harriet Heyman The Bernard Osher Foundation Remick Family Foundation Robin Renfrew & family in honor of Taylor Renfrew Ingham Sakana Foundation Santel McGinnis Family Charitable Fund Scandling Family Foundation Cameron Schrier Family Fund Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society Twitter Gene & Suzanne Valla Kyle & Tracy Vogt Karen & Jim Wagstaffe The Walther Foundation SHIP’S MASTER

Anonymous Annikka Berridge Brickyard Family Fund Sam & Susie Britton Arlene Buechert Sylvia & Barry Bunshoft in honor of Jennifer Bunshoft Pergher The Campodonico Family Cole Haan Jill Cowan & Stephen Davis EMIKA Fund Abhas Gupta

24

Jen Hamilton & Seth Boro Reece Hirsch & Kathy Taylor June P. Jackson Charitable Fund Jeri & Jeffrey Johnson Jordan & Theo Kurland Alexander M. & June L. Maisin Foundation of the Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund The Joseph & Mercedes McMicking Foundation Mark Risher & Deborah Yeh Lee & Perry Smith Fund TPG Global, LLC Mike Wilkins & Sheila Duignan Kevin & Rachel Swain Yeaman BOATSWAIN

Bill Graham Supporting Foundation of the Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund The Donald & Carole Chaiken Foundation Nathaniel de Rothschild in honor of Zoe Luhtala John Eidinger Shepard & Melissa Harris Hellman & Friedman LLC Derek G. Howard Christina Hurvis & Steve Malloy Melind John Meg Krehbiel Lesbians for Good, a fund of the Horizons Foundation Olivia Morgan in honor of Nínive Calegari David & Katy Orr Delsa & Jay Rendon Joe Vasquez Valerie Veronin & Robert Porter Molly West & Chuck Slaughter


Write & Raise: Hosted by Nicole, Arun, Sarah, Ani, Seif & Andy Yelp Foundation HELMSPERSON

Anonymous (2) Michael S. & Sigrid Anderson-Kwun Blakely & John Atherton The Awesome Foundation Bateman Group The Baughman Co., Inc. Meryl & James Bennan Bien-Kahn Philanthropic Fund Bluestone Family Fund Scott & Jacqueline Botterman Adriene Bowles Kathy & Greg Calegari Celia Sack & Omnivore Books on Food Chambers & Chambers Wine Merchants Melissa Clarke Christine Comaford Con-Volution 2015 Steven & Alexi Conine The Conway Frankel Family Fund Coulter 2006 Management Trust on behalf of Natalie J. Guo, Sanjay Banker, Nick Marncini, and Rob Snook John Couch David & Carla Crane Philanthropic Fund David Foster Wallace Literary Trust Disney VoluntEARS Community Fund Holly Elfman Nasseam Elkarra Arline Epstein & the Quadra Foundation Francis-Chapman Charitable Fund Alison & Mark Garrett Daniel Gelfand & Nicole Avril Kristin & Jeremy Ginsberg

Andrew & Emma Gray Green Bicycle Fund Natalie Guo, Margaret Kirchner, Ashley Rape, & Gloria Herbert on behalf of Baking Event Joe & Barbara Gurkoff Philanthropic Fund Hammarskjold Family Fund Jessica Hemerly & Jonathan Koshi Paul Herman Jonn & Max Herschend-Schroder The Justin and Michelle Hughes Foundation Kevin Hunt Hyun Chin Charitable Fund James Irvine Foundation Jason Family Foundation Nate Johnson Amanda Kelso Krummel Family Fund Lisa Laukkanen Gloria Lenhart Angus MacLane Joshua J. Mahoney John & Lynda Marren Donna Maynard Coline McConnel Paul Menage in honor of Vivienne Pustell Steven Miller & Jennifer Durand Amir Najmi & Linda Woo Jennifer Noland The Odell/Kemp Fund Ginger & Dan Oros Sruti Patel Zachary Patton & Janel Thysen PECO Foundation Andrew & Emily Perito Matthew Pirkowski Jessica Powell

25


Supporters

Alexandra Quinn & Mark Spoylar as a gift for Daphne Spoylar Rabine Family Fund Marcia Rodgers & Garrett Loube R. Rolfe Brooke & David Rusenko Joan Scott Will Scullin Irene S. Scully Fund Silicon Valley Bank Lisa Sison as a gift for Alyssa Aninag The Stephen and Paula Smith Family Foundation Squire Patton Boggs in honor of Nate Lane’s retirement Tamara Mellon Brand Inc. William Terrell Tides Foundation in honor of the work of Hollie Smiley Samantha Tripodi in honor of Dan & Geri Rolandson Ellen & Rob Valletta April & Cameron Walters Warby Parker Annie Ward Gina Warren Dan Welch Tim Wirth & Anne Stuhldreher Kirsten Wolfe in honor of Holden & Dashiel Brown Steven Nathaniel Wolkoff Foundation Woodward Family Foundation Maxine and Jack Zarrow Family Foundation SAILOR

Erika & Jordan Alperin Kimberly Beverett

26

Robin Bot-Miller Nicole Boyer Robert K. Brown Kim Connor Michael Duckworth Isabel Duffy-Pinner & Dickon Pinner Kopal & Malcolm Goonetileke Allyson Halpern & Dan Cohen Marc Henrich Lisa Kessler James Kim Marcia & Lawrence Lusk Lutes & Abrons Family Fund Thomas McVey Sejal Patel & Sanjay Banker Amber Reed & Dan Newman Matthew Sonefeldt in honor of Gabe & Jen Escovar Mark Thomas Rachel & Stephen Tracy VanCheng Fund Diane Zagerman & Donald Golder RIGGER

Chiara Andres Anna Bartley Bi-Rite Market Gloria Bonora Jennifer Braun & Ray Ryan Courtney Colburn Mag Dimond Andrew Dunbar & Zoee Astrachan Gillian & Peter Emblad Jody Fox Kristen Grannan as a gift for Martino Andrus Elizabeth Haffenreffer


Eric Heiman in honor of Volume Inc. David Jedrzejek David L. Kirp Ellen Levin Syida C. Long Jamie & Marc Lunder Aaron Mount as a gift for Jim Lesser Lisa Nahmanson Bita Nazarian Bruce & Risa Nye O'Reilly Media, Inc. Zohreh & Ike Okuda James Park Mark Perry Mark Plakias & Carolyn Schultz Plakias Brian Powers Ramya Raghavan Meg Ray Devon Reed Patrick Reeves Revolutions Per Minute on behalf of Treasure Island Music Festival Darah Roslyn Ashley Seashore Jean-Emmanuel Shein & Christiane Janssen Mark Shepherd Vanessa & Phil Siino Haack Sing For America Foundation on behalf of Dina Martin Michael Sippey Barbara Spicer Spivy Family Philanthropy Fund St. Thomas the Apostle School Frances Stroh William & Heather Terrell Chase Tingley Christine Tooby

Peter & Lisa Westley Karen H. Wickre Fund Jesse & Michelle Zeifman LOOKOUT

Eric & Donna Abrams Jo Adams Tahira Ali Debra Armstrong in honor of The Readers of Mary E. Silveira Recess Library Club Andi & David Arrick Arlyn Asch Laurie Barkin & Brian Brosnahan Hathaway Barry Heidi Bastel John Battelle Linda Bauccio Wendy Bean George Beckwith in honor of Michael Beckwith Tim Belonax Barb Bersche & David Katznelson Elise Birkhofer John & Natasha Boas Cheryl Bowers in honor of Kimberly Connor Sue Breedlove Elizabeth Brenum as a gift for Gil Brenum Erin Bright Sarah Brockmueller Emily Brodman Susan Bronstein Kerry Brown Jamieson Bunn Gerard Buulong & Fredric Silverman Fund Marie D’Amico & Steve Capps

27


Supporters

Jack & Molly Cargas Marit & Enrico Casarosa Edmund Cavagnaro Otis Chandler in honor of winning the office NCAA pool Doris Y. Chang in memory of Jane Han Todd Chapin Tyler Chapman The Charles Armstrong School Faith Chiang Anthony Chivetta Amy Chou Aurelien Chouard Morris Chow Kristin & Dickson Chu Sandra Chu Evelyn Clair Patti & Harry Cocciolo Kristine Coco Ed Cohen Norma Cole Cynthia Colon Genevieve Conaty Sheila Cooper Kerry Cooper Tom Counts Craftsman and Wolves John Creagan Elizabeth Dalay Susanna Daniels Shannon David Phillip Davis Megan Davy Tony Day Manoj Dayaram Design Options on behalf of Chloe Denbow

28

Alec Ditonto Carissa Dizon Joe Doctor Heidi Dolamore Julie Down Norman Patrick Doyle Jon & Holly Drawbaugh Joel Dubin as a gift for Karen & Stuart Gansky Kelly Dubisar Lisa Dungan Sally Durgan Marybeth Dyer in honor of Lucille Birmingham Julie Dyer Vree Taylor & Scott Eason Kenneth Eddings Marnina Edelhart Liisa Eisenlohr Ann Elliott Laura Ellis Samantha Eng Marc Engel in honor of Voicebox Creative Sarah Esterkyn as a gift for Alex & Lucas Perry Deborah Fedorchuk David Fisher Phyllis Florin Darryl Forman Andrew Forssell Four Dollar Books & the Four is a little, Four is a LOT team Taryn Fransen Lisa Freeman Joel Fruchtman & Maureen Murphy Fullosophie on behalf of Shinola Marlyn Fusek


Karen & Stuart Gansky in honor of Shelley & Arnold Leder Maureen Gates Linda Gebroe Nile Geisinger Stephen Gilbane as a gift for Sejal Patel Danielle Gilbert in honor of Rubi & Zach Gilbert Michael Gillespie Sarah Glicken Ken Goldberg & Tiffany Shlain Janice Goldblatt Gregorio Gonzalez Shirley Gordon in honor of Caroline Kangas Raj Gossain Michelle Graham Shannon Grant Judith Greber Yvonne Green in honor of Shelby DeWeese Mary Lynn Greenhow Dixie & Richard Grossman Carol Gunby Aron Hall & Alison Huml Sara Hall John & Marsha Hall in memory of Brian Hall Janet H. & J. Mark Hall Yosh Han Morgan Hankins Blaire Hansen A.J. Harm David & Jane Hartley Brad Hathaway Pamela Herbert Christine Herrin Joeli Hettler & Alden Bourne

Kit & Linda Hinrichs Sadie Hoagland Wanda M. Holland Greene Emily Holt Matthew Holt Vince Horner Anna & James Hsu Whitney Huey as a gift for Alyssa Aninag Natalie Inouye Irvington High School’s French Club Ivivva USA Inc. & Lululemon Benjamin Jacobs Najeeb Jarrar Shane Jarvie Erik Jensen Joseph & Urmilla John Oliver Kadak Scott Kane Jennifer Kaplan Doug Keller Jo Keroes Julie & Connor Kidd Kristen & Ryan King Lucy Kirchner Penny Kittle Kristin Klein & William Donahoe Dale Knauss Nate Koechley Charlotte Koh Wendy Kordesch Marvin Koshi Eric Kostenbauder Robyn Kruse Jacqueline Kudler Natalie Larios Cynthia Lee

29


Supporters

Michelle Lee & Dennis Kim Derek Lee Leigh & Michael Lehman Jacob Leland Feralee & Charles Levin Ethan Levy Stuart Litwin Lobster Theater Project Michelle Long & Christopher Nicholson Amanda Loo Kavitha & Reza Lotun Berta & Sanford Lowenstein Lisa Lozo Jennifer MacCloskey Gregor MacLennan Joen & Paul Madonna David Mandelbrot Mark Anthony Maningas Cathy Manshel & Bill Rusitsky in honor of Ashley Varady & her team at Buena Vista Horace Mann John Marcom Abby Marks Chase Martin John Martin Joseph Maser Christopher Mason Mariel Matze Shannon May Erica McAulay Margaret McCarthy Maudie McCormick Barry McGee Roxann McGlumphy Jeffrey McGrath Pamela McGuire & Russell Corrigan Patricia McMahon Paul Mele

30

Tessa & John Melvin Megan Mikhail Anupam Mishra Jeanette & Kevin Moore Morehouse Family Fund Mark Morford Cheryl Morris Katrina & Tim Morshead Naomi Mraz as a gift for Elliott Girouard Lauren Mulkey Multiply Technology National Center for Employee Ownership Molly Naughton Meredith Nguyen Elizabeth W. Nolan Kelly O’Reilly as a gift for Tom O’Reilly Kate O’Sullivan & Kurt Bauer Mike O’Toole Trisha Okubo Zachary Olson Kasra Omid-Zohoor Victor Ortiz de Montellano Dana Oshiro Emily Ostendorf Koa Ostrem Eric Ouyang Cady Owens Jennifer Padget Arrie Park Rodney & Anne Pearlman in honor of Karen Wagstaffe Peet’s Coffee & Tea Debra Pell Sacha Perold Geoff Perrin Christina V. Perry Han Phung & Juan Malo


Dale Pitman in honor of After-School Tutoring students & families Christina Poindexter William Poole Michael Powell in honor of Dumpster & Barb Haiduck Meg Donohue & Phil Preuss Simone Price Matt Price Erik Ragatz Mary Lou Ragghianti Sally Randel Radhika Rathinasabapathy Bryan Rea Kaye Reeves in honor of Owen & Charlie Shreenath Regunathan Charles Reiker & Barbara Keating Ellen Richard Margaret Robbins & Seth Weissman as a gift for NĂ­nive Calegari Prudence Roberts John B. Roberts Rene Rodarte Karen Rowan Lauren Rutherford Francesca Salcido Anne Sandbach Jim & Emily Scheinman in honor of Mac Barnett, Carson Ellis, Jon Klassen, & Christian Robinson Nina Schindler as a gift for Ilya Sukhar & Courtney Ward Gregory Schram in honor of Jamie Shaw Katharine Schultz Rebecca Schumacher in honor of Ann Elliott Fred Seely in honor of Blake R. Seely SFTech4Good

Judd Sher Vaughn Shields Sarah Shriver in memory of Florence Hochman Sibby’s Cupcakery Michael Silverman Simons Family Foundation Laura Singer in memory of Kathryn Payne Carole Sirulnick Thomas Skewes-Cox Jenny Slade Leef Smith on behalf of Free Comic Book Day Funraiser Adam Smith Barron Snyder Melanie Sperling Nicholas Spuhler St. Philip Catholic School Tania Stepanian Jeff Stephenson Seth Sternglanz Loretta Stevens Kimberly Stewart Hopper & James Stearns Jeremy Stone in honor of Maggy Cullman Matt Sulkis Sarah Sweeney Sweetwater Fund Alex Syverson Reina Takahashi Brooke & Eric Tao Mark Tauber Mary Taugher & F. Martin Booth Judith Temple David Thomas Susan Thompson Marcia Tingley as a gift for Chase Tingley

31


Supporters

Mary Kay Tisch Karen Trilevsky Turbow Family Fund Jenise Uehara Henrikson Lisa & Robert Varady Nicole Varvitsiotes Mark Vermeulen Sarah Vetters Kim Wade Travis Waind Taylor & Kent Wakefield Christopher Walker Jessica Walter Kia Wang Nevarez Ben Watanabe in honor of First Draft Howard Weaver Anna Westendorf Delina Wierzbinski Rachel Wikoff Lori Wilson Christopher H. Winship Erica Wong Anna Yen Suzanne Yonkers in honor of Joya Banerjee Yu Jurafsky Charitable Fund Leslie Yuan & David Aaronson Joyce Zavattero Sophie Ziegler in honor of Jennifer Braun Bob Zipp MATCHING GIFT SPONSORS

Adobe Systems Incorporated Matching Gifts BlackRock, Inc. Dolby Match Program Dropbox Inc.

32

Gartner, Inc. Matching Gifts Program Goldman Sachs Matching Gifts Program Google Matching Gifts Program Kaiser Permanente, Southern California Region Maverick Capital Foundation (Dallas) Microsoft Matching Gifts Program PG&E Corporation Campaign for the Community S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation Salesforce.com Foundation Select Equity Group Foundation Skoll Global Threats Fund The Walt Disney Company Foundation Thomson Reuters Zynga.com IN-KIND SUPPORT

Ali Baba’s Cave Almanac Beer Co. ALR Associated Lighting Reps Inc. AMP Printing and Graphics Anderson, Rowe, and Buckley, Inc. Ana Aranda Arrigoni Woods Ayoob & Perry Robert Steinebel B Metals Bay Area Concrete BBDO San Francisco BCCI Construction Co. Bi-Rite Market Bluewater Environmental Services Inc. Dan Brotsky & Shawna Hartman Brotsky Budget Signs Barbara Butler Margherita Buzzi


Nínive & Jean Claude Calegari California Drywall Co. California Wood Floors Camira Darren Chan Kay Chesterfield Commercial Casework Inc. Craftsman and Wolves Creative Ceilings and Drywall Inc. Cutting Edge Drapery Daltile DeAnza Tile Adriana del Mar Design and Direct Source Design Workshops DW Nicholson Corporation Dave Eggers & Vendela Vida Joanna Ellis Emser Tile Finelite Fire Detection Unlimited, Inc. Britta Fithian-Zum Four Barrel Coffee Qris Frye Gensler Will Georgantas Giampolini & Co. Einat Gilboa Chris Giordano Glumac Dylan Gold Golden Gate Fire Protection Gundlach Bundschu Winery & Vineyard Annelise Hagar HD Supply Construction & Industrial White Cap Jenna Hernandez

Christine Herrin Alice Hoult Ash Huang Independent Electric Supply Inc. Industry West Interface INTERSTICE Architects Mary Lou Iverson jak.w Jamestown Community Center Jonas Kellner Lucy Kirchner Koleksiyon Jonathan Koshi Isabella Kung La Méditerranée Andrea Lacorrazza Gloria Lenhart Jessica Lin Tracy Liu Amanda Loo Kehau Lyons Buffy and Patrick Maguire Raven Mahon Majestic Floors Inc. Magdalena Mardinian Shannon May Christy McCreary and Clif Bar & Company McMillan Electric Mission Glass Company Microbiz Security Company Minton Door Company MKThink Monticelli Painting and Decorating Lauren Mulkey National Air Balance Co.

33


Supporters

New Bohemia Signs Nor-Cal Floor Design, Inc. Northwood Office Omni Sheet Metal Inc. Orion Chandelier Overhead Door Company Paganini Electric Corporation Palmyra Kate Park Patrick J. Ruane, Incorporated Patxi’s Pizza Philips Lighting Bill Plumb PPG Paints Pribuss Engineering Progress Glass Co., Inc. Tim Ratanapreukskul Restoration Hardware Richard Hancock Inc. Rubio Monocoat USA Brooke Rusenko Helaine Lasky Schweitzer

Mike Scribner Service Metal Products Inc. SF Interiors Shaw Floors Emma Sherwood-Forbes Sprig Electric Stockham Construction Annalise Stromsta Surber Drywall Construction Inc. Tandus Centiva The Lawson Roofing Company, Inc. Stephanie Theune Tipping Structural Trader Joe’s Twitch Two Furnish Gene & Suzanne Valla Valerie Veronin Vitra Karen Wagstaffe Wattstopper Whole Foods Market Young Electric Co.

We strive for accuracy in our listings. Please email development@826valencia.org if your information is incorrect. This list ref lects gifts of $100 or more, from July 1, 2015 through June 30, 2016.

34


35 PHOTO BY MATTHEW MILLMAN


Supporters

36 PHOTO BY JUDY HART


826 Valencia Annual Report 2015-2016  
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