Page 1

VE R MO NT ’S INDE PEN DENT VO IC E OCTOBER 11-18, 2017 VOL.23 NO.05 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

— MOLLY MCLAIN, 8/11/89-7/26/17

’Til Death Do Us Part

Like half of Vermont’s homicides, Maidstone’s grisly murder-suicide was domestic violence BY MARK DAVIS, PAGE 32

MAD MAX

PAGE 14

BTV councilor speaks up

A HOME RUN

PAGE 42

VT Stage hits with Fun Home

INEDIBLE FEAST

PAGE 46

Sugar highs at “Sweet Tooth”


OCTOBER SALE OCTOBER SALE SAVE 20 – 25% OFF ON CDG SOFAS,

SAVE 20 –SECTIONALS 25% OFFAND ON CDG SOFAS, CHAIRS SECTIONALS AND CHAIRS

OCTOBER SALE

INTRODUCING DANISH DESIGN

SAVE 20 – 25% OFF ON CDG SOFAS, OCTOBER SALE SECTIONALS AND CHAIRS

Chairs starting at $449, Loveseats at $629 and Sofas at $719

SAVE 20 – 25% OFF ON CDG SOFAS, SECTIONALS AND CHAIRS

INTRODUCING DANISH DESIGN

HOLIDAY PARTY BOOKINGS

Chairs starting at $449, Loveseats at $629 and Sofas at $719

FARMHOUSE GROUP PRIVATE DINING ROOMS ARE HERE FOR YOU! SAVE UP TO 30% OFF DINING ROOM FURNITURE

GUILD TAVERN Seated dinners up to 50 guests, cocktail parties up to 70

33RD ANNIVERSARY SALE

PASCOLO RISTORANTE Seated dinners up to 35 guests

INTRODUCING DANISH DESIGN

THE FARMHOUSE TAP & GRILL PARLOR Seated dinners up to 35 guests, cocktail parties up to 70

INTRODUCING DANISH DESIGN

Chairs starting at $449, Loveseats at $629 and Sofas at $719 Chairs starting at $449, Loveseats at $629 and Sofas at $719

STOREWIDE SAVINGS!

FARMHOUSE GROUP EVENTS Full service catering & bar services anywhere in the universe

SAVE UP TO 35%*OFF

will be planting 330 Trees and SAVE UP TO 30%WeOFF DINING ROOM FURNITURE

Contact Events@FarmhouseGroup.com for details and bookings. Cheers!

Untitled-19 1

supporting the American Elm Restoration Project through the Nature Conservancy

10/9/17 1:40 PM

COMFORT SLEEPER

$300 Off

THE DAYS ARE GETTING SHORTER AND IT IS TIME TO ADD SOME LIGHT INTO YOUR LIFE. Featuring: Visual Comfort, Hubbardton Forge, Pablo, Artemide, Koncept and Vita Lighting

COPELAND AUDREY DINING TABLE CHERRY OR WALNUT

Now 33%* Off

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

THINK BIG. SHOP SMALL.

SAVE UP TO 30% OFF DINING ROOM FURNITURE

SAVE UP TO 30% OFF DINING ROOM FURNITURE

FREE IN-HOME CONSULTATION THIS MONTH! A PERFECT WAY TO EXPERIENCE OUR INTERIOR DESIGN SERVICES

NATUZZI MILAN LEATHER SECTIONAL

10.11.17-10.18.17

THE DAYS ARE GETTING SHORTER AND IT IS TIME 747 LIGHT PINE STREET, BURLINGTON | 862-5056 TO ADD SOME INTO YOUR LIFE. Mon-Sat 10–6, Sun 12-5 | www.burlingtonfurniture.us

$2,599 Now 30–40% Off

THE DAYS ARE GETTING SHORTER AND IT IS TIME TO ADD SOME LIGHT INTO YOUR LIFE.

Featuring: Visual Comfort, Hubbardton Forge, Pablo, Artemide, Koncept and Vita Lighting

THEFeaturing: DAYS ARE GETTING SHORTER AND IT IS TIME Visual Comfort, Hubbardton Forge, Pablo, Artemide, Koncept and Vita Lighting TO ADD SOME LIGHT INTO YOUR LIFE. Featuring: Visual Comfort, Hubbardton Forge, Pablo, Artemide, Koncept and Vita Lighting HOUSTON CHERRY BED GROUP

SEVEN DAYS

QUEEN BED $999 Chest or Dresser $999 Nightstand $349

FREE IN-HOME CONSULTATION THIS MONTH! A PERFECT WAY TO EXPERIENCE OUR INTERIOR DESIGN SERVICES

CALL FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT TODAY.

FREE IN-HOME CONSULTATION THIS MONTH!

FREE IN-HOME CONSULTATION THIS MONTH!

A PERFECT WAY TO EXPERIENCE OUR INTERIOR DESIGN SERVICES

A PERFECT WAY TO EXPERIENCE OUR INTERIOR DESIGN SERVICES 747 PINE ST. BURLINGTON - 862-5056

Monday-Saturday Sundays 12-5 747 PINE STREET, BURLINGTON |10–6, 862-5056 www.burlingtonfurniture.us Mon-Sat 10–6, Sun 12-5 | www.burlingtonfurniture.us

2

Dora Sudarsky, O.D.

370 SHELBURNE ROAD BURLINGTON 497-1676 CHROMAOPTICS.COM

INTERIOR DESIGN SERVICES AVAILABLE VOTED: BEST FURNITURE STORE 2017 - 8 YEARS IN A ROW!

4T-chroma071917-2.indd 1

7/18/17 12:20 PM

2v-burlfurnitureco101117.indd 1

10/5/17 2:58 PM


Featured in al, treet Journ The Wall S azette G l ea tr be, Mon lo G n o st o B Pouce and Sur le SMOKED MEAT

Stop by for hooch before you go.

Specials and one-offs from one of our faves—Upper Pass Beer Company out of Tunbridge. Come sample the goods on a crisp Fall day!

10/9/17 1:41 PM

Daysies Winners 2012-2017

IT’S TIME FOR FALL ADVENTURES!

Wednesday, October 18th

Untitled-19 1

LIBATIONS BREWERY ®

Brewery opens every day at 11:30AM for LUNCH + SUPPER 23 South Main Street • Waterbury, Vermont prohibitionpig.com

4T-ProPig090617.indd 1

10/3/17 8:31 PM

come

&

enjoy our new

at the great northern

“10 BEST WINE BARS IN NEW ENGLAND”

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

kid’s menu

4 PM - 11 PM | 388 PINE STREET, BURLINGTON VT | (802) 865-2368

- BOSTON.COM

10.11.17-10.18.17

$1 OYSTERS WED - SAT FROM 4:00 - 6:00 #allthechablis

SEVEN DAYS

716 PINE STREET, BURLINGTON, VT THEGREATNORTHERNVT.COM

3

Untitled-38 1

10/10/17 12:49 PM

Untitled-37 1

10/10/17 12:44 PM


MENTION THE CODE REBOUND10 AND RECEIVE 10% OFF YOUR PURCHASE

T RY ON A NE W MOVE. TR Y O N A P A I R O F S H O E S & RECEIVE A

FREE PRIZE *

10/12 - Burlington - 3pm-7pm 10/13 - St Albans 10am-2pm & Colchester - 3pm-7pm

REBOUND AND RECOVER NATURALLY Athletes are discovering the benefits of hemp based wellness products and the primary active ingredient, Cannabidiol (CBD). Find relief from tired, sore muscles and joints, improve focus and sleep, and shorten injury recovery time. Experience the power of plant based medicine.

10/14 - Shelburne 10am-3pm

COBB HILL AUBREY Khaki

COBB HILL ADRIANA Pewter

COBB HILL RASHEL Black

BURLINGTON • COLCHESTER • SHELBURNE • ST ALBANS

1 STEELE ST. UNIT 113, BURLINGTON MON-SUN 10-6 844-789-9333 CERESREMEDIES.COM

Enter to win • Surprises too! *Limit one per customer. While supplies last. See complete rules in-store for promotion details. ©The Rockport Company, LLC. All rights reserved.

Untitled-1 1

10/6/17 11:51 AM

Untitled-24 1

10/9/17 2:22 PM

20% OFF FLOOR MODEL AND SPECIAL ORDER SEVENDAYSVT.COM

SOFAS, RECLINERS, LOVESEATS AND CHAIRS! 0% interest

• MATTRESSES • BEDS • BEDROOM FURNITURE • SOFAS • DINING • ENTERTAINMENT • KIDS BEDS featuring...Hillsdale furniture (NE Kids), The Bedworks of Maine, International Furniture Direct, Craftmaster, Lane, Magnussen, A-America, Night and Day, Capel Rugs and many more.

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

We also feature Vermont made furniture and Amish made furniture!

2800 Shelburne Rd., Shelburne burlingtonbedrooms.com 802-985-3049

4

Hours: Monday-Saturday 9-6, Sunday 11-5

2H-burlbedrooms092017.indd 1

9/14/17 11:58 AM


emoji that

THE LAST WEEK IN REVIEW OCTOBER 4-11, 2017 COMPILED BY SASHA GOLDSTEIN, MATTHEW ROY & ANDREA SUOZZO

Ben & Jerry’s announced it would stop using ingredients treated with the herbicide glyphosate by 2020. One small scoop for ice cream lovers.

Rex Butt

AS SEEN ON TV

An animated Alison Bechdel made a cameo on Sunday’s episode of “The Simpsons.” Add the small screen to the Vermont cartoonist laureate’s impressive résumé.

1. “Bennington Banner Faces Backlash Over Las Vegas Massacre Cartoon” by John Walters. The newspaper’s Facebook page attracted more than 1,000 comments. 2. “UVM Student Cited in ‘Racist and Threatening Language’ Case” by Kymelya Sari. University police cited a student allegedly overheard using “racist and threatening language toward African Americans.” 3. “Jars of CBD-Infused Broth Recalled by Maker” by Sally Pollak. The Simmering Bone voluntarily recalled jars of meat and poultry broth infused with CBD. 4. “UVM Medical Center Plans to Expand Air Ambulance Service” by Molly Walsh. The hospital is in negotiations to expand service by working with the DartmouthHitchcock Advanced Response Team. 5. “Pride Center Leader Steps Down, Interim Director Named” by Sasha Goldstein. After just five months on the job, Susan Hartman has resigned.

tweet of the week: @the_kochalka Hermie bought a hat from mother nature.

CLASS DISMISSED

Susan Hartman

The tiny Essex County towns of Victory and Granby will soon sell their unused one-room schoolhouses. Museums in the making.

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSVT OUR TWEEPLE: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/TWITTER

WHAT’S WEIRD IN VERMONT

COUSINLY LOVE

David also learned that his paternal great-grandfather emigrated from Germany, settled in Alabama and fought for the Confederacy in the Civil War. That relative also owned slaves, much to David’s dismay. The researchers did not find a specific relative that the two men share but instead used DNA testing to prove that they are cousins, according to Gates. Sanders and David are each about 98 percent Ashkenazi Jewish. Despite their obvious similarities, both men were in a state of disbelief. “People ... talk about Larry David, and I say, ‘He does a better Bernie Sanders than I do,’” Sanders said with laugh. As for a Larry David impression? “Yeah, I’m me, I’m doing it,” Sanders replied. “I thought it’s pretty good.”

LAST SEVEN 5

an were tickled last year when funnyman Larry David delivered a pitch-perfect portrayal of Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) on “Saturday Night Live.” Now we’re learning just why the impression was so spot-on. A PBS program revealed last week that the balding, bespectacled older white men are actually cousins — distant ones, but cousins nonetheless. And neither could curb his enthusiasm when he found out the big news. “You’re kidding! Oh, my God. That is unbelievable!” Sanders exclaimed when

“Finding Your Roots” host Henry Louis Gates Jr. revealed the familial connection. “What the hell!” yelled his relation, when told the same news during a different interview. “All right, cousin Bernie.” Here’s what we knew before. Both men are Jews born and raised in Brooklyn — Sanders, 76, in the Flatbush section and David, 70, in Sheepshead Bay. Their respective paths diverged in college: Sanders took to politics at the University of Chicago while David discovered history — and humor — at the University of Maryland. But researchers with the PBS program found that both had Polish ancestors, many of whom were killed by the Nazis during the Holocaust.

SEVEN DAYS

F

Sen. Bernie Sanders (left) and Larry David on “Saturday Night Live”

FLAVOR SAVER

TOPFIVE

MOST POPULAR ITEMS ON SEVENDAYSVT.COM

10.11.17-10.18.17

? 802much

?? ? ?? ? ??

Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) said he’d donate the $5,600 in campaign contributions he received from disgraced Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein. Quite the plot twist.

That was the average price of gas in Vermont last week, according to a GasBuddy survey. Nationally, gas prices spiked after Hurricane Harvey, but they’re starting to fall again.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

usan Hartman has resigned as the executive director of the Pride Center of Vermont, just five months after she was hired. Hartman had moved to Vermont from Arkansas to start the job May 1, replacing Kim Fountain, who had been in the position for five years. Hartman resigned effective October 2, Sasha Goldstein reported on sevendaysvt.com. “Susan was aware that it wasn’t working,” said Rex Butt, who was named the nonprofit’s interim executive director, “and she had the guts to say, ‘You know, I’m not the person to continue.’ So she said it’s time for us to make a change.” Hartman came to Vermont to interview during a tumultuous time for the gay rights organization. The Pride Center was under fire for its response to an announcement that a gay bar called Mister Sister was to open in Winooski. Some trans women considered the name a slur. The center’s leaders initially declined to take a position, which prompted two board members to resign. The Pride Center hosted a “trans town hall” to discuss the issue, and the group eventually denounced the name. Its board selected Butt as the interim leader, and he’s expected to hold the post until June 2018. He talked about the recent controversy and the path forward. “Having all that in the public eye and having the vitriol is very divisive,” he said. “And the most important thing we can do is to establish our unity and our sense of a strong, stalwart community.” Butt taught for 25 years at the Bronx Community College of the City University of New York before retiring and moving to Burlington in 2016. He started to volunteer at the center and eventually served on its board. He acknowledged that it’s odd to have a “white, cisgender, hetero dude” at the organization’s helm. One of his children came out as transgender in 2002, after which he served on the board of the Hudson Valley LGBTQ Community Center. He also wrote the book Now What? For Families With Trans and Gender-Nonconforming Children.

SASHA GOLDSTEIN

Turnover at Pride Center S

SEX, LIES AND POLITICS

$2.58


LEAF PEEPS.

SHOPPES

CO-OWNERS/FOUNDERS Pamela Polston & Paula Routly PUBLISHER/COEDITOR Paula Routly ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER/COEDITOR Pamela Polston ASSOCIATE PUBLISHERS/CO-OWNERS

Don Eggert, Cathy Resmer, Colby Roberts NEWS & POLITICS EDITOR Matthew Roy DEPUTY EDITOR Sasha Goldstein POLITICAL EDITOR Paul Heintz CONSULTING EDITOR Candace Page POLITICAL COLUMNIST John Walters STAFF WRITERS Mark Davis, Alicia Freese,

Terri Hallenbeck, Katie Jickling, Molly Walsh ARTS & LIFE EDITOR Pamela Polston ASSOCIATE EDITOR Margot Harrison ASSISTANT EDITORS Dan Bolles, Elizabeth M. Seyler FOOD WRITER Hannah Palmer Egan MUSIC EDITOR Jordan Adams CALENDAR WRITER Kristen Ravin SPECIALTY PUBLICATIONS MANAGER Carolyn Fox STAFF WRITERS Rachel Elizabeth Jones, Ken Picard,

Back to School - Student Discount we honor 15% off with student ID

Sally Pollak, Kymelya Sari, Sadie Williams

PROOFREADERS Carolyn Fox, Elizabeth M. Seyler

www.essexshoppes.com facebook.com/pages/essexvt 21 Essex Way, Essex Junction, VT | 802.878.2851

D I G I TA L & V I D E O DIGITAL EDITOR Andrea Suozzo DIGITAL PRODUCTION SPECIALIST Bryan Parmelee SENIOR MULTIMEDIA PRODUCER Eva Sollberger MULTIMEDIA JOURNALIST James Buck

W E S T N I L E V I R U S9/4/17 10:30 AM DENGUE FEVER • ZIKA

Untitled-6 1

YOUR GLOBAL COMMUNITY NEEDS YOU!

DESIGN CREATIVE DIRECTOR Don Eggert ART DIRECTOR Rev. Diane Sullivan PRODUCTION MANAGER John James STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Matthew Thorsen DESIGNERS Brooke Bousquet, Kirsten Cheney,

Alex Mauss, Richele Young

SALES & MARKETING DIRECTOR OF SALES Colby Roberts SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Michael Bradshaw ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Robyn Birgisson,

Michelle Brown, Kristen Hutter, Logan Pintka MARKETING & EVENTS DIRECTOR Corey Grenier CLASSIFIEDS & PERSONALS COORDINATOR Ashley Cleare SALES & MARKETING COORDINATOR Madeleine Ahrens A D M I N I S T R AT I O N BUSINESS MANAGER Cheryl Brownell BENEFITS & OPERATIONS Rick Woods CIRCULATION MANAGER Matt Weiner CIRCULATION DEPUTY Jeff Baron HUMP MASTER Rufus

6 FEEDBACK

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Luke Baynes, Justin Boland, Alex Brown, Julia Clancy, Amelia Devoid, Erik Esckilsen, Kevin J. Kelley, Rick Kisonak, Jacqueline Lawler, Amy Lilly, Gary Lee Miller, Bryan Parmelee, Suzanne Podhaizer, Jernigan Pontiac, Robert Resnik, Julia Shipley, Sarah Tuff Dunn, Molly Zapp CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS Harry Bliss, Caleb Kenna, Matt Mignanelli, Marc Nadel, Tim Newcomb, Susan Norton, Oliver Parini, Sarah Priestap, Kim Scafuro, Michael Tonn, Jeb Wallace-Brodeur

Screen for future research to develop vaccines against mosquito-borne viruses Healthy volunteers ages 18 to 50 Determine your eligibility Email UVMVTC@UVM.EDU or visit UVMVTC.ORG COMPENSATION POSSIBLE IF ENROLLED IN FUTURE RESEARCH

Contact the Vaccine Testing Center at 802-656-0013 for more info and to schedule a screening. Leave your name, number and a good time to call back.

C I R C U L AT I O N : 3 6 , 0 0 0 Seven Days is published by Da Capo Publishing Inc. every Wednesday. It is distributed free of charge in Greater Burlington, Middlebury, Montpelier, Northeast Kingdom, Stowe, the Mad River Valley, Rutland, St. Albans, St. Johnsbury, White River Junction and Plattsburgh. Seven Days is printed at Upper Valley Press in N. Haverhill, N.H. DELIVERY TECHNICIANS Harry Applegate, Jeff Baron, Joe Bouffard, Pat Bouffard, Caleb Bronz, Colin Clary, Donna Delmoora, Todd Field, Matt Hagen, Nat Michael, Bill Mullins,Dan Nesbitt, Ezra Oklan, Brandon Robertson, Dan Thayer, Josh Weinstein With additional circulation support from PP&D. SUBSCRIPTIONS 6-MONTH 1ST CLASS: $175. 1-YEAR 1ST CLASS: $275. 6-MONTH 3RD CLASS: $85. 1-YEAR 3RD CLASS: $135. Please call 802-864-5684 with your credit card, or mail your check or money order to “Subscriptions” at the address below. Seven Days shall not be held liable to any advertiser for any loss that results from the incorrect publication of its advertisement. If a mistake is ours, and the advertising purpose has been rendered valueless, Seven Days may cancel the charges for the advertisement, or a portion thereof as deemed reasonable by the publisher. Seven Days reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including inserts, at the discretion of the publishers. DISCLOSURE: Seven Days publisher and coeditor Paula Routly is the domestic partner of Vermont Senate President Pro Tempore Tim Ashe. Routly abstains from involvement in the newspaper’s Statehouse and state political coverage. Find our conflict of interest policy here: sevendaysvt.com/disclosure.

P.O. BOX 1164, BURLINGTON, VT 05402-1164 802-864-5684 SEVENDAYSVT.COM FACEBOOK: /SEVENDAYSVT TWITTER: @SEVENDAYSVT

©2017 Da Capo Publishing Inc. All rights reserved.

FEEDback READER REACTION TO RECENT ARTICLES

THE PRESS AND POMERLEAU

In his September 27 Fair Game column, John Walters highlighted the Burlington Free Press’ recent special section honoring Tony Pomerleau. Walters is so desperate for an opportunity to tear down the Free Press that he chooses to cast aspersions on one of our community’s most generous citizens. Yes, Pomerleau is a self-made man and, in the process, may very well leave future generations of his family financially comfortable, but he has also given millions to this community to help people in desperate need. Pomerleau has given to a diverse array of organizations and institutions, from health and human services to arts and culture. So the crux of Walters’ condescension is that the Free Press sold space in their publication so that people in our community could celebrate this altruistic man on his 100th birthday? How is what the Free Press did any different than Seven Days’ annual Daysies awards? Before the final votes are cast, Daysies nominees pay for ads trying to sway readers’ opinions, and, once the winners are announced, ads from victors in every category pop up all over the pages of that week’s edition of Seven Days. You’re really going to disparage a centenarian who ensures that less fortunate children have a holiday party and that fireworks fill Burlington’s skies on Independence Day just so you can stick it

TIM NEWCOMB

to the Freeps? I think you’re just miffed that you didn’t think of it first. Tamira Martel

MILTON

PARK VERSUS PLAZA

The new plan for Burlington City Hall Park confuses plazas with parks [Off Message: “Burlington Residents React to Latest City Hall Park Redesign,” August 14]. A plaza is a paved space for flexible and dense public use such as weekly markets, buskers and theatrical productions. In Burlington, this is Church Street, which we could well expand as a pedestrian grid. A city park is entirely different. Frederick Law Olmsted tells us that parks should improve the quality of urban life for all classes of people by counteracting the artificiality and stress of the built environment using natural pastoral elements. Jane Jacobs reminds us that small city parks easily reached on foot by seniors and toddlers have a special function. They serve seniors with game tables and conversational benches and toddlers with natural play elements. Does the current proposal measure up? Sadly, it fails. Absent are the features the elderly need for repose and social engagement. They can’t even be assured of restrooms. Spaces for running and climbing by small children are replaced with a granite spout-fountain — hardedged and slippery. There are no changing rooms. Trees are sacrificed in favor


Homeownership

WEEK IN REVIEW

of surveillance across an open vista, a concern better addressed with a permanent groundskeeper and bicycle police. Finally, with retaining the soilcompacting farmers market and adding a café, restaurant terraces and a performance stage, the design is fundamentally commercial and an outside extension of Burlington City Arts. We arrive at a Disneyland of colored lights, squirting water, amplified music, and privatized eating and drinking spaces. Rip up the plan; start over. Charles Simpson

BURLINGTON

MAYBE MORAN?

I see that the Moran Plant is on the chopping block once more [Off Message: “No New Moran: Burlington Ends Old Plant Redevelopment Talks,” September 1]. I offer an idea that’s been on my mind for

Moran Plant

income through capital gains. Unlike the pay received by workers, the tax on my stocks, real estate and other investments is only paid when I sell. In addition, the 20 percent federal tax rate on my earnings is well below the 39.6 percent rate I would have paid if the money were earned in wages. We could change the Vermont tax code to capture this unfair and unnecessary gap in tax rates. We could collect the money that should have been collected by the feds and use it to transition to universal health care. Fixing the tax code that now disproportionately favors the wealthy could get Vermont much of the money it needs to move forward. I agree with Bernie that we are likely to find substantial savings by driving out the middlemen, greed and corruption. We can also save by funding prevention and wellness. Other countries spend half as much on a per capita basis while covering everyone. Bernie’s plan is great. We need a backup version for Vermont. Judd Allen

BURLINGTON

FILE: MATTHEW THORSEN

MEDICARE FOR ALL — NOW

» P.27

SAY SOMETHING! Seven Days wants to publish your rants and raves. Your feedback must... • be 250 words or fewer; • respond to Seven Days content; • include your full name, town and a daytime phone number.

Noosa Mates Yogurt Honey Cranberry Almond

$.99

Arnott’s Tim Tam Original Biscuits

$2.49

KELLY A. DEFORGE Senior Mortgage Loan Originator NMLS: 103643

CHEESE SHOP DEALS Alouette Sharp Cheddar Cheese Spread, 6oz

Reg $4.99

30 Kimball Avenue, Suite 200, South Burlington, VT ublocal.com • 802.652.2985 kdeforge@unionbankvt.com

SALE $3.99

Valley Forge NY Smoked Cheddar Cheese, 7oz Prairie Sunset

Reg $13/lb

SALE $10.99

WINES OF THE WEEK

8v-unionbankkellydeforge040517.indd 1

4/3/17 2:29 PM

Lieu Dit - Melon 2014

$19.99

Sextant Cabernet Sauvignon 2013

$14.99

Noble Wines Sauvignon Blanc

$9.99

ONE OF OUR FAVORITE CONDIMENTS! Mike’s Hot Honey Honey infused with Chilies. Drizzle on cheeses, fried chicken, BBQ, mix into dressings and cocktails and even pour over ice cream! 12oz

«»

$9.99

Seven Days reserves the right to edit for accuracy, length and readability.

34 Park Street Essex Junction Open: Tue. through Sat. Lunch: 11:30 - 2pm Dinner: 4:30 - 9pm

1186 Williston Rd. So. Burlington, VT 05403 (Next to the Alpine Shop) 802.863.0143 Open 7 days 10am-7pm cheeseandwinetraders.com

4v-cheesetraders101117.indd 1

porkandpicklesbbq.com 871.5295 10/9/17Untitled-5 2:01 PM 1

FEEDBACK 7

Your submission options include: • sevendaysvt.com/feedback • feedback@sevendaysvt.com • Seven Days, P.O. Box 1164, Burlington, VT 05402-1164

$1.99

SEVEN DAYS

I am delighted that Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) has introduced a plan for national universal health care [Fair Game, September 13]. Vermont needs a backup plan just in case Bernie’s bill doesn’t succeed this year. We could show the nation how the compassionate and rational people of Vermont address the health care crisis. As I understand it, the biggest impediment to Vermont’s recent efforts was finding the tax dollars. Like many affluent Americans, I earn most of my

FEEDBACK

Better Than Bouillon Roasted Garlic

10.11.17-10.18.17

WINOOSKI

VERY BEST DEALS OF THE WEEK!

Thinking about buying a home but not sure where to start? Pre-approval is the first step! Call or email me to set up an appointment. We will look at the possibilities! Its free and painless. I promise!

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Your article in the September 13 issue [“Stage Struck”] highlighting Adrienne Truscott’s comedy act about rape describes the accolades she is receiving for presenting a new frontier in the world of comedy. I know that comedy has traditionally been about constantly pushing thresholds, and virtually no topic has been considered sacred. So why did I find her subject matter the epitome of distasteful? I can’t even begin to imagine how someone who’s been raped deals with this kind of show. And I certainly can’t understand how anyone who isn’t sociopathic, if subjected to witnessing even one rape — of a small child, an elderly person, someone with a disability, or anyone of any age or

Sarah van Ryckevorsel

OUR ANNIVERSARY CHEESE & WINE SALE STARTS NEXT WEEK! 10/20-10/29

Reg $6.99 SALE $3.99

NOTHING FUNNY ABOUT RAPE

a very long time. The Benjamin Franklin house in Philadelphia is a very simple concept but with a very great impact. Using the same approach, a steel I-beam frame would outline the Moran Plant. It would have open space at ground level that could be used for events, markets and music. This idea keeps the majesty of this great piece of architecture while creating welcome public space underneath the shadow of the structure.

SAVE THE DATE

a big step!

9/28/17 3:16 PM


at the flynn DIRK LEUNIS

17/18

flynnspace

NOVEMBER 2-3 Thursday-Friday at 8 pm

Adrienne Truscott Asking For It

4-5 Saturday at 8 pm & Sunday at 2 pm

Soovin Kim & Gloria Chien

10-11 Friday-Saturday at 8 pm

Hinterlands

Untitled-40 1

10/10/17 4:44 PM

The Radicalization Process

12 Sunday at 8 pm

Habib Koité and Bamada

MARCH

14 Tuesday at 7:30 pm

30-31 Friday-Saturday at 8 pm

Vermont Abenaki Artists Association

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

18 Saturday at 8 pm

Stand Up, Sit Down, & Laugh

Souleymane Badolo Yimbégré

APRIL 8 Sunday at 7 pm

DECEMBER

Dayme Arocena

2 Saturday at 8 pm

Brian McCarthy Quartet Codex Release

MAY 9-10 Wednesday-Thursday at 7:30 pm

Kaori Seki

JANUARY 12-13 Friday-Saturday at 8 pm

Sandglass Theater

11 Friday at 8 pm

Gaelynn Lea

Babylon

12-13 Sat. at 8 pm & Sunday at 2 pm

FEBRUARY

Tense Vagina: An Actual Diagnosis

Sara Juli

16 Friday at 8 & 10 pm

The Sweet Remains (8 pm show is sold out)

16-18 Wednesday-Friday at 8 pm

INFORMATION AND EVALUATION SO YOU CAN LEGALLY MEDICATE

19-20 Sat. at 8 pm & Sunday at 2 pm

VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR HOURS AND INFORMATION ·

Backstage in Biscuit Land

Soovin Kim & Gloria Chien

17 Saturday at 8 pm

TURNmusic

Season Sponsor

Media

8

P E R F O R M I N G

Untitled-4 1

A R T S

· US ON FACEBOOK TO STAY UPDATED!

WWW.CANNACAREDOCS.COM

802-276-5500

FlynnSpace Performances Sponsor

Imaginary

LIKE

100% SAFE & CONFIDENTIAL

23-24 Friday-Saturday at 8 pm

Lida Winfield

WE PROVIDE PATIENTS WITH THE

NOW SERVING VERMONT

FLYNNCENTER.ORG or 802-863-5966 10/4/17 11:47 AM

VETERANS RECEIVE A 10% DISCOUNT MUST HAVE PROOF OF MILITARY SERVICE

4t-cannacaredocs092717.indd 1

9/22/17 1:08 PM


contents

LOOKING FORWARD

OCTOBER 11-18, 2017 VOL.23 NO.05

25

14

NEWS 14

Outspoken BTV Prog Pulls No Punches

ARTS NEWS 22

BY KATIE JICKLING

16

Burlington Cops Call Out Repeat Offenders A Rock Climber’s Death Highlights Danger of the Sport

24 24

Excerpts From Off Message

32

38

New Comics Festival at UVM Progressive Porn Screens in Burlington

40

BY RACHEL ELIZABETH JONES

BY SEVEN DAYS STAFF

COLUMNS + REVIEWS

FUN STUFF

BY PAMELA POLSTON

12 28 29 47 71 75 78 84 94

Comfort Food

SECTIONS

CLASSIFIEDS

’Til Death Do Us Part

Law enforcement: Like half of Vermont’s homocides, Maidstone’s grisly murdersuicide was domestic violence BY MARK DAVIS

BY SADIE WILLIAMS

25

70

FEATURES

What if Shakespeare Were Female? BY JACQUELINE LAWLER

BY MOLLY WALSH

21

Page 32: Short Takes on Vermont Books

BY MARGOT HARRISON, PAMELA POLSTON & SADIE WILLIAMS

BY MARK DAVIS

18

46

Going Dutch

Culture: A class gives a taste of Amsterdam

Culture: A social brings together UVM’s community of color BY KYMELYA SARI

42

VIDEO SERIES

Online Thursday

Home Coming

Theater review: Fun Home, Vermont Stage

11 52 66 70 78 84

Fair Game POLITICS WTF Work Side Dishes FOOD Soundbites MUSIC Album Reviews Art Review Movie Reviews Ask Athena SEX

straight dope offbeat flick mr. brunelle explains it all deep dark fears this modern world edie everette iona fox red meat jen sorensen harry bliss rachel lives here now free will astrology personals

The Magnificent 7 Calendar Classes Music Art Movies

vehicles housing homeworks services buy this stuff music, art legals calcoku/sudoku support groups crossword fsbo puzzle answers jobs

BY ALEX BROWN

44

26 87 88 88 88 88 89 89 90 90 90 91 92

Life, Interrupted

Theater review: The Exonerated, UVM Theatre

C-2 C-2 C-3 C-3 C-3 C-3 C-4 C-4 C-5 C-5 C-6 C-7 C-8

BY ALEX BROWN

46

Sweet and Bitter

Food: The art and politics of sugar at Shelburne Museum

COVER DESIGN REV. DIANE SULLIVAN

50

Empire of the Fun

BY SUZANNE M. PODHAIZER

Stuck in Vermont: Eva Sollberger joined

Underwritten by:

70

avian aficionados at the Birds of Vermont Museum in Huntington for the annual Big Sit, an international birding identification event.

XX Factor

Music: Talking with Twist’s Laura Hermiston

— MOLLY MCLAIN, 8/11/89-7/26/17

’Til Death Do Us Part

Like half of Vermont’s homicides, Maidstone’s grisly murder-suicide was domestic violence BY MARK DAVIS, PAGE 32

BY JORDAN ADAMS

MAD MAX

PAGE 14

BTV councilor speaks up

PAGE 42

INEDIBLE FEAST

PAGE 46

Sugar highs at “Sweet Tooth”

Faux fur is in

Document Storage • Climate-controlled document storage • Same-day delivery and pick-up to most locations

Jewelry & Gifts

• Month-to-month contracts, reasonable rates, no hidden fees

46 Swift Street, South Burlington, VT • 8h-easyselfstorage030817.indd 1

Self Storage & The Archive Center

802-863-8300 • www.easyselfstoragellc.com 3/2/17 1:26 PM

8H-alittlesomething101117.indd 1

10/9/17 12:48 PM

CONTENTS 9

• Destruction services

shelburnebay plaza 2989 shelburne rd • 985.9909 alittlesomethingvt.com next to the Shelburne Meat Market

SEVEN DAYS

We are a full-service document storage center. We provide:

10.11.17-10.18.17

We store it. We file it. We deliver it!

A HOME RUN

VT Stage hits with Fun Home

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Food: The whimsical domain of a Montréal chef

V E R MO N T ’S IN DE P E ND E NT V O IC E OCTOBER 11-18, 2017 VOL.23 NO.05 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

BY MELISSA PASANEN


Untitled-13 1

10/9/17 11:48 AM

10 SEVEN DAYS 10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM


LOOKING FORWARD

the

MAGNIFICENT FICENT MUST SEE, MUST DO THIS WEEK COMPI L E D BY K RI STEN RAVIN

SATURDAY 14

Movin’ & Groovin’ Though he spent his childhood in Poland, California Honeydrops cofounder Lech Wierzynski absorbed American sounds — by way of contraband recordings. The multi-instrumentalist’s rock, soul and jazz influences shine through smoldering numbers such as “Cry Baby Blues” from the Oakland-based band’s 2015 album, A River’s Invitation. Catch a high-energy live show at Higher Ground Ballroom. SEE CLUB LISTING ON PAGE 74

FRIDAY 13-SATURDAY 28

Horror Story

FRIDAY 13-SATURDAY 28

FROM PAGE TO STAGE

Emmy Award-winning actor Gordon Clapp may have found his dream job in the role of American poet Robert Frost in a current Northern Stage production. “In Gordon, we found someone who had been in love with Frost since he was a kid,” says director Gus Kaikkonen in a promotional video. The “NYPD Blue” veteran delights lit lovers in Robert Frost: This Verse Business.

Looking for a play that you can really sink your fangs, er, teeth into? The Essex Community Players embrace the Halloween spirit with Dracula, a dramatization of Bram Stoker’s spellbinding story of a vampire in search of new blood. Actor Aaron Reil portrays the caped creature of the night in this world-famous story of good versus evil. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 61

ONGOING

SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 58

Hidden Treasures SATURDAY 14

By Heart

SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 60

SEE REVIEW ON PAGE 78

SATURDAY 14

Running for Change

SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 60

Wily Woods

SEE CALENDAR LISTINGS ON PAGES 58 AND 55, RESPECTIVELY

MAGNIFICENT SEVEN 11

On Saturday, families who follow the candlelit paths at Montpelier’s Hubbard Park find the Enchanted Forest Forest, a community celebration complete with storytelling, music and a 50-foot firelit tower. Looking to lend a hand? Stop by the Montpelier Senor Activity Center on Thursday to join in Pumpkin Carving for the Enchanted Forest Forest.

SEVEN DAYS

THURSDAY 12 & SATURDAY 14

10.11.17-10.18.17

Every step taken in the SToPP 5K Run & Walk helps to raise awareness of campus sexual assault. The University of Vermont is one of several schools across the country to host this 3.1-mile outing for students, administrators and other advocates. Funds raised support the New Agenda Foundation, an organization dedicated to improving the lives of women and girls.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Raconteurs in Middlebury College’s Cocoon storytelling event must stick to two rules: All tales must be true and told sans notes. Inspired by the popular storytelling series “The Moth Radio Hour,” the Middlebury Moth-UP organization presents six individuals who share real-life anecdotes on a given theme. This year, participants muse on the topic of boundaries.

Now you see it, now you don’t. According to the Helen Day Art Center website, artist Michael Rocco Ruglio-Misurell’s current solo exhibition “explores the fluctuation between appearance and disappearance.” On view into November, “Enough to Divide a Room” features prints and sculptures made with debris and found objects paired with spray paint, fabric or concrete.


FAIR GAME

H Vermont Philharmonic Opera Gala Saturday, October 14, 8 pm Soaring concert featuring operatic selections and orchestral music of Verdi, Puccini, Vivaldi and more!

Joe Davidian Trio Saturday, October 21, 8 pm

12 FAIR GAME

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

The Joe Davidian Trio’s nuance, rhythmic unity, and fresh approach to jazz classics cultivate moving and memorable experiences.

John McEuen, Will the Circle Be Unbroken Saturday, November 18, 7:30 pm Nitty Gritty Dirt Band founding member John McEuen brings his guitar, banjo, fi ddle & mandolin along with favorite NGDB songs and stories to the stage in one special concert!

NEW SEASON ON SALE OCTOBER 12! Acrobats & Warriors of Tianjin, China

SprucePeakArts.org 802-760-4634 122 Hourglass Drive, Stowe

4V-sppac101117.indd 1

Wrestling the Octopus

ere’s one statistic that reflects, all at once, many of the most pressing issues facing Vermont. “There are 11,000 Vermonters between the ages of 19 and 25 who aren’t even in the unemployment system,” says FRANK CIOFFI, president of the Greater Burlington Industrial Corporation, a nonprofit economic development organization for Chittenden County. They’re not in school, do not have steady jobs, and have, as Cioffi put it, “fallen out of the labor market.” “We call them ‘the lost Vermonters.’” Lost, he adds, to persistent poverty, substance abuse, crime and who knows what else. Cioffi calls this group “a target of necessity” — a resource we can’t afford to waste. And that, he says, will require new ways of thinking about education and preparing people for satisfying careers. He’s brought those views to his work as chair of the unpoetically named Workforce Development Review Work Group, established by the legislature earlier this year. The group’s membership encompasses representatives of several state agencies, educational professionals, and business and labor leaders. The goal: to bring some sense and order to Vermont’s worker-training and workforce development programs. Its job is the bureaucratic equivalent of wrestling an octopus. Cioffi holds a thick sheaf of paper, page after page listing all the relevant programs spread across multiple state agencies and departments: education, human services, transportation, labor, even health and corrections. And that’s only part of the story. There are plenty of programs in the private and nonprofit sectors. The work group plans to assemble a complete list of all such efforts. But they already know one thing. “We have complexity, but we don’t have a system,” says state Rep. TRISTAN TOLENO (D-Brattleboro), a member of the work group. “There are various activities, lots of good effort and energy, a good amount of money, but no coherent direction.” This hamstrings the Vermont economy in crucial ways. It’s at the heart of a seeming contradiction: Many Vermonters struggle to find meaningful work, but, at the same time, there are good jobs going begging. “When I talk with our commercial and industrial customers, I ask, ‘How’s your business? What are your top issues?’”

10/10/17 12:20 PM

OPEN SEASON ON VERMONT POLITICS BY JOHN WALTERS

says JANETTE BOMBARDIER, senior vice president of regulatory and financial affairs at Green Mountain Power. “Everybody says ‘workforce.’”

WE HAVE COMPLEXITY, BUT WE DON’T HAVE A SYSTEM. RE P. T RI S TAN T OL E NO

Not taxes, not regulation, not Vermont’s fabled antibusiness climate. Bombardier learned the lesson firsthand before joining GMP, when she was a senior executive at IBM and GlobalFoundries. “It was difficult to hire two-year degree people,” she recalls. “We had really good jobs available but no people to fill them.” These were jobs, she says, with starting pay in the $50,000 range and “huge upside potential. And it’s really cool work, fixing things, solving problems.” “We’ve always had problems filling jobs,” says SEAN BUCHANAN, president of Springfield-based Black River Produce. He struggles to find truck drivers with commercial licenses and with keeping his warehouses fully staffed. And these are not dead-end jobs, he emphasizes. “Anybody who works for Black River certainly has upward mobility,” he says. “We want to hire people who aren’t just looking for a job but a career. We want people to stick around.” He adds that the food industry — one of Vermont’s fastest-growing sectors — is hampered by personnel problems in distribution, retail and food service. According to ELLEN KAHLER, executive director of the Vermont Sustainable Jobs Fund, the food sector has created 6,400 net new jobs since 2009. That number could have been even higher. “There is so much opportunity being missed,” she says. “People’s incomes are limited. Having better jobs with better incomes benefits everyone.” Ask anyone in education or business, and they’ll share a story that reveals the untapped potential in Vermont’s youth. “One of our students would get into trouble in high school. He would test the limits,” says EILEEN ILLUZZI, director of the North Country Career Center in Newport, located at North Country Union High School. But then “he came to the career center in the welding program and did really well. He’s now a teacher in a welding school.”

Cioffi recalls a success story that came right to his front door. He needed a plumber on a recent weekend — not an easy person to find. He finally found someone willing to show up at 8 a.m. on a Saturday — a man in his early twenties. “I asked him how he became a plumber,” Cioffi says. “He said he didn’t do that well in high school, but afterward he wanted to learn a trade. He went to the technical education center in Essex. Now he’s skilled, he loves his job, and he can move anywhere if he wants.” Some profound changes will be needed, Cioffi says, to make such stories commonplace. First and foremost, taming that octopus. Also, building an understanding that everyone is on a career path and that no career is inherently inferior. And, crucially, a much broader and deeper approach to career education in public school. Currently, it’s only offered in 11th and 12th grades. That’s not nearly enough, say the experts. “Kids are making decisions about their identities in sixth and seventh grade,” Illuzzi says. “Especially girls. That’s when they’re most likely to take risks and not fall back on careers identified with their gender.” Educators call this new approach Career Pathways. “We map out, starting in the middle school years, a variety of outcomes and careers,” says HEATHER BOUCHEY, deputy education secretary for research and flexible pathways. For a certain career path, she asks, “What should students be exploring? What classes should they be taking?” Some might see this early emphasis as effectively putting kids on a work-oriented treadmill at the expense of learning for its own sake. Not so, says Bouchey; it’s a matter of providing choices for students and letting them find pathways that align with their interests. “Kids need to understand the career paths that are open to them,” says Toleno. “Be aware of the awesome options that are available with or without a four-year degree.” The work group’s primary focus is on preventing another cohort of “lost Vermonters” from emerging, but it will also address the needs of college students, workers whose jobs are changing or disappearing, immigrants, and people in their sixties who still want — or need — to find or retain good-paying jobs. In the near term, the group aims to develop a handful of achievable improvements in time for the next legislative


GOT A TIP FOR JOHN? JOHNWALTERS@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

session. But the larger work of bringing order to complexity will take a lot of time and effort. The ultimate goal, according to Bombardier: “We want every high schooler to become a productive citizen and love what they do.” That’s all.

Adventures in Patent Extension

POLITICS

gbymca.org Untitled-15 1

10/6/17 11:14 AM

Untitled-20 1

10/9/17 2:00 PM

SEVEN DAYS FAIR GAME 13

Waterbury-based WDEV radio has lost another veteran staffer. Vermont musician ARTY LAVIGNE, host of the midafternoon music show “The Getaway,” is no longer with the station. LaVigne is the second major voice to leave WDEV since KEN SQUIER sold the station last month to sales manager STEVE CORMIER. The other departure was general manager and morning cohost ERIC MICHAELS. “Arty decided he didn’t want to stay,” explains Cormier. “Ken and I tried to convince him to stay, but he said he couldn’t.”

• No joining fee • Free fitness orientation • Enter to win a 3 month membership • 20% discount on annual membership

10.11.17-10.18.17

Media Notes

JUMP START TO FALL!

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

The pharmaceutical giant Allergan recently unveiled a new tactic in the battle against an industry scourge: losing patent protection for profitable drugs. In early September, it transferred the patents for Restasis, a lucrative dry-eye medication, to the Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe in northern New York. By doing so, it sought to take advantage of the tribe’s sovereignty to fend off potential patent challenges. The scheme has caught the eye of Congressman PETER WELCH (D-Vt.), a frequent critic of high prescription drug prices. He joined with three colleagues on the House Oversight & Government Reform Committee in writing to Allergan chief executive officer BRENTON SAUNDERS seeking extensive information about the sale. “The unconventional maneuver has received considerable criticism,” the members of Congress wrote, adding that the deal “may impair competition across the pharmaceutical industry.” On October 3, they asked for a trove of documents, including communications within the corporation and between Allergen and the tribe, financial analyses of Restasis’ potential profits, and any documents related to similar agreements covering other drugs. They gave Saunders a deadline of October 17 to comply. Sen. CLAIRE MCCASKILL (D-Mo.) is sponsoring legislation to block these kinds of patent deals. Welch says he will introduce her bill in the House this week.

LaVigne could not be reached for comment by press time. Cormier plans no changes to “The Getaway,” which offers a mix of music from Vermont and elsewhere, plus interviews with local musicians. So now he’s looking for “the right person” to handle that mix. In other WDEV news, Cormier is about to slide into Michaels’ old seat. Starting Monday, Cormier will be coanchor of “The Morning News Service” along with JON NOYES. And, at least for now, JAMES EHLERS will continue hosting “Our Nature,” a weekly show on WDEV. Ehlers is a Democratic candidate for governor, which triggered concerns about the federal equal time rule, part of the Communications Act of 1934. With certain exceptions, a broadcaster that provides airtime for a political candidate may be obligated to open its airwaves to other candidates for the same office. But the rule — apparently — doesn’t apply here. It requires that there be more than one “qualified candidate” for a specific office. Right now, Ehlers and 13-year-old ETHAN SONNEBORN are the only Vermonters to announce their intention to run for governor. Cormier expresses doubt that Sonneborn “is a qualified candidate.” Also, thanks to exploratory committees and announcements of intent to announce, there’s a large gray area around the question of who’s a candidate and who’s not. Ehlers has said he plans to run for governor and has registered his campaign with the Secretary of State’s Office, but he has not made a formal announcement. Cormier is confident the equal time rule doesn’t yet apply, but he’s keeping an eye on the situation. Finally, Vermont Public Radio is looking to hire a full-time news reporter for southern Vermont and the Connecticut River Valley. Former Valley correspondent REBECCA SANANES recently left the station, while HOWARD WEISS-TISMAN remains on staff as southern Vermont reporter. After Sananes’ departure, “We saw an opportunity to reimagine our coverage areas,” wrote VPR news director JOHN DILLON in an email. “The change will also help VPR become more agile in the areas of investigative and enterprise reporting.” And where does the reorg leave Weiss-Tisman, who’s been a part-timer at VPR? “As you know, we are unable to comment on personnel matters and how this posting could affect our current staffing,” wrote Dillon. Watch this space. !


LOCALmatters

Max-imum Candor: Burlington’s Most Outspoken Prog Pulls No Punches B Y KATI E JI CK LI N G

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 10.11.17-10.18.17 SEVEN DAYS 14 LOCAL MATTERS

KATIE JICKLING

I

f it wasn’t a scandal that Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger prompted a Burlington Telecom bidder to withdraw on September 20, City Councilor Max Tracy certainly treated it like one. As soon as the Ward 2 Progressive found out that Weinberger had sent a message to the bidder without city council approval, he unleashed a tirade on Facebook, calling Weinberger “a hypocrite” and comparing him to former Burlington mayor Bob Kiss, who was accused of secrecy and financial mismanagement that damaged the city’s credit rating. When Weinberger called Tracy minutes later, the 30-year-old councilor was unapologetic. “I’m not retracting anything,” Tracy later recalled saying to the mayor. “I would appreciate an acknowledgement of the screwup.” Tracy’s remarks, at once unabashedly defiant and politically calculated, featured prominently in news coverage. The moment epitomized the Tracy touch: confrontation laced with moral indignation, offering a biting critique with a melodramatic flair. The outburst from the council’s most combative Progressive didn’t change the outcome; the fourth bidder remained on the sideline. But for Tracy, that wasn’t the point. “We need to ask more questions and … be more vigilant,” he said. The council “needs to hold the administration accountable.” For Tracy, it’s just the most recent time he’s opposed Democrat Weinberger. In 2013, Tracy led the unsuccessful effort to get the council to oppose U.S. Air Force plans to base F-35 fighter jets at Burlington International Airport, and, last year, he fought the redevelopment plans for the Burlington Town Center. More recently, he spoke out against the proposed redesign of City Hall Park and the Weinberger-backed efforts to increase penalties for those accused multiple times of quality-of-life violations. Even though his activist efforts have been largely unsuccessful, Tracy sees himself as more than a gadfly. He’s looking long-term to win policy changes that benefit working-class Burlingtonians and to shift the conversation in the direction of Progressive values.

Max Tracy

The Old North End councilor serves as a foil to Weinberger in a number of ways. The mayor, with his coiffed hair and neat suit coat, looks the part of a former developer; Tracy is lanky and baby-faced and wears small, wireframe glasses that give him an academic air. He dresses in casual earth-tone, button-down shirts and doesn’t own a car, instead scooting around on a 1973 Schwinn bicycle. But if Weinberger has learned to adopt the refined detachment of a public official, Tracy has not. At council meetings, Tracy is quick to launch into a passionate spiel, gesticulating with his hands for emphasis. As his enthusiasm grows, his face grows redder. He’s one of three Progressive city councilors; council President Jane Knodell (Central District) and Sara Moore (Ward 3) also represent the Old North End. Ward 7 councilor Ali Dieng was elected with the support of both Democrats and Progressives. Tracy’s demeanor and politics have earned him widespread backing from what councilors refer to as Burlington’s most progressive ward. He’s faced no

strong opponent since he was first elected in 2012. “Vermont politics are incredibly special,” Tracy said. “I love being a part of that.” Tracy grew up in the Chicago suburb of Northbrook, Ill., in a family that was neither politically active nor progressive. His father, an architect, is a “James Dobson-listening, born-again Christian,” Tracy said, referring to the evangelical Christian speaker. His mother, also conservative, ran a not-for-profit resale shop. Tracy had a self-described “comingof-age moment” in 2003, when he and his best friend took the train to downtown Chicago to protest the Iraq War. He was enthralled by the power of dissent, of “people resisting something that everyone else was saying was a foregone conclusion.” It was Tracy’s first taste of politics. “I was like, Whoa, this is what I want to do,” he said. The budding pol arrived in Burlington to attend the University of Vermont in 2005. The home of then-congressman

Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) offered a hospitable climate for political outsiders — a welcome contrast to Chicago, where every city councilor at the time was a Democrat. Besides, Tracy added, he’s a Phish-head. He majored in anthropology and history and was an “academically gifted and hardworking student,” according to Knodell, who was then an administrator at UVM. Tracy became a grassroots organizer by joining the Vermont Livable Wage Campaign and the university’s Student Labor Action Project. He participated in protests and once marched naked across campus advocating for “the bare necessities” for workers. Tracy also cultivated connections with local Progs: He campaigned for then-state representatives David Zuckerman and Chris Pearson. In 2009, he helped Emma Mulvaney-Stanak, future chair of the Vermont Progressive Party, win a Ward 2 city council seat — the same one Tracy now holds.

POLITICS


GOT A NEWS TIP? NEWS@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

As a senior, Tracy used his connections as president of an honor society to get into the president’s wing of the Waterman Building and organize a sit-in to protest faculty layoffs. As Tracy led the occupation, he found himself face-to-face with a furious Knodell. “You know, Max, I just don’t understand you,” he recalled her saying, as students flooded into the building. Her thoughts? “You little stinker,” she recalled. Tracy graduated in 2009 and took a job as an international admissions officer for UVM, where he still works recruiting students from Latin America and India. He describes himself as a “Latinophile” and speaks fluent Spanish.

IT’S REALLY IMPORTANT TO REALLY GIVE VOICE TO THOSE WHO ARE OPPOSING THE PREVAILING IDEOLOGY. MAX T RAC Y

Lots of casual relaxed sofas. Not too expensive, either.

10.11.17-10.18.17 SEVEN DAYS

1515 Shelburne Road Burlington, VT 05403 Phone: 802-863-1165 Mon-Sat. 10am-5pm; Sunday 12-4

browse us at www.townandcountryvt.com like us too!

» P.20 Untitled-28 1

10/10/16 3:08 PM

LOCAL MATTERS 15

MAX-IMUM CANDOR

Not too shabby, very chic.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Tracy made his first political bid the following year, running for the Ward 2 council seat against Democrat Bram Kranichfeld. “I had no business being in that race,” Tracy said, referring to his political inexperience. But he “worked [his] ass off,” knocking on every door, sometimes two or three times. He lost by 14 votes. Tracy was appointed to the Burlington Public Works Commission in 2010. Two years later, at age 25, he ran for the same Old North End seat and bested Democrat Phil Hammerslough by 200 votes. Tracy campaigned on the need for affordable housing, alternative transportation and climate change solutions — the same issues he speaks about today. He calls himself a “Democratic socialist” and cites socialist historian and author Howard Zinn as one of his influences. On the council, he’s focused his efforts on transportation and environmental policy. Knodell noted that Tracy has a combination of both technical expertise and passion. “I can call Max [for advice] about these areas … I’ll know I can take it to the bank, because he knows his stuff,” said Knodell. Weinberger has occasionally found Tracy to be an ally, though that

collaboration has taken time, the mayor admitted. When the two were first elected in 2012, “I may have taken [his criticisms] a little more personally,” Weinberger said. “Figuring out how to serve with Max has been part of my maturing as an official over the last five and half years,” Weinberger said. When he spoke with Seven Days last week, Weinberger called Tracy’s comparison between him and Kiss “wrong” but noted that both the council and the administration had moved past the spat surrounding the BT bidder. Whether Tracy’s forthrightness is more pageantry than pragmatism depends on whom you ask. “I see Max as being courageous to challenge the mayor,” said Pearson. But Tracy shouldn’t be “pigeonholed” merely as a naysayer, added Pearson, who is now a state senator. “He’s a dissenting voice, but he’s not so strident that he can’t work with people,” he said. But Chip Mason (D-Ward 5) said councilors can more effectively make change by working quietly to incorporate their ideas into resolutions that come before the council. Public complaints, by Tracy or any other councilor, Mason said, “can veer into the realm of political theater.” For his part, Tracy has embraced the role of maverick. On the council, “dissent is absolutely important to that conversation,” he said. “I think it’s really important to really give voice to those who are opposing the prevailing ideology or the prevailing policy winds to really show that they’re being heard.” In the case of the Burlington Town Center, Tracy said, his break with the mayor reflected the views of his constituents in a densely populated ward that runs north from Pearl Street between Elmwood Avenue and North Willard Street. With a large number of students and immigrants, the ward has the most renters and the fewest car owners of any part of the city. “The Old North End often votes differently than the rest of the city,” Tracy said. “When I’m opposing the mall, the reality is, I’m voting in support of my neighborhood.” Other Progs, including Knodell and former mayor Peter Clavelle, backed the redevelopment. While they touted the project as an economic opportunity that would provide housing for all Burlingtonians, Tracy chalked it up to Weinberger’s “neoliberal, trickledown” philosophy.


LOCALmatters

Burlington Cops Call Out Repeat Offenders in News Releases B Y M A R K D AV I S

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

THE SAME PEOPLE, VIOLATING THE SAME LAWS AGAIN AND AGAIN. D AV I D C L E M E N T S

MA TT

her to a detox facility. While police led her away, she spat in an officer’s face. At the local jail, she kicked a guard’s leg, police said. The department’s news release lamented that Coolum had been “routinely released” on pretrial conditions. Police said she has been arrested 79 times since January 2016, including for 14 “asBrandon del Pozo saultive crimes.” “This incident is an example of rising concerns for the safety of law enforcement, fire department personnel, hospital staff and correctional officers,” the department’s release said. The implication: The Vermont judiciary is bungling how it handles people in crisis. That’s put the people who work in the courts — prosecutors, defense attorneys and judges — on the HE

W

T

SE

N

10.11.17-10.18.17

DAY AFTER DAY, OFFICERS WHO POLICE CHITTENDEN COUNTY ENCOUNTER

OR

SEVEN DAYS

Jason Breault

H

16 LOCAL MATTERS

COURTESY OF THE BURLINGTON POLICE DEPARTMENT

B

efore dawn on September 30, Burlington police officers descended on the downtown corner of Church and Main streets, where a man was reported to be waving a knife. They surrounded Jason Breault, a homeless man who already faced nearly two dozen low-level criminal charges. Breault followed orders to drop the knife — which was later discovered to be a gardening tool — but when cops told him to lie down on the sidewalk, he ran away. Officers tackled the 41-year-old in nearby City Hall Park. During the struggle, a cop’s hand was cut by a small knife that Breault was holding, police said. Such incidents rarely get much media attention, but Burlington police quickly trumpeted it in a detailed news release as part of an unusual, aggressive publicrelations campaign. Breault was charged with assaulting a law enforcement officer and other offenses, but the release focused on the fact that police had busted him for 29 crimes since December 2016. The Burlington police union, which does not generally comment on arrests, also issued a lengthy statement prompted by the early-morning encounter. “Day after day, on a near-constant basis, officers who police Chittenden County encounter the same people, violating the same laws again and again,” Burlington Police Officers’ Association president David Clements said in the union’s news release. “Their criminal charges are often met with excuses and justifications … The public should be outraged that a known offender with more than 20 active criminal cases has been allowed to walk the streets armed and free to endanger the lives of lawabiding citizens and their loved ones.” A judge’s decision to set bail at $750 represented a failure to “recognize the gravity of the situation,” Clements wrote. In his own statement about Breault, Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger said it was “unacceptable” that somebody with his record had been “in a position to threaten the public and harm a police officer.” The coordinated effort had the desired effect: It generated a round of stories in the Burlington Free Press and VTDigger.org and on WCAX-TV about Burlington’s population of repeat offenders, many of whom are homeless or transient people prone to congregating downtown. Burlington Police Chief Brandon del Pozo is leading a charge to crack down on repeat petty criminals. With the backing of Weinberger, police have complained in official statements, releases and interviews that people who they arrest repeatedly are being released on little or no bail, without receiving adequate treatment or punishment. The day after the union released its statement about Breault, the department publicized another case, involving Nicole Coolum. Officers were asked to pick up the 35-year-old homeless woman at the University of Vermont Medical Center emergency room and take

defensive. They say that police are focusing on the wrong problem. “If law enforcement wants to get into the business of criticizing judges, I think that the criminal justice system has a bigger problem, because that’s not a police officer’s job,” said American Civil Liberties Union of Vermont staff attorney Jay Diaz. “Judges are supposed to be impartial and dispassionate and hear the facts and make decisions.” Contrary to popular perception, bail decisions are not intended to protect the public in the majority of cases. When cases do not involve violent felonies, bail is designed to ensure that defendants appear for court hearings. Many of the defendants whom police encounter back on the streets usually show up for court, attorneys say. The defendants are ordered to abide by conditions of release, such as avoiding new charges or staying away from alcohol and drugs, because that’s what the law calls for, said Chief Superior Judge Brian Grearson, who oversees the state’s superior courts. “Repeated violations of conditions do not, in and of itself, create a risk of flight,” Grearson said. “What [police] are really asking for, and what our bail statute doesn’t provide for, is preventive detention.” “I absolutely understand the cops’ frustration, and I agree with their concerns, but the problem … is, the judiciary is not the right target,” Chittenden County State’s Attorney Sarah George said. In numerous cases involving repeat offenders, court officials said, prosecutors, judges and defense attorneys have sought mental health evaluations or treatment for offenders, only to find resources limited or unavailable. Generally, defendants must be deemed a danger to themselves or others to be admitted into the mental health system, but legal officials say that standard is unevenly applied. In 2015, Seven Days documented the case of a Burlington refugee who tried to commit suicide by cop during one of his many law enforcement encounters. He jumped off the Winooski bridge in a second attempt and still did not receive intensive mental health services. He eventually killed himself while living in the community. “The bottom line is, this isn’t a judicial system problem,” Defender General Matt Valerio said. “The problem is, you’ve got a deficient mental health system, and there are insufficient beds for the court to put people in who are going to be evaluated.” Breault, whom Burlington police have offered as exhibit A in their argument, probably doesn’t belong in prison, George said. After Breault was arrested in August, George noted, a judge ordered him to undergo a psychiatric evaluation to help determine whether or not he was competent to stand trial. Breault missed his appointment, though, and it was rescheduled, George said. He could eventually be diverted to a treatment program.


GOT A NEWS TIP? NEWS@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

OUR 6-ACRE CORN MAZE

FILE: JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

IS OPEN DAILY! Vermont Apples & Cider, Pumpkins, Gourds, Winter Squash, Pie Pumpkins and Cornstalks

Come get lost... or not! FAMILY FUN

SAT. OCT. 14 Pumpkin Paint Party with DrgFli Studios $5 each includes Pumpkin & paints SUN. OCT. 21 11am – 1pm Trick or Treat in Our Corn Maze - Family Special $20 (2 Adults + 2 Kids)

WAGON RIDES TO THE PUMPKIN PATCH FARM MARKET • BAKERY • GREENHOUSES

Oct. 14-15 & 19-22 10am- 4pm

IN THE BAKERY

Party or Meetings? Order Your Apple Cider Donuts and Frosted Sugar Cookies Today!

802-655-3440

277 Lavigne Rd., Colchester • M-Sa 7am-7pm • Su 7am- 6pm sammazzafarms.com • See our monthly sale coupon! • MC/Visa/Disc 6h-sammazza101117.indd 1

10/9/17 12:08 PM

Jay Diaz

LAW ENFORCEMENT

10.11.17-10.18.17 SEVEN DAYS LOCAL MATTERS 17

Coolum is also incarcerated for not having $300 to make her bail. Before advocating for tougher treatment of repeat offenders, del Pozo and Weinberger spent years espousing criminal justice reform principles that don’t involve traditional punishment. For example, del Pozo has repeatedly lamented the lack of substance abuse treatment in prison and called for addiction to be treated as a public health problem. “It’s easy to talk about addiction as a disease and mental health issues needing to be addressed, but … it’s harder to walk the walk,” said Tom Dalton, executive director of Vermonters for Criminal Justice Reform. “There are legitimate concerns police are raising, but what we should be demanding is

not that we increase criminal penalties. That approach isn’t going to make a difference.” As Diaz put it, “Putting people in cages is not effective in making communities safer.” Del Pozo rejected that analysis. For some defendants, the chief said, treatment is needed. But others who are repeatedly breaking the law by flouting conditions of release need to be incarcerated. That particular misdemeanor — the most common crime in the city —  accounts for nearly 1,100 of the charges Burlington police have brought since 2011. At least one of those was Breault’s; he’d been told by a judge not to possess weapons. “I’m not dogmatically clinging to one solution,” del Pozo said. Clements said police plan to keep up the public pressure for change. In late August, the city council instructed two committees to draft a proposed local ordinance targeting repeat offenders and to review the city’s social safety net. That work is ongoing. “This is a failure,” Clements said, “and it ... falls on our shoulders to make life-or-death decisions, usually when it’s beyond just a mental health concern, and [these offenders are] a risk to themselves or others. That is a recipe for death. It’s a recipe for somebody getting shot. Nobody wants that.” !

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

“He should be hospitalized based on his mental illness,” George suggested. “But that seems to be harder and harder to accomplish based on the bed space.” Because he couldn’t come up with $750 for bail, Breault is being held in the Northwest State Correctional Facility in Swanton. He bemoaned his repeated arrests in a court document. “I lose money for being harassed by the police,” Breault wrote. “And everything gets stolen while I’m unjustly sitting in jail.”

Contact: mark@sevendaysvt.com, @Davis7D or 865-1020, ext. 23 Untitled-39 1

10/10/17 12:50 PM


LOCALmatters

A Rock Climber’s Death Highlights Dangers of an Increasingly Popular Sport

18 LOCAL MATTERS

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

COURTESY OF RON RYAN

T

wo smooth branches nailed into the shape of a cross adorn the trunk of a scraggly maple tree below a photograph of 20-year-old Rebecca Ryan. The makeshift memorial at the popular rockclimbing destination known as Lower West Bolton is a reminder that Ryan and her easygoing smile will never return. She died in a fall at the rugged 90foot wall of rock in Bolton on September 16, as two friends waited below. The loss of the University of Vermont junior devastated fellow students and her family. It’s also triggered conversations about safety in relation to a sport that is growing in popularity with adrenalin junkies around Vermont. Ryan fit the climber profile. The young woman skied alpine race courses at 40 miles an hour, kayaked in waters off Alaska and picked her way over icecovered glaciers. She’d been climbing for at least two years and had even checked out the competitive circuit. The Vermont State Police say they have not completed the final report on Ryan’s accident and denied a public records request from Seven Days for the document last week. The preliminary one, penned by Vermont Department of Public Safety search and rescue coordinator Neil Van Dyke, was posted at climbing resource website neclimbs.com in response to climbers who were calling for more details about the accident. His account did not name the two climbers who were with Ryan, and Van Dyke, a veteran ice climber, also declined to identify them to Seven Days. UVM has a rock-climbing club, but this excursion was just an outing among friends. Ryan and her companions had headed to Lower West to tackle a popular climb. A half hour from Burlington, it’s an easy walk from a parking pulloff on Bolton Notch Road. Seven Days visited the site last week with Seth Maciejowski, an avid climber who serves as president of CRAG-VT. The nonprofit group, based in Richmond, promotes safe climbing and works to preserve and expand access to climbing areas in Vermont. Signs at the start of the path mark the area, including one that warns: “Rock climbing is dangerous. Climb at your own risk!” Another notes that CRAG owns Lower West and urges visitors

FILE: JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

B Y M O LLY WA LSH

Climber in Lower West Bolton

to join the group. CRAG has about 150 members statewide. The sun filtered through the birch, beech and maple trees en route to the base of ancient cliffs. Autumn leaves helicoptered to the ground alongside the walls of schist — a gray, coarsegrained rock — that form a buttress 90 to 120 feet high. Nobody was scaling the cliff that day, but evidence of its popularity was everywhere. The slippery lichen known as rock tripe had been scrubbed clean along the well-traveled vertical routes. Here and there, white

marks indicated spots where climbers covered their hands in chalk to better grip the crags. Numerous steel bolts screwed into the rock provide more reliable protection. Ryan and her climbing partners were not using those permanent bolts that day on their route, known as Harvest Moon. Instead, they were “top-roping” — a technique that involves looping the rope around a tree or through a secure anchor at the apex of the cliff. One end is secured to a harnessed belayer on the ground; the other is attached to the climber above. The belayer keeps the

rope taut as the climber ascends, to prevent a fall. Climbers can lower themselves in the top-roping scenario, too, with the belayer providing a counterweight and slowly giving the climber more rope to descend. The trio made several climbs and were ready to leave, according to the preliminary report. Ryan ascended one more time to collect equipment at the top, where the rope was anchored onto two rings bolted into a boulder. In the report, Van Dyke refers to Ryan as “climber #1.” Her climbing partners, referred to as “climber #2” and “climber #3,” believed the plan was for “#1 to ascend, clean the anchor and rappel down.” Cleaning anchor entails resetting the rope at the top, so that all gear can be collected and ropes pulled down from the ground after a final descent. Rappelling would have involved Ryan threading the rope through a piece of gear and lowering herself from the top anchor — without the assistance of a belayer below. According to the report, Ryan climbed up and called “Off belay,” signaling to her partner on the ground to remove belay equipment from the rope, presumably so she could rearrange the roping and “clean anchor.” The belayer took off the harness, believing that Ryan would rappel down without help. Then things got confusing, according to the report.


MOLLY WALSH

SHE LIVED AN EXTRAORDINARY LIFE.

MOLLY WALSH

GOT A NEWS TIP? NEWS@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

OUTDOORS

IT WAS SHORT, BUT IT WAS VERY BEAUTIFUL. RON RYAN

A makeshift cross fastened to a tree at the Lower West Bolton cliffs

“About 5 minutes later #1 called, ‘Are you ready to lower?’ Both #2 and #3 shouted ‘no’ back, and #2 rushed to put their harness back on. Less than a minute later Climber #1 was observed in an uncontrolled fall down the face, which she did not survive.” Ryan did not have a rappel device on her harness. It was found in a pile of gear at the base of the climb, according to the report.

Van Dyke concluded that the “most likely scenario” was that Ryan had intended to rappel down but realized she had left that crucial piece of equipment behind. She probably didn’t hear the “no” shouts from below and leaned back to descend, expecting to be lowered, and fell. But it’s also possible that she slipped, his report says. There’s no way to know for sure.

Seth Maciejowski

Her loss hit Vermont climbers hard. They’re weighing in on online chat boards, paying their respects, attempting to analyze the emerging details and also reflecting on the dangers of the sport. Some climbers have offered their own close-call tales. Rock-climbing deaths are rare but not unheard of in Vermont. Two years ago, in 2015, a Sunderland rock climber fell to his death in Dorset as a result of a rappelling

error. There have also been fatalities and serious accidents at Smugglers’ Notch, news stories and accident reports show. Some are tricky to categorize. For example, in 1980, a man died after a 30-foot fall while climbing at the Notch without any ropes or gear — an incident Van Dyke considers a hiking death not a climbing

ROCK CLIMBER

» P.20

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Rebecca Ryan

10.11.17-10.18.17 SEVEN DAYS LOCAL MATTERS 19

Untitled-4 1

9/7/17 3:40 PM


LOCALmatters

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 10.11.17-10.18.17

one. Vermont State Police do not keep a tally of rock-climbing fatalities. For all the technical gear that climbers use, from carabiners to harnesses, one of the most important tools is communication, Maciejowski emphasized. It’s “imperative” that your partners “know exactly what you are doing,” he said. When in doubt? Walk down. Some commenters noted that’s what Ryan should have done if she couldn’t hear her partners. At West Bolton it’s an easy 12-minute hike from the top of the cliff to the base. Despite the dangers, more and more people are negotiating rock faces. Indoor climbing gyms and mini-walls at playgrounds and resorts are proliferating — and leading newcomers to the sport to then venture outside. Twenty years ago, the cliffs at Bolton had just a few marked routes, said Maciejowski. Now, there are probably 200, he said. Students from Middlebury College, Saint Michael’s College and UVM climb there. And there are plenty of other spots, too. CRAG owns 58 acres at four cliff bands in Vermont and is raising funds to buy property near Lower West known as the Bolton Dome. The nonprofit is negotiating with the Episcopal Diocese of Vermont for permission to climb at Rock Point, the limestone cliff in Burlington overlooking Lake Champlain. CRAG members are also working with state officials on getting signs to mark a popular route for bouldering — climbing huge rocks without ropes — at Smugglers’ Notch. So far, most of the group’s minimal funding has come from memberships, donations and grants. The sport draws thrill seekers such as Ryan. She’d always been game to conquer whatever challenges the mountains offered, recalled her father, Ron Ryan, a

20 LOCAL MATTERS

SEVEN DAYS

Max-imum Candor « P.15 “I wasn’t doing it to be oppositional,” Tracy said, noting that he had pushed for concrete changes, such as more parking and an increased number of affordable units. “The development should be affordable and accessible to a wide range of Burlingtonians. It shouldn’t just be a playground for the rich.” Some of his suggestions were later incorporated into the development plan.

consultant and entrepreneur who lives in Knoxville, Tenn. When Rebecca Ryan was a child, the family lived in Missoula, Mont. The little girl learned to ski steep faces and bowls that left her own mother, Martha, quaking at the top, Ron Ryan said. Their daughter started alpine racing in Montana and continued training after she, her two siblings and her parents moved to Tennessee. She enrolled at the Green Mountain Valley School, a ski academy and boarding school in Waitsfield, and thrived there during her teen years. A crash at Sugarloaf in Maine slowed her down. “She fell on the headwall. Her leg was twisted around behind her head, and she broke her femur pretty cleanly,” her father recalled. A surgeon put Rebecca Ryan back together, but she had lingering problems. “She competed the next year, her senior year, but she was under tremendous pain and really didn’t ski terribly well,” he said. So Ryan found other outlets. At UVM, she enjoyed hiking, camping and teaching people with disabilities how to ski. A practicing Presbyterian, she found a deeper spirituality in the UVM InterVarsity Christian Fellowship. She spent her spring breaks on mission trips with the campus group. “It was something much more powerful than someone who gets up and polishes their shoes and goes to church every Sunday,” her father said. “It was something she was much more committed to than that.’’ He declined to discuss any details of the accident, saying it was too difficult. “I think that one of the most important things that gives us as parents comfort is that she lived an extraordinary life,” he said. “It was short, but it was very beautiful.” He and his wife sometimes talked to their daughter about the wisdom of her

And he gave “a sense of inspiration” to the Coalition for a Livable City opposition group, said Tony Redington, a Ward 2 resident. Last winter, Pearson encouraged Tracy to run for the state legislative seat vacated by Democrat Kesha Ram, who ran for lieutenant governor. “There are a lot of wishy-washy people who hold positions in politics” who aren’t “grounded in principles around equality, criminal justice and social justice, the way Max is,” Pearson said.

MOLLY WALSH

Rock Climber « P.19

CLIMBER #1 WAS OBSERVED IN AN UNCONTROLLED FALL DOWN THE FACE,

WHICH SHE DID NOT SURVIVE.

P R E LI M I NA RY S TATE R E P O R T

The bolts and anchors at the top of the cliff that Rebecca Ryan used the day of the accident

athletic pursuits, especially after a fall during an indoor climbing competition caused a second major injury during her first year at college. The compound fracture to her right ankle required surgery and more rehab. Still, Ryan recovered and made inspirational posters to help with the

journey. One of them, her father remembered, summed up her attitude well. It quoted a line from a Harry Potter book that said: “What’s life without a little risk?” !

Tracy considered the offer but declined when two other Progs — Selene Colburn and Brian Cina — stepped up to run. It’s unclear if Tracy’s worldview would resonate beyond the young, liberal demographics of his ward, said Kurt Wright (R-Ward 4). That may limit Tracy’s chances of seeking higher office, Wright hypothesized. “I think that when you get outside of the Old North End area, the broader electoral vote would be looking for someone a little more centered,” he said.

Tracy said he’s not yet looking beyond his ward’s borders, citing ongoing council efforts to improve Burlington’s walking and biking infrastructure. Much of his current work, he said, is a long-term investment. “I may lose battles along the way, but I may shift the consciousness,” Tracy said. “I may convince the administration to think differently in the next battle.” !

Contact: molly@sevendaysvt.com

Contact: katie@sevendaysvt.com


EXCERPTS FROM THE BLOG

A Burlington activist said he used graffiti Monday to make a political statement about a mural near Church Street. Albert Petrarca, who describes himself as a member of the Off the Wall coalition, said in a press release that he and other members of the group defaced an identification plaque that accompanies the “Everyone Loves a Parade” mural downtown. Petrarca called the public art, which is 124 feet by 16 feet, a “white supremacist symbol” that obliterates “First Nation peoples’ lives and history.” The goal of his graffiti? “To reset the debate on why an undeniably racist piece of ‘art’ and ‘history’ occupies our town square,” wrote Petrarca, an activist who is outspoken on a variety of Burlington issues. The mural is located on the side of a building that houses Banana Republic along the pedestrian-only Leahy Way, which leads to the Marketplace parking garage. And yes, for those wondering, Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) is also depicted in the mural. It also includes Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger, who is seen waving to the

SADIE WILLIAMS

Burlington Activist Takes Aim at ‘White Supremacist’ Mural

The graffiti

parade-loving crowd with his daughter, Li Lin, sitting astride his shoulders and his wife, Stacy, standing at his side. Petrarca’s coalition demands that Weinberger “immediately withdraw his consent to being on this mural and insist that his figure be removed from it.” The mayor, in a statement Monday, said “the city appreciates the outreach regarding this public art. “The city is deeply committed [to] inclusion and diversity, and I have directed Ron Redmond to review the issues raised by today’s protest and provide a report and recommendations within 30 days,” Weinberger said. “While I appreciate the hard work and private resources that went into creating the mural, the issues raised today deserve careful review.” Redmond is the executive director of the Church Street Marketplace, which commissioned the $100,000 project in 2009 to celebrate the quadricentennial of

Samuel de Champlain’s 1609 discovery of Lake Champlain. The mural was completed in 2012. The timing of the defacement appears not to be a coincidence. Columbus Day, declared by Gov. Phil Scott as Indigenous Peoples’ Day in Vermont, has long been controversial for whitewashing the impact explorer Christopher Columbus had on Native Americans. “People all over the U.S. are reexamining the flags, statues and memorials in our public commons,” Petrarca wrote. “Racism and fake history have no place in Burlington.”

SASHA GOLDSTEIN

Mayor Urges City Council to Reject Co-op Bid for Burlington Telecom Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger plugged the out-of-state companies offering the two highest bids for Burlington Telecom and urged city councilors to reject a substantially lower offer from the Keep BT Local co-op. The co-op’s $12 million bid is doomed by legal, financial and regulatory concerns, and is inferior to the $27.5 million offer from

Ting and the $30.8 million put up by Schurz Communications, the mayor said Tuesday at a press conference in his city hall office. Weinberger voiced his opinion loud and clear several days before the city council holds a key vote next Monday to narrow the field from three to two finalists. “Fundamentally, at this point, the KBTL proposal is not viable,” Weinberger said. According to Weinberger, Citibank, which is owed proceeds from the sale, has implied that it could sue if the city accepts the co-op’s low bid. He instead emphasized the positives found in the other two bids. Both proposals include a pledge to build out the system so that it can reach portions of the city where service is not now available. Both also are committed to strong privacy policies, to net neutrality, and to having an office and “major staff presence” in the Queen City, Weinberger said. He urged councilors to accept both the Schurz and Ting bids so that city officials can do a final blitz of negotiations with the two outfits. “Ultimately, accepting either will result in big wins for Burlington Telecom customers, taxpayers and the city itself,” Weinberger said.

MOLLY WALSH

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 10.11.17-10.18.17 SEVEN DAYS LOCAL MATTERS 21

Untitled-23 1

9/29/17 4:42 PM


Page 32: Short Takes on Five Vermont Books

22 STATE OF THE ARTS

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

B Y MARGOT HARRISON, PAMEL A PO LSTON & S A D I E WI LLI A MS

S

even Days writers can’t possibly read, much less review, all the books that arrive in a steady stream by post, email and, in one memorable case, a scurry of squirrels. So this monthly feature is our way of introducing you to five books by Vermont authors. To do that, we contextualize each book just a little and quote a single representative sentence from, yes, page 32. Inclusion here implies neither approval nor derision on our part, but simply: Here are a bunch of books, arranged alphabetically by authors’ names, that Seven Days readers might like to know about. !

Contact: margot@sevendaysvt.com, pamela@sevendaysvt.com, sadie@sevendaysvt.com

Bathory

Robert Buckeye, Amandla Publishing, 53 pages. $15.

Roxie & Fred

Richard Alther, Regent Press, 318 pages. $19.95 paperback, $7.19 ebook.

The girls at fifteen were well along in social studies, world geography and history, but Roxie was riveted by the newspaper pictures of war-ravaged families, the wailing, lost children especially. Roxie is 88, slowing down and enjoying her solitude after a tumultuous life that has taken her around the globe. Fred is 48, a successful painter who leaves his stable married life in the hopes of developing a bold new artistic practice. When they meet in an art class, a third of the way into the book, Roxie impresses Fred with her “unforced vigor” and her unabashed sketch of the male model’s impressive equipment. He’s intrigued by her frankness, and the pair forges a relationship that encompasses art, philosophy, friendship, sex and much more. Author RICHARD ALTHER (The Scar Letters) focuses on interiority, his stylized, alliterative third-person narration often slipping toward internal monologue just as the story slips among different eras in the characters’ lives. In this ruminative twist on the film Harold and Maude, age is only a footnote to a meeting of the minds. M.H.

On these All Soul’s Days families go not only to the cemeteries where their loved ones lie but also where — wherever they might be — their daughters who have disappeared might be… ROBERT BUCKEYE’s

latest publication, about the infamous 17th-century murderer Elizabeth Báthory, opens with a quote from surrealist scribe Georges Bataille. “Beyond a doubt, mankind as a whole must forever remain in hiding, but human consciousness — in pride and humility, with passion and in trembling — must forever be open to the zenith of horror.” The book plainly takes cues from Bataille, rendering a surreal, fragmented and erotic portrait of Báthory’s mind during her last years as she lies — and paces and rages and reflects — imprisoned in her castle. Everyone is complicit in her murders and torture, some of which are evocatively described in what can only be called loving terms. And, while that quote certainly leads the reader toward relevant motifs of the work — hidden desires, madness and stream of consciousness — perhaps equally appropriate would be Bataille’s famously morbid words: “A kiss is the beginning of cannibalism.” That statement, which makes intellectual and sexual intercourse into acts of bloody devouring, evokes the attitude of Bathory in all its intimate and sanguine poetry. S.W.

Never Too Late to Die James M. DiClerico, AuthorHouse, 316 pages. $20.99 paperback, $3.99 ebook.

Stunned by Anne McCracken’s revelations, I asked, “What is it you want of me?” A widow arrives in the office of a Stowe private investigator with a story both chilling and intriguing. She believes her engineer husband, killed by a collision with a boulder as he crossed Smugglers’ Notch, was actually murdered. An unexplained cash stash could be the key to the motive. Stowe author JAMES M. DICLERICO is a former PR flak just like his fictional P.I., Harley Napoleon, about whom this is his second novel. More thriller than mystery, Never Too Late to Die switches rapidly from first to omniscient third person, taking readers all the way back to the Vietnam War to lay its plot groundwork. Napoleon finds himself embroiled in a conspiracy that spans decades, involving a mobster, a general, a congressman and a CIA agent with a very big grudge. Can he get justice for his client as those dangerous players converge on his idyllic ski town? M.H.


My Father & New England

BOOKS

with

peter barnett

Philosopher and book artist.

WEDNESDAY

October 18

12:00pm

While Herbert Barnett spent the latter half of his career as Dean of the Art Academy of Cincinnati, his landscape painting during this time focused on New England. In this talk Peter Barnett, the artist’s son, places the Vermont work in the context of Herbert Barnett’s other landscapes and his New England roots. Support from UVM’s Center for Research on Vermont. Held in conjunction with the current Fleming exhibition, Herbert Barnett: Vermont Life and Landscape, 1940-1948 regular admission

Trace

Archer Mayor, Minotaur Books, 336 pages. $25.99 WWW.FLEMINGMUSEUM.ORG

Not every case begins with a knife dripping blood.

10/4/17 11:44 AM

This Fall join us at

Nightly Food Specials

Food Specials Start at 5 PM | Dine-In Only

Monday

$3 Pierogis (5) • $3 Moscow Mules

Tuesday

$2 Fish Tacos (each) • $3 Margaritas

Wednesday

$2 Pulled Pork Sliders (each) $3 Cuba Libres • (rum & coke w/lime)

Thursday

½ off Wings ($6, 8 wings) $4 draft beer selection

SEVEN DAYS

Lovely outdoor patio • Children’s menu Seating is first-come, first-served Casual Dress • Gluten-free options available.

Open for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Visit our website or call for hours.

70 Essex Way | Essex Jct, Vt. | EssexResortSpa.com | 802.878.1100 4t-thessex090617.indd 1

9/1/17 12:12 PM

STATE OF THE ARTS 23

P.P.

The Holy Father released the young man and said, “It is my pleasure to help you, my son. We’ll have your papers for you presently.”

Untitled-3 1

10.11.17-10.18.17

M.H.

Jess and Keith Flaherty, Crimson Cloak Publishing, 282 pages. $13.99 paperback, $3.99 ebook.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

The cast of this novel from a Rutland County couple includes numerous angels and demons, Lucifer, an immortal Roman soldier who witnessed Christ’s death, a descendant of Mary Magdalene and, yes, the pope himself. But don’t expect inspirational fiction, at least not in the usual sense. This is the first installment in a pop-culture-savvy, humor-tinged urban fantasy series reminiscent of the eternally running CW show “Supernatural.” Cheeky demon protagonist Ben masquerades as a Burlington student to get close to a half-angel girl who’s the subject of an apocalyptic prophecy. Soon he finds himself falling for her — as well as her home. “Vermont … was full of good food, good booze, well-educated people, and was easy for him to love,” the authors write. Seems even hellspawn appreciate our beer scene.

An uptick in crime is not something Vermonters want to read about in their local newspapers. But fans of Newfane-based author ARCHER MAYOR eagerly await the annual novel that desecrates the state’s bucolic, wholesome image. With Trace, the 28th book in his Joe Gunther series, Mayor delivers the deliciously villainous goods. But, as always, the de rigueur elements of detective fiction — a clever plot, the frisson of suspense, a gripping build to climax — are only part of the appeal. What makes his books eminently readable is Mayor’s deep dive into the minds of his complex characters, the quartet of seasoned detectives who make up the Vermont Bureau of Investigation. While solving wrongful deaths and other misdeeds, each also works through the puzzles of his or her life. In Trace, Mayor sends Gunther out of state to care for his ailing mother, temporarily putting loyal sidekick Samantha Martens in charge. Meantime, the misanthropic Willy Kunkle follows an unlikely lead to a military saboteur. And Lester Spinney’s discovery of planted evidence upends a long-closed doublehomicide case. Mayor deftly layers this trio of plots toward conclusions that come all too soon.

Always Darkest

Herbert Barnett (American 1910-1972) Self-Portrait, about 1958. Oil on canvasboard. Courtesy of Childs Gallery, Boston


A Contemporary Play Asks: What If Shakespeare Were Female? B Y JA CQ UELI N E L AWL ER

COURTESY OF DOK WRIGHT/MODEL CHRYSTAL HUTCHINS

W

hen a play exploring gender roles 400 years ago seems disturbingly familiar, it upsets the notion of progress, to say the least. This week, the VERMONT SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL presents a reimagining of Elizabethan England with a staged reading of Shakespeare’s Sister, a 2015 play by Emma Whipday. As its title suggests, the work posits a female playwright and how she might have been received. The performance features local actor ALY PERRY as Shakespeare’s sister, Judith, and VSF veterans Dean Linnard and Nick Piacente, among others. The production is the third in VSF’s “salon” series this year — intimate gatherings at which local actors read aloud plays by, about or inspired by William Shakespeare. After the readings, special guests lead a discussion with the audience. VSF founders, married team JENA NECRASON and JOHN NAGLE, began hosting the salons in their

THEATER

Publicity image for Shakespeare’s Sister

living room about two and a half years ago. Their initial aim was to enjoy some lesser-produced Shakespeare plays with their friends and other industry folk. They have since taken their salons to the community at large. Their production of Shakespeare’s Sister this Sunday, October 15, at Colchester’s Mead Hall, is the third public salon this year. Necrason believes that the salons have allowed an opportunity “to dive into work by playwrights other than Shakespeare” and to easily perform in different locations. For the past five years, VSF has produced a summertime Shakespeare play in multiple locations, including Burlington’s Oakledge Park and the Shelburne Museum lawn. This year, that format was put on hold in favor of the salon series. As Nagle told Seven Days back in May, the company has focused on building its board and resources in order to accommodate a larger, more expansive festival in the future.

10.11.17-10.18.17 SEVEN DAYS 24 STATE OF THE ARTS

The phrase “pulp culture” comes from the practice of printing popular stories on pulp paper, pioneered by Argosy magazine in 1896. Once derided as trash, pulp literary forms have multiplied, thrived and, in many cases, won cultural respectability. Still, their humble origins are reflected in the title of Burlington’s upcoming Pulp Culture Comic Arts Festival and Symposium, which seeks to honor and explore one prominent pulp descendant: comics. The inaugural installment of this hoping-to-beannual fest focuses on nonfiction comics. Held at the University of Vermont beginning on October 19, it includes discussion panels, workshops, a daylong symposium, and a display of comic arts from more than 30 cartoonists from New England and Québec. A long-term exhibit curated by the FLEMING MUSEUM OF ART is on view in the Bailey/Howe Library. Keynote speakers are industry notables Art Spiegelman, Joe Sacco and ALISON BECHDEL. The three-day event is organized by UVM and the VERMONT FOLKLIFE CENTER in Middlebury. The latter’s interest and experimentation in the medium can be traced to ANDY KOLOVOS, director of archives and research. In addition to sustaining a childhood interest in comics, Kolovos says, “I’ve been curious about … the use of comics as a documentary medium and an ethnographic medium.” Kolovos says he saw the potential of comics to capture and share personal narratives while collaborating with Middlebury’s Open Door Clinic on an ethnographic cartoon project: Local cartoonists paired up with undocumented individuals to tell the latter’s stories. For years, the VFC’s staff has

ART From “A Stranger Walks Among Us,” 1972 Justice League of America comic

documented stories through audio and video. As Kolovos sees it, cartoons are a logical next step. “Using comics to talk about cultural issues is something I’m really interested in,” he says. “Thankfully, I’ve discovered there are people who are interested in similar things. The event, for me, is a way to draw those people to Burlington.” Among those people are Sacco, Bechdel and Spiegelman. Each of the acclaimed artists uses the medium to recount personal histories, real-life events or fictionalized cultural commentaries. Sacco is a comics journalist known for his 2001 graphic novel Palestine, which relays his experiences in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. On the Friday of the festival, he’ll talk about how journalism intersects with cartooning. Bechdel, a Vermont resident, established herself with “Dykes to Watch Out For.” That groundbreaking, lesbian-centric strip was carried in gay and alt-weekly papers from 1983 through 2008. Bechdel went on to publish Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic, a 2006 graphic novel that hinges on family

COURTESY OF VERMONT FOLKLIFE CENTER

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW COMICS FESTIVAL BRINGS LUMINARIES TO UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT memories, her own coming out and her closeted father’s suicide. It became an award-winning Broadway musical (see review of the new VERMONT STAGE production on page 42) and led to, among other things, the cartoonist’s recent cameo on “The Simpsons.” Now a James Marsh professor-at-large at UVM, Bechdel will give a live interview on Saturday night. Spiegelman also has used comics to unearth family history. Maus, serialized from 1980 to 1991, depicted his interviews with his father, a Holocaust survivor. In 1992, it became the first graphic novel to win a Pulitzer Prize. Spiegelman will speak on Thursday evening. Pulp Culture includes a fair-style event in the Fleming’s Marble Court with regional comics. “The people who organized this are largely comics fans,” Kolovos says, citing UVM professor and cartoonist ISAAC CATES and cartoonist and illustrator GLYNNIS FAWKES. They wanted to host an event that, unlike the massively popular Comic-Con festivals, focuses on the intellectual aspects of nonfiction and fiction comics rather than the costumes they inspire. Toward that end, the comic artists will participate in panel discussions about such subjects as ethnographic and autobiographical cartooning, and comics as a medium to discuss health care. Who says cartoons are just for fun? SADIE WILLIAMS

Contact: sadie@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Pulp Culture Comic Arts Festival and Symposium, Thursday through Saturday, October 19 to 21, at various University of Vermont locations in Burlington. Free. vermontfolklifecenter.org


So what does a VSF salon look like? “The actors get the script ahead of time and rehearse on their own,” Necrason explains by phone. “But this will be the first time we’re all reading it together. In that way, it will be very fun and spontaneous, since we don’t really know what everyone will bring.” Previous salon productions have included Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice, in March, and Red Velvet, by Lolita Chakrabarti, in June. The latter explores the fascinating biography of Ira Aldridge, the first black actor to perform Shakespeare in the UK — in 1828, before slavery had been abolished in Britain or the U.S. Shakespeare’s Sister references two literary giants: William Shakespeare and Virginia Woolf. The play was written in response to Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own: “Let me imagine, since the facts are so hard to come by,” Woolf muses, “what would have happened had Shakespeare had a wonderfully gifted sister, called Judith, let us say.” She goes on to elucidate how it would have been nearly impossible for a woman to write in Elizabethan England. Judith’s ambitions, at odds with the expectations of her society, lead to her suicide. In a preface to Shakespeare’s Sister, Whipday notes her contrarian mission: “I want to tell a very different tale about Judith Shakespeare. My play does not show that a poet’s heart is incompatible with a woman’s body, and it does not suggest that, for a woman, sex and death must go together.”

A feminist manifesto of sorts, Shakespeare’s Sister features historically recognizable characters but presents an alternative vision to Woolf’s narrative. This Judith does not bow to the expectations of her society but rather lives solely for the sake of her work. When Necrason saw the world premiere of Shakespeare’s Sister at the American Shakespeare Center in Staunton, Va., she was immediately intrigued. “The title draws you in,” she says. “Elizabethan England is really successfully portrayed by this writer. It is rigorously and dangerously divided by politics and religion, and that’s a very direct connection to things that we’re experiencing in the world and in our country.”

WE WANT TO BE AN AGENT OF CHANGE IN THIS CULTURAL MOVEMENT. J E N A N E C RAS ON

Necrason was also drawn to the strong female lead and the supporting characters. “They are doing what they have to do to survive, but they also buck the system, banding together to demand recognition,” she explains. “At that time, it was illegal for women to be onstage. There were adversarial circumstances pressing on them from outside and from within their group. But, as women do, they create community to solve the problem and prevail.”

PROGRESSIVE PORN SCREENS IN BURLINGTON WITH HUMP! FILM FESTIVAL “platonic art partner” Ethan Folk. In fall 2016, the, um, butter-centric short was a runner-up in the HUMP! “Best Kink” category, as judged by festivalgoers at the Seattle opening.

Shakespeare’s Sister by Emma Whipday, presented by Vermont Shakespeare Festival, Sunday, October 15, 3 p.m., at Colchester’s Mead Hall. $10 suggested donation. vermontshakespeare.org

RACHEL ELIZABETH JONES

Contact: rachel@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Dan Savage’s HUMP! Film Festival, Wednesday and Thursday, October 18 and 19, 7:15 and 9:15 p.m., at Merrill’s Roxy Cinemas in Burlington. $20-25. merrilltheatres.net

STATE OF THE ARTS 25

COURTESY OF NICOLLE CLEMETSON

second week of screenings in Seattle fell immediately after the election, so Dan began each screening apologizing for us all having to look at MAGA hats when we just wanna get turned on, scream and giggle.” One of HUMP!’s goals is to enable regular folks to direct or act out their porn-star fantasies — temporarily. The fest maintains a strict anonymity policy, with zero tolerance for cellphone use in the theater. Savage himself reads the rules of engagement, either personally or via recording, and asks the audience to repeat them back. What’s radical about HUMP! is not just the content of the films but the community created around sharing them. “To sit with strangers in a public theater watching porn,” Wardwell said, “for a lot of us, that feels pretty transgressive and new.” Got something you’d like to share? HUMP! 2018 submissions are open. Extra credit for making use of the Statue of Liberty, Ping-Pong balls and a Planned Parenthood T-shirt.

SEVEN DAYS

While living in Seattle, Wardwell attended the festival twice there before submitting their own work. They described the ballot boxes: “You’re stuffing your ballot into this cardboard vagina or cardboard butthole — it’s quite an experience.” Wardwell said their film, which is in the lineup now touring nationally, originated with their humorous YouTube personality, who offers instructional videos for relatively simple projects. Though “Breakfast in Bed” might not be everybody’s cup of tea (or buttered toast), HUMP!’s pornographic programming is wide ranging. The roster includes everything from mountaintop-partner-yoga-turnedsoftcore to an average Joe with an accordion singing “A Pervert’s Guide to Loneliness” to animal role-play. There may not be something for everyone, but there’s something for many. Each year, the fest offers filmmakers “extra credit” for including particular props. At the Roxy, expect to see an unusual number of accordions and knockoff MAGA hats (no money given to Donald Trump) with slogans such as “Make America Gape Again” and “Make America Gay Again.” Wardwell explained by email that “the

10.11.17-10.18.17

FILM

INFO

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Last summer, the ninth annual Bike Smut film festival came to Burlington. It was the final installment of that festival, but if you’ve been missing sex-positive communal porn viewing, not to worry. HUMP! Film Festival will screen at MERRILL’S ROXY CINEMAS in Burlington on Wednesday and Thursday, October 18 and 19. At $20 to $25 a ticket, HUMP! is more of an investment than, say, a night at home with your laptop. But then, the goals are a bit different. “HUMP!’s main mission is to change the way America sees — and makes and shares — porn,” declares the festival’s website. The annual traveling porn fest was launched in 2005 by Dan Savage, the sex and relationship writer behind the syndicated column Savage Love. It’s billed as a production of his employer, alt-weekly sister papers the Stranger and the Portland Mercury. In advance of the Burlington screenings, Seven Days reached out by phone to HUMP! filmmaker Ty Wardwell. The Massachusetts-raised and Berlin, Germany-based artist, who uses “they/ them” pronouns, created “Breakfast in Bed” with

The play also serves one of the goals of VSF: to address the gender gap in theater. “Things are getting better,” Necrason concedes. “More women playwrights are being produced, and major cultural institutions are being held accountable if they unveil a season that doesn’t include female playwrights or playwrights of color. We want to be an agent of change in this cultural movement.” Playing with gender in Shakespeare’s plays is not a new concept, but Necrason hopes to continue to push the boundaries of what it means to gender-bend these plays. “It can be very powerful for an audience to see a female actor playing the role of Julius Caesar, but it’s even more powerful if she doesn’t have to play it as a man, or play it as a woman, but play it as a human being,” she says. “Don’t play the gender at all, but play the character.” In Shakespeare’s Sister, it is difficult for characters to comprehend that a play was written by Judith Shakespeare. They believe that it could only have been written by her brother. “We struggle with these expectations still today,” Necrason concludes, “and are only beginning to see a shift in the [21st] century.” !


THE STRAIGHT DOPE BY CECIL ADAMS

Dear Cecil,

Can friends and family video-conference with prisoners? I know prisoners have access to phones and can have visitors, but it seems like video would also make it easier to keep in touch. — Filmore, via the Straight Dope Message Board

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

H

eck of an idea you’ve got there, Filmore. Know who else is a fan of video visitation, as it’s called? Good old Joe Arpaio, late of the Maricopa County, Ariz., sheriff ’s department, where he gained a reputation for ghastly human rights abuses before being voted out of office and convicted of contempt (and subsequently pardoned by President Donald Trump). Arpaio called video visitation “a win for everyone involved,” and while we live in a complex world with few easy answers, I’d suggest you couldn’t find a more reliable rule of thumb than: If Sheriff Joe’s for it, be wary. And indeed, video visitation is far from the simple convenience it might appear to be. Let’s thumb through Screening Out Family Time, a 2015 report by the nonprofit think tank Prison Policy Initiative, which elucidates some objections to what the organization calls the “for-profit video visitation industry.”

This ain’t Skype. Or FaceTime, either. If you’re picturing high-quality video service, forget it — this is “poorly designed” technology, according to the report’s authors, plagued with complaints about crappy connections. That’s particularly a problem for friends and relatives trying to connect from home: Video visitation is typically free when using dedicated visitor terminals at correctional facilities, but anyone logging on remotely is paying handsomely for the terrible service. (More on that below.) Even if the tech were to get sorted out on the provider’s end, consider the customer. PPI cites a Bureau of Justice Statistics survey of previously incarcerated people in which 86 percent of respondents reported an income of less than $25,000 — in other words, folks from families unlikely to have access to the decent computers and reliable bandwidth a good video link requires. In-person visits work. Most of these video schemes have

been implemented at county jails, rather than prisons, which seems exactly backward: Unlike state prisons, jails aren’t the kinds of places that generally require loved ones to travel long distances for a visit. And video visitation isn’t supplementing in-person visits, as ideally it should; it’s replacing it altogether. In 74 percent of jails, PPI found, in-person visits were no longer permitted after video visits were implemented; in at least some cases, this change was made at the request of the contractor responsible for the video technology. Why does this matter? Because “family contact,” PPI writes, “is one of the surest ways to reduce the likelihood that an individual will re-offend,” so it’s something that jails and prisons should want to facilitate, not discourage. (Unlike jails, prisons seem to recognize this: PPI found “virtually no state prisons” that had eliminated inperson visitation.) Even a single visit to an incarcerated offender has been shown to reduce the

chance of recidivism by 13 percent. And beyond any technical challenges, video makes visitation difficult because... It’s really expensive. This is the big one and opens the door to tons of broader issues. Video visitation is administered by external contractors, who charge out the nose for the service — in some cases, up to $1.50 a minute. Again, sometimes these companies will stipulate in their contracts that in-person visits be banned — hey, they’re bad for business. This is consistent with how all sorts of carceral services have been privatized at great cost to inmates and their families. It’s a tremendous racket: The companies make piles of money, the facilities get a kickback, and the fees can be set at extortionate levels while the services provided are lousy — after all, the contractors have a literally captive consumer base and, in many cases, a near lock on the market. Sending money to an incarcerated pal? That’s another way these companies make a buck. The Center for Public Integrity found transmission fees of up to 45 percent in some states; they mention one Tennessee woman who

pays a total of $70 just to send $50 to her son in the clink. And remember, that’s money inmates’ relatives don’t typically have; more than one-third of families with an incarcerated loved one go into debt paying for visits and phone calls alone. As you might guess, those calls aren’t cheap either. In fact, in 2013 the Federal Communications Commission announced rules capping inmate phone fees, citing, for instance, charges of up to $17 for a 15-minute call. Who would argue against sensible government regulation like that, right? Well, one commissioner did dissent from the ruling: Ajit Pai, who (you can’t make it up) now leads the agency, promoted to the chair’s job by Trump. The companies levying the sky-high fees sued, of course, and, earlier this year, with Pai in charge, the FCC ceased its legal defense of the rate caps. In June, an appeals court ruled that the FCC didn’t have the authority to regulate inmate phone charges, which could go on being exorbitant. So sure, video conferencing’s a great service, just like inmate phone calls — provided you’re the one hooking up the cables.

INFO

Is there something you need to get straight? Cecil Adams can deliver the Straight Dope on any topic. Send questions to Cecil via straightdope.com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.

I 7J$  E 9 J E 8 ; H  ( '

SEVEN DAYS

9EB9>;IJ;H>?=>I9>EEB

26 STRAIGHT DOPE

W Y f ^ i $ [ Z k % L[ h c e d j M [ b b d [ i i < W _ h

Untitled-7 1

10/5/17 10:54 AM


Feedback « P.7 a “Doonesbury” theme of yore?!) [Movie Review: Mother!]. I know it’s a challenge expounding upon your distinct experience, but that’s what piques our curiosity.

OF

SA

means — would ever be able to muster up so much as a chuckle, no matter how “funny” the comedian is supposed N OW to be. BR H A R Considering the centuries of suffering caused by rape, overwhelmingly of women, it seems to me that Truscott is selling her Adrienne Truscott own kind down the river. How sad. Perhaps some topics in the world of comedy should remain sacred.  ES Y

Doug Collette

CO UR T

SOUTH BURLINGTON

Stephanie Calanthe Victoria BRISTOL

CRITIC OF CRITICS

I hardly consider myself a movie buff, but I have come to look forward to the erudite assessments of current film fare written by Rick Kisonak and Margot Harrison (in large measure because I’ve given up learning anything from the Seven Days music section). So it was disturbing to peruse [September 20th’s] two reviews and notice the former’s increasing penchant for hyperbole [Movie Review: American Assassin 2] and the latter’s uncharacteristic waffling (recalls

BIGGER THAN CLIMATE CHANGE

[Re “Conquering Climate Change, One Business at a Time,” September 20]: The Vermont Council on Rural Development’s Climate Economy projects, including the Catalysts of the Climate Economy National Innovation Summit last month in Burlington and the justlaunched Climate Economy Initiative in Middlebury, demonstrate such a cursory and shallow understanding of the climate crisis that these moneymaking responses to said crisis would be laughable if they weren’t so darn tragic. Climate change is not the problem so much as it is a symptom of a larger problem: an economy that relies on perpetual growth to sustain itself, fueled by exploitation of people and the planet.

Either the passionate leaders at VCRD do not understand this basic science or they are too hamstrung by grant funds to rock the boat with meaningful programs that actually address the frank reality that our growth-driven economy is the cause of the climate crisis. I’m disappointed that reporter Terri Hallenbeck didn’t challenge the smoke screen. VCRD’s “new economy” is just the same old economy with a shiny new product. This hip branding betrays the very real tragedy that people are dying from climate change across South Asia, in Puerto Rico and in Houston, Texas. VCRD and their peer nonprofit organizations, state legislators and grant funders are hereby welcome to join the struggle and help fix the real problem as soon as they all stop pushing this profiteering dope. Jason Kaye

MIDDLEBURY

Kaye served on the Middlebury Energy Committee for a number of years, including two terms as its chair, from April 2015 to April 2017.

UNSUNG HERO

Unwittingly left out of the Nest story “Happy Together” about Bristol Village Cohousing [September 17] was the pivotal work of the landscape architect Katie Raycroft-Meyer. She has been involved with the project from the beginning, living across North Street from the infill project. She shepherded the project through the permit process; sited the buildings, pathways and parking lots; dealt with the complex issues of drainage by designing and helping to install several rain gardens; saved several existing trees from the hazards of construction; and designed patios, including one made from the vintage stones from the foundation of the fourplex that was deconstructed. Many times, the work of the landscape architect is unappreciated, and we would like to thank Katie for all her work that helped make Bristol Village Cohousing a successful new community right in the middle of the village. Peg Kamens and Jim Mendell

BRISTOL

Kamens and Mendell are members of Bristol Village Cohousing.

H.O.M.E.

A mortgage program offered by NEFCU SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEFCU is providing an opportunity to become a first-time homebuyer Down Payment Assistance No Monthly Mortgage Insurance Premium Limited Time Offer (other restrictions may apply)

10.11.17-10.18.17

For more details call

SEVEN DAYS

802.879.8790 Option 1, Ext. 2052

!

FEEDBACK 27

Federally Insured by NCUA NMLS#446767

Untitled-1 1

10/4/17 11:26 AM


WHISKEY TANGO FOXTROT BY KEN PICARD

I

s Stewart’s Shops guilty of the worst package-design fail of the decade? Or is the employee- and family-owned convenience store chain just a fervent advocate for truth in advertising? The answer may depend on your personal taste in beer. This week, a Seven Days reader and regular visitor to New York’s North Country wrote us to inquire about the design of the beer can for Stewart’s store-brand discount lager, Mountain Brew Beer Ice. Specifically, the sides of the 16-ounce, silver-and-blue tall boys are emblazoned with icons of various sports, including baseball, basketball, bowling, soccer and golf. But sandwiched between images of a volleyball player and a fisherman is the likeness of a person hunched over

Why Does the Stewart’s Beer Can Feature an Icon of a Man Puking? decals destined for Vermont State Police cruisers? Or was the Olympic hurler a deliberate inside joke meant for sharpeyed patrons of the Saratoga, N.Y.-based convenience store chain? WTF? Turns out our Vermont reader, who asked not to be identified because he works in marketing himself, isn’t the first Stewart’s customer to spot barf boy on the beer can. In the hipster world of bargain-basement beer guzzlers, the redundantly named Brew Beer has achieved a certain cult status of the “sobad-it’s-good” variety. (Our unnamed reader said he uses it to kill slugs in his garden.) For years, suds aficionados have gone online to laud or laugh out loud at Stewart’s dirt-cheap malt liquor. Some in the latter camp have picked up on the

In an August 2015 online beer review for Albany’s Times Union newspaper, Chad Polenz, craft beer consultant and coauthor of The Handbook of Porters & Stouts: The Ultimate, Complete and Definitive Guide, characterized Mountain Brew’s taste as “nothing but corn, metal and, quite frankly, dirt.” The “mouthfeel” was “oily and slick.” Polenz concluded that the beer and its lowercalorie cousin, Mountain Brew Light, were “two of the worst beers I’ve ever had in my life. I can’t believe they exist.” Other reviewers were only slightly more generous. Mr. Dave, author of the food blog Ridiculous Food Society of Upstate New York, put Mountain Brew solidly in the “piss beer” category, writing that it “smells vaguely of socks and the flavor is a bit funky, with virtually no hints of hops.

28 WTF

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Stewart’s store-brand discount lager, Mountain Brew Beer Ice

at the waist and facing a puddle on the ground. Though several Seven Days staffers offered plausible theories about the activity represented here — bocce, quail hunting, mushroom foraging, competitive hole gazing — the prevailing opinion was that it looks exactly like someone who just vomited after a heavy drinking session. Was this icon a head-slapping marketing botch, akin to the official Vermont maple syrup signs that resemble a man urinating into a sap bucket? Was it slipped in surreptitiously by a prankster product designer, like the pig image that prison inmates artfully concealed within

spewing stick figure as a validation of their atrocious reviews of the beer. There’s even a parody promotional video, viewable online, in which a lost hiker discovers a dirt-covered six-pack of Mountain Brew in an abandoned Volkswagen Microbus. Its tagline: “Mountain Brew: Can’t get any worse.”

“But guess what folks? Get those silver bad boys goddamn ice-ass cold and you can slam these suckers like water,” he added. “You can’t beat the price with a stick, and several cases of Mountain Brew is the flippin’ perfect thing for a hot-ass day in August when you feel like getting shitty drunk with the boy-os on the cheap.” Indeed, the beer, which boasts a buzz factor of 5.9 percent alcohol by volume, retails for just $3.99 per six-pack before tax and deposit. According to Stewart’s own promotional material, it can be sold so inexpensively because the company warehouses and distributes the beer itself. This also explains why Mountain Brew is available in Stewart’s 325 locations in northern New York but in none of its 10 outlets in Vermont, where, according to the State Department of Liquor Control, a beer retailer cannot be its own distributor unless it brews locally. Maria D’Amelia, media and public relations spokesperson for Stewart’s, elaborates that Mountain Brew debuted in 2010 in 12-ounce cans. Originally made by Genesee Brewing in Rochester, N.Y. — not exactly a ringing endorsement among craft beer connoisseurs — it’s now a product of Associated Brewing of La Crosse, Wis. What does Stewart’s have to say about its spewing sports logo, which has appeared on the 16-ounce beer cans since their 2013 redesign? D’Amelia says she’s been asked the question numerous times and has heard a variety of theories about what the image represents, among them ice fishing, a spilled drink and, yes, a hangover heave. Still, D’Amelia refuses to cough up a definitive answer. “Our mystery man has certainly left people abuzz for some time now,” she says with a sly chuckle. “People have tossed out some ideas along the way, but we have always left it to the customers’ imagination … While we take pride in our products, we also know how to have fun.” Presumably, though, only in moderation. ! Contact: ken@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Got a Vermont WTF head-scratcher? Ask us! wtf@sevendaysvt.com


WORK

VERMONTERS ON THE JOB

The Divorce Coach B Y K E N PI CA R D

CALEB KENNA

F

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Chris Larson

me [billing you for] going to court and holding your hand through the whole thing? It’s a seat in the back of the plane, but you’re still getting there.

SEVEN DAYS

Contact: ken@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Learn more at vermontfamilylaw.com.

WORK 29

SD: If you’re not making money, why do it? CL: I get more joy out of that hour of coaching than anything else I do as a lawyer. People come in with so much anxiety and confusion. I used to spend that hour trying to convince people to hire me. It was a free consultation, but really it was a sales pitch. Now I’m not doing that at all. People come in, they bring whatever paperwork they have, and we go over what step of the process they’re at.

It’s still a lawyer-client relationship. I can’t talk to the other party. But I can say, “Here’s your homework.” Then I can come up with a plan of what’s going to happen next and what to expect. Often I can predict what the outcome is going to be with a fair degree of accuracy. And I’ve got a box of tissues on the table, because people cry. A lot of the time, it’s because there’s a light at the end of the tunnel. I feel like I just gave someone a gift. And it’s easy for me to do. !

10.11.17-10.18.17

resh out of Harvard Law School, benches are full of people who can’t Chris Larson landed a job that afford me and don’t have thousands of most law school grads only dollars to spend [getting divorced] and dream about: He was hired by have no idea or resources about how to a large, prestigious law firm in Boston represent themselves. and given a 37th-floor window office overlooking Boston Harbor. There, he SD: Basically, you’re giving away negotiated commercial real estate deals something you previously charged for? worth millions of dollars. “My first year out of law school, I CL: Yes, exactly. It makes no business made more money than I’ll probably sense. ever make again,” he says. “And I was SD: How does the cost of this apterminally bored.” Larson, who grew up on a Wells dairy proach differ from a traditional divorce? farm, returned to his CL: If two people boyhood home every NAME agree [to a divorce], chance he could. and they fill out the Chris Larson And whenever it forms the way I’ve was time to return to TOWN marked them up, Boston, he recalls, he it’s less than $100. felt a crushing sense Rutland It’s just a filing fee. of dread. So, one day, On the other end JOB Larson made a clean break from the bigDivorce and family lawyer, of the spectrum, Seven Days wrote city legal practice Meub, Gallivan & Larson an article about to try his hand as someone who spent a country lawyer millions [on a child-custody fight]. So instead. Larson, now 40, joined two other there’s no upper limit. lawyers in a small family practice in Rutland. There, he devised a simple SD: Can any divorcing couple use this but effective way to help clients resolve method? what are often the most contentious and CL: Well, if there are businesses involved, there needs to be an accountant figuring costly of legal matters: divorces. About two years ago, Larson wrote an out the values of things. But I’ve sat article, which he posted online for free, down with people with millions of called “The 10-Minute Divorce.” In it, dollars in assets, and they come in and he explained how Vermont couples can say, “We recognize that you should file their own divorce paperwork with- get this business and I should get the out the time, expense and acrimony that house, and we’ll split up our retirement attorneys typically bring to the process. accounts.” Done. Today, about 300 people per month visit Larson’s website to read “The 10 SD: Does this work only if both parSteps to Getting a Divorce (+2 with ties are amenable to it? Kids).” In lieu of his previous approach CL: Yes. I try to encourage people to of taking a $5,000 retainer up front, he separate their divorces: their emotional now refers clients to his site and then divorce and their financial divorce. If answers whatever questions may arise people can do that — and there are no kids — then the financial part is all the later — for a fraction of the price. As he describes this nearly pro bono family court deals with. service, “I think of myself more as a divorce coach.” Seven Days met with SD: What do other lawyers think of you giving away services for which Larson to find out more. they charge? CL: Family lawyers, for the most part, SEVEN DAYS: What compelled you to are fighting over [clients with] the top write this article? CHRIS LARSON: Along the way, I 10 percent of income and assets. Those started doing some family law, mostly are the only ones who can afford us. because the need is enormous. More The way I look at it is, we’re an airline than half of us end up in family court, that sells only first-class tickets, and the one way or another. At the same time, planes are flying empty. My idea is, how most people can’t afford a lawyer. The can we give [clients] value that is not


P R E S E N T S

YOUR ALL-ACCESS PASS TO INNOVATION! OCTOBER 20 & 21 • CHAMPLAIN VALLEY EXPO, ESSEX JCT.

POWERED BY

30

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Connect with Vermont’s fastest-growing and most innovative companies at this rockin’ career and tech expo. NO CAR? NO PROBLEM! Take a GMT bus or get a Lyft. C O M M U N I T Y PA RT N E R S

FREE RIDE TO TECH JAM 10/20/17 & 10/21/17

Ride GMT on the Essex Route #2 and show your driver this free ride coupon.

New Lyft customers get a $5 credit during Tech Jam. For details on redeeming the deal go to techjamvt.com


Your boss says it’s okay to jam. For our 11th Jam, we’ve created three programming tracks for aspiring and veteran tech pros. Get career tips, business tricks and a whole lot of tech from local and global experts, including reps from Facebook and Tesla. Attend all the sessions, just a few, or even jump the tracks — but don’t forget to register!

(SO FAR)

WANT TO EXHIBIT? techjam@sevendaysvt.com

These sessions cover areas of interest to decision makers at small businesses. Speakers will discuss emerging opportunities — and threats — in cybersecurity, data science, energy storage, automation and the Internet of Things. • #WhatTheHack?! (REGISTRATION REQUIRED) • Using Data to Weather the Storm • Batteries Required: Tesla Comes to Vermont (REGISTRATION REQUIRED)

• The Next Disruption: Industry 4.0

CAREER TRACK

For professionals who want to take it to the next level

FRI

This series starts off with Coffee + Confidence, a session designed specifically for women, who are traditionally underrepresented in high-paying STEM fields. The other two panel discussions focus on education and job training, as well as peer support through the network of local user groups. • Coffee + Confidence (REGISTRATION REQUIRED) • Career Shift: Local Options for Continuing Education • User Groups (aka Free and Fun Professional Development)

ONLY IN VERMONT!

For anyone interested in our state’s unique tech scene

SAT

Panelists discuss ways in which local tech companies are leveraging some of Vermont’s unique assets. • • • •

What’s Next for Cannabiz and Tech in Vermont? What Does It Mean to Be a Socially Responsible Tech Company? How Does Outdoor Rec Intersect With Tech? How Do We Grow FIRST Robotics in Vermont?

Register for the Jam and select sessions today — it’s FREE!

techjamvt.com

SEVEN DAYS

WITH SUPPORT FROM

LIQUID MEASUREMENT SYSTEMS LOGIC SUPPLY LORD SENSING-MICROSTRAIN NBC 5 NEXTCAPITAL NORTHCOUNTRY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION NORWICH UNIVERSITY NPI TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT NRG SYSTEMS NUHARBOR SECURITY OPENTEMPO PWNIE EXPRESS QOR360 REGIONAL TRAINING INSTITUTE FOR THE VERMONT ARMY NATIONAL GUARD’S CYBER INCIDENT RESPONSE TEAM RESOLUTE PARTNERS RESOURCE REVISION SEVEN DAYS JOBS SOCIAL SENTINEL

FRI

10.11.17-10.18.17

ALLEARTH RENEWABLES ASICNORTH BURLINGTON BYTES BURLINGTON TECHNICAL CENTER BURLINGTON TELECOM C2 – COMPETITIVE.COM CAD CUT CASENET CATAMOUNT INNOVATION FUND CHAMPLAIN COLLEGE COMCAST BUSINESS COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF VERMONT COX AUTOMOTIVE CREATIVE MICROSYSTEMS CSL SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS DATA INNOVATIONS DRAKER GALEN HEALTHCARE SOLUTIONS GIRL DEVELOP IT, BURLINGTON GLOBALFOUNDRIES GREEN MOUNTAIN POWER GREENSEA INNTOPIA

For entrepreneurs, executives and small business owners

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

60+ EXHIBITORS

SOLAR CITY/TESLA STATE OF VERMONT RECRUITMENT SERVICES STEP AHEAD INNOVATIONS SYSTEMS & SOFTWARE TALON RPO UVM CONTINUING AND DISTANCE EDUCATION UVM MEDICAL CENTER UVM ALTERNATIVE ENERGY RACING ORGANIZATION (AERO) VERMONT ARMY NATIONAL GUARD VERMONT BUSINESS MAGAZINE VERMONT CENTER FOR GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF LABOR VERMONT ENERGY INVESTMENT CORPORATION VERMONT INFORMATION PROCESSING VERMONT TECHNICAL COLLEGE VERMONT TECHNOLOGY ALLIANCE WESTAFF

BUSINESS TRACK

O RG A N I Z I N G PA RT N E R

31


’Til Death Do Us Part

Like half of Vermont’s homicides, Maidstone’s grisly murder-suicide was domestic violence BY MA R K D AV I S

32 FEATURE

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

M

Molly McLain

olly McLain’s mother selected the wallet-size photo that was distributed at her daughter’s August funeral in Colebrook, N.H. The image was nothing fancy, just a spontaneous selfie the 27-year-old snapped in her kitchen a few months before she died. But it captured everything Amy Benoit wanted to remember about Molly: her big brown eyes and a crooked smile that hinted at the mischievous streak that Benoit always loved about her daughter. The heart-shaped necklace, dangling on Molly’s pale skin, was an early birthday gift from her mom. At home in Pittsburg, N.H., though, Benoit urged a reporter to take a closer look at the picture. It revealed something else about the slain mother of two. “Look at her left eye,” Benoit said. It was ringed by a subtle purple and yellow hue. In June, Molly’s husband, Jason McLain, had punched her in the eye. Molly’s 4-year-old son, Jack, and 2-year-old daughter, Quinne, called it “Mommy’s boo-boo eye.” By the time Molly snapped the picture, the injury was almost healed, and, after years of suffering abuse, she was finally taking steps to leave Jason permanently, Benoit said. But instead of a new life came a violent death. On July 26, a month after a judge ordered him to move out and avoid contact with Molly, Jason, 33, burst into their Maidstone house, plunged a knife into her face and shot her with a semiautomatic pistol. Law enforcement officials found Molly’s body in a ditch across the street. They located Jason inside the home, dying of a self-inflicted gunshot wound. Benoit said her grandchildren’s clothes were caked in blood when she picked them up at a neighbor’s house that night. While the details of the McLain murder-suicide are shocking, the events that preceded the incident are common to almost every domestic-violence-fueled slaying: a restraining order ignored, a prohibition on firearms flouted, a victim’s


‘She Wanted a Family’

Molly and Jason McLain

» P.34

FEATURE 33

’TIL DEATH DO US PART

SEVEN DAYS

“He thought he knew everything,” said Benoit’s partner, Tom Guild, who lives with her in Pittsburg. “You couldn’t tell him anything.” Molly quickly moved into Jason’s home, which he shared with his father, who died in 2012. Jason’s mother, Carole, was not a strong presence in his life, according to Benoit. Neither she nor his brother, James Jr., could be reached for comment. When Jason and Molly married in March 2011, Molly was working at a nursing home in Lancaster, making $9.50 an hour. She left that job when the couple’s first child, Jack, was born in 2013 and never worked again. Becoming a mother fulfilled Molly’s lifelong dream. She doted on her baby boy. “She wanted a family. That was really important to her,” Hall said. “She wanted

to have the boyfriend, to fall in love, have the happy ending.” Slowly, though, Molly began distancing herself from friends and family. Once inseparable, Hall and Molly went six years without seeing one another, and their online communication slowed to a trickle. Benoit said that her daughter never revealed the extent of her troubles at home. She would occasionally mention that Jason had a temper, but she wouldn’t elaborate. “She didn’t tell me everything. She wasn’t a gossipy person — ‘We fought; Jason did this,’” Benoit said. “She didn’t want anyone to know there were problems.” In court documents filed years later, Molly revealed that Jason had been abusive. “He had no problem inciting that violence on me while our children were running around playing from room to room,” Molly wrote to an Essex Superior Court judge in 2017. While Benoit said she was unaware of those details in the early years of her daughter’s marriage, she had seen enough to become concerned. Jason drank heavily, Benoit said. Three beers in, the 5-foot-10-inch, 150-pound father of two would start swearing. He also talked openly of abusing prescription pills. Guild remembered Jason once finding a single discarded pill in the back seat of his car. Jason picked it up, shrugged his shoulders and popped it into his mouth. “Who does that?” Guild said incredulously. By winter 2014, Molly apparently had had enough. She was pregnant again when she left Jason and moved an hour east, to Littleton, N.H., into a subsidized apartment. Jason’s reaction? According to a statement Molly filed in court, he took everything she left in Maidstone and set it on fire. Molly obtained a relief from abuse order against her husband in a Littleton court in December 2014. She took that step because Jason raped her, she alleged in a 2017 court filing. Then, in February 2015, Molly filed for divorce. Records indicate that, at least initially, the divorce was uncontested. In August 2015, the couple signed off on a custody-sharing arrangement. But Jason apparently had second thoughts and decided to challenge it. Neither Molly nor Jason showed up for a final divorce hearing in July 2016. A judge dismissed the case and never heard from Molly again. She had apparently decided to move back to Maidstone, population 200, to give Jason another chance. “How do you forgive somebody who burns all your shit?” Guild asked rhetorically. “He sweettalked her back, saying, ‘I won’t drink anymore or do any pills.’” Molly’s mom said she understood her daughter’s motivation: She wanted her family reunited.

10.11.17-10.18.17

Molly grew up in Lisbon, N.H., a sleepy town of 1,600 located half an hour west of the White Mountains. She was a quiet kid who caused little trouble in the house and tried not to get annoyed by her energetic little brother, Dylan, according to her mom. At Woodsville High School, Benoit said, Molly was an average student who didn’t give much thought to college. She had little interest in sports and never aligned herself with a particular group of kids. Throughout her teenage years, she spent nearly every day with her friend Lindsey Hall. They would talk for hours inside Hall’s Woodsville home and, in the summers, hang out by the Connecticut River. Molly’s goal in life, Benoit said, was to become a wife and mother. After leaving high school in 2008, Molly held a series of jobs at convenience stores and started looking for a relationship. She met Jason on the dating website PlentyOfFish. He had grown up in his family’s modest home in Maidstone and spent most of his life in the Northeast Kingdom.

It didn’t take long for them to get together. Jason was Molly’s first, and only, serious relationship. “They had the same personality,” Hall said. “He was polite. He seemed like a great guy — at the beginning.” Initially, Benoit said she liked her daughter’s new boyfriend, too. Jason had a steady job as a janitor at nearby Weeks Medical Center in Lancaster, N.H., and he seemed well-read — he talked excitedly about science-fiction books and psychological thrillers. Molly shared those interests, though hers extended into the mystical realm. She liked to debate whether aliens and mermaids were real and believed in the power of karma and prayer flags. Benoit saw that Jason made Molly happy. But from early on, she said, there were troubling signs. Jason seemed arrogant, interrupted Molly often and seemed to have an inflated sense of self-importance.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

desire to keep a family together at all costs, geographic isolation, economic insecurity, substance abuse, and a final declaration of independence that enraged a partner and, in Molly’s case, caused him to snap. Domestic violence is one of Vermont’s most intractable criminal justice problems, which, for the past 25 years, has fueled a predictable crime stat: Half of the state’s homicides result from escalating domestic abuse. “We ought to be able to get that number down to zero,” said Assistant Attorney General Carolyn Hanson, who chairs a statewide commission that studies every domestic violence death in Vermont. “It’s a goal we need to be committed to.” But as they process the horror of Molly’s death — and the killings of at least two other Vermont women this summer at the hands of their domestic partners — law enforcement officials and advocates acknowledge the trend is not decreasing. “Each homicide is another moment when we take stock and go, ‘Wow, this is discouraging,’” said Auburn Watersong, associate public policy director at the Vermont Network Against Domestic and Sexual Violence. “We look at the criminal justice system a lot for answers, but it’s going to take more than that. Until we get at the root of the causes, which involve shifting culture and acceptance of violence … we may be stuck in not being able to make a dent.” Everyone who has examined the circumstances of Molly’s death agrees that she “did everything right,” as Vermont State Police Capt. J.P. Sinclair put it, in the weeks leading up to her death. She spoke up. She went to authorities, got Jason out of the house, kept in touch with the outside world, and took steps to permanently break away and support herself. “She was making plans,” Sinclair said. “She was courageous.” In the end, though, that wasn’t enough.


’Til Death Do Us Part « P.33

34 FEATURE

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

“She felt bad,” Benoit said. “She was sympathetic and empathetic and wanted everybody to be happy and Jason to be happy and see his kids.” Returning to an abuser is a common occurrence among battered spouses, according to domestic violence experts. Some studies suggest it takes eight or nine tries to make a permanent break. When Molly returned to Maidstone, she put herself at significant risk. As a full-time mom, she was economically dependent on Jason, who never earned more than $1,600 a month. In 2016, he lost his job and started collecting unemployment. Molly was also physically isolated. Though the McLains lived on the busiest road in town, Maidstone is in the middle of nowhere, even by Northeast Kingdom standards. No neighbors were visible from their house on Route 102, a one-story ranch set back from the road. The nearest place to socialize was a McDonald’s 20 minutes away in Lancaster. The most reliable contact with the out-

Attorney Wynona Ward founded the Vershire nonprofit Have Justice Will Travel to offer legal aid to people, especially abused women, in rural areas. Many of her clients — a group that included, for a brief time, Molly — experience a heightened sense of despair when stuck in a remote area with an abusive partner, Ward said. “The isolation adds to the learned helplessness, that there is no one out there to help you, so you begin to believe your spouse is taking care of you,” Ward said. “Many times, what I hear from my clients is that they can put up with the physical abuse, but the constant putting down, being told you’re stupid and never going to go anywhere in life — all of those things mount up, especially if you don’t have contact with a lot of other people.”

‘There Is Too Much Verbal and Physical Abuse’ Between 1994 and 2016, 49 percent of Vermont’s adult homicides were recorded as incidents of domestic violence.

On August 27, Rutland resident Randal Johnson allegedly killed his “live-in companion” Trina Fitzgerald during an argument, police said. Johnson is being held without bail after pleading not guilty to second-degree murder. Roughly a monthy later, news broke of a possible third case. On October 1, St. Albans police found Leaf Blouin, 51, and the man she lived with, Stephen Puro, 37, dead. Blouin had been stabbed, and Puro had a record of domestic violence. St. Albans police did not respond to requests for further information. Things started escalating for Molly on June 16, when she called Benoit to say that Jason had hit her, according to court documents. Her mom called 911. When she arrived at the McLain home, Vermont State Police Cpl. Callie Field immediately noticed that Molly’s left cheekbone was bruised, the officer wrote in an affidavit. Molly said Jason had punched her, ramming the rims of her eyeglasses into her cheekbone. She showed Field another bruise, in the hairline above her right eye, that she said was the result of a previous assault.

— FROM MOLLY MCLAIN’S HANDWRITTEN LETTER TO THE COURT

side world came via a cable modem that, in moments of rage, Jason often unplugged, according to court documents. Now abandoned, the dwelling is surrounded by a picket fence on which someone spray-painted the words, “Love Hotel.” A plastic kitchenette and a Cozy Coupe toy car remain in the front yard. The dangers of such secluded settings are wellknown to victim advocates in Vermont, who have long tried to get help to remote areas. For example, Vermont has for the past two decades received a federal grant, the Rural Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence and Stalking Assistance Program, to increase training for counselors and other supports for children in violent homes in the Northeast Kingdom. But experts say there is only so much that any government-sponsored initiative can do to overcome geography.

That figure remained largely unchanged even after 2002, when the Vermont legislature created the Domestic Violence Fatality Review Commission to study every domestic violence killing and make policy recommendations to try to prevent future tragedies. The commission found that four times out of five, men were the killers. Guns were used in nearly 60 percent of the incidents. And, like Molly, 18 of the 137 victims had relief from abuse orders against the individual who took their lives. Those trends are evident in 2017, too. Vermont State Police investigators hadn’t finished writing up their reports on Molly’s case when, a few days later, they were pulled off to investigate another suspected domestic violence murder: Barre resident Randal Gebo allegedly strangled his former girlfriend Cindy Cook in July, then went on the lam for more than a week before he was arrested near Chicago.

Molly submitted a four-page, handwritten note to Essex Superior Court explaining what happened. She said Jason stole $50 that her grandmother gave her to spend on the children. He used the money to buy 12 Percocets, Molly wrote. Upset, she said she wanted to take the kids to visit Benoit in Pittsburg. As the children napped, their parents argued. Jason said Molly would not be allowed back in the house if she left, and he would again burn her belongings. Then he took her keys and phone, shut off their modem, and punched her in the face. Molly was eventually able to get to the phone and call Benoit. By then, Molly had opened up to her mom about what was happening with Jason. The mother and daughter had grown closer and spoke nearly every day. Benoit urged Molly to take steps to leave Jason, who would eventually blame Benoit for their final separation.


Breaking Away

controlling another person, the ultimate lack of control is when the victim starts to make moves to get away. Benoit said she had never been more proud of her This is the time that violence often escalates.” daughter than in the weeks after the court orders were On the day she was killed, Molly drove with her kids issued. to Pittsburg to spend the afternoon with her mother. Molly became more talkative and smiled easily. They laughed and chased the kids around the yard and She began reaching out to old friends, mostly through planned for Molly’s future, Benoit recalled. Facebook. As evening neared, Benoit said that Molly seemed Hall, who hadn’t seen her friend in six years, said reluctant to leave. But the kids were eager to get home, she was overjoyed when she and Molly began trading so she bid her mother goodbye and drove to Maidstone. daily Facebook messages during the summer. She and her mom continued to communicate that In July they met up in Bradford, where Hall was evening. throwing a birthday party for her 2-year-old daughter. “I love u and it will all turn out OK,” Benoit texted The old friends’ children met for the first time, and Molly at 6:52 p.m. Molly seemed excited about her future, Hall said. “Hey, I know, it’s just hard to keep that focus “She was happy — genuinely happy,” Hall said. The but thank you so much, we just got home,” Molly two planned a playdate for their kids and, at Molly’s replied. insistence, snapped a few pictures together. “I notice that when I think good things, good things happen…hard…but worth it,” Benoit texted back. Molly McLain and Lindsey Hall in July It was the kind of conversation the mother and daughter had been having frequently in the past year. They had grown closer, Benoit said. She had sewn a prayer flag and given it to Molly to keep watch over her. “I know, thank you, I need another prayer flag lol,” Molly replied. “Oooh what a good idea,” Benoit said. “Ya, put extra love in it lol I love u, ur awesome.” Those were the last words Molly ever shared with her mother.

Sympathy for the Abuser?

FEATURE 35

» P.36

SEVEN DAYS

’TIL DEATH DO US PART

10.11.17-10.18.17

In the months before she died, Molly explored the possibility of enrolling in a nursing school and visited at least one to talk to an admissions counselor, Benoit said. Though a judge had granted her exclusive use of the house for a year, Benoit said her goal was to move within six months. She even went out on a couple of dates with an old friend from high school. This time, her mother said, Molly was determined to leave Jason for good. That resolve brought her perilously close to what victim advocates describe as the cruel irony of domestic violence: Victims need to break away to be safe and yet are at their most vulnerable when they do. “That is very real,” said Abby Tasell, assistant director of the Upper Valley domestic abuse organization WISE. “When we’re talking about this as one person

Is there a better way to deter domestic violence in Vermont? “If you asked me 20 years ago, I’d say: enhance penalties and lock them up,” veteran prosecutor Illuzzi said. “But there’s another school of thought that says we have to be sensitive to who he is, too. People see doors closing and not a lot of light at the end of the tunnel, and they snap.” Much like criminal justice reformers have urged policy makers to think of drug abuse as a health problem and not a crime, domestic abuse experts are starting to call for alternative approaches to keeping victims safe — and to looking after their abusers. Gwen Lavoie, who recently departed after several years as head of a Franklin County shelter and advocacy organization, suggested that the state devote more resources to hiring social workers and clinicians and require counseling for both victims and abusers. “These things are just so delicate and bizarre. Asking cops to walk cold into this crazy situation and figure out how to help a family move forward is just ludicrous,” Lavoie said. “I would love to see us do lots

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

“There is too much verbal and physical abuse for me to feel safe, and [I] cannot guaranty my childrens safety if we went back and he was at the home,” Molly wrote in her report to the court. She ended it on a chilling note: “Jason keeps his rifle on the floor in a corner in the open so he can look at it and mention where it is so I have to be aware that it is right there where he can always access it,” she wrote. “I feel he might get angry and use it against me if he is angry enough.” Jason denied assaulting his wife when interviewed by police in June. He said that Molly had pushed him, though he later amended that accusation to say that she “brushed by” him. Police arrested him, and a judge allowed him to remain free, pending his court case. Essex County State’s Attorney Vince Illuzzi charged Jason with two misdemeanors: domestic assault and interfering with emergency services. Jason had no criminal record and had deep ties to the community. He posed almost no risk for flight, and so could not be subjected to bail, Illuzzi said in an interview. “I don’t know what I could have done differently,” Illuzzi said. On July 10, Jason pleaded not guilty. Judge Elizabeth Mann released him without bail, on conditions that he stay 300 feet away from Molly and the children. On the strength of her letter, along with her visible injuries and the police affidavit, Molly also secured a restraining order against Jason as the criminal case was pending. She was awarded sole possession of her home for one year, to give her a chance to rebuild her life without worrying about where her kids would live. The judge also ordered Jason to surrender his rifle, which remains, to this day, in an evidence locker inside the Essex County Sheriff ’s Department. Over the years, victim advocates have proposed policies to make it easier for police to seize and store firearms from alleged domestic abusers. Their efforts came after several cases in which killers got their hands on weapons when a judge had ordered them not to. Essex County Sheriff Trevor Colby suggested that the language in court orders ought to be tougher. Judges should not only forbid people from possessing firearms, he said; they should ban defendants from living inside homes with firearms. “For anybody who has a propensity for violence, it’s not enough to just say, ‘Shall not possess,’” Colby said. “I asked Jason if he had any other firearms. He said, ‘No, I haven’t been home; whatever you guys took is what I have.’” In the end, police believe Jason stole the murder weapon from a friend who had given him a place to stay, according to Capt. Sinclair.


’Til Death Do Us Part « P.35

thinking.

wheeling.

Then she called him, and, in the moments before shooting himself, he said again, “I murdered your daughter.” Benoit called the police. They had already received reports from neighbors who’d heard gunshots. Then Benoit sped to Maidstone. The normally hourlong trip took about half as much time, she remembered.

After finding Jason, police began frantically searching the house and yard for Molly. They eventually found her in a ditch across Route 102 from her house. She, too, had a pulse but was pronounced dead that night at Weeks. In the hours after the call, cops from several law enforcement agencies, including the Vermont and New

more work with women and their children afterward. And batterers. Let’s stop treating them like criminals and treat them like humans who need help. We don’t work with them to help them understand what a real relationship looks like.” As he looks back on the Maidstone case, Illuzzi said he wondered if pressing charges against Jason somehow made things worse. “To someone who doesn’t have a lot of good things going on in their life, you isolate the person, take away Household their house, their wife, their kids — member they break,” Illuzi said. “That’s what happened in this case. Jason broke. You look at the system — the participants did Ex-partner what they were supposed to. Current I don’t know what an alterpartner native response would look like.” How Vermont Benoit said she wishes Domestic Violence Jason had been held in jail on bail, even for a few Homicide Victims days, to scare him straight. Were Related Ultimately, though, she doesn’t blame the criminal to Their Killers justice system for Molly’s death. “If somebody is wanting Other to get you, they’re going to get to you,” Benoit suggested. She said she tries not to dwell on what happened. Raising Molly’s two children, when she had expected to be retiring, keeps her focused. Family But her thoughts drift often to member that night and her final conversaSOURCE: VERMONT ATTORNEY tion with her daughter. Police seized GENERAL’S DOMESTIC VIOLENCE FATALITY REVIEW COMMISSION, her iPad as evidence, she said, and 1994-2016 DATA have yet to return it. But she can still access the text messages from her partner’s iPad. As Molly’s kids ran back and forth on her porch, Benoit Colby, the Essex County sheriff, was Hampshire state police and the U.S pulled up the texts. also speeding to Maidstone. He had Border Patrol, descended on the area. At 7:54 p.m., less than an hour after been on patrol in a nearby town when a They congregated in the conference Benoit and Molly exchanged their final dispatcher notified him of a 911 call from room inside the Essex County Sheriff’s text, Jason texted Benoit from Molly’s a resident there. No one offered any spe- Department in nearby Guildhall. phone. cifics, but Colby had a hunch about what As the cops milled around the room, “I murdered your daughter. And had happened. Colby noticed a card with a drawing of killed myself. Kids selle with s neighJason had parked his truck up the small birds sitting on the conference bor. I never hit herel. You know that. street, barged into the home and, with room’s main table. You planned it with her. You did this, their children inside, attacked his Molly had brought it by a few days with her. Hiw could yiu? I was a good wife. earlier, along with a tray of brownies, to man. I worked 7 years she worked Police found Jason on a living room thank the sheriff’s deputies for their help. 6 months. You told her what to do. couch with a hole in his head. He “Many thanks for being so nice,” it This is on you. How’s her new boy- had a pulse and was taken to Weeks read. “From Molly and the children.” ! friend feel?” Medical Center and later to DartmouthBenoit said she initially thought — Hitchcock in Lebanon, N.H., where he Contact: mark@sevendaysvt.com, @Davis7D or 865-1020, ext. 23 or perhaps hoped — Jason was joking. was pronounced dead the next day.

7%

14%

styling.

32%

36 FEATURE

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

20%

4v-free-colors.indd 1

for all.

6/12/12 3:25 PM

27%


SEVENDAYSVT.COM 10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVEN DAYS

37

9/20/17 1:05 PM

Untitled-10 1


Going Dutch

A free Burlington class gives students a taste of Amsterdam S TO RY & PHOT OS B Y PAMEL A POLSTON

38 FEATURE

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

F

ive students straggled into a Fletcher Free Library meeting room on a Saturday morning, unusual peers for an unusual class: Dutch. Over the next hour and a half, they wrapped their minds around a language rarely heard in Vermont, and their tongues around its guttural pronunciation. Comments like “That sentence is hell” and “That’s a lot of vowels” punctured the atmosphere of studious concentration. So did laughter. Yes, this language class was fun. Instructor Bob van Heeks made sure of that, balancing lessons on grammar or parts of speech with games based on, for example, “Wheel of Fortune.” (Tip: “Buying” a vowel — including ÿ — is a good idea.) The affable, 43-year-old Amsterdam native moved to Burlington with his American husband last March. Soon he began using the website Meetup to announce free classes in his native language. “I wanted to do some volunteer work, kind of paying it forward,” van Heeks explained. He looked around at local colleges and did not find any other Dutch offerings. The sessions began in mid-May with three students; average class size is now six, van Heeks said, and more are welcome. Students may enter at any time, not just at the start of a semester, as in a traditional school setting. In fact, there are no semesters. There are no grades, either — but that doesn’t mean van Heeks won’t throw in pop quizzes now and again. His classes are free not just because of altruism but necessity. A longtime flight attendant on KLM Royal Dutch Airlines (if you’ve ever wondered what that stands for, it’s Koninklijke Luchtvaart Maatschaapij), he can’t earn income in a foreign country while employed in the Netherlands, for tax reasons. But van Heeks does have a green card, and offering classes gratis serves his long-range dream of launching a second career in academia. “Doing this after 16 years of flying, it relights my fire,” he said. “It’s a new reason to get up in the morning, a new passion. Eventually, I’d like to make this my [ job].” Earning a master’s degree in Russian gave van Heeks partial preparation to teach. Still, to gear up for Dutch class, he said, “I literally went online and looked up ‘how to teach a language.’” Watching him in class, anyone might think he had years of experience. He’s a natural — comfortable, confident and organized, but also endearingly enthusiastic. “Learning a language can be boring and tedious, so it’s important to make it fun,” van Heeks said. “I absolutely love this; I look forward to it.”

Bob van Heeks

It seems his students do, too, willingly forgoing lazy Saturday mornings for the challenge of tackling a tricky language. Their reasons for studying Dutch vary. “I already know Spanish and was looking for another language,” said Leon Williams, 25, of Colchester. “I found that Dutch was closest to English, and found the class on Meetup.” His partner, Inali Shaw, 24, is also taking the class. She already has three languages to her credit: English, Hindi and Gujarati — “It’s the Indian state language,” Shah explained. Dutch, in her mind, “is concise, straight to the point and logical,” she said. Noting that she and Williams had traveled to Amsterdam in March, Shah said she thought the language “sounded amazing.” Both have nothing but praise for van Heeks. “He’s absolutely engaging, a great teacher,” said Williams. “Nobody likes to go to class on a Saturday, but we look forward to it!”

CULTURE

Dutch homework: prepositions


Katie Loesel, Sediments Revealed (detail), 2017

BCA CENTER

SHELBURNE FARMS

October 20 - January 7, 2018

October 6 - October 29, 2017

OPENING RECEPTION Friday, October 20, 6-8 p.m.

OPENING RECEPTION Friday, October 6, 6-8 p.m.

Untitled-21 1

9/29/17 4:39 PM

Untitled-48 1

10/2/17 6:44 PM

Students making sentences with words drawn at random

BOB VAN HEEKS

Contact: pamela@sevendaysvt.com FEATURE 39

Van Zuilen has previously studied French, Spanish, German and Japanese but modestly said she can only “get by” in the first two. In Dutch class, she admitted with a laugh, her practiced pronunciation of Romance languages

SEVEN DAYS

I LOOK FORWARD TO IT.

10.11.17-10.18.17

I ABSOLUTELY LOVE THIS;

can get in the way. Dutch “is so harshly spoken,” she observed. “My husband says you just have to commit to it and sound ugly.” At Saturday morning Dutch class, van Zuilen is in good company with a small cluster of Americans eager to make the sounds and rules of a foreign language, well, less foreign. At the head of the class, the Dutchborn instructor not only navigates vowels and consonants, spelling and grammar, but proudly shares details of his heritage. His prizes for in-class games include candies and other souvenirs picked up when he flies back home. “I can leave behind a little bit of the culture I’m familiar with,” said van Heeks. His own reward for the class, he said: “I think I’m evolving into a good teacher.” !

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Amber van Zuilen, 33 and also a Colchester resident, has a more personal reason for showing up every week: Her husband is Dutch. Like many citizens of the Netherlands, he speaks English, so learning his native tongue has not been a necessity for her. But she wants to improve her “limited ability to communicate with his family,” she noted, so, after 10 years of marriage, she took the plunge.

INFO Look for a new announcement next month on meetup.com.


Comfort Food

Annual Soul Food Social brings together UVM’s community of color B Y KYMELYA SAR I

LEE KROHN

10.11.17-10.18.17 SEVEN DAYS 40 FEATURE

CULTURE

Will “Kasso” Condry

LEE KROHN

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

W

hen Khalil Munir attended the University of Vermont in 1970, he was one of 13 African American students on a campus of 8,000. “It was a cultural and ethnic wasteland,” he said. Since then, things at his alma mater have improved, Munir noted. About 11 percent of the current undergraduate cohort is from multicultural backgrounds, and the campus has a greater appreciation for diversity. On Saturday evening, Munir, now a policy analyst based in Washington, D.C., was among 200 people who attended the Soul Food Social in UVM’s Grand Maple Ballroom. The annual event typically takes place over Homecoming Weekend. Organized by the Black Student Union, it’s an opportunity for students of color to gather, share a meal and feel welcome on campus, said BSU publicist Daneil Whyte. “It can get lonely walking around this campus [when] you don’t see someone who looks like you.” This year’s Soul Food Social had the theme “Reclaiming Our Time,” a reference to U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters’ (D-Calif.) viral response to Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin. The gathering started off with a networking session to help students and alumni such as Munir connect. “I’ve gained an appreciation for what this event is, the work and the spirit that the students throw into preparing a meal,” said Munir, who sits on the board of the university’s alumni association. Bernard Palmer, a fellow board member from the class of 1975, agreed. When he was at UVM, he said, “We didn’t even have this kind of event, because there wasn’t a lot of us here.” Why soul food? “A lot of people come from New York, Chicago or somewhere far away, and they don’t have the food [here],” explained Whyte, a second-year student. “So, even though we can’t bring you back home, we bring a little piece of home to you.” The students took two days to whip up a hearty meal of traditional soul food such as fried chicken, macaroni and cheese, and corn bread — plus less traditional offerings sucy as vegetable curry, tossed salad and flan. Having budgeted,

Soul Food Social at the University of Vermont

shopped and cooked for the event, they were on hand to serve the food, too. “They told me one drumstick per person,” one student server apologetically told a guest. “It’s like in the Bronx,” exclaimed a student to a friend as they headed back to their table, each with a brimming plate. Amid the sea of guests dressed in slacks and sweaters, bare-back dresses, head wraps and dark suits, campus

police officers stuck out as they patrolled the ballroom and hallways. Days before the Soul Food Social, campus police had cited a student for disorderly conduct. Wesley Richter was allegedly overheard on campus using “explicitly racist and threatening language directed toward African Americans,” said the university in a statement. Some campus community members see Richter’s action as backlash against

a protest march on September 25, they said. On that date, student groups went to UVM president Tom Sullivan’s office to press the administration to address diversity issues. While the BSU did request additional security for the Soul Food Social after the incident with Richter, Whyte, said that canceling the event never crossed anyone’s mind. “Even though we’re all scared individually, when we come together, we can all be safe,” she said. For Briana Martin, the presence of campus police was “a little weird” and “unnerving.” Martin, who graduated in 2011 and now works at UVM, had been out of state and returned just in time for the event, which she described as one of the highlights of the year. Martin had fond memories of cooking for the social when she was a member of the BSU. She pointed out a group of Champlain College students, seated on the other side of the room, as evidence of the event’s appeal. “We’re here to show our support,” said Champlain student Nyjah Strange. Her college doesn’t have a black student union, though it does have an office of diversity and inclusion, which the senior described as a “safe space.” Saturday’s event was her second Soul Food Social, Strange said. The food, she added, was “nothing as good as my mother and grandmother’s cooking, but it’s almost there.” Kofi Mensah, a 2011 graduate, said he hadn’t been back for Homecoming Weekend in three years. “I love UVM,” said Mensah, who was president of the Student Government Association in his senior year. “UVM helped shape me a lot into the person I am today.” Still, commenting on the recent campus incidents, Mensah said latent bias at the school is nothing new. “My four years here, there was always just a lot of underlying racism and … a lot of undertones that we heard from students in class, even some professors.” The students’ push for more conversations about inclusion and racism is a “great thing,” Mensah continued. “It’s just going to make the campus that much better overall.”


“Being an artist of color in this country is a political act itself,” he told an enraptured audience. “Let’s be honest, there wouldn’t be anything cool in this country if it wasn’t for black folks,” he added. “Wow,” exclaimed Wyatt Suich after 15 minutes, when Kasso revealed his finished artwork. The UVM freshman from Vershire was at the Soul Food Social with his mother, Carol. The KY pair was tired from attendME LY A ing other homecoming S events, they said, but they still stayed for the whole evening and bid successfully on a Carib Ibis print. In addition to Kasso, licensed clinical mental health counselor and racial justice leader Vicki Garrison and spoken-word artist Rajnii Eddins took the stage to speak about issues such as self-care, selflove and institutionalized racism. Audience members cheered and intermittently snapped their fingers — a tradition at poetry readings — as each spoke. Interviewed before his performance, Eddins said he was honored to be there. “It’s an opportunity to connect with folks who mirror WHYTE and reflect your experience, break bread, and share common fellowship,” the poet said. That fellowship included professional networking. Throughout the evening, alumni Munir and Palmer gave out their business cards to students. “Email me, and then we’ll talk,” said Palmer, who works for the New York City Department of Education, to a student who hopes to be a school psychologist. “We have connections … in terms of getting jobs, putting them in contact with other people, letting them know they’re not here by themselves,” said Palmer. Munir noted that he and his peers didn’t have such role models when they were students at UVM. “Now, there’s a critical mass of ethnic, social and cultural minorities who matriculated to UVM, who graduated and go on to have illustrious careers,” he said. “We are trying to give something back.” ! AR

I

▲▲▲▲▲ ▲▲ ▲

Sweet Tooth

▲▲▲▲▲ ▲ ▲▲

▲▲▲ ▲▲ ▲▲

EVEN THOUGH WE CAN’T BRING YOU BACK HOME, WE BRING A LITTLE PIECE OF HOME TO YOU.

▲▲▲▲▲ ▲▲ ▲ ▲

THE ART OF DESSERT 4T-shelburnemuseum092017 1

Christopher Boffoli, Blowpop Jackhammer (detail), 2012. The number of licks to the bubble gum center became a moot point with Big Jake around. C-print on metallic paper, 24 x 36 inches. Courtesy of Christopher Boffoli/ Big Appetites.

shelburnemuseum.org

Sweet Tooth: The Art of Dessert is generously sponsored by

Donna and Marvin Schwartz and the Stiller Family Foundation.

9/14/17 3:23 PM

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 10.11.17-10.18.17 SEVEN DAYS

Contact: kymelya@sevendaysvt.com FEATURE 41

Mensah, who now divides his time between London and New York City, noted that Saturday’s event was more diverse than the ones he attended as a student. While the Soul Food Social was always seen as an event geared toward students of color, he added, “we really wanted it as a way to bring more diversity, even within the community of color.” South Korean engineering student Eric Kim said he attended the social to learn about new cultures. Two weeks ago, he was at a dinner organized by the UVM Muslim Student Association. “Everything is new to me,” said Kim, who cut a striking figure with his all-black attire and gelled-back hair with blond streaks. The master’s student arrived in Vermont last year, and he has always wanted to join BSU meetings, which typically attract about 40 students. Attending different cultural celebrations is also a way for him to take a break from his studies, he said. As chatter and the sound of clanking utensils filled the room, a silentDAN E IL auction slide show played on a large projector screen. The student MC urged guests to bid on colorful prints created by Carib Ibis, a black-owned company. Proceeds from their sale would be donated to Three Little Flowers Center, an organization that helps a Haitian school damaged by last year’s Hurricane Matthew. That school wasn’t the night’s only beneficiary. Halfway through the evening, street artist Will “Kasso” Condry got onstage to finish a painting for an auction to benefit Black Lives Matter Vermont. The Middlebury-based artist, who was born in Trenton, N.J., and is best known for his murals, was painting a monochromatic portrait of singer and activist Nina Simone. As he worked, Kasso talked about his craft and his experience as a black artist in “a very white art world.” Arguably his most controversial mural depicts Michael Brown, the unarmed teenager who was shot by a police officer in Ferguson, Mo. That mural of Brown in Trenton, Kasso said, got him international attention.

ESEP 23–FEB 18, 2018 E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E

INFO Learn more at bsuatuvm.weebly.com. Untitled-11 1

10/9/17 11:43 AM


Home Coming Fun Home, Vermont Stage BY AL EX BR OW N

and hurts. A solid singer, he gives us a wrenching look into Bruce’s interior life in his finale song. Lulu Barr-Brandt plays 9-year-old Alison with her eyes wide open to the world. In the triumphant “Ring of Keys,” she sings about her first sexual role model: a cool, take-charge woman. Barr-Brandt evokes the thrill of self-awareness in an uplifting awakening. Elise Killian, as 18-year-old Alison, shows the scary steps between flustered and confident. Her just-right nervousness at her first feeling of sexual attraction explodes into joy in the shout-to-the-rafters “Changing My Major.” As Joan, Alison’s girlfriend, Shea Dunlop is positively magical as she unleashes an invitation in the form of a sly smile. Moira Stone plays the mature Alison in constant, loving engagement with the events she’s recalling, participating through songs and commentary. As Alison’s mother, Gina Fearn skillfully hides her character in Bruce’s shadow, until what she’s suffered alongside him finally becomes clear. Fearn’s evocative performance of “Days and Days” describes the sad bargain she made. The young men who attract Bruce are all smartly played by Owen Leavey. Luke Fitzgerald and Rowan Williams play Alison’s young brothers, showing the bright side of this idiosyncratic family with in-joke enjoyment. Fawcett and scenic designer Chuck Padula developed staging that’s effective and eye-popping in its wit. Faced with creating 15 locations in a small space open on three sides, Padula uses the single wall for projections that echo Bechdel’s drawings. Scene by scene, backgrounds of rooms are delineated by projected artwork created by Anne Barrett. Three-dimensional elements are just as clever. A spinet piano has a keyboard that pulls out of the back wall, and sofas and beds rise up from the floor on ingenious lifts embedded in the stage platform. The occasional piece of real furniture is as blank-page white as the wall, with firm black lines marking its edges. A chair is emphatically a drawing of a chair in this world that Alison sketches from memory. Musically, the production is impeccable. Musical director Randal Pierce developed sensitive, full orchestration using violin, cello, guitar, reeds, bass, drums and percussion. Pierce plays keyboards and conducts six talented musicians. The sound mix positions the vocals for lyrical clarity, while the instruments come through at full intensity. Fun Home bypasses every musical formula to go straight to the audience’s heart with tenderness and wit. Alison has the courage to embrace her sexuality and the good fortune to live at a time when closet doors started opening. Bruce is not as fortunate in time or in temperament. Fun Home tells their stories with compassion and gives viewers a reason to remember their own families — perhaps with a little more love. !

COURTESY OF LINDSAY RAYMONDJACK

THEATER

Moira Stone and John Jensen in Fun Home

T

he Tony Award-winning 2014 Broadway musical Fun Home is an inspired reverie of heartbreak and elation, all set loose by an honest look back at growing up. The autobiographical story is adapted from Vermont resident — and current cartoonist laureate — Alison Bechdel’s graphic novel of the same name. With inventive staging that is itself a delight, Vermont Stage presents the show’s regional premiere in Burlington’s FlynnSpace. Lisa Kron’s book and lyrics preserve the nuances of Bechdel’s characters while unfolding the story over 100 exhilarating minutes. Jeanine Tesori’s brilliant music connects the emotional waypoints of a journey through memory. Three actors portray Alison, at ages 9, 18 and 43. The grown Alison glides in and out of scenes, observing, writing and drawing her memories. The story is her account of a 1960s childhood with a difficult father, and of college years in which her happy realization that she’s gay coincides with the tragic discovery that her father, Bruce, concealed his homosexuality and most likely took his own life. Bruce teaches high school English and runs a funeral home that the family casually calls “fun home.” Bruce’s free time is spent ruthlessly restoring the family’s Victorian house and instilling aesthetic taste in his three children. There’s love in this whip-smart family, but it takes elusive forms. If it seems a stretch to convert a story told in pictures to one told in song, the logic lies in the nonlinear quality of memory that both mediums capture. The memoir relies on pictures captioned with contrasting recollections — juxtapositions in the space of a graphic panel. The musical does so in time through counterpoint of music, speech, action, song and

characters that move through different locations and multiple ages. The audience has the pleasant puzzle of seeing the contrasts resonate just as grown Alison strains to. Ultimately, both the book and the musical describe memory by tumbling together multiple means of expression. Like memory, Fun Home teeter-totters between joy and sorrow. Alison’s exultant first sexual experience contrasts with her father’s desperate, have-a-glass-ofsherry seduction of an underage boy. Young Alison and her two brothers make up a hilarious fake commercial for the funeral home, sung to Tesori’s peppy tribute to disco and Motown. That scene parallels a number that builds to a near frenzy of contrapuntal divergence, as the kids and mom frantically clean house to suit dad’s imperial standards. The energy is thrilling, but the reason for it is Bruce’s tyrannical will. Fun Home maintains a lovely balance of tenderness and irony. It’s exuberant in the musical comedy tradition, with the big moments of joy coming from Alison’s two wonderful discoveries about her sexuality. But it never skirts darkness — both Alison and Bruce face the crucial problem of accepting who they are. Tesori’s melodies soar but carry poignant complexity. Insistent rhythmic lines drive the pace, while repeated musical motifs touch on the anchoring points of memory. Thanks to the score and Robin Fawcett’s direction, the transitions from speech to singing are so elegant that every word is made musical. Fawcett’s lighthearted directorial touch lets laughs overflow, but she’s equally keen on building nuanced relationships. John Jensen opens up Bruce’s dark corners, portraying a father who delights and disappoints, loves

42 FEATURE

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

FUN HOME BYPASSES EVERY MUSICAL FORMULA

TO GO STRAIGHT TO THE AUDIENCE’S HEART WITH TENDERNESS AND WIT.

Contact: alex@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Fun Home, music by Jeanine Tesori, book and lyrics by Lisa Kron, based on the graphic memoir by Alison Bechdel, directed by Robin Fawcett, produced by Vermont Stage, through October 29: Wednesday through Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; and Saturday and Sunday, 2 p.m., at FlynnSpace in Burlington. $35-44.50. vermontstage.org


VERMONT INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL OCTOBER 20-29, 2017 | DOWNTOWN BURLINGTON VTIFF.ORG FOR FILM SCHEDULE AND DESCRIPTIONS

10/9/17 10:35 AM

Untitled-9 1

9/25/17 12:21 PM

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Untitled-4 1

10.11.17-10.18.17 SEVEN DAYS 43


Life, Interrupted The Exonerated, UVM Theatre B Y A L EX BROW N

I

n The Exonerated, we meet six people found guilty of crimes they did not commit, left to count the days of their lives on death row. Perhaps the main thing they have in common is that they could be any one of us. The 2002 documentary play interweaves stories into kaleidoscopic variations on a theme. The University of Vermont Department of Theatre staged it with student and adult actors. The Exonerated eliminates one kind of suspense with its title but opens up a different uncertainty with its structure of true-life stories that should never have been true. The play answers how such things can happen; it’s up to viewers to ponder how they can be prevented. In 2000, playwrights Jessica Blank and Erik Jensen interviewed 20 deathrow inmates, then distilled six of their stories into first-person accounts. The play consists of authentic voices found through interviews, court transcripts and letters. The stories show how little it takes to produce a wrongful conviction in America: race, police interrogation techniques, must-win prosecutors, poverty, accident and investigative incompetence. Sunny Jacobs and her husband were convicted of killing two highway patrolmen. The actual killer retracted his false testimony a few years later, but Sunny’s case wasn’t reopened for another 13 years. Eighteen-year-old David Keaton was nowhere near the store where a man was killed, but he was found guilty of the crime. The evidence against Robert Earl Hayes and Delbert Tibbs amounted to the fact that they are black. An old fingerprint of Kerry Max Cook’s was enough to convict him of murdering a woman he’d slept with months before, despite evidence pointing to another suspect. After Gary Gauger discovered his father’s dead body, police kept him awake for 12 hours of questioning and finally asked him to give a “vision statement.” It required him to describe, hypothetically, what he would have done if he had killed his parents. The police turned that into a confession.

44 FEATURE

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

THEATER

Jolie Garrett (front) with The Exonerated cast

THE PLAY PROVOKES AUDIENCES TO CONSIDER THE CONSEQUENCES OF

AMERICA’S PRISON INDUSTRY AND DEATH PENALTY. In this production at the Royall Tyler Theatre, the acting style was uniformly low-key. Director Gregory Ramos steered the performers to avoid overemotionalizing, letting the facts speak for themselves. This approach gave the audience the freedom to respond like firsthand observers, not people listening to a lecture. The actors used regional accents to echo the fidelity of a script built from the real words of real people. Ramos added simple, emphatic lines of choreography, putting some or all performers in motion at most story transitions. The show began with a straight line of 10 identical aluminum Navy chairs at the back of the stage; the performers lifted and repositioned the chairs, then sat in unison to reassemble themselves in new patterns around the stage. By using simultaneous movement, Ramos gave the mesh of stories a multilayered, harmonic feel. The ensemble remained onstage throughout, forming a backdrop for a series of riveting, unaffected monologues. All the performers showed a good sense of the audience, instinctively connecting without tugging for viewers’ attention. Katherine Reid, as Sunny, was a captivating storyteller who let her character’s humor and perspective shine clearly.

Subtle and centered, Reid had no need to emotionalize what listeners immediately recognized as powerful. Jolie Garrett, a professional actor, played Delbert, whose poetic musings provide transitions in the story. Garrett’s acting craft was sometimes a little too polished for this documentary style, but his skill allowed the play’s one emotional eruption to burn with pure heat. As Robert, UVM philosophy professor Randall Harp showed exquisite naturalism in speech and manner. He was supremely comfortable onstage and brought Robert’s story to life by owning every moment of it. Ian Walls emphasized David’s inner strength, giving him a mysterious solemnity. Ethan Foley did some deep work as Kerry, capturing the character’s youthful hope and later defeat. Toby Esposito, as Gary, radiated impenetrable calm to show that a lifetime isn’t long enough to understand the unimaginable but does allow one to adapt. In ensemble roles, Brianna Ball, Caitlin Durkin, Michael Daly III and Ian Kimmel played a variety of briskly sketched police, family members and trial participants. Often with only a single line to paint a character, they all did an admirable job of reenacting the

flashpoint conditions around the main characters. The production design was austere, suggesting simple dignity but also desolation. Scenic designer Jeff Modereger filled an imposing back wall with conflicting symbols of freedom and imprisonment. On a roughly textured gray wall, three small barred windows hinted at a faraway world outside. Across the wall, a massive American flag was painted with coarse strokes. Lighting designer John B. Forbes kept those high prison windows impossibly out of reach by lighting them with an unreal glow. The back wall was often lit as if dimmed by grime, but Forbes sometimes let light pulse across it to represent an electric chair or washed it with uplights. The sound design by Liam Daugherty started with preshow songs of freedom and youth from the ’70s, the period in which several characters were incarcerated. The precision sound effects provided crisp jolts of reality in the stories: Though little was enacted literally, the sound of a gunshot or a rainstorm flooded the theater with the essence of a moment. On the show’s opening night, the audience was hushed and rapt but able to acknowledge the little accents of humor that dotted the stories. Watching the play is not a grim ordeal, but it does provoke audiences to consider the consequences of America’s prison industry and death penalty. The Exonerated doesn’t have the shape of drama since the title itself reveals the outcome. Instead, the play captivates by making the possibility of false conviction a quiet little horror story. Combining a documentary perspective with solid, understated performances gives the audience a reason to reflect on a justice system that seems to consider lost years — and lost lives — a cost of doing business. ! Contact: alex@sevendaysvt.com

INFO The Exonerated, by Jessica Blank and Erik Jensen, was directed by Gregory Ramos and produced by the University of Vermont Department of Theatre, at the Royall Tyler Theatre, UVM, in Burlington. uvmtheatre.org


Stick Seas on Spa Spec ial Enjoy 25% off any à la carte spa service

RETAIL STORE

& TASTING ROOM

NOW OPEN THURS & FRI 12-7 SAT & SUN 12-5

and receive a $20 coupon towards a service on a future visit Valid on services Monday through Friday October 16th through December 15th 2017*

ORGANIC VODKAS, *This offer is not applicable with any other packages, discounts, or Spafinder Gift Cards. This offer may not be redeemed on Thanksgiving.

4000 Mountain Road, Stowe, VT | 802.253.6463 | TopnotchResort.com Untitled-17 1

10/9/17 1:23 PM

GIN, AND LIQUEURS

SMALL-BATCH WHISKEY FEATURED PRODUCTS AVAILABLE AT THIS LOCATION ONLY

171 WHISKEY RUN, (RT 100 TO GOELTZ RD), MORRISVILLE, VT • GREENDISTILLERS.COM 4t-greenmountaindistillers100417.indd 1

9/28/17 1:00 PM

North is more than a sense of place. It’s a sense of purpose.

Open House – Johnson Campus

Friday, October 20 Open House – Lyndon Campus

ATTEND AN OPEN HOUSE.

SEVEN DAYS

Saturday, October 21

10.11.17-10.18.17

Tour campus, meet professors and students in our nationally known liberal arts and professional programs, explore our athletics and travel opportunities, and more.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Join us for Northern Vermont University’s fall open houses to see what we do and how we do it.

NorthernVermont.edu/Visit

knowledge knows no bounds.

DO NORTH. 45

Untitled-18 1

10/9/17 1:26 PM


COURTESY OF CHRISTOPHER BOFFOLI

food+drink

Sweet and Bitter The art and politics of sugar at the Shelburne Museum BY M EL I SSA PASAN E N

46 FOOD

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

“Blowpop Jackhammer” by Christopher Boffoli

I

f not for sugar, there would be no Shelburne Museum. As museum director Tom Denenberg points out in the fall newsletter, “Museums don’t grow on trees.” Many, he notes, owe their existence to industry titans and their heirs seeking to make a mark on the American cultural landscape. The Vermont landmark over which Denenberg presides is no exception. While the 60-year-old Shelburne Museum did not grow on a tree, he explains, it did grow indirectly from sugar cane. Founder Electra Havemeyer Webb’s family fortune came from sugar. Her father, Henry Osborne Havemeyer, was such a dominating force in the U.S. sugar refining industry that he was

FOOD LOVER?

GET YOUR FILL ONLINE...

crowned the “Sugar King” by the press in the late 19th century. A hand-colored lithograph of a Havemeyer refinery hangs on the wall at the beginning of the new exhibition, “Sweet Tooth: The Art of Dessert,” currently on view in the Pizzagalli Center for Art and Education. The link to Shelburne Museum’s inception was among the factors that led head curator Kory Rogers to the exhibit theme. “We always look for a connection to the museum,” he says. In addition, Rogers, who grew up in a restaurant family in Oklahoma and has worked at the museum for 14 years, says he’s long been fascinated by the interplay between art and food. Lately, he observes, “It feels like food is in the news all the LISTEN IN ON LOCAL FOODIES...

time: food waste, food politics, food and the environment. It’s in the zeitgeist.” “Sugar is a complicated and loaded subject,” Rogers acknowledges, from its historic coupling with the rise of slavery to its public health impact today. Despite these global realities and the personal battles many people fight against sugar’s siren song, sweet treats can also evoke fun and whimsy. “Candy and desserts have the power to take you back to your childhood,” Rogers explains. “We didn’t want to do a show that was just a bummer. You can walk in and just see poppy, fun art,” he says, “but if you read the labels, you’ll see that it’s a bit more nuanced.” “Sweet Tooth” includes the work of 12 contemporary artists from across

BROWSE READER REVIEWS OF 1,000+ RESTAURANTS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/FOOD. REGISTER TO JOIN OUR BITE CLUB. YOU’LL GET FOOD NEWS IN YOUR INBOX EACH TUESDAY.

the country and Europe, as well as pieces commissioned from seven Vermont artists. There are also two intricate chocolate sculptures created by Emily McCracken of Lake Champlain Chocolates, one of the exhibit sponsors. “I’m pretty sure it’s the first time we’ve ever had edible art on display,” Rogers says. The art is diverse in scale, style, media and meaning. Rogers worked with assistant curator Carolyn Bauer to develop the exhibit. “We cast a broad net. We wanted to represent art in all dimensions and materials — high art, low art and fashion,” he says. A monumental, photo-realist oil painting of licorice by acclaimed pop SWEET AND BITTER

» P.48

LOOK UP RESTAURANTS ON YOUR PHONE:

CONNECT TO M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM ON ANY WEB-ENABLED CELLPHONE AND FIND LOCAL RESTAURANTS BY LOCATION OR CUISINE. FIND NEARBY EVENTS, MOVIES AND MORE.


GOT A FOOD TIP? FOOD@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

SIDEdishes SERVING UP FOOD NEWS LEE KROHN

Market Share

MICHAEL CLAUSS WILL HOLD NEW EXEC CHEF POSITION AT CITY MARKET

Bye-Bye Bijou BIJOU FINE CHOCOLATE SHUT DOWN IN SHELBURNE

On Friday, October 13, at 6 p.m., SHELBURNE VINEYARD will host a concert and release a new dry red wine, made with Marquette grapes, in honor of singer-songwriter Myra Flynn, a former Vermonter now based in Los Angeles. The occasion is the celebration of Flynn’s marriage to Phil Wills, who went to high school in Essex Junction. While the wedding will be small and private, Flynn pointed out on Facebook, the concert and wine tasting are open to the public with a $10 cover fee. Flynn, who still gives frequent local shows, will play alongside regular collaborators Paul Boffa and Dave Grippo. Will the new vintage, Flynn Wine, remind sippers of the singer’s sultry voice? According to GAIL ALBERT of Shelburne Vineyard, the stainless-steelaged vino is “rich, delicate and smooth as it moves across the palate from first sip to finish.” S.M.P.

SEVEN DAYS

Michael Clauss

CONNECT Follow us for the latest food gossip! On Twitter: Hannah Palmer Egan: @findthathannah; Sally Pollak: @vtpollak. On Instagram: Hannah and Suzanne Podhaizer: @7deatsvt.

FOOD 47

Sally Pollak

Suzanne M. Podhaizer

SHELBURNE VINEYARD CELEBRATES SINGER WITH A NEW WINE

10.11.17-10.18.17

BIJOU FINE CHOCOLATE closed abruptly last week after the confectionery business, which had production and retail space at 120 Graham Way in Shelburne, was cleared of its equipment and furnishings, according to chocolatier KEVIN TOOHEY. “We showed up Monday morning [October 2] to work and found the entire place had been completely emptied and gutted,” said Toohey, who operated the business with his wife and two grown children. “There was nothing left but white walls and wood floors.” Toohey, who makes truffles and other confections, said Bijou was caught in a dispute between the business’ landlord and its owner/investor. He estimates that $65,000 in equipment was removed from the premises, including an Italian-made machine that melts and tempers chocolate, which he valued at about $30,000. “We were T-boned by a freight train, but the train didn’t have anything to do with us,” Toohey said. “We were caught in the middle. It was a horrific shock.”

Toohey and his family opened Bijou, which specialized in truffles, at the Shelburne site in April 2014. The retail space was added in March 2015. Bijou had one of its busiest days ever on September 30, said Toohey. He added that “random customers” and customers who are “dear and sweet to us” have been calling to express support. “The interesting piece for us is, we just had a tremendous outpouring from the community,” Toohey said. “We had no idea of the breadth of our reach into the community. People were really, truly upset.” STEVE BLOOD, managing member of Bijou Fine Chocolate LLC, said by email that he has been working with the business for about a year to get it on “sound financial footing.” He added, “Unfortunately, we were unable to get there.” In combination with an “unresolved dispute with the landlord,” Blood wrote, “we didn’t have any options but to close the doors.” Bijou’s landlord at VERMONT ARTISAN VILLAGE in Shelburne is J. GRAHAM GOLDSMITH, a Burlingtonbased architect and developer. He could not be reached for comment by press time.

FILE: MATTHEW THORSEN

Kevin and Laura Toohey

In Like Flynn

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

In preparation for the opening of its new location in Burlington’s South End, CITY MARKET/ONION RIVER CO-OP has created a new position: executive chef. The position went to MICHAEL CLAUSS, who attended the Culinary Institute of America and worked for famed chef Daniel Boulud before moving to Vermont. Clauss cooked at the DAILY PLANET, Bluebird Tavern and the ESSEX RESORT & SPA before starting his own biz, Michael Clauss Events. Now he’ll bring his experience to bear at the pair of Burlington markets. “He walked around the store after his interview and had a lot of great ideas,” said ALLISON HOPE, City Market’s director of community engagement. “He’s our people. He knows the farmers we know; he comes with all of those relationships.” Clauss will work with prepared-food managers STEVEN OBRANOVICH and NORAH CUNHA to make sure the fare served at both stores’ hot and cold bars is consistent, appealing and

affordable, Hope said. He’ll also look into the creation of value-added products such as marinated meats, ensure that kitchen staffers have the training they need to move up the ladder, and keep an eye on trends and customer engagement. City Market’s South End location, a spacious 33,000 square feet including a teaching kitchen, is slated to open the week before Thanksgiving, giving customers the opportunity to pick up their local turkeys at either location. Hope says local artists are in the process of painting murals on the building, and a space is being outfitted there for JUICE FOR THE PEOPLE, which will operate a “store-within-a-store.” An espresso bar is a possibility down the line. One thing that won’t change? The commitment to affordable groceries. “The [City of Burlington] did a great job making sure we’re meeting the needs of the community,” said Hope. “That philosophy is now just part of the co-op. A lot of other co-ops don’t carry conventional products, and I think that’s hurt them.”


food+drink

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 10.11.17-10.18.17

CO

UR

TE

SY

O

H FS

OE

BA

KE

RY

SEVEN DAYS 48 FOOD

YOU CAN WALK IN AND JUST SEE POPPY, FUN ART, BUT IF YOU READ THE LABELS, YOU’LL SEE THAT IT’S A BIT MORE NUANCED. KORY R OGER S

COURTESY OF WOODWARD GALLERY

“Creamy Donuts” by Peter Anton

artist-activist,” Markowski elaborates by phone, “I wanted to explore the social cost of human behavior and of the industrial activities around us.” He was inspired, he says, by liver-tissue slides a physician friend had shared. “I like that a slice of cake is a cross-section itself, like the slides,” Markowski says. “Worker Bee Sugar Cubes” by Mary Zompetti of Grand Isle offers a decorative glass bowl filled with small resin cubes, each of which encases a dead honeybee. Zompetti explains via email that she works primarily in photography, new media and larger-scale installations. “Premium Mint Ice Cream “Being asked to produce a Heels” by Chris Campbell small sculpture presented a

COURTESY OF STEVE HADEKA

artist Kay Kurt shares a wall with giant, crumpled, vintage candy-wrapper sculptures created by Paul Rousso. To their right, tiny model-train-scale people are dwarfed by real food landscapes in Christopher Boffoli’s high-profile “Big Appetites” photographs that have appeared in media worldwide. “It’s like a walk into Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory,” Rogers says, gesturing around the gallery to real shoes with heels layered like lemon meringue pie and massive, three-dimensional lollipops. “Scale is a big part of this exhibit. When you magnify to a huge scale, something’s off,” the curator says. “It’s a commentary on consumption.” Boffoli’s photographed creations offer social commentary at multiple levels. In the exhibit, a shot of two figures carrying a body on a stretcher over a field of Twinkies is captioned: “Sometimes the shelf life of food exceeded that of the people eating it.” By phone from his studio in Seattle, Boffoli comments, “Food is an incredibly rich subject matter for art. It has color, texture, gorgeous geometry.” His work features many types of food and drink, but candy and other sweets evoke especially strong responses, he notes. “Sometimes a cucumber is just a cucumber, but a Twinkie is sugar, culture, fast food,” Boffoli explains. “Sweets can have a dark undercurrent. I see the reactions when I put in a Twinkie or an Oreo. It works on a different level. It’s really complicated and interesting.” Many of the contributions by local artists are among the most overtly political in their messaging. Each was asked to create something representing America’s insatiable appetite for sweets and to present it on a dessert plate. Panton metal sculptor Eben Markowski created “$weet Tooth,” a round steel cake with a wedge sliced out of it. The cake is “frosted” inside and out with color prints of medical slides of liver tissue destroyed by long-term, sugar-related disease. His artist statement details the impact and cost of this American health crisis. “As an

COURTESY OF UNIX GALLERY/PETER ANTON

Sweet and Bitter « P.46

“Chocolates” by Margaret Morrison

“EAT-IT-ALL” by Steve Hadeka

new and exciting challenge,” she writes, “both materially and conceptually.” In the context of the current political climate, Zompetti continues, she felt compelled to develop something that spoke to “the larger environmental and social impacts of the choices we make, both as individuals and as a society.” She had learned about the mysterious appearance of thousands of dead bees washed ashore in Florida and the speculation that its cause was excessive pesticide application. “The sugar industry is notorious for its exploitation of the environment — and of its workers,” details Zompetti in her artist statement. “This piece comments

on what is often not discussed as we enjoy the seductive pleasures of refined sugar at our tables.” While “Sweet Tooth” offers plenty of easily appreciated eye candy, those willing to dig deeper will find the exhibit far more complex and interesting than a simple sugar rush. !

INFO “Sweet Tooth: The Art of Dessert” is on view through February 18 at the Shelburne Museum. “A Sweet Symposium” is Saturday, October 14, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., including a guided tour, panel discussion and presentations by social and food history authorities, a chocolate sculpture demonstration, and lunch. $25-45. Learn more and preregister at shelburnemuseum.org.


Wilson AGE/SEX: 10-year-old neutered male ARRIVAL DATE: July 18, 2017 REASON HERE: Not a good fit for his previous home.

SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS: Wilson needs

to go outside in his new home.

SUMMARY: Handsome? Check!

Friendly? Check! Super sweet and nice? Double check! Wilson has everything and more of what you're looking for. Wilson came to us as a stray, but he is all about people! Playful and curious, too, Wilson sure doesn't act his age! Do you have the perfect home for this handsome boy?

DOGS/CATS/KIDS: Wilson lived with

a cat in his previous home and did well. He coexisted with the dog in his previous home as long as they respected his space. Visit HSCC at 142 Kindness Court, South Burlington, Tuesday through Friday from 1 to 6 p.m., or Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 862-0135 for more info.

on!

derful Wil s Won

housing »

APARTMENTS, CONDOS & HOMES

Humane

Society COURTESY OF KELLY SCHULZE/MOUNTAIN DOG PHOTOGRAPHY

of Chittenden County

Sponsored by:

on the road »

CARS, TRUCKS, MOTORCYCLES

pro services »

CHILDCARE, HEALTH/ WELLNESS, PAINTING

buy this stuff »

DID YOU KNOW?

All of our cats and dogs available for adoption are microchipped. A microchip can mean the difference between losing your beloved pet forever and being quickly reunited after it is found. Microchips help keep families together!

NEW STUFF ONLINE EVERY DAY! PLACE YOUR ADS 24-7 AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM.

APPLIANCES, KID STUFF, ELECTRONICS, FURNITURE

music »

INSTRUCTION, CASTING, INSTRUMENTS FOR SALE

jobs »

NO SCAMS, ALL LOCAL, POSTINGS DAILY


CLASSIFIEDS TRANSPORTATION on the road

housing ads: $20 (25 words) legals: 52¢/word buy this stuff: free online services: $12 (25 words)

Burlington’s oldest industrial building. Parking, trash incl. Private porches. NS; pets negotiable. Facebook: BP at 495 Colchester Ave., kbrb@ shoreham.net, 802-897-5625.

We Pick Up & Pay For Junk Automobiles!

Route 15, Hardwick

802-472-5100

Valley Painting

Interior/exterior Painting 802-793-9133 Sheetrocking & Taping 2002 SAAB 9-3 VIGGEN for 2-BRs and 3-BRs on Kenwood stereo Cathedral Ceilings South Willard St. 802deck, Bluetooth/USBsm-allmetals060811.indd 7/20/15 1 5:02 PM 318-8916 Joe, 862-9103, Custom Carpentry connectivity, leather 802-238-0004 Jackie. seats. 158K. This car Any Size Job handles better than BURLINGTON 1-BR APT. Free Estimates any other Saab I have $900/mo. Bright. Fully Insured owned. Must see. Call

CARS/TRUCKS

for details. $8,500. 355-0830.

2007 JEEP COMMANDER, BLACK 143,931 miles, excellent condition, V8 flex fuel, auto. 4WD, power seats, power adjustable pedals, roof rack, towing package. Asking $6,999. Call 802-238-8478 or email pmkvam@yahoo. com.

HOUSING housing

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

FOR RENT 1-BR + DEN, PET FRIENDLY New openings at Bacon Street Lofts & The Olympiad! Conveniently located next to shopping, dining & I-89 in S. Burlington. Leasing Special: $1,575/mo. incl. heat & hot water, free common laundry, climate-controlled storage unit, off-street parking, fi tness center, dog park & grilling area. Call 802-861-3000 ext. 11 today! 1-STUDIO, 2-BR, 3-BR Burlington. Studio $695/mo. 2-BR $1,350/ mo. 3-BR $1,450/mo. All heated. On-site laundry

display service ads: $25/$45 homeworks: $45 (40 words, photos, logo) fsbos: $45 (2 weeks, 30 words, photo) jobs: michelle@sevendaysvt.com, 865-1020 x21

3842 Dorset Ln., Williston

Lg. furnished 1-BR apt. HDWD, off-street parking. NS/pets. Tub and shower. Lease req., temps welcome. Avail. mid-Nov. $1,295/mo. + utils. Call 476-4071.

CATAMOUNT RIDGE APTS. First mo. free on 12-month lease! 1-BRs starting at $1,450/ mo. 2-BRs starting at $1,775/mo. Kyle Marquis, Redstone, 802-343-6118, kmarquis@redstonevt. com, catamountridgevt. com.

ESSEX JCT. 15 Mohawk Ave. Close to good schools & excellent neighborhood. 3-BR, 1 full BA, 1-year lease. Tenant pays heat (kerosene efficient monitor heater), HW, electricity. Includes trash/recycling, 2 spaces for parking, attic for storage. New paint, W/D, refrigerator, toilet, carpets, stove, microwave, deck, garbage disposal, dishwasher. NS/pets. $1,600/mo. + sec. dep., refs. req. Jack, 343-6119.

Close to colleges, fully furnished, large CHARMING VICTORIAN deck. New North End LG. 1-BR APT. DOWNTOWN neighborhood near 46 Sherman St. On park bike path & lake, 3 & lake, breathtaking miles from downtown. ESSEX JCT. sunsets, lots of natural Electric incl. No pets. Clean 1-BR, heated. (formerly 100 Grove light. Kitchen, full DR, Avail. now. Contact NS/pets. Ground floor, St.). bayberrycomthomasbusineslg-valleypainting112614.indd 11/24/14 1 12:11 LR, PM HDWD floors, private off-street parking. monsapartments.com, porch, W/D, attached sagency@comcast.net 1-year lease. $825/mo. 355-7633. garage w/ opener, 1,400 for online application. + utils. & sec. dep. Call sq.ft. $1495/mo. incl. Paula, 864-0838. 802-735-7703 for apt. BURLINGTON 2-BR utils. NS/pets. Text/call Please speak slowly & Lg., sunny apt. 185 N. BURLINGTON 4-BR 793-0767. clearly. Willard St. NS/dogs. HOUSE $1,400/mo. + utils. Avail. now. Near UVM DOWNTOWN FUNKY LITTLE HOUSE 658-0621. BURLINGTON & hospital. $2,250/ Little country house Across from park w/ lake mo. + utils. First w/ studio-type living/ BURLINGTON 2-BR views. Bright mornings, & last due. 1-year sleeping area. Great TOWNHOUSES majestic sunsets. lease. Quiet, private, location. $1,100/mo. Stainless steel dead-end street. 1,655 appliances & sq.ft. Porch, backyard, granite counter tops. parking. NS/pets. Community gardens, maggieseverance@ river views, covered bike gmail.com. storage & underground parking. Adjacent BRISTOL/STARKSBORO to nature/running Saturday, October 14 @ 9AM 2-BR, 1.5-BA country trails & basketball/ home. Oil heat w/ wood Register from 7:30AM tennis courts. Bayberry backup. NS. Asking Circle, Burlington 298 J. Brown Dr., Williston, VT $1300/mo. Sec. dep., (formerly 100 Grove refs., credit check req. 800-474-6132 • 802-878-9200 St.). bayberrycomAvail. now. 453-3687. monsapartments.com, 300 Vehicles Expected! 355-7633. BURLINGTON

Call TJ NOW!

355-0392

Public Auto Auction!

Single room, Hill Section, on bus line. No cooking. Linens furnished. 862-2389, 2-6 p.m. No pets.

BURLINGTON 1- & 2-BR APTS. W/D in each unit, air conditioning, stainless steel appliances, granite counter tops. Community gardens, elevators, adjacent to children’s playground. Your dream apartment! Bayberry Circle, Burlington

BURLINGTON, BAYBERRY COMMONS New 1- & 2-BR flats, 9’ ceilings, exterior porches/patios. Close to public transportation, shops, dining, universities & more. Bayberry Circle, Burlington (formerly 100 Grove St). bayberrycommonsapartments.com, 355-7633. BURLINGTON: 2-BR & 3-BR $1,800-2,200/mo. On bus line. All new;

Bid Online On Select Vehicles!

Come to the LIVE Auction to See ALL the Cars!

’07 Saturn Aura ’07 Saturn Ion ’07 Toyota Corolla ’07 VW Jetta ’06 Chevy TrailBlazer ’06 Dodge Ram 1500 ’06 Ford F-150

’06 Ford Five Hundred ’06 GMC Yukon ’06 Hyundai Tucson ’06 Jeep Liberty ’06 VW Jetta & Passat ’05 Dodge 1500 & MORE!

Exquisite Gentleman’s Farm Thursday, November 9 @ 11AM 776 Arnold District Rd., Brandon, VT Open House: Oct. 19 from 1-3PM

print deadline: Mondays at 4:30 p.m. post ads online 24/7 at: sevendaysvt.com/classifieds questions? classifieds@sevendaysvt.com 865-1020 x37

incl. electricity. W/D. NS. 802-598-4371 or lucy_mccullough@ myfairpoint.net. JEFFERSONVILLE/ SMUGGLERS’ Very nice 2-BR, 2-BA. Fresh paint, vaulted ceiling, deck. NS/pets. Lease, refs. req. $900/ mo. 802-777-0568. N.UNION ST. APT. FOR RENT 2-BR apt. on the 2nd floor. Clean, pleasant. Heat & HW incl. Very close to downtown/ UVM bus line. NS/pets $800. Available Nov. 1. 802-862-9525 PINECREST AT ESSEX 7 Joshua Way, independent senior living. 2-BR, 1-BA avail. Nov. 15. $1,310/mo. incl. utils. & parking garage. Must be 55+ years. NS/ pets. 802-872-9197 or rrappold@coburnfeeley. com. VERGENNES 2-BR APT., NOV. 1 Sunny 2nd-floor apt. has lg. windows, ample closets, W/D, parking. New: floors, energyefficient appliances & Rinnai heater. Pets negotiable. $1,125/ mo. + utils. Paul at pseyler44@gmail.com. WINOOSKI: COURTYARD APTS. A 100-unit affordable senior housing facility is accepting applications. These units are income eligible, bright & freshly renovated & offer 24-hour, on-call maintenance. Off-street parking, on-site laundry, heat & utils. incl. in rent. For info & application, call 802-655-2360. EHO. WINOOSKI: SENIOR HOUSING Sunny studio & 1-BR apts. for seniors. Utils. incl. Off-street parking. 24-hour,

CLASSIFIEDS KEY appt. appointment apt. apartment BA bathroom BR bedroom DR dining room DW dishwasher HDWD hardwood HW hot water LR living room NS no smoking OBO or best offer refs. references sec. dep. security deposit W/D washer & dryer on-call maintenance. Residents pay 30% of adjusted income for rent. Application preference for seniors. For info & application, call 802- 655-2360. EHO.

HOUSEMATES

ADDISON Seeking a pet-friendly housemate to help w/ dog-walking & chip in on yard work. $400/mo. all incl. Private BA. NS. WATERBURY CARRIAGE No sec. dep. 863-5625 HOMES or homesharevermont. New 2-BR, 1.5-BA, org for application. detached garage, stainrefs., less steel appliances, EMAILEDInterview, ADVERTISEMENT background checks req. W/D included. $1,575 + EHO. utils. Close to I-89. Call

518-257-2818 orADVERTISING email INSERTION ORDER BOLTON admin@stowevt.com. Thomas Seeking Hirchak Company vegetarian female to share home YOU WANT TO LIVE FROM: Terra Keene w/ active nature lover HERE! in her 50s. $500/mo. 1- & 2-BR apts. Phone: 800-634-7653 all incl., + help w/ dog starting at $1,375/mo. Advertising2@THCAuction.com walking. Shared BA & Conveniently located in kitchen. No sec. dep. downtown North Ave. 863-5625, homeFree off-street parking, TO: Logan sharevermont.org for free common laundry, COMPANY: SevenInterview, Days application. fitness center, pet park, background check grilling area & free PHONE: refs., 802-865-1020 x22 req. EHO. storage unit. Heat & HW 1/16= 1C: 2.30 x 1C: 2.72; 1/12= 1C: incl. Call 802-861-3000, ROOMxFOR RENT, ext. 11 today! 1/8= 1C: 2.30 3C: 5.56; 1/6= 1C: 2. AVAIL. NOW Monkton farmhouse on acres, all amenities TODAY’S20 DATE: 10/06/17 incl., garden space, NAME OF13.5FILE: miles10112017_7D to I-89. Start $400/mo. 453-3457.

DATE(S) TO RUN: 10/11/17

Buying or Selling? I work for you!

LAND

SIZE OF AD: 1/8 V (2.3 x5 .56) EMAILEDLAND TO:INlogan@sevendaysv CHITTENDEN COUNTY Robyn@sevendaysvt.com Acreage for single-

C-2 CLASSIFIEDS

SEVEN DAYS

family home, horse

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 and similar Vermont statutes which make it illegal to advertise any preference, limitations, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, sexual orientation, age, marital status, handicap, presence of minor children in the family or receipt of public assistance, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or a discrimination. The newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate, which is in violation

developSECTION:property ClassorAuctions ment in Westford. Open

of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Any home seeker who feels he or she has encountered discrimination should contact: HUD Office of Fair Housing 10 Causeway St., Boston, MA 02222-1092 (617) 565-5309 — OR — Vermont Human Rights Commission 14-16 Baldwin St. Montpelier, VT 05633-0633 1-800-416-2010 hrc@vermont.gov

pasture, wooded, hiking trails, pond. 5-stall barn w/ electricity. Sub-dividable. 61.82 acres. $264,000. 802-598-9809.

4BR, 2BA Farmhouse, 7-stall state-of-the-art horse barn, 43’x96’ Calhoun Superstructure Dome, 2-car Garage/Barn with Kennels and MUCH MORE on 22± acres.

Thomas Hirchak Company THCAuction.com • 800-634-7653 Untitled-9 1

Robbi Handy Holmes • 802-951-2128 robbihandyholmes@c21jack.com Find me on Making it happen for you!

1 10/6/1716t-robbihandyholmes101117.indd 3:48 PM

10/9/17 11:50 AM


REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS: List your properties here and online for only $45/week. Submit your listings by Mondays at noon to homeworks@sevendaysvt.com or 802-865-1020, x37.

BROWSE THIS WEEK’S OPEN HOUSES: sevendaysvt.com/open-houses INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

CONVENIENT COLCHESTER CAPE

HINESBURG | 10750 ROUTE 116 | #4661532

Check out this well-maintained 4-unit in the heart of Hinesburg Village just minutes from schools, shopping, and dining. Large apartments with 2 bedrooms, 1 bath each. Tenants enjoy covered porches, plenty of parking and heat included in their rent! Solid rental history. $365,000

OFFICE/ COMMERCIAL 2997 SHELBURNE RD., SHELBURNE 400 sq.ft. multiuse space. Lots of parking, private entrance. Join other merchants & artists. Susan, 373-5603.

SERVICES

BIZ OPPS

PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1,000 a week mailing brochures from home! No experience required. Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine opportunity. Start immediately! AdvancedMailing.net. (AAN CAN)

CLOTHING ALTERATIONS SOMETHING SEW RIGHT Professional clothing alterations since 1986. Creative, quality work from formal wear to leather repairs. 248 Elm St., 2nd floor, Montpelier. 229-2400, pmorse52@live.com.

CREATIVE NEW AUTHORS WANTED! Page Publishing will help you self-publish your own book. Free author submission kit. Limited offer! Why wait? Call now: 888-231-5904 (AAN CAN)

HEALTH/ WELLNESS

lott@outlook.com if interested.

MAKE THE CALL TO START GETTING CLEAN TODAY Free 24-7 help line for alcohol & drug addiction treatment. Get help! It is time to take your life back! Call now: 855-7324139. (AAN CAN)

PROFESSIONAL BROADWAY VANITY TABLE Brand-new, still in box. Originally $900. $100 firm. Oval mahogany table w/ 4 chairs & 2 leaf extensions. $125. 802-857-5674.

FURNITURE

PSYCHIC COUNSELING Psychic counseling, channeling w/ Bernice Kelman, Underhill. 30+ years’ experience. Also energy healing, chakra balancing, Reiki, rebirthing, other lives, classes, more. 802-899-3542, kelman.b@juno.com.

GARAGE/ESTATE SALES

HOME/GARDEN

HUGE ESTATE SALE Variety of household goods, furniture, clothing, toys, books, antiques. Elm Hill Peddler, 75 percent off almost everything. Closing our doors. 4211 Roosevelt Hwy., Colchester. Sale ongoing. Thu.-Sun. 10 am.-4 p.m.

HONEY-DO HOME MAINTENANCE All jobs lg. or small, home or office, 24-hr. service. A division of Sasso Construction. Call Scott today! Local, reliable, honest. All calls returned. 310-6926.

BIG FALL YARD SALE! Sat. & Sun., Oct. 14 & 15, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 45 Mainieri Ln., Colchester.

BUY THIS STUFF MISCELLANEOUS buy this stuff

FINANCIAL/LEGAL APPLIANCES/ TOOLS/PARTS OVER $10K IN DEBT? Be debt free in 24 to 48 mos. No upfront fees to enroll. A+ BBB rated. Call National Debt Relief, 844-8315363. (AAN CAN)

846.9583 JulieLamoreaux.com

FOR SALE: WASHER & DRYER Kenmore washer & dryer set; both work great. Asking $375 for the set. Email sara.

ATTENTION VIAGRA USERS Generic 100 mg blue pills or Generic 20 mg yellow pills. Get 45 + 5 free, $99 + S/H. Guaranteed, no prescription necessary. Call 877-290-9875. (AAN CAN) HOUSE PLANTS $2 EACH Variety of house plants for $2 each, pots are incl. Please call or text 802-343-0065. Thanks.

LG. HIBISCUS PLANTS They are about 3’ tall & in nice pots. $10 each. Please call or text 802-343-0065. Thanks .

PETS GOLDENDOODLE PUPPIES Beautiful pups, apricot color. Sweet & intelligent! Paper trained. First shots done. Born & bred in Lamoille County. $1,000 each. 802-793-3675.

SPORTS EQUIPMENT 2013 VOLKL VWERKS RTM 84 183CM System IPT wide-range marker binding. One of the lightest & strongest performance skis on the market. Full-rocker caver, ultimate versatility. $249. 355-0830. KAYAKS FOR SALE Old Town kayak w/ skirt & paddle, $125. Element Dagger w/ paddle, $100. 2 vests, Thuli car rack, $75. 802-872-5732, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., or jrmingus@gmail.com.

WANT TO BUY ANTIQUES Furniture, postcards, pottery, cameras, toys, medical tools, lab glass, photographs, slide rules, license plates & silver. Anything unusual or unique. Cash paid. Dave, 859-8966.

Julie Lamoreaux 846.9583 JulieLamoreaux.com

MUSIC music

INSTRUCTION BASS LESSONS W/ ARAM For all ages, levels & styles. Beginners welcome! Learn songs, theory, technique & more on Pine St. Years of pro performing, recording & teaching experience. First lesson half off! 598-8861, arambedrosian.com, lessons@ arambedrosian.com. BASS, GUITAR, DRUMS, VOICE LESSONS & MORE! Learn bass, guitar, drums, voice, flute, sax, trumpet, production & beyond w/ some of Vermont’s best players & independent instructors in beautiful, spacious lesson studios at the Burlington Music Dojo on Pine St. All levels & styles are welcome, incl. absolute beginners! Gift certificates available. Come share in the music! burlingtonmusicdojo.com, info@ burlingtonmusicdojo. com, 540-0321. GUITAR INSTRUCTION Berklee graduate w/ 30 years’ teaching experience offers lessons in guitar, music theory, music technology, ear training. Individualized, step-by-step approach. All ages, styles, levels. Rick Belford, 864-7195, rickb@rickbelford.com.

GUITAR INSTRUCTION All styles/levels. Emphasis on developing strong technique, thorough musicianship, personal style. Paul Asbell (Unknown Blues Band, Kilimanjaro, UVM & Middlebury College faculty). 233-7731, pasbell@paulasbell. com.

STUDIO/ REHEARSAL FRIDAY POP CAFÉ STUDIO Located in downtown Burlington, Friday Pop Café is a creative, cozy-vibed recording studio that welcomes solo acts, bands & multimedia projects! Kat, 802-231-1134.

ART art

CREATIVE SPACE FREE PAPER CRAFTING WORKSHOP At Vermont Psychiatric Survivors. 128 Merchants Row, Suite 606, Rutland. RSVP to 802-775-6834. Everything you need is provided!

LEGALS»

CLASSIFIEDS C-3

ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTOR The Vermont Association of Wedding Professionals (VAWP) is looking to contract their administrative duties, membership management and

LOCAL BAKERY FOR SALE The Nomadic Oven, LLC, a small bakery business currently located in downtown Burlington, is for sale. Please contact us at thenomadicoven@ gmail.com with serious inquiries.

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical & continued support afterward. Adoptive family of your choice. Call 24-7. 877-362-2401. (AAN CAN)

Julie Lamoreaux

SEVEN DAYS

services

event-planning services to a proven nonprofit executive. The ideal candidate has a home office, is an independent contractor and has a proven track record of success in nonprofit management. Must be proficient in Microsoft Word & Excel, Constant Contact, WordPress and invoicing through Quickbooks. Responsibilities include: management of the Board of Directors: Coordinate quarterly board meetings, create agenda, complete minutes and action items from the meeting. Event Management for VAWP member meetings: Including two yearly mixers, full-day Educational Seminar and Annual Meeting. Member Management: Annual dues invoicing and collection for more than 200 members, management of deposits, and blackbaud database, answer member email and phone calls, approve member applications, management of Constant Contact and newsletter creation. Website: Assist members with updating their listings, update and manage content, create new member listings and add photos. Please send proposal to: vawpmember@gmail. com.

Charming Winooski 4 bedroom, 2 bath home with owned solar panels, updated kitchen, formal dining room, first-floor bedroom & office, full basement, detached garage & huge yard with gardens. Close to I-89 and all that Winooski has to offer for shops & dining! $229,900

10.11.17-10.18.17

OFFICE/RETAIL SPACE AT MAIN ST. LANDING on Burlington’s waterfront. Beautiful, healthy, affordable spaces for your business. Visit mainstreetlanding.com & click on space avail. Melinda, 864-7999.

846.9575 LipVT.com

WINOOSKI | 15 ROLAND COURT | #4658405

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT Psychotherapist office for rent in beautifully maintained brick building w/ parking, 3 blocks from downtown Burlington. Enjoy collegial interactions w/ 9 other highly respected & well-established mental health professionals. Call Marcia Hemley, PhD, 802-863-6114.

This 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath charmer really does have it all! Dynamic floor plan with large kitchen, updated appliances, dining room, living room with built-ins. large master suite with private 1/2 bath. Detached 2 car garage & a huge partially fenced .79 acre yard $259,900

Steve Lipkin

THE POWER IS IN YOUR CONTROL!

COLCHESTER | 2029 MAIN STREET | #4661823


ACT 250 NOTICE MINOR APPLICATION #4C1220-1 10 V.S.A. §§ 6001 - 6093

available for review at the office listed below. The application and a draft permit may also be viewed on the Natural Resources Board’s web site (http://nrb.vermont. gov) by clicking on “Act 250 Database” and entering the project number “4C1220-1”.

No hearing will be held and a permit may be issued unless, on or before October 23, 2017, a person notifies the On September 25, 2017, Commission of an issue Town of Williston, 7900 or issues requiring the Williston Road, Wilpresentation of evidence liston, VT 05495 filed at a hearing or the Comapplication #4C1220-1 mission sets the matter for a project generally for hearing on its own described to relocate motion. Any hearing mitigation of primary request must be in writagricultural soils from ing to the address below, subject parcel to an offmust state the criteria site parcel (Mahan Farm or subcriteria at issue, on Williston Rd) to allow why a hearing is required use and maintenance and what additional eviof pedestrian trails on dence will be presented subject parcel. This also at the hearing. Any hearincludes the construcing request by an adjointion of trail improveing property owner or ments to an existing other interested person primitive path extending must include a petition the Allen Brook Nature for party status. Prior to Trail from subject parcel submitting a request for north to Jensen Road. a hearing, please contact The project is located off the district coordinator North Williston Road in at the telephone number Williston, Vermont. listed below for more information. Prior to The District #4 Environconvening a hearing, the mental Commission is Commission must deterreviewing this applicamine that substantive tion under Act 250 Rule issues requiring a hear51 — Minor Applications. ing have been raised. A copy of the application Findings Fact and Using thepermit enclosed math ofoperations and proposed are

Calcoku

Conclusions of Law will not be prepared unless the Commission holds a public hearing. If you feel that any of the District Commission members listed on the attached Certificate of Service under “For Your Information” may have a conflict of interest, or if there is any other reason a member should be disqualified from sitting on this case, please contact the district coordinator as soon as possible, no later than prior to the response date listed above. Should a hearing be held on this project and you have a disability for which you are going to need accommodation, please notify us by October 23, 2017. Parties entitled to participate are the Municipality, the Municipal Planning Commission, the Regional Planning Commission, affected state agencies, and adjoining property owners and other persons to the extent they have a particularized interest that may be affected by the proposed project under the 10 criteria. Non-party participants may also be allowed under 10 V.S.A. Section 6085(c)(5).

at Essex Junction, asDated a guide, fill the grid using the numbers 1 - 6 only once in each row and column.

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

5-

1-

13+

BY: Warren Foster, Acting District Coordinator 111 West Street Essex Junction, VT 05452 Tel:(802) 786-5922 warren.foster@vermont. gov NOTICE OF LEGAL SALE View Date: 10/26/2017 Sale Date: 10/27/2017 Carolyn Lyford Unit #325 Easy Self Storage 46 Swift Street South Burlington, VT 05403 (802)863-8300

1-

The BHTF requests proposals for FY2018 awards. The total funding available for projects and capacity grants for FY2018 is approximately $310,445.00. Please note that through the City’s annual budget process, the Community & Economic Development Offices receives 15% of the total BHTF allocation for administrative costs. The proposals shall be for projects and organizations serving the housing needs of lowincome Burlington residents. All projects must serve households having an income not exceeding 100% of median income, as defined by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and preference will be given to proposals serving households having an income not exceeding 50% of median income. Priority for funding will be given to perpetually affordable housing projects. Organizations that provide services, as distinct from housing development, are limited to capacity grants of no

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS FISCAL YEAR 2018 BURLINGTON HOUSING TRUST FUND OCTOBER 11, 2017 The Burlington Housing Trust Fund (BHTF) provides grants and loans for the promotion, retention, and creation of long-term affordable housing for very low, low and moderate-income households. Non-profit corporations, municipal corporations, limited equity housing cooperatives, for-profit corporations, partnerships, and individuals are eligible to apply for project funding. Capacity grants Complete the following

Sudoku

4

3-

15x

Proposals for FY2018 BHTF funding must be submitted on or before Wednesday, November 15, 2017, at 4:00 p.m. Proposals submitted after that time will not be considered for funding. A complete application consists of an application form and all applicable attachments. Applications for both Projects and Capacity grants can be found at: https://www.burlingtonvt.gov/CEDO/HousingTrust-Fund-FY18. The completed electronic application and attachments should be sent as a PDF to trawlings@ burlingtonvt.gov. Please ONLY SEND APPLICATIONS BY EMAIL. Additional information may be requested of the applicant at a later date. Applications are reviewed for eligibility by the Community & Economic Development Office (CEDO). Eligible applications are then reviewed by the Housing Trust Fund Administrative Committee, which makes funding decisions. Funding decisions are expected to be made by the December 13, 2017.

6 2

3 2 7 1

2-

3-

more than $7,500.00 per program. FY2018 BHTF awards must be expended by June 30, 2018.

puzzle by using the numbers 1-9 only once in each row, column and 3 x 3 box.

23÷

are also made for the staffing, training, planning, fundraising, and ongoing operations of non-profit organizations creating or preserving housing for very low, low, and moderate-income households.

7+

9 3 1 3 8 6 7

6 5 9 5 8 3 5 2

52-

CALCOKU

Difficulty - Hard

4

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK:

6

No. 501

SUDOKU

Difficulty: Medium

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK:

5

4

3

Fill the grid using the numbers 1-6, only once in each row and column. The numbers in each heavily outlined “cage” must combine to produce the target number in the top corner, using the mathematical operation indicated. A onebox cage should be filled in with the target number in the top corner. A number can be repeated within a cage as long as it is not the same row or column.

2

6

3

4

2

5

1

5

4

6

1

2

3

Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each 9-box square contains all of the numbers one to nine. The same numbers cannot be repeated in a row or column.

8 3 9 4 1 2 ANSWERS4 ON P.1C-7 6 7 3 5 = MODERATE = CHALLENGING 5 7 2 8 6 9 2 9 7 1 4 3

6 2 4 5

If your organization has received previous funding from the BHTF, you must include a progress report on the project or program that was funded. Applicants who have not fully drawn down previous grant awards must request an extension in writing. For further information on this RFP, please contact CEDO Housing Program Manager Todd Rawlings at 652-4209 or by email at trawlings@burlingtonvt.gov.

All creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the first publication of this notice. The claim must be presented to me at the address listed below with a copy sent to the court. The claim may be barred forever if it is not presented within the four (4) month period.

STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT CHITTENDEN UNIT PROBATE DIVISION DOCKET NO. 1601-11-16CNPR In re estate of Timothy O. Messier.

Jessica Marcellus Executor/Administrator: 16 Wiggins Road Fairfax, VT 05454 802-318-2574

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

Publication Dates: October 11, 2017

To the creditors of Timothy O. Messier late of South Burlington, Vermont. I have been appointed to administer this estate. All creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the first publication of this notice. The claim must be presented to me at the address listed below with a copy sent to the court. The claim may be barred forever if it is not presented within the four (4) month period. Date: October 9, 2017 /s/ James T. Messier Signature of Fiduciary

6

1

C-4 CLASSIFIEDS

120x

Vermont this 26th day of September, 2017.

5 7 9 8 = HOO, BOY! 3 1 8 6

James T. Messier Executor/Administrator: 17 Shore Road Burlington, VT 05408 802-863-8195

Date: October 9, 2017 /s/ Jessica Marcellus Signature of Fiduciary

Name of publication Seven Days

Name and Address of Court: Franklin Unit - Probate Court 17 Church Street St. Albans, VT 054782272 STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT ORLEANS UNIT FAMILY DIVISION DOCKET NO. 16-2-17 OSJV In re: S.S. ORDER FOR SERVICE BY PUBLICATION Based upon the motion filed by the State of Vermont, dated September 5, 2017 and the accompanying affidavit, the Court finds that service of process cannot, with due diligence, be made upon Sara Savo, other than by publication.

STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT FRANKLIN UNIT PROBATE DIVISION DOCKET NO. 397-9-17CNPR In re estate of Daniel C. Marcellus.

It is, therefore, ORDERED, ADJUDGED and DECREED that notice of the disposition hearing to be held on December 11, 2017 at 8:30 a.m. at the Vermont Superior Court, Orleans Family Division, 247 Main Street, Suite 1, Newport, Vermont, shall be published for two (2) consecutive weeks, at least once a week and seven days apart, in the Seven Days, which is a newspaper of general circulation reasonably calculated to give notice to Sara Savo. A copy of this order shall be mailed to Sara Savo if her address can be determined.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

9/28/17

To the creditors of Daniel C. Marcellus late of Fairfax, Vermont.

/s/ Hon. Robert Bent Family Division Judge

Name of publication Seven Days Publication Dates: October 11, 2017 Name and Address of Court: Chittenden Unit Probate Court 175 Main Street Burlington, VT 05402

I have been appointed to administer this estate.


SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT ORLEANS UNIT FAMILY DIVISION DOCKET NO. 16-2-17 OSJV NOTICE OF HEARING TO: Sara Savo, mother of S.S.

STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT WASHINGTON UNIT PROBATE DIVISION DOCKET NO. 370-6-17 WNPR In Re the Estate of Matthew J. Beattie Late of Northfield, Vermont

The State of Vermont has filed a petition alleging that S.S. is a child in need of care and supervision. You are hereby notified that the hearing to consider the State’s petition will be held on 11/6/17 at 9:00 A.M. and the Disposition Hearing will be held on 12/11/2017 at 8:30 A.M., at the Vermont Superior Court, Orleans Family Division, at 247 Main Street, Suite 1, Newport, Vermont. You are notified to appear in connection with this case. Failure to appear at these hearings will result in the matter proceeding in your absence. The State is represented by the State’s Attorney’s Office, 217 Main Street, Suite 2, Newport, Vermont 05855. Other interested parties include Ronald Carter Jr. and S.S. 9/28/17

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

/s/ Hon. Robert Bent Family Division Judge

Address: c/o Little & Cicchetti, P.C. P.O. Box 907, Burlington,

To The Creditors Of: Matthew J. Beattie late of Northfield, Vermont I have been appointed to administer this estate. All creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the date of the first publication of this notice. The claim must be presented to us at the address listed below with a copy sent to the Court. The claim will be barred forever if it is not presented within the four (4) month period. Dated: October 7, 2016 Signed Sheena M. Beattie Executrix

VT 05402-0907 Telephone: 802-8626511 Email: ben.luna@ lclawvt.com Name of Publication: Seven Days Publication Date: October 11, 2017 Address of Court: Washington Probate Court 65 State Street Montpelier, VT 05602 STATE OF VERMONT WASHINGTON UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT DOCKET NO: 550-9-14 WNCV WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. v. DORIS J. MARTIN, ADMINISTRATOR OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT THOMAS PHILIP A/K/A ROBERT T. PHILIP, THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT AND OCCUPANTS OF 140 BERLIN STREET, BARRE, VT OCCUPANTS OF: 140 Berlin Street, Barre VT MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq.

crossword

Show and tell.

»

View and post up to 6 photos per ad online.

In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered July 20, 2016 in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Robert T. Philip to Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc., dated October 4, 2000 and recorded in Book 182 Page 199 of the land records of the City of Barre, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder due to acquisition of Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc. by Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. effective August 5, 2008, for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 140 Berlin Street, Barre, Vermont on October 23, 2017 at 10:00 AM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To wit: Being all and the same land and premises conveyed to Robert Thomas Philip and Merle Philip (now deceased) by warranty deed of Robert Thomas Philip dated January 29, 1988 and recorded at Book 135 Page 621 of the Barre Land Records.

Being all and the same land and premises conveyed to Robert Thomas Philip by warranty deed of Gray M. Willette (sic) and Janet E. Willett dated November 16, 1979 and recorded at Book 109 Page 135 of the Barre Land Records. Reference may be had to the above-mentioned instruments and their records, and to all prior instruments and their records, for a more particular description of the herein conveyed land and premises. Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description. Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described. TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s

Open 24/7/365. Post & browse ads at your convenience. or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale. The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale. DATED: September 7, 2017 By: /S/Rachel K. Jones, Esq. Rachel K. Jones, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032

support groups AHOY BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS Join our floating

support group where the focus is on living, not on the disease. We are a team of dragon boaters. Learn all about this paddle sport & its health-giving, life-affirming qualities. Any age. No athletic experience needed. Call Penni or Linda at 999-5478, info@ dragonheartvermont. org, dragonheartvermont.org. AL-ANON For families & friends of alcoholics. For meeting info, go to vermontalanonalateen.org or call 866-972-5266. ALATEEN GROUP New Alateen group in Burlington on Sundays from 5-6 p.m. at the UU building at the top of Church St. For more information please call Carol, 324-4457. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Daily meetings in various locations. Free. Info, 864-1212. Want to overcome a drinking problem? Take the first step of 12 & join a group in your area. ALL CANCER SURVIVORS Join the wellness classes at Survivorship NOW, created by cancer

Extra! Extra! There’s no limit to ad length online.

survivors for survivors of all cancers. Benefi ts from lively programs designed to engage and empower cancer survivors in our community. Email: info@ survivorshipnowvt.org. Call Chantal, 777-1126, survivorshipnowvt.org. ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION SUPPORT GROUP This caregivers support group meets on the 3rd Wed. of every mo. from 5-6:30 p.m. at the Alzheimer’s Association Main Office, 300 Cornerstone Dr., Suite 128, Williston. Support groups meet to provide assistance and information on Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. They emphasize shared experiences, emotional support, and coping techniques in care for a person living with Alzheimer’s or a related dementia. Meetings are free and open to the public. Families, caregivers, and friends may attend. Please call in advance to confirm date and time. For questions or additional support group listings, call 800-272-3900.

SUPPORT GROUPS »

GOING FOR A SPIN ANSWERS ON P. C-7

»

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 10.11.17-10.18.17 SEVEN DAYS CLASSIFIEDS C-5


fsb

FOR SALE BY OWNER

List your property here for 2 weeks for only $45! Contact Ashley, 864-5684, fsbo@sevendaysvt.com.

ALBURGH

CO-HOUSING OPPORTUNITY Very nice, year around home with full basement and lg. detached garage. 3-BR, 1 1/4 BA, central heat + pellet stove, partially furnished, garden. Well w/ water treatment sys. and softener. One mile from border. Open any time w/ appt. 802-796-3324 181 Cedar Lane. $246,000

FSBO-RogerCurtis100417.indd 1

support groups [CONTINUED]

C-6 CLASSIFIEDS

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION TELEPHONE SUPPORT GROUP 1st Monday monthly, 3-4:30 p.m. Pre-registration is required (to receive dial-in codes for toll-free call). Please dial the Alzheimer’s Association’s 24/7 Helpline 800-272-3900 for more information. ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE & DEMENTIA SUPPORT GROUP Held the last Tue. of every mo., 5:30-7:30 p.m., at Birchwood Terr., Burlington. Info, Kim, 863-6384. ARE YOU HAVING PROBLEMS W/ DEBT? Do you spend more than you earn? Get help at Debtor’s Anonymous plus Business Debtor’s Anonymous. Sat., 10-11:30 a.m., Methodist Church at Buell & S. Winooski, Burlington. Contact Brenda, 338-1170. BABY BUMPS SUPPORT GROUP FOR MOTHERS AND PREGNANT WOMEN Pregnancy can be a wonderful time of your life. But, it can also be a time of stress that is often compounded by hormonal swings. If you are a pregnant woman, or have recently given birth and feel you need some help with managing emotional bumps in the road that can come with motherhood, please come to this free support group lead by an experienced pediatric Registered Nurse. Held on the 2nd

and 4th Tuesdays of the month, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at the Birthing Center, Northwestern Medical Center, St. Albans. Info: Rhonda Desrochers, Franklin County Home Health Agency, 527-7531. BEREAVEMENT/GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP Meets every other Mon. night, 6-7:30 p.m., & every other Wed., 10-11:30 a.m., in the Conference Center at Central Vermont Home Health & Hospice in Berlin. The group is open to anyone who has experienced the death of a loved one. There is no fee. Info, Ginny Fry or Jean Semprebon, 223-1878. BRAIN INJURY SUPPORT GROUP IN ST. JOHNSBURY Monthly meetings will be held on the 3rd Wed. of every mo., 1-2:30 p.m., at the Grace United Methodist Church, 36 Central St., St. Johnsbury. The support group will offer valuable resources & info about brain injury. It will be a place to share experiences in a safe, secure & confidential environment. Info, Tom Younkman, tyounkman@vcil.org, 800-639-1522. BRAIN INJURY ASSOCIATION OF VERMONT Montpelier daytime support group meets the 3rd Thu. of the mo. at the Unitarian Church ramp entrance, 1:302:30 p.m. St. Johnsbury support group meets the 3rd Wed. montly at the Grace United Methodist Church, 36 Central St., 1:00-2:30 p.m.  Colchester  Evening support group meets the 1st Wed. monthly at the Fanny Allen Hospital in the Board Room Conference Room, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Brattleboro meets at Brooks Memorial Library on the 1st Thu. monthly from 1:15-3:15 p.m. and the 3rd Mon.

Rare opportunity to live in a Co-Housing Community. 77 acres shared land and Community house. See community website: www. tenstonescommunity.com and Picket Fence Preview/Charlotte for more information. Contact: janerowe@gmavt. net. $365,000.

montly from 4:15-6:15 & GLUTEN10/2/17 1:14 CELIAC PM 1 p.m. White River Jct.FSBO-Rowe091317.indd FREE GROUP meets the 2nd Fri. Last Wed. of every montly at Bugbee Sr. month, 4:30-6 p.m., at Ctr. from 3-4:30 p.m. Tulsi Tea Room, 34 Elm Call our helpline at St., Montpelier. Free 877-856-1772. & open to the public! To learn more, contact BURLINGTON AREA Lisa at 598-9206 or PARKINSON’S DISEASE lisamase@gmail.com. OUTREACH GROUP People with CEREBRAL PALSY Parkinson’s disease GUIDANCE & their caregivers Cerebral Palsy Guidance gather together to gain is a very comprehensive support & learn about informational website living with Parkinson’s broadly covering disease. Group meets the topic of cerebral 2nd Wed. of every mo., palsy and associated 1-2 p.m., continuing medical conditions. It’s through Nov. 18, 2015. mission it to provide Shelburne Bay Senior the best possible Living Community, 185 information to parents Pine Haven Shores of children living with Rd., Shelburne. Info: the complex condition 888-763-3366, parkinof cerebral palsy. ceresoninfo@uvmhealth. bralpalsyguidance.com/ org, parkinsonsvt.org. cerebral-palsy/ CELEBRATE RECOVERY PROSTATE CANCER Overcome any hurt, SUPPORT GROUP habit or hangup in Held every 2nd Tue. of your life with this the mo., 6-8 p.m. at the confidential 12-Step, Hope Lodge, 237 East Christ-centered Ave., Burlington. Newly recovery program. We diagnosed? Prostate offer multiple support cancer reoccurrence? groups for both men General discussion and women, such and sharing among as chemical depensurvivors and those dency, codependency, beginning or rejoining sexual addiction and the battle. Info, Mary pornography, food L. Guyette RN, MS, issues, and overcoming ACNS-BC, 274-4990, abuse. All 18+ are vmary@aol.com. welcome; sorry, no childcare. Doors open CODEPENDENTS at 6:30 p.m.; we begin ANONYMOUS at 7 p.m. Essex Alliance CoDA is a 12-step fellowChurch, 37 Old Stage ship for people whose Rd., Essex Junction. common purpose is Info: recovery@essexalto develop healthy liance.org, 878-8213. & fulfilling relationships. By actively CELEBRATE RECOVERY working the program Celebrate Recovery of Codependents meetings are for anyone Anonymous, we can with struggles with realize a new joy, achurt, habits and hang ceptance & serenity in ups, which includes our lives. Meets Sunday everyone in some way.  at noon at the Turning We welcome everyone Point Center, 191 Bank at Cornerstone Church Street, Burlington. Tom, in Milton which meets 238-3587, coda.org. every Friday night at 7-9 p.m. We’d love to DECLUTTERERS’ have you join us and SUPPORT GROUP discover how your life Are you ready to make can start to change. improvements but find Info: 893-0530, Julie@ it overwhelming? Maybe mccartycreations.com. two or three of us can get together to help

each other simplify. 989-3234, 425-3612. DISCOVER THE POWER OF CHOICE! SMART Recovery welcomes anyone, including family and friends, affected by any kind of substance or activity addiction. It is a science-based program that encourages abstinence. Specially trained volunteer facilitators provide leadership. Sundays at 5 p.m. at the 1st Unitarian Universalist Society, 152 Pearl St., Burlington. Volunteer facilitator: Bert, 399-8754. You can learn more at smartrecovery. org. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SUPPORT Steps to End Domestic Violence offers a weekly drop-in support group for female identified survivors of intimate partner violence, including individuals who are experiencing or have been affected by domestic violence. The support group offers a safe, confidential place for survivors to connect with others, to heal, and to recover. In support group, participants talk through their experiences and hear stories from others who have experienced abuse in their relationships. Support group is also a resource for those who are unsure of their next step, even if it involves remaining in their current relationship. Tuesdays, 6:30-8 p.m. Childcare is provided. Info: 658-1996. FAMILIES, PARTNERS, FRIENDS AND ALLIES OF TRANSGENDER ADULTS We are people with adult loved ones who are transgender or gender-nonconforming. We meet to support each other and to learn more about issues and concerns. Our sessions are supportive, informal, and confidential. Meetings

G.R.A.S.P. (GRIEF RECOVERY AFTER A SUBSTANCE PASSING) Are you a family member who has lost a loved one to addiction? Find support, peer-led support group. Meets once a month on Mondays in Burlington. Please call for date and location. RSVP graspvt@gmail.com or call 310-3301.

G.Y.S.T. (GET YOUR STUFF TOGETHER) GYST creates a safe & empowering community for young men & youth in transition to come are held at 5:30 PM, together with one comAM the second Th9/11/17 ursday of10:34monality: learning to each month at Pride live life on life’s terms. Center of VT, 255 South Every Tue. & Thu., 4 Champlain St., Suite p.m. G.Y.S.T. PYNK (for 12, in Burlington. Not young women) meets sure if you’re ready weekly on Wed., 4 p.m. for a meeting? We Location: North Central also offer one-on-one Vermont Recovery support. For more Center, 275 Brooklyn St., information, email rex@ Morrisville. Info: Lisa, pridecentervt.org or 851-8120. call 802-238-3801. GRIEF & RECOVERY SUPPORT GROUP FAMILY AND FRIENDS OF THOSE 1st & 3rd Wed. of every EXPERIENCING mo., 7-8 p.m., Franklin MENTAL HEALTH County Home Health CRISIS Agency (FCHHA), 3 This support group is a Home Health Cir., St. dedicated meeting for Albans. 527-7531. family, friends and community members who HEARING VOICES are supporting a loved GROUP one through a mental This Hearing Voices health crisis. Mental Group seeks to find health crisis might understanding of voice include extreme states, hearing experiences as psychosis, depression, real lived experiences anxiety and other which may happen to types of distress. The anyone at anytime.  We group is a confidential choose to share experispace where family ences, support, and and friends can discuss empathy.  We validate shared experiences anyone’s experience and receive support and stories about their in an environment experience as their own, free of judgment and as being an honest and stigma with a trained accurate representafacilitator. Weekly on tion of their experience, Wednesdays, 7-8:30 and as being acceptable p.m. Downtown exactly as they are. Burlington. Info: Weekly on Tuesday, 2-3 Jess Horner, LICSW, p.m. Pathways Vermont 866-218-8586. Community Center, 279 North Winooski FCA FAMILY SUPPORT Ave., Burlington. Info: GROUP 802-777-8602, abby@ Families coping with pathwaysvermont.org. addiction (FCA) is an open community peer HEARTBEAT VERMONT support group for Have you lost a friend, adults 18 & over strugcolleague or loved one gling with the drug by suicide? Some who or alcohol addiction call have experienced of a loved one. FCA a recent loss and some is not 12-step based are still struggling w/ but provides a forum a loss from long ago. for those living this Call us at 446-3577 to experience to develop meet with our clinician, personal coping skills Jonathan Gilmore, at & draw strength from Maple Leaf Clinic, 167 one another. Weekly North Main St. All are on Wed., 5:30-6:30 welcome. p.m. Turning Point Center, corner of Bank HELLENBACH CANCER St., Burlington. (Across SUPPORT from parking garage, Call to verify meeting above bookstore). place. Info, 388-6107. thdaub1@gmail.com. People living with cancer & their caretakers convene for support.

INTERSTITIAL CYSTITIS/PAINFUL BLADDER SUPPORT GROUP Interstitial cystitis (IC) and painful bladder syndrome can result in recurring pelvic pain, pressure or discomfort in the bladder/pelvic region & urinary frequency/ urgency. These are often misdiagnosed & mistreated as a chronic bladder infection. If you have been diagnosed or have these symptoms, you are not alone. For Vermont-based support group, email bladderpainvt@gmail.com or call 899-4151 for more information. KINDRED CONNECTIONS PROGRAM OFFERED FOR CHITTENDEN COUNTY CANCER SURVIVORS The Kindred Connections program provides peer support for all those touched by cancer. Cancer patients as well as caregivers are provided with a mentor who has been through the cancer experience & knows what it’s like to go through it. In addition to sensitive listening, Kindred Connections provides practical help such as rides to doctors’ offices & meal deliveries. The program has people who have experienced a wide variety of cancers. For further info, please contact info@vcsn.net. LGBTQ SURVIVORS OF VIOLENCE SafeSpace offers peer-led support groups for survivors of relationship, dating, emotional &/or hate violence. These groups give survivors a safe & supportive environment to tell their stories, share information, & offer & receive support. Support groups also provide survivors an opportunity to gain information on how to better cope with feelings & experiences that surface because of the trauma they have experienced. Please call SafeSpace 863-0003 if you are interested in joining. MALE SURVIVOR OF VIOLENCE GROUP A monthly, closed group for male identified survivors of violence including relationship, sexual assault, and discrimination. Open to all sexual orientations. Contact 863-0003 for more information or safespace@pridecentervt.org.


OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS 12-step fellowship for people who identify as overeaters, compulsive eaters, food addicts, anorexics, bulimics, etc. Tue., 7 p.m., St. James Episcopal Church, 4 St. James Place, Essex Jct. All are welcome; meeting is open. Info: Felicia, 777-7718. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Do you promise you’ll only have one more but

then you eat the whole bag? Have you tried every diet possible and nothing works? There is hope. Come to an Overeaters Anonymous meeting and find out about a 12 step program of recovery. There is a solution! Turning Point Center, 191 Bank Street, Suite 200, Burlington. Weekly on Thursdays, 7 p.m. Info: Elise, 302-528-6672. OA Big|Book Solution Group of Burlington. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Do you worry about the way you eat? Overeaters Anonymous may have the answer for you. No weigh-ins, dues or fees. Mon., 5:30-6:30 p.m. Temple Sinai, 500 Swift St., S. Burlington. Info: 863-2655. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS (OA) Meetings in Barre Tue. 5:30-6:30 p.m. and Sat. 8:30-9:30 a.m., at the Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd, 39 Washington St. Info, Valerie 279-0385. Meetings in Burlington Thurs. 7:30-8:30 a.m., at the First United Church, 21 Buell St. Info, Geraldine, 730-4273. Meetings in Johnson occur every Sun., 5:30-6:30 p.m., at the Johnson Municipal Building, Rte. 15 (just west of the bridge). Info, Debbie Y., 888-5958. Meetings in Montpelier occur every Mon., 5:30-6:30 p.m. at Bethany Church, 115 Main St. Info, Joan,

FROM P.C-4

5

4

Post & browse ads at your convenience. 223-3079. Steps to Food Freedom Meetings in Morrisville occur every Sat., 10-11 a.m., at the First Congregational Church, 85 Upper Main St. Contacts: Anne, 888-2356. Big Book Meetings in Morrisville occur every Tue., 6 p.m. at the North Central Recovery Center (NCVRC), 275 Brooklyn St. Info: Debbie, 888-5958. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS 12-step. Sat., 9-10 a.m. Turning Point Center, 182 Lake St., St. Albans. Is what you’re eating, eating you? We can help. Call Valerie, 825-5481. PEER ACCESS LINE Isolated? Irritable? Anxious? Lonely? Excited? Bored? Confused? Withdrawn? Sad? Call us! Don’t hesitate for a moment. We understand! It is our choice to be here for you to listen. Your feelings do matter. 321-2190. Thu., Fri., Sat. evenings, 6-9 p.m. QUEEN CITY MEMORY CAFÉ The Queen City Memory Café offers a social time & place for people with memory impairment & their fiends & family to laugh, learn & share concerns & celebrate feeling understood & connected. Enjoy coffee, tea & baked goods with entertainment & conversation. QCMC meets the 3rd Sat. of each mo., 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Thayer Building, 1197 North Ave., Burlington. 316-3839. QUEER CARE GROUP This support group is for adult family members and caregivers of queer, and/or questioning youth. It is held on the 2nd Monday of each month from 6:30-8 p.m. at Outright Vermont, 241 North Winooski Ave. This group is for adults only. For more information, email info@outrightvt.org.

our Tobacco Treatment Specialists. We meet in a friendly, relaxed atmosphere.  You may qualify for a FREE 8-week supply of nicotine replacement therapy. Contact us at (802)-847-7333 or QuitTobaccoClass@ UVMHealth.org. RHYTHM OF THE REIN THERAPEUTIC RIDING AND DRIVING PROGRAM BEREAVEMENT AND GRIEF EQUINE SUPPORT GROUP Horses are amazing, sentient, gentle beings that have a way of calming the soul and bringing inner peace to one’s self. For those who are having a hard time in the grieving process, sometimes interaction with a horse can help where other interventions have fallen short. We will be able to provide referral resources if issues come up during sessions for which someone would want to seek professional guidance. Weekly on Wednesdays, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Sep. 6-Oct. 11. Located at Water Tower Farm, 386 U.S. Route 2, Marshfield. Free of charge, but please call to register, 4263781, rhythmoftherein@ aol.com. SCLERODERMA FOUNDATION NEW ENGLAND Support group meeting held 4th Tue. of the mo., 6:30-8:30 p.m. Williston Police Station. Info, Blythe Leonard, 878-0732. SEX & LOVE ADDICTS ANONYMOUS 12-step recovery group. Do you have a problem w/ sex or relationships? We can help. Ralph, 658-2657. Visit slaafws. org or saa-recovery.org for meetings near you.

STUTTERING SUPPORT GROUPS If you’re a person who stutters, you are not alone! Adults, teens & school-age kids who

stutter & their families are welcome to join one of our three free National Stuttering Association (NSA) stuttering support groups at UVM. Adults: 5:30-6:30, 1st & 3rd Tue. monthly; teens (ages 13-17): 5:30-6:30, 1st Thu. monthly; school-age children (ages 8-12) & parents (meeting separately): 4:15-5:15, 2nd Thu. monthly. Pomeroy Hall (489 Main St., UVM campus. Info: burlingtonstutters.org, burlingtonstutters@ gmail.com, 656-0250. Go Team Stuttering! SUICIDE SURVIVORS SUPPORT GROUP For those who have lost a friend or loved one through suicide. Maple Leaf Clinic, 167 N. Main St., Wallingford, 446-3577. 6:30-8 p.m. the 3rd Tue. of ea. mo. SUICIDE HOTLINES IN VT Brattleboro, 257-7989; Montpelier (Washington County Mental Health Emergency Services), 229-0591; Randolph (Clara Martin Center Emergency Service), 800-639-6360. SUPPORT GROUP FOR WOMEN who have experienced intimate partner abuse, facilitated by Circle (Washington Co. only). Please call 877-5439498 for more info. SURVIVORSHIP NOW Welcome, cancer survivors. Survivorship NOW has free wellness programs to empower cancer survivors to move beyond cancer & live life well. Regain your strength & balance. Renew your spirit. Learn to nourish your body with exercise & nutritious foods. Tap in to your creative side. Connect with others who understand the challenges you face. Go to survivorshipnowvt. org today to sign up. Info, 802-7771126, info@ survivorshipnowvt.org. SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE — BURLINGTON Who: Persons experiencing the impact of a loved one’s suicide. When: 1st Wed. of each mo., 6-7:30 p.m. Location: Comfort Inn, 5 Dorset St., Burlington. Facilitators: Myra Handy, 951-5156 or Liz Mahoney, 879-7109. Request: We find it important to connect with people before their first meeting. If you can, please call one of the facilitators before you come. Thank you!

CLASSIFIEDS C-7

QUIT TOBACCO GROUPS Are you ready to be tobacco free? Join our FREE five-week group classes facilitated by

There’s no limit to ad length online.

SEVEN DAYS

QUIT SMOKING GROUP Do you want to quit smoking? Join us every Tuesday, 5-6 p.m., at the Castleton Community Center, 2108 Main St., Castleton. We can help you with the skills to stay quit and nicotine replacement products. Info: 802-747-368, scosgrove@rrmc.org.

SEXUAL VIOLENCE SUPPORT HOPE Works offers free support groups to women, men & teens who are survivors of sexual violence. Groups are available for survivors at any stage of the healing process. Intake for all support groups is ongoing. If you are interested in learning more or would like to schedule an intake to become a group member, please call our office at 864-0555, ext. 19, or email our victim advocate at advocate@sover.net.

Extra! Extra!

10.11.17-10.18.17

1

2

4

5

3

6 1 8 4 5 7+ 2 3 1- 1 9 6 7 5-

6 3 9 113+ 6 7 2 9 7 43÷ 5 63- 8 5 1 2÷ 8 3 2 4 120x

FROM P.C-5

Open 24/7/365.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

2

3

3

6

6

1

4

2

5 4 7 8 1 9 2 6 5 3

4 1 2 32÷ 5 6 9 4 3 82- 6 515x 7 7 8 2 4 9 1 1-

4

1

6

4

5

2

3

5

1

3

2

6 5 7 3-2 9 8 4 32- 1 5 8 6 7 1 2 5-9 4 3 3 2 4 21 7 9 8Difficulty 6 - Hard 5 2÷

Using the enclosed math operations as a guide, fill the grid using the numbers 1 - 6 only once in each row and column.

Calcoku

PUZZLE ANSWERS

NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS is a group of recovering addicts who live w/ out the use of drugs. It costs nothing to join. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop using. Info, 862-4516 or cvana.org. Held in Burlington, Barre and St. Johnsbury.

NORTHWEST VERMONT CANCER PRAYER & SUPPORT NETWORK A meeting of cancer patients, survivors & family members intended to comfort & support those who are currently suffering from the disease. 2nd Thu. of every mo., 6-7:30 p.m., St. Paul’s United Methodist Church, 11 Church St., St. Albans. Info: stpaulum@myfairpoint.net. 2nd Wed. of every mo., 6-7:30 p.m. Winooski United Methodist Church, 24 W. Allen St., Winooski. Info: hovermann4@comcast. net.

6

NAMI FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP Brattleboro, 1st Wed. of every mo., 6:30 p.m., 1st Congregational Church, 880 Western Ave., West Brattleboro; Burlington, 3rd Wed. of every mo., 6 p.m., Community Health Center, Riverside Ave., Mansfield Conference Room; Burlington, 2nd & 4th Tue. of every mo., 7 p.m., HowardCenter, corner of Pine & Flynn Ave.; Berlin, 4th Mon.

NAR-ANON BURLINGTON GROUP Group meets every Monday at 7 p.m. at the Turning Point Center (small room), 191 Bank St., Burlington. The only requirement for membership is that there be a problem of addiction in a relative or friend. Info: Amanda H. 338-8106.

5

MYELOMA SUPPORT GROUP Area Myeloma Survivors, Families and Caregivers have come together to form a Multiple Myeloma Support Group. We provide emotional support, resources about treatment options, coping strategies and a support network by participating in the group experience with people that have been though similar situations. Third Tuesday of the month, 5-6 p.m. at the New Hope Lodge on East Avenue in Burlington. Info: Kay Cromie, 655-9136, kgcromey@aol.com.

of every mo., 7 p.m. Central Vermont Medical Center, Room 3; Georgia, 1st Tue. of every mo., 6 p.m., Georgia Public Library, 1697 Ethan Allen Highway (Exit 18, I-89); Manchester, 4th Wed. of every mo., 6:30 p.m., Equinox Village, 2nd floor; Rutland, 3rd Mon. of every mo., 6 p.m., Rutland Regional Medical Center, Leahy Conference Ctr., room D; Springfield, 3rd Wed. of every mo., 6:30 p.m., HCRS (café on right far side), 390 River St.; St. Johnsbury, 4th Wed. of every mo., 5:30 p.m., Northeastern Vermont Regional Hospital Library, 1315 Hospital Dr.; White River Junction, last Mon. of every mo., 5:45 p.m., VA Medical Center, William A. Yasinski Buidling. If you have questions about a group in your area, please contact the National Alliance on Mental Illness of Vermont, info@namivt. org or 800-639-6480. Family Support Group meetings are for family & friends of individuals living mental illness.

1

THE MEMORY CAFÉ The Memory Café is where people with memory loss disorders and their care partners can come together to connect and support one another. Second Saturday of each month, 10-11:30 a.m. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 58 Barre St., Montpelier. Info: 223-2518.

NAMI CONNECTION PEER SUPPORT GROUP MEETINGS Bennington, every Tue., 1-2:30 p.m., CRT Center, United Counseling Service, 316 Dewey St.; Burlington, every Thu., 3-4:30 p.m., St. Paul’s Cathedral, 2 Cherry St. (enter from parking lot); Montpelier, every Fri., 2-3:30 p.m., Another Way, 125 Barre St.; Newport, first Wed. of the month, 6-7:30 p.m., St. Mark’s Church, 44 2nd St.; Rutland, every Sun., 4:30-6 p.m., Rutland Mental Health Wellness Center, 78 S. Main St.; St. Johnsbury, every Thu., 6:30-8 p.m., Unitarian Universalist Church, 47 Cherry St. If you have questions about a group in your area, please contact the National Alliance on Mental Illness of Vermont, program@ namivt.org or 800639-6480. Connection groups are peer recovery support group programs for adults living with mental health challenges.

View and post up to 6 photos per ad online.

2

MARIJUANA ANONYMOUS Do you have a problem with marijuana? MA is a free 12-step program where addicts help other addicts to get & stay clean. Ongoing Tue. at 6:30 p.m. and Sat. at 2 p.m. at Turning Point Center, 191 Bank St., suite 200, Burlington. 861-3150.

Show and tell.

»

3

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS


C-8 10.11.17-10.18.17

ATTENTION RECRUITERS: POST YOUR JOBS AT: PRINT DEADLINE: FOR RATES & INFO:

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTMYJOB NOON ON MONDAYS (INCLUDING HOLIDAYS) MICHELLE BROWN, 802-865-1020 X21, MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

YOUR TRUSTED LOCAL SOURCE. SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS

Bakery & Retail Help We are looking for part time retail and bakery help in our busy Shelburne store. Experience preferred, but willing to train the right candidates. Weekend availability a must.

LIGHT PRODUCTION POSITIONS 8 HOUR DAY SHIFTS. STARTING PAY $14.70.

Stop by our store on Route 7 to apply in person.

FOR MORE INFO CALL 802-658-9900. EOE.

Busy Shelburne restaurant is

2h-@Work101117.indd 1

looking to add

waitstaff & bartenders

3h-HarringtonsBAKERYretail081617.indd 1

8/11/17 3:33 PM

Join VBT and Country Walkers; an award-winning, Vermontbased active travel company and be part of our high performing, international team. We offer deluxe, small-group bicycling and walking tours worldwide at a variety of different levels and paces. Positively impacting people’s lives through active travel experiences is what we’re all about! WE’RE CURRENTLY RECRUITING THE FOLLOWING FULL-TIME POSITIONS FOR OUR BUSY WILLISTON, VT CALL CENTER:

TOUR SALES CONSULTANT CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE Applicants may submit their resume to nvoth@vbt.com.

4t-VBT100417.indd 1

9/29/17 11:45 AM

Family Support Consultant 10/9/17 3:07 PM

Mental Health, 20 hrs/week

Are you a parent of a child with special needs? Would you like to assist other families with similar experiences? VFN, a family support organization, is To apply, please send cover letter and resume to looking for a dedicated person to provide family barkeatersrestaurant@yahoo.com. centered information, referrals, and assistance to families whose children are experiencing mental health 1t-Barkeaters-082411.indd 1 8/22/11 5:27:10 PM or emotional/behavioral issues in Chittenden County. to their staff.

Email resume and cover letter to HR@vtfn.org or by mail to HR, Vermont Family Network, 600 Blair Park Rd. Suite 240, Williston, VT 05495.

DRIVERS WANTED

Green Mountain Messenger is seeking Drivers. We are looking for On call STAT Drivers and some Routed Drivers. Daytime, Weekend and Night work also available. Full-Time and Part Time 4t-VTFamilyNetwork101117.indd Drivers needed. Qualified Candidates must: • Have a valid driver’s license. • Be able to provide proof of clean driving history. • Have a clean criminal history. • Be comfortable using a smart phone and scanner. • 21+ years old • Be able to safely lift up to 50 lbs. • Comfortable driving on all road conditions • Must be Reliable and Professional Applications can be downloaded on our website at: www.shipgmm.com. Please feel free to apply in person and ask for Aaron at: Green Mountain Messenger Inc. 54 Echo Place, Suite#1 Williston, VT 05495

Join VBT and Country Walkers; an award-winning, Vermontbased active travel company and be part of our high performing, international team. We offer deluxe, small-group bicycling and walking tours worldwide at a variety of different levels and paces. Positively impacting people’s lives through active travel experiences is what we’re all about! WE’RE CURRENTLY RECRUITING THE FOLLOWING FULL-TIME POSITIONS FOR OUR BUSY WILLISTON, VT CALL CENTER:

TOUR SALES CONSULTANT CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE Applicants may submit their resume to nvoth@vbt.com.

1

Join Our Team!

10/9/174t-VBT100417.indd 2:54 PM 1

VERMONT CENTER FOR CRIME VICTIM SERVICES

Victims Compensation Claims Specialist Seeking detail-oriented individual with strong victim service/ case management skills for Victims Compensation Program. Social work background helpful but not required. Responsible for processing victim compensation claims. Position requires good communication and phone skills, computer/data entry skills, and ability to balance multiple priorities. Full-time position, competitive salary and benefits package. This is not a state position. E.O.E. Email resume and cover letter by Oct. 25, 2017 to Attn: Office Manager at: HIRING@CCVS.VERMONT.GOV

9/29/17 11:45 AM

We’re hiring Registered Nurses, Licensed Nursing Assistants and Licensed Practical Nurses. We are a four star facility and deficiency free! Build your career and thrive in a collaborative and positive work environment, supported by a strong team of nursing leaders. We offer comprehensive compensation and flexible scheduling, so you can focus on what really matters – providing quality patient care. For more information, contact Myra Clayton at 502.596.3106. EOE. M/W/V/D. Drug Free Workplace.

www.kindredcareers.com © 2017 Kindred Healthcare Operating, Inc. CSR 191877-01


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

Join our ily! e fam employe

olidays! for the H h s a C a tr Earn Ex ll-time ime or fu -t rt a p le ib Very flex s! le u d e h sc nd Shifts & Weeke Evening nt s Discou Generou T The BES rs & e m to s Cu ers Co-work

We have SEASONAL positions thru DECEMBER

10.11.17-10.18.17

Housings Navigator The Housings Navigator works directly with COTS clients who are without homes or at imminent risk of becoming homeless to assist them in transitioning to stable housing. Responsibilities include direct assistance with completing housing and subsidy applications, addressing credit challenges and connecting families/individuals to any available resources that will expedite or stabilize housing.

Seasonal Call Center & Distribution Center

Holiday Job Fairs CALL CENTER: DISTRIBUTION CENTER: Customer Sales & Service Catamount Industrial Park 128 Intervale Road 947 Route 7 South Burlington, VT 05401 Milton, VT 05468 For more info, call 660-4611 Job Hotline: 660-3JOB WEDNESDAYS TUESDAYS October 11 & 18 October 17, 24, 31 & November 7 3:00–5:30 PM 3:00–5:30 PM

gardeners.com

Download our job application TODAY and bring the completed form to our job fair!

Seven Days • 5.8 w x 3.46 h • Ad date: 10/11/17

Untitled-27 1

C-9

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

BSW or BA in a related field requires, plus three to five years of relevant experience. Master’s Degree preferred. Previous experience with homeless families/individuals preferred, as well as knowledge of federal and state housing subsidy programs. This is a full time position with benefits. Submit resume and cover letter to jobs@cotsonline.org. EOE.

10/9/17 2:28 PM 4t-COTS101117.indd 1

10/6/17 4:22 PM

FACILITIES AND ANIMAL CARE SPECIALIST

SCHOOL CHEF The Burlington School Food Project seeks a motivated individual to join our School Nutrition team! Required qualifications include: 5+ years’ food service experience, Culinary Arts degree and/or relevant experience, demonstrated success working as a team player in a fast-paced kitchen and experienced skill in from-scratch and batch cooking processes. The ideal candidate will also be proficient in computer applications and be familiar with Federal and State laws and regulations regarding health and safety, including food handling and safety laws and regulations. Duties include all aspects of on site food preparation, production, service, and clean-up as well as some menu planning and daily special creation, taste tests and recipe testing. This is a school-year position from mid-August through late June; 35-40 hours/week.

ESSENTIAL DUTIES:

• • • • • •

Prepare menu and other items that reflect both a variety and an understanding of nutritious meals for kids Ability to create wholesome fruit and vegetable offerings utilizing a variety of preparation methods Have an interest in Farm 2 School outreach Maintain a high level of customer service Attend scheduled staff/faculty meetings Prepare/complete appropriate reports/paperwork

SALARY:

• • • •

As per the Master Agreement between the Burlington Board of School Commissioners and the Food Service Employees. Primary Location: Burlington High School Salary Range: Starting $15.23/Hour Shift Type: Full-Time (School Year), Part-time, Substitute

The Facilities & Animal Care Specialist is a unique position that serves in a split capacity within the Facilities & Animal Care department, working as a key team player to ensure a positive visitor experience. This position will provide state of the industry animal care and husbandry for ECHO’s reptile/amphibian/fish collection, facilities and exhibit repair assistance, and support custodial and facilities maintenance needs of our 36,000 square foot, LEED-certified aquarium and science center. ECHO’s mission is to educate and delight people about the Ecology, Culture, History, and Opportunity for stewardship of the Lake Champlain Basin. ECHO is a dynamic, nationally acclaimed science center and lake aquarium committed to engaging diverse public audiences and providing experiential, relevant and lifelong educational experiences for all our guests. This position requires demonstrated experience in both building maintenance and animal husbandry consistent with ECHO’s mission. This position will be full time, non-exempt and will be scheduled for four, ten-hour days per week, including one weekend day. Occasionally, this position will be required to work full weekends, holidays and overtime. For a full job description please visit www.echovt.org/jobs.html. ECHO is an Equal Opportunity Employer and welcomes candidates for employment who will contribute to our diversity.

Please submit cover letter and resume to jobs@echovermont.org with Facilities and Animal Care Specialist position in the subject line. Apply by Monday, October 30, 2017.

Interested parties must apply online:

EQUIPMENT MOVER Entry-level position for a motivated individual for installation of vending equipment. Experience with vending equipment preferred, but willing to train the right candidate. Must possess mechanical skills and be willing to learn various levels of repair. You must have a clean driving record. We offer competitive wages, benefits and a challenging environment. Apply online at farrellvending.com or in person at:

Farrell Vending Services 405 Pine Street, Burlington, VT 05401.

https://bsdvt.tedk12.com/hire/ViewJob.aspx?JobID=552

6t-BurlingtonSchoolFoodProject100417.indd 1

9/29/176t-ECHO101117.indd 3:21 PM 1

10/6/17 4v-FarrellVending-050416.indd 5:02 PM 1

5/2/16 6:37 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-10

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

10.11.17-10.18.17

WHERE YOU AND YOUR WORK MATTER...

JOB OPPORTUNITY Excited about renewable energy and technology? The Draker Team is expanding:

INSIDE SALES COORDINATOR Candidates will be responsible for the execution of agreements, order processing, and other administrative functions providing sales support

Competitive Candidate Qualifications: Minimum of an Associate’s Degree in Engineering or Computer Sciences, or a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Technology-oriented work experience in the PV industry, operations, applications engineering, computer science, manufacturing, and/or sales support Strong sense of customer service and satisfaction For a full job description and details on how to apply, visit: drakerenergy.com/company/careers

NURSE CASE MAN AGER/ UTILIZATION REVIEW NURSE – WILLIS TON

The DVHA Clinical Unit is looking a nurse to join our team to help us achieve our mission by assisting Medicaid members access clinically appropriate, cost effective, and quality health services. This position will perform utilization management activities, including prior authorization of health services, telephonic concurrent reviews of inpatient admissions, and participate in quality improvement projects. The candidate must be a licensed registered nurse with at least three years of clinical nursing experience. For more information contact Kristy Allard 879-5617 Kristin.Allard@Vermont.gov . Vermont Health Access. Job ID #622180. Status: Permanent, Full Time. Application Deadline: 10/15/2017.

FACILIT Y PLANNER & DESIGNER – MONTPELIER

Seeking a self-starter to fulfill a new role in our Planning Division to help manage a diverse and complex portfolio of state-owned facilities and leased space. The incumbent will be responsible for capital planning, programming, and space management to optimize program performance and operational efficiency. Candidates must have the ability to establish effective working relationships and thrive in a fast-paced environment with a high degree of independence. Bachelor’s degree or Professional Registration in Engineering or Architecture required. For more information contact Bill.Laferriere@vermont.gov. Building & General Services. Job ID #622001. Status: Full Time. Application Deadline: Open Until Filled.

Learn more at: careers.vermont.gov

The State of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity Employer

Untitled-29 1 Untitled-28 1

10/9/17 3:27 PM

10/9/17 2:31 PM

VENDING ROUTE DRIVERS Burlington

and Brandon

We are looking for motivated, responsible individuals. Must be able to work independently, possess a positive attitude, be capable of lifting up to 50 pounds and have a clean driving record. We offer a competitive wage along with benefits. Apply in person or online at Farrell Vending Services 405 Pine Street Burlington, VT 05401 farrellvending.com.

4v-FarrellVending120716.indd 1

Vice President Commercial Banking - Chittenden County Northfield Savings Bank is seeking a commercial lending professional to join our team in Chittenden County. As the largest bank headquartered in Vermont, Northfield Savings Bank is growing throughout our service area from north of Burlington to south of Bethel. We are presenting this opportunity to a proven relationship builder to be a key contributor to a unique mutual institution with a strong 150-year history and a promising, independent future. Qualifications of the successful candidate will include: High level commercial credit skills; minimum five years’ experience developing and managing a commercial portfolio; knowledge of Chittenden County market; track record of collaborating in a multibusiness line team environment; bachelor’s degree; self-directed work ethic. Northfield Savings Bank offers a competitive compensation and benefits program and a supportive culture that promotes personal growth. Our company – backed by a cohesive management team and board – continues to invest in people, programs, facilities, and technology to ensure long-term impact in service to our Champlain Valley and Central Vermont communities. If you are interested in exploring a career with Northfield Savings Bank, we would like to hear from you. Please address your confidential inquiry to: Donna Austin-Hawley Sr. Vice President – Chief Human Resources Officer Northfield Savings Bank 60 Wright Avenue Williston, VT 05495 Email: donna.austin-hawley@nsbvt.com Subject: VP – Commercial Banking Inquiry

12/2/16 6t-NorthfieldSavingsBank101117.indd 12:56 PM 1

We are currently accepting applications for a variety of positions that require many different skill sets. Our openings include:

Project Manager – ITS Associate Program Manager Enrollment Advisor Academic Assistant Customer Service Assistant Custodians To apply for these and other great jobs:

www.norwich.interviewexchange.com Norwich University is an Equal Opportunity Employer and is committed to providing a positive education and work environment that recognizes and respects the dignity of all students, faculty and staff. Reasonable accommodations will be made for the known disability of an otherwise qualified applicant. Please contact the Office of Human Resources at nuhr@norwich.edu for assistance. All candidates must be US Citizens/Permanent Residents who are legally eligible to work in the US without sponsorship now or in the future. A post offer, pre-employment background check will be required of the successful candidate. Norwich University offers a comprehensive benefit package that includes medical, dental, vision, group life and long term disability insurance, flexible-spending accounts for health and dependent care, 403(b) retirement plan with employer match, employee assistance program, paid time off including parental leave, and tuition scholarships for eligible employees and their family members.

10/6/17 6t-Norwich101117.indd 4:19 PM 1

10/2/17 11:28 AM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

C-11

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

10.11.17-10.18.17

Hearing Aid Centers

Patient Care Coordinator RESPONSIBILITIES: •

Requires advanced administrative experience in a professional business office. • Ensure quality customer service, oversee the daily operation of services for the practice and the execution of contracts, deposits and billing. • Greet new and existing patients like they are family. • Schedule patients’ appointments either in person or over the phone. • Call established patients for their yearly checkup. • Maintain patients’ files abiding by HIPAA regulations. • Knowledgeable in verifying patients’ insurance eligibility and benefits through all insurance carriers. • Maintains patient care database by entering new information as it becomes available. • Prepare and generate reports for the clinic and the home office. • Sales Support • To work in an environment that fosters team work • Professional demeanor a must More information online.

Champlain Community Services

Community Inclusion Facilitator CCS is an intimate, person centered developmental service provider with a strong emphasis on employee and consumer satisfaction. We would love to have you as part of the team. Provide inclusion supports to individuals with intellectual disabilities and autism. Help people realize dreams and reach goals. Starting wage is $14.35 per hour with mileage compensation and includes a comprehensive benefits package. This is an excellent job for applicants entering human services or for those looking to continue work in this field.

5v-Beltone101117.indd 1

ccs-vt.org

Under the supervision of the Capital Improvement Program Manager, the primary responsibilities of the Associate Public Works Project Coordinator are assisting in the management of construction projects, development of construction ready designs, development and procurement of construction and service contracts, and coordination of improvement projects. Requirements include an Associate’s Degree in Construction Management, Architecture, Landscape Architecture or related field and 5 years of experience in a related construction field with a minimum of 3 years of direct experience in construction management and project implementation. The position is considered Limited Service Part Time (24 hours week). For a complete description, or to apply online, visit www.governmentjobs.com/careers/burlingtonvt. WOMEN, MINORITIES AND PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES ARE HIGHLY ENCOURAGED TO APPLY. EOE.

Engaging minds that change the world

EOE

Building a community where everyone participates and everyone belongs.

10/9/175v-ChamplainCommServices100417.indd 5:56 PM 1

ASSOCIATE PUBLIC WORKS PROJECT COORDINATOR

Champlain Orchards is currently seeking a full-time, senior level Human Resources & Compliance Manager. This position reports directly to the owner and will work closely with senior management. Full job description and application available at champlainorchards.com/ employment

Send your application and cover letter to Karen Ciechanowicz at staff@ccs-vt.org.

Bonus Plan: $50.00 per Outbound Calls that generate a lead. Profit Sharing that can be earned quarterly. Based on sales and overhead.

H.R. and Compliance Manager

Seeking a position with a quality employer? Consider The University of Vermont, a stimulating and diverse workplace. We offer a comprehensive benefit package including tuition remission for on-going, full-time positions. This opening and others are updated daily. Electrical Senior Mechanic Physical Plant Department #S1322PO - The Physical Plant Department at the University of Vermont is hiring an Electrical Senior Mechanic to perform highly skilled electrical, fire alarm, and emergency system repairs, to do preventative maintenance, emergency service and installation, and to perform highly skilled electric control system troubleshooting for HVAC systems.

9/29/17 3:06 PM

Burlington School District’s Property Services/Transportation Department has immediate openings for the following positions:

Second Shift Licensed Electrician/ Maintenance Worker Required qualifications would include a minimum of five years’ previous experience as a licensed electrician. Full time position, M-F, 2:00-10:30 PM

School Bus Aide/Backup Bus Driver This person will also be the backup school bus driver in the event the regularly scheduled driver is not available. CDL Bus Endorsement is a requirement for permanent employment; however, BSD will offer training and support for an individual to receive any such required school bus licensure. Full time, school year ONLY position.

Temp Evening Custodian Full time TEMP position, M-F, 2:30-11 PM

All positions must be able to pass a background check. EOE To apply, visit www.bsdvt.org and click on “Careers” for current listing of employment opportunities.

Minimum Qualifications*: High School Diploma; Vermont State Master Electrician’s License; Fire Alarm TQP Certification; 5 years’ experience in electrical maintenance and repair; Demonstrated proficiency in two or more skilled trades (such as boiler operations, HVAC, plumbing and/or controls). *Please see job posting for further details on the position and minimum qualifications. The University is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the institution. Applicants are encouraged to include in their cover letter information about how they will further this goal. For further information on this position and others currently available, or to apply online, please visit our website at: www.uvmjobs.com; Job Hotline #802-656-2248; telephone #802-656-3150. Applicants must apply for position electronically. Paper resumes are not accepted. Job positions are updated daily. The University of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Applications, from women, veterans, individuals with disabilities and people from diverse racial, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds are encouraged.

Se Is D Si C


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-12

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

10.11.17-10.18.17

CA R I N G P E O P L E WA N T E D

We’re Hiring!

Home Instead Senior Care, a provider of home helper services to seniors in their homes, is seeking friendly and dependable people. CAREGivers assist seniors with companionship, light housekeeping, meal preparation, personal care, errands, safety presence and more. Part-time, flexible scheduling, including: daytime, evening, weekend and overnight shifts currently available. Higher pay for weekend shifts. No heavy lifting.

Apply online at: www.homeinstead.com/483 or call us at 802.860.4663

2v-HomeInstead020817.indd 1

1/13/17

• Social Work Case Manager • Registered Nurse • Dental Hygienist • Medical Billing Representative

1

Data Conversion Project Manager

Data Conversion Analyst

Data Conversion Technical Analyst

Electronic Health Record Consultant

Strategic Healthcare IT Consultant

Technical Consultant

Please visit our website for an up-to-date list of employment opportunities: www.galenhealthcare.com/company/careers. We are dedicated to empowering our customers and providing the best talent in the industry and are looking for you to join our team!

10/6/175v-GalenHealthCare101117.indd 5:05 PM 1

10/6/17 5:03 PM

www.cvabe.org

Full–time Position:

Come join our Burlington Team!

Part-Time Marketing Coordinator Great opportunity for a 24-hour a week position with a flexible schedule. The Marketing Coordinator will work to increase awareness, advocacy, support and growth for Good News Garage programs and services through social media, advertising, PR/media opportunities and events.

Vehicle Processor The Vehicle Donation Processor works with donors to ensure vehicle donations happen in an efficient and professional manner, schedules repair work, works with vendors and partner garages, and manages all related paperwork. A working knowledge of cars and car repair is highly desirable. Must have superior customer service, attention to detail, a valid driver’s license and clear motor vehicle driving record. These are great opportunities to work in a meaningful environment empowering others. If you enjoy being part of a fast-moving team, email a resume and cover letter to nhjobs@ascentria.org. ASCENTRIA CARE ALLIANCE IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

4v-PhoenixHouse101117.indd 1

Here is a sample of our current openings:

All people share a powerful need for the basic necessities of a good life and a place that understands that good health starts with a caring touch and a kind word. For over 45 years, the Community Health Centers of Burlington (CHCB) has provided access to high 12:37 PM quality health care regardless of financial status or life circumstance. CHCB is an innovative Federally Qualified Health Center with eight sites throughout Chittenden County and southern Grand Isle County. We are an Equal Opportunity Employer and are especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the organization. We offer an excellent benefits package to eligible employees. Send resumes to hr@chcb.org.

The Phoenix House R.I.S.E Program located in Burlington VT is seeking qualified individuals to fill our Full and Part-time Counselor positions. Both the full and part-time openings are evening positions. The RISE program provides transitional housing and substance use services to adult men.

Phoenix House is an Equal Opportunity Employer

• Development Manager • Medical Respite Social Worker • Medical Respite Support Staff • Evening and Overnight Shelter Staff

These are just a few of our current opportunities! Learn more about our open positions, how to apply, and the perks of being on the CHCB team at chcb.org/careers.

Full and Part-time5v-CommHealthCenterBurlington101117.indd Counselor positions

Please send resumes to James Henzel, 435 Western Avenue, Brattleboro, VT 05301 or jhenzel@ phoenixhouse.org

Galen Healthcare Solutions is an award-winning, #1 in KLAS, healthcare IT technical & professional services and solutions company providing highly-skilled, cross-platform expertise to our many healthcare clients. Galen is proud to offer a powerful combination of expert advice and technology for Allscripts, Epic, MEDITECH, Cerner, and other electronic health records. We have multiple openings in our Burlington office.

Are you looking for a fulfilling career with a local nonprofit? Join the CHCB team and contribute to the health of your community! We are currently seeking applicants for the following positions:

10/9/17 5v-GoodNewsGarage101117.indd 2:32 PM 1

Teacher/Community Coordinator based in Montpelier

Candidates must have: Proven capacity for providing basic skills instruction reading, writing, math, computer literacy; Proven capacity for providing instruction to English Language Learners and preparation for U.S. citizenship; Experience with developing personalized education plans; Spirit and capacity for outreach and organizing community involvement to support student success; Experience with volunteers; Familiarity with the service area (Montpelier, East Montpelier, Berlin, Middlesex, Worcester) CVABE, a community-based, nonprofit organization has served the residents of Washington, Orange and Lamoille counties for 50+ years. Hundreds of central Vermonters enroll annually to improve basic literacy skills, pursue alternative pathways to high school completion, learn English as another language, and gain skills for work and college. Please submit cover letter, resume and three references by October 20th to:

Executive Director Central Vermont Adult Basic Education, Inc. 46 Washington Street, Suite 100 Barre, Vermont 05641 info@cvabe.org

10/6/17Untitled-18 4:13 PM 1

9/29/17 4:33 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

C-13 10.11.17-10.18.17

CLINICAL DIRECTOR BEHAVIORAL HEALTH Ushio America, Inc. – at our Vermont location – is seeking highly self-motivated individuals to join our Engineering Team as:

CAD Drafter Electrical Design Engineer For more details on these positions please visit: nathaniel.com/Articles.asp?ID=271 Ushio offers a comprehensive benefit package. Interested applicants can apply via email or mail. Ushio America, Inc. Attn: Human Resources 101 Panton Road Vergennes, VT 05491 Email: vermontjobs@ushio.com

Department consists of licensed mental health and drug and alcohol counselors, social workers, and case managers, providing psychotherapy for adults, adolescents, children, families and couples. Position requires licensure in the mental health field, strong communication, administrative and organizational skills, including managing budget goals, experience in writing and managing grants, and desire and ability to collaborate with community partners. Competitive compensative package including, vacation, health, dental, vision, life & disability, continuing education funds, and 401(k) retirement plan with company funding. Please submit your resume and letter of interest to: recruitment8601@gmail.com

www.ushio.com

6t-USHIO101117.indd 1

Non-profit organization in north central Vermont seeking an experienced Clinical Director to manage our outpatient Behavioral Health Dept.

10/6/17 4t-CommunityHealthServicesLamoilleValley101117.indd 11:15 AM 1

10/6/17 PRECI-MANUFACTURING INC.

400 WEAVER STREET WINOOSKI, VT 05404 TEL: 802-655-2414 FAX: 802-655-0796 CAGE: 66841

CNC Machine Operators

LEADERS IN INFORMATION SECURITY SERVICES

Conscientious individuals required to run state of the art CNC equipment. Use of basic hand measuring instruments such as micrometers and verniers as well as the ability to read basic mechanical drawings are a plus.

Join an elite team of information security professionals who are driven to find innovative ways to solve problems for our company and clients.

We need a talented individual to perform in-process and final inspection of machined components. Minimum skills include blueprint reading, geometric tolerance interpretation and use of basic hand held measuring tools such as micrometers, verniers etc.

We are a premier provider and national leader of information security services and have an excellent reputation. We provide the highest quality consulting services and strive to be the best. Therefore, we are very selective on who we add to our team. We take enormous pride in our staff and provide career growth opportunities to develop the next generation of security and business leaders. Competitve salaries and benefits Hiring three experienced professionals:

Pen Tester - Infrastructure Pen Tester - WebApp Managed Services Manager nuharborsecurity.com/careers or contact Kathie@nuharborsecurity.com

MECHANICAL INSPECTOR

1:09 PM

Looking for a Sweet Job? Our new, mobile-friendly job board is buzzing with excitement.

PRODUCTION CONTROL ASSISTANT

The candidate for this job opening will be required to work in coordination with production control to move product throughout the facility based on a process of manufacturing and router. Data entry, mechanical aptitude and good computer skills are requirements for this position.

CNC Milling Machinist

Position requires ability to set up and run CNC milling machines. Selected candidate will load machine programs, mount necessary tooling and fixturing to produce product. Help other individuals in the department to keep production going efficiently. The ideal candidate should have two years’ experience in interpreting G-code programming, part inspection and machine set-up. Horizontal milling experience a plus.

JUNIOR BUYER EXCITING ENTRY LEVEL BUYERS

Junior Buyer will be required to purchase raw material, assembly details and all necessary gauging and cutting tools for a manufacturing facility. Candidate must possess strong computer skills, be organized, communicate well and have the ability to negotiate contracts. Go to www.preci.com for full job description.´ Send resume to: Jeff Grunvald

jgrunvald@preci.com Preci Manufacturing 400 Weaver St., Winooski, VT 05404

Start applying at jobs.sevendaysvt.com


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-14

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

10.11.17-10.18.17

TRAFFIC MANAGER

2v-QueenCityPrinters101117.indd 1

Hall Communications Radio Group dba WOKO, WKOL, WJOY, WIZN, WBTZ is accepting resumes for a Marketing Consultant sales position. Prior sales experience is helpful. Candidate should also possess good verbal and writing skills. Hall Communications also has a great benefits package. This position is very competitive but for the right person can be very lucrative.

EO E.

Lamoille Restorative Center is hiring a

IS

AN

JOBS Program Case Manager

M CO M

Please send resume and references to Dan Dubonnet: ddubonnet@hallradio.net.

UN

IC AT IO N

S

Do you have a passion for youth work? Do you have case management experience? Do you want to help young people develop the skills needed to live independently?

L

Queen City Printers Inc. 701 Pine Street Burlington VT 05401 (802) 864-4566

Do you share our passion for community-based restorative justice?

AL

Full time employment complete with health, dental and 401K benefits. Send resume or email inquiries to info@qcpinc.com.

MARKETING CONSULTANT

H

Queen City Printers Inc. is looking for the right person to join our front office team. Job entails a combination of customer service and production scheduling, including estimating. Strong communication, interpersonal and mathematical skills along with attention to detail and positive attitude are all a must.

Hall Communications Radio Group dba WOKO, WKOL, WJOY, WIZN, WBTZ has an opening for a Traffic Manager. The job responsibilities include working with sales and programming, entering sales orders and producing reports. This is important detailed data entry work in a fast-paced environment.

No calls accepted.

10/6/174t-HallCommunications101117.indd 2:05 PM 1

10/9/17 10:18 AM

Join the ReNEWable Power Generation At AllEarth Renewables, we believe that there are better, more responsible ways to meet the energy needs of today that will result in a cleaner tomorrow. Our dual-axis solar trackers are designed, engineered, tested and assembled right here in Vermont and produce up to 45% more energy than same-sized fixed installations.

Director of Marketing and Sales • • • • •

• •

A bachelor’s degree and experience in a related field is required. Interested individuals should apply by sending a cover letter and resume to the following email address: info@lrcvt.org.

Applications accepted until position is filled. More information about LRC is available at. lrcvt.org

LAMOILLE RESTORATIVE CENTER IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.

5v-LamoilleRestorativeJustice101117.indd 1

Bachelor’s Degree in business, marketing, or engineering. 7+ years’ successful experience in a senior-level position. Understands how to market and sell technical products. Proven experience in driving profitable business growth. Experience in creating effective marketing copy, presentations, collateral, and campaigns.

10/9/17 10:11 AM

C ATA M O U N T C O LO R I S S E E K I N G

SHIPPING & RECEIVING CLERK LOOKING FOR FULL TIME HIGHLY ORGANIZED SHIPPING CLERK TO ASSIST IN OUR SHIPPING AND RECEIVING DEPARTMENT.

Embedded Systems Engineer • • •

LRC is a team-oriented, nonprofit agency based in Hyde Park. We have a position for someone who possesses strong communication skills, a clear sense of boundaries, an understanding of the human service system and an interest in working with young people. Primary responsibility is to provide case management services for youth ages 16-22 as they pursue employment and education.

Bachelor’s Degree in engineering. Solid programming competency of embedded microcontrollers in C or C++. Experience in hands-on development and troubleshooting on embedded targets. Excellent knowledge of OS coding techniques, IP protocols, interfaces, and hardware subsystems. Comfortable with “breaking the rules” by being innovative and thinking outside the box.

We seek employees who are committed to a cleaner, more sustainable planet. www.allearthrenewables.com for details and application process instructions. 94 Harvest Lane, Williston, VT 05495 allearthrenewables.com | 802.872.9600

• Pack and ship packages and skids of printed material via FedEx, UPS and common carrier freight. • Maintain inventory of shipping materials and supplies. • Ability to lift up to 50 lbs. • Operate forklift. • Computer skills. • Experience with Microsoft Excel a plus. • Valid driver’s license. • High school diploma or GED.

BINDERY OPERATOR SEEKING FULL TIME BINDERY OPERATOR FOR BUSY PRINT SHOP. RESPONSIBILITIES AND QUALIFICATIONS INCLUDE:

• Operate various folders, stitchers, cutters and lettershop equipment. • Ability to stand long periods of time. • Ability to bend, lift and carry up to 50 lbs. • High school diploma or GED. Apply at Catamount Color, 89 Sand Hill Road, Essex, VT 05451.

Untitled-13 1

10/6/17 10:44 AM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! Visit VPR.net for a full job Discover theand power of description application. Applicants mustcan fill do. out the what ONE PERSON application, provide a cover Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re seeking an energetic, letter and resume and send compassionate and deeply it by email to

LEGAL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/ PARALEGAL/ EXECUTIVE SECRETARIAL

committed applicant who

seeks to grow their career in

Kirkpatrick & Goldsborough, PLLC, a South Burlington, Vermont law firm, is seeking to hire a highly motivated individual to provide administrative support to a senior partner and other attorneys doing primarily litigation support.

a place theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll for love.a full job Visit VPR.net description and application. Applicants must fill out the application, provide a cover letter and resume and send it by email to careers@vpr.net.

Candidates must be executive secretarial caliber, detail-oriented while maintaining efficiency, and have strong verbal, written and comprehension skills, and be a team player able to answer phones, greet clients, order supplies, check in mail, bill, organize discovery, file documents, and type. Candidate must be flexible and have the ability to manage multiple projects for multiple attorneys. Strong technology skills and a working knowledge of MS Office applications a must. Prior office/business experience, legal education is a must.

Ambulatory RNs and LPNs Sign on bonus up to $6,000 We are looking for outstanding Ambulatory RNs and LPNs who are passionate about providing care that puts the patient first!

References (3) are required. Salary is commensurate upon ability and experience. Forward cover letter, resume to:

Full time, part time and per diem opportunities exist in Pediatrics, Cardiology, Ophthalmology, Transplant, Endocrinology, Pulmonary and Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.

Mary Kirkpatrick, Esq., Kirkpatrick & Goldsborough, PLLC, 1233 Shelburne Road, Suite E1, South Burlington, VT, 05403,

We offer competitive pay, flexible day schedule and great benefits (including tuition reimbursement).

UVMHealth.org/MedCenterJobs

or by email to mkirk@vtlawfirm.com.

5v-KirkpatrickGoldborough100417.indd 1

C-15

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, or protected veteran status.

9/29/17 Untitled-1 3:17 PM1

10.11.17-10.18.17

Development Services Associate (Part Time) Vermont Public Radio has an exciting opportunity for a detail oriented customer service professional to participate in the continued success of our membership program. We seek a reliable team member to assist with donor communications, gift processing and donor account maintenance. The work schedule is 20 hours per week, ideally four hours per day Monday through Friday with the potential for a different arrangement based on department capacity.  Visit VPR.net for a full job description and application. Applicants must fill out the application, provide a cover letter and resume and send it by email to careers@vpr.net. VPR IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.

10/9/173v-VPR101117.indd 10:22 AM 1

10/6/17 4:30 PM

Advancement/Membership Coordinator The Lake Champlain Maritime Museum is seeking an Advancement/Membership Coordinator to support the Marketing & Development Departments and the Executive Director. This key position oversees membership and donor databases, coordinates membership correspondence and growth efforts, processes gift acknowledgements, grant proposals and reports, prepares financial reports, processes mailings and assists with special events. This position assists with other aspects of the Executive Directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities such as Board meeting organization. This professional multi-tasker will also be responsible for phone communications for the administrative office.

#SBOE.BOBHFS'VMM5JNF +PJOPVSHSPXJOHNBSLFUJOHUFBNJOUIJTOFXMZDSFBUFEQPTJUJPO"T#SBOE.BOBHFS  ZPVBSFSFTQPOTJCMFGPSEFWFMPQJOHBOEFYFDVUJOHNBSLFUJOHTUSBUFHJFTUIBUBEWBODF PVSQPSUGPMJPPGQSPEVDUTBOEESJWFQSPöUBCMFCVTJOFTTHSPXUIUISPVHIPVUPVS XIPMFTBMF SFUBJM BOEFDPNNFSDFDIBOOFMT8PSLJOHJODMPTFDPMMBCPSBUJPOXJUIUIF %JSFDUPSPG4BMFT.BSLFUJOH ZPVQMBZBLFZ IBOETPOSPMFJONBOBHJOHUSBEF NBSLFUJOHJOJUJBUJWFT EFNBOEHFOFSBUJPOQSPTQFDUJOH BOENBSLFUSFTFBSDI BOBMZTJT



The right candidate will be organized, flexible and resourceful, have very strong computer and database skills and be a selfstarter. Experience in a non-profit environment and with fundraising databases is a plus. This is a full time position with competitive salary, medical, dental and short & long term disability benefits. See full job description at www.lcmm.org. Submit cover letter and resume to Susan Jones at susanj@lcmm.org.

1MFBTFWJTJUPVSXFCTJUFGPSBEEJUJPOBMKPCEFUBJMT IUUQTXXXMBLFDIBNQMBJODIPDPMBUFTDPNBCPVUVTFNQMPZNFOU

LCMM is an Equal Opportunity Employer

-BLF$IBNQMBJO$IPDPMBUFTJTBOFRVBMPQQPSUVOJUZFNQMPZFS Untitled-4 1

5v-LakeChamplainMaritimeMuseum101117.indd 1

10/6/17 1:20 PM

10/6/17 3:35 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-16

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

10.11.17-10.18.17

COACHING POSITIONS DESIGNER/ ARCHITECTURE SCHOOL GRADUATE

Dynapower Company in South Burlington is a leading manufacturer of large custom power supplies and energy conversion systems. Our staff is dedicated to providing quality workmanship and the highest level of customer service. We offer an extensive benefits package and a pleasant working environment, as well as an opportunity for personal and professional growth. We are currently accepting resumes and applications for the following position:

ESSEX MIDDLE SCHOOL Our Essex Middle School is seeking coaches for the following winter sport activities: Girls B Team Basketball – Job ID 28585648 Boys Basketball – Job ID 2855655 Head Cheerleading Coach – Job ID 2855657

Immediate opening Undergraduate degree preferred but not required. Previous for a recent B.Arch or middle school or high school coaching experience M.Arch graduate with preferred, or a minimum of two years of varsity level playing 1-3 years’ experience experience required. Candidates must be at least 18 years w/commercial Sales Support Specialist – of age. Positions pay a stipend of $2,460 ($2,716 for the construction Head Cheerleading Coach). After Market Services documents. Proficiency w/Revit and AutoCad For consideration, please apply on www.schoolspring.com to For the full job description and to apply, go to required. Strong design the corresponding Job ID listed above. EOE. www.dynapower.com and click on “careers.” EOE. skills and graphic presentation abilities a plus. Competitive Manufacturing Operator 4t-Dynapower101117.indd 1 10/9/174t-EssexWestfordSchoolDistrict101117.indd 10:22 AM 1 10/6/17 salary & benefits. Email letter of interest & resume to estelle@ scottpartners.com. No phone calls, please.

Looking to join a great health care team? Want full time work and great hours?

www.scottpartners.com

Wake Robin is hiring!

Our new management team 9/22/17 3:29 PM wants you to come work for us! We are looking for

3v-Scott+Partners092717.indd 1

Nurses (RN or LPN), LNAs and Care Providers for all shifts:

7:00 AM to 3:30 PM

Staff Nurse (LPN or RN) Full-Time All Shifts Vermont’s premier continuing care retirement community seeks a dedicated nursing professional with a strong desire to work within a community of seniors. Wake Robin provides high quality nursing care in a fast paced residential and long-term care environment, while maintaining a strong sense of “home.” Wake Robin offers an opportunity to build strong relationships with staff and residents in a dynamic community setting. We continue to offer generous shift differential for evenings, nights and weekends!

3:00 PM to 11:30 PM

MDS Coordinator

11:00 PM to 7:30 AM

Full-Time Monday - Friday

Every other weekend is a must.

The MDS Coordinator is a Registered Nurse who is responsible for the timely and accurate completion of the MDS treatment assessment tool. This critical team member ensures the delivery of high quality care reviewing care plans and care delivery for factors specific to geriatric residents (i.e. physical, cognitive, and socialization factors). This tracking ensures that Wake Robin is in compliance with our high standards of care for our residents. We seek a person who can combine their love of nursing with the skill to manage data and care plan details. While we prefer a candidate with a background or familiarity with MDS regulations, coding and care planning, and compliance, we will train the right candidate on the job.

Spring Village at Essex, a Memory Care Community located at 6 Freeman Woods in Essex Junction. We hold weekly group interviews every Wednesday at 2:00 PM.   802-872-1700

Interested candidates please email a cover letter and resume to hr@wakerobin.com or complete an application online at www.wakerobin.com.

9/29/176t-WakeRobinSTAFFNURSEmds101117.indd 3:06 PM 1

A good steady job is hard to find. But not as hard as good steady people.

You are looking for a good job with a steady income and good benefits. And you have what it takes to be a valued part of a factory environment in a global company where you can be proud of your contribution to the end product. You are someone who expects to be respected and treated as a valued member of the team. You will find that here! Along with this you will receive on the job training, compressed work weeks, and benefits that start on day one, the first day you start working for us.

Manufacturing Operators High School Diploma / GED and no experience needed To apply: www.globalfoundries.com/about-us/careers or Text “GFO” to 86677.

GlobalFoundries is an EOE/AA Employer.

WAKE ROBIN IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.

3v-SpringVillageEssex100417.indd 1

4:35 PM

10/9/17 Untitled-30 3:07 PM 1

10/9/17 4:41 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Office Admin/Bookkeeping/Social Media Nonprofit outdoor family center looking for a full-time year round office worker to handle light bookkeeping, payroll/HR, purchasing, social media, etc. tagc@catamountoutdoor.com catamountoutdoorfamilycenter.com Catamount Outdoor Family Center does not discriminate in employment opportunities or practices on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability or any other characteristic protected by law.

2h-CatamountOutdoorFamilyCenter101117.indd 1

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

C-17 10.11.17-10.18.17

Administrative Assistant Part Time position. 21 hours per week. 10:00 am – 3:00 pm Tuesday-Friday. For more information see FCC webpage. Send resume to: info@firstchurchburlington.org. For more information: http://bit.ly/2kzb22Y

AmeriCorps VISTA Positions Available!

1 10/9/17 10:40 AM 10/9/17 1t-FirstCongregationalChurch101117.indd 10:17 AM

Vermont Housing Finance Agency (VHFA), located in Burlington VT, has immediate openings for the following positions. Named one of the “Best Small/Medium Places to Work in Vermont” the last few years, VHFA is looking for individuals who will help us to maintain our great reputation, who demonstrate a strong work ethic, and who are creative, put our customers first, and work well both independently and as a team player.

Development Underwriter - Multifamily Responsible for comprehensive analysis of prospective multifamily housing and single family developments being considered for VHFA financing, tax credits, and other financing and special initiatives; underwrites Housing Credit applications and assists in the development of loan and Housing Credit policies and procedures and the administration of Federal and State Housing Credit Programs; assists the Director of Development in the administration of Development programs; serves as a high level resource for pertinent research and training of federal regulations, VHFA statutory requirements, and Multifamily rules and underwriting guidelines.

SerVermont currently has multiple AmeriCorps VISTA positions available beginning November 27, 2017. Host sites include Capstone Community Action in Barre, Alliance for Community Transformation in Bennington, Vermont Youth Conservation Corps in Richmond, and Senior Solutions in Springfield. The SerVermont VISTA Project places members in oneyear terms at organizations and state agencies across the state that fight poverty and increase opportunity for low-income individuals. Our VISTAs gain professional development experience while building capacity for host site organizations through activities like fundraising, volunteer management, program development, and outreach. To learn more about specific opportunities, please click the link and search for VISTA positions available in Vermont. www.my.americorps.gov/mp/ listing/publicRequestSearch.do. You will be able to view listings and submit your application through our online system.

Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent work experience, and experience in multifamily and/or single family robyn.baylor@vermont.gov housing development, loan underwriting, or residential and/or commercial finance is required. Experience with community development and knowledge of State and federal housing programs is desirable. Requires occasional travel throughout Vermont with a valid driver’s license and dependable transportation. Proficiency with Microsoft Office products (Outlook, Excel, Word and SharePoint), a creative problem SLATE - Come be part of Burlington’s 10/6/17 4:33 PM solving approach, and good attention to detail are all required, as is a solid grasp of finance and financial5v-SerVermont101117.indd 1 newest store team! We are looking to build risk analysis. a team of innovative, smart, hardworking

Business Development Coordinator – Homeownership Responsible for providing support and taking initiative to manage the Agency’s mortgage program participating lender relationships. Will execute marketing strategies and proactively monitor and manage advertising and marketing results, respond to lender, consumer and general inquiries received by the Homeownership Department, and manage internal policy, procedure and guide updates. Will also provide support to the production area of the Homeownership Department as needed, and attend and participate in presentations at seminars and events to promote VHFA homeownership programs. Candidate must have a minimum of a Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent marketing experience, a minimum of one year of experience developing creative and instructive content, and operational and development support within a professional environment charged with proprietary information. Experience in print and digital graphic design is preferred, and familiarity with the mortgage lending process is desirable. Experience in public speaking and presentation is required, as is regular travel throughout Vermont with a valid driver’s license and dependable transportation. Proficiency with Microsoft Office products (Outlook, Excel, Word, PowerPoint and SharePoint) and Adobe InDesign is also preferred.

In addition, candidates must demonstrate exceptional customer service skills, and possess excellent written and verbal communication skills. Must be highly organized, able to handle multiple tasks, set priorities and meet deadlines, while working with a wide range of individuals, both internal and external to the Agency. VHFA offers a competitive salary and an excellent benefits package. For a detailed job description and benefits overview, please see the Careers section of www.VHFA.org. To apply, send cover letter (required), resume, salary requirements and references to the Human Resources Department at HR@vhfa.org by Friday, October 20, 2017. VHFA is an equal opportunity employer and is committed to a diverse workplace. We highly encourage women, persons with disabilities, and people from diverse racial, ethnic and cultural backgrounds to apply.

employees. If you like a fast paced, dynamic environment, appreciate beautiful products, and enjoy working with the public, then check out our opportunities! Potential for growth with all positions.

Assistant Manager:

Responsibilities include hiring/training sales associates, customer service, monitoring inventory and ordering. Must have prior experience in a retail environment, proficient use of MS Office, familiarity with POS systems, ability to work day and some evening shifts.

Sales Personnel:

Work directly with customers, operate POS, process receipts, learn product lines, open and close. Display experience a plus. Prior customer service experience required. Full time and part time positions available, days and evenings.

Furniture Manager:

Lead sales for furniture category and design team. Prior Interior Design a plus, proficiency in Microsoft Office required.

Visual Merchandiser:

In-store and window display. Must have prior experience and images of prior work. Flexible schedule possible.

Inventory/Shipping/Receiving:

Receive shipments, lightweight construction and assembly, Inventory control. Part time to start. Please email resumes to: Sarahp@slatehome.co

10v-VHFA100417.indd 1

10/2/17 4:18 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-18

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

10.11.17-10.18.17

Seasonal Positions

The Gryphon Bistro and Neighborhood Lounge is seeking an experienced server (bartending experience a plus) to add to our front of house team. Please email paigechadwick11@gmail.com.

1T-TheGryphon082317.indd 1

WINTER JOB FAIR

We have immediate openings in our manufacturing department for long-term, full-time & part-time seasonal employment. We will have other opportunities available throughout our company for days, early evening, and weekend shifts. No experience is necessary; we will train you.

October 21 | 1:00pm - 4:00pm Adventure Center at Spruce Peak

Manufacturing Customer service reps Warehouse

8/18/17 1:26 PM

Apply in person. 8 am to 5 pm 210 East Main Street, Richmond, VT 05477

We are looking for professional servers, We are hosts & for looking bartenders! professional servers, hosts & bartenders!

Come meet hiring managers from the following departments: 4t-Harrington'sSEASONAL081617.indd 1

8/11/17 3:28 PM

LEGAL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Rose Bedard UpperBedard Deck Server, 10 years of service Rose

Upper Deck Server, 12 years of service

selena@windjammergroup.com

An Equal Opportunity Employer Send your resume to selena@windjammergroup.com Interested? lo c al , fr es h , o r i gi nal Send your resume to

An Equal Opportunity Employer selena@windjammergroup.com An Equal Opportunity Employer

lo c al , fr es h , o r i gi nal

1076 Williston Road, S. Burlington

862.6585 www.windjammerrestaurant.com

1076 Williston Road, S. Burlington

862.6585

• Facilities Operations

The successful candidate will have initiative; be professional and friendly with clients; have excellent typing and technological skills; and the ability to handle all aspects of an office. Position could be 80% or 100% time; attorneys are flexible and responsive to demands of non-work life. Salary will be set based on proficiency and ability.

Untitled-11 1

Please submit cover letter, resume and two references to Jframe@hoffcurtis.com.

10/9/17 3:01 PM 4t-HoffCurtis101117.indd 1

ILL

D

FIN

SS

E CC

UW YO

SU

CRACK OPEN YOUR FUTURE...

with our new, mobile-friendly job board.

Join our Team! The Humane Society of Chittenden County is recruiting a

10/9/17

Chief Executive Officer

Director of Development & Communications

The Humane Society of Chittenden County is seeking a new CEO to join a dynamic organization entering the next stage of its evolution. The successful candidate will bring strategic thinking, energy, and a and commitment to HSCC’sprofessional mission, along The primary fundraiser communications with the skills expand interacts the organization’s vision, leadership for HSCC. Thistoposition with individual donors, role, and collaboration within the community. vendors, sponsors, and media contacts to clearly communicate Candidates mayand or may not come from the welfare HSCC’s mission, programs, events andanimal funding needs. field,closely but it will be the essential theyofunderstand work Work with CEO,that Board Directors,and andcan staff to effectively within unique culture of a fundraising mission-driven organisuccessfully targetthe and achieve annual goals. zation such development as HSCC. Experience working as lead executive in Professional experience is required. Please send an organization providing humane services is highly desirable. a resume and letter of interest to jane@chittendenhumane.org. For more information and details on how to apply, please visit: Deadline October 13. For a complete job description, www.chittendenhumane.org www.chittendenhumane.org.

Billing Manager

10/6/17 10:23 AM

SSTA is looking for a full-time Billing Manager who will be responsible for full charge bookkeeping for a 4 million dollar budget, including monthly billing and supervision of 2 billing specialists. Examples of duties include the managing and processing of weekly payroll (through a payroll service), preparation of monthly and quarterly tax returns and the preparation of financial statements. Job includes working with a transportation data system. Must be able to communicate effectively with other departments and individual employees 11:32 AM on a regular basis. Special Services Transportation Agency is a non-profit human services agency and an equal opportunity employer.

START APPLYING AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

4t-HumaneSocietyChittendenCty100417.indd 1

• Adventure Center & Cubs Daycare

To apply online and find out more information, please visit our website at stowe.com/about/employment.

Immediate opening for experienced legal administrative assistant / versatile office person for two attorney Burlington law firm.

www.windjammerrestaurant.com

3v-Windjammer101117.indd 1

• Food & Beverage

• Retail & Rental • Mountain Operations

Interested?

Rose Bedard Interested? Upper Deck 10 years Send yourServer, resume to of service

• Tickets

We offer competitive pay, a robust benefits package, paid holidays and vacation. All incumbents must successfully pass background checks, drug test upon offer of hire. To apply for this position, please download an application from sstarides.org or obtain an application at 2091 Main Street, Colchester, Vermont.

Equal Opportunity Employer

9/29/17 1:44 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

Full-Time Stewardship and Volunteer Coordinator

Data, Quality & Training Coordinator BURLINGTON, VERMONT The Data, Quality and Training Coordinator for statewide selfmanagement programs provides support to all aspects of a grant funded program, which promotes, monitors, and reports on population health initiatives. Self-management health programs empower patients to play an active role in reducing chronic illness and improving quality of life.

THE NATURE CONSERVANCY in Vermont seeks a full-time Stewardship and Volunteer Coordinator to join our dynamic and growing team in Montpelier. The right candidate will implement a range of preserve management activities, coordinate the monitoring of our conserved lands, and enhance our flagship preserve network to raise the profile of TNC’s broader conservation work. The Coordinator will also strategically build and manage our volunteer capacity, and work on other priority conservation projects as needed. For a complete position description and to apply for this position, visit www.nature.org/careers and apply online to Job #45796. The application deadline is Midnight EST October 27, 2017.

Qualified Candidates Will Have: Bachelors degree in Business or Health Care related field 3-5 years experience developing and maintaining databases Experience with grant writing and reporting preferred

THE NATURE CONSERVANCY IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.

APPLY ONLINE: bit.ly/DataCoordinator

C-19

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

4t-NatureConservancy100417.indd 1

10.11.17-10.18.17

Carpenter, Cabinet Maker and Finish Person

Silver Maple Construction & The Woodworks by Silver Maple Construction in New Haven, VT are seeking skilled employees for various immediate openings. All positions require experience in carpentry, cabinet construction, and/or spraying conversion varnishes and lacquers. Please submit a cover letter, a resume, and 3 references to: msweeney@ silvermapleconstruction.com

9/29/172v-SilverMapleConstruction100417.indd 11:50 AM 1

PROJECT ARCHITECT Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer. All qualified applicants will receive onsideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, or protective veteran status.

PROGRAM SERVICES COORDINATOR

Untitled-5 1

10/4/17 12:57 PM

The Vermont Youth Conservation Corps (VYCC) has a tremendous impact on the lives of young people and in the growing number of Vermont communities where our crews work and learn. The VYCC is looking for a mission driven, dynamic, Jedi-like Program Services Coordinator to play a key role in supporting VYCC’s Farm and Conservation programs. Essential roles include admissions coordination, recruiting and AmeriCorps grants management. This position works closely with all departments and across various staff teams to deliver VYCC’s nonprofit work: youth development, environmental conservation, and food and nutrition programs.

We’re Hiring! Positions Available:

Long-term career opportunity: Scott + Partners, an established architectural firm in Essex, VT with a focus on commercial, healthcare & multi-family housing projects, is seeking a creative, self-motivated architect with 5-8 years of experience in similar projects. Good design and communication skills are important. B.Arch. or M.Arch required. Licensed architect preferred but not required. Must have demonstrated abilities & experience in construction document production, project coordination & CA experience. Must be proficient in Revit, AutoCad, & Microsoft Office. A very competitive salary & benefits package will be offered to the right candidate. Email letter of Interest & resume to estelle@scottpartners.com. No phone calls, please.

Cabinet Makers CNC Operator Finish Foreman Veneer Tech Molder Operator Project Manager Email:

HR@walkerofficeworks.com

www.scottpartners.com

4t-Scott+Partners092717.indd 1

9/29/17 2:11 PM

2v-WalkerOfficeWorks100417.indd 1 9/22/17 3:28 PM

10/2/17 1:27 PM

The ideal candidate possesses proven administrative and program support skills, has familiarity with admissions and recruiting and experience with grants management. The position offers varied tasks, ongoing training/support, and excellent professional growth opportunities in a nonprofit setting. VYCC offers competitive salary and benefits. VYCC’s offices are located in a renovated, turn of the century monitor barn on a 400 acre campus, in Richmond, with hiking trails and an organic farm.

Looking for a Sweet Job?

For a full job description and instructions on how to apply visit VYCC.org/join/join-the-VYCC-staff. Send resumes to bob.coates@vycc.org by October 23, 2017.

Our new, mobile-friendly job board is buzzing with excitement. THE MANOR, 577 WASHINGTON HWY. MORRISVILLE, VT 05661

5v-VYCC101117.indd 1

10/6/174t-TheManor101117.indd 4:26 PM 1

Start applying at jobs.sevendaysvt.com

10/6/17 4:50 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-20

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

10.11.17-10.18.17

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Vermont-NEA is seeking a highly qualified Administrative Assistant/Receptionist to provide administrative support to our professional staff. In addition to the specific qualifications below, this position requires exceptional interpersonal skills, careful attention to detail, proofreading abilities, excellent oral and written communication skills, strategic thinking, conference planning, managing multiple ongoing projects and a commitment to confidentiality, all within the context of a highly professional and advocacy-oriented membership organization. Specific qualifications: This is not an entry-level position. BA or higher degree preferred; at least 3 years’ experience in administrative/assistant capacity; appreciation for the role of labor unions and for the work of public school educators; advanced proficiency in Microsoft Excel is required. Paralegal experience a plus, but not a requirement. To apply, send a cover letter and resume, including names and contact information for at least 3 references to Jeff Fannon, Executive Director, Vermont-NEA, at 10 Wheelock Street, Montpelier, Vermont 05602, or electronically to kferguson@vtnea.org by 4:30 p.m. on Monday, November 6, 2017.

5v-VTNEA101117.indd 1

10/9/17 5:17 PM

Join an Industry Leader and Become an Employee-Owner! CAD Cut, a Web Industries company located in Middlesex, VT; enables innovation of global aerospace companies by developing and commercializing precision formatting processes for advanced composite materials. Manufacturing Technicians are a critical part of delivering integrated material management, precision formatting and supply chain solutions.

Manufacturing Technicians Full-Time, All Shifts These are direct-hire positions. Key responsibilities include the operation of computerized knife cutting systems, inventory control, and part drawing interpretation, part measurement, and quality system documentation. Minimum requirements include: • High school diploma or equivalent • Working knowledge of basic math • Strong mechanical aptitude to change out tooling on cutting machines • Ability to read and interpret drawings • Computer competency for accessing files and software programs • Excellent interpersonal skills suitable for teamwork oriented environment As an Employee-Owner, you will be eligible for incredible benefits, including: • Company-paid stock ownership plan • Educational assistance plan that pays, in advance, all tuition, fees and book for undergraduate studies (tuition paid at Vermont state college equivalence} • Comprehensive medical, dental. vision and prescription coverage with low deductibles and low out-of-pocket and employee premiums • Competitive salary and 401(k) and profit sharing plan • Career progression planning and opportunities for advancement Please email your resume, indicating shift preference, to nchase@cadcut.com or fax it to 260-435-4364. An equal opportunity employer

10v-CadCut101117.indd 1

10/6/17 5:00 PM

Looking for a Sweet Job?

Our new, mobile-friendly job board is buzzing with excitement.

Start applying at jobs.sevendaysvt.com 3h_JobFiller_Bee.indd 1 5v-UVMMedCtrFOOT100417.indd 1

9/29/17 1:10 PM

2/27/17 4:27 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

C-21 10.11.17-10.18.17

YOU WILL FIND SUCCESS

Director of Human Resources The Director of Human Resources will oversee the HR team and is responsible for the development and execution of department strategies, objectives and metrics aligned with Howard Center’s strategic intent. This leader will oversee all aspects of Human Resources practice and process including compensation and benefits, recruitment and retention, training and development, employee and labor relations, policy development, and regulatory compliance. Present priorities include ensuring all of these functional areas are aligned with and supportive of the agency’s ongoing strategic integration of client service programs and the agency’s commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion. Required: three years of experience in leadership position; five years of HR experience in a similar role with similar degree of responsibilities for an organization of comparable size and complexity. Full time.

ARCh Program Leader Offer leadership, supervision, expertise and risk assessment as the ARCh Program Leader. The ARCh Program serves children and adults up to the age of 22 who have an intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorder or emotional/behavioral challenge. Consider this position if you have a master’s degree and meet the standard to be a Qualified Developmental Disability Professional (QDDP). Successful applicant will have three years of human services experience with at least two years working with individuals with developmental disabilities, along with supervisory experience.

Budget and Financial Manager Put your financial expertise to work making a difference in your community. Join Howard Center’s Finance Team, where you can expect a culture that supports your professional growth and your personal priorities! The successful candidate will be responsible for budget development, performance monitoring, financial and operational analysis, costing, grant and contract management, providing general business and operational guidance, and collaborating with program and agency leadership to effectively manage financial performance of more than 30 cost centers with a budget total of $30 million. Looking for a highly motivated self-starter with excellent interpersonal skills.

Clinical Director – Park Street, Rutland Join the Park Street Program, a residential treatment program in Rutland specializing in therapy for adolescent males who have engaged in sexually harmful behaviors. Programming is family centered and trauma informed. Provide clinical supervision and consultation, oversee implementation of treatment plans and provide program evaluation/development to ensure that best practice models are reflected in all aspects of treatment. Consider this position if you have a master’s degree and hold a Vermont clinical license.

Registered Nurse – Medication Assisted Treatment Program Seeking a part-time Registered Nurse. Our nurses are responsible for safely dispensing methadone and buprenorphine products and maintaining all Nursing Dispensary operations. Must have excellent attention to detail and organizational skills plus strong interpersonal and communication skills.

Residential Counselor – Allen House Seeking an energetic and professional individual to provide a safe environment for persons with mental health challenges living in an independent permanent housing environment. Limited part-time. Four hours per week. BA required.

Residential Counselor – Safe Haven Seeking an energetic and professional individual to provide a safe environment for persons with mental health challenges living in a transitional housing program. Must have the ability to exercise sound judgement and be compassionate and respectful. Limited part-time. 7.5 hours per week. BA required.

SUB - Registered Nurse – Medication Assisted Treatment Program Seeking subs to cover vacancies. Our nurses are responsible for safely dispensing methadone and buprenorphine products and maintaining all Nursing Dispensary operations. Must have excellent attention to detail and organizational skills plus strong

interpersonal and communication skills.

Howard Center offers an excellent benefits package including health, dental and life insurance, as well as generous paid time off for all regular positions scheduled 20-plus hours per week.

Please visit our website, howardcentercareers.org. Enter position title to view details and apply. Howard Center is an equal opportunity employer. Applicants needing assistance or an accommodation in completing the online application should feel free to contact Human Resources at 488-6950 or hrhelpdesk@howardcenter.org. 14-HowardCenter101117.indd 1

10/9/17 12:49 PM

HUNGRY TO FILL THAT

POSITION? Seven Days’ readers are locally sourced and ready to bring something new to the table. Reach them with Seven Days Jobs — our brand-new, mobile-friendly, recruitment website. JOB RECRUITERS CAN:

• Post jobs using a form that includes key info about your company and open positions (location, application deadlines, video, images, etc.). • Accept applications and manage the hiring process via our new applicant tracking tool. • Easily manage your open job listings from your recruiter dashboard. Visit jobs.sevendaysvt.com to start posting!


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-22

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

10.11.17-10.18.17

Searching for two actors with age archetype of around 70s to play the leads in the theatrical action dramedy Bygones! Please email Writer-Director/Exec. Producer John Gibbons for more information. john.gibbons@mymail.champlain.edu 1t-PrimoPictureProductions101117.indd 1

TOWN OF SHELBURNE

Mechanic/Truck Driver

10/9/17Untitled-10 10:15 AM 1

10/6/17 3:49 PM

Shelburne’s Highway Department is seeking a full-time Mechanic/Truck Driver. The successful candidate will be responsible for the maintenance of all Town vehicles, machinery and equipment, and will operate trucks and other equipment when necessary. High school diploma or equivalent and five years of experience; CDL or the ability to obtain a CDL; Vermont State Vehicle Inspection License; drug & alcohol test and background check are required. See full job description at shelburnevt.org/237/Human-Resources. Salary range $20-$27/hr., plus benefits.

Join Our Public Works Team!

Submit resume or application to: Susan Cannizzaro, Town of Shelburne, P. O. Box 88, Shelburne, VT 05482 or scannizzaro@shelburnevt.org. Position open until filled. First review of applications will begin on October 23rd.

Equipment Operator II

THE TOWN OF SHELBURNE IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.

This position is responsible for a wide range of general labor work associated with maintaining City streets, water, sewer, and stormwater systems, sidewalks, parking garage, buildings and grounds, and all other duties as assigned. The Equipment Operator Maintenance Technician II will be operating all vehicles including but not limited to dump trucks with air brakes, plows with wings, Vactor, loader, backhoe, Bobcat, street sweeper, sidewalk plow, truck with trailer and other equipment involving plowing, salting and sanding in winter, and general highway maintenance and construction work in other seasons, and all special projects as assigned. High school diploma or equivalent level of education, two years of experience and a valid Commercial Driver’s License Class B required.

5v-TownofShelburne101117.indd 1

Equipment Operator II - Facilities The EO II Facilities provides essential services associated with maintaining City’s facilities including the O’Brien Community Center, Winooski Senior Center, Dog Parks and occasionally other facilities. The individual in this role performs routine building maintenance, maintains the common areas City buildings and coordinates or executes the maintenance and repair of the City’s physical assets. High school diploma or equivalent level of education required with two years of experience and one of the following certifications: Journeyman’s license in plumbing or electric, Carpentry union card or licensure, or similar licensure. Valid driver’s license is also required. A Commercial Driver’s License is preferred but not required.

In addition to a competitive pay and benefits package, we offer a work culture of development and growth and we are looking for enthusiastic individuals to help our City grow! Interested in joining our team? For additional information, including complete position posting and job requirements, please visit our website at www.winooskivt.org. 10v-CityofWinooski101117.indd 1

10/9/17 1:35 PM

10/6/17 4:00 PM

PAY IT FORWARD Become the teacher who inspired you in only 8 months. Transition to teaching with Champlain’s accredited Teacher Apprenticeship Program (TAP). Our fast-track to a teacher’s license is designed for new & midcareer professionals wanting to teach grades 5-12.

Attend our Session to learn Attend ourInformation Information Session tomore. learn more. Tuesday, October 17, 6:00-7:00 p.m. Tuesday, May 2 I 6:00-7:00 p.m. Champlain College, 175175 Lakeside Ave.,Ave., Burlington Champlain College, Lakeside Burlington Register at Register atchamplain.edu/tap champlain.edu/tap or Call Call802.651.5844 802.651.6488


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

Full Time Evenings

Interested candidates please send resume and cover letter to HR@wakerobin.com or visit our website, www.wakerobin.com, to complete an application. WAKE ROBIN IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.

4t-WakeRobinSECURITY10117.indd 1

10.11.17-10.18.17

Ivy Computer, ranked in 2017 as the 2nd fastest growing technology company in the State by Vermont Business Magazine, is in need of a software technical support person to join our existing team. This is a full-time position supporting software developed by Ivy.

Security Officer Wake Robin, Vermont’s premier continuing care retirement community, seeks an experienced Security Officer to ensure that our community is secure and that our residents are safe throughout the nighttime hours. Duties include addressing emergency or comfort concerns of residents, responding to and assessing situations involving the physical plant, and ensuring that all buildings are secured according to appropriate schedules. We seek an individual with a background in security or as a first responder, with the compassion and problem solving skills to interact with our senior population. At least 3 years of relevant experience is required.

C-23

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

For more information, visit www.IvyComputer.com. If you are interested in joining our team, please send a cover letter and resume to Jobs@IvyComputer.com.

NPC Processing Inc. (NPC), and Custom Food Processing, Inc. (CFP), are leading suppliers of protein solutions to restaurants nationwide — from tender steaks to cooked chicken pot pies. Both companies save restaurants time and money. NPC simplifies food preparation for chefs by offering pre-cut, ground, or seasoned, ready-to-cook meat. CFP cooks proprietary, meat-based recipes for chefs, allowing them to quickly heat and serve to guests. NPC & CFP are located in Shelburne, VT, in a new, state-of-the-art food processing building behind Kinney Drugs and the Volvo dealership off of RT 7.

NPC is hiring for:

10/9/17 3:04 PM

SUBSTITUTES10/6/17

2v-IvyComputer101117.indd 1

2:14 PM

1) Warehouse Operations

VERMONT-NEA STAFF POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT Vermont-NEA is seeking to fill its UniServ Director position to serve local Associations in Addison and Rutland counties. We are accepting applications until Monday, October 30 (or until the position is filled), and we will interview finalist candidates soon thereafter. Starting date is approximately January 1, 2018. Please send application letter, resume, two or three writing samples, and names/contact information of three references to Jeff Fannon, Executive Director, Vermont-NEA, 10 Wheelock Street, Montpelier, Vermont 05602-3737. Direct phone and email inquiries to (800) 649-6375 or kferguson@vtnea.org. Duties include assisting local educator unions with organizing, collective bargaining, and grievance processing around working conditions and professional issues, engaging with Association members, and participating in some anticipated policy advocacy activities. Our UniServ staff constitute half our professional staff and work in concert with our organizing, legal, communications, program benefits, and professional development personnel.

General duties include: Loading and unloading trailers. Monitoring/maintaining the general warehouse and shipments to keep all aspects of operations/production running smoothly. Must be able to lift 70 lbs., stand in cold/frozen room temperatures for long periods of time, and use a pallet jack.

Winooski School District SUBSTITUTES for Teachers, Nurses or Instructional Assistants (on-call basis)

2) Packaging:

General duties include: Packing finished product into boxes or bags, building and filling master cases, wrapping finished pallets, and maintaining an organized packing area to help maximize future efficiencies. Must be able to lift 70 lbs., stand in cold/ frozen room temperatures for long periods of time, and use a pallet jack.

Winooski School District is looking for substitute teachers, nurses and instructional assistants. We have positions available at every level from Pre-K through high school.

3) Meat Cutters:

General duties include: Cutting a variety of meats, from beef to poultry to fish. Keen eye for detail and safety required, combined with a willingness to learn new skills from others who are more experienced. Must be able to lift 70 lbs., and stand in cold room temperatures for long periods of time.

Ideal candidates should be outgoing, demonstrate strong communication skills, and enjoy working with students.

CFP is hiring for: 1) Cooking:

General duties include: Looking for individuals with cooking experience who can share their talent within the cooking group, yet be open to learning new skills from other teammates who are more seasoned. Must be able to lift 70 lbs., and stand for long periods of time. All positions are for 1st shift: 7AM -3PM. Compensation: Hourly Paid. If you are ready to help streamline the food processing industry, and be a team player ready for winning growth, NPC & CPF is anxious to hear from you.  Send resumes to: shawn@npcprocessing.com.

The successful candidate will have unusually strong and broad skills, including: unlimited dedication to the interests of both public education and public school educators in Vermont; excellent interpersonal skills both with groups and with individuals; extensive ability to work collaboratively as well as individually; thorough working knowledge of employee Let’s get rights as well as education and labor laws and processes; 8t-NPCProcessing101117.indd appreciation for the role of labor unions; excellent oral and written communication skills; understanding of public policy issues and trends affecting public education and educators; interest and involvement in political action activities as they relate to public education and educators; good computer, math, and typing abilities; a willingness to work many evenings and some weekends on Association business; and adaptability.

to..... 1

10/9/17

Salary ranges from $60/day up to $110/day depending on education level and/or licensure. Nurses will be paid $219/day. Join our team of energetic educators by completing a substitute packet which can be found at www.wsdschools.org/ human-resources/ substitute-teacher

or visiting the Superintendent’s Office at 60 Normand St. Our office is open Monday5:15 PMFriday from 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. If you have questions, you may call Sandy at (802) 383-6000. MUST BRING COMPLETED APPLICATION IN PERSON TO THE SUPERINTENDENT’S OFFICE TO BE PUT ON THE LIST.

jobs.sevendaysvt.com

6t-VTNEA101117.indd 1

1 10/9/172h_JobFiller_Work.indd 4:23 PM

3/6/17 4v-WinooskiSchoolDistrict101117.indd 4:33 PM 1

10/9/17 10:19 AM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-24

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

10.11.17-10.18.17

VIP is a 100% employee owned company where our customers are our friends. Using the latest technologies, we provide an innovative suite of solutions to distributors, bottlers, suppliers, and brand owners in the beverage industry. At the heart of our innovation is the VIP culture where we embrace a collaborative problem-solving approach, and put a premium on one’s health and wellness. VIP OFFERS A FULL BENEFITS PACKAGE INCLUDING: • • • •

Health & Vision 401k, Profit Sharing, ESOP Life Insurance Long-Term Disability

• • • •

Flexible Spending Accounts Health Savings Account On-Site Daycare On-Site Fitness Center

• • •

Fitness Reimbursement Discounted Fitness Membership Paid Time Off

VIP has immediate openings for the following positions. All interested applicants should submit a cover letter and resume to careers@vtinfo.com. Full-Time job offers are contingent upon passing a pre-employment drug screening. Full job descriptions may be found at http://public.vtinfo.com/careers#Web.

Software Developer

VIP currently seeks qualified Software Developers to join our Agile Development organization. PREFERRED SKILLS: • • • • • • •

Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Science 2+ years’ experience in web and/or software development Demonstrable knowledge of web technologies, such as HTML, CSS, and Javascript Demonstrable knowledge of database technologies and writing SQL Demonstrable knowledge of IBM iSeries server (RPG and/or Job Queues) Ability to work both independently and on a team Proven analytic and problem solving skills

Distributor Data Manager

Our Supplier Services business is focused on moving data between distributors and suppliers in the beverage industry. This data is a driving force in marketing and supply chain planning and is vital to the business practices of our customers. This non-technical entry-level position is well-suited to an inquisitive self-starter willing to ask questions and work with little direct supervision. The Distributor Manager is responsible for monitoring a set of assigned distributor accounts to ensure the prompt and accurate reporting of data based on supplier guidelines.

multiple tasks and be committed to customer satisfaction. Knowledge of the distribution industry is a plus. REQUIREMENTS: • • • • • •

Excellent communication skills - verbal & written Strong ability in problem solving and problem analysis Attention to detail and accuracy Detail oriented and ability to maintain data confidentially Reliable & dependable Ability to multi-task under pressure

Infant/Toddler Teacher

The Infant/Toddler Teacher will be in charge of creating a safe and nurturing environment for children ages 1-5. He/She will assist with planning and implementing a creative curriculum. The qualified candidate will need to communicate daily with parents, be a reliable asset to the daycare, and most importantly get down and work at the children’s level. Pay is competitive depending on education and experience. Applicant must have a positive attitude, be a team player, and be committed to working with children. EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS:

REQUIREMENTS:

Bachelor’s degree in early childhood or human/child development or a related field, which includes one year (may be school year of experience if the experience is in a school) of successful experience with the ages of children specified by the terms of the license or appropriate license from the Vermont Department of Education.

• •

Data Matcher – Full Time & Part Time

• • • •

History of solid employment Strong analytical and reasoning skills to assess and implement information from multiple resources Clear communication skills Self-organization to meet daily, weekly and monthly responsibilities, both to the company and the customer Strong computer skills and knowledge of working with spreadsheets (Excel) College preferred but not required

Customer Support Specialist The successful software specialist must enjoy working with others, be a fast learner, have excellent technical diagnostic skills, and enjoy a fast-paced environment. We are looking for an enthusiastic individual who can handle

The Data Matcher will make cross references between two distinct files using already existing comparison tools. This long-term data analysis position is perfect for parents of young children, students, or anyone seeking 20-40 hours per week. This is an easy to learn skill set that is continuously repeated. The desired candidate must be comfortable working on a computer in an office environment setting. REQUIREMENTS: • • • • • •

Highly organized Basic computer skills Strong attention to detail A positive attitude and a willingness to work hard Ability to interact in a positive and effective manner with colleagues Ability to focus for a short but sustained period of time

ALL RESUMES SHOULD BE SENT TO CAREERS@VTINFO.COM 15t-VIP101117.indd 1

10/9/17 10:09 AM


TASTY BITS FROM THE CALENDAR AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM COURTESY OF BREAD & BUTTER FARM

LAND & LENS Photographers Envision the Environment MUSEUMMIDDLEBURYEDUs .JEEMFCVSZ$PMMFHF-USEUMOF!RT Untitled-10 1

JOIN Darren & Kristin

10/6/17 3:50 PM

@ 5p and 6p on

WCAX!

WCAX.COM WCAX.COM WCAX.COM WCAX.COM WCAX.COM WCAX.COM WCAX.CO

Untitled-19 1

Mr. Chris and dancers from Ballet Vermont

1/30/17 11:16 AM

WEEKNIGHT SPECIALS

Bread, Ballet and Bugs

TUESDAYS: WEDNESDAYS: THURSDAYS:

$4 DRAFT BEERS 50¢ WINGS $9 BURGER + PBR

FALL FESTIVAL Saturday, October 14, 3-6:30 p.m., Bread & Butter Farm. $20. Info, , 985-9200, breadandbutterfarm.com.

BUON APPETITO! ITALIAN WINE DINNER Sample Italian dishes, served family-style, and hear Umbrian winemaker Danilo Marcucci tell stories while he pours libations. Who is Marcucci? Sassy wine blogger Marissa A. Ross calls him the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yoda of Italian natural wines.â&#x20AC;? Listen to him you must. Tuesday, October 17, 6:30-9:30 p.m., Cork Wine Bar & Market, Stowe. $72.05. Info, 7606143, corkvt.com.

SEVEN DAYS

PICNICSOCIALSTOWE.COM | 802-221-4947 | 433 MOUNTAIN ROAD, STOWE

Untitled-1 1

9/26/17 2:59 PM

FOOD 49

REINVENTING THE WHEEL: MILK, MICROBES AND THE FIGHT FOR REAL CHEESE Cheese experts Bronwen and Francis Percival discuss the ways in which industrial processing has smothered the artistry of cheesemaking. Yet they also believe that the combination of thoughtful science and traditional methods could bring the culinary craft to new and glorious heights. Saturday, October 14, 3-5 p.m., Shelburne Farms. $5. Info, 985-8686, shelburnefarms.org.

10.11.17-10.18.17

CABOT APPLE PIE FESTIVAL Confident bakers enter their pies for judging, and others donate pastries for sale to benefit the Cabot Historical Society. Expect crafts and raffles, too. Saturday, October 14, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Cabot School, Free. Info, 563-3396.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Bread & Butter Farmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fall Festival is suitable for littles and their grown-ups. It begins with a Ballet Vermont performance to Antonio Vivaldiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Four Seasons, in which a variety of insects â&#x20AC;&#x153;come to life.â&#x20AC;? Then there are dance activities and songs from Mr. Chris. Dusk brings lullabies and an encore ballet performance called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fireflies at Dusk.â&#x20AC;? Audience members are encouraged to bring their own picnics.


Guinea hen with mushroom purée and grilled onions at Cul-Sec Cave & Cantine

50 FOOD

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Cheesecake with ground cherries at Pastaga

Cauliflower with vadouvan at Pastaga

Empire of the Fun A trip through the whimsical domain of Montréal chef Martin Juneau S TO RY & PHOT OS BY SU ZAN NE M. PODHAIZE R

A

melting, mint-green ice cream cone sporting raised eyebrows and a Hercule Poirot mustache graces the door of the Monsieur Crémeux ice cream shop on Montréal’s rue Beaubien Est. Inside, patrons line up for creemee sundaes, tangy citrus ice, and pistachio ice cream sandwiches made with chunky chocolate chip cookies. Those cookies come from the restaurant Pastaga on boulevard Saint-Laurent, one of Monsieur Crémeux’s sister businesses. Both are owned by Canadian celebrity chef Martin Juneau and his business partner, Louis-Philippe Breton. The duo’s domain doesn’t end there. Near the ice cream shop you’ll find their chic natural wine bar, Cul-Sec Cave & Cantine (literally, cul-sec means “dry ass,” a sweetly vulgar reference to the state of a glass after its contents have been drained), and their corner grocery

store, Le Petit Coin Épicerie. Their snack bar in the Old Port recently closed for the winter. In his spare time, Juneau has produced a cookbook, Simplicité Culinaire (2016), and a slew of other seasonal projects and collaborations, and he’s made numerous television appearances. One thing’s for sure: He is one busy chef. In Montréal, which has a high number of restaurants per capita, it’s possible to go from one incredible meal to the next and never visit the same place twice. But Juneau and Breton’s realm offers out-oftown visitors the particular pleasure of spending a weekend getting to know a chef’s fare in different venues. Empire building appeals to restaurateurs, too: Economies of scale can make a tough business more viable, allowing them to share staff and other resources among their establishments. Another prominent Montréal example

is the crew behind Lawrence, Larry’s and Boucherie Lawrence — a symbiotic restaurant, wine bar and butcher shop. I wrote about that pork-loving restaurant group last fall. So on this trip I decided to explore the empire of Juneau and company, teasing out common threads in the chef’s different establishments. One thing I quickly learned is that Juneau and Breton don’t take themselves too seriously. There’s the mustachioed ice cream cone, for starters, and the fact that Le Petit Coin sells several varieties of ramen noodles, just like any minimart. Then there’s the dress code spelled out on Pastaga’s website. Translated into English, it reads: “It is not too difficult, provided you are not naked or dressed in a way that makes others uneasy.” Accordingly, my companions and I were clothed when we arrived at Pastaga on a quiet Sunday evening. But

perhaps the website’s warning against nudity wasn’t entirely gratuitous. Over the course of a three-hour dinner, we encountered appealing, flavorful food and service that felt like the culinary equivalent of an S&M scene. After promising, with a teasing note in his voice, that he would never say no to any request of ours, our server returned immediately to tell us that several things we’d ordered were unavailable. That shortage was understandable on a Sunday night, but he proceeded to discuss the menu in a way that felt designed to cajole us in one direction or another. “You could order this,” he said of fried cauliflower seasoned with a spice blend called vadouvan, “but if you want something more substantial, you could instead order the venison.” Whenever one of us tried to select a glass of wine, he appeared at the table with two possible offerings but seemed already to have chosen a favorite. Despite the oddity of the experience, or perhaps because of it, the meal was deeply memorable. Nearly every dish on the Pastaga menu sounded appealing enough to make ordering très difficile, and we ended up receiving waves of plates bearing more calories than needed to satisfy our hunger.


food+drink

FARM

NORTHEAST SEAFOOD

THE BAR AT BLEU 4 P M D A I LY/ B L E U V T. C O M Untitled-18 1

6/5/17 1:41 PM

FARM TO BARN TO BOTTLE A FULL CIRCLE DINNER

PRESENTED BY HOTEL VERMONT AND SILO DISTILLERY

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19TH

WELCOME COCKTAIL & HORS D’OEURVES: 6:30 DINNER PAIRED WITH TWO COCKTAILS: 7:00

$65 + TAX TICKETS AVAILABLE TO PURCHASE AT SEVENDAYSTICKETS.COM FEATURING A SPECIAL CRAFTED MENU BY CHEF DOUG PAINE INLCUDING SPRINGMORE FARM PASTURE RAISED, SPENT GRAIN FED PORK

Untitled-5 1

10/9/17 10:48 AM

Hurricane relief! Join us and our friends at Farrell Dist., WhistlePig Distillery and Landshark Lager as we raise money to support children affected by this devastating hurricane season.

10.11.17-10.18.17

100% of sales of WhistlePig and Landshark Lager will be donated during the month of October.

SEVEN DAYS

that hadn’t fully shed their coriander seeds. The bursts of flavor from the seeds and the tortilla’s crunch were perfect counterpoints to the tender fish. A shrimp salad with watercress, pickled mushrooms and a tiny brunoise of cucumber was equally good. Alongside, we sampled several wines by the glass, all excellent matches for the food. We passed on the bottles in favor of sampling a wider selection, but the wine list was extensive and deep. It was a pair of meat dishes, both of which went nicely with my Séléné beaujolais, that made me fall in love. First came pork ravioli with mushrooms, served in a shallow puddle of rich broth. The noodles were al dente, the shredded meat was tender and the broth was good enough to drink off the plate. The best dish of the evening, though, was a roulade of guinea fowl served over a deep, dark mushroom purée, with a meat glaze, grilled onions and baby greens that looked like beet leaves but weren’t, according to our server. The dish was bursting with umami from the sauce and the mushrooms. Getting the matched set of four Juneau-Breton businesses under my belt gave me an experience I wouldn’t have had simply dining at Pastaga or passing through Le Petit Coin. Like a quartet of novels that can stand alone but together build an elaborate universe, each spot offered its own playful variation on Juneau’s approach to food, from the souped-up ice cream sandwiches at Monsieur Crémeux to the whimsical poutine at Pastaga. As I watched the threads come together, I felt the sort of nostalgia that doesn’t usually happen until well after a meal. “Look, they’re using watercress as a garnish again,” I pointed out to my crew at Pastaga. “They did that at Cul-Sec, too.” At home, one can make dining out a richer experience by following a favorite chef from one restaurant to the next, watching their cooking develop over time. Exploring a chef’s kingdom, as one can with Juneau’s, is another side of the same petit coin. !

INFO

Fire & Ice

Vermont’s Iconic steakhouse

26 Seymour Street | Middlebury | 802.388.7166 | fireandicerestaurant.com 6H-fireandice092717.indd 1

9/26/17 12:02 PM

FOOD 51

Monsieur Crémeux, 43 rue Beaubien Est, Montréal Le Petit Coin Épicerie, 45 rue Beaubien Est Montréal, 514-439-2135 Pastaga, 6389 boulevard Saint-Laurent, Montréal, 438-381-6389, pastaga.ca Cul-Sec Cave & Cantine, 29 rue Beaubien Est, Montréal, 514-439-8747, cul-sec.ca

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

I melted over the foie gras special: tender seared liver surrounded by florets of fractal Romanesco cauliflower, garnished with black chanterelle mushrooms, parsley and pea shoots. I preferred that to the other liver dish we tried that evening, which was a riff on Jewish deli food: chopped liver, pickled onions and bagel chips. The second was solid, but the first was exceptional. In Québec, chefs may struggle to offer an original poutine, with 24-hour poutine shops making taco, hot dog and meat lover’s variations, among others. But Juneau has done it. In his twist on the dish, fingerling potatoes in a deep, rich jus are buried under a cloud of Parmesan mousse, ringed with a nest of fried, shredded potato. Shaved black truffle completes the decadent picture. The maple-glazed pork belly with pickled carrots and herbs was delicious, although the carrot pancake at its base was a bit flabby. Both of these dishes exemplified a hallmark of Juneau’s cuisine: building layers of flavor by using the same ingredient in several ways. Just as the carrot pancake was topped with pickled carrot, so the poutine’s fingerling potatoes were paired with fried ones. We finished our meal with a perfect fruit-topped panna cotta and a chocolate mousse. The latter was on the house, because our octopus dish had failed to appear. “Do you have coffee?” my friend inquired. “Of course,” the server replied, looking a bit confused. “What kind of coffee would you like?” It might seem like an odd question to ask in a restaurant, but not an unwarranted one here. The previous evening, at wine bar Cul-Sec, my sister had received a different response. “We have bad coffee,” our server replied with a grin. Cul-Sec doesn’t make fancy espresso drinks, and the coffee it does serve comes from pods. So my sister ordered one serving of “bad coffee” and stirred in a large lump of raw sugar as we examined the menu. Much as I enjoyed the food at Pastaga, overall, I preferred the experience at Cul-Sec, which offers a selection of flawless small plates alongside its vin. The environment was intimate and cozy, with wine bottles and iconic Montréal scenes on the dark gray walls. A tattooed chef worked alone in the open kitchen beneath a sign reading “cuisine.” And the service was entirely charming, from the “bad coffee” on. We began with loup de mer ceviche, garnished with bits of crispy corn tortilla and micro-cilantro with leaves


calendar O C T O B E R

1 1

WED.11 activism

INTERNATIONAL DAY OF THE GIRL: Activist Selamawit Adugna Bekele sounds off on the worldwide education crisis and its impact on the U.S. South Burlington High School, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, kiranwaqar1111@gmail.com.

art

2 0 1 7

Community, South Burlington, 9:30 a.m. Free for first-timers; bring a bag lunch. Info, 372-4255. KNITTING & MORE: TWO-NEEDLE MITTENS: Needleworkers of all skill levels pick up new techniques while working on projects. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660.

dance

Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section.

bazaars

etc.

business

BUSINESS PLAN BASICS & WORKING SESSION: Sessions with the center’s staff and volunteers help aspiring entrepreneurs get quick answers to business questions. Center for Women & Enterprise, Burlington, 4-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 391-4870. SIMPLE STEPS FOR STARTING YOUR BUSINESS: Champlain Valley SCORE helps potential purveyors make an educated decision on whether they are well-suited for entrepreneurship. New England Federal Credit Union, Williston, 5:30-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 879-8790.

community

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

1 8 ,

DROP-IN HIP-HOP DANCE: Beginners are welcome at a groove session inspired by infectious beats. Swan Dojo, Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m. $15. Info, 540-8300.

JEFFERSONVILLE FARMERS & ARTISAN MARKET: Live music spices up a gathering of more than 30 vendors. 49 Old Main St., Jeffersonville, 4:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, jefffarmersandartisanmarket65@gmail. com.

10.11.17-11.18.17

-

COFFEE HOUR: Friends, neighbors and AARP Vermont volunteers catch up on upcoming activities and issues facing older Vermonters. Cups of coffee are free! The Skinny Pancake, Burlington, 9-10 a.m. Free. Info, 951-1313. GREENER DRINKS: Supporters of commonsense cannabis reform sip beverages and discuss the culture, industry and politics of the agricultural product. Zenbarn, Waterbury, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, info@vtcannabisbrands.com. WHITE CANE SAFETY AWARENESS DAY: An experiential walk celebrates the achievements of blind and visually impaired individuals. Burlington City Hall, 11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 863-7530.

crafts

GREEN MOUNTAIN CHAPTER OF THE EMBROIDERERS’ GUILD OF AMERICA: Needleand-thread enthusiasts fine-tune their techniques. Living/Dining Room, Pines Senior Living

GUIDED TOURS: A historic Gothic Revival house opens its doors for hourly excursions. Self-guided explorations of the gardens, exhibits and walking trails are also available. Justin Morrill Homestead, Strafford, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. $6; free for kids 14 and under. Info, 828-3051. OPEN MIC NIGHT: Feats of comedy, music, poetry and storytelling fill five-, 10- and 15-minute time slots. Main Street Museum, White River Junction, 7-9 p.m. Donations. Info, info@mainstreetmuseum. org.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘CHASING TRANE: THE JOHN COLTRANE DOCUMENTARY’: A 2016 film focuses on the man behind the groundbreaking jazz music. KelloggHubbard Library, Montpelier, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338. ‘EXTREME WEATHER 3D’: A National Geographic film takes viewers to the front lines of powerful storms, widespread fires and rising waters. Northfield Savings Bank Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 11 a.m., 1 & 3:30 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $11.50-14.50; admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848. ‘HEAD GAMES: THE GLOBAL CONCUSSION CRISIS’: A 2014 documentary tackles the long-term effects of head injuries caused by sports. A discussion follows. Richmond Free Library, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, 434-3036. ITVFEST: THE INDEPENDENT TELEVISION FESTIVAL: TV fans and industry insiders converge for a four-day showcase of episodic programs. See itvfest.com for details. Various Manchester locations. $25-1,250. Info, 362-7200. ‘PASSION TO TEACH’: The teacher-student relationship is central to this educational documentary.

52 CALENDAR

SEVEN DAYS

WED.11

» P.54

List your upcoming event here for free! SUBMISSION DEADLINES: ALL SUBMISSIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY THURSDAY AT NOON FOR CONSIDERATION IN THE FOLLOWING WEDNESDAY’S NEWSPAPER. FIND OUR CONVENIENT FORM AND GUIDELINES AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT. YOU CAN ALSO EMAIL US AT CALENDAR@SEVENDAYSVT.COM. TO BE LISTED, YOU MUST INCLUDE THE NAME OF EVENT, A BRIEF DESCRIPTION, SPECIFIC LOCATION, DATE, TIME, COST AND CONTACT PHONE NUMBER.

CALENDAR EVENTS IN SEVEN DAYS: LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY KRISTEN RAVIN. SEVEN DAYS EDITS FOR SPACE AND STYLE. DEPENDING ON COST AND OTHER FACTORS, CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS MAY BE LISTED IN EITHER THE CALENDAR OR THE CLASSES SECTION. WHEN APPROPRIATE, CLASS ORGANIZERS MAY BE ASKED TO PURCHASE A CLASS LISTING.

OCT.18 | TALKS By Design Thanks in part to the TV show “Mad Men,” set mostly in 1960s Manhattan, the last decade has seen a resurgence of midcentury modern style. In fact, a 2011 article in MidCentury magazine claims that the show “has placed midcentury style firmly in the mainstream.” Norwich’s history with the retro aesthetic is the focus of a talk by Norwich Historical Society director Sarah Rooker. In “Mad for MidCentury Modern: A New Architectural Style Comes to Norwich,” she tells the story of the architects, SARAH ROOKER artists and scholars who brought Wednesday, October 18, 7 p.m., at Norwich a dash of modernism to the Public Library. Free. Info, 649-0124, norwichvthistoricalsociety.org. traditional town during and after World War II.


OCT.12-15 | THEATER

GOLDEN OLDIES Pop songs from the 1950s and ’60s propel the story of The Marvelous Wonderettes, the hit off-Broadway musical by Roger Bean. Audience members meet teen singers Suzy, Betty Jean, Cindy Lou and Missy, performing at their high school’s senior prom in 1958. The story continues at their 10-year high school reunion, where the women, facing the challenges of adulthood, reconnect in four-part harmony. Familiar tunes such as “Stupid ‘THE MARVELOUS Cupid,” “Lipstick on Your Collar” WONDERETTES’ and “Respect” have onlookers Thursday, October 12, and Friday, October dancing in their seats during this 13, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, October 14, 3 & 7:30 p.m.; and Sunday, October 15, 2 p.m., ArtisTree Music Theatre Festival at the Grange Theatre in South Pomfret. production. See website for additional dates. $15-25. Info, 457-3500, artistreevt.org.

OCT.14 | MUSIC

OCT.14 & 15 | MUSIC All Shook Up

Saturday, October 14, 8 p.m., at Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe Mountain Resort. $20-25. Info, 760-4634, sprucepeakarts.org. Sunday, October 15, 2 p.m., at Barre Opera House. $5-20. Info, 476-8188, barreoperahouse.org.

SEVEN DAYS

Saturday, October 14, 8 p.m., at Flynn MainStage in Burlington. $26.50-49.75. Info, 863-5966, flynntix.org.

VERMONT PHILHARMONIC OPERA GALA

10.11.17-11.18.17

‘THE KING RETURNS’

Got opera? The state’s oldest community orchestra presents its annual opera gala in two ear-pleasing performances in Stowe and Barre. Music director Lou Kosma conducts the Vermont Philharmonic in a stirring program of operatic works by Giuseppe Verdi, Giacomo Puccini, Gaetano Donizetti, Ottorino Respighi and Antonio Vivaldi. Violinist and newly appointed Vermont Philharmonic concertmaster Letitia Quante showcases her bow-andstring mastery as a featured soloist. Also in the spotlight is Danish soprano and 2017 Bel Canto Institute Performance Award-winner Helle Gössler Christensen (pictured).

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Elvis Presley tribute artist Mark Shelton has a special source of motivation for taking the stage in a sequined jumpsuit: his wife, Lisa. The Newport performer channels the rock-and-roll legend in his show The King Returns to support his bride in her battle against cancer. Flanked by a full band, Shelton doles out notefor-note interpretations of hip-shaking hits from the 1950s through the ’70s — think “Jailhouse Rock” and other upbeat numbers as well as ballads such as “My Way.” Proceeds from Saturday’s concert at the Flynn MainStage also benefit the American Cancer Society and Vermont’s Relay for Life. Thank you, thank you very much.

Brava, Brava!

CALENDAR 53


calendar

HEIRLOOM APPLE DINNER: An autumnal meal features fall’s famous fruit. The Kitchen Table Bistro, Richmond, 6 p.m. $115. Info, 434-8686. MIDDLEBURY FARMERS MARKET: Crafts, cheeses, breads, veggies and more vie for spots in shoppers’ totes. VFW Post 7823, Middlebury, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free. Info, middleburyfarmersmkt@yahoo.com.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEWPORT FARMERS MARKET: Pickles, meats, eggs, fruits, veggies, herbs and baked goods are a small sampling of the seasonal bounty. Causeway, Newport, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 274-8206. VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: Local products — think veggies, breads, pastries, cheeses, wines, syrups, jewelry, crafts and beauty supplies — draw shoppers to a diversified bazaar. Depot Park, Rutland, 3-6 p.m. Free. Info, 342-4727. WOODSTOCK MARKET ON THE GREEN: Homespun products and farm-fresh eats fill tables. Woodstock Village Green, 3-6 p.m. Free. Info, 457-3555.

games

54 CALENDAR

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-11.18.17

BRIDGE CLUB: Strategic players have fun with the popular card game. Burlington Bridge Club, Williston, 9:15 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. $6. Info, 872-5722. DO YOU WANT TO LEARN TO PLAY BRIDGE?: Players of varying experience levels put strategic skills to use. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 10 a.m.-noon. Free; preregister. Info, 223-3322. SCAVENGER HUNT: Lists in hand, community members search Bridge Street bricks for words and phrases. Call for list pickup locations. Bridge Street, Waitsfield. Free. Info, 496-9416.

health & fitness

BUTI YOGA: A fusion of power yoga, tribal dance and deep abdominal toning boosts the flow of energy throughout the body in a class for women. Prenatal Method Studio, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. $10. Info, hayley_williams_21@hotmail.com. GENTLE YOGA IN WATERBURY: Individuals with injuries or other challenges feel the benefits of a relaxing and nourishing practice. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 8:30-9:30 a.m. Donations. Info, studio@ zenbarnvt.com.

S

TE R

K

GOOD MEASURE BREWING BEER DINNER: Four courses paired with local suds please palates. Proceeds support the Vermont Fresh Network. The Farmhouse Tap & Grill, Burlington, 6 p.m. $75; preregister. Info, 859-0888.

L TA

COMMUNITY SUPPER: A scrumptious spread connects friends and neighbors. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 5-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 300.

2|

COMMUNITY MEAL: Diners dig into a hot lunch. United Church of Johnson, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 635-1247.

WEDNESDAY STORY TIME: From timeless tales to new adventures, books transport tots to another world. Phoenix Books, Essex, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 872-7111.

YOGA FOR KIDS: Yogis ages 2 through 5 strike a pose to explore breathing exercises and S O |F relaxation techniques. Fletcher IR UE ST G A RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: AM LE Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. END TH E M EN T Folks in recovery and their families SERIES WITH Free. Info, 865-7216. enrich mind, body and spirit in an all-levels class. All props are provided; wear loose clothing. language Turning Point Center, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. BEGINNER ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASS: Students Free. Info, 861-3150. build a foundation in reading, speaking and writing. RESILIENCE FLOW FOR THOSE AFFECTED BY TBI: Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Individuals affected by a traumatic brain injury Info, 865-7211. practice poses in a six-week LoveYourBrain Yoga inINTERMEDIATE-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: Pupils troductory class. Sangha Studio — Pine, Burlington, improve their speaking and grammar mastery. 3:30-5 p.m. Donations; preregister. Info, 448-4262. Private residence, Burlington, 6 p.m. $20. Info, SUNRISE YOGA: Participants of all levels enjoy 324-1757. slowing down, moving mindfully and breathing INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE deeply while building strength and stamina on CLASS: Learners take communication to the next the mat. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 6-7 a.m. level. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Donations. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com. Free. Info, 865-7211. UPBEAT YOGA: Instructor John McConnell leads LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: SPANISH: ¡Hola! a fun-spirited stretching session. Railyard Yoga Language lovers perfect their fluency. KelloggStudio, Burlington, 5-6:30 p.m. $14. Info, 318-6050. Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, WEDNESDAY GUIDED MEDITATION: Individuals 223-3338. learn to relax and let go. Burlington Friends Meeting House, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, music 318-8605. Find club dates in the music section. ZUMBA EXPRESS: A shortened version of this GLENN MILLER ORCHESTRA: The 19-member guided, beat-driven workout gives students a ensemble behind classic hits such as “Chattanooga much-needed midday surge of energy. Marketplace Choo-Choo” interweaves elements of jazz into a Fitness, Burlington, 11:30 a.m.-noon. $12; free for swing-dance repertoire. Colchester High School, members and first-timers. Info, 651-8773. 7-9 p.m. $15-25. Info, 655-7593. U.1

BURGER & BEER: Boyden Farm beef and craft brews help patrons beat the midweek slump. Mary’s Restaurant, Bristol, 5-9 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 453-2432.

PREMA AGNI & MINI RISING STAR HEALINGS: Delyn Hall promotes wellness with powerful drop-in energy healing sessions. Railyard Yoga Studio, Burlington, 1:30-3 p.m. Donations. Info, 495-9435.

STORY TIME FOR PRESCHOOLERS: Picture books, songs, rhymes and early math tasks work youngsters’ mental muscles. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

TH

food & drink

NIA WITH LINDA: Eclectic music and movements drawn from healing, martial and dance arts propel an animated barefoot workout. South End Studio, Burlington, 8:30-9:30 a.m. $14; free for first-timers. Info, 372-1721.

STORY TIME & PLAYGROUP: Engrossing plots unfold into fun activities for tots ages 6 and younger. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

VO

‘WALKING WITH DINOSAURS: PREHISTORIC PLANET 3D’: Moviegoers follow a herd of planteating dinosaurs in Cretaceous Alaska through the seasons and the challenges of growing up in a prehistoric world. Northfield Savings Bank Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, noon & 2:30 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $11.50-14.50; admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848.

KETTLEBELL & CORE: Fitness fans bring water and ball-shaped strength-building weights for a killer workout. Cambridge Community Center, 6-7 p.m. $10. Info, 644-5028.

STORY TIME: Children are introduced to the wonderful world of reading. Richmond Free Library, 10-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 434-3036.

EN

TOURNÉES FRENCH FILM FESTIVAL: Shown with English subtitles, La Noire de… follows a nursemaid from Dakar who finds herself trapped by her French employers. Room 111, Cheray Science Hall, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, lclerfeuille@smcvt.edu.

Regular admission, $11.50-14.50; free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848.

OM

A panel discussion follows. Jeffords Auditorium, Castleton University, social hour, 5-6 p.m.; film, 6-7:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 468-1358.

GINGER’S EXTREME BOOT CAMP: Triathletes, Spartan racers and other fitness fanatics challenge themselves to complete Navy Seal exercises during an intense workout. Come in good shape. Private residence, Middlebury, 7-8 a.m. $8-12; for ages 16 and up. Info, 343-7160.

W

« P.52

kids

‘DANIEL TIGER’S NEIGHBORHOOD LIVE!’: Audience members join the lovable cat on an interactive musical adventure in the tradition of “Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood.” Flynn MainStage, Burlington, 6 p.m. $15-75. Info, 863-5966. ‘HANSEL AND GRETEL’: Engelbert Humperdinck’s children’s opera gets new life in a poignant Viva La Musica VT production. McCarthy Arts Center Gallery, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 7:309:30 p.m. $12-20. Info, 870-0335. HERBALISM CLASS SERIES FOR TEENS: Young adults deepen their awareness of global natural medicine traditions. Wild Faith Herb Farm, South Burlington, 3:30-5:30 p.m. $15; preregister. Info, wildfaithherbfarm@gmail.com. LEGO CLUB: Kiddos ages 6 and up snap together snazzy structures. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 849-2420. PREMA AGNI: A HEART-OPENING EXPERIENCE FOR KIDS: Youngsters and their caregivers drop in throughout a 90-minute window for an energy healing session with Delyn Hall. Railyard Yoga Studio, Burlington, 1:30-3 p.m. Free. Info, 495-9435. READ TO DAISY: Budding bookworms join a friendly canine for ear-catching narratives. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:15-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-6956. SCIENCE & STORIES: PUMPKINS: Little ones look into the life cycle of the orange, round squash. A take-home craft caps off the fun. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 10:30 a.m.

F

WED.11

seminars

BULLET JOURNAL: Folks looking to boost their productivity transform notebooks into customized organizational tools. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955. A COURSE IN MIRACLES: A monthly workshop based on Helen Schucman’s 1975 text delves into the wisdom found at the core of the world’s major religions. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Plattsburgh, N.Y., 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 518-645-1930. AN INTRODUCTION TO WORKING WITH PLANT ENERGY & SPIRIT: John Lisnik guides attendees toward a deeper connection with flora. Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism, Montpelier, 6-8 p.m. $10-12. Info, 224-7100.

sports

WEDNESDAY WOMEN’S BASKETBALL: Former players get back in the game. Lyman C. Hunt Middle School, Burlington, 7:30-9 p.m. Free. Info, 862-5091. WOMEN’S PICKUP BASKETBALL: Athletes dribble up and down the court during an evening of friendly competition. Robert Miller Community & Recreation Center, Burlington, 7:30-9 p.m. $3; $50 for unlimited pass; preregister at facebook.com. Info, 864-0123.

talks

ANN DEMARLE: Gamers get in on “Critical Conversations: Video Games for Change.” Champlain College Art Gallery, Burlington, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-8980. GARY SHATTUCK: The author provides historical context for a modern-day problem in “Lawyers, Opium and Rails: Exploring Vermont’s Early Courts, Drug Abuse and Railroad.” Vermont State Archives & Records Administration, Middlesex, open house and tours, 5 p.m., talk, 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 828-2308. IDEAS ON TAP: ‘VANDALS, VIGILANTES, OR VIRTUOSOS? THE HISTORY AND POWER OF STREET ART’: Professor David Mills confronts questions surrounding art in society. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0406. MARIE MAUDE EVANS: The chief priestess offers a glimpse of the power behind Haitian altars in “Heat and Happiness in the Making of a Haitian Vodou God.” Fleming Museum of Art, University of Vermont, Burlington, 6 p.m. Regular admission, $3-10; free for members, faculty, staff, students and kids 6 and under. Info, 656-0750. STEVE FACCIO: The conservation biologist spreads his wings in “What’s Up With the Birds,” an overview of results from a quarter century of monitoring. Waterbury Public Library, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 244-7036.

tech

INTRODUCTION TO HTML5 & CSS3: Tech savvy students in this four-part workshop learn the base language supporting all webpages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 865-7217. TECH HELP WITH CLIF: Electronics novices develop skill sets applicable to smartphones, tablets and other gadgets. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, noon & 1 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-6955. TECHNOLOGY NIGHT: Online photo storage becomes second nature during a class with Vermont Technical College’s Ken Bernard. Bring your own device. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

theater

‘AND THEN THERE WERE NONE’: Staged by Stowe Theatre Guild, Agatha Christie’s classic mystery keeps audience members on the edge of their seats. Stowe Town Hall Theatre, 7:30-10 p.m. $1420. Info, tickets@stowetheatre.com. ‘A DOLL’S HOUSE’: Faced with blackmail, a wife and mother must choose her path in a Northern Stage production. Barrette Center for the Arts, White River Junction, 7:30 p.m. $15-59. Info, 296-7000. ‘FUN HOME’: Cartoonist Alison Bechdel’s graphic novel is the basis of this award-winning musical about viewing one’s parents through grownup eyes, put on by Vermont Stage. FlynnSpace, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $35-44.50. Info, 863-5966.

words

ARCHER MAYOR: The Vermont writer regales readers with passages from his most recent mystery, Trace: A Joe Gunther Novel. Norwich Bookstore, 7 p.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, 649-1114. CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP: Wordsmiths focus on elements of craft while discussing works-inprogress penned by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104. AN EVENING OF STORIES FROM TOTAL LOSS FARM: Lit lovers line up for a reading by Peter Gould, the Vermont author of Horse Drawn Yogurt: Stories From Total Loss Farm. Yankee Bookshop, Woodstock, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 457-2411. FALL COLORS BOOK SALE: Arranged by genre, thousands of titles call to avid readers. KelloggHubbard Library, Montpelier, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338. ‘A LINK TO ANOTHER WORLD’: KELLY LINK: The author transports listeners to alternate universes with her works of magic realism. Ira Allen Chapel,


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

University of Vermont, Burlington, 5-6 p.m. Free. Info, maria.hummel@uvm.edu.

mic session. Clark Farm, Barnard, 5:30-8 p.m. Donations. Info, 234-1645.

NOVEL MEDICINE BOOK GROUP: Comics fans connect over Ellen Forney’s Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo, and Me: A Graphic Memoir. Norwich Public Library, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 649-1184.

GHOST WALK: GHOSTS & LEGENDS: Vermont’s queen of Halloween tells the ghostly tales that inspired her book Ghosts and Legends of Lake Champlain. Meet 10 minutes before the start time. Battery Park, Burlington, 7 p.m. $20. Info, 863-5966.

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST BOOK CLUB: Bookworms sound off on Commonwealth by Ann Patchett. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Plattsburgh, N.Y., 1:30 p.m. Free. Info, 518-726-6499. WRITING CIRCLE: Words flow when participants explore creative expression in a lowpressure environment. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218.

THU.12 activism

WOMEN’S INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE FOR PEACE & FREEDOM MEETING: Socially conscious ladies convene to discuss upcoming programs and community-related topics. Peace & Justice Center, Burlington, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 862-4929.

art

Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section.

bazaars

NEWBERRY MARKET: Shoppers browse specialty foods, clothing, pottery, décor, collectibles and more at a weekly indoor bazaar. Newberry Market, White River Junction, 2-7 p.m. Free. Info, newberrymarketwrj@gmail.com.

business

LADIES GET DRINKS: BURLINGTON: Those who identify as female or nonbinary network with other career-focused women. Hotel Vermont, Burlington, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, ladiesgetpaidvt@gmail.com. MARKETING ON A SHOESTRING: Enterprisers learn to maximize visibility and reach potential customers through the right message and media. Center for Women & Enterprise, Burlington, noon-2 p.m. $20; preregister. Info, 391-4870.

LAKE CHAMPLAIN COMMITTEE ANNUAL MEETING: Locals come together for light fare and an address on microplastics in Lake Champlain. Chef’s Corner South End, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 658-1414.

crafts

dance

ADVANCED CONTEMPORARY TECHNIQUE: Students condition strength, stability and clarity while exercising their artistry. North End Studio B, Burlington, 10-11 a.m. $12. Info, hannasatt@gmail. com.

etc.

FEAST & FIELD MARKET CLOSING PARTY: A seasonal pastoral party winds down with an open

RECEPTION: Several St. Michael’s College groups welcome a delegation from Burlington’s French sister city, Honfleur. Farrell Room, St. Edmund’s Hall, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 654-2000. RITUAL CELEBRATION: Haitian priestess Manmi Maude honors the gods of Vodou with a sacred festival. Fleming Museum of Art, University of Vermont, Burlington, 5-7 p.m. Regular admission, $3-10; free for members, faculty, staff, students and kids 6 and under. Info, 656-0750. TROPICAL FISH CLUB MONTHLY MEETING: Speakers ranging from local hobbyists to nationally known aquarium aficionados share their expertise. Essex Junction VFW Post, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 372-8716.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘BECOMING BULLETPROOF’: Shown as part of the Howard Center’s Fall Community Education Series, this 2014 documentary spotlights actors with and without disabilities during the making of the original Western film Bulletproof. Film House, Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, 6-8:15 p.m. Free. Info, 488-6910.

OCTOBER 12, 2017, 6 – 8:15 pm MAIN STREET LANDING FILM HOUSE 60 LAKE STREET, BURLINGTON

COMMUNITY

EDUCATION

PRESENTING UNDERWRITER:

SERIES FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

802-488-6912 | howardcenter.org Registration not required.

Untitled-7 1

9/27/17 12:55 PM

THE BARRE OPERA HOUSE The Barre Opera House Presents The

Sam Bush Band 3-time Grammy winner!

Friday, October 13, 8 p.m. sponsored by Swenson Granite media support from WDEV & WLVB CELEBRATION SERIES

‘EXTREME WEATHER 3D’: See WED.11. ‘HEAD GAMES: THE GLOBAL CONCUSSION CRISIS’: See WED.11, Deborah Rawson Memorial Library, Jericho, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 899-4962.

Pilobolus is a wildly creative and physically daring troupe of dancers who leap, fly, intertwine and break all the rules.

ITVFEST: THE INDEPENDENT TELEVISION FESTIVAL: See WED.11.

Friday, October 20, 8 pm

‘WALKING WITH DINOSAURS: PREHISTORIC PLANET 3D’: See WED.11.

sponsored by

food & drink

BURLINGTON EDIBLE HISTORY TOUR: Foodies sample farm-fresh eats on a scrumptious stroll dedicated to Burlington’s culinary past. Awning behind ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 1-4:15 p.m. $53.50; preregister. Info, 863-5966. COMMUNITY LUNCH: Farm-fresh fare makes for a delicious and nutritious midday meal. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 309.

media support from

NFP Jet Service Envelope Granite industries of Vermont

Rosanne Cash

MILTON FARMERS MARKET: Fresh finds woo seekers of produce, eggs, meat and maple syrup. Hannaford Supermarket, Milton, 3:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 893-1009.

Sat., November 11, 7:30 pm

TWIN VALLEY SENIORS HARVEST DINNER: Baked ham, pumpkin squares, apple cider, coffee and tea are on the menu at a seasonal feast. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 4-7 p.m. Donations; preregister for groups of six or more. Info, 223-3322.

Leahy Press Gifford Medical Center Valsangiacomo, Detora & McQuesten

THU.12

» P.56

sponsored by

media support from WDEV & WLVB

476-8188, www.barreoperahouse.org

CALENDAR 55

FOR REAL WOMEN SERIES WITH BELINDA: GIT UR FREAK ON: R&B and calypso-dancehall music is the soundtrack to an empowering sensual dance session aimed at confronting body shaming. Swan Dojo, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. $15. Info, bestirredfitness@gmail.com.

LADIES’ NIGHT: Fierce females clad in pink find vendors, drinks, appetizers and a photo booth at this breast cancer awareness extravaganza. PowerHouse Mall, West Lebanon, N.H., 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 861-4930.

FALL

SEVEN DAYS

DAUGHTERS OF CORN DANCE TROUPE: Eyecatching dresses complement Nicaraguan cultural routines set to marimba music. Ackley Hall, Green Mountain College, Poultney, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 287-8388.

JOB HUNT HELP: Community College of Vermont interns assist employment seekers with everything from résumé writing to online applications. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 2:30-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 745-1393.

A documentary that portrays an inclusive world of filmmaking featuring actors with disabilities. Followed by Q & A.

10.11.17-11.18.17

PUMPKIN CARVING FOR THE ENCHANTED FOREST: Helping hands prepare jack-o’-lanterns for an upcoming event in Hubbard Park. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 1:30-3:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-2518.

HEALTH HAPPENS AT HOME: AGE WELL ANNUAL MEETING & RECEPTION: Doctor Michael A. LaMantia keynotes a yearly gathering replete with hors d’oeuvres, updates and networking opportunities. Doubletree Hotel, South Burlington, 5-7 p.m. Free. Info, 662-5229.

BECOMING BULLETPROOF

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

community

GUIDED TOURS: See WED.11.

Howard Center presents THE MARNA AND STEPHEN WISE TULIN


calendar THU.12

« P.55

program. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 3-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

WOODBELLY PIZZA POP-UP: Foodies take away wood-fired sourdough slices, farinata and other tasty eats made with local ingredients. Call ahead to order whole pies. Woodbelly Pizza, Montpelier, 4-7:30 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 552-3476.

October 5 - October 22 Created by Roger Bean | Directed and Choreography by Gary John La Rosa Music Direction by Josh D. Smith

Festival

For a full listing of dates and times, or to get tickets visit:

www.artistreevt.org

(802) 457-3500 info@artistreevt.org Sponsored in part by

Untitled-28 1

games

GAME NIGHT: From Monopoly to Bananagrams, players participate in tabletop pastimes. Main Street Museum, White River Junction, 6 p.m. Donations. Info, 356-2776. POKÉMON LEAGUE: I choose you, Pikachu! Players of the trading-card game earn weekly and monthly prizes in a fun, friendly environment where newbies can be coached by league leaders. Brap’s Magic, Burlington, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0498. SCAVENGER HUNT: See WED.11.

health & fitness

PRE-K ART PLAY: Children let their imaginations run wild during a free-form paint-and-canvas session. Caregivers must stick around. Helen Day Art Center, Stowe, 10-11:30 a.m. $5. Info, 253-8358. PRESCHOOL MUSIC: Tykes up to age 5 have fun with song and dance. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. READ TO A DOG IN FAIRFAX: Book hounds ages 5 through 10 curl up with a good story and a furry friend. Fairfax Community Library, 3:15-4:15 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 849-2420. READ TO A DOG IN WILLISTON: Tots share stories with a lovable pooch. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-4918. READ TO ARCHIE: Budding bookworms join a friendly therapy dog for entertaining tails — er, tales. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:15-4 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

BEGINNER/INTERMEDIATE SUN-STYLE TAI CHI, LONG65 Stage Road, South Pomfret, VT 05067 FORM: Improved mood, greater muscle strength and increased energy are a few of the benefits of this gentle 9/29/17 4:55 PMexercise. Winooski Senior Center, 6:45-8 p.m. Free. Info, 735-5467. BEGINNERS TAI CHI CLASS: Students get a feel for the ancient Chinese practice. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 223-3322.

THURSDAY PLAY TIME: Kiddos and their caregivers convene for casual fun. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 11 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 878-4918.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

UKULELE KIDS: Musical munchkins play instruments and dance to | AN E favorite children’s songs. Fletcher Free VE N IN G W IT H Library, Burlington, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Free. Info, CHAIR YOGA AT SANGHA STUDIO — NORTH: 865-7216. Whether they’re experiencing limited mobility, chronic pain or emotional challenges, attendees language can participate in this modified practice. Sangha BEGINNER-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: Basic comStudio — North, Burlington, 2-3:15 p.m. Donations. munication skills are on the agenda at a guided Info, 448-4262. lesson. Private residence, Burlington, 6 p.m. $20. COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS: A 20-minute guided Info, 324-1757. practice with Andrea O’Connor alleviates stress and tension. Tea and a discussion follow. Winooski music Senior Center, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 233-1161. Find club dates in the music section. CORNWALL FITNESS BOOT CAMP: Interval training GLENN MILLER ORCHESTRA: See WED.11, helps participants improve strength, agility, endurParamount Theatre, Rutland, 7 p.m. $35. Info, ance and cardiovascular fitness. Cornwall Town 775-0903. Hall, 9-10 a.m. $12. Info, 343-7160. SONGWRITING WORKSHOP: Seth Melvin Cronin FORZA: THE SAMURAI SWORD WORKOUT: guides Burlington Writers Workshop musicians and Students sculpt lean muscles and gain mental singers in structuring original strains. 110 Main St., focus when using wooden replicas of the weapon. Suite 3C, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister at North End Studio A, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. $10. Info, meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104. 578-9243. FR

I.1

3|

MU

SI C

HEALING THROUGH YOGA: Anyone with a history of cancer and their care providers are welcome in this stretching session focused on maintaining energy, strength and flexibility. Sangha Studio — North, Burlington, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 448-4262.

10.11.17-11.18.17

KARMA KLASS: DONATION-BASED YOGA FOR A CAUSE: Active bodies hit the mat to support local nonprofits. The Wellness Collective, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. Donations. Info, 540-0186. MINDFULNESS MEDITATION: A peaceful, guided meditation helps participants achieve a sense of stability and calm. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 777-8602.

SEVEN DAYS

Breakfast Lunch Dinner Take Out

POWER YOGA IN WILLISTON: Individualized attention ensures that poses burn in all the right ways. Kismet Place, Williston, noon-1 p.m. $12. Info, 343-5084. YOGA: A Sangha Studio instructor guides students who are in recovery toward achieving inner tranquility. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 5-6 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

kids 56 CALENDAR

PJ STORY HOUR: Little ones dress for bed and wind down with tales and treats. Fairfax Community Library, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 849-2420.

BABY TIME: Books, rhymes and songs are specially selected for tiny tots. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:15-10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216.

175 Church St, Burlington, VT

Untitled-26 1

KIDS’ CARTOONING CLUB: Aspiring artists ages 8 through 12 create their own comics in a six-week

7/31/17 1:48 PM

SAM

BU

SH

sports

VELO VERMONT PIZZA RIDE: Scenic paved and gravel roads lead cyclists to the Woodbelly Pizza Pop-Up. Onion River Sports, Montpelier, 5-8 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, velovermontvrr@ gmaill.com.

talks

BILL MCKIBBEN: The scholar sets his sights on satellites and other instruments in “Seeing the World, as the First Step Toward Saving It.” Robison Hall, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168. FIRST AMENDMENT SERIES WITH THE LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS: A CONVERSATION ABOUT THE FREEDOM OF ASSEMBLY: Pulitzer Prize-winning writer David Moats moderates a discussion of the right to collectively express, promote and defend ideas. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, lwvofvt@gmail.com. JOHN DOUGLAS: Those who have viewed Ken Burns’ and Lynn Novick’s series “The Vietnam War” process their thoughts during a chat with a filmmaker and artist. Peace & Justice Center, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, madel51353@ aol.com. MARCEL LUERIO REYES: A Global Conversation Series talk touches on the effects of U.S. policies in Cuba. McCarthy Arts Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 654-2000.

MARK STOLER: History buffs lend an ear for “Let’s Declare Victory and Get Out!: Vermont Senator George D. Aiken and the Vietnam War.” Memorial Lounge, Waterman Building, University of Vermont, Burlington, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 373-1131. ONE WORLD LIBRARY PROJECT: Folklorist Gregory Sharrow looks at the state’s long history of immigration in “Carving a Niche: How Immigrants Have Made Their Mark on Vermont.” Lawrence Memorial Library, Bristol, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 453-2366.

tech

TECH SUPPORT: Need an email account? Want to enjoy ebooks? Bring your phone, tablet or laptop to a weekly help session. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 5-7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-8291, ext. 302.

theater

‘AND THEN THERE WERE NONE’: See WED.11. BURLINGTON FRINGE FESTIVAL: Vermont theater artists showcase original works in a fast-paced whirlwind of comedy, drama, poetry, puppetry, dance and musical theater. See offcentervt.com for details. Off Center for the Dramatic Arts, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $15. Info, 716-640-4639. ‘A DOLL’S HOUSE’: See WED.11, 2 & 7:30 p.m. AN EVENING OF ONE-ACT PLAYS: Tom Stoppard’s 15-Minute Hamlet and A Separate Peace and Carolyn Lane’s The Scheme of the Driftless Shifter grace the stage. Enosburg Opera House, 7-9 p.m. $12-15. Info, 933-6171. ‘FUN HOME’: See WED.11. ‘L’ELISIR D’AMORE’: Opera Company of Middlebury captivates theatergoers with a romantic comedy about a smitten waiter who employs a magic love potion. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, 7:30 p.m. $45-60. Info, 382-9222. ‘LONERS. LOVERS. FREAKS.’: Twenty-five actors stage scenes by contemporary New York City writers in this Middlebury College Department of Theatre presentation. Hepburn Zoo, Hepburn Hall, Middlebury College, 8 p.m. $6. Info, 443-3168. LOST NATION THEATER’S ‘SENSE & SENSIBILITY’: This production based on Jane Austen’s novel follows the fortunes and misfortunes of the Dashwood sisters. Montpelier City Hall Auditorium, 7:30 p.m. $10-30. Info, 229-0492. ‘THE MARVELOUS WONDERETTES’: Favorite hits including “Stupid Cupid” propel an ArtisTree Music Theatre Festival production of Roger Bean’s familyfriendly musical, set in 1958. See calendar spotlight. The Grange Theatre, South Pomfret, 7:30 p.m. $1525. Info, 457-3500. ‘RIPCORD’: Girls Nite Out presents David LindsayAbaire’s play in which tension between assistedliving community roommates reaches a feverish pitch. Black Box Theater, Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $2325. Info, 863-5966.

words

ARCHER MAYOR: See WED.11, Phoenix Books, Burlington, 7 p.m. $3. Info, 448-3350. BOOK CLUB: Yogis deepen their practice through reading and discussion. Call for title. Sangha Studio — North, Burlington, 7:30-8:30 p.m. $5. Info, 448-4262. BRATTLEBORO LITERARY FESTIVAL: A four-day page-turner party hosts readings, panels and other literary happenings. See brattleboroliteraryfestival. org for details. Various Brattleboro locations, 5:158:30 p.m. Free. Info, 579-7414. FALL COLORS BOOK SALE: See WED.11. NONFICTION BOOK GROUP: Readers connect to text during a discussion of Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates. Fairfax Community Library, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 849-2420. STEPHEN BUTZ: The ruins of revolutionary Daniel Shays’ fortified settlement reveal the hidden story of a famous rebellion in Shays’ Settlement in Vermont: A Story of Revolt and Archaeology. Phoenix Books, Rutland, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 855-8078.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

FRI.13 activism

PEACE VIGIL: Friends and neighbors come together, bringing along their signs and their hearts. Top of Church St., Burlington, 5-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 899-1731. VERMONTERS STAND WITH PUERTO RICO: Locals demonstrate solidarity with residents of the island affected by Hurricane Maria with a history lesson, a silent auction, tasty eats and donation-based healing treatments. Christ Episcopal Church, Montpelier, 5-7 p.m. $5-25. Info, vermonters4pr@ gmail.com.

THE UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT

routes. Old Mill Park, Johnson, noon-4 p.m. $75; preregister. Info, 730-0161. GHOST WALK: DARKNESS FALLS: Local historian Thea Lewis treats pedestrians to tales of madmen, smugglers, pub spirits and, of course, ghosts. Arrive 10 minutes early. Democracy sculpture, 199 Main St., 6 & 8 p.m. $20. Info, 863-5966. MONTHLY WOMEN’S SHARING CIRCLE: Those who identify as female gather to laugh, cry and connect on a spiritual level. Essex Hub for Women & Business, Essex Junction, 6:30-8 p.m. $10. Info, mindfuleuphoria@gmail.com.

Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section.

MONTSHIRE UNLEASHED: AN EVENING FOR ADULTS: Grown-ups unleash their scientific curiosity during after-hours activities. Local fare, wine and Jasper Murdock’s Alehouse brews are available for purchase. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 6:30-9 p.m. $7-10; free for members; for ages 21 and up. Info, 649-2200.

business

film

art

CHAMBER $MARTS AND ¢ENTS PROGRAM: USING SOCIAL MEDIA TO MARKET YOUR BUSINESS: Experts elucidate ways in which online platforms can boost bottom lines. Central Vermont Chamber of Commerce, Berlin, 7:30-9 a.m. $15-20. Info, 229-5711.

comedy

CASUAL FRIDAY LIVE!: Standup, games, storytelling and improv have audience members in stitches. Marquis Theatre & Southwest Café, Middlebury, 8-9:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 388-4841. JUSTON MCKINNEY: Belly laughs abound when the former deputy sheriff doles out jokes. Lebanon Opera House, N.H., 7:30 p.m. $25. Info, 603-448-0400.

community

FEAST TOGETHER OR FEAST TO GO: Senior citizens and their guests catch up over a shared meal. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, noon-1 p.m. $7-9; preregister. Info, 262-6288. OPEN HOUSE: Safety comes first at a Fire Prevention Week affair offering hot dogs, snacks and information. Burlington Fire Department Station 5, 4-7 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7205.

crafts

SIT & KNIT: Adult crafters share projects, patterns and conversation. Main Reading Room, Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955.

dance

ECSTATIC DANCE VERMONT: Jubilant motions with the Green Mountain Druid Order inspire divine connections. Christ Episcopal Church, Montpelier, 7-9 p.m. $10. Info, 505-8011.

education

etc.

BIKE & BREW TOUR: Electric bicycles transport suds lovers to local beer producers via scenic

HOSTED BY THE UNIVERSIT Y OF VERMONT C O L L EG E O F AG R I C U LT U R E A N D L I F E S C I E N C E S

‘EXTREME WEATHER 3D’: See WED.11. HG SKIS PRESENTS: ‘EAT THE GUTS’: DJ sets, casual drinking and a high-stakes raffle accompany the premiere of a two-year movie project. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 8:30 p.m. $5-10. Info, 448-0132.

DATE:

TIME:

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

5:30 pm

LO C ATION:

ITVFEST: THE INDEPENDENT TELEVISION FESTIVAL: See WED.11.

UVM Ira Allen Chapel

‘WALKING WITH DINOSAURS: PREHISTORIC PLANET 3D’: See WED.11.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

food & drink

Parking available in the Gutterson Garage after 3:30pm

AUTUMN IN ADDISON COUNTY: APPLE & CHEESE FARM TOUR: Locavores board a van and taste their way through Champlain Orchards, Twig Farm and Shacksbury Cider. Bring a bag lunch. City Market/ Onion River Co-op, Burlington, 8:45 a.m.-4 p.m. $10-15. Info, 861-9700. BRANDON FARMERS MARKET: More than 50 local farmers, specialty food producers and artisans offer up their goods. Central Park, Brandon, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 273-2655.

P RO D U C E D I N PA RT N E R S H I P W I T H U V M CO N T I N U I N G A N D D I STA N C E E D U C AT I O N

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

l e ar n .uv m .e d u /ai ke n

UVM.107.17 Untitled-22 1 AIKEN LECTURE 7D FULL-COLOR AD: 5.75" x 5.56"

10/9/17 2:19 PM

BURLINGTON EDIBLE HISTORY TOUR: See THU.12. RICHMOND FARMERS MARKET: An open-air marketplace connects cultivators and fresh-food browsers. Volunteers Green, Richmond, 3-6 p.m. Free. Info, 391-0806. SUN TO CHEESE TOUR: Fromage fanatics go behind the scenes and follow award-winning farmhouse cheddar from raw milk to finished product. Shelburne Farms, 1:45-3:45 p.m. $18 includes a block of cheddar. Info, 985-8686.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.11, 9:15 a.m. SCAVENGER HUNT: See WED.11.

health & fitness

ACUDETOX: Attendees in recovery undergo acupuncture to the ear to propel detoxification. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150. ADVANCED TAI CHI CLASS: Folks keep active with a sequence of slow, controlled movements. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3322. BUTI YOGA: See WED.11, 10 a.m. & 6-7 p.m. FELDENKRAIS AWARENESS THROUGH MOVEMENT: Aches and pains, be gone! The physically challenged to the physically fit increase flexibility and body awareness with this form of somatic education. The Wellness Collective, Burlington, 12:30-1:30 p.m. $10. Info, 560-0186. FRIDAY NIGHT POWER YOGA: Practitioners get their sweat on during a full-body, flow-style stretching session. Kismet Place, Williston, 5-6 p.m. $12. Info, 343-5084. GET OFF YOUR BUTT & HIT THE FLOOR FELDENKRAIS: Slow, easy movements leave

FRI.13

CALENDAR 57

PRESIDENTIAL INSTALLATION CEREMONY: Vermont Law School welcomes its ninth president and dean, Thomas J.P. McHenry. A reception on the VLS campus follows. South Royalton Town Green, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 831-1225.

2017 GEORGE D. AIKEN LECTURE

SEVEN DAYS

FLASHBACK FRIDAY: Merrymakers cut a rug to the rhythms of the ’90s. Main Street Museum, White River Junction, 8 p.m.-midnight. $5-7; BYOB. Info, info@mainstreetmuseum.org.

MICHAEL MOSS, KEYNOTE

10.11.17-11.18.17

BALLROOM & LATIN DANCING: Learn new moves with Ballroom Nights, then join others in a dance social featuring the waltz, tango and more. Singles, couples and beginners are welcome. Williston Jazzercise Fitness Center, lesson, 7-8 p.m.; dance social, 8-9:30 p.m. $10-14; $8 for dance only. Info, 862-2269.

HOW THE FOOD GIANTS HOOKED US

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

CRAFTY CRAP NIGHT: Participants bring supplies or ongoing projects and an adventurous attitude to share creative time with other people in recovery. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150.

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section.

salt sugar fat:

» P.58 Untitled-2 1

10/4/17 11:33 AM


calendar

LIVING RECOVERY: Folks overcoming substance move, breathe and make positive change in a moderately paced flow yoga class. Sangha Studio — Pine, Burlington, 4-5 p.m. Donations. Info, 448-4262. PRANAYAM: Students boost their vitality and prosperity in a breathwork class benefitting Burlington’s refugee families. Railyard Yoga Studio, Burlington, 5:30-6:30 p.m. $14. Info, 318-6050. QIGONG: Students are schooled on the ancient Chinese health care system. Waterbury Public Library, 11-11:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 244-7036. RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: See WED.11.

holidays

WITCHCRAFT: Mummies, daddies, boys and ghouls park their broomsticks at a fall festival featuring hayrides, a haunted house, trick-or-treating, a Goose Island beer garden and more. Killington Resort, 5-9 p.m. $29-109. Info, alena@humanmovement.com.

kids

58 CALENDAR

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-11.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ACORN CLUB STORY TIME: Little ones up to age 4 gather for read-aloud tales. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 748-8291. DUNGEONS & DRAGONS: Imaginative gamers exercise their problem-solving skills in battles and adventures. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:308:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-6956. EARLY-BIRD MATH: Books, songs and games put a creative twist on mathematics for tots ages 2 through 5. Richmond Free Library, 11-11:45 a.m. Free. Info, 434-3036. HERBAL CLASS SERIES FOR KIDS: Magic, potions and fairies appear in every installment of this plant-based learning experience. Wild Faith Herb Farm, South Burlington, 2-4 p.m. $15; preregister. Info, wildfaithherbfarm@gmail.com. LITERACY CELEBRATION: Stories and songs with children’s author David Martin delight kids and adults. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 745-1391. LIVE ACTION ROLE-PLAY: Gamers in middle and high school take on alter egos for mythical adventures. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-5 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. PRESCHOOL YOGA WITH DANIELLE: Yogis up to age 5 strike a pose, then share stories and songs. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. STORY TIME: Picture books, songs, rhymes and puppets work youngsters’ mental muscles. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. STORY TIME: Babies, toddlers and preschoolers drop in for books, rhymes, songs and activities. Winooski Memorial Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 655-6424.

ENSEMBLE 4.1: The self-described “only piano windtet of its kind,’ the group lends its talents to works by Mozart and Beethoven, among others. University of Vermont Recital Hall, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $5-30. Info, 656-4455. AN EVENING WITH SAM BUSH: Lively newgrass numbers ring out courtesy of the awardwinning multi-instrumentalist. Barre Opera House, 8 p.m. $3539. Info, 476-8188.

SOUP & STORIES WITH VERMONT AUTHORS: Following a hearty meal, local writers Bill Torrey and Bill Schubart regale lit lovers with original narratives. Richmond Free Library, 6-9 p.m. Free. Info, 434-3036.

SAT.14

activism

JOHN BROWN DAY CELEBRATION & ANTI-RACISM EVENT: Locals join Woodstock Social Justice Initiative members in recognizing a historic abolitionist. Vergennes Union High School & Middle School, 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. $10; free for kids. Info, 299-8539.

art SI SOOVIN KIM: Bow in hand, the vioC D |S VI US Find visual art exhibits and events in linist delights listeners with an allDA IE B & URKE AN the art section. Bach program. Robison Hall, Mahaney , SKIP GO RM Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 8-10 p.m. $6-28. Info, 443-3168. bazaars U

TAI CHI AT ZENBARN STUDIO: Instructor Shaina shares the fundamentals of Yang style, including standing and moving postures. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 9-10 a.m. Donations. Info, studio@ zenbarnvt.com.

CHAMBER MUSIC MASTER CLASS: Del Sol Quartet and ZOFO school student musicians as members of the public look on. Faulkner Recital Hall, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 4 p.m. Free. Info, 603-646-2422.

|M

TAI CHI AT WATERBURY PUBLIC LIBRARY: Instructors demonstrate the moving meditation passed down through generations. Waterbury Public Library, 11:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 244-7036.

ABENAKI DRUMMING: Percussionists keep the beat during an Indigenous People’s Week with Lucy Cannon Neel and Melody Walker Brook. IDX Student Life Center, Champlain College, Burlington, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 865-5487.

.1 4 SAT

REFUGE RECOVERY: A LOVE SUPREME: Buddhist philosophy is the foundation of this mindfulnessbased addiction-recovery community. Turning Point Center, Burlington, noon. Free. Info, 861-3150.

Find club dates in the music section.

FRIDAY MORNING WORKSHOP: Wordsmiths offer constructive criticism on works in progress by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104.

E

KUNDALINI YOGA: Mantras, meditation and breathing techniques meet in the practice known as “the yoga of awareness.” Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, noon-1:30 p.m. $14. Info, 318-6050.

FALL COLORS BOOK SALE: See WED.11.

TT

students relaxed and smiling. The Wellness Collective, Burlington, 12:30-1:30 p.m. $10. Info, 540-0186.

music

sports

KILLINGTON DIVAS OF DIRT: Female mountain bikers of all ability levels share their passion for the sport at biweekly group rides and happy hours. Killington Bike Park, Killington Resort, 4-6 p.m. $20 for lift ticket; $39 for lift ticket and bike rental. Info, 422-6232.

talks

EDUCATION & ENRICHMENT FOR EVERYONE: Seven Days staff writer Mark Davis serves food for thought in “Is Criminal Justice Reform Really Making a Difference?” Faith United Methodist Church, South Burlington, 2-3 p.m. $5. Info, 864-3516. PANEL DISCUSSION: “Environmental Law for the Community and the World” underpins the VLS motto and mission. Chase Community Center, Vermont Law School, South Royalton, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 831-1225.

tech

TECH TUTOR: Techies answer questions about computers and devices during one-on-one help sessions. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 4-6 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-4918.

theater

‘AND THEN THERE WERE NONE’: See WED.11. BURLINGTON FRINGE FESTIVAL: See THU.12. ‘DRACULA’: Essex Community Players take a bite out of Bram Stoker’s spellbinding story of a vampire in search of new blood. Essex Memorial Hall, 7:30 p.m. $14-18. Info, tickets.essexplayers@gmail.com. AN EVENING OF ONE-ACT PLAYS: See THU.12. ‘FUN HOME’: See WED.11. ‘L’ELISIR D’AMORE’: See THU.12. ‘LONERS. LOVERS. FREAKS.’: See THU.12, 8 & 10 p.m. LOST NATION THEATER’S ‘SENSE & SENSIBILITY’: See THU.12. ‘THE MARVELOUS WONDERETTES’: See THU.12. ‘RIPCORD’: See THU.12. ‘ROBERT FROST: THIS VERSE BUSINESS’: Theatergoers get up close and personal with the poet in a Northern Stage production starring Emmy Award-winning actor Gordon Clapp. Barrette Center for the Arts, White River Junction, 7:30 p.m. $15-59. Info, 296-7000.

words

BRATTLEBORO LITERARY FESTIVAL: See THU.12, 10-11:15 a.m.

RE

« P.57

SU

FRI.13

COMMUNITY FLEA MARKET: Customers scoop up bargain items to benefit the Elmore SPCA. Plattsburgh Farmers Market Building, N.Y., 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, 518-493-5052. FLEA MARKET: Eclectic used items vie for spots in shoppers’ totes. Farr’s Field, Waterbury, 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Info, 882-1919.

community

MONTPELIER MEMORY CAFÉ: Filmmaker George Woodard and producer Joan Brace O’Neal are the special guests at a monthly gathering for people with memory loss and their caregivers. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, montpeliermemcafe@gmail.com. PLATTSBURGH CARES: IMMIGRANT SUPPORT TRAINING: Area residents learn to assist refugees entering the North Country. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Plattsburgh, N.Y., 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, pburghcares@gmail.com. SINGLE ADULTS’ VOLLEYBALL/GAME/POTLUCK DINNER NIGHT: Social butterflies serve, set, spike and snack at a fun-filled gathering. Essex Alliance Church, 6-8:30 p.m. $2; preregister. Info, 922-7479.

conferences

TRANSLATING IDENTITY CONFERENCE: Transathlete.com founder Chris Mosier delivers the keynote speech at a day dedicated to exploring gender and transgender identities, expressions, communities and intersections. Davis Center, University of Vermont, Burlington, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, tic@uvm.edu. VERMONT REIKI ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE: Jikiden Reiki Institute vice president Frank Arjava Petter keynotes a daylong exploration of Japanese bodywork guided by the theme “From the Roots of Reiki ... Firmly Planted and Blooming.” Holiday Inn, South Burlington, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $95-110. Info, info@ vermontreikiassociation.org.

dance

CONTRA DANCE: Peter Stix is the caller at a jamboree featuring live music by Red Dog Riley. Bring clean, soft-soled shoes. Cornwall Town Hall, 7-9:30 p.m. $5-10. Info, 462-3722. AN EVENING OF LATIN AMERICAN CULTURE & DANCE: Attendees find their footing in styles such as salsa, mambo, rumba and bachata. Roy Event Center, Dion Family Student Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 8 p.m. Free. Info, 654-2000. FRANKLIN HARVEST HOEDOWN: Tunes by the Franklin Traditional Musicians propel a contra dance with calling by Luke Donforth. Franklin Town Hall, 7-9 p.m. $5; free for kids. Info, 285-6505.

INTERNATIONAL JOURNEY DANCE: Guided and freestyle movement set to a wide array of music help participants get out of their minds and into their bodies as part of a global event. Howe Center, Rutland, 2-3:30 p.m. $15. Info, ashley.journeydance@gmail.com. S P A C E: Ranging in age from 2 to over 80, students from Dancers’ Corner showcase their best moves in ballet, jazz and hip-hop. Lebanon Opera House, N.H., 4 p.m. $12-21. Info, 603-448-0400.

education

COLLEGE FAIR: Sen. Bernie Sanders addresses Vermont high school students and their families who meet representatives from Green Mountain State colleges, universities, and certificate and apprenticeship programs. Spartan Athletic Complex, Castleton University, 10 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 800-339-9834.

etc.

BIKE & BREW TOUR: See FRI.13. GHOST WALK: DARKNESS FALLS: See FRI.13. INDEPENDENT COMMUNITY MEETING PLACE: Brainstorming leads to forming activity groups for hobbies such as flying stunt kites and playing music. Presto Music Store, South Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 658-0030. LEGAL CLINIC: Attorneys offer complimentary consultations on a first-come, first-served basis. 274 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 383-2118. UVM HISTORIC TOUR: Professor emeritus William Averyt references architectural gems and notable personalities on a walk through campus. Ira Allen statue, University Green, University of Vermont, Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 656-8673.

fairs & festivals

CABOT APPLE PIE FESTIVAL: Bakers tempt judges’ tastebuds with flaky pastries boasting fall’s signature flavor. Crafts and raffles round out this benefit for the Cabot Historical Society. Cabot High School, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, 563-3396. COMMUNITY HEALING ARTS FAIR: Folks explore Railyard Yoga Studio’s offerings for mending body, mind and soul. Railyard Yoga Studio, Burlington, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. $25 includes lunch and snacks. Info, 318-6050. ENCHANTED FOREST: A magical evening for kids and adults features storytelling, music, wagon rides and an epic fire. Hubbard Park, Montpelier, 4-8 p.m. $4-25. Info, 223-7335. FALL FEST: Festive individuals celebrate the season with food, tunes, crafts, games and soccer matches for men and women. Southern Vermont College, Bennington, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 447-6328. FALL FESTIVAL IN RUTLAND: Pumpkin carving, crafts and face painting meet creative activities and a photo booth at this family-friendly fest. Community Green Space, Rutland, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 797-8606. FALL FESTIVAL IN SHELBURNE: Bees & Friends, a performance by Ballet Vermont, gives way to songs by Mister Chris, farm-fresh fare and evening lullabies. Bread & Butter Farm, Shelburne, 3-6:30 p.m. $20. Info, katie@balletvermont.org. FUR FEST: Animal lovers throw potential pets a bone at a Central Vermont Humane Society benefit with hors d’oeuvres, desserts, live and silent auctions, and heartwarming stories. Vermont Granite Museum, Barre, 5-8 p.m. $35; cash bar. Info, 4763811, ext. 110. ROKTOBERFEST: Revelers go hog wild for bacon, beer and bands. The Red Mill, Vergennes, 4 p.m. $15-40; free for kids under 5. Info, 863-5966. VT CHRISTIAN ROCK-TOBERFEST: Stars Go Dim, Mallary Hope and Frank Palangi lend their musical gifts to a family-friendly concert. Comedian Judy McDonald is also on the bill. North Avenue Alliance Church, Burlington, 7-10 p.m. $20-30. Info, 233-9603. VT’S ORIGINAL PREGNANCY & BABY EXPO: Current and expectant parents learn about local resources, services and products that help foster healthy families. Sheraton Burlington Hotel & Conference


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT Center, South Burlington, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. $5; free for kids. Info, vtspregnancybabyexpo@gmail.com.

film

See whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s playing at local theaters in the movies section. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;EXTREME WEATHER 3Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;: See WED.11. ITVFEST: THE INDEPENDENT TELEVISION FESTIVAL: See WED.11. MOUNTAINFILM ON TOUR: Adventure hounds view documentary films celebrating mountain culture, outdoor sports and the environment. Spaulding Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 7 p.m. $5-12. Info, 603-646-2422. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;THE SALESMANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;: A woman is assaulted in her home, leaving her husband determined to track down her attacker in this 2016 drama. Dana Auditorium, Sunderland Language Center, Middlebury College, 3 & 8 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;WALKING WITH DINOSAURS: PREHISTORIC PLANET 3Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;: See WED.11.

food & drink

BURLINGTON EDIBLE HISTORY TOUR: See THU.12. BURLINGTON FARMERS MARKET: Dozens of stands overflow with seasonal produce, flowers, artisan wares and prepared foods. Burlington City Hall Park, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, burlingtonfarmersmarket.org@gmail.com. CAPITAL CITY FARMERS MARKET: Meats and cheeses join farm-fresh produce, baked goods, and locally made arts and crafts. 60 State Street, Montpelier, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 793-8347. CHOCOLATE TASTING: With the help of a tasting guide, chocoholics of all ages discover the flavor profiles of four different confections. Lake Champlain Chocolates Factory Store & CafĂŠ, Burlington, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 864-1807. MIDDLEBURY FARMERS MARKET: See WED.11. NORTHWEST FARMERS MARKET: Locavores stock up on produce, preserves, baked goods, ethnic foods, and arts and crafts. Taylor Park, St. Albans, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, alavista@myfairpoint.net. NORWICH FARMERS MARKET: Neighbors discover fruits, veggies and other riches of the land offered alongside baked goods, crafts and live entertainment. Route 5, Norwich, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 384-7447.

REINVENTING THE WHEEL: MILK, MICROBES & THE FIGHT FOR REAL CHEESE: Fromage experts Bronwen and Francis Percival explore what has been lost as raw-milk, single-farm cheeses have given way to factory production. Shelburne Farms, 3-5 p.m. $5; preregister. Info, 985-8686.

SHELBURNE FARMERS MARKET: Harvested fruits and greens, artisan cheeses, and local novelties grace outdoor tables. Shelburne Parade Ground, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 482-4279.

CALCUTTA FUNDRAISER: Folks catch up over cocktails and dinner, then vie for prizes at this fundraiser for the Donnie Messier Reward Fund. American Legion Post 59, Waterbury, cocktails, 6 p.m.; dinner, 7 p.m. $80 per couple; cash bar. Info, 760-0793. SCAVENGER HUNT: See WED.11.

health & fitness

FELDENKRAIS AWARENESS THROUGH MOVEMENT: See FRI.13, Kismet Place, Williston, 9-10 a.m. Free. Info, 655-0950. FITNESS BOOT CAMP: Maâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;am, yes, maâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;am! Exercise expert Ginger Lambert guides active bodies in an interval-style workout to build strength and cardiovascular fitness. Middlebury Recreation Facility, 8-9 a.m. $12. Info, 343-7160. SPIRITUAL WARRIOR SERIES: Those looking for a fast-paced yet well-rounded practice are in luck with this invigorating sequence. Sangha Studio â&#x20AC;&#x201D; North, Burlington, noon-1 p.m. $5-15. Info, 448-4262. YIN YOGA: Students hold poses for several minutes to give connective tissues a good stretch. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 8-9:30 a.m. Donations. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com.

Threepart documentary series on the health of the Lake Champlain basin.

Starts Thursday, October 19 8 pm

holidays

GHOSTACULAR: PARACON: A paranormal preview to Halloween features vendors, speakers, readers, healers, workshops and aura photography. Hilton Burlington, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $10. Info, 893-9966.

vermontpbs.org/water

WITCHCRAFT: See FRI.13, 10 a.m.-9 p.m.

kids

HOPSTOP FAMILY SHOW: ANTONIO ROCHA: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Animalesco â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Animal Tales From Around the Globeâ&#x20AC;? entertains petite patrons. Alumni Hall, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 11 a.m. Free. Info, 603-646-2422.

Untitled-2 1

10/9/17 10:24 AM

SATURDAY STORY TIME AT BROWNELL LIBRARY: Picture books, puppets, songs and rhymes evoke smiles. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. SATURDAY STORY TIME: Timeless tales and new adventures spark imaginations. Phoenix Books, Burlington, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 448-3350. SPANISH MUSICAL PLAYGROUP: Language learners up to age 5 get together for stories, rhymes and songs en espaĂąol. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 878-4918. STORY TIME & VISIT FROM BRUCE THE BEAR: Budding bookworms perk up their ears for Bruceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Big Move by Ryan T. Higgins. Phoenix Books, Essex, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 872-7111. YOUTH TENNIS CLINCS: Kiddos ages 6 and up build their skills on the court. Cambridge Community Center, 10:15 a.m.-11:15 p.m. $10. Info, 644-5028.

lgbtq

THE SKY WRITING GROUP: Creative storytelling supports health and community cohesion in a critique-free environment. Pride Center of Vermont, Burlington, noon-2 p.m. Free. Info, liz@ pridecentervt.org.

music

Find club dates in the music section.

VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: See WED.11, 9 a.m.2 p.m.

DEL SOL STRING QUARTET & ZOFO: Two California-based chamber ensembles band together for a program reflecting the rich diversity of the contemporary Pacific Rim. Rollins Chapel, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 8 p.m. $17-25. Info, 603-646-2422.

COON HILL JOHN: A Champlain Valley quartet serves up Americana, bluegrass and folk stylings. Meeting House on the Green, East Fairfield, 7-10 p.m. $10. Info, 827-3275.

SAT.14

472 Marshall Ave, Williston â&#x20AC;˘ (802) 658-2433 128 Intervale Rd Burlington â&#x20AC;˘ (802) 660-3505 Sun 10-5 â&#x20AC;˘ Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat 9amâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;6pm www.GardenersSupplyStore.com

Âť P.60 Untitled-6 1 FNCS_7D.indd 1

10/6/17 1:29 3:42 PM

CALENDAR 59

TASTE FOR TRAILS WATABURY: Imbibers sip suds from participating restaurants and bars to support Waterbury Area Trails Alliance. Various Waterbury locations, 4-9 p.m. $10 includes tasting glass and beer card. Info, 585-6431.

WAITSFIELD FARMERS MARKET: A bustling bazaar boasts seasonal produce, prepared foods, artisan crafts and live entertainment. Mad River Green, Waitsfield, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, waitsfieldmarketmanager@gmail.com.

SAVING OUR WATERS

SEVEN DAYS

ST. JOHNSBURY FARMERS MARKET: Growers and crafters gather weekly at booths centered on local eats. Anthonyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Diner, St. Johnsbury, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, cfmamanager@gmail.com.

games

10.11.17-11.18.17

ROAST TURKEY SUPPER: Thanksgiving makes an off-season appearance at this taste bud pleaser, served buffet-style. Takeout is available. Vergennes United Methodist Church, 5-6:30 p.m. $5-9. Info, 877-3150.

WINDSOR FARMERS MARKET: Locavores go wild for fruits, veggies, maple syrup, honey, eggs, meats, crafts and more. 51 Main St., Windsor, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 359-2551.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

RANDOLPH FARMERS MARKET: Locavores support area purveyors who proffer seasonal foodstuffs and arts and crafts. Gifford Green, Gifford Medical Center, Randolph, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, randfarmmarket@yahoo.com.

Major funding provided by;


calendar

GUITAR OPEN MIC: Instrumentalists test their talents onstage. Pickering Room, Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211. ‘THE KING RETURNS’: World-class Elvis Presley impersonator Mark Shelton conjures the King in a Vegas-worthy spectacle complete with a full band. See calendar spotlight. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, 8 p.m. $26.50-49.75. Info, 863-5966. PETE’S POSSE: Three generations of players come together to create dynamic roots music. Burnham Hall, Lincoln, 7:30 p.m. $10; free for kids and teens. Info, 388-6863.

BRATTLEBORO LITERARY FESTIVAL: See THU.12, 9:30 a.m.-9 p.m. COCOON: Inspired by the storytelling series “The Moth Radio Hour,” raconteurs approach the mic with true tales. A reception follows. Robison Hall, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 8-10 p.m. $6-15. Info, 443-3168.

sports

IC |U

ADULT INTRODUCTION TO TENNIS: Rackets in hand, newcomers get a feel for the sport. Cambridge Community Center, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $15. Info, 644-5028.

US

FALL COLORS BOOK SALE: See WED.11.

GRAND OPENING CEREMONY: Live music by Colin McCaffrey gets toes tapping at the unveiling of a new addition to the nature center. Food and drinks fuel the fun. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 3-5 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, emilys@ northbranchnaturecenter.org.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘EXTREME WEATHER 3D’: See WED.11. ITVFEST: THE INDEPENDENT TELEVISION FESTIVAL: See WED.11. ‘WALKING WITH DINOSAURS: PREHISTORIC PLANET 3D’: See WED.11.

food & drink

UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT FALLFEST: Snakehips, Vundabar and UVM’s own Kudu Stooge take the stage in the biggest concert of the semester. University of Vermont Patrick Gymnasium, South Burlington, 8-11 p.m. $10-30. Info, 656-2076.

STOPP 5K RUN & WALK: College students and community members pound the pavement to support the New Agenda Foundation. University of Vermont Archie Post Athletic Complex, Burlington, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $10-35. Info, sydney.farrell@uvm.edu.

POKÉMON LEAGUE: See THU.12, noon-5 p.m.

VERMONT PHILHARMONIC OPERA GALA: A program of works by Verdi, Puccini and others features soprano Helle Gössler Christensen and violinist Letitia Quante. See calendar spotlight. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe Mountain Resort, 8 p.m. $20-25. Info, 760-4634.

talks

outdoors

FALL FOREST BATHING: Outdoor enthusiasts and novices alike experience nature through all five senses with this guided mindfulness practice. See natureconnectionguide.com for details. Oakledge Park, Burlington, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $10-20. Info, 718-753-8443.

ER

S

Y

IV

N

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

words

4|M

10.11.17-11.18.17

‘RIPCORD’: See THU.12, 2 & 7:30 p.m.

GHOST WALK: LAKEVIEW CEMETERY: Local historian Thea Lewis guides ghost hunters through great characters of Burlington’s yesteryear. Louisa Howard Chapel, Burlington, 6 p.m. $20. Info, 863-5966.

CHOCOLATE TASTING: See SAT.14.

TWANGTOWN PARAMOURS: A hybrid of the Nashville and Austin music scenes, the acoustic duo crafts catchy Americana sounds. Brandon Music, 7:30 p.m. $20; $45 includes dinner; BYOB; preregister. Info, 247-4295.

SEVEN DAYS

NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: ‘ANGELS IN AMERICA: PART ONE: MILLENIUM APPROACHES’: New Yorkers grapple with life, death, love and sex in the midst of the AIDS crisis in a broadcast production of Tony Kushner’s Tony Award-winning play. Woodstock Town Hall Theatre, 2-5:30 p.m. $10-20. Info, 457-3981.

BALKAN FOLK DANCING: Louise Brill and friends organize participants into lines and circles set to complex rhythms. Ohavi Zedek Synagogue, Burlington, 4-7 p.m. $6; free for first-timers; bring snacks to share. Info, 540-1020.

‘STAR WARS’ READS DAY: GREEN MOUNTAIN COLLEGE 5K FUN U YO Costumed fans of all ages stop in | CO F VE RUN: Joggers lace up for a 3.1-mile jaunt. RM ONT FALLFEST for themed crafts and hot-off-the-press Green Mountain College, Poultney, 8:30-11 titles from the science-fiction series. Phoenix a.m. $20-25. Info, 287-8238. Books, Burlington, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 448-3350. LEARN TO CURL CLINIC: Athletes get acquainted TRACEY MEDEIROS: The author signs copies of her with the on-ice sport. Wendell A. Barwood Arena, taste-bud-tempting title The Vermont Non-GMO White River Junction, 5:45-8 p.m. $25; preregister; Cookbook: 125 Organic and Farm-to-Fork Recipes limited space. Info, uppervalleycurling@gmail.com. from the Green Mountain State. The Woodstock Inn PUBLIC SKATING: Active bodies coast across the & Resort, 1-3 p.m. Free. Info, 457-6628. ice. Plattsburgh State Fieldhouse, N.Y., 12:30-1:30 p.m. $2-3. Info, 518-564-4136.

SUSIE BURKE, SKIP GORMAN & DAVID SURETTE: After a day of teaching, the string players serve up original, traditional and old-time strains. Upper Valley Music Center, Lebanon, N.H., 4-5:30 p.m. $20. Info, 603-448-1642.

60 CALENDAR

VCAM’S DIGITAL EDITING CERTIFICATION: Adobe Premiere users get familiar with the most recent version of the editing software. Prerequisite: VCAM Access Orientation or equivalent, or instructor’s permission. VCAM Studio, Burlington, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 651-9692.

etc.

SAT.1

PUTTING TOGETHER THE STRING BAND SOUND: Drawing on the American folk traditions, three instructors help craft instrumental and vocal parts for classic numbers in a group class. Upper Valley Music Center, Lebanon, N.H., 2:45-3:45 p.m. $20. Info, 603-448-1642.

USING NEIGHBORS IN GENEALOGY RESEARCH: Family-tree fact-finders learn how a case for kinship ties was established through the correlation of indirect evidence in Vermont records. Vermont Genealogy Library, Fort Ethan Allen, Colchester, 10:30 a.m.-noon. $10. Info, 310-9285.

THE METROPOLITAN OPERA LIVE IN HD: ‘DIE ZAUBERFLÖTE’: An on-screen production captures the comedy and mysticism of Mozart’s fairy tale opera. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 12:55 p.m. $16-25. Info, 748-2600. Loew Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 1 p.m. $26-29. Info, 603-646-2422.

NSON

GUITAR ACCOMPANIMENT: Be they flat pickers or fingerpickers, six-string songsters hone their skills. Upper Valley Music Center, Lebanon, N.H., 1:30-2:30 p.m. $20. Info, 603-448-1642.

COFFEE: EXPLORING HERBALISM THROUGH A POPULAR PLANT EXTRACT: Students draw on their experiences with java to understand aspects of herbalism with instructor Katherine James. Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism, Montpelier, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. $10-12. Info, 224-7100.

dance

L BE

FILLING OUT YOUR MANDOLIN TUNES: Bigger, fuller sounds ring out after this workshop with Davit Surette. Upper Valley Music Center, Lebanon, N.H., 1:30-2:30 p.m. $20. Info, 603-448-1642.

seminars

‘THE MARVELOUS WONDERETTES’: See THU.12, 3 & 7:30 p.m.

N IE

FIDDLE TUNES & TECHNIQUES: Skip Gorman schools players in American mountain, Appalachian and Western bow-and-string styles. Upper Valley Music Center, Lebanon, N.H., 1:30-2:30 p.m. $20. Info, 603-448-1642.

tending to Green Mountain Club-maintained trails. Montpelier High School, 8 a.m. Free. Info, trails@ gmcmontpelier.org.

DA

« P.59

OF

SAT.14

E RT

SI T

DAVID FEHERTY: The professional-golfer-turnedsports-personality serves up sharp wit and madcap storytelling as part of his Off Tour! Robert E. Miller Expo Centre, Champlain Valley Expo, Essex Junction, 7:30 p.m. $65-179. Info, 863-5966. MARK MCCURTIES: Spiritual seekers absorb “Making Meaningful Change: How God’s Love Can Change Your Life and the World!” Memorial Lounge, Waterman Building, University of Vermont, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 864-4709.

tech

SUN.15 activism

RALLY TO KEEP THE SOIL IN ORGANIC: A tractor parade paves the way for speeches, local eats and live music at this gathering of organic farmers, eaters and movement leaders. Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., noon-2 p.m. Free. Info, 274-2043. WALK & SING FOR CIVILITY: Neighbors come together for a stroll down the Stowe Recreation Path to Stowe Community Church where they unite in song. Jewish Community of Greater Stowe, walk, 1 p.m.; singing, 2:15 p.m. Free. Info, 253-7578.

agriculture

BEAUTIFUL TREE WALK: Outdoor lovers embark on a guided arboreal ramble. Stranahan Town Forest, Marshfield, 1-4 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

MUSHROOMS DEMYSTIFIED: Fungi fanatics learn about different varieties — fabulous and fearsome alike — found throughout the park. Nature Cente, Little River State Park, Waterbury, 2:30 p.m. $2-4; free for children ages 3 and under; preregister; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103.

TECH HELP: Electronics novices bring their questions and devices to a hands-on help session with a trained troubleshooter. Fairfax Community Library, 9-11 a.m. Free. Info, 849-2420.

art

theater

bazaars

NIGHT SKY VIEWING NIGHT: Stargazers join members of the Green Mountain Astronomers for a study of the solar system. Call to confirm. Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site, 6:30-11 p.m. Donations. Info, 273-2282.

‘AND THEN THERE WERE NONE’: See WED.11.

FLEA MARKET: See SAT.14.

AQUILA THEATRE’S ‘SENSE & SENSIBILITY’: Two sisters must leave their lives of luxury in a story by Jane Austen, interpreted by Aquila Theatre. Fuller Hall, St. Johnsbury Academy, 7 p.m. $15-42; free for students. Info, 748-2600.

LEAF PEEPING WITH LULAROE: Fashion-forward shoppers freshen up their fall wardrobes with stylish garments. The Essex Resort & Spa, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 324-3899.

OWL PROWL & NIGHT GHOST HIKE: Flashlight holders spy denizens of dusk on a journey to 19thcentury settlement ruins, where spooky Vermont tales await. Meet at the History Hike parking lot, Little River State Park, Waterbury, 6:30 p.m. $2-4; free for kids 3 and under; preregister; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103. RAVEN RIDGE HIKE: Trekkers cover two miles of ground on an easy excursion with great views. Contact trip leader for details. Free; preregister. Info, mbruskai@gmail.com. STOWE WORK HIKE: Nature lovers in work clothes and sturdy boots give back to the community by

BURLINGTON FRINGE FESTIVAL: See THU.12. ‘A DOLL’S HOUSE’: See WED.11, 2 & 7:30 p.m. ‘DRACULA’: See FRI.13. AN EVENING OF ONE-ACT PLAYS: See THU.12. ‘FUN HOME’: See WED.11, 2 & 7:30 p.m. ‘L’ELISIR D’AMORE’: See THU.12, 2 p.m. ‘LONERS. LOVERS. FREAKS.’: See THU.12. LOST NATION THEATER’S ‘SENSE & SENSIBILITY’: See THU.12.

Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section.

community

BRISTOL VILLAGE COHOUSING GRAND OPENING: A planned community of 14 households opens its doors for tours, refreshments and music. Bristol Village Cohousing, 2-5 p.m. Free. Info, 734-0798. COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS WITH THE CENTER FOR MINDFUL LEARNING: Peaceful people gather for guided meditation and interactive discussions. Burlington Friends Meeting House, 5-7 p.m. $10. Info, assistant@centerformindfullearning.org.

STOWE FARMERS MARKET: An appetizing assortment of fresh veggies, meats, milk, berries, herbs, beverages and crafts tempts shoppers. Red Barn Shops Field, Stowe, 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, 279-3444.

games

GAMES PARLOUR: Strategic thinkers bring favorite tabletop competitions to play with others. Champlain Club, Burlington, 2-8 p.m. $5. Info, orsonbradford@gmail.com. SCAVENGER HUNT: See WED.11.

health & fitness

TRADITIONAL YOGA FLOW: Breath accompanies each transition during a vinyasa flow focused on body awareness and self acceptance. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 9-10:15 a.m. Donations. Info, 244-8134.

holidays

WITCHCRAFT: See FRI.13, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

kids

‘CUENTOS: TALES FROM THE LATINO WORLD’: Writer and raconteur David Gonzalez breathes life into stories from Spanish-speaking cultures. Spaulding Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 3 p.m. $13-23. Info, 603-646-2422. PEER-LED MINDFULNESS MEET-UP FOR TEENS: South Burlington High School junior Mika Holtz guides adolescents toward increased awareness through music, movement and other techniques. Stillpoint Center, Burlington, 9-10:30 a.m. Donations. Info, 720-427-9340.

language

DIMANCHES FRENCH CONVERSATION: Parlezvous français? Native speakers and students alike practice the tongue at a casual drop-in chat. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 4-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 363-2431. SPANISH GROUP CLASSES: Students roll their Rs while practicing en español. New Moon Café, Burlington, 2:45-4:30 p.m. $20. Info, maigomez1@ hotmail.com.

music

Find club dates in the music section. THE END OF AMERICA: Rock and Americana stylings resonate with fans of Ryan Adams and Dawes.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

Richmond Congregational Church, 4-6 p.m. $2025. Info, 434-4563. FREVO: Four Vermont musicians find common ground in spirited works ranging from Beatles numbers to children’s songs to classical jazz pieces. United Church of Westford, 4-5 p.m. Donations. Info, 879-4028. VERMONT PHILHARMONIC OPERA GALA: See SAT.14, Barre Opera House, 2 p.m. $5-20. Info, 476-8188. THE WAILERS: Old-school members and newgeneration talent spread good vibes with timeless reggae tunes. Lebanon Opera House, N.H., 6 p.m. $25-45. Info, 603-448-0400.

outdoors

HIKE INTO HISTORY: Trekkers, guided by Stephen Zeoli, walk in the footsteps of Revolutionary War soldiers. Mount Independence State Historic Site, Orwell, 1-3:30 p.m. $5; free for kids under 15. Info, 948-2000. LITTLE OTTER CREEK TO LAKE CHAMPLAIN PADDLE: Aquatic adventurers keep their eyes peeled for wildlife on an easy five-mile round trip. Free; preregister. Info, ted@ted-albers.net. LITTLE RIVER FOLIAGE RAMBLE: Hikers step off the beaten path for a guided tour of the Little River settlement. Little River State Park, Waterbury, 2 p.m. $2-4; free for kids 3 and under; preregister; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103.

PAUL GILLIES: The lawyer reads into historic addresses in “Vermont Election Sermons.” Ethan Allen Homestead Museum, Burlington, 2-3 p.m. Free. Info, 865-4556.

theater

BURLINGTON FRINGE FESTIVAL: See THU.12, 4 p.m. ‘DRACULA’: See FRI.13, 2 p.m. FLIP FABRIQUE: Six stunning acrobats soar in a spectacle of theater, circus, cabaret and street performance arts. Paramount Theatre, Rutland, 7 p.m. $30-35. Info, 775-0903. LOST NATION THEATER’S ‘SENSE & SENSIBILITY’: See THU.12, 2 p.m. ‘THE MARVELOUS WONDERETTES’: See THU.12, 2 p.m. THE METROPOLITAN OPERA LIVE IN HD: ‘DIE ZAUBERFLÖTE’: See SAT.14. ‘ROBERT FROST: THIS VERSE BUSINESS’: See FRI.13, 5 p.m. ‘SHAKESPEARE’S SISTER’: Local actor Aly Perry portrays Judith Shakespeare in the Vermont Shakespeare Festival’s full reading of Emma Whipday’s new play. Colchester’s Mead Hall, 3 p.m. $10. Info, 877-874-1911.

words

BRATTLEBORO LITERARY FESTIVAL: See THU.12, 10 a.m.-5:15 p.m.

MON.16 activism

NETDAHE STODDARD: The past illuminates the problems of the present during the discussion “History of Racism.” Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 3:15 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

SI

|T

HE

BI

LIT

Y’

4 T.1 SA

seminars

talks

‘FUN HOME’: See WED.11, 2 p.m.

BURLINGTON TREE TOURS: Outdoors lovers learn to identify common species on a moderately paced walking tour of the Queen City’s urban forest. Hilton Burlington, 10-11:15 a.m. & 5-6:15 p.m. $11.9113; free for kids 10 and under. Info, 343-1773.

TOUR OF THE WATERBURY DAM: Visitors explore a reforested encampment and discover how the Civilian Conservation Corps saved the Winooski Valley from flooded ruin. Meet at the top of the Waterbury Dam, Little River State Park, 11:30 a.m. $2-4; free for kids 3 and under; preregister; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103.

T H E S T E V E I B E Y M U S I C F O U N D AT I O N P R E S E N T S :

AT E

SE

N

agriculture

sports

AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY MAKING STRIDES AGAINST BREAST CANCER OF NORTHERN VERMONT WALK: Pedestrians support this healing cause one step at a time. Veterans’ Memorial Park, South Burlington, registration, 11 a.m.; walk, 1 p.m. Donations. Info, 872-6325.

SHAMROCK ’N’ RUN 5K: UVM’s Kappa Delta chapter hosts an autumnal jog to raise funds for Prevent Child Abuse Vermont. University of Vermont 5K Loop, Burlington, 9-11 a.m. $10. Info, kdalphathetacommunityservice@gmail.com. ULTIMATE FRISBEE FALL LEAGUE: Competitors break out their discs for weekly games. Leddy Park, Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. $30; preregister. Info, fall-league-17-admins@gmda.ultimatecentral.com.

business

HOW TO USE YOUR WEBSITE TO GROW YOUR HEART-CENTERED BUSINESS: Entrepreneurs pick up tips for connecting with ideal customers by way of their web presence. Holistic School of Business, Montpelier, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 225-5960.

PERFORMANCES BY: Chelsea ALL IN Middle School Chorus • Makenzi ONE Edwards • Elizabeth Duvall • Imagine NIGHT! That • Harvest Trio • Chin Hippies • Jimmy “T” Thurston • FLPSIDE • Clinton Davis Group • Yvonne & The Reverbs • 2 Token Joker • Rocket 88 • Tim Brick • Donna Thunders • Heartless • Bonfire • The NEX Sponsored by

LIMITED SEATING — GET YOUR TICKET TODAY! Tickets: $20, Call: 802-479-9522 to reserve All proceeds support Chelsea Public School Music Programs 6H-ChelseaSchool101117.indd 1

BARRE ELECTRIC Audio & Lighting:

STUDIO 131

10/6/17 4:16 PM

es Witch WIZARDS, WISHES ,

&

VERMONT TEDDY BEAR FACTORY SHELBURNE, VERMONT

October 21st

a.m.-2 p.m.

5K WALK • COSTUME CONTESTS • FACE PAINTING • KIDS’ ACTIVITIES • VERMONT TEDDY BEAR FACTORY TOURS WELL-BEHAVED, LEASHED DOGS ARE WELCOME! (COSTUMES OPTIONAL)

dance

CONTACT IMPROV DANCE: Movers engage in weight sharing, play and meditation when exploring this style influenced by aikido and other somatic practices. Aikido of Champlain Valley, Burlington, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $4. Info, 864-7306.

REGISTER: WWW.WITCHESANDWIZARDSVT.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION: 802.864.9393

SEVEN DAYS

KENYA RUN: HEAL Raising Our World Foundation feels the love from participants in a 5K run/walk. Grace Congregational Church, Rutland, registration, 1 p.m.; run, 1:30 p.m. $20-25; $45-50 for families; free with $50 in funds raised. Info, 558-0139.

Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section.

Doors: 5pm / Show: 6pm Barre Elks #1535 • Jefferson St. Barre

VT’S FAS TEST MO MUSICAL FUNDRAVING ISER

10.11.17-10.18.17

HARVEST RUN FOR SUSTAINABILITY: Families make strides in a 5K romp through farm fields and dirt roads. Proceeds benefit the Sustainability Academy. Intervale Center, Burlington, 9-11:30 a.m. $5-15; $30 per family. Info, kellykdson@gmail.com.

art

SATURDAY OCTOBER 21

SALSA MONDAYS: Dancers learn the techniques and patterns of salsa, merengue, bachata and chacha. North End Studio A, Burlington, fundamentals, 7 p.m.; intermediate, 8 p.m. $12. Info, 227-2572. WEST AFRICAN DANCE: Live djembe and dundun drumming drive a family-friendly class with teacher Seny Daffe of Guinea. Drop-ins are welcome. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 5:30-7 p.m. $10-16. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com.

MON.16

Sponsored by CALENDAR 61

WOMEN’S PICKUP SOCCER: Swift females shoot for the goal. Robert Miller Community & Recreation Center, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. $3; $50 for unlimited drop-in pass. Info, 864-0123.

A Benefit for

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

REGIONAL FARM-TO-SCHOOL R| S AQU GROWING UP THROUGH EMOTIONAL MEETING: Locavores gather to build IL A THEATRE’S ‘SEN PAIN: Diana Wardell explores how a connections with peers and farm-tospiritual path can lead individuals out of child-like school practitioners. Refreshments are provided. reactions to emotional adulthood. Unitarian Farm Barn, Shelburne Farms, 4-7 p.m. Free. Info, Universalist Fellowship of Plattsburgh, N.Y., 10 a.m. 861-4769. Free. Info, 518-561-6920. E&

SLI’s Allnighter IV

» P.62 Untitled-6 1

10/4/17 3:25 PM


calendar MON.16

« P.61

education

CAMPUS TOUR: Potential students ages 16 through 24 check out a facility offering free housing, meals, career technical training, high school diplomas, driver’s licenses and job placement. Northlands Job Corps Center, Vergennes, 9:45 a.m.-noon. Free; preregister. Info, 877-0121.

etc.

JOB HUNT HELP: See THU.12, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

film

LEGO ROBOTICS: Building and programming keep youngsters engaged. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 3-4:15 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-4918. PRESCHOOL MUSIC: See THU.12, 11 a.m. ROBIN’S NEST NATURE PLAYGROUP: Outdoor pursuits through fields and forests captivate little ones up to age 5 and their parents. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 10 a.m.-noon. Donations. Info, 229-6206. STORIES WITH MEGAN: Lit lovers ages 2 through 5 open their ears for exciting tales. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7216.

language

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section.

ADVANCED-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: Language learners perfect their pronunciation with guest speakers. Private residence, Burlington, 4:30-6 p.m. $20. Info, 324-1757.

‘EXTREME WEATHER 3D’: See WED.11. ‘WALKING WITH DINOSAURS: PREHISTORIC PLANET 3D’: See WED.11.

15

OR

N.

LD

SU

LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE: Bring a bag lunch to BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.11, 6:30 |K W ID O practice the system of communicap.m. S| IN ‘C U AT L ENT E tion using visual gestures. KelloggOS: TALES FROM TH MAGIC: THE GATHERING — MONDAY Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. NIGHT MODERN: Tarmogoyf-slinging madFree. Info, 223-3338. ness ensues when competitors battle for prizes in a

games

ARE YOU A

Conquer your weekend NOW with Notes on the Weekend. This e-newsletter maps out the best weekend events every Thursday. Visit sevendaysvt.com/ enews to sign up.

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

WEEKEND WARRIOR?

weekly game. Brap’s Magic, Burlington, 6:30-10 p.m. $8. Info, 540-0498. SCAVENGER HUNT: See WED.11.

health & fitness

ADVANCED SUN-STYLE TAI CHI, LONG-FORM: Elements of qigong thread through the youngest version of the Chinese martial art. Winooski Senior Center, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 735-5467. ADVANCED TAI CHI CLASS: See FRI.13. BLOOD PRESSURE CLINIC: A nurse from Support and Services at Homes screens for healthy circulation. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3322. BUTI YOGA: See WED.11. HERBAL CONSULTATIONS: Clinical interns from the Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism evaluate individual constitutions and health conditions. Burlington Herb Clinic, 4-8 p.m. $10-20; preregister. Info, 244-7100. QIGONG: Basic movements and fundamental breathing principles engage participants. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 9-10 a.m. $10. Info, 505-1688. RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: See WED.11. SEATED TAI CHI: Movements are modified for those with arthritis and other chronic conditions. Winooski Senior Center, 11 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 735-5467.

62 CALENDAR

CAITLÍN NIC GABHANN & CIARÁN Ó MAONAIGH: Through fiddle, concertina and dance, two acclaimed musicians breathe fire into traditional Irish tunes. Burlington Violin Shop, 6-8:30 p.m. $20. Info, 233-5293. SAMBATUCADA! OPEN REHEARSAL: Burlington’s samba street band welcomes new drummers. Neither experience nor instruments are required. 8 Space Studio Collective, Burlington, 6-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 862-5017.

politics

VERMONT LIBERTARIAN PARTY TOWN CAUCUS FOR COLCHESTER: Colchester voters who have not yet participated in a caucus this year convene to discuss local issues. Private residence, Colchester, 5-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, spencerdcsherman@gmail. com. VERMONT LIBERTARIAN PARTY TOWN CAUCUS FOR SOUTH BURLINGTON: South Burlington voters who have not yet participated in a caucus this year convene to discuss local issues. Shaw’s, Shelburne Road, South Burlington, 10-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, sophie.choueiri@gmail.com.

talks

ADAM BOYCE: The musician walks a mile in a historic troubadour’s shoes in “The Old Country Fiddler: Charles Ross Taggart, Vermont’s Traveling Entertainer.” Monkton Fire Station, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 482-2277.

YIN YOGA: See SAT.14, noon-1:15 p.m. $10.

AMY WLODARSKI: The film score from the 1955 documentary Night and Fog is at the center of “Musical Witness and Holocaust Representation.” Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168.

kids

BOOKS AND BEYOND! SCIENCE FOR PRESCHOOLERS: This program combines children’s literature and hands-on activities for scientific learning. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 10:15 & 11:30 a.m. Regular admission, $3-15. Info, 649-2200.

CRAFTERNOON: PUMPKINS: A themed activity motivates children ages 6 and up to create. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 849-2420.

4t-Now011316.indd 1

Find club dates in the music section.

VERMONT CENTER FOR INTEGRATIVE HERBALISM STUDENT HERBAL CLINIC: Third-year interns evaluate individual constitutions and health conditions. Burlington Herb Clinic, 4-8 p.m. $10-30; preregister. Info, info@vtherbcenter.org.

CHESS CLUB: Checkmate! Players make strategic moves and vie for the opposing king. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

sevendaysvt.com/enews

music

DOROTHY READS BOOK CLUB: Eager readers in fourth grade and above voice opinions about It Ain’t So Awful, Falafel by Firoozeh Dumas. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 745-1393.

1/12/16 5:05 PM

MIRIAM VINCENT: A lawyer demystifies the electoral college. Room 207, Bentley Hall, Johnson State College, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 635-1247. QUINCY WHITNEY: Listeners lean in for “Sound Posts and Sand Patterns: Fiddles Under the Knife.” 30 City Place, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 518-564-5279.

tech

TECH HELP WITH CLIF: See WED.11.

theater

‘GRANNY D: THE POWER OF ONE’: Dixie Tymitz portrays a legendary campaign finance reform activist in this one-woman play. Norwich Public Library, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 649-1184.

‘THE TELEPHONE’: A young man competes with a phone for his girlfriend’s attention in Gian Carlo Menotti’s comic opera staged by Viva La Musica VT. A recital of post-WWII popular music rounds out the evening. Seven Stars Arts Center, Sharon, 7-8:30 p.m. $15-20; free for kids 18 and under with a paid adult. Info, 763-2334.

words

MONDAY NIGHT POETRY WORKSHOP: Wordsmiths analyze creative works-in-progress penned by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104. MUST-READ MONDAYS: Lit lovers cover The Glass Castle by Jeanette Walls. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955. ‘NEW ENGLAND REVIEW’ VERMONT READING SERIES: Rob Hardy, April Ossmann, Jericho Parms and Lizzie Apple share original poetry and essays. Marquis Theatre & Southwest Café, Middlebury, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 443-5075.

TUE.17 activism

PEACE TEAM FOCUS GROUP: The Peace & Justice Center explores the idea of forming a collective of individuals to de-escalate conflict on Burlington streets. Peace & Justice Center, Burlington, 4-6 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 863-2345.

agriculture

REGIONAL FARM-TO-SCHOOL MEETING: Locavores gather to build connections with peers and farm-toschool practitioners. Refreshments are provided. The Loft, Rutland, 4-7 p.m. Free. Info, 861-4769.

art

Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section.

business

BUSINESS PLANNING: GETTING STARTED: Entrepreneurs prepare to take the plunge in a 10week course covering everything from funding to marketing. Rutland Region Chamber of Commerce Office, 6-9 p.m. Free for Rutland residents; preregister. Info, 391-4871. RUTLAND YOUNG PROFESSIONALS OCTOBER MIX: Area business people rub elbows amid appetizers, door prizes and a cash bar. The Draught Room, Rutland, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 773-9147.

comedy

COLIN RYAN: The standup comedian uses jokes to educate listeners on personal finance in his talk “Manage Your Money, Reach Your Dream.” Room 207, Bentley Hall, Johnson State College, 4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 635-1247.

community

FEAST TOGETHER OR FEAST TO GO: See FRI.13. TUESDAY VOLUNTEER NIGHTS: Helping hands pitch in around the shop by organizing parts, moving bikes and tackling other projects. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. Bike Recycle Vermont, Burlington, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 264-9687.

crafts

IN STITCHES: A CRAFTING CIRCLE OF FRIENDS: Friends toil away at knitting, crocheting and other types of projects. Grange Hall Cultural Center, Waterbury Center, 7-9 p.m. Donations. Info, 244-4168.

dance

BEGINNER WEST COAST SWING & FUSION DANCING: Pupils get schooled in the fundamentals of partner dance. North End Studio B, Burlington, 8-9 p.m. $11-16. Info, burlingtonwestie@gmail.com. BEGINNING LINDY HOP CLASS SERIES: Hoofers learn the foundation of the swing-dance style


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT developed in the 1920s and ’30s in weekly lessons. Drop-ins after the first week require instructor approval. Champlain Club, Burlington, 6:30-7:30 p.m. $10. Info, seetherhythm@yahoo.com. INTERMEDIATE & ADVANCED WEST COAST SWING: Fun-loving folks learn the smooth, sexy stylings of modern swing dance. North End Studio A, Burlington, 7-9 p.m. $11-16. Info, burlingtonwestie@gmail.com. SWING DANCING: Quick-footed participants experiment with different forms, including the Lindy hop, Charleston and balboa. Beginners are welcome. Champlain Club, Burlington, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $5. Info, 448-2930.

CENTRAL VERMONT ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION 40TH ANNUAL MEETING: Top businesses are recognized with an awards ceremony following a buffet dinner and a networking session. Capitol Plaza Hotel & Conference Center, Montpelier, 4:30-7:30 p.m. $35-260; preregister; cash bar. Info, 223-4654. DANCE, PAINT, WRITE: DROP-IN: Creative people end their day with an energetic meditation, music, movement, intuitive painting, free writing and destressing. Expressive Arts Burlington, 7-9 p.m. $15. Info, 343-8172.

film

BEGINNER/INTERMEDIATE SUN-STYLE TAI CHI, LONG-FORM: Improved mood, greater muscle strength and increased energy are a few of the benefits of this gentle exercise. South Burlington Recreation & Parks Department, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 735-5467. BRANDON FITNESS BOOT CAMP: Hop to it! Get fit with strength, endurance, agility and coordination exercises. Otter Valley North Campus Gym, Brandon, 5-6 p.m. $12. Info, 343-7160. DE-STRESS YOGA: A relaxing and challenging class lets healthy bodies unplug and unwind. Balance Yoga, Richmond, 5:45-7 p.m. $14. Info, 434-8401. DHARMA YOGA: Students at all levels are welcome to hit the mat. Railyard Yoga Studio, Burlington, 5:30-6:45 p.m. $14. Info, 318-6050. DROP-IN GENTLE HATHA YOGA: Folks bring their own mats for a mindful stretching session with Betty Molnar. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660. FELDENKRAIS AWARENESS THROUGH MOVEMENT: See FRI.13, Sacred Mountain Studio, Burlington, 9:30-10:30 a.m. $15; free for first-timers. Info, 735-3770.

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘EXTREME WEATHER 3D’: See WED.11. KNIGHTS OF THE MYSTIC MOVIE CLUB: Cinema hounds view campy features at this ode to offbeat productions. Main Street Museum, White River Junction, 8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 356-2776.

KUNDALINI YOGA: See FRI.13, Railyard Yoga Studio, Burlington, 7-8:15 p.m. $14. Info, 318-6050.

GH

16

|M

ON

N.

MIND-YOGA-NUTRITION TRAINING: Individuals in this unique yoga class apply mindfulness to their relationship with food. Kismet Place, A Williston, 6:45-8 p.m. $15. Info, M Ó N 448-5006. RÁ AI

MO

food & drink

US

IC

| CA

I TL Í

N NIC G A BH A N N & C

BUON APPETITO: ITALIAN WINE DINNER: Danilo Marcucci of Della Staffa pours a variety of vinos to be paired with mouthwatering morsels served family-style. Cork Wine Bar & Market, Stowe, 6:30-9:30 p.m. $55. Info, corkvt.katie@ gmail.com.

OLD NORTH END FARMERS MARKET: Locavores snatch up breads, juices, ethnic foods and more from neighborhood vendors. Dewey Park, Burlington, 3-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, oldnorthendfarmersmarket@gmail.com.

TIKI TUESDAYS: Imbibers sip tropical cocktails mixed with Stonecutter Spirits liquor and topped with tiny umbrellas. Hotel Vermont, Burlington, 4-11 p.m. Free. Info, sas@stonecutterspirits.com.

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.11, 7 p.m. SCAVENGER HUNT: See WED.11. TUESDAY NIGHT BINGO: Participants cover squares and dip into refreshments. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 6-9 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3322.

R.I.P.P.E.D.: See SAT.14, 6-7 p.m. STAYING FIT THROUGH FALL: Strength, agility, coordination and heart-healthy exercises are modified for folks of all ability levels. Charlotte Senior Center, 9:15-10 a.m. $10. Info, 343-7160. YOGA FOR AARP MEMBERS: A monthly stretching session is tailored to people ages 50 and up. Sangha Studio — Pine, Burlington, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free for AARP members. Info, 951-1301.

kids

CREATIVE TUESDAYS: Artists exercise their imaginations with recycled materials. Kids under 8 must be accompanied by an adult. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. FALL STORY TIME: A wide variety of seasonally inspired books jump-starts early-literacy skills. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. PRESCHOOL STORY HOUR: PUMPKINS & AUTUMN: Imaginations blossom when kids up to age 6 engage in themed tales and activities. Fairfax Community Library, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 849-2420. SEWING CLUB: Needle-and-thread neophytes stitch together new skills in a two-part, fallthemed project. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4:30 p.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, 849-2420. SPANISH MUSICAL KIDS: Amigos ages 1 through 5 learn Latin American songs and games with Constancia Gómez, a native Argentinean. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:45 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. TUE.17

3 1st A nnual Sheraton Hotel Burlington Sunday, January 21, 2018 Noon – 3 pm Proceeds benefit the VT/NY Multiple Myeloma Support Group

Email Paul at paulg@95triplex.com for more details.

CALENDAR 63

50/50 POWER/YIN YOGA: Physical therapist Kyle McGregor designed this class to address the needs of cyclists and those with a sedentary

POWER YOGA IN WILLISTON: See THU.12.

SEVEN DAYS

games

PEACEFUL WARRIOR KARATE: Martialarts training promotes healthy living for those in recovery. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150.

rgeted Engage with a ta audience at the...

10.11.17-10.18.17

TASTE OF ERITREA: CURRIED LENTILS (YEMISIR WAT) & SPICY BEEF STEW (KEY WAT): Mulu Tewelde guides home cooks in the preparation of popular African dishes. McClure Multigenerational Center, Burlington, 5:30-7:30 p.m. $5-10. Info, 861-9700.

IA

Interested in exhibiting at the longest-running bridal show in Vermont?

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

MINDFUL EATING WORKSHOP SERIES: Foodies digest techniques for bringing consciousness, control and peace to meal times. The Everything Space, Montpelier, 11 a.m.-noon. Donations. Info, 598-9206.

health & fitness

AWARENESS THROUGH MOVEMENT LESSON: From reducing pain to improving mobility, this physical practice reveals new ways to live with the body. Come with comfy clothes and an open mind. The Wellness Collective, Burlington, 5:30-6:30 p.m. $10. Info, 504-0846.

BEGINNERS TAI CHI CLASS: See THU.12.

etc.

‘WALKING WITH DINOSAURS: PREHISTORIC PLANET 3D’: See WED.11.

lifestyle. Kismet Place, Williston, 4-5 p.m. $12. Info, 343-5084.

» P.64 2V-95TripleX101117.indd 1

10/5/17 11:05 AM


calendar TUE.17

« P.63

STEAM TUESDAYS: Creative activities are based in science, technology, engineering, art and math. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. STORY TIME FOR BABIES & TODDLERS: Picture books, songs, rhymes and puppets arrest the attention of children and their caregivers. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9:10-9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. STORY TIME FOR PRESCHOOLERS: See WED.11. VEGETABLE CARVINGS: Pieces of produce are transformed into decorative shapes in an activity inspired by Saxton Freymann’s children’s books. Waterbury Public Library, 3-5 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 244-7036.

GOVERNOR’S GALLERY

language

of tennis, badminton and Ping-Pong. Cambridge Community Center, 7-9 p.m. $5. Info, 644-5028.

talks

HANK KAESTNER: Birding enthusiasts flock to “The Jewels of Ecuador,” a detailed account of the speaker’s avian adventures. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, gmas@greenmountainaudubon.org. PETER BURMEISTER: A psychotherapist shares his expertise in “Siegfried Must Die! C.G. Jung & the Shadow: An Exposition of Jung’s Relationship With His Patient, Colleague & Anima, Sabina Spielrein.” Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 6:30-8 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 223-3338. RICHARD BRANSON: The English business magnate offers his two cents via a live broadcast. Room 207, Bentley Hall, Johnson State College, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 635-1247.

tech

BUSINESS ENGLISH CLASS: Non-native speakers with intermediate-to-advanced proficiency broaden their vocabulary with industry jargon and idioms. Administrative Conference Room, Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 865-7211.

IPHONE: Participants who have iTunes accounts and know their passwords dial into their mobile phones’ features and apps. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 865-7217.

‘LA CAUSERIE’ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Native speakers and learners are welcome to pipe up at an unstructured conversational practice. El Gato Cantina, Burlington, 4:30-6 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0195. VERMONT SUPREME COURT GALLERY

Untitled-25 1

10/9/17 2:24 PM

CHECK OUT THE

words

BROWN BAG BOOK CLUB: Readers voice opinions about The Witches: Suspicion, Betrayal, and Hysteria in 1692 Salem by Stacy Schiff. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: TU E.17 AN | COM ITALIAN: Speakers hone their skills in EDY | COLIN RY CREATIVE NONFICTION WORKSHOP: Folks the Romance language over a bag lunch. give feedback on essays, poetry and journalism Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. written by Burlington Writers Workshop members. Free. Info, 223-3338. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Free; PAUSE-CAFÉ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Frenchpreregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, language fanatics meet pour parler la belle 383-8104. langue. Meet in the back room. ¡Duino! (Duende), Burlington, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 430-4652. SOCIAL GATHERING: Those who are deaf or hard of hearing or want to learn American Sign Language get together to break down communication barriers. The North Branch Café, Montpelier, 4-6 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 595-4001.

music

VEGAN VERSES: Vermont poet Tamra Higgins shares original stanzas after readings by openers Meghan Reynolds and Samuel Hughes. An open mic follows. Pingala Café, Burlington, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0110. WINE & STORY OPEN MIC: Prompts trigger first-person narratives told to a live audience. Shelburne Vineyard, 7:30 p.m. $5. Info, 863-1754.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Find club dates in the music section.

CONCERT SERIES WITH

AND THE KIDS

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

FEATURING

SUN PARADE AND PAPER CASTLES Thursday October 26 at ArtsRiot. $12 8 p.m. doors, 8:30 p.m. show Tickets: $12 | $15 Day of Show

OPEN JAM: Instrumentalists band together for a free-flowing musical hour. Borrow an instrument or bring your own. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 300.

Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section.

PINK MARTINI: SOLD OUT. It’s cocktail time! Attendees are transported by the ensemble’s retro-inspired blend of jazz, cabaret and lounge music. Spaulding Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 7 p.m. $10-60. Info, 603-646-2422.

INTRO TO QUICKBOOKS: Folks become familiar with the electronic accounting program. Brandon Town Hall, 10-11:30 a.m. & 6-7:30 p.m. $10; free for Brandon area Rutland Region Chamber of Commerce members; preregister. Info, bacceducationseries@gmail.com.

FOR A CHANCE TO WIN TICKETS + A FREE RIDE TO and FROM the show, download the GreenCab App and enter "KISSFM" in Leave Feedback Section

64 CALENDAR

WED.18

seminars

Buy tickets at artsriot.com

4T-GreatEasternRadio101117.indd 1

ABIGAIL STAUFFER: The yoga studio is transformed into an intimate listening room for a folk siren. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 7-9 p.m. $10. Info, 434-4563.

10/10/17 3:46 PM

SUPPORT YOUR BODY & HOME WITH ESSENTIAL OILS: Elixirs and tinctures remove toxins from the house and help boost the bod. Fletcher Room, Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, vermontessentialoilslifestyle@gmail.com.

sports

PICKUP PICKLEBALL: Beginners and seasoned players get their hands on paddles and plastic balls to play the game that combines elements

art

business

KELLEY MARKETING GROUP BREAKFAST MEETING: Professionals in marketing, advertising, communications and social media brainstorm ideas for nonprofit organizations. Room 217, Ireland Building, Champlain College, Burlington, 7:45-9 a.m. Free. Info, 864-4067. LEGAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR NEW BUSINESS OWNERS: A high-level overview of legal matters helps entrepreneurs avoid common mistakes. Center for Women & Enterprise, Burlington, 5:307:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 391-4870.

community

GREENER DRINKS: See WED.11.

crafts

KNITTING & MORE: TWO-NEEDLE MITTENS: See WED.11.

dance

DAUGHTERS OF CORN DANCE TROUPE: Eyecatching dresses complement Nicaraguan cultural routines set to marimba music. McCarthy Arts Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 654-2000.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

DROP-IN HIP-HOP DANCE: See WED.11.

YOGA FOR KIDS: See WED.11.

film

language

‘CALVET’: Shown as part of the Architecture + Design Film Series, this 2011 documentary focuses on artist Jean Marc Calvet and his quest for redemption. Burlington City Hall Auditorium, 6 p.m. Free. Info, adfilmseries@gmail.com.

GERMAN CONVERSATION GROUP: Community members practice conversing auf Deutsch. Local History Room, Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211.

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section.

‘EXTREME WEATHER 3D’: See WED.11. HUMP! FILM FESTIVAL: Myriad body sizes, shapes, ages, genders and fetishes appear on the silver screen in 22 short pornographic films shown two nights in a row. Merrill’s Roxy Cinema, Burlington, 7:15 & 9:15 p.m. $20-25. Info, info@humptour.com. MOVIE NIGHT: Film buffs point their eyes to the screen for a popular picture. Call for title. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581. TOURNÉES FRENCH FILM FESTIVAL: Shown with English subtitles, Examen d’état follows a group of Congolese high school students as they prepare for a high-stakes exam. Room 111, Cheray Science Hall, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, lclerfeuille@smcvt.edu. ‘WALKING WITH DINOSAURS: PREHISTORIC PLANET 3D’: See WED.11.

food & drink

BURGER & BEER: See WED.11. COMMUNITY SUPPER: See WED.11. VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: See WED.11.

games

BEGINNER ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASS: See WED.11.

INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: See WED.11. INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASS: See WED.11. LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: SPANISH: See WED.11.

music

Find club dates in the music section. DÉTOURNEMENT MAJEUR: André Marchand, Pete Sutherland and Jean Francois Belanger hit all the right notes in traditional Québécois numbers. Burlington Violin Shop, 7-9:30 p.m. $20; preregister. Info, 989-2303. NORTHERN VERMONT SONGWRITERS: Melody makers meet to share ideas and maximize their creativity. Call for details. Catamount Outback Artspace, St. Johnsbury, 6:45 p.m. Free. Info, 467-9859. SONG CIRCLE: Singers and musicians congregate for an acoustic session of popular folk tunes. Godnick Adult Center, Rutland, 7:15-9:15 p.m. Donations. Info, 775-1182.

sports

WEDNESDAY WOMEN’S BASKETBALL: See WED.11.

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.11.

WOMEN’S PICKUP BASKETBALL: See WED.11.

CHESS CLUB: Strategy comes into play as competitors try to capture opposing game pieces. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

talks

SCAVENGER HUNT: See WED.11.

health & fitness BUTI YOGA: See WED.11.

GENTLE YOGA IN WATERBURY: See WED.11. GINGER’S EXTREME BOOT CAMP: See WED.11.

KETTLEBELL & CORE: See WED.11. NIA WITH LINDA: See WED.11. PREMA AGNI & MINI RISING STAR HEALINGS: See WED.11. RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: See WED.11. RESILIENCE FLOW FOR THOSE AFFECTED BY TBI: See WED.11. SUNRISE YOGA: See WED.11. UPBEAT YOGA: See WED.11. ZUMBA EXPRESS: See WED.11.

kids

HERBALISM CLASS SERIES FOR TEENS: See WED.11.

PREMA AGNI: A HEART-OPENING EXPERIENCE FOR KIDS: See WED.11. READ TO DAISY: See WED.11.

STORY TIME: See WED.11. STORY TIME & PLAYGROUP: See WED.11. STORY TIME FOR PRESCHOOLERS: See WED.11. WEDNESDAY STORY TIME: See WED.11.

SARAH ROOKER: The Norwich Historical Society director delves into her ongoing research in “Mad for Mid-Century Modern: A New Architectural Style Comes to Norwich.” See calendar spotlight. Norwich Public Library, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 649-0124.

tech

INTRODUCTION TO HTML5 & CSS3: See WED.11. TECH HELP WITH CLIF: See WED.11.

theater

‘FUN HOME’: See WED.11. ‘ROBERT FROST: THIS VERSE BUSINESS’: See FRI.13, 10 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.

words

COMMUNITY BOOK DISCUSSION: Bibliophiles read into Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson. Waterbury Public Library, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 244-7036. CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP: See WED.11. LIFE AS POETRY, POETRY AS LIFE: Wordsmiths Sarah W. Bartlett and Anne Averyt read from and discuss their new collections celebrating the resiliency of the human spirit. Deborah Rawson Memorial Library, Jericho, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 899-4962. VT READS: Community members mingle at a multigenerational potluck and book discussion. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955. !

THURS., OCT 12 ARTSRIOT, BURLINGTON

THIS WE E K

Session Americana THURS., OCT 12 ZENBARN, WATERBURY CENTER

THIS WE E K

HG Skis Presents: Eat the Guts

Paint and Sips (w/ four mead samples) SAT., OCT 14 THE COLCHESTER MEAD HALL

Burlington Tree Tours

THIS WE E K

SUN., OCT 15 THE MOUNTED CAT PATIO (OUTSIDE OF HILTON BURLINGTON)

FRI., OCT 13 ARTSRIOT, BURLINGTON

Melvin Seals & JGB

THIS WE E K

Innovation Week 2017

WED/THURS., OCT 18 & 19 ARTSRIOT, BURLINGTON

OCT 13-21 VARIOUS LOCATIONS

SELLING TICKETS?

WE CAN HELP!

• • • • •

• No cost to you • Local support

Fundraisers Festivals Plays Sports Concerts

• Built-in promotion • Custom options

MADIE AHRENS 865-1020 ext. 10 tickets@sevendaysvt.com

CALENDAR 65

SCIENCE & STORIES: BATS: Animal lovers learn about these endangered creatures of the night. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Regular admission, $11.50-14.50; free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 877-324-6386.

JOHN ELDER: “Stay together,/learn the flowers,/go light: Reflections on Community and Sustainability” resonates with listeners. Ira Allen Chapel, University of Vermont, Burlington, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 656-3196.

WRUV’s Rocktober with Weaves

THIS WE E K

SEVEN DAYS

‘THE MONEY TREE’: A play for youth introduces the concept of financial literacy. Lebanon Opera House, N.H., 10 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. $4-10; free for evening performance; preregister. Info, 603-448-0400.

DEBORAH LUSKIN: In “1964: A Watershed Year in Vermont’s Political (and Cultural) History,” the writer navigates a shift in the state’s politics. Vermont History Center, Barre, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 828-2180.

THIS WE E K

10.11.17-10.18.17

WEDNESDAY GUIDED MEDITATION: See WED.11.

CURRENT EVENTS CONVERSATION: Newsworthy subjects take the spotlight in this informal and open discussion. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 878-4918.

EVENTS ON ON SALE SALE NOW! NOW EVENTS

SEVENDAYSTICKETS.COM 3v-tickets101117.indd 1

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

HERBS & JOINT HEALTH: Colleen Cronin outlines the role of herbs in an integrative approach to joint health. Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism, Montpelier, 6-8 p.m. $10-12. Info, 224-7100.

A GREAT EVENT FOR A GREAT CAUSE

10/10/17 4:23 PM


CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES

classes

craft

THE FOLLOWING CLASS LISTINGS ARE PAID ADVERTISEMENTS. ANNOUNCE YOUR CLASS FOR AS LITTLE AS $13.75/WEEK (INCLUDES SIX PHOTOS AND UNLIMITED DESCRIPTION ONLINE). SUBMIT YOUR CLASS AD AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTCLASS. theshelburnecraftschool.org

art ART & POTTERY IN MIDDLEBURY: Adult: Wed. evening: Mixed Level Wheel. Mon. evening: Raku Pottery. Thu. evening: Mixed Media/Pastels. Mon. evening: Chinese Landscape Painting. Mon. evening & Thu. morning: Oil Painting. Wed. morning: Oil/Pastel Painting. Thu.: Night Drawing. Fri. afternoon: Playful Painting w/ Ink & Watercolors Workshop. Kids: After-School Clay Hand Building & Wheel, Art Around the World, Holiday Gifts. Location: Middlebury Studio School, 2377 Route 7, Middlebury. Info: Barbara Nelson, 247-3702, ewaldewald@aol.com, middleburystudioschool.org.

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

FALL WATERCOLOR WORKSHOP: This workshop will focus on painting the vibrant colors of the fall landscape as well as creating light and shadow. Instructor Robert O’Brien. Sat., Oct. 14, 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost: $110/person; $85/ members. Location: Helen Day Art Center, 90 Pond St., Stowe. Info: 253-8358, education@ helenday.com, helenday.com. STORYTELLING FOR SOCIAL CHANGE: This workshop explores the ethics and techniques of oral history and storytelling as activist research methodologies. Focus on listening skills while considering the challenges, possibilities and ethics of representing experiences through media. Includes discussion of participants’ project ideas. Intended for anyone interested in developing collaborative documentary or storytelling skills. Fri., Oct. 13, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost: $95/6-hour class. Location: Vermont Folklife Center, 88 Main St., Middlebury. Info: Bob Hooker, 388-4964, info@vermontfolklifecenter.org, vermontfolklifecenter.org.

66 CLASSES

SEVEN DAYS

ayurveda AYURVEDA INTEGRATION PROGRAM: This 200-hour training is ideal for yoga teachers, counselors, therapists, body-workers, nurses, doctors, wellness coaches, herbalists and anyone wanting to improve their own health and the health of their family. We will focus on integrating Ayurveda as lifestyle medicine for chronic disease, longevity and prevention. Kripalu School of Ayurveda approved, continue your education to become an Ayurvedic health counselor by transferring these

hours to the Kripalu program. See our website for more details. One weekend (Sat. & Sun.) per month, Feb.-Nov., 2018, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. 200-hour training (payment plan avail.). Location: Ayurvedic Center of Vermont, Williston. Info: 872-8898, ayurvedavt@comcast.net, ayurvedavermont.com.

AYURVEDIC HOME FACIALS: This class includes a basic introduction to Ayurveda and the benefits of treating your skin with plant-based formulas. We’ll conduct a face and neck massage and make our own face masks based on individual constitution. Leave feeling radiant and beautiful! Mon., Oct. 16, 7-8:30 p.m. Cost: $35. Location: The Ayurvedic Center of Vermont , Williston. Info: 8728898, ayurvedavt@comcast.net, ayurvedavermont.com.

computers COMPUTER WORKSHOPS AT THE LIBRARY: Learn a new technology skill at the Fletcher Free Library. We are offering workshops in Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Additional workshops cover Intro to Computers, Facebook, iPhones, Google Drive and a 4-part workshop in HTML5/CSS3. Our workshops are designed for beginning and intermediate users in a supportive setting. Sat., 10:30 a.m.; Tue. & Wed., 5:30 p.m. 1.5-hour workshops. Location: Fletcher Free Library, 235 College St., Burlington. Info: Robert Coleburn, 865-7218, rcoleburn@burlingtonvt.gov, fletcherfree.org/ComputerCenter. htm#computerworkshops.

985-3648

ADULT: DRAWING FOUNDATIONS: Instructor: Misoo Filan. Learn the fundamental skills of observational drawing. Explore the technical and conceptual foundation of drawing using a variety of drawing materials such as graphite, charcoal, pen and ink. Develop personal goals while examining creative concepts through demonstrations. Materials not included. Mon., Nov. 6-Dec. 18, 10 a.m.-noon. Cost: $217/ person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org. ADULT: DRAWING LEVEL 2: Instructor: Clark Derbes. Explore the foundation of drawing. Learn to depict objects, people, space and emotion. Using mediums such as graphite, charcoal, conte and ink, students will develop and expand drawing skills through demonstrations and one-on-one instruction. Instructor will also tailor classes based on student interest. Materials not included. Tue., Nov. 7-Dec. 19, 6 -8 p.m. Cost: $227/ person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org. ADULT: MIXED-LEVEL WHEEL: Instructor: Rik Rolla. Further develop the fundamentals of wheel-throwing. Explore techniques through demonstrations and hands-on assistance. You set the pace and gain experience through guided individualized practice. Gas reduction kiln and electric oxidation kiln are available for firing, including an option to explore other firing methods. Wed., Nov. 8-Dec. 20, 6-8 p.m.; no class July 5. Cost: $300/person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org. ADULT: PAINTING PRACTICE: Instructor: Neil Berger. Together we will explore painting as performance: a series of gestures more like a dance than a marathon. We will look at pictures as holistic arrangements of shapes and colors instead of “subject matter” and learn to trust the intimate, awkward and natural encounter with paint. Tue., Nov.

7-Dec. 19, 10 a.m.-noon. Cost: $227/person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org. WORKSHOP: STAINED GLASS: Instructor: Chris Jeffrey. For beginners and those who would like to brush up on their skills. Students will make two small panels and learn how to cut glass and how to put together and solder their panels using the copper-foil technique of stainedglass assembly. Sat. & Sun., Nov. 4 & 5, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Cost: $272/ person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

dance DANCE STUDIO SALSALINA: Salsa classes, nightclub-style, group and private, four levels. Beginner walk-in classes, Wed., 6 p.m. $15/person for one-hour class. No dance experience, partner or preregistration required, just the desire to have fun! Drop in any time and prepare for an enjoyable workout. Location: 266 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Victoria, 598-1077, info@salsalina.com, DSANTOS VT SALSA: Experience the fun and excitement of Burlington’s eclectic dance community by learning salsa. Trained by world famous dancer Manuel Dos Santos, we teach you how to dance to the music and how to have a great time on the dance floor! There is no better time to start than now! Mon. evenings: beginner class, 7-8 p.m.; intermediate, 8:15-9:15 p.m. Cost: $12/1-hour class. Location: North End Studios, 294 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: Jon Bacon, 355-1818, crandalltyler@hotmail. com, dsantosvt.com. LEARN TO DANCE W/ A PARTNER!: Come alone or come with friends, but come out and learn to dance! Beginning classes repeat each month, but intermediate classes vary from month to month. As with all of our programs, everyone is encouraged to attend, and no partner is necessary. Private lessons also available. Cost: $50/4week class. Location: Champlain Club, 20 Crowley St., Burlington. Info: First Step Dance, 598-6757, kevin@firststepdance.com, firststepdance.com.

design/build TINY-HOUSE WORKSHOP: A crew of beginners will help instructor Peter King frame and sheath a 16-foot x 26-foot tiny house in Shelburne Oct. 14-15. Plenty of hands-on experience. Tools provided; safety glasses required. On-site camping avail. Oct. 14-15. Cost: $250/workshop. Info: Peter King, 933-6103, vermonttinyhouses.com.

drumming

hypnosis

DJEMBE & TAIKO: Classes in Burlington, Hyde Park and Montpelier. Drums provided. Classes for adults (also for kids with parents) Mon., Tue. & Wed. in Burlington. Wed. a.m. or Friday a.m. in Hyde Park. Thu. in Montpelier. Most classes are in the evenings or after school. Conga classes, too! Visit our schedule and register online. Location: Taiko Space, 208 Flynn Ave., Suite 3G, Burlington; Capital City Grange, 6612 Rte. 12, Berlin; Moonlight Studios, 1670 Cleveland Corners Rd., Hyde Park. Info: 999-4255, burlingtontaiko.org.

TEEN & ADULT ADHD AND CLINICAL HYPNOSIS: RESEARCH & APPLICATIONS WORKSHOP PRESENTED BY MAUREEN TURNER, MED, LCMHC, RNBC, LCSW: A Burlington-based psychotherapist/hypnotherapist specializing in ADHD and comorbids: addictions, anxiety, depression, OCD, ODD, & PTSD. Hypnosis training helpful but not required. Eligible: educators, licensed health and mental health clinicians and graduate students of same disciplines. Sponsored by Northeastern Mountain Society of Clinical Hypnosis. 6.5 CEUs pending for LCMHC, psychologist & social workers. Fri., Oct. 20, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Location: Holiday Inn-Burlington, 1068 Williston Rd., South Burlington. Info: 3388040, NMSCH.org.

empowerment ALLIANCE OF THE WILLING: CITIZEN ENGAGEMENT FOR CIVIC HYGIENE, A THREE-PART COURSE: Part III: Effective Agents of Change: Lessons from History. This course provides examples of several key change agents in recent history, illustrating how the principles involved in effective change get lived out in practical reality toward fostering civic hygiene. Included are discussions of some of the significant documents in the social transformation movement. Led by Sue Mehrtens. Wed., Oct. 25, Nov. 1, 8 & 15; 7-9 p.m. Cost: $60/person. Location: Jungian Center for the Spiritual Sciences, 55 Clover Ln., Waterbury. Info: Sue, 244-7909,

TWO CLINICAL HYPNOSIS WORKSHOPS: BASIC FUNDAMENTALS OF CLINICAL HYPNOSIS AND INTERMEDIATE SKILLS & APPLICATIONS OF CLINICAL HYPNOSIS: Eligible: licensed health and mental health clinicians and graduate students of same disciplines. CEUs (pending): LCMHC’s, nurses, psychologists, social workers. American Society of Clinical Hypnosis (ASCH) approved. Sponsored by Northeastern Society for Clinical Hypmosis (nmsch.org). Nov. 10-12, 9:15 a.m.-5 p.m. Location: Jackson Gore Inn, Okemo Mtn., Ludlow. Info: 338-8040, hypnovations.com.

language LEARN SPANISH & OPEN NEW DOORS: Connect with a new world. We provide high-quality, affordable instruction in the Spanish language for adults, students and children. Travelers lesson package. Our 11th year. Personal instruction from a native speaker. Small classes, private lessons and online instruction. See our website for complete information, or contact us for details. Location: Spanish in Waterbury Center, Waterbury Center. Info: 585-1025, spanishparavos@gmail.com, spanishwaterburycenter.com.

family PARENTING YOU WORKSHOPS: Does your child push your buttons? Are you parenting defensively? Parents, you are definitely not alone! Discover the secrets to empowered parenting. Hint: It’s not about your child. Children benefit by how well parents know and take care of themselves. Kimberly Hackett, MA, LMHC is a parent coach, educator and writer who has developed a new model of parenting focused on parent leadership and personal growth. Space is limited. Oct. 21, 9 a.m.-noon, Montpelier; Nov. 18, 9 a.m.-noon, Burlington. Cost: $25/person. Info: KimberlyHacket.com.

SPANISH CLASSES: Learn the basics of Spanish from pronunciation, basic vocabulary and situations. Beginners, intermediate, AP Spanish, Spanish conversation and Spanish literature. We speak and practice Spanish in class, and you learn quickly. We are experienced native Spanish teachers and we make learning fun. Fall classes begin Thu., Oct. 19. Williston. Info: Constancia Gomez, 917-1776, constanciag@ gmail.com.

MARTIAL ARTS

» P.68


Live show takes place in December. To participate you must try out in front of a panel of

SEVEN DAYS

Auditions held Saturday, November 11, noon-3 p.m. on the Higher Ground stage.

SPONSORED BY:

10.11.17-10.18.17

CASTING CALL!

VERMONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RISING STARS

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

2 017 T A L E N T S H O W F O R

judges. Visit kidsvt.com/talentshow to register your act.

67


CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES

classes LANGUAGE

« P.66

martial arts

MARTIAL WAY: Colchester and Milton locations. Classes in selfdefense, karate, kung fu, jiu jitsu and tai chi. We have 14 different age and experience levels, so the training is always age- and skillappropriate. Beginner or experienced, fit or not yet, young or not anymore, we have a class for you! Days and evenings; see website for schedule and fees. Location: Martial Way Self Defense Center, 73 Prim Rd., Colchester, Colchester. Info: David Quinlan, 893-8893, info@martialwayvt. com, martialwayvt.com. VERMONT BRAZILIAN JIUJITSU: Brazilian jiujitsu is a martial arts combat style based entirely on leverage and technique. Brazilian jiujitsu self-defense curriculum is taught

truth and find answers to our questions. Have you had a significant dream or an out-of-body experience? In this open forum for sharing spiritual experiences, try a spiritual exercise for your next step in healing the mind, body and heart. Mon,, Oct, 16, 7-8:30pm. 1.5-hour workshop. Location: Eckankar Center, 95 College St., Burlington. Info: 800-772-9390, eck-vermont@ gmail.com, eckankar-vt.org.

tai chi BEGINNER TAI CHI IN BURLINGTON: At Long River Tai Chi Circle, we practice Cheng Man-ch’ing’s “simplified” 37 posture Yang-style form. The three pillars of our study are Form, Sensing Hands and Sword. Patrick is a senior instructor at Long River in Vermont and New Hampshire and will be teaching the classes in Burlington. Starts Oct. 4, 8-9 a.m. Open registration through Oct. 25. Cost: $65/ mo. Location: North End Studios, 294 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: Long River Tai Chi Circle, Patrick Cavanaugh, 490-6405, patrick@longrivertaichi.org, longrivertaichi.org.

meditation LEARN TO MEDITATE: Through the practice of sitting still and following your breath as it goes out and dissolves, you are connecting with your heart. By simply letting yourself be, as you are, you develop genuine sympathy toward yourself. The Burlington Shambhala Center offers meditation as a path to discovering gentleness and wisdom. Shambhala Cafe (meditation and discussions) meets the first Saturday of each month, 9 a.m.-noon. An open house (intro to the center, short dharma talk and socializing) is held on the third Sunday of each month, noon-2 p.m. Instruction: Sun. mornings, 9 a.m.-noon, or by appt. Sessions: Tue. & Thu., noon-1 p.m., & Mon.-Thu., 6-7 p.m. Location: Burlington Shambhala Center, 187 S. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 658-6795, burlingtonshambhalactr.org.

SNAKE-STYLE TAI CHI CHUAN: The Yang Snake Style is a dynamic tai chi method that mobilizes the spine while stretching and strengthening the core body muscles. Practicing this ancient martial art increases strength, flexibility, vitality, peace of mind and martial skill. Beginner classes Sat. mornings & Wed. evenings. Call to view a class. Location: Bao Tak Fai Tai Chi Institute, 100 Church St., Burlington. Info: 864-7902, ipfamilytaichi.org.

well-being

spirituality ECKANKAR: DREAMS & SOUL TRAVEL: Dreams and Soul Travel offer a way to connect with inner

WELLNESS RETREAT WITH CES!: Earn CEs from George Russell, Cynthia Wood, Annie Powell and Dale Montelione Grust during a November weekend getaway! Topics include scoliosis, orthobionomy, hip and knee pain, dermatology, and therapeutic anti-aging face and neck treatments. Join us for a fun,

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ACHIEVE YOUR POTENTIAL: Come to Wu Xing Chinese Martial Arts. Join other thoughtful, intelligent adults to learn and practice tai chi, kung fu, meditation and dynamic physical exercises. Maximize your mental tranquility and clarity, physical health and fitness, and self-confidence. For people who never thought this would be for them. Fri., 6-7 p.m. & 7-8 p.m.; Sat., 11 a.m.noon & noon-1 p.m.; Tue., 6-7:30 p.m. Cost: $12/1-hour class; $40/ mo. (incl. all classes offered); $5/ trial class. Location: 303 Flynn Ave., Burlington. Info: 355-1301, info@wxcma.com, wxcma.com.

to Navy SEALs, CIA, FBI, military police and special forces. No training experience required. Easy-to-learn techniques that could save your life! Classes for men, women and children. Students will learn realistic bully-proofing and self-defense life skills to avoid them becoming victims and help them feel safe and secure. Our sole purpose is to help empower people by giving them realistic martial arts training practices they can carry with them throughout life. IBJJF & CBJJ certified black belt sixth-degree Instructor under Carlson Gracie Sr.: teaching in Vermont, born and raised in Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. A five-time Brazilian National Champion; International World Masters Champion and IBJJF World Masters Champion. Accept no Iimitations! Location: Vermont Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, 55 Leroy Rd., Williston. Info: 598-2839, julio@ bjjusa.com, vermontbjj.com.

YOGA & RECOVERY GROUP FOR FOLKS LIVING W/ LYME DISEASE: Join as we practice gentle restorative poses suitable for all levels. Afterward, join the discussion as we share and support one another on the often confusing and isolating journey to wellness while living with lyme disease. Wear comfortable clothing. Sign up or find more information at Laughingriveryoga.com. Oct. 29, Nov. 19, Dec. 17, 2-3:30 p.m. By donation. Location: Laughing River Yoga, The Chase Mill, 1 Mill St., Burlington.

yoga BALANCE YOGA CLASSES/ WORKSHOPS: Offering a variety of yoga classes & wellness workshops to meet individual needs for beginners to experienced yogis seeking to deepen their practice. Our welcoming community offers support to experience and explore yoga, meditation, sound therapy and bodywork. First class free for Vermonters. See website to schedule private/ group sessions. See website for daily class information. Cost: $15/drop-in class; $130/10-class

card; $70/5-class card; $120/ monthly unlimited; workshop costs vary. Location: Balance Yoga, 840 W. Main St., Richmond. Info: 434-8401, balanceyogavt@ gmail.com, balanceyogavt.com. EVOLUTION YOGA: Evolution Yoga and Physical Therapy offers yoga classes for everyone from beginner to expert. Choose from a wide variety of drop-in classes, series and workshops in Vinyasa, Kripalu, Core, Gentle, Vigorous, Yoga on the Lake, Yoga Wall, Therapeutics, and Alignment. Become part of our yoga community. You are welcome here. Cost: $15/class; $140/10-class card; $5-10/community classes. Location: Evolution Yoga, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington. Info: 8649642, evolutionvt.com. HONEST YOGA: Honest yoga offers practices for all levels. We just expanded to have two practice spaces! Your children can practice in one room while you practice in the other. No need for childcare. Yoga and dance classes ages 3 and up. Brand-new beginners’ course: This includes two specialty classes per week for four weeks plus unlimited access to all classes. We have daily heated and alignment classes kids classes in yoga and dance. We hold yoga teacher trainings at the 200- and 500-hour levels, as well as children and dance teacher training courses. Check our our website for dance classes and yoga summer camps! Daily classes & workshops. $50/new student (1 month unlimited); $18/class; $140/10-class card; $15/class for student or senior; or $110/10-class punch card; $135/mo. adult memberships; $99/mo. kid memberships. Location: Honest Yoga Center, 150 Dorset St., Blue Mall, next to Hana, South Burlington. Info: 497-0136, honestyogastudio@ gmail.com, honestyogacenter. com. SANGHA STUDIO | NONPROFIT, DONATION-BASED YOGA: Sangha Studio builds an empowered community through the shared practice of yoga. Free yoga service initiatives and outreach programs are offered at 17 local

organizations working with all ages. Join Sangha in both downtown Burlington and the Old North End for one of their roughly 60 weekly classes and workshops. Become a Sustaining Member for $60/month and practice as often as you like! Daily. Location: Sangha Studio, 120 Pine St. and 237 North Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 448-4262, Info@ sanghastudio.org, SOBER YOGIS: Are you looking for support on your path through sobriety? Join others in a safe environment to develop supports in your life to keep you on track toward your goals. Sober Yogis is designed to support your yoga practice and enhance your recovery. Participants of all ages and levels of fitness in sobriety may participate. Mindfulness practices continue to gain notoriety for their ability to assist individuals in recovery with retaining sobriety. Participants take yoga class five days and attend one group therapy session per week. Those who complete this over eight weeks will receive a month of unlimited yoga. The teaching staff will guide you through the practice with care and accuracy. Sober Yogis offers rolling admissions. Watch Ted Talk “On the Mat to Recovery” by Sara Curry. Cost: $200/8-weeks. Location: Queen City Bikram Yoga, 40 San Remo Dr., South Burlington. Info: 489-5649, info@queencitybikramyoga.com, queencitybikramyoga.com.

You Can Manage Your Anger!

SEVEN DAYS 68 CLASSES

soothing, relaxing and educational weekend with discounted rates! Register at http://bit. ly/2qlmbGh. Nov. 11-12. 4-16 CEs avail. ($100-$350). Location: Lake Morey Resort, 1 Clubhouse Rd., Fairlee. Info: 552-0217, education@amta-vermont.org, amta-vermont.org.

Custom wood paddleboards as unique as you Build your own paddleboard in five 4-hour sessions. Classes starting at $1200

Dr. Dwight Norwood, PhD, LICSW National Anger Management Association

• Evidence-based • Court approved 802-234-1232 • www.DwightNorwood.com One Kennedy Drive, S. Burlington, VT 05403

180 FLYNN AVENUE • 802.999.3075 • TAOWOODWORKING.COM 8h-taowoodworking092017.indd 1

9/18/17 10:44 AM

8h-dr.dwightnorwood083017.indd 1

8/28/17 6:19 PM


PRESENTS

Men’s Health + Cancer 3R D A N N U A L C O N F E R E N C E

Friday, November 3, 2017 7:30 am – 12:00 pm •••

A FREE COMMUNITY EVENT

UVM Campus: Davis Center Burlington, Vermont

Please join us for a half-day event focused on education about MEN’S HEALTH AND CANCER. Sessions will include information about nutrition and cancer prevention, screening, treatment, survivorship, and more. Pre-registration is available until October 30th. Visit www.VermontCancer.org or call (802) 656-2176. facebook.com/UVMCancerCenter

@UVMCancerCenter

Untitled-10 1

10/9/17 11:31 AM

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

PRESENTS: SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Jam On It!

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. NO COVER. CASH BAR.

Grab a snack, throw back some craft brews, try virtual reality gear, listen to jams from DJ Disco Phantom and find out what everyone’s up to. Level up with some real XP!

SEVEN DAYS

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 5-7 P.M. CHAMPLAIN VALLEY EXPO NORTH

10.11.17-10.18.17

Party with tech titans, industry pros and newbie coders… IRL.

techjamvt.com 69

2h-afterhours-tj17.indd 1

10/3/17 5:20 PM


music

Twist’s Laura Hermiston

XX Factor COURTESY OF JUNE LEE

Twist’s Laura Hermiston considers her songwriting voice, music videos and band cohesion

70 MUSIC

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

BY JORD A N ADAMS

I

n September, the New York Times published a series of pieces — including a roundtable discussion, an interactive multimedia feature and an episode of its pop-music podcast, Popcast — asserting that women and nonbinary musicians are making the best and most relevant music in rock today. The interrelated pieces feature conversations with Sadie Dupuis (Speedy Ortiz), Christina Halladay (Sheer Mag), Alex Luciano (Diet Cig), Laetitia Tamko (Vagabon), Victoria Ruiz (Downtown Boys) and many others who seem to be at the forefront of a cultural shift in guitar-centric rock. Though not included in the New York Times series, Toronto’s Twist, led by singer-songwriter, guitarist and front woman Laura Hermiston, would have fit the bill to a tee. Signed to the boutique label Buzz Records — alongside fellow female-fronted acts including Weaves, Dilly Dally and PONY — Twist are a perfect example of cutting-edge, guitar-driven music that rises from a feminine point of view, as opposed to XY insouciance. Twist blend grunge, garage and punk rock with a light sprinkle of electronic elements. Hermiston, 28, transitioned into her current project after fronting a more traditional rock band called the BB Guns in the late aughts. While working in that band, she met Brian Borcherdt of Canadian electro-rock band Holy Fuck; he lent his production skills to material that would become the earliest of Twist’s catalog.

Now in the middle of a prolific hot streak, Twist are set to release their sophomore LP sometime in 2018. Their 2016 debut, Spectral, is a collection of material recorded over several years. More recently, they dropped a foursong EP called Benefits. Twist are currently touring in support of that EP, including a local stop on Friday, October 13, at the Karma Bird House Upper Roost in Burlington. Not only multitalented, Hermiston is also a multitasker. Seven Days caught up with her by phone as she was driving her band from Toronto to Detroit.

THE EARLIER STUFF WAS MORE ABOUT

BEING YOUNG AND CONFUSED. L AUR A HE R MISTO N

SEVEN DAYS: How do you think Benefits bridges the gap between Spectral and your forthcoming LP? LAURA HERMISTON: We definitely found ourselves as a band. A few songs [on Benefits] were older. They were written and recorded around the time Spectral was finishing up. “Going Home” and “Leave This Town” were recorded around March [2017] when we got back from tour. So we combined them into this EP. I think it bridges the gap between our lo-fi sound, and … we’re obviously growing as a band and getting better at writing songs.

SD: I really like the song “Where to Lie.” I feel like it stands out — not just because it’s the last track on Spectral, but also because it has no percussion. What can you tell me about the choices you made with that song? LH: That [song] is 4 years old. I don’t know. We never play it. I just recorded the guitar and vocal and decided to just leave it as is. It’s definitely very, very old and not representative of what we sound like. But I do like that song a lot. And yes, it probably stands out because there’s no percussion. Or bass. SD: I think it also stands out because it’s one of your music videos — which I love. I think your director, Brittany Lucas, is kind of a visionary. LH: That’s so nice! SD: What’s your working relationship like? LH: I’m very lucky. She’s really talented and comes up with really good concepts. And she’s really good at figuring out how to pull them off with, you know, different budgets. Usually small budgets. I usually send her lyrics, and she’ll come up with a concept. She knows what I like, and our aesthetics complement each other. We just put out a video for a song called “Freak” from the new EP this week. XX FACTOR

» P.76


GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Half Awake

S

s e t i b UND

sic sceD AnMeS u m l a c e lo B Y J O R D A N A ws on th ie v d n a News

SAT 10.14

The California Honeydrops

THU 10.12

Joshua Davis

SAT 10.14

The Districts

MON 10.16

Kevin Statesir’s Industry Night ft. The Hydes

The Steady 45’s

Pine Barons

!

FR E E

WED 10.18

Boogie T Jasher

THU 10.19 Lotus & FRI The Main Squeeze 10.20

Half Lounge

» P.73

Noam Pikelny

SAT 10.21

lespecial

SUN 10.22

Kris Delmhorst, Jeffrey Foucault

TUE 10.24

Baauer, What So Not

Electric Love Machine

JUST ANNOUNCED: 10.26 12.29 1.18 3.01

Into The Great Wide Open: A Tom Petty Tribute Cabinet Andrea Gibson Big Wild

1214 Williston Road, South Burlington 802-652-0777 @higherground @highergroundmusic

4V-HG101117.indd 1

MUSIC 71

SOUNDBITES

FRI 10.20

w/ Autograf, Ayokay

SEVEN DAYS

“We had to take out a wall,” Sackheim explained. Apparently, in order to swap the old one with the new, Sackheim and company had to perform some light structural surgery. But if that’s the case, how the eff did they get the original fridge in there in the first place? “We think they built the wall around the old fridge after they installed it,” the co-owner said. He and his associates spent Sunday morning sawing, hauling and sweeping up sawdust. Half Lounge will continue to serve as an art gallery. Local digital artist JAMES MERRILL is the first to have work hung on the freshly painted walls.

Gryffin

10.11.17-10.18.17

who among us never tripped on or almost completely yanked off one of those excessively long tablecloths at the old Half Lounge?) Speaking of the delayed opening, Sackheim chuckled at his original goal of getting the place up and running by August. Though everything seemed fine and dandy in the front of house, he mentioned a mini-crisis that unfolded behind the scenes just hours before opening. The house refrigerator, which was handed down from the previous owners, conked out earlier in the weekend. This wouldn’t have been too much of a setback under normal circumstances. But removing the fridge from the kitchen proved more difficult than expected.

THU 10.19

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

COURTESY OF HALF LOUNGE

I’m sure I’m not the only person who’s been sitting around for the last few months, sighing deeply and casting my glance in a far-off direction, wondering what the hell is happening with Half Lounge. If you recall, the compact Church Street cocktail bar and live music venue shut down in March after serving Burlington’s nightlife scene for more than a decade. Only two months later, SideBar talent buyer ADRIAN SACKHEIM, along with Mr. Mikes Pizza/ SideBar proprietors AARON CHIARAVELOTTI and BOUDEE LUANGRATH, announced that they had purchased the club and planned to give it some much-needed TLC. The new owners intended to open the bar in August. Unfortunately, the eighth month of the Gregorian calendar came and went with no sign of Half’s sweet-AF signature cocktail, the Velvet Glove. And that was totally understandable, albeit disappointing. After all, renovations always take longer than expected. But on Sunday evening, a Facebook post announced that the club was open. Though I had basically checked out for the evening and was about halfway through watching the Middle Ages raunch-comedy The Little Hours, I paused the flick, jumped out of bed, quickly got myself together — i.e., put on pants — and hightailed it downtown to bear witness to the grand splendor of the reinvigorated music nexus. It couldn’t have been a better night for a soft open. Between Homecoming and Family Weekend at the University of Vermont and the brief spike in temperature, Queen City denizens were out in droves. Upon arrival, the disco ball was spinning, house music was thumping (thanks, DJs OD3 and CLIFF) and patrons were beginning to fill up the now-expanded dance floor and the outdoor patio area. Sackheim was on the scene, all smiles and holding court while his grateful customers kicked back and cut a rug. The first thing I noticed was how much bigger the club felt, likely because of the light-colored paint and the removal of the bench seating and tables from the northern wall. If you scoffed at the notion of dancing at the old Half Lounge — which easily became congested — the rebooted floor plan may have fixed that problem. Boogie away, you dancing fools! Another change that stood out: The new, reclaimed wood tables weren’t hidden under oversize tablecloths like their predecessors were. (Seriously,

10/9/17 3:19 PM


music

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

WED.11

burlington

CITIZEN CIDER: Brett Hughes (country), 6 p.m., free. THE DAILY PLANET: Silver Bridget (saw-folk), 8 p.m., free. FOAM BREWERS: Craig Broadhead (rock), 7 p.m., free. HALF LOUNGE: DJ Craig Mitchell (hip-hop, hits), 10 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

Animal Feelings Connecticut-based outfit

OLIVE TIGER

started as a nebulous, down-the-line folk

collective. Gradually, front woman Olive — who prefers to leave her real name out of the equation — began focusing on tighter arrangements and mixing in electronic elements. She and her band have since gone fully “folktronic” and now operate as a streamlined trio with their indomitable leader’s cello at the center of their baroque compositions. The group’s 2016 album, Until My Body Breaks, is a testament to Olive’s commitment to making music. As she told the Hartford Courant, “I’ll find a way, [even] after my body gives out.” Olive Tiger perform on Thursday, October 12, at the Light Club Lamp Shop in Burlington.

NECTAR’S: Seth Yacovone (solo acoustic blues), 7 p.m., free. Annie in the Water, Juice (jam), 9 p.m., $5. RÍ RÁ THE IRISH LOCAL & WHISKEY ROOM: DJ Supersounds (hits), 10 p.m., free.

RÍ RÁ THE IRISH LOCAL & WHISKEY ROOM: Reagh Greenleaf Jr. with Gyspsy Reel (folk, Irish), 7:30 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: Friday Morning Sing-Along with Linda Bassick & Friends (kids’ music), 11 a.m., free. DJ Ryan Kick (eclectic), 4 p.m., free. Will Pellerin and Connor McGinnis (folk, country), 7 p.m., free. Tuck Ryan Band (mountain soul), 10 p.m., $5.

RADIO BEAN: DJ Two Sev (eclectic vinyl), 4 p.m., free. Stolen Moments (jazz), 6:30 p.m., free. LittleHeadBigBoyOnBike (indie folk-rock), 8:30 p.m., free. RED SQUARE: The High Breaks (surf), 7 p.m., free. DJ Cre8 (hip-hop), 11 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE: Left Eye Jump (blues), 4 p.m., free. DJ Craig Mitchell (house, hits), 11 p.m., $5.

SIDEBAR: Hotel Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ KermiTT (hits), 10 p.m., $5.

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Old Sky (Americana), 7 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Standup Open Mic and Improv Jam, 7 p.m., free. Songs in the Key of Slink (improv), 9 p.m.

northeast kingdom

chittenden county

outside vermont

STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Open Mic Night, 7:30 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

SWEET MELISSA’S: D. Davis (acoustic), 5:30 p.m., donation.

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Josh Johnson (standup), 7 p.m., $15-27.

MONOPOLE: Open Mic with Lucid, 10 p.m., free.

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Tim & the Tall Boys (rock), 10 p.m., free.

BACKSTAGE PUB: Trivia, 9:30 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Bow Thayer (folk), 7:30 p.m., free.

NECTAR’S: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. Toubab Krewe, Rumblecat (jam), 9:30 p.m., $12/15.

THU.12

burlington

ARTSRIOT: WRUV’s Rocktober with Weaves, Tancred (rock), 8:30 p.m., $10/12.

WHAMMY BAR: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

DRINK: BLiNDoG Records Acoustic Sessions, 5 p.m., free.

middlebury area CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. Open Mic Night, 9 p.m., free. 72 MUSIC

(folk, electronic), 9:30 p.m., free. Phinneus Sonin and the Facaway Collective Rresents: Life Heist (theatre), 11:30 p.m., $5-10.

PARKER PIE CO.: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

THE DAILY PLANET: The Hot Pickin’ Party (bluegrass), 8 p.m., free.

MOOGS PLACE: Jim Charonko (Americana), 8 p.m., free.

HALF LOUNGE: The Return of Good Times featuring 2KDeep DJs Haitian, L Yeah and Sharkat (house, techno), 10 p.m., free.

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Ethan Snyder Presents (jazz), 10 p.m., free.

NECTAR’S: Kelly Ravin (country), 7 p.m., free. Nate Reit and Friends play Trombone Shorty, Brickdrop (funk), 9 p.m., $3/5. 18+.

MONKEY HOUSE: 22 Long Riffs, Comrade Nixon, Pissant (punk, hardcore), 8 p.m., $3/8. 18+.

CLUB METRONOME: Dino Bravo, Pooloop, Stolk (rock), 9 p.m., $5.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Samara Lark and the Outfit (jazz-rock), 6:30 p.m., free. Dietrich Strause & the Blue Ribbons (folk, rock), 8 p.m., free. DJ Disco Phantom (eclectic dance), 11 p.m., $5.

THU.12 // OLIVE TIGER [FOLK, ELECTRONIC]

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Open Mic with Andy Lugo, 9 p.m., free.

JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: Bluegrass Session, 7 p.m., free.

BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD: Chris Peterman (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free.

JUNIPER: Shane Murley Band (Americana), 9 p.m., free.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Irish Sessions (traditional), 7 p.m., free. Anna Lombard and Kenya Hall (indie soul, funk), 9 p.m., free.

HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Blue October, the Score (alternative), 8 p.m., $25/28.

burlington

JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

JUNIPER: Ray Vega Latin Jazz Quintet, 8:30 p.m., free. LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Paul Asbell Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free.

FRI.13

FOAM BREWERS: Brews & Bros (standup), second Thursday of every month, 7 p.m., free. HALF LOUNGE: SVPPLY (hip-hop, future-soul), 10 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Shane Hardiman Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: The Dream Eaters (indie pop), 7:30 p.m., free. Olive Tiger

PHO NGUYEN: Karaoke with DJ Walker, 8 p.m., free. RÍ RÁ THE IRISH LOCAL & WHISKEY ROOM: The County Down (pub songs, Americana), 7 p.m., free. Tyler and Ryan (rock covers), 9 p.m., free. RADIO BEAN: DJ Chia (house), 4 p.m., free. JSN (reggae), 7 p.m., free. Shane Hardiman Trio (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free. Tyrone Shoelaces (reggae, funk), 11 p.m., $5. RED SQUARE: Roughhead Blenny (rock), 7 p.m., free. D Jay Baron (mashup, hip-hop), 11 p.m., free. RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ Cre8 (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Binger, Let’s Be Leonard (jam), 9:30 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Stephanie Tonneson (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free.

chittenden county

MOOGS PLACE: Open Mic with Allen Church, 8:30 p.m., free. THE RESTAURANT AT EDSON HILL: Thursday Night Music Series (eclectic), 6:30 p.m., free.

SIDEBAR: L Yeah (house), 7 p.m., free. Haitian and Dave Villa (EDM), 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Mosa (singersongwriter), 7 p.m., free.

SUSHI YOSHI (STOWE): Moroz/ Jarrett/Morse (modern jazz), 5 p.m., free.

THE TAP ROOM AT SWITCHBACK BREWING: Mini Kin (rock), 6 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury

UPPER ROOST AT KARMA BIRD HOUSE: Twist, Hypoluxo, J Bengoy (indie), 7:30 p.m., $7.

LOCALFOLK SMOKEHOUSE: Open Mic with Alex Budney, 8:30 p.m., free.

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Josh Johnson (standup), 7 & 9:30 p.m., $15-27.

STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Fred Brauer (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free.

ZENBARN: Session Americana, Troy Millette and Dylan Gombas (Americana), 8 p.m., $12/15. Session Americana (folk-rock), 9 p.m., $12/15.

chittenden county

barre/montpelier

middlebury area

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Joshua Davis (Americana), 7:30 p.m., $15/18. MONKEY HOUSE: People Are Strange (Reunion Show) (rock), 9 p.m., $3/8. 18+. ON TAP BAR & GRILL: The Jeff Salisbury Band (blues), 7 p.m., free.

BACKSTAGE PUB: Karaoke with Jenny Red, 9 p.m., free. JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: The Brevity Thing (rock, folk), 7 p.m., free.

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Nathan Kalish, Matt Pless (alt-country), 8 p.m., free.

TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: Jam Man Entertainment (hits), 9 p.m., free.

MONKEY HOUSE: Untapped: A Night of Burlesque and Drag, 8:30 p.m., $10.

SWEET MELISSA’S: David Langevin (ragtime), 6 p.m., donation.

outside vermont

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Lokey (rock), 5 p.m., free. Photo Bomb (rock), 9 p.m., free.

WHAMMY BAR: Papa G SingAlong, 7 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

MARTELL’S AT THE RED FOX: Open Mic & Jam Session, 9 p.m., free.

MONOPOLE: Underground River, Krish Mohan, Sam Egan (eclectic), 9 p.m., free. OLIVE RIDLEY’S: Karaoke with DJ Jon Berry & DJ Coco, 9 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Andrew Merzi (rock covers), 7:30 p.m., free.

STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Nina’s Brew (blues, soul), 7 p.m., free. WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: DJ Fattie B (hip-hop, hits), 9 p.m., free.

FRI.13

» P.74


COMEDY

GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

S

5 NIGHTS

UNDbites

A WEEK THIS WEEK THU 12 | FRI 13 | SAT 14

CONT I NUED FROM PA GE 7 1

LANGSTON

KERMAN NEXT WEEK

COURTESY OF LUKE AWTRY PHOTOGRAPHY

THU 20 | FRI 21 | SAT 22

DAVE

ATTELL Marcie Hernandez

HOST YOUR

HOLIDAY PARTY

GOLDFRAPP, “Believer” HOLY OYSTERS, “Take Me for a Ride” QUEENS OF THE STONE AGE,

“Domesticated Animals” PORTISHEAD, “Humming”

SHOP

Speaking of supporting hurricane relief, you could also download a copy of the GIFTS’ latest EP, Dor. Proceeds from the freshest installment of former PRETTY & NICE guitarist JEREMY MENDICINO’s new experimental electronic project support international nonprofit Direct Relief and its ongoing efforts in a number of regions. You can find the charitable EP at thegifts.bandcamp.com. !

10/6/17 11:59 AM

fin

1

e

n’s consign me m en wo

T he Exchange

JEANS PURSES BOOTS OH MY!

Stop by and check out the new fall arrivals. 167 Pearl Street • Essex Junction 802-878-3848 theechangevt.com closed Sundays & Mondays

8v-theexchange101117.indd 1

MUSIC 73

In the coming weeks, a number of local bands and musicians are teaming up for a few benefit shows to raise money for ongoing relief efforts in Puerto Rico after the devastating effects of Hurricane Maria. On Wednesday,

101 main street, BurlingtoN

SEVEN DAYS

to completely abandon his planned set and improvise everything from scratch. Alternating among looped guitar, cello, synthesizer and electronic samples, he created a hauntingly beautiful soundscape that could easily have been the score of a romantic horror film. Though not currently on the books, the dunk! team hopes to bring the festival back in the years to come.

(802) 859-0100 | WWW.VTCOMEDY.COM

A

KELELA, “Waitin”

ORDER YOUR TICKETS TODAY!

10.11.17-10.18.17

Kudos to DAVID ZEIDLER, Higher Ground and the rest of the dunk!USA team. Over the weekend, dozens of post-rock bands descended on the South Burlington nightclub for the first-ever American edition of the long-running Belgian dunk!festival. Given that the event was in its first year, it was anyone’s guess as to how it would be received. But audiences were enraptured, and things seemed to run exceptionally well. Those who were present for the EYE OF TIME’s performance got to see a oneof-a-kind set from the French composer, whose real name is MARC EUVRIE. A series of mishaps forced the ambient artist

If I were a superhero, my superpower would be the ability to get songs stuck in other people’s heads. Here are five songs that have been stuck in my head this week. May they also get stuck in yours. Follow sevendaysvt on Spotify for weekly playlists with tunes by artists featured in the music section.

AT VERMONT COMEDY CLUB!

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

BiteTorrent

Listening In

October 18, bilingual singer-songwriter MARCIE HERNANDEZ and 8 CUERDAS guitarist DANIEL GAVIRIA perform at Radio Bean. Hernandez enlisted music photographer extraordinaire LUKE AWTRY for a dramatic photo series, prints of which will be available at the show. All proceeds benefit the Hurricane Maria Untitled-2 Community Relief Fund. On Sunday, October 22, RAY VEGA, MAL MAIZ and DJ JAH RED join Hernandez and Gaviria, as well as others, for a night of Latin music and food at North End Studios’ new event hall. In addition to the aforementioned fund, proceeds from this event also support Resilient Power Puerto Rico. Finally, the Shrewsbury Community Church presents a benefit concert featuring the SHREWSBURY SINGERS, the SHREWSBURY COMMUNITY BAND, ERIC HANGEN and HEIDIE VASQUEZ-GARCIA and additional special guests on Sunday, October 29. The concert benefits local nonprofits Shrewsbury Institute for Agriculture Education and the Vermont Farmers’ Food Center, both of which are working with La Comunidad Organizada de San Salvador in Puerto Rico.

p ho ts

Several of his large, abstract prints adorn the bar’s interior. Rather than celebrating its grand opening with only a single night, the entire coming weekend is one extended extravaganza. Thursday night kicks off with SideBar resident DJ SVPPLY spinning a mix of hip-hop and futuresoul. Friday evening marks the return of DJ collective 2KDeep’s Good Times, a formerly monthly night of house and techno featuring L YEAH, SHARKAT and HAITIAN (aka Sackheim himself ). Saturday’s festivities nod to the LGBTQ scene with DJs CHIA and ROB DOUGLAS and their recurring house music event, Fun House. Sunday winds down the weekend with the hip-hop stylings of DJ DAKOTA. Welcome back, Half Lounge! We’ve felt the vacuum between Red Square and Gaku Ramen for far too long.

10/6/17 10:50 AM


music FRI.13

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

« P.72

barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Daniel Waterhouse (singer-songwriter), 6 p.m., free. CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Matt Olson (bluegrass), 6 p.m., free. Viva le Vox, Forest Gray, Scrimmy the Dirtbag (punk, blues), 9 p.m., free. DEMENA’S: Joe Moore (jazz), 6 p.m., free. GUSTO’S: Two Guys with Guitars (acoustic), 5 p.m., free. Friday the 13th Metal Massacre with No Son of Mine, Tactiles, Don’t Cross the Streams, Rommel’s Last Stand, 9 p.m., $5. POSITIVE PIE (MONTPELIER): Vorcza (jazz), 10 p.m., $5. SWEET MELISSA’S: Honky Tonk Happy Hour with Mark LeGrand, 5:30 p.m., donation. WHAMMY BAR: Marc Delgado (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

EL TORO: Paul Aiken (rock, blues), 6:30 p.m., free. MOOGS PLACE: Chris Lyon (solo acoustic), 6 p.m., free. Dead Sessions Lite (Grateful Dead tribute), 9:30 p.m., $5.

middlebury area

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Flashback Costume Party with Duroc (’80s covers), 9 p.m., free. HATCH 31: The Big Pick (bluegrass), 7:30 p.m., free. TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: Double or Nothing (rock covers), 9 p.m., $3.

champlain islands/northwest

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 10.11.17-10.18.17

NECTAR’S: Marc Delgado (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free. Dynamo, Mob Barber (jazz, rock), 9 p.m., $5.

including art-rock quartet

dropped Wide Open, its second album in as many years. It features a guest spot from acclaimed Inuk throat singer Tanya Tagaq on track “Scream.” Weaves play on Thursday, October 12, at ArtsRiot in Burlington, as part of WRUV’s ongoing Rocktober series. TANCRED add support.

RÍ RÁ THE IRISH LOCAL & WHISKEY ROOM: DJ Dodg3r (EDM, hits), 10 p.m., free. RADIO BEAN: Looks Like Mountains & Moonish Brute (indie rock), 7 p.m., free. Top Brahman (R&B, soul), 8:30 p.m., free. Deep Rooted #1 featuring Lenore, DJ Two Sev, Clothcutter (reggae, hip-hop), 11:30 p.m., $5. RED SQUARE: The Jeff Salisbury Band (blues), 3 p.m., free. The Starline Rhythm Boys (rockabilly), 7 p.m., $5. Mashtodon (hip-hop), 11 p.m., $5. RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ Raul (hits), 6 p.m., $5. DJ Reign One (EDM), 11 p.m., $5. SIDEBAR: Lil Sprout (future soul), 7 p.m., free. SVPPLY (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Dan & the Wildfire (folk, rock), 8 p.m., free. SMITTY’S PUB: Chris and Erica: Barefoot and Pregnant Tour (rock, country), 8 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Josh Johnson (standup), 7 & 9:30 p.m., $15-27.

THU.12 // WEAVES [ROCK]

chittenden county BACKSTAGE PUB: Cyn City (rock), 9 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: The Districts, Pine Barons (rock), 8 p.m., $13/15.

middlebury area

MONOPOLE DOWNSTAIRS: Happy Hour Tunes & Trivia with Gary Peacock, 5 p.m., free.

JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: Old Tone String Band (bluegrass), 7 p.m., free.

OLIVE RIDLEY’S: All Request Night with DJ Skippy (hits), 10 p.m., free.

MONKEY HOUSE: Pinact, Cave Bees, Vex & Silence (grunge, indie), 9 p.m., $5/10. 18+.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Dan & the Wildfire (folk, rock), 8:30 p.m., free.

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Nerbak Brothers (blues), 5 p.m., free. Timothy James Blues & Beyond, 9 p.m., free.

SAT.14

STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Isaac French (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free.

BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD: Ted Crosby (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free.

WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: Outright VT Benefit featuring Craig Mitchell (hits), 11:30 a.m., donation.

CLUB METRONOME: Retronome With DJ Fattie B (’80s dance party), 9 p.m., free/$5. FOAM BREWERS: The Other Brothers (soul, funk), 9 p.m., free. HALF LOUNGE: Fun House featuring DJs Chia and Rob Douglas (house), 10 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. JUNIPER: The Idles (surf), 9 p.m., free.

Their self-titled 2016 debut garnered nominations from both the JUNO

leads the pack with zest as she and her bandmates conjure an avalanche of fuzzed-out licks. The group just

MONOPOLE: Knott Dead (rock), 10 p.m., free.

outside vermont

WEAVES.

Awards and the Polaris Music Prize, two of Canada’s most prestigious accolades. Front woman Jasmyn Burke

EL TORO: Stefani Capizzi (folk), 6:30 p.m., free.

burlington SEVEN DAYS

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: The Good Parts (soul-jazz), 10 p.m., free.

Tightly Stitched Toronto’s Buzz Records boasts an impressive roster of cutting-edge artists,

HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: The California Honeydrops, the Steady 45’s (soul, roots), 8:30 p.m., $12/15.

TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: Tim Brick (country), 7 p.m., free.

74 MUSIC

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Steph Pappas Experience (rock), 7 p.m., free. Mosa (singer-songwriter), 9 p.m., $5. Troy Ramey and Johnny Gates (singersongwriter), 10 p.m., $10. DJ Taka (eclectic vinyl), 11 p.m., $5.

barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Irish Session, 2 p.m., donation. Tyler Campbell (singer-songwriter), 6 p.m., free.

MOOGS PLACE: Willie Edwards Blues Band, 9 p.m., free.

TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: Robin Gottfried Band (rock), 9 p.m., $3.

champlain islands/northwest TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: Cooper & Lavoie (blues, folk), 7 p.m., free.

outside vermont

AUSABLE BREWING COMPANY: Heavier than HELL featuring Model 97, Aliendog, Executive Order (punk, rock), 5 p.m., free. MONOPOLE: Mister F (funk, rock), 10 p.m., free. OLIVE RIDLEY’S: Barktoberfest: Blues and Brews with Angel Forrest (blues, jazz), 8 p.m., $20/25. Ill Funk, 10 p.m., free.

SUN.15

GUSTO’S: DJ JAWZ (EDM), 9 p.m., $3.

burlington

WHAMMY BAR: The Laddies featuring Bob Sassaman (The Beatles sing-along), 7 p.m., donation.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Game Night, 8 p.m., free.

HALF LOUNGE: DJ Dakota (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

NECTAR’S: Mi Yard Reggae Night with DJs Big Dog and Jahson, 9:30 p.m., free/$3. 18+. RÍ RÁ THE IRISH LOCAL & WHISKEY ROOM: DJ Supersounds (hits), 10 p.m., free. RADIO BEAN: Clare Byrne (singer-songwriter), 11 a.m., free. Pete Sutherland and Tim Stickle’s Old Time Session (traditional), 1 p.m., free. normauniform (indie folk), 4 p.m., free. Dakotah Hutkin (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free. Intergalactic Taxi and Friends (jazz), 8 p.m., free. Hoag & the Weasel (progressive rock), 9:30 p.m., free. Super Birdman Birthday Bash (reggae), 11 p.m., free. RED SQUARE: DJ David Chief (dance), 11 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Comedy Open Mic and Showcase (standup), 7 p.m., free. Junglist Lounge (drum and bass), 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Bluegrass Brunch, noon, $5-10 donation. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: All About Aaron! (improv), 7 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Bleecker & MacDougal (folk), 11 a.m., free. SWEET MELISSA’S: Live Band Karaoke, 8 p.m., donation.

rutland/killington

RICK & KAT’S HOWLIN’ MOUSE: At the Heart of It, Every Enemy Alive, NO SOUL, Misanthrope, Cemetery Show (post-hardcore), 6 p.m., donation.

outside vermont

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Pickin’ Party with Dave Clark (bluegrass), 3 p.m., free.

MON.16 burlington

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Lamp Shop Lit Club (open reading), 8 p.m., free. Julia Julian (new wave), 10:30 p.m., free. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Karaoke, 9:30 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Crushed Out, Donner Beach Party (honky-tonk, surf), 9 p.m., free/$5. 18+. RADIO BEAN: Noah Lehrman (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free. Stephanie Tanneson (indie pop), 8 p.m., free. Good Morning Gils (alternative yacht rock), 10:30 p.m., free.

SIDEBAR: Family Night (open jam), 9 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Comedy & Crêpes (standup), 8 p.m., free.

chittenden county BACKSTAGE PUB: Open Mic, 9:30 p.m., free.

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Kevin Statesir’s Industry Night with the Hydes (rock), 6:30 p.m., free. MONKEY HOUSE: Erin CasselsBrown (indie folk), 6 p.m., free. Iron Chic’s Biennial Punk Rock Pizza Party with Doom Service, Belly Up, 8 p.m., $12/15.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Seth Yacovone (solo acoustic blues), 7 p.m., free.

TUE.17

burlington

ARTSRIOT: Advance Music Singer-Songwriter Contest, 6 p.m., free. FOAM BREWERS: Local Dork (eclectic vinyl), 6 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE: DJ KermiTT (hits), 10 p.m., free.

THE GRYPHON: P’tit Trio (jazz), 8 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ Robbie J (dance), 7 p.m., free.

LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Mike Martin (jazz), 9:30 p.m., free.


GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Raphael Groten (acoustic), 7:30 p.m., free. Erin Cassels-Brown (indie folk), 9:30 p.m., free. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Melodious Zach (soul), 9:30 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Dead Set (Grateful Dead tribute), 10 p.m., $3/5. 18+. RADIO BEAN: DJ Lee J (eclectic), 4 p.m., free. Lokum (music of the Near East), 6:30 p.m., free. Grup Anwar (classical Arabic), 8:30 p.m., free. Honky Tonk Tuesday with Jukebox George & the Last Dimes, 10 p.m., $5. RED SQUARE: DJ A-RA$ (dance), 10 p.m., free. RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: SVPPLY (hip-hop), 7 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Seth Yacovone (blues), 7 p.m., free. Blackout Barbie and SVPPLY (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

chittenden county

MONKEY HOUSE: The Hills and the Rivers, the Green Mountain Boys, Party of the Sun (folk), 8 p.m., $3/8. 18+. ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Trivia with Top Hat Entertainment, 7 p.m., free. WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Old Time Music Session (traditional), 6 p.m., free. CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Karaoke with DJ Vociferous, 9:30 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Paul Aiken (rock, blues), 7:30 p.m., free.

middlebury area

TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: Karaoke with DJ Chauncey, 9 p.m., free.

outside vermont

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

burlington

ARTSRIOT: Melvin Seals & JGB, Zach Nugent (blues, rock), 9 p.m., $22/25.

THE DAILY PLANET: Seth Yacovone (blues), 8 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. JUNIPER: Ray Vega Quartet (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free. LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Paul Asbell Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free.

» P.76

Michael Hahn, Nash-Vegas Dreams (SELF-RELEASED, CD)

For decades, Nashville. Tenn., has stood as the country music capital of the world, a gleaming, rhinestone-studded mecca to which countless singers with nothing more than a guitar and a dream have pilgrimaged. Of course, you’ll never hear of the vast majority of those would-be stars. For every honky-tonk hopeful who realizes their dreams of being discovered, the grindhouse that is the country-music biz chews up and spits out numerous others. But that doesn’t keep people from trying to make it in the Music City anyway. For example, Vermont’s Michael Hahn. Hahn is best known to locals as an in-demand multi-instrumentalist and a member of the Northeast Kingdom rock band Hornbeam. He’s also an author with five books to his credit. What Vermonters

might not know about the Berklee College of Music grad is that, for the past five years, he’s been recording a solo album, Nash-Vegas Dreams, splitting time between Vermont and Nashville. Actually, given how many musicians appear on the record, there’s a good chance locals not only know about it but played on it. Hahn’s latest is a labor of love — emphasis on labor. The album was recorded at six different studios, including four in Nashville and two in Vermont. It features 27 performers. Many of those are hotshot Nashville session players with credits such as Kenny Chesney and Clint Black. But Nash-Vegas Dreams has plenty of local flavor, too — most notably Vermont vocalist and aspiring country star Keeghan Nolan, who sings backup on four cuts. Fair warning: Hahn’s voice is not for everyone. In moments on Nash-Vegas Dreams, his thin, reedy delivery borders on grating. He ain’t a pretty singer. But

Hahn does sing with a lot of character and charm, which is an apt vehicle for his unconventional but compelling writing style. Throughout the record, Hahn strikes a fine balance between earnestness and lighthearted brashness. Opener “Meet Me in the Moonlight,” for example, is sweet and heartfelt. Ditto the pedal-steel-heavy ballad “Here’s Your Love Song.” Meanwhile, songs such as “Chick Magnet” and “Please Don’t Come Around” reveal a playful streak that winks at bygone country jesters such as Johnny Paycheck. It’s no surprise that, given the caliber of his backing musicians, Hahn’s latest sounds nearly perfect. The performances throughout are flawless, giving even Hahn’s most blues- and rock-informed tunes an authentically twangy edge. With all of that star power and the overabundance of hired hands, it would seem easy for Hahn to get lost in shuffle. Fortunately, the singer and his top-notch songwriting remain the focus of Nash-Vegas Dreams. Nash-Vegas Dreams by Michal Hahn will be available soon at CDBaby.

JORDAN ADAMS

DAN BOLLES

YOU A VT ARTIST OR BAND? SEND US YOUR MUSIC! DIGITAL: MUSIC@SEVENDAYSVT.COM; GET YOUR MUSIC REVIEWED: ARE SNAIL MAIL: MUSIC C/O SEVEN DAYS 255 S. CHAMPLAIN ST., SUITE 5, BURLINGTON, VT 05401

MUSIC 75

WED.18

Tiffany Couture is a 23-year-old singersongwriter from Milton with some heavy-hitting associates and mentors. For starters, she’s a protégée of Vermont-born neosoul singer-songwriter and wine enthusiast Myra Flynn. Flynn coproduced Couture’s debut EP, She Still Rises, alongside production wizard Colin McCaffrey at his Green Room studio in Montpelier. Furthermore, Trey Anastasio Band drummer Russ Lawton handles percussion duties. Couture’s crowdfunded EP is dedicated to her father, Donovan, who passed away of cystic fibrosis in late 2016. Couture balances twang and R&B influences well on her first outing. It’s kind of her defining characteristic. The singer’s YouTube channel is replete with live performances of cover versions that

The song undoubtedly comes from a place of boundless love, but it doesn’t quite land. The singer ruminates on how she feels she changed her parents’ lives. She sings, in the third person, “When she got off the plane / In her little pink dress / All their big dreams came / Nothing more, nothing less.” It’s a peculiar perspective to take. Wouldn’t it be more authentic to pen a song about how someone or something changed her life, not the other way around? “Broken Promises,” a breakup song, stands out as the EP’s most engaging cut. Nylon-stringed guitars pop on the offbeat as a tambourine punctuates each measure. Couture neither wallows nor lashes out at her betrayer. The singer honestly assesses her own feelings and self-worth while also adding a bit of sass as she reminds a heart-breaking jerk, “What goes around comes around.” Given that She Still Rises is Couture’s first recording, it’s natural that she’s still finding her footing. On future endeavors, it would be great to hear the singer push beyond clichéd tendencies — without sacrificing her positive spirit, of course. She Still Rises is available on iTunes.

SEVEN DAYS

CITIZEN CIDER: Brett Hughes (country), 6 p.m., free.

(SELF-RELEASED, CD, DIGITAL DOWNLOAD)

fit her particular brew. To wit: She’s just as partial to Carrie Underwood and Kelly Clarkson as she is to Beyoncé and Jennifer Hudson. Those names should also give you an idea of Couture’s particular flavor of songwriting. If not, let me spell it out for you: P-O-P — specifically the kind heard on “The Voice” or “American Idol.” Layered harmonies flourish throughout She Still Rises, which help vocal arrangements on tracks such as “Hold Your Head Up High” and “Broken Promises” stand out against somewhat bland songwriting. Couture has a knack for counterpoint, and her vocals are immaculate — though adding a bit of jagged edge would likely spice things up. Track two, “Texas Tornado,” is an uptempo, down-home ballad that tells the story of how her adoptive parents brought her to Vermont from the Lone Star State. That’s right. The meteorological maelstrom to which the title refers is the singer herself. And that’s a little odd.

10.11.17-10.18.17

WED.18

Tiffany Couture, She Still Rises

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

HATCH 31: Erin Cassels-Brown (indie folk), 6 p.m., free. Kelly Ravin and Lowell Thompson (country), 7 p.m., free.

REVIEW this


music WED.18

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

« P.75

chittenden county

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Irish Sessions (traditional), 7 p.m., free. Anna Lombard and Kenya Hall (indie soul, funk), 9 p.m., free. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Open Mic with Andy Lugo, 9 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Kelly Ravin (country), 7 p.m., free. Bumpin Uglies, Kudu Stooge (jam), 9 p.m., free/$5. 18+. RÍ RÁ THE IRISH LOCAL & WHISKEY ROOM: The County Down (Americana, reggae), 7:30 p.m., free. RADIO BEAN: DJ Two Sev (eclectic vinyl), 4 p.m., free. Bishop LaVey (acoustic punk), 7 p.m., free. Marcie Hernandez and Daniel Gaviria Benefit for Puerto Rico (singer-songwriter, Latin), 8:30 p.m., donation. Discavus (jazz fusion), 10:30 p.m., free. RED SQUARE: Small Change (Tom Waits tribute), 7 p.m., free. DJ Cre8 (hip-hop), 11 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Hotel Karaoke, 9 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Old Sky (Americana), 7 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Standup Open Mic and Improv Jam, 7 p.m., free. Songs in the Key of Slink (improv), 9 p.m.

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Boogie T, Jasher (EDM), 8:30 p.m., $12/15.

WED.18 // THICK BUSINESS [ROCK]

MONKEY HOUSE: Thick Business, Swale (rock), 8:30 p.m., $5/10. 18+. STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Bluegrass Session, 7 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

SWEET MELISSA’S: D. Davis (acoustic), 5:30 p.m., donation. John Lackard Blues Jam, 7:30 p.m., donation. WHAMMY BAR: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Jim Charonko (Americana), 8 p.m., free.

middlebury area CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. Open Mic Night, 9 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom PARKER PIE CO.: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

outside vermont MONOPOLE: Open Mic with Lucid, 10 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Bow Thayer (folk), 7:30 p.m., free. !

No Fear Sometimes a snippet of song lyrics can tell you everything you need to know about a band. Take Boise,

Idaho-based rockers THICK BUSINESS and their stinging diatribe “Pissy Vixen,” for example. Between bursts of elemental

76 MUSIC

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ARTS NEWS + VIEWS For more news about the local music scene, read the Live Culture blog: sevendaysvt.com/liveculture.

XX Factor « P.70 SD: I saw it! What’s up with the intermittent text that appears during the video? LH: She and the other director, Jacq Andrade, turned [the song] into this concept of the eight stages of love. They based it off the lyrics I sent them. It’s about regaining control. They took that and focused on the “psychotic woman [archetype] in film.” SD: There seems to be a theme of being captive in your videos. Is that a feeling that comes up in your music? LH: Maybe on Spectral and a little bit of [Benefits], there’s a yearning to leave a situation — to travel, or to move. I don’t think the new record is like that. The new one is more focused on a collective conscious — like a group feeling, not a

guitar riffs, singer and keyboardist Sarah Pincock shouts with fevered disdain, “I hate your balls!” She’s quick to add: “Almost as much as I hate your dick.” (Tell us how you really feel!) Fearless is the watchword for this psychedelic, garage-rock-infused quartet as it explores the sonic reaches of progressive rock and heavy post-punk influences. Catch Thick Business on Wednesday, October 18, at the Monkey House in Winooski. Local indie rockers SWALE open.

singular person writing about being in a terrible relationship or being in love. The earlier stuff was more about being young and confused. SD: Did something happen in your life that led to that shift? LH: I like writing about an idea as opposed to just [writing] in a free-form way about whatever’s on my mind. Like, I’ll want to write from this perspective, or I’ll want a song to express this feeling or emotion. It wasn’t a moment. I think it was just being young and then growing up and growing out of old points of view. SD: I understand that when you first started playing music you, played the flute and the violin. LH: I grew up reading music and playing violin and flute. I don’t think I could play violin anymore. I could probably play

the flute. I don’t practice reading music anymore. SD: Would you ever integrate those sounds into Twist? LH: Probably not with me playing them. There are musicians I know who are way better, and I’d rather include them. SD: Who is your guitar icon? LH: The guitar player in my band, Matt [Buckberrough]. SD: Aw, that’s sweet. LH: Actually, I’m going to change my answer. St. Vincent. I love the guitar that she made. SD: If you could form a supergroup with prominent musicians from various eras, who would they be? LH: The dude from ABBA [Björn Ulvaeus], Giorgio Moroder and Kate Bush.

SD: The title Spectral reads as very mysterious, whereas Benefits sounds more practical. How do you choose your album titles? LH: With Spectral I had so much time to think about it. And I thought about the artwork I wanted. Benefits was just the single’s title. SD: What’s something you could never live without? And it can’t be related to making music. LH: Essential oils. SD: Ooh. Any ones in particular? LH: Eucalyptus and patchouli. ! Contact: jordan@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Twist perform on Friday, October 13, 7:30 p.m., at the Karma Bird House Upper Roost in Burlington. $7. AA. facebook.com/twist


VENUES.411 BURLINGTON

AMERICAN FLATBREAD, 115 St. Paul St., Burlington, 861-2999 ARTSRIOT, 400 Pine St., Burlington, 540 0406 AUGUST FIRST, 149 S. Champlain St., Burlington, 540-0060 BARRIO BAKERY & PIZZA BARRIO, 203 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington, 863-8278 BATTERY STREET JEANS, 115 College St., Burlington, 865-6223 BENTO, 197 College St., Burlington, 497-2494 BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD, 25 Cherry St., Burlington, 854-4700 BRENNAN’S PUB & BISTRO, UVM Davis Center, 590 Main St., Burlington, 656-1204 CITIZEN CIDER, 316 Pine St., Burlington, 497-1987 CLUB METRONOME, 188 Main St., Burlington, 865-4563 THE DAILY PLANET, 15 Center St., Burlington, 862-9647 DOBRÁ TEA, 80 Church St., Burlington, 951-2424 DRINK, 133 St. Paul St., Burlington, 951-9463 ETHAN ALLEN PUB/PHO NGUYEN, 1130 North Ave., Burlington, 658-4148 THE FARMHOUSE TAP & GRILL, 160 Bank St., Burlington, 859-0888 FINNIGAN’S PUB, 205 College St., Burlington, 864-8209 FOAM BREWERS, 112 Lake St., Burlington, 399-2511 THE GRYPHON, 131 Main St., Burlington, 489-5699

HALF LOUNGE, 136.5 Church St., Burlington JP’S PUB, 139 Main St., Burlington, 658-6389 JUNIPER, 41 Cherry St., Burlington, 658-0251 KARMA BIRD HOUSE’S UPPER ROOST, 47 Maple Street, Burlington, 343-4767 LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ, 115 Church St., Burlington, 863-3759 LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP, 12 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington, 660-9346 MAGLIANERO CAFÉ, 47 Maple St., Burlington, 861-3155 MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB, 167 Main St., Burlington, 864-6776 MUDDY WATERS, 184 Main St., Burlington, 658-0466 NECTAR’S, 188 Main St., Burlington, 658-4771 RADIO BEAN, 8 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington, 660-9346 RASPUTIN’S, 163 Church St., Burlington, 864-9324 RED SQUARE, 136 Church St., Burlington, 859-8909 RÍ RÁ THE IRISH LOCAL & WHISKEY ROOM, 123 Church St., Burlington, 860-9401 RUBEN JAMES, 159 Main St., Burlington, 864-0744 SIGNAL KITCHEN, 71 Main St., Burlington, 399-2337 SIDEBAR, 202 Main St., Burlington, 864-0072 THE SKINNY PANCAKE, 60 Lake St., Burlington, 5400188 SOCIAL CLUB & LOUNGE, 165 Church St., Burlington SPEAKING VOLUMES, 377 Pine St., Burlington, 540-0107

SPEAKING VOLUMES, VOL. 2, 7 Marble Ave., Burlington, 540-0107 THE SP0T ON THE DOCK, 1 King St., Burlington, 5400480 THE TAP ROOM AT SWITCHBACK BREWING, 160 Flynn Ave., Burlington, 651-4114 VERMONT COMEDY CLUB, 101 Main St., Burlington, 859-0100 THE VERMONT PUB & BREWERY, 144 College St., Burlington, 865-0500

CHITTENDEN COUNTY

AUTUMN RECORDS, 11 E. Allen St., Suite 2, Winooski, 399-2123 BACKSTAGE PUB, 60 Pearl St., Essex Jct., 878-5494 GOOD TIMES CAFÉ, Rt. 116, Hinesburg, 482-4444 HIGHER GROUND, 1214 Williston Rd., S. Burlington, 652-0777 HINESBURGH PUBLIC HOUSE, 10516 Route 116 #6A, Hinesburg, 482-5500 JAMES MOORE TAVERN, 4302 Bolton Access Rd. Bolton Valley, Jericho, 434-6826 JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN, 30 Route 15, Jericho, 899-2223 MONKEY HOUSE, 30 Main St., Winooski, 655-4563 ON TAP BAR & GRILL, 4 Park St., Essex Jct., 878-3309 PARK PLACE TAVERN, 38 Park St., Essex Jct. 878-3015 ROZZI’S LAKESHORE TAVERN, 1022 W. Lakeshore Dr., Colchester, 863-2342 STONE CORRAL BREWERY, 83 Huntington Rd., Richmond, 434-5767

WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK, 20 Winooski Falls Way, Winooski, 497-3525

BARRE/MONTPELIER

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ, 28 Main St., Montpelier, 229-9212 BUCH SPIELER RECORDS, 27 Langdon St., Montpelier, 229-0449 CAPITOL GROUNDS CAFÉ, 27 State St., Montpelier, 223-7800 CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS, 70 Main St., Montpelier, 223-6820 DEMENA’S, 44 Main St., Montpelier, 613-3172 ESPRESSO BUENO, 248 N. Main St., Barre, 479-0896 GUSTO’S, 28 Prospect St., Barre, 476-7919 KISMET, 52 State St., Montpelier, 223-8646 MULLIGAN’S IRISH PUB, 9 Maple Ave., Barre, 479-5545 NORTH BRANCH CAFÉ, 41 State St., Montpelier, 552-8105 POSITIVE PIE, 20 State St., Montpelier, 229-0453 RED HEN BAKING, 961 Route 2, Middlesex, 223-5200 THE SKINNY PANCAKE, 89 Main St., Montpelier, 2622253 SWEET MELISSA’S, 4 Langdon St., Montpelier, 225-6012 THREE BEAN CAFÉ, 22 Pleasant St., Randolph, 728-3533 WHAMMY BAR, 31 W. County Rd., Calais, 229-4329

STOWE/SMUGGS AREA

CORK WINE BAR & MARKET OF STOWE, 35 School St., Stowe, 760-6143 EL TORO, 82 Lower Main St., Morrisville, 521-7177 MARTELL’S AT THE RED FOX, 87 Edwards Rd., Jeffersonville, 644-5060 MATTERHORN, 4969 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-8198 MOOGS PLACE, Portland St., Morrisville, 851-8225 PIECASSO PIZZERIA & LOUNGE, 899 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-4411 RIMROCKS MOUNTAIN TAVERN, 394 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-9593 TRES AMIGOS AND RUSTY NAIL, 1190 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-6245 STOWEHOF INN, 434 Edson Hill Rd., Stowe, 253-9722 SUSHI YOSHI, 1128 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-4135

MAD RIVER VALLEY/ WATERBURY

BIG PICTURE THEATER & CAFÉ, 48 Carroll Rd., Waitsfield, 496-8994 CORK WINE BAR & MARKET, 40 Foundry St., Waterbury, 882-8227 GREEN MOUNTAIN LOUNGE AT MOUNT ELLEN, 102 Forest Pl., Warren, 583-6300 HOSTEL TEVERE, 203 Powderhound Rd., Warren, 496-9222 SHEPHERDS PUB, Rt. 100, Waitsfield, 496-3422 THE RESERVOIR RESTAURANT & TAP ROOM, 1 S. Main St., Waterbury, 244-7827

SLIDE BROOK LODGE & TAVERN, 3180 German Flats Rd., Warren, 583-2202 ZENBARN, 179 Guptil Rd., Waterbury Center, 244-8134

MIDDLEBURY AREA

BAR ANTIDOTE, 35C Green St., Vergennes, 877-2555 CITY LIMITS, 14 Greene St., Vergennes, 877-6919 HATCH 31, 31 Main St., Bristol, 453-2774 TOURTERELLE, 3629 Ethan Allen Hwy., New Haven, 453-6309 TWO BROTHERS TAVERN LOUNGE & STAGE, 86 Main St., Middlebury, 388-0002

RUTLAND AREA

HOP’N MOOSE BREWERY CO., 41 Center St., Rutland, 775-7063 PICKLE BARREL NIGHTCLUB, Killington Rd., Killington, 422-3035 RICK & KAT’S HOWLIN’ MOUSE, 158 N. Main St., Rutland, 772-7955

CHAMPLAIN ISLANDS/ NORTHWEST

BAYSIDE PAVILION, 15 Georgia Shore Rd., St. Albans, 524-0909 NORTH HERO HOUSE INN & RESTAURANT 3643 Route 2, North Hero, 372-4732 SNOW SHOE LODGE & PUB, 13 Main St., Montgomery Center, 326-4456 TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB, 28 N. Main St., St. Albans, 524-1405

UPPER VALLEY

WINDSOR STATION RESTAURANT & BARROOM, 26 Depot Ave., Windsor, 674-4180

NORTHEAST KINGDOM

BIG JAY TAVERN, 3709 Mountain Rd., Montgomery, 326-6688 COLATINA EXIT, 164 Main St., Bradford, 222-9008 JASPER’S TAVERN, 71 Seymour La., Newport, 334-2224 MUSIC BOX, 147 Creek Rd., Craftsbury, 586-7533 PARKER PIE CO., 161 County Rd., West Glover, 525-3366 THE PUB OUT BACK, 482 Route 114, East Burke, 626-1188 TAMARACK GRILL, 223 Shelburne Lodge Rd., East Burke, 626-7390

OUTSIDE VERMONT

AUSABLE BREWING CO., 765 Mace Chasm Rd., Keeseville, N.Y., 581-900-2739 MONOPOLE, 7 Protection Ave., Plattsburgh, N.Y., 518-563-2222 NAKED TURTLE, 1 Dock St., Plattsburgh, N.Y., 518-566-6200. OLIVE RIDLEY’S, 37 Court St., Plattsburgh, N.Y., 518-324-2200 PALMER ST. COFFEE HOUSE, 4 Palmer St., Plattsburgh, N.Y. 518-561-6920 THE SKINNY PANCAKE, 3 Lebanon St., Hanover, N.H., 603-277-9115

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 10.11.17-10.18.17 SEVEN DAYS MUSIC 77

FOR MORE INFORMATION, FULL LIST OF VENDORS, OR TO PURCHASE TICKETS:

jaypeakresort.com/Events

Untitled-6 1

10/9/17 10:53 AM


Self-Consciousness

art

“Art of the Selfie” and “Enough to Divide a Room,” Helen Day Art Center B Y RA CHEL ELI ZA BET H JONES

78 ART

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

T

he Oxford Dictionaries define a selfie as a “photograph that one has taken of oneself, typically one taken with a smartphone or webcam and uploaded to a social media website.” But most of us don’t need Oxford to know what selfies are — at, well, face value, anyway. Seeing people take their own picture in public — documenting a special moment, creating “I was here” evidence of a vacation — is commonplace, and the resulting images are ubiquitous online. Naturally, the new entanglement of self-portraiture and the internet has spurred a whole micro-genre of art and scholarly studies. The first book dedicated to the selfie phenomenon, cultural critic Alicia Eler’s The Selfie Generation: How Our Self Images Are Changing Our Notions of Privacy, Property, Sex, Consent and Culture, will be released in November. Independent Montréal-based curator Sarah McCutcheon Greiche is contributing to this growing body of work. Her show “Art of the Selfie” is currently on view at the Helen Day Art Center in Stowe. The tantalizingly sparse exhibition occupies two of the center’s galleries; in the adjoining third space is a separate show, “Enough to Divide a Room” by Berlin artist Michael Rocco Ruglio-Misurell. Though the two are distinct, Ruglio-Misurell’s sculptural investigation of screens, barriers and grids seems to be in provocative dialogue with Greiche’s inquiry. A critical element in “Art of the Selfie” is the division of its 11 artists into “Historical Selfies” and “Contemporary Selfies.” In this sense, Greiche acknowledges the severe break in how we think of self-portraiture practices pre- and post-internet. Within the gallery space, though, the works intermingle. In the west gallery, for example, an iconic 1990 photograph from Carrie Mae Weems’ “Kitchen Table Series” is sandwiched between recent small-scale sculpture and painting by Los Angeles artist Sarana Mehra. None of the works is a selfie in the traditional sense. In Weems’ black-and-white photo, the artist poses herself as a mother “putting her face

“Untitled (from the ‘Kitchen Table Series’)” by Carrie Mae Weems

REVIEW

THE WEIGHT GIVEN TO WOMEN ARTISTS SUGGESTS A PARTICULAR LINK BETWEEN THE CONSTRUCTION OF IDENTITY AND THE PERFORMANCE OF GENDER. on” at the kitchen table while her young daughter also applies makeup nearby. In contrast to Weems’ faux-voyeurism, Mehra addresses the performance of femininity using tropes of the ancient female archetype. “The Divine Stain” series features 50 small-scale gouache paintings of watery female figures arranged in a grid. It’s no accident that

their rusty brown color could be interpreted as dried menstrual blood. Exhibition text tells us that the totemic figures are modeled after images of women that Mehra appropriated from the internet. Many occupy sexual and/or sexually explicit poses. The silhouettes of arms raised, holding the phone at the most flattering angles, are unmistakable.

Nearby, these feminine apparitions seem to blossom into three dimensions in Mehra’s “Selfigurines” — unprecious, pocket-size sculptures in clay that reference the Venus de Willendorf. On the whole, this exhibition is slanted toward the feminine, not least because seven of the 11 artists represented are women. Even portrait king


ART SHOWS

From “Inspired by Real Events” by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

“The Divine Stain” by Sarana Mehra

Installation view of Michael Rocco Ruglio-Misurell’s “Enough to Divide a Room”

CALL TO ARTISTS

‘A CELEBRATION OF THE CREATIVE PROCESS’: We welcome submissions of photography for an upcoming exhibition to be juried by Kat Kiernan. For details and to submit, visit photoplacegallery.com. Deadline: October 16. PhotoPlace Gallery, Middlebury. $35 for one to five photographs; $6 for each additional. Info, photoplacegallery@ gmail.com.

‘JEEZUM CROW, IT’S NOVEMBER!’: Lyndonville Downtown Art Revitalization Team invites all artists, sculptors and makers in all mediums to create work focusing on our entry into the transitional month of November. Work could include our unofficial state bird, the Jeezum Crow, as well. Art will be exhibited all month in various locations throughout the village of Lyndon, with an Art Walk brochure indicating exhibit locations. For details and to submit, email melmelts@yahoo.com. Deadline: October 27. Village of Lyndonville. Info, melmelts@yahoo.com.

ONE TAYLOR STREET REDEVELOPMENT PROJECT: The City of Montpelier is seeking proposals from a Vermont artist or team of artists for a major public art installation. Elements of Montpelier’s history and ethos should be key inspirations for the work. To view the request for proposals, visit montpelier-vt.org. Deadline: November 1. Montpelier City Hall. Info, kcasey@montpelier-vt.org. ‘PLEASED TO MEET YOU!’: This 2018 show will bring to life fantastical, imaginative creatures and beings of the nonhuman variety, whether based on folklore, ancient myths, wild imagination or a memorable dream. Any medium welcome. Deadline: February 2. For more info and submission guidelines, see studioplacearts.com/ calls-to-artists. Studio Place Arts, Barre. Members free, nonmembers $10. Info, 479-7069. RIVER ARTS PHOTO CO-OP PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST: Welcoming photography submissions from all photo enthusiasts involved with the River Arts Photo Co-op. Contest participants must attend at least one Photo Co-op meeting to qualify. Each photographer may enter up to three digital photographs. For details and to submit, visit riverartsvt.org. Deadline: December 17. River Arts, Morrisville. Info, 802-888-1261.

NEW THIS WEEK

» P.80

ART 79

CITY OF BURLINGTON FLAG COMPETITION: Seeking design submissions for a new Burlington city flag. The winning design will receive a $250 honorarium, one-year membership to Burlington City Arts and a flag of their design. Submitters must be a resident of

ISLAND ARTS GALLERY: Inviting artists interested in showing works at the community gallery to submit materials. Applications must include an artist statement and/or biography, medium, and up to five high-quality digital images. Accepted artists will receive a month-long exhibition in 2018. Interested artists should email maryjomccarthy@gmail.com. Deadline: October 31. Island Arts Gallery, North Hero. Info, maryjomccarthy@gmail.com.

“Art of the Selfie” and “Enough to Divide a Room” by Michael Rocco Ruglio-Misurell are both on view through November 11 at Helen Day Art Center in Stowe. helenday.com

SEVEN DAYS

‘CELEBRATE!’: Member artists of SPA are invited to share their work in a show on all three floors during the holiday gift-giving season. Deadline: October 13. Show dates: November 15 through December 28. For more info and submission guidelines, see studioplacearts. com/calls-to-artists. Studio Place Arts, Barre. Members free, nonmembers $10. Info, 479-7069.

‘GOLDEN’: Submissions relating to aging, broadly conceived, are invited for a January exhibition.Traditional and nontraditional media, 2-D and 3-D works, and small installations are welcome. Deadline: December 9. For details and to submit, see studioplacearts.com/calls-to-artists. Studio Place Arts, Barre. Members free, nonmembers $10. Info, 479-7069.

INFO

10.11.17-10.18.17

THE BURLINGTON BEAT: The Burlington Beat invites submissions for its second online issue, scheduled for mid-October, including art, poetry, prose and more. The first issue and submission guidelines can be found at burlingtonbeat.com. Deadline: October 25. Various Burlington, Montpelier & Barre locations. Info, theburlingtonbeat@ gmail.com.

Burlington or own a Burlington business. For details and to submit, visit burlingtoncityarts.org/btvflag. Deadline: October 15. Burlington City Arts. Info, akrebbs@burlingtoncityarts.org.

Contact: rachel@sevendaysvt.com SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Andy Warhol appears in drag, in a photograph taken by Christopher Makos. Performative portrait godmother Cindy Sherman is present in the 1983 photograph “Cindy Sherman in Turban,” in which the notorious chameleon is browned and bronzed and … wearing a turban. “The Current” features performance icon Marina Abramović in the context of her 2012 Museum of Modern Art exhibition “The Artist Is Present.” Her eyes are closed; if she can’t see us, can we see her? The weight given to women artists suggests a particular link between the construction of identity and the performance of gender. As John Berger wrote in Ways of Seeing, “A woman … is almost continually accompanied

by her own image of herself … From earliest childhood she has been taught and persuaded to survey herself continually.” Surveillance is a critical theme here. We survey ourselves and facets of our identity with a self-portrait. We survey the internet for information about other people’s identities. With the selfie, the two functions collide. During a recent gallery visit, first graders from Stowe Elementary School sat on the floor looking up at a monitor that was screening work by Montréal artist Rafael Lozano-Hemmer. “Have you guys heard of a surveillance camera?” the teacher asked. Nods, a round of yeses. The teacher went on to discuss Lozano-Hemmer’s 2004 video “Inspired by Real Events,” in which participants climb a ladder to turn off a surveillance camera. Next to the mounted monitor are three video stills

of outstretched hands, captured just prior to the camera’s switch-off. “Art of the Selfie” works to expand our understanding of the space between one side of the screen and the other. The selfie is not as simple as snapping a picture of oneself; the paradox of the internet is that even the most intimate forms of sharing are mediated by a screen. Ruglio-Misurell’s ethereal sculpture and installation act like an abstract foil to Greiche’s query. Ten works fill the gallery. Mounted on the southern wall is “Grid 1,” a simple rectangular grid made of rope. “Impressions,” a series of 18 monoprints, is laid out in two neat rows directly over this grid. Like Mehra’s “The Divine Stain,” this layering of artwork and image evokes the dominating grid form of Instagram. The layering is advanced by three sculptures titled “Mesh 1,” “Mesh 2” and “Mesh 3.” These constructions of synthetic mesh are patterned with the outline of spray-painted objects and adorned with everyday items and detritus, like rocks and rusted pieces of metal. The works appear impermanent and fleeting — like a Snapchat video, and memory itself. !


art CALL TO ARTISTS

« P.79

NEW THIS WEEK chittenden county

! THOMAS WATERS: “Changing Seasons,” an exhibition of oil paintings inspired by the natural world. Reception: Saturday, October 14, 1-4 p.m. October 12-November 12. Info, ealexander22@ yahoo.com. Info, 899-3211. Emile A. Gruppe Gallery in Jericho.

barre/montpelier

RETURNING STUDENT EXHIBITION: Exhibition of works by students in VCFA’s MFA program in graphic design. October 11-13. Info, 828-8600. Alumni Hall, Vermont College of Fine Arts in Montpelier.

middlebury area

! ‘BRINGING THE OUTSIDE IN’: An exhibition of three Vermont artists who use live natural materials in their works: Krista Cheney, Aurora Davidson and Susan Goldstein. Reception: Friday, October 13, 5 p.m. October 13-November 12. Info, 338-6607. Art on Main in Bristol.

upper valley

! HOOKED FIBER ARTS: Hand-hooked rugs designed by regional fiber artists, showcasing a contemporary approach to a traditional American craft. Reception: Friday, October 13, 5-7 p.m. October 13-November 27. Info, 333-9607. Pompanoosuc Mills Showroom in East Thetford.

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

brattleboro/okemo valley

‘IN-SIGHT EXPOSED’: An exhibition celebrating the 25th anniversary of this program, featuring images by In-Sight students curated by Rachel Portesi. October 13-January 8. ‘TOUCHSTONES, TOTEMS, TALISMANS: ANIMALS IN CONTEMPORARY ART’: An exhibition exploring the deep connections humans have with animals, both domestic and wild, with works by Walton Ford, Bharti Kher, Colleen Kiely, Stephen Petegorsky, Shelley Reed, Jane Rosen, Michal Rovner, Rick Shaefer and Andy Warhol. October 13-February 11. ‘YOUR SPACE: FLIGHTS OF FANCY’: Images of iconic artworks inspired by birds, from Leonardo’s sketches of flying machines to Ai Wei Wei’s design for the Olympic stadium in Beijing, assembled by education curator Linda Whelihan. October 13-February 11. ANILA QUAYYUM AGHA: “Shimmering Mirage,” a sculptural light installation inspired by Islamic architecture. October 13-March 10. JOAN O’BEIRNE: “The Scarf,” an installation of photographs, video and a giant scarf fashioned out of bright-orange industrial extension cords, dedicated to the memory of the artist’s brother. October 13-February 11. Info, 257-0124. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center.

! ‘WILDLANDS’: Works by 10 artists that celebrate public lands, national parks and wilderness. Reception: Thursday, October 12, 5:30-7 p.m. October 12-March 30. Info, 885-3061. The Great Hall in Springfield.

manchester/bennington

! BARBARA ACKERMAN: “Personal Geography,”

new mixed-media works by the Bennington artist. Reception: Friday, October 13, 4-6 p.m. October 13-November 28. Info, 447-6388. Southern Vermont College in Bennington.

randolph/royalton

! JOHN F. PARKER: Sculptural assemblage

works by the veteran designer and homebuilder. Reception: Saturday, October 21, 4-7 p.m. October 16-December 31. Info, 498-8438. White River Gallery @ BALE in South Royalton.

80 ART

ART EVENTS ART BREAK FOR MOM & MOMS WITH BABES: Join other mothers in creating guided eclectic art projects each week, or use the studio materials

‘Dark Matter’ This Halloween season, the S.P.A.C.E. Gallery is filled with dark matter. Far from being only a concern

of physics, the concept of dark matter is interpreted broadly, touching upon mystery, death and current political realities in the U.S.

and globally. To this last point, exhibition curator and gallery director Christy Mitchell asks, “Do you feel that we may be in the new ‘dark ages’ with regards to our environment or political climate?” Another question: Can there be (dark) humor in these uncharted waters? Artist Kimberly Garland thinks so. Her sardonic work “USA LOL” (pictured) features the internet version of “haha” in red, drippy letters emblazoned across a child’s map of the states. Through October 28. to make the art of your choice. Babies welcome. Expressive Arts Burlington, Friday, October 13, 10:30 a.m.-noon. $15. Info, 343-8172. ARTIST TALK: MELORA KENNEDY & HANNAH MORRIS: The artist-members of the cooperative gallery discuss their works and process. Kennedy speaks and fields questions from 7 to 7:30 p.m., followed by Morris from 7:30 to 8 p.m. The Front, Montpelier, Wednesday, October 11, 7-8 p.m. Info, 272-0908. ARTS BUS GALA & GALLERY SHOWCASE: Guests tour the digital gallery of artwork created during the Art Bus’ 2017 summer season and listen to readings by National Book Award-winning authors William Alexander, M.T. Anderson and Katherine Paterson. Chandler Center for the Arts, Randolph, Saturday, October 14, 7-9 p.m. $30 individual, $50 couple. Info, 272-2762. BCA SUMMER ARTIST MARKET: Shop handmade works by Vermont artists and artisans, in conjunction with the Burlington Farmers Market. Burlington City Hall Park, Saturday, October 14, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Info, 865-7166. BLUEBIRD FAIRIES: Emily Anderson offers readings using her singular oracle deck, as well as cards and other artworks. ArtsRiot, Burlington, Friday, October 13, 5-10 p.m. Info, emily@bluebirdfairies.com. HUNTINGTON ARTS FESTIVAL: Local artists and artisans offer ceramics, textile arts, jewelry, cards, leathercraft, paintings and photography. A percentage of all sales will go to support the nonprofit Huntington Valley Arts and restoration of the historic Huntington Town Hall. Huntington

VISUAL ART IN SEVEN DAYS:

Town Hall, Saturday, October 14, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Info, huntingtontownhall@gmail.com. ‘INFLATABLES’: A one-day exhibition of inflatable sculpture made by students in the art class “Sculpture: Subject and Object.” Dion Family Student Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, Wednesday, October 18, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Info, mtarnacki@smcvt.edu. ‘THE LIGHT AROUND US’: An interactive, educational exhibition exploring the physics of light and how we see it. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich. Through May 2, 2018. Free with museum admission. Info, 649-2200. ‘LOST AND FOUND’: An “art treasure hunt” instigated by Vermont artist DJ Barry, in which he places stenciled woodcuts in various locations, free to those who find them in exchange for paying it forward. Find the artist on Facebook for clues. State of Vermont, Wednesdays, October 11 and 18. Info, djbarryart@gmail.com. MAGNIFICENT ART MIXER: Community art event showcasing works by Annette Hansen, Stephanie Madeline, Pilar Paulsen and Sharon Radtke. Milton Art Center & Gallery, Thursday, October 12, 4:30-6:30 p.m. Info, 355-6583. MEET THE MAKER: Speak with Generator artists about their work, see a steel or copper forging demo and learn about efforts to build an on-site foundry. Generator, Burlington, Monday, October 16, 5 p.m. Info, communications@generatorvt.com. OPEN STUDIO: CLAIRE PAYNE & MYLISSA KOWALSKI DAVIS: The local artists welcome the public to visit their studio and browse works includ-

ART LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY RACHEL ELIZABETH JONES. LISTINGS ARE RESTRICTED TO ART SHOWS IN TRULY PUBLIC PLACES.

ing paintings, drawings, sculpture and photography in a restored 18th-century barn. Claire Payne, St. Albans, Saturday, October 14, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday, October 15, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Info, 782-5930. OPEN STUDIO: GERALD K. STONER: The artist presents more than 50 welded steel sculptures for the Vermont Crafts Council Fall Open Studio Weekend. Gerald K. Stoner Sculpture, Underhill, Saturday, October 14, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday, October 15, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Info, 324-3897. OPEN STUDIO: SHELBURNE POND STUDIOS: Eight resident visual artists and several guest artists open their studios to the public. Shelburne Pond Studios, Friday, October 13, 5:30-8:30 p.m., and Saturday, October 14, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Info, 999-4394. OPEN STUDIOS & HOLIDAY ART FAIR: Eight resident visual artists and several guest artists exhibit small works in painting, stone sculpture, jewelry, stained-glass, bookbinding, candles, assemblage and more. Shelburne Pond Studios, Friday, October 13, 5:30-8:30 p.m., and Saturday, October 14, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Info, 999-4394. READING: GENNAROSE NETHERCOTT: GennaRose Nethercott reads from A Ghost of Water, her book of her poetry inspired by the artwork of Susan Osgood. Mitchell Giddings Fine Arts, Brattleboro, Sunday, October 15, 5:30 p.m. Info, 251-8290. RITUAL CELEBRATION: Priestess (Manbo Asogwe) Marie Maude Evans leads this festival in honor of the gods of Vodou. The ritual includes the presentation of delectable foods to the gods on an altar that will be mounted and consecrated, as well as a drumming and dance performance. Fleming

GET YOUR ART SHOW LISTED HERE!

IF YOU’RE PROMOTING AN ART EXHIBIT, LET US KNOW BY POSTING INFO AND IMAGES BY THURSDAYS AT NOON ON OUR FORM AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT OR GALLERIES@SEVENDAYSVT.COM.


ART SHOWS

Museum of Art, University of Vermont, Burlington, Thursday, October 12, 5-7 p.m. Info, 656-0750. STUDIO SALE: GEORGE LAWRENCE: The Vermont artist and teacher hosts a farewell studio sale of his watercolors and newer abstract pieces. George Lawrence Studio, Tunbridge, Saturday, October 14, and Sunday, October 15, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Info, 234-6987. TALK: ‘A NEW ACQUISITION AFTER TITIAN’: Pieter Broucke discusses a small-scale copy of Titian’s “Rest on the Flight to Egypt,” painted by David Teniers the Younger in the 1660s, as part of the first-ever visual inventory of an art collection. Middlebury College Museum of Art, Friday, October 13, 12:30 p.m. Info, 443-5007. TALK: ‘BACK FROM THE FUTURE’: Architect Dave Sellers offers a visual presentation of early designs, unbuilt environments and visions of future settlements in Vermont. Williams Hall, University of Vermont, Burlington, Tuesday, October 17, 6 p.m. Info, artdept@uvm.edu. TALK: ‘CAPE COD’S MODERN ARCHITECTURE’: Peter McMahon, the founding director of the Cape Cod Modern House Trust, speaks about how the remote town of Wellfleet became a laboratory for some of the 20th century’s greatest architectural thinkers. McMahon will also sign copies of his book Cape Cod Modern. Corinth Town Hall, Saturday, October 14, 7 p.m. Info, mjnart.nielsen@gmail.com. TALK: ‘HEAT AND HAPPINESS IN THE MAKING OF A HAITIAN VODOU GOD’: Priestess (Manbo Asogwe) Marie Maude Evans offers a glimpse of the power behind the paket kongo altars of Haiti, as well as some background in advance of her public Burlington ceremony. Fleming Museum of Art, University of Vermont, Burlington, Wednesday, October 11, 6 p.m. Info, 656-0750. TALK: ‘IDEAS ON TAP: VANDALS, VIGILANTES, OR VIRTUOSOS? THE HISTORY & POWER OF STREET ART’: Champlain College professor David Mills speaks about the transgressive practices of street artists. ArtsRiot, Burlington, Wednesday, October 11, 7 p.m. Info, acunningham@vermonthumanities. org. TALK: ‘MY FATHER AND NEW ENGLAND’: Philosopher and book artist Peter Barnett places his father’s Vermont works in the context of the artist’s other landscapes and New England roots. Fleming Museum of Art, University of Vermont, Burlington, Wednesday, October 18, noon. Info, 656-0750.

ONGOING SHOWS burlington

ART HOP GROUP SHOW: An exhibition of works by more than 35 area artists. Through November 30. Info, 859-9222. VCAM Studio in Burlington.

‘DARK MATTER’: Annual exhibition featuring works relating to the unseen, the existential and the dark, juried by Christy Mitchell. Through October 28. Info, 578-2512. The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery in Burlington. FALL EXHIBIT: ONE Arts and ArtShape Mammoth present works in a range of disciplines by Ann Barlow, Wendy Copp, Barbee Hauzinger, Winnie Looby, Lyna Lou Nordstrom and Ted Wimpey. Through October 31. Info, artshapemammoth@ gmail.com. Info, 363-4746. Flynndog in Burlington. FRANK DEANGELIS: Paintings by the self-taught Burlington artist. Through October 15. Info, frank@ closetohomevt.com. Info, 448-3657. Revolution Kitchen in Burlington. ‘HERBERT BARNETT: VERMONT LIFE AND LANDSCAPE, 1940-1948’: An exhibition that reexamines the contribution of this midcentury modernist painter through the subject matter and time period in which his distinctive style found its greatest expression: Vermont landscapes of the 1940s. Through December 15. ‘SPIRITED THINGS: SACRED ARTS OF THE BLACK ATLANTIC’: An exhibition featuring objects from the Yorùbá religion of West Africa, as well as Haitian Vodou, Cuban Santería, Brazilian Candomblé and Caribbean Spiritism. These faiths emerged from the practices of enslaved Africans who blended their ancestral cultures with that of their captors. Through December 16. Info, 656-0750. Fleming Museum of Art, University of Vermont in Burlington.

Healthy volunteers ages 18 to 50 Determine your eligibility COMPENSATION POSSIBLE IF ENROLLED IN FUTURE RESEARCH

Email UVMVTC@UVM.EDU or visit UVMVTC.ORG

Contact the Vaccine Testing Center at 802-656-0013 for more info and to schedule a screening. Leave your name, number and a good time to call back. 6h-uvmVaccinetesting(FriendlyMosquito)061417.indd 1

8/28/17 10:15 AM

Celebrating 26 Years Annual Anniversary Sale!

INNOVATION PLAYGROUND EXHIBIT: An exhibit celebrating lifelong play and its role in sparking technological, social and artistic innovation in our community. Features giant blue blocks, virtual galaxies, a cardboard spaceship and a fully equipped maker space. In partnership with Champlain College Emergent Media Center and Generator. Through January 15, 2018. Free with admission or ECHO membership. Info, 864-1848. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain in Burlington. ‘INTERPOSE’: A group exhibition curated by Susan Smereka featuring works by Kate Donnelly, Wylie Sofia Garcia, Molly Greene, Lucy Leith and Estefania Puerta. Through October 24. Info, 355-5440. New City Galerie in Burlington. IVAN KLIPSTEIN: Original drawings of the Old North End, created for the artist book Emerald Moon Over Dirty Lake. Through October 31. Info, 863-8278. Barrio Bakery in Burlington. LAUREN STORER: “The Magic of Cuba,” photographs taken in Cuba in March 2017 by the local photographer. Through November 26. Info, 503-7666. Black Horse Gallery in Burlington. NORTHERN VERMONT ARTIST ASSOCIATION: An exhibition of works by association artist-members. Through October 31. Info, 859-9222. Art’s Alive Gallery @ Main Street Landing’s Union Station in Burlington. ‘OFF THE WALL’: Works by more than 20 members of the Milton Artists Guild. Through October 31. Info, 863-6458. Frog Hollow Vermont Craft Gallery in Burlington.

20% OFF Storewide* Friday, October 13 thru Sunday, October15 www.KissTheCook.net 72 Church Street • Burlington • 863-4226 16 Merchants Row • Middlebury • 349-8803 * excludes electronics and promos 4t-Kissthecook100417.indd 1

10/2/17 3:18 PM

! ‘PHISH IN THE NORTH COUNTRY’: An exhibition

of posters and show flyers to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the WaterWheel Foundation, the charitable partnership of Phish and their fan community. Gallery talk with Phish archivist Kevin Shapiro: Saturday, November 4, 1-3 p.m. Through December 30. Info, 652-4500. Amy E. Tarrant Gallery in Burlington.

SOUTH END ART HOP ORIGINAL JURIED WINNERS CIRCLE SHOW: Works by winners of the South End

BURLINGTON SHOWS

» P.82

obsessed? Find, fix and feather with Nest Notes — an e-newsletter filled with home design, Vermont real estate tips and DIY decorating inspirations. Sign up today at sevendaysvt.com/enews. 12h-nest.indd 1

ART 81

BILLYBOB: Works by the art team consisting of William Coil and Robert Green. Through October 31. Info, 859-9222. The Gallery at Main Street Landing in Burlington.

Screen for future research to develop vaccines against mosquito-borne viruses

DANA TALMO & GRACE WILSON: An exhibition of works by the local artists. Through October 31. Info, 865-6223. Cavendish Gallery & Collective in Burlington.

SEVEN DAYS

TALK: ‘VISUALIZING RENEWABLE ENERGY’: In conjunction with “Land & Lens,” photographer Jamey Stillings speaks about his decades-long work taking documentary photographs of the Earth, with a particular interest in conservation and renewable energy. Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, Tuesday, October 17, 4:30 p.m. Info, 443-3168.

Your Global Community Needs You!

10.11.17-10.18.17

TALK: ‘THE SACRED & THE SECULAR’: Marlon Blackwell, an architect working outside the architectural mainstream, speaks about design strategies that draw upon vernaculars, typologies and the contradictions of place. Johnson Memorial Building, Middlebury College, Tuesday, October 17, 7 p.m. Info, 443-3168.

CORRINA THURSTON: “Animals in Colored Pencil,” more than 30 works by the wildlife artist Corrina Thurston. Through October 26. Info, corrinathurston@gmail.com. Info, 383-1505. New Moon Café in Burlington.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

TALK: ‘SEEING THE WORLD AS THE FIRST STEP TOWARD SAVING IT’: In conjunction with “Land & Lens,” Bill McKibben discusses recent ways of seeing that satellites and scientific instruments have provided, and how we might use visual technology to help protect the Earth. Middlebury College Museum of Art, Thursday, October 12, 4:30 p.m. Info, 443-5007.

WEST NILE VIRUS • DENGUE FEVER • ZIKA

11/18/15 12:07 PM


art BURLINGTON SHOWS

« P.81

Art Hop juried show, selected by New York gallerist Asya Geisberg: Jeffrey Robbins, Eleanor Lanahan and Teresa Celemin, with people’s choice winner Patrick Krok Horton. Through November 30. Info, 859-9222. SEABA Center in Burlington.

December 31. Info, 479-8500. Vermont Heritage Galleries in Barre. JENNI BEE: Ink drawings and “fuzz monsters” by the local artist. Through October 31. Info, 229-9416. Montpelier City Hall.

MARGE PULASKI & HELEN RABIN: Paintings and studies by the Vermont artists. Through November 3. Info, 426-3581. Jaquith Public Library in Marshfield. NICK NEDDO: “Primeval Pigments,” works created using primitive skills from tools and materials

‘SHOW 21’: The collective gallery showcases the latest works by its contemporary artist members, as well as drawing, printmaking and sculpture by Alisa Dworsky. Through November 18. Info, 552-0877. The Front in Montpelier.

UVM ALUMNI SHOW: Fifth annual showcase of works by former students. Through November 1. Info, 656-3131. Livak Fireplace Lounge and Gallery, University of Vermont Dudley H. Davis Center in Burlington.

‘SKETCHES IN PERFECTION’: Paintings and sketches by Thomas Waterman Wood. Through October 27. Info, 262-6035. T.W. Wood Gallery in Montpelier.

VIKTORIA STRECKER: “Anamnesis,” an evolving, site-specific installation made using a 3-D pen by the Dusseldorf-based artist. Through November 4. Info, dheffern@champlain.edu. Champlain College Art Gallery in Burlington.

! STUDENT PIN-UP EXHIBITION: Thesis exhibition for students graduating from VCFA’s graphic design MFA program. Reception: Friday, October 13, 7-9 p.m. Through October 14. Info, 828-8600. Vermont College of Fine Arts in Montpelier.

chittenden county

‘BIRDING BY THE NUMBERS’: Twenty-four artworks by 23 area artists consider the relationship between ornithology and math. Through October 31. Info, 434-2167. Birds of Vermont Museum in Huntington.

WENDY SOLIDAY: “As I Pass By,” pastel paintings by the East Montpelier artist. Through November 18. Info, 371-4100. Central Vermont Medical Center in Berlin.

‘THE HISTORY OF RACING IN MILTON’: An exhibition about the town’s role as a Chittenden County stock-car-racing hot spot. Through October 31. Info, 363-2598. Milton Historical Society.

YVONNE STRAUSS: Whimsical folk paintings in acrylic and watercolor, inspired by the natural landscape and its woodland creatures. Through October 31. Info, 223-1981. The Cheshire Cat in Montpelier.

‘IMPRESSIONS OF LAKE CHAMPLAIN & BEYOND’: New paintings by Helen Nagel, Ken Russack, Athenia Schinto and Carolyn Walton. Through December 30. Info, 985-8223. Luxton-Jones Gallery in Shelburne.

stowe/smuggs

‘ART OF THE SELFIE’: An exhibition featuring work by Andy Warhol, Suzy Lake, Carrie Mae Weems, Marina Abramovic, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer and emerging artists who explore the expression and transformation of self-images and identity. Curated by Sarah McCutcheon Greiche. MICHAEL ROCCO RUGLIO-MISURELL: “Enough to Divide a Room,” a solo exhibition of recent sculptures and prints by the Berlin-based artist. Through November 11. Info, 253-8358. Helen Day Art Center in Stowe.

‘PIECED TRADITIONS: JEAN LOVELL COLLECTS’: Historic bedcovers gathered by the Californiabased collector and longtime friend of the Shelburne Museum. Through October 31. ‘SWEET TOOTH: THE ART OF DESSERT’: An exploration of the American appetite for sweets and its impact on modern visual culture. Through February 18, 2018. Info, 985-3346. Shelburne Museum.

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

KATRA KINDAR: “The Inside Outcome,” watercolor paintings by the local artist. Through October 31. Info, 985-8922. Village Wine and Coffee in Shelburne.

‘LAND & LIGHT & WATER & AIR’: Annual juried exhibition featuring more than 100 landscape paintings by New England artists. Through November 5. Info, mickey@bryangallery.org. ‘LEGACY COLLECTION 2017’: Works by 19 living and 14 deceased artists whose art continues the legacy of Alden and Mary Bryan. Through December 23. DENNIS SHEEHAN: A solo exhibition of more than 20 of the artist’s landscape paintings. Through November 5. Info, 644-5100. Bryan Memorial Gallery in Jeffersonville.

barre/montpelier

‘ROCK SOLID XVII’: An annual showcase of stone sculpture and assemblage by area artists. ATHENA PETRA TASIOPOULOS: “Amended,” stitched collages by the recipient of the 2016-17 SPA studio residency. MOLLY BOSLEY: “We’re All Fine Here,” contemporary papercut works. Through November 4. Info, 479-7069. Studio Place Arts in Barre.

‘FABRIC OF OUR LIVES’: An exhibition featuring a wide variety of textile art by regional artists. Through November 21. Info, grangehallcc@gmail. com. Grange Hall (Berlin).

82 ART

CHARLIE BLUETT: “Elements,” abstract-expressionist paintings by the Westfield artist. KATHLEEN KOLB: “Thin Places, Long Light,” paintings of Ireland and Vermont by the Lincoln artist. Through October 15. Info, 253-8943. West Branch Gallery & Sculpture Park in Stowe.

‘OF LAND & LOCAL: WATERSHED’ AT SHELBURNE FARMS: The fifth annual collaboration of the BCA Center and Shelburne Farms, featuring works by 16 new and returning artists who are continuing last year’s focus on watershed. Through October 29. Info, 865-7166. McClure Education Center, Shelburne Farms.

‘EXPLORERS OF NORWICH’: An exhibition exploring the lives of Norwich University alumni who shaped and changed the U.S. during the mid-19th and early 20th centuries. Through June 30, 2018. Info, dlarkin@ norwich.edu. Info, 485-2183. Sullivan Museum & History Center, Norwich University in Northfield.

‘FREAKS, RADICALS & HIPPIES: COUNTERCULTURE IN 1970S VERMONT’: An exhibition that explores the influx of people and countercultural ideas to the state, from communes to organic agriculture, progressive politics to health care reform, alternative energy to women’s and gay rights. Through

NIKKI EDDY: Paintings by the Vermont artist. Through November 15. Info, 595-4866. The Hive in Middlesex. RENÉ SCHALL: “New England Stone Portraits,” paintings of rocks by the Vermont artist. Through December 15. Info, 476-2131. Morse Block Deli in Barre.

STEVE SHARON: Abstract paintings by the Vermont artist and musician. Through October 31. Info, 658-6016. Speeder & Earl’s Coffee in Burlington.

CRAIG MOONEY: “Green Mountain State of Mind,” paintings of pastures, cities and seascapes. Through December 29. Info, 828-0749. Vermont Supreme Court Gallery in Montpelier.

including fibers, furs, berries, beeswax, mud, sticks and stones. Through December 29. Info, 828-0749. Governor’s Gallery in Montpelier.

‘EXPOSED’: The 26th annual multi-site exhibition of outdoor public sculpture, curated by Rachel Moore. Through October 21. Info, mail@helenday.com. Various Stowe locations.

‘Ordinary Time’ Curated by Stephanie Walker, director of the Walker

Contemporary, this exhibition at the Bundy Modern in Waitsfield features paintings and kinetic sculpture by Grace DeGennaro and Anne Lilly, respectively. Both artists use mesmerizing geometry to evoke serenity throughout motion and time. DeGennaro places archetypal forms and patterning against deep, solid backgrounds in two dimensions, while Lilly’s stainless steel sculptures require viewers to instigate the works’ smooth motion, provoking contemplation of their place in the order of things. “So much of the power in this show lies in its subtlety,” Walker writes, “and I think that’s often the way women work, offering incredibly profound sentiments encased in profound beauty.” Through October 22. Pictured: “Shroud” by DeGennaro.

‘A STITCH IN TIME’: Quilts, samplers and embroidery work created by women in the 18th and 19th centuries. GROUP EXHIBIT: The third annual group exhibition, featuring works by Robert Waldo Brunelle Jr., Renee Greenlee, Phil Herbison, Jen Hubbard, Jean O’Conor, John Sargent, Kent Shaw, Rett Sturman and Homer Wells. Through October 20. Info, 888-1261. Gallery at River Arts in Morrisville. LAUREN ROSENBLUM: “Flora, Fauna & Fiber,” luminescent fiber art by the Long Island artist. Through October 20. Info, 253-7767. Stowe Craft & Design. MELISSA FAIRGRIEVE: “Coastal Excavation,” a thesis exhibition featuring large, multiple-piece works in oil and graphite on paper. Through October 20. Info, 635-1469. Julian Scott Memorial Gallery, Johnson State College.


ART SHOWS

MELORA GRIFFIS: “Beyond All Walking,” new and recent work by the New York City-based artist. Through October 14. Info, 881-0418. 571 Projects in Stowe. ‘VERMONT LANDSCAPES’: A group exhibition featuring 38 paintings by 18 artists, curated by Bryan Memorial Gallery. Through December 30. Info, 644-5100. Lamoille County Courthouse in Hyde Park.

mad river valley/waterbury

‘MULTI-MEDIA MANIA’: First annual non-juried exhibition of fine art and quality custom crafts by Vermont artists and artisans. Through October 14. Info, 496-6682. Big Red Barn Gallery at Lareau Farm in Waitsfield. ‘ORDINARY TIME’: An exhibition of works by Maine painter Grace DeGennaro and kinetic sculpture by Boston artist Anne Lilly, curated by Stephanie Walker of Walker Contemporary. Through October 22. Info, 617-842-3332. Bundy Modern in Waitsfield. PAMELA DRUHEN: “Seasons,” mixed-media thread paintings by the Vermont artist. Through October 15. Info, knevin421@gmail.com. Waitsfield United Church of Christ. ‘TRANSITIONS: REALISM TO ABSTRACT’: An exhibition featuring a wide range of works by Valley Arts artists. Through October 21. Info, 496-6682. Vermont Festival of the Arts Gallery in Waitsfield. ‘WAXING ARTISTIC: ENCAUSTIC AND COLD WAX BY THREE ARTISTS’: Works utilizing wax by Alice Cheney, Kate Fetherston and Kathy Stark, demonstrating three different approaches to the medium. Through October 27. Info, 244-7801. Axel’s Gallery & Frame Shop in Waterbury.

middlebury area

‘THE ART OF WORD’: Mixed media, collage, installation and paintings by six Bristol artists: Rachel Baird, Reagh Greenleaf Jr., Lily Hinrichsen, Basha Miles, Annie Perkins and Karla Van Vliet. Through November 30. Info, kvanvlie@middlebury. edu. ARTSight Studios & Galleries in Bristol. ‘THE COLOR OF WATER’: Works by 40 member artists that reflect on Vermont’s blue natural spaces. Through October 15. Info, 877-3850. Creative Space Gallery in Vergennes.

ETHAN HUBBARD: “Driving the Back Roads: In Search of Old-Time Vermonters,” a retrospective of the photographer’s work in Vermont. Through January 6, 2018. Info, 388-4964. Vermont Folklife Center in Middlebury.

SELECT GALLERY MEMBERS GROUP SHOW: An exhibition featuring works by a large number of

FACULTY EXHIBIT: Pottery, photography, paintings, prints and more by Jennifer Baker, Kevin Bubriski, Valerie Carrigan, Christine Schultz and Karen Swyler. Through October 28. Info, 287-8398. Feick Arts Center in Poultney. JOAN CURTIS: “Living With the Earth,” three collections of paintings by the Brandon artist. Through October 31. Info, galleries@castleton.edu. Rutland City Hall. KERRY FURLANI & RICHARD WEIS: Sculpture and slate carvings by Kerry O. Fulani and figurative abstract paintings of Richard Weis. Through October 28. Info, 287-8398. Feick Arts Center, Green Mountain College in Poultney.

! ‘NETWORKS: THE CRACKERJACK ART OF CHUCK WELCH AND THE FE’MAIL’ CONSPIRACY’: Mail art contributed by Chuck “The Cracker Jack Kid” Welch and hundreds of artists from more than 20 countries, as organized by Tara “Sinclair Scripa” Verheide. Reception: Friday, October 13, 6-8 p.m. Through November 8. Info, 504-358-3137. Christine Price Gallery, Castleton University. NORMA JEAN ROLLET: “Portraits of the Vermont Landscape,” paintings by the Middlebury artist. Through October 31. Info, 247-4956. Brandon Artists Guild. SCULPTFEST2017: Guest curator Whitney Ramage selected sculptural and video installations for this annual exhibit, this time responding to the theme “The State of Hope.” Artists include Jessica Adams, Lila Ferber, Charles Hickey, Yasunari Izaki, Kate Katomski, Tom Kearns, John Morris with Maya Murphy, Gary Parzych, Rick Rothrock, Ryan Smitham and Joanna Sokolowska. Through October 22. Info, 438-2097. The Carving Studio & Sculpture Center in West Rutland. SUSAN BULL RILEY: “Natural Affection,” paintings inspired by Vermont’s natural landscape. Through October 28. Info, 247-4295. Compass Music and Arts Center in Brandon.

upper valley

‘CAPE COD MODERN HOUSES’: Original Basswood models and photographs of the Cape’s endangered modern houses, presented in collaboration with the Cape Cod Modern House Trust (CCMHT). Through October 15. Info, 439-3730. Towle Hill Studio in Corinth. EN PLEIN AIR EXHIBITION & ART SALE: An exhibition and sale of works created during the previous week’s En Plein Air Painting Festival. Through October 14. Info, 359-5000. Vermont Institute of Natural Science Nature Center in Quechee. ‘THE FRUITS OF TIME: HEIRLOOM APPLES, THEN AND NOW’: Using photographs, illustrations, historical interpretation and compelling narratives, this exhibit explores the story of heirloom apples and shows how to bring old trees back into production. Through October 15. Free with $6 admission. Info, 765-4288. Justin Morrill Homestead in Strafford. LANDARTLAB 2017: An exhibition of site-specific work by Mary Admasian, Ethan Ames, Barbara Bartlett, Brenna Colt, Charlet Davenport, Nera Granott Fox, Susie Gray, Rachel Gross, Margaret Jacobs, Marek Jacism, Jay Mead, Mary Mead,

ANN YOUNG: Oil portraits of local people and scenes of the New York City subway. Through October 19. Info, 525-3366. Parker Pie Co. in West Glover. ‘BELLS & WHISTLES’: An exhibition exploring the myriad forms and associations connected to these ordinary objects. Through May 1, 2018. Info, 626-4409. The Museum of Everyday Life in Glover. ‘BORDERLINES’: Four Northeast Kingdom artists reflect on gender, culture, politics and the environment: mixed-media collages by Vanessa Compton, acrylic paintings by Chuck Trotsky, illustrated books by Anna Weisenfeld and sculptural installations by Gampo Wickenheiser. Through November 26. Info, 533-9097. Highland Center for the Arts in Greensboro. ‘BOREAL FEAST’: A group exhibition of paintings, collages, photographs, sculptures, textiles and more that examine the fantastic and highlight the beauty of northern forests. Through October 31. Info, 533-2045. Miller’s Thumb Gallery in Greensboro. CECELIA KANE: “A Year of Forgetting,” a selection of new paintings mapping a year of daily mental lapses. Through December 1. Info, 592-3216. Peacham Town Library. STEVE MALSHUK: “The People of Chhattisgarh, India’s Crown Jewels” documentary photographs by the Newport native. Through November 4. Info, 334-1966. MAC Center for the Arts Gallery in Newport. W. DAVID POWELL: “Curiosities of History and Science in the Old World and New,” collages, digital prints, tapestries, paintings and assemblages by the Underhill artist and professor. Through November 18. Info, 748-0158. Northeast Kingdom Artisans Guild Backroom Gallery in St. Johnsbury.

brattleboro/okemo valley

‘HOPE AND HAZARD: A COMEDY OF EROS’: A group exhibition curated by American artist Eric Fischl featuring some 65 artists and more than 80 paintings, photographs, works on paper and sculptures. Artists include Tracy Emin, Nicole Eisenman, Yves Klein, Jeff Koons, Robert Mapplethorpe, Francis Picabia, Man Ray, Jason Rhoades, Hannah Wilke and many more. ‘READY. FIRE! AIM.’ AT HALL ART FOUNDATION: Joint exhibition curated by former BCA curator DJ Hellerman, inspired by Andy and Christine Hall’s art-collecting philosophy. DAVID SHRIGLEY: A solo exhibition of roughly 25 works by the British artist, including drawings, animations, paintings and sculpture. Through November 26. Info, 952-1056. Hall Art Foundation in Reading. JOANNE RUSSO: “Win, Lose or Draw: My Journey Through Cancer,” drawings by the Vermont artist. Through October 13. Info, info@mainstreetarts.org. Main Street Arts in Saxtons River. ROGER SANDES: “Constellations,” a new series of kaleidoscopic works featuring the artist’s colorful, patterned paintings surrounded by secondary manipulations of these originals. Through January 8, 2018. Info, 257-0124. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center. SUSAN OSGOOD: “Mapping the Unknown,” a solo exhibition of monotypes, oil paintings and collages. Through November 5. Info, 251-8290. Mitchell Giddings Fine Arts in Brattleboro. TERRY JOHN WOODS: “Line of Horizon,” works by the designer and author of New Farmhouse Style,

AL HIRSCHFELD: A selection of drawings and prints by the late artist and pop-culture caricaturist. Through October 31. Info, 362-7200. Art Manchester. ‘GRANDMA MOSES: AMERICAN MODERN’: An exhibition that reconsiders the work and legacy of Anna Mary Robertson “Grandma” Moses within the framework of the artist’s contemporaries and cultural milieu. Through November 5. ‘PHOTOGRAPHS BY LAURA GILPIN AND HER CIRCLE: GERTRUDE KÄSEBIER, CLARENCE H. WHITE, AND CLARA SIPPRELL’: Early 20th-century photographs by the noted photographer and her friends and acquaintances. Through December 30. Info, 447-1571. Bennington Museum. NORTH BENNINGTON OUTDOOR SCULPTURE SHOW: The 20th annual outdoor sculpture exhibition, featuring works by more than 30 area artists. Through October 29. Info, 442-5549. Vermont Arts Exchange at Sage Street Mill in North Bennington. ‘VERMONT ARTISTS THEN & NOW’: An exhibition honoring Barbara Melhado and celebrating Vermont artists, including founding members of the center. Through October 15. Info, 362-1405. Elizabeth de C. Wilson Museum, Southern Vermont Arts Center in Manchester.

randolph/royalton

‘FROM GREEN TO FALL’: The Clara Martin Center’s second annual art and poetry show celebrating creativity in mental health, wellness and recovery. Through November 5. Info, 728-9878. Chandler Center for the Arts in Randolph. JOAN KAHN: “See the Woods for the Trees,” compositions of geometric forms and vivid colors by the California painter. Through October 14. Info, 349-0979. BigTown Gallery in Rochester.

! MEGAN MURPHY: “In the Garden,” paintings in watercolor and mixed media. Reception: Thursday, October 12, 6 p.m. Through October 31. Info, 685-2188. Chelsea Public Library. PAT LITTLE: “Landscapes From Around New England,” paintings by the Massachusetts artist. Through October 20. Info, 889-9404. Tunbridge Public Library in Tunbridge Village.

outside vermont

KIRA’S GARDEN: An outdoor juried exhibition of sculpture. Through August 23, 2018. Info, 603-4483117. AVA Gallery and Art Center in Lebanon, N.H. ‘LA BALADE POUR LA PAIX: AN OPEN-AIR MUSEUM’: An outdoor public exhibition featuring 67 “stations” along rue Sherbrooke with sculpture and photographs by international world-class artists. Through October 29. Info, 514-285-2000. Various Montréal locations. ‘MNEMOSYNE’: An exhibition pairing ancient and modern European works with contemporary art by Canadian artists. Through May 20, 2018. MERYL MCMASTER: “In-Between Worlds,” photographic self-portraits that explore the combination and transmutation of bicultural identities and cultural histories. Through December 3. Info, 514-285-2000. Montréal Museum of Fine Arts. ‘RESONANT SPACES: SOUND ART AT DARTMOUTH’: Seven sound commissions by internationally recognized artists Terry Adkins, Bill Fontana, Christine Sun Kim, Jacob Kirkegaard, Alvin Lucier, Laura Maes, Jess Rowland and Julianne Swartz. Through December 10. Info, 603-646-3661. Hood Museum, Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H. ‘VISUAL SWAY: POLITICAL ART FROM THE COLLECTION AT PLATTSBURGH STATE ART MUSEUM’: An exhibition exploring the intersection of art and politics guest-curated by Jason Miller. Through November 3. Info, 518-564-2474. Plattsburgh State Art Museum, N.Y. !

ART 83

PATRICK SHOEMAKER: “The Strong and The Weak,” a solo exhibit of paintings inspired by mythology and lore, rooted in American history and folk art. Through October 15. Info, 877-2173. Northern Daughters in Vergennes.

rutland/killington

northeast kingdom

manchester/bennington

SEVEN DAYS

LYN DUMOULIN: “Places of the Heart,”watercolors by the Middlebury artist that reflect her passion for nature and outdoor activities. Through November 12. Info, 382-9222. Jackson Gallery, Town Hall Theater in Middlebury.

‘YOURS IN THE CAUSE: FACES OF RADICAL ABOLITION’: Rarely seen historic photographs depicting 14 pre-Civil War-era abolitionists, chosen for their ties to the Robinson family as documented in letters, account books and broadsides, which are also on view. Through October 29. Info, 877-3406. Rokeby Museum in Ferrisburgh.

LOIS MASOR BEATTY & MAUREEN O’CONNOR BURGESS: Prints by the local artists. Through November 30. Info, 295-5901. Two Rivers Printmaking Studio in White River Junction.

Summer House, and Farmhouse Modern. Through October 31. Info, 875-8900. DaVallia at 39 North in Chester.

10.11.17-10.18.17

‘A STORY OF ART’: GIFTS AND BEQUESTS FROM CHARLES MOFFETT ’67 AND LUCINDA HERRICK: Organized by assistant professor of history of art Carrie Anderson and her students, this eclectic selection of drawings, photographs, paintings and sculpture tells a story of artistic production from its conception to its afterlife. ‘LAND & LENS: PHOTOGRAPHERS ENVISION THE ENVIRONMENT’: A comprehensive survey of photographs drawn primarily from the museum’s collection, featuring some 70 images that address environmental appreciation, concern or activism. Through December 10. Info, 443-3168. Middlebury College Museum of Art.

‘THE SOVIET CENTURY: 100 YEARS OF THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION’: Highlights from the museum’s holdings of Russian art, including photographs, luxury items by Fabergé and a recently acquired Soviet poster. Through December 10. Info, 443-5258. Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College.

Murray Ngoima, Tracy Penfield, Otto Pierce, Cristina Salusti and Jeffrey Simpson. Curated by Jay Mead and Meg Brazill, this is an extension of SculptureFest; both sites connected by a walking trail. Children are welcome. Pets must be on a leash. Through October 31. Info, 457-4552. King Farm in Woodstock.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

‘DRAW ME A STORY, TELL ME A TALE’: Paintings, illustrations, photographs and completed books by 18 contemporary Vermont children’s book authors and artists. Through January 13, 2018. Info, 388-2117. Henry Sheldon Museum of Vermont History in Middlebury.

the gallery’s artists. Through October 22. Info, 349-0979. BigTown Gallery Vergennes.


movies Battle of the Sexes

S

pouses Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris seemed destined to be tagged in promos for any new film they made as “the team behind Little Miss Sunshine.” No more. The pair has directed scores of music videos and documentaries and runs a company that creates award-winning TV commercials. They’ve made just three features, however, and this is the best. From here on, I’d guess, their promos will say “the team behind Battle of the Sexes.” Fall has finally made it to the multiplex. Time for movies that turn out to be awards contenders. Even the ones that don’t will reek way less than the dreck late summer sent our way. Blade Runner 2049 and Battle of the Sexes couldn’t be less alike, but both are welcome signs of the season’s change. This is an exceptional film, insightfully conceived and built on a beautifully written script by British Oscar winner Simon Beaufoy (Slumdog Millionaire). It doesn’t hurt that Emma Stone and Steve Carell do perhaps the most exquisite work of their careers. Each delivers a richly layered, ridiculously appealing performance. Stone captures Billie Jean King’s essence at a pivotal juncture in her professional and personal life. At 29, she was the world’s top-

ranked women’s tennis star and, apparently, happily married. The filmmakers do a superb job of illuminating her evolution into a leader in the women’s movement and an (eventually) out lesbian. For all its comic cultural satire, the movie’s heart is a love story. Andrea Riseborough costars as the stylist who helped change not just the way King wore her hair but the way she lived. Carell tackles a tricky job here. Bobby Riggs was a complex figure — a Wimbledon champion, compulsive gambler, showman and self-promoter. He was 55 in 1973, when he tapped the country’s zeitgeist for his million-dollar idea: Defeat the No. 1 women’s player and prove once and for all the superiority of men. I vividly recall the media coverage of his provocative stunts and boasts. What I was too young to realize was that Riggs was largely mocking male chauvinism, not espousing it. Most of the big talk about a woman’s place being in the kitchen or bedroom was calculated to generate publicity and interest in the match. He wanted to make a buck, not a statement. But his shenanigans put King in a tough spot. She’d rejected his initial proposal. Her goal, after all, was to get people to take female athletes seriously. After Riggs played

NET GAINS The latest from Dayton and Faris celebrates King’s gift for translating victory on the court into advances in social justice.

and beat Margaret Court, King realized it fell to her to set the record straight and agreed to play under certain conditions. One put fellow player Rosie Casals in the control booth with Howard Cosell. The rest is history. Which, we know, has a habit of repeating itself. Battle of the Sexes isn’t just great fun; it is, I regret to report, timely. What a shock to hear some of the dismissive, demeaning comments made by the legendary sportscaster. Even more appalling is the resemblance they bear to things being said and done in the Oval Office today, like the

administration’s assault on women’s reproductive rights, its ban on military service by transgender Americans and its repeal of protections against sexual discrimination in the workplace. King more than merits this big-screen tribute to her playing, her work for social justice and the progress she made for the women’s movement. What a shame that, almost half a century after that match, it feels like Riggs ran for president. And this time came out on top. RI C K KI S O N AK

84 MOVIES

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Blade Runner 2049

A

belated sequel to a beloved film is always at least part homage — unless it’s all cash-grab. Blade Runner 2049 is decidedly not the latter. With this long, unwieldy and ambitious film, director Denis Villeneuve (Sicario, Arrival) makes the world of Ridley Scott’s 1982 sci-fi classic his own, bringing to it his characteristic strengths and weaknesses. There’s a lot of story, perhaps too much. There are awe-inspiring visuals, courtesy of cinematographer Roger Deakins. There is moody strolling where most movies of comparable budget would have nonstop explosions. There are dark reflections on the possibility of meaningful agency in a corrupt world. That last theme is where Villeneuve’s noir tendencies (best seen in Sicario) intersect with the original Blade Runner, which was both a work of futurism and a noir pastiche. In that film, a jaded cop (Harrison Ford) hunts down bioengineered androids called “replicants” after they stop obediently serving humanity. Set 30 years later, 2049 has the same premise, with one key exception: Blade runner K (Ryan Gosling) is a replicant. One of a new generation created by tech tycoon Niander Wallace (Jared Leto), he “retires” antiquated replicants who weren’t, as he was, designed for flawless compliance. During one such assigned hit, K discovers evidence that a female replicant has, improbably, given birth. “This breaks the world,” K’s

MR. ROBOT Humans once again commit the cardinal mistake of creating servants in their image in Villeneuve’s sequel.

boss (Robin Wright) hisses at him, before telling him to find and murder the miracle child whose existence challenges human dominion. Meanwhile, the sinister Wallace is eager to secure the replicant offspring for his own ends. Anyone can guess that K’s quest will eventually lead him toward players from the original film. The surprise is that their reappearance feels like a detour, slowing down and unfocusing the film just as K’s story becomes most compelling.

While it’s always nice to see Ford back and committing to a role, Leto’s performance is a distracting attempt to recapture the campier aspects of the original. Ultimately, they’re both less interesting than K’s search for fulfillment with a digital love interest (Ana de Armas) and his dawning sense that he can make choices on his own. While Blade Runner’s themes (“What does it mean to be human?”) were old hat even in 1982, its immersive urbanscape was totally new — part modern Tokyo and part

gritty old-time LA, part nostalgia and part future dread. Villeneuve can’t give us the thrill of seeing that for the first time, but he shows us new marvels: the laboratory where replicant memories are manufactured, future LA’s vast garbage dump (formerly known as San Diego), an orange-hazed Las Vegas where icons of the past perform as holograms. Philip K. Dick’s midcentury pessimism meets climate-change consciousness in this world clothed in a dreamlike, funereal sheen, the monumental graveyard of an Earth wasted by human overreach. Finding meaning there is quixotic, yet K does emerge, in his own way, as a hero. Popular with neither critics nor audiences when it opened, Blade Runner slowly built a cult of viewers seduced by its unique vision. Yet there’s an irony at the heart of its built-in nostalgia, and the nostalgia surrounding it now. In the film’s world, memories can be programmed, which means your fond recollections of seeing Blade Runner on first run are no guarantee that you aren’t actually an android. But would it matter? For all its flaws, Blade Runner 2049 is the kind of film that provokes such questions — a big-budget genre movie that respects its audience’s intelligence, and an homage that adds something beautifully new. MARGO T HARRI S O N


MOVIE CLIPS

NEW IN THEATERS THE FOREIGNER: Jackie Chan plays a businessman who seeks help from a British government official (Pierce Brosnan) to bring to justice the terrorists who killed his daughter. Martin Campbell (Green Lantern) directed the action thriller. (114 min, R. Essex, Majestic, Palace) HAPPY DEATH DAY: In this horror twist on Groundhog Day, a girl must relive the day of her murder until she figures out whodunit. Jessica Rothe and Israel Broussard star. Christopher Landon (Scouts Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse) directed. (96 min, PG-13. Essex, Majestic, Marquis, Roxy) PROFESSOR MARSTON & THE WONDER WOMEN: Psychologist and Wonder Woman creator William Moulton Marston (Luke Evans) wasn’t content with just one wonder woman, suggests this portrait of him and two ladies in his life (Rebecca Hall, Bella Heathcote). Angela Robinson (Herbie Fully Loaded) wrote and directed. (108 min, R. Essex, Palace)

NOW PLAYING 21 X NY: Piotr Stasik’s documentary follows New Yorkers from the subway onto the street to paint a portrait of the modern city. (70 min, NR) AMERICAN ASSASSIN 1/2 Based on Vince Flynn’s 2010 novel, this action-packed thriller from Michael Cuesta follows a black-ops recruit (The Maze Runner’s Dylan O’Brien) seeking revenge for acts of tragedy and terrorism. Michael Keaton and Taylor Kitsch also star. (111 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 9/20) AMERICAN MADE 1/2 Tom Cruise plays Barry Seal, a former TWA pilot who worked for both the CIA and drug cartels in the 1980s, in this fact-based action comedy from director Doug Liman (Edge of Tomorrow). With Sarah Wright and Domhnall Gleeson. (115 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 10/4) BATTLE OF THE SEXES Steve Carell and Emma Stone play Billie Jean King and Bobby Riggs in this comedy-drama about their historic 1973 tennis match. With Andrea Riseborough and Natalie Morales. Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris (Little Miss Sunshine) directed. (121 min, PG-13; reviewed by R.K. 10/11)

DOLORES Peter Bratt’s documentary charts the struggles of Dolores Huerta, a feminist mother of 11 who helped start the first farmers’ union in the 1950s. (95 min, NR)

= refund, please = could’ve been worse, but not a lot = has its moments; so-so = smarter than the average bear = as good as it gets

MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL 2017: Viewers vote on the best film and actor after seeing this showcase of 10 short narrative films from around the world, with themes ranging from weighty to comic. (Running time approx. 105 min, NR) THE MOUNTAIN BETWEEN US 1/2 Two strangers (Idris Elba and Kate Winslet) stranded in the wilderness by a plane crash fight to survive in this drama from director Hany Abu Assad (The Idol). With Beau Bridges and Dermot Mulroney. (103 min, PG-13)

Ready to recruit some new talent? Our readers are planning their next career moves. Employers get results with Seven Days Jobs — our brand-new, mobile-friendly, online job board at jobs.sevendaysvt.com.

SAME GREAT CE SERVI

Job Recruiters: • Post jobs using a form that includes key info about your company and open positions (location, application deadlines, video, images, etc.). • Accept applications and manage the hiring process via our new applicant tracking tool. • Easily manage your open job listings from your recruiter dashboard.

MY LITTLE PONY: THE MOVIE The Mane 6 must use the magic of friendship to save Ponyville in this family animation. With the voices of Emily Blunt, Kristin Chenoweth and Liev Schreiber. Jayson Thiessen directed. (99 min, PG)

EW ALL-N TE I S B WE

Job Seekers: • Search for jobs by keyword, location, category and job type.

PERSON TO PERSON 1/2 This comedy-drama from writer-director Dustin Guy Defa follows a group of New Yorkers over a single day. Michael Cera, Abbi Jacobson and Philip Baker Hall star. (84 min, NR)

• Set up job alert emails using custom search criteria.

POP AYE 1/2 In Thailand, an architect takes a wandering elephant on a journey home in this drama from director Kirsten Tan, starring Thaneth Warakulnukroh. (104 min, NR)

• Apply for jobs directly through the site.

• Save jobs to a custom list with your own notes on the positions. • Share jobs on social media channels.

THE STRAY 1/2 Pups and prayers both loom large in this inspirational drama from director Mitch Davis (Christmas Eve). Sarah Lancaster and Michael Cassidy star. (92 min, PG) STRONGER Jake Gyllenhaal plays Jeff Bauman, who lost both legs in the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing, in this biographical drama directed by David Gordon Green (Pineapple Express). With Tatiana Maslany and Miranda Richardson. (116 min, R) TRANSFORMERS: THE LAST KNIGHT 1/2 In the fifth Michael Bay-directed film in this toy-based franchise, humans and Transformers battle. Mark Wahlberg, Laura Haddock and Anthony Hopkins star. (148 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 6/28)

Launch your recruitment campaign today on jobs.sevendaysvt.com!

VICEROY’S HOUSE 1/2 In 1947, Lord Mountbatten (Hugh Bonneville), India’s last viceroy, prepares for the nation’s independence in this period piece from director Gurinder Chadha. Gillian Anderson and Michael Gambon also star. (106 min, NR) NOW PLAYING

Get a quote when you post online or contact Michelle Brown: 865-1020, ext. 21, michelle@sevendaysvt.com.

» P.87 2v-jobsgohire052417.indd 1

5/23/17 5:21 PM

MOVIES 85

RATINGS ASSIGNED TO MOVIES NOT REVIEWED BY RICK KISONAK OR MARGOT HARRISON ARE COURTESY OF METACRITIC.COM, WHICH AVERAGES SCORES GIVEN BY THE COUNTRY’S MOST WIDELY READ MOVIE REVIEWERS.

THE LEGO NINJAGO MOVIE In the second spin-off of The LEGO Movie, a team of teen LEGO ninjas is tasked with defending their island from evil. With the voices of Dave Franco, Justin Theroux and Kumail Nanjiani. Charlie Bean, Paul Fisher and Bob Logan directed the family animation. (101 min, PG)

SEVEN DAYS

ratings

KINGSMAN: THE GOLDEN CIRCLE In the sequel to the hit Bond-esque satire Kingsman: The Secret Service, the very British secret agents find themselves forced to ally with a parallel organization in the U.S. Taron Egerton and Colin Firth star. Matthew Vaughn again directed. (141 min, R)

GO HIRE.

10.11.17-10.18.17

FLATLINERS 1/2 In this remake of the unmemorable 1990 thriller, medical students give themselves near-death experiences, with creepy results. Ellen Page, Diego Luna and Nina Dobrev star. Niels Arden Oplev (The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo) directed. (108 min, PG-13)

IT 1/2 Half of Stephen King’s horror novel, about a gang of misfit kids fighting a monster that takes on the likeness of a creepy clown, comes to the big screen. Jaeden Lieberher, Jeremy Ray Taylor and Bill Skarsgård star. Andy Muschietti (Mama) directed. (135 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 9/13)

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

BLADE RUNNER 2049 1/2 Ryan Gosling plays an LA cop tracking down a long-missing slayer of androids (Harrison Ford) in this sequel to the landmark 1982 sci-fi film. With Dave Bautista and Robin Wright. Denis Villeneuve (Arrival) directed. (163 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 10/11)

INGRID GOES WEST 1/2 Aubrey Plaza plays a young woman who moves to LA to stalk her favorite Instagram star (Elizabeth Olsen) in this Sundance-lauded comedy, the feature debut of director Matt Spicer. With O’Shea Jackson Jr. (98 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 10/4)


movies

LOCALtheaters

The Mountain Between Us The Stray Stronger

(*) = NEW THIS WEEK IN VERMONT. FOR UP-TO-DATE TIMES VISIT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/MOVIES.

friday 13 — thursday 19

Viceroy's House

BIG PICTURE THEATER

48 Carroll Rd. (off Rte. 100), Waitsfield, 496-8994, bigpicturetheater.info

wednesday 11 — thursday 12

wednesday 11 — thursday 12

wednesday 11 — thursday 12

American Made Battle of the Sexes Blade Runner 2049 (2D & 3D) Flatliners *Happy Death Day (Thu only) It Kingsman: The Golden Circle The LEGO Ninjago Movie The Mountain Between Us My Little Pony: The Movie

Blade Runner 2049 (2D & 3D) It Kingsman: The Golden Circle Manhattan Short Film Festival 2017 Viceroy’s House Victoria and Abdul

Blade Runner 2049 It Kingsman: The Golden Circle The LEGO Ninjago Movie

American Made Battle of the Sexes Blade Runner 2049 (2D & 3D) Flatliners *The Foreigner (Thu only) It Kingsman: The Golden Circle The LEGO Ninjago Movie The Mountain Between Us My Little Pony: The Movie *Professor Marston and the Wonder Women (Thu only)

friday 13 — tuesday 17

friday 13 — wednesday 18

Blade Runner 2049 It Kingsman: The Golden Circle The LEGO Ninjago Movie (Sat & Sun only) The Mountain Between Us

American Made Battle of the Sexes Blade Runner 2049 (2D & 3D) *The Foreigner *Happy Death Day Kingsman: The Golden Circle The LEGO Ninjago Movie The Mountain Between Us My Little Pony: The Movie *Professor Marston and the Wonder Women

BIJOU CINEPLEX 4

Rte. 100, Morrisville, 888-3293, bijou4. com

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

wednesday 11 — thursday 12

CAPITOL SHOWPLACE 93 State St., Montpelier, 229-0343, fgbtheaters.com

wednesday 11 — thursday 19 Battle of the Sexes Blade Runner 2049 (2D & 3D) Kingsman: The Golden Circle The Lego Ninjago Movie (Sat & Sun only) The Mountain Between Us Wind River

friday 13 — wednesday 18 American Made Battle of the Sexes Blade Runner 2049 (2D & 3D) *The Foreigner *Happy Death Day It Kingsman: The Golden Circle The LEGO Ninjago Movie The Mountain Between Us My Little Pony: The Movie

MARQUIS THEATRE Main St., Middlebury, 388-4841, middleburymarquis.com

wednesday 11 — thursday 12 Blade Runner 2049 Kingsman: The Golden Circle friday 13 — thursday 19 Blade Runner 2049 *Happy Death Day

222 College St., Burlington, 864-3456, merrilltheatres.net

friday 13 — thursday 19 Blade Runner 2049 *Happy Death Day Ingrid Goes West It Kingsman: The Golden Circle Manhattan Short Film Festival 2017 Viceroy’s House Victoria and Abdul

PALACE 9 CINEMAS

10 Fayette Dr., South Burlington, 8645610, palace9.com

PARAMOUNT TWIN CINEMA

241 North Main St., Barre, 479-9621, fgbtheaters.com

wednesday 11 — thursday 12 It The LEGO Ninjago Movie (2D & 3D) friday 13 — thursday 19 American Made It

THE SAVOY THEATER 26 Main St., Montpelier, 229-0598, savoytheater.com

wednesday 11 — thursday 12 American Assassin Blade Runner 2049 Kingsman: The Golden Circle friday 13 — thursday 19 Battle of the Sexes Blade Runner 2049 Kingsman: The Golden Circle

SUNSET DRIVE-IN

155 Porters Point Rd., Colchester, 8621800, sunsetdrivein.com

friday 13 — sunday 15 Schedule not available at press time.

WELDEN THEATRE

104 No. Main St., St. Albans, 527-7888, weldentheatre.com

wednesday 11 — thursday 12 Blade Runner 2049 It Kingsman: The Golden Circle friday 13 — thursday 19 Blade Runner 2049 Kingsman: The Golden Circle The LEGO Ninjago Movie (Sat & Sun only) The Mountain Between Us

21 X NY Dolores Person to Person Pop Aye

wednesday 11 — thursday 12 American Made Blade Runner 2049 (2D & 3D) **Deconstructing the Beatles’ Revolver (Thu only) *The Foreigner (Thu only) It Kingsman: The Golden Circle The LEGO Ninjago Movie **Met Opera: Norma (Wed only)

LOOK UP SHOWTIMES ON YOUR PHONE!

GO TO SEVENDAYSVT.COM ON ANY SMARTPHONE FOR FREE, UP-TO-THE-MINUTE MOVIE SHOWTIMES, PLUS OTHER NEARBY RESTAURANTS, CLUB DATES, EVENTS AND MORE.

SHOP

and Going Off Antidepressants?

You may be eligible to participate in a research study testing a cognitive-behavioral course to prevent a depression relapse while you are off your meds.

LOCAL

CHANNEL 15

HOWARD CENTER COMMUNITY EDUCATION SERIES

Volunteers, 18 or over, please call (802) 656-9890. Visit our study website: http://www.uvm.edu/~krohan/moms4moms/

FRIDAYS > 7:30 P.M. GET MORE INFO OR WATCH ONLINE AT VERMONTCAM.ORG

Psychological Science Department, University of Vermont

8h-uvmdeptofpsych( pregnantantidressive)100417.indd 1

Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-4678, stowecinema.com

wednesday 11 — thursday 19

PREGNANT Participants receive the 12-session course at no cost and up to $75 to complete study measures.

86 MOVIES

MERRILL’S ROXY CINEMAS

190 Boxwood St. (Maple Tree Place, Taft Corners), Williston, 878-2010, majestic10.com

Schedule not available at press time.

10.11.17-10.18.17

MAJESTIC 10

21 Essex Way, Suite 300, Essex, 8796543, essexcinemas.com

wednesday 11 — thursday 19

SEVEN DAYS

ESSEX CINEMAS & T-REX THEATER

American Made Blade Runner 2049 *The Foreigner It Kingsman: The Golden Circle The LEGO Ninjago Movie **Met Opera: Die Zauberflöte (Sat & Wed only) The Mountain Between Us *Professor Marston and the Wonder Women Stronger **Tokyo Ghoul (subtitled) (Mon, Tue & Thu only) **Turner Classic Movies: The Princess Bride (Sun & Wed only)

STOWE CINEMA 3 PLEX

and say you saw it in…

9/29/17 2:13 PM 16t-shoplocal-guy.indd 1

4/24/12 3:56 PM


MOVIE CLIPS

NOW PLAYING

« P.85

VICTORIA AND ABDUL This historical drama from director Stephen Frears (Philomena) traces the friendship between Queen Victoria (Judi Dench) and a young Indian clerk (Ali Fazal). With Tim Pigott-Smith and Eddie Izzard. (112 min, PG) WIND RIVER Elizabeth Olsen plays an FBI agent who enlists the help of a local tracker (Jeremy Renner) to solve a murder on a Native American reservation in the directorial debut of Taylor Sheridan (who wrote Hell or High Water and Sicario). (107 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 8/30)

BASIN HARBOR • OCTOBER 14 • 4-8pm

Annual Bacon & Beer Festival!

NOW ON VIDEO

MAUDIE 1/2 Sally Hawkins plays Canadian folk artist Maud Lewis in this biopic that explores her hard-scrabble life with her husband (Ethan Hawke). Aisling Walsh (“Fingersmith”) directed. (115 min, PG-13)

BABY DRIVER Edgar Wright (Hot Fuzz) wrote and directed this action thriller about a young getaway driver (Ansel Elgort) trying to leave the biz. With Kevin Spacey, Jon Hamm and Lily James. (113 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 7/5/17)

WISH UPON 1/2 A teenager (Joey King) discovers that using a magical, wish-granting box brings dire consequences in this horror flick from director John Leonetti (Annabelle). With Ryan Philippe and Ki Hong Lee. (90 min, PG-13)

THE BEGUILED In director Sofia Coppola’s remake, set during the Civil War, the women of an isolated Virginia girls’ school take in a wounded Union soldier. Nicole Kidman, Colin Farrell and Kirsten Dunst star. (93 min, R)

LIVE MUSIC FROM 4-8 PM featuring: Eric George & the Last Dimes, the Justin Panigutti Band, and Rumblecat All-you-can-eat buffet starting at 5 PM Lawn games for adults and kids, plus face painting, balloon animals, and a bouncy house

OKTOBERFEST BEER TASTING Hogback Mountain and Hired Hand on tap Giant bonfire after the live music ends Save money and get your tickets early through FlynnTix basinharbor.com 802.475.2311

6H-basinharbor101117.indd 1

10/9/17 3:09 PM

More movies!

Film series, events and festivals at venues other than cinemas can be found in the calendar section.

OFFBEAT FLICK OF THE WEEK B Y MARGOT HARRI SON

Pop Aye

Offbeat Flick of the Week: We pick an indie, foreign, cultish or just plain odd movie that hits local theaters, DVD or video on demand this week. If you want an alternative to the blockbusters, try this!

sevendaysvt.com/liveculture.

802-860-EDGE edgevt.com/join MOVIES 87

READ THESE EACH WEEK ON THE LIVE CULTURE BLOG AT

SEVEN DAYS

When was the last time you saw a movie about a guy with a midlife crisis going on a road trip ... with an elephant? That's what happens in the directorial debut of Singapore-born Kirsten Tan, who shot her film in Thailand. Frustrated with his marriage and his career, architect Thana (Thaneth Warakulnukroh) meets an elephant he believes was part of his childhood and sets out to return "Popeye" to his hometown. Along the way, the two encounter a gallery of colorful characters. "Nothing about this journey ends up quite the way anyone imagined it would," writes Kenneth Turan in the Los Angeles Times, "but this trip is worth your time." Pop Aye is currently playing at the Savoy Theater in Montpelier.

10.11.17-10.18.17

Available for purchase until 10/18/17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

GROUP EXERCISE ONLY MEMBERSHIPS

ESSEX | SOUTH BURLINGTON | WILLISTON 3v-edge101117.indd 1

10/9/17 11:05 AM


fun stuff FRAN KRAUSE

88 FUN STUFF

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Have a deep, dark fear of your own? Submit it to cartoonist Fran Krause at deep-dark-fears.tumblr.com, and you may see your neurosis illustrated in these pages.

EDIE EVERETTE


MORE FUN! STRAIGHT DOPE (P.26) CALCOKU & SUDOKU (P.C-4) CROSSWORD (P.C-5)

Northeastern Mountain Society of Clinical Hypnosis (NMSCH) announces 3 new Workshops NMSCH presents

Clinical Hypnosis Treatments for Teen & Adult ADHD & Comorbids: Addiction, Anxiety, Depression, OCD, ODD & PTSD Research and Practical Applications Workshop

October 20, 2017 Workshop 8:30am-5:00pm Holiday Inn, Burlington, VT Eligible: Licensed Health & Mental Health Clinicians, Educators & Graduate students in Education & Healthcare programs CEUs (pending) - MH Counselors, Psychologists, Social Workers

é Registration Required é Hypnosis training helpful but not required

REGISTRATION & INFO: www.NMSCH.org

HYPNOVATIONS & NMSCH

present two workshops

Basic Fundamentals of Clinical Hypnosis AND Intermediate, Skills & Applications of Clinical Hypnosis

at Okemo Mtn, Ludlow, VT November 10 - 12, 2017 Eligible: Licensed Health & Mental Health Clinicians & Graduate students CEUs (pending) - MH Counselors, Nurses, Psychologists, Social Workers

REGISTRATION & INFO: www.Hypnovations.com

8h-hypnovations092017-2.indd 1

art

WE

9/19/17 2:51 PM

VERMONT

Plan your art adventures with the Seven Days Friday email bulletin including:

Ċ Ċ Ċ Ċŗ

Receptions and events Weekly picks for exhibits “Movies You Missed” by Margot Harrison News, profiles and reviews

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/REVIEW

8h-review-heart.indd 1

Memory Care Excellence

1/13/14 5:09 PM

Reflections Memory Care collaborating with Harvard Medical School, Brigham & Women’s Hospital and McLean Hospital.

Serving our residents

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

since 1999

10.11.17-10.18.17

For more information contact Alicia Butson, Tel 802-985-9847 abutson@residenceshelburnebay.com

185 Pine Haven Shores, Shelburne, VT 05482 www.residenceshelburnebay.com 7days_memory.indd 1 Untitled-13 1

5/11/17 5/12/17 11:04 11:42AM AM

FUN STUFF 89

TO SUBMIT, GO TO: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOKE.

SEVEN DAYS

Calling All Jokers!

What if we told you that you could share your jokes with the world?

The Residence at Shelburne Bay has relationships with some of the most sophisticated healthcare organizations in the world, allowing us to combine the finest memory care available, with the warm, lifeaffirming environment that has always been our hallmark.


fun stuff JEN SORENSEN

HARRY BLISS

“Yes, Greg, I do remember that time my mother broke her hip.”

90 FUN STUFF

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

RACHEL LIVES HERE NOW


REAL FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY OCTOBER 11-18

LIBRA

(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22)

“I am more interested in human beings than in writing,” said author Anaïs Nin, “more interested in lovemaking than in writing, more interested in living than in writing. More interested in becoming a work of art than in creating one.” I invite you to adopt that perspective as your own for the next 12 months, Libra. During this upcoming chapter of your story, you can generate long-lasting upgrades if you regard your life as a gorgeous masterpiece worthy of your highest craftsmanship.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “I was satisfied

with haiku until I met you,” Dean Young tells a new lover in his poem “Changing Genres.” But Young goes on to say that he’s no longer content with that terse genre. “Now I want a Russian novel,” he proclaims, “a 50-page description of you sleeping, another 75 of what you think staring out a window.” He yearns for a story line about “a fallen nest, speckled eggs somehow uncrushed, the sled outracing the wolves on the steppes, the huge glittering ball where all that matters is a kiss at the end of a dark hall.” I bring Young’s meditations to your attention, Gemini, because I suspect that you, too, are primed to move into a more expansive genre with a more sumptuous plot.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Statistical evidence suggests that Fridays falling on the 13th of the month are safer than other Fridays. The numbers of fires and traffic accidents are lower then, for example. I find this interesting in light of your current situation. According to my analysis, this October’s Friday the 13th marks a turning point in your ongoing efforts to cultivate stability and security. On this day, as well as the seven days before and seven days after, you should receive especially helpful clues about the future work you can do to feel even safer and more protected than you already do. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Too much propaganda and not enough real information are circulating through your personal sphere.

You’re tempted to traffic in stories that are rooted more in fear than insight. Gossip and hype and delusion are crowding out useful facts. No wonder it’s a challenge for you to sort out the truths from the half-truths! But I predict that you will thrive anyway. You’ll discover helpful clues lodged in the barrage of bunkum. You’ll pluck pithy revelations from amidst the distracting ramblings. Somehow, you will manage to be both extra sensitive and super discriminating.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A journalist named Jenkin Lloyd Jones coined the term “Afghanistanism,” which he defined as “concentrating on problems in distant parts of the world while ignoring controversial local issues.” I want to urge you Virgos to avoid engaging in a personal version of Afghanistanism. In other words, focus on issues that are close at hand, even if they seem sticky or prickly. Don’t you dare let your attention get consumed by the dreamy distractions of faraway places and times. For the foreseeable future, the best use of your energy is here and now. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scorpio actress Tara Reid told the magazine Us Weekly about how her cosmetic surgeries had made her look worse than she had been in her natural state. “I’ll never be perfect again,” she mourned. I bring this up in the hope that it will inspire you. In my astrological opinion, you’re at a tuning point when it’s crucial to appreciate and foster everything about yourself that’s natural and innate and soulfully authentic. Don’t fall sway to artificial notions about how you could be more perfect than you already are. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I didn’t

go to work today. I woke up late, lingered over a leisurely breakfast and enjoyed a long walk in the autumn woods. When I found a spot that filled me with a wild sense of peace, I asked my gut wisdom what I should advise you Sagittarians to attend to. And my gut wisdom told me that you should temporarily escape at least one of your duties for at least three days. (Escaping two duties for four

days would be even better.) My gut wisdom also suggested that you get extra sleep, enjoy leisurely meals and go on long walks to spots that fill you with a wild sense of peace. There you should consult your gut wisdom about your top dilemmas.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): A snail climbed to the top of a big turtle’s shell as it was sleeping under a bush. When the turtle awoke and began to lumber away in search of food, the snail was at first alarmed but eventually thrilled by how fast they were going and how far they were able to travel. Wheeee!, the snail thought to itself. I suspect, Capricorn, that this little tale is a useful metaphor for what you can look forward to in the coming weeks. AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “If these years have taught me anything, it is this,” wrote novelist Junot Díaz. “You can never run away. Not ever. The only way out is in.” That’s your plucky wisdom for the coming weeks, Aquarius. You have arrived at a pivotal phase in your life cycle when you can’t achieve liberation by fleeing, avoiding or ignoring. To commune with the only kind of freedom that matters, you must head directly into the heart of the commotion. You’ve got to feel all the feelings stirred up by the truths that rile you up.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): J. Allan Hobson is a scientist of sleep who does research at Harvard. He says we dream all the time, not just at night. Our subconscious minds never stop churning out streams of images. During the waking hours, though, our conscious minds operate at such intensity that the lower-level flow mostly stays subliminal. At least that’s the normal state of affairs. But I suspect your dream generator is running so hot right now that its stories may leak into your waking awareness. This could be disconcerting. Without the tips I’m giving you here, you might worry you were going daft. Now that you know, I hope you’ll tap into the undercurrent to glean some useful intuitions. A word to the wise: The information that pops up won’t be logical or rational. It will be lyrical and symbolic, like dreams.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ARIES (March 21-April 19): In his book The Logic of Failure, Dietrich Dorner discusses the visionaries who built the Aswan Dam in Egypt. Their efforts brought an abundance of cheap electricity to millions of people. But the planners didn’t take into account some of the important effects of their innovation. For example, the Nile River below the dam no longer flooded its banks or fertilized the surrounding land every year. As a result, farmers had to resort to chemical fertilizers at great expense. Water pollution increased. Marine life suffered because of the river’s diminished nutrients. I hope this thought will motivate you to carefully think through the possible consequences of decisions you’re contemplating. I guarantee that you can avoid the logic of failure and instead implement the logic of success. But to do so, you’ll have to temporarily resist the momentum that has been carrying you along. You’ll have to override the impatient longing for resolution.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Are you primed to seek out new colleagues and strengthen your existing alliances? Are you curious about what it would take to infuse your best partnerships with maximum emotional intelligence? From an astrological perspective, the next nine weeks will be a favorable time to do these things. You will have opportunities to deepen your engagement with collaborators who cultivate integrity and communicate effectively. It’s possible you may feel shy about pursuing at least one of the potential new connections. But I urge you to press ahead anyway. Though you may be less ripe than they are, their influence will have a catalytic effect on you, sparking you to develop at an accelerated rate.

CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES & DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES: REALASTROLOGY.COM OR 1-877-873-4888

sponsored by:

SEVEN DAYS FUN STUFF 91

...AND LOVIN’ IT!

ctober 12 Thursday, O ger joined Eva Sollber nados o ci avian afi of at the Birds seum in u Vermont M for the n to Hunting Sit, an annual Big al birding internation n event. o ti identifica

Watch at sevendaysvt.com

4H-Stuck101117.indd 1

10.11.17-10.18.17

Eva Sollberger’s

NEW VIDEO!

10/10/17 3:41 PM


ARTIST, MUSICIAN, ATHLETE Looking for a reasonably attractive, outgoing woman who wants a lover not a fucker and will allow me to be myself. pstn7, 66, l

For relationships, dates and flirts: dating.sevendaysvt.com

WOMEN Seeking MEN

MOSTLY NORMAL, LOOKING FOR SAME I would love to find a man who enjoys live music, road trips, day hikes, campfires and good conversation. I am happy and content with my life, but this world is built for couples, and I miss having that type of connection. I am reasonably intelligent, moderately attractive, and very loyal and patient, with a wicked sense of humor! Peggy05402, 55, l UNCONDITIONAL LOVE: DOES IT EXIST? I assume nothing and take nothing for granted. I like who I am, more so as I age. I desire nothing materialistic. Would love a soul mate who feels the same. VtMokki, 72, l ACTIVE, FUN-LOVING FREE SPIRIT I appreciate beauty, fun, simplicity. I am currently into West Coast swing. I love being active outdoors and meeting new people. Let’s ski, sail, ride, swim, listen to music or experience something new together. Katie_bee, 64, l

92 PERSONALS

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

CREATIVE, ENERGETIC, FUN I hope to meet someone who shares similar interests: love of the outdoors and art, music and family. I hope to find someone who has a bit of a wild side and a huge sense of humor. It would be fabulous to find a partner who I can look toward the future with, make plans, and work toward dreams and goals. mustbemyturn, 46, l NONJUDGMENTAL, FRIENDLY, RELAXED I’m friendly, down-to-earth and a bit quirky. I like living alone; don’t want to change that. I don’t want to be the love of anyone’s life — too much responsibility. I’d like to have someone to spend time with — going out or staying in or walking around the block. I’m easily amused and don’t need to be entertained. MToday, 67 ARE YOU SERIOUS? Looking for a sincere guy not into games! I am looking for friends first, then we’ll see where that goes. Vermont66, 51 I’M THE FUNNY ONE I am delightful. You know this is the part I hate most. Well, as I look at profiles, I see skiing, hiking, all that exercise stuff, and I think to myself, Really? People actually do that? I love humorous people. Let’s just laugh. I haven’t been in a relationship since ‘04. So I thought to myself, Let’s give it a try. biginvt, 56, l GIMME THE BEAT, BOYS ...and free my soul! I’m a big, beautiful 47-y/o woman. Not a girly-girl. More of a T-shirt and jeans person. I do love my music. I like to read. A place where we can have a couple of drinks, play pool and listen to some music sounds like a great date to me. Looking for a relationship/friendship. Some fun! BuckinghamNicks, 47, l

FINDING LOVE TO LAST FOREVER I love the outdoors and time with family. Reading is a new part of my life when I can. Stay very active. Enjoy cooking and trying new recipes for family and friends. If you are interested to learn more, contact me. Tish, 68, l CREATIVE, LOVING DREAMER I am nice-looking with bright blue eyes. I enjoy people and conversation. I love to cook. I love time together, but I also love time apart. I like lectures, reading, documentaries. I also love yoga and walking. I love balance. I want to build a small home, host and live a simple, intentional, beautiful life with a likeminded individual. forfunlife, 58, l FUN, CARING, ADVENTUROUS, OPENMINDED Looking for you and ready to explore our lives. Keep me smiling, and I will keep you happy. Let’s try it together. Long trips, holding your hand, biking, hiking, kayaking or something new to try. Cooking together and making a wonderful partnership and sharing it with our friends and family. VTB0706, 58, l SMART, SASSY AND HONEST Educated, attractive night owl craving intellectual discussions, belly laughs and someone to cook with/try new restaurants. Can’t get enough of Bernie, Maher and George Nori. Picky eaters, early risers, exercise enthusiasts and Republicans need not apply. Let’s watch “Create” for culinary inspiration while competing at Scrabble! Good sense of humor a must. ckramer1, 76, l

CURIOUS? You read Seven Days, these people read Seven Days — you already have at least one thing in common!

All the action is online. Browse more than 2,000 local singles with profiles including photos, voice messages, habits, desires, views and more. It’s free to place your own profile online. Don't worry, you'll be in good company.

l

See photos of this person online.

WITTY, WILDLY WONDERFUL, WARMHEARTED WOMAN My car is small and in good condition, and there’s room in my heart for you. I don’t care about the miles on your odometer, but you must pass inspection! Good tires are a plus, minor dents considered, no beaters, no baggage, no junk in the trunk. Are you up for an adventure? I am, or I wouldn’t be on this site! Sentient, 63, l I LOVE TO TRAVEL! I am a fun-loving, footloose, music-loving lady with a good sense of humor! daylily, 56 LOYAL, SENSITIVE, HUMOROUS — OH, MY! Would soooo rather communicate face-to-face! Love meeting new people and hearing their stories. Although I appreciate quiet alone time, being single is not for me. Love Vermont; can’t imagine living anywhere else. Yet also love travel, and look forward to more adventures. Can’t wait to meet you and engage in meaningful conversation. Until then... SoPhil212, 59, l THINKING OF MOVING NORTH People say that you look young for your age, but it’s only because you still move like a young man. You enjoy thoughtful films and discussions with interesting people. I am a widowed flatlander who has been coming up here for 40 years. I am here during the summer and would like to have a reason to move north. elsewhere, 56, l

MEN Seeking WOMEN

WE’LL KNOW, RIGHT? At peace, a combination of retirement planning, good health and a clean conscious make it easy to be me (now). I am often drawn to low-key pursuits, including but not limited to breakfast out, a drive, live music at a smaller venue, brewpubs, a hike and sexual intimacy just off the trail, world travel, and cooking a meal together. wmorgan, 54, l LET’S ENJOY LIFE TOGETHER The beauty of nature, creative artistry, compassion for others, music (all kinds, as long as it’s good), delectable food, biking, hiking, playing in the water and the snow — these are the kinds of things that make my life fulfilling, especially sharing these with another, or others. I’m all about enjoying the journey. Love4Life, 54, l COUNTRY BOY AT HEART I like to think of myself as kindhearted. Willing to be there for my family and friends. Looking for someone who is willing to try some new adventures together. Would like to get back to doing some outdoor things like hiking, walking, downhill skiing. Truckerfourlife, 53, l COUNTRY BOY LOOKING FOR SOMEONE I am a good-looking guy, and I enjoy the outdoors and like to hunt and fish. I like to have a good time, so hit me up. Harley51, 46, l

HUMOROUS, FUN-LOVING SENIOR I’m looking for an honest, fun, outgoing woman who will enjoy spending time with me going to movies, going out for a quiet dinner, sharing a good laugh and generally enjoying each other’s company. I’m not looking for drama — just someone to share good times with. Mr1950, 67, l LIQUOR MONSTER I like long walks to the liquor store. I have a hard time feeling emotions. I don’t drive, so you’ll have to drive my stupid ass around. I hate horses. They are the worst. Have you ever looked a horse in the eye? Vacant. I love chicken wings more than I will ever love you. Or anything, for that matter. suhdude69, 23, l POLO SHIRT, CLEAN-SHAVEN, CASUAL, POLITE I think of the old style: Ladies first, hold the door and she goes first. I grew up fast in the early ‘70s and have complicity and simplicity at the same time. Most easy to get along with, and I desire someone of that cast. No stress or drama at this point in our lives. larrywhite, 62, l 10 WEEKS I’m in a long-term relationship. My sweet, loving girlfriend has given me permission to see other ladies ... but only for the next 10 weeks! I love older, experienced women. whitestone100, 43 CAFFEINATED CYCLING COSMONAUT Do you ride bikes, drink coffee, stare into space and wish you had an off-planet partner? I can relate and wish to have you join me and my pooch for radical adventures in our local atmosphere. Who knows? Maybe we can get off planet for a vacation or two. phoblin, 33, l QUIRKY WOODSMAN, NERDY CHEF I’ve had crazy adventures and high drama, but I’m more into calm, relaxing nights and just chilling out lately. I do have the potential for an adventure once in a while. Just looking to share some joy and love with a nice girl. ". McGregor8, 42, l ON THE GO Hopeless romantic but still believe. Reserved, but the right woman will draw me out. Sentimentalist not afraid to shed a tear. Enjoy visual and performing arts and volunteering. Play sports, hike and bike. Like music and dancing. Garden and fruit trees. Looking for someone who wants to share their interests, join me in mine and explore new ones together. Kemosabe, 66, l HONEST, DEPENDABLE, PASSIONATE, ROMANTIC I consider myself to be one of the most honest and straightforward people you will ever meet. I am comfortable dressing up, being casual or being naked. Whatever the occasion calls for. LOL. I was raised a gentleman. Having a relationship with someone I’m attracted to physically, mentally and spiritually is what I’m looking for. Gentlemanlover, 50, l I’M HERE FOR YOU, BABY Oh yes, darling, I am here for you. We will create love, make love, share love like it’s the first love, the last love. I will be your everything in love. My dear, we will remove our brassiere, and ecstacy will find us in the rapture of love. Hmmmmmm. barry_white, 47, l

LOVE THE LIFE YOU LIVE Looking for a hippie girl who’s into nature, gardening, hiking, rivers and making art. Let’s do some healthy activities to recharge and maintain our mind, body and spirit! How about a yoga class at the Zenbarn? All loving women welcome! Come check me out! Not a social butterfly, but still a butterfly. # maplelion, 35, l THOUGHTFUL, COURAGEOUS AND CURIOUS Clean, fit, discreet man, early 60s, seeks partner(s?) for exploration of nonbinaryexclusive, non-hierarchical relationship paradigm-shifting. If the old way(s) of being in relationship(s) no longer work or make sense for you, let’s try out some new ones. Curiosity, a sense of adventure, a bit of courage and a good sense of humor would probably help. toferburl, 62, l

WOMEN Seeking WOMEN ATHLETE, HARD WORKER I love to play hockey, bike with friends, help others with house projects and build things for others. I like to meet up with friends for dinner and drinks. I am looking for a fun-loving, patient, active woman for friendship and maybe more. hockeywood, 61

CREATIVE, INTELLIGENT, KIND Hello there! I am looking for you. You are a strong, independent woman who can melt my heart with lingering glances and your intelligent conversation. You match my enthusiasm for the outdoors and can be happy in companionable silence or lively conversation. We can dance, sing along to the radio, and laugh long and hard. It’s all good. PurpleThistle, 50, l ACTIVE, SEXY, NURTURING I am an active doer who loves to spend as much time outside as possible. My dogs and other animals are a big part of my life. I am very nurturing and love to take care of the people I love. I am looking for an active partner who also loves animals and the outdoors. Schltnhund, 55, l KIND, COMPASSIONATE, REFLECTIVE I am looking for someone interested in becoming so present in life and all it may be. I enjoy tinkering in the home, making creations in my woodshop, getting dirty in the garden and writing my deepest thoughts. Would enjoy warming the sofa and sharing a meal, learning about myself and you through connection. abcvt, 44, l FUNNY, MELLOW, NATURE AND MUSIC Not a lot of free time, but it would be nice to find a person to chillax with once in a while. ComicMellow, 40, l

MEN Seeking MEN

LONGTIME BACHELOR SEEKING MORE Admittedly, I’m not sure what I’m looking for. I’m an asexual introvert with a love of animals. A cynical optimist and someone who loves discussion and arguments about politics, religion, video games, movies etc. I stopped dating to find out who I was and where I wanted to go, and now I feel I’m ready to see what’s out there. MakesUWonder, 31, l HUGGER I am looking for friendship and a partner to love and for a partner to love me, too. Like to go places with a man — nightclubs, movies, out to eat. Also like dinners at home and hugging and being with the man I love. Watching movies together and having a beer together. And traveling together also. Bearliker, 61


Want to go explore places and go on road trips? Must be independent, responsible and open-minded. Age between 25 and 30. #L1096

Internet-Free Dating!

Reply to these messages with real, honest-to-goodness letters. DETAILS BELOW.

Sexy at 70? You betcha! Female seeking equally frisky male about my age. Let’s have dinner out and come home for dessert. #L1095 I’m an artist and retired college professor seeking a likeminded gentleman who likes jazz, blues, opera, going to the movies, eating out, riding bikes, watching TV, loves to read, reads the New Yorker magazine and enjoys cooking. Seeks male 63-67. #L1094

Senior gay white male seeks gay black male. Want friend and lover. I need a passionate man to keep me warm this winter in my bed. I’m retired, and only a man knows another man’s likes. I’m smooth and versatile. I’ve been around for a long time. Just be clean, healthy and gentle. Champagne is waiting for you. #L1100 Road trip: Destinations? Packing list? My wishlist might include mountain lake swims, city nights, tickets to a play and totally unmapped adventures; much laughter, good books. What’s your list look like? Progressive, youthful female (57) seeks male for shared joys. #L1099

SWM seeking SWF age 48 to 58. I’m funny, handsome and honest. Just looking for a nice, average lady for long-term relationship. Someone to adore and care about. All letters will be answered graciously. #L1098 Average-build 55-y/o women seeking average-build 47- to 65y/o male for a real relationship. Be true to one’s self. Big heart, love, honest communicator. No games or drugs. Good cook is a bonus. Funny, gentle, protective not controlling. Familyoriented. #L1097 I’m a young woman looking for a friend who loves hikes, art, staying fit and eating healthy.

HOW TO REPLY TO THESE MESSAGES:

MAIL TO: Seven Days Love Letters

P.O. Box 1164, Burlington, VT 05402 PAYMENT: $5/response. Include cash or check

I’m a 70-something in Caledonia County. Bernie girl seeking a male companion for picnics, bikes, occasional Saturday night dates. Love reading, gardening, writing, dancing, and Bread and Puppet Circus. #L1091.

Attractive SWF, 63, active with many interests. Ready smile looking for dating to LTR with gentlemen of similar traits. Country home, self-sufficient. Would love a partner to share life’s adventures. Widowed, miss cuddling. Chittenden/ Addison County. #L1053 Almost 39-y/o woman; brunette with hazel eyes. Undergrad student sending herself to school. Loves motorbikes, kayaking, exploring, cooking. Very straitlaced; DD-free. Looking for all-American type of guy for a fun summer. #L1051

65-y/o divorced WM seeking woman for casual encounters and maybe more. I do have some health issues such as artery disease and neuropathy. I am a nondrinker and seeking the same. Please write if interested. #L1049 SWM, 59, romantic outdoorsman, enjoys what all four Vermont seasons have to offer. Blue/green eyes, brown hair, kind, loyal, good listener, sense of humor, and still has a youthful body and enthusiasm. Enjoys downtime, cuddling, watching movies. Seeks likeminded 45- to 60-y/o SWF for sharing nature, music and adventures. #L1044

Describe yourself and who you’re looking for in 40 words below:

Required confidential info:

(OR, ATTACH A SEPARATE PIECE OF PAPER.)

__________________________________________

I’m a _________________________________________________ ______

NAME

AGE + GENDER (OPTIONAL)

seeking a____________________________________________ ___________ AGE + GENDER (OPTIONAL)

__________________________________________ ADDRESS

_______________________________________________________

__________________________________________

_______________________________________________________

__________________________________________

_______________________________________________________

ADDRESS (MORE)

CITY/STATE

10.11.17-10.18.17

(made out to “Seven Days”) in the outer envelope. To send unlimited replies for only $15/month, call Ashley at 802-865-1020, ext. 37 for a membership (credit accepted).

Here I am being a 73-y/o woman wondering if I’ll have one more man to love/to love me. A telepath would be fun; an empath for sure! Listening to Pentatonix now, drinking a strawberry-kefir smoothie and reading. #L1092

Lonely like me? I would like to meet a man who is retired like me for friendship and possible relationship. I am 70, attractive and an honest lady. #L1088

50-plus man seeks bright, funloving woman who enjoys arts/ music/theater, nature, creative living, cooking, humor; who’s active physically, culturally, sociopolitically, philosophically, spiritually liberal and openminded. Friendship and/or romance. No punk/metal/hard rock. #L1050

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Seal your reply — including your preferred contact info — inside an envelope. Write your penpal’s box number on the outside of that envelope and place it inside another envelope with payment.

SWF seeking SWM ages 55 to 68 who is sincere, honest, cleancut, nonsmoker and dog lover. No drugs! I enjoy country rides, beer and burgers, campfires, flea markets, dining out, and long walks. Friendship first. #L1093

I’m a 60-y/o male seeking a female 55 to 65. Gentleman, farmer, gardener. Cook and will share with nice lady. Enjoy movies, tennis, warm beaches in winter, talking and watching the sunset. In the Northeast Kingdom. #L1090.

__________________________________________

1

Submit your FREE message at sevendaysvt.com/loveletters or use the handy form at right.

_______________________________________________________

2

We’ll publish as many messages as we can in the Love Letters section above.

3

Interested readers will send you letters in the mail. No internet required!

MAIL TO: SEVEN DAYS LOVE LETTERS • PO BOX 1164, BURLINGTON, VT 05402 OPTIONAL WEB FORM: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/LOVELETTERS HELP: 802-865-1020, EXT. 37, LOVELETTERS@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ZIP

__________________________________________ PHONE

SEVEN DAYS

PUBLISH YOUR MESSAGE ON THIS PAGE!

_______________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________

Hookups and I-Spy sections must be submitted online at dating.sevendaysvt.com.

PERSONALS 93

THIS FORM IS FOR LOVE LETTERS ONLY. Messages for the Personals,


i SPY

If you’ve been spied, go online to contact your admirer!

dating.sevendaysvt.com

BEETLES AT STOWE BREW FEST? Me: staying cool in one of the chairs in the shade of the expo tent with a male friend who is not my boyfriend. You: Beetles (?) shirt talking to some other people in the slice of shade. We locked eyes a few times before you and your friend moved on. Want to seek cover together? When: Saturday, July 29, 2017. Where: Stowe Brewers Festival. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914136 SHIRTLESS RUNNER, BURLINGTON BIKE PATH WAVOBX so much better in person! I was biking with my daughter. Spotted (and recognized) you immediately. I should have tripped you, but I didn’t want to mess with your stride. When: Sunday, October 1, 2017. Where: Burlington Bike Path. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914135 LAST RESORT A stunning smile, kind eyes and easy conversation have greeted me most of my summer Sundays. I should have asked you out when I was not with my doughnut-loving daughter, but I found myself tongue-tied when we officially introduced ourselves. What will you do with all your market-less Sundays? Silas, would you be interested in a hike and a beer? When: Sunday, October 1, 2017. Where: farmers market. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914134

SEVEN DAYS

10.11.17-10.18.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

WINOOSKI RAVEN Perched next to me, in the sheen of your wing I could see myself with you, soaring through pink and orange skies. But I’m stuck between the ground and clouds, loving both. And the ground holds me, and I can’t hold you. So send me some nudes. When: Tuesday, October 3, 2017. Where: Winooski. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914133 LOST: BEST FRIEND If you see her with her head hanging down low, / Tell her we were both wrong, and God will only know, / If we can be forgiven. / Until then, we will continue on loving, giving and livin’. When: Friday, September 15, 2017. Where: Milton. You: Woman. Me: Woman. #914132 TRAPPED AT A WEDDING... But we made the best of it. I gave you a lift in a golf cart, and you may have had one too many cider doughnuts. I would’ve liked to finish our conversation; maybe over drinks? When: Friday, September 29, 2017. Where: Shelburne. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914131

PRETTY. AWKWARD. PRETTY AWKWARD. We knew each other in another life, and I saw you again for the first time in years. It was a magical night, full of pleasant surprises, insightful conversation and amazing experiences. The English language has over 170,000 words, yet none of them adequately describe your stunning beauty and sparkling personality. When: Wednesday, September 27, 2017. Where: El Gato, the N’ender. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914129 SANDWICH IN THE GRAVEYARD You were sitting in the graveyard eating a sandwich. Your shirt said “Sex is cool,” and I could not stop myself from watching you devour it. You kept squirting more hot sauce onto it, and I wished that I was the meat between that bun. Your beauty is beyond anything I have ever seen in this town. Let me be your deli boy. When: Wednesday, September 27, 2017. Where: graveyard. You: Woman. Me: Woman. #914128 WAITING OUTSIDE AUTOMASTER’S SERVICE CENTER I picked you up in my KIA Soul this morning and was too shy to tell you how very much I enjoyed our conversation. You are a beautiful and intelligent woman, and I would enjoy seeing you again. I hope we can have coffee or something sometime. I hope to hear from you again. When: Tuesday, September 26, 2017. Where: BMW Automaster’s Service Center. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914127 TINA FROM COSTCO Seeing you walk up the aisle with that shy but friendly smile as you said hello made my day, same as it has every other time we’ve met. I’ve always thought you were very attractive, but I don’t get to see you more than a few times every year. If you see this, please look me up. When: Monday, September 25, 2017. Where: Costco. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914125 TRADER J Your checkout skills were impeccable. You brightened the afternoon with your conversation....maybe I’ll run into you at the bank sometime. " When: Sunday, September 24, 2017. Where: Trader Joe’s. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914124 LEONARDO’S PIZZA DELIVERY MAN I was biking my Leonardo’s home. You were out delivering pizza. At the corner of North Champlain and Manhattan, we were both turning. You said, “Don’t

worry, I won’t hit you. You have our pizza” as you turned onto 127. There’s nothing sexier than a man who looks out bicyclists. Pizza sometime?! When: Saturday, September 23, 2017. Where: North Champlain and Manhattan. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914122 A TOUCH AND A SMILE You said hello with a touch on my arm and a friendly smile toward the end of Grace Potter’s set as you walked by with friends. Please contact me if you would like to speak some more. When: Sunday, September 17, 2017. Where: Grand Point North. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914121 CITY MARKET CHECKOUT SMILE So cute in your black-and-white summer skirt, black top, long hair, and polished nails, with your daughter in tow. Me: in blue plaid shirt. You: envious of my salad, strawberries and wine I would have shared. Your sweet smile made my evening. It kept going heading out in your black CRV. Thanks! Hope to see it again someday. When: Tuesday, September 19, 2017. Where: City Market/Onion River Co-op, Burlington. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914120 BARNES & NOBLE BIKER You were in the music section, holding a helmet and buying a record. I didn’t catch the name of the artist. I was in line in front of you, learning which Zeppelin DVDs I should purchase. I don’t have much to say other than: Want to hang out? When: Thursday, September 21, 2017. Where: Barnes & Noble. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914119 SAM, CALL ME STEVE I was trying hard to focus on all the AT set-up information you were giving me, but your smile was too distracting. Grab a beer before you head to New Hampshire? When: Thursday, September 21, 2017. Where: OGE. You: Man. Me: Man. #914118 ARTSRIOT ANGEL You: black, backless bodysuit at the Pinegrove show. Multiple nose piercings, beautiful eyes and a glowing smile. Me: breathless when I managed to catch your eye for a fleeting moment. I am not even looking for a response — just wanted to let you know that dancing in your presence made my night. When: Wednesday, September 20, 2017. Where: ArtsRiot. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914117 MEET CUTE, MONTPELIER COOP SALAD BAR 6 p.m. You: sexy, sweet, spunky woman with short light-brown hair and a smile to write an iSpy about. Caught me off guard as you complimented my really red hair and “coordinated outfit.” I said “thank you” three times. In my mind we should have broken out into song and dance. I think we should play dress up and do anything fun. When: Tuesday, September 19, 2017. Where: Hunger Mountain Coop, Montpelier. You: Woman. Me: Woman. #914116

Your wise counselor in love, lust and life

ASK ATHENA Dear Athena,

I began seeing this guy about four months ago. We’ve already had sex and are moving on to more kinky and fun things in the bedroom. I want a serious relationship with him and to make him fall in love with me, but he is saying to take things slow, and that he rarely jumps from girl to girl — therefore he is serious about me. He hasn’t been talking to any girls, seeing anyone or having sexual affairs with anyone but me (as far as I know). I believe him, but I’m not sure if he is just using me. He does crazy things sometimes, like always making me deep-throat, etc. What do you think? Is he using me for his pleasure only, or could he possibly be serious?

Signed,

Kinky Love

Dear Kinky Love,

First of all, hear this: You can’t make someone fall in love with you. He says he’s serious. You’re pretty sure he hasn’t been playing the field. What else can he do to convince you he’s committed? Ask yourself that question, and then don’t be afraid to ask him for what you need. If he’s truly serious about you, I imagine he’ll be happy to give it. But don’t be mistaken: There is no party trick or password, no gesture or act that can move this thing along faster. Give your romance room to grow. You might be pleasantly surprised at what it grows into. Falling in love is rarely a “one look and I knew” sort of thing. It takes time, patience and faith for most long-term partnerships to evolve. Your relationship is still very new. Maybe this kinkiness is a way of becoming more vulnerable and intimate with one another — making room for love to blossom. However, playing bedroom games and having kinky sex — or any sex, for that matter — must always be consensual. In no way should sex be a method to win someone’s heart. If you ever feel you’re doing anything that isn’t motivated by your own desire or needs, stop! And take a break to reassess if he’s really worth sacrificing your self-worth. Regard your body as a temple. Treat it with kindness, and share it with someone who honors it the way you do. Sex is not a tool to wield love or power in a relationship. Talk to your partner. Tell him how you’d like your relationship to be. If you two are going to last, an open line of communication is the only road to your life together.

Yours,

94 PERSONALS

Athena

Group play, BDSM, and kink profiles are now online only at:

dating.sevendaysvt.com

Need advice?

You can send your own question to her at askathena@sevendaysvt.com.


s t n i o The P ! k c a b s i r u o T d l r o W Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your chance to win a trip to see the band

The Lumineers and Walk The Moon

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

in Jacksonville, Florida!

10.11.17-10.18.17

FOR ALL THE DETAILS HIT WWW.POINTFM.COM... OR JUST TUNE IN!

SEVEN DAYS

104.7 & 93.3 BURLINGTON 93.7 MIDDLEBURY 104.7 & 100.3 MONTPELIER 95.7 THE NORTHEAST KINGDOM 103.1 & 107.7 THE UPPER VALLEY

95

1T-ThePoint101117.indd 1

10/9/17 2:52 PM


GOLD SPONSORS

SEASON SPONSORS

2017/2018 SEASON GLENN MILLER ORCHESTRA

Thursday | October 12, 2017 | 7:00 PM

AMERICA’S GOT TALENT:

FLIP FABRIQUE: CATCH ME! Sunday | October 15, 2017 | 7:00 PM

CANDID CAMERA : 8 DECADES OF SMILES Hosted by Peter Funt

AN INTIMATE SOLO EVENING WITH

Sunday | October 22, 2017 | 7:00 PM

Wednesday | October 25, 2017 | 8:00 PM

AMOS LEE

LUKAS NELSON

Country Legend DAVID CROSBY PUDDLES PITY PARTY ROSANNE CASH & FRIENDS

& POTR + NIKKI LANE

Saturday | November 11, 2017 | 8:00 PM

Sunday | November 12, 2017 | 7:00 PM

Saturday | November 18, 2017 | 8:00 PM

THE VIENNA BOYS CHOIR

SCOTTY McCREERY

A CHARLIE BROWN RECYCLED ON CHRISTMAS LIVE STAGE! PERCUSSION

Thursday | December 7, 2017 | 7:00 PM

Friday | December 15, 2017 | 8:00 PM

TOSCA: Puccini

New Production Saturday, January 27, 2018 | 12:55 PM

DIE ZAUBERFLÖTE: Mozart Saturday, October 28, 2017 12:00 PM Encore

THE EXTERMINATING ANGEL: Adès Saturday, November 25, 2017 12:55 PM Encore

Full listing at: Untitled-7 1

L’ELISIR D’AMORE: Donizetti

New Production Sunday, February 11, 2018 12:55 PM Encore

LA BOHÈME: Puccini Saturday, February 24, 2018 12:30 PM

PARAMOUNTVT.ORG

Wednesday | December 27, 2017 | 2 & 7 PM

Sunday | November 19, 2017 | 7:00 PM

Saturday | January 13, 2017 | 7:30 PM

SEMIRAMIDE: Rossini

PETER PAN

Saturday, December 9 2:00 PM

Saturday, March 10, 2018 | 12:55 PM

LUISA MILLER: Verdi

Saturday, April 14, 2018 | 12:30 PM

CENDRILLON: Massenet

New Production Sunday, April 29, 2018 | 12:55 PM Encore

COSÌ FAN TUTTE: Mozart

Sunday, May 20, 2018 | 12:55 PM Encore

30 CENTER ST. | RUTLAND, VT | 802.775.0903

ANGELS IN AMERICA PART ONE: MILLENNIUM APPROACHES

Saturday, October 21 2:00 PM

PART TWO: PERESTROIKA

Sunday, November 5 2:00 PM

OBSESSION

Sunday, January 7 2:00 PM

SAINT JOAN

Saturday, January 20 2:00 PM

FOLLIES

Saturday, February 3 2:00 PM

10/6/17 3:44 PM

Seven Days, October 11, 2017  

What a Vermont Murder-Suicide Teaches Us About Domestic Violence; A Contemporary Play Asks: What If Shakespeare Were Female?; The Art and Po...

Advertisement