Page 1


MONEY CAN’T BUY

THE FARMHOUSE GROUP GIFT CARD

HAPPINESS

It’s four great gifts wrapped up in one! Easy to use, fits in your pocket. Happy Gifting. VALID AT ANY FARMHOUSE GROUP RESTAURANT!

But It could buy you a

YETI 110

iced down with some silver bullets.

LIM QUANITED AVAIL TITIES ABLE!

Or it could buy a

LOWBALL

four pack gift set. Or it could buy a

TUMBLER

with carry handle. Lenny’s Shoe & Apparel

ORDER ONLINE OR STOP IN & VISIT US!

AUTHORIZED

FARMHOUSEGROUP.COM

Williston | St. Albans | Barre | Plattsburgh Untitled-1 1

11/18/16 4:18 PM

S H E L B U R N E

M U S E U M

P R E S E N T S

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NOV 19, 2016– JAN 22, 2017

Untitled-20 1

Buy One, Get One

DEALER lennyshoe.com 11/28/16 2:18 PM

O HO H! HO

FREE!

11.30.16-12.07.16

All laser hair removal, laser tattoo removal, skincare and VelaShape treatments and packages.

SEVEN DAYS

Offer Valid 11/21-12/31

THE ROUTHIER COLLECTION OF MID-CENTURY PRINTS

H

E

L

B

U

R

N

E

M

U

S

E

U

M

.

O

R

G

2

S

Untitled-2 1

11/2/16 2:39 PM

95 ST. PAUL ST. BURLINGTON 802-861-2273

GG4t-bare112316.indd 1

BAREVT.COM

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE! 11/17/16 10:07 AM


RECEIVE $400 OFF *

Featured in al, treet Journ The Wall S azette G l ea tr be, Mon lo G n o st o B Pouce and Sur le

select StresslessYOU® recliners or $200 OFF StresslessYOU® seating when you donate $50 to charity.

Daysies Winners 2012-2016 SMOKED MEAT

LIBATIONS BREWERY

®

We’ve all been lied to since childhood: milk’s not really what he wants... but Pro Pig hooch is! Brewery opens at 11:30AM everyday for LUNCH + SUPPER

23 South Main Street ✯ Waterbury, Vermont ✯ prohibitionpig.com GG4t-ProPig112316.indd 1

11/17/16 2:18 PM

waterworksvt.com | 802.497.3525

11.30.16-12.07.16

See what a difference comfort can make. *See your sales associate for complete details.

November 23 - January 16

747 PINE ST. BURLINGTON 862-5056 www.burlingtonfurniture.us

lunch | dinner | weekend brunch | parties up to 200 Upcoming Trivia Themes

Live Music

11/29: Football vs. Futbol 12/6: Everything’s Connected 12/13: Trivial Pursuit of Happiness 12/20: All the Christmas Movies

12/2: DJ Cre8 12/4 Mihali of Twiddle Acoustic Show 12/9: Pop Rap Dance Party • 12/16: DJ Dakota 12/17: Foxy the Disco Queen 12/23: DJ Cre8 • 12/30: DJ Fattie B

2v-burlingtonfurn113016.indd 1

11/22/16 4:23 PM

4t-Waterworks113016.indd 1

11/28/16 3:20 PM

3

Located in the Champlain Mill, Winooski — 1 mile from Downtown Burlington!

SEVEN DAYS

VOTED: BEST FURNITURE STORE 2016 SEVEN YEARS IN A ROW!

Mon-Sat 10–6, Sun 12-5

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Book Your Holiday Reservation or Event Today & Treat Yourself to a Cocktail Whether You’re Naughty or Nice!


$50 off a Pair of ULU Boots!

Never before have we offered ULUs at this low of a price! $50 off 2 days only December 3rd & 4th - All 4 Danform Stores!

Special event: Stop into our Shelburne store on 12/3 between 10am-3pm enter to win a FREE Pair of ULU boots!

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

(6 pairs will be given away)

Shop with us this December and get Danform Dollars!

SEVEN DAYS

11.30.16-12.07.16

During the entire month of December shop at any Danform Shoes and get $1 Danform Dollar for every $20 you spend.

4

BURLINGTON

DanformShoesVT.com Untitled-4 1

COLCHESTER

SHELBURNE

ST ALBANS

*selection varies by store 11/18/16 10:02 AM


THE LAST WEEK IN REVIEW NOVEMBER 23-30, 2016 COMPILED BY SASHA GOLDSTEIN, MATTHEW ROY & ANDREA SUOZZO

emoji that

16,000 That’s roughly how many spectators came to Killington Resort on Saturday to watch women’s World Cup events.

SLIP ’N’ SLIDE

Freezing temps made for an icy and dicey commute Tuesday morning. Too bad everybody needs snow tires at the same time.

SKI STAR

FAILING HEALTH CARE?

F

PLATTER

COMPILED BY KEN PICARD

A Williamstown man allegedly stole a dead deer from a hunter’s home. Theft, Vermont-style.

After a Richford woman called 911 to report that her front door had been kicked in and several items stolen — including a 55-inch flat-screen television set and a snowmobile helmet — a witness tipped off the cops that they’d seen a vehicle belonging to Michael Cruz, 27, leave the area with his girlfriend, Felicia Hanvey, 30, in the passenger seat. When police knocked on the couple’s door in East Fairfield, neither answered — though Cruz and Hanvey were clearly visible from outside. That’s when a keen-eyed trooper, peering through a window, spotted the stolen TV set on the kitchen floor. Cops obtained a search warrant and returned to find the TV hidden in the laundry room beneath a pile of clothes, with the helmet nearby. Both Cruz and Hanvey were arrested and charged with burglary.

@bnjohns This is a lie. @RealDonaldTrump: In addition to winning the Electoral College in a landslide, I won the popular vote if you deduct the millions of people who voted illegally FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVEN_DAYS OUR TWEEPLE: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/TWITTER

ALL IN THE FAMILY

State police in Royalton responded to “repeated” false 911 calls emanating from a Stockbridge home last week. The “emergency”: Todd Martell, 50, was bickering with his sister, Lisa Wakefield, 48, and each one separately decided to call the emergency hotline to snitch on the other. The squabbling sibs were warned that 911 is for emergencies only — but troopers hadn’t even left the driveway before the dialing duo made two more calls to 911. Police cited both Martell and Wakefield for disorderly conduct and for making false claims to police. While back at the house, police also found a bag of weed and issued Martell a civil citation for pot possession.

LAST SEVEN 5

a sampler of citizen shenanigans

VENISON VULTURE

tweet of the week:

SEVEN DAYS

Po-Po

Vermont State Police popped two drivers within minutes of each other for allegedly driving drunk on the same road — in the same car. Early on Sunday, Trooper Stephen McGranaghan stopped a car on Mount Pisgah Road in St. Johnsbury and arrested the driver for alleged DUI. One of the two passengers was “chugging a 22-ounce Bud Ice can,” but the trooper let the sober passenger drive the car away. Minutes later, however, cops spotted the same vehicle parked in the middle of the same road, then saw it “pull away erratically.” The Bud Ice passenger was behind the wheel. Joann Chew, 43, had a 0.243 blood alcohol content — three times the state legal limit. Chew faces charges of drunk driving — her third DUI — and driving with a suspended license.

SCREEN TIME … UP

A moose cozied up to a group of cows in a Sheldon pasture. Someone’s got a cuddle buddy for the cold weather!

11.30.16-12.07.16

TWO OUTTA THREE

to Sean Sheehan, director of outreach and education at Vermont Health Connect. Should Trump eliminate the health insurance programs enacted under the Affordable Care Act, Vermont could lose $100 million a year in subsidies, Shumlin told reporters. But exactly what Trump will do remains to be seen. As Terri Hallenbeck reported on our Off Message blog, while Trump campaigned on a pledge to eliminate Obamacare, he has since said that parts of the law, such as requiring insurers to cover preexisting conditions, are beneficial. Meanwhile, Shumlin was more optimistic about the future of the all-payer waiver agreement that Vermont negotiated with the federal government. That agreement is meant to shift the way health care professionals are reimbursed — from a fee-for-service system to one that pays providers set amounts for comprehensive care. Read Hallenbeck’s full post at sevendaysvt.com.

FURRY FEELINGS

1. “Dykes to Watch Out For: Pièce de Résistance” by Pamela Polston and Alison Bechdel. After eight years, cartoonist Alison Bechdel’s “Dykes to Watch Out For” series was back with a special Thanksgivingthemed strip. 2. “WTF Is Richford’s ‘Mystery Spot’?” by Chad Abramovich. County lore has it that your car will roll uphill when put in neutral on one Richford incline. 3. “The Parmelee Post: Demolition Derby to Be Held in City Market Parking Lot” by Bryan Parmelee. Let’s be honest, though — it’s not that different from the parking lot on a normal day. 4. “Phil Scott Names Several Staffers to Posts in New Administration” by Terri Hallenbeck. Several members of the governor-elect’s campaign staff are getting jobs in his new administration. 5. “Allegiant Air Prepares to Take Off From Burlington — for Good” by Molly Walsh. After just three years of jetting between BTV and Orlando, the low-cost carrier will stop serving Vermonters in March.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

irst, the good news: Vermont Health Connect, the costly, much maligned and technically challenged online insurance marketplace, is pretty much operating as it should be. That’s according to Gov. Peter Shumlin, who on Tuesday morning summoned reporters to say the long-troubled exchange is working well for people who use it to sign up for insurance coverage. But that’s not the end of the story. Shumlin, who made health care reform a centerpiece of his administration’s efforts during the past several years, wanted to talk about Obamacare — the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act that president-elect Donald Trump has vowed to dismantle. The gov’s gist: Before 2010, 8.6 percent of Vermonters lacked health insurance. But by last year, that figure had dropped to 2.7 percent. Vermonters who get subsidies for health coverage get a median amount of $300 a month per person, according

Mikaela Shiffrin, Burke Mountain Academy’s own, raced to win the slalom at the women’s World Cup in Killington. She’s a Vermont superhero.

TOPFIVE

MOST POPULAR ITEMS ON SEVENDAYSVT.COM


fresh NOV 30 – DEC 13 available while supplies last

BRAVE NEW WORLD CUP. E D I T O R I A L / A D M I N I S T R AT I O N Co-owners/founders

Pamela Polston & Paula Routly

publisher/Coeditor Paula Routly assoCiate publisher/Coeditor Pamela Polston assoCiate publishers

Don Eggert, Cathy Resmer, Colby Roberts news editor Matthew Roy assoCiate editor Margot Harrison deputy news editor Sasha Goldstein assistant editor Candace Page staff writers Mark Davis, Alicia Freese, Terri Hallenbeck, Katie Jickling, Rachel Elizabeth Jones, Ken Picard, Kymelya Sari, Molly Walsh, Sadie Williams politiCal editor Paul Heintz MusiC editor Dan Bolles assistant MusiC editor Jordan Adams food writer Hannah Palmer Egan Calendar writer Kristen Ravin diGital Content editor Andrea Suozzo senior MultiMedia produCer Eva Sollberger MultiMedia journalist James Buck business ManaGer Cheryl Brownell benefits & operations Rick Woods CirCulation ManaGer Matt Weiner CirCulation deputy Jeff Baron proofreaders Carolyn Fox, Elizabeth Seyler speCialty publiCations ManaGer Carolyn Fox news hound Rufus DESIGN/PRODUCTION Creative direCtor Don Eggert art direCtor Rev. Diane Sullivan produCtion ManaGer John James staff photoGrapher Matthew Thorsen desiGners Brooke Bousquet,

Kirsten Cheney, Charlotte Scott, Richele Young diGital produCtion speCialist Bryan Parmelee

$2.99 Red Bell Peppers ORGANIC

SALES/MARKETING direCtor of sales Colby Roberts senior aCCount exeCutive Michael Bradshaw aCCount exeCutives

per pound

FEEDback READER REACTION TO RECENT ARTICLES

BERNIE’S NEXT BOOK

[Re “Manual for a Movement?” November 23]: Now that Sen. Bernie Sanders has written a political treatise, Our Revolution, he is ready to author a work of pure fiction. His novel will be called His Revolution, about a crass real estate tycoon from Manhattan who does what liberals have been unsuccessfully trying to do for decades: capture the hearts and minds of the working class. How does the billionaire, who lives in a gilded tower on Fifth Avenue and who never wears camo or even jeans, connect with blue-collar America? Well, you just have to read Bernie’s book, which you will find in the fantasy section of your local bookstore.  Doug Kallen

JERICHO

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Luke Baynes, Justin Boland, Alex Brown, Liz Cantrell, Julia Clancy, Erik Esckilsen, Kevin J. Kelley, Rick Kisonak, Jacqueline Lawler, Amy Lilly, Gary Lee Miller, Suzanne Podhaizer, Jernigan Pontiac, Robert Resnik, Julia Shipley, Sarah Tuff Dunn, Molly Zapp

$6.99 Vermont Maple

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

BLACK RIVER MEATS

each

and Apple Sausage

C I R C U L AT I O N : 3 6 , 0 0 0 Seven Days is published by Da Capo Publishing Inc. every Wednesday. It is distributed free of charge in Greater Burlington, Middlebury, Montpelier, Northeast Kingdom, Stowe, the Mad River Valley, Rutland, St. Albans, St. Johnsbury, White River Junction and Plattsburgh. Seven Days is printed at Upper Valley Press in North Haverhill, N.H.

$6.99 Mild Cheddar CABOT

Cheese

6 FEEDBACK

SEVEN DAYS

per pound

CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS Harry Bliss, Caleb Kenna, Matt Mignanelli, Marc Nadel, Tim Newcomb, Susan Norton, Oliver Parini, Sarah Priestap, Kim Scafuro, Michael Tonn, Jeb Wallace-Brodeur

DELIVERY TECHNICIANS Harry Applegate, Jeff Baron, Joe Bouffard, Pat Bouffard, Caleb Bronz, Colin Clary, Donna Delmoora, Dan Egan, Matt Hagen, Paul Hawkins, Nat Michael, Bill Mullins, Dan Nesbitt, Ezra Oklan, Dan Thayer, Josh Weinstein With additional circulation support from PP&D. SUBSCRIPTIONS 6-Month 1st Class: $175. 1-year 1st Class: $275. 6-Month 3rd Class: $85. 1-year 3rd Class: $135. Please call 802.864.5684 with your credit card, or mail your check or money order to “Subscriptions” at the address below. Seven Days shall not be held liable to any advertiser for any loss that results from the incorrect publication of its advertisement. If a mistake is ours, and the advertising purpose has been rendered valueless, Seven Days may cancel the charges for the advertisement, or a portion thereof as deemed reasonable by the publisher. Seven Days reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including inserts, at the discretion of the publishers.

82 S. Winooski Ave., Burlington, VT Open 7am - 11pm every day (802) 861-9700 www.citymarket.coop

Untitled-5 1

11/28/16 10:42 AM

P.O. BOX 1164, BURLINGTON, VT 05402-1164 802.864.5684 SEVENDAYSVT.COM FACEBOOK: /SEVENDAYSVT TWITTER: @SEVENDAYSVT

©2016 Da Capo Publishing Inc. All rights reserved.

Skeeter Sanders

SIDE OF BECHDEL

Thanks for last week’s “Dykes to Watch Out For” cover! Really needed that.

Julia Atherton, Robyn Birgisson, Michelle Brown, Logan Pintka MarketinG & events ManaGer Corey Grenier Classifieds & personals Coordinator Ashley Cleare sales & MarketinG assistant Kristen Hutter

Nat Michael

UNDERHILL

THANKFUL FOR ‘DYKES’

This is very likely one of many of letters and emails you’re receiving from longtime fans of Alison Bechdel’s “Dykes to Watch Out For” comic strip after seeing her beloved characters grace the cover of the November 23 issue of Seven Days. After reading the inside story of Bechdel’s decision to express her feelings about Donald Trump’s election by

TIM NEWCOMB

drawing a brand-new “DTWOF” strip for the Thanksgiving issue, the obvious question that’s popping up in my mind (and doubtless many other “Dykes” fans) is whether this is a one-time thing or the beginning of a full-scale revival of the strip.  Hard to believe that it’s been eight years since Bechdel halted “DTWOF” to concentrate on writing her graphic novels. Fun Home went on to become a hugely successful, Tony Award-winning Broadway musical.  So, Ms. Bechdel, if you’re reading this, please don’t keep fans of your beloved “Dykes” hanging in suspense. I, for one, would love to see a full-on comeback of the strip.  To say that “DTWOF” has been sorely missed would be an understatement.  SHELBURNE

MOSHER’S WRONG ABOUT NEK

Leave it to Howard Frank Mosher, the Northeast Kingdom’s biggest story thief, a “novelist” and “foremost chronicler,” to proclaim the whole area racist by citing one comment heard here at a “dance” [“Why Many Northeast Kingdom Voters Chose Trump,” November 16]. This “author” has made a pretty penny gleaning other people’s family lore, jumbling a few names and dates, and then penning them as his own with no credits to the folks he stole them from, the “independent-minded … almost to the point of


Winter Has Arrived

WEEK IN REVIEW

self-delusion” locals. The story thief then states, with no facts to back it up, that “there’s a lot of latent racism, and it’s a half-step away from being a really dangerous and active racism.”  From what I’ve heard up here, the major topic was gun control “for our own good” so that all guns handed down, given, traded, swapped and sold would now require “background checks” brokered through a Federal Firearms License holder. I’m a native New Englander who grew up watching Revolutionary War reenactments, and we all know instinctively that now, like on April 19, 1775, when the “authorities” come looking for the muskets, powder, flints and shot “for our own good,” all they’ll get is a fight — then at Lexington Green/Old North Bridge, and now at the ballot box. Steve Merrill

NORTH TROY

PROGS AREN’T THE STORY

Michael Long

BURLINGTON

CORRECTIONS

SAVE THE DATE Free Shacksbury Cider Tasting Saturday 12/3, 3-6 PM

VERY BEST DEALS OF THE WEEK!

There were a record number of errors in last week’s issue. Wish we could blame it on Thanksgiving. • The news story titled “In the Trump Era, Does Vermont Need More Abortion Options?” misstated the time frame within which abortion is legal in Vermont: There is no state-imposed time limit. The story also incorrectly stated which institution is applying for a family-planning grant: It is the University of Vermont Medical Center.

Unreal Dark Chocolate Crispy Quinoa Peanut Butter Cups

$3.99

Mon - Sat 9-7 / Sun 9-5 802-862-2714 /AlpineShopVT.com Williston Road, S. Burlington, VT

Newman’s Own Ranch Dressing

/AlpineShopVT

$1.99

Bike

Dang Caramel Sea Salt Toasted Coconut Chips

$2.99

• Jay Peak developer Bill Stenger grew up in western New York and moved to Newport in 1984. His Vermont history was incorrect in “Can a Scandal-Tainted Hotel Save Q-Less Burke Mountain?”

Untitled-2 1

Ski

ALPINE SHOP V

Swim

E

R

Ride

M

O

Tennis

N

T

Style

the gift of grooming

11/28/16 10:33 AM

THE BIG CHEESE Our Custom Cut Special of the Week! Spring Brook Farm Tarentaise

• “Peak Power: Burlington Electric Draws Vermont’s Top Brass,” contained multiple errors: Neale Lunderville is chair of governor-elect Phil Scott’s budget development committee — his role with Scott was misstated; Mike Kanarick did not serve as Mayor Miro Weinberger’s campaign manager; and Tom Lyle was a hearing officer for the Public Service Board, not a board member. The story also misstated the salary increase amounts for several employees who joined BED: for Kanarick, it was $45,000; for Lunderville, $20,000; and for Darren Springer — who will start at BED in January — it will be $26,000. Lastly, the net metering legislation Springer worked on passed in 2014.

Reg $24.99/lb

Sale $22.99

You Save $2.00

WINE TALK

gift certificates available

Camps d’Estels Cava Brut

$11.99 Huber Hugo Sparkling Rosé

$14.99 <M EN S R OOM VT.C OM > 106 M A I N S T. 802.864.2088

LaLuca Prosecco

$9.99

L A DI E S I NVI T E D

GIVE GIFTS !

12v-mens113016.indd 1

11/28/16 3:13 PM

11.30.16-12.07.16

• In the food section, there was an error in a Side Dishes item titled “Multitasking.” The correct name of the eatery is Beau Butchery + Bar.

Dinner for Two Basket

SAY SOMETHING!

Seven Days reserves the right to edit for accuracy, length and readability.

4v-cheesetraders113016.indd 1

www.essexoutlets.com facebook.com/pages/essexvt 21 Essex Way, Essex Junction, VT | 802.878.2851

11/29/16 1:48 PM

FEEDBACK 7

1186 Williston Rd. So. Burlington, VT 05403 (Next to the Alpine Shop) 802.863.0143 Open 7 days 10am-7pm cheeseandwinetraders.com

SEVEN DAYS

$64.99

Seven Days wants to publish your rants and raves. Your feedback must... • be 250 words or fewer; • respond to Seven Days content; • include your full name, town and a daytime phone number.

Your submission options include: • sevendaysvt.com/feedback • feedback@sevendaysvt.com • Seven Days, P.O. Box 1164, Burlington, VT 05402-1164

Free Gift Wrapping

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Ted Wimpey, city council President Jane Knodell and former Burlington mayor Peter Clavelle in unison doth protest too much [“Growing Pains: Burlington Progressives Clash Over Development,” November 16]. It is their support for a project that is simply overblown for Burlington that is “knee-jerk.” It is the trumped-up charges of campaign finance law violations and “well-funded ... distortions and misinformation” that are ground zero for testiness, and also for post-truth politics. The good folks who jumped on the Don Sinex project bandwagon are the same folks who spent $30,000 or more on the votes to make our mall great. This pro-Sinex blitz was the real campaign of distortion and misinformation. If the Sinex project simply respected long-established rules to guide development, it would deserve community support. But the Sinex organization required major alterations in Burlington zoning law so that the zoning would allow such a project. It was inconvenient for the developer to design a project that advanced the community values articulated in our zoning. Burlington’s leaders went astray when they promised to eliminate the rules on height limits and height bonuses that the developer objected to. This sent the Sinex project off the rails in terms of design, scale, democracy and legitimacy. This is why the Progressive Party stood firmly against this specific project. If developers write their own rules, then there are no rules the community can count on. This is the backstory that should be front and center.

To present the fissure in Progressive ranks as a pro- versus anti-development difference is altogether misleading and inaccurate.


HOLIDAY

Give the Gift of the

PERFORMING ARTS!

This holiday, give an experience they’ll always remember!

DECEMBER

8 Thursday at 7:30 pm

10 Friday at 8 pm

A Christmas Carol

3 Tuesday at 7:30 pm

Cirque Mother Africa

MARCH

12 Sunday at 7 pm

Marc Maron

The Too Real Tour

Le Patin Libre

Vertical Influences

42nd Street

14 Saturday at 8 pm

31 Friday at 7 & 9:30 pm

So Percussion A Gun Show

27 Friday at 8 pm

APRIL

FEBRUARY

Upright Citizens Brigade

MOMIX

Opus Cactus 16 Thursday at 7:30 pm

Garrison Keillor

18 Saturday at 8 pm New Voices Series

Vermont Hindu Temple

and Handridge & Quattrone 24 Friday at 8 pm

Ballaké Sissoko & Vincent Segal 25-26 Sat. at 8 pm & Sun. at 2 pm

Borromeo Quartet Hosted by Soovin Kim Beethoven String Quartet Op. 127

1 Saturday at 7 & 9:30 pm

SEVEN DAYS

4T-ecco113016.indd 1

11/28/16 11:42 AM

Christal Brown

The Opulence of Integrity 8 Saturday at 8 pm New Voices Series

Walinja

and Migmar Tsering 22 Saturday at 8 pm

Joey Alexander

MAY 10 Wednesday at 7:30 pm Broadway National Tour

Pippin

19-20 Fri. & Sat. at 7 & 9 pm

ADD SOME SPARKLE TO YOUR HOLIDAY.

Adele Myers and Dancers

P E R F O R M I N G

8

Ecco Clothes | 81 Church Street | Burlington, VT eccoclothesboutique.com | 802.860.2220

6-7 Thurs. at 7:30 pm & Fri. at 8 pm

The Dancing Room

Dora Sudarsky, O.D.

Call today to schedule your eye exam

A R T S

WWW.FLYNNCENTER.ORG or 153 Main Street, Burlington Untitled-14 1

SHOP LOCAL, SHOP ECCO

Upright Citizens Brigade

Balé Folclórico da Bahia

12 Sunday at 7 pm

Cocktail Dresses. Designer Denim. Luxe Cashmere. Sparkly Tops. Sexy Booties. Glamorous Jewelry... And More!

Ladysmith Black Mambazo

27 Monday at 7:30 pm Broadway National Tour

13 Friday at 8 pm

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

27 Monday at 7:30 pm

The Chieftains

JANUARY

Season Sponsor

by ECCO

1 Thursday at 7:30 pm Nebraska Theatre Caravan

Vienna Boys Choir

11.30.16-12.07.16

STYLE

11/28/16 1:43 PM

370 SHELBURNE ROAD BURLINGTON 497-1676 CHROMAOPTICS.COM GG4t-Chroma112316.indd 1

11/16/16 3:37 PM


contents

LOOKING FORWARD

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 07, 2016 VOL.22 NO.12 30

16

NEWS 14

In With the New: Two College-to-Statehouse Reps Prepare to Serve

ARTS NEWS 22

BY ALICIA FREESE

16

Despite Challenges, More Private Docs Are Treating Opiate Addicts

23

Homecoming: A New York Curator Returns to Vermont

24

BY MOLLY WALSH

Two Cinéastes and a Bunch of Films Make for a Lively Local Podcast

32

COLUMNS + REVIEWS

Surviving Syria

Film: A Vermont journalist and former al-Qaeda prisoner reflects on his ordeal BY KEN PICARD

36

Room to Move

Culture: Burlington’s North End Studios to expand into St. Joseph’s School BY KYMELYA SARI

39

A Montréal Hood Beckons

Montréal: Need another reason to visit the city? Try Mile Ex

BY LUKE BAYNES

Excerpts From Off Message

44

FEATURES

BY SADIE WILLIAMS

In the Final Chapter, Keven’s Story Becomes Kay’s

20

A New Book Offers a Curriculum for Treating Trauma Through Art

BY RACHEL ELIZABETH JONES

BY MOLLY WALSH

18

39

BY SUZANNE PODHAIZER

42

BY SEVEN DAYS STAFF

VIDEO SERIES

Quick-Change Artist

Book review: Shift, Marylen Grigas BY JULIA SHIPLEY

44

Jailhouse Beets

12 26 29 30 45 69 73 78 84 93

Fair Game POLITICS Drawn & Paneled ART Hackie CULTURE Work JOBS Side Dishes FOOD Soundbites MUSIC Album Reviews Art Review Movie Reviews Ask Athena SEX

SECTIONS 11 21 50 65 68 78 84

The Magnificent 7 Life Lines Calendar Classes Music Art Movies

Food: In the Northeast Kingdom, inmates take to the kitchen with locavore food

Younger and Wiser

Music: Twin Peaks’ Cadien Lake James on youth and maturity

straight dope movie extras mr. brunelle explains it all edie everette this modern world deep dark fears red meat iona fox rachel lives here now jen sorensen harry bliss free will astrology personals

27 87 88 88 88 88 89 89 90 90 90 92 92

CLASSIFIEDS vehicles housing services homeworks buy this stuff music fsbo legals crossword support groups calcoku/sudoku puzzle answers jobs

C-2 C-2 C-2 C-3 C-3 C-3 C-4 C-4 C-5 C-5 C-7 C-8 C-9

COVER IMAGE JUSTIN CASH

BY HANNAH PALMER EGAN

68

FUN STUFF

COVER DESIGN REV. DIANE SULLIVAN

BY JORDAN ADAMS

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Underwritten by:

Stuck in Vermont: On Small Business Saturday, the owners of the Flying Pig Bookstore in Shelburne celebrated the store's 20th anniversary, joined by a steady stream of friends and longtime customers.

Jewelry & Gifts

SEVEN DAYS

GIVE THE GIFT OF HEALTH TO A WOMAN YOU LOVE.

11.30.16-12.07.16

experience the difference CHECK OUT OUR HOLIDAY GIFT PACKAGES THAT START AT $20

WWW.ARTEMISFITNESSVT.COM COME TRY A CLASS. FIRST CLASS IS ALWAYS FREE.

F I T N E S S shelburnebay plaza • 2989 shelburne rd • 985.9909 alittlesomethingvt.com • next to the Shelburne Meat Market

7 FAYETTE DRIVE, SOUTH BURLINGTON, VT • 802-448-3769 Untitled-9 1

11/14/16 2:07 PM

8H-alittlesomething113016.indd 1

11/23/16 11:50 AM

CONTENTS 9

A R T E M I S


16 0 Bank St ree t Burlington

10:00am - 3:00pm Breakfast plates, sandwiches, Bloody Marys and more.

BRUNCH ON BANK STREET

Lincoln Peak, Sugarbush • Spruce Peak, Stowe • Hanover, NH •

Saturday & Sunday brunch is happening with earlier opening times and expanded menus. Cheers! CORTIJOVT.COM 189 Bank Street Burlington

Buy $50 worth of Skinny Pancake gift cards and receive a $10 gift card for you! FULL BAR. LOCAL EATS. GREAT TUNES.

10:00am - 3:00pm Mexican inspired brunch specialties plus the lunch favorites!

Untitled-40 1

This Holiday Season, Give The Gift of Crepes!

Burlington Waterfront • Downtown Montpelier • Burlington International Airport Lincoln Peak, Sugarbush • Spruce Peak, Stowe • Hanover, NH • skinnypancake.com 11/29/16 2:11 PM

4t-skinnypancake120215.indd 1

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

MORE THAN JUST MATTRESSES!

11/18/16 10:28 AM

• MATTRESSES • BEDS • BEDROOM FURNITURE • SOFAS • DINING • ENTERTAINMENT • KIDS BEDS • FUTONS featuring...Hillsdale furniture (NE Kids), The Bedworks of Maine, International Furniture Direct, Craftmaster, Lane, Magnussen, A-America, Night and Day, Capel Rugs and many more.

11.30.16-12.07.16

We also feature Vermont made furniture and Amish made furniture! 0% financing and free delivery in Chittenden County on purchases $499 or more!

10

SEVEN DAYS

*see store for details - ends 12/24.

0% FINANCING AND FREE DELIVERY! GG2H-burlbeds112316.indd 1

BUY 1 ITEM, GET ONE 50% OFF *

2800 Shelburne Rd., Shelburne burlingtonbedrooms.com 802-985-3049 Hours: Monday-Saturday 9-6, Sunday 11-5

11/17/16 11:35 AM


COURTESY OF NEDA NAVAEE

LOOKING FORWARD

the

MAGNIFICENT

SATURDAY 3

Come Together

MUST SEE, MUST DO THIS WEEK

At least two hate crimes have been documented in Middlebury since the 2016 presidential election. In response, the Middlebury Area Clergy Association invites folks of all faiths to the Middlebury Town Green for a Gathering of Love & Hope. Here, community members offer messages of solidarity alongside donations of food, cash and winter clothing for Helping Overcome Poverty’s Effects.

C O M PI L E D B Y K R I S T E N R AV I N

SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 56

SATURDAY 3

Words and Music SUNDAY 4

FIRST-STRING PLAYERS For the ninth year running, Sophie Shao and Friends are slated to take the stage as part of Middlebury College’s Performing Arts Series. Joined by violinist Jennifer Frautschi, violist Dimitri Murrath and pianist Gloria Chien, Shao, a Yale University-trained cellist, interprets works by Beethoven, Schumann and Dvořák. Bravo! SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 59

Randall Thompson’s 1959 musical composition “Frostania” was inspired by the work of onetime Vermont poet laureate Robert Frost. The music, which premiered in front of the wordsmith, features settings from poems such as “The Road Not Taken.” The South Burlington Community Chorus gives voice to Thompson’s piece along with other contemporary compositions in the program “Frost in the Air.” SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 58

SATURDAY 3

Bust a Move Since 2000, Vermont Access to Reproductive Freedom has been empowering women to maintain control over their health and their bodies. Partygoers can pitch in to support women’s health at the ShakeOff Dance Party to benefit VARP at Burlington’s Union Station, where Radio Bean serves up drinks and DJs spin jams from across the decades. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 56

Rock Band

SEE STORY ON PAGE 68

Wine It Up

SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 60

Mod, Mod World Northfield’s Jason and Dana Routhier have quite the art collection. The young connoisseurs have accumulated midcentury prints from more than 45 artists including Wassily Kandinsky, Agnes Martin and Frank Stella. Showcasing art styles such as hard edge, concrete and optical, the Routhiers’ collection is on display in the Shelburne Museum exhibition “Hard-Edge Cool.” SEE REVIEW ON PAGE 78

MAGNIFICENT SEVEN 11

With wine in hand, oenophiles make their way to Burlington City Arts for Uncorked for a Cause. Each participant trades one bottled beverage for the chance to bid on red and white varieties to benefit the Pride Center of Vermont. Treats from Velvet Catering and Events fuel this evening of elegant winter fun.

ONGOING

SEVEN DAYS

MONDAY 5

11.30.16-12.07.16

On the Facebook page for Chicago’s Twin Peaks, the band’s biography states, “We like to rock and most certainly love to roll.” Need proof? Listen to their 2016 release Down in Heaven. The guys hit up Signal Kitchen with songs from the album that Pitchfork calls “a casual, charmingly low-key set of kitchen-table blues, slow-dance serenades and unplugged power pop.”

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

MONDAY 5


FAIR GAME

OPEN SEASON ON VERMONT POLITICS BY TERRI HALLENBECK

Mitzi in the Middle

A

s Rep. MITZI JOHNSON (D-South Hero) traveled around the state over the past few weeks, winning over House Democrats in her bid for speaker, she says she didn’t make any promises about committee assignments. La Mer “I was asked. Some people hinted. One Natura Bissé person asked flat out,” she says. “I said, Bobbi Brown ‘Look, my entire campaign is based on Trish McEvoy the idea that we need more transparency Laura Mercier in state government … If I were making promises, you shouldn’t believe anything SkinCeuticals I said.’” When she was done, she says, that legislator had promised to vote for her. The race to be the next House speaker involved both shrewd political calculus and gracious gestures. Corner of Main & Battery Streets, By the end of last week, Johnson had Burlington, VT • 802-861-7500 won the support of a sufficient number www.mirrormirrorvt.com of members that House Majority Leader SARAH COPELAND HANZAS (D-Bradford) saw the writing on the wall and dropped out of the race. Copeland Hanzas was so polite 8v-MirrorMirror081915.indd 1 8/17/15 10:18 AMabout the whole thing that she reached out to media to report her own bad news Monday. “Mitzi clinched the votes for speaker over the weekend,” Copeland Hanzas texted at 8 a.m. Members said that deciding between Johnson and Copeland Hanzas was hard. Their political differences are subtle. Both women are likable. They plan to room holidays got your panties in a bunch? together in Montpelier next session, dewe’ve got you covered. spite competing for a job they both really wanted. “Mitzi and I are friends,” Copeland Hanzas emphasized in declaring defeat. Both have proven themselves as dedicated leaders. Johnson, as chair of the MON 12/5 – SAT 12/10 House Appropriations Committee, knows the state budget better than anybody in Deep discounts on luxury women’s the chamber. Copeland Hanzas, as House undergarments, hosiery, and sleepwear. majority leader, has skillfully led members through difficult debates. “It was a really hard choice,” Johnson says of her colleagues’ decision. Johnson says it was her broad knowl50% OF ALL SALES DONATED TO edge of state government that ultimately United Way of won her the support of a majority of the Northwest Vermont Democratic caucus. Leaders of every agency pass through the doors of the appropriations committee, which she has served on since 2007, she notes. For times and locations visit us at Indeed, that was a factor, says Rep. SAM wearcommando.com/pop-up-sale YOUNG (D-Glover). “At the end of the year, it’s the speaker, the [Senate] pro tem and

[ pop-up sale ]

12 FAIR GAME

SEVEN DAYS

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

All the lines you love...

Untitled-25 1

11/28/16 4:30 PM

the governor in a room,” he says. “I’d like my person in the room to know the budget better than anybody else.” But in selecting Johnson, members also chose a more moderate, less partisan path. Subtle as the differences are, most members place Copeland Hanzas on the left end of the political spectrum and Johnson closer to the center. “It was a conscious decision for me,” says Young, a moderate who committed to Johnson about a week ago. “I want to work with the governor as much as possible.” Rep. JIM CONDON (D-Colchester), another moderate who committed to Johnson last week, says he considered her ability to win bipartisan support from members of the appropriations committee. “Mitzi strove to find common ground,” he says.

I THINK MITZI REPRESENTS THE CENTER OF THE PARTY, MORE OF A

MAINSTREAM DEMOCRAT.

RE P. AD AM GRE S H IN (I - WARRE N )

More liberal members of the caucus, meanwhile, had hoped to see Copeland Hanzas as speaker. Rep. JOHANNAH “JOEY” DONOVAN (D-Burlington) said the majority leader won her support in part by attending meetings of the Legislative Working Vermonters’ Caucus, a group that supports labor rights. Donovan notes that Johnson comes from a relatively moderate district in the Champlain Islands where she barely won reelection to her own House seat. She came in second in a two-seat district, just 103 votes ahead of the third-place finisher. “She had a difficult race,” Donovan says. “It’s going to be harder for her to lean a little left.” House Minority Leader DON TURNER (R-Milton) said he plans to field a candidate for speaker but acknowledged long odds. Those odds might have been shorter if Copeland Hanzas had prevailed.

“I view Sarah as more of a partisan,” says Rep. ADAM GRESHIN (I-Warren), adding that Copeland Hanzas likely would have faced a more significant challenge on the House floor in January than Johnson. “I think Mitzi represents the center of the party, more of a mainstream Democrat.” But Johnson does not lean so far right that she’s unpalatable to those on the left. Donovan expects her liberal Democratic colleagues will fall in line behind Johnson. Progressives have no plans to field a candidate. “I would be very happy with Mitzi Johnson as speaker,” says Rep. SANDY HAAS (P-Rochester). “She’s very responsive.” Johnson should officially secure the Democratic caucus’ endorsement on Saturday. Already, there’s speculation about what she’ll do come January. Johnson was noncommittal this week about how many committee chair changes she might make. But she notes that when she steps up to the podium, the Statehouse will have a new governor, lieutenant governor, Senate president pro tempore and speaker. “When you have too much change in the system, it becomes too chaotic and unproductive,” she says. “I’m going to need some experience.” She will have one big vacancy to fill — the chair of appropriations, her old position. Looking over the roster of committee members, Rep. KITTY TOLL (D-Danville) stands out as a likely candidate — a wellrespected member with several years’ experience. It just happens that Toll’s sister, Sen. JANE KITCHEL (D-Caledonia), is chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee. Would naming Toll place too much power in the hands of one family? “I understand that it’s a concern,” Johnson says, hinting that she’s thought about this. “I don’t think it’s impossible. Kitty is delightfully loyal to the House.” Copeland Hanzas, quietly licking her wounds Monday, wasn’t ready to say what role she’ll have in the next legislative session. It won’t be her position as majority leader, which Rep. JILL KROWINSKI (D-Burlington) is seeking. Copeland Hanzas says, “It’ll take me some time to figure out.”

Right With Trump On election night, as Republicans mingled in a ballroom at the Sheraton Hotel in South Burlington, a few large televisions


GOT A TIP FOR TERRI? TERRI@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

POLITICS the Trump bandwagon to Washington, D.C., by landing a job with his administration. Ideally, she’d like to work to dismantle Obamacare, the health-insurance program she has spent years fighting in Vermont as founder of Vermonters for Health Care Freedom. But, she says, “Frankly, I’d be interested in anything they offer.” So while some Vermonters were sending postcards to Trump Tower with the message “No Bannon,” protesting the president-elect’s choice of STEVE BANNON for chief strategist, and others are planning to attend a postinaugural protest in D.C., Johnston was filling out an online job application for the incoming administration. Job or no job, Johnston hopes to attend the inauguration, as she did those of President GEORGE W. BUSH after the 2000 and 2004 elections. Trump is the first victorious candidate Johnston has backed in years. She managed Republican RANDY BROCK’S unsuccessful 2012 gubernatorial campaign. In 2014, she backed Libertarian DAN FELICIANO, whose capture of 4.4 percent of the vote arguably cost Republicans a chance to oust Democratic incumbent Gov. PETER SHUMLIN. That year, she also worked for a losing gubernatorial candidate in Arizona. Never a fan of Scott, who she says has been too soft on Shumlin, Johnston

managed to stay publicly quiet during the 2016 governor’s race. Now that it’s decided, however, she scoffs at Scott for his decision to denounce Trump, suggesting that the governor-elect has put the state at a disadvantage. Johnston claims that if Vermont Republicans, including Scott, had embraced Trump, more of the party’s downticket candidates would have won. She dismisses any suggestion that Scott won the support of moderate Vermonters because he denounced Trump. “It’s sad for me, what it means for Vermont,” she says.

Attorney Wanted If Johnston gets a job with the Trump administration, she likely won’t be the only Vermonter to do so. Every president appoints his own U.S. attorneys, who prosecute federal crimes. ERIC MILLER, the current U.S. attorney for Vermont who was selected in 2015 by Democratic President BARACK OBAMA, tells Seven Days he’s unsure what to expect. Sources say it typically takes months for a new president to install a new prosecutor. But because Trump is Trump, the uncertainty is even greater. First, there’s the question of who might want to prosecute cases under an unpredictable president who plans to nominate conservative Sen. JEFF SESSIONS (R-Ala.) as

his attorney general. How many Vermont lawyers would take the job without knowing what Trump’s policies will be on such topics as immigration, marijuana and the death penalty? Johnston says there is no shortage of willing lawyers. “I’ve heard of more than three people interested,” she says. “I even had someone who served a Democratic governor who’s interested.” There are also questions about how to apply. Miller, for example, was vetted and recommended to Obama by Sen. PATRICK LEAHY (D-Vt.). Leahy spokesman DAVID CARLE said the senator still expects to be consulted and that the Senate would not confirm a candidate without his consent. But, typically, candidates for the job go through a high-ranking elected leader of the president’s party. When Bush took office in 2001, Vermont still had a Republican senator in JIM JEFFORDS, who vetted candidates for U.S. attorney. Now that job might fall to the state’s only high-ranking Republican — governor-elect Scott, who has publicly distanced himself from Trump. “The governor would be happy to provide the White House with input,” says JASON GIBBS, Scott’s chief of staff. “It’s unclear, however, how much input, if any, the new administration will seek.” m Paul Heintz is on vacation. He will return to Fair Game on December 14.

SEVEN DAYS

131 Church Street Burlington, Vermont 802.864.0012

FAIR GAME 13

VONBARGENS.COM/GIFTGUIDE Untitled-26 1

11.30.16-12.07.16

THIS HOLIDAY, CELEBRATE WITH FEWER, BETTER THINGS.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

carried election news with the sound muted. It was one of the few places in America that night where most of the crowd was largely ignoring the presidential race. Many in the room had disavowed their party’s candidate as a bombastic buffoon but also wanted nothing to do with the Democratic candidate, either. Most were there to celebrate Republican Lt. Gov. PHIL SCOTT’S victory in the governor’s race. Most, but not all. At the end of the night, DARCIE JOHNSTON and a small group of like-minded volunteers sat off to the side, quietly delighted that Republican DONALD TRUMP was pulling off a stunning upset over Democrat HILLARY CLINTON. Johnston and her fellow Trump supporters slipped upstairs to a hotel room to watch as Trump triumphed in the early morning hours. Johnston, who served as Trump’s Vermont campaign coordinator, acknowledges that she feels differently about the presidential election than the majority of Vermonters. That does nothing to mute her enthusiasm. “It’s hope for what we could do in this country, literally to make America great again,” she says. “I don’t feel like a minority, because I worked closely with so many volunteers.” The Colchester woman hopes to ride

11/28/16 4:31 PM


LOCALmatters

In With the New: Two College-to-Statehouse Reps Prepare to Serve B Y ALI CI A FR EESE

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 11.30.16-12.07.16 SEVEN DAYS 14 LOCAL MATTERS

ALICIA FREESE

J

ay Hooper, a newly elected Democratic state representative from Brookfield, vowed not to wear any green blazers in the Statehouse this January. He doesn’t want to be mistaken for one of the middle school-age legislative pages in green jackets who roam the halls carrying messages between officials. It’s a reasonable concern for the lanky 23-year-old, but at least he can claim seniority over his district-mate. At 22, Ben Jickling, an independent from Brookfield, will be the youngest lawmaker in the building. Voters in the two-seat OrangeWashington-Addison district, which covers Brookfield, Randolph, Braintree, Granville and Roxbury, did a curious thing on November 8: They ousted a well-liked seven-term incumbent in favor of two political neophytes. How did Hooper and Jickling parlay their lack of experience into a selling point, given that the average age of state reps is 60 and incumbents often seem invincible? Equally mystifying, what possessed the two of them —  a college kid and a recent graduate — to spend the summer campaigning for a political post that pays less than $700 a week? Jickling, a member of Randolph Union High’s championship baseball team in 2013, came home from college to pursue politics. Campaign lawn signs cover his apartment walls — “cheap wall art,” he explained. He’s adamantly independent and knocked on every door in his district twice, telling voters about his plans to address youth flight by expanding broadband and promoting economic development. “This is not a stepping stone for me. I want to be in Vermont for the rest of my life,” Jickling said. Hooper, equally comfortable in Carhartts on the family goat farm or in a blazer at boarding school, is energetic and voluble. “I have the ideals of a liberal,” he said, but “I understand the culture of red Vermont.” The Connecticut College graduate wants to increase the minimum wage, stem the opiate problem and preserve the state’s farmland. The five central Vermont towns the two will represent have a rich agricultural heritage. Randolph is the largest, with a population of about 5,000, a modest downtown and large employers, including Gifford Medical Center and the Vermont Technical College. The

Ben Jickling at home

Jay Hooper on his family’s goat farm

other four towns are more rural, with populations ranging from 300 to 1,300. For 14 years, the district’s voters had elected Democrat Patsy French, a 67-year-old former elementary school teacher. Her district-mate, Democrat Marjorie Ryerson of Randolph, didn’t run for reelection this year. Ryerson’s two predecessors both died in office. Undeterred by the district’s apparent

preference for the older demographic, Jickling launched his campaign in February, months before Ryerson bowed out. It became a four-way competition when French, Hooper, and, lastly, Republican Bob Orleck declared. By then Jickling, a political science major taking time off from Trinity College in Connecticut, already had a strategy. “I chose to really aggressively

market my age as a potential strength rather than a weakness,” he said during an interview in his apartment last week. Though baby-faced, he is at ease in an older crowd. At a November 19 auction fundraiser for the parent-teacher organization at Brookfield Elementary School, Jickling, dressed in a blue sweater, gray khakis and worn suede shoes, mingled with gray-haired constituents. He and Hooper had been asked to introduce the items. If Jickling resented spending his Saturday night there, he showed no sign of it, earnestly presenting honey, clover potpourri and handmade dolls. “I knew Ben from playing golf,” said Mark Hutchinson, a 62-year-old mailman from Randolph who declared, “I’m no spring chicken.” Jickling worked as a greenkeeper at Randolph’s Montague Golf Club for the past four summers. “He would come sit with the older guys and ask questions,” Hutchinson recalled. Although Jickling has spent most of his life in Brookfield, he was born in Bolivia, where his forester father had a job. His mother is the librarian at the Brookfield Free Public Library. Jickling spent a semester interning with U.S. Rep. Bill Keating (D-Mass.), a gig he got by cold-calling the office. In 2014, Jickling ran his cousin Calvin McEathron’s campaign for a Vermont House seat. The 20-year-old Middlebury College student nearly upset an 18-year incumbent, Democrat Betty Nuovo. Jickling is renting an apartment above a weathered garage in Brookfield, where the downstairs tenant is a tractor. The lawn signs lining the walls are diverse and include ones for Republican gubernatorial candidate Bruce Lisman and President Barack Obama — evidence of Jickling’s refusal to be politically pigeonholed. During the campaign, he said, “a lot of people thought I was a secret liberal or a secret Republican.” But he maintained, “I do consider myself a real independent.” Tending to avoid what he calls partisan issues, Jickling is more interested in talking about improving Vermont’s internet connectivity than discussing, say, marijuana legalization. If the legislature is addressing drugs, he reasoned, it should focus on reining in opiate use.


GOT A NEWS TIP? NEWS@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

SANTAMAYNOT GETITRIGHT But you can.

Bring in this coupon and receive

50% OFF

ONE NON-SALE ITEM M-Sa 10-8, Su 11â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6 40 ď?Łď?¨ď?ľď?˛ď?Łď?¨ď?łď?´ď?˛ď?Ľď?Ľď?´ ď?˘ď?ľď?˛ď?Źď?Šď?Žď?§ď?´ď?Żď?Ž 8 6 2 5 0 5 1 â&#x20AC;˘ S W E E T L A D YJ A N E . B I Z I N F O @ S W E E T L A D YJ A N E . B I Z 8h-sweetlady112316.indd 1

Let Your Light Shine

POLITICS

BEN AND JAY WERE VERY VISIBLE OUT THERE â&#x20AC;Ś

11/2/16 2:25 PM

this Holiday Season... with a Limited Edition Gemstone Candle.

Each handcrafted candle includes a hand selected gemstone inside. One in every 20 candles will have a DIAMOND!

$35

102 Harbor Rd., Shelburne | 985-3190

matthewtaylordesigns.net 8H-matttaylor113016.indd 1

11/28/16 11:29 AM

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

THEY REALLY GOT THE ATTENTION OF THE TOWN.

11.30.16-12.07.16 SEVEN DAYS

Vermont chocolates for a jolly, happy holiday! PINE ST & CH U RCH ST IN BU RLINGTON ROUTE 10 0, WATERBU RY CENTER

Untitled-15 1

11/14/16 4:36 PM

LOCAL MATTERS 15

Several people, including his He said he thinks towns should have more influence, but not veto father, described Hooper as a peacepower, over large solar projects, and maker. Hooper said his â&#x20AC;&#x153;biggest he generally opposes industrial- claim to fameâ&#x20AC;? is resolving a feud at scale wind turbines. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s studied Trinity-Pawling between the mostly Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s education finance laws white hockey team and the mostly and thinks the state should do more black basketball team over a supposto incentivize frugal school budgets. edly stolen hockey jersey. His first attempt to bring the teams He said his district is proof together ended with a fistthat small schools can be fight in the school chapel. cost-effective. He ultimately persuaded In elementary school, the hockey team to attend Jickling played Little League with Hooper. The former a basketball game, and vice versa; teammates are still friendly, even both teams came back from behind though they technically ran against to win. The jersey mysteriously reapone another. Hooper entered the race peared soon after. Though heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been away at school, in May immediately after graduating from Connecticut College with Hooper has plenty of community a double major in government and cred. His mother, Allison, cofounded the Vermont Creamery in history. Websterville, a thriving Hooper lives with his local business that churns parents in an old white out cultured butter and farmhouse on a dirt road artisanal cheeses, and â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  off another dirt road. young Hooperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rĂŠsumĂŠ In 1984, his father, Don includes haying, milking Hooper, became the and packing butter. first Democrat to win a He won over a number House seat in the Orangeof Republicans and rightWashington-Addison leaning independents district. After eight years with his support for gun as a rep, he was elected rights and his allegiance secretary of state, serving to agriculture. He spoke one term that ended in out against Connecticut 1995. developer Jesse â&#x20AC;&#x153;Samâ&#x20AC;? When Ryerson decided Sammisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Exit 4 project to step down, she called proposal, which would the elder Hooper to see REP. MARJORIE have swallowed up fertile if he would run. Jay overRYERSON farmland in Randolph. heard the conversation At the PTO auction, and volunteered instead. Hooper wore green He had some political experience, if trying and failing Carhartts slung low and prodded the counts. During his senior year at the crowd to bid on a toy tractor, telling all-boys Trinity-Pawling School in them, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nothing runs like a Deere.â&#x20AC;? Although he was happy to win, New York, he ran for head prefect and lost. As a freshman at Connecticut Hooper didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expect that doing so College, he went for class president. would oust French, whom he deHe said his opponent offered beer for scribed as a grandmother figure. She even campaigned for him. votes and won. The longtime legislator was But Hooper has charm. He was uncannily comfortable talking with gracious about her unexpected a reporter and unabashed about his defeat. She predicted that Hooper youthfulness. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re practically pre- and Jickling will â&#x20AC;&#x153;bring a youthful schoolers!â&#x20AC;? he said, referring to him- perspectiveâ&#x20AC;? to the Statehouse and self and Jickling. He sat in a rocking passed up the chance to mention their chair in his living room listening to lack of experience. Fleetwood Mac, occasionally stoking the fire. IN WITH THE NEW Âť P.20

One per customer. Valid from 11/28-12/14/2016.


LOCALmatters

Despite Challenges, More Private Docs Are Treating Opiate Addicts B Y M O LLY WA LSH

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 11.30.16-12.07.16 SEVEN DAYS 16 LOCAL MATTERS

SEAN METCALF

V

ermont officials are encouraging private physicians to treat addicts in an all-handson-deck battle against opioid abuse. But state sanctions against some of them illustrate the potential pitfalls of putting office docs on the front lines. Take Dr. Robert Penney. The Vermont Medical Practice Board found that the Burlington-based doctor prescribed the recovery drug buprenorphine even after a urine test showed one of his opioidaddicted patients was not taking it. Penney also failed to halt buprenorphine prescriptions after urine screens showed patients were taking other prescriptions or illicit street drugs that can pose safety risks when combined with “bupe,” according to the board’s official sanction. The Medical Practice Board fined Penney $2,000 in 2015 for failure to practice competently with six patients who were either opioid addicts or classified as suffering from chronic pain. It ordered him to attend medical education courses, and Penney complied. He did not respond to a message seeking comment. Penney is not the only doctor whom the state has faulted for problems with addiction care, according to records obtained by Seven Days. Over the past five years, the board has sanctioned at least four other Vermont physicians for improperly prescribing buprenorphine or methadone. In 2011, the Medical Practice Board found that psychiatrist Dr. Louis Frank of St. Johnsbury was treating opiateaddicted patients with methadone for “chronic pain.” He wrote more than 130 false prescriptions, according to the board, which revoked Frank’s license for seven years. His punishment was more severe than most. In 2014, Brattleboro physician Loren Anthony Landis had to pay a $3,000 fine and agree to treat no more than 30 patients at a time with buprenorphine. That was for not keeping proper records, failing to create treatment agreements with patients, and, in one case, prescribing “extremely high doses” of opioids to a patient with chronic pain, serious mental illness and addiction. In 2013, the board determined that Dr. Michael Schorsch of Lebanon, N.H., failed to meet the standard of appropriate care for Vermont patients

receiving buprenorphine prescriptions. He refilled one eight times for a patient who claimed it had been lost, stolen or destroyed. The year before, the board found that Dr. Donald Weinberg of Berlin failed to properly care for three patients with opioid addictions. He continued to prescribe buprenorphine to one despite evidence of cocaine and Ritalin abuse. Another got meds without having face-toface contact with the doc for almost two years. Stand-alone clinics offer the most intensive services for addicts, many of whom have lost jobs, children and housing, and, in some cases, have been in and out of jail, by the time they agree to treatment. But some of those facilities have waitlists, or they aren’t conveniently located for rural patients who have to make the treatment trek every day. Office-based care expands the options for far-flung addicts as well as those no longer in need of daily monitoring. State regulations and federal law governing office-based treatment are intended to reduce the risks of

anti-addiction drugs, which can cause overdoses if misused, said David Herlihy, executive director of the Medical Practice Board. At least 27 people in Vermont have fatally overdosed on buprenorphine or methadone since 2010, including five last year, according to the Vermont Health Department. The figure is higher for deaths involving those drugs combined with others. Under federal law, it’s illegal for office-based physicians to prescribe methadone for opioid treatment. That’s because the drug, which eases cravings for heroin and painkillers such as OxyContin, poses an overdose risk. For this reason, methadone is supposed to be prescribed only for opioid recovery in a clinical setting, where doses are typically taken on-site under close supervision. However, office doctors are allowed to prescribe methadone for chronic pain, and, in some cases, Vermont doctors have been sanctioned for using that diagnosis improperly, as a guise for opioid addiction treatment.

HEALTH

“We get complaints from neighbors, loved ones: ‘I think this doctor is turning my neighbor into a zombie,’” Herlihy said. For the Medical Practice Board, failure to follow the guidelines can amount to a violation of state law to provide proper care. Nonetheless, Herlihy agrees with Vermont Health Commissioner Harry Chen that office-based care can benefit patients and reduce the tragic toll of addiction. The number of Vermont physicians who are federally certified to prescribe buprenorphine for opioid addiction increased from 169 to 269 between 2013 and August 2016, according to the health department. That’s good, Chen suggested in an interview. “We have a great model,” he said. “That doesn’t mean that sometimes you aren’t going to have things that slip through the cracks.” The state doesn’t have the resources to police doctors who treat addicts in their offices, and it must rely on doctors to follow best practices, he added. It’s true that recovery drugs have caused fatal overdoses in Vermont, Chen acknowledged. A few have involved patients at state-funded clinics that specialize in opioid addiction treatment. Those fatalities are unusual, Chen said, adding that he has personally reviewed some of the cases. The benefits of recovery medicines outweigh the risks, Chen said. Buprenorphine, which acts to quell withdrawal symptoms, is considered to have less of an overdose risk than methadone and can be legally prescribed in an office setting. Often sold under the brand name Suboxone, buprenorphine can be a stabilizing force that helps people stay out of jail, earn a paycheck and recover custody of their children, said Dr. Patricia Fisher, medical director for case management at the University of Vermont Medical Center. “I think it saves people’s lives,” Fisher said. Fisher supports expansion of office-based opioid addiction treatment but warns that it can be “tricky.” In some cases, doctors who see 20 or 30 patients daily don’t make time to check urine screens as advised by the state guidelines for medically assisted treatment of heroin or OxyContin addiction. Other doctors are reluctant to


GOT A NEWS TIP? NEWS@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

confront patients who appear to be misusing their prescriptions. “If it’s not in their urine, they are making a living off of selling it; that’s what they are doing,” Fisher said. “Addicts … can be charming and conniving, and they can be pretty good at just telling you what you want to hear.” Fisher said she had a patient who admitted to putting a vial of her daughter’s urine inside her own vagina and releasing it into a specimen cup during a supervised urine screening. Good doctors know that they might have to refuse prescriptions to addicts who aren’t following the rules and look for other options — including

IF IT’S NOT IN THEIR URINE,

THEY ARE MAKING A LIVING OFF OF SELLING IT;

THAT’S WHAT THEY ARE DOING. D R . PATRICIA F ISHER

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 11.30.16-12.07.16 SEVEN DAYS LOCAL MATTERS 17

sending patients back to an addiction clinic setting for more closely monitored treatment, she added. “You feel like you have to be a little bit of a hard-ass,” Fisher said. Federal regulators, meanwhile, are expanding the range of people who can provide office-based treatment. Earlier this month, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced that, starting in 2017, it would allow nurse practitioners and physician’s assistants in private practices to prescribe buprenorphine. Currently, only doctors can. Gov. Peter Shumlin welcomed that as “great news.” “By allowing more medical professionals to prescribe these treatments, we will hopefully further reduce waitlists and get more Vermonters and Americans into recovery,” Shumlin said in a statement.  The state-funded Chittenden Clinic, which operates in South Burlington and Burlington, provides opioid addiction treatment in a closely supervised setting, with many patients visiting daily to take their

meds while nurses or doctors observe. It was treating 923 people earlier this month but had 243 on a waiting list. Around the state, some 3,000 people are in medically assisted opioid treatment at clinics and about 2,700 are receiving treatment in doctors’ offices. So far the big investments in treatment have not stopped the death toll. Accidental deaths involving opioids in Vermont increased from 50 to 76 per year between 2012 and 2015, according to the Vermont Health Department. As of the end of June, this year has seen 47 fatalities. State leaders insist more would have died of overdoses without the investment in medically assisted treatment. At the time he was sanctioned, Penney was a family medicine practitioner at Burlington Primary Care on Pine Street. Today he works at the Community Health Centers of Burlington, which purchased his former practice. Medical director Audrey Wen and Dr. Heather Stein, who treats patients for opioid addiction, said they could not discuss Penney’s sanction and emphasized that it happened before they hired him. The health centers have about 250 patients with opioid addictions who are taking buprenorphine, Wen and Stein said. The center also has patients with chronic pain diagnoses who are being treated with methadone. Wen and Stein said that opioid addicts getting care at the health centers must come in at least every three months, sign an agreement to quit illegal drugs and undergo random urine drug screening. Even with these rules, it’s difficult to prevent patients from selling their meds, they said. “I wish that we could find a way to completely eliminate it, but the tools are just not good,” said Stein. Both Wen and Stein said they believe it’s important to see opioid addiction without stigma, as a chronic illness that requires long-term treatment — at a regular doctor’s office. “A chronic illness is something that we all treat just like we would diabetes or high blood pressure,” Wen said. “For many people this is a lifelong struggle.” m Contact: molly@sevendaysvt.com Untitled-1 1

11/10/16 1:58 PM


LOCALmatters

In the Final Chapter, Keven’s Story Becomes Kay’s B Y M O LLY WA LSH

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 11.30.16-12.07.16 SEVEN DAYS 18 LOCAL MATTERS

JAMES BUCK

W

ith just weeks to live, 56-year-old Keven Pearce made a decision: He’d spend the rest of his days living as a woman. So it is that Kay Pearce, not Keven, is dying of terminal cancer at the McClure Miller VNA Respite House in Colchester. Pearce sports dangling earrings and clinking bracelets. A long, brunette wig rests on a stand by her bed — when she’s not wearing it. It’s too late for surgery or hormones. In this final chapter, Pearce is happy to be seen by nurses and other caregivers as the female she says she has long felt herself to be. “There has been that joy, that happiness and that feeling of fulfillment,” Pearce said last week in her room at the Respite House, with her collection of delicate pink Depression glass decorating the coffee table and a miniature Christmas tree lit up in a corner. Wearing an orange cardigan, dark pants and bedroom slippers, Pearce talked about her decision six weeks ago to assume a different gender expression. Single and childless, the Burlington native explained that she had always felt like a girl and, as an adult, identified as gay and occasionally cross-dressed. She thought about transitioning in the late 1990s but suffered a massive heart attack around age 40. She said doctors advised against hormone therapy, saying it could further strain her heart. So she did nothing. Seven years ago, Pearce was diagnosed with bladder cancer and learned this year that her illness is terminal. That sealed the deal, and she resigned herself “to just hide out and wait for the eventual.” But in preparation for end-of-life care about six weeks ago, Pearce had a change of heart. Jeanne Sullivan, a social worker for the Visiting Nurse Association of Chittenden and Grand Isle Counties hospice and palliative care team, remembers the conversation well. “Something he always wanted to do was to become Kay,” recalled Sullivan, who spoke to Seven Days with Pearce’s permission. “He decided: Why wait? Why not do it now?” Sometimes, reaching the end of one’s life brings clarity, added Carol Snow, a VNA chaplain who has spent time with Pearce in the last few weeks.

Kay Pearce

“The train’s always been coming, but now you can see it,” Snow said. Death’s approach brings an intense mixture of feelings — fear and distress, sometimes changing to peace and contentment. Amid all these conflicting emotions, many people seem to want to make sense of their lives by talking about them. Listening is a powerful comfort, Snow said. “The best possible thing we can do for each other is … help each other tell our stories,” she said. Pearce wants to tell hers. Because she made the decision at the end of her life, she will not face some of the issues that other transgender people do. Pearce is simply making cosmetic alterations with makeup and nail polish. She’s not going to change her legal name — there’s no time — nor is she worried about an employer’s reaction. Pearce’s days in retail sales and customer service jobs are well behind her. But at least one person is critical of her decision. Her mother, Sheila Godin, brings home-cooked meals to Pearce’s bright, cheerful room almost every day. Yet

Godin, who cared for Pearce for several months at her Burlington home before the move to the Respite House, is not supporting the gender expression shift and won’t use the name “Kay.” “I make his food, and I put ‘Keven’ on it, because that’s who he is,” Godin said in a telephone interview with Seven Days. The transition doesn’t sit well with her. “I think it’s unnecessary,” Godin said. “I don’t believe in any of it. If he wants to be gay, that’s one thing, but this, as far as I’m concerned, is total nonsense.” Not to Pearce. For decades, Pearce said, she lived with the feeling of being in the wrong body. “To walk by the mirror every single day and not see what you see inside your mind is very disturbing,” she said. “It causes a very deep sadness.” These past few weeks, being referred to as “Kay” and “she” has contributed to the feeling that she is exhibiting her “true self,” Pearce said. That takes courage, said Josie Leavitt, interim executive director of the Pride Center of Vermont, a Burlington nonprofit.

“It should be honored, supported and respected,” said Leavitt, who does not know Pearce. For some parents, an adult child’s transition to a new gender can be harder to accept than for the child coming out as gay. “You’ve spent your whole life as a parent seeing your child one way, then all of a sudden everything you’ve known about your child feels very different,” Leavitt said. “It shakes people to the core sometimes if they don’t understand why people feel the need to do this.” Often, the eureka moment comes when a skeptical family member sees what a difference it makes for the individual, Leavitt added: “That’s where the real joy of being able to transition can be seen.” Kay’s journey was a long one. Pearce, one of three children, grew up in Burlington’s New North End and attended J.J. Flynn Elementary School, Lyman C. Hunt Middle School and Burlington High School. As a young boy, Pearce wanted to

HEALTH


GOT A NEWS TIP? NEWS@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

play with dolls, which didn’t go over well in the 1960s, when most gay or transgender people were deeply closeted because of societal disapproval. “I’ve always felt female,” Pearce explained. “I was always stared at. That is the thing I always remember. I was always looked at differently. People seemed to know that what they were seeing was a little bit different. I was not the usual rough-and-tumble boy.” The neighborhood boys played with toy trucks. “I was playing house and trying to find ways of playing dolls with the girls in the neighborhood,” Pearce said. Sensing that such behavior was embarrassing to family members, a young Pearce concealed it. “I learned very early to hide who I was,” she said. Theater helped — Pearce acted in the Hunt Middle School production of You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown, and sang in the chorus of the community Lyric Theatre production of Gypsy in 1974. “I was accepted and almost even admired when I performed,” Pearce recalled. Offstage, the glow evaporated, Pearce said. “When you weren’t performing, you were just back to that boy that looked like a girl or that girl that looked like a boy, or what are you, anyway?”

As a young adult, Pearce worked in retail and customer service jobs in Burlington and also lived in upstate New York and Maine, among other places. Pearce wanted children but did not want to do what some friends did:

TO WALK BY THE MIRROR EVERY SINGLE DAY AND NOT

SEE WHAT YOU SEE INSIDE YOUR MIND IS VERY DISTURBING. KAY PE ARC E

marry women, have children and carry on affairs with gay men. Later, Pearce was ready to raise kids with a man but says the right partner never came along. “I didn’t want to raise a child by myself. I wanted to raise a child with a partner,” she said. After her health problems accelerated, Pearce lived on disability and took comfort in occasionally teaching

The 21-room Respite House opened in September and replaced a smaller version in Williston. The new building feels like a friendly boutique hotel — with a big stone fireplace and walls of windows in the sitting room, an open kitchen full of bustling volunteers and, on a recent afternoon, a pianist tinkling away as a patient in a wheelchair sang along to “Unforgettable.” Respite House residents stay, on average, about two weeks before death claims them. Pearce, who has been there six weeks, has outlived at least a half dozen others. She knows that her time could come any day, any moment, but prefers not to dwell on it. “I don’t feel that I am really at the end of my life, but should it happen today or tomorrow, I am prepared for it,” Pearce said. “I can tell you that this past six weeks has been the most beautiful time of my life. The people I have met, the people … who help others leave this world and move onto another place. It’s been remarkable. I did not know this kindness and generosity was possible.” m Contact: molly@sevendaysvt.com

Own a new

2016 Fiat 500X

349/mo

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

GIFT YOURSELF

classes through the Burlington Housing Authority, which manages subsidized housing in Burlington. Pearce chose the first name Kay in recognition of a childhood neighbor who was kind and welcoming, and taught Pearce all about the flowers growing in her yard in the New North End. “I called her the garden lady,” Pearce recalled of the elderly woman. “God had put the world together so that there was so much softness,” Pearce said the woman taught her. “There was so much beauty.” As a youngster, Pearce attended St. Mark Catholic Parish on North Avenue but came to feel like an outsider in relation to the faith and no longer attends mass. “I still consider myself a Catholic,” she said. “I’m a different kind of Catholic, but I’m a Catholic.” A statuette of the Virgin Mary sits on Pearce’s nightstand next to her bed at the Respite House. Why the Madonna? “Because she is with me everywhere,” Pearce said. “I say the ‘Hail Mary’ every night … I just have always had an allegiance and a feeling of love and safety and gratitude, all surrounding the Blessed Mother.”

Trekking AWD

$

11.30.16-12.07.16

— $0 DOWN — Save $5,257 Off MSRP

SEVEN DAYS

**Stk# 6F1340: MSRP: $27,705 Qualified buyers finance $22,448 with $0 down. At 3.79% APR for 72 months. Sale price includes Chrysler NE Bonus Cash $2,000, Chrysler Cash $500, Chrysler Conquest Cash $1,000, Berlin City Discount $2,256, With approved credit. Sale price includes a $499 Doc fee. Sales tax, title and registration fees not included Offer expires 12/31/16.

Easy. Pre-Discounted Pricing

Easy. No Questions Return Easy. Door-to Door Delivery LOCAL MATTERS 19

585 Marshall Ave Williston VT (888) 460-5481 BerlinCityFiat.com Untitled-31 1

11/29/16 11:31 AM


In With the New « P.15

EXCERPTS FROM THE BLOG

MATTHEW THORSEN

Burlington International Airport

11.30.16-12.07.16 SEVEN DAYS 20 LOCAL MATTERS

Budget flights to Orlando, Fla., on Allegiant Air are being phased out at Burlington International Airport three years after they began. The airline will officially sever service out of BTV in March 2017, ending the run between Burlington and Orlando Sanford International Airport. The penny-wise airline likes airports with little infrastructure and lower fees than what Burlington’s airport generally charges, according to Gene Richards, director of aviation. “They were not happy,” Richards said. “They do not want to pay the fees that the other airlines pay, because that is not their model. So I think that’s what it came down to.” An airline spokeswoman confirmed that Allegiant’s service to Burlington will end on March 4. “Increased airport costs and a route that lacked strong demand made it a situation which was no longer financially feasible for us,” Hilarie Grey wrote in an email. News of the departure comes as the airport negotiates five-year agreements with the other airlines that fly in and out of Burlington. American Airlines has already signed an agreement, and Delta, United and JetBlue have agreed to terms and are expected to sign by year’s end, according to Richards. Allegiant continues to fly from Plattsburgh International Airport across Lake Champlain in New York. The small operation on a former U.S. Air Force base calls itself “Montréal’s U.S. Airport” and has aggressively wooed travelers who live just over the border in Canada. The current disadvantageous exchange rate has been working against both BTV and PBG. Allegiant’s flights to Orlando from Burlington drew 13,002 passengers in 2014, 14,600 in 2015 and 9,975 passengers through October of this year.

MOLLY WALSH

U.S. Attorney’s Office Adds a Civil Rights Prosecutor The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Burlington has hired a new prosecutor to focus on enforcing civil rights laws. Julia Torti, a Vermont native who worked as a civil rights attorney in New York, is one of 34 new assistant U.S. attorneys that the U.S. Department of Justice is hiring across the country to enforce laws against discrimination. Julia Torti

MARK DAVIS

Burlington City Council Votes — Twice — to Welcome Immigrants KATIE JICKLING

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Allegiant Air Prepares to Take Off From Burlington — for Good

The Vermont office said it secured one of the positions through a competitive application process. “The Department and this U.S. Attorney’s Office are committed to a level playing field for all Vermont residents, promoting equal opportunity for Vermonters and educating the public about their rights and responsibilities under federal civil rights laws,” U.S. Attorney Eric Miller said in a prepared statement. The office will also hire a coordinator to collaborate with community groups and other agencies on civil rights issues, Miller said. The hirings come as president-elect Donald Trump prepares to shake up the Department of Justice when he takes office in January. Trump’s nominee for U.S. Attorney General, U.S. Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.), failed in a 1986 bid to become a federal judge after former employees alleged that he made racist statements. Nationwide, hate crimes and incidents involving harassment or intimidation have surged in the wake of Trump’s election. The Vermont Partnership for Fairness and Diversity cheered Torti’s hiring. The organization’s executive director, Curtiss Reed Jr., noted that it comes “at a time when many Vermonters feel vulnerable to acts of discrimination, denial of services and hate crimes.”

Burlington City Council

The Burlington City Council voted overwhelmingly Monday to back a pair of resolutions welcoming immigrants. One supports the resettlement of Syrian refugees in the Queen City, while the second will begin the process of earning Burlington the designation of a sanctuary city. Both motions, which drew a large crowd of civilian supporters, passed easily. Before the meeting, a group of more than 200 people held a vigil on the Burlington City Hall steps. Attendees cradled candles against the wind and carried signs supporting Syrian refugees. The resolution to accept the refugees is nonbinding, said Kit O’Connor, who crafted the measure in her role as the legislative coordinator for Vermont Amnesty International. “My bottom line is this,” she told those gathered at the vigil. “We can decide how we welcome people into our community.” After council debate and testimony of support from attendees, both resolutions passed by a wide margin. Republican Councilor Kurt Wright voted against both measures, while independent Councilor Dave Hartnett voted against beginning the sanctuary city process. The council also passed a resolution to “reaffirm Burlington as a welcoming and inclusive place for refugees.” The vote allows for the creation of an ad hoc committee to investigate the policies and consequences around becoming a sanctuary city. The committee will return to the council on January 9 with policy recommendations. The designation would codify practices, already in place in Burlington, that prevent municipal workers, including law enforcement, from asking individuals about their immigration status. “As an all-white council, it’s important to recognize that these things are real for people in our community,” said Councilor Sara Giannoni.

KATIE JICKLING

“I voted for Patsy French for years. She’s a good friend of mine,” said Hutchinson. But in his view, “She always toed the party line.” This year he voted for Jickling and Hooper because “despite their lack of life experience, I think they put a lot of effort into learning about what was important to people.” The specter of a carbon tax played a role in the election. Throughout the campaign, her Republican opponent and others criticized French for cosponsoring a bill that would have explored the concept. It was worrisome to Sam Lincoln, who calculated that a carbon tax could cost him $15,000. A lifelong Randolph resident, he owns a logging business and a farm. He’s harvested timber for French and said he respects her, but he voted for Jickling and Hooper. He liked that Jickling is an independent, observing, “It’s hard to get an elected legislator to vote against their party.” At first he opposed Hooper, who had gone door-to-door for the Vermont Public Interest Research Group last summer, extolling the benefits of taxing carbon fuels. But partway through the campaign, Hooper had a change of heart, declaring during an interview on a local country radio station that he would vote against a carbon tax. He explained that he still personally supports the idea, but he’s been persuaded that it would be unaffordable for many people in the district. Whether you call that open-mindedness or malleability, the about-face won people over. Lincoln and others saw it as evidence that the candidate had heard their concerns. “A lot of Republican voters decided to give me a shot because I was so emphatic that representation is my No. 1 purpose,” said Hooper. “That’s the beauty of being an independent,” said Jickling. “You can make every decision based on your district.” “I think the race was interesting because Ben and Jay were very visible out there … They really got the attention of the town,” said outgoing Rep. Ryerson. “It’s going to be fascinating to watch this next session.” Ryerson said she met Hooper for a celebratory drink at the Black Krim Tavern after the election. When the server asked for Hooper’s ID, Ryerson protested, “He’s our next state rep!” The server rolled her eyes and said, “I still need to see his ID.” m Disclosure: Ben Jickling is the brother of Seven Days reporter Katie Jickling. Contact: alicia@sevendaysvt.com


lifelines

OBITUARIES, VOWS, CELEBRATIONS

PERSONALIZED PHOTO ORNAMENTS

GREAT KEEPSAKE FOR ALL AGES

MEMORIALS KK Wilder 1942-2016

A memorial for KK Wilder will be held on Sunday, December 11, at the Unitarian Universalist Church at the top of Church Street at 2 p.m. with reception to follow. In keeping with KK’s spirit, it will be a cooperative affair with many

people contributing food, flowers, photos and words. Please let us know if you can offer any of these or if you know any of KK’s favorite songs that would be fun to play before, during or after the service. We do plan part of the service as an open mic. Mary, mfillmor@together.net, 238-4696.

Want to memorialize a loved one in Seven Days? Post your remembrance online and in print at lifelines.sevendaysvt.com. Or contact us at lifelines@sevendaysvt.com or 865-1020, ext. 37.

Mark your family’s milestones in

10 Dorset Street • South Burlington • 802.863.1256 • thephotogarden.com

GG4t-Photogarden112316.indd 1

11/14/16 12:10 PM

E!

IV

Discover CBD The Herbal Supplement Everyone is Talking

S LU

About!

• GSG Carries Organic, Vermont-Grown Green Mountain CBD. • Extracted With Coconut Oil From Whole Hemp Plants

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Memorialize your loved one by publishing their obituary in Seven Days.

PhotoGarden

C EX

lifelines

EASY ORDERING ONLINE OR IN STORE

11.30.16-12.07.16

Our print and digital publications can share news efficiently and effectively — ideal for publicizing funerals and memorial services, as well as for sharing with family and friends far away. Let Seven Days help honor a special person who meant so much to so many.

SEVEN DAYS

READ, POST, SHARE & COMMENT lifelines.sevendaysvt.com • lifelines@sevendaysvt.com

Green State Gardener

Trusted Advisors, Experienced Indoor Growers 388 Pine Street, Burlington • Across From Arts Riot 802 - 540 - 2097 Untitled-29 1

11/29/16 10:29 AM

LIFE LINES 21

OBITUARIES • MEMORIALS • ENGAGEMENTS WEDDINGS • BIRTHS • BIRTHDAYS • GRADUATIONS


A New Book Offers a Curriculum for Treating Trauma Through Art

I

BOOKS

EVERY SINGLE ONE OF US WILL HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY AT SOME POINT TO BE A PROACTIVE BYSTANDER. TR A C Y P E NF I E LD

22 STATE OF THE ARTS

SEVEN DAYS

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

COURTESY OF TRACY PENFIELD

n the first chapter of A Curriculum of Courage: Making SafeArt, Chelsea artist, educator and advocate TRACY PENFIELD relates the story of the abusive relationship that dominated her life from ages 14 to 30. This cumulative trauma, combined with a lifetime of work in dance and textile arts, has informed her ongoing exploration of creative expression as healing. In 2000, Penfield founded SAFEART, a program whose mission is “creating community and healing through the expressive arts.” Now, 16 years later, the 60-year-old has channeled the essence of her work into a 179-page, 16-chapter curriculum guide that’s chock-full of anecdotes, activity plans, poetry, artwork and resources. “It’s been a long and organic process,” she told Seven Days by phone. SafeArt initially grew from Penfield’s work as a volunteer in 1999 with Safeline, Orange County’s sexual and domestic violence advocacy group. After organizing a performance to raise awareness of abuse, she worked closely with that organization to develop a grant-funded curriculum for local middle and high schools. Penfield toured variants of that program from 2000 to 2008. SafeArt has grown to include a wide array of initiatives, from the Sexual Assault Survivor Youth group to Penfield’s somatic “tracing” sessions. Currently in development is the Healing Arts Intensive Care Unit, which works with women living with mental illness who seek alternatives to psychiatric hospitalization. SafeArt’s HQ is at Altus Healing Arts, a Chelsea yoga and wellness studio that Penfield opened in 2008. Though SafeArt’s facilitators and artists are not psychotherapists, Penfield explained by email, “We are frequently in communication with a participant’s therapist and/or PCP, primarily for those in the HAICU.” Often, she said, health care providers “who grasp that what we offer is outside the box” will refer clients to the program. The SafeArt curriculum embraces

COURTESY OF ERICA VENUTI

B Y RA CHEL ELI ZA BET H JONES

spiritual growth. “That’s definitely an obstacle we’ve come up against, and we keep working around it, over it, through it.” Within the guide, sections called “Scientific Check-Ins” aim to assuage any reader skepticism by citing doctors and researchers who testify to the impact that art therapy can have. Chapters 5 and 6 describe types of abuse and sexual violence, including “relationship wheel” diagrams to help individuals identify abuse in their or others’ lives.

From the cover of A Curriculum of Courage: Making SafeArt

Tracy Penfield

visual art, movement, writing, drama and music. “I use [‘creative expression’] often instead of ‘the arts’ or ‘art,’” Penfield said, “because for some people the word ‘art’ has a high and mighty connotation of something you see in a museum or concert hall.” Chapters 11 through 15 of her book are dedicated to specific “explorations” in these various disciplines, and include images of participants’ artwork, poetry and performances. Other chapters address self-care, mindfulness and group icebreakers. Most of the volume, however, clarifies the context of SafeArt’s ethos and

programming and prepares facilitators to work in settings that are inherently serious and fraught with emotion. Chapter 3 recommends that facilitators cultivate the Zen Buddhist “beginner’s mind and body” and discusses workshop content and form, confidentiality, and the threat of vicarious trauma. Chapter 4 introduces the triune brain theory, a debated model of the human brain first described by neuroscientist Paul D. MacLean in the 1960s. Penfield writes, “We use this model for its simplicity and ease of understanding everyday behavior in the framework of trauma.” “Most of what we do has qualitative outcomes rather than quantitative,” Penfield said, indicating the difficulty of numerically measuring emotional and

“Since the election,” Penfield said, “many people have said to me, ‘Wow, Tracy, this is really timely.’” How does she think the SafeArt curriculum can address ongoing cultural divisiveness? Penfield wants to show people how to be “proactive bystanders” when they witness public harassment. “Every single one of us will have the opportunity at some point to be a proactive bystander,” she explained. “I want people to know how to safely be proactive.” SafeArt survives on grants and donations, and Penfield readily acknowledged that funding is the organization’s most immediate challenge. She’s hopeful that sales of the curriculum guide will help support the program’s viability. She’s presented the book in several lectures in Orange County, as well as at Emerson College and the New Hampshire Behavioral Health Conference. Those experiences, she said, “buoyed my confidence that people in many different walks of life are going to be able to find something in this book.” For the moment, Penfield has suspended her work with individual clients to tour and promote the SafeArt curriculum. She hopes to present at the University of Vermont’s Dismantling Rape Culture Conference next spring. “Maybe if SafeArt had come to my high school when I was 15 years old,” Penfield said, “I wouldn’t have stayed unconscious for so long.”  Contact: rachel@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Learn more at safeart.org.


FRESH VT BALSAM HOMECOMING: A NEW YORK CURATOR RETURNS TO VERMONT

Balsam wreaths, plain or decorated. Mazza-grown poinsettas!

Gifts for Home & Garden, Vermont & Specialty Food Baskets, Cream & Butter Fudge, WE SHIP!

OPEN HOUSE

Sophie Bréchu-West

Farm Market • Bakery • Greenhouses

SHOP ! LOCAL

Apple Cider Donuts, Breads, Rolls, Fruit Pies, Cream Pies, Pastries & Cookies

802-655-3440

277 Lavigne Rd., Colchester • M-Sa 7am-7pm• Su 7am- 6pm sammazzafarms.com • See our monthly sale coupon! • MC/Visa/Disc

6h-sammazza113016.indd 1

11/21/16 12:32 PM

WINTER’S WARM MUSIC

INFO

UNIVERSITY CONCERT CHOIR AND CATAMOUNT SINGERS

Free Admission • 61 Colchester Avenue, Burlington • www.flemingmuseum.org Untitled-5 1

11/3/16 1:39 PM

STATE OF THE ARTS 23

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 4 AT 2:00PM

SEVEN DAYS

A Celebration of Yuletide

SADIE WILLIAMS “Golden Days,” work by Dorothy Simpson Krause, on view by appointment, December 7 to January 14, at 56 Park Street in Stowe. Reception, Wednesday, December 7, 5 to 8 p.m. 571projects.com

FRESH EVERY DAY FROM OUR BAKERY:

11.30.16-12.07.16

So she hopped across the pond to get her master’s in contemporary art and connoisseurship from Christie’s London. From there, it was on to New York City. 571 Projects started, says Bréchu-West, “as a boutique gallery space.” Her aim was to showcase emerging and mid-career artists with solo shows. “I wanted to highlight the strength of these artists in the context of their own work, which is frequently rolled into group shows and never allowed to stand and shine alone.” The curator staged 12 before losing her New York space. She also developed a portfolio of clients for the art-consulting side of her business, something she aims to recreate in Vermont. “As a native Vermonter, coming back to the state was a natural choice,” Bréchu-West says. “Stowe seemed like a good fit. My husband [Antoine Bréchu] is from the French Alps, and we’re both avid skiers.” And she’s here to stay. “I kind of got the city thing out of my system,” she says. “I’m not asking myself why I’m here. I know why I’m here. I like the pace of life, I like having time for the outdoors, and I like this new environment for my artists — to try to get them going in different, interesting places.” “I don’t have anything against artwork that reads as ‘typically’ Vermont, nice figurative landscapes that may or may not include foliage, barns, cows,” the curator says. “It just happens that I am interested in artists who explore landscape … in ways that challenge and stretch our preconceived notions of how we see and respond to our world.”

Saturday, December 10, 11am–3pm Santa will be here 11-1!

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

In October, SOPHIE BRÉCHU-WEST quietly made her debut in the Vermont art scene. Not as an artist, but as a curator. The 36-year-old is originally from Bennington and most recently lived in New York City. Over the past few months, she was the impetus behind multiple exhibitions of work by Brooklyn artist Sally Gil, whose work you can still see in the “Contemporary Voices From Vermont” show at the University of Vermont’s FLEMING MUSEUM OF ART in Burlington. Bréchu-West is an independent curator and art consultant who operates a company called 571 PROJECTS. She’s currently prepping for a new show, a smaller affair featuring artist DOROTHY SIMPSON KRAUSE, which Bréchu-West will hang in her snug Stowe headquarters in December. Krause, an accomplished artist who founded the Computer Arts Center at the Massachusetts College of Art, has never shown her work in Vermont before. While this is only her second exhibition in Vermont, Bréchu-West is by no means inexperienced. She launched 571 Projects in 2009 in New York City. In 2012, when the building was scheduled to be demolished and redeveloped, she uprooted herself and moved back home with her husband. Now Bréchu-West plans to continue her practice by bringing mid-career artists to Vermont. The contemporary art she exhibits ranges from loose, painterly portraits by New York artist Melora Griffis to Krause’s experimental environmental prints. But it wasn’t always so. When Bréchu-West earned a degree in art history from the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Va., she had no real grounding in contemporary art. She started her career in the arts with an internship at the Boston branch of Christie’s Auctions, which led to a job at the Judi Rotenberg Gallery in Cambridge. “Abby Ross, Judi Rotenberg’s daughter, had just taken over the gallery,” Bréchu-West recalls, “and had sort of shifted the vision … into a much more cutting-edge visual aesthetic. And I realized I didn’t have the framework for any of it.”

ART

CHRISTMAS TREES!

VISIT OUR GIFT DEPARTMENT


Two Cinéastes and a Bunch of Films Make for a Lively Local Podcast BY L U KE BAYN E S

I

24 STATE OF THE ARTS

SEVEN DAYS

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

f “Siskel & Ebert & the Movies” had been emceed by an improv comedy duo and recorded with beers nursed over a leisurely hour and a half, it might have sounded something like the podcast of Burlington residents LINCOLN L. HAYES and TIM BRIDGE. “The What the Hell Are You Watching?! Podcast,” a casually structured yet impassioned dialogue between a pair of multitalented film geeks, dissects current releases with the comic verve of an improvised variety show. Last week, Seven Days sat in on a recording session in the den at Hayes’ house in the New North End. Behind the podcasters stood shelves crammed with DVDs. On the wall was a poster from the original Star Wars, along with a pair of framed awards that Hayes’ short film “Pillow Talk” picked up as part of the Vermont Filmmakers’ Showcase at the 2015 VERMONT INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL. Hayes’ two cats, Cleopatra and Daenerys Targaryen, curiously prowled the room and occasionally interrupted the episode; at one point, Daenerys tried to drink this reporter’s water. The movie under discussion was the Harry Potter spinoff Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, which marked author J.K. Rowling’s screenwriting debut. It earned a disappointing (by lofty Harry Potter standards) $75 million in domestic box-office receipts during its opening weekend. Early in the podcast, Bridge acknowledged the presence of a journalist in the room. “It’s kind of weird, I’m not gonna lie. It’s like I’m being watched,” he remarked. “I feel like I’m in a movie where they couldn’t afford a two-way mirror.” But Bridge and Hayes quickly settled into back-and-forth banter, which became increasingly contentious when it turned out they had divergent opinions of the film. Hayes said he “had a lot of fun at the theater,” and wants “to see more of these fantastic beasts, and I want to know where to find them.” For his part, Bridge thought the movie suffered from an excess of subplots and expository character development, especially given that the studio has plans to turn it into a franchise by “making

Untitled-21 1

11/28/16 2:20 PM

Tim Bridge (left) and Lincoln L. Hayes

[four] more of these goddamned movies.” Unlike Siskel and Ebert, whose televised movie debates in the ’80s and ’90s could turn downright nasty, Hayes and Bridge diffuse moments of discord with comic relief. “This must be what Mike Pence felt like when he was attacked by those Hamilton fellas,” Bridge quipped at one point, referencing the vice president-elect’s recent run-in on Broadway. When the discussion turned to the character of Credence Barebone, Bridge launched into his best John Fogerty impression, hollering, “Some folks are born with wizard powers” to the melody of Creedence Clearwater Revival’s “Fortunate Son.” Bridge, 24, is a film major at the University of Vermont who does standup comedy when he’s not working part-time at the Windjammer Restaurant. He placed third last month in the Vermont’s Funniest Comedian contest at the VERMONT COMEDY CLUB. Hayes, 32, also works at the Windjammer to fund his artistic pursuits. As a filmmaker, he collaborates with his wife, RACHEL RIENDEAU, who starred in and cowrote the story for “Pillow Talk.” The couple founded Pretty Beard Productions in 2015; its most recent release was “#Dinnergate.” The spoof depicts a news conference that’s called when a husband (local comedian DENNIS LEMOINE) burns


FILM

LUKE BAYNES

dinner and provokes the ire of his wife (Riendeau). Hayes and Bridge appear as reporters. Hayes originated the podcast with Los Angeles-based writer and filmmaker Kyle Anderson in 2011 under the title “The WTF Are You Watching?! Podcast.” When he met Bridge last year, after one of the latter’s performances at NORTH END STUDIOS with the improv comedy group the UNMENTIONABLES, Hayes was seeking a new partner. In its original form, the podcast sported the tagline “We watch shitty movies so you don’t have to” and specialized in reviews of awesomely awful movies of the so-bad-it’s-good variety. After Bridge entered the fold, the format changed. When just Hayes and Bridge are holed up at Hayes’ house, they discuss a new release. When a guest is involved — which occurs about half of the time — they ask that person to choose a film they’re particularly passionate about. The pair originally conceived the revived show as a live event at the Vermont Comedy Club. After a couple of unsatisfactory attempts, they realized they hadn’t established the right rapport to take the show on the road.

Now, with 20 episodes under their belts, they’re reconsidering public appearances, they said. “We’re going to explore it more in the future,” Bridge said. “We needed to build a base. We needed to know what this podcast was.” Hayes actively promotes the venture on social media. In the aftermath of the Fantastic Beasts episode, he acknowledged that he was a bit harsh in his rebuttal of Bridge’s critique. “I’ll be the first to admit it: I was kind of a dick in this one,” Hayes wrote on Facebook when posting a link to the podcast. Riendeau chimed in, commenting that while she “loved the movie,” she concurred with many of Bridge’s points. She particularly agreed with his assessment that the British-born Rowling made a laughable mistake when she specifically name-checked the state of Arizona as a place of mystical wonder. “I will concede and agree,” her husband wrote in response. 

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

UNLIKE SISKEL AND EBERT, HAYES AND BRIDGE DIFFUSE MOMENTS OF DISCORD

11.30.16-12.07.16

WITH COMIC RELIEF.

SEVEN DAYS STATE OF THE ARTS 25

INFO For more info on “The What the Hell Are You Watching?! Podcast,” and to listen to past episodes, visit wtfareyouwatching.libsyn.com. Untitled-12 1

11/28/16 1:38 PM


NOVEL GRAPHICS FROM THE CENTER FOR CARTOON STUDIES

SEVEN DAYS

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

DRAWN+paneled

26 ART

DAVID HUMPHREYS is a cartoonist and the photographer for the Well Fed

series of cookbooks. He completed his masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in cartooning at the Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction in May of 2016.

DRAWN & PANELED IS A COLLABORATION BETWEEN SEVEN DAYS AND THE CENTER FOR CARTOON STUDIES IN WHITE RIVER JUNCTION, FEATURING WORKS BY PAST AND PRESENT STUDENTS. FOR MORE INFO, VISIT CCS ONLINE AT CARTOONSTUDIES.ORG.


THE STRAIGHT DOPE BY CECIL ADAMS

Dear Cecil,

What’s going on with autism? When I was growing up, there seemed to be hardly any autistic kids around; now they’re everywhere. Is this an example of better diagnostic methods or are there more autistic kids around now, and, if so, does anyone have any ideas as to why? Joanne in Euless, Texas

I

edition of its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, published in 2013, experts figured that between 10 and 40 percent of existing diagnoses wouldn’t meet the new standards. Again, recent data seems to bear this out: The diagnosis rate among kids evaluated for ASD at one Buffalo hospital dropped from 50 percent under the old criteria to 39 percent under DSM-5. Complexities of diagnosis aside, there’s a fairly clear set of traits that has historically been described as autism — significant trouble with communication and interaction, repetitive or otherwise rigid behavior — but thus far little solid consensus about what causes it. One ongoing question has been the relative impact of heredity, genetic mutation and environmental factors; all are seemingly in play, but our understanding of the balance continues to swing back and forth. Scientists have long studied autism in twins — the basic idea being that if identical twins (who share all their genes) are

significantly more likely to both have ASD than fraternal twins (who share only half ), that tells us something about the genetics-environment relationship. At one point such research suggested that ASD risk might be as much as 90 percent the result of inherited genes, but a surprising 2011 study at Stanford concluded it was only 38 percent, with 62 percent attributable to environmental exposure. More recent studies haven’t settled much: A 2014 Swedish report estimated that autism was 50 percent heritable; a UK paper from last year didn’t pin it down any better than “56 percent to 95 percent.” On this front the jury is apparently still way out. In the wake of since-discredited findings about mercury in vaccines (and resulting dips in vaccination coverage), it’s hard not to be skeptical when you hear about some substance newly linked to autism; as I said in 2014, “If there actually were an environmental cause of autism, with so many false positives being reported we’d never know.” OK, so that’s

from her field (her doctorate’s in computer science); likewise, those critics have found themselves dismissed as shills for Big Agriculture. All this notwithstanding, so far Seneff has merely shown a correlation between ASD prevalence and glyphosate use on corn and soybeans without demonstrating causation. Among the biggest recent news about autism, one might argue, was a CDC report in March finding that the ASD rate had remained flat since the previous report two years earlier. But the sense that autism is ever on the rise, borne out by statistics or not, feeds into the suspicion of many parents that some external malignancy has warped their child’s development. In her 2014 book On Immunity, the essayist Eula Biss examines the seductive appeal of anti-vaxxer beliefs, suggesting that ours is a culture that fears the unnatural and seeks to blame it whenever something goes wrong. If autism turns out to be as natural as any other genetic mutation, that just goes to show that not everything in nature has our best interests in mind.

INFO

Is there something you need to get straight? Cecil Adams can deliver the Straight Dope on any topic. Send questions to Cecil via straightdope.com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.

11.30.16-12.07.16

Style and

SEVEN DAYS

function! are you someone who struggles integrating your glasses and goggles on the mountain? We can help!

8h-opticalCenter011514.indd 1

Bourbon, Rye, Rum and Apple Brandy 100% Fermented, Distilled & Bottled in VT 107 Church Street Burlington 864-7146 • opticalcentervt.com 1/13/14 1:27 PM

Tasting Room and Cocktail Shop: 137 St. Paul St. Burlington, VT 05401 Cocktails served Thursday -Sunday 8H-MadRivDistiller113016.indd 1

11/29/16 3:52 PM

STRAIGHT DOPE 27

Eliminate fogging and see the slopes clearly with this special insert that clips into the google. This accessory is included at no additional cost with the purchase of the Smith Turbo Fan goggle and prescription lenses. Come in today and see why this goggle is a combination of style and technology at it’s finest.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

f I had a dollar for every letter I get asking about the autism epidemic — well, you’d think I could fund a study definitive enough to stop people writing the letters. It so happens I addressed a question much like Joanne’s in March 2014, but both the study of autism and popular interest in it are still going strong, and now’s not a bad time for an update. As of that earlier column, it looked like the dramatic increase in autism diagnoses seen in recent decades was due substantially to a broadened definition of autism —  specifically, to the decision made in the 1990s to include Asperger’s syndrome and other developmental conditions under the umbrella term “autism spectrum disorders.” Nearly  three years later, that’s still what it looks like: A 2015 study, for instance, found that 60 percent of an apparent ASD upswing in Denmark could be attributed to changes in reporting practices. After the American Psychiatric Association tightened up the criteria for ASDs in the fifth

a little strong. The Centers for Disease Control is confident enough to state that exposure during pregnancy to the pharmaceuticals valproic acid and thalidomide present a heightened ASD risk, for instance, but those are known to cause birth defects too. Pesticides make a more worrisome potential culprit. A California study published in Environmental Health Perspectives in 2014 reported that pregnant mothers who lived near fields treated with pesticides called organophosphates were more likely to have kids with ASD —  surely a connection worth further investigation. A louder version of this claim, though, came from MIT researcher Stephanie Seneff, who that same year attributed high autism rates (and a host of other ills) to the wide use of glyphosate, a related herbicide found in Monsanto’s weed killer Roundup, and predicted that by 2025 half of all American children would have autism. Beyond attacking her findings on their merits, critics have characterized Seneff as an anti-GMO zealot who’s strayed too far


Holidays in Montpelier ARTS • DINING • SHOPPING

Lingerie Sale

Up to 50% off Calvin klein, Spanx, Bali, Blush, Jockey

BOUTIQUE

75 Main Street, Montpelier

12h-No9Boutique113016.indd 1

11/29/16 1:02 PM

stay cozy and well fed

RIVERSIDE SEATING | LOCAL PRODUCE | WOOD-BURNING OVEN GREAT ITALIAN FOOD | OUTSTANDING SERVICE GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE 3 MAIN ST, MONTPELIER, VERMONT | 802 223 0229 | WWW.SARDUCCIS.COM

GG12H-Sarduccis112316.indd 1

11/18/16 11:35 AM

holiday events & info:

RIVERSIDE SEATING | LOCAL PRODUCE | WOOD-BURNING OVEN SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Shop Alla Vita for the Holidays! Oil & Vinegar Gift Packs • Sea Salts • Unique Maple Products • Local Pottery & Breadboards • Gift Certificates • Wine FREE Wine Tasting Friday, December 2nd from 5:00 - 7:30 p.m. SAVE 10% On Wine Purchases from the Tasting

- come join us -

www.montpelieralive.org

GREAT ITALIAN FOOD | OUTSTANDING SERVICE

Cool Jewels

12H-AllaVita113016.indd 1

11/29/16 10:59 AM

America’s Premier Rock AND Bead Store

featuring organic produce from local farmers 11.30.16-12.07.16

27 State Street, Montpelier 225-6526 | allavitavermont.com

COME SEE US & ENJOY NEW SPECIALS DAILY AT

N ST, MONTPELIER, VERMONT | 802 223 0229 | WWW.SARDUCCIS.COM

7/18/16 3:14 PM SEVEN DAYS

1

locally sourced ingredients nationally recognized for VT’s best draft list threepennytaproom.com | 108 Main Street, Montpelier VT 05602 | 802.223.taps

28

8H-3Penny083116.indd 1

8/30/16 12:22 PM

Holiday Art Walk • Holiday Baked Goods & Luminaries • Downtown Montpelier Friday, December 2, 4-8pm at most venues

1t-MontplelierPage113016.indd 1

Beads • Rocks • Jewelry • Findings • Fossils Crystals • Witch Balls • Prisms • Salt Lamps Brings Your Kids! 4 State St, Montpelier • www.beading.com • 223-1718 Open 7 Days a Week Through Christmas GG6H-CoolJewels112316.indd 1

11/21/16 10:37 AM

View & purchase local art and enjoy homemade baked goods at local downtown shops. Art Walk is a self-guided tour. Guidebooks available throughout downtown locations.

11/29/16 4:07 PM


HACKIE

W

A VERMONT CABBIE’S REAR VIEW BY JERNIGAN PONTIAC

Resilience “I am,” he replied with a laugh. “How’d you guess?” “Probably the cool construction boots.” “Yeah, I do pretty high-end stuff. The company I’m with does a fair amount of work in California, building homes for tech and entertainment millionaires. Honestly, I’d rather be building housing

ritual. My dad was an unlucky victim of this.” “Holy smokes! What a thing to go through — I mean, the whole family. Did they ever catch the perpetrator?” “Yeah, they did — this teenage African American kid. You know, I never forgot my dad never got racist about the incident. He wasn’t that way before, and his

I DROPPED ARNIE AT HIS PLACE IN HUNTINGTON AND FOUND MYSELF REVISITING HIS STORY AS I WORKED THE REMAINDER OF MY SHIFT. for your average person, but this pays really well. Long term, though, I want to launch my own outfit.” “You’ll get there,” I said. “Save your pennies. Quit chasing women on the weekends.” “True that!” he said, slapping his knee. As we turned onto the highway, I asked, “You a Vermont boy? You got family up here?” “Nope to both. I lived in Queens — you know, New York City — until I was 6. Then the family moved upstate to the Catskills.” “What precipitated the move? That’s a big change.” It was an innocuous enough question, but little did I know. “My father was shot in the head and sustained brain damage. After that, he just didn’t want to live in the city anymore, so we left. This was the early ’90s, and there was a rash of gang-initiation assaults. Maybe you remember this? In order to get into a gang, you had to shoot some random person in the street. Not even a robbery, just like a sick hazing

being attacked by a black person didn’t change him. I always admired that.” “So, the family moved and carried on. Was your dad able to function afterward? Like, could he still work?” “Yeah, he’s a tech guy. He still works to this day, but in a diminished capacity.” “How about your moms?” “Oh, she’s great, all considered. She’s an artist. One of her works got displayed at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington. I got a twin brother, too, who works for the Department of the Interior in ecological forest management. I hate to think what his job will be like now that Trump will be running the show.” My heart sank, as it has five times a day since the election. It feels like I’m trapped, the country is trapped, in an unfolding nightmare. I’m aware that about half of those who voted feel — at least for the time being — the diametrical opposite, but that reality only compounds my heartache. I’ve heard many who share my view compare the election results to

9/11, but that analogy falls short: Unlike the terrorist attack, this national disaster was self-inflicted. “A twin brother, huh?” I said, shaking off the election blues. “Do you and he ever experience that inexplicable ‘twin thing’? You know, where you feel things at the same time when you’re apart? I’m sorry — you must get this question all the time.” “Hey, it’s all right,” Arnie replied. “And, yeah — we totally have that twin thing. A big example just happened this past spring. I woke up in the middle of the night literally screaming and in a cold sweat. The next morning I called my mom, and she told me Billy had been in a terrible car accident the previous night, at the exact time when I had been jarred awake. He pulled through, thank God. It was scary, though. But I’m glad we have that connection. I can’t imagine life without it.” I dropped Arnie at his place in Huntington and found myself revisiting his story as I worked the remainder of my shift. Somehow, his family seemed to have survived an unimaginable act of violence. The resilience was hard for me to fathom, but, as the night wore on, the notion began to give me hope for America. At least a glimmer, which at this point, I’ll hold on to for all it’s worth. m All these stories are true, though names and locations may be altered to protect privacy.

INFO Hackie is a twice-monthly column that can also be read on sevendaysvt.com. To reach Jernigan, email hackie@sevendaysvt.com.

11.30.16-12.07.16

BOOK YOUR HOLIDAY PARTIES

WITH US!

SEVEN DAYS

JOIN US FOR

5 MARGARITAS

$

EVERY WEDNESDAY! Open 7 days a week for lunch and dinner!

802-540-3095 • 169 Church St. • Burlington • 802-662-4334 • 4 Park St. • Essex Junction (Lincoln Inn) www.ElGatoCantina.com • info@elgatocantina.com 8h-elgato113016.indd 1

11/23/16 2:27 PM

Let us service you! Buy FOUR winter tires and receive FREE oil change.

Applicable for in-stock tires only with installation. $38.99 value.

1691 Shelburne Rd., S. Burlington 951-0290 | Susie Wilson Rd., Essex Junction 879-2707 Expires 12/16/16 7days 8H-oilngo113016.indd 1

11/23/16 2:10 PM

HACKIE 29

authentic mexican cuisine

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ill you go to Huntington for 50 bucks?” Having flagged me down, the thirtysomething man was speaking to me through my passenger-side window. On this unusually warm late November night, he was jacket-free, and his blue flannel shirt was crisp and clean, as were his blue jeans. He had tousled, sandy-blond hair and an easy smile. Huntington’s a ride, I considered, but $50 is the right number. “That’ll work,” I told him. “You can jump right in the front.” As we got under way, he chuckled wistfully and said, “You know, here I am running after women downtown, and I realized I’d rather be home in my bed sleeping. You been there, right?” Not really, I thought, before replying, “Oh, sure. Tell me about it.” This was going to be a longish ride, and a little manly solidarity was called for. Of this I had plenty to spare, although — truth be told — the last time I was “running after women,” Gerald Ford was president. “Anyway, thanks for taking this long haul. I’m Arnie,” my customer said, extending his hand. “Jernigan,” I reciprocated, taking a hand off the wheel to shake his. There’s something about this common ritual of physically touching another person that instantly creates a bond, however temporary. The act never fails to touch me, pardon the pun. “So, Arnie, are you working in town? Are you in the trades?” I asked, using the vernacular for skilled construction work.


WORK

VERMONTERS ON THE JOB

Fantasy Life B Y DA N B O LLES

SEVEN DAYS 11.30.16-12.07.16 SEVENDAYSVT.COM 30 WORK

LEE KROHN

I

f you are one of the estimated 57 million North Americans who play fantasy sports, then you might think getting paid to play and write about the hobby is the coolest job ever. Shelburne’s Ken Crites agrees. “It really is ridiculous that I get paid for this,” he says recently over pizza and beer at Folino’s in Shelburne. “The amount of sports I watch now is obscene.” Then he jokes, “It’s not healthy for the marriage, frankly.” Unlike most other sports-obsessed husbands, Crites does have a legit excuse: It’s his job. Crites, 47, is a fantasy sports analyst and the vice president of business development at RotoWire, one of the oldest fantasy sports websites in the country. He joined the Wisconsin-based company following two-plus decades of working high-pressure white-collar gigs for the likes of Nestlé and, most recently, Keurig Green Mountain. Now he works from home for his old college buddies and, most importantly, gets to spend more time with his family. And his marriage is just fine, thanks. “It’s one of the best decisions I’ve ever made,” Crites says. In fantasy sports — whether football, baseball, basketball, cricket or any other iteration — the teams are imaginary, but the scoring is based on the on-field performances of real players. For fantasy enthusiasts, real-life information that might lend them a competitive edge is crack cocaine. That makes RotoWire something like the Pablo Escobar of a now $27 billion-a-year industry. The company’s bread and butter, and Crites’ primary responsibility, is syndicating fantasy-relevant sports news to media partners such as ESPN, Yahoo Sports and DraftKings. Media outlets take the information, culled from hundreds of beat reporters nationwide, and distribute it to fantasy addicts the world over. Each of RotoWire’s 30 employees also contributes content to the site. Crites writes fantasy basketball columns. Naturally charismatic, he makes weekly appearances on a handful of East Coast radio stations to offer fantasy football advice. Every Wednesday, he’s a guest on the local drive-time show “The Huddle With Rich & Arnie” on ESPN radio affiliate 101.3 FM. Crites talked with Seven Days about the tricky business of prediction, the

That’s a fact in 50 states of the Union. That’s especially true in dating. I’m old and married, but nothing is more of a buzzkill in dating than when someone insists on telling their date about their fantasy teams. Maybe you talk to people in your league. But in normal society, this is not to be discussed. SD: Does making your hobby your job ever become a burden? KC: Certainly. When Browns-Bengals are on, for instance, there are times when you question your life choices. SD: I’m a New England Patriots fan. Inevitably, with fantasy football, my rooting interest is compromised because I either own a player the Pats are playing against or I’m playing against a team with Patriots players. How do you balance that? KC: Look on the positive side: It is just more reason to be happy. If the Patriots win, you’re happy. If your player has a good game against the Patriots, that’s a reason to be happy. We spend so much time and money in sports, having more reasons to be happy is a good thing. Don’t look at it as more reasons to be upset — though, especially for New England sports fans, our natural tendency is to find things to complain about.

Ken Crites

hazards of mixing fantasy sports with dating and the future of his biz. SEVEN DAYS: A big part of fantasy sports analysis is projecting how players will perform. So why are fantasy analysts always wrong? KEN CRITES: [Laughs.] Well, you can never predict injuries, for one. One way that RotoWire differs from our competitors is that we rely on player news and trends, rather than mathematical formulas, to predict how a player might do. That’s easier to do with yearly projections. But weekly predictions are random, because it is such a small sample size. Somebody gets hurt in the first quarter, and there goes your projection. But the randomness of it is part of the fun. Nobody really knows exactly what will happen. That’s why they play the games, right? SD: I’m having a crisis of faith with fantasy football this season, because I just can’t catch a break with any of my teams. Talk me off the ledge. KC: Take a step back. Really, this isn’t important. The recent election,

NAME

Ken Crites

TOWN

Shelburne

JOB

vice president of business development, fantasy sports analyst, RotoWire for instance, is far worse news than whatever happened with your little fantasy team last week. It’s easy to obsess. The game encourages obsessing. But you’ll be back next year. SD: I just violated this rule, but — one of the most annoying things a fantasy player can do is talk to other people about their fantasy team. You must get that all the time. KC: Everyone completely obsesses about their own team. But no one cares about your fantasy football team.

SD: Daily fantasy sports revolutionized the industry. And there is a fantasy version of almost any sport you can think of. What is the next frontier? KC: When fantasy started, it was just baseball. And MLB actually tried to kill it. They wanted to own it and sued thirdparty sites like ours. They lost in court. The NFL saw that, back when fantasy football was a distant second to baseball, and realized that, with fantasy, people were watching five games instead of one. They decided to nurture that. That’s when fantasy football flew by fantasy baseball. So the next wave is that basketball, hockey, eSports — they’re realizing that, if they can get fans into fantasy, those fans will spend more on their sport. eSports [competitive video gaming], for one, is taking off. Not here yet. But it’s huge globally and is probably the next growth thing for fantasy. m

INFO Learn more at rotowire.com.


for the

Holidays

The Perfect Gift for Her

give them what they really want this year.

Uno De 50 Jewelry & Accessories

present this ad for 10% off select tops by Frank & Eileen exp. 12/20/16 2850 MOUNTAIN ROAD, STOWE | 802.253.6077 WELLHEELEDSTOWE.COM | OPEN DAILY 10AM - 6PM

Untitled-53 1

11/23/16 12v-wellheeled113016.indd 11:19 AM 1

The Perfect Gift

STOWE KITCHEN BATH & LINENS 1813 Mountain Rd • Stowe 800.244.6813 • stowekitchen.net

11/28/1612v-stowekitchenbath113016.indd 2:13 PM 1

Vermont Snowflake Pendants are Custom Made in White Gold and Diamonds Starting at $275

91 Main Street, Stowe 802-253-3033 stowe@ferrojewelers.com ferrojewelers.com/stowe/

11/28/1612v-ferro112316.indd 3:03 PM VERMONT1to the CORETM

11/14/16 3:44 PM

is an Expereince

kids under ten eat FREE with purchase of one adult entrée at our Apple Core Luncheonette.

4000 Mountain Road Stowe, Vermont 802-253-4000 topnotchresort.com

CH–XMAS AD.indd 1 Untitled-17 1

11/28/16 1:50 1:01 PM PM 11/28/16

For full events calendar visit

gostowe.com/events

31

Untitled-13 1

1T-stowe113016.indd 1

Plenty of sleigh parking!

3600 Waterbury/Stowe Road, Waterbury Center, VT 05677 ColdHollow.com 800-3-APPLES

SEVEN DAYS

Luxury lodging Award winning spa Vermont dinning at its best Lively après ski atmosphere with live musical entertainment Indoor tennis center

He’ll be at Cold Hollow Cider Mill

DEC 3, 11:00 - 2:00 | DEC 10, 11:00 - 2:00

11.30.16-12.07.16

A Topnotch Gift Card is a Gift of Endless Possibilities

While you’re here, try a FREE sample of our own new Barn Dance Hard Cider.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

It’s amazing who you meet at a real Vermont Cider Mill. After a visit with Santa,

11/18/16 5:01 PM

11/29/16 12:00 PM


JUSTIN CASH

SURVIVING

32 FEATURE

SEVEN DAYS

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

SYRIA

A Vermont journalist and former al-Qaeda prisoner reflects on his ordeal B Y K EN P I C A R D

On October 20, 2012, Theo Padnos made a risky decision that nearly killed him: He walked calmly across an olive grove in Turkey with three young men he trusted, ducked through a barbed-wire fence and disappeared into the maw of Syria’s bloody civil war. The freelance journalist from Vermont thought he was going to interview Free Syrian Army fighters who were trying to overthrow the regime of President Bashar al-Assad. Instead of getting that story, Padnos stumbled into another one when he was kidnapped, imprisoned and tortured by members of Jabhat al-Nusra, al-Qaeda’s Syrian affiliate, aka the Nusra Front. He spent 45 days with his hands and feet bound in a cell the size of a dog kennel and another 200 days in a heat box that he likened to “being buried alive.” Almost no one in Vermont knew Padnos was missing throughout his 22-month ordeal. There were no yellow ribbons at the Putney School, where Padnos attended high school; at Middlebury College, where he got his bachelor’s degree in comparative literature; or in Woodstock, where he has lived on and off since 10th grade. The silence was intentional, strongly advised by the U.S. government. Padnos’ mom, Nancy Curtis, figured out that her son was in trouble when his emails from Turkey abruptly ceased — at the time, Padnos was guiding her on the purchase of a new woodstove. She immediately notified the Federal Bureau of Investigation, but weeks went by before an agent took her seriously. That agent, whom neither Curtis nor Padnos will identify, urged Curtis to keep her son’s abduction out of the press, because the publicity could be deadly. Like the parents of journalist James Foley, who was taken in Syria one month later — and beheaded by Islamic State militants less than a week before Padnos’ release on August 24, 2014 — Curtis had joined an elite club to which no one wants to belong: the family members of American journalists kidnapped in Syria and Iraq.


Survival of the Wittiest

SURVIVING SYRIA

» P.34

FEATURE 33

In Theo Who Lived, Padnos attempts to explain why he chose to enter Syria without a specific writing assignment. Penniless and dealing with related “self-esteem issues,” he didn’t tell a soul where he was going. Acknowledging now that it was “crazy,” “stupid” and seemingly suicidal, he explained that he’s always been a risk-taker. In fact, he had been a rock climber despite the fact that his mother’s brother died doing it in the 1950s.

SEVEN DAYS

in the press immediately after his release in August 2014. One Associated Press image, taken from an undated video shot by his captors, showed Padnos sitting cross-legged on the floor, his wrists bound in his lap, a Kalashnikov rifle aimed at his head. He looked disheveled and broken, like a beaten dog. With iPhone in hand, Padnos scrolled through his recent Facebook messages, including one he’d just received late the night before. He showed me the photo of a thirtysomething Syrian man pointing at his own bandaged chest, the way a gang leader might boast about fresh battle scars. Padnos played the attached audio file, then expertly translated the Arabic. The speaker was Abdul Qadr, a Syrian fighter. He inquired about Padnos’ health, then said he was angry with Padnos for not writing more often. The bandages, he explained, were the result of injuries he suffered in a recent air strike by either the forces of Assad or the Americans, he wasn’t sure which. “Qadr isn’t officially in ISIS. He may be and might not be. I really don’t know, and I don’t care, either,”

11.30.16-12.07.16

I met Padnos for the first time in November 2003, shortly before the publication of his first book, My Life Had Stood a Loaded Gun. Named after an Emily Dickinson poem, it chronicles Padnos’ experiences teaching poetry to convicted kidnappers, rapists and murderers in the now-closed Woodstock Regional Correctional Facility in southern Vermont. Thirteen years later, as we chatted over coffee at Burlington’s New Moon Café, I looked at Padnos for hints that might reveal how his own captivity had changed him. His curly, salt-and-pepper locks are thinner and grayer but otherwise recalled the same unruly mess I remembered. His face, while still angelic, sported several days of stubble, but his cheeks looked hale in contrast to the photos of him that circulated

A still from Theo Who Lived

Padnos said. “I know he gets along pretty well with the ISIS authorities, knows everyone in Jabhat al-Nusra and wants to get out.” “The FBI knows who this guy is, right?” I asked naïvely. “Are you kidding? Of course not. Why would they know?” Padnos said dismissively. “There are thousands … just like him. Thousands, thousands, thousands. And they all want to come to Turkey and Germany. The more we bomb them, the more they want to run away to Turkey. This guy, if he had the cash, he’d be in Berlin tomorrow.” I stared, with an air of incredulity, trying to imagine how Padnos, a resident of Woodstock, could casually sip espresso in a Burlington coffeehouse and exchange pleasantries with a Syrian jihadist who’s being bombed by American fighter jets. “War nowadays,” Padnos said with a chuckle. “This is the nature of the world we’re living in. We’re that connected.” But Padnos paid a steep price for such connections. One year after My Life Had Stood a Loaded Gun, he got to work on his next book, which sought to explain why young, angry and disillusioned Muslim men from Europe and the United States travel to Yemen, renounce their lives in the West and embrace jihad. He went abroad to study Arabic and Islam, eventually journeying into the Yemeni countryside to Dar al-Hadith, one of the world’s most radical mosques. “Even … before I left for Yemen, I was aware that Americans wandering around the Arab world often wandered into trouble,” Padnos wrote presciently in the resulting 2010 book, Undercover Muslim: A Journey Into Yemen. Although Padnos doesn’t disparage Islam in his book, he describes going through the motions of surrendering to the faith — and, in the eyes of al-Qaeda, a false conversion is a sin punishable by death. As Padnos explained in Burlington, he almost immediately regretted the book’s title: Whenever he’d check into a hotel in Beirut or Amman under the name Theo Padnos, the desk clerk would google his name and discover his book. Soon after its publication, he legally changed his name to the more anonymous-sounding Peter Theo Curtis, assuming he’d be safer traveling in Muslim countries. It didn’t work out that way.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

‘We’re That Connected’

The documentary Theo Who Lived is showing on Thursday, December 1, 7 p.m., at Merrill’s Roxy Cinemas in Burlington. zeitgeistfilms.com

COURTESY OF ZEITGEIST FILMS

A few friends were in on the secret, too. “We were really concerned, and I felt really helpless,” recalled Woodstock resident Kirk Kardashian, who stayed in contact with Curtis for the duration of her son’s captivity. “These things don’t happen to Americans all that much. So it’s weird to be in this situation where your friend just disappears.” Padnos, 48, is now the subject of a newly released documentary that chronicles his abduction and captivity. He also narrates and stars in Theo Who Lived, which the New York Times called “imaginative and affecting.” It notes that Padnos is, “among other things, a compelling movie character: voluble, articulate, energetic and still understandably agitated.” Director David Schisgall brought Padnos back to the Middle East less than a year after his release to retrace each step of his terrifying odyssey, from the streets of Antakya, Turkey, to the barbed-wire Syrian border to facsimiles of the dungeons in which he was interrogated, confined and tortured. The two met through Schisgall’s wife, Effie Peretz, who attended grade school with Padnos. Padnos spares the viewer few details of his harsh detention: the unrelenting abuse at the hands of his tormentors, some of whom were children as young as 10; his repeated escape attempts, including one during which Padnos’ fellow prisoner and cellmate, American photojournalist Matthew Schrier, abandoned him at the last minute; his suicide attempts; and, finally, his trips through the Syrian desert with Abu Maria alQahtani, the Nusra Front leader who broke with the Islamic State and who ultimately released Padnos to United Nations workers in the Golan Heights. To convey what it was like for those who waited for and worried about him, Schisgall interviewed Curtis and her niece, Viva Hardigg, inside the light-filled country comfort of a Vermont abode. Their anxious accounts and multiple shots of lush Vermont contrast sharply with the grim reality Padnos faced for almost two years in the Middle East. “I had fallen into the darkness and woken in a netherworld, the kind found in myths or nightmares,” Padnos wrote in a New York Times Magazine piece published a few weeks after he was released. “I knew there was a kind of logic to this place, and I could tell that my captors wanted me to learn it. But what exactly they wished to teach me, and why they couldn’t say it straight out but preferred to speak through their special language of pain, I couldn’t understand.”


Surviving Syria « P.33

34 FEATURE

SEVEN DAYS

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

COURTESY OF ZEITGEIST FILMS

But his intellectual interest in Islam appears genuine, and the way Padnos talks about his experience in the 86-minute documentary indicates he doesn’t hold anyone else personally responsible for what he suffered. Ironically, he explained, his fluency in Arabic and deep knowledge of Islam —  “all this stuff I thought was a personal strength — turned out to be a personal liability.” Shortly after he was taken, Padnos was hauled before an Islamic judge and accused of being a U.S. Central Intelligence Agency operative. The judge issued no formal decree, but Padnos believes his captors were told that they could do with him as they saw fit.

he wouldn’t live past November 2012, Padnos didn’t bother making a December calendar. He was a year and a half into his captivity before they allowed him the use of a pen and paper. Even before then, he had begun composing a novel in his head, partly to pass the time, Padnos explained, but also as a way to make sense of his terrifying experience. That novel, tentatively titled The Vermont Branch Church of Scholars, Simple Ones and Free Women, is set in the fictional town of Shepherds Crossing. It’s about an epidemic of violence that seizes a small Vermont community, and it centers on a young woman who works in a local prison. She develops a relationship with a backwoods cult leader who burned down the town’s church. This Vermont town became Padnos’ metaphor for the violent extremism gripping Syria.

Theo Padnos on location in the Middle East

Soon thereafter, they figured out his real name. “The guy that discovered this, somehow he didn’t kill me for some reason,” Padnos explained. “I don’t know why. He was a very sinister person who has since been killed by a drone.” In the initial months after his abduction, Padnos said he found himself in a place of “deep disorientation in time and space,” unaware of who was detaining him or whether he’d live or die. More than once, his captors told him he was about to be executed. “I was in many different prisons. Usually I would arrive in a blindfold and handcuffs in the trunk of a car. ‘Get in that room! Sit down and shut up!’” he recalled them yelling. “They were beating me. Is it morning? Night? What time is it? I didn’t know.” Throughout his captivity, Padnos did whatever he could to orient himself. To keep track of the time, he used a rock to scratch a calendar into the wall. “When they discovered I had been drawing on the wall, they came in with these pieces of wood and beat the shit out of me,” he recalled. “You’re not supposed to know what time it is.” When his captors told him

“Something similar was happening in Deir ez-Zor,” Padnos said about the Syrian city where he was taken. “Five years ago, if you went to this city, you couldn’t pay for your tea because they were so loving and gracious to foreigners … If you went there today, they’d cut off your head.” Padnos’ novel served another function: It kept his guards entertained. He’d have conversations with them, then find ways to incorporate their dialogue into his book. And to them, the story fed into their guilty sexual obsessions with American women. “All they wanted to know was, ‘Is this story real? Is it about sex? And if it is, tell me more,’” Padnos said. “That’s all they cared about.”

Two’s a Crowd Padnos had company for some of the time he was imprisoned. In fact, many of his fellow inmates were Islamic State fighters who were at war with Jabhat alNusra. They included Qadr, Padnos’ Facebook buddy, who had once been a mid-level lieutenant in the Nusra

Front until, as Padnos puts it, “he saw the writing on the wall” and changed alliances. “The distinctions that we make between ISIS, Jabhat al-Nusra and the [Free Syrian Army] are not as important to them,” Padnos explained. “One day they’re one thing; the next day they’re the next thing. They’re much more fluid on the ground than our analysts believe. And when those refugees come over, they all have a past. It doesn’t mean they want to continue that past.” That empathy —  which Padnos also extends to his captors —  does not apply to his fellow American Schrier, with whom he shared a cell for seven months. In Theo Who Lived, Padnos explains how the duo planned to escape together. He said they worked together for days, loosening the wire mesh on the window of their cell. When push came to shove, Padnos helped Schrier out, but the freed man didn’t return the favor. Schrier offered a different account to the media when he got home, but director Schisgall didn’t interview him for the documentary. Instead, he acknowledged the conflicting versions of what happened by showing Padnos watching Schrier on television — and then calling him a liar. “The stillglowing resentment Mr. Padnos has for Mr. Schrier makes for a surprising and gripping scene,” the Times review observed. “He was like the abusive husband, and I was like the cowering wife,” Padnos said at New Moon. “I don’t need to ever talk to this guy again.” A week before our interview, Padnos spoke to a TV news crew from Toronto. During their captivity, Padnos and Schreir were interrogated by men whose accents Padnos recognized as French-Canadian. After Schrier’s escape, his stolen credit card revealed the purchase of computer equipment that was shipped to Montréal. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police are still searching for those jihadists. “I think I’m Facebook friends with the mom of one of those guys,” Padnos said. Why does he maintain such connections? “As a journalist, it’s an important subject, and he can give me good information. And I know this guy knows everybody in jihad,” he explained. “What the U.S. government could get out of this guy … Well, they don’t know what they don’t know.” So why doesn’t the FBI tap Padnos for intelligence? “Why don’t they? Good question,” he said. “The U.S. government is a bunch of experts sitting in cubicles in D.C., and they say, ‘We’ve got the situation under control.’ They don’t. That’s why things in Iraq got worse and worse and worse.”

A Fair Sheikh? Things got worse and worse, too, in the Syrian town where the Nusra Front was holding Padnos — at least on the outside, where the al-Qaeda group was warring with the Islamic State. Padnos asked after guards who kept disappearing until, one day, a sheikh came to see him. It was al-Qahtani, the Nusra Front leader. ISIS was forcing the group out of town, he told Padnos, adding, “Wherever I go, you go. You’re with me now,” as Padnos recalls in the film. “Alhamdulillah,” Padnos responds. “Praise God.” Padnos accompanied the sheikh as he retreated through the Syrian desert in a convoy of white pickup


hungry and lost weight, Padnos’ captors gave him enough calories to survive. “The thing that shamed me the most — and I thought it’d be a long time before I could admit to anyone — were my suicide attempts,” he said. “I tried for a really long time, longer than they say in the movie.” That Padnos didn’t end his own life wasn’t due to any religious or moral quandary about suicide. It was entirely a practical matter: He didn’t have a gun, a cyanide capsule or a rope long enough to finish the job.

EVEN WITH THE 20/20 HINDSIGHT OF TIME AND DISTANCE, VERMONT JOURNALIST

THEO PADNOS STILL CANNOT SAY HOW OR WHY HE SURVIVED.

FEATURE 35

Contact: ken@sevendaysvt.com

SEVEN DAYS

Physically, Padnos looks fine now. He said he suffered only minor health issues after his release, including months of vertigo likely caused by repeated blows to his head. Padnos also insisted he doesn’t suffer from posttraumatic stress disorder; he stopped attending counseling shortly after his release, claiming he didn’t need it anymore. “Therapy for me is expressing myself, and I can do this in writing and that’s good enough,” he said. “I feel enhanced and rejuvenated by my experience and not traumatized.” Padnos reclaimed his name. He is currently finishing his novel, as well as a “Spalding Gray-esque” monologue, and shopping around an op-ed piece about how to resolve

the Syrian crisis. During the presidential primaries, he even reached out —  unsuccessfully —  to Sen. Bernie Sanders’ (I-Vt.) campaign staff to offer suggestions for drafting a policy position on the 6-year-old civil war. Another good sign: Padnos hasn’t lost his sense of humor, which also comes through in Theo Who Lived. Noting the punctuality of his faux friends on the morning they delivered him to Syria, for example, he calls them “very reliable kidnappers.” “The truth is, I was not laughing when this was happening,” he explained at New Moon. “But a lot of people emerge from these jails, not just me, and they want to laugh at the absurd craziness of it all.” “Given what he’s been through, he’s remarkably similar to the guy he was before he went through all this,” said Kardashian, an occasional contributor to Seven Days who has resumed biking with Padnos. “Theo’s a funny guy. He’s kind of a vagabond” who will “blow in and out of your life.” “If anything,” Kardashian added, “he seems to be a little more compassionate and empathetic.” Amazingly, Padnos was unaware of plans to resettle Syrian refugees in Rutland next year. He said he’s not concerned. Unlike the refugees flooding into Turkey and the rest of Europe, he said, those headed to the U.S. — mostly women and children — are subjected to “extreme vetting” before they get here. Most likely fled the conflict zone years ago and have been living in refugee camps in Lebanon, Turkey and Jordan. “These people are the sweetest and loveliest people on Earth,” Padnos said. “They’re going to be good and excellent immigrants. We couldn’t ask for anyone better.” It’s fitting that the last 10 minutes of Theo Who Lived includes footage of Padnos standing on a beach on the Greek island of Lesbos, greeting Syrian refugees in Arabic as their raft washes up on shore. In a very real sense, their hellish, odds-defying odyssey mirrors his own. m

11.30.16-12.07.16

Even with the 20/20 hindsight of time and distance, Padnos still cannot say how or why he survived. “I do know that it was not a function of my fortitude or survival strategies,” he said. Although he was always

Padnos at home in Woodstock

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Syria in Vermont

JUSTIN CASH

trucks flying big black flags, alongside men with beards, flowing robes and .50-caliber machine guns. “At the head of this column was me and Abu Maria and, like, 10 bags of cash,” Padnos recalled. “This was the financial resources of their entire army.” To survive, Padnos adopted a “submissive and interested posture” in relation to the sheikh, “and I was interested in the grievances of an al-Qaeda leader. I wanted to hear them,” he says in Theo Who Lived. Padnos became a kind of confessor for the sheikh, likening their relationship to the biblical story of Joseph and the pharaoh. “He would tell me about his troubles with ISIS; he’d tell me about his troubles with the U.S. government —  how nobody understood him.” Padnos didn’t have to hide his views to ingratiate himself: “I am sympathetic to their claims of victimhood at the hands of the Americans. What business did we have in Iraq?” he says in the film. “I, in fact, know the injustices committed better than they do. I think they found me to be someone who could advocate for their point of view better than they can.” During that stage of his captivity, Padnos was forced to help his captors by loading their weapons, driving their trucks and even offering advice when they asked him how to attract more Westerners into the jihad. It was the kind of assistance for which Padnos feared the U.S. government might charge him with providing material aid to terrorists. “I’m like, ‘No problem, man. I’ll help you. Let’s get on Twitter now,’” Padnos said. “I wanted to get on Twitter to communicate secret messages to my friends and family. But there was a lot of stuff that I would have done … just to save my own life.” Would he have killed someone? “Well, that’s the kind of issue you think about,” Padnos said vaguely. “Maybe I would have. Maybe. But could I say I deserved to live and that guy doesn’t?” The Qatari government helped negotiate his release —  less than a week after Foley’s televised execution —  but Padnos won’t reveal if a ransom was involved. A July 2015 New Yorker story titled “Five Hostages” suggested the price on his life at one point reached 22 million euros. Though Padnos appreciates what the FBI did to help, he remains critical of the official U.S. policy of never negotiating with terrorists, calling it shortsighted and ultimately ineffectual. He blames himself for his two-year ordeal but asserts that the deaths of other American captives — notably, Kayla Mueller, Steven Sotloff and Peter Kassig, all of whom were eventually executed by ISIS — could have been prevented. Padnos likened the situation to having boat trouble on Lake Champlain. At first you blame yourself, but eventually you expect to see the Coast Guard. “I made that mistake. I got in the boat. But now that I’m here, can you do anything to help me?” he asked rhetorically. “And the official policy is, ‘No. Fuck off!’ And I don’t think that’s right.”


OLIVER PARINI

CULTURE

Ben Bergstein and April Werner

Room to Move Burlington’s North End Studios to expand into St. Joseph’s School

36 FEATURE

SEVEN DAYS

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

B Y KYMELYA SAR I

O

ld posters advertising the Vermont International Festival fill a notice board in Ben Bergstein and April Werner’s office in Burlington’s North End Studio A. Rows of whiteboards have been converted into monthly planners. Framed paintings and a map of the world decorate the rest of the room. North End Studios, on North Winooski Avenue, is the home base of the Vermont Performing Arts League. It’s here that the husbandand-wife team plans the nonprofit’s programs, including the annual VIF. But North End Studios isn’t solely an organization’s headquarters —  increasingly, it’s a thriving community space. Locals have been coming to the studios for classes, performances and gatherings of all kinds. The space is especially popular with New American communities for engagement, graduation and wedding celebrations, Bergstein said. While the largest room, Studio A, has approximately a 150-person capacity, it’s still not big enough for some of the events community members want to hold there, he noted. Bergstein and Werner have no larger space to offer them. That’s going to change. The pair is currently in talks with the Champlain Housing Trust about managing the cafeteria and kitchen in the former Co-Cathedral of St. Joseph’s church and school. That building is also located in the Old North End, in the heart of a neighborhood that’s long been a first home for new arrivals. Its spaces will allow New American and other groups to host more

and bigger events, said Bergstein. And its kitchen will permit on-site food preparation, which is not available at the North Winooski Avenue location. “There is no [other] space that size that is going to be that affordable,” Bergstein pointed out. “I’m pretty hopeful,” said Michael Monte, CHT chief operations and financial officer, of the organization’s negotiations with Bergstein and Werner. “[We’re] mutually working it out together, taking the right pace and making sure we do it right.” The housing nonprofit has signed an agreement with the Roman Catholic Diocese of BE N BE R GS TE IN Burlington to lease and then buy the former school for $2 million. The building on 20 Allen Street currently houses three nonprofits: Robin’s Nest Children’s Center and the Janet S. Munt Family Room occupy the first floor, while the Association of Africans Living in Vermont is on the third floor. This isn’t the first community building CHT has developed, said Chris Donnelly, the organization’s director of community relations. Some of its other properties are the Chittenden Emergency Food Shelf and the McClure Multigenerational Center, both also in the Old North End. Donnelly said the current tenants of St. Joseph’s approached CHT about two years ago, when the building was on the market and they were anxious about potentially losing their homes.

IT’S A SPACE FOR EVERYONE.

The school’s newest tenant, the City of Burlington’s Department of Parks, Recreation & Waterfront, is set to take the second floor. It will introduce indoor recreational activities and move its programming for seniors from the McClure Multigenerational Center to St. Joseph’s. Because the building lacks soundproofing, Bergstein and Werner noted, they’d need to discuss timing of programming with the tenants and work out a schedule. “We can have a one-stop shop in the building, where different programs can take place at different times,” said Jacob Bogre, AALV’s executive director. Bergstein and Werner also see themselves as stepping into a “gatekeeper” role, making sure that no single group monopolizes the new event space, which will be colocated with the Family Room and Robin’s Nest. Booking will be on a first-come, first-served basis, said Werner. “This is a space for everyone,” added Bergstein. But before any new programming can be scheduled, the building needs to undergo renovation that will cost $5 million, according to Donnelly. The first phase will involve the installation of an elevator and renovation of the “antiquated” bathrooms. More extensive work, such as wiring, flooring and lighting, will take place during a second phase — after CHT has purchased the building. The sale is expected to happen next July. Despite the hefty price tag, CHT is committed to keeping the rents at the school affordable, said Donnelly. Bogre noted that the current rent is “way below” what his organization would have to pay just about anywhere else in Burlington. The project is about giving the organizations involved the support they need to be successful in the long term, Monte said: “Nonprofits need a stable home, too.” Donnelly hopes residents will be able to build their social lives around the facility. “We would love to see the building teeming with life and being the center for people to come in,” he said. As for Bergstein and Werner, they would like their new space at St. Joseph’s eventually to be managed and operated by the immigrant and refugee community. “I would like to see it as a training ground — for training people how to manage and run an event space,” said Bergstein. At the North Winooski Avenue venue, New American youths who live in the area often help the couple set up and prepare for events. The bigger space at St. Joseph’s, Werner said, would require more helping hands. Her husband hopes proximity to AALV will allow them to connect with interested individuals; that organization provides services such as employment counseling to refugees, immigrants and asylees. There’s still plenty of work to be done at St. Joseph’s, but Bergstein and Werner are excited at the prospect of being part of a new community gathering place. “The only reason why we’re doing this,” said Werner, “is because the Champlain Housing Trust has the same mission as we do: creating an institution that’s going to last for this neighborhood.” m Contact: kymelya@sevendaysvt.com

INFO The Champlain Housing Trust will hold a community meeting to discuss plans for St. Joseph’s on Wednesday, November 30, at 20 Allen Street in Burlington. Pizza at 5:30 p.m.; presentation at 6 p.m. getahome.org


Our Focus is Your Fertility We provide affordable, high-quality care for individuals and couples with infertility in an easily accessible, friendly environment. Our team customizes cost-effective treatment plans based on your history, diagnosis, and personal needs. We offer a variety of services: fertility preservation; treatment for recurrent pregnancy loss; basic and advanced fertility therapy; LGBT donor sperm and egg services.

Learn more! Join us on the last Thursday of every month for a free Fertility 101 Seminar. 105 West View Road, Ste 302, Colchester, VT 05446 802-245-3772 www.nrmvt.com Untitled-4 1

11/14/16 10:38 AM

4t-northeastreproductive110216.indd 1

10/31/16 10:50 AM

Refinance your car, boat, RV or motorcycle and get cash back! SEVENDAYSVT.COM

When you refinance your loan* with NEFCU between November 1 and December 31, 2016, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll give you 1%** of the loan balance in cash (up to $200). Call 866.80.LOANS or apply online at nefcu.com

11.30.16-12.07.16 SEVEN DAYS

*Current loans need to be from another financial institution and in place for at least 90 days. **1% cash back based on loan amount refinanced and subject to loan approval. Amount deposited into a NEFCU Share or Share Draft account.

FEDERALLY INSURED BY NCUA

37

Untitled-16 1

11/17/16 10:13 AM


SHOP GREEN THIS HOLIDAY SEASON Coyuchi Organic Bedding, Wool Holiday Decor, Nursing and Maternity Clothing, Baby Holiday Wear & Toys

Hundreds of organic and all natural gifts under $40!

Become a gifted shopper. Instantly BECOME A GIFTED

COLORFUL TABLE LINENS BENNINGTON POTTERY DECORATIVE ACCESSORIES spend $150 on GLASSWARE VT MADE, FAIR TRADE & RECYCLED OPTIONS CANDLES GREETING CARDS BAKEWARE HOLIDAY DECORATIONS FUN STOCKING STUFFERS FURNITURE MUCH MORE

with our new SHOPPER. holiday bennington potters INSTANTLY. GIFT FOR GIFT GIVERS PROGRAM

bennington potters free gift wrapping | we ship anywhere | gift certificates 127 COLLEGE STREET, BURLINGTON

thegreenlifevt.com

151 CHERRY STREET, BURLINGTON | MON 12-6; TUES-SAT 10-6; SUN 11-5| 881-0633 4t-TheGreenLife113016.indd 1

bennington pottery and receive one free gift.

M-F 10-9; SAT 10-6; SUN 11-5 * 802 863 2221

FREE GIFT WRAPPING * WE SHIP ANYWHERE * GIFT CERTIFICATES 127 college street, burlington

mon-fri 10-9; sat 10-6; sun 11-5 | 802.863.2221

11/28/16 4:07 PM

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

HOLIDAY GUIDE 2016+17 JAY ONLY COLLEGE SEASON PASS

249

$

11.30.16-12.07.16

No blackout dates or restrictions. Purchase by December 12, 2016

The American Led Zeppelin

2017 PUMP HOUSE SEASON PASS

279

$

FOR A 4-PACK OF PASSES Valid May 13 – November 19, 2017

Limited number of passes available at this rate.

12.17.16 | Jay Peak’s Foeger Ballroom Doors: 8pm, Show: 9pm

MOVE UP GIFT CARDS

SEVEN DAYS

CAN’T DECIDE ON ANY ONE THING?

A Move Up Gift Card will cover you for all things Jay Peak.

38

TO PURCHASE CALL: (802) 327-2321 Untitled-27 1

25 General Admission | $50 VIP*

$

*Includes a pre and post-show lounge with appetizers, two free drinks, and meet & greet with the band.

For more information and tickets jaypeakresort.com/Music 11/28/16 4:46 PM


A Montréal Hood Beckons Need another reason to visit the city? Try Mile Ex S TO RY A ND PHOT OS BY SU ZAN NE PODHAIZE R

M

ontréal’s Mile Ex, a petite neighborhood that borders Little Italy to the west, doesn’t really encourage wandering by eager visitors. Meandering down the streets that define the area’s borders — rue Clark, Avenue du Parc, rue Jean-Talon Ouest, and a set of railroad tracks that runs behind a Home Depot and parallel to Avenue Van Horne — you’ll see little that invites you to plunge in. Unless, that is, you’re particularly keen on back alleys and street art or just like to explore an “emerging” urban hood. If Mile Ex — officially called the Alexandra-Marconi district — isn’t obviously appealing, there’s nothing intimidating or frightening about it, either. On one side, it’s dominated by residential townhouses sprinkled with commercial enterprises; on the other, by a rail yard bordered by manufacturing businesses. Nothing flashes or sparkles. It’s a place where people live, hang out their laundry and wake up in the morning to get ready for work. Simply put, Mile Ex is not touristy — yet. So why go there? Perhaps you’re in need of a hot-towel shave and a haircut accompanied by an espresso, which you can find at the Emporium Barbershop on rue Saint-Zotique Ouest. Once you’ve been tidied up, you can shop for pomades and blades in the shop’s apothecary. A few blocks over, you’ll find a club that has bowling lanes and hosts bingo, karaoke and queer movie nights. It’s not really a gay bar, but it’s also not not a gay bar. Enjoy photographing urban decay, graffiti and construction? You can do that in Mile Ex, too. The main reason an outsider might want to visit, though, is the food. The area is home to incredible hidden gems in restaurant categories ranging from casual to fine dining. There’s even an eatery called Le Ballpark that specializes in unusual meatballs — such as one based on the Spanish rice dish paella.

MONTRÉAL

Start at Dispatch Coffee 267 rue Saint-Zotique Ouest, 514-437-1327, dispatchcoffee.ca

Cappuccino at Dispatch

Have Lunch at Dépanneur le Pick Up 7032 rue Waverly, 514-271-8011, depanneurlepickup.com

In Québec, a dépanneur is a neighborhood convenience store stocked with household staples such as jarred tomato A MONTRÉAL HOOD BECKONS

» P.40

FEATURE 39

house Dispatch’s truck. It’s an excellent place to grab a snack and a cup of lightly roasted Ethiopian Hawa Yember — which, according to its package, has notes of white honey, lime and jasmine. The space has high ceilings and a distinctly industrial feel: Light streams in through the garage door, and a Probat roaster sits in the back. There’s no

SEVEN DAYS

Dispatch Coffee began as a roving coldbrew and espresso truck. Eventually, it became so popular that its owner committed to brick-and-mortar, and it has continued to grow. Besides the truck, which is still in operation, the business operates a trio of cafés, the most recent of which opened this month on rue Saint-Laurent. The Mile Ex roastery and café is located in the garage that used to

separation between the seating and the place where the magic happens. Order a tender canelé pastry — which resembles baked custard with a darkened exterior crust — and a cappuccino made with local cow’s milk or housemade almond milk. Need a more filling snack? Try selecting from the toast menu, which features a variety of sweet and savory options, such as avocado, goat cheese, seasonal jams and cinnamon-cardamom butter.

11.30.16-12.07.16

Because Mile Ex is a stone’s throw from Jean-Talon Market and Little Italy’s bakeries and grocery stores, it’s a great jumping-off point for a day of culinary exploration. Here’s a suggested itinerary for a walking tour centered on eating and drinking options.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Chipotle club sandwich and a cup of tea at Dépanneur le Pick Up


A Montréal Hood Beckons « P.39

40

college pass T H E P E R F E CT 4 M O U N TA I N C O L L E G E PA SS WHAT YOU GET

2,877 399 159 18 $379 ACRES

TRAILS

MILES

PA R K S

BUY YOURS NOW

Buy now at killington.com/thecollegepass, or call 800-887-3257 **This rate is valid through December 15, 2016. Price increases to $419 on 12/16/16. All season pass sales are non-refundable and subject to 7% applicable state and local taxes. Purchaser must be registered as a full-time student for fall and spring semesters and have valid college ID upon picking up the pass.

SEVEN DAYS

What if we told you that you could share your jokes with the world?

SPEAKING OF COMEDY...

40 FEATURE

11/28/16 10:28 AM

Calling All Jokers!

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Untitled-1 1

sauce, toilet paper, Oreo cookies and potato chips. At Dépanneur le Pick Up, you may have to reach around or over people to grab a box of tampons or a bag of maple-bacon popcorn. That’s because the cluttered, cozy store doubles as a restaurant. It specializes in takeout but offers seats to those who can’t wait to chow down. At lunchtime, the spot is jammed with people picking up red-and-white boxes containing the kitchen’s most famous offerings. Meat eaters love the chipotle club sandwich, stacked high and slathered with spicy mayo, and the barbecued pulled pork. Vegetarians can get theirs with grilled haloumi cheese and mint coleslaw, or a combo of eggplant, roasted red peppers and mozzarella. The dépanneur has specials, too. During one visit, the soup of the day was a soothing cream of mixed vegetables, and the off-menu sandwich was moist and lemony chicken on focaccia, slathered with olive tapenade and strewn with red cabbage slaw. A green salad, topped with toasted pecans and shredded beet, carrot and apple, was made with lettuce so fresh that it appeared to have been harvested that day. The staff is another perk. Young, charming and hip, our server took breaks to chat with us whenever he could find a free moment. On your way out, as you’re waiting in line to pay, grab a lemon bar or a cookie for the road.

check out the “Parmelee Post” online. It’s a new humor column on local news that hasn’t happened yet.

4t-joke.indd 1

No, we’re not kidding. Each week, we’ll publish one joke submitted by a comic on our arts blog, Live Culture. So, what are you waiting for? TO SUBMIT, GO TO: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOKE.

10/4/16 8:19 PM

Kitchen staff at Restaurant Manitoba

Dine at Restaurant Manitoba

271 rue Saint-Zotique Ouest, 514-270-8000, restaurantmanitoba.com

Two halved beef bones, each nearly as long as my forearm, arrived hot from the oven on a bed of hay. The marrow inside glistened and oozed, topped by a sprinkle of maple sugar and black garlic salt and finished with crispy strips of parsnip. The bread that came on the side was smoked. A bourbon cocktail was garnished with tender corn sprouts, while another, a muddle of vodka and spruce syrup, incorporated strips of seaweed. And so it went on. Located right beside Dispatch Coffee, Restaurant Manitoba brings the walking tour full circle. On Facebook, the eatery’s owners jokingly call it a “wildlife preserve,” but they seriously aim to use as much found food as possible. “We want a taste of the forest in our plates … wood, rock, wind,” reads the website. So it’s no surprise when the arctic char crudo is topped with crispy lichen, or when a rich ring of liver pâté is dotted with pickled mustard seeds and bits of sea asparagus. What’s incredible is how well this all works. At some restaurants, a chef ’s ego — the drive to be quirky — causes missteps in the flavor department. Not so at Manitoba. Although the garnishes are frequently odd, they always fit the dishes perfectly — the taste you’ve been missing but didn’t know you needed.


Commercial Banking Cheese plate at Brasserie Harricana

Nutcracker

The

Saturday December 17, 2016 • 2 & 7pm • Sunday December 18, 2016 • 1 & 6pm The Flynn Center For The Performing Arts • Burlington, Vermont

Tickets start at $23 802-86Flynn • www.flynntix.org 21 Carmichael St. Suite 203 Essex Junction, VT 05452 For Info 878-2941 www.vbts.org • info@vbts.org

Contact: podhaizer@sevendaysvt.com 4t-VBTS111616.indd 1

11/9/16 4:48 PM

FEATURE 41

At Brasserie Harricana, a spacious microbrewery and restaurant at the edge of Mile Ex, one of the house beers is brewed with goldenrod and carrot. Another, with a hint of sourness, is flavored with red pine and mushrooms. Alongside these experimental offerings, Harricana concocts a solid selection of more typical brews, from blond ale to dubbel to porter.

3/11/16 11:07 AM

SEVEN DAYS

95 rue Jean-Talon Ouest, 514-303-3039, brasserieharricana.com

Untitled-14 1

11.30.16-12.07.16

Get Drinks and Late-Night Snacks at Brasserie Harricana

From the remainder of the brasserie’s 40-plus taps flows an equally wide selection from other brewers, as well as a number of ciders from Québec. For nondrinkers, there’s elegant housemade kombucha. One variety is flavored with sencha, kaffir lime and ginger; another, with green Taiwanese oolong and rose petals. The snacks are wild enough to match the beverages. Duck-confit croquettes were crisp and hot, perfectly salted and served with a delicate honey-mustard sauce. Briny oysters came balanced atop cups of dark beer; these are meant to be shot one after the other. The Harricana Special, a meat-pie platter, came with baked beans, slaw, beets and fruit ketchup. It was homey but not memorable. The dining room, by contrast, stands out. It sports white brick walls, a white glass-tile floor and a wooden drop ceiling with latticework that adds an enticing accent. With its Québécois libations and fun finger foods, Harricana is a fitting place to conclude a tour of Mile Ex. One of the best things about exploring new places is discovering foods that may come to rank as staples: pounds of coffee from Dispatch; hunks of Québeccrafted Bleu d’Élizabeth (which made a luscious appearance on a cheese plate); lichen served as a garnish. Equally wonderful is finding spots you love, and where you will inevitably return. In both respects, Mile Ex is a winner. m

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

A seat at the bar offers both a view into the open kitchen and the opportunity to converse with the kitchen staff when they’re not in the weeds. During one visit, while waiting between appetizers and entrées, I exchanged recipe ideas and restaurant suggestions with a particularly friendly bearded man who was working the garde-manger station. After sampling cocoa-rubbed deer with king eryngii mushrooms, and guinea fowl with Indian celery and long pepper, my companion and I ended the meal with buffalo mozzarella mousse dotted with candied cranberries and pieces of ginger cake. Every bite was as intriguing as it was delicious. For diners who want to explore Canada through its native foods — and step away from the everyday without risking a muddled meal — Manitoba is a perfect choice.

Commercial Real Estate Cash Management Services Preferred SBA Lender Lines of Credit


NFL Ticket

11 TVs

NOW Open Sundays at noon!

42 FEATURE

SEVEN DAYS

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Untitled-12

Quick-Change Artist Book review: Shift, Marylen Grigas B Y J U LIA S H IP L E Y

T

he cover of Marylen Grigas’ first poetry collection is a blurry photo of the open road. It looks as if the driver shot it from inside the vehicle as he or she hurtled along the interstate at dawn. Above the smeary taillights of other vehicles, the book’s title, Shift,, looms in a sulfurousyellow sky like a disembodied road sign. Is this title a command — a synonym for “change” or “repent”? Or does “shift” refer to the collection’s overarching idea, l o c al, fres h, ori gi nal a synonym for transition and change, as in shifting the gears of a car? Perhaps, despite the vehicular associations the cover evokes, the “shift” is an actual or metaphorical dress, one that can be donned and tossed off with a sweep of the arms. 1076 Williston Road, S. Burlington The answer is yes to all three ideas. Burlington poet Grigas, whose work 862.6585 has appeared in such well-respected www.windjammerrestaurant.com publications as the New Yorker, Alaska Quarterly Review and Poetry East, invokes these meanings and more as she 1 10/7/16 10:37 AMtakes readers on an exhilarating ride. The title poem, for instance, orients us by disorienting us: “watch listen something-just-arrived / is missing.” Grigas summons a feeling of queasy panic, of running out of time, with subsequent lines such as “lack of time hangs heavy / a thick gold watch on a choke chain / left in the back seat of a yellow cab rushing away.” Although Grigas stops short of saying so, readers may find in this poem an allusion to the breakneck speed at which atmospheric carbon, emitted by vehicles like the taxicab, has surged past cautionary thresholds. Yet Shift is not pedantic. Grigas invokes urgency — in addition to living amid ecological crisis, she is a “writer with cancer,” as she revealed in a recent Broad Street interview. Yet her verse is also playful and curious, exploring and intertwining ideas about spirituality, biology and memory. For example, in “Foreign Cities,” Grigas writes:

Meet John Brickels, our demonstrating artist

on Saturday, Dec. 3. Noon

to 4PM

I’ve heard it said that death is a hazy passage but why not something more definitive, not a loosening

WWW.FROGHOLLOW.ORG 85 Church St.|Burlington, VT|802-863-6458

Untitled-15 1

11/17/16 10:12 AM

of consciousness, a letting go, shavasana, the deadman’s pose with shallow breath, cells shutting down their failing businesses,

BOOKS

“SHIFT” watch listen something-just-arrived is missing like a larch that’s dropped its golden leaves sudden somehow gone with taxicab-yellow rushing though you believe what’s missing must be must be time lack of time hangs heavy a thick gold watch on a choke chain left in the back seat of a yellow cab rushing away something’s missing you can hear its lowering whine it’s leafing gold again

there go its tail lights but then loud and lush and leafing

time unlocking its effects once more: watches lives leaves intentions misplaced keys startling abundance amplitude yet in all this high-pitched yellow how could it be this urgency faint alarm this expectancy easy easy


Your Vermont home for custom design and jewelry repair since 1975.

Treasured gifts of love pulling the blinds, turning the signs to closed, but rather a flash of light and it’s 1908, long before you were born, when sweating horses pulled dripping ice carts down dirt streets…

EVEN AS GRIGAS INVOKES URGENCY, HER VERSE IS PLAYFUL AND CURIOUS, EXPLORING AND INTERTWINING IDEAS ABOUT SPIRITUALITY, BIOLOGY AND MEMORY.

of

11/18/16 12:53 PM

FITNESS

with a

FAMILY MEMBERSHIP

25% OFF EDGE gift cards now available, stop by any EDGE location

3v-edge113016.indd 1

Family & Short term individual packages are also available

HURRY

ESSEX | SOUTH BURLINGTON | WILLISTON

Offer ends 12/15/16. Call for Details.

edgevt.com/join 11/15/16 3:10 PM

FEATURE 43

802-860-EDGE

YEARLY MEMBERSHIP!

SEVEN DAYS

Shift by Marylen Grigas, Nature’s Face Publications, 90 pages. $15.99.

GIVEthe Gift

GG6H-designerscircle112316.indd 1

11.30.16-12.07.16

INFO

52B CHURCH ST BURLINGTON • DESIGNERSCIRCLEVT.COM • 802-864-4238 OPEN EVERY DAY THROUGH THE HOLIDAYS

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

The poem then relinquishes the backward pursuit of history and ancestry and reaches forward to embrace the totality of the body’s lifetime of experiences, including “dreams of traveling to foreign cities.” From there, Grigas harks back to the origins of the human being and the planet on which it lived: “you sense movement, its spinning fire and shooting rays / like hands of Shiva.” Having placed the end of a single life in universal context, the poem concludes at the moment a self is first conceived: “when the first cell split into longing.” Grigas’ prose poem “About Muscle” likewise presents a panoply of ideas through swift shifts in time and topic. She launches the poem with a fact: “If there’s no need for movement, then no need for a brain.” She then proceeds to describe how this principle affects the sea squirt, “a small creature that swims freely in its youth until it settles on a rock. Then it devours its own brain. And spinal cord.” Grigas is not just name-dropping trivia for the sake of amusement. Rather, she hints at her own health challenges, juxtaposing the squirt’s developmental biology with her own and alluding indirectly to the cancer that has been co-opting her lung. The poem continues in a cheerful, discursive manner, describing Grigas’ thoughts as she attempts to strengthen her muscles by walking on the treadmill. Praying, “God don’t let me settle,” she simultaneously watches an expert on “Charlie Rose” explain the evolution of human brains. The poem’s shifts or “turns” (to use poetic terminology) continue to be hairpin tight, as Grigas deftly explores the development and breakdown of muscles, ranging from

those of primitive creatures (like the sea squirt) to Arnold Schwarzenegger to talk-show biologists. In the poem’s final twist, it loops back to the opening. Just like the sea squirt, which settled itself on a rock, the speaker finds herself searching among boulders, which she uses as building materials. “I thought I was making a terrace,” she writes — but, she realizes, “afterward it looked more like a grave.” While the sea squirt may consume its own brain, Grigas’ poetry evidences a mind that has remained supple and spry. Readers may find themselves googling terms and names she incorporates into her lines. The Red Scapular (a Catholic sacred vestment), a Nereid (sea nymph) and Ockham (a theologian excommunicated for his beliefs) are just three such allusions that pop up in her poems, and they prove well worth some research on behalf of greater comprehension. But Grigas is also generous to readers, often incorporating lyrical definitions or explanations into a poem. In “Syntax Me, Please,” she writes, “they say meaning / is mostly in the syntax, / the core and haute couture / of expression.” Even when a poem fails to yield its full meaning to a reader, one can still appreciate Grigas’ talent for floating rich images in our minds. Her poem “Song,” for instance, begins with a cardinal on a snowy branch: “Red bird, spark in the leafless fire bush.” Grigas then echoes this image several lines later with “Once I was a shop girl who hung red dresses / on limbs of an apple tree in the heart of winter.” The poem concludes with the speaker becoming someone who is “silent and hollow as a plastic saint,” but the earlier image of those easily donned, easily doffed red dresses dangling in the tree persists. Of such unforgettable shifts is a powerful collection made. 


food+drink

Jailhouse Beets

In the Northeast Kingdom, inmates take to the kitchen with locavore food

44 FOOD

SEVEN DAYS

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

S T O RY AND PHOT O S BY HANN AH PALMER E GAN

Trimming beets from Harvest Hill Farm

O

n a spitting-rain November evening, Brian Bertenshaw stood at a stainless steel table trimming beets. With deft movements, he lopped off the roots’ spiny tops and tossed their bleeding red bodies into a wide metal mixing bowl. His forearms were scarred with the shallow nicks and burns that are common among line cooks and other restaurant workers. But, in his hand, a 14-inch chef’s knife told a different kind of tale. The blade was tethered to the table with a braided wire cord, and the cook’s prison-orange T-shirt identified him as

FOOD LOVER?

GET YOUR FILL ONLINE...

a corrections inmate. Bertenshaw is one of 18 resident-cooks at the men-only Northeast Regional Correctional Facility in St. Johnsbury, where he is currently serving a minimum of 28 months for aggravated domestic assault. “I like to keep busy,” he said, rolling a beet toward the knife. “[The kitchen] is a good environment, and it gets you off the block.” So long as Bertenshaw works hard and stays out of trouble, NERCF dining manager Bryan Mitofsky will see to it that he picks up some new cooking skills, too. LISTEN IN ON LOCAL FOODIES...

EVERY INMATE HERE SHOULD BE WEARING AN “EAT MORE KALE” T-SHIRT. BRYAN MITO F S K Y

And those beets? Local and organic. Last May, Mitofsky met with farmer Bill Half from Walden’s Harvest Hill Farm. “We set up what I like to think of as an institutional CSA,” Mitofsky said, standing near the kitchen door as dinner

BROWSE READER REVIEWS OF 1,000+ RESTAURANTS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/FOOD. REGISTER TO JOIN OUR BITE CLUB. YOU’LL GET FOOD NEWS IN YOUR INBOX EACH TUESDAY.

service began. “I told him I’d buy three cases of lettuce every week, plus $55 [worth] of whatever extra [produce] they had around.” Most weeks, the $55 grab bag comes in the form of kale. “Every inmate here should be wearing an ‘Eat More Kale’ T-shirt,” Mitofsky said, snickering at his only-in-Vermont statement. The cooks sauté fresh greens with minced garlic and maybe some diced tomatoes. Anything that can’t be used within a few days gets chopped and frozen, then added to soups and other dishes throughout the winter. Mitofsky connected with Harvest Hill through Green Mountain Farm to School’s Farm Direct program, with which he’d signed on in August 2014. As with its other, similar initiatives, Farm Direct’s main goal is to expand markets for, and broaden access to, Vermontgrown meats, dairy and produce. In practice, that means funneling more local products into institutions such as schools, hospitals and prisons. “We care that local food is something for all Vermonters,” GMFTS founder and executive director Katherine Sims told Seven Days via phone last week, echoing an oft-heard locavore mantra. “It’s not just for the tote-bag-carrying ladies at the farmers market.” Sims cited studies proving that many prison inmates gain weight over time. While there are many reasons for that, typical prison diets — mainly processed meats and starches and frozen or canned vegetables — are a major contributing factor. So linking Vermont’s jails with a steady supply of fresh, nutrient-dense food could help improve inmate health. And, since prisons are funded with taxpayer money, each dollar spent on local products circulates back into the state’s economy instead of to midwestern JAILHOUSE BEETS

» P.46

LOOK UP RESTAURANTS ON YOUR PHONE:

CONNECT TO M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM ON ANY WEB-ENABLED CELLPHONE AND FIND LOCAL RESTAURANTS BY LOCATION OR CUISINE. FIND NEARBY EVENTS, MOVIES AND MORE.


GOT A FOOD TIP? FOOD@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

SIDEdishes

sustainable

REGIONAL

Joshua Smith

FRESH 24/7/365

— H.P.E.

KICKBACK BREWERY PREPARES FOR 2017 LAUNCH JOSHUA SMITH, 34, home-

Taking Root

ROOTS SCHOOL TO ADD COURSES IN PERMACULTURE

At ROOTS SCHOOL in Corinth, students learn traditional skills such as arrow making, animal tracking, hide tanning, wilderness self-reliance

ONTARIO MAINE

VERMONT

NEW HAMPSHIRE NEW YORK

MASSACHUSETTS

CONNECTICUT

RI

PENNSYLVANIA

UVPGroup.com

1

Celebrate the holidays with us!

9/12/16 6:18 PM

Gift Cards Available

The Grataskis have returned for more Roots courses ever since; this spring, they will move onto the land to establish a farm. “It will include everything from organic vegetable gardens to forest gardens, holistic orchards and mob-grazing a bunch of animals,” Salon says. Within a few years, he hopes, as the operation becomes established, nearly all the food students eat will come from the property. Founded in 2007, Roots has been written up in the Chicago Tribune and Vice, SIDE DISHES

QUEBEC

1840 West Main St, Richmond, VT

802-434-8686

SERVING DINNER Tuesday-Saturday

kitchentablebistro.com

» P.49 GG8V-KitchenTable112316.indd 1

FOOD 45

brewed for almost a decade before deciding to launch a brewery from his garage in Burlington. An Essex native with a degree in community development and

— J.C.

RR<250 Mile

SEVEN DAYS

Vermonters Still Like Beer

Chris Grataski

WE ARE THE UVP GROUP

11.30.16-12.07.16

“A big part of what we want to do is work with local agriculture,” West says. “So, when strawberries come in, we can offer a small run of strawberry liqueur.” The locavore model will hold for the company’s larger releases, too — excepting the rum, which will incorporate blackstrap molasses and turbinado sugar from a family-run farm in Louisiana. “We’re looking toward developing a New Englandstyle whiskey using grains that grow well here,” says Overbay, a former army sergeant who did two tours in Iraq. After completing college under the G.I. Bill, Overbay learned the finer points of spirits production

— and, soon, how to feed a homestead or community. Next year, Roots will expand its offerings with a collection of classes on how to cultivate crops and raise animals in fields and forests. “I was looking for [a teacher] with a lot of on-theground experience,” says BRAD SALON, who co-owns the school with his wife, SARAH CORRIGAN. He found one in CHRIS GRATASKI, who first came to Roots many years ago with his wife, MELISSA. The pair took a class as part of their honeymoon. Untitled-70

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Oats at Rogers Farmstead

applied economics from the University of Vermont, Smith tapped into his brewing passion (pun intended) shortly after graduation. Come 2017, he’ll start distributing kegs — and eventually bottles and cans — to local venues hankering for a pint. The name is KICKBACK BREWERY, and, for Smith, it sums up an action, an ethos and a drink all in one. “I love the name,” he says. “I asked my friends, ‘What do you envision when drinking a beer?’ They all said something similar: ‘I want to sit down, put my feet up and relax. Just kick back.’” Though permits are still pending, Smith hopes to be making and distributing beer before the summer 2017 season. “The ultimate goal is to gain a spot in this summer’s VERMONT BREWERS FESTIVAL in Burlington,” he says. “Then I’ll know I’ve made it as a brewer.” In the meantime, Smith is developing recipes for “simple, straightforward beer,” as the brewery’s moniker indicates. In the works are a porter with a hit of fresh vanilla bean, a chocolate-coffee stout, a raspberry-spiked pilsner and a not-too-hoppy pale ale for easy drinking.

A truly local fresh meat program, The finest and freshest seafood that is currently available in the Northeast, an exclusive regional artisanal cheese program and oh yeah, the highest quality produce at the most competitive prices.

RR<250 Mil e

In Barre, a new distillery is coming to town. High in the quarried hills of Websterville, OLD ROUTE TWO SPIRITS is slowly taking form in the same industrial park that’s home to VERMONT CREAMERY and the VERMONT FOODBANK. Co-owners ADAM OVERBAY, JENNIFER WEST and RYAN DUMPERTH say Old Route Two’s focus will be on rum, gin and whiskey. The company will also produce micro-batches of absinthe and other liqueurs, which will showcase the diversity of Vermont’s native crops and wild flora.

DELIVERED

RR<25 0M ile

OLD ROUTE TWO SPIRITS HAS LOCAVORE BOOZE IN THE WORKS

RR<250 Mile

Hooch of Ages

at Massachusetts’ Turkey Shore and Ryan & Wood Distilleries, then moved to Vermont and spent time at DUNC’S MILL in St. Johnsbury. At Old Route Two, source grains might include spelt, oats and rye from farms such as ROGERS FARMSTEAD in Berlin, which supplies wheat for ELMORE MOUNTAIN BREAD’s popular Vermont Redeemer loaves. Grain harvests can be unpredictable in Vermont’s cool, wet climate. To accommodate year-to-year fluctuations in availability, the distillers plan to build considerable variation into their products, just as wineries distinguish among vintages. Rather than follow a set recipe for each spirit, Overbay says, he will adjust mash bills to showcase the season’s harvest. “So, if the oats do really well one year, that’ll be reflected in the mash bill. You’ll be able to taste what 2016 or 2017 tasted like.” Most of the spirits will spend time in barrels hand-built by a local cooper using wood harvested from northeastern forests. Old Route Two’s production will begin later this winter once a few permits go through. If all goes well, the first spirits should be available at Vermont state liquor stores in the spring, with an on-site tasting room soon to follow.

COURTESY OF KRISTY DOOLEY

BY JULI A CL ANCY, HA NNA H PAL M E R E GAN & SUZANNE POD HA I Z E R

11/18/16 2:29 PM


food+drink Jailhouse Beets « P.44

46 FOOD

SEVEN DAYS

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

factory farms, interstate distributors and multinational food conglomerates that dominate the institutional food market. Since 2013, Farm Direct has steered some $1 million in revenue from schools, hospitals and prisons to local farms. Each week, the farmers harvest and pack the requisitions,  which come in via an online ordering portal. Central Vermont’s D & S Distributors picks them up, compiles and repacks everything by institution, and delivers the orders to their final destinations. While access and logistics have improved, the trickiest part of making local food work in a prison setting is finding a price point that works for facility and farmer. In very real terms, Mitofsky said most Farm Direct purveyors can’t accommodate NERCF’s $1.25- to $1.50-per-meal budget on a week-toweek basis. Still, the prison makes a concerted effort to comply with Act 38, Vermont’s 2007 agriculture viability act, which requests — without leveraging consequences for noncompliance — that residential institutions and schools purchase at least 10 percent of their total foodstuffs from in-state producers. During the growing season, Mitofsky said he can almost find enough budgetfriendly product to meet the 10 percent mark. On a yearly basis, he estimated that Vermont-grown foods represent 4 to 5 percent of his $360,000 food expenditures.

ON GOOD BEHAVIOR Most of NERCF’s 130-some residents arrive on probation and parole violations or pass through on their way to or from other facilities or furloughs. They stay a few weeks or months, sometimes between court appearances in central or northeastern Vermont. Post-conviction, most who face lengthy sentences head to larger — and often out-of-state — facilities for long-term residencies. “We have a lot of traffic in and out of here,” said Northeast Correctional Complex superintendent Alan Cormier, who oversees NERCF and the adjacent minimum-security work camp for petty, nonviolent offenders. At medium-security NECRF, inmates’ offenses range from DUI to sex crimes to homicide. “There’s a bit of everything here,” Cormier said during Seven Days’ visit earlier this month. “We don’t discriminate.” When it comes to kitchen staffing, Mitofsky doesn’t care what crimes landed his workers in jail. “Some of our

Preparing trays at Northeast Regional Correctional Facility

Local Food Sales to Two Northern Vermont Prisons December 2014-December 2015 $10,000

$7,500

$5,000

$2,500

$0

Fruits $1,373

Dairy $4,317

best cooks have been murderers,” the chef said, standing in his cramped office just off the mess hall. In the prison’s warehouse pantry, Scott Cota handles shipping and receiving. When deliveries arrive —  perhaps bearing 50-pound bags of off-size spuds from Chappelle’s Vermont Potatoes in Williamstown, or 17-pound pails of nonfat Regal Raspberry yogurt from East Hardwick’s Kingdom Creamery of Vermont — Cota meets the truck at the loading dock. He signs in orders, tallies inventory, and shuffles cases of product to walk-in freezers or onto the soaring

Eggs $7,159

Vegetables $9,573

metal shelves that line the warehouse walls. Cota landed at NERCF after authorities caught him red-handed with hundreds of emails containing child pornography. In some of them, he encouraged a Florida man to molest his infant daughter and send images of the action. In December 2014, Cota pleaded guilty to those offenses; the conviction came with a minimum four-year jail term. But while awaiting trial, Cota had proven himself a good worker. “I was fortunate that they put a hold on me [so I could stay here],” he said, standing near

the dish sink toward the end of his shift. During his two and a half years in the St. Johnsbury prison, Cota has worked as a baker, server and cook. “As long as you keep your nose clean and work hard,” he said, “they’ll work hard for you.” Mitofsky said that kitchen privileges — for which prisoners are paid pennies per shift — live and die on good behavior. “Before someone can even enter the kitchen,” he said, “I’m looking at their incident history. How are they behaving in the facility?” Men who bully their cellmates or pick fights on the block won’t get anywhere near a scalding pan or a chef’s knife. “This can be a dangerous environment,” Mitofsky acknowledged. “I want zero incidents.” Even candidates with a clean residential record must complete several volunteer shifts, during which the chef observes how they interact with the other cooks and monitors them for skill, work ethic and temperament. “I don’t want someone who’s gonna come in and be bossy,” Mitofsky said. Unlike most food operations — and contrary to the galley portrayed in the popular Netflix series “Orange Is the New Black” — NERCF’s crew doesn’t follow a defined hierarchy. Mitofsky prefers to step back and let the inmates teach each other. Though longer-term cooks often show newbies the ropes, the pecking order is more about mutual learning and exchange. More experienced workers learn soft management


Give a Tasteful Gift... Cooking utensils in the pantry

A Tiny Thai Gift Card!

24 Main Street, Downtown Winooski, 655-4888 • tinythairestaurant.net 6h-tinythai112614-3.indd 1

PREVENTING WASTE

Rates from $159* with Vermont identification. Know a Hotel Vermont enthusiast? Gift cards are on sale now! *Book online at hotelvt.com using promo code VISIT or call us at 802.651.0080. Subject to availability. Black outdates and restrictions apply. Valid now through 1/31/17. hotelvt.com. Untitled-37 1

11/15/16 2:54 PM

e m u l o v e h t Turnip e’re on VPR! —w

n to R CAFÉ and liste Tune into the VP out ab lk ta od writers the Seven Days fo ing ap sh le ns and peop the farms, kitche t si Vi e. t food scen Vermont’s vibran ur local frequency yo VPR.NET or find listen. AT 10:45 A.M. to select SUNDAYS

FOOD 47

JAILHOUSE BEETS

Enjoy a Burlington staycation with our Vermonter rate.

SEVEN DAYS

Super-fresh, vine-ripened tomatoes notwithstanding, most of NERCF’s Farm Direct orders are for inexpensive storage crops such as winter squash and root vegetables. These appear en masse in fall and can create overstock situations. What’s a farmer to do with a bumper crop of butternut squash, once he or she has exhausted the usual outlets? Six miles from NERCF, Mary and Eric Skovsted cultivate dozens of crops at Joe’s Brook Farm in St. Johnsbury. Their operation is one of the prison’s main suppliers of local produce. Still, Mary Skovsted said prison sales represent a small fraction of the farm’s income —  in fiscal year 2016, the farm sold the jail only about $2,700 worth of veggies. But she said the institution does represent a nice secondary market. “The price point is so low that it barely pays for the cost of growing the stuff,” Skovsted said. “But when we have excess or waste, we have a place to sell it.” Earlier this fall, the farmers were a few days late in harvesting a row of cabbage. The heads split, slashing their shelf life and rendering them unsellable

STAY LIKE A LOCAL

11.30.16-12.07.16

THEIR SKILL SETS BECOME EVEN MORE VALUABLE TO CHEFS OUTSIDE PRISON WALLS.

things come in all the time,” the inmate said. Asked what product he most enjoyed working with, Bertenshaw didn’t miss a beat. “Tomatoes,” he gushed. “When the tomatoes come in, I’m psyched. You can’t even find stuff that fresh at the supermarket. But seeing that come in — you know you’re gonna get to do something with it. Vermont is different in that you can get so much of that stuff here.”

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

and teaching skills; newer guys focus on the basic howtos of service, food prep and functioning in a busy kitchen. Everyone goes through ServSafe foodhandler training. Those skills and certifications don’t evaporate once a prisoner is released. “A lot of these guys do this here, and that’s what they do when they get out,” Mitofsky said. Particularly in Vermont, where an ongoing dearth of line cooks has forced many restaurants to post standing ads for kitchen staff, many food businesses won’t begrudge a worker’s criminal background. What’s important is that they show up for work on time and do a good job while they’re there. And, as prison cooks grow more familiar with farm-fresh ingredients, their skill sets become even more valuable to chefs outside prison walls, where farmto-table is fast evolving from exception to rule. At the beet-trimming table, Bertenshaw said that working with Vermont produce has unlocked a new appreciation for the vegetal world. “The cool thing about it is that different

AS PRISON COOKS GROW MORE FAMILIAR WITH FARM-FRESH INGREDIENTS,

11/24/14 1:37 PM

» P.48 6h-VPRCafe082416.indd 1

8/23/16 2:17 PM


48 FOOD

SEVEN DAYS

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Jailhouse Beets « P.47 to CSA, farmstand and farmers market customers. The cabbage needed to be used or processed right away — perhaps into kimchi or kraut. Most of Skovsted’s commercial clients, which include schools, restaurants and hospitals, run on skeleton staffs. They can’t spare workers to chop, salt, knead and pack 100 pounds of imperfect brassica. But —  with 18 sets of willing hands and a shiny new industrial food processor — Mitofsky could. He couldn’t pay Joe’s Brook a premium price, but then, he wasn’t buying a premium product. The sale allowed the farm to salvage something from a large quantity of longseason produce that otherwise would have gone to compost. In the NERCF kitchen, Mitofsky turned to Bertenshaw, who was finishing up the beets. “Brian, why don’t you go into the walk-in and dig out that sauerkraut so we can have a taste?” he asked. “Yes, sir,” answered the inmate, already heading toward the cooler door. A few minutes later, he returned and beckoned Mitofsky into the cooler. Bertenshaw opened a 10-gallon tote of sauerkraut, immediately flooding the space with the funky-tart scent of fermenting cabbage. “Go on, dig down in there,” the chef instructed. Wearing gloves, Bertenshaw wiggled a fork deep into the kraut, then handed samples to Mitofsky and superintendent Cormier before lifting the fork to his own mouth. He chewed carefully and paused to consider the flavor. “I think it may need a little more time,” the inmate said, glancing toward his boss. “But it’s getting there.” The chef nodded and explained that they’d made kraut using an old Bavarian recipe. It had been cold-fermenting for five weeks and wouldn’t be ready for a few more, as Bertenshaw had just observed. But, once its flavor developed, Mitofsky expected the kraut would last for much of the winter. On the back wall of the cooler, a metal locker stored cheeses —  the kitchen’s most coveted ingredient — under lock and key. To one side, clear plastic containers held leftover tomato sauce, chop suey, coleslaw and carrot spears. “The golden rule is not to run out,” Mitofsky said, nodding to the leftovers. “That’s from an inmate point of view.” No one wants 130 hangry inmates on their hands.

Dinner service line at Northeast Regional Correctional Facility

Dessert sherbet

MESS HALL Out in the dining hall, the day’s supper —  turkey in gravy, potatoes, peas and carrots —  garnered mixed reviews. At one table, three young men weren’t very happy. “Oh,” sneered one, who got booked in Burlington while visiting from Brooklyn, “we were just complaining about this meal. Seems like whoever’s back there,  they just thrown it all together.”

At another table, a guy who said he’d been at NERCF for a couple of weeks was more positive. “It’s fresher,” he said. “The flavors are good compared to other places I’ve been.” “You don’t go hungry, that’s for sure,” said another. Yet another inmate pronounced the prison food a step up from his typical diet. “I eat better here than I do at my house,” he said. Across the table, a tall, wiry 27-yearold with serpentine, color-block tattoos

creeping up his neck said he’d been in and out of NECRF for the past seven years. Asked if he’d noticed any improvements in the food, he said yes. “It’s been getting better,” the inmate said, seeming to fight a smile. “I don’t believe I’m saying that, but I am.” Near the door, an older fellow ate alone. His thin, graying hair was greasy against his skull, and he had a defeated look. After getting picked up for a DUI in 2014, the man had spent the past two years awaiting trial. But when the conversation turned to his meals, he perked up a little. “The food experience isn’t so bad,” he said with a grin. “Even with no teeth.” The inmate acknowledged that he’d been eating more fruits and vegetables since arriving in St. Johnsbury. Still, he’d pined for something sweet: “I wish there was some way someone could give the [prison] a deal on blueberries,” he said, “so we could have more pies during the year.” m Contact: hannah@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Learn more at greenmountainfarmtoschool.org.

More food after the classifieds section. PAGE 49


housing »

PHOTO COURTESY OF KELLY SCHULZE/MOUNTAIN DOG PHOTOGRAPHY

APARTMENTS, CONDOS & HOMES

Bugs

AGE/SEX: 14-year-old neutered male ARRIVAL DATE: November 3, 2016 REASON HERE: Owner could no longer care for him.

on the road »

CARS, TRUCKS, MOTORCYCLES

Humane

Sponsored by:

Society of Chittenden County

SUMMARY: Bugs is a sweet senior looking for a quiet home that can give him some time to settle. Change can always be hard, but it is often harder in old age. Once he is comfortable, Bugs loves head scratches and will reward you with drooling! If you're looking for a kitty who will be your sweet companion and who will take leisurely naps while you're working, Bugs is sure to deliver. He just asks that you give him a chance!

SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS: Bugs needs to be able to go outside in his new home. CATS/DOGS: Bugs has lived with another cat. He hasn't been around dogs and would prefer a quiet home. Visit HSCC at 142 Kindness Court, South Burlington, Tuesday through Friday from 1 to 6 p.m., or Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 862-0135 for more info.

NEW STUFF ONLINE EVERY DAY! PLACE YOUR ADS 24-7 AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM.

pro services »

CHILDCARE, HEALTH/ WELLNESS, PAINTING

buy this stuff »

APPLIANCES, KID STUFF, ELECTRONICS, FURNITURE

music »

INSTRUCTION, CASTING, INSTRUMENTS FOR SALE

jobs »

NO SCAMS, ALL LOCAL, POSTINGS DAILY


CLASSIFIEDS

universities & more. One free mo. w/ lease starting 3/1/17 or sooner! bayberrycommonsapartments.com, 355-7633.

printed body

TRANSPORTAon the TION road

housing ads: $20 (25 words) legals: 52¢/word buy this stuff: free online services: $12 (25 words)

display service ads: $25/$45 homeworks: $45 (40 words, photos, logo) fsbos: $45 (2 weeks, 30 words, photo) jobs: michelle@sevendaysvt.com, 865-1020 x21

Valley Painting

BURLINGTON Sunny quaint 3rd floor space w/ walk-in closets. Own BA, LR & round room. $700/ mo. Health conscious & eco-friendly professional or student. Avail. 1/1. 881-7606.

CARS/TRUCKS

Call TJ NOW!

355-0392

CLASSIFIEDS KEY

appt. appointment apt. apartment BA bathroom bayberrycommons apartments.com BR bedroom BURLINGTON 802.355.7633 DR dining room HOUSEMATE DESIRED For 58-year-old man DW dishwasher w/ condo in South End. Needs someone able information, call 802HDWD hardwood to buy groceries, cook 777-8968 or email us at SDIreland-Sm.ClassyDisplay081716.indd 8/22/16 1:51 PM 1 HW hot water dinner & be a companddenny@cdbesq.com. ion most evenings. LR living room Room & board provided. OFFICE/RETAIL SPACE AT MAIN STREET 864-3103 for details. NS no smoking LANDING On Burlington’s BURLINGTON ROOM OBO or best offer Waterfront. Beautiful, Stylish, furnished, healthy, affordable recently renovated refs. references spaces for your downtown house. business. Visit sec. dep. security deposit Respectful living w/ mainstreetlanding.com others. Parking avail. W/D washer & dryer & click on space avail. W/D, back deck, BBQ &

BURLINGTON, UPPER SHELBURNE RD. Beautiful Victorian 2 story, 2-BR, 1-BA. Interior/exterior HDWD. Separate dining 802.355.7633 Painting room, foyer, on bus line. Sheetrocking Parking, NS/pets. Some 2010 CHRYSLER T&C utils. incl. Walk to lake & Taping neighborhood near LIMITED and colleges. $1,495/ Cathedral Ceilings bike path & lake, 3 Mini passenger van, mo. 476-4071. SDIreland-Sm.ClassyDisplay081716.indd 8/22/16 1:51 PM1 miles from downtown. 4-door. $4,000. 4.0 liter, Custom Carpentry Electric incl. No pets. V6, back-up camera/ BURLINGTON: 31 HYDE Any Size Job Avail. now. Contact sensors, navigation, ST. thomasbusinesauto., 88K miles. 1 Avail. now. Medium-size Free Estimates sagency@comcast.net owner, no accidents. 3-BR condo. 1.5-BA, DW, Fully Insured for online application. Fully inspected and no W/D, parking, low utils. Paula, 864-0838. damage. Call or text $1,500/mo. No dogs. 317-449-9423. Thanks! 862-7467. BURLINGTON 1- & 2-BR APTS. 2011 KIA SORENTO EX ESSEX JCT. W/D in each unit, air FWD Clean 1-BR + den. 2nd conditioning, stainless 4 cylinder, FWD, 73,500 floor, full BA, range, steel appliances, miles. Excellent garden. Wi-Fi, cable TV. stove, refrigerator, DW, TAFT FARM SENIOR granite counter tops. condition. New front outside only. coin W/D, off-street lg-valleypainting112614.indd 11/24/14 1 12:11 Smoking PM LIVING COMMUNITY Community gardens, struts, rear brakes & $600/mo. incl. all utils. parking. Sorry, no pets. 10 Tyler Way, Williston. elevators, adjacent to radiator assembly. 18$100 deposit. Monthly. Lease, dep. $975/mo. + Independent senior children’s playground. inch wheels, 4 studded utils. 878-2825. living. Avail. Dec. 1. 1-BR, Avail. now. Dennis, Your dream apartment! tires. Fog lights. Spicy 520-203-5487. 1-BA, $1,110/mo. incl. all bayberrycommonred. $12,500/OBO. FURNISHED APT. utils & cable. Garage sapartments.com, ESSEX JCT. Essex Jct. Five Corners, parking optional. NS/ CASH FOR CARS 355-7633. Share an apt. w/ a man 1-BR. NS/pets. $750/ pets. Must be 55+ Any car/truck in his 60s interested mo. + utils. First, last years of age. jfloyd@ BURLINGTON 2-BR 2000-2015, running in music & art. Must and damage deposit. coburnfeeley.com, TOWNHOUSES or not! Top dollar for be 55+ for senior 802-363-7670. 879-3333. Stainless steel used/damaged. Free building. Minimal rent appliances & nationwide towing! Call in exchange for help PINECREST AT ESSEX WINOOSKI 1-BR granite counter tops. now: 888-420-3808. w/ housekeeping, 9 Joshua Way, Essex Near the circle. Close Community gardens, (AAN CAN) occasional cooking & Junction. Independent to UVM, hospital, river views, covered bike senior living. 1-BR unit errands. Full private bus route. Gas heat. storage & underground BA. No pets/smoking. avail. Dec. 1. $1,135/ Parking. No pets. NS. parking. Adjacent to 863-5625 or homemo. Incl. all utils. & $900/mo. + utils. Avail. nature/running trails sharevermont.org for underground parking. now. 802-310-2204. & basketball/tennis application. Interview, NS/pets. Must be 55+ courts. bayberrycomrefs., background years of age. rrappold@ WINOOSKI, 72 EAST monsapartments.com, checks required. EHO. coburnfeeley.com, ALLEN ST. 355-7633. 872-9197. 3-BR, HDWD, gas heat. ROOM FOR RENT, $1,500/mo. + utils. BURLINGTON, AVAIL. NOW SHELBURNE Avail. now. Call for BAYBERRY COMMONS Monkton farmhouse on TOWNHOUSE details. 864-0341. New 1- & 2-BR flats, 20 acres, all amenities 2-BR, rear deck, full 9’ ceilings, exterior incl., garden space, cellar. W/D hookups. Gas porches/patios. Walk 13.5 miles to I-89. Start heat. No pets. Available to public transporta$400/mo. 453-3457. now. Rent $1,050/mo. tion, shops, dining, Call 802-373-0325. BURLINGTON 2-BR REDROCKS TOWNHOUSE Share a home w/ a SMART SUITES ON THE 2-BR, 1.5-BA townhouse professional in her We Pick Up HILL for rent. Avail. Jan. 1. 70s interested in Studios $1,200/mo. & Pay For Junk Steps to Redrocks & yoga, cooking & travel. 1-BRs $1,500/mo. Automobiles! Oakledge Parks. W/D Seeking collaborative No lease; mo. to mo. incl., tons of storage female housemate BURLINGTON, 180 Everything incl., cable, FLYNN AVE. space! Contact Jeff at who’s into healthy wifi. Contact Holly for 2 spaces. Green house jgonzo220@aim.com. eating & has good more information at computer skills to assist building. Art space, 802-846-1986, 1702 office, etc. Parking, near Route 15, Hardwick BURLINGTON 1-BR APT. on projects 1-2 hours/ Shelburne Rd., S. bike path. Incl. all utils. $800/mo. Bright. week. $350/mo. (all 802-472-5100 Burlington. Avail. now. $250/mo. & Close to colleges, incl.). Small sec. dep. 3842 Dorset Ln., Williston $295/mo. 363-7557. fully furnished, large Shared BA & kitchen. 802-793-9133 deck. New North End 863-5625 or homeTHE OFFICES AT 289 sharevermont.org for COLLEGE application. Interview, Multiple downtown refs., background sm-allmetals060811.inddlaw. 7/20/15 1 Our readers 5:02 PMare hereby informed EQUAL HOUSING Burlington offices checks required. EHO. OPPORTUNITY that all dwellings, advertised in this avail. ranging from All real estate advertising in this newsnewspaper are available on an equal 100-400 sq.ft. Rent is paper is subject to the Federal Fair opportunity basis. Any home seeker a per-office gross rent Housing Act of 1968 and similar Verwho feels her or she has encountered ranging from $350mont statutes which make it illegal to discrimination should contact: $800/mo. depending on advertise any preference, limitations, the private office. For

bayberrycommons apartments.com

print deadline: Mondays at 4:30 p.m. post ads online 24/7 at: sevendaysvt.com/classifieds questions? classifieds@sevendaysvt.com 865-1020 x37

Melinda, 864-7999.

SERVICES ALL AREAS: ROOMMATES.COM Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality & lifestyle at roommates. com! (AAN CAN)

HOUSING

C-2 CLASSIFIEDS

SEVEN DAYS

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

housing

HOUSEMATES

FOR RENT

OFFICE/ COMMERCIAL

or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, sexual orientation, age, marital status, handicap, presence of minor children in the family or receipt of public assistance, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or a discrimination. The newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate, which is in violation of the

HUD Office of Fair Housing 10 Causeway St., Boston, MA 02222-1092 (617) 565-5309 — OR — Vermont Human Rights Commission 135 State St., Drawer 33 Montpelier, VT 05633-6301 800-416-2010 Fax: 802-828-2480

bayberrycommons apartments.com

services

BIZ OPPS AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE Get started by training as FAA-certified aviation technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance, 800-7251563. (AAN CAN) PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical & continued support afterward. Adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 877-362-2401. (AAN CAN)

Say you saw it in...

802.355.7633

SDIreland-Sm.ClassyDisplay081716.indd 8/22/16mini-sawit-black.indd 1:51 PM1 1

sevendaysvt.com

CLOTHING ALTERATIONS

HEALTH/ WELLNESS

SOMETHING SEW RIGHT Professional clothing alterations since 1986. Creative, quality work from formal wear to leather repairs. New location: 248 Elm St., 2nd floor, Montpelier. 229-2400, pmorse52@ live.com.

BRILLIANT MASSAGE THERAPY Specializing in deep tissue, Swedish, sports therapy, pre- & postnatal, hot stones & more. Jolita is a nationally licensed & insured therapist. Contact: 802-825-4116, jolitabrilliant.com.

COMPUTER

MANO DIVINO MASSAGE GIFTS Massage specials & gift cards! Special: $100 down for 4 hours. Regular: $60 per 1 hour. Text 802-578-9355. Stephano V. Bove, CMT.

COMPUTER SECURITY/ PRIVACY Worried about online privacy & security? Wondering if you or your business is vulnerable to hackers, scammers, spammers, phishers or ransomware attacks? Email grep8000@gmail. com.

ENTERTAINMENT BINGO FUN! Chittenden Housing Corp sponsors 2 weekly bingo sessions at Broadacres Bingo in Malletts Bay, Colchester. Sessions are: Tue. & Sat., 6:15 p.m. for Warm-ups, & Regular Games at 7 p.m. Regular Games guaranteed to pay $150, Jackpot guaranteed to pay $400 (both increase as crowd does). Large variety of pull tabs--progressive up to $5,000. Call 802-8601510 for directions. LIVELINKS CHAT LINES Flirt, chat & date! Talk to sexy real singles in your area. Call now! 877-6092935. (AAN CAN)

11/24/09 1:33:19 PM

MAKE THE CALL TO START GETTING CLEAN TODAY Free 24-7 help line for alcohol & drug addiction treatment. Get help! It is time to take your life back! Call now: 855-7324139. (AAN CAN) PSYCHIC COUNSELING Psychic counseling, channeling w/ Bernice Kelman, Underhill. 30+ years’ experience. Also energy healing, chakra balancing, Reiki, rebirthing, other lives, classes, more. 802-899-3542, kelman.b@juno.com.


REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS: List your properties here and online for only $45/week. Submit your listings by Mondays at noon to homeworks@sevendaysvt.com or 802-865-1020, x37.

BROWSE THIS WEEK’S OPEN HOUSES: sevendaysvt.com/open-houses 176 ACRE FARM

WINOOSKI STARTER HOME

HINESBURG | 570 CHARLOTTE ROAD | #4367769

WONDERFUL SINGLE WIDE

WINOOSKI | 8 FLORIDA AVENUE | #4607935

MILTON | 100 RITA WAY | #4606057

OPEN Sunday 1-3 This centrally located farm is in a village lending itself to country living with town amenities. It's 100% in the land trust and currently is home to 100 New Zealand cattle, a logging business and vast hay fields. $625,000

Cindy Feloney 846.9578 CindyFeloney.com

Well cared for with 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, hardwood floors, newer appliances, updated electrical, 3 year old roof, central A/C and more! Fenced yard plus garage. Would also make a great college rental just a few blocks from St. Michael's College, downtown/rotary and I-89. $234,900

RICHMOND VILLAGE RANCH

YORKIE PUPPIES 4 males & 1 female, home raised, dam is silver. No breeding rights. $800 for males, $1,000 for female. 802928-3312 for photos, johenery2009@ fairpoint.net.

Breathe, connect, reflect from this Adirondack-style Log Home on 58+ acres. Two-story Great Room with fireplace, gourmet kitchen with new Viking appliances, Craftsman detail, lots of light, built-ins, and screened porch. Two stall barn, plenty of grazing space. Easy Burlington commute. $695,900

Flat Fee Real Estate 802-310-3669 erin@flatfeevt.com

MALE ENHANCEMENT & E.D. SOLUTIONS Better than Viagra or Cialis! Gain 1-3 Inches permanently. 30-day money-back guarantee. Free brochure: call 619294-7777. drjoelkaplan. com (AAN CAN)

John & Lisa Grady 802-760-3139 lisa.grady@pallspera.com john.grady@pallspera.com

dazzle your guests & create an unforgettable

11/28/16HW-PallSpera-113016.indd 11:20 AM 1& magical evening. For

PURRFECT CHRISTMAS GIFTS! SIAMESE KITTENS Will hold until Christmas. Purebred seal point. Raised w/ both parents. 338-6827.

MISCELLANEOUS WANT TO BUY 48 PILLS + 4 FREE! Viagra 100 mg/Cialis 20 mg. Free pills! No hassle, discreet shipping. Save now. 877-621-7013. (AAN CAN)

MUSIC

ANTIQUES Furniture, postcards, pottery, cameras, toys, medical tools, lab glass, photographs, slide rules, license plates & silver. Anything unusual or unique. Cash paid. Dave, 859-8966.

music

BANDS/ MUSICIANS CARPENTERS TRIBUTE CONCERT: AVAIL. FOR HOUSE PARTIES Looking for unique & retro entertainment for your next house party? Planning ahead for your holiday party or New Year’s Eve bash? Carpenters Tribute Concert, starring Sally Olson & her all-star band, will be sure to

11:12 AM

booking fees & more information, please visit carpenterstributeconcert.com or email sallyolson@billreedvoicestudio.com.

INSTRUCTION ANDY’S MOUNTAIN MUSIC Affordable, accessible instruction in banjo, guitar, mandolin, more. All ages, skill levels, interests welcome! Holiday gift certificates, bulk purchase discounts avail. Andy Greene, 802658-2462; guitboy75@ hotmail.com, andysmountainmusic.com.

BASS, GUITAR, DRUMS, VOICE LESSONS & 11/28/16 3:52 PM MORE! Learn bass, guitar, drums, voice, flute, sax, trumpet, production & beyond w/ some of Vermont’s best players & independent instructors in beautiful, spacious lesson studios at the Burlington Music Dojo on Pine St. All levels & styles are welcome, including absolute beginners! Gift certificates avail. Come share in the music! burlingtonmusicdojo. com, info@burlingtonmusicdojo.com, 540-0321.

MUSIC»

CLASSIFIEDS C-3

BY BICYCLE PAINTING & CARPENTRY Efficient, motivated, honest. Fully insured. Mindful execution for a permanent solution. Call Michael Waters at 802-338-0668 or email bicyclecarpenter@ gmail.com.

PET

HINESBURG | 85 SENECA CREEK | #4603272

SEVEN DAYS

HOME/GARDEN

RENT A PLAYER Need a hand w/ yard work, heavy lifting or getting those last cords of wood stacked before the snow flies? If your project is big or small, let BFA Fairfax High School Baseball Players help you, while you help them raise money to travel to Florida for Spring Training in April 2017. For only $15/hour, your mundane chores will be done & you will have helped offset the cost of this trip.

buy this stuff

LEAVE THE WORLD BEHIND! 11/28/16

HW-C21-Fitgerald113016.indd 1

Erin Dupuis

BUY THIS STUFF PETS

Your tax deductible contribution will be 11/28/16 HW-Dupius2-113016.indd 3:48 PM 1 greatly appreciated! Contact Gigi Chapman: 802-999-5489 or email gigi.chapman@ge.com to reserve a Bullet Baseball player today!

802-310-2443 dfitzgerald@c21jack.com

11.30.16-12.07.16

“You-ology” self actualization at a fraction of the cost. Up to 16 free coaching sessions with HuMethod CIT; affordable, clinically-tested book, exercises, MP3s. Contact youologyspiritualcoach@gmail.com.

HONEY-DO HOME MAINTENANCE All jobs large or small, home or office, 24-hour service. A division of Sasso Construction. Call Scott today! Local, reliable, honest. All calls returned. 310-6926.

Donna Fitzgerald

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

REACH YOUR SELF-

HELP GOALS 1 HW-Dupius1-113016.indd

Flat Fee Real Estate 802-310-3669 erin@flatfeevt.com

846.9575 LipVT.com

BURLINGTON | 602 NORTH AVE. | #4508133

Spacious 3 bedroom, 3 level townhouse with partial finished basement. This home features beautiful brazilian cherry hardwood floors and slate floor in kitchen and entryway. The kitchen offers large panty, granite countertops and stainless steel appliances. Jetted tub in master bath and plenty of closet space throughout. $299,000.

Erin Dupuis

Steve Lipkin

WALK TO BURLINGTON BEACHES

RICHMOND | 335 EAST MAIN ST. | #4508133

Spacious hillside ranch in Richmond Village. This home is zoned for residential or commercial use. This open floor plan offers updated kitchen, hardwood floors and spacious family room. Master suite with two closets and half bathroom attached. Full basement that walks out to garage. Large mudroom. $235,000.

Wonderful single wide home with some special upgrades such as birch built ins in both bedrooms and beautiful solid wood doors. Double pane windows, metal roof and fully fenced private backyard. Large open living room and eat in kitchen. Home is in Milton Mobile Home Co-op and pets are allowed. $45,000.


fsb

FOR SALE BY OWNER

List your property here for 2 weeks for only $45! Contact Ashley, 864-5684, fsbo@sevendaysvt.com. BEAUTIFUL HISTORIC SCHOOLHOUSE The Old Village School in Wells River holds 2 apartments and 4 businesses. It’s a solid income property in great condition. Very motivated to sell! $180,000. OldVillageSchool.com

the Regional Planning Commission, affected state agencies, and adjoining property owners and other persons to the extent they have a particularized interest that may be affected by the proposed project under the 10 criteria. Non-party participants may also be allowed under 10 V.S.A. Section 6085(c)(5). Dated at Essex Junction, Vermont this 21st day of November, 2016. By: Peter E. Keibel District #4 Coordinator Natural Resources Board 111 West Street Essex Jct., VT 05452 802-879-5658 Peter.Keibel@vermont. gov

FSBO-Webb110916.indd 1

music [CONTINUED]

C-4 CLASSIFIEDS

SEVEN DAYS

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

BEGINNER GUITAR LESSONS Great for kids. Plenty of experience in the area. Great refs. Find ad online & reply online. 646-600-8357. GUITAR INSTRUCTION Berklee graduate w/ 30 years’ teaching experience offers lessons in guitar, music theory, music technology, ear training. Individualized, step-by-step approach. All ages, styles, levels. Rick Belford, 864-7195, rickb@rickbelford. com. GUITAR INSTRUCTION All styles/levels. Emphasis on developing strong technique, thorough musicianship, personal style. Paul Asbell (Unknown Blues Band, Kilimanjaro, UVM & Middlebury College faculty). 233-7 731, pasbell@paulasbell. com.

ACT 250 NOTICE MINOR APPLICATION #4C0842-13A 10 V.S.A. §§ 6001 - 6093 On November 17, 2016, Ed & Robin Lockerby, 1162 Main Street, Isle la Motte, VT 05463 filed application #4C084213A for a project generally described as the formalization of a graveled parking area on Lots #17 and #25 of the Gauthier Industrial Park. The Project is located on Bushey Lane in Essex, Vermont. The District #4 Environmental Commission is reviewing this application under Act 250 Rule 51 — Minor Applications. Copies of the application and proposed permit are available for review at the office listed below. The application and a draft permit may also be viewed on the Natural Resources Board’s web site (www.nrb.state. vt.us/lup) by clicking on “Act 250 Database” and entering the project number “4C0842-13A”. No hearing will be held and a permit may be issued unless, on or before December 15, 2016, a person notifies the Commission of an issue or issues requiring the presentation of

J

evidence at a hearing or NOTICE OF SELF 11/3/16 1:19 PM the Commission sets the STORAGE LIEN SALE matter for hearing on its MALLETTS BAY SELF own motion. Any hearing STORAGE, LLC request must be in writ115 HEINEBERG DRIVE ing to the address below, COLCHESTER, VT must state the criteria 05446 or subcriteria at issue, Notice is hereby given why a hearing is required that the contents of the and what additional eviself storage units listed dence will be presented below will be sold at at the hearing. Any hearpublic auction by sealed ing request by an adjoinbid. ing property owner or other interested person Name of Occupant Stormust include a petition age Unit for party status. Prior to submitting a request for Jennifer C Dame #77 a hearing, please contact the district coordinator Said sales will take place at the telephone number on 12/9/16, beginning at listed below for more 9:00am at Malletts Bay information. Prior to Self Storage, LLC, (MBSS, convening a hearing, the LLC)115 Heineberg Dr, Commission must deterColchester, VT 05446. mine that substantive issues requiring a hearUnits will be opened for ing have been raised. viewing immediately Findings of Fact and prior to auction. Sale Conclusions of Law will shall be by sealed bid not be prepared unless to the highest bidder. the Commission holds a Contents of entire storpublic hearing. age unit will be sold as one lot. The winning bid If you feel that any of must remove all conthe District Commission tents from the facility members listed on the at no cost to MBSS, LLC attached Certificate of on the day of auction. Service under “For Your MBSS, LLC reserves the Information” may have a right to reject any bid conflict of interest, or if lower that the amount there is any other reason owed by the occupant or a member should be disthat is not commercially qualified from sitting on reasonable as defined by this case, please contact statute. the district coordinator as STATE OF VERMONT Should a hearing be LAMOILLE UNIT, CIVIL held on this Project and DIVISION you have a disability VERMONT SUPERIOR for which you are going COURT to need accommodaDOCKET NO: 159-6-07 tion, please notify us by LECV December 15, 2016. BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE Parties entitled to CERTIFICATEHOLDERS participate are the MuCWALT, INC. ALTERNAnicipality, the Municipal TIVE LOAN TRUST 2006Planning Commission, OC6 MORTGAGE PASS-

THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-OC6 v. DONNA LYNN PELLEGRINI AND WALKER CONSTRUCTION, INC. OCCUPANTS OF 301 SLEEPY HOLLOW ROAD, JOHNSON, VT MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered January 16, 2008 in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Donna Lynn Pellegrini to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Countrywide Home Loans, Inc., dated April 27, 2006 and recorded in Book 111 Page 482 of the land records of the Town of Johnson, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of an Assignment of Mortgage from Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Countrywide Home Loans, Inc. to Bank of New York, as Trustee for the Certificateholders CWALT, Inc. Alternative Loan Trust 2006-OC6 Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-OC6 dated June 20, 2007 and recorded in Book 116 Page 387 of the land records of the Town of Johnson for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 301 Sleepy Hollow Road, Johnson, Vermont on December 13, 2016 at 1:30 PM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To wit: Being a part of the same land and premises conveyed to Marquis E. Houle by Warranty Deed of Ted Stepanek and Sharron Stepanek Mason, dated September 20, 1995 and recorded in Book 74, Pages 402-403 of the Johnson Land Records. Said land and premises are depicted on a certain survey map entitled “A Theodolite & E.D.M. Survey and Subdivision of Lands Belonging to Marquis S. Houle, Johnson, Vermont, Scale 1”=50’” prepared by Gove

Land Surveyors, Inc. as follows: Lot 2 Being a parcel of land consisting of 3.28 acres of land, or less, and beginning at a point marked by an iron pin, which point marks the northeastern most corner of the property herein conveyed and the southeasternmost corner of Lot 1; Thence proceeding along the boundary line of Lot 1 and Lot N 38° 31’ 58” W a distance of 290.05 feet to an iron pin in the ground; Thence proceeding along the boundary line of Lot 12 and Lon N. 38° 31’ 58” W a distance of 304.312 feet to an iron pin in the ground; Thence proceeding along the boundary line of Lot 1 and Lot N 38° 31’ 58” W a distance of 107 feet to an unmarked point in the center of the Lamoille River; Thence turning and proceeding along the centerline of Lamoille River in a general southwesterly direction a distance of 243 feet along the centerline of the Lamoille River to an unmarked point; Thence turning and proceeding S 390 02’ 55” E a distance of 114 feet along the boundary line of Lot 2 and Lot 3 to a point marked by an iron pin set in the ground; Thence turning and proceeding 8.39 02’ 55” E a distance of 240.43 feet along the boundary line of Lot 2 and Lot 3 to a point marked by an iron pin set in the ground; Thence turning and running S 39° 02’ 55” East a distance of 232.00 feet along the boundary line of Lots 2 and Lots 3 to a point marked by an iron pin set in the ground, which point marks the southeasternmost corner of the property herein conveyed and the northeasternmost corner of Lot 3; Thence turning and proceeding N 59° 25’ 54” E a distance of 141.82 feet to an iron pin found in the ground on the northerly boundary of a 50’ right of way in favor of Edigio; Thence proceeding N 59° 24’ 15” W a distance of 82.10 feet to the point and place of beginning. Menaing and intending to mortgage Lot 2 of the same premises conveyed to the herein named mortgagor(s) by deed recorded with Johnson Town Office-

Say you saw it in...

Land Records in Book 121, Page 96. Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description.   Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described. TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid in cash, certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid in cash, certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within thirty (30) days after the date of sale. The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale. DATED : November 8, 2016 By: /S/ Rachel K. Jones, Esq. Rachel K. Jones, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032 NOTICE:  THE LAW FIRM OF BENDETT & MCHUGH, PC IS A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT.  ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.   IF YOU HAVE PREVIOUSLY RECEIVED A DISCHARGE IN BANKRUPTCY WHICH DISCHARGED THIS DEBT, THIS CORRESPONDENCE IS NOT AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSTRUED TO BE AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT, BUT ONLY ENFORCEMENT OF A LIEN AGAINST PROPERTY STATE OF VERMONT RUTLAND UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT

DOCKET NO: 559-9-15 RDCV WELLS FARGO BANK, NA v. GAIL PORTER-BECKLEY AND MOON BROOK CONDOMINIUMS INCORPORATED OCCUPANTS OF 80 ENGREM AVENUE, UNIT #3, RUTLAND, VT MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered March 11, 2016 in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Gail PorterBeckley to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Primelending, a Plainscapital Company, dated November 24, 2009 and recorded in Book 584 Page 833 of the land records of the City of Rutland, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of an Assignment of Mortgage from Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Primelending, a Plainscapital Company to Wells Fargo Bank, NA dated June 3, 2015 and recorded in Book 644 Page 707 of the land records of the City of Rutland for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 80 Engrem Avenue, Unit #3, Rutland, Vermont on December 20, 2016 at 9:00 AM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To wit: Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to Robert E Brown, Jr by warranty deed of Kelly Bullock Vitagliano and Joseph Birks dated September 28, 2004 and recorded in Book 492 at page 243 of the City of Rutland Land Records, and therein more particularly described as follows Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to Kelly BullockVitaghamo and Joseph A. Birks by deed of Clara C Claessens and William Claessens, Jr dated July 26, 2004 and recorded in Book 488 at page 298 of the City of Rutland

NOW IN sevendaysvt.com

3D!


SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Land Records, and therein more particularly described as follows Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to Clara S Claessens by deed of Frank E. Punderson, Jr and Linda I Punderson dated December 16, 1983, and recorded in book 234, at page 19 of the city of Rutland land records Reference is had to a warranty deed from Clara C Ciaessens to Clara Claessens and William Claessens, Jr dated April 8, 1994, and recorded in book 335 at page 626 of the city of Rutland land records. Said lands and premises are further and more particularly described as follows Being Unit 80-3 of the Moon Brook Condominium as shown on a plan entitled “Lands of Frank E Jr and Linda I Punderson Known as ‘Moon Brook Condominiums’, No 78 and No 80 Engrem Avenue- City of Rutland, Vermont; Building 80 Upper Level” prepared by Roberts & Franzoni, Inc. dated March 1983, Sheet 5 of 5, which Plans are filed in Map Book 11 in the Rutland City Land Records, together with undivided 15% interest

in the common areas and elements and a 15% share of common costs and expenses in accordance with the Declaration and Bylaws of the Condominium. The within conveyed lands and premises are a portion of those lands and premises conveyed to Frank E Punderson, Jr. and Linda I Punderson by Ann T. Martin Harris by deed dated August 27, 1982 and recorded in Book 226, Page 316 of the Rutland City Land Records. The within conveyed lands and premises are subject to and benefitted by the Declaration and Bylaws of the Moon Brook Condominium dated August 19, 1983 and recorded August 23, 1983 in Book 231, Pages 826-838 of the Rutland City Land Records The Units of the Moon Brook Condominium shall be used for residential purposes only and not for any business or commercial use whatsoever, except the renting of such Units for residential purposes, and shall further be subject to such other restrictions and/or reservations as are set forth in the

Declaration and Bylaws of the Condominium. Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description.   Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described. TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid in cash, certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid in cash, certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within thirty (30) days after the date of sale. The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale.

crossword

Show and tell.

»

Open 24/7/365.

View and post up to 6 photos per ad online.

Other terms to be announced at the sale. DATED : 11/7/2016 By: /S/Rachel Jones, Esq. Rachel Jones, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032 NOTICE:  THE LAW FIRM OF BENDETT & MCHUGH, PC IS A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT.  ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.   IF YOU HAVE PREVIOUSLY RECEIVED A DISCHARGE IN BANKRUPTCY WHICH DISCHARGED THIS DEBT, THIS CORRESPONDENCE IS NOT AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSTRUED TO BE AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT, BUT ONLY ENFORCEMENT OF A LIEN AGAINST PROPERTY STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT ADDISON UNIT PROBATE DIVISION DOCKET NO. 9416-916 ANPR In Re the Estate of Kyle Young Late of Monkton, Vermont NOTICE TO CREDITORS

To the creditors of the estate of Kyle Young, late of Monkton, Vermont. We have been appointed personal representatives of the above-named estate. All creditors having claims against the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the date of the first publication of this notice. The claim must be presented to either of us at the address listed below with a copy filed with the register of the Probate Court. The claim will be forever barred if it is not presented as described above within the four (4) month deadline. Dated this 22nd day of November 2016. /s/ Corey F. Wood, Esq. Mickenberg, Dunn, Lachs & Smith, PLC P.O. Box 406 Burlington, VT 054020406 (802)658-6951 corey@mickdunn.com Attorney for the Administrator Janelle Sartwell Name of Publication: Seven Days First Publication Date: 11/30/2016 Second Publication Date:

Post & browse ads at your convenience. 12/7/2016 Address of Probate Court: Vermont Superior Court Addison Unit, Probate Division 7 Mahady Court Middlebury, VT 05753 THE CONTENTS OF STORAGE UNIT 0101338, 01-04487 LOCATED AT 28 ADAMS DR. OR 48 INDUSTRIAL DR., WILLISTON, VT 05495, WILL BE SOLD ON DECEMBER 15TH, 2016 TO SATISFY THE DEBT OF SANDY FISHER. Any person claiming a right to the goods may pay the amount claimed due and reasonable expenses before the sale, in which case the sale may not occur. THE CONTENTS OF STORAGE UNIT 0101657 LOCATED AT 28 ADAMS DR. OR 48 INDUSTRIAL DR., WILLISTON, VT 05495, WILL BE SOLD ON DECEMBER 15TH, 2016 TO SATISFY THE DEBT OF GERALYN SHELVEY. Any person claiming a right to the goods may pay the amount claimed due and reasonable expenses before the sale,

in which case the sale may not occur. THE CONTENTS OF STORAGE UNIT 0102426 LOCATED AT 28 ADAMS DR. OR 48 INDUSTRIAL DR., WILLISTON, VT 05495, WILL BE SOLD ON DECEMBER 8TH, 2016 TO SATISFY THE DEBT OF REBECCA WHITE. Any person claiming a right to the goods may pay the amount claimed due and reasonable expenses before the sale, in which case the sale may not occur. THE CONTENTS OF STORAGE UNIT 0103661 LOCATED AT 28 ADAMS DR. OR 48 INDUSTRIAL DR., WILLISTON, VT 05495, WILL BE SOLD ON DECEMBER 8TH, 2016 TO SATISFY THE DEBT OF ROBIN LOWRY-MERRITT. Any person claiming a right to the goods may pay the amount claimed due and reasonable expenses before the sale, in which case the sale may not occur. THE CONTENTS OF STORAGE UNIT 0200237 LOCATED AT 28 ADAMS DR.

Extra! Extra! There’s no limit to ad length online.

OR 48 INDUSTRIAL DR., WILLISTON, VT 05495, WILL BE SOLD ON DECEMBER 15TH, 2016 TO SATISFY THE DEBT OF KATHLEEN BRADLEY. Any person claiming a right to the goods may pay the amount claimed due and reasonable expenses before the sale, in which case the sale may not occur.

support groups AHOY BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS Join our floating support group where the focus is on living, not on the disease. We are a team of dragon boaters. Learn all about this paddle sport & its health-giving, life-affirming qualities. Any age. No athletic experience needed. Call Penni or Linda at 999-5478, info@ dragonheartvermont. org, dragonheartvermont.org.

SUPPORT GROUPS»

NOTED PHRASES ANSWERS ON P. C-8

»

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 11.30.16-12.07.16 SEVEN DAYS CLASSIFIEDS C-5


support groups

support groups [CONTINUED]

thinking.

AL-ANON For families & friends of alcoholics. For meeting info, go to vermontalanonalateen.org or call 866-972-5266. ALATEEN GROUP New Alateen group in Burlington on Sundays from 5-6 p.m. at the UU building at the top of Church St. For more information please call Carol, 324-4457. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Daily meetings in various locations. Free. Info, 864-1212. Want to overcome a drinking problem? Take the first step of 12 & join a group in your area.

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

for all.

ALL CANCER SURVIVORS Join the wellness classes at Survivorship NOW, created by cancer survivors for survivors of all cancers. Benefi ts from lively programs designed to engage and empower cancer survivors in our community. Email: info@ survivorshipnowvt.org. Call Chantal, 777-1126, survivorshipnowvt.org. ALTERNATIVES TO SUICIDE Alternatives to Suicide is a safe space where the subject of suicide can be discussed freely, without judgment or stigma. The group is facilitated by individuals who have themselves experienced suicidal thoughts/ feelings. Fletcher Free Library, 235 College St., Burlington. Group meets weekly on Thursdays, 1-2:30 p.m. Info: makenzy@ pathwaysvermont.org, 888-492-8218 x300.

C-6 CLASSIFIEDS

SEVEN DAYS

ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION SUPPORT GROUP This caregivers support group meets on the 3rd Wed. of every mo. from 5-6:30 p.m. at the Alzheimer’s Association Main Office, 300 Cornerstone Dr., Suite 128, Williston. Support groups meet to provide assistance and information on Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. They emphasize shared experiences, emotional

2v-free.indd 1

6/18/12 6:54 PM

support, and coping techniques in care for a person living with Alzheimer’s or a related dementia. Meetings are free and open to the public. Families, caregivers, and friends may attend. Please call in advance to confirm date and time. For questions or additional support group listings, call 800-272-3900. ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION TELEPHONE SUPPORT GROUP 1st Monday monthly, 3-4:30 p.m. Pre-registration is required (to receive dial-in codes for toll-free call). Please dial the Alzheimer’s Association’s 24/7 Helpline 800-272-3900 for more information. ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE & DEMENTIA SUPPORT GROUP Held the last Tue. of every mo., 5:30-7:30 p.m., at Birchwood Terr., Burlington. Info, Kim, 863-6384. ARE YOU HAVING PROBLEMS W/ DEBT? Do you spend more than you earn? Get help at Debtor’s Anonymous plus Business Debtor’s Anonymous. Sat., 10-11:30 a.m., Methodist Church at Buell & S. Winooski, Burlington. Contact Brenda, 338-1170. BABY BUMPS SUPPORT GROUP FOR MOTHERS AND PREGNANT WOMEN Pregnancy can be a wonderful time of your life. But, it can also be a time of stress that is often compounded by hormonal swings. If you are a pregnant woman, or have recently given birth and feel you need some help with managing emotional bumps in the road that can come with motherhood, please come to this free support group lead by an experienced pediatric Registered Nurse. Held on the 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of the month, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at the Birthing Center, Northwestern Medical Center, St. Albans. Info: Rhonda Desrochers, Franklin County Home Health Agency, 527-7531. BEREAVEMENT/GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP Meets every other Mon. night, 6-7:30 p.m., & every other Wed., 10-11:30 a.m., in the Conference Center at Central Vermont Home Health & Hospice in Berlin. The group is open to anyone who has experienced the death

of a loved one. There is no fee. Info, Ginny Fry or Jean Semprebon, 223-1878. BRAIN INJURY SUPPORT GROUP IN ST. JOHNSBURY Monthly meetings will be held on the 3rd Wed. of every mo., 1-2:30 p.m., at the Grace United Methodist Church, 36 Central St., St. Johnsbury. The support group will offer valuable resources & info about brain injury. It will be a place to share experiences in a safe, secure & confidential environment. Info, Tom Younkman, tyounkman@vcil.org, 800-639-1522. BRAIN INJURY ASSOCIATION OF VERMONT Montpelier daytime support group meets the 3rd Thu. of the mo. at the Unitarian Church ramp entrance, 1:302:30 p.m. St. Johnsbury support group meets the 3rd Wed. montly at the Grace United Methodist Church, 36 Central St., 1:00-2:30 p.m.  Colchester  Evening support group meets the 1st Wed. monthly at the Fanny Allen Hospital in the Board Room Conference Room, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Brattleboro meets at Brooks Memorial Library on the 1st Thu. monthly from 1:15-3:15 p.m. and the 3rd Mon. montly from 4:15-6:15 p.m. White River Jct. meets the 2nd Fri. montly at Bugbee Sr. Ctr. from 3-4:30 p.m. Call our helpline at 877-856-1772. BURLINGTON AREA PARKINSON’S DISEASE OUTREACH GROUP People with Parkinson’s disease & their caregivers gather together to gain support & learn about living with Parkinson’s disease. Group meets 2nd Wed. of every mo., 1-2 p.m., continuing through Nov. 18, 2015. Shelburne Bay Senior Living Community, 185 Pine Haven Shores Rd., Shelburne. Info: 888-763-3366, parkinsoninfo@uvmhealth. org, parkinsonsvt.org. CELEBRATE RECOVERY Overcome any hurt, habit or hangup in your life! This confidential 12-Step recovery program puts faith in Jesus Christ at the heart of healing. We offer multiple support groups for both men & women, such as chemical dependency, codependency, sexual addiction & pornography, food issues, &

overcoming abuse. All 18+ are welcome; sorry, no childcare. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.; we begin at 7 p.m. Essex Alliance Church, 37 Old Stage Rd., Essex. Info: recovery@essexalliance.org, 878-8213. CELEBRATE RECOVERY Celebrate Recovery meetings are for anyone with struggles with hurt, habits and hang ups, which includes everyone in some way.  We welcome everyone at Cornerstone Church in Milton which meets every Friday night at 7-9 p.m. We’d love to have you join us and discover how your life can start to change. Info: 893-0530, Julie@ mccartycreations.com. CELIAC & GLUTENFREE GROUP Every 2nd Wed., 4:30-6 p.m. at Tulsi Tea Room, 34 Elm St., Montpelier. Free & open to the public! To learn more, contact Lisa at 598-9206 or lisamase@ gmail.com. CODEPENDENTS ANONYMOUS CoDA is a 12-step fellowship for people whose common purpose is to develop healthy & fulfilling relationships. By actively working the program of Codependents Anonymous, we can realize a new joy, acceptance & serenity in our lives. Call for time and location. Tom, 238-3587, coda.org. COMING OFF PSYCHIATRIC MEDICATION MUTUAL SUPPORT GROUP Through sharing experiences and resources, this group will provide support to individuals interested in coming off psychiatric medications, those in the process of psychiatric medication withdrawal or anyone looking for a space to explore their choices around psychiatric medication use. The group is also open to those supporting an individual in psychiatric medication withdrawal. 5:15-6:15 p.m. every other Monday (beginning 1/25/2016), Pathways Vermont, 125 College St., 2nd floor, Burlington. Contact: Cameron Mack cameron@ pathwaysvermont.org or 888 492 8218 x 404.


SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS DECLUTTERERS’ SUPPORT GROUP Are you ready to make improvements but find it overwhelming? Maybe two or three of us can get together to help each other simplify. 989-3234, 425-3612. DISCOVER THE POWER OF CHOICE! SMART Recovery welcomes anyone, including family and friends, affected by any kind of substance or activity addiction. It is a science-based program that encourages abstinence. Specially trained volunteer facilitators provide leadership. Sundays at 5 p.m. at the 1st Unitarian Universalist Society, 152 Pearl St., Burlington. Volunteer facilitator: Bert, 399-8754. You can learn more at smartrecovery. org.

are experiencing. Cost: $25. To register and for more info contact Sandy, 989-4081.

step, even if it involves remaining in their current relationship. Tuesdays, 6:30-8 p.m. Childcare is provided. Info: 658-1996.

DOMESTIC & SEXUAL VIOLENCE WomenSafe offers free, confidential support groups in Middlebury for women who have experienced domestic or sexual violence. Art For Healing.  Six-week support group for people who have experienced domestic or sexual violence. Childcare provided. Please call our hotline, 388-4205, or email am@womensafe.net for more information.

FAMILY AND FRIENDS OF THOSE EXPERIENCING MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS This support group is a dedicated meeting for family, friends and community members who are supporting a loved one through a mental health crisis. Mental health crisis might include extreme states, psychosis, depression, anxiety and other types of distress. The group is a confidential space where family and friends can discuss shared experiences and receive support in an environment free of judgment and stigma with a trained facilitator. Weekly on Wednesdays, 7-8:30 p.m. Downtown Burlington. Info: Jess Horner, LICSW, 866-218-8586.

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SUPPORT Steps to End Domestic Violence offers a weekly drop-in support group for female identified survivors of intimate partner violence, including individuals who are experiencing or DIVORCED OR have been affected by SEPARATED? domestic violence. The Come join this 13-week support group offers a class sponsored by safe, confidential place Essex Alliance Church, for survivors to connect starting Sept. 25, 5:30with others, to heal, and 7:30 p.m. at Bluewater to recover. In support Center Conference group, participants Room, 145 Pine Haven talk through their Shores Rd., Shelburne.  experiences and hear It is a support group stories from others who for men and women, have experienced abuse consisting of video in their relationships. seminars and discusSupport group is also a sion led by people who resource for those who understand what you Using the enclosedaremath unsureoperations of their next

FCA FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP Families coping with addiction (FCA) is an open community peer support group for adults 18 & over struggling with the drug or alcohol addiction of a loved one. FCA is not 12-step based but a provides a forum as guide, fill

Calcoku

the grid using the numbers 1 - 6 only once in each row and column.

5

4-

2÷ 1-

for those living this experience to develop personal coping skills & draw strength from one another. Weekly on Wed., 5:30-6:30 p.m. Turning Point Center, corner of Bank St., Burlington. (Across from parking garage, above bookstore). thdaub1@gmail.com. G.R.A.S.P. (GRIEF RECOVERY AFTER A SUBSTANCE PASSING) Are you a family member who has lost a loved one to addiction? Find support, peer-led support group. Meets once a month on Mondays in Burlington. Please call for date and location. RSVP graspvt@gmail.com or call 310-3301. G.Y.S.T. (GET YOUR STUFF TOGETHER) GYST creates a safe & empowering community for young men & youth in transition to come together with one commonality: learning to live life on life’s terms. Every Tue. & Thu., 4 p.m. G.Y.S.T. PYNK (for young women) meets weekly on Wed., 4 p.m. Location: North Central Vermont Recovery Center, 275 Brooklyn St., Morrisville. Info: Lisa, 851-8120.

HELLENBACH CANCER SUPPORT Call to verify meeting place. Info, 388-6107. People living with cancer & their caretakers convene for support.

HEARING VOICES GROUP This Hearing Voices Group seeks to find understanding of voice hearing experiences as real lived experiences which may happen to anyone at anytime.  We choose to share experiences, support, and empathy.  We validate anyone’s experience and stories about their experience as their own, as being an honest and accurate representation of their experience, and as being acceptable exactly as they are. Weekly on Tuesday, 2-3 p.m. The Wellness Co-op, 279 North Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 802-777-8602, abby@ pathwaysvermont.org.

INTERSTITIAL CYSTITIS SUPPORT GROUP Interstitial cystitis (IC) is recurring pelvic pain, pressure or discomfort in the bladder & pelvic region & urinary frequency/urgency. This is often misdiagnosed & mistreated as a chronic bladder infection. If you have been diagnosed or have these symptoms, you are not alone. We are building a Vermontbased support group & welcome you to email bladderpainvt@gmail. com or call 899-4151 for more information.

HEARTBEAT VERMONT Have you lost a friend, colleague or loved one by suicide? Some who call have experienced a recent loss and some are still struggling w/ a loss from long ago. Call us at 446-3577 to meet with our clinician, Jonathan Gilmore, at Maple Leaf Clinic, 167 North Main St. All are welcome. following puzzle by

Sudoku

8

2-

3x

5

8

10+

60x 9+

CALCOKU

Difficulty - Medium

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: HH

1

4

2

3

6

1

5

6

3

2

4

2

3

5

6

4

1

SUDOKU

9 Difficulty: Hard

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: HHH Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row acrosss, each column down and each 9-box square contains all of the numbers one to nine. The same numbers cannot be repeated in a row or column.

7 9 5 6 2 8 3 4 1 8 2 1 3 7 4 5 9 6 ANSWERS ON P. C-8 H = MODERATE 3 4 H6H =9CHALLENGING 1 5 8HH2H = HOO, 7 BOY! 9 5 2 8 4 1 7 6 3

MALE SURVIVOR OF VIOLENCE GROUP A monthly, closed group for male identified survivors of violence including relationship, sexual assault, and discrimination. Open to all sexual orientations. Contact 863-0003 for more information or safespace@pridecentervt.org. MARIJUANA ANONYMOUS Do you have a problem with marijuana? MA is a free 12-step program where addicts help other addicts to get & stay clean. Ongoing Tue. at 6:30 p.m. and Sat. at 2 p.m. at Turning Point Center, 191 Bank St., suite 200, Burlington. 861-3150. THE MEMORY CAFÉ The Memory Café is where people with memory loss disorders and their care partners can come together to connect and support one another. Second Saturday of each month, 10-11:30 a.m. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 58 Barre St., Montpelier. Info: 223-2518. MYELOMA SUPPORT GROUP Area Myeloma Survivors, Families and Caregivers have come together to form a Multiple Myeloma Support Group. We provide emotional support, resources about treatment options, coping strategies and a support network by participating in the group experience with

people that have been though similar situations. Third Tuesday of the month, 5-6 p.m. at the New Hope Lodge on East Avenue in Burlington. Info: Kay Cromie, 655-9136, kgcromey@aol.com. NAMI CONNECTION PEER SUPPORT GROUP MEETINGS Bennington, every Tue., 1-2:30 p.m., CRT Center, United Counseling Service, 316 Dewey St.; Burlington, every Thu., 3-4:30 p.m., St. Paul’s Cathedral, 2 Cherry St. (enter from parking lot); Montpelier, every Fri., 2-3:30 p.m., Another Way, 125 Barre St.; Newport, first Wed. of the month, 6-7:30 p.m., St. Mark’s Church, 44 2nd St.; Rutland, every Sun., 4:30-6 p.m., Rutland Mental Health Wellness Center, 78 S. Main St.; St. Johnsbury, every Thu., 6:30-8 p.m., Unitarian Universalist Church, 47 Cherry St. If you have questions about a group in your area, please contact the National Alliance on Mental Illness of Vermont, program@ namivt.org or 800-6396480. Connection groups are peer recovery support group programs for adults living with mental health challenges. NAMI FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP Brattleboro, 1st Wed. of every mo., 6:30 p.m., 1st Congregational Church, 880 Western Ave., West Brattleboro; Burlington, 3rd Wed. of every mo., 6 p.m., Community Health Center, Riverside Ave., Mansfield Conference Room; Burlington, 2nd & 4th Tue. of every mo., 7 p.m., HowardCenter, corner of Pine & Flynn Ave.; Berlin, 4th Mon. of every mo., 7 p.m. Central Vermont Medical Center, Room 3; Georgia, 1st Tue. of every mo., 6 p.m., Georgia Public Library, 1697 Ethan Allen Highway (Exit 18, I-89); Manchester, 4th Wed. of every mo., 6:30 p.m., Equinox Village, 2nd floor; Rutland, 3rd Mon. of every mo., 6 p.m., Rutland Regional Medical Center, Leahy Conference Ctr., room D; Springfield, 3rd Wed. of every mo., 6:30 p.m., HCRS (café on right far side), 390 River St.; St. Johnsbury, 4th Wed. of every mo., 5:30 p.m., Northeastern Vermont Regional Hospital Library, 1315 Hospital Dr.; White River Junction, last Mon. of every mo., 5:45 p.m., VA Medical Center, William A. Yasinski Buidling. If you have questions about a group in your area, please contact

SUPPORT GROUPS »

CLASSIFIEDS C-7

5

Fill the grid using the numbers 1-6, only once in each row and column. The numbers in each heavily outlined “cage” must combine to produce the target number in the top corner, using the mathematical operation indicated. A onebox cage should be filled in with the target number in the top corner. A number can be repeated within a cage as long as it is not the same row or column.

No. 456

2

LGBTQ SURVIVORS OF VIOLENCE SafeSpace offers peer-led support groups for survivors of relationship, dating, emotional &/or hate violence. These groups give survivors a safe & supportive environment to tell their stories, share information, & offer & receive support. Support groups also provide survivors an opportunity to gain information on how to better cope with feelings & experiences that surface because of the trauma they have experienced. Please call SafeSpace 863-0003 if you are interested in joining.

There’s no limit to ad length online.

SEVEN DAYS

3 6 3 7 9 6 2 4 7 4 6 8 2

Connections provides practical help such as rides to doctors’ offices & meal deliveries. The program has people who have experienced a wide variety of cancers. For further info, please contact sherry. rhynard@gmail.com.

Extra! Extra!

11.30.16-12.07.16

2

1 9 6 7

2

9

6+ 1-

KINDRED CONNECTIONS PROGRAM OFFERED FOR CHITTENDEN COUNTY CANCER SURVIVORS The Kindred Connections program provides peer support for all those touched by cancer. Cancer patients as well as caregivers are provided with a mentor who has been through the cancer experience & knows what it’s like to go through it. In addition to sensitive using listening,the Kindred

Complete the numbers 1-9 only once in each row, column and 3 x 3 box.

4 9+

Post & browse ads at your convenience.

GRIEF & RECOVERY SUPPORT GROUP 1st & 3rd Wed. of every mo., 7-8 p.m., Franklin County Home Health Agency (FCHHA), 3 Home Health Cir., St. Albans. 527-7531.

2÷ 9+

Open 24/7/365.

View and post up to 6 photos per ad online.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

12x

Show and tell.

»


QUIT TOBACCO GROUPS Are you ready to be tobacco free?  Join our FREE fi ve-week group classes facilitated by our Tobacco Treatment Specialists.  We meet in a friendly, relaxed atmosphere.  You may qualify for a FREE 8-week supply of nicotine replacement therapy. Contact us at (802)-847-7333 or QuitTobaccoClass@ UVMHealth.org.

FROM P.C-7

4

6

3

2

5

1

1

5 5 7 8 12x 3 9 1 4 15 2 6

942 4 9+ 5 8 6 2 3 7 1

5 1 6 2 7 3 9 8 4

2 5 6 4 2÷ 6 1-3 9 8 2 7 10+ 1 4 5

6

5

1

6

4

3

2

2 2 8 79+ 4 1 5 24 1 36+ 6 5 9 6 2 99+ 3 8 7

3

5 3 1 4 6

2÷ 3 4 1 5 9 6 8 2 7 3x 7 6 3 9 5 4 1 8 2 60x 4 7 8 6 1 5 2Difficulty 3 - Medium 9

Using the enclosed math operations as a guide, fill the grid using the numbers 1 - 6 only once in each row and column.

Calcoku

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

SEXUAL VIOLENCE SUPPORT HOPE Works offers free support groups to women, men & teens who are survivors of sexual violence. Groups are available for survivors at any stage of the healing process. Intake for all support groups is ongoing. If you are interested in learning more or would like to schedule an intake to become a group member, please call our office at 864-0555, ext. 19, or email our victim advocate at advocate@ sover.net.

FROM P.C-5

1

11.30.16-12.07.16

QUEER CARE GROUP This support group is for adult family members and caregivers of queer, and/or questioning youth. It is held on the 2nd Monday of each month from 6:30-8 p.m. at Outright Vermont, 241 North Winooski Ave. This group is for adults only. For more information, email info@outrightvt. org.

3

SEVEN DAYS

Post & browse ads at your convenience. SCLERODERMA FOUNDATION NEW ENGLAND Support group meeting held 4th Tue. of the mo., 6:30-8:30 p.m. Williston Police Station. Info, Blythe Leonard, 878-0732.

2

C-8 CLASSIFIEDS

Open 24/7/365.

QUEEN CITY MEMORY CAFE The Queen City Memory Café offers a social time & place for people with memory impairment & their fiends & family to laugh, learn & share concerns & celebrate feeling understood & connected. Enjoy coffee, tea & baked goods with entertainment & conversation. QCMC meets the 3rd Sat. of each mo., 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Thayer Building, 1197 North Ave., Burlington. 316-3839.

4

PUZZLE ANSWERS

PROSTATE CANCER SUPPORT GROUP Held every 2nd Tue. of the mo., 6-8 p.m. at the Hope Lodge, 237 East Ave., Burlington. Newly diagnosed? Prostate cancer reoccurrence? General discussion and sharing among survivors and those beginning or rejoining the battle. Info, Mary L. Guyette RN, MS, ACNS-BC, 274-4990, vmary@aol.com.

2

OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Do you promise you’ll only have one more but then you eat the whole bag? Have you tried every diet possible and nothing works? There is hope. Come to an Overeaters Anonymous meeting and find out about a 12 step program of recovery. There is a solution! Turning Point Center, 191 Bank Street, Suite 200, Burlington. Weekly on Thursdays, 7 p.m. Info:

PEER ACCESS LINE Isolated? Irritable? Anxious? Lonely? Excited? Bored? Confused? Withdrawn? Sad? Call us! Don’t hesitate for a moment. We understand! It is our choice to be here for you to listen. Your feelings do matter. 321-2190. Thu., Fri., Sat. evenings, 6-9 p.m.

5

NAR-AON BURLINGTON GROUP Group meets every 2nd and 4th Monday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Turning Point Center (small room), 191 Bank St., Burlington. The only requirement for membership is that there be a problem of addiction in a relative or friend. Info: Amanda H. 338-8106.

OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS 12-step fellowship for people who identify as overeaters, compulsive eaters, food addicts, anorexics, bulimics, etc. Tue., 7 p.m., St. James Episcopal Church, 4 St. James Place, Essex Jct. All are welcome; meeting is open. Info: Felicia, 777-7718.

OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS (OA) Meetings in Barre Tue. 5:30-6:30 p.m. and Sat. 8:30-9:30 a.m., at the Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd, 39 Washington St. Info, Valerie 279-0385. Meetings in Burlington Thurs. 7:30-8:30 a.m., at the First United Church, 21 Buell St. Info, Geraldine, 730-4273. Meetings in Johnson occur every Sun., 5:30-6:30 p.m., at the Johnson Municipal Building, Rte. 15 (just west of the bridge). Info, Debbie Y., 888-5958. Meetings in Montpelier occur every Mon., 5:30-6:30 p.m. at Bethany Church, 115 Main St. Info, Joan, 223-3079. Steps to Food Freedom Meetings in Morrisville occur every Sat., 10-11 a.m., at the First Congregational Church, 85 Upper Main St. Contacts: Anne, 8882356. Big Book Meetings in Morrisville occur every Tue., 6 p.m. at the North Central Recovery Center (NCVRC), 275 Brooklyn St. Info: Debbie, 888-5958.

PARKINSON’S DISEASE OUTREACH GROUP This group meets on the second Tuesday, 10-11:30 a.m. of the month at Pillsbury Homestead Senior Community Residence at 3 Harborview Rd., St. Albans in the conference room next to the library on the first floor. Wheelchair accessible. Info: patricia_rugg18@ comcast.net.

4

NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS is a group of recovering addicts who live w/ out the use of drugs. It costs nothing to join. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop using. Info, 862-4516 or cvana.org. Held in Burlington, Barre and St. Johnsbury.

OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Do you worry about the way you eat? Overeaters Anonymous may have the answer for you. No weigh-ins, dues or fees. Mon., 5:30-6:30 p.m. Temple Sinai, 500 Swift St., S. Burlington. Info: 863-2655.

OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS 12-step. Sat., 9-10 a.m. Turning Point Center, 182 Lake St., St. Albans. Is what you’re eating, eating you? We can help. Call Valerie, 825-5481.

1

the National Alliance on Mental Illness of Vermont, info@namivt. org or 800-639-6480. Family Support Group meetings are for family & friends of individuals living mental illness.

Elise, 302-528-6672. OA Big|Book Solution Group of Burlington.

View and post up to 6 photos per ad online.

6

support groups [CONTINUED]

NORTHWEST VERMONT CANCER PRAYER & SUPPORT NETWORK A meeting of cancer patients, survivors & family members intended to comfort & support those who are currently suffering from the disease. 2nd Thu. of every mo., 6-7:30 p.m., St. Paul’s United Methodist Church, 11 Church St., St. Albans. Info: stpaulum@myfairpoint.net. 2nd Wed. of every mo., 6-7:30 p.m. Winooski United Methodist Church, 24 W. Allen St., Winooski. Info: hovermann4@comcast. net.

Show and tell.

»

3

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

SEX & LOVE ADDICTS ANONYMOUS 12-step recovery group. Do you have a problem w/ sex or relationships? We can help. Ralph, 658-2657. Visit slaafws. org or saa-recovery.org for meetings near you.

STUTTERING SUPPORT GROUPS If you’re a person who stutters, you are not alone! Adults, teens & school-age kids who stutter & their families are welcome to join one of our three free National Stuttering Association (NSA) stuttering support groups at UVM. Adults: 5:30-6:30, 1st & 3rd Tue. monthly; teens (ages 13-17): 5:30-6:30, 1st Thu. monthly; school-age children (ages 8-12) & parents (meeting separately): 4:15-5:15, 2nd Thu. monthly. Pomeroy Hall (489 Main St., UVM campus. Info: burlingtonstutters.org, burlingtonstutters@ gmail.com, 656-0250. Go Team Stuttering! SUICIDE SURVIVORS SUPPORT GROUP For those who have lost a friend or loved one through suicide. Maple Leaf Clinic, 167 N. Main St., Wallingford, 446-3577. 6:30-8 p.m. the 3rd Tue. of ea. mo. SUICIDE HOTLINES IN VT Brattleboro, 257-7989; Montpelier (Washington County Mental Health Emergency Services), 229-0591; Randolph (Clara Martin Center Emergency Service), 800-639-6360.

SUPPORT GROUP FOR FAMILY, FRIENDS AND ALLIES OF TRANSGENDER ADULTS We are the parents of an adult transgender woman. While we celebrate the emergence of her authentic self, we find we have many questions to explore with others on this path with their loved ones. We meet the 4th Thursdays of the month, 5 p.m. Pride Center of VT. Please join us! margie@pridecentervt.org, 802-860-7812 SUPPORT GROUP FOR WOMEN who have experienced intimate partner abuse, facilitated by Circle (Washington Co. only). Please call 877-5439498 for more info. SURVIVORSHIP NOW Welcome, cancer survivors. Survivorship NOW has free wellness programs to empower cancer survivors to move beyond cancer & live life well. Regain your strength & balance. Renew your spirit. Learn to nourish your body with exercise & nutritious foods. Tap in to your creative side. Connect with others who understand the challenges you face. Go to survivorshipnowvt. org today to sign up. Info, 802-7771126, info@ survivorshipnowvt.org. SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE — BURLINGTON Who: Persons experiencing the impact of a loved one’s suicide. When: 1st Wed. of each mo., 6-7:30 p.m. Location: Comfort Inn, 5 Dorset St., Burlington. Facilitators: Myra Handy, 951-5156 or Liz Mahoney, 879-7109. Request: We find it important to connect with people before their first meeting. If you can, please call one of the facilitators before you come. Thank you! SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE If you have lost someone to suicide and wish to have a safe place to talk, share and spend a little time with others who have had a similar experience, join us the 3rd Thu. at the Faith Lighthouse Church, Rte. 105, Newport (105 Alderbrook), 7-9 p.m. Please call before attending. Info: Mary Butler, 744-6284. THE COMPASSIONATE FRIENDS Burlington Chapter TCF meets on the 3rd Tue. of ea. mo. at 7 p.m. at 277 Blair Park Rd., Williston;

Extra! Extra! There’s no limit to ad length online.

for more info, call Dee Ressler, 598-8899. Rutland Chapter TCF meets on the 1st Tue. of ea. mo. at 7 p.m. at Grace Congregational Church, West St., Rutland; for more info, call Susan Mackey, 446-2278. Hospice Volunteer Services (HVS) also serves bereaved parents w/ monthly peer support groups, short-term educational consultations & referrals to local grief & loss counselors. HVS is located in the Marble Works district in Middlebury. Please call 388-4111 for more info about how to connect w/ appropriate support services. TOGETHER IN RECOVERY Community members with a friend or family member affected by Opioid use are invited to come for support, discussion and encouragement. Chittenden Clinic, 75 San Remo Dr., So. Burlington. Every third Tuesday of the month, 5:30 p.m. Info: 488-6456, jspagnuolo@ howardcenter.org. TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) chapter meeting. Hedding United Methodist Church, Washington St., Barre. Wed., 5:15-6:15 p.m. For info, call David at 371-8929. VEGGIE SUPPORT GROUP Want to feel supported on your vegetarian/ vegan journey? Want more info on healthy veggie diets? Want to share & socialize at veggie potlucks, & more, in the greater Burlington area? This is your opportunity to join with other like-minded folks. veggy4life@ gmail.com, 658-4991. WOMEN’S CANCER SUPPORT GROUP FAHC. Led by Deb Clark, RN. Every 1st & 3rd Tue., 5-6:30 p.m. Call Kathy McBeth, 847-5715. XA – EVERYTHING ANONYMOUS Everything Anonymous is an all encompassing 12-step support group. People can attend for any reason, including family member challenges. Mondays, 7-8 p.m. Turning Point Center, 191 Bank St., Burlington. Info: 777-5508, definder@ gmail.com.


C-9 11.30.16-12.07.16

Retail Sales & Customer Support Specialist

YOUR TRUSTED LOCAL SOURCE. SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS

FT/PT $12.00-$15.00 per hour Provide retail, customer service, and general office support to Girl Scout members and volunteers in the Williston office of the GSGWM Council. Apply on line at girlscoutsgwm.org or send resume and cover letter to employment@girlscoutsgwm.org. 11/28/16 AFTERSCHOOL AND SUMMER CAMP SITE DIRECTOR

2v-GirlScoutsGreen&WhiteMountains112613.indd 1

3:50 PM

The Sara Holbrook Community Center seeks an Afterschool and Summer Camp Site Director to manage after school and summer programs for elementary, school-age children. Position includes direct service and administrative roles, including tracking attendance and statistics, staff hiring and training, and grant writing and reporting. Looking for someone who is extremely organized, professional, flexible and adventurous. Bachelor’s degree in education, human services or related field and two years’ direct work experience with school age children required. Forty hours per week for seven weeks in the summer, 30 hours per week for the school year following BSD calendar. Includes benefits.

Send cover letter, resume and three written references to: lpollander@saraholbrookcc.org or 66 North Ave. Burlington, VT 05401.

EQUIPMENT MOVER Entry-level position for a motivated individual for installation of vending equipment. Experience with vending equipment preferred, but willing to train the right candidate.

Untitled-29 1

Must possess mechanical skills and be willing to learn various levels of repair. You must have a clean driving record. We offer competitive wages, benefits and a challenging environment. Apply online at farrellvending.com or in person at:

Farrell Vending Services 405 Pine Street, Burlington, VT 05401.

4v-FarrellVending-050416.indd 1

EOE. No phone calls, please.

11/21/16 4t-SaraHolbrook-082615.indd 1:53 PM 1

NURSING POSITION

JOB FAIR Thursday, December 1st 12:00pm – 3:00pm Green Mountain Suites Lane Press is looking to immediately fill several entry-level full-time positions in our Bindery and Pressroom departments. We have openings on our 1st, 2nd and 3rd shift(s) and offer competitive starting wages as well as generous shift premiums. Employees are eligible to participate in our comprehensive benefit package after 60 days of employment which includes medical, dental and vision insurance as well as paid vacation, 401(k), disability, onsite physical therapy services and an amazing health club membership! We provide on the job training and opportunities for advancement.

Please stop by our job fair and meet with a member of our team and complete an employment application. On-site interviews will be conducted.

5/2/165v-LanePress113016.indd 6:37 PM 1

www.lanepress.com EOE

Busy, mid-sized family practice looking for a full time nurse who enjoys working in the clinic setting. Must have a valid Vermont nursing license. Must be organized, efficient and detail oriented. Familiarity with family practice helpful. Experience using an electronic health record required. Competitive pay with an excellent benefit package. Send resume and cover letter to: Cheryl McCaffrey Practice Administrator, TCHC, 586 Oak Hill Road, Williston, VT 05495 or email cheryl.mccaffrey@ tchconline.com.

11/28/163v-ThomasChittenden113016.indd 11:58 AM 1

8/24/15 5:05 PM

Norwich University Applied Research Institutes (NUARI) is seeking an experienced

SENIOR SOFTWARE DEVELOPER To support on-going cyber security Web Client/ Server Development Visit our website, nuari.org/Careers. html, to learn more and apply. NUARI is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer

11/28/163v-NUARI113016.indd 2:35 PM 1

11/23/16 12:25 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-10

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

11.30.16-12.07.16

Sterling House

FULL TIME COOK The Converse Home, an Assisted Living Community, located in downtown Burlington is seeking an experienced cook to work 32 hours per week, FridayMonday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. This position comes with benefits including healthcare, dental and vacation.

CAREGIVER Small residential care home looking for caring, positive caregiver. Willing to train, every other weekend required. Includes assist with personal care and daily activities. Please send resume to prachael6@gmail.com.

The ideal candidate will have strong scratch cooking skills, speed, organization, and the ability to multitask. 2v-SterlingHouse113016.indd Must be a team player who enjoys providing quality customer service to our elderly population. THE CONVERSE HOME A community of caring for elders ServSafe certification a plus.

1

Learn more about our community and apply on our website at conversehome.com.

4t-ConverseHome113016.indd 1

11/28/16 3:41 PM

Help Vermonters pursue their education goals!

11/28/16 2:05 PM

Bus Mechanic/Driver (1.0 FTE) The Franklin West Supervisory Union is seeking an hourly, yearround position. Basic responsibilities will be bus maintenance, daily route, field trips, athletic trips, and maintaining grounds equipment. Applicant needs to be flexible, personable, and able to work well with others. Will need a Class B CDL license with air brake, passenger and school bus endorsement as well as own tools and general knowledge of medium duty truck repair and preventative maintenance. Job comes with full benefits including vacation, holidays, health and dental, sick and personal days, etc.

Programmer/Analyst Vermont Student Assistance Corporation (VSAC) is seeking a programmer for webbased applications with some knowledge of database administration. Preferred candidates will have experience using Java based technologies with a proven track record of learning and applying new technology; experience creating/consuming Web Services (RESTful and/or WS.*), experience in database administration using SQL server and DB2, experience working with business users to create and analyze requirements, troubleshoot issues, and the ability to support and enhance existing systems. A Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science, related field of study, or equivalent experience is required. Candidates also required to have one to three years’ related applications programming experience. This position may be filled at an intermediate or senior level based on the skills and experience of the applicant. We seek candidates with creative ideas, excellent communication skills, the ability to work independently and with large projects teams, and the proven ability to design, develop, and maintain software.

For more information call Patsy Parker at 849-2068.

Accounting Specialist

Interested applicants should apply on www.schoolspring.com to Job # 2726260.

Are you great with numbers?

.

4t-FranklinWestSU112316.indd 1

11/18/16 2:39 PM

DIRECT CARE PROVIDER Be a part of 24/7 team providing residential supports to CRT consumers. Implement treatment and support plans. Support consumers around daily living skills. Ability to deal with clients in all types of situations with patience, insight, and compassion. Ability to work effectively with other agency personnel in the implementation of client program and goals. Valid driver’s license, good driving skills, use of car necessary occasionally.

VSAC has a great opportunity for an Accounting Specialist position. If you have an Associate’s Degree, 2+ years of accounting-related experience, have experience with various financial software, the Microsoft Office suite, and are detail-oriented, then this would be a great fit for you. This position monitors all cash activity, performs transfers between bank accounts, issues daily and weekly disbursements for the various corporate programs and provides accounting support. VSAC offers a dynamic, professional environment with competitive compensation and generous benefits package. Apply online at vsac.org no later than December 12, 2016.

VERMONT STUDENT ASSISTANCE CORPORATION PO Box 2000 Winooski, VT 05404 EOE/Minorities/Females/Vet/Disabled www.VSAC.org

Submit resume and cover letter to apply@csac-vt.org. For more opportunities please visit www.csac-vt.org. 10v-VSAC113016.indd 1 4t-CSAC113016.indd 1

11/23/16 12:15 PM

11/28/16 3:54 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

PROJECT MANAGER Jvillage Network creates easy-to-update custom Web sites and engaging interactive tools to help Jewish organizations grow their membership communities. We are seeking an experienced Project Manager to join our Burlington-based team. The Project Manager is responsible for all aspects of client management, including client development, maintenance, and the day-to-day management of client projects. Candidate must have a college degree and at least 2 years of relevant experience, including experience working with Internet technologies, social media, database and content management systems, and e-communications. Please send cover letter, resume, LinkedIn profile, and salary requirements to: careers@jvillagenetwork.com.

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

RN NEEDED for busy outpatient cardiology practice, BLS certified, for combination of patient care and triage. Daytime hours, no evenings or weekends. Part-time to start with potential for full-time. Email resume to cvca6312@comcast.net.

The State of Vermont For the people…the place…the possibilities. Untitled-7 1

Seven Days // 3.83" x 3.46" // BW // Jvillage Help Wanted - Project Manager

11/14/162v-CVC050416.indd 11:34 AM 1

Vermont PsychiatricThe State of Vermont For the people…the place…the possibilities. Care Hospital 5/2/16

Vermont Psychiatric Exciting Social Worker Position

Care Hospital Vermont Psychiatric Care Hospital (VPCH), a 25 bed state-of-the-art, progressive facility providing excellent care in a recovery-oriented, safe, respectful environment has an immediate opening for a social worker to join Exciting Social Worker Positionteam. our multi-disciplinary clinical treatment

REGISTERED NURSE II & III

Vermont Psychiatric Care Hospitalpositions (VPCH), a 25available bed state-of-the-art, Full-time temporary This positionand involves significant collaboration with hospital staff of other

C-11 11.30.16-12.07.16

PERSONAL CARE ATTENDANT OPENING

Missisquoi Valley Union School has an opening for a Personal Care Attendant for the 2016-17 School Year. Responsibilities will include providing personal care to students with medical and physical needs, including assistance with feeding, toileting, communication and physical/occupational and speech therapy exercises as well as adapted curriculum activities. The PCA may also assist with the delivery of educational services in and out of the classroom environment. 11:55 AM The position requires flexibility, patience and close collaboration with special educators and teachers.

Vermont

Vermont

The ideal candidate should have experience and training in this field; a nursing or LNA background is preferred but not necessary. Please submit resume, references and letter of interest to:

MVU- Attn: Johanne Hamilton, 175 Thunderbird Drive Swanton, Vermont 05488 Or apply online at schoolspring.com. EOE

VENDING ROUTE DRIVERS Burlington

We are looking for motivated, responsible individuals. Must be able to work independently, possess a positive attitude, be capable of lifting up to 50 pounds and have a clean driving record. We offer a competitive wage along with benefits. Apply in person or online at Farrell Vending Services 405 Pine Street Burlington, VT 05401 farrellvending.com.

progressive facility providing excellent care in a recovery-oriented, safe, disciplines, and community providers involved in the formulation and respectful environment hasPlan an immediate opening for a social worker to join New Compensation implementation of a comprehensive treatment plan for patients. The ideal our multi-disciplinary clinical treatment team. Vermont Psychiatric Care Hospital (VPCH),ina both 25-bedastate-of-the-art, recovery-oriented candidate will have experience hospital andprogressive community setting, and facility off ering care in a safe, respectful environment, has immediate openings for Psychiatric Nurses have strong interpersonal and communication skills. Experience or interest 11/28/16 4v-FarrellVending101815.indd 1 3:06 PM 1 11/16/15 11:26 AM This position staffIn of otherto an 4v-FranklinNorthwestSupervisoryUnion113016.indd on all shifts. This isinvolves an excitingsignificant opportunitycollaboration for nurses with allwith levelshospital of experience. addition in trauma informed care or open dialogue appreciated. Licensure or excellent benefiand ts package, tuition reimbursement and loan repayment assistance may be available disciplines, community providers involved in the formulation and eligibility for licensure within six months is required. for eligible applicants. EMERGENCY TEAM CLINICIAN! implementation of a comprehensive treatment plan for patients. The ideal Apply Online at careers.vermont.gov Seeking an experienced mental health clinician candidate will have experience in both a hospital and community setting, and The salary range for this position is $48,713.60-$76,169.60 and has full state for interesting work on our Emergency Team. Registered Nurse II (Psychiatric Clinical Specialty Nurse) –skills. Job Opening ID# 619338 have strong interpersonal and communication Experience or interest Crisis mental health is a clinical specialty that employee benefit package. Registered II (Psychiatric Clinical Nurse) (Temporary)Licensure – Job Opening in traumaNurse informed care or openSpecialty dialogue appreciated. or ID# 620159 is challenging, collaborative, varied, and worthwhile. Provide phone and face-to-face assessment, crisis eligibilityNurse for licensure six Clinical monthsSpecialty is required. Registered III (Chargewithin Psychiatric Nurse) – Job Opening ID# 619341 For more information, contact Becky Moore at rebecca.moore@vermont.gov intervention and stabilization counseling. Primarily officebased with some evening and weekend on call required. For moreonline information, please contact Kathy Bushey at 802-505-0501 or Apply at www.careers.vermont.gov Master’s Degree is preferred, excellent engagement and The salary range for this position is $48,713.60-$76,169.60 and has full state Kathleen.bushey@vermont.gov Reference Job Opening ID# 618303 assessment skills are required, plus the ability to think on employee benefit package. For questions related to your application, please contact the Department of Human For more information, contactatBecky Moore at rebecca.moore@vermont.gov Resources, Recruitment Services, 855-828-6700 (voice) or 800-253-0191 (TTY/Relay Apply online at www.careers.vermont.gov Service). The State of Vermont offers an excellent total compensation package & is an Reference Job Opening ID# 618303 Equal Opportunity Employer.

your feet, and a strong team orientation. Must have reliable transportation and the ability to be in Middlebury within about 30 minutes during on call shifts. Full benefits package, excellent clinical supervision, and supportive team-based work environment.

Submit resume and cover letter to apply@csac-vt.org.

For more opportunities, please visit csac-vt.org. For questions related to your application, please contact the Department of Human Resources, Recruitment Services, at 855-828-6700 (voice) or 800-253-0191 (TTY/Relay 9t-VTDeptHumanResourcesRN112316.indd 1 11/18/16 2:33 PM Service). The State of Vermont offers an excellent total compensation package & is an 4t-CSACemergencyTeam113016.indd 1 11/28/16

11:48 AM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-12

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

11.30.16-12.07.16

SOCIAL EMOTIONAL LEARNING PROJECT LEADER

SHARED LIVING PROVIDERS Do you have experience in the mental health field? Do you enjoy arts and crafts, shopping, eating healthy, and being silly? We are seeking a Shared Living Provider(s) to support an independent 49-year-old woman. The ideal candidate would be kind and sensitive with strong boundaries and the ability to provide consistent care and supervision. The right provider(s) will provide a calm and peaceful home environment. Compensation: $30,000 tax-free annual stipend and generous respite.    Seeking a Shared Living Provider to support a 30-year-old man who enjoys taking walks, playing music, helping others and participating in hands-on activities. This individual is seeking a roommate to share a furnished, centrally located home in Essex Junction (2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, washer/dryer, off-street parking). The right provider will have strong boundaries, clear communication and the ability to provide ongoing supervision in support of building independent living skills. This would be an ideal opportunity for a peer-aged professional or graduate student. Compensation: $40,000 tax-free annual stipend and generous respite budget. Available January 1.   Interested candidates, contact lreid@howardcenter.org or call 802-488-6563.

Vermont Afterschool is looking to hire a self-directed, energetic, and conscientious individual to spearhead a new project initiative around Social Emotional Learning (SEL) in afterschool and summer learning programs. The successful candidate will join our highly effective, dynamic, and collaborative team based in Colchester, VT. Vermont Afterschool is a statewide nonprofit organization that supports organizations in providing quality afterschool, summer, and expanded learning opportunities so that Vermont’s children and youth have the experiences, skills, and resources they need to become healthy, productive members of society. Vermont Afterschool staff work statewide and this position requires access to reliable transportation; significant training and experience in education, youth work, and/or afterschool programming; demonstrated organizational and project leadership skills; and excellent communication and interpersonal skills. The position starts at 32 hrs/week with the potential to grow. KEY RESPONSIBILITIES: • Develop a sustainable SEL initiative for Vermont Afterschool; • Help afterschool programs implement SEL curriculum starting in grades K-3 and working up to older grades; and • Develop partnerships and funding opportunities with other organizations in Vermont in support of this work. • This position also has the potential to work closely with the Executive Director to develop related areas of work such as work-based learning, dropout prevention, and juvenile justice. We offer a competitive compensation package, including prorated benefits and the opportunity to play a role in growing an organization that is dedicated to quality afterschool for all. For more information on this position and how to apply, please visit our website at vermontafterschool.org/about/jobs/. Applications are due by December 12, 2016, and must be submitted electronically. VERMONT AFTERSCHOOL IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER AND WE WELCOME APPLICATIONS FROM INDIVIDUALS WHO WILL CONTRIBUTE TO OUR DIVERSITY.

7t-VTAfterschool112316.indd 1 5v-HowardCenterSHARED112316.indd 1

11/21/16 1:29 PM

11/21/16 1:55 PM

Our mission is to inspire and enable youth in our community, especially those who need us most, to realize their full potential as productive, healthy, caring and responsible citizens.

Director of Finance and Administration Are you looking for a professional career opportunity that is also meaningful? The Boys & Girls Club of Burlington is seeking to hire a Director of Finance and Administration. This position can be structured to be either full or part time and offers a diverse work experience with overall responsibility for fiscal and business operations. The ideal candidate has an entrepreneurial spirit and experience that includes: non-profit accounting, financial statement preparation, accounts receivable and payable processing, budgeting and analysis, financial grant management and benefit administration. In addition, the ideal candidate knows how to handle special projects and working with outside service providers, such as network administrators and investment advisors to actively manage business needs. The chosen candidate will report to the Club’s Executive Director and will have the potential for a flexible work schedule. If you have 5+ years of relevant professional experience, a bachelor’s degree and a proven professional track record, please send your cover letter and resume to

greatfutures@bandgclub.org THE BOYS & GIRLS CLUB OF BURLINGTON IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

7t-BoysGirlsClub113016.indd 1 Untitled-7 1

11/28/16 11:37 AM

11/28/16 12:33 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

COMMUNITY INCLUSION FACILITATOR CCS is a growing, not for profit human service organization with a strong emphasis on employee and consumer satisfaction. We are currently offering benefited inclusion support positions and per diem shifts. This is an excellent job for applicants entering human services or for those looking to continue their work in this field. We would love to have you here during this exciting time of growth! If you are interested in joining our supportive team and making an impact on the lives of others, send your letter of interest and resume to Karen Ciechanowicz, staff@ccs-vt.org. EOE

4t-ChamplainCommServicesINCLUSION113016.indd 1

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

Booska Movers is looking for drivers to join our team. Competitive wages, vacation, sick and holiday pay, Health coverage, and retirement plan are some of the benefits we offer. Send resume/ application to abooska@ booskaworldwide.com or come to our office and fill out an application.

11/28/16 2v-BooskaMovers112316.indd 2:16 PM 1

11/18/16 2:35 PM

PROJECT MANAGER Vermont Information Technology Leaders, Inc. (VITL) is seeking a project manager for the successful planning and execution of health information technology, interface deployment and data quality projects related to the Vermont Health Information Exchange. This is a full-time permanent position. The ideal candidate will have a bachelor’s degree in computer science, information systems, or health care related field; a master’s degree is preferred, and requires five or more years of experience in large scale, cross-functional project management and system and software development lifecycles. Project Management Professional (PMP) (or equivalent) certification preferred or actively pursuing certification. A Six Sigma Black/Green Belt is preferred.

5v-ClaraMartin113016.indd 1

11/28/16 3:04 PM

Basin Harbor Club is a seasonal resort on Lake Champlain. Open May to October, we have been welcoming visitors for over 130 years. Owned and operated by the Beach Family since 1886, the resort caters to family vacations, reunions, weddings, corporate retreats and is open to the public for golfing and dining.

TECHNICAL SUPPORT SERVICES MANAGER

HR Generalist

Vermont Information Technology Leaders, Inc. (VITL) is seeking a technical support services manager to successfully provide front-line leadership for VITL’s technical support team, and for the hardware and software support needs of VITL staff. Additionally, the technical support services manager will work closely with VITL’s client services and operations teams, to ensure client satisfaction and successful long-term business relationships. This is a full-time permanent position. The ideal candidate will have a bachelor’s degree in business administration, computer science, engineering, health informatics or other related discipline, and five or more years’ experience in technical client support, proven people management leadership, system administration, desktop support or other related experience.

Seeking experienced, energetic and creative HR Generalist to lead HR department. Human Resources plays a critical role in maintaining Basin Harbor’s position as an exceptional hospitality property. Key areas of experience include recruitment, onboarding administration, training and development and compensation and benefits but recruitment and employee relations are the priority. Will work with department leaders to create a safe and productive work environment, outstanding guest service, foster great team spirit and build a winning culture. This is a year round position within Basin Harbor. Interested? Please apply online at basinharbor.com/jobs/ or send cover letter and resume to

For a detailed job description go to the Careers section on the VITL website at vitl.net/about/careers. To apply, please email a cover letter and resume to hr@vitl.net.

The Beach Family Basin Harbor Club 4800 Basin Harbor Road, Vergennes, VT 05491 or email to beachfamily@basinharbor.com.

NO PHONE CALLS, PLEASE. 9t-VITL111616.indd 1

C-13 11.30.16-12.07.16

CLASS B AND C DRIVERS NEEDED

Champlain Community Services

ccs-vt.org

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

11/11/16 1:48 PM 5v-BasinHarborClub110916.indd 1

11/4/16 1:06 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-14

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

11.30.16-12.07.16

Blodgett Oven Company is hiring the following FULL TIME positions:

LOGISTICS/SERVICE PARTS ASSOCIATE ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/PLANNING TECHNICIAN

STARTING PAY - $16.25

The Town of Williston is currently seeking qualified applicants for an Administrative Assistant/Planning Technician to work in the Planning and Zoning Department. This full time position provides administrative support to a team of professional planners in a fast paced municipal planning office. This person is the fi rst point of contact for most people who visit or call the Planning and Zoning office.

Must be flexible, self-starter and have related experience. Blodgett offers a supportive environment, competitive pay, health, dental and vision plans, 401(k) and life insurance. Email or mail resume/cover letter to Lynn Wolski, Director of H.R.: employment@blodgett.com.

Blodgett Ovens 44 Lakeside Avenue, Burlington, VT 05401

Qualifications for this position are an associate’s degree in an appropriate discipline, plus one to two years of relevant administrative work experience, or a combination of education and experience from which comparable knowledge and skills are acquired. Demonstrated proficiency using personal computers including word processing, spreadsheet, internet web browsers, and email applications. Familiarity and experience with concepts and processes of land use planning and zoning, and local government administration is highly desirable. This is a full time position in the Planning and Zoning Department. Compensation includes salary range from $35,464 to $51,002 dependent upon experience, plus full benefits including health insurance, retirement plan, and paid leave. Send resumes and a letter of interest to the attention of Ken Belliveau, AICP, Director of Planning and Zoning, at kbelliveau@willistonvt.org. Preferred deadline December 12, 2016. WILLISTON IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.

5v-TownofWilliston113016.indd 1

Or stop by to fill out application.

We are an equal opportunity employer. 5h-BlodgettOvens113016.indd 1

11/23/16 12:04 PM

Providing innovative mental health and educational services to Vermont’s children and families. “Make a difference in the life of a child!”- NFI Vermont, a leader in specialized trauma and adolescent development, is looking to expand our team of innovators. Full time and part time positions available. Competitive wages, training opportunities, flexible work schedules and family oriented culture. Excellent benefits with tuition reimbursement offered for 30 or more hour employees.

11/28/16 4:15 PM

Therapeutic Case Manager St. Albans

Project Engineer

Omya Inc. is seeking a Project Engineer for Florence, VT. The successful candidate will possess the skills and abilities to estimate, design, contract, and supervise major and minor improvements to the plant facilities and processes.

The NFI St. Albans wraparound program is seeking a therapeutic case manager to provide comprehensive clinical services to youth and families. The ideal candidate would be a flexible, outside the box thinker to provide trauma informed care while interacting with multi-stressed systems. The case manager is responsible for collaborating with teams and families to develop and guide treatment; this includes providing clinical supervision within the WRAP micro-team. NFI provides excellent training opportunities, clinical supervision and a comprehensive benefits package. Master’s degree in social work, counseling or related field preferred. Send resume and cover letter to kristenlococo@nafi.com.

Residential Counselor

QUALIFICATIONS: •

BS in Engineering; mechanical, electrical, chemical or industrial preferred

Minimum of 3 years experience in a preferred industrial field.

Previous mineral processing experience preferred

Hands-on troubleshooting and equipment operating abilities

Knowledgeable in the area of industrial process controls Please submit resume and cover letter to

Liz Gregorek, HR Manager, Omya Inc. elizabeth.gregorek@omya.com by December 9, 2016.

Shelburne House

Shelburne House is a residential program which provides assessment and stabilization services to male teenagers, ages 13-18. Responsibilities include supporting youth, ADL (activity, daily learning), assisting with independent living skills, and implementing treatment plans created by clinicians. Experience working with teenagers with emotional and behavioral challenges desired. BA in psychology or related field highly desirable. Our full time position is offered with a comprehensive benefits package. Send cover letter and resume to laurenclark@nafi.com.

Residential Counselor Allenbrook

Allenbrook is a co-ed community based group home for teens. Qualified candidates will hold a Bachelor’s Degree, experience working in residential care or parenting their own children and managing a household (cooking, maintenance, gardening, etc.). Flexibility to work some weekends is a must. Valid driver’s license and the ability to pass a criminal background check required. Please email resume and cover letter to jennifersnay@nafi.com.

EOE 9t-NFI113016.indd 1

11/28/16 1:19 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

C-15 11.30.16-12.07.16

St. JoSeph ReSidentiAl CARe home

Part-time Nursing

Tourism & Marketing: Director of Communications PUBLIC HEALTH PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR Department of Health

St. Joseph Residential Care Home is seeking a dedicated, skilled nurse (LPN/RN) for a part-time position which will include every other weekend days, and the occasional day or evening shift during the week. This position has potential for the successful candidate to develop nurse management skills under the direction of the Director of Nursing. All applicants must have a valid state license to be considered.

Job Description:

The Vermontprofessional Department ofsought Health’sto Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Experienced lead the Vermont Department of Tourism has a key position open fortrade an organized, collaborative self-starter who will join a hard& Marketing’s public and relations efforts. This mission-critical position working and tobaccotourism-related prevention and control team.of Vermont in the is designed toknowledgeable generate positive coverage

national and international The Director oftobacco Communications is The program administrator marketplace. is a required position in the CDC control infrastructure framework for and the plays an important role the day-to-day management of the business work. This responsible development andinimplementation of a proactive positionplan oversees the funding received by the Centers for Disease and Prevention, outreach consistent with the goals and mission of the Control Department of and is and responsible for financial and reporting on all funding streams Tourism Marketing as wellmanagement, as maintaining consistent communications the tobaccotools. program. via supporting social networking This position is responsible for all tourism media relations in-state and out-of-state; press releaseexperience, development; pitching targeted Candidates should demonstrate project management knowledge of grant/ tourism story ideas to regional nationaland media; of Planning press contract management, supervisoryand experience, skilleddevelopment in collaboration. familiarization trips duties, and itineraries; of media contact lists; and and administrative in addition management to program implementation and monitoring, are support for Vermont’s international public initiatives. The Director major components for the position. Grant and relations fiscal administration and strong writing willskills alsoare collaborate the to Agency of Commerce executive team and in the required in with addition knowledge of program planning principles practices, and experience grant writing. Proven communication and recruitment organizationalplan. abilities are development of ainproactive travel trade and business This necessary. in tobacco control andofprevention federal or state government position will Experience report to the Commissioner Tourismand/or & Marketing.

keting: Director of Communications is highly desired.

Candidates must: demonstrate strong oral and written havewho a BA The Vermont Department of Health is especially interested in skills; candidates canincontribute Public Relations or related eld;commitment have a minimum ve years of of relevant work to the department’s diversityfiand to fosterofanfienvironment mutual respect, sought to lead the Vermont Department of Tourism experience; demonstrate knowledge of Vermont and Vermont’s tourism industry. acceptance and equal opportunity. Applicants are encouraged to include in their cover letter

Apply to: St. Joseph Residential Care Home 243 North Prospect Street Burlington, VT 05401 (802) 864-0264

4t-StJosephs-092513.indd 1

nal information about how they will This further this goal. d trade relations efforts. mission-critical position Resume, writing samples and a minimum of three references should be For more information, contact Rhonda Williams at 863-7592 or rhonda.williams@vermont. positive tourism-related coverage Vermont in the submitted to Kitty Sweet, Vermont Agency of of Commerce and Community gov. This position is in downtown Burlington with occasional travel throughout the state. Development, One National Life Drive, Montpelier, VT 05620-0501. In- and out-ofal marketplace. The Director of Communications is Reference Job ID# 620236. Location: Burlington. Status: Full time. Application deadline: state travel will be required. Salary range: $45,000 $50,000. December 2016. elopment and8, implementation of a proactive business nt with the goals and mission of the Department of DISEASE PROGRAM SPECIALIST as wellCHRONIC as maintaining consistent communications Department of Health ols. This position is responsible for all tourism media The Vermont Department of Health’s Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention is looking for an energetic, collaborative and organized individual to supporttargeted capacity building ut-of-state; press release development; pitching and implementation of systems and environmental level work focused on chronic disease egionalprevention and national media; development ofpeople press and health promotion strategies that are inclusive of with cognitive impairment and mobility limitations. This work will be based on the Centers for Disease itineraries; management of media contact lists; and Control’s best practice and guidance. nternational public relations initiatives. The Director The position requires an understanding of the principles and practices of public health h the Agency of Commerce executive in the and of the challenges people with cognitive impairmentteam and mobility limitations have in maintaining good health. The successful candidate will demonstrate a tive travel trade and business recruitment plan.proven Thisability to communicate effectively, both orally and in writing. The position will work collaboratively e Commissioner ofstaff, Tourism Marketing. with existing program an external&advisory group, and other state and external partners. Program areas include chronic disease prevention and management with a focus on tobacco, physical activity and nutrition.

onstrate oral and written skills; have a BA in Thestrong Vermont Department of Health is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to thehave department’s diversity and commitment to foster an of mutual ted field; a minimum of five years ofenvironment relevant workrespect, acceptance and equal opportunity. Applicants are encouraged to include in their cover letter e knowledge of Vermont and this Vermont’s tourism industry. information about how they will further goal. This position is in downtown Burlington, with routine travel to Montpelier, Waterbury, and other Vermont locations. Out-of-state travel for CDC grantee meetings will be required. For information, contact Susan Kamp at 951-4006 or susan.kamp@vermont.gov. Reference Job ID# 620314. Location: Burlington. Status: Limited. Application deadline: December 11, 2016.

es and a minimum of three references should be et, Vermont Agency of Commerce and Community onal Life Drive, Montpelier, VT 05620-0501. In- and out-ofTo apply, you must use the online job application at careers.vermont.gov. For questions related to your red. Salary $45,000 - $50,000. application,range: please contact the Department of Human Resources, Recruitment Services, at 855-8286700 (voice) or 800-253-0191 (TTY/Relay Service). The State of Vermont offers an excellent total compensation package and is an EOE.

12-VTDeptHumanResources113016.indd 1

11/28/16 11:45 AM

9/23/13 11:47 AM

Apparel. Gear. Footwear. Savings.

GET YOUR

CAREER IN GEAR

NOW HIRING $250 SIGN-ON BONUS FOR THE HOLIDAYS • 30% OFF EMPLOYEE DISCOUNT • FLEXIBLE SCHEDULING

STP.me/Apply


C-16 11.30.16-12.07.16

ATTENTION RECRUITERS: Vermont

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

The State of Vermont For the people…the place…the possibilities.

MDS Coordinator Full-Time

Vermont Psychiatric Care Hospital

MENTAL HEALTH SPECIALIST

Exciting Social Worker Position

Vermont Psychiatric Care Hospital (VPCH), a 25-bed, state-of-the-art, Vermont Psychiatric Care Hospital a 25-bed stateprogressive facility providing excellent care(VPCH), in a recovery-oriented, safe, of-the-art, progressive providing excellent care respectful environment, hasfacility an immediate opening for a social worker to join in amulti-disciplinary recovery-oriented, respectful our clinicalsafe, treatment team. environment has

immediate openings for temporary Mental Health Specialists

on all shifts. If you are looking for a position where can This position involves significant collaboration with hospital staffyou of other disciplines, and community providers involved in the formulation andhealth make a difference in the changing landscape of mental implementation a comprehensive treatmentatplan for patients. The ideal care, there’s aof rewarding opportunity VPCH. candidate will have experience in both a hospital and community setting, and have strong interpersonal and communication skills. Experience or interest Apply Online at www.careers.vermont.gov inMental trauma-informed care or open dialogue appreciated. Licensure or Health Specialist (Temporary) – eligibility for licensure within six months is required.

The MDS Coordinator is a Registered Nurse who is responsible for the timely and accurate completion of the MDS treatment assessment tool. This critical team member assures the delivery of high quality care by applying knowledge of factors specific to geriatric residents (i.e. physical, cognitive, and socialization factors) in planning and tracking delivery of nursing care in our facility. The Coordinator maintains comprehensive knowledge of MDS regulations, and demonstrates expertise in item coding, RAPS, care planning, electronic submission, and compliance. This individual must be a Registered Nurse in the State of Vermont, with at least 2 years’ experience managing MDS compliance in a similar facility. We will train the right candidate on the job. Interested candidates please email hr@wakerobin.com or fax your resume with cover letter to: HR, (802) 264-5146. WAKE ROBIN IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.

Job Opening ID# 619652

The salary range for this position is $48,713.60-$76,169.60 and has full state For more information, please contact Kathy Bushey employee benefit package.

5h-WakeRobinMDSCoordinator113016.indd 1

11/28/16 12:39 PM

at 505-0501 or kathleen.bushey@vermont.gov.

For more information, contact Becky Moore at rebecca.moore@vermont.gov Apply online at www.careers.vermont.gov. Reference Job Opening ID# 618303 For questions related to your application, please contact the Department of Human Resources, Recruitment Services, at 855-828-6700 (voice) or 800-253-0191 (TTY/Relay Service). The State of Vermont offers an excellent total compensation package & is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

5v-VtDeptHumanResourcesMENTAL112316.indd 1

11/18/16 11:23 AM

IT Help Desk Support The Help Desk Support position will provide one-on-one technical support through email, phone, or in person for software, hardware, Internet connectivity, and network problem resolution to all end-users (staff, students, faculty, and alumni). The candidate for this position will be a flexible team player that is able to work independently, who has strong communication skills and a good demeanor. This is a part-time position, 25 hours a week. RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE: • Management and support of the College’s computer and printing labs • Supporting various OS platforms including Microsoft Windows, Macintosh OS X, and iOS • Addressing general access and connectivity issues • Supporting desktop applications • Basic administration of user accounts and groups • Support for mobile devices such as iPhones and iPads EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE: • High School diploma required, associate degree or some college preferred • One or more years IT help desk support preferred Please send cover letter and resume to  vcfaitjobs@vcfa.edu.

Human Resources 879-8751 764-6578 (fax)

New England Federal Credit Union, Vermont’s largest Credit Union with 7 branch locations, is a growing organization committed to excellence in service, convenience, and simplicity. NEFCU offers a stable, supportive, high-standards work environment, where employees are treated as key stakeholders. Please visit our website, nefcu.com, to learn more about the great opportunities and benefits that exist at NEFCU.

Computer Operations Specialist Williston, Vermont The Computer Operations Specialist shall provide quality first line support to the users of NEFCU’s computer services including the ability to trouble shoot performance issues with desktop systems, phone systems, peripherals and various internal and external information system services. Responsibilities include the ability to build and deploy desktop computer systems and associated peripheral devices based on established standards. Must have experience in computer operations and supporting Windows 7 or Windows 10 PCs. Advanced troubleshooting and multi-tasking skills a plus. Must be able to lift 50 pounds. This position will provide support in 8-hour shifts Monday-Friday from 8:00am-4:30pm and rotational Saturdays from 8:00am-1:30pm with on-call responsibilities. Please note these hours are subject to change based on the needs of the business and some flexibility may be afforded. College degree preferred but an acceptable combination of education and experience will be considered in lieu of a degree. Qualified applicants should submit a complete resume and cover via nefcu.com illustrating reasons for interest and further qualification. NEFCU enjoys an employer-of-choice distinction with turnover averaging less than 10 percent. More than 96 percent of our 165 staff say NEFCU is a great place to work. - 2015 Annual Staff Survey If you believe you have the qualifications to contribute to this environment, please send your résumé and cover letter and salary history to: hr@nefcu.com.

NO CALLS, PLEASE.

nefcu.com 9t-NEFCU112316.indd 1 5v-VCFA112316.indd 1

11/18/16 12:08 PM

EOE/AA 11/18/16 2:46 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

C-17 11.30.16-12.07.16

Join the Yestermorrow team!

CHEF

ACCOUNTANTS

We are seeking a creative, flexible, team-oriented, and talented chef to join our culinary team. Position is 32 hours per week, requiring early mornings, evenings and weekends. We offer competitive pay and a generous benefits package. Position to begin January 7, 2017.

Rutland, Vermont CPA firm seeks self-motivated, career-oriented accountant. Strong tax background preferred. Qualified candidates are team oriented with strong technical skills. Opportunity for advancement for the right candidate.

Check out ourJob Description at yestermorrow.org/connect/jobs.

Competitive compensation, excellent benefit package and a flexible work schedule available. 2v-Yestermorrow113016.indd 1

11/28/16 3:44 PM

All responses will be confidential. Send current resume with cover letter and salary requirements to:

Michael Jakubowski, CPA CVA Stevens Wilcox Potvin Cassidy & Jakubowski PO Box 937 Rutland, VT 05702

FIELD DIRECTOR This is an opportunity to join a timely and historic effort to create change on an issue that’s quickly rising to the forefront of public consciousness: early childhood. The Let’s Grow Kids team is a smart, energetic and fun group of people who are passionate about their work and fully committed to the campaign’s mission. Our workplace is located in the heart of Burlington’s Arts District, the South End, and is an open and collaborative space. If you enjoy a fast-paced, team-based, dynamic work environment and a down-to-earth social atmosphere, this is the place for you.

4t-StevensWilcoxPotvin112316.indd 1

Distribution Coordinator

The primary role of the field director is to oversee all the field operations for the campaign, supporting the field team to engage key stakeholders in local communities throughout Vermont in order to educate and mobilize community members in support of young children. The field director leads the Let’s Grow Kids field team and collaborates with the communications, community education, policy and research, and business outreach teams. The field director manages the database of campaign supporters and petition signers.

Part Time

The Regional Educational Television Network (RETN) is looking for a motivated professional with a passion for community media to join our team as a part-time Distribution Coordinator. If you enjoy working collaboratively, have a sharp eye for detail and an interest in curating local video content, we want to hear from you.

POSITION QUALIFICATIONS • High school diploma required, bachelor’s degree preferred. • Strong attention to accuracy and detail a must. • Statewide campaign experience, or deep understanding of Vermont’s grassroots and political landscapes based on firsthand organizing experience with a political, labor or issue-based campaign. • Experience supervising staff. • Excellent writing skills, strong verbal communication skills, able to work directly with the campaign team and volunteers. • Must be very self-motivated, able to work independently and take initiative. • Demonstrated ability to work well under pressure, ability to handle multiple projects simultaneously and manage work under tight deadlines. • Proficiency with Word, Outlook, Excel; ability to learn new software and database management skills. • Must have reliable transportation and be willing to travel across the state. • Some nights and weekends required.

RESPONSIBILITIES • Creating programming schedules for multiple RETN cable television channels • Supporting online distribution of RETN-produced and user-generated content • Supporting live programming efforts REQUIREMENTS • Excellent written and verbal communication skills • High level of self motivation and creative problem solving ability • Great attention to detail • A passion for supporting local arts and culture This is a 20-hour a week position with a flexible schedule. Some daytime availability on Thursdays and Fridays is required. Occasional evening and weekend work. Compensation is commensurate with experience.

COMPENSATION: Competitive salary and excellent benefits. SALARY RANGE: $55,000 to $61,000.

If you are interested in joining the RETN team please email a cover letter and resume to

POSITION TYPE: Full Time

careers@retn.org

LOCATION: Campaign headquarters, Burlington, Vermont TO APPLY: Please submit résumé, cover letter and at least three references to Elizabeth Wareing at elizabeth@letsgrowkids.org.

RETN IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER AND DOES NOT DISCRIMINATE ON THE BASIS OF RACE, ANCESTRY, NATIONAL ORIGIN, COLOR, RELIGION, GENDER, AGE, MARITAL STATUS, SEXUAL ORIENTATION, DISABILITY, OR VETERAN STATUS.

DEADLINE: Friday, December 9, 2016

10v-Let'sGrowKids113016.indd 1

11/21/16 11:51 AM

11/23/16 10:12 AM 6t-RETN113016.indd 1

11/28/16 2:30 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-18

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

11.30.16-12.07.16

Account Manager Join a Great Medical Office Team in Central Vermont HARK is an award-winning design and development studio where experience, passion, and imagination come together to help today’s innovative companies tell their stories. + • + • + • + •

+ •

Project Manager

Office Assistant

We are looking for an energetic, well organized licensed Property & Casualty Account Manager for Personal Lines in our Jeffersonville office. Responsibilities include full service work of a current book of business. Salary based on experience. Send resumes to robin.bilodeau@nfp.com.

2h-NFP113016.indd 1

Primary Job Responsibilities: • Answer Phones

Attention to detail and organizational abilities.

• Assist Patients with Questions

Determine, document and manage project scope, goals, timelines and milestones.

Demonstrate established methods and creatively seek out new solutions in solving client needs.

Manage teams of Designers, Developers and others, as needed, through the life of a project.

• Use Medical Scheduling Software • Put Together Paper Charts • Filing • Office Equipment Use: Keyboarding Skills, Navigating Software, Fax Machine and Copier • Positive Attitude • Team Player Send resumes to accounting@

mbahealthgroup.com.

Hiring a Program Director to run one of our childcare teams, and teachers to join our growing childcare centers. Email resumes to

krista@leapsvt.com or call 879-0130.

11/28/161t-LeapsBounds110916.indd 1:46 PM 1

11/4/16 2:28 PM

GREEN MOUNTAIN TRANSIT HAS OPENINGS IN OUR MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT IN OUR BURLINGTON VT OFFICE

Part-Time: Flexible Afternoon Hours

This is a full-time in-house position.

PROGRAM DIRECTOR and TEACHERS

Green Mountain Transit is seeking to hire a career-focused Mechanic and Custodian. Our mission is rooted in ensuring a safe, stable, and comfortable work environment for our employees and providing safe, convenient, accessible, innovative, and sustainable public transportation for our community. We have two exciting opportunities for individuals who would like to join an expert team and grow as GMT grows. The GMT Maintenance department are members of the Teamsters Local 597. Current available positions are:

FIRST SHIFT CUSTODIAN

Responsible for maintaining non-revenue vehicles along with maintaining the facility. Including but not limited to the recycling, trash, lawn care and lawn equipment, snow removal and maintaining floors, along with assisting the Maintenance Department in maintaining our bus fleet’s interiors and exteriors.

MECHANIC

3v-Hark!113016.indd 1

11/28/16 3v-MBAHealthGroup112316.indd 2:51 PM 1

11/21/16

ARE YOU A

PROFESSIONAL COOK WHO WANTS A REGULAR SCHEDULE?

Join our Team! Full-Time Position Available Wake Robin, Vermont’s premier continuing care retirement community is adding members to our team of Cooks. Wake Robin provides a fine dining experience with a focus on farm to plate freshness, and a work environment that is hard to find in the restaurant industry. • • • • •

We work from scratch, not from a box 40% of our produce is local/organic Innovative on-site protein butchering and smoking Manageable schedule ending in early evening Superb kitchen facilities with excellent benefits Our cook will have experience producing high quality soups, sauces and entrees from scratch, demonstrate experience in all aspects of cooking from grilling to sautéing, and strong attention to the quality of food consistency and delivery.

Interested candidates please email hr@wakerobin.com or fax your resume with cover letter to: HR, (802) 264-5146. WAKE ROBIN IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.

Our team of mechanics perform preventative and corrective maintenance, maintaining a fleet of approximately 100 buses that keep our community moving. GMT is seeking an experienced 2:28 PM Mechanic with his or her own tools, preferably heavy–duty diesel experience and a CDL (we will train the right candidate to obtain their CDL), with the desire to continue in your professional development. Compensation is based on experience: hourly rate ranges from $17.50-$23.28. Other compensation includes a generous benefits package, $1050.00 annual tool allowance, and GMT provides uniforms and safety shoes. This is an exciting opportunity for an individual who would like to be part of a dedicated, committed team atmosphere with decades of experience. Mechanics receive a $500.00 sign on bonus at the completion of their probationary period. Benefits: GMT offers all full-time employees a competitive salary and exceptional benefits, paid premiums for health, dental, and vision: for both the employee and his/her family members and generous time off. • • • •

GMT offers 100% paid premium for health, dental, vision and prescription plans. GMT offers short-term disability. 100% of the premium is paid by GMT. GMT pays 100% of the premium for a $50,000 life insurance/accidental death and disability insurance. GMT offers great time off. Each new employee receives 2 weeks of vacation time, 6 sick days, 11 holidays and 1 personal day. Candidates must pass background checks, drug screening, and medical evaluation. To apply for these positions, please download an application from RideGMT.com. Submit the application in one of the following ways (no phone calls please): Via email to jobs@ridegmt.com Via fax to (802) 864-5564 or Via mail to: GMT, 15 Industrial Parkway, Burlington, VT, 05401 Attn: Human Resources

GMT IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER AND COMMITTED TO A DIVERSE WORKFORCE.

10v-GreenMountainTransit112616.indd 1

11/21/16 2:53 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

C-19 11.30.16-12.07.16

PARALEGAL Busy litigation firm seeks experienced paralegal. If you are an outgoing, motivated team player, possess strong leadership, organizational/ attention-to-detail and computer skills with a “can-do” attitude, this is a career opportunity for you!

MEDICAL BILLING AND CODING SPECIALIST

Prior experience required. 15-20 hours per week. $14-$16 per hour. Email resume to: ewalton233@gmail.com. NO CALLS, PLEASE.

2h-VTEyeLaser113016.indd 1

This is a full time position with competitive pay and benefits. Join a great team and work in a friendly office environment.

11/28/16 1:06 PM

SEND COVER LETTER AND RESUME TO: Jennifer Welsh, Office Manager Lynn, Lynn, Blackman & Manitsky, P.C. 76 St. Paul Street, Suite 400 Burlington, VT 05401 jwelsh@lynnlawvt.com

MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE SERVICES Case Manager – Safe Recovery Provide case management and specialized intervention services to people who inject drugs or who are athigh risk of injection drug use. This includes assessment, service coordination, risk reduction knowledge and skill development. Minimum of high school diploma required. Hiring rate is $15/ hour. Job ID# 3340

4t-LynnLynnBlackman113016.indd 1

CLINICAL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIST The Health Center in Plainfield, VT is looking for a Clinical Information Technologist to work with clinical leadership, provider teams, clinical support staff, and the EHR and related systems to ensure usability and patient-centered care, as well as compliance with quality initiatives.

Clinical Supervisor Act 1/Bridge Compassionate. Committed. Creative. An agent for change. We are seeking these qualities as we interview for this new position. The Clinical Supervisor assists and supports the Program Coordinator in providing clinical and administrative oversight to the Act 1/Bridge program, a 24-7 substance abuse crisis detox and stabilization program. LADC is required with three years’ prior experience in the substance abuse field. Counseling, organizational and crisis intervention skills also needed. FT. Job ID# 3537

FINANCIAL ASSISTANT We are also looking for a Financial Assistant to support Accounts Payable, Cash Collections, Financial Reporting, Payroll, and other financial systems.

Clinician – Substance Abuse – Chittenden Clinic Provide individual, group and family counseling and health home services to patients dependent on opioids in the context of an outpatient opioid treatment program. Seeking applicants with experience counseling clients with co-occurring disorders (individually and in a group settings), knowledge of substance abuse treatment imperative and experience preparing high-quality clinical documentation. LADC or AAP preferred. Positive attitude is essential as well as ability to collaborate with team members and community resources. Early morning shift. This is a full-time, benefits-eligible position with a starting annual salary of $41,008.50. Must be mental health license-eligible or licensed, and those who are already licensed in a mental health discipline will receive an additional $2,000 to the base pay (pro-rated for part-time positions). Job ID# 3576

11/28/16 4:07 PM

Send email of interest and resume to ekrajewski@the-health-center.org

4t-HealthCenter113016.indd 1

11/28/16 2:55 PM

DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES Residential Manager – Burlington & Starksboro Lead a strong direct service team supporting individuals in a residential setting. Residents are individuals with developmental disabilities working toward independence. Required: insightful, respectful communication, bachelor’s degree with minimum of two years’ experience, valid driver’s license and clean driving record. Job ID# 3610

For more information, please visit howardcentercareers.org. Howard Center offers an excellent benefits package including health, dental, and life insurance, as well as generous paid time off for all regular positions scheduled 20-plus-hours-per-week. Applicants needing assistance or an accommodation in completing the online application should feel free to contact Human Resources at 488-6950 or hrhelpdesk@howardcenter.org. 10v-HowardCenter113016.indd 1

11/28/16 1:16 PM

QUALITY ASSURANCE MANAGER

Vermont Creamery, a small specialty creamery with over 30 years of successful business, is looking for a Quality Assurance Manager to join our busy team. The Quality Assurance Manager directs and manages all aspects of Vermont Creamery’s Quality Assurance and Safety Program. Primary duties include managing the company’s third party BRC certification, implementing the HACCP plan, training employees in Good Manufacturing Practices, conducting audits, and ensuring regulatory compliance. Other duties include managing outside contractors and responding to and resolving customer complaints. The Quality Assurance Manager is also in charge of all safety aspects including OSHA requirements, and assists in Research & Development projects in collaboration with the Creamery Manager. To apply, send cover letter and resume to: Vermont Creamery, PO Box 95, 40 Pitman Road, Websterville, VT 05678 or jobs@vermontcreamery.com


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-20

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

11.30.16-12.07.16

Holiday Cash

As Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premier manufacturer of Smoked Hams and other smoked meats, sold directly to our customers through our catalog, web, and retail stores we have a variety of positions available throughout our company for days, early evenings, and weekend shifts. No experience is necessary; we will train you.

Champlain Community Services

Shared Living Provider

Manufacturing Warehouse Customer Service Reps

Open your home to an individual with an intellectual disability or autism. A generous stipend, paid time off (respite), comprehensive training & supports are available. We are currently offering a variety of opportunities.

Apply in person. 8 am to 5 pm Harringtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s of Vermont 210 East Main Street, Richmond, VT 05477

4t-harrington-112316.indd 1

For more information contact Jennifer Wolcott, jwolcott@ccs-vt.org or 655-0511 ext. 118.

11/21/16 2:08 PM

CHAMPLAIN COMMUNITY SERVICES 512 Troy Ave, Suite 1 Colchester, VT 05446 (802) 655-0511.

Join the rapidly growing healthcare IT industry and work in a fantastic team culture. PCC is an award-winning provider of software for pediatric practices. We seek a talented, energetic system administrator to

ccs-vt.org

EOE

join our company.

Client System Administrator

Untitled-27 1

10/27/163v-ChamplainCommServiceSHARED113016.indd 1:50 PM 11/28/16 1 4:08 PM

Our Client System Administrators work on our Technical Solutions Team to provide a broad range of technical services to our clients. They provide telephone support, remote system administration, and occasionally travel to client sites to install servers, networks and perform upgrades. This position requires a blend of exceptional technical and customer service skills. Candidates should have two or more years of professional, client-facing IT experience including Linux and Windows system administration, TCP/IP networking (firewalls, routers, switches, wireless, VPN, DHCP, DNS), good security practices, and comfort configuring and installing hardware. This position works as part of a dedicated, customer-centered account team. Some domestic travel and the ability to work occasional evenings and weekends is required.

As a Benefit Corporation, PCC places high value on client, employee and community relationships. Our company offers a friendly, informal, and professional work environment. PCC is located in the Champlain Mill in Winooski, VT. To learn more about PCC, this position, and how to apply, please visit our website at pcc.com/careers. The deadline for submitting your application is December 9. No phone calls, please.

T OW N O F E S S E X

Assistant Town Clerk II The Town of Essex, Vermont is seeking an Assistant Town Clerk II. Position involves administrative and responsible clerical work in connection with keeping of official municipal records, issuing a variety of licenses and official documents, assisting with elections, independently providing information to the general public and town departments. Works under the general supervision of the town clerk and in strict accordance with the applicable provisions of Vermont State Law, town bylaws and ordinances, and federal laws and regulations. Works under the general supervision of the town treasurer, collecting and recording tax payments. This is a complex administrative/clerical position requiring a high level of accuracy and attention to detail, constant contact with the general public, and willingness to assume all responsibilities in the absence of the Town Clerk. Ability to manage and prioritize multiple requests in a timely manner. Also requires the exercise of independent judgment, tact and initiative. High school education with experience in word processing; minimum of 5 years of prior experience in municipal clerk office required; consideration may be given for a combination of education beyond high school and experience in a comparable, responsible administrative position. Must be proficient in deed recording. Ability to perform accurate mathematical computations. Minimum starting salary is $17.97/hour DOE, plus excellent benefits. Position open until filled. Apply with cover letter, and resume to: Patrick Scheidel, Town Manager, 81 Main Street, Essex Junction, VT 05452 or via email to dfisher@essex.org. www.essex.org EOE 7t-TownofEssex113016.indd 1

6t-PCC112613.indd 1

11/21/16 3:45 PM

11/23/16 12:21 PM


More food before the classifieds section.

PAGE 48

SIDEdishes

food+drink

Fresh. Filtered. Free.

CONT I NUED FROM PA GE 4 5

Traditional Pies • Dinner Rolls Cookies • Cakes Stuffing Mix and More!

sevendaysvt.com/daily7 16t-daily7-coffee.indd 1

COURTESY OF SHEM ROOSE

oliday h r u o ! y Book ith us today w party

Celebrate the Holidays Gluten-Free!

34 Park Street, Essex Junction

878-1646

1/13/1416t-westmeadowfarm112515.indd 1:51 PM 1

11/18/15 11:22 AM

Brunch at Hatchet Tap and Table

— S.P.

HATCHET TAP AND TABLE ADDS BRUNCH; DONNY’S NEW YORK PIZZA, JUNIOR’S RUSTICO CLOSE

— H.P.E.

CONNECT Follow us for the latest food gossip! On Twitter: Hannah Palmer Egan: @findthathannah. On Instagram: Hannah, Julia Clancy and Suzanne Podhaizer: @7deatsvt.

26 Seymour Street | Middlebury | 802.388.7166 | fireandicerestaurant.com 6H-fireandice112316.indd 1

11/21/16 1:23 PM

All-Clad Stainless Steel 1.5qt Saucepan

Reg $150

NOW $ 7999 72 Church Street • Burlington • 863-4226 M-TH 9AM-8PM F-S 9AM-9PM SUN 10AM-6PM

6H-KTC113016.indd 1

Say you saw it in...

mini2col-sawit-3Dcmyk.indd 1

www.KissTheCook.net 11/17/16 1:59 PM

NOW IN sevendaysvt.com

3D!

1/12/10 9:51:52 AM

FOOD 49

As of mid-November, Chittenden County residents have two fewer places to order a pizza. In Winooski, the MICHAELIDES family shuttered Donny’s New York Pizza & Sports Bar on November 11, ending 18 years of serving thin-crust pizzas and Greek-inflected fare. Thomas Hirchak Company is scheduled to auction the contents of the restaurant on Wednesday, November 30. The family did not

Fire & Ice

Vermont’s Iconic steakhouse

SEVEN DAYS

On Sunday, November 27, Richmond’s HATCHET TAP AND TABLE added Sunday brunch to its repertoire of seasonal menus, craft cocktails, local pours and housemade creemees. The first installment rang in the post-Thanksgiving holiday season with updated classics: pork-belly Benedicts, red flannel hash decked with BOYDEN FARM corned beef,

— J.C.

return comment requests by press time. On Shelburne Road in Burlington, FRANKE and EVELYN SALESE closed Junior’s Rustico in late October. The spot had served Latin-inspired tapas and wood-fired pizzas since November 2014. A Facebook post dated October 24 said Rustico would reopen with a restructured concept “in a couple weeks,” but a follow-up post on November 2 made the closing permanent. Via email earlier this month, Salese declined to discuss the closing but acknowledged he’d shifted his focus to JUNIOR’S AT STOWE, which replaced Gracie’s Restaurant at 18 Edson Hill Road in July. “You should make your way up to STOWE,” he wrote. “I’m running [the] kitchen personally!”

11.30.16-12.07.16

Crumbs: Leftover Food News

and made-from-scratch cranberry granola with candied ginger. “There was room for a full-service Sunday brunch,” says Hatchet’s chef-owner, GABRIEL FIRMAN. “Plus, personally, I love brunch.” And since Richmond is less than 20 minutes from Burlington, he adds, “We’re not far off the beaten path.” Specialty cocktails such as Aperol spritzers, mimosas and Bloody Hatchets (the tavern’s take on a Bloody Mary) are available for a Sunday morning hair-of-the-dog fix, should your Saturday night warrant one.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

which touted the school’s hands-on approach. With Grataski on board, it can now offer classes such as Garden Literacy, Edible and Medicinal Forest Gardens, and the Art and Science of Soil Fertility. Most will last for a weekend, with their cost including food and camping. In the works is an advanced program, Salon says, that would bring participants together for a weekend each month over 10 months.


NOVEMBER 30 - DECEMBER 7, 2016

WED.30 dance

DROP-IN HIP-HOP DANCE: Beginners are welcome at a groove session inspired by infectious beats. Swan Dojo, Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m. $15. Info, 540-8300.

environment

CLIMATE CHANGE DISCUSSION: Environmentally conscious community members join Vermont Institute of Natural Sciences for a heated conversation on global politics and climate change. Upper Valley Food Co-op, White River Junction, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 359-5000, ext. 245.

AMERICAN RED CROSS BLOOD DRIVE: Healthy donors give the gift of life. U.S. Army Reserve, Rutland, noon-6 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 800-733-2767. BURLINGTON DEATH CAFÉ: Individuals meet for a thought-provoking and respectful conversation about death and dying. All Saints Episcopal Church, South Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 985-8984. CAREER SERVICES: A Community College of Vermont job-hunt helper assists employment seekers with everything from résumé writing to online applications. Winooski Memorial Library, 1-4 p.m. Free. Info, 655-6424. GIRLS’ RIDE OUT: WRENCH NIGHT: Femaleidentifying cyclists come first at a drop-in bike-repair shop where questions are welcome. Bike Recycle Vermont, Burlington, 6-9 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 863-4475.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

film

11.30.16-12.07.16

food & drink

COMMUNITY SUPPER: A scrumptious spread connects friends and neighbors. Bring a dessert to share. The Wellness Co-op, Burlington, 5-5:45 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 300. VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: Local products — think produce, breads, pastries, cheeses, wines, syrups, jewelry, crafts and beauty supplies — draw shoppers to a diversified bazaar. Vermont Farmers Food Center, Rutland, 3-6 p.m. Free. Info, 342-4727.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: Strategic players have fun with the popular card game. Burlington Bridge Club, Williston, 9:15 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. $6. Info, 872-5722.

health & fitness

etc.

EPIC MINDFULNESS MEDITATION: Guided practice and group conversation with Yushin Sola cultivate well-being. Railyard Apothecary, Burlington, 7:308:30 p.m. $14. Info, 299-9531. EVERY WEDNESDAY, EVERYONE TAI CHI: Beginners and longtime practitioners alike improve balance, posture and coordination through the Chinese martial art. Ascension Lutheran Church, South Burlington, 5-6 p.m. Donations. Info, 862-8866. GENTLE TAI CHI: Madeleine Piat-Landolt guides students in a sequence of postures with an emphasis on relaxation and alignment. Champlain Senior Center, McClure MultiGenerational Center, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 658-3585. GINGER’S FITNESS BOOT CAMP: Students get pumped with an interval-style workout that boosts muscle strength, cardiovascular fitness, agility, balance and coordination. Middlebury Municipal Gym, 7-8 a.m. $12. Info, 343-7160.

‘ALL OF ME’: Bess O’Brien’s latest documentary explores the lives of people consumed with eating disorders. A discussion follows. Woodstock Town Hall Theatre, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 457-3981.

INSIGHT MEDITATION: Attendees absorb Buddhist principles and practices. Wellspring Mental Health and Wellness Center, Hardwick, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 472-6694.

‘THE ENDURANCE’: Viewers are frozen in suspense during the 2000 retelling of Sir Ernest Shackleton’s Antarctic expedition. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600.

LUNAR YOGA/PILATES: Female-identifying students empower and tone the feminine mind, body and spirit. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 10:30-11:45 a.m. $10. Info, 779-0444.

SOIRÉE CINÉ: ‘GABRIELLE’: A young woman confronts prejudice and her own physical limitations in this 2013 drama shown in French with English subtitles. Room 111, Cheray Science Hall, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, 654-2000.

MORNING FLOW YOGA: Greet the sun with a grounding and energizing class for all levels. The Wellness Collective, Burlington, 10-11 a.m. $10. Info, 540-0186.

WARREN MILLER’S ‘HERE, THERE & EVERYWHERE’: Big names in skiing and snowboarding tackle daunting peaks around the globe in this tribute to all things snow sports. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, 7:30 p.m. $15-18. Info, 382-9222.

NIA WITH LINDA: Eclectic music and movements drawn from healing, martial and dance arts propel an animated barefoot workout. South End Studio, Burlington, 8:30-9:30 a.m. $14; free for first-timers. Info, 372-1721.

SEVEN DAYS

WED.30

50 CALENDAR

COURTESY OF LINDSAY RAYMONDJACK PHOTOGRAPHY

calendar

» P.52

List your upcoming event here for free! SUBMISSION DEADLINES: ALL SUBMISSIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY THURSDAY AT NOON FOR CONSIDERATION IN THE FOLLOWING WEDNESDAY’S NEWSPAPER. FIND OUR CONVENIENT FORM AND GUIDELINES AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT. YOU CAN ALSO EMAIL US AT CALENDAR@SEVENDAYSVT.COM. TO BE LISTED, YOU MUST INCLUDE THE NAME OF EVENT, A BRIEF DESCRIPTION, SPECIFIC LOCATION, DATE, TIME, COST AND CONTACT PHONE NUMBER.

CALENDAR EVENTS IN SEVEN DAYS: LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY KRISTEN RAVIN. SEVEN DAYS EDITS FOR SPACE AND STYLE. DEPENDING ON COST AND OTHER FACTORS, CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS MAY BE LISTED IN EITHER THE CALENDAR OR THE CLASSES SECTION. WHEN APPROPRIATE, CLASS ORGANIZERS MAY BE ASKED TO PURCHASE A CLASS LISTING.

WINTER

READING What could be better on a snowy winter’s night than settling in for an evening of stories and songs? It’s the time of year when Vermont Stage invites folks to come in out of the cold for its annual holiday production, Winter Tales. This treasury of poems and narratives features local raconteurs performing new works by Vermont writers Stephen Kiernan, Kathryn Blume, State Sen. Philip Baruth and music man Pete Sutherland. Poetry by Young Writers Project students and original tunes from Sutherland and Patti Casey pepper this seasonal celebration of words.


Music History

DEC.7 | TALKS

Former Middlebury College Alexander Twilight artist-in-residence François Clemmons aims to preserve traditional African American spirituals. Moved by the American folksong form originated by African slaves, Clemmons founded the Harlem Spiritual Ensemble. The Grammy Award-winning opera singer once known for his recurring role as the friendly Officer Clemmons on “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” explains how slaves’ experiences led to the genre’s formation. Clemmons shares his performance lecture “If You Don’t Want Your Slave to Speak Freely, You Should Also Forbid Him to Sing!” as part of the Vermont Humanities Council’s First Wednesdays series.

FRANÇOIS CLEMMONS

Wednesday, December 7, 7-8:30 p.m., at Rutland Free Library. Free. Info, 773-1860. vermonthumanities.org

No Passport Required Vermonters can experience arts, crafts, food, dance and music from around the world without leaving the Green Mountain State. This weekend, the Champlain Valley Exposition is transformed into a display of global cultures for the 24th annual Vermont International Festival. Attendees can take a virtual world tour while browsing wares from more than 50 craft vendors and community groups, including newly added artisans from Peru, Uzbekistan and India. An eclectic selection of traditional eats from Brazil, Uruguay, Tibet, Poland and other countries fuels festivalgoers, and music and dance performances by the likes of Heather Morris Celtic Dancers and Grup Anwar put cultural traditions at center stage.

DEC.2-4 | FAIRS & FESTIVALS

Friday, December 2, 5-8 p.m.; Saturday, December 3, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; and Sunday, December 4, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., at Champlain Valley Exposition in Essex Junction. $5-20; free for kids under 6. Info, 863-6713. vermontinternationalfestival.com

Festival Favorites

DEC.3 | FILM

MIFF AT WRIF Saturday, December 3, 3 and 7 p.m., at Briggs Opera House in White River Junction. $5-9. Info, 281-3785. wrif.org

CALENDAR 51

DEC.7 | HOLIDAYS

SEVEN DAYS

Wednesday, December 7, 7:30 p.m., at FlynnSpace in Burlington. See website for additional dates. $28.80-37.50. Info, 8635966. flynntix.org

11.30.16-12.07.16

‘WINTER TALES’

White River Indie Films treats Vermont movie buffs to a look back at the offerings from the 2016 Maine International Film Festival. In addition to highlighting short and feature films shown at the July festival, two programs give cinephiles an introduction to festival director Ken Eisen and shorts programmer Karen Young. Young kicks off the cinematic celebration with a selection of short films, including her 1995 work The Pesky Suitor, starring Claire Danes. MIFF director Eisen closes the curtain with a screening of the 2015 feature Louder Than Bombs, an emotional drama starring Isabelle Huppert and Jesse Eisenberg.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

VERMONT INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL


calendar WED.30

A CHRISTMAS CAROL

VIENNA BOYS CHOIR

FLYNN SHOW CHOIRS

« P.50

PERSONAL BEST RUNNER’S CIRCUIT: A small-group training class prepares athletes to meet their goals and avoid injury. Your Personal Best Fitness, South Burlington, 5:45-6:30 p.m. $15. Info, 658-1616. RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: Physical and mental strength improve as the result of a stretching session for all ability levels. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 861-3150. R.I.P.P.E.D.: Resistance, intervals, power, plyometrics, endurance and diet define this high-intensity physical-fitness program. North End Studio B, Burlington, 6 p.m. $10. Info, 578-9243. SMILE! HERBS FOR ORAL HEALTH: Natural dental remedies keep teeth and gums in good condition. Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism, Montpelier, 6-8 p.m. $5-17; preregister. Info, 224-7100.

12/1 TH

Nebraska Theatre Caravan

A CHRISTMAS CAROL Flynn MainStage

THE ROSE ENSEMBLE UVM Recital Hall (12/1-2)

12/2 FR

WARREN MILLER

12/9 FR

CÒIG

TAI CHI FOR ALL: Shaina Levee instructs attendees wearing loose, comfy clothing in moving meditation. Jericho Town Library, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 899-4686.

12/10 SA

VSO HOLIDAY POPS

WEDNESDAY NIGHT SOUND BATH: Draw in the good vibrations of gongs, bowls and didgeridoos — a relaxing sonic massage to get you through the week. The Wellness Collective, Burlington, 7:30-9 p.m. $15. Info, 510-697-7790.

Here, There, & Everywhere Flynn MainStage (6:30 & 9:30 pm)

Flynn MainStage

Palace 9 Cinemas (2 & 7 pm)

12/17 SA Vermont Ballet Theater

VERMONT’S OWN NUTCRACKER

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 11.30.16-12.07.16

THE VERMONT CHORAL UNION

Flynn MainStage (12/17-18)

SOLARIS VOCAL ENSEMBLE

St. Paul’s Cathedral

12/8 TH

Vermont Stage Company 12/18 SU

Palace 9 Cinemas (2 & 7 pm)

ON SALE & COMING SOON

SOLARIS VOCAL ENSEMBLE

College St. Congregational

A Holiday Celebration Flynn MainStage

WAR HORSE

SEVEN DAYS

Waterbury Congregational

VIENNA BOYS CHOIR National Theatre Live

FLYNN SHOW CHOIRS

NO MAN’S LAND

CVU High School

FlynnSpace (12/7-11)

NORTHERN STAGE’S ‘A CHRISTMAS CAROL’: Northern Stage interprets this timeless holiday classic about Ebenezer Scrooge and a trio of ghosts. Barrette Center for the Arts, White River Junction, 11 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. $14-64. Info, 296-7000.

National Theatre Live

First Baptist Church (12/3-4)

WINTER TALES

ORIANA SINGERS

FlynnSpace (12/15-16)

BELLA VOCE

12/7 WE

ZUMBA: Lively Latin rhythms fuel this dance-fitness phenomenon for all experience levels. Vergennes Opera House, 6 p.m. $10. Info, 349-0026.

College St. Congregational

VSO MASTERWORKS

JOE LOVANO AND JUDI SILVANO

ORCHESTRACHORUS-PALOOZA Flynn MainStage

Main Street Landing Film House 12/15 TH

12/4 SU

Flynn MainStage

12/11 SU VT Youth Orchestra Assoc.

LEGENDS OF AMERICAN SKIING 12/3 SA

UVM Recital Hall

HANDEL’S MESSIAH Elley-Long Music Center

12/31 SA

FIRST NIGHT BURLINGTON

Various Burlington locations

NEW YEAR’S EVE AT HOTEL VERMONT Hotel Vermont

52 CALENDAR

Lewis Black | Barenaked Ladies NTL’s Twelfth Night

802-86-FLYNN l 153 Main St., Burlington Untitled-54 1

11/23/16 11:35 AM

holidays

LOST NATION THEATER’S ‘IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE: A LIVE RADIO PLAY’: In front of a live studio audience, five versatile actors and a sound effects wizard interpret the story of a down-and-out man who meets his guardian angel. Montpelier City Hall Auditorium, 7 p.m. $10-15; free for kids under 11 with a paying adult. Info, 229-0492. ST. ALBANS FESTIVAL OF TREES: Movies, crafts, live entertainment and more set the holiday season in motion. See festivaloftreesvt.com for details. Downtown St. Albans, 6:30-8 p.m. Prices vary; most events are free. Info, 527-7243. USING SUGAR SUBSTITUTES FOR FAVORITE HOLIDAY RECIPES: Home cooks learn to use Stevia, licorice root, dates and more to sweeten festive treats. Community Room, Hunger Mountain Coop, Montpelier, 6-7:30 p.m. $10-12; preregister. Info, info@hungermountain.coop.

kids

KIDS’ DUNGEONS & DRAGONS: Experienced and novice players take on challenges to defeat enemies in this pen-and-paper role-playing game. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6-7:45 p.m. Free. Info, jmuse@colchestervt.gov. ONE-ON-ONE TUTORING: First through sixth graders get extra help in reading, math and science. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4-8 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 264-5660. RICHMOND STORY TIME: Lit lovers ages 2 through 5 are introduced to the wonderful world of reading. Richmond Free Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 434-3036. STEM CLUB: Inquisitive kids tackle challenges in science, technology, engineering and math. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 849-2420. STORY TIME & PLAYGROUP: Engrossing plots unfold into fun activities for tots up to age 6. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 426-3581. YOUNG WRITERS & STORYTELLERS: Kindergarteners through fifth graders practice crafting narratives. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4-5 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 264-5660.

language

BEGINNER ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASS: Students build a foundation in reading, speaking and writing. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211. INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: Pupils improve their speaking and grammar mastery. Private residence, Burlington, 6 p.m. $20. Info, 324-1757. INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASS: Learners take communication to the next level. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211.

lgbtq

LGBTQ GENDER-FREE SQUARE DANCE CLASS: Folks with a twinkle in their eye and in their toes bring a water bottle and a sense of humor to a stepping session for all abilities. No partner necessary. Social Hall, Ohavi Zedek Synagogue, Burlington, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $5-10; free for firsttimers. Info, dance@together.net.

music

DANA SIPOS: Haunting numbers influenced by Canada’s high country captivate listeners. Abigail Lapell, Super Super Serious Please Don’t Laugh Band and Christina Nori also perform. ROTA Gallery and Studio, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 7 p.m. $3-10. Info, rotagallery@gmail.com. JAZZ VOCAL ENSEMBLE & TUESDAY COMBO: Jazz classics from the Philadelphia music scene get heads bopping. University of Vermont Recital Hall, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 656-3040. SONG CIRCLE: COMMUNITY SING-ALONG: Heidi Wilson leads an evening of vocal expression. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 6:45-8:15 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581. THETFORD CHAMBER SINGERS: “For Each of Us” contains seasonal choral selections spanning five centuries. United Church of Strafford, 7 p.m. $8-15. Info, 870-6362.

seminars

CYBER SECURITY WORKSHOP: Attendees learn how to safeguard their systems and networks against viruses, hacking and other threats. Beaulieu Place Conference Rooms, Central Vermont Chamber of Commerce, Berlin, 7:30-9 a.m. $20-25; preregister; limited space. Info, 229-5711.

sports

WOMEN’S PICKUP BASKETBALL: Ladies dribble up and down the court during an evening of friendly competition. See meetup.com for details. Lyman C. Hunt Middle School, Burlington, 8-9:30 p.m. $3; $50 for season pass. Info, carmengeorgevt@gmail.com.

talks

JULIE MOORE: The Stone Environmental Inc. engineer gets to the bottom of nutrient and sediment losses in the Lake Champlain basin. Room 207, Bentley Hall, Johnson State College, 4-5:15 p.m. Free. Info, leslie.kanat@jsc.edu. LOUIS DEROSSET: The professor schools listeners with “The Social Determinants of Reference, or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Metaphysics.” Memorial Lounge, Waterman Building, University of Vermont, Burlington, 4-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 656-3166.

words

FRIENDS OF THE STOWE FREE LIBRARY BOOK SALE: Page turners for kids and adults find new homes. Stowe Free Library, 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 253-6145. VETERANS’ BOOK GROUP: Those who have served their country join Michael Heaney for a discussion of texts. South Burlington Veterans Center, 5-6:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 862-1806. WEDNESDAY WORKSHOP: CHAPTER FOCUS: Folks give feedback on selections of up to 40 pages penned by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

WRITING CIRCLE: Prompts flow into a 30-minute freewrite and sharing opportunities in an atmosphere without judgment. The Wellness Co-op, Burlington, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 303.

THU.1 OPEN DISCUSSION: Concerned community members converge to address issues of racism, oppression and empathy. Greensboro Free Library, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister for childcare. Info, rosecheney@yahoo.com.

‘THEO WHO LIVED’: This 2016 documentary focuses on Vermont journalist Theo Padnos, who was kidnapped by Al-Qaeda. Merrill’s Roxy Cinema, Burlington, 7 p.m. $6.50-9.75. Info, 864-4742.

NEBRASKA THEATRE CARAVAN’S ‘A CHRISTMAS CAROL’: Miserly Mr. Scrooge gets unexpected Christmas Eve visitors in Nebraska Theatre Caravan’s adaptation of Charles Dickens’ tale. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $15-45. Info, 863-5966.

food & drink

COCKTAIL PARTY: Themed beverages please palates at a weekly sipping session complete with shuffleboard. Stonecutter Spirits, Middlebury, noon-8 p.m. Cost of drinks; BYO food. Info, 388-3000.

LI

ER

HO

ST

O RY

FOUNDERS’ BEER NIGHT: Suds lovers are in hog heaven when Founders Brewing beer flows from six different taps. Big Fatty’s BBQ, AY RA S| White River Junction, 5-8 p.m. Cost of TC ‘CL NU AR A ’S D REA M : A food and drink. Info, 295-5513.

D

CK

.1 |

bazaars

THU

OPEN STUDIO: Friends new and old convene for a creative session. Expressive Arts Burlington, 12:302:30 p.m. $15. Info, 343-8172.

LOST NATION THEATER’S ‘IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE: A LIVE RADIO PLAY’: See WED.30.

WARREN MILLER’S ‘HERE, THERE & EVERYWHERE’: See WED.30.

activism

art

in the Andes Mountains. Bellows Falls Opera House, 6:15 p.m. $5. Info, teresasavel@yahoo.com.

BAKED BEADS JEWELRY & SCARF SALE: Fashion hounds scoop up baubles and more at low prices. Holiday Inn, South Burlington, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Free. Info, 496-2440.

PENNYWISE PANTRY: On a tour of the store, shoppers create a custom template for keeping the kitchen stocked with affordable, nutritious eats. City Market/Onion River Co-op, Burlington, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, 861-9757.

business

games

BURLINGTON BUSINESS ASSOCIATION WINTER SOCIAL: BBA members connect with community leaders over catered eats, a cash bar and live music. University of Vermont Alumni House, Burlington, 5-7:30 p.m. $30-45. Info, 863-1175.

CHITTENDEN COUNTY CHESS CLUB: Checkmate! Strategic thinkers make calculated moves as they vie for their opponents’ kings. Faith United Methodist Church, South Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 324-1143.

OPEN HOUSE: The Center for Women & Enterprise Vermont opens its doors to area entrepreneurs. Center for Women & Enterprise, Burlington, 1 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 391-4871.

POKÉMON LEAGUE: I choose you, Pikachu! Players of the trading-card game earn weekly and monthly prizes in a fun, friendly environment where newbies can be coached by league leaders. Brap’s Magic, Burlington, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0498.

community

health & fitness

INFORMATIONAL SESSION: Those interested in home-sharing programs meet with staff to learn more. HomeShare Vermont, South Burlington, 1010:30 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 863-5625.

dance

FOR REAL WOMEN SERIES WITH BELINDA: GIT UR FREAK ON: R&B and calypso-dancehall music is the soundtrack to an empowering stepping session aimed at confronting body shaming. Swan Dojo, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. $15. Info, bestirredfitness@ gmail.com.

LA LECHE LEAGUE MEETING: Nursing mothers share breastfeeding tips and resources. Essex Free Library, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, lllessexvt@gmail.com. POSTNATAL SELF-EMPOWERMENT: Mothers and babes-in-arms circle up for a reflective session centered on embracing one’s self and family amid the chaos of daily life. Prenatal Method Studio, Burlington, noon-1 p.m. $10-20. Info, 829-0211.

‘PALOMITA’: A film by Vermont’s Teresa Savel follows a collective of indigenous women doll makers

.2

|D

AN

A VERY VINTAGE CHRISTMAS!: Champagne, wine, cheese, cookies and retro threads make for an evening of good old-fashioned fun. Billie Jean Vintage, Stowe, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 760-6052.

kids

BURLINGTON GARDEN CLUB HOLIDAY LUNCHEON: An afternoon affair benefiting the club is complete with a pink elephant sale, a plant sale, a bake sale and a silent auction. Faith United Methodist Church, South Burlington, noon-2:30 p.m. $10. Info, 489-5485. NORTHERN STAGE’S ‘A CHRISTMAS CAROL’: See WED.30, 2 & 7:30 p.m. ‘CLARA’S DREAM: A NUTCRACKER STORY’: Fresh choreography puts a new spin on the classic ballet for adults and kids alike. Preperformance tea at the Lebanon Ballet School is optional for some shows. Lebanon Opera House, N.H., 7:30 p.m. $9-37. Info, 603-448-0400. FILM: ‘BACH CHRISTMAS ORATORIO’: The Hamburg Ballet celebrates the six feasts of Christmas in a 2013 recorded dance performance. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe Mountain Resort, 7 p.m. $16. Info, 760-4634.

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for great deals and giveaways.

973 Roosevelt Highway Colchester • 655-5550 www.threebrotherspizzavt.com

BABY & TODDLER PLAYGROUP: Parents connect while kids up to age 3 enjoy toys, stories, challah GG12v-threebros112316.indd 1 and juice. Social Hall, Ohavi Zedek Synagogue, Burlington, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, grace@ ohavizedek.org.

11/9/16 12:41 PM

FOOD FOR THOUGHT TEEN LIBRARY VOLUNTEERS: Pizza fuels a discussion of books and library projects. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. LEGO CLUB: Brightly colored interlocking blocks inspire developing minds. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660.

presents

MUSICAL STORY TIME: Little ones keep the beat with rhythm instruments while Inger Dybfest strums the guitar. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 10:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 985-5124.

AT BURLINGTON December

PJ STORY HOUR: Little ones dress for bed and wind down with tales and treats. Fairfax Community Library, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 849-2420.

SAT 3 11AM

EUGENIE DOYLE: SLEEP TIGHT FARM

SUN 4 2-4PM

FULL CIRCLE

SAT 10 2-4PM

GUIDO MASÉ & JOVIAL KING: DIY BITTERS

PLAINFIELD PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Tykes ages 2 through 5 discover the magic of literature. Cutler Memorial Library, Plainfield, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 454-8504. PRESCHOOL MUSIC: Half-pints have fun with song and dance. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

O

E NC

R

SNOWFLAKE FACTORY: Creations made of pipe cleaners, beads and paper come in all shapes and sizes. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 3:15-5 p.m. Free. Info, 985-5124.

THURSDAY PLAY TIME: Kiddos and their caregivers convene for casual fun. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 11 a.m.noon. Free. Info, 878-4918.

CE | F EC A LL D AN C

holidays

$24.99

Plus tax. Pick-up or delivery only. Expires 12/31/16. Limit: 1 offer per customer per day.

ST. ALBANS FESTIVAL OF TREES: See WED.30, 6:30-7:15 p.m.

READ TO ARCHIE: Budding bookworms join a friendly therapy dog for entertaining tails — er, tales. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:15-4 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

RI

2 large, 1-topping pizzas & 2-liter Coke product

language

FRENCH CONVERSATION: Speakers improve their linguistic dexterity in the romantic tongue. Bradford Public Library, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 222-4536.

Browse for gifts while you enjoy live holiday music from many countries and times. Free.

Join the founders of Urban Moonshine for a book signing and meet and greet featuring delicious samples from the pages of their new book. Free.

AT ESSEX December SUN 4 MEET THE GRINCH! 12PM Bring a camera to

music

FIRST THURSDAY CONCERT: Guitarist Aaron Flinn treats music lovers to an intimate show. Partial proceeds benefit Passion for Paws. Shelburne Vineyard, 6-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 985-8222.

get your photo taken, and grow your heart three sizes by bringing a nonperishable donation for the food shelf. All ages. Free

JAZZ WINTER CONCERT: Eleven-piece ensemble the Mambo Combo give life to works by Jaco Pastorius, Wayne Shorter Hoagy Carmichael and others. E. Glenn Giltz Auditorium, Hawkins Hall, SUNY Plattsburgh, N.Y., 7:30-10 p.m. Free. Info, 518-564-2243. THU.1

Join local farmer and children’s author Eugenie Doyle for a storytime and activity in partnership with City Market. All ages. Free.

» P.54

191 Bank Street, Downtown Burlington • 802.448.3350 21 Essex Way, Essex • 802.872.7111 www.phoenixbooks.biz

6v-phoenixbooks113016.indd 1

CALENDAR 53

film

TAI CHI FOR WOMEN’S HEALTH: Moving and standing postures focus on the core, pelvic floor, back and legs. Pre- and postnatal participants are welcome. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 5:30-6:15 p.m. $10. Info, 779-0444.

$19.99

SEVEN DAYS

DANCE, PAINT, WRITE: DROP-IN: Teens and adults create, connect, heal and grow through self-guided movement and art set to music. Expressive Arts Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. $20; free for first-timers. Info, 343-8172.

MINDFULNESS MEDITATION: Seekers clear their heads, finding inspiration and creativity. The Wellness Co-op, Burlington, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 303.

1 large, 1-topping pizza, 12 boneless wings, 2 liter Coke product

11.30.16-12.07.16

ASTROLOGY MEET-UP: Beginners and advanced practitioners alike come together to talk and share resources on the study of celestial bodies. Railyard Apothecary and Yoga Studio, Burlington, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 318-6050.

FORZA: THE SAMURAI SWORD WORKOUT: Students sculpt lean muscles and gain mental focus when using wooden replicas of the weapon. North End Studio A, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. $10. Info, 578-9243.

F

etc.

CORNWALL FITNESS BOOT CAMP: Interval training helps participants improve strength, agility, endurance and cardiovascular fitness. Cornwall Volunteer Fire Department, 9-10 a.m. $12. Info, 343-7160.

HOLIDAY SPECIAL

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

CONTEMPORARY DANCE CLASS: Instruction for individuals of varying ability levels is tailored to each mover’s unique style. North End Studio B, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. $5; free for first-timers. Info, 863-6713.

COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS: A 20-minute guided practice with Andrea O’Connor alleviates stress and tension. Tea and a discussion follow. Winooski Senior Center, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 233-1161.

THE ROSE ENSEMBLE: Vocalists explore the miracle of new life amid the cold of winter in “A Rose in Winter: A Garden of Medieval and Renaissance Music for the Nativity.” University of Vermont Recital Hall, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $10-40. Info, 656-4455.

T

COMMUNITY DISCUSSION: Residents chew the fat over the values of space and community growth. The Wellness Co-op, Burlington, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 303.

‘RIFFTRAX HOLIDAY SPECIAL DOUBLE FEATURE’: Michael J. Nelson, Kevin Murphy and Bill Corbett offer wisecracking commentary on Santa Claus Conquers the Martians and Rifftrax Live: Christmas Shorts-stravaganza! Palace 9 Cinemas, South Burlington, 7 p.m. $14. Info, 660-9300.

11/22/16 3:40 PM


calendar THU.1

« P.53

crafts

sports

BURLINGTON RUGBY FOOTBALL CLUB: Veterans and new players lace up for practices and games on mixed-gender teams. Bring personal cleats, a mouth guard and a water bottle. Fort Ethan Allen Athletic Fields, Colchester, 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, burlingtonrugbyevents@gmail.com. FREE AIKIDO CLASS: An introduction to the Japanese martial art focuses on centering and finding freedom while under attack. Aikido of Champlain Valley, Burlington, 6-7:15 p.m. Free. Info, 951-8900.

talks

BRYAN PFEIFFER: The naturalist treats fans of feathered fliers to “Getting Gulls: A Virtual Field Trip.” Essex High School, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, gmas@greenmountainaudubon.org.

MAGGIE’S FIBER FRIDAY FOR ADULTS: Veteran knitter Maggie Loftus facilitates an informal gathering of crafters. Main Reading Room, Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 6maggie2@myfairpoint.net.

dance

BALLROOM & LATIN DANCING: Learn new moves with Ballroom Nights, then join others in a dance social featuring waltz, tango and more. Singles, couples and beginners are welcome. Williston Jazzercise Fitness Center, lesson, 7-8 p.m.; dance social, 8-9:30 p.m. $10-14; $8 for dance only. Info, 862-2269. EAT MY ART OUT: Local dancers and choreographers showcase works in progress in a night of creativity and feedback. New City Galerie, Burlington, 7 p.m. $5-10. Info, 735-2542. ECSTATIC DANCE VERMONT: Jubilant motions with the Green Mountain Druid Order inspire divine connections. Auditorium, Christ Episcopal Church, Montpelier, 7-9 p.m. $10. Info, 505-8011.

PANEL DISCUSSION IN RECOGNITION OF WORLD AIDS DAY: Experts connect the dots between income levels and HIV risk. Robert A. Jones House, Middlebury College, 4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168.

Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 7 p.m. $10-40. Info, 603-646-2422. KICKOFF MEETING FOR LYRIC THEATRE’S ‘9 TO 5, THE MUSICAL’: Theater lovers learn about opportunities to participate onstage and behind the scenes in this comic musical based on the 1980 hit movie. Lyric Theatre Company Office/Warehouse, South Burlington, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 363-4599. Untitled-18 1

11/28/16 2:09 PM

One of a Kind Estate Jewelry

‘TALLEY’S FOLLY’: A St. Louis accountant and an educated liberal woman share their innermost secrets in Lanford Wilson’s 1979 play. Hepburn Zoo, Hepburn Hall, Middlebury College, 7:30 p.m. $5. Info, 443-3168.

words

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

CHUCK COLLINS: The author covers his book Born on Third Base: A One Percenter Makes the Case for Tackling Inequality, Bringing Wealth Home, and Committing to the Common Good. First Unitarian Universalist Society, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 862-5630. FRIENDS OF THE STOWE FREE LIBRARY BOOK SALE: See WED.30, noon-7 p.m. GEEK MOUNTAIN STATE SCI-FI/FANTASY BOOK DISCUSSION: Propelled by pizza, word nerds gab about Uprooted by Naomi Novik. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 7-8:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 985-5124.

11.30.16-12.07.16

DESIGNING PERENNIAL POLYCULTURES: Green thumbs get the dirt on creating successful combinations of plants at a seminar with Aaron Guman and Graham Unangst-Rufenacht. Community Room, Hunger Mountain Coop, Montpelier, 6-7:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, info@hungermountain.coop.

54 CALENDAR

FRI.2

SEVEN DAYS

RECITE!: Rhyme-and-meter masters regale listeners with original and chosen poetry at this monthly meet-up. Mon Vert Café, Woodstock, 5:30-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 457-299-7073.

agriculture

112 CHURCH ST. BURLINGTON, VT 802-862-1042

WWW.LIPPAS.COM 4T-lippas113016.indd 1

Lippa’s 11/23/16 1:37 PM

bazaars

BAKED BEADS JEWELRY & SCARF SALE: See THU.1.

community

FEAST TOGETHER OR FEAST TO GO: Senior citizens and their guests catch up over a shared meal. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, noon-1 p.m. $7-9; preregister. Info, 262-6288.

LA

R

T. SA

ENGLISH COUNTRY DANCE: Wendy Gilchrist and Martha Kent lead casually dressed hooftheater ers in the steps popular in the CIRQUE MECHANICS: Seasoned cir3 |H time of Jane Austen. Elley-Long CU cus performers inhabit a postapocaOL A T ID A Music Center, Saint Michael’s College, PEC YS | H lyptic world of machines in Pedal Punk. OLIDAY S Colchester, 7-9:30 p.m. $10. Info, 899-2378. Moore Theater, Hopkins Center for the Arts, FALL DANCE CONCERT: Middlebury College dance pupils show the fruits of their labor. Dance Theatre, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 8 p.m. $6-12. Info, 443-6433.

JOHNSON STATE COLLEGE DANCE CLUB: Students bring spectacular choreography to the stage in Danceland. Dibden Center for the Arts, Johnson State College, 7-10 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 635-1476.

environment

VERMONT MONITORING COOPERATIVE ANNUAL CONFERENCE: Ideas take root when environmentally minded folks focus on forest ecosystem management. Silver Maple Ballroom, Davis Center, University of Vermont, Burlington, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $20. Info, 249-5691.

etc.

CAREER SERVICES: See WED.30. ‘PEDAL PUNK’ MAKER SPACE: A hands-on exploration of different kinds of motion gets gears turning. Top of the Hop, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 603-646-2010. SILENT AUCTION FINAL BID PARTY: Prizes ranging from snowshoe rentals to tattoos reward the highest bidders at a benefit for Good Neighbor Health Clinics. Good Neighbor Health Clinic, White River Junction, 5-7 p.m. Free. Info, 295-1868.

fairs & festivals

VERMONT INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL: A showcase of arts, crafts, food, dance and musical performances celebrates cultures from around the world. See calendar spotlight. Champlain Valley Exposition, Essex Junction, 5-8 p.m. $5-20; free for kids under 6. Info, 863-6713.

film

SOIRÉE CINÉ: ‘LA GRANDE SÉDUCTION’: The residents of a small fishing village attempt to bait a full-time doctor in this 2003 French-language comedy. Room 111, Cheray Science Hall, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, 654-2000. WARREN MILLER’S ‘HERE, THERE & EVERYWHERE’: See WED.30, Flynn MainStage, Burlington, 6:30-8:30 & 9:30-11:30 p.m. $19.27. Info, 863-5966. ‘YOUNG MAN WITH A HORN’: A musician hits high and low notes in his personal and professional life in this 1950 drama shown on 16mm film. Newman


FIND FUTURE DATES + UPDATES AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/EVENTS

Center, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 7 p.m. Donations. Info, serious_61@yahoo.com.

food & drink

COCKTAIL PARTY: See THU.1. COSMIC WINES: SOLD OUT. Cheers! National and international winemakers and importers uncork bottles at an epic tasting. Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, 7-9 p.m. $45. Info, 865-2368.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.30, 9:15 a.m.

health & fitness

ACRO YOGA: Beginners bring a friend or come solo for this acrobatic practice utilizing counterbalance, weight stacking, alignment and cooperation. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 5:15-6:45 p.m. $10. Info, 779-0444. ACUDETOX: Attendees in recovery undergo acupuncture to the ear to propel detoxification. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150. BEGINNERS’ TAI CHI: Interested individuals learn slow-set, tai chi gong, moving and standing postures, and basic techniques. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 9-10 a.m. $10. Info, 779-0444. FELDENKRAIS WITH GILLIAN FRANKS: A movement-centered class with instructions such as “Do less” and “Rest” renders participants rejuvenated. The Wellness Collective, Burlington, 7-7:45 a.m. $10. Info, 540-0186. FITNESS FLOW YOGA: All types of athletes can build strength, increase flexibility and prevent injuries with a moderate-to-vigorous vinyasa flow. Colchester Health & Fitness, 5:30-6:30 p.m. $15; free for members. Info, 860-1010. LAUGHTER YOGA: Breathe, clap, chant and giggle! Both new and experienced participants reduce stress with this playful practice. The Wellness Coop, Burlington, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 300. NIA WITH REBECCA: An expressive workout combining dance, martial arts and healing arts strengthens the mind, body and spirit. Shelburne Town Hall, 8:30-9:30 a.m. $16; free for first-timers. Info, 489-6701. RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: See WED.30.

holidays

CANDY CANE CHRISTMAS MARKETPLACE: Crafts, baked goods, dolls, linens, attic treasures, a silent auction and raffles make spirits bright. Bristol St. Ambrose Parish, 1-5 p.m. Free. Info, 453-2488. NORTHERN STAGE’S ‘A CHRISTMAS CAROL’: See WED.30, 7:30 p.m.

‘CLARA’S DREAM: A NUTCRACKER STORY’: See THU.1. COUNTRY HOLIDAY FEST: Santa, s’mores, art, live music and more help locals kick off the celebratory season. Various Mad River Valley locations, Warren, 5-7 p.m. Free. Info, 496-6682.

‘LEGENDS OF AMERICAN SKIING’: Vermont filmmaker Rick Moulton’s award-winning documentary chronicles the evolution of the snowy-weather sport. Film House, Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, reception and cash bar, 6 p.m.; film, 7 p.m. $11.25. Info, 863-5966.

WILLEM LANGE: The Vermont author regales listeners with a reading of his children’s classic, Favor Johnson: A Christmas Story. Stowe Free Library, 4-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 253-6145.

NEW LOCATION (THIS SESSION ONLY)

Sullivan Classroom, Larner Medical Education Center, UVM Campus

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!

First Tuesday of each month: November 1 and December 6

6:00–7:30 pm, including a Q+A Session

November 1 › The Dengue Fever Vaccine: How It Can Help Us Defend Against the Zika Virus

kids

ACORN CLUB STORY TIME: Little ones up to age 4 gather for read-aloud tales. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 748-8291. DUNGEONS & DRAGONS: Imaginative XP earners in grades 6 and up exercise their problem-solving skills in battles and adventures. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Sean Diehl, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine, and Kristen Pierce, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine and UVM Vaccine Testing Center researchers

EARLY-BIRD MATH STORY TIME: Books, songs and games put a creative twist on mathematics. Community Room, Richmond Free Library, 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 434-3036. ‘HER MAJESTY’S SECRET CIRCUS’: Two dynamic performers use acrobatics, juggling and slapstick comedy to defeat the villainous Doctor Awful. Chandler Center for the Arts, Randolph, 10 a.m. $6. Info, 728-6464. MAGIC: THE GATHERING: Decks of cards determine the arsenal with which participants, or “planeswalkers,” fight others for glory, knowledge and conquest. For grades 6 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

For more information, visit www.UVMHealth.org/MedCenterCMS or call (802) 847-2886

SEVEN DAYS (due 10/21 for 10/26 insertion): 4.75" x11/28/16 5.56"4:01 PM

Untitled-24 1

GET YOUR TICKETS NOW

MAGIC: THE GATHERING FOR TEENS/TWEENS: Seasoned players and beginners bring their cards and their friends for an afternoon of casual gaming. Turner Toys & Hobbies, Essex Junction, 4-6 p.m. Free. Info, 233-6102. MUSIC WITH ROBERT: Sing-alongs with Robert Resnik hit all the right notes. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. PLAY GROUP: Crafts and snacks amuse young’uns up to age 5. Doty Memorial Elementary School, Worcester, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, moonsong148@ hotmail.com. SONGS & STORIES WITH MATTHEW: Matthew Witten helps children start the day with tunes and tales of adventure. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. STORY TIME: Babies, toddlers and preschoolers drop in for books, rhymes, songs and activities. Winooski Memorial Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 655-6424. TEEN ADVISORY BOARD: High school students put their heads together to plan programs for the library. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

music

THIS WEEK!

BURLINGTON FLYNN CENTER FOR THE PERFORMIN G ARTS

BURLINGTON F LY N N C E N T E R F O R T H E FRIDAY, P E R F O RDEC. M I N G2 A R6 T S:30 FRIDAY, DEC. 2

& 9:30 PM

6:30 & 9:30 PM

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 30

* BURLINGTON SHOW TICKETS ONLY

TICKETS FOR MIDDLEBURY AVAILABLE AT THE TOWN HALL THEATER BOX OFFICE.

MIDDLEBURY

MIDDLEBURY

GET YOUR TICKETS NOW * BURLINGTON SHOW TICKETS ONLY

LOOKING FOR DISCOUNTED TICKETS? CALL 800.523.7117 FOR GROUP RATES.

FREE WITH PURCHASE

TICKET HOLDERS RECEIVE SAVINGS COUPON AT EVENT

7:30 PM

TOWN HALL THEATER THURSDAY, DEC. 1 7:30 PM

* BURLINGTON ONLY

FREE LIFT TICKET TO SUGARBUSH & SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH

TOWN HALL THEATER

2-FOR-1 LIFT TICKET TO SQUAW VALLEY | ALPINE MEADOWS FREE EARLY/LATE-SEASON LIFT TICKET TO STEAMBOAT SAVE 20% AT ANY L.L.BEAN STORE

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 30 7:30 PM THURSDAY, DEC. 1 7:30 PM

Buy Tickets Here

$25 OFF A PURCHASE OF $100 OR MORE AT ALPINE SHOP

FOR COMPLETE OFFER DETAILS GO TO WARRENMILLER.COM

EDDY & KIM LAWRENCE: The married couple captivates listeners with quirky originals played on guitar and upright bass. Palmer Street Coffeehouse, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 7:30 p.m. $10. Info, 518-561-6920. JAZZ VOCAL MASTER CLASS: All are welcome to observe as Judi Silvano helps UVM jazz vocalists find all the right notes. University of Vermont Recital Hall, Burlington, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, adelaure@uvm.edu.

DEALS FROM * BURLINGTON ONLY

FREE LIFT TICKET TO SUGARBUSH & SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH 2-FOR-1 LIFT TICKET TO SQUAW VALLEY | ALPINE MEADOWS FREE EARLY/LATE-SEASON LIFT TICKET TO STEAMBOAT UNLIMITED USE 2-FOR-1 LIFT TICKETS AND BOGO LODGING ALL SEASON TO CRESTED BUTTE $25 OFF A PURCHASE OF $100 OR MORE AT ALPINE SHOP

SAVE 20% AT ANY L.L.BEAN STORE

CALENDAR 55

‘THE NUTCRACKER’S ADVENTURE’: Tchaikovsky’s famous music sets the stage for the Middlebury Community Players’ family-oriented adaptation of The Nutcracker. Auditorium, Middlebury Union High School, 7 p.m. $6. Info, 382-9222.

WALDORF HOLIDAY FAIR: Artisan wares and African drumming complement kids’ crafts, games and homemade eats. Lake Champlain Waldorf School, Shelburne, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Free. Info, 9852827, ext. 216.

FALL 2016

SEVEN DAYS

HOLIDAY STROLL: Families mix and mingle with Santa and decorate custom ornaments. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 985-5124.

VERMONT PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA & CHORUS: A spirited performance of Handel’s Messiah transports audience members to the height of the baroque period. Montpelier St. Augustine’s Catholic Church, 7:30 p.m. $5-15. Info, 476-8188.

11.30.16-12.07.16

CHRISTMAS MUSIC: Friends and neighbors join for festive songs, readings and refreshments. United Reformed Church, New Haven, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 877-2486.

ST. ALBANS FESTIVAL OF TREES: See WED.30, 7 p.m.-midnight.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

REIKI: Touch activates the body’s natural healing abilities, aiding people in recovery. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150.

SOUTH END HOLIDAY SHOP: A wide array of business and art studios showcase handcrafted wares and the creative processes behind them. See seaba.com for details. South End Arts District, Burlington, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 859-9222.

THE ROSE ENSEMBLE: See THU.1. FRI.2

» P.56

FOR COMPLETE OFFER DETAILS GO TO

Burlington_4 Untitled-4 1 75x5 56 runs11 30.indd 1

WARRENMILLER.COM 11/22/16 10:40 2:41 PM 11/28/16 AM


calendar

24th ANNUAL

FRI.1

FRIDAY, DEC. 2

SATURDAY, DEC. 3 10 A.M. - 6 P.M.

SUNDAY, DEC. 4 10 A.M. - 5 P.M.

5 P.M. - 8 P.M.

Hand-crafted Gifts from 40 Countries Global Cuisine World Music and Dance International Fashion Show… and much more

Admission good for entire weekend! $7 Adults, $5 Children 6-12/Seniors 65+ Children under 6 free, $20 Family Pass

« P.55

MIDDLEBURY COMMUNITY WIND ENSEMBLE: Saxophonist Sam Kudman is featured in a concert including works by Gabrieli, Verdi and ensemble members. Robison Hall, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 443-6433. THETFORD CHAMBER SINGERS: See WED.30, North Universalist Chapel Society, Woodstock. THE WOVEN BODY CHOIR AUDITIONS: Singers, movers and artists vie for spots in a performance ensemble focused on exploring the relationship of sound, bodies and environment. The Everything Space, Montpelier, 6-8 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, wilsonheidiann@gmail.com. WYLD LIFE: A BENEFIT CONCERT FOR 350VT: Billy Wylder and Bow Thayer serve up sounds ranging from American roots to prog rock to support the organization committed to cutting down carbon. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 8 p.m. $15. Info, 540-0406.

talks

Untitled-3 1

11/28/16 10:36 AM

UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT PREGNANCY STUDY

Researchers at the Vermont Center on Behavior and Health are looking for women who are currently pregnant to participate in a study on health behaviors and infant birth outcomes. This study involves: 9 short appointments (approximately 20 minutes each)

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

‘ROZENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD’: Main Street Arts presents Tom Stoppard’s comedy that expands upon two of Hamlet’s minor characters. The White Church, Grafton, 7:30 p.m. $10-15. Info, 869-2960. ‘TALLEY’S FOLLY’: See THU.1.

words

Compensation $700

FRIENDS OF THE STOWE FREE LIBRARY BOOK SALE: See WED.30.

SAT.3

activism

GATHERING OF LOVE & HOPE: Locals bearing donations for Helping Overcome Poverty’s Effects leave uplifting messages to offset postelection hate crimes. Middlebury Town Green, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 989-3015.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 802-656-3348 OR VISIT FACEBOOK.COM/UVMMOM 6h-uvmdeppsych(pregnancystudy)011316.indd 1

WINTER IS HARD…

1/11/16 11:26 AM

WINTER IS HARD… 11.30.16-12.07.16

CIRQUE MECHANICS: See THU.1, 8 p.m.

ART & AUTHOR NIGHT: Poet Sandra Erickson excerpts selected works after a reception for artist Suki Ka’Pinao White. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

If interested, please visit our website to complete the recruitment questionnaire: http://j.mp/1yLwkLO

SEVEN DAYS

theater

Flexible scheduling, including weekend and evening appointments 2 Free Ultrasounds

WRITE FOR RIGHTS: Individuals make their voices heard by writing, emailing, texting and tweeting to help end human-rights abuses. Amnesty International Vermont hosts. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955.

agriculture

INDOOR SALAD GARDENING: Locavores learn to cultivate fresh foods with only a cupboard and a windowsill. City Market/Onion River Co-op, Burlington, 1-2 p.m. $5-10; preregister. Info, 861-9753.

BUT WE MAKE IT EASY!

art

Introducing our Program Introducing ourWinter WinterStay Stay Program

BUT WE MAKE IT EASY!

Without the threat of slippery driveways, snow, and ice, the winter will simply fly by! Pack a bag and let us the take care of the needs you Without threat of cooking, slipperyhousekeeping, driveways, laundry snow, and andany ice,support the winter willmay have so you can feel free to safely turn your attention to new hobbies and interests. Introducing our Winter Stay Program

simply fly by! Pack a bag and let us take care of the cooking, housekeeping, Without the threat slippery driveways, snow, andhave ice, the fly by!toPack a bag laundry and anyofsupport needs you may sowinter you will cansimply feel free safely 802-652-4114 to schedule your and let us take care ofCall the cooking, housekeeping, laundry and any visit! support needs you may turn your attention to new hobbies and interests have so you can feel free to safely turn your attention to new hobbies and interests. PET FRIENDLY

465 Quarry Hill Road | South Burlington, VT 05403 | residencequarryhill.com

56 CALENDAR

EDUCATION & ENRICHMENT FOR EVERYONE: Following a catered luncheon, professor Peter Hans Matthews looks north of the border in “Trudeau’s Canada: A One Year Assessment.” Faith United Methodist Church, South Burlington, luncheon, noon; talk, 1 p.m.. $5; preregister. Info, 846-4835.

Call 802-652-4114 to schedule your visit!

PET FRIENDLY

465 Quarry Hill Road | South Burlington, VT 05403 | residencequarryhill.com

OPEN SPACE: AN IMPROVISATIONAL LABORATORY: Artistic students, faculty and community members try out ideas during an hour of silent experimentation, followed by an hour open to musicians. Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 1-3 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168.

bazaars

BAKED BEADS JEWELRY & SCARF SALE: See THU.1, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. CRAFT FAIR: Clothing, candles, wreaths, Christmas items and more catch shoppers’ eyes. Malletts Bay Congregational Church, Colchester, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 343-9767. GREEN MOUNTAIN PUG RESCUE CRAFT/VENDOR SHOW: More than 30 makers and sellers set up shop. A pug kissing booth and a raffle round

out the day. Rice Memorial High School, South Burlington, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, pugmama7@ yahoo.com.

comedy

KAMIKAZE COMEDY: Audience prompts propel hilarious scenes when comic actors improvise onstage. Chandler Center for the Arts, Randolph, 7:30 p.m. $10-15. Info, 728-6464.

dance

BURLINGTON WESTIE FIRST SATURDAY DANCE: Hoofers hit the dance floor for a themed evening of blues and West Coast swing. North End Studio A, Burlington, introductory lesson, 6:30 p.m.; workshop, 7 p.m.; dance, 8-11 p.m. $7-10. Info, burlingtonwestie@gmail.com. CONTRA DANCE: A traditional social dance comes complete with music by Cedar Stanistreet, Marko Packard and Rebecca Bosworth-Clemens and calling by Linda Leslie. Capital City Grange, Berlin, 8-11 p.m. $5-9. Info, 744-2851. FALL DANCE CONCERT: See FRI.2. FUNKY TOWN: DJ sets fuel an epically groovy dance party. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 10 p.m.-2 a.m. $2. Info, 540-0406. JOHNSON STATE COLLEGE DANCE CLUB: See FRI.2. SHAKE-OFF DANCE PARTY: Revelers groove to DJed tunes at this annual benefit for Vermont Access to Reproductive Freedom. Union Station, Burlington, 6:30-11 p.m. $15-150; cash bar. Info, 355-3910.

environment

SOLAR SHINE ’N’ DINE: Eco-conscious community members enjoy an appetizer and a drink on SunCommon while learning about alternative energy options. Pork & Pickles BBQ, Essex Junction, 2:30-4 p.m. Free. Info, 882-8651.

etc.

COMMUNITY COFFEE HOUSE: Steaming beverages in hand, neighbors socialize amid live acoustic music, games, books and Wi-Fi. Jericho Town Library, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 899-4686. INDEPENDENT COMMUNITY MEETING PLACE: Brainstorming leads to forming activity groups for hobbies such as flying stunt kites and playing music. Presto Music Store, South Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 658-0030. PEARL HARBOR REMEMBRANCE & VETERANS’ DINNER: Special recognition is paid to the North Country Honor Flight during a memorial meal. VFW Post 309, Peru, N.Y., cocktails, 5 p.m.; dinner, 6 p.m. $10. Info, 563-7558.

fairs & festivals

VERMONT INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL: See FRI.2, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

film

‘CHEVALIER’: Six fellows afloat on the Aegean Sea compete for the title of best man in this 2015 comedy shown in Greek with English subtitles. Dana Auditorium, Sunderland Language Center, Middlebury College, 3 & 8 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168. MIFF AT WRIF: Cinephiles screen short and feature-length selections from the Maine International Film Festival. See calendar spotlight. Briggs Opera House, White River Junction, 3 & 7 p.m. $5-9. Info, 281-3785.

food & drink

ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT BREAKFAST: Pancakes, scrambled eggs, bacon, home fries, biscuits, gravy, ham and more are on the menu at a buffet-style meal. Takeout is available. Isle of Patmos Masonic Lodge, South Hero, 7:30-11:30 a.m. $5-10; free for kids 2 and under; nonperishable food donations accepted. Info, 372-5748. BUBBLES, BAUBLES & BRUNCH: Handcrafted jewelry adds some sparkle to a mouthwatering brunch to benefit Love Light Compassion Foundation. Waterworks Food + Drink, Winooski, 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 497-3525.


FIND FUTURE DATES + UPDATES AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/EVENTS BURLINGTON WINTER FARMERS MARKET: A bustling indoor marketplace offers fresh and prepared foods alongside crafts, live music, lunch seating and face painting. Davis Center, University of Vermont, Burlington, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, burlingtonfarmersmarket.org@gmail.com.

Green Mountain College, Poultney, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 800-776-6675.

CAPITAL CITY WINTER FARMERS MARKET: Root veggies, honey, maple syrup and more change hands at an off-season celebration of locally grown food. Montpelier City Hall, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 793-8347.

HOLIDAY BOOK SALE: Bibliophiles add gently used titles to their bookshelves or find gifts for fellow readers. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10 a.m.5:30 p.m. Free. Info, fletcherfriends@gmail.com.

CHOCOLATE TASTING: With the help of a tasting guide, chocoholics of all ages discover the flavor profiles of four different confections. Lake Champlain Chocolates Factory Store & Café, Burlington, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 864-1807. COCKTAIL PARTY: See THU.1, noon-6 p.m. MIDDLEBURY FARMERS MARKET: Crafts, cheeses, breads, veggies and more vie for spots in shoppers’ totes. Mary Hogan Elementary School, Middlebury, 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, middleburyfarmersmkt@ yahoo.com. ST. JOHNSBURY FARMERS MARKET: Growers and crafters gather weekly at booths centered on local eats. St. Johnsbury Welcome Center, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, cfmamanager@gmail.com. VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: See WED.30, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. WINDSOR FARMERS MARKET: Locavores go wild for fruits, veggies, maple syrup, honey, eggs, meats, crafts and more. Windsor Welcome Center, 11 a.m.2 p.m. Free. Info, 359-2551.

health & fitness

GINGER’S FITNESS BOOT CAMP: See WED.30, 8-9 a.m. PERSONAL BEST RUNNER’S CIRCUIT: A small-group training class prepares athletes to meet their goals and avoid injury. Your Personal Best Fitness, South Burlington, 9-10 a.m. $15. Info, 658-1616. RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: See WED.30, 10:45 a.m. R.I.P.P.E.D.: See WED.30, North End Studio A, Burlington, 9-10 a.m.

HOLIDAY BAZAAR & CRAFT FAIR: White elephant gifts, Christmas items, jewelry and baked goods complement handmade wares. Heineberg Senior Center, Burlington, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 863-3982.

HOLIDAY CENTERPIECE WORKSHOP: Participants use local evergreens to fashion eye-catching tabletop arrangements. MAC Center for the Arts Gallery, Newport, 2:30 p.m. $3; preregister; limited space. Info, 334-1966. A HOLIDAY CONCERT IN THE BARBERSHOP STYLE: Burlington’s Green Mountain Chorus and Barre’s BarreTones band together for a choral music extravaganza. Hunger Mountain Christian Assembly, Waterbury Center, 2-3 p.m. $12. Info, 505-9595. HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR: Neighbors catch up at this seasonal fête featuring locally made art and crafts. Maple Corner Community Center, Calais, 9:30 a.m.3:30 p.m. Free. Info, 229-6861. HOLIDAY CRAFT SHOW & SCHOLASTIC BOOK FAIR: Customers take their pick from a wide variety of wares presented alongside an extensive selection of page turners. Grand Isle School, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, 372-6913. HOLIDAY EVENTS: Live ice carving, horse-drawn trolley rides, mini train excursions, live performances and costumed characters keep spirits high. See shopmtp.com for details. Maple Tree Place, Williston. Free. Info, 391-8000. HOLIDAY FAIR: A display of holiday décor, tasty treats, plants, jewelry, toys and more offers something for everyone on your list. Unitarian Church of Montpelier, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 225-6373. HOLIDAY MARKET: Floating Bridge Food and Farms Cooperative helps locavores find the perfect presents for under the tree. Red School House, Randolph Center, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 276-0787.

CANDY CANE CHRISTMAS MARKETPLACE: See FRI.2, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

HOLIDAY SPECTACULAR: The Twilight Players present an evening of seasonal music, dance and humor. Alexander Twilight Theatre, Lyndon State College, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Donations of new toys or nonperishable food items. Info, 626-3663.

BELLA VOCE: Local vocalists interpret festive tunes in “Glorious Sounds of the Season.” First Baptist Church of Burlington, 8 p.m. $15-18. Info, 863-5966.

CHRISTMAS AT THE FARM: Families celebrate the holidays 19th-century-style with ornament making and baked treats. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $4-14; free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 457-2355. CHRISTMAS BAZAAR: Homemade eats fuel shoppers for browsing a wide array of holiday gifts. United Methodist Church of North Hero, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 372-8211.

IMPROVISO!’S ‘A CHRISTMAS CAROL’: Child actors stage Charles Dickens’ story of a miserly man who finds redemption with the help of some time-traveling spirits. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, 11 a.m. & 4 p.m. Donations. Info, 382-9222.

Untitled-24 1

FrOm $25

11.30.16-12.07.16

ISLANDS HOLIDAY HOP: An alternative to crowds treats shoppers to gift boutiques, local eats and an artisan fair. Call for details. Various Champlain Islands locations, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. Info, 999-5862.

NORTHERN STAGE’S ‘A CHRISTMAS CAROL’: See WED.30, 2 & 7:30 p.m.

AS

HA

|M

IE

T.3 SA

MEET THE GRINCH!: The young and the young at heart get acquainted with Dr. Seuss’ meanest, US L greenest character. Phoenix Books IC TA A |A N LAS Rutland, 10 a.m. Nonperishable food D AIR FRA SE R & donations accepted. Info, 855-8078. ‘CLARA’S DREAM: A NUTCRACKER STORY’: See MOCO HOLIDAY FARMERS MARKET: Local produce, THU.1, 1 & 4 p.m. meats, maple products, prepared foods and gift items catch shoppers’ eyes. Morrisville Food Co-op, 10 a.m.-1 COUNTRY HOLIDAY FEST: See FRI.2, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. p.m. Free. Info, markets@morrisvillecoop.com. FESTIVAL OF CHOIRS: Church choirs of differ‘THE NUTCRACKER’S ADVENTURE’: See FRI.2, 2 p.m. ent faiths come together to usher in the spirit of Christmas. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day RICHMOND HOLIDAY MARKET: Santa makes an Saints, Essex Junction, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 899-4739. appearance as folks take horse-drawn wagon rides through town and check out specialty items from FESTIVAL OF TREES: As bids rise, so do holiday more than 60 vendors. Various Richmond locaspirits at this annual auction led by Bob Prozzo, tions, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, 434-4483. who presents vacation getaways, gift certificates, home furnishings and more. Paramount Theatre, SANTA CLAUS IS COMING...: Tots tell old St. Nick if Rutland, cash bar, 5:30 p.m.; auction, 6:45 p.m. they’ve been naughty or nice. Cold Hollow Cider Mill, $10. Info, 775-0903. Waterbury Center, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 244-8771. GREEN MOUNTAIN COLLEGE CHOIRS & CHAMBER ENSEMBLE: Student songsters stage a spirited concert complete with opportunities for audience participation. A reception follows. Ackley Hall, SAT.3 P.58 CHRISTMAS TREE SALE: Eyecatching evergreens make for a festive fundraiser for All Breed Rescue. All Breed Rescue, Williston, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Info, 658-0809.

11/17/16 10:31 AM

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

holidays

HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE: Carols played on an 1831 piano set a festive mood for a raffle, art viewing, an electric train and other activities. Henry Sheldon Museum of Vermont History, Middlebury, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Donations. Info, 388-2117.

SEVEN DAYS

www.GardenersSupplyStore.com Mon–Sat 9am–6pm; Sun 10am–5pm

»

VTGrownTrees_7D.indd Untitled-10 1 1

11/28/16 1:35 9:43 PM AM

CALENDAR 57

128 Intervale Road, Burlington • (802)660-3505 472 Marshall Ave. Williston • (802)658-2433


calendar SANTA TRAIN: Passengers of all ages ride the rails through Santa’s Village. Amtrak Station, Rutland, 10 a.m., noon & 1:30, 3 & 4:30 p.m. $16. Info, 773-2747. ST. ALBANS FESTIVAL OF TREES: See WED.30, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. VERMONT CHORAL UNION: A cappella harmonies propel traditional carols, ancient chants and more in the program “Behold, a Mystery.” St. Albans City Hall, 7:30-9 p.m. $10-40. Info, 989-7355. WALDORF HOLIDAY FAIR: See FRI.2, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. WINTER HOLIDAYS PARTY: Tots get hands-on with gingerbread while adults help decorate the library. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-4918. WREATH MAKING: Balsam bows get repurposed into one-of-a-kind adornments in a family-friendly creative session. Fairfax Community Library, 9-11 a.m. $10-20; preregister. Info, 849-2420.

kids

FAMILY BOARD GAME AFTERNOON: Leisurely games of chance and brain-busting battles of wit entertain kids and their caregivers. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 1:30-4 p.m. Free. Info, 985-5124. SATURDAY DROP-IN STORY TIME: A weekly selection of songs and storylines engages all ages. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 10-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 264-5660. STORY TIME SATURDAY: Tots perk up their ears for Eugenie Doyle’s Sleep Tight Farm: A Farm Prepares for Winter. Phoenix Books Burlington, 11 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 861-9753.

music

ALASDAIR FRASER & NATALIE HAAS: The bowand-string masters have audience members in awe with spirited renditions of Celtic tunes. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe Mountain Resort, 7 p.m. $20-37. Info, 760-4634.

DADDY LONG LEGS: Rick Ceballos, David Gusakov and Matthew Witten combine their talents at a CD release party for Twin Bridges. Private residence, Bristol, 7:30 p.m. $10; preregister; limited space; BYOB. Info, 453-4613. JOHN LAROUCHE TRIO: Three players put their personal stamp on traditional jazz tunes and original numbers. Brandon Music, 7:30 p.m. $20; $45 includes dinner; preregister; BYOB. Info, 247-4295. JORY NASH: The Canadian singer-songwriter masterfully mixes elements of folk, jazz, blues, pop and soul. Ripton Community House, 7:30 p.m. $3-15. Info, 388-9782.

MIDDLEBURY COMMUNITY WIND ENSEMBLE: Saxophonist Sam Kudman is featured in a concert including works by Gabrieli, Verdi and ensemble members. Mount Abraham Union High School, Bristol, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 388-1012.

58 CALENDAR

MIDNIGHT SNACK: The quintet gets toes tapping with eclectic pop numbers. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $5. Info, 540-0406. MONTPELIER COMMUNITY GOSPEL CHOIR: An uplifting program includes elements of soul, jazz, and original and traditional gospel. First Presbyterian Church, Barre, 7 p.m. $10-25. Info, 778-0881. NORM CHAMBERS: The Seattle sound artist employs electronics and modular synths as part of the

VERMONT FIDDLE ORCHESTRA WINTER CONCERT: Bows in hand, skillful players perform pieces of New England, Québécois and Appalachian music. College Hall Chapel, Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, 7 p.m. $12-15; free for kids 12 and under. Info, 229-4191. VSO MASTERWORKS: Anthony Princiotti conducts the Vermont Symphony Orchestra in works by Beethoven, Hindemith and Tchaikovsky. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, 8 p.m. $10-61. Info, 863-5966.

seminars

DIGITAL PHOTO BASICS: Those with working knowledge of Microsoft Windows learn how to import and edit images from phones and cameras. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free; preregister. Info, 865-7217. PLANT PURE WORKSHOP: A discussion of a plantbased lifestyle provides food for thought. Natural Provisions Deli & Café, Williston, 2-3 p.m. Free. Info, 876-1400. VCAM ORIENTATION: Video-production hounds master basic concepts and nomenclature at an overview of VCAM facilities, policies and procedures. VCAM Studio, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 651-9692. WORKSHOP: PET PORTRAITS: Animal lovers honor their furry friends in a variety of media. Catamount Outback Artspace, St. Johnsbury, 1-3 p.m. $15; preregister. Info, 748-2600.

sports

BOSTON BRUINS ALUMNI CHARITY GAME: The Green Mountain Boys Hockey Club takes the ice against National Hockey League veterans in a family-friendly match to benefit Camp Ta-Kum-Ta. University of Vermont Gutterson Fieldhouse, South Burlington, 5:30-8:30 p.m. $5-15. Info, 522-5645.

talks

MARYL WALTERS: Spiritual seekers open their hearts and their minds to the international speaker’s talk “The Healing Power of Divine Love.” North End Studio A, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 864-4709.

POETRY EXPERIENCE: Rajnii Eddins facilitates a poetry and spoken-word workshop aimed at building confidence and developing a love of writing. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 1-3 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211.

SUN.4

community

COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS WITH THE CENTER FOR MINDFUL LEARNING: Peaceful people gather for guided meditation and interactive discussions. Burlington Friends Meeting House, 5-7 p.m. $10. Info, assistant@centerformindfullearning.org.

“Sleigh Ride.” McCarthy Arts Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 654-2000. BELLA VOCE: See SAT.3, 3 p.m. CAROL SING EVENT: Choirs from area churches lend their powerful pipes to seasonal selections. First Unitarian Universalist Society, Burlington, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 862-5630. CHRISTMAS AT THE FARM: See SAT.3. NORTHERN STAGE’S ‘A CHRISTMAS CAROL’: See WED.30, 2 p.m. CHRISTMAS TREE LIGHTING & CAROLING: ’Tis the season for crafts, carols, cocoa, cookies and boughs ablaze with tiny lights. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4-5:15 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660.

FLAG RETIREMENT CEREMONY: Patriots bring tattered and torn flags to be properly retired. Barre Elks Club, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 479-9522.

CHRISTMAS TREE SALE: See SAT.3.

dance

COUNTRY HOLIDAY FEST: See FRI.2, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

BALKAN FOLK DANCING: Louise Brill and friends organize participants into lines and circles set to complex rhythms. Ohavi Zedek Synagogue, Burlington, 3-6 p.m. $6; free for first-timers; bring snacks to share. Info, 540-1020. DANCE, SING & JUMP AROUND: Traditional music enlivens an afternoon of intergenerational circle and line dancing. Plainfield Town Hall Opera House, 3-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-1509. UPPER VALLEY INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING: Creative movers learn diverse routines rooted in Eastern and Western Europe, Scandinavia, and the Mediterranean. Bring clean, soft-soled shoes. Tracy Hall, Norwich, 3-6 p.m. $4-8. Info, 436-2151.

etc.

JANE AUSTEN IN VERMONT: Fans of the famed writer dress their best for the annual Jane Austen Birthday Tea. Morgan Room, Aiken Hall, Champlain College, Burlington, 4:30 p.m. $10-35; preregister; limited space. Info, 343-2294.

fairs & festivals

VERMONT INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL: See FRI.2, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

food & drink

COCKTAIL PARTY: See THU.1, noon-4 p.m. WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET: Delicious, local fare is accessible to both newbies and foodies at a year-round emporium of prepared foods, baked goods, produce, seafood, meats and cheeses. Woodstock Farmers’ Market, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. Info, 457-3658.

games

POKÉMON LEAGUE: See THU.1, noon-5 p.m. SHRINERS SUPER BINGO: Cash prizes reward players who fashion five in a row. Robert E. Miller Expo Centre, Champlain Valley Expo, Essex Junction, 12:30-4:30 p.m. $30 for 12 cards. Info, 434-2055.

theater

‘BORDERLESS: A NIGHT OF INTERNATIONAL CULTURES’: More than 100 pupils from Middlebury College’s International Student Organization take the health & fitness stage in celebration of traditions |M IL from around the world. Wilson Hall, US IS DYNAMIC QIGONG: Breathing, D IC | JU JO E L McCullough Social Space, Middlebury OVA N O & stretching and meditative motions College, 5:30 & 8 p.m. Free. Info, 443-6433. enhance health and well-being. Charlotte Congregational Church, 5-6:30 p.m. $10-15. Info, THE METROPOLITAN OPERA HD LIVE: ‘THE 238-2637. MAGIC FLUTE’: A broadcast screening of Mozart’s masterpiece dazzles opera devotees. Catamount MORNING FLOW YOGA: See WED.30. Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 12:55 p.m. $16-25. Info, NIA WITH SUZY: Drawing from martial, dance and 748-2600. healing arts, sensory-based movements push par‘ROZENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD’: ticipants to their full potential. South End Studio, See FRI.2. Burlington, 9-10 a.m. $14. Info, 522-3691. ‘TALLEY’S FOLLY’: See THU.1, 2 & 7:30 p.m. ZUMBA FITNESS: High-spirited students dance toward health in an easy-to-follow fitness program words set to red-hot international music. North End Studio A, Burlington, 9 a.m. $8-10. Info, 777-7032. BOOK SALE: Bookworms pore over page turners. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. holidays Free. Info, 388-4095. 40TH ARMY BAND: Founded in 1907, the iconic FRIENDS OF THE STOWE FREE LIBRARY BOOK group plays traditional holiday favorites such as SALE: See WED.30, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. 4

MADMAN3: Mini golf and barbecue fare are set against a backdrop of electronica beats. Anachronist open. Flying Stage, ReSOURCE Household Goods & Building Material Store, Barre, 7:30-11 p.m. $7-20. Info, 552-3481.

SOUTH BURLINGTON COMMUNITY CHORUS: Singers find perfect harmony in the Robert Frostinspired program “Frost in the Air.” McCarthy Arts Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 7:30 p.m. $10; free for kids under 18 and St. Mike’s students, faculty and staff. Info, 846-4108.

N.

SEVEN DAYS

CLASSICOPIA: Exciting rhythms ring out during “Vagabond Violin,” a tune-filled program of folkinfluenced music from around the world. ArtisTree Community Arts Center & Gallery, South Pomfret, 2-4 p.m. $18-20; free for ages 18 and under. Info, 457-3500.

THE SOUND INVESTMENT JAZZ ENSEMBLE: Middlebury College’s big band swings into the season with a toe-tapping performance. Robison Hall, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 8 p.m. Free. Info, 443-6433.

SU

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ANIMA: Voices carry when the female vocal ensemble presents “‘Hayl, Mary,’ Medieval and Renaissance Music for the Season of Darkness and Light.” Green Mountain Monastery, Greensboro, 7-8:30 p.m. Donations. Info, info@animavermont.org.

Signals @Soundtoys series. Hood Plant, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free; limited space. Info, 951-9700.

O

« P.57

VA N

SAT.3

‘CLARA’S DREAM: A NUTCRACKER STORY’: See THU.1, 3 p.m. FULL CIRCLE: The five-woman ensemble entertains shoppers with a mix of medieval, Renaissance, Celtic, folk and holiday music. Phoenix Books Burlington, 2-4 p.m. Free. Info, 448-3350. GIFTS THAT GIVE: More than a dozen organizations set up shop at this nonprofit pop-up market offering fair-trade goods and gifts in the form of donations. Burlington Town Center, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, 874-7704. HOLIDAY BOOK SALE: See SAT.3, noon-5:30 p.m. HOLIDAY EVENTS: See SAT.3. HOLIDAY MARKET: See SAT.3, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE: See SAT.3, noon-4 p.m. MEET THE GRINCH!: See SAT.3, Phoenix Books Essex, noon. Info, 872-7111. ‘MESSIAH’ SING: Vermont Symphony Orchestra and Burlington Chamber Orchestra musicians join vocalists for a rousing rendition of this seasonal favorite by Handel. Charlotte Congregational Church, 4 p.m. $12-40. Info, 425-3176. NUTCRACKER DOLL & ME TEA: Favorite dolls in hand, kids ages 3 through 12 dress their best for an afternoon with the Clara and the Sugar Plum Fairy. See balletschoolofvermont.com for details. St. Albans City Hall, 3-5 p.m. $20. Info, 393-8655. ‘THE NUTCRACKER’S ADVENTURE’: See FRI.2, 2 p.m. OPERATION CHRISTMAS FOR TROOPS PACKING PARTY: Folks prepare care packages to send to soldiers who can’t be home for the holidays. American Legion Post 55, Brandon, 2-4 p.m. Free. Info, 353-1325. PLATTSBURGH STATE GOSPEL CHOIR: Seventy voices soar in “A Soulful Christmas 2016.” E. Glenn Giltz Auditorium, Hawkins Hall, SUNY Plattsburgh, N.Y., 4-6:15 p.m. $5-18; free for kids under 5 in laps. Info, 518-564-2704. RANDOLPH SINGERS HOLIDAY CONCERT: Dick Drysdale conducts a program of carols and classical compositions. Chandler Music Hall, Randolph, 4 p.m. Donations. Info, 728-6464. RUTLAND AREA CHORUS: Under the direction of Sherrill Blodget, soloists and orchestra members perform Handel’s Messiah. Grace Congregational Church, Rutland, 3:30 & 7 p.m. Donations. Info, 775-4301. ST. ALBANS FESTIVAL OF TREES: See WED.30, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. UNIVERSITY CONCERT CHOIR & CATAMOUNT SINGERS: Professor David Neiweem directs student vocalists in “Winter’s Warm Music: A Celebration of Yuletide.” Fleming Museum of Art, University of Vermont, Burlington, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 656-0750. VERMONT CHORAL UNION: See SAT.3, the Cathedral Church of St. Paul, Burlington, 3 p.m. $1540. Info, 863-5966. VERMONT PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA & CHORUS: See FRI.2, Barre Opera House, 2 p.m.

kids

‘PLANETARY GODS & GODDESSES: ASTRONOMY & MYTHS OF THE NEW SOLAR SYSTEM’: Star gazers set their sights on a slide-show presentation on the expanding solar system. Bring pencils, markers or crayons. Railyard Apothecary and Yoga Studio,


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

Burlington, 1-3 p.m. $15-20; free for kids 12 and under. Info, 456-1078.

language

DIMANCHES FRENCH CONVERSATION: Parlez-vous français? Speakers practice the tongue at a casual drop-in chat. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 4-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 363-2431. SPANISH GROUP CLASSES: Students roll their Rs while practicing en español. New Moon Café, Burlington, 2:45-4:30 p.m. $15. Info, maigomez1@ hotmail.com.

lgbtq

THE SKY WRITING GROUP: Creative storytelling supports health and community cohesion in a critique-free environment. Pride Center of Vermont, Burlington, 1-4 p.m. Free. Info, liz@pridecentervt.org.

music

ADVANCED JAZZ COMPOSITION CONCERT: Students of professor Patricia Julien present their final-project compositions. University of Vermont Recital Hall, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 656-3040. ANIMA: See SAT.3, United Church of Cabot, 4 p.m. THE JOE K. WALSH BAND: Fingers fly as the fourpiece string band picks and strums as part of the P.M. Sundays series. Richmond Congregational Church, 4-6 p.m. $17.50-20. Info, 434-4563. JOE LOVANO & JUDI SILVANO: The Grammywinning saxophone player and the vocalist join forces for a noteworthy concert. Jamie Masefield opens. Champlain Valley Union High School, Hinesburg, 3 p.m. $20-30. Info, 863-5966. MONTPELIER COMMUNITY GOSPEL CHOIR: An uplifting program includes elements of soul, jazz, and original and traditional gospel. Bethany United Church of Christ, Montpelier, 4 p.m. $10-25. Info, 778-0881. SOPHIE SHAO & FRIENDS: At once impromptu and note-perfect, the chamber ensemble performs a program of Beethoven, Schumann and Dvořák. Robison Hall, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 3 p.m. $6-25. Info, 443-3168. THETFORD CHAMBER SINGERS: See WED.30, First Congregational Church of Thetford, 4:30 & 7:30 p.m. VERMONT FIDDLE ORCHESTRA WINTER CONCERT: See SAT.3, Hyde Park Opera House, 2-4 p.m. $5-10; free for preschoolers. Info, 888-5561.

seminars

WINTER HIKING SAFETY BASICS: Green Mountain Club members help outdoor lovers plan ahead for cold-weather excursions. Eastern Mountain Sports, South Burlington, 2-3 p.m. Free. Info, 241-8327.

WOMEN’S PICKUP SOCCER: Swift females of varying skill levels shoot for the goal. For ages 18 and up. Rain location: Robert Miller Community & Recreation Center. Soccer fields, Leddy Park, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free; $3 for rain location. Info, carmengeorgevt@gmail.com.

‘9 TO 5, THE MUSICAL’ AUDITIONS: Actors, singers and dancers give their all for roles in Lyric Theatre’s production of this workplace musical. Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, Burlington, 12:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 363-4599.

‘OLD ENOUGH TO KNOW BETTER, YOUNG ENOUGH TO DO IT AGAIN’: A play by college senior Celia Watson explores issues of mobility, memory and

agriculture

BRANCH OUT BURLINGTON! AWESOME TREE CONTEST AWARDS CEREMONY: Arborist Warren Spinner offers remarks at a pizza party recognizing this year’s winners. Burlington Municipal Building, 6 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 656-5440.

Sweetback Sisters

art

OPEN STUDIO: See THU.1, 3-5 p.m.

crafts

DEC. 16

INTRO TO HAND SEWING: Beginners pick up needle and thread to stitch fleece ear warmers. Jericho Town Library, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, colleen@jerichotownlibraryvt.org.

Live at

KNITTING 4 PEACE: Needle-and-yarn artists cast on for a cause, stitching items to be donated to those in need. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 1-2 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 985-5124.

dance

Main Street Randolph, Vt.

ADULT AERIAL DANCE CONDITIONING: With or without previous experience, folks forge strength, grace and confidence in the air. North End Studio B, Burlington, noon-1 p.m. $15. Info, 863-6713. ADULT CONTEMPORARY DANCE: A weekly class crescendos with expressive phrases of movement. North End Studio B, Burlington, 10-11:30 a.m. $12. Info, 863-6713. CONTACT IMPROV DANCE: Movers engage in weight sharing, play and meditation when exploring this style influenced by aikido and other somatic practices. Aikido of Champlain Valley, Burlington, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $4. Info, 864-7306.

Darlingside

802-728-6464 chandler-arts.org

Donate a car… Change a life!

Untitled-11 1

11/18/16Untitled-51 4:58 PM 1

11/23/16 11:04 AM

SALSA MONDAYS: Dancers learn the techniques and patterns of salsa, merengue, bachata and chacha. North End Studio A, Burlington, fundamentals, 7 p.m.; intermediate, 8 p.m. $12. Info, 227-2572.

etc.

SOCIAL GATHERING: Those who are deaf or hard of hearing or want to learn American Sign Language get together to break down communication barriers. The North Branch Café, Montpelier, 4-6 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 595-4001. TECH HELP WITH CLIF: Electronics novices develop skill sets applicable to smartphones, tablets and other gadgets. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, noon & 1 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-6955. VERMONT ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY: IS THE SUN BIG?: Stargazers meet to discuss celestial subjects. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.30, 7 p.m. MAGIC: THE GATHERING — MONDAY NIGHT MODERN: Tarmogoyf-slinging madness ensues when competitors battle for prizes in a weekly game. Brap’s Magic, Burlington, 6:30-10 p.m. $8. Info, 540-0498.

health & fitness

DISCUSSION GROUP: MEATLESS DIET: A conversation about animal-friendly eating habits satisfies hungry minds. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150.

This is the perfect time to give to those in need in our community. All vehicles donated by 12/31/16 qualify for a 2016 tax deduction – FAIR MARKET VALUE if provided to a family.

FREE TOWING Donate toll-free: 877.GIVE.AUTO (877.448.3288) Donate online: GoodNewsGarage.org

CALENDAR 59

‘9 TO 5, THE MUSICAL’ AUDITIONS: DOLLY ONLY: Female and male performers throw their hats into the ring for the role of narrator in Lyric Theatre Company’s production. Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, Burlington, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 363-4599.

DEC. 10

MON.5

MORNING FLOW YOGA: See WED.30. NIA WITH SUZY: See SUN.4, 7 p.m. MON.5

SEVEN DAYS

theater

Kamikaze Comedy

BURLINGTON WOMEN’S POETRY GROUP: Female writers seek feedback from fellow rhyme-andmeter mavens. Email for details. Private residence, Burlington, 3 p.m. Free. Info, jcpoet@bellsouth.net.

11.30.16-12.07.16

sports

DEC. 3

words

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

WHEEZER & SQUEEZER: Jeremiah McLane and Timothy Cummings take to accordion and bagpipe for original and traditional tunes. New City Galerie, Burlington, 7 p.m. $10. Info, joseph@ newcitygalerie.org.

independence within the Middlebury elderly community. Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168.

» P.60 GG4t-goodnewsgarage112316.indd 1

11/14/16 1:35 PM


calendar MON.5

« P.59

songs, bounces and rhymes. Richmond Free Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 434-3036.

PERSONAL BEST RUNNER’S CIRCUIT: See WED.30.

KIDS’ AERIAL FABRIC DANCE CLASS: Adventurous youngsters ages 7 through 12 learn to hang, climb and spin on silks in a high-flying class for all experience levels. North End Studio B, Burlington, 3:15-4:15 p.m. $15. Info, 863-6713.

R.I.P.P.E.D.: See WED.30, North End Studio A, Burlington. RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: See WED.30. THE SUBTLE SERIES: YOGA FOR HEALING: Gentle movements enable the free flow of energy in the body and mind, especially for those experiencing sickness, injury or fatigue. Railyard Apothecary and Yoga Studio, Burlington, 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. $14. Info, 318-6050.

LUMINARIES & LANTERNS: Students craft lamps that will line downtown sidewalks during First Night St. Johnsbury. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 3:45-5:15 p.m. Donations; preregister. Info, 748-2600.

VERMONT CENTER FOR INTEGRATIVE HERBALISM STUDENT HERB CLINIC: Third-year interns evaluate individual constitutions and health conditions. Burlington Herb Clinic, 4-8 p.m. $5-10; preregister. Info, info@vtherbcenter.org. ZUMBA: See WED.30.

PRESCHOOL MUSIC: See THU.1, 11 a.m. ROBIN’S NEST NATURE PLAYGROUP: Outdoor pursuits through fields and forests captivate tykes up to age 5 and their parents. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Donations. Info, 229-6206. SPANISH MUSICAL KIDS: Amigos keep busy in an interactive class with Constancia Gómez. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

holidays

AMARYLLIS: VERMONT’S EARLY VOICE: Susanne Peck directs the local ensemble in the choral music program “O Great Mystery! A Concert of Renaissance Christmas Motets and Carols.” St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church on the Green, Middlebury, 7:30 p.m. $15. Info, 453-3513.

STORIES WITH MEGAN: Little lit lovers ages 2 through 5 open their ears for exciting tales. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. STORY TIME & CRAFTS WITH CAITLIN: Engaging plots complement seasonal creative projects. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 10:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 985-5124.

HOLIDAY CARD MAKING: Crafters send season’s greetings with recycled materials. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955. HOLIDAY STORY TIME: Traditional tales and contemporary narratives set the tone for music, rhymes and a snack. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 10:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 264-5660.

TEENS’ & TWEENS’ AERIAL FABRIC DANCE CLASS: Adolescents use suspended silks to integrate ground and sky with seamless transitions. North End Studio B, Burlington, 4:15-5:15 p.m. $15. Info, 863-6713.

kids

WRITE NOW!: Emerging wordsmiths in grades 6 through 12 hone their skills in a supportive environment. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6:307:30 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660.

BABY LAP TIME: Babes up to 24 months experience color, sound and movement through stories,

language

ADVANCED-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: Language learners perfect their pronunciation with guest speakers. Private residence, Burlington, 5-6:30 p.m. $20. Info, 324-1757.

lgbtq

CINÉ SALON: CINEMA BEFORE STONEWALL: Experimental films showcase early LGBTQ aesthetics. For mature audiences. Mayer Room, Howe Library, Hanover, N.H., 7 p.m. Free. Info, 603-643-4120. UNCORKED FOR A CAUSE: Red or white? Revelers take their pick at an elegant Pride Center of Vermont benefit featuring tasty fare and a wide variety of vinos for auction. Burlington City Arts, 6-9 p.m. $20 or a bottle of wine. Info, 860-7812.

music

CHAMBER ENSEMBLES: UVM students perform classical chamber music for duos, trios, quartets and quintets. University of Vermont Recital Hall, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 656-3040. GUITAR CLASS: Notes ring out at a six-string lesson for folks in recovery. Instruments are available. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150. MONDAY NIGHT COMMUNITY KIRTAN: Instruments are welcome during call-and-response chanting of mostly Sanskrit mantras in the bhakti yoga tradition. Sacred Mountain Studio, Burlington, 7:30-9 p.m. Donations. Info, bpatoine@aol.com. SAINT MICHAEL’S COLLEGE STRING ORCHESTRA: Works by Purcell, Telemann, Tchaikovsky and others make up the program “Suite of Suites.” McCarthy Arts Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 654-2000.

seminars

BASIC BIKE MAINTENANCE & DIY FLAT REPAIR: Riders get their gears turning during a lesson on bicycle anatomy, vocabulary, functions and fixes. Bike Recycle Vermont, Burlington, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 863-4475. INTRO TO FACEBOOK FOR SENIORS: An overview of social media helps participants ages 50 and up stay connected in the digital age. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 3-4:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 865-7217.

sports

PICKUP DODGEBALL: Coed groups of adult players drop in and heave balls at the competition. Orchard School, South Burlington, 7-8 p.m. $5. Info, 324-3036.

talks

VERMONT COUNCIL ON WORLD AFFAIRS ANNUAL MEETING: Former United States ambassador to Syria Robert Ford and Rutland Mayor Christopher Louras contribute to a thought-provoking panel discussion. Pomerleau Alumni Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 5:30 p.m. Free. Info, vcwa@vermont.org.

theater

‘9 TO 5, THE MUSICAL’ AUDITIONS: See SUN.4, 5:45-10 p.m. MONDAYS AT THE IMPROV: Emerging entertainers express themselves through theater games and acting techniques for onstage and off. The Wellness Co-op, Burlington, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 999-7373.

words

FRIENDS OF THE STOWE FREE LIBRARY BOOK SALE: See WED.30.

Essexresortspa.com 802.878.1100 or stop in to pick yours up today! Pamper your friends and family with our

50 Minute Massage

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

There’s something for everyone on your holiday list at

or Facial Gift Certificate for just

$99 all-inclusive

60 CALENDAR

SEVEN DAYS

Good for purchase now until December 24th. For use: 12/26/16-12/31/2017

ESSEX RESORT & SPA / 70 ESSEX WAY / ESSEX JCT. VT 05452 844 • 509 • 8551 VISIT US TODAY AT WWW.ESSEXRESORTSPA.COM

4t-theessex113016(2).indd 1

11/28/16 2:42 PM

25 Truffles for $22.99!

FREE CHOCOLATE SNOWFLAKE with a purchase of $25 or more With this ad. Expires 12/31/16.

The Blue Mall • 150 Dorset St., So. Burlington • 863-8306 Factory location • 81A Vermont Rte. 15, Jericho • 899-3373

snowflakechocolate.com 4t-snowflake113016.indd 1

11/28/16 2:43 PM


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

SHAPE & SHARE LIFE STORIES: Prompts from Recille Hamrell trigger recollections of specific experiences, which participants craft into narratives. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

TUE.6 art

COLORING CLUB: Adults and high school students relax by shading inside the lines. BYO coloring books and implements. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600, ext. 108. HEALING ARTS FOR WOMEN: Creative sessions encourage recovery through games, expression, movement and companionship among survivors of trauma. Gifford Medical Center, Randolph, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 685-3138.

business

RENTAL INCOME SEMINAR: Those seeking financial freedom and security get wise to the ways of real estate investment. Preferred Properties, South Burlington, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 318-7654.

community

FEAST TOGETHER OR FEAST TO GO: See FRI.2. TUESDAY VOLUNTEER NIGHTS: Helping hands pitch in around the shop by organizing parts, moving bikes and tackling other projects. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. Bike Recycle Vermont, Burlington, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 264-9687.

crafts

OPEN CRAFT NIGHT: Creative sparks fly in the studio as attendees whip out woven wall hangings and

SHOP SMALL. SHOP LOCAL.

crochet, knitting and sewing projects. Nido Fabric & Yarn, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 881-0068.

dance

BEGINNER WEST COAST SWING & FUSION DANCING: Pupils get schooled in the fundamentals of partner dance. North End Studio B, Burlington, 8-9 p.m. $11-16. Info, burlingtonwestie@gmail.com. INTERMEDIATE & ADVANCED WEST COAST SWING: Fun-loving folks learn the smooth, sexy stylings of modern swing dance. North End Studio A, Burlington, 7-9 p.m. $11-16. Info, burlingtonwestie@gmail.com. SWING DANCING: Quick-footed participants experiment with different forms, including the Lindy hop, Charleston and balboa. Beginners are welcome. Champlain Club, Burlington, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $5. Info, 448-2930.

TU

E .6

|H

OLID

health & fitness

BRANDON FITNESS BOOT CAMP: Hop to it! Get fit with strength, endurance, agility and coordination exercises. Otter Valley North Campus Gym, Brandon, 5-6 p.m. $12. Info, 343-7160. DE-STRESS YOGA: A relaxing and challenging class lets healthy bodies unplug and unwind. Balance Yoga, Richmond, 5:45-7 p.m. $14. Info, 434-8401.

KNIGHTS OF THE MYSTIC MOVIE CLUB: Cinema hounds view campy features at this ode to offbeat productions. Main Street Museum, White River Junction, 8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 356-2776. ‘NERDLAND’: Paul Rudd and Patton Oswalt voice two animated dudes determined to hit the big-time by going viral. Palace 9 Cinemas, South Burlington, 8 p.m. $15. Info, 660-9300.

food & drink

WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET: See SUN.4, 7:30 a.m.-7 p.m.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.30, 7 p.m.

IN

G

FITNESS AT ANY AGE: Strength, agility, coordination and heart-healthy exercises are modified for folks of all ability levels. Charlotte Senior Center, 9:15-10 a.m. $10. Info, 343-7160.

AYS | ‘M ES S

film

’S

FELDENKRAIS: AWARENESS THROUGH MOVEMENT: Whether you consider it relaxing exercise or active meditation, this experience can reduce pain and increase mobility. Bring a blanket and wear warm, cozy clothes. Sacred Mountain Studio, Burlington, 9:30-10:30 a.m. $15; free for first-timers. Info, 735-3770.

IAH

FITNESS FLOW YOGA: See FRI.2, 6:30-7:30 p.m. GENTLE DROP-IN YOGA: Yogis hit the mat for a hatha class led by Betty Molnar. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660. LENGTHEN & TONE BOOT CAMP: Dancers enjoy conditioning specifically for their art form with a mix of yoga, pilates, ballet barre and resistance training. Chase Dance Studio, Flynn Center, Burlington, 5:40-6:55 p.m. $15. Info, slowell@ flynncenter.org. NIA WITH REBECCA: See FRI.2. PEACEFUL WARRIOR KARATE: Martial-arts training promotes healthy living for those in recovery. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150.

workout. Your Personal Best Fitness, South Burlington, 6-7 p.m. $15. Info, 658-1616. ZUMBA WITH ALLISON: Conditioning is disguised as a party at this rhythm-driven workout session. Swan Dojo, Burlington, 7-8 p.m. $10. Info, 227-7221.

holidays

HAPPY, HEALTHY HOLIDAYS WITH FOOD AS MEDICINE: Healthy eating equals healthy bodies in a workshop with Harmonized Cookery’s Lisa Masé. Community Room, Hunger Mountain Coop, Montpelier, 5-6 p.m. $3-5; preregister. Info, info@ hungermountain.coop. ILLUMINATION NIGHT: A welcome from VCFA president Tom Greene paves the way for a tree lighting and holiday carols. Refreshments in College Hall follow. College Green, Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 828-8600. ‘MESSIAH’ SING: Community members are welcome to join the Burlington Choral Society in singing the Christmas choruses of Handel’s composition. North Avenue Alliance Church, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Info, bcssingerz@gmail.com. NEEDLE FELTING HOLIDAY ORNAMENTS: Crafters use provided supplies to produce handmade decorations. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 2-3:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 264-5660. ‘THE NIGHTMARE BEFORE CHRISTMAS’: Christmas Town is a whole new world for the king of Halloween Town in this stop-motion animated favorite. Film House, Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, 7-10 p.m. Free. Info, 540-3018. ‘RUDOLPH THE RED-NOSED REINDEER: THE MUSICAL’: A reindeer with a bright, bulbous nose longs for acceptance in a sparkling stage adaptation of the 1964 feel-good flick. Paramount Theatre, Rutland, 6 p.m. $30-40. Info, 775-0903.

TREAD & SHED: Active bodies take to treadmills and elliptical machines for a motivating group

TUE.6

» P.62

SHOP ST. ALBANS!

TAX FREE! Enjoy a little Christmas shopping with our help. Don’t pay the taxes, let us do it!

e, Toy Local Gam m! y Emporiu and Cand

Tuesday-Thursday 9-5 Friday 9-6 Saturday 9-4

30 North Main Street • St. Albans 802-524-4055 • eatonsjewelry.com

46 N Main Street, 527-1200

Great Wine, Kitchen Gadgets & Gifts M-SA 9:30-6, SUN 10-4 58 N. MAIN ST.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

WE HAVE THAT LAST MINUTE GIFT YOU STILL NEED!

11.30.16-12.07.16

Free smoked pork samples in November! ONE FEDERAL ST.

802.524.0330

sports uniforms & equipment custom player & fan websites embroidery, silkscreening and more! KEVINSMITHSPORTS.COM 38 S. MAIN ST., ST. ALBANS • 524.3312 174 WILLISTON RD., S. BURLINGTON • 658.0848

Chasworth Farm Soap Studio Artisan soaps and body care sundries

82 North Main St, St. Albans 802.309.3778 chasworthfarm.com

Open Tue-Sat, 11am-9pm 65 N. Main Street • (802) 524-6135 jeffsmaineseafood.com

SEVEN DAYS

Open 7 Days

CALENDAR 61

2h-SAFF113016.indd 1

11/29/16 1:33 PM


OFF

- U.S. Ski and Snowboard Hall of Fame

Legends of American Skiing

with this ad Limit one per tattoo Expires 02/01/17

Friday, Dec. 2, 7pm

236 Main St. Burlington

802-540-1080

eventhorizonink.com

Main Street Landing Film House 60 Lake St., Burlington

vermonthumanities.org/skiing

TUE.6

« P.61

kids

CODING CLUB: Third and fourth graders put on their thinking caps and design their own video games. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, 878-4918. FAMILY GAME NIGHT: Players ages 5 and up sit down to bouts of friendly competition. Fairfax Community Library, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 849-2420. FAMILY YOGA DANCE: The young and the young at heart move and groove in a personalized class. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 6-6:45 p.m. $10. Info, 779-0444. LEGO CHALLENGE: Burgeoning builders tackle construction tasks with colorful blocks. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 748-8291. LEGO CLUB: Youngsters snap together snazzy structures. Kids 8 and under must be accompanied by an adult. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 2-3 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

OPEN JAM SESSION: Musicians follow the flow and explore sound together. The Wellness Co-op, Burlington, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 303. POST-BOP ENSEMBLE & NONET: Music lovers get their fix with a varied program of works from Wayne Shorter, Miles Davis, Pamela Baskin Watson and others. University of Vermont Recital Hall, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 656-3040. VERMONT YOUTH CHORUS: Caleb Pillsbury picks up the baton to conduct “Madrigalia: The Music of the World.” Elley-Long Music Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 7 p.m. $5-10; free for Vermont Youth Orchestra Association Members. Info, 655-5030.

US

11/29/16 2:13 PM MIDDLE SCHOOL PLANNERS &

GREEN MOUNTAIN CHORUS: Vocalists with and without experience get in harmony for a holiday chorus that will perform at a Christmas concert and informal local events. St. Francis Xavier School, Winooski, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 505-9595.

|M

11/14/16 Untitled-41 10:41 AM 1

CATAMOUNT WINTER CONCERT: Professor David Neiweem directs the University of Vermont Catamount Singers in seasonal selections. The Cathedral Church of St. Paul, Burlington, 12:15 p.m. Free; bring a bag lunch. Info, 864-0471.

W E D .7

MAGIC: THE GATHERING FOR TEENS/TWEENS: See FRI.2. 12v-eventhorizon111616-3.indd 1

music

BLE

10%

calendar

SE M

5 ANNIVERSARY! TH

“One of the top ten ski films of all time.”

EN

Event Horizon Tattoo

|

IO

N

IC

HELPERS: Sixth through eighth JS sports CJ US graders practice a program to be /F AZ Z EN NK BURLINGTON RUGBY FOOTBALL CLUB: U F S & performed for younger kids. Brownell E MBLE See THU.1. Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. PRESCHOOL MUSIC: Melody makers ages 3 through 5 sing and dance into the afternoon. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 11:30 a.m.noon. Free. Info, 264-5660. PRESCHOOL STORY HOUR: ANIMALS IN WINTER: Imaginations blossom when young’uns up to age 6 engage in themed tales and activities. Fairfax Community Library, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 849-2420. PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Books and creative projects promote early literacy skills for tykes ages 3 through 5. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. READ TO DAISY: Budding bookworms join a friendly canine for ear-catching narratives. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:15-4 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

SPANISH MUSICAL KIDS: Amigos ages 1 through 5 learn Latin American songs and games with Constancia Gómez, a native Argentinian. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:45 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216.

11.30.16-12.07.16

STORY TIME FOR BABIES & TODDLERS: Picture books, songs, rhymes and puppets arrest the attention of children and their caregivers. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9:10-9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

SEVEN DAYS

theater

‘9 TO 5, THE MUSICAL’ AUDITIONS: See SUN.4, 5:45-10 p.m. NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: ‘WAR HORSE’: A broadcast production of this award-winning drama features a boy determined to reunite with his beloved steed, who is recruited to serve in World War I. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. $16-25. Info, 748-2600.

words

FRIENDS OF THE STOWE FREE LIBRARY BOOK SALE: See WED.30, noon-7 p.m.

TODDLER STORY TIME: Good listeners up to 3 years old have fun with music, rhymes, snacks and captivating tales. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 10:30-11 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 264-5660.

WED.7

language

DROP-IN QUILTING STUDIO: Adult and teen needle-and-thread enthusiasts work on patchwork projects. River Arts, Morrisville, 10 a.m.-noon. Donations. Info, 888-1261.

‘LA CAUSERIE’ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Native speakers are welcome to pipe up at an unstructured conversational practice. El Gato Cantina, Burlington, 4:30-6 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0195.

62 CALENDAR

PATHWORK LECTURES DISCUSSION GROUP: A road map to self-acceptance points participants toward a genuine love of self, others and the divine. Vermont Center for Integrative Therapy, South Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 658-9440.

STORYTELLING VT: Locals tell true tales before a live audience. Light Club Lamp Shop, Burlington, 7:30-9 p.m. Free. Info, deenastories@gmail.com.

ITALIAN CONVERSATION GROUP: Parla Italiano? Language learners engage with a fluent speaker in an informal training. Jericho Town Library, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 899-4686.

PAUSE-CAFÉ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Frenchlanguage fanatics engage in dialogue en français. Light Club Lamp Shop, Burlington, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 363-2431. 11/28/16 2:21 PM

COMMUNITY MEDICAL SCHOOL: Doctor Debra G.B. Leonard maps out how the University of Vermont aims to utilize genetic information in “Genomic Medicine in Vermont” Carpenter Auditorium, Given Medical Building, University of Vermont, Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 847-2886.

STORY TIME FOR PRESCHOOLERS: Picture books, songs, rhymes and early math tasks work youngsters’ mental muscles. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

BEGINNER-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: Basic communication skills are on the agenda at a guided lesson. Private residence, Burlington, 6 p.m. $20. Info, 324-1757.

Untitled-22 1

talks

art

‘RENOIR: REVERED AND REVILED’: Shown as part of Great Art Wednesdays, this 2016 film examines the fiercely debated impressionist artist. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, 11 a.m. $5-10. Info, 382-9222.

crafts

KNITTING & MORE: BROOMSTICK LACE: Needleworkers of all skill levels learn the popular crochet technique. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660.

dance

DROP-IN HIP-HOP DANCE: See WED.30.


FIND FUTURE DATES + UPDATES AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/EVENTS

etc.

CAREER SERVICES: See WED.30. ONE-ON-ONE GENEALOGY HELP: Folks familiar with family-tree fact-finding take their research to the next level with individualized help. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 1:30-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 985-5124. TECH HELP WITH CLIF: See MON.5.

film

CLASSIC FILM SERIES: Movie lovers view cinematic masterpieces. Call for details. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 229-5290. ‘SPINNING PLATES’: Shown as part of the Architecture + Design Film Series, this 2012 documentary gives viewers an inside look at three restaurants and their owners. Burlington City Hall Auditorium, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, adfilmseries@gmail.com.

food & drink

COMMUNITY SUPPER: See WED.30. VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: See WED.30. WOODSTOCK FARMERS MARKET: See SUN.4, 7:30 a.m.-7 p.m.

games

GERMAN CONVERSATION GROUP: Community members practice conversing auf Deutsch. Local History Room, Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211. INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASS: See WED.30.

GIVE YOURSELF THE GIFT OF FITNESS

lgbtq

DE-STRESS AND GET HEALTHY!

music

• 70+ group exercise classes, including Yoga, Zumba & Spin

INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: See WED.30.

LGBTQ GENDER-FREE SQUARE DANCE CLASS: See WED.30.

GUITAR ENSEMBLE & STUDIO CONCERT: Michael Angelo Fratino directs SUNY Plattsburgh students in a varied six-string program. Krinovitz Recital Hall, Hawkins Hall, SUNY Plattsburgh, N.Y., 7:30-10 p.m. Free. Info, 518-564-2243. JSC JAZZ ENSEMBLE & FUNK/FUSION ENSEMBLE: Two student groups get toes tapping with an end-ofsemester performance. Dibden Center for the Arts, Johnson State College, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 636-1476. SONG CIRCLE: Singers and musicians congregate for an acoustic session of popular folk tunes. Godnick Adult Center, Rutland, 7:15-9:15 p.m. Free; donations accepted. Info, 775-1182.

health & fitness

SONGS ALIVE!: First-year students give voice to arias and newly composed original songs. Robison Hall, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 8 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168.

EVERY WEDNESDAY, EVERYONE TAI CHI: See WED.30.

sports

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.30.

EPIC MINDFULNESS MEDITATION: See WED.30. GENTLE TAI CHI: See WED.30. GINGER’S FITNESS BOOT CAMP: See WED.30. INSIGHT MEDITATION: See WED.30. LUNAR YOGA/PILATES: See WED.30. MORNING FLOW YOGA: See WED.30. NIA WITH LINDA: See WED.30. PERSONAL BEST RUNNER’S CIRCUIT: See WED.30. RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: See WED.30. R.I.P.P.E.D.: See WED.30. TAI CHI FOR ALL: See WED.30. WEDNESDAY NIGHT SOUND BATH: See WED.30. ZUMBA: See WED.30.

holidays

MAKE A HOLIDAY ARRANGEMENT: Festive floral designs take shape with help from Sharon Niquette of Buds & Roses. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, 878-4918. PAINT A NUTCRACKER: Seasonal snacks satiate kids ages 4 and up as they apply color to takehome wooden figures. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 3:15-4:30 p.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, 985-5124.

kids

READ TO A DOG: Book hounds ages 5 through 10 curl up with a good story and a furry friend. Fairfax Community Library, 3:15-4:15 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 849-2420. READING BUDDIES: Little pals meet with mentors to bond over books. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3:30-4 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660. RICHMOND STORY TIME: See WED.30.

language

Untitled-32 1

11/21/16 1:59 PM

WOMEN’S PICKUP BASKETBALL: See WED.30.

talks

AMY HUNGERFORD: Hailing from Yale University, the First Wednesdays series speaker reads into a poet’s perspective in “Wallace Stevens and the Art of the Empty Mind.” Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 388-4095. CHRISTOPHER PLANETTA: Selected scenes illustrate the First Wednesdays series talk “Classic Films of 1966.” Goodrich Memorial Library, Newport, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 334-7902.

EVENTS EVENTS ON ON SALE SALE NOW! NOW THIS WEEK Wyld Lyfe: A

Benefit Concert for 350VT

THE DISH: FOOD WASTE: A lively panel discussion dives into the misuse of foodstuffs from field to plate. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. $5. Info, 861-9753. FRANÇOIS CLEMMONS: A performance lecture presented as part of the First Wednesdays series illustrates the evolution of spiritual songs originated by slaves. See calendar spotlight. Rutland Free Library, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 773-1860. GEORGE JAEGER: Delivered as part of the First Wednesdays series, “America in a New, More Dangerous World” reflects on rapid changes in global power relationships. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955. JULIE THEORET: The Johnson State College mathematician assesses the sum of support structures for math and science students. Room 207, Bentley Hall, Johnson State College, 4-5:15 p.m. Free. Info, leslie.kanat@jsc.edu. KELLEY HELMSTUTLER DI DIO: The UVM professor paints a compelling picture in the First Wednesdays speech “The Medici Grand Dukes: Art and Politics in Renaissance Florence.” St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 745-1393. VIRGINIA HEFFERNAN: In the First Wednesdays series lecture “Magic and Loss: The Internet as Art,” the journalist dials into the worldwide web as a collective work of creativity. Norwich Congregational Church, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 649-1184.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 12, ARTSRIOT, BURLINGTON

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2, ARTSRIOT, BURLINGTON

THIS WE E K

Midnight Snack SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3, ARTSRIOT, BURLINGTON

The Resurrection of Victor Jara THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8, MAIN STREET LANDING PERFORMING ARTS CENTER FILMHOUSE THEATER, BURLINGTON

2016 Vermont Filmmakers’ Showcase Award Winners

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, MAIN STREET LANDING PERFORMING ARTS CENTER FILM HOUSE THEATER, BURLINGTON

SELLING TICKETS? • • • • •

Fundraisers Festivals Plays Sports Concerts

WE CAN HELP!

words

AN EVENING WITH BILLY COLLINS: The former United States poet laureate shares his gift for verse as part of the First Wednesdays series. House Chamber, Vermont Statehouse, Montpelier, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 262-1353.

Chris Cohen

Paint Cabaret

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 10, ARTSRIOT, BURLINGTON

• • • •

No cost to you Local support Built-in promotion Custom options

CONTACT US:

• 865-1020, ext. 22 • tickets@sevendaysvt.com

FRIENDS OF THE STOWE FREE LIBRARY BOOK SALE: See WED.30. WRITING CIRCLE: See WED.30. m

SEVENDAYSTICKETS.COM

BEGINNER ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASS: See WED.30. 3v-tickets113016.indd 1

11/29/16 4:22 PM

CALENDAR 63

STORY TIME & PLAYGROUP: See WED.30.

www.gbymca.org

SEVEN DAYS

JUNK MUSIC: Donald Knaack makes music with objects from the garage, Dumpster, kitchen and beyond. Fuller Hall, St. Johnsbury Academy, 10:30 a.m. & 1 p.m. $3.50-10. Info, 748-2600.

• A welcoming community

11.30.16-12.07.16

‘WINTER TALES’: Folk singers Patti Casey and Pete Sutherland join Vermont Stage actors in this seasonal celebration of stories and songs. See calendar spotlight. FlynnSpace, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $28.8037.50; $55 for Sunday night gala. Info, 863-5966.

• Two indoor pools

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NORTHERN STAGE’S ‘A CHRISTMAS CAROL’: See WED.30.

• On-site member child care


SEVENDAYSVT.COM 11.30.16-12.07.16 SEVEN DAYS

2 016 T A L E N T S H O W F O R

SATURDAY, December 10, at noon

VERMONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RISING STARS SPONSORED BY:

Kids ages 5-13 wow the crowd with two-minute acts showcasing their talents. Visit kidsvt.com/talentshow for ticket information.

64

Higher Ground Ballroom. Kids 6 & under free, $7 in advance, $10 at the door. 1T-TalentShow112316.indd 1

11/22/16 10:26 AM


CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES

classes THE FOLLOWING CLASS LISTINGS ARE PAID ADVERTISEMENTS. ANNOUNCE YOUR CLASS FOR AS LITTLE AS $13.75/WEEK (INCLUDES SIX PHOTOS AND UNLIMITED DESCRIPTION ONLINE). SUBMIT YOUR CLASS AD AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTCLASS.

astrology ASTROLOGY AT RAILYARD: Astrology meet-up first Thu. of every month starts Dec. 1, 7-8:30 p.m. 30-minute astrology readings every Sat. 1-4 p.m. Check our website for details! Location: Railyard, 270 Battery St., Burlington. Info: 318-6050, railyardyoga@gmail.com, railyardapothecary.com.

craft

ADULT: CLAY HANDBUILDING: Instructor: Sarah Ahrens. Explore hand-built sculptural forms in clay. Design and build projects based on individual interest. Learn construction techniques and surface treatments. Supportive group discussions inform the creative process and technical skill sets. Gas reduction kiln and electric oxidation kiln are available for firing. Thu., 10 a.m.-noon, Jan. 19-Mar. 16, no class Mar. 2. Cost: $335/person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

ADULT: METALS 1: This class will focus on jewelry design, small sculpture or functional art. Students will complete several practice pieces before designing and creating wearable finished pieces out of sterling silver. There will be weekly demonstrations, including sawing, drilling, piercing, annealing, texturing, jump rings, forming and soldering techniques. Instructor: Sarah Sprague. Thu., 6-9 p.m., Jan. 19-Mar. 16, no class Mar. 2. Cost: $427/person; member discount avail. Location: Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@theshelburnecraftschool. org, theshelburnecraftschool.org. ADULT: PAINTING IN OIL: Instructor: Brooke Monte. Develop confidence in composition, color, layering and mixing using oil paints. Designed for beginners. Students will use still life set-ups to explore techniques ranging from layout and surface preparation to a variety of brush work, including wet into wet, scrubs and

ADULT: STAINED GLASS: Instructor: Sarah Sprague. This class will teach you the copper-foil stained-glass method pioneered by Louis Comfort Tiffany. Begin with a project that introduces you to pattern selection and creation using different types of glass, and cutting and fitting glass pieces, then learn how to foil and solder. Thu., 3-5 p.m., Jan. 19-Mar. 16, no

WORKSHOP: TEXTURES IN JEWELRY: Instructor: Sarah Sprague. This workshop focuses on introducing textures to surface design. Students will learn how to use the rolling mill, create a sampler of textures and create a final silver pendant ready to wear. Sat., Feb. 18, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost: $163.50/person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: The Shelburne Craft School, 985-3648, info@theshelburnecraftschool. org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

dance DANCE STUDIO SALSALINA: Salsa classes, nightclub-style, group and private, four levels. Beginner walk-in classes, Wed., 6 p.m. $15/person for one-hour class. No dance experience, partner or preregistration required, just the desire to have fun! Drop in any time and prepare for an enjoyable workout. Location: 266 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Victoria, 598-1077, info@salsalina.com.

LEARN TO DANCE W/ A PARTNER!: Come alone or come with friends, but come out and learn to dance! Beginning classes repeat each month, but intermediate classes vary from month to month. As with all of our programs, everyone is encouraged to attend, and no partner is necessary. Private lessons also available. Cost: $50/4week class. Location: Champlain Club, 20 Crowley St., Burlington. Info: First Step Dance, 598-6757, kevin@firststepdance.com, firststepdance.com.

drumming DJEMBE & TAIKO: Classes in Burlington, Hyde Park and Montpelier. Drums provided. Classes for adults (also for kids with parents) Mon., Tue. & Wed. in Burlington. Wed. a.m. or Friday a.m. in Hyde Park. Thu. in Montpelier. Most classes are in the evenings or after school. Conga classes, too! Visit our schedule and register online. Location: Taiko Space, 208 Flynn Ave., Suite 3G, Burlington; Capital City Grange, 6612 Rte. 12, Berlin; Moonlight Studios, 1670 Cleveland Corners Rd., Hyde Park. Info: 999-4255, burlingtontaiko.org.

Flynn Arts

BEING IN MOVEMENT: ENHANCING POTENTIAL & EXPRESSION: These monthly workshops facilitate a lively interplay between inner connectivity and outer expressivity to enrich and embody your life and movement practice. Upcoming Session: Creating Landscapes. Instructor: Sara McMahon. Fri., Dec. 2, 5:45-7:45 p.m. Cost: $25/ person. Location: Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: 652-4548, flynnarts.org. IMPROVISATIONAL LABORATORY COPRESENTED BY UVM’S DANCE PROGRAM: These intensives focus on improvisation skills and movement’s relationship to self, others, and the elements of space and time. UVM students are eligible for funding through the FLYNN ARTS

» P.66

CLASSES 65

ADULT: COLOR THEORY: Instructor: Dana Heffern. Explore advanced color theory using Munsill’s Color Theory Workbook. Gain an understanding of ambience, atmosphere, clash, vibration, and other color perceptions through guided experiments and lively class discussions. Then develop your own style with how color can create environment, mood and a sense of aesthetics. Fri., 10 a.m.-noon, Jan. 27-Mar. 17. Cost: $248/person; member discount avail., you purchase book & materials. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648,

ADULT: INTRO TO INK: Instructor: Misoo Filan. Learn the fundamental skills of ink drawing. Explore technical basics through observational drawing, still life, landscape and abstract design concepts. Gain confidence with composition and surface manipulation by trying out different kinds of ink and discovering new ways to create with the medium. Materials not included. Mon., 1-3 p.m., Jan. 23-Mar. 20, no class Feb. 27. Cost: $248/person; member discount avail.; you purchase materials. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

ADULT: SHAKER HALL TABLE: Instructor: Chris Ramos. A comprehensive introduction to woodworking, this course explores basic principles of lumber selection, hand-tool and machinery usage, milling, joinery and finishing. You will build a Shaker-style hall table, taking the project from blueprint through completion, while gaining familiarity with the wood shop environment. Wed., 6-9 p.m., Jan. 18-Mar. 22. Cost: $565/person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: Sage Tucker-Ketcham, 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

ADULT: WOODWORKING 2: Instructor: Rob Palmer. Further develop woodworking skills in an independent study format. Examine a specific technique or simple concept you are wanting to learn about. Explore concepts in design, materials, and tool usage. Planning, consulting, and wood selection are conducted before class begins. Students purchase their own wood. Thu., Jan. 19-Mar. 23, 6-9 p.m. Cost: $500/person; member discount avail., you buy wood. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd, Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

DSANTOS VT SALSA: Experience the fun and excitement of Burlington’s eclectic dance community by learning salsa. Trained by world famous dancer Manuel Dos Santos, we teach you how to dance to the music and how to have a great time on the dance floor! There is no better time to start than now! Mon. evenings: beginner class, 7-8 p.m.; intermediate, 8:15-9:15 p.m. Cost: $12/1-hour class. Location: North End Studios, 294 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: Jon Bacon, 355-1818, crandalltyler@hotmail. com, dsantosvt.com.

SEVEN DAYS

MAKE IT SEW! SERIES AT NIDO: Interested in widening your sewing machine skills beyond basic hemming? This four-week sewing series will introduce beginner sewers to several new machine skills and develop the foundation to move forward with solo projects. Participants will create a drawstring bag, apron, zip pouches and more. Nido has kids’ classes, too! Mon., Jan. 9, 16, 23 & 30, 6-9 p.m. Cost: $220/4 3-hour classes; materials incl. Location: Nido Fabric and Yarn, 209 College St., Suite 2E, Burlington. Info: 881-0068, info@ nidovt.com, nidovt.com.

ADULT: ABSTRACT PAINTING: Instructor: Brooke Monte. Create a visual language through abstract form, space and color. Explore techniques using a variety of mediums, including charcoal, pastel, acrylics or oils. Learn glazing, dry brush, acrylic transfers and textured impasto while discovering the basics of color theory, sacred geometry, pattern, scale and brush work. Wed., 3-5 p.m., Jan. 18-Mar. 15, no class Mar. 1. Cost: $248/person; member discount avail.; you purchase materials. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@theshelburnecraftschool. org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

ADULT: INSTRUCTED LIFE DRAWING: Instructor: Misoo Filan. Practice the traditional art of drawing the human figure in a supportive and respectful atmosphere. With a life drawing model present ever other week, learn how to capture the human form in varying mediums and further develop your drawing skills. All abilities are welcome. Tue., 6-8 p.m., Jan. 24-Mar. 21, no class Feb. 28. Cost: $288/person; member discount avail., you purchase materials. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

ADULT: PORTRAITURE: Instructor: Misoo Filan. This class guides students through the creation of portraits from life and from photographs using basic drawing and paint media. Students will gain hands-on experience with a wide variety of materials and techniques, including painting with a model in the final class. Thu., 6-8 p.m., Jan. 26-Mar. 23; no class Mar. 2. Cost: $258/person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

class Mar. 2. Cost: $365/person; member discount avail. Location: Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: Sage Tucker-Ketcham, 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

11.30.16-12.07.16

LEARN TO SEW SERIES AT NIDO: Take our two-part Learn to Sew series beginning Mon., Dec. 5, with Learn to Sew I. Learn machine basics and fundamental sewing techniques. Follow up with our Learn to Sew II class on Mon., Dec. 19, to continue building your sewing repertoire. Leave with finished projects and inspiration. Register today! Mon., Dec. 5 & 19, 6-9 p.m. Cost: $106/2 3-hour classes; materials incl. Location: Nido Fabric and Yarn, 209 College St., Suite 2E, Burlington. Info: 881-0068, info@nidovt.com, nidovt.com.

985-3648

ADULT: DRAWING: Instructor: Misoo Filan. This class will focus on fundamentals of observational drawing skills. Students will acquire the technical and conceptual foundation to develop their personal vision. Students will gain hands-on experience with a wide variety of drawing materials and drawing techniques, including drawing from a model in the final class. Mon., 10 a.m.-noon, Jan. 23-Mar. 20; no class Feb. 27. Cost: $258/person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

glazing. Materials not included. Wed., 12:30-2:30 p.m., Jan. 18-Mar. 15; no class Mar. 1. Cost: $248/person; member discount avail.; you purchase materials. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@theshelburnecraftschool. org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

KIDS’ HOLIDAY SEWING WORKSOPS: Looking for a kids’ class full of creativity, making and fun? Nido’s Kids’ Holiday Sewing Workshops offer beginners the basics of sewing while constructing fun projects. Learn how to thread/ use a sewing machine and create basic stitches to craft holiday gifts from zipper pouches to bracelets and accessories. Ages 9-13. Sun., Dec. 4, 11, or 18, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Cost: $58/1 3-hour class; materials incl. Location: Nido Fabric and Yarn, 209 College St., Suite 2E, Burlington. Info: 881-0068, info@nidovt.com, nidovt.com.

theshelburnecraftschool.org

info@theshelburnecraftschool. org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.


CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES

classes THE FOLLOWING CLASS LISTINGS ARE PAID ADVERTISEMENTS. ANNOUNCE YOUR CLASS FOR AS LITTLE AS $13.75/WEEK (INCLUDES SIX PHOTOS AND UNLIMITED DESCRIPTION ONLINE). SUBMIT YOUR CLASS AD AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTCLASS.

FLYNN ARTS

« P.65

UVM Lattie F. Coor Endowment and the Humanities Center. Instructor: Hannah Dennison. Sat., Dec. 2, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost: $66/ person, or $120 to pair w/ Looking Deeper on Sun. for a full weekend of dance. Location: Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: 652-4548, flynnarts.org. LOOKING DEEPER: AN INTENSIVE FOR ADVANCED IMPROVISORS COPRESENTED BY UVM’S DANCE PROGRAM: These intensives at UVM are designed to support and strengthen the skills and community of practicing contemporary dancers and dance-makers. UVM students are eligible for funding through the UVM Lattie F. Coor Endowment and the Humanities Center. For advanced contemporary dancers. Curator: Hannah Dennison. Sun., Dec. 4. Cost: $66/person, or $120 to pair w/ Improvisation Laboratory on Sat. for a full weekend of dance. Location: Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: 652-4548, flynnarts.org.

registration information at website. Sat., Jan.-Mar., 8:30 a.m.3:30 p.m. Cost: $100/one-day workshop. Location: Red Wagon Plants, 2408 Shelburne Falls Rd., Hinesburg. Info: Queen City Soil & Stone, Charley MacMartin, 318-2411, macmartin@igc.org, queencitysoilandstone.com.

glassblowing GLASSBLOWING: Lessons in glassblowing offered during Open Studio Days. From 9 a.m.-3 p.m. on Saturdays, December 3, 10 & 17. Sign up ahead or just show up. Create a piece in 15-30 minutes. Ages 6 and up. Reservations get priority but aren’t necessary. Email, call or text. Sat., Dec. 3, 10 & 17, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Cost: $55/cup or vase; $30/paperweight. Location: Zug Glass Studio, 168 Dickerman Hill Road, Tunbridge. Info: Zug Glass Studio, Janet Zug, 738-9602, zugglassstudio@gmail.com, zugglass.com.

Helen Day Art Center

STONE WALL WORKSHOPS: Our introductory workshops for homeowners and tradespeople promote the beauty and integrity of stone. The one-day workshop focuses on basic techniques for creating dry-laid walls with an emphasis on stone native to Vermont. Workshops are held inside warm greenhouses. Space is limited. Schedule details and

WINTER LANDSCAPE IN WATERCOLOR: Focus on the New England countryside in winter with an emphasis on light, shadow, values and composition. All levels welcome. Instructor Robert O’Brien. Sat., Dec. 3, 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost: $110/person; $85/ members. Location: Helen Day Art Center, 90 Pond St., Stowe.

Tell Vermont friends about FPF!

kids MONDAY GIRLS’ SURFSET SERIES: Excellent after-school fitness activity for middle-schoolaged girls! Small group exercises combined with interactive games empower girls to challenge themselves physically while having fun and increasing team-building skills. Mon. 3:30-4:30 p.m., starts Dec. 5. Cost: $60/4-week series. Location: Surfset Fitness Studio, 696 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Southend Surfset, Roxanne Scully, 999-1918, info@southendsurfset. com, southendsurfset.com.

language LEARN SPANISH & OPEN NEW DOORS: Connect with a new world. We provide high-quality, affordable instruction in the Spanish language for adults, students and children. Travelers’ lesson package. Our 10th year. Personal instruction from a native speaker. Small classes, private lessons and online instruction. See our website for complete information or contact us for details. Location: Spanish in Waterbury Center, Waterbury Center. Info: 585-1025, spanishparavos@gmail.com, spanishwaterburycenter.com.

literature YOUNG ADULT BOOK CLUB: Are you a young adult interested in various intellectual topics? Come join our new book club, Slow and Curious. Very open to different forms of literature and topics. Every other Sun., starts Dec. 4, 1-3 p.m. 2-hour book discussion. Location: Pickering Room, Fletcher Free Library, 235 College St., Burlington. Info: Henry Bodkin, 734-9096, henrybodkin87@gmail.com.

martial arts CHANGE YOUR LIFE: Come to Wu Xing Chinese Martial Arts. Join other thoughtful, intelligent adults to learn and practice Tai Chi, kungfu, and Chinese internal

Yeah, it works for me. I’v‘ e sold a car and found a good plumber.

and physical exercises. Maximize your mental tranquility and clarity, physical health and fitness, and self-confidence. Our classes are for people who never thought this would be for them. Fri., 6-7 p.m. & 7-8 p.m.; Sat., 11 a.m.-noon & noon-1 p.m.; Tue., 6-7:30 p.m. Cost: $15/1-hour class; $50/mo. (incl. all classes offered); $5/trial class. Location: 303 Flynn Ave., Burlington. Info: Wu Xing Chinese Martial Arts, 355-1301, info@ wxcma.com, wxcma.com.

house (intro to the center, short dharma talk and socializing) is held on the third Sunday of each month, noon-2 p.m. Instruction: Sun. mornings, 9 a.m.-noon, or by appt. Sessions: Tue. & Thu., noon-1 p.m., & Mon.-Thu., 6-7 p.m. Location: Burlington Shambhala Center, 187 S. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 658-6795, burlingtonshambhalactr.org.

VERMONT BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is a Martial Arts Combat style based entirely on leverage and technique. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu self-defense curriculum is taught to Navy Seals, CIA, FBI, Military Police and Special Forces. No training experience required. Easy-to-learn techniques that could save your life! Classes for men, women and children. Students will learn realistic bully-proofing and self-defense life skills to avoid them becoming victims and help them feel safe and secure. Our sole purpose is to help empower people by giving them realistic martial arts training practices they can carry with them thoroughout life. IBJJF & CBJJ Certified Black Belt 6th Degree Instructor under Carlson Gracie Sr.: teaching in Vermont, born and raised in Rio de Janeiro, Brasil! A five-time Brazilian National Champion; International World Masters Champion and IBJJF World Masters Champion. Accept no Iimitations!. Location: Vermont Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, 55 Leroy Rd., Williston. Info: 598-2839, julio@ bjjusa.com, vermontbjj.com.

ENERGY MGMT FOR CLINICIANS: 6 CE credits available. Jernigan and Benevento team up to train clinicians in skills beyond their current practice. Participants will learn how self-care can exist in the work, not just outside of it, and how, with the right tools, clinicians can feel energized and centered in the critical work they do. Thu., Dec. 15, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost: $180/workshop. Location: All Souls Interfaith Gathering, 291 Bostwick Farm Rd., Shelburne. Info: Your True North Counseling, Caryn Benevento, 233-6120, caryn.benevento@gmail.com, yourtruenorthhealing.com.

meditation LEARN TO MEDITATE: Through the practice of sitting still and following your breath as it goes out and dissolves, you are connecting with your heart. By simply letting yourself be, as you are, you develop genuine sympathy toward yourself. The Burlington Shambhala Center offers meditation as a path to discovering gentleness and wisdom. Shambhala Cafe (meditation and discussions) meets the first Saturday of each month, 9 a.m.-noon. An open

psychology

tai chi SNAKE-STYLE TAI CHI CHUAN: The Yang Snake Style is a dynamic tai chi method that mobilizes the spine while stretching and strengthening the core body muscles. Practicing this ancient martial art increases strength, flexibility, vitality, peace of mind and martial skill. Beginner classes Sat. mornings & Wed. evenings. Call to view a class. Location: Bao Tak Fai Tai Chi Institute, 100 Church St., Burlington. Info: 8647902, ipfamilytaichi.org.

yoga EVOLUTION YOGA: Evolution Yoga and Physical Therapy offers yoga classes for everyone from beginner to expert. Choose from a wide variety of drop-in classes, series and workshops in Vinyasa, Kripalu, Core, Gentle, Vigorous, Yoga on the Lake, Yoga Wall, Therapeutics, and Alignment. Become part of our yoga community. You are welcome here. Cost: $15/ class; $140/10-class card; $5-10/

community classes. Location: Evolution Yoga, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington. Info: 864-9642, evolutionvt.com. HONEST YOGA: Honest yoga offers practices for all levels. We just expanded to have two practice spaces! Your children can practice in one room while you practice in the other. No need for childcare. Yoga and dance classes ages 3 months and up. Brand-new beginners’ course: This includes two specialty classes per week for four weeks plus unlimited access to all classes. We have daily heated and alignment classes kids classes in yoga and dance, pre- and postnatal yoga. We hold yoga teacher trainings at the 200- and 500hour levels, as well as children and dance teacher training courses. Daily classes & workshops. $50/ new student (1 month unlimited); $18/class; $140/10-class card; $15/class for student or senior; or $110/10-class punch card; $135/ mo. adult memberships; $99/ mo. kid memberships. Location: Honest Yoga Center, 150 Dorset St., Blue Mall, next to Hana, South Burlington. Info: 497-0136, honestyogastudio@gmail.com, honestyogacenter.com. NOON COMMUNITY YOGA CLASSES: We offer three weekly lunchtime Community Yoga classes, 12:15-1:15 p.m. Tue.: Hatha Flow w/ Carolyn Crotty; Wed.: Katonah Yoga w/ Lauren Godes; and Thu.: Hatha Flow w/ Adam Bluestein. Yoga for every body, every level, only $6. Quality, friendly classes in a welcoming, nonintimidating, noncompetitive environment. Come practice with us! weekly ongoing. Cost: $6/1-hour class. Location: South End Studio, Burlington. Info: 540-0044. RAILYARD YOGA AND DANCE: Welcome! Kundalini Yoga for Deep Sleep with Mansukh Kaur: Dec. 10, 10 a.m.-noon. New class: Subtle Series for Healing with Jessica Miller: Mon. 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. through Dec. 12. Life Force Dance: Fri., 5-6 p.m. with Silvia. See website for schedule. Location: Railyard Yoga Studio, 270 Battery St., Burlington. Info: 318-6050, railyardyoga@gmail.com, railyardapothecary.com.

FIRST IN WEATHER

WCAX.COM WCAX.COM WCAX.COM WCAX.COM WCAX.COM WCAX.COM WCAX.C

66 CLASSES

SEVEN DAYS

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

gardening

Info: 253-8358, education@ helenday.com, helenday.com.

8H-FPF113016.indd 1

11/28/16 11:28 AM


“TAKE ME HAM AWAY, TAKE AWAY MY EGGS, EVEN MY CHILI, BUT

LEAVE ME MY” NEWSPAPER. Seven Days will never leave you hungry. From the interviews, reviews and recipes in the food section to our annual Vermont Restaurant Week, we help feed your mind and body — and the local food scene.

SEVEN DAYS

You can help by supporting our advertisers. Thank them for keeping Seven Days free.

11.30.16-12.07.16

The ads you see here pay for the endeavor, from printing and servers to our critics’ restaurant tabs. The more advertising support we get, the better journalism we can provide.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

FILE: JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

WILL ROGERS

SAY YOU SAW IT IN

67


music

Younger and Wiser Twin Peaks’ Cadien Lake James on youth and maturity

68 MUSIC

SEVEN DAYS

11.30.16-12.07.16

COURTESY OF DANIEL TOPETE

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

BY J ORDAN ADAMS

Left to right: Connor Brodner, Clay Frankel, Colin Croom, Jack Dolan and Cadien Lake James

F

ollowing the release of Twin Peaks’ 2016 album, Down in Heaven, a judgment began floating around the music-sphere that the Chicagobased DIY rockers had “matured.” That’s a somewhat flawed narrative for two reasons. First, it implies that everything that came before the new release was immature. The band’s first two albums, Sunken and Wild Onion, certainly offer more basement-rock fury than the more subdued, Americana-by-way-ofthe-Rolling Stones on Down in Heaven. But the subject matter on all three, in the words of singer-songwriter and guitarist Cadien Lake James, is largely the same: “angsty, teenage-girl shit.” The second reason, and what really irked James, is that he found the word “mature” to be a kind of verbal castration. Ouch. Keep in mind that Twin Peaks’ members — Connor Brodner, Clay Frankel, Jack Dolan, Colin Croom and James (aka Big Tuna) — are all in their early twenties. Whatever evolution one might perceive on the new album could relate to its production values. Famed producer John Agnello, who has worked with big-time acts including the Breeders, Dinosaur Jr. and Mick Jagger, mixed it. But that doesn’t mean the band has mellowed.

Despite their youth, these players are experienced. They’ve been making music together for half a decade. The group spent its formative years on the road, touring extensively throughout North America and Europe. The four original members — Brodner, Frankel, Dolan and James — all serve as songwriters. Too many cooks in the kitchen could lead to rock-and-roll turmoil, but the guys make it work with little drama. That is a point in the maturity column. Wasn’t there a British group with two brothers whose differences destroyed the band and now they don’t even speak? Seven Days caught up with James by phone in advance of Twin Peaks’ show on Monday, December 5, at Signal Kitchen in Burlington. SEVEN DAYS: Why are you called Big Tuna? CADIEN LAKE JAMES: On the first day of our first tour back in 2012, Connor [Brodner] said, “We need to come up with nicknames.” He called me Big Tuna, and I hated it. People used to call me Fish Eyes and Fish Lips back in elementary school, because I have large features. Whatever. I started embracing it. And now I just like it. I tattooed it on myself on our last tour of the states. I did a really bad job.

SD: So it has nothing to do with NBC’s “The Office.” CLJ: No, I’ve never seen it. I know that’s a character, right? SD: It’s a nickname that Andy gives to Jim, and Jim hates it. CLJ: See, that’s how this kind of started. I guess we have a similar history. SD: Tell me about your “Let It Bleed” clavicle tattoo. CLJ: I decided to get it when I was a little drunk. I was at a friend’s house, who does stick-and-pokes. I just really love the Rolling Stones album [of the same name]. They did Americana better than any American band. [At] my dad’s first [wedding], he got married to the song “Let It Bleed.” And — no? Sorry, my mom was trying to correct me, but I think I’m right. Yeah, I’m sitting next to my mom right now. The only time I regret [the tattoo] is when I think it makes me look scary to people. SD: There’s been a lot of talk about Twin Peaks having matured on Down in Heaven. Why do you think that is? YOUNGER AND WISER

» P.70


GOT MUSIC NEWS? DAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Rough Francis

UNDbites

The Last Mosh

B Y DAN BO LL E S

the past 32 years, chances are that 242 Main was your first exposure to the music scene — as a fan or a performer, or both. It’s impossible to count how many local musicians got their start on that dingy stage. I’m going to guess that topic has come up in the interviews that local filmmaker BILL SIMMON has been conducting recently for his forthcoming 242 documentary. And, yes, he and his camera crew will be in attendance at the show. So, if you go, make sure your mohawk is looking tight.

BiteTorrent

SOUNDBITES

» P.71

99.9 the Buzz 99 cent Low Dough Show featuring

FRI 12.02

Judah & the Lion The Red Summer Sun

Scissorfight

Backwoods Payback, Hey Zeus, Thunderhawk

SAT 12.03

Ripe, Lawrence

SAT 12.10

Spectacular Spectacular

SAT 12.10

Ellis Paul

TUE 12.13

July Talk

THU 12.15

Chris Pureka

SAT 12.17

Girls Guns & Glory

WED 12.21

Habstrakt, KRNE

WED 12.28

Mona

Kelly McFarling

Slander B2B NGHTMRE 99.9 The Buzz welcomes

Badfish: A Tribute to Sublime Spiritual Rez

JUST ANNOUNCED — 12.31 New Queers Eve 2.10 Moon Hooch 2.25 Black Joe Lewis & The Honeybears 2.26 River Whyless

SEVEN DAYS

We haven’t heard from AVI SALLOWAY in a while. That’s probably because the Burlington expat, formerly half of beloved local duo AVI & CELIA (and, later, the band HEY MAMA), has been a tad busy. He’s been touring the globe with Tuareg guitar sensation BOMBINO, helping to bridge cultural divides between Israeli and Palestinian children with the nonprofit music advocacy group Heartbeat, and spreading the musical gospel of loving thy neighbor with his worldly rock band BILLY WYLDER. Most recently, Salloway spent time at the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in North Dakota, as part of the ongoing oil pipeline protests there — rumors of whether he was actually walking on the water there remain unconfirmed.

THU 12.01

11.30.16-12.07.16

BEAN, legendary BTV punk originators the WARDS, vowel-challenged hardcore heroes CBRASNKE, pop-punk whiz kids BETTER THINGS, stoner-metal chameleons VULTURES OF CULT, sons of DEATH ROUGH FRANCIS and Rutland hardcore champs GET A GRIP. Y’know, to name a few. Headlining the show are heralded Burlington hardcore heavyweights MY REVENGE! (If you want to kill five minutes staring into the dark void that is the internet, check out the band’s marked-for-deletion Wikipedia page. In short: holy shit.) Fun fact about MY REVENGE!: Long before they became one of Vermont’s most visible heavy-music exports, they played their first-ever show at 242 Main in July 2001. I’ll go out on a limb and guess that most, if not all, of the bands on Saturday’s slate also had their first gigs at the club — or at least a few of their earliest and most formative. That’s important to note and hopefully something that our civic leaders will consider as they mull the club’s future. So, here’s a challenge to those folks: Name your favorite local band. I will bet you a lifetime supply of free newspapers that at least one of the members of that band has a strong connection to 242 Main. If you care to take me up on the offer, email dan@ sevendaysvt.com. If you are a rock musician who grew up in or around Burlington over

TAUK Formula 5

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

1214 Williston Road, South Burlington

ARTS NEWS + VIEWS

For up-to-the-minute news abut the local music scene, follow @DanBolles and @jtadamsvt on Twitter or read the Live Culture blog: sevendaysvt.com/liveculture.

802-652-0777 @higherground @highergroundmusic

4V-HG113016.indd 1

MUSIC 69

As the old chestnut goes, all good things must come to an end. And this Saturday, December 3, after a 30-plus-year run as the oldest all-ages punk club in the country, beloved basement haunt 242 Main will host one final, sweaty, punkrock bacchanalia … at least for now. While the show is billed as “The FINAL 242 Main Show/GARY LANE’s 50th Birthday” — the caps are not mine, sorry to shout — it is far from a certainty that we’ve reached the end of the 242 era. As long as the City of Burlington continues to ponder what to do with Memorial Auditorium, the decaying monolith that houses the club, there is hope that the future of 242 Main will figure into those plans. As mentioned last week, Big Heavy World’s JIM LOCKRIDGE, among others, is doing his best to ensure that city officials don’t forget about the teen center-turned-punk haven. We’ll be following that story closely in the months ahead. For now, we can assume that Saturday’s show will be the last at the club for a while. (A quick aside: Let’s say 242 Main does reopen in a few months. Does it still get to claim the mantle of the oldest all-ages punk club in the country? Or do we have to restart the clock and cede that title to 924 Gilman Street in San Francisco?) And what a show it should be. The daylong affair features 21 bands, including some of the finest local hardcore and punk acts around. Among the highlights are ferocious gloommetal band REVERSER, doom-punks DOOM SERVICE, emo stalwart TYLER DANIEL

COURTESY OF ROBIN KATRICK

S

FRI 12.09

11/29/16 8:08 PM


Younger and Wiser « P.68

SD: That sounds frustrating. CLJ: I almost feel silly, because when I first read that I was livid. Looking back on it, I feel like it was a really silly thing to be aggressive about.

11/18/16 4:19 PM

SEVEN DAYS

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Untitled-2 1

BEACH BOUND?

70 MUSIC

YOUR SURF APPAREL AND LIFESTYLE SHOP ALL YEAR LONG

STORE HOURS: MON-SAT 10-6

688 PINE ST, BURLINGTON Untitled-32 1

WNDNWVS.COM

802.540.2529 11/29/16 11:42 AM

SD: Aww, you are maturing. CLJ: We’re growing up in front of everyone. I’ve got tax problems already, so I’m getting forced to mature. I own a business, and we’re getting our first taste of, like, “Oh, yeah, you owe 40 percent of your profits to taxes, because you started the wrong kind of business.” It’s like, “Oh, man, we own a company, and we don’t know what the fuck we’re doing. We need a business manager.” My older siblings aren’t worrying about taxes like I am. SD: I’ve read some things that paint Twin Peaks as having a kind of “hive mind.” Is that true? CLJ: I think we do work together as a unit pretty well. It’s certainly exaggerated that we don’t ever get into discussions about what we’re going to do and argue about songs. It’s a democratic band of five very loud minds. And I think that’s why we haven’t worked with producers yet, because the way we look at it is, we already have so many strong opinions in the room. Adding another one seems detrimental. Who knows? Maybe [a producer] would help unify us. For a band that could have so many problems, with four songwriters, we really get along pretty damn well. SD: Clay Frankel was quoted as saying he wants a person’s first time seeing Twin Peaks to be an enlightening, religious experience. CLJ: Fucking Clay.

COURTESY OF DANIEL TOPETE

CLJ: I think part of it is, it’s a very easy narrative. I’m not trying to say that writers are lazy, but they probably think, This band has been around for years now, they’re getting bigger, putting out records with slightly better production value — they’re maturing. That’s what I’ll write. [Also,] we had some songs that weren’t just straight-up punk. Then again, Wild Onion had a few tracks that were pretty dang chill, but I think that record was more known for all-out bursts of aggression. At the end of the day, whatever people want to write — I don’t really care anymore. I don’t know why I rejected [the maturity narrative] so much. It pissed me off for a second, probably because I’m still young and angsty. I was saying, “Oh, they’re saying we’re maturing. We’re not; we’re still hard core!”

IT’S A DEMOCRATIC BAND

OF FIVE VERY LOUD MINDS.

C A D I EN L A K E JA M ES

SD: Tell me about a band you’ve seen that made you feel that way. CLJ: The first time I saw the Black Lips really blew my mind. I was 12 or 13. I went with my brother and some older friends to see Be Your Own Pet. It was the first time I’d gotten turned on to something that visceral and raw. Everyone ended up dancing onstage with them. It was pretty special. SD: Do you have any musical guilty pleasures? CLJ: I guess Charles Manson. I feel kind of guilty, [but] his music is pretty tight. I can get into really schmaltzy shit, like Frankie Valli. I don’t know, I’m pretty fucking into everything I listen to, even if it’s cheesy. Have you ever heard of Mort Garson? He has this record, Plantasia [1976]. It’s this ridiculous synth-baroque stuff that people were supposed to play for their plants, to help them be happy plants. I’ll jam on that. m

INFO Twin Peaks, Monday, December 5, 8 p.m., at Signal Kitchen in Burlington. $13/15. AA. signalkitchen.com


GOT MUSIC NEWS? DAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Billy Wylder

S

UNDbites

CO NT I NU E D F RO M PA G E 6 9

Salloway was part of a local contingent that traveled to the site with 350 Vermont, a grassroots organization dedicated to fighting climate change through, in part, reducing dependence on fossil fuels. This Friday, December 2, Salloway and Billy Wylder will play a benefit for 350 at ArtsRiot in Burlington, alongside local songwriter BOW THAYER. The show will include presentations from 350 Vermont members who were at Standing Rock. Look for an interview with Salloway about his North Dakota visit on the Seven Days arts blog, Live Culture, on December 1.

(WHOARFROST), guitarist WALKER ALLEN (NICO SUAVE & THE BODACIOUS SUPREME) and keyboardist ERIC MAIER (MADAILA). So, what sorts of sonic shenanigans do EVNGwear indulge in? That’s hard to say, mostly because no one has ever heard them. But, according to a recent press release, they trade in “modern improvisational music that is kinetic, tight and dynamic.” Also: “Rooted in the fusion tradition, the four-piece strives for compelling, spontaneous interaction.” Translation: heady jamz, yo. If that sounds like your thing, swing by the band’s debut performance this Friday, December 2, at Citizen Cider in Burlington as part of the cidery’s monthly Late Nighter music series. Speaking of heady series, the next installment of GREG DAVIS’ fascinating Signals series is slated for this Saturday, December 3, at the Hood Plant in Burlington. The featured performer is Seattle electronica composer NORM CHAMBERS. He’s achieved global

In other news, a tip of the hat to my alma mater, Champlain Valley Union High School. This Sunday, December 4, the Home of the Redhawks — they were Crusaders in my day — hosts Grammy Award-winning saxophonist and Blue Note recording artist JOE LOVANO. Acclaimed vocalist JUDI SILVANO joins the sax man. Backing the duo is a truly topnotch contingent of locals, including pianist TOM CLEARY, bassist CLYDE STATS and drummer GABE JARRETT. Mandolin whiz JAMIE MASEFIELD opens the show, which is a benefit for Responsible Growth Hinesburg. For ticket info, check out flynntix.org.

LOUNGE

THIS WEEK THU 1 | FRI 2 | SAT 3

JOE

MACHI NEXT WEEK FRI 9 | SAT 10

DANA

GOULD TUES | $4 DRAUGHT / CLASSES WED & SUN | STANDUP / OPEN MIC THURS | IMPROV COMEDY

ORDER YOUR TICKETS TODAY! (802) 859-0100 | WWW.VTCOMEDY.COM

Last but not least, welcome back, JAMES HARVEY. Or rather, James Harvey’s trombone. Due to dental issues, the Untitled-11 local jazz legend hasn’t been able to play it for a dozen years. He’s been making the rounds on piano, of course. But local audiences haven’t heard the man on his primary instrument in a long time. I’m delighted to report that’s about to change. Harvey has resolved his mouth matters and, on Wednesday, November 30, will play his horn with a trio at Juniper in Burlington. 

101 main street, BurlingtoN

GIVETHEGIFTOF GROOVETHIS 1

11/28/16 1:37 PM

SEASON

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

New band alert! Burlington, say hello to EVNGWEAR. This funky fresh quartet came together during a run as the house band for the long-running, weekly Family Night jam series. Formerly held at the Halflounge Speakeasy in Burlington, the event has moved around the corner to SideBar. And it’s kind of a who’s-who of local funk, rock and blues players, including bassist ALEX BUDNEY (SETH

YACOVONE BAND), drummer ETHAN SNYDER

renown for his Panabrite project, a multifaceted musical exploration that merges a wide array of disciplines and influences. These include everything from early New Age music and minimalist composition to electronic and tape music to soundtracks and field recordings. Translation: heady jamz, yo. Or perhaps more accurately: heady, ambient jamz, yo. As always, an artist Q&A follows the performance. I’m guessing you may have some questions.

LEARN LAUGH

SOVEREIGNTY, ILLADELPH, MGW, AND LOCAL AND FAMOUS ARTISTS

11.30.16-12.07.16

EVNGwear

Listening In

KATE BUSH, Before the Dawn GILLIAN WELCH, Boots No. 1: The Of-

ficial Revival Bootleg DANIEL BACHMAN, Daniel Bachman KRISTIN HERSH, Wyatt at the Coyote

Palace

THE TOBACCO SHOP WITH THE HIPPIE FLAVOR 75 Main St., Burlington, VT 864.6555 • Mon-Thur 10-9 Fri-Sat 10-10 Sun 10-8

www.northernlights pipes .c om Must be 18 to purchase tobacco products, ID required

@ N o r th e r n L i g h ts V T

GG8v-northernlight112316.indd 1

MUSIC 71

BODY/HEAD, No Waves

LARGEST PORTABLE & PLUG-IN VAPORIZER SELECTION IN TOWN!

SEVEN DAYS

A peek at what was on my iPod, turntable, eight-track player, etc. this week. Follow sevendaysvt on Spotify for weekly playlists with tunes by artists featured in the music section.

11/15/16 3:28 PM


music

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

WED.30 burlington

CLUB METRONOME: Waltz Wednesday featuring Jiggawaltz, Lord Electro, Dokowala (DJ set) (rock), 9 p.m., free/$5. 18+.

Alasdair Fraser & Natalie Haas

Saturday, December 3, 7pm

THU.1 // JUDAH & THE LION [FOLK, HIP-HOP]

THE DAILY PLANET: Silver Bridget (saw folk), 8 p.m., free. HALFLOUNGE SPEAKEASY: Devon McGarry (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free. DJ Learic (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Pub Quiz with Dave, 7 p.m., free. Karaoke with Melody, 10 p.m., free. LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Cody Sargent Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Jesse Dee Residency (soul), 9:30 p.m., free. Film Night: Indie, Abstract, Avant Garde, 10 p.m., free. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Open Mic with Andy Lugo, 9 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Vinyl Night with DJ Disco Phantom (vinyl DJs), 6 p.m., free. Zach Deputy (soul, funk), 9 p.m., $12/15. RADIO BEAN: Sten Bowen (indie rock, neo-classical), 7 p.m., free. Green Mountain Boys (bluegrass), 9:30 p.m., free. Chris Colepaugh & the Cosmic Crew (rock), 11 p.m., free.

Christmas in Ireland with the McLean Avenue Band Saturday, December 17, 7pm

RED SQUARE: Chris Page & Co. (folk), 7 p.m., free. DJ KermiTT (hits), 11 p.m., free. RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: Dale & Darcy (traditional, Americana), 7 p.m., free.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 11.30.16-12.07.16 SEVEN DAYS 72 MUSIC

SprucePeakArts.org 802-760-4634 122 Hourglass Drive, Stowe

4V-sppac113016.indd 1

fresh, radio-ready bangers. Fuzzy bass, old-school beats and the majesty of stringed folk instruments converge like a jacked-up, musical jigsaw puzzle. The title of their latest album, Folk Hop N’ Roll, says it all. Judah & the Lion perform on Thursday, December 1, at the Higher Ground Ballroom in

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Josh Panda’s Acoustic Soul Night, 8 p.m., $5-10 donation.

HATCH 31: Bristol Folk Session, 6 p.m., free. TWO BROTHERS TAVERN LOUNGE & STAGE: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. Open Mic Night, 9 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom

PARKER PIE CO.: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Turkuaz, the New Mastersounds (power-funk), 9 p.m., $20/22.

outside vermont

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: William Fitzsimmons, Laura Burhenn (rock), 7:30 p.m., $15/17.

NAKED TURTLE: Jay Lesage (acoustic), 5:30 p.m., free.

MONKEY HOUSE: Saxsyndrum (experimental, electronic), 8:30 p.m., $3/8. 18+.

Save 25% on the purchase of four or more tickets with our Family 4-Pack!

The independent, Tennessee-based quartet fearlessly combines its various musical proclivities into

South Burlington. Local popsters the RED SUMMER SUN open.

chittenden county

Wednesday, December 28, 7 pm

brash as glam-rock? If you ask JUDAH & THE LION, they’ll undoubtedly say, “Yes, they do, and yes, it can.”

SIDEBAR: Ethan Snyder Presents (jazz), 9 p.m., free. D Jay Baron (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Rants and Raves with Tim Dillon (standup), 9 p.m., free.

Flip Fly Fun! by Nimble Arts

Taking Pride Do hip-hop beats and banjo go together? Can earnest folk also be as

barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Paint ‘n Sip with Liz Lawson, 6 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (MONTPELIER): Cajun Jam with Jay Ekis, Lee Blackwell, Alec Ellsworth & Katie Trautz, 6 p.m., $5-10 donation. SWEET MELISSA’S: D. Davis (acoustic classical), 5 p.m., donation. Sweet and Lowdown (covers), 8 p.m., donation. WHAMMY BAR: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Lesley Grant (Americana), 8 p.m., free.

middlebury area

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

11/28/16 10:20 AM

MONOPOLE: Open Mic with Lucid, 10 p.m., free.

OLIVE RIDLEY’S: So You Want to Be a DJ?, 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Bow Thayer (folk-rock), 7:30 p.m., free.

THU.1

burlington

CHURCH & MAIN: Cody Sargent Trio (jazz), 8 p.m., free. CLUB METRONOME: Chauncey’s Get Wet Together: A Benefit for Lake Champlain featuring Doctor Rick, Cosmosis Jones and Ryan Dempsey of Twiddle (jam, rock), 8 p.m., $7/10. 18+. THE DAILY PLANET: The Mike Santosusso Experience (acoustic), 8 p.m., free. DRINK: BLiNDoG Records Acoustic Sessions, 5 p.m., free. FINNIGAN’S PUB: Craig Mitchell (funk), 10 p.m., free. HALFLOUNGE SPEAKEASY: Half &

Half Comedy (standup comedy), 8 p.m., free. Harder They Come (techno, EDM), 10:30 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Sabouyouma (West African fusion), 8 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. Bluegrass Thursday: The Tenderbellies, Front Country, 9:30 p.m., $2/5. 18+.

barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Jim Rooney and Colin McCaffrey (Americana), 6 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (MONTPELIER): Al Teodosio and Friends (jazz), 6 p.m., free. SWEET MELISSA’S: BYOV Thursdays, 3 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: Keiti Botula (indie), 7 p.m., free. Shane Hardiman Trio (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free. Justin Burgess Trio (jazz), 11 p.m., free.

WHAMMY BAR: The Flatlanders (Americana), 7 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE: D Jay Baron (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

MOOGS PLACE: Open Mic, 8 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ Cre8, 10 p.m., free.

middlebury area

SIDEBAR: Mannequin Pussy, Sleeping In, Dilligaf (punk, hardcore), 8:30 p.m., $5-10. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Cricket Blue, Ethan Tischler (folk), 7 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Short Jam (improv), 6:30 p.m., free. Joe Machi (standup), 7 p.m., $15/20/27. Daily Grind: Pamela Polston (improv), 8:30 p.m., $5.

chittenden county

BACKSTAGE PUB: Trivia, 9:30 p.m., free. HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Judah & the Lion, the Red Summer Sun (folk, hip-hop), 7:30 p.m., $.99. MONKEY HOUSE: Kirsti Blow (singersongwriter), 8:30 p.m., $3/8. 18+. ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Nobby Reed Project (soul, blues), 7 p.m., free. SUGAR HOUSE BAR & GRILL: Country DJ, 9 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

51 MAIN AT THE BRIDGE: Creative Bloc Paint and Sip, 5 p.m., $40. CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Throttle Thursdays with DJ Gold, 9 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom

PARKER PIE CO.: Howie Cantor (folk), 7:30 p.m., free.

outside vermont

OLIVE RIDLEY’S: Karaoke with DJ Jon Berry, 9 p.m., free.

FRI.2

burlington

ARTSRIOT: Wyld Lyfe: A Benefit Concert for 350VT with Billy Wylder and Bow Thayer (roots, world), 7:30 p.m., $15.

FRI.2

» P.74


GOT MUSIC NEWS? DAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

REVIEW this Anachronist, Lost in the Corners (STATE AND MAIN RECORDS, CD, DIGITAL DOWNLOAD)

On their first two releases, Montpelier’s Anachronist explored the nooks and crannies of indie rock’s jangly past. The scruffy likes of Uncle Tupelo, Dinosaur Jr. and Built to Spill left indelible imprints on the band’s 2012 debut EP, Row. On their 2014 full-length, Static and Light, a reconfigured Anachronist synthesized those formative influences even further and added some new (old) inspirations to the mix: the fuzzed-out high jinks of Sonic Youth and emotional sensitivity of Yo La Tengo, to name two. Really, that, ahem, anachronistic approach stretches back to bandleader Brian Clark’s 2010 debut solo album, Solo Duo Trio. And it is crystallized on Anachronist’s latest gem, Lost in the Corners. As with the band’s earlier works, the new release wears its influences proudly. But something else is at work here, too. The album is leaner and more focused than its predecessors. It’s stripped down in a way that slyly reveals the previously unseen significance of the Replacements and, by extension, that band’s most critical influence, Big Star. Those two bands are

perhaps more fundamental to Clark than any others. In truth, Clark’s Paul Westerberg/Alex Chilton bent has always been present. But the band’s tendency toward sonic shape shifting has obscured it. Until now. Opener “Amy” sets the album’s slender tone. The sub-two-minute charmer is a perfect slice of hooky pop jangle that wouldn’t sound out of place on an early Joe Jackson record. Even on relative epics, Clark’s efficiency is marvelous. Clocking in at a comparatively ponderous four-plus minutes, the unhurried “I’ll Get Wise”

Eastern Mountain Time, Back Home (SELF-RELEASED, DIGITAL DOWNLOAD)

JORDAN ADAMS

YOU A VT ARTIST OR BAND? SEND US YOUR MUSIC! DIGITAL: MUSIC@SEVENDAYSVT.COM; GET YOUR MUSIC REVIEWED: ARE SNAIL MAIL: MUSIC C/O SEVEN DAYS 255 S. CHAMPLAIN ST., SUITE 5, BURLINGTON, VT 05401

NOW IN sevendaysvt.com

3D!

MUSIC 73

J

Say you saw it in...

SEVEN DAYS

With sorry nostalgia like 100 splinters / And nothing but trouble on my mind.” Anyone who’s lived through a northern winter can relate to that bleak-ass tableau. “Discount Pack of Cigarettes” finally brings some percussion to the EP, which makes the track bouncy and sunnier. But its lyrics remain as stark as those on other tracks. When Hood sings, “Got a discount pack of cigarettes / Shitty six of beer / Wondering where my friends might be / they’re here,” it’s as though he feels his L&Ms and Schlitz are the only friends he has. Overall, Back Home lacks staying power. While EMT’s songwriting and production on the debut LP had oomph, here it is listless. Save for “Low Down Mid-December,” the songs are too understated and indistinguishable. The production, too, is subdued. A keyboard track may have tied the band’s previous work together in ways that are only noticeable in its absence. Perhaps these songs will be brought to life in concert. Eastern Mountain Time play an EP release party on Friday, December 2, at the Monkey House in Winooski. Back Home is available at easternmountaintime.bandcamp.com.

11.30.16-12.07.16

The song glows like the last bit of sunlight over the Adirondacks at dusk. Hood’s observations are honest and relatable, especially for those who struggle with the winter blues. He sings, “The car wouldn’t start / first frost of the winter / So I just sat out in the drive /

DAN BOLLES

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Following their excellent 2015 self-titled debut, Eastern Mountain Time return with a five-song EP, Back Home. Sean Hood and company enlisted Wren Kitz for support on this new effort, recording the tracks in Kitz’ home studio over the course of 2016. Back Home is a stripped-down collection of sadboy country. It reiterates the band’s love for classic ’70s sounds pioneered by artists such as Gram Parsons, Willie Nelson and David Allan Coe. While their debut eponymous LP was charged with fervor and feeling, Back Home sounds a little threadbare. “Four Gold Letters” is a good example. With only Hood’s vocals and acoustic guitar present, it’s a quintessential coffeehouse snoozer. Placed squarely in the middle of the EP, the song perilously lowers the recording’s energy at a crucial point in its trajectory. “Low Down Mid-December,” however, shines by comparison. Bass and electric guitar create a warm, atmospheric cradle around the acoustic thrumming.

could pass for an outtake from Big Star’s #1 Record. Ditto “Only Line,” a song that fuses Chilton’s wry earnestness with a barren, ethereal atmosphere reminiscent of Calexico. (Who says all influences have to be older?) Appropriately, the title track, “Lost in the Corners,” offers the clearest example of Clark’s economical acuity. In a scant 97 seconds of power-pop bliss, he and vocalist Angela Paladino pack in more hooks and clever turns of phrase than some bands do over an entire album. Credit also belongs with the crack rhythm section of drummer Phil Carr and bassist Mike Donofrio. And the understated melodic precision of lead guitarist Craig Jarvis is the perfect foil to Clark. With Lost in the Corners, Anachronist have found something that was never really missing, just overlooked. By paring back arrangements and refocusing on Clark’s brilliant writing, the band delivers a masterwork of succinct pop that both honors and expands upon its inspirational framework. Lost in the Corners by Anachronist is available at anachronist.bandcamp.com. The band plays a pair of release shows this week: Friday, December 2, at La Puerta Negra in Montpelier and Saturday, December 3, at the Flying Stage in Barre.


THE HOLIDAY CONCERT featuring

music

DAVID MALLETT with

obsessed?

MIKE BURD

DECEMBER 10TH

7:30pm United Church of Christ Greensboro, VT

— an e-newsletter filled with home design,

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Rachel Ries (rock), 8 p.m., free. Taka (vinyl DJ), 11 p.m., free.

Vermont real estate tips

NECTAR’S: Seth Yacovone (solo acoustic blues), 7 p.m., free. Sophistafunk, Annie in the Water (hip-hop, funk), 9 p.m., $10.

and DIY decorating

RADIO BEAN: Friday Morning Sing-Along with Linda Bassick & Friends (kids’ music), 11 a.m., free. Bad Accent (folk), 6 p.m., free. Genna & Jesse (acoustic soul), 8 p.m., free. ThatOneEyedKid (indie-pop), 9 p.m., free. STIG (funk), midnight, free.

TICKETS $15 -

RED SQUARE: Craig Mitchell (house), 11 p.m., $5. RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: D Jay Baron (house), 9 p.m., $5.

Sign up today at sevendaysvt.com/enews. 11/29/168v-nest.indd 4:54 PM 1

500 songs

11/18/15 12:06 PM

2612 & Counting!

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Ours:

BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD: Paul Asbell (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free.

JUNIPER: Brett Hughes (folk), 9 p.m., free.

Available at the Door and @ themirror.org, Galaxy Bookshop in Hardwick, Willey’s in Greensboro, Catamount Arts or call 802-249-8262

Their Playlists:

« P.72

HALFLOUNGE SPEAKEASY: Mitch Terriciano (singersongwriter), 7 p.m., free. DJ Hellixx (techno), 10 p.m., free.

with Nest Notes

inspirations.

8v-greensboroartsalliance113016.indd 1

NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

CITIZEN CIDER: EVNGwear (improvisational fusion), 8:30 p.m., free.

Find, fix and feather

SATURDAY

FRI.2

CLUB DATES

RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: Supersounds DJ (top 40), 10 p.m., free. RUBEN JAMES: DJ Cre8 (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Navytrain (neoAmericana), 8 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Joe Machi (standup), 7 & 9:30 p.m., $15/20/27.

chittenden county

BACKSTAGE PUB: Acoustic Happy Hour, 5 p.m., free. Karaoke with Jenny Red, 9 p.m., free.

SEVEN DAYS

keep things classy and

socially conscious rhymes over smooth-as-silk organs and punchy hip-hop beats. For example, on their 2013

MONKEY HOUSE: The Willoughbys (folk), 5:30 p.m., free. Eastern Mountain Time, Little Slugger (country), 9 p.m., $3/8. 18+.

early-era hip-hop sounds and sociopolitical commentary

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: King Me (rock), 5 p.m., free. The Complaints (rock), 9 p.m., free.

Nectar’s in Burlington with ANNIE IN THE WATER.

barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Art Herttua and Ray Caroll (jazz), 6 p.m., free. CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Julia Kate Davis (folk, indie), 6 p.m., free. Boomslang, Maiden Voyage (hip-hop), 9 p.m., free. ESPRESSO BUENO: Extempo (storytelling), 8 p.m., $5. LA PUERTA NEGRA: Joe Moore (jazz), 6 p.m., free. Anachronist (rock), 9 p.m., donation.

74 MUSIC

SOPHISTAFUNK

positive at all times. Jack Brown, the band’s MC, delivers

cut, “Bruce Lee,” Brown raps, “Nothing wrong with

WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: DJ Cre8 (soul, hits), 9 p.m., free.

11/18/16 10:36 AM

Syracuse, N.Y.,

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Scissorfight, Backwoods Playback, Hey Zeus, Thunderhawk (punk, metal), 7:30 p.m., $13/15.

STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Jeezum Crow (country), 7 p.m., free.

Untitled-7 1

Fresh and Finessed Hailing from

being civil and disobedient” and “I’d rather question all authority / And even act disorderly.” The band’s mix of could lead to as much conversation as booty shaking. Check out Sophistafunk on Friday, December 2, at

POSITIVE PIE (MONTPELIER): Armies (electro-pop), 10 p.m., $5. SWEET MELISSA’S: Honky Tonk Happy Hour with Mark LeGrand, 5:30 p.m., donation. WHAMMY BAR: Penny Arcade (jazz), 7 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

RIMROCK’S MOUNTAIN TAVERN: DJ Rekkon #FridayNightFrequencies (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free. RUSTY NAIL: The Edd, Revibe, the Mangroves (electronic, space-rock), 8 p.m., $7. SUSHI YOSHI (STOWE): Let’s Get Ugly 2.0 (ugly sweater party), 6 p.m., free.

middlebury area 51 MAIN AT THE BRIDGE: Michele Fay Band (folk, bluegrass), 8 p.m., free.

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: DJ Kilie (hits), 9:30 p.m., free.

outside vermont

MONOPOLE DOWNSTAIRS: Happy Hour Tunes & Trivia with Gary Peacock, 5 p.m., free. OLIVE RIDLEY’S: All Request Night with DJ Skippy (hits), 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Leyeux (soul), 8 p.m., free.


Kick-off/Informational Meeting Thu., December 1, 7:00 PM Lyric Theatre Office/Rehearsal Space 7 Green Tree Drive, South Burlington

barre/montpelier

Auditions

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Irish Session, 2 p.m., donation.

Seeking actors, singers and dancers, stage ages 16 to 65+, for Lead, Featured and Supporting roles. All shapes, sizes and ethnicities welcome!

ESPRESSO BUENO: Taylor Rich (alt-folk), 7:30 p.m., free. FEMCOM (standup), 8:30 p.m., donation.

Auditions for the role of Dolly* ONLY: Sun., December 4, Registration at 10:30 am

WHAMMY BAR: Sid Morse Blues Jam, 7 p.m., free.

*Gender is female on stage, but can be played by a male.

mad river valley/ waterbury

Auditions for all other Roles:

Sun., December 4, Registration at 12:30 pm Mon., December 5, Registration at 5:45 pm Tue., December 6, Registration at 5:45 pm

THE RESERVOIR RESTAURANT & TAP ROOM: ONE over ZERO (funk, hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

Flynn Center, 153 Main Street, Burlington

middlebury area

www.lyrictheatrevt.org

51 MAIN AT THE BRIDGE: The Doughboys (soul, rock), 8 p.m., free.

generous support from

media partner

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: City Limits Dance Party with DJ Earl (top 40), 9:30 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom

6H-lyric113016.indd 1

11/29/16 11:27 AM

PARKER PIE CO.: Monty’s Lobster, the Bonnets, Hear (progressive rock), 8 p.m., free.

outside vermont

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): 90-Mile Portage (acoustic), 7 p.m., free.

FRI.2 // SOPHISTAFUNK [HIP-HOP, FUNK]

SAT.3

burlington

242 MAIN: Final 242 Main Show (live music marathon), noon, free.

BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD: Bob Gagnon (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free.

HALFLOUNGE SPEAKEASY: Sutton & McKenzie (Celtic folk), 7 p.m., free. Space Echo with Jahson Deejay (house), 10 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Karaoke with Megan, 10 p.m., free.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Hollar General, Green Empire (Americana), 8 p.m., free. Taka (vinyl DJ), 11 p.m., free. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: The Space Between (rock, blues), 10 p.m., free.

RUBEN JAMES: Craig Mitchell (house), 10 p.m., free. SMITTY’S PUB: The Hubcats (acoustic rock), 8 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Joe Machi (standup), 7 & 9:30 p.m., $15/20/27.

chittenden county GOOD TIMES CAFÉ: Martin Grosswendt, Susanne SalemSchatz (roots), 8:30 p.m., $15.

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Ripe, Lawrence (soul, pop), 8:30 p.m., $10/12. MONKEY HOUSE: Allie Fox, Amanda Rogers, Giovanina Bucci (rock), 8:30 p.m., $3/8. 18+. ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Phil Abair Band (rock), 9 p.m., free. STONE CORRAL BREWERY: The Owl Stars (folk), 7 p.m., free. SUGAR HOUSE BAR & GRILL: DJ Steve B (top 40), 9:30 p.m., free.

NECTAR’S: Mi Yard Reggae Night with DJs Big Dog and Jahson, 9:30 p.m., free/$3. 18+. THE OLDE NORTHENDER PUB: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free. PIZZERIA VERITÀ: Jazz Brunch with the Paul Asbell Trio, 11:30 a.m., free. RADIO BEAN: Pete Sutherland & Tim Stickle’s Old Time Session (traditional), 1 p.m., free. Charley & Grace (acoustic), 7 p.m., free. My Mother’s Mustache (Americana), 8 p.m., free. SkyDaddy (funk, jam), 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Bluegrass Brunch Scramble, noon, $5-10 donation. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Scene Jam (improv), 5:30 p.m., free. Napoleon (improv), 7:30 p.m., $5.

chittenden county

SUGAR HOUSE BAR & GRILL: Vermont’s Next Star (open mic), 8 p.m., free. WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: Mihali (jam), 8 p.m., $5.

barre/montpelier

SWEET MELISSA’S: Kelly Ravin (country), 6:30 p.m., donation.

SUN.4

MUSIC 75

NECTAR’S: The Nectar’s Bluegrass Jam, 7 p.m., free. Big Mean Sound Machine, the New Review (world, Afro-beat), 9 p.m., $5.

RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: DJ KermiTT (top 40), 10 p.m., free.

HALFLOUNGE SPEAKEASY: Mitteltoner (techno, EDM), 10 p.m., free.

SEVEN DAYS

JUNIPER: John Daly Trio (acoustic rock), 9 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ Raul, 6 p.m., $5. DJ Reign One (EDM), 11 p.m., $5.

THE GRYPHON: Linda Oats, Shane Hardiman and John Rivers (jazz), 6:30 p.m., free.

11.30.16-12.07.16

CLUB METRONOME: Glitter and Duct Tape: Wrapped Up (cabaret, drag), 7 p.m., $10/12. 18+. Retronome With DJ Fattie B (’80s dance party), 9 p.m., free/$5.

RED SQUARE: Mashtodon (hip-hop), 11 p.m., $5.

burlington

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ARTSRIOT: Midnight Snack, Cricket Blue, Erin CasselsBrown (indie-pop), 7:30 p.m., $5. Funky Town (dance party), 10 p.m., $2.

RADIO BEAN: Isabella’s Jazz Trio, 6:30 p.m., free. Logan Caliano (blues, country), 8 p.m., free. Trevor New (ambient, experimental), 9 p.m., free. Colbis the Creature (indie, progressive rock), 10 p.m., free. Five of the Eyes (progressive rock), 11:30 p.m., free.

SUN.4

» P.76 Untitled-45 1

11/29/16 4:31 PM


weetback Sisters S COUNTRY CHRISTMAS sing-along spectacular!

music SUN.4

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

« P.75 SAT.3 // MIDNIGHT SNACK [INDIE-POP]

outside vermont

OLIVE RIDLEY’S: Open Mic Night, 7 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Bluegrass Brunch, noon, free.

MON.5

burlington

HALFLOUNGE SPEAKEASY: Family Night (open jam), 10:30 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Dance Video Request Night with Melody, 10 p.m., free. JUNIPER: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

SATURDAY, DEC. 10, 7:30 P.M.

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Quiltro (rock, jam), 9 p.m., free/$5. 18+. RADIO BEAN: Latin Sessions with Mal Maiz (cumbia), 9:30 p.m., free. RED SQUARE: Mashtodon (hip-hop), 8 p.m., free.

Live at

SIGNAL KITCHEN: Twin Peaks, together PANGEA, Golden Daze (rock), 8 p.m., $13/15. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Comedy & Crêpes (standup), 7 p.m., free.

Main Street Randolph, Vt.

chittenden county

802-728-6464 chandler-arts.org

wandered for a bit and eventually settled in Asheville, N.C. As they prepare to release their third album, Child’s Eyes, their sound inches closer to true pop and away from the artsy-crunchy

11/28/16 2:16 PMCHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Trivia,

Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros. Lead vocalists Jack Victor and Katie Richter have palpable

stowe/smuggs

synchronicity. And it’s cute that their names rhyme. Catch Midnight Snack on Saturday, December

northeast kingdom

SEVEN DAYS

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

PHAT KAT’S TAVERN: Jay Natola (solo guitar), 9 p.m., free.

TUE.6

burlington

CLUB METRONOME: Gubbulidis featuring Zdenek and Mihali of Twiddle (jam, rock), 7 p.m., $10.

76 MUSIC

Gift certificates, too!

412 PINE ST, BURLINGTON 658-6016

GG8V-Speeders112316.indd 1

experimentation of debut release The Explorist. Their sophomore recording, The Times, bridges the gap. It’s grand and heartfelt, and also a little bit homespun — as if Burt Bacharach wrote songs for

8:30 p.m., free.

MOOGS PLACE: Seth Yacovone (solo acoustic blues), 7 p.m., free.

Check out our new specialty coffees coming in throughout the season! 12 oz. “stocking stuffer” bags available.

MIDNIGHT SNACK

MONKEY HOUSE: Kelly Ravin (country), 6 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

Untitled-19 1

Tasty Treat After graduating college in Boston, indie-popsters

BACKSTAGE PUB: Open Mic, 9:30 p.m., free.

THE GRYPHON: P’tit Trio (jazz), 8 p.m., free. HALFLOUNGE SPEAKEASY: Everything Is Connected Trivia, 7 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Open Mic with Kyle, 9 p.m., free. LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Dayve Huckett (jazz), 7 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: StorytellingVT, 7:30 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Dead Set (Grateful Dead tribute), 10 p.m., $3/5.18+. RADIO BEAN: Gua Gua (psychotropical jazz), 6:30 p.m., free. Alex Smith (Americana), 9 p.m., free. Honky Tonk Tuesday with Eric George & Friends, 10 p.m., $3. RED SQUARE: Karaoke with D Jay Baron, 7 p.m., free.

11/21/16 11:32 AM

3, at ArtsRiot in Burlington. CRICKET BLUE and ERIN CASSELS-BROWN open.

chittenden county

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Trivia with Top Hat Entertainment, 7 p.m., free. WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Godfather Karaoke, 9:30 p.m., free. LA PUERTA NEGRA: Salsa Lessons with Dsantos, 6:30 p.m., $12. SWEET MELISSA’S: Open Mic, 7 p.m., donation.

middlebury area

TWO BROTHERS TAVERN LOUNGE & STAGE: Karaoke with Roots Entertainment, 9 p.m., free.

outside vermont

JP’S PUB: Pub Quiz with Dave, 7 p.m., free. Karaoke with Melody, 10 p.m., free. LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Cody Sargent Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Irish Sessions (traditional), 7 p.m., free. Brett Hughes & Chad Hollister (country, rock), 9 p.m., free. Film Night: Indie, Abstract, Avant Garde, 10 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (MONTPELIER): Cajun Jam with Jay Ekis, Lee Blackwell, Alec Ellsworth & Katie Trautz, 6 p.m., $5-10 donation. WHAMMY BAR: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free.

middlebury area

NECTAR’S: Vinyl Night with DJ Disco Phantom (vinyl DJs), 6 p.m., free. Ween Wednesday with Tar Iguana and Friends (Ween tribute), 9 p.m., $3/5. 18+.

HATCH 31: Bristol Folk Session, 6 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: Ensemble V (jazz), 7 p.m., free. Zachary DuPont (folk), 9 p.m., free. RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: Rowan (Celtic), 7 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Jazz & Fondue, 7 p.m., free.

SIDEBAR: Ethan Snyder Presents (jazz), 9 p.m., free.

WED.7

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Josh Panda’s Acoustic Soul Night, 8 p.m., $5-10 donation.

HALFLOUNGE SPEAKEASY: The Green Mountain Boys (bluegrass), 7 p.m., free. Pop Rap Dance Party, 10 p.m., free.

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Nancy Reid Taube Student Music Party (piano recital), 6 p.m., free.

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Open Mic with Andy Lugo, 9 p.m., free.

OLIVE RIDLEY’S: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

burlington

barre/montpelier

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: LGBTQLOL (standup), 9 p.m., free.

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

TWO BROTHERS TAVERN LOUNGE & STAGE: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. Open Mic Night, 9 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom

PARKER PIE CO.: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

outside vermont

MONOPOLE: Open Mic with Lucid, 10 p.m., free. NAKED TURTLE: Jay Lesage (acoustic), 5:30 p.m., free. OLIVE RIDLEY’S: So You Want to Be a DJ?, 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Bow Thayer (folk-rock), 7:30 p.m., free. m


VENUES.411 BURLINGTON

STOWE/SMUGGS AREA

CLAIRE’S RESTAURANT & BAR, 41 Main St., Hardwick, 472-7053 CORK WINE BAR & MARKET OF STOWE, 35 School St., Stowe, 760-6143 MATTERHORN, 4969 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-8198 MOOGS PLACE, Portland St., Morrisville, 851-8225 PIECASSO PIZZARIA & LOUNGE, 899 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-4411 RIMROCKS MOUNTAIN TAVERN, 394 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-9593 THE RUSTY NAIL, 1190 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-6245 STOWEHOF INN, 434 Edson Hill Rd., Stowe, 253-9722 SUSHI YOSHI, 1128 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-4135 SWEET CRUNCH BAKESHOP, 246 Main St., Hyde Park, 888-4887

BIG PICTURE THEATER & CAFÉ, 48 Carroll Rd., Waitsfield, 496-8994

RUTLAND AREA

HOP’N MOOSE BREWERY CO., 41 Center St., Rutland 775-7063 PICKLE BARREL NIGHTCLUB, Killington Rd., Killington, 422-3035

CHAMPLAIN ISLANDS/ NORTHWEST

BAYSIDE PAVILION, 15 Georgia Shore Rd., St. Albans, 524-0909 CHOW! BELLA, 28 N. Main St., St. Albans, 524-1405 SNOW SHOE LODGE & PUB, 13 Main St., Montgomery Center, 326-4456

4T-smalldog113016.indd 1

11/29/16 2:07 PM

PRESENTS

UPPER VALLEY

BREAKING GROUNDS, 245 Main St., Bethel, 392-4222

NORTHEAST KINGDOM

BIG JAY TAVERN, 3709 Mountain Rd., Montgomery, 326-6688 COLATINA EXIT, 164 Main St., Bradford, 222-9008 JASPER’S TAVERN, 71 Seymour La., Newport, 334-2224 MARTELL’S AT THE FOX, 87 Edwards Rd., Jeffersonville, 644-5060 MUSIC BOX, 147 Creek Rd., Craftsbury, 586-7533 PARKER PIE CO., 161 County Rd., West Glover, 525-3366 PHAT KATS TAVERN, 101 Depot St., Lyndonville, 626-3064 THE PUB OUTBACK, 482 Vt. 114, East Burke, 626-1188 THE STAGE, 45 Broad St., Lyndonville, 427-3344 TAMARACK GRILL, 223 Shelburne Lodge Rd., East Burke, 626-7390

OUTSIDE VERMONT

MONOPOLE, 7 Protection Ave., Plattsburgh, N.Y., 518-563-2222 NAKED TURTLE, 1 Dock St., Plattsburgh, N.Y., 518-566-6200. OLIVE RIDLEY’S, 37 Court St., Plattsburgh, N.Y., 518-324-2200 PALMER ST. COFFEE HOUSE, 4 Palmer St., Plattsburgh, N.Y. 518-561-6920 THE SKINNY PANCAKE, 3 Lebanon St., Hanover, N.H., 603-277-9115

75 Main Street | 802-865-6555

Chris Pureka THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15 DOORS: 7:00 PM SHOW: 7:30 PM SHOWCASE LOUNGE

“SUCH A GIFTED GUITAR PLAYER AND SINGER THAT YOU HAVE TO LISTEN TO EACH SONG TWICE, ONCE FOR HER GUITAR PLAYING AND AGAIN FOR HER PASSIONATE LYRICS....”

THE BOSTON GLOBE

WIN TIX! 4t-hotticket113016.indd 1

and answer two Go to sevendaysvt.com

trivia questions.

Or, come by Northern Lights (75 Main Street, Burlington). Deadline: Monday , 12/12

at noon. Winners

notified by 5 p.m. 11/28/16 2:42 PM

MUSIC 77

MAD RIVER VALLEY/ WATERBURY

51 MAIN AT THE BRIDGE, 51 Main St., Middlebury, 3888209 BAR ANTIDOTE, 35C Green St., Vergennes, 877-2555 CITY LIMITS, 14 Greene St., Vergennes, 877-6919 HATCH 31, 31 Main St., Bristol, 453-2774 TOURTERELLE, 3629 Ethan Allen Hwy., New Haven, 453-6309 TWO BROTHERS TAVERN LOUNGE & STAGE, 86 Main St., Middlebury, 388-0002

SEVEN DAYS

ASIAN BISTRO, 25 Winooski Falls Way #112, Winooski, 655-9800 BACKSTAGE PUB, 60 Pearl St., Essex Jct., 878-5494 GOOD TIMES CAFÉ, Rt. 116, Hinesburg, 482-4444 HIGHER GROUND, 1214 Williston Rd., S. Burlington, 652-0777

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ, 28 Main St., Montpelier, 229-9212 CAPITAL GROUNDS CAFÉ, 27 State St., Montpelier, 223-7800 CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS, 70 Main St., Montpelier, 223-6820 ESPRESSO BUENO, 248 N. Main St., Barre, 479-0896 GUSTO’S, 28 Prospect St., Barre, 476-7919 KISMET, 52 State St., Montpelier, 223-8646 LA PUERTA NEGRA, 44 Main St., Montpelier, 613-3172 MULLIGAN’S IRISH PUB, 9 Maple Ave., Barre, 479-5545 NORTH BRANCH CAFÉ, 41 State St., Montpelier, 552-8105 POSITIVE PIE, 20 State St., Montpelier, 229-0453 RED HEN BAKERY + CAFÉ, 961 US Route 2, Middlesex, 223-5200 THE SKINNY PANCAKE, 89 Main St., Montpelier, 262-2253 SWEET MELISSA’S, 4 Langdon St., Montpelier, 225-6012 THREE BEAN CAFÉ, 22 Pleasant St., Randolph, 728-3533 WHAMMY BAR, 31 W. County Rd., Calais, 229-4329

MIDDLEBURY AREA

11.30.16-12.07.16

CHITTENDEN COUNTY

BARRE/MONTPELIER

THE CENTER BAKERY & CAFÉ, 2007 Guptil Rd., Waterbury Center, 244-7500 CORK WINE BAR & MARKET, 40 Foundry St., Waterbury, 882-8227 HOSTEL TEVERE, 203 Powderhound Rd., Warren, 496-9222 PURPLE MOON PUB, Rt. 100, Waitsfield, 496-3422 THE RESERVOIR RESTAURANT & TAP ROOM, 1 S. Main St., Waterbury, 244-7827 SLIDE BROOK LODGE & TAVERN, 3180 German Flats Rd., Warren, 583-2202

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

242 MAIN ST., Burlington, 8622244 AMERICAN FLATBREAD, 115 St. Paul St., Burlington, 861-2999 ARTSRIOT, 400 Pine St., Burlington, 540 0406 AUGUST FIRST, 149 S. Champlain St., Burlington, 540-0060 BARRIO BAKERY & PIZZA BARRIO, 203 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington, 863-8278 BENTO, 197 College St., Burlington, 497-2494 BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD, 25 Cherry St., Burlington, 854-4700 BREAKWATER CAFÉ, 1 King St., Burlington, 658-6276 BRENNAN’S PUB & BISTRO, UVM Davis Center, 590 Main St., Burlington, 656-1204 CHURCH & MAIN RESTAURANT, 156 Church St., Burlington, 540-3040 CITIZEN CIDER, 316 Pine St, Burlington, 497-1987 CLUB METRONOME, 188 Main St., Burlington, 865-4563 THE DAILY PLANET, 15 Center St., Burlington, 862-9647 DOBRÁ TEA, 80 Church St., Burlington, 951-2424 DRINK, 133 St. Paul St., Burlington, 951-9463 THE FARMHOUSE TAP & GRILL, 160 Bank St., Burlington, 8590888 FINNIGAN’S PUB, 205 College St., Burlington, 864-8209 THE GRYPHON, 131 Main St., Burlington, 489-5699 HALFLOUNGE SPEAKEASY, 136 1/2 Church St., Burlington, 865-0012 JP’S PUB, 139 Main St., Burlington, 658-6389 JUNIPER, 41 Cherry St., Burlington, 658-0251 LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ, 115 Church St., Burlington, 8633759 LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP, 12 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington, 660-9346 MAGLIANERO CAFÉ, 47 Maple St., Burlington, 861-3155 MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB, 167 Main St., Burlington, 864-6776 MUDDY WATERS, 184 Main St., Burlington, 658-0466 NECTAR’S, 188 Main St., Burlington, 658-4771 RADIO BEAN, 8 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington, 660-9346 RASPUTIN’S, 163 Church St., Burlington, 864-9324 RED SQUARE, 136 Church St., Burlington, 859-8909 RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB, 123 Church St., Burlington, 860-9401 RUBEN JAMES, 159 Main St., Burlington, 864-0744 SIGNAL KITCHEN, 71 Main St., Burlington, 399-2337 SIDEBAR, 202 Main St., Burlington, 864-0072 THE SKINNY PANCAKE, 60 Lake St., Burlington, 540-0188 SPEAKING VOLUMES, 377 Pine St., Burlington, 540-0107 THE TAP ROOM AT SWITCHBACK BREWING, 160 Flynn Ave., Burlington, 651-4114 VERMONT COMEDY CLUB, 101 Main St., Burlington, 859-0100 THE VERMONT PUB & BREWERY, 144 College St., Burlington, 865-0500

HINESBURGH PUBLIC HOUSE, 10516 Vt., 116 #6A, Hinesburg, 482-5500 JAMES MOORE TAVERN, 4302 Bolton Access Rd. Bolton Valley, Jericho,434-6826 JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN, 30 Rte., 15 Jericho, 899-2223 MONKEY HOUSE, 30 Main St., Winooski, 655-4563 OAK45, 45 Main St., Winooski, 448-3740 ON TAP BAR & GRILL, 4 Park St., Essex Jct., 878-3309 PARK PLACE TAVERN, 38 Park St., Essex Jct. 878-3015 ROZZI’S LAKESHORE TAVERN, 1022 W. Lakeshore Dr., Colchester, 863-2342 SHELBURNE VINEYARD, 6308 Shelburne Rd., Shelburne, 985-8222 STONE CORRAL BREWERY, 83 Huntington Rd., Richmond, 434-5767 SUGAR HOUSE BAR & GRILL, 733 Queen City Park Rd., S. Burlington, 863-2909 WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK, 20 Winooski Falls Way, Winooski, 497-3525


art

Looking Sharp

“Hard-Edge Cool: The Routhier Collection of Mid-Century Prints,” Shelburne Museum B Y AMY LI LLY PHOTOS COURTESY OF ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY/THE ROUTHIER COLLECTION

“Abstract Composition from Cahiers d’Art” by Wassily Kandinsky

11.30.16-12.07.16 SEVEN DAYS 78 ART

in an art that aims to subtract the artist’s individuality from the picture. The hard-edge movement proper lasted only about a decade, starting in the mid-1950s. California critic Jules Langsner coined the term in 1959 to describe art that championed austere form and an impersonal aesthetic over what was seen as the emotional and idiosyncratic output of Jackson Pollock and other “action painters.” But “hard edge,” as a style, stretches back to the 1920s, exemplified by the Dutch De Stijl movement, in which Taeuber-Arp was involved, and Bauhaus in Germany. The latter pioneering school of design and craft had a profound impact in both Europe and America; its influence can be seen in this exhibition’s organization by artistic school. Curator Carolyn Bauer’s labels take viewers through groups of prints representing the De Stijl, Swiss concrete art and American hard-edge, op-art and minimalist movements, tracing influences along the way. The Bauhaus’ Josef Albers, for example, taught a number of people whose work appears in the show, including Max Bill and Richard Anuszkiewicz. If this approach seems a bit academic, Bauer has countered that tendency with an intriguing twist. She made “HardEdge Cool” equally about the art and its collectors, the Routhiers. Jason, 40, is a graphic artist who grew up in Newport, Vt., and founded the design group RouthierHolmes in Burlington. Dana, 35, is a Cincinnati native who studied

“Affiche St. Gallen I” by Jean Arp

“Lithographie Originale” by Max Bill

THE EXHIBIT FOCUSES ON AN AESTHETIC NOT OFTEN SEEN AT ANY VENUE IN VERMONT — THE POINTED EXPLORATION OF COLOR AND ABSTRACT, GEOMETRIC FORM. COURTESY OF ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY/THE ROUTHIER COLLECTION/ PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDY DUBACK

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

A

new exhibit at the Shelburne Museum is a far cry from the folk art for which the museum is famous, and demonstrates the broad curatorial possibilities of its contemporary Pizzagalli Center for Art and Education. “Hard-Edge Cool: The Routhier Collection of Mid-Century Prints” focuses on an aesthetic not often seen at any venue in Vermont — the pointed exploration of color and abstract, geometric form. The show’s 75 works on paper cover a longer time span than one might expect from the title — about six decades — and include some extraordinary pieces. In a 1930 print by Wassily Kandinsky, a red half-circle and black ellipsis pop against a yellow background. Ellsworth Kelly designed a white 1990 exhibition poster that features a single precisely distorted black tranche of a circle on white paper. Many of the works are compelling studies in how colors interact when placed side by side without transition — that is, in forms with hard edges. Sophie Taeuber-Arp, an early pioneer of such work, helped retrofit the interior of a Strasbourg building called Aubette. Her 1928 wall design of diamond-shaped panels in relief, painted red, gray, blue, yellow and green, is reproduced on the back wall of this exhibition. Sometimes color is not the point, as in a grid by Sol LeWitt called “A Square for Each Day of the Seventies” (1981). Here, form becomes the medium of exploration

“Plate from 10 Origin” by Sophie Taeuber-Arp

“Cercles” by Geneviéve Claisse

modern literature, holds an MFA in poetry and directs special projects for RouthierHolmes. The couple lives in Northfield with their 3-year-old son. The Routhiers collect a range of art; Jason began the collection by acquiring works by Shepard Fairey and other contemporary street artists. But the bulk of it consists of more than 300 prints in a hard-edge style. A selection of Routhiers’ Albers works was shown last March at the BCA Center. In “Hard-Edge Cool,” a freestanding gallery wall introduces the Routhiers with a photograph of the family at home. Above their couch hangs Nassos Daphnis’ “SS K-80,” a composition of offset concentric circles in gray, white and blue overlaid by a white cross. The same work graces the exhibition walls, which are painted a similar pale gray. Additional labels throughout the gallery offer the Routhiers’ comments on what certain works mean to them or how they were acquired. Beside Taeuber-Arp’s “Plate” from the 10 Origin portfolio (1942), for example, a Routhier label declares, “This is a rare piece that was published while Taeuber-Arp was still living; we can’t believe our luck in finding it.” The personal context provides an interesting counterbalance to a visual aesthetic that aimed for impersonality (albeit not always successfully). Bauer’s own intention, she said while guiding a reporter around the exhibit, was to show how accessible art collecting can be — and how affordable, if one collects


ART SHOWS

NEW THIS WEEK burlington

f ‘THE ELEMENTS’: An exhibition of works by local artists Elizabeth Cleary, Gwendolyn Evans and Kristen Richland. Reception: Friday, December 2, 5-8 p.m. December 2-March 31. Info, 651-9692. VCAM Studio in Burlington.

white circles on a deep blue, is one of the great pleasures of “Hard-Edge Cool.” Just how male-oriented hard edge was can be seen in three short blackand-white films looping on the gallery’s back wall. One silent clip is the only known video of Albers teaching; another shows his protégé Anuszkiewicz working on a piece much like his “Silent Red” (1972) in this exhibit. The third film, a CBS news clip, was shot at the seminal 1965 op-art exhibit at MoMA titled “The Responsive Eye,” which included very few works by women. Aficionados can search the footage for work by late Burlington artist Frank Hewitt, whose Anonima Group was included. The CBS reporter captures some hilarious reactions to the MoMA show from visitors, including one indignant woman who declares that such work isn’t art at all. That attitude may persist today, Jason Routhier suggested, but it has abated over the years because the hard-edge aesthetic has become so familiar. “These artists, they really did create the blueprint for the 21st century,” he said. “We’re living in their world. Look at IKEA; look at the iPhone. I think this type of work is completely ingrained in the culture.” m

GROUP SHOW: New works from members of the Bellcate School, Howard Center Arts Collective and guest artists. December 1-January 31. Info, aforguites@howardcenter.org. Burlington Records. KEVIN MONTANARO: An exhibition of highly detailed works meant to convey the spectrum of human emotions. December 1-January 31. Info, 658-6016. Speeder & Earl’s Coffee, Pine Street, in Burlington.

f LYNN CUMMINGS: Paintings in a wide variety of styles by the local artist. Reception: Friday, December 2, 5-8 p.m. December 2-March 31. Info, 651-9692. RETN & VCAM Media Factory in Burlington. f SALLY LINDER: “White Magnetism,” paintings and drawings of Arctic polar bears threatened by extinction. Reception: Saturday, December 3, 2 p.m. December 3-April 1. Info, 652-4500. Amy E. Tarrant Gallery in Burlington. f ‘SMALL WORKS’: A group exhibition of works

in a variety of mediums measuring 12 inches or smaller. Reception: Friday, December 2, 5-9 p.m. December 2-January 28. Info, 578-2512. The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery in Burlington.

SOUTH END HOLIDAY SHOP: Festive marketplace featuring locally made artwork, available for holiday gifting. December 2-24. Info, 859-9222. SEABA Center in Burlington. VERMONT PHOTO GROUP: “Framed,” a group exhibition of images featuring the various realities of frames within frames, taken by 13 Vermont photographers. December 2-31. Info, 434-5503. Mirabelles Café in Burlington.

chittenden county

f ‘TREASURE THE SMALL’: A group exhibition focused on small and affordable original art, featuring more than 25 regional fine artists. Reception: Friday. December 2, 5-7 p.m. December 2-January 31. Info, 985-3848. Furchgott Sourdiffe Gallery in Shelburne.

Contact: lilly@sevendaysvt.com

INFO “Hard-Edge Cool: The Routhier Collection of Mid-Century Prints,” through January 22 at Shelburne Museum. shelburnemuseum.org

barre/montpelier

f GOWRI SAVOOR: “Between Two Worlds,”

PRIA CAMBIO: “And Somewhere Else There’s a Beach,” beachscape paintings and drawings by the Vermont artist. December 1-April 8. Info, 479-7069. Morse Block Deli in Barre.

f ‘SHOW 14’: An exhibition featuring the

f SUKI KA’PINAO WHITE: “Veins of Gold,” a visual exploration of veins and connectivity, inspired by the artist’s husband’s recent open-

f MEMBERS ART SHOW: An eclectic group exhibition featuring the works of art center members, shown among 13 communitydecorated evergreen trees and a Hanukkah display of menorahs, games and dreidels. Curated by Amanda Marquis and Chiyomi McKibbin. Reception: Friday, December 2, 5-8 p.m. December 2-31. Info, 253-8358. Helen Day Art Center in Stowe.

middlebury area

f ‘MORE LIGHT’: An exhibit of small works by Anne Cady, Bonnie Baird, Cameron Schmitz, Katie Loesel, Pamela Smith, Rebecca Kinkead and Sobelman Cortapega. Reception: Friday, December 9, 5-8 p.m., with live music by the Meatpackers. December 1-January 15. Info, 877-2173. Northern Daughters in Vergennes.

upper valley

f TWO RIVERS HOLIDAY PRINT SHOW: Annual

group exhibition featuring prints by artist members that demonstrate a variety of printmaking techniques, from relief to solar plate. Reception: Friday, December 2, 6-8 p.m. December 2-31. Info, 295-5901. Two Rivers Printmaking Studio in White River Junction.

ART EVENTS ARTIST TALK: EVE JACOBS-CARNAHAN: The Vermont artist discusses her work in fiber art in conjunction with the current exhibition, “Surface Expressions.” Chaffee Art Center, Rutland, Saturday, December 3, 1 p.m. Info, 775-0356. BENEFIT POTTERY SALE: Browse works by Kathy Clarke, Ken Martin, Stacey Stanhope and Su Shannon as well as other local potters, studio assistants and students. Purchases benefit the Middlebury Studio School. Middlebury Studio School, Saturday, December 3, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Info, middleburystudioschool@gmail.com. BOOK LAUNCH: ‘ARTISTS OF THE MOHAWKHUDSON REGION’: Launch party for the exhibition’s commemorative catalog. The Hyde Collection, Glens Falls, N.Y., Friday, December 2, 5:30 p.m. Info, 518-792-1761. DEMO: JOHN BRICKELS: The Burlington clay sculptor shares his work and process with gallery visitors. Frog Hollow Vermont Craft Gallery, Burlington, Saturday, December 3, noon-4 p.m. Info, 863-6458. ESSEX ART LEAGUE MEETING: Monthly business and social time for members, followed by an artist presentation. First Congregational Church Essex, Essex Junction, Thursday, December 1, 9-11 a.m. Info, jdbeebo@yahoo.com. FIRST FRIDAY ART: Dozens of galleries and other venues around the city open their doors to pedestrian art viewers in this monthly event. See Art Map Burlington at participating locations. Friday, December 2, 5-8 p.m. Info, 264-4839. HOLIDAY FUNDRAISER CELEBRATION: Casey Blanchard and Dan Cox invite the public to shop art, note cards and gift tags, and will donate 25 percent of proceeds to Grounds for Health. Brickwork Art Studios, Burlington, Friday, December 2, 4-7 p.m. Info, 985-3037. HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE: Annual holiday celebration of community and the practice of making beautiful things together. There will be pottery ART EVENTS

» P.80

ART 79

Jason and Dana Routhier at home; “SS K-80” by Nassos Daphnis hanging over the couch

latest works of the collective gallery’s growing membership of local, contemporary artists. Light refreshments and drinks will be served, and live music will be provided by Bob Hannan. Reception: Friday, December 2, 4-8 p.m. December 2-January 28. Info, 272-0908. The Front in Montpelier.

an exhibition of collaged works that strive for an alternative definition of reality. Reception: Thursday, December 1, 7 p.m. December 1-15. Info, 635-2727. Vermont Studio Center Gallery II in Johnson.

SEVEN DAYS

drawings that explore the boundaries of reality, memory and myth. Reception: Friday, December 2, 4-8 p.m., with artist talk at 5:30 p.m. December 2-January 8. Info, 224-6878. Second Floor, 43 State Street in Montpelier.

f DAVE KENNEDY: “Something Fully Itself,”

11.30.16-12.07.16

COURTESY OF SHELBURNE MUSEUM

REVIEW

f FIBER ART EXTRAVAGANZA: An exhibition featuring rug-hooked creations by the Champlain Island Fiber Bees and upcycled Christmas sweater stockings from Nancy Gadue. Reception: Friday, December 2, 4-8 p.m. December 2-31. Info, 223-1981. The Cheshire Cat in Montpelier.

stowe/smuggs

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

prints. The curator also saw the dual theme as a way to link the exhibit to Shelburne Museum’s raison d’être. “Collecting was what we were born on, with Electra [Havemeyer Webb, the museum’s founder],” said Bauer. Reached by phone, Jason Routhier estimated that the couple paid as little as $20 for some works and no more than $500 for any one piece. But affordability didn’t drive him so much as a pure love of the aesthetic. Routhier discovered hard edge while attending North Country Union High School, in art books at the public library and LP covers he encountered in his job at the local record store, Tones. Later, on a senior-year trip to the Museum of Modern Art in New York, he got a first hand look. Routhier went on to study printmaking at Johnson State College, and his professional work has been deeply influenced by the style. “If I could, I’d print squares all day,” he said with a laugh. Dana Routhier has a particular interest in women artists who work in the male-dominated hard-edge aesthetic, and she has a flair for research. (“I’m the hoarder, and she’s the organizer,” Jason joked.) She has steered the couple’s collecting, according to her husband, to include remarkable artists such as Tess Jaray, a British painter and printmaker; and Geneviève Claisse of France. The latter’s “Cercles” from 1967, a composition of eclipsed black, bright blue and

FRANK DEANGELIS: “Heartrocities,” paintings created in the past seven months by the Burlington artist. December 2-31. Info, 578-2512. The Backspace Gallery in Burlington.

heart surgery. Reception: Friday, December 2, 6 p.m., with reading by Sandra Erickson at 7 p.m. December 2-January 7. Info, 426-3581. Jaquith Public Library in Marshfield.


art ART EVENTS

« P.79

‘OF LAND & LOCAL: WATERSHED’ AT BCA: The fourth iteration of the annual exhibition features new site-specific and place-based works relating to the Vermont landscape, presented by Shelburne Farms and Burlington City Arts. Exhibiting artists include Sean Clute, Cameron Davis, Al Larsen, Rachel Moore, Michael Zebrowski, John Douglas, Casey Blanchard, Galen Cheney, Mark Reamy and Gail Salzman. Through January 14. Info, 865-7166. BCA Center in Burlington.

activities for all ages, crown-making for kids, woodworking and pottery demonstrations by our craftspeople and partner vendors showcasing their work. ShackletonThomas, Bridgewater, Saturday, December 3, 3-6 p.m. Info, 672-5175. IN RESIDENCE: DUG NAP: The Burlington artist makes himself available to customers to talk about his work and sign prints. Frog Hollow Vermont Craft Gallery, Burlington, Fridays, 1-6 p.m. Info, 863-6458.

‘OUT OF DARKNESS TOWARDS LIGHT’: New mixed-media works by Lily Hinrichsen and Karla Van Vliet, each depicting their journey from the mysteries of darkness to the illuminations of light. Through December 31. Info, lilyhinrichsen@gmail. com. Flynndog in Burlington.

‘INTERSECTION: ART SHOW & SALE’: A diverse offering of work by eight artists in ceramics, textiles, painting, illustration, jewelry and wood. New Moon Café, Burlington, Saturday, December 3, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, intersectionartshow@gmail.com. INTUITIVE DRAWING WORKSHOP: The local artists of Poppyclock Collective lead this workshop in drawing from the subconscious. Materials (plus pizza and nonalcoholic beverages) supplied. Battery Street Jeans, Burlington, Monday, December 5, 6-8 p.m. $10 suggested donation. Info, 865-6223. LAKE CHAMPLAIN WALDORF SCHOOL HOLIDAY MARKET: Annual European-style festival featuring an artisan market with more than 50 local makers, as well as family activities, crafts and homemade food. Lake Champlain Waldorf School, Shelburne, Friday, December 2, 6:30-9 p.m., and Saturday, December 3, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Info, 985- 2827. LIFE PAINTING SESSION: Join Billy Brauer to draw and paint from live models, who generally hold one pose for two hours. BYO materials; all media welcome. T.W. Wood Gallery, Montpelier, Thursday, December 1, 7-9 p.m. . $12. Info, 839-5349.

80 ART

SEVEN DAYS

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

‘MAKING THOUGHT VISIBLE’: Art professor emeritus Michael Strauss and poet Tony Magistrale explore the role of visual thinking in observation, reflection, problem solving and creation in both art and science. T.W. Wood Gallery, Montpelier, Friday, December 2, 6 p.m. Info, 262-6035.

‘Treasure the Small’

Furchgott Sourdiffe Gallery in Shelburne offers up a selection of small-scale, affordably priced works by more than 25 regional artists. A range of styles and mediums is represented, from Frank Woods’ colorful oil abstractions to Dianne Shullenberger’s meticulous fabric collage to Julie Y Baker Albright’s realist still lifes. Should you decide to gift — or bring home — a new work, consider doing it between December 2 and 10, when the gallery will donate 10 percent of proceeds to Hunger Free Vermont. An opening reception is Friday, December 2, 5-7 p.m. Through January 31. Pictured: “Clementine Pieces” by Albright. Museum of Art, University of Vermont, Burlington, Wednesday, November 30, noon. Info, 656-0750.

ONGOING SHOWS

POTTERY STUDIO OPENING AND HOLIDAY SALE: Claude Lehman Pottery shows a wide selection of unique, wheel-thrown pottery from mugs, bowls, teapots and serving platters to special items such as yarn bowls. Free gift for the first 50 customers. 4 Howard Street, Burlington, Friday, December 2, 5-9 p.m., and December 3-4, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Info, 399-5181.

ART HOP GROUP SHOW: An exhibition featuring works by more than 30 local artists. Through November 30. Info, 651-9692. VCAM Studio in Burlington.

SODA PLANT HOLIDAY POP-UP MARKET: Studios such as Alice and the Magician, Conant Metal & Light, recycle moe, Revival Studio, and Vintage Inspired Lifestyle Market open to make works available for holiday shopping. The Soda Plant, Burlington, Friday, December 2, 5-9 p.m. Info, recyclemoe@gmail.com. TALK: ‘RADICAL NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN HIV/ AIDS PREVENTION’: In recognition of World AIDS Day, assistant professor of psychology Robert W. Moeller discusses his research on HIV/AIDS among racial and sexual minorities in the U.S. Presented in conjunction with the concurrent exhibition “Post Pop: Prints of Keith Haring.” Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, Thursday, December 1, 4:30 p.m. Info, 443-3168. TALK: ‘WHAT WE KNOW (AND DON’T KNOW) ABOUT SAMUEL WOOD GAYLOR’: Curator Andrea Rosen discusses new discoveries about the elusive figure, including his role in elaborate artists’ costume balls, his folk art collecting and his connections to the Fleming collection. Fleming

VISUAL ART IN SEVEN DAYS:

It’s said that good things come in small

packages — and that could include small canvases. Just in time for the holiday season,

OPEN HOUSE: PETER FRIED: Join the Vermont artist in his studio and gallery space to discuss recent works on linen, canvas and paper. Peter Fried Art, Vergennes, Friday, December 2, 5-8 p.m. Info, 355-1447.

RIVER OF LIGHT LANTERN PARADE: Seventh annual community-sourced illuminated procession, with the theme “Everything Botanical: Wild Vegetation and Fantastical Flora!” Leave from Thatcher Brook Primary School or Rusty Parker Memorial Park. Various Waterbury locations, Saturday, December 3, 5-6 p.m. Info, 778-0334.

THE POPPYCLOCK COLLECTIVE: Collaborative mixed-media works by Burlington artists Haley Bishop Rockwood and DeAnna Kerley. Through November 30. Info, 658-6016. Speeder & Earl’s Coffee, Pine Street, in Burlington.

burlington

THE ART HOP WINNERS’ CIRCLE: Selected works highlight winners John Douglas, Larry Bissonnette, Cara Lai FitzGibbon and People’s Choice winner Robert Gold. Through November 30. Info, 859-9222. SEABA Center in Burlington. CAROLINE BICK: Photographs by the University of Vermont studio art major. Through December 31. Info, 865-6227. Uncommon Grounds Coffee and Tea in Burlington. CHRISTY MITCHELL: “IRL,” a mixed-media exhibition that uses photography, sculpture and digital works to present the artist’s trials of dating in the digital age. Through December 31. Info, 578-2512. Backspace Gallery in Burlington. COLLEEN MURPHY: “Alternate Realities,” a series of photographs and painted diptychs that explore the contrast between objective and subjective views of objects and spaces. Through January 13. Info, 658-5731. The Daily Planet in Burlington. DOK WRIGHT: “Sammada Photographs,” large-scale images on canvas. Through December 31. Info, 8642088. Artspace 106 at the Men’s Room in Burlington. ‘GAME PROGRAM’: Works by alumni in game art, design, programming and production work featuring concept art, playable game media, panel discussions and workshops. Through December 8. EBEN MARKOWSKI: “Gravity,” a life-size steel sculpture of a female Asian elephant inspired by the tragedy of the global ivory trade. Through December 10. JOE MANLEY: “Plug/Unplug,” an exhibition of the Champlain game design professor’s clustered ceramic wall sculptures, brought to life

ART LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY RACHEL ELIZABETH JONES. LISTINGS ARE RESTRICTED TO ART SHOWS IN TRULY PUBLIC PLACES.

by digital projection mapping. Through December 10. Info, cthompson@champlain.edu. Champlain College Art Gallery in Burlington. HOLIDAY MARKET: A selection of artwork and handmade gifts for the holiday season. Through January 4. Info, 777-7777. ONE Arts Center in Burlington. INNOVATION CENTER EXHIBITION: Works curated by SEABA in a variety of mediums. First floor: Kelley Taft, Kristen Watson, Littlest Penguin Photography, Rae Harrell, Robert Gold and Stephen Zeigfinger; second floor: Amanda Vella, Janet Bonneau, John Metruk, Marilyn Barry and Pete Boardman; third floor: Donna Bister, Gaal Shepherd, Nicole Colella, SRMPhotography and Terry L. Mercy. Through November 30. Info, 859-9222. The Innovation Center of Vermont in Burlington. KATHARINE MONTSTREAM: “Snow Daze,” new snowscape paintings in watercolor and oil. Through December 1. Info, 862-8752. Montstream Studio in Burlington. ‘KEN RUSSACK: URBAN STUDIES 101’: Oil paintings on canvas of buildings and houses of Burlington’s neighborhoods. Through December 2. Info, 8645884. Karma Bird House Gallery in Burlington. KIRSTEN HURLEY: “Death,” an exhibition of paintings and hanging sculptural ornaments by the Vermont artist. Through December 6. Info, 865-6223. Battery Street Jeans in Burlington. LONGINA SMOLINSKI: “Reflection,” new work that presents the artist’s emotions through color while reflecting on the beauty of Vermont landscapes. Through December 4. Info, 999-4848. Brickwork Art Studios in Burlington. MARC FONTAINE: “45 Years Later,” an exhibition of photos representing the artist’s return to photography. Through January 1. Info, 540-8333. Sequoia Salon in Burlington. MATT DOUGLAS: “Pets in Tiny Hats,” a series of screen prints that explore the contrast between domesticated companions and small headgear. Through November 30. Info, 651-4114. The Tap Room at Switchback Brewing in Burlington.

GET YOUR ART SHOW LISTED HERE!

IF YOU’RE PROMOTING AN ART EXHIBIT, LET US KNOW BY POSTING INFO AND IMAGES BY THURSDAYS AT NOON ON OUR FORM AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT OR GALLERIES@SEVENDAYSVT.COM.

‘SARGENT TO BASQUIAT: UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT ALUMNI COLLECTIONS’: An exhibition of works on loan that span the late 19th to the early 21st centuries and represent some of the most influential styles of the last 130 years. Through December 16. Info, 656-8582. Fleming Museum of Art, University of Vermont, in Burlington. STEVE SHARON: Paintings by the local artist. Through December 31. Info, 859-9222. The Gallery at Main Street Landing in Burlington. VERMONT WATERCOLOR SOCIETY: The BurlingtonSt. Albans hub of the statewide art organization shows new works by members. Through November 30. Info, 859-9222. Art’s Alive Gallery @ Main Street Landing’s Union Station in Burlington.

chittenden county

‘THE BLUES’: Exhibition of works incorporating the color blue. Through December 31. Info, 899-4936. Jericho Town Hall. ‘GREEN: A FINE ART PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION’: An exhibition of images incorporating the color that we associate with money, the environment, aliens, revitalization and rebirth, juried by Sarah Elise Abramson. Through December 4. Info, 777-3686. Darkroom Gallery in Essex Junction. HARALD AKSDAL: “Landscape Portraits and Other Things,” drawings inspired by the artist’s admiration for the natural world. Through December 31. Info, 899-3211. Emile A. Gruppe Gallery in Jericho. TANYA CHALY: “Complex Contingencies,” an exhibition of “forensic suites” of detailed and individually framed drawings of biodiversity by the New York artist. Upon close inspection, the works reveal pathologies, disease, parasitic infestations and mutations. Through December 9. Info, bcollier@ smcvt.edu. McCarthy Arts Center Gallery, Saint Michael’s College, in Colchester.

barre/montpelier

‘CELEBRATE!’: Annual local arts celebration featuring a wide variety of art and crafts created by more than 75 SPA member artists. Through December 30. Info, 479-7069. Studio Place Arts in Barre. ‘FREAKS, RADICALS & HIPPIES: COUNTERCULTURE IN 1970S VERMONT’: An exhibition that explores the influx of people and countercultural ideas to the state, from communes to organic agriculture, progressive politics to health care reform, alternative energy to women’s and gay rights. Through December 30. $5-20. Info, 479-8500. Vermont Heritage Galleries in Barre. HOLIDAY POP-UP GIFT SHOP: Annual marketplace highlighting local Vermont artists, including works and gifts by Phyllis Chase, Anne Davis, Cindy Griffith, David Kaczynski/Khaos Jewelry, Barbara Leber, Phillip Robertson, Joan Smith and Janice Walrafen. Through December 24. f MICHAEL STRAUSS: “Making Thought Visible,” an exhibition of paintings in watercolor, oils, acrylic, pastel and ink by the Vermont artist and University of Vermont instructor, who investigates drawing and painting as a form of problem solving. Reception: Friday, December 2, 6-8 p.m. Through January 13. Info, 262-6035. T.W. Wood


ART SHOWS

Gallery in Montpelier.

Goddard College, in Plainfield.

‘IN PRAISE OF WATER’: Goddard College artists approach the theme of water from multiple perspectives: aesthetic, ecological, social, political, spiritual and contemplative. Artists include Richard Ambelang, Susan Buroker, Kate Egnaczak, Dan Goldman, Tom Hansell, Seitu Jones, Phillip Robertson, Cynthia Ross, Sharon Siskin, Ruth Wallen and Nanci Worthington. Through April 9. Info, 322-1604. Goddard Art Gallery, Pratt Center,

IRIS GAGE: Handcrafted botanical art by the apothecary owner. Through December 31. Info, 223-0043. Grian Herbs Apothecary in Montpelier.

CALL TO ARTISTS‘ AIA EMERGING PROFESSIONALS CHARRETTE: Emerging design professionals are invited to compete in this creative competition with an $800 prize. Individuals or partners will be given a design challenge at Burlington City Arts on December 10, which they may work to solve from 3 to 6 p.m. A public reception will follow at 6 p.m. Competitors must register by December 5 by emailing aiavt. ep@gmail.com. ART OF WINTER’: Vermont Art Guide and the S.P.A.C.E. Gallery seek works for an exhibition of Vermont art that trades on themes of winter. All mediums are welcome in works that express winter as a landscape and/or approaches the season from a psychological, emotional or conceptual viewpoint. A selection of artwork will be published in Vermont Art Guide #3. To apply, complete this form: kasini.submittable. com/submit/72308/art-ofwinter. The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery, Burlington. Through December 30. Info, 578-2512.

GINGERBREAD CONSTRUCTION COMPETITION: Gingerbread enthusiasts of all ages and abilities are invited to submit a structure relating in some way to the theme “animal kingdom.” Entries outside of the theme are welcome and included. Family and group entries are welcomed. Professional chefs may participate, but their creations will not be included in the judging. No kits allowed. Submitted creations will be on display December 14-23. Deadline: December 10, 3 p.m. Chaffee Art Center, Rutland. $15. Info, 775-0356. GINGERBREAD/GRAHAM CRACKER HOUSE CONTEST: Drop off your entry starting December 1; voting starts December 7, but entries accepted even after voting begins. We’ll display your creations, and every entrant will be eligible for a raffled basket of goodies. Patrons can vote on their favorites. Gingerbread kits and family/team entries are welcome. Guidelines and entry forms are available at the library or on our website. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester. Info, 264-5660. ‘IT’S THE LITTLE THINGS’: Seeking photography of life’s “little” moments for an upcoming exhibition to be juried by Denise Letendre Bach, Lowell Snowdon Klock and Norma Montaigne. Deadline: December 2. Compass Music and Arts Center, Brandon. Info, 247-4295. JEWELERS AND FUNCTIONAL ARTISTS: Seeking work by local artists and artisans for the upcoming holiday season. Interested artists should email photos of work and/ or a link to their website to thebuzz@thehivevt.com. Deadline: December 1. The Hive, Middlesex. Info, 595-4866.

MARKET STREET RECONSTRUCTION PROJECT: The city seeks to commission an artist to deliver and install a new, original, permanent and site-specific piece of art as part of the Market Street Reconstruction Project. The budget for the selected artist is $46,000. For a copy of the Request for Qualifications, please email Ilona Blanchard at iblanchard@sburl.com or call 846-4107. Deadline: December 16, 10 a.m. South Burlington City Hall.

Gi cards, hand craed jewelry, vegan bags & more! In December, we will donate a $5 gi card to VT Steps for every $50 gi card purchase, plus a swag bag for you!

‘ROUND & AROUND’: Seeking art in a variety of mediums that pays homage to circles, spheres and endless loops. Deadline: December 10. Studio Place Arts, Barre. Free for members; $10 nonmembers. Info, 479-7069. SMALL WORKS EXHIBITION: Seeking work for an upcoming, nonjuried exhibition open to all artists and mediums. All work must measure 12 inches or smaller in all directions, before framing. $5 entry fee per submission. For details and to register, email spacegalleryvt. com. Deadline: December 1, 3 p.m. The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery, Burlington. Info, 578-2512.

86 main st, burlington 862.1670 • urbansalonteam.com 4t-UrbanSalonBeautyBar113016.indd 1

11/29/16 12:43 PM

TEACHING ARTISTS: Across Roads Center for the Arts seeks artists looking to share their knowledge with a central Vermont audience through ongoing workshops. For more information and to submit a proposal, email info. acrossroads@gmail.com. Deadline: December 31. Grange Hall, Waterbury Center. Info, 244-4168. ‘UNDER CONSTRUCTION’: Seeking wall-based and sculptural works, as well as artist books, with a particular emphasis on unusual or nontraditional materials, for a springtime exhibition exploring the processes of building and design. Deadline: January 27. Studio Place Arts, Barre. Free for members; $10 nonmembers. Info, 479-7069. ‘A WORLD FREE OF VIOLENCE’: Seeking art that represents the theme for an upcoming exhibition hosted by Steps to End Domestic Violence. All submissions must be wall-ready, including wiring on the back of each piece. Interested artists should submit an image of work for consideration and other details to janices@stepsvt. org. Deadline: December 12. Art’s Alive Gallery @ Main Street Landing’s Union Station, Burlington. Info, 658-3131.

ART 81

‘KALEIDOSCOPE’: Established and emerging artists are invited to submit one or two pieces of two-dimensional artwork in any medium for an upcoming exhibition scheduled for January through March. The work must reflect whatever kaleidoscope means to the artist, and it must be able to be hung on a wall. Registration deadline: December 16. Jericho Town Hall. Info, blgreene@ myfairpoint.net.

» P.82

SEVEN DAYS

‘FOLLOWING THE RULES / BREAKING THE RULES’: Seeking art in any medium by local artists for an upcoming show juried by Glen Coburn Hutcheson, Kathleen Kolb and Tom Slayton. The theme is “We live by rules. Some rules are personal; some are societal; others are merely artistic.” Works must be made within

the last five years. Deadline: December 30. T.W. Wood Gallery, Montpelier. $25 for three submissions; $10 for each additional. Info, 262-6035.

BARRE/MONTPELIER SHOWS

We’re more than just another salon... we’re changing the way you see beauty!

11.30.16-12.07.16

DANCE FILMS: The Vermont Dance Alliance seeks submissions of short- to medium-length dance films to be screened at Lost Nation Theater on Friday, December 16, during a fundraising event for the Winter Dance Gala. Artist must be able to be present at this event. For consideration, submit link to film to hannasatt@gmail.com. Deadline: December 1. Lost Nation Theater, Montpelier.

traits, still lifes and photorealistic scenes. Reception: Friday, December 2, 4-7 p.m. Through December 27. Info, 828-3291. Spotlight Gallery in Montpelier.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

‘COMPOSED’: Seeking photographs that emphasize the significance of composition, to be shown in an upcoming show cohosted by the Texas Photographic Society and juried by Sam Abell. PhotoPlace Gallery, Middlebury. Through December 12. Up to five photographs for $30; $7 for each additional image. Info, 388-4500.

f KATIE RUNDE: “Etudes,” drawn and painted por-

Give the Gift of Confidence!

Untitled-10 1

11/28/16 1:33 PM


art ST DECEMBER 1

Holiday Menu! THE BARRIO HOLIDAY MENU WILL BE AVAILABLE ALL DECEMBER FOR YOUR HOLIDAY EVENTS! HOLIDAY COOKIE TRAYS, BUCHE DE NOEL, PIES, CAKES, HOLIDAY BREADS...

Breakfast • Lunch • Sunday Brunch

For details, visit:

Open Monday - Sunday 7am - 3pm

barriobakeryvt.com/holiday-menu

!

197 North Winooski Avenue 863-8278 BarrioBakeryVt.com

39 Esplanade in Richmond, VT (next to the park)

(802)434-7770

11/23/1512v-oneradish113016.indd 1:58 PM 1

12v-barrio112515.indd 1

Gallery II in Johnson, Kennedy combines

11/28/16 2:29 PM

Get warm from the inside out... Bring in your gently worn winter coat, we’ll give it to someone who needs it, and you’ll receive ,

20% Off a New Coat

May not be combined with other offers or promotions.

102 Church Street | 864-0414 | w w w . e x p r e s s i o n s v t . c o m

the Vermont Studio Center visual-arts

bricolage to manipulate assumptions of a

coordinator and artist-in-residence, “one

single location and singular viewpoint. A

that allows us to reconsider the beliefs that

reception is Thursday, December 1, 7 p.m.

we bring to what we see.” In “Something

Through December 15. Pictured: “Framed

Fully Itself,” which opens this week at VSC’s

Between Two Others.”

« P.81

11/28/16 1:26 PM

‘SHEDDING LIGHT ON THE WORKING FOREST’: An exhibition of paintings by visual artist Kathleen Kolb and poetry by Verandah Porche. Through December 31. Info, 828-0749. Vermont Supreme Court Gallery in Montpelier.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

stowe/smuggs

 CECIL GERRY AND KYLE SELMER: “Orchestrating the Truth,” a thesis exhibition of puppets and abstract expressionist paintings. Reception: Thursday, December 1, 3-5 p.m. Through December 9. Info, 635-1224. Dibden Center for the Arts, Johnson State College.

11.30.16-12.07.16

ERIC TOBIN & MARILYN JAMES: “Two Views of Vermont,” interpretations of the local landscape. Through December 31. Info, 253-1818. Green Mountain Fine Art Gallery in Stowe. KENT SHAW: “Retro Looks,” an exhibition of works by the Elmore photographer. Through January 3. Info, 888-1261. Morrisville Post Office.

mad river valley/waterbury

SEVEN DAYS

AXEL’S HOLIDAY GROUP EXHIBITION: The annual group exhibition features works by Vermont artists Kelly Holt, Christian Magnani, Marilyn Ruseckas, Gerald K. Stoner, Athena Petra Tasiopoulos and Larry Weinstein. Through January 7. Info, 244-7801. Axel’s Gallery & Frame Shop in Waterbury.

Untitled-20 1

82 ART

wall-mounted collages use distortion and

 MARY ADMASIAN: “Shadowlands,” an exhibition of paintings, small sculptures and assemblages. Photo ID required for entry into the gallery. Reception: Friday, December 2, 4:30-7 p.m. Through December 30. Info, 828-5657. Governor’s Gallery in Montpelier.

a donation will also be made to COTS.

Untitled-9 1

an alternative definition of reality,” says

BARRE/MONTPELIER SHOWS

Offer good through December 16

Clothes for Women

Dave Kennedy “We need

layered photocopies of his own photographs

Say you saw it in...

mini2col-sawit-3Dcmyk.indd 1

3/14/16 10:34 AM

NOW IN sevendaysvt.com

3D!

1/12/10 9:51:52 AM

JUDY DODDS: A retrospective exhibition featuring works in a variety of mediums, including handdyed and woven fabric, appliqué and quilted wall hangings, and hooked rugs by the octogenarian artist. Through December 30. Info, 496-6682. Vermont Festival of the Arts Gallery in Waitsfield. MICHELLE TURBIDE: “Fragments,” a collection of colorful acrylic paintings featuring narratives inspired by nature and dreamscapes. Through December 1. Info, 244-6606. Waterbury Congregational Church.

with small objects. These large-scale,

middlebury area

‘BLOOM AND DOOM: VISUAL EXPRESSIONS AND REFORM IN VIENNA 1900’: Exhibition of works by Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele and other members of the Viennese Secession, which illuminate how these individuals rejected the traditional academic system and turned to new means of expression. Through December 11. Info, 443-3168. Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College. JACKSON GALLERY HOLIDAY SHOW: Unique and affordable works made by 22 regional artists. Through December 31. Info, 382-9222. Jackson Gallery, Town Hall Theater, in Middlebury. MIKA INGERMAN: “Primped and Pugnacious: A Fusion of Fish and Fashion,” a multimedia series by the Burlington illustrator that explores male bio-ornamentation and the aesthete’s experience. Through November 30. Info, 453-3280. The Bristol Bakery and Café. ‘POST POP: PRINTS OF KEITH HARING’: An exhibition of select, limited-edition prints on loan from the Keith Haring Foundation. Through December 11. Info, 443-3168. Middlebury College Museum of Art. ‘SEVEN ARTISTS FOR OUR SEVENTH BIRTHDAY: A SMALL WORKS SHOW’: Works on view from Amy Brnger, Irma Cerese, Michael Egan, CJ Hockett, Sara Katz, Hannah Sessions and Patty Sgrecci. Through December 31. Info, 458-0098. Edgewater Gallery at Middlebury Falls. SILKSCREEN PRINTS: Works by students of Hedya Klein’s ART318 class. Through December 6. Info, 443-3168. Johnson Memorial Building, Middlebury College. ‘WOODEN WONDERS’: Celebrating Vermont’s history as a wood manufacturer, this exhibition features a variety of historical toys. Through January 14. Info, 388-2117. Henry Sheldon Museum of Vermont History in Middlebury.

rutland/killington

‘THE SPIRIT OF THE SEASON: MY FAVORITE THINGS’: Artist guild members share works, including framed original art, giclée prints, jewelry, wood, clay, mixed media and glass, as well as handmade ornaments. Through January 31. Info, 247-4956. Brandon Artists Guild.


Accessories She’ll Adore!

ART SHOWS

Jewelry, Knits, and so much more!

‘SURFACE EXPRESSIONS’: Fourteen Vermont members of the international Surface Design Association present works in fiber, textiles and mixed media in two and three dimensions. Through December 9. Info, 775-0356. Chaffee Art Center in Rutland.

‘WALKING DOHA’: Photographs of Doha, Qatar, by Maria French. Through November 30. Info, maria@mariadayphotography.com. School for International Training Graduate Institute in Brattleboro.

upper valley

manchester/bennington

GUEST ARTISTS: The gallery welcomes master knitter Rachel Kahn, illustrator Zoë Tilley Poster, polymer clay jeweler Mindy Jackson-Jefferys and woodworker Detlev Hundsdorfer. Through December 31. Info, 235-9429. Collective — the Art of Craft in Woodstock. MARGARET JACOBS: “Lost and Found,” an exhibition of sculpture honoring Native American symbols and spirituality, made from materials including deer hair, porcupine quills and leather. Through November 30. Info, scavenger.gallery@gmail.com. Scavenger Gallery in White River Junction. SARAH SMITH: An exhibition featuring the results of the artist’s self-imposed challenge to draw and post one drawing every day for a year. Through November 30. Info, 356-2776. Main Street Museum in White River Junction. SETH HARPER GOODWIN: “Images of the Soviet Union, 1988,” an exhibition of photographs documenting the waning days of the former USSR. Through January 13. Info, 649-1184. Norwich Public Library. SUE SCHILLER & NANCY WIGHTMAN: “It Takes Two,” new hand-pulled prints including traditional etchings, collagraphs and 3D multiplate prints. Through November 30. Info, 295-5901. Two Rivers Printmaking Studio in White River Junction. ‘THROUGH THE EYES OF LITTLE VILLAGE’: Landscapes of the Upper Valley by members of the artist group Odanaksis (Abenaki term for “little village”): Jo Tate, Susan Rump, Jonathan Rose, Anne Rose, Anne Hartmann, Anne Webster Grant, Helen Elder, Alexandra Corwin, Becky Cook and Gail Barton. Through December 10. Hartland Public Library.

northeast kingdom

KYLE GRAY: Photographs taken around the world. Through December 20. Info, 525-3366. Parker Pie Co. in West Glover.

‘X-RAY VISION: FISH INSIDE OUT’: A traveling exhibition from the Smithsonian Institution featuring 40 large-scale digital prints of X-rays of several species of fish. Through June 1. Info, 748-2372. Fairbanks Museum and Planetarium in St. Johnsbury.

brattleboro/okemo valley

 ‘FIGURATION’: An exhibition of paintings by Randolph artist Mark Goodwin and Contoocook, N.H., artist Lucy Mink-Covello.  FULVIO TESTA: “Landscape and Figure,” watercolor paintings by the Italy-born painter. Reception: Saturday, December 17, 3-5 p.m. Through February 14. Info, 767-9670. BigTown Gallery in Rochester. HOLIDAY MARKET: Annual event featuring a wide array of gifts made by local artists and artisans. Through December 21. Info, 431-0204. Chandler Center for the Arts in Randolph. LOUIS C. CHAP: A retrospective exhibition of commercial art, paintings and other works by the late Stockbridge artist. Through February 18. Info, 763-7094. Royalton Memorial Library in South Royalton.

outside vermont

‘ARTISTS OF THE MOHAWK HUDSON REGION’: Eightieth annual exhibition, featuring 126 works by 106 regional artists. Guest curated by Michael Oatman. ‘TRANSFORMING THE HYDE: THE FEIBES & SCHMITT GIFT’: An exhibition featuring works from the newly accessioned 160-piece collection donated by Werner Feibes and the late James Schmitt. The show expands the museum’s focus to include postwar nonobjective and abstract art. Through December 31. Info, 518-792-1761. The Hyde Collection in Glens Falls, N.Y. ‘SHE PHOTOGRAPHS’: An exhibition featuring 70 works by 30 contemporary women photographers, including Nan Goldin, Catherine Opie, Kiki Smith and Marnie Weber. Through February 19. ‘THE BLACK SUN OF MELANCHOLY: MONSTERS OF THE UNCONSCIOUS, FROM GOYA AND BLAKE TO REDON AND MUNCH’: Drawings and lithographs by 16 romantic artists who delved the depths of their imaginations to evoke strong feelings in the beholder. Through December 11. Info, 514-285-1600. Montréal Museum of Fine Arts. DEBORAH FRANKEL REESE: Exhibition of oil paintings by the late South Strafford artist, who passed away while preparing her final show. Through December 16. Info, 603-795-4909. Long River Gallery & Gifts in Lyme, N.H.

11/29/16 3:36 PM

ARE YOU A MAKER? Come to this years

MANUFACTURERS BALL December 2nd, 6 - 10:30 pm

WHY SHOULD YOU COME? START the effort of branding Vermont for our high quality manufacturing services and companies. BUILD a level of comradery among people and companies in the Vermont manufacturing scene. NETWORK with other manufacturing companies in Vermont to help each other grow. FREE tickets on eventbrite.com or send an email to info@hecoengineering.com The Barns at Lang Farm | 43 Upper Main Street| Essex, VT 05452

Memory more… Memory carecareandandmore...

6h-heccoltd113016.indd 1

11/28/16 2:35 PM

A new senior living community specializing in caring for people with

A new senior living community specializing in caring for people with Alzheimer’s, dementia and memory impairment. Alzheimer’s, dementia and memory impairment.

W W

e offer 24-hour affordable, 24-hour e offer affordable, support for for those who need those who support need everything from minimal assistance assistance toeverything those whofrom need minimal a high level of care. to those who need a high level of care.

• Large, sunny private or shared suites • Large, sunny private or shared suites • Tranquil garden court yards and patios • Tranquil garden court yards and patioscare • Person centered • Person centered care • Staff experienced with memory care • Staff experienced with memory care • Short term respite stays • Short term respite stays • Aging in place, including end of life care • Aging in place, including end of life care

Opening OpeningSoon! September

DIANNE SHULLENBERGER: An exhibition of works by the Vermont artist. Through December 31. Info, vtdianne@hotmail.com. Dartmouth-Hitchcock in Lebanon, N.H. ‘INNER SOUL: THE SCULPTURAL WORK OF LAWRENCE J. NOWLAN JR’: Figurative works by the late sculptor. Through December 31. Info, 603-4483117. AVA Gallery and Art Center in Lebanon, N.H. LAETITIA SOULIER: “The Fractal Architectures,” an exhibition of works by the contemporary French photographer. Through December 11. Info, 603-646-2426. Hood Downtown in Hanover, N.H. 

Call Carrie Shamel to schedule a visit. 802-872-1700 Call Carrie Shamel to schedule a visit. 6 Freeman Woods, Essex Jct., VT802-872-1700 6 Freeman Woods, Essex Jct., VT www.springvillageessex.com www.springvillageessex.com

Let Us Take the the Journey With You! Let Us Take Journey With You!

4t-springvillage092816.indd 1

9/22/16 1:36 PM

ART 83

‘FROM LUMINOUS SHADE’: Painter Margaret Lampe Kannenstine, poet Guiseppe Ungaretti and translator Ann McGarrell take viewers on a journey from despair to renewal, as they mourn the untimely passing of their sons. Through January 8. Info, 257-0124. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center.

BRENDA GARAND: “Touching at a Distance,” sculptures and paintings made with cold-rolled steel, flood clay, wool from the Johnson Woolen Mills, porcupine quills, walnut ink and black felt paper. Through January 15. Info, 498-8438. White River Gallery at BALE in South Royalton.

12h-hydrangea113016.indd 1

SEVEN DAYS

‘PORTRAIT OF A FOREST: MEN AND MACHINE’: An exhibition of contemporary photographs by Weybridge photojournalist George Bellerose, shown alongside archival photographs and commentary from the logging and forest products community. Through December 31. Info, 334-1966. MAC Center for the Arts Gallery in Newport.

randolph/royalton

199 College Street, Burlington 862-0707 • www.HydrangeaToo.com

11.30.16-12.07.16

‘MIRROR/MIRROR’: An exhibition reflecting upon the looking glass and all that it contains, from telescopes to magic tricks, disco balls to dentistry, fashion to psychotherapy, myth to superstition. Through May 1. Info, 626-4409. The Museum of Everyday Life in Glover.

WINTER MEMBER SHOW: Affordably priced paintings and photography by local artists. Through January 1. Info, 362-1405. Yester House Galleries, Southern Vermont Arts Center, in Manchester.

*excludes Barefoot Dreams products

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

TWO RIVERS PRINTMAKING: Hand-pulled prints by studio members that explore ambition and redemption, and the magic and passion of Macbeth and A Christmas Carol. Through December 31. Info, 295-5901. Barrette Center for the Arts in White River Junction.

‘HARMONIC RESONANCE: RETURN TO THE MYTHIC’: Works by Terry Hauptman and Hugh Joudry. LUIGI LUCIONI: “Within the Birch Grove,” oil paintings and etchings by the late Italian-born artist. Through December 11. Info, 362-1405. Elizabeth de C. Wilson Museum, Southern Vermont Arts Center, in Manchester.

20 EC DISCOUNT CODE: D

FP-0000400445

‘DINOSAUR REVOLUTION’: An interactive maze and hands-on learning experience that investigates all things dinosaur. Through January 1. ‘MAKING MUSIC: THE SCIENCE OF MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS’: An exhibition that explores the science behind making rhythms and harmonies heard. Through September 17. Info, 649-2200. Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich.

20% OFF*

1 full-price item with this ad! exp. 12/24/16


movies Rules Don’t Apply ★★★

I

n March, Warren Beatty will be 80. Eighteen years have passed since he last directed and starred in a film. That was Bulworth (1998), a political comedy that, let’s say, is unlikely to be among the movies for which he’ll be remembered. As I watched Beatty’s latest and possibly last project, I couldn’t help reflecting on how fast time flies. And wondering to what extent the average moviegoer is even aware of this living legend’s place in Hollywood history. Consider your typical X-Men: Apocalypse fan. Has he seen Bugsy (1991) or Dick Tracy (1990), much less Shampoo (1975), The Parallax View (1974) or the groundbreaking Bonnie and Clyde (1967)? Does he have a clue that, while Orson Welles made history by snagging Oscar nominations as actor, producer, writer and director of the same picture, Beatty is the only filmmaker ever to accomplish that feat twice? (The honors were for Heaven Can Wait [1978] and Reds [1981], the latter earning him an Academy Award for Best Director.) It’s a hell of a career — and there are worse ways to wrap it, I suppose, than with a project like Rules Don’t Apply. Still, Beatty didn’t do himself any favors by batting around the idea of a Howard Hughes film

for half a century. The delay allowed Martin Scorsese to beat him to the punch with The Aviator (2004). As a result, much of the ground covered in Rules seems familiar. Granted, this isn’t a biographical portrait but a love story that just happens to have Hughes looming over it. It’s the tale of an aspiring actress named Marla, played by Lily Collins (daughter of Phil), who gets signed to Hughes’ RKO Pictures and falls for her driver, Frank (Alden Ehrenreich). Studio contracts prohibited employees from entering into romantic relationships with each other, so much of the movie’s screwballish plot centers on the couple’s attempts to conceal their involvement. Beatty sets the romance in 1958 and plays the eccentric billionaire in his fifties, a stretch even for a 79-year-old in great shape. Most of his scenes are shot in neardarkness. His dye job isn’t particularly subtle. Then there’s the script’s jumbled timeline. In an apparent attempt to squeeze in as many of the tycoon’s greatest hits as possible, Beatty places various events in Hughes’ life within a few years of each other, including the near-fatal plane crash responsible for his codeine addiction, his halting of production on a picture because he didn’t like the design

PARTING SHOTS? Given the lengthy gestation period of his projects, this disappointing dramedy may well be Beatty’s curtain call.

of its star’s brassiere, his triumphant flying of the colossal Spruce Goose and the Clifford Irving hoax. In reality, those milestones were spread over 40 years. Even for an artist with Beatty’s gifts, it’s possible to overthink a project. That appears to be what happened with this film. Over the five decades it bounced around in the filmmaker’s brain, the concept changed countless times, from the original plan for a standard biopic to the good-natured goofball farce we have here. Beatty’s performance as Hughes is full of humor and high spirits, but it’s really only entertaining because the guy

was such a fascinating freak. There’s nothing new here except for the love story — and that, unfortunately, is a frequently silly, forgettable bit of fluff. As I say, there are worse ways to wrap a career. Still, we’re talking about Warren Beatty. The movie’s disastrous opening weekend had to be humiliating. Lots of filmmakers would be satisfied still to be in the game and calling shots at Beatty’s age. But something tells me this is a case in which that rule doesn’t apply. RI C K KI S O N AK

84 MOVIES

SEVEN DAYS

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Allied ★★★

W

hen I criticize a movie for its poorly fleshed-out characters, I sometimes get the response, “They don’t need depth. They’re iconic.” Fair enough. But a movie needs to earn “iconic” characters by being memorable in other ways — visually stunning, thematically resonant, devilishly twisty, something. Paying homage to movies that are iconic doesn’t wash as an excuse for trafficking in clichés. Director Robert Zemeckis wants us to buy Canadian intelligence officer Max Vatan (Brad Pitt), the protagonist of Allied, as an iconic figure. That’s clear from the very first scene, in which Vatan parachutes into the Moroccan desert and the camera slowly, slowly pivots around him. It’s even clearer in the scene in which Vatan and his fellow spy, Marianne Beauséjour (Marion Cotillard), consummate their passion in the middle of a sandstorm. But, for all its echoes of Casablanca and The English Patient, this World War II drama doesn’t earn the “iconic” label. At most, it’s a middling diversion with a void at the center. That void is Max Vatan, who never develops a personality beyond generic heroism and a desire to retire to Medicine Hat once the war is over. During the film’s first third, in which Max and Marianne impersonate a married couple and spearhead a daring plot to kill a Nazi ambassador, Cotillard frantically overworks her flirtatious wiles to make their every interaction into a double entendre. Pitt, meanwhile, just looks bored.

HERE’S LOOKIN’ AT YOU Zemeckis’ World War II drama has the surface appearance of a classic, but not the substance.

But apparently Max is charmed by their one-sided banter, because soon he’s asking the sultry French Resistance worker to marry him for real. The two settle down in London, where their Hampstead cottage is a refuge from the horrors of the Blitz — until Vatan’s superiors inform him that Marianne is a suspected double agent. If she’s found guilty, her husband will have to execute her himself. Zemeckis works up several visually striking, moderately thrilling set pieces, including a

baby’s birth during an air raid and the interruption of a boozy party by a careening Nazi plane. The film’s second half, set over a weekend as Max races to gather evidence of Marianne’s innocence, gains a degree of suspense and momentum from that “ticking clock” structure. Recurring shots of Max watching Marianne in mirrors evoke the confusion of appearance and reality inherent in the couple’s profession. Yet Steven Knight’s screenplay simply doesn’t provide enough depth or enough

twists to place Allied among the ranks of memorable espionage films. The supporting characters, often MVPs of this genre, are barely developed here, despite the casting of accomplished actors such as August Diehl, Jared Harris and Lizzy Caplan. The film’s main focus is not on the double-crossing and mind games but on the romance, and that’s a problem. While Max and Marianne get steamier sex scenes than Rick and Ilsa ever could have, their cinematic coupling isn’t one for the ages. We don’t feel the smoldering chemistry early on or the mature affection later; while her character is teasingly mysterious, his remains flat. And that flatness —  of both writing and performance — becomes a serious deficiency in the last section, when the whole film revolves around Max’s conflict between love and duty. Pitt still looks like the iconic wartime hero, but he doesn’t sell the anguish that would make us care. If there’s anything genuinely iconic about Allied, it’s the succession of silky and slinky dresses, robes and nightgowns that Cotillard wears. Costume designer Joanna Johnston deserves ample recognition at Oscar time, as does the production team that re-created the era in sumptuous detail. The movie looks like an epic, all right, but it plays like a Greatest Generation soap opera. MARGO T HARRI S O N


SHOP

MOVIE CLIPS

NEW IN THEATERS

CHANNEL 15

INCARNATE: Aaron Eckhart plays a hunky scientist who ventures into the brain of a demon-possessed kid after the usual exorcism methods fail in this horror flick from director Brad Peyton (San Andreas). With Carice van Houten and Catalina Sandino Moreno. (91 min, PG-13. Essex, Majestic)

NOW PLAYING ALLIEDHH1/2 In this World War II drama directed by Robert Zemeckis (The Walk), an army intelligence officer (Brad Pitt) begins to question the nature of his passionate relationship with a French resistance fighter (Marion Cotillard). (124 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 11/30)

LOCAL

BEING THE CHANGE— YOUTH ENRICHMENT PROGRAMS MONDAY > 8:30 P.M.

GET MORE INFO OR DOCTOR STRANGEHHH1/2 The latest Marvel WATCH ONLINE AT Avengers universe flick introduces neurosurgeon Stephen Strange (Benedict Cumberbatch), who VERMONTCAM.ORG gains eldritch powers from his explorations of the metaphysical realm. With Chiwetel Ejiofor and Rachel McAdams. Scott Derrickson (Sinister) 16T-VCAM113016.indd 1 11/29/16 16t-shoplocal-guy.indd 11:01 AM 1 directed. (115 min, PG-13)

and say you saw it in... 4/24/12 3:56 PM

THE EDGE OF SEVENTEENHHHH A high schooler (Hailee Steinfeld) deals with the awkwardness of her BFF dating her older brother in this coming-ofage comedy-drama from first-time feature director Kelly Fremon Craig. With Haley Lu Richardson and Kyra Sedgwick. (104 min, R)

ARRIVALHHHH1/2 In this sci-fi mystery from director Denis Villeneuve (Sicario), Amy Adams plays a linguist who must find a way to communicate with aliens before their sudden, unexplained presence causes global war. With Jeremy Renner and Forest Whitaker. (116 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 11/16) BAD SANTA 2HH In this sequel to the 2003 black comedy, Billy Bob Thornton reprises his role as a misanthrope who uses the Santa suit as a cover for crime. Kathy Bates, Tony Cox and Christina Hendricks also star. Mark Waters (Mean Girls) directed. (92 min, R)

FANTASTIC BEASTS AND WHERE TO FIND THEMHHH1/2 In this prequel of sorts to the Harry Potter series, writer Newt Scamander (Eddie Redmayne) explores New York’s underworld of witches and wizards in 1926. With Katherine Waterston, Alison Sudol, Johnny Depp and Colin Farrell. (133 min, PG-13) HACKSAW RIDGEHHH1/2 Mel Gibson directed this war-drama biopic about a World War II medic (Andrew Garfield) who was the first Conscientious Objector to receive the Medal of Honor. With Sam Worthington, Luke Bracey, Vince Vaughn and Teresa Palmer. (131 min, R)

BLEED FOR THISHHHH1/2 Miles Teller plays champion boxer Vinny Pazienza in this fact-based tale of his injury and comeback. Aaron Eckhard and Katey Sagal also star. Ben Younger (Boiler Room) directed. (116 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 11/23)

H = refund, please HH = could’ve been worse, but not a lot HHH = has its moments; so-so HHHH = smarter than the average bear HHHHH = as good as it gets

Gift certificates available online or in store.

MOANAHHHH A young girl (voiced by Auli’i Cravalho) who longs to escape her small island enlists the aid of the demigod Maui (Dwayne Johnson) in the latest Disney family animation, with songs cowritten by Hamilton’s Lin-Manuel Miranda. Ron Clements and John Musker (The Little Mermaid) directed. (113 min, PG) MOONLIGHTHHHH1/2 This acclaimed drama from director Barry Jenkins (Medicine for Melancholy) tells the story of a young African American growing from boy to man in a rough part of Miami. Mahershala Ali, Sharif Earp and Duane Sanderson star. (111 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 11/23)

NOW PLAYING

» P.87

116 CHURCH STREET • BURLINGTON • 865.4766 • STEPHENANDBURNS.COM GG4t-Stephenandburns112316.indd 1

11/15/16 1:55 PM

MOVIES 85

RATINGS ASSIGNED TO MOVIES NOT REVIEWED BY RICK KISONAK OR MARGOT HARRISON ARE COURTESY OF METACRITIC.COM, WHICH AVERAGES SCORES GIVEN BY THE COUNTRY’S MOST WIDELY READ MOVIE REVIEWERS.

relaxation GIVE THE GIFT OF

SEVEN DAYS

ratings

A MAN CALLED OVEHHH1/2 In this adaptation of the best-selling Swedish comic novel, a cantankerous widowed retiree (Rolf Lassgård) develops an unexpected friendship with his new neighbors. Hannes Holm directed. (116 min, PG-13)

11/28/16 1:40 PM

11.30.16-12.07.16

BILLY LYNN’S LONG HALFTIME WALKHH1/2 In this drama from director Ang Lee, a young soldier (Joe Alwyn) is fêted as a hero on his return from Iraq, but lacks the words to describe what he experienced. With Kristen Stewart, Garrett Hedlund and Chris Tucker. (110 min, R)

Untitled-13 1

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

LOVINGHHHH Jeff Nichols (Midnight Special) wrote and directed this biopic of Richard and Mildred Loving (Joel Edgerton and Ruth Negga), the couple whose 1967 Supreme Court case tested the state laws prohibiting interracial marriage. (123 min, PG-13)

Release Event Dec 10th INFO:www.greendistillers.com


movies

LOCALtheaters (*) = NEW THIS WEEK IN VERMONT. FOR UP-TO-DATE TIMES VISIT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/MOVIES.

LOOK UP SHOWTIMES ON YOUR PHONE!

GO TO SEVENDAYSVT.COM ON ANY SMARTPHONE FOR FREE, UP-TO-THE-MINUTE MOVIE SHOWTIMES, PLUS OTHER NEARBY RESTAURANTS, CLUB DATES, EVENTS AND MORE.

BIG PICTURE THEATER

48 Carroll Rd. (off Rte. 100), Waitsfield, 496-8994, bigpicturetheater.info

SEVEN DAYS

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

wednesday 30 — sunday 4 Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them Moana

BIJOU CINEPLEX 4 Rte. 100, Morrisville, 888-3293, bijou4.com

wednesday 30 — thursday 1 Bad Santa 2 Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them Moana Trolls friday 2 — thursday 8 Schedule not available at press time.

CAPITOL SHOWPLACE 93 State St., Montpelier, 229-0343, fgbtheaters.com

wednesday 30 — thursday 8 Allied Arrival Doctor Strange (2D & 3D) Moana (2D & 3D) Rules Don’t Apply

ESSEX CINEMAS & T-REX THEATER

21 Essex Way, #300, Essex, 879-6543, essexcinemas.com

wednesday 30 — thursday 1 Allied Arrival Bad Santa 2 Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk Bleed for This Doctor Strange The Edge of Seventeen Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (2D & 3D) Moana (2D & 3D) Rules Don’t Apply Trolls friday 2 — thursday 8 Allied Arrival Bad Santa 2 Doctor Strange Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (2D & 3D) *Incarnate Moana (2D & 3D) Rules Don’t Apply Trolls

MAJESTIC 10

190 Boxwood St. (Maple Tree Place, Taft Corners), Williston, 878-2010, majestic10.com

86 MOVIES

wednesday 30 — thursday 1 Allied Arrival Bad Santa 2 Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk

Hacksaw Ridge

Doctor Strange The Edge of Seventeen Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (2D & 3D) Hacksaw Ridge Moana (2D & 3D) Trolls

Doctor Strange Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them Loving Moonlight Rules Don’t Apply

friday 2 — thursday 8

Arrival Doctor Strange Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them Loving A Man Called Ove Moonlight Rules Don’t Apply

Allied Arrival Bad Santa 2 Doctor Strange The Edge of Seventeen Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (2D & 3D) Hacksaw Ridge *Incarnate Moana (2D & 3D) Trolls

MARQUIS THEATRE Main St., Middlebury, 388-4841, middleburymarquis.com

wednesday 30 — thursday 1 Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them Moana friday 2 — thursday 8 Schedule not available at press time.

MERRILL’S ROXY CINEMA

222 College St., Burlington, 864-3456, merrilltheatres.net

wednesday 30 — thursday 1 Arrival

friday 2 — thursday 8

PALACE 9 CINEMAS

10 Fayette Dr., South Burlington, 8645610, palace9.com

wednesday 30 — thursday 1 Allied Arrival Bad Santa 2 Bleed for This Doctor Strange Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them Hacksaw Ridge Moana **RiffTrax Holiday Special Double Feature (Thu only) Rules Don’t Apply **TCM Presents: Breakfast at Tiffany’s (Wed only) Trolls friday 2 — thursday 8 Allied Arrival Bad Santa 2

Doctor Strange Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (2D & 3D) Hacksaw Ridge **Met Opera: The Magic Flute (Sat only) Moana (2D & 3D) **National Theatre Live: War Horse (Thu only) **Nerdland: The Special Event (Tue only) Rules Don’t Apply **Stratford Festival: Antony and Cleopatra (Sun only) Trolls (2D & 3D)

PARAMOUNT TWIN CINEMA

241 North Main St., Barre, 479-9621, fgbtheaters.com

STOWE CINEMA 3 PLEX

Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-4678. stowecinema.com

wednesday 30 — thursday 1 Arrival Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (2D & 3D) Moana (2D & 3D) friday 2 — thursday 8 Schedule not available at press time.

SUNSET DRIVE-IN

155 Porters Point Rd., Colchester, 8621800. sunsetdrivein.com

Closed for the season.

wednesday 30 — thursday 8 Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (2D & 3D) Trolls (2D & 3D)

THE SAVOY THEATER 26 Main St., Montpelier, 229-0598, savoytheater.com

wednesday 30 — thursday 8 Dancer (starting Fri) A Man Called Ove Moonlight

WELDEN THEATRE

104 No. Main St., St. Albans, 527-7888, weldentheatre.com

wednesday 30 — thursday 1 Doctor Strange Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them Moana friday 2 — thursday 8 Allied Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them Moana (except Wed) Trolls (Sat & Sun only)


MOVIE CLIPS MORRISVILLE CEREBRAL PALSY GROUP

NOW PLAYING

« P.85

Presents

1st Annual

LAMOILLE COUNTY CEREBRAL PALSY CONFERENCE

RULES DON’T APPLYHHH Warren Beatty wrote and directed this romantic comedy, set in 1958, about an aspiring actress and a chauffeur who both work for the reclusive millionaire Howard Hughes, played by Beatty himself. Lily Collins and Alden Ehrenreich star. (126 min, PG-13; reviewed by R.K. 11/30) THE BFGHHH1/2 Steven Spielberg directed this Disney adaptation of Roald Dahl’s quirky fantasy about a young girl (Ruby Barnhill) who befriends a “Big Friendly Giant” (Mark Rylance, aided by CGI). (117 min, PG) TROLLSHHH When the shiny, happy Trolls are menaced by a race of pessimistic ogres, only a cheerful Troll princess (voiced by Anna Kendrick) and an anomalous Troll grouch (Justin Timberlake) can save them. Walt Dohrn and Mike Mitchell directed the DreamWorks family animation. (92 min, PG)

NOW ON VIDEO

December 8 9AM – 3PM VFW Post 9653 Morrisville, VT

DON’T BREATHEHHHH1/2 A team of young thieves break into the house of a blind veteran (Stephen Lang) in this horror thriller directed by Fede Alvarez. (88 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 8/31)

THE 802 BRACELET • Continental Breakfast • Compliemtary Lunch • Open to the Public

More movies!

Film series, events and festivals at venues other than cinemas can be found in the calendar section.

OFFBEAT FLICK OF THE WEEK B Y MARGOT HARRI SON

HANDCRAFTED FINE JEWELRY

Hosted by

PETE’S DRAGONHHH1/2 Disney offers a remake of its 1977 family adventure flick about an orphan (Oakes Fegley) whose best friend is a dragon visible to him alone. David Lowery directed. (102 min, PG)

ABSOLUTELY FABULOUS: THE MOVIEHHH1/2 Jennifer Saunders and Joanna Lumley star in this big-screen follow-up to their UK TV comedy. (90 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 7/27)

RAINTREE

Empowering Neighbors with Disabilities to be at Home in the Community

8v-greenmountainsupportservices113016.indd 1

HANDMADE IN VERGENNES

raintreevt.com 802.430.4825 165 Main Street Vergennes, VT

11/22/168V-raintree113016.indd 2:57 PM 1

11/28/16 10:53 AM

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

GROW

11.30.16-12.07.16

Dancer

Offbeat Flick of the Week: We pick an indie, foreign, cultish or just plain odd movie that hits local theaters, DVD or video on demand this week. If you want an alternative to the blockbusters, try this!

Spring classes at Community College of Vermont REGISTER NOW AT CCV.EDU/SPRING

sevendaysvt.com/liveculture.

Untitled-40 1

11/15/16 5:07 PM

MOVIES 87

READ THESE EACH WEEK ON THE LIVE CULTURE BLOG AT

SEVEN DAYS

'Tis the season for matinees of The Nutcracker, but dance fans will also want to catch this documentary about the "bad boy of ballet." Born in poverty in the Ukraine, Sergei Polunin was the youngest-ever principal dancer at London's Royal Ballet. Later, he'd become known not only for prize pirouettes but for tattoos, erratic behavior and a starring role in a viral video. The Los Angeles Times calls Steven Cantor's doc "a gentle inquiry into how a gifted performer disrupts his life in order to test his passion." Starts Friday at the Savoy Theater in Montpelier.


fun stuff

FRAN KRAUSE

88 FUN STUFF

SEVEN DAYS

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Have a deep, dark fear of your own? Submit it to cartoonist Fran Krause at deep-dark-fears.tumblr.com, and you may see your neurosis illustrated in these pages.

EDIE EVERETTE


MORE FUN! STRAIGHT DOPE (P.27) CROSSWORD (P.C-5) CALCOKU & SUDOKU (P.C-7)

Great Food = Better Meetings

IONA FOX

Always fresh, plentiful and punctual.

THESNAPVT.COM

4t-sugarsnap101916.indd 1

Eating healthy is easy at

10/17/16 10:29 AM

THE BAGEL PLACE

with our real Egg White Sandwich on your choice of bagel or toast

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 11.30.16-12.07.16

BRING IN THIS AD FOR 15% OFF YOUR ENTIRE PURCHASE Expires December 31, 2016

SEVEN DAYS

• Choose from over 20 types of bagels and 15+ cream cheeses made fresh in-house daily. • Breakfast sandwiches available all day. • Uncommon Grounds coffee, soups, salads, pastries & more!

TO SUBMIT, GO TO: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOKE.

Open 6am-4pm Mon-Sat and 7am-4pm on Sundays 1166 Williston Road, South Burlington (next to Gadue’s) www.thebagelplacevt.com • 802-497-2058 4t-TheBagelPlace113016.indd 1

11/28/16 12:10 PM

FUN STUFF 89

Calling All Jokers!

What if we told you that you could share your jokes with the world?


90 FUN STUFF

SEVEN DAYS 11.30.16-12.07.16 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

fun stuff

JEN SORENSEN

RACHEL LIVES HERE NOW HARRY BLISS


REAL FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY DECEMBER 1—7

this declaration by Oscar-winning Taurus actress Audrey Hepburn: “I’m a long way from the human being I’d like to be, but I’ve decided I’m not so bad after all.” Here are other thoughts to draw on during the festivities: 1. “If you aren’t good at loving yourself, you will have a difficult time loving anyone.” —Barbara De Angelis. 2. “The hardest challenge is to be yourself in a world where everyone is trying to make you be somebody else.” —E. E. Cummings. 3. “To accept ourselves as we are means to value our imperfections as much as our perfections.” —Sandra Bierig. 4. “We cannot change anything until we accept it.” —Carl Jung.

SAGITTARIUS NOV. 22-DEC. 21:

A journalist dared composer John Cage to “summarize himself in a nutshell.” Cage said, “Get yourself out of whatever cage you find yourself in.” He might have added, “Avoid the nutshells that anyone tries to put you in.” This is always fun work to attend to, of course, but I especially recommend it to you Sagittarians right now. You’re in the time of year that’s close to the moment when you first barged out of your mom’s womb, where you had been housed for months. The coming weeks will be an excellent phase to attempt a similar if somewhat less extravagant trick.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): For you Tauruses, December is “I Accept and Love and Celebrate Myself Exactly How I Am Right Now” Month. To galvanize yourself, play around with

orative projects (including the romantic kind) evolving at a slower pace than you expected? Have they not grown as deep and strong as you’ve wished they would? If so, I hope you’re perturbed about it. Maybe that will motivate you to stop tolerating the stagnation. Here’s my recommendation: Don’t adopt a more serious and intense attitude. Instead, get loose and frisky. Inject a dose of blithe spirits into your togetherness, maybe even some high jinks and rowdy experimentation. The cosmos has authorized you to initiate ingenious surprises.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): I don’t recommend that you buy a cat-o’-nine-tails and whip yourself in a misguided effort to exorcize your demons. The truth is, those insidious troublemakers exult when you abuse yourself. They draw perverse sustenance from it. In fact, their strategy is to fool you into treating yourself badly. So, no. If you hope to drive away the saboteurs huddled in the sacred temple of your psyche, your best bet is to shower yourself with tender care, even luxurious blessings. The pests won’t like that, and — if you commit to this crusade for an extended time — they will eventually flee. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Nobel Prize-winning novelist Gabriel García Márquez loved yellow roses. He often had a fresh bloom on his writing desk as he worked, placed there every morning by his wife Mercedes Barcha. In accordance with the astrological omens, I invite you to consider initiating a com-

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “For a year I watched as something entered and then left my body,” testified Jane Hirshfield in her poem “The Envoy.” What was that mysterious something? Terror or happiness? She didn’t know. Nor could she decipher “how it came in” or “how it went out.” It hovered “where words could not reach it. It slept where light could not go.” Her experience led her to conclude that “There are openings in our lives of which we know nothing.” I bring this meditation to your attention, Virgo, because I suspect you are about to tune in to a mysterious opening. But unlike Hirshfield, I think you’ll figure out what it is. And then you will respond to it with verve and intelligence.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A reporter at the magazine Vanity Fair asked David Bowie, “What do you consider your greatest achievement?” Bowie didn’t name any of his albums, videos or performances. Rather, he answered, “Discovering morning.” I suspect that you Libras will attract and generate marvels if you experiment with accomplishments like that in the coming weeks. So yes, try to discover or rediscover morning. Delve into the thrills of beginnings. Magnify your appreciation for natural wonders that you usually take for granted. Be seduced by sources that emanate light and heat. Gravitate toward what’s fresh, blossoming, just in its early stages. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): According to tra-

ditional astrology, you Scorpios are not prone to optimism. You’re more often portrayed as connoisseurs of smoldering enigmas and shadowy intrigue and deep questions. But one of the most creative and successful Scorpios of the 20th century did not completely fit this description. French artist Claude Monet was renowned for his delightful paintings of sensuous outdoor landscapes. “Every day I discover even more beautiful things,” he testified. “It is intoxicating me, and I want to paint it all. My head is bursting.” Monet is your patron saint in

the coming weeks. You will have more potential to see as he did than you’ve had in a long time.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Hundreds of

years ago, the Catholic Church’s observance of Lent imposed a heavy burden. During this sixweek period, extending from Ash Wednesday to Easter Sunday, believers were expected to cleanse their sins through acts of self-denial. For example, they weren’t supposed to eat meat on Fridays. Their menus could include fish, however. And this loophole was expanded even further in the 17th century when the Church redefined beavers as being fish. (They swim well, after all.) I’m in favor of you contemplating a new loophole in regard to your own self-limiting behaviors, Capricorn. Is there a taboo you observe that no longer makes perfect sense? Out of habit, do you deny yourself a pleasure or indulgence that might actually be good for you? Wriggle free of the constraints.

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “The Pacific Ocean was overflowing the borders of the map,” wrote Pablo Neruda in his poem “The Sea.” “There was no place to put it,” he continued. “It was so large, wild and blue that it didn’t fit anywhere. That’s why it was left in front of my window.” This passage is a lyrical approximation of what your life could be like in 2017. In other words, lavish, elemental, expansive experiences will be steadily available to you. Adventures that may have seemed impossibly big and unwieldy in the past will be just the right size. And it all begins soon.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “I have a deep

fear of being too much,” writes poet Michelle K. “That one day I will find my someone, and they will realize that I am a hurricane. That they will step back and be intimidated by my muchness.” Given the recent astrological omens, Pisces, I wouldn’t be shocked if you’ve been having similar feelings. But now here’s the good news: Given the astrological omens of the next nine months, I suspect the odds will be higher than usual that you’ll encounter brave souls who’ll be able to handle your muchness. They may or may not be soul mates or your one and only. I suggest you welcome them as they are, with all of their muchness.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “I frequently tramped eight or ten miles through the deepest snow,” wrote naturalist Henry David Thoreau in Walden, “to keep an appointment with a beech-tree, or a yellow birch, or an old acquaintance among the pines.” I’d love to see you summon that level of commitment to your important rendezvous in the coming weeks, Aries. Please keep in mind, though, that your “most important rendezvous” are more likely to be with wild things, unruly wisdom or primal breakthroughs than with pillars of stability, committee meetings and business as usual.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Are your collab-

parable ritual. Is there a touch of beauty you would like to inspire you on a regular basis? Is there a poetic gesture you could faithfully perform for a person you love?

CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES & DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES: REALASTROLOGY.COM OR 1-877-873-4888

sponsored by:

SEVEN DAYS FUN STUFF 91

...AND LOVIN’ IT!

30, 2016 November siness u B On Small e owners th , ay Saturd Pig of the Flying Shelburne in Bookstore the store’s celebrated sary, 20th anniver dy ea st joined by a nds and ie fr f o stream stomers. longtime cu

Watch at sevendaysvt.com

4h-stuck-lovn113016.indd 1

11.30.16-12.07.16

Eva Sollberger’s

NEW VIDEO!

11/29/16 3:56 PM


TIME FOR FUN I am fit, intelligent, caring, have a good sense of humor and, of course, am humble, too. All of these I hope to find in my partner. Hope to hear from you soon. itistime, 46, l

For relationships, dates and flirts: dating.sevendaysvt.com

WOMEN Seeking MEN

CURIOUS I enjoy keeping my mind open to learning as much as I can about the world we live in today, as well as the past. Ideally, I would like to have a kind and intelligent partner as part of my life. I am on the serious side and like being responsible. Take care. giveitago, 60, l NATURE LOVER, FAMILY FIRST, PASSIONATE Ready to get out and have some fun. Looking for company to hike, paddle, go out for coffee or wine, and enjoy live music and baseball. I love to go camping and travel. My needs are simple. I consider myself low maintenance, and I’m easy to get along with. Enjoying my life, though I would like to share it with someone special. vtgal56, 56, l ENERGETIC YET A SOFT LANDING Belly laughs and honesty are my quest. Petite and active, am drawn to the outdoors yet equally enjoy dinner out, a movie or a good book. Even if there is not a weak-in-the-knees spark, good conversation with a new acquaintance is fun! Aethereal, 61, l

92 PERSONALS

SEVEN DAYS

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

FUN, ACTIVE, KINDHEARTED I’m an upbeat, caring, thoughtful woman who loves her friends and family. I work out daily and love being outdoors (if it’s not too cold). I enjoy being active and like hiking and kayaking as well as shopping and eating out. I like being chill at home, too. Watching TV and talking with others sounds awesome! VTJourney, 46, l FUNNY, ADVENTURER, TRAVELER, LATINA I’m looking to meet people in Burlington. I’ll be there some days this November. Let’s go to a coffee shop or just walk around. BeckyMx, 33, l SHY GIRL LOOKING FOR FUN I like going for hikes, reading, watching movies. I am honest and shy. I am slightly overweight. I am 5’6. I am kind. I am a fan of “Doctor Who” as well as other TV shows that I enjoy watching. Looking to have fun. Looking for friendship, dating or anything else you have in mind. SazarMoose, 23, l SASSY Oh, jeez. I am so delightful, it’s bursting at the seams. LOL. OK, on a serious note: My friends all tell me I am funny and a lot of fun to hang out with, for the most part. I like to do most anything. Not hard to please. realmenonly, 50 LOVING, HONEST, CARING Easygoing, likes walks, rides, visiting family/friends, four-wheeling, fishing, camping, beaches, music, a couple of drinks after work or on a weekend — don’t need to be out all night. Looking for a nice, honest, loyal man who is financially stable. Not into drama or games. NiceVTgal, 49, l EVER GRATEFUL I believe that the secret to happiness is being aware of, and grateful for, all that

I already have. I’m looking for a partner who believes in keeping a balance between work and play; enjoys travel; stays moderately fit; and appreciates the simplest things in life, like a walk through Red Rocks Park or cooking dinner together in the evening. winter_wonderland, 50, l LOOKING FOR FUN PARTNER I’m a good catch; are you fishing? I’m positive, happy, cultured, educated and financially stable. Looking for same in a man. Would like to travel. activebarb, 67, l CONSCIOUS, ACTIVE, KIND, CURIOUS, REWILD Grateful Earth tender happy to live in this village town. While concerned about the sixth great extinction, working to decolonize and advocate for justice, I also revel in forest bathing, hiking, canoeing, bicycling, dancing, ancient skills, circling, and playing music. While rewilding our home, teaching, mentoring and researching, I welcome a sweet playmate and friends to share and explore. tendinghearth, 41, l COUGAR SEEKING MALE ENERGY Attractive, in-shape, independent cougar with a full and active life. Only thing missing is male energy! Looking for companionship and possible romance. Enjoy walking, snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, cooking, wine, traveling and more. vtgirl7, 61, l HAPPY, ACTIVE AND SLIGHTLY GEEKY I grew up thinking of myself as an athlete who was smart. As I’ve aged I realize I’m really a geek who is athletic. Enjoy a variety of creative activities, reading and spending time outside. I love Bloom County! Prefer to hang out with a few good friends. Looking for someone who can make me dissolve into laughter. 12skiVT, 53, l

CURIOUS? You read Seven Days, these people read Seven Days — you already have at least one thing in common!

All the action is online. Browse more than 2,000 local singles with profiles including photos, voice messages, habits, desires, views and more. It’s free to place your own profile online. Don't worry, you'll be in good company.

l

See photos of this person online.

KINDHEARTED OUTDOOR ADVENTURER Love the outdoors, hiking, sailing, camping and traveling. Enjoy the arts, movies, theater and reading. I love to laugh. Looking for someone to share some adventures and laughs! Arts_and_Leisure, 56, l SWEET, REAL AND FUN I am a positive, moving-towardsolutions girl. Love to ski, bike and lots of stuff: garden a little, read and love, love movies. Caterina, 51 HAPPY PILGRIM SEEKING COMPANION I am a happy person who loves life. I value intelligence, character, a sense of humor and a sense of fun. I get outside as much as possible. I love to explore new places near or far. I am a widow, and I would love to find someone to be my companion on the journey. Camino17, 59, l CURIOUS, ENERGETIC, HAPPY Life has been one long, exciting adventure, and this former city girl has found her new life in Vermont as a “retired person” — not tiring. I’m a former artist, and now I write for a living. Would love to find an open-minded man who is healthy, active and still appreciates what’s good in the world. CLC, 71, l

MEN Seeking WOMEN

BROKEN SOUL Lost the best years of my life on someone who only thought of themselves. Looking to find that spark that I know exists. Deerhunter, 50 LUMBERJACK LOOKING FOR LUMBERJILL Never married; no kids. Like to be in love and make love. Would rather relax at home or camp with my girl than be out for the night. Kiss and hug are must-have daily components. Lumberjack1, 47, l SUCCESFUL, HAPPY AND ACTIVE LOOKING I am a successful and happy entrepreneur. Would love to find a great lady to share my time and successes, as well as hers. Not looking to take care of someone and don’t need to be taken care of. Just a kind, romantic and sexy lady would work. If this is anything that interests you, send me a note. duke7487, 65 GNARLY CHARLIE I am looking for the one person I cannot live without. The one person, regardless of what has happened in the past, I cannot forget. The one whose kiss, whose hug, whose voice made all the difference. There is nothing I want more than to just make up with you, no matter what it takes. EmpireStateOfMind, 25 A WORKING TITLE I am looking for somebody who is creative and enjoys crafting/making and also is up for an occasional hike or other outdoor fun. When I go to the movies, I tend to favor comedies the most and really enjoy standup. Clyde, 35, l

EASYGOING SMARTASS I prefer to be smiling and laughing. I want the affection and passion that come with a healthy relationship. Flatlander06, 47 FIT, FASCINATING AND FUN Sorry, I’m not Clint Eastwood. I am a good-looking guy with a good heart. If we meet, you will be beautiful and interesting, because everyone is. I will listen to all you have to say, and I will care. If we don’t meet again, we will never forget each other. Isn’t that how it should be? Simplynice, 68, l LOOKING TO TRAVEL Looking for an honest and faithful woman who knows what she wants in life. Willing to do some traveling. Looking for someone to join me for romantic candlelit dinners or cuddling on a couch with a good movie. readytogo, 67, l MOVING TO CANADA? Fit, active, late 50s (look and feel younger!), down-to-earth, self-employed cultural worker in Montréal. If you’re moving to Canada (I feel your pain), you’ll be needing new friends and a local guide. You like reading, biking, hiking and simple pleasures? You ideally speak more than one language (for its own sake), are kind and whipsmart? ’Twould be nice to meet. Canuck_Amuck, 58 BIKING VT NIRVANA I am a kind and understanding person. I do my best to listen to the other person who accompanies me. My interests are in bicycling, crosscountry skiing, snowshoeing, hiking. I am looking for someone for dating that will turn into a LTR eventually. Independent films and attending live music events. I can share your interest, too. I love animals, too. beman, 62, l LAUGH, LOVE, TRAVEL, 420, SNOWBOARD Always up for adventure! Honesty is key. Looking for mutual attraction and someone who wants to blaze, listen to music and hook up. Diseasefree and respectful. I’m a nice guy until you get naked. ;) ridevt06, 28 WANTS TO HAVE FUN I want a person who enjoys me for what I am: a hardworking guy who wants to enjoy life and no drama. Hdc2004, 54 SEER SEEKING INTUITIVE, IMAGINATIVE MINGLING Looking for good conversation and times hanging out and talking about everything from quantum holographic universe to UFOs and paranormal stuff. I love science, but I grew up in a haunted house, so I know there is more out there. I am a 49-y/o off-grid hardened native Vermonter who does holistic healing. LifepathWanderer, 28, l I’M A TRUE RENAISSANCE MAN! I strive to live life to its fullest. I am very much a Renaissance man with many interests and talents. I enjoy being outdoors and communing with nature, whether it be skiing or hiking, kayaking, cycling, etc. I love it all. I enjoy traveling to lands unknown and discovering what wonders are to be found, including the food! InkedGRNMTNBOY, 29, l

GOOD OLE VERMONT BOY I’m a bigger guy. I’m shy until I get to know you. I have a great personality. I like to make people laugh and sit down by the lake. I’m just looking for someone who won’t judge me. Someone to hang out with and make me laugh. But if you want to know more about me, you should message me. Bigtank209, 24, l BOLD BOHEMIAN I enjoy being active and outdoors in nature as much as possible. I like to be artistic and creative with my hands. I am not afraid to stand up for the things that I believe in, especially when it has to do with the natural environment or human rights. I look forward to meeting a lady who has similar interests. Content, 62, l

WOMEN Seeking WOMEN LOVE, DESIRE, SPIRIT, GROWTH, FUN I am a very open-minded womon looking for other very open-minded womyn for friendship or friendship caught on fire (love). I have loads of experience. You don’t need experience, just an open mind. I’ll talk your ear off or chew on it if there’s a spark between us and turn that spark into a raging fire! polyspiritRU12, 53, l UKULELE RIOT GRRRL SEEKING CONNECTIONS Cute, totally open and authentic, ukulele-playing Riot Grrrl femme seeking meaningful connections of any form with other human souls. Total nerdy girl gamer. I love Riot Grrrl, roller derby, being creative, supercheesy horror movies, and being wined and dined. I’m a polyamorous, pan/demi-sexual submissive. My kinks include light bondage, BDSM, and exhibitionism. I’m all about the Oxford comma. xXRiotGrrrlXx, 44, l

MEN Seeking MEN

ADIRONDACK ANARCHIST WITH BRAINS Disabled veteran; retired New York City high school teacher with metal implants; radical anarchist; queer poet still into Ian Drury. CFS has its ups/downs; I can spend days in bed with cats! And I take no prisoners! Expect no fool! Professor, 65, l LOOKING FOR FWB Just because I am disabled and have no teeth, I’m being true and honest, unlike most would. I’m a simple man, kind, good looking. Just looking for fun in the bedroom with benefits — friends, you know. vtbigbear, 50, l GENTLE MAN FULL OF LOVE Kind, gentle, giving, loving but lonely man. I live alone, in my small home, on the shores of beautiful Lake Champlain. Looking to share quality time with a man who likes to spend time together, whether that be at home or out on the town in Montréal. I love the village up there. Plattsburgh_60, 60, l COUNTRY LOVER Hi. I’m a white male getting long in the tooth, but I still like going out. Love to see you. whodunit, 71 GENTLE, WARM, EASYGOING, LOVABLE Hi, I’m a gay white male with ataxia (I have no balance). I use a walker, but everything works fine. Most guys shy away, but your loss. Get to know me. onionman1, 60, l


For groups, BDSM, and kink:

dating.sevendaysvt.com

WOMEN Seeking?

SENSUAL ABS I am a personal trainer who is always working with others or working out himself and needs someone to help him relax a little. Athletix90, 26 SHY GIRL LOOKING FOR FUN I am shy and slightly overweight. I am looking for someone who doesn’t care that I am overweight. I am looking to have sex and to have fun. Willing to try new things. I am average looking. I have very low self-esteem. SazarMoose1, 23, l UNICORN LOOKING FOR SOME FUN Fit, fun female looking for some new experiences with a couple. Professional. Looking for it to be discreet and clean. jessicaRabbit, 29 VERMONT LOVE Passionate, committed 60+ couple desiring a like-minded friend for a sensual/sexual rendezvous. We would welcome a couple or individual to join us for a joyful/playful encounter. We are both very attractive, open-minded, and eccentric. We’d love to meet for a hike, swim, or a glass of wine to see if we are a match. We are happy to exchange pictures. WinterWonder, 63, l

GIRLS JUST WANNA HAVE FUN Hey hey, I am just looking for someone to hang out with. Nothing too crazy, but I’m a lot of fun. Vonnie, 25, l

MEN Seeking?

LOOKING Want to find someone who wants a man to cum in them. horny14, 42 YOUNG INFIDEL I’m a college senior with a girlfriend but have a bit of a wandering eye. Looking for someone to break the rules with. JodyHighroller, 21 DISCREET, ONGOING FUN BREAST PLAY Discreet, ongoing fun with a sexy man. Breast play, nipples, erotic oil massage. Our little secret. Multiple cummer here! vermonter15, 29 LOVE TO SWALLOW DICK JIZZ My downfalls are no teeth and I’m disabled, but know this: I know how to worship a man’s cock ‘til it will drive you so crazy you can’t stand it. I don’t bottom but will rim your ass. swallowyourmeat, 50, l VT FUN WITH LIKE PROFESSIONALS Seeking like-minded professionals around the Burlington area for fun, discretion and spice. Skihat, 40 TANTRA LOVER FROM RUSSIA I practice tantra. Looking for a partner or a couple to practice together the spiritual love! I’m open to a lot of new and interesting things. I’m a neat and nice-looking 28-y/o man. I was studying tantra and the art of tantric massage in India. dmitryfromrussia, 28, l SEEKING FUN BIG BREASTED GODDESS Seeking younger or older big breasted women for FWB for any period of time. I’m clean, single, horny and I can travel. I’ll consider any offer. 802Hunk, 48 LOOKING FOR FUN What is there to say? I’m looking for someone to have a good time with. Shade, 57, l

DRAMA-FREE FUN I am looking for drama-free fun. It can be kinky or it can be vanilla, depending on my and partner’s desires. I am clean, DD-free, good looking. dramafreeefun, 46, l

STARVING IN CENTRAL VERMONT Simple and subtle guy turning a page in the book of life. Always had an appetite that hasn’t been matched. Hungry. Mtnman76, 33

LOOKING FOR OLDER WOMAN College boy looking to play. timlincl, 20

TALL KINK Looking to find some like-minded individuals. Triplea, 32

LOOKING TO HAVE NEW EXPERIENCES We are 46M/37F couple looking for others to enjoy. Both bi-curious. We are new to the swinging lifestyle and would like to expand on our sexually active lifestyle together. We are looking for bi or bi-curious females or couples for swapping or watching. If you think you could handle us, send us a message. sjdr7079, 37, l KINKY COUPLE LOOKING TO SHARE As the title says, we are a kinky couple looking to meet another fun and adventurous couple to have fun with and share our bed. We are new to this, so we would be looking to meet for drinks first to see if there’s chemistry and then let things go where they may. KinkyCoupleVt, 38 2HOTLOVERS Committed couple looking for exciting times with other respectful and discreet people. We are new to this but by no means shy. Very open to different experiences and situations. She is a sexy, tall, athletic girl, and he is burly, handsome and well built. Looking for ongoing adventures with the right person(s). heyo112, 27, l PASSIONATE, EROTIC, FUN, SEXUAL COUPLE M/F couple looking for female(s) or other couples who enjoy adult playtime. We are a couple who enjoys each other’s bodies and want you to participate with us. We have lots of energy! No drama here. We just want to have fun. Knot_tee_couple, 55 HIPPIE LOVERS IN THE SUNSHINE Couple madly in love looking for a third person to join us in a casual evening of candlelit massage, lovemaking and body/soul appreciation. Let us cook you dinner, pour you a glass of wine, and we’ll see where it goes! stargazers, 23 YOUNG, OUTDOORSY, OPEN-MINDED! We are an outdoorsy young couple ready to explore more sexual experiences. We are interested in making sexual connections with a woman as well as couples play and MMF/FFM adventures! We love having sex out in the woods, by the river or atop a mountain. Let’s go camping and see how we can please each other! Bring your party tent! DiosaSabrosa, 29, l

My boyfriend proposed recently, and I am so excited to be with him. I love him a lot. But I can’t bear his family. We were visiting recently and I started having a political conversation with one of his cousins, and then his father got involved and his opinions annoyed me. We are so different. How can I deal with this? Should I not get married?

Signed,

Dear Maybe,

Maybe a Mrs.

First, let me offer you hearty congratulations on your engagement! As to your question: We can’t choose what family we’re born into, and the same is pretty much true of our partner’s family. You fall in love with a person, but those feelings don’t necessarily extend to his or her relatives. We can put up with our partner’s annoying habits because our chemistry, our bond, is strong. But tolerating family members can be more challenging, particularly if you hold opposing views on biggies like politics or religion. You’re right to consider how you will manage this, especially if your partner is close to his family and you find some of them obnoxious. You should also consider that the feeling might be mutual. This situation isn’t just about you. And being at odds with your future in-laws can put your partner in a very uncomfortable situation. Do not make him feel that he must choose between you and them. My advice? When you’re with his family, focus on what you have in common: love for your partner, their son, brother, cousin. Practice tolerance, and try to build a relationship based on, if not genuine affection, then at least respect. Have you talked with your partner about this? If not, you should. Be sensitive — even people who disagree with or dislike some of their family members often get defensive when someone else criticizes them. But as long as you two are on the same page and able to communicate lovingly and patiently, you can manage his family. The key will be to support his relationship with them and let your actions demonstrate your commitment to your partner. His family will surely notice and appreciate that. When you attend group dinners or gatherings, avoid topics that get you ruffled. Don’t let yourself get roped into arguments; gently steer conversations in other directions. And here’s a concept: Stop thinking about his family as opponents and get to know them as individuals. If you can ask your partner’s dad for advice on car repair or an explanation of football, maybe he’ll drop the political agenda. Of course, I can’t guarantee this will always be successful, but at least you’ll feel better for taking the high road. One last note: If you and your partner decide to start a family, be prepared for relatives on both sides who might want to get more involved in your life. This can lead to a lot of eye rolling behind closed doors and deep breathing in the car, but let your bond with your partner keep you grounded. And remember, a new baby gives everyone something else to talk about.

Need advice?

Yours,

Athena

You can send your own question to her at askathena@sevendaysvt.com.

PERSONALS 93

HORNDOG Hello, I’m a hardworking guy looking for my soul mate and or a playmate. I’m in decent shape and am ready to go all night. Will exchange pics. Asianguy, 32

HORNY SEXPOT SWALLOWS I’m a gay male looking for men who want to be satisfied to their likeness. onionman60, 60, l

HIGH-SEAS ADVENTURE Hi! We’re a couple in our mid-thirties setting sail on a new adventure, looking for a couple or woman to share some vanilla but delicious time with. We love mountains and the ocean. You: smart, political, sensual. Good food, good fun. Want to hop aboard? dorkyNsincere, 35, l

Dear Athena,

SEVEN DAYS

GOOD ADULT FUN, FUN, FUN I travel quite a bit, but when home in Burlington I like to indulge in good food, good drinks, outdoor activities and, of course, some good, healthy adult fun. I am a bit kinky, almost always horny and a generous, respectful play partner. Colorado_Guy, 31

HEDONISTIC GEOMETRY INSTIGATOR Shy, sweet and sexy T-girl looking for playmates. Love dressing sexily and very feminine. I want to meet people to enjoy things like live music, cabaret and dance parties with; and then, if things are right, to go somewhere else and find out more about the best things in life. Looking for sweetness, or at least some candy. amyvermont, 35, l

11.30.16-12.07.16

DEDICATED TO LICKING PUSSY I am quiet and enjoy skiing, the cold weather and keeping you warm. If you would like someone compulsive about pleasuring you, then I am your guy. I believe all women are beautiful, especially pregnant ones. Skier, 28

OTHERS Seeking?

ASK ATHENA

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

RAINBOW UNICORN SEEKS EROTIC ADVENTURES In a loving, healthy, committed, open relationship, and seeking female playmates for myself and females or couples for my partner and me together. I value those with a great presence, honesty, openness, and a grounded sense of self spiked with laughter and lightheartedness! Open to diverse experiences. Respect, excellent communication skills and healthy boundaries are critical! STD-free only, please. mangolicious, 45, l

LET’S BE WARM THIS WINTER Simply enough, the cold is coming and there is one way to stay warm that rises above the rest. Let’s be fun and naughty and make some heat. Looking for a happy, playful sort. Let’s start some casual and repeatable fun! kumquatguy, 39, l

Your wise counselor in love, lust and life


MT. HUNGER HIKE We crossed paths — you were with your dog, and we shared a laugh about my description of the hike. We parted ways at that point, but something has been nagging me since — I wish we could have talked a bit more. Let me know if I can motivate you for a drink. When: Saturday, November 19, 2016. Where: Mt. Hunger. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913765 HAND LOTION AT CITY MARKET To the fine lady whom I shared a moment with while picking up my favorite moisturizer. I laughed at myself for providing a demo of how I put it on (back of hands first). Smiles were shared as we each sought relief from dryness. You have a nose ring; I have a ponytail. Maybe our paths can cross again? When: Wednesday, November 23, 2016. Where: Burlington. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913763 BEEP AT BARRIO My beep made you pause at the door that afternoon. It was meant for my friend, but it would have been nice to talk to you, too... When: Wednesday, November 23, 2016. Where: Barrio Bakery. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913762 STEAL YOUR FACE GREEN EQUINOX Me: impatient, in a hurry, rushing, honking, needless energy put on you. You: a light, a reminder, my teacher. Deep gratitude for you and your grounded response and allowing me the opportunity to be humbled and move on into my day with appreciation, slowing, breathing and hope knowing souls like you are out there. When: Friday, November 18, 2016. Where: corner of Prospect and Main. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913761 KEEPCALM I have seen your profile and have attempted to contact you several times with no reply back. Are you not seeing or getting my messages? I would really like to get to know you. Don’t know what else to do. Giving this a try and being hopeful this will work. When: Thursday, November 3, 2016. Where: Seven Days Personals. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913760

94 PERSONALS

SEVEN DAYS

11.30.16-12.07.16

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

I SPY A YEAR GONE BY I spy with my eye my soul mate: 5’5 with sweet green eyes. I spy you picking up the phone and righting a wrong. I spy getting lost in each other. I spy both of us finally happy together. I spy Sweaty P getting everything that she has ever wanted. I spy you giving me the chance you promised. When: Tuesday, November 22, 2016. Where: Daily Planet/Shaw’s/basement bar. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913759 SEEKING CONTACT WITH AETHEREAL I saw your recent ad but have not been able to contact you through my computer. The lighthearted tone of your ad caught my attention, besides the interests you expressed, which seem compatible with mine. However, I am 75 and may be out of your age range, but friendship is never limited by age. When: Monday, November 14, 2016. Where: Seven Days Personals. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913757 STICK FIGURE AT HIGHER GROUND You were dancing behind me with some friends. Then you were dancing with me. You: very tall in a blue T-shirt. I think you live out of town. Me: short with long brown hair that maybe you even got caught up in. I just wanted to say thank you. My friend whisked me away before I had the chance. When: Saturday, November 12, 2016. Where: Higher Ground. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913756 LIMBO AT THE MONKEY HOUSE How low can you go? We couldn’t have made our interest in each other any more obvious with our eyes. One of us is a beautiful blonde who was wearing a red dress. Hint: That’s you. I like how you looked at me, although the people that we were there with probably didn’t. I’d love to hear from you! When: Saturday, November 12, 2016. Where: Monkey House, Winooski. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913755 SO AMAZING! Extraordinary young beauty working at the liquor store. When: Wednesday, November 16, 2016. Where: buying booze. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913753

i SPY

If you’ve been spied, go online to contact your admirer!

dating.sevendaysvt.com

HALLOWEEN BIKE PARADE ENTOURAGE To the girl scout, red cat girl, batwoman, wizardess and batboy riding in the halloween parade: WOW. Your smiles astounded me. I could tell that these disguises were to obfuscate your actual super-people identities. If I prove my mettle, can I join your league? When: Sunday, October 30, 2016. Where: Burlington Halloween Bike Ride. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913752 WILLIN’ When I texted you the other night to say hey, I know it was confusing and ill advised, considering the circumstances. What I meant, but couldn’t say, was that you make me doubt what I thought I wanted and wish that I was unattached. The fantasy of you wanting me the way I want you is enough to make me crazy. When: Sunday, November 13, 2016. Where: downtown. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913751 BUCHI DRINKER BEEN SPIED I believe you called me out, as I am one of very few yellow-raincoat-sporting Vermonters. I’ll be on the Hump Saturday. Maybe we’ll meet again. When: Thursday, October 27, 2016. Where: Healthy Living Market & Café. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913750 I ALMOST RAN YOU OVER To the girl I almost hit with my car last night: I wanted to apologize. I also wanted to say I accept your middle-finger gesture and I probably would have done the same thing, and also maybe yelled and called me an asshole. If you’d like me to make it up with a beer, I’d be happy to. When: Monday, November 14, 2016. Where: crosswalk of South Union and Buell. You: Woman. Me: Woman. #913749 MAPLEFIELDS, EXIT 16 Three times I could not help but stare at you, and now you have not been there for a couple of weeks. You are intoxicating and incredible. You stared back, maybe wondering why I could not take my eyes off you. Send me a note. When: Thursday, November 3, 2016. Where: Maplefields, Exit 16. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913748 OAK45 BLM Mosaics. What you drank. I didn’t catch your number before you left. We shared too many laughs, and I called you out on your fidgeting, as we both didn’t participate. Cheers to recognizing each other from work. I hope the ONE is treating you good. I hope you had a good ride home. I walked home. My math’s in your phone, C. Holla! When: Monday, November 14, 2016. Where: Oak45. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913747 THINKING OF YOUR CRUSTY PANTS You don’t wear any underwear / You also seem to have no fear / You make a mean pumpkin pie / And write a hella sexy I-Spy / I’ve been saving all my sponges / Maybe we can get together and do some lunges... When: Sunday, November 13, 2016. Where: OGE. You: Woman. Me: Woman. #913746 GORGEOUS BALD MAN You were wearing blue Adidas shorts and a black-and-gray Adidas shirt with red/orange stripes. I don’t see a ring. Single? When: Saturday, November 12, 2016. Where: gym, South Burlington. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913745 PEPSI GIRL So this is new to me, being attracted to women, but you’ve caught my interest in such a way I don’t think it wise to ignore. Initially met in Ankes and later on in Red Square. You have long, dark curly

hair and an entrancing raspy voice. Me being the redhead who likes to shoulder dance in Old Gold. When: Friday, October 14, 2016. Where: Church Street. You: Woman. Me: Woman. #913744 CUPCAKE DIRECTOR Not only could I do it barefoot in a snowstorm, but backward and blindfolded, too. Was the point the lengths I’d go to help or I’m so dopey I forgot my boots in the car, parked ... you know where. Thanks for the nicest thing you’ve ever said, NGITC. Hey, when’s our next chance encounter or should I stop following you? When: Thursday, November 3, 2016. Where: on the highway and the rotary. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913743 ATMOSPHERE AT HIGHER GROUND You came up to me outta the blue, threw me a bit off balance. Kept asking who I was and pulled me close to dance. You came back around after I thought you left to get close for another song. I still missed getting your number. When: Thursday, November 10, 2016. Where: Higher Ground. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913742 LOVE AND BUBBLEGUTS You came and changed my world in a matter of days. I have never felt anything as strong as the connection between us. The way you look at me is magical. I continuously replay our weekend together in my head. I can’t wait to be in your arms again, because it’s my favorite place to be. When: Friday, November 4, 2016. Where: everywhere with me. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913741 HEADY SKINNY PANCAKE CRÊPE WIZARD Spotted you wearing a sexy orange sweatshirt, hair flowing down to your shoulders like Fabio. I want you to lay me down like you lay batter onto a hot griddle. Dominant looking for submissivetype man to role-play with NSA. ;) When: Monday, November 7, 2016. Where: UVM Skinny Pancake. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913740 SWEET GUY AT DUNKIN’ I have seen you several times now. You’re always smiling and bubbly. You had short grayish-black hair, Red Sox hat on, black coat and jeans. Got into a truck. Me: blond hair in ponytail. Had sweater and yoga pants. I want to get to know you better. What make and color was your truck? If you’re interested. When: Monday, November 7, 2016. Where: Dunkin’ Donuts. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913739 PROSCIUTTO AND ROMANESCO I claimed my place in line at the deli only to be inspired to make some cruciferous sensation. After speaking, I felt compelled to ask you out. That day I was tired and dirty and cold. I’m sure I was a sight. But I can clean up. If you are single, let’s catch a bite. When: Monday, November 7, 2016. Where: City Market/Onion River Co-op. You: Man. Me: Man. #913738 TOMGIRL Sometimes it’s hard to slow down during the day, even to introduce myself. I was hoping to swing by to remedy that but haven’t made it yet. I like your silver and turquoise rings. Are they Navajo? When: Friday, October 14, 2016. Where: Tomgirl Juice. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913737 SKIRACK BABE You don’t work there anymore, but I thought for sure someone would have called you out. I spied you on Mt. Ellen. Gorgeous view, but I liked looking at you! When: Saturday, October 15, 2016. Where: Sugarbush. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913736

PLAYIN’ GUITAR, ROUTE 15, WOLCOTT I was playing guitar on the side of the road, as I often do when my daughter is studying ballet there; I was playing “Wharf Rat” by the Grateful Dead and you drove by, honked, waved ... but as in “Castles Made of Sand” (Jimi Hendrix), you just kept right on going. Tell me it was real. When: Wednesday, November 2, 2016. Where: Route 15, Wolcott. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913735 BBB SPIN GIRL SATURDAY I recognized you at first, then an image popped into my head. You in your spin shorts! It’s been a long time, and when I saw you the second time, you caught me off guard. I was trying to speak and started to stammer. Kind of embarrassing. Anyway, you look fantastic! Sorry I didn’t stick around to talk. When: Saturday, November 5, 2016. Where: Bed Bath & Beyond. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913734 SHAW’S 30-RACK You: standing in line at 5 p.m.-ish. You made a comment about hanging out with friends with a 30-rack and playing hockey. Me: I was dressed for the barn, with mud on my pants. I promise I clean up nice! Maybe I can come watch a hockey game. ;) When: Saturday, November 5, 2016. Where: Shaw’s, Colchester. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913733 HOLDING MY BREATH FOR YOU You are an underwater hockey player in mismatched socks and scrubs?! A beautiful woman regulated to dreams! I hear you can also do pelvic exams. I’d love to be your final test. When: Thursday, November 3, 2016. Where: medical library. You: Woman. Me: Woman. #913732 BUCHI KOMBUCHA AT HEALTHY LIVING To the yellow-raincoated, curly-blond-haired guy: Thanks for convincing me to buy the Buchi. Would you like to drink more over a hike? Maybe you’ll find this someday... Until next time. ;) When: Thursday, October 27, 2016. Where: Healthy Living. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913731 SHELBURNE ROAD PRICE CHOPPER 11/3 Cashier Eric with the slightly different-colored blue eyes: Just wanted to say I thought you were sexy. That’s all. Me: Lucky 7s. You may or may not remember. It’s OK if you don’t. When: Thursday, November 3, 2016. Where: Price Chopper, Shelburne Road. You: Man. Me: Man. #913730 LATE SEPTEMBER RIDE HOME I gave you a lift from your friend’s house in the ONE to your house in the SE. We chatted about our new Hondas, road-tripping to NOLA with a stop in Nashville, living in Paris and how much we love Vermont but find the winter a drag. I am curious if you would like to continue the conversation sometime? When: Friday, September 30, 2016. Where: in a Honda CRV. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913729

CURIOUS?

You read Seven Days, these people read Seven Days — you already have at least one thing in common! All the action is online. Browse more than 2,000 local singles with profiles including photos, voice messages, habits, desires, views and more. It’s free to place your own profile online. Don't worry, you'll be in good company.

l

See photos of this person online.


Hey there,

klutz!

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Prone to spilling? No problem! This 22-ounce stainless steel mason jar is basically an adult sippy cup. You're welcome. Sip in style with this "Never Canned" mug and crack open a world of beverage possibilities. $7

11.30.16-12.07.16 SEVEN DAYS

L I M I T E D I N V E N T O R Y. O R D E R YO U R H O L I D AY G I F T S T O D AY.

1t-7dstoreMug1116.indd 1

95

sevendaysvt.com/store

11/8/16 4:52 PM


SEASON SPONSORS:

GOLD SPONSORS:

2016/2017 SEASON: FULL LISTING AT AT PARAMOUNTVT.ORG

E K T TLLER KO & KE S M A I L L WI LEO

H P L ER E R O D E N I D K E R C A RHEURED-NOSED R C T NU T NY

M

P 6:00 | 6 C | DE TUES

THE

AL USIC M E TH

ALBA

: LLET

RE BA

SHI BERK

M | 2P 8 1 C | DE SUN

0 | 8:0 N 13

B O BARLEY M

0 JAN 2 | I R F PM 8:00

JA FRI |

E IMAT T N I AN SATION ER … CONV WITH

A I D LI

H C I N A I T S A B SAT |

0 | 8:0 N 28

PM

JA

JUST ADDED!

PER M SU FEST... O R F R E CT DIRE ERS & BE P O TRO

R O L L I KE

TIC COUS AN A G WITH IN EVEN

0 PM

:0 2 | 8

1 | JAN S R U TH

30 CENTER ST • RUTLAND, VT • 802.775.0903

0 | 8:0 N 27

N O S I ARR

G

N A N R FE MME T TT F T E E H V E N O N HIA L E KEAVNDI STEVE L L LY & JOH Untitled-49 1

PM

N

DIA E M O

C

M

+6P

PM

JA FRI |

2016/17 season listing at:

MON

0 | 7:3 3 1 B E

PM

| F

R E T PE PTON

FRAM

RAW

TOUR C I T S COU 0 PM AN A | 7:3

| APR WED

12

paramountvt.org 11/23/16 10:41 AM


Seven Days, November 30, 2016  

Vermont Journalist and Former al-Qaeda Captive Reflects on His Ordeal; Straight Out of College, Two New Reps Prepare to Serve; Inmates in th...

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you