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DAYSIES NOMINATIONS ARE OPEN!

VE R MO NT ’S INDE PEN DENT VO IC E MAY 17-24, 2017 VOL.22 NO.36 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

PAGE 31

TOTAL WRECKS

PAGE 34

Champlain’s underwater museum

SECRET GARDEN

PAGE 36

Visiting VT’s new state park

MOVEABLE FEASTS

PAGE 45

Three picnics and where to eat ’em


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THE LAST WEEK IN REVIEW

emoji that

MAY 10-17, 2017

ALICIA FREESE

COMPILED BY SASHA GOLDSTEIN, MATTHEW ROY & ANDREA SUOZZO

DON’T GO SPLAT

Rep. Peter Welch (D-Vt.)

Vermont wildlife officials are warning drivers to watch for turtles crossing the road. Follow the reptilian lead here, motorists: Slow and steady.

GREENEST GENERATION

WELCH: IMPEACHMENT ‘PREMATURE’

C

A Cabot Creamery employee allegedly stole machine parts from the company to make reverseosmosis systems for extracting maple syrup. Because Vermont.

tweet of the week: @anniemrussell Fiancé meant to tell me I was judging his Doritos breakfast from my “ivory tower,” said “porcelain armchair” instead. Um, no. FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVEN_DAYS OUR TWEEPLE: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/TWITTER

was responsible for the Town Meeting ballot item that declared Calais a sanctuary city. “Calais has a strong community connection,” Sassaman said. “It wasn’t that hard to get together.” A few months ago, members were alarmed after some reporters were banned from a White House briefing. Hoping to demonstrate support for the First Amendment, they hosted two postcard-writing get-togethers. The resulting messages also went locally to Vermont Public Radio and VTDigger.org, along with national news outlets such as the New York Times and the Washington Post. Thanks for the support! Feel free to target us with that kind of letter-writing campaign anytime. MARK DAVIS

LAST SEVEN 5

coalesced in the town of 1,600 people after the November election to resist President Donald Trump’s agenda in ways that are varied — and, yes, oh-soVermont-y. The group, which numbers 50 with about a dozen diehards, has held a fundraiser for the American Civil Liberties Union featuring ukulele players

leading a singalong to Beatles One of the postcards tunes. Another event included a dessert potluck and a Moth-style storytelling session. The crew ends meetings with a chant or singing, according to group member Virginia Sassaman. Group members have been a vocal presence at anti-Trump demonstrations, including the recent science march in Montpelier. Indivisible Calais, too,

SEVEN DAYS

ver the past year or so, high-ranking people — including, ahem, the president — have said some pretty terrible things about journalists. So imagine our delight here at Seven Days when dozens of postcards flooded our office last week — with words of kindness! “Thank you for all the great journalism you and your staff provide,” one handwritten message read. “We are grateful for your thoughtful and courageous reporting,” said another. The messages were the work of a nascent grassroots group, Indivisible Calais, that

GREEN MOUNTAIN GRIFT

1. “Family-Friendly Wooden Nickel Opens in St. Albans” by Suzanne Podhaizer. Melissa and John Montagne aim to provide pub staples such as poutine and burgers at affordable prices. 2. “Burlington’s Pine Street Deli Closes Its Doors” by Katie Jickling. The owners of the South End sandwich shop are demolishing the building to make way for a 30-unit apartment complex. 3. “Vermont’s Female Tattoo Artists Are Making a Mark” by Dan Bolles, Rachel Elizabeth Jones, Ken Picard, Elizabeth M. Seyler and Sadie Williams. More and more Vermont tattoo parlors are owned or coowned by women. 4. “Seven Foodie Reasons to Visit St. Albans” by Suzanne Podhaizer. It’s been called the “maple capital of the world,” but the St. Albans food scene offers more than desserts. 5. “Vermont House to Vote on SenateApproved Marijuana Legalization” by Terri Hallenbeck. In the waning days of the legislative session, the House sent a compromise bill to the governor’s desk.

WHAT’S WEIRD IN VERMONT

POSTCARDS OF POSITIVITY O

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recordings of the Oval Office meeting. Trump has suggested he may be taping White House conversations. If the president did improperly share intelligence, Welch said, “whether that’s an impeachable offense, in this environment, I think is premature to say.” He noted that only the Republican-controlled U.S. House can initiate impeachment proceedings. A two-thirds majority of the Senate would have to convict the president to remove him from office. “The burden on impeachment is huge,” Welch said. “So let’s get the facts, is what I’m saying.” Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) also stopped short of calling for impeachment. In a statement, Vermont’s senior senator said, “What we know is beyond alarming. But there is still much we do not know. Before I judge whether his reckless and damaging behavior merits impeachment, I want to see an independent investigation into his actions.” The senator concluded on an ominous note: “We are closer to a constitutional crisis than any moment that I can remember.” Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Read Freese’s full story at sevendaysvt.com.

IS IT SPRING YET?

That’s the year 20-year-old Cpl. George Perreault went missing while serving in the Korean War. Last Saturday, after years working to bring back his remains, Perreault’s family buried him in Winooski.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ongressman Peter Welch (D-Vt.) called President Donald Trump’s recent actions “pretty stupid” Tuesday at a South Burlington press conference. But he did not call for proceedings to remove the president from office. At least two of his congressional colleagues have. On Monday, the Washington Post reported that the president shared highly classified intelligence with Russian officials last week in the Oval Office, setting off a national furor. The Oval Office meeting occurred just a day after Trump fired Federal Bureau of Investigation director James Comey — a decision Trump later said was influenced partly by the FBI’s investigation into his campaign’s ties with Russia. Seven Days’ Alicia Freese asked Welch if the president had committed an impeachable offense. “He’s got the legal authority,” Vermont’s only U.S. House member replied. “I think it’s a judgment issue. “Well, we gotta get the facts,” he added. “I think if we have a special investigator or an independent commission, and it’s not embroiled in the political process, we have a much better chance to find out, in fact, what happened.” According to Welch, Congress should seek any potential

Tesla plans to install rechargeable battery packs in Vermont homes and on Green Mountain Power land to ease peak power use. Not your grandfather’s Tesla coil.

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FEEDback READER REACTION TO RECENT ARTICLES

PAIN POLICY

We are all very aware of the opioid epidemic in Vermont and across the country. But as you noted in [“Do No Harm: New Rules Discourage Overprescribing Opiates,” April 26], the great majority of physicians in Vermont have already modified their prescribing practices. What concern me are two issues: 1. This new law is a very bad precedent to set when a governor and legislature — none of whom are physicians, except for Rep. George Till (D-Jericho) — set clinical treatment guidelines. We have a medical licensing board in Vermont that certainly can and should be monitoring prescription patterns of medical providers and counseling the outliers. That would be much more palatable to me and other physicians than having the government do this. After all, now that this precedent is set, what stops the governor from deciding what blood pressure and diabetic medications physicians should be prescribing? 2. We live in a country that tends to careen from one extreme social policy to the next, and that is certainly reflected in the medical field as well. When I went through medical school and residency in the 1990s, it was felt that physicians were under-treating pain. The pendulum is now swinging again, and it has already begun to be very difficult for people who are in really debilitating pain to find relief. I would point out that “pain management” centers are very scarce, and mostly what

TIM NEWCOMB

they offer are highly expensive injections — treatments that usually offer temporary relief at best. I don’t see anyone mention India, a country that shuns any opiates for pain relief. There are many patients there — especially cancer patients — suffering horribly. I think we are going to overreact and quickly head in that direction.   Louis Meyers

SOUTH BURLINGTON

Meyers is a physician at Rutland Regional Medical Center.

AN ADDICT’S VIEW

With great respect for Donna Constantineau and what she wrote in her letter to the editor [Feedback, “Have a Heart for Heroin Addicts,” April 19], I’m a heroin addict with hopes not to be one day! I’m an inmate who lost everything and everyone important to me to heroin addiction. Did I wake up one day and say, “I’m going to try heroin”? Definitely not! It started after two back surgeries and many years of legal pain meds, which were stopped not because of misuse or illegal actions but because my new doctor is against them and believes aspirin works for the pain of rods and screws in the body. Want to understand the disease of heroin addicts? Find my info on inmatelocator.com. I’m currently at Rutland’s Marble Valley Regional Correctional Facility, then on to Grafton County, N.H., because of heroin


WEEK IN REVIEW

addiction! Thank you, Seven Days and Ms. Constantineau. PS: Once an addict, always an addict in recovery! Aaron W. Goodrich RUTLAND

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I’ve always thought dryer lint was one contributor to climate change [“Vermonter Aims to Save Our Water — One Laundry Load at a Time,” May 3]. All those fuzzies — from clothes made of plastic bottles — are making a mask around the Earth. But it doesn’t matter, as the Earth will be sealed in plastic soon, judging by the countless water bottles I pick up on the roadsides. Julanne Sharrow

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CORRECTION

Last week’s story entitled “Skin in the Game” misidentified Sara King’s mentor. She apprenticed with Chris Bijolle of Tribal Eye Tattoo — now Sacred Sparrow Tattoo.

Friday, 5/19 from 3-6 PM! SEE YOU THERE! 05.17.17-05.24.17

SAY SOMETHING! Seven Days wants to publish your rants and raves. Your feedback must... • be 250 words or fewer; • respond to Seven Days content; • include your full name, town and a daytime phone number.

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FEEDBACK 7

[Re Off Message: “Walters: Vermont Senate Scorns Scott on Teacher Health Care,” April 28; “A Legislative Showdown Over Teacher Health Insurance,” May 2; “House Dems Narrowly Win Vote on Teacher Health Care Negotiations,” May 4; “Walters: The Day After the Big Vote,” May 4; “In the Vermont House, Freshman Dems Become a Moderating Force,” May 10; “Vermont Legislature Delays Adjournment Again as Negotiations With Scott Falter,” May 12]: What’s causing the budget impasse in Montpelier is the insistence of the Vermont-National Education Association and its legislative supporters that negotiations for

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Editor’s note: Our article was not intended to be inclusive, just a sampling. Absolutely Vermont has many more fine female — and male — tattoo artists.

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[Re “Skin in the Game,” May 10]: I read your article profiling the many talented women tattoo artists in Vermont and, within seconds, found that you missed the best female tattoo artist in Vermont: Cori Jean Sanders of Craftsbury’s own Kingdom Ink. Cori is by far the most talented artist I have ever seen in Vermont, and she just so happens to be female, too, so it was a glaring omission on your part that I would love to see you rectify with a future visit to and interview of Ms. Cori Jean, although she is very busy with a jam-packed book of appointments and planning her upcoming wedding. I am a repeat customer to Kingdom Ink, and I can attest to Cori’s friendliness and artistic skill. She works hard to make your vision come to life in ink while still adding her own unique touch. She listens to your ideas and will let you know if something will not look right or hold up well, and she makes sure that you have the proper home-care instructions to heal and to maintain your new art. She also offers free touch-ups, if needed. She stands behind every piece she does and is often called upon to fix others’ mistakes, which she does brilliantly. I look forward to seeing a future article on Kingdom Ink.

teachers’ health benefits take place at the local level rather than statewide. At the local level, the Vermont-NEA, with its staff of highly paid trained negotiators, has a decided advantage compared to volunteer school board members. It’s loath to give that up. The nonsense of this actually being about collective bargaining is becoming clearer each day as facts come out. Years ago, for example, Democratic House speaker Ralph Wright, a teacher and union activist, supported statewide collective bargaining for health benefits because he knew it was fairer and would contain costs. The nonsense about timing is also revealing itself. The opportunity to take advantage of a unique situation to make significant savings is now, and Gov. Phil Scott is correct to push the point. With this critical issue, legislators need to decide whom they really represent: the Vermont-NEA or the people of Vermont.

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contents

LOOKING FORWARD

fresh

MAY 17-24, 2017 VOL.22 NO.36

After a chilly, just-kidding spring, we’re ready for sunny days. And we’ve got ideas on how to spend them. It’s a short season, after all, so let’s get a move on. If you like to move quickly, the research is in: Do it in packs. SOCIAL RUNNING is not only trendy but also enhances performance. Prefer to sit and eat? Then get out the tablecloth and try our THEMED PICNICS. We also introduce Vermont’s NEWEST STATE PARK, preview summer MUSIC FESTIVALS, survey updated FARM STANDS and dive into history at the LAKE CHAMPLAIN MARITIME MUSEUM. Wannabe boaters, take note: A nifty new home for Burlington’s COMMUNITY SAILING CENTER is under construction; we learn all about it from 88-year-old architect and CSC founder MARCEL BEAUDIN. Ahoy, mates!

NEWS 14

Seven Laws-to-Be That Could Affect Your Life

26

Locked In: Contract Guarantees Inmates Get Sent Out of Vermont

26

Going, Going, Gone: A Crowd Turns Out to Buy Vermont’s Used Stuff BY KATIE JICKLING

20

FEATURES 31

34

Bridal Brawls: The Old Lantern Fights Its Neighbors Over Noise Excerpts From Off Message

36

ARTS NEWS

Lost Shul Mural Inspires Play About Burlington’s ‘Little Jerusalem’

Daysies Nominations What Lies Beneath

Summer Preview: Lake Champlain Maritime Museum makes exploring historic shipwrecks easy to fathom

48

Three for the Road

Summer Preview: Picnic experiences custom-made for a Vermont summer

BY DAN BOLLES

39

Catching the Wind

Summer Preview: An architect and longtime sailor fulfills a dream at Burlington’s new sailing center

Taking a Stand

Summer Preview: Vermont farmers reinterpret the farm stand BY HANNAH PALMER EGAN & SUZANNE PODHAIZER

72

Dancin’ in the Moonlight

Summer Preview: Summer in Vermont means music festivals galore

Ramble On

Summer Preview: Exploring Vermont’s newest state park, in Hubbardton

BY AMY LILLY

VIDEO SERIES

45

BY JORDAN ADAMS

COLUMNS + REVIEWS 12 29 30 49 73 77 82 88 98

Fair Game POLITICS Hackie CULTURE Drawn & Paneled ART Side Dishes FOOD Soundbites MUSIC Album Reviews Art Review Movie Reviews Ask Athena SEX

11 23 54 68 72 82 88

The Magnificent 7 Life Lines Calendar Classes Music Art Movies

FUN STUFF

straight dope offbeat flick mr. brunelle explains it all deep dark fears this modern world edie everette iona fox red meat jen sorensen harry bliss rachel lives here now free will astrology personals

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TOTAL WRECKS

PAGE 34

Champlain’s underwater museum

from Burlington’s Champlain Elementary School produced their very own album at the Burlington Record Plant and will release it at ArtsRiot on Thursday, May 25.

SECRET GARDEN

PAGE 36

Visiting VT’s new state park

MOVEABLE FEASTS

COVER IMAGE CHARLOTTE SCOTT, MATTHEW THORSEN COVER DESIGN CHARLOTTE SCOTT

PAGE 45

Three picnics and where to eat ’em

82 S. Winooski Ave, Burlington, VT Open 7am - 11pm every day (802) 861-9700 www.citymarket.coop

Untitled-9 1

CONTENTS 9

Stuck in Vermont: A group of fourth and fifth graders

05.17.17-05.24.17

DAYSIES NOMINATIONS ARE OPEN!

Underwritten by:

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

BY KEN PICARD

BY SARAH TUFF DUNN

BY KEN PICARD

BY SEVEN DAYS STAFF

24

SECTIONS

BY SUZANNE PODHAIZER

BY MOLLY WALSH

22

From Broadway to Burlington: Vermont Stage to Produce Fun Home

Friends With Fit Benefits

Summer Preview: Running together helps local athletes excel on and off the track

BY JACQUELINE LAWLER

BY MARK DAVIS

18

42

BY KYMELYA SARI

BY ALICIA FREESE

16

Integrated Arts Academy Unveils Family Portrait Exhibition

5/15/17 10:44 AM


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5/15/17 5/8/17 10:19 7:19 AM PM


COURTESY OF JULIE LANG

LOOKING FORWARD

THURSDAY 18

Take Note Having toured the world playing guitar with the likes of Faithless and Sinéad O’Connor, author Dave Randall has a unique perspective on the music industry. He draws on his insider experience for his 2017 book Sound System: The Political Power of Music. The British musician, writer and activist discusses his hard-hitting text at Phoenix Books Burlington.

MUST SEE, MUST DO THIS WEEK

SEE SOUNDBITES ON PAGE 75

CO MPILED BY KRI STE N RAV I N

SUNDAY 21

Shifting Gears What better way to experience the Green Mountain State than on two wheels? Described as “more than a ride, but less than a race,” the Velo Vermont Spring Roll invites cyclists to kick up dust on 35 miles of mostly gravel roads. This early-season excursion starts in Middlesex and features a few treats along the way. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 63

MONDAY 22

Guilty Pleasure

SUNDAY 21

NATIONAL ANTHEMS

SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 63

SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 64

TUESDAY 23

The Sound of Silence

SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 65

On a Roll

SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 60

Picture This “By making these images, I face the tension between struggle and surrender,” says central Vermont multimedia artist Susan Calza on her website. An installation at Axel’s Gallery & Frame Shop in Waterbury features such images in the form of drawings, assemblage and textile art. Seven Days’ Rachel Elizabeth Jones offers her take on the exhibition “LET’S NOT PRETEND, it’s ordinary gold.” SEE REVIEW ON PAGE 82

MAGNIFICENT SEVEN 11

Floats, bikes, skateboards, strollers, kinetic sculptures and just about anything that travels petroleum-free can be found rolling down Bristol streets this Saturday. The Human-Powered Parade, thought up by the Living Tree Alliance as part of National Bike Month, gives way to a party with vendors, bikeadvocate talks and the soulful musical stylings of Band of the Land.

ONGOING

SEVEN DAYS

SATURDAY 20

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From the babbling of a brook to the revving of an engine, sound is a perpetual part of life for all but the hearing-impaired. The 2015 documentary In Pursuit of Silence delves into humans’ interaction with noise — and the lack thereof — through carefully crafted, no-frills footage from around the world. A Shelburne screening is timed so that viewers exit the venue at peak sunset.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

A deep love of American vocal music is the tie that binds the members of the Vermont a cappella trio Yestermorn.. Alto Suzanne Rhodes, baritone Chuck Fergus and tenor Steve Maleski — also a meteorologist whose voice carries across the Vermont Public Radio airwaves — find perfect harmony in Appalachian, folk, gospel and shapenote selections at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church of St. Johnsbury.

If your idea of a good time is geeking out on Star Wars, Donnie Darko and A Clockwork Orange, SuicideGirls: Blackheart Burlesque is your style of sexy stage show. This seductive spectacular has audience members going gaga as bodacious dancers strut into the spotlight with striptease routines based on unconventional classics such as Suicide Squad and “Orange Is the New Black.”


FAIR GAME

OPEN SEASON ON VERMONT POLITICS BY TERRI HALLENBECK

Rookie Mistakes

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SEVEN DAYS

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eading into the 2017 legislative session, Vermonters knew to expect a triumvirate of freshfaced leaders at the Statehouse: a new governor, Senate president pro tempore and House speaker. They weren’t exactly strangers. During his 16 years as a state senator and lieutenant governor, Republican Gov. PHIL SCOTT had shown himself to be an easygoing, handshake-and-a-smile kind of guy. Sen. TIM ASHE (D/P-Chittenden), an eight-year veteran of the institution, had won the pro tem’s job by building a broad coalition in the Senate — including liberals, moderates and even conservatives. l oc al, fr es h, ori gi nal And House members specifically chose the more centrist, policy-oriented candidate when they elected Rep. MITZI JOHNSON (D-South Hero) speaker last winter. What we didn’t know then was how 1076 Williston Road, S. Burlington these three leaders would fare under the 862.6585 pressure of their new jobs. Now, with the www.windjammerrestaurant.com legislature entering its second week of overtime, we’re getting a close-up view. And it’s not all pretty. The three leaders have been stuck in a 1 4/21/17 11:57 AM weeks-long gridlock over how to achieve and what to do with savings generated by lower-cost teacher health insurance plans that will take effect next year. Scott has threatened to veto the state budget if lawmakers reject his plan to capture up to NEW: CORE $26 million a year in savings by mandatRESTORE ing statewide negotiation of the health Unlimited plans. He can likely make a veto stick PLUS Monthly membership! because House Republicans have enough members — 53 out of 150 — to block an override. What we’re discovering is that Scott, whom Vermonters thought was so easy to work with, is turning out to be a wily, even intransigent, political negotiator. Ashe, a 40-year-old whiz kid, is showing himself to be an impetuous, shorttempered pro tem who may not be as clever as he sees himself. And Johnson, the highly organized policy wonk of a speaker, can’t seem to read the political climate in her caucus — nor count on its support.

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Last Thursday morning, as the governor’s stalemate with legislators dragged on, another email from the Phil Scott for Governor campaign popped into inboxes around the state. “In case you missed it,” the missive said, “Gov. Phil Scott’s Administration Responds to Proposal from Senate Pro Tem.”

5/15/17 10:24 AM

Seventeen months before the next election, Scott is using his campaign email, Twitter and Facebook accounts to help hammer home his message. Who knew there was a campaign? Volunteers are keeping Scott’s political operation running, according to spokeswoman REBECCA KELLEY. She refused to identify them, though she said that none of the governor’s paid staffers are involved. (By the way, this makes Scott ineligible to ever claim it’s too early to talk about whether he’s running for reelection. He’s running — and the campaign has started.) In his first four months on the job, the 58-year-old chief executive has learned

WE’RE BOTH TRYING TO WORK THROUGH A SPHINXLIKE SITUATION. S E N AT E P R E S I D E NT PRO T E M PORE T I M AS H E

a key lesson of governing: Keep the message simple. In this case, it’s the oft-repeated mantra: “I’m unwilling to leave $26 million on the table.” Scott argues that his pitch to replace district-by-district negotiations with one statewide teacher health plan will save property taxpayers the most money. To his credit, the governor has landed on a proposal that appears to have gained traction with the public. But Scott has deftly disregarded its complexities. He does not trouble himself with the fact that if school districts choose to increase teacher salaries to compensate for less generous health contracts, his plan would not save $26 million a year. He does not dwell on the fact that next year’s estimated savings amount to just $13 million, because the contracts start halfway through the fiscal year. These omissions, among others, have made negotiating with Scott frustrating, Ashe and Johnson claim. “We’re both trying to work through a sphinxlike situation,” Ashe said, suggesting that haggling with Scott was an unwin. “It’s not a typical negotiation.” When legislators argued that mandating statewide negotiations would violate teachers’ collective bargaining rights, Scott responded that he was open to other ideas. Yet he’s rejected all other

ideas — while changing his own standards for what he’d accept. First, he said he merely wanted to ensure $26 million in savings. More recently, he has insisted on statewide negotiation. Last Thursday night, Scott’s staff slipped a counterproposal under the door of Ashe’s office. It called on lawmakers to simply put a single statewide teacher health insurance contract into law. Ashe was incredulous. “There’s not even a semblance of negotiations about the benefit,” he said. “I’m typically working on negotiations when the two sides go this way,” Ashe said Friday, moving his hands toward each other. “The latest proposal from the governor has actually circled back around beyond where the starting point was.”

The New Pro Tem

On the Senate floor late Thursday afternoon, Ashe announced that the chamber would reconvene the next morning. Senators would vote on the pro tem’s own proposal — regardless of whether the governor agreed with it. “At this point, we’ve done every single piece required of us so that we could reach across the table and shake hands,” he said, with a surly bite to his words. Sen. KEVIN MULLIN (R-Rutland) posed an innocent question. “Should one attempt to find housing for tomorrow night?” he asked, wondering whether the legislature would spend the weekend in session. “Is the goal to be out of here tomorrow night?” “That’s a problem of other people’s making,” Ashe snapped back. “Other people can answer how and if it will be solved.” Minutes later, WCAX-TV reporter KYLE MIDURA asked Ashe which plan the Senate would vote on the next day, given that Ashe had been unwilling earlier to share details. “You’re asking for too much transparency, Kyle,” Ashe said sarcastically as he walked out of the Senate chamber. The statements were an example of Ashe’s unwillingness to share information — with the public or his own members —  especially when he’s under pressure. The net effect: He isolates himself just when he should be seeking allies. The next morning, Ashe came to the Senate with a revised proposal, responding to some of Scott’s criticisms. His new plan would require school districts to save $13 million next year. It encouraged


LOCALmatters

Seven Laws-to-Be That Could Affect Your Life B Y ALI CI A FR EESE

W

hen Vermont’s 2017 legislative session ends — assuming it ever does — readers are sure to know the legal status of a certain mindaltering substance, and they’ll probably understand more than they care to know about teachers’ health insurance. Of course, the Vermont legislature did more than vote to legalize marijuana and spar with Gov. Phil Scott over health care savings. As of late Tuesday, 86 bills had made it through both the House and Senate and were either awaiting Scott’s signature or had already been signed into law. Many apply only to particular groups — inmates, cops, captive insurance companies — but some apply to a broad swath of Vermonters. Seven Days chose seven bills that, in modest but meaningful ways, may affect your life.

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If you’re pregnant One might hope that employers have the decency to refrain from making pregnant workers lift 50 pounds, but that isn’t always the case, according to Dr. George Till. The ob-gyn physician said he’s seen patients lose jobs as a result of pregnancy. He wrote a note for a nursing-home employee saying she shouldn’t lift more than 50 pounds, and she was promptly fired. Another time, Till recalled, “I had somebody who had to quit her job because she worked on a factory line, and they wouldn’t let her break often enough to go to the bathroom.” Conveniently, Till also happens to be a state representative. This year, the Jericho Democrat successfully steered a bill through the legislature entitling pregnant employees to “reasonable accommodations” at their workplace. That adjustment might mean providing a stool for someone who stands behind a cash register all day or being more generous with bathroom breaks. Cary Brown, executive director of the Vermont Commission on Women, praised the legislation: “Three-quarters of women entering the workforce will be pregnant and employed at some point in their lives,” she said. “Sometimes a simple accommodation can make the difference between being able to continue

working and having to take time off, and the strength of Vermont’s economy depends on women’s ability to remain in their jobs and support their families.”

If you still text and drive

You’re in good company. In 2014, Vermont banned the use of handheld devices while driving, but the state If you don’t has the most distracted want to “friend” drivers in the nation, your boss on according to a study by the company Zendrive. Facebook Using data collected For those of us who from sensors in the joined Facebook in college, phones of 3.1 million the social media platform drivers, it found immortalized our most that Vermonters irresponsible moments. Sensible spend 7 percent of professionals make their profiles their driving time on private — a photo of a keg stand their phones. That’s twice as much as generally doesn’t advance one’s Oregon, which had the lowest rate. career — but some employers insist “It is a problem,” said Sen. Dick that prospective or current employees Mazza (D-Grand Isle), who chairs the hand over passwords, accept friend Senate Transportation Committee. “We requests or otherwise all continue to see it, and provide access to it’s very dangerous.” personal social media Vermont police officers accounts. have gotten resourceful Leave it to a millenabout nabbing offenders. nial lawmaker to fix They will ride along in a what many would big rig, allowing them to consider an invasion peer down into cars, or go of privacy. “I think undercover as a constructhat’s really weird,” tion flagger. said 32-year-old Rep. Cops’ creative strateMatt Hill (D-Johnson). gies haven’t persuaded “Prior to social media, no RE P. M AT T H I L L drivers to put down their one would say, ‘Hey, let me devices, though. In a see your diary.’” second legislative attempt Hill, who likens his own Facebook to influence their behavior, Mazza’s experience to “a bad relationcommittee wrote a bill that increases ship — on and off for six or the penalties for using phones without seven years,” used to work at the a hands-free device. Vermont Department of Labor. Right now, motorists can be There, he somefined up to $200 for a first oftimes dealt with fense and $500 for subsequent complaints from offenses. Under this legislation, employees whose they’ll also accumulate penalty bosses had asked points on their license: two for to view their a first offense and four for subsesocial media acquent ones. counts. He found himself explaining that nothing in state law prevented If you’re not saving employers from seeking such access. One of Hill’s first acts as a fresh- for retirement man representative this year was Stowe Street Café is a family-owned to introduce legislation prohibiting coffee shop in Waterbury that hosts employers from requiring or coerc- community events such as Friday ing employees to give them access Night Sushi & Bring Your Own Vinyl. to Facebook, Instagram, blogs or any Its baristas are among the 104,000 other form of social media. Vermonters who, according to the Thanks to him, your digital diaries AARP, don’t get retirement benefits will soon be off-limits to your boss. through their work.

PRIOR TO SOCIAL MEDIA, NO ONE WOULD SAY,

“HEY, LET ME SEE YOUR DIARY.”

Café owner Nicole Grenier said she wants to offer it, but her business is so small that “it’s just not something that financially would be feasible.” After years of study, and pending final approval by both chambers, the legislature will finally set up a public retirement plan that will benefit Grenier’s baristas and anyone else whose job doesn’t provide a retirement plan. The public option will allow workers to make pretax contributions directly from their paychecks, and it will eventually give employers the option of pitching in as well. The benefit won’t be tied to employment, so switching jobs won’t require changing plans. A panel of seven, chaired by the state treasurer, will oversee the fund, which must be up and running no later than 2019. State Treasurer Beth Pearce makes the case that employees aren’t the only ones who’ll benefit. “Studies have shown that a dramatic reduction in government expenditures occurs when you’re able to increase the net worth of folks that are contemplating retirement,” she noted. “We see this as a win for taxpayers, a win for retirees and a win for employers.”

If you’re pestered by telemarketers In divisive times, we can all unite around at least one thing: shared antipathy toward telemarketers. “This is really getting out of control,” said Rep. Laura Sibilia (I-West Dover), who spearheaded legislation requiring telemarketers to provide accurate caller ID information. When she went around the Statehouse at the start of the session seeking cosponsors, “people were falling over themselves to sign onto this.” Some solicitors are scammers who use blocked or fake phone numbers to mask their identities. After Sibilia introduced her bill in February, University of Vermont students started getting calls from someone claiming to be a Federal Bureau of Investigation employee who told


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them that they owed money to the Internal Revenue Service. According to UVM police, the caller used “phone number spoofing to make it appear that they were calling from the local Burlington FBI offices.” Under Sibilia’s legislation, which requires that telemarketers provide their actual number and name, it should at least be easier to figure out who’s on the other end of the line. Also helpful: Telemarketers must register with the secretary of state. Violators face up to 18 months in prison or fines up to $10,000.

Don’t worry — the bill doesn’t demand dog mansions. While outlined in great detail, the types of accommodations aren’t anything more extravagant than humane pet owners would provide of their own accord. The goal of the legislation is to make it easier to prosecute animal cruelty crimes.

HIP HOORAY

If you need a copy of your birth certificate Right now, anyone who wants a certified copy of a Vermont native’s birth certificate can get it by going to the town clerk’s office where he or she was born. Legislation passed this session makes it easier for residents to obtain their own birth certificates and harder for potential identity thieves to get hold of them. “This is a security issue of deep concern to Vermonters in the age of identity theft,” Sen. Chris Pearson (P/D-Chittenden) said as he presented the bill to fellow senators. The bill’s lead sponsor, Rep. Dennis Devereux (R-Belmont), offered a hypothetical: “Someone from a foreign nation — Russia — could ask for my birth certificate,” he posited. The bill creates a statewide electronic repository for birth certificates, which the state registrar will oversee. Having a centralized system means Vermont-born residents will be able to pick up a copy of their birth certificate at any town clerk’s office, rather than trek back to wherever they were born. The legislation also limits who else can request a certified copy to close relatives, guardians and legal representatives. According to Devereux, Vermont is behind the curve. Forty-seven states already have similar requirements in place, he said. !

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Legislation introduced by Rep. John Bartholomew (D-Hartland), a former veterinarian, spells out what kind of accommodations must be provided for four-legged companions. For example, doghouses must allow the animal to “turn about freely, stand, sit and lie down” and must be “structurally sound and constructed of suitable, durable material.” Metal barrels, cars, refrigerators and freezers are not acceptable doghouses, the legislation notes. It contains similar provisions for cats. Before the Senate debated the bill, Sen. Bobby Starr (D-Essex/Orleans) told his colleagues, “We spent a great deal of time on this bill, not just this year, but last year, the year before that, and the year before that.” Lawmakers debated appropriate dimensions at length, and not everyone is convinced they got it right. “It’s guesswork,” said Sen. Dick McCormack (D-Windsor). “We’re not dogs.”


LOCALmatters

Locked In: Contract Guarantees Inmates Get Sent Out of Vermont

CORRECTIONS

B Y M A R K D AV I S

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SEAN METCALF

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ermont’s long-standing goal to reduce its reliance on out-ofstate prisons has never seemed more attainable. From 2014 to present, the number of inmates the state Department of Corrections houses outside Vermont has dropped from more than 500 to 270. But a contract the DOC signed with its Pennsylvania counterpart last month has made that goal all but unreachable. Why? For the first time, Vermont is guaranteeing it will send a minimum number of inmates to an out-of-state prison. Under the terms of the three-year, $21 million contract, Vermont taxpayers will be on the hook for 250 beds in Pennsylvania — even if the prison population falls and the state doesn’t need all of them. It’s likely the DOC would send inmates to Pennsylvania even if Vermont facilities had room for them, critics say. “It’s a little disheartening,” Defender General Matt Valerio said. “We’re going to fill the space we’ve agreed to rent.” “It’s a huge step backward,” added Suzi Wizowaty, executive director of Vermonters for Criminal Justice Reform. Next month, Vermont’s two-year, $30 million deal to house inmates at a Baldwin, Mich., prison owned by the multinational firm the GEO Group expires. The contract includes options for extensions that the DOC was willing to pursue. But earlier this year, GEO declined, according to Vermont Commissioner of Corrections Lisa Menard. New demand for its cells could explain why. President Donald Trump campaigned as a tough-on-crime, “law-and-order” candidate. Since taking office, he has ordered U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents to arrest undocumented immigrants. In February, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions overturned president Barack Obama’s directives for the federal government to curtail use of private prisons — and, last week, ordered federal prosecutors to seek maximum sentences for drug offenders. The beds are now hot commodities: GEO’s stock price has tripled since Election Day. The DOC suddenly found itself in a seller’s market, according to Menard, and it had to strike a deal quickly. Vermont’s relatively small number of prisoners makes it a bit player in the market, she added. The DOC received eight bids, Menard said, but each required a minimum

number of inmates. Pennsylvania’s bid was lowest. Vermont will pay that state $72 per inmate per day — up from $61.80 under the contract with GEO. The deal can be canceled with six months’ notice, though neither the DOC nor its critics expect that it will be. Senate Judiciary Committee chair Dick Sears (D-Bennington) said that failing to find new space for out-ofstate inmates would have “jeopardized public safety.” “We didn’t have 270 beds in state to put these people [in],” Sears said. “We’ve made tremendous strides reducing the [inmate population], but we’re not there yet.”

During his run for statewide office last year, Vermont Attorney General T.J. Donovan pledged in many campaign speeches that he would fight to end the use of out-of-state prisons. “Without the governmental and community oversight that exists in Vermont’s prison system, we have less ability to ensure incarcerated persons are treated fairly and have access to meaningful programs that will fulfill our goal of successful rehabilitation and reintegration,” Donovan wrote in an April 2016 op-ed. These days, the AG says the Pennsylvania deal is the best Vermont could do, given GEO’s late notice that it would not renew its contract with Vermont.

“Is this the perfect solution? No,” Donovan said, adding that he remains committed to bringing Vermont’s inmates home. Critics say it would be easy enough to reduce the prison population and free up bed space in Vermont — if politicians had the will to do so. About 150 inmates are being held past their release date because the DOC does not approve of their proposed living arrangements or they have no place to go. Another 350 awaiting trial are eligible for bail but can’t come up with the money. Other inmates are addicted to drugs or are mentally ill and would be better served in treatment than in prison, those same critics say. In March, Seven Days


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Menard, citing security concerns, was documented the story of a 91-year-old man with no criminal record who was jailed for unwilling to divulge how they will be months because he got kicked out of his transported to Pennsylvania next month. retirement home after a fight and authori- Inmates said they haven’t been informed of how they will be conveyed. ties couldn’t find a place for him. “As a man who is trying to find his Last year, Valerio counted 275 inmates who were scheduled for release within six way into some type of redemption, it’s months, had finished all of their required really just another move that uproots and counseling and programming, and were changes, on the whim of whomever may simply doing “dead time.” Those people, be pulling the strings,” said Eric Marallo, he suggested, could be released early. who added that he has been sent to nine “It might be one of the easiest things states while serving a 20-year minimum you could possibly do,” Valerio said. “But sentence for second-degree murder. it’s a matter of politics. When people “I understand why I’m in prison, and who govern let people out of jail, there I’m very consciously aware of the debt I is a public backlash from law enforce- owe to our society,” Marallo added. “[But] ment and victims’ advocates groups and every time they do this, it robs us of any the like. It’s not a politically palatable identity and stunts any positive [progress] situation.” that a man has worked for in here. Our Menard said the DOC plans to even- system breeds desperation and despair.” tually keep all inmates in Vermont. But Inmates and their advocates say they for now, she said, there are a few ben- are also unhappy that any grievances they efits to moving Vermont’s inmates to file, or any disciplinary investigations Pennsylvania, where they are slated to initiated against them, will be handled by be held either in a prison Pennsylvania authorities outside of Harrisburg — not the Vermont DOC, or one an hour north of which had more control Philadelphia. in Michigan. (Vermont By car, those facilities inmates can still file legal are about 10 hours closer appeals in state courts and to Vermont than the will still be represented Michigan prison, which by the Vermont Prisoners’ should make it easier for Rights Office.) families and friends to They fear that MAT T VALERIO visit. Menard said that visPennsylvania authorities iting hours are more flexwill be more eager to initiible in Pennsylvania than in Michigan. ate disciplinary proceedings, which can And by leaving GEO, the DOC is — for make it more difficult for inmates to win the first time in a decade — not relying early release. on a for-profit prison corporation. Those “They have a financial incentive,” companies are often accused of slashing Wizowaty said. “It’s in Pennsylvania’s budgets for guards, recreation and medi- interest to keep them there.” cal care to boost their profit margins. Menard dismissed that concern and Inmate Salvatore MacEwan said he’s said she has faith in her Pennsylvania excited to be moving closer to home. counterparts. “I can’t wait to see my family, and I “I have no reason to believe that hope that they will be able to visit often,” would be true or accurate,” Menard said. he said. “To my knowledge, this is not a departBut he and his fellow prisoners are ment that is punitive.” frustrated at what they see as capricious Inmates also gripe about their limited decisions on the part of the state. property and what they might not be “I am upset over the move because able to take to Pennsylvania. Inmates I feel like I am just merchandise at this said they are being told that certain point,” MacEwan wrote in an email to computer tablets and reading lamps that Seven Days. The 31-year-old inmate is they have in Michigan are not allowed in serving 20 years to life on a second-de- Pennsylvania. They will have to buy difgree murder conviction. “They just want ferent models once they are transferred. to dump a bunch of angry Vermonters Their complaints may seem trivial, with no property onto [Pennsylvania’s] Wizowaty said. But when one’s life is lap and say, ‘You deal with it.’ This isn’t confined to a cell, a few possessions right by any standards. It is all business and the daily routine take on an outsize and political instead of rehabilitative.” importance. Other inmates who also communi“I realize many members of the public cated via email wrote that they are tired would say, ‘So what?’” Wizowaty said. “But of being moved from place to place. it is an affront to our personal dignity to Many of those heading to Pennsylvania say, ‘So what?’ to another human being.” ! were held in private prisons in Kentucky and Arizona before they were flown to Contact: mark@sevendaysvt.com, Michigan in 2015. @Davis7D or 865-1020, ext. 23


( ( (!DISPATCH

SCENE AND HEARD IN VERMONT

B Y K ATI E J I CK LING

Bidders perusing the items up for auction

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large crowd gathered in a Berlin parking lot last Saturday to watch two men compete for a coin-fed washing machine. It was a surprise hot-ticket item among the hundreds for sale at the state’s annual surplus auction — essentially, a government garage sale, complete with dump trucks and snowplows. The two men’s bids rose so quickly that auctioneer RJ Klisiewicz of Auctions International interrupted his calling to interject: “What’s in this thing?” That thing was an unremarkable white Whirlpool top-loader, smudged from three years of use in one of Vermont’s state parks. Its condition, according to the 30-page auction program in the hands of each registered bidder: “works.” In the end, a gray-haired man lounging on a parked snow machine — a Fish & Wildlife Department castoff that would later be up for auction — won the appliance. He held up the orange card that displayed his bidding number to offer $570 for the washer. Vermont’s annual auction is part festival and part cultural event, said Terry Lamos, a state employee who oversees the surplus property program and spent the last five months organizing Saturday’s event. She said the Agency of Transportation is the biggest supplier of secondhand stuff, followed by the Department of Public Safety — primarily

Auctioneer RJ Klisiewicz

Kayaks to be auctioned

PHOTOS: KATIE JICKLING

Going, Going, Gone: A Crowd Turns Out to Buy Vermont’s Used Stuff

state police — and Buildings and General Services. Lamos’ job is to convert that aging and obsolete Vermont property into state revenue. This year’s offerings included plenty of old dump trucks and police cars, lined up in the parking lot outside the Agency of Transportation’s repair garage. But there were some unexpected items for sale, too, among a total of 239 “lots”: a Boston Whaler motorboat (with a saltwater engine, oddly enough, as one passerby pointed out), more than a dozen kayaks (state park rentals that probably leaked, according to Klisiewicz) and a stack of confiscated deer stands. Also new this year were airport “sharps,” assorted implements that didn’t make it through the security screening at Burlington International Airport. They had been sorted into plastic tubs by type — corkscrews, pocketknives, innocuous butter knives and a couple of more ominous-looking switchblades — and tagged with nonnegotiable prices to be sold under a tent. Everything had to go by the end of the day. Five hundred and two people had registered to bid, up from 355 last year, according to Lamos. Most of those appeared to be men in work boots who parked their dirt-spattered Ford and Chevy pickups along Route 302. Some brought girlfriends or other family members, but the predominant demographic was middle-aged dudes. They had started trickling in to register as bidders at 8 a.m., after which some slouched against the lined-up vehicles, hands in their jeans pockets, examining the machinery in advance of the action. The auction started promptly at 10 a.m. under dark, threatening clouds. But Klisiewicz was covered. Assisted by a microphone, he directed the bidding from an enclosure on the back of a pickup truck that followed the action, lot by lot. Next to him, Bill Beard, a state employee, recorded the winning bids on a pad of paper. Men swarmed around the first item, a 2008 Chevy Tahoe with 108,000 miles and a chipped windshield. A state employee started it up, and the engine purred. Minutes later, it sold for $6,200 to bidder No. 398, Klisiewicz announced. And so it continued, for hours. A woman holding a long stick festooned with strips of yellow caution tape stood, Vanna White-style, by the items to be auctioned. If a vehicle was too far away, Klisiewicz would call out to his driver, “Dean, move on up,” and his mobile auction house would inch through the crowd of roughly 1,500 to get there. “Only $200?” he’d cry to get things going. “This is a truck, folks.” “Gonna need new valves,” a man mumbled about a pickup he passed up. Occasionally, buyers found deals. A lot of 25 push mowers went for $75. A massive


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Equipment for sale

RV-size fire-safety trailer sold for $700. One man considered a 2005 Chevy truck with 175,000 miles on it. “Runs good, major rust, rear fenders are rotted,” read the auction catalog. He gave the winning bid — $350 — and said he’d find something to do with it. One 2004 Subaru Legacy was listed as being in good working condition but had a caveat: Klisiewicz warned that it “stinks real bad” — like a dead mouse, apparently. He recommended that the buyer pay a visit to Dollar General across the street for a Christmas-tree car freshener. “Don’t let the stink scare you off,” he added. It didn’t. The smelly car, with 102,000 miles and some body damage, went for $1,050. Vermonters made up about 80 percent of Saturday’s bidders, but the auction attracted buyers from all over the Northeast and even Pennsylvania. Myron Moody, a road commissioner from Cornville, Maine, said he’s come to Vermont’s auction every year for two decades. He’s snatched up massive trucks for as little as $25,000 and put them to work clearing the streets in his town of 600, he said. Here in Vermont, Beard chimed in, the state buys them new for $175,000. This year, Moody said, he came for the fun of it — and to look for a “cheapie” truck to give his grandson. He didn’t need any more heavy equipment, he said proudly; the vehicles he bought six years ago were all still running fine. Robby Mazza was not happy about the idea of Vermont taxpayer dollars going to waste as he perused the dump trucks for ones he could use for his Colchester excavation business.

“You see any rust on these trucks?” he asked, gesturing to plow trucks. “Doesn’t make a lot of sense.” Lamos had a reasonable defense. The state uses historical and national data to determine the best time to sell equipment, she said, before it starts to require costly repairs. The state typically keeps its vehicles for about five years, though each department has a say about when to get rid of stuff, she said. Joe Perreault, owner of Midway Auto in Plainfield, said the best deal he ever got was on an old ambulance, which he resold to a man who brought it to a village in the Dominican Republic. Three hours into Saturday’s auction, though, he hadn’t purchased anything. Perreault said that some of the vehicles were going for double what he’d hoped to pay. He speculated that the big crowd was driving prices higher. “This is crazy,” he said, shaking his head. Such complaints are part of the ritual, Lamos said. She noted one man from Maine was “out there trash-talking first thing in the morning” — part of an elaborate and practiced display to dissuade others from bidding. As the afternoon advanced, the rain held off. The Boy Scouts sold 300 hamburgers. And, in the end, the state would make $886,000, plus $1,200 from the airport’s items. Despite the bigger crowd, that’s $200,000 less than last year. Lamos offered some theories: No Québécois turned out to bid this year, she said. And those snowplows? Compared to the usual offerings, she said, they just weren’t in as good shape. !

THE SMELLY CAR, WITH 102,000 MILES AND SOME BODY DAMAGE,

WENT FOR $1,050.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 05.17.17-05.24.17 SEVEN DAYS LOCAL MATTERS 19

Contact: katie@sevendaysvt.com Untitled-12 1

5/15/17 1:00 PM


LOCALmatters

Bridal Brawls: The Old Lantern Fights Its Neighbors Over Noise BY MOLLY WAL S H

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 05.17.17-05.24.17 SEVEN DAYS 20 LOCAL MATTERS

PHOTOS: CALEB KENNA

V

ermont is a popular place to get married, but not all of the people who live next to its rural wedding venues are celebrating. The special day isn’t so special when it’s almost every Friday, Saturday and Sunday from spring to late fall. Conflicts with neighbors have spilled into municipal meetings — and courts. Just ask Justin Wygmans. In 2015, the owners of the Old Lantern, just 400 feet from his house on Greenbush Road in Charlotte, sued him and his wife, Maura, in Vermont Superior Court. Lisa and Roland Gaujac claimed the Wygmans were intentionally disrupting their outdoor weddings with a chain saw and a lawn mower. The lawsuit was the culmination of several years of disagreements over wedding music, exterior lighting and the frequency of outdoor ceremonies. In the court filing, the Gaujacs said the Wygmans came to the border of the Old Lantern property “often in a motorized golf cart, and have screamed and yelled, including various obscenities, at plaintiffs and at reception guests in an attempt to disrupt the ceremonies.” Lisa Gaujac told Seven Days that the roaring chain saws were “ridiculous”; one noisy incident was deeply upsetting to the wedding party. “They came in and said, ‘Who is this crazy guy? Why did he try to ruin our wedding?’” Gaujac recalled. Wygmans is adamant that neither he and nor his family members has ever attempted to disrupt the roughly 70 weddings the Lantern hosts annually. He denied the allegations in a legal response to the lawsuit. In his view, the Gaujacs are unfairly asking his family to turn its property into a quiet zone to accommodate their business. “You literally can’t listen to, you know, like, light jazz when you’re on your own patio,” said Wygmans, who ran a noisy Burlington music venue called Club Toast with his brother before he bought his Charlotte home in 2005. Now he said he has to worry that his grown-up soundtrack will upset brides and grooms. “It’s crazy,” he said of the “wedding factory” next door. After two years of haggling, the Wygmans and Gaujacs settled their lawsuit in January: They agreed to split the cost of a cedar hedge. But that’s the extent of their cooperation. “They realized they had to settle because we had all this proof,” Gaujac said, referring to numerous people who witnessed the chain saw incident. Not so, said Wygmans, who insists he stopped fighting only because his family spent $30,000 on legal bills and ran out of money. The Old Lantern conflict lives on in related legal actions that have yet to be resolved. The venue was built before the town adopted zoning regulations, so it’s exempt from most of them. Wygmans and at least four other neighbors have challenged that “grandfathered” status by claiming that the venue is not the occasional event hall it once was. Rather, they point out, it’s a restaurant that serves 350 people. So far, Charlotte’s zoning administrators have rejected the suggestion that there has been a change of use at the Lantern, the result of which would be more regulation and greater scrutiny.

Roland and Lisa Gaujac

Last year the Gaujacs took a bold step toward legitimizing their status: They started a petition to create a zoning change that would specifically authorize an event hall on their property. It passed at the polls with strong support, and the Charlotte Planning Commission is now studying possible language for an ordinance that would go to the voters for final approval. Charlotte has changed over the years. Once a community of dairy farmers and summer residents who congregated in camps along Lake Champlain’s rugged shoreline, the town has attracted newcomers over the decades, many of whom have built million-dollar homes. The median family income hit $116,230 last year, the third highest for any municipality in the state, according to the Vermont Department of Taxes. Nearly 4,000 people now call the place home. But while they enjoy pastoral views of Lake Champlain, mountains and sweeping pastures that are just turning green, Charlotte residents have to leave town to shop for a cocktail dress, go to a full-service grocery store or sit at a pub. Local leaders have used strict zoning and aggressive land conservation to protect the Route 7 corridor, making it a largely sprawl-free zone. The barn-red, wooden, 8,000-square-foot Old Lantern remains a rare place to congregate. Dairy farmers Mary and Earl Burns, who are now deceased, built it in 1963 after their own barn burned down, according to their daughter, Linda Burns Blake. “They got together with my uncles and my aunt, and we all decided to build a recreation hall,” she said.

Her parents acquired a barn in Jericho and reassembled it on their property in Charlotte. Blake was about 16 when the Old Lantern first opened its doors, looking much like it does now — minus the glittery disco ball that is suspended from the exposed ceiling timbers. With wooden benches along the sides, the spacious room can accommodate dozens of tables for sit-down dinners and still allow plenty of space for dancing. In Blake’s memory, everyone in the family cooked and served for the weddings, banquets and square dances that happened there. Sunday mornings, they cleaned up and polished the maple plank dance floor — once one of


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the largest and best constructed in the state. Then they would have a party for themselves. “On Sunday evenings we would turn on the music, on low, and we’d all rollerskate, all evening long,” Blake recalled. She met her future husband, Gary Blake, while serving food at a Saturday square dance. “I got her to come out from behind the counter and dance with me one time,” he said. “We’ve been together ever since.” The couple, who live in Georgia, Vt., held their wedding party at the Lantern in 1972. The Burns family also ran a campground on their land, which at one point stretched east from Greenbush Road to Route 7, across meadowlands and fields that are now mostly conserved.

THE VENUE WAS BUILT BEFORE THE TOWN ADOPTED ZONING REGULATIONS, SO IT’S EXEMPT FROM MOST OF THEM.

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The campground had tent sites and hookups for RVs. The Lantern property was a busy place, with concerts and other events as well as weddings, Linda Blake said. “It’s such a large hall. We could accommodate a lot of people. We would do 600 at a whack. And sometimes we would have two wedding parties going on at the same time.” The Burns’ property was divided up in a complicated transaction and conservation project in the 1990s. Antiques dealer and appraiser Jim Dickerson owned the Lantern with two partners from 2000 to 2006. Dickerson had first visited the place in the 1970s as a high school student and, after college, rented the property to hold auctions. The barn hasn’t changed much. “I think the interior, it really is basically the same as it was the day they built it. Over the years, all the wood just got a wonderful old brown patina, and that’s where it is now,” Dickerson said. He can’t understand the neighbors’ complaints. “Hey, if you don’t like the sound of noisy kids, you better not buy the house next to the playground at the school,” Dickerson said. Dickerson sold to the Gaujacs, a couple who knows the restaurant business. French-born Roland worked at a Four Seasons hotel in Newport Beach, Calif., and as a private chef. He and Lisa met in 1984 in Los Angeles. “It was a blind date in a bar,” she said. “And we eloped, like, eight weeks later.” They made their way to Vermont and, in 1995, opened a restaurant in New

Haven, the 1796 House at Roland’s Place. They sold it a few years after they bought the Lantern. In 2012, the Gaujacs built a small inn on the property, which Wygmans and another neighbor family, Karen and Mike Frost, also challenged. The additional structure helped the Gaujacs grow their business, as has the national trend for barn weddings. Robert Mack, a farmer and former selectboard member who lives on the south side of the Lantern property, said the Gaujacs are good neighbors. Mack disagrees with those who are raising concerns. “It’s just a lot of NIMBYism,” Mack said. Other neighbors would counter: Why does one property in Charlotte get special treatment? In a 2015 letter, the Wygmans and Karen Frost said 2009 upgrades to the Lantern’s small kitchen on the north side of the building should have required multiple permits. Frost asked the town to “minimize the negative impacts of these changes on the neighbors.” Two more neighbors, Adrian and Alison Wolverton, added their voices. They appealed a town zoning administrator’s decision that changes to the kitchen at the Old Lantern did not constitute a change of use. The Wolvertons argued that by improving the kitchen so all the food could be cooked on-site, the Gaujacs had made the facility more like a restaurant than an event hall. Their appeal is pending in the Environmental Division of Vermont Superior Court. Many Charlotte residents have supported the Lantern at zoning hearings. But they haven’t been so welcoming of other proposed venues. Late last year, neighbors circulated a petition against an event barn proposed for 783 Mt. Philo Road. The Charlotte Zoning Board of Adjustment turned the project down in December. Another event barn on the west side of Route 7 won approval in early 2016, but neighbors have appealed that decision to the Environmental Division. It has yet to open. Meanwhile, the Gaujacs said they have spent more than $70,000 on legal bills. They hired a sound engineer to take decibel readings in an effort to mediate a dispute over noise with the Wolvertons. A compromise is forthcoming, according to Lisa Gaujac. None of this behind-the-scenes legal drama is keeping bridal parties away from the vintage dance floor in Charlotte. Couples from around the East Coast are lining up like bridesmaids in a conga line to book the Old Lantern. Dates are already reserved for many Saturdays in the summer and autumn — not only this year, but next. !

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EXCERPTS FROM THE BLOG KATIE JICKLING

In High Gear: Burlington Moves Forward With Bike Projects

05.17.17-05.24.17 SEVEN DAYS 22 LOCAL MATTERS

Michael Alvanos

Burlington’s Pine Street Deli Closes Its Doors The Pine Street Deli closed early last Wednesday, its final day in business. By 3 p.m., the coolers were empty, the shelves were bare and even the bread had been snatched up by a surge of customers who dropped by one final time. Employee Taylor Courville gestured toward the coolers. “All we have left is cream and beer,” he said. The Alvanos family had owned the popular sandwich shop and convenience store on the corner of Pine Street and Flynn Avenue for 11 years. The building is to be demolished and replaced by a new one with 30 studio and one-bedroom apartments. It’s been a four-year process to design the new building and secure permits, said Michael Alvanos, who helped run the deli. His parents, George and Christine Alvanos, owned the place. The new building will have two commercial spaces on the first floor. Alvanos said he hopes to have a restaurant but couldn’t say for sure if he’d reopen Pine Street Deli. Demolition is scheduled to begin in early June, he said. “We wanted to design ourselves a project that we feel will support all the great things going on on Pine Street,” said Alvanos, who also works as an architect for JRMA Design Studio. He sees the development as a way to strengthen his family’s ties to the South End. He grew up in the area, as did his mother. “We have a great strong connection to this area,” Alvanos said. “We want to put something here that’s going to last a long time.”

KATIE JICKLING

Bernie Sanders Headed Across the Pond for Book Tour Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) is taking his message to Great Britain and Ireland, appearing at six events during an action-packed four days beginning June 1. The mini-tour is designed to promote the British paperback release of Sanders’ book, Our Revolution: A Future to Believe In. The dates coincide with a long weekend in the U.S. Senate’s calendar, so if his travel arrangements come off without a hitch, he won’t miss any days at work. News of his tour was not easy to come by. We first caught wind of it via several reports in the British and Irish press. The senator’s office, meanwhile, was no help whatsoever; we inquired after hearing of tour stops in Dublin and Oxford, and got the following terse emailed response from Sanders staffer Josh Miller-Lewis: “It is a book event. You should contact the publisher.” Well, OK, so it’s a book event. But it’s hard to believe that Sanders’ office doesn’t know where the guy is going, even if another party is making the arrangements. What if they need to reach him on a moment’s notice? We inquired again, which produced this nonresponse: “His book events are completely separate from his Senate work. We don’t have anything to do with that itinerary.” Sheesh.

FILE: ERIC TADSEN

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

KATIE JICKLING

SASHA GOLDSTEIN

The City of Burlington is moving full speed ahead to promote bike transportation, and projects are taking shape across the city. On Tuesday evening, the Department of Public Works and the Department of Parks, Recreation and Waterfront were scheduled to paint so-called advisory bike lanes along Flynn Avenue. They’ll run in both directions between the railroad tracks by Switchback Brewing and the road’s terminus at Oakledge Park, said Nicole Losch, senior transportation planner at the DPW. New signage and temporary street markings denoting the new bike lanes “Advisory” lanes are marked with a dashed white line and create a “preferred” space for bicyclists, according to the city. Motorists can, when necessary, head into the bike lanes to avoid oncoming traffic. The lanes will replace 29 free on-street parking spaces, Losch said. Last year, she said, the DPW instituted parking kiosks in Oakledge Park to allow drivers to pay by the hour rather than a full-day rate. The Flynn Avenue plan, which was approved last summer, had been years in the making, Losch said. Also, Burlington’s first bike-share program will be piloted this summer. The project launch includes 100 bikes for rent at kiosks around the Queen City by the end of the summer. The city is also seeking feedback on the North Avenue pilot bike lanes. The controversial lanes have been in place for a year, and Burlington residents have until May 29 to weigh in on the changes. Castleton Polling Institute is collecting surveys along with traffic and crash data, Losch said. They’ll submit a report to the city next month, paving the way for a final decision by the city council in late June.

JOHN WALTERS

political columnist

Sen. Bernie Sanders

Please bear in mind that Miller-Lewis’ salary is courtesy of the American taxpayer, and one of his duties is responding to press inquiries or routing them to someone who can. We then contacted Friends of Bernie Sanders, the senator’s campaign organization. “We are told to tell

everyone that the publisher is handling all his book events,” said campaign staffer Grady Kennison. “There are a lot of boundaries between his book tour, us handling the campaign and his senatorial staff.” As for who’s paying Sanders’ travel expenses, neither Miller-Lewis nor Kennison could speak definitively, although Kennison assumed that the publisher is paying the freight. OK, so on to the publisher, St. Martin’s Press. Our efforts there met with failure. Emails and phone calls to the publicity department were not returned. And they wonder why the book trade is in trouble. Left to our own devices, we ferreted out details of Sanders’ tour through various sources online. What we discovered was that five of the six events are sold out — and at prices that seem a little out of whack for hearing a politician pump his own book. A Democratic Socialist, at that. The ticket prices available online ranged from 15 euros, or about $16.50, to a whopping 35 British pounds, or $45 and some change. To be fair, you do get a free copy of the book for your 35 quid. Sanders may not be a fan of free-market economics, but in the free marketplace of ideas, he’s a resounding success. !


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Lost Shul Mural Inspires Play About Burlington’s ‘Little Jerusalem’ DAVID PUNIA

B Y KEN PI CA R D

THEATER

24 STATE OF THE ARTS

SEVEN DAYS

05.17.17-05.24.17

T

wo years ago, members of Burlington’s Jewish community finally unveiled the newly restored Lost Shul Mural, a distinctive work of folk art that was painted in 1910 by a Jewish immigrant from Lithuania. The mural, which for decades adorned the altar of an Orthodox Jewish shul, or synagogue, in the Old North End, was nearly lost after the building where it hung was sold and repurposed as commercial space. In 1986, the mural was sealed behind the wall of what had become an apartment complex; it wasn’t rediscovered until 2012. As one of the few surviving examples of eastern European wooden synagogue art, the three-panel mural, painstakingly restored and rehung in the foyer of Burlington’s Ohavi Zedek Synagogue, continues to impress and inspire. Now its origins are the subject of a new play by Burlington writer JOY COHEN. Her historical fiction brings alive the community of Lithuanian Jewish immigrants who inhabited the Old North End neighborhood once known as “Little Jerusalem.”

SHARON PANITCH

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

The Lost Shul Mural at Ohavi Zedek Synagogue

Timothy Lewis with a photo of Ben Zion Black

Cohen’s play, Of the Better Kind, a work in progress commissioned by the Burlington production company THEATRE KAVANAH and partially funded by a grant from BURLINGTON CITY ARTS, will premiere on Friday, May 19, with a staged reading at the MAIN STREET LANDING BLACK BOX THEATRE. The play tells the story of Ben Zion Black, the painter whom Chai Adam Synagogue hired to create the mural for $200. Its title pays tribute to the commercial sign shop, Signs of the Better Kind, on Center Street — now home to the Daily Planet — that Black owned for about 50 years. As Cohen explains, the play begins on the day before Black is due to unveil his new mural. It highlights all the stressors that come with meeting a deadline and wanting to produce an important work of religious art that will make the community proud. “We’re sharing a story that very few people know about,” Cohen says, “and we’re trying to really honor the role they played in creating this community.” Though the story of the mural’s creation is fictional, Cohen says she spent more than a year researching the play’s characters, many of whom were actual Jewish immigrants to Burlington, and the challenges they faced in gaining acceptance from native Vermonters. Though Black himself came from the Lithuanian town of Kovno (now Kaunas), many of Burlington’s Jews emigrated from the Lithuanian town of Čekiškė, or Chaikishok. In fact, much of the play is set in the fictional Café Chaikishok, another homage to a community that was displaced by religious persecution. “This all took place in 1910,” Cohen adds, “but it has so much relevance to what’s taking place politically in our country today.” Cohen, who was raised in a traditional Jewish household in Valley Stream, N.Y., by parents and grandparents who all spoke Yiddish, didn’t have to look far for an appropriate producer for her play. THEATRE KAVANAH, whose motto is “staging the Jewish experience,” was founded in 2012 by WENDI STEIN of Hinesburg as a way to combine and explore her passions for the theater and her Jewish heritage. The company is headquartered in the Burlington home of co-director SHARON PANITCH. Theatre Kavanah produced an


If you see these lovely ladies, make sure to say

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Emily Lopez (Rachel Saiger) and Timothy Lewis (Ben Zion Black) reading Of the Better Kind

THIS ALL TOOK PLACE IN 1910, BUT IT HAS SO MUCH RELEVANCE TO WHAT’S TAKING PLACE POLITICALLY IN OUR COUNTRY TODAY.

M-Th 10-7, F-Sa 10-8. Su 11-6 4 0 CH U R CH % STR EE T BU R LINGTON % • 8 0 2 8 6 2 5 0 5 1 S W E E T L A D YJ A N E . B I Z 4t-sweetladyjane051717.indd 1

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JOY COHEN

Yes, it’s that beautiful.

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INFO Of the Better Kind, Friday, May 19, and Saturday, May 20, 7 p.m.; Sunday, May 21, 4 p.m., at Main Street Landing Black Box Theatre in Burlington. $10-25. theatrekavanah.org

For information, call 802-652-4114

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As this play was in development last fall, Panitch notes, Ohavi Zedek’s Rabbi AMY SMALL was contacted by a journalist from Radio Lithuania about a series the station is running on that country’s lost shtetls, or Jewish enclaves. It’s not known why so many Lithuanian Jews immigrated to Vermont, but one theory holds that the climate and topography reminded them of their native land. The reporter, who happened to be visiting Chaykishok at the time, reached out to Small to find out what, if anything, she knew about the Chaikishok Jews who’d immigrated to Burlington. Says Panitch, “I feel like [we’re] long-lost siblings trying to find each other across the world and being like, ‘Whatever happened to you?’ and ‘We’re here!’” !

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“enhanced stage reading” of Cohen’s play Anna’s Journal in 2013. Panitch points out that Of the Better Kind, which is directed by Montpelier’s MARGO WHITCOMB, tells the real-life love story of Ben Zion Black (played by TIMOTHY LEWIS of Colchester) and Rachel Saiger (played by EMILY LOPEZ of Burlington). According to Panitch, Black was interested in courting Saiger back in Lithuania. Her parents didn’t approve, which may be why the couple left that country in 1905. Black had to work for five years to save enough money for passage to Burlington, where the pair eventually married. Panitch describes the real Black as a “Renaissance man” who was not only an accomplished painter but also a mandolin player, actor and Yiddish playwright and poet. Much of his poetry, she notes, is still archived at the University of Vermont. “He loved the Yiddish language and culture,” she says. “At a time when people were … trying to leave the old country behind, he really embraced that, which was probably unusual for a young man of that time.”


PHOTOS: COURTESY OF MICHELLE SAFFRAN

Integrated Arts Academy Unveils Family Portrait Exhibition B Y KY MELYA SA R I

L

26 STATE OF THE ARTS

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undertook four years ago. That initial project involved only the students, but, “The school has such a diverse group of families, and I thought, What a way to honor that diversity,” said JUDY KLIMA, the school’s arts integration coach. Klima estimated that close to 80 percent of the student population participated in the family portrait project. About 49 percent of that population is white, 23 percent is black or African American, 19 percent is Asian, 7 percent is bi- or multiracial, and 4 percent is Latino. The timing of the project was serendipitous, said Klima. The call for students and their families to sign up to have their pictures taken went out in October. It was a time when students, particularly those of immigrant or refugee origin, were already feeling the effects of the xenophobic rhetoric surrounding the presidential election. The message of the project is clear: “All families matter and we are all welcome,” said Klima. But the project doesn’t solely reflect IAA’s rich ethnic diversity. It also celebrates the different types of families from which its students come: nuclear,

FROM BROADWAY TO BURLINGTON: VERMONT STAGE TO PRODUCE FUN HOME EVA SOLLBERGER

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ast week, visitors to NORTH END STUDIOS in Burlington found themselves gazing at an unusually engaging art exhibition. From Howard Center employees in a training session to people attending classes, concerts and meetings, everyone took a moment to examine the portraits of students from the Integrated Arts Academy at H.O. Wheeler with their families, said studio co-owner APRIL WERNER. The IAA Family Portrait Project is a collaboration of IAA, BURLINGTON CITY ARTS and the school’s parent-teacher association. It features 147 family photographs in color taken by BCA photographer MICHELLE SAFFRAN, alongside stories written by IAA students about their families. Throughout the month of May, the portraits are on display at seven locations in the Old North End and downtown Burlington: Barrio Bakery, Burlington City Hall, the Chubby Muffin, Fletcher Free Library, IAA, North End Studios and Nunyuns Bakery & Café. The idea of taking pictures of students and their families evolved from a similar project that the school and Saffran

Alison Bechdel at Circle in the Square Theatre, 2016

Tucked into a recent program for The Call at VERMONT STAGE was an announcement for the 2017/18 season, and reading it gave some theatergoers a pleasant surprise. Leading the charge in October will be Fun Home, a bold and ambitious choice for the modest quarters of the company’s home, FLYNNSPACE. The critically acclaimed musical was adapted by Lisa Kron and Jeanine

Tesori from Vermont cartoonist Alison Bechdel’s best-selling 2006 graphic memoir (subtitled A Family Tragicomic) about growing up, and coming out, in her family’s funeral home business. In 2012, the story journeyed from her pages to its off-Broadway debut at New York’s Public Theater. From there, in 2015, the show graduated to a Broadway production at Circle in the Square Theatre. Fun Home was nominated for 12 Tony Awards and won five, including the title of Best Musical; Kron and Tesori were the first female writing team to win the Tony for Best Original Score. The show is now a few months into its U.S. national tour and will visit an additional 19 cities before the end of the year. For a company such as Vermont Stage to present a show during its national tour is a rare occurrence. To produce a theatrical work, a company must apply for the rights, and such requests are regularly denied. The

single-parent, cross-generational, samesex and blended. In one portrait, we see that Max and his two dads love to read. For another, Vartai’s father wore the traditional Nepali dhaka topi, while her mother chose to wear patterned leggings. The pictures and stories provide a “window into what each child thinks about their family,” noted Klima. Some stories are particularly poignant. A student named Mafali wrote: “Most of my family is from Africa. But I’m African American because of my mom. It’s really sad to think about [it] because that means some of my ancestors were slaves.” “People aren’t just looking at their [own] picture,” said Nunyuns owner KRISTINE HARBOUR. “They’re going around to read what the other kids wrote.” Saffron, a photo-collage artist, called the family portrait project a “big departure” from her usual work. “I use a lot of family imagery, but it’s my own imagery,” she said. “This time, I was working with people I didn’t know, and it was groups of people, which is generally not how I work.” She’s not a portrait photographer, she pointed out, and typically

most common reason is that another (usually bigger) production — such as a simultaneous national tour — is happening elsewhere. (Fun fact: Four days after President Donald Trump fired him, FBI director James Comey attended a matinee of the show in Washington, D.C., according to the New York Times.) Nonetheless, when Vermont Stage artistic producing director Cristina Alicea heard that publishing company Samuel French was going to grant Fun Home rights to professional theaters on a case-by-case basis, she decided to throw her hat in the ring. “At one point, we were trying to get the national tour to come to the Flynn [Center for the Performing Arts],” Alicea told Seven Days by phone, “but the show is only going to big cities that can sustain a two-week run. The only way that northern Vermont and Burlington will ever see Fun Home is if we do it.” Alicea won the rights. Bechdel’s life story is the basis for the musical. Prior to writing — and drawing — the memoir, she penned the comic strip “Dykes to Watch Out For,” which appeared in gay and alternative

The Maludi family

ART

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newspapers nationwide, including Seven Days. One of her panels is the source of the term “Bechdel test,” a metric for the representation of women in fiction; a Bechdel character famously refused to see a film unless it featured two or more women having a conversation about something other than men. In Vermont, residents might run into Bolton-based Bechdel — who was recently appointed the state’s newest cartoonist laureate — at the supermarket or at local events. In past months, she’s pulled “DTWOF” out of retirement a couple of times, employing her cast of characters to comment on the Trump administration. Regarding Fun Home, Alicea said she recognizes that Vermont Stage has big shoes to fill. “It was more of a daydream, applying for the show,” she recounted. “So, when we got the call from Sam French, we started jumping around for joy. But my next thought was, Wait, how am I going to do this show?” By necessity, the Vermont Stage version will be stripped down to a much smaller scale than the Broadway


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INFO Integrated Arts Academy Family Portrait Project, through May 31 at Barrio Bakery, Burlington City Hall, the Chubby Muffin, Fletcher Free Library, IAA, North End Studios and Nunyuns Bakery & Café, all in Burlington. Reception Tuesday, May 23, 4-6 p.m. in City Hall Foyer, Burlington. burlingtoncityarts.org

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that a play with a lesbian protagonist talking about her father’s suicide would end up a musical that would resonate with so many people, but clearly it does.” At this point, the only known hire for the Burlington production is its director: Robin Fawcett. A theater teacher at Champlain Valley Union High School, she directed Slowgirl for Vermont Stage in 2015. Alicea said Bechdel knows about the local production of Fun Home and is excited about it. Other details will have to wait until October. Auditions for the show begin in June.

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Fun Home, by Lisa Kron (book and lyrics) and Jeanine Tesori (music), adapted from Alison Bechdel’s graphic novel, Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic, produced by Vermont Stage, October 4 to 29 at FlynnSpace in Burlington. vermontstage.org

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STATE OF THE ARTS 27

production. Alicea hasn’t seen any performances of the show, aside from a few YouTube clips. “I prefer not to see a show that we’re going to do,” she explained. “I don’t want my experience of watching other artists’ work to color the way we’re doing it here.” Fun Home is far and away the largest show Vermont Stage has ever approached, and Alicea acknowledged it will cost twice as much as the company’s typical productions. For starters, the rights to a musical are more expensive than those for a drama. Fun Home requires nine actors, seven musicians, a musical director and possibly a vocal coach. Accordingly, Vermont Stage needs to fundraise about $20,000 by September to afford a full mounting of the show. “That in itself is a daunting concept,” Alicea said, then added, “I think we’ll be able to do it.” Despite the obstacles, Alicea insisted the choice to produce Fun Home was a no-brainer. “Our mission is to produce plays that are both entertaining and offer meaningful conversation in our community,” she said. “No one imagined

felt embarrassed, she recalled. “When my mum saw it, she started taking pictures and sending it to everyone,” she said. “It’s also kind of cool.” In the portrait, Nico has her arms around her father, who sits on the chair with her mother. Her younger brother sits across their laps. The IAA project could inspire a new one: Saffran wants to team up with her friend, Shelburne-based writer DAVID FRENCH, to produce a book about refugee families, she said. Klima said the pictures will go home with the families after the exhibition ends. Some of them may take a road trip first, though — the VERMONT ARTS COUNCIL in Montpelier has expressed interest in hanging selected portraits, Klima noted. !

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uses natural lighting in her own work. The IAA sessions, held in a basement, necessitated studio lighting. To minimize the inconvenience to families, the organizers scheduled those sessions around activities for which the subjects were already coming to school. Saffran gave the students and their families the responsibility of directing the shoot. “I didn’t want to be the one influencing the process,” she said. “I wanted to document them.” She had just one rule: Each family group had to be connected in some way to an antique wingback chair that she dubbed “the wishing chair.” “They could be under it, lift it up, turn it around,” Saffran explained. The chair encouraged “everything [to be] clustered,” she said, “and so that helps with composition.” As she prepared to photograph her subjects, she told them to think of good things for their families, Saffran said, which “broke the ice and got [the process going] in a more playful direction, more relaxed and genuine.” Some families, she noted, came dressed up, while others wore casual clothes. She and her assistant, ELI THURSTON, took six months to photograph 147 families. At the end of the project, Saffran had the difficult task of choosing 15 portraits to be displayed at Burlington City Hall. “They all mean the most to me,” she said. First, she shortlisted portraits that

CARDS BAKEWARE HOLIDAY DECORATIONS FUN looked the most artistic. From those, she STOCKING chose the pieces that best represented the goal of the project. “I wanted to make STUFFERS sure I had a diverse representation of all FURNITURE different kinds of families,” Saffran said. When fourth grader Nico saw her MUCH MORE family portrait at North End Studios, she


THE STRAIGHT DOPE BY CECIL ADAMS

Dear Cecil,

Where did the modern depiction of Jesus come from, and when? — Ryan Copper

28 STRAIGHT DOPE

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Y

ou could be a little more specific, Ryan. Maybe the depiction you’re thinking of is a version of what’s called the Divine Mercy image, showing a very white Jesus with puppy-dog eyes, that originated in the 1930s. Or maybe it’s the somewhat more rugged fellow seen in “Head of Christ,” from 1940. But yes, either way, what you’re talking about is a clearly European-looking Jesus — fairskinned, light-haired, blueeyed, his softly handsome demeanor suggesting a teen idol, if a serious-minded one. You’d figure a guy like that would have been a real sore thumb in firstcentury Judea. So where’d we get the idea that that’s Jesus? Well, it sure wasn’t from the Bible. You can read the Holy Writ cover to cover, Old Testament and New, and you’re not going to find any usable info about what Jesus looked like. In Revelation, the triumphant Christ is described as being white in color, true, but he’s also said to have white hair, fiery eyes and feet of burnished bronze. Prophets who describe the coming messiah also mention whiteness, but similarly this seems to be an indication of his purity rather than his complexion.

We don’t have any historical documentation of Jesus’ appearance either — at least, none that’s authentic. There’s a letter, widely reprinted in Renaissance Europe, attributed to one Publius Lentulus, purportedly a Roman governor of Judea who lived in Jesus’ day, describing him to the Roman Senate as radiantly handsome with wavy red-brown hair, rosy cheeks and bright gray eyes. But the letter’s a fake, dating back no further than the 1400s. (This is around the same period when the Shroud of Turin first surfaced to provide alleged evidence of Jesus’ facial features.) Nor did the earliest Christians leave behind any useful renderings of Jesus. Read broadly, the Second Commandment forbade “graven images,” and, anyway, scurrying through catacombs to avoid persecution was hardly conducive to the production of fine art — Jesus was represented, if at all, in scrawled symbols of Xs and fishes. And when his followers debated about his physical appearance, they didn’t necessarily consider him to have been a looker. Early Christians may have understood Jesus as a shape-shifter: In the Apocryphal text Acts of John,

he simultaneously appears to one apostle as a bald guy with a thick beard but to another as a scraggly-bearded kid. The early theologian Tertullian, quoting Isaiah (“He had no form nor comeliness”), presents Jesus as unimpressive-looking at best, perhaps even disfigured. In a second-century work, the scholar Origen seems to imply that pagan critics had razzed Christians for their funnylooking god. Over the ensuing years, though, theological arguments began to surface insisting that Jesus must be beautiful, as a proper physical representation of the divine. Images of Jesus began drawing on classical models of beauty and grace. Pre-Renaissance artistic renderings already show him as unmistakably European: A fresco by Pietro Lorenzetti from around 1320 has a lighthaired, light-bearded Jesus being taken down from the cross. Which — in addition to the little fact that’s there’s no support for it — is why we can dismiss the story you’ll see tossed around in which the emergence of Euro-Jesus can be traced to 1490, when Pope Alexander I supposedly ordered a purge of all depictions of Jesus as Semitic looking and

commissioned a number of influential replacement paintings using his son, Cardinal Cesare Borgia, as the model. In reality, a white Jesus had established his foothold well before. It’s hardly shocking, then, that when a 20th-century mystic, the Polish nun and future saint Faustina Kowalska, reported in 1931 that Jesus had revealed himself to her in a vision, the figure she saw matched the long-standing consensus view of his appearance. Under Sister Faustina’s direction, a painter named Eugene Kazimirowski produced a likeness of a lightskinned, light-brown-haired Jesus with right hand raised in benediction, his left drawing aside the robe over his heart, from which emanate beams of red and white light. Hung in a chapel in Vilnius and known as the Divine Mercy or the Merciful Jesus, it went over big enough to inspire adaptations by subsequent artists who widened the eyes to more doelike proportions. Eventually, reproductions of the various Faustina images

became notably popular in Latin America, meaning they’re often encountered in the U.S., too. Meanwhile “Head of Christ,” by Chicago illustrator Warner Sallman, entered public awareness at right around the same time. With his imposing brow, this Jesus has a little more of a red-blooded look, and it apparently struck a chord in World War II-era America; the Salvation Army and the YMCA handed out wallet-size cards to countless soldiers, and within four years  of taking on the job, Sallman’s publishers had printed 14 million copies. All told, maybe half a billion “Head of Christs” have rolled off the presses to date.  None of this, of course, addresses the question of how accurate these images likely are, or how non-European the historical Jesus’ features might have been. We won’t sort it out now, but it’s safe to say that sticking to a stricter reading of the Second Commandment’s no-graven-images policy would have avoided a lot of disputation down the road.

INFO

Is there something you need to get straight? Cecil Adams can deliver the Straight Dope on any topic. Send questions to Cecil via straightdope.com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.

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A VERMONT CABBIE’S REAR VIEW BY JERNIGAN PONTIAC

Bombay afford to pay for it. So I took off and drove to the West Coast. I took the classes and worked as an LPN. Then my mother died suddenly from an aneurysm, and I returned home to help my dad care for my three younger siblings.” We passed through town after town — Mooers, Irona and Ellenburg with those tracts of massive windmills. Compared with Vermont, rural New York seems — I don’t know, forlorn is the word that comes to mind. So many shuttered storefronts, neglected fields and ramshackle properties. I would say that the area has seen better times, but I don’t even know if that’s true. Vermont’s small towns have declined as well over the past few

I WOULD SAY THAT THE AREA HAS SEEN BETTER TIMES, BUT I DON’T EVEN KNOW IF THAT’S TRUE. decades, but all over the state, I see promising signs of life, and the landscape is dotted with new development, both business and agricultural. At Burke, we cut northwest onto Route 122. A memory of the Dannemora prison-break saga of 2015 came to mind. That was all anybody talked about during that summer two years ago. “Aren’t we near where they caught the second Dannemora prison escapee?” I asked Renee. “I guess the Lifetime TV channel just released a movie about it.” “Yeah, they caught him in a trailer just up the road from here. I knew Joyce, the prison guard who helped them escape. She was a beautician before she went to work in the jail. She cut my hair once or

“I came home late one morning, and he was still in bed, totally hungover. He looked up at me and said, ‘I’m so sorry I can’t be the man you need me to be.’ I moved out the next week.” “Life’s like that, you know,” I said. “We think we can, but no one can truly change another person. If only it was possible, but I don’t think it is. It sucks, but everyone is responsible for their own behavior. That’s my experience, anyway.” “I agree with everything you said, but I still consider Rick the love of my life. I was married two times afterward, but I never experienced that kind of connection with either of them. That’s probably why the marriages both ended.”

Renee was unsure of the route to her daughter’s place, because, she told me, her daughter always did the driving when she visited. I used my GPS, but it just took us to a dead end; apparently, the disembodied narrator who lives in my cellphone didn’t know a bridge was out for repairs. Luckily, we ran into a road worker operating a brush-clearing vehicle. He got out, removed his soundproof headphones and, with a friendly smile, gave us clear directions to where we needed to go. “That was Greg,” she said, as we got under way again. “He didn’t recognize me, but I went to high school with him. He was a senior when I was a sophomore.” With an ETA about 10 minutes away, I asked Renee if her dad was still around. “No, he passed away two years ago this June, it will be,” she said. “On his death bed, he told me, ‘Button’ — that’s what he called me — ‘my one regret is that I didn’t come up with the money to send you to college. You would have made a great doctor.’” Only a lucky few get to hear something like that from a dying parent, I thought. Renee had endured a tough life, but she lived long enough to experience her dad’s apology and acknowledgment before he was gone from this world. “Renee, I bet that meant a lot to you,” I said. “Yes, it did,” she said, her eyes misting up. “It meant everything.” ! All these stories are true, though names and locations may be altered to protect privacy.

INFO Hackie is a twice-monthly column that can also be read on sevendaysvt.com. To reach Jernigan, email hackie@sevendaysvt.com.

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pparently, an early landowner named the town in tribute to his wife, who grew up in Bombay, India. That’s the story, anyway.” I was conversing with Renee Capaldi as we drove west across the northern tier of New York State, en route to a town with the unlikely name of Bombay. She was returning home after heart surgery at the University of Vermont Medical Center. For someone who had just undergone a major operation, Renee didn’t appear too worse for wear. Having spent the past hour with the woman, I attributed that to her fighting spirit: Life might knock her down, but she refused to stay down. Most people just released from the hospital let vanity go by the wayside. Not Renee. Her black hair was attractively pinned up, and her face made up. She had rings on her fingers and two or three necklaces. I couldn’t help but notice her snug knit top, which revealed some nifty cleavage. I admit to appreciating that touch, especially from what I affectionately refer to as an “older broad.” “Did you actually grow up in Bombay?” I asked. “No, that’s where my daughter is living. I’m going to spend a few weeks at her home while I recover. I live a couple of towns over.” “Have you spent your whole life in the North Country?” “All of it with the exception of a few years in California. When I graduated high school, I wanted to go to college and become a doctor. My dad was an electrician, but there was very little money in the family, and he said we just couldn’t

twice. My idea is that she never got any attention from men and she was starved for it. That’s how those two guys manipulated her for help.” Renee let out an audible sigh as we drove through the town of Constable. “OK,” she said, motioning to the right. “Do you see that small house and garage set back behind the stream? I lived there for two great years with this guy. He was a ‘bad boy,’ you could say, when I met him. A biker and a drinker. But he was gorgeous, and I knew he had a good heart. “I told him, if he wanted to get with me, I wouldn’t put up with the rowdiness and the drinking — I didn’t want a life like that. So he quit partying, and we moved in together and had great times. We bought this pair of wicked Harleys, and we’d take these awesome road trips. But, after two years, he went back to the drinking.


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The state and the city of Burlington are routinely on the nation’s top-10 lists for one thing or another. But you don’t know the half of it. Read the results of our annual best-of readers’ survey, the Daysies, to find out what really rules in Vermont — say, the best eats, the best beers and the best places to get physical. But first, readers, you’ve gotta pick ’em! Read on. »

Top finalists in each category from Round 1 will face off in the second voting round. (Categories with sufficient votes will be divided into “Inside Chittenden County” and “Outside Chittenden County” subcategories.)

The top vote getter in each category will win a Daysie and be recognized along with the other finalists in the annual Daysies magazine.

18. Best day spa

32. Best bridal shop

49. Best place to buy a pipe

19. Best resort spa

33. Best women’s shoe store

50. Best adult toy store

20. Best lodging

34. Best menswear store

51. Best housewares store

Best veterinarian/animal hospital

21. Best health club/gym

35. Best men’s shoe store

52. Best secondhand housewares store

3.

Best pet daycare

22. Best yoga studio

36. Best secondhand clothing

53. Best antique store

4.

Best pet groomer

23. Best cycling studio

37. Best children’s clothing store

54. Best furniture store

5.

Best wedding venue

24. Best CrossFit studio

38. Best children’s toy store

55. Best kitchen store

6.

Best caterer

25. Best cab company

39. Best eyeglasses store

56. Best lighting store

7.

Best florist

26. Best auto repair

40. Best place to buy jewelry

57. Best garden center

8.

Best tailor*

27. Best radio station (music)

41. Best beauty-product purveyor

58. Best auto dealer

9.

Best real estate agency

28. Best radio station (news)

42. Best pet supply store

59. Best ski/snowboard shop

29. Best local TV news station

43. Best musical instrument store

60. Best bike shop

Shopping

44. Best local art supply store

61. Best outdoor outfitter

10. Best real estate agent 11. Best bank/credit union 12. Best mortgage broker 13. Best salon (unisex) 14. Best barber/men’s cut 15. Best manicure/pedicure 17. Best place to get a massage (location)

31. Best women’s evening-wear store

46. Best place to buy a computer 47. Best bookstore 48. Best place to buy a unique gift

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Don’t wait! Nominate at sevendaysvt.com. Nominations for Round 1 close on Tuesday, May 30, at noon. Check back on June 12 to see if your nominations made the final ballot, and vote for your favorites!

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Arts + Entertainment 62. Best large live music venue

87. Best arts event 88. Best painter/illustrator 89. Best sculptor 90. Best photographer

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91. Best ski/ride slope

67. Best karaoke

92. Best cross-country ski area

68. Best standup comic

93. Best public golf course

69. Best vocalist

105. Best new restaurant (opened in the last year)

142. Best doughnuts*

94. Best state park

70. Best instrumentalist

95. Best day hike

106. Best restaurant

71. Best folk artist or group*

107. Best family restaurant

144. Best frozen yogurt

96. Best foot race

72. Best country artist or group*

97. Best place to bike

108. Best chef (name, restaurant)

73. Best bluegrass artist or group*

98. Best public place to swim

109. Best restaurant service

74. Best jazz artist or group*

99. Best place to kayak/canoe (be specific)

110. Best breakfast/brunch

100. Best guided tour*

112. Best place to get late-night food

Drink

101. Best in-state weekend getaway

113. Best restaurant for dessert

148. Best craft brewery

102. Best Vermont day trip with the kids

114. Best outdoor dining

149. Best brewpub

103. Best place to take your parents

115. Best place to grab a quick meal

150. Best draft beer list

104. Best people-watching place

116. Best place to eat alone

151. Best craft brew selection (retailer)

117. Best locally owned grocery store

152. Best winery

118. Best farmers market vendor

153. Best wine list

119. Best food truck

154. Best wine shop

120. Best food cart

155. Best hard cidery

121. Best bread bakery

156. Best cidery (nonalcoholic)

122. Best sweets bakery

157. Best spirits distiller

123. Best Thai restaurant

158. Best bar (overall)

124. Best Chinese restaurant

159. Best bartender (full name, business)

125. Best Mexican restaurant

160. Best pickup bar

126. Best Vietnamese restaurant

161. Best dive bar

127. Best Italian restaurant

162. Best sports bar

128. Best vegetarian fare

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Lake Champlain Maritime Museum makes exploring historic shipwrecks easy to fathom BY K E N P IC AR D

Footage from an Escape shipwreck tour

34 FEATURE

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s summer approaches, Vermonters invariably turn their eyes toward the sparkling waters of Lake Champlain. While most people engage in aquatic recreation on or near the water’s surface, the waves hide a long and rich history, much of which still resides on the lake’s bottom. At 120 miles long, up to 12 miles across and 400 feet at its deepest, Lake Champlain is home to more than 300 shipwrecks dating back to the mid-1700s. Some are just a stone’s throw from shore, and previously unknown submerged vessels and related artifacts are being discovered all the time. Nowhere are these unique archaeological treasures easier to access than at the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum, founded 32 years ago as a way to showcase the lake’s underwater resources. “The only way you get a crazy collection of shipwrecks like the one we have is by having an amazing history,” says museum codirector Erick Tichonuk. Actually, the word “museum” doesn’t do justice to this hidden gem in Vergennes. The nonprofit has begun calling itself the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum & Research Institute, explains codirector Joyce Cameron, as a more accurate reflection of its mission to preserve, maintain and teach the public about the lake’s history and cultural importance. To that end, the LCMM has a contract with the State of Vermont to maintain and oversee the lake’s many underwater cultural resources. It’s been instrumental in creating the rules and guidelines that govern how recreational divers can access the historic wrecks, with the goal of protecting them from anchor damage and archaeological plunder. There’s no need to don a wetsuit and scuba tank to get an up-close look at these shipwrecks and other historic vessels. The museum displays dozens of watercraft, both originals and replicas, as well as high-tech

means for accessing the ones that remain deep below the surface. The museum sprawls across the outskirts of Vergennes, just across the road from the Basin Harbor Club. More than a dozen buildings scattered across its grounds contain fascinating nauticalthemed installations worth hours of exploration. Most pay tribute to the different modes of travel that have been used on Lake Champlain for centuries. They range from traditional Abenaki canoes to horse-powered ferries to 19th-century steamboats and canal boats — the last of which, says Tichonuk, were once as common on Lake Champlain as tractor trailers are on today’s highways. The museum’s Hazelett Watercraft Center holds two floors of original vessels such as dugout and bark canoes, rowing skiffs, kayaks, and sailboats, some of which date back hundreds of years. The centerpiece of the exhibit is a fully rigged, 35-foot ice yacht dubbed the Storm King. Built in 1902, it was the fastest mode of human transportation in its day, capable of traveling 120 miles per hour. Another exhibit, “The Key to Liberty: The Revolutionary War in the Champlain Valley,” is a must-see for visitors with an interest in the American Revolution and the decisive naval battles that were fought on Lake Champlain. This permanent display features eyewitness accounts of the 1776 Battle of Valcour Island and a nine-foot scale model of the gunboat Philadelphia, which was sunk by the British Royal Navy. In 1935, it was raised and transported to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C. “The Key to Liberty” exhibit reflects the kind of research that happens at the museum all year round. On-site archaeologists and researchers continually

“Discovery of Spitfire” painting by Ernie Haas

PHOTOS COURTESY OF LAKE CHAMPLAIN MARITIME MUSEUM

What Lies Beneath


discover new items to add to the museum’s collection of more than 12,000 artifacts. “The Key to Liberty” exhibit revolves around the moment when a cannon exploded aboard the gunboat New York in 1776. Eloise Beil, director of collections and manager of community relations, explains that, thanks to years of detailed underwater archaeological surveys, the museum has recovered most of the fragments of the cannon in question, along with other artifacts of the incident. Researchers have identified the lieutenant from Massachusetts who was killed in the explosion, located his grave and reproduced his headstone. It’s an example, Beil says, of how shipwreck exhibits like “Liberty” continue to evolve and assemble pieces of the vast historical puzzle. The LCMM differs from most museums in that its archaeology conservation lab is open to the public. Visitors are invited to walk in, watch the staff at work, and ask questions about how they restore and preserve newly discovered artifacts — and occasionally re-create the past. Two prominent wreck exhibits at the museum, the General Butler and O.J. Walker, inspired the 2002 construction of a replica schooner, the Lois McClure. Originally intended as a permanently moored exhibit on Burlington’s waterfront, the Lois McClure proved to be such a successful outreach tool that it now takes regular

excursions as far as Long Island, N.Y., and Québec City, says Chris Sabick, the museum’s archaeological and conservation director. This Fourth of July weekend, the schooner will begin a two-month water journey to Buffalo, N.Y., to mark the bicentennial of the start of the Erie Canal’s construction. One of the more unusual wreck displays in the museum’s Nautical Archaeology Center is a half-scale replica of a fragile shipwreck that still sits on the bottom of Burlington Bay. It’s a 63-foot-long horse-powered ferryboat, one of many that operated on Lake Champlain from the early to mid-19th century, when they were replaced by faster and more efficient steamboats. In fact, when this wreck was discovered, in 1983, Tichonuk says, archaeologists initially assumed it was a steamboat but were puzzled by the absence of metal machinery. Only later did they discover a turntable beneath the deck, similar to a treadmill, on which the horses walked to power the ferry. “It’s a fascinating piece of history that, frankly, had been forgotten about,” Tichonuk says. “This is the only known archaeological example of this [kind of ] boat.” Why do old shipwrecks stay so well preserved in Lake Champlain? As Sabick explains, freshwater lacks the organisms that normally consume the wood of ocean shipwrecks. The mud and silt on the bottom of the lake may even act as preservatives, keeping centuries-old wrecks in remarkably good condition. “The Key to Liberty” exhibit

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Aerial view of the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum shoreline

05.17.17-05.24.17 SEVEN DAYS

“We have wrecks from a long window of time that represent various phases of the lake’s history,” Sabick says, “which is just amazing.” While raising wrecks from the water’s depths is one way to share that rich underwater history with people who don’t scuba dive, it’s also a time-consuming and costly process. Over the years, one of the museum’s bigger challenges has been finding alternatives. One solution is an underwater ROV, or remotely operated vehicle. About twice a month, the LCMM, in conjunction with the Basin Harbor Club, offers one-hour excursions on a 50-passenger vessel called the Escape. Visitors climb aboard and explore still-submerged wrecks along the lake bottom via a live video feed from the ROV. Says Cameron, “You see it really clearly on a big screen, all with a cocktail in hand.” The museum staff has also used sonar to create threedimensional images of shipwrecks in the form of point clouds that the public can examine and manipulate on tablets. Using a process called photogrammetry — the computerized stitching together of thousands of separate digital images of shipwrecks shot from different angles — they’ve crafted entire 3D models of wrecks that are useful for both research and educational outreach. While history may be one focus, also central to the museum’s mission is keeping nautical skills alive through workshops, classes and opportunities to get out on the water in traditional boats. Throughout the summer and fall, museum visitors can choose from an à la carte menu of classes that range from lunch cruises and rowing opportunities to daily demonstrations and instruction in traditional glassblowing. The technique was long used for making navigational lights, lighthouse lenses, deck lights and prisms for watercraft of all kinds. Dedicated to nautical crafts as well as skills, the LCMM is also home to one of New England’s largest blacksmith shops. About 10 years ago, while working on a replica of the gunship Philadelphia, the museum built an 18th-century-style forge. That exhibit proved so popular that, in 2008, a new forge was opened on-site for teaching blacksmithing, metalworking and bronze casting. Visitors who want the above-the-water view can check out one of the museum’s fleet of 18 rowing gigs, which are available daily for hourlong, self-guided trips on the lake, weather permitting. Sound like too much to experience in just one day? Tichonuk remembers walking the museum grounds last summer and asking a visitor what he thought of the place. “He said, ‘I’m pissed!’ So I asked him what’s wrong,” Tichonuk recalls. “He said, ‘I read somewhere that I should allow two hours at the museum — and I’ve spent two hours in just the first two buildings!’” Not a problem, Tichonuk reassured his guest. A day pass is good for a return visit the following day. ! Contact: ken@sevendaysvt.com

Longboat rowing

Lake Champlain Maritime Museum & Research Institute, 4472 Basin Harbor Rd., Vergennes, 475-2022. Open daily, May 27 to October 15. lcmm.org

FEATURE 35

INFO


ALYSSA BENNETT

Japanese garden

Ramble On

Exploring Vermont’s newest state park, in Hubbardton BY D A N BOL L ES

36 FEATURE

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W

ord to the wise: If you check out Taconic Mountains Ramble State Park, don’t wear Chuck Taylors. This is a lesson I learned the hard way on a recent late-morning, um, ramble through Vermont’s new state park. While the 420-acre spread in Hubbardton is serene and spectacular, certain sections — including those that offer access to the most dramatic vistas — require sturdier footwear. Granted, it would also be pretty easy just to spend the day lounging barefoot amid the splendor of the park’s meadows, waterfalls and lush, meditative Japanese garden. Taconic Mountains Ramble opened quietly last fall. The park is open yearround, but off-season visitors have to park on the dirt road beyond the gate and walk in on the half-mile access road — an approach I might recommend even in the summer months. As you crest the gravel road’s final curve, a sweeping panorama of the park’s namesake mountain range unfurls like the opening shot of an Alejandro González Iñárritu film. The cinematic quality of this breathtaking scene must have been one of the attractions for the land’s previous long-time owner: author and two-time Academy Awardnominated filmmaker Carson “Kit”

Davidson, who donated the Ramble to the state last year before his death. “A lot of people who come here ask to see the mansion,” said land manager Alyssa Bennett as we walked toward the ridge that slopes into the park. “Well, there it is,” she said, smirking and pointing to the neatly kept singlewide mobile home where she and her 13-year-old dog currently reside. Bennett explained that, despite their wealth, Davidson and his wife — children’s book author Margaret “Mickie” Davidson — viewed their Vermont land as a simple refuge from their hectic urban lives in Greenwich Village. “They were flatlanders,” she said. When they began searching for their country getaway, Bennett added, the Davidsons were merely in the market for “a few acres.” They ended up with more than 400, purchased from a Hubbardton farmer named Clayton Calvin in 1966 — for $69 an acre. The couple spent the next four decades blazing miles of hiking trails, maintaining wildflower meadows and building the park’s most distinctive feature: the Japanese garden. A foot-worn path runs down a long, gentle slope from the ridge, cutting through a wildflower field that will soon be bursting with color. Descending, you can hear the trickle of waterfalls against

a background of chattering birds. When you reach the bottom, the garden unfolds before you like the entrance to a fairy kingdom. Massive boulders tower above a series of small ponds spanned in several places by arched footbridges. At the southern end, a grassy rise is topped with a stone lantern and an Adirondack chair. On the garden’s opposite end, another Adirondack chair perches on a boulder facing the mountain range. Reaching it entails a harrowing climb over and around a series of rocks and up a weathered wooden ladder. Near the top, you approach the chair from behind, clinging to an especially perilous, narrow section of rock where obvious footholds are few — and, I discovered, slippery. But the reward is otherworldly. If you can summon the nerve to actually sit in the chair — bolted to the stone, it still feels rickety — you’ll be afforded a view you’re unlikely to match in any of Vermont’s other 50-plus state parks. With the garden some 20 feet below, it almost feels like you’re floating as you gaze toward the undulating Taconic Mountains. Japanese gardens are designed to embody and reflect their surroundings, exhibiting a symmetry with the landscape in which they are embedded. Here, the tall stone faces ringing the

garden mimic the cliffs at the apex of the trails that zigzag up Mount Zion, past a series of small waterfalls. The grassy swells evoke the sweeping meadows and rolling mountains in the distance. According to Bennett, Kit Davidson wasn’t a practitioner of Buddhism. But he did take an open, Zen-like approach to his land. While Taconic Mountains Ramble remains to be discovered by most Vermonters, Rutland County locals have enjoyed its wonders for decades. “He never intended to hoard this for himself,” said Bennett. “He always encouraged people to come and enjoy it.” Davidson hired Bennett, who also works part time for the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department as a small mammal biologist, to manage and begin upgrading the property in 2012. He died last September at age 92, only weeks after the state accepted his plan to donate the land as a park, ensuring that it would be protected from subdivision and development. On his passing, 204 of the property’s 420 acres were granted to the state, with the rest to follow shortly. The remainder of Davidson’s wealth will be used to maintain the park, including keeping his protégée Bennett on as manager. Davidson had only three rules for the hikers, bird-watchers and cross-country skiers who visited his land: no overnights, no fires and no smoking. Those rules remain, and the state will probably add a few more at some point, Bennett said. As she explained, lands newly acquired by the state are subject to an evaluation period that typically takes a few years. During that time, state employees inventory natural resources and develop plans for infrastructure and use. Future projects at the park will likely include a new parking area and outbuildings with bathrooms. (Right now, only a portable toilet is available.) In the meantime, Bennett and Zen philosophy students from nearby Castleton University — whose curriculum includes public-service volunteering — are sprucing up trails for the park’s debut summer season. I had time to explore only about half the place, but what I did see was dazzling. Midway up the Moot Point Trail, which winds behind the garden, you’ll find an overlook called Zion Minor. It’s a steep climb in places — comparable to the more vertical sections of Mount Philo or Snake Mountain — but the view is even grander there than from the “floating” chair. Continuing up the Springs Trail, you reach another overlook, Top of the Ridge. The view of the valley from there includes the Hubbardton Battlefield,


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“I told Kit for years that I wouldn’t let him name a trail after me,” Bennett said, as we pondered the odds of my breaking a leg navigating the steep, narrow trail in my Converse sneakers. “But a few months before he died, he played his trump card: ‘You wouldn’t deny a dying man, would you?’” She wouldn’t. “I agreed, on the condition that it had to be a really tough trail,” Bennett continued, pointing to the wooden trail marker. It reads: “Alyssa Trail — Difficult.” !

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FEATURE 37

site of the only Revolutionary War battle fought on Vermont soil. It would be a heck of vantage point to catch the annual reenactment of the conflict (on Saturday, July 8, this year). Like the storyteller he was, Davidson saved the best for last. A few hundred yards past Top of the Ridge sits another outcropping, Zion Major. The park’s highest point, it offers a magnificent finale: To the west, the purple majesty of the far-off Adirondacks frames a 180-degree view of the Taconics in the foreground. You’ll also catch sight of Mickie’s Elm, a giant — and now rare — elm tree abutting one of the wildflower meadows. Davidson named it for his wife, who predeceased him in 2002. To descend from Zion Major, you can return the way you came or try the park’s most challenging route.

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Catching the Wind An architect and longtime sailor fulfills a dream at Burlington’s new sailing center

Marcel Beaudin

I

THE VISION OF A FACILITY WHERE ANYONE CAN LEARN TO SAIL

HAS BEEN WITH HIM FOR DECADES.

» P.40

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CATCHING THE WIND

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This generous design is the work of Marcel Beaudin, 88, a South Burlington architect who has been practicing in Vermont since 1957. While it took the vision and determination of many people to raise $5.75 million for this community center, Beaudin can be credited with a guiding role. Beaudin is more than the building’s architect; he’s responsible for Burlington having a community sailing center at all. An enthusiastic sailor and member of the Lake Champlain Yacht Club in Shelburne for more than 40 years, he led a group of friends and fellow sailors in founding the CSC in 1994. Over the years, the center has found makeshift quarters in the leaky, abandoned Moran Plant and, after 2007, in the old Burlington Water Works building — essentially a garage where the bathrooms are three portable toilets. The new facility will be of a different order. Seated in a construction trailer beside its framed-out bones on

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f the Queen City has a crown, it might be the public-minded waterfront. And one of its brightly shining gems is the Community Sailing Center. The facility’s mission is to make sailing — an activity historically associated with wealthy white men — accessible to everyone. Because of the CSC, every year some 6,000 people, including almost 1,900 children, sail or paddle in boats they don’t have to own, maintain, store or insure. The Burlington center, dependent on philanthropy and revenue from classes, asks for none of the membership or annual fees associated with yacht clubs. A dinghy sailboat can be rented for $30 per hour, a paddleboard for half that. Now the CSC is about to get a new home. Though it won’t be fully operational until the fall, the Raymond P. Sullivan Sailing Education Center at the Pomerleau Community Waterfront Campus (named for two major donors) will have a soft opening in late July. The ground was broken last October, and the 22,000-square-foot, multistory waterfront building is currently taking shape beside the Andy A-Dog Williams Skatepark. When finished, it will feature net-zero energy use, classrooms, showers, indoor boat storage and a third-floor, covered event deck with southwest views of the water.

a recent rainy morning, Beaudin dealt cheerfully with both a reporter and the workers. The latter popped in to consult with the architect on floor-pouring plans, tiling and color swatches. Beaudin’s upbeat mood was understandable. The new facility, he said with a broad smile, is “a dream come true.” Beaudin would seem an unlikely champion for the concept of a community sailing center. He continues to pay almost $1,000 a year in yacht-club fees and has owned many boats over his lifetime. (He sold his last, a 23-foot Sonar, a year ago with the provision that he be able to borrow it to race in the LCYC’s Ladies Cup Race in August.) But Beaudin was always bothered by the perception of sailing as an elite sport. “I smarted under that association,” he said. The vision of a facility where anyone can learn to sail has been with him for decades, he said, and may well date back to his training as an architect. Beaudin’s professional development has been well documented, thanks in part to a retrospective of his architectural work mounted by Burlington City Arts in 2005 and a 2012 interview with Dwell magazine. But his story bears repeating. The Barre native was born in 1929 into a stonecarving family with centuries-old roots in the business. Yet in 1947 he decided, on the spur of the moment, to become an architect. The catalyst was a chance visit to Le Corbusier’s studio in New York, where the SwissFrench architect had come to build the United Nations complex. Beaudin enrolled immediately at Pratt Institute, where he absorbed the form-follows-function mantra of the era’s famous modernist architects. In an interview at his small but meticulously arranged office on Shelburne Road, Beaudin explained that he honed his design-competition skills at Pratt, in part by serving juries coffee to learn how they worked. “I won a lot of competitions,” he said with a smile. For one of them, sponsored by Indiana Limestone, he designed a structure with an interior frieze depicting the history of jurisprudence. The addition of ornamentation, which served a psychological purpose in Beaudin’s opinion but ran against the “functional” mantra, disturbed his modernist professors but won him the contest. By the time Beaudin returned to Vermont to raise a family with his first wife, in 1957, he was notable enough for the Burlington Free Press to reprint excerpts from his senior thesis on urban planning in a four-part series. In them, Beaudin urged the City of Burlington to develop a master plan to avoid being eviscerated by suburbanization. Those writings, pointed out Vermont architectural historian Devin Colman, offer an early glimpse of Beaudin’s interest in the lake and its preservation

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MATTHEW THORSEN

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for public use. “A master plan would thwart misuses of the city’s lakefront and trees,” Beaudin wrote. “It would not only anticipate the immediate needs for beaches and parks but also its future needs.” Piecemeal planning might be more expedient, Beaudin continued, but it “takes the toll of the city’s natural advantages for the immediate benefit of a few.” Beaudin founded his practice in 1959 and began designing distinctive modernist residences for successful clients, among them James F. Heywood, then the first manager of the IBM facility in Essex Junction; Shearer Automotive president Bill Shearer; and University of Vermont psychology professor Donald Forgays. (Full disclosure: This reporter now lives in the 1965 Burlington house that Forgays commissioned.) “Clean, sparse, crisp, simple, functional” is how retired TruexCullins principal emeritus Tom Cullins described Beaudin’s style. He worked for Beaudin while attending architecture school in the summers of 1963 and ’64. “Marcel was a true modernist, particularly with his houses,” Cullins said. “To this day, you can always recognize a Marcel Beaudin house.” Beaudin had first sailed as an 11-yearold in Québec, and, as he plied the waves of Lake Champlain, his two interests intertwined. That influence is apparent to Jesse Beck, now president of Freeman French Freeman, who grew up on Shelburne Point, near the Beaudins and their five children, in a Beaudin-designed 1957 circular house with pie-slice-shaped bedrooms. (It has since been torn down.) Of Beaudin’s style, Beck observed, “He’s a master of built-ins, of economy of space. Everything was built in, like [on] a ship.” As he developed his practice, Beaudin remained active in urban planning, joining the Burlington waterfront planning committee convened by thenmayor Bernie Sanders in the mid-1980s. Although the city owned barely more waterfront in those days than the section at the foot of College Street, Sanders proposed a boathouse. Lake Champlain Ferries came up with a barge on which to float the structure, and officials at the Community & Economic Development Office — including then-director Peter Clavelle — held a competition and chose Beaudin’s design. The Burlington Boathouse is now iconic, though it’s nothing like Beaudin’s characteristic streamlined designs;

instead, the structure references its 19th-century predecessor. It also represented the architect’s first effort to counter the image of sailing as elite. Beaudin had envisioned the boathouse as a community facility, he said. But its placement near motorboat wakes and other risks rendered it unsafe for children, whom he saw from the start as the future of sailing and the main users of a community boathouse. “I was really disappointed at that point,” Beaudin said. CEDO officials, aware of Beaudin’s aim of building a sailing center, suggested he take a look at the Moran Plant, then defunct and rent-free. That proved to be the turning point. “I looked at those sluiceways, where the cooling water for the old plant went in, and it took me 10 seconds to decide,” recalled Beaudin. In 1993, the architect convened a meeting of friends — including Dale Hyerstay, who became the CSC’s first vice president and instrumental organizer — and a group of sailboat-racing enthusiasts seeking a base. The idea of a community boathouse was floated, and all agreed. Beaudin admitted he “leveraged” the racers to launch the CSC. Those people skills have figured prominently in the architect’s success in bringing a decades-old dream to fruition. “[Marcel is] really a joy to work with,” declared Fritz Horton, a Shelburne-based architect who conferred with Beaudin on the new facility’s design and produced its computerassisted construction plans. “When he’s faced with a problem or confrontation, his first response is to smile and chuckle, and that completely changes the discussion. He’s always looking for solutions, not dwelling on problems.” Horton, 74, secured the CSC’s first dock grant and put in countless hours of weekend dock-repair work alongside Beaudin. “Marcel would always have a pad and pen to work out how to fix a connection,” Horton said. “He’s constantly learning. At his age, most people check out; he’s checking in.” The new building’s project manager, Mike Foster of Malone Properties, deeply appreciates Beaudin’s openness to better solutions and willingness to listen. “The thing is, you can talk to him and he doesn’t treat you like he’s better than you,” Foster said. Foster started his own career on a Beaudin building in Berlin in 1998. He jumped at the opportunity to work with the architect again on the new sailing center, even though Malone typically develops and sells its own properties rather than building others’.


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Beaudin is proud that all of these activities grew from his original idea, but courting recognition isn’t his way. When Naud suggested putting the architect’s name on a meeting room in the new facility, at the very least, Beaudin demurred. “He said, ‘If you put my name up there, you’ll have to put the names of every other person who helped make it happen,’” Naud recalled. Nonetheless, the director sees the CSC facility as Beaudin’s “legacy project.” The architect, who numbers his completed projects at “something under” 2,000, agreed with that description. What really excites him, though, are the possibilities the new center represents. If it attracts, as he hopes, “major regional, national and international sailing regattas,” then it could help grow the Burlington economy as well as its own donation base. “We’ll no longer look like a fly-by-night operation,” Beaudin said with a chuckle. High on the west side of the building, the architect designed a prow-like lookout deck. Musing on its purpose, he joked, “People could go up there with a bullhorn and shout, ‘You kids get your act together, or you’re getting thrown out!’” People might also take in the sweeping view of the Adirondacks, then descend to rent one of the CSC’s nearly 100 keelboats, dinghies, kayaks, canoes or paddleboards — and regard Beaudin’s legacy from one of his own favorite vantages, on the water. !

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Contact: lilly@sevendaysvt.com FEATURE 41

“The only reason I’m doing this project is Marcel,” Foster said. And, he added, the chance to “see Marcel’s face during the eight or 12 seconds it takes him to cut the ribbon.” The young CSC went through some tenuous times. “Early on, we almost threw in the towel,” acknowledged Hyerstay. After 10 years on the board of directors, he is now a founding director, along with Beaudin, of the board of trustees. The center’s self-described historian, Hyerstay still brings a symbolic towel to meetings, he said. But the team had motivation to keep going. “Our real excitement was getting kids off the streets and into boats,” he said. “Adults were peripheral.” There were early successes, too. In 1995, Hyerstay recalled, “we got a grant to purchase a used Sonar 23 that Marcel and a friend modified to be steerable by a disabled person.” Thus began the CSC’s ongoing relationship with Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports, which offers sailing opportunities to individuals with physical or developmental disabilities who retain upper-body mobility. Mark Naud is the current CSC executive director, to be succeeded on July 1 by Thomas Hark, longtime director of the Vermont Youth Conservation Corps. These days, Naud said, the sailing center gives nearly $50,000 each year in scholarships, mostly to children, including New Americans. In addition to the adaptive watersports program, CSC has a women-only program, Women in Wind; a youth character-development program, Leader Ship; and STEM education programs on lake ecology and environmental stewardship, known as Floating Classrooms.

INFO Learn more at communitysailingcenter.org. 4t-uvmdeptofmed051017.indd 1

5/5/17 10:09 AM


Friends With Fit Benefits Running together helps local athletes excel on and off the track B Y SA RAH T UFF D UNN

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W

aiting for the light to turn green at the corner of Flynn Avenue and Pine Street, I had my first sighting: about 10 of the creatures swooping around a telephone pole. A few days later, I spotted another flock on the Burlington Bike Path, and then more circling the track at the University of Vermont. The woods of Shelburne Farms and Williston’s Catamount Outdoor Family Center, too, are atwitter with this species. Birds? Nope — they’re runners. Striding two or three abreast or single file, they seem to be everywhere in Chittenden County these days, and not just because of the Vermont City Marathon coming up on May 28. As a longtime runner who has trained both solo and with groups, I wondered how all this social networking and group running might be affecting endurance efforts in northern Vermont. My timing, it turns out, was spoton. A study of more than 1 million people recently published in Nature Communications concluded that the “loneliness of the long-distance runner” — a phrase popularized by novelist Alan Sillitoe in 1959 — is now passé. “The study offers some of the first hard evidence that health-related habits can spread — and so perhaps could be deliberately seeded and encouraged — by social influence and peer pressure,” write the editors of research done by the MIT Sloan School of Management in Cambridge, Mass. “People run more when their friends do.” That’s certainly true for Colchester’s Erin Randall-Mullins, who ran her first marathon in 2009, in Burlington, finishing in four hours and five minutes. Soon afterward, hoping to qualify for the Boston Marathon, she joined members of the Green Mountain Athletic Association on Sunday-morning runs. Now, having

run Boston twice, Randall-Mullins leads the weekly effort. “Without the collective knowledge, support and encouragement of the group, I wouldn’t have been able to do it,” she said. “But, more important than the running accomplishments, the members of the Sunday group have become my second family.” Allen Mead, for his part, joins the Thursday GMAA track workouts as a fun way to train more intensely and jump-start his social weekend. “Running is a great way to make connections with people you might not otherwise come into contact with,” said the 50-year-old health care administrator from Hinesburg. “I met my wife for the first time at a race!” It’s not just romance that grows on group runs; apparently babies do, too.

would be their first and only marathon, only to run a dozen marathons after,” observed Leja. “And 14 years of running together is comparable to staying together through elementary school, high school and college, plus more. We’ve had a ‘great, long run.’” Also marking a 14-year milestone is First Strides, cofounded by elite runner Kasie Enman of Huntington. It’s a group-based model for getting women into running and fitness walking. “I got my start in running as part of a team that was stronger and more

Shelburne’s Jan Leja told of several near-due or past-due mothers who participated in a Sunday group run — albeit at a leisurely pace — and gave birth the following Monday or Tuesday. “Each Sunday run has been truly special,” said Leja, who helped organize a Team in Training run for the national Leukemia & Lymphoma Society in 2003; she began calling it Run With Jan the following year. And, 722 Sunday runs later, the group is still at it, battling blizzards and blisters alike to raise more than $1 million for cancer research. “I’ve witnessed those who swore at mile 18 of a training run that this

successful than I was individually,” said Enman, referring to her GMAA team. She still serves as GMAA’s coach and team racing coordinator when not globe-trotting as part of the Salomon trail running team. “GMAA shepherded me along into the world of longer distances,” she added. “When I started having some higher-level success in marathons, one of my most vivid memories was the joy and pride that I felt on behalf of the GMAA running group. I still get chills and a smile thinking about the collective happiness.” Enman’s efforts, in turn, have spawned another group, led by Jamie Sheahan, nutritionist and personal

trainer at the EDGE Sports & Fitness. Working with a client who had just completed the First Strides program and then lost motivation to train on her own, Sheahan organized Thursdayevening runs to help others prepare for races. “Running socially creates accountability,” Sheahan said. “It makes the time fly by, and, I swear, something about running together allows people to open up and have really meaningful conversations — and plenty of gossip, too.” Last weekend’s Persist 5K on the Burlington Bike Path was born from the meaningful movement of millions after the recent presidential election and inauguration. “The Montpelier Women’s March was powerful and invigorating, and we want to keep that spirit going in Vermont,” said Meg Smith, director of the Vermont Women’s Fund. She decided to stage the race with a group of women who meet regularly for boot-camp classes in Charlotte. Proceeds from the run benefited the VWF. “One of the tremendous benefits of working together as a group is the support we give one another, whether it’s about exercising or how to deal with a tough situation at work,” said Smith. “We came together as strangers, but there’s a great sense of camaraderie that comes from seeing each other twice a week at 6 a.m.” ! Contact: tuff@sevendaysvt.com


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FEATURE 43

SD: OK, what about supplementing social running with social networking and apps that track workouts in a group environment? SD: Yeah, sure, some people post every day — themselves, their dogs, their Strava, whatever. That can bring them out of the doldrums, getting support from the group. I’ve typically backed away from the day-to-day cheerleader part, but if I feel there is something I can contribute as a coach to this, I will help them out. Apps such as Strava can give you short-term goals, where Facebook or similar platforms give you a less tangible motivational challenge: “Jane went out

SD: Vermont City Marathon is right around the corner. How have your coaching strategies for that changed with group runs and increased technology? SD: I encourage group runs for the athletes I coach, as long as the group is OK with running at the athlete’s pace. Or, if the runner is doing a recovery run, then the slower pace of the group would be a nice opportunity to socialize. Technology and apps have been great for training specificity — you can measure pace, duration, distance, heart rate, intensity, etc. But it can’t be a complete substitute for self-awareness and listening to your body.

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Seven Days: How does running socially help? Sam Davis: Well, it certainly breaks up the monotony of running alone. Long runs can become boring unless you’re occupying your time with earbuds or whatnot. And even the most seasoned runners can lose motivation to go do a workout on their own. Even when I was really competitive, I would call friends and ask them if they were interested in going out for a run.

and ran her eight miles; I should go out and run mine.”

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SOCIAL SECURITY: LOCAL RUNNING COACH SAM DAVIS ON RUNNING WITH A GROUP


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TIM NEWCOMB

PRO TIPS: Take

Picnic experiences custom-made for a Vermont summer BY SUZANNE PODHAIZER

» P.46

• Summer sausage and barbecue beef sticks from Maple Wind Farm. • A block of cheddar. This is a great hiking companion because it’s safe to carry around without refrigeration, and the saltiness makes it taste great after vigorous exercise. • Dense breads that pack a lot of calories, such as the three-seed loaf from Running Stone Bread in Huntington. For extra deliciousness, bring a container of roasted and mashed garlic, a stick of butter in a Ziploc baggie, or a travel bottle filled with olive oil. • Homemade or store-bought kimchi or sauerkraut, packed without its juice (reserve the juice for other uses at home). You want something made with vegetables, right? • Iced tea, herbal or caffeinated. Or, if brewing and chilling the tea is too much work, simply add crushed mint and cucumber slices to your water bottle for extra flavor. • Dried fruits, nuts and other snacky things from the bulk section of the nearest market. Keep ’em separate, or mix favorites to make a personalized trail mix.

FEATURE 45

THREE FOR THE ROAD

Thoughtful packing is rarely more important than when you are on a hike. Make your backpack too weighty, and you’ll be moaning and groaning long before you reach the top. Fail to bring enough calories, and you’ll be listless on the way down. This picnic doesn’t include the freeze-dried and dehydrated products you’d need to thru-hike the Long Trail. It’s meant for shorter jaunts that don’t entail carrying tons of gear.

SEVEN DAYS

Whether your summer wanderlust takes you up mountains, to small towns in pursuit of your Vermont 251 Club goals, or to outdoor sculpture gardens and other arty wonders, packing a meal is always a good idea. If you discover a sweet eatery on the way, you can bring your prepacked food back home with you. If not, you’re set with something delicious. But not all outings (or hunger pangs) are created equal, so your picnic should be tailored to the occasion. On a hike, for instance, food that is light to carry but heavy in calories is the name of the game. On an art gallery visit, you might get a little more elaborate. Here are three ideas for themed picnics, designed with Vermont’s attractions in mind, each with suggestions for the perfect location. !

Hunger (trailheads in Worcester and Waterbury), Snake Mountain (trailhead in Addison) or Mount Tom (trailhead in Woodstock)

05.17.17-05.24.17

ou’re driving a wooded byway abutting a state forest, keeping one eye on the road while the other looks out for wildflowers, waterfalls trickling down craggy rocks or cardinals darting from tree to tree. The scenic route takes you farther and farther from civilization, and then you feel them … the first pangs of “hanger.” Scenario 1: You didn’t plan ahead for this. The spotty cell service may or may not put you on the trail of a food source, and the winding, scenic routes will make it a trek. You might just resort to the stale energy bar in your bag. Scenario 2: You’ve brought a picnic! You pull over a half mile past the point of your hanger’s onset and find a shady nook by a burbling stream. You spread out a blanket, pop open your cooler and bite into a hunk of fresh bread slathered with butter and topped with slices of colorful spring radishes. The air is sweet and clean. Soon you’re satiated, happy and back on the road.

TO BE EATEN: on a peak such as Mount

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Three for the Road Y

MOUNTAINTOP MUNCHIES

condiments out of their glass jars and tote them in foodsafe travel bottles (the ones you use to get your favorite shampoo through airport security); freeze cubes of your favorite beverage and use them to keep food cold (you can drink them after they’ve melted); split picnics into portions so everybody can carry their own.


Three for the Road « P.45 ILLUSTRATION: TIM NEWCOMB

FOOD IS ART IS FOOD TO BE EATEN: at Shelburne Museum (shelburnemuseum.org), a pull-off on Route 100 South after a visit to BigTown Gallery in Rochester, or at Fred Mold Park in St. Johnsbury after a visit to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium (fairbanksmuseum.org) and the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum (stjathenaeum.org)

While some people like to “paint ’n’ sip,” others prefer “picnic kit,” including to look and sip. Happily, plates, flatware, cups Vermont’s artisan food and a wine opener, producers make fare that in your car so you’ll pairs well with art of all be prepared to snack on the go. For bonus kinds, from contemporary awesomeness points, installations to Albert make an occasionBierstadt’s monumental “The appropriate playlist on Domes of the Yosemite.” your smartphone. (Catch that 1867 painting this summer at the Athenaeum before it gets shipped off for restoration in the fall.) To exercise your own creative muscles, you could make the food and libations match the occasion. If you’re going to Shelburne Museum to see “Wild Spaces, Open Seasons: Hunting and Fishing in American Art” (June 3 to August 27), pack your basket with smoked salmon and venison jerky. If you have tickets to a performance of Vermont Shakespeare Festival’s Richard III, bring on the shellfish, game birds and wine.

PRO TIPS: Keep a

PROTEST PICNIC

46 FEATURE

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

TO BE EATEN: on the Vermont

Statehouse lawn in Montpelier, wherever an objectionable pipeline is being built or while occupying a bench on Burlington’s City Hall Park

• Salami from Vermont Salumi, pâtés and rillettes from Beau Butchery + Bar in Montpelier, and smoked salmon from Starbird Fish. Combine them on a platter pretty enough to paint as a still life. • A trio of artisan cheeses. Mix up wedges and rounds made from sheep, cow and goat milk in styles ranging from young and gooey to aged and firm. • A seeded baguette from your favorite bakery. • Mustard mixed with minced dill or tarragon, and homemade or store-bought pickles.

PRO TIPS: Just as you’d set a

place for Elijah at a seder dinner, leave a spot on your picnic blanket in case Sen. Bernie Sanders shows up. Or maybe just bring extra food for fellow marchers, ’cause sharing is caring.

• Wine from La Garagista Winery in Bethel, cider from Eden Specialty Ciders, or craft beer from one of Vermont’s countless breweries. Wanna get fancy? Shake up a few portions of a cocktail, sans ice, and bring them along. When you’re ready to imbibe, simply grab some “rocks” from the cooler. • Fruit salad. Chop up pears, apples, grapes, cherries, etc. before you leave the house. For extra flavor, pour on a little simple syrup made by simmering equal parts sugar and water with a few sprinkles of cinnamon and allspice and a pinch of salt.

When you’re rallying to protect the environment or the rights of migrant workers on dairy farms, you don’t want to be packing any old genetically engineered items. Here are some foods that will keep you marching, chanting and waving signs for the long haul. • Roasted pasture-raised chicken salad with homemade mayo and chives. • Any cheese from Lazy Lady Farm, where provender and politics go hand in hand. Owner Laini Fondiller has made cheeses called Bernie — which was a bit holey — and Barick Obama. And we doubt she intends to replace the latter with a bitter, older, orange-tinted variety anytime soon. • Elmore Mountain Bread made from locally grown wheat milled by the bakers themselves. • Wild pesto made of dandelion greens, nettles and wild leek tops, ground up with sunflower oil, pepper and salt. • Kombucha, duh. And fair-trade coldbrew coffee to keep you moving. • Brownies. Contact: suzanne@sevendaysvt.com.


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food+drink

Taking a Stand Vermont farmers reinterpret the farm store B Y HA NNA H PAL M E R EGAN & SU ZANN E PODHAIZE R

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TRILLIUM HILL FARM

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

COU

RT

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YO

F

COURTESY OF PEBBLE BROOK FARM

t’s a classic Vermont scene: You’re cruising along a back road through some rural hamlet when you happen upon a farmhouse, an old red barn or a 10643 Route 116, Hinesburg, 482-4139, trilliumfarmvt.com. little roadside shack with the words “Farm Stand” Open daily, mid-March through Thanksgiving. painted on the side. You’ve got a few dollars in your wallet, so you pull Located right on Route 116 near its intersection with over. After all, these are the places where you’re likely the Hinesburg-Charlotte Road, the Trillium Hill farm M stand is incredibly convenient for passersby to find free-range eggs for $2.50 a dozen, maple UM HILL FAR I on the main thoroughfare. LL I syrup for $35 per gallon and fist-size beets for TR Although smaller than some of the 50 cents per pound. Score! other stands on this list, it stocks Even if the selection is slim, you know it’s an impressive supply of proteins, fresh. You grab a bunch of carrots or a dozen including its own beef tenderears of corn, deposit your money in a lockGreens at loin, hot dogs and short ribs, plus Trillium Hill box or coffee can, and you’re on your way Farm poultry from Maple Wind Farm in minutes. The transaction harks back to a in Huntington, lamb from Rolling more innocent time, and the food is satisfyBale Farm in Shoreham and coho ing in an ineffable as well as nutritious way. salmon from Starbird Fish. Vermont is still scattered with roadside The grass-fed beef in the fridge — stops like this one. They appear and disappear from the Angus, Hereford and British White in an annual flux as crops expand and contract. But herd — is one of Trillium’s points of pride. In the over the past few years, a new breed of on-farm store warmer seasons, these farmers move the cattle one to has emerged, upping the ante on what consumers can three times a day, a grazing practice that helps improve expect to find. They represent a movement in which the soil and sequester as much carbon as possible. food growers and producers are creating fresh ways to In addition to meats, the stand offers eggs, fermented market their products collaboratively. Like the spots foods from Sobremesa and a variety of Trillium’s homefeatured here, these grown veggies. A recent visit yielded bags of claytonia farm stands tend — a green also known as miner’s lettuce — as well as to offer an array of carrots and spinach. Like many others, the farm stand is self-serve, goods and services: which allows the farmers to be out in the field while Freezers hold local meats, ice creams customers help themselves.

48 FOOD

Pies at Pebble Brook Farm

FOOD LOVER?

GET YOUR FILL ONLINE...

and fresh fish, while refrigerator cases stock prepared foods, artisan cheeses, beverages and other tasty tidbits. Dry goods include everything from handmade soaps to herbal tonics and tinctures, table linens, and pottery. Any or all of these items might be produced on the host farm’s property, or they may hail from neighboring farms. When passersby stop for eggs and a bag of potatoes, they might also take home an unexpected tub of cultured butter or bouquet of flowers. And everybody wins. For Seven Days’ 2017 Summer Preview Issue, we’ve rounded up a sample of excellent new — or newly updated —  farm stands you might visit during Vermont day-trip excursions. Then again, they are worthy destinations on their own. !

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S.P.

PEBBLE BROOK FARM

188 Menard Rd., Braintree, 728-6251, facebook.com/ pebblebrookfarmstore. Open Thursday through Sunday, Memorial Day weekend through October.

As a tenant farmer, Chip Natvig worked the fields at 188 Menard Road in Braintree for several years. Then, in 2016, he and his family purchased the property and moved into the old farmhouse. They continued cultivating a three-acre vegetable spread in the low fields along Ayers Brook, just off Route 12. Last July, Natvig opened a farm stand in an unused horse stall in the 19th-century barn and loaded it up with salad TAKING A STAND

» P.50

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THE GREAT NORTHERN OPENS IN BURLINGTON’S SOUTH END

Sally Pollak

Pastries With Soul

Hannah Palmer Egan

Gluten-Free Gluttony

For three years, BHAVATARINI CARR has been selling

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Suzanne Podhaizer

FOOD 49

SWEET ALCHEMY BAKERY AND CAFÉ SETS UP IN ESSEX JUNCTION

Congratulations

SEVEN DAYS

Five weeks ago, VICKI FERENTINOS and SHANNON PARKER-FERENTINOS moved from New York City to Vermont. Last weekend, the couple began serving breakfast and lunch at brandnew SOULFULLY GOOD CAFÉ at 67 Central Street in Woodstock. In New York, Vicki Ferentinos served hundreds of people weekly through her catering outfit at events ranging from weddings to corporate lunches. It made for a decent living, but the chef started thinking it might

baked goods made in her Burlington kitchen under the name FOUR SISTERS BAKERY. This month she’ll soft-open her SWEET ALCHEMY BAKERY AND CAFÉ, located in the Barns at Lang Farm (43 Upper Main Street) in Essex Junction. Carr will offer pastries, tea and coffee on weekends for the rest of May and plans to serve breakfast and lunch six days a week by mid-June. The entire operation will be meat- and egg-free, and Lunch & Dinner q Tues - Sat many of the baked goods 39 Bridge St, Richmond will exclude dairy, soy and gluten. Carr herself is a 434-3148 vegetarian who eats gluten and occasional dairy, but she takes pleasure in replicating12v-toscano051717.indd 1 5/15/17 4:14 PM the textures of traditional NOW BOOKING recipes with allergenfree ingredients. “I’m an accidental chemist,” Carr said. “Focusing Open Sunday, May 21 on this niche for UVM Graduation market has worked really well for me.” Carr loves to re-create family recipes, such as her grandmother’s spiced-apple cake and bitter-chocolate-almond cake. She also turns out whoopie pies, savory turnovers, fruit tarts and “everything under the sun,” she surmised. The 1,500-square-foot 1840 West Main St, space, approximately half of Richmond, VT which comprises the kitchen, holds 20 seats in the dining 802-434-8686 room and many more outSERVING DINNER doors. “I want you to be able to sit down in the café and Tuesday-Saturday not be bumped up against kitchentablebistro.com someone else,” Carr said. In that spacious dining room, she’ll serve specialties such as dairy-free butternutsquash “mac and cheese,” 8V-KitchenTable051017.indd 1 5/8/17 1:15 PM Thai peanut salad, falafel subs, and a few dishes influenced by her time living in India, including a sourdough lentil pancake filled with potato curry. “I’m creating this menu around things I love to eat,” Carr said. sevendaysvt.com 05.17.17-05.24.17

A PEEK AT SOULFULLY GOOD, NOW OPEN IN WOODSTOCK

be nice to cook for fewer people in a more personable setting, she said. Last fall, the duo spent a little time in Vermont; in Woodstock, a Central Street storefront caught their eye. “We liked [the space], and we thought about [opening a café there],” the chef recalled. When the space came up for rent this spring, they went for it. As luck would have it, their house in New York sold the next day. The couple packed up and moved to the Upper Valley, where they got to work sprucing up the café interior and planning menus. At Soulfully Good, all of the pastries and breads are baked in-house daily, from single-serving foccacia, slick with blistered cheese and studded with Pastry from Four olives or Sisters Bakery artichokes, to rustic ciabatta loaves to sweet breads laced with apples and cinnamon or cranberries. Heartier breakfast fare includes sandwiches stuffed with eggs, meats, veggies and cheeses. Lunch brings shaved-Brussels-sprout salads that commingle kale, apples and Parmesan, along with local ham-and-cheddar panini, toasted quinoa bowls, dressed zucchini noodles, and other healthy, savory treats. For dessert, there’s Rocky Road fudge, pies, cakes and other sweet pastries. All are available during breakfast and lunch every day but Tuesday, when the restaurant is closed.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

The new sign at 716 Pine Street in Burlington’s South End looks like the marker for a National Forest: dark brown wood, pine tree and a name evocative of wide-open spaces: the GREAT NORTHERN. But the small print — reading “food” and “drink” — reveals that this is not a natural wonder but a new restaurant. The Great Northern opened on Mother’s Day in the space previously occupied by South End Kitchen. The place is something of a man-made wonder: an industrial-size room softened by architectural features such as interior clapboard siding and a wooden arch flanking a trio of mirrors. A mega leather banquette stands before a stone fireplace, and a cast-iron lighting fixture hangs from patterned beams. The restaurant is run by husband-and-wife team FRANK PACE and MARNIE LONG, who own the business with partners from neighboring ZERO GRAVITY CRAFT BREWERY. Pace, the chef, is a fixture of the Burlington restaurant scene who has worked at Smokejacks, HEALTHY LIVING MARKET & CAFÉ, Guild Fine Meats and the SPOT. His bar food, featuring housemade sausages, is available at Zero Gravity. At the Great Northern, Pace has put together a

menu that reflects the name of the business, riffing on Scandinavian fare such as fermented vegetables and salmon tartar. There’s also a nod to Asian cuisine and a raw bar. At brunch on day one, we chose eggs Benedict and a softshell-crab sandwich. The eggs were runny, always a good sign. The crab legs, dressed with spicy aioli and kimchi, crept over the edge of the roll. Servers were so attentive that three different people attempted to clear our dessert plates before we’d used them. The Great Northern is open Monday through Saturday for breakfast through dinner service, with brunch only on Sunday.

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM 05.17.17-05.24.17 SEVEN DAYS 50 FOOD

Produce at Golden Well Farm & Apiaries

SUZANNE PODHAIZER

greens, heirloom tomatoes, brassica crops, squash and other fresh produce. Natvig’s wife, Sarah, the chef-owner at Black Krim Tavern in Randolph, supplied the stand with breads, pastries and other just-baked goodies from the restaurant galley. At first, they offered simple, crusty white and whole-wheat loaves, and then … “One day I did this cinnamon bread,” Sarah said, standing in the grassy barnyard last week, “and it was all downhill from there.” People started showing up for baked goods as the stand opened each morning — most of the loaves would be gone before they’d even cooled. The shop was so successful that, for year two, the Natvigs decided to forego their 15member CSA. Most of their members frequented the stand anyway — and spent more money there on the specific products they wanted. This year, the couple installed a walkin cooler in an adjacent stall — it serves as cold storage for the stand and for the farm’s wholesale vegetable operation. In addition to fresh summer veggies, and then winter squash and root crops, visitors can find maple products from Raven Hill Farm; frozen pork and beef from Fog Lake Farms; duck, goose and chicken eggs from Bulrush Family Farm; coffee by Northfield’s Carrier Roasting; and ceramics and other crafts by local artists. New this summer, look for pints of Black Krim’s handmade ice cream, along with refrigerated soups in quart containers, a salad bar stocked with the day’s harvest, housemade dressings and other accoutrements. When the weather cools down, customers will find hot cider and coffee.

COURTESY OF GOLDEN WELL FARM & APIARIES

Taking a Stand « P.48

H.P.E.

PHILO RIDGE FARM

2766 Mt. Philo Rd., Charlotte, 539-2912, philoridgefarm.com. Open Tuesday through Saturday, mid-June through November.

In 2012, Diana McCargo and Peter Swift began an ecological farming project at 400-acre Philo Ridge Farm, formerly operated as a conventional dairy known as Foote Farm. Since then, they’ve been working to improve the pastures with thoughtful, diversified agricultural practices and, with a team of helpers, are producing meat, wool, garlic, grains, and fruit and vegetable crops. Currently, the Philo Ridge crew is putting up a barn that will serve as the farm store. It will feature prepared foods made on-site as well as raw ingredients. For now, shoppers can find the farm’s

Lambs at Philo Ridge Farm

goods in a charming, tiny building at the edge of Mt. Philo Road with a glorious view of mountains and valleys. As the season runs its course, there will be pork, chicken, beef and sometimes lamb, as well as dried beans,

sweet corn, chile peppers and other selections from the fields. The stand will also offer flowers, both fresh and dried. Two of the most unusual items sold at Philo Ridge are wool made with the farm’s own sheep fleece and blankets woven from that wool by Massachusettsbased fiber artist Peggy Hart. The natural-colored blankets, in gray and black, are elegant and warm. Because Philo Ridge is a newer operation, its owners and team are still in the process of adding products, figuring out what works best on their particular plot of land and doing research with University of Vermont Extension. Their goal, said McCargo, is to create a model diversified farm that brings the community together, offers delicious and nutritious foods, and can be studied and replicated by other farmers. S.P.

GOLDEN WELL FARM & APIARIES 1089 River Rd., New Haven, 870-0361, goldenwellapiaries.com. Open daily, April through October.

Motorists navigating the graceful curves of River Road in New Haven will come across a colorful, hand-lettered sign at No. 1089 that beckons them to turn off for CSA pickups and a farm stand. On a breezy afternoon last week, four workers in wide-brimmed hats squatted over raised beds along the driveway, transplanting cabbages. Near the parking area, a tall red gambrel barn is fringed with well-groomed rose and berry bushes. On one side of the barn, a low ell is painted with the words “Farmstand entrance around corner.” To the right of the barn, fruit trees put on a show of pink-tinged blooms, well attended by honeybees.


Mouse Needs a House! AGE/SEX: 10-year-old neutered male ARRIVAL DATE: February 2, 2017 REASON HERE: Mouse was a stray. SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS: Mouse is diabetic. Ask HSCC for more info.

SUMMARY: Mouse was found as a stray near

Malletts Bay in Colchester in February. He was picked up by a Good Samaritan. She took him into her home and cared for him while trying to find his owner. Ultimately, she knew the best thing to do would be to bring Mouse to HSCC so that he could be medically evaluated and treated. Once in our care, we found that Mouse was diabetic. We started him on a diabetic cat treatment plan, which includes special food and twice-daily insulin injections. We regularly checked on him and found that his glucose levels were consistently low, which was great news! We discontinued his insulin entirely to see if he could be a diabetic cat who was maintained on a prescription diet only, and he has been stable since mid-March.

Did you see Mouse featured on the Local 22 & Local 44 News?

Mouse has become a huge staff favorite here at HSCC because of his endearing personality. He spends his time here lounging around with his inquisitive nature, talking to everyone to let them know he is hungry, getting copious belly rubs and chowing down on his food! He has been doing great on his treatment for diabetes and is now ready to find an awesome home to match his awesome purrsonality!

CATS/DOGS: Mouse shared a room with another cat at HSCC, and they got along fine. He has no known experience living with dogs, but his finder said he met a dog and seemed OK with it.

COURTESY OF KELLY SCHULZE/MOUNTAIN DOG PHOTOGRAPHY

Visit HSCC at 142 Kindness Court, South Burlington, Tuesday through Friday from 1 to 6 p.m., or Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 862-0135 for more info.

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BURLINGTON 2-BR TOWNHOUSES Stainless-steel appliances & granite countertops. Community gardens, river views, covered bike storage & underground parking. Adjacent to nature/running trails & basketball/tennis courts. Bayberry Circle, Burlington (formerly 100 Grove St.). bayberry commonsapartments. com, 355-7633.

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CARS/TRUCKS 1990 TOYOTA LAND CRUISER 4WD, auto. 90,371 original miles. Like new. $2,600. Call 802-222-0277.

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BURLINGTON Avail. Jun. 1. 540 St. Paul St. Medium-size 2-BR apt. Closed porch, HDWD floors, $1,225/ mo. Large 3-BR. Storage. $1,650/mo. Quiet, laundry, parking. No dogs. 862-7467.

BURLINGTON 1- & 2-BR APTS. W/D in each unit, A/C, stainlesssteel appliances, granite countertops. Community gardens, elevators, adjacent to children’s playground. Your dream apartment! Bayberry Circle, Burlington (formerly 100 Grove St.). bayberry commonsapartments. com, 355-7633.

BURLINGTON, BAYBERRY COMMONS New 1- & 2-BR flats, 9’ ceilings, exterior porches/patios. Close to public transportation, shops, dining, universities & more. Bayberry Circle, Burlington (formerly 100 Grove St). bayberrycommons apartments.com, 355-7633. CHARLOTTE 2-BR APT. $1,350 Beautiful, classic 2-BR w/ garden & deck, in historic home. HDWD, 1st floor, 10’ ceilings. Avail. Jun. 1. Dave: 802-752-9249.

BURLINGTON 3-BR gas, water & sewer). EFFICIENCY APT., 2 blocks from Church 2 parking spaces: 1 in lg-valleypainting112614.indd 11/24/14 1 12:11 PM HINESBURG St. on edge of Old North garage, 1 outdoors. NS/ Newly remodeled, 1st jessica@smithlane.org End. 3-BR, 1.5-BA. pets. Fully furnished. fl oor, semi-private or 802-878-4334. $2,100/mo. Avail. $1,300 sec. dep. + entrance. Remodeled immediately. Landlord $175 util. budget + 1st kitchenette, W/D. All lives on premises. mo.’s rent due at lease utils. incl., + Wi-Fi & 802-683-7590. signing. Interested apcable. $900/mo. Avail. plicants are encouraged now. Sec. dep. & 1st BURLINGTON DOWNTOWN WINOOSKI to call 802-434-3796 & mo.’s rent. 300 sq.ft. of Minimal rent to share 1-BR upstairs apt. Gas ask for Laura to set up a living space + full BA. downtown apt. w/ heat, parking for 1 car. viewing. Can show now. Smoking woman in her 30s: CCV $800/mo. + $800 sec. outside only. No pets. grad who enjoys yoga, dep. Semi-furnished. TAFT FARM SENIOR Tracie, 363-9663. rock climbing, podcasts. Avail. now. No pets. LIVING COMMUNITY Seeking organized, 343-9315, 655-1220. 10 Tyler Way, Williston, NORTH HERO supportive female independent senior LAKEFRONT to assist w/ cooking, ESSEX JCT. 2-BR living. Avail. Jun. 15. Cozy Eastshore 5-room HOUSE, $1,450 cleaning & organization. Newly remodeled 2-BR house, w/ 1 large BR. Private location, Own vehicle required. unit avail., $1,300/mo. beautiful setting, HDWD 200 feet to water. Human services incl. utils. + cable. NS/ Garage. Screened porch. floors, W/D, walk-in experience preferred. pets. Must be 55+ years Town water. $1,100/mo. closet & area. It is a Shared BA. No sec. dep. of age. cintryburn+ utils. Lease, refs., sec. wonderful place to live. 863-5625 or homescfpm@gmail.com or dep. No pets. 372-4862. 800 sq.ft., a charming sharevermont.org for 802-879-3333. property. NS/pets. application. Interview, RESIDENCES AT 802-734-0708. refs., background WILLISTON 2-BR, GREAT CEDARS 2-BA CONDO checks required. EHO. Winooski, new 1- & ESSEX JCT. Brand-new Clean 1-BR, 2nd floor, full 2-BR senior-living apts. condo. High-end, BURLINGTON ROOM Spacious, bright rooms BA. Off-street parking; super-efficient stainless Stylish, furnished, w/ beautiful windows & 1 car only. No pets. Coin appliances. A/C. W/D recently renovated upscale kitchens featurlaundry. Lease, dep. in unit, attached downtown house. ing granite counters $900/mo. incl. utils. garage. Pool, tennis. Respectful living w/ & stainless-steel 878-2825. Williston schools. others. up to Post & browse ads Parking avail. appliances. Rent from Photos avail. Contact W/D, back deck, BBQ 6 photos per adincl. online. at your convenience. $1,200/mo. utils. jbowley@summitpmg. com or 802-497-1740. may also be allowed under 10 V.S.A. Section 3. 10-0865SD; 1189-1193 6085(c)(5). North Avenue (NAC, Ward 4) Cathedral ALPACAS FOR SALE Dated at Essex Square Corporation Sugarbush Alpacas Junction, Vermont this Subdivide back lot into of Stowe. 253-6262, 17th day of May, 2010. two lots. mbhaynes54@gmail. com, sugarbushalBy /s/ Stephanie H. 4. 10-0836CA; 46 pacas.com. Monaghan Chittenden Drive (RL,

HOUSEMATES

BARRE: 3-BR, 1.5-BA + DEN Large, sunny, modern COUNTRY LIVING apt. in owner-occupied IN WESTFORD duplex. Highly desired Cute 3-BR house on BURLINGTON 2-BR & Orange St. neighborSTUDIO APTS. AVAIL. 18 acres in Westford. hood; close to Church St. Marketplace. New paint. 25 mins. to downtown. Recently 2-BR avail. now. $1,409/ Burlington & St. Albans. renovated, restored mo. Studio avail. Sep. 1. 2-BA, full basement. HDWD floors, new $906/mo. NS/pets. W/D W/D. $1,700/mo. + utils. carpet, fresh paint, on-site. 1-year lease. Pet deposit. Rental apremodeled kitchen w/ 922-8518. plication. jfranz@sover. new stainless-steel net, 802-878-7405. appliances, W/D, DW. Ample storage space. 1,600 sq.ft. + enclosed will porch. be directed west request by an adjoining The District 4 sun $1,395/mo. to the existing property owner or other Environmental incl. heat, HW, snow/ Southwest Stormwater interested person must Commission will review trash removal. NS/ facility located near include a petition for this application under pets. 802-272-0321, the Redstone campus. party status. Prior to Act 250 Rule 51 — Minor lannenproperties.com. Project will involve submitting a request Applications. Copies blasting to connect the for a hearing, please of the application and stormwater systems. contact the district proposed permit are sevendaysvt.com The Project is located coordinator at the available for review at on Spear Street, south telephone number the Essex Town Office, of the Gutterson Field listed below for more Stephanie H. Monaghan Ward 6) Ute Regan Chittenden County ARE YOUofGOOD W/ House in the Cities of information. Prior to Natural Resources Appeal Regional Planning DOGS? EQUAL HOUSING mini-sawit-white.indd 1 11/24/09 1:32:18 PM Burlington and South convening a hearing, Board Administrative Commission located at law. Our readers are hereby informed Looking for dogOPPORTUNITY the District Commission Burlington. District #4 Coordinator that all dwellings, in this Approval to convert 110advertised West Canal Street, savvy for All real estate advertising in must this newsnewspaper available onWinooski, an equal determine that are Suite 111 West Street singleadopter family home 202, 13-mo.-old rescue. paper is subject to the Federal Fair opportunity basis. Any home seeker The District 4 substantive issues Essex Junction, VT to single family with and the office listed Up-to-date vaccinaHousing Act of 1968 and similar Ver- a hearing who feels her orbelow. she has encountered Environmental requiring have 05452 accessory apartment. The application tions, spayed, playful, mont statutes which make it illegal to discrimination should contact: Commission will review been raised. Findings of T/ 802-879-5662 and proposed permit agile, intelligent. Needs advertise any preference, limitations, this application under Fact and Conclusions of E/ stephanie. 5. 05-401CA/MA; 237 may also be viewed on or discrimination based on race, color, HUD Offi ce of Fair Housing Act 250 Rule 51 - Minor Law will not be prepared the Natural Resources monaghan@state.vt.us continued North Avetraining; (RM, Ward religion, sex, national origin, sexual 10 Causeway St., MORETOWN VILLAGE should be only dog Applications. Copies unless the Commission 7) Hartland Group for Real Board’s web site (www. SALE age, marital status, MA 02222-1092 now. vtdogfoster@ oforientation, the application and holds a publicBoston, hearing. Estate Developers, LLC nrb.state.vt.us/lup) Robbi Handy Holmes • 802-951-2128 handicap, presence of minor children (617) 565-5309 Village-wide yard sale, gmail.com. proposed permit are Extension of time by clicking on “Act 250 BURLINGTON in the family or receipt of public as— OR — p.m., Sat., May robbihandyholmes@c21jack.com DEVELOPMENT available for review Should a hearing be request for adaptive Database” and entering 9 a.m.-3 sistance, or an intention to make any Vermont Human Rights Commission 25. Huge range of items, SWEET & existing CUDDLY LAB REVIEW BOARD atsuch the Burlington held on this project and reuse the case number above. Find mePUPS on of preference, limitation or a dis14-16 Baldwin St. incl. antiques, clothing, Municipal Office, you have a disability for industrial warehouse crimination. The newspaper will not Montpelier, VT 05633-0633 sporting goods AKC Tuesday June& 15,much 2010 Chittenden Countyany advertising whichfor you are1-800-416-2010 going to andregistered. new construction No hearing will be Making it happen for you! knowingly accept more. Route 100B. Chocolate & units black,ofboth PUBLIC HEARING Regional Planning need to build 25 held unless, on or real estate, which is in violation of accommodation, the hrc@vermont.gov sexes. Ready Jun. 7. Vet NOTICE Commission located at please notify us by June before Wednesday, condominium housing, WATERBURY FLEA checked, 110 West Canal Street, 8, 2010. encloseddewormed, parking and June 9, 2010, a party MARKET AKC papers. $700; The Burlington IN THE SUPERIOR Winooski, and the a cafe. notifies the District 16t-robbiehandyholmes051717.indd 1 $250 deposit to5/11/17 3:12 PM largest! Find COURT OF THE 1STATE Development Review hold.PM-Munch-052114.indd office listed below. Parties entitled to Commission of an issue Vt.’s

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& garden. Wi-Fi, cable TV. Smoking outside only. $600/mo. incl. all utils. $100 dep. Monthly. Avail. now. 520-203-5487. IN WINOOSKI, ROOMMATE B&B atmosphere. NS/ ND. Fresh paint. All utils. incl. Wi-Fi. Great phone reception. $600/ mo. + 1/2 dep. Avail. Jun. 1. To view now, call 497-1011 . ROOM FOR RENT, AVAIL. NOW Monkton farmhouse on 20 acres, all amenities incl., garden space, 13.5 miles to I-89. Start $400/mo. 453-3457. S. BURLINGTON Share home w/ vibrant woman in her 70s interested in healthy living, teaching ESL & current events. Seeking female housemate There’ s nointerested limit to who is also adcommunity, length online. in music

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HE CAME ON A HUNCH. HE STAYED FOR THE CRUNCH. WE LOVED HIM SO MUCH. LORD, PLEASE WELCOME OUR MUNCH.

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HOME/GARDEN HONEY-DO HOME MAINTENANCE All jobs lg. or small, home or office, 24-hr. service. A division of Sasso Construction. Call Scott today! Local, reliable, honest. All calls returned. 310-6926. LANDSCAPING, POST HOLES, MORE Ditching, post holes, grading, lawn shaping, tilling, brush hogging, small stump removal, material moving. Fully insured! Credit cards accepted. lgminix.com, kevin@lgminix.com, 802-456-0549.

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STORAGE SALE:

5/15/17 HW-Dupius2-051717.indd 3:55ET. PM 1 TOOLS,

COMMUNITY YARD SALE Incl. furniture, kitchen items, snowboard gear, frames, curtain rods, clothes, books & more. Sun., May 21, 7 a.m.-2 p.m. 86 Dodds Ct., Burlington. MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE Sat., May 20, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Lots of great stuff. North Ave. past Flynn School to left on Westward Dr. to our Northshore neighborhood. MOVING SALE IN SHELBURNE 9 a.m., Sat., May 20. 579 Beaver Creek Rd. Natuzzi leather sectional sofa, love seat, chairs, rugs, household, Universal Gym, Brunswick pool table, Fuji bike mint, 3 signed Woody Jackson prints, Cawley Lemay stove, vintage stereo equipment, lamps, rugs. 802-238-9574. MOVING SALE! May 21 only, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Window A/Cs, women’s/teen clothing, military, furniture, housewares, women’s ski boots, books, DVDs. 42 Conger Ave. on the porch, Burlington. NEIGHBORHOOD GARAGE SALE Sat., May 20, 8:30 a.m.4 p.m. 277 N. Harbor Rd., Colchester. Furniture, baby items, house & garden odds & ends.

Stanley toolbox, automotive tools, SEA/ metric wrenches, shelving, artwork, clothing. Everything goes, BO. Sat., May 27, 8 a.m. 7362 Route 2A, St. George. gary@outercapesailing. com, 508-237-4012.

10 YARD SALES IN SHELBURNE Sat., May 20, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. 10 separate homes: all in 1 Shelburne neighborhood! Enter on Meadow Ln. off Route 7. Don’t miss this sale!

HOUSEHOLD ITEMS IN-GROUND POOL HEATER Model: Hayward 200 NG. Lists for $1,895; selling for $1,395. Never used. 802-598-3125.

MISCELLANEOUS 48 PILLS + 4 FREE! Viagra 100 mg/Cialis 20 mg. Free pills! No hassle, discreet shipping. Save now. Call today! 877-621-7013. (AAN CAN). GRASS-FED CHICKEN Local, pasture-raised, fresh, whole, nonGMO, antibiotic-free chicken & turkey. Direct from Northeast Kingdom’s Hillside Farm. Call GretaJane, 802-347-1780, pearcespasturedpoultry@ gmail.com. Order now. Sells out fast.

Erin Dupuis Flat Fee Real Estate 802-310-3669 erin@flatfeevt.com

WANT TO BUY

INSTRUCTION

ANTIQUES Furniture, postcards, pottery, cameras, toys, medical tools, lab glass, photographs, slide rules, license plates & silver. Anything unusual or unique. Cash paid. Dave, 859-8966.

ANDY’S MOUNTAIN MUSIC Affordable, accessible instruction in banjo, guitar, mandolin, more. All ages/skill levels/ interests welcome! Supportive, dedicated teacher offering references, results, convenience. Andy Greene, 802-658-2462, guitboy75@hotmail. com, andysmountainmusic.com.

ANTIQUES WANTED Trusted 3rd-generation Vermont antique dealer specializing in jewelry, watches, silver, art, military, antique collectibles, etc. bittnerantiques.com. Brian, 802-272-7527. Consulting/appraisal services avail. House calls made free of charge.

MUSIC music

BANDS/ MUSICIANS GYPSY/WORLD MUSIC PROJECT Players of flamenco or other Romani music styles: We are specifi cally looking for violin/ viola, cello, accordion. Open to players of other instruments. jahilek@ comcast.net.

5/15/17 3:56 PM

BASS LESSONS W/ ARAM For all ages, levels & styles. Beginners welcome! Learn songs, theory, technique & more on Pine St. Years of pro performing, recording & teaching experience. 1st lesson half off! 598-8861, arambedrosian.com, lessons@arambedrosian.com. BASS, GUITAR, DRUMS, VOICE LESSONS & MORE! Learn bass, guitar, drums, voice, flute, sax, trumpet, production & beyond with some of Vermont’s best players & independent instructors in beautiful, spacious lesson studios at the Burlington Music Dojo on Pine St. All levels & styles are welcome, incl. absolute beginners! Gift certificates avail. Come share in the music! burlingtonmusicdojo. com, info@burlingtonmusicdojo.com, 540-0321.

MUSIC »

CLASSIFIEDS C-3

ALL AREAS FREE ROOMMATE SERVICE At rentmates.com. Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at rentmates.com! (AAN CAN)

COMMERCIAL KITCHEN Ready for retail or wholesale application. Lease includes utils. + equipment. Located in beautiful downtown Huntington. Call 802-434-2564.

HOUSE HELPER Individual w/ 20+ years of experience in a private home. Honest & very loyal. Seeking homes to clean. I’m a very detailed individual seeking to help families in their homes, & I also have excellent refs. on demand. Will clean estates to get it ready for the market. Pet-sitting, running errands. Please call me at 785-201-5734. Thank you. Only serious inquiries, please.

channeling w/ Bernice Kelman, Underhill. 30+ years’ experience. Also energy healing, chakra balancing, Reiki, rebirthing, other lives, classes, more. 802-899-3542, kelman.b@juno.com.

Erin Dupuis

SEVEN DAYS

OFFICE/RETAIL SPACE AT MAIN ST. LANDING on Burlington’s waterfront. Beautiful, healthy, affordable spaces for your business. Visit mainstreetlanding.com & click on space avail. Melinda, 864-7999.

BIZ OPPS

PSYCHIC COUNSELING

HW-Dupius1-051717.indd Psychic1counseling,

Bright and sunny 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath end unit with finished basement, updating flooring in spacious living and formal dining room and bedrooms, kitchen that opens to breakfast nook overlooking front yard, 2nd floor laundry, finished basement with and lots of extra storage. Close to bike path and town beaches. $248,900.

05.17.17-05.24.17

DOWNTOWN EXEC. OFFICE SUITE Burlington, 1 Lawson Ln., 1 block from Church St., single offices for rent in co-op-style office suite. Shared reception area, kitchen & conference. Private office. Prices from $400-700/mo. Call 802-658-0355 today!

services

CLEANING

COLCHESTER | 97 INDIAN CIRCLE | #4623494

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

OFFICE/ COMMERCIAL

SERVICES

MOVE-IN READY TOWNHOME

CHARLOTTE | 3231 MOUNT PHILO ROAD | #4624360

BURLINGTON | 43 ISHAM STREET | #4625278

Single-Family rental with lots of potential. Tenants enjoy the open floor plan, laundry, storage, large backyard and off-street parking. Blocks to colleges/hospital and downtown. $365,000

REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS: List your properties here and online for only $45/week. Submit your listings by Mondays at noon to homeworks@sevendaysvt.com or 802-865-1020, x37.

BROWSE THIS WEEK’S OPEN HOUSES: sevendaysvt.com/open-houses

5:54 PM


SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

music [CONTINUED] BEGINNER GUITAR LESSONS Great for kids. Plenty of experience in the area. Great refs. Find ad online & reply online. 646-600-8357. GUITAR INSTRUCTION Berklee graduate w/ 30 years’ teaching experience offers lessons in guitar, music theory, music technology, ear training. Individualized, step-by-step approach. All ages, styles, levels. Rick Belford, 864-7195, rickb@rickbelford.com. GUITAR LESSONS W/ GREGG All levels/ages. Acoustic, electric, classical. Patient, supportive, experienced, highly qualified instructor. Relax, have fun & allow your musical potential to unfold. Gregg Jordan, gregg@ gjmusic.com, 318-0889.

various dance backgrounds. Open class/audition: May 25, 7:30 p.m., UVM Mann Gym. paulahiga.com.

HARMONICA LESSONS W/ ARI Lessons in Montpelier & on Skype. 1st lesson half price! All ages & skill levels welcome. Avail. for workshops, too. pocketmusic. musicteachershelper. com, 201-565-4793, ari. erlbaum@gmail.com.

STUDIO/ REHEARSAL FRIDAY POP CAFÉ STUDIO Located in downtown Burlington, Friday Pop Café is a creative, cozy-vibed recording studio that welcomes solo acts, bands & multimedia projects! Kat, 802-231-1134.

ACT 250 NOTICE MINOR APPLICATION #4C0877-9 10 V.S.A. §§ 6001 - 6093 On May 3, 2017, Marilyn Larkin, 410 Shelburne Road, Burlington, VT 05401 filed application #4C0877-9 for a project generally described as the demolition and removal of two existing residential structures and sidewalks. No further construction is proposed at this time. The Project is located at 1185 Shelburne Road in South Burlington, Vermont.

ART art

AUDITIONS/ CASTING

The District #4 Environmental Commission is reviewing this application under Act 250 Rule 51 — Minor CALL FOR DANCERS Applications. Copies of Paula Higa Dance & Ers the application and prois looking for new posed permit are availUsing the enclosed math operations as a guide, fill the grid company members w/ able for review at the

Calcoku

using the numbers 1 - 6 only once in each row and column.

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If you feel that any of the District Commission members listed on the attached Certificate of Service under “For Your Information” may have a conflict of interest, or if there is any other reason a member should be disqualified from sitting on this case, please contact the district coordinator as soon as possible, no later than prior to the response date listed above. Should a hearing be held on this Project and you have a disability for which you are going to need accommodation, please notify us by June 1, 2017. Parties entitled to participate are the Municipality, the Municipal Planning Commission, the Regional Planning Commission, affected state agencies, and adjoining property owners and other persons to the extent they have a particularized interest that may be affected by the proposed project under the 10 criteria. Non-party participants may also be allowed under 10 V.S.A. Section 6085(c)(5).

Sudoku

Dated at Essex Junction, Vermont this 8th day of May 2017. By: Peter E. Keibel District #4 Coordinator Natural Resources Board 111 West Street Essex Jct., VT 05452 802-879-5658 Peter.Keibel@vermont. gov AUCTION – MOBILE HOME Sale Date and Location: Thursday, 5/25/17 at 11:00 a.m. – 21 Avenue C, mobile home located on North Avenue in Burlington, Vermont formerly known as Farrington’s Mobile Home Park in Burlington. For more info. call (802) 860-9536. 1982 Windsor, Min. bid $6,274.25 Must be moved 5 days after sale. Auctioneer: Uriah Wallace – Lic. #0570002460 CITY OF BURLINGTON TRAFFIC REGULATIONS The following traffic regulations are hereby enacted by the Public Works Commission as amendments to Appendix C, Rules and Regulations of the using the Traffic Commission, and

Complete the following puzzle by numbers 1-9 only once in each row, column and 3 x 3 box.

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No hearing will be held and a permit may be issued unless, on or before June 1, 2017, a person notifies the Commission of an issue or issues requiring the presentation of evidence at a hearing or the Commission sets the matter for hearing on its own motion. Any hearing request must be in writing to the address below, must state the criteria or subcriteria at issue, why a hearing is required and what additional evidence will be presented at the hearing. Any hearing request by an adjoining property owner or other interested person must include a petition for party status. Prior to submitting a request for a hearing, please contact the district coordinator at the telephone number listed below for more information. Prior to convening a hearing, the Commission must determine that substantive issues requiring a hearing have been raised.

Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law will not be prepared unless the Commission holds a public hearing.

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office listed below. The application and a draft permit may also be viewed on the Natural Resources Board’s web site (www.nrb.state. vt.us/lup) by clicking on “Act 250 Database” and entering the project number “4C0877-9”.

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Difficulty - Hard

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

No. 480

SUDOKU

5 Difficulty: Hard

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: ★★★

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: ★★★

Fill the grid using the numbers 1-6, only once in each row and column. The numbers in each heavily outlined “cage” must combine to produce the target number in the top corner, using the mathematical operation indicated. A onebox cage should be filled in with the target number in the top corner. A number can be repeated within a cage as long as it is not the same row or column.

Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each 9-box square contains all of the numbers one to nine. The same numbers cannot be repeated in a row or column.

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ANSWERS ON P. C-7 ★ = MODERATE 7 9 1★★8= CHALLENGING 6 4 2 ★★5★ =3HOO, BOY!

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the City of Burlington’s Code of Ordinances:

public auction by sealed bid.

7A Accessible spaces designated

Name of Occupant/ Storage Unit Demercado #1

No person shall park any vehicle at any time in the following locations, except automobiles displaying special handicapped license plates issued pursuant to 18 V.S.A. § 1325, or any amendment or renumbering thereof: (1)-(143) As Written. (144) [In the space in front of 78 North Street.] Reserved. (145)-(166) As Written. 9 Fifteen-minute parking (a) No person shall park a vehicle longer than fifteen (15) minutes, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 10:00 p.m., Sundays and holidays excepted, in the following areas: (1)-(14) As Written. (15) [Reserved.] In the space in front of 78 North Street. (16) As Written. (17) [Reserved.] On the north side of North Street in the second space east of Park Street. (18)-(32) As Written. (33) [In the parking space in front of 75 North Street.] Reserved. (34)-(126) As Written. *Adopted this 19th day of October, 2016 by the Board of Public Works Commissioners: Attest Norman Baldwin, P.E. Assistant Director – Technical Services Adopted 10/19/16; Published 05/17/17; Effective 06/07/17. Material in [Brackets] delete. Material underlined add. *Administrative correction NOTICE OF LEGAL SALE View Date 6/1/17 Sale Date 6/2/17

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Paul Meacham Unit #166 Unit #168 Easy Self Storage 46 Swift South Burlington, VT 05403 (802)863-8300 NOTICE OF SELF STORAGE LIEN SALE BURLINGTON SELF STORAGE 1825 SHELBURNE RD SOUTH BURLINGTON, VT 05403 Notice is hereby given that the contents of the self storage unit listed below will be sold at

Auction will take place on Friday, June 2, 2017 beginning at 11:00am at Burlington Self Storage, 1825 Shelburne Road, South Burlington, VT 05403. Unit will be opened for viewing immediately prior to auction. Sale shall be by sealed bid to the highest bidder. Contents of entire storage unit will be sold as one lot. The winning bid must remove all contents from the facility at no cost to BSS. BSS reserves the right to reject any bid lower that the amount owed by the occupant. OPENINGS BURLINGTON CITY COMMISSIONS/ BOARDS Airport Commission Term Expires 6/30/20 One Opening Board of Assessors Term Expires 3/31/20 One Opening Cemetery Commission Term Expires 6/30/19 One Opening Cemetery Commission Term Expires 6/30/20 Two Openings Chittenden County Regional Planning Comm. Term Expires 6/30/19 One Opening Chittenden County Regional Planning Comm.-alt Term Expires 6/30/19 One Opening Green Mountain Transit (CCTA) Term Expires 6/30/20 One Opening Church Street Marketplace Commission Term Expires 6/30/20 Two Openings Conservation Board Term Expires 6/30/21 Four Openings Design Advisory Board Term Expires 6/30/20 Two Openings Design Advisory BoardalternateTerm Expires 6/30/20 Two Openings Development Review Board Term Expires 6/30/19 One Opening Electric Light Commission Term Expires 6/30/20


SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Two Openings

Three Openings

Fence Viewers Term Expires 6/30/18 Three Openings

Board for Registration of Voters Term Expires 6/30/22 Two Openings

Fire Commission Term Expires 6/30/20 Two Openings Board of Health Term Expires 6/30/20 Two Openings Housing Board of Review Term Expires 6/30/20 One Opening Library Commission Term Expires 6/30/20 One Opening Parks and Recreation Commission Term Expires 6/30/20 Two Openings Planning Commission Term Expires 6/30/20 Two Openings Police Commission Term Expires 6/30/20 Two Openings Public Works Commission Term Expires 6/30/20 Two Openings Retirement Board Term Expires 6/30/20 One Opening Board of Tax Appeals Term Expires 6/30/20

Applications may be submitted to the Clerk/ Treasurer’s Office, 149 Church Street, Burlington, VT 05401 Attn: Lori NO later than Wednesday, May 24, 2017, by 4:30 pm. If you have any questions, please contact Lori at (802)865-7136 or via email lolberg@ burlingtonvt.gov. City Council President Knodell will plan for appointments to take place at the June 12, 2017 City Council Meeting. STATE OF VERMONT FRANKLIN UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT DOCKET NO: 522-1215 FRCV USAA FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK v. DOUGLAS C. GREIG AND KRISTEN GREIG OCCUPANTS OF 58 SNOWCREST ROAD, FAIRFAX, VT MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE

OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Amended Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered February 15, 2017 in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Douglas C. Greig and Kristen Greig to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for USAA Federal Savings Bank, dated November 6, 2010 and recorded in Book 209 Page 20 of the land records of the Town of Fairfax, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of an Assignment of Mortgage from Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for USAA Federal Savings Bank to USAA Federal Saving Bank dated April 13, 2011 and recorded in Book 244 Page 73 of the land records of the Town of Fairfax for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 58 Snowcrest Road, Fairfax, Vermont on

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May 31, 2017 at 11:00 AM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To wit: The land and premises subject to this Security Instrument are all of the land and premises conveyed to Douglas C. Greig and Kristen Greig by deed from Gregory A. Parker and Carol J. Parker dated June 21, 2006 and recorded on July 12, 2006 in Book 178, Page 605 of the Land Records of the Town of Fairfax, County of Franklin and State of Vermont. Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description. Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described. TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a

LET EM GO! ANSWERS ON P. C-7

certified check, bank treasurer's or cashier's check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer's or cashier's check within thirty (30) days after the date of sale. The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale. DATED: April 28, 2017 By: /S/Rachel K. Jones, Esq. Rachel K. Jones, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032 STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT CHITTENDEN UNIT PROBATE DIVISION DOCKET NO. 166-2-17CNPR In re estate of Patricia H. Bremer.

Open 24/7/365. Post & browse ads at your convenience. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To the creditors of Patricia H. Bremer late of Essex Junction, VT. I have been appointed to administer this estate. All creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the first publication of this notice. The claim must be presented to me at the address listed below with a copy sent to the court. The claim may be barred forever if it is not presented within the four (4) month period. Date: 5/6/2017 /s/ Jennifer Armstrong Signature of Fiduciary /s/ James Bremer Co-executor Jennifer L. Armstrong Executor/Administrator: 13 Glen Ridge Lane St. Albans, VT 05478 Name of publication Seven Days Publication Dates: 5/17/2017 Name and Address of Court: Vermont Superior

Court, Chittenden Unit, Probate Division P.O. Box 511 Burlington, VT 05402 STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT WASHINGTON UNIT CIVIL DIVISION DOCKET # 773-12-15 WNCV THE BANK OF NEW YORK, MELLON, AS TRUSTEE FOR FIRST HORIZON ALTERNATIVE MORTGAGE SECURITIES TRUST 2007-FA5 Plaintiff v. TRACY E. GRIFFIN A/K/A TRACY GRIFFIN AND MICHAEL P. GRIFFIN A/K/A MICHAEL GRIFFIN OCCUPANTS OF: 54 WELLINGTON STREET, BARRE, VTDefendants MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered March 30, 2017 in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Tracy E. Griffin Michael P. Griffin to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as a nominee for First

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Horizon Home Loans, a Division of First Tennessee Bank National Association, dated June 15, 2007 and recorded in Book 240 Page 207 of the land records of the City of Barre, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of the following Assignments of Mortgage: (1) Assignment of Mortgage from Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as a nominee for First Horizon Home Loans, a Division of First Tennessee Bank National Association to First Horizon Home Loans, a Division of First Bank National Association dated January 28, 2009 and recorded in Book 250 Page 989 and (2) a Corrective Assignment of Mortgage from First Horizon Home Loans, a Division of First Bank National Association to The Bank of New York, Mellon, as Trustee for First Horizon Alternative Mortgage Securities Trust 2007-FA5 dated September 24, 2015 and recorded in Book 294 Page 276, both of the land records of the City of Barre for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the

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fsb

FOR SALE BY OWNER

List your property here for 2 weeks for only $45! Contact Ashley, 864-5684, fsbo@sevendaysvt.com.

RICHMOND COUNTRY HOME

CHAMPLAIN, NY 12919

This Vermont country home & 11.4 acres at 3325 Hinesburg Road, Richmond, has been lovingly and thoughtfully cared for over thirty years including many upgrades & improvements. 802922-1771, vermontreal-estate-for-salerent.com/ $675,000.

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

[CONTINUED] purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 54 Wellington Street, Barre, Vermont on June 13, 2017 at 10:00 AM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To wit: Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to Tracy E. Griffin and Michael P. Griffin by Deed of Robert G. Manley and Wendy T. Manley of approximate even date herewith and to be recorded in the City of Barre City Land Records. Said lands and premises being more particularly described as follows: Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to Robert G. Manley, Wendy T. Manley and Julie A. Clemons by Warranty Deed of Julwen, LLC dated July 16, 2004 and recorded at Book 214, page 974 of the City of

Barre Land Records. The interest of Julie A. Clemons was conveyed to Robert G. Manley and Wendy T. Manley by Warranty Deed dated February 17, 2006 and recorded at Book 229, Page 436 of said land records. Being parcel No. 2 in a Warranty Deed from Julie A. Clemons, Robert G. Manley and Wendy T. Manley to JULWEN, LLC dated October 24, 2003 and recorded at Book 207, Page 565 of the Barre City Land Records. Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description. Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described. TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The

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Wake up to a dream come true! Expan5/8/17 Untitled-6 1:39 PM 1 sive lake views from this waterfront home located on a private, quiet, dead end road. 57 Spauldings Bay Ct., Colchester, Vt. $475,000. 879-1203 MallettsBayLakeHouse@gmail.com

balance of the purchase life-affirming qualities. 5/1/17 Fsbo-Metcalf-051017.indd 12:38by PM 1 No athletic Any age. price shall be paid experience needed. a certified check, bank Call Penni or Linda treasurer’s or cashier’s at 999-5478, info@ check within thirty (60) dragonheartvermont. days after the date of org, dragonheartversale. mont.org. The mortgagor is AL-ANON entitled to redeem the For families & friends of premises at any time alcoholics. For meeting prior to the sale by payinfo, go to vermontalaing the full amount due nonalateen.org or call under the mortgage, 866-972-5266. including the costs and expenses of the sale. ALATEEN GROUP Other terms to be anNew Alateen group in nounced at the sale. Burlington on Sundays from 5-6 p.m. at the DATED: May 11, 2017 UU building at the top By: /S/ Rachel K. Jones, of Church St. For more Esq. information please call Rachel K. Jones, Esq. Carol, 324-4457. Bendett and McHugh, PC ALCOHOLICS 270 Farmington Ave., ANONYMOUS Ste. 151 Daily meetings in Farmington, CT 06032 various locations. Free. Info, 864-1212. Want to overcome a drinking problem? Take the first step of 12 & join a group in your area.

support groups AHOY BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS Join our floating support group where the focus is on living, not on the disease. We are a team of dragon boaters. Learn all about this paddle sport & its health-giving,

183/185 North Willard St. Large 3 room efficiency, nice sunny 1-BR and large 2-BR up stairs. Large walk-in attic. Each unit has its own porch. Nice backyard has a garage and drive way.   802-658-0621

MALLETTS BAY LAKEHOUSE

Seasonal classic. 4/17/17 FSBO-Macdonald051017.indd 10:38 AM 1 Adjacent to waterfront park, marina and golf. Boatlaunch and hiking nearby. Deeded lake rights, 10 rooms, unfinished attic. Original features, updates, fixer-upper. Additional 2 story building. Old Arsenal Road. $175,000. 802-735-7089.

FSBO-Bohen-041917.indd 1

FSBO-Toomey-050317.indd 1

Renovated, spacious 2-bd, 1-1/2 storey farmhouse on 31.5 acres (2 meadows, woods, brook, bedrock, trees, deer, etc.). Large eat-in kitchen. 1.5 baths. Finished attic. Oil heating and wood stove. Drilled well. Perennial garden. Close to 1-87. $90,000. 514-485-1636, 518-2985249 cynthiamacd001@ hotmail.com

PRICE REDUCED

LAKE CHAMPLAIN, WESTPORT

BURLINGTON 3-UNIT APARTMENT HOUSE

ALL CANCER SURVIVORS Join the wellness classes at Survivorship NOW, created by cancer survivors for survivors of all cancers. Benefi ts from lively programs designed to engage and empower cancer survivors in our community. Email: info@ survivorshipnowvt.org. Call Chantal, 777-1126, survivorshipnowvt.org.

6/27/16 12:15 PM

List your property here for 2 weeks for only $45! Contact Ashley, 864-5684, fsbo@sevendaysvt.com.

questions or additional 5/8/17 10:18group AM listings, ALTERNATIVES TO support SUICIDE call 800-272-3900. Alternatives to Suicide is a safe space where ALZHEIMER’S the subject of suicide ASSOCIATION can be discussed freely, TELEPHONE SUPPORT GROUP without judgment or 1st Monday stigma. The group is famonthly, 3-4:30 p.m. cilitated by individuals Pre-registration who have themselves is required (to experienced suireceive dial-in codes cidal thoughts/ for toll-free call). Please feelings. Fletcher Free dial the Alzheimer’s Library, 235 College Association’s 24/7 St., Burlington. Group Helpline 800-272-3900 meets weekly on for more information. Thursdays, 1-2:30 p.m. Info: makenzy@ ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE pathwaysvermont.org, & DEMENTIA SUPPORT 888-492-8218 x300. GROUP Held the last Tue. of ALZHEIMER’S every mo., 5:30-7:30 ASSOCIATION p.m., at Birchwood Terr., SUPPORT GROUP Burlington. Info, Kim, This caregivers support 863-6384. group meets on the 3rd Wed. of every mo. ARE YOU HAVING from 5-6:30 p.m. PROBLEMS W/ DEBT? at the Alzheimer’s Association Main Office, Do you spend more than you earn? Get help at 300 Cornerstone Dr., Debtor’s Anonymous Suite 128, Williston. plus Business Debtor’s Support groups meet Anonymous. Sat., to provide assistance 10-11:30 a.m., Methodist and information on Church at Buell & S. Alzheimer’s disease Winooski, Burlington. and related dementias. Contact Brenda, They emphasize shared 338-1170. experiences, emotional support, and coping BABY BUMPS SUPPORT techniques in care for GROUP FOR MOTHERS a person living with AND PREGNANT Alzheimer’s or a related WOMEN dementia. Meetings Pregnancy can be a are free and open to wonderful time of your the public. Families, life. But, it can also be caregivers, and friends a time of stress that is may attend. Please call often compounded by in advance to confirm hormonal swings. If you date and time. For are a pregnant woman,

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or have recently given birth and feel you need some help with managing emotional bumps in the road that can come with motherhood, please come to this free support group lead by an experienced pediatric Registered Nurse. Held on the 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of the month, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at the Birthing Center, Northwestern Medical Center, St. Albans. Info: Rhonda Desrochers, Franklin County Home Health Agency, 527-7531. BEREAVEMENT/GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP Meets every other Mon. night, 6-7:30 p.m., & every other Wed., 10-11:30 a.m., in the Conference Center at Central Vermont Home Health & Hospice in Berlin. The group is open to anyone who has experienced the death of a loved one. There is no fee. Info, Ginny Fry or Jean Semprebon, 223-1878. BRAIN INJURY SUPPORT GROUP IN ST. JOHNSBURY Monthly meetings will be held on the 3rd Wed. of every mo., 1-2:30 p.m., at the Grace United Methodist Church, 36 Central St., St. Johnsbury. The support group will offer valuable resources & info about brain injury.

It will be a place to share experiences in a safe, secure & confidential environment. Info, Tom Younkman, tyounkman@vcil.org, 800-639-1522. BRAIN INJURY ASSOCIATION OF VERMONT Montpelier daytime support group meets the 3rd Thu. of the mo. at the Unitarian Church ramp entrance, 1:302:30 p.m. St. Johnsbury support group meets the 3rd Wed. montly at the Grace United Methodist Church, 36 Central St., 1:00-2:30 p.m.  Colchester  Evening support group meets the 1st Wed. monthly at the Fanny Allen Hospital in the Board Room Conference Room, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Brattleboro meets at Brooks Memorial Library on the 1st Thu. monthly from 1:15-3:15 p.m. and the 3rd Mon. montly from 4:15-6:15 p.m. White River Jct. meets the 2nd Fri. montly at Bugbee Sr. Ctr. from 3-4:30 p.m. Call our helpline at 877-856-1772.

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DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SUPPORT Steps to End Domestic Violence offers a weekly drop-in support group for female identified survivors of intimate partner violence, including individuals who are experiencing or have been affected by domestic violence. The support group offers a safe, confidential place for survivors to connect with others, to heal, and to recover. In support group, participants talk through their experiences and hear stories from others who have experienced abuse in their relationships. Support group is also a resource for those who are unsure of their next step, even if it involves remaining in their current relationship. Tuesdays, 6:30-8 p.m. Childcare is provided. Info: 658-1996. FAMILIES, PARTNERS, FRIENDS AND ALLIES OF TRANSGENDER ADULTS We are people with adult loved ones who are transgender or gender-nonconforming. We meet to support each other and to learn more about issues and concerns. Our sessions are supportive, informal, and confidential. Meetings are held at 5:30 PM, the second Thursday of each month at Pride Center of VT, 255 South Champlain St., Suite 12, in Burlington. Not sure if you’re ready

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Post & browse ads at your convenience. for a meeting? We also offer one-on-one support. For more information, email rex@ pridecentervt.org or call 845-705-5816. FAMILY AND FRIENDS OF THOSE EXPERIENCING MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS This support group is a dedicated meeting for family, friends and community members who are supporting a loved one through a mental health crisis. Mental health crisis might include extreme states, psychosis, depression, anxiety and other types of distress. The group is a confidential space where family and friends can discuss shared experiences and receive support in an environment free of judgment and stigma with a trained facilitator. Weekly on Wednesdays, 7-8:30 p.m. Downtown Burlington. Info: Jess Horner, LICSW, 866-218-8586. FCA FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP Families coping with addiction (FCA) is an open community peer support group for adults 18 & over struggling with the drug or alcohol addiction of a loved one. FCA is not 12-step based but provides a forum for those living this experience to develop personal coping skills & draw strength from one another. Weekly on Wed., 5:30-6:30 p.m. Turning Point Center, corner of Bank St., Burlington. (Across from parking garage, above bookstore). thdaub1@gmail.com. G.R.A.S.P. (GRIEF RECOVERY AFTER A SUBSTANCE PASSING) Are you a family member who has lost a loved one to addiction? Find support, peer-led support group. Meets once a month on Mondays in Burlington. Please call for date and location. RSVP graspvt@gmail.com or call 310-3301.

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G.Y.S.T. (GET YOUR STUFF TOGETHER) GYST creates a safe & empowering community for young men & youth in transition to come together with one commonality: learning to live life on life’s terms. Every Tue. & Thu., 4 p.m. G.Y.S.T. PYNK (for young women) meets weekly on Wed., 4 p.m. Location: North Central Vermont Recovery Center, 275 Brooklyn St., Morrisville. Info: Lisa, 851-8120. GRIEF & RECOVERY SUPPORT GROUP 1st & 3rd Wed. of every mo., 7-8 p.m., Franklin County Home Health Agency (FCHHA), 3 Home Health Cir., St. Albans. 527-7531. HEARING VOICES GROUP This Hearing Voices Group seeks to find understanding of voice hearing experiences as real lived experiences which may happen to anyone at anytime. We choose to share experiences, support, and empathy.  We validate anyone’s experience and stories about their experience as their own, as being an honest and accurate representation of their experience, and as being acceptable exactly as they are. Weekly on Tuesday, 2-3 p.m. Pathways Vermont Community Center, 279 North Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 802-777-8602, abby@ pathwaysvermont.org. HEARTBEAT VERMONT Have you lost a friend, colleague or loved one by suicide? Some who call have experienced a recent loss and some are still struggling w/ a loss from long ago. Call us at 446-3577 to meet with our clinician, Jonathan Gilmore, at Maple Leaf Clinic, 167 North Main St. All are welcome. HELLENBACH CANCER SUPPORT Call to verify meeting place. Info, 388-6107. People living with cancer & their caretakers convene for support.

INTERSTITIAL CYSTITIS SUPPORT GROUP Interstitial cystitis (IC) is recurring pelvic pain, pressure or discomfort in the bladder & pelvic region & urinary frequency/urgency. This is often misdiagnosed & mistreated as a chronic bladder infection. If you have been diagnosed or have these symptoms, you are not alone. We are building a Vermontbased support group & welcome you to email bladderpainvt@gmail. com or call 899-4151 for more information. KINDRED CONNECTIONS PROGRAM OFFERED FOR CHITTENDEN COUNTY CANCER SURVIVORS The Kindred Connections program provides peer support for all those touched by cancer. Cancer patients as well as caregivers are provided with a mentor who has been through the cancer experience & knows what it’s like to go through it. In addition to sensitive listening, Kindred Connections provides practical help such as rides to doctors’ offices & meal deliveries. The program has people who have experienced a wide variety of cancers. For further info, please contact sherry. rhynard@gmail.com. LGBTQ SURVIVORS OF VIOLENCE SafeSpace offers peer-led support groups for survivors of relationship, dating, emotional &/or hate violence. These groups give survivors a safe & supportive environment to tell their stories, share information, & offer & receive support. Support groups also provide survivors an opportunity to gain information on how to better cope with feelings & experiences that surface because of the trauma they have experienced. Please call SafeSpace 863-0003 if you are interested in joining.

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DOMESTIC & SEXUAL VIOLENCE WomenSafe offers free, confidential support groups in Middlebury for women who have experienced domestic or sexual violence. Art For Healing. Six-week support group for people who have experienced domestic or sexual violence. Childcare provided. Please call our hotline, 388-4205, or email am@womensafe.net for more information.

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CEREBRAL PALSY GUIDANCE Cerebral Palsy Guidance is a very comprehensive informational website broadly covering the topic of cerebral palsy and associated medical conditions. It’s mission it to provide the best possible information to parents of children living with the complex condition of cerebral palsy. cerebralpalsyguidance.com/ cerebral-palsy/

DISCOVER THE POWER OF CHOICE! SMART Recovery welcomes anyone, including family and friends, affected by any kind of substance or activity addiction. It is a science-based program that encourages abstinence. Specially trained volunteer facilitators provide leadership. Sundays at 5 p.m. at the 1st Unitarian Universalist Society, 152 Pearl St., Burlington. Volunteer facilitator: Bert, 399-8754. You can learn more at smartrecovery. org.

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CELIAC & GLUTENFREE GROUP Every 2nd Wed., 4:30-6 p.m. at Tulsi Tea Room, 34 Elm St., Montpelier. Free & open to the public! To learn more, contact Lisa at 598-9206 or lisamase@ gmail.com.

COMING OFF PSYCHIATRIC MEDICATION MUTUAL SUPPORT GROUP Through sharing experiences and resources, this group will provide support to individuals interested in coming off psychiatric medications, those in the process of psychiatric medication withdrawal or anyone looking for a space to explore their choices around psychiatric medication use. The group is also open to those supporting an individual in psychiatric medication withdrawal. 12-1:30 p.m. every Tuesday. Pathways Vermont, 125 College St., 2nd floor, Burlington. Contact: Cameron Mack cameron@ pathwaysvermont.org or 888 492 8218 x 404.

DECLUTTERERS’ SUPPORT GROUP Are you ready to make improvements but find it overwhelming? Maybe two or three of us can get together to help each other simplify. 989-3234, 425-3612.

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CELEBRATE RECOVERY Overcome any hurt, habit or hangup in your life! This confidential 12-Step recovery program puts faith in Jesus Christ at the heart of healing. We offer multiple support groups for both men & women, such as chemical dependency, codependency, sexual addiction & pornography, food issues, & overcoming abuse. All 18+ are welcome; sorry, no childcare. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.; we begin at 7 p.m. Essex

CELEBRATE RECOVERY Celebrate Recovery meetings are for anyone with struggles with hurt, habits and hang ups, which includes everyone in some way. We welcome everyone at Cornerstone Church in Milton which meets every Friday night at 7-9 p.m. We’d love to have you join us and discover how your life can start to change. Info: 893-0530, Julie@ mccartycreations.com.

CODEPENDENTS ANONYMOUS CoDA is a 12-step fellowship for people whose common purpose is to develop healthy & fulfilling relationships. By actively working the program of Codependents Anonymous, we can realize a new joy, acceptance & serenity in our lives. Meets Sunday at noon at the Turning Point Center, 191 Bank Street, Burlington. Tom, 238-3587, coda.org.

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BURLINGTON – STEPS TO END DOMESTIC VIOLENCE Offering a weekly drop-in support group for female identified survivors of intimate partner violence. We offer a safe, confidential place for survivors to connect with others, to heal, and to recover. Call us at 802-658-1996.

Alliance Church, 37 Old Stage Rd., Essex. Info: recovery@essexalliance.org, 878-8213.

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BURLINGTON AREA PARKINSON’S DISEASE OUTREACH GROUP People with Parkinson’s disease & their caregivers gather together to gain support & learn about living with Parkinson’s disease. Group meets 2nd Wed. of every mo., 1-2 p.m., continuing through Nov. 18, 2015. Shelburne Bay Senior Living Community, 185 Pine Haven Shores Rd., Shelburne. Info: 888-763-3366, parkinsoninfo@uvmhealth. org, parkinsonsvt.org.

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MALE SURVIVOR OF VIOLENCE GROUP A monthly, closed group for male identifi ed survivors of violence including relationship, sexual assault, and discrimination. Open to all sexual orientations. Contact 863-0003 for more information or safespace@pridecentervt.org. MARIJUANA ANONYMOUS Do you have a problem with marijuana? MA is a free 12-step program where addicts help other addicts to get & stay clean. Ongoing Tue. at 6:30 p.m. and Sat. at 2 p.m. at Turning Point Center, 191 Bank St., suite 200, Burlington. 861-3150.

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THE MEMORY CAFÉ Th e Memory Café is where people with memory loss disorders and their care partners can come together to connect and support one another. Second Saturday of each month, 10-11:30 a.m. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 58 Barre St., Montpelier. Info: 223-2518. MYELOMA SUPPORT GROUP Area Myeloma Survivors, Families and Caregivers have come together to form a Multiple Myeloma Support Group. We provide emotional support, resources about treatment options, coping strategies and a support network by participating in the group experience with people that have been though similar situations. Third Tuesday of the month, 5-6 p.m. at the New Hope Lodge on East Avenue in Burlington. Info: Kay Cromie, 655-9136, kgcromey@aol.com.

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NAMI CONNECTION PEER SUPPORT GROUP MEETINGS Bennington, every Tue., 1-2:30 p.m., CRT Center, United Counseling Service, 316 Dewey St.; Burlington, every Thu., 3-4:30 p.m., St. Paul’s Cathedral, 2 Cherry St. (enter from parking lot); Montpelier,

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every Fri., 2-3:30 p.m., Another Way, 125 Barre St.; Newport, first Wed. of the month, 6-7:30 p.m., St. Mark’s Church, 44 2nd St.; Rutland, every Sun., 4:30-6 p.m., Rutland Mental Health Wellness Center, 78 S. Main St.; St. Johnsbury, every Thu., 6:30-8 p.m., Unitarian Universalist Church, 47 Cherry St. If you have questions about a group in your area, please contact the National Alliance on Mental Illness of Vermont, program@ namivt.org or 800639-6480. Connection groups are peer recovery support group programs for adults living with mental health challenges. NAMI FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP Brattleboro, 1st Wed. of every mo., 6:30 p.m., 1st Congregational Church, 880 Western Ave., West Brattleboro; Burlington, 3rd Wed. of every mo., 6 p.m., Community Health Center, Riverside Ave., Mansfi eld Conference Room; Burlington, 2nd & 4th Tue. of every mo., 7 p.m., HowardCenter, corner of Pine & Flynn Ave.; Berlin, 4th Mon. of every mo., 7 p.m. Central Vermont Medical Center, Room 3; Georgia, 1st Tue. of every mo., 6 p.m., Georgia Public Library, 1697 Ethan Allen Highway (Exit 18, I-89); Manchester, 4th Wed. of every mo., 6:30 p.m., Equinox Village, 2nd floor; Rutland, 3rd Mon. of every mo., 6 p.m., Rutland Regional Medical Center, Leahy Conference Ctr., room D; Springfi eld, 3rd Wed. of every mo., 6:30 p.m., HCRS (café on right far side), 390 River St.; St. Johnsbury, 4th Wed. of every mo., 5:30 p.m., Northeastern Vermont Regional Hospital Library, 1315 Hospital Dr.; White River Junction, last Mon. of every mo., 5:45 p.m., VA Medical Center, William A. Yasinski Buidling. If you have questions about a group in your area, please contact the National Alliance on Mental Illness of Vermont, info@namivt. org or 800-639-6480. Family Support Group meetings are for family & friends of individuals living mental illness. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS is a group of recovering addicts who live w/ out the use of drugs. It costs nothing to join. Th e only requirement for membership is a desire to stop

using. Info, 862-4516 or cvana.org. Held in Burlington, Barre and St. Johnsbury. NAR-ANON BURLINGTON GROUP Group meets every 2nd and 4th Monday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Turning Point Center (small room), 191 Bank St., Burlington. Th e only requirement for membership is that there be a problem of addiction in a relative or friend. Info: Amanda H. 338-8106. NORTHWEST VERMONT CANCER PRAYER & SUPPORT NETWORK A meeting of cancer patients, survivors & family members intended to comfort & support those who are currently suffering from the disease. 2nd Thu. of every mo., 6-7:30 p.m., St. Paul’s United Methodist Church, 11 Church St., St. Albans. Info: stpaulum@myfairpoint.net. 2nd Wed. of every mo., 6-7:30 p.m. Winooski United Methodist Church, 24 W. Allen St., Winooski. Info: hovermann4@ comcast.net. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS 12-step fellowship for people who identify as overeaters, compulsive eaters, food addicts, anorexics, bulimics, etc. Tue., 7 p.m., St. James Episcopal Church, 4 St. James Place, Essex Jct. All are welcome; meeting is open. Info: Felicia, 777-7718. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Do you promise you’ll only have one more but then you eat the whole bag? Have you tried every diet possible and nothing works? Th ere is hope. Come to an Overeaters Anonymous meeting and find out about a 12 step program of recovery. Th ere is a solution! Turning Point Center, 191 Bank Street, Suite 200, Burlington. Weekly on Thursdays, 7 p.m. Info: Elise, 302-528-6672. OA Big|Book Solution Group of Burlington. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS Do you worry about the way you eat? Overeaters Anonymous may have the answer for you. No weigh-ins, dues or fees. Mon., 5:30-6:30 p.m. Temple Sinai, 500 Swift St., S. Burlington. Info: 863-2655.

OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS (OA) Meetings in Barre Tue. 5:30-6:30 p.m. and Sat. 8:30-9:30 a.m., at the Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd, 39 Washington St. Info, Valerie 279-0385. Meetings in Burlington Thurs. 7:30-8:30 a.m., at the First United Church, 21 Buell St. Info, Geraldine, 730-4273. Meetings in Johnson occur every Sun., 5:30-6:30 p.m., at the Johnson Municipal Building, Rte. 15 (just west of the bridge). Info, Debbie Y., 888-5958. Meetings in Montpelier occur every Mon., 5:30-6:30 p.m. at Bethany Church, 115 Main St. Info, Joan, 223-3079. Steps to Food Freedom Meetings in Morrisville occur every Sat., 10-11 a.m., at the First Congregational Church, 85 Upper Main St. Contacts: Anne, 888-2356. Big Book Meetings in Morrisville occur every Tue., 6 p.m. at the North Central Recovery Center (NCVRC), 275 Brooklyn St. Info: Debbie, 888-5958. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS 12-step. Sat., 9-10 a.m. Turning Point Center, 182 Lake St., St. Albans. Is what you’re eating, eating you? We can help. Call Valerie, 825-5481. PARKINSON’S DISEASE OUTREACH GROUP This group meets on the second Tuesday, 10-11:30 a.m. of the month at Pillsbury Homestead Senior Community Residence at 3 Harborview Rd., St. Albans in the conference room next to the library on the first floor. Wheelchair accessible. Info: patricia_rugg18@ comcast.net. PEER ACCESS LINE Isolated? Irritable? Anxious? Lonely? Excited? Bored? Confused? Withdrawn? Sad? Call us! Don’t hesitate for a moment. We understand! It is our choice to be here for you to listen. Your feelings do matter. 321-2190. Thu., Fri., Sat. evenings, 6-9 p.m. PROSTATE CANCER SUPPORT GROUP Held every 2nd Tue. of the mo., 6-8 p.m. at the Hope Lodge, 237 East Ave., Burlington. Newly diagnosed? Prostate cancer reoccurrence? General discussion and sharing among survivors and those


beginning or rejoining the battle. Info, Mary L. Guyette RN, MS, ACNS-BC, 274-4990, vmary@aol.com. QUEEN CITY MEMORY CAFÉ The Queen City Memory Café offers a social time & place for people with memory impairment & their fiends & family to laugh, learn & share concerns & celebrate feeling understood & connected. Enjoy coffee, tea & baked goods with entertainment & conversation. QCMC meets the 3rd Sat. of each mo., 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Thayer Building, 1197 North Ave., Burlington. 316-3839. QUEER CARE GROUP This support group is for adult family members and caregivers of queer, and/or questioning youth. It is held on the 2nd Monday of each month from 6:30-8 p.m. at Outright Vermont, 241 North Winooski Ave. This group is for adults only. For more information, email info@outrightvt. org.

SCLERODERMA FOUNDATION NEW ENGLAND Support group meeting held 4th Tue. of the mo., 6:30-8:30 p.m. Williston Police Station. Info, Blythe Leonard, 878-0732.

SUICIDE HOTLINES IN VT Brattleboro, 2577989; Montpelier (Washington County Mental Health Emergency Services), 229-0591; Randolph (Clara Martin Center Emergency Service), 800-639-6360. SUPPORT GROUP FOR WOMEN who have experienced intimate partner abuse, facilitated by Circle (Washington Co. only). Please call 877-5439498 for more info. SURVIVORSHIP NOW Welcome, cancer survivors. Survivorship NOW has free wellness programs to empower cancer survivors to move beyond cancer & live life well. Regain your strength & balance. Renew your spirit. Learn to nourish your body with exercise & nutritious foods. Tap in to your creative side. Connect with others who understand the challenges you face. Go to survivorshipnowvt.org today to sign up. Info, 802777-1126, info@ survivorshipnowvt.org.

THE COMPASSIONATE FRIENDS Burlington Chapter TCF meets on the 3rd Tue. of ea. mo. at 7 p.m. at 277 Blair Park Rd., Williston; for more info, call Dee Ressler, 598-8899. Rutland Chapter TCF meets on the 1st Tue. of ea. mo. at 7 p.m. at Grace Congregational Church, West St., Rutland; for more info, call Susan Mackey, 446-2278. Hospice Volunteer Services (HVS) also serves bereaved parents w/ monthly peer support groups, short-term educational consultations & referrals to local grief & loss counselors. HVS is located in the Marble Works district in Middlebury. Please call 388-4111 for more info about how to connect w/ appropriate support services. TOGETHER IN RECOVERY Community members with a friend or family member affected by Opioid use are invited to come for support, discussion and encouragement. Chittenden Clinic, 75 San Remo Dr., So. Burlington. Every third Tuesday of the month, 5:30 p.m. Info: 4886456, jspagnuolo@ howardcenter.org.

VEGGIE SUPPORT GROUP Want to feel supported on your vegetarian/ vegan journey? Want more info on healthy veggie diets? Want to share & socialize at veggie potlucks, & more, in the greater Burlington area? This is your opportunity to join with other like-minded folks. veggy4life@ gmail.com, 658-4991.

Refresh your reading ritual. Flip through your favorite local newspaper on your favorite mobile device. (And yes, it’s still free.)

WOMEN’S CANCER SUPPORT GROUP FAHC. Led by Deb Clark, RN. Every 1st & 3rd Tue., 5-6:30 p.m. Call Kathy McBeth, 847-5715. YOGA FOR FOLKS LIVING WITH LYME DISEASE Join as we build community and share what works on the often confusing, baffling and isolating path to wellness while living with Lyme disease. We will have a gentle restorative practice suitable for all ages and all levels from beginner to experienced, followed by an open group discussion where we will share what works and support one another in our quest for healing. By donation. Wear comfortable clothing. March 5, April 2, May 7, June 4. 2-3:30 p.m. More information at laughingriveryoga. com. XA – EVERYTHING ANONYMOUS Everything Anonymous is an all encompassing 12-step support group. People can attend for any reason, including family member challenges. Mondays, 7-8 p.m. Turning Point Center, 191 Bank St., Burlington. Info: 777-5508, definder@ gmail.com.

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SEXUAL VIOLENCE SUPPORT HOPE Works offers free support groups to women, men & teens who are survivors of sexual violence. Groups are available for survivors at any stage of the healing process. Intake for all support groups is ongoing. If you are interested in learning more or would like to schedule an intake

SUICIDE SURVIVORS SUPPORT GROUP For those who have lost a friend or loved one through suicide. Maple Leaf Clinic, 167 N. Main St., Wallingford, 446-3577. 6:30-8 p.m. the 3rd Tue. of ea. mo.

SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE If you have lost someone to suicide and wish to have a safe place to talk, share and spend a little time with others who have had a similar experience, join us the 3rd Thu. at the Faith Lighthouse Church, Rte. 105, Newport (105 Alderbrook), 7-9 p.m. Please call before attending. Info: Mary Butler, 744-6284.

TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) chapter meeting. Hedding United Methodist Church, Washington St., Barre. Wed., 5:156:15 p.m. For info, call David at 371-8929.

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SEX & LOVE ADDICTS ANONYMOUS 12-step recovery group. Do you have a problem w/ sex or relationships? We can help. Ralph, 658-2657. Visit slaafws. org or saa-recovery.org for meetings near you.

STUTTERING SUPPORT GROUPS If you’re a person who stutters, you are not alone! Adults, teens & school-age kids who stutter & their families are welcome to join one of our three free National Stuttering Association (NSA) stuttering support groups at UVM. Adults: 5:30-6:30, 1st & 3rd Tue. monthly; teens (ages 13-17): 5:30-6:30, 1st Thu. monthly; school-age children (ages 8-12) & parents (meeting separately): 4:15-5:15, 2nd Thu. monthly. Pomeroy Hall (489 Main St., UVM campus. Info: burlingtonstutters.org, burlingtonstutters@ gmail.com, 656-0250. Go Team Stuttering!

SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE — BURLINGTON Who: Persons experiencing the impact of a loved one’s suicide. When: 1st Wed. of each mo., 6-7:30 p.m. Location: Comfort Inn, 5 Dorset St., Burlington. Facilitators: Myra Handy, 951-5156 or Liz Mahoney, 8797109. Request: We find it important to connect with people before their first meeting. If you can, please call one of the facilitators before you come. Thank you!

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QUIT TOBACCO GROUPS Are you ready to be tobacco free? Join our FREE five-week group classes facilitated by our Tobacco Treatment Specialists.  We meet in a friendly, relaxed atmosphere.  You may qualify for a FREE 8-week supply of nicotine replacement therapy. Contact us at (802)-847-7333 or QuitTobaccoClass@ UVMHealth.org.

to become a group member, please call our office at 864-0555, ext. 19, or email our victim advocate at advocate@ sover.net.


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Join Champlain Housing Trust’s Property Management team in Burlington and serve the affordable housing needs of a diverse group of people. Perform a variety of maintenance tasks including painting, cleaning, light maintenance, grounds maintenance and snow removal. Experience in carpentry, plumbing, electrical, grounds maintenance required. Should be self-motivated, work independently and as part of a team, be prevention-minded and committed to a membership-based model of community controlled and permanently affordable housing. Reliable transportation and criminal background check required.

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PART-TIME

Custodian

For position details and application process, visit jobs.plattsburgh.edu and select “View Current Openings” SUNY College at Plattsburgh is a fully compliant employer committed to excellence through diversity.

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CHT is a socially responsible employer offering a competitive salary commensurate with experience. Our benefit package includes training, health insurance, vacation, holiday, sick leave, 403(b), disability and life insurance. Submit a cover letter and resume by May 22nd to Human Resources, Champlain Housing Trust, 88 King Street, Burlington, VT 05401 or email HR@champlainhousingtrust.org. No phone calls, please.

Fern Hill located in Burlington is seeking candidates for a EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER - CHT is committed to a diverse workplace and highly encourages women, persons with part-time Custodian role. The disabilities, Section 3 residents, and people from diverse racial, ethnic and cultural backgrounds to apply. work schedule will be 20-25 hours a week. The property consists of 60 units of elderly 1 5/12/17 housing. Responsibilities Untitled-8 659CHT-HR-MainTECH-7D-04.indd 1 5/11/17 11:27 10:17 AM include daily cleaning of the buildings and grounds, trash removal, and snow removal. Cleaning experience is required. Some basic maintenance skills are a plus. Must have excellent communication skills and We have an immediate opening for a Project Administrator have a strong customer service in your area. The successful candidate should possess philosophy. A valid Driver’s 1-3 years of general office administration experience, License with your own vehicle computer proficiency and exceptional customer service and the ability to participate skills. Familiarity with the Construction industry, including in emergency on-call service certified payroll and document control experience rotation and snow removal are preferred. also required.

Project Administrator

At Maloney Properties, we offer our employees a competitive salary and benefits package that includes a 401(k) plan, medical and dental insurance, life and long-term disability benefits, paid sick time, paid company holidays and paid vacation, recruitment bonus benefits, confidential employee assistance programs and tuition reimbursements. EOE. mspicer@ maloneyproperties.com

Lecturers, Communication Studies

If you would like to become part of our growing construction company, please fax, email or send your resume to the address below. A full job description is available on our website at www.dewcorp.com. We are an EOE. All qualified applications will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender, identity, or national origin. DEW Construction Corp. 277 Blair Park Road, Suite 130, Williston, VT 05495 Attn: Human Resources Department Email: careers@dewcorp.com Fax: 802-872-0707

LOAN OFFICER Make a difference in Vermont’s small businesses! Community Capital of Vermont is a non-profit alternative lender serving Vermont’s lower income entrepreneurs. We consistently perform as the U.S. Small Business Administration’s top microenterprise business lender in the state. We seek an underwriter with 3-5 years of commercial loan experience, preferably in a non-profit environment, and with great follow-through and effective communication skills. The Loan officer is responsible for managing prospective, new, and established borrower relationships, from outreach and application through underwritng, closing and follow-up. Successful candidates will have a combination of related experience and education. BS/BA preferred together with 3-5 years of lending experience; formal credit training is a plus. A full job description is available upon emailed request, no phone calls, please. For information about Community Capital of Vermont visit us on the web. communitycapitalvt.org Please direct inquiries to Carol Lighthall, Executive Director clighthall@communitycapitalvt.org COMMUNITY CAPITAL OF VERMONT IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

We are an EOE.

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Individual to do GENERAL MILL WORK & ASSEMBLY. Penrod Stairways, Inc.

Helpdesk Support Technician For position details and application process, visit jobs.plattsburgh.edu and select “View Current Openings” SUNY College at Plattsburgh is a fully compliant employer committed to excellence through diversity.

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Prefer experience but will train. Full time with insurance and other benefits. Call 802-655-3090 to schedule an interview.

TOWN OF MILTON

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Technical Coordinator, University Event Services

8/25/14 4:30 PM

Employment opportunities

Finance Director The Town of Milton is seeking a Finance Director for a highly responsible managerial, administrative and technical position in the field of municipal finance and budgeting. Duties include close collaboration with the Town Manager and the Selectboard, directing and coordinating the varied functions of the Finance Department, which also provides specific financial services to the School District. This position is responsible for maintaining and improving the efficiency and effectiveness of all areas under his/her direction. This position requires a thorough knowledge of departmental operations and the exercise of judgment and initiative in completing tasks, particularly in situations not clearly defined by precedent or established procedures. Required: bachelor’s degree in Accounting, Business Administration, Public Finance or Administration or a closely related field; plus four (4) to six (6) years of progressively responsible experience in a municipal financial administrative position.

Oversee, schedule, plan and deliver technical support and services (audio/visual, media and computer) in the Davis Center. Hire, train, and supervise 15-20 student Technical Assistants who provide daily and event-specific technical support. Ensure outstanding technical and customer support is delivered through pre-planning efforts, staff scheduling, execution and assessment. Associate’s Degree and 5 years of related work experience, and commitment to diversity and social justice required. For further information and to apply, search uvmjobs.com for Posting #S1097PO.

THE UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER. APPLICATIONS FROM WOMEN AND PEOPLE FROM DIVERSE RACIAL, ETHNIC, AND CULTURAL BACKGROUNDS ARE ENCOURAGED.

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Fiscal Assistant II The Town of Milton is seeking a Fiscal Assistant II to perform a variety of duties related to finance, such as calculating, verifying, posting and balancing a variety of financial transactions. This position is the primary contact for the annual audit. The Fiscal Assistant II is responsible for financial management for all Town grants, bank statement reconciliation for the Town and the School District, and posts journal entries. This position is the steward of the general ledger and is responsible to oversee the flow of financial activity as it relates to all Town departments. A bachelor’s degree in accounting and municipal accounting courses are desired. Prior experience in accounting in a responsible position, preferably in a municipal government, is desired, or any equivalent combination of education and experience.

YOU WILL FIND

SUCCESS

To apply for either position, email cover letter, resume, references and a Town of Milton Employment Application to Mary Thompson, Administrative Assistant, at mthompson@town.milton.vt.us or mail to:

CRACK OPEN YOUR FUTURE... with our new, mobile-friendly job board.

Town of Milton Attn: Mary Thompson 43 Bombardier Road Milton, VT 05468

Job seekers can: • Browse hundreds of current, local positions from Vermont companies. • Search for jobs by keyword, location, category and job type. • Set up job alerts. • Apply for jobs directly through the site.

An Employment Application is available in the Town Manager’s Office or on the Town website at miltonvt.org/jobapp.pdf. Full job description is also available on the Town website. Positions are open until filled. The Town of Milton is an equal opportunity employer.

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ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

05.17.17-05.24.17

Join our dynamic, community-oriented store, committed to providing healthy food to all people. Several positions are available. All require flexible weekend availability, team player mentality, and attention to details. Send resume and cover letter to: Buffalo Mountain Coop, P.O. Box 336, Hardwick, VT 05843, c/o Debra Wilson - Personnel Manager, drop it off at the coop, or email to info@buffalomountaincoop.org. For more details on positions, visit our website buffalomountaincoop.org.

Administrative Assistant Fast-paced law firm located in Burlington seeks fulltime administrative assistant. A good candidate will demonstrate the ability to multi-task, take initiative and have excellent computer, communication and writing skills with an eagerness to learn and grow within the firm. Candidates must be able to work independently and as part of a team. Legal experience preferred, but not required.

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Let’s get to...

jobs.sevendaysvt.com

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Lund’s mission is to help children thrive by

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE: answering telephones, computer entry and other office-related duties.

empowering families to break cycles of poverty, addiction and abuse.

This is a full-time position with benefits.

Lund offers hope and opportunity to families through education, treatment, family support and adoption.

SEND COVER LETTER AND RESUME TO:

Custodian

Jennifer Welsh, Office Manager Lynn, Lynn, Blackman & Manitsky, P.C. 76 St. Paul Street, Suite 400 Burlington, VT 05401

THE POSITION: • Full-time, 40 hour per week position working Tuesday - Saturday.

• Perform a wide variety of cleaning duties in a residential treatment facility for pregnant and parenting women. • Principal activities include, but are not limited to, scrubbing, mopping, waxing, vacuuming, shampooing, polishing, and disinfecting offices, public areas, meeting rooms, bathrooms, dining room, stairways and vacated bedrooms.

jwelsh@lynnlawvt.com

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WHAT WE LOOK FOR: • Duties performed using hand held cleaning supplies/equipment and machinery. Experience in aspects of effective cleaning techniques and use of a variety of custodial machinery required.

• Ability to work with a variety of people and perform tasks independently required.

PUBLIC INFORMATION MANAGER Help lead the reinvestment in one of America’s most livable small cities. This position acts as communications officer for the Department of Public Works with the primary responsibility of educating and engaging the public in the activities of the Department, with a focus on the implementation of capital projects at the direction of the DPW Director. The Public Information Manager will engage stakeholders in the Department’s other programs and planning initiatives, coordinate the department’s key performance indicators, respond to general media issues and work collaboratively with other communications positions in the City. This position connects DPW with the public and the media to foster open government by utilizing communications tools that facilitate transparency and provide timely information. Requirements include a Bachelor’s Degree in public administration, political science, journalism, communications or related field and three (3) years’ experience in a related field required. Additional experience may be substituted for a degree requirement on a two-for-one year basis. For a complete description, or to apply online, visit burlingtonvt.gov/hr/jobs or contact us at 802.865.7145.

WHY JOIN OUR TEAM AT LUND: • We honor and celebrate the distinctive strengths and talents of our clients and staff.

• Our work encompasses collaboration with a strong team of professionals and a strengthsbased approach to providing services to families. • Lund’s adoption program provides life-long services to families brought together through adoption. • Lund’s residential and community treatment programs are distinctive as our work focuses on both treatment and parenting. • Lund’s educators believe in laughter, the importance of fun, community-oriented activities, and non-stop learning. • Ongoing training opportunities are available. Lund offers competitive pay and paid training, as well as a comprehensive and very generous benefit package including health, dental, life, disability, retirement, extensive time off accrual, 11 paid holidays, and wellness reimbursement. EEO/AA

Please send resume and cover letter to: Human Resources PO Box 4009, Burlington, VT 05406-4009 fax (802) 864-1619 email: employment@lundvt.org

EOE. WOMEN, MINORITIES AND PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES ARE HIGHLY ENCOURAGED TO APPLY.

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Finance Associate Population Media Center (PMC) is a nonprofit, international nongovernmental organization utilizing entertainment mass media to empower people to adopt healthy lifestyles and behaviors. The Finance Associate will work closely with the Vice President for Finance & other staff in all aspects of financial operations for PMC. Duties will include processing cash receipts and disbursements, general accounting, program budgeting and accounting and other duties as assigned. A minimum of 1-3 years’ experience and a bachelor’s degree in accounting or business administration is required. Visit populationmedia.org/jobs for a full list of duties and qualifications. Send cover letter and resume to pmc@populationmedia.org. Review of applications to begin immediately and continue until the position is filled.

DELIVER happiness .

Bindery Machine Operator needed by high quality sheetfed printer. Experience on Stahl, MBO, Mueller Martini and Polar equipment preferred. Attention to detail, good math skills and ability to work as part of a team in fast paced environment. Full time, first shift, health, dental and 401K. Contact Queen City Printers Inc. at 864-4566 or send resume to info@qcpinc.com.

We know what you want in a job. Kelly Services® is now hiring seasonal delivery drivers for ® assignments with FedEx Ground . Don’t miss out! Details:

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• 21 years or older • Business-related driving experience required • Weekly pay • Safety bonus plan

5/8/17 2:59 PM

Inquire in Person Monday - Friday 9am - 5pm 322 Leroy Road Williston, VT 05495 802-651-6837

kellyservices.us FedEx Ground is a registered trademark of the Federal Express Corporation An Equal Opportunity Employer © 2015 Kelly Services, Inc. Z0758D

INSTRUCTOR OF SPECIAL EDUCATION The Education Department of Saint Michael's College is seeking an active educator and Untitled-4 collaborative colleague for the position of Instructor of Special Education. The successful candidate will be expected to teach, advise, and mentor undergraduate and graduate pre-service educators working towards licensure in general education and special education. The candidate should have a strong commitment to promoting innovative educational practice, and bring passion and vision to the next generation of teachers. Responsibilities include: teaching licensure courses, supervising student teachers, and coordination of the special education program. Benefits include health, dental, vision, life, disability, 401(k), employee and dependent tuition benefits, and discounted gym membership. All offers of employment are contingent upon the successful completion of a background check.

DAY SHIFT CUSTODIAN

5/4/17 5:19 PM

$1500 SIGN ON BONUS The Arbors at Shelburne is a Benchmark Senior Living community focused on caring for individuals with memory related diseases. We offer competitive wages and benefit packages. We currently have openings for

LICENSED NURSING ASSISTANTS

Saint Michael's College is seeking applications from a dependable, efficient worker for a Day Shift Custodian position (Monday through Friday, 7:00 AM to 3:30 PM - Management adjusts start/stop times according to campus needs) to clean College buildings including dormitories, restrooms, offices and classrooms. Training will be provided for the right candidate.

FULL EVENING SHIFT

Must hold a valid Vermont LNA license

Benefits include health, dental, vision, life, disability, 401(k), generous paid time off, employee and dependent tuition benefits, and discounted gym membership.

Please call to schedule an interview or stop in to complete an application. The Arbors at Shelburne Attn: Human Resources 687 Harbor Road Shelburne, VT 05482 802-985-8600 phurteau@benchmarkquality.com

An offer of employment will be contingent upon the successful completion of a background check (and driving record check if applicable) and a pre-employment physical screening. For full job descriptions and to apply online please go to:

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A Benchmark Assisted Living Community, EOE.

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ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

05.17.17-05.24.17

Town Manager Randolph, VT

CONCRETE LABORERS Local concrete cutting business looking for reliable employee. Full time hours for at least 6 months, potentially longer. Must be willing to work hard (this is about concrete after all). Experience with concrete pouring and heavy equipment a plus, but willing to train the right person. Must have references that reveal a reliable track record and trustworthiness. If this sounds like you, please contact me! senesacconcrete@gmail.com

Want to make a positive impact in the lives of Residents? Then come lead our team of caregivers! CCCC is a 24 bed Residential Level III Facility that provides a caring, homelike, affordable residence for seniors in a setting that encourages independence, activities and involvement with families and the larger community. CCCC is seeking a

Director of Nursing/Resident Services. This is a responsible managerial position for a Vermont Registered Nurse to provide oversight of all medical responsibilities at the Center and to be an active participant in residents’ physical and emotional health. Must be an RN with an individualized resident centered approach to care, team player, positive coaching and interpersonal skills, supervision experience. Experience in long term care with Seniors a plus. On call is required.

The Town of Randolph, VT (pop. 5000), seeks an engaging, collaborative, and dynamic town manager. Randolph is a diverse, historic, and active community in the White River Valley. The manager reports to a five-member selectboard, is responsible for the daily operations of the town and administers a $6.8 million budget. Full description available at: randolphvt.org. Salary range is $75,000 to $80,000, plus excellent benefits. Bachelor’s degree is required (Master’s preferred) in a relevant field. Five years government management experience preferred: as town manager a plus. Please send a confidential cover letter, resume, and three references to municipal.recruitment@vlct.org. Application deadline: May 29, 2017.

For more information or to apply e-mail ccccenter@myfairpoint.net

DIRECTOR OF MUSIC MINISTRY

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The Charlotte Congregational Church, UCC is seeking a new Director of Music Ministry. Primary responsibilities: accompanying congregational singing, leading Thursday night rehearsals with the choir, and conducting the adult choir for our Sunday morning worship services and for other occasional services. We are looking for someone who is classically trained, has eclectic musical tastes, inspiring energy, is eager to collaborate with guest musicians and is committed to having music be an integral part of the church’s spiritual life. This part time position is available starting June 12, 2017. Please send a cover letter and resume to: Rev. Susan Cooke Kittredge. Or to Rev. Susan Cooke Kittredge, The Charlotte Congregational Church 403 Church Hill Road, Charlotte, VT 05445. Church office: 802-425-3176.

EOE

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Town Manager Your opportunity to make a difference in the lives under your care awaits! Valley Vista Vergennes, a 19 bed chemical dependency and co-occurring treatment facility, is currently seeking full-time candidates for the following positions:

0 $2,50ON SIGN US! BON

RNs/LPNs Valley Vista is currently seeking Full Time, Part Time and Per Diem RNs and LPNs with a valid VT license in our new 19 bed inpatient facility in Vergennes, VT. Full-time candidates will be eligible for up to a $2,500 sign-on bonus! Chemical dependency or psychiatric nursing experience a plus. Valley Vista offers a competitive compensation and benefit package, tuition reimbursement, as well as paid trainings. Valley Vista is an EOE. To apply, please email resume to: jenny.gilman@vvista.net or mail to:

Jenny Gilman Valley Vista 23 Upper Plain Bradford, VT 05033 vvista.net

The Town of Fairfax, Vermont (pop 4,285) seeks a collaborative and enthusiastic, part-time Town Manager. Fairfax is located in the southwest section of Franklin County, just south of the Canadian border. We have panoramic views of Mount Mansfield, Vermont’s highest peak, plus we are minutes away from Lake Champlain, with plenty of outdoor opportunities including, hiking, skiing, golfing, fishing and more. The Town Manager reports to a five member Selectboard and is responsible for the day-to-day operations of the town and general government administration, oversees all personnel, financial management and budgeting. The Town Manager supervises 8 full-time and 5 part-time employees and administers a $4M, 18-month transitional budget. A full job description is available on the town website at www.fairfax-vt.gov A Bachelor’s degree in public administration, business management, or relevant field is required with a working knowledge of municipal practices, budgeting, finance and public relations. Previous experience in municipal government is desired. This is a part-time, hourly position to be paid between $23-$27/hour at a maximum of 28 hours per week. The position requires participation in the state’s pension program (VMERS). Please apply in confidence with a cover letter, resume, and 3-5 references via email to sbvicechair@fairfax-vt.gov with “Town Manager” as a subject or send via U.S. mail to:

Town of Fairfax 12 Buck Hollow Road Fairfax Vermont 05454 Attention: Town Manager Position STARTING DATE TO BE DETERMINED.

The Town of Fairfax is an equal opportunity employer, and has the right to reject any and all applications.


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NURSES-RNS & LPNS SIGN ON BONUS $3000 Are you interested in joining our medical team? We are now hiring nurses (RNs and LPNs) at our Berlin, Vermont location. We offer competitive pay, benefits, and have positions open for per diem, part time and full time. Send resumes to: recruiting@baymark.com. baartprograms.com

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Director of Property Management jobs.sevendaysvt.com

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Second Spring, located in Williamstown and Westford VT, is the ideal place to work if you enjoy working in rural, aesthetically pleasing surroundings that include a beautifully renovated historic former inn and bed and breakfast that have been converted to Community Recovery Residences with picturesque views of the outdoors. The program at Second Spring is a recovery focused, wellness based model that values the individual strengths and creativity of employees which contributes to the wellbeing and recovery of those we serve. We currently are offering the opportunity for a Director of Team Development and Director of Programs to join our highlycollaborative organization’s senior leadership team.

DIRECTOR OF TEAM DEVELOPMENT This position collaborates with staff at all levels of the organization to ensure managers have the requisite training and resources to promote mission-based, client-centered values, aspirations, and patterns of thought and conduct. Responsible for organizationwide success related to workforce planning, employee relations, compensation and benefits, HR Department development, and risk management. Creates a culture in which coaching, supervision, and performance feedback are viewed as positive aspects of organizational life. Our intensive residential care for adults with severe mental illness provides exceptional evidence-based treatment in caring recovery-oriented community settings for our residences.

Immediate opening for full-time salaried Director of Property Management (DPM) in support of Addison County Community Trust's (ACCT's) mission of providing affordable housing. The DPM oversees all property management and maintenance activities for a growing portfolio of multifamily affordable housing and mobile home parks. The DPM is a member of the management team responsible for supervising staff, managing performance, and developing policy and strategy related to property & asset management functions, such as marketing, tenant selection, fair housing/RA requests, occupancy procedures, capital plans, etc. In addition, the DPM works closely with the bookkeeper on budgeting and asset management. The DPM reports directly to the Executive Director. Proven supervisory and property management experience required; other desirable experience includes federally assisted housing program compliance. Must have a strong sense of teamwork with the ability to work both independently and as part of a team; flexibility and good judgment; ambition to develop new skills and be highly organized. Respond with resume and cover letter to jobs@addisontrust.org. POSITION OPEN UNTIL FILLED. EEO.

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The ideal candidate will be a great team collaborator with ability to understand and implement organizational initiatives at a high level of abstraction for the strategic benefit of the organization. Organizational, leadership, and communication skills must be exceptional. Ability to perform office functions, use electronic health records, and quickly master new browser-based applications with minimal instruction is required. Ability to work under pressure and handle crises effectively is required. Requires a bachelor’s degree or higher, plus 3+ years of management experience. If the academic degree is not in HR or a closely related field, this position requires maintenance of the HR Certification Institute’s PHR certification within one year of accepting the position.

5/12/17 4:15 PM

The Arbors at Shelburne is a Benchmark Senior Living community focused on caring for individuals with memory related diseases.

RECEPTIONISTS FULL TIME

DIRECTOR OF PROGRAMS This position is responsible for coordinating with other senior leaders and with program managers to ensure each program is client-centered, demonstrates high-level outcomes for our clients, supports high-quality staff learning and supervision, and meets administrative requirements (e.g. compliance and financial). The position supervises (indirectly or directly) approximately 75 FTE’s. The ideal candidate will be a great team collaborator with 6+ years in behavioral health care, 3+ years’ management experience, and an applicable license with degree (e.g. LICSW, RN, Ph.D., or similar). Salary and Benefits Commensurate with Experience Qualified applicants please submit resume and a letter of interest via email to Scott Acus, Executive Director: scotta@cscorp.org.

We have TWO full time receptionist positions available. Must be available to work a Sunday to Thursday or a Tuesday to Saturday schedule. Individual must have good phone and interpersonal skills. Computer experience with Word and cel a m st. We offer a f ll benefit pac age wit . Please call to schedule an interview. The Arbors at Shelburne Attn: Human Resources 687 Harbor Road Shelburne, VT 05482 802-985-8600 phurteau@benchmarkquality.com A Benchmark Assisted Living Community, EOE.

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ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

05.17.17-05.24.17

Construction Workers Needed We have immediate openings for Carpenters, Helpers and laborers in your area. Full-time and seasonal opportunities are available. If you would like to become part of our growing construction company, please fax, email or send your application to the address below. Applications may be picked up at our Williston office or downloaded from our website at dewcorp.com. We are an EOE. All qualified applications will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender, identity, or national origin DEW Construction Corp. 277 Blair Park Road, Suite 130, Williston, VT 05495 Attn: Human Resources Department Email: careers@dewcorp.com Fax: 802-872-0707 We are an EOE.

VERMONT TECHNICAL COLLEGE IS CURRENTLY SEEKING A

Director of Human Resources This position will design, develop, implement and maintain professional human resources functions at Vermont Technical College. The Director oversees, administers and communicates human resources services and functions for the College; is advisory to the college and administers activities relating to payroll, classification and compensation, recruitment and hiring, training and development, workers’ compensation, benefits administration, employee and labor relations, safety and security , risk management and legal compliance. Serve as a member of the President’s Senior Leadership Team and the VSC Human Resources Council. Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration or Human Resources (Master’s Degree preferred) plus 6-10 years of experience in administration or personnel. Related Human Resources certification a plus. Evidence of leadership essential; excellent planning, administrative, organizational, supervisory and budget managements skills critical. Experience working in a unionized environment essential. Valid Vermont driver’s license required.

For more information on this and other positions currently under recruitment at Vermont Tech, please visit our website: vtc.edu, “Work at VTC”.

SHARED LIVING PROGRAM

THIS POSITION IS SUBJECT TO A FINGERPRINT-SUPPORTED CRIMINAL BACKGROUND CHECK. ANY OFFER OF EMPLOYMENT IS CONTINGENT UPON THE SATISFACTORY RESULTS OF THIS CHECK.

ACCEPTING EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST Howard Center’s Shared Living Program creates opportunities for individuals with developmental disabilities to live in the community. The Shared Living Program is currently accepting expressions of interest from experienced caregivers to provide a home, day-to-day assistance and support tailored to the needs of individuals seeking caregivers. This is a rewarding employment opportunity for individuals who are interested in working from home while making a meaningful difference in someone’s life. We use a careful matching process to ensure that each placement is mutually compatible. A generous tax-free stipend, room and board, respite budget, training, and team support are provided.

To apply, please submit a mandatory Vermont Tech employment application with resume and cover letter to jobs@vtc.edu. The employment application is available on the Vermont Tech website, vtc.edu. Incomplete application materials will not be considered.

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Looking for a Sweet Job?

To see current listings of all available shared living opportunities, and receive an informational brochure/ application, contact lreid@howardcenter.org or call 802-488-6563.

Our new, mobile-friendly job board is buzzing with excitement.

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2/27/17 4:27 PM


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NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

C-17 05.17.17-05.24.17

DOCKET CLERK B (Job Code # 17023)

The Vermont Judiciary has several long term temporary openings up to 40 hours per week for positions which involves specialized clerical work and data entry. Recruiting positions in White River Junction, Burlington, Rutland, & Montpelier. High School graduate and two years of clerical, or data entry experience required. Starting at $16.29 per hr. Open until filled. Candidates shall submit a complete and up-to-date Judicial Branch Application and resume. An electronic version of the Application and a more detailed job description may be found at: vermontjudiciary.org/employment-opportunities/ staff-openings

PSYCHOTHERAPIST Rostered or licensed psychotherapist needed for expanding, professional group practice. Must see children: 20-25 clinical hours/week. We’re a collegial, busy practice serving a diverse community in Vermont's lovely Northeast Kingdom. Please forward letter of interest and CV to: St. Johnsbury Psychology Associates stjohnsburypsychology@gmail.com

www.lhha.org

Billing Specialist Flexible part-time position with responsibilities in patient billing, insurance verification and collections; works closely with intake department. The successful candidate must possess 3-5 years of medical billing experience (Medicare and electronic billing preferable), a thorough understanding of insurance guidelines, strong customer service skills and a keen eye for detail. For more information, visit www.lhha.org and complete an on-line application, or call 802-888-4651.

54 FARR AVE. MORRISVILLE, VT 05661

Equal opportunity employer

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Billing Specialist

Executive Director

Town Manager

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The Town of Fair Haven, VT (2015 population est. 2,633) seeks an experienced leader to serve as its next Town Manager. Fair Haven is a small, rural town, but with many urban amenities, on the western border of Rutland County in west-central Vermont. It maintains strong civic pride, especially due to its smaller population, its historicallyrecognized slate mining/manufacturing industry, its veterans, and its Town green (called “The Park”). Fair Haven is within an easy 15 minute drive to Castleton University and Green Mountain College. It’s within a 40 minute drive to the communities of Killington, Lake George, NY, and Manchester and Middlebury, VT. The Town is also only 1½ hours from both the Albany and Burlington International Airports. The Manager reports to a 5-member Selectboard and is responsible for day-to-day Town operations, including supervision of all departments (Police, Fire, Water, Wastewater, Highways, Solid Waste, Recreation, and Accounting). The current operating budget is $2.93M with 32 full- and part-time employees.

The Janet S. Munt Family Room Board of Directors is hiring an Executive Director to lead the organization as it transitions to an independent non-profit and stand alone Parent-Child Center. The Family Room offers a variety of programs to a diverse group of parents/caregivers and children from birth through six years old across Chittenden County. The ideal candidate must have experience in non-profit management, business and resource development, with a proven track record leading during times of change and leveraging community resources to achieve results. The Executive Director is a skilled communicator and trusted team builder with a healthy sense of humor. Applications will be accepted until May 31. To apply, please submit your resume and cover letter to janetsmuntfamilyroom@gmail.com or mail to  PO Box 8506, Burlington, VT 05402.

For full job description go to: thefamilyroomvt.org. A working knowledge of municipal practices, budgeting, finance, personnel administration, and public relations is essential. The strongest candidates will have a collaborative and open management style, rooted in quality “customer service.” especially with elected officials, employees, and the community 4t-JanetSMuntFamilyRoom051017.indd 1 at-large. A background in the areas of economic development, labor relations, grant writing/ administration, and project management is a plus. A Bachelor’s degree in public administration, business management, or related field (Master’s degree preferred) along with five years of management experience are required. Salary will be commensurate with experience, and an excellent benefits package is offered. The Manager is encouraged but not required to reside in Town. However, a 30-minute commute would be the reasonable maximum distance expectation of the Selectboard. Background check required. THE POSITION REMAINS OPEN UNTIL FILLED. HOWEVER, APPLICATIONS RECEIVED BEFORE 7:00 PM, ON WEDNESDAY, MAY 31, 2017 WILL BE GIVEN PRIORITY REVIEW. For a full job description see fairhavenvt.org. To apply, please email or mail a confidential cover letter, resume, and three professional references to: Town Manager Search Fair Haven Selectboard Attn: Robert Richards, Chair 3 North Park Place, Fair Haven, VT 05743 brichards2355@gmail.com

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5/8/17 2:58 PM

Intake & Outreach Coordinator HomeShare Vermont, based in South Burlington, is a small nonprofit dedicated to affordable housing and helping elders and others continue to remain at home. The preferred candidate must have excellent interpersonal and organizational skills. Working knowledge of Microsoft Publisher, MailChimp and WordPress are desirable. Marketing experience a plus. Must be able to work as part of a team and multi-task. Job includes work with the public, program participants as well as helping with various marketing and outreach projects. Position is 40 hours/week with benefits. Send resume by June 7 via email ONLY to sharevt@sover.net.

The Town of Fair Haven is an Equal Opportunity Employer

5/15/17 3:23 PM

EOE.


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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05.17.17-05.24.17

REGISTERED NURSE AND LICENSED NURSING ASSISTANT, CONSTRUCTION SUPERVISOR Whole house Women Build project. Experience in Residential Construction Management or Oversight required. Women are encouraged to apply.

ASSISTANT RESTORE MANAGER Experience required in Retail Management, and proficient in Customer Service. Send cover letter and resume to: dmullin@ vermonthabitat.org

BARTENDERS SERVERS KITCHEN STAFF The Kingdom Taproom serves craft beer, wine & spirits and is complemented by a small and diverse menu.  We are looking to fill a variety of positions, both full and parttime. We need experienced bartenders and servers, as well as kitchen staff at every level. For front of the house positions, previous experience is necessary; beer and mixed drink knowledge is extremely helpful, but we will consider those that are willing and excited to learn.  Please send an email to kingdomtaproom@gmail.com to apply!

OFFICE ASSISTANT Fast-paced law firm located in Burlington seeks parttime office assistant. A good candidate will demonstrate the ability to multi-task, take initiative and have excellent computer and communication skills. Attention to detail and an eagerness to learn are essential. Must be able to work independently and as part of a team. Office, filing and legal experience preferred. RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE: answering telephones, photocopying, faxing, filing and file management and computer entry. Monday through Friday: 25 hours per week; paid hourly; no benefits. SEND COVER LETTER AND RESUME TO:

Jennifer Welsh, Office Manager Lynn, Lynn, Blackman & Manitsky, P.C. 76 St. Paul Street, Suite 400 Burlington, VT 05401 jwelsh@lynnlawvt.com

SOUTH BURLINGTON, VT

$1,000 SIGN ON BONUS OFFERED!!!! Centurion, a partnership between MHM Services and Centene Corporation, is a leading provider of healthcare services to correctional facilities nationwide. Centurion of Vermont is proud to be the provider of healthcare services to the Vermont Department of Corrections.

We invite you to learn more about the environment that is often referred to as “nursing’s best kept secret” — Correctional Nursing. We are currently seeking a Registered Nurse and Licensed Nursing Assistant at our Chittenden Regional Correctional Facility in South Burlington, VT. The LNA position is full time NIGHTS and the Registered Nurse position is full time DAY and EVENING SHIFTS! For the LNA position, we are looking for someone that is willing to do, four (4) 10 hour shifts, 6pm-4:30 am or 8pm-6:30 am!!!! For the RN position, we are looking for someone to work 6am-2:30 pm for days and 2pm-10:30 pm for evenings!! The Registered Nurse (RN) will work in a fast paced environment providing nursing care to offenders in the medical unit/infirmary. The Licensed Nursing Assistant provides basic offender healthcare under the direction of nursing staff. The LNA performs offender care by assisting offenders with performance of activities of daily living, vital sign monitoring and documenting and reporting changes to healthcare team. Requirements for RN: • Current RN license in VT • Experience in med/surg or correctional environment preferred • Must be able to pass background investigation and obtain agency security clearance Requirements for LNA: • Must be a graduate of a Licensed Nursing Assistant program and have an active VT Nursing Assistant License • One (1) year of clinical experience preferred, willing to train • CPR certification • Must be able to pass and maintain security background clearance We offer competitive compensation and a comprehensive benefits package for FULL TIME including: • Health, dental, vision, life and disability insurance • Health savings account with matching employer contributions • 20 paid days off plus 8 paid holidays • 401(k) retirement plan with employer match • Career development benefit • Flexible spending accounts for health and dependent care • Wellness activity subsidy • Access to corporate discount programs Interested candidates, please email resumes to

kelli@mhmcareers.com or fax 888-317-1741; www.mhm-services.com FOR MORE INFORMATION ON SHIFTS, PLEASE CALL KELLI AT 866-616-8389-EOE


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The historic Middlebury Inn in Middlebury, VT is looking for a Sous Chef or Lead Line Cook with a passion for delicious and visually appealing food to be a team leader in our 71 room full-service hotel. This is an exempt position and a culinary degree is a plus as well as 2-4 years in a kitchen supervisory role. Our restaurant, Morgan’s Tavern, offers a full service Food & Beverage operation serving Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner and Afternoon Tea as well as offering spectacular weddings and catered events in a variety of banquet room settings. Send Resume to geoff@middleburyinn.com. middleburyinn.com

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Northgate Apartments in Burlington is seeking an experienced Maintenance Technician/Custodian to perform general cleaning, maintenance, work orders, unit turnovers, and annual preventative maintenance. The work hours for this position are 6:30am to 2:30pm Monday to Friday. The successful candidate will have experience with light plumbing, electrical, carpentry, painting, and grounds maintenance. Excellent communication and customer services skills are required. Must have a Valid Driver’s license and your own vehicle with the ability to participate in emergency call rotation and snow removal a must. At Maloney Properties, we offer our employees a competitive salary and benefits package that includes a 401(k) plan, medical and dental insurance, life and long-term disability benefits, paid sick time, paid company holidays and paid vacation, recruitment bonus benefits, confidential employee assistance programs and tuition reimbursements. Apply via maloneyproperties.com. EOE

Full Time Family Teachers

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Help Vermonters pursue their education goals!

Senior Evaluation & Research Analyst We’re all about mission at Vermont Student Assistance Corporation (VSAC). Help us fulfill our mission of providing all Vermont students with information and financial resources to reach their educational goals. You’ll work in a relaxed yet challenging environment. We offer many top-notch benefits, plus a fabulous on-site fitness room & café. You will develop, implement and execute ongoing research and evaluation activities for the GEAR UP program including program evaluation planning and execution, data collection, data management, planning and conducting quantitative and qualitative research studies; disseminate research and evaluation findings through local and national presentations and written reports. This is a grant funded position contingent on continued grant funds. Our ideal candidate will have proven leadership, quantitative analytical, and oral/written communication skills along with demonstrated experience with educational program evaluation and research studies, thorough knowledge of quantitative and qualitative research methods and strong skill set in formative data-driven evaluation, MS Office, SAS, and SPSS or other statistical software. We require a master’s degree in related field plus 3 to 5 years’ professional experience. We prefer knowledge of federal grant reporting and doctorate in education, statistics, analytics or other related field. VSAC offers a dynamic, professional environment with competitive compensation and generous benefits package. Apply ONLY online at www.vsac.org.

VERMONT STUDENT ASSISTANCE CORPORATION PO Box 2000 Winooski, VT 05404 EOE/Minorities/Females/Vet/Disabled www.VSAC.org

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Maintenance Technician/Custodian

Sous Chef

CRACK OPEN YOUR FUTURE...

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Residential group home is seeking individuals to work with adolescent girls in a treatment program. Must be confident, motivated and have some experience working with kids. Open positions include Monday-Friday 3 pm-11 pm, Monday-Friday 7 am-3 pm. Competitive pay based on experience. Training provided. BC/BS and Delta Dental benefits as well as paid time off. Must have a valid driver’d license and be willing to have a background check. Please send resumes to blaire.orc@gmail.com, suzannesmith1263@gmail.com or 111 Bliss Road, Montpelier, VT 05602.

Part Time Driver Residential group home is seeking a part time driver. Must be a confident, reliable person and have some experience working with kids. Must be comfortable driving in types of weather. Hours are MondayFriday 7 am-9 am. Starting pay $12.00 an hour. Must have a valid driver’s license and be willing to have a background check. Please send resumes or letters of interest to blaire. orc@gmail.com, suzannesmith1263@gmail.com or 111 Bliss Road, Montpelier, VT 05602.

Part Time Family Teacher/Barn Manager Small 2 horse riding program looking for a person to manage barn and teach 6 to 8 teenage girls basic horsemanship/riding lessons. Monday-Friday 2 pm-6 pm. Certification helpful but not necessary for the right person. Experience with kids a plus. Must have a valid driver’s license and be willing to have a background check. Please send resume to suzannesmith1263@gmail.com or 111 Bliss Road, Montpelier, VT 05602.

5/15/17 4:32 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

05.17.17-05.24.17

STONE UNDERGROUND CONSTRUCTION (WILLISTON) SEEKS

Marketing & Public Relations Specialist Marketing & Public Relations Coordinator

EXPERIENCED EQUIPMENT OPERATORS AND LABORERS

Restorative Justice Panel Manager PART-TIME

The Restorative Justice Panel Manager (RJPM) plays a vital function in the continued growth and development of the Winooski Community Justice Center (WinCJC). This role supports the panel process and its volunteers, assist in guiding the conversation in a restorative matter, and assures that Restorative Justice (RJ) goals are addressed. Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent in a combination of education and experience. Experience with mediation and working with volunteers, knowledge of and experience with Restorative Justice, dynamics of offending, corrections system, criminal justice system, process of change, and/or social work.

Pay $16 per hour to start. Pay based on experience. 40 plus hours per week. Clean driving record required. Contact Diana Stone, 272-7410, or Joe Stone, 310-1359 for more information and to schedule an interview.

Looking for a daily routine that always has something new? Looking for a daily routine that alwaysand hashave great If you are detail-oriented, self-motivated, something new? If you are detail-oriented, verbal/written communication skills, we would like to talk organized and have great verbal/written communication skills, we would like to talk to you. to you. WeWe are are looking for aforteam player whowho enjoys creative looking a team player enjoys creative thinking and can take an idea and bring it to life, bein thinking and loves all things PR. If you have experience it creating a compelling press release, social media content social media, media and/ story,creation, or meme. If you haveCision, experience inalerts marketing or press releases/pitches, sharp conceptual thinking and a and/or public relations, sharp conceptual thinking and ainterest genuineininterest getting things get3-5 genuine getting in things done, get indone, touch. in touch. 1-3 years experience with copy/public years experience in public relations preferred. relations is preferred. Send youryour resume andand cover letter to to Send resume cover letter info@haganmarketing.com. No phone calls, please. info@haganmarketing.com. No phone calls, please.

To apply, please visit

winooskivt.org.

LOOKING FOR THAT DREAM JOB? OR A GREAT NEW EMPLOYEE?

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Creative Marketing Strategies & Design

Hagan Associates - Feb 2016; Size 4; BW; 3.83” x 3.46”

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Then make sure you are at the:

4th Annual

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Vermont Career Connections!

Vermont Municipal Bond Bank Vermont Educational & Health Buildings Financing Agency

May 23 • 11am - 5pm Join our sponsors and dozens of additional hiring employers at this exciting recruiting event!

The Sheraton Burlington Conference Center

Here are some of the companies who will be there: GOLD SPONSOR:

Vermont Municipal Bond Bank and Vermont Educational and Health Buildings Financing Agency are seeking a highly qualified individual to serve as an Executive Director who will successfully support and promote the mission of both organizations; is committed to driving positive change; has a strong commitment to excellence; and a genuine desire to serve the public. VMBB is an instrumentality of the State of Vermont with a mission to support access to readily available, low cost financing options for Vermont’s governmental units. We provide loan financing through publicly issued bonds and Vermont’s State Revolving Fund, with loan portfolios of $570 million and $320 million, respectively. VEHBFA is also an instrumentality of the State of Vermont. As a conduit issuer, VEHBFA issues tax-exempt/taxable bonds and lease financing on behalf of non-profit healthcare and educational institutions. The Agency has a loan portfolio of just under $1.1 billion.

SILVER SPONSORS:

We are seeking exceptional candidates with proven leadership skills and a knowledge of or a willingness to learn in the following areas: public/private tax-exempt and taxable bond markets; credit underwriting; overseeing investments; budget development and fiscal management; and strong written and oral presentation skills. Familiarity with Vermont’s municipal forms of government and non-profits is a plus. A Master’s Degree and a minimum of five (5) years’ related experience OR a Bachelor’s degree with a minimum of eight (8) years’ related experience is required for this exciting career opportunity.

For JOB SEEKERS we will also have some informational sessions to help boost your job search skills!

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE GO TO:

Qualified individuals should visit either the VMBB or VEHBFA websites to obtain a copy of the full job description and application information. Competitive salary and benefits offered. Position open until filled. AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

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Organist/ Choir Director

Accounts Payable Manager Seeking an Accounts Payable Manager who is responsible for accurate and timely processing of all vendor invoices and payments for the company. The ideal candidate will manage the Accounts Payable (AP) functions, including travel expense reporting, as well as develop, document and improve processes to increase effectiveness. This position is also responsible for ensuring the AP team has timely and accurate monthly and year-end financial closings. Bachelor’s degree required. This is a full time (37.5 hrs/week) benefits eligible position. Job Listing # 3938

First Church of Essex Junction, U.C.C. seeks PT Organist/Choir Director. Church is GLBTQ friendly. Job includes coord. music program, directing adult choirs, and playing organ & piano at 2 services [beautifully refurbished 1928 Estey organ / Young Chang baby grand].

Maintenance Specialist Provide both routine and complex maintenance support services to multiple sites throughout the state. This job is accountable for accomplishing tasks in the building trades including but not limited to electrical, plumbing, carpentry, painting, HVAC, equipment servicing, risk management, and relocation. Candidate should have 3-5 years in general maintenance. Valid driver’s license required. FT benefits eligible. Job ID# 3885

Email cover letter and resume to FCCEJmusicsearch@gmail. com or mail to

Sub-Registered Nurse – Medication Assisted Treatment Program Seeking a Registered Nurse to cover vacancies. Our nurses are responsible for safely dispensing methadone and buprenorphine products and maintaining all Nursing Dispensary operations. Must have excellent attention to detail and organizational skills, plus strong interpersonal and communication skills. Job ID# 3677

FCCEJ Music Search 1 Church Street Essex Junction VT 05452. Church office 878-5745 Website: fccej.org.

Substance Abuse Clinical Care Coordinator Provide care coordination for clients receiving buprenorphine treatment through the new Pine Street Counseling Spoke, ensuring clients receive coordinated care addressing Home Health Services. FT. Benefits eligible. Masters required. Must have LADC or LCMHC or LICSW. Job ID# 3851

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We’re hiring in Morrisville!

Ready To Go Drivers and Driver Aide We’re looking for personable Drivers and a Driver Aide! Full-Time, Part-Time, and Per Diem positions available to safely transport our clients and/or their children. Must have a valid driver’s license and clean driving record. Email a resume and cover letter to nhjobs@ascentria.org. These are great opportunities to work in a meaningful environment empowering others. ASCENTRIA CARE ALLIANCE IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.

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5/8/17 2:19 PM

Supervisor II – First Call for Chittenden County Join First Call for Chittenden County, Howard Center’s newly integrated crisis program, as a Supervisor II.

Planned Parenthood of Northern New England (PPNNE) is seeking qualified candidates to fill a variety of available position. PPNNE is the largest reproductive health care and sexuality education provider and advocate in northern New England. Our mission is to provide, promote, and protect access to reproductive health care and sexuality education so that all people can make voluntary choices about their reproductive and sexual health.

The Supervisor II position has a Sunday - Thursday schedule (daytime hours) and assists in the daily operations and oversight of the program. This includes internal and external training, direct clinical service, community relations, shift coverage, assisting with triaging and resource utilization, and direct staff supervision. MA degree, experience, and license required. Job ID# 3815

For more information, please visit howardcentercareers.org.

POSITIONS WE HAVE AVAILABLE CURRENTLY ARE:

Howard Center offers an excellent benefits package including health, dental, and life insurance, as well as generous paid time off for all regular positions scheduled 20-plus-hours-per-week.

System/Network Administrator – Colchester, VT Advanced Practice Clinician (Nurse Practitioner/Certified Midwife/PA) – in St Johnsbury, Hyde Park & Newport, VT Locations

Applicants needing assistance or an accommodation in completing the online application should feel free to contact Human Resources at 488-6950 or hrhelpdesk@howardcenter.org.

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Accounting Associate – Accounts Payable Colchester, VT

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Floating Advanced Practice Clinician (Nurse Practitioner/Certified Midwife/PA) VT mid-South Region

For more information and to apply, visit our website at ppnne.org and submit your Cover Letter & Resume by clicking on our JOBS tab at the bottom.

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Planned Parenthood of Northern New England welcomes diversity and is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

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ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

05.17.17-05.24.17

LANDSCAPER Chittenden County Landscaping business looking for full and part-time workers. Contact

Marc at

Outdoor Works Landscaping at mktorelli@aol.com

CONSTRUCTION CREW LEADER Green Mountain Habitat for Humanity seeks an AmeriCorps Construction Crew Leader! This is a 1,700 hour, full-time AmeriCorps opportunity with a Tuesday-Saturday schedule and an anticipated start date in early September. Past construction experience is preferred, as is the ability to communicate and work with individuals from diverse backgrounds. AmeriCorps benefits include: • • • • •

Annual living allowance of $12,630 $5,815 Education Award upon completion of service Forbearance on eligible student loans Health care plan Childcare benefits (if qualified) Come join our team as we build homes, community, and hope in Northwest Vermont! To apply or learn more, visit habitat.org/americorps

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Experienced Inventory and Receiving Supervisor The ideal candidate is interested in working in a privately owned business that values personal health and well-being as well as contributing to communities in which we work. This job will require you to lift 50+ lbs repeatedly. Qualified candidate will have previous inventory/warehouse experience. Supervisory or management experience is preferred. Ability to multitask, problem-solve and make decisions independently and in collaboration with other store leaders. You approach working with both the least and most experienced staff with a professionalism and positive attitude which is felt throughout the company. This is a full time benefited position including health, vacation, company sponsored 401(k), purchase benefits and more. You can find a detailed job description at skirack.com. Please send a cover letter and resume to jobs@skirack.com.

5/8/17 5:28 PM

VT Tenants Housing Education Supervisor he h pl in lle O e n i Opp rtunit O O en nt r r ee n e perien ed ener eti nd itted indi idu l ith hi h de ree initi ti e t in ur te the u in du ti n uper i r. he u in du ti n uper i r i re p n i le r n in the n in per ti n the en nt tline pr ide edu ti n nd utre h er i e t l ndl rd nd ten nt ill e the le d edu t r re p n i le r te hin i ri ht nd re p n i ilitie t ten nt nd l ndl rd in r h p ettin re p n i le r utili in upd tin pr idin er i ht nd upp rt ur ten nt tr inin teri l nit r nd rep rt n the e e ti ene h tline er i e nd i e input t the r r ire t r n p tenti l i pr e ent nd pr ide dire t er i e t lient needed. u e ul ppli nt ill h e hel r de ree in edu ti n u ine r hu n er i e plu 2 e r rel ted e perien e p r le l tr inin de ired ener l n led e . . 9 12 nd 1 r ini u 2 e r e perien e r in ith ten nt l ndl rd nd h u in t tute rel ted i ue nd the ilit t uni te ith uper i e nd e p er e pl ee t e e e ti e in their r le . uper i r e perien e pre erred. tr n pre eren e i en t ppli nt uent in n ti e l n u e h red ur re u ee i i r nt unit . le rn re ut thi p iti n ple e i it cvoeo.org. hi i 2 h ur per ee p iti n ith he lth in ur n e nd e ellent enefit . ppl ple e end er letter nd re u e t vtsuper17@cvoeo.org. e ie ppli ti n e in i edi tel nd ill ntinue until uit le ndid te re und.

CVOEO is an Equal Opportunity Employer

Wake Robin, Vermont’s premier continuing care retirement community, seeks dedicated nursing professionals with a strong desire to work within a community of seniors.

Evening Nurse Manager (RN) Full-Time Evenings The Nurse Manager oversees the delivery and coordination of care during the evening shift. This individual manages care plans and related documentation, reinforces best practices, acts as primary liaison with families and other care providers, coordinates staffing resources for the shift, and provides primary nursing care when needed. The successful candidate will be an RN in the State of Vermont, with a minimum of two years of clinical oversight experience in a long term care or related setting. S/he will demonstrate a solid understanding of geriatric care delivery, and the ability to lead and communicate with others in a positive and supportive manner. This position works Monday – Friday.

Staff Nurse (RN or LPN) Full-Time Evenings Wake Robin provides high quality nursing care in a fast paced residential and long-term care environment, while maintaining a strong sense of “home.” Wake Robin also offers an opportunity to build strong relationships with staff and residents in a dynamic community setting Wake Robin offers an excellent compensation and benefits package and generous shift differential for evenings, nights and weekends! Interested candidates please email cover letter and resume to hr@wakerobin.com or complete an application online at

wakerobin.com. WAKE ROBIN IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.

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Looking for a Sweet Job? Our new, mobile-friendly job board is buzzing with excitement. Start applying at

jobs.sevendaysvt.com

5/15/17 4:27 PM


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VEHI’s school employee wellness program, PATH, offers its members state of the art services to build and maintain healthy behaviors at work, at home and in the community.

Lund offers hope and opportunity to families through education, treatment, family support and adoption.

Wellness Program Support The Wellness Program Support person will assist with the planning, preparation, design and implementation of PATH’s day to day operations. Main duties include customer service to our 15,000+ members, management of our complex web application, conference planning/implementation, and design/publication of marketing and communications materials.

ADOPTION CASE MANAGER The Position: • Full-time, 40 hours per week with statewide travel required. • Responsible for service delivery to adoptive families and facilitation of adoption finalizations. • Schedule includes some non-traditional hours such as evenings and weekends depending on the needs of clients.

KNOWLEDGE/EXPERIENCE: Must have a high school diploma or equivalent. Candidate must be fluent in MS office, proficient in social media platforms, have good organizational and communication skills, the ability to work independently and must be a team player.

What We Look For: • Minimum Bachelor’s degree in relevant field; knowledge of adoption-related issues and/or adoption experience recommended. • Candidate must work well with a variety of people, possess excellent verbal and written communication skills, demonstrate flexibility and open-mindedness, and be able to work well independently. • Valid driver’s license and reliable transportation required. Position entails extensive travel; Lund reimburses for mileage at the federal rate. What You Gain: • An opportunity to work with and learn from a strong and enthusiastic team of professionals. • Knowledge of adoption services, adoption law, and the opportunity to create counseling relationships with individuals and families. • The opportunity to participate in the creation of new families. • Ongoing training opportunities available.

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This is a full time position with competitive salary and benefits. WANT TO JOIN OUR TEAM? To apply, please send your resume and cover letter by June 2nd to: amy@vsbit.org or to Amy Gilbert, VSBIT, 52 Pike Drive, Berlin, VT 05602.

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Why Join Our Team at Lund: • Lund is a multi-service nonprofit that has served families and children throughout Vermont for 125 years. • Our mission is to help children thrive by empowering families to break cycles of poverty, addiction and abuse. • Lund is committed to diversity and cultural competence. • Lund offers a comprehensive benefit package for full-time positions including health, dental, life insurance, disability, retirement, extensive time off accrual and holiday pay. Excellent opportunity to join strengths-based team of multi-disciplinary professionals.

EEO/AA

5/12/17 4:27 PM

Senior Quality Improvement Specialist OneCare Vermont Responsible for providing leadership in the daily operations associated with OneCare Vermont’s Quality Improvement program. Serve as the primary liaison with clinicians in hospitals, specialty and primary care practices and with continuum of care providers to develop quality improvement strategies to achieve ACO clinical priority areas. Select and deploy effective QI methods to achieve identified aims, oversee patient experience survey processes, author annual QI work plans, and manage the collection and dissemination of results of performance improvement initiative that demonstrate the ACO’s value. Qualified Candidates Will Have:

Please send resume and cover letter to:

Bachelor’s degree in healthcare field required. Master’s degree in nursing, public health, health administration desired. CPHQ preferred. CPHQ will be required within one year of employment. Five to seven years of varied clinical experience in a complex healthcare related setting.

Human Resources PO Box 4009 Burlington, VT 05406-4009

Apply Online: http://bit.ly/2qnSvbS Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, or protective veteran status.

fax: (802) 864-1619 or email: employment@lundvt.org UVMHealth.org/MedCenterCareers 12t-Lund051717.indd 1

5/12/17 2:19 PM


issue: 05-17

ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

05.17.17-05.24.17

Maintenance Technician The Y is hiring a day time Maintenance Technician to work Tuesday – Saturday. Full-time comprehensive benefits package, pension, PTO, and Y membership.

Digital Marketing Specialist Electronic Technician

$15-$18 per hour.

For the full job description and to apply, go to dynapowerenergy.com and click on “employment.” EOE

Submit resume to hr@gbymca.org

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Dynapower Company in South Burlington is a leading manufacturer of large custom power supplies and energy conversion systems. Our staff is dedicated to providing quality workmanship and the highest level of customer service. We offer an extensive benefits package and a pleasant working environment, as well as an opportunity for personal and professional growth. We are currently accepting resumes and applications for the following positions:

Awesome Summer Jobs Are Waiting for You!

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RATE OF PAY: $10.10 – $15.83 Hourly

Engaging minds that change the world Seeking a position with a quality employer? Consider The University of Vermont, a stimulating and diverse workplace. We offer a comprehensive benefit package including tuition remission for on-going, full-time positions. This opening and others are updated daily. Research Review Assistant - Research Protections Office - #S1102PO The Research Protections Office at The University of Vermont is seeking a Research Review Assistant. This position provides high-level assistance to the research review process which includes broad support of Research Protections Office operations, the committees and the research community. Associate’s degree and one to three years of related experience or an equivalent combination of education and experience required. Working knowledge of Microsoft Office, attention to detail, organizational skills and strong written and verbal communication skills required. Customer service experience highly desirable. For further information on this positions and others currently available, or to apply online, please visit our website at: www.uvmjobs.com; Job Hotline #802-656-2248; telephone #802-656-3150. Applicants must apply for positions electronically. Paper resumes are not accepted. Job positions are updated daily. The University of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Applications, from women, veterans, individuals with disabilities and people from diverse racial, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds are encouraged.

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Applications are now being accepted for the following jobs. You may apply for more than one position at a time. You must apply online (or from your mobile phone)! governmentjobs.com/careers/burlingtonvt/jobs/1671975

BARJ and Youth Justice Program Manager This position oversees the Balanced and Restorative Justice and Youth Justice Programs for the Franklin Grand Isle Restorative Justice Center. This position is responsible for oversight of all youth justice programming, supervision of program staff, maintaining high quality case management, partner relationships, restorative services, grant management and program vision. Full-time 40 hours with benefits. Send cover, resume and 3 references by Friday, June 2 to Nina Curtiss/Executive Director: nina@fgirjc.org. Please go to the City of St. Albans website and click on Employment Opportunities for complete job description. stalbansvt.com

Day Camp Directors/Counselors We're searching for a Landscaping/Horticulture Maintenance

Awesome Summer Jobs Are Waiting for You! Basketball Camp Counselors Director of Parks & Recreation

toAttendants/Event lead amazing team RATE OF PAY:our $10.10 – $15.83 Hourly Park Assistants beautiful Burlington! Applications are in now being accepted for the following jobs. You Track & Field Counselors may apply for more than one position at a time. You must apply

The position is responsible for providing high-level managerial online (or from your mobile phone)! (WSI) direction. Lifeguards leadership,Beach/Program administrative and financial The Director governmentjobs.com/careers/burlingtonvt/jobs/1671975 is responsibleWaterfront for directing theSecurity planning, development Guards and operation of City-wide parks, recreation, waterfront as well as Dayarboriculture Camp Directors/Counselors cemetery and services, programs and City facilities management. Work involves analyzing program effectiveness, Rec Nutrition Counselors Landscaping/Horticulture Maintenance managing, planning and supervising the traditional recreation Gate Attendants Basketball Camp Counselors programs, special events, youth development and senior Arborist Assistants programs.Park This position is a political appointed position that Attendants/Event Assistants serves at the pleasure of and reports directly to the Mayor. Cemetery Assistants Track Maintenance Field Counselors Annual salary: $79,913 -&$89,980

Beach/Program Find complete(WSI) details Lifeguards online: Ice Skating Professional governmentjobs.com/careers/burlingtonvt/jobs/1739068 Waterfront Security Guards

Ice Skating Teacher The City of Burlington will not tolerate unlawful harassment or Rec Nutrition Counselors

Gateplace Attendants race, color, national origin, of birth, ancestry, age, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, marital status, veteran status, Arborist disability, HIV positive status orAssistants genetic information. The City is also committed to providing proper access to services, facilities, Cemetery Maintenance Assistants and employment opportunities. Women, minorities, and persons with disabilities are highly encouraged to apply. For accessibility or alternative formats, please Iceinformation Skating Professional contact Human Resources Department at 865-7145.

Ice Skating Teacher

The City of Burlington will not tolerate unlawful harassment or 4t-FranklinGrandIsleRestorativeJustice051717.indd 5/15/17 16t-BurlingtonParks&Rec051717.indd 4:36 PM 1

5/15/17 3:47 PM

WE ARE LOOKING FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS:

SALES PLANNER

This position assists the Sales Manager in the development and execution of sales and trade strategies with key channel customers as well as development of trade goal segments and customer plans to achieve annual volume and profit plan goals.

BUSINESS TO BUSINESS SALES MANAGER

Responsible for planning, coordinating and growing the sales of our existing key account customer base as well as new customer acquisition.

FINANCIAL ANALYST

This position will support the global operations in developing planning, forecasting and value creation models to drive the business forward. The remuneration will be highly competitive and commensurate with experience. We are looking for the best and brightest Vermonters who want to make a difference on a global scale.

Please email resume and cover letter to annie@bigtreefarms.com This local multi-national company is a leading mission-driven food company. It is also dedicated to building sustainable livelihoods for their farming partners as well as leading the charge as the best environmental stewards on a global scale. The company is a champion for a brighter future in food and it's an ethos that starts right here in Vermont.


NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

C-25 05.17.17-05.24.17

C H I T T E N D E N (802) 872-8111 S olid Waste Distric t Director www.cswd.net Executive

SALES ASSOCIATE Burlington Bedrooms is seeking a part-time or full-time sales associate. Qualified candidates must be available Saturday and Sunday. Previous sales experience is not necessary, but all applicants must possess the following qualifications: superior customer service skills, must be highly motivated, must work well in a "team" environment and take direction from others. In the past this has been an ideal job for college students who are looking to earn extra money! Serious applicants only, please email cat@ burlingtonbedrooms.com

C H I T T E N D E N (802) 872-8111

S olid Waste Distric t www.cswd.net Gifford Retirement Community, a division of Gifford Health Care in Randolph, Vermont, Business Outreach seeks an Executive Director to oversee management of our Menig Nursing Home, Adult Coordinator Day, and new Independent Living programs. This is a unique opportunity to work in a

The Chittenden Solid Waste District, a leader in municipal solid waste management, is seeking an energetic, articulate, well-organized waste reduction advocate. The ideal candidate is both idealistic and pragmatic, and will translate complicated requirements into understandable terms while assisting diverse businesses in reducing and managing streams including recycling, food residuals, hazardous, and special wastes. 40 hours per week. $21.49 per hour. Excellent benefit package. Detailed job description at cswd. net. Send cover letter and resume by 6/2/17 to: ajewell@cswd.net.

spectacular setting at a rural, financially stable, non-profit organization with a progressive philosophy, supportive administrative team, and advanced technology. The qualified applicant will have strong organizational, leadership, and team development skills and at least five (5) years of experience working in a nursing home, independent living, and/or assisted living field at a senior management level (or equivalent combination of training and experience). The ideal candidate will be able to effectively direct and support staff, establish guidelines and goals, and clearly communicate with residents through collaborative leadership. A bachelor’s degree in healthcare, gerontology, or a business-related field is preferred; a master’s degree is desirable. A Nursing Home Administrator license is preferred and/or the expectation of completing and AIT program within a defined timeframe. The Independent Living building at Morgan Orchards is under construction and scheduled to open in August, 2017. Learn more about our Senior Living Community at www.morganorchards.com. Apply online at: www.GiffordHealthCare.org

Gifford Retirement Community EOE

Caring for you... for life.

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Medical Assistant Integrative Medicine, Family Practice in Colchester, VT is seeking an experienced MA, LNA, EMT or LPN to work Mon-Fri (32-40 hours/ week). This is an immediate opening for an energetic, detail oriented team player with strong computer skills. Experience in EKG, IM, phlebotomy and EMR are required. Scribing and IV skills are a plus. We specialize in Nutritional Medicine. Please email a cover letter, your resume and 3 professional references to preventivemedicinevt @gmail.com

LEGISLATIVE

FISCAL ANALYST The Vermont Legislative Joint Fiscal office is accepting applications for a legislative fiscal analyst. The person will provide support and research to legislators on a variety of fiscal issues including state revenues, taxes, tax expenditures, commerce, and other relevant matters. A full job description can be found at http://www.leg.state.vt.us/ jfo/link/jfojob17.pdf. Resumes will be reviewed starting on May 22, with the position open until filled.

5/4/17 5:17 PM

THOMAS FLEMING ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, ESSEX JCT.

5/15/17 1:06 PM

School Administrative Assistant Our Thomas Fleming Elementary School is seeking an Administrative Assistant to support the Principal and staff by performing a full range of secretarial/clerical and administrative functions. The administrative assistant is a valued and important school position that contributes much to our school being a welcoming, safe and supportive place to learn and work. We are seeking candidates with the following qualifications. • • • • • • • •

Minimum of an Associate's Degree in a secretarial/business curriculum (or other appropriate discipline) plus two to three years of relevant experience, or a combination of education and experience from which comparable knowledge and skills are acquired. Excellent computer technology skills and experience (e.g., Word, Excel, e-mail, database systems, webpage management, Publisher, etc.) Excellent organizational, planning, and written communication skills (as evidenced through quality of resume, cover letter, and essay question responses). Experience working with elementary aged children, and a general love for children. Excellent interpersonal skills which model and promote a welcoming and positive school climate. Familiarity with school systems and processes. Evidence of positive relationships with supervisors, co-workers, and other constituents. Knowledge of skill set necessary to succeed in a fast paced office environment, including best practices necessary for efficiency and effectiveness in the position.

Position pays $16.17 per hour and is available for 8 hours per day, 12 months of the year. Excellent benefits package available including family medical and dental insurance; term life insurance; access to professional development funds; retirement plan with up to 6% employer contribution; competitive leave package including vacation, sick/family, personal, and bereavement leaves. For additional information or to apply, please visit schoolspring.com, Job ID 2780340.

preventivemedicinevt.com

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4/28/17 11:37 AM

5/15/17 4:17 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-26

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

05.17.17-05.24.17

Executive Director

DIRECTOR OF NURSING

Northeast Wilderness Trust is an accredited, non-profit land trust founded in 2002 with jobs.sevendaysvt.com a mission to protect foreverwild landscapes for nature and people. NWT seeks an inspired, experienced and 1-JobsFiller_work.indd 1 2/27/17 6:30 PM passionately-focused leader to build and sustain the Nation's only regional land trust John Deere Lawn & dedicated to wilderness.

Centurion, a partnership between MHM Services and Centene Corporation, is a leading provider of health care services to correctional facilities nationwide. Centurion of Vermont is proud to be the provider of health care services to the Vermont Department of Corrections.

We invite you to learn more about the environment that is often referred to as “nursing’s best kept secret” — Correctional Nursing.

Full job description: newildernesstrust.org/ mission-and-history/ employment-opportunities/

We are currently seeking a full time Director of Nursing at our Chittenden Regional Correctional Facility in South Burlington, VT. The Director of Nursing provides clinical, educational and professional supervision for nursing and support staff. Collaborates with site health care leadership, facility leadership and other multidisciplinary team members to maintain and improve health care programs and services provided to incarcerated population.

Completion of an accredited registered nursing program. BSN preferred

Must hold a valid Vermont RN license

Progressive nursing experience in nursing care with a minimum of 3 years’ supervisory experience

Experience in acute care, ambulatory care or correctional environment preferred

Must be able to pass the Vermont Department of Corrections background investigation and obtain security clearance.

Please stop in at Mountain View Equipment in Middlebury or Plattsburgh during working hours to apply in person or check out the full Job Description and fill out an application online at mountainviewequip.com.

WE OFFER COMPETITIVE COMPENSATION AND A COMPREHENSIVE BENEFITS PACKAGE INCLUDING: •

Health, dental, vision, life and disability insurance

Health savings account with matching employer contributions

20 paid days off plus 8 paid holidays

401(k) retirement plan with employer match

Career development benefit

Flexible spending accounts for health and dependent care

Wellness activity subsidy

Access to corporate discount programs

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5/15/17 4:28 PM

C H I T T E N D E N (802) 872-81

S oli d Wa s t e D i s t r i c t www.cswd.n

Compliance Officer

Interested candidates, please email resumes to

kelli@mhmcareers.com or fax 888-317-1741; www.mhm-services. com FOR MORE INFORMATION ON SHIFTS, PLEASE CALL KELLI AT 866-616-8389-EOE

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Garden Technician

Mountain View Equipment is looking for Experienced Small Engine/Mower/Compact Diesel Tractor Technicians at our busy John Deere Lawn & Garden Shops in our Middlebury and Plattsburgh locations. Must have experience, your own tools, and a clean driving record. Competitive Pay plan based on your Experience. All inquiries kept strictly confidential. This position is year-round, full time, with benefits.

REQUIREMENTS: •

Let’s get to...

The Chittenden Solid Waste District is seeking a Compliance Officer to oversee the Compliance program, including administrative and professional work in quality assurance, safety, internal auditing, and monitoring and enforcing compliance with the solid waste management ordinance. The ideal candidate will have a Bachelor’s Degree in Environmental Science, Environmental Law or Engineering, Occupational Safety & Health or related field with minimum five years’ experience in solid waste management, including knowledge of regulations or any equivalent combination of education and experience. Salary range from $63,356 to $74,880. Excellent benefit package. Detailed job description at cswd.net. Send cover letter and resume by 6/2/17 to: ajewell@cswd.net.

5/15/17 4:59 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

PUBLIC GUARDIAN Tourism & Marketing: Director of Communications Department of Disabilities, Aging and Independent Living

New England’s Premier special event company is seeking hardworking, enthusiastic individuals to join our team. We are currently accepting applications for the following positions starting late April/early May through November 1.

you looking to elevate your career as a Public Guardian, this could be an appealing opportunity for a passionate and JobAre Description: energetic person to protect and monitor the legal and human rights of individuals under court-ordered guardianship. You will

Experienced professional to lead theorVermont Department cover a caseload of individuals withsought developmental disabilities age-related cognitive impairmentsof in Tourism Southwestern Vermont who require assistance with critical decision making in several life domains. At times, there is a high level of stress. Applicants & Marketing’s public and trade relations efforts. This mission-critical position must have knowledge of the needs of individuals with disabilities, services and opportunities for meeting those needs. Must be is designed to generate positive tourism-related coverage of Vermont in the able to work well with diverse teams, learn a variety of computer applications, and be available for emergency response at night national and international marketplace. Theinformation, Director of Communications is or email dave. and on the weekends. Extensive travel is required. For more contact Dave Ramos at 802-786-5042 ramos@vermont.gov. Job ID #621269. Rutland. Status: Full Application Deadline: May 22, 2017. responsible for theReference development andLocation: implementation of Time. a proactive business outreach plan consistent with the goals and mission of the Department of NURSEand CASEMarketing MANAGER / URNasI well as maintaining consistent communications Tourism Veterans’ Home via social networking tools. This position is responsible for all tourism media The Vermont Veterans’ Home (VVH) has a unique opportunity for a home-based Registered Nurse in the Burlington area to work relations in-state and out-of-state; press release pitching with discharge planners at area hospitals to screen for possible admits development; to the VVH in Bennington, Vermont.targeted You will provide tourism story ideas and on-site national media; development of press education on the servicesto at regional the Home, conduct evaluations of potential admissions including providing all necessary information to make an admission decision, attend special functions/events to promote and marketlists; the facility, familiarization trips and itineraries; management of media contact andand participate in weekly admission meetings. The ideal candidate will have experience in admissions (preferably long-term care); working support for ofVermont’s international public relations The Director knowledge VA, Medicare, Medicaid and commercial insurances and VA, initiatives. CMS, and State Nursing Home Regulations. For more information contact with Al Faxon at allan.faxon@vermont.gov. Reference executive Job ID #621159. Location: Home Based. Status: will also collaborate the Agency of Commerce team in the Temporary. Application Deadline: Open Until Filled. development of a proactive travel trade and business recruitment plan. This Tourism Director Communications position will report & to Marketing: the Commissioner of Tourismof & Marketing. ENERGY SERVICES PROGRAM OFFICER Job Description: Department for Children & Families Candidates must: demonstrate strong oral and skills; have a BA in professional sought lead thewritten Vermont Department Tourism WeExperienced have an exciting and rewarding opportunity for an to energy efficiency professional to join the State of of Vermont’s Public Relations or related fi eld; have a minimum of fi ve years of relevant work Weatherization Program. You will provide training and technical assistance to the 5 local Weatherization providers as well be & Marketing’s public and trade relations efforts. This mission-critical position responsible for quality control / quality assurance of of the Vermont Vermont Weatherization Program. Youtourism must have significant experience; demonstrate knowledge and Vermont’s industry. is designed to generate positive tourism-related coverage of Vermont in theexperience in the residential energy field and or applicable BPI certifications and strong interpersonal and communication skills. For more national andGeoff international marketplace. The Director of Communications is Location: information, contact Wilcox at 802-241-0943 or email geoff.wilcox@vermont.gov. Reference Job ID# 620627. Resume, writing samples and a minimum of three references should be Waterbury. Status: Full Time, Application Deadline: June 1, 2017. responsible for theLimited. development and implementation of a proactive business submitted to Kitty Vermont Agency Commerce outreach planSweet, consistent with the goalsofand mission ofand theCommunity Department of HEALTH DEPARTMENT OPERATIONSLife ADMINISTRATOR Development, OneMarketing National Drive, Montpelier, consistent VT 05620-0501. In- and out-ofTourism and as well as maintaining communications Department of Health via social networking This position is responsible for all tourism media state travel will be required.tools. Salary range: $45,000 - $50,000. Werelations have an exciting and challenging opportunity for an press Operations Administrator to join our Operations Unit in Burlington in-state and out-of-state; release development; pitching targeted Vermont. You will be responsible for projects that are diverse in scope along with operational and business functions such as; tourism story ideas to regional and national media; development of press continuity of operations planning, space renovations and internal communications. Strong interpersonal, communication, and familiarization and itineraries; management of media contact and organizational skills alongtrips with the ability to adapt quickly to unexpected situations are essential in thislists; position. For more information, contact Charon Goldwyn,international Chief of Operations at 802 865-7748 or email charon.goldwyn@vermont.gov. support for Vermont’s public relations initiatives. The Director Reference Jobwill ID # also 621354. Location: Burlington. Full Time, of Limited. Application executive Deadline: May 23, 2017. collaborate with Status: the Agency Commerce team in the development of a proactive travel trade and business recruitment plan. This ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYST position will reportIVto the Commissioner of Tourism & Marketing.

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Tent Installers Event Division Driver/ Warehouse Event Division Crew For detailed job descriptions please visit vttent.com/employment. Stop by our office to fill out an application or email resume to jobs@vttent.com. EOE.

14 Berard Drive, South Burlington VT 05403

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5/1/17 4:56 PM

Agency of Natural Resources

This position will be working in the Solid Waste Program of the Waste Management and Prevention Division of VT DEC. Primary Candidates must: demonstrate strong oral and written skills; have a BA in responsibilities include implementing the state’s Universal Recycling law (Act 148), the statewide materials management plan, or related field; haveanda priorities. minimum of offive years ofonrelevant work andPublic assisting Relations with other materials management programs A focus the work will be recycling and organics diversion outreach and tracking, specifically to businesses,of institutions, and and residents. Other dutiestourism include working with experience; demonstrate knowledge Vermont Vermont’s industry. and supporting solid waste districts, municipalities, haulers, facilities, farmers, and other stakeholders to improve recycling, organics diversion and waste reduction in Vermont, and developing and disseminating outreach materials. For more information, Resume, writing samples andReference a minimum of three references should be contact Josh Kelly at josh.kelly@vermont.gov. Job ID #621326. Location: Montpelier. Status: Full-Time. Application submitted Kitty Sweet, Vermont Agency of Commerce and Community Deadline: May 24, to 2017.

Looking for a Sweet Job?

Development, One National Life Drive, Montpelier, VT 05620-0501. In- and out-of-

Our new, mobile-friendly job board is buzzing with excitement.

To apply, you must use the online job application at careers.vermont.gov. For questions related to your application, please contact the state oftravel will be Recruitment required. Salary range: $45,000 - $50,000. Department Human Resources, Services, at 855-828-6700 (voice) or 800-253-0191 (TTY/Relay Service). The State of Vermont is an equal opportunity employer and offers an excellent total compensation package.

Start applying at jobs.sevendaysvt.com 14-VtDeptHumanResources051717.indd 1

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2/20/17 6:25 PM


GO HIRE. Ready to recruit some new talent?

SAME GREATE C SERVI

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Job Recruiters: • Post jobs using a form that includes key info about your company and open positions (location, application deadlines, video, images, etc.). • Accept applications and manage the hiring process via our new applicant tracking tool.

05.17.17-05.24.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Our readers are planning their next career moves. Employers get results with Seven Days Jobs — our brand-new, mobile-friendly, online job board at jobs.sevendaysvt.com.

• Easily manage your open job listings from your recruiter dashboard.

EW ALL-N TE I WEBS

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Launch your recruitment campaign today on jobs.sevendaysvt.com!

• Search for jobs by keyword, location, category and job type. • Set up job alert emails using custom search criteria. • Save jobs to a custom list with your own notes on the positions. • Apply for jobs directly through the site.

Get a quote when you post online or contact Michelle Brown: 865-1020, ext. 21, michelle@sevendaysvt.com.

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• Share jobs on social media channels.

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5/8/17 4:40 PM


SUZANNE PODHAIZER

CUT THE MONDAY BLUES WITH 1/2 PRICE BOTTLES *Monday only

Goods at Family Cow Farmstand

A RU S T I C “ R E I N V E N T I O N O F V E R M O N T C U I S I N E ”

O P E N 7 DAY S A W E E K

5:30pm – 9:30 pm call 802.764.1489 for reservations ESSEXRESORTSPA.COM | 70 ESSEX WAY | ESSEX JCT, VT.

WEEKLY SPECIALS

8h-thessex011117.indd 1

authentic mexican cuisine 802-540-3095 • 169 Church St. • Burlington • 802-662-4334 • 4 Park St. • Essex Junction (Lincoln Inn) www.ElGatoCantina.com • info@elgatocantina.com 8h-elgato022217.indd 1

2/20/17 11:46 AM

S.P.

WATERFRONT PARK

MY FARMERS MARKET

1442 Creamery Rd., South Ryegate, 5844067, myfarmersmkt.com. Open Tuesday through Saturday, April through December (and possibly through the winter).

“I think of this more as a farmers market than a stand,” said My Farmers Market cofounder Jennifer Bone, working the counter last Friday. With its regular weekday hours, small size and location inside a small building — formerly a one-room schoolhouse — the market has the look and feel of a farm stand, albeit a well-stocked and diverse one. TAKING A STAND

WATERFRONT PARK

BURLINGTON VERMONT VERMONT

www.burlingtonwineandfoodfestival.com

FOOD 51

Dairy is the name of the game here. In addition to the farm’s own products — 100 percent grass-fed raw milk and pastured chicken — the store’s coolers hold Maple Hill Creamery yogurt, cheeses from North Country Creamery and Northland Sheep Dairy in upstate New York, and ricotta, butter and

Open 7 days a week for lunch and dinner!

SEVEN DAYS

2386 Shelburne Falls Rd., Hinesburg, 408666-9120, familycowfarmstand.com. Open Tuesday through Sunday, year-round.

1/2 PRICE NACHO THURSDAYS

2017 2017

FAMILY COW FARMSTAND

TACO TUESDAY

$2 CHICKEN OR SHREDDED BEEF TACOS & $3 LONG TRAILS

05.17.17-05.24.17

H.P.E.

buttermilk from Mountain Home Farm in Tunbridge. (The latter’s owners, Lindsay Harris and Evan Reiss, founded Family Cow but sold it when they moved to their current property.) The stand, which is barn red with a colorful bed of pansies just outside the door, is located right next to Red Wagon Plants — convenient for those who like to buy local and grow their own. What else can you get at Family Cow? Plenty. Among other things, flour and cornmeal from Nitty Gritty Grain Co. of Vermont in Charlotte, veggies from Footprint Farm in Starksboro and ShakeyGround Farm in Charlotte, and a luscious, intensely flavored grape juice from Dak & Dill of Essex, N.Y., that puts name brands to shame. Why sell goods from out of state? Because Essex is just a hop and short ferry ride away. And because so many fine products are made there. The New York cheeses are excellent: An aged Gouda was dark gold in color and complex in flavor, while a slab of Havarti proved perfectly delicate and creamy. Slap the latter on a sandwich with some baby greens, roasted chicken, and a slathering of Dak & Dill’s Dilly Topper — a tangy condiment made with chopped pickled garlic scapes — and you’ve got yourself a meal.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Inside the shop, an abundance of fresh veggies, herbs and flowers will dominate the space as the season takes off. For now, a refrigerator case offers eggs and bottles of farm-brewed APIS Honey Kombucha (also available in growlers), along with coffee from Northern Bayou Cold Brew, Family Cow Farmstand’s raw milk, and Sobremesa’s kimchi and other ferments. Jars of honey and maple syrup line shelves along the wall, as do V Smiley Preserves’ jams and Sweetgrass Herbals’ salves, lotions and tinctures. In the freezer, you can find wildcaught salmon and other seafood from Starbird Fish. Golden Well co-owners Nicole Burke and Ryan Miller plan to add local meats, cheeses and breads later this summer. Burke and Miller, who purchased the property a year and a half ago, opened the stand last summer. In addition to wholesaling to area restaurants, running a 40- to 60-member CSA, and making weekly trips to Waitsfield and Winooski farmers markets, the couple hosts yoga classes for kids and grown-ups, spiritual retreats and workshops, farm dinners, and live music. The idea is to bring people together to celebrate the food and the place, but there’s a practical aspect, as well. “When people come for yoga, they can go grab a dozen fresh eggs or do some of their shopping of the week [at the farm stand],” Burke said.

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HANNAH PALMER EGAN

Taking a Stand « P.51

Fiddleheads at My Farmers Market

SUZANNE PODHAIZER

Call it what you will, but in the past year, the market has accumulated some 20 members, each of whom works in the storefront a few hours a week. They supply an impressive array of fresh foods and pantry items. Outside, the patio area offers garden vegetable starts, annual flowers and floral hanging baskets. A walk-in cool room is currently stacked with baskets holding produce: spring-dug turnips, fiddleheads and sprouts from Bone Farm; gorgeous shiitake mushrooms from Cotwinkel Acres Forest Farm in Newbury; aged alpinestyle cheeses from Ryegate’s Karim Farm & Creamery; and all manner of coffee cakes, quiches, Boston cream cupcakes, and other baked goods and sweets from a handful of vendors. Fridges and freezers near the checkout counter proffer even more prepared foods — lasagna rolls and other bites from Dinner on Demand of Woodsville, N.H., and beef, lamb, pork and ice cream from Adams Family Farm in Barnet. Across the room, shelves hold breads from School House Bakery in Haverhill, N.H., along with maple syrup, pottery, soaps, pickles and preserves from local artisans. — H.P.E.

BREAD & BUTTER FARM

The farm stand at Bread & Butter — also home to Henry’s Dairy, a series of yoga classes and a program called

05.17.17-05.24.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

200 Leduc Farm Rd., Shelburne, 985-9200, breadandbutterfarm.com. Open Monday through Saturday, year-round.

S.P.

Contact: food@sevendaysvt.com The kitchen at Bread & Butter Farm

e m u l o v e h t p i Turn e’re on VPR! —w

BUCKETS & BEERS

SEVEN DAYS

Music for Sprouts — has several offerings that are entirely out of the ordinary. For instance, how many farm stands have their very own pop-up coffee shop? Bread & Butter houses Blank Page Café, which offers brewed coffee, gluten-free baked goods and supertrendy butter coffee that’s flavored with maple or chocolate. (On a recent day, after consuming nothing but a maple butter coffee from Blank Page, this writer was able to visit three other farm stands, climb a small mountain and forage for Japanese knotweed without getting hungry.) B&B also has a particularly plentiful selection of products, even in the shoulder seasons. One week in early May there were six varieties of greens, including tender young collards, along with plenty of roots, raw honey, herb bread from Jeffersonville’s Slowfire Bakery and Green Rabbit salad dressings. Several freezers consistently hold a plethora of meats from B&B and other local farms. Nonedible goods are available, too: onesies for babies, a healing salve for dry skin and leather bags made by Vera Simon-Nobes (who also works with Shelburne Farms and Philo Ridge Farm). B&B is gearing up for its seventh summer season of Burger Nights. These popular gatherings on Fridays feature burgers, seasonal salads, desserts and live music.

n to R CAFÉ and liste Tune into the VP out od writers talk ab the Seven Days fo ing ap ns and people sh the farms, kitche t t food scene. Visi Vermont’s vibran cy your local frequen VPR.NET or find ten. lis AT 10:45 A.M. to select SUNDAYS

52 FOOD

Tuesday Nights at Juniper $40 includes a bucket of fried chicken, sides & a 32 oz growler of beer - while supplies last! Untitled-4 1

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food+drink

Kick the keg... for the kids.

TASTY BITS FROM THE CALENDAR AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Friday, May 26th Come by Fire and Ice and drink a 2nd Fiddle Double IPA from Fiddlehead Brewing! One-hundred percent of proceeds will benefit the Vermont Children’s Hospital. 4:30pm kegs will be tapped. Come early to be a part of this wonderful fundraiser!

Fire & Ice

Vermont’s Iconic steakhouse 26 Seymour Street | Middlebury | 802.388.7166 | fireandicerestaurant.com 4T-fireandice051717.indd 1

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FOOD 53

TRUCK STOP: In a sure sign of spring, mobile kitchens converge in Burlington’s South End and dish mouthwatering meals and libations. Live music and a full bar add to the fun. Fridays starting May 19, 5-10 p.m., ArtsRiot, Burlington. Cost of food and drink. Info, artsriot.com.

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SEVEN DAYS

ROSÉ RELEASE PARTY: Drink pink at an industrystyle tasting featuring more than a dozen spring-appropriate wines. Friday, May 19, 5-8 p.m., Cork Wine Bar & Market, Waterbury. $20. Info, 882-8227.

GROWN!

Harpoon

05.17.17-05.24.17

GREEN MOUNTAIN BEER WEEK: Through Sunday, May 21, various locations statewide. Cost of food and drink. Info, vermontbrewers.com/events.

$14.99

WE HAVE

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Celebrate American Craft Beer Week with tours and pours hosted by the 40-odd brewer-members of the Vermont Brewers Association. Put some cheese in your steez with pairing plates — some available all week, others happening for one night only — at Otter Creek Brewing, Zero Gravity Craft Brewery and Simple Roots Brewing, among others. Or sample Tulach Leis, a rare Flemish brett sour, all week at Vermont Pub & Brewery. Then trek to Newport on Friday, May 19, and learn the history and practice of making sap beer with Kingdom Brewing’s Brian Cook and TJ Greenwood from Lawson’s Finest Liquids. Looking to sample suds from several breweries at once? Hit up Bar Antidote in Vergennes, Waterbury’s Blackback Pub, South Royalton’s Worthy Burger or Doc Ponds in Stowe, all of which are devoting their draft lines to Vermont beers for the week. Check the brewers’ association website for a full list of patio parties, can drops, pairing dinners and tap takeovers.

PLANT SALE: Freshen up your garden with perennials, herbs, veggies and annuals. Proceeds benefit housing and programming for former prison inmates at the Dismas House of Vermont. Wednesday, May 17-Saturday, May 20, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., 1033 Pine Street, Burlington. Info, 658-0381.

Von Trapp Variety

in the market!


Seasonal Selection

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WED.17

agriculture

CHARLIE NARDOZZI: The gardening guru heard on Vermont Public Radio plants a seed in “Growing an Edible Landscape Without Sacrificing the Beauty.” Bixby Memorial Library, Vergennes, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 877-2211. PLANT SALE IN BROOKFIELD: Green thumbs take their pick of more than 300 varieties of certified organic seedlings including veggies, herbs, dye plants and flowers. Arc of the Eye Organic Farm & Nursery, Brookfield, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 276-3839. PLANT SALE IN BURLINGTON: Gardeners grab up perennials, herbs, veggies and annuals. Proceeds benefit Dismas House of Vermont. 1033 Pine St., Burlington, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Info, 658-0381.

art

FIGURE DRAWING: Artists sharpen their skills of observation of the human form. Chaffee Art Center, Rutland, 6-8 p.m. $10-15; preregister; limited space. Info, 775-0356.

business

KELLEY MARKETING GROUP BREAKFAST MEETING: New members are welcome at a brainstorming session for marketing, advertising and communications professionals. Room 217, Ireland Building, Champlain College, Burlington, 7:45-9 a.m. Free. Info, 864-4067.

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

VERMONT BUSINESSES FOR SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY SPRING CONFERENCE: Jason Haber, author of The Business of Good: Social Entrepreneurship and the New Bottom Line, keynotes a day of workshops, exhibitors and exploration of the theme “The Road Forward.” Davis Center, University of Vermont, Burlington, 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. $150-200. Info, 862-8347.

dance

BEGINNER CONTEMPORARY BALLET CLASS: Developing dancers find their footing in a level-one lesson. North End Studio C, Burlington, noon-1:30 p.m. $10. Info, 310-467-5879. CONTEMPORARY BALLET, LEVEL 2: Dancers take their skills to the next level with a dedicated instructor. North End Studio C, Burlington, 1:30-3 p.m. $10. Info, 310-467-5879. DROP-IN HIP-HOP DANCE: Beginners are welcome at a groove session inspired by infectious beats. Swan Dojo, Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m. $15. Info, 540-8300.

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etc.

GREENER DRINKS: Supporters of common-sense cannabis reform sip beverages and discuss the culture, industry and politics of the agricultural product. Zenbarn, Waterbury, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, info@vtcannabisbrands.com.

film

SEVEN DAYS

Sunday, May 21, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., at Plant Spirit Farm & Fibers in Brookfield. Free. Info, 276-3839. floatingbridgefoodandfarms.com

food & drink

1970S COOK-OFF: Inspired by the exhibit “Freaks, Radicals and Hippies: Counterculture in 1970s Vermont,” contestants whip up original dishes or pull from Ginny Callan’s Horn of the Moon Cookbook. Vermont History Center, Barre, 6-8 p.m. $5-10; preregister. Info, 479-8500. COMMUNITY DINNER: Diners get to know their neighbors over tasty fare. O’Brien Community Center, Winooski, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 655-4565. COMMUNITY SUPPER: A scrumptious spread connects friends and neighbors. Bring a dessert to share. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 5-5:45 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 300. GREEN MOUNTAIN BEER WEEK: Participating Vermont breweries join the nation in celebrating American Craft Beer Week with tours, special releases, food and beverage pairings, and tap takeovers. See vermontbrewers.com for details. Various locations statewide. Prices vary. Info, 310-6942.

MAY 21 | AGRICULTURE

VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: Local products — think produce, breads, pastries, cheeses, wines, syrups, jewelry, crafts and beauty supplies — draw shoppers to a diversified bazaar. Depot Park, Rutland, 3-6 p.m. Free. Info, 342-4727.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: Strategic players have fun with the popular card game. Burlington Bridge Club, Williston, 9:15 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. $6. Info, 872-5722. CHESS CLUB: Strategy comes into play as competitors try to capture opposing game pieces. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

health & fitness

BACKYARD BOOT CAMP: Ma’am, yes, ma’am! Exercise expert Ginger Lambert guides active bodies in an interval-style workout to build strength and cardiovascular fitness. Private residence, Middlebury, 7-8 a.m. $12. Info, 343-7160. WED.17

54 CALENDAR

SPRING HOEDOWN — PLANT SALE & FARMERS MARKET

MOVING PICTURES: FILMS ABOUT IMMIGRATION: Film fanatics take in tales of uprooted people. Call for details. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

COURTESY OF DEVIL’S BOWL SPEEDWAY MEDIA

M A Y

Pasture-raised meat, beeswax candles and wearable fiber art are just a small sampling of the locally produced goods up for grabs at the Spring Hoedown — Plant Sale & Farmers Market. Hosted by Plant Spirit Farm & Fibers and members of the Floating Bridge Food & Farms co-op, this agricultural affair offers more than 300 varieties of certified organic seedlings. Representatives from Green Mountain Girls Farm proffer produce while Brookfield Bees boasts honey, syrup and soaps. Fiber fanatics find plant-dyed textiles and free weaving and dyeing demos with Plant Spirit’s Jennifer Johnson. A noontime concert by fiddler Katie Trautz and friends tops off the farm-fresh fun.

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List your upcoming event here for free! SUBMISSION DEADLINES: ALL SUBMISSIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY THURSDAY AT NOON FOR CONSIDERATION IN THE FOLLOWING WEDNESDAY’S NEWSPAPER. FIND OUR CONVENIENT FORM AND GUIDELINES AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT. YOU CAN ALSO EMAIL US AT CALENDAR@SEVENDAYSVT.COM. TO BE LISTED, YOU MUST INCLUDE THE NAME OF EVENT, A BRIEF DESCRIPTION, SPECIFIC LOCATION, DATE, TIME, COST AND CONTACT PHONE NUMBER.

CALENDAR EVENTS IN SEVEN DAYS: LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY KRISTEN RAVIN. SEVEN DAYS EDITS FOR SPACE AND STYLE. DEPENDING ON COST AND OTHER FACTORS, CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS MAY BE LISTED IN EITHER THE CALENDAR OR THE CLASSES SECTION. WHEN APPROPRIATE, CLASS ORGANIZERS MAY BE ASKED TO PURCHASE A CLASS LISTING.

Race fans, start your engines! The annual Devil’s Bowl Downtown car show rolls into Rutland on Sunday, giving gearheads the chance to check out stock-car racing machines and chat with local drivers. The high-octane fun kicks off at the new Ground Round Grill & Bar, where cars are on display before motoring to Merchants Row for further viewing. At 2 p.m., racers get behind the wheel for a parade down city streets. Motorsports maniacs can then make their way to the Devil’s Bowl Speedway Dirt Track in West Haven and watch as fast-trackers take laps during an open practice session.

DEVIL’S BOWL DOWNTOWN Sunday, May 21, 9 a.m., in downtown Rutland. Free. Info, 265-3112. devilsbowlspeedwayvt.com


Beats and Brews

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Scrolling through singer Sara Evans’ Twitter feed, one thing is obvious: The pop-country superstar is pumped for the future. “I’m so excited to launch my own record label: Born to Fly Records! I’ve been busy working on my new album & can’t wait to share it with you!” she tweeted on April 24. Due in July, Evans’ new record, titled Words, is stacked

with female songwriters — Ashley Monroe and Lady Antebellum’s Hillary Scott, to name a couple — and moving messages. Well-known numbers such as “Suds in the Bucket” and “A Little Bit Stronger” get boots tapping at Rutland’s Paramount Theatre.

HEAVYFEST 7 Saturday, May 20, 1-6 p.m., at Magic Hat Artifactory in South Burlington. $5. Info, info@ bigheavyworld.com. magichat.net

SARA EVANS Sunday, May 21, 8 p.m., at Paramount Theatre in Rutland. $26-56. Info, 775-0903. paramountvt. org

COURTESY OF JMS ART & PHOTO

Flying High

Beer and bands go hand in hand at Heavyfest 7, an annual benefit bash for the nonprofit music-community organization Big Heavy World. Brewers lead hourly tours of the Magic Hat Artifactory while an all-star lineup of local musical talent takes to an outdoor stage. Funk-fusion quintet Casio Bastard, art rockers Evil People, reggae ensemble Steady Betty, and the high-energy Hayley Jane and the Primates (pictured) keep the beat before headliners Soule Monde serve up jazz-funk stylings. Festivalgoers can fill their bellies with food-truck fare and suds from an outdoor beer garden, and feast their eyes on a live art expo by Burlington creative Jason Tooth.

MAY 21 | MUSIC

MAY 20 | FAIRS & FESTIVALS

PEDAL METAL TO THE

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

MAY 21 | ETC.

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calendar WED.17

1 large, 1-topping pizza, 12 boneless wings OR new fried buffalo chicken ravioli, 2 liter Coke product

$19.99

2 large, 1-topping pizzas & 2-liter Coke product

$24.99

NIA WITH LINDA: Eclectic music and movements drawn from healing, martial and dance arts propel an animated barefoot workout. South End Studio, Burlington, 8:30-9:30 a.m. $14; free for first-timers. Info, 372-1721.

STORY TIME WITH A TWIST: Wee ones get the wiggles and giggles out with Ms. Liza. Highgate Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 868-3970. TODDLER TIME: With activities ranging from Legos and PlayDoh to stories and snacks, little ones and their caregivers find plenty of ways to play. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 745-1391.

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Check us out on Facebook & Instagram!

INSIGHT MEDITATION: Attendees absorb Buddhist principles and practices. Wellspring Mental Health and Wellness Center, Hardwick, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 472-6694.

STORY TIME & PLAYGROUP: Engrossing plots unfold into fun activities for tots ages 6 and younger. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

FRI.1

Plus tax. Pick-up or delivery only. Expires 5/31/17. Limit: 1 offer per customer per day.

GENTLE TAI CHI: Madeleine Piat-Landolt guides students in a sequence of poses with an emphasis on relaxation and alignment. Champlain Senior Center, McClure Multigenerational Center, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 658-3585.

YOGA FOR KIDS: Young yogis ages 2 through 5 strike a pose to improve balance and flexibility. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216.

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Richmond Free Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 434-3036.

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PILATES: Active bodies uti973 Roosevelt Highway lize core strength, build body AD Colchester • 655-5550 EL TO awareness, improve posture, EM IS HR YE www.threebrotherspizzavt.com FC RS gain stamina and alleviate pain O Y & DA NC E RS | C O U RT ES with this innovative system of exercise. language Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 7:15-8:15 a.m. BEGINNER ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASS: $10. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com. Students build a foundation in reading, speaking 12v-threebros050317.indd 1 4/13/17 10:55 AM RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: Folks in recovery and writing. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30and their families enrich mind, body and spirit in an 8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211. all-levels class. All props are provided; wear loose GERMAN CONVERSATION GROUP: Community clothing. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 10:30members practice conversing auf Deutsch. Local 11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 861-3150. History Room, Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, RESTORATIVE GENTLE YOGA: Individuals with injuries or other challenges feel the benefits of a relaxing and nourishing practice. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 8:30-9:30 a.m. $10. Info, studio@ zenbarnvt.com.

presents

SUNRISE YOGA: Participants of all levels enjoy slowing down, moving mindfully and breathing deeply while building strength and stamina on the mat. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 6-7 a.m. $10. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com.

AT BURLINGTON May THU 18 7PM

56 CALENDAR

SEVEN DAYS

05.17.17-05.24.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

SAT 20 11AM

TAI CHI CLASS: Folks renew body, mind and spirit by learning Yang-style long-form postures, qigong, partner practice and yin/yang principles. McClure Multigenerational Center, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. $15. Info, 453-3690.

DAVE RANDALL: SOUND SYSTEM

Explore the political power of music.

FOREVER GARDEN STORY TIME

All ages welcome for a story and activity presented in partnership with City Market. Free.

TUE 23 7PM

KATE LAUD: LUSCIOUS

THU 25 7PM

GARRETT GRAFF: RAVEN ROCK

Onion River Press book launch. Free.

TUE 6 7PM

Discover the government’s secret plans to survive a catastrophic attack.

YOGA NIDRA: THE YOGA OF DEEP RELAXATION: Savitri Devi Dasi leads students into a state of deep meditation, which brings profound calmness, quietness and relaxation. Bring a blanket and something comfortable to lie on. Cavendish Gallery, Burlington, 7:30-8:30 p.m. $10-15. Info, 206-557-9850.

MARK PENDERGRAST: CITY ON THE VERGE

ZUMBA EXPRESS: A shortened version of this guided beat-driven workout gives students a much-needed midday surge of energy. Marketplace Fitness, Burlington, 11:30 a.m.-noon. $12; free for members and first-timers. Info, 651-8773.

Vermont book launch!

BILL SCHUBART: LILA AND THERON

kids

Book launch celebration!

Burlington events are ticketed unless otherwise indicated. Your $3 ticket comes with a coupon for $5 off the featured book. Ticket proceeds go to Vermont Foodbank! 191 Bank Street, Downtown Burlington • 802.448.3350 21 Essex Way, Essex • 802.872.7111 www.phoenixbooks.biz

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VINYASA YOGA: Salutations, standing poses, seated poses, backbends and inversions are on the agenda in a class for all experience levels. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 5:45-6:45 p.m. $10. Info, 244-8134. WEDNESDAY NIGHT SOUND BATH: Draw in the good vibrations of gongs, bowls and didgeridoos — a relaxing sonic massage to get you through the week. The Wellness Collective, Burlington, 7:30-9 p.m. $15. Info, 510-697-7790.

June THU 1 7PM

UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT NURSING STUDENT VISITS: Presentations on different types of healthy lifestyles promote well-being. Champlain Senior Center, McClure Multigenerational Center, Burlington, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 658-3585.

LEGO CHALLENGE: Kids tackle construction tasks with colorful blocks. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 745-1391. READ TO A DOG: Book hounds ages 5 through 10 curl up with a good story and a furry friend. Fairfax Community Library, 3:15-4:15 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 849-2420. RICHMOND STORY TIME: Lit lovers ages 2 through 5 are introduced to the wonderful world of reading.

5/12/17 12:26 PM

6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211. INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: Pupils improve their speaking and grammar mastery. Private residence, Burlington, 6 p.m. $20. Info, 324-1757. INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASS: Learners take communication to the next level. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211. LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: SPANISH: Hola! Language lovers perfect their fluency. KelloggHubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

montréal

‘MILLION DOLLAR QUARTET’: Rock hits such as “Blue Suede Shoes” fuel a dramatization of the recording session that brought together Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins. Segal Centre for Performing Arts, Montréal, 8 p.m. $51-65. Info, 514-739-7944.

music

THE DAVYDOV-FANNING DUO: Longtime collaborators Diana Fanning and Dieuwke Davydov showcase their virtuosity in a program for piano and cello. Stowe Community Church, noon. Free. Info, 253-7792. SONG CIRCLE: Singers and musicians congregate for an acoustic session of popular folk tunes. Godnick Adult Center, Rutland, 7:15-9:15 p.m. Donations. Info, 775-1182.

seminars

LIVING WITH ALZHEIMER’S FOR LATE-STAGE CAREGIVERS: Professionals provide strategies for safe, effective and comfortable care. University of Vermont Medical Center Memory Program, Colchester, 5:30-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 800-272-3900.

sports

WOMEN’S PICKUP BASKETBALL: Ladies dribble up and down the court during an evening of friendly competition. Lyman C. Hunt Middle School, Burlington, 8:15-9:30 p.m. $3; preregister at meetup.com. Info, carmengeorgevt@gmail.com.

talks

CURRENT EVENTS CONVERSATION: Newsworthy subjects take the spotlight in this informal and open discussion. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 11 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 878-4918.

tech

TECH HELP WITH CLIF: Electronics novices develop skill sets applicable to smartphones, tablets and other gadgets. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, noon & 1 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-6955.

theater

‘MAMMA MIA!’: Timeless tunes by ABBA are the backbone of Northern Stage’s production of this high-energy musical about a bride-to-be searching for her father. Barrette Center for the Arts, White River Junction, 7:30 p.m. $15-55. Info, 296-7000.

words

WEDNESDAY WORKSHOP: Lit lovers analyze works-in-progress penned by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup. com; limited space. Info, 383-8104. WRITE NOW: Wordsmiths let their creativity flow freely at a monthly meeting. Chaffee Art Center, Rutland, 6:30-9 p.m. $15-20; preregister; limited space. Info, 775-0356. WRITING CIRCLE: Prompts lead into a 30-minute free write and sharing opportunities without judgment. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 303.

THU.18

agriculture

PLANT SALE: See WED.17, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

art

OPEN STUDIO: Friends new and old convene for a creative session. Expressive Arts Burlington, 12:302:30 p.m. $15. Info, 343-8172. PHOTO CO-OP: Lensmen and -women gather to share their experience and knowledge of their craft. River Arts, Morrisville, 6-8 p.m. $5. Info, 888-1261. PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB: Shutterbugs develop their picture-taking skills. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. PRINT YOUR VERMONT: Using an antique printing press, visitors make relief prints that reflect their Green Mountain State communities. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Special admission, $7-14; free for members. Info, 985-3346.

bazaars

NEWBERRY MARKET: Shoppers browse specialty foods, clothing, pottery, décor, collectibles and more at a weekly indoor bazaar. Newberry Market, White River Junction, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. Info, 299-0212.

business

LEGAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR NEW BUSINESS OWNERS: A high-level overview of legal matters helps entrepreneurs avoid common mistakes. Center for Women & Enterprise, Burlington, noon-2 p.m. Free. Info, 391-4870. NIBBLES, NETWORKING & KNOWLEDGE: Entrepreneurs gain tools for success in a one-two punch workshop on topics such as leveraging Google, creating action plans and building a profitable business. Best Western Waterbury-Stowe, 1-4 p.m. $20; free for members of participating chambers and organizations. Info, 882-8191. STRIKE NIGHT: Lake Champlain Regional Chamber members and business community partners mingle over a round of tenpin. Cocktails and appetizers fuel the fun. Spare Time Family Fun Center, Colchester, 5:30-7:30 p.m. $12-20 includes shoe rental, food and one drink. Info, 863-3489.

community

COMMUNITY DISCUSSION: Area residents chew the fat over the values of space and community growth. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Free. Info, 888-4928218, ext. 303.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

crafts

BOOKBINDING FOR BEGINNERS: Nicole Vance facilitates the construction of one-of-a-kind pads using the Japanese stab binding technique. Fairfax Community Library, 5:30-7:30 p.m. $10; preregister. Info, 849-2420. MOUNT MANSFIELD SCALE MODELERS: Hobbyists break out the superglue and sweat the small stuff at a miniature construction skill swap. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 879-0765.

dance

ADULT AERIAL DANCE CONDITIONING: With or without previous experience, folks forge strength, grace and confidence in the air. North End Studio B, Burlington, 10-11:30 a.m. $15. Info, 863-6713. FOR REAL WOMEN SERIES WITH BELINDA: GIT UR FREAK ON: R&B and calypso-dancehall music is the soundtrack to an empowering sensual dance session aimed at confronting body shaming. Swan Dojo, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. $15. Info, bestirredfitness@gmail.com. SWING DANCE: Beginners work their brains and bodies in and easy-to-follow class. A postlesson practice session keeps dancers on their toes. Vergennes Opera House, class, 6:30-7:30 p.m.; practice session, 7:30-8:30 p.m. $10. Info, 475-2349.

environment

CITIZEN SCIENCE: Marshfield Conservation Commission representatives recommend ways for community members to participate in projects tracking environmental trends. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

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DANCE, PAINT, WRITE: DROP-IN: Teens and adults create, connect, heal and grow through self-guided movement and art set to music. Expressive Arts Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. $20; free for first-timers. Info, 343-8172. POSTNATAL SELF-EMPOWERMENT: Mothers and babes-in-arms circle up for a reflective session centered on embracing one’s self and family amid the chaos of daily life. Prenatal Method Studio, Burlington, noon-1 p.m. $10-20. Info, 829-0211.

Pentangle Arts youth programming and entertainment by the Woodstock Union High School Jazz Funk Band. Cloudland Farm Restaurant, Woodstock, 6-8 p.m. $100; preregister. Info, 457-3981.

games

CHITTENDEN COUNTY CHESS CLUB: Checkmate! Strategic thinkers make calculated moves as they vie for their opponents’ kings. Faith United Methodist Church, South Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 324-1143. POKÉMON LEAGUE: I choose you, Pikachu! Players of the trading-card game earn weekly and monthly prizes in a fun, friendly environment where newbies can be coached by league leaders. Brap’s Magic, Burlington, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0498.

health & fitness

‘ARTS AND HEALTH: RESEARCH, PRACTICE AND EXPERIENCE’: From the patient experience to staff well-being to overall outcomes, an expert discussion familiarizes attendees with the benefits of creativity in health care. Davis Auditorium, Medical Education Center Pavilion, University of Vermont Medical Center, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 656-9266.

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BEGINNERS TAI CHI CLASS: Students get a feel for the ancient Chinese practice. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 223-3322. CHAIR YOGA: Yogis limber up with modified poses. Champlain Senior Center, McClure Multigenerational Center, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 316-1510. COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS: A 20-minute guided practice with Andrea O’Connor alleviates stress and tension. Tea and a discussion follow. Winooski Senior Center, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 233-1161. CORNWALL FITNESS BOOT CAMP: Interval training helps participants improve strength, agility, endurance and cardiovascular fitness. Cornwall Town Hall, 9-10 a.m. $12. Info, 343-7160. FORZA: THE SAMURAI SWORD WORKOUT: Students sculpt lean muscles and gain mental focus when using wooden replicas of the weapon. North End Studio A, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. $10. Info, 578-9243.

film

‘THE LOCAL MOTIVE’: A six-part PBS series digs into aspects of Vermont’s local food system. Heartbeet Lifesharing, Hardwick, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, director@ vermontarthouse.org.

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MINDFULNESS MEDITATION: A peaceful, guided meditation helps participants achieve a sense of stability and calm. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 777-8602. YOGA: A Sangha Studio instructor guides students who are in recovery toward achieving inner tranquility. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 5-6 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

food & drink

GREEN MOUNTAIN BEER WEEK: See WED.17.

ROYALTON FARMERS MARKET: A cornucopia of farm-fresh fare catches shoppers’ eyes. South Royalton Town Green, 3-6 p.m. Free. Info, 763-8302.

YOUTH IN ARTS SPRING BENEFIT DINNER: Patrons of the arts are treated to a three-course farm-to-table meal, a preview of upcoming

BABY & TODDLER PLAYGROUP: Parents connect while kids ages 3 and younger enjoy toys, stories, challah and juice. Social Hall, Ohavi Zedek Synagogue, Burlington, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, grace@ohavizedek.org. FLOWERS & FAIRY HOUSES: Imaginative kiddos and their adult companions embark on a whimsical adventure into a miniature world of spring blooms and sprites. Sugarhouse Parking Area. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 9-10:30 a.m. $8-10 per adult/kid pair; $4 per additional kid; preregister. Info, 434-3068. LAURIE FOREST: Bookworms are spellbound by a talk on the Vermont author’s new young adult novel, The Black Witch. Phoenix Books Rutland, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 855-8078. THU.18

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VERMONT EMPLOYER SUPPORT OF THE GUARD & RESERVE BREAKFAST: Community members get the facts about the future commitments of Vermont’s Guardsmen. Capitol Plaza Hotel & Conference Center, Montpelier, 8:30-10 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 338-4187.

kids

SEVEN DAYS

IN-STORE TASTING: PET-NAT: Crisp, sparkly wines please palates. Dedalus Wine Shop, Market & Wine Bar, Burlington, 4-7 p.m. Free. Info, 865-2368.

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‘NATIONAL BIRD’: A 2016 documentary turns the lens FR S toward three whistleblowers who I.1 RT 9| YOGA PILATES THERAPY: A class for CE MU spoke up about the United States’ CON SIC | CAPITAL CITY beginners is tailored to suit the needs drone program. A discussion with Peace of students looking to improve their posture & Justice Center representatives follows. and overall wellbeing. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 7-8:30 p.m. 8:30-9:30 a.m. $10. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com. Free. Info, 223-3338.

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language

BEGINNER-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: Basic communication skills are on the agenda at a guided lesson. Private residence, Burlington, 6 p.m. $20. Info, 324-1757. FRENCH CONVERSATION: Speakers improve their linguistic dexterity in the Romantic tongue. Bradford Public Library, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 222-4536. FRENCH THURSDAY: SOCIAL HOUR: Francophones fine-tune their French-language conversation skills over cocktails. Bar, Bleu Northeast Seafood, Burlington, 5-7 p.m. $4; free for Alliance Française members. Info, michelineatremblay@gmail.com. LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: FRENCH: Bag lunches in hand, attendees brush up on their linguistic abilities. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

FLYNN SHOW CHOIRS: More than 80 of Vermont’s top singers, actors and dancers ages 9 through 18 perform Broadway favorites and pop hits with live accompaniment. FlynnSpace, Burlington, 6 & 8 p.m. $12-16. Info, 863-5966. YUNG $ETH: The rapper spits rhymes on songs such as “Way Up” and “Mom.” ArtsRiot, Burlington, 9 p.m. $10-12. Info, 540-0406.

seminars

NATURAL MARSHFIELD: Wildlife experts uncover the wonders of the local environment. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

sports

CREATING CONSISTENCY IN YOUR RUNNING PRACTICE: Certified running instructor Sarah Richardson helps on-again, off-again joggers make strides toward a steady routine. Community Room, Hunger Mountain Coop, Montpelier, 6-7:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, info@hungermountain.coop.

SHOEFLY TRAIL RUNNING SERIES: Runners and walkers break a sweat on one-mile, 5K and 10K excursions on Northeast Kingdom trails. See shoeflytrailrun.org for details. 5 p.m. $45 for the series; free for kids under 10; preregister. Info, julie@shoeflytrailrun.org.

talks

PEACE VIGIL: Friends and neighbors come together, bringing along their signs and their hearts. Top of Church St., Burlington, 5-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 899-1731.

agriculture

PLANT SALE: See WED.17, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

art

ART 100: Original art is up for grabs during an “everyone wins” raffle. Catered eats and a cash bar round out this benefit for River Arts. Gallery at River Arts, Morrisville, 6-9 p.m. $100 includes admission for two. Info, 888-1261.

bazaars

SPRING RUMMAGE SALE: Bargain shoppers browse a wide array of secondhand treasures. Fletcher Farm School for the Arts & Crafts, Ludlow, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 228-3663.

community

FEAST TOGETHER OR FEAST TO GO: Senior citizens and their guests catch up over a shared meal. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, noon-1 p.m. $7-9; preregister. Info, 262-6288.

dance

ADELE MYERS & DANCERS: Combining interactive illumination and original music, the movement ensemble brings The Dancing Room to an intimate setting. FlynnSpace, Burlington, 7 & 9 p.m. $25. Info, 863-5966. BALLROOM & LATIN DANCING: Learn new moves with Ballroom Nights, then join others in a dance social featuring the waltz, tango and more. Singles, couples and beginners are welcome. Williston Jazzercise Fitness Center, lesson, 7-8 p.m.; dance social, 8-9:30 p.m. $10-14; $8 for dance only. Info, 862-2269.

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CONTEMPORARY DANCE & FITNESS STUDIO PERFORMANCE: Movers of all .2 U 0 M ages twist and twirl through a vari|M LY US I M IC | ety of forms in this annual showcase. &E CARO L IN E C O T T E R Barre Opera House, 7 p.m. $12-15. Info, tech 476-8188. TECH SUPPORT: Need an email account? Want to ECSTATIC DANCE VERMONT: Jubilant motions with enjoy ebooks? Bring your phone, tablet or laptop to the Green Mountain Druid Order inspire divine cona weekly help session. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, nections. Christ Episcopal Church, Montpelier, 7-9 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-8291, ext. 302. p.m. $10. Info, 505-8011.

theater

‘MAMMA MIA!’: See WED.17, 2 & 7:30 p.m. NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: ‘OBSESSION’: Passion and destruction ensue when a handsome drifter played by Jude Law falls for a married woman in this on-screen production. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. $16-25. Info, 748-2600. NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: ‘WHO’S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF?’: Sonia Friedman Productions presents a broadcast staging of Edward Albee’s

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INFINITUS — RUGGED TRAIL RACES 888K: A course covering more than 551 miles puts endurance runners through the ringer. Blueberry Hill Ski Center, Goshen, 8:08 a.m. $675. Info, jack@ endurancesociety.org.

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ENGLISH COUNTRY DANCE: Joyce Crouch, Char Morgan, and Sarah Babbitt Spaeth provide music for casually dressed newcomers and experienced movers alike. Wendy Gilchrist and Val Medve call the steps. Elley-Long Music Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 7-9:30 p.m. $10-15; bring a snack to share. Info, 899-2378.

‘GO WEST’: The Marx Brothers saddle up for a wild ride in this classic musical comedy shown on 16mm film. The 1977 drama The Blue Hotel and a 1968 “Star Trek” episode also grace the silver screen. Newman Center, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 7 p.m. Donations. Info, serious_61@yahoo.com.

REMEDIES FOR DETOXIFICATION & PERSONAL GROWTH: Taoist clinical medicine expert Baylen Slote shares holistic tools for healthy physiology. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581. TAI CHI: Instructor Shaina shares the fundamentals Yang Style, including standing and moving postures. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 9-10 a.m. $10. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com.

kids

ACORN CLUB STORY TIME: Little ones up to age 4 gather for read-aloud tales. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 748-8291.

food & drink

CHELSEA FARMERS MARKET: A long-standing town-green tradition supplies shoppers with eggs, cheese, vegetables and fine crafts. North Common, Chelsea, 3-6 p.m. Free. Info, 299-1280. GREEN MOUNTAIN BEER WEEK: See WED.17.

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SEVEN DAYS

ORAL STORYTELLING WORKSHOP: Wordsmiths join Burlington Writers Workshop members in a “Moth”-style exploration of telling tales for live audiences. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104.

RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: See WED.17.

FANTASIA OF COLOR IN EARLY CINEMA: Film buffs are transported to a time before Technicolor with dazzling hand-colored cinema from the 1890s through the 1910s. Loew Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 7 p.m. Free. Info, 603-646-2422.

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‘MILLION DOLLAR QUARTET’: See WED.17.

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DAVE RANDALL: The musician and author brings years of touring, protesting and performing to his 2017 book Sound System: The Political Power of Music. Phoenix Books Burlington, 7 p.m. $3. Info, 448-3350.

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ARNIE KOZAK: “Mindfulness With a Capital ‘M’: Focus, Goodness and Peace for an Uncertain World,” presented by the psychotherapist, promotes a peaceful way of engaging with challenging situations. Dealer.com, Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 488-6912.

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LYNDON FARMERS MARKET: Vendors proffer a rotation of fresh veggies, meats, cheeses and more. Bandstand Park, Lyndonville, 3-6 p.m. Free. Info, lyndonfarmersmarket@gmail.com. ROSÉ RELEASE PARTY: Oenophiles drink pink at an industry-style tasting of 16-plus varieties. Cork Wine Bar & Market, Waterbury, 5-8 p.m. $20. Info, 882-8227. TRUCK STOP: Mobile kitchens dish out mouthwatering meals and libations. Live music and a full bar add to the fun. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 5-10 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 540-0406.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.17, 9:15 a.m.

health & fitness

ACUDETOX: Attendees in recovery undergo acupuncture to the ear to propel detoxification. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150. ADVANCED TAI CHI CLASS: Folks keep active with a sequence of slow, controlled movements. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3322. FITNESS FLOW YOGA: All types of athletes can build strength, increase flexibility and prevent injuries with a moderate-to-vigorous vinyasa flow. Colchester Health & Fitness, 5:30-6:30 p.m. $15; free for members. Info, 860-1010. FREESTYLE DANCE FITNESS: Jumps, flips, spins, kicks and squats set to high-energy music help students shake awake their chi. Railyard Yoga Studio, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. $14. Info, railyardyoga@ gmail.com. GUIDED PARTNER THAI YOGA BODYWORK: Lori Flower of Karmic Connection teaches techniques for relaxation and rejuvenation. Community Room, Hunger Mountain Coop, Montpelier, 6-7 p.m. $8-10; preregister. Info, info@hungermountain.coop. KUNDALINI YOGA: Rhythmic movements combined with deep stretches, breathing techniques and meditation help clear the mind, energize the body and uplift the spirit. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, noon-1:15 p.m. $10. Info, studio@ zenbarnvt.com. MOTOWN FLOW: Yogis of all levels flow, stretch and boogie their way into the weekend with this bodyshaking class set to funky jams. Sangha Studio — North, Burlington, 7-8:30 p.m. $12-15; preregister. Info, 448-4262. QI GONG: Those ages 65 and up are the priority in a beginner-level class complete with seated modifications. Waterbury Public Library, 11-11:30 a.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, 244-7036.

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BIG & MESSY — ART SPACE: Process, not product, is the focus of this parent-child creative session with open-ended art stations. River Arts, Morrisville, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 888-1261.

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IN-STORE TASTING: HAND-CARVED SPANISH HAM: Gastronomes sample slices of sweet, delicious meat. Dedalus Wine Shop, Market & Wine Bar, Burlington, 4-7 p.m. Free. Info, 865-2368.

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ALL-AGES STORY TIME: Babies, toddlers and preschoolers participate in finger plays and action rhymes. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

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EARLY-BIRD MATH STORY TIME: Books, songs and games put a creative twist on mathematics. Community Room, Richmond Free Library, 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 434-3036. FAMILY MOVIE: Parents and tots take their seats for an all-ages flick. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. MUSIC WITH ROBERT: Sing-alongs with Robert Resnik hit all the right notes. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. PLAY GROUP: Crafts and snacks amuse young’uns up to age 5. Doty Memorial Elementary School, Worcester, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, moonsong148@ hotmail.com. STORY TIME: Babies, toddlers and preschoolers drop in for books, rhymes, songs and activities. Winooski Memorial Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 655-6424.

music

ANDERSON / FADER GUITAR DUO: Selections by Bach, Granados, Haydn and Vermont composer Damon Ferrante fill the air. St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church on the Green, Middlebury, 7:30 p.m. $5-15. Info, 388-7200. CAPITAL CITY CONCERTS: Cellist Joel Krosnick and violinist Laurie Smukler are featured in the seasonclosing concert “The Sublime and the Mellifluous.” Champlain Valley Unitarian Universalist Society, Middlebury, 7:30 p.m. $15-25. Info, info@capitalcityconcerts.org. FLYNN SHOW CHOIRS: See THU.18. GEOFF ACHISON: Bluesy notes fill the air by way of the Australian songwriter and guitarist. York Street Meeting House, Lyndon, 7 p.m. $15. Info, 748-2600. ‘THE NEXT GENERATION’: Classical instrumental and vocal training shines in this showcase for talented young musicians. Chandler Music Hall, Randolph, 7:30 p.m. $10-16. Info, 728-6464. PAUL ASBELL: The guitar virtuoso, who has recorded with the likes of Muddy Waters and Bobby McFerrin, shows off his skills on the six-string. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church of St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. $10; free for students. Info, 748 0632. THE ROUGH & TUMBLE: Close harmonies, versatile instrumentation and deliberate songwriting combine in Americana-folk numbers from the duo’s 2016 album Pieces and Pieces. ArtisTree Community Arts Center & Gallery, South Pomfret, 7-9 p.m. $15. Info, 457-3500. VERMONT MOZART FESTIVAL: Chamber players hit all the right notes in “The Haydn Quartets.” Union Elementary School, Montpelier, 7 p.m. $15; free for kids. Info, 598-9520.


FIND FUTURE DATES + UPDATES AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/EVENTS

ZACH NUGENT’S LEGION OF JERRY: An all-star lineup of local musicians jam out. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 9 p.m. $12-15. Info, 540-0406.

outdoors

SPRING MIGRATION BIRD WALKS: Avian enthusiasts explore habitat hot spots in search of warblers, waterfowl and more. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 7-8:30 a.m. $10; free for members. Info, 229-6206.

PLANT & SEED SWAP: Cultivators exchange and purchase herbs, vegetables and perennials. Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism, Montpelier, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 224-7100.

sports

PLANT SALE IN CRAFTSBURY COMMON: Perennials, shrubs, small trees and tomatoes are up for grabs. Church on the Common, Craftsbury Common, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 586-9683.

RUTLAND REGION CHAMBER OF COMMERCE GOLF CLASSIC: Players hit the links and take a swing at a friendly competition. Prizes, an awards barbecue and networking sweeten the deal. Rutland Country Club, 1 p.m. $500 per team of 5. Info, 773-2747.

theater

PLANT SALE IN ST. JOHNSBURY: Kids keep busy at a children’s planting table while grown-ups get their hands dirty with perennials, shrubs and veggies. University of Vermont Extension, St. Johnsbury, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 800-639-2230. TRANS*PLANTS ARE AWESOME, TOO!: Folks show their support for the Pride Center of Vermont by snapping up ornamentals, herbs, vegetables and Green Mountain Mules compost. Pride Center of Vermont, Burlington, 9 a.m.-3:15 p.m. Free. Info, 860-7812.

‘BLACK POWDER’: Big Daddy Bucks Western and his board members aim to build up Boomtown in a rock opera presented by Mickey Western Musick Hall. Off Center for the Dramatic Arts, Burlington, 8 p.m. $11.11. Info, theoffcenter@gmail.com.

WAKE UP THE GARDEN: RECONSTRUCTING MORRILL’S HISTORIC LANDSCAPE: Green thumbs work with the homestead’s gardener to cultivate the plots and beds surrounding the historical home. Justin Morrill Homestead, Strafford, 9 a.m.noon. Free. Info, 765-9630.

NOR’EASTERN SHOWCASE: Vermont Actors’ Repertory Theatre presents contest-winning plays. Discussions follow. Brick Box, Paramount Theatre, Rutland, 7:30 p.m. $20; limited space. Info, 775-0903. ‘OF THE BETTER KIND’: Set in 1910 Burlington, Joy Cohen’s new play follows an artist as he struggles to complete a synagogue mural. This staged reading is presented by Theatre Kavanah. Black Box Theater, Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, 7-9 p.m. $10-25. Info, 503-1132.

words

BROWN BAG BOOK CLUB: Readers voice opinions about Dead Awake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania by Erik Larson. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

FRIDAY MORNING WORKSHOP: Wordsmiths offer constructive criticism on works-in-progress by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104.

Email askathena@sevendaysvt.com with your questions.

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‘OUR MOTHERS, OUR GARDENS’ FAIRY & DEMON DRAWING WORKSHOP: Artist Emily Anderson shares her pen-and-paper technique for banishing personal demons and celebrating uplifting thoughts. No artistic skills necessary! Bluebird Fairies, Burlington, 1-3 p.m. $25. Info, emily@ bluebirdfairies.com.

bazaars

FLEA MARKET: An eclectic mix of used items vie for spots in shoppers’ totes. Farr’s Field, Waterbury, 7 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Info, 882-1919. GARAGE SALE FOR THE BIRDS: Avian enthusiasts stock up on hummingbird feeding station supplies and other accessories. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, 10:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Free. Info, 434-2167. REUSE, REPURPOSE & RECYCLE SALE: Entertainment, kids’ activities and local eats can be found at this bazaar bursting with secondhand scores. Vermont Farmers Food Center, Rutland, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, 302-332-6116.

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BURLINGTON WOMEN VETERANS BOOK GROUP: Those who have served in the U.S. military connect over reading materials and a light dinner. Burlington Lakeside Clinic, 12:30-2 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 657-7092.

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PLANT SALE IN BURLINGTON: See WED.17.

‘AWAY THIS NIGHT’: Feminist theatre traditions thread through three Shakespearean stories of women who cross-dress in student Julie Solomon’s honors thesis production. Moore Theater, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 6 p.m. $4. Info, 603-646-2422.

‘MAMMA MIA!’: See WED.17.

NEED ADVICE ON LOVE, LUST AND LIFE?

PERENNIAL PLANT SWAP: Garden starters change hands at a gathering of green thumbs. No orange daylilies or ditch lilies, please. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 10-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 264-5660.

RUTLAND COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY YARD SALE: Thrifty consumers browse a wide variety of gently used goods. Cheney Hill Community Center, Rutland, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 483-9171. SPRING RUMMAGE SALE: See FRI.19.

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FREE TRADE VS. FAIR TRADE: Locals learn the basics of globalization and how certain policies pave the way for companies to profit at the expense of people and the planet. Peace & Justice Center, Burlington, PJC new volunteer orientation, 2:30 p.m.; presentation, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 863-2345.

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agriculture

CROP MOB: Helping hands ready the land for the growing season. Rain date: May 21. Stray Cat Flower Farm, Burlington, 9 a.m.-noon. Free; preregister. Info, 861-9757.

CONTEMPORARY DANCE & FITNESS STUDIO PERFORMANCE: See FRI.19, 7-10 p.m. CONTRA DANCE: Bill Olson calls the steps at a spirited social dance with music by Audrey & Clayton. Capital City Grange, Berlin, instruction session, 7:35 p.m.; dance, 8-11 p.m. $5-9. Info, 249-7454.

education

JOIN FOR 9 MONTHS AND GET MAY, JUNE, JULY AND AUGUST FOR FREE Expires 5/31/17 cannot be combined with any other offers.

VERMONT LAW SCHOOL COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY: Graduates walk the stage after a speech by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration general counsel Lois J. Schiffer. South Royalton Town Green, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 831-1000.

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NEW NORTH END PLANT SALE: Horticulturalists consult with Red Wagon Plants staff members, who offer gardening advice and assist in the selection of new greenery. Bibens Ace Hardware Store, Burlington, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, 482-4060.

ADELE MYERS & DANCERS: See FRI.19.

SEVEN DAYS

RESIST & REBUILD SUMMIT: Does the news keep you up at night? Twenty groups, workshops and a keynote speaker arm activists with tools for saving the planet and its people. Montpelier High School, 11:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 279-7222.

QUEEN CITY MEMORY CAFÉ: People with memory loss accompany their caregivers for coffee, conversation and entertainment. Thayer House, Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 656-4220.

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VERMONT TECHNICAL COLLEGE APPLIED SCIENCE PROGRAMS COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY: Vermont Tech alumnus Dennis Grimard addresses outgoing students. Vermont Technical College, Randolph, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 728-1212.

BURLINGTON FARMERS MARKET: Dozens of stands overflow with seasonal produce, flowers, artisan wares and prepared foods. Burlington City Hall Park, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, burlingtonfarmersmarket.org@gmail.com.

environment

CAPITAL CITY FARMERS MARKET: Meats and cheeses join farm-fresh produce, baked goods, and locally made arts and crafts. 60 State Street, Montpelier, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 793-8347.

SARANAC RIVER TRAIL CLEAN-UP: SUNY Plattsburgh alumni, students, faculty, staff and friends pitch in to beautify the path. Memorial Field. SUNY Plattsburgh, N.Y., 9 a.m.-noon. Free; preregister. Info, 518-564-2090.

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CHOCOLATE TASTING: With the help of a tasting guide, chocoholics of all ages discover the flavor profiles of four different confections. Lake Champlain Chocolates Factory Store & Café, Burlington, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 864-1807.

CARS & COFFEE UPPER VALLEY: Auto enthusiasts talk shop over cups of joe while checking out rides ranging from motorcycles to Teslas. Weather permitting. The Tuckerbox, White River Junction, 8-11 a.m. Free. Info, adam@adamchandler.me.

GREEN MOUNTAIN BEER WEEK: See WED.17.

INDEPENDENT COMMUNITY MEETING PLACE: Brainstorming leads to forming activity groups for hobbies such as flying stunt kites and playing music. Presto Music Store, South Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 658-0030.

NEWPORT FARMERS MARKET: Pickles, meats, eggs, fruits, veggies, herbs and baked goods are a small sampling of the seasonal bounty. Causeway, Newport, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 274-8206.

PANCAKE BREAKFAST & BALLOON LAUNCH: Families start the day with stacks of flapjacks drenched in maple syrup, then watch as airborne carriers go up, up and away. Post Mills Airport, breakfast, 5:30-10:30 a.m.; launch, 6 a.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 866-556-3083. WORK PARTY WEEKEND: Zen seekers pitch in around the spiritual center by cleaning up waterways, preparing the garden and tending to other maintenance projects. Milarepa Center, Barnet, 9 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 633-4136.

SEVEN DAYS

05.17.17-05.24.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

fairs & festivals

HEAVYFEST 7: Soule Monde, Hayley Jane and the Primates, Steady Betty, Evil People and Casio Bastard entertain revelers at this benefit for Big Heavy World. Brewery tours, local eats and a live art expo top off the fun. See calendar spotlight. Magic Hat Artifactory, South Burlington, 1-6 p.m. $5. Info, info@bigheavyworld.com.

CLINICAL

PSYCHOLOGY

Our Master of Arts degree program prepares students for entry-level professional psychology positions in the public mental health system or study towards a doctoral degree at another institution. Elective courses in play therapy, marital and family therapy, intensive individual psychotherapy, and group therapy. The curriculum of our program is approved by both the Vermont Board of Psychological Examiners and the Vermont Board of Allied Mental Health Practitioners.

APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING ACCEPTED.

60 CALENDAR

MAY FESTIVAL: Garden experts are on hand to assist attendees who browse a wide array of plants amid vendors offering food, crafts, woodworking, jewelry, flea market items and more. Unitarian Universalist Church, Springfield, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, 885-1699. SPRING FEST: Families find food, music and games galore at this community-building bash complete with a bouncy house. Church of the Nazarene, Williston, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 878-8591.

film

BRITISH ARROWS: THE BEST U.K. COMMERCIALS: Television lovers screen prize-winning gems from across the pond. Loew Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 4 p.m. $5-9. Info, 603-646-2422.

BREAKFAST BUFFET: A scrumptious buffet-style spread offers scrambled eggs, vegetable quiche, home fries and onions, baked beans, ham, cornbread, fruit salad and beverages. Gluten-free and vegetarian options as well as takeout are available. Isle of Patmos Masonic Lodge, South Hero,

smcvt.edu/psych psych@smcvt.edu

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HUMAN-POWERED PARADE: Merrymakers mark National Bike Month with a procession of all things that roll petroleum-free. A post-parade party includes vendors and live entertainment by Band of the Land. The Hub Teen Center & Skatepark, Bristol, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 503-9774.

food & drink

800.654.2206

11/11/16 6:20 PM

CHAMPLAIN ISLANDS FARMERS MARKET: Baked items, fresh produce, meats and eggs sustain seekers of local goods. Grand Isle St. Joseph’s Church, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, champlainislandsfarmersmkt@gmail.com.

CARS & COFFEE VERMONT: Fueled by petrol, caffeine and passion, automobile aficionados gather to talk cars and make new friends. University Mall, South Burlington, 7-9 a.m. Free. Info, carscoffeevermont@gmail.com.

LEGAL CLINIC: Attorneys offer complementary consultations on a first-come, first-served basis. Legal Services Law Line of Vermont, Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 383-2118.

MASTER’S DEGREE PROGRAM IN

7:30-11:30 a.m. $5-10; free for kids 2 and under; preregister for takeout. Info, 777-6316.

MIDDLEBURY FARMERS MARKET: Crafts, cheeses, breads, veggies and more vie for spots in shoppers’ totes. VFW Post 7823, Middlebury, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free. Info, middleburyfarmersmkt@yahoo.com.

NORTHWEST FARMERS MARKET: Locavores stock up on produce, preserves, baked goods, ethnic foods, and arts and crafts. Taylor Park, St. Albans, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, alavista@myfairpoint.net. NORWICH FARMERS MARKET: Neighbors discover fruits, veggies and other riches of the land offered alongside baked goods, crafts and live entertainment. Route 5 South, Norwich, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 384-7447. ST. JOHNSBURY FARMERS MARKET: Growers and crafters gather weekly at booths centered on local eats. Anthony’s Diner, St. Johnsbury, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, cfmamanager@gmail.com. VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: See WED.17, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. WAITSFIELD FARMERS MARKET: A bustling bazaar boasts seasonal produce, prepared foods, artisan crafts and live entertainment. Mad River Green, Waitsfield, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, waitsfieldmarketmanager@gmail.com.

health & fitness

BACKYARD BOOT CAMP: See WED.17, 8-9 a.m. INVERSION WORKSHOP: Practitioners turn things upside down with headstands, shoulder stands, handstands and forearm stands. Sangha Studio — North, Burlington, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $14-24. Info, 448-4262. R.I.P.P.E.D.: Resistance, intervals, power, plyometrics, endurance and diet define this high-intensity physical-fitness program. North End Studio A, Burlington, 9-10 a.m. $10. Info, 578-9243. YIN YOGA: Students hold poses for several minutes to give connective tissues a good stretch. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 8-9:15 a.m. $10. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com.

kids

‘ALADDIN, JR’ AUDITIONS: Fifth through 8th graders vie for roles in a Vermont Children’s Theater staging of the story of a poor young man who’s tired of being on the outside looking in. Vermont Children’s Theater, Lyndonville, 3-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 626-5358. ‘ANNIE KIDS’ AUDITION: Tots try out for Vermont Children’s Theater’s summer production of the story of a plucky orphan. Vermont Children’s Theater, Lyndonville, 1-2:30 p.m. Free. Info, 626-5358. ‘EMMA’ AUDITIONS: Thespians entering ninth grade through recent high school graduates throw their hats into the ring for parts in an adaptation of Jane Austen’s classic novel, staged by Vermont Children’s Theater. Vermont Children’s Theater, Lyndonville, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 626-5358.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT SATURDAY DROP-IN STORY TIME: A weekly selection of books and music engages all ages. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 10-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 264-5660. ‘SNOW WHITE’: Cameo appearances by professional dancers pepper Ballet Wolcott’s production of this timeless tale of seven dwarves, an evil queen and love’s first kiss. Dibden Center for the Arts, Johnson State College, 7 p.m. $10-20. Info, 888-5891, ext. 2. STORY TIME SATURDAY: Tykes sit tight for The Forever Garden by author Laurel Snyder and illustrator Samantha Cotterill, then get their fill of themed healthy foods. Phoenix Books Burlington, 11 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 861-9757.

outdoors

EARLY BIRD NATURE WALK: Avian expert Sue Wetmore points out the migratory species of spring. No pets, please. Mount Independence State Historic Site, Orwell, 8-10 a.m. $5; free for kids under 15. Info, 759-2412.

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MAPLE SUGARBUSH BIRD WALK: Winged spring travelers treat trekkers to bright colors and beautiful songs. Jed’s Maple Products, Derby, 7-9 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 766-2700.

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WHOLE-BOOK APPROACH US IC STORY TIME: Tots learn how NG SPRING BIRD WALK: Outdoor |H RI INE SP words, pictures and book design ES SBU adventurers keep their eyes peeled R G A R TI S T S E R I work together to complete a narrafor feathered fliers. Rain date: May 27. tive. Phoenix Books Essex, 11 a.m. Free. Info, Stranahan Town Forest, Marshfield, 7:30-10 a.m. 872-7111. Free. Info, 426-3581. CO

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montréal

‘MILLION DOLLAR QUARTET’: See WED.17.

SPRING TRAIL WORK: Volunteers ready the Long Trail for the hiking season. Contact trip leader for details. Free; preregister. Info, 879-1457.

music

seminars

ANDERSON / FADER GUITAR DUO: See FRI.19, Old Round Church, Richmond. Info, 434-3220. ARC IRIS REIMAGINES JONI MITCHELL’S ‘BLUE’: Songs such as “Carey” and “All I Want” get a power-pop treatment from the Providence, R.I., trio. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 8:30 p.m. $8-10. Info, 540-0406.

CEMETERY VOLUNTEER TRAINING: Helpers don work clothes, gloves and sturdy boots to learn the ropes of righting fallen or leaning stones in preparation for a future work day at Burlington’s Greenmount Cemetery. Barber Cemetery, Charlotte, 8 a.m. Free. Info, info@preservationburlington.org.

BELLA VOCE: The women’s vocal ensemble hits all the right notes in “Holst and Harp.” First Baptist Church of Burlington, 8 p.m. $15-18. Info, 863-5966.

VCAM ORIENTATION: Video-production hounds master basic concepts and nomenclature at an overview of VCAM facilities, policies and procedures. VCAM Studio, Burlington, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 651-9692.

BEN PATTON: The singer-songwriter captivates fans with jazzy, whimsical and poignant selections from his diverse body of work. Meeting House on the Green, East Fairfield, 7 p.m. $10; cash bar. Info, 827-6626.

sports

CAPITAL CITY CONCERTS: See FRI.19, Unitarian Church of Montpelier.

FLYNN SINGERS: A community chorus belts out selected numbers. FlynnSpace, Burlington, 6 p.m. $5. Info, 863-5966.

IAIN MACHARG: The Scottish bagpiper performs a concert of traditional tunes benefiting Jaquith Public Library’s youth services. Fritz’s Barn, Marshfield, 7 p.m. $8-10; free for kids. Info, 426-3190.

TUESDAY, MAY 23 11 - 3

More information: UVM Student & Community Relations, (802) 656-9405, oscr@uvm.edu

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NOURISH VERMONT

5/12/17 11:09 AM

Traditional Foods & Health Gathering

Saturday June 3, 2017 | Coach Barn, Shelburne Farms

HEARTS FOR HUNGER 5K & 1K FUN RUN/WALK: Friends and families lace up and make strides for the Vermont Foodbank’s Backpack Program. Champlain Valley Union High School, Hinesburg, 9-11 a.m. $10-14. Info, 793-2572.

FEATURING:

Dr. Jack Kruse

SPRING GREEN: Hot wheels! Racing fans head to the track for the season opener between stock-car champions and competing speedsters. Devil’s Bowl Speedway, West Haven, 6 p.m. $5-20; free for kids 12 and under. Info, 265-3112.

Your Eyes Create the Reality You Get in Life

A WALK FOR SIGHT: Participants make strides for the visually impaired at a walk-a-thon hosted by local Lions Club charities. See vermontlions.org for details. Various locations statewide, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Donations. Info, 465-4010.

Dr. Jack Kruse is a respected neurosurgeon and CEO of Optimized Life, a health and wellness company dedicated to helping patients avoid the healthcare burdens we typically encounter as we age.

WALK FOR THOUGHT: Participants put one foot in front of the other on half-mile, one-mile and threemile courses to support the Vermont Brain Injury Association. Oakledge Park, Burlington, registration, 9 a.m.; walk, 10 a.m. Donations. Info, 877-856-1772.

talks

MOHAMMED SAWALHA: The Palestinian House of Friendship director paints a portrait of life in his native country in “Beyond Barriers: Thriving in Occupied Palestine.” Trinity United Methodist Church, Montpelier, 7 p.m. Donations. Info, 917-4763.

tech

TECH HELP: Electronics novices bring their questions and devices to a hands-on help session with a trained troubleshooter. Fairfax Community Library, 9-11 a.m. Free. Info, 849-2420.

SAT.20

ADDITIONAL Presenters Eileen McKusick: The Electric Universe, Syntropy and Your Wave Sense Chris Masterjohn: Trace Minerals and Human Health Ruben Salinas: Quantum Biology and Human Health FOR MORE INFORMATION & TO REGISTER VISIT WWW.SHELBURNEFARMS.ORG

Nourish Vermont is a program generously funded by The Forrest C. and Frances H. Lattner Foundation.

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CALENDAR 61

SOUTH BURLINGTON COMMUNITY CHORUS: Singers find perfect harmony in the natureinspired program “For the Beauty of the Earth.” McCarthy Arts Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 7:30 p.m. $10; free for kids under 18. Info, 846-4108.

TRA COSTSH CASHS

swap or trash at two locations: loomis street lower buell street

SEVEN DAYS

HANDEL SOCIETY OF DARTMOUTH COLLEGE: The choral ensemble marks its 210th anniversary with a powerful performance of Dvořák’s “Stabat Mater.” Spaulding Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 8 p.m. $10-20. Info, 603-646-2422.

DROP OFF REUSABLE STUFF FOR FREE!

05.17.17-05.24.17

CAROLINE COTTER & EMILY MURE: Two singersongwriters cross paths for a captivating concert of original material. Brandon Music, 7:30 p.m. $20; $45 includes dinner; preregister; BYOB. Info, 247-4295.

books • clothes • furniture • kitchenware • & more!

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

BURLINGTON SONGWRITERS GROUP SESSIONS: Kip Demoll, Joni AvRutick, and Janice Russotti and Shane Bowley make their original music heard. Grange Hall, Essex, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 899-1139.

Spring Move Out Project allows you to conveniently recycle or trash your stuff.

INTERNATIONAL MIGRATORY BIRD DAY & OPEN HOUSE: “Helping Birds Along the Way” inspires a day dedicated to feathered fliers that takes folks from trails to waterways to a light lunch. Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge, Swanton, Early Bird bird walk, 5:30 a.m.; regular activities, 7:30 a.m.2 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 868-4781.

SU

WATER CRITTER WONDERS: Kiddos clad in mud boots dip into the pond to look for the creatures that call it home. Chaperones are required. Shelburne Farms, 9:30-11:30 a.m. & 12:30-2:30 p.m. $10-12 per adult/kid pair; $5-6 per additional kid. Info, 985-8686.

MOVING? SMOP IT!

VERMONT MOZART FESTIVAL: See FRI.19, The Essex Culinary Resort & Spa, 1 p.m. Stowe Community Church, 7 p.m.


calendar SAT.20

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TECH TUTOR: Techies answer questions about computers and devices during one-on-one help sessions. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10 a.m.-noon. Free; preregister. Info, 878-4918.

theater

‘AWAY THIS NIGHT’: See FRI.19, 8 p.m. ‘BLACK POWDER’: See FRI.19, noon & 8 p.m.

IMAGE BY BELTRAMI & CO. PHOTOGRAPHY

JUNE 3, 2017 10:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. ArtsRiot, Burlington Register at stepsVT.org/events

Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield support Steps to End Domestic Violence

WALK in purple shoes to raise awareness of domestic violence

BID on auction items to support

services & programs for survivors

LISTEN

to stories by those affected by domestic violence

FLYNN ACTORS ENSEMBLE: Auditioned participants in this theater company/acting workshop hybrid showcase their talents. FlynnSpace, Burlington, 3 p.m. $5. Info, 863-5966. ‘THE KING AND I’ AUDITIONS: Men, women and children vie for parts in Rodgers and Hammerstein’s royal musical. Those going for leads should prepare a song from the show. Enosburg Opera House, 1-4 p.m. Free. Info, 933-6171. ‘MAMMA MIA!’: See WED.17, 2 & 7:30 p.m. THE METROPOLITAN OPERA LIVE IN HD: ‘DER ROSENKAVALIER’: Renée Fleming portrays the Marschallin in Strauss’s comic opera about matters of the heart. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 12:30 p.m. $16-25. Info, 748-2600.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED To test a vaccine against a respiratory virus

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

• Ages 18-35 • 8 day/7 night inpatient stay • 2 outpatient screening visits • 4 outpatient follow up visits

BUDDHA’S BIRTHDAY: An optional sitting meditation kicks off a festive procession through the woods followed by rituals and refreshments honoring the birth of Shakyamuni Buddha. Shao Shan Temple, East Calais, 1:30 p.m. Free. Info, 456-7091. DEVIL’S BOWL DOWNTOWN: Gearheads rev up for an exhibition of Devil’s Bowl Speedway stock cars and drivers. See calendar spotlight. Downtown Rutland, 9 a.m. Free. Info, 265-3112. PANCAKE BREAKFAST & BALLOON LAUNCH: See SAT.20. WORK PARTY WEEKEND: See SAT.20.

NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: ‘ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD’: Tom Stoppard’s play starring Daniel Radcliffe and Joshua McGuire turns Hamlet on its head in an on-screen production. Loew Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 7 p.m. $23. Info, 603-646-2422.

STOWE FARMERS MARKET: An appetizing assortment of fresh veggies, meats, milk, berries, herbs, beverages and crafts tempts shoppers. Red Barn Shops Field, Stowe, 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, 279-3444.

NOR’EASTERN SHOWCASE: See FRI.19.

GAMES PARLOUR: Strategic thinkers bring favorite tabletop competitions to play with others. Champlain Club, Burlington, 2-8 p.m. $5. Info, orsonbradford@gmail.com.

words

BOOK SALE: Voracious readers delight in gently used titles. Proceeds benefit Meals on Wheels. Mad River Valley Senior Citizens Center, Evergreen Place, Waitsfield, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, 865-6786. POETRY EXPERIENCE: Rajnii Eddins facilitates a poetry and spoken-word workshop aimed at building confidence and developing a love of writing. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 1-3 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211.

SUN.21

agriculture

food & drink

CHOCOLATE TASTING: See SAT.20. GREEN MOUNTAIN BEER WEEK: See WED.17.

games

POKÉMON LEAGUE: See THU.18, noon-5 p.m.

health & fitness

NIA WITH SUZY: Drawing from martial, dance and healing arts, sensory-based movements push participants to their full potential. South End Studio, Burlington, 9-10 a.m. $14. Info, 522-3691. TRADITIONAL YOGA FLOW: Breath accompanies each transition during a vinyasa flow focused on body awareness and self acceptance. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 9-10:15 a.m. $10. Info, 244-8134. ZUMBA FITNESS: Highspirited students dance toward health in an easyto-follow fitness program set to red-hot international music. North End Studio A, Burlington, 9 a.m. $8-10. Info, 777-7032.

PLANT SALE: See WED.17. SPRING HOEDOWN — PLANT SALE & FARMERS MARKET: Organic vegetation, vendors, weaving demos, lunch items and live music by Katie Trautz & Friends are on the menu at this farm-fresh fête. See calendar spotlight. Plant Spirit Farm & Fibers, Brookfield, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 276-3839.

62 CALENDAR

Email UVMVTC@UVM.EDU or visit UVMVTC.ORG

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FLEA MARKET: See SAT.20. GARAGE SALE FOR THE BIRDS: See SAT.20. REUSE, REPURPOSE & RECYCLE SALE: See SAT.20. SPRING RUMMAGE SALE: See FRI.19, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

community

COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS WITH THE CENTER FOR MINDFUL LEARNING: Peaceful people gather for guided meditation and interactive discussions. Burlington Friends Meeting House, 5-7 p.m. $10. Info, assistant@centerformindfullearning.org.

dance

BALKAN FOLK DANCING: Louise Brill and friends organize participants into lines and circles set 4t-uvmdeptofmed051017.indd 1

5/5/17 10:09 AM

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Call 802-656-0013 for more info and to schedule a screening. Leave your name, number and a good time to call back.

bazaars

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VACCINE TESTING CENTER

SI

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05.17.17-05.24.17

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SEVEN DAYS

UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY: Wise words from journalist James Fallows set the stage for the university’s graduation proceedings. University Green, University of Vermont, Burlington, 8:20 a.m. Free. Info, 656-3272.

SU

• Up to $1650 compensation

education

RS

5/12/17 3:26 PM

CONTEMPORARY DANCE & FITNESS STUDIO PERFORMANCE: See FRI.19, 1-4 p.m.

THE METROPOLITAN OPERA LIVE IN HD: ‘L’AMOUR DE LOIN’: Ribbons of LED lights dazzle viewers of Kaija Saariaho’s opera about a knight on a quest of love. Paramount Theatre, Rutland, 12:55 p.m. $1023. Info, 775-0903.

‘OF THE BETTER KIND’: See FRI.19, 7-10 p.m. 4t-stepupagainstdomesticvolience051717.indd 1

to complex rhythms. Ohavi Zedek Synagogue, Burlington, 4-7 p.m. $6; free for first-timers; bring snacks to share. Info, 540-1020.

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kids

‘ALADDIN, JR’ AUDITIONS: See SAT.20.

‘ANNIE KIDS’ AUDITION: See SAT.20.

BUDDY DUBAY: The Westford Music Series winds down with an enchanting children’s concert. United Church of Westford, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 879-4028. ‘EMMA’ AUDITIONS: See SAT.20. PEER-LED MINDFULNESS MEET-UP FOR TEENS: South Burlington High School junior Mika Holtz guides adolescents toward increased awareness through music, movement and other techniques. Stillpoint Center, Burlington, 9-10:30 a.m. Donations. Info, 720-427-9340. ‘SNOW WHITE’: See SAT.20, 2 p.m. YOUNG ADVENTURERS CLUB: Nature lovers navigate local trails at a family-friendly pace. Contact leader for details. Free; preregister. Info, colem2003@hotmail.com.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

language

‘DIMANCHES’ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Parlezvous français? Speakers practice the tongue at a casual drop-in chat. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 4-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 363-2431. SPANISH GROUP CLASSES: Students roll their Rs while practicing en español. New Moon Café, Burlington, 2:45-4:30 p.m. $20. Info, maigomez1@ hotmail.com.

montréal

‘MILLION DOLLAR QUARTET’: See WED.17, 7 p.m. PIKNIC ÉLECTRONIK MONTRÉAL: DJ sets and beat-driven music propel a dance party of epic proportions. See piknicelectronik.com for details. Plaine des jeux, Montréal, 2-9 p.m. $13.50-116. Info, 514-904-1247.

music

BELLA VOCE: See SAT.20, South Hero Congregational Church, 3 p.m. CLASSICOPIA: Violinist Omar Chen Guey and pianist Daniel Weiser whisk listeners away with “Violin Voyage,” a passionate program of music from around the world. ArtisTree Community Arts Center & Gallery, South Pomfret, 3-5 p.m. $18-20. Info, 457-3500. DIANE HULING REED: Sounds range from ethereal to thundering during a solo piano recital. Plainfield Town Hall Opera House, 4-5:30 p.m. $5-15. Info, 498-3173. HINESBURG ARTIST SERIES SPRING CONCERT: Conductor Rufus Patrick leads the Hinesburg Community Band and the South County Chorus in a varied program featuring guest flutist Laurel Ann Maurer. Champlain Valley Union High School, Hinesburg, 4:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 373-0808. JAZZ ON THE TOWN: Cool cats snap their fingers to the swinging sounds of the Woodstock Union High School/Middle School Jazz Funk Bands and special guests. Woodstock Town Hall Theatre, 7:309 p.m. $10. Info, 457-3981. OPERA COMPANY OF MIDDLEBURY: MEET THE SINGERS: The stars of the upcoming performance of Puccini’s Il Trittico sing their favorite arias and mingle with attendees over drinks and hors d’oeuvres. Champlain Valley Unitarian Universalist Society, Middlebury, 5 p.m. $35; cash bar. Info, 382-9222.

SARA EVANS: Pop country hits such as “Suds In the Bucket” and “Born to Fly” get boots tapping. See calendar spotlight. Paramount Theatre, Rutland, 8 p.m. $26-56. Info, 775-0903. VERMONT MOZART FESTIVAL: See FRI.19, Burlington Country Club.

outdoors

PEASE MOUNTAIN HIKE: Hoofers cover three miles of ground on an easy excursion. Contact trip leader for details. Free; preregister. Info, ruskai@member. ams.org.

WOMEN’S NATURE NERDS FROLIC: Fans of flowers, fowl and fungi embark on a leisurely stroll through field and forest. Huntington Open Women’s Land, 10 a.m. Free. Info, howlvt@gmail.com.

WALK OF AGES: SuperSounds DJ spins tunes from throughout time while participants take laps around the track to support the Heineberg Community Senior Center. Burlington High School, check-in, 12:30 p.m.; walk, 1 p.m. $10; free before May 21. Info, 863-3982.

Register as an Organ and Tissue Donor

Check Yes on your license, permit or ID or sign-up at:

www.DonateLifeVT.org

DEPARTMENT OF MOTOR VEHICLES DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

talks

GEORGE LARRABEE: Using handcrafted items, the Untitled-8 1 Donation ad 7Days_2.3x2.72.indd 1 tribal council member demonstrates aspects of Organ Abenaki customs and language in “Chief Grey Lock and the Abenaki Culture.” Ethan Allen Homestead Museum, Burlington, 2-3 p.m. Free. Info, 865-4556.

5/15/17 5/12/17 10:40 12:58AM PM

Well, I am the friendliest lender!

Pick me!

theater

‘AWAY THIS NIGHT’: See FRI.19, 2 p.m.

KELLY A. DEFORGE

‘MAMMA MIA!’: See WED.17, 5 p.m. NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: ‘ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD’: See SAT.20, 4 p.m. ‘OF THE BETTER KIND’: See FRI.19, 4-6 p.m.

words

BOOK FAIR: Readings, refreshments and a wide selection of page turners foster a love of literature in the whole family. American Legion Post 27, Middlebury, noon-4 p.m. Free. Info, coteyc@ hotmail.com.

Senior Mortgage Loan Originator NMLS: 103643

CHANNEL 15

THE ARTFUL WORD—ARTS & LOCAL EVENTS SHOWCASE MONDAYS > 11:00 P.M. GET MORE INFO OR WATCH ONLINE AT VERMONTCAM.ORG

PHILIP BARUTH: Nonfiction fans open their ears for passages from the University of Vermont professor’s biography of Patrick Leahy titled Senator Leahy: A Life in Scenes. Vermont Book Shop, Middlebury, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 388-2061. 16T-VCAM051717.indd 1

30 Kimball Avenue, Suite 200 South Burlington, VT ublocal.com • 802.652.2985

SUNDAY, AUGUST 6, 2017 1 5/15/17 8v-unionbankkellydeforge051717.indd 12:14 PM

5/10/17 4:27 PM

BURLINGTON’S WATERFRONT PARK

MON.22

RELEASE THE

art

OPEN STUDIO: See THU.18, 3-5 p.m.

DRAGONS

community

VERMONT ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM OPEN HOUSE: Elderly individuals and folks with disabilities meet staff members and learn about assistive technology in honor of Global Accessibility Awareness Day. Waterbury State Office Complex, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Free. Info, 800-750-6355.

dance

CONTACT IMPROV DANCE: Movers engage in weight sharing, play and meditation when exploring this style influenced by aikido and other somatic practices. Aikido of Champlain Valley, Burlington, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $4. Info, 864-7306. SALSA MONDAYS: Dancers learn the techniques and patterns of salsa, merengue, bachata and chacha. North End Studio A, Burlington, fundamentals, 7 p.m.; intermediate, 8 p.m. $12. Info, 227-2572. WEST AFRICAN DANCE: Live djembe and dundun drumming drive a family-friendly class with teacher Seny Daffe of Guinea. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 5:30-7 p.m. $10-16; preregister. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com.

TEAM UP AND RACE TO SUPPORT CAMP TA-KUM-TA! Presented by

education

CAMPUS TOUR: Potential students ages 16 through 24 check out a facility offering free housing, meals, career technical training, high school diplomas, driver’s licenses and job placement. Northlands Job Corps Center, Vergennes, 9:45 a.m.-noon. Free; preregister. Info, 877-0121.

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SPRING WILDFLOWER WALK: Floricultural fanatics stroll in search of seasonal blossoms. Sugarhouse Parking Area, Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 1-3 p.m. $12-15; preregister; limited space. Info, 434-3068.

VELO VERMONT SPRING ROLL: Vermont back roads are the venue for a 35-mile ride with a fun, casual vibe. MiddleGround, Middlesex, 1-6 p.m. Free. Info, velovermontvrr@gmail.com.

SEVEN DAYS

EARLY BIRDER MORNING WALK: Avian enthusiasts search for winged species. Bring tick repellent, binoculars and good walking shoes. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, 7-8:30 a.m. Free. Info, 434-2167.

RACE AROUND THE LAKE: Lunch, live music and an awards ceremony reward athletes who break a sweat on 5- and 10-K routes to raise funds for BarnArts. Silver Lake State Park, Barnard, 10:30 a.m. $15-35. Info, 234-1645.

05.17.17-05.24.17

YESTERMORN: An a cappella trio harks to days gone by with Appalachian, folk, gospel, spiritual and shape-note songs. Funds raised benefit the Northeast Kingdom Youth Services Summer Central Scholarship Program. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church of St. Johnsbury, 4 p.m. Donations. Info, 473-0632.

sports

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ORIANA SINGERS: The vocal ensemble sings into the season with festive selections by Bach and Handel in “Celebrate Spring!” The Cathedral Church of St. Paul, Burlington, 4 p.m. $10-25. Info, 863-5966.

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REIKI OR TAROT SESSIONS: Claire Whitaker consults her cards or offers energy healing in 30-minute or 1-hour sittings. Railyard Yoga Studio, Burlington, 4-6 p.m. $30-60; preregister. Info, 318-6050.

film

MOVIE: Snacks are provided at a showing of a popular flick. Call for details. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 5:45 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

food & drink

PENNYWISE PANTRY: On a tour of the store, shoppers create a custom template for keeping the kitchen stocked with affordable, nutritious eats. City Market/Onion River Co-op, Burlington, 6:307:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 861-9757.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.17, 7 p.m. MAGIC: THE GATHERING — MONDAY NIGHT MODERN: Tarmogoyf-slinging madness ensues when competitors battle for prizes in a weekly game. Brap’s Magic, Burlington, 6:30-10 p.m. $8. Info, 540-0498. MAH-JONGG: Longtime players and neophytes alike compete in the popular Chinese tile game. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6-7:45 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660.

health & fitness

ADVANCED TAI CHI CLASS: See FRI.19. ASHTANGA YOGA: An athletic flow combines strength, flexibility and stamina in a specific sequence of asanas linking breath and movement. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 7:15-8:30 p.m. $10. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com. Untitled-28 1

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HERBAL PREPS & THERAPEUTIC USES FOR MEDICAL CANNABIS: Students in medicine maker Stephanie Boucher’s workshop learn to calculate safe and effective doses of cannabis to benefit the body. Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism, Montpelier, 6-8:30 p.m. $20-23. Info, 224-7100. NIA WITH SUZY: See SUN.21, 7 p.m. RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: See WED.17.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

SEATED TAI CHI: Movements are modified for those with arthritis and other chronic conditions. Winooski Senior Center, 11 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 735-5467. TAI CHI, SUN-STYLE LONG-FORM: Elements of qigong thread through the youngest version of the Chinese martial art. Winooski Senior Center, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 735-5467.

05.17.17-05.24.17

VERMONT CENTER FOR INTEGRATIVE HERBALISM STUDENT HERBAL CLINIC: Third-year interns evaluate individual constitutions and health conditions. Burlington Herb Clinic, 4-8 p.m. $10-30; preregister. Info, info@vtherbcenter.org. YIN YOGA: See SAT.20, noon-1:15 p.m. ZUMBA: Lively Latin rhythms fuel this dancefitness phenomenon for all experience levels. Vergennes Opera House, 6 p.m. $10. Info, 349-0026.

SEVEN DAYS

kids

BABY LAP TIME: Babes up to 24 months experience color, sound and movement through stories, songs, bounces and rhymes. Richmond Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 434-3036.

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CHESS CLUB: Checkmate! Players make strategic moves and vie for the opposing king. Adult supervision is required for those 8 and under. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

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CRAFT FOR KIDS: Kiddos 5 and up flex their creative muscles with unique projects. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660. OPEN GYM PLAY GROUP: Parents can socialize while tykes stay active with movement-centered

recreation. River Arts, Morrisville, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 888-1261. PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Captivating narratives pave the way for crafts and activities for youngsters ages 3 through 6. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 10:30-11 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 264-5660. ROBIN’S NEST NATURE PLAYGROUP: Outdoor pursuits through fields and forests captivate little ones up to age 5 and their parents. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Donations. Info, 229-6206.

language

ADVANCED-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: Language learners perfect their pronunciation with guest speakers. Private residence, Burlington, 5-6:30 p.m. $20. Info, 324-1757. LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE: Bring a bag lunch to practice the system of communication using visual gestures. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

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PIKNIC ÉLECTRONIK MONTRÉAL: See SUN.21, 2-9:30 p.m.

music

JOEY AGRESTA: The Burlington artist previously known as Joey Pizza Slice celebrates the release of a new batch of outside-the-box songs. Bleach Day and Big French open. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 8:30 p.m. $8-10. Info, 540-0406. MONDAY NIGHT COMMUNITY KIRTAN: Instruments are welcome during call-and-response chanting of mostly Sanskrit mantras in the bhakti yoga tradition. Sacred Mountain Studio, Burlington, 7:30-9 p.m. Donations. Info, bpatoine@aol.com. SAMBATUCADA OPEN REHEARSAL: Newbies are invited to help keep the beat as Burlington’s samba streetpercussion band sharpens its sound. Instruments are not required. 8 Space Studio Collective, Burlington, 6-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 862-5017.

politics

NEWS & BREWS: VTDigger.org senior editor Mark Johnson provides a 2017 legislative wrap-up during a coffee-fueled conversation. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 10:15-11:15 a.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

seminars

FAMILY-TO-FAMILY CLASS: The National Alliance on Mental Illness builds understanding between individuals struggling with psychological health and their loved ones. Call for details. 6 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 876-7949. NURTURING HEALTHY SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT: Opening lines of communication, identifying normal and concerning behaviors, and other topics are on the table during a seminar centered on protecting children. Community Room, Hunger Mountain Coop, Montpelier, 6-7:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, info@hungermountain.coop.

sports

VERMONT MOZART CLASSIC: Clubs in hand, competitors play 18 holes to benefit the Vermont Mozart Festival. Burlington Country Club, registration, 11:30 a.m.; shotgun start, 1 p.m. $700 per team; $60 for dinner. Info, 598-9520.

tech

TECH HELP WITH CLIF: See WED.17.

theater

SUICIDEGIRLS: BLACKHEART BURLESQUE: Billed as “the sexiest show on the planet,� this high-energy performance features pop-culture references, an indie soundtrack and a choreographed striptease. Higher Ground Ballroom, South Burlington, 9 p.m. $25-85. Info, 877-987-6487.

words

BOOK LAUNCH: Author Andy Potok marks the release of his memoir 13 Stradomska Street: A


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

Memoir of Exile and Return. Copies are available for purchase and signing. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338. MONDAY NIGHT POETRY WORKSHOP: Wordsmiths analyze creative works-in-progress penned by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104. SHAPE & SHARE LIFE STORIES: Prompts from Recille Hamrell trigger recollections of specific experiences, which participants craft into narratives. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

TUE.23 business

NIBBLES, NETWORKING & KNOWLEDGE: Entrepreneurs gain tools for success in a one-two punch workshop on topics such as leveraging Google, creating action plans and building a profitable business. River Bend Career and Technical Center, Bradford, 1-4 p.m. $20; free for members of participating chambers and organizations. Info, 882-8191. RENTAL INCOME SEMINAR: Those seeking financial freedom and security get wise to the ways of real estate investment. Preferred Properties, South Burlington, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 318-7654.

community

FEAST TOGETHER OR FEAST TO GO: See FRI.19. TUESDAY VOLUNTEER NIGHTS: Helping hands pitch in around the shop by organizing parts, moving bikes and tackling other projects. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. Bike Recycle Vermont, Burlington, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 264-9687. UNITED WAY ANNUAL CELEBRATION & COMMUNITY AWARDS: A nonprofit organization focused on improving education, financial stability and health recognizes those whose efforts better local communities. Dion Family Student Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 4:30-6:30 p.m. $25. Info, 861-7816.

crafts

UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT PREGNANCY STUDY

‘ROCKY’: A working class Italian-American boxer gives his all for glory in this 1976 sports drama starring Sylvester Stallone. Film House, Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, 7-10 p.m. Free. Info, 540-3018.

AUTHOR TALK & TASTING: Foodies feed their minds and bodies at a chat and salumi sampling with Jeffrey Roberts, author of Salted & Cured: Savoring the Culture, Heritage and Flavor of America’s Preserved Meats. Bear Pond Books, Montpelier, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 229-0774.

film

‘DREAM, GIRL’: A documentary film showcasing ambitious female entrepreneurs inspires viewers to think big. A Q&A with local businesswomen follows. Briggs Opera House, White River Junction, 5:30 p.m. $5-10. Info, 388-3355, ext. 301.

KNIGHTS OF THE MYSTIC MOVIE CLUB: Cinema hounds view campy features at this ode to offbeat

If interested, please visit our website to complete the recruitment questionnaire: http://j.mp/1yLwkLO

COOKING WITH GLADYS: Foodies whip up delicious dishes with guidance from a kitchen whiz. Champlain Senior Center, McClure Multigenerational Center, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 658-3585. KATE LAUD: Samples are served at the launch of the cookbook Luscious: Food I Fed My Family. Phoenix Books Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 448-3350.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 802-656-3348 OR VISIT FACEBOOK.COM/UVMMOM 6h-uvmdeppsych(pregnancystudy)011316.indd 1

1/11/16 11:26 AM

NORTHFIELD FARMERS MARKET: A gathering place for local farmers, producers and artisans offers fresh produce, crafts and locally prepared foods. Depot Square, Northfield, 3-6 p.m. Free. Info, northfieldfarmersmarketvt@gmail.com. TASTE OF ERITREA & ETHIOPIA: Mulu Tewelde guides home cooks in preparing authentic dishes. McClure Multigenerational Center, Burlington, 5:30-7:30 p.m. $5-10; preregister. Info, 861-9757.

games

BINGO NIGHT: Participants cover squares and dip into refreshments. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 6-9 p.m. $5 per card. Info, 223-3322.

EVENTS EVENTS ON ON SALE SALE NOW! NOW THIS WE E K

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.17, 7 p.m.

health & fitness

THURSDAY, MAY 18, ARTSRIOT, BURLINGTON

BEGINNERS TAI CHI CLASS: See THU.18.

THIS WE E K

DE-STRESS YOGA: A relaxing and challenging class lets healthy bodies unplug and unwind. Balance Yoga, Richmond, 5:45-7 p.m. $14. Info, 434-8401. FELDENKRAIS: AWARENESS THROUGH MOVEMENT: Whether you consider it relaxing exercise or active meditation, this experience can reduce pain and increase mobility. Sacred Mountain Studio, Burlington, 9:30-10:30 a.m. $15; free for first-timers; preregister. Info, 735-3770. FITNESS AT ANY AGE: Strength, agility, coordination and heart-healthy exercises are modified for folks of all ability levels. Charlotte Senior Center, 9:15-10 a.m. $10. Info, 343-7160.

HATHA FLOW YOGA: A balanced combination of sustained and flowing poses promotes mindfulness. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 5:30-6:45 p.m. $10. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com. KETTLEBELLS CLASS: Fitness fanatics with basic knowledge of the ball-shaped, strength-building weight break a sweat with certified instructors. North End Studio B, Burlington, 6:30-7:30 p.m. $12. Info, 438-1017. TUE.23

Zach Nugent’s Legion of Jerry FRIDAY, MAY 19, ARTSRIOT, BURLINGTON

THIS WE E K

THIS WE E K

Green Mountain Cabaret Presents: Cabaret Roulette SATURDAY, MAY 20, CLUB METRONOME, BURLINGTON

Joey Agresta Record Release

THIS WE E K

MONDAY, MAY 22, ARTSRIOT, BURLINGTON

SELLING TICKETS?

Burlington Tree Tours

FRIDAY, MAY 19, THE MOUNTED CAT PATIO (OUTSIDE HILTON BURLINGTON)

FITNESS FLOW YOGA: See FRI.19, 6:30-7:30 p.m. GENTLE DROP-IN YOGA: Yogis hit the mat for a hatha class led by Betty Molnar. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660.

Post Modern Projects Presents Yung $eth

THIS WE E K

• • • • •

Fundraisers Festivals Plays Sports Concerts

WE CAN HELP!

A Reimagining of Joni Mitchell’s Blue by Arc Iris SATURDAY, MAY 20, ARTSRIOT, BURLINGTON

• • • •

No cost to you Local support Built-in promotion Custom options

CONTACT US:

865-1020, ext. 10

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‘IN PURSUIT OF SILENCE’: From a traditional tea ceremony in Kyoto to the loudest city in the world, Mumbai, a 2015 documentary explores the impact of noise on our lives. All Souls Interfaith Gathering, Shelburne, 6:30 p.m. $5-10. Info, 660-2600.

2 Free Ultrasounds

BENEFIT BAKE: Pizza lovers dine on slices to support Camp Kaleidoscope. Partial proceeds from each flatbread sold are donated. American Flatbread Burlington Hearth, 4-11 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 881-8278.

SEVEN DAYS

SWING DANCING: Quick-footed participants experiment with different forms, including the Lindy hop, Charleston and balboa. Beginners are welcome. Champlain Club, Burlington, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $5. Info, 448-2930.

Compensation $700

05.17.17-05.24.17

INTERMEDIATE & ADVANCED WEST COAST SWING: Fun-loving folks learn the smooth, sexy stylings of modern swing dance. North End Studio A, Burlington, 7-9 p.m. $11-16. Info, burlingtonwestie@gmail.com.

Flexible scheduling, including weekend and evening appointments

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BEGINNER WEST COAST SWING & FUSION DANCING: Pupils get schooled in the fundamentals of partner dance. North End Studio B, Burlington, 8-9 p.m. $11-16. Info, burlingtonwestie@gmail.com.

9 short appointments (approximately 20 minutes each)

food & drink

OPEN CRAFT NIGHT: Creative BRANDON FITNESS BOOT sparks fly in the studio as attendCAMP: Hop to it! Get fit with TU E O .2 3 ees whip out woven wall hangings strength, endurance, agility and AN |M U SIC T OL and crochet, knitting and sewing coordination exercises. Otter Valley | WILLIAM TOR projects. Nido Fabric & Yarn, Burlington, North Campus Gym, Brandon, 5-6 p.m. $12. 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 881-0068. Info, 343-7160.

dance

Researchers at the Vermont Center on Behavior and Health are looking for women who are currently pregnant to participate in a study on health behaviors and infant birth outcomes. This study involves:

productions. Main Street Museum, White River Junction, 8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 356-2776.

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PEACEFUL WARRIOR KARATE: Martial-arts training promotes healthy living for those in recovery. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150. REMEDIES FOR DIGESTION & ENERGY: Acupuncturist Baylen Slote pinpoints methods for balancing the body and boosting well-being in a holistic healing workshop. Community Room, Hunger Mountain Coop, Montpelier, 6-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, info@hungermountain.coop. R.I.P.P.E.D.: See SAT.20, 6-7 p.m.

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SUMMER FLOOR HOCKEY LEAGUE: Men and women aim for the goal in a friendly setting for all ability levels. Mater Christi School, Burlington, 7:159:15 p.m. $5; $55 for the full season; preregister. Info, gbfloorhockey@gmail.com. TAI CHI, LEVEL I: Beginners are introduced to sequences of slow, controlled movements. South Burlington Recreation & Parks Department, 11 a.m.noon. Free. Info, 735-5467. ZUMBA: A high-energy instructor and a wide array of music keep students going strong as they dance their way to health. Marketplace Fitness, Burlington, 4:30-5:15 p.m. $12; free for members and first-timers. Info, 651-8773. ZUMBA WITH ALLISON: Conditioning is disguised as a party at this rhythm-driven workout session. Swan Dojo, Burlington, 7-8 p.m. $10. Info, 227-7221.

kids

NESTLINGS FIND NATURE: Books, crafts, nature walks and outdoor activities give preschoolers a look at how songbirds develop and grow. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Regular admission, $3.50-7; free for members and kids under 3. Info, 434-2167.

05.17.17-05.24.17 SEVEN DAYS

$695 LIMITED SUPPLY OF USED BOARDS IN STOCK.

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Michael Dolsey Designs

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seminars

EXPLORING THE PSYCHOLOGICAL NOVEL: Two novels by Chaim Potok are the basis of a course with psychotherapist Peter Burmeister on the ways in which works of fiction let readers in on aspects of personality. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

MEDICARE & YOU: AN INTRODUCTION TO MEDICARE: Members of the Central Vermont Council on Aging clear up confuREAD TO DAISY: Budding sion about the application OR S bookworms join a friendly process and plan options. LD TE R MU OU canine for ear-catching narratives. Central Vermont Council on Aging, SI C |C LE PER C U S SIO N E NS E M B Brownell Library, Essex Junction, Barre, 3-5 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 3:15-4 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. 479-0531. READ TO WILLY WONKA THE VOLUNTEER sports THERAPY DOG: Kiddos cozy up for story time with the library’s furry friend. Burnham Memorial INFINITUS — RUGGED TRAIL RACES 250 MILE: Library, Colchester, 4:15-4:45 p.m. Free; preregister. Runners test the limits of their endurance. Info, 264-5660. Blueberry Hill Ski Center, Goshen, 8:08 a.m. $349. Info, jack@endurancesociety.org. SPANISH MUSICAL KIDS: Amigos ages 1 through 5 learn Latin American songs and games with words Constancia Gómez, a native Argentinian. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:45 a.m. Free. Info, CREATIVE NONFICTION WORKSHOP: Folks give 865-7216. feedback on essays, poetry and journalism written by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 110 Main STORY TIME FOR BABIES & TODDLERS: Picture St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Free; preregister books, songs, rhymes and puppets arrest the attenat meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104. tion of children and their caregivers. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9:10-9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. NG

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WILLIAM TORTOLANO: The Saint Michael’s College professor emeritus upholds tradition with his 51st concert on the chapel’s 14-stop pipe organ. Chapel of Saint Michael the Archangel, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 12:15 p.m. Free. Info, 654-2000.

IC

EARLY SEASON SPECIALS

GREAT DESIGNS & VALUE- SUPER STABLE & DURABLE

OPEN JAM SESSION: Musicians follow the flow and explore sound together. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 303.

US

We make stand up paddling affordable!

MILTON COMMUNITY BAND REHEARSAL: Brass, wind and percussion players are welcome to join the ensemble as they hone their skills in preparation for upcoming recitals. Milton Middle/High School, 7-8:45 p.m. Free. Info, 893-1398.

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DAVID CROSBY & FRIENDS: Folk-rock fans catch the cofounder of the Byrds and Crosby, Stills & Nash playing tunes from his 2016 solo album, Lighthouse, along with some of his greatest hits. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, 8 p.m. $44.50-78. Info, 863-5966.

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PRESCHOOL STORY HOUR: BUGS: Imaginations blossom when kids up to age 6 engage in themed tales and activities. Fairfax Community Library, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 849-2420.

music

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PRESCHOOL MUSIC: Melody makers ages 3 through 5 sing and dance into the afternoon. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 11:30 a.m.noon. Free. Info, 264-5660.

SOCIAL GATHERING: Those who are deaf or hard of hearing or want to learn American Sign Language get together to break down communication barriers. The North Branch Café, Montpelier, 4-6 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 595-4001.

RO

2500 Williston Road • (802) 862-5514 2455 Shelburne Road • (802) 985-3302 Mon-Fri: 9-7; Sat & Sun: 9-6 wecare@pfwvt.com • www.pfwvt.com

PAUSE-CAFÉ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Frenchlanguage fanatics meet pour parler la belle langue. Meet on the terrace in fair weather. Burlington Bay Market & Café, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 363-2431.

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10% OFF +

STRETCH & SIP YOGA WITH LIVE MUSIC: Tunes by Ousmane energize participants for a flow yoga practice suitable for all levels. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 6-7:15 p.m. $15-20. Info, studio@ zenbarnvt.com.

LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: ITALIAN: Speakers hone their skills in the Romance language over a bag lunch. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

STORY TIME FOR PRESCHOOLERS: Picture books, songs, rhymes and early math tasks work youngsters’ mental muscles. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. STORY TIME WITH A TWIST: See WED.17. TODDLER STORY TIME: Good listeners up to 3 years old have fun with music, rhymes, snacks and captivating tales. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 10:30-11 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 264-5660.

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Some exclusions apply, see stores for details.

‘LA CAUSERIE’ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Native speakers are welcome to pipe up at an unstructured conversational practice. El Gato Cantina, Burlington, 4:30-6 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0195.

WED.24 agriculture

PLANT SALE: See WED.17.

art

STITCH & B!TCH DROP-IN EMBROIDERY SESSIONS: Needle-and-thread enthusiasts explore the history and politics of fiber arts through


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

projects and discussions. Generator, Burlington, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $9-10; preregister. Info, 540-0761.

under 5 require adult supervision. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

community

RICHMOND STORY TIME: See WED.17.

COMMUNITY SUPPER: See WED.17. HOME SHARING INFO SESSION: Locals get upto-date details on home-sharing opportunities in Vermont. HomeShare Vermont, South Burlington, 4-4:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 863-5625.

conferences

SOUTHERN VERMONT ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SUMMIT: Attendees at this meeting of the minds examine innovative responses to emerging issues in community and regional economic growth. Base Lodge, Stratton Mountain Resort, 9:30 a.m. $30 includes lunch. Info, 442-0713, ext. 312.

dance

BEGINNER CONTEMPORARY BALLET CLASS: See WED.17. CONTEMPORARY BALLET, LEVEL 2: See WED.17. DROP-IN HIP-HOP DANCE: See WED.17.

etc.

GREENER DRINKS: See WED.17. NURSING BEYOND A YEAR MEET-UP: Breastfeeding parents connect over toddler topics such as weaning and healthy eating habits. Aikido of Champlain Valley, Burlington, 9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 985-8228. RUTLAND DEATH CAFÉ: Men and women discuss issues related to the end of life. Pyramid Holistic Wellness Center, Rutland, 7-9 p.m. Free; donations accepted. Info, 353-6991.

film

‘THE LOBSTER’: Colin Farrell stars in a 2015 comedy in which single people who cannot find mates are transformed into animals. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600.

food & drink

CHAMPLAIN ISLANDS FARMERS MARKET: See SAT.20, South Hero St. Rose of Lima Church, 3-6 p.m. COMMUNITY MEAL: Diners dig into a hot lunch. United Church of Johnson, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 635-2356.

STORY TIME & PLAYGROUP: See WED.17. STORY TIME WITH A TWIST: See WED.17. TODDLER TIME: See WED.17. YOGA FOR KIDS: See WED.17. YOUNG WRITERS & STORYTELLERS: Kindergartners through fifth graders practice crafting narratives. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4-5 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 264-5660.

language

INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASS: See WED.17.

seminars

CABLE ALTERNATIVES: Television lovers tune into options for viewing their favorite shows and movies. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. I CHING: Instructor Baylen demonstrates the ancient Chinese oracle used for insight and guidance in a five-part series. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338. LIVING WITH ALZHEIMER’S FOR LATE-STAGE CAREGIVERS: See WED.17. SMARTPHONE SECURITY: Android and iPhone operators pick up tips for ensuring privacy on their devices. Waterbury Public Library, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 244-7036.

theater

PILATES: See WED.17. RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: See WED.17. RESTORATIVE GENTLE YOGA: See WED.17. SUNRISE YOGA: See WED.17. UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT NURSING STUDENT VISITS: See WED.17. VINYASA YOGA: See WED.17. WEDNESDAY NIGHT SOUND BATH: See WED.17. YOGA NIDRA: THE YOGA OF DEEP RELAXATION: See WED.17. ZUMBA EXPRESS: See WED.17.

LEGO CHALLENGE: See WED.17.

ZONTA SPELLING BEE: Teams duke it out in an annual syllable showdown benefiting the college’s Single Parents Program. Alumni Auditorium, Champlain College, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free; preregister to participate. Info, burlingtonVT@zontadistrict1.org.

words

BOOK LAUNCH: Editors and lauded wordsmiths Sydney Lea and Chard deNiord unveil the anthology Roads Taken: Contemporary Vermont Poetry. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

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• Phone and in-person support • Individual

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SLAM!: SPOKEN WORD POETRY: An open mic paves the way for a juried set at this word fest featuring the Sustainability Academy Poets, Muslim Girls Making Change and Reuben Jackson. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 6 p.m. $3. Info, 540-0406.

CALENDAR 67

kids

‘THE KING AND I’ AUDITIONS: Men, women and children vie for parts in Rodgers and Hammerstein’s royal musical. Those going for leads should prepare a song from the show. Enosburg Falls Junior/Senior High School, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 933-6171.

SEVEN DAYS

TAI CHI CLASS: See WED.17.

tech

05.17.17-05.24.17

NIA WITH LINDA: See WED.17.

WOMEN’S PICKUP BASKETBALL: See WED.17.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

games

INSIGHT MEDITATION: See WED.17.

Detail: Justin Hoekstra, Points For Wallowing, 2016

WHAM, BAM! NO, THANK YOU, SCAM: Attendees learn how to tell if they’re being targeted in fraudulent activities. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3322.

TECH HELP WITH CLIF: See WED.17.

GENTLE TAI CHI: See WED.17.

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WORLD MUSIC PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE: Hafiz Read all about it @ burlingtonbookfestival.com sevendaysvt.com/enews. Shabazz directs a full band in a beat-driven repertoire ranging from ancient African to Brazilian and Latin American rhythms. Spaulding Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, 12v-nest.indd 1 11/19/15 12V-BBF050317.indd 11:03 AM 1 5/15/17 5:26 PM Hanover, N.H., 7 p.m. $9-10. Info, 603-646-2422.

VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: See WED.17.

BACKYARD BOOT CAMP: See WED.17.

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LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: SPANISH: See WED.17.

music

THE TRUMP TOUR! $25 in advance get tickets at $30 at the door SEVENDAYSTICKETS.COM

INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: See WED.17.

sports

health & fitness

Find, fix and feather with Nest Notes — an e-newsletter filled with home design, Vermont real estate tips and DIY decorating inspirations.

BEGINNER ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASS: See WED.17.

KICK THE SUGAR HABIT: Clinical herbalist Barb Alpert helps sweets addicts balance their cravings with new, healthy patterns. Community Room, Hunger Mountain Coop, Montpelier, 6-7:30 p.m. $35; preregister. Info, info@hungermountain.coop.

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.17.

obsessed?

WRITING CIRCLE: See WED.17. !

LEGO FUN: Creative types in grades K and up build unique structures with brightly colored pieces. Kids

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CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES

classes

Sat. & Sun., May 27-May 28, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost: $235/person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

THE FOLLOWING CLASS LISTINGS ARE PAID ADVERTISEMENTS. ANNOUNCE YOUR CLASS FOR AS LITTLE AS $13.75/WEEK (INCLUDES SIX PHOTOS AND UNLIMITED DESCRIPTION ONLINE). SUBMIT YOUR CLASS AD AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTCLASS.

acting FILM ACTING CLASS: Learn a simple, powerful, scene-analysis technique, proactive choice and heightened connection. Develop and hone the skill to remain present and vital through multiple takes of a scene and embrace all that you are to become an acting dynamo in my six-week film scene study class. Every Wed. through Jul. 26, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Location: Waterbury Festival Rehearsal Space, Waterbury Center. Info: Richard Waterhouse, rikwala@ gmail.com.

art

theshelburnecraftschool.org ADULT: INTRODUCTION TO ACRYLIC: Instructor, Misoo Filan. Learn fundamental acrylic painting techniques including color mixing, paint and brush handling, composition, form, and value. Perfect for a beginner painter and someone who would enjoy water-soluble paint medium. Some of the topics we will cover are still life, landscape, portrait, and old masters

05.17.17-05.24.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

985-3648

reproduction. 8 weeks, Thu., 6-8 p.m., Jul. 13-Aug. 31. Cost: $248/ person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd, Shelburne. Info: The Shelburne Craft School, 985-3648, info@theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org. ADULT: METALS 1: This class will focus on jewelry design, small sculpture or functional art. Students will complete several practice pieces before designing and creating wearable finished pieces out of sterling silver. There will be weekly demonstrations, including sawing, drilling, piercing, annealing, texturing, jump rings, forming and soldering techniques. Instructor: Sarah Sprague. Summer 2017: 6 weeks, Wed., 5:30-8:30 p.m., Jun. 21-Aug. 2; no class Jul 5. Cost: $265/person; member discount avail. Location: Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org. BLACKSMITHING 1: Instructor: Robert Wetzel. Using a forge, you will learn basic blacksmith techniques from building and maintaining a fire to hammer control. Students will create hooks, pokers and small leaves during this two-day workshop.

astrology ASTROLOGY AT RAILYARD: Private 1-hour astrology readings: Sun., 1-3:30 p.m.; must preregister. Astrology 101: Thu., 5:30-6:30 p.m. Know Your Natal Chart Workshop: Jun. 4, 4-6 p.m. Embodied Dream Work private sessions with Janis: Fri., contact studio for appointment. See website for details and registration. See website for schedule. Location: Railyard, 270 Battery St., Burlington. Info: 318-6050, railyardyoga@gmail.com, railyardapothecary.com.

dance DANCE STUDIO SALSALINA: Salsa classes, nightclub-style, group and private, four levels. Beginner walk-in classes, Wed., 6 p.m. $15/person for one-hour class. No dance experience, partner or preregistration required, just the desire to have fun! Drop in any time and prepare for an enjoyable workout. Location: 266 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Victoria, 598-1077, info@salsalina.com. DSANTOS VT SALSA: Experience the fun and excitement of Burlington’s eclectic dance community by learning salsa. Trained by world-famous dancer Manuel Dos Santos, we teach you how to dance to the music and how to have a great time on the dance floor! There is no better time to start than now! Mon. evenings: beginner class, 7-8 p.m.; intermediate, 8:15-9:15 p.m. Cost: $12/1-hour class. Location: North End Studios, 294 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: Jon Bacon, 355-1818,

crandalltyler@hotmail.com, dsantosvt.com. LEARN TO DANCE W/ A PARTNER!: Come alone or come with friends, but come out and learn to dance! Beginning classes repeat each month, but intermediate classes vary from month to month. As with all of our programs, everyone is encouraged to attend, and no partner is necessary. Private lessons also available. Cost: $50/4week class. Location: Champlain Club, 20 Crowley St., Burlington. Info: First Step Dance, 598-6757, kevin@firststepdance.com, firststepdance.com.

design/build TINY HOUSE ‘GARDENEER’: In class: tool type and use, materials, parts of a house, lumber list, cut list. In field: we will frame a floor, deck it, get a rafter pattern and put up 2 walls, framed for window and door. Forestry walk: cruising timber, dropping, limbing, chunking, splitting, stacking cord wood. Garden tour: tools, layout and utilities. Creating a “destination CSA” for progressive share cropping. vermonttinyhouses.com May 20-21. Cost: $250/weekend; on-site camping avail. Location: Bakersfield, Vermont. Info: 933-6103, vermonttinyhouses.com.

drumming DJEMBE & TAIKO: Classes in Burlington, Hyde Park and Montpelier. Drums provided. Classes for adults (also for kids with parents) Mon., Tue. & Wed. in Burlington. Wed. a.m. or Fri. a.m. in Hyde Park. Thu. in Montpelier. Most classes are in the evenings or after school. Conga classes, too! Visit our schedule and register online. Location: Taiko Space, 208 Flynn Ave., Suite 3G, Burlington;

VOLUNTEER

Capital City Grange, 6612 Rte. 12, Berlin; Moonlight Studios, 1670 Cleveland Corners Rd., Hyde Park. Info: 999-4255, burlingtontaiko.org.

language ALLIANCE FRANCAISE: TWO SUMMER SESSIONS IN BURLINGTON: New: The Alliance Francaise is offering two summer sessions: one starting on Jun. 14 and a second starting on Jul. 26 in our Burlington location. These two 5- or 6-week sessions offer courses at all levels, from French for Travelers to literature and conversation classes. We will also offer classes in Montpelier. aflcr.org. See website for schedule. Location: Alliance Francaise of the Lake Champlain Region, 43 King St., Burlington. Info: Micheline Tremblay, 881-8826, michelineatremblay@gmail.com, aflcr.org. LEARN SPANISH & OPEN NEW DOORS: Connect with a new world. We provide highquality, affordable instruction in the Spanish language for adults, students and children. Travelers’ lesson package. Our 11th year. Personal instruction from a native speaker. Small classes, private lessons and online instruction. See our website for complete information or contact us for details. See website for schedule. Location: Spanish in Waterbury Center, Waterbury Center. Info: 585-1025, spanishparavos@ gmail.com, spanishwaterburycenter.com.

martial arts ACHIEVE YOUR POTENTIAL: Come to Wu Xing Chinese Martial Arts. Join other thoughtful,

intelligent adults to learn and practice tai chi, kung fu, meditation and dynamic physical exercises. Maximize your mental tranquility and clarity, physical health and fitness, and self-confidence. For people who never thought this would be for them. Fri., 6-7 p.m. & 7-8 p.m.; Sat., 11 a.m.-noon & noon-1 p.m.; Tue., 6-7:30 p.m. Cost: $15/1-hour class; $50/mo. (incl. all classes offered); $5/trial class. Location: 303 Flynn Ave., Burlington. Info: 355-1301, info@wxcma.com, wxcma.com. MARTIAL WAY: Colchester and Milton locations. Classes in selfdefense, karate, kung fu, jiu jitsu and tai chi. We have 14 different age and experience levels, so the training is always age- and skillappropriate. Beginner or experienced, fit or not yet, young or not anymore, we have a class for you! days and evenings; see website for schedule and fees. Location: Martial Way Self Defense Center, 73 Prim Rd., Colchester, Colchester. Info: David Quinlan, 893-8893, info@martialwayvt. com, martialwayvt.com. VERMONT BRAZILIAN JIUJITSU: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is a martial arts combat style based entirely on leverage and technique. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu self-defense curriculum is taught to Navy Seals, CIA, FBI, military police and special forces. No training experience required. Easy-to-learn techniques that could save your life! Classes for men, women and children. Students will learn realistic bully-proofing and self-defense life skills to avoid them becoming victims and help them feel safe and secure. Our sole purpose is to help empower people by giving them realistic martial arts training practices they can carry with them thoroughout life. IBJJF & CBJJ Certified Black Belt 6th Degree Instructor under Carlson Gracie Sr.: teaching in Vermont, born and raised in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil! A five-time Brazilian National Champion; International World Masters Champion and IBJJF World Masters Champion. Accept no MARTIAL ARTS

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VOLUNTEER

VOLUNTEER

- OnCall for Vermont offers two types of opportunities.

- OnCall for Vermont offers two types of opportunities.

SEVEN DAYS

Medical Reserve Corps: Medical and non-medical Medicalfor Reserve Corps: Medical and non-medical OnCall Vermont offers two types of opportunities: individuals volunteering the time their schedule allows on individuals volunteering the time their schedule allows on

- OnCall for Vermont offers two types of opportunities. health and preparedness activities and/or just serving in

health and preparedness activities and/or just serving in

Medical Reserve Corps: Medical and non-medical individuals volunteering the time their times of need. times of need. schedule allows on health and preparedness activities and/or just serving in times of need.

Medical Reserve Corps: Medical and non-medical Volunteer Emergency Medical Services:

Volunteer Emergency Medical Services:

EMS provide critical pre-hospital pre hospital care to people in their individuals volunteering the timeEMS their schedule allows onon local ambulance provide critical pre-hospital care squads. community to people in their community on local ambulance squads. health and preparedness activities and/or just serving in Vermont needs your help. Today. Vermont needs your help. Today. times of need. Vermont needs your help. Today. Visit OnCallforVT.org to learn more aboutEmergency both opportunities. Volunteer Medical Services:

68 CLASSES

EMS provide critical pre-hospital care to people in their Volunteer Medical Services: community onEmergency local ambulance squads.

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EMS provide critical pre-hospital care to people in their community on local ambulance squads.

4/3/17 11:51 AM


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FRIDAY 8-11 PM

FRIDAY NIGHT JAZZ

Reuben Jackson takes you on an adventure every Friday night, exploring the great American musical invention.

SATURDAY 6-8 PM

A PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION

Now hosted by musician Chris Thile, the radio classic features contemporary music and comedy.

SATURDAY 8-9 PM

MY PLACE

Music of the ‘50s and ‘60s and the stories behind it, hosted by Vermont radio legend Joel Najman.

SATURDAY 9-11 PM

AMERICAN ROUTES

Exploring the shared musical and cultural threads of American music. Hosted by Nick Spitzer.

SUNDAY 7-10 PM

ALL THE TRADITIONS

Robert Resnik hosts a folk and world music “show and tell” and highlights the work of local musicians.

Only 4 miles from I-89 in beautiful Jericho, VT

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69

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CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES

classes THE FOLLOWING CLASS LISTINGS ARE PAID ADVERTISEMENTS. ANNOUNCE YOUR CLASS FOR AS LITTLE AS $13.75/WEEK (INCLUDES SIX PHOTOS AND UNLIMITED DESCRIPTION ONLINE). SUBMIT YOUR CLASS AD AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTCLASS.

MARTIAL ARTS

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Iimitations!. Location: Vermont Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, 55 Leroy Rd., Williston. Info: 598-2839, julio@ bjjusa.com, vermontbjj.com.

massage ASIAN BODYWORK THERAPY PROGRAM: This program teaches two forms of massage: amma and shiatsu. We will explore oriental medicine theory and diagnosis as well as the body’s meridian system, acupressure points, yin yang and fiveelement theory. Additionally, 100 hours of Western anatomy and physiology are taught. VSAC non-degree grants are available. NCBTMB-assigned school. elementsofhealing.net. Begins Sep. 2017. Cost: $5,000/600-hour program. Location: Elements of Healing, 21 Essex Way, Suite 109, Essex Jct. Info: Scott Moylan, 288-8160, scott@elementsofhealing.net, elementsofhealing. net.

first Sat. of each month, 9 a.m.noon. An open house (intro to the center, short dharma talk and socializing) is held on the third Sun. of each month, noon-2 p.m. Instruction: Sun. mornings, 9 a.m.-noon, or by appt. Sessions: Tue. & Thu., noon-1 p.m., & Mon.-Thu., 6-7 p.m. Location: Burlington Shambhala Center, 187 S. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 658-6795, burlingtonshambhalactr.org.

photography SPRING IN VERMONT PHOTO WORKSHOP: Spring in Vermont is one of the most magical times to be outdoors exploring

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 05.17.17-05.24.17 SEVEN DAYS

well-being HOPE & HEALING FOR AUTISM & NEURO-DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS: Our children are suffering from an epidemic of chronic, non-infectious disease. How have we arrived here, where are we headed, and what can we do about it? Six inspiring worldclass speakers will present their views on causes of, and solutions to, the dramatic rise in autism, neuro-behavioral disorders, autoimmune diseases and associated chronic conditions. Sat., May 20, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Cost: $95/person. Location: Stowe High School, 413 Barrows Rd., Stowe. Info: 917-3230, jennifer@ voicesforchoice.com, VCAND. eventbrite.com. YOGA & RECOVERY GROUP FOR FOLKS LIVING W/ LYME DISEASE: Join as we practice gentle restorative poses suitable for all levels. Afterword, join the discussion as we share and support one another on the often confusing and isolating journey to wellness while living with lyme disease. Wear comfortable clothing. Visit laughingriveryoga. com for more information. May 7 & 28, 2-3:30 p.m. By donation. Location: Laughing River Yoga, The Chase Mill, 1 Mill St., Burlington.

HONEST YOGA: Honest yoga offers practices for all levels. We just expanded to have two practice spaces! Your children can practice in one room while you practice in the other. No need for childcare. Yoga and dance classes ages 3 months and up. Brandnew beginners’ course: This includes two specialty classes per week for four weeks plus unlimited access to all classes. We have daily heated and alignment classes kids classes in yoga and dance, pre- and postnatal yoga. We hold yoga teacher trainings at the 200- and 500-hour levels, as well as children and dance teacher training courses. Daily classes & workshops. $50/new student (1 month unlimited); $18/class; $140/10-class card; $15/class for student or senior; or $110/10-class punch card; $135/mo. adult memberships; $99/mo. kid memberships. Location: Honest Yoga Center, 150 Dorset St., Blue Mall, next to Hana, South Burlington. Info: 497-0136, honestyogastudio@ gmail.com, honestyogacenter. com. IYENGAR YOGA: A classical approach to yoga. Our experienced teachers offer classes for all levels, ages and abilities, as well as prenatal classes and yoga therapy for injuries. Iyengar yoga focuses on uniting the body, breath and mind through attention to alignment. Precision.

Rigor. Depth. Experience the Iyengar difference. 10 weekly classes; See website for schedule. Cost: $16/90-minute class. Location: Iyengar Center of Vermont, 294 North Winooski Ave., suite 212B, Burlington. Info: Rebecca Weisman, 379-7389, rebecca@IYCVT.com, iycvt.com. LAUGHING RIVER YOGA SCHOOL: Are you a yoga teacher or seeking to be one? We offer a renowned 200-hour teacher training program to get you started, as well as a continuous flow of trainings designed specifically for yoga teachers. The learning never ends! Check out our website for dates and topics. Daily classes, 200- and 300hour teacher trainings. Cost: $65/first month of unlimited classes; workshop and training prices vary. Location: Laughing River Yoga, Chace Mill, Suite 126, Burlington. Info: 343-8119, laughingriveryoga.com. RAILYARD YOGA STUDIO: Golden Temple Meditation and Harnessing the Ethers with Sukhpran: May 20, 4-6 p.m. Maha Sadhana Dharma Yoga Workshop with Lyn and Amy: Jun. 3, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Sound Healing with Melinda: Wed., May 10-31, 7-8:30 p.m. Dances of Universal Peace: Jun. 11, 1:30-4 p.m. See website for schedule. Location: Railyard Yoga Studio, 270 Battery St., Burlington. Info: 318-6050, railyardyoga@gmail. com, railyardapothecary.com. SANGHA STUDIO | NONPROFIT, DONATION-BASED YOGA: Sangha Studio builds an empowered community through the shared practice of yoga. Free yoga service initiatives and outreach programs are offered at 17 local organizations working with all ages. Join Sangha in both downtown Burlington and the Old North End for one of their roughly 60 weekly classes and workshops. Become a Sustaining Member for $60/month and practice as often as you like! Daily. Location: Sangha Studio, 120 Pine St. and 237 North Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 448-4262, Info@sanghastudio. org.

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70 CLASSES

SNAKE-STYLE TAI CHI CHUAN: The Yang Snake Style is a dynamic tai chi method that mobilizes the spine while stretching and strengthening the core body muscles. Practicing this ancient martial art increases strength, flexibility, vitality, peace of mind and martial skill. Beginner classes Sat. mornings & Wed. evenings. Call to view a class. Location: Bao Tak Fai Tai Chi Institute, 100 Church St., Burlington. Info: 864-7902, ipfamilytaichi.org.

MOBILE VIDEOMAKERS WORKSHOPS: Gain introductory skills in the entire iPad videomaking process in 4 weeks and make your own short video, too! Our New Mobile Videomakers Workshop Series walks you through making professional-quality videos with your iPad. Learn to storyboard, script, shoot video using professional microphones and edit on your iPad. learn@retn. org. Thu., May 18-Jun. 8. Cost: $60/4-class session ($80 value); scholarships avail. Location: The Media Factory, 208 Flynn Ave., Suite 2K, Burlington. Info: RETN, 654-7980, learn@retn.org, retn. org/learn/event/new-mobilevideomakers-workshop-series.

LEARN TO MEDITATE: Through the practice of sitting still and following your breath as it goes out and dissolves, you are connecting with your heart. By simply letting yourself be, as you are, you develop genuine sympathy toward yourself. The Burlington Shambhala Center offers meditation as a path to discovering gentleness and wisdom. Shambhala Café (meditation and discussions) meets the

EVOLUTION YOGA: Evolution Yoga and Physical Therapy offers yoga classes for everyone from beginner to expert. Choose from a wide variety of drop-in classes, series and workshops in Vinyasa, Kripalu, Core, Gentle, Vigorous, Yoga on the Lake, Yoga Wall, Therapeutics, and Alignment. Become part of our yoga community. You are welcome here. Cost: $15/ class; $140/10-class card; $5-10/community classes. Location: Evolution Yoga, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington. Info: 864-9642, evolutionvt.com.

tai chi

visual arts

meditation

yoga

the landscape with a camera. The streams are full, leaves are bursting and the fields are exploding with green. During this intensive weekend photography workshop, we’ll explore and photograph some of the most stunning Vermont landscapes. Fri.Sun., May 26, at 3 -Sun., May 28, at 4 p.m. Cost: $695/ weekend intensive workshop. Location: Comfort Inn & Suites, Montpelier. Info: Green Mountain Photographic Workshops, Kurt Budliger, 272-5328, info@kurtbudligerphotography.com, greenmtnphotoworkshops.com.

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THE 15TH ANNUAL

READERS’ PICKS

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3

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CELEBRATE

Write in your favorites.

Pick the best from top finalists.

See who won in Seven Days!

MAY 17-30

JUNE 12-27

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Check out the ballot on pages 31 and 32 and nominate your favorites online now at sevendaysvt.com. BALLOT SPONSORED BY

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music Rockfire

Hayes Carll

Kat Wright

Jojo Abot

DANCIN’ IN THE MOONLIGHT

BY JORDAN ADAMS

ROOTS ON THE RIVER

ZIONTIFIC SUMMER SOLSTICE MUSIC FEST

Vermont Festivals presents Roots on the River, a three-day hootenanny that grew out of a recurring concert series featuring Canadian alt-country singer-songwriter Fred Eaglesmith. After a good run in the mid-2000s, Eaglesmith hung up his hat — and his guitar. But that didn’t mean the party was over. With a wealth of community support, VTF founder Ray Massucco has since transformed the fest into an expansive celebration of old-timey twang and rustic roots music in a picturesque, riverfront setting. This year’s top-billed artists include the sardonic Texan singer-songwriter Hayes Carll, rockabilly legend Bill Kirchen and queer folk songstress Mary Gauthier. Other notable participants include Birds of Chicago, the Suitcase Junket and the Mammals. Though its name conjures images of campsite villages and sing-alongs ’round the fire, ROTR does not recommend camping — unless you have an RV.

Ziontific Summer Solstice Music Fest is all about community, harmony and, most prominently, reggae music. While funk and hip-hop acts are well represented — including locals Cultural Chemistry, Binger, Bless the Child and Fresh Patterns — this weekend jamboree is all about dub, dancehall and Jamaican roots music. One of the fest’s centerpieces is the Silent Disco. If you aren’t familiar with the concept, here’s how it works: Rather than sending music through a traditional sound system, DJs broadcast sets into wireless headphones. Revelers experience a thumpin’ dance party, while onlookers simply see a bunch of people rocking their bodies in total silence. It’s a major trip for everyone involved. Also in full effect are members of the Conduit Center, a wellness practice based in East Hartford, Conn. In its Wellness Village, practitioners host yoga workshops, meditation sessions, Thai massage and even Hula-Hoop lessons. Other irie highlights include the Alchemystics, Dub Apocalypse and SensaMotion.

June 9-11, Bellows Falls

June 16-19, Woodford

vermontfestivalsllc.com YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE: Montréal Folk Festival on the Canal (montrealfolkfest.com), Old Songs Folk Festival (festival.oldsongs.org)

ziontificproductions.com YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE: Wanderlust Stratton (wanderlust.com), Manifestivus (manifestivus.com) DANCIN’ IN THE MOONLIGHT

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The Alchemystics

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W

e’re on the cusp of a colossal outbreak — a pandemic surge of infectious revelry I like to call “festival fever.” And Vermont is patient zero. Fortunately, this contagion is one you’ll want to catch. The only cure? Get yourself to as many summer fiestas as you can. No matter what part of the state you live in, dozens of unique, outdoor wingdings are just a quick road trip away. As a brief primer for festival season, here are seven diverse offerings that will take you to various nooks and crannies of Vermont and beyond — save for one glaring omission: the Burlington Discover Jazz Festival. But don’t worry, we’ll be checking in on all of that magic in the next few weeks. !

Summer in Vermont means music festivals galore

Lorde

Ricky Skaggs


GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

S UNDbites

News and views on the local music scene B Y J O RDAN A D A MS

COURTESY OF TIA ROONEY

THU 5.18

WIZN welcomes

Satisfaction: A Rolling Stones Experience

FRI 5.19

104.7 The Point welcomes

SUN 5.21

Boss Hog

MON 5.22

SuicideGirls: Blackheart Burlesque

THU 5.25

Whitehorse

FRI 5.26

Oh Wonder

FRI 5.26

Carpenter’s Tribute Concert

TUE 5.30

Reeve Carney

The Record Company Smooth Hound Smith

Aspero Saicos

Troy Millette

And the Winner Is…

Out to Sea

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Mondo Cozmo

Weakened Friends, The Devon McGarry Band

THU 6.01

Runaway Gin: A Tribute to Phish

FRI 6.02

Broods

Mister F

Michi

JUST ANNOUNCED — 6.13 Comedy Open Mic 6.22 Stevie Wonder’s “Songs in the Key of Life” 7.22 Pop Evil 10.25 Bad Suns 1214 Williston Road, South Burlington 802-652-0777 @higherground @highergroundmusic

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SOUNDBITES

99.9 The Buzz 99 Cent Low Dough Show feat.

SEVEN DAYS

Local experimental concert promotion group Burlington Gull recently announced its final shows. Masterminds CAROLINE DECUNZO and JACK BRAUNSTEIN are taking their talents to Philadelphia. But in an email to Seven Days, they mention that they’re looking forward to taking a short hiatus from the promoter lifestyle. “We’re excited to just spectate for a bit [and] experience new stuff from that angle,” they write. They go on to thank all of the “brilliant artists, open-minded showgoers [and] misguided haters” they’ve worked with in the Queen City. (Kudos for acknowledging the haters. Everyone’s opinion is valid, I guess — even if it’s a dissenting one.)

TUE 5.30

Charlotte Cardin

05.17.17-05.24.17

ARTS NEWS + VIEWS

For up-to-the-minute news about the local music scene, read the Live Culture blog at sevendaysvt.com/liveculture.

booked just days before their GPN set. On Friday, September 8, they’re heading to the Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion to open for two of yesteryear’s studliest powerhouse crooners: RICHARD MARX and RICK SPRINGFIELD. And then they’ll be, ahem, right there waiting for you as they open GPN on Saturday, September 16. If you want to see Millette and Gombas before their GPN performance, you’ll have plenty of chances. The two perform fairly regularly in the Burlington area. For instance, you can catch them on Friday, May 19, at Farnham Ale & Lager in South Burlington. They’re also at Nectar’s on Tuesday, May 23, as part of an ongoing residency.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Last week, numerous Vermont-based bands, artists and DJs aggressively campaigned via social media to get on the bill at this year’s Grand Point North music festival. More than 70 acts, each nominated either by themselves or their fans, were included on the ballot. Yet only one would claim the coveted opening slot this September. Out of 3,874 total votes cast, the duo of singer-songwriter/guitarist TROY MILLETTE and violinist DYLAN GOMBAS emerged victorious with 901 votes. There’s no point in ignoring the obvious: With well-known names such as TWIDDLE, MADAILA and KAT WRIGHT on the ballot, it’s safe to say that Millette and Gombas were solidly considered underdogs. A little bit about the fellas: The two met while studying at Saint Michael’s College and both have been lifelong music enthusiasts. In an email to Seven Days, Millette sheds some light on his musical origin story. “When I was a kid, I used to think I was ELVIS [PRESLEY],” Millette writes. “I would run around in this white jumpsuit singing ‘Blue Suede Shoes’ all day.”

Since no one will be able to get that image out of their head, I’d like to make a request, Mr. Millette: Please bring this vision to life. Perform your GPN set clad in the finest white jumpsuit money can buy. Bonus points for actual blue suede shoes. Both Millette and Gombas are Vermont natives, hailing from Fairfax and Peacham, respectively. The acoustic duo plays a straightforward mix of originals and covers, with Millette as primary lyricist. He comes from the ’90s school of soft-rock singer-songwriters and even has the requisite raspy, MATCHBOX TWENTY drawl. (I call that particular affectation a “yawrl.”) Gombas comes from classical and bluegrass backgrounds. He’s a former member of the Vermont Youth Orchestra and has claimed multiple victories at the Cracker Barrel Bazaar & Fiddle Contest in Newbury. Another fun fact about Millette: His second cousin, GREG KRIESEL — aka GREG K. — is the bassist in the OFFSPRING. Yup. The Offspring. Will we hear a cover of “Pretty Fly (for a White Guy)” during their set? Other exciting stuff on the duo’s plate: They’re working on a debut EP and have a pretty dope opening gig

5/15/17 5:04 PM


music Dancin’ in the Moonlight « P.72

OSHEAGA MUSIC AND ARTS FESTIVAL August 4-6, Montréal

ROCKFIRE

June 23-25, Barre

SUMMER ON SALE NOW KIDS FREE tickets on select events! Visit SprucePeakArts.org for details

Carol Ann Jones Quartet

osheaga.com YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE: The Thing in the Spring (thethinginthespring.com), Boston Calling (bostoncalling.com)

COURTESY OF PETER RYAUX-LARSEN

Saturday, June 17, 8pm A free-flowing up-tempo evening of rock, country, pop, jazz and blues.

In the early 20th century, Millstone Hill in Barre was home to 75 granite quarries, making it a staple of the local economy and an essential part of the overall granite industry. The sites have since been transformed into recreational trails. And, for one weekend in June, the place comes alive with RockFire, a unique celebration that combines music, sculpture, art and, of course, fire. Pyrophobes, beware: This “elemental experience” features live displays of fire-art from the Iron Guild, a group of purveyors and exhibitionists of the molten arts. Basically, these modern-day blacksmiths get their jollies by hurling liquid metal at enormous slabs. It’s like being inside a volcano. On the music side of things, songwriter and Skinny Pancake artist-in-residence Bow Thayer returns with his band. You’ll also find the traditional Scottish ensemble St. Andrews Pipeband of Vermont. And then there’s the pyrophone organ, which, as you might guess, literally spits fire as it’s played.

Among the biggest summer festivals within two hours of Burlington, the Osheaga Music and Arts Festival gives Coachella a run for its money. Across five stages, household names and underground darlings alike come together for a blissed-out rager just minutes from downtown Montréal. This indie music carnival’s headliners seem to get more impressive every year. Some will say nothing could top last year’s über-famous top-slot performer, Radiohead. But this year’s biggest acts — the Weeknd, Lorde and Muse — might appeal to a slightly different set. What do these three artists have in common, aside from ubiquity? Perhaps they tend toward overly showy and sensational appeals to emotion. Not that there’s anything wrong with that. Noteworthy acts include R&B maven Solange, Australian singer-songwriter Gordi, British glam-revivalists Temples and Swedish groove-meisters Little Dragon.

rockfirevt.com YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE: South End Art Hop (seaba.com), Vermont Renaissance Faire (vtgatherings.com) Osheaga

JENNY BROOK BLUEGRASS Comedian Bob Marley Friday, July 7, 8pm New England’s King of Comedy

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June 22-25, Tunbridge

Dar Williams Friday, July 14, 8pm “One of America’s very best singersongwriters.” – The New Yorker

SprucePeakArts.org 802-760-4634

As one of the largest bluegrass festivals in these here parts, Jenny Brook Bluegrass features some of Appalachia’s finest pickers, such as the Gibson Brothers and David Davis and the Warrior River Boys. Ricky Skaggs and Kentucky Thunder take top billing. Skaggs probably needs a wheelbarrow — or maybe a minivan — to cart around all of his industry trophies. He’s won multiple Grammy Awards for Best Country Instrumental Performance. The International Bluegrass Music Association crowned his band Instrumental Group of the Year on numerous occasions. And, in the 1980s, the Academy of Country Music awarded Skaggs and co. Touring Band of the Year five times. After soaking up the sounds, you might feel the urge to pick up a banjo yourself. If so, consider enrolling in Jenny Brook Bluegrass University. Professional musicians will show you the ropes on the stringed instrument of your choosing.

jennybrookbluegrass.com YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE: Sugarbush Brew-Grass Festival (sugarbush.com), Rattlingbrook Bluegrass Festival (rattlingbrookbluegrassfestival. wordpress.com)

122 Hourglass Drive, Stowe

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FRENDLY GATHERING

OTIS MOUNTAIN GET DOWN

Who needs correct spelling when you’re immersed in three days of funk-laden, jamtastic, soul-licious music? In truth, the Frendly Gathering’s misspelling is tied to the fest’s high-concept manifesto. That screed claims that there’s “no I in frends” and outlines the 10 tenets of “frendship.” They are (with my own interpretations): passion (feel strongly); mutual accountability (don’t pass the buck); humility (you’re not as cool as you think you are); inclusivity (cliques are for kids); respect (do unto others…); revelry (it’s a party, after all); collaboration (you can’t do it alone); selflessness (it’s not just about you); integrity (do things the right way); and honesty (let it all out). After several years in Windham, this year’s wild rumpus moves to the Sugarbush Resort at Mount Ellen — which makes sense, since a group of professional snowboarders founded the festival. Home-state jam champs Twiddle headline the first two nights, and a hefty batch of locals anchor this year’s lineup, including Kat Wright, Madaila, smalltalker, the Renegade Groove, Peace in the Valley, and DJs Disco Phantom, Taka and Cre8.

This homegrown shindig is technically across state lines, but its origins can be traced back to Burlington. A group of the festival’s founders once operated “the Range,” an off-the-grid performance space in a South End basement. In 2013, they sought to take the party outdoors and found themselves atop Otis Mountain, upon which sits a momand-pop ski area. (Not so coincidentally, the family of one of OMGD’s originators owns the mountain.) The lineup typically leans toward on-the-cusp, cutting-edge artists — ones who garner attention from big-name outlets such as National Public Radio and Pitchfork. For instance, one of this year’s headliners, Overcoats, made waves with their NPR Tiny Desk Concert back in April. Other headliners include Delicate Steve, Jojo Abot and Sam Evian. Repping the 802 are the Wormdogs, Iron Eyes Cody and smalltalker.

June 29-July 1, Waitsfield

frendlygathering.com YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE: Twiddle’s Tumble Down (twiddlemusic.com), Onion River Music Campout (Facebook page, flynntix.com)

September 8-10, Elizabethtown, N.Y.

otismountain.com YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE: Grand Point North (grandpointnorth.com), Solid Sound: Wilco’s Music & Arts Festival (solidsoundfestival.com)

Contact: jordan@sevendaysvt.com


GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

LEARN LAUGH LOUNGE

THIS WEEK FRIDAY 19

YOUR LOVE,

OUR MUSICAL

SATURDAY 20

S

UNDbites

LAURIE

NEXT WEEK Boy Harsher

KILMARTIN

CO NT I NU E D F RO M PA G E 7 3

(Bigman is making the move to Philly, too.) The second and final event, dubbed the Peaceout Party, on Sunday, May 28, is purported to be a low-key affair with “inventive singer-songwriters” WENDY EISENBERG (BIRTHING HIPS) and OLIVIA WILKINS-BECKER (OJ). Locals CHOPAN and PAT COPPINGER are also scheduled to appear. Email Como Tapes for the event’s semiprivate location.

Fight for Your Right

(802) 859-0100 | WWW.VTCOMEDY.COM 101 main street, BurlingtoN

SPRING IS IN THE 1

5/15/17 10:48 AM

AIR

Listening In If I were a superhero, my superpower would be the ability to get songs stuck in other people’s heads. Here are five songs that have been stuck in my head this week. May they also get stuck in yours. Follow sevendaysvt on Spotify for weekly playlists with tunes by artists featured in the music section.

,

,

,

,

Tomorrow”

,

SOVEREIGNTY, ILLADELPH, MGW, AND LOCAL AND FAMOUS ARTISTS THE TOBACCO SHOP WITH THE HIPPIE FLAVOR 75 Main St., Burlington, VT 864.6555 • Mon-Thur 10-9 Fri-Sat 10-10 Sun 10-8

www. nor ther nl i ghts pi pes . c om Must be 18 to purchase tobacco products, ID required @ N o r t h e r n L i g h t s V T

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HAIM “Want You Back” EBN EZRA “Gimme Back My Baby” KIIARA “Whippin (feat. Felix Snow)” ROMANS “Uh Huh” LE MATOS FEATURING PAWWS “No

LARGEST SELECTION OF SCIENTIFIC AND AMERICAN GLASS IN TOWN

SEVEN DAYS

Dave Randall

a few other inspirational acts, such as BILLY BRAGG, ANI DIFRANCO and RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE, before diving deep into topics such as the Arab Spring andUntitled-11 the intersection of youth culture and political resistance. After his presentation, Randall will field questions regarding the book and other related topics. If you aren’t able to make it out to the event, he recently recorded an in-depth podcast with UK record label ROUGH TRADE, during which he examines the historical context and various themes from his book. Stream it on RT’s SoundCloud page. !

05.17.17-05.24.17

British guitarist DAVE RANDALL visits Phoenix Books Burlington on Thursday, May 18, as part of his ongoing book tour. The former axe-man of electronica band FAITHLESS also played with DIDO and SINÉAD O’CONNOR, and recently published Sound System: The Political Power of Music. Part memoir, part cultural analysis, the book examines the inherent political power of music and how it can be used as vehicle for change. In the first chapter, “Roots,” Randall recalls his first exposure to protest music: the SPECIAL A.K.A.’s 1984 anti-apartheid anthem, “Nelson Mandela.” He goes on to name

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Their departure also means that their cassette tape label, Como Tapes, is making the move to the City of Brotherly Love, as well. The label’s cofounder, GREG GOLDSTEIN, lives just over the Delaware River in New Jersey. Of course, DeCunzo and Braunstein wouldn’t leave town without making a big old noisy ruckus. They’ve announced two final Burlington Gull shows, both of which are copresented with local promoters Friends + Family. On Sunday, May 21, they take over Speaking Volumes’ warehouse for a “weird graduation party” for “turntup dads and grads.” The description references Braunstein’s impending graduation from the University of Vermont. The school’s 2017 commencement ceremonies are also this coming weekend. Northampton, Mass., cold-wave duo BOY HARSHER is set to headline. DJ ORGANIC MOMMY provides beats, and DILLIGAF — aka the seldom-seen, loosely incorporated R&B band composed of Braunstein, DeCunzo and performance artist HARVEY BIGMAN — will also make an appearance. COURTESY OF HENNA MALIK

COURTESY OF TRAVIS WEITZMAN

FRI 26 | SAT 27


music

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

WED.17 burlington

CITIZEN CIDER: Brett Hughes (country), 6 p.m., free.

Whose Love Is It, Anyway? You and your partner probably think that your love story

is the greatest of all time. How you met, your courtship, your wedding — it’s basically When Harry Met Sally... meets Enchanted. Wouldn’t it be great to see your own romantic tale turned into a live, improvised musical? It could happen

THE DAILY PLANET: The Baker’s Basement (indie rock, hip-hop), 8:30 p.m., free.

at REBECCA VIGIL and EVAN KAUFMAN’s long-form improv comedy show, “Your Love, Our Musical.” The comedians pick

JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

songs. Along with musical director DAN REITZ, the duo has deep roots in New York City’s theater and comedy scenes.

JUNIPER: The George Voland Quintet (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free.

a random couple from the audience, interview them onstage and reenact their tale with on-the-spot, Broadway-style Catch “Your Love, Our Musical” on Friday, May 19, at the Vermont Comedy Club in Burlington.

LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Mike Martin (jazz), 7 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Irish Sessions (traditional), 7 p.m., free. Willverine (electro-pop, soul), 9:30 p.m., free.

RUBEN JAMES: DJ Cre8 (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Navytrain (neoAmericana), 7 p.m., free. DJ Dakota (hits), 10 p.m., free.

NECTAR’S: Vinyl Night with DJ Disco Phantom (vinyl DJs), 6 p.m., free. Sammich, Eggy (jam), 9:30 p.m., free/$5. 18+.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): About Time (funk, jazz), 8 p.m., free.

RÍ RÁ THE IRISH LOCAL & WHISKEY ROOM: The County Down (Celtic, eclectic), 7:30 p.m., free.

SMITTY’S PUB: Hi-Note Karaoke, 8:30 p.m., free. THE TAP ROOM AT SWITCHBACK BREWING: Jacob Green (roots, Americana), 6 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: Matt Olson (gypsygrass), 7 p.m., free. Matthew O’Neil (alternative, Americana), 10:30 p.m., free.

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: ‘Your Love, Our Musical’ (improv), 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., $15.

RED SQUARE: The Jeff Salisbury Band (blues), 6 p.m., free. DJ David Chief, 11 p.m., free.

chittenden county

BACKSTAGE PUB: Karaoke with Jenny Red, 9 p.m., free.

SIDEBAR: Happy Folk (jam, Americana), 9 p.m., free.

FARNHAM ALE & LAGER: Troy Millette and Dylan Gombas (acoustic), 7 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Hannah Fair (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free.

chittenden county

05.17.17-05.24.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

MISTER SISTER: Godfather Karaoke with Wolfie, 8:30 p.m., free. MONKEY HOUSE: The North Country (Americana, psychedelic), 8:30 p.m., free. STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Bluegrass Session, 7 p.m., free. SUGARHOUSE BAR & GRILL: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

SWEET MELISSA’S: D. Davis (acoustic), 5:30 p.m., donation. John Lackard Blues Jam, 7:30 p.m., free. WHAMMY BAR: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

SEVEN DAYS

MOOGS PLACE: Lesley Grant (Americana), 8 p.m., free.

middlebury area

51 MAIN AT THE BRIDGE: Blues Jam, 8 p.m., free. CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free. TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. Open Mic Night, 9 p.m., free.

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northeast kingdom PARKER PIE CO.: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE: Chris Page (singer-songwriter), 4 p.m., free. Wild Accusations (rock, Americana), 7 p.m., $5. Craig Mitchell (house, hits), 11 p.m., $5. RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ KermiTT (hits), 10 p.m., $5.

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Open Mic with Andy Lugo, 9 p.m., free.

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Standup Open Mic, 7 p.m., free. Girl Crush Comedy (standup, improv), 9 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: Friday Morning Sing-Along with Linda Bassick & Friends (kids’ music), 11 a.m., free. Waves of Adrenaline (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free. Rebecca Padula with Dan Wyman (Americana), 8 p.m., free. MC Mycelium (hip-hop), 9 p.m., free. Ryan Ober & Co. (rock), 10 p.m., $5. Justin Panigutti Band (rock, soul), 11:30 p.m., $5.

HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: The Record Company, Smooth Hound Smith (rock, blues), 8 p.m., $18/20.

FRI.19 // ‘YOUR LOVE, OUR MUSICAL’ [IMPROV]

JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: Rushmore (rock), 7 p.m., free.

outside vermont MONOPOLE: Open Mic with Lucid, 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Bow Thayer (folk-rock), 7:30 p.m., free.

THU.18

burlington

ARTSRIOT: Yung $eth (hip-hop), 8:30 p.m., $10/12. THE DAILY PLANET: The Mike Santosusso Experience (rock), 8 p.m., free. DRINK: BLiNDoG Records Acoustic Sessions, 5 p.m., free. FOAM BREWERS: DJ Fattie B (hits), 6 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: George Petit Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Jeremy Gilchrist (singersongwriter), 7 p.m., free. Luke J. (alt-country), 8:30 p.m., free. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: The Good Morning Gills (rock), 10 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Trivia Mania, 7 p.m., free. The Morris-set: Jagged Little Pill (Alanis Morrisette tribute), 9:30 p.m., $8.

PHO NGUYEN: Karaoke with DJ Walker, 8 p.m., free. RADIO BEAN: Sweet Transition (a cappella), 1 p.m., free. The Baker’s Basement (indie rock, hip-hop), 7 p.m., free. James Harvey Trio (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free. DJ Disco Phantom (eclectic dance), 10 p.m., $5. The Dan Ryan Express (jazz), 11 p.m., $5. RED SQUARE: The Growlers (rock, blues), 7 p.m., free. D Jay Baron (mashup, hip-hop), 11 p.m., free. RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ Cre8 (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

MONKEY HOUSE: Anthill Presents: Third Thursdays with Spocka Summa and Friends, Eyedos, Khaosity, PR Department (hip-hop), 9 p.m., $3/8. 18+. ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Jenni and the Jazz Junketeers, 7 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier SWEET MELISSA’S: David Langevine (ragtime), 6 p.m., donation. Ricky Golden (acoustic), 8 p.m., donation.

stowe/smuggs

SIDEBAR: Mal Maiz, Sabouyouma (Cumbia), 10 p.m., free.

MARTELL’S AT THE RED FOX: Open Mic & Jam Session, 9 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Pete’s Posse (folk), 7:30 p.m., free.

MOOGS PLACE: Open Mic with Allen Church, 8:30 p.m., free.

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Short Jam (improv), 6 p.m., free. Casey James Solengo (standup), 7:30 p.m., $5. The Daily Grind (improv), 8:45 p.m., $5.

chittenden county BACKSTAGE PUB: Trivia, 9:30 p.m., free. CUCINA ANTICA: Cooie Sings (Americana), 6 p.m., free. HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Satisfaction: A Rolling Stones Experience, 8:30 p.m., $13/15.

SUSHI YOSHI (STOWE): The Dan Ryan Express (jazz), 5 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury

ZENBARN: Justin Panigutti (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free.

middlebury area

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Throttle Thursdays with DJ Gold (hits), 9 p.m., free. TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: DJ Da.Root (hits), 9 p.m., free.

outside vermont

MONKEY HOUSE: Puppy Love: An Evening with Faux in Love and Shy Husky (indie), 8:30 p.m., $3.

OLIVE RIDLEY’S: Karaoke with DJ Jon Berry, 9 p.m., free.

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: King Me (acoustic), 5 p.m., free. Radio Flamingo (rock covers), 9 p.m., free.

MONOPOLE: William Hale (rock), 10 p.m., free.

FRI.19

burlington

ARTSRIOT: Zach Nugent’s Legion of Jerry (Grateful Dead tribute), 8 p.m., $12/15. BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD: Jeff and Gina (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free. FOAM BREWERS: Osage Orange (rock), 8 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Caroline Cotter, Emily Mure, Michael Howard (alt-folk), 8 p.m., $5-10. Taka (vinyl DJ), 11 p.m., free. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Our Common Roots (blues, folk-rock), 10 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Seth Yacovone (solo acoustic blues), 7 p.m., free. Blues for Breakfast, 9 p.m., $7. RÍ RÁ THE IRISH LOCAL & WHISKEY ROOM: Supersounds DJ (top 40), 10 p.m., free.

STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Jeezum Crow, Justin LaPoint (Americana, rock), 7 p.m., free. SUGARHOUSE BAR & GRILL: Flpside (rock), 9 p.m., free. WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: DJ Von Hauer (eclectic dance), 9 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Bird Full of Trees (roots, blues), 6 p.m., free. Tsunamibots, Blowtorch (surf-punk), 9 p.m., free. LA PUERTA NEGRA: Joe Moore (jazz), 6 p.m., free. SWEET MELISSA’S: Honky Tonk Happy Hour with Mark LeGrand, 5:30 p.m., donation. Peace in the Valley (jam), 9 p.m., donation.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Chris Lyon (solo acoustic), 6 p.m., free. Starline Rhythm Boys (rockabilly), 9 p.m., $5. FRI.19

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GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

REVIEW this The Mangroves, The Grand Scheme EP (SELF-RELEASED, DIGITAL DOWNLOAD)

The Mangroves are an instrumental quartet from Lyndonville. They came together as students of Lyndon State College’s innovative Music Business and Industry program. In the band’s short career, its members have evolved, with remarkable speed, from dorm-funk jams into a seriously polished group of young musicians. Their latest project, The Grand Scheme EP, feels like a line in the sand marking a new beginning. Between this stellar sampler and an extensive summer tour schedule, the Mangroves are making it clear they aim to have an impact far beyond the Northeast Kingdom. They’ve definitely got the tools for the job. Like the band’s previous releases — not including Urban Priorities, a 2014 collaboration with BTV hip-hop champs Lynguistic Civilians — The Grand Scheme is a three-song EP. It’s a short ride, but the recipe works because every track here is single-worthy material.

Joey Agresta, Let’s Not Talk About Music

Regardless of his pseudonym or stylistic fancy at any given time, Agresta’s writing has often touched upon themes of existential dread, the cosmic joke and processing emotional trauma. Here he condenses universal truth into the structure of popular song. Let’s Not Talk About Music is Agresta’s Pet Sounds. That 1966 Beach Boys classic advanced the field of music production by blending pop and avantgarde with elements of psychedelia. It was a bridge between dancehall and progressive rock and roll. Agresta utilizes the same technique on Let’s Not Talk About Music that inspired Brian Wilson: Phil Spector’s “Wall of Sound.” This recording process relies on using many simple, warm layers to create a thick, symphonic sound when played over AM radio and lo-fi speakers. Side A begins with “A Win Song for Bernie.” The instrumental synth arrangement transports the listener to an alternate reality where Sen. Bernie Sanders ascends the White House steps. Then reality sets back in with “Don’t Be Sad.” Here Agresta sings about the process of accepting and moving through sadness over

accompaniment that conveys optimism in its punk bass line, New Wave synths and surf-rock drums. “Jerks” strips back to reveal more peace-punk bones. It’s a minimal track whose Zen nursery-rhyme lyrics are made for sing-alongs: “We live on the edge of a fumble / For this I am grateful / I don’t want to be hateful.” The album starts to get nice and gooey with the doo-wop bop of “Baby Girl.” “I Won’t Give Up (featuring Palberta)” goes full flower child with a jubilant chorus of vocal harmonies and exclamations on the radical act of love: “Love is yours / dare to believe it.” Part of the brilliance of Pet Sounds was that even amid Wilson’s provocative experimentation, his songs maintained their inherent pop perfection. In its own way, Let’s Not Talk About Music shares that quality. From “I See a Light” to “I Want to Live Again,” each track of Agresta’s latest is incredibly catchy and easy to listen to. Let’s Not Talk About Music by Joey Agresta is available on CD and LP at Pure Pop and digitally at wharfcatrecords.bandcamp.com. Agresta plays an album release party with Bleach Day and Big French on Monday, May 22, at ArtsRiot in Burlington.

JUSTIN BOLAND

05.17.17-05.24.17 SEVEN DAYS

Joey Agresta doesn’t want to talk about music; he wants to talk about love. Real, beaming, smiling, universal love of the kind that Ram Dass passed on during the Summer of Love. The kind of love on which the Beatles crowd-surfed across continents. As a musician, Agresta has worn many names, from Nosebleed Island to Son of Salami to Joey Pizza Slice. His songs have captivated the underground scene in the Northeast for a decade. His last major release, A Study in Eraser Headless Tape Recording — as Son of Salami — was a demonstrative thesis on a rarely used recording technique involving the removal of the erase head of a tape recorder. Let’s Not Talk About Music is Agresta’s first release under his given name. This creative decision reflects the personal honesty delivered on the album.

pockets and harmonized grooves. There are no flashy solos, no obvious “lead” musician. The Mangroves are totally committed to their songs. The project wraps up with “POWr,” a return to the straightforward jam-funk sounds that once defined the band. Yet what stands out this time around isn’t the immaculate mix but the tasteful composition and dynamite performances. These gentlemen are locked in, and it’s a pleasure to hear. Indeed, the Mangroves have grown so much, it’s almost like they’re a new band. The short EP inevitably leaves the listener wondering what else they’ve been cooking up. In the short term, the Mangroves will be working the festival circuit hard this summer, so you’ll have ample opportunities to catch them live and find out. Beyond that? Life comes at you fast, and young bands finishing college are always in a precarious position. One can only hope the Mangroves will stick together and deliver a full-length album of this caliber. In the meantime, The Grand Scheme EP is the perfect entrée to introduce these NEK talents to a wider audience. The Grand Scheme EP by the Mangroves is available at themangrovesofficial.bandcamp.com. The Mangroves play Nectar’s in Burlington on Thursday, June 1, opening for the Atlantic Effect.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

(WHARF CAT RECORDS, CD, DIGITAL DOWNLOAD, VINYL)

The party starts with “1970,” a big, sexy slab of synth-heavy insanity. The hook is anthemic, and the vamps are absolutely scorching, pushed by the atomic-clock fury of drummer Ian MacGregor. There’s also a break that showcases the slapping chops of bassist Austin Beveridge. This is how you start off a set when you’ve got something to prove. “Cnidarian,” the second cut, is perhaps the EP’s finest moment. Floating on a dreamlike R&B pocket, the track spotlights the near-psychic bond between guitarist Mike Marzerka and keyboard player Dylan Allwine. Their understated and deft melodic lines blend seamlessly. It’s a very mature piece of work. It also sounds flat-out amazing. On their two previous EPs, the Mangroves opted to self-produce and got predictably demo-tape results. That loose, live feel was hardly a bad thing, but The Grand Scheme sounds completely different. This is largely thanks to the production expertise of Brian Warwick, a Grammy-winning engineer who recently joined the faculty at Lyndon State — sorry, Northern Vermont University, as it will soon be called. The EP sounds lush and spacious, and Warwick’s mix emphasizes the ensemble’s aesthetic: deep

AMELIA DEVOID

MUSIC 77

YOU A VT ARTIST OR BAND? SEND US YOUR MUSIC! DIGITAL: MUSIC@SEVENDAYSVT.COM; GET YOUR MUSIC REVIEWED: ARE SNAIL MAIL: MUSIC C/O SEVEN DAYS 255 S. CHAMPLAIN ST., SUITE 5, BURLINGTON, VT 05401


music FRI.19

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

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TAP 25: Wylie Shipman (singersongwriter), 6 p.m., free.

middlebury area 51 MAIN AT THE BRIDGE: Crazyhearse (Acoustic Set) (folk), 7 p.m., free.

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: DJ Kilie (hits), 9:30 p.m., free. TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: Dr. No (funk, rock), 9 p.m., $3.

champlain islands/northwest TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: Arthur James (blues), 7 p.m., free.

upper valley

WINDSOR STATION RESTAURANT & BARROOM: My So Called Band: ’90’s Tribute Night, 9:30 p.m., free.

outside vermont

MONOPOLE: Adrian Aardvark (psychedelic grunge-folk), 10 p.m., free. MONOPOLE DOWNSTAIRS: Happy Hour Tunes & Trivia with Gary Peacock, 5 p.m., free. OLIVE RIDLEY’S: Dawn Tyler Watson (blues), 8 p.m., $15/18. All Request Night with DJ Skippy (hits), 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Binger (jam), 8:30 p.m., free.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 05.17.17-05.24.17

SIDEBAR: Coon Hill John (folk, rock), 7 p.m., free. DJ Disco Phantom (eclectic dance), 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Cookie’s Hot Club (gypsy jazz), 8 p.m., free. SMITTY’S PUB: Robin Gottfried Duo (rock), 8 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Best in Show! (standup), 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., $15.

chittenden county

JUNIPER: Matt the Gnat and the Gators (narrative noir-folk), 9 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: The Dream Eaters (dream-pop), 7:30 p.m., free. Wooden Dinosaur (alt-country), 9 p.m., free. Taka (vinyl DJ), 11 p.m., free. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: DJ Moar Mead (deep house, hip-hop), 10 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Adlai Waxman (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free. Tar Iguana, Al’s Pals (jam), 9 p.m., $5. RÍ RÁ THE IRISH LOCAL & WHISKEY ROOM: DJ Dodg3r (EDM, trap), 10 p.m., free.

just critics who think so. Countless artists have released their own versions of its various tracks, such as James Blake’s “A Case of You,” Rufus Wainwright’s “All I art-pop trio has gone further than dabbling in the odd cover. Led by Jocie Adams (ex-the Low Anthem), the group has reimagined and reconstructed the entire album, replacing Mitchell’s understated acoustics with electronic samples, analog synths and intrepid experimentalism. Arc Iris present their take on Blue this Saturday, May 20, at ArtsRiot in Burlington.

ZENBARN: The Aerolites (folk, funk), 9 p.m., free.

middlebury area

51 MAIN AT THE BRIDGE: Paul Asbell Quartet (jazz), 7:30 p.m., free. CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: City Limits Dance Party with DJ Earl (top 40), 9:30 p.m., free. TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: Bob McKenzie Band (blues), 6 p.m., $3.

champlain islands/northwest

RADIO BEAN: Bad Accent (folk), 6 p.m., free. Hat & Boots, acorns are YUM. (ambient folk), 8 p.m., free. Lake Superior, Little Slugger (indie), 11 p.m., $5.

TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: Leno & Young (rock covers), 7 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE: Zach Rhoads (singer-songwriter), 5 p.m., free.

WINDSOR STATION RESTAURANT & BARROOM: Toast (rock, soul), 9:30 p.m., free.

upper valley

TUE.23 burlington

THE GRYPHON: P’tit Trio (jazz), 8 p.m., free. LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Shane Hardiman Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: Open Mic with Eric George, 7 p.m., free. Alex Smith (Americana), 9 p.m., free. Honky Tonk Tuesday with Eric George & Friends, 10 p.m., $3. RED SQUARE: DJ Aras (dance), 7 p.m., free. Pop Rap Dance Party, 10 p.m., free.

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Irish Session, 2 p.m., donation.

mad river valley/ waterbury

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

NECTAR’S: Troy Millette and Friends (acoustic), 7:30 p.m., free. Dead Set (Grateful Dead tribute), 10 p.m., $3/5.18+.

barre/montpelier

MOOGS PLACE: Bobfest with the Jokermen and Special Guests (Bob Dylan tribute), 4 p.m., $5.

outside vermont

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Orange Julians (electro-pop), 9:30 p.m., free.

SUGARHOUSE BAR & GRILL: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Seth Yacovone (solo acoustic blues), 7 p.m., free.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Stephen Callahan Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free. Happy Folk and Friends (jam, Americana), 10 p.m., free.

STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Justin Panigutti (singersongwriter), 7 p.m., free.

SWEET MELISSA’S: Kevin Atkinson (acoustic), 6 p.m., donation. Drunk & in the Woods (soul, funk), 9 p.m., $5.

stowe/smuggs

Want” and James Taylor’s “River.” Providence, R.I.’s ARC IRIS are fans, too. But the

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Timothy James Connection (folk, rock), 5 p.m., free. Last Kid Picked (rock covers), 9 p.m., free.

ESPRESSO BUENO: James Graham (blues, soul), 7:30 p.m., free. Happy Folk (jam, Americana), 8:30 p.m., free.

JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

generally referred to as one of the greatest folk albums of all time. And it’s not

MONKEY HOUSE: Tambourelli & Her SuperTrips (rock), 9 p.m., $3/8. 18+.

ARTSRIOT: Arc Iris Reimagines Joni Mitchell’s ‘Blue’ (art-pop), 8 p.m., $8/10.

CLUB METRONOME: Green Mountain Cabaret Presents: Cabaret Roulette (burlesque), 8 p.m., $15/20. Retronome With DJ Fattie B (’80s dance party), 9 p.m., free/$5.

A Case of Blue Joni Mitchell’s seminal 1971 album Blue is

JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: Old Tone String Band (Americana), 7 p.m., free.

SAT.20

BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD: Bryan McNamara (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free.

SEVEN DAYS

RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ Raul (hits), 6 p.m., $5. DJ Reign One (EDM), 11 p.m., $5.

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Scott Graves and Chris Martin (acoustic rock), 6 p.m., free. Megan Jean & the KFB (Americana), 9 p.m., free.

burlington

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Relative Souls (jam), 7 p.m., $5. Mashtodon (hip-hop), 11 p.m., $5.

SIDEBAR: Ron Stoppable (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

chittenden county SAT.20 // ARC IRIS REIMAGINES JONI MITCHELL’S BLUE [ART-POP]

northeast kingdom PARKER PIE CO.: Subject to Change (rock), 8 p.m., free.

outside vermont

MONOPOLE: Ausable Branch (folk, rock), 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Jeff Przech and the Outfit (singer-songwriter), 8:30 p.m., free.

SUN.21

burlington

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Game Night, 7:30 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: 2nd Annual Burlington Record Fair, 11 a.m., free/$5. Mi Yard Reggae Night with DJs Big Dog and Jahson, 9:30 p.m., free/$3. 18+. RADIO BEAN: Pete Sutherland and Tim Stickle’s Old Time Session (traditional), 1 p.m., free. Kosi (jazz, folk), 7 p.m., free. Ty Miller (acoustic soul), 8:30 p.m., free. The Crew of the Half Moon (garage-rock), 10 p.m., free. Kooked Out (surf, punk), 11 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE: Seth Yacovone Band (rock, blues), 7 p.m., free. DJ Cre8 (hip-hop), 11 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Bluegrass Brunch with Coon Hill John, noon, free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: The Four Tonys (improv), 8:15 p.m., free.

chittenden county HEALTHY LIVING MARKET & CAFÉ: Jazz Brunch with Art Herttua, 11 a.m., free.

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Boss Hog, Aspero Saicos (rock), 8 p.m., $15/17. SUGARHOUSE BAR & GRILL: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier SWEET MELISSA’S: Live Band Karaoke, 8 p.m., donation.

outside vermont

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Bluegrass Brunch, noon, free. Pickin’ Party with Dave Clark (bluegrass), 3 p.m., free.

MON.22 burlington

ARTSRIOT: Joey Agresta (Album Release), Bleach Day, Big French (indie, experimental), 8:30 p.m., $8/10. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Lamp Shop Lit Club (open reading), 8 p.m., free. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Karaoke, 9:30 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Ruckzuck, Soul Juice, Plastique Mammals (psychedelic, jam), 9 p.m., free/$5. 18+. RADIO BEAN: Joe Jack, F. Woods (indie, folk-rock), 7 p.m., free. Gestalt (indie), 10 p.m., free. Ruckzuck (psychedelic, jam), midnight, free. SIDEBAR: Family Night (open jam), 9 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Comedy & Crêpes (standup), 7 p.m., free.

chittenden county BACKSTAGE PUB: Open Mic, 9:30 p.m., free.

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Trivia with Top Hat Entertainment, 7 p.m., free. WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: DJ Jessbro Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Rudy Dauth (acoustic), 7:30 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury

SHEPHERDS PUB: John Smyth (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free.

middlebury area CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Aliendog (rock), 8 p.m., free.

HATCH 31: Erin Cassels-Brown (indie folk), 6 p.m., free. Kelly Ravin and Lowell Thompson (country), 7 p.m., free. TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: Karaoke with Roots Entertainment, 9 p.m., free.

outside vermont

OLIVE RIDLEY’S: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Jazz & Fondue, 7 p.m., free.

HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: SuicideGirls: Blackheart Burlesque, 9 p.m., $25-85. MONKEY HOUSE: Kelly Ravin (country), 6 p.m., free.

WED.24

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VE HELP SA S ANIMAL LIVES!

FOR ALL THE DETAILS, HIT WWW.POINTFM.COM... OR JUST LISTEN!

Humane Society of Chittenden County

Sunday, June 11, 8AM - 11AM Veterans Memorial (Dorset) Park, South Burlington

104.7 & 93.3 BURLINGTON 05.17.17-05.24.17

23rd Annual Walk for the Animals & 5K Doggie Fun Run

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Trip #3 is to catch Cold War Kids at Red Rocks in Colorado!

93.7 MIDDLEBURY 104.7 & 100.3 MONTPELIER 95.7 THE NORTHEAST KINGDOM 103.1 & 107.7 THE UPPER VALLEY

SEVEN DAYS

Registration & Information: www.chittendenhumane.org

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SHOP

CLUB DATES

music

NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

LOCAL

THE TRUMP TOUR! NOW MORE THAN EVER

FRI, MAY 26 7 PM CONTOIS AUDITORIUM $25 in advance get tickets at $30 at the door SEVENDAYSTICKETS.COM

MADE POSSIBLE IN PART BY:

Say you saw it in…

SUN.21 // BOSS HOG [ROCK]

Read all about it @ burlingtonbookfestival.com

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10/30/12 6:04 PM

Animal Farm In 1989, New York City’s

BOSS HOG

introduced

the world to a blues-punk sound they called “pig fuck.” After a solid decade of rocking out, they went into a lengthy hiatus. But, in 2016, fans were likely as happy as swine in shit to hear that new music was on its way. Though last year’s Brood Star EP was written before the most recent U.S. presidential election, singer Cristina Martinez told the website Essentially Pop that its defiant songs have become “more resonant” since then. She and her husband/bandmate, Jon Spencer — of the Jon Spencer Blues Explosion — also contributed a track to the anti-Trump benefit compilation Battle Hymns. Catch Boss Hog on Sunday, May 21, at the Higher Ground Showcase Lounge in South Burlington. Locals ASPERO SAICOS open.

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WED.24 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

burlington

CITIZEN CIDER: Brett Hughes (country), 6 p.m., free. THE DAILY PLANET: Silver Bridget (saw-folk), 8 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

05.17.17-05.24.17

JUNIPER: Jazz Wednesday 4th Anniversary: Miles Davis Birthday Celebration (Latin jazz), 8:30 p.m., free. LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Paul Asbell Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Irish Sessions (traditional), 7 p.m., free. Willverine (electro-pop, soul), 9:30 p.m., free.

SEVEN DAYS

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Open Mic with Andy Lugo, 9 p.m., free.

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NECTAR’S: Vinyl Night with DJ Disco Phantom (vinyl DJs), 6 p.m., free. Sammich, Space Carnival (jam), 9:30 p.m., free/$5. 18+.

RÍ RÁ THE IRISH LOCAL & WHISKEY ROOM: The County Down (Celtic, eclectic), 7:30 p.m., free. RADIO BEAN: Sophie Patenaude (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free. RED SQUARE: Joe Moore Band (blues), 6 p.m., free. DJ David Chief, 11 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Fatty Shay and Friends (house), 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Hannah Fair (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Standup Open Mic, 7 p.m., free. The Best! (comedy), 9 p.m., free.

chittenden county JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: Bluegrass Jam Session, 7 p.m., free.

MISTER SISTER: Godfather Karaoke with Wolfie, 8:30 p.m., free. SUGARHOUSE BAR & GRILL: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

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barre/montpelier

SWEET MELISSA’S: D. Davis (acoustic), 5:30 p.m., donation. Umlaut (Tex-Mex Kraut-rock), 8 p.m., donation. WHAMMY BAR: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Christine Malcolm (folk), 8:30 p.m., free.

middlebury area CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. Open Mic Night, 9 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom PARKER PIE CO.: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

outside vermont MONOPOLE: Open Mic with Lucid, 10 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Bow Thayer (folk-rock), 7:30 p.m., free. !

For up-to-the-minute news about the local music scene, read the Live Culture blog at sevendaysvt.com/liveculture.


VENUES.411 BURLINGTON

STOWE/SMUGGS AREA

CLAIRE’S RESTAURANT & BAR, 41 Main St., Hardwick, 472-7053 CORK WINE BAR & MARKET OF STOWE, 35 School St., Stowe, 760-6143 MARTELL’S AT THE RED FOX, 87 Edwards Rd., Jeffersonville, 644-5060 MATTERHORN, 4969 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-8198 MOOGS PLACE, Portland St., Morrisville, 851-8225 PIECASSO PIZZERIA & LOUNGE, 899 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-4411 RIMROCKS MOUNTAIN TAVERN, 394 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-9593 THE RUSTY NAIL, 1190 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-6245 STOWEHOF INN, 434 Edson Hill Rd., Stowe, 253-9722 SUSHI YOSHI, 1128 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-4135

MAD RIVER VALLEY/ WATERBURY

51 MAIN AT THE BRIDGE, 51 Main St., Middlebury, 3888209 BAR ANTIDOTE, 35C Green St., Vergennes, 877-2555 CITY LIMITS, 14 Greene St., Vergennes, 877-6919 HATCH 31, 31 Main St., Bristol, 453-2774 TOURTERELLE, 3629 Ethan Allen Hwy., New Haven, 453-6309 TWO BROTHERS TAVERN LOUNGE & STAGE, 86 Main St., Middlebury, 388-0002

RUTLAND AREA

HOP’N MOOSE BREWERY CO., 41 Center St., Rutland, 775-7063 PICKLE BARREL NIGHTCLUB, Killington Rd., Killington, 422-3035

CHAMPLAIN ISLANDS/ NORTHWEST

BAYSIDE PAVILION, 15 Georgia Shore Rd., St. Albans, 524-0909 SNOW SHOE LODGE & PUB, 13 Main St., Montgomery Center, 326-4456 TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB, 28 N. Main St., St. Albans, 524-1405

UPPER VALLEY

BREAKING GROUNDS, 245 Main St., Bethel, 392-4222 WINDSOR STATION RESTAURANT & BARROOM, 26 Depot Ave., Windsor, 674-4180

LUNCH| DINNER

| WEEKEND BRUNCH | PARTIES | FRIDAY LIVE MUSIC| TUESDAY TRIVIA waterworksvt.com | 802.497.3525

Located in the Champlain Mill, Winooski — 1 mile from Downtown Burlington! 6h-waterworks051717.indd 1

5/16/17 5:13 PM

And The Winner Is... Troy Millette & Dylan Gombas gra

NORTHEAST KINGDOM

BIG JAY TAVERN, 3709 Mountain Rd., Montgomery, 326-6688 COLATINA EXIT, 164 Main St., Bradford, 222-9008 JASPER’S TAVERN, 71 Seymour La., Newport, 334-2224 MARTELL’S AT THE FOX, 87 Edwards Rd., Jeffersonville, 644-5060 MUSIC BOX, 147 Creek Rd., Craftsbury, 586-7533 PARKER PIE CO., 161 County Rd., West Glover, 525-3366 PHAT KATS TAVERN, 101 Depot St., Lyndonville, 626-3064 THE PUB OUTBACK, 482 Vt. 114, East Burke, 626-1188 THE STAGE, 45 Broad St., Lyndonville, 427-3344 TAMARACK GRILL, 223 Shelburne Lodge Rd., East Burke, 626-7390

ce potter’s

OUTSIDE VERMONT

MONOPOLE, 7 Protection Ave., Plattsburgh, N.Y., 518-563-2222 NAKED TURTLE, 1 Dock St., Plattsburgh, N.Y., 518-566-6200. OLIVE RIDLEY’S, 37 Court St., Plattsburgh, N.Y., 518-324-2200 PALMER ST. COFFEE HOUSE, 4 Palmer St., Plattsburgh, N.Y. 518-561-6920 THE SKINNY PANCAKE, 3 Lebanon St., Hanover, N.H., 603-277-9115

presentS the SEVEN DAYS

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MUSIC 81

BIG PICTURE THEATER & CAFÉ, 48 Carroll Rd., Waitsfield, 496-8994 THE CENTER BAKERY & CAFÉ, 2007 Guptil Rd., Waterbury Center, 244-7500 CORK WINE BAR & MARKET, 40 Foundry St., Waterbury, 882-8227

MIDDLEBURY AREA

SEVEN DAYS

BACKSTAGE PUB, 60 Pearl St., Essex Jct., 878-5494 GOOD TIMES CAFÉ, Rt. 116, Hinesburg, 482-4444 HALYARD BREWING CO., 80 Ethan Allen Dr., #2, S. Burlington, 497-1858 HIGHER GROUND, 1214 Williston Rd., S. Burlington, 652-0777

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ, 28 Main St., Montpelier, 229-9212 CAPITAL GROUNDS CAFÉ, 27 State St., Montpelier, 223-7800 CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS, 70 Main St., Montpelier, 223-6820 ESPRESSO BUENO, 248 N. Main St., Barre, 479-0896 GUSTO’S, 28 Prospect St., Barre, 476-7919 KISMET, 52 State St., Montpelier, 223-8646 LA PUERTA NEGRA, 44 Main St., Montpelier, 613-3172 MULLIGAN’S IRISH PUB, 9 Maple Ave., Barre, 479-5545 NORTH BRANCH CAFÉ, 41 State St., Montpelier, 552-8105 POSITIVE PIE, 20 State St., Montpelier, 229-0453 RED HEN BAKERY + CAFÉ, 961 US Route 2, Middlesex, 223-5200 THE SKINNY PANCAKE, 89 Main St., Montpelier, 262-2253 SWEET MELISSA’S, 4 Langdon St., Montpelier, 225-6012 THREE BEAN CAFÉ, 22 Pleasant St., Randolph, 728-3533 WHAMMY BAR, 31 W. County Rd., Calais, 229-4329

PLEASE CONSIDER US FOR THIS YEAR’S DAYSIES NOMINATIONS

05.17.17-05.24.17

CHITTENDEN COUNTY

BARRE/MONTPELIER

GREEN MOUNTAIN LOUNGE AT MOUNT ELLEN, 102 Forest Pl., Warren, 583-6300 HOSTEL TEVERE, 203 Powderhound Rd., Warren, 496-9222 SHEPHERDS PUB, Rt. 100, Waitsfield, 496-3422 THE RESERVOIR RESTAURANT & TAP ROOM, 1 S. Main St., Waterbury, 244-7827 SLIDE BROOK LODGE & TAVERN, 3180 German Flats Rd., Warren, 583-2202 ZENBARN, 179 Guptil Rd., Waterbury Center, 244-8134

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

AMERICAN FLATBREAD, 115 St. Paul St., Burlington, 861-2999 ARTSRIOT, 400 Pine St., Burlington, 540 0406 AUGUST FIRST, 149 S. Champlain St., Burlington, 540-0060 BARRIO BAKERY & PIZZA BARRIO, 203 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington, 863-8278 BENTO, 197 College St., Burlington, 497-2494 BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD, 25 Cherry St., Burlington, 854-4700 BRENNAN’S PUB & BISTRO, UVM Davis Center, 590 Main St., Burlington, 656-1204 CITIZEN CIDER, 316 Pine St., Burlington, 497-1987 CLUB METRONOME, 188 Main St., Burlington, 865-4563 THE DAILY PLANET, 15 Center St., Burlington, 862-9647 DOBRÁ TEA, 80 Church St., Burlington, 951-2424 DRINK, 133 St. Paul St., Burlington, 951-9463 ETHAN ALLEN PUB/PHO NGUYEN, 1130 North Ave., Burlington, 658-4148 THE FARMHOUSE TAP & GRILL, 160 Bank St., Burlington, 859-0888 FINNIGAN’S PUB, 205 College St., Burlington, 864-8209 FOAM BREWERS, 112 Lake St., Burlington, 399-2511 THE GRYPHON, 131 Main St., Burlington, 489-5699 JP’S PUB, 139 Main St., Burlington, 658-6389 JUNIPER, 41 Cherry St., Burlington, 658-0251 LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ, 115 Church St., Burlington, 8633759 LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP, 12 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington, 660-9346 MAGLIANERO CAFÉ, 47 Maple St., Burlington, 861-3155 MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB, 167 Main St., Burlington, 864-6776 MUDDY WATERS, 184 Main St., Burlington, 658-0466 NECTAR’S, 188 Main St., Burlington, 658-4771 RADIO BEAN, 8 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington, 660-9346 RASPUTIN’S, 163 Church St., Burlington, 864-9324 RED SQUARE, 136 Church St., Burlington, 859-8909 RÍ RÁ THE IRISH LOCAL & WHISKEY ROOM, 123 Church St., Burlington, 860-9401 RUBEN JAMES, 159 Main St., Burlington, 864-0744 SIGNAL KITCHEN, 71 Main St., Burlington, 399-2337 SIDEBAR, 202 Main St., Burlington, 864-0072 THE SKINNY PANCAKE, 60 Lake St., Burlington, 540-0188 SOCIAL CLUB & LOUNGE, 165 Church St., Burlington SPEAKING VOLUMES, 377 Pine St., Burlington, 540-0107 SPEAKING VOLUMES, VOL. 2, 7 Marble Ave., Burlington, 540-0107 THE TAP ROOM AT SWITCHBACK BREWING, 160 Flynn Ave., Burlington, 651-4114 VERMONT COMEDY CLUB, 101 Main St., Burlington, 859-0100 THE VERMONT PUB & BREWERY, 144 College St., Burlington, 865-0500

HINESBURGH PUBLIC HOUSE, 10516 Vt., 116 #6A, Hinesburg, 482-5500 JAMES MOORE TAVERN, 4302 Bolton Access Rd. Bolton Valley, Jericho, 434-6826 JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN, 30 Rte., 15, Jericho, 899-2223 MISTER SISTER, 45 Main St., Winooski, 448-3740 MONKEY HOUSE, 30 Main St., Winooski, 655-4563 ON TAP BAR & GRILL, 4 Park St., Essex Jct., 878-3309 PARK PLACE TAVERN, 38 Park St., Essex Jct. 878-3015 ROZZI’S LAKESHORE TAVERN, 1022 W. Lakeshore Dr., Colchester, 863-2342 STONE CORRAL BREWERY, 83 Huntington Rd., Richmond, 434-5767 SUGARHOUSE BAR & GRILL, 733 Queen City Park Rd., S. Burlington, 863-2909 WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK, 20 Winooski Falls Way, Winooski, 497-3525


Golden Opportunity Susan Calza, Axel’s Gallery & Frame Shop B Y R A CHEL ELI Z ABET H JONES

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

s humans, we’re so damn awkward,” says Susan Calza, “[but] we’ve got this incredible radiance, too.” In a recent phone interview, the Montpelier artist shared insights into her current show, “LET’S NOT PRETEND, it’s ordinary gold,” at Axel’s Gallery & Frame Shop in Waterbury. Using gold as a central metaphor, the interdisciplinary artist has crafted a delightfully peculiar, personal installation featuring recent sculpture, drawing, painting and textile-based works. It’s a portal into a broad-reaching career guided by enchantment and intuition. “A lot of the work is about deception,” Calza said. The exhibition title is an amalgam of two of its works; “LET’S NOT PRETEND” is a soft sculpture of Harris Tweed jackets the artist found at thrift shops. Having amassed the upscale coats but unable to find wearers, Calza explained, she found herself stuffing them one inside the other. At the time, she said, she had been thinking about the Penn State (Jerry Sandusky) child sex abuse scandal and the multiple layers humans assemble to cover often-ugly realities. On the left side of the outermost jacket she embroidered the words “Let’s not pretend.” In the other work referenced in the exhibit’s title, “This is ordinary gold,” Calza again uses repurposed materials, but they serve as talismanic accents within a larger installation. Nine walls enclose a small, inaccessible room, visible through three windows. Calza specifically chose an odd number of sides for the work: “When you open a door, you never do see a flat face,” she said. “I didn’t want your eye to rest really comfortably. I wanted you to have to shift your eyes to jar your brain a little bit.” Small items adorn the outer walls of the nonagon; Calza selected them to correspond in some way to the wallpaper on the panel’s other side. Among the objects are a spinning top and a micrometer, both gilded in gold. The visual conflation suggests not only Calza’s elevation of the humble toy and tool, but also her challenge of gold as a human power symbol: “Gold is really ordinary,” she said. “It’s just a damn mineral.” Calza’s penchant for sometimes-cheeky reclamation asserts itself throughout the exhibition,

CALZA SHOWS AN UNCANNY KNACK FOR TRANSFORMING ACUTELY POLITICAL TOPICS

INTO HIGHLY PERSONALIZED MANIFESTATIONS.

from an oversize ball of wool on a pedestal (“Happy Medium”) to the billowing hanging sculpture titled “Mama.” Calza made the latter using a 12-foot-long handmade Afghan blanket that she purchased from a thrift store for a dollar — she couldn’t leave “her” behind, she said. To give new life to the stereotypically matronly domestic item made from granny squares, Calza threaded strips of golden-yellow paper through the knitted yarn. Another large sculpture, also made from castoff textiles, hangs opposite “Mama.” Calza created “9000 Is Enough” by tearing her collection of vintage hankies and other white- and cream-colored linens into strips, then knotting them 9,000 times. “All of my work is pretty obsessive,” she acknowledged. However, unlike many artists who express a sense of nostalgia and love for reclaimed objects, Calza seems to reject preciousness. She made “Black Box Dramas,” sumi ink drawings that line the gallery walls, using her nondominant hand. “I found I was getting too tight, too controlled,” Calza said. “I wanted to get to a deeper emotional, psychological plane with [these drawings].” Depicting a variety of figures — a baby and its mother, children, floating demon-esque heads


ART SHOWS

art

O’Brien Community Center, Winooski, Saturday, May 20, 2-5 p.m. Info, q17@riseup.net.

stowe/smuggs

TALK: PAUL SHORE: The Brooklyn-based artist discusses his exhibition “Drawn Home,” for which he drew every object in his house. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center, Thursday, May 18, 7 p.m. Info, 257-0124.

KINDER ARTS END-OF-YEAR EXHIBITION: Works including group murals, mobiles and paintings produced by children enrolled in the River Arts Kinder Arts Program during the 2016-17 school year. May 18-June 2. Info, 888-1261. River Arts in Morrisville.

REVIEW — the works have a fluid, fragmented, dreamlike quality. A deep anxiety that is both political and more intimate underscores this show. In conversation, Calza evidences global awareness, from the exploitation of South African gold miners to air pollution in Beijing. Her “Middle East Series” — tabletop clay sculptures dusted in gold — distinctly mimics homelike structures, referencing the widespread violent destruction of communities across that region. Almost hiding in the gallery’s front window is “Gotcha, Election 2016.” In it, a vaguely threatening, jack-in-thebox-like figure looms over the doorway of a small, square domicile made of paper.

NEW THIS WEEK

mad river valley/ waterbury

CLASSIC MOTORCYCLES AT THE BUNDY MODERN: Classic motorcycles and cars along with related motoring art and motorabilia at the Bauhaus modern building in the woods. May 20-July 9. Info, 583-5832. Bundy Modern in Waitsfield.

Calza shows an uncanny knack for transforming acutely political topics into highly personalized manifestations. Nothing is on the nose. There is no moralism, only the self-aware creation of objects that can be both frustrating and friendly. With genuine wonder, Calza has formed a poetic puzzle that invites viewers to navigate human contradictions, consumerism and the confounding question of how we construct beauty and value. !

middlebury area

! ELAINE ITTLEMAN: Large, bold and colorful abstract landscapes by the Shoreham artist. Reception: Friday, May 19, 5-7 p.m. May 19-June 25. Info, 382-9222. Jackson Gallery, Town Hall Theater, in Middlebury.

champlain islands/ northwest

! ‘ART ON THE REFUGE’: Two-dimensional works by 20 artists depicting the variety of species and habitats found in the refuge. Reception: Friday, May 19, 5:30-6:30 p.m. May 19-July 21. Info, 868-4781. Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge in Swanton.

Contact: rachel@sevendaysvt.com

INFO “LET’S NOT PRETEND, it’s ordinary gold,” through May 27 at Axel’s Gallery & Frame Shop in Waterbury. Reception and artist’s talk Friday, May 26, 6-8 p.m. axelsgallery.com

manchester/bennington

! VERMONT GLASS GUILD: A group exhibition of works by guild members. Reception: Saturday, May 20, 4-6 p.m. May 20-July 2. Info, 362-1405. Elizabeth de C. Wilson Museum, Southern Vermont Arts Center, in Manchester.

Far left: “LET’S NOT PRETEND”; near left: “Black Box Dreams”

ONGOING SHOWS burlington

AARON SCOT INGHAM: The artist behind Bent Nails Studio shows his works and furniture made from found and salvaged materials. Thursdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Through June 1. Info, 595-4148. Burlington Town Center. ‘ALNOBAK: WEARING OUR HERITAGE’: An exhibition of recent works by contemporary Abenaki artists paired with historic garments, accessories, photographs and prints that reflect previous generations. Organized by the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum in partnership with the Vermont Abenaki Artists Association. Through June 17. Info, 652-4500. Amy E. Tarrant Gallery in Burlington. ‘IMBIBE: DRINKING IN CULTURE’: An exhibition using an eclectic selection of drinking vessels to investigate the complex social, physical and aesthetic experience of liquid consumption. BARBARA BLOOM: Conceptual artist’s books accompanied by texts from print scholar Susan Tallman. CATHERINE JANSEN: “1008,” an exhibition of the photographer’s images of India, including digital prints and projections as well as ambient sound from field recordings. Through May 21. Info, 656-8582. Fleming Museum of Art, University of Vermont, in Burlington.

! MARCUS RATLIFF: “The Ladies Room,” new

works by the Vermont collage artist. Reception and artist talk: Sunday, June 11, 4 p.m. May 17-July 1. Info, 767-9670. BigTown Gallery in Rochester.

‘CONJURING: SHE RISES’: Works by 13 female artists, in commemoration of the 325th anniversary of the Salem witch trials. Through May 27. Info, spacegalleryvt@gmail.com. The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery in Burlington.

ART EVENTS

EMERGENT MEDIA MFA THESIS SHOW: Work by MFA candidates exploring diverse projects focused on art, entrepreneurship, innovation and technology. Through May 27. GALEN CHENEY: “Street Level,” a solo exhibition of abstract works with inspiration drawn from Arabic script and urban graffiti. Through June 12. Info, cthompson@champlain.edu. Champlain College Art Gallery in Burlington.

ALTERED BOOKMAKING: An expressive-arts therapist leads this workshop in altering and customizing preexisting books. Bring your own book or use a supplied one; materials provided. RSVP required. JourneyWorks, Burlington, Monday, May 22, 6-8 p.m. $20. Info, 860-6203.

SILENT AUCTION FOR BLACK LIVES MATTER VT: Bid on works of local art to help raise funds for the August My Sister’s Keeper conference.

‘HERE STILL’: Portraits by Vermont painters Kate Longmaid, Nathaniel J Moody and Corrine Yonce. Through July 25. Info, joseph@ newcitygalerie.org. New City Galerie in Burlington. HOWARD CENTER GROUP EXHIBITION: An exhibition of works by members of the Howard Center Arts Collective and students from the Bellcate School. Through June 1. Info, aforguites@howardcenter.org. Flynndog in Burlington.

BURLINGTON SHOWS

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MOEL COMMUNITY INSTALLATION WEEK: Community members are invited to participate in constructing the museum’s upcoming exhibition, “Bells & Whistles.” Use the “Contact Us” form at museumofeverydaylife.org to let museum staff know when you plan to attend. The Museum of Everyday Life, Glover, May 20-28. Info, claredol@sover.net.

‘FACING AN EPIDEMIC’: A multimedia exhibition campaign with works by Ed Kashi, Tom Laffay and Aubrey Roemer that seek to raise awareness about and support Nicaraguan sugarcane workers impacted by occupationrelated health hazards. Through May 31. Info, 656-9511. Center for Cultural Pluralism, University of Vermont, in Burlington.

SEVEN DAYS

‘ART 100’ FUNDRAISER: The fourth annual “everyone wins” art raffle of original art, benefiting River Arts. A $100 ticket entitles two people to attend the event, enjoy appetizers and choose an original artwork with a value of at least $100. River Arts, Morrisville, Friday, May 19, 6 p.m. Info, 888-1261.

EMILY MITCHELL: Narrative paintings by the Richmond artist. Through June 30. Info, 859-9222. SEABA Center in Burlington. 05.17.17-05.24.17

TALK: ‘AMERICAN FACES: A CULTURAL HISTORY OF PORTRAITURE AND IDENTITY’: Middlebury College Museum of Art director Richard H. Saunders speaks about our collective understanding of portraiture, its history in America, how it shapes our individual and national identity, and why we make portraits. Vermont History Museum, Montpelier, Thursday, May 18, 12-1:30 p.m. Info, 479-8500.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

randolph/royalton

‘THE COMBINATION’: Black-and-white photographs taken by Elliot Burg of UVM senior and dedicated amateur boxer Ali Watson. Through June 1. Info, eburg4@gmail.com. Livak Fireplace Lounge and Gallery, Dudley H. Davis Center, University of Vermont, in Burlington.


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IAA FAMILY PORTRAIT PROJECT: Family portraits taken by BCA photographer Michelle Saffran, alongside family stories written by Integrated Arts Academy students. More than 145 family portraits are also on display at Fletcher Free Library, North End Studios, Barrio Bakery, Chubby Muffin and Nunyuns. Through May 31. Info, 864-8475. Burlington City Hall. JANN LABELLE-PRINCE: “60 Years of Painting,” a retrospective of works by the Vermont artist. Through May 31. Info, 862-8679. Brickwork Art Studios in Burlington. JOHN ROSE: “Grace Within the Contours,” minimalist sculpture by the internationally acclaimed West Coast artist. Through May 23. Info, 863-9553. The Havoc Gallery in Burlington. JUSTIN HOEKSTRA: “Heavy Smile,” a solo exhibition of large-scale abstract paintings by the former BCA artist-in-residence. Through July 9. Info, 865-7166. Vermont Metro Gallery, BCA Center, in Burlington. ‘NINE BY NINE’: Nine 12-by-12-inch titles, made by Heidi Broner, Sally Duval, Wendy James, Irene Lederer LaCroix, Carol MacDonald, Dianne Shullenberger, Ellen Spring, Daryl Storrs and Ulrike Tessmer. Tiles are accompanied by additional works by each of the artists. Through May 31. Info, 863-6458. Frog Hollow Vermont Craft Gallery in Burlington. ‘PAPER VIEW’: Iskra Print Collective showcases works made during its spring 2017 classes, featuring prints by Liza Cowan, Diane Culotta, Will Gebhard, Serdar Gizer, Julius Higgins, Yeshua Hill, Michelle Hobbs, Jabari Jones, Meryl Kremer, Ada Leaphart, Macy Margolin, Kate Robinson, Jeremy Smith and Danielle Vogl. Through June 16. Info, 516-263-7335. Karma Bird House Gallery in Burlington. PETER KATZ: Mixed-media works by the self-taught Burlington artist. Through May 31. Info, 658-6016. Speeder & Earl’s Coffee, Pine Street, in Burlington.

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‘READY. FIRE! AIM.’: A group exhibition that explores the psychology of impulsive action and strategic thinking, in collaboration with the Hall Art Foundation and inspired by Andy and Christine Hall’s collecting philosophy. Through July 9. Info, 865-7166. BCA Center in Burlington. ROBERT WALDO BRUNELLE JR.: “The Old Neighborhood,” paintings inspired by vintage photographs of Rutland, as well as colorful kinetic sculptures. Through July 31. Info, 859-9222. The Gallery at Main Street Landing in Burlington. ROBERT WALDO BRUNELLE JR.: A series of paintings of Winooski’s concrete bridge, painted throughout the year by the local artist. STEVE SHARON: Abstract paintings by the local artist. Through May 31. Info, 651-9692. VCAM Studio in Burlington. ‘VERMONT LANDSCAPE & WATER’: A group exhibition featuring seasonal landscapes by Vermont artists Sean Dye, Phil Laughlin, Sandra Reese and Ken Russack. Through July 29. SARAH BUNKER: A solo exhibition of works in acrylic, oils pastels, graphite and collage. Through June 15. Info, 860-4972. Black Horse Gallery in Burlington.

! SENIOR ART SHOW: “Class of 2017” artworks from Mount Mansfield Union, Champlain Valley Union, Burlington, South Burlington, Essex and Colchester high schools. Closing reception: Wednesday, May 31, 6-7 p.m. Through May 31. Info, 859-9222. Art’s Alive Gallery in Burlington.

share work and support one another in their artistic practices. Through July 30. Info, dorseyhogg@ gmail.com. Fletcher Free Library in Burlington.

chittenden county

‘CHIAROSCURO’: Images by 48 photographers whose images employ the contrast of light and shade. Through May 21. Info, 777-3686. Darkroom Gallery in Essex Junction. ‘CHICKENS!’: A group exhibition of chicken-themed works by local artists. Through August 31. Info, ealexander22@yahoo.com. Jericho Town Hall. ‘DUO EXHIBIT OF VERMONT WATERCOLORS’: Amanda Amend and Susan Bull Riley show paintings of the Green Mountain State. Through May 28. Info, 899-3211. Emile A. Gruppe Gallery in Jericho.

! GINNY JOYNER: The Colchester watercolor artist and illustrator shows framed original paintings, as well as and unframed archival prints and greeting cards. Reception: Wednesday, May 24, 5-7 p.m. Through May 28. Info, 985-9511. Rustic Roots in Shelburne. ‘THE HISTORY OF RACING IN MILTON’: An exhibition about the town’s role as a Chittenden County stock-car-racing hot spot. Through October 31. Info, 363-2598. Milton Historical Society. JANE SANDBERG: “Another Perspective,” watercolors and stained-glass work by the Jericho artist. Through May 31. Info, 434-2550. Mt. Mansfield Community Television in Richmond. ‘PIECED TRADITIONS: JEAN LOVELL COLLECTS’: Historic bedcovers gathered by the Californiabased collector and longtime friend of the Shelburne Museum. Through October 31. Info, 985-3346. Shelburne Museum.

JAMES LUND & JENEANE LUNN: Paintings in watercolor and pastel by the couple, who have summered in Italy since 2011. Through August 15. Info, 479-7069. Morse Block Deli in Barre. JAYNE SHOUP: Pastels of the Vermont artist’s rural neighborhood. Through May 31. Info, 223-1981. The Cheshire Cat in Montpelier. JO MACKENZIE: “Moments,” watercolor paintings on paper featuring domestic interiors and florals. Through June 30. Info, 828-0749. Governor’s Gallery in Montpelier. LAURA JANE WALKER: “Studies in the Art of Chance,” abstractions made using dyed salt-water, meticulously placed steel nails and cotton string. Through May 25. Info, 828-3291. Spotlight Gallery in Montpelier. MARIA ANGHELACHE: “From Nature to Abstract,” pastel and acrylic works on paper and canvas. Through June 30. Info, 828-0749. Vermont Supreme Court Gallery in Montpelier. ‘SEEING THE FOREST FOR THE TREES’: A group exhibition reflecting the diversity of woody plants and the feeling of forests, including traditional and nontraditional media and small installations. Main Floor Gallery. ROGER GOLDENBERG: “Homage to the Earth,” a series of monotypes inspired by the planet’s climate, weather and geology. Third Floor Gallery. Through May 28. Info, 479-7069. Studio Place Arts in Barre. ‘SHOW 17’: Latest works by members of the Vermont-based contemporary artists’ collective gallery. Through June 10. Info, 272-0908. The Front in Montpelier.

JOSEPH SALERNO: “Woods Edge,” small oil paintings merging observation and abstraction, created at the same forest vantage over more than two years. Through May 23. Info, 985-3848. Furchgott Sourdiffe Gallery in Shelburne.

‘SPRING FOUR-WARD’: Watercolors by Vermont Watercolor Society members Lisa Forster Beach, Annelein Beukenkamp, Gary C. Eckhart and Robert O’Brien. Through June 2. Info, 279-6403. Central Vermont Medical Center in Berlin.

KATE LONGMAID: “Freedom Speak,” an exhibition of portraits with graffiti-like phrases and slogans that merge the artist’s interest in capturing individual identities and political realities through image and voice. Through May 31. Info, 985-8222. Shelburne Vineyard.

stowe/smuggs

WENDY BREEDEN: Watercolors, collage and charcoal drawings by the Stowe artist. Through June 30. Info, 864-2088. Salon Salon, Winooski.

INAUGURAL SHOW: The new Morrisville gallery space celebrates its grand opening with an exhibition of works by Marie LaPré Grabon, Kathleen Johanna Lovell and Jude Prashaw. Through June 9. Info, kathleenjlovell@gmail.com. Pretty Lights Gallery, Morrisville.

barre/montpelier

‘A CHANGE IN THE WEATHER’: Alaskan landscape paintings by Adelaide Murphy Tyrol and photographs by Richard Murphy. Through July 7. Info, 262-6035. T.W. Wood Gallery in Montpelier. DJ BARRY: “The Leftovers,” stencil and spray-paint designs by the Vermont artist. T. NAMAYA: “100 Flowers of Peace,” poetry banners based on the poem of the same name, which has been translated into 109 languages. Through May 31. Info, 223-3338. Kellogg-Hubbard Library in Montpelier. ‘FINDING YOURSELF IN VERMONT’: The Vermont Center for Geographic Information presents a group exhibition of artworks featuring maps of Vermont. Through June 3. Info, 828-0749. Vermont Statehouse Cafeteria in Montpelier.

STEPHEN BEATTIE: Digital photographs by the local artist. Through May 31. Info, 651-9692. RETN in Burlington.

‘FREAKS, RADICALS & HIPPIES: COUNTERCULTURE IN 1970S VERMONT’: An exhibition that explores the influx of people and countercultural ideas to the state, from communes to organic agriculture, progressive politics to health care reform, alternative energy to women’s and gay rights. Through December 31. Info, 479-8500. Vermont Heritage Galleries in Barre.

‘STRENGTH IN NUMBERS’ ANNUAL SHOW: Works by Vermont art teachers, who meet monthly to

HARRIET WOOD: A retrospective of abstract paintings by the Marshfield artist. Through June

VISUAL ART IN SEVEN DAYS:

16. Info, 454-8311. Eliot D. Pratt Library, Goddard College, in Plainfield.

ART LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY RACHEL ELIZABETH JONES. LISTINGS ARE RESTRICTED TO ART SHOWS IN TRULY PUBLIC PLACES.

‘FROM GENERATION TO GENERATION ... WE ARE HERE!’: A special exhibit honoring Jewish lives lost and stories of survival. Through May 18. Info, 253-1800. Jewish Community of Greater Stowe.

‘LAND MARKS: JANET FREDERICKS & MICHAELA HARLOW’: The two Vermont artists explore abstract landscapes on macro and micro scales in a variety of mediums, pushing references to the natural environment behind graphic mark-making. KRISTA HARRIS: “Retracing My Steps,” a solo exhibition of richly layered, gestural abstract paintings by the Colorado artist. Through May 30. Info, 253-8943. West Branch Gallery & Sculpture Park in Stowe. ‘LEGACY COLLECTION 2017’: Works by 19 living and 14 deceased artists whose art continues the legacy of Alden and Mary Bryan. Through December 23. ‘TRAVELLING ARTISTS’: A group show of more than 100 artworks by 60 artists from their travels around the world. Through June 25. Info, 644-5100. Bryan Memorial Gallery in Jeffersonville. PATRICIA DE GOGORZA: “Sunrise,” a retrospective of the sculptures, prints and paintings of the northern Vermont artist. Through June 6. Info, 456-8940. Vermont Studio Center Gallery II in Johnson. PHOTOS BY MARIE LAPRÉ GRABON: Photographs by the Vermont artist. Through June 30. Info, 635-7423. Dream Café in Johnson.

GET YOUR ART SHOW LISTED HERE!

IF YOU’RE PROMOTING AN ART EXHIBIT, LET US KNOW BY POSTING INFO AND IMAGES BY THURSDAYS AT NOON ON OUR FORM AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT OR GALLERIES@SEVENDAYSVT.COM.

CALL TO ARTISTS ‘ABSTRACTION’: Welcoming submissions of photos in which color, form, design and shape take the place of a representation of reality. For details and to submit, visit darkroomgallery. com. Deadline: May 17, midnight. Darkroom Gallery, Essex Junction. $29 for five images; $6 for each additional. Info, 777-3686. ‘BLACK & WHITE’: Inviting submissions of black-and-white photography for an upcoming exhibition to be juried by Jennifer Schlesinger. For details and to submit, visit photoplacegallery.com. Deadline: May 22. PhotoPlace Gallery, Middlebury. Up to five photographs for $35; $6 for each additional. Info, 388-4500. ‘LAND AND LIGHT AND WATER AND AIR’: Welcoming submissions for this annual fall juried exhibition of Vermont and New England landscape paintings. For details and to submit, visit bryangallery.org. Deadline: July 14. Bryan Memorial Gallery, Jeffersonville. Info, 644-5100. ‘LIGHTS! CAMERA! AUCTION!’: Seeking tax-deductible donations of art, beautiful and useful things, amusements, experiences and events for this annual auction to benefit Town Hall Theater and its programming. To contribute, contact Magna Dodge at magnadodge@ gmail.com. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury. Through May 22. Info, 462-3898. RUTLAND COUNTY AUDUBON WILDLIFE ART SHOW: Inviting visual artists working in any medium to submit up to three works to be included in an art show featuring nature and wildlife, May 26 through June 11. Scenic landscapes will not be considered. Works need not be for sale. For details and to submit, contact birding@rutlandcountyaudubon.org. Deadline: May 22. Stone Valley Arts, Poultney. SOLO & SMALL GROUP SHOWS 2018: Inviting proposals for upcoming exhibitions. To submit, send a brief written statement about yourself or the artist group and what you want to accomplish with a show, as well as a CD or DVD with eight to 12 images of representative work. Label carefully with name, medium, size, price and date of your work. Mail submissions to 201 N. Main Street, Barre, VT 05641. Deadline: June 9. Studio Place Arts, Barre. Free for members; $10 for nonmembers. Info, 479-7069. SOUTH END ART HOP: Registration is now open for the 25th annual South End Art Hop, to take place September 8 to 10. For details, visit seaba. com/art-hop. Deadline: June 16. SEABA Center, Burlington, Through June 16. Info, 859-9222. SUMMER JURIED SHOW: Vermont artists are invited to submit works in any medium for the gallery’s first annual juried summer show. Works must have been created within the past five years, with a dimension of no greater than 40 inches. For details and to submit, visit twwoodgallery.org. Deadline: May 21. T.W. Wood Gallery, Montpelier. $30. Info, 262-6035. ‘TEN’: Seeking submissions of artworks inspired by the old counting nursery rhyme, “One, two buckle my shoe…” For the full rhyme, details and to submit, visit studioplacearts.com. Deadline: June 2. Studio Place Arts, Barre. Free for members; $10 for nonmembers. Info, 479-7069. VERMONT PRINTS: The Burlington shop seeks Vermont- and/or Burlington-inspired prints by local artists and community members. Selected artists will receive monetary compensation and be part of the store’s partnership program. Deadline: May 29. For more info and to submit, visit commondeer.com/pages/artists. Common Deer, Burlington. Info, 497-0100.


ART SHOWS

‘Paper View’ They’ve done it again: Iskra Print Collective presents

works by their Class of Spring 2017 at the Karma Bird House Gallery in Burlington. Student prints are shown in the main gallery, with recent works by Iskra teachers

and teaching assistants occupying the back wall. Jabari Jones’ participatory print comes closest to a literal translation of the show’s title: With a sharp edge and some tape or glue, his two prints are transformed into a three-dimensional puppet theater. Participating artists include Liza Cowan, Diane Culotta, Will Gebhard, Serdar Gizer, Julius Higgins, Yeshua Hill, Michelle Hobbs, Meryl Kremer, Ada Through June 16. Pictured: paper theater by Jones.

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STUDENT ART SHOW: A group exhibition of works by Stowe students. Through May 27. Info, 253-8358. Helen Day Art Center in Stowe. ‘THRU OUR EYES’: Photography by youth, staff and board members of Laraway Youth & Family Services. Through May 31. Info, 635-2805. Laraway Youth & Family Services in Johnson. VERMONT LANDSCAPES: An exhibition of 38 artworks by 20 artists, featuring landscapes in oil, watercolor, pastel and acrylics, curated by Bryan Memorial Gallery. Through June 30. Info, 644-5100. Lamoille County Courthouse in Hyde Park.

! SUSAN CALZA: “LET’S NOT PRETEND, it’s

ordinary gold,� an installation by the acclaimed central Vermont artist. Reception: Friday, May 26, 6-8 p.m. Through May 27. Info, 244-7801. Axel’s Gallery & Frame Shop in Waterbury.

middlebury area

CAMERON SCHMITZ: “Suspended Moments,� a solo exhibition of new abstract oil paintings. Through May 28. Info, 877-2173. Northern Daughters in Vergennes.

KATE GRIDLEY: “A Few True Things,� still-life paintings that consider objects and their personalities by the Middlebury artist. Through May 31. Info, 989-7419. Edgewater Gallery on the Green in Middlebury. ‘LOST & FOUND’: Mixed-media and watercolor works by Vermont artists Pat Laffin and Gail Martin. Through June 1. Info, 453-6309. Tourterelle in New Haven.

ANNUAL STUDENT ART EXHIBITION: Works by K-12 students from across Rutland County. Through May 19. Info, 775-0356. Chaffee Art Center in Rutland.

! ELIZABETH MICHELMAN: “Notes From the Underground,� a site-responsive exhibition featuring video, collage, acrylic ink paintings and interactive sculpture by the Brookline, Mass., multimedia artist. Reception: Friday, May 19, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Artist talk: 6:30 p.m. Through June 2. Info, 282-2396. Castleton Downtown Gallery in Rutland.

IT’S TIME TO PICK THE DAYSIES!

‘FISH, FOWL & FLOWERS’: An exhibition of wildlife woodcarving by William Barnard and floral photographs by Richard Conrad. Through June 27. Info, 247-4956. Brandon Artists Guild.

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NORMA MONTAIGNE: “Splash of Color,� paintings by the Vermont artist. Through July 2. Info, 2474295. Compass Music and Arts Center in Brandon.

! ‘THE SHE PROJECT – PART I’: An interactive exhibition exploring what women of all ages experience as they cope with the pressure to maintain a youthful appearance at any cost, by Vermont multidisciplinary artists Mary Admasian and Kristen M. Watson. Closing reception: Friday, June 16, 5-8 p.m. Artist talk: 7 p.m. Through June 24. Info, galleries@castleton.edu. Castleton University Bank Gallery in Rutland.

champlain islands/northwest FRANKLIN COUNTY LIBRARIES ART BOP: Works by local artists. Through May 20. Info, 933-7323. Sheldon Municipal Library.

‘THE LIQUID EDGE: POLAR REGIONS’: Photographs by Massachusetts-based photographer Sarah Holbrook and soapstone carvings by Emil Socher of St. Armand, QuĂŠbec. Through June 5. Info, 355-2150. GreenTARA in North Hero. UPPER VALLEY SHOWS

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ART 85

SENIOR STUDIO ART THESIS EXHIBITION: Students of ART700 exhibit works in various media for this culminating exhibition, which showcases the work of advanced students completing semester-long independent studio art projects.

rutland/killington

SEVEN DAYS

JOE BOLGER: Addison County landscapes by the Shoreham painter. Through May 31. Info, 458-0098. Edgewater Gallery at Middlebury Falls.

STEVEN JUPITER: “After the Flood,� a new series of 10 monochrome photographs of a Vermont forest flooded with spring snowmelt. Through July 30. Info, 917-686-1292. Steven Jupiter Gallery in Middlebury.

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‘THE BAKER’S DOZEN’: A selection of works by BigTown artists, both new and long-established, in a show dedicated to longtime gallery friend and supporter Varujan Boghosian. Through July 23. Info, 349-0979. BigTown Gallery Vergennes.

Through May 26. Info, 443-3168. Johnson Memorial Building, Middlebury College.

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art CHAMPLAIN ISLANDS/NORTHWEST SHOWS

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upper valley

DAVID CRANDALL & JIM MAAS: Fine jewelry and painted bird carvings, respectively, by the local artisans. Through September 30. Info, 235-9429. Collective — the Art of Craft in Woodstock. ‘MAKING MUSIC: THE SCIENCE OF MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS’: An exhibition that explores the science behind making rhythms and harmonies heard. Through September 17. Info, 649-2200. Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich. ‘ODANAKSIS IS BLOOMING’: Ten Upper Valley plein air artists show new works in watercolor, oil, pastel and mixed media. Through May 26. Info, 649-1184. Norwich Public Library.

northeast kingdom

Sometimes, the Upside Down is even closer than you think. Using water as a natural mirror, photographer Steven Jupiter documents and abstracts a flooded Vermont forest in springtime. The monochromatic images, now on view in “After the Flood” at the artist’s Middlebury gallery, are somber and mysterious. They work to disorient, snaring

ALEXIS KYRIAK: Paintings by the New York-born Vermont artist. Through May 21. Info, 745-1393. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum.

the viewer in an otherworldly

‘IN THE KINGDOM OF THE ANIMALS’: An exhibition featuring a wide range of works expressing reverence for the animal world. Through July 9. Info, 533-2045. Miller’s Thumb Gallery in Greensboro.

rejuvenation. “While inundated,”

MARIE LAPRE’ GRABON: Selected drawings and paintings by the Vermont artist. Through June 3. Info, 578-8809. 3rd Floor Gallery in Hardwick. ‘RECYCLE INTO SPRING’: Second annual group exhibition of works by Vermont artists made with repurposed materials. Through May 27. Info, 3341966. MAC Center for the Arts Gallery in Newport. SEAN FRANSON: “Know Thyself,” digital works by the Vermont artist. Through June 1. Info, 748-8141. Northeastern Vermont Regional Hospital in St. Johnsbury. ‘SEEN AND UNSEEN’: A group exhibition of works that invite deep looking. Through June 13. Info, 748-0158. Northeast Kingdom Artists Guild in St. Johnsbury. SUE TESTER: New photographs of local landscapes and wild creatures by the Vermont artist. Through June 26. Info, 525-3366. Parker Pie Co. in West Glover. ‘X-RAY VISION: FISH INSIDE OUT’: A traveling exhibition from the Smithsonian Institution featuring 40 large-scale digital prints of X-rays of several species of fish. Through June 1. Info, 748-2372. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium in St. Johnsbury.

brattleboro/okemo valley

‘HOPE AND HAZARD: A COMEDY OF EROS’: A group exhibition curated by American artist Eric Fischl featuring some 65 artists and more than 80 paintings, photographs, works on paper and sculptures. Artists include Tracy Emin, Nicole Eisenman, Yves Klein, Jeff Koons, Robert Mapplethorpe, Francis Picabia, Man Ray, Jason Rhoades, Hannah Wilke and many more. ‘READY. FIRE. AIM!’ AT HALL: Joint exhibition curated by former BCA curator DJ

05.17.17-05.24.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Steven Jupiter

realm

of

growth,

decay

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Jupiter writes, “this small patch of woods transforms from ordinary to enchanted. Though bordering a busy highway, it offers no evidence of human activity.” Pictured: “After the Flood #6.” Hellerman, inspired by Andy and Christine Hall’s art-collecting philosophy. DAVID SHRIGLEY: A solo exhibition of roughly 25 works by the British artist, including drawings, animations, paintings and sculpture. Through November 26. Info, 952-1056. Hall Art Foundation in Reading. ‘GLASSTASTIC’: Glass sculptures inspired by children’s drawings of imaginary creatures. CLAIRE VAN VLIET: “Ghost Mesa,” lithographs of rock formations printed on a variety of handmade papers and collaged with pulp paintings and marbled papers. EDWARD KOREN: “Seriously Funny,” works by the Brookfield-based New Yorker cartoonist. MARY WELSH: “Appearances & Reality,” collages that use art historical and pop-culture sources, among others. PAUL SHORE: “Drawn Home,” drawings of every object in the artist’s home, inspired by Audubon’s project to draw all the birds of North America. SOO SUNNY PARK: “Luminous Muqarna,” an immersive sculptural installation based on muqarnas, ornamental vaults found in Islamic architecture, especially mosques. Through June 18. Info, 257-0124. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center. ‘DISTANT THUNDER’: Artwork by Gil Perry and writing and illustrations by Charles Norris-Brown.

Through June 16. Info, 869-2960. Main Street Arts in Saxtons River.

p.m. Through July 14. Info, 763-7094. Royalton Memorial Library in South Royalton.

TORIN PORTER: “Before Words,” an exhibition of steel sculptures by the Glover artist. Through June 18. Info, 251-8290. Mitchell Giddings Fine Arts in Brattleboro.

HUGH TOWNLEY: “Sculpture, Reliefs & Prints” by the late Vermont artist. Through September 10. ROSAMUND PURCELL: Photographs from the documentary film about the artist, An Art That Nature Makes. Through July 29. Info, 767-9670. BigTown Gallery in Rochester.

manchester/bennington

PAT ADAMS: “Gatherum of Quiddities,” a survey of abstract paintings spanning the artist’s decadeslong career. Through June 18. Info, 447-1571. Bennington Museum.

SUSAN ROCKWELL: “Adventures in Weaving” presents a variety of colors and structures allowed within the form, as rendered by the Braintree artist. Through May 19. Info, 889-9404. Tunbridge Public Library.

randolph/royalton

‘THESE GREEN MOUNTAINS’: Works in a variety of mediums created by local artists and artisans, including David Hurwitz. Kristen Johnson and Sue Schiller. Through June 17. Info, 431-0204. Chandler Gallery in Randolph.

70TH ANNIVERSARY EXHIBIT: A juried exhibition of works by members of the Vermont Weavers Guild, featuring handwoven cotton, silk, wool, Tencel and other fibers. Through May 28. Info, 728-8912. White River Craft Center in Randolph.

! ‘FRANCES & FRIENDS’: Fiber crafts, paintings, photographs and drawings by six South Royalton area artists. Reception: Wednesday, May 17, 6-8

! W. DAVID POWELL: “The Golden Era of the New Dawn & Other Distractions,” collage and prints by the Vermont artist. Reception: Saturday, June 3, 4-6 p.m. Through July 1. Info, 498-8438. White River Gallery at BALE in South Royalton.

June 10-11, 2017

SEVEN DAYS

Champlain Valley Exposition — Burlington, VT. More than 150 practical workshops presented by the nation’s leading experts!

86 ART

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‘AMERICAN ARTISTS IN EUROPE: SELECTIONS FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION’: An exhibition of works by American artists who were inspired by their travels, including Frank Duveneck, Leonard Freed, Childe Hassam, Winslow Homer and Elihu Vedder. Through June 11. JURIED HIGH SCHOOL SHOW: The 26th annual exhibition of 100 selected works by area students. Through May 28. Info, 518-792-1761. The Hyde Collection in Glens Falls, N.Y.

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AMY BALKIN AND LUIS DELGADOQUALTROUGH: Works by two artists who use big data to inform their practice. San Franciscobased conceptual artist Balkin presents her poster essay “The Atmosphere: A Guide.” Delgado-Qualtrough’s “10 Carbon Conundrums” series of prints constructs a conversation across time between two fictional characters contemplating human impact on the Earth. Through May 28. Info, 603-646-2426. Strauss Gallery, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, in Hanover, N.H.

JULY 19 – 29

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‘HIGH SCHOOL AWARD WINNERS’ EXHIBITION’: Selected works by regional high school students. Through May 19. JANET FREDERICKS: “The Anthill Drawings,” works by the Vermont artist. Through June 9. JOSEPH MONTROY: Recent works by the sculptor. Through June 9. STEPHEN PROCTER: “Presences,” works by the Brattleboro ceramicist. Through June 9. Info, 603-448-3117. AVA Gallery and Art Center in Lebanon, N.H.

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‘CHAGALL: COLOR & MUSIC’: An exhibition exploring the importance of music to the Russian-French artist, presenting 400 works including paintings, sculptures, maquettes, gouaches, stained-glass windows, photographs, films, costumes and puppets. Through June 11. Info, 514-285-2000. Montréal Museum of Fine Arts.

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ART 87

INGO GÜNTHER: “World Processor,” more than 50 illuminated plastic globes featuring data mapped by the artist and journalist. Through May 28. Info, 603-646-2426. Hood Downtown in Hanover, N.H. !


movies Colossal ★★★★★

A

reviewer can go years without encountering a genuinely original, one-of-a-kind film. I figured The Red Turtle would have to hold me for the foreseeable future when it came to magically imaginative cinematic experiences. The experience included a personal message of thanks from Oscar-winning Dutch director Michael Dudok de Wit; a reviewer can go a lifetime without being on the receiving end of a gesture like that. But I was mistaken. While different from Turtle in virtually every conceivable respect, Colossal possesses one-of-a-kindness in spades. The work of Spanish w r i t e r- d i r e c t o r Nacho Vigalondo (Timecrimes), it’s totally crazy, completely unpredictable, unclassifiable and more than a tad touching — which is unusual for a movie featuring a skyscraper-dwarfing monster. When was the last time you developed an emotional connection to Godzilla? Anne Hathaway stars as Gloria, a New Yorker whose nightlife has begun to take a toll on her days. As the movie opens, she’s been out until the wee hours drinking away the pain of getting sacked. Her boyfriend

REVIEWS

(Dan Stevens) has lost his patience with her partying and packed her bags. Faster than you can say Rachel Getting Married (Gloria could be Hathaway’s character in that film a few hundred hangovers later), she’s back in her hometown, licking her wounds and looking for work. She finds it, ironically, in a bar owned by an old school chum. Jason Sudeikis costars as Oscar, a seemingly harmless pickup-driving, salt-of-the-earth type. At least in Act One. This is a movie that changes genres the way most movies change settings, so almost nothing is as it initially appears. One minute it’s a laid-back indie sporting a quirky, Juno-esque soundtrack. The next, it’s a sci-fi thriller with screaming masses of humanity fleeing the unthinkable down the streets of Seoul. In the course of 110 minutes, Colossal touches a half dozen other bases, and the most amazing part is how seamlessly it all unfolds. OK, the monster. This isn’t a monster movie, not even a distant cousin of Cloverfield or Pacific Rim. So what’s a monster doing in the middle of it? Critical opinion is split. One camp insists it’s a projection of Gloria’s demons. The other accepts the monster at face value: “Hey, there’s this giant kaiju terrorizing South Korea. Deal

SEOUL MATES The latest from Vigalondo explores the mysterious connection between a New York woman and a monster terrorizing South Korea.

with it. That doesn’t mean people don’t still look for love, abuse intoxicants and spend too much time on their devices.” I’m with the latter. The fabulous thing about Vigalondo’s approach is that it’s clear the writer-director couldn’t care less. He’s come to have fun and wreak havoc. The premise is genius: Gloria discovers that the monster mimics her every movement half a world away. She raises her hand; it raises its hand. She dances; it dances. The first few times this happens, you get a feeling you hardly ever get at the cineplex — undiluted wonder. The only question is: Can the filmmaker sustain it? Can he carry the narrative ball into the end zone without

stumbling, cheating or in some way selling the viewer short? Movie critic law prevents me from saying more than that Vigalondo not only delivers but makes it look easy, which it isn’t. He gets invaluable assistance from his cast, who do sublimely nuanced work. Hathaway has never been better, and Sudeikis reveals heretofore untapped depths. From its first frame to its last, Colossal is nothing less than a big-screen blast. When was the last time a movie with a giant city-crunching reptile blew your mind while touching your heart?

RICK KISONAK

88 MOVIES

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Snatched ★★★

I

guess we should be thankful to Hollywood for figuring out that women can enjoy R-rated comedies, too. Without its bracing moments of rudeness, lewdness and randomness, Snatched would be an unredeemable bore. And, yes, that is damning it with faint praise. It’s easy to imagine the less racy version of this Mother’s Day weekend release that might have been made 10 years ago, perhaps with Katherine Heigl playing the feckless grown daughter who somehow ends up sharing a tropical vacation with her uptight mom. Kidnapped and held for ransom by generic Colombian baddies, the sparring twosome must learn mutual respect if they want to survive. Cue slapstick action scenes and a “female empowerment” playlist on the soundtrack. All of that happens in Snatched, but without the earnestness. The movie takes a haphazard, WTF approach to its premise that makes it sometimes entertaining and sometimes just a mess. Protagonist Emily Middleton (Amy Schumer) and her mom, Linda (Goldie Hawn), never feel much like mother and daughter. They’re opposites, yes, but there’s no sense of shared family history or long-simmering conflicts, and no indication of how well-meaning, soppy Linda inadvertently raised Emily to be the monstrous narcissist she is from her very first scene. Rather than delving into the bonding theme, director Jonathan Levine (50/50) and

BUNGLE IN THE JUNGLE Schumer and Hawn play a dysfunctional mother-daughter team in Levine’s haphazard comedy.

screenwriter Katie Dippold (The Heat) use it as a pretext to let outsize characters loose to snipe at each other. Snipe they do — and, for a while, it’s halfway fun. The film’s first third is a showcase for Schumer, with a talky, semi-improvised feel. Hawn plays likable straight man as Emily drags her mom along on the vacation she booked for herself and her now-AWOL boyfriend, exhibiting casual disregard for Linda’s feelings and generally acting like a foul-

mouthed, hedonistic, effortlessly destructive pixie. She’s terrible — and, as Linda discovers, her terribleness isn’t bad company. Emily’s destructiveness comes in handy, too, when the women venture outside the resort and must escape their kidnappers with the help of conveniently placed deadly weapons. As the abduction plot grinds into gear, the script increasingly plays like something produced by 10 Mountain Dew-addled tweens

locked in a room. On their way to the safety of Bogotá, Linda and Emily experience a series of misadventures, each more absurd and pointless than the last. The nadir is an episode with a giant CG tapeworm that turns out to be the prelude to Emily’s long-delayed, ridiculously rapid redemption. As it goes off the rails, Snatched manages to snatch opportunistic laughs from its supporting characters, who are funniest when they’re not interacting with Linda and Emily. As a tourist couple claiming to wield extreme survival skills, Joan Cusack and Wanda Sykes periodically steal the show with physical comedy. Ike Barinholtz and Bashir Salahuddin have an equally amusing verbal interplay as, respectively, Emily’s nerdy brother and the State Department employee he attempts to enlist to save his family. But the movie just can’t get past its lack of commitment to its own tired themes. Comedies like Bridesmaids and Spy manage to combine antic, absurdist action with semi-coherent character arcs and believable human moments. The makers of Snatched appear to have taken more of a “throw outrageousness at the audience and see if it sticks” approach. Mostly, it doesn’t. If there’s one impression that viewers of future generations might take away from this movie, it’s that the baby boomers endured their offspring with a befuddled patience of Herculean proportions.

MARGOT HARRISON


MOVIE CLIPS

NEW IN THEATERS ALIEN: COVENANT: In Ridley Scott’s prequel to Alien and sequel to Prometheus, a ship full of 22nd-century colonists happens on a supposedly uninhabited planet emitting a mysterious distress signal. In space, will anyone hear them scream? Michael Fassbender, Katherine Waterston and Billy Crudup star in the SF horror flick. (122 min, R. Capitol, Essex, Majestic, Marquis, Palace, Roxy, Sunset, Welden) DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: THE LONG HAUL: In the fourth comedy based on Jeff Kinney’s tween book series, which introduces a new cast, young Greg (Jason Drucker) schemes to change the destination of a family road trip. With Alicia Silverstone and Tom Everett Scott as his parents. David Bowers again directed. (90 min, PG. Bijou, Capitol, Essex, Majestic, Palace) EVERYTHING, EVERYTHING: A girl (Amandla Stenberg) whose allergies keep her housebound risks everything for romance with the boy next door (Nick Robinson) in this adaptation of the YA best seller by Nicola Yoon. Stella Meghie (Jean of the Joneses) directed. (96 min, PG-13. Capitol, Essex, Majestic, Palace)

COLOSSAL★★★★1/2 In this high-concept comedy from director Nacho Vigalondo (Timecrimes), Anne Hathaway plays an alcoholic who begins to suspect the ravages of a giant monster in Korea are related somehow to her own struggle. With Jason Sudeikis and Austin Stowell (109 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 5/17) THE DINNER★★★★ Two wealthy power couples meet to discuss a disturbing incident involving their kids in this drama based on Herman Koch’s best-selling novel. With Richard Gere, Steve Coogan and Laura Linney. Oren Moverman (Love & Mercy) directed. (120 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 5/10) THE FATE OF THE FURIOUS★★★ In this eighth entry in the resilient car-driven action franchise, Charlize Theron plays a mystery woman who draws Dom (Vin Diesel) away from his beloved crew and into a life of crime. With Luke Evans and Dwayne Johnson. F. Gary Gray (Straight Outta Compton) directed. (136 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 4/19) GIFTED★★★ A child prodigy (Mckenna Grace) becomes the object of a custody battle between her uncle and grandmother, who have different ideas about raising her, in this drama from director Marc Webb (500 Days of Summer). With Chris Evans and Lindsay Duncan. (101 min, PG-13)

NORMAN: In this drama from writer-director Joseph Cedar (Footnote), Richard Gere plays a small-time New York fixer who tries to take advantage of his chance connection to a political power broker. With Lior Ashkenazi and Michael Sheen. (118 min, R. Roxy)

GOING IN STYLE★1/2 In this “reboot” of the 1979 comedy, three cash-strapped seniors set out to improve their fortunes by robbing a bank. With Morgan Freeman, Michael Caine, Alan Arkin and Joey King. Zach Braff (Garden State) directed. (96 min, PG-13; reviewed by R.K. 4/12)

RISK: Documentarian Laura Poitras (Citizenfour) presents her portrait of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, which was six years in the making and reflects her own changing attitudes toward her subject. (92 min, NR. Savoy)

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY VOL. 2★★★1/2 Marvel’s light-hearted saga of a regular dude who joins up with a team of misfits to save the galaxy continues, as Peter Quill (Chris Pratt) and his friends attempt to learn about his origins. With Zoe Saldana, Dave Bautista and Sylvester Stallone. James Gunn returns as director. (136 min, PG-13)

NOW PLAYING BEAUTY AND THE BEAST★★★1/2 Disney reworks the 1991 animated hit with this live-action musical featuring the original songs and Emma Watson as the book-loving girl forced into imprisonment in the castle of the dreaded Beast (Dan Stevens). Bill Condon (Mr. Holmes) directed. (129 min, PG; reviewed by M.H. 3/22)

THE BOSS BABY★★1/2 Babies and puppies not only talk in this animated kids’ comedy from DreamWorks — they’re at war. Alec Baldwin voices the scheming, suit-wearing title character; Steve Buscemi the nefarious CEO of Puppy Co. Tom McGrath (Megamind) directed. (97 min, PG)

★ = refund, please ★★ = could’ve been worse, but not a lot ★★★ = has its moments; so-so ★★★★ = smarter than the average bear ★★★★★ = as good as it gets

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THE LOST CITY OF Z★★★★ James Gray (The Immigrant) directed this biopic about Col. Percival Fawcett (Charlie Hunnam), who, in the 1920s, claimed to have discovered the ruins of an advanced civilization in the Amazon. With Robert Pattinson and Sienna Miller. (141 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 4/26)

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PERSONAL SHOPPER★★★ Kristen Stewart plays a young woman in Paris trying to make contact with her deceased brother in this Palme d’Or-nominated thriller from director Olivier Assayas (Clouds of Sils Maria). (105 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 5/10) A QUIET PASSION★★★★1/2 Cynthia Nixon plays reclusive New England poet Emily Dickinson in this biopic directed by Terence Davies (The Deep Blue Sea). With Jennifer Ehle and Duncan Duff. (125 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 5/3)

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KING ARTHUR: LEGEND OF THE SWORD★★ The legends of the early English monarch’s upbringing and rise get a gangster-film treatment in this new rendition from director Guy Ritchie. With Charlie Hunnam as Arthur, Jude Law, Astrid Bergès-Frisbey and Djimon Hounsou. (126 min, PG-13)

SNATCHED★★1/2 Amy Schumer plays a recent dumpee who persuades her picky mom (Goldie Hawn) to take her boyfriend’s place on a tropical vacay in this comedy from director Jonathan Levine (50/50). (91 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 5/17)

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JULIETA★★ A middle-aged woman reflects on her difficult relationship with her daughter in the latest from director Pedro Almodóvar, based on an Alice Munro story. With Emma Suárez and Adriana Ugarte. (99 min, R. Savoy; reviewed by R.K. 3/29)

SMURFS: THE LOST VILLAGE★★ Smurfette and three friends go on a walkabout in search of “the biggest secret in Smurf history” in this sequel to the 2011 family-film adaptation of the cartoon. With the voices of Demi Lovato, Jack McBrayer and Julia Roberts. Kelly Asbury (Gnomeo and Juliet) directed. (89 min, PG)

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THE CIRCLE★1/2 A young woman (Emma Watson) takes a job with the world’s most powerful social media company and discovers that her visionary boss (Tom Hanks) has a hidden agenda in this futuristic thriller based on Dave Eggers’ novel. James Ponsoldt (The End of the Tour) directed. (110 min, PG-13; reviewed by R.K. 5/3)

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BORN IN CHINA★★★ This DisneyNature documentary traces the fates of three animal families — pandas, monkeys and snow leopards — in the wilds of China. John Krasinski narrates. Chuan Lu (City of Life and Death) directed. (76 min, G)

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LOCALtheaters (*) = NEW THIS WEEK IN VERMONT. FOR UP-TO-DATE TIMES VISIT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/MOVIES.

BIG PICTURE THEATER

48 Carroll Rd. (off Rte. 100), Waitsfield, 496-8994, bigpicturetheater.info

wednesday 17 — thursday 18 Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 King Arthur: Legend of the Sword friday 19 — tuesday 23

Alien: Covenant

Schedule not available at press time.

BIJOU CINEPLEX 4 Rte. 100, Morrisville, 888-3293, bijou4.com

ESSEX CINEMAS & T-REX THEATER

MAJESTIC 10

21 Essex Way, Suite 300, Essex, 879-6543, essexcinemas.com

190 Boxwood St. (Maple Tree Place, Taft Corners), Williston, 878-2010, majestic10.com

wednesday 17 — thursday 18

wednesday 17 — thursday 18

wednesday 17 — thursday 18

*Alien: Covenant (Thu only) Beauty and the Beast The Boss Baby The Circle The Fate of the Furious Gifted Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2D & 3D) King Arthur: Legend of the Sword Snatched

The Dinner Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 King Arthur: Legend of the Sword The Lost City of Z Personal Shopper Snatched Their Finest Your Name

93 State St., Montpelier, 229-0343, fgbtheaters.com

*Alien: Covenant (Thu only) Beauty and the Beast The Boss Baby The Circle The Fate of the Furious Gifted Going in Style Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2D & 3D) King Arthur: Legend of the Sword (2D & 3D) Snatched

wednesday 17 — thursday 18

friday 19 — tuesday 23

wednesday 17 — thursday 18 The Fate of the Furious Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 King Arthur: Legend of the Sword Snatched friday 19 — tuesday 23 *Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 King Arthur: Legend of the Sword Snatched

CAPITOL SHOWPLACE

Beauty and the Beast The Circle King Arthur: Legend of the Sword (2D & 3D) Snatched Their Finest

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friday 19 — thursday 25 *Alien: Covenant *Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul *Everything, Everything King Arthur: Legend of the Sword Snatched

*Alien: Covenant Beauty and the Beast The Boss Baby *Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul *Everything, Everything Gifted Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2D & 3D) King Arthur: Legend of the Sword (2D & 3D) Snatched

friday 19 — tuesday 23 *Alien: Covenant Beauty and the Beast The Boss Baby *Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul *Everything, Everything Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2D & 3D) King Arthur: Legend of the Sword Snatched

MARQUIS THEATRE Main St., Middlebury, 388-4841, middleburymarquis.com

wednesday 17 — thursday 18 Born in China Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

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friday 19 — thursday 25 *Alien: Covenant Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

MERRILL’S ROXY CINEMA

222 College St., Burlington, 864-3456, merrilltheatres.net

friday 19 — thursday 25 *Alien: Covenant Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 King Arthur: Legend of the Sword *Norman Snatched Their Finest

PALACE 9 CINEMAS 10 Fayette Dr., South Burlington, 864-5610, palace9.com

wednesday 17 — thursday 18 *Alien: Covenant (Thu only) The Boss Baby The Circle Colossal The Fate of the Furious **The Fifth Element: 20th Anniversary (Wed only) Gifted Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2D & 3D) King Arthur: Legend of the Sword **Met Opera: Der Rosenkavalier **National Theatre Live:

A Quiet Passion *Risk

friday 19 — tuesday 23

STOWE CINEMA 3 PLEX

*Alien: Covenant The Boss Baby Colossal *Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul *Everything, Everything Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2D & 3D) King Arthur: Legend of the Sword Snatched **TCM: Smokey and the Bandit (Sun & Wed only)

Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-4678. stowecinema.com

wednesday 17 — thursday 25 Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2D & 3D) King Arthur: Legend of the Sword (2D & 3D) Snatched

SUNSET DRIVE-IN

155 Porters Point Rd., Colchester, 862-1800. sunsetdrivein.com

PARAMOUNT TWIN CINEMA

241 North Main St., Barre, 479-9621, fgbtheaters.com

friday 19 — sunday 21

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2D & 3D)

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 & The Fate of the Furious *Alien: Covenant & Snatched The Boss Baby & King Arthur: Legend of the Sword

THE SAVOY THEATER

WELDEN THEATRE

26 Main St., Montpelier, 229-0598, savoytheater.com

104 No. Main St., St. Albans, 527-7888, weldentheatre.com

wednesday 17 — thursday 18

wednesday 17 — thursday 18

Julieta The Lost City of Z A Quiet Passion The Zookeeper’s Wife

*Alien: Covenant (Thu only) Going in Style (Wed only) Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Snatched

friday 19 — thursday 25

friday 19 — tuesday 23

Born in China The Lost City of Z

*Alien: Covenant Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Snatched

wednesday 17 — wednesday 24

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THEIR FINEST★★★★ During the London Blitz, a naïve young secretary (Gemma Arterton) is enlisted to write screenplays for patriotic war films in this period comedy from director Lone Scherfig (An Education). With Sam Claflin and Bill Nighy. (117 min, R) YOUR NAME★★★★ Two teenagers in different parts of Japan discover they have a mysterious night-time connection in this acclaimed animated film from director Makoto Shinkai, based on his novel. With Ryûnosuke Kamiki and Mone Kamishiraishi. (106 min, PG) THE ZOOKEEPER’S WIFE★★★ Jessica Chastain and Johan Heldenbergh play Antonina and Jan Zabinski, the real-life Warsaw Zoo caretakers who rescued humans as well as animals during the Holocaust — unnervingly right under the nose of a Nazi zoologist (Daniel Brühl). Niki Caro (Whale Rider) directed. (124 min, PG-13)

RESIDENT EVIL: THE FINAL CHAPTER★★1/2 As the lengthy game-based action series draws to an end, Milla Jovovich defends the last survivors of the apocalypse, and Paul W.S. Anderson directs the CG-laden spectacle. (106 min, R) THE SPACE BETWEEN US★1/2 The first kid ever born on Mars visits Earth in the hopes of connecting with his origins and his long-distance crush. With Asa Butterfield, Britt Robertson and Gary Oldman. Peter Chelsom directed the teen-oriented drama. (121 min, PG-13) XXX: RETURN OF XANDER CAGE★★ Vin Diesel returns to the action franchise launched in 2002 with XxX as the athlete turned spy; D.J. Caruso (I Am Number Four) directed. (107 min, PG-13)

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Film series, events and festivals at venues other than cinemas can be found in the calendar section.

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Offbeat Flick of the Week: We pick an indie, foreign, cultish or just plain odd movie that hits local theaters, DVD or video on demand this week. If you want an alternative to the blockbusters, try this!

PINK MARTINI, DIANA KRALL, KAMASI WASHINGTON, TERENCE BLANCHARD & THE E-COLLECTIVE, SULLIVAN FORTNER TRIO, PETER BRÖTZMANN & HEATHER LEIGH, CAMILA MEZA QUARTET, DOM FLEMONS DUO, JANE BUNNETT & MAQUEQUE, BASSDRUMBONE, THE VT/NY COLLECTIVE FEAT. VICTOR LEWIS AND MORE! Tickets on sale now at discoverjazz.com or 802-863-5966 Support the festival, become a member at discoverjazz.com/membership

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The original title of writer-director Joseph Cedar's sly sort-of-comedy is Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer. Richard Gere plays the title character, one of those semi-con men who claims to be connected to all sorts of rich and powerful folk — but is he really? Norman has cultivated a relationship with a politician (Lior Ashkenazi) who may be on track to become Israel's next prime minister. But in attempting to trade in on favors, will this fixer finally overreach himself? Critics are calling it Gere's best performance in decades, and A.O. Scott of the New York Times praises the plot's "antic elegance and brazen unpredictability." Starts Friday at Merrill's Roxy Cinemas in Burlington.

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REAL FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY MAY 18-24

TAURUS APRIL 20-MAY 20:

My pregnant friend Myrna is determined to avoid giving birth via Caesarean section. She believes that the best way for her son to enter the world is by him doing the hard work of squeezing through the narrow birth canal. That struggle will fortify his willpower and mobilize him to summon equally strenuous efforts in response to future challenges. It’s an interesting theory. I suggest you consider it as you contemplate how you’re going to get yourself reborn.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “A 2-year-old kid is like using a blender, but you don’t have a top for it,” said comedian Jerry Seinfeld. Would you like to avoid a scenario like that, Aries? Would you prefer not to see what happens if your life resembles turning on a topless blender that’s full of ingredients? Yes? Then please find the top and put it on! And if you can’t locate the proper top, use a dinner plate or newspaper or pizza box. OK? It’s not too late. Even if the blender is already spewing almond milk and banana fragments and protein powder all over the ceiling. Better late than never! the following meditation: Picture yourself filling garbage bags with stuff that reminds you of what you used to be and don’t want to be any more. Add anything that feels like decrepit emotional baggage or that serves as a worn-out psychological crutch. When you’ve gathered up

tailed evidence of how unique and compelling you are — concrete data that will provide an antidote to your habitual self-doubts and consecrate your growing sense of self-worth. Here’s what I suggest you do: Write an essay entitled “I’m an Interesting Character and Here’s the Proof.”

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In normal times, your guardian animal ally might be the turtle, crab, seahorse or manta ray. But in the next three weeks, it’s the cockroach. This unfairly maligned creature is legendary for its power to thrive in virtually any environment, and I think you will have a similar resourcefulness. Like the cockroach, you will do more than merely cope with awkward adventures and complicated transitions; you will flourish. One caution: It’s possible that your adaptability may bother people who are less flexible and enterprising than you. To keep that difference from being a problem, be empathetic as you help them adapt. (PS: Your temporary animal ally is exceptionally well groomed. Cockroaches clean themselves as much as cats do.)

wrote a bestiary, an odd little book in which he drew moral conclusions from the behavior of animals. One of his descriptions will be useful for you to contemplate in the near future. It was centered on what he called the “wild ass,” which we might refer to as an undomesticated donkey. Leonardo said that this beast, “going to the fountain to drink and finding the water muddy, is never too thirsty to wait until it becomes clear before satisfying himself.” That’s a useful fable to contemplate, Libra. Be patient as you go in search of what’s pure and clean and good for you. (The translation from the Italian is by Oliver Evans.)

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Lady Jane Grey was crowned Queen of England in July 1553, but she ruled for just nine days before being deposed. I invite you to think back to a time in your own past when victory was short-lived. Maybe you accomplished a gratifying feat after an arduous struggle only to have it quickly eclipsed by a twist of fate. Perhaps you finally made it into the limelight but then lost your audience to a distracting brouhaha. But here’s the good news: Whatever it was — a temporary triumph? incomplete success? nullified conquest? — you will soon have a chance to find redemption for it. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): While shopping at a funky yard sale, I found the torn-off cover of a book titled You’re a Genius and I Can Prove It. Sadly, the rest of the book was not available. Later I searched for it in online bookstores and found it was out of print. That’s unfortunate, because now would be an excellent time for you to peruse a text like this. Why? Because you need specific, de-

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Leonardo da Vinci

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): My friend Allie works as a matchmaker. She has an instinctive skill at reading the potential chemistry between people. One of her key strategies is to urge her clients to write mission statements. “What would your ideal marriage look like?” she asks them. Once they have clarified what they want, the process of finding a mate seems to become easier and more fun. In accordance with the astrological omens, Scorpio, I suggest you try this exercise — even if you are already in a committed relationship. It’s an excellent time to get very specific about the inspired togetherness you’re willing to work hard to create. SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In ancient Greek myth, Tiresias was a prophet who could draw useful revelations by interpreting the singing of birds. Spirits of the dead helped him devise his prognostications, too. He was in constant demand for revelations about the future. But his greatest claim to fame was the fact that a goddess magically transformed him into a woman for seven years. After that, he could speak with authority about how both genders experienced the world. This experience

enhanced his wisdom immeasurably, adding to his oracular power. Are you interested in a less drastic but highly educational lesson, Sagittarius? Would you like to see life from a very different perspective from the one to which you’re accustomed? It’s available to you if you want it.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “You remind me of the parts of myself that I will never have a chance to meet,” writes poet Mariah Gordon-Dyke, addressing a lover. Have you ever felt like saying that to a beloved ally, Capricorn? If so, I have good news: You now have an opportunity to meet and greet parts of yourself that have previously been hidden from you — aspects of your deep soul that, up until now, you may only have glimpsed. Celebrate this homecoming! AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I predict that you won’t be bitten by a dog or embarrassed by a stain or pounced on by a lawyer. Nor will you lose your keys or get yelled at by a friend or oversleep for a big appointment. On the contrary! I think you’d be wise to expect the best. The following events are quite possible: You may be complimented by a person who’s in a position to help you. You could be invited into a place that had previously been off-limits. While eavesdropping you might pick up a useful clue, and while daydreaming you could recover an important memory you’d lost. Good luck like this is even more likely to sweep into your life if you work on ripening the most immature part of your personality.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Time out. It’s intermission. Give yourself permission to be spacious and slow. Then, when you’re sweetly empty — this purge may take a few days — seek out experiences that appeal primarily to your wild and tender heart as opposed to your wild and jumpy mind. Just forget about the theories you believe in and the ideas you regard as central to your philosophy of life. Instead, work on developing brisk new approaches to your relationship with your feelings. Like what? Become more conscious of them, for example. Express gratitude for what they teach you. Boost your trust in their power to reveal what your mind sometimes hides from you.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I invite you to try

all the props and accessories that demoralize you, imagine yourself going to a beach where you build a big bonfire and hurl your mess into the flames. As you dance around the conflagration, exorcise the voices in your head that tell you boring stories about yourself. Sing songs that have as much power to relieve and release you as a spectacular orgasm.

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chemistry, connection and fun with a man. I live wholeheartedly and want to be with a man who also loves life, can communicate, laugh, think, dance and travel his way to me. RumiLove, 67, l KIND AND LIVING LIFE! It doesn’t matter where we have been. What’s important is where we are going. I’ve learned to live for myself as much as my friends and family. We are all worthy and deserve happiness. I work hard and love learning new things, including figuring out how to fix things around my house. We are capable of so much. Are you ready?! kit987, 48 ENERGETIC, POSITIVE AND ADVENTUROUS, VIBRANT I am a kind person with a huge heart. I love spending time with friends and family. I enjoy outdoor activities. I enjoy candlelit dinners, flowers, romance and just hanging out. Looking for a guy who is active, honest and really knows how to love a woman with all of his heart. Someone who enjoys a nice glass of wine. Chance1, 58, l FINALLY CLUEING IN! Irredeemable treehugger, field traipser, hill climber. Once a potter. Love to dance, kayak, ponder. Make things that ferment. Push dirt around. Have a thing for birds. You are discerning, practical, funny and, above all, kind. Kestrel, 61, l NOW WHAT? I love to laugh and enjoy the simple things in life. I try to find the positive in every “bad” situation. I believe everything works out the way it should. We need to be kind to everyone. Life is too short to be uppity. Bonus points if you can make me laugh. Leemay64, 52, l HUMOROUS, SENSITIVE, ACTIVE, DEEP THINKER Looking for friendship and companion; possibly more. Someone to enjoy activities and conversation with — indoors and outdoors. simba33, 52, l ACTIVE, CREATIVE, APPRECIATIVE COUNTRY ARTIST I am an independent, self-employed artist and love Vermont, my home, my lifestyle, my friends and family. My home, studio and gallery are in a renovated historic barn surrounded by gardens near a lake. I have lots to appreciate and feel there is always room for more friends, more to love and others with whom to share life experiences. Libelle, 60, l A DASH OF EVERYTHING Funny, smart and caring, 5’3 average to slight build, with unruly curly hair and brown eyes. College educated with an excellent job. Enjoy the outdoors, water activities, snow, evening fires, and the sound of rain. My biggest vices are shoes and chocolate. Nonsmoker and social drinker. I have a tasteful tattoo. Can be impatient and a bit of a klutz. ManekiKat, 51

TIME FOR MORE ADVENTURES Widowed a year ago after a great 23-year marriage. The past year has been an interesting reassessment of where I’ve been and where I’m going. I’m into outdoor activities, walks with my dogs and Vermont life. I’m looking for a companion who’s active, optimistic and of similar mind. Forward, 60, l GOOD-NATURED MAN WHO CARES I’m looking for a nice woman who has a nice sense of humor and a great personality to spend time with and enjoy each other’s company. ArtieNY, 73 SHY, GAMER, ANIME NERD, AWKWARD I’m shy and awkward. I’m a gamer who loves metal music. When I warm up to you, I can be super affectionate and will care for you almost every time with cheesy “Good morning” texts. TheotherM, 26, l EASYGOING, LOVING MAN I’m looking for that serious woman who has played way too many games and been lied to, fought with and cheated on so that I can show her there is more to life than the hurt. A woman needs to be listened to, caressed, told how great she looks and acted pleasantly toward at all times. patrioteagle, 56, l SINGLE VERMONT MAN #NEEDSHISGIRL Please be honest, loyal, attractive, humble, kind and OK with lots of sex if it comes to that. Find me, pull my eyes into yours and make me see no others. I’m open to dating but will not host a charade. I go completely on chemistry and raw animal instinct. My love will be my queen, and I will be her king. She will be cherished, loved, protected, respected and never neglected. Mud, 39, l MAKE IT MEANINGFUL Life should be enjoyed. I enjoy sunsets, sunrises, the mountains and good conversation. An openminded approach works best for me, as situations are constantly changing. I thoroughly enjoy outdoor activities — hiking, cycling, occasionally jogging — but I like my downtime too. A good book, music, chilling out — all good. I like to go with the flow. Green_Up_Now, 41 NO-NAMES QUICKIE, THEN LEAVE If you just wanna meet, hook up and then go about your day. No names. I just wanna meet someone, get it on and part ways. So if you’re between 18 and 50 and wanna just fuck without all the other bullshit, then don’t think — just do it. I know people do it and thought I’d try it. quickie, 35 CREATING A NEW ENDING I am a simple guy who keeps busy. I work a lot doing fire and rescue and work in the health care field. My hobbies include my motorcycle and good company. My perfect date would be with someone honest who has a pure heart. I would like to settle down someday with a house and kids. Fire_Boy_343, 23, l SHOW ME THE MAGIC! I’ve recently moved to Vermont, and I’m looking to make this my home. I’m a musician, a creative, funny, passionate, potentially sarcastic, thoughtful guy who’d love to find that inexplicable, magical connection with a kindred spirit (ha, wouldn’t we all?), or at least have as a new friend to show me around this place! Mookie20Hz, 64, l

NEW BEGINNINGS College-educated executive looking for intelligent conversation. Looking for someone who is willing to be friends first and see where things go from there. I have a variety of interests, and I’m willing to try new things. Megabyte, 39, l WE CAN BE AWESOME TOGETHER! I’m a happy, fun-loving and sincere guy with a great attitude seeking a similar woman. I have a nice blend of energy, laid-back attitude, passion, sense of humor, intelligent. I’m a rounded person who has experienced a fulfilled and diversified life. I love the outdoors and get my exercise and vitality by hiking, skiing and bicycling. greenmtnsguy, 63 HAVE A OPEN MIND I like to stay busy, like to ski, hike, work out, ride bikes, outdoor things. Easygoing. Don’t let things get to me. Life is too short. Drop a note to me if you would like to know anything about me. skiski1, 53, l STRONGER LOVE Very happy and smart. BlackInkligns, 32, l NICE, FRIENDLY, ROMANTIC, CARING, TALENTED Hi, my name is Mike, and I’m looking into dating, making friends and meeting new people. I enjoy writing, playing music, watching movies, and I love going to concerts. I’m a soft-spoken, kind, gentle person who likes to laugh, cuddle and also has a good sense of humor. I’m pretty chill and laid-back. Also like to work. motley123, 40, l A LONELY GUY LOOKING Thought I would branch out and give this a try. Living in southern Vermont, looking for a long-term relationship. rubberbandman, 56, l EASYGOING Happy, hardworking farmer who likes what he does, who wants someone who can accept him for what he is and to spend time with him on days off, doing whatever we wish to do and no drama. rpb7456, 59, l HONEST, CARING, OPEN-MINDED I am honest, totally against double standards, and considerate. I think those who have known me in many walks of life would agree. I am happy to say more in one-toone communication. falcon, 60

WOMEN Seeking WOMEN FUNNY, MELLOW, NATURE AND MUSIC Not a lot of free time, but it would be nice to find a person to chillax with once in a while. ComicMellow, 40, l BLASTED-OUT HUSK Blasted-out husk of a grrrl seeks to be filled and validated as a worthwhile human being. xXRiotGrrrlXx, 45, l

MEN Seeking MEN

WEIRD, BRAVE, HONEST I have a hard time describing myself because everyone I know sees me differently. Not to say that I am twofaced, but you will have to come up with your own decision of who I am. Ideally, I am interested in finding someone who can complement me, and I them. Realistically, I would like to meet an honest human being. JDiddy, 31, l


understanding, nonsmoker. Me: independent, confident, hopelessly romantic, one-man woman, no drama, nonsmoker, very honest. I am a woman seeking a male. #L1064 I am a 37-y/o WM, somewhat clean-shaven, smooth chest/ back, tattoos, verse/top. It’s been a long time, and I just want to be with a man again. Love body contact, kissing, sucking, all of it. Interested?! I am a male seeking a male. #L1065 Young 70 SWF, retired lawyer seeking intelligent, well-read gentleman for companionship, dinner, movies and evenings out. #L1040 SWM, 59-y/o snowbird looking for fit SWF, 40s to 50s. In Vermont for six months, island in Florida six months. Social drinking, classic cars, boats, travel. No pets, young kids or drama queens. Let’s see where it goes. Live is short; embrace it! I am a male seeking a female. #L1060 40ish SWM seeking a 40 to 50ish SWF. Life is better when shared. Kind, caring, honest and affectionate male seeking same qualities in female partner. Average/getting fit who enjoys being outdoors. Nonsmoker. Take a chance. Life is too short. Central Vermont. I am a male seeking a female. #L1061

SWM, 30s, looking for a funloving girl. I’m a single dad who puts his kid first, so it’s hard meeting girls that understand. Fun-loving and up for just about anything. I am a male seeking a female. #L1062 Handsome SWM, 52, is looking for one or two female FWBs at any ages. Can be into a committed relationship. Love to sleep together every day. I am a male seeking a female. #L1063 Looking for him: strong but sensitive, romantic, honest, truthful, a one-woman man, hardworking or retired from being hardworking,

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White male, 50, single. Want to date to find a lady to fall in love with (relationship). I love to ride my motorcycle. I am a Civil War Confederate reenactor. Love history, not hate. I am a Christian. Love God and Jesus. #L1045

65-y/o divorced WM seeking woman for casual encounters and maybe more. I do have some health issues such as artery disease and neuropathy. I am a nondrinker and seeking the same. Please write if interested. #L1049

SWM, bisexual, 50s, in good shape. Looking for black/ white male. FWB. I’m mostly a bottom. Love to give oral, receive anal. You: clean, nice guy, slim, DD-free, well endowed a plus. Let’s get together! #L1046

50-plus man seeks bright, funloving woman who enjoys arts/ music/theater, nature, creative living, cooking, humor; who’s active physically, culturally, sociopolitically, philosophically, spiritually liberal and openminded. Friendship and/or romance. No punk/metal/hard rock. #L1050

GWM, 65 years young and healthy. Looking for companionship and more with another older gay male. Hope to hear from you. #L1047 You: fit, beautiful, happy, creative. Me: SWM, fit, handsome, happy, creative. Together create a space of love fit for eternity in Lamoille County with apple/pear hedges, ponds, chickens, cow, honey bees, music, singing, dance, conscious conception. Write me. #L1048

Almost 39-y/o woman; brunette with hazel eyes. Undergrad student sending herself to school. Loves motorbikes, kayaking, exploring, cooking. Very straitlaced; DD-free. Looking for all-American type of guy for a fun summer. #L1051

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SWM, 59, romantic outdoorsman, enjoys what all four Vermont seasons have to offer. Blue/green eyes, brown hair, kind, loyal, good listener, sense of humor, and still has a youthful body and enthusiasm. Enjoys downtime, cuddling, watching movies. Seeks likeminded 45- to 60-y/o SWF for sharing nature, music and adventures. #L1044

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52-y/o male seeking to hook up and please a very older woman who still has spunk. Age and wrinkles are a plus. I’m in the Rutland area but guarantee you that after one trip, you’ll be making more. Write me. #L1043

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WINOOSKI CIRCLE CROSSWALK You: driving in a white car, sunglasses, handsome. Me: crossing the street wearing a light-blue shirt, linen skirt, brown boots and glasses. You rolled down your window to say hi. I said hi back, but you had to drive off and I had to cross the street. I’d like to say hi again sometime. When: Friday, May 12, 2017. Where: Winooski circle. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913974 WAKING WINDOWS VOLUNTEER M, It’s G. We both were volunteers for Waking Windows. We got to chatting at Monkey House, and then I got distracted in my wandering and never made it back. You’re lovely, and it would be great to get to know you better. When: Sunday, May 7, 2017. Where: Waking Windows. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913971 MY TRAVELING WOODWORKER Salamanders, Miss Weinerz doughnuts, that wisp of hair that falls over your eyes, a soft breeze through the trees, wind chimes, heartbeats, butterfly kisses, earth tones, black coffee, a touch of sawdust, peace, comfort and so much more. Even when you are an ocean away, I will feel your comfort in all of these things. You’ll be in my heart. When: Monday, May 8, 2017. Where: in my hammock. You: Woman. Me: Woman. #913970

98 PERSONALS

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SHAW’S, SHELBURNE ROAD, 5/7 You were wearing a red jacket. I was in front of you at checkout. I have bIond hair and was wearing gray yoga pants and a black top. I was going to strike up a conversation with you but got distracted. (I also didn’t see if you were wearing a ring, so I won’t say more!) I have regrets about not saying hi. When: Sunday, May 7, 2017. Where: Shaw’s, Shelburne Road. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913969 SIDE BAR, LEFT-SLEEVED GENTLEMAN Left arm was sleeved; I noticed when I watched you roll your own cigarette while drinking good beer with two friends. I was with a friend on the short side of the bar. I doubt you are single, but if you are I’d love to have a drink. Either way, thought I’d let you know I found you very attractive. When: Saturday, May 6, 2017. Where: Side Bar. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913968 PINK-HAIRED AMAZONIAN QUEEN Spied you at Lucky Door and was lucky enough to talk to you at Waterworks. You know who I am but not what I can offer — anything and everything you want or need, anytime, anywhere, no questions, no drama. Hope to hear from you. When: Saturday, May 6, 2017. Where: Waking Windows. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913967

SIMON’S SHELBURNE ROAD I was behind you in line. You were wearing an EMS jacket and have blond hair. We saw one another. I think you drove a red Civic away. I think your name was Susan from your ID when you handed it to the cashier. Let’s connect. When: Friday, May 5, 2017. Where: Simon’s, Shelburne Road. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913966 SEXY SHELBURNE SIREN Sexy siren seen grabbing iced coffee to go in Village Wine and Coffee Thursday afternoon. You discreetly — not — peeled off a layer of clothing right in front of me, which in turn showed off an obvious dedication to health and fitness. With that healthy figure, a boatload of bouncy curly hair. You know exactly who I am if you remember doing the aforementioned. When: Thursday, May 4, 2017. Where: Shelburne. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913965 SEXY SINGER PLAYING BADASS GUITAR You: wearing this tailored suit. Me: pink flower dress and chord jacket. You: performing onstage — solo, in the café under where the concert was. I could have listened to you for hours. Me: I found out you are moving to Canada. Hoping you haven’t moved yet. Maybe we can meet before you go? When: Sunday, April 16, 2017. Where: Middlebury College Hurray for the Riff Raff concert. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913964

LOVE THAT NEVER WAS I knew your heart was too young for mine, yet somehow I found myself not just falling but hurtling down into the ghastly pit called “love.” It was pictureperfect, and we have plenty of those to prove it. My heart was yours after the first night. Did you ever mean it? When: Friday, June 10, 2016. Where: work. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913959 BEAUTIFUL BROWN-EYED GRAPHIC DESIGNER You helped me set up for my talk. There was a sparkle in your eyes. You were helpful and kind and said you sometimes teach classes there. I wanted to chat more but had to bounce right after my talk. Coffee sometime? Me: gray blazer, salt-and-pepper hair. You: petite, cute bangs. When: Saturday, April 22, 2017. Where: Power to the People’s Climate event, the Karma Bird House, Burlington. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913958 ALDO NOVA CONCERT, ALBANY, 1982 “Fred Robinson,” you were my first; want to be my last? Next time you call, leave a number. I’m hoping that you are back in Vermont and we can reconnect. When: Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Where: Friendly’s, Williston. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913957 UNPLANNED AFFECTION AT PLANNED PARENTHOOD Dear El: You’re a beautiful blonde (I’m blond, too), and I thought I felt a little chemistry, but it didn’t seem like the time or place to ask you out while we were discussing my sex and drug history. I think you’re gorgeous, and you brightened my day. Thank you, and I hope to see you again. # T. When: Tuesday, April 25, 2017. Where: Burlington. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913956

LOWE’S IN VENDOR VEST Afternoon. You had a vendor vest on near the seeds and lawn chemicals. We glanced and smiled. Really wanted to say hi. " When: Wednesday, May 3, 2017. Where: Lowe’s. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913963

ZEBRA SPOTTED BY A BIRD Can’t get you off my mind. I miss you every day as a best friend and lover. I want to share my life with you. I know we are different; our differences complement each. You make me happy and the better person that I want to be. You are my zebra; I am your crocodile. When: Saturday, April 1, 2017. Where: Hardwick. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913954

GREAT DEFEAT OF THE WORLD Against the great defeat of the world, we’re going to take up again the struggle. We met at the climate march in Montpeculiar, right after Woody Guthrie sent us a message from the heavens; you were wearing just the right colors. Keep your eyes peeled for a semiotic poem. When: Saturday, April 29, 2017. Where: Montpelier. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913962

LOOKING FOR BIFF Listen to the music; I hope you see this. I am looking forward to getting out on your motorcycle in the spring as a friend. I always wanted to see Vermont from a biker’s perspective, so I’m putting it out there. I live in Montpelier. I’ll buy you a cup of coffee or maybe lunch if you come here. When: Monday, April 24, 2017. Where: Seven Days. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913953

MISS MAÎTRE D’ AT ARTSRIOT You tended to my needs when I attempted to locate the owners of the car I had accidentally scraped with my artwork. You asked around at each table for the owners of the license plate number I gave you. This is awkward for me, but how about a glass of water, and I’ll buy you a drink, at Zero Gravity? When: Saturday, April 29, 2017. Where: ArtsRiot, 6:30 p.m. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913961

ARTIST AT STARBUCKS Michelle, I don’t make it into Starbucks during the morning since I changed jobs. I usually saw you when you were visiting someone who looked like a coworker with a client. You might have filled in for her on occasion. I was always doing artwork. You commented on one of my selfportraits (white horse in background). Coffee sometime? When: Friday, March 10, 2017. Where: Starbucks. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913952

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Your wise counselor in love, lust and life

ASK ATHENA Dear Athena,

I recently fell in love with my best friend. The only problem is that he’s in a partnership with another woman (also my friend), and they have a young child together. I know he’s in love with me, too, and we don’t know what to do. If we get together, so many other hearts will be broken, but we can’t deny our feelings. We want to rush into this, and I know I’ll treat him better than his current partner does. Could this work? What do you think?

Signed,

Dear Crazy,

Crazy in Love

Love often finds us when — and where — we least expect it. Have two friends ever fallen in love and made it work? Totally. In fact, falling in love with your best friend has the potential to be the best scenario ever. You already know you’re compatible, and you already love each other — how convenient. Except when the object of your affection is with someone else. Maybe you two haven’t yet indulged in your love affair, but the fact that it’s happening in your hearts is going to feel like cheating to his current girlfriend. So it would be in his and your best interests if he ends things with her right away. If you’re longing for an eventual “happily ever after,” it has to start with honesty right now. You can’t choose whom you fall in love with, but you can certainly choose what your next move will be. It sounds like you two know what’s coming if you declare your feelings publicly. The current girlfriend will no doubt be hurt and angry and feel that you have betrayed her; do not expect her to be accommodating. Also, no matter how in love you are, she is and always will be the mother of your guy’s child. That situation could get very messy. Your relationship will force a big adjustment on everyone involved — including other friends and family members — so be prepared to navigate dramatically shifting dynamics. In fact, there’s a risk you could be socially ostracized, at least initially. Regardless of your own desires, it’s paramount to proceed with respect and to give your two friends the space they need to end their relationship on their terms. They must be the ones to negotiate that and to set parameters with regard to the child. Do not try to get in the middle — that part is not about you. Clearly his current relationship was not meant to last if he was susceptible to falling in love with you. But that doesn’t make the transition any easier for anyone involved. You’ll need to be patient and supportive. And, down the road, perhaps you’ll find a way to salvage your friendship with her, too.

Need advice?

Yours,

Athena

You can send your own question to her at askathena@sevendaysvt.com.


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