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VE R MO NT ’S INDE PEN DENT VO IC E APRIL 19-26, 2017 VOL.22 NO.32 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Eating Out 2.0 New Vermont restaurants reinvent farm-to-table BY HANNAH PALMER EGAN, PAGE 32

STARTS THIS FRIDAY!

APRIL 21-30

VICTORY REDUX

PAGE 22

Blood still boiling in NEK town

JOKING MATTERS

PAGE 38

VT funnyman Kendall Farrell

CANNY PACKS

Breweries get art AF

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It’s Sunday Fun-day!

SUNDAY, APRIL 30, THE ESSEX: VERMONT’S CULINARY RESORT

session #1: 9-11 a.m. Session #2: 12-2 p.m.

APRIL 21-30

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SEVEN DAYS

04.19.17-04.26.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

During Vermont Restaurant Week, 118 participating locations (see opposite page) offer inventive 3-course, prix-fixe menus for $20, $30 or $40 per person. Try breakfast, brunch and lunch specials at select locations.

Our new, deliciously decadent tasting event brings together your favorite Vermont brunch chefs under one roof for a bottomless* feast of bite-size classics and inventive new creations. Belly up to the Bloody Mary bar or sip on mimosas while you listen to live music from Dwight & Nicole. Treat yo’ self at this Vermont Restaurant Week finale — you’ve earned it! *You must wear pants to this event.

Chefs include

3 Squares Café • picnic social • August First Bakery & Café City Market/Onion River Co-op • Pingala Café & eatery the essex: Vermont’s culinary resort & Spa • and more TBA!

Buy all tickets in advance at

vermontrestaurantweek.com ($45/35. Limited availability; this event will sell out.)

TO BENEFIT

$1 provides 3 meals to Vermonters in need. In 2016, with your help, we raised more than $20,000 for the Vermont Foodbank. This year, The Vermont Community Foundation will once again match our total donation up to $5,000. Help us connect all Vermonters with local healthy food. Donate today at vermontrestaurantweek.com.

Sunday, April 30

THURSDAY, APRIL 20, 5:30-7 P.M., MAGLIANERO, BURLINGTON, $7

APERITIVO CONTEST

Open your palate at Aperitivo — a snacky social hour for Vermont foodies. Enjoy tasty bites from American Flatbread — Burlington Hearth, plus spirited cocktails and products from our sponsors. Make sure to save room for the main course — Vermont Restaurant Week. Buy tickets at vermontrestaurantweek.com.

Feeding Frenzy ALL WEEK: APRIL 21-30

Foodies compete against one another in a statewide Instagram scavenger hunt. The challenges will be announced at the start of Restaurant Week, and participants will have one week to complete the tasks. The winner will receive a pair of tickets to the Vermont Cheesemakers Festival and the Seven Daysies Awards Party. Details to come at vermontrestaurantweek.com.


118 RESTAURANTS ¡Duino! Duende 3 Squares Café 51 Main at the Bridge A Single Pebble Apple Core Luncheonette & Brew (Cold Hollow Cider Mill) Ariel’s Restaurant ArtsRiot August First Bakery & Café The Bagel Place Bar Antidote The Bearded Frog The Bench Bistro de Margot Black Krim Tavern Bleu Northeast Seafood Blue Cat Steak & Wine Bar Blue Moose Bistro Italian Restaurant Blue Paddle Bistro Bluebird Barbecue The Bobcat Café & Brewery The Bryant House* Butch + Babe’s* Café Provence* Charlie B’s Pub & Restaurant at Stoweflake Church & Main Citizen Cider

Find all menus, hours and reservation contact info at

vermontrestaurantweek.com

City Market/ Onion River Co-op Colatina Exit* Cook Academy at the Essex Resort Cornerstone Pub & Kitchen* The Daily Planet Dedalus Wine Shop, Market & Bar* Doc Ponds Down Home Kitchen duo Restaurant East West Café El Cortijo Taqueria y Cantina Esperanza Restaurante* The Farmhouse Tap & Grill Fire & Ice Restaurant Foam Brewers* Gaku Ramen* Grazers The Gryphon Guild Tavern Happy Belly Deli (Winooski)* Hazel Hen of the Wood (Burlington, Waterbury) Hired Hand Brewing* Hyde Away Inn and Restaurant*

J. Morgan’s Steakhouse Joyce’s Noodle House Junction at the Essex: Vermont’s Culinary Resort & Spa Juniper Kingdom Taproom Kismet The Kitchen Table Bistro La Puerta Negra Leunig’s Bistro & Café The Lighthouse Restaurant and Lounge The Lobby The Mad Taco (Montpelier, Waitsfield)* Maple City Diner The Marina* Maxi’s Restaurant Michael’s on the Hill Misery Loves Co. Morgan’s Tavern at the Middlebury Inn* Mule Bar Myer’s Bagel Bakery* NECI on Main New Moon Café Our House Bistro Park Squeeze

Culinary trivia night in the Age of

PREMIER SPONSORS

Going With the Grain WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26, 5:30-7 P.M., ARTSRIOT, BURLINGTON, $5 SUGGESTED DONATION Join a panel of local experts for a lively and grain-ular discussion on the benefits and pitfalls of restoring grain production to the Northeast. Vermont grain farmers chat with bakers, distillers and brewers about what’s possible, practical and sustainable for the land and its people. Reserve your free ticket at vermontrestaurantweek.com.

EXPERTS INCLUDE: • • • •

Jack Lazor, Butterworks Farm Randy George, Red Hen Baking Connor Burleigh, WhistlePig Whiskey Bobby Grim, Foam Brewers

Sample a special batch of IPA made with all Vermont grains and hops from the brewers at Switchback!

SEVEN DAYS

Feed your brain with seven rounds of foodie trivia, and wash it down with a pint of nostalgia. Each round represents a decade — 1950s until now. Emceed by Top Hat Entertainment. The winning team earns a private sunset cruise for 10 on the Friend Ship. Reserve your team a spot at vermontrestaurantweek.com.

* = New in 2017

Stowe Bowl

04.19.17-04.26.17

MONDAY, APRIL 24, 6-9 P.M., NECTAR’S, BURLINGTON, FREE

THE FUN STARTS FRIDAY

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

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Sugarhouse Bar & Grill* The Parker House Inn & Restaurant Superfresh! Organic Café Pascolo Ristorante Sweetwaters Pauline’s Café Table 24 Restaurant Picnic Social* Tavern at the Essex: Vermont’s Culinary Resort & Spa Pizzeria Verità Thai Dishes The Porch Too* Three Brothers Pizza & Grill Positive Pie (Hardwick) Three Penny Taproom Prohibition Pig Toscano Café & Bistro The Quechee Inn at Marshland Farm The Reservoir Restaurant & Tap Room MAKE A RESERVATION TODAY! Roots the Restaurant Tourterelle Sarducci’s Restaurant & Bar Trattoria Delia The Scuffer Tap & Table Vermont Pub & Brewery* Sherpa Kitchen Waterworks Food + Drink Silver Palace* Whetstone Station Restaurant Simon Pearce & Brewery Smokin’ Butt’s Bar-B-Q* Wicked Wings Sotto Enoteca (Essex, Johnson)* The Spot* Th e Windjammer Restaurant Starry Night Café Windsor Station * Stone Corral Brewery* Zenbarn* Storm Café

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04.19.17-04.26.17

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THE LAST WEEK IN REVIEW APRIL 12-19, 2017 COMPILED BY SASHA GOLDSTEIN, MATTHEW ROY & ANDREA SUOZZO KATIE JICKLING

Brian Shupe of the Vermont Natural Resources Council and Tim Storrow of the Castanea Foundation

emoji that PAST DUE

Marchers took to Church Street Saturday to demand that President Donald Trump release his tax returns. What excuse will Trump use this year to keep them private?

FLYING HIGH

SEEING GREEN S

development decisions we make in the future,” he said. “I think this moment sets a great precedent for that.” The transaction is bittersweet for Greenwich, Conn., developer Jesse “Sam” Sammis. He’d been buying up land around the interstate since 1973 with the intention of developing it. Plans included 274 homes, a 180-room hotel and conference center, more than 500,000 square feet of office and light industrial space, a 10,000-squarefoot fitness center and an interstate rest stop with an attached retail outlet. Permitting had proceeded apace, but the environmental groups mounted a grassroots campaign against the proposal. In the end, Sammis will sell the land for $2.2 million — about $1 million less than it had been appraised for. “Financially, this is not what I had planned,” he said. The other side, meanwhile, says green is good. “It’s an area very susceptible to sprawl development,” said Sandy Levine, a senior attorney for the Conservation Law Foundation. “Our goal has always been to create long-term protection.”

PLATTER

COMPILED BY KEN PICARD

tweet of the week:

SMOOTH RIDE

Burlington officials touted the benefits of electric buses during a test ride on Tuesday. No more noxious diesel fumes in our future?

FAMILY FEUD

@ReneeMyNBC5 First-of-the-season maple creamee because #Vermont FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVEN_DAYS OUR TWEEPLE: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/TWITTER

Here’s a family fishing trip that ended all wet. Vermont State Police on Saturday responded to a call about an alleged assault at a West Haven fishing access. According to police, three young men came to blows after arguing over whose turn it was to drive home the family truck. During the melee, one of the brawlers tossed a tackle box into the Poultney River, damaging the fishing equipment and sending some of the bait floating down the drink. Troopers subsequently hooked Robert Boyer, 25, and Jordan Boyer, 20, on charges of domestic assault, and Hunter Boyer, 18, on an unlawful mischief charge.

LAST SEVEN 7

a sampler of citizen shenanigans

1. “Bernie Sanders’ Campaign War Chest Nears $3.9 Million” by Alicia Freese. More than 18 months before he faces reelection, Sanders has a hefty campaign balance. 2. “The Man Who Built Bolton Valley Resort Buys It Back” by Sasha Goldstein. Ralph DesLauriers founded Bolton Valley Resort in 1966. Others have owned it for years, but the DesLauriers family is buying it back. 3. “South Burlington Man Arraigned in Rebels Stalking Case” by Molly Walsh. A man pleaded not guilty to stalking a student who pushed to drop the school’s “Rebel” nickname. 4. “Renowned Modernist House in Hardwick Is Up for Sale” by Devin Colman. This stark, cubic house, built in 1969, could be yours. 5. “Honey Road to Replace Church & Main Restaurant” by Julia Clancy. The eastern Mediterranean restaurant will open on Church Street in June.

SEVEN DAYS

Po-Po

This plan had no chance. At about 8 a.m. Easter Sunday, Rutland City police were called to Walmart for a reported robbery. According to Sgt. Charles Whitehead, a man walked in and demanded that a checkout clerk hand over all the money in her cash register. When she opened the drawer, Whitehead said, the suspect allegedly “grabbed the whole contraption,” bolted out the door and escaped on foot. Witnesses and store employees helped police locate the suspect, 24-year-old Kyle Bizon of Rutland City, at his home less than half a mile away. When police tried to arrest him, Bizon’s older sister — who lives with her bro — “charged the police,” Whitehead said. Cops arrested Bizon on charges of assault, robbery and violating conditions of release. His sister, Brittney Smith, 28, was also hauled to jail on charges of impeding police officers, resisting arrest and disorderly conduct.

TOPFIVE

MOST POPULAR ITEMS ON SEVENDAYSVT.COM

04.19.17-04.26.17

QUICK ON THE DRAWER

BYE BYE BIRDIES

A new report says there are fewer birds in Vermont now than there were 25 years ago. Maybe their young’uns are flocking to cities, too.

That’s how much financial services firm Raymond James has agreed to pay contractors and foreign investors to settle fraud charges in connection with Jay Peak Resort EB-5 development projects.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

core one for the conservationists. A 172-acre parcel of land in Randolph that had been slated for a controversial development will instead remain open space, several environmental groups announced on Tuesday. The Conservation Law Foundation, the Preservation Trust of Vermont and the Vermont Natural Resources Council unveiled a plan to purchase the area, off a rural stretch of Interstate 89 near Exit 4. The Castanea Foundation will pay $1.2 million for 149 acres, which it subsequently intends to sell to Ayers Brook Goat Dairy, the parties involved explained at a news conference on the site. The Preservation Trust of Vermont will purchase the remaining 22.5 acres for $1 million — if it can raise the cash by June 15. Farmer Miles Hooper, who supplies milk to Vermont Creamery, plans to grow alfalfa and hay the fields, he told Seven Days’ Katie Jickling. Hooper highlighted the shortage of prime ag land in the central Vermont area. As a result, “We need to be very deliberate about the

Burlington will hold a contest for a new city flag design. Who even knew there was a city flag?

$145.5 million


FIT TO BE TRIED. Co-owners/founders Pamela Polston & Paula Routly publisher/Coeditor Paula Routly assoCiate publisher/Coeditor Pamela Polston assoCiate publishers/Co-owners

Don Eggert, Cathy Resmer, Colby Roberts NEWS & POLITICS editor Matthew Roy deputy editor Sasha Goldstein politiCal editor Paul Heintz assistant editor Candace Page politiCal Columnist John Walters staff writers Mark Davis, Alicia Freese,

RAINTREE HANDCRAFTED FINE JEWELRY

Terri Hallenbeck, Katie Jickling, Molly Walsh ARTS & LIFE editor Pamela Polston assoCiate editor Margot Harrison assistant editors Dan Bolles, Elizabeth M. Seyler food writer Hannah Palmer Egan musiC editor Jordan Adams Calendar writer Kristen Ravin speCialty publiCations manaGer Carolyn Fox staff writers Rachel Elizabeth Jones, Ken Picard,

THE 802 BRACELET

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D I G I TA L & V I D E O diGital editor Andrea Suozzo diGital produCtion speCialist Bryan Parmelee senior multimedia produCer Eva Sollberger multimedia journalist James Buck 1:20 PM

YOUR GLOBAL COMMUNITY NEEDS YOU!

DESIGN Creative direCtor Don Eggert art direCtor Rev. Diane Sullivan produCtion manaGer John James staff photoGrapher Matthew Thorsen desiGners Brooke Bousquet, Kirsten Cheney,

Charlotte Scott, Richele Young

SALES & MARKETING direCtor of sales Colby Roberts senior aCCount exeCutive Michael Bradshaw aCCount exeCutives Robyn Birgisson,

Michelle Brown, Kristen Hutter, Logan Pintka marketinG & events manaGer Corey Grenier Classifieds & personals Coordinator Ashley Cleare sales & marketinG Coordinator Madeleine Ahrens intern Olivia Werenski A D M I N I S T R AT I O N business manaGer Cheryl Brownell benefits & operations Rick Woods CirCulation manaGer Matt Weiner CirCulation deputy Jeff Baron doGGie baG Rufus

READER REACTION TO RECENT ARTICLES

CLEAN UP CHURCH STREET

The City of Burlington, Church Street Marketplace and Chittenden County State’s Attorney’s Office must take immediate, affirmative steps to deter crime on Church Street [Off Message: “Transient Held After Man Fatally Stabbed on Church Street,” March 29]. The recent murders and stabbings on Church Street, rampant petty larceny epidemic, and culture of complacency must change. I have spoken with beat cops downtown frustrated with higher-up politicians who have either tied their hands or imposed lax enforcement policies that dilute their presence. Last year I wrote the city a letter and recommended a police “substation” at the old bus terminal kiosk less than 50 feet from where Louis Fortier allegedly murdered Richard Medina last month. A substation on Church Street would likely have deterred this crime. Crime on Church Street threatens families, public safety and economic stability. Status quo politics and policies must give way to heightened levels of enforcement, education and prosecution. Ben Luna

BURLINGTON

Luna is a former deputy state’s attorney.

CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS Harry Bliss, Caleb Kenna, Matt Mignanelli, Marc Nadel, Tim Newcomb, Susan Norton, Oliver Parini, Sarah Priestap, Kim Scafuro, Michael Tonn, Jeb Wallace-Brodeur

Screen for future research to develop vaccines against mosquito-borne viruses

C I R C U L AT I O N : 3 6 , 0 0 0 Seven Days is published by Da Capo Publishing Inc. every Wednesday. It is distributed free of charge in Greater Burlington, Middlebury, Montpelier, Northeast Kingdom, Stowe, the Mad River Valley, Rutland, St. Albans, St. Johnsbury, White River Junction and Plattsburgh. Seven Days is printed at Upper Valley Press in N. Haverhill, N.H.

Healthy volunteers ages 18 to 40 Determine your eligibility Email UVMVTC@UVM.EDU or visit UVMVTC.ORG Contact the Vaccine Testing Center at 802-656-0013 for more info and to schedule a screening. Leave your name, number and a good time to call back.

8 FEEDBACK

SEVEN DAYS

04.19.17-04.26.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Luke Baynes, Justin Boland, Alex Brown, Liz Cantrell, Julia Clancy, Erik Esckilsen, Kevin J. Kelley, Rick Kisonak, Jacqueline Lawler, Amy Lilly, Gary Lee Miller, Bryan Parmelee, Suzanne Podhaizer, Jernigan Pontiac, Robert Resnik, Julia Shipley, Sarah Tuff Dunn, Molly Zapp

FEEDback

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DELIVERY TECHNICIANS Harry Applegate, Jeff Baron, Joe Bouffard, Pat Bouffard, Caleb Bronz, Colin Clary, Donna Delmoora, Dan Egan, Matt Hagen, Paul Hawkins, Nat Michael, Bill Mullins, Dan Nesbitt, Ezra Oklan, Dan Thayer, Josh Weinstein With additional circulation support from PP&D. SUBSCRIPTIONS 6-month 1st Class: $175. 1-year 1st Class: $275. 6-month 3rd Class: $85. 1-year 3rd Class: $135. Please call 802-864-5684 with your credit card, or mail your check or money order to “Subscriptions” at the address below. Seven Days shall not be held liable to any advertiser for any loss that results from the incorrect publication of its advertisement. If a mistake is ours, and the advertising purpose has been rendered valueless, Seven Days may cancel the charges for the advertisement, or a portion thereof as deemed reasonable by the publisher. Seven Days reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including inserts, at the discretion of the publishers. DISCLOSURE: Seven Days publisher and coeditor Paula Routly is the domestic partner of Vermont Senate President Pro Tempore Tim Ashe. Routly abstains from involvement in the newspaper’s Statehouse and state political coverage. Find our conflict of interest policy here: sevendaysvt.com/disclosure.

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4/12/17 12:29 PM

TIM NEWCOMB

HAVE A HEART FOR HEROIN ADDICTS

[Re Feedback: “No Sympathy for Heroin Addicts,” March 29]: Although I’m equally glad that law enforcement took a significant supply of heroin off the streets, I am not sympathetic to the author’s meanspirited and snarky invitation for addicts to sign do-not-resuscitate orders. This lack of empathy for the addict is appalling. In addition, the ignorance of the fact that addiction is a disease is regressive, and, frankly, I find it hard to believe that anyone these days doesn’t grasp this concept. What we need is continued law enforcement in concert with compassionate treatment for those who are unfortunately battling addiction. We need love and compassion for all our brothers and sisters, and, in particular, we need to harness empathy for anyone less fortunate than we are. Donna Constantineau

WILLISTON

TAXING CARBON CAN HELP

Recently Rep. Diana Gonzalez (P/DWinooski) introduced a short form bill calling for a carbon fee and dividend [Re Off Message: “Vermont Lawmakers Float Carbon-Combating Proposals,” April 10]. Under this plan, Vermont fuel suppliers would pay a modest fee on the fossil fuels they sell. The money collected would be returned equally to Vermont households. For many families, and especially low-income


WEEK IN REVIEW

families who already pay the highest percentage of their income for fuel to drive cars and heat their homes, the dividend would be a net financial benefit despite modest cost increases on gas and oil. This is a sound plan that Vermonters of all political persuasions should support. Rep. Gonzalez’s plan is practically identical to the plan introduced by Reagan-era Republican leaders including James Baker and George Shultz. Even the Niskanen Center, a Libertarian think tank, supports putting a price on carbon. In the U.S. House of Representatives, 18 Republicans recently joined the Climate Solutions Caucus to find bipartisan solutions to the climate crisis. The writing is on the wall. Climate change is real, and it is already increasing economic risks and imposing huge costs on society. Many conservatives recognize this and realize that we can turn a crisis into an economic opportunity by using the free market to price fossil fuels in a way that reflects their true cost to society. I am disappointed that the Vermont GOP released a statement on the same day as Rep. Gonzalez’s announcement saying that they would not even consider such a proposal. I respectfully ask them to reconsider. Sandra O’Flaherty

SOUTH HERO

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KEEP AMERICA OUT OF SYRIA

[Re Off Message: “Vermont Delegation Says Trump Must Seek Approval for Future Syrian Strikes,” April 7]: President Donald Trump has a well-documented history of deceiving the American people. Given his entanglement in Russia’s interference in the 2016 U.S. election process, it is very difficult to believe that his actions against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in Syria are anything more than a smoke screen, a way to distract the media, the American people and the U.S. Congress away from his own incriminations. His first reaction to the gas attacks on innocent Syrian civilians, after all, was to blame Barack Obama. Only afterward did he demonstrate any compassion for the victims of the bombings. Trump doesn’t understand the complexity of Middle Eastern politics. I can only hope that he’ll listen to his national security adviser, General H.R. McMaster, and keep us from an all-out war in the region.

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FREE TASTING! FREE Spring Wine Tasting on Friday, 4/21 from 3-6 PM

SEE YOU THERE!

Steve Justis

EAST MONTPELIER

SAY SOMETHING! Seven Days wants to publish your rants and raves. Your feedback must... • be 250 words or fewer; • respond to Seven Days content; • include your full name, town and a daytime phone number. Seven Days reserves the right to edit for accuracy, length and readability. Your submission options include: • sevendaysvt.com/feedback • feedback@sevendaysvt.com • Seven Days, P.O. Box 1164, Burlington, VT 05402-1164

1186 Williston Rd. So. Burlington, VT 05403 (Next to the Alpine Shop) 802.863.0143 Open 7 days 10am-7pm cheeseandwinetraders.com

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FEEDBACK 9

[Re “American Muslims Grapple With Interest-Based Borrowing,” April 5]: I have occasionally wondered how Muslims handled the debt money system in the West. The article by Kymelya Sari explains it.

Hogue is the Vermont representative of the Public Banking Institute.

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[Re Off Message: “South Burlington School Budget Voted Down for Second Time,” April 6]: When Billy Idol penned his hit “Rebel Yell” back in 1983, I don’t think he was channeling one of Robert E. Lee’s soldiers at Vicksburg. The anti-rebel group should stop obsessing over the bad Confederate rebels and embrace the good historical rebels in order to find comfort with the name. I mean, there’s Marx, Lenin, Mao, Ho Chi Minh — just to name a few. These guys are rebel gods! So I suggest the next time you hear the Rebels of South Burlington High School, don’t run to your progressive safe room, but rather imagine the strong jawline of Lenin, the cherubic face of Mao or that cute little stash of Father Ho — you know, the good rebels.

Please allow me to add a note about the war against debt-free money. Debtfree money is the monetary system of the Muslim world and the reason that Afghanistan, Syria, Iraq and Libya were destroyed. The European Central Bank, the International Monetary Fund and Wall Street cannot tolerate countries that operate outside the debt money system. You may have heard the expression “All wars are bankers’ wars.” Since the formation of the Bank of England in 1694, this has been the case. Western armies are the constabulary of the central banks.  I recommend the writings of Frederick Soddy, Ellen Brown, Smedley Butler and John Perkins to confirm my point. 

4/18/17Untitled-26 3:20 PM 1

4/10/17 3:29 PM


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contents

LOOKING FORWARD

fresh

APRIL 19-26, 2017 VOL.22 NO.32 36

22

NEWS 16

The Conservative Takeover of a Presidential Foundation

BY PAUL HEINTZ

18

Protests Build Over South Burlington’s Mascot Change

29

Convict-TurnedLawmaker Pushes Criminal Justice Reform in Vermont

FEATURES 32

Is It Time to Disband the Tiny Town of Victory?

36

Excerpts From Off Message

26

40

Russian Troupe From Burlington’s Sister City Performs The Cherry Orchard

Comedy: Kendall Farrell is making a scene

Coming of Age

Culture: A Somali Bantu youth finds his voice

42

Back From the Drink

Book review: Dryland: One Woman’s Swim to Sobriety, Nancy Stearns Bercaw BY JIM SCHLEY

46

Culinary Art

Food: When food looks as good as it tastes BY SUZANNE PODHAIZER

Beer-Can Do

FUN STUFF

Food: Breweries are arting around

Making Space

Music: Caroline DeCunzo and Jack Braunstein stake a claim in Burlington’s experimental music community BY JORDAN ADAMS

COLUMNS + REVIEWS 14 31 44 47 73 77 82 88 98

straight dope offbeat flick mr. brunelle explains it all deep dark fears this modern world edie everette iona fox red meat jen sorensen harry bliss rachel lives here now free will astrology personals

30 91 92 92 92 92 93 93 94 94 94 95 96

CLASSIFIEDS

Fair Game POLITICS Hackie CULTURE Drawn & Paneled ART Side Dishes FOOD Soundbites MUSIC Album Reviews Art Review Movie Reviews Ask Athena SEX

vehicles housing services buy this stuff homeworks music legals calcoku/sudoku crossword fsbo puzzle answers support groups jobs

C-2 C-2 C-3 C-3 C-3 C-4 C-4 C-4 C-5 C-6 C-7 C-8 C-9

APR 19 – MAY 2

available while supplies last SWEET ONION JAM recipe in this week’s insert!

$1.29 Vidalia Onions ORGANIC

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SECTIONS 13 25 52 69 72 82 88

The Magnificent 7 Life Lines Calendar Classes Music Art Movies

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BY KEN PICARD

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Eating Out 2.0

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SEVEN DAYS

V E R M O NT ’ S I N D E PE N D E N T V O I C E APRIL 19-26, 2017 VOL.22 NO.32 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

VIDEO SERIES

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

28

The Producer

BY KYMELYA SARI

Page 32: Short Takes on Five Vermont Books

BY ELIZABETH M. SEYLER AND SADIE WILLIAMS

Shear Delight

BY DAN BOLLES

BY SEVEN DAYS STAFF

ARTS NEWS

72

Eating Out 2.0

Culture: Old Soul Barbershop’s traditional cuts and shaves

46

BY SADIE WILLIAMS

Food: New Vermont restaurants reinvent farm-to-table

BY JORDAN ADAMS

38

BY MARK DAVIS

24

50

BY HANNAH PALMER EGAN

BY ALICIA FREESE

22

Midd Alumna Composes for VT Choral Union BY AMY LILLY

BY MOLLY WALSH

20

40

BY HANNAH PALMER EGAN, PAGE 32

STARTS THIS FRIDAY!

APRIL 21-30

PAGE 22

Blood still boiling in NEK town

COVER DESIGN REV. DIANE SULLIVAN

JOKING MATTERS

PAGE 38

VT funnyman Kendall Farrell

CANNY PACKS

Breweries get art AF

PAGE 50

82 S. Winooski Ave, Burlington, VT Open 7am - 11pm every day (802) 861-9700 www.citymarket.coop Untitled-30 1

CONTENTS 11

Underwritten by:

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Since 2012, the Community Foundation has awarded more than $2 million in grants through its Food and Farm Initiative to help connect all Vermonters with healthy, local food. Learn more at vermontcf.org/localfood.

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LOOKING FORWARD

the

MAGNIFICENT

THURSDAY 20-SUNDAY 23

Girl Fight

MUST SEE, MUST DO THIS WEEK

Compared to the teenage tormenters in Heathers: The Musical, Regina George, the fear-mongering frenemy in the movie Mean Girls, looks pretty tame. Lyndon State College’s Twilight Players present a theatrical interpretation of the 1989 cult-classic film Heathers that puts a darkly comic twist on high school cliques, murder and croquet.

COMPI L E D BY K RISTEN RAVIN

SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 57

FRIDAY 21

Eclectic Ensemble Music fans, fasten your seatbelts. Performing as part of the University of Vermont Lane Series, Washington, D.C.’s Bumper Jacksons take listeners on a wild ride, tapping into sounds ranging from New Orleans jazz to Appalachian folk music. Banjo, bass, pedal steel, horns and harmonies ring out in songs from the award-winning band’s upcoming release I’ve Never Met a Stranger. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 59

TUESDAY 25

SATURDAY 22

PARTY WITH A PURPOSE Potluck fare, storytelling and live music are on the menu at Good Earth Collective’s benefit bash for the nonprofit organization Abenaki Helping Abenaki. Decolonize Your Mind!: Honoring the Abenaki People offers friends and neighbors the chance to groove to tunes by Old Growth SoulJourner, the Band of the Land and Boston hiphop/R&B duo Dark Matter (pictured) in a substance-free environment. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 65

Just Chillin’ What better way for ski bums to celebrate Earth Day than by soaking up sunshine at the base of Killington Resort’s Superstar Trail? Snow sports enthusiasts can do this and more at Nor‘Beaster :: Dazed & Defrosted, a day of on-snow demos, ice-cold brewskies and an environmental village. DJ sets and live bands such as Steal Your Funk and Max Creek keep up the good vibes. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 60

Cartoon Network

SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 62

FRIDAY 21-SUNDAY 30

Eat Up

SEE CALENDAR LISTINGS ON PAGES 58 AND 63

Next Generation “Indigenous artists no longer need to choose between traditional and contemporary art forms,” says creative Vera Longtoe Sheehan. She’s the co-curator of the exhibition “Alnobak: Wearing Our Heritage,” which combines works by contemporary Abenaki artists with historical artifacts at the Flynn Center’s Amy E. Tarrant Gallery. Read on for a review by Seven Days’ Rachel Elizabeth Jones. SEE REVIEW ON PAGE 82

MAGNIFICENT SEVEN 13

The concept of Vermont Restaurant Week is simple, yet so satisfying: Eateries around the state serve up lip-smacking dishes from specially created menus at prices that won’t break the bank. Along with making

reservations at any of the 100plus participating establishments, diners can whet their appetites with themed activities such as Culinary Trivia Night: Food in the Age of Advertising.

SEVEN DAYS

ONGOING

04.19.17-04.26.17

You don’t have to write an epic tome to address topics such as history, science or politics — just look at the colorful, outside-the-box pages on display at the Vermont Folklife Center’s Nonfiction Comics Mini Fest. Exhibiting cartoonists from around the region — Steve Bissette, Rachel Lindsay and James Kochalka, to name a few — make a splash during panel discussions, book signings and meet-and-greets.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

SUNDAY 23


FAIR GAME

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The Black Box of Ethics

he purpose of ethics laws is to provide a safeguard against • Register now! Call Jess to abuses of public trust. Right? determine level, 652-8143 So what does it mean if an official ethics watchdog does its work behind closed doors? That’s what Vermont would get under S.8, the so-called ethics reform bill currently making its way through the legislature. Untitled-18 1 4/14/17 10:26 AM For reform advocates, the bill is flawed in a number of ways. The state ethics commission it envisions would have scant resources, no enforcement powers and only a single part-time staffer. But the cherry atop this legislative sundae is that the commission would be an ethical black box CHANNEL 15 — its deliberations and decisions shielded from public view, save for an annual report THE WRESTLING HOUR— stripped of all pertinent information. ALL THINGS WRESTLING I guess that’s one way to restore public THURSDAYS > 5:00 P.M. trust. Sen. JEANETTE WHITE (D-Windham) chairs the Senate Government Operations GET MORE INFO OR WATCH ONLINE AT Committee, which shaped the ethics bill VERMONTCAM.ORG that passed her chamber and is now under consideration by the House Government Operations Committee. She offers a pair of 16T-VCAM041917.indd 1 4/17/17 11:11 AM explanations for all the secrecy. First, the commission has to maximize confidentiality because it’s merely a “funnel” that simply forwards ethics complaints to six different enforcement bodies. “They would have to know exactly how the different agencies deal with confidentiality, and they would have to follow the same rules,” White explains. So because the commission is powerless, it has no choice but to provide maximum secrecy. And whose idea was it to create a powerless commission? Oh yeah, the Senate Government Operations Committee. White’s second rationale: to protect the reputations of state officials. st th “You have all kinds of complaints,” she says, “witch hunt complaints, people who are angry for whatever reason. I don’t Four Courses for think they should be made public until there’s some validity to them.” “If some complaint has been found to be groundless,” says White’s counterpart on the House Government Operations Committee, Rep. MAIDA TOWNSEND (D-South Burlington), “somebody’s good name is not smeared for some vacuous assertion.” This is a popular bugbear: If the process is open, aggrieved Vermonters will 1076 Williston Road, S. Burlington file reams of baseless complaints. But there are a few problems with 862.6585 that argument. First, does this ever really

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Untitled-9 1

4/12/17 3:29 PM

OPEN SEASON ON VERMONT POLITICS BY JOHN WALTERS

happen? More than 40 states have ethics commissions. Have these agencies been flooded by nuisance complaints? Second, if some wing nut starts filing reams of complaints, it’s not lawmakers’ reputations that will suffer. It’s the reputation of said wing nut. Third, even if the ethics commission erects a shield of privacy, there’s nothing to stop the complainer from going public. The most frequent accuser in recent years has been the Vermont Republican Party, and its complaints are always accompanied by press releases seeking maximum publicity. In short, it won’t work. And all the secrecy will do nothing to enhance the public trust. Truth be told, many lawmakers are, at best, reluctant backers of ethics reform. They see no need for it. They fear the chimera of baseless complaints. They fear a runaway commission.

IT’S LIKE A PRIVATE SUPREME COURT. RE P. RON H U BE RT

“If we expanded and made it fully funded with subpoena powers and investigatory powers, they would want to justify their existence even if there aren’t a lot of complaints,” says White. The rhetoric gets ridiculous at times. “It’s like a private Supreme Court,” grumbled Rep. RON HUBERT (R-Milton), vice chair of House Government Operations, during the panel’s deliberations last week. “They’ll have their hands on all the state’s ethics.” Well, it’s like a Supreme Court with no power or authority, I guess. In fairness, lawmakers spend hours upon hours working together. They share a common bond. And they have a hard time imagining their colleagues bending the rules or breaking the law. Despite a spate of recent controversies, the occasional outright scandal and the ever-present revolving door between public and private sector, many lawmakers remain convinced that the legislature is as pure as the driven snow. To them, the mere suggestion that they need ethical oversight is an insult to their probity. Advocates of ethics reform are backing S.8 despite its weaknesses, calling it a good first step. It may prove to be an ethical dead end.

Lobby No Hobby By most accounts, this year’s legislative session has been a rather colorless affair, with a shortage of high-profile policy battles. Tax and budget issues, where bigdollar lobbying can often be found, have been far less contentious than in most years. Still, there’s plenty of work for Montpelier’s lobbyist corps, as evidenced by their latest disclosures, which were due Monday to the Secretary of State’s Office. The top line: Businesses and nonprofits spent $3.2 million during the first three months of the 2017 legislative session directly lobbying Vermont lawmakers — just a smidge less than the $3.5 million spent by this point last year. Hmmm. I begin to see the allure of the revolving door. The grass is definitely greener over there. There was no single entity that broke the bank on lobbying, and a whole lot of players were clustered in the moderate range. Seven organizations topped the $30,000 mark: • Vermont State Employees Association, $70,844 • Vermont Public Interest Research Group, $70,738 • Vermont Association of Hospitals and Health Systems, $62,185 • Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee, $45,000 • FairPoint Communications, $36,827 • University of Vermont Health Network, $32,805 • Vermont Electric Power Company, $31,500 You may have noticed that two of the top seven spenders were health care outfits. In all, 17 of the top 100 lobbying spenders were businesses and nonprofits related to health care. They doled out roughly $428,000 on lobbying between January 1 and March 31. Other figures of note, for informational or entertainment value: Three independent schools — Burr and Burton Academy, St. Johnsbury Academy and Sharon Academy — spent a combined $40,558.26 on lobbying. And that’s not including the $18,533 spent by the Vermont Independent Schools Association, to which they all belong. (Your tuition dollars at work.) FanDuel and DraftKings, the major players in the trouble-plagued daily fantasy sports industry, spent a combined $12,400. Vermont PBS spent $9,450, presumably to fight state budget cuts. CoreCivic, the


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After DONALD TRUMP’s presidential victory last November, Congressman PETER WELCH (D-Vt.) openly mulled his approach to the new reality. Would he continue his role as a pragmatic conciliator, seeking common ground with the Republican majority? Or would he adopt a fiercer stance? As he said in a December interview with Seven Days, “There will be times when I will have to be much more oppositional than I have been in the past.” Oppositional he has been at times; but the glass-half-full version of Welch is still very much with us. Take, for example, one of his pet issues: allowing the Medicare program to

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negotiate bulk purchases of prescription drugs — a practice that is currently banned under federal law. On March 8, Welch and Congressman ELIJAH CUMMINGS (D-Md.) met with Trump to promote the idea. At the time, Welch told Seven Days that the president was “knowledgeable and enthusiastic” about the idea, putting him at odds with congressional Republicans who’ve been blocking Cummings’ and Welch’s legislation to achieve that end for years. At the end of the meeting, Trump handed the bill to TOM PRICE, now secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, who was a staunch opponent of price negotiation when he served in Congress. The president told Price to get back to him in two weeks. Well, it’s been more than five weeks. Any news? Nope. “We haven’t heard back,” says Welch, “but I’m a long way from giving up on it.” Welch gives the Trump administration the benefit of the doubt. “What happened after that is, we went into the whole repeal of health care, so that absorbed Secretary Price’s time,” the congressman notes. Perhaps. But it could be hoped that a cabinet-level official would be capable of walking and chewing gum at the same time. Or if not, maybe one of his underlings could tackle the gum-chewing. In the meantime, Welch continues to buttonhole his Republican colleagues. “I need Republican support,” he says. “And what I’ve noticed is, there is more openness by more Republican members who’ve traditionally been opposed to the idea. But the green light from Trump, the things he’s said in the press, I’m getting more active engagement from my GOP colleagues.” Could the issue be sidelined by congressional leaders, abetted by Trump’s short attention span? “It certainly could,” Welch admits. “And if it were up to Republican leadership in the House, and if it’s up to Secretary Price, it’s not going to happen.” Neither his office nor Cummings’ has had any contact with Trump or Price since that March 8 meeting, but Welch has seen indirect signs that Trump’s interest in the issue has not waned. “I talked to KEVIN MCCARTHY, the House majority leader, who told me that President Trump on his own brings up the question of price negotiation and the high price of drugs,” Welch says. “So there appears to be strong interest on the part of the president, and that translates into grudging interest on the part of some of his allies.” Spoken like a man whose optimism has been tempered by experience. m

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

private prison operator formerly known as Corrections Corporation of America, spent $6,475. Best Bingo Supplies spent $5,850 — for what, I have no idea. Something called the Elevator Industry Work Preservation Fund spent $4,000. And BreathableBaby, a company that makes “safer bedding products” for infants, spent $3,750 to lobby on behalf of, just guessing here, allowable crib slat spacing. While more than 450 people have registered as lobbyists this year, the money trail leads mainly to the usual handful of very successful lobbying firms. A total of 17 firms took in slightly less than $2 million from January through March — and that only includes direct lobbying expenses, not other services those companies may provide. The top billers for 2017 so far were: Downs Rachlin Martin at $372,273; MMR at $361,644; the Necrason Group at $353,340; and Leonine Public Affairs at $228,117. Past sessions have seen big expenditures on advertising. Take 2015, when lawmakers were considering a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages. The beverage industry spent more than half a million dollars in three months fighting the measure, including nearly $400,000 in advertising. This year, total ad spending by corporations and special interests has so far totaled a mere $55,000. More than half of that — $32,201 in all — was spent by Let’s Grow Kids, an advocacy group that fights for improved access to child care. Three million dollars for lobbying may seem like big money to most Vermonters, but it’s unexceptional by Montpelier standards. It’s just the cost of doing business and maintaining a presence at the Statehouse. Still, if this is what a lean year looks like, then lobbying remains big business. Yeah, sorry, I guess that’s not news.

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LOCALmatters

Coolidge Runnings: The Conservative Takeover of a Vermont Presidential Foundation B Y PAUL HEI N TZ

16 LOCAL MATTERS

SEVEN DAYS

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

S

POLITICS

PAUL HEINTZ

ix days a week, John Donald walks a quarter mile from his Plymouth Notch farmhouse to the hilltop hamlet’s tiny post office, where he works part-time as its sole employee. The 73-year-old postmaster’s commute bisects the Calvin Coolidge Homestead, a compact collection of buildings that have stood largely unchanged since 1923, when America’s 30th president swore the oath of office by lamplight in his childhood home. “Being that I’ve been here just about all my life, I know just about everybody in town,” the wiry, bespectacled man said last Friday afternoon from behind the post office counter in the tiny, southern Vermont village, just south of Killington. Donald couldn’t say the same about the conservative donors who, in recent years, have taken over the sleepy historical society once known as the Calvin Coolidge Memorial Foundation. Back when Donald served on its board and his wife, Kathleen, was its executive director, the foundation was a “backroom operation with a very limited budget,” focused on preserving the homestead and Coolidge’s memory. These days, the rechristened Calvin Coolidge Presidential Foundation has deeper pockets and greater ambitions: to become a national institution befitting a former president and to spread his gospel of fiscal discipline. Now run by two alumni of the George W. Bush Foundation, the Vermont nonprofit has attracted major conservative donors to its board — including one of President Donald Trump’s top financial backers, the New York City heiress Rebekah Mercer. Since 2008, she and her father, Long Island hedge fund billionaire Robert Mercer, have donated more than $77 million to conservative causes — and bankrolled chief White House strategist Steve Bannon. Like others in town, Donald bears no ill will toward the reconstituted Coolidge Foundation, whose offices remain just across the road, in the basement of the state-owned Coolidge Museum and Education Center. But the postmaster wonders why the nonprofit has become so “focused on money.” “For folks that were [involved] back in the original time of it, it’s almost like night and day,” Donald said, recalling bygone board meetings attended by the president’s late son, John Coolidge.

Calvin Coolidge’s birthplace and church in Plymouth Notch

The foundation’s transformation has drawn sharper condemnation from others, including Montpelier historian Howard Coffin, who served on the Coolidge board for two decades. “It’s clearly a partisan, rightwing organization,” said Coffin, a former press secretary to the late Republican-turnedindependent senator Jim Jeffords. “I think Coolidge would be turning in his grave with what’s happening at that foundation.” Former Republican governor Jim Douglas, who has served on the board since 2011, acknowledges that the foundation has “matured quite a lot” in recent years, but he disputes the notion that it has become politicized. “There’s no question it’s a different organization. It’s a national board. We’re raising more resources to support our efforts, so there are growing pains,” said Douglas, one of just four Vermonters remaining on a board of 20. “That may make some people uncomfortable, but I don’t see any ideological imprint on anything we do as an organization.” Indeed, many of the foundation’s programs appear nonpartisan. It continues to partner with the state to provide seasonal educational events in Plymouth Notch. More recently, it has established a high school debate competition that culminates in a Coolidge Cup finale each summer at the president’s birthplace. And last year it created a Coolidge Scholarship, which provides four years’ college tuition to two to three students.

Its Coolidge Prize for Journalism, however, seems to have a more ideological bent. Awarded annually to those who articulate the tax-cutting ideals of the late president, its $20,000 purse has gone to a regulatory lawyer, a libertarian economist and a Wall Street Journal columnist. “We’re trying to promote the Coolidge values of civil discourse and a robust democracy,” said foundation executive director Matthew Denhart. Detractors and defenders alike credit the same person with reimagining the foundation: Amity Shlaes, a conservative scholar who previously served as a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and as a member of the Wall Street Journal editorial board. Shlaes was elected to the Coolidge board in 2011 while researching a biography that recast the oft-mocked “Silent Cal” as a tax-cutting hero of the right. Three years later, Shlaes was elevated to board chair and hired as chief executive officer — a newly created position — after the free-market-oriented Thomas W. Smith Foundation committed $1 million to finance her salary for four years. At the same time, the board also hired Denhart, then a 26-year-old researcher who worked with Shlaes at the Bush Foundation, to serve as executive director. According to Coffin, no Coolidge employee earned more than $50,000 a year when he served on the board. Cyndy Bittinger, the foundation’s executive

director from 1990 to 2008, said she earned “a basic salary” in that position. “It was very modest,” the Hanover, N.H., retiree said. Filings with the Internal Revenue Service show that employee compensation at the Coolidge Foundation jumped from roughly $136,000 to $423,000 the year Shlaes and Denhart were hired. In 2015, the most recent year for which IRS records were available, Shlaes earned nearly $202,000 in salary and benefits, while Denhart made $131,000. That accounted for about one-third of the foundation’s $906,000 budget. Though she was promised an even higher salary when she was hired, Shlaes said she asked the board to redistribute some of it to other employees. “The bottom line is that while we received a commitment for $1 million for my employment, I discovered I could not take the $250k a year planned without touching our endowments for other outlays,” she said in an email after declining multiple interview requests. “My goal was to help the foundation, not the other way.” Unlike Denhart and Coolidge’s four other full- and part-time staffers, Shlaes does not work out of the Plymouth Notch office. She lives in New York City, where she serves as a presidential scholar at the King’s College, a Christian liberal arts institution once run by the conservative firebrand Dinesh D’Souza. Shlaes also finds time to advance her political agenda in the press, often invoking Coolidge’s legacy and the foundation that bears his name. In a column last December for Forbes, she extolled “the greatness” of Trump’s initial pick for labor secretary, Andrew Puzder — the fast-food tycoon who later withdrew from consideration following allegations that he abused his first wife and employed an undocumented immigrant. In recent years, Shlaes and Denhart have co-authored pieces for the National Review praising then-senator Jeff Sessions as a fiscal hawk and criticizing Sens. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) and Mike Lee (R-Utah) for proposing a tax plan that “does not go nearly far enough in cutting marginal taxes.” In a speech sponsored by the Charles Koch Institute at February’s Conservative Political Action Conference in Maryland, Shlaes drew


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applause after noting, “Yesterday, right here at CPAC, President Trump promised that the forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no longer!” According to Shlaes, her work for the Coolidge Foundation is “national” in scope and requires frequent travel to spread the word and raise money. “We are like a startup,” she said. Shlaes has certainly found success courting generous donors. In 2011, the year she joined the board, the Coolidge Foundation raised just $160,000, IRS records show. In 2014, when she took over the organization, it took in $409,000 in donations. The next year, that figure jumped to $774,000. The foundation does not identify its donors, but according to Douglas, all board members are expected to contribute. How much the Mercers give

I THINK COOLIDGE WOULD BE TURNING IN HIS GRAVE

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is unclear. Shlaes would not say, and a spokesman for Rebekah Mercer declined to comment. According to the Washington Post, the Mercer Family Foundation has contributed more than $36 million since 2008 to conservative think tanks and other nonprofits, including the climate change-denying Heartland Institute, the anti-Clinton Citizens United Foundation and the court-focused Federalist Society. The family invested at least $10 million in the Breitbart News Network and owns Cambridge Analytica, the data science firm that advised the Trump campaign. The family has also donated $41 million to Republican office-seekers since 2008, according to the Post. They were among the first major donors to shift their support last summer from Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) to Trump following the GOP presidential primary — and helped install Bannon and Kellyanne Conway as the Trump campaign’s new leaders. When Bannon considered resigning his White House post earlier this month, it was Rebekah Mercer who convinced him to stay, according to a Politico report. In a recent profile of the Mercer family, the New Yorker’s Jane Mayer quoted Shlaes praising the clan as

“enchanting firecrackers” and Rebekah as “into action.” “The Mercers have strong values, they’re kind of funny, and they’re really bright,” she told the magazine. “Their brains are almost too strong.” When Woodstock resident Mimi Baird served on the Coolidge board, from 1994 to 2012, she said, “We were bipartisan. We made a big point of having people from all stripes be on our board. And we didn’t talk politics. We talked Coolidge.” A review of the board’s current makeup suggests that’s no longer the case. Its members include CaptiveAire Systems founder Robert Luddy, a North Carolina charter school advocate who donated more than half a million dollars to conservative candidates during the 2016 election; Boston private equity billionaire John Childs, who has spent close to $10 million on conservative causes in the past six years; and C. Boyden Gray, an heir to the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco fortune who served as White House counsel in the first Bush administration and ambassador to the European Union in the second. Like Douglas, Shlaes denied that the Coolidge Foundation has become “a partisan instrument.” “Some of our donors give money to political causes,” she said. “But as donors or trustees, they apply no inappropriate pressure.” During Coffin’s era, the board was mostly comprised of locals and state political figures. These days, the only Vermonters left are Douglas, former Rutland Herald publisher Catherine Nelson, Manchester consultant Leslie Keefe and Norwich business owner Ann Shriver Sargent. Coffin said he is most concerned about the foundation’s relationship with the Vermont Division for Historic Preservation, which owns most of the buildings on the Coolidge Homestead. The foundation owns only the village’s Union Christian Church, but it occupies, rent-free, 2,100 square feet of office space in the museum and education center, thanks to its financial support for the building’s construction in 2009. “I don’t think that a clearly politically partisan organization should be using that state facility,” said Coffin, who helped raise the money to build it in the first place. “We’re aware of the current direction, if you will, that [the foundation is] taking,” said state historic preservation officer Laura Trieschmann. “We’re aware of their politics.”

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LOCALmatters

‘Rebels’ Yell: Protests Build Over South Burlington’s Mascot Change B Y M O LLY WA LSH

18 LOCAL MATTERS

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OLIVER PARINI

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ome South Burlington “Rebels” are living up to their nickname. Resistance has grown steadily in Vermont’s second largest city since the local school board decided in February to call its sports teams something less controversial. Defenders insist the “Rebel” moniker is not specific to Confederate soldiers in the Civil War and therefore shouldn’t offend anyone. South Burlington voters have already rejected their school budget — twice — and that may have something to do with the organizing efforts of the Rebel Alliance. Now the group has gathered signatures from 5 percent of the city’s registered voters to bring two ballot questions to the public: The first would instruct the board to restore the Rebels name; the second would forbid the board or the city council from spending public funds on the name change. Two South Burlington grads started the Rebel Alliance, but neither currently lives in Vermont. Kiya Batmanglidj is a 1986 alumnus who works as a staff member of the congressional House Appropriations Committee in Washington, D.C; Corey Mansfield, a member of the class of 1996, is a salesman in Clifton Park, N.Y. Mansfield played youth football and remembers meeting Batmanglidj back when he was a volunteer coach in the early 1990s. The two reconnected over their fondness for the Rebels name on a South Burlington alumni Facebook page. “I don’t think it’s racist. You look at the word ‘rebel.’ The country was built on rebels,” Mansfield said, referring to the American Revolution. They felt strongly enough to launch the Rebel Alliance Facebook Page, and “within 24 hours we had 1,800 members,” Mansfield recalled. Its focus has grown, too, encompassing issues such as taxes and terms of the teacher contract, which is now under negotiation. Last month, the Rebel Alliance registered as a political action committee with South Burlington residents as officers. “There’s definitely a high tax rate in SB,” said Batmanglidj, a former U.S. Army paratrooper who identifies himself on Facebook as a National Rifle Association member and proud supporter of President Donald Trump. “Maybe there’s been some festering, you

know, angst about the tax rate and the budgets and all that. And maybe the Rebel Alliance group kind of channeled all that.” Batmanglidj came to Vermont from Iran with his family as a child in the 1980s. He said he supports the name out of loyalty to a community that embraced him as a youth. While neither he nor Mansfield lives in South Burlington anymore, their relatives do, and the two men said they still feel a strong attachment to the city. Vicki Garrison of Essex — administrator of two Facebook pages, including “Rebel Name Retirement: Our Voice” — got involved in the Rebels debate for an altogether different reason. “I’m black in Vermont, and that’s enough,” she said via email. “Racism has no Captain Rebel boundaries.” “As a black person, to ask me to accept the Rebel name is to ask me to deny the truth and pain of my ancestors, our black ancestors, which I will not, cannot, and should not be asked to do,” Garrison added. It’s unclear why the district adopted the moniker after the school was founded in the early 1960s. Whatever the origin, symbols of the Confederacy

accosted Hines in a local store and told him, “You’re shitting in the wrong yard.” The affidavit also says Emmons later sent Hines a Facebook message warning him to keep the conversation private, threatening to reveal images from social media. One showed Hines flipping the bird, and another depicted a friend of his with what appeared to be drugs. Emmons, who pleaded not guilty Thursday to stalking, said that he was being targeted for political reasons. Hines declined to comment for this story. He listened attentively but did not speak at a packed school board meeting last Thursday in the library at Frederick H. Tuttle Middle School. “I see so much anger and unhappiness, and it’s sad,” attorney and former school board member Rich Cassidy told fellow residents at the emotional gathering. He expressed support for the school board’s decision to drop the name and asked publicly how to “achieve healing.” Others had fighting words for the school board. Stacey Savage, a member of the Rebel Alliance, said it must be more accountable to the public. “We’re just not going to take it anymore,” Savage said. Several speakers urged the school crept in: Students waved board to keep the Rebels label, if only to Confederate flags at games avoid seeing the budget defeated a third and clapped as Captain time by Rebel Alliance members. “Leave Rebel marched onto the name to another day if you want,” the football field at said Carol Elliott, a longtime South halftime. The school Burlington resident. board banned Others disagreed. Jim the flags and the Leddy, 75, a former state captain about 20 legislator, said he was going years ago during an to “confession” in public by earlier go-round in admitting he voted against the debate, but kept the the first budget over conname in a compromise. cerns about the size of the Renewed objections spending increase. But he came from 18-year-old urged the community to Isaiah Hines. As an apcome together and support pointed student representathe school board, including JI M LE D D Y tive on the school board, what he called its longthe African American teen overdue decision to dump spoke out against the moniker and the Rebels. “I’ve been opposed to that later celebrated the board’s decision to name for years and years and years,” finally drop it. he said. His advocacy led to an alleged Leddy noted that when he attended confrontation with a man who had Rice Memorial High School on the other argued to keep the name. According side of South Burlington, the Catholic to a police affidavit, Dan Emmons, 43, school’s mascot was the Little Indians.

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In 2004, the school dropped the name in response to criticism regarding racial stereotyping and adopted a new mascot — the Green Knights. Controversy ensued, but people adjusted, Leddy told the crowd. The same thing will happen in South Burlington, he implied. It’s time to stop seeing “Rebels” as a bonding force, because it’s not, Leddy said. “We are much more than that name,” he said. Vermont has seen its share of mascot controversies. In 2005, Champlain Valley Union High School in Hinesburg dispatched the Crusaders for a new mascot, the Red Hawks. Critics pointed out the violence and religious persecution that accompanied the Crusades, as well as the questionable use of a religious symbol — a cross on a shield — as part of the public school’s mascot imagery. Other schools have compromised. Brattleboro Union High School stopped using an image that some said looked like a Southern plantation owner as its mascot, but kept the Colonels as a name. Danville High School scrubbed the images associated with its mascot, the

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Indians, but kept the name after a bitter controversy. Randolph Union High School removed some depictions of the cloaked horseman that went with its mascot, the Galloping Ghosts, after some said the image suggested a Klansman on horseback. The controversies will likely continue, said Bob Johnson, associate executive director of the Vermont Principals’ Association, which oversees high school and middle school sports. Schools favor

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mascots that are perceived as strong, he said. He’s had many conversations with athletic directors about questionable mascots. “They really don’t stop to think about, ‘Well, what does the name really mean; how is it being portrayed, and is it offensive to people?’” he said. Several schools around New England have Confederate-associated mascots. It’s an odd embrace, given how many northerners died fighting the Confederacy and its institution of slavery. Howard Coffin of Montpelier, author of books about the Civil War, theorized that the Confederate mascots might have surfaced out of ignorance. Schools weren’t teaching much Civil War history back in the 1950s and 1960s, he said, when many of Vermont’s current union high schools were formed and adopted mascots. The discussion today should be particularly attentive to concerns raised by black people, Coffin said. “They were the victims of American slavery. And if any of them, if any blacks today are troubled by any of this, get rid of it,” he said of the mascots. It’s unclear whether South Burlington’s school board or its city council will decide to bring the Rebel Alliance petition questions to voters. State law says the questions should be warned for votes within 60 days of signatures being certified by the city clerk. But the law also gives local bodies some discretion to deny petitions. The South Burlington City Council once refused to put an abortion parental-notification question on the ballot, arguing that the question was about state law — and not a local decision. The Vermont Supreme Court upheld that position in 2007. School leaders say they are seeking legal advice on the issue, and the board was expected to discuss the matter in an executive session during its Wednesday, April 19 session. As Batmanglidj sees it, people deserve a direct say on the Rebels debate. He said, “It’s about making sure that people have a chance to express themselves.” m

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LOCALmatters

Convict-Turned-Lawmaker Pushes Criminal Justice Reform in Vermont B Y ALI CI A FR EESE

04.19.17-04.26.17 SEVEN DAYS 20 LOCAL MATTERS

He denies this allegation but does acknowledge that what he did was wrong. The way he describes it, he was an arrogant 22-year-old who “made promises I couldn’t keep.” The court came to a less sympathetic conclusion, sentencing him to 10 years in prison for “theft by deception.” In prison, Willhoit alleges, two guards raped him, and others repeatedly sent him to “the infirmary” — solitary confinement — for fabricated offenses. At one point, he said, prison officials tried to get a psychologist to deem

offenders into the community. In September 2009, just months after Willhoit’s own release, the governor pardoned him. That cleared the way for Willhoit to start a new life. In early 2010 he was accepted at Vermont Law School. After completing clerkships with the defender general and in the Vermont Prisoners’ Rights Office, he graduated in 2012 and was admitted to the Vermont bar. The newly minted lawyer moved to St. Johnsbury, where he now works as a defense attorney. He handles JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

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R

ep. Janssen Willhoit (R-St. Johnsbury) stood in the chamber of the Vermont House for 90 minutes last month defending a bill that would allow some ex-convicts to have their records wiped clean more quickly. The debate turned intense as other Republican lawmakers challenged the notion that criminals deserve a fresh start. Willhoit understands better than most the benefits of a second chance. “I’m no different than these other individuals” seeking expungement, the swift-talking 38-year-old told his colleagues. He didn’t explain — but lawmakers knew what he meant. Eight years ago, Willhoit was released from a Kentucky prison, where he had served five years for bilking investors out of more than $100,000. With a felony on his record, the best job he could find was prepping poultry at a Chick-fil-A. Since then, Willhoit has made a remarkable turnaround — in part because he won a pardon from the Kentucky governor. Today, the former felon is practicing law as a defense attorney in Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom and shaping the law as a state representative. He has applied to be the state’s next U.S. attorney. Willhoit scored a seat on the House Judiciary Committee in January as he started his second term in the legislature. He’s seized that opportunity to pursue progressive criminal justice reforms — at the cost of irking his more conservative Republican colleagues. “I do feel my life’s calling is this work,” Willhoit said, referring to his role as a defense attorney and criminal justice reformer. “Even those that have committed the most heinous crimes still are human beings. We have a duty and obligation to protect their rights.” The Republican state rep has boyish features and speaks in a torrent of words with a slight drawl that betrays his Southern roots. Willhoit grew up on a small tobacco farm in rural Kentucky, raised by a poor, politically active mother. She was a Democrat, but Willhoit was drawn to the GOP’s focus on fiscal restraint. He spent the summer of 1998 interning for U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) Two years later, he graduated from Eastern Kentucky University, the first in his family to earn a college degree. After working for a year at a brokerage firm in Lexington, Ky., he started his own investment firm at age 22. Struggling to find clients, the young broker began guaranteeing returns that he soon couldn’t deliver. Willhoit started using new clients’ investments to pay back old clients, operating what was essentially a Ponzi scheme. He did so, he said, in the hopes that the financial market would improve and he could make the money back. One of his clients, Jamie Leigh, grew suspicious in 2004 and notified the police. Her complaint led to an investigation and Willhoit’s arrest later that year. Willhoit estimates he lost about $130,000 of his clients’ money. Leigh, who said she was defrauded of $40,000, told Seven Days that Willhoit deliberately misled his clients and was spending their money, not investing it.

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WAS A BAD THING. JAN S S E N W I L L H OI T

him mentally incompetent after he clashed with them. “It was bad, really bad,” he said, summing up his prison years. Willhoit was released in 2009, his 10-year sentence reduced to five for work and education credits he had earned. By his account, he entered prison “a very self-centered individual” and departed intent on helping others. “I don’t think my own incarceration was a bad thing,” he’s now concluded. His wife, Sarah, went further in her assessment. She met Willhoit in college, got back in touch with him after he was arrested and married him while he was incarcerated. “[Prison] was a horrible experience, but I think it was one of the best things that ever happened,” she said. “I think it truly changed his outlook on his life.” After his release, Willhoit began volunteering on behalf of Kentucky inmates — working with ex-offenders with a Christian organization called Lexington Rescue Mission and helping start a group called Bluegrass Families of the Incarcerated to support prisoners’ relatives. He made multiple trips to the Kentucky State Capitol to testify about his experience and lobby for prisoners’ rights. Then-governor Steve Beshear appointed Willhoit to a state task force studying ways to reintegrate released

cases through a contract with the defender general, most often custody hearings for abused or neglected children. That work led Willhoit and his wife to become foster parents. They adopted their first two children, now ages 7 and 14, and are taking care of three others — one of whom they also plan to adopt. “The two of them go above the call of duty,” said Sen. Joe Benning (R-Caledonia). “They really have a dedication to those kids.” Rep. Chip Troiano (D-Stannard), a now-retired defense investigator who, for a time, worked in the same office as Willhoit, agreed: “His heart is in the right place.” But, Troiano added, “Where we differed is that he seemed to see everything as a competition,” even treating coworkers as rivals. Willhoit is unquestionably ambitious. In 2014, he decided to run for state representative, despite his problematic past and the fact that he’d moved to town just two years earlier. When local Republicans met to vet him, Willhoit said, “They weren’t concerned about my past but [they were concerned] that I might be a little too religious.” Durward Ellis, a Republican and longtime resident of St. Johnsbury, met Willhoit at the Methodist church they both attend. “I asked him some very pointed


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sentences, and he played a lead role defending the bill to clear criminal records. Both passed in the House, as did a bill he sponsored to give foster parents a limited role in child custody hearings. “I would consider him a strong ally,” said Rep. Selene Colburn (P-Burlington), a liberal who serves with Willhoit on the judiciary committee. Next year, the Progressive and the Republican are hoping to convince their colleagues to reduce penalties for drug users who aren’t dealers. Members of Willhoit’s own party are less pleased with his work. Turner said he lobbied House Speaker Mitzi Johnson (D-South Hero) to get Willhoit his committee seat, thinking it would help the party to have a Republican lawyer in that position. “I really asked — pleaded — that we get Janssen on Judiciary.” So what has Willhoit achieved for the party? “Ummm, sometimes I wonder,” said Turner, half-joking. The Republican leader said he respects Willhoit — and the fact that “he’s in the trenches every day doing that kind of work.” But, Turner said, “It’s troubling for me sometimes because we have some really conservative people, and they believe … you break the law, you pay the price. And what seems to be coming out of that committee is, you break the law, we’ll make it easier for you to clear your record.” That tension was evident on the House floor last month when law-and-order Republicans began raising objections to the criminal record bill Willhoit was defending. Jamie Leigh, Willhoit’s Kentucky victim, is incredulous that Vermonters have put him in a position where he can influence legislation. “I think he is the proverbial ‘wolf in sheep’s clothing,’” she wrote in an email. She signed off: “Good luck with your article, and may God have mercy on the voters of Vermont.” For now, constituents and colleagues seem to have embraced Willhoit. Last week, he was talking with a reporter in an empty House chamber when Assistant Majority Leader Tristan Toleno (D-Brattleboro) wandered in. Toleno recalled the debate over clearing criminal records, which took place when Willhoit’s 14-year-old daughter was visiting the Statehouse. “You took great personal risk in front of your daughter and stood up in front of a caucus that was frankly unkind on the floor, and you spoke your truth,” Toleno said. m

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questions about his background, which is quite unique, and he answered very straightforward.” That was good enough for Ellis, who went door-to-door with Willhoit during the campaign. “He’s a good family man,” Ellis added. Benning, another early supporter, said Willhoit “went out of his way to explain what happened.” Then again, he didn’t have much choice. The Caledonian Record ran several stories about his transgressions. One sticking point for some critics: Willhoit has never paid back his former clients. Legally, he didn’t have to pay restitution because he completed his prison sentence. He claims his former clients pushed to keep him behind bars, knowing the tradeoff. Practically, he said, he lives paycheck to paycheck and isn’t in a position to return the money. Still, why not try? “I think it’s a fair question … I’m not a person of means. I’ve done the best I can to give back to my community,” Willhoit said. He campaigned relentlessly, knocking on doors starting in April 2014 — a full seven months before his first election. Enough voters were willing to look beyond his past, and that November he finished second in a four-way race, barely edging out Democratic incumbents Michelle Fay and Bob South. Last December, Willhoit was thrust into a high-profile political fracas over then-governor Peter Shumlin’s plan to select a new Vermont Supreme Court justice. Republicans sued to stop the Democrat’s appointment, since the retiring justice did not plan to step down until after Republican governor-elect Phil Scott was sworn in. House Minority Leader Don Turner (R-Milton) turned to Willhoit — the only practicing lawyer in his caucus — to argue before the Supreme Court. With assistance from Deborah Bucknam — a Vermont Republican Party leader and its 2016 candidate for attorney general — Willhoit prevailed. “I think the Supreme Court case was a major feather in his cap,” said Benning, who was one of the plaintiffs. “It gave him a lot of exposure and a lot of credibility.” When the legislature reconvened in January, Willhoit was named to the spot he coveted on the judiciary committee. “I think some of his personal experiences really have enabled him to have an open mind,” said Rep. Maxine Grad (D-Moretown), the committee’s chair. “He’s taken the lead on a number of bills relating to reforms in criminal justice.” Willhoit spearheaded legislation to make more people eligible for deferred


LOCALmatters

After Decades of Feuding, Is It Time to Disband the Tiny Town of Victory? B Y M A R K D AV I S

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 04.19.17-04.26.17 SEVEN DAYS 22 LOCAL MATTERS

TIM NEWCOMB

V

ictory Town Clerk Carol Easter has a lot on her mind these days. Last month, a predecessor sued her, alleging she committed “massive voter fraud.” Meanwhile Easter, one of 72 residents in the tiny Northeast Kingdom burg, is helping to lead an effort to disband the town altogether and transform it into an unincorporated “gore.” But Easter had a more pressing concern last Tuesday. The white-haired 72-year-old, who moves slowly but is always quick with an acerbic response, pointed to a new security camera mounted high on a wall and trained on her desk in Victory Town Hall. “They’ve been spying on me,” Easter told a reporter. They, Easter said, are longtime rivals who would like to catch her doing something illegal. Led by selectmen Walter Mitchell and Walt Neborsky, the group has gone as far as to change the padlock on a town-owned cabinet in which footage from the camera is stored. No one but Mitchell and Neborsky is allowed to access the images. The allegation might sound paranoid to anyone unfamiliar with how Victory governs itself. But Easter’s rivals happily confirmed that she is telling the truth. “Mr. Mitchell put the lock on there,” Neborsky explained. “When somebody needs to get footage, he opens it up and can do so.” Two years ago, Seven Days visited Victory to document a decades-long feud between two factions of residents battling over minor matters. There were allegations of slain pets and misappropriated town money, and some of the players openly wished their opponents dead. The Essex County Sheriff’s Department started sending an officer to keep the peace at selectboard meetings. Despite the law-enforcement presence, the feud has intensified, spilling over from town hall into the judicial system. It’s “completely, significantly, 100 percent worse,” said former selectboard member Ferne Loomis, an ally of Easter. In addition to the voter fraud case, the bickering parties have filed at least five other lawsuits in the past year. One alleges malfeasance in a justice of the peace election. The Elizabeth Brown Humane Society, run by Mitchell’s wife,

POLITICS

is countersuing the town after a politi- is among the most isolated communities cally charged property tax dispute. And in the state. Residents live primarily along a kennel owner down the road from the three dirt roads etched into two hillsides, humane society claims town officials divided by 20,000 acres of state-owned forests and bogs. There are only two ways and a neighbor harassed him. Victory’s population could fit into a into town, but in winter and mud season, Chittenden County apartment building. one of them, an unmaintained class-four road, is impassable. In the But Vermont Secretary of past year, town officials State Jim Condos, who adhave debated taking down vises officials on election the speed limit signs, belaws, said his office has cause so many locals use spent more time dealing them for target practice. with complaints and quesTheir shared rural chaltions from Victory than lenges haven’t brought from any other community Victory’s residents together. in the state. Condos conThe latest conflict firmed that the fighting erupted in March, when has escalated. former town clerk Tracey “Essentially, what you’ve got is the Hatfields S E C RE TARY OF S TAT E Martel, an ally of Mitchell J I M C ON D OS and Neborsky, filed a lawand McCoys going at it,” suit against Easter and Condos said. “It seems like all they do is file lawsuits against one some of her political associates on the another and try to make life difficult for Victory Board of Civil Authority. Martel alleged that the defendants had packed one another. You wonder what’s next.” Victory was one of the last towns in the voter checklist with nonresidents Vermont to receive electricity and, sit- to help their side’s election prospects ting 15 miles northeast of St. Johnsbury, on Town Meeting Day. Additionally,

ESSENTIALLY, WHAT YOU’VE GOT IS

THE HATFIELDS AND MCCOYS GOING AT IT.

the lawsuit accused Easter of being deliberately slow in sending out absentee ballots to supposed political enemies and inappropriately helping an infirm woman fill out her ballot. Martel lost to Easter by three votes in the town clerk’s race. Easter’s husband, Lionel, tied Otis McKennistry in their race for a selectboard seat. “Numerous nonresidents who are political allies of the individual defendants have been placed on the voter checklist, and voted by absentee ballot in the March 7, 2017 election,” reads the lawsuit, filed by Deborah Bucknam, the Republican candidate for Vermont attorney general who lost last fall to Democrat T.J. Donovan. Easter denied any wrongdoing. “We’re not playing games with the checklist,” Easter said, calling allegations to the contrary “nothing but lies. These people have bullied us and bullied us.” Martel did not respond to a message seeking comment. But, in an interview, Bucknam pinned blame for the ongoing bickering on Easter, Loomis and their other allies.


FRESH OFF THE BOAT.

“The people I represent have not engaged in name-calling at all,” Bucknam said. The Secretary of State’s Office examined claims that people added to the checklist had inappropriately voted in Victory, Condos said. The result? “We have not seen any true voter fraud,” Condos said, though he added that he could not confirm whether everyone on the checklist lived full-time in town. Laws covering residency and voter eligibility are complex. Generally, Condos said, people can be registered in a town if they spend a certain amount of time there, or move away but intend to return. As long as they vote in only one place — and Condos said everyone on the Victory checklist voted only in town — they have likely done nothing wrong. “It’s not as simple as one would think,” Condos continued. “Someone could live in a different town or state and still maintain that they held onto their residency in Victory.” Easter knows that now. Just last year, she and her allies on the Board of Civil Authority tried to boot Neborsky’s two stepsons and his wife, Ruth, off the checklist, saying that they were not permanent residents of Victory. That spawned yet another lawsuit. A judge sided with the Neborskys and restored all three to the list. The sons were away at college and in military service. Ruth Neborsky’s residency was also at issue. Easter — her next-door neighbor — maintained that she no longer lived with her husband. Neborsky denied that. A few votes can make all the difference in a town where almost a third of the residents holds elected office, and power swings back and forth between factions in close, bitter campaigns. Money is certainly not the motivator: Victory’s operating budget was a mere $112,000 last year. Still, the town coffers have been a source of controversy. In 2016, Barre accountant Bonnie Batchelder, who had been commissioned to study Victory’s books between 2009 and 2012, revealed her findings. She said she discovered “alarming information” including misuse of town funds for purchases, discrepancies in transaction checks and invoices totaling more than $250,000, and missing tax forms and bank statements. Her findings focused on the offices of town clerk and road agent — positions held

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SEVEN DAYS LOCAL MATTERS 23

TOWN OF VICTORY

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Town of Victory « P.24

Bernie Sanders’ Campaign War Chest Nears $3.9 Million FILE: JAMES BUCK

During the first three months of 2017, Sen. Bernie Sanders’ (I-Vt.) campaign fundraising reflected his national ambitions. The unsuccessful presidential candidate-cumprogressive darling out-raised Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) and Congressman Peter Welch (D-Vt.) combined — and outspent both by large margins, according to campaign finance filings submitted April 15 to the Federal Election Commission. Sen. Bernie Sanders Nearly all of the $215,694 Sanders brought in that quarter came from individual donors, many of whom hail from outside of Vermont. Sanders, who eschews contributions from most political action committees, received $6,093 from two PACs: The League of Conservation Voters PAC, which supports environmental causes, gave $1,093; and the America Works PAC, which is affiliated with Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), contributed $5,000.  More than 18 months before he faces reelection, Sanders has already accumulated $3,877,831 in his political war chest. That money could also be transferred to a presidential campaign fund, should he decide to run for the White House again in 2020.  The junior senator’s expenses this quarter, which total $127,931, also underscore the fact that he’s still in national campaign mode, nine months after losing to former secretary of state Hillary Clinton in the Democratic primary. He paid $32,500 for website and fundraising services from Revolution Messaging, which ran his lucrative digital fundraising operation during that race. And in addition to the typical expenses — salaries, event space rentals, catering, office supplies — Sanders’ tab included airfare for trips to Texas, Arizona, Georgia, Philadelphia, Utah and West Virginia.  The jetsetting won’t slow down anytime soon: In a recent fundraising email, Sanders asked supporters to donate to his Senate “reelection campaign” to pay for him to continue to bring his message to areas “often ignored by Democrats” — namely, outside Vermont.

ALICIA FREESE

04.19.17-04.26.17 SEVEN DAYS 24 LOCAL MATTERS

A Vermont Superior Court judge has given state officials an easy way to circumvent Bill Sorrell the public records law. In response to a lawsuit, Judge Robert Mello ruled in February that government agencies don’t have to search private email accounts or private cellphones when responding to public records requests. The suit’s plaintiff, Brady Toensing, appealed the decision Monday to the Vermont Supreme Court, arguing that the ruling creates a “gaping loophole” in the state’s public records law. It’s the latest in a long-running battle that Toensing, a Charlotte attorney and the vice chair of the Vermont Republican Party, has waged against former Democratic attorney general Bill Sorrell. Toensing sued the Vermont Attorney General’s Office last year after it rejected his request to search “nongovernmental” email accounts and text messages for records. He was looking for communications Sorrell may have had with lobbyists. Mello himself noted the loophole his ruling created but said it’s up to the legislature — not the courts — to fix the problem. “To be sure, the idea that state officials and employees can avoid valid public records requests merely by conducting official work-related communications on private email and text messaging accounts is a seriously and, frankly, disturbing concern,” he wrote in his decision. Secretary of State Jim Condos also expressed alarm about the decision. “If the judge’s interpretation were to stand, there’s nothing that would stop any government official from using a private email or private cell phone to do business,” he told Seven Days. “It really flies in the face of public records [statute].” Vermont law defines a public record as “any written or recorded information, regardless of physical form or characteristics, which is produced or acquired in the course of public agency business.” Toensing argues that this definition is “unlimited by location or possession.”

ALICIA FREESE

MATTHEW THORSEN

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Vermont Court Ruling Leaves ‘Gaping Loophole’ in Public Records Act

by Walt and Ruth Neborsky during that timeframe. Regardless, Walt Neborsky won a seat on the selectboard in March 2016, dethroning Loomis and joining his ally Mitchell in taking the majority on the three-person board. Neborsky and Mitchell then fired Batchelder and refused to pay her fees, according to meeting minutes. “The audit was bogus,” Neborsky told Seven Days. “There is no truth to it. There is no money missing; everything was there.” The Vermont State Police investigated but found no criminal wrongdoing, Essex County State’s Attorney Vince Illuzzi said. “The audit raised a number of questions which, on further investigation, were resolved,” Illuzzi said. “It didn’t appear as though there was criminal behavior.” General troublemaking, however, continues unabated in Victory. Two weeks ago, someone posted a flier at the nearby Mooselook Restaurant and at Barnie’s Market. It pictured Easter, Loomis and two of their allies, Sandy Hudson and Jan Stanley, beneath a written message: “You can’t fix stupid, but you can vote it out.” Loomis called the flier — for which no one has taken responsibility — “childish.”

Coolidge Runnings « P.24 According to Trieschmann, Shlaes and her colleagues broached the topic of inviting Republican presidential candidates to Plymouth Notch last year, but the state put the kibosh on the idea. “It’s a historic property,” she said, emphasizing that the two entities have been able to reconcile their different approaches. “It’s not to be used to promote current politics in any way.” Like Donald, the postmaster, Plymouth Notch resident Phyllis Martin has watched with wonder as the Coolidge Foundation has outgrown its roots. “From what I hear, they’re more into getting all the money that they can — the grants and things,” she said last Friday outside her home on the outskirts of the village. “I don’t know that they have done so much for the town.”

As they did two years ago, some residents suggested that the tensions will ease only after some of the protagonists pass away. But in recent weeks, a few of the combatants have proposed a different solution: Perhaps the Town of Victory itself needs to die. In February, Loomis, Easter and others circulated a petition to hold a town-wide vote to disband Victory and make it the seventh unincorporated community in Essex County. There would be no more selectboard, no more town clerk, no more Board of Civil Authority to fight about. But the other side is — spoiler alert — vehemently against the idea. At least for now, it’s been tabled. No one in the Secretary of State’s Office could recall the last time a Vermont community disbanded, Condos said, adding he isn’t sure what the procedure would be. But if Victory went that route, the former town would likely join six other unincorporated areas that are run by a single manager. Three elected representatives of the Unified Towns and Gores in Essex County chose that individual, who arranges for essential services. Who selects the reps? The voters in the unincorporated communities. That means: Victory’s messy brand of democracy could go regional. m Contact: mark@sevendaysvt.com, @Davis7D or 865-1020, ext. 23

Martin, whose family has lived in the notch for at least seven generations, spent three decades working for John Coolidge at the Plymouth Cheese Factory and another two decades as town clerk and treasurer. Her father, she said, knew the president. Standing next to a green John Deere tractor beside her husband, Don, and brother-in-law, Cedric Johnson, Martin recalled with nostalgia the years when Plymouth Notch was a major tourist attraction — in the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s. “It’d be hard to drive down through there,” she said, of the once bustling village. “It’s not like it was years ago.” Nor, she noted, were the nation’s politics. “If he was around today,” Martin said of Coolidge, “things might be a little different.” m Contact: paul@sevendaysvt.com


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lifelines

OBITUARIES, VOWS, CELEBRATIONS

OBITUARIES

Gerard Paul “Jed” Guertin Jr. 1943-2017, MONTPELIER, VT

Ruth Conklin Hummel

moved into Crestwood Village, a retirement community near the Jersey Shore. Ruth joined music, poetry and writing groups, making many friends. They continued an active lifestyle, making trips through the back roads, the museums, the book stores and to visit.   In 2013, Fritz passed away at 98 in Crestwood Manor, where Ruth, at 97, was in hospice. Ruth moved to Bristol, Vt., to live with her son Karl and daughterin-law Abby. Ruth thrived in Vermont. She became a major part of everything at 18 Garfield: our meals, our pets, our friends, our cocktail parties. At 99, she stayed out in the rain on Halloween to hand out the candy and to listen to every child that came to our house. She had such a good time; she said she felt like she was 80! Ruth, our mom, loved and cared for family and friends. She could light up a room and make anyone feel better about the day and themselves. Some of us think she is the most appreciative person we ever met. She appreciated life and everyone in it! We will miss her. Children: Suzanne Hummel Bell (Jeff); Karl (Abby); and Sylvia; granddaughters: Gabriella Santinelli, Kathleen Collins, Kari Hancock, Ruth Hummel and Helen Hummel; greatgrandchildren: Ciara, Sinead, Eimear and Sawyer.

In lieu of flowers, please send contributions to Addison County Home Health and Hospice or to Lawrence Memorial Library in Bristol, Vt. There will be some informal gatherings this spring to smile and laugh and share. Let us know if you want to be invited!

MEMORIAM

Gary Steller

JUNE 24, 1946, TO FEBRUARY 15, 2017 Join us to remember and celebrate the life of Gary Steller on Sunday, April 30, from 2 to 5 p.m. at the Community College of Vermont in Winooski. Come when you can, and leave when you’d like. Bring a story or two to share and photos if you have them. 

Want to memorialize a loved one in Seven Days? Post your remembrance online and in print at lifelines.sevendaysvt.com. Or contact us at lifelines@sevendaysvt.com or 865-1020, ext. 37.

LIFE LINES 25

lifelines.sevendaysvt.com

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Mark your family’s milestones in lifelines.

04.19.17-04.26.17

AGE 101, BRISTOL, VT. Ruth Hummel passed away on Tuesday, March 28, 2017, at Anthony Myrick’s Community Care Home in Bristol, attended by her daughter Sylvia and son Karl. Ruth grew up in the Episcopal Rectory in Asbury Park, N.J., a few blocks from the ocean. Her father, Randall Conklin, was the kindly and beloved minister and, along with his musically talented wife Harriet, raised Ruth and her siblings, Harriet, Randall and Walt, in a house that was full of laughter and a very strong feeling of family. From the shore, Ruth developed a lifelong love for swimming and the ocean. From her father, she developed a lifelong respect for all people and an interest in all things.   She graduated at the top of her class at Asbury Park High School and went to Montclair Teachers College, following her sister Harriet. In college and throughout their lives, they were called

by their nicknames, Tui and Tibi, from the Latin declension tu, tui, tibi, te, te. The group of 10 classmates that roomed together freshman year stayed together through graduation and continued to correspond and have their own reunions, including spouses and kids, for the next 40-plus years.        While in college, Ruth had a blind date, a girl-shy guy from Princeton. Fritz (Frederick Hummel) became the love of her life and her partner in all things for the next 75 years. They were married in 1940 while living in Philadelphia, where Fritz completed medical training and Ruth commuted to Trenton to teach Latin and French. In 1942, Fritz enlisted as a doctor and spent three years in Australia and New Guinea while Ruth brought up their daughter Suzanne, born as the doctor sailed west. After the war, Fritz and Ruth settled in Belmar, N.J., set up a medical practice, and had Karl and Sylvia. In 1954, the family moved 10 miles south to a wonderful house on a beautiful lake about 20 minutes from the ocean and stayed there for the next 26 years. During all of this, Ruth worked in the office with Fritz as receptionist, nurse and cleanup crew … before going home to get dinner ready (while the doctor mixed the martinis) and then help children with homework. She volunteered in libraries, sang with various groups and entertained their friends at the lake. Her love of music and singing wove through her entire life and left an enduring appreciation of music in her children and grandchildren.         In 1980, Ruth and Fritz

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Gerard Paul “Jed” Guertin Jr. passed away at home on March 30, 2017. He was born in Springfield, Vt., on January 12, 1943, the son of Catherine McSherry Guertin and Gerard Paul Guertin. Jed grew up in Shrewsbury, Mass., where he nurtured an interest in ethics (while hiding his motorcycle at a friend’s house). Known as “Flex” to his coworkers at Strand’s Ski Shop in Worcester, Jed was a competitive water and snow skier. After college, Jed moved to Burlington, Vt., where he started the Skirack in 1968. Near the end of the Skirack’s first year, Page Smith wandered in to rent a pair of skis — four months later she and Jed were married. Through a series of careers and businesses, Jed and Page raised two sons and Jed earned his master’s degree in resource economics at the University of Vermont. Along the way, Jed and Page developed their

mutual interest in sailing, and in 1998 they sold their house and most of their worldly possessions to sail away. They cruised the East Coast for five years, from Lake Champlain to the Bahamas, marketing Jed’s marine invention and exploring sea and shore. Eventually they were called back to land by the arrival of grandchildren. Jed was a husband, father, silly (and adoring) grandpa, businessman, salesman, “designated hugger” for the local Little League team, high school and college ski coach, college instructor, inventor, sailor, plumbing enthusiast, political wonk, advocate for the colorblind and whistle-blowers, curmudgeon, cobbler, rough carpenter, storyteller, novice magician, internet troll slayer, home trash and recycling manager, prodigious reader, water quality defender, tinkerer, “Picklehead” — and very sensitive man. He was a kind and positive figure in the lives of people, young and old, whose paths crossed his. An intrepid seeker of truth and justice, he always followed his moral compass. In the last few years of his life, Jed worked tirelessly to protect and maintain drinking water quality for the residents of Montpelier and all of Vermont. Jed leaves his wife, Page, after 47 years together; sons Jesse and Christopher Guertin; grandchildren Remy and Laurel Guertin, and Milo and Juniper LorangerGuertin; daughters-in-law Kim Guertin and Jessica

Loranger; sister Ann-Marie and her husband, Rob Walley. Gifts in Jed’s honor can be made to the KelloggHubbard Library, 135 Main St., Montpelier, VT.


STATEof THEarts

Page 32: Short Takes on Five Vermont Books B Y ELI ZA B ETH M. SEYLER A N D SA D I E WILL IAMS

26 STATE OF THE ARTS

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

S

even Days writers can’t possibly read, much less review, the number of books that arrive in a steady stream by post, email and, in one memorable case, a pace of asses. So this monthly feature is our way of introducing you to five books by Vermont authors. To do that, we contextualize each book just a little and quote a single representative sentence from, yes, page 32. Inclusion here implies neither approval nor derision on our part, but simply: Here is a bunch of books, arranged alphabetically by authors’ names, that Seven Days readers might like to know about. 

The Art and Science of Grazing: How Grass Farmers Can Create Sustainable Systems for Healthy Animals and Farm Ecosystems

Sarah Flack, Chelsea Green Publishing, 240 pages, $39.95

To Look Out From

Dede Cummings, Homebound Publications, 92 pages. $16.95.

She rages outside and slaps the cedar door, gloats as graves / are upturned, she courses through the land oblivious / until the loose let water cracks walls of stone-lined cemeteries, / as long-dead bodies burst out and coffins set sail down river.

On some farms, having some fields in warmseason grass and other areas growing cool-season grass can increase pasture productivity over a longer growing season.

Dede Cummings has published many other writers through her company, Green Writers Press, which focuses on environmentally oriented works. And though she’s published her own poems in editorials such as Kentucky Review and Bloodroot Literary Magazine, this is her first published collection of verse. The slim volume contains works spanning 30 years and touches on femininity, family and place. While most poems seem rooted in Vermont, Cummings takes readers as far as the site of a Nazi massacre in Berdychiv, Ukraine, or, as she calls it, Berditchev. The quote above addresses the deathly maneuvers of Tropical Storm Irene’s raging waters in Vermont. Expect vivid encounters with local landscapes and tropes: barn owls and fiddlers and laundry lines glorified in lyric forms ranging from loosely metered couplets to rambling free verse to the occasional sonnet.

The farm practice of putting animals out to pasture may appear easy, but there is far more to grazing than meets the eye. When managed well, rotational grazing (strategically moving ruminants among paddocks) creates highquality forage, ecosystem balance and reduced farm costs. Poorly managed grazing and confinement farming create just the opposite and contribute to climate change. Vermont livestock farmer and consultant SARAH FLACK draws on 30 years of experience and formal education to guide farmers in The Art and Science of Grazing. Full of descriptive photographs, drawings and graphs, the book is written for grazing in mesic (non-dryland) regions, including Vermont. Its everyday prose describes the benefits of good pasture management, types of grazing systems and ideal conditions for cows, sheep and goats. Ten farm profiles go from theory to praxis, including how to graze (almost) year-round in the North. According to Flack, that grass-fed burger is better for many reasons beyond taste.

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E.M.S.

Collateral Trout: A Vermonter’s Angling Memoirs and Fishy Tales

Peter Shea, Wind Knot Publishing, 126 pages. $14.95.

He was about two cranks into the retrieve when his rod bent heavily in response to the strike of a large trout. Peter Shea is a fish guy. His previous publications include Vermont Trout Ponds, The Atlas of Vermont Trout Ponds, In the Company of Trout and Long Trail Trout. And his newest release, Collateral Trout, comes just in time for Vermont’s trout-fishing season, which opened on April 8. The compilation of stories from Shea’s adventures are likely to get seasoned anglers and newbies alike in the mood for an outdoor adventure. Some stories are derived from real life, such as the time Shea was busted for smoking pot by a “fish and game trooper.” Others are pure works of fiction. The opener, “Ducking at Duck,” brings the heat of summer into high relief while offering up quick dips in cool ponds, sweating under weighted packs and the terror of sharing a campsite with gun-laden coeds. Needless to say, this book opens with a bang. S.W.


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Shelburne Farms: House, Gardens, Farm, and Barns

Glenn Suokko, Rizzoli International Publications, 288 pages, $65

[Photo caption] The Webbs were active sportsmen on land and on water. They owned several boats; among them were three yachts that they sailed on the vast open waters of Lake Champlain.

Tim Weed, Green Writers Press, 262 pages. $24.95.

[F]or various reasons our houses were by this time off-limits, so we frequently put on snowmobile boots and ski parkas and used the place to hang out, smoke dope, and, sometimes, drop acid.

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Ready. Fire! Aim. April 21, 2017 - July 9, 2017 BCA Center, First and Second Floor Opening Reception: Friday, April 21, 2017 5-8 p.m. Can an entrepreneurial strategy serve as a departure for the creative process? Ready. Fire! Aim. is a collaboration between the Hall Art Foundation and Burlington City Arts and is curated by DJ Hellerman.

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STATE OF THE ARTS 27

The first collection of short stories from Vermont novelist and educator Tim Weed takes readers from the mountains of the American west to Rome, Italy, and various locales in between. Weed teaches writing at GrubStreet, a Boston-based creative writing center, and in the master of fine arts writing program at Western Connecticut State University. “Tower Eight,” the story in which the above quotation appears, follows a high school outsider through the terror and beauty of acid trips. Weed delves into adolescent friendship and the idea of being an outsider with great care for his characters. The tale begins and ends with one character musing on the reality of the other. The surreal ploy is subtle enough to bring the story into the realm of good literature, making the reader question perceptions of reality. As the kids in “Tower Eight” say, “there is no gravity.” Weed’s prose is weightless, and weighty, all at once.

jacobalbee.com . 802-540-0401 burlington, vt hours by appointment

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E.M.S.

Goldsmith

Fresh. Filtered. Free.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Rizzoli is a leading publisher of art, architecture and design books, and each is a stunning testament to its subject. This book on Shelburne Farms is no exception. Author, designer and photographer GLENN SUOKKO artfully presents more than 300 landscape and architectural photos, along with historical and ecological narratives, to celebrate a 130-year tradition. In the 1800s, Lila and Seward Webb acquired dozens of farms to create what they deemed a model estate farm. Architect Robert Henderson Robertson and landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted created a property for agricultural, woodland management and recreational use. Suokko’s photos chart a gorgeous journey through the 1,400-acre farm’s land, inn, formal gardens, major barns, lake views and agricultural enterprises. The foreword by family descendant and farms president ALEC WEBB and afterword by vice president and program director MEGAN CAMP recount the transition from estate to nonprofit organization devoted to education and stewardship.

Jacob Albee

A Field Guide to Murder and Fly Fishing: Stories

4/14/17 10:26 AM


STATEof THEarts

Russian Troupe from Burlington’s Sister City Performs The Cherry Orchard B Y KEN PI CA R D

COURTESY OF DAVID SEAVER

THEATER

Yaroslavl, one of Burlington’s seven sister cities around the globe, is in Russia’s so-called “Golden Ring” and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site about 160 miles northeast of Moscow. The ancient city, known for its majestic Roman Orthodox churches, just celebrated its 1,000-year anniversary. By comparison, Moscow was founded 870 years ago. Yaroslavl has another significance to Vermonters: It’s the city where BERNIE and JANE O’MEARA SANDERS honeymooned in the 1980s while the former served as Burlington mayor. He forged this sister-city relationship at the close of the Cold War. In the decades since, cultural exchanges between the two cities have included everything from jazz musicians to firefighters to ice hockey teams.

THE ARTS ARE A GREAT HUB AROUND WHICH WE CAN HAVE A CONVERSATION

ABOUT DIFFERENCES IN CULTURE AND WHAT THAT MEANS FOR POLITICS.

Atmosphere Theater Troupe performing The Cherry Orchard in Yaroslavl

28 STATE OF THE ARTS

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

GEEDA SEARFOORCE

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he current political climate between the United States and Russia may be chillier than a Siberian winter, but culturally, Burlington and its Russian sister city, Yaroslavl, still enjoy a warm and fuzzy relationship. This week, Vermonters will have a rare opportunity to take in performances of a play by Anton Chekhov, Russia’s most celebrated playwright and short-story author, performed in Russian. The two performances of Chekhov’s The Cherry Orchard, hosted by Burlington High School and Middlebury College, are part of the Burlington Yaroslavl Sister Cities Program’s annual “Days of Russian Culture.” From April 18 through 24, the Vermont nonprofit group will host a 21-member delegation of Russians from Burlington’s longtime “twin town,” as the Russians call it, including the 16member semi-professional Atmosphere Theatre Troupe. The Russians’ visit represents the “return journey” of the latest cultural exchange that began last fall, explained ALEX BUNTON, president of the Burlington/ Yaroslavl program. In October 2016, a

small delegation of Vermonters, including several Burlington city councilors, visited the Russian metropolis of more than a half million people. That and the upcoming Russian visit are among the largest cultural exchanges between the two cities since their relationship was first established in 1988. The Cherry Orchard, Chekhov’s last play before his death from tuberculosis in 1904 at age 44, tells the story of a turn-of-the-century aristocratic family that’s fallen on hard times. The story centers on its matriarch, Madame Lyubov Andreievna Ranevskaya, who returns to her family’s estate, after a long self-imposed exile, just as its renowned cherry orchard is about to be auctioned off and cut down to pay off the mortgage. Though the play will be presented in Russian, it will not feature wordfor-word translation subtitles. Instead, select pieces of dialogue and touchstones of the plot will be projected onto a screen behind the performers to help audience members follow the story. Burlington theater artist, writer and self-described “Chekhov geek” GEEDA SEARFOORCE will also give a pre-show

presentation at the BHS show to deconstruct the story and put the play into a larger cultural and historical context. For instance, Searfoorce noted that Chekhov, the world’s second-mostperformed playwright after William Shakespeare, is considered one of the first authors to adopt an ecological perspective in a modernist way. His writing of The Cherry Orchard, she noted, coincided with the rise of industrialization and the deforestation of Russia in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The play laments not only how industrial development was degrading the landscape but also how it was breaking down Russia’s traditional social order. As such, Searfoorce said, the play’s environmental and social messages come at a timely moment in U.S.-Russia relations amid rising global concerns about climate change. “The arts are a great hub around which we can have a conversation about differences in culture and what that means for politics,” Searfoorce said. “The arts have so much to offer — to create and further those conversations in a deeper way.”

The politics of Yaroslavl are also “pretty complicated,” Bunton said, because the city is seen, like Burlington, as a liberal bastion. He noted that in its most recent mayoral election, Yaroslavl was the only city in Russia to elect someone not from the United Russia party, the Vladimir Putin-aligned ruling party. Last August, Yaroslavl’s anti-Kremlin mayor Yevgeny Urlashov was sentenced to 12 years in prison on what many allege were trumped-up corruption charges. Cultural exchanges like this one, Bunton added, help to remind residents in both countries that not all Russians are like Putin, nor are all Americans like President Donald Trump. As he put it, “At the end of the day, people are people.” m Contact: ken@sevendaysvt.com

INFO The Cherry Orchard in Russian with English supertitles, Thursday, April 20, 7:30 p.m. at Burlington High School. Free. Intimate reading of the play in Russian by the theater troupe on Friday, April 21, 7 p.m., followed by a Q&A in English and Russian at Middlebury College, in Chateau 005. Free. burlingtonyaroslavl.com


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Midd Alumna Composes for Vermont Choral Union’s 50th Anniversary

V

MUSIC

Christina Whitten Thomas

IS THE CROWNING MOMENT OF MY CAREER. C H RI S T I N A W H I T T E N T H OM AS

INFO “Wings of Song”: Vermont Choral Union 50th Anniversary Concert, Friday, April 21, 7:30 p.m. at Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College; Sunday, April 23, 3 p.m. at McCarthy Arts Center, Saint Michael’s College, in Colchester; and Saturday, April 29, 7:30 p.m. at Unitarian Church of Montpelier. $12; Middlebury affiliates $10. vtchoralunion.org A German Requiem: Burlington Choral Society’s 40th Anniversary Spring Concert, Saturday, April 22, 7:30 p.m. at Elley-Long Music Center in Colchester; and Sunday, April 23, 4 p.m. at Barre Opera House. $20-25. bcsvermont.org

STATE OF THE ARTS 29

Guided by a locavore sensibility and Killary’s theme of gold — representing “nostalgia, remembrance, heritage,” says Whitten Thomas — the pair also selected Middlebury College professor JAY PARINI’s poem “I Was There” and “Canticle” by Chittenden County poet and historian ABIGAIL CARROLL. A flute interlude between the second and third songs completes the four-movement work. Whitten Thomas, 38, studied vocal performance at Middlebury but turned

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Vermont and the Gold “the richness of our musicality,” he says. In choosing a composer with local roots to set the work, he adds, he honors the Choral Union’s founder and longtime director, James G. Chapman, who was known for his research into Vermont composers such as Justin Morgan. (The program for “Wings of Song” includes pieces by Morgan as well as by Maurice Duruflé, Hildegard von Bingen, Randall Thompson and others.)

Contact: lilly@sevendaysvt.com

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BEING INVITED BACK TO WHERE IT ALL STARTED

toward composing as an undergrad. She sang in the Middlebury Chamber Singers (now called the MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE CHOIR), directed by Rehbach at the time, and the group performed her senior project, a composition for choir and orchestra. She continued studying vocal performance in a master’s program at the University of Southern California while winning competitions for her compositions. Says Whitten Thomas, “Being invited back to where it all started is the crowning moment of my career.” That career, as a successful choral composer with a musician husband and two small children, is remarkable in itself. Whitten Thomas will return to her alma mater as part of her trip back east for the premiere. There, she’ll talk to students of Midd music professor-composers SU LIAN TAN — a former mentor — and PETER HAMLIN about the realities of a composer’s life. “I do have a lot of advice,” Whitten Thomas admits. For instance, “Make sure you have diverse talents; don’t expect you’ll be composing for eight hours a day. And have good sight-singing abilities. You’ll have to find gigs.” The composer is the staff soprano soloist at a local Congregational church and gives private lessons in voice, piano and flute. Rehbach has more than one gig, too. In addition to directing the Union since 2011, he has conducted the town-gown MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE COMMUNITY CHORUS since 2000. The latter, incidentally, has been around since 1860. As Carroll’s poem “Canticle” puts it so memorably, audiences at the VCU’s 50th-season performances are invited “to enter the concert … the way the sky enters the glow of evening, the greenturning-flame of its song.” m

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ermont choirs are not exactly fly-by-night ensembles. The BURLINGTON CHORAL SOCIETY is wrapping up its 40th season this weekend with performances of Johannes Brahms’ powerful A German Requiem in Colchester and Barre. The Bach-oriented BLANCHE MOYSE CHORALE in Brattleboro will turn 40 next year. ORIANA SINGERS OF VERMONT has been around for 43 years and will give a concert of Bach and Handel in Burlington on May 21. Meanwhile, the VERMONT CHORAL UNION, based in Essex Junction, just turned 50. To celebrate, the VCU is taking a slightly different tack. The 35-member auditioned a cappella group has performed its share of Bach and other centuries-old music; it served as the Vermont Mozart Festival chorus from 1974 to 1987. But it has always aired new compositions, too. This year, it commissioned one for the first time. The commission is a four-part song cycle called “Songs of Gold,” by Middlebury College alumna Christina Whitten Thomas. Under the direction of JEFF REHBACH, the VCU will premiere the work at its anniversary concerts titled “Wings of Song,” this weekend and next in Middlebury, Colchester and Montpelier. At the Colchester performance, the group’s ranks will be augmented by 30 former VCU members who have been invited back for the occasion. When Seven Days spoke to Whitten Thomas, who lives near Pasadena, Calif., she was sitting in a church drafting program notes for “Songs of Gold.” The cycle’s title, she says, came from one of three poems she set: “Green and Gold,” by former Vermont poet Jean Killary. “Green and Gold” was the impetus for the commission. Written while Killary was a patient in the Vermont State Hospital in Waterbury in the 1940s and ’50s, it lay undiscovered in the state archives until 2013. Artist SARAH-LEE TERRAT found it and used it as inspiration for a 50-foot mural she painted in the former hospital building, now the state office complex. The poem’s two stanzas describe the difficulty of distinguishing between birch trees’ golden leaves and the similarly colored finches flitting through them. For Rehbach, who obtained permission from Killary’s family to use the poem, the Green of its title represents

COURTESY OF CHRISTINA WHITTEN THOMAS

B Y AMY LI LLY


THE STRAIGHT DOPE BY CECIL ADAMS

Dear Cecil,

After the death of the Beastie Boys’ Adam Yauch, I read an article about how their album Paul’s Boutique could never be made today because of copyright laws governing music sampling. Is this true? What is the current legal state of sampling? — gvgmama

04.19.17-04.26.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

A

sk any copyright attorney, and she’ll tell you: unlicensed sampling, no matter how minimal, undetectable or artistic in nature, is at best a seriously risky move. Many hiphop albums now considered classics, including 1989’s Paul’s Boutique, were constructed from innumerable sampled scraps of other records, and the cost of securing the rights to every last snippet would be exorbitant. U.S. copyright law, one might argue, protects artists from moochers out to piggyback on their success. Or you might say it imposes an insurmountable financial burden on certain kinds of expression, shutting down a major avenue of creative activity. The laws on the books, though, haven’t changed since before the days the Sugar Hill Gang was cutting the first rap records. To legally sample part of a recording — i.e., digitally rerecord it and use it as a component in a new piece of music — you need the permission of two sets of copyright owners: the person — or, more

likely, the label — that owns the rights to the recording itself, called the mechanical rights; and the owner of the rights to the underlying composition, or publishing rights, often but not always the songwriters. So what did change? Once sampling got cheaper, easier and more widespread, there got to be real money in suing the folks who did it without paying up. One distinctive trick of early rap DJs was to punctuate a song’s beat with excerpts from vinyl LPs played on a turntable. By the early 80s, high-end technology had made it possible to do this digitally instead — i.e., via sampling. Within a few years, newly affordable sampling gear set off a flurry of ingenuity in the rap world: Artists including Public Enemy, De La Soul, and the Beastie Boys assembled samples by the dozens into brand-new compositions that previously would have required hours of tedious tape-splicing. Meanwhile, though, other rap record-makers took to simply swiping the most recognizable part of a familiar pop song — the “hook” — to score a hit of their

own. The wild success of such singles as MC Hammer’s “U Can’t Touch This” and Vanilla Ice’s “Ice Ice Baby,” both from 1990, brought about the earliest sampling suits, which typically settled out of court. Despite this increased legal activity, hip-hop record production was still relatively unpoliced in 1991 when a comical sad-sack rapper named Biz Markie sampled the piano part from a maudlin ’70s hit by Gilbert O’ Sullivan, “Alone Again (Naturally),” for use in his own song “Alone Again.” This might have escaped notice, except that the chorus of the new song consisted of Biz singing (after a fashion) the refrain from the old one. When O’Sullivan protested, a federal court in Manhattan decided that Biz had infringed copyright, barred further sales of his record, awarded Gil $250,000 in damages, and even referred the matter to a U.S. attorney for criminal prosecution (though nothing came of it). The response was immediate: extensive sampling went out of fashion. But some

producers were convinced that unlicensed sample use might still be feasible. What if you folded a fragment of sampled music into a larger production so trickily that no one could identify it? A federal appeals court in Cincinnati cleared that question up in 2005 when it ruled that the rap group N.W.A. had infringed copyright even though the sample in question had been doctored beyond recognition. “Get a license or do not sample,” the court declared flatly, adding, “We do not see this as stifling creativity in any significant way.” Well, then. For years, anyone with any money abided by this diktat. Last summer, though, another federal court found that using an unlicensed but very, very brief sample did not infringe copyright. The fallout from these clashing opinions hasn’t settled yet — eventually, the Supreme Court may have to step in. (There does exist something called the “fair use” exception, permitting you to legally excerpt copyrighted material for purposes like criticism or parody, but it’s hard to claim

it for a commercial recording.) Negotiating sample rights has become big business. Whereas early on the norm was a buyout — a one-time payment that allowed free-and-clear usage — now you’re more likely to have to pay an ongoing percentage of royalties; once your record reaches a certain sales threshold, the percentage goes up. Could this be simplified? Well, Congress could pass a compulsory licensing statute for samples. Rather than having to secure the approval of copyright owners, an artist who wanted to use a sample would just pay a set rate. There’s precedent for this: If I’ve written a song that you want to record, I can’t stop you as long as you comply with certain legal requirements, which include paying a predetermined royalty. But, given the power that big-money copyright holders wield, it’s hard to imagine much congressional activity on the sampling-lawreform front. We may be no more likely to see another Paul’s Boutique than we are to see a new Gothic cathedral.

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Is there something you need to get straight? Cecil Adams can deliver the Straight Dope on any topic. Send questions to Cecil via straightdope.com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.

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HACKIE

A VERMONT CABBIE’S REAR VIEW BY JERNIGAN PONTIAC

Little Sister

T

way. Just past midnight, Alex called again. “Could you pick us up at Church and Main?” he requested. “That intersection gets a bit chaotic. If it’s all right, let’s make it right in front of Nectar’s, and I’ll be there in 10.” I pulled up and Alex took the front while a young woman stepped into the back seat. “Jernigan, this is my sister, Annie. If you could drop me on Drew

moving shortly, so it’s no time to be job searching for a change.” “Where are you headed?” “My boyfriend is about to graduate from the State Police Academy and is going to be a game warden. So, it all depends where he gets stationed. It could be as far away as, like, Brattleboro.” “Sounds exciting and a little scary. But, if he’s a good man, I guess it’s worth it.”

I DON’T NORMALLY HAVE CABDRIVERS

DROP ME OFF AT MY REAL ADDRESS. and take her to the New North End, that would be great. I’m going to pay for it.” “Aww, you don’t have to do that, Alex,” Annie said. “Well, I am.” “That’s a good big brother,” I said. “Yup, he’s the best,” Annie agreed. We dropped Alex at his place and continued up North Avenue. I asked Annie, “You’re a local girl, right?” “Yup, I grew up right down the road in Colchester.” “Go, Lakers,” I said, calling out the local high school moniker. “You got it. I’m a Laker girl, all right.” “You working in town?” “I’m an office manager in Williston.” “Doesn’t sound like you love it.” “You picked that up, huh? Well, I don’t, really. But I’ll probably be

I could see Annie’s face light up in the rear-view mirror. “He is a good man,” she said. “We’ve been together two-and-a-half years. Yup, he is a keeper.” “How did you guys meet, if I may ask?” “We met online.” “Just chatting, or on a relationship site?” “Well, it was Tinder, believe it or not.” “I totally believe it,” I said. “Among young folks like yourself, it seems to be more the rule than the exception that couples find each other on the web. Is Tinder the one where you just place a photo?” “No, you can include a bio.” “Gosh, that must be tricky, because anyone can write anything about their history. How do you know if the person is bona fide?”

“That’s a good question. But isn’t that true about anyone you meet? I mean, unless you’re talking about a catfish situation, where you meet someone online and they never want to hook up in person. That should be a red flag for anyone with half a brain. There’s even, like, a TV show about it.” As we passed the North Avenue shopping center, Annie told me to slow down, and we pulled into her driveway, coming to a stop. “I don’t normally have cabdrivers drop me off at my real address,” she said. “I’m worried about being stalked, that sort of thing.” Gosh, it’s tough being a woman, I reflected. Even in relatively safe little Burlington, a woman has to be aware of things that I, as a man, never even have to consider. “Yeah, I’ve heard that before,” I said. “But my brother told me that you’re, like, totally trustworthy, and I can see he was right about that.” “Well, I appreciate your trust,” I said, reaching up to my visor to grab a business card. Passing it to her, I asked, “Can you read the tagline?” “I sure can — ‘safe, clean and friendly.’” “Annie,” I said, “you can count on it.” m All these stories are true, though names and locations may be altered to protect privacy.

INFO

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hey’ve modernized the décor, and it really looks great,” Alex explained to me from the shotgun seat. “Yeah, two of the old bartenders bought the place, and one of ’em’s a friend of mine. Tonight was what they call the ‘soft opening’ — just invited friends and relatives. The official opening is not for a couple weeks.” It was an early Friday evening, and I had just picked up Alex at what had been CK’s Sports Bar in Winooski, now reborn, he informed me, as the “Last Stop.” CK’s had enjoyed, if that’s the word, a raunchy reputation as a downand-dirty watering hole. It will be interesting, I thought, to see how things change under the new ownership. “So, Alex, you got big plans for the weekend?” “Well, it’s still early, so I’ll probably go downtown later. But, for tomorrow and Sunday — no, not really.” Alex took a phone call, and I could hear a girl’s voice on the other end. “Yeah, RJ’s sounds good,” Alex said. “See ya there.” “So, that was a female,” I said, chuckling. “That’s a good thing, brother.” “It was my kid sister, Jernigan,” Alex replied, shooting me a smile. “So, not that good a thing.” I dropped Alex off at his apartment on Drew Street in the Old North End and worked the next few hours downtown. Things were slow, as they usually are in April, at least until the first truly warm weekend. Then all hell breaks loose, which I mean in the best possible

Hackie is a twice-monthly column that can also be read on sevendaysvt.com. To reach Jernigan, email hackie@sevendaysvt.com. 04.19.17-04.26.17

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Eating Out 2.0 New Vermont restaurants reinvent farm-to-table

MEREDITH MIOTKE

BY H ANNAH PAL ME R E GAN

32 FEATURE

SEVEN DAYS

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n a chic, dusky wine bar in a former industrial space in Burlington’s South End, servers glide around the room, pouring guests tastes of old-world vintages and funky, quirky natural selections. In the kitchen, an acclaimed chef plates savory snacks meant to showcase the wine’s flavor. In a separate space beyond the bar, sales staff guide customers through the finer points of each bottle; ask, and they’ll explain factors such as vineyard age and soil composition and the family histories of the wine makers. In a former storeroom at the back of a general store in Pittsfield, Katie Stiles and Kevin Lasko host a lively dinner party for 15 to 20 paying guests three nights a week. On Barre Street in Montpelier, Jules Guillemette and Crystal Maderia transform whole animals into steaks, chops, roasts, pâtés and terrines. Bartender Kate Wise mixes cocktails for patrons who make time to sit awhile and get to know their meat. And, just steps from the busy rails that flank Main Street in White River Junction, Justin Barrett serves a short menu of savory pies, soups and salads to a daily lunch crowd. Patrons pour their own water and bus their own tables.

These images describe businesses that are exploring new ideas about what a restaurant is and does. Like other farm-to-table spots, they source most or all of their food from Vermont farms. But each has created service plans to help them skirt the financial and operational strains that trouble standard-format restaurants. At Hen of the Wood, co-owner Eric Warnstedt has spoken candidly about his imperiled bottom line. “Hen of the Wood is not a sustainable business model,” he told Seven Days last spring. “We’re the ‘popular place’ in town, so people assume we’re doing well. But if you want to do things ‘right,’ the margins just don’t exist anymore.” At Vermont Fresh Network, an organization that tracks restaurant purchases from local farms, executive director Meghan Sheridan hinted that the demands of running a traditional farm-to-table

restaurant were beginning to spur innovation. “We’re seeing chefs try to diversify their profiles so they can make their food costs work,” she said in a 2016 interview. “So, they have different kinds of restaurants.” Such eateries — like the ones described above — are finding ways to mitigate high ingredient prices, diversify their income streams and minimize labor costs, while creating formats that allow restaurateurs and chefs more creative freedom and a better lifestyle. They’re embracing seasonality while ensuring that farmers, chefs and food-service workers can make a decent living doing what they love and do best. At the same time, this wave of restaurateurs strives to satisfy what diners crave when they visit a locavore restaurant. Even at informal cafés, the food is often exquisite, and it’s prepared and served with an origin story that allows guests to connect the dots between field and plate. What’s more, these new businesses are crafting intimate, deep-diving food experiences that ask customers to reengage with what they eat, how it’s prepared and where it comes from. Many guests are eating up the conversation, according to early reports from restaurateurs offering different ways to dine.


Before moving to Vermont, Kevin Lasko was the executive chef at New York City’s celebrated Park Avenue restaurant. Katie Stiles handled public relations for celebrity chefs including Alain Ducasse and Michael White. In 2014, the couple bought the Original General Store in Pittsfield and moved to southern Vermont. They run the store year-round and cater 35 to 40 lavish weddings in the summer. When they arrived, Lasko and Stiles planned to open some kind of restaurant business during the wedding off-season, but they wanted to do something different. “We didn’t want a situation where we’d be walking into a restaurant and producing a menu every day,” Stiles said on a call earlier this month. Nor did they want to wait five years — the average time span most restaurants operate in the red —  to turn a J U S TI N BAR RET T profit. They wanted to work with phenomenal local ingredients and provide a unique, high-quality guest experience — but only a few nights a week, when local restaurants are busy. When the Backroom opened on Valentine’s Day weekend of 2015, the couple set their supper table in a tiny room that doubles as a catering kitchen behind their store. Now, as then, on weekend evenings at about 5:30 p.m., guests enter for drinks and pre-dinner

A Piece of the Pie

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EATING OUT 2.0

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In White River Junction, Justin Barrett opened Piecemeal Pies in October 2016. Before that, the chef spent much of his career trying to integrate farm-totable ideas at sit-down restaurants such as Maine’s Salt Water Farm Café & Market and, before that, the Fat Radish, in New York City. “The primary goal of a conventional restaurant is to give the customer whatever they want,” Barrett told Seven Days, taking a break from service on a sunny afternoon last week. At Piecemeal, the chef threw out the somethingfor-everyone format. His menu features two or three savory pies, a couple of salads, one soup and a handful of baked sweets. Aside from a few indulgences such as avocados and citrus, nearly everything comes from small local farms. Barrett keeps price points affordable by minimizing staff and batch-preparing, freezing or preserving fresh ingredients for year-round use. “It’s how Vermonters have eaten for centuries — you put things up,” he said. “That’s how we can serve outof-season fruit pies all year and feel great about it.” Buying in quantity also allows Barrett to forge partnerships with small-but-growing farms to source custom and specialty ingredients at reasonable prices. Last year, Norwich’s Hogwash Farm wanted to start raising rabbits but didn’t have an outlet for the new product. “Usually, they would have to sit at the farmers market hoping to sell one [rabbit in a day],” Barrett said. “But I can say, ‘I will buy all of them.’” Guaranteeing the sale means that Barrett can negotiate a lower price because he’s saving the farmer the time and expense of processing the rabbits and taking them to market. Piecemeal is open Tuesday through Saturday, from 11:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. — to the chagrin of customers who would like to eat there for dinner. The service team is just one café manager and one cashier/steward.

04.19.17-04.26.17

The Backroom

Piecemeal Pies

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

FILE: OLIVER PARINI

It’s part of getting people more involved with their food. That philosophy is really important.

snacks. Just after 6 p.m., they sidle onto benches at two long tables, dimly lit with Edison bulbs, elbow to elbow with strangers. During dinner, Stiles mixes cocktails from a bar inside a coat closet. She circles the room and pours wine for guests, then pauses to assist Lasko, who tends a six-burner stove at the head of the room. As the night’s meal takes form — perhaps a roasted leg of lamb dusted with Mediterranean spices and served with ribboned cucumber and Greek yogurt — the duo brings food to the tables in large bowls and platters. The guests serve themselves and, usually, each other. Each meal reflects a moment in season — the cool, wet pop of spring’s early radishes, or the tangy, floral scent of fresh coriander seeds plucked in the August heat. Lasko prepares each meal with the night’s guests in mind, accounting for allergies and food aversions. It’s asking something of diners to sit with strangers and submit to an unknown menu. But Backroom diners arrive ready to relinquish control. “They’re OK with being surprised,” Lasko said. “If they’re going to try [something new], they might as well try it here, where the chef’s cooking right in front of them, and they can see what’s going on.” Because of the restaurant’s modest scale, two people can usually manage everything alone — so labor costs are next to nothing. Granted, as Lasko noted, “The financial top line is nowhere near what it [was at Park Avenue].” But the bottom line can end up being similar, because the restaurant has less waste and can spend less on food. In addition, the Backroom works in tandem with the couple’s store and catering business: They minimize ingredient costs by buying in bulk and shuffling product from one channel to another. “When we buy half a pig,” Lasko said, “we use part of it for the store and part in the restaurant; we make bacon and use it for the weddings.”

FILE: SARAH PRIESTAP

In Chefs We Trust


SEVENDAYSVT.COM 04.19.17-04.26.17 SEVEN DAYS 34 FEATURE

Guests order from a counter and carry their own food to a table. “It’s part of getting people more involved with their food,” Barrett said. “That philosophy is really important — it’s the only way people are going to get such a quality product for $10. Customers have to assume some sort of responsibility in order to get that.” But, though Barrett operates with a skeleton crew and asks customers to serve themselves, he doesn’t ask them to pay his workers. Piecemeal’s front-of-house staff make $12 or $13 per hour instead of the usual $4 to $7 per hour plus tips. “Tipping is something that has always bothered me,” the chef said. “It’s a terrible, archaic situation that stems from slavery.” While service gratuities originated in Europe during feudal times, tipping took root in America in the post-emancipation era. Rather then deign to pay former slaves for food service, restaurant owners passed the buck to the customer. “I want my café staff to get a paycheck every two weeks like a grownup,” Barrett said. “I want them to know they can pay their rent.” Twelve dollars per hour is hardly a rich living, but it passes for a livable wage in the Upper Valley. When Piecemeal is busy, kitchen workers pitch in by pouring drinks, wiping tables and running the register. Tips are pooled and, at the end of the month, are divided among all employees as a bonus. Barrett admitted that he probably works more than he should —  his goal is to get “six hours of sleep at least one night a week,” he said. But, of the three restaurants he’s opened, he said Piecemeal has been the least stressful.

Service-Oriented Last November, Kismet owner Crystal Maderia and butcher Jules Guillemette opened Beau Butchery + Bar at 207 Barre Street in Montpelier. Inside, a small cooler holds steaks, roasts, assorted poultry, housemade deli meats and forcemeat terrines, which Guillemette cuts daily. Near the door, a bar invites visitors to sit for a drink or a sandwich or bowl of bone stock, with or without noodles and other accoutrements. Meat-focused cookbooks rest on a deep windowsill for customers to peruse. Maderia and Guillemette’s raison d’être was straightforward enough — Guillemette wanted to cut meat, and Montpelier had no full-service butcher counter. The duo knew they could provide the capital city with excellent meat

FILE: JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

Eating Out 2.0 « P.33

Jules Guillemette at Beau Butchery + Bar

service while supporting their community’s farm economy. But it’s expensive to buy whole animals and break them down — and to recruit and cultivate meat professionals. And Beau is as much about providing knowledgeable counter service as cutting great meat. “To put all those expenses into [the meats only] would be astronomical,” Maderia said. Adding the bar allowed Beau to diversify its income stream and spread expenses across retail meats, prepared foods, beverages, classes and events. That diversity keeps prices reasonable across the board and allows Beau to pay six high-level food pros wages that are above industry standards for their nuanced customer service. When businesses invest in workers — in training, fair wages and the freedom to explore their interests and grow professionally —  workers invest themselves in the business, Maderia believes. “It’s a mutually beneficial relationship,” she said. She also believes that Beau patrons can sense the attention that goes into everything at the shop. “People may not know why they feel a difference, but when they ask me, ‘What makes your meat better [than what] I buy from the co-op?’ I can give them a list: ‘It’s not frozen — here’s what’s happening on a cellular level…’” she said. “As soon as I start talking, people who are a little apprehensive are like, ‘Oh yeah, you care. That’s why it’s different.’” “I think our culture is really hungry [for service like this],” Maderia added. “We’re looking for that spiritual connection. When I’m at Beau and Kismet, I’m 100 percent vested.” Operating the two businesses as standalone but sister enterprises allows some cross-pollination between the two. As at Pittsfield’s Backroom, economies in purchasing and labor are at work here. When

Guillemette negotiates a good price for a side of beef, Maderia can parcel some of it to Kismet, and both locations benefit. The partners are also standardizing some recipes across both places. Meanwhile, Beau “mirth and merriment” director Kate Wise is developing new cocktails for Kismet and training its bar staff. Maderia notes intangible benefits, too. “My staff at Kismet can now be involved with this whole-animal butchery process, with procuring the animals,” she said. “There’s this very rich conversation that’s giving my staff an elevated culinary experience, which they’re passing on to our customers.”

It’s Personal When Dedalus Wine Shop, Market & Wine Bar owner Jason Zuliani first heard about Beau, he immediately thought of the iPod. “Who wanted an iPod [before it came out]?” he wondered aloud, sitting in his Burlington office two weeks ago. “Nobody knew they wanted an iPod.” While Beau’s model is unexpected, “It makes a ton of sense now that they’re doing it,” he said. “I didn’t know I wanted a butcher shop that would serve me cocktails, but now I can’t wait to go down there.” Modern restaurants, said Zuliani, now succeed upon the merits of their uniqueness. He pointed to Hen of the Wood and Misery Loves Co. as other examples: “There are things that are really novel about those places.” For restaurants, Zuliani said, the key question must be: “What do you compete with? What do you get people excited with?” When Dedalus moved from Battery Street to Pine Street in February, the wine shop rolled a full-service wine bar, cheese counter and provisions under its new roof.

Though similar models exist elsewhere, the place is distinctive in Vermont. Zuliani wanted to push Vermonters to explore food and drink in ways he couldn’t in a retail wine store. “We wanted to reach into culture and influence it, in a way,” he said. “So, this was a natural move in that direction.” How to open people’s minds to wines they’ll love but haven’t met yet? Talk to them. Ask them questions. The wine bar offers a venue for that conversation. It also sells bottles at retail-shop prices — without the usual 50 percent restaurant markup — to encourage guests to try new things. “Maybe we’ll take you outside your comfort zone a little bit,” Zuliani said, “but maybe you’ll find something that totally enthralls you.” Visitors who have the best time at Dedalus, he said, “are the ones who open themselves up to it, who are willing to let us take over for a little while.” During service, that conversation extends beyond the staff-patron connection. When the restaurant opened, separate parties began sitting together at a long communal table near the door. They would geek out about the wines, discuss food and beverages, and talk about happenings in Burlington and elsewhere. And, in a move that surprised Zuliani and Dedalus staff, they started pouring glasses of wine for their neighbors. Servers, accustomed to doing the pouring themselves, were taken aback at first. “It was like, Do we let people do that?” Zuliani said. “Of course we do. The whole intent of this place is to do it our way.” He makes a good point: When was the last time you opened a bottle of wine but offered to share it with only a few of the people at the table? “We don’t do that,” Zuliani said, “and this is our table.” As new American food culture embraces a melting-pot approach to dining, chefs and business owners have grown more comfortable putting their personalities on the plate. As Zuliani put it, “I think [food service] has become less about chasing somebody else’s ideal and more about chasing the ideas you want to give to people.” The most successful people in restaurants today, he noted, are working in a way that’s extremely personal. Still, as with all retail and service businesses, success is measured in sales. “We don’t shy away from this idea that you have to generate revenue,” Zuliani said. “If you want to teach people what’s great about Chenin blanc, you have to sell it to them.”


Proof Is in the Pudding

COURTESY OF DEDALUS WINE SHOP/JESSICA SIPE

So far, customers seem willing to buy Zuliani’s pitch. In the 10 weeks that Dedalus has been open, the bar has drawn crowds almost every evening. Across the alley at ArtsRiot, chef George Lambertson said his dining room, too, has been “packed every night since [Dedalus] opened.” But before that, ArtsRiot’s dining room had seen its own surge in business, which began when the venue ditched a fixed daily menu and let the kitchen off the chain two years ago. Turns out, diners were more interested in bigflavor, experimental cookery than in

have landed on a model in which he can indulge his creative vision without compromising his ethics. “I’ve been on the other side of this situation,” he said “[where] you have to gouge customers, and you wake up every day wondering how do you still do this. At a certain point, it’s like, Where do you start sacrificing your values? Do you start lying?” Though the business is just six months old, and Barrett is still teasing out his efficiencies, he’s operating within his financial “safe zone,” he said. Margins are at that magical 30 percent food-costs-to-price-point ratio for which restaurants strive. “I’m not making as much as a restaurant that gets cheap lamb from Sysco

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and charges a lot for a little bit,” Barrett said, “but this model is allowing us to breathe. I’m watching it work.” The best way to fix a broken system, he added, “is to do your thing in a way you believe in — make your little universe as sustainable as you can.” Barrett hopes that Piecemeal will inspire his workers and guests to live and eat better. “Hopefully, my staff will go on and take this model, and someday open something [of their own] and do some good,” the chef said. Because, he added, “Isn’t the goal to feed people better?” m

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Lambertson’s tasty but safe debut menu of steaks and chicken, market salads and country pâté. At the Backroom in Pittsfield, Lasko and Stiles have added a fourth night of service — they’re now open Friday through Monday — and most nights are booked weeks in advance. They’ve outsourced booking to Yelp’s online reservations app to keep up with demand. In Montpelier, Maderia is launching a series of meat-forward cooking classes at Beau, in response to constant how-to questions from butchery patrons. Wise plans to host cocktail-pairing sessions and distiller nights this summer, as well as pop-up dinners with cooks and food trucks to extend the shop’s hours beyond its usual 7 p.m. closing time. Much of this innovation is possible because the butchery’s open-book format invites customers to ask questions about cooking and eating in ways that aren’t possible at a standard-format restaurant like Kismet. And, in White River Junction, Piecemeal’s Barrett seems grateful to


Shear Delight

Old Soul Barbershop brings traditional haircuts and shaves to Winooski B Y JOR D AN A D AMS

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 04.19.17-04.26.17 SEVEN DAYS 36 FEATURE

PHOTOS: MATTHEW THORSEN

A

cop, a lawyer and an ex-convict walk into a barbershop. No, this isn’t the beginning of a bad joke. It’s a typical day at Old Soul Barbershop, which opened in Winooski in October 2016. The shop’s owner, Christian DuBrul, wasn’t joking when he mentioned that particular trio during my recent visit to his shop. The 22-year-old master of shears says Old Soul attracts people from a wide range of backgrounds. The shop specializes in a number of traditional cuts, such as the high and tight, the crew cut and the executive cut. It also offers the bygone practice of the hot-towel, straight-razor shave. DuBrul opened the shop to fill what he saw as a void in men’s grooming options in the area. I discovered an inviting, boisterous hub of male bonding, fine craftsmanship and a pitch-perfect throwback to the American mid-century barbershop. “I make sure all my clients know me on a personal level,” said DuBrul. That sentiment was echoed by his team: Andrew Juhasz, James Lightholder and Jake Sleeper. On a recent Wednesday morning, I motored over to the shop to get snipped and shorn. Old Soul is located in the small bungalow on Main Street that formerly housed the Classy Closet, a secondhand clothing store. Upon arrival, I was surprised to see that nearly every seat in the waiting area was full and that all four of the shop’s barbers were busy with clients. I later learned that “hump day” is usually the shop’s slowest. Warm and welcoming, DuBrul greeted me and told me to add my name to the list by the door — Old Soul is walk-in only. He’s tall and slim with dirty-blond hair and a sparse goatee. He sported a red, polyester zip-up barber’s jacket. Born and raised in South Burlington, DuBrul started learning the barber trade by practicing on his friends while still in high school. After graduating in 2013, he trained at O’Briens Aveda Institute. He worked as a barber for a few years at a shop in Burlington before striking out on his own. On the day of my visit, most clients appeared to be in their twenties or

Old Soul Barbershop

I MAKE SURE ALL

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C H R IS TIAN D UBR UL

thirties, though DuBrul told me his customers range in age from less than a year to well into their senior years. He also said that the shop is not exclusively for men. Anyone who desires a short hairstyle is welcome. “I’m not going to tell you [that] you can come in here and get a long, layered cut,” he said. “[But] hair doesn’t have a sex.” Three Dog Night’s “Mama Told Me (Not to Come)” played over the sound system as the barbers discussed popular magicians (“Didn’t that one guy get eaten by his tiger?”). I took in the shop’s motley collection of found objects, photographs and memorabilia: a large, stuffed fish that DuBrul’s dad caught in the ’80s; a reprinted World War II-era pinup calendar; a blueprint of a barber’s chair; a vintage advertisement for Wildroot hair tonic that reads, “Take care of your hair while you have it”; a

Christian DuBrul

large photo of retired professional wrestler Bret “The Hitman” Hart. It’s a grand smattering of the quartet’s interests and personalities. DuBrul hopes to eventually cover the walls from floor to ceiling. The shop blends retro charm with modern conveniences. Atop the long counter are a couple of small appliances that look like mini refrigerators. They’re actually warming units that use ultraviolet light to make the towels piping hot.

At one point, I’m jarred by the sharp hiss of compressed air, which the barbers use to blast stray hairs off a client’s face, neck, clothing and shoes. The shop’s four antique barbers’ chairs are of a quality that DuBrul said can’t be found in new products. Nearly 100 years old, they weigh almost 400 pounds each. He sourced three on Long Island, and one came from Vermont’s Champlain Islands.


As I waited my turn, two more men arrived but decided to bail after learning they would have to wait up to 45 minutes. Old Soul only accepts walk-ins for two reasons. One, traditional barbershops don’t take appointments. Second, DuBrul doesn’t like the tyranny of scheduling. He prefers to take his time and not rush through the finer points of a cut or shave just to get to the next one. A pithy sign on the wall reinforces this ethos. It reads: “We guarantee fast service, no matter how long it takes.” “We get to know people,” said Lightholder. “I actually give a shit about the customers. Like, deeply.” My turn in the chair finally arrived. We began with a trim. Since I get my hair cut about once a month, there wasn’t a lot to be done up top. As a finishing touch, DuBrul used a straight razor to contour around my ears and the back of my neck. While he deftly carved around my hairline, he squeezed my head the way you would a melon to see if it was ripe. When performing this delicate maneuver, a good grip seems to be key. Then came the main event: the shave. First, DuBrul massaged a tonic and shaving lather all over my lower face. Next,

Antique razors

he gently folded a steaming-hot towel across it. That makes the hair easier to remove, he explained. “This is the hardest part of your day, right?” DuBrul joked while wrapping my visage. The warm, musky mask was soothing and relaxing. Moments later, my relaxation would end. I usually shave once a week, because I’m lazy. For this experience, I’d put off

shaving a few days longer than normal. DuBrul told me that’s what he prefers. “I don’t like it when it’s just stubble,” he said. “Give me a challenge.” He unwrapped my face, applied more lather and began scraping my whiskers away. “Oh, yeah, it’s coming off like butter,” DuBrul murmured. I’m not going to lie: The shave was mildly terrifying. I’m sure my knuckles were 50 shades of white as I clung to the arms of the chair. DuBrul began with the hairs under my nose, which are the most difficult because mustache hairs tend to be the thickest. The only way to get at them is by thumbing the nose and pulling it up like a pig’s snout. It’s probably not the most flattering view from DuBrul’s perspective, but it’s the best way to get into the crannies around the nostrils. One thing I wasn’t expecting was the heft of the blade. It’s much thicker than any razor I’ve ever used. But DuBrul’s steady hands never faltered. He told me he’s never cut anyone — except himself. He finished up by patting my face with a healthy layer of aftershave lotion. I resisted the urge to scream and clap the

sides of my face like Kevin McCallister in Home Alone, but it did sting quite a bit. The entire process, including the wait time, took about two hours and cost $52, not including tip. And, take note — Old Soul is a cash-only operation. Before I left, DuBrul told me that the shop has been consistently busy since he opened five months ago. “There’s never a moment when someone’s not getting their hair cut or shaved,” he said. After chatting with a couple of clients, I learned that DuBrul and his crew have developed a loyal following, which speaks to their level of care, proficiency and artistry. “I think that’s the best thing that’s happened [with] all of this,” he said: “giving barbers an opportunity to really show off their art.” m

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The Producer

COMEDY

Comedian Kendall Farrell is making a scene B Y D AN BOL L ES

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 04.19.17-04.26.17 SEVEN DAYS 38 FEATURE

PHOTOS: MATTHEW THORSEN

K

endall Farrell doesn’t tell people he’s a comedian. This is a little weird given that he spends virtually every waking moment either onstage telling jokes or thinking about being onstage and telling jokes. “I’ve always been obsessive about comedy,” admits Farrell recently over coffee at the Skinny Pancake in Burlington. When they ask, Farrell tells people the truth about what he does — or half of it, anyway. The 23-year-old comedian works the front desk at the Hilton Garden Inn in downtown Burlington, just above the Vermont Comedy Club — “because I’m super lazy,” he says with a coy grin. Unless they happen to venture downstairs on a night when he’s performing, it’s unlikely the tourists and businesspeople checking in or asking for extra towels at the hotel know that the man behind the counter — a tall, pleasantly goofy guy sporting a man bun — is “one of the funniest people in Vermont.” That’s what fellow comedian and Vermont Public Radio deputy news director Annie Russell calls him, anyway. Most who’ve seen him would agree that Farrell is among the most talented, accomplished and admired comedians in the state. He won the Vermont’s Funniest Comedian contest in 2015, one year after placing third in the annual competition. He plays stages almost nightly throughout Vermont, from Burlington to the Northeast Kingdom. He travels regularly throughout the Northeast to perform and network. Later this month, April 27 through 29, Kendall will do five shows in three nights at VCC as the featured comedian supporting Michelle Wolf from “The Daily Show with Trevor Noah.” That’s a big deal for a local comedian — weekend feature slots at VCC are typically reserved for touring regional comics. While his onstage résumé is impressive, Farrell’s work offstage is increasingly becoming vital to the local comedy scene as well. When Natalie Miller and Nathan Hartswick opened VCC in 2015, the first couple of Vermont comedy necessarily

Kendall Farrell

shifted their focus to the club and away from the hundreds of smaller shows they had produced around the state each year. Farrell has picked up that mantle. He’s helping to nurture Vermont’s booming underground comedy scene by producing a range of recurring showcases that feature a curated mix of local and regional talent. These include Farrell’s weekly Comedy & Crepes series Mondays at the Skinny Pancake, the monthly Brews & Bros showcase he hosts with Nicole Sisk at Foam Brewers in Burlington, the monthly LGBTQLOL gay comedy show at VCC, and the semimonthly political comedy series

he coproduces with Russell, United We Standup, also at VCC. “It’s so important to have someone doing these kinds of shows because it gives more people a chance to see Vermont comedy, and it gives local comedians a chance to get better,” says Hartswick by phone. The success of VCC is tied to the health of the comedy scene overall, he notes. “And a few people have stepped up to fill the void. But I think Kendall has done it most effectively.” “Part of doing a show is that you want to be developing new people as much as you can,” explains Farrell of his passion for producing. “Because new people will

bring other new people to the show and help spread the word.” “He’s great at recognizing talent,” says Russell. “He’s given a lot of newer local comics their first five-minute sets, which is a real growth opportunity for them.” While Farrell’s showcases help germinate the next crop of Vermont comics, his efforts aren’t entirely altruistic. He readily admits that part of the reason he produces so many shows is to get stage time for himself. “In this scene, you have to create your own opportunities,” he says. And few in the current comedy community create as many of those opportunities — for themselves or others. Farrell got into comedy because, as he puts it, “I kinda failed at everything else.” After high school, the Vernon, Vt., native attended Emory University in Atlanta. It didn’t go well. “I went to school for business,” he says, explaining that his parents run a small business, so it seemed like a logical move. “But then I got to school and realized no business would be well served with me at the helm.” Somehow, Farrell missed the memo that math is rather important when it comes to business. “I’m not bad at math, but it’s not my thing,” he says. “It would be hard to interview for a business job. Like, ‘I’m not the best at math. But I try hard!’” He pauses, then adds. “I don’t try hard, though.” Except when it comes to comedy. Farrell dropped out of Emory after a few semesters and moved to Boston to take a video-marketing internship. That went about as well as school had, he says. But while he was there, Farrell started attending comedy open mics — first as an observer, then as a performer. “I figured, if I’m going to be poor anyway, I might as well have fun and do something that’s creatively fulfilling,” he reasons. “Really, I tried comedy for a lack of anything better to do.” Following a solid month of doing open-mic slots nightly, Farrell moved to Burlington, theoretically to go back to college at the University of Vermont. But he lasted only a semester before dropping out again.


“I was kind of sad to be coming back to Vermont after Boston,” he says, adding that he assumed there would be fewer opportunities for stage time and that he would have to slow down. “But I didn’t.” For comedians, stage time is precious currency. If anything, Burlington offered Farrell more opportunity to hone his craft. “I could get up every night and do way more time,” he says. “In Boston, you get, like, two minutes and there are 60 people on the list.” Farrell became a regular at area open mics. Eventually, he inherited a weekly gig from comedian Regi B hosting an open mic at South Burlington dive Franny O’s — now called the Sugar

“He might go dark,” says Hartswick. “But he always does it with kind of a pleasant, goofy smile on his face, or an awkward hand gesture that allows you to go there with him.” “He’s just fucking hilarious,” says Russell. “I love the way he sets up his punch lines. He’s great at misdirection.” While Farrell excels at political humor and social commentary, he’s not above going blue (using sexual innuendo). But even his dirtiest, most lowbrow bits highlight his comedic range. “Some people ask me why I have to do so many dirty jokes,” Farrell says. “That’s just what’s on my mind. If I could sit down and write jokes about funny doors, I would. But that’s not what I think about.”

REALLY, I TRIED COMEDY FOR A LACK OF ANYTHING BETTER TO DO.

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Kendall Farrell hosts Comedy & Crepes every Monday at 7 p.m. at the Skinny Pancake in Burlington. Free. He performs with Michelle Wolf on Thursday, April 27, at 7 p.m., and Friday & Saturday, April 28 & 29, at 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. at the Vermont Comedy Club in Burlington. $15-27. vermontcomedyclub.com, facebook.com/kendallfarrellcomedy

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For all his accolades and accomplishments, Farrell understands that he’s still a work in progress. “Three years in, I’m a good host,” says Farrell. “But I don’t feel like a master of my craft.” Thanks to his talent and tireless effort, though, Farrell would be a good bet to approach mastery before too long. “He’s gonna go places,” says Bridge. “He’s doing everything you need to do to become a successful comedian. I’m excited to see where he goes, because there is no doubt in my mind he’s going to be doing this for a living one day.” Maybe then Farrell will tell folks what he does. m

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

House Bar & Grill. For two years Farrell hosted that show, whose primary patrons were barflies, other comics and a comedy-indifferent pool league. Farrell is a chameleon onstage. As a host, he exudes easy, enthusiastic charm. His wit is as quick as the impish grin he often flashes while working a room. “He’s very good at picking up on things that happen in the moment and making them funny,” says Hartswick. Given room to stretch out, Farrell can be silly, insightful and dark by turns. He might riff on anything from politics to intimate details of his personal life to, say, his dad losing a finger in a wood chipper — he masterfully touched on all three during a recent gig at Foam. “Kendall is incredibly versatile,” says Burlington comedian Tim Bridge, who also did a set at that Foam show. “But he’s consistently funny, too, which is really hard to do.” “His writing and editing is really tight,” says VCC’s Miller. “He’s just professional.”

4/17/17 3:26 PM

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Coming of Age

CULTURE

A Somali Bantu youth finds his voice and calling B Y KYMELYA SAR I

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 04.19.17-04.26.17 SEVEN DAYS 40 FEATURE

participated in an antidiscrimination protest at Burlington High School. He gave speeches on equity and youth activism during events to commemorate Martin Luther King Jr. Day. He gave youth perspectives on problems that parents were trying to solve. Last year, Haji won the Ignite Burlington studentspeaking contest, an event sponsored by the Hergenrother Foundation. These days, he leads a mentoring group for multicultural youth at the Boys & Girls Club of Burlington that he named “Building Blocks to Success.” “Growing up, I realized I would have benefited a lot more if I’d had a mentor or someone to look up to,” said Haji. “[Someone] who has gone through the same experience I’ve gone through, someone who has a cultural-rich background such as I.” Haji’s transformation from a “very quiet, very reserved” boy to a “role model” hasn’t gone unnoticed, said Bobby Riley, principal of the Integrated Arts Academy at H.O. Wheeler. Riley was the school librarian when Haji was a student there. The latter remains connected with the IAA community, and his siblings attend the school, Riley noted. Haji’s “quiet leadership has rubbed off on his siblings,” he said. “That’s what the Old North End needs,” Riley continued. “Young men that are really positive, [who] create those connections and partner with young people; [they] help make some good decisions.” “He’s a thinker,” said Infinite Culcleasure from Parents & Youth for Change, a group that aims to improve educational opportunities for youth and families in Burlington and Winooski. “We don’t have many nonwhite young men who are appreciated for that.” Haji sees the positive in everything. His mother described him as “a happy child.” In an autobiography that he hopes to publish someday, Haji wrote that life in the refugee camp where his family lived was “simple and joyful.” But the reality was far from it. The Bantu refugees were ethnic minorities brought to Somalia from southeastern Africa as part of the slave trade some 200 years ago. Even after slavery ended, the Bantu continued to face

MATTHEW THORSEN

W

hen Aden Haji was 8 years old, he and his family were on the cover of the Burlington Free Press. Haji and his parents, two siblings and uncle were the first Somali Bantu refugees to resettle in Vermont, on July 24, 2003. They left their refugee camp in Kenya and traveled for two days before arriving at Burlington International Airport, where a welcoming party greeted the family and gave them small American flags. Reporter Candace Page wrote, “The men and boys wore drab gray sweatshirts with the initials of the U.S. refugee program on them, but [Haji’s mother] lit up the airport with her blue dress, bright yellow head scarf and the scarlet cloth with which she held the baby close to her body.” Fourteen years later, Haji, now 22, stared goggle-eyed at the family photo during a recent interview. “Oh, wow!” and “That’s crazy,” were all he could say. The junior at the University of Vermont hadn’t known about his family’s historical significance in the state. Nor was he aware that their arrival had been immortalized in the local press. When Seven Days met Haji’s family days later, they were just as enthralled by the photo. The passage of time hasn’t diminished family matriarch Asha Abdille’s penchant for wearing brightly colored cotton dresses favored by traditional Somali women. She recalls being “a little bit scared” when the family arrived in the U.S. because she didn’t speak English. She and her husband were unable to get a formal education in Africa, but she held hopes that her children would have a better future in Vermont. The importance of getting a college degree isn’t lost on Haji. “I’m getting an education to help lift my family here and in Kenya,” he said. But the anthropology major isn’t content to focus just on academics. At the UVM Mosaic Center for Students of Color Spring Awards Banquet on Friday, April 21, Haji will receive the Lufuno Tshikororo Award. It recognizes an undergraduate student of color who has demonstrated emerging leadership at the university. While the award is a testament to Haji’s role on campus, his community involvement started years earlier. He

Aden Haji (back row, red cap) with his family

persecution. When a civil war broke out in Somalia in 1991, they bore the brunt of the violence and fled to refugee camps in Kenya. By most accounts, life in the camps was difficult. But it wasn’t the harsh living conditions that Haji remembers. Having few possessions enabled him to nurture his creativity, he pointed out. He made toy cars from wires. He rolled a tire along the ground with a stick. “Coming from nothing, your mind is encouraged to find ideas to occupy yourself,” Haji said.

When they first arrived in Vermont in 2003, Haji’s mother hid at home, while the other family members were at work or school. The foreign language and culture terrified her, she admitted. At the same time, her eldest son was trying to assimilate into his new environment by imitating the habits of his classmates. “I felt my priority was to fit in,” Haji said, which included bringing lunch to school. “Most of the popular students, they were all bringing their own food,” he


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recalled. “I would make my own [turkey] sandwiches and salads.” His parents were amused and wondered why he was eating grass, Haji said with a laugh. His parents bought him a lunchbox, which he attached to his backpack “so people could see.” Like most of his peers, when he was an adolescent, Haji never saw himself as part of the bigger Burlington community. He said he thought, “I just live here ... and my voice does not count.” There was no one from his community whose behavior he could model. “It was just hard to find someone who builds up their voice and who could show us how they did it,” Haji said. It wasn’t until he was a high school sophomore that he started to develop a sense of identity. Haji’s first foray into activism was in 2012. He was one of several English-

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Haji (left) arriving in Vermont in 2003

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language-learner students at BHS who staged a protest in response to racism in the district. Looking back on that experience, one of the organizers, Jacques Okuka, explained, “We wanted to feel included.” Now a junior at Southern New Hampshire College and still Haji’s best friend, Okuka said he and his fellow immigrant students faced multiple struggles while growing up. Not only did they have to learn a new culture and language, they also struggled to reconcile their parents’ customs with their desire to be like their peers. “[The school administrators] don’t understand the heavy load we carry as immigrants,” Okuka said. During high school, Haji joined the multicultural youth group Diversity Rocks and got to know Culcleasure. They later worked together with Parents & Youth for Change. Culcleasure, PYC’s lead organizer and project manager, described the organization as an “intergenerational group of everyday people who have historically not had

meaningful influence on political and economic decisions.” Youth involvement was uncommon at that time, Culcleasure noted. “When other people see Aden doing this kind of work, it makes it safe for [them] to do it,” he explained. But what impressed Culcleasure was Haji’s authenticity and empathy. “He actually cares about other kids. It’s not résumé-building for him.” Over time, Haji also began to feel comfortable giving media interviews about the causes he was promoting. Today, Haji and Okuka, along with six of their peers attending college, are mentors to 21 youth, most of whom are people of color. During the school year, half of their interactions take place on Facebook because some of the mentors, including Okuka, reside out of state. “[Multicultural] youth don’t realize how unique they are. They just want to fit in,” said Haji, who was once in their shoes. The mentors aim to help the youth develop their own identities and cultivate a sense of belonging, as well as achieve academic success. “We know their struggles,” said Okuka. “It’s easier for them to relate to us.” It’s not only the youth who have benefited from their mentors’ experience and connections. Since being a part of the group, Okuka said he feels a greater sense of responsibility toward the younger generation. “I have to represent myself the way I want these kids to represent themselves,” he observed. Next month, Haji will facilitate a workshop during the Multicultural Youth Leadership Conference organized by Spectrum Youth & Family Services. He hopes to invite New Americans to tell their stories, and then connect their stories to books and autobiographies of famous personalities. Although the junior admits he’s got a lot on his plate, he’s not slowing down. “I love doing work that revolves around cross-cultural interaction, advocating for inclusiveness,” he said, “just making [others] aware of Burlington’s hidden minority communities.” m


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Book review: Dryland: One Woman’s Swim to Sobriety, Nancy Stearns Bercaw

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ancy Stearns Bercaw was a champion swimmer as a youth and is now a champion again in the YMCA’s masters program. Her new memoir Dryland: 12v-fullcircle040517.indd 1 3/31/17 12:59 PM CONGRATULATIONS to our One Woman’s Swim to Sobriety is the very own Matthew DeWolf tale of how she went from there to for being awarded the Allen B here. While the analogy of swimming is threaded throughout, more imporCrane Horticultural Employee tantly the book is about Bercaw’s exAcknowledgement Award from periences as a dedicated drinker. GreenWorks. Matthew is a true She had learned to swim as a 3-yearicon in the industry and we’re old when her father waded into a river proud to count him as a fellow and insisted she jump in and thrash employee-owner. her way out to him.

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“Imagine that a cottonmouth moccasin snake is chasing you,” he said before my second jump. “If it bites your feet, you’ll be dead in less than an hour! Even I can’t save you! Swim as if your life depends upon it!”

as a tourist; and eventually — two years ago — Abu Dhabi. There she accepted that she wasn’t just a “party girl” but actually an alcoholic. Dryland alternates relatively brief chapters, each titled with the name of a body of water (the Gulf of Mexico, the Ohio River, the Arabian Gulf, the Nile) and dated like a journal entry. Those in past tense relate remembered incidents in far-flung places; those in present tense give an hour-by-hour account of the crisis that occurs during her year in Abu Dhabi with her husband and young son. When she exhausts her prescription for antidepressant medication, Bercaw has to navigate the medical bureaucracy of a country far less tolerant of pharmaceutical or alcohol use than our own. Faced with caring medical professionals who are alarmed by her blood pressure and general physical condition, Bercaw finally recognizes the hazards of her constant imbibing. In many places, the writing in Dryland is breezy, utilizing puns and shopworn similes. The author repeatedly compares drinking to swimming, robbing a reader of the pleasure in perceiving these implicit parallels. However, the back-and-forth structure of the book works well to knit together the experiences of a lifetime, and Bercaw as narrator comes across as irrepressibly merry much of the time. Even when describing the more repellant of her drunken mishaps, she conveys a sense of joie de vivre that’s contagious. One surmises that, unlike some inebriates, she was fun during her drinking years, not surly and moody. While the completion of any memoir requires an obsessive self-regard,

DRYLAND REACHES FOR AND TAKES HOLD OF

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A TRIUMPH MORE MOVING AND MOMENTOUS THAN ANY SWIMMING TROPHY.

SEVEN DAYS 42 FEATURE

This swim-lesson anecdote appears early in Dryland, and as Bercaw grows older she continues to equate speedy swimming with surviving. Bercaw, who has lived in Burlington since 1996 — when not ranging out on travels around the world — is the author of Brain in a Jar: A Daughter’s Journey Through Her Father’s Memory (Prakash Book Depot, 2015), a memoir about her neurologist father. Dr. Beauregard Bercaw was a career specialist in Alzheimer’s disease whose own mind and memory were ultimately engulfed by this malady. While readers may wince at the description of a toddler incited to swim as if snakes were at her heels, Bercaw herself expresses gratitude to her otherwise mostly preoccupied father for his excitement about her aquatic

prowess and for the determination he instilled. She went on to swim competitively for 18 years, with grueling practice six days a week (3.5 to 5.6 miles a day), and she earned shelves full of trophies as a sprinter. But then, in the 1986 NCAA Championships, having just barely qualified for the 1988 U.S. Olympic Trials, she realized she couldn’t afford further training. As a member of her college team, she’d met the Olympic amateur requirement. But, having graduated, she would need to cover the costs of two years’ preparation for the trials, and then might or might not clinch a spot on the Olympic team. “I was being spit out of a sport that had consumed me,” she laments in Dryland. “I was washed up at age twenty.” While working her way through two bottles of champagne on the evening after her final race, Bercaw decided to apply for the Peace Corps.

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She had discovered alcohol as a preteen, but growing up with a rigorous athletic regimen countered what could have been the debilitating effects of steady and, at times, binge-level drinking. Beginning in her twenties, as her memoir recounts with startling candor, she embarked upon two decades of increasingly all-consuming and sometimes dangerous guzzling in numerous countries: Kenya while in the Peace Corps; Korea while teaching English; Tanzania, Jordan and Egypt


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FROM DRYLAND The South China Sea January 15, 2010 Becoming a mother turned my wanderlust to dust. I could barely overcome my fears for David’s safety in order to get to the grocery store for wine—the magic potion that quelled my anxiety—let alone an airport or another country. I left my coaching job at James Madison a few months after David was born so we could move back to Vermont. Still, a part of me longed for the day when I’d feel safe enough to show my son the wonders of the world. I doubted that the day would ever come. Just before David turned six, in 2010, Allan was offered a position teaching film at an American graduate school in Singapore. “What do you think?” he asked. “Singapore is the safest place in the world. Let’s go.” And so we did. But Singapore had a surprise for me: alcohol was cost prohibitive. A Singapore Sling at the famed Raffles Hotel was almost $30. The government puts an exorbitant tax on alcohol to discourage its use. Singapore wants citizens to be productive members of society, not addicts. Tourists and expats pay a high price for their vices. Allan earned a sizable salary, but it barely covered the cost of living in one of the most expensive cities in the world. We had to watch every penny. We limited ourselves to having drinks on the weekend. But I spent weeknights obsessing about Friday. Every Sunday, I faced the grim reality of being dry and antsy for the subsequent five days. I convinced myself that having none was better than having just one, because I’d never be able to drink a single glass of wine without wanting more. I didn’t feel any withdrawal symptoms during the week, only the need to make time pass more quickly. The reward for doing so was a martini and bottle of wine in our living room on Friday evening and again on Saturday. Allan’s colleagues would come over, too, and bring their booze with them. I never had to worry about running out on those nights. Still, I felt compelled to drink as much as I could to compensate for the dry days to come, like a camel.

SEVEN DAYS FEATURE 43

Dryland: One Woman’s Swim to Sobriety by Nancy Stearns Bercaw, Grand Harbor Press, 256 pages. $14.95.

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Dryland also regales the reader with fascinating information about life in a Kenyan village, a modern-day Seoul and a Middle Eastern metropolis. Bercaw is genuinely curious about other people, particularly those who do not share her background. She seems ever ready to talk with cabbies, waiters, bellhops and tour guides. Many of these encounters involve the story’s most profound connections, particularly when someone she meets by chance expresses concern about her drinking, which is far less “secret” than she imagines. Dryland reaches for and takes hold of a triumph more moving and momentous than any swimming trophy. Bercaw won her self back, after decades of orbiting around a bottle. Her new book is a victory lap in which she readily acknowledges others: A circle of friends, relations, acquaintances and even kind strangers are among the heroes of this story. 

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM 04.19.17-04.26.17 SEVEN DAYS 46 FOOD

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OLIVER PARINI

T

he image is arresting: prosciutto, pink meat lined with creamy fat, spread flat on a circular white plate; on top, thin slices of horned melon, its seeds splayed out like a star; a sprinkle of pepinos, striped fruits shaped like miniature footballs. Small flowers and baby beet leaves bring even more color and delicacy to the array. The image, and the food arrangement, is the work of Doug Paine, chef of Juniper and of Bleu Northeast Seafood — both at Hotel Vermont in Burlington. For years, he’s been developing a style of plating that stands out. It’s elegant and intricate without looking contrived or overdone. Paine worked his way from Mr. Pickwick’s in Stowe — where throwaway garnishes consisted of ruffled kale leaves and orange slices — to Michael’s on the Hill in Waterbury Center. There, over a decade, Paine played with plating techniques and refined his style. His photos from the end of that period reveal a deft hand with ingredients: a rectangle of rabbit terrine scattered with frilled lovage leaves and the crimson petals of wild bergamot flowers, a slice of pickled tongue with spruce tips and mushroom confit. Now, Paine crafts entrées, small plates, fun sandwiches and snacks at Juniper — think rabbit-and-foie-gras meat pies with tomato-bacon jam, green pea soup with smoked pork jowl and buttermilk, and deep-fried Scotch eggs wrapped with Merguez sausage. He serves slightly more restrained dishes at the quieter and more refined Bleu. At both restaurants, the dishes Paine sends to the table are beautiful, and his style is so recognizable that his plates could be picked out of a crowd. “In the culinary arts, the plating is really the artistic part,” Paine says. “Everything else is technique and skill. It’s not until you’re putting the food on a plate that it becomes an expression of how you feel, and what you want the dish to say.” Like all art forms, plating changes with time. Just as you can discuss modern versus contemporary architecture, you can talk about changes in

Culinary Art In some kitchens, the food looks as good as it tastes

Pickled smelt, quark and aquavit on Red Hen sprouternickel See a video of chef Doug Paine plating this dish at sevendaysvt.com

B Y SU ZA NNE P O D H AIZE R

the way that food is arranged on plates. That’s particularly true at restaurants where chefs have the time and the cash flow to do more than ladle courses onto serving vessels. As public interest in food has grown, and with the rise of celebrity chefs and competitive cooking shows on television, the new culinary stars demonstrated how they could bend ingredients to their will. They turned liquids into solids using a technique called spherification. They used “meat glue” to stick ingredients together in unnatural ways. Those techniques trickled down to more quotidian restaurants, as cooks LISTEN IN ON LOCAL FOODIES...

got excited about replicating what they were seeing on TV. In the 1990s through the aughts, it was common to pile ingredients into towers in the center of the plate. (God forbid the server disrupt the stack on the way to the table.) Sauces were drizzled from squirt bottles. Powders were tossed around the plates’ rims. And then the pendulum swung. These days, thanks to the influence of restaurants such as Alinea in Chicago, Ill. and Noma in Copenhagen, Denmark, food is frequently plated in a way that looks artfully natural. Some dishes appear as tableaux that you might stumble across

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on a walk through the woods or along a beach: a scattering of seaweed, a handful of whelks in their shells, broth to represent the sea. Edible flowers and whole herb leaves — rather than ones that have been minced into submission — add color, flavor and style. “I like a natural way of plating,” says Paine. “I don’t like zigzags. I don’t like dots.” What does he like? Serving food on plates that have a matte finish and perhaps a little texture rather than a glossy sheen — or even on wooden boards. And CULINARY ART

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at local markets and grocery stores, these will include hickory-smoked, garlic-rosemary and maple-Sriracha eggplant bacon, along with condiments such as salad dressings, chipotle aioli and “maybe some nut cheeses,” Sullivan said. “We’re positioning it as a brand that could go beyond Burlington,” Sullivan said. He hinted that if the new location, retail foods and rebranding go well, diners can

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may have noticed a few updates. Owner TREVOR SULLIVAN and his team have painted the service window to look like a food truck and taken a more street-food-y approach to service. Now the restaurant is preparing to open a second location, in Williston’s shiny new Kismet building at 421 Blair Park Road. The second Pingala will offer plant-based sandwiches, salads and snacks much like those at the Chace Mill original. But service will take a fast-casual approach that Sullivan hopes will appeal to lunch-hour diners and clients of the spin studio and other health-oriented businesses in the building. That format, he added, lines up nicely with where the greater food industry is headed. “It’s all about quickservice restaurants right now,” he said. “Younger generations want more time and high-quality, chef-made food, and they want to save money. They want in and out, and organic and local ingredients. Everybody’s shifting toward that.”

When the Williston spot opens in June, it will have just a handful of bar stools onsite, but guests will be able to eat at picnic tables outside the building, Sullivan said. The food — both there and at the Chace Mill — will come in new, street-foodinspired packaging. Sullivan hopes the new look will invite nonvegans and others to give Pingala a try. “We don’t want to be just the vegan café,” he said. “I want to serve food anyone can connect with; it’s about making inspired sandwiches and taking something classic and putting a funky streetfood sort of twist on it.” Meanwhile, Sullivan and team have rented space in a South Burlington commissary kitchen, from which they’ll launch a retail line of vegan yummies. To be sold under the name

Beginning on May 4, Brooklyn residents will have access to something that until now was available only to Vermonters: Good Eats vegetable CSA shares from PETE’S GREENS in Craftsbury. The certified organic farm already delivers carrots and greens to restaurants in Boston and New York via distributors, but this is its first time offering a CSA drop point outside of Vermont. “We know there’s a demand for good, organic, farmgrown food,” said staffer TAYLAR FOSTER. “It seems like a natural extension.” Five pick-up sites in Brooklyn are currently planned, said Foster, including coworking spaces and a yoga studio. The initial goal is to get 100 New York-based customers signed up. If all goes well, Pete’s will add more sites and customers for the summer share season. As in Vermont, those who volunteer as site hosts will get discounted shares. While Pete’s is extending its out-of-state reach, Foster said, don’t expect the company to have a reduced presence in Vermont. “We’re working on finding more places to sell our product,” Foster explained. “We grow a lot of vegetables, and we’re making sure we have the opportunity to sell everything we grow … We’d love for more Vermonters to become members of our CSA.”

THE BAGEL PLACE


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SEVENDAYSVT.COM 04.19.17-04.26.17 SEVEN DAYS 48 FOOD

IT’S NOT UNTIL YOU’RE PUTTING THE FOOD ON A PLATE THAT IT BECOMES

AN EXPRESSION OF HOW YOU FEEL.

D O U G PA I N E

Even when the food is presented in brown cardboard boxes, Menard gives it style: A hot dog is cut in half lengthwise and nestled in its bun, with pink pickled carrots and slices of jalapeño adding bursts of color. A blueberry creemee comes in a waffle cone with cookies, spoonfuls of wild blueberry jam and a sprig of mint. Another one features maple ice cream, cookie crumbs and a cloud of maple cotton candy. But as playful as he gets, Menard thinks that some chefs take things too

Mostly, says Menard, it’s about organizing ingredients in a way that distributes them appropriately and ensures that customers get bite after delicious bite — and, of course, that the food is aesthetically pleasing with a “layering of colors and flavors. “You want to put yourself in the place of the person eating it,” Menard suggests. When Paine is cooking, his goal is not to worry much. “My strategy is always to go with what’s available … it’s always gotta be fun,” he says. “You can never take anything too seriously. If you think organically and plate organically, you’re more in touch with the ingredients, and you can let them fall where they may. Anything that’s cooked well is going to be beautiful on its own.” m

far. He’s not a fan of plating on slate, which has a texture that grates against the fork. He doesn’t like to see food on the rim of the plate. And he’s not excited about food plated in whimsical objects that weren’t designed for the purpose. “It’s up to us as artists to adapt and make things nice,” Menard says, “but give me something plated in a toy truck and that’s just not going to fly.” On the other hand, a little foam here or there is A-OK.

Hot dog at Canteen Creemee

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he appreciates the way that “the plate has become a canvas” in contemporary cuisine. As surprising as it may seem to those who have seen Paine’s food presentation — in person or on Facebook or Instagram — the plating isn’t part of the initial conception of a dish. “When we come up with dishes, we never think about how we’ll present them,” he says. The way he presents a bowl of soup, a seared scallop, or a tangle of fresh greens may change over time, or even from plate to plate. “It’s always pretty fluid. [There are] differences in the size of vegetables and in the way a sauce hits the plate, so that is going to affect the end result,” Paine explains. Additionally, he never gives appearance primacy over substance. “Flavor and color are always together,” he insists. Do similar rules of plating apply at more casual eateries? They do indeed, says Charlie Menard, who, like Paine, grew up in Vermont. Menard is the chef at the Inn at Round Barn Farm in Waitsfield and co-owns Canteen Creemee, a way-above-average snack bar and ice cream stand in the same town. Menard believes that plating is nearly as important at his fast-food joint as it is at the restaurant. “What we do at the Round Barn is fine dining, and a fair amount of thought goes into making sure the presentation and the flavors and the texture are all going to contrast but complement each other,” he says. “A lot of that carries over to the Canteen.” One example: constructing an ice cream sundae. “I want to make sure there’s something fresh, as in fruit. Is there a sauce? Is there something salty? Maybe a little pecan?” Same for the fried-chicken dinner with corn pudding, which is garnished with fried parsley and pickled cauliflower. “I need to have those colors and flavors to contrast [the meat],” Menard says. Patrons might be paying less attention to plating at Canteen than they do at a fine-dining restaurant, but perhaps not. With the rise of Instagram, Menard says that his patrons nearly always have their cameras out while they eat, snapping shots even as their ice cream melts and drips onto their hands. Every dish, he says, “has to be photo ready. All of them.” His staffers, too, enjoy rising to the challenge. “It’s part of the training, to be sure,” Menard explains. “The young people we work with are outstanding people who care.”

Juniper and Bleu Northeast Seafood at Hotel Vermont, 41 Cherry Street, Burlington, 651-0080. hotelvt.com Canteen Creemee, Village Square Shopping Center, Waitsfield, 496-6003. canteencreemee.com The Inn at Round Barn Farm, 1661 E. Warren Road, Waitsfield, 496-2276. theroundbarn.com

OLIVER PARINI

Culinary Art « P.46


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Arts and Eats GREENSBORO’S NEW ARTS CENTER WILL HOST A CAFÉ

Greensboro is about to get a brand-new town landmark — and a restaurant to match. Builders are hard at work finishing up the Highland Center for the Arts, featuring a main theater that will seat 275 — more than a third of the population of the tiny town. In addition to performance spaces, the building will be home to the new HARDWICK STREET CAFÉ. The eatery, with about 40 seats plus summer outdoor seating, will open toward the end of May, said manager

and chef ALICE PERRON. Initially, she hopes to serve breakfast and lunch six days a week, as well as evening fare when the Center hosts events and shows. Although she eschews buzzwords such as “farm-to-table,” Perron said she’s excited to showcase ingredients from her Northeast Kingdom neighbors. Beef and eggs will come from right down the road. There will be lamb from BONNIEVIEW FARM in Craftsbury Common, bread from PATCHWORK FARM & BAKERY

in Hardwick and, of course, cheese from the

CELLARS AT JASPER HILL in

Greensboro. Perron will use the goods in dishes such as maple baked beans, sliders, seasonal soups and plenty of daily specials, including a variety of ethnic foods. The experienced baker, who used to own BIEN FAIT CAKES, will showcase her recipes for Boston cream pie and a variety of pastries made with reduced sugar. Most important to Perron, she said, is keeping the café “accessible and affordable. It doesn’t have to be really expensive to be good.” — S.P.

FREE

• Choose from over 20 types of bagels and 15+ cream cheeses made fresh in-house daily. • Breakfast sandwiches available all day.

BREAKFAST SANDWICH WITH PURCHASE OF ANY OTHER BREAKFAST SANDWICH OF EQUAL OR GREATER VALUE.

• Uncommon Grounds coffee, soups, salads, pastries & more!

Expires 05/31/2017 Not valid with any other offers.

Open 6am-4pm Mon-Sat and 7am-4pm on Sundays 1166 Williston Road, South Burlington (next to Gadue’s) www.thebagelplacevt.com • 802-497-2058

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BATTLE OF THE CAMPUS CHEFS: University of Vermont cooks get creative in an annual fundraiser for the Chittenden Emergency Food Shelf. Fill up on — and rate — gourmet dishes made with local ingredients. Thursday, April 20, 7-9 p.m., Grand Maple Ballroom, Davis Center, University of Vermont in Burlington. $5-9. Info, 656-1204.

RESPONSIBLE MUSHROOM FORAGING AND HARVESTING: Explore the ecological importance and health benefits of wood-eating cap-and-stem fungi — and talk responsible foraging practices that will ensure a fresh, funky harvest, year after year. Tuesday, April 25, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Pierson Library in Shelburne. Free. Info, 985-5124.

A portable keg cooler offering 4 beers on tap for all your outdoor Sierra 4-Way party needs.

$14.99

Shock Top Variety

$12.99

Long Trail

$14.99

SEVEN DAYS

LIQUOR | BEER | WINE | TOBACCO | SOFT DRINKS | BOTTLE REDEMPTION | DELI

The BEVERAGE Lake Street, St. Albans, VT 802 527-7437

4t-beveragemart041917-1.indd 1

Mart

Fast. Friendly. Convenient.

Fast. Friendly. Convenient. Sale Prices Feb 1April - March Sale Prices GoodGood through 301 Open 6 a.m.-10Open p.m.6am-10pm - 7 Days- 7 Days Visit us on the web @beveragemartvt.com Visit us at beveragemartvt.com Not Responsible for Typographical Errors 4/17/17 10:39 AM

FOOD 49

GROUNDSWELL: COMMUNITY CONVERSATIONS ABOUT LAND USE, LIVELIHOOD, FOOD AND THE FUTURE OF VERMONT: Got thoughts or visions for the state’s agricultural economy? Talk them over with fellow citizens and reps from Rural Vermont. Farmer and childcare stipends available. Wednesday, April 19, 5:30 p.m., ArtsRiot in Burlington. Free; preregister. Info, ruralvermont.org

12-PACK OF THE BEST BRANDS

04.19.17-04.26.17

APERITIVO — A SNACKY SOCIAL HOUR: Thursday, April 20, 5:30-7 p.m., Maglianero in Burlington. $7 (benefits the Vermont Foodbank). More info about this and other events, plus the VRW menu guide, at vermontrestaurantweek.com.

PICK UP A VARIETY

Magic Hat

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

The eighth annual Vermont Restaurant Week kicks off with a boozy after-work social this Thursday. Gather in Maglianero’s open, light-filled space for springy cocktails, courtesy of WhistlePig’s mixologists, and suds by Switchback Brewing. Let the distillers and brewers walk you through a tasting, then pair sips with small bites from American Flatbread Burlington Hearth and cheeses from Vermont Creamery. But be sure to save room for the rest of Restaurant Week, Friday, April 21, through Sunday, April 30.


Beer-Can Do

BURLINGTON BEER FOUNDED: 2014 LOCATION: Williston

Breweries are arting around with their packaging

ANNUAL PRODUCTION: 3,500 barrels

B Y SA D I E W I L L IAMS

DESIGNER: Steve McDonald

A

FORMAT: 16-ounce cans, 750-milliliter bottles

quick perusal of the beer selection at your local grocery store reveals an almost equal number of cans and bottles. But brewers say it hasn’t always been like this. Back in the day, Dale’s Pale Ale from Colorado-based Oskar Blues Brewery was the only craft brew you could get in a can. Of course, there were also the inexpensive everyman’s beers such as Pabst Blue Ribbon and Budweiser. Now, more and more craft breweries are packaging their suds in aluminum. Why? The brewers interviewed for this article cited portability, trendiness and better light-blocking capabilities. And some brews, such as the Alchemist’s Heady Topper, simply taste better from the can. Not to mention, a 16-ounce silver cylinder provides ample real estate for branded artwork. And that’s increasingly important in the saturated beer market. The U.S. counted more than 5,000 craft brewers as of 2016, according to the Brewers Association. That’s a lot of competition. Whether printed on the bare metal substrate or on a glossy wrap, beer-can designs speak to the personalities of the brews and the companies that make them. We tapped four designers in an attempt to better understand the artful can.

COLLECTIVE ARTS BREWING FOUNDED: 2013 LOCATION: Hamilton, Ontario. The design team is in

Stowe.

DESIGNER: Creative director Ryan Thibault winnows

designs by artists from around the world, and then passes finalists to a panel of judges to select the winners.

ANNUAL PRODUCTION: 30,000 barrels

50 FOOD

SEVEN DAYS

04.19.17-04.26.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

FORMAT: Four-packs of 16-ounce cans AESTHETIC: “Collective Arts’ aesthetic is art-forward and

in a state of constant evolution fueled by our rotating artists,” says Thibault.

SEVEN DAYS: When did you start offering cans, and why? RYAN THIBAULT: We started selling cans in 2014. A, it was on trend, and B, we found it to be a superior vehicle to showcase the artwork with the added real estate on a can. SD: How has the art on the cans evolved in that time? RT: Over time, the quantity of high-caliber art being submitted has grown. And art is now being delivered from around the globe, including some very unexpected places: Havana, Tehran, Mumbai… We’ve collaborated with artists from 40 countries now. SD: What does your look say about your beer? Who are you targeting? RT: The people who are most in tune with what we’re doing tend to be millennials and the creative class. I feel akin to millennials’ approach to being sold to — they’re an engaged audience and like to think that what they’re buying is participatory. And the creative class [is] anyone in the creative arts field. We’re very much art-forward.

AESTHETIC: “Simple, bright, clean, illustrative and imaginative,” says McDonald.

SEVEN DAYS: Why this look? It’s very different from any other beer can I’ve seen. STEVE MCDONALD: I had a real eye-opening experience six months into our then-chosen branding path when I visited the Vermont Brewers Festival. We wanted to do something drastically different, and I knew, in such a competitive market, the margin for that separation to fall short was minimal from a consumer perspective, so we could take some risk graphically.  We wanted to represent ourselves more as we’re a younger group and brewery. Also we

MAGIC HAT BREWING FOUNDED: 1994 LOCATION: South Burlington DESIGNER: Ryan Ober leads the

Foundry, an in-house design team.

ANNUAL PRODUCTION: 150,000 barrels FORMAT: 12- and 22-ounce bottles, 12- and 16-ounce cans AESTHETIC: “Eccentric, psychedelic, artful,” says brand manager Lisa Kelly.

SEVEN DAYS: When did you start selling cans, and why? LISA KELLY: We started selling cans in the spring of 2011. Cans have become a great option for outdoor activities, like gathering in parks, camping trips … boating and enjoying at all the outdoor music festivals. [And] here are some benefits to using cans over bottles: Cans seal out oxygen better, which keeps the beer fresher longer. They also block out the light completely, so you don’t get that skunkiness to the beer. SD: How has Magic Hat evolved to keep up? RYAN OBER: We just rebranded all our cans — we were focusing on better communication, a formula. We want to have a consistent look to the logo but stay true to who we are,

being a little bit mysterious with our beers and having fun with it. We really hadn’t changed our packaging in 10 years, so we’re [evolving] with all of our packaging, creating this family look. It looks more modern. SD: Do you print on wraps or the bare substrate? RO: I like printing on the substrate, because you have to communicate more with the printers — pick where you’re going to let the shiny spots come through. I think some people like to print on the wrap, because then they can guarantee a white background. [Printing on the can] changes the colors.


Weevil

housing »

AGE/SEX: 1-year-old spayed female ARRIVAL DATE: March 3, 2017 REASON HERE: Owners lost their housing COURTESY OF KELLY SCHULZE/MOUNTAIN DOG PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMARY: Described as a silly, fun and cuddly girl, Weevil is sure to win you over

with her cute face and love for treats. She's wary of strangers and needs a little extra time to be comfortable when meeting new people ... but you can certainly get her on your side with hot dogs and patience! Weevil is an active girl who enjoys playing with other dogs and being with her people.

DOGS/CATS/KIDS: Weevil lived with another dog and does well with dogs at HSCC;

she would enjoy another dog in the home for company, but this circumstance is not required. Weevil needs a home without cats. She may do well with youth 16 and older. Visit HSCC at 142 Kindness Court, South Burlington, Tuesday through Friday from 1 to 6 p.m., or Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 862-0135 for more info.

Humane

DID YOU KNOW? Low-Cost Rabies Clinic Saturday, April 29 1-3 p.m. @ HSCC No appointment necessary!

Vet to Pet Mobile Veterinary Services works as our partner to offer rabies vaccinations for only $16! Cash & check only. Visit chittendenhumane.org/ news-and-events for more information.

Sponsored by:

Society of Chittenden County

NEW STUFF ONLINE EVERY DAY! PLACE YOUR ADS 24-7 AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM.

APARTMENTS, CONDOS & HOMES

on the road »

CARS, TRUCKS, MOTORCYCLES

pro services »

CHILDCARE, HEALTH/ WELLNESS, PAINTING

buy this stuff »

APPLIANCES, KID STUFF, ELECTRONICS, FURNITURE

music »

INSTRUCTION, CASTING, INSTRUMENTS FOR SALE

jobs »

NO SCAMS, ALL LOCAL, POSTINGS DAILY


CLASSIFIEDS TRANSPORTAon the TION road

housing ads: $20 (25 words) legals: 52¢/word buy this stuff: free online services: $12 (25 words)

display service ads: $25/$45 homeworks: $45 (40 words, photos, logo) fsbos: $45 (2 weeks, 30 words, photo) jobs: michelle@sevendaysvt.com, 865-1020 x21

We Pick Up & Pay For Junk Automobiles!

Route 15, Hardwick

802-472-5100

bayberrycommons apartments.com

Valley Painting

Interior/exterior Painting 802-793-9133 Sheetrocking 2015 MAZDA & Taping 3i Touring 5-door, BEACON ROW BURLINGTON 2-BR Cathedral Ceilings hatchback. Black, sm-allmetals060811.indd 1 SDIreland-Sm.ClassyDisplay081716.indd 5:02 PM TOWNHOUSES7/20/15 TOWNHOUSES 8/22/16 1:51 PM1 manual transmission, Custom Carpentry 2-BR, 2-BA, enclosed Stainless steel 13K miles. Excellent garage, balcony, HDWD appliances & Any Size Job condition. Winter on first floor, off-street granite counter tops. & summer tires on Free Estimates parking & storage. Community gardens, alloy rims. $16,300. Fully Insured NS/pets. $1,725/mo. + river views, covered bike

CARS/TRUCKS

802-476-7281.

RECREATIONAL VEHICLES 2003 VW EUROVAN CAMPER Well-maintained delight. Seats 7, sleeps 4. Economical camper, a few minor dings, runs nicely w/ 180K miles. Contact rsmolker@gmail.com or call 802-482-2848.

HOUSING housing

C-2 CLASSIFIEDS

SEVEN DAYS

04.19.17-04.26.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

FOR RENT 1-BR/STUDIO AFFORDABLE $735 New construction. 1-BR or studio apts avail. May 1. Lake views! Starting at $735/mo. Income restrictions apply. For info, contact hwilliams@summitpmg. com or 802-846-5430, extension 8. 2-BR, 3-BR NOW OR JUN. 1 2-BR, 3-BR now & Jun. 1. Roomy & extra roomy. 2-BR: $1,100/ mo. & $1300/mo. 3-BR: $1,600/mo. 318-8916 cell, 238-0004 cell, 862-9103 office.

3842 Dorset Ln., Williston

efficient natural gas & electric. Summit Property Management Group, Call Karen at 802-865-1109, extension 3.

BURLINGTON 1- & 2-BR APTS. W/D in each unit, air conditioning, stainless steel appliances, granite counter tops. Community gardens, elevators, adjacent to children’s playground. Your dream apartment! Bayberry Circle, Burlington (formerly 100 Grove St.). bayberrycommonsapartments.com, 355-7633. BURLINGTON 2-BR & STUDIO APTS. AVAIL. Church St. Marketplace. 2-BR avail. May 1. $1,409/mo. Studio avail. Jun. 1. $854/mo. Studio avail. Sep. 1. $906/mo. NS/pets. W/D onsite. 1-year lease. 922-8518.

802.355.7633

355-0392

BURLINGTON 380-382 NORTH AVE. 3-BR, 1-BA, 2 floors, HDWD, large kitchen, porch, gas heat & HW, off-street parking, coin-op W/D. Garbage & snow removal incl. Lease. NS/pets. $1,800/ mo. Avail. Jun. 1. Application: gridguide. com, 324-6446.

BURLINGTON: 31 HYDE ST. Avail. now. Medium-size 3-BR condo. 1.5-BA, DW, W/D, parking, low utils. $1,650/mo. No dogs. 862-7467.

BURLINGTON 76 MARBLE AVE. 3-BR, 1-BA, off-street parking, downtown location. NS/pets. Lease. No W/D. $1,850/ mo. + utils. Avail. Jun. 1. Tyler, 324-6446.

COLCHESTER 2 rooms plus private BA, kitchen privileges. $1,000/mo. First and last month’s rent required. Avail. now. Text 598-9839.

CENTRAL BURLINGTON 2-BR. $1,100/mo. + utils. No pets. Avail. immed. Call for appt. 863-2798.

Say you saw it in...

EQUAL HOUSING mini-sawit-white.indd OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 and similar Vermont statutes which make it illegal to advertise any preference, limitations, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, sexual orientation, age, marital status, handicap, presence of minor children in the family or receipt of public assistance, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or a discrimination. The newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate, which is in violation of the

COUNTRY LIVING IN WESTFORD Cute 3-BR house on 18 acres in Westford. New paint. 25 minutes to Burlington & St. Albans. 2-BA, full basement. W/D. $1,700/mo. + utils. Pet deposit. Rental application. jfranz@sover. net, 802-878-7405.

HUD Office of Fair Housing 10 Causeway St., Boston, MA 02222-1092 (617) 565-5309 — OR — Vermont Human Rights Commission 14-16 Baldwin St. Montpelier, VT 05633-0633 1-800-416-2010 hrc@vermont.gov

HOUSEMATES MONKTON Share a home w/ woman in her 60s interested in environmental issues, reading & cooking. $400/mo. + utils. & lend a hand w/ yardwork. Private half BA. 863-5625 or homesharevermont.org for application. Interview, refs., background checks required. EHO.

SPACIOUS 1-BR APT. In the heart of Burlington. Kindly write to me at paulinkhart60@gmail.com or text 415-663-7201 for more details.

ROOM FOR RENT, AVAIL. NOW Monkton farmhouse on 20 acres, all amenities incl., garden space, 13.5 miles to I-89. Start $400/mo. 453-3457.

BANKRUPTCY AUCTION

Online Through Mon., April 24 @ 6PM 786 College Parkway, Colchester, VT

1 law. Our readers are hereby11/24/09 informed1:32:18 PM that all dwellings, advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Any home seeker who feels her or she has encountered discrimination should contact:

LIVING COMMUNITY 10 Tyler Way, Williston, independent senior living. Avail. Jun. 15. Newly remodeled 2-BR unit avail., $1,300/ mo. inc. utils. & cable. NS/pets. Must be 55+ years of age. rrappold@ coburnfeeley.com or 802-879-3333.

RESIDENCES AT GREAT CEDARS Winooski, new 1- & 2-BR senior-living apts. Spacious, bright rooms w/ beautiful windows & upscale kitchens featuring granite counters & stainless steel appliances. Rent from $1,200/mo. incl. utils. jbowley@summitpmg. com or 802-497-1740.

Medical Office & Office Equip.

sevendaysvt.com

CLASSIFIEDS KEY

appt. appointment apt. apartment BA bathroom bayberrycommons apartments.com BR bedroom 802.355.7633 DR dining room DOWNTOWN DW dishwasher BURLINGTON 3-BR Two blocks from HDWD hardwood TAFT FARM SENIOR Church St. on edge of SDIreland-Sm.ClassyDisplay081716.indd 8/22/16 1:51 PM 1 LIVING COMMUNITY HW hot water Old North End, right in 10 Tyler Way, Williston, downtown Burlington. LR living room independent senior 3-BR, 1-BA. Landlord living. Newly remodeled lives on premises. NS no smoking 1-BR units avail., $1,110/ 802-683-7590. mo. inc. utils. & cable. OBO or best offer NS/pets. Must be 55+ DOWNTOWN years of age. rrappold@ BURLINGTON 4-BR refs. references coburnfeeley.com or Two blocks from Church sec. dep. security deposit 802-879-3333. St. on edge of Old North End, right in downtown W/D washer & dryer TAFT FARM SENIOR Burlington. 4-BR, 1-BA.

storage & underground parking. Adjacent to nature/running trails & basketball/ tennis courts. Bayberry Circle, Burlington (formerly 100 Grove $2,600/mo. Landlord BURLINGTON, St.). bayberrycomlives on premises. Craig lg-valleypainting112614.indd 11/24/14 1 12:11 PM BAYBERRY COMMONS monsapartments.com, 802-683-7590. New 1- & 2-BR flats, 355-7633. 9-foot ceilings, exterior PINECREST AT ESSEX porches/patios. Walk to BURLINGTON 22 9 Joshua Way, Essex public transportation, GREENE ST. Junction. Independent shops, dining, universi4-BR, 1-BA. Avail. Jun. 1. senior living. 1-BR unit ties & more. Bayberry 3 floors of living space. avail. May 15. $1,160/mo. Circle, Burlington NS/pets. Close to UVM, incl. all utils. & garage (formerly 100 Grove downtown. Limited parking. NS/pets. Must St). bayberrycomparking. $2,799/mo. + be 55+ years of age. monsapartments.com, utils. Year lease. Tyler, rrappold@coburnfeeley. 355-7633. 324-6446. com or 802-872-9197.

Call TJ NOW!

print deadline: Mondays at 4:30 p.m. post ads online 24/7 at: sevendaysvt.com/classifieds questions? classifieds@sevendaysvt.com 865-1020 x37

LAND NEW PRICE ON BERLIN LOTS 2 building lots. 3 miles to I-89 & Statehouse. Septic permits, low taxes. 27 acres: $119,000. 29 acres: $109,000. 802-223-8644 x23, fountainsland.com.

Call or email for a free market analysis or buyer consultation.

Preview: Wed., April 19 from 11AM -2PM

OFFICE/ COMMERCIAL 208 FLYNN: BTVSPACES.COM 1,200 sq.ft. open studio. 2,700 sq.ft. office suite. 3,000 sq.ft. multilevel office. Near bike path, bus route. Great neighbors. Call Dave at 802-316-6452. MIDDLEBURY RETAIL SPACE Prime space located in town center, heavy foot traffic. Overlooks Otter Creek, 44 Main St. 740 sqft., AC. 802-989-7277 or 206-715-5344. OFFICE/RETAIL SPACE AT MAIN STREET LANDING on Burlington’s Waterfront. Beautiful, healthy, affordable spaces for your business. Visit mainstreetlanding.com & click on space avail. Melinda, 864-7999.

SERVICES

EMAILED ADVERTISEMENT ALL AREAS FREE ROOMMATE SERVICE

ADVERTISING INSERTION At RentMates.com. FindORDER the perfectCompany roommate Thomas Hirchak to complement your FROM: Terra Keene personality and lifestyle at RentMates.com! Phone: 800-634-7653 (AAN CAN) Advertising2@THCAuction.com TO: Logan COMPANY: Seven Days PHONE: 802-865-1020 x22

Office Furnishings & Equipment, Home Appliances, Exam Tables, Computers, Assorted Medical Supplies & More. Thomas Hirchak Company THCAuction.com • 800-634-7653 Untitled-32 1

SOUTH BURLINGTON Seeking female to share apt. w/ woman in her 40s w/ Down syndrome. Minimal rent in exchange for 10-12 hours per week of help: companionship, some cooking, shared cleaning, schedule reminders. Some evening & weekend avail. needed (on very flexible schedule). Shared BA. 863-5625, homesharevermont. org for application. Interview, refs., background checks required. EHO.

1/16= 1C: 2.30 x 1C: 2.72; 1/12= 1C: Robbi Handy Holmes • 802-951-2128 1/8= 1C: 2.30 x 3C: 5.56; 1/6= 1C: 2. bayberrycommons robbihandyholmes@c21jack.com apartments.com Find me on TODAY’S DATE: 4/14/17 802.355.7633 NAME OF FILE: MapleLeaf_7D Making it happen for you!

4/17/17 16t-robbiehh021815.indd 10:35 AM 1

DATE(S) TO RUN: 04/20/17

SIZE OF AD: 1/16 V (2.3 x 2.72)

8/31/15 SDIreland-Sm.ClassyDisplay081716.indd 11:23 AM 8/22/16 1:51 PM1


REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS: List your properties here and online for only $45/week. Submit your listings by Mondays at noon to homeworks@sevendaysvt.com or 802-865-1020, x37.

BROWSE THIS WEEK’S OPEN HOUSES: sevendaysvt.com/open-houses VERMONT HOUSE

FAIRFAX COLONIAL

Spacious and sunny home with amazing mountain views nestled on a 0.87-acre lot backing up to common land with nature trails to explore. Inside you'll find an open floor plan, hardwood floors, upgraded kitchen, master suite, finished basement and more. Only 10 minutes to I-89. Price Reduced! $319,900

Two bedrooms and 1.5 bath condominium located in the heart of downtown Burlington. Bright corner unit with many windows. Onsite laundry, storage and parking options available. All conveniently located near Church Street, the bike path, Lake Champlain, lots of shopping and nearby restaurants. Priced at $249,900.

Steve Lipkin 846.9575 LipVT.com

CHARMING BUNGALOW

ST. ALBANS | 68 HIGH STREET | #4617330

SERVICES

HW-Dupius2-041917.indd 1

BIZ OPPS

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical & continued support afterward. Adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 877-362-2401. (AAN CAN) PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1,000 a week mailing brochures from home! No experience required. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine opportunity. Start immed. incomestation.net. (AAN CAN)

CLOTHING ALTERATIONS

from courthouse, Amtrak. Near many 4/17/17 HW-Heney1-041917.indd 3:01several PM 1 offices. Includes venues: great room, pub/bar, intimate library & a brick Victorian SOMETHING SEW courtyard. 236 total RIGHT capacity. Mark Ledoux, Professional clothing realtor, 802-393-2297, alterations since 1986. markledouxsells@ Creative, quality work gmail.com. from formal wear to leather repairs. New location: 248 Elm St., 2nd floor, Montpelier. 229-2400, pmorse52@ SUMMER live.com. NANNY AVAIL.

CHILDCARE

Highly qualified nanny avail. to give your children a wonderful, active & creative summer! 8+ years of experience, CPR/first aid certified. Contact Amanda: mndneal@ yahoo.com.

ENTERTAINMENT LIVELINKS CHAT LINES Flirt, chat & date! Talk to sexy real singles in your area. Call now. 844-359-5773. (AAN CAN)

NEW HOME? VACATION HOME?4/17/17

4/17/17HW-Dupius1-041917.indd 3:10 PM 1

WAITSFIELD | 149 AIRPORT RD. UNIT H | #4496528

Brendan Coyne 81 Main Street, Montpelier 135 Washington Street, Barre HeneyRealtors.com

HEALTH/ WELLNESS

Flat Fee Real Estate 802-310-3669 erin@flatfeevt.com

Waitsfield three bedroom condo with first floor master bedroom suite, sunken living room with cathedral ceiling and propane stove. Great space for entertaining. Clean and crisp as the interior has been professionally painted throughout. Central to Sugarbush, Montpelier, Waterbury, I-89. $125,900

Brendan Coyne 81 Main Street, Montpelier 135 Washington Street, Barre HeneyRealtors.com

HOME/GARDEN BUY THIS STUFF GARAGE/ESTATE SALES

4/17/17 HW-Heney2-041917.indd 12:28 PM 1

MAKE THE CALL TO START GETTING CLEAN TODAY Free 24-7 help line for alcohol & drug addiction treatment. Get help! It is time to take your life back. Call now: 855-7324139. (AAN CAN) PSYCHIC COUNSELING Psychic counseling, channeling w/ Bernice Kelman, Underhill. 30+ years’ experience. Also energy healing, chakra balancing, Reiki, rebirthing, other lives, classes, more. 802-899-3542, kelman.b@juno.com.

3:03 PM

HONEY-DO HOME MAINTENANCE All jobs large or small, home or office, 24-hr. service. A division of Sasso Construction. Call Scott today! Local, reliable, honest. All calls returned. 310-6926. VERMONT SEPTIC SERVICES Vermont Septic Services, A Wind River Environmental Company. Locally operated, providing commercial & residential septic pumping, grease services, drain cleaning & jetting. Call today 802-728-3805.

4/17/17 11:15 AM

buy this stuff

ANTIQUES/ COLLECTIBLES WEDGWOOD FINE CHINA Pattern: Florentine w/ decorative black & gold border. 14 place settings plus soup bowls & serving pieces. Very lightly used. Retail value $3,500. Offered at $999. 802-753-7403.

MOVING SALE 22 CLARK ST., BURLINGTON Fri. & Sat., Apr. 21 & 22, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Biomat, washer & dryer, furniture, books, massage table, clothes, massage equipment. Everything must go. 881-7606. MOVING/GARAGE SALE Furniture, artwork, rugs, tools, books, clothing, household. Fri-Sat, Apr. 21-22, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Rain or shine in dry garage. 4 Vale Drive, S. Burlington.

BUY THIS STUFF»

CLASSIFIEDS C-3

TURN-KEY RESTAURANT Popular, successful restaurant in the best location in Franklin County. Near new 84-room Hampton Inn about to open. Across

JUST LISTED

Erin Dupuis

SEVEN DAYS

LOCAL DRIVERS WANTED! Be your own boss. Flexible hours. Unlimited earning potential. Must be 21 with valid U.S. driver’s license, insurance & reliable vehicle. 866329- 2672. (AAN CAN)

Flat Fee Real Estate 802-310-3669 erin@flatfeevt.com

Brokers/REALTORS® ‘the experienced team’ 44 Shelburne St., Burlington, VT 802-864-9856/802-373-3506

PLAINFIELD | 786 UPPER RD. | #4623820

Plainfield 1867 schoolhouse, taken down to the studs and beautifully restored. Great care was taken to preserve the history. Mudroom, open concept kitchen, dining area and living room with plenty of natural light, woodstove, bathroom with clawfoot tub. You cannot help but fall in love. $225,000

Erin Dupuis

Chuck and Cindi Burns

Immaculately maintained townhome on Vermont National Country Club offering several upgrades throughout. Dining area and gourmet kitchen with granite counters and tumbled marble backsplash. Exquisite master suite offering a 2nd fireplace, a large walk-in closet and a private 4 piece bath including jetted tub and glass shower. $499,000

04.19.17-04.26.17

services

hw-C21-Burns-041917.indd 1

SOUTH BURLINGTON | 251 FAIRWAY DRIVE | #4605595

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

This early 20th century home offers original hardwood floor and newly built covered front porch. Front foyer offers a closet for shoes and coats. The spacious kitchen offers porcelanosa tile black spash, granite counters, stainless steel appliances, ample storage and cork floors. Second floor has 3 bedrooms, and rear sun porch off master bedroom. $229,900

SUN FILLED TOWNHOME

BURLINGTON | 131 MAIN ST. UNIT #306 | #4622414

FAIRFAX | 29 VILLAGE VIEW ROAD | #4622392


SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

WANT TO BUY buy this stuff [CONTINUED]

ANTIQUES Furniture, postcards, pottery, cameras, toys, medical tools, lab glass, photographs, slide rules, license plates & silver. Anything unusual or unique. Cash paid. Dave, 859-8966.

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PETS

of Vermont’s best players and independent instructors in beautiful, spacious lesson studios at the Burlington Music Dojo on Pine St. All levels and styles are welcome, including absolute beginners. Gift certificates available. Come share in the music! burlingtonmusicdojo.com, info@ burlingtonmusicdojo. com, 540-0321. GUITAR INSTRUCTION Berklee graduate w/ 30 years’ teaching experience offers lessons in guitar, music theory, music technology, ear training. Individualized, step-by-step approach. All ages, styles, levels. Rick Belford, 864-7195, rickb@rickbelford.com.

music

INSTRUCTION BASS LESSONS W/ ARAM For all ages, levels & styles. Beginners welcome! Learn songs, theory, technique & more on Pine St. Years of pro performing, recording & teaching experience. First lesson half off! 598-8861, arambedrosian.com, lessons@arambedrosian.com.

AMAZON PARROT ACT 250 NOTICE FOR ADOPTION MINOR APPLICATION My Amazon parrot, BASS, GUITAR, DRUMS, #4C0614-6 Booker, male, 15 years 10 V.S.A. §§ 6001 VOICE LESSONS & old, healthy & tame, - 6093 MORE! needs a new home. Learn bass, guitar, Experienced bird owner On April 10, 2017, Estate or a very special adopter drums, voice, flute, sax, of Marie J. Dubois, trumpet, production only. north.books@ Using the enclosed math operations as a guide, fill the grid and beyond with some comcast.net.

Calcoku

using the numbers 1 - 6 only once in each row and column.

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C-4 CLASSIFIEDS

SEVEN DAYS

04.19.17-04.26.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

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c/o Veronica Lambert, Executrix, 5410 Vermont Route 116, St. George, VT 05495 filed application #4C0614-6 for a project generally described as the afterthe-fact subdivision of a 4.11 acre lot into two lots. Lot 1 is a 1.44 acre parcel with a pre-existing three bedroom residence and Lot 2 is a 2.67 acre parcel with a preexisting five bedroom duplex residence and an existing 5,000 square foot steel storage building. Both lots are served by municipal water and sewer. The Project is located at 1375 (Lot #2) and 1405 (Lot #1) Vermont Route 116 in South Burlington, Vermont.

sued unless, on or before May 8, 2017, a person notifies the Commission of an issue or issues requiring the presentation of evidence at a hearing or the Commission sets the matter for hearing on its own motion. Any hearing request must be in writing to the address below, must state the criteria or subcriteria at issue, why a hearing is required and what additional evidence will be presented at the hearing. Any hearing request by an adjoining property owner or other interested person must include a petition for party status. Prior to submitting a request for a hearing, please contact the district coordinator at the telephone number listed below for more information. Prior to convening a hearing, the Commission must determine that substantive issues requiring a hearing have been raised. Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law will not be prepared unless the Commission holds a public hearing.

The District #4 Environmental Commission is reviewing this application under Act 250 Rule 51 — Minor Applications. Copies of the application and proposed permit are available for review at the office listed below. The application and a draft permit may also be viewed on the Natural Resources Board’s web site (www. nrb.state.vt.us/lup) by clicking on “Act 250 Database” and entering the project number “4C0614-6”. No hearing will be held and a permit may be is-

If you feel that any of the District Commission members listed on the attached Certificate of Service under “For Your Information” may have a conflict of interest, or if there is any other reason a member

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should be disqualified from sitting on this case, please contact the district coordinator as soon as possible, no later than prior to the response date listed above. Should a hearing be held on this Project and you have a disability for which you are going to need accommodation, please notify us by May 8, 2017. Parties entitled to participate are the Municipality, the Municipal Planning Commission, the Regional Planning Commission, affected state agencies, and adjoining property owners and other persons to the extent they have a particularized interest that may be affected by the proposed project under the 10 criteria. Non-party participants may also be allowed under 10 V.S.A. Section 6085(c)(5). Dated at Essex Junction, Vermont this 13th day of April, 2017. By: /s/Stephanie H. Monaghan District #4 Coordinator Natural Resources Board 111 West Street Essex Jct., VT 05452 802-879-5662 stephanie.monaghan@ vermont.gov

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Complete the following puzzle by using the numbers 1-9 only once in each row, column and 3 x 3 box.

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CALCOKU

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Difficulty - Hard

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

No. 476

SUDOKU

Difficulty: Hard

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: ★★★

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: ★★★

Fill the grid using the numbers 1-6, only once in each row and column. The numbers in each heavily outlined “cage” must combine to produce the target number in the top corner, using the mathematical operation indicated. A onebox cage should be filled in with the target number in the top corner. A number can be repeated within a cage as long as it is not the same row or column.

Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row acrosss, each column down and each 9-box square contains all of the numbers one to nine. The same numbers cannot be repeated in a row or column.

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7 8 5 9 3 2 6 1 4 ANSWERS1ON P.3C-7 2 7 4 6 8 5 9 ★ = MODERATE 2 BOY! 4 9 ★★6 = CHALLENGING 5 1 8 ★7★★3= HOO, 3 5 8 2 9 7 1 4 6

ACT 250 NOTICE MINOR APPLICATION #4C0770R-4A 10 V.S.A. §§ 6001 - 6093 On April 5, 2017, Christophe and Alice Lissarrague, P.O. Box 716, Shelburne, VT 05482 filed application #4C0770R-4A for a project generally described as subdivision of 72.1 acre parcel into 6 lots for single family residences. The Project is located on Thompson Road in Shelburne, Vermont. The District #4 Environmental Commission is reviewing this application under Act 250 Rule 51 — Minor Applications. Copies of the application and proposed permit are available for review at the office listed below. The application and a draft permit may also be viewed on the Natural Resources Board’s web site (www.nrb.state. vt.us/lup) by clicking on “Act 250 Database” and entering the project number “4C0770R-4A”. No hearing will be held and a permit may be issued unless, on or before May 2, 2017, a person notifies the Commission of an issue or issues requiring the presentation of evidence at a hearing or the Commission sets the matter for hearing on its own motion. Any hearing request must be in writing to the address below, must state the criteria or subcriteria at issue, why a hearing is required and what additional evidence will be presented at the hearing. Any hearing request by an adjoining property owner or other interested person must include a petition for party status. Prior to submitting a request for a hearing, please contact the district coordinator at the telephone number listed below for more information. Prior to convening a hearing, the Commission must determine that substantive issues requiring a hearing have been raised. Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law will not be prepared unless the Commission holds a public hearing. If you feel that any of the District Commission members listed on the attached Certificate of Service under “For Your Information” may have a conflict of interest, or if there is any other reason a member should be disqualified from sitting on this case, please contact the district coordinator as soon as possible, no later than prior to the

Extra! Extra! There’s no limit to ad length online. response date listed above. Should a hearing be held on this Project and you have a disability for which you are going to need accommodation, please notify us by May 2, 2017. Parties entitled to participate are the Municipality, the Municipal Planning Commission, the Regional Planning Commission, affected state agencies, and adjoining property owners and other persons to the extent they have a particularized interest that may be affected by the proposed project under the 10 criteria. Non-party participants may also be allowed under 10 V.S.A. Section 6085(c)(5). Dated at Essex Junction, Vermont this 10th day of April 2017. By: Peter E. Keibel District #4 Coordinator Natural Resources Board 111 West Street Essex Jct., VT 05452 802-879-5658 Peter.Keibel@vermont. gov CITATION BY PUBLICATION – TERMINATION OF PARENTAL RIGHTS TO: JAKEB POTTER 235 HEMLOCK ROAD ST. GEORGE, VT 05495 Case Number: 6562016—TR-00048; 6562016-TR-00049 Initial Hearing A petition to terminate parental rights over your minor child(ren) has been filed in this Court. You are hereby cited to appear at a Court to show cause why the same should not be granted. Date: May 25, 2017 Time: 9:30 AM Time Allotted: 30 minutes Courtroom 101-9th Circuit-Family DivisionManchester 35 Amherst Street Manchester, NH 03101 A written appearance must be filed with this Court on or before the date of the hearing, or the respondent may personally appear on the date of hearing or be defaulted. CAUTION You should respond immediately to this notice to prepare for trial and because important hearings will take place prior to trial. If you fail to appear personally or in writing, you will waive your right to a hearing


SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS and your parental rights may be terminated at the above hearing. IMPORTANT RIGHTS OR PARENTS THIS PETITION IS TO DETERMINE WHETHER OR NOT YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS OVER YOUR CHILD(REN) SHALL BE TERMIANTED. TERMINATION OF THE PARENT/ CHILD RELATIONSHIP MEANS THE TERMINATION SHALL DIVEST YOU OF ALL LEGAL RIGHTS, PRIVILEGES, DUTIES AND OBLIGATION, INCLUDNG BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE LOSS OF ALL RIGHTS TO CUSTODY, VISITATION AND COMMUNCATION WITH YOUR CHILD(REN). IF TERMINATION IS GRANTED, YOU WILL RECEIVE NO NOTICE OF FUTURE LEGAL PROCEEDINGS CONCERNING YOUR CHILD(REN). You are hereby notified that you have a right to be represented by an attorney. You also have the right to oppose the proceedings, to attend the hearing and to present evidence. If you desire an attorney, you may notify this Court within ten (10) days of receiving this notice and upon a finding of indigency, the Court will appoint

an attorney without cost to you. If you enter an appearance, notice of any future hearings regarding this child(ren) will be by first class mail to you, your attorney and all other interested parties not less than ten (10) days prior to any scheduled hearing. Additional information may be obtained from the Family Division Court identified in the heading of this Order of Notice. If you will need an interpreter or other accommodations for this hearing, please contact the court immediately. Please be advised (and/ or advise clients, witnesses, and others) that it is a Class B felony to carry a firearm or other deadly weapon as defined in RSA 625.11, V in a courtroom or area used by a court. BY ORDER OF THE COURT /S/ Mary A. Barton Clerk of the Court March 27, 2017 (656621) C: Barbara Griffin, ESQ; John A. Wolkowski, ESQ LEGAL NOTICE CITY OF BURLINGTON AMENDING

THE CITIZEN PARTICIPATION PLAN The City of Burlington is soliciting input on the City’s amendments of its Citizen Participation Plan as part of federal requirements under 24 CFR Part 91.105 for planning and allocation of federal funds from CDBG, HOME, other HUD administered programs and the Assessment of Fair Housing. On Monday, May 1, 2017 after 7:00 pm, there will be a Public Hearing before the Burlington City Council to hear comments on the proposed amendments to the Citizen Participation Plan. The Plan and amendments are available online at www.burlingtonvt.gov/ CEDO. The public is encouraged to review the Plan, attend the Public Hearing, and comment. Written comments will also be accepted on the Plan through the close of business on May 22, 2017, at the Community & Economic Development Office, 149 Church Street, Room 32, City Hall, Burlington, VT 05401 or mesbjerg@ burlingtonvt.gov. For more information, or information

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on alternative access, contact Marcy Esbjerg, Community & Economic Development Office, at 865-7171. STATE OF VERMONT CHITTENDEN UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT DOCKET NO: 423-516 CNCV BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. v. ANDREW H. MONTROLL, ESQ., ADMINISTRATOR OF THE ESTATE OF ANN M. BESSETTE AND SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT OCCUPANTS OF 10 MAPLEWOOD DRIVE, SOUTH BURLINGTON, VT MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered January 3, 2017 in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by the late Ann M. Bessette to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., dated July 3, 2009 and recorded in Book 877 Page 312 of the land records of the City of South

KP DUTY ANSWERS ON P. C-7

Burlington, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder by virtue of an Assignment of Mortgage from Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. to Bank of America, National Association dated October 12, 2009 and recorded in Book 904 Page 187 of the land records of the City of South Burlington , for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 10 Maplewood Drive, South Burlington, Vermont on April 27, 2017 at 11:00 AM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To wit: Being all and the same land and premises conveyed to Ann Bessette by Quit-Claim Deed of Franklin D. Bessette and Ann Bessette dated February 23, 1990 and recorded in Book 292, Page 587 of the City of South Burlington Land Records. Being all the same land and premises conveyed to Franklin D. Bessette and Ann Bessette by Warranty Deed of Rayond P. Bessery and Linda A. Bessery dated September 10, 1971 and recorded in Book 102,

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Page 347 of the City of South Burlington Land Records, and more particularily described as follows:

instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description.

Rachel K. Jones, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032

A lot of land with all the buildings thereon situated on the easterly side of Maplewood Drive, the dwelling house thereon being known and designated as No. 10 Maplewood Drive. Said lot has a frontage on said Maplewood Drive and uniform width of 75 feet, a north line of 171.7 feet and a south line of 172.4 feet. Being all of lot No. 9 as laid down on a plan of property entitled “Revised Plan Mountainview Subdivision” which plan is recorded in Volume 11, page 31 of the City of South Burlington Land Records.

Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described.

NOTICE: THE LAW FIRM OF BENDETT & MCHUGH, PC IS A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. IF YOU HAVE PREVIOUSLY RECEIVED A DISCHARGE IN BANKRUPTCY WHICH DISCHARGED THIS DEBT, THIS CORRESPONDENCE IS NOT AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSTRUED TO BE AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT, BUT ONLY ENFORCEMENT OF A LIEN AGAINST PROPERTY

Being known and designated as No. 10 Maplewood Drive, South Burlington, VT, Parcel ID # 1110-00010.

TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within thirty (30) days after the date of sale.

Reference is hereby had to the above mentioned deeds and the records thereof and to all former deeds and their records for a more particular description of the premises.

The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale.

Reference is hereby made to the above

DATED: March 24, 2017 By: /s/ Rachel K. Jones

STATE OF VERMONT FRANKLIN UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT DOCKET NO: 363-813 FRCV GOSHEN MORTGAGE LLC AS SEPARATE TRUSTEE FOR GDBT I TRUST 2011-1 v. TODD A. RIVERS, MARY ELLEN GERVAIS, MARY ELLEN RIVERS AKA MARYELLEN RIVERS AND CITIBANK (S. DAKOTA), N.A.

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» SEVENDAYSVT.COM 04.19.17-04.26.17 SEVEN DAYS CLASSIFIEDS C-5


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FOR SALE BY OWNER

List your property here for 2 weeks for only $45! Contact Ashley, 864-5684, fsbo@sevendaysvt.com.

RICHMOND COUNTRY HOME

CHAMPLAIN, NY 12919 Renovated, spacious 2-bd, 1-1/2 storey farmhouse on 31.5 acres (2 meadows, woods, brook, bedrock, trees, deer, etc.). Large eat-in kitchen. 1.5 baths. Finished attic. Oil heating and wood stove. Drilled well. Perennial garden. Close to 1-87. $99,000. 514-485-1636, cynthiamacd001@ hotmail.com

This Vermont country home & 11.4 acres at 3325 Hinesburg Road, Richmond, has been lovingly and thoughtfully cared for over thirty years including many upgrades & improvements. 802922-1771, vermontreal-estate-for-salerent.com/ $675,000.

FSBO-Bohen-041917.indd 1

[CONTINUED]

C-6 CLASSIFIEDS

SEVEN DAYS

04.19.17-04.26.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered January 5, 2016 in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Mary Ellen Gervais and Maryellen Rivers to CitiFinancial, Inc., dated November 1, 2007 and recorded in Book 221 Page 74 of the land records of the City of St. Albans, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of the following Assignments of Mortgage: (1) Assignment of Mortgage from CFNA Receivables (MD) Inc. F/K/A CitiFinancial, Inc. to CitiFinancial Servicing, LLC, dated December 16, 2013 and recorded in Book 265 Page 6; (2) Corrective Assignment of Mortgage from CitiFinancial Servicing, LLC to Bayview Loan Servicing, LLC dated February 21, 2014 and recorded in Book 265 Page 630; (3) Assignment of Mortgage from Bayview Loan Servicing, LLC to Bayview Dispositions IIIA, LLC dated June 8, 2015 and recorded in Book 271 Page 45; (4) Assignment of Mortgage from Bayview Dispositions IIA, LLC to Goshen Mortgage, LLC dated June 8, 2015 and recorded in Book 271 Page 46; and (5) Assignment of Mortgage from Goshen Mortgage, LLC to Goshen Mortgage LLC as separate trustee for GDBT I Trust 2011-1 dated October 9, 2015 and recorded in Book 274 Page 89; all of the land records of the City of St. Albans for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the

purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 1 Finn Avenue, St. Albans, Vermont on May 10, 2017 at 10:00 AM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN PARCEL OF LAND IN CITY OF ST. ALBANS, FRANKLIN COUNTY, STATE OF VT, AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN BOOK 135 PAGE 195 ID# 22035001, BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT #1, ON A SURVEY ENTITLED PLAN OF SUBDIVISION DATED APRIL 4, 1969 DRAWN BY D. GREGORY PIERCE, CHECK PHC 69-3-H2-10, SHEET 1, FILED IN VOLUME 20, PAGE 472. BEING THE SAME FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED FROM MARY ELLEN GERVAIS, WIDOW TO MARY ELLEN RIVERS and MARY ELLEN GERVAIS JOINT TENANTS, DATED 05/17/2001 RECORDED ON 05/23/2001 IN BOOK 135, PAGE 195 IN FRNAKLIN COUNTY RECORDS, STATE OF VT. Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description. Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described. TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within thirty (30) days after the date of sale.

The mortgagor is entitled that certain mortgage to redeem the premises at given by Jonathan W. 4/17/17 FSBO-Macdonald050416.indd 10:38Kingston AM any time prior to the sale and Monique 1 by paying the full amount L. Kingston to Mortgage due under the mortgage, Electronic Registration including the costs and Systems, Inc., as nominee expenses of the sale. for PHH Mortgage Corp. Other terms to be an(fka Cendant Mortgage nounced at the sale. Corp) dated March 25, 2005 and recorded in DATED: April 6, 2017 Book 192 Page 101 of the By: /s/ Rachel K. Jones land records of the City Rachel K. Jones, Esq. of St. Albans, of which Bendett and McHugh, PC mortgage the Plaintiff 270 Farmington Ave., is the present holder, by Ste. 151 virtue of the following Farmington, CT 06032 Assignments of Mortgage: (1) Assignment of NOTICE: THE LAW FIRM Mortgage from Mortgage OF BENDETT & MCHUGH, Electronic Registration PC IS A DEBT COLLECTOR Systems, Inc., as nominee AND IS ATTEMPTING for PHH Mortgage Corp TO COLLECT A DEBT. (fka Cendant Mortgage ANY INFORMATION WE Corp) to CitiMortgage, OBTAIN WILL BE USED Inc., dated February 28, FOR THAT PURPOSE. IF 2014 and recorded in YOU HAVE PREVIOUSLY Book 265 Page 650; (2) RECEIVED A DISCHARGE Assignment of Mortgage IN BANKRUPTCY WHICH from CitiMortgage, Inc., DISCHARGED THIS DEBT, to Green Tree Servicing, THIS CORRESPONDENCE LLC, dated April 22, 2014 IS NOT AND SHOULD and recorded in Book NOT BE CONSTRUED TO 265 Page 1057; and (3) BE AN ATTEMPT TO COLAssignment of Mortgage LECT A DEBT, BUT ONLY from Ditech Financial, LLC, ENFORCEMENT OF A LIEN Successor by Merger to AGAINST PROPERTY Green Tree Servicing, LLC to Wilmington Savings Fund Society, FSB, DBA STATE OF VERMONT Christiana Trust, not indiFRANKLIN UNIT, CIVIL vidually but as Trustee for DIVISION Pretium Mortgage AcquiVERMONT SUPERIOR sition Trust, dated August COURT 4, 2016 and recorded at DOCKET NO: 398-10Book 274 Page 226, all 14 FRCV of the land records of WILMINGTON SAVINGS the City of St. Albans, for FUND SOCIETY, FSB, D/B/A breach of the conditions CHRISTIANA TRUST, NOT of said mortgage and for INDIVIDUALLY BUT AS the purpose of foreclosing TRUSTEE FOR PRETIUM the same will be sold MORTGAGE ACQUISITION at Public Auction at 18 TRUST Walnut Street, St. Albans, v. Vermont on May 10, 2017 JONATHAN W. KINGSTON, at 11:30 AM all and singuMONIQUE L. KINGSTON, lar the premises described BROWN, CAHILL, GAWNE in said mortgage, & MILLER, P.C. AND CITIBANK (SOUTH DAKOTA), To wit: N.A. A PARCEL OF LAND LOOCCUPANTS OF 18 CATED IN SAINT ALBANS, WALNUT STREET, ST. COUNTY OF FRANKLIN, ALBANS, VT STATE OF VERMONT WITH A STREET LOCATION MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF ADDRESS OF 18 WALNUT FORECLOSURE SALE OF STREET, SAINT ALBANS, REAL PROPERTY UNDER VT, 05478 CURRENTLY 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. OWNED BY JONATHAN W. KINGSTON AND MONIQUE In accordance with the L. KINGSTON HAVING Judgment Order and A TAX IDENTIFICATION Decree of Foreclosure NUMBER OF 22088018, entered February 16, 2017 AND MORE FULLY in the above captioned ac- DESCRIBED IN THE VESTtion brought to foreclose

ING DOCUMENT DATED 11/01/02, RECORDED ON 11/04/02, IN LIBER 153, PAGE 165 AND DESIGNATED AS METES AND BOUNDS PROPERTY. Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description. Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described. TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within thirty (30) days after the date of sale. The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale. DATED: April 5, 2017 By: /s/ Rachel K. Jones Rachel Jones, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032 NOTICE: THE LAW FIRM OF BENDETT & MCHUGH, PC IS A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. IF YOU HAVE PREVIOUSLY RECEIVED A DISCHARGE IN BANKRUPTCY WHICH DISCHARGED THIS DEBT, THIS CORRESPONDENCE IS NOT AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSTRUED TO BE AN ATTEMPT TO COL-

Road, Newport, Vermont on May 5, 2017 at 10:00 AM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage,

To wit: A parcel of land together with buildings and improvements thereon located at 123 Lake Road and being all and the same lands and premises conveyed in a Warranty Deed from Anthony C. Tanguay to Joseph Cornelius and Kimberly Cornelius dated April 23, 2004 and recorded in Book 161 at Pages 469-470 of the City of Newport LECT A DEBT, BUT ONLY Land Records. ENFORCEMENT OF A LIEN 6/13/16 11:34 AM AGAINST PROPERTY Being all and the same lands and premises STATE OF VERMONT together with the buildORLEANS UNIT, CIVIL ings and improvements DIVISION thereon as were conveyed VERMONT SUPERIOR to Christian Cornelius COURT by Joseph Cornelius DOCKET NO: 71-3-12 and Kimberly CorneOSCV lius by Warranty Deed JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, dated June 5, 2007 and recorded in Book 185 at NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Page 397 of the City of v. Newport Land Records. CHRISTIAN CORNELIUS AND MARY DAMIANIReference is hereby made CORNELIUS to the above instruments OCCUPANTS OF: 123 Lake and to the records and Road, Newport, VT references contained therein in further aid of MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF this description. FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER Terms of sale: Said 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. premises will be sold and conveyed subject to In accordance with the all liens, encumbrances, Judgment Order and unpaid taxes, tax titles, Decree of Foreclosure municipal liens and asentered August 3, 2016 in sessments, if any, which the above captioned actake precedence over tion brought to foreclose the said mortgage above that certain mortgage described. given by Christian Cornelius and Mary DamianiTEN THOUSAND Cornelius to Mortgage ($10,000.00) Dollars of Electronic Registration the purchase price must Systems, Inc. solely as be paid by a certified nominee for MetLife check, bank treasurer’s or Home Loans, a division of cashier’s check at the time MetLife Bank, N.A., dated April 8, 2009 and recorded and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balin Book 197 Page 34 of ance of the purchase price the land records of the shall be paid by a certified City of Newport, of which check, bank treasurer’s mortgage the Plaintiff or cashier’s check within is the present holder, by thirty (30) days after the virtue of the following date of sale. Assignments of Mortgage: (1) Assignment of The mortgagor is entitled Mortgage from Mortgage to redeem the premises at Electronic Registration any time prior to the sale Systems, Inc. solely as by paying the full amount nominee for MetLife due under the mortgage, Home Loans, a division including the costs and of MetLife Bank, N.A. to expenses of the sale. MetLife Home Loans, a Other terms to be anDivision of MetLife Bank, nounced at the sale. N.A. dated November 2, 2011 and recorded in Book 211 Page 267 and (2) DATED: 3/13/2017 Assignment of Mortgage from MetLife Home Loans, By: /S/Bozena Wysocki, a Division of MetLife Bank, Esq. Bozena Wysocki, Esq. N.A. to JPMorgan Chase Bendett and McHugh, PC Bank, N.A. dated January 270 Farmington Ave., 24, 2013 and recorded Ste. 151 in Book 197 Page 42A-B, Farmington, CT 06032 both of the land records of the City of Newport, for breach of the conditions STATE OF VERMONT of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing ORLEANS UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION the same will be sold at Public Auction at 123 Lake VERMONT SUPERIOR

COURT DOCKET NO: 79-4-16 OSCV FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION v. LINDA M. BRADY AND MICHAEL J. BRADY OCCUPANTS OF 327 VT ROUTE 105, JAY, VT MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered October 31, 2016 in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Linda M. Brady and Michael J. Brady to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, dated June 12, 2012 and recorded in Book 67 Page 83 of the land records of the Town of Jay, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of an Assignment of Mortgage from JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association to Federal National Mortgage Association dated October 17, 2016 and recorded October 31, 2016 in Book 72 Page 316 of the land records of the Town of Jay, for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 327 VT Route 105, Jay, Vermont on April 26, 2017 at 11:00 AM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To wit: A CERTAIN PIECE OF LAND IN THE TOWN OF JAY, IN THE COUNTY OF ORLEANS AND STATE OF VERMONT, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, VIZ: BEING A PORTION OF THE SAME LANDS AND PREMISES AS WERE CONVEYED TO CREATIVE CHOICES, INC. BY ALAN L. BONNEAU BY WARRANTY DEED DATED DECEMBER 31, 1986 AND RECORDED IN BOOK 26 AT PAGES 118-120 OF THE TOWN OF JAY LAND RECORDS. SAID PORTION BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED THEREIN AS FOLLOWS: “LOT NO. 2: BEGINNING AT A SURVEYOR’S BAR SET IN THE SOUTHERLY EDGE OF THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF VERMONT ROUTE 105 AT THE NORTHWESTERLY CORNER OF THE AFORESAID LOT NO. 3; THENCE RUNNING SOUTH 03 DEGREES 43 MINUTES WEST ALONG THE BLAZED TREE LINE WHICH MARKS THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF THE AFORESAID LOT NO. 3 A DISTANCE OF 750.8


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DRAWN AND PREPARED BY NORBERT BLAIS FOR ALAN L. BONNEAU DATED DECEMBER 2, 1985 AND BEARING MAP NO, 262-85. REFERENCE IS HERE MADE TO THE ABOVE MENTIONED DEEDS AND THEIR RECORDS AND TO ALL PRIOR DEEDS AND THE RECORDS THEREOF FOR A FURTHER DESCRIPTION OF THE LANDS AND PREMISES HEREIN CONVEYED.

shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within thirty (30) days after the date of sale.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale.

BEING THE SAME PREMISES AS CONVEYED IN DEED FROM CREATIVE CHOICES, INC., A MARYLAND CORPORATION RECORDED 06/08/1989, BOOK 29, PAGE 352 IN SAID COUNTY AND STATE.

DATED : March 27, 2017

I have been appointed to administer this estate. All creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the first publication of this notice. The claim must be presented to me at the address listed below with a copy sent to the court. The claim may be barred forever if it is not presented within the four (4) month period.

COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 327 VT ROUTE 105, JAY, VT

NOTICE: THE LAW FIRM OF BENDETT & MCHUGH, PC IS A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. IF YOU HAVE PREVIOUSLY RECEIVED A DISCHARGE IN BANKRUPTCY WHICH DISCHARGED THIS DEBT, THIS CORRESPONDENCE IS NOT AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSTRUED TO BE AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT, BUT ONLY ENFORCEMENT OF A LIEN AGAINST PROPERTY

Lynne Durbin Executor/Administrator: 105 Continental Drive Flat Rock, NC 28731 (561)254-0153 Name of publication Seven Days Publication Dates: 4/19/2017 Name and Address of Court: Vermont Superior Court, Chittenden Unit, Probate Division P.O. Box 511 Burlington, VT 05402 STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT CHITTENDEN UNIT PROBATE DIVISION DOCKET NO. 4-1-17CNPR In re estate of Norita Marie Brenneman.

Open 24/7/365. Post & browse ads at your convenience. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To the creditors of late of MaryRose B. Kern late of Burlington, VT. I have been appointed to administer this estate. All creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the first publication of this notice. The claim must be presented to me at the address listed below with a copy sent to the court. The claim may be barred forever if it is not presented within the four (4) month period. Date: 4/4/17 /s/ Sandra K. Colbourne Signature of Fiduciary

Scott Brenneman Executor/Administrator: 40 Hilltop Drive Mount Vernon, OH 43050

Sandra K. Colbourne Executor/Administrator: 6 Lindenwood Dr. Jericho, VT 05465

Name of publication Seven Days

Name of publication Seven Days

Publication Dates: 4/19/2017

Publication Dates: 4/12/17 & 4/19/2017

Name and Address of Court: Chittenden Superior Court Probate Division PO Box 511 Burlington, VT 05402

Name and Address of Court: Chittenden County Probate Court PO Box 511 Burlington, VT 05402

STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT CHITTENDEN UNIT PROBATE DIVISION DOCKET NO. 419-3-17CNPR In re estate of MaryRose B. Kern.

STORAGE AUCTION Booska Movers, Inc will be holding a public storage auction on May 12, 2017 from 9:00 am to 10:00am. of the good storage under the names of Brian Coppom of Hogansburg, NY and Colleen Ryan of Burlington, VT.

FROM P.C-4

VERMONT NATURAL RESOURCES BOARD NOTICE OF ACT 250 JURISDICTIONAL OPINION On April 4, 2017, the District #4 Coordinator issued Act 250 Jurisdictional Opinion #JO 4‑254 (final) pursuant to 10 V.S.A. 6007(c) and Act 250 Rule 3(C), in response to a request made in a letter dated February 27, 2017 from David White. The Jurisdictional Opinion states that an Act 250 permit is not required for the reconstruction of the Burlington Plaza located on Route 7 (Shelburne Road) in the City of South Burlington. Copies of this jurisdictional opinion have been served on all persons specified in 10 V.S.A. 6007(c) and Act 250 Rule 3(C). A copy of the jurisdictional opinion may be obtained by contacting the District Coordinator at the address/telephone number below. Reconsideration requests are governed by Act 250 Rule 3(C)(2) and should be directed to the District Coordinator at the address listed below. Any appeal of this decision must be filed with the Superior Court, Environmental Division

Dated at Essex Junction, Vermont this 4th day of April, 2017. /s/ Peter E. Keibel, District Coordinator District #4 Commission 111 West Street Essex Junction, VT 05452 802-879-5658 Peter.keibel@vermont.gov WARNING POLICY ADOPTION CHAMPLAIN VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT The Board of School Directors gives public notice of its intent to adopt local district policies dealing with the following at its regular meeting scheduled May 2, 2017: F20 – Participation of Home Study Students F21 – Field Trips/Elective Trips F22 – Eligibility for Kindergarten F23 – Student Placement/ Assignments F24 – Grade Advancement: Retention, Promotion & Acceleration of Students F25 – Student Attendance/ Truancy F26 – Restrictive Behavioral Intervention F27 – Use of Imaging and Recording Devices in School F28 – Protection of Pupil Privacy Rights F29 – Tuition for Admitted Students F30 – Admission of Students F31 – Intradistrict School Choice Program for Elementary & Middle Schools F32 – Wellness Policy F33 – Non-School Sponsored Student Activities F34 – Policy on the Prevention of Harassment, Hazing and Bullying of Students Copies of the above policies may be obtained for public review at the Office of the Human Resources Dept. in Shelburne, VT.

SUPPORT GROUPS »

CLASSIFIEDS C-7

THE CONTENTS OF STORAGE UNIT 01-04171 LOCATED AT 28 ADAMS DR. OR 48 INDUSTRIAL DR., WILLISTON, VT 05495, WILL BE SOLD ON MAY 4TH, 2017 TO

THE CONTENTS OF STORAGE UNIT 0200118 LOCATED AT 28 ADAMS DR. OR 48 INDUSTRIAL DR., WILLISTON, VT 05495, WILL BE SOLD ON MAY 4TH, 2017 TO SATISFY THE DEBT OF JEFFREY TROTTIER. Any person claiming a right to the goods may pay the amount claimed due and reasonable expenses before the sale, in which case the sale may not occur.

(32 Cherry Street, 2nd Floor, Ste. 303, Burlington, VT 05401) within 30 days of the date the decision was issued, pursuant to 10 V.S.A. Chapter 220. The Notice of Appeal must comply with the Vermont Rules for Environmental Court Proceedings (VRECP). The appellant must file with the Notice of Appeal the entry fee required by 32 V.S.A. § 1431 and the 5% surcharge required by 32 V.S.A. § 1434a(a), which is $262.50. The appellant also must serve a copy of the Notice of Appeal on the Natural Resources Board, National Life Records Center Building, Montpelier, VT 056203201, and on other parties in accordance with Rule 5(b)(4)(B) of the Vermont Rules for Environmental Court Proceedings.

SEVEN DAYS

THE CONTENTS OF STORAGE UNIT 0103515 LOCATED AT 28 ADAMS DR. OR 48 INDUSTRIAL DR., WILLISTON, VT 05495, WILL BE SOLD ON MAY 4TH, 2017 TO SATISFY THE DEBT OF PAULINE ANDERSON. Any person claiming a right to the goods may pay the amount claimed due and reasonable expenses before the sale, in which case the sale may not occur.

THE CONTENTS OF STORAGE UNIT 0104447 LOCATED AT 28 ADAMS DR. OR 48 INDUSTRIAL DR., WILLISTON, VT 05495, WILL BE SOLD ON MAY 4TH, 2017 TO SATISFY THE DEBT OF STEPHANIE BILODEAU. Any person claiming a right to the goods may pay the amount claimed due and reasonable expenses before the sale, in which case the sale may not occur.

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FROM P.C-5

Anyone wishing to participate in the auction would attendant the auction located at Booska Movers 180 Flynn Ave Burlington, VT 05401 by 9:00 a.m.

SATISFY THE DEBT OF CAITLIN GREGORY. Any person claiming a right to the goods may pay the amount claimed due and reasonable expenses before the sale, in which case the sale may not occur.

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

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PUZZLE ANSWERS

STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT CHITTENDEN UNIT PROBATE DIVISION DOCKET NO. 1800-12-16CNPR In re estate of Jonathan Seth Diamond.

I have been appointed to administer this estate. All creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the first publication of this notice. The claim must be presented to me at the address listed below with a copy sent to the court. The claim may be barred forever if it is not presented within the four (4) month period. Date: April 11, 2017 /s/ Scott C Brenneman Signature of Fiduciary

Signature of Fiduciary

2

TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price

Date: 4/8/2017 /s/ Lynne Durbin

1

Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described.

By: /s/ Rachel K. Jones Rachel K. Jones, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032

To the creditors of late of Norita Marie Brenneman late of Essex, VT.

4

Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description.

Other terms to be announced at the sale.

To the creditors of Jonathan Seth Diamond late of Essex Junction, VT.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

5

FEET TO A SURVEYOR’S BAR; THENCE SOUTH 08 DEGREES 43 MINUTES WEST A DISTANCE OF 11 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE NORTHERLY EDGE OF THE JAY BRANCH RIVER; THENCE TURNING AND RUNNING IN A GENERAL NORTHWESTERLY DIRECTION ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF THE JAY BRANCH RIVER A DISTANCE OF 1,776 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT AT THE SOUTHEASTERLY CORNER OF LOT NO, 1 AS SHOWN ON SAID SURVEY; THENCE TURNING AND RUNNING NORTH 14 DEGREES 07 MINUTES EAST A DISTANCE OF 12 FEET TO A SURVEYOR’S BAR; THENCE NORTH 14 DEGREES 07 MINUTES EAST A DISTANCE OF 227,5 FEET TO A SURVEYOR’S BAR LOCATED AT THE SOUTHEASTERLY CORNER OF THE JUDITH PEPPER LOT; THENCE NORTH 114 FEET DEGREES 29 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF THE PEPPER LOT A DISTANCE OF 197.8 FEET TO A CEMENT HIGHWAY MARKER LOCATED IN THE SOUTHERLY EDGE OF SAID PUBLIC RIGHT-OF-WAY; THENCE TURNING AND RUNNING IN A GENERAL EASTERLY DIRECTION ALONG THE EDGE OF SAID PUBLIC RIGHT-OF-WAY A DISTANCE OF 1,067.9 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF SAID LOT NO. 2, SAID LOT CONTAINS 10.74 ACRES.” THE ABOVE DESCRIBED LANDS AD PREMISES BEING DEPICTED AS LOT NO. 2 ON A SURVEY

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS


support groups AHOY BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS Join our floating support group where the focus is on living, not on the disease. We are a team of dragon boaters. Learn all about this paddle sport & its health-giving, life-affirming qualities. Any age. No athletic experience needed. Call Penni or Linda at 999-5478, info@ dragonheartvermont. org, dragonheartvermont.org. AL-ANON For families & friends of alcoholics. For meeting info, go to vermontalanonalateen.org or call 866-972-5266. ALATEEN GROUP New Alateen group in Burlington on Sundays from 5-6 p.m. at the UU building at the top of Church St. For more information please call Carol, 324-4457.

C-8 CLASSIFIEDS

SEVEN DAYS

04.19.17-04.26.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Daily meetings in various locations. Free. Info, 864-1212. Want to overcome a drinking problem? Take the first step of 12 & join a group in your area. ALL CANCER SURVIVORS Join the wellness classes at Survivorship NOW, created by cancer survivors for survivors of all cancers. Benefi ts from lively programs designed to engage and empower cancer survivors in our community. Email: info@ survivorshipnowvt.org. Call Chantal, 777-1126, survivorshipnowvt.org. ALTERNATIVES TO SUICIDE Alternatives to Suicide is a safe space where the subject of suicide can be discussed freely, without judgment or stigma. The group is facilitated by individuals who have themselves experienced suicidal thoughts/ feelings. Fletcher Free Library, 235 College St., Burlington. Group meets weekly on Thursdays, 1-2:30 p.m. Info: makenzy@ pathwaysvermont.org, 888-492-8218 x300.

ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION SUPPORT GROUP This caregivers support group meets on the 3rd Wed. of every mo. from 5-6:30 p.m. at the Alzheimer’s Association Main Office, 300 Cornerstone Dr., Suite 128, Williston. Support groups meet to provide assistance and information on Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. They emphasize shared experiences, emotional support, and coping techniques in care for a person living with Alzheimer’s or a related dementia. Meetings are free and open to the public. Families, caregivers, and friends may attend. Please call in advance to confirm date and time. For questions or additional support group listings, call 800-272-3900. ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION TELEPHONE SUPPORT GROUP 1st Monday monthly, 3-4:30 p.m. Pre-registration is required (to receive dial-in codes for toll-free call). Please dial the Alzheimer’s Association’s 24/7 Helpline 800-272-3900 for more information. ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE & DEMENTIA SUPPORT GROUP Held the last Tue. of every mo., 5:30-7:30 p.m., at Birchwood Terr., Burlington. Info, Kim, 863-6384. ARE YOU HAVING PROBLEMS W/ DEBT? Do you spend more than you earn? Get help at Debtor’s Anonymous plus Business Debtor’s Anonymous. Sat., 10-11:30 a.m., Methodist Church at Buell & S. Winooski, Burlington. Contact Brenda, 338-1170. BABY BUMPS SUPPORT GROUP FOR MOTHERS AND PREGNANT WOMEN Pregnancy can be a wonderful time of your life. But, it can also be a time of stress that is often compounded by hormonal swings. If you are a pregnant woman, or have recently given birth and feel you need some help with managing emotional bumps in the road that can come with motherhood, please come to this free support group lead by an experienced pediatric Registered Nurse. Held on the 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of the month, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at the Birthing Center, Northwestern Medical

Center, St. Albans. Info: Rhonda Desrochers, Franklin County Home Health Agency, 527-7531. BEREAVEMENT/GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP Meets every other Mon. night, 6-7:30 p.m., & every other Wed., 10-11:30 a.m., in the Conference Center at Central Vermont Home Health & Hospice in Berlin. The group is open to anyone who has experienced the death of a loved one. There is no fee. Info, Ginny Fry or Jean Semprebon, 223-1878. BRAIN INJURY SUPPORT GROUP IN ST. JOHNSBURY Monthly meetings will be held on the 3rd Wed. of every mo., 1-2:30 p.m., at the Grace United Methodist Church, 36 Central St., St. Johnsbury. The support group will offer valuable resources & info about brain injury. It will be a place to share experiences in a safe, secure & confidential environment. Info, Tom Younkman, tyounkman@vcil.org, 800-639-1522. BRAIN INJURY ASSOCIATION OF VERMONT Montpelier daytime support group meets the 3rd Thu. of the mo. at the Unitarian Church ramp entrance, 1:302:30 p.m. St. Johnsbury support group meets the 3rd Wed. montly at the Grace United Methodist Church, 36 Central St., 1:00-2:30 p.m.  Colchester  Evening support group meets the 1st Wed. monthly at the Fanny Allen Hospital in the Board Room Conference Room, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Brattleboro meets at Brooks Memorial Library on the 1st Thu. monthly from 1:15-3:15 p.m. and the 3rd Mon. montly from 4:15-6:15 p.m. White River Jct. meets the 2nd Fri. montly at Bugbee Sr. Ctr. from 3-4:30 p.m. Call our helpline at 877-856-1772. BURLINGTON AREA PARKINSON’S DISEASE OUTREACH GROUP People with Parkinson’s disease & their caregivers gather together to gain support & learn about living with Parkinson’s disease. Group meets 2nd Wed. of every mo., 1-2 p.m., continuing through Nov. 18, 2015. Shelburne Bay Senior Living Community, 185 Pine Haven Shores Rd., Shelburne. Info: 888-763-3366,

parkinsoninfo@ uvmhealth.org, parkinsonsvt.org. BURLINGTON – STEPS TO END DOMESTIC VIOLENCE Offering a weekly drop-in support group for female identified survivors of intimate partner violence. We offer a safe, confidential place for survivors to connect with others, to heal, and to recover. Call us at 802-658-1996. CELEBRATE RECOVERY Overcome any hurt, habit or hangup in your life! This confidential 12-Step recovery program puts faith in Jesus Christ at the heart of healing. We offer multiple support groups for both men & women, such as chemical dependency, codependency, sexual addiction & pornography, food issues, & overcoming abuse. All 18+ are welcome; sorry, no childcare. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.; we begin at 7 p.m. Essex Alliance Church, 37 Old Stage Rd., Essex. Info: recovery@essexalliance.org, 878-8213. CELEBRATE RECOVERY Celebrate Recovery meetings are for anyone with struggles with hurt, habits and hang ups, which includes everyone in some way. We welcome everyone at Cornerstone Church in Milton which meets every Friday night at 7-9 p.m. We’d love to have you join us and discover how your life can start to change. Info: 893-0530, Julie@ mccartycreations.com. CELIAC & GLUTENFREE GROUP Every 2nd Wed., 4:30-6 p.m. at Tulsi Tea Room, 34 Elm St., Montpelier. Free & open to the public! To learn more, contact Lisa at 598-9206 or lisamase@ gmail.com. CEREBRAL PALSY GUIDANCE Cerebral Palsy Guidance is a very comprehensive informational website broadly covering the topic of cerebral palsy and associated medical conditions. It’s mission it to provide the best possible information to parents of children living with the complex condition of cerebral palsy. cerebralpalsyguidance.com/ cerebral-palsy/ CODEPENDENTS ANONYMOUS CoDA is a 12-step fellowship for people whose common purpose is to develop healthy

& fulfilling relationships. By actively working the program of Codependents Anonymous, we can realize a new joy, acceptance & serenity in our lives. Meets Sunday at noon at the Turning Point Center, 191 Bank Street, Burlington. Tom, 238-3587, coda.org. COMING OFF PSYCHIATRIC MEDICATION MUTUAL SUPPORT GROUP Through sharing experiences and resources, this group will provide support to individuals interested in coming off psychiatric medications, those in the process of psychiatric medication withdrawal or anyone looking for a space to explore their choices around psychiatric medication use. The group is also open to those supporting an individual in psychiatric medication withdrawal. 12-1:30 p.m. every Tuesday. Pathways Vermont, 125 College St., 2nd floor, Burlington. Contact: Cameron Mack cameron@ pathwaysvermont.org or 888 492 8218 x 404. DECLUTTERERS’ SUPPORT GROUP Are you ready to make improvements but find it overwhelming? Maybe two or three of us can get together to help each other simplify. 989-3234, 425-3612. DISCOVER THE POWER OF CHOICE! SMART Recovery welcomes anyone, including family and friends, affected by any kind of substance or activity addiction. It is a science-based program that encourages abstinence. Specially trained volunteer facilitators provide leadership. Sundays at 5 p.m. at the 1st Unitarian Universalist Society, 152 Pearl St., Burlington. Volunteer facilitator: Bert, 399-8754. You can learn more at smartrecovery. org. DOMESTIC & SEXUAL VIOLENCE WomenSafe offers free, confidential support groups in Middlebury for women who have experienced domestic or sexual violence. Art For Healing.  Six-week support group for people who have experienced domestic or sexual violence. Childcare provided. Please call our hotline, 388-4205, or email am@womensafe.net for more information.

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SUPPORT Steps to End Domestic Violence offers a weekly drop-in support group for female identified survivors of intimate partner violence, including individuals who are experiencing or have been affected by domestic violence. The support group offers a safe, confidential place for survivors to connect with others, to heal, and to recover. In support group, participants talk through their experiences and hear stories from others who have experienced abuse in their relationships. Support group is also a resource for those who are unsure of their next step, even if it involves remaining in their current relationship. Tuesdays, 6:30-8 p.m. Childcare is provided. Info: 658-1996. FAMILIES, PARTNERS, FRIENDS AND ALLIES OF TRANSGENDER ADULTS We are people with adult loved ones who are transgender or gender-nonconforming. We meet to support each other and to learn more about issues and concerns. Our sessions are supportive, informal, and confidential. Meetings are held at 5:30 PM, the second Thursday of each month at Pride Center of VT, 255 South Champlain St., Suite 12, in Burlington. Not sure if you’re ready for a meeting? We also offer one-on-one support. For more information, email rex@ pridecentervt.org or call 845-705-5816. FAMILY AND FRIENDS OF THOSE EXPERIENCING MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS This support group is a dedicated meeting for family, friends and community members who are supporting a loved one through a mental health crisis. Mental health crisis might include extreme states, psychosis, depression, anxiety and other types of distress. The group is a confidential space where family and friends can discuss shared experiences and receive support in an environment free of judgment and stigma with a trained facilitator. Weekly on Wednesdays, 7-8:30 p.m. Downtown Burlington. Info: Jess Horner, LICSW, 866-218-8586.

FCA FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP Families coping with addiction (FCA) is an open community peer support group for adults 18 & over struggling with the drug or alcohol addiction of a loved one. FCA is not 12-step based but provides a forum for those living this experience to develop personal coping skills & draw strength from one another. Weekly on Wed., 5:30-6:30 p.m. Turning Point Center, corner of Bank St., Burlington. (Across from parking garage, above bookstore). thdaub1@gmail.com. G.R.A.S.P. (GRIEF RECOVERY AFTER A SUBSTANCE PASSING) Are you a family member who has lost a loved one to addiction? Find support, peer-led support group. Meets once a month on Mondays in Burlington. Please call for date and location. RSVP graspvt@gmail.com or call 310-3301. G.Y.S.T. (GET YOUR STUFF TOGETHER) GYST creates a safe & empowering community for young men & youth in transition to come together with one commonality: learning to live life on life’s terms. Every Tue. & Thu., 4 p.m. G.Y.S.T. PYNK (for young women) meets weekly on Wed., 4 p.m. Location: North Central Vermont Recovery Center, 275 Brooklyn St., Morrisville. Info: Lisa, 851-8120. GRIEF & RECOVERY SUPPORT GROUP 1st & 3rd Wed. of every mo., 7-8 p.m., Franklin County Home Health Agency (FCHHA), 3 Home Health Cir., St. Albans. 527-7531. HEARING VOICES GROUP This Hearing Voices Group seeks to find understanding of voice hearing experiences as real lived experiences which may happen to anyone at anytime.  We choose to share experiences, support, and empathy.  We validate anyone’s experience and stories about their experience as their own, as being an honest and accurate representation of their experience, and as being acceptable exactly as they are. Weekly on Tuesday, 2-3 p.m. Pathways Vermont Community Center, 279 North Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 802-777-8602, abby@ pathwaysvermont.org.

HEARTBEAT VERMONT Have you lost a friend, colleague or loved one by suicide? Some who call have experienced a recent loss and some are still struggling w/ a loss from long ago. Call us at 446-3577 to meet with our clinician, Jonathan Gilmore, at Maple Leaf Clinic, 167 North Main St. All are welcome. INTERSTITIAL CYSTITIS SUPPORT GROUP Interstitial cystitis (IC) is recurring pelvic pain, pressure or discomfort in the bladder & pelvic region & urinary frequency/urgency. This is often misdiagnosed & mistreated as a chronic bladder infection. If you have been diagnosed or have these symptoms, you are not alone. We are building a Vermontbased support group & welcome you to email bladderpainvt@gmail. com or call 899-4151 for more information. KINDRED CONNECTIONS PROGRAM OFFERED FOR CHITTENDEN COUNTY CANCER SURVIVORS The Kindred Connections program provides peer support for all those touched by cancer. Cancer patients as well as caregivers are provided with a mentor who has been through the cancer experience & knows what it’s like to go through it. In addition to sensitive listening, Kindred Connections provides practical help such as rides to doctors’ offices & meal deliveries. The program has people who have experienced a wide variety of cancers. For further info, please contact sherry.rhynard@ gmail.com. LGBTQ SURVIVORS OF VIOLENCE SafeSpace offers peer-led support groups for survivors of relationship, dating, emotional &/or hate violence. These groups give survivors a safe & supportive environment to tell their stories, share information, & offer & receive support. Support groups also provide survivors an opportunity to gain information on how to better cope with feelings & experiences that surface because of the trauma they have experienced. Please call SafeSpace 863-0003 if you are interested in joining.


C-9 04.19.17-04.26.17

ATTENTION RECRUITERS: POST YOUR JOBS AT: PRINT DEADLINE: FOR RATES & INFO:

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTMYJOB NOON ON MONDAYS (INCLUDING HOLIDAYS) MICHELLE BROWN, 802-865-1020 X21, MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

YOUR TRUSTED LOCAL SOURCE. SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR VSAVT.ORG

VSA VERMONT SEEKS A LEADER ENERGIZED BY JOYFUL, INCLUSIVE ARTS. APPLY BY MAY 12.

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4/17/17

Sales Professional

PayData Workforce Solutions is looking for an additional team member to join ourPayData Client Service Department a Payroll Workforce Solutionsas is seeking anProcessor/Client ambitious sales Service Representative. professional who is a goal driven, detail oriented, and a

career minded self-starter. We are offering an outstanding

long-term where you are a key member ourclients team. to produce Our Client Servicecareer Representatives work closely withofour accurate payrolls utilizing various import methods including data entry, Use your proven prospecting and networking skills to drive Excel worksheets, and time clock imports. The ability to perform your success and contribute to PayData’s continued growth multiple 3:27 PM tasks efficiently and manage is necessary. Attention to as the region’s premierongoing providerprojects of outsourced payroll and detail isHR a must. services.

Harness our CRMprior and payroll other technology to manage Candidates must have experiencetools as well as customer service your pipeline, log activities, develop relationships, prepare skills. experience and possess strong communication and organizational proposals, sales, and launch new accounts. Candidates shouldgenerate also have proven troubleshooting skills and be able to A new college andtechnology. at least 2 years of Client successful B2B anddegree changing Our Service Wellness Family Practice in adapt toprospecting experience is environment preferred. Familiarity withoffice Payroll, Representatives work in a team and cubicle setting. Colchester, VT, is seeking an HRIS Applications, and Accounting would be beneficial. experienced MA, LPN, RN Outside travel atolarge our regional as well as toas well as having handling volume territory of telephone calls, or LNA to work Mon-Fri Experience Chamberskills events, tradepayroll shows,experience and networking functions or prior is required; working (30 – 40 hrs/wk). Looking strong number is important facets of this position, requiring reliable Experience with for an energetic, detail knowledge of the “Evolution” payroll software is desirable. transportation. oriented team player who Windows including Word, Excel, and Outlook is required as well as strong can work independently in keyboarding skills. Compensation includes Salary plus Commission, a busy office. EMR, EKG, and PayData’s benefit plan. IM & phlebotomy skills Apply on line at https://paydatapayroll.companycareersite.com/JobList.aspx Preference will be given to candidates who effectively are required. Experience in demonstrate that they possess the skills and attributes scribing and IVs is a plus.

Clinical Assistant

WATER SYSTEM TECHNICIAN The Village of Essex Junction is seeking a full time Water System Technician in the Public Works Department. 40 hours a week plus overtime. Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) required. Job application and job description at essexjunction.org/departments/employment and the Village office, 802-878-6944. Submit application to the Village of Essex Junction, 2 Lincoln St., Essex Jct., VT 05452 or admin@essexjunction.org. Position open until filled. EOE.

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listed below, and whose work history illustrates the related sales experiences we seek.

Please email cover letter with resume and 3 professional references to preventivemedicinevt @gmail.com.

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4/17/17 3:33 PM

Organizational Skills Required • Sales Territory Development & Sustaining Sales Strategies • Facility for Managing Multiple Tasks • Time Management • Prospect & Account Administration

QA Manager

Personal Attributes for Success • Energetic, Self-Motivated, Attention to Detail, & Disciplined Work Ethic • Driven to Reach and Exceed Assigned Goals • Confident, Persistent, and Constantly Learning and Developing • Possess an Understanding of Business Needs • Effective Communicator – Verbal and Written • Professional Appearance

Lead and manage Lake Champlain Chocolates' quality and food safety program. In this role, you will serve as the SQF practitioner accountable for developing, executing, and maintaining GFSI certification for our manufacturing and chocolate handling facility. Develop and maintain quality assurance objectives in alignment with Regulatory, HACCP, and company policies and goals for all food handling processes. Qualified candidates will have strong technical and regulatory knowledge, demonstrated success in supervising/leading teams, and exceptional communication skills. Bachelor's Degree in Food Science, Biology, Chemistry or equivalent combination of education & experience. Must have at least 5 years of leadership and regulatory experience within a food manufacturing facility.

If you have enthusiasm, a drive to succeed, and above all, enjoy selling, then a career with PayData Workforce Solutions might be the right fit for you.

P lease visit our website for additional job details: https://www.lakechamplainchocolates.com/about-us/employment

Apply on line at paydatapayroll.companycareersite.com/JobList.aspx

Lake Champlain Chocolates is an equal opportunity employer.

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Prospecting & Sales Skills Required • Telephone Prospecting & Cold Calling Strategies • Product Service & Software Demonstration • Referral Relationship Building and Network Development • Ability to Generate Opportunities & Close Sales • Committed to Using & Leveraging CRM Tools

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3/20/17 5:44 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

04.19.17-04.26.17

MASTER ELECTRICIAN

The Arbors has immediate openings for full time Housekeepers. Individuals will be responsible for cleaning resident’s rooms, common areas and laundry.

The plant master electrician will be responsible for all electrical maintenance for our 200,000 sqft manufacturing facility in Colchester. • • • •

Westview Meadows: Residential Care Home (16 Residents)

Seeking a qualified person for a:

Competitive salary Benefits package Tuition reimbursement Bonus opportunities Team focused workplace

REQUIREMENTS Master Electrician License. At least 5 years of related work experience, preferably in manufacturing. Able to work from electrical schematics, sketches, prints, and verbal instructions. Have a complete set of tools.

Residential Care Director (RN) 32 hrs/week

We offer competitive pay, benefits and opportunity to spend time with our best benefit of all ~ our residents! For Consideration please forward a resume to:

HOUSEKEEPER

Westview Meadows 171 Westview Meadows Road Montpelier VT 05602

full time

Stop in to complete an application and an on-the-spot interview.

We offer a very competitive salary, profit-sharing, 401(k), benefits, vacation, and a great work environment.

or email: dprovost@westviewmeadows.com.

phurteau@benchmarkquality.com Priscilla Hurteau, Human Resources The Arbors at Shelburne 687 Harbor Road Shelburne, VT. 05482 (802) 985-8600

IO#11199 Full job description at: Seven Days http://bit.ly/2mQuGbl 04/12 & 04/19/17 Please submit your resume 5V 5.25” and3.83” or coverxletter to

hr@champcable.com or mail to 175 Hercules Dr. Colchester, VT 05446.

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4/14/17 1:51 PM

A BENCHMARK ASSISTED LIVING COMMUNITY, EOE

NO PHONE CALLS, PLEASE.

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4/3/17 5v-Arbors041917.indd 10:31 AM 1

It’s not a job… it’s a lifestyle

Bookkeeper Adirondack Audiology Associates is seeking a full-time bookkeeper with a thorough knowledge of Quickbooks and Excel to work in our office in Colchester, VT. Duties will include A/R, A/P, payroll, balance sheets, profit and loss statements, and business taxes. Our ideal candidate is efficient, qualified, self-motivated, honest and able to work in a team environment. Please send cover letter, resume and references to

keith@ adirondackaudiology.com.

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4/17/17 12:20 PM

Join the Retail Team at Gardener’s Supply Company! We work hard AND offer a fun place to work. We also offer strong cultural values, competitive wages and outstanding benefits (including a tremendous discount on plants & product!).

DELIVER happiness . We know what you want in a job. Kelly Services® is now hiring seasonal delivery drivers for ® assignments with FedEx Ground . Don’t miss out! Details:

• 21 years or older • Business-related driving experience required • Weekly pay • Safety bonus plan

Inquire in Person Monday - Friday 9am - 5pm 322 Leroy Road Williston, VT 05495 802-651-6837

We’re looking for a full-time Customer Service Associate at our Williston Garden Center. The CS Associate will be responsible for ensuring an exceptional service experience for all customers. This person will impact the customer experience as the first and last point of contact with the customer from welcoming and greeting to the POS transaction and subsequent loading of their purchase. Our ideal candidate will have excellent customer service skills, including: very positive attitude; ability, patience and enthusiasm to research solutions to help solve customer problems or answer questions; strong problem and communication skills; previous POS/Cash Register experience (computerized POS system preferred); and intermediate plant and gardening knowledge. We are a 100% employee-owned company and an award winning and nationally recognized socially responsible business. Interested? Please send your cover letter & resume to Gardener’s Supply Company, 128 Intervale Rd., Burlington, VT 05401 or to jobs@gardeners.com.

kellyservices.us FedEx Ground is a registered trademark of the Federal Express Corporation An Equal Opportunity Employer © 2015 Kelly Services, Inc. Z0758D

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4/17/17 4/14/17 11:10 1:57 AM PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

AUTOMOTIVE MECHANIC

Keeler Bay Service is looking for an experienced automotive mechanic. Starting pay $20.00 plus an hour. Please contact 372-6139 or email us at clshoram@gmail.com.

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NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

Looking for a Sweet Job? Our new, mobile-friendly job board is buzzing with excitement. Start applying at

jobs.sevendaysvt.com

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3/6/17 4:28 PM

Support Secretary Office of the Public Defender, Burlington. Previous secretarial experience required. Law office experience, and strong customer services skills in a human services environment highly preferred. Full-time (40 hours per week) State position with benefits. Pay $14.75/hr. ($15.08 per hour effective 7/8). Must be able to work independently and as part of a legal team in a fast-paced office environment.

HEALTH CARE CONSUMER PROTECTION STAFF ATTORNEY

Email resume and cover letter by Sunday, April 30th to:

Vermont Legal Aid seeks a full-time consumer protection attorney in its Health Care Advocate Project in its Montpelier office. The position offers a unique opportunity to be a part of a small policy team representing the public interest and shaping health care policy in a state that is at the cutting edge of health care reform.

mary.deaett@vermont.gov EOE

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE: • Represent the public before the Green Mountain Care Board on health care related issues including health insurance rate review, hospital budget review, Accountable Care Organization budget review, certificates of need, and other regulatory matters; •

Analyze, monitor and comment on the development and implementation of federal and state laws, rules and policies relating to health care consumers;

With the Chief Health Care Advocate and policy team, develop public policy initiatives that promote access to affordable, high quality health care services for all Vermonters;

Work to increase public engagement in health care reform activities including public comment on laws, rules and policies affecting health care consumers; and

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Make public presentations before the GMCB, other government agencies, legislators and other forums.

Applicants must have excellent written and oral communication skills and a commitment to universal access to health care. Demonstrated experience in health care policy, insurance law and public benefits is strongly preferred. Applicants must be comfortable reviewing quantitative materials and performing basic calculations. Applicants must also have a commitment to working in a participatory egalitarian management setting and have the ability to make decisions and solve problems creatively. Applicants must be admitted to practice law in Vermont, eligible for admission by waiver, or willing to sit for the next examination. Some in-state travel required. Salary is $46,298 + D.O.E. with excellent fringe benefits. Send cover letter, resume, references, and writing sample as a single PDF with the subject line “HCA Application 2017” by April 28, 2017 to Eric Avildsen, Executive Director, c/o Rose Wunrow (rwunrow@vtlegalaid.org). Visit our website for complete application instructions. We are an equal opportunity employer committed to building cultural competency in order to effectively serve our increasingly diverse client community. We encourage applicants to share in their cover letters how they can further this goal. http://www.vtlegalaid.org/health-care-consumer-protection-staff-attorney

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C-11 04.19.17-04.26.17

4/7/17 1:14 PM

4/17/17 12:15 PM

ASSISTANT TO CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

Multi location local retailer seeks an accounting professional. This position will report to the CFO and be responsible for full comprehension and execution of daily, weekly and monthly accounting functions. As our business has grown so has our need for an additional team member responsible for accurately recording and reporting financial data. Duties will include learning and mastering our proprietary accounting software, daily data entry, subsidiary ledgers, bank reconciliation, weekly and monthly reporting. We offer a secure work environment with a low staff turnover. You will earn competitive compensation, a full benefits package including 401(k). Also included are personal use discounts on the products we sell. The position is based in Williston Vermont. Occasional travel to retail locations may be required. While this is a full time position, there is scheduling flexibility. Please respond in confidence to: mmead@furniturevt.com


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-12

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

04.19.17-04.26.17

ST. JOSEPH RESIDENTIAL CARE HOME PART-TIME, DAY, EVENING AND PER DIEM

Experienced Caregiver This is a great opportunity to work with caring adults while offering superior caregiving skills. Position requires a high level of professionalism and a willingness to promote the vision, mission and values of the Home. This job offers competitive wages and benefits. Schedule is varied with some weekend shifts required. If interested, please send resumes to: mbelanger@vermontcatholic.org

Send resumes to: recruiting@baymark.com.

jobs.sevendaysvt.com 4/7/171-JobsFiller_work.indd 11:00 AM 1

2/27/17 6:30 PM

Supervisor II – First Call for Chittenden County EEO

TECHNICAL CONTENT CREATOR/ DOCUMENTATION MANAGER

Are you interested in joining our medical team? We are now hiring nurses (RNs and LPNs) at our Berlin, Vermont location. We offer competitive pay, benefits, and have positions open for per diem, part time and full time.

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Or mail to: Mary Belanger St. Joseph’s Residential Care Home 243 N. Prospect St., Burlington, VT 05401. (802) 864-0264

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Let’s get to.....

NURSES (RNS AND LPNS)

3/27/17 12:30 PM

Greensea Systems, Inc., a leading provider of navigation and control software for Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs), is seeking a Technical Content Creator and Documentation Manager to be a part of our growing team. Job Description This position is responsible for the design, creation, and management of operator-level documentation for Greensea’s software products. Delivering clear documentation, written and visual, is an elemental component of that mission. The successful candidate will produce and manage written and visual documentation to assist operators in understanding how to use Greensea’s technology most effectively. Responsibilities Design and implement modular documentation and technical content architecture. Develop user documentation for software products. Work with the engineering team, operators, and customers to gather technical content and produce it in an easily understood and well-communicated format. Work with the Product Development Director to define the required documentation for Greensea’s products. Travel to support operator training, system integration, and field work. Requirements Strong communication and interpersonal skills. Bachelor’s degree with a minimum of 5 years of relevant experience. Excellent grammatical and writing skills. Proficiency with modern productivity software, desktop tools as well as page layout, graphics, and multimedia content creation. Experience producing content describing the use and operation of technology.

Join First Call for Chittenden County, Howard Center’s newly integrated crisis program, as a Supervisor II. The Supervisor II position has a Sunday through Thursday schedule (daytime hours) and assists in the daily operations and oversight of the program. This includes internal and external training, direct clinical service, community relations, shift coverage, assisting with triaging and resource utilization, and direct staff supervision. Master’s degree, experience and license required. Job ID# 3815

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Building Cleaning Services Technician Seeking candidate to perform a variety of cleaning activities and ensure all rooms are cared for and inspected according to standards. Must have valid driver’s license and transportation. Full time. Benefits eligible. Job ID# 3841

MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE SERVICES Sub-Registered Nurse – Medication Assisted Treatment Program Seeking a registered nurse to cover vacancies. Our nurses are responsible for safely dispensing methadone and buprenorphine products and maintaining all nursing dispensary operations. Must have excellent attention to detail and organizational skills plus strong interpersonal and communication skills. Job ID# 3677

Substance Abuse Clinical Care Coordinator Seeking individual to provide care coordination for clients receiving buprenorphine treatment through the new Pine Street Counseling Spoke, ensuring clients receive coordinated care addressing Home Health Services. Full time. Benefits eligible. Master’s required. Must have LADC or LCMHC or LICSW. Job ID# 3851

Director of Operations Seeking individual responsible for the effective and efficient management of a 950-plus-patient Opioid Treatment Program (“hub”). Candidate will oversee accreditation, policy and procedure, and will adhere to all applicable federal, state and agency rules and regulations. The successful candidate will have experience leading and motivating a team of people, be organized, self-starting, able to manage projects independently, and will have navigated systems within and between organizations. Full time. Benefits eligible. Job ID# 3864

For more information, please visit howardcentercareers.org.

To apply, please send your resume, cover letter, and a sample of your work to careers@greenseainc.com as PDF documents.

Howard Center offers an excellent benefits package including health, dental, and life insurance, as well as generous paid time off for all regular positions scheduled 20-plus-hours-per-week.

THE CANDIDATE MUST BE ELIGIBLE TO WORK IN THE US. THIS CONTRACT-TO-PERMANENT POSITION IS BASED IN RICHMOND AND WILL REQUIRE TRAVEL.

Applicants needing assistance or an accommodation in completing the online application should feel free to contact Human Resources at 488-6950 or hrhelpdesk@howardcenter.org. 10v-HowardCenterFULLAGENCY041917.indd 1

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4/14/17 12:42 PM

4/17/17 12:17 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW HIGHER PAY SCALE

TEACHERS

Join our growing childcare centers. Email resumes to krista@leapsvt.com or call 879-0130.

NANNY

Seeking Nanny for Vergennes family! Up to 30 hours per week, must have car, available weekends, references required. Great pay and benefits.

Email resume to 3rubytrain@gmail.com.

CRANE and BOOM TRUCK OPERATOR POSITION

1t-Leaps&Bounds030117.indd 1

2/27/17 1t-RaintreeVT041217.indd 12:06 PM 1

4/7/17

We are currently seeking an operator for a crane based in Chittenden County. The position requires the right individual to possess: • Positive Attitude and Behavior • Works Well with Customers and Other Employees • Reliable Transportation to and from Work • Physically Able to Lift 100 lbs. • Minimum of a Class B CDL and Clean Driving Record • Valid Medical Card • Crane Operator Certification a Plus • Mechanical Ability and Experience a Plus • Construction Experience a Plus Starting Wages - $50K-$65K/year

CALL 800-639-0712 HUTCH CRANE SERVICE

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

C-13 04.19.17-04.26.17

Town Administrator

CHOICE SUPPORT SERVICES

Life Skills Aide

The Town of Bristol is seeking highly motivated candidates for the position of Town Administrator. Bristol (pop. 3894) is a steadily growing, vibrant community located in Central Vermont’s Addison County.

The Selectboard is seeking an individual with strong business and financial management skills, ability to oversee 11 full-time, 4 part-time Seeking full-time Life Skills employees and 35 paid on call fire fighters, administer approximately $3.27 Aide in Burlington area to million in general operating and other funds, experience in economic assist a young man recovering development, grant writing, growth and planning issues. Knowledge of from a brain injury. Duties municipal process and municipal experience are a must. A detailed job include, but are not limited description is available at bristolvt.org. Salary is commensurate with 2:32 PM to, minor personal care, experience. Minimum of four years of municipal experience, Incident assistance with meal prep, Command System training and degree, preferably in business or finance, accessing community, & are preferred. light household chores. Must To apply, please send a confidential cover letter, resumes and three be patient, compassionate, references to: Bristol Town Administrator Search, have a good sense of humor PO Box 249, Bristol, VT 05443. Deadline to apply is 4/24/2017. & ability to handle defiance. Males preferred, but will THE TOWN OF BRISTOL IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PROVIDER AND EMPLOYER. consider the right female. Compensation TBD based on experience. Send resumes to 4t-TownofBristol032917.indd 1 3/27/17 12:32 PM info@ choicetbisupportservices.com. Additional openings available - call 622-8122 for more information.

Planned Parenthood of Northern New England (PPNNE) is seeking qualified candidates for a variety of open positions choicetbisupportservices.com across Me, NH & VT. PPNNE is the largest reproductive AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER health care and sexuality education provider and advocate in northern New England. Our mission is to provide, 4t-HutchCrane041917.indd 1 4/14/173v-ChoiceTBI041917.indd 1:32 PM 1 4/17/17 12:22 PM promote, and protect access to reproductive health care and sexuality education so that all people can make We are Age Well - the leading experts and advocates voluntary choices about their reproductive for the aging population of Northwestern Vermont. and sexual health. Committed to employee wellness and work-life balance, The positions we currently have available are: we offer competitive pay and extensive benefits, including generous paid time off, affordable and comprehensive Advanced Practice Clinician health, dental and vision insurances, and more! (NP, CNM, PA) HYDE PARK & WILLISTON (22 HRS/WK)

Job Openings at Age Well:

Floating Advanced Practice Clinician

• Associate Director of Development & Communications

(NP, CNM, PA) CENTRAL VT & CONNECTICUT RIVER VALLEY (PART TIME)

Floating Advanced Practice Clinician

• Wellness Benefits Counselor

(NP, CNM, PA) NH REGION (PART TIME)

The successful candidates will be supportive and enthusiastic voices for Age Well’s mission: to provide the support and guidance that inspires our community to embracing aging with confidence. Bachelor’s degree required. Experience preferred.

Marketing & Graphic Design Coordinator COLCHESTER, VT (PART-FULL TIME, TEMPORARY)

Health Center Site Manager SANFORD, ME (PART TIME) For more information and to apply, submit a resume & cover letter by visiting our website at www.ppnne.org and apply under our JOBS section.

Visit agewellvt.org/about/careers to learn more and apply. Since 1974, we have provided Northwestern Vermonters with essential services to help them age well. Meals on Wheels | Care Coordination | Helpline: 1-800-642-5119 Age Well is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and an Equal Opportunity Employer. 7t-AgeWell041217.indd 1

Planned Parenthood of Northern New England welcomes diversity and is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

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4/17/17 3:55 PM


selena@windjammergroup.com

ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

04.19.17-04.26.17

Executive Director

Property Manager

The Executive Director of Lyric Theatre Company (Lyric) is responsible for engaging our community, membership, donors, and volunteers in promoting and delivering a community theater experience to 14,000+ attendees a year, while ensuring financial stability and security. The Executive Director reports to the Lyric Board of Directors and oversees all functions of this nonprofit. Visit Lyric Theatre’s website for the full job description. Send resumes to: lyricvtdirectorsearch@gmail.com.

Established firm seeks experienced person to manage senior living community in Chittenden County. This position is parttime, 25 hours-per-week, Monday-Friday. Job requires excellent people and communication skills, as well as experience with Excel, and Word. Job duties include leasing apartments, collection of rental payments, oversight of tenants, and must have excellent administrative skills. Property management experience preferred. Salary $18-$20 per hour depending on experience.

Linen Division Assistant

Warehouse Chair Cleaner For detailed job descriptions please visit vttent.com/employment. Stop by our office to fill out an application or email resume to jobs@vttent.com. EOE. 14 Berard Drive, South Burlington, VT 05403

SAVE THE DATE! MAY 23, 2017

SEEKING SHARED LIVING PROVIDERS FOR: Progressive 22-year-old and two cats. Female providers preferred. No dogs. Sociable 59-year-old woman. Personal care required. Home must be accessible, or provider must be willing to modify. Providers with nursing/eldercare experience ideal. Intelligent and kind 27-year-old woman. This individual uses facilitated communication and requires a provider who is willing to support her in maintaining and developing this skill. General supervision. Assistance with personal care required. Female provider(s) preferred. Sociable 70-year-old man. Personal care required. Home must be accessible or provider must be willing to modify. Mechanically inclined 23-year-old man. Provider must support development of independent living skills. Ideal opportunity for peer-aged male professional or graduate student. 47-year-old man seeking roommate to share partially furnished twobedroom apartment in Burlington. The right provider will have good cooking skills.

The Vermont Recruiters Association and The Lake Champlain Chamber of Commerce Present:

THE 4TH ANNUAL

CONNECTIONS [ VERMONT CAREER ] n o t

C Join Vermont’s top employers at this m exciting recruiting event! Where:

The Sheraton Burlington Conference Center

VCC When:

Tuesday, May 23, 2017 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Co

Warehouse Tent Cleaner

4/14/17 2:44 PM

n

n o cti

The Vermont Career Connections event

ne

s

2nd Shift Truck Loading

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represents a diverse group of

Employers & Industries providing COMPENSATION: $20,000-31,000 tax-free annual stipend, room and board ($708.69 per month) and generous respite budget. Must reside within Chittenden County. Must pass background check. Interested candidates contact lreid@howardcenter.org or call (802)488-6563.

er

Event Division Crew

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re

Event Division Driver/Warehouse

Best Western Windjammer Inn & Conference Center Attn: Human Resources 1076 Williston Road South Burlington, VT 05403 Fax: 802-651-0640 EOE

a

Tent Installers

Windjammer Hospitality Group Attn: Human Resources 1076 Williston Road South Burlington, VT 05403 Fax: 802-651-0640 selena@windjammergroup.com

Candidates must have previous customer service experience and possess a clean driving record. Our competitive benefits package includes: medical/dental, 401(k), company discounts and paid time off.

EOE

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New England’s Premier special event company is seeking hardworking, enthusiastic individuals to join our team. We are currently accepting applications for the following positions starting late April/early May through November 1.

for our high-volume Windjammer kitchen. We offer a competitive wage and benefits package that includes medical/dental, 401(k), paid time off and discounts.

r

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FRONT DESK REP/ CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST

SOUS CHEF LINE COOK PREP COOK

Ve

lyrictheatrevt.org

Please forward cover letter and resume by email to: Stephanie Casavant, Vice President, Coburn & Feeley Property Management: scasavant@coburnfeeley.com.

We are seeking

outstanding career opportunities that embrace Vermont’s Work Hard, Play Hard lifestyle! For more information, please go to:

W W W.V T C A R E E R S .O R G


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

C-15

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

Sr Manager Platform @ Dealertrack, Inc. (Burlington, VT). Wrk in collaborative agile team enviro to manage & ld sftwr engg teams that build solutions for cmplx biz probs. Dir sftwr dvlpmt prjcts in tch matters. Partcpte in ldershp rev of tchncl dsgns, implmntatn, & general success of prdct. Reqs Bachelor's (or foreign equiv) in Elctrnc Engg, CompEngg or rltd fllwd by 5 yrs prog resp exp in job offrd, as Sftwr Engr, Prjct Mngr, Engg Mngr or rltd. 1 yr w/: Grails; Java; Spring; jQuery; MySQL; Mongo; & REST. Emp will accpt any suita combo of edu, train / exp. Mail resume to A. Davis & S. Chokshi, Dealertrack, 6205 Peachtree Dunwoody Rd, Atlanta, GA 30328. Indicate job title & specify ref code: DS-VT. EOE.

Versatile? Vivacious? Valiant?

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04.19.17-04.26.17

Perrigo Nutritionals, in Georgia, VT, currently has openings for some Production Sanitizers, Packaging Operators, and an experienced Controls Engineer and Chemistry Lab Supervisor. For full job descriptions and to apply, please visit our website at perrigocareers.com. • • • • • •

4/17/17 11:16 AM

Excellent Wages Great benefits at reduced rates Quarterly and Annual Bonus Profit sharing 401(k) w/ Employer Matching Tuition Reimbursement

out you.

We want to know more ab

Shelter Coordinator

3v-PerrigoNutritionals041917.indd 1

ER JUNIOR GRAPHIC DESIGN ilable on its

te position ava Seven Days has an immedia . A successful candidate award-winning design team creatively under intense and ly lful skil designs quickly, be ready to hit the ground deadline pressure. You must ilable to work onsite during ava running from day one and (exact schedule TBD). weekdays and early evenings per duties, this designer In addition to weekly newspa cs for our monthly phi may assist in producing gra ewsletters, web banner e-n VT, s Kid e parenting magazin es (7 Nights, What’s ads and annual glossy magazin candidates who have to n give Good, BTV). Preference ing at magazines and/or significant experience design a designer with an edgy for newspapers. We are looking — both print and digital — aesthetic who loves media orial and advertising for and is skilled at designing edit level knowledge of: ertany medium. Required, exp op. No exceptions. tosh Pho and tor InDesign, Illustra your current employment Send cover letter explaining t design samples from prin situation, resume and three lio links to print work rtfo (po at form print work in .pdf sevendaysvt.com by also acceptable) to designjob@ ne calls, please. pho No n. Friday, April 28, at noo employer. nity ortu opp al equ Seven Days is an

4/17/17 12:23 PM

Nonprofit organization serving victims of intimate partner violence. Responsibilities include: coordinating and providing support services for residents, interacting with housing and benefit providers, and a serious commitment to hotline and shelter coverage. Flexible schedule required. Awareness of issues faced by victims of intimate partner violence a must. Full time with benefits. Send cover letter and resume by May 12th to: CIRCLE (formerly Battered Women’s Services and Shelter) PO Box 652 Barre, VT 05641

Survivors and people from diverse communities encouraged to apply. EOE


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-16

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

04.19.17-04.26.17

Landscape Laborer

“Community Transportation for Everyone” Now Hiring for 2 Positions!

FULL-TIME

Program Support Administrator FULL-TIME

Dispatcher

Full time, Hardworking. Previous experience desirable. Transportation required.

BOTH POSITIONS REQUIRE: • Strong customer service skills and experience • Good oral and written communication skills • Ability to maintain a high level of confidentiality • Ability to work independently and as a team • Ability to maintain a positive attitude • Ability to learn new software • A high level of professionalism • Strong attention to detail • Sense of humor a plus

Contact Marc at Outdoor Works Landscaping at mktorelli@aol.com.

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4/17/17

PROGRAM SUPPORT ADMINISTRATOR ALSO REQUIRES: • 3 plus years of experience in an administrative support role • Strong analytical skills 2:16 PM • Experience in Volunteer Recruitment/Coordination desired 4t-WOWToyz041917.indd

Assistant Retail Manager/Social Media

Submit resume and cover letter to: gina@stagecoach-rides.org STAGECOACH IS AN AA/EO EMPLOYER

stagecoach-rides.org

1

We offer a competitive Salary, 401(k), vacation and sick time, paid holiday days, and a great working environment. Please submit a cover letter of interest and resume to the attention of Nicole. Email: nicole@klingersbread.com.

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RESIDENTIAL EDUCATOR: Rock Point School, a small independent residential high school, is looking for two Residential Educators to join our team! We are looking for someone who has energy, patience, a sense of humor, and the desire to help guide young people through the challenges of transforming adolescence into adulthood. This is a full-time, live-in position and includes weekend and evening hours. Responsibilities: • Weekend and evening activities & trips • Weekend meals • Outdoor adventures • Dorm floor and other meetings • Student chores • Sports class • One-on-one advising • Communicating with parents and families when necessary • Overnight (live-in) supervision & on-call 3-4 nights/week The ideal candidate: • Loves working with people, especially teens • Is a creative problem solver • Has patience, humor, and a driver’s license • Bachelor's degree required Use this link to apply rockpointschool.org/residential-educator.

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Bertek Systems, a wholly-owned subsidiary of IMS (Identification Multi Solutions Inc.) with headquarters in Montreal, is an established Vermont printing company located at 133 Bryce Blvd., Fairfax, VT. We are looking for an experienced CSR, Print Estimator and a Prepress Technician familiar with the production of custom labels.

CSR

4/17/17 12:14 PM

Main Qualifications Include:

Some previous supervisory experience Ability to oversee and supervise 2-3 team members per shift Assist with a monthly inventory of wine and dry goods for the café Basic computer skills and social media experience Assist with daily ordering & bank change orders

4/17/17 2:00 PM

Both positions offer a competitive salary and excellent benefits. Good working environment. Employment contingent upon passing required background checks and pre-employment drug testing. Application Deadline April 28, 2017

Klinger’s Bread Company is looking to add an Assistant Retail Manager to our team. This is a full-5v-Stagecoach041917.indd time position, which may require some weekend and holiday scheduling. •

1

Primary function is to provide exceptional service and support to our Customers, Account Reps and Order Entry Department. Candidate must be able to process customer inquiries, quotes and orders. Qualified candidates must have excellent communication skills, an ability to multitask and be well versed in Microsoft Office. Previous CSR experience in the label printing industry a plus. Knowledge of LabelTraxx MIS/ERP. Program very desirable.

PRINT ESTIMATOR

Primary responsibility is to develop accurate, competitive, and profitable cost estimates on routine and complex label and card jobs as required by our customer’s request. Estimator will be required to stay current with materials available in the market and implement into cost saving estimates. Estimator will be required to consult with appropriate department managers to determine production capabilities and optimal production processes for implementation into estimate. Knowledge of sheet-fed and continuous-web press manufacturing processes desired. Knowledge of LabelTraxx MIS/ERP Program very desirable.

PREPRESS TECHNICIAN

Primary duties would be to 1.) Read job tickets and work with production staff to produce proof and plates for pressroom; 2.) Review job tickets to determine prepress requirements 3.) Prepare finished page layouts; and operate proofing systems; 4.) Prepare printing plates and operate platemaking systems; and 5.) Maintain prepress files Candidate must have excellent organizational skills, be quality focused, and have exceptional attention to detail, be deadline-oriented, and have equipment maintenance and desktop publishing skills. Interested candidates may send a resume to: Bertek Systems, Arrowhead Industrial Park, 133 Bryce Boulevard, Georgia, VT 05454. Attn: Human Resources or e-mail to akimball@ berteksystems.com.

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4/7/17 1:36 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

C-17 04.19.17-04.26.17

NorthCountry is Hiring! Join the team Gallup ranks in the top 4% worldwide for employee engagement!

IT Support Specialist A

Licensed Nursing Assistants

Our growing IT Department is seeking a personable problem-solver to work behind the scenes to help keep our organization running smoothly. In addition to data processing, the Support Specialist sets up and maintains employee profiles, performs system upgrades, and produces reports. Applicants should have one to three years of related experience and enjoy being part of a hard-working team.

Full-time Days What you do is important; at least we think so, and our residents agree.

HR/Training Specialist The HR/Training Specialist works with Tellers and MSRs, guiding them through a training checklist, providing support along the way, and preparing them for the next step in their development plan. The HR/Training Specialist will also be responsible for publicizing job openings, reviewing applications, assisting managers with interviews, and working with them to identify the best candidate for a position.

Come to work for Vermont’s premier CCRC, and be a part of the community you hoped for. Wake Robin seeks a dedicated nursing assistant with a strong desire to work within a community of seniors. Wake Robin seeks LNAs licensed in Vermont to provide high quality care in a fast paced residential and long-term care environment, while maintaining a strong sense of “home.” We offer higher than average pay including shift differentials, great benefits, a pristine working environment, and an opportunity to build strong relationships with staff and residents in a dynamic community setting.

Maintenance Technician The Maintenance Technician plays a key role in providing members, staff, and guests with a safe, clean, and welcoming environment. To keep all ten of our locations in shipshape, we need a Mr. or Ms. Fix-It with a keen eye and a strong back to tackle everything from installing cabinets and building walls, to changing light bulbs and mowing lawns. Three to five years of related experience in construction, landscaping, and finish carpentry is required, as well as proficiency in plastering, drywall installation, and painting. Travel between branches is necessary for this position.

Interested candidates please email hr@wakerobin.com or fax your resume with cover letter to: HR, (802) 264-5146. WAKE ROBIN IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.

Member Resource Specialist If you have excellent listening, speaking, writing, and problem-solving skills, we may have a position for you on our Member Resource Team. Use your skills and training to reply to member phone calls, online chats, and emails accurately and efficiently. You’ll answer questions about everything from the simplest teller transactions to higher-level products including consumer and home equity loans.

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4/17/17 12:21 PM

Mortgage Loan Officer Buying a home can be a stressful experience, but we’re here to make it as easy and affordable as possible for our members. The Mortgage Officer is the home buyer’s key contact person at the credit union and provides guidance and information throughout the process. The ability to demonstrate confidence, find solutions, and communicate clearly with people with varying levels of home-buying experience is necessary. Accuracy and a willingness to inform members of other products and services that may be beneficial to them is also expected.

Administrative Assistant/Bookkeeper Tata Harper Skincare seeks a part-time Administrative Assistant/Bookkeeper for their successful, growing company. This position involves a combination of general administrative tasks as well as bookkeeping tasks including budgeting, reconciling accounts, writing checks, and processing returns for both business and personal needs; therefore, discretion is crucial.

All positions listed above are full-time and are based out of our headquarters in South Burlington. NorthCountry offers competitive pay and a generous benefit program. n Paid holidays & paid time off

n 401(k) with employer matching up to 5%

n Medical, dental & vision insurance

n Employee training

n Life insurance & disability

n Wellness program

This is an exciting opportunity to be a part of a fast-paced, successful skincare company at the forefront of natural, nontoxic beauty. A passion for the industry, positive attitude, willingness to work in a fast-paced, ever-changing environment, and ability to self start and prioritize many tasks at once are all a must. Reliable transportation is also required for out of office errands. The Administrative Assistant/ Bookkeeper reports to the Executive Assistant to Tata Harper. He/she will work primarily from home, but will be expected to work 2-3 partial days/week at the company headquarters in Whiting, VT, schedule to be determined.

We would love to hear from you!  To apply, submit your information at NorthCountryFederalCreditUnion.appone.com at your earliest convenience. NorthCountry is an equal opportunity employer.

Hourly salary offering will be based on level of experience.

www.northcountry.org Untitled-14 1

Recognized as one of Vermont’s Top 10 Best Places to Work by Vermont Business Magazine

If you think you’d be absolutely awesome for this job, we’d love to hear from you! To apply, please submit a resume and cover letter describing your relevant experience and interest in our company to allison@tataharper.com. Applications must be submitted by April 26th, 2017 for full consideration.

Federally insured by NCUA

4/13/17 2:47 PM 5v-TataHarper041917.indd 1

4/17/17 12:26 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

04.19.17-04.26.17

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSOCIATE

CREW MEMBERS AND SHIFT SUPERVISORS

Part-time

Now hiring all positions for our new restaurant opening at Church Street, Burlington. If you have a lot of energy and like to have fun at work with a great opportunity for advancement and development, then you are in the right place. We offer competitive wages with weekly incentives along with flexible schedules. Now hiring full- and part-time employees.

Friendly, detail-oriented person with excellent communication and database skills in creative space.16 hours per week (Includes shift on Sat.) Position description at website.

OPEN HOUSE

The Residence at Shelburne Bay is a premiere Senior Living Community and we are currently looking to expand our nursing team!

We are having an open house this Friday and Saturday from 12-4 pm at 49 Church Street (mall entrance next to Panera) where we will be accepting applications in person. You can also find us on Snag-a-job if you prefer to apply online.

We are hiring a Full-Time, Day Nurse and a Full-Time Overnight Nurse.

Send letter of interest/ resume by May 4 to:

Studio Place Arts 201 N Main St Barre, VT 05641 info@studioplacearts.com

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1 4/17/17 4t-FiveGuys041917.indd 12:52 PM

RN NURSE MANAGER

The right candidate will have some long term care leadership experience. Come work with a well established team! $5000 sign on Bonus

Randolph is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

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4/17/17

4/7/17 11:12 AM

Full Time

EOE

Let’s get to.....

$3000 Sign-On Bonus

LNA’s on all shifts including every other weekend, full & part time.

Full & Part Time Sign-On Bonus

$2000 Full-Time $1000 Part-Time

Caregivers (non-licensed)

on all shifts including every other weekend, full & part time.

maeve.luciani@ kindred.com

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4/17/17 12:19 PM

To obtain an application visit randolphvt.org. An application with letter of interest and resume should be sent to Manager, Town of Randolph, PO Drawer B, Randolph VT 05060.

Birchwood Terrace Healthcare Sue Fortin RN, DNS 43 Starr Farm Rd. Burlington Vermont 05408 802-419-2407 For more information or to apply call, text or email Maeve Luciani at 502-403-8246

Water/Wastewater Superintendent

The Town of Randolph is accepting applications for the position of Water/ Wastewater Superintendent for systems averaging 250,000 gpd each. Applicants must possess a Grade 2 Water License and a Grade 3 Wastewater License. Prior experience with SBR systems is preferred for management and operation of a new 400,000 gpd SBR facility. Applicants should be able to demonstrate experience in personnel management, systems operation and maintenance to include SCADA, familiarity with MS Word and Excel, and fiscal and inventory planning. This is a full-time exempt position with a full range of benefits and a competitive salary range based upon qualifications. Position is open until filled.

For Long Term Care Unit Full-time Monday-Friday

Nurses Wanted

Cook

The Gary Home is currently searching for a person who has experience in fine dining cooking. Candidates should possess excellent interpersonal skill, be a multi-tasker and thrive in a team of 12:22 PM kitchen personnel. Must have a clean background record. Weekends a must. We combine great pay, benefits and our best benefit, the opportunity to work among our community of residents. Please stop by with resume or to fill out an application to:

The Gary Home 149 Main Street Montpelier VT 05602 Or email to: dprovost@westviewmeadows.com

jobs.sevendaysvt.com

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. EOE

Full- and Part-Time Sign-On Bonus

$500 Full-Time $250 Part-Time Competitive wages and benefits including tuition reimbursement, medical, dental & vision for full-time employees. Bonuses will be paid out after six months of employment. Must mention this ad in interview to be eligible for bonus.

Please send resume to Allyson Sweeney asweeney@residenceshelburnebay.com. Call us to learn more (802) 985-9847.


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Commercial Roofers& Laborers

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

C-19 04.19.17-04.26.17

Year round, full time positions. Good wages & benefits. Pay negotiable with experience. EOE/M/F/VET/Disability Employer Apply in person at: A.C. Hathorne Co. 252 Avenue C Williston, VT 802-862-6473

3h-ACHathorne040517.indd 1

Public Safety Dispatcher The Winooski Police Department is currently accepting applications for full time Public Safety Dispatcher. We are a progressive, community oriented, 24-hour police department, serving a diverse population of over 7,500 citizens in the heart of Chittenden County. We offer a competitive benefits package that includes the Vermont Municipal Employees Retirement System, paid vacation, holidays, sick leave, medical, life and dental insurance.

4/3/17 10:29 AM

Tourism & Marketing: Director of Communications

HEALTH SYSTEMS PROGRAMS ADMINISTRATOR

For more information about joining our team, please visit

JobDepartment Description: of Health

Experienced professional soughthealth to lead the communities! Vermont Department of Tourism Join the team that brings public to local The Vermont & Marketing’s public and trade relations efforts. This mission-critical position Department of Health is seeking a professional to join the Office of Local Health is designed to generate positive tourism-related coverage of Vermont in the team. The Office of Local Health, which comprises the twelve district offices, is the national and international marketplace. The Director of Communications is implementation of the health and department bringing public programs and responsible for thearm development implementation of ahealth proactive business initiatives to local communities. Our goal is to improve the health and well-being outreach plan consistent with the goals and mission of the Department offor Vermonters. The ideal candidate be a proven consistent leader with skills and experience in Tourism and Marketing as well aswill maintaining communications nal sought to lead the Vermont Department of Tourism program planning, quality workforce development communication. via social networking tools.improvement, This position is responsible for and all tourism media Examples of work include: Develop system and provide technical assistance for targeted relations in-state and out-of-state; press release development; pitching d trade relations eff orts. This mission-critical position tourism story ideas to scorecards; regional and national of press maintaining division responsible formedia; divisiondevelopment publications including writing positive tourism-related coverage of of Vermont in the familiarization tripsand andoperationalize itineraries; management media contact lists; and content; identify best practices among 12 district offices; oversee support for Vermont’s public relations initiatives. Thecontact Director al marketplace. Theinternational Director ofdivision. Communications is Deb workforce development activities for the For more information, will also collaborate with the Agency of Commerce executive team in the Wilcox, at 802-652-4173 or deb.wilcox@vermont.gov. Reference Job ID #621197. elopment and ofimplementation ofand a business proactive business development a proactive travel trade recruitment plan. This Location: Burlington. Status: Full Time. Application Deadline: April 23, 2017. position will reportand to themission Commissioner Tourism & Marketing. of nt with the goals of of the Department

keting: Director of Communications

as well as maintaining communications HEALTH DISTRICT OFFICE consistent TECHstrong I oral and Candidates must: demonstrate written skills; have a BA in ols. Public This position is responsible for alloftourism media Relations related field; have a minimum five years of relevant work Department of or Health experience; demonstrate knowledge of Vermont and Vermont’s tourism industry. The Health District Office Technician (HDOT) position is dynamic and multi-faceted. ut-of-state; press release development; pitching targeted Administrative support of the Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, egional andwriting national media; development of press Resume, samples minimum references shouldwith be many and Children (WIC) is theand mainafocus of the of job.three WIC is a federal program submitted to Kitty Sweet, Vermont Agency of Commerce and Community itineraries; management ofmust media contact andand WIC requirements. The HDOT position work closely with otherlists; clerical staff Development, One National Life Drive, Montpelier, VT 05620-0501. In- and out-ofcertifiers to complete administrative activities that support WIC participants nternational relations Directorreceiving state travel public will be required. Salary initiatives. range: $45,000 -The $50,000. program benefits. Accuracy, timeliness, and a team approach are critical. The HDOT h the Agency of Commerce executive team in the position requires attention to detail and the ability to move seamlessly among various tasks with regular interruptions. Work is recruitment done in a fast-paced plan. environment. The HDOT tive travel trade and business This position serves as the face of the local health office--via phone, email, and face-toe Commissioner of Tourism & Marketing. face encounters with the public, stores who offer WIC foods, community agencies, and staff. Stellar internal and external customer service skills are required to meet the demands of this work. The ability to maintain a calm demeanor in stressful situations is key to success in this position. The HDOT should understand and recognize the importance of adhering to federal and state guidelines and be able to internalize their role in contributing to the larger mission of WIC, the Health Department, and the Agency of Human Services. For more information, contact Lisa Fitzgerald, at 802-951-0064 or lisa.fitzgerald@vermont.gov Reference Job ID #621122. Location: Burlington. Status: Full Time. Application Deadline: April 23, 2017

winooskipolice.com. We’re Hiring. Join Our Team!

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4/17/17 2:24 PM

Outreach & Education Manager Join City Market’s Community Engagement team as our Outreach & Education Manager! This full-time position manages the Co-op’s sponsorship of local events, donations to local non-profits, community and staff classes, store tours, Crop Mobs, farm tours and offsite events like the annual Co-op Food Fest and Open Farm Week. The position is also responsible for managing the Co-op’s blog content and updating in-store brochures. We’re looking for someone with great communication skills, a knowledge and love of the local food system, education experience, computer proficiency, public speaking experience, and a collaborative and cooperative spirit. Please apply by Monday, May 1.

Your Community-Owned Grocery Store More information and online application at www.citymarket.coop/jobs

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4/17/17 12:42 PM

onstrate strong oral and written skills; have a BA in ted field; have a minimum of five years of relevant work e knowledge of Vermont and Vermont’s tourism industry.

es and a minimum of three references should be et, Vermont Agency of Commerce and Community onal Life Drive, Montpelier, 05620-0501. In- For and out-ofTo apply, you must use the online job VT application at careers.vermont.gov. questions related torange: your application, please contact the Department of Human Resources, Recruitment red. Salary $45,000 - $50,000. Services, at 855-828-6700 (voice) or 800-253-0191 (TTY/Relay Service). The State of Vermont offers an excellent total compensation package and is an EOE.

Become the teacher who inspired you in only 8 months.

Transition to teaching with Champlain’s accredited Teacher Apprenticeship Program (TAP). Our fast-track to a teacher’s license is designed for new & midcareer professionals wanting to teach grades 5-12. Attend our Information Session to learn more. Tuesday, May 2, 6:00-7:00 p.m. Champlain College, 175 Lakeside Ave., Burlington Register at tapvt.org or Call 802.651.5844.


GO HIRE. Ready to recruit some new talent?

SAME GREATE C SERVI

SEVEN DAYS

Job Recruiters: • Post jobs using a form that includes key info about your company and open positions (location, application deadlines, video, images, etc.). • Accept applications and manage the hiring process via our new applicant tracking tool. • Easily manage your open job listings from your recruiter dashboard.

04.19.17-04.26.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Our readers are planning their next career moves. Employers get results with Seven Days Jobs — our brand-new, mobile-friendly, online job board at jobs.sevendaysvt.com.

EW ALL-N TE I S WEB

Job Seekers: • Search for jobs by keyword, location, category and job type.

Launch your recruitment campaign today on jobs.sevendaysvt.com!

• Set up job alert emails using custom search criteria. • Save jobs to a custom list with your own notes on the positions. • Apply for jobs directly through the site.

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• Share jobs on social media channels.

Get a quote when you post online or contact Michelle Brown: 865-1020, ext. 21, michelle@sevendaysvt.com.

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3/1/17 2:06 PM


food+drink wanted to represent [founder] Joe Lemnah and [head brewer] Alex Swanson’s eccentric beers with immediate, one-glance branding — to give a feeling that we’re not your average brewery. Something that we could own visually rather than what the market or industry might be responding to at the time. [We needed to be able to] build on that branding so we could be flexible but always simple and recognizable. With the rate of brewing Joe and the team are doing, we need a design system, something we can create or illustrate within a reasonable timeframe without reinventing the wheel for each label, while maintaining consistency. So, we defined a few design rules that apply for each design to keep everything on point with our brand. Graphically, I can safely say Scandinavian design style has inspired our branding and illustration approach very much. Also, being less literal with

OTTER CREEK BREWING FOUNDED: 1991 LOCATION: Middlebury ANNUAL PRODUCTION: 30,000

barrels

DESIGNER: Art director Brett Murray and senior graphic designer Dale Donaldson

$24.99

CALL FOR RESERVATIONS Lunch & Dinner q Tues - Sat 39 Bridge St, Richmond 434-3148 12v-Toscano041917.indd 1

location, tourism and the wonderful things this area offers. The problem was, as the craft-beer industry was going through an extreme expansion, the small-town Vermont voice wasn’t being heard in the crowded marketplace. We love Vermont and boast about it whenever we can, but we believe the new branding speaks more directly to the ideals of today’s craft-beer drinkers and carries further in the cacophony of the beer aisle. We’ve utilized catchy, creative names, vibrant colors and nostalgia-inducing graphics to reflect the free-spirited, counterculture mentality of the crew that keeps our beer flowing. If you walk the brewery floor, you’ll likely hear Grateful Dead blasting from the boom box. Our goal with updating the OCB aesthetic has been to create a connection between the innovative spirit of our team and the fun-loving culture that makes craft beer an exciting industry. SD: Do you print on the can, or on a wrap? Why? MS: We print directly on the cans. Given the scale of our releases, it’s more efficient for us to order larger quantities of printed cans. Recently, we have played around with can wraps — especially for super-limited, brewery-only beers. But the major releases are printed directly. m

Plus tax. Pick-up or delivery only. Expires 4/30/17. Limit: 1 offer per customer per day.

Check us out on Facebook & Instagram!

973 Roosevelt Highway Colchester • 655-5550 www.threebrotherspizzavt.com

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3/28/17 6:40 PM

NORTHEAST SEAFOOD

SUNDAY BRUNCH 1 0 A M - 1 P M / B L E U V T.C O M Untitled-21 1

4/14/17 10:36 AM

Any day, any occasion...Come by today and belly-up!

Fire & Ice

Vermont’s Iconic steakhouse 26 Seymour Street | Middlebury | 802.388.7166 | fireandicerestaurant.com

FOOD 51

SD: What was your aesthetic like then? How has it evolved? MS: The aesthetic of the original brand was very Vermont-centric. The focus was heavily tied to our Middlebury

$19.99

2 large, 1-topping pizzas & 2-liter Coke product

SEVEN DAYS

SEVEN DAYS: When did you start using cans, and why? MIKAELA SHEA: Fresh Slice White IPA was the first canned beer we packaged in 2014. Being a summer release, we recognized the need for a vessel that you could bring to the beach, the boat and beyond. Canned beers have taken off since then, and we’ve been looking for any excuse to put our beers in cans.

SD: Do you print on wraps or the bare substrate, and why? SM: Minimum orders for bare substrate are very high in price, and as a more agile brewery, wraps are more cost effective with less production time.

CELEBRATE VERMONT RESTAURANT WEEK!

SPECIAL

1 large, 1-topping pizza, 12 boneless wings OR new fried buffalo chicken ravioli, 2 liter Coke product

04.19.17-04.26.17

AESTHETIC: “We wanted to capture the funky vibe of culture and innovation of Otter Creek — to reflect who we are and where we’re going with a healthy dose of our counterculture past rolled into one,” says marketing creative manager Mikaela Shea.

APRIL

SD: Are there any challenges in designing for beer cans, specifically? SM: Creating something that has good shelf presence and sticks out from the crowd, especially in today’s market. Staying consistent with your labels and designs. Not using beer ingredients in your graphics all the time, which I’m guilty of. What kind of label you’ll be printing on is important to think about, and the scale of the label or sticker. Legal info is always hard to hide, and the dreaded barcode can take up some major space.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

FORMAT: 12- and 16-ounce cans, 12-ounce bottles

our graphics, more playful themes, names and color palette matched with a simplistic illustrative style.


Burlington theatrical and belly dance fusion company, the Accaliae, hosts an evening of movement, moon myths, stories and rituals honoring Earth’s satellite through dance. The show She Who Walks in the Moonlight features belly dance, burlesque and contemporary performers from Vermont, New York City, Boston and beyond, including Green Mountain Cabaret, Sahidi Sisters and Amity Alize (pictured). Attendees at this lunar-inspired spectacular can also browse post-apocalyptic fashions from Huntington designer Wings of Sin. One hundred percent of the night’s proceeds benefit Puppets in Education, a nonprofit aimed at teaching children leadership, inclusion and problem-solving skills through life-size puppets.

calendar A P R I L

1 9 - 2 6 ,

WED.19

agriculture

art

ACRYLICS WITH SUE: Artistic types follow step-bystep instructions to create paintings. Champlain Senior Center, McClure Multigenerational Center, Burlington, 12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 658-3585. FIGURE DRAWING: Artists sharpen their skills of observation of the human form. Chaffee Art Center, Rutland, 6-8 p.m. $10-15; preregister; limited space. Info, 775-0356.

business

BUSINESS OWNERSHIP SUCCESSION: Business owners and key managers examine four different ways to sell a business and how to navigate challenges posed by each one. Kennedy Brothers Building, Vergennes, 2-5 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 338-7448. KELLEY MARKETING GROUP BREAKFAST MEETING: New members are welcome at a brainstorming session for marketing, advertising and communications professionals. Room 217, Ireland Building, Champlain College, Burlington, 7:45-9 a.m. Free. Info, 864-4067.

04.19.17-04.26.19

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

WOMEN BUSINESS OWNERS NETWORK SPRING CONFERENCE: Inspiring tales, practical tools and networking opportunities afford entrepreneurs useful information and a renewed sense of motivation. Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $55-155. Info, info@wbon.org.

community

COMMUNITY SUPPER: A scrumptious spread connects friends and neighbors. Bring a dessert to share. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 5-5:45 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 300. CURRENT EVENTS CONVERSATION: Newsworthy subjects take the spotlight in this informal and open discussion. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 11 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 878-4918.

conferences

CSI SYMPOSIUM: Experts in the field of crimescene investigation drop knowledge on topics ranging from criminal profiling to utilizing technology. Dole Auditorium, Norwich University, Northfield, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 485-2455.

crafts

KNITTING & MORE: FOUR NEEDLE TUBE SOCKS: Needleworkers of all skill levels pick up new techniques while working on projects. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660.

dance

DANCE MASTER CLASS: BUTOH AS CREATIVE PROCESS: No dance experience? That’s no problem for participants in this introductory workshop on the postmodern Japanese dance form. Dance Theatre, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 2:50 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168. DROP-IN HIP-HOP DANCE: Beginners are welcome at a groove session inspired by infectious beats. Swan Dojo, Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m. $15. Info, 540-8300. ‘A HERO OF OUR TIME’: The Bolshoi Ballet carries out the story of the larger-than-life character Pechorin who endures heartbreaking betrayals. This is an on-screen performance. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. $6-18. Info, 748-2600.

environment

NATALIE JEREMIJENKO: The eco-artist considers the Queen City’s role in climate change in her talk “The Art of the Eco-Mindshift: ‘Plan B’ for Burlington.” Carpenter Auditorium, Given Medical Building, University of Vermont, Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 355-6197. WASTE WARRIOR TRAINING: Eco-minded individuals complete this interactive orientation with a team of friendly operatives that brings recycling and composting to Chittenden County events. Shelburne Town Offices, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 872-8111.

film

MOVING PICTURES: FILMS ABOUT IMMIGRATION: Film fanatics take in tales of uprooted people. Call for details. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581. ‘N.O.I.R.’: Tension between police and Montréal North’s black community is central to this gritty 2015 drama shown in French with English subtitles. Room 111, Cheray Science Hall, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 654-2000.

Saturday, April 22, 7 p.m., at North End Studio A in Burlington. $12. Info, 860-3349. puppetsineducation. org

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List your upcoming event here for free! SUBMISSION DEADLINES: ALL SUBMISSIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY THURSDAY AT NOON FOR CONSIDERATION IN THE FOLLOWING WEDNESDAY’S NEWSPAPER. FIND OUR CONVENIENT FORM AND GUIDELINES AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT. YOU CAN ALSO EMAIL US AT CALENDAR@SEVENDAYSVT.COM. TO BE LISTED, YOU MUST INCLUDE THE NAME OF EVENT, A BRIEF DESCRIPTION, SPECIFIC LOCATION, DATE, TIME, COST AND CONTACT PHONE NUMBER.

CALENDAR EVENTS IN SEVEN DAYS: LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY KRISTEN RAVIN. SEVEN DAYS EDITS FOR SPACE AND STYLE. DEPENDING ON COST AND OTHER FACTORS, CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS MAY BE LISTED IN EITHER THE CALENDAR OR THE CLASSES SECTION. WHEN APPROPRIATE, CLASS ORGANIZERS MAY BE ASKED TO PURCHASE A CLASS LISTING.

COURTESY OF PETER PARADISE PHOTOGRAPHY

SEVEN DAYS

‘SHE WHO WALKS IN THE MOONLIGHT’

‘VISUAL ACOUSTICS: THE MODERNISM OF JULIUS SHULMAN’: Shown as part of the Architecture + Design Film Series, this 2009 documentary spotlights the photographer who brought modern architecture to the American mainstream. Burlington City Hall Auditorium, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, adfilmseries@gmail.com.

WED.19

52 CALENDAR

NIGHT MOVES APR.22 | DANCE

GROUNDSWELL: COMMUNITY CONVERSATIONS ABOUT LAND USE, LIVELIHOOD, FOOD & THE FUTURE OF VERMONT: Rural Vermont representatives field feedback about visions for the state’s agricultural economy. Farmer and childcare stipends are available. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 223-7222.

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COURTESY OF RICH GILLIGAN

APR.21 | MUSIC

A Take on Tradition While their roots may be in traditional Irish music, the Gloaming are anything but conventional. Crossing geographical and generational boundaries, the band includes Irish fiddle master Martin Hayes, vocalist Iarla Ó Lionáird and indie-rock pianist Thomas Bartlett, the group’s youngest member and a Vermont native. Joined by American guitarist Dennis Cahill and fiddler Caoimhin Ó Raghallaigh, the guys, who also have successful solo careers, breathe new life into ancient Gaelic ballads and dance numbers. The band hits up Dartmouth College’s Hopkins Center for the Arts with tunes from its 2016 album 2, giving listeners a chance to hear Celtic music through fresh ears.

THE GLOAMING Friday, April 21, 8 p.m., at Spaulding Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H. $17-40. Info, 603-646-2422. hop. dartmouth.edu

Word Nerds Family Planning You’re a new parent. You come home from the hospital with your partner and your precious little one. Life is perfect — or is it? Making Babies and Other Complications, the inaugural production from Complications Company, takes on the not-so-pretty parts of parenthood and modern life through an anthology of seven short plays. Penned by Burlington playwright Mary Beth McNulty, Making Babies tackles topics ranging from sex to death to kidnapping to fruitless workouts. Laura Roald, who cofounded Complications Company with McNulty, directs an ensemble cast of local talent in this hilarious and heartbreaking portrait of life after birth.

‘SAYS YOU!’ Saturday, April 22, 7 p.m., at Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe Mountain Resort. $20-35. Info, 760-4634, sprucepeakarts.org. Sunday, April 23, 1 p.m., at Studio One, Vermont Public Radio in Colchester. $35. Info, saysyou.net SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Do you ever wonder what your favorite radio personalities actually look like? Fans of the National Public Radio quiz show “Says You!” can see contestants in the flesh when the parlor game plays out in person at Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center. Two teams of panelists put their vocabularies to the test in front of a live audience, giving language lovers plenty of laughs along the way. Vermont’s own indie-soul duo Dwight & Nicole are the musical guests at this battle of wits where, as the show’s motto goes, “It’s not important to know the answers … it’s important to like the answers.”

04.19.17-04.26.19

‘MAKING BABIES AND OTHER COMPLICATIONS’

SEVEN DAYS

APR.22-23 | GAMES

CALENDAR 53

APR.19-23 | THEATER

COURTESY OF LAURA ROALD

Wednesday-Friday, April 19-21, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, April 22, 2 and 7:30 p.m.; and Sunday, April 23, 4 p.m., at Off Center for the Dramatic Arts in Burlington. $15; donations for Wednesday. Info, complicationscompany@ gmail.com. offcentervt. com


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food & drink

THE ART & SCIENCE OF KOMBUCHA: Nutritionist Suzanna Bliss provides step-by-step instruction for making the beneficial fermented tea. Participants take home a starter culture. City Market/Onion River Co-op, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. $5-10; preregister. Info, 861-9753. BENEFIT BAKE: Pizza lovers dine on slices to support Slow Food Vermont. Partial proceeds from each flatbread sold are donated. American Flatbread Burlington Hearth, 5-11:30 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 323-1237. COMMUNITY NIGHT: Diners dig in for a cause at an evening benefiting the Vermont Community Garden Network. Partial proceeds are donated. Bluebird Barbecue, Burlington, 4:30-9 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 448-3070. VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: Local products — think veggies, breads, pastries, cheeses, wines, syrups, jewelry, crafts and beauty supplies — draw shoppers to a diversified bazaar. Vermont Farmers Food Center, Rutland, 3-6 p.m. Free. Info, 342-4727. Untitled-6 1

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Support a woman’s healthy return to community from prison

Become a Mentor Orientation May 10, 2017 at 5:30pm

54 CALENDAR

SEVEN DAYS

04.19.17-04.26.19

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Contact Pam Greene (802) 846-7164 pgreene@mercyconnections.org

The Vermont Women’s Mentoring Program A partnership with: Untitled-12 1

MS in Clinical Mental Health Counseling (PCMH)

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BINGO: Prizes reward players who mark off numbers drawn by a caller. Champlain Senior Center, McClure Multigenerational Center, Burlington, 12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 658-3585. BRIDGE CLUB: Strategic players have fun with the popular card game. Burlington Bridge Club, Williston, 9:15 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. $6. Info, 872-5722. CRIBBAGE: Team members aim for a value of exactly 15 or 31 in this classic card game. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3322.

health & fitness

BACKYARD BOOT CAMP: Ma’am, yes, ma’am! Exercise expert Ginger Lambert guides active bodies in an interval-style workout to build strength and cardiovascular fitness. Private residence, Middlebury, 7-8 a.m. $12. Info, 343-7160. BONE BUILDERS: Folks of all ages ward off osteoporosis in this exercise and prevention class. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 7:30-8:30 & 9:15-10:15 a.m. Free. Info, 223-3322. EPIC MINDFULNESS MEDITATION: Guided practice and group conversation with Yushin Sola cultivate well-being. Railyard Apothecary and Yoga Studio, Burlington, 7:30-8:30 p.m. $14. Info, 299-9531. GENTLE TAI CHI: Madeleine Piat-Landolt guides students in a sequence of poses with an emphasis on relaxation and alignment. Champlain Senior Center, McClure Multigenerational Center, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 658-3585. HERB TASTING GROUP: Blind taste tests prompt herbalists to note flavors, physical reactions and natural impressions of various medicinal plants. Railyard Apothecary and Yoga Studio, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0595. INSIGHT MEDITATION: Attendees absorb Buddhist principles and practices. Wellspring Mental Health and Wellness Center, Hardwick, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 472-6694.

Classes meet one weekend a month in Burlington, Vermont. Preparation for licensure as a clinical mental health counselor and certification as a substance abuse counselor. Accepting applications for 2017 and January 2018.

NIA WITH LINDA: Eclectic music and movements drawn from healing, martial and dance arts propel an animated barefoot workout. South End Studio, Burlington, 8:30-9:30 a.m. $14; free for first-timers. Info, 372-1721. RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: Folks in recovery and their families enrich mind, body and spirit in an all-levels class. All props are provided; wear loose clothing. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 861-3150. TAI CHI CLASS: Folks renew body, mind and spirit by learning Yang-style long-form postures, qigong, partner practice and yin/yang principles. McClure Multigenerational Center, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. $15. Info, 453-3690.

Specializations offered in Integrated Mental Health and Addictions Treatment for Children, Youth and Families or Adults

800.730.5542 | pcmhadmissions@snhu.edu | snhu.edu/pcmh 6h-snhu021517.indd 1

games

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UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT NURSING STUDENT VISITS: Presentations on different types of healthy lifestyles promote well-being. Champlain

Senior Center, McClure Multigenerational Center, Burlington, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 658-3585. WEDNESDAY NIGHT SOUND BATH: Draw in the good vibrations of gongs, bowls and didgeridoos — a relaxing sonic massage to get you through the week. The Wellness Collective, Burlington, 7:30-9 p.m. $15. Info, 510-697-7790. YOGA NIDRA: THE YOGA OF DEEP RELAXATION: Savitri Devi Dasi leads students into a state of deep meditation, which brings profound calmness, quietness and relaxation. Bring a blanket and something comfortable to lie on. Cavendish Gallery, Burlington, 7:30-8:30 p.m. $10-15. Info, 206-557-9850. ZUMBA EXPRESS: A shortened version of this guided beat-driven workout gives students a much-needed midday surge of energy. Marketplace Fitness, Burlington, 11:30 a.m.-noon. $12; free for members and first-timers. Info, 651-8773.

kids

CHILDREN’S FILM NIGHT: A short movie paves the way for a community supper. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581. FAMILY MOVIE NIGHT: ‘PETE’S DRAGON’: Mini movie buffs don PJs and bring their favorite stuffed animals for a screening of this 1977 film about an orphan boy and his fire-breathing buddy. Vermont History Center, Barre, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 828-2180. LEGO CHALLENGE: Kids tackle construction tasks with colorful blocks. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 745-1391. RICHMOND STORY TIME: Lit lovers ages 2 through 5 are introduced to the wonderful world of reading. Richmond Free Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 434-3036. SCIENCE STORY TIME: CELEBRATE EARTH DAY: Eco-conscious kids brainstorm ways to care for the planet. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Regular admission, $13.5016.50; free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848. STEM CLUB: Inquisitive kids embark on challenges in science, technology, engineering and math. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 849-2420. STORY TIME & PLAYGROUP: Engrossing plots unfold into fun activities for tots up to age 6. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 426-3581. STORY TIME WITH A TWIST: Wee ones get the wiggles and giggles out with Ms. Liza. Highgate Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 868-3970. TODDLER TIME: With activities ranging from Legos and Play-Doh to stories and snacks, little ones and their caregivers find plenty of ways to play. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 745-1391. ‘WILD KRATTS LIVE!’: Science fuses with fun as Chris and Martin Kratt encounter incredible wild animals in an onstage version of their animated PBS program. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, 6 p.m. $25-45. Info, 863-5966. YOGA FOR KIDS: Yogis ages 2 through 5 strike a pose to explore breathing exercises and relaxation techniques. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 1111:30 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216.

language

BEGINNER ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASS: Students build a foundation in reading, speaking and writing. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211. GERMAN CONVERSATION GROUP: Community members practice conversing auf Deutsch. Local History Room, Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211. INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: Pupils improve their speaking and grammar mastery. Private residence, Burlington, 6 p.m. $20. Info, 324-1757. INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASS: Learners take communication to the next


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

level. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211. LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: SPANISH: Hola! Language lovers perfect their fluency. KelloggHubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

music

CHRISTINA WHITTEN THOMAS: The award-winning composer and Middlebury College grad gives music lovers a glimpse into her recent work during a noteworthy discussion. Room 221, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168.

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tech

TECH HELP WITH CLIF: Electronics novices develop skill sets applicable to smartphones, tablets and other gadgets. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, noon & 1 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-6955.

theater

‘THE CALL’: A couple hoping to add to their family receives surprising news from their adoption agency, leading to an exploration of global issues in Tanya Barfield’s play presented by Vermont Stage. FlynnSpace, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $28.8037.50. Info, 863-5966.

Ages 18-35 8 day/7 night inpatient stay 2 outpatient screening visits 4 outpatient follow up visits Up to $1650 compensation

VACCINE TESTING CENTER

Call 802-656-0013 for more info and to schedule a screening. Leave your name, numberand a good time to call back.

‘MAMMA MIA!’: Timeless tunes by ABBA are the backbone of Northern Stage’s production of this high-energy musical about a bride-to-be searching for her father. Barrette Center for the Arts, White River Junction, 7:30 p.m. $15-55. Info, 296-7000.

A R E D E A D’

Email UVMVTC@UVM.EDU or visit UVMVTC.ORG

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PUSHING A BRAIN UPHILL: WOLF EYES: The Detroit noise band headlines an experimental music showcase that also includes locals Last World and Staples. Vermonters for Criminal Justice will speak. The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery, Burlington, 8-11 p.m. $12. Info, burlington.gull@gmail.com.

To test a vaccine against a respiratory virus

Memorial Lounge, Waterman Building, University of Vermont, Burlington, 4-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 656-0756.

TER THU.20 | THEA

GEORGE WINSTON: The prolific pianist tickles the ivories in works inspired by seasons and topographies. Paramount Theatre, Rutland, 7:30 p.m. $40. Info, 775-0903.

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SONG CIRCLE: Singers and musicians congregate for an acoustic session of popular folk tunes. Godnick Adult Center, Rutland, 7:15-9:15 p.m. Donations. Info, 775-1182. STUDENT PERFORMANCE RECITAL: UVM music students showcase their skills on various instruments. University of Vermont Recital Hall, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 656-3040.

outdoors

WOODCOCK WATCH: Avian enthusiasts seek out the bird’s elaborate mating rituals on a sunset stroll. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 7:30 p.m. $5-10. Info, 229-6206.

seminars

A COURSE IN MIRACLES: A monthly workshop based on Helen Schucman’s 1975 text delves into the wisdom found at the core of the world’s major religions. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Plattsburgh, N.Y., 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 518-561-6920.

UNLEASH THE POWER OF YOUR THOUGHTS: Participants learn to harness the force of the subconscious mind to manifest the life they desire. Sacred Mountain Studio, Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m. $10. Info, 349-7098.

WOMEN’S PICKUP BASKETBALL: Ladies dribble up and down the court during an evening of friendly competition. Lyman C. Hunt Middle School, Burlington, 8:15-9:30 p.m. $3; preregister at meetup.com. Info, carmengeorgevt@gmail.com.

talks

MATTHIAS BREWER: Science rules! “Organic Chemistry: Scary to Some, But Indispensable to All” introduces a lay audience to the discipline and describes the professor’s research contributions.

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words

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ANDREW FORSTHOEFEL: The author of Walking to Listen: 4,000 Miles Across America, One Story at a Time steps in for a talk and signing. Norwich Bookstore, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 649-1114.

Jeff Rehbach, Music Director

CAROL JOHNSON COLLINS: The Vermont poet shares some of her favorite stanzas and songs, encouraging listeners to write and read original works on the spot. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 2-3:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338. LUNCHTIME POETRY READINGS: An open micstyle event allows writers to recite their own poems, works by others or just listen. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 745-1392. MEET THE AUTHOR: Vermont penman Adam Boyce excerpts his latest publication, Because I Loved the Daffodil: The Writings of a Vermont Farm Wife, Mildred F. Boyce. Waterbury Public Library, 10:3011:30 a.m. Free. Info, 244-7036. WEDNESDAY WORKSHOP: Lit lovers analyze works-in-progress penned by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup. com; limited space. Info, 383-8104. WRITE NOW: Wordsmiths let their creativity flow freely at a monthly meeting. Chaffee Art Center, Rutland, 6:30-9 p.m. $15-20; preregister; limited space. Info, 775-0356. WRITING CIRCLE: Prompts lead into a 30-minute free write and sharing opportunities without judgment. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 303.

THU.20

presents AT BURLINGTON April SAT 22 11AM

AMY HUNTINGTON: FRESH-PICKED POETRY

THU 27 7PM

BRIAN STAVELEY: SKULLSWORN

SUN 30 4PM

STEPHEN KIERNAN: THE BAKER’S SECRET

WHAT IS JUSTICE? BUILDING A MORE COMPASSIONATE JUSTICE SYSTEM: Former inmates and others connected to criminal justice speak out at a forum to raise awareness of dysfunction in Vermont’s prison system. Unitarian Church of Montpelier, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 803-249-5905.

agriculture

JOSHUA FAULKNER: The talk “Increasing the Resilience of Vermont Agriculture to Climate Change” covers strategies for adapting agricultural systems plus current research and outreach efforts in the state. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338. TRIP TO GARDENER’S SUPPLY: Green thumbs meet at the senior center, then travel together to the Williston store. Champlain Senior Center, McClure Multigenerational Center, Burlington, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 658-3585. THU.20

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Celebrating 50 years

of singing timeless a cappella music

Book launch!

Friday, April 21, at 7:30 pm

Book launch! Fundraiser for Vermont Foodbank. Cosponsored by August First.

Mahaney Center for the Arts Middlebury College Middlebury, VT

May TUE 2 7PM WED 3 7PM

activism

A story time and activity cosponsored by City Market. Free.

THU 4 7PM

Sunday, April 23, at 3:00 pm McCarthy Arts Center Saint Michael’s College Colchester, VT

LAURIE FOREST: THE BLACK WITCH Book launch!

Saturday, April 29, at 7:30 pm

PHILIP BARUTH: SENATOR LEAHY BIOGRAPHY

Unitarian Church of Montpelier Montpelier, VT

Burlington book launch!

Tickets available in advance at

KRISTIN RICHLAND: MURAL RIBBON CUTTING

VTChoralUnion.org or at the door

A Children’s Book Week event for children’s lit fans of all ages. Light fare. Free.

With generous support from:

Burlington events are ticketed unless otherwise indicated. Your $3 ticket comes with a coupon for $5 off the featured book! Beginning in May, proceeds go to Vermont Foodbank! Choral Arts New England

Independent Bookstore Day

Encouraging choral excellence through Alfred Nash Patterson grants

SATURDAY, APRIL 29

In Essex and Burlington. Join us for giveaways and merriment as we celebrate with indie bookstores nationwide. 191 Bank Street, Downtown Burlington • 802.448.3350 21 Essex Way, Essex • 802.872.7111 www.phoenixbooks.biz

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CALENDAR 55

CHRIS ABANI: Known as an international voice on humanitarianism, art and ethics, the acclaimed novelist presents “Self and Others — Literature and Empathy.” Ira Allen Chapel, University of Vermont, Burlington, 5-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 656-3056.

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ALEX WOLFF: After covering 10 Olympic Games with Sports Illustrated, the longtime journalist presents “Five-Ring Circus: Why We Can’t Live With the Olympics — or Without Them.” Champlain Valley Unitarian Universalist Society, Middlebury, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 388-2117.

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LIVING WITH ALZHEIMER’S FOR EARLY-STAGE CAREGIVERS: Professionals share strategies for safe, effective and comfortable care. University of Vermont Medical Center Memory Program, Colchester, 5:30-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 800-272-3900.

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art

HEART + SOUL: Mark Stone and Evil People provide the soundtrack to a silent auction and multimedia art show. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 6 p.m. $5. Info, 540-0406.

PHOTO CO-OP: Shutterbugs gather to share their experience and knowledge of their craft. River Arts, Morrisville, 6-8 p.m. $5. Info, 888-1261.

HOMESHARE VERMONT’S ‘THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE HOME: CELEBRATING 35 YEARS’: Raconteurs Sue Schmidt and Kevin Gallagher headline an evening of “Moth”-inspired storytelling, good eats and live music by the Brevity Thing. Comfort Suites, Shelburne, 6-9 p.m. $35. Info, 863-5625.

THU.20

OPEN STUDIO: Friends new and old convene for a creative session. Expressive Arts Burlington, 12:302:30 p.m. $15. Info, 343-8172.

PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB: Shutterbugs develop their picture-taking skills. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. STEVE PERKINS: Art hounds munch on bag lunches during the talk “Paul Sample’s Vermont,” in which Vermont Historical Society executive director examines the artist’s 1961 mural “Salute to Vermont.” Vermont History Museum, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 479-8500.

bazaars

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NEWBERRY MARKET: Shoppers browse specialty foods, clothing, pottery, décor, collectibles and more at a weekly indoor bazaar. Newberry Market, White River Junction, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. Info, 299-0212.

business

LEGAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR NEW BUSINESS OWNERS: A high-level overview of legal matters helps entrepreneurs avoid common mistakes. Center for Women & Enterprise, Burlington, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 391-4870.

POSTNATAL SELF-EMPOWERMENT: Mothers and babes-in-arms circle up for a reflective session centered on embracing one’s self and family amid the chaos of daily life. Prenatal Method Studio, Burlington, noon-1 p.m. $10-20. Info, 829-0211.

film

‘CRAZYWISE’: A 2016 documentary asks the question “What can we learn from those who have turned a psychological crisis into a positive transformative experience?” A panel discussion follows. Film House, Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, 6-8:15 p.m. Free. Info, 488-6912.

food & drink

420 SMOKED FOODS BUFFET: Folks satisfy the munchies with an extensive spread of smoked snacks — think fried chicken and mac and cheese — and local brews. The Tap Room at Switchback Brewing, Burlington, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $38 includes one beer and meal; preregister; limited space. Info, 651-4114. VERMONT RESTAURANT WEEK: APERITIVO: A SNACKY SOCIAL HOUR: Spirited cocktails and taste bud-tempting bites from American Flatbread Burlington Hearth fuel foodies for mingling with area food-and-drink producers. Maglianero, Burlington, 5:307 p.m. $7. Info, 864-5684.

STEPS TO STARTING A BUSINESS: Entrepreneurs pick up tips for getting new enterprises off the ground. Essex Hub for Women & Business, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 391-4870.

community

BATTLE OF THE CAMPUS CHEFS: University of Vermont Dining cooks tempt judges’ tastebuds with gourmet dishes SAT ’ D I . 22 | F made with local, sustainable ingrediIL M | ‘T H E K ents. Grand Maple Ballroom, Davis Center, University of Vermont, Burlington, 7-9 p.m. $5-9. Info, campuskitchenuvm@gmail.com. FRANKLIN COUNTY REGIONAL CHAMBER OF TASTES OF ERITREA: YEBEG TIBS & INGUDAI COMMERCE MIXER: Friends and colleagues catch TIBS: Mulu Tewelde guides home cooks in preup in a relaxed environment featuring special paring dishes from her native country. McClure guests from United Way of Northwest Vermont. Multigenerational Center, Burlington, 5:30-7:30 Coldwell Banker Hickok & Boardman Realty, St. p.m. $5-10; preregister. Info, 861-9753. Albans, 5:30-7:30 p.m. $5-8; preregister; cash bar. Info, 524-2444.

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COMMUNITY DISCUSSION: Area residents chew the fat over the values of space and community growth. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 303.

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HAVE YOU

NOTICED OUR LEGAL ADS?

Check them out for important and useful information, including: • Act 250 Permit applications • Foreclosures • Notices to creditors

• Storage auctions • Planning and zoning changes

MOUNT MANSFIELD SCALE MODELERS: Hobbyists break out the superglue and sweat the small stuff at a miniature construction skill swap. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 879-0765.

dance

FOR REAL WOMEN SERIES WITH BELINDA: GIT UR FREAK ON: R&B and calypso-dancehall music is the soundtrack to an empowering sensual dance session aimed at confronting body shaming. Swan Dojo, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. $15. Info, bestirredfitness@gmail.com. MOVEMENT MATTERS: TWO YEARS IN PROCESS: Choreographer Maree ReMalia and her crossdisciplinary collaborators reflect on her two-year residency through informal sharing of text, movement and archival media. A reception follows. Dance Theatre, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 443-6433.

etc.

DANCE, PAINT, WRITE: DROP-IN: Teens and adults create, connect, heal and grow through self-guided movement and art set to music. Expressive Arts Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. $20; free for first-timers. Info, 343-8172.

Turn to the Classifieds section (center pull-out) or go to sevendaysvt.com/legals for a list of legal notices. 6h-legals.indd 1

crafts

4/4/17 4:58 PM

games

CHITTENDEN COUNTY CHESS CLUB: Checkmate! Strategic thinkers make calculated moves as they vie for their opponents’ kings. Faith United Methodist Church, South Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 324-1143. POKÉMON LEAGUE: I choose you, Pikachu! Players of the trading-card game earn weekly and monthly prizes in a fun, friendly environment where newbies can be coached by league leaders. Brap’s Magic, Burlington, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0498.

health & fitness

CHAIR YOGA: Yogis limber up with modified poses. Champlain Senior Center, McClure Multigenerational Center, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 316-1510. COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS: A 20-minute guided practice with Andrea O’Connor alleviates stress and tension. Tea and a discussion follow. Winooski Senior Center, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 233-1161. CORNWALL FITNESS BOOT CAMP: Interval training helps participants improve strength, agility, endurance and cardiovascular fitness. Cornwall Town Hall, 9-10 a.m. $12. Info, 343-7160. FORZA: THE SAMURAI SWORD WORKOUT: Students sculpt lean muscles and gain mental focus when using wooden replicas of the weapon. North End Studio A, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. $10. Info, 578-9243.


FIND FUTURE DATES + UPDATES AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/EVENTS

GLOBAL HERBALISM SERIES: SENEGAL, WEST AFRICA: Clinical herbalist Kenzie McDonald discusses the connection of spirituality and traditional herbalism within the Wolof and Cerer peoples. Railyard Apothecary and Yoga Studio, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. $15-20. Info, 540-0595. MINDFULNESS MEDITATION: A peaceful, guided meditation helps participants achieve a sense of stability and calm. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 777-8602. YOGA: A Sangha Studio instructor guides students who are in recovery toward achieving inner tranquility. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 5-6 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

kids

BABY & TODDLER PLAYGROUP: Parents connect while kids up to age 3 enjoy toys, stories, challah and juice. Social Hall, Ohavi Zedek Synagogue, Burlington, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, grace@ ohavizedek.org. FAIRY CRAFT AFTERNOON: Tots tap into their creativity when constructing items inspired by woodland pixies. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 3:15-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 985-5124. INTRODUCTION TO POETRY SLAMS FOR KIDS: Aspiring wordsmiths learn about spoken-word verse, and even compose their own pieces. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 2-5 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338. LEGO CLUB: Brightly colored interlocking blocks inspire developing minds. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660. MUSICAL STORY TIME: Little ones keep the beat with rhythm instruments while Inger Dybfest strums the guitar. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 10:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 985-5124. READ TO A DOG: Book hounds ages 5 through 10 curl up with a good story and a furry friend. Fairfax Community Library, 3:15-4:15 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 849-2420. READ TO ARCHIE: Budding bookworms join a friendly therapy dog for entertaining tails — er, tales. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:15-4 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. ‘WILD KRATTS LIVE!’: See WED.19.

language

FRENCH CONVERSATION: Speakers improve their linguistic dexterity in the Romantic tongue. Bradford Public Library, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 222-4536. FRENCH THURSDAY: SOCIAL HOUR: Francophones fine-tune their French-language conversation skills over cocktails. Bar, Bleu Northeast Seafood, Burlington, 5-7 p.m. $4; free for Alliance Française members. Info, michelineatremblay@gmail.com.

music

NORTHERN VERMONT SONGWRITERS: Melody makers meet to share ideas and maximize their creativity. Call for details. Catamount Outback Artspace, St. Johnsbury, 6:45 p.m. Free. Info, 467-9859.

REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS: SMALL BITES: Realtor Jeanne Felmly demystifies the process of buying and selling property. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 1:30-3 p.m. Free. Info, 223-2518.

sports

SHOEFLY TRAIL RUNNING SERIES: Runners and walkers break a sweat on one-mile, 5K and 10K excursions on Northeast Kingdom trails. See shoeflytrailrun.org for details. 5 p.m. $45 for the series; free for kids under 10; preregister. Info, julie@shoeflytrailrun.org. UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT WE 4.20 5K FOR WELLNESS: Friends, families and even dogs make strides in a fun run or walk. University of Vermont Archie Post Athletic Complex, Burlington, 4:15-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 656-4524.

talks

PARKER MERRILL SPEECH CHAMPIONSHIP: Student finalists vie for cash prizes in an oratory competition. Professors and students also square off in a round of PowerPoint Roulette, improvising a presentation incorporating never-before-seen slides. Robison Hall, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 443-6433. REIMAGINING JUSTICE FOR WOMEN: A panel discussion hosted by Greater Burlington Women’s Forum gets to the heart of how Vermont’s criminal justice system impacts women. Networking follows. Burlington City Hall Auditorium, noon1:15 p.m. Donations; preregister. Info, leaders@ btvwomen.org.

tech

TECH SUPPORT: Need an email account? Want to enjoy ebooks? Bring your phone, tablet or laptop to a weekly help session. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-8291, ext. 302.

theater

‘CABARET’: Johnson State College student actors travel to Weimar-era Germany in this time-tested musical centered on a Berlin nightclub during Hitler’s rise to power. Dibden Center for the Arts, Johnson State College, 7 p.m. $10. Info, 635-1476. ‘THE CALL’: See WED.19. ‘THE CHERRY ORCHARD’: The Russian Atmosphere Theatre Studio stages Chekhov’s classic tale of an aristocratic woman who loses her estate, performed in Russian with English subtitles. Burlington High School, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Free. Info, info@burlingtonyaroslavl.com. DAVID BUDBILL’S ‘JUDEVINE’: A poet’s portraits of ordinary people propels this tribute to gritty, backroad Vermont. Montpelier City Hall Auditorium, 7:30 p.m. $10-30. Info, 229-0492. ‘EURYDICE’: The SUNY Plattsburgh Department of Music presents Sarah Ruhl’s modern take on the classic myth “Orpheus and Eurydice.” Hartman Theatre, Myers Fine Arts Building, SUNY Plattsburgh, N.Y., 7:30-9:30 p.m. $3-11. Info, 518-564-2243. ‘HEATHERS: THE MUSICAL’: The 1989 cult-classic comedy film comes to the stage via Lyndon State College’s Twilight Players. Kids 16 and under require a parent or guardian. Alexander Twilight Theatre, Lyndon State College, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 626-3663.

THU.20

CALENDAR 57

SUNY PLATTSBURGH SYMPHONIC BAND: Daniel Gordon directs the program “Folk Dances From Around the World.” E. Glenn Giltz Auditorium, Hawkins Hall, SUNY Plattsburgh, N.Y., 7:30-9 p.m. Free. Info, 518-564-2243.

NATURAL MARSHFIELD: Wildlife experts uncover the wonders of the local environment. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

SEVEN DAYS

NOONTIME CONCERTS: Music lovers munch on bag lunches while reveling in medieval, Renaissance and traditional music by women’s vocal ensemble Anima. Christ Episcopal Church, Montpelier, noon. Free. Info, 223-3631.

seminars

04.19.17-04.26.19

LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: FRENCH: Bag lunches in hand, attendees brush up on their linguistic abilities. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

T.J. DONOVAN: Vermont’s attorney general discusses the state’s role in opposing President Donald Trump’s travel ban and other pressing issues. Shelburne Town Offices, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 363-0539.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

BEGINNER-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: Basic communication skills are on the agenda at a guided lesson. Private residence, Burlington, 6 p.m. $20. Info, 324-1757.

politics

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EVENTS EVENTS ON ON SALE SALE NOW! NOW THIS WE E K

Vermont Restaurant Week Presents Apertivo: A Snacky Social Hour

04.19.17-04.26.19

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

THURSDAY, APRIL 20, MAGLIANERO CAFÉ, BURLINGTON

THIS WE E K

THIS WE E K

SEVEN DAYS 58 CALENDAR

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26, ARTSRIOT, BURLINGTON

THU.20

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‘MAKING BABIES AND OTHER COMPLICATIONS’: Burlington playwright Mary Beth McNulty’s anthology show includes seven short plays about the tangles of modern life, from the hilarious to the horrible. See calendar spotlight. Off Center for the Dramatic Arts, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $15. Info, 264-9001. ‘MAMMA MIA!’: See WED.19. NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: ‘ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD’: Tom Stoppard’s play starring Daniel Radcliffe and Joshua McGuire turns Hamlet on its head. Palace 9 Cinemas, South Burlington, 2 & 7 p.m. $18. Info, 863-5966. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. $1625. Info, 748-2600. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, 7 p.m. $10-17. Info, 382-9222.

SUNDAY, APRIL 30, ESSEX CULINARY RESORT & SPA, ESSEX

The VSO Presents Jukebox

• • • • •

Fundraisers Festivals Plays Sports Concerts

Make an Essential Oil Candle & HandPainted Glass Jar SUNDAY, APRIL 23, EDO, SHELBURNE

• • • •

words

‘SPACE ALIENS: LOOKING FOR LIFE IN THE UNIVERSE’: Stargazers get swept up in Daniel Soref’s celestial spectacular accompanied by a live ephemeris and a tour of the spring sky. Northcountry Planetarium, SUNY Plattsburgh, N.Y., 8:30 p.m. $4-6. Info, 518-564-3168.

DEDE CUMMINGS, MEGAN BUCHANAN & JAMES CREWS: Three Vermont poets share stanzas from their respective collections To Look Out From, Clothesline Religion and The Book of What Stays. Phoenix Books Rutland, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 855-8078. LUNCH & LEARN: Chelsea Frisbee of Burlington’s Intervale Center sows seeds of understanding with “Planting Trees to Heal Our Waters.” Ohavi Zedek Synagogue, Burlington, noon. Free. Info, 863-4214. ORAL STORYTELLING WORKSHOP: Wordsmiths join Burlington Writers Workshop members in a “Moth”-style exploration of telling tales for live audiences. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104.

art

FIBER ARTS FRIDAY: Yarn lovers get together for tea and casual project time. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 985-5124.

bazaars

dance

BALLROOM & LATIN DANCING: Learn new moves with Ballroom Nights, then join others in a dance social featuring the waltz, tango and more. Singles, couples and beginners are welcome. Williston Jazzercise Fitness Center, lesson, 7-8 p.m.; dance social, 8-9:30 p.m. $10-14; $8 for dance only. Info, 862-2269.

CONTACT US:

865-1020, ext. 10 tickets@sevendaysvt.com

SEVENDAYSTICKETS.COM 3v-tickets041917.indd 1

PEACE VIGIL: Friends and neighbors come together, bringing along their signs and their hearts. Top of Church St., Burlington, 5-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 899-1731.

FEAST TOGETHER OR FEAST TO GO: Senior citizens and their guests catch up over a shared meal. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, noon-1 p.m. $7-9; preregister. Info, 262-6288.

No cost to you Local support Built-in promotion Custom options

4/17/17 6:49 PM

NORTH COUNTRY CLIMATE REALITY CONFERENCE: It’s getting hot in here, so attendees take in keynote speeches and panel discussions and engage in breakout sessions on various aspects of global warming. Withey Hall, Green Mountain College, Poultney, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. $20; limited space. Info, 800-776-6675.

NIGHT AT CITY CENTER: Performances from Farm to Ballet, Bill Carmichael and other talents originated in South Burlington drive home the importance of the arts at this fundraiser gala for South Burlington City Center for the Arts. Doubletree Hotel, South Burlington, 7 p.m. $75. Info, 662-2018.

community

WE CAN HELP!

EARTH DAY BASH: Environmentally friendly folks join the 1% for the Planet team for live music, food, beverages, a silent auction and an Earth Day mural. Maglianero, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, membershipintern2@onepercentfortheplanet.org.

TWO ONE-ACT PLAYS: Shelburne Players treat audience members to a double bill of gut-busting plays including Peter Shaffer’s Black Comedy and Tom Stoppard’s The Real Inspector Hound. Shelburne Town Center, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $12-15. Info, 343-2602.

LULAROE FUNDRAISER FOR VERMONT FAMILY NETWORK: Fashionistas spruce up their spring wardrobes with stylish garments while supporting the Vermont Family Network. 14th Star Brewing Co., St. Albans, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, roewithravelin16@ gmail.com.

SELLING TICKETS?

environment

etc.

FRI.21

Burlington Tree Tours Vermont Restaurant FRIDAY, APRIL 21, Week Presents OUTSIDE OF HILTON BURLINGTON, Bottomless BURLINGTON Brunch Bash

ECSTATIC DANCE VERMONT: Jubilant motions with the Green Mountain Druid Order inspire divine connections. Christ Episcopal Church, Montpelier, 7-9 p.m. $10. Info, 505-8011.

STAGE RUSSIA HD: ‘THE BLACK MONK’: The Moscow Young Generation Theater interprets Anton Chekhov’s tragic tale of a young man overcome with hallucinations. This on-screen event is presented in Russian with English subtitles. Palace 9 Cinemas, South Burlington, 7 p.m. $15. Info, 660-9300.

activism

FRIDAY, APRIL 21, ARTSRIOT, BURLINGTON

THIS WE E K

Vermont Restaurant Week Presents The Dish: Going With the Grain

THIS WE E K

calendar

MISS VERMONT 2017 COMPETITION: Promising contestants lend their talents to the annual event, at which the winners receive academic scholarships and the honor of serving Vermont for a year. Vergennes Opera House, 7 p.m. $25. Info, 877-6737.

WOMEN’S SHABBAT: Women from all walks of life are welcome to pitch their tents for songs and blessings followed by a potluck, storytelling and stargazing. Huntington Open Women’s Land, 6 p.m. Donations. Info, 453-7622.

food & drink

FRESH: IDEAS & INGREDIENTS BEHIND THE BAR 2017: Bartenders highlight unique techniques and exciting flavors to watch for in the coming year in a fashion show-inspired presentation. Mad River Distillers Burlington Tasting Room, 4:30-9 p.m. Cost of drinks. Info, 489-5501. VERMONT RESTAURANT WEEK: Foodies, take note! Mouthwatering prix-fixe menus and themed events celebrate local fare. See vermontrestaurantweek.com for details. Various locations statewide. Prices vary. Info, 864-5684.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.19, 9:15 a.m.

health & fitness

ACUDETOX: Attendees in recovery undergo acupuncture to the ear to propel detoxification. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150. ADVANCED TAI CHI CLASS: Attendees keep active with a sequence of slow, controlled movements. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3322. BONE BUILDERS: See WED.19, 7:30-8:30 a.m. FITNESS FLOW YOGA: All types of athletes can build strength, increase flexibility and prevent injuries with a moderate-to-vigorous vinyasa flow. Colchester Health & Fitness, 5:30-6:30 p.m. $15; free for members. Info, 860-1010. RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: See WED.19. STUDENT PHARMACY PROGRAM: Curious minds ask questions about their current medications. Champlain Senior Center, McClure Multigenerational Center, Burlington, 11 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 658-3585. YOGA DANCE: Yogis leave their mats at home for this energizing movement session. Sangha Studio — Pine, Burlington, 8-9:30 p.m. $10-20. Info, 448-4262.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

kids

ACORN CLUB STORY TIME: Little ones up to age 4 gather for read-aloud tales. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 748-8291. ALL-AGES STORY TIME: Babies, toddlers and preschoolers participate in finger plays and action rhymes. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. BIG & MESSY — ART SPACE: Process, not product, is the focus of this parent-child creative session with open-ended art stations. River Arts, Morrisville, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 888-1261. EARLY-BIRD MATH STORY TIME: Books, songs and games put a creative twist on mathematics. Community Room, Richmond Free Library, 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 434-3036.

Hall, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 2:15 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 603-646-2422. ‘FIRE AND ICE’: A trio of professional musicians presents works for classical guitar, accordion and cello by composers from the U.S. and Norway. A silent film screening is also accompanied by live music. McCarthy Arts Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 654-2000. THE GLOAMING: A transatlantic supergroup puts a new spin on ancient Gaelic dance tunes and ballads. See calendar spotlight. Spaulding Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 8 p.m. $10-40. Info, 603-646-2422.

FAMILY MOVIE: Parents and tots take their seats for an all-ages flick. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

JUKEBOX: A WAREHOUSE CHAMBER MUSIC PROJECT: Composer Matt LaRocca curates this concert series presented by ArtsRiot and Vermont Symphony Orchestra. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $5-200. Info, 540-0406.

KIDS’ SPRINGTIME HERBAL CLASS SERIES: Budding herbalists get schooled on interactions in nature, traditional herbal systems, plant identification, medicine making and herbal justice. Email for details. Various Burlington locations, noon-2 p.m. $15-20. Info, wildfaithherbfarm@gmail.com.

MICHAEL HURLEY: The folk cult hero kicks off the 2017 summer concert series. Beer, wine, jambalaya, corn bread and salad are also on the menu. Meeting House on the Green, East Fairfield, food and drink, 6 p.m.; concert, 7-9 p.m. $10-20; preregister. Info, 827-6626.

MUSIC WITH ROBERT: Sing-alongs with Robert Resnik hit all the right notes. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216.

MYERS FINE ARTS GALLERY CONCERT: Set among student artwork, student musicians dole out piano compositions and musical theater selections. Myers Fine Arts Building, SUNY Plattsburgh, N.Y., 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 518-564-2243.

PLAY GROUP: Crafts and snacks amuse young’uns up to age 5. Doty Memorial Elementary School, Worcester, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, moonsong148@ hotmail.com. STORY TIME: Babies, toddlers and preschoolers drop in for books, rhymes, songs and activities. Winooski Memorial Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 655-6424.

ROBERT RESNIK: The host of Vermont Public Radio’s “All the Traditions” doles out toe-tapping numbers. Champlain Senior Center, McClure Multigenerational Center, Burlington, 11 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 658-3585.

TEEN ADVISORY BOARD: Teens interested in assisting with Essex Eats Out meet at the library. Helping hands can also meet at the St. James Episcopal Church at 5 p.m. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:45-7 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

VERMONT CHORAL UNION: Thirty-six voices soar in works from medieval times to the present in the Vermont a cappella ensemble’s 50th anniversary concert, “Wings of Song.” Robison Hall, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 7:30 p.m. $6-12. Info, 433-6433.

lgbtq

talks

OUTRIGHT AWARDS: Friends and family of Outright Vermont celebrate the best in queer youth leadership with an awards ceremony, a not-so-silent auction, catered eats and tunes courtesy of DJ Chia and Premier Entertainment & Events. The Barn at Lang Farm, Essex Junction, 6-10 p.m. $15; free for people ages 22 and under; cash bar. Info, 865-9677.

BUMPER JACKSONS: Originality and verve shine through old-time jazz, blues and swing sounds. University of Vermont Recital Hall, Burlington, preshow talk, 6:30 p.m.; concert, 7:30 p.m. $10-25. Info, 656-4455.

TECH TUTOR: Techies answer questions about computers and devices during one-on-one help sessions. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 4-6 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-4918.

theater

‘CABARET’: See THU.20. ‘THE CALL’: See WED.19.

GS IN

M

|M

US

M

04.19.17-04.26.19

DAVID BUDBILL’S ‘JUDEVINE’: See THU.20. 2 T.2 SA

CHARLIE DANIELS BAND: Signature Southern rock and country hits such as “The Devil Went Down to Georgia” get boots tapping. Paramount Theatre, Rutland, 8 p.m. $55-75. Info, 775-0903.

tech

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

music

EDUCATION ENRICHMENT FOR EVERYONE: Associate history professor Sylvie Beaudreau puts forth “The Never to Be Forgotten Celebrations: Vermont’s 1909 Tercentenary of the Discovery of Lake Champlain.” Faith United Methodist Church, South Burlington, 2-3 p.m. $5. Info, 864-3516.

‘EURYDICE’: See THU.20. ‘HEATHERS: THE MUSICAL’: See THU.20.

her band, the vocalist moves effortlessly between rock, folk and country selections from Heart Shaped Stone. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, 7:30 p.m. $15. Info, 382-9222.

FIDDLE MASTER CLASS: Bow-and-string master Martin Hayes demonstrates techniques from Irish traditional music. Observers are welcome. Alumni

‘MAKING BABIES AND OTHER COMPLICATIONS’: See THU.20. ‘MAMMA MIA!’: See WED.19. ‘THE CHERRY ORCHARD’: The Russian Atmosphere Theatre Studio offers an intimate Russian reading of Checkhov’s classic tale of an aristocratic woman who loses her estate. Middlebury College, 7 p.m. Free. Info, info@ burlingtonyaroslavl.com.

CALENDAR 59

FEMME TECHNO NIGHT: Live sets from feminist techno musician Valerie Martino, Golden Poussett and Babe Paradise DJs propel a queer-friendly dance party. Speaking Volumes, Burlington, 9 p.m.midnight. $10. Info, burlington.gull@gmail.com.

SEVEN DAYS

IC CU CHOIR REHEARSAL FOR SOCIAL |J HY ER OT EMI ‘JUDEVINE’ OPENING NIGHT GALA: JUSTICE PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP: A H M C L A N E & TI M Ellen McCulloch Lovell and Rusty Dewees Vocalists unite in song in preparation for cohost a preshow catered reception and a posta late-April recital kicking off the Building a World show party with members of poet David Budbill’s Beyond War: What Will It Take? conference. North family. Funds raised benefit Lost Nation Theater. End Studios, Burlington, 5-6:30 p.m. Free; preregMontpelier City Hall, 6:30 p.m. $60; $100 for two; ister. Info, 607-348-7843. preregister. Info, 229-0492. DEB BRISSON & THE HAY BURNERS: Backed by

TWO ONE-ACT PLAYS: See THU.20. FRI.21

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UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT PREGNANCY STUDY Researchers at the Vermont Center on Behavior and Health are looking for women who are currently pregnant to participate in a study on health behaviors and infant birth outcomes. This study involves: 9 short appointments (approximately 20 minutes each) Flexible scheduling, including weekend and evening appointments Compensation $700 2 Free Ultrasounds If interested, please visit our website to complete the recruitment questionnaire: http://j.mp/1yLwkLO FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 802-656-3348 OR VISIT FACEBOOK.COM/UVMMOM 6h-uvmdeppsych(pregnancystudy)011316.indd 1

1/11/16 11:26 AM

calendar FRI.21

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words

BROWN BAG BOOK CLUB: Readers voice opinions about Let the Great World Spin by Colum McCann. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 12:301:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. FRIDAY MORNING WORKSHOP: Wordsmiths offer constructive criticism on works-in-progress by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104. HINESBURG COMMUNITY WRITERS’ READING: Lit lovers perk up their ears for poems and stories by Jennifer Chiodo, Heather Caulfield Mills, Sandy Haddock and other local authors. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, 482-3191. REMEMBERING THE WORKS OF ALDO LEOPOLD AND HIS INFLUENCE ON GENERATIONS OF LAND STEWARDS: Community members share their favorite passages from the writings of the man known as the father of wildlife ecology. Craftsbury Public Library, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 586-7711, ext. 169.

SAT.22 activism

BUILDING A WORLD BEYOND WAR: WHAT WILL IT TAKE?: Nobel Prize nominee David Swanson keynotes a conference complete with 12 Vermontfocused workshops on topics ranging from nuclear weapons to everyday militarism. Winooski Middle/ High School, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. $25; preregister. Info, 863-2345, ext. 6. MARCH FOR SCIENCE VERMONT: Individuals take steps as part of a national movement to protect evidence-based policymaking. See marchforsciencevt. wordpress.com for details. Various locations statewide. Free. Info, march4sciencevt@gmail.com. POWER TO THE PEOPLE’S CLIMATE: LEARNING & MAKING WORKSHOPS FOR CLIMATE JUSTICE: Activists prepare for the 2017 People’s Climate March with workshops by 350vt.org and by making their own unique posters with support from Iskra Print Collective. Karma Bird House, Burlington, noon-6 p.m. Free. Info, 444-0350.

agriculture SEVENDAYSVT.COM

BERRY GROWING: Blueberries, raspberries, gooseberries, oh my! Cultivators get the dirt on planting pruning and fertilizing juicy, fleshy fruits. Bramble & Berry Farm, Plainfield, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 426-3581. HOW TO PLANT A TREE SUCCESSFULLY: Participants of all skill levels branch out in this indoor/outdoor class on sowing leaf-and-trunk species. Community Room, Hunger Mountain Coop, Montpelier, noon-2 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, info@hungermountain.coop.

04.19.17-04.26.19

LANDSCAPING WITH NATIVE PLANTS TO SUPPORT WILDLIFE, POLLINATORS & PEOPLE: Gardeners in this workshop learn to identify, assemble and maintain native species with natural plant communities as their inspiration. Community Room, Hunger Mountain Coop, Montpelier, 10-11 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, info@hungermountain.coop.

bazaars

SEVEN DAYS

GLAD RAGS SPRING SALE: Folks browse clothing, linens, shoes and household items at this annual fundraiser for local charities. Woodstock Masonic Hall, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, 457-1054.

dance

60 CALENDAR

FOURTH SATURDAY SWING DANCE: Participants put their best foot forward at a session set to jazz, big band and contemporary music. Indoor shoes are required. Champlain Club, Burlington, beginner lesson, 8 p.m.; dance, 8:30 p.m. $5. Info, 864-8382. ‘SHE WHO WALKS IN THE MOONLIGHT’: Myths, stories and rituals are interpreted through movement in a celebration of all things lunar. The Accaliae host this event benefiting Puppets

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in Education. See calendar spotlight. North End Studio A, Burlington, 7 p.m. $12. Info, 860-3349.

environment

COMMUNITY EARTH DAY CELEBRATION: Ecominded folks reduce their carbon footprint with Earth-friendly workshops, raffles, samples, a swap meet and a solar-powered bouncy house. Hunger Mountain Coop, Montpelier, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, info@hungermountain.coop. EARTH DAY / SCIENCE RALLY: Speakers, activities and demonstrations make up this nonpartisan celebration meant to strengthen the relationship between scientists and the public. Rutland Free Library, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free. Info, mindsworthann@gmail.com. EARTH DAY MARCH FOR SCIENCE: Visitors show their appreciation for the planet by joining in raptor, songbird and reptile programs, self-guided activities and a screening of Before the Flood. Vermont Institute of Natural Science Nature Center, Quechee, celebration, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; film screening, 7-9 p.m. Regular admission, $13-15; free for members and kids 3 and under; free for screening. Info, 359-5000.

etc.

ASTRONOMY FOR EVERYONE: SIZE & SCALE OF THE UNIVERSE: An indoor presentation paves the way for stargazers to view sunspots through a telescope. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. INDEPENDENT COMMUNITY MEETING PLACE: Brainstorming leads to forming activity groups for hobbies such as flying stunt kites and playing music. Presto Music Store, South Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 658-0030. OPEN HOUSE: Interested individuals find out about the fraternal organization’s tradition of community service. Saint Albans Moose Lodge #1090, 1-4 p.m. Free. Info, 527-1327. ROKEBY MUSEUM VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION: A brief training course for those who wish to lend a hand details the museum’s history and collections. Rokeby Museum, Ferrisburgh, 10 a.m. Free. Info, rokeby@comcast.net. SPRING FASHION COLLECTIVE: Local designers showcase their collections on the runway before an afterparty with dancing and DJed tunes. Main Street Museum, White River Junction, 8 p.m. $1542. Info, 281-6080. VERD MONT BUTTON CLUB OPEN HOUSE: Button collectors from around the state display their wares and welcome fellow enthusiasts to bring their stash in for identification. Middlebury VFW Hall, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, 897-2001. WILDLIFE ENCOUNTERS: Animal lovers get up close with exotic and North American species. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6955. WOMEN’S SHABBAT: See FRI.21, 9 a.m.

fairs & festivals

DAZED & DEFROSTED: On-snow demos, cold brews, an environmental village and plenty of live music make for an epic Earth Day shindig. Killington Resort, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. Info, 422-6201. ECHO EARTH WEEK’S MUDFEST: Families celebrate muck in all its glory with themed activities, games and mud flinging. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Regular admission, $13.50-16.50; free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848.

film

‘THE KID’: Charlie Chaplin’s character cares for a cast-off child in his first full-length feature. Jeff Rapsis orchestrates a live score to accompany the silent film. Ludlow Auditorium, 7 p.m. Donations. Info, 228-7239. LAKE CHAMPLAIN INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL’S MICROFEST: Cinephiles feast their eyes on the best short films from the 2016 festival. A live performance by Izland Tonik, microbrews and food trucks round out the evening. Strand Center


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

CASINO NIGHT: Players try their luck in rounds of blackjack, craps and roulette. Bristol St. Ambrose Parish, 7:30 p.m. $20 includes $200 in gaming chips. Info, 453-2488. FAMILY GAME AFTERNOON: Oliver Dienz teaches games from around the world for all ages. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 1:30-4 p.m. Free. Info, 985-5124. ‘SAYS YOU!’: Two teams of logophiles compete in a parlor game taped for public radio. See calendar spotlight. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe Mountain Resort, 7 p.m. $20-35. Info, 760-4634.

health & fitness

GINGER’S FITNESS BOOT CAMP: Students get pumped with an interval-style workout that boosts muscle strength, cardiovascular fitness, agility, balance and coordination. Middlebury Municipal Gym, 8-9 a.m. $12. Info, 343-7160. NEDA WALK: Locals take steps for National Eating Disorder Awareness on a stroll through campus. Royall Tyler Theatre, University of Vermont, Burlington, 9 a.m.-noon. $15. Info, 793-0952.

kids

BUZZING WITH VERMONT’S NATIVE BEES: Tots and their companions construct a take-home nest box for the honey-producing insects. Shelburne Farms, 10 a.m.-noon. $10-12 per adult/kid pair; $5-6 per additional kid; preregister. Info, 985-8686.

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APRIL WORK DAYS: Helping hands put up a tent, clean boats and otherwise assist in preparing the center for the upcoming season. Community Sailing Center, Burlington, noon-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 864-2499.

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seminars

LITAN OPER WHOLE-BOOK APPROACH STORY CAR CARE AWARE WORKSHOP: TIME: Tots learn how words, pictures and Waterbury Service Center owner Albert Carron book design work together to complete a narrative. steers drivers in the right direction regarding Phoenix Books Essex, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 872-7111. maintenance, tires, safety and more. Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m.-noon. Free; preregister. Info, music 244-7036. BURLINGTON CHORAL SOCIETY: Vocalists lend MAP & COMPASS: Hikers learn to travel over tertheir powerful pipes to music by Johannes Brahms. rain with the help of navigational tools. Call for Elley-Long Music Center, Saint Michael’s College, details. Free; preregister. Info, 355-7181. Colchester, 7:30 p.m. $20-25. Info, 863-5966. SEARCHING FOR YOUR ENGLISH ANCESTORS WITH

CAPITAL CITY CONCERTS: Words meet melody in the program “Poem Music,” performed by pianist Jeffrey Chappell, soprano Mary Bonhag, bassist Even Premo and flutist Karen Kevra. Unitarian Church of Montpelier, 7:30 p.m. $15-25. Info, info@ capitalcityconcerts.org.

AN EXPERIMENTAL MUSIC SHOW & TELL: An all-day showcase of the best and brightest local and regional offbeat acts features turn-tablist Maria Chavez, Wren Kitz, Throat of the Loon and others. Burlington City Arts, 2-10 p.m. $12. Info, burlington.gull@gmail.com. ‘FIRE AND ICE’: See FRI.21, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 8 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168. JEREMIAH MCLANE & TIMOTHY CUMMINGS: The accordionist and the multi-instrumentalist present originals and traditional tunes rooted in the diverse heritage of Appalachian, Cajun and Québécois music. Brandon Music, 7:30 p.m. $20; $45 includes dinner; preregister; BYOB. Info, 247-4295. THE JOEY ALEXANDER TRIO: The 13-year-old jazz piano prodigy tickles the ivories in his first Vermont concert. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, 8 p.m. $1545. Info, 863-5966. JUKEBOX: Vermont Symphony Orchestra musicians reflect on the themes in the museum’s special exhibition “Backstage Pass: Rock & Roll Photography” in an evening of chamber music. Pizzagalli Center for Art and Education, Shelburne

FINDMYPAST: Family tree fact-finders branch out with the online tool for research in the British Isles and Ireland. Vermont Genealogy Library, Fort Ethan Allen, Colchester, 10:30 a.m.-noon. $5. Info, 310-9285. VCAM’S DIGITAL EDITING CERTIFICATION: Adobe Premiere users get familiar with the most recent version of the editing software. Prerequisite: VCAM Access Orientation or equivalent, or instructor’s permission. VCAM Studio, Burlington, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 651-9692.

sports

RASPUTITSA SPRING CLASSIC: Riders spin their wheels along a 40-mile route through some of Vermont’s coldest and most barren landscapes. Proceeds benefit Little Bellas. Burke Mountain, 9 a.m. $100; preregister. Info, ride@rasputitsagravel.com. STEIN’S CHALLENGE: Ambitious athletes ski and ride as many laps as possible over four grueling hours. Sugarbush Resort, Warren, registration, 8-9 a.m.; competitors meeting, 9:45 a.m., event start, 10 a.m. $20. Info, 583-6300.

tech

INTERMEDIATE MICROSOFT WORD: Students work with the word processor’s advanced features and customization options. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free; preregister. Info, 865-7217.

TECH HELP: Electronics novices bring their questions and devices to a hands-on help session with a trained troubleshooter. Fairfax Community Library, 9-11 a.m. Free. Info, 849-2420.

theater

‘CABARET’: See THU.20. ‘THE CALL’: See WED.19, 2 & 7:30 p.m. DAVID BUDBILL’S ‘JUDEVINE’: See THU.20, 2 & 7:30 p.m. ‘EURYDICE’: See THU.20. ‘HEATHERS: THE MUSICAL’: See THU.20. ‘MAKING BABIES AND OTHER COMPLICATIONS’: See THU.20, 2 & 7:30 p.m. ‘MAMMA MIA!’: See WED.19. THE METROPOLITAN OPERA LIVE IN HD: ‘EUGENE ONEGIN’: The operatic retelling of Alexander Pushkin’s novel in verse, starring Anna Netrebko and Peter Mattei, hits the silver screen. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, 12:30-4:15 p.m. $10-24. Info, 382-9222. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 12:55 p.m. $16-25. Info, 748-2600. Paramount Theatre, Rutland, 12:55 p.m. $10-23. Info, 775-0903. Loew Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 1 p.m. $29. Info, 603-646-2422. TWO ONE-ACT PLAYS: See THU.20.

words

BOOK LAUNCH & SIGNING: From her days as a championship swimmer to her battle with alcohol addiction, Nancy Stearns Bercaw bears her soul in her memoir Dryland: One Woman’s Swim to Sobriety. Black Box Theater, Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Free; recommended for ages 16 and up. Info, 540-3018. FIVE COLLEGES BOOK SALE: Thousands of used, rare and out-of-print volumes delight bibliophiles at a benefit for New England collegiate scholarships. Lebanon High School, N.H., 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Info, 603-428-3311. HAIKU WORKSHOP: The Northeast Storytellers take writers through the process of penning poems in the traditional Japanese style. West Burke Public Library, 1-3 p.m. Free. Info, 201-519-3633.

SUN.23 bazaars

GLAD RAGS SPRING SALE: See SAT.22, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

community

COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS WITH THE CENTER FOR MINDFUL LEARNING: Peaceful people gather for guided meditation and interactive discussions. Burlington Friends Meeting House, 5-7 p.m. $10. Info, assistant@centerformindfullearning.org.

SUN.23

VOLUNTEER

VOLUNTEER - OnCall for Vermont offers two types of opportunities.

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R.I.P.P.E.D.: Resistance, intervals, power, plyometrics, endurance and diet define this high-intensity physical-fitness program. North End Studio A, Burlington, 9-10 a.m. $10. Info, 578-9243.

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VERMONT RESTAURANT WEEK: See FRI.21.

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VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: See WED.19, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

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NORWICH FARMERS MARKET: Farmers and artisans offer meats, baked goods and produce alongside handcrafted items. Tracy Hall, Norwich, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 384-7447.

WEBBY’S ART STUDIO: Temporary and permanent exhibitions inspire specialized art activities for all ages. Pizzagalli Center for Art and Education, Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Regular admission, $5-10; free for kids under 5. Info, 985-3346.

outdoors

SAT.2

CHOCOLATE TASTING: With the help of a tasting guide, chocoholics of all ages discover the flavor profiles of four different confections. Lake Champlain Chocolates Factory Store & Café, Burlington, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 864-1807.

VERMONT FIDDLE ORCHESTRA SPRING CONCERT: Genticorum’s Pascal Gemme is the guest soloist at a recital of Québécois music. Hyde Park Opera House, 7 p.m. $12-15; free for kids 12 and under. Info, 229-4191.

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food & drink

STORY TIME SATURDAY: Tykes sit tight for FreshPicked Poetry: A Day at the Farmers’ Market by Michelle Schaub, then get their fill of themed healthy foods. Illustrator Amy Huntington appears. Phoenix Books Burlington, 11 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 861-9753.

SPRING SING 2017: The Dartmouth Brovertones host a spirited a cappella concert of popular music. Spaulding Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 8 p.m. $9-10. Info, 603-646-2422.

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‘THEEB’: This 2014 thriller follows a Bedouin boy who faces danger as he guides a British officer to a desert destination. Dana Auditorium, Sunderland Language Center, Middlebury College, 3 & 8 p.m. Free. Info, 443-6433.

SATURDAY DROP-IN STORY TIME: A weekly selection of songs and storylines engages all ages. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 10-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 264-5660.

Museum, 7-9 p.m. $5-10 includes access to the exhibition; cash bar. Info, 985-3346.

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‘RASHOMON’: Different points of view come into play in the aftermath of a murder in this 1950 crime movie shown as part of Sexual Assault Awareness Month. A discussion follows. Newman Center, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 7 p.m. Free. Info, serious_61@yahoo.com.

PRACTICE SAT EXAM: Students put on their thinking caps for an authentic testing experience. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 264-5660.

EU

Theatre, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 6-9 p.m. $5; free for students. Info, 518-588-5950.

- OnCall for Vermont offers two types of opportunities.

- OnCall for Vermont offers two types of opportunities. health and preparedness activities and/or just serving in

health and preparedness activities and/or just serving in

Medical Reserve Corps: Medical and non-medical individuals volunteering the time their times of need. times of need. schedule allows on health and preparedness activities and/or just serving in times of need.

Medical Reserve Corps: Medical and non-medical Volunteer Emergency Medical Services:

Volunteer Emergency Medical Services:

EMS provide critical pre-hospital pre hospital care to people in their individuals volunteering the timeEMS their schedule allows onon local ambulance provide critical pre-hospital care squads. community to people in their on local ambulance health andcommunity preparedness activities and/orsquads. just serving in Vermont needs your help. Today. Vermont needs your help. Today. times of need. Vermont needs your help. Today. Visit OnCallforVT.org to learn more aboutEmergency both opportunities. Volunteer Medical Services:

SEVEN DAYS

Medical Reserve Corps: Medical and non-medical Medicalfor Reserve Corps: Medical and non-medical OnCall Vermont offers two types of opportunities: individuals volunteering the time their schedule allows on individuals volunteering the time their schedule allows on

EMS provide critical pre-hospital care to people in their Volunteer Medical Services: community onEmergency local ambulance squads.

EMS provide critical pre-hospital care to people in their community on local ambulance squads.

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MAKE AN ESSENTIAL OIL CANDLE & HAND PAINTED GLASS JAR: Ordinary 8 ounce jars are transformed into eye-catching and therapeutic votives composed of wax and essential oils. Groennfell Meadery, Colchester, 2-3 p.m. $25. Info, bmeeartdesign@gmail.com.

environment

APRIL STOOLS DAY: Community members team up with the Lake Champlain Committee to scoop up dog droppings and litter in the Plattsburgh area. Email for details. 1-3 p.m. Free. Info, mmd. slp@charter.net.

etc.

HOLOCAUST REMEMBRANCE COMMEMORATION: Guest speaker professor Ingrid Anderson pays tribute to a Nobel Laureate with “Beyond Night: The Life and Work of Elie Wiesel.” Jewish Community of Greater Stowe, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 253-1800.

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ECHO EARTH WEEK’S MUDFEST: See SAT.22. NONFICTION COMICS MINI FEST: In a new twist on the genre, Vermont cartoonists display panels related to politics, memoir and diaries. Discussions with well-known artists round out this colorful exhibition. Vermont Folklife Center, Middlebury, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 388-4964.

film

SEVEN DAYS

04.19.17-04.26.19

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

‘195 LEWIS’: Set in Brooklyn, this dramatic series follows a group of friends navigating the realities of being black, queer and polyamorous. A Q&A with director Chanelle Aponte Pearson follows. The Savoy Theater, Montpelier, 7-10 p.m. Free. Info, 828-8600.

MASTER’S DEGREE PROGRAM IN

CLINICAL

PSYCHOLOGY

Our Master of Arts degree program prepares students for entry-level professional psychology positions in the public mental health system or study towards a doctoral degree at another institution. Elective courses in play therapy, marital and family therapy, intensive individual psychotherapy, and group therapy. The curriculum of our program is approved by both the Vermont Board of Psychological Examiners and the Vermont Board of Allied Mental Health Practitioners.

APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING ACCEPTED. 800.654.2206

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‘SAYS YOU!’: See SAT.22, Studio One, Vermont Public Radio in Colchester, 1 p.m. $35. Info, saysyouradio@ gmail.com.

health & fitness

NIA WITH SUZY: Drawing from martial, dance and healing arts, sensory-based movements push participants to their full potential. South End Studio, Burlington, 9-10 a.m. $14. Info, 522-3691. STRETCH & SIP YOGA: Yogis at all levels do the downward-facing dog before quenching their thirst with a pint or flight of Switchback suds. The Tap Room at Switchback Brewing, Burlington, 10-11 a.m. $20; preregister; limited space. Info, 651-4114.

11/11/16 6:20 PM

‘DIMANCHES’ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Parlezvous français? Speakers practice the tongue at a casual drop-in chat. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 4-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 363-2431. SPANISH GROUP CLASSES: Students roll their Rs while practicing en español. New Moon Café, Burlington, 2:45-4:30 p.m. $15. Info, maigomez1@ hotmail.com.

lgbtq

LGBTQ FIBER ARTS GROUP: A knitting, crocheting and weaving session welcomes all ages, gender identities, sexual orientations and skill levels. Pride Center of Vermont, Burlington, noon-2 p.m. Free. Info, 860-7812.

montréal

‘MILLION DOLLAR QUARTET’: Rock hits such as “Blue Suede Shoes” fuel a dramatization of the recording session that brought together Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins. Segal Centre for Performing Arts, Montréal, 1 p.m. $51-65. Info, 514-739-7944.

music

BURLINGTON CHORAL SOCIETY: See SAT.22, Barre Opera House, 4 p.m. $20-25. Info, 476-8188. CANTRIP: A trio of Scottish traditional musicians take audience members on a cultural journey via Celtic and other European styles. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. $15. Info, 748-2600. CASTLETON UNIVERSITY CHOIRS & THE VERMONT COLLEGIATE CHORAL CONSORTIUM: Vocalists from the Saint Michael’s College and the University of Vermont choirs join Castleton singers in performing Mozart’s Mass in C. Casella Theater, Castleton University, 3-5 p.m. $5-10. Info, 468-1373.

EMILY TAUBL: The cellist bands together with pianist Paul Orgelo and soprano Suzanne Kantorski for a faculty recital. University of Vermont Recital Hall, Burlington, 5 p.m. Donations. Info, 656-3040. MUSIC IN THE BARN: Locals band together to protect Hinesburg’s Geprags Park from a fracked-gas pipeline while rocking out to the Rick Ceballos and Lausanne Allen Duo, Eric George and Rik Palieri. Common Ground Center, Starksboro, 6-10 p.m. $1220. Info, 296-8318. NATASHA KOVAL PADEN: A recital of selected 19th-century pieces played on piano charms classical connoisseurs. Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168.

WELLNESS DAY: Attendees pamper themselves with a variety of mini treatments and workshops such as massage, soundbowl healing and guided meditation. Blackbird Wellness VT, Morrisville, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $15-40; preregister. Info, 888-4054.

RYAN MAHONY: Solo piano pieces from the baroque period through the mid-20th century ring out during the student musician’s senior recital. Krinovitz Auditorium, Hawkins Hall, SUNY Plattsburgh, N.Y., 2-3 p.m. Free. Info, 518-564-2477.

ZUMBA FITNESS: High-spirited students dance toward health in an easy-to-follow fitness program set to red-hot international music. North End Studio A, Burlington, 9 a.m. $8-10. Info, 777-7032.

STEPHEN WAARTS: Bow in hand, the violinist captivates classical music lovers. Paramount Theatre, Rutland, 3 p.m. $12-22. Info, 775-0903.

PEER-LED MINDFULNESS MEET-UP FOR TEENS: South Burlington High School junior Mika Holtz guides adolescents toward increased awareness through music, movement and other techniques.

psych@smcvt.edu

language

‘HIGH NOON’: Gary Cooper and Grace Kelly star in the story of ’ SU a retired lawman preparing for a ON N .2 3 | FI L M | ‘ HI G H N O showdown with a man he sent to prison. CHAMBERWORKS: ‘FROM THE HEART’: Chandler Center for the Arts, Randolph, 6:30 Original compositions and arrangements of p.m. $9. Info, 728-6464. jazz standards delight listeners. Rollins Chapel, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 1 p.m. Free. Info, food & drink 603-646-2422. CHOCOLATE TASTING: See SAT.22. DANIEL BELLONE: Spiritual teachings thread VERMONT RESTAURANT WEEK: See FRI.21. through an acoustic show as part of the acclaimed Argentine artist’s Awakening Through Music tour. games All Souls Interfaith Gathering, Shelburne, 7 p.m. $20-25. Info, 985-3819. POKÉMON LEAGUE: See THU.20, noon-5 p.m.

kids

smcvt.edu/psych

Stillpoint Center, Burlington, 9-10:30 a.m. Donations. Info, 720-427-9340.

UKULELE MÊLÉE: Fingers fly at a group lesson on the four-stringed Hawaiian instrument. Fletcher Room, Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 4-6 p.m. Free. Info, reference@burlingtonvt.gov.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

VERMONT CHORAL UNION: See FRI.21, McCarthy Arts Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 3-4:30 p.m. $10-15; $40 per family. Info, 989-7355. ZACK TYLER: Unique vocal stylings set this folkinspired singer-songwriter apart. United Church of Westford, 4-5 p.m. Donations. Info, 879-4028.

outdoors

LAKE IROQUOIS TRAILS HIKE: Trekkers explore two miles of terrain on an easy excursion. Contact trip leader for details. Free; preregister. Info, ruskai@member.ams.org.

seminars

SUPPORTING A PURPOSE-DRIVEN LIFE: Nick Dubay of the Anti-Stigma Coalition of Clinton County outlines resources for individuals seeking direction. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Plattsburgh, N.Y., 10 a.m. Free. Info, 518-561-6920.

sports

LAMOILLE VALLEY RAIL TRAIL BICYCLE: Pedal pushers whet their whistles on a stop at Lost Nation Brewing during this 35-mile trip with very easy grades. Contact trip leader for details. Free; preregister. Info, 899-9982. WOMEN’S PICKUP SOCCER: Swift females of varying skill levels shoot for the goal. For ages 18 and up. Rain location: Robert Miller Community & Recreation Center. Soccer fields, Leddy Park, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free; $3 for rain location. Info, carmengeorgevt@gmail.com.

theater

‘CABARET’: See THU.20, 2 p.m. ‘THE CALL’: See WED.19, 2 p.m.

SALSA MONDAYS: Dancers learn the techniques and patterns of salsa, merengue, bachata and chacha. North End Studio A, Burlington, fundamentals, 7 p.m.; intermediate, 8 p.m. $12. Info, 227-2572. WEST AFRICAN DANCE: Live djembe and dundun drumming drive a family-friendly class with teacher Seny Daffe of Guinea. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 5:30-7 p.m. $10-16; preregister. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com.

education

CAMPUS TOUR: From culinary arts to carpentry to office administration and beyond, prospective students ages 16 through 24 learn about trade training programs. Northlands Job Corps Center, Vergennes, 9:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 877-0121.

fairs & festivals

ECHO EARTH WEEK’S MUDFEST: See SAT.22.

film

‘LITTLE BOXES’: A screenwriter Q&A follows a showing of this 2016 comedy about an interracial family struggling to adjust to small-town life in Washington State. The Savoy Theater, Montpelier, 7-10 p.m. Free. Info, 828-8600.

food & drink

FORGET-ME-NOTS BROWN BAG LUNCH: Women ages 65 and up meet for a midday meal. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Plattsburgh, N.Y., noon. Free. Info, 518-561-6920. VERMONT RESTAURANT WEEK: See FRI.21.

games

DAVID BUDBILL’S ‘JUDEVINE’: See THU.20, 2 p.m.

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.19, 7 p.m.

‘EURYDICE’: See THU.20, 2-4 p.m.

MAGIC: THE GATHERING — MONDAY NIGHT MODERN: Tarmogoyf-slinging madness ensues when competitors battle for prizes in a weekly game. Brap’s Magic, Burlington, 6:30-10 p.m. $8. Info, 540-0498.

‘HEATHERS: THE MUSICAL’: See THU.20, 2-4 p.m. ‘MAKING BABIES AND OTHER COMPLICATIONS’: See THU.20, 4 p.m. ‘MAMMA MIA!’: See WED.19, 5 p.m. THE METROPOLITAN OPERA LIVE IN HD: ‘EUGENE ONEGIN’: See SAT.22, Loew Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 1 p.m. $29. Info, 603-646-2422.

STAGE RUSSIA HD: ‘THE BLACK MONK’: See THU.20, 2 p.m.

words

DELICIOUS WORDS: Sweets by dessert chefs John and Liz Snell complement readings by writers Pam MacPherson, Maya Parry and Rosa Costellano. Dianne Shullenberger Gallery, Jericho, 4 p.m. $25; preregister. Info, 899-4993.

MON.24 art

OPEN STUDIO: See THU.20, 3-5 p.m.

dance

ADULT AERIAL DANCE CONDITIONING: With or without previous experience, folks forge strength, grace and confidence in the air. North End Studio B, Burlington, noon-1 p.m. $15. Info, 863-6713.

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MAH-JONGG: Longtime players and neophytes alike compete in the popular Chinese tile game. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660. VERMONT RESTAURANT WEEK: CULINARY TRIVIA NIGHT: FOOD IN THE AGE OF ADVERTISING: Teams feed their minds with seven rounds of foodie trivia. Nectar’s, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 864-5684. WANT TO PLAY OR LEARN MAH-JONGG?: Competitors collect winning sets of tiles in this popular Chinese game. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3322.

health & fitness

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ADVANCED TAI CHI CLASS: See FRI.21. BEYOND THE BROWNIE: HERBAL PREPS & THERAPEUTIC USES FOR MEDICAL CANNABIS: Students in herbalist Stephanie Boucher’s workshop learn to calculate safe and effective doses of cannabis to benefit the body and make a hemp-infused salve. Railyard Apothecary and Yoga Studio, Burlington, 6-8:30 p.m. $20-25. Info, 540-0595.

8/23/16 2:17 PM

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED To test a vaccine against a respiratory virus • • • • •

NAMI VERMONT ‘IN OUR OWN VOICE’: Trained presenters provide practical information about mental illness. Davis Auditorium, Medical Education Center Pavilion, University of Vermont Medical Center, Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 876-7949. NIA WITH SUZY: See SUN.23, 7 p.m. RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: See WED.19. VERMONT CENTER FOR INTEGRATIVE HERBALISM STUDENT HERBAL CLINIC: Third-year interns evaluate individual constitutions and health conditions. Burlington Herb Clinic, 4-8 p.m. $10-30; preregister. Info, info@vtherbcenter.org. ZUMBA: Lively Latin rhythms fuel this dance-fitness phenomenon for all experience levels. Vergennes Opera House, 6 p.m. $10. Info, 349-0026.

MON.24

Ages 18-35 8 day/7 night inpatient stay 2 outpatient screening visits 4 outpatient follow up visits Up to $1650 compensation

VACCINE TESTING CENTER

Call 802-656-0013 for more info and to schedule a screening. Leave your name, numberand a good time to call back. Email UVMVTC@UVM.EDU or visit UVMVTC.ORG

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CONTACT IMPROV DANCE: Movers engage in weight sharing, play and meditation when exploring this style influenced by aikido and other somatic practices. Aikido of Champlain Valley, Burlington, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $4. Info, 864-7306.

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SEVEN DAYS

SILENT ART AUCTION: Potential buyers bid on creative works donated by faculty, staff, students and community members to support the SUNY Plattsburgh Child Care Center. Sibley Hall, SUNY Plattsburgh, N.Y. Free. Info, 518-564-2274.

e m u l o v e h t p Turni n VPR!

04.19.17-04.26.19

FIVE COLLEGES BOOK SALE: See SAT.22, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.

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‘SAVE ME A PLACE AT FOREST LAWN’: Friends for 40 years, two women meet daily to eat lunch, gossip and share secrets in this one-act comedydrama benefiting the library. Lawrence Memorial Library, Bristol, 2 p.m. Donations. Info, 453-5060.

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BABY LAP TIME: Babes up to 24 months experience color, sound and movement through stories, songs, bounces and rhymes. Richmond Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 434-3036. CRAFT FOR KIDS: Half-pints ages 5 and up flex their creative muscles with unique projects. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3:30-4 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660. OPEN GYM PLAY GROUP: Parents can socialize while tykes stay active with movement-centered recreation. River Arts, Morrisville, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 888-1261. ROBIN’S NEST NATURE PLAYGROUP: Outdoor pursuits through fields and forests captivate little ones up to age 5 and their parents. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Donations. Info, 229-6206. STORIES WITH MEGAN: Lit lovers ages 2 through 5 open their ears for exciting tales. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216.

language

ADVANCED-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: Language learners perfect their pronunciation with guest speakers. Private residence, Burlington, 5-6:30 p.m. $20. Info, 324-1757. LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE: Bring a bag lunch to practice the system of communication using visual gestures. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

montréal

‘MILLION DOLLAR QUARTET’: See SUN.23, 8 p.m.

music

words

seminars

THE HUSBANDRY OF POETRY WORKSHOP: Penwoman Julia Shipley encourages questions, qualms and curiosity at a discussion of some best practices for nurturing verse as a vital part of life. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

MONDAY NIGHT COMMUNITY KIRTAN: Instruments are welcome during call-and-response chanting of mostly Sanskrit mantras in the bhakti yoga tradition. Sacred Mountain Studio, Burlington, 7:30-9 p.m. Donations. Info, bpatoine@aol.com.

COINCIDENCES & AMAZING CONNECTIONS: An open discussion hosted by Eckankar gives spiritual seekers techniques to identify links in life. Rutland Free Library, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 800-772-9390. FAMILY-TO-FAMILY CLASS: The National Alliance on Mental Illness builds understanding between individuals struggling with psychological health and their loved ones. Call for details. 6 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 876-7949. HOW FINANCIALLY PREPARED ARE YOU?: Folks learn to fortify themselves against future financial crises. Waterbury Public Library, 6:30-8 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 244-7036.

tech

ONE-ON-ONE TECH APPOINTMENTS: Staff members troubleshoot tech issues during individual sessions. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 985-5124. TECH HELP WITH CLIF: See WED.19.

theater

MONDAYS AT THE IMPROV: Emerging entertainers express themselves through theater games and acting techniques for onstage and off. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 999-7373.

BOOK GROUP FOR ADULTS: A Spool of Blue Thread by Anne Tyler sparks conversation. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

MONDAY NIGHT POETRY WORKSHOP: Wordsmiths analyze creative works-in-progress penned by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104. SHAPE & SHARE LIFE STORIES: Prompts from Recille Hamrell trigger recollections of specific experiences, which participants craft into narratives. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

TUE.25

agriculture

BURLINGTON GARDEN CLUB MEETING: Professor Josef Gorres gets down and dirty with his talk “Snake Worms – Not Your Grandparents’ Earthworm: How Japanese Earthworms Change Vermont Forests.” Faith United Methodist Church, South Burlington, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 615-390-9965. RESPONSIBLE MUSHROOM FORAGING & HARVESTING: Leader Elliott guides foragers in an exploration into the ecological importance, health benefits and harvesting of wood-eating cap-andstem varieties. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 6:307:30 p.m. Free. Info, 985-5124.

art

SILENT ART AUCTION: See MON.24.

business

RENTAL INCOME SEMINAR: Those seeking financial freedom and security get wise to the ways of real estate investment. Preferred Properties, South Burlington, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 318-7654.

community

FEAST TOGETHER OR FEAST TO GO: See FRI.21. RUTLAND REGIONAL DOWNTOWN MIXER SERIES: Locals rub elbows while learning about the Rutland Regional Medical Center’s Foley Cancer Center and breast care program. Chittenden Building, Rutland, 5:30-7 p.m. Free; cash bar. Info, 747-3634. TUESDAY VOLUNTEER NIGHTS: Helping hands pitch in around the shop by organizing parts, moving bikes and tackling other projects. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. Bike Recycle Vermont, Burlington, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 264-9687.

conferences

NORTHEAST BIOMASS HEATING CONFERENCE & EXPO: Exhibitors showcase residential and commercial products during this three-day event featuring speakers, panel discussions and a biomass site bus tour. See nebiomassheat.com for details. Sheraton Burlington Hotel, South Burlington. Prices vary. Info, 202-596-3974.

crafts

OPEN CRAFT NIGHT: Creative sparks fly in the studio as attendees whip out woven wall hangings and crochet, knitting and sewing projects. Nido Fabric & Yarn, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 881-0068.

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dance

Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, 7-10 p.m. Free. Info, 540-3018.

INTERMEDIATE & ADVANCED WEST COAST SWING: Fun-loving folks learn the smooth, sexy stylings of modern swing dance. North End Studio A, Burlington, 7-9 p.m. $11-16. Info, burlingtonwestie@gmail.com.

‘THE ISLANDS AND THE WHALES’: Filmmaker Mike Day is on hand for a Q&A after a screening of his 2016 documentary in which whale hunters on the Faroe Islands are faced with the effects of marine pollution. The Savoy Theater, Montpelier, 7-10 p.m. Free. Info, 828-8600.

ECHO EARTH WEEK’S MUDFEST: See SAT.22.

film

‘COMPLICIT’: Both historical and highly relevant, this award-winning documentary delves into President Roosevelt’s refusal of safe haven to Jewish refugees fleeing Nazi tyranny. A panel discussion follows. Temple Sinai, South Burlington, 7 p.m. $10; free for students. Info, 644-6650. ‘FIVE EASY PIECES’: Jack Nicholson stars in the story of a surly oil rig worker with an unlikely background as a piano prodigy. Film House, Main Street

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DECOLONIZE YOUR MIND!: HONORING THE ABENAKI PEOPLE: A seasonal potluck paves the way for a substance-free soirée featuring a ceremony, storytelling and live music Dark Matter, Old Growth SoulJourner and the Band of the Land. Christ Episcopal Church, Montpelier, 6:30 p.m. $10100. Info, mcmycelium74@gmail.com.

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.19, 7 p.m.

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KNIGHTS OF THE MYSTIC MOVIE CLUB: Cinema hounds view campy features at this ode to offbeat productions. Main Street Museum, White River Junction, 8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 356-2776.

BINGO NIGHT: Participants cover squares and dip into refreshments. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 6-9 p.m. $5 per card. Info, 223-3322.

TU E

SWING DANCING: Quick-footed participants experiment with different forms, including the Lindy hop, Charleston and balboa. Beginners are welcome. Champlain Club, Burlington, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $5. Info, 448-2930.

games

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BEGINNER WEST COAST SWING & FUSION DANCING: Pupils get schooled in the fundamentals of partner dance. North End Studio B, Burlington, 8-9 p.m. $11-16. Info, burlingtonwestie@gmail.com.

FH

CHESS CLUB: Players of all ages put on their thinking caps in a relaxed, supportive atmosphere. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 985-5124.

health & fitness

BRANDON FITNESS BOOT CAMP: NIL RTE E PR O Hop to it! Get fit with strength, endurJECT | COU ‘MAYA ANGELOU: AND STILL I RISE’: ance, agility and coordination exercises. Interviews with the likes of Hillary Clinton, Otter Valley North Campus Gym, Brandon, 5-6 p.m. Oprah Winfrey and Common offer insight into the $12. Info, 343-7160. life and work of the late poet and author. River Arts, Morrisville, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 888-1261. DE-STRESS YOGA: A relaxing and challenging class lets healthy bodies unplug and unwind. Balance ‘NATIONAL BIRD’: A 2016 documentary turns the Yoga, Richmond, 5:45-7 p.m. $14. Info, 434-8401. lens toward three whistleblowers who spoke up about the United States’ drone program. A panel FELDENKRAIS: AWARENESS THROUGH discussion follows. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, MOVEMENT: Whether you consider it relaxing Montpelier, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 863-2345. exercise or active meditation, this experience can reduce pain and increase mobility. Sacred Mountain Studio, Burlington, 9:30-10:30 a.m. $15; free for food & drink first-timers; preregister. Info, 735-3770. THE NO-FUSS KITCHEN: COOKING WITH PLANTHE

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BASED PROTEIN: Omnivores and vegans alike find new recipe inspiration in this culinary class with City Market’s Meredith Knowles. McClure Multigenerational Center, Burlington, 5:30-7:30 p.m. $5-10; preregister. Info, 861-9753.

FITNESS AT ANY AGE: Strength, agility, coordination and heart-healthy exercises are modified for folks of all ability levels. Charlotte Senior Center, 9:15-10 a.m. $10. Info, 343-7160.

VERMONT RESTAURANT WEEK: See FRI.21.

GENTLE DROP-IN YOGA: Yogis bring their own mats for a hatha class led by Betty Molnar. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660.

FITNESS FLOW YOGA: See FRI.21, 6:30-7:30 p.m.

PEACEFUL WARRIOR KARATE: Martial-arts training promotes healthy living for those in recovery. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150. R.I.P.P.E.D.: See SAT.22, 6-7 p.m. STRETCH & SIP YOGA WITH LIVE MUSIC: Tunes by Ousmane energize participants for a flow yoga practice suitable for all levels. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 6-7:15 p.m. $15-20. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com. THREE REASONS YOU’RE GETTING HURT WHEN RUNNING & WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT: Instructor Sarah Richardson enlightens pavement pounders on risks and recovery. Community Room, Hunger Mountain Coop, Montpelier, 6-7:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, info@hungermountain.coop. ZUMBA: A high-energy instructor and a wide array of music keep students going strong as they dance their way to health. Marketplace Fitness, Burlington, 4:30-5:15 p.m. $12; free for members and first-timers. Info, 651-8773. ZUMBA WITH ALLISON: Conditioning is disguised as a party at this rhythm-driven workout session. Swan Dojo, Burlington, 7-8 p.m. $10. Info, 227-7221.

kids

MUSIC & MOVEMENT: Infants through preschoolers sing and swing to the beat. River Arts, Morrisville, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 888-1261. PRESCHOOL MUSIC: Melody makers ages 3 through 5 sing and dance into the afternoon. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 11:30 a.m.noon. Free. Info, 264-5660. PRESCHOOL STORY HOUR: FAVORITE AUTHORS: Imaginations blossom when kids up to age 6 engage in themed tales and activities. Fairfax Community Library, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 849-2420.

TUE.25

Join Vermont’s largest dog-friendly event benefiting the Humane Society of Chittenden Country

Sunday, June 11 Veteran’s Memorial Park, South Burlington, VT Information & Registration: chittendenhumane.org

REGISTER TODAY!

SEVEN DAYS

23rd Annual Walk for the Animals & 5K Doggie Fun Run

CALENDAR 65

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STORY TIME FOR BABIES & TODDLERS: Picture books, songs, rhymes and puppets arrest the attention of children and their caregivers. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9:10-9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. STORY TIME FOR PRESCHOOLERS: Picture books, songs, rhymes and early math tasks work youngsters’ mental muscles. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. STORY TIME WITH A TWIST: See WED.19, 11 a.m. TODDLER STORY TIME: Good listeners up to 3 years old have fun with music, rhymes, snacks and captivating tales. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 10:30-11 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 264-5660.

language

‘LA CAUSERIE’ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Native speakers are welcome to pipe up at an unstructured conversational practice. El Gato Cantina, Burlington, 4:30-6 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0195. LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: ITALIAN: Speakers hone their skills in the Romance language over a bag lunch. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338. PAUSE-CAFÉ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Frenchlanguage fanatics meet pour parler la belle langue. New Moon Café, Burlington, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 363-2431. SOCIAL GATHERING: Those who are deaf or hard of hearing or want to learn American Sign Language get together to break down communication barriers. The North Branch Café, Montpelier, 4-6 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 595-4001.

montréal

‘MILLION DOLLAR QUARTET’: See SUN.23, 8 p.m.

music

OPEN JAM SESSION: Musicians follow the flow and explore sound together. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 303. SINFONIA STRING ORCHESTRA: Student musicians and community members engage listeners with an ambitious program. Krinovitz Auditorium, Hawkins Hall, SUNY Plattsburgh, N.Y., 7:30-9 p.m. Free. Info, 518-564-2243.

outdoors

WINE & WOODCOCKS: Oenophiles and fans of feathered fliers find common ground during this moonlit birding expedition. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $10; preregister. Info, 434-2167.

politics

LEGISLATOR MEET & GREET: JESSICA BRUMSTED & KATE WEBB: State representatives field questions and concerns over light refreshments. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 985-5124.

seminars

HOW TO SURVIVE SPIRITUALLY IN OUR TIMES: Participants in this Eckankar workshop gain tools for keeping a balanced perspective in stressful situations. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 6:307:30 p.m. Free. Info, 800-772-9390. MEDICARE & YOU: AN INTRODUCTION TO MEDICARE: Members of the Central Vermont Council on Aging clear up confusion about the application process and plan options. Central Vermont Council on Aging, Barre, 3-5 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 479-0531.

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ONE-ON-ONE TECH APPOINTMENTS: See MON.24.

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NAVY BAND NORTHEAST: SOLD OUT. Thirty-five musicians from across the country combine talents for a concert of popular standards, jazz and patriotic tunes. Lebanon Opera House, N.H., 7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 603-448-0400.

words

ADULT BOOK DISCUSSION: Bibliophiles read into Flight Behavior by Barbara Kingsolver. Burnham

JOIN Darren & Kristin

SEVEN DAYS

Memorial Library, Colchester, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660. CREATIVE NONFICTION WORKSHOP: Folks give feedback on essays, poetry and journalism written by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104. GUSTO! PERFORMANCE POETRY WORKSHOP: From projection and expression to variety, eye contact and gesture, would-be performers explore the five dimensions of slam poetry with penman Geof Hewitt. Lanpher Memorial Library, Hyde Park, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 888-4628. SEARCH FOR MEANING DISCUSSION GROUP: Readers reflect on The Disappearance of the Universe: Straight Talk About Illusions, Past Lives, Religion, Sex, Politics and the Miracles of Forgiveness by Gary R. Renard. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Plattsburgh, N.Y., 7 p.m. Free. Info, 518-561-6920. SPRING LITERATURE READING SERIES: Ambitious readers cover selected pages from Giovanni’s Room by James Baldwin. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup. com; limited space. Info, 383-8104.

WED.26 agriculture

GROUNDSWELL: COMMUNITY CONVERSATIONS ABOUT LAND USE, LIVELIHOOD, FOOD & THE FUTURE OF VERMONT: See WED.19, Simpson Hall, Sterling College, Craftsbury Common.

art

SILENT ART AUCTION: See MON.24.

business

MARKETING ON A SHOESTRING: Enterprisers learn to maximize visibility and reach potential customers through the right message and media. Center for Women & Enterprise, Burlington, noon-2 p.m. $20. Info, 391-4870.

community

COMMUNITY SUPPER: See WED.19.

‘ANNIE’: Leapin’ lizards! The Broadway National Tour of this Tony Award-winning musical about a redheaded LAURA MARKOWITZ, JOHN LE orphan who wins the heart of a GE EN N JA DUNLOP & REBECCA KAUFFMAN: IO ZZ billionaire inspires smiles. Flynn US F ENS Violin, cello and harp are in tune in E M BL E & F U N K MainStage, Burlington, 7 p.m. $25-75. “Trio Music of the Ages.” The Cathedral Info, 863-5966. Church of St. Paul, Burlington, noon. Donations. ‘MAMMA MIA!’: See WED.19. Info, 864-0471. TE STA

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IDEAS ON TAP: ‘AN ACOUSTIC ARCHAEOLOGY: IMPRESSIONS OF ANCIENT GREEK MUSIC’: University of Vermont classics professor John Franklin uses modern software and recreated instruments to explore the sounds of another time. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0406.

THE NILE PROJECT: Artists from six Nile countries offer a diverse program of danceable, life-affirming songs combining diverse instruments, languages and musical traditions. Spaulding Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 7 p.m. $10-40. Info, 603-646-2422.

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TUE.25

@ 5p and 6p on

WATERBURY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MEETING: A business meeting, annual elections and a presentation by entertainer George Woodard are on the agenda at this spring gathering. Grange Hall Cultural Center, Waterbury, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 244-8089.

conferences

NORTHEAST BIOMASS HEATING CONFERENCE & EXPO: See TUE.25.

dance

DROP-IN HIP-HOP DANCE: See WED.19.

etc.

NURSING BEYOND A YEAR MEET-UP: Breastfeeding parents connect over toddler topics such as weaning and healthy eating habits. Aikido of Champlain Valley, Burlington, 9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 985-8228. ONE-ON-ONE GENEALOGY HELP: Folks familiar with family-tree fact-finding take their research to the next level with individualized help. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 1:30-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 985-5124. RUTLAND DEATH CAFÉ: Men and women discuss issues related to the end of life. Pyramid Holistic Wellness Center, Rutland, 7-9 p.m. Free; donations accepted. Info, 353-6991.

fairs & festivals

ECHO EARTH WEEK’S MUDFEST: See SAT.22.

film

‘ARRIVAL’: A linguistics professor played by Amy Adams has the daunting task of interpreting the language of extra-terrestrial beings. Academy Award-winning sound editor Sylvain Bellemare fields audience questions. The Savoy Theater, Montpelier, 7-10 p.m. Free. Info, 828-8600. ‘NATIONAL BIRD’: See TUE.25, Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury. Info, 748-2600. ‘NERUDA’: Lit lovers and movie buffs find common ground in this 2016 biopic about the Nobel Prizewining poet Pablo Neruda. Latin American poetry professor Tina Escaja speaks. Alumni Auditorium, Champlain College, Burlington, 7 p.m. Donations; limited space. Info, 660-2600. ‘NIGHT OF THE CREEPS’: Teenagers tackle alien parasites in this 1986 horror-comedy. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 9 p.m. Free; for ages 18 and up. Info, 540-0406.

food & drink

COMMUNITY MEAL: Diners dig into a hot lunch. United Church of Johnson, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 635-2356. VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: See WED.19. VERMONT RESTAURANT WEEK: See FRI.21.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.19. CHESS CLUB: Strategy comes into play as competitors try to capture opposing game pieces. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. CRIBBAGE: See WED.19.

health & fitness

crafts

KNITTING & MORE: FOUR NEEDLE TUBE SOCKS: See WED.19.

BACKYARD BOOT CAMP: See WED.19. EPIC MINDFULNESS MEDITATION: See WED.19.

Open House Party! SATURDAY, MAY 13TH 10:30-NOON

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FALLING AWAY: A mindful talk by Robert Kest moves beyond a Western view of self and psychotherapy. Community Room, Hunger Mountain Coop, Montpelier, 6-7:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, info@hungermountain.coop.

MIDDLEBURY AFRICAN MUSIC & DANCE ENSEMBLE: A lively concert highlights the diversity and richness of African steps and sounds. Robison Hall, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 8 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168.

GENTLE TAI CHI: See WED.19.

SOULFUL HARMONY: A coed a cappella group grabs attention with their style of R&B with a gospel flair. McCarthy Arts Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 654-2000.

INSIGHT MEDITATION: See WED.19. AN INTEGRATIVE APPROACH TO LYME DISEASE: NAVIGATING THE OPTIONS: Eleanor Baron presents herbal support for combating the tick-borne illness. Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism, Montpelier, 6-8 p.m. $12-15. Info, 224-7100. NIA WITH LINDA: See WED.19. RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: See WED.19. TAI CHI CLASS: See WED.19. UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT NURSING STUDENT VISITS: See WED.19. WEDNESDAY NIGHT SOUND BATH: See WED.19. YOGA NIDRA: THE YOGA OF DEEP RELAXATION: See WED.19. ZUMBA EXPRESS: See WED.19.

kids

KIDS’ DUNGEONS & DRAGONS: Experienced and novice players take on challenges to defeat enemies in this pen-and-paper role-playing game. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, jmuse@colchestervt.gov. LEGO CHALLENGE: See WED.19. LEGO FUN: Creative types in grades K and up build unique structures with brightly colored pieces. Kids under 5 require adult supervision. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. ‘NICK OF TIME’: An astronaut is sent hurtling through time in No Strings Marionette’s puppet show for all ages. Fuller Hall, St. Johnsbury Academy, 10:30 a.m. & 1 p.m. $4. Info, 748-2600. PARTY IN PICTURE BOOK CITY: Little lit lovers celebrate the library’s new and improved collection of illustrated stories with music, treats and mingling. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. ‘PEPPA PIG LIVE!’: The lovable star of the Nick Jr. program makes a splash in her first live stage show. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, 6 p.m. $36.7557.50. Info, 863-5966. RICHMOND STORY TIME: See WED.19. STORY TIME & PLAYGROUP: See WED.19. TODDLER TIME: See WED.19. YOGA FOR KIDS: See WED.19. YOUNG WRITERS & STORYTELLERS: Kindergartners through fifth graders practice crafting narratives. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4-5 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 264-5660.

LIVING WITH ALZHEIMER’S FOR MIDDLE-STAGE CAREGIVERS: Professionals share strategies for safe, effective and comfortable care. University of Vermont Medical Center Memory Program, Colchester, 5:30-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 800-272-3900. RECOVERING FROM FINANCIAL SETBACKS: Participants bank strategies for getting back on their feet. Waterbury Public Library, 10:30 a.m.noon. Free; preregister. Info, 244-7036.

4/13/17 2:17 PM

WOMEN’S PICKUP BASKETBALL: See WED.19.

talks

ARTIST TALK: Nile Project CEO Mina Girgis and Dartmouth College’s Jamie Coughlin looks at how a music collective reimagines international water sustainability. Networking follows. DEN Innovation Center, Hanover, N.H., 5 p.m. Free. Info, 603-646-2422. VERMONT RESTAURANT WEEK: THE DISH: GOING WITH THE GRAIN: Panelists ponder the benefits and pitfalls of restoring grain production to the northeast. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. $5. Info, 864-5684.

tech

ONE-ON-ONE TECH APPOINTMENTS: See MON.24. TECH HELP WITH CLIF: See WED.19.

theater

ABBY PAIGE: ‘TOUS MES COUSINS — ALL MY COUSINS’: A bilingual one-woman play-in-progress explores what it means to be Franco-American on both sides of the border. An audience discussion follows. Montpelier City Hall Auditorium, 7:30 p.m. $5. Info, 229-0492. ‘THE CALL’: See WED.19.

words

SING STUCK IN VERMONT

KARAOKE AT WAKING WINDOWS

Add your voice to the 500th musical episode of Stuck in Vermont, airing August 18. Sign up and we’ll record you singing the Stuck in Vermont theme song during Winooski’s Waking Windows music festival on Saturday, May 6, 12-6 p.m.

LYRICS

Cause we’re stuck in, stuck in Vermont Stuck in, stuck in Vermont

LUNCHTIME POETRY READINGS: See WED.19. PAINTED WORD POETRY SERIES: A program highlighting established and emerging New England poets features Lemon Hound writer Sina Queyras. Fleming Museum of Art, University of Vermont, Burlington, 6 p.m. Regular admission, $3-10; free for members, faculty, staff, students and kids 6 and under. Info, 656-0750. PAINTING WITH WORDS WORKSHOP: Writers give voice to the stories within instrumental compositions under the guidance of poet Reuben Jackson. Montpelier Bridge Office, 6-8 p.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, carla@montpelierbridge.com. WEDNESDAY WORKSHOP: CHAPTER FOCUS: Folks give feedback on selections of up to 40 pages penned by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104.

Special thanks to the good folks running our pop-up recording booth:

SIGN-UP TODAY AT

sevendaysvt.com/stuck-karaoke The Stuck in Vermont theme music was composed and performed by the Smittens who will be playing May 6 at the Monkey House, 2:15-3pm.

WRITING CIRCLE: See WED.19.  3v-SIVkaraoke041917.indd 1

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CALENDAR 67

JOHNSON STATE COLLEGE JAZZ ENSEMBLE & FUNK/FUSION ENSEMBLE: Student musicians hit all the right notes in a varied program. Dibden Center for the Arts, Johnson State College, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 635-1476.

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SEVEN DAYS

JAZZ VOCAL ENSEMBLE & TUESDAY JAZZ COMBO: Amber deLaurentis and Tom Cleary direct a toe-tapping tribute to Ella Fitzgerald and Thelonius Monk. University of Vermont Recital Hall, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 656-3040.

86 main st, burlington • 862.1670 urbansalonteam.com

04.19.17-04.26.17

CASTLETON UNIVERSITY WIND ENSEMBLE: Amanda McCullough, Shelley Hanson and Laura Phillips are among the female composers featured in this spring concert. Casella Theater, Castleton University, 7-9 p.m. $5-10. Info, 468-1373.

Change the way you see beauty

sports

EWA CHRUSCIEL: National Poetry Month continues with a reading by the Polish American writer and educator. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 745-1392.

music

Expires 6.30.17

I CHING: Instructor Baylen demonstrates the ancient Chinese oracle used for insight and guidance in a five-part series. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: See WED.19.

LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: SPANISH: See WED.19.

1st cut & color

ADMINISTRATIVE PROFESSIONAL GROUP WORKSHOP: Guest speaker Deb Allen shares her expertise as a team facilitator. A complimentary continental breakfast and exciting raffle prizes top off the morning. National Life Building, Montpelier, 8:30-10:30 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 229-7481.

‘MAMMA MIA!’: See WED.19.

INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASS: See WED.19.

$25 OFF

seminars

language

BEGINNER ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASS: See WED.19.

1st cut or color

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

STORY TIME WITH A TWIST: See WED.19.

$10 OFF


vtrecycles.com

1-855-63-CYCLE

Go to the “What Do I Do With This...?” page

FREE Recycling

Electronics • Computers • Monitors • Printers • Televisions • Computer Peripherals

(e.g mouse, keyboard)

Thermostats

Paint

Mercury Bulbs

Don’t trash it, CASH it!

Quarts, Gallons and 5 gallons

Compact (CFL)

GET $5 when you recycle mercury thermostats

• Oil Based • Stains • Acrylic • Shellac • Lacquer • Latex • Enamel • Varnish

Limit of 10: • Fluorescent Tubes • Circulines • HID • Mercury Vapor • U-Tube

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Batteries Single-use Alkaline • AAA & AA • 9-volt • Button Cells • D-Cells Rechargeables Cell Phones

12/20/16 12:45 PM

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Refresh your reading ritual.

04.19.17-04.26.17

Flip through your favorite local newspaper on your favorite mobile device.

SEVEN DAYS

(And yes, it’s still free.)

68

Download the Seven Days app for free today at sevendaysvt.com/apps.

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CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES

classes THE FOLLOWING CLASS LISTINGS ARE PAID ADVERTISEMENTS. ANNOUNCE YOUR CLASS FOR AS LITTLE AS $13.75/WEEK (INCLUDES SIX PHOTOS AND UNLIMITED DESCRIPTION ONLINE). SUBMIT YOUR CLASS AD AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTCLASS.

agriculture THE FAMILY COW: Interested in having a milk cow and wondering how to get started? This class will cover the ins and outs of owning a family cow and calf from health & nutrition, to breeding, milking, rotational grazing, calf care, udder health, milk quality, raw milk sales, organic certification and more. Sun., May 7, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Cost: $70/person; $130 for 2 people. Location: Earthwise Farm & Forest, 341 Macintosh Hill Rd., Randolph. Info: 2345524, Lmccrory560@gmail.com, earthwisefarmandforest.com/ dairy_workshops.html.

art PAINTING LIGHT IN WATERCOLOR: Explore techniques on how to achieve spectacular light effects from ordinary images through the use of light and shadow. Materials list available. Instructor: Robert O’Brien. Sat., May 13, 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost: $110/person; $85/ members. Location: Helen Day Art Center, 90 Pond St., Stowe. Info: 253-8358, education@ helenday.com, helenday.com.

985-3648

BLACKSMITHING 1: Instructor: Robert Wetzel. Using a forge, you will learn basic blacksmith techniques from building and maintaining a fire to hammer control. Students will create hooks, pokers and small leaves during this two-day workshop. Sat. & Sun., May 27-May 28, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost: $235/person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org. WORKSHOP: STAINED GLASS: Instructor: Chris Jeffrey. For beginners and for those who would like to brush up on their skills. Students will make two small panels and learn how to cut glass and how to put together and solder their panels using the copper foil technique of stained

WORKSHOP: PASTELS: Instructor: Robert Carsten, PSA-mp, IAPS-mc, CPS. Explore bold landscapes with pastels. Working from sketches and photos, students will experiment with color and design. Demonstrations and a variety of instructor-guided approaches, critiques, at-easel assistance and lots of painting time will make this an educational and enjoyable painting experience. All levels welcome. Sat. & Sun. Aug. 12 & 13, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Cost: $200/person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org. WORKSHOP: RELIEF PRINTMAKING: Instructor: Noah Lagle. Come home with a lovely set of carving tools and an edition of test and final prints made from your own carved wood and linoleum blocks. In this introductory workshop, learn about printmaking and design and how to make relief prints. Sat., Jun 17, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost: $155/person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@theshelburnecraftschool. org, theshelburnecraftschool. org.

dance DANCE STUDIO SALSALINA: Salsa classes, nightclub-style, group and private, four levels. Beginner walk-in classes, Wed., 6 p.m. $15/person for one-hour class. No dance experience, partner or preregistration required, just the desire to have fun! Drop in any time and prepare for an enjoyable workout. Location: 266 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Victoria, 598-1077, info@ salsalina.com. DSANTOS VT SALSA: Experience the fun and excitement of Burlington’s eclectic dance community by learning salsa. Trained by world famous dancer Manuel Dos Santos, we teach you how to dance to the music and how to have a great time on the dance floor! There is no better time to start than now. Mon. evenings: beginner class, 7-8 p.m.; intermediate, 8:15-9:15 p.m. Cost: $12/1-hour class. Location: North End Studios, 294 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: Jon Bacon, 355-1818, crandalltyler@hotmail. com, dsantosvt.com. LEARN TO DANCE W/ A PARTNER!: Come alone or come with friends, but come out and learn to dance! Beginning classes repeat each month, but intermediate classes vary from month to month. As with all of our programs, everyone is encouraged to attend, and no partner is necessary. Private lessons also available. Cost: $50/4week class. Location: Champlain Club, 20 Crowley St., Burlington. Info: First Step Dance, 598-6757,

drumming DJEMBE & TAIKO: Classes in Burlington, Hyde Park and Montpelier. Drums provided. Classes for adults (also for kids with parents) Mon., Tue. & Wed. in Burlington. Wed. a.m. or Friday a.m. in Hyde Park. Thu. in Montpelier. Most classes are in the evenings or after school. Conga classes, too! Visit our schedule and register online. Location: Taiko Space, 208 Flynn Ave., Suite 3G, Burlington; Capital City Grange, 6612 Rte. 12, Berlin; Moonlight Studios, 1670 Cleveland Corners Rd., Hyde Park. Info: 999-4255, burlingtontaiko.org.

fitness RIPPED: TOTAL BODY WORKOUT: Resistance, intervals, power, plyometrics, endurance. Using free weights; body weight; driving, motivating music; and a new focus and activity every few minutes, participants jam through R.I.P.P.E.D. with smiles, determination and strength. It is tough yet doable and fun. Beginners welcome! All moves are modified to meet your fitness level. Tue., 6-7 p.m.; Sat., 9-10 a.m. Cost: $10/1-hour class. Location: North End Studio A, 294 North Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: Tweak Your Physique, Stephanie Shohet, 578-9243, steph.shohet@ gmail.com, rippedplanet.com/ instructor/stephanie_shohet.

language SIGN UP NOW & LEARN SPANISH: Our Spanish classes just started, and you can still sign up! Our 11th year. Learn from a native speaker in lively small classes or private instruction. You’ll always be participating and speaking. Lesson packages for travelers. Lessons for children; they love it! See our website or contact us for details Starts Apr. 3-6. Cost: $225/10 weekly classes of 90+ minutes each. Location: Spanish in Waterbury Center, Waterbury Center. Info: 585-1025, spanishparavos@gmail.com, spanishwaterburycenter.com.

martial arts ACHIEVE YOUR POTENTIAL: Come to Wu Xing Chinese Martial Arts. Join other thoughtful, intelligent adults to learn and practice Tai Chi, Kung Fu, meditation and dynamic physical exercises. Maximize your mental tranquility and clarity, physical health and fitness, and self-confidence. For people who never thought this would be for them. Fri., 6-7 p.m. & 7-8 p.m.; Sat., 11 a.m.-noon & noon-1 p.m.; Tue., 6-7:30 p.m. Cost: $15/1-hour class; $50/mo. (incl. all classes offered); $5/trial class. Location: 303 Flynn Ave., Burlington. Info: 355-1301, info@ wxcma.com, wxcma.com. MARTIAL ARTS

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CLASSES 69

ADULT: DRAWING: Instructor: Misoo Filan. Learn fundamental skills of observational drawing. Explore technical and conceptual foundation of drawing using a variety of drawing materials such as graphite, charcoal, pen and ink. Develop personal goals while examining creative concepts through demonstrations, including drawing from a model in the final class. Mon., Jul. 10-Aug. 28, 6-8 p.m. Cost:

ADULT: SHAKER HALL TABLE: Instructor: Chris Ramos. Learn a comprehensive introduction to woodworking. This course explores basic principles of lumber selection, hand-tool and machinery usage, milling, joinery and finishing. You will build a Shaker-style hall table, taking the project from blueprint through completion, while gaining familiarity with the wood shop environment. Wed., Jul. 12-Sep. 6, 6-9 p.m. Cost: $518.50/ person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: Sage Tucker-Ketcham, 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

WORKSHOP: BRANCH TO SPOON: Instructor: Rob Palmer. Learn to carve spoons from locally sourced green wood using hand tools and traditional Swedish carving methods at Rokeby Museum. Learn to identify appropriate species of wood for carving spoons and other utensils. Learn about the anatomy of a spoon and carving safety and techniques. Sat., Aug. 26, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost: $160/ workshop; incl. materials & a set of carving tools to take home. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

WEAVING A TAPESTRY OF LOVE AND REMEMBRANCE: Each participant will weave on a small handheld loom to create a unique and personally meaningful piece representing their relationship with their mother. Bring a private list of thoughts, feelings and memories of your mom along with something personally significant to weave into your piece, such as a ribbon or piece of fabric. No prior weaving experience is needed. Adults only. Sat., Apr. 29, 10 a.m.2 p.m. Cost: $45/person; $40/ members; $25/material fee to be paid to instructor. Location: Milton Artists’ Guild Art Center & Gallery, 199 US Rt. 7, Milton. Info: Christina Lesperance, castlegarden_vt@yahoo.com.

kevin@firststepdance.com, firststepdance.com.

SEVEN DAYS

ADULT: ALTERNATIVE FIRING: Instructor: Rik Rolla. Explore clay on the wheel in a creative mixedlevel supportive environment. Examine properties of form function, color and glazes. Fire finished pieces in the primitive pit, the Raku Kiln with the option to explore other firing techniques. Gas reduction kiln and electric kilns are also available. Mon., Jun. 19-Aug. 14, 6-8 p.m., no class Jul. 3. Cost: $335/person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@theshelburnecraftschool. org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

ADULT: MIXED-LEVEL WHEEL: Instructor, Rik Rolla. Further develop the fundamentals of wheel-throwing. Explore techniques through demonstrations and hands-on assistance. You set the pace and gain experience through guided individualized practice. Gas reduction kiln and electric oxidation kiln are available for firing including an option to explore other firing methods. Tue., Jun. 10-Aug. 15, 6-8 p.m.; no class Jul. 4. Cost: $335/person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

ADULT: INTRO TO EN PLEIN AIR: Instructor: Clark Derbes. Practice the traditional fair-weather art of painting outside. Learn the basics of open-air landscape painting from how and where to set up your easel, to selecting your palate, to capturing changing light. All ability levels are welcome. Tue., Jul. 11-Aug.29, 6-8 p.m. Cost: $248/person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

WORKSHOP: WATERCOLORS: Instructor: Joel Popadics. Explore the vistas of the Shelburne region and enjoy en-plein-air watercolor painting with renowned watercolorist Joel Popadics. Each day, participants will meet at different locations, and Joel will offer the group two, brief painting demonstrations followed by an opportunity to paint and apply technique with individual instruction. Mon.-Fri:, Aug. 7-11, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost: $650/person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

WORKSHOP: WATERCOLORS: Instructor: Ayn Baldwin-Riehle. Explore the best uses of photographic reference materials to create fine detail in watercolor. Learn how to keep vitality, memory and overall composition working effectively in detailed work, and how to avoid the pitfalls of using photographs! Some experience in drawing and painting is necessary. Sat. Jul. 15,10 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost: $100/ person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School , 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

04.19.17-04.26.17

theshelburnecraftschool.org

ADULT: MIXED-LEVEL WHEEL: Instructor: Mune Taguchi. Further develop the fundamentals of wheel-throwing. Explore techniques through demonstrations and hands-on assistance. You set the pace and gain experience through guided individualized practice. Gas reduction kiln and electric oxidation kiln are available for firing, including an option to explore other firing methods. Wed., Jun. 21-Aug. 16, 6-8 p.m.; no class July 5. Cost: $335/person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

ADULT: INTERMED. OIL PAINTING: Instructor, Dana Heffern. Perfect for those looking to build on their basic knowledge of oil painting. Techniques will be learned through theory and practice. Subject matter may include still life, drapery, landscape and the human figure. Demonstrations will be provided for each class. Water-based or traditional oil paints welcome. Wed., Jun. 21-Aug. 16, 6-8 p.m.; no class Jul. 5. Cost: $248/ person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

glass assembly. Sat. & Sun., Jun. 10 & 11, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Cost: $272/ person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

craft

ADULT: BEGINNER CLAY: Instructor: Rik Rolla. Learn how to throw clay on the wheel. Explore centering, throwing, trimming and glazing. Gain confidence with hands-on demonstrations and one-on-one time with the instructor. Leave with several finished pieces. Gas reduction kiln and electric oxidation kiln are available for firing. Fri., Jun. 12-Aug. 18, 10 a.m.-noon; no class July 7. Cost: $335/person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

$258/person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.


CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES

classes THE FOLLOWING CLASS LISTINGS ARE PAID ADVERTISEMENTS. ANNOUNCE YOUR CLASS FOR AS LITTLE AS $13.75/WEEK (INCLUDES SIX PHOTOS AND UNLIMITED DESCRIPTION ONLINE). SUBMIT YOUR CLASS AD AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTCLASS.

MARTIAL ARTS

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

VERMONT BRAZILIAN JIUJITSU: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is a martial arts combat style based entirely on leverage and technique. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu self-defense curriculum is taught to Navy Seals, CIA, FBI, Military Police and Special Forces. No training experience required. Easy-to-learn techniques that could save your life! Classes for men, women and children. Students will learn realistic bully-proofing and self-defense life skills to avoid them becoming victims and help them feel safe and secure. Our sole purpose is to help empower people by giving them realistic martial arts training practices they can carry with them thoroughout life. IBJJF & CBJJ Certified Black Belt 6th Degree Instructor under Carlson Gracie Sr.: teaching in Vermont, born and raised in Rio de Janeiro, Brasil! A five-time Brazilian National Champion; International World Masters Champion and IBJJF World Masters Champion. Accept no Iimitations!. Location: Vermont Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, 55 Leroy Rd., Williston. Info: 598-2839, julio@ bjjusa.com, vermontbjj.com.

massage ASIAN BODYWORK THERAPY PROGRAM: This program teaches two forms of massage: amma and shiatsu. We will explore oriental medicine theory and diagnosis as well as the body’s meridian system, acupressure points, yin yang and fiveelement theory. Additionally, 100 hours of Western anatomy and physiology are taught. VSAC nondegree grants are available. NCBTMB-assigned school. elementsofhealing.net. Begins Sep. 2017. Cost: $5,000/600-hour program. Location: Elements of Healing, 21 Essex Way, Suite 109, Essex Jct. Info: Scott Moylan, 288-8160, scott@elementsof healing.net, elementsofhealing. net.

meditation LEARN TO MEDITATE: Through the practice of sitting still and following your breath as it goes out and dissolves, you are connecting with your heart. By simply letting yourself be, as you are, you develop genuine sympathy toward yourself. The Burlington Shambhala Center offers meditation as a

path to discovering gentleness and wisdom. Shambhala Cafe (meditation and discussions) meets the first Saturday of each month, 9 a.m.-noon. An open house (intro to the center, short dharma talk and socializing) is held on the third Sunday of each month, noon-2 p.m. Instruction: Sun. mornings, 9 a.m.-noon, or by appt. Sessions: Tue. & Thu., noon-1 p.m., & Mon.-Thu., 6-7 p.m. Location: Burlington Shambhala Center, 187 S. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 658-6795, burlingtonshambhalactr.org. SPIRITUALITY FOR DIFFICULT TIMES: 14 PRECEPTS OF THICH NHAT HANH: Buddhist teacher and author Elizabeth Mattis Namgyel will lead an inspiring and provocative weekend of teachings, sharing her insights on navigating today’s world, based on Thich Nhat Hanh’s Fourteen Precepts of Engaged Buddhism and on her own extensive experience as a Buddhist practitioner. All three talks available on video streaming. Apr. 29-30. Location: Pema Osel Do Ngak Choling, Vershire. Info: 333-4521, bit.ly/pemaosel.

music BAGPIPES & HIGHLAND DRUMMING: Free lessons in bagpipes and highland drumming for anyone interested in joining our band: a non-profit educational/performing group playing in parades and civic events throughout Vermont. No experience necessary; we teach you everything you need to know! All levels of ability welcome. We meet weekly. Wed., 7-7:30 p.m. Location: St James Episcopal Church fellowship hall, Fairgrounds Gate F, Rte 2A, Essex Junction. Info: St Andrews Pipe Band of Vermont, Beth Paul, 343-4738, isabetty@aol.com, vtpipeband.org.

photography SPRING IN VERMONT PHOTO WORKSHOP: Spring in Vermont is one of the most magical times to be outdoors exploring the landscape with a camera. The streams are full, leaves are bursting and the fields are exploding with green. During this intensive weekend photography workshop, we’ll explore and photograph some of the most stunning Vermont landscapes. Fri., May 26, at 3 p.m. through Sun., May 28, at 4 p.m. Cost: $695/

weekend intensive workshop. Location: Comfort Inn & Suites, Montpelier. Info: Green Mountain Photographic Workshops, Kurt Budliger, 272-5328, info@ kurtbudligerphotography.com, greenmtnphotoworkshops.com.

psychology LISTENING TO SPIRITUAL GUIDANCE WORKSHOP: Learn how to work more closely with your spiritual guidance in this hands-on workshop full of exercises and techniques. All necessary readings and materials are provided. Led by Sue Mehrtens. May 10, 17, 24 & 31; 7-9 p.m. Cost: $60/person. Location: Jungian Center for the Spiritual Sciences, 55 Clover Ln., Waterbury. Info: Sue, 244-7909. SYNCHRONICITY WORKSHOP: Learn how to put synchronicity to work for you in this workshop that combines discussion and hands-on application. Students should come with specific questions about which they want insight and guidance. Lunch and snacks are provided on both days. Led by Sue Mehrtens Apr. 29 & 30, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Cost: $75/per person. Location: 55 Clover Ln., Waterbury. Info: Sue Mehrtens, 244-7909.

tai chi BEGINNER TAI CHI IN BURLINGTON: At Long River Tai Chi Circle, we practice Cheng Man-ch’ing’s “simplified” 37 posture Yang-style form. The three pillars of our study are Form, Sensing Hands and Sword. Patrick is a senior instructor at Long River in Vermont and New Hampshire and will be teaching the classes in Burlington. Starts May 10, 9-10 a.m. Cost: $65/mo. Location: North End Studios, 294 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: Long River Tai Chi Circle, Patrick Cavanaugh, 4906405, patrick@longrivertaichi.org, longrivertaichi.org. SNAKE-STYLE TAI CHI CHUAN: The Yang Snake Style is a dynamic tai chi method that mobilizes the spine while stretching and strengthening the core body muscles. Practicing this ancient martial art increases strength, flexibility, vitality, peace of mind and martial skill. Beginner classes Sat. mornings & Wed. evenings. Call to view a class. Location: Bao Tak Fai Tai Chi Institute, 100 Church St., Burlington. Info: 8647902, ipfamilytaichi.org. TAI CHI PRINCIPLES WORKSHOP: World-renowned Tai Chi Master William Ting (Ting Kuo-Piao) visits Burlington. Limited space available. Jun. 9-11. Location:

Rock Point Retreat Center, 20 Rock Point Rd., Burlington. Info: Elizabeth Wirls, 735-5467, marty@oaktreetaichi.com.

yoga EVOLUTION YOGA: Evolution Yoga and Physical Therapy offers yoga classes for everyone from beginner to expert. Choose from a wide variety of drop-in classes, series and workshops in Vinyasa, Kripalu, Core, Gentle, Vigorous, Yoga on the Lake, Yoga Wall, Therapeutics, and Alignment. Become part of our yoga community. You are welcome here. Cost: $15/class; $140/10-class card; $5-10/community classes. Location: Evolution Yoga, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington. Info: 8649642, evolutionvt.com. HONEST YOGA: Honest yoga offers practices for all levels. We just expanded to have two practice spaces! Your children can practice in one room while you practice in the other. No need for childcare. Yoga and dance classes ages 3 months and up. Brandnew beginners’ course: This includes two specialty classes per week for four weeks plus unlimited access to all classes. We have daily heated and alignment classes kids classes in yoga and dance, pre- and postnatal yoga.

We hold yoga teacher trainings at the 200- and 500-hour levels, as well as children and dance teacher training courses. Daily classes & workshops. $50/new student (1 month unlimited); $18/ class; $140/10-class card; $15/ class for student or senior; or $110/10-class punch card; $135/ mo. adult memberships; $99/ mo. kid memberships. Location: Honest Yoga Center, 150 Dorset St., Blue Mall, next to Hana, South Burlington. Info: 497-0136, honestyogastudio@gmail.com, honestyogacenter.com. IYENGAR YOGA: A classical approach to yoga. Our experienced teachers offer classes for all levels, ages and abilities, as well as prenatal classes and yoga therapy for injuries. Iyengar yoga focuses on uniting the body, breath and mind through attention to alignment. Precision. Rigor. Depth. Experience the Iyengar difference. 10 weekly classes. See website for schedule. Cost: $16/90-minute class. Location: Iyengar Center of Vermont, 294 North Winooski Ave., suite 212B, Burlington. Info: Rebecca Weisman, 379-7389, rebecca@IYCVT.com, iycvt.com. LAUGHING RIVER YOGA SCHOOL: Are you a yoga teacher or seeking to be one? We offer a renowned 200-hour teacher training program to get you started, as well as a continuous flow of trainings designed specifically for yoga teachers. The learning never ends! Check out our website for dates and topics. Daily classes, 200- and 300-hour teacher trainings. Cost: $65/first month of unlimited classes; workshop and training prices vary. Location: Laughing River Yoga, Chace Mill, suite 126, Burlington. Info: 3438119, laughingriveryoga.com. RAILYARD YOGA STUDIO: Railyard offers classical yoga, meditation and healing classes. Clearing Subconscious Kundalini Yoga Series with Sukhpran: first three Thu. in May, 7-8:30 p.m. Dharma Yoga: Tue., 5:30 p.m., with Amy. Life Force Dance: Fri., 6-7 p.m., with Silvia. New: Reiki and Tarot Readings with Claire: Mon., 6-8 p.m. Four-session Sound Healing with Melinda coming Wed in May See website for schedule. Location: Railyard Yoga Studio, 270 Battery St., Burlington. Info: 318-6050, railyardyoga@gmail.com, railyardapothecary.com. NONPROFIT, DONATION-BASED YOGA: Sangha Studio builds an empowered community through the shared practice of yoga. Free yoga service initiatives and outreach programs are offered at 17 local organizations working with all ages. Join Sangha in both downtown Burlington and the Old North End for one of their roughly 60 weekly classes and workshops. Become a Sustaining Member for $60/month and practice as often as you like! Daily. Location: Sangha Studio, 120 Pine St. and 237 North Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: Caitlin Pascucci, 448-4262, sanghastudiovt@ gmail.com, info@sanghastudio. org.


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music

Making Space

Caroline DeCunzo and Jack Braunstein stake a claim in Burlington’s experimental music community B Y J OR D AN A D AMS

MAKING SPACE

» P.74

Jack Braunstein and Caroline DeCunzo of Como Tapes

IT’S ALL ABOUT EXPANDING YOUR RANGE OF POSSIBILITY. JAC K BR AU N S T EI N

LEE KROHN

72 MUSIC

SEVEN DAYS

04.19.17-04.26.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

F

or the average listener, experimental music is a hard sell. It’s usually bereft of the comforting hallmarks of conventional, popular music: catchy hooks, identifiable melodies, etc. So-called “other music” can even be downright alienating to some. But for Caroline DeCunzo and Jack Braunstein, Burlingtonbased enthusiasts of all things musically off-center, the unconventional is their norm. DeCunzo, 23, and Braunstein, 21, are partners in life and in their creative endeavors. They operate Como Tapes, a not-for-profit cassette-tape label that releases avant-garde music from such local artists as Shepherd of the Choir and Amelia Devoid (a Seven Days contributor), as well as out-of-state artists including Swings and Reformer. The couple also maintains Burlington Gull, a promotional website for DIY happenings in the Queen City, and presents an experimental music series called Pushing a Brain Uphill. The third installment of the series begins on Wednesday, April 19, and continues on Friday and Saturday, April 21 and 22, at Burlington locations. Over the past few years, DeCunzo and Braunstein have worked to help stabilize the local experimental scene. Specifically, they’ve focused on maintaining spaces for offkilter music to be produced, promoted and disseminated, and make a conscious effort to diverge from traditional, capitalist structures. The pair recently spoke with Seven Days at a coffee shop in Burlington’s South End. DeCunzo and Braunstein’s affection and respect f or one another is obvious. They communicate both verbally and nonverbally, frequently clarify and interpret for one another, and tend to finish each other’s sentences. Both have been interested in experimental music since their teenage years. “I think the most powerful part is the liberating aspect of it,” says Braunstein. “It’s all about expanding your range of possibility.” “It’s not prescriptive,” adds DeCunzo. She hails from Glens Falls, N.Y., while Braunstein grew up in Cherry Hill, N.J. Both arrived in Burlington in the early 2010s to attend the University of Vermont. DeCunzo graduated in 2016 with a degree in Spanish and global studies; Braunstein will graduate this spring in geography and natural resources planning. They began developing many of the ideals that support their various projects while studying at UVM. Braunstein cofounded Como Tapes with childhood friend Greg Goldstein before moving to Vermont. The latter operates a branch of the label in New Jersey. Como Tapes’ website is sparsely designed, with few frills other than a kitschy cassette icon that replaces the


GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

S UNDbites

News and views on the local music scene

COURTESY OF ANDY O’BEIRNE

B Y J O RDA N A D A MS

The Snaz

Hello/Goodbye

BiteTorrent

This Saturday, April 22, scientists and allies of the scientific community plan to rally together for the March for Science. According to its official SOUNDBITES

FRI 4.21

Operation Prince

THU 4.20

Pigeons Playing Ping Pong

THU 4.20

Vaud & The Villains

SAT 4.22

Aqueous

99.9 The Buzz welcomes

Badfish: A Tribute to Sublime

Roots of Creation, Seamus the Great

SAT 4.22

Cabinet

WED 4.26

Bleeker, Beware of Darkness

FRI 4.28

Sunsquabi

FRI 4.28

» P.75

feat. Craig Mitchell & the Purple Ones

Starbird

Maddy O’Neal

104.7 The Point welcomes

Start Making Sense: Talking Heads Tribute The Insidious Rays

SAT 4.29

Overcoats

SUN 4.30

Noah & Abby Gundersen

MON 5.01

Kosha Dillz

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Yoke Lore

David Ramirez

04.19.17-04.26.17

Cultural Chemistry, Self Portrait SEVEN DAYS

JUST ANNOUNCED — 5.14 Minus The Bear 6.2 Broods 6.24 Lucero 6.27 MISSIO 1214 Williston Road, South Burlington 802-652-0777 @higherground Tsunamibots

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MUSIC 73

I apologize for starting out this week’s column with a stone-cold bummer of an announcement, but news is news: Brattleboro-based indie rockers the SNAZ are calling it quits. The band announced its demise last week on its Facebook page. This might be a bit of a shock to anyone who’s been following the band and its skyward trajectory over the last couple of years. I truly thought the Snaz were “going places,” as did other Seven Days scribes who’ve reviewed their recent releases: 2015’s Running Away From Home, and 2017’s Sensitive Man. Though I won’t speculate about “what could’ve been,” the Snaz seemed destined to launch their eloquent, tough-as-nails/sweet-ascandy-bars brand of rock far beyond the regional scene. In an email to Seven Days, front woman DHARMA RAMIREZ explains the breakup: “It’s difficult working with four other people, all of whom are going through adolescence, different schools and separate dreams. The Snaz held so many dreams for me, and I put my heart and soul into writing these songs. However, in the end, my relationship with music and my bandmates needed to be saved. The whole business of the Snaz had become one of stress and disagreement. It was time to take our energies elsewhere.” Bassist NINA CATES echoes the sentiment. She writes, “In the end, it felt more like work and stress than fun.”

One of the main narratives surrounding the Snaz was the fact that its members were so young. With that in mind, may we all take a cue from the level of maturity and self-awareness these 18-year-olds have displayed the next time we’re faced with a conflict. You have (at least) two more chances to catch the Snaz before they fade away. They play on Friday, May 5, at Scout & Co. in Winooski as part of Waking Windows, and again on Saturday, June 10, at the Scout Film Festival in Stowe. On the plus side, Ramirez’s other band, OSABA, is still active. The hardedged, grungy duo recently released an EP, so be on the lookout for a review in

Seven Days’ music section sometime in the next few weeks. Given that Vermont’s music scene is a veritable embarrassment of riches, it only makes sense that as one band announces its demise, another one (or two!) sprouts up to take its place. JB LEDOUX and GAHLORD DEWALD of the improvisational avant-jazz outfit the LE DUO recently teamed up with experimental visionary GREG DAVIS for a new project called THREES. Ledoux tells us via email that the newly formed trio was born “out of the need to create significantly challenging art in the wake of a perceived global shift to the altright.” He notes that the band seeks to provoke self-awareness in its listeners. Threes make their debut on Monday, May 1, at the Light Club Lamp Shop in Burlington. Check out the Bandcamp page to hear the trio’s first release, Volume 0. And speaking of debuts, producer and former PRETTY & NICE guitarist JEREMY MENDICINO unveils his new project, the GIFTS, on Friday, May 5, at Waking Windows. He dropped the ominous, glitchy, fuzz-core singles “Ocable” and “Maustv” on Bandcamp in February.

4/17/17 3:23 PM


music Making Space « P.72

KAMASI WASHINGTON WEDNESDAY, JUNE 7 FLYNN MAINSTAGE

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SIDEWALK CHALK WITH YONRICO SCOTT & FRIENDS SOUTHERN GOSPEL BRUNCH FEATURING NICK CASSARINO’S SALVATION STATION AND MORE!

Tickets on sale to public Friday, April 21.

Become a member to purchase tickets early discoverjazz.com/membership 74 MUSIC

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A R T S

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user’s regular cursor. A link that reads, “I want to read more…” takes the user to the label’s heady manifesto, which Braunstein penned in early 2015. The writ combines the kind of highbrow rhetoric one might expect from an idealistic freshman philosophy student with the near-incoherent emoji-speak of a millennial’s Snapchat account. It cites philosophers such as Michel Foucault and Theodor Adorno, but also peppers in phrases such as “u know” and the numeral “2” instead of the word “to.” His style suggests that Braunstein doesn’t take the treatise too seriously. It frames Como Tapes as a “parallel economy,” one that doesn’t fall prey to the institutionalized landscape of the music industry. “[It’s about] creating something outside of a capitalist system,” says DeCunzo, categorizing Como Tapes as a “capitalist-secessionist arts space.” The label seeks to maximize profits for its artists, as opposed to the label itself. Since 2015, the label has released more than a dozen albums and produced approximately 20 physical cassettes per release. Half are given to artists for their own sales and distribution. Any sales from the other half of the stock are invested back into the label for future releases. The average tape costs $1 or $2 to produce and sells for $5 to $7. Little to no money is spent on promotions. This ties into the label’s emphasis on community and word-of-mouth to spread awareness of its artists, as written in an updated version of the label’s manifesto. Braunstein posted the addendum approximately five months after the original. It reads, “We need 2 define a new approach ... When people relate with each other in ways that are not institutionally informed, it opens up new ways of understanding and practicing the interpersonal.” “The idea of organizing around friendship and care was really compelling,” explains DeCunzo. One of their most recent projects is the Taft Cornerz series, a collection of “oppositional music” from Vermont artists such as Harvey Bigman, Wren Kitz and ouzkxqlzn. The series examines concepts such as personal identity and political and social discord. As seen on the Como Tapes website, its artwork appropriates City Market/ Onion River Co-op’s signature onion logo (adding a hammer and sickle), while riffing on Williston’s Taft Corners shopping center. Braunstein explains that the name is a critique of “the consumerist ideology of Chittenden County and Vermont.”

Many Como Tapes artists have performed under the Burlington Gull banner. DeCunzo created the website as a way to compile a calendar of DIY, underground events without relying on Facebook or other outlets for marketing. She and Braunstein had previously worked with local promoters Friends + Family. “There was a lot of anti-Facebook sentiment in the way that [it] was suppressing shows unless you pay [to promote] them,” says DeCunzo, referring to the site’s recently imposed restrictions on events and how many followers they reach. One such event is Pushing a Brain Uphill. The series emphasizes femme, queer, nonbinary and trans artists who make experimental music. DeCunzo founded PABU with Bigman, a Burlington-based musician and performance artist, as a response to the male-dominated world of experimental music. Most proceeds from events are distributed back to the artists to cover travel expenses, though they note that local artists often prefer that their cut be reinvested or distributed to out-ofarea artists. What’s ironic about both Como Tapes and Burlington Gull is that they are in some ways reliant on the things that they intend to defy. DeCunzo says she scours Facebook for events that fit Burlington Gull’s ethos and aggregates them for the site. And the Como Tapes website uses pop-up advertising — the lifeblood of online capitalism — for various companies including Adobe Systems, Health IQ life insurance and SoundCloud. DeCunzo and Braunstein aren’t just purveyors of fringe music; they also make it. They perform together as the search-engine-confounding noise duo Staples. Their act goes beyond typical noise table sets and is different every time: They’ve covered Bruce Springsteen and incorporated opera singing. In one performance, they each sported choke collars connected to one another via carabiner. Staples perform on the first night of PABU III at the BCA Center. Other headliners include noise band Wolf Eyes, abstract turntablist Maria Chavez and DJ Valerie Martino. m Contact: jordan@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Pushing a Brain Uphill III starts on Wednesday, April 19, 7:30 p.m., at the BCA Center in Burlington. It continues on Friday, April 21, 8 p.m., at Speaking Volumes Warehouse in Burlington, and concludes on Saturday, April 22, 3 p.m., again at the BCA Center. $10-25. AA. burlington-gull.com, comotapes.com


GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

S

LEARN LAUGH LOUNGE

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4/14/17 10:31 AM

Listening In If I were a superhero, my superpower would be the ability to get songs stuck in other people’s heads. Here are five songs that have been stuck in my head this week. May they also get stuck in yours. Follow sevendaysvt on Spotify for weekly playlists with tunes by artists featured in the music section. ANNA WISE, “Precious Possession” AZTEC CAMERA, “Good Morning Britain” KIDD VIDEO, “Where Did Our Love Go?” THE SNAZ, “Strung Out on Candy Bars”

SOVEREIGNTY, ILLADELPH, MGW, AND LOCAL AND FAMOUS ARTISTS THE TOBACCO SHOP WITH THE HIPPIE FLAVOR 75 Main St., Burlington, VT 864.6555 • Mon-Thur 10-9 Fri-Sat 10-10 Sun 10-8

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MUSIC 75

TRACEY ULLMAN, “Bobby’s Girl”

LARGEST SELECTION OF SCIENTIFIC AND AMERICAN GLASS IN TOWN

SEVEN DAYS

Three of the go-to names in Burlington house and techno happenings converge for a special event this Friday, April 21, at Club Metronome. Sunday Night

SPRING IS IN THE 1

04.19.17-04.26.17

Have I mentioned how much I love karaoke? I effing love it, and I take it quite seriously. I know it’s not a big deal for most people. It’s just a way to blow off steam and make an ass of yourself after kicking back a few. But for those of us who use it as an excuse to live out our fizzled dreams of onstage glory, it’s nice to know that some other people take it seriously, too. For instance, there’s JASMINE WHITE of GigginVT Productions and the HEART/ LED ZEPPELIN cover band, HEARTLESS. She’s organizing a yuuuge karaoke contest at City Limits Night Club in Vergennes on Friday, April 21. The contest is modeled after NBC’s “The Voice.” Judges CASSANDRA DEMARAIS, CHRISTA LANG and KEVIN MCENERNEY won’t have eyes on contestants until after they’ve heard them sing. So, you know, don’t feel the need to dress up all fancy er nothin’. It’s all about the pipes. Aside from momentary fame and glory, the winner also receives a fistful of greenbacks. Cash register sound!

Mass, Nexus Artist Management and 2K Deep present Belgian techno superstar Untitled-20 KILL FRENZY. The Berlin, Germanybased DJ/producer is currently on Los Angeles label DIRTYBIRD RECORDS’ roster. Local support includes DJs HAITIAN, JUSTIN R.E.M. and JACK BANDIT. This is likely to be one of the larger EDM offerings of springtime, so, if you’re a slave to the throbbing strains of Kill Frenzy’s brand of ghetto-house, you don’t want to sleep on this opportunity. 

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

website, the march is “a gathering of people standing together to acknowledge and voice the critical role that science plays in each of our lives.” The main event happens in Washington, D.C., but more than 500 satellite marches are planned on every continent — except Antarctica, which seems strange, because I was under the impression that Antarctica is pretty much populated with nothing but scientists. Maybe a march on the South Pole would be like preaching to the choir. And who better to provide musical entertainment for Burlington’s march than Waitsfield’s cybernetic surfpunk trio the TSUNAMIBOTS. The band, composed of three humanoid subjects controlled remotely by their robot overlords, wouldn’t exist without major scientific and technological advancements, such as artificial intelligence. (Play along with their shtick, people.) The march begins at 5 p.m., starting at the plaza in front of the Royall Tyler Theatre on the University of Vermont’s main campus. Marchers proceed down College Street toward Waterfront Park. There, the Tsunamibots will begin their robotic assault on all humans who dare withstand their mighty riffs and licks. Aside from the wave-slaying automatons, guest speakers include

3/14/17 6:09 PM


music

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

WED.19

Bandit (house, techno), 9 p.m., $15.

CITIZEN CIDER: Brett Hughes (country), 6 p.m., free.

JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

burlington

FOAM BREWERS: Paul Asbell Trio (jazz), 8 p.m., free. JUNIPER: Lowell Thompson (alt-country), 9 p.m., free.

THE DAILY PLANET: Silver Bridget (saw-folk), 8 p.m., free.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Jeremiah Tall (folk, Americana), 7:30 p.m., $5. Taka (vinyl DJ), 11 p.m., free.

JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Paul Asbell Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Irish Sessions (traditional), 7 p.m., free. Eric George and Zack DuPont (folk), 9 p.m., free.

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Congress Funk, 10 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Seth Yacovone (solo acoustic blues), 7 p.m., free. Bella’s Bartok, COPOUTS (circus punk), 9 p.m., $7.

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Open Mic with Andy Lugo, 9 p.m., free.

RÍ RÁ THE IRISH LOCAL & WHISKEY ROOM: Supersounds DJ (top 40), 10 p.m., free.

NECTAR’S: Vinyl Night with DJ Disco Phantom (vinyl DJs), 6 p.m., free. Navytrain, Jeddy (neo-Americana), 9 p.m., free/$5. 18+. RÍ RÁ THE IRISH LOCAL & WHISKEY ROOM: The County Down (traditional Irish), 7:30 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: Friday Morning Sing-Along with Linda Bassick & Friends (kids’ music), 11 a.m., free. Bad Accent (folk), 6 p.m., free. Rose Street Collective (jazz), 9 p.m., free. Blowtorch (punk), 11:30 p.m., $5.

RADIO BEAN: Dirty Dollhouse, Caroline Reese, the Ands (alt-folk), 7 p.m., free. Pocket Protector (funk-hop), 10:30 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE: Shrimptunes (rock), 5 p.m., free. Good Lord the Liftin’ (rock, jazz), 7 p.m., $5. Craig Mitchell (house, hits), 11 p.m., $5.

RED SQUARE: The Joe Moore Band (jazz), 6 p.m., free. DJ KermiTT (hits), 8 p.m., free. DJ David Chief, 11 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Fatty Shay and Friends (house), 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Hannah Fair (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Standup Open Mic, 7 p.m., free. Girl Crush Comedy (standup), 9 p.m., free.

chittenden county

SEVEN DAYS

04.19.17-04.26.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Lewis Del Mar, Anna Wise (indie), 8 p.m., $13/15.

MONKEY HOUSE: The Show Up Shows Vol. 3: A Benefit for Black Lives Matter featuring Pariah Beat, Swale, the Welterweights, Wren Kitz (rock), 7:30 p.m., $5. STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Bluegrass Session, 7 p.m., free. SUGARHOUSE BAR & GRILL: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Stephanie Nilles (jazz-punk), 9 p.m., free. SWEET MELISSA’S: D. Davis (acoustic), 5:30 p.m., donation. John Lackard Blues Band, 7:30 p.m., donation. WHAMMY BAR: Myra Flynn and Paul Boffa (neo-soul), 7 p.m., free.

middlebury area

51 MAIN AT THE BRIDGE: Blues Jam, 8 p.m., free. CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

76 MUSIC

HATCH 31: Bardela (Grateful Dead tribute), 7 p.m., free. TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. Open Mic Night, 9 p.m., free.

THU.20 // KISHI BASHI [INDIE]

Shared Existence

RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ KermiTT (hits), 10 p.m., $5.

Designer John Koenig’s website, the Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows, a

“compendium of invented words,” defines “sonder” as “the realization that each passerby has a life as vivid and complex as your own.” The title of

KISHI BASHI’s

latest album, Sonderlust, implies the multi-instrumentalist has an intense

desire for that newly named reckoning. Lyrically, the album features some of his most emotionally raw songs to date. Stylistically, it pushes further into electropop and disco than previous efforts, resulting in a sound both resplendent and poignant. Kishi Bashi plays on Thursday, April 20, at Signal Kitchen in Burlington. TALL TALL TREES and locals the DUPONT BROTHERS open.

northeast kingdom PARKER PIE CO.: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

outside vermont MONOPOLE: Open Mic with Lucid, 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Bow Thayer (folk-rock), 7:30 p.m., free.

THU.20 burlington

BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD: Peter Krag (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free. CLUB METRONOME: DJ Ross Presents a 4/20 Celebration with CoolTable Gang and Special Guests (hip-hop), 9 p.m., $5/10. 18+. THE DAILY PLANET: Lowell Thompson and Kelly Ravin (country), 8 p.m., free. DRINK: BLiNDoG Records Acoustic Sessions, 5 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: George Petit Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Charley & Grace (acoustic), 7:30 p.m., free. Sofia Talvik (Americana, folk), 8:30 p.m.,

free. DJ Disco Phantom (eclectic dance), 10 p.m., $5. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Dan Rahily featuring Ty and Rob (rock, folk), 10 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Trivia Mania, 7 p.m., free. Damn Tall Buildings (bluegrass), 9:30 p.m., $4/8. 18+. PHO NGUYEN: Karaoke with DJ Walker, 8 p.m., free. RÍ RÁ THE IRISH LOCAL & WHISKEY ROOM: Rob Benton (rock), 9:30 p.m., free. RADIO BEAN: Aaron Wardwell (singer-songwriter), 6 p.m., free. Tough Old Bird (folk), 7 p.m., free. Shane Hardiman Trio (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free. 2% (funk), 11 p.m., $5.

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Short Jam (improv), 6 p.m., free. Steve Byrne (standup), 7 p.m., $15. The Daily Grind (improv), 8:45 p.m., $5.

mad river valley/ waterbury

chittenden county

middlebury area

BACKSTAGE PUB: Trivia, 9:30 p.m., free.

HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Pigeons Playing Ping Pong (electro-funk), 8:30 p.m., $15/17.

JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: Irish Jam Session (traditional), 7 p.m., free.

outside vermont

RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ Cre8 (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

SWEET MELISSA’S: Dave Langevine (ragtime), 6 p.m., donation. Erin Cassels-Brown (indie folk), 8 p.m., donation.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Heady Vermont First Anniversary Party with DJ Taka (vinyl DJ), 7:30 p.m., free.

TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: DJ Da.Root (hits), 9 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Jenni and the Jazz Junketeers, 7 p.m., free.

SIGNAL KITCHEN: Kishi Bashi, Tall Tall Trees, the DuPont Brothers (indie), 8 p.m., $16/18.

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Throttle Thursdays with DJ Gold (hits), 9 p.m., free.

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Vaud & the Villains (cabaret, Americana), 8 p.m., $17/20.

RED SQUARE: Locals & Company (blues-rock), 7 p.m., free. D Jay Baron (mashup, hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

SIDEBAR: Hammydown, J Bengoy, Workman Song (indie), 10 p.m., free.

ZENBARN: Steady Betty (reggae, rocksteady), 8 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

stowe/smuggs

MARTELL’S AT THE RED FOX: Rudy Dauth (solo acoustic), 7 p.m., free. Dead Sessions (Grateful Dead tribute), 9 p.m., $7. MOOGS PLACE: Open Mic with Allen Church, 8:30 p.m., free.

PARKER PIE CO.: Chickweed (jazz, blues), 7 p.m., free.

RUBEN JAMES: DJ Cre8 (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Wren Kitz (singersongwriter, experimental), 7 p.m., free. DJ Fattie B (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free. SIGNAL KITCHEN: Lakou Mizik, Mal Maiz (Haitian Troubadou), 8:30 p.m., $12/14. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Moose Crossing (jazz), 7 p.m., free. SMITTY’S PUB: Hi-Note Karaoke, 8:30 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Steve Byrne (standup), 7 & 9:30 p.m., $20/27.

chittenden county

BACKSTAGE PUB: Karaoke with Jenny Red, 9 p.m., free. HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Operation Prince featuring Craig Mitchell and the Purple Ones (Prince tribute), 9 p.m., $12/15. HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Cashmere Cat, Longboy (EDM), 8:30 p.m., $17/20.

MONOPOLE: Last Nugg (reggae), 10 p.m., free.

JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: The Tenderbellies (bluegrass), 7 p.m., free.

OLIVE RIDLEY’S: Karaoke with DJ Jon Berry, 9 p.m., free.

MONKEY HOUSE: Flasher (rock), 9:30 p.m., $7/12. 18+.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Richie & Rosie (Americana), 8 p.m., free.

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: The Duo (rock), 5 p.m., free. Justice (rock), 9 p.m., free.

FRI.21

burlington

ARTSRIOT: Jukebox: A Warehouse Chamber Music Project (orchestral), 7 p.m., $5-200. CLUB METRONOME: Kill Frenzy, Haitian, Justin R.E.M., Jack

STONE CORRAL BREWERY: The Insiders (blues, jazz), 7 p.m., free. WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: Audrey Bernstein (jazz), 9 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Johnny Drop (folk), 6 p.m., free. FRI.21

» P.78


GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

REVIEW this

Bluegrass Gospel Project, Delivered. (VITAL RECORDS, CD, DIGITAL DOWNLOAD)

Bluegrass Gospel Project began with a one-off show for a First Night celebration in Burlington back in 2001. Throughout the years — and lineup changes — since, they’ve built an ironclad reputation for pure, unvarnished traditional music. BGP’s latest album, Delivered., is unfortunately their last. But it’s a fitting capstone for such a carefully cultivated legacy. As with their previous albums, Delivered. consists entirely of live recordings. That might be a problem for less polished ensembles, but every note and nuance here shines. The sound quality is transparent and consistent — especially considering that the record is stitched together from two years’ worth of performances. This spartan approach spotlights the band’s distinctive blend of bluegrass and … well, almost

Bostjan Zupancic, MicroMetal Volume II (SELF-RELEASED, CD, DIGITAL DOWNLOAD)

multi-instrumental talents of Steve Light are equally capable of commanding center stage. Song after song, Delivered. sounds better the more you turn it up. Audience participation is mostly in the margins, alternating between rapt hush and wild cheering. In fact, “Precious Memories,” a warm a cappella rendition of a traditional song, sounds like it was recorded in an empty room — until it’s over. BGP members contribute several originals to Delivered. It’s a credit to their collective talent how well compositions such as Crehan’s “Time Is Gonna Lose” and Light’s “Mobius Breakdown” stand up alongside the classics. The album closes with Billy Joe Shaver’s “I’m Just an Old Chunk of Coal,” which kicks off with a scorching fingerstyle blues solo. It’s a humble, simple song and a perfect note on which to exit. Bluegrass Gospel Project end their journey with a truly remarkable body of work — some seven indispensible albums. This is a band that started strong and kept getting better, a notion punctuated perfectly by Delivered. Delivered. by Bluegrass Gospel Project is available at bluegrassgospelproject.com.

obscure Japanese RPGs while heavily medicated. Those familiar with Zupancic — aka St. Johnsbury’s Russ Hayes (not to be confused with the judge at the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg, France) — and his 2016 album MicroMetal Volume I, will find the guitarist up to his usual experiments in tonality. Hayes is a proponent of the 19-EDO scale, a form of alternate tuning that uses microtones. The scale is more common in Eastern music, though Western composers have been using it since Guillaume Costeley’s Seigneur Dieu ta pitié in 1558. It hasn’t found a foothold in modern popular music because the quartertones can sound simply out of tune to the uninitiated. Hayes is in no hurry to cater to that crowd. He builds riffs like spider webs on the punishing “Demon of Entropy” — a song that comes across as Mike Patton fronting the fictitious cartoon band Dethklok. But he has vision. Every note, however dementedly off it sounds, is placed ever so carefully. At times MMVII is transcendent. And then there are moments when the songs feel like someone is pointing

a finger at you until it almost touches the space between your eyes. More than anything, though, there is shredding. So much weird, tonally abusive shredding. To circle back to the confused hallucinations, one moment — say, “Buried,” for example — makes you feel like you’re a conquering Viking with an ax. The next — “From Death to Life,” perhaps — you’re pretty sure the FBI are in your laptop and totally fucking with you. It’s not just the tuning scale, either. Hayes writes enchantingly weird stuff. But at its brightest moments, MMVII really brings the listener to strange shores. The results are less stellar when Hayes eases up. While he makes a gripping plea to take control of one’s destiny on “Give In,” his laid-back turn on “The Finite Song” doesn’t hold together as well. The tuning does him no favors when it comes to some of his vocal melodies. My conscious mind knows the pitch isn’t technically off. But my unconscious Western brain doth protest. The casual metalhead might not be ready for Hayes’ experiments. But more studious listeners just might find themselves drawn into the heavy dose of bizarre. MicroMetal Volume II by Bostjan Zupancic is available at bostjanzupancic.bandcamp.com.

JUSTIN BOLAND

04.19.17-04.26.17 SEVEN DAYS

CHRIS FARNSWORTH

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

1998 is a year I chiefly remember for scoring a job reviewing videogames, then promptly getting such a glorious case of mono that my whole fall semester was wiped out. The two events crossed over with tragic results when I was assigned to review a Japanese role-playing game called Grandia. I’d never attempted to play any game like it in my life. I spent most of the time I was supposed to be playing just staring at the screen and muttering, “What the fuck is happening?” I don’t know if it was the mono or the game, but my confusion bordered on the hallucinogenic. Which brings me to Bostjan Zupancic’s MicroMetal Volume II. I’ll get to the finer details of why this is such an odd-sounding record in a second. But it’s fair to say that MMVII is even weirder than playing

everything but rap and EDM. Early on, BGP expanded their repertoire beyond the deep roots of bluegrass and gospel, converting even rock and reggae tunes into stark acoustic arrangements. Yet it’s never a gimmick. Anything they touch, these musicians transform. Midway through the album, BGP reinterpret Jimmy Cliff ’s classic “Many Rivers to Cross,” and it’s a seamless fit. Opening with a mournful fiddle solo before swaying into a lush ballad, the standout track is perfectly paced. “For us, it’s all about the song,” said BGP founder and musical director Gene White in these pages back in 2012. The band has never deviated from that ethos, and every track on Delivered. clearly belongs. The center of BGP’s sound is lead vocalist Colby Crehan, who joined the group in 2007 after the departure of Vermont folk legend Patti Casey. Crehan is a gem, blessed with a remarkable tone that’s equal parts Iris DeMent and Alison Krauss. She’s understated but powerful and completely inhabits every song. The layers of accompaniment are seamless and spare, although White’s lyrical fiddle work and the

YOU A VT ARTIST OR BAND? SEND US YOUR MUSIC! DIGITAL: MUSIC@SEVENDAYSVT.COM; GET YOUR MUSIC REVIEWED: ARE SNAIL MAIL: MUSIC C/O SEVEN DAYS 255 S. CHAMPLAIN ST., SUITE 5, BURLINGTON, VT 05401

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THU.20 // SOFIA TALVIK [AMERICANA, FOLK]

• Swim lessons for ages 6 months to adults

North Country Swedish singersongwriter

SOFIA TALVIK

does Americana just as

authentically as anyone born and raised in the U.S.

• New 8 week session starts the week of May 1

of A. She’s released six full-length albums since 2005, the earliest of which lean more toward

• Register now! Call Jess to determine level, 652-8143

traditional Nordic folk. Between studio albums, Talvik also issued a dance-tastic collection

www.gbymca.org

of remixes from her second record, Street of Dreams, an acoustic version of her fourth album, Florida, and a live album, Drivin’ and Dreaming.

Untitled-18 1

4/14/17 10:26 AM

Her latest release, Big Sky Country, is a pristine

GALLERY GOER?

collection of airy folk ballads, rambling bluegrass and grand country melodies. Catch Sofia Talvik on Thursday, April 20, at the Light Club Lamp Shop in Burlington.

FRI.21

« P.76

Woodshed Rats (Americana), 9 p.m., free. ESPRESSO BUENO: Jennings & McComber (indie folk), 7 p.m., free. AliT (indie pop), 9 p.m., free. LA PUERTA NEGRA: Joe Moore (jazz), 6 p.m., free. SWEET MELISSA’S: Honky Tonk Happy Hour with Mark LeGrand, 5:30 p.m., donation. Starline Rhythm Boys (rockabilly), 9 p.m., $5. WHAMMY BAR: Chad Hollister (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

Design the perfect weekend with re:View — a weekly e-newsletter curated by Seven Days. Stay informed about: » Upcoming art receptions and events » Must-see exhibits » News, profiles and reviews

MOOGS PLACE: Chris Lyon (solo acoustic), 6 p.m., free. John Lackard Blues Band, 9 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury

ZENBARN: Satta Sounds (reggae), 10 p.m., free.

middlebury area

51 MAIN AT THE BRIDGE: Sound Investment Jazz Ensemble, 8 p.m., free. CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: GigginVT Productions’ BIG Karaoke Contest, 8 p.m., $5. TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: Toast (rock), 9 p.m., $3.

champlain islands/ northwest

SEVEN DAYS

04.19.17-04.26.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

MARTELL’S AT THE RED FOX: Fiasco (folk, rock), 9 p.m., free.

TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: Erin Cassels-Brown (indie folk), 7 p.m., free.

78 MUSIC

outside vermont

SUBSCRIBE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/ ENEWS

SAT.22

burlington

CLUB METRONOME: King Mecca Presents Totally Inappropriate (comedy), 7 p.m., $10. Retronome With DJ Fattie B (’80s dance party), 9 p.m., free/$5. JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. JUNIPER: Kelly Ravin (country), 9 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Eric Lee (Americana, indie), 7 p.m., free. Jennifer Kimball (chamber folk), 9 p.m., free. Taka (vinyl DJ), 11 p.m., free. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Black Mountain Symphony (symphonic groove-pop), 10 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Sarah Blacker & New England Groove Association with Special Guest Aaron Katz of Percy Hill (soul, groove), 7 p.m., free. The Heavy Pets, Backup Planet, Dr. No (jam), 9 p.m., $5. RÍ RÁ THE IRISH LOCAL & WHISKEY ROOM: DJ KermiTT (hits), 10 p.m., free. RADIO BEAN: Stolen Moments (jazz), 6 p.m., free. Isabella’s Jazz Trio, 8 p.m., free. Space Carnival, Sammich (jam), 10 p.m., $5. RED SQUARE: Left Eye Jump (blues), 4 p.m., $5. Mashtodon (hip-hop), 11 p.m., $5. RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ Raul (hits), 6 p.m., $5. DJ Reign One (EDM), 11 p.m., $5. SIDEBAR: Jack Bandit (house), 7 p.m., free. Dave Villa (top 40), 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Get Messy (funk, rock), 9 p.m., free. SMITTY’S PUB: Mike Scott (rock), 8 p.m., free.

MONOPOLE: Space Carnival (psychedelic groove-rock), 10 p.m., free.

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Steve Byrne (standup), 7 & 9:30 p.m., $20/27.

MONOPOLE DOWNSTAIRS: Happy Hour Tunes & Trivia with Gary Peacock, 5 p.m., free.

chittenden county

OLIVE RIDLEY’S: All Request Night with DJ Skippy (hits), 10 p.m., free.

HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Badfish: A Tribute to Sublime, 8 p.m., $20/22.

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Cabinet, Starbird (roots, Americana), 9 p.m., $15/18. JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: Gneiss (jam), 7 p.m., free. MONKEY HOUSE: The Mountain Says No (rock), 9 p.m., $3/8. 18+. ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Nerbak Brothers (blues), 5 p.m., free. Locals & Company (blues-rock), 9 p.m., free. STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Steve Hartman (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free. SUGARHOUSE BAR & GRILL: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

champlain islands/ northwest

TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: Bardela (Grateful Dead tribute), 7 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom

PARKER PIE CO.: Six Feet to Heaven, Thursday Torys, Covert Express (punk), 8 p.m., free.

outside vermont

MONOPOLE: Intrepid Travelers (funk, jazz), 10 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Dirty Bourbon River Show (blues, jazz), 9 p.m., $17.

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: COPOUTS (Celtic punk), 9 p.m., free.

SUN.23

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Irish Session, 2 p.m., donation.

LA PUERTA NEGRA: Chris Killian and the Vermont Brigade (country, rock), 9 p.m., $5. WHAMMY BAR: Fiasco (folk, rock), 7 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

MARTELL’S AT THE RED FOX: 66 City Band (’60s rock), 9 p.m., free. MOOGS PLACE: Robin Gottfried Band (rock), 9 p.m., free. RUSTY NAIL: Bobby Roberts Stowe Stampede featuring Jamie Lee Thurston (country), 8:30 p.m., $15/20.

mad river valley/ waterbury

ZENBARN: Mashtodon (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

middlebury area

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: City Limits Dance Party with DJ Earl (top 40), 9:30 p.m., free. TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: Jam Man Entertainment (eclectic dance), 9 p.m., free.

burlington

FOAM BREWERS: EmaLou & the Beat (folk, blues), noon, free. NECTAR’S: Mi Yard Reggae Night with DJs Big Dog and Jahson, 9:30 p.m., free/$3. 18+. RADIO BEAN: Old Sky Country Band with Andrew Stearns and Shay Gestal (bluegrass, Americana), 3 p.m., free. Stranger Days (jazz), 5 p.m., free. Tango Sessions, 7 p.m., free. Eva Cassel Band (indie folk, rock), 9:30 p.m., free. Zodiac Sutra, Evil People, Comrade Nixon (punk), 11 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Jack Bandit and Friends (EDM), 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Bluegrass Brunch, noon, $5-10 donation. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: House of LeMay (drag), 5 & 7:30 p.m., $12.

chittenden county

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Mick Jenkins (hip-hop), 8:30 p.m., $18/20. MONKEY HOUSE: The Freeway Revival (rock, blues), 8:30 p.m., $3/8. 18+. SUN.23

» P.80


THE KIDS HAVE THEIR STATION...NOW YOU HAVE YOURS!

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

104.3 KISS-FM IS BURLINGTON & PLATTSBURGH’S THROWBACK STATION! WITH NON-STOP CLASSIC HIP-HOP FOR THE CHAMPLAIN VALLEY!

04.19.17-04.26.17 SEVEN DAYS 79

1T-GreatEasternRadio041217.indd 1

4/10/17 6:26 PM


music SUN.23

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

« P.78 WED.26 // BEWARE OF DARKNESS [ALTERNATIVE]

SUGARHOUSE BAR & GRILL: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier SWEET MELISSA’S: Live Band Karaoke, 7 p.m., donation.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Beg, Steal or Borrow (bluegrass), 5 p.m., free.

outside vermont

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Bluegrass Brunch, noon, free.

MON.24 burlington

Says You! Saturday, April 22, 7 pm Says You! offers their listeners the best quips, quotes and questions that public radio has to offer, all scored to the rhythms of our musical guest performers.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Lamp Shop Lit Club (open reading), 8 p.m., free. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Karaoke, 9:30 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Bourgeois Mystics, Peace in the Valley (art funk), 9 p.m., free/$5. 18+. RADIO BEAN: Kyle Sherman (indie, folk), 7 p.m., free. Jesse Ahern (Americana), 8 p.m., free. BUNCH (indie rock, folk-tronic), 9:30 p.m., free. The Freeway Revival with Tony Glaser (jam), 10:30 p.m., free. Definitely Not Aliens (alt-rock), 12:30 a.m., free. SIDEBAR: Family Night (open jam), 9 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Comedy & Crêpes (standup), 7 p.m., free.

chittenden county

80 MUSIC

SEVEN DAYS

04.19.17-04.26.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Frozen by Lamoille Valley Dance Academy Saturday and Sunday, May 6 at 6 pm, and May 7 at 3 pm Spring production highlighting dance and gymnastics students ages 2 through teens.

New Events on Sale Now 50 Years Ago, A Beatles Celebration with the Contois School of Music Band - June 3 Scout Film Festival Screenings and Award Ceremony - June 10 Carol Ann Jones Quartet - June 17 Heliand Consort - June 24 Comedian Bob Marley - July 7 Dar Williams - July 14 DreamCycle by Cirque Us - July 24 Mary Chapin Carpenter - August 2

SprucePeakArts.org 802-760-4634 122 Hourglass Drive, Stowe

4V-sppac041917.indd 1

BACKSTAGE PUB: Open Mic, 9:30 p.m., free. MONKEY HOUSE: Kelly Ravin (country), 6 p.m., free. Motown Mondays! (Motown DJs), 8 p.m., free/$5. 18+.

barre/montpelier

Warning Signs

pre-chorus from “Muthafucka,” the heavy, glammed-out opening track on their latest album, Are You Real? Front man Kyle Nicolaides sings of his newfound lease on life after teetering on the edge of sanity following the success of the band’s first album, Orthodox. Are You Real? is full of razor-wire guitar riffs, hot-tempered lyrics and psychedelic undertones. Beware of Darkness play on Wednesday, April 26, at the Higher Ground Showcase lounge in South Burlington, co-headlining with BLEEKER. Tuesday with Eric George & Friends, 10 p.m., $3.

outside vermont

RED SQUARE: Karaoke with D Jay Baron, 7 p.m., free. DJ Aras (dance), 8 p.m., free. Pop Rap Dance Party, 10 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Jazz & Fondue, 7 p.m., free.

SIDEBAR: Cam Will (folk), 7 p.m., free. Ron Stoppable (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

chittenden county

SWEET MELISSA’S: Showboat Comedy Open Mic, 7 p.m., donation.

stowe/smuggs

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Trivia with Top Hat Entertainment, 7 p.m., free.

outside vermont

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

TUE.25

burlington

THE GRYPHON: P’tit Trio (jazz), 8 p.m., free. LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Will Patton (jazz), 7 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Stephen Callahan Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free. Alex Smith (Americana), 9 p.m., free. Xenia Dunford (singer-songwriter), 10:15 p.m., free. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Jacob Green (Americana, roots), 9:30 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Dead Set (Grateful Dead tribute), 10 p.m., $3/5.18+. RADIO BEAN: Open Mic with Eric George, 7 p.m., free. Honky Tonk

4/17/17 12:52 PM

a Los Angeles-based alternative outfit, have a

message for you: “I want the world to know / I want you to know / That I have changed.” So goes the

MONKEY HOUSE: Tiki Tuesday with the Full Cleveland (yacht rock), 9 p.m., free/$5. 18+.

MOOGS PLACE: Seth Yacovone (solo acoustic blues), 7 p.m., free.

BEWARE OF DARKNESS,

SUGARHOUSE BAR & GRILL: The Thunder Kittens (rock), 7 p.m., free.

OLIVE RIDLEY’S: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

WED.26 burlington

barre/montpelier

JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Open Mic with Andy Lugo, 9 p.m., free.

SWEET MELISSA’S: Open Mic, 7 p.m., donation.

NECTAR’S: Vinyl Night with DJ Disco Phantom (vinyl DJs), 6 p.m., free. Kitchen Dwellers, Navytrain (bluegrass, jam), 9 p.m., $5/10. 18+.

stowe/smuggs

RÍ RÁ THE IRISH LOCAL & WHISKEY ROOM: The County Down (traditional Irish), 7:30 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury

RADIO BEAN: Justin Franco (indie, folk-rock), 7 p.m., free. Zach Russack (singer-songwriter), 8 p.m., free. Out of System Transfer (folk, punk), 9:30 p.m., free. Night Idea (progressive rock), 11 p.m., free.

middlebury area

HATCH 31: Erin Cassels-Brown (indie folk), 6 p.m., free. Kelly Ravin and Lowell Thompson (country), 7 p.m., free. TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: Karaoke with Roots Entertainment, 9 p.m., free.

MONKEY HOUSE: Cy-LINT Apparation (folk), 8:30 p.m., $3/8. 18+.

THE DAILY PLANET: Sam DuPont (folk), 8 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

SHEPHERDS PUB: Pat Lambdin (singer-songwriter), 6 p.m., free.

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Bleeker, Beware of Darkness (alternative), 8 p.m., $15/18.

SUGARHOUSE BAR & GRILL: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

MOOGS PLACE: Cal Stanton (solo acoustic), 7:30 p.m., free.

chittenden county

CITIZEN CIDER: Brett Hughes (country), 6 p.m., free.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Irish Sessions (traditional), 7 p.m., free. Eric George and Zack DuPont (folk), 9 p.m., free.

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: DJ Jessbro Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Standup Open Mic, 7 p.m., free. On the Spot! Spontaneous Standup, 9 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE: The Dan Rahily Blues Trio featuring Ty Cicia, 6 p.m., free. DJ KermiTT (hits), 8 p.m., free. DJ David Chief, 11 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Sad Turtle, Saxsyndrum (rock), 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Hannah Fair (singersongwriter), 7 p.m., free.

SWEET MELISSA’S: D. Davis (acoustic), 5:30 p.m., donation. UMLAUT (Tex-Mex, Krautrock), 8 p.m., donation. WHAMMY BAR: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Christine Malcolm (folk), 8 p.m., free.

middlebury area

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free. TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. Open Mic Night, 9 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom

PARKER PIE CO.: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

outside vermont

MONOPOLE: Open Mic with Lucid, 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Bow Thayer (folk-rock), 7:30 p.m., free. m


VENUES.411 BURLINGTON

STOWE/SMUGGS AREA

CLAIRE’S RESTAURANT & BAR, 41 Main St., Hardwick, 472-7053 CORK WINE BAR & MARKET OF STOWE, 35 School St., Stowe, 760-6143 MARTELL’S AT THE RED FOX, 87 Edwards Rd., Jeffersonville, 644-5060 MATTERHORN, 4969 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-8198 MOOGS PLACE, Portland St., Morrisville, 851-8225 PIECASSO PIZZERIA & LOUNGE, 899 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-4411 RIMROCKS MOUNTAIN TAVERN, 394 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-9593 THE RUSTY NAIL, 1190 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-6245 STOWEHOF INN, 434 Edson Hill Rd., Stowe, 253-9722 SUSHI YOSHI, 1128 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-4135

MAD RIVER VALLEY/ WATERBURY

RUTLAND AREA

HOP’N MOOSE BREWERY CO., 41 Center St., Rutland, 775-7063 PICKLE BARREL NIGHTCLUB, Killington Rd., Killington, 422-3035

CHAMPLAIN ISLANDS/ NORTHWEST

BAYSIDE PAVILION, 15 Georgia Shore Rd., St. Albans, 524-0909 SNOW SHOE LODGE & PUB, 13 Main St., Montgomery Center, 326-4456 TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB, 28 N. Main St., St. Albans, 524-1405

UPPER VALLEY

BREAKING GROUNDS, 245 Main St., Bethel, 392-4222

NORTHEAST KINGDOM

BIG JAY TAVERN, 3709 Mountain Rd., Montgomery, 326-6688 COLATINA EXIT, 164 Main St., Bradford, 222-9008 JASPER’S TAVERN, 71 Seymour La., Newport, 334-2224 MARTELL’S AT THE FOX, 87 Edwards Rd., Jeffersonville, 644-5060 MUSIC BOX, 147 Creek Rd., Craftsbury, 586-7533 PARKER PIE CO., 161 County Rd., West Glover, 525-3366 PHAT KATS TAVERN, 101 Depot St., Lyndonville, 626-3064 THE PUB OUTBACK, 482 Vt. 114, East Burke, 626-1188 THE STAGE, 45 Broad St., Lyndonville, 427-3344 TAMARACK GRILL, 223 Shelburne Lodge Rd., East Burke, 626-7390

OUTSIDE VERMONT

MONOPOLE, 7 Protection Ave., Plattsburgh, N.Y., 518-563-2222 NAKED TURTLE, 1 Dock St., Plattsburgh, N.Y., 518-566-6200. OLIVE RIDLEY’S, 37 Court St., Plattsburgh, N.Y., 518-324-2200 PALMER ST. COFFEE HOUSE, 4 Palmer St., Plattsburgh, N.Y. 518-561-6920 THE SKINNY PANCAKE, 3 Lebanon St., Hanover, N.H., 603-277-9115

MUSIC 81

BIG PICTURE THEATER & CAFÉ, 48 Carroll Rd., Waitsfield, 496-8994 THE CENTER BAKERY & CAFÉ, 2007 Guptil Rd., Waterbury Center, 244-7500

51 MAIN AT THE BRIDGE, 51 Main St., Middlebury, 3888209 BAR ANTIDOTE, 35C Green St., Vergennes, 877-2555 CITY LIMITS, 14 Greene St., Vergennes, 877-6919 HATCH 31, 31 Main St., Bristol, 453-2774 TOURTERELLE, 3629 Ethan Allen Hwy., New Haven, 453-6309 TWO BROTHERS TAVERN LOUNGE & STAGE, 86 Main St., Middlebury, 388-0002

SEVEN DAYS

BACKSTAGE PUB, 60 Pearl St., Essex Jct., 878-5494 GOOD TIMES CAFÉ, Rt. 116, Hinesburg, 482-4444 HALYARD BREWING CO., 80 Ethan Allen Dr., #2, S. Burlington, 497-1858 HIGHER GROUND, 1214 Williston Rd., S. Burlington, 652-0777

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ, 28 Main St., Montpelier, 229-9212 CAPITAL GROUNDS CAFÉ, 27 State St., Montpelier, 223-7800 CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS, 70 Main St., Montpelier, 223-6820 ESPRESSO BUENO, 248 N. Main St., Barre, 479-0896 GUSTO’S, 28 Prospect St., Barre, 476-7919 KISMET, 52 State St., Montpelier, 223-8646 LA PUERTA NEGRA, 44 Main St., Montpelier, 613-3172 MULLIGAN’S IRISH PUB, 9 Maple Ave., Barre, 479-5545 NORTH BRANCH CAFÉ, 41 State St., Montpelier, 552-8105 POSITIVE PIE, 20 State St., Montpelier, 229-0453 RED HEN BAKERY + CAFÉ, 961 US Route 2, Middlesex, 223-5200 THE SKINNY PANCAKE, 89 Main St., Montpelier, 262-2253 SWEET MELISSA’S, 4 Langdon St., Montpelier, 225-6012 THREE BEAN CAFÉ, 22 Pleasant St., Randolph, 728-3533 WHAMMY BAR, 31 W. County Rd., Calais, 229-4329

MIDDLEBURY AREA

04.19.17-04.26.17

CHITTENDEN COUNTY

BARRE/MONTPELIER

CORK WINE BAR & MARKET, 40 Foundry St., Waterbury, 882-8227 GREEN MOUNTAIN LOUNGE AT MOUNT ELLEN, 102 Forest Pl., Warren, 583-6300 HOSTEL TEVERE, 203 Powderhound Rd., Warren, 496-9222 PURPLE MOON PUB, Rt. 100, Waitsfield, 496-3422 THE RESERVOIR RESTAURANT & TAP ROOM, 1 S. Main St., Waterbury, 244-7827 SLIDE BROOK LODGE & TAVERN, 3180 German Flats Rd., Warren, 583-2202 ZENBARN, 179 Guptil Rd., Waterbury Center, 244-8134

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

AMERICAN FLATBREAD, 115 St. Paul St., Burlington, 861-2999 ARTSRIOT, 400 Pine St., Burlington, 540 0406 AUGUST FIRST, 149 S. Champlain St., Burlington, 540-0060 BARRIO BAKERY & PIZZA BARRIO, 203 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington, 863-8278 BENTO, 197 College St., Burlington, 497-2494 BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD, 25 Cherry St., Burlington, 854-4700 BRENNAN’S PUB & BISTRO, UVM Davis Center, 590 Main St., Burlington, 656-1204 CITIZEN CIDER, 316 Pine St., Burlington, 497-1987 CLUB METRONOME, 188 Main St., Burlington, 865-4563 THE DAILY PLANET, 15 Center St., Burlington, 862-9647 DOBRÁ TEA, 80 Church St., Burlington, 951-2424 DRINK, 133 St. Paul St., Burlington, 951-9463 ETHAN ALLEN PUB/PHO NGUYEN, 1130 North Ave., Burlington, 658-4148 THE FARMHOUSE TAP & GRILL, 160 Bank St., Burlington, 859-0888 FINNIGAN’S PUB, 205 College St., Burlington, 864-8209 FOAM BREWERS, 112 Lake St., Burlington, 399-2511 THE GRYPHON, 131 Main St., Burlington, 489-5699 JP’S PUB, 139 Main St., Burlington, 658-6389 JUNIPER, 41 Cherry St., Burlington, 658-0251 LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ, 115 Church St., Burlington, 8633759 LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP, 12 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington, 660-9346 MAGLIANERO CAFÉ, 47 Maple St., Burlington, 861-3155 MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB, 167 Main St., Burlington, 864-6776 MUDDY WATERS, 184 Main St., Burlington, 658-0466 NECTAR’S, 188 Main St., Burlington, 658-4771 RADIO BEAN, 8 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington, 660-9346 RASPUTIN’S, 163 Church St., Burlington, 864-9324 RED SQUARE, 136 Church St., Burlington, 859-8909 RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB, 123 Church St., Burlington, 860-9401 RUBEN JAMES, 159 Main St., Burlington, 864-0744 SIGNAL KITCHEN, 71 Main St., Burlington, 399-2337 SIDEBAR, 202 Main St., Burlington, 864-0072 THE SKINNY PANCAKE, 60 Lake St., Burlington, 540-0188 SOCIAL CLUB & LOUNGE, 165 Church St., Burlington SPEAKING VOLUMES, 377 Pine St., Burlington, 540-0107 SPEAKING VOLUMES, VOL. 2, 7 Marble Ave., Burlington, 540-0107 THE TAP ROOM AT SWITCHBACK BREWING, 160 Flynn Ave., Burlington, 651-4114 VERMONT COMEDY CLUB, 101 Main St., Burlington, 859-0100 THE VERMONT PUB & BREWERY, 144 College St., Burlington, 865-0500

HINESBURGH PUBLIC HOUSE, 10516 Vt., 116 #6A, Hinesburg, 482-5500 JAMES MOORE TAVERN, 4302 Bolton Access Rd. Bolton Valley, Jericho, 434-6826 JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN, 30 Rte., 15, Jericho, 899-2223 MISTER SISTER, 45 Main St., Winooski, 448-3740 MONKEY HOUSE, 30 Main St., Winooski, 655-4563 ON TAP BAR & GRILL, 4 Park St., Essex Jct., 878-3309 PARK PLACE TAVERN, 38 Park St., Essex Jct. 878-3015 ROZZI’S LAKESHORE TAVERN, 1022 W. Lakeshore Dr., Colchester, 863-2342 SHELBURNE VINEYARD, 6308 Shelburne Rd., Shelburne, 985-8222 STONE CORRAL BREWERY, 83 Huntington Rd., Richmond, 434-5767 SUGARHOUSE BAR & GRILL, 733 Queen City Park Rd., S. Burlington, 863-2909 WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK, 20 Winooski Falls Way, Winooski, 497-3525

2V-mswalker041917.indd 1

4/17/17 3:47 PM


art

82 ART

Tribal Pride

“Alnobak: Wearing Our Heritage,” Amy E. Tarrant Gallery BY RAC H E L E L I Z ABE T H J ON E S

COURTESY OF TAKARA MATHEWS

SEVEN DAYS

04.19.17-04.26.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

I

n May 2012, then Vermont governor Peter Shumlin signed into law the state recognition of four of Vermont’s Abenaki tribes: the Elnu, Nulhegan, Koasek and Missisquoi. The victory had more than symbolic significance: Formal recognition meant that many of Vermont’s contemporary indigenous artists could begin legally to label their work as “American Indian.” According to Elnu Abenaki member Vera Longtoe Sheehan, access to this designation has opened many new doors — including, at least indirectly, doors to galleries. Such fraught politics of visibility and authenticity are very much at the heart of “Alnobak: Wearing Our Heritage,” now on view at the Amy E. Tarrant Gallery in Burlington. The show offers a chronological survey of Abenaki fashion and adornment, from the preChamplain era to the present day, accompanied by both modern and historical photographs. There’s a twist, though: Almost all of the objects on view are contemporary, regardless of the era they were created to represent. While reproductions are often considered to be lesser facsimiles, in this case, the absence of “traditional” artifacts speaks to the 20-plus artists’ ongoing commitment to making their history and heritage come alive. “Being in a mainstream art gallery is such a huge step forward for us,” said Longtoe Sheehan during a gallery visit. In the context of the show, “Alnobak” roughly translates as the people of N’dakinna, a region encompassing Vermont, New Hampshire and parts of Massachusetts, Maine, New York and Québec. “This is a celebration of thousands of years of our history and culture,” Longtoe Sheehan continued, “the resilience of our people, the resistance of our people.” The exhibition evolved from a decade-long collaboration of local Abenaki and the Vermont Abenaki Artists Association, of which Longtoe Sheehan is director, and with the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum, where Eloise Beil is director of collections and exhibitions. The two have been at work curating this particular show for three or four years, they estimate. Longtoe Sheehan noted that the exhibition pointedly includes some artists who have not been

“Powwow Style Jingle Dress” by Takara Mathews

able to obtain government recognition. “They’re Abenaki, [too],” she said. Arranged in a U-shape following the gallery walls, the show begins with an archaic-style knotted bag by Longtoe Sheehan. Made from plant fibers, it features a design motif called “where the mountains meet the sky” in richly dyed hues of blue and yellow. Longtoe Sheehan learned knotting — a weaving technique often referred to as “twining” — from her father when she was growing up. Close by is a 1600s-style buckskin dress made and worn by Melody Walker Brook. It’s designed after drawings by Samuel de Champlain, who first came to the region in 1609. The dress is one of many garments created as part of a practice called “experimental archaeology,” in which living Abenaki re-create and test the styles of their ancestors at “living encampments.” Next comes a series of objects that exemplify the early days of Abenaki adaptation to European presence. Beil finds it important to counter the “impression that Native American presence ended when the European presence began.” She pointed out, “The indigenous never left — other people came and co-occupied the space.” To this end, Beil and Longtoe Sheehan have created study guides for young students that, they say, “come with a decolonized voice.” Items representing these first centuries of “contact” include original trade beads made in the Netherlands and Venice, as well as works by Janice Medor, Jim Taylor, Paul-Rene Tamburro, Francine Poitras-Jones, Rhonda Besaw, Lori Lambert and Denise Pouliot. Taylor’s delicate roach (a traditional type of headwear) looks like abstract sculpture, crafted with porcupine quills, vibrant red deer hair and brass “kettle cones,” a popular trade good of the 17th and 18th centuries. Poitras-Jones’ acrylic “18th Century Abenaki Couple” interprets a 1700s watercolor by an unknown artist and depicts the hybrid fashions of the era’s Abenaki. The artist constructed her own frame from birch branches and leather. Medor’s women’s garments, titled “Traditional With a Twist,” feature delicately embroidered flowers on purple


ART SHOWS

VERA L ON GT OE S H E E H AN

writings and research. To contribute, or for more info, contact Clare Dolan via museumofeverydaylife. org. Deadline: May 5. The Museum of Everyday Life, Glover. Info, claredol@sover.net. COMPASS MUSIC & ARTS CENTER: Welcoming proposals of innovative work for solo or group exhibitions from artists working in a variety of mediums. Emerging and established curators encouraged to apply. For more info, visit cmacvt.org. Rolling deadline. Compass Music and Arts Center, Brandon, Through April 22. Info, 247-4295. FESTIVAL OF FINE ARTS: Welcoming submissions for the 37th annual juried Festival of Fine Arts, presented by Art’s Alive, SEABA and Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center. For more info and to apply, email sarah@seaba.com. Deadline: May 5. Art’s Alive Gallery, Burlington. Info, 859-9222. ‘HONORING TREES’: Welcoming submissions of images that celebrate trees in all their forms, locations and seasons, for an upcoming exhibition juried by Laura Valenti of Photolucida. For details and to submit, visit photoplacegallery.com. Deadline: April 24. PhotoPlace Gallery, Middlebury. Up to five photographs for $35, $6 for each additional. Info, 388-4500.

MONTPELIER ART SHOW OPPORTUNITY: Seeking artists who are co-op member-owners to display works in monthlong shows beginning in June. Works must be appropriate for a public setting and for all ages. A minimum of three professionally presented pieces is required; maximum is 10 pieces. For details and to apply, contact Robyn Joy Peirce at info@hungermountain.coop. Deadline is rolling. Hunger Mountain Co-op, Montpelier, Through May 6. Info, 262-3242. PECHAKUCHA NIGHT: Inviting artists, designers, scholars, scientists and otherwise creative thinkers to present 20 slides for 20 seconds each at this May 4 community event. For details and to register, email fleming@uvm.edu. Deadline: May 1. Fleming Museum of Art, University of Vermont, Burlington. Info, fleming@uvm.edu. RUTLAND COUNTY AUDUBON WILDLIFE ART SHOW: Inviting visual artists working in any medium to submit up to three works to be included in an art show featuring nature and wildlife, May 26 through June 11. Scenic landscapes will not be considered. Works need not be for sale. For details and to submit, contact birding@rutlandcountyaudubon.

INFO “Alnobak: Wearing Our Heritage,” through June 17 at the Amy E. Tarrant Gallery, Flynn Center for the Performing Arts in Burlington. Open Saturdays 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. flynncenter.org

org. Deadline: May 22. Stone Valley Arts, Poultney. Info, birding@rutlandcountyaudubon.org. SOLO & SMALL GROUP SHOWS 2018: Inviting proposals for upcoming exhibitions. To submit, send a brief written statement about yourself or the artist group and what you want to accomplish with a show, as well as a CD or DVD with eight to 12 images of representative work. Label carefully with name, medium, size, price and date of your work. Mail submissions to 201 N. Main Street, Barre, VT 05641. Deadline: June 9. Studio Place Arts, Barre. Free for members; $10 for nonmembers. Info, 479-7069. SOUTH END ART HOP: Registration is now open for the 25th annual South End Art Hop, to take place September 8-10. For details, visit seaba.com/arthop. Deadline: June 16. SEABA Center, Burlington. Info, 859-9222. SUMMER JURIED SHOW: Vermont artists are invited to submit works in any medium for the gallery’s first annual juried summer show. Works must have been created within the past five years, with a dimension of no greater than 40 inches. For details and to submit, visit twwoodgallery.org. Deadline: May 21. T.W. Wood Gallery, Montpelier. $30. Info, 262-6035. ‘TEN’: Seeking submissions of artworks inspired by the old counting nursery rhyme, “One, two buckle my shoe…” For the full rhyme, details and to submit, visit studioplacearts.com. Deadline: June 2. Studio Place Arts, Barre. Free for members; $10 for nonmembers. Info, 479-7069.

ART 83

‘LAND AND LIGHT AND WATER AND AIR’: Welcoming submissions for this annual fall juried exhibition of Vermont and New England landscape paintings. For details and to submit, visit bryangallery.org. Deadline: July 14. Bryan Memorial Gallery, Jeffersonville. Info, 644-5100.

‘LIGHTS! CAMERA! AUCTION!’: Seeking tax-deductible donations of art, beautiful and useful things, amusements, experiences and events for this annual auction to benefit Town Hall Theater and its programming. To contribute, contact Magna Dodge at magnadodge@gmail.com. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, Through May 22. Info, 462-3898.

Contact rachel@sevendaysvt.com

SEVEN DAYS

‘BELLS & WHISTLES’: Seeking artists and contributors for the museum’s upcoming 2017 exhibition consisting of or relating to all aspects of bells and whistles. May include bells for cows and sheep, bellhops, alarms and timekeepers, as spiritual or musical instruments, jingle bells, etc. Contributions may be personal artifacts accompanied by individual narrative, raw ideas for displays, fully realized art objects or theoretical

A HUGE STEP FORWARD FOR US.

04.19.17-04.26.17

‘100 DAYS OF SPACE FOR CREATIVITY’: Inspired to act by the potential call to defund the arts on a federal level, Backspace Gallery offers a free and open space for artists to work while processing reactions to the current political climate. Thursday through Saturday, noon to 5 p.m., through April 29, artists are invited to meet with gallery director Christy Mitchell to pitch ideas on using the venue for displaying, creating, speaking or performing work. Email ideas to spacegalleryvt@gmail.com or show up during open gallery hours for more information. The Backspace Gallery, Burlington. Info, spacegalleryvt@gmail.com.

BEING IN A MAINSTREAM ART GALLERY IS SUCH

Detail of “Girl’s Fancy Dancing Dress” by Takara Mathews

friend Lara Sobel, the social worker who was murdered in Barre in 2015. Perhaps the most eye-catching works here are the neon dancing outfits of Takara Matthews, which Longtoe Sheehan described as inspired in part by the loudness of urban graffiti. Matthews created the “Little Girl’s Jingle Dress” and “Girl’s Fancy Dancing Dress” for her daughter Nami — who “danced until her cones fell off,” Longtoe Sheehan said, pointing to a missing bead. Between the costumes hangs a stethoscope with an intricately beaded casing, made and used by EMT Aaron York. “We can’t separate our spirituality from our history from our art,” said Longtoe Sheehan. “The very being of our art is a celebration of our culture.” Both she and Beil are excited and moved, they said, that members of the Abenaki community have been coming to the exhibition with their parents and grandparents, many of whom grew up hiding their indigenous identities. There’s a lot to be learned here, and the door is open. m

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

‘ART WORKS!’: Seeking submissions of art that invites viewers to engage and interact with the work, including manual interactive devices, electronic installations and kinetic sculpture. To submit and for details, visit studioplacearts.com. Deadline: April 28. Studio Place Arts, Barre. Free for members, $10 nonmembers. Info, 479-7069.

“Twined Textiles” by Vera Longtoe Sheehan

COURTESY OF TAKARA MATHEWS

CALL TO ARTISTS

REVIEW COURTESY OF VERA LONGTOE SHEEHAN

gingham, one of the cotton fabrics traded by Europeans. Thick ceremonial wool coats by Besaw and Pouliot are artfully embellished in beads and chain stitches, respectively, with Abenaki symbols including pine trees, tobacco leaves and variations on what Longtoe Sheehan calls the “double curve.” Such designs are found throughout the exhibition; indeed, the curator said she was astounded by their continuity. A wealth of archival photos of Abenaki hang on what Longtoe Sheehan referred to as the “Wall of Honor.” Among them are a portrait of 19th-century matriarch Nellie Longtoe Sheehan wearing an animal claw beside her crucifix pendant, a post-1950s picture of Huntington resident Leon Bridges standing in front of his woodpile wearing full regalia, and a photo from the wedding ceremony of Bob and Jeanne Morningstar Kent. The final gallery wall is reserved for works that decidedly merge contemporary indigenous and Western styles. There’s an early 1990s denim jacket that Longtoe Sheehan embellished with small quahog shells and a turtle design on leather, along with hair ties and earrings that Liz Charlebois crafted using the nearly lost technique of birch-bark biting — which is exactly what it sounds like. Pat Leno made a beaded stone necklace as a tribute to her


art Ed Koren Just as the celebrated

NEW THIS WEEK burlington

New Yorker cartoonist hands over the

 ‘THE COMBINATION’: Black-and-white pho-

Vermont Cartoonist Laureate, um, laurels,

tographs taken by Elliot Burg of UVM senior and dedicated amateur boxer Ali Watson. Reception: Wednesday, April 19, 4-5 p.m. April 19-June 1. Info, eburg4@gmail.com. Info, 656-4636. Livak Fireplace Lounge and Gallery, University of Vermont Dudley H. Davis Center in Burlington.

to Alison Bechdel, the Brattleboro Museum & Art Center has mounted “Seriously Funny,” a celebratory exhibition of his

 ‘FACING AN EPIDEMIC’: A multimedia exhibition campaign with works by Ed Kashi, Tom Laffay and Aubrey Roemer that seek to raise awareness about and support Nicaraguan sugarcane workers impacted by occupation-related health hazards. Reception: Friday, April 21, 5-7 p.m. April 21-May 31. Info, 656-9511. Center for Cultural Pluralism, University of Vermont in Burlington.

career. Known for his sweet, scratchy style

 JUSTIN HOEKSTRA: “Heavy Smile,” a solo

York City. On Thursday, April 20, at 6 p.m.,

and hirsute characters, Koren has lived in Brookfield for several decades. There he churns out gently amusing works based on human observations made there and in New

exhibition of large-scale abstract paintings by the former BCA artist-in-residence. Reception: Friday, April 21, 5-8 p.m. April 21-July 9. Info, 865-7166. Vermont Metro Gallery, BCA Center in Burlington.

Brattleboro Museum chief curator Mara Williams will lead a discussion with Koren and syndicated cartoonist Jeff Danziger,

 ‘READY. FIRE! AIM.’: A group exhibition that

explores the psychology of impulsive action and strategic thinking, in collaboration with the Hall Art Foundation and inspired by Andy and Christine Hall’s collecting philosophy. Reception: Friday, April 21, 5-8 p.m. April 21-July 9. Info, 865-7166. BCA Center in Burlington.

chittenden county

 ‘DUO EXHIBIT OF VERMONT WATERCOLORS’: Amanda Amend and Susan Bull Riley show paintings of the Green Mountain State. Reception: Sunday, April 30, 2-4 p.m. April 20-May 28. Info, 899-3211. Emile A. Gruppe Gallery in Jericho.

04.19.17-04.26.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

barre/montpelier

‘PT201’: A pop-up exhibition of the Central Vermont Solid Waste District’s Project Tote, featuring artist-altered composting totes. April 24-27. ‘SEEING THE FOREST FOR THE TREES’: A group exhibition reflecting the diversity of woody plants and the feeling of forests, including traditional and nontraditional media and small installations; Main Floor Gallery. April 25-May 28. ROGER GOLDENBERG: “Homage to the Earth,” a series of monotypes inspired by the planet’s climate, weather and geology; Third Floor Gallery. April 25-May 28. SPA SILENT AUCTION: Original artworks, including by featured artists Wendy James and Rene Schall, and other items benefit the nonprofit art center and its programs in an upcoming auction; Second Floor Gallery. April 25-May 12. Info, 479-7069. Studio Place Arts in Barre.

stowe/smuggs

‘FROM GENERATION TO GENERATION ... WE ARE HERE!’: A special exhibit honoring Jewish lives lost and stories of survival. April 23-May 18. Info, 253-1800. Jewish Community of Greater Stowe.

champlain islands/northwest

 FRANKLIN COUNTY LIBRARIES ART BOP: Works by local artists. Reception: Saturday, April 22, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. April 22-May 20. Info, 933-7323. Sheldon Municipal Library.

SEVEN DAYS

northeast kingdom

 ALEXIS KYRIAK: Paintings by the New York-

born Vermont artist. Reception: Friday, April 21, 7-8 p.m. April 21-May 21. Info, 745-1393. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum.

brattleboro/okemo valley

84 ART

 ‘THE RESISTANCE’: A pop-up group show of

two- and three-dimensional art, poetry and song exploring the spectrum of art-making in social commentary and political action, curated by artist Jeanette Staley. Reception: Saturday, April 22, 6-8 p.m. April 22-May 13. Info, 463-3252. Project 9 Gallery in Bellows Falls.

who curated “Seriously Funny.” “I always felt that Ed Koren was one of the best things to happen to New York,” Danziger says, “and that Vermont was one of the best things to

ART EVENTS

Sheldon Museum of Vermont History, Middlebury, Wednesday, April 19, noon. Info, 388-2117.

ALTERED BOOKMAKING: An expressive-arts therapist leads this workshop in altering and customizing pre-existing books. Bring your own book or use a supplied one; materials provided. RSVP required. JourneyWorks, Burlington, Monday, April 24, 6-8 p.m. $20. Info, 860-6203.

TALK: ‘PAUL SAMPLE’S VERMONT’: Vermont Historical Society executive director Steve Perkins discusses the artist’s vision of Vermont as evidenced by his 1961 mural “Salute to Vermont,” now exhibited at the museum. Vermont History Museum, Montpelier, Thursday, April 20, noon. Info, jack.zeilenga@vermont.gov.

CREATIVE MEDIA SENIOR CAPSTONE SHOW: Graduating Creative Media students exhibit a diverse group of projects that represent the culmination of their concentration. Reception: Thursday, April 20, 5-8 p.m. Champlain College Art Gallery, Burlington, April 20-25. Info, 865-8980. FRIDAYS AT THE MUSEUM: JAMES BLAIR: National Geographic photographer discusses his work and photographic portraiture in conjunction with current exhibition “American Faces: A Cultural History of Portraiture and Identity.” Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, Friday, April 21, 12:15 p.m. Info, 443-5258. NON-FICTION COMICS MINI-FEST: The daylong event features Vermont cartoonists engaged in nonfiction work, including Angela Boyle, Robert Brunelle Jr., Isaac Cates, Bridget Comeau, Iona Fox, Kevin Kite, Rachel Lindsay, Kane Lynch, Mike Rodriguez, Michelle Sayles, Kelley Swann and Stephanie Zuppo. Included are three panel discussions: “Cartoonists’ Perspectives on El viaje mas caro/The Most Costly Journey Project,” 11 a.m.; “Cartooning and Place: On Being a Vermont Cartoonist,” 1 p.m.; and “Diary Comics: A Conversation With James Kochalka and Isaac Cates,” 3 p.m. Vermont Folklife Center, Middlebury, Sunday, April 23, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Info, 388-4964. ‘ODANAKSIS IS BLOOMING’: Ten Upper Valley plein air artists show new works in watercolor, oil, pastel and mixed media. Norwich Public Library. Through May 26. Info, 649-1184. TALK: ED KOREN & JEFF DANZIGER: The cartoonists speak in conjunction with the current exhibition “Seriously Funny.” Brattleboro Museum & Art Center, Thursday, April 20, 7 p.m. Info, 257-0124. TALK: KATE GRIDLEY: The artist offers “An Artist Journey From Still Life Painter to Doll Photographer,” discussing aesthetic concerns, colors, edges, abstract spaces and observations that inform her portrait photos of dolls in the Sheldon’s collection. Henry

VISUAL ART IN SEVEN DAYS:

ONGOING SHOWS burlington

AARON SCOT INGHAM: The artist behind Bent Nails Studio shows his works and furniture made from found and salvaged materials. Thursdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Info, 595-4148. Burlington Town Center. ‘ALNOBAK: WEARING OUR HERITAGE’: An exhibition of recent works by contemporary Abenaki artists paired with historic garments, accessories, photographs and prints that reflect previous generations. Organized by the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum in partnership with the Vermont Abenaki Artists Association. Through June 17. Info, 652-4500. Amy E. Tarrant Gallery in Burlington. ‘ART OF THE PRETZEL’: Thirty-two drawings of pretzels baked at Feldman’s Bagels created by students in two introductory drawing courses taught by Leslie Fry at the University of Vermont. Through April 30. Info, 540-0474. Feldman’s Bagels in Burlington. ‘ART/JOURNALISM AND DEMOCRACY’: Works created by 2016 UVM Cynic newspaper illustrators. Through April 30. Info, cynicnewsroom@gmail. com. Info, 656–2060. Davis Center, University of Vermont in Burlington. ‘IMBIBE: DRINKING IN CULTURE’: An exhibition using an eclectic selection of drinking vessels to investigate the complex social, physical and aesthetic experience of liquid consumption. BARBARA BLOOM: Conceptual artist’s books accompanied by texts from print scholar Susan Tallman. CATHERINE JANSEN: “1008,” an exhibition of the photographer’s images of India, including digital prints and projections as well as ambient sound from field recordings. Through May 21. Info, 656-8582. Fleming Museum of Art, University of Vermont in Burlington.

ART LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY RACHEL ELIZABETH JONES. LISTINGS ARE RESTRICTED TO ART SHOWS IN TRULY PUBLIC PLACES.

happen to Ed.” Through June 18. Pictured: “Chickens on Bikes.” CLARK DERBES: “Self-commissioned,” photographs of the Burlington artist’s large-scale, geometric paintings on the Burlington waterfront. Through May 3. Info, audrie@thekarmabirdhouse.com. Info, 861-3155. Karma Bird House Gallery in Burlington. DURFEE PHOTOGRAPHY ARCHIVES: Black-and-white photographs taken in 1950s Europe, documenting the aftermath of World War II. Through April 30. Info, 860-4972. Black Horse Gallery in Burlington. EMILY MITCHELL: Narrative paintings by the Richmond artist. Through June 30. Info, 859-9222. SEABA Center in Burlington. GALEN CHENEY: “Street Level,” a solo exhibition of abstract works with inspiration drawn from Arabic script and urban graffiti. Through June 12. Info, cthompson@champlain.edu. Champlain College Art Gallery in Burlington. JACQUES BURKE: Mixed-media works by the Vermont artist. Through April 30. Info, 859-9222. The Gallery at Main Street Landing in Burlington. JOHN ROSE: “Grace Within the Contours,” minimalist sculpture by the internationally acclaimed West Coast artist. Through May 23. Info, 863-9553. The Havoc Gallery in Burlington. ‘LIGHT’: The third annual exhibition of UVM Pottery Co-op teacher and student works, which interpret light in unique ways. Through April 30. ‘YOUNG VERMONT’: Curated by UVM students Kat Dooman and Christina Mignosa, this exhibition features emerging artists 30 and under who reside in Vermont permanently or are studying at a local university. Through April 30. Info, 863-6458. Frog Hollow Vermont Craft Gallery in Burlington. ‘MOMENSION’: A sculptural environment made primarily from glass, metal and clay by Vermont artists Bech Evans, Alissa Faber and Patrick O’Shea. Through April 25. Info, joseph@newcitygalerie.org. Info, 355-5440. New City Galerie in Burlington. PETER KATZ: Mixed-media works by the self-taught Burlington artist. Through May 31. Info, 658-6016. Speeder & Earl’s Coffee (Pine Street) in Burlington.

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IF YOU’RE PROMOTING AN ART EXHIBIT, LET US KNOW BY POSTING INFO AND IMAGES BY THURSDAYS AT NOON ON OUR FORM AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT OR GALLERIES@SEVENDAYSVT.COM.


ART SHOWS

ROBERT WALDO BRUNELLE JR.: A series of paintings of Winooski’s concrete bridge, painted throughout the year by the local artist. STEVE SHARON: Abstract paintings by the local artist. Through May 31. Info, 651-9692. VCAM Studio in Burlington. SARAH ROSEDAHL: “31 Days of Mary Oliver,” paintings inspired by the poet. Through April 29. Info, 863-3403. Fletcher Free Library in Burlington. ‘SOJOURN’: A dialogue on temporality and loneliness, created through pairings of photographs by Dana Heffern and paintings by Sage Tucker-Ketcham. Curated by Wylie Garcia and Christy Mitchell. Through April 29. Info, 578-2512. The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery in Burlington. STEPHEN BEATTIE: Digital photographs by the local artist. Through May 31. Info, 651-9692. RETN in Burlington. ‘TOMCZAK, TOMCZAK & TOMCZAK’: Original works in watercolor, mixed-media and photography by Nancy, Grace and Jim Tomczak of Milton. Through April 30. Info, 660-9005. Dostie Bros. Frame Shop in Burlington. ‘VERMONT STANDS WITH’: Works that meaningfully engage with issues of advocacy, justice and community building. Through April 30. Info, 859-9222. Art’s Alive Gallery in Burlington. YESHUA HILL: “Good Friday,” works by the Vermont illustrator. Through May 14. Info, stuart.sporko@ gmail.com, 865-6223. Battery Street Jeans in Burlington.

chittenden county

“BACKSTAGE PASS: ROCK & ROLL PHOTOGRAPHY”: An exhibition featuring more than 300 photographs, many rarely seen by the public, of famous rock-and-roll and jazz greats including Miles Davis, Elvis Presley, the Beatles, David Bowie, Prince and the Beastie Boys. Through May 7. Info, 985-3346. Pizzagalli Center for Art and Education, Shelburne Museum. ‘BODY/IMAGE’: A group exhibition juried by Gary Samson featuring photography that presents the human body as subject. Through April 23. Info, 777-3686. Darkroom Gallery in Essex Junction. BOSTON NEARY: “A Bird’s Eye View of the Beauty of Shelburne Bay,” photographs by the local photographer. Through April 30. Info, asig@ allsoulsinterfaith.org. Info, 985-3819. All Souls Interfaith Gathering in Shelburne.

JOSEPH SALERNO: “Woods Edge,” small oil paintings merging observation and abstraction, created at the same forest vantage over more than two years. Through May 23. Info, 985-3848. Furchgott Sourdiffe Gallery in Shelburne.

LAINEY RAPPAPORT: A display about frogs by “The Vermont Frog Lady.” Through April 30. Info, laineyrapp@yahoo.com. Info, 878-6955. Brownell Library in Essex Junction.

f ZANELE MUHOLI: “Documenting Identity, Teaching Activism,” photographs by the South African visual activist, who documents her home country’s LGBTQ population. Artist talk and reception: Wednesday, April 19, 7 p.m. Through April 21. Info, 654-2667. International Commons, Saint Michael’s College in Colchester.

barre/montpelier

f LAURA JANE WALKER: “Studies in the Art of Chance,” abstractions made using dyed salt water, meticulously placed steel nails and cotton string. Reception: Friday, May 5, 4-7 p.m. Through May 25. Info, 828-3291. Spotlight Gallery in Montpelier. LINDA MIRABILE: “All Things Avian,” paintings of birds by the Berlin artist and designer. Through April 28. Info, jack.zeilenga@vermont.gov. Info, 828-2252. Vermont Statehouse Cafeteria in Montpelier. MARIA ANGHELACHE: “From Nature to Abstract,” pastel and acrylic works on paper and canvas. Through June 30. Info, 828-0749. Vermont Supreme Court Gallery in Montpelier. ‘SPRING FOUR-WARD’: Watercolors by Vermont Watercolor Society members Lisa Forster Beach, Annelein Beukenkamp, Gary C. Eckhart and Robert O’Brien. Through June 2. Info, 279-6403. Central Vermont Medical Center in Berlin.

stowe/smuggs

CAROLYN MECKLOSKY: “Women, Beasts and Dreams,” vibrant acrylic paintings by the Waterville artist and arts instructor. Through May 9. TED ZILIUS: “Jazz and Sad,” mixed-media works created through a process of collage and dance by the Vermont artist. Through May 9. Info, 888-1261. Gallery at River Arts in Morrisville. DOROTHY SIMPSON KRAUSE: “A Matter of Time,” an exhibition of mixed-media works and UV-cured flatbed prints that address the increasing threats to Earth’s ecosystems. Through April 29. Info, 881-0418. 571 Projects in Stowe. JOHNSON BFA THESIS EXHIBITION: Mixed-media works, mandalas, photography and more by graduating seniors Brady Hird, Hannah Leroux, Brittany Miracle, Dani LaPerle, Brendan Walsh, Vanessa Sproates-Horl and Laurel Hubbert Severance. Through April 25. Info, 635-1469. Julian Scott Memorial Gallery, Johnson State College.

First up, it’s your chance to win a trip to see The Red Hot Chili Peppers in Chicago!

FOR ALL THE DETAILS, HIT WWW.POINTFM.COM... OR JUST LISTEN! 104.7 & 93.3 BURLINGTON 93.7 MIDDLEBURY 104.7 & 100.3 MONTPELIER 95.7 THE NORTHEAST KINGDOM 103.1 & 107.7 THE UPPER VALLEY

‘LAND MARKS: JANET FREDERICKS & MICHAELA HARLOW’: The two Vermont artists explore abstract landscapes on macro and micro scales in a variety of mediums, pushing references to the natural environment behind graphic mark-making. KRISTA HARRIS: “Retracing My Steps,” a solo exhibition of richly layered, gestural abstract paintings by the Colorado artist. Through May 30. Info, 253-8943. West Branch Gallery & Sculpture Park in Stowe. PHOTOS BY MARIE LAPRÉ GRABON: Photographs by the Vermont artist. Through June 30. Info, 635-7423. Dream Café in Johnson. VERMONT LANDSCAPES: An exhibition of 38 artworks by 20 artists, featuring landscapes in oil, STOWE/SMUGGS SHOWS

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‘SHOW 16’: An exhibition of recent works by the collective gallery’s Vermont contemporary artists. Through April 29. Info, 272-0908. The Front in Montpelier.

JO MACKENZIE: “Moments,” watercolor paintings on paper featuring domestic interiors and florals. Through June 30. Info, 828-0749. Governor’s Gallery in Montpelier.

SEVEN DAYS

NANCY JACOBUS: “Celebrate Spring,” brightly colored silk paintings by the South Burlington artist. Through April 30. Info, 598-7874. Healthy Living Market & Café in South Burlington.

‘FREAKS, RADICALS & HIPPIES: COUNTERCULTURE IN 1970S VERMONT’: An exhibition that explores the influx of people and countercultural ideas to the state, from communes to organic agriculture, progressive politics to health care reform, alternative energy to women’s and gay rights. Through December 31. Info, 479-8500. Vermont Heritage Galleries in Barre.

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KATE LONGMAID: “Freedom Speak,” an exhibition of portraits with graffiti-like phrases and slogans that merge the artist’s interest in capturing individual identities and political realities through image and voice. Through May 31. Info, 985-8222. Shelburne Vineyard.

‘FOLLOWING THE RULES, BREAKING THE RULES’: A group exhibition of 25 works by 20 artists in pastel, acrylics, oils, photography and sculpture. Artists include Nitya Brighenti, Hasso Ewing, Cindy Griffith, Lysa Intrator, Joyce Kahn, Hannah Morris, Maggie Neale, Dan Neary, Jack Sabon, Sarah Spletzer and Ann Young. NORTHERN VERMONT ART ASSOCIATION EXHIBITION: A group exhibition of works by NVAAE members. Through April 28. Info, 262-6035. T.W. Wood Gallery in Montpelier.

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JANE SANDBERG: “Another Perspective,” watercolors and stained-glass work by the Jericho artist. Through May 31. Info, 434-2550. Mt. Mansfield Community Television in Richmond.

ELLIOT BURG: “Sunset Park, Brooklyn,” black-andwhite images by the Middlesex photographer. Through April 20. Info, 272-4920. ILLUSTRATED POEMS EXHIBIT: Art and poetry by Berlin Elementary School students. T. NAMAYA: “100 Flowers of Peace,” large banners featuring the poem by the same name, which has been translated into 109 languages. Through April 30. Info, 223-3338. Kellogg-Hubbard Library in Montpelier.

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watercolor, pastel and acrylics, curated by Bryan Memorial Gallery. Through June 30. Info, 644-5100. Lamoille County Courthouse in Hyde Park.

mad river valley/waterbury MICHAEL J. BALZANO: “The Bun Is Back: The Return of My Daily Bunny,” drawings by the local artist. Through April 29. Info, 244-7801. Axel’s Gallery & Frame Shop in Waterbury.

‘TOWN BY TOWN’: Works by Carolyn Enz Hack that explore how traditional landscape paintings can incorporate history and time into their imagery. Through May 7. Info, 244-6606. White Meeting House in Waterbury.

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middlebury area

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‘AMERICAN FACES: A CULTURAL HISTORY OF PORTRAITURE AND IDENTITY’: An exhibit that brings together 90 portraits from more than 20 collections, exploring and explaining Americans’ 300-year fascination with images of themselves. Through April 30. Info, 443-6433. Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College.

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JUNE 3, 2017

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Register at stepsVT.org/events  

The St. Michael’s College swim team supports   Steps to End Domestic Violence WALK in purple shoes to raise

awareness of domestic violence

 BID on auction items to support services & programs for survivors  LISTEN to the stories of those affected by domestic violence

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Arcana

Opening for the Season April 22! Beautiful Flowering Perennials in the Greenhouse & Lots of New Plants this Year!

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DELSIE HOYT: “Re-imagine the Braided Rug,” an exhibition of innovative textiles by the West Fairlee artist. Through April 29. STANLEY HORACE LYNDES: “Family Traits: Art, Humor and Everyday Life,” an exhibition exploring family identity through the artist’s cartoons, caricatures, carved objects and fiber arts. Through May 12. Info, 388-4964. Vermont Folklife Center in Middlebury.

‘FOCUS ON THE SHELDON: FIVE-POINT PERSPECTIVE’: Photographs of objects from the Sheldon’s collection by local artists Suki Fredericks, Paul Gamba, Kate Gridley, Kirsten Hoving and Eric Nelson. Through May 13. Info, 388-2117. Henry Sheldon Museum of Vermont History in Middlebury. FRED LOWER: Landscape paintings of Addison County by the Vermont artist. Through May 11. Info, 382-9222. Jackson Gallery, Town Hall Theater in Middlebury. ‘GLASS ART: MOLTEN COLOR AND FROZEN FORMS’: Glass sculpture by Alyssa Oxley, hand-blown glass by Bud Shriner, and glass jewelry and objects by Micaela Wallace, as well as works by emerging glass artists Anne Hulvey, Mary Ellen Jeffries, Cherie Marshall, Lori Pietropaoli and Christie Witters. Through May 7. Info, info@creativespacegallery.org. Creative Space Gallery in Vergennes.

ANNUAL STUDENT ART EXHIBITION: Works by K-12 students from across Rutland County. Through May 19. Info, 775-0356. Chaffee Art Center in Rutland.

f BRUCE BLANCHETTE: “Breaking New Ground/ Modularities,” modular reliefs made with appropriated manufactured, recycled and/or reinvented media. Reception: Friday, April 21, 6-8 p.m. Through 4/17/17 11:49 AM

tion exploring what women of all ages experience as they cope with the pressure to maintain a youthful appearance at any cost, by Vermont multidisciplinary artists Mary Admasian and Kristen M. Watson. Closing Reception: Friday, June 16, 5-8 p.m. Artist talk: 7 p.m. Through June 24. Info, galleries@castleton.edu. Castleton University Bank Gallery in Rutland.

upper valley

DAVID CRANDALL & JIM MAAS: Fine jewelry and painted bird carvings, respectively, by the local artisans. Through September 30. Info, 235-9429. Collective — the Art of Craft in Woodstock.

‘MAKING MUSIC: THE SCIENCE OF MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS’: An exhibition that explores the science behind making rhythms and harmonies heard. Through September 17. Info, 649-2200. Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich.

rutland/killington

802-899-5123

f ‘THE SHE PROJECT – PART I’: An interactive exhibi-

f CAMERON SCHMITZ: “Suspended Moments,” a solo exhibition of new abstract oil paintings. Reception: Friday, April 28, 5-8 p.m. Through May 28. Info, 877-2173. Northern Daughters in Vergennes.

‘UNTOUCHED BY TIME: THE ATHENIAN ACROPOLIS FROM PERICLES TO PARR’: Early archaeological publications, antiquarian paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, books and more that represent enduring fascination with the Acropolis. Through April 23. Info, 443-5007. Middlebury College Museum of Art.

Only 4 miles from I-89 in beautiful Jericho, VT

PAM BROWN: “The Final Cut,” figurative, organic and animal sculptural forms made from synthetic polymer clays, recycled sheet metal, copper, rubber and fabric. Through May 6. Info, 282-2396. Castleton Downtown Gallery in Rutland.

GLORIA KING MERRITT: “Take Flight,” photorealistic digital paintings on canvas that capture singular moments of birds in flight. Gallery open by appointment. Through May 1. Info, 436-2200. VermontArts.Gallery in Hartland.

SCOTT ADDIS: Oil paintings by the Québec artist, in conjunction with “Northern Neighbors: Celebrating 150 Years.” Through April 30. Info, 458-0098. Edgewater Gallery at Middlebury Falls.

Check us out on Instagram and Facebook @arcanagardens for photos of our plants & the latest from the farm.

SEVEN DAYS

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Certified Organic Plants & Produce

DICK KIRBY: “Metal Madness,” a solo exhibition of artist-designed steel works, including lamps, weathervanes, candleholders and coat-racks. Through April 30. Info, 247-4956. Brandon Artists Guild.

‘ART OF THE WORD’: Artist books and handmade journals by New Haven artists Jane Ploughman of Ploughgirl Press, and posters, broadsides and cards by John Vincent of A Revolutionary Press. Through May 8. Info, 453-4032. Art on Main in Bristol.

DONNA ANDREYCHUK: “Northern Neighbors: Celebrating 150 Years,” new works by the Canadian landscape painter. Through April 30. Info, 989-7419. Edgewater Gallery on the Green in Middlebury.

Gardens & Greenhouses

May 13. Info, 282-2396. Christine Price Gallery, Castleton University.

‘SPIRIT OF ODANAKSIS’: Ten members of the 14-year-old art collective, named for the Abenaki term for “little village,” show works in oil, watercolor, pastel, multimedia, photography and prints. Artists: Gail Barton, Le Liu Browne, Becky Cook, Helen Elder, Anne Webster Grant, Linda Laundry, Anne Rose, Jonathan Rose, Susan Rump and Jo Tate. Through May 10. Info, 295-3118. Zollikofer Gallery at Hotel Coolidge in White River Junction. VICKY TOMAYKO & BERT YARBOROUGH: “Collaborations,” works created together by the printmakers. Through April 30. Info, 295-5901. Two Rivers Printmaking Studio in White River Junction.

northeast kingdom

KELLY DOYLE: “Improbable Surfaces,” an exhibition of mixed-media works that transform existing materials. Through April 22. Info, 748-0158. Northeast Kingdom Artisans Guild Backroom Gallery in St. Johnsbury. MARIE LAPRE’ GRABON: Selected drawings and paintings by the Vermont artist. Through June 3. Info, 578-8809. 3rd Floor Gallery in Hardwick. ‘MIRROR/MIRROR’: An exhibition reflecting upon the looking glass and all that it contains, from telescopes to magic tricks, disco balls to dentistry, fashion to psychotherapy, myth to superstition. Through May 1. Info, 626-4409. The Museum of Everyday Life in Glover. ROSIE PREVOST: “Under the Surface,” nearly 30 sepia or selenium-toned, silver-gelatin prints that explore the idea of visual metaphor by using historic techniques. Through April 29. Info, 7482600. Catamount Arts Center in St. Johnsbury. SEAN FRANSON: “Know Thyself,” digital works by the Vermont artist. Through June 1. Info, 748-8141. Northeastern Vermont Regional Hospital in St. Johnsbury. ‘X-RAY VISION: FISH INSIDE OUT’: A traveling exhibition from the Smithsonian Institution featuring 40 large-scale digital prints of X-rays of several species of fish. Through June 1. Info, 748-2372. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium in St. Johnsbury.

brattleboro/okemo valley

‘GLASSTASTIC’: Glass sculptures inspired by children’s drawings of imaginary creatures. CLAIRE VAN VLIET: “Ghost Mesa,” lithographs of rock formations printed on a variety of handmade papers and collaged with


ART SHOWS

‘Ready. Fire! Aim.’ Burlington City Arts joins forces with the Hall Art Foundation in Reading to offer this collaborative summerseason exhibition curated by former BCA Center curator DJ Hellerman. The show, built around Andy and Christine Hall’s collective philosophy, explores tensions between impulsive action and strategic thinking, as well as ideas of violence, spontaneity and impermanence. On view in Burlington are works by Mildred

Beltré, Nancy Dwyer, Peter Gallo, Jonathan Gitelson, Timothy Horn and Matthew Peterson. The Hall

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component of the exhibition includes works by Richard Artschwager, Joseph Beuys, Olafur Eliasson, Anoka Faruqee, Lara Favaretto, Eric Fischl, Daniel Gordon, Keith Haring Glenn Ligon, Robert Longo, Tony Matelli, Bruce Nauman, Susan Rothenberg and Michael Scoggins. A reception at BCA Center is Friday, April 21, 5-8 p.m. Through July 9. Pictured: “Most Everything Must Go” by Peterson.

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outside vermont

‘SIGNS OF LIFE’: An exhibition featuring the works of married artists Roger Sandes and Mary Welsh. Through April 21. Info, 258-3992. The Great Hall in Springfield.

AMY BALKIN AND LUIS DELGADO-QUALTROUGH: Works by two artists who use big data to inform their practice. San Francisco-based conceptual artist Balkin presents her poster essay “The Atmosphere: A Guide.” Delgado-Qualtrough’s “10 Carbon Conundrums” series of prints constructs a conversation across time between two fictional characters contemplating human impact on the Earth. Through May 28. Info, 603-646-2426 |. Strauss Gallery, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H.

randolph/royalton

JASPER TOMKINS: “Expansions,” colorful acrylic paintings by the award-winning author and illustrator. Through April 30. Info, 498-8438. White River Gallery at BALE in South Royalton.

‘CHAGALL: COLOR & MUSIC’: An exhibition exploring the importance of music to the Russian-French artist, presenting 400 works including paintings, sculptures, maquettes, gouaches, stained-glass windows, photographs, films, costumes and puppets. Through June 11. Info, 514-285-2000. Montréal Museum of Fine Arts in Montreal, QC. INGO GÜNTHER: “World Processor,” more than 50 illuminated plastic globes featuring data mapped by the artist and journalist. Through May 28. Info, 603-646-2426. Hood Downtown in Hanover, N.H. m

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SUSAN ROCKWELL: “Adventures in Weaving” presents a variety of colors and structures allowed within the form, as rendered by the Braintree artist. Through May 19. Info, 889-9404. Tunbridge Public Library in Tunbridge Village.

SEVEN DAYS

PAT ADAMS: “Gatherum of Quiddities,” a survey of abstract paintings spanning the artist’s decadeslong career. Through June 18. Info, 447-1571. Bennington Museum.

‘AMERICAN ARTISTS IN EUROPE: SELECTIONS FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION’: An exhibition of works by American artists who were inspired by their travels, including Frank Duveneck, Leonard Freed, Childe Hassam, Winslow Homer and Elihu Vedder. Through June 11. LORNA BIEBER: “Forces of Nature,” eight large-scale photo murals and montages made by manipulating stock media photography to reinterpret the natural world. Through May 14. Info, 518-792-1761. The Hyde Collection in Glens Falls, N.Y.

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manchester/bennington

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

pulp paintings and marbled papers. EDWARD KOREN: “Seriously Funny,” works by the Brookfield-based New Yorker cartoonist. MARY WELSH: “Appearances & Reality,” collages that use art historical and pop-culture sources, among others. PAUL SHORE: “Drawn Home,” drawings of every object in the artist’s home, inspired by Audubon’s project to draw all the birds of North America. SOO SUNNY PARK: “Luminous Muqarna,” an immersive sculptural installation based on muqarnas, ornamental vaults found in Islamic architecture, especially mosques. Through June 18. Info, 257-0124. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center.

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movies Sandy Wexler ★★★★

M

an, do we live in the future or what? It seems like only yesterday Netflix was this kooky company that mailed you movies. After they played in theaters. Then on pay-per-view. And finally hit DVD (even Netflix couldn’t afford the postage for bricksized VHS cassettes). Seemingly overnight, the company with the kooky mailers morphed into a television powerhouse. Then a movie studio. Even while paying the postage on millions of DVDs, Netflix somehow became the equivalent of HBO and Paramount Pictures combined. That’s one spooky business plan. But for a minute there back in 2014, the company’s management looked like it might’ve lost it. No way, scoffed Hollywood insiders, was the streaming giant about to pin its bid to take on the traditional movie industry and render the cineplex obsolete on ... Adam Sandler. Yes way. The actor made history by becoming the first star to sign on to a new model bypassing the box office and premiering new releases in living rooms around the world. (Netflix has 93 million subscribers in 50 countries.) The four-picture deal guaranteed Sandler $100 million and total artistic control.

How’s it working? Last month the company doubled down, locking the comic in for eight films. Turns out Sandler’s comedies are the most streamed of Netflix’s offerings. All over the world. Industry analysts posit that he could singlehandedly bring down the movie business. Something to ponder as you enjoy Sandy Wexler in the comfort of your domicile at the hour of your choice. And with way cheaper snacks. Sandler’s third Netflix project debuted last Friday. He popped by “Jimmy Kimmel Live” to promote it. Trade publications reviewed it. Show business as usual. Except for the minor detail that not a single ticket was sold. If you own a theater chain, this might make you nervous. The film is not just historic but also fairly hilarious. A 21st-century riff on Woody Allen’s Broadway Danny Rose, it offers an affectionate, often affecting character study. Sandler plays a nebbishy talent manager. Set in ’90s LA and based on the comic’s real-life manager, Sandy Wernick, the picture is a mix of the disarmingly sweet and decidedly surreal. Sandy’s glasses are goofy hula hoops, his voice an annoying squawk. He dresses like a Tampa Bay retiree but will do absolutely anything for his “stable,” a roster of mis-

NET THREAT Sandler’s latest comedy opened in 50 countries this weekend and, to the chagrin of theater owners, not a single ticket was sold.

fit toys played by Sandler regulars including Kevin James, Nick Swardson and Terry Crews. They’re the bottom of the entertainment barrel, though some of their acts are dreadful in an undeniably delectable way. Then Sandy discovers Courtney (Jennifer Hudson) singing in an amusement park. She proves such a natural talent that even he can’t screw up her rise to stardom. That plot takes an unexpected turn I won’t spoil. I will say that I dug this long (131 minutes!), strange trip down memory lane (Blockbuster, beepers, Tower Records, Fruitopia). Some of the things I dug most were the weird, playful touches that Sandler

plays down here — for example, his character’s bedtime ritual of apologizing to clothes he hasn’t worn in a while. Brilliant. Directed by Steven Brill (Mr. Deeds) and cowritten with Paul Sado and Dan Bulla, Sandy Wexler is at heart a film that celebrates loyalty. Having stuck with the same manager for 28 years and provided paychecks to pals who haven’t made $100 million deals twice (yes, David Spade, Chris Rock and Rob Schneider are all here), Sander is well qualified to speak on the subject. Even in a funny voice if he wants to. RI C K KI S O N AK

88 MOVIES

SEVEN DAYS

04.19.17-04.26.17

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

The Fate of the Furious ★★★

T

he eighth installment of the Fast and Furious series is distinguished by stunts so absurd they could only have been accomplished by someone sitting at a computer, and by lines of dialogue so absurd they could only have been crafted by someone sitting at a computer doing tequila shots. The undoable stunts are standard blockbuster fare, appropriate for what are now essentially superhero flicks about guys who drive fast cars. But there’s something more endearing about the self-consciously awful dialogue of The Fate of the Furious, directed by F. Gary Gray (Straight Outta Compton). It’s a throwback to the series’ unassuming B-movie roots, and a few selected lines from the film may just tell you all you need to know. “You’ve earned my car. And my respect.” Early in the film, Dominic Toretto (Vin Diesel) hears this from a grizzled Havana street racer whose sneaky tactics he’s just beaten fair and square. In the simple ethical system of these movies, all it takes is mutual respect to turn antagonists into allies. But Dom is about to meet someone who doesn’t play by those rules: an evil hacker in clubwear (Charlize Theron) who calls herself Cipher and likes to pontificate about choice theory. She uses the one thing in the world Dom loves more than cars (guess: it starts with F) to force him to do her bidding and turn against his beloved crew. It’ll take

I AM FURIOUS, YELLOW Theron plays a flaxen-haired hacker who ropes Diesel into her evil scheme in the action series’ eighth installment.

a team-up of Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Jason Statham and Dame Helen Mirren to solve this one! “The only thing I love more than saving the world is my daughter.” So says Johnson, playing a federal agent who does, once again, save the world in this movie. Fate actually gives us the dream team-up described above, without discarding any

of its regular players (Michelle Rodriguez, Tyrese Gibson, Chris “Ludacris” Bridges, etc.). The pursuit of Cipher — whose only stated goal is “accountability” — turns out to entail the destruction of a Russian missile base, chunks of Berlin and New York City, and countless vehicles. “I said no, Mr. Nobody!” Johnson tosses this existentialist tidbit at Kurt Russell,

playing the shadowy government operative who recruits him for the world saving. Mr. Nobody versus Cipher is a scenario straight out of comic-book panels, with all the internal mythology and a bit too much of the self-seriousness that entails. Dom Toretto used to be a reasonably charming workingclass hero; now he glowers and sweats like Batman. Was that escalation necessary? Granted, Fast and Furious is all about more, bigger, faster, but perhaps this series needs to learn the art of saying no. “It’s zombie time.” With these words, Cipher takes control of all New York’s autonomous cars and unleashes a plague of driverless vehicles on the city. Marking the film’s midpoint, it’s a chaotic set piece that should have been more fun. The film’s most enjoyable action sequences come earlier: a Havana street race as cheerily color-coordinated as La La Land; a prison riot that seems one catchy tune away from becoming a musical number. Really, musical numbers are about all that Fast and Furious needs to fulfill its destiny as a monument to more. The sheer excess of this series that keeps pushing on the accelerator is, undeniably, kind of fun, and fans won’t be disappointed. But it’s a tiring kind of fun. Sooner or later, somebody is going to remember that being thrown from a moving car can kill you. MARGO T HARRI S O N


MOVIE CLIPS

NEW IN THEATERS BORN IN CHINA: This DisneyNature documentary traces the fates of three animal families — pandas, monkeys and snow leopards — in the wilds of China. John Krasinski narrates. Chuan Lu (City of Life and Death) directed. (76 min, G. Essex, Majestic) FREE FIRE: The latest from British director Ben Wheatley (High-Rise, Kill List) is a gritty action thriller set in 1978, in which two gangs clash in a deserted warehouse. Sharlto Copley, Brie Larson and Armie Hammer star. (90 min, R. Palace) GIFTED: A child prodigy (Mckenna Grace) becomes the object of a custody battle between her uncle and grandmother, who have different ideas about raising her, in this drama from director Marc Webb (500 Days of Summer). With Chris Evans and Lindsay Duncan. (101 min, PG-13. Capitol, Essex, Majestic, Palace) THE LOST CITY OF Z: James Gray (The Immigrant) directed this biopic about Col. Percival Fawcett (Charlie Hunnam), who, in the 1920s, claimed to have discovered the ruins of an advanced civilization in the Amazon. With Robert Pattinson and Sienna Miller. (141 min, PG-13. Roxy) MY LIFE AS A ZUCCHINI: In this Oscar-nominated stop-motion animation from Switzerland, a young boy with a grim past finds himself struggling to make friends in a foster home. Claude Barras directed. (70 min, PG-13. Savoy) NERUDAHHHHH Pablo Larraín (Jackie) directed this semi-fictionalized drama about Pablo Neruda, in which the Chilean poet flees persecution in his homeland and is pursued by a hapless police inspector (Gael García Bernal). (107 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 3/15. Savoy) PHOENIX FORGOTTEN: This found-footage horror flick purports to unveil the fate of three teenagers who vanished 20 years ago while chasing mysterious lights in Phoenix, Ariz. With Florence Hartigan and Luke Spencer Roberts. Justin Barber directed. (80 min, PG-13. Palace)

UNFORGETTABLE: Rom-com queen Katherine Heigl goes to the dark side in this thriller in which she plays a woman who stalks her ex-husband’s new wife (Rosario Dawson). Producer Denise Di Novi makes her directorial debut. (100 min, R. Essex, Majestic, Palace)

BEAUTY AND THE BEASTHHH1/2 Disney reworks the 1991 animated hit with this live-action musical featuring the original songs and Emma Watson as the book-loving girl forced into imprisonment in the castle of the dreaded Beast (Dan Stevens). Bill Condon (Mr. Holmes) directed. (129 min, PG; reviewed by M.H. 3/22)

H = refund, please HH = could’ve been worse, but not a lot HHH = has its moments; so-so HHHH = smarter than the average bear HHHHH = as good as it gets

FRANTZHHH1/2 After World War I, the fiancée of a dead German soldier finds herself drawn toward his mysterious French friend in this antiwar drama loosely based on Ernst Lubitsch’s 1932 film Broken Lullaby. With Pierre Niney and Paula Beer. François Ozon (Swimming Pool) directed. (113 min, PG-13) GET OUTHHHH Writer-director Jordan Peele (“Key & Peele”) swerves from comedy to socially conscious horror with this thriller about a young African American (Daniel Kaluuya) who senses something very wrong at the home of his white girlfriend’s folks. With Allison Williams, Lakeith Stanfield and Bradley Whitford. (103 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 3/1) GHOST IN THE SHELLHH1/2 Based on the acclaimed Japanese manga by Masamune Shirow, Rupert Sanders’ futuristic sci-fi thriller stars Scarlett Johansson as a cyborg counterterrorist confronting mind-hack attacks — and her own twisted past. (106 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 4/5) GOING IN STYLEH1/2 In this “reboot” of the 1979 comedy, three cash-strapped seniors set out to improve their fortunes by robbing a bank. With Morgan Freeman, Michael Caine, Alan Arkin and Joey King. Zach Braff (Garden State) directed. (96 min, PG-13; reviewed by R.K. 4/12) KEDIHHHH Cat lovers, prepare for cute overload! This documentary from director Ceyda Torun profiles the city of Istanbul through the unusual lens of its street cats and the people who love them. (80 min, NR) KONG: SKULL ISLANDHHH The folks who brought us the 2014 Godzilla take a shot at the story of the great ape, in which soldiers fresh from the Vietnam War explore the titular island in search of monsters. Tom Hiddleston, Samuel L. Jackson and Brie Larson star. Jordan Vogt-Roberts (The Kings of Summer) directed. (120 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 3/15) LIFEHHHHH Things go very wrong as a space station crew examines humanity’s first sample of Martian life in this sci-fi thriller from director Daniel Espinosa (Child 44). Rebecca Ferguson, Ryan Reynolds and Jake Gyllenhaal star. (103 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 3/29) LOGANHHHH Hugh Jackman returns as the impregnable X-Man in a new take on the comicbook mythos, set in the near future and featuring Patrick Stewart as a decrepit Professor X. James Mangold (The Wolverine) cowrote and directed. (137 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 3/8) POWER RANGERSHH The popular ’90s superpowered action series for kids gets a new filmic incarnation, directed by Dean Israelite (Project Almanac). Dacre Montgomery, Naomi Scott and RJ Cyler star. (124 min, PG-13)

NOW PLAYING

Online dating isn’t for everyone. If you’re weary of web profiles and swiping left, why not try a new/old idea? Love Letters! It’s the perfect thing for singles who want to bring the romance back to dating and take things slowly.

How does it work? 1.

Compose a message introducing yourself to other Vermonters and send it to Seven Days.

2. We’ll publish your anonymous message in the Love Letters section (see page 97). 3. Potential penpals will reply to the messages with real letters delivered to you confidentially by the Seven Days post office. 4. Whatever happens next is up to you!

I’m in. Let the romancing begin! Go to page 97 or sevendaysvt.com/loveletters for instructions on submitting your message. MOVIES 89

RATINGS ASSIGNED TO MOVIES NOT REVIEWED BY RICK KISONAK OR MARGOT HARRISON ARE COURTESY OF METACRITIC.COM, WHICH AVERAGES SCORES GIVEN BY THE COUNTRY’S MOST WIDELY READ MOVIE REVIEWERS.

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THE FATE OF THE FURIOUSHHH In this eighth entry in the resilient car-driven action franchise, Charlize Theron plays a mystery woman who draws Dom (Vin Diesel) away from his beloved crew and into a life of crime. With Luke Evans and Dwayne Johnson. F. Gary Gray (Straight Outta Compton) directed. (136 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 4/19)

04.19.17-04.26.17

NOW PLAYING

CHIPSH1/2 Actor-director Dax Shepard (Hit and Run) wrote, helmed and starred in this comic riff on the 1970s beefcake TV action drama about California’s highway patrol. Michael Peña plays the Erik Estrada role. (100 min, R)

Get love in your mailbox, not your inbox.

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THE PROMISE: An Armenian medical student (Oscar Isaac) fights to save his loved ones from the Ottoman Empire’s genocide campaign in this drama set during World War I. With Christian Bale and Charlotte Le Bon. Terry George (Hotel Rwanda) directed. (132 min, PG-13. Capitol, Essex, Roxy)

THE BOSS BABYHH1/2 Babies and puppies not only talk in this animated kids’ comedy from DreamWorks — they’re at war. Alec Baldwin voices the scheming, suit-wearing title character; Steve Buscemi the nefarious CEO of Puppy Co. Tom McGrath (Megamind) directed. (97 min, PG)

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Spirituality for Difficult Times:

movies

14 Precepts of Thich Nhat Hanh with Elizabeth Mattis Namgyel

SATURDAY & SUNDAY, APRIL 29-30

LOCALtheaters

Pema Osel Do Ngak Choling

Vershire, Vermont Info at: bit.ly/pemaosel or 802-333-4521

(*) = NEW THIS WEEK IN VERMONT. FOR UP-TO-DATE TIMES VISIT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/MOVIES.

The Zookeeper's Wife

ALL THREE TALKS AVAI‹BLE ON VIDEO STREAMING

12v-PemaOselCholing041917.indd 1

BIG PICTURE THEATER

4/18/17 1:28 PM48 Carroll Rd. (off Rte. 100), Waitsfield, 496-8994, bigpicturetheater.info

wednesday 19 — thursday 20 The Boss Baby Kong: Skull Island friday 21 — sunday 23

Congratulations Jane Larson on becoming a Vermont Certified Horticulturist!

Schedule not available at press time.

BIJOU CINEPLEX 4

Rte. 100, Morrisville, 888-3293, bijou4.com

wednesday 19 — tuesday 25 Beauty and the Beast The Boss Baby The Fate of the Furious Smurfs: The Lost Village

CAPITOL SHOWPLACE

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

2638 Ethan Allen Hwy, New Haven

802-453-5382

93 State St., Montpelier, 229-0343, fgbtheaters.com

wednesday 19 — thursday 20 The Boss Baby (2D & 3D) Going in Style Kong: Skull Island Logan Smurfs: The Lost Village (2D & 3D)

SEVEN DAYS

04.19.17-04.26.17

friday 21 — thursday 27 “One of the Best Regional Theaters in america” The Boss Baby 12v-greenhaven041917.indd 1- NYC Drama League 4/17/17 12:24 PM *Gifted Going in Style Logan *The Promise Smurfs: The Lost Village (Fri-Sun only)

A tribute to back roads Vermont by one of her best poets.

LOST NATION 12V

by turns bawdy & raucous delicate & painful angry & loving

April 20 – May 7

90 MOVIES

MAJESTIC 10

190 Boxwood St. (Maple Tree Place, Taft Corners), Williston, 878-2010, majestic10.com

wednesday 19 — thursday 20

Mon-Sat 7:30am-5:30pm Sun 9-4 greenhavengardensandnursery.com

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*Gifted Going in Style *The Promise Smurfs: The Lost Village *Unforgettable

lostnationtheater.org Montpelier City Hall Arts Center

ESSEX CINEMAS & T-REX THEATER

21 Essex Way, Suite 300, Essex, 879-6543, essexcinemas.com

wednesday 19 — thursday 20 Beauty and the Beast The Boss Baby ChiPs The Fate of the Furious Going in Style Kong: Skull Island Logan Power Rangers Smurfs: The Lost Village (2D & 3D)

Beauty and the Beast The Boss Baby The Fate of the Furious Get Out Ghost in the Shell Going in Style Kong: Skull Island Life Logan Smurfs: The Lost Village friday 21 — thursday 27 Beauty and the Beast *Born in China The Boss Baby The Fate of the Furious Get Out Ghost in the Shell *Gifted Going in Style Life Smurfs: The Lost Village *Unforgettable

MARQUIS THEATRE Main St., Middlebury, 388-4841, middleburymarquis.com

wednesday 19 — thursday 27 The Boss Baby The Fate of the Furious

MERRILL’S ROXY CINEMA 222 College St., Burlington, 864-3456, merrilltheatres.net

wednesday 19 — thursday 20 Beauty and the Beast The Fate of the Furious Frantz Get Out Kedi T2 Trainspotting The Zookeeper’s Wife

friday 21 — thursday 27 Beauty and the Beast The Fate of the Furious Frantz *The Lost City of Z *The Promise The Zookeeper’s Wife

4/17/17 3:52 PM

241 North Main St., Barre, 479-9621, fgbtheaters.com

wednesday 19 — thursday 27 Beauty and the Beast The Fate of the Furious

PALACE 9 CINEMAS 10 Fayette Dr., South Burlington, 864-5610, palace9.com

wednesday 19 — thursday 20 Beauty and the Beast The Boss Baby **Boston: An American Running Story (Wed only) **Doctor Who Season 10 Premiere (Wed only) The Fate of the Furious Get Out Ghost in the Shell Going in Style **The Grateful Dead Movie 40th Anniversary (Thu only) Kong: Skull Island (Wed only) Logan (Wed only) **National Theatre Live: Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead (Thu only) Smurfs: The Lost Village **Stage Russia: The Black Monk (Thu only) friday 21 — thursday 27 Beauty and the Beast The Boss Baby The Fate of the Furious *Free Fire Get Out *Gifted Going in Style **Met Opera: Eugene Onegin (Sat & Wed & Thu only) *Phoenix Forgotten Smurfs: The Lost Village **Stage Russia: The Black Monk (Sun only) TCM: The Graduate (Sun & Wed only) *Unforgettable

THE SAVOY THEATER 26 Main St., Montpelier, 229-0598, savoytheater.com

wednesday 19 — thursday 20 Get Out Kedi Toni Erdmann friday 21 — thursday 27 Get Out (Fri-Sun only) Kedi (Fri-Sun only) *My Life as a Zucchini *Neruda **VCFA Faculty Screenings (Sun-Thu)

STOWE CINEMA 3 PLEX Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-4678. stowecinema.com

wednesday 19 — thursday 20 Beauty and the Beast The Fate of the Furious Going in Style friday 21 — thursday 27 Schedule not available at press time.

SUNSET DRIVE-IN

155 Porters Point Rd., Colchester, 862-1800. sunsetdrivein.com

friday 21 — thursday 27 The Fate of the Furious & Get Out Beauty and the Beast & Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

WELDEN THEATRE

104 No. Main St., St. Albans, 527-7888, weldentheatre.com

wednesday 19 — thursday 20 Beauty and the Beast The Boss Baby (Thu only) The Fate of the Furious friday 21 — thursday 27

friday 21 — wednesday 26 Beauty and the Beast *Born in China The Boss Baby The Fate of the Furious

PARAMOUNT TWIN CINEMA

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Beauty and the Beast The Boss Baby The Fate of the Furious Smurfs: The Lost Village


MOVIE CLIPS

NOW PLAYING

« P.89

SMURFS: THE LOST VILLAGEHH Smurfette and three friends go on a walkabout in search of “the biggest secret in Smurf history” in this sequel to the 2011 family-film adaptation of the cartoon. With the voices of Demi Lovato, Jack McBrayer and Julia Roberts. Kelly Asbury (Gnomeo and Juliet) directed. (89 min, PG) T2 TRAINSPOTTINGHHH1/2 Director Danny Boyle’s sequel to his 1996 breakthrough dark comedy about heroin addicts in Edinburgh takes place 20 years later, as a somewhat matured Renton (Ewan McGregor) returns to the city. With Robert Carlyle, Jonny Lee Miller and Ewen Bremner. (117 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 4/12) TONI ERDMANNHHHHH In this Oscar-nominated German comedy-drama directed by Maren Ade (Everyone Else), a prank-prone dad takes drastic steps to try to reconnect with his workaholic daughter. With Peter Simonischek and Sandra Hüller. (162 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 4/5. Savoy)

THE ZOOKEEPER’S WIFEHHH Jessica Chastain and Johan Heldenbergh play Antonina and Jan Zabinski, the real-life Warsaw Zoo caretakers who rescued humans as well as animals during the Holocaust — unnervingly right under the nose of a Nazi zoologist (Daniel Brühl). Niki Caro (Whale Rider) directed. (124 min, PG-13)

NOW ON VIDEO THE FOUNDERHHHH1/2 Michael Keaton is Ray Kroc in this fact-based account of the origins of the towering McDonald’s fast-food franchise. John Lee Hancock (The Blind Side) directed. (115 min, PG-13. Reviewed by R.K. 1/18) SLEEPLESS: In this remake of the French action thriller Nuit Blanche, Jamie Foxx plays a cop seeking his abducted son — with his weapons and fists — in the nightclub scene. With Michelle Monaghan and Dermot Mulroney. Baran bo Odar directed. (95 min, R) SPLITHHH1/2 Writer-director M. Night Shyamalan is back at it with this horror thriller in which teens must free themselves from the clutches of an abductor (James McAvoy) who has 24 distinct personalities. (117 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 1/25)

OWN YOUR OWN HOME

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More movies!

Film series, events and festivals at venues other than cinemas can be found in the calendar section.

OFFBEAT FLICK OF THE WEEK B Y MARGOT HARRI SON

GET STARTED

RATES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS APPLY

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SEVEN DAYS

READ THESE EACH WEEK ON THE LIVE CULTURE BLOG AT

SPEAKING OF COMEDY...

check out the “Parmelee Post” online. It’s a new humor column on local news that hasn’t happened.

No, we’re not kidding. Each week, we’ll publish one joke submitted by a comic on our arts blog, Live Culture. So, what are you waiting for?

04.19.17-04.26.17

What if we told you that you could share your jokes with the world?

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Offbeat Flick of the Week: We pick an indie, foreign, cultish or just plain odd movie that hits local theaters, DVD or video on demand this week. If you want an alternative to the blockbusters, try this!

3/9/17 11:00 AM

Calling All Jokers!

The Lost City of Z In 1925, Col. Percy Fawcett disappeared in the Amazon while trying to find proof of an ancient advanced settlement he called the Lost City of Z. His quest has inspired hundreds of others to comb the area. Based on David Grann's book about Fawcett's "deadly obsession in the Amazon," this historical epic from writer-director James Gray (Two Lovers, The Immigrant) stars Charlie Hunnam as the explorer. In one of many glowing reviews, the A.V. Club called it "a lyrical epic of madness, mystique, and civilization in rich and almost symphonic dialogue with itself." Explore the territory starting Friday at Merrill's Roxy Cinema in Burlington.

.org


fun stuff FRAN KRAUSE

92 FUN STUFF

SEVEN DAYS 04.19.17-04.26.17 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Have a deep, dark fear of your own? Submit it to cartoonist Fran Krause at deep-dark-fears.tumblr.com, and you may see your neurosis illustrated in these pages.

EDIE EVERETTE


MORE FUN! STRAIGHT DOPE (P.30) CALCOKU & SUDOKU (P.C-4) CROSSWORD (P.C-5)

She So should you. Getchose your SIT. master’s at SIT. Fadia Najib Thabet Recipient of the International Women of Courage Award Current Student, MA in Peacebuilding and Conflict Transformation

Real skills. Real world. GRADUATE.SIT.EDU O P E N H O U S E : F R I D AY, A P R I L 2 1 , B R AT T L E B O R O , V T

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SPECIAL THANKS: Co-Chairs Patrick Robins, Lisa Schamberg and John Crabbe; Auctioneers Eileen Blackwood and Lynn Goyette; Emcee Ryan Addario; Vermont Community Access Media; and The Essex Resort and Spa. Event Volunteers: Doris Angiono, Dakota Brizendine, Jen Goldberg, Melissa Willette, Amy Whitehouse, Christine Barton, Tausha Deal, Nick Caycedo, Julie Kaplan, Olivia Taylor, Eric Herz-O’Brien, Erik Wirkkala, and members of UVM’s Alpha Phi Omega. As well as all of our generous individual donors, local business partners and bighearted auction bidders; all of whom value the health of our community.

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GLASS SPONSORS: NorthCountry Federal Credit Union Davis & Hodgdon Associates CPAs Thank you to everyone involved in the Instrumart Community Health Centers of Burlington’s “Salud” event! Our event, which included a Patterson Dental thrilling wine auction and exquisite plates from Morgan Stanley – Burlington Branch Vermont’s finest gourmet chefs, raised $50,000 GMCS in support of CHCB’s important mission to Peter and Margie Stern provide health care to all Vermonters, regardless Aplomb Consulting of their ability to pay or life circumstance. Spring Village at Essex Timberlane Dental Group MAGNUM SPONSOR: Loso’s Professional Janitorial Services, Inc. KeyBank Julie C Richards Photography LITRE SPONSORS: John Crabbe MVP Health Care Patrick Robins & Lisa Schamberg University of Vermont Medical Center BlueCross BlueShield of Vermont The Arbors at Shelburne Seven Days

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fun stuff JEN SORENSEN

HARRY BLISS

Is it pronounced “shāman,” “shăman,” or “drug dealer”?

94 FUN STUFF

SEVEN DAYS 04.19.17-04.26.17 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

RACHEL LIVES HERE NOW


REAL FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY APRIL 20-26

TAURUS APRIL 20-MAY 20:

Fantasize about sipping pear nectar and listening to cello music and inhaling the aroma of musky amber and caressing velvet, cashmere and silk. Imagine how it would feel to be healed by inspiring memories and sweet awakenings and shimmering delights and delicious epiphanies. I expect experiences like these to be extra available in the coming weeks. But they won’t necessarily come to you freely and easily. You will have to expend effort to ensure that they actually occur. So be alert for them. Seek them out. Track them down.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Contagion may

work in your favor, but it could also undermine you. On the one hand, your enthusiasm is likely to ripple out and inspire people

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I love to see you Virgos flirt with the uncharted and the uncanny and the indescribable. I get thrills and chills whenever I watch your fine mind trying to make sense of the fabulous and the foreign and the unfathomable. What other sign can cozy up to exotic wonders and explore forbidden zones with as much no-nonsense pragmatism as you? If anyone can capture greased lightning in a bottle or get ahold of magic beans that actually work, you can.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): A reader named Kris X sent me a rebuke. “You’re not a guru or a shaman,” he sneered. “Your horoscopes are too filled with the slippery stench of poetry to be useful for spiritual seekers.” Here’s my response: “Thank you, sir! I don’t consider myself a guru or shaman, either. It’s not my mission to be an all-knowing authority who hands down foolproof advice. Rather, I’m an apprentice to the Muse of Curiosity. I like to wrestle with useful, beautiful paradoxes. My goal is to be a joyful rebel stirring up benevolent trouble, to be a cheerleader for the creative imagination.” So now I ask you, my fellow Cancerian: How do you avoid getting trapped in molds that people pressure you to fit inside? Are you skilled at being yourself even if that’s different from what’s expected of you? What are the soulful roles you choose to embody despite the fact that almost no one understands them? Now is a good time to meditate on these matters.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A friend told me about a trick used by his grandmother, a farmer. When her brooding hens stopped laying eggs, she would put them in pillowcases that she then hung from a clothesline in a stiff breeze. After the hens got blown around for a while, she returned them to their cozy digs. The experience didn’t hurt them, and she swore it put them back on track with their egg-laying. I’m not comfortable with this strategy. It’s too extreme for an animallover like myself. (And I’m glad I don’t have to deal with recalcitrant hens.) But maybe it’s an apt metaphor or poetic prod for your use right now. What could you do to stimulate your own creative production?

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In the coming weeks, there will be helpers whose actions will nudge you — sometimes inadvertently — toward a higher level of professionalism. You will find it natural to wield more power, and you will be more effective in offering your unique gifts. Now maybe you imagine you have already been performing at the peak of your ability, but I bet you will discover — with a mix of alarm and excitement — that you can become even more excellent. Be greater, Leo! Do better! Live stronger! (P.S. As you ascend to this new level of competence, I advise you to be humbly aware of your weaknesses and immaturities. As your clout rises, you can’t afford to indulge in self-delusions.)

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Now would be an excellent time to add deft new nuances to the ways you kiss, lick, hug, snuggle, caress and fondle. Is there a worthy adventurer who will help you experiment with these activities? If not, use your pillow, your own body, a realistic life-size robot or your imagination. This exercise will be a good warm-up for your other assignment, which is to upgrade your intimacy skills. How might you do that? Hone and refine your abilities to get close to people. Listen deeper, collaborate stronger, compromise smarter and give more. Do you have any other ideas? SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “If I had nine hours to chop down a tree, I’d spend the first six sharpening my ax,” said Abraham Lincoln, one of America’s most productive presidents. I know you Sagittarians are more renowned for your bold, improvisational actions than your careful planning and

strategic preparation, but I think the coming weeks will be a time when you can and should adopt Lincoln’s approach. The readier you are, the freer you’ll be to apply your skills effectively and wield your power precisely.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Zoologists say that cannibalizing offspring is common in the animal kingdom, even among species that care tenderly for their young. So when critters eat their kids, it’s definitely “natural.” But I trust that in the coming weeks, you won’t devour your own children. Nor, I hope, will you engage in any behavior that metaphorically resembles such an act. I suspect that you may be at a low ebb in your relationship with some creation or handiwork or influence that you generated out of love. But please don’t abolish it, dissolve it or abandon it. Just the opposite, in fact: Intensify your efforts to nurture it. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Your astro-

logical house of communication will be the scene of substantial clamor and ruckus in the coming weeks. A bit of the hubbub will be flashy but empty. But much of it should be pretty interesting, and some of it will even be useful. To get the best possible results, be patient and objective rather than jumpy and reactive. Try to find the deep codes buried inside the mixed messages. Discern the hidden meanings lurking within the tall tales and reckless gossip. If you can deal calmly with the turbulent flow, you will give your social circle a valuable gift.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The best oracular advice you’ll get in the coming days probably won’t arise from your dreams or an astrological reading or a session with a psychic, but rather by way of seemingly random signals, like an overheard conversation or a sign on the side of a bus or a scrap of paper you find lying on the ground. And I bet the most useful relationship guidance you receive won’t be from an expert but maybe from a blog you stumble upon or a barista at a café or one of your old journal entries. Be alert for other ways in which this theme is operating, as well. The usual sources may not have useful info about their specialties. Your assignment is to gather up accidental inspiration and unlikely teachings.

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ARIES (March 21-April 19): After George Washington was elected as the first President of the United States, he had to move from his home in Virginia to New York City, which at the time was the center of the American government. But there was a problem: He didn’t have enough cash on hand to pay for his long-distance relocation, so he was forced to scrape up a loan. Fortunately, he was resourceful and persistent in doing so. The money arrived in time for him to attend his own inauguration. I urge you to be like Washington in the coming weeks, Aries. Do whatever’s necessary to get the funds you need to finance your life’s next chapter.

whose help you could use. On the other hand, you might be more sensitive than usual to the obnoxious vibes of manipulators. But now that I’ve revealed this useful tip, let’s hope you will be able to maximize the positive kind of contagion and neutralize the negative. Here’s one suggestion that may help: Visualize yourself surrounded by a golden force field that projects your good ideas far and wide even as it prevents the disagreeable stuff from leaking in.

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photos. I’m good-looking, physically fit and very healthy. I do not smoke cigarettes, and I do not do drugs. I am laid-back and drama-free. Am ultimately looking for a long-term relationship. MrRight4U, 38, l

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GENUINE, DEEP, PLAYFUL AND PASSIONATE Communication is key for me. I’m open with my thoughts and feelings and appreciate the same in a partner. If we are a good match, I will feel like my best self in your company and be inspired to continuously improve — and the same will be true for you. Sing_Laugh_Be, 41, l LOVE LIFE AND STILL SEEKING Adventuresome, gentle soul looking for kindred spirit to share time at home and travels near and far. I have a sharp wit and inquisitive mind. I have yet to go beyond the tip of the iceberg of wisdom to be found in this world. Two minds are better than one when it comes to figuring out what it all means. Natarajasana, 68, l LOW MAINTENANCE, ASK FOR NOTHING I am a low-maintenance, ask-fornothing woman. I enjoy being home gardening and am a very good cook. If I was with someone, it wouldn’t matter what we were doing as long as we were together and happy. Hellovt2, 61

96 PERSONALS

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LAID-BACK AND LOOKING AROUND I’m just seeing who’s out there. I’m not looking for anyone to “complete” me. I’m already whole. I’m busy and independent, not looking to get married or live together. I’m direct and have a sarcastic sense of humor; nothing is sacred. Looking for someone who likes to be outdoors, laugh and adventure. Knitter67, 49, l KAYAKING PARTNER WANTED Kayaking on a quiet pond with loons singing nearby; backcountry skiing on the beautiful trails of the Northeast Kingdom. So much to do in the great outdoors of our lovely state, but far more fun to be had with another person. Prefer coffee shops over loud bars. Seek one with similar interest. Drop me a line. Let’s chat. Pam. Carmie51, 51, l HONEST, CREATIVE, FIERY My life riches are work, children, dog, writing, photography, gardening, biking and enjoying the life choice of living in Vermont. I desire closeness, chemistry, connection and fun with a man. I live wholeheartedly and want to be with a man who also loves life, can communicate, laugh, think, dance and travel his way to me. RumiLove, 67, l SIMPLE LIFE PARTNER WANTED I am 58 y/o, divorced for two and a half years, and looking for a partner with whom to share mutual respect, carry on conversations, go out to dinner and enjoy a moonlit stroll. I love summer and enjoy watching the geese flying. I love to read, embroider, shop and just laugh and smile. bluetinanich, 58, l COUNTRY GIRL WITH SOPHISTICATED SIDE Educated accountant who enjoys life and doesn’t mind getting her hands dirty seeking her soul mate

— preferably a man with integrity, honesty, and a passion for traveling and the outdoors. Looking for someone to sit with at bonfires, ride motorcycles, watch football, cuddle on the couch and become a best friend. Carpe diem! OutdoorGirl041, 41, l ENERGETIC, POSITIVE AND ADVENTUROUS, VIBRANT I am a kind person with a huge heart. I love spending time with friends and family. I enjoy outdoor activities. I enjoy candlelit dinners, flowers, romance and just hanging out. Looking for a guy who is active, honest and really knows how to love a woman with all of his heart. Someone who enjoys a nice glass of wine. Chance1, 58, l FINALLY CLUEING IN! Irredeemable treehugger, field traipser, hill climber. Once a potter. Love to dance, kayak, ponder. Make things that ferment. Push dirt around. Have a thing for birds. You are discerning, practical, funny and, above all, kind. Kestrel, 61, l NOW WHAT? I love to laugh and enjoy the simple things in life. I try to find the positive in every “bad” situation. I believe everything works out the way it should. We need to be kind to everyone. Life is too short to be uppity. Bonus points if you can make me laugh. Leemay64, 52, l FUNNY, CREATIVE, COMPASSIONATE ADVOCATE/ACTIVIST I’m a grounded leftie whose sense of adventure is intact as much for things that’ve seasoned me as for things I haven’t yet imagined, though I’m also happy alone with a book on Mt. Pisgah. I come from four generations who delight in one another, and, as a result, I have

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an appreciation for commitment to others on many levels. Soulair, 63, l HUMOROUS, SENSITIVE, ACTIVE, DEEP THINKER Looking for friendship and companion; possibly more. Someone to enjoy activities and conversation with — indoors and outdoors. simba33, 52, l STILL LOOKING... I’m short and curvy with blond hair. I have brown/hazel eyes. I enjoy writing, reading and cooking. I’m always on the hunt for a good recipe and love to wander through an Asian or farmers market. I love music; not really into country, though. Love a good movie, too! Looking to be friends first, then maybe more! MCKitty, 34, l SLOW DOWN TO ENJOY LIFE Looking for one person to build a great foundation of a friendship with, then see how everything progresses. Life is short, and I want to meet someone who wants to enjoy life together. Elle4heaven, 41 DANCING POET FULL OF FUN I’m a communicator and a thinker. I look within, around, up to the trees, blue and dark skies, plus at the details underfoot and within clichés. A dreamer who trusts and loves easily, I’m quixotic, deeply loyal, considerate and idealistic. Communicating for clarity and compassion can transform our world. I enjoy dancing, cooking, writing, painting, joking and social activism. PeacefulCommunicator, 60, l ACTIVE, CREATIVE, APPRECIATIVE COUNTRY ARTIST I am an independent, self-employed artist and love Vermont, my home, my lifestyle, my friends and family. My home, studio and gallery are in a renovated historic barn surrounded by gardens near a lake. I have lots to appreciate and feel there is always room for more friends, more to love and others with whom to share life experiences. Libelle, 60, l THROUGH AN ARTIST’S FILTER Jump right in; don’t be shy. By now, we all have fascinating stories to tell. I bartended in New Orleans, survived the worst thing imaginable, taught K-12 art for years and find this world, well, fascinating. If you can shrug off the small stuff, laugh it up, howl at the moon, lose yourself in the music, wanna do it together? BonaFide, 63, l

MEN Seeking WOMEN

PLEASE INSTEAD OF BE PLEASED Personality, sense of humor, spontaneousness, sense of adventure, sex appeal, and being down with beer and a ball game — or a ball game and maybe some beer — is the kind of person I am and want to be around. IrishLover42, 43, l A TRUE GENTLEMAN LADIES’ MAN Hello. My name is Bob, and other people tell me that I am a much more handsome man in person than in my

NEW BEGINNINGS College-educated executive looking for intelligent conversation. Looking for someone who is willing to be friends first and see where things go from there. I have a variety of interests, and I’m willing to try new things. Megabyte, 39, l WE CAN BE AWESOME TOGETHER! I’m a happy, fun-loving and sincere guy with a great attitude seeking a similar woman. I have a nice blend of energy, laid-back attitude, passion, sense of humor, intelligent. I’m a rounded person who has experienced a fulfilled and diversified life. I love the outdoors and get my exercise and vitality by hiking, skiing and bicycling. greenmtnsguy, 63 HAVE A OPEN MIND I like to stay busy, like to ski, hike, work out, ride bikes, outdoor things. Easygoing. Don’t let things get to me. Life is too short. Drop a note to me if you would like to know anything about me. skiski1, 53, l NICE, FRIENDLY, ROMANTIC, CARING, TALENTED Hi, my name is Mike, and I’m looking into dating, making friends and meeting new people. I enjoy writing, playing music, watching movies, and I love going to concerts. I’m a soft-spoken, kind, gentle person who likes to laugh, cuddle and also has a good sense of humor. I’m pretty chill and laid-back. Also like to work. motley123, 40, l A LONELY GUY LOOKING Thought I would branch out and give this a try. Living in southern Vermont, looking for a long-term relationship. rubberbandman, 56, l HONEST, CARING, OPEN-MINDED I am honest, totally against double standards, and considerate. I think those who have known me in many walks of life would agree. I am happy to say more in one-toone communication. falcon, 60 INTELLIGENT, BLUNT, FUNNY Let’s have fun. Hike, cook, garden or discuss something deep. I’d like someone to have fun with and enjoy. I don’t play games or the field. Hahaha, if I wrote all my interests, hobbies and dreams, one would miss out on my humility. Hekkenschutze, 34, l ADVENTURESOME WANDERER, SEEKING FELLOW TRAVELER Been around the world for a spell, looking to have a home base to do more traveling and exploring from! Want to find someone who wants to try new things, go to new places and live life to the fullest (in addition to some relaxing hikes in the wilderness)! GuardianHikerX28, 28 CREATIVE, COMPASSIONATE, GRATEFUL, OPEN-HEARTED ADVENTURER I am creative, sensuous and playful and love exploring. I’m healthy and active with many interests including climate activism, farmers markets, being in water and nature, photography, swimming, kayaking, dancing, yoga, cooking, skiing, art, bicycle and motorcycle riding, mushroom hunting, and more. I’m looking for a warm, openhearted, creative, fun woman. Must love kids and dogs. WhirlingDancer, 68, l

URBANE HICK, FLEDGLING WRITER From very far away, people often say I remind them of a young Paul Newman. I’m a carpenter and a writer and an excellent friend to my dog. I have some people friends, too. I wash my truck once a year. I’m good with my hands and have a special gift with stubborn machinery. TheDrinkerYouLaugh, 26 THIS? AGAIN? Me: physically active (love skiing, hiking, cycling, golf), pretty smart, financially independent, not bad-looking (happy to share pictures). You: must be active and have a sense of humor! 810B, 55, l CONFIDENT. CURIOUS. AVAILABLE. Giving this venue a try. Are there any nice, young, single women left in Vermont? Looking for a partner in crime. I am not afraid of a long-term relationship. Give me a shout-out. Let’s see how it goes. LOOKINGLOCAL, 74, l SUGARMAKER, WRITER SEEKS SWEET PARTNER Athletic, romantic mystic in love with the land here on the edge of the Kingdom seeks partner for maple, shiitake, cider, singing, dancing and homemaking. I am a writer, restorative justice advocate, peacemaker who loves my non-dependence and introversion, looking for an active life partner for fun, laughter, and the joy of family and activism toward the emerging global culture. sugarmaker10, 64, l FUNNY, LOW-KEY, ANTSY Hmm. Looking for some comfort with an edge; you are not too hot, not too cold, but just right. Let’s say “warm.” I can be warm, too. I talk to birds and other animals. I am a good listener. samten, 67, l NO GAMES Recently separated amicably; sparks were missing. I am looking for someone who can feel comfortable being themselves, even if being yourself means you have flaws. Not interested in judgment. I enjoy chilling out with a glass of wine or a beer, snacks, and a good movie or show. Love comedy. Healthy sense of humor a must. Enjoy camping, relaxing walks. Notperfect, 56, l BIKE NUT AND FIDDLE PLAYER Retired, financially independent former engineer, math and physical science teacher, house renovator and remodeler seeks intelligent, athletic gal to share the finer points of life. Juneapple, 56 SENSITIVE, MERCIFUL, COMPASSIONATE My “mask” is off, and my walls have been torn down. I seek to fully be with someone who is able to fully be with me. The only catch is, there needs to be physical attraction. We all have our preferences. singular, 49 PASSIONATE NATURAL PHILOSOPHER What a beautiful world; so much to be passionate about! And such great need for it right now. Emotionally, physically and in every way; there’s much to be done, and much that can be done — let’s find out. mvgfr, 53, l

WOMEN Seeking WOMEN KIND AND LIVING LIFE! It doesn’t matter where we have been. What’s important is where we are going. I’ve learned to live for myself as much as my friends and family. We are all worthy and deserve happiness. I work hard and love learning new things, including figuring out how to fix things around my house. We are capable of so much. Are you ready?! kit987, 48


a bottom. Love to give oral, receive anal. You: clean, nice guy, slim, DD-free, well endowed a plus. Let’s get together! #L1046 GWM, 65 years young and healthy. Looking for companionship and more with another older gay male. Hope to hear from you. #L1047 You: fit, beautiful, happy, creative. Me: SWM, fit, handsome, happy, creative. Together create a space of love fit for eternity in Lamoille County with apple/pear hedges, ponds, chickens, cow, honey bees, music, singing, dance, conscious conception. Write me. #L1048

SWM seeking my black girlfriend. I’m honest, loving, clean and enjoy cooking. Any age, weight. You’ll enjoy my foot massage. Let me pamper and spoil you. I’m not abusive. I’m 6’, 170 pounds. Let’s meet. Photo, phone. #L1042 52-y/o male seeking to hook up and please a very older woman who still has spunk. Age and wrinkles are a plus. I’m in the Rutland area but guarantee you that after one trip, you’ll be making more. Write me. #L1043 SWM, 59, romantic outdoorsman, enjoys what all four Vermont seasons have to

offer. Blue/green eyes, brown hair, kind, loyal, good listener, sense of humor, and still has a youthful body and enthusiasm. Enjoys downtime, cuddling, watching movies. Seeks likeminded 45- to 60-y/o SWF for sharing nature, music and adventures. #L1044 White male, 50, single. Want to date to find a lady to fall in love with (relationship). I love to ride my motorcycle. I am a Civil War Confederate reenactor. Love history, not hate. I am a Christian. Love God and Jesus. #L1045 SWM, bisexual, 50s, in good shape. Looking for black/ white male. FWB. I’m mostly

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herself to school. Loves motorbikes, kayaking, exploring, cooking. Very straitlaced; DD-free. Looking for all-American type of guy for a fun summer. #L1051 A handsome, kind, funny, sincere, sensitive and honest person. SWM, 52, with two adorable children ages 5 and 7 living with me sometimes. Looking for friendship to longterm relationship, ages 40s to 50s. Interests are holding hands, hiking, dining out, cooking together, beaches, travel, watching TV together and more. Healthy lifestyle. #L1052

50-plus man seeks bright, funloving woman who enjoys arts/ music/theater, nature, creative living, cooking, humor; who’s active physically, culturally, sociopolitically, philosophically, spiritually liberal and openminded. Friendship and/or romance. No punk/metal/hard rock. #L1050

Attractive SWF, 63, active with many interests. Ready smile looking for dating to LTR with gentlemen of similar traits. Country home, self-sufficient. Would love a partner to share life’s adventures. Widowed, miss cuddling. Chittenden/ Addison County. #L1053

Almost 39-y/o woman; brunette with hazel eyes. Undergrad student sending

“I can’t even find the motivation to quit my gym membership.” 67 y.o. woman needs a “perk-up” Vermonter,

practical, quiet, seeking male and energy. #L1036 Young-spirited; fit/trim middle-age female. Enjoy walks; music; theater; sci-fy/ adventure movies. Am into awesome friendship not last chance love drama. Desire to meet single like-minded male 40-60ish; average/fit for companion to share interests. Can be poetic… inspire me. #L1037 63 y.o. SWM, semi-retired, active, love outdoors. Skiing, boating, hiking, riding my Harley. Everywhere. Romantic, holding hands, hiking, bicycle riding. ISO like-minded woman, outdoorsy, active, intellectual, discuss current events. R U looking for that one last relationship? So am I. #L1038 Looking for him. A man that is hard working or retired from working hard... a patient man, a lovable man sensitive but strong nonsmoker. Me honest. Truthful, romantic. One man women. Nonsmoker. Love to dance in his arms. #L1039

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65-y/o divorced WM seeking woman for casual encounters and maybe more. I do have some health issues such as artery disease and neuropathy. I am a nondrinker and seeking the same. Please write if interested. #L1049

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HEY, RUGBY ROOSTER Last night walking in the rain was the first rain for us since that first kiss. I tried to tell you we’ve come a long way, but you just said that it was dark. I never thought to iSpy you then. Phooey. Better late: You are my favorite mister. Maybe we can see each other outside of here sometime? Maybe! When: Friday, July 22, 2016. Where: the store. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913939 BIKE COMMUTING DOCTOR/NURSE/GODDESS You were on your way to acupuncture with some awesome earrings and work scrubs. We were both commuting on bikes, turning left onto Pearl Street from South Winooski Ave. in the afternoon. You let me know my bag was open, and we talked quickly before the light turned. Casual bike ride sometime? When: Tuesday, April 11, 2017. Where: South Winooski Ave./Pearl Street. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913938

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MONTPELIER TUESDAY A.M. PT I sit waiting for my appointment and to see your tall, handsome self. Me: short light hair, green eyes. I’ve lost my 8:45 slot so may not be seeing you there again. I feel drawn to you and think we should meet if you’re available. When: Tuesday, April 11, 2017. Where: Montpelier PT clinic. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913937 RAVEN-HAIRED PRINCESS You stepped out through the snowy forests into my dreams on our hike in the Notch. Let our love back into your heart, your bed, so that we might worship every porcelain curve and share each cream-and-rose kiss together. When: Sunday, April 9, 2017. Where: the Notch. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913936 CASHEW DROPPER AT CITY MARKET I saw your post so long ago but was busy with other things. In the bulk section today I thought of you and our witty banter in line before you dropped your cashews. It would be great to meet up outside the walls of City Market if you’re up for it. When: Friday, January 6, 2017. Where: City Market. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913934 BURLINGTON DMV, SPANISH ACCENT You had your picture taken and sat down next to the window I was at. We talked about your picture and shared a “Have a good day.” You were stunningly attractive with a cute accent that left me speechless. I’m regretting not asking your name and if you would have dinner with me. Contact me if

intuition leads you. When: Friday, April 7, 2017. Where: DMV, Burlington. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913933 $18 FOR SIX BEERS?! Twice in one day, and you were behind the register both times. Even though the beer is overpriced, it was worth it to talk to you again. You complimented my patchwork hat and waited patiently while I picked out a slightly cheaper beer. Want to get a cheapish beer together sometime? When: Friday, April 7, 2017. Where: Pine Street Deli. You: Woman. Me: Woman. #913932 CITY MARKET AND PARKING LOT “We will see each other again.” Sometimes two soul-ships pass each other to exchange smiles, to send each other off with a lighter heart. Sometimes there might be more than brightening another’s day. Blue eyes at the coffee station left me wondering if it was just a smile needed for that day or if there is more to discover. When: Friday, March 31, 2017. Where: City Market. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913931 OLIVE JUICE Jasmyn, I can’t begin to express how much fun this year has been, from Beck to metal shows, living in my car to sleeping in hammocks. I couldn’t ask for a better roller-coaster partner in crime. One year down, many more to come if you can handle it. When: Thursday, April 6, 2017. Where: Waterbury. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913930 DAMN THAT HINDSIGHT Your beauty made me stumble until two steps down the stairs, when I realized I should have responded to your question about the wait in line with, “15 minutes. Want company?” So to the pretty woman who matched my outfit of green jacket, black pants and a joy of tasty treats served in a waffle cone, the offer stands. When: Tuesday, April 4, 2017. Where: Free Cone Day at Ben & Jerry’s. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913929 SEO TUCKER I will love you forever. Goodbye, sweet prince. When: Wednesday, April 5, 2017. Where: Dealer.com. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913928 WE SHARED ‘GOOD KARMA’ I gave you a ride to pick up your car in Colchester. We had a great but short conversation. I thought about it all day afterward. Love to chat with you again. I am terrible with names, but I think your name was Madeline? When: Sunday, April 2, 2017. Where: Mobil, Burlington. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913927

JOE(L) FROM MONTPELIER BLM DAY Black V-neck Joel/Joe. We met before the POC meeting. I think you’re Asian. My sleuthing’s led to nothing besides that you’re maybe a designer and live in central Vermont. Were we catching glances across the table, or was that just hopeful illusion? Or are you a strikingly handsome infiltrator? If not, let’s meet. When: Thursday, February 9, 2017. Where: the Statehouse. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913926 JAC HUNTLEY SALON 4 p.m. You were standing, blow-drying your long, brown hair. I was in the small room on the other side of the bamboo divider. The divider slipped. We both caught it at the same time. Let’s pretend that was a good omen. Would you be interested in having a drink at Leunig’s? When: Thursday, March 30, 2017. Where: Jac Huntley hair-coloring salon. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913924 ACE I miss you. Let’s spend a night together before you leave to explore the Mississippi on barges. Love your face and everything about you. When: Wednesday, February 8, 2017. Where: Riding Ravel. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913923 A SWAN SONG From the Nender on Sunday nights to Trinity campus (almost) running late, I see you running around Burlington kicking ass and still somehow finding pockets of time for a movie or an episode of “Planet Earth.” Maybe we will be able to meet up for a game of chess again. :) When: Thursday, March 23, 2017. Where: Burlington. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913922 HOT FOR TEACHER Hello sexy lady working hard, preparing for classes. Maybe you can teach me a lesson. I was digging all of the funky 50 shades of gray you were wearing. Perhaps we could reenact that story ourselves sometime. When: Monday, April 3, 2017. Where: Feldman’s. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913921 BEAUTIFUL PIZZA You’re small and beautiful and had way too much ice in your cup. I’ve never been left speechless by somebody smiling at me like that before. We will probably never see each other again, but on the off-chance you see this and know it’s you, look me up. We can get a slice somewhere else. When: Wednesday, March 29, 2017. Where: Burlington. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913920 TALL MIDDLE EASTERN COFFEE LOVER I see you at practically every coffee shop in town. You seem to be best friends with every barista, and I heard them call you by an Arabic name. You have the most intense dark eyes and serious face, but when you smile, you light up the room. Why won’t you look at me? When: Saturday, March 25, 2017. Where: all over. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913919

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Your wise counselor in love, lust and life

ASK ATHENA Dear Athena,

I have been with the same man for seven years, but I was promiscuous from the time I was 15 to 18. I am now 29. Is my past relevant? Should he know my “number”?

Signed,

Promiscuous Past

Dear Promiscuous Past,

My short answer: Nobody has a right to know your “number” unless you care to share it. What difference does it make how many lovers you enjoyed before you met your current guy? My long answer starts with a question: Why does this matter all of a sudden? You’ve been together seven years — that’s pretty committed. So, why now? What’s going on with you two that this has come up? Have you heard of the seven-year itch? It’s a term based on the notion that couples can get bored or antsy around the seven-year mark. Maybe there’s a little bit of an itch going on here. Do you find yourself questioning your relationship? I bring this up because, for some reason, you’re feeling the need to own up to who you were once upon a time. Did you at one point lie about how many people you had slept with before him? Are you trying to come clean? Or is he suddenly questioning you about your past, and you feel ashamed? (Which you shouldn’t, by the way.) If your partner loves you now, he needs to learn to appreciate the past that shaped you — the good and the bad. Your “number,” if you choose to share it, should be no threat to your current relationship. If it is, don’t spend another seven years with someone who judges you for ancient history.

Yours,

Athena

Need advice?

You can send your own question to her at askathena@sevendaysvt.com.

HOTTIE AT PFIT SB Caught your glance at the beginning of my workout Monday morning. I smiled at you as I was leaving to return the favor, and you were waiting for it. Margaritas sometime? You: blonde, 5’6 or so, black leggings, white top. So pretty. Me: backward hat, Star Wars tee, brown hair. When: Monday, March 27, 2017. Where: Planet Fitness, South Burlington. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913918 SUNDAY, HANNAFORD IN SWANTON To the gray-haired gentleman who drives the silver Toyota Echo: We flirted, we talked, you bought steak

and milk. I would like to get to know you better and continue our talk about cars, etc. —Lady with light blue Chevy Spark. When: Sunday, March 26, 2017. Where: Hannaford, Swanton. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913917 SWEET SMILE AND EYES You greeted me at the door. You rang me out, and you made small talk with me and told me to enjoy the beautiful day. I tripped on my words a few times because I couldn’t stop looking at you. I was wearing a brown sweater and jeans. Thank you. You made my day. When: Sunday, March 26, 2017. Where: Petco, Barre-Montpelier Rd. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913916


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Seven Days, April 19, 2017  

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