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AGAINST THE LAW

Deputy versus sheriff in primary PAGE 18

V E R MO NT ’S INDE PEN DENT VO IC E AUGUST 8-15, 2018 VOL.23 NO.47 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

What Election? The most powerful offices in Vermont are up for grabs this year, and voters have barely noticed. Is something broken? B Y TAYL OR D OBBS , PA G E 28

WHALES’ TALE

PAGE 24

New sculpture for Randolph

PEG & TER-IFFIC!

PAGE 38

A bistro blooms in Shelburne

PUNK ATTACK

PAGE 58

Rough Francis release new LP


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THE LAST WEEK IN REVIEW

emoji that

AUGUST 1-8, 2018 COMPILED BY SASHA GOLDSTEIN, MATTHEW ROY & ANDREA SUOZZO

AFTERBURNER

A fire at the Vermont Air National Guard hangar closed Burlington International Airport briefly on Monday. No planes were involved.

The ReUse Zone at Chittenden Solid Waste District’s South Burlington facility

ALL WET

ZONES OUT O MOLLY WALSH

?

?? ? ?? ? ??

802much

The federal Environmental Protection Agency is investigating chemical vapors in the vicinity of Burlington’s Elmwood Avenue. That stinks.

tweet of the week: @VermontSOS We’re strongly opposed to Shopper ID laws. There has been no evidence that grocery fraud occurs on a widespread basis, and restrictive Shopper ID laws only serve to prevent eligible shoppers from buying their groceries on shopping day. FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSVT OUR TWEEPLE: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/TWITTER

laugh. “They thought we were messing with their cars.” He had never been to Burlington, but his wife grew up in Massachusetts and used to ski at Bolton Valley. She’s worked at the Ford Motor Company for 25 years, he said, and when the couple began to think about retiring, they decided to head for the East Coast. The Queen City made an instant impression. Hakken said it reminded him of what Ann Arbor — a small city that’s home to the University of Michigan — was like 25 or 30 years ago. The couple hopes to get the home built in the next year and retire and move to Vermont full time within the next three years, he said. “You guys have one of the most unique cities,” he said. “It has everything I think that somebody would be looking for — unless you’re a Republican.” SASHA GOLDSTEIN

LAST SEVEN 5

ne of Burlington’s quirkiest undeveloped pieces of land is officially off the market. Joel and Wendy Hakken of Ann Arbor, Mich., paid $103,000 for the steep, wooded 0.1acre plot that was for sale along Depot Street. The transaction went through July 2. The couple plans to build their dream retirement home overlooking Lake Champlain, and they’ve hired Smith Buckley Architects to design the place with plenty of west-facing windows. It’ll likely be four stories tall — including a garage and basement — spread out over 1,400 to 1,800 square feet. “We gave them seven pages of what we want,”

said Joel Hakken. “We’ll see what they come up with.” Depot Street plunges from North Avenue down to the Burlington waterfront, steep enough that it’s been used as a downhill ski run for events. Hakken’s lot sits on the road’s eastern side, a severe slope that is almost entirely undeveloped. “I’m the son of an architect,” Hakken said, explaining he’s seen plenty of hillside dwellings. “I wasn’t worried we could build a house, but I am worried about what it’s gonna cost and what the city is going to tax us!” The parcel fronts Depot Street, but its official address is 31 North Avenue. It’s next to the Burlington Police Department parking lot. “We were standing in the lot looking at the land, and some officers came out and said, ‘What the hell are you doing?’” Hakken said with a

SEVEN DAYS

SASHA GOLDSTEIN

OLD NORTH CHEM?

1. “University of Vermont Medical Center Stops Collecting Nurses’ Union Dues” by Sara Tabin. The hospital used to take union dues out of employee paychecks, passing the money along to the union. 2. “Sail Up to the Pickled Perch, Now Open in Colchester” by Hannah Palmer Egan. There’s a new restaurant in the former Bayview Bar and Grill location. 3. “In Race for Governor, Sen. John Rodgers Stands His Ground” by Alicia Freese. The Northeast Kingdom state senator is running as a write-in in the August 14 Democratic primary. 4. “Seven Days Staffers Pick Even More Vermont ‘Bests’” by Seven Days staff. Tallying the Daysies results, we were inspired to pick a few of our favorite things about life in Vermont, too. 5. “What to Do About Vermont’s Poison Parsnip Problem?” by Ken Picard. The invasive plant looks like a yellow version of Queen Anne’s lace, and you definitely shouldn’t touch it.

WHAT’S WEIRD IN VERMONT

SLIPPERY SLOPE?

O

Showtime has posted a trailer of its upcoming series about the 2015 escapes from the New York State prison in Dannemora. Airs right before Thanksgiving.

TOPFIVE

MOST POPULAR ITEMS ON SEVENDAYSVT.COM

08.08.18-08.15.18

Property on Depot Street

Why close them down? According to district officials, some people have dropped off household trash in the zones. Others have left prohibited items such as prescription medication, chemicals and even live ammunition. For district employees who have to clean up the areas and dispose of those items properly, the task has been time-consuming — and potentially dangerous. The district has to pay for it. Another problem: people who linger all day, waiting for the latest freebie. The district’s spokesperson, Jonny Finity, outlined the problems in a press release earlier this month. He said complaints about the decision aren’t likely to change it. The district is encouraging people to unload their unwanted items through Goodwill, ReSOURCE and freecycle.org. Read Walsh’s full story at sevendaysvt.com.

JUST RELEASED

That’s how many days the temperature reached at least 85 degrees in Burlington in July. Last month was the warmest on record in the Champlain Valley, according to the National Weather Service.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ne man dropped off a green plastic sandbox shaped like a turtle. Another went home with a cast-iron frying pan. It was business as usual on Tuesday at the Chittenden Solid Waste District ReUse Zone in South Burlington. At this transfer station and others like it around the county, people have long dropped off unwanted stuff for others to take home in the trash-totreasure tradition. But that practice is ending soon, at least in Chittenden County. After 20 years of running them, the district is shuttering its regional ReUse Zones at the end of September, according to a report by Molly Walsh. Users aren’t happy. “It’s not right,” Ron Dickens of St. Albans said at the SoBu facility. “The elimination of this facility is an affront. It is way too useful to the general public, let alone the financially stressed public.”

Cops tracked a robbery suspect via the GPS ankle monitor he was already wearing. The man took off, then drove into Lake Champlain and started swimming. Quite the catch.

21


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Colby Roberts, Paula Routly publisher Paula Routly deputy publisher Cathy Resmer AssoCiAte publishers

Don Eggert, Pamela Polston, Colby Roberts NEWS & POLITICS editor Matthew Roy deputy editor Sasha Goldstein politiCAl editor Paul Heintz Consulting editor Candace Page politiCAl Columnist John Walters stAff writers Mark Davis, Taylor Dobbs,

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WE CARRY A LARGE SELECTION OF VT FOOD PRODUCTS OT WE’VE G E L P A M ES! CREEME

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EXPERIENCE

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ARTS & LIFE editor Pamela Polston AssoCiAte editor Margot Harrison AssistAnt editors Dan Bolles, Elizabeth M. Seyler food writer Hannah Palmer Egan musiC editor Jordan Adams CAlendAr writer Kristen Ravin speCiAlty publiCAtions mAnAger Carolyn Fox stAff writers Rachel Elizabeth Jones, Ken Picard,

Sally Pollak, Kymelya Sari, Sadie Williams

proofreAders Carolyn Fox, Elizabeth M. Seyler D I G I TA L & V I D E O digitAl editor Andrea Suozzo digitAl produCtion speCiAlist Bryan Parmelee senior multimediA produCer Eva Sollberger multimediA journAlist James Buck DESIGN CreAtive direCtor Don Eggert Art direCtor Rev. Diane Sullivan produCtion mAnAger John James stAff photogrApher Matthew Thorsen designers Brooke Bousquet,

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08.08.18-08.15.18

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DISCLOSURE: Seven Days publisher and coeditor Paula Routly is the domestic partner of Vermont Senate President Pro Tempore Tim Ashe. Routly abstains from involvement in the newspaper’s Statehouse and state political coverage. Find our conflict of interest policy here: sevendaysvt.com/disclosure.

6 FEEDBACK

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7/24/18 4:13 PM

FEEDback READER REACTION TO RECENT ARTICLES

WHERE’S ‘DOPE’?

What happened to “Dear Cecil” — one of my favorite features?! Jud Lawrie

ESSEX JUNCTION

Editor’s note: The column was written by the editors of the Chicago Reader and ran weekly in Seven Days for 23 years. Only a few papers were still running “The Straight Dope” when they discontinued it last month. We explained everything in our July 4 issue [“Straight Dope Calls It … 45 Years”].

SUPREMELY UNHELPFUL

[Re Off Message: “Leahy: Trump’s Supreme Court Pick ‘More Than Terrifying,’” July 10]: Democrats in the U.S. Senate have little or no interest in solving our nation’s problems and getting along with others to make our country “great again.” As a result, they instruct Vermont’s senior senator to oppose a highly qualified individual such as Brett Kavanaugh when the president names such a person to a very important position. Bernard Keefe Jr.

FAIRFAX

REPRESENTING VERMONT?

Congrats to reporter Taylor Dobbs for setting the record straight on Sen. Patrick Leahy’s inaccurate and hyperbolic attack concerning past remarks by U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh [Off Message: “Leahy: Trump’s Supreme Court Pick ‘More Than Terrifying,’” July 10]. Kudos, as well, to Seven Days for publishing John McClaughry’s letter on this matter [Feedback: “A Closer Look at Kavanaugh,” July 25]. I am tired of all the fluff coverage given by most media outlets in Vermont on Leahy, Sen. Bernie Sanders and U.S. Rep. Peter Welch. I’d like to see a story on who has the better prescription plan — Sanders or President Donald Trump?! It is pathetic that with such a near lock on reelection year after year after year, Sanders, Welch and Leahy can’t reach across the aisle to work with the loyal opposition instead of just appearing to be the party of “no” and resistance. In Vermont, we deserve better! Robert B. Devost

©2018 Da Capo Publishing Inc. All rights reserved.

JERICHO


WEEK IN REVIEW

TIM NEWCOMB It seems to me that asking everyone who uses an electric-assist vehicle of any sort to prove they are “legally disabled” smacks of the worst sort of ableism. What about all the people who are disabled and have no legal classification? I can only bike if I use an electric assist, and I know that to be so for others. As a community, we do indeed need a sane policy for the bike path. I suspect we need more policing to control poor behavior. We do not need more disabling of already compromised individuals and families. Michael Watson

BURLINGTON

SAGE ADVICE

CLIMATE LEADER CHRISTINE

JUDGING SUZANNE BROWN

Judy Rosenstreich

BURLINGTON

VROOM FOR ALL?

I noted Robert Herendeen’s letter to the editor with mixed feelings [Feedback: “E-Bikes Off the Greenway,” June 20]. I absolutely agree that bikes go too fast on the bike path. As a polio survivor with significant disabilities, I find both the pace and all-too-frequent lapses of civility on the path disturbing and hazardous. That said, I do use an electric-assist bike, as I can pedal for only short distances. I also use an electric mobility scooter, and I use both on the bike path. The late effects of polio can be quite disabling. I prefer the term “disabling” because the term relates to both the impacts of an event — in my case, polio — and the effects of social and political attitudes toward disabilities. In my experience, the most disabling aspect of most illnesses and accidents is the “ableism” of the temporarily abled. Most everyone will experience at least some period of disability in his or her life.

CORRECTIONS

Last week’s news story headlined “Three State’s Attorneys Face Scrutiny Ahead of Tough Primaries” misstated the year Amy Davis finished Vermont Law School. She graduated in 2015. Bay Foley-Cox’s name was misspelled in “A Shelburne Teen Tackles Straws, Artificial Intelligence and College Applications.”

SAY SOMETHING! Seven Days wants to publish your rants and raves. Your feedback must... • be 250 words or fewer; • respond to Seven Days content; • include your full name, town and a daytime phone number. Seven Days reserves the right to edit for accuracy, length and readability. Your submission options include: • sevendaysvt.com/feedback • feedback@sevendaysvt.com • Seven Days, P.O. Box 1164, Burlington, VT 05402-1164

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FEEDBACK 7

Suzanne Brown is my choice for assistant judge of Chittenden County [story in this week’s issue, page 15]. Why? It is because she is so well qualified to sit on the complex cases that come before the family court involving children and families. Brown has practiced family law for more than two decades, giving her

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real knowledge of how the court system works and its impact on families, particularly the kids. On August 14, we will vote for two Democratic candidates for assistant judge. Please give one of your votes to Brown, who will help our judges decide the facts, administer the county budget and work most effectively for Chittenden County families. Brown has decided to give up her law practice and go to work for the good of our community by running for this constitutional office. Please help elect Suzanne Brown on August 14!

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John Walters’ piece on “Green Christine?” [Fair Game, August 1] works hard to make Christine Hallquist’s commitment and commendable experience in tackling climate change look questionable. The fact is, there is no other candidate for statewide office who comes close to her in the practical realities of taking action on climate change. Hallquist has a strong record of delivering on this issue as CEO of Vermont Electric Coop, the state’s second-largest utility. It’s nonsensical to paint her as a representative of utility interests, as Walters implies, when in fact she spent the last decade focused on representing the interests of her co-op’s members. Hallquist is very clear about her motivation on energy issues. She wants to reverse climate change and knows the way to do that: Stop using fossil fuels and increase the use of renewables. She understands firsthand the complexity of the climate puzzle and has a history of effective climate leadership. It’s about time we have a governor who is committed to really fighting climate change.

The challenge of replacing a longtime nonprofit leader is sometimes referred to as “founder’s syndrome.” It’s very tricky, and your article [“Search and Replace: Hiring New Nonprofit Leaders Isn’t Easy,” July 18] presented some great advice. What disappointed me, though, was the paragraph in which Nick Richardson said it’s nice to have same-age counterparts with whom he can discuss the ups and downs of leadership. Did he really say that? As the new leader of Vermont Land Trust, he needs to be aware of ageism and anti-diversity inclinations. Older, more experienced leaders contribute invaluable diversity and wisdom.

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8-11 Thursday-Sunday Lyric Theatre Company

6 Saturday

Annie

Spectrum Dance Theater A Rap on Race

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2-3 Friday-Saturday

11 Thursday

The Capitol Steps

10 Saturday FlynnSpace

Daniel Kahn & Painted Bird 11 Sunday Chase Studio

13 Saturday

Red Kite Green Mountain

David Bowie’s Blackstar

11 Sunday

The Ambient Orchestra featuring Maya Beiser, cello 18 Thursday

Rock of Ages 22 Monday

Spamalot 25 Thursday

Ping Chong + Company Beyond Sacred: Voices of Muslim Identity

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29 Thursday

Something Rotten

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27 Wednesday

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The US Army Field Band & Soldiers’ Chorus

Herbie Hancock 13 Wednesday

Cirque Éloize: Saloon 14 Thursday

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Keigwin + Company Places Please! 14 Friday

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Carnival of Souls 17 Sunday

King Lear 31 Sunday

Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo

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Le Vent du Nord & De Temps Antan

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8/2/18 3:45 PM


contents

LOOKING FORWARD

AUGUST 8-15, 2018 VOL.23 NO.47 24

14

32

38

local, fresh, original since 1978

NEWS 14

Benched? Campaign Cash Issue Roils Probate Judge Race

24

Last Trash Can Standing: Should Vermont’s Huge Landfill Get Bigger?

FEATURES 28

BY MOLLY WALSH

18

Chittenden Sheriff Faces Challenge From His Own Deputy

32

20

Excerpts From Off Message BY SEVEN DAYS STAFF

BY KEN PICARD

35

ARTS NEWS 22

Comics and Medicine Conference Draws Art and Health Care Together

37

BY KYMELYA SARI

Second Act

Theater review: A Doll’s House, Part 2, Weston Playhouse BY ALEX BROWN

38

58

New Kid in Town

Food: Good food, casual feel and communal comfort at Peg & Ter’s in Shelburne

mr. brunelle explains it all deep dark fears this modern world edie everette iona fox red meat jen sorensen harry bliss rachel lives here now free will astrology personals

Cranked Up

Music: Rough Francis’ message is more important than ever BY JORDAN ADAMS

COLUMNS + REVIEWS 12 26 27 39 59 63 66 72 82

FUN STUFF

76 76 76 76 77 77 78 78 78 79 80

CLASSIFIEDS vehicles housing services buy this stuff homeworks music fsbo legals calcoku/sudoku crossword puzzle answers jobs

Fair Game POLITICS Drawn & Paneled ART Hackie CULTURE Side Dishes FOOD Soundbites MUSIC Album Reviews Talking Art Movie Reviews Scarlett Letters SEX

C-2 C-2 C-2 C-3 C-3 C-3 C-4 C-4 C-4 C-5 C-7 C-8

862.6585 www.windjammerrestaurant.com

Chill

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SECTIONS 11 44 55 58 66 72

1076 Williston Road, S. Burlington

The Magnificent 7 Calendar Classes Music Art Movies

8/1/18 1:33 PM

at Quarry Hill

BY SALLY POLLAK

VIDEO SERIES

Online Thursday Deputy versus sheriff in primary PAGE 18

ADULT DAY PASS $10

The most powerful offices in Vermont are up for grabs this year, and voters have barely noticed. Is something broken? BY TAYLOR DOBBS, PAGE 28

~ 2 Swimming Pools ~ Club House Café & Bar ~ Ages 14+ only ~ Poolside 16 oz. Frozen Margaritas $5.95

WHALES’ TALE

PAGE 24

New sculpture for Randolph

PEG & TER-IFFIC!

PAGE 38

A bistro blooms in Shelburne

COVER IMAGE MARC NADEL COVER DESIGN REV. DIANE SULLIVAN

PUNK ATTACK

~ Weekly special 6 oz. Burgers $6.95 PAGE 58

Rough Francis releases new LP

Sign-up for membership at

quarryhillclub.com!

259 Quarry Hill Rd, S. Burlington 8v-quarryhill080818.indd 1

CONTENTS 9

Stuck in Vermont: The Wayside Restaurant, Bakery & Creamery in Montpelier celebrated its 100th anniversary with an ice cream social last Sunday. Hundreds of guests looked through historic photos and marveled at a fireworks display.

includes a Vt. beer or 9 oz. glass of wine

SEVEN DAYS

V E R M O N T ’ S I N D E P E N D E N T V O I C E AUGUST 8-15, 2018 VOL.23 NO.47 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

What Election?

08.08.18-08.15.18

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New Shelburne Craft School Director Aims to Expand Curriculum

Comic Timing

Theater review: See How They Run, Saint Michael’s Playhouse BY ALEX BROWN

BY PAMELA POLSTON

23

Grace Notes

Health: Music therapists help clients learn, heal and reconnect through song

Pop Up the Mountain

Food: In Stowe, Fridays are for fancy guest-chef picnics on the green BY HANNAH PALMER EGAN

What Election?

Politics: The most powerful offices in Vermont are up for grabs this year, and voters have barely noticed. Is something broken? BY TAYLOR DOBBS

BY ALICIA FREESE

42

BY RACHEL ELIZABETH JONES

BY KATIE JICKLING

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COURTESY OF THE FAIRBANKS MUSEUM

LOOKING FORWARD

the

MAGNIFICENT MUST SEE, MUST DO THIS WEEK COMPI L E D BY K RI STEN RAVIN

FRIDAY 10

HEAVENLY BODIES With their hopes set sky-high, Vermont’s celestial admirers attempt to break the Guinness World Record for the largest astronomy lesson on the planet, led by science educator Bobby Farlice-Rubio. Early arrivals at the Saint J Subaru Stargazing Party at St. Johnsbury’s Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium can nosh on food-truck fare and conduct out-of-this-world experiments. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 49

SUNDAY 12

Purposeful Poses Burlington-area yogis strike a pose in an unconventional setting for Yoga on Church Street. Led by Sukha Yoga’s Cilla and Noah Weisman, this open-air stretching session on the Church Street Marketplace supports HOPE Works, a nonprofit dedicated to ending sexual violence. Raffle prizes, goody bags and free samples reward the first 500 participants. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 52

FRIDAY 10 & SATURDAY 11

Community Spirit Local pride reaches new heights as the Danville Community Fair draws friends and neighbors to the village green on Friday for rock-and-roll music by eXit-23 and an outdoor dance set to the sounds of Side Show. The revelry continues on Saturday with a parade, horse pulls, tasty eats and live entertainment. Let’s party! SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 49

FRIDAY 10-SUNDAY 12

Slow Ride Auto aficionados: It’s time to rev your engines and cruise to the Vermont Antique and Classic Car Meet. Vehicles from decades past park it on Farr’s Field in Waterbury for an annual exhibition featuring automobile judging, a vintage fashion contest and a flea market. Folks can motor into Waterbury Village for a parade and a street dance during this multiday meet-up. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 49

Meaningful Music

SATURDAY 11

SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 52

SEE STORY ON PAGE 58

ONGOING

Straight and Narrow “Line and structure underpin all of my work,” writes Burlington artist Scott André Campbell on his website. This statement rings true in “Deliveries,” his exhibition of two-dimensional mixed-media works at Burlington’s Karma Bird House. In it, the contemporary creative uses drawing and screenprinted components to evoke a sense of harmony in tension. SEE INTERVIEW ON PAGE 66

MAGNIFICENT SEVEN 11

Rough Francis celebrate the release of their long-awaited third album, MSP3: Counter Attack, with a party at Higher Ground in South Burlington. Warning: It will be loud. Led by brothers Bobby, Julian and Urian Hackney, the garage-rock group isn’t afraid to get rowdy in its punk-infused performances. Cave Bees and Jessica Rabbit Syndrome open.

SEVEN DAYS

COURTESY OF ROUGH FRANCIS

High Volume

08.08.18-08.15.18

In 2011, local performer Carol Ann Jones began singing at an assisted living facility in St. Albans. Throughout this experience, she kept a journal, recording stories and favorites songs of people she sang to near the end of their lives. These writings are the foundation of Jones’ tuneful one-woman show, The Power of Music: Twelve Souls in Song.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

SATURDAY 11


FAIR GAME

congrats to all the daysie winners!

OPEN SEASON ON VERMONT POLITICS BY JOHN WALTERS

Mortgage anyone???

R

Climate Redaction

oughly one year ago, with much fanfare, Gov. PHIL SCOTT created the Vermont Climate Action Commission, whose charge was to produce recommendations for fighting climate change in Vermont. The commission was greeted with a fair bit of skepticism, partly because Scott’s environmental track record is heavy on delay and incrementalism, and partly because he strongly opposes any measures that would add costs to the economy, especially taxes and government-imposed limits on greenhouse gas emissions. Oh, and did I mention that the 21-member panel was heavy on business Senior Mortgage Loan Originator NMLS: 103643 and administration figures and included only one environmental advocate? That didn’t seem promising. Well, the commission completed its work on schedule at the end of July and released its final report, which was 30 Kimball Avenue, Suite 200 lengthy and amorphous. There was no South Burlington, VT real summary, and there were no key ublocal.com • 802.652.2985 points — just a list of 53 separate, unranked recommendations. Some were highly specific, such as No. 31: “Maintain 8v-unionbankkellyd080818.indd 1 8/6/18 12:13 PM large forest blocks by implementing the Act 171 Intergenerational Transfer Report recommendations.” Some were perplexingly broad, such as No. 43: “Create an electric regulatory environment that promotes cost-effective innovation.” For commission chair and Deputy Secretary of Natural Resources PETER WALKE, the report’s complexity is simply a reflection of reality. “There is no silver bullet,” he said. The commission’s final deliberations were heavily influenced by some bad news on greenhouse gas emissions. In late Take a round-trip train ride through June, the state Department of Environthe beautiful Champlain Valley on mental Conservation reported that Verour historic dinner train. Savor mont’s emissions had risen substantially delicious dishes and specialty between 2011 and 2015, ending the period seasonal cocktails. Departs at 16 percent above 1990 levels. Vermont Burlington on Friday and Saturday has a legally established goal of reducing evenings until September 1st. greenhouse gas emissions to 50 percent of For more information and 1990 levels by the year 2028. reservations visit our website: The increase added fresh urgency to the commission’s work. “The question www.trainridesvt.com was, do we identify recommendations that will get us [to that goal]?” said JARED DUVAL, commission member and executive director of Energy Action Network, a nonprofit that includes businesses and public and private organizations interested in promoting renewable energy. “We decided we could only do so through means that many members didn’t favor, like an CLASSIC DINNER TRAIN emissions cap.”

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12 FAIR GAME

SEVEN DAYS

08.08.18-08.15.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

KELLY A. DEFORGE

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At the commission’s July 12 meeting, its sole environmental advocate, JOHANNA MILLER of the Vermont Natural Resources Council, proposed an addition to the final report recommending that an emissions cap be imposed in the year 2021 “unless there is significant progress in GHG reductions over the next three years.” That would have been a no-go for the governor, and commissioners voted it down, with seven in favor and 11 against. The commission then adopted a watereddown version suggesting “additional wide scale measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions” if Vermont fails to reduce emissions, without mentioning 2021 or any other year.

THE DELAY HAS ADDED TO SKEPTICISM AROUND SCOTT’S COMMITMENT TO FIGHTING CLIMATE CHANGE. The rollout of the report did nothing to assuage concerns about Scott’s commitment. The commission had planned to present its findings to the governor and the public on Tuesday, July 31. But the event was canceled with less than a day’s notice for an almost unbelievable reason: Officials had failed to properly warn the meeting as required by law. “It was an oversight on my part,” said Walke. He believed that the panel had formally completed its work at its last regular meeting on July 12 and essentially didn’t exist. For the session at the end of July, he explained, “I had assumed we would simply be a group of former commission members coming together to present our report.” That assumption was unfounded. On Monday morning, officials realized that most of the commissioners planned to attend. That meant it would be a public meeting subject to the legal requirement of at least 24 hours’ public notice. “Our feeling was that we should do it right and give the public and interest groups a chance to participate,” said JASON GIBBS, the governor’s chief of staff, explaining the decision to cancel and reschedule the rollout. That may be true. But it was a bad look for the administration. The sudden

POLITICS cancelation seemed like an effort to bury the commission’s report. And the following day at Scott’s weekly press conference, he professed to be unfamiliar with the panel’s conclusions. His lack of preparedness added to the perception that the commission was getting the brush-off. Gibbs insists that wasn’t the case. The meeting has, in fact, been rescheduled for August 20. But the delay has added to skepticism around Scott’s commitment to fighting climate change. Miller, Duval and others remain hopeful that the commission’s report will be the first stage in a more ambitious effort to fight climate change. Hopeful, but unconvinced. “The big question is, ‘What is the governor willing to act on?’” Miller said. “I hope he will do something substantial, but I highly doubt it.”

A Legislative Top Nine The Democratic race for governor has been distinctly underwhelming, with candidates struggling to raise money and failing to raise awareness among voters (See story, page 28.) The winner next Tuesday should enjoy a postprimary bounce, but it’s very late in the game for a relative unknown to break through and seriously challenge Scott. Given that reality, Democrats have turned their organizational attention toward the legislature — and particularly the House, where the Dems need to pick up seven to 10 seats (depending on who’s doing the numbers) to gain a veto-proof supermajority. That would completely change the balance of power, even if Scott wins reelection. And the Dems have done far better than the Republicans in candidate recruitment. That strength is apparent in a list of the most competitive primary races around the state; nearly all of them are Democratic contests featuring an oversupply of qualified, credible candidates. Here are my top nine legislative primaries to watch: RUTLAND COUNTY SENATE: Newcomers sense opportunity in the three-seat district because longtime Sen. PEG FLORY (R-Rutland) is retiring and Sen. DAVID SOUCY (R-Rutland) is in his first campaign after being appointed to the Senate last year. Sen. BRIAN COLLAMORE (R-Rutland) is seeking his third term in office. Three challengers face Soucy and Collamore for three nominations, including former state representative JAMES MCNEIL, former


GOT A TIP FOR JOHN? JOHNWALTERS@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

any combination of the four would be capable of sweeping the district in November. Baser’s running mate is VALERIE MULLIN, who lost bids for the House in 2014 and 2016. VERMONT

HOUSE,

WASHINGTON-1:

This two-seat district is usually Republican territory. Rep. PATTI LEWIS (RBerlin) is retiring; Rep. ANNE DONAHUE (R-Northfield) is running for another term. There are four Democrats in the primary: Norwich University computer science associate professor JEREMY HANSEN, retired college administrator DENISE MACMARTIN, retired Norwich engineering prof JOHN STEVENS and prisoner advocate GORDON BOCK. The Dems see Donahue as essentially unbeatable but hope to pick up Lewis’ seat. VERMONT HOUSE, WASHINGTON-3: The two incumbents, Rep. TOMMY WALZ (DBarre City) and Rep. PAUL POIRIER (I-Barre City), are both running for reelection. Two Democrats are on the primary ballot along with Walz: former Barre mayor PETER ANTHONY and onetime Barre City Council candidate PAUL FLINT. This is the first time since Poirier switched from Democrat to independent in 2008 that the Dems will directly challenge him. Poirier used to be a stalwart of the Democratic caucus, having chaired multiple committees and served in leadership posts. The presence of Anthony and Flint appear to signal a growing distance between Poirier and the Dems. VERMONT

HOUSE,

RE-ELECT SHERIFF MCLAUGHLIN PROVEN LEADERSHIP, TRUSTED EXPERIENCE ATTORNEY GENERAL T.J. DONOVAN says, “Sheriff Kevin McLaughlin has been a proven leader for over 32 years. He has worked hard with other Chittenden County law enforcement agencies to promote public safety and I support him.”

VOTE AUGUST 14 in the Democratic Primary! ENDORSEMENTS Attorney General T.J. Donovan • Sen. Dick Mazza • Sen. Ginny Lyons • Sen. Phil Baruth Rep. Joey Donovan • Rep. Terry Macaig • Rep. James Condon • Rep. Jean O’Sullivan Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger • Burlington City Counselors: Chip Mason, Karen Paul Former Colchester Town Clerk: Karen Richard • Burlington Firefighters Association, Local 3044 • Former Democratic State Chair: Jake Perkinson • Selene Hofer-Shall • Kate Lapp Kesha Ram • County Democratic Committee Members: Bob Hooper, Theresa Lefebvre, Andrew Champagne • Lance McKee • Norm Blais • Brooks McArthur • Nan Patrick Sam Jackson • Joe McNeil • Jack Kell • Allison Crowley Demag • Maurice Mahoney Bill Keough • Thomas Torti • Joe Gamache • Petie Shea • Colin McNeil • Deirdre Maley John Barrows • Maureen O’Brien • Maureen McNeil • Mark Saba • Margaret McNeil John Leddy • Louise Thabault • Sid Harmon • Karen Lynch • Lainey Rappaport Joe Finnegan • Debbie O’Brien • Katharine Montstream and many more! Paid for by McLaughlin for Sheriff. PO Box 625, Burlington, VT 05402. To learn about Sheriff McLaughlin’s accomplishments and leadership, please visit https://www.facebook.com/mclaughlinforsheriff/ Untitled-26 1

BENNINGTON-3:

Incumbent Rep. ALICE MILLER (D-Shaftsbury) is retiring after 11 terms, and two Democrats are vying to replace her: DAVID DURFEE, manager of a food co-op and a member of the Shaftsbury and Mount Anthony Union school boards, and TIM SCOGGINS, retired geophysicist and chair of the Shaftsbury Selectboard. House Democrats would be pleased with either candidate, and there is no Republican on the ballot.

In the

GARDEN

08.08.18-08.15.18

March 17– August 26, 2018

Media Note

SEVEN DAYS

shelburnemuseum.org In the Garden is sponsored in part by the MARIE AND JOHN ZIMMERMANN FUND, the Oakland Foundation, and Donna and Marvin Schwartz.

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FAIR GAME 13

The Valley News, the Lebanon, N.H.based daily serving the Upper Valley of Vermont and New Hampshire, is losing one of its most experienced hands. Chief editor MARTIN FRANK has decided to retire early next year, after more than three decades at the paper. He spent much of that time as editorial page editor and has also served as news editor. Retirement will provide a slower pace and fewer deadlines. “I’ve always enjoyed working, and I’ve always enjoyed not working, too,” he said, and then reeled off a formidable list of “not-working” pursuits: “backcountry skiing, bird-watching, hunting mushrooms, reading, gardening, cooking and playing poker.” m

8/7/18 10:31 AM

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Rutland alderman ED LARSON and former Poultney Selectboard member TERRY WILLIAMS. The Dems didn’t field any candidates, perhaps missing an opportunity in a district that Democrat BILL CARRIS represented as recently as six years ago. WASHINGTON COUNTY SENATE: As I wrote in my July 25 column, three Democratic nominations are up for grabs in central Vermont, and six credible candidates are in the race. They include incumbent Sens. ANN CUMMINGS (D-Washington) and ANTHONY POLLINA (P/D-Washington), and challengers ASHLEY HILL, ANDREW PERCHLIK, ANDREW BREWER and THEO KENNEDY. Cummings and Pollina are likely to win, and the Dems would be happy with any one of the others. VERMONT HOUSE, WINDHAM-2-1: Democrats have a rare intraparty challenge to a sitting lawmaker in southern Vermont. Four-term Rep. VALERIE STUART (DBrattleboro) has a Democratic opponent for the first time since she took office. EMILIE KORNHEISER, director of workforce development at Youth Services, Inc., has mounted an energetic campaign and, as of July 15, had outraised Stuart by more than 3-to-1. Stuart professes confidence, but it’s highly unusual for a challenger to gain so much traction. VERMONT HOUSE, WINDHAM-4: This is a solidly Democratic, two-seat district just north of Brattleboro. Rep. DAVID DEEN (D-Westminster) is retiring. Rep. MIKE MROWICKI (D-Putney) is seeking reelection. And two other Dems are in the race: NADER HASHIM, a state trooper, and CINDY JEROME, former head of the Holton Home and Bradley House senior residences in Brattleboro. She’s faced some bad publicity over allegations that residents of the Holton Home were improperly solicited for donations. Jerome has denied any wrongdoing. VERMONT HOUSE, WINDSOR-1: In a two-seat district in the Upper Valley, Reps. PAUL BELASKI (D-Windsor) and JOHN BARTHOLOMEW (D-Hartland) are being challenged by ZACHARIAH RALPH, program coordinator for Sustainable Woodstock. Ralph is progressive on most issues but opposes the gun restrictions that became law this year. VERMONT HOUSE, ADDISON-4: A twoseat district represented by Rep. DAVE SHARPE (D-Bristol), who is not seeking reelection, and Rep. FRED BASER (R-Bristol), who is. Four candidates are seeking the two Democratic nominations: registered nurse and progressive activist MARI CORDES, health care policy consultant PAUL FORLENZA, contractor ROB DEMIC (who earned the nickname “Miracle Man” after surviving a 40-foot fall in 2008), and CALEB ELDER, solar project developer and bluegrass musician. House Dems believe

3/5/18 10:55 AM


LOCALmatters

Benched? Campaign Cash Issue Roils Probate Judge Race

ELECTIONS

B Y KATI E JI CK LI N G

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 08.08.18-08.15.18 SEVEN DAYS 14 LOCAL MATTERS

ROB DONNELLY

D

emocratic voters in Chittenden County will vote in a rare contested primary for probate judge on August 14: Incumbent Gregory Glennon faces a challenge by lawyer and former Winooski mayor Bill Norful. Glennon is not taking the opposition lightly. By the July 15 campaign finance reporting deadline, he had raised $7,500 from 76 donors. That’s more money than reported by any of the 16 other probate judge candidates in counties across the state. Glennon is also the only one of the bunch who reported receiving cash from attorneys whose cases he will decide — an issue that sparked a testy exchange with his opponent during a televised forum last week. At stake is a four-year term as the county’s $125,000-a-year probate judge, handling adoptions, estates and wills, name changes, and guardianships. There is no declared Republican candidate, but the county GOP committee can nominate someone after the primary. Glennon’s fundraising and the fact that he has an opponent are both unusual, according to Dan Richardson, a Montpelier attorney and former president of the Vermont Bar Association. Most candidates self-fund or don’t spend any money at all. Richardson said he’s never known an incumbent probate judge to face an opponent. “I don’t think many people go to the polls because of a big interest in a probate judge race,” he said. Certainly not in the last two decades in Chittenden County. Susan Fowler, Glennon’s predecessor, was elected in 1994 and ran uncontested in six elections over 22 years. When she retired in 2016, midway through her term, then-governor Peter Shumlin appointed Glennon, who was general counsel to the state Agency of Education. The judge is married to the sister of Vermont Attorney General T.J. Donovan, who said he advocated for Glennon’s appointment. As candidates for a judgeship, Glennon and Norful are subject to a stricter set of campaign rules than contenders for legislative or executive office. Judges cannot “personally solicit publicly stated support” or donations, according to the state’s judicial code

of conduct. Instead, candidates must create a committee to do it for them. Contributions are capped at $150 per person. Glennon said his committee asks for money and authorizes all expenditures. A number of donations have come from lawyers who have cases in Glennon’s court. For example, Norm Blais, a $150 donor and head of Glennon’s campaign committee, is scheduled to appear in Chittenden Probate Court three times this month. The act of electing judges “inherently creates a situation that’s somewhat awkward,” Blais acknowledged, but added, “The Vermont Supreme Court has set out a pretty distinct set of rules, and I know we’re following it.” Mark Langan, of the firm Dinse, gave $150; he appears in Glennon’s courtroom about once a month, he said. He gave after receiving a mailing from Glennon’s committee. The judge “does a good job,” Langan said, adding that he isn’t familiar with Norful.

Langan said he read the ethics rules before donating and decided he was in the clear. “It’s too small an amount” to affect Glennon’s impartiality, he said. Jeff Wick, a partner at Wick & Maddocks, gave $150; in September he will represent a client in an estate case before Glennon. Wick wrote in an email to Seven Days that he does a “fair amount of probate work.” “In my experience, Judge Glennon runs the probate court efficiently and competently, and he treats all who appear before him with respect and dignity,” he continued. Asked whether such a donation could constitute a conflict of interest, Wick suggested that Seven Days was engaging in “gotcha journalism.” “It is very well established that lawyers may make campaign contributions to candidates for the office of probate judge, even if the giving attorney is a probate lawyer,” he said. Attorney Ben Luna and the law firm Unsworth LaPlante, where Stephen

Unsworth is a partner, also donated to Glennon. Luna and Unsworth had argued cases in his court within the last six months. Glennon emphasized that he played no role in deciding whom to ask for money and that supporters are limited to small donations. He noted that he is required to announce in court whether an attorney involved in a case before him has donated to his campaign. In a contested hearing, which is rare, a lawyer can request that a different judge preside. “Believe me, I’m not for sale,” Glennon said. It’s not just corruption but the appearance of corruption that’s at stake, said Peter Teachout, a professor of constitutional law at Vermont Law School. “It gives me a little pause; it certainly does,” he said. “The minute you start to allow contributions in an election campaign, you have to worry about … influence.” Judges who raise money from lawyers who appear before them can


GOT A NEWS TIP? NEWS@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

“undermine the independence of the courts,” said Stephen Spaulding, an attorney with Common Cause, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit that works to improve government accountability and ethics. “Vermont has very low contribution limits to curb corruption and the appearance of corruption,” he acknowledged, but said he advocates for public financing of elections. A $150 donation may not buy influence, Spaulding said, but “it’s fair, I think, for people to question that it could.” One of Glennon’s $150 donations came from Jessica McCloud, Donovan’s wife. And though the Vermont attorney

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general himself didn’t donate any money, Donovan is an unabashed supporter of his brother-in-law. “We have a sign in our front yard,” he said. “Bill Norful’s a friend of mine, but Greg’s family.” Glennon said he hasn’t taken advantage of his relationship with Vermont’s most powerful lawyer on the campaign trail. “I’m standing on my own two feet, working as hard as I can to meet as many people as possible,” he said. Norful, who practices family, criminal and probate law, declined to comment in an interview on Glennon’s fundraising but took his opponent to task in a Channel 17 debate last week. BENCHED?

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Compared to her previous two campaigns, in 2010 and 2014, “This one’s just so crazy,” Ramsey said. “Usually it’s low-key.” Delaney touted his success at keeping county spending in check. He and Ramsey balanced the budget by renting out the parking spaces behind the courthouse after hours, Delaney said. “We’re trying to hold the line” on taxes, he noted. Under the fluorescent lights at a neighborhood planning assembly in Burlington’s New North End in late July, the candidates all pitched themselves as uniquely qualified for the position. Delaney, who was trained as a mason, contended that he’s the right man for the job because of his work advocating for Abenaki rights on the Vermont Commission on Native American Affairs. Ramsey described herself as a woman of the people: She’s an eighth-generation Vermonter who has raised two kids and started a business in Burlington. York touted his work as a court administrator, working primarily in the building where, if elected, he’d sit on the bench. Brown did not attend, but she has run her own family law practice for 30 years, she told Seven Days later. Ramsey has contributed $1,500 to her own reelection effort. York has contributed his own money and received donations from his fiancée and Burlington City Councilor Jane Knodell (P-Central District). He’s raised about $2,100, according to the July 15 campaign finance filings. Delaney and Brown did not file campaign reports, but both said they accepted no outside contributions. York made no apologies for his battalion of yard signs. Being a side judge is “such a great opportunity, I’d hate to not give it my all,” he said.

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If the proliferation of yard signs decided political races, Zachary York would be a shoo-in for one of Chittenden County’s two assistant judge — or side judge — positions. The 25-year-old Burlington resident and court clerk bought 300 signs and has lined them up by the dozens along busy roads. That’s set off incumbent Connie Cain Ramsey, who has grown irritated with what she sees as York’s excessive signage. “I put up one poster. He puts five around it. It’s ridiculous,” she fumed. York and Suzanne Brown of South Burlington are challenging Ramsey and her fellow incumbent, Charles Delaney, for the Democratic NG nomination for side LI judge on August 14. Delaney and York already received the Progressive nomination from the party’s county committee, so even if they lose in the Democratic primary they will appear on the November ballot. No Republicans have announced a challenge. Side judges are elected to help a primary judge sort through the facts in family and civil cases. They also act as county administrators, preparing the $1.2 million county budget as well as overseeing the county courthouse and other county property. They serve four-year terms and are paid $22,000 a year plus $20 per hour for the time they’re in court. The contenders’ first job, they said, has been to introduce themselves to an electorate largely ignorant of what side judges do. More than campaigning, it’s been an “educational tour,” York said. Brown put it more bluntly. “Most Vermonters have no idea about assistant judge and probate judge,” she said. Brown is the only one of the contenders who has a law degree. Ramsey and Delaney said they are taking their challengers seriously.


LOCALmatters

Last Trash Can Standing: Should Vermont’s Huge Landfill Get Bigger? S T O RY & PHO TO S BY MOLLY WAL SH

16 LOCAL MATTERS

SEVEN DAYS

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rom a distance, the mounds of land east of Route 5 in Coventry resemble one more set of rolling hills in Vermont’s mountainous Northeast Kingdom. But locals know that this topography is man-made. “That was flat land at one time,” Chris Jacobs said as he gazed at Vermont’s only operating landfill last week. “Now it’s a mountain of trash.” The white-bearded Northeast Kingdom resident isn’t happy about it, but the massive dump near the Canadian border could soon grow bigger — if state regulators approve it, that is. The landfill’s owner, Casella Waste Systems, has proposed a 51-acre expansion that would allow it to stay open for another 22 years — and take in an additional 11 million tons of trash. The company has applied for a new solid waste certificate from the state Agency of Natural Resources. That permit is necessary before a broader review can be completed under Act 250, the state’s land use law. In the meantime, debate is ramping up. Last month, a dozen Northeast Kingdom opponents of the expansion, including Jacobs, founded DUMP — an acronym for Don’t Undermine Memphremagog’s Purity — a reference to the scenic lake just across the road from the landfill. And a powerful coalition of advocacy groups, including the Conservation Law Foundation and the Vermont Public Interest Research Group, submitted a joint letter on July 20 urging ANR to reject the expansion. Critics fear that polluted water will leak from the landfill into groundwater and Lake Memphremagog, which straddles the U.S.-Canadian border and supplies drinking water to thousands of people in Québec. The southern tip of the lake is within 1,000 feet of the landfill property. Earlier this summer, Québec politicians jumped into the fray to voice concern, which heartened Vermont critics. Without a new permit, the landfill will probably run out of space and be forced to close in four years. Vermont’s haulers would have to truck waste to other states — and would likely pass on higher fuel costs to customers. The situation is partly of Vermont’s own making. State officials successfully pushed to close the hundreds of small, oozing, unlined town dumps across

Coventry landfill

Trucks leaving Coventry landfill

Landfill general manager Jeremy Labbe (left) speaking with Chris Jacobs

Vermont in the 1980s and 1990s. The second part of a state plan, articulated under Act 78, was to encourage the creation of regional landfills with proper environmental controls. That program flopped. A network of transfer stations was created for trash, recycling and, eventually, composting. But the materials are ultimately trucked elsewhere, with most of the trash going to Coventry. High costs and loud public opposition killed various proposals for new landfills, including one in Williston. Environmental groups increasingly agree that adding trash capacity thwarts efforts to become a “zero waste” society. So Vermont wound up with one big landfill. “They say nobody else wants to have a dump,” Jacobs harrumphed. “Well, we don’t want a dump in our backyard, either.” The Albany resident is not the only one who resents that the Northeast Kingdom has become the state’s trash

can. “It’s just out of sight, out of mind,” Rep. Vicki Strong (R-Albany), said about the region. “A lot of times, we don’t get a voice in something until it’s done.” DUMP wants more stringent weight limits on trucks traveling to and from the landfill, better odor control and a pause on any expansion. Supporters of a bigger landfill say it’s the best solution for Vermont’s rubbish problem. Officials at Casella, the Rutland-based company that started with one garbage truck in 1975 and now brings in annual revenues of $600 million, point out that trash has to go somewhere. “Everyone wants you to pick it up on Tuesday morning or Wednesday morning, but nobody wants you to put it down anywhere,” observed Jeremy Labbe, general manager of the Coventry landfill, during an interview on the grounds. As he spoke, trucks full of trash, construction debris and contaminated soil pulled into the entrance of the 627-acre property. The semis groaned as they

labored up the site’s winding roads to empty their loads onto what some locals have dubbed Mount Casella. Last year, Casella accepted 600,000 tons of waste in Coventry. Roughly 70 percent of it was from Vermont. The landfill does not accept municipal waste from outside the state, but it does take construction and demolition debris, contaminated soil, and wastewater treatment sludge. Casella charges higher disposal fees for out-of-state trash. Each day’s deposits are covered with dirt, sometimes the same contaminated soil that trucks pay to unload. All but a closed 11-acre section of the landfill that predates Casella’s ownership is lined with heavy layers of plastic. Grass covers large, filled-up sections of the Mount Casella range — composed of at least five mini-mountains. But whatever the cover, snow, rain and waste decomposition generate large amounts of liquid known as leachate, or, as some refer to it, garbage coffee — liquid that has seeped through trash and picked up harmful chemicals on the way. Casella collects the leachate with wells and pipes built into the sprawling mounds and trucks it to sewage treatment plants, including one in Newport. The company estimates that the expansion could generate an additional 7 million gallons a year. That increases the risk of problems, including leaks into groundwater from plastic liners that invariably deteriorate, according to opponents. They say Casella has already failed to address the presence of arsenic and other substances in leachate near the old, unlined sections of the landfill. They worry about additional leachate containing a host of potentially harmful toxins from items allowed at the dump: flame-retardants in cellphones and computers, non-friable asbestos, and nonstick pans. They further point out that banned items can wind up in the dump anyway, including leadbased batteries and light bulbs containing mercury. Tests have not detected any contaminants beyond the landfill property line, according to Jeff Bourdeau, waste management specialist at ANR. “At this point, we’ve no evidence of any pollution off-site,” he said. Casella officials echo that. “Leachate from the landfill is not going to make


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LOCAL MATTERS 17

it into the lake,” vice president Joe “I believe they’ve been a very good Fusco said. “There are redundant liner neighbor not just to Coventry but to systems — test wells that would catch the whole area,” said Rep. Michael any kind of leak, so to speak, from the Marcotte (R-Coventry), who is chair landfill well in advance of any kind of of the Coventry Selectboard. “They environmental damage.” employ a significant number of people In the July 20 letter to ANR, CLF there at good wages.” and five other environmental groups The landfill is a much more socontend that Casella phisticated operation has not sufficiently than it was back in addressed concerns the 1980s, Marcotte about leachate. The recalled. Back then, a groups say Vermont Coventry businessman should pursue agnamed Charlie Nadeau gressive recycling and composting pro- owned the relatively small dump and grams, not a landfill expansion. ran stock-car races nearby. Québec The groups also suggest that the pay- investors purchased the landfill, then ments Casella makes to the host com- sold it to Casella in the mid-’90s. munity, Coventry — $779,000 last year While the members of DUMP — will ultimately not cover the legacy of want landfills to be opened elsewhere pollution. in Vermont to take the pressure off The Northeast is facing a landfill Coventry, environmentalists such as the capacity shortage, and the state should CLF’s Pecci say that’s a bad idea. Even “ensure that Coventry does not become Casella VP Fusco says Vermont doesn’t a dumping ground for the rest of New need a new landfill. England,” the letter reads. “The facility in Coventry It’s from Kirstie L. is a crucial and important Pecci, director of the Zero part of Vermont’s waste Waste Project at CLF, and management infrastrucwas signed by the Vermont ture,” Fusco said, “and it Natural Resources Council, has the capacity to serve the VPIRG, the Toxics Action state of Vermont for at least Center, Clean Water Action a few more decades.” REP. MIC HAEL and Vermont Conservation Sen. John Rodgers MARCOT T E Voters. The Coventry (D-Essex/Orleans) has deep proposal is “so clearly concerns about the expandangerous and so clearly sion, citing worries about an antiquated and irresponsible idea” the lake. “I don’t think any of us are exthat it was “easy to wrangle a coalition cited about the potential for that landfill together in short order,” Pecci said. growing,” said Rodgers, who is running Despite precautions, dumps pollute, as a write-in candidate for governor. and even sewage plants often can’t Gov. Phil Scott deferred comment to properly treat landfill leachate, so the his chief of staff, Jason Gibbs, who said Coventry proposal would be a step his boss did not want to prejudge the backward, Pecci said. She noted that state review and would not take a stand Casella has lost several recent landfill now. expansion battles, including one in ANR is expected to take months to Southbridge, Mass., and another in consider public input, so the landfill’s Bethlehem, N.H. future won’t be decided quickly. And if The hubbub over the Vermont ex- the agency says yes to the expansion, the pansion has landed Coventry, popula- District 7 Environmental Commission tion 1,048, back in state headlines. It’s in St. Johnsbury would still need to probably the biggest story there since finish its Act 250 review, which could Phish played in a field next to the local have more potential hurdles. airport in 2004, attracting 65,000 fans. Meanwhile, last Thursday ANR The small town outside Newport has ordered Casella to collect additional few businesses, and the village center groundwater monitoring data at six looked tired last week. The burned husk test wells near the landfill. Cathy of a vacant house occupied one lot, and Jamieson, ANR solid waste program the windows were boarded up at the manager, said the order was in regraceful old church on the green. In a sponse to public comments that state community where household income is groundwater protections are not 35 percent lower than the state average, being met at the landfill now. The even a landfill has fans. Coventry has results likely won’t be in before midno zoning, so the expansion does not September. m require local approval. But town leaders Contact: molly@sevendaysvt.com are supportive.


LOCALmatters

Chittenden Sheriff Faces Challenge From His Own Deputy

ELECTIONS

B Y ALI CI A FR EESE

08.08.18-08.15.18 SEVEN DAYS 18 LOCAL MATTERS

spends most of his days shuttling prisoners to and from court. McLaughlin said he took this step to “eliminate any conflict of interest.” Asked what kind of conflict, the sheriff offered a hypothetical: An officer running for his boss’ job might turn down requests for the sheriff department’s services in an effort to spread discontent with the current sheriff. “If I’m running against [an incumbent sheriff ], and I have the ability to make [that person]

began shuttling prisoners around the state for court appearances and other purposes. Another photo on his office wall shows McLaughlin, then 28, graduating from the FBI Academy in Quantico, Va. He’s with his dad, also an academy alum, and William Webster, director of the FBI at the time. The younger McLaughlin put his skills to use when his father’s successor, Duell, lent him for a year to a federal drug task force. ALICIA FREESE

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K

evin McLaughlin was 34 and second-in-command at the Chittenden County Sheriff’s Department in 1986, the year he ran against his boss to become the next sheriff. McLaughlin made a case for professionalizing the county police force, whose three full-time employees sometimes had to use their own cars to transport prisoners: “I said, ‘We need to turn this into a business of some kind.’” Sheriff Ronald Duell, who’d held the job for a decade, promptly fired his challenger, but the young lieutenant beat him anyway. Now 66 years old and the longestserving sheriff in county history, McLaughlin is facing a primary challenge from a man who until recently was his second-in-command. Michael Major said he wants to expand and reinvigorate the department. “Right now, it seems we’re in a regression mode,” said Major, who has called for more full-time deputies and longer-term police contracts. Major, 52, isn’t exactly a newcomer; he’s worked in the department for 34 years. But he’s been eyeing McLaughlin’s seat for more than a decade. “Everybody knows that I want to be the sheriff,” said the soft-spoken Shelburne resident. While he acknowledged that it’s been uncomfortable to take on his own boss, “I don’t want to be running when I’m 70,” he said. Major’s message to McLaughlin: “You’ve had more than enough time to make your mark.” Vermont’s 14 sheriffs are elected to four-year terms, and state law doesn’t limit how long they may serve. Chittenden’s is one of five contested sheriff primaries on August 14; Addison, Bennington, Caledonia and Orleans have races, too. But Major is the only candidate mounting a challenge from within. It’s a risky move on his part and one he’s already paying for. When Major came back from a vacation in early July, McLaughlin told him he’d been “temporarily demoted” from captain to become one of approximately a dozen deputies. “After 22 years of being the No. 2 man, I’m now the No. 0 man,” Major said. Before the demotion, he oversaw the department schedule, assigning deputies to perform various duties. Now he takes orders from a lieutenant and

Sheriff Kevin McLaughlin

look bad, what’s to stop me from doing that?” McLaughlin asked. Walking through the cage-like door into the sheriff’s South Burlington office is a bit like stepping back in time; McLaughlin’s Dell laptop and printer are the only items that indicate it’s no longer 1987. Framed black-andwhite photos on the wall document McLaughlin’s long history with the department. One shows his father, Earle, who was sheriff of Chittenden County for 22 years and ran the county jailhouse at 220 Main Street in Burlington. McLaughlin and his 10 siblings grew up there, helping their mother cook meals and do laundry for the inmates, until it shut down in 1969. McLaughlin, who has associate’s degrees in accounting and law enforcement from Champlain College, went to work for his father in 1973. By then, regional correctional facilities had replaced the county jails, and instead of presiding over the jailhouse, sheriffs

When he returned, McLaughlin ousted Duell, whom he says mismanaged the finances. The young cop set out to modernize the department, creating a formal payroll system, hiring more fulltime deputies and purchasing muchneeded equipment. Today, he has 21 full-time employees, 10 part-timers and a fleet of 25 cars. Each sheriff’s office in Vermont gets an annual appropriation from the state. Chittenden County receives approximately $700,000 for sheriffs and their deputies to transport prisoners, mental health patients and juveniles in state custody, as well as to deliver legal paperwork, including subpoenas, divorce papers, eviction notices and restraining orders. McLaughlin estimated that the Chittenden department serves papers to between 4,000 and 6,000 people a year. His base salary of roughly $85,000 comes from those state funds. Another $300,000 of the Chittenden County Sheriff’s Department budget

comes from the county. Jericho, Westford and Underhill — all towns without local police departments — contract with McLaughlin for law enforcement services. Public and private entities also hire sheriffs to direct traffic during construction projects and to serve as security officers at concerts, proms and other events. These gigs generate more income for the department, as well as an additional $10,000 to $40,000 a year for McLaughlin.  Major wants to grow that supplemental business. If elected, he said, he’d seek out more such contracts, particularly year-round ones. For example, the Chittenden sheriff currently provides one officer to serve as a school resource officer at Mount Mansfield Union High School for $52,500 per year. “I’d like to see an SRO at every school,” Major said. If a school shooter were to show up, that person would be “the first line of defense,” Major said. He said that extra income would bring greater financial stability to the department. A state-mandated audit, which excludes some state and county funding, shows that the department brought in $1.4 million in revenue last year, but with nearly $1.7 million in expenses, it fell short by about $270,000. The department has $1.7 million in assets, according to the audit. McLaughlin defended his department’s size —  and its balance sheet. “Bottom line is, we’re fiscally sound,” he said. “We have never gone into financial crisis here since I’ve been sheriff, nor will we as long as I’m sheriff.” Taking on new business would require new hires. In fact, Major believes the office is already understaffed, in part because his boss isn’t doing enough to find recruits. “I think the last time we actually put an ad in the paper was maybe eight years ago,” Major said. He wants to hire another eight to 10 people and said he’d start seeking candidates at job fairs. “We’re down about 2.5 positions, but we can still meet all our needs,” said McLaughlin, adding that “We’ve put ads in the paper in the past and hardly gotten anything back.” He contended that hiring is a challenge for many police departments, a problem he attributes to animosity toward police officers nationwide and younger generations being less willing to work nights and weekends.


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“I know he thinks we should be bigger, and whatever, but he hasn’t done anything to accommodate that,” McLaughlin said of Major. He pointed out that juggling all those contracts — he estimated they have about 50 — is a complex task and questioned whether his challenger had the “business acumen” to handle it all. “I think I’m ready,” said Major, who recently earned a bachelor’s in business science from Champlain College. His wide-ranging responsibilities as the No. 2 officer included purchasing cars and other equipment, coordinating schedules, supervising the training of new deputies, and applying for state and federal grants. As sheriff, Major said, he’d volunteer more with local

criminal justice professor Ed Cafferty in the 2014 primary, has plenty going for him. He’s racked up endorsements from a who’s who of local Democratic politicians, including Vermont Attorney General T.J. Donovan and Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger. “He’s got deep Burlington roots, which has always impressed me,” said Weinberger. But Rep. Ben Joseph (D-North Hero), a retired judge and public defender who is backing Major, thinks the deputy has a good shot. “I think he’s fairly well known in the community,” said Joseph, describing him as both “persuasive and personable.” Others are reluctant to take sides. “I respect and like both of them,” said Chittenden County State’s Attorney

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organizations, such as Women Helping Battered Women. What’s on McLaughlin’s agenda if he gets reelected? He said he wants to continue loaning an officer to work with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration — an arrangement he put in place in 2006. He’s also eager to oversee a new full-time highway safety coordinator — a new role for his department — and pointed to his work advocating for arraignments held via video feed from prisons. Those arraignments are controversial among public defenders and some lawmakers because they limit defendants’ ability to confer privately with their attorneys. The lifelong Burlingtonian, who easily beat Champlain College adjunct

Sarah George. She sees McLaughlin at monthly police chief meetings, where he’s an active participant and “always up-to-date with the newest stuff in the legislature.” Before he was demoted, Major was the point person whenever her office needed the sheriff to transport an inmate or deliver a warrant. “It’s always been handled efficiently and professionally,” she said. “That we may lose either is sad to me,” George went on, but “frankly, it’s the backbone of our democracy … If Mike believes he can do a better job, he should run against Kevin.” Even some McLaughlin supporters give Major credit for running. “I think he’s really raised the profile of the office,” said Donovan. “I think Mike’s got good ideas, and Mike’s time will come, but right now I think it’s still Kevin’s time.” If he wins, would the incumbent sheriff restore Major’s rank? “We’ll see what happens,” McLaughlin said. m

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UVM President Sullivan to Step Down Next Summer University of Vermont president Tom Sullivan announced Monday that he will step down next summer after seven years in the top job at the Burlington campus. Sullivan will take time off to write a book about freedom of speech on college campuses and then will return to UVM as a full-time faculty member. The president, who earned $438,000 last year, is 69.  With fundraising efforts going better than anticipated, Sullivan decided he was ready to leave the president’s office in the Waterman building, he said in a press release and a letter to his colleagues. Sullivan wrote, “Now with the University’s comprehensive campaign crossing over its campaign goal of $500 million, one year ahead of schedule, UVM is poised for its next era of reaching even

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Burlington Police Chief Brandon del Pozo plans to be back on duty full time on August 20 — nine weeks after a bicycle crash sent him to the intensive care unit at the University of Vermont Medical Center. SE N OR Del Pozo said the last TH W E H thing he remembers from June 16 is coasting down the gradual, 4.5-mile hill on Route 73 in Keene Valley, N.Y., when the used bike he had recently Brandon del Pozo bought started shaking uncontrollably. He crashed, fracturing three bones in his skull, four ribs, two bones in his shoulder and his collarbone, he said. He was flown by helicopter to Burlington and spent two days in intensive care and a third day in the hospital before being released. The bones are on the mend, and del Pozo is still recovering from a concussion. “All indications are that, cognitively, I’m lucky to be exactly the same as I was,” he said. For the time being, he added, “I don’t know if I’ll be doing foot pursuits or subduing anyone.” When he crashed, del Pozo had been training for an Ironman half triathlon — a 1.2-mile swim, a 56-mile bike ride and a 13.1-mile run. That’s now off the table. “The prognosis about ski season is optimistic,” he said. The department’s deputy chief of administration, Jan Wright, is filling in as acting chief during del Pozo’s absence.

He called it “unethical” and “absolutely improper” for a judge’s campaign committee to ask an attorney for cash, suggesting that any lawyer would feel obligated to donate if he or she had a case before the judge. “Call me Victorian, but I don’t think it’s appropriate. I haven’t done that. I won’t do that,” Norful said vehemently. “That’s a really outrageous statement for an attorney to make against a sitting judge,” Glennon retorted. “It’s untrue, and it’s disgraceful.” He said he’s following the Vermont Supreme Court’s rules “to the letter” and accused Norful of “unprofessional conduct.” At a July candidate forum, Norful pitched his experience as a Winooski city councilor, four-term mayor and selfemployed attorney. He has what it takes, he said, to help those trying to adopt a child or change their name to navigate judicial processes.

greater academic expectations and aspirations. The time is right!” The search for Sullivan’s replacement will begin immediately, aimed at hiring a new president by March, Board of Trustees chair David Daigle said in a press release Monday. During Sullivan’s Gov. Phil Scott (right) and tenure, UVM made Republican challenger Keith Stern huge investments in science, Republican grocer Keith Stern is technology, running against Scott for the party’s engineering and math. UVM also nomination, and the RGA spending pushed to recruit more internadays ahead of that vote suggests the tional students, in response to national group is concerned that Scott the demographic challenge of a is vulnerable. A spokesperson did not dwindling number of college-age immediately respond to a request for students in the Northeast. comment. This past school year was In a filing on Tuesday, A Stronger perhaps the most challenging of Vermont reported paying $115,540, Sullivan’s service, as he faced a wave of including $91,000 for TV ads and an anti-racism protests. A staffer went on a additional $8,000 for Facebook ads on hunger strike, and student demonstraAugust 6. The RGA commercials are tors flooded the president’s office as well among the first in Vermont this camas portions of Burlington’s Main Street. paign season. Demands included revamping campus The RGA, which launched its ad blitz diversity classes and recruiting more with $100,000 on July 31 and more than faculty of color. MOLLY WALSH doubled that spending a week later, has already put more money into the race for governor than any candidate had raised as of last month. Campaign reports from July 15 show that Scott had raised $213,700 for this year’s campaign. Democratic challenger Christine Hallquist had raised $132,339, and no other candidate had received more than $60,000 in donations. A conservative political action committee This isn’t the first time outside groups supporting Republican Gov. Phil Scott have bought ads in a Vermont gubernatodoubled its spending on Vermont’s guberrial contest. By the end of the 2016 general natorial race in the first week of August, election, the same PAC had spent more according to filings with the Secretary of than $2.9 million supporting Scott. Our State’s Office. Vermont, a PAC run by the Democratic The super PAC, named A Stronger Governors Association, spent upwards of Vermont and funded by the Republican $1.3 million backing Democratic nominee Governors Association, has spent Sue Minter in that race. $216,361 supporting Scott ahead of the GLENN RUSSELL

Burlington Police Chief to Return to Work After Bike Accident

Tom Sullivan

“When people come into a room, whether it’s city hall or a courtroom, they need to feel comfortable and welcome,” he said, calling the courthouse the “people’s hall.” Norful said later his challenge of Glennon isn’t personal; for years, he planned to run when Fowler retired. As of July 15, he had used nearly $6,000 of his own money to fund his run. Craig LaVigne, post quartermaster of the local Veterans of Foreign Wars chapter, said he’d grown up with Norful in Winooski — but that wasn’t why he put up a lawn sign in support.   “Knowing Billy, he’ll put 110 percent into this,” LaVigne said of the judgeship. Norful has plenty of experience as a lawyer, and “he’s civic-minded here in Winooski, too,” he added. Norful said he is trying to steer clear of the conflicts mentioned in the judges’ ethics code. When Seven Days asked whether he had a campaign volunteer who would discuss the race, he hesitated, worrying that his answer might be considered “soliciting public support.” “It’s a funny business to run for office and yet be a judge,” Norful said. m


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Comics and Medicine Conference Draws Art and Health Care Together B Y PA MEL A PO LSTON

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THERE ARE SO MANY APPLICATIONS, FROM TRAINING PROFESSIONALS

TO ALLOWING PATIENTS TO EXPRESS THEIR EXPERIENCES. W H I T N E Y TAYL OR

Whitney Taylor

CARTOONS

MK Czerwiec’s comic avatar

Graphic Medicine Manifesto. He’ll attend the Vermont conference, as will MK Czerwiec, his Manifesto coeditor and colleague at the Graphic Medicine website. She creates cartoons and a website under the name Comic Nurse. Czerwiec (pronounced sir-wick, her site helpfully informs us) is the artist-in-residence at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago and a senior fellow of the George Washington School of Nursing Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement. Her job titles would barely fit on a business card and don’t include her additional roles as teacher, cartoonist, writer and speaker. Czerwiec, 51, unpacked that in a phone conversation from her home in Chicago. In her youth, this nurse’s daughter never could have imagined the career she would have now, particularly

COURTESY OF MK CZERWIEC

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public health professional and cartoonist from New Jersey creates a graphic memoir to help her heal from sexual assault. At Penn State College of Medicine, fourth-year students learn how comics can communicate complex medical information — and make their own. At VERMONT FOLKLIFE CENTER in Middlebury, an ethnographic cartooning project aims to “mitigate loneliness, isolation and despair” among Latin American migrant farmworkers. Also in Vermont, artists from the CENTER FOR CARTOON STUDIES work with veterans to help address the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder. All four of these endeavors fit within the definition of “graphic medicine,” a diverse and burgeoning field that uses cartooning to convey information, tell stories and enhance positive outcomes in the broad arena of health care. Graphic medicine in turn falls under the rubric of “applied cartooning,” a practical orientation that CCS emphasizes. The center, with support from the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College, is hosting the ninth international Comics and Medicine Conference this month, called Comics and Medicine: The Ways We Work. From August 16 to 18, the already-sold-out event will turn White River Junction into a conference center, as CCS cofounder JAMES STURM put it. The school itself, the BRIGGS OPERA HOUSE, the ENGINE ROOM and other venues, as well as locations in Hanover, N.H., will host more than 180 attendees from around the country and as far away as China. Sturm called the Comics and Medicine Conference “a natural extension of applied cartooning.” Aware of the conferences since they began in 2010, he was an invited keynote speaker at the 2014 edition at Johns Hopkins University, talking about “some of our work with the VA hospital,” he said. The number of presentations at the Vermont gathering is staggering, with concurrent time slots that likely will force attendees to make difficult choices. A few of the titles suggest the breadth of content: “The Story of My Tits: Breast Cancer as Metamorphosis From Patient to Survivor to Creator”; “Graphic Trauma: Drawing as Working Through Sexual Violence”; “Exploring the Use of Comics in Health Education”; “Rock Steady: Brilliant Advice From My Bipolar Life”; and “The Ways Graphic Medicine Works in a Pharmacy School.” One of the presenters will be familiar to fans of the comics pages in this newspaper: RACHEL LINDSAY, whose talk bears the long but intriguing title “Cartoonist Behind the Curtain: Working in Psychopharmaceutical Advertising as a Closeted Mental Patient and Living to Draw the Tale.” That’s essentially the subject of Lindsay’s debut graphic memoir, Rx, due out in early September. Graphic medicine, both the phrase and the conference, can be credited to Ian Williams, a physician, cartoonist and writer based in Brighton, UK. Author of the graphic novel The Bad Doctor: The Troubled Life and Times of Dr. Iwan James, Williams is also coeditor of the

since her parents did not encourage her drawing habit. Earning a master’s in humanities and bioethics, Czerwiec said, she hoped to be a “student of narrative in health care.” Today, she went on, “I mostly talk about drawing and how it can help in health care” — an understatement that sums up the essence of graphic medicine. At Feinberg, Czerwiec teaches in the medical school and is “available if someone wants to use comics in their process,” she said. At George Washington, she was “brought on as part of an effort to amplify the voices of nurses in media.” As she pointed out, “The number of times nurses are quoted in media is abysmal.” The voices of those underrepresented caregivers, in her view, are critical to the health care conversation. Czerwiec’s own narrative, based on a tough but affirming clinical experience, informed her 2017 graphic memoir Taking Turns: Stories From HIV/AIDS Care Unit 371. Attending to dying patients in the early years of that health crisis gave Czerwiec an interest in end-oflife experiences and care — the subject of a forthcoming graphic work and the topic of her shared presentation at the conference, “Dying, Death and Comics.” One of the conference’s keynote speakers is Whitney Taylor, 34, a cartoonist, social justice activist and public health professional. She has published numerous comic books and web comics and participated in many anthologies, including the reproductive-rights volume Comics for Choice. And, in some of her work, she has revealed and processed personal trauma. “One of the things I’ll be talking about [at the conference] is the book Ghost Stories,” Taylor explained in a phone conversation from her home in Queens. “One of the stories deals with mental health and sexual assault. “It takes a lot of work to deal with the trauma,” she continued. “I’ll talk about the choice to make that public.” Taylor added that the exposure was “worth it” because of the feedback she got from others who had the same or similar experiences. “When I write about stuff involving mental health,” she said, “it’s to reduce stigma. The public health [work] is to increase literacy.” Taylor attended her first graphic medicine conference in 2014, the same year she took a workshop at CCS. “When I found out about graphic medicine, I realized there’s a real interest in this field,” she said, pointing out that it crosses a broad range of disciplines. “There are so many applications, from training professionals to allowing patients to express their experiences. There’s a lot of enthusiasm. “It’s so cool that the conference is being held at CCS this year,” Taylor concluded. “It’s a great place to learn.”  Contact: pamela@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Comics and Medicine: The Ways We Work, Thursday to Saturday, August 16 to 18, various locations in White River Junction and at Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H. graphicmedicine.org, cartoonstudies.org


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helm, has left the organization in a “very good position,” wrote board president DAVID WEBSTER in an email. He said the board is confident that Gear will undertake a “seamless transition, and that she has the skills to develop and implement new initiatives.” While the board “has reverence” for the school’s mission, its members also “realize that we have a responsibility to look ahead and to augment our core curriculum,” Webster added. Gear, an architect by training, grew up in upstate New York. Prior to SHELBURNE CRAFT SCHOOL

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whose father was a woodworker, grew up surrounded by craft. “I studied design, space, people and materials ever since I was very young,” she said. A love for making and building isn’t the only thing she has in common with her father: He was also an executive director in the nonprofit world. Next month, Gear, 35, will officially assume her position as executive director of the SHELBURNE CRAFT SCHOOL, taking over from SAGE TUCKER-KETCHAM. Tucker-Ketcham, who is stepping down after almost eight years at the

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Jim Sardonis to Create New ‘Whale Dance’ Sculpture for Randolph B Y RA CHEL ELI ZA BET H JONES

BEN DEFLORIO

ART

the whales’ tails. The sculpture was a ral- that it would be wonderful to have a lying point for the Whales Tail Biathlon. new, iconic sculpture installed where “[The move was] a bad metaphor the whales’ tails had been,” said Bruhn. about all good things in Vermont moving Ryerson, a member of E4OS, reached to Chittenden County,” said PAUL BRUHN, out to Sardonis last summer to ask about executive director of the PRESERVATION the possibility of “Reverence” returning TRUST OF VERMONT. “It was a to its first home. The artist real loss for the Randolph told her it would be less community.” hassle and less expensive to At the original site, near create a new work instead. the interstate, Sammis After the Preservation hoped to build a gigantic Trust purchased the parcel multiuse development that from Sammis, Bruhn had would include a welcome several “informal conversacenter, rest stop, hotel, resitions” with the Middleburydential area and more. That based Vermont Community “Whale Dance” — or any Foundation. These, he said, public structure — will be “led to a commitment from installed there instead is due them for the funding that alprimarily to the combined lowed us to commission this M A R JO R I E efforts of the Preservation new sculpture by Jim.” Bruhn RY E R S O N Trust, the Conservation Law would not share further Foundation, the Vermont details. Natural Resources Council and the “I don’t think any of us hoped that we grassroots group Exit 4 Open Space would find the money anytime soon to (E4OS). do the sculpture,” said Bruhn, “so this is Beginning in May 2015, these orgaa great bit of icing on an amazing effort.” nizations worked together to prevent As for “Whale Dance” itself, Sardonis Sammis from developing the site, opsaid it will be rendered in bronze, posing his request for an Act 250 permit. a major difference from the granite After 149 acres of the parcel were sold “Reverence” and more in keeping with to the Montpelier-based conservation his original vision of the sculpture. nonprofit Castanea Foundation in April The malleability of bronze will allow 2017, a 22.5-acre plot remained. for more fluid movement than granite, “We nudged him, cajoled, pleaded which Threlkeld requested when he with [Sammis] to give us an opportunity commissioned “Reverence.” to buy the 22 acres,” said Bruhn. “He ul“Whale Dance” will also be larger — timately agreed and gave us two months 16 feet high; “Reverence” is 13 feet tall to raise a million dollars.” at its highest point. Once the design is One million was less than the land’s finished, the work will be fabricated at estimated value but a considerable sum the Polich Tallix foundry in Walden, N.Y. for community foundations and grass“I’m trying to emphasize the danceroots organizers. Eventually, they raised like qualities that I originally envithe money through direct solicitations to sioned,” Sardonis said, “thinking of the major donors, contributions from more tails you see above the ground [but also] than 500 individuals, and small-scale imagining the rest of the bodies below fundraising efforts, Bruhn explained. He the surface, touching and dancing.” estimated that approximately $200,000 “It’s really a full-circle thing,” was raised through grassroots efforts Sardonis continued. “I’m really looking spearheaded by E4OS. Sardonis himforward to getting something back to self played guitar at several fundraising Randolph that echoes what was there events with his band SECOND WIFE. for 10 years.” m This month, E4OS members learned that their efforts, and success, will Contact: rachel@sevendaysvt.com be honored at December’s national Conservation Law Foundation gala in Boston. “I would say that, throughout this INFO whole process, as we dreamed about Learn more at sardonis.com and protecting that land, we all had in mind exit4openspace.org.

THE SCULPTOR AND THE SCULPTURE

24 STATE OF THE ARTS

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ARE BELOVED IN THIS TOWN.

Jim Sardonis

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long a stretch of Interstate 89 in South Burlington, two large structures resembling whales’ tails emerge from the ground, a novel view for passersby and a favorite photo op for visitors from the adjacent field. But the local landmark made of African black granite wasn’t always sited there. Officially titled “Reverence,” the sculpture was once an icon in the town of Randolph, 60 miles to the south. Now, nearly three decades after JIM SARDONIS completed “Reverence,” the local sculptor has been commissioned to create a second, similar work — and this one will stay in Randolph. Due to be completed next spring, the bronze “Whale Dance” will be installed on the exact spot where “Reverence” once stood. The original whale sculpture was commissioned in 1989 by DAVID THRELKELD, who owned the land surrounding the

installation site. In 1999, when he sold the 172-acre parcel to JESSE “SAM” SAMMIS, he had to find a new home for the artwork. Threlkeld sold it to developers Technology Park Partners, who moved it to its current location near an office complex; a planned sculpture park at the site never materialized. “A lot of people from Randolph were really upset when ‘Reverence’ was allowed to leave,” said Sardonis. “Many people expressed, at least to me, that they were so sorry that there wasn’t an effort to try to keep it here. It had kind of created an identity for Randolph.” “The sculptor and the sculpture are beloved in this town,” said MARJORIE RYERSON, “and they have a long history of being our icon.” Ryerson, who has lived in the Randolph area since 1973, described recently pawing through some of her old T-shirts and finding several depicting


Shelburne Craft School

a supportive, creative and hyper-local place.

joining the craft school, she was executive director of YESTERMORROW DESIGN/ BUILD SCHOOL in Waitsfield. At a time when individuals have grown dependent on computers and mobile devices, Gear believes that the craft school plays an important role in helping children and adults experience the joys of hands-on creating. Seven Days caught up with her to learn more about her work and plans for the 73-year-old school.

SD: What are your goals for the craft school? CG: I’m looking forward to being immersed in the community of Shelburne and learning the deep history of this school from current and past students, instructors and community members. [I’m also] really looking forward to expanding our reach through our donor base [and] being able to offer more curriculum in visual arts, clay, metal and glass. We have a historic campus. That is an ongoing project to keep up-to-date and renovated, so I’m looking forward to fundraising around that effort and continuing to improve our beautiful campus. I’m looking forward to building our scholarship and financial aid capabilities so we can reach more students of all ages and all demographics.

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SD: Do you miss being an architect and designer since moving into leadership positions? CG: What I was drawn to in architecture was making with craft and with people, not necessarily a building. Although it looks different [from] drafting, sketching and creating a building, a lot of the pieces and the components of being in a not-for-profit organization are focused on craft and making. It’s very, very similar to being an architect. In my time transitioning away from more traditional architectural practice into nonprofit leadership, I have to say, I haven’t missed architecture proper. I still execute the training and the reasons I got into it every day. I will use [my passive-house design] training to continue to make improvements to our historic campus and our building. All that training and everything that brought me to this point is still with me. m K

08.08.18-08.15.18

Two Days Only Sign up to shop ahead of time, and skip the line! Learn more at facebook.com/BurtonBurlington

STATE OF THE ARTS 25

Contact: kymelya@sevendaysvt.com

SEVEN DAYS

SD: How did your overseas sojourns influence your work as an architect and passive-house designer? CG: [The experience] gives me a deep respect for travel and for meeting new people and exploring new mediums and to just keep learning. Working abroad and living in different states, cities and communities of 500 to 5 million can bring a real appreciation for the people and customs. It makes me appreciate Vermont and the community in Shelburne even more, because it’s such

SD: Did Sage offer any words of wisdom? CG: We really see it as a passing of the torch. Sage and I were able to spend quite a bit of time together in the past month, with her giving lessons learned and really showing me the way the school operates but also empowering me to look at it with fresh eyes.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

SEVEN DAYS: Tell us a little about your background and how you got your start in the industry. CLAIRE GEAR: As a child, [I was always] a builder, maker, designer and crafter. I felt like [architecture] was the career path for me and followed a pretty traditional path to gain my architectural license. I worked professionally for about 10 years in the Pacific Northwest, Seattle, Norway, France, New York and moved to Vermont about seven years ago. I worked professionally as an architect on high-performance and passivehouse buildings that were focused on reducing our reliance on fossil fuels and making our buildings very energy efficient. I [also] helped manage my husband’s sports-medicine and chiropractic business and learned that I really love being in a leadership role. I decided to make a transition over to leading a mission-driven organization at Yestermorrow that was focused on architecture, design and building as an integrative and iterative process. When the opportunity arose to hold a relatively similar position in a mission-driven nonprofit organization in my home community of Shelburne, I jumped at that opportunity. I knew Sage and several members of the board and very much respected the mission and the impact that the Shelburne Craft School was having and has had on this community.

INFO Learn more at shelburnecraftschool.org.

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NOVEL GRAPHICS FROM THE CENTER FOR CARTOON STUDIES

SEVEN DAYS

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DRAWN+paneled

26 ART

DAN NOTTgraduated with an MFA from the Center for Cartoon Studies in 2018 after

completing a series of comics exploring hidden systems. This comic is based on a book he’s drawing on the history and geography of the internet. He lives in White River Junction and loves it very much. You can follow him on Instagram at @dan_nott. Find more of his work at dannott.com.

DRAWN & PANELED IS A COLLABORATION BETWEEN SEVEN DAYS AND THE CENTER FOR CARTOON STUDIES IN WHITE RIVER JUNCTION, FEATURING WORKS BY PAST AND PRESENT STUDENTS. FOR MORE INFO, VISIT CCS ONLINE AT CARTOONSTUDIES.ORG.


HACKIE

A VERMONT CABBIE’S REAR VIEW BY JERNIGAN PONTIAC

Me Versus the Visigoths

I

fiber of my being, I cannot help but give them their props. In a nutshell, the company built a better mousetrap. The taxi industry circa 2009 was antiquated, out of step with the modern era. If you wanted a ride, you had to either flag a cab on the street (always a touch-andgo scenario) or call up a taxi company to order one. And, as anyone who has

with success. In a few short years, Uber has grown to a multibillion-dollar enterprise for one reason: People want what they’re selling. Back at the waterfront, I sat there like a potted plant as the Uber hookups happened all around me, again and again. A few years earlier, every one of these people would have taken a traditional

I REFUSED TO ABANDON MY POST

UNTIL I SCORED AT LEAST ONE MEASLY FARE. ever exercised option two knows, taxi companies often provided questionable customer service. Cabs might arrive late or not at all. Sometimes the cabs that did arrive were quite funky, as was the driver. Uber revolutionized the taxi delivery system. The whole process happens digitally, including the ordering of the cab, the dispatching of the driver and the payment of the fare. With a workforce consisting of eager drivers using their personal vehicles, the system is crazy efficient and has left the old taxi companies in the dust. To be sure, there are many bad things about the way Uber has operated. It has been accused of bullying the municipalities in which it sets up shop; it is said to exploit its drivers, who operate entirely at the whim of their corporate overlords; and Uber’s founding owner was forced to step down in light of documented incidents of sexual harassment, which contributed to a toxic company culture. Not to excuse these and other transgressions, but, in the end, you can’t argue

cab. It was as if my taxi were invisible, as if I were invisible. As you can imagine, this is deflating to the spirit, not to mention the wallet. According to a Seven Days investigative piece last October, in the three short years that Uber has been active in Burlington, it has captured about 80 percent of the market. Prior to the arrival of Uber, a couple of dozen independent cabs regularly worked the downtown streets on weekend nights. With any luck, an industrious cabbie could walk away with $200 or more on a decent shift. Nowadays, if you find two or three indies working downtown, that’s a lot, and I’m afraid these diehards are fueled by wishful thinking. Alas, the halcyon days of random people hailing cabs are slowly drawing to an end. Aside from a few righteous holdouts — and perhaps those too hammered to successfully deploy the Uber app on their phones — these customers have been captured by Uber. Absent this once-steady source of revenue, most of the hardworking independent drivers

are now dependent on the airport queue for nearly all of their income. These good folks, many of them recent immigrants to the country, are hurting. However, fear not for this humble hackie. Like Gloria Gaynor and cockroaches, I will survive. Over decades, I have developed a robust stable of loyal customers, and that’s allowed me to resist this modern-day invasion of the Visigoths. And Burlington still boasts one innovative and nimble taxi fleet, Green Cab, which has also held its own against the onslaught. Still hunkered down at the waterfront, I refused to abandon my post until I scored at least one measly fare. After a depressing half hour, a woman and man with three young kids walked up to me and asked if I was available. Halle-freakin’-lujah! “We were about to order an Uber,” the woman said, “but we saw you first.” “Can you take us to the Best Western?” the man chimed in. “As a matter of fact, I can,” I replied with a smile. “Jump in.” Neither the parents nor the kids appeared buzzed on craft beer, so I deduced they weren’t in town for the Brewers Festival. I’m sharp that way. As we got under way, I asked, “So, what brings you folks to Vermont?” m All these stories are true, though names and locations may be altered to protect privacy.

INFO Hackie is a twice-monthly column that can also be read on sevendaysvt.com. To reach Jernigan, email hackie@sevendaysvt.com.

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t was the Saturday of the Vermont Brewers Festival, and the first session, which runs from noon to four, was just finishing up. The Burlington Waterfront Park was teeming with happy people as I sat parked in my taxi near the ECHO museum looking to grab a fare. I knew from experience that dozens of people would be wanting rides up the hill to the Church Street Marketplace to prolong their merriment, or back to their hotel/Airbnb or home. I have been pushing the hack in Burlington since the early ’80s and know my job inside and out. If you do anything day in and day out for that many years, you pick up a few things along the way. Like, I have learned to show up when events let out, and the Brewers Festival is a biggie. I saw three people standing by the curb, caught their eye and pointed to them. One responded, “No, we’re good,” and went back to meditating on his cellphone. A few minutes later, an unmarked vehicle pulled up to the trio, and they climbed into the back. As the car pulled away from the curb, I noticed a small sign in the rear window: Uber. For those of you just awakening from a coma, Uber is a digitally dispatched taxi service founded in San Francisco about nine years ago. Along with some smaller competitors such as Lyft, Uber has upended, disrupted and generally wreaked havoc in the worldwide taxi trade, laying waste to a business model that had flourished probably since the dawn of motorized vehicles. What Amazon did to bookstores, Uber has done to traditional taxis. As much as I hate Uber with every


What Election? The most powerful offices in Vermont are up for grabs this year, and voters have barely noticed. Is something broken? B Y TAY L O R D O B B S

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But public opinion polls, fundraising figures and the sparse number of early ballots requested by voters suggest that Vermonters are paying little attention. And that’s good news for the state’s highest-profile incumbents — Republican Gov. Phil Scott, U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and U.S. Rep. Peter Welch (D-Vt.) — all of whom face weak opposition in the August 14 primary. A poll commissioned by Vermont Public Radio and Vermont PBS found that three of the four Democrats running for governor were unknown to more than 70 percent of those surveyed in early July, a month before the primary. When pollsters asked about former utility executive Christine Hallquist, the highest-profile Democrat

From left: U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), U.S. Rep. Peter Welch (D-Vt.) and Gov. Phil Scott

MARC NADEL

28 FEATURE

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cross America, 2018 is shaping up to be a remarkable election year. Energized by their opposition to President Donald Trump, Democrats are hoping a “blue wave” will sweep the nation and help them capture the U.S. House. An unusual number of governorships are up for grabs, and control of the closely divided U.S. Senate is also in play. In Vermont, though, this campaign season is remarkable for how sleepy it is. “It’s an election year again?” joked former governor Jim Douglas when a reporter called his office at Middlebury College. “It’s like crickets out there in terms of the public knowing what’s going on,” said Senate President Pro Tempore Tim Ashe (D/P-Chittenden). On paper, plenty of public positions are up for grabs. With the exception of U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.), every statewide officeholder is up for reelection this fall, along with every legislator, prosecutor, sheriff and high bailiff.


already held another. But few established pols are willing to risk their current jobs for a long-shot bid at a better one. “You can take a look at who chooses to run against incumbents,” said Deb Markowitz, a former secretary of state and onetime gubernatorial candidate. She said challengers rarely have the same qualifications as candidates who run for vacant seats. “So if there was an open seat for governor, an open seat for U.S. Senate, you would have very different résumés in those candidates,” Markowitz said. Candidates running for Scott’s job this time around include a grocer, a 14-year-old, a dance festival organizer,

GLENN RUSSELL

of choosing U.S. senators, only one Vermont senator has lost reelection, in 1930. In the same period, five Vermont senators have died in office. The state’s three-member congressional delegation has remained static since the late senator Jim Jeffords retired in 2006. Sanders, then a 16-year veteran of the U.S. House, was elected to succeed him, and Welch took over Vermont’s sole House seat. Leahy, who took office in 1975, is the longest-serving of all 100 U.S. senators and the fifth longest-serving senator in the nation’s history. Upsets are slightly more common for Vermont’s U.S. House seat. But when Sanders defeated incumbent Republican Peter Smith in 1990, it was the first time

Democratic gubernatorial candidates debate at WCAX-TV

Gun-Shy Dems

The Echo Chamber

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Almost any discussion of this year’s dull campaign season eventually arrives at a classic chicken-and-egg question: Does it seem boring because it’s not getting news coverage? Or does it lack news coverage because it’s boring? “There’s no drama to pay attention to,” Perkinson said. “Bernie’s running again, Welch is running again, all the down-ticket people are running again. And they’re all well known.” Based on the state’s electoral history, Perkinson’s analysis is probably right on. But there was no apparent drama in 2014, either. That year, political newcomer

SEVEN DAYS

As the list of failed gubernatorial challengers has lengthened over the last 56 years, Vermont’s love of incumbents has become a self-fulfilling prophecy. “The conventional wisdom in Vermont really keeps people from challenging incumbents, because they think they have a lock,” said Burlington attorney Jake Perkinson, a former chair of the Vermont Democratic Party. Those best positioned to win one statewide office are those who have

an environmental lobbyist and the former CEO of a regional utility. None has ever served in state office. While Vermont has its share of up-and-coming Democratic politicians — including Attorney General T.J. Donovan, House Speaker Mitzi Johnson (D-South Hero), Sen. Ashe, Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger, 2016 gubernatorial nominee Sue Minter and former House speaker Shap Smith — none of them chose to challenge Scott this year. Doug Racine, a former lieutenant governor and state senator who twice ran for governor, said there’s a reason top Democrats opted not to run. “[Scott is] an incumbent … a popular incumbent, so folks weren’t really willing to take the risk,” he said. The result is less turnover in the state’s top offices, and that means fewer chances for women to hold them. Vermont has elected only one female governor — Madeleine Kunin — and

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in 30 years that a member of Congress from Vermont lost reelection. Elections are the defining feature of democracy, but this year’s slow races raise the question: Do Vermonters get a real choice every two years, or are voters and politicians simply going through the motions until one of the state’s top officeholders retires or dies?

is the only state to have never sent a woman to Congress. “If there’s no change, there’s no opportunities for new people to go,” Markowitz said. “And in Vermont’s case, it also means no opportunity for women to run and win.” With incumbents on the ballot, it can be hard for any challenger to prevail. The last time an ambitious Democrat took on an established officeholder was the 2012 primary for attorney general. Donovan, then Chittenden County state’s attorney, ran against Bill Sorrell, a 15-year incumbent, and lost by fewer than 1,000 votes. Donovan could afford the risk because he was halfway through a four-year term and didn’t have to sacrifice his existing job. But unlike county prosecutors, all state offices in Vermont have two-year terms. According to Markowitz, that dynamic keeps most promising politicians from challenging incumbents. “Because why would you leave a great legislative seat to run for governor in a year when it was so unlikely that you could win?” she asked. “Why would you leave a job in the private sector where you’re earning a good living to run for a race that was going to be so difficult, if not impossible, to win?” There are occasional exceptions. This year, Rep. Don Turner (R-Milton) is stepping down from his job as House minority leader to challenge Lt. Gov. David Zuckerman, a Progressive/Democrat. Alex MacLean, who ran Shumlin’s successful campaigns for governor in 2010 and 2012, said most serious candidates take a careful look at their odds and tend to stay away from long-shot campaigns. “It’s 16-hour days, eight of which are on the phone dialing for dollars. It’s not fun,” MacLean said. “Running for statewide [office] is brutal. It’s incredibly taxing. It’s a lot of ego involved in it, and losing is difficult, and I think people are understandably fearful of that.”

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

in the race, 59 percent said they hadn’t heard of her. According to the Secretary of State’s Office, 10,716 people had requested absentee ballots as of Monday — eight days before the election. At the same point in the 2016 primary campaign, as voters prepared to choose a replacement for outgoing Democratic governor Peter Shumlin, 15,896 people had asked for ballots. Douglas, a four-term Republican governor, said he’s disappointed but not necessarily surprised that this year’s election is so quiet. “We have a U.S. senator who’s, according to one report, the most popular in America among his or her constituents,” he said, referring to a spring poll by online survey company Morning Consult that pegged Sanders’ homestate approval at 63 percent. “I don’t think most Vermonters feel that there’s a strong contest there.” The same is true of Welch, according to Douglas, who argued that the six-term member of Congress was “not likely to have a strong challenge.” The race for governor would seem to have room for excitement. A Morning Consult poll in July found that Scott’s net approval rating — the percentage of voters who approve of his work minus the percentage who disapprove — fell from 43 percent in the first quarter of this year to 5 percent in the second quarter. The change came after Scott reversed himself and embraced gun control legislation in the spring, angering Second Amendment supporters. Most voters, though, don’t seem to be paying attention. In fact, Vermonters don’t seem to be paying much of anything to politics. Contributions and spending in this year’s race for governor are down 90 percent compared to the 2016 election, according to July 15 filings with the Secretary of State’s Office. By July 15 two years ago, gubernatorial candidates had spent nearly $1.5 million on TV and radio advertising alone. This year? Zero. (In the past two weeks, though, a political action committee funded by the Republican Governors Association has spent more than $216,000 on pro-Scott TV and social media ads.) Scott’s challengers may see opportunity in the Morning Consult data, but each of them is trying to accomplish something that hasn’t been done since 1962: defeat an incumbent governor. That November, Democrat Phil Hoff unseated first-term Republican F. Ray Keyser. It’s not just governors who seem to have job security. Since 1913, when the 17th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution put the state’s voters directly in charge


SEVEN DAYS

Scott Milne challenged Shumlin, who was running for a third term. The Republican businessman was written off by much of the political establishment. “Milne’s campaign and message have improved in recent weeks, but he is unlikely to do much better than the low 40-percent range,” retired Middlebury College political science professor Eric Davis wrote in an analysis for the Addison County Independent days before the general election. Davis’ only question was whether Shumlin would get more than 50 percent of the vote. When Milne won 45.2 percent of the vote and came within 3,000 votes, or 1.3 percent, of beating Shumlin, the political establishment was shocked. Milne lost, but the election proved that the conventional wisdom at the time wasn’t so wise after all. “Milne came out of nowhere, and he wasn’t the strongest Republican candidate that that party could have put up,” Racine said. The result left some insiders wondering: If Milne had been treated as a viable candidate all along, would he have won? Milne said the media’s focus on a few big-name politicians hurts candidates like him who don’t have the typical résumé of a governor or U.S. senator. (Milne went on to challenge Leahy in 2016 — and lost 60 to 32 percent.) “Established folks can all get three statewide stories a week on meaningless press releases,” Milne said, noting that only Seven Days and VTDigger.org reported on his decision not to run for office in 2018. “I think the media tends to both reflect the conventional wisdom and feed it at the same time,” Racine said. “If … some of the insiders who tend to set the tone of these sorts of discussions, if they’re out there saying, ‘Hey, you should really be paying attention to candidate X’ and ‘You’re missing something,’ I think the media would say, ‘OK, there’s something I’m missing here.’ When nobody is saying that, I don’t know what you really report on.”

The Honeymoon Isn’t Over

30 FEATURE

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

What Election? « P.29

In every state but Vermont and New Hampshire, governors serve four years before facing the voters again. While that results in fewer elections, it also results in more competitive ones. In Vermont, Perkinson said, candidates struggle to mount serious challenges to incumbents so quickly after

U.S. Congressional Turnover in Vermont and New Hampshire since Sen. Patrick Leahy took office in 1975

VERMONT SENATE

PATRICK LEAHY ROBERT STAFFORD

JIM JEFFORDS

BERNIE SANDERS

PETER SMITH

HOUSE

JIM JEFFORDS

BERNIE SANDERS

NEW HAMPSHIRE

THOMAS MCINTYRE

SENATE

GORDON HUMPHREY JOHN DURKIN

MAGGIE HASSAN

BOB SMITH

JOHN SUNUNU

BOB SMITH

WILLIAM ZELIFF

CHARLIE BASS

CHARLES DOUGLAS III

1980

FRANK GUINTA

ANNIE KUSTER

RICHARD SWETT

1990 DEMOCRAT

CAROL SHEA-PORTER

JOHN SUNUNU

JUDD GREGG JAMES COLGATE CLEVELAND

KELLY AYOTTE

JEB BRADLEY

NORMAN D’AMOURS

JEANNE SHAHEEN

JUDD GREGG

WARREN RUDMAN

NORRIS COTTON

HOUSE

PETER WELCH

2010

2000 INDEPENDENT

CHARLIE BASS

PAUL HODES

REPUBLICAN

SOURCE: U.S. SENATE HISTORICAL OFFICE AND U.S. HOUSE OFFICE OF THE HISTORIAN

they take office. “You need a pretty long runway to [set up a statewide campaign],” he said, “and two years is not a long runway.” While the two-year term may stifle competition early in a governor’s tenure, it can serve a purpose later, according to Chris Graff, a former Vermont journalist who now works for National Life Group. “We hang on to the two-year term because it gives us some flexibility when you hit the six-year mark,” he said. While they weren’t booted from the job by voters, three Democratic governors in the past 50 years — Hoff, Kunin and Shumlin — opted to leave office after six years. All were in the activist mold and pushed hard for momentous changes in state law. “Governors, if [they] make the hard decisions, eventually do wear out [their] welcome,” Graff said. It just doesn’t happen quickly. In general, Graff said, “our governors stay [in office] a little too long. Whether you’re talking about governor Kunin or governor Shumlin, at the end they’ve lost a lot of their popularity.” Shumlin coasted to reelection in 2012 after drawing accolades for his response to Tropical Storm Irene. By 2014, his administration’s difficulties launching the Vermont Health Connect insurance exchange nearly cost him reelection. And by 2016, when he retired from office, his abandonment of a single-payer health care plan had lost him his base.

In general, Markowitz said, two years is too short a period for many voters to turn against a governor. “It requires the psychology of thinking that you made a mistake in that first vote,” she said. “So for Phil Scott, there’s a cohort that aren’t going to vote for him again because they believe they made a mistake because of his [reversal] on guns. But the vast majority who voted for him, aside from that cohort, will have no reason to say, ‘Hey, I made a mistake.’”

No Cheap Seats Running for office is expensive. In Vermont’s 2016 gubernatorial race, candidates spent more than $7.5 million. The introduction of independent political action committees that can raise and spend unlimited amounts of money has added a new dimension to political races. In 2016, these super PACs spent more than $5.4 million on the state’s gubernatorial contest. Kevin Ellis, a Montpelier lobbyist and former journalist, has an intimate view of the influence of money in politics. He’s not thrilled with what he’s seen. “At the national level, it’s beyond corruption. It’s legalized criminality,” he said. “When Peter Welch is in Washington, D.C., he leaves his office on Capitol Hill and goes to a special room that’s not paid for with taxpayer dollars, and he has a list of rich people to call,”

Ellis said, adding that Welch tries to keep the calls to a short two to three minutes before closing with an ask: $1,000. Those calls seem to work. From January 2017 through late July 2018, Welch raised $590,000, putting his campaign account over $2.1 million. Nearly 80 percent of the money came from PACs associated with corporations and other special interests. All but 12 of the 282 PAC donations during that period were for $1,000 or more. “I don’t know what Ellis is talking about,” Welch said. “I don’t know how he gets off on saying anything about how I do my fundraising.” Welch said he does spend “a couple of hours every week” raising money, but he didn’t elaborate on the specifics of the operation. “It’s a combination of mail, phone call, email [and] other people doing events for you,” he said. Overstuffed war chests don’t just scare off the competition. MacLean, the former Shumlin campaign manager, said political fundraising gets in the way of governing. “With two-year terms, those folks who are in office spend a bulk of that time fundraising and thinking about their next campaign, and I do not think that’s healthy,” she said. When incumbents are cash-rich, it can be difficult for other candidates to mount a serious challenge. Sanders, for


example, was sitting on a $7.6 million campaign account at the end of June. In the governor’s race, Scott began with an $18,000 head start from the 2016 campaign, then raised more than $200,000 before July 15. By that time, he had spent more than the $132,339 Hallquist had raised. None of the other candidates took in more than $60,000. Ellis said that imbalance is exactly why the race for governor is boring this year. “[The Democrats] are inexperienced candidates who can’t get their message out in part because they have no money to get it out,” Ellis said. “We need to publicly fund elections to stop the corruption of political fundraising and legalized bribery, so that challengers have money to mount a campaign.” Welch agreed. “I’ve always supported public financing,” he said. “That’s the one way there’s no question of intention by the donor.”

Lefty Lockdown

$8 M

JULY 15

$7 M $6 M

2016

$4.8 M

$5 M $4 M $3 M

“The consequence was that whoever was chosen in that smoke-filled room was then anointed governor, or lieutenant governor — all of the races.” While today’s back rooms may be less smoky, Milne said he feels Vermont has returned to anointing rather than electing candidates. “I imagine this is like it used to be for much of the ‘100 years of Republican rule,’” Milne wrote in an email to Seven Days. “This is a year without exciting primaries in a Vermont that is by and large ruled by one party.”

What’s the Fix?

$2 M 2018

$1 M

$4.8 K

0 600

400

200

0

Days until election

SOURCE: VERMONT SECRETARY OF STATE

said, pointing to North Dakota’s junior senator as an example. “Heidi Heitkamp, she’s in a purple state. She’s got to fight every single time.” Adding to the challenge for Vermont Republicans is a dearth of well-known, qualified candidates running for statewide office. Unlike Democrats, the GOP doesn’t have a pipeline of experienced politicians ambitious for higher office.

AND FEED IT AT THE SAME TIME. D O UG R AC INE

Contact: taylor@sevendaysvt.com

FEATURE 31

Disclosure: Tim Ashe is the domestic partner of Seven Days  publisher and coeditor Paula Routly. Find our conflictof-interest policy here:  sevendaysvt.com/ disclosure.

SEVEN DAYS

Democrats haven’t always reigned supreme in Vermont, Markowitz noted. Until the 1960s, Republican politicians won virtually every election. Back then, party officials chose nominees instead of holding primaries. “The party insiders would literally go into a smoke-filled room and decide who their candidates were,” Markowitz said.

08.08.18-08.15.18

I THINK THE MEDIA TENDS TO BOTH REFLECT THE CONVENTIONAL WISDOM

Incumbents will always have an advantage, and there’s nothing inherently harmful about electing the same politician more than once. But almost everyone interviewed for this story agreed on one change that could make Vermont campaigns more interesting and improve the quality of state government: Hold fewer gubernatorial elections. “I think a two-year term is incredibly wasteful, and the reality is that you can’t govern in a two-year cycle,” Markowitz said. “It really takes four years to take government in a new direction. And I think it’s bad for government administration to have a governor who essentially has to always be campaigning, because they’re always in a cycle for reelection.” Critics of Vermont’s current system say the 48 other states that hold elections every four years are on to something. “I think a four-year term for governor would really make the governor’s race — every governor’s race — quite significant,” Ashe said. “It would actually empower every governor who is elected to be much bolder and more long-term in his or her thinking.” While the concept may have strong support in Montpelier, moving to fouryear terms would require amending the state’s constitution, and that’s a difficult process. The legislature would have to vote twice for the change — with an election in between — and then a majority of voters would have to agree. “It’s not going to change. It’s too difficult,” Ellis said. “You don’t have a champion. You’ve got to have a governor to appoint a commission. You’ve got to have a governor who takes this on.” Ellis isn’t guessing that it’d be a hard change to make. It’s a historical fact. According to state records, there have been 19 attempts to extend term lengths since 1880. In 1974, the legislature approved four-year terms, but voters defeated the change at the polls.

Recent governors have been understandably slow to pitch an idea so transparently self-serving. MacLean suggested that the likely path to fouryear terms, if one existed, would involve advocacy by an outgoing governor who didn’t stand to benefit from the policy change. Ashe, for one, is ready to try again. He said if he is reelected he plans to formally propose a constitutional amendment that would give the governor a four-year term. Extending the governor’s term wouldn’t spice up congressional races at all, but a federal system to publicly finance elections might. Some states and countries give candidates money to spread their messages to voters, but Ellis said he doesn’t think the U.S. would adopt such a system. “We fundamentally don’t believe in that here, and as a result we have a corrupt system that forces these candidates to sit in a room and call rich people for money at least a third of their time, and that is wrong,” Ellis said. “These candidates need to be out there campaigning and telling us what they stand for … Instead, they’re calling rich people for money.” Whatever the fix is, it won’t change this year’s elections. The candidates are still working hard to spread their messages and inspire voters to go to the polls on August 14. Minter, who lost to Scott in 2016, said she isn’t convinced there’s anything wrong with the way elections are working in Vermont. She recalled answering an inquiry from a Seven Days reporter after one of the many candidate forums during the 2016 campaign. “It was packed … packed to the rafters,” she said of the forum. Afterwards, “I got this call, and he said, ‘How come nobody’s paying attention to the election?’ and I thought, Whoa, come on out.” Minter said that while the campaign season may seem sleepy to outsiders, candidates are spending each day meeting voters and hearing about issues of importance to the state. Though she lost the election in 2016, she said that kind of campaigning left a lasting impression. “It was the thing that restored, renewed, created my ongoing faith in Vermont’s democracy,” Minter said. m

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

The advantages of incumbency are not unique to Vermont, so why is it that incumbents in the Green Mountain State outlast their counterparts elsewhere? In the 12 years since Welch took his seat in Congress, voters in New Hampshire’s first congressional district have ousted their incumbent representative in four out of five elections. Vermont’s incumbents seem so safe this year that some local activists are focusing their efforts almost entirely out of state. Williston’s Ruth Wallman, a retired chamber of commerce executive, is part of a loosely organized group of Vermont women volunteering to assist vulnerable Democrats in other states and to help flip Republican-held congressional districts. “Maybe we’re taking Vermont for granted,” Wallman said, “but it feels like … the reason to work hard is out of state, not in state, because we’re so lucky to have the representative in Congress that we have. And [we’re] presuming that Peter Welch is gonna get reelected. If he required helping, we’d be helping him, too.” Why are Vermonters electing the same pols again and again as other states so frequently vote for challengers? Unlike New Hampshire and other swing states, Vermont is dominated by Democratic voters — so incumbent Dems often get a pass in general elections. The same happens with Republican incumbents in deep-red states such as Mississippi and Utah. “In a purple state, every time a senator is up, it’s very competitive,” Markowitz

Vermont Gubernatorial Fundraising, 2016 vs. 2018


Grace Notes

Music therapists help clients learn, heal and reconnect through song S TO RY BY KEN PICARD • PHOTOS BY JAME S B UC K

32 FEATURE

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

H

annah Waterman doesn’t speak. The 16-year-old Burlington girl has Rett syndrome, a rare neurological disorder that affects her motor skills, coordination, balance and intellectual development. She also grinds her teeth, wrings her hands repetitively, has difficulty focusing her gaze and suffers from sleep disruptions. But one thing helps lift her neurological fog: Katy Perry songs. “Katy Perry is her absolute favorite,” said her mother, Shelly Waterman, while Hannah’s music therapist, Marcie Hernandez, stood in the center of their living room and tuned her acoustic guitar. Hernandez has many tools in her therapeutic toolbox, but on this particular afternoon, she chose one with proven effectiveness in reaching Hannah: Perry’s “Roar.” Before she began playing, Hernandez enlisted the help of Hannah’s 13-yearold sister, Hadley, and her friend. She instructed the girls to press a large elastic band into Hannah’s clenched fists, then use it to help the girl stretch and exercise her arms. “I’ll give you the cue for stretching,” Hernandez told the girls. “If you want to bounce it with her, too, that’d be great.” As Hernandez strummed her guitar and sang, she improvised some lyrics to appeal to the teen. “Healthy now, I’m having fun, / I’m getting so much more done, / I’m traveling, bike riding and shopping around town,” she sang, eliciting a rare smile from Hannah. “OK, girls, now we’re going to do a little stretch … Nice job, Hannah!” Hernandez is a board-certified music therapist with Music Blooms Music Therapy of Burlington. She’s worked with Hannah for about five years; during the school year, they meet weekly for about an hour at Burlington High School. The therapy is covered by Vermont’s Pediatric Palliative Care, a statewide program for children with serious and life-threatening conditions. When the song ended, Hernandez picked up a cabasa, a percussive instrument with steel chain looping around a metallic cylinder. She and Hannah’s aide wrapped the teen’s fingers around the instrument and helped her move it rhythmically while Hernandez strummed and sang the traditional folk

HEALTH

Marcie Hernandez (center) conducting a session with Hannah Waterman (left) as personal care assistant Stephanie Shohet helps out

song “Mama Don’t Allow (No Music Playing Around Here).” The choice seemed ironic, given that Hannah’s mother couldn’t feel more strongly about the benefits that her daughter reaps from music therapy. Five years ago, Waterman noted, Hannah couldn’t grip a percussive egg shaker for three seconds without dropping it. On this afternoon, Hannah shook it rhythmically through an entire song. What’s more, the effects endure after the therapy sessions are over, Waterman noted. On the days when Hernandez works with her, Hannah wrings her hands less, relaxes more quickly and wakes less frequently during the night. “Hannah loves music so much. It calms her; it engages her. She’s focused,” her mother added. “It’s a way of bringing out her better self — her best self.” Music Blooms Music Therapy was founded in 2001 by Jennifer DeBedout, a board-certified music therapist and 25-year veteran of the profession. In addition to working with kids like Hannah, DeBedout and her team of three music therapists see children and teens with autism, seniors with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia, and patients in hospice. Other music therapists in Vermont work with individuals who have mental illness, addictions and posttraumatic stress disorder. For centuries, humans have marveled at music’s unique ability to pierce the psychic noise of a troubled individual.

“Rhythm and harmony,” wrote Plato in Book III of The Republic, “find their way to the inmost soul and take strongest hold upon it ... imparting grace, if one is rightly trained.” The earliest clinical reference to music as therapy appeared in a 1789 article in Columbian Magazine titled “Music Physically Considered,” according to a history of the profession on the American Music Therapy Association website. Benjamin Rush, an 18th-century physician and psychiatrist, was an early proponent of using music to treat physical maladies; two of his medical students published dissertations on the practice. The 19th century saw the first Hannah using an eye-gaze device to create music with Marcie

See a video of music therapy in action at sevendaysvt.com.

application of music therapy in an institutional setting — at Blackwell’s Island Asylum in New York City, the country’s first municipal psychiatric hospital. Music therapy gained wider recognition during the first and second world wars, as amateur and professional musicians visited veterans hospitals around the country and performed for patients recovering from the physical and psychological traumas of combat. Observation of the benefits that music provided these patients — as recreation, occupational therapy and physical reconditioning — led to the creation of a music therapy degree program at Michigan State University in 1944. But it wasn’t until the National Association for Music Therapy formed in 1950 that the profession gained wider credibility and acceptance. In Vermont, music therapy is still an uncommon profession. When DeBedout moved here in 2001, she was one of three certified music therapists in the state. Today, the Certification Board for Music Therapists lists just 14 statewide. As a consequence, many myths prevail about the practice, DeBedout noted. In 2014, the documentary Alive Inside: A Story of Music and Memory highlighted the power of music to reach patients with dementia, recover their lost memories and, in some cases, reanimate their ability to recognize and communicate with others. While caregivers and relatives of people with dementia hailed the film, DeBedout


From left: Marcie Hernandez, Hannah Waterman and Stephanie Shohet

WHEN MARCIE COMES INTO OUR HOME, I SEE A WHOLE

OTHER SIDE OF MY DAUGHTER THAT I DON’T

GET TO SEE ON A REGULAR BASIS. SHELLY WATE R MAN

music, DeBedout explained. If they don’t know that preference yet, typically they’ll choose music based on the client’s age, researching songs that were popular when the client was in their teens to midtwenties, because the music of youth often is the most enduring. In one case, DeBedout worked with an 11-year-old boy suffering from extreme

behavior disorder, anxiety and loss-ofcontrol issues related to the death of a family member. When DeBedout first met him, the boy identified his favorite music as ’80s hair metal. She recalled telling him, “I graduated from high school in 1987, so I’m the right music therapist for you. We’re gonna rock out!” The first song DeBedout played for the client on guitar was Whitesnake’s “Here I Go Again,” which includes the line, “I don’t know where I’m going / But I sure know where I’ve been.” “That song precipitated a really good discussion about managing stress,” DeBedout recalled. The boy eventually progressed to the point where he wrote his own songs about grief and loss. “He set his feelings to music, and it was quite beautiful.” Often, the effects of music therapy are deeply personal. The week

Hernandez was interviewed for this story, she’d just lost her own grandmother to Alzheimer’s. In the final days, she said, she sang old Spanish songs to her grandmother, who was Puerto Rican. “It would definitely brighten her mood, and it would also help my family see a different way to connect with her,” Hernandez said. “I was thankful to have the background and knowledge that I have … especially at the end, when language is lost and a lot of the communications had to be nonverbal.” Waterman said music therapy has helped not just her daughter but the entire family. Hannah is a medically fragile child, she said, who for years suffered life-threatening seizures. Sometimes, when Hernandez was present for a seizure, she would lie down beside Hannah and sing songs to keep mother and daughter calm. “At the time, any seizure that Hannah had could have been her last,” Waterman said. “[Music therapy is] really deep for families like mine. This isn’t an on-the-surface kind of therapy. “When Marcie comes into our home, I see a whole other side of my daughter that I don’t get to see on a regular basis,” she added. “That gives her an ability to express herself in a way that she’s not able to express herself in day-to-day life. That’s huge. And she’s happy. Even bigger.” m Contact: ken@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Learn more at musicbloomsmusictherapy.com.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

said many viewers incorrectly assumed what they were seeing on-screen was music therapy. The film reinforced the mistaken belief that music therapists merely sing songs or play recorded music on headphones for their clients, hoping they’ll tap their feet or sing along. In fact, DeBedout and her colleagues at Music Blooms are trained in the neuroscience of music. Through advanced neuroimaging, they’ve learned how different parts of the brain react and “entrain” to rhythms and melodies. At times, those reactions are profound. DeBedout recounted her experience of working with a boy with autism who was nonverbal. For years his family tried, unsuccessfully, to teach him to count. One day, DeBedout slowed the rhythm of her music and counted along in tempo. “Once I slowed it down to 35 beats per minute, which is pretty slow, he starting counting,” DeBedout explained. “It made me realize that, in his brain, his internal rhythm may be a lot slower than his neurotypical peers.” How does music overcome such neurological barriers? According to Oliver Sacks, the late neurologist and author of the 2007 book Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain, music engages many more areas of the brain than do spoken and written language. A patient who is, say, recovering from a stroke or traumatic brain injury can often sing before they can speak again, and can remember song lyrics even when they can’t remember other details of their lives. How do music therapists decide which music might best serve a given client’s needs and goals? At Music Blooms, their priority is always client-preferred

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Comic Timing

THEATER

Gregory Jon Phelps and Clare Mahoney

Theater review: See How They Run, Saint Michael’s Playhouse B Y A L E X BROW N

COURTESY OF ANDY DUBACK

T

THE PLAY HAS LIGHTWEIGHT ENTERTAINMENT OBJECTIVES,

BUT IT TAKES CRAFT TO REALIZE THEM.

Contact: alex@sevendaysvt.com

SEVEN DAYS

Lilly Tobin gives Ida an immense cockney accent and a laugh-inducing ditzy take on all the action. As Miss Skillon, Amanda Ryan Paige wraps herself in righteous indignation, only to spend much of the play being propped up, dragged and hidden in the closet — the classic fate of the pompous scandalmonger. Tyler Nye as Lionel, Kenneth Kimmins as the bishop, and Bill Carmichael as Humphrey are all at their best when flustered and are rarely anything but. “I was perfectly sane when I entered this house,” Humphrey says, almost poignantly. Kordell Pritchard uses multiple foreign accents as the dodgy Russian spy, and Zachary Gibson has his hands full trying to sort out the mess as the police sergeant. A grand set and lighting design by John Paul Devlin provides the ideal staid backdrop to the shenanigans. The living room of patterned wallpaper and knickknacks is richly detailed, and the doors get a wonderful workout. The audience is asked to turn off cellphones before the lights go down, and disconnecting from today’s headlines is just what a show of silly gags and goofy chases is for. If the news offers little to laugh about, the sight of a vicar scrambling about in underwear and garters always does. m

08.08.18-08.15.18

INFO See How They Run by Philip King, directed by Catherine Doherty, produced by Saint Michael’s Playhouse. Through August 11: Tuesday through Saturday, 8 p.m.; and Saturday, 2 p.m., McCarthy Arts Center, Saint Michael’s College, in Colchester. $36-45. saintmichaelsplayhouse.org

FEATURE 35

comic-book boing suits a farce that invites the audience to try keeping track of who’s hiding where and how a certain scene must appear to a certain character stumbling upon it. The play was written during wartime in England, designed to satisfy a need for frivolous entertainment that would buoy Britons in the midst of shelling and tragedy. Indeed, on opening night in London’s West End, three bombs exploded nearby. The show carried on for an audience accustomed to treating theater as a defiant, if silly, dose of normalcy during the war. The leading man later complained that all three explosions occurred during his funniest lines. The play has lightweight entertainment objectives, but it takes craft to realize them. Director Catherine Doherty makes fine use of a stage wide enough for galloping, the actors’ agility and an array of compromising circumstances in which the characters are pinned down and squirming. Doherty gives all the players their little heroic moments when they seem almost able to master their situations. The free fall, when hope is again lost, is the delight of this staging. King’s story relies on stock characters. It’s up to the actors to make them appealing without begrudging them a complete lack of depth. This cast has the charm and energy to amuse an audience that can root for more mayhem yet also hope these dears survive. It’s pride that farces shatter, not bones. Clare Mahoney as Penelope and Gregory Jon Phelps as Clive form a dashing duo in search of innocent fun. Their insouciant expectation of surviving a night in which each mix-up breeds another makes them endearing. Just before Clive dons the vicar’s suit, he voices his only doubt: “I’ve been in a lot of plays where something like this doesn’t turn out well.”

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heatrical farce rule of thumb: If the first scene establishes that the vicar owns three suits with clerical collars, before the play is over three vicars will pop up onstage, most of whom are not ordained. In Philip King’s 1943 British comedy See How They Run, now at Saint Michael’s Playhouse, a cast of nine must run, jump, pass out, slam doors and claw their way through misunderstandings. Last Thursday night’s audience did a lot of laughing. In the updated version of the play performed at St. Mike’s, it’s just after the end of World War II. Penelope, an American former actress, is happily married to the Reverend Lionel Toop, the vicar in a small English village. She’s stylish and free-spirited; he’s stuffy but good-hearted. Miss Skillon, the self-righteous village busybody, peppers the vicar with complaints, hoping he’ll join her in being shocked at Penelope’s penchant for wearing trousers about town. Lionel proves adept at selective hearing and genial nodding. On an ordinary Saturday evening, Ida, the maid, has the night off and the vicar will be playing piano for the glee club. Even tight-jawed Miss Skillon, having lodged her latest complaints, may eventually depart. Penelope should have a quiet night to herself. Tomorrow her uncle, the bishop, is to arrive. And the visiting Reverend Humphrey will give the Sunday sermon; he also may drop by the house. The key to all these comings and goings is that none of the visitors has met the vicar before, and one clerical collar looks much like another. Enter Clive. He’s an American GI in uniform with a night of leave who looks up Penelope, his stage partner during their youthful stint as actors. They fondly, and platonically, recall their acting days and decide to go out to a play. But Clive can’t be on the town in uniform, so Penelope suggests the perfect disguise: the vicar’s second-best suit. And off we go. The audience has a lot of doors to watch as the characters dart in and out, pursuing either each other or a good hiding place. King stacks up the coincidences and misunderstandings to a bonfire-size pile, starting with Ida flirting with Clive and Miss Skillon mistaking Clive for Lionel. Mix in the unexpected arrivals of the bishop, Humphrey, and an escaped Russian spy, and you have the meaning of madcap. The characters exert themselves so much that consciousness is truly at a premium here. Characters are drunk, dizzy from running or out cold from a knock on the head. No concussion protocols are needed in a staging that uses sound effects to signal a KO. The


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Second Act

Theater review: A Doll’s House, Part 2, Weston Playhouse B Y A L E X BROW N

S

COURTESY OF HUBERT SCHRIEBL

THEATER

Lizbeth Mackay (left) and Kathleen McNenny

going to help her manipulate Torvald into getting that divorce. Nora is not only proud of her independence but encourages other women to secure theirs. To Torvald, that amounts to running away, refusing to try to repair a marriage

VIEWERS NEED NOT BE FAMILIAR WITH IBSEN

TO ENJOY THIS TAUT, EMOTIONAL PIECE.

INFO

FEATURE 37

A Doll’s House, Part 2 by Lucas Hnath, directed by Mary B. Robinson, produced by Weston Playhouse. Through August 26: Tuesday through Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 3 p.m.; and Wednesday and Saturday, 2 p.m., Weston Playhouse at Walker Farm in Weston. $22-43. westonplayhouse.org

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Contact: alex@sevendaysvt.com

08.08.18-08.15.18

and meet the demands of a relationship. Nineteen-year-old Emmy is eager to be married and craves the comfort of being held, being possessed. Nora winces to hear it. All these points of view are made equally compelling. Torvald can see that something in the marriage was wrong. But what should replace it? This production brings a strong script to life with performances built on keen understatement. Director Mary B. Robinson shows a superb command of the play’s balance, letting each idea emerge with the strength to challenge viewers. And she gives the play’s humor a prominent place.

As Nora, Kathleen McNenny is passionate and articulate enough to be persuasive. But if Nora’s ideas can convince the audience, they can’t sway the other characters. McNenny embodies all the strength we imagine Ibsen’s character was seeking when she boldly walked out. Now, when McNenny reenacts the craven way the married Nora used to flirt when asking Torvald for money, we see her shrink into a frailer person. Showing off her fine clothes, this Nora doesn’t expect that the wounds her return will open in others will affect her, too. But they do. Boyd Gaines, McNenny’s real-life husband, plays Torvald. Gaines portrays him with an exquisite touch of pain, his strong eyebrows hooding wounded eyes. He walks with a slight stoop for age but a prickly carriage, striving to maintain his posture just as he does his position in society. He waits to speak but knows he’ll be heard, imperious by habit. Gaines gives Torvald a tremor to contrast with Nora’s firm energy. She appears the braver of the two, until Torvald risks much more than Nora had believed he could. As Emmy, Margo Seibert is youthful and confident. She makes Emmy too good-natured to fiercely oppose Nora, but disagree she can. When Emmy comes up with what she thinks

is a fine solution to Nora’s problem, Seibert shows how proud she is of her own cleverness. Nora speaks to only one of her grown-up children and learns that this young woman has no need of her. Lizbeth Mackay plays Anne Marie with a gentle physical sag in her movement. She’s showing age, but she’s also letting Nora — and the audience — underestimate her. Anne Marie has the play’s most directly comic moments, and Mackay tucks them as closely as she curls her handkerchief in tight, the better to let the humor bloom on its own. That admirable restraint also serves her in dramatic exchanges. She is riveting to watch as she moves from tenderness to anger to understanding. Staged in Weston’s new, intimate three-quarter-round theater, the play has the quality of chamber music. Scenic designer Jason Simms creates an open space stripped of ornament and comfort. The round wood floor places the actors in a circle; it fulfills Hnath’s interest in verbal exchanges that play like two boxers sparring. The back wall is covered in what appears to be gray flannel, lending softness to an otherwise harshly empty space. Centered on the wall is a paneled wooden door, the only detail of Nora’s house needed to tell her story. In a powerful, otherworldly touch, lighting designer Ann G. Wrightson projects a thin, glowing light around the doorframe before the show begins. The austere space adds an abstract quality to the dialogue, stripping the conversation down to elemental truths. It’s a proving ground, a laboratory in which ideas can be tested. The play’s ending doesn’t fix marriage or prove that a good one is impossible. It shows how opposition is a bond in itself, and a cathartic one. m

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ymmetry: A circle of a floor and a square of a wall. In that otherwise blank wall is an ornate wooden door. Nora knocks, and the door she slammed when leaving her bourgeois marriage 15 years earlier opens. In Weston Playhouse’s production of A Doll’s House, Part 2, the play’s beautiful geometry reveals itself in the balance of comedy and drama, and in the equal merits of arguments from four complex characters. The play is not so much a sequel to Henrik Ibsen’s 1879 A Doll’s House as a fresh contemplation of how marriage limits independence yet offers vital, if difficult, human connection. Lucas Hnath’s smart, funny and spellbinding 2017 play is a series of two-person conversations in which Nora speaks with the nanny who raised her children; her husband, Torvald; and her daughter, Emmy. The play honors Ibsen’s characters, but Hnath shifts the style from Ibsen’s then-groundbreaking realism to modern abstraction and wraps 19thcentury circumstances in contemporary dialogue. Seeing Nora and Torvald in a new playwright’s hands suggests that Ibsen’s proto-feminist statement still ripples through our culture. In a potent juxtaposition, they speak in Hnath’s lean vernacular while wearing period costumes. The format is also a contrast of old and new. Ibsen’s play is in three acts and runs two and half hours. Hnath’s is in the contemporary 90-minute, intermission-free style. Ibsen was criticizing the cultural norms of his day; Hnath doesn’t nudge us forward but ponders where we are by looking backward. Viewers need not be familiar with Ibsen to enjoy this taut, emotional piece. As Hnath imagines it, after walking out on her family, Nora has built a good life, writing popular novels under a pseudonym. Now she’s discovered a serious piece of unfinished business: Torvald never obtained a divorce. That destroys Nora’s financial freedom and puts her at some personal risk. She’s come back to finish her exit. But nanny Anne Marie, who remains a household servant, doesn’t accept Nora’s views on marriage and is not


food+drink

FIRST

BITE

PHOTOS: JAMES BUCK

Amy’s Wild Hart cocktail, Spicy Paloma Sunrise cocktail, P&T Burger, cajun shrimp tacos, and pearl pesto couscous

New Kid in Town

38 FOOD

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Good food, casual feel and communal comfort at Peg & Ter’s in Shelburne B Y SA L LY POL L AK

W

e had only traveled to Shelburne from Montpelier and Burlington, but my friends and I felt like we were on vacation. Our destination was Peg & Ter’s, the casual, upbeat restaurant that opened in late June in the building that was home to Café Shelburne for 25 years. The space has been transformed into a bright and airy dining room with walls in natural wood and white. Tables ring an L-shaped bar in the center. On the south side of the building, a homey lounge with a blue couch, cushioned chairs and a brass-topped table provides additional seating. We found three spots at the end of a high-top communal table near the bar. From this vantage, we could share the tapas-style plates that came from the

kitchen, talk among ourselves and chitchat with people in the neighboring party. The vacation vibe at Peg & Ter’s flows, I think, from its easy matching of food, feel and menu design: All three are straightforward and good-looking, with a dash of panache. The masterstroke here is the food, which is all of the above plus good and reasonably priced. By selecting à la carte items from a varied but cohesive menu, diners can chow down on creative, fresh fare and have more dishes to choose from on a subsequent visit. The menu — both the food it describes and the physical object — was conceived and designed by executive chef Cory Perkins. It’s divided into four sections: Graze, Devour, Share and Indulge. The first two sections are broadly organized by themes — veggie, Mexican, meat and sides — that represent pairing suggestions

from the kitchen. Executive chef Pickled vegeta- Cory Perkins bles (Graze, $4) might go well with kale Caesar salad ($10) or pearl pesto couscous (Devour, $10). Street corn (Graze, $7) could start a meal that includes chorizo tacos (Devour, $10). Fingerling potatoes (Graze, $7) are lined up with the house burger (Devour, $11). We enjoyed (and devoured) an ensemble of shared plates. The corn-on-the-cob came with chile-lime crème and cilantro, while a refreshing — and refreshingly simple — watermelon-and-feta salad was flavored with mint and lime. A touch of heat and sweet (think pineapple salsa) gave spark to shrimp tacos, and a cheeseburger came served on an English muffin and topped with a runny sunny-side-up

egg. Out of habit, I put ketchup on my half of the burger only to find I didn’t need it: The sandwich was packed with its own juice and flavor. Perkins, 33, moved to Vermont a year ago from Somerville, Mass., where he had lived for about six years and cooked in Boston-area restaurants. Last summer, on vacation from his job as sous chef at True Bistro, a vegan restaurant in Somerville, Perkins hiked the Long Trail. On his NEW KID IN TOWN

» P.40


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varieties of bagels. The menu will include soups, sandwiches, smoothies, coffee and tea. The restaurant will have an espresso machine, according to Fersing. Burlington Bagel Bakery is a family affair for the founding Fersings, who live in St. Albans, and their children. Avery’s brother, Hayden, rolls and bakes the bagels in South Burlington.

Junior’s Jr. FORMER DISHWASHER TO OPEN JR’S IN WINOOSKI

8/2/18 3:49 PM

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Lasagna will be on the menu at Jr’s Original

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Open 7  Days  Lunch,  Dinner,  Take  Out  

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On August 2, six weeks after Junior’s Italian closed its Colchester restaurant following 25 years in business, a longtime employee announced on Facebook that he would open a restaurant, JR’S ORIGINAL, at 348 Main Street in Winooski.

“I want to remind people of the old location,” childhood friend KYLE CRETE plan to open their pizzeria Andreescu said. “I want to bring back that old familyand Italian restaurant on style Italian vibe. It’s going November 1, Andreescu told to be a cozy little place. [We] Seven Days. The restaurant, want to get away from the which will accommodate about 50 people, will occupy corporate aspect of these large restaurants.” the same building that is The eatery, with a full the new home of PHO DANG bar, will feature many of VIETNAMESE CAFÉ, which moved two blocks north to 347 Main the Italian specialties that were on the menu at Junior’s a month ago. Italian, including lasagna, Jr’s Original will pay tribspaghetti, chicken Parmesan, ute to the original Junior’s, chicken marsala and veal said Andreescu, 33, who saltimbocca. washed dishes at Junior’s Andreescu will be chefItalian as a Winooski teen when the restaurant was on manager of the new place; Crete is a business partner. Main Street in Colchester. Andreescu’s wife, KATELYN, He went on to become a line cook at Junior’s Italian and will help with the baking, most recently was a manager preparing desserts such as at JUNIOR’S STOWE. He is leavtiramisu, cheesecake and ing that position to open Jr’s flourless chocolate cake. Original. “I’m proud to bring it to Winooski,” said Andreescu, who was born in Romania and immigrated with his family to Winooski as D REAM STIM E a toddler. “It’s my home city.” BOGDAN ANDREESCU and his

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launched its business on St. Paul Street in Burlington, it will return downtown when a new branch opens at 93 Church Street on the Marketplace, site of the former BRUEGGER’S BAGELS. The restaurant is expected to open in October, according to assistant manager AVERY FERSING. This will be a second location for the bagel bakery, which relocated to Shelburne Road in South Burlington three decades ago. The availability of the space on Church Street, coupled with a “really great staff,” presented an opportunity for expansion, said Fersing, daughter of owners KYLE and TAMARA FERSING. “There was a perfect spot open.” The two-story space is under renovation, including installment of new floors, counters and booths, Fersing said. But the basic layout of the bagel shop and café will remain the same. The Burlington branch, like its South Burlington counterpart, will make and serve about two dozen

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SERVING UP FOOD NEWS

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SIDEdishes BY SA L LY P OLL ACK

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PHOTOS: JAMES BUCK

New Kid in Town « P.38

Interior lounge at Peg & Ter’s

21-day walk, he ate oatmeal with dehydrated berries for breakfast, wraps with hummus and cheese for lunch, and couscous or quinoa with dehydrated vegetables for dinner. Walking the length of Vermont across its highest peaks, Perkins fell in love with the state, he recalled, and decided to move here. On his return to Somerville, he gave two weeks’ notice at True Bistro, a place he praised for its “influential” chef and co-owner, Stuart Reiter. In Vermont, Perkins applied for a dozen cooking jobs that he found on Craiglist and heard back quickly from almost all of them. After interviewing at the three restaurants that most interested him, he accepted a cooking job at Twin Farms, an upscale resort in Barnard. Within a month of his Long Trail hike, he had moved to Randolph. “I chose to work at Twin Farms because I knew I would grow and learn there,” Perkins said. “I had never worked high-end before. As soon as I walked into the kitchen, I knew I was going to learn a lot there.” In May, he left that job to open Peg & Ter’s, the fourth restaurant he has helped launch, but his first executive chef position. He’s also working as the prep cook and line cook. “It’s a really cool place,” Perkins said. “I like it a lot.” The restaurant is named for Peggy and Terry Thatcher, late parents of Tina Helzer, who owns the restaurant with her husband, Charlotte native Johnny Helzer. Peg & Ter’s aims to capture the ambience of the dinner parties Pearl pesto couscous the Thatchers loved, Johnny told Seven Days in May. Johnny has a background in wine sales, and the wine list here is small but well rounded, with choices in red and white starting at $8 a glass. We had noteworthy cocktails to start our meal, mixed with local spirits: a cucumber gimlet and a house special called Amy’s Wild Hart ($14) that

THE CHEESECAKE IS SERVED IN A GLASS, PARFAIT-STYLE,

40 FOOD

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WITH BLUEBERRY COMPOTE SPICED WITH CINNAMON AND CLOVE ON TOP.

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Interior dining area

features gin from the Shelburne distillery for which the drink is named. Its froth comes from egg white, its zing from the booze, with a hit of grapefruit and elderflower. In keeping with the vacation theme, I topped off dinner with a generous pour of La Farra Prosecco. Perkins, who has a degree in baking LISTEN IN ON LOCAL FOODIES...

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from Southern New Hampshire University, said he designed the menu to complement the “community-based feel” of Peg & Ter’s. The food also fits the way he likes to eat when he goes out: sharing plates and interacting with fellow diners. “I like going out and trying a few dishes, not getting one full plate,” Perkins said. “I was a vegetarian for nine years. I garden a lot. And I’m very, very into fresh, organic local food.” Our party of three shared everything we ordered, even though we skipped the section of the menu titled Share. That category consists of cheese and charcuterie boards, and we were more interested in exploring new things. I especially liked Perkins’ couscous salad, a hockey-puck-size mound of pestoCheesecake dressed pearl couscous studded with veggies. Toward the end of our meal, a second party filled the seats of the big table where we were eating at one end. While I like to think my friends and I are good company at a barroom meal, I’m pretty sure we were not what attracted the attention of our dining neighbors. Rather, it was our cheesecake. Perkins’ version is served in a glass, parfait-style, with a disc of graham cracker crust at the bottom, a rich cream cheese/condensed milk filling as the middle layer, and blueberry compote spiced with cinnamon and clove on top. I hit the Peg & Ter’s jackpot when an orange slice in the compote got stuck on my spoon and delivered to me more than my share of cheesecake. Still, my friend Diane managed to eat enough to make this pronouncement: “This is the best dessert I’ve ever had.” m Contact sally@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Peg & Ter’s, 5573 Shelburne Road in Shelburne, 489-5390, pegandters.com

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SUMMER HERE IS DELICIOUS. Dining at

TASTY BITS FROM THE CALENDAR AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM

COURTESY OF BLACK DIAMOND BARBECUE

BASINHARBOR.COM • 802.475.2311 Untitled-17 1

We may be known for our steaks... but we know seafood!

8/6/18 2:10 PM

FISH • SCALLOPS • SALMON SHRIMP • LOBSTER

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Swine and Wine

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EVERY THURSDAY IN AUGUST 5-SUNDOWN FEAT. BARR HILL GIN SLUSHIES ON THE JUNIPER PATIO 8/9: Erin Cassels-Brown Band & Loupo

SEVEN DAYS

8/16: Live music TBD & DJ Mae 8/23: Mia Valentini & Friends 8/30: Esther Rose & DJ Mae + Rosé All Day! Untitled-22 1

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VERMONT ADDISON COUNTY BUILDING SOIL FROM CHEESEMAKERS FAIR & FIELD DAYS THE GROUND UP Ag enthusiasts check Farm visitors take in FESTIVAL out exhibits featuring tips on improving soil Foodies join more rare-breed animals along fertility and water than 40 Vermont with horses and oxen, retention and enhancing cheesemakers for a day as well as tractor pulls, the local underground of tastings, workshops fried dough and carnival microbiome through and demos featuring rides. Through Saturday, methods such as hundreds of Vermont August 11, Addison composting, cover food and beverage County Fairgrounds, cropping, hugelkultur artisans. Sunday, New Haven. $5-45. Info, and companion planting. August 12, Shelburne addisoncountyfielddays. Saturday, August 11, 10 Farms. $20-175. Info, com. a.m.-4 p.m., Linden Road, vtcheesefest.com. New spring menu served daily from 5pm - 10pm Hartland. $40-50. Info, nofavt.org.

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08.08.18-08.15.18

PIG & THE PRINCESS Saturday, August 11, 4-10 p.m., Dedalus Wine Shop, Market & Wine Bar, Burlington. $33.30. Info, 865-2368, dedaluswine.com.

Fire & Ice

Vermont’s Iconic steakhouse

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What rhymes with pork? Cork! On Saturday, August 11, Burlington’s Dedalus Wine Shop, Market & Wine Bar teams up with Black Diamond Barbecue and vom Boden wine imports for a night of smoked meat and German wines. Vom Boden founder Stephen Bitterolf will be on the lawn pouring glasses of golden dry Rieslings, sparkling pét-nats and food-friendly alpine reds. Meanwhile, Morrisville meat man Jason Pacioni and company dish smoketinged pork and poultry with cool summer slaws and pickles, mac and cheese, and sauces a-slather.

8/6/18 4:53 PM


Pop Up the Mountain In Stowe, Fridays are for fancy guest-chef picnics on the green B Y HA NNA H PAL M E R EGAN

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 08.08.18-08.15.18 SEVEN DAYS 42 FOOD

PHOTOS COURTESY OF JESSE SCHLOFF PHOTOGRAPHY

I

n tiny incandescent lights, the sign above the window at Spruce Peak Village’s walk-up bar advertised “VT BEER.” But on the service counter, a display of stiff red roses, glittering with crystallized sugar, and neat rows of cut-crystal coupe glasses told a different story. For willing drinkers, the evening would begin with cocktails. And the flowers were meant for eating. The night was Friday, July 27; the affair, the second of Stowe Mountain Lodge’s Farm Table Fridays. The luxe mountainside hotel-resort launched the supper series earlier this summer. Along with Spruce Peak’s performing arts center, golf club, shops and private residences, the lodge is independent of the Stowe ski area, which Vail Resorts purchased in summer 2017. At the bar, a bartender spritzed a glass with juniper-spruce perfume from Burlington’s Alice & the Magician. “It’s a custom scent,” he said, adding bourbon from Smugglers’ Notch Distillery and citrus juice sweetened with herbed brown-sugar syrup. He finished the drink with fizzy, mauve-colored wine and placed a flower on top. “If you’d like to eat the rose,” he added, “you might want to start by pulling off a petal or two. The flavor is actually a little bitter.” With drinks in hand, my dinner mate and I wandered onto the village green, a grassy circle surrounded by the soaring timber-frame buildings that define modern resort architecture. Around us were a climbing gym here, a clubhouse there, and shops selling everything from outdoor clothing to high-end home décor. A modest crowd of resort visitors, golf club members and a few locals mingled near the bar and on Adirondack chairs. Servers circulated with trays of deviled eggs and pillowy cheese puffs made with aged cheddar from Newbury’s 4 Corners Farm. As evening shadows fell over the green, long tables set with linen runners and napkins, white dinner plates and sparkling glasses beckoned all to come and sit for dinner. In the kitchen, Jacqueline Cochran of the Club at Spruce Peak, known locally as “Chef Jackie,” put the final touches on an opulent evening picnic.

FOOD

Farm Table Fridays dinner at Stowe Mountain Lodge

Vases of peach and yellow dahlias matched the warm colors in a tomato salad course. The heirloom jewels — sourced from nearby Pete’s Greens and dressed in mellow red-wine vinaigrette — popped with juicy freshness. Hunks of ripe avocado absorbed the acid, while ribbons of shaved fennel added a sweet crunch. Up the mountain, the chairlifts were still. The snow guns stood silent as the light faded from dusky blue to flickering candlelight. In this relative summer quiet lies the genesis of the supper series, said Scott Cochran, who is the operations director at Stowe Mountain Lodge and Chef Jackie’s husband. “The goal of every ski resort is to make it four seasons,” he said. “This place is an asset to the community in the summer; it’s not just for skiing.” Cochran is also the area director of food and beverage for Two Roads Hospitality, which manages guest services at hundreds of hotels and restaurants worldwide, including the Stowe Mountain Lodge. That means the lodge has

WHAT I ENJOY ABOUT COOKING IN VERMONT IS

THE RUSTIC, HOMEY FEEL. JA C Q U EL I N E C O C H R A N

Chef Jacqueline Cochran

access to an impressive stable of chefs from Two Roads-managed properties around the country. On August 31, chef Derek Simcik of Seattle’s Scout restaurant at the Thompson Hotel will prepare this summer’s final on-the-green dinner. Past meals

have come from Patrick Ryan, nominated for a James Beard Award for best chef in 2017 for his Kansas City, Mo., restaurant Port Fonda; and Carlos Benedicto of New York City’s Temple Court at the Beekman Hotel, where James Beard Award winner Tom Colicchio is chef-owner.


Humane

Society of Chittenden County

Lordeyes AGE/SEX: 13-year-old neutered male ARRIVAL DATE: July 3, 2018

COURTESY OF KELLY SCHULZE/MOUNTAIN DOG PHOTOGRAPHY

REASON HERE: Owner could no longer care for Lordeyes. DOGS/CATS/KIDS: Lordeyes needs to be the only dog in his new home. He lived with cats many years ago and may do well with another, with a proper and slow introduction. He has lived with children and does well with them.

housing »

DID YOU KNOW? When a dog shakes off, yawns or pants, it can be a sign of stress. Be on the lookout for these common behaviors, as your dog could be uncomfortable!

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SUMMARY: This senior gentleman has won our hearts; we cannot handle

how adorable his sweet, graying face is! Lordeyes is a well-established fella — a perk of adopting a senior pup! Despite being a senior guy, he’ll totally surprise you with the pep in his step and all the love he has to offer! He adores tennis balls (maybe too much), hanging with the staff and going for walks! Got a stick? He'll take the stick, too! There's something about trees that he's obsessed with, but we think that's just perfect for all of our Vermont seasons' outdoor adventures!

APARTMENTS, CONDOS & HOMES

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display service ads: $25/$45 homeworks: $45 (40 words, photos, logo) fsbos: $45 (2 weeks, 30 words, photo) jobs: michelle@sevendaysvt.com, 865-1020 x21

mo. Call/text Susan, 802-989-8941.

on the road

housing

CARS/TRUCKS

FOR RENT

2002 SUZUKI AERIO SX AWD, 4 cylinder. 5 speed. Hatchback. Only 112,000 miles. Great MPG. Ultra clean and well maintained; color silver. New inspection. $1,200. 802-863-0176.

$2,500 QUEEN CITY PARK HOME 2-BR + office. Energy efficient, completely renovated, HDWD floors, gourmet kitchen, gas fireplace, basement, W/D, 2-car garage. NS. Avail. Sep. 15. 425-2910.

2007 TOYOTA CAMRY XLE V6 86,298 miles, black, auto, leather, excellent condition, $2,000, susg@netscape.com.

Valley Painting

Interior/exterior Painting Sheetrocking & Taping Cathedral Ceilings Custom Carpentry Any Size Job Free Estimates Fully Insured

Call TJ NOW!

FURNISHED HOUSE $1,950 2-BR, 2-BA, corner lot w/ parking, laundry, Victorian cottage, stainless kitchen, gas parlor stove & furnace. $1,950/mo. Contact: Jim Reagan 802-5910975 or jameslreagan@ gmail.com. HINESBURG EFFICIENCY APT. Ground-floor apt. Kitchen, full BA. $900/ mo. + sec. dep. Incl. heat, electric, cable, Wi-Fi, shared laundry. No pets. Call Tracie, 802-363-9663.

APT. FOR RENT 3-BR, 2-BA apt. on HOUSE FOR RENT street off Dorset St. Small house for rent in incl. all utils. $2,000/ Cambridge. Secluded lomo. Contact Deb at cation, $875/mo. + utils. 238-6989 or email Propane heat. Plowing BURLINGTON 2007 TOYOTA TACOMA debwehrlin@gmail.com. lg-valleypainting112614.indd 1 12:11 & PMmowing incl. Year VICTORIAN 11/24/14 Good condition. lease begins Sep. 1. NS/ Lg. 1-BR, very bright, BEACON ROW TOWN 115K miles. Silver pets. Email slaughlin@ overlooks park & lake HOMES color. 5-speed manual. myfairpoint.net, or call w/ beautiful sunsets. Very close to Healthy $4,950. Email rks@ 802-644-5358. 2nd floor. Kitchen, LR, Living, Trader Joe’s & country-lawyer.net. restored HDWD, tub/ soon Target! Attached HOUSE FOR RENT IN shower combo, off2015 PROMASTER CITY garage, plenty of WESTFORD street parking. $1,120/ TRADESMAN storage. NS/pets. Small cape on farmland mo. trash/plowing White, like new, roof 2-BR, 2-BA. $1,700/ on Cambridge Rd. New incl. NS/pets. Text/call rack, backup camera, mo. mboucher@ floors, paint, W/D. 793-0767. Bluetooth, low mileage. summitpmg.com, $1,700/mo. + utils. Avail. $16,000. Call 802-881802-497-1740. now. 802-878-7405. BURLINGTON, 234 3870. Great vehicle. SHELBURNE RD. BURLINGTON Charming victorian 2nd- KEEN’S CROSSING IS SCOOTERS, LOW Single room, Hill NOW LEASING! floor 1-BR apt. HDWD, MILEAGE Section, on bus line. Keen’s Crossing is now BA w/ clawfoot tub, 2012 Propel Daytona No cooking. Linens accepting applications shower. $1,050/mo. 150 scooters, 150cc, furnished. 862-2389, for our Affordable Trash, plowing, some less than 1,000 miles. 2-6 p.m. No pets. Waitlist! 1-BR: $1,054. utils. incl. NS/pets. Excellent condition. 2-BR: $1,266. Income Lease, off-street Storage compartment. BURLINGTON CLEAN restrictions apply. parking for 1. Avail. Sep. SPACIOUS HOUSE Two avail. $1,000 each. Call for details. 802 1. 802-793-0767. Downtown 4-BR. Near Contact 75crossfield@ 655-1810, keenscrossUVM & downtown. 2 lg. gmail.com. ing.com. BURLINGTON, living rooms, entrance DIRECTLY DOWNTOWN way, storage, full basePINECREST AT ESSEX Furnished, stylish, ment. Parking. No pets. 7 Joshua Way, Essex. newly renovated 2-BR Avail. now. $2,800/ Avail. Aug. 15, 1-BR, We Pick Up apt. Off-street parking, mo. Ray, 233-2991, $1,185/mo. incl. utils. & private W/D, new & Pay For Junk mbenway@sunrayvt. underground parking. carpets. Wi-Fi & cable com. Automobiles! Independent senior TV in all rooms incl. No pets. $1,700/mo. incl. all housing; must be age BURLINGTON PEARL 55+. Pet free, smoke utils. Avail. Sep. Dennis, ST. VICTORIAN free. 802-672-9197 or 520-203-5487. 1-BR apt. avail. 2 rrappold@coburnfeeley. blocks from Church Route 15, Hardwick com for a showing. EAST MIDDLEBURY St. $1,050/mo. Heat & 802-472-5100 Furnished 2-room HW incl. 1-year lease. TAFT FARM SENIOR suite. Private entrance, 3842 Dorset Ln., Williston Refs. req. NS/pets. Call LIVING COMMUNITY private BA, kitchen. All 802-391-7288. 802-793-9133 10 Tyler Way, Williston, incl.; W/D, Wi-Fi, utils., independent senior off-street parking. living. Newly remodeled Tasteful. Immaculate. 1-BR unit on ground Serene. In classic sm-allmetals060811.indd 7/20/15 1 5:02 PM level (restricted view) 1840 home. $500/ avail., $1,045/mo. incl. utils. & cable. NS/ pets. Must be 55+ years of age. cburns@ EQUAL HOUSING of the law. Our readers are hereby coburnfeeley.com or OPPORTUNITY informed that all dwellings advertised 802-879-3333. All real estate advertising in this in this newspaper are available on an

WILLISTON VILLAGE APT. Spacious 1-BR on 2nd floor of quiet, historic Williston village house. W/D, garden space, yearly lease. NS/ pets. $1,250/mo. incl. heat & more. Avail. Sep. 1. 802-324-1254, chapinkaynor@gmail. com.

HOUSEMATES NEED A ROOMMATE? Roommates.com will help you find your perfect match today! (AAN CAN) ROOM FOR RENT, AVAIL. NOW Monkton farmhouse on 20 acres, all amenities incl., garden space, 13.5 miles to I-89. Start $400/mo. 453-3457.

OFFICE/ COMMERCIAL OFFICE/RETAIL SPACE AT MAIN STREET LANDING on Burlington’s waterfront. Beautiful, healthy, affordable spaces for your business. Visit mainstreetlanding.com & click on space avail. Melinda, 864-7999.

services

BIZ OPPS LOCAL FLOWER SHOP FOR SALE Well-located, profi table & highly respected business. Motivated seller but willing to train before retiring. Revenues of $450,000. Owner draws $75,000. Contact broker: John Stimets; jstimets@ countrybusiness.net; 802-879-0108. NATURAL BODY PRODUCTS MFR. FOR SALE Strong, recognizable brand. Established wholesale & retail customer base. Steady revenues. Relocate near you. jstimets@ countrybusiness.net, 802-879-0108.

C-2 CLASSIFIEDS

SEVEN DAYS

08.08.18-08.15.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

355-0392

TAYLOR PARK RESIDENCES St Albans. 8 modern, new construction 1-BR, 2-BR, 1-BR w/ den, & 2-BR w/ den apts., located in the heart of downtown in a beautiful historic building. Easy access to I-89, Route 7 & Route 105. Overlooks Taylor Park. Elevator onsite & W/D in each apt. Landlord pays trash/ recycling & HW. Tenant pays electric. Electric heat & A/C. Rent ranges from $1,250-1,975/ mo. Leasing for Sep. 1, 2018. Contact Christine for a showing: cgolden@neddere. com, 802-373-5893, taylorparkresidences. com.

newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 and similar Vermont statutes which make it illegal to advertise any preference, limitations, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, sexual orientation, age, marital status, handicap, presence of minor children in the family or receipt of public assistance, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or a discrimination. The newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate, which is in violation

equal opportunity basis. Any home seeker who feels he or she has encountered discrimination should contact: HUD Office of Fair Housing 10 Causeway St., Boston, MA 02222-1092 (617) 565-5309 — OR — Vermont Human Rights Commission 14-16 Baldwin St. Montpelier, VT 05633-0633 1-800-416-2010 hrc@vermont.gov

TAFT FARM SENIOR LIVING COMMUNTY 10 Tyler Way, Williston, independent senior living. Newly remodeled 1-BR unit on 2nd floor avail., $1,135/mo. incl. utils. & cable. NS/ pets. Must be 55+ years of age. cburns@ coburnfeeley.com or 802-879-3333.

print deadline: Mondays at 4:30 p.m. post ads online 24/7 at: sevendaysvt.com/classifieds questions? classifieds@sevendaysvt.com 865-1020 x37

CLASSIFIEDS KEY appt. appointment apt. apartment BA bathroom BR bedroom DR dining room DW dishwasher HDWD hardwood HW hot water LR living room NS no smoking OBO or best offer refs. references sec. dep. security deposit W/D washer & dryer

PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1,000/week mailing brochures from home! Genuine opportunity. Helping home workers since 2001! Start immediately! incomecentral. net. (AAN CAN) WANT TO SELL TO AMAZON? I help businesses sell to Amazon. I have the contacts & the experience & can make the initial introduction, help w/ listing products, market products using AMS, train how to process orders & manage the relationship. If you’re looking to start selling to Amazon or grow your existing business, let’s talk. You can reach me at jeremystern@icloud.com.

CHILDCARE AFTER-SCHOOL CARE NEEDED After-school (and more) care needed for young boy in Georgia, Vt., w/ disabilities. He is energetic, quirky & fun loving but needs help w/ daily tasks. Looking for someone to provide companionship, keep him safe, & help him learn, explore & make good choices. Please reach out if you are interested or have questions. Thank you! jfreivt@gmail.com.

For Lease

Corner of Pearl and South Union 233 Pearl Street, Burlington, VT 2,330+/- SF on two floors Including 4 on-site parking spaces $3000 month plus utilities Features: A wonderful opportunity to locate your business to a visible, historic and fully renovated property. Recently used as a law office but flexible space allows for multiple uses. First Floor: • Four (4) individual offices and a bathroom • Hardwood floors • Oak stairway to lower level

Lower Floor • One (1) individual office • Two (2) large open areas (previously accommodated 4 desks) (wired for 8) which may be separated into smaller areas • Bathroom • Beautiful pink and purple exposed masonry and exposed beams. 6 windows • Carpeted 6h-aarongoldberg050218.indd 1

Rent and Utilities • $3000/mo. gross (Landlord pays taxes, building insurance, maintenance, etc.). • Tenant pays individually metered gas heat and hot water, electric and water. Former law office paid $190 monthly for utilities.

Brokers Protected Contact: Aaron Goldberg agoldbergvt@gmail.com 4/25/18 3:32 PM


REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS: List your properties here and online for only $45/week. Submit your listings by Mondays at noon to homeworks@sevendaysvt.com or 802-865-1020, x37.

BROWSE THIS WEEK’S OPEN HOUSES: sevendaysvt.com/open-houses DESIGNED FOR YOUR LIFESTYLE!

ESSEX VILLAGE COLONIAL

5+/- ACRES IN SHELBURNE

SOUTH BURLINGTON | 30 LAURENTIDE LANE

ESSEX | 33 JUNIPER RIDGE ROAD | #4710594

SHELBURNE | 44 FRANK’S WAY | #4697701

OPEN Sunday 1-3

OPEN Thur-Sun 1-4 Welcome home to this gorgeously kept 4 bedroom home with finished basement, master suite, & upgraded kitchen. This home boasts a vibrant open floor plan, hardwood floors, and many modern touches. Sited on a large, landscaped lot close to 5 corners, schools, & shopping. $437,500

Explore the Model Home and Design Center at Hillside at O'Brien Farm. Located on a picturesque hillside, this 30+ acre neighborhood offers 118 energyefficient homes in the heart of South Burlington. Choose from 20 unique home designs, floor plans, and finishes. Prices Starting at $334,500.

Steve Lipkin 846.9575 LipVT.com

VIEWS OF LAKE CHAMPLAIN PORT HENRY, N.Y. | 22 LEWALD LANE

COMPUTER

homeworks

HW-Landvest062718.indd 1

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List your properties here and online for only $45/ week. Submit your listings by Mondays at noon. Sue Cook

518-546-7557 realty-results.com

CREATIVE EMPLOYMENT/ COMMUNITY COACH Seeking creative, energetic & supportive person to work w/ young adult in the community & in work settings. Please call Barb at 355-3781.

ENTERTAINMENT DISH TV $59.99 For 190 channels + $14.95 high-speed internet. Free installation, smart HD DVR included, free voice remote. Some restrictions apply. Call now: 1-800-373-6508. (AAN CAN) LIVELINKS CHAT LINES Flirt, chat & date! Talk to sexy real singles in

Call or email Ashley today to get started: 865-1020 x37, homeworks@sevendaysvt.com

your area. Call now! Untitled-25 802-345-2038. 1 844-359-5773. (AAN classicshadespainting@ 7/16/18 12:14 PM CAN) gmail.com.

HEALTH/ WELLNESS PSYCHIC COUNSELING Psychic counseling, channeling w/ Bernice Kelman, Underhill. 30+ years’ experience. Also energy healing, chakra balancing, Reiki, rebirthing, other lives, classes, more. 802-899-3542, kelman.b@juno.com.

HOME/GARDEN CLASSIC SHADES PAINTING Interior/exterior painting. Lead certified. Fully insured. Local refs. avail. Call now & book your free estimate.

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MISCELLANEOUS CHEAP AIRLINE FLIGHTS! We get deals like no other agency. Call today to learn more: 800-7670217. (AAN CAN) HEAR AGAIN! Try our hearing aid for just $75 down & $50/ mo. Call 866-787-3141 & mention 88271 for

a risk-free trial! Free shipping. (AAN CAN) HUGHESNET SATELLITE INTERNET 25mbps starting at $49.99/mo.! Fast download speeds. Wi-Fi built in! Free standard installation for lease customers! Limited time. Call 1-800-490-4140. LUNG CANCER? & AGE 60+? You & your family may be entitled to significant cash award. Call 844-898-7142 for information. No risk. No money out of pocket. (AAN CAN)

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Say you saw it in...

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MUSIC music

INSTRUCTION BASS LESSONS W/ ARAM For all ages, levels & styles. Beginners welcome! Learn songs, theory, technique & more on Pine St. Years of pro performing, recording & teaching experience. 1st lesson half off! 598-8861, arambedrosian.com, lessons@arambedrosian.com.

sevendaysvt.com

11/24/09 1:33:19 PM

6/6/16 4:30 PM

BASS, GUITAR, DRUMS, VOICE LESSONS & MORE! Learn bass, guitar, drums, voice, flute, sax, trumpet, production & beyond w/ some of Vermont’s best players & independent instructors in beautiful, spacious lesson studios at the Burlington Music Dojo on Pine St. All levels & styles are welcome, incl. absolute beginners! Gift certificates avail. Come share in the music! burlingtonmusicdojo. com, info@burlingtonmusicdojo.com, 540-0321. GUITAR INSTRUCTION Berklee graduate w/ 30 years’ teaching experience offers lessons in guitar, music theory,

MUSIC »

CLASSIFIEDS C-3

COMPUTER PROBLEM Call 802-231-3034. Ask for Matt. Military & college student discounts w/ ID. CompTIA Network+, A+ certified professional, AS, computer information management, BS network administration.

Wade Weathers

802-238-6362 802-488-0120 acook@landvest.com wweathers@landvest.com

SEVEN DAYS

SOMETHING SEW RIGHT Professional clothing alterations since 1986. Creative, quality work from formal wear to leather repairs. 248 Elm St., 2nd floor, Montpelier. 229-2400, pmorse52@live.com.

Averill Cook

08.08.18-08.15.18

CLOTHING ALTERATIONS

RR-Cook-031418.indd 1

846.9575 LipVT.com

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Lovely traditional home on .63 acres overlooking Lake Champlain. 4-BR, 1.5-BA, formal DR, spacious kitchen, sleeping porch, and covered veranda. Many recent updates including a new roof, furnace, HW heater, exterior paint and paved parking for 4 vehicles. Just 35 minutes from Vergennes/ Middlebury. $139,900.

Steve Lipkin

Charming country Cape beautifully sited on 5 acres with manicured lawns, gardens and westerly views. 3,450 sf includes a light-filled open floor plan with 10 rooms including gourmet kitchen, 4 BR, 3BA, master suite with luxurious bath and radiant heat. Beautiful hardwood floors throughout. Expansive finished lower level. Many improvements. $675,000.


music [CONTINUED] music technology, ear training. Individualized, step-by-step approach. All ages, styles, levels. Rick Belford, 864-7195, rickb@rickbelford.com.

fsb

Drive, Suite 1, South Burlington, VT 05403 and Pines IV, LLC, 7 Aspen Drive, Suite 1, South Burlington, VT 05403 filed application #4C0965-2A for a project generally described as construction of a 2,300 square foot, 1 story building addition to house existing administrative office space. The Project includes a boundary line adjustment between Lots 4 and 4C. The Project is located at 7 Aspen Drive in South Burlington, Vermont.

FOR SALE BY OWNER

List your property here for 2 weeks for only $45! Contact Ashley, 864-5684, fsbo@sevendaysvt.com.

SHELBURNE HEIGHTS HOME

TIMBER FRAME IN PEACHAM VERMONT

Spotless four bedroom, 1 3/4 bath, 1800 sq.ft. ranch on 0.88 acres in lovely neighborhood, close to golf course and minutes from Burlington. Terraced back yard includes gazebo. $369,000. 802-558-1444

The District #4 Environmental Commission is reviewing this application under Act 250 Rule 51 — Minor Applications. A copy of the application and proposed permit are SOLO & BAND available for review at REHEARSAL SPACE the office listed below. Air-conditioned, soundThe application and a treated band rehearsal Planning Commission, evidence will be 1 members listed on the draft permit may alsoFSBO be - ditional Nancy Leary 080118.indd 7/30/18 FSBO-Feldman080818.indd 12:09stephanie.monaghan@ PM 1 space avail. on Pine St. vermont.gov the Regional Planning presented at the hearing. attached Certificate of viewed on the Natural in the evening. PerService under “For Your Commission, affected Any hearing request by Resources Board’s web night & regular weekly Information” may have a state agencies, and adan adjoining property site (http://nrb.vermont. BURLINGTON spots avail. Some gear joining property owners owner or other interested conflict of interest, or if gov) by clicking on “Act DEVELOPMENT REVIEW on-site. Check out there is any other reason and other persons to the 250 Database” and enter- person must include a BOARD burlingtonmusicdojo. a member should be disextent they have a parpetition for party status. ing the project number TUESDAY AUGUST 21ST, com for more info. qualified from sitting on ticularized interest that Prior to submitting a “4C0965-2A”. 2018, 5:00 PM this case, please contact may be affected by the request for a hearing, PUBLIC HEARING the district coordinator proposed project under please contact the disNo hearing will be held NOTICE as soon as possible, no the 10 criteria. Non-party trict coordinator at the and a permit may be isThe Burlington Developlater than prior to the participants may also be telephone number listed sued unless, on or before ment Review Board will response date listed allowed under 10 V.S.A. August 24, 2018, a person below for more informahold a meeting on Tuesabove. Section 6085(c)(5). tion. Prior to convening notifies the Commission day August 21st, 2018 a hearing, the Commisof an issue or issues reat 5:00pm in Contois Should a hearing be Dated at Essex Junction, sion must determine quiring the presentation Auditorium, City Hall. held on this project and Vermont this 2nd day of that substantive issues of evidence at a hearing you have a disability August, 2018. requiring a hearing have or the Commission sets 1. 18-1190CU; 233 Pearl St for which you are going been raised. Findings of the matter for hearing (RH, Ward 8E) Aaron and to need accommodaBy: Stephanie H. Fact and Conclusions of on its own motion. Any Rebecca Goldberg tion, please notify us by Monaghan Law will not be prepared hearing request must be ACT 250 NOTICE Time extension request August 24, 2018. District #4 Coordinator unless the Commission in writing to the address MINOR APPLICATION for continuance of non111 West Street holds a public hearing. below, must state the #4C0965-2A conforming general office Parties entitled to Essex Junction, VT 10 V.S.A. §§ 6001 - 6093 criteria or subcriteria at use. participate are the Mu05452 If you feel that any of issue, why a hearing is On July 26, 2018, Pines nicipality, the Municipal 802/879-5662 the District Commission what adHousing, 7 Aspen Complete the following puzzle by 2.using UsingLP,the enclosedrequired mathandoperations as a guide, fill 18-1186CU;the 162 North

STUDIO/ REHEARSAL

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08.08.18-08.15.18 SEVEN DAYS

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DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: ★★★

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: ★★

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Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each 9-box square contains all of the numbers one to nine. The same numbers cannot be repeated in a row or column.

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3880 sq.ft. Built 1996 on 29+ acres in current land use. Power, septic, drilled well. Five minutes to Peacham Pond and Marshfield Damn. With open floor plan easily finished to your desires. $225,000 OBO. 802-426-3543, 802-793-5952.

Champlain St (RM, Ward 3C) Sean Melinn and Jessica Hyman Demolish existing garage included in Vermont historic register and replace with larger garage. 3. 19-0105MP; 111 Colchester Ave (I, Ward 1E) Fletcher Allen Health Care, Inc. Amendment to master sign plan for UVM Medical Center. 4. 18-1208CA/MA; 75 Briggs St (ELM, Ward 5S) Onion River Cooperative Inc. Construct a new health club/climbing center. Includes a new building and site improvements. 5. 19-0008CU; 46 Chittenden Dr (RL, Ward 6S) Ute Regan Establish short-term rental (bed & breakfast) within existing residence. 6. 19-0021CA/MA; 375 North Ave (RM-W, Ward 4N) 375 North Avenue LLC Revisions to Buildings M, P, Q , & R. Additional story added to each. Other design changes specific to building M including 2 levels of parking. Also, expanded surface parking area. No increase in total number of dwelling units. Plans may be viewed in the Planning and Zoning Office, (City Hall, 149 Church Street, Burlington), between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Participation in the DRB proceeding is a prerequisite to the right to take any subsequent appeal. Please note that ANYTHING submitted to the Planning and Zoning office is considered public and cannot be kept confidential. This may not be the final order in which items will be heard. Please view final Agenda, at www. burlingtonvt.gov/pz/ drb/agendas or the office notice board, one week

before the hearing for the 8/6/18 10:46 AM order in which items will be heard. CITY OF BURLINGTON TRAFFIC REGULATIONS The following traffic regulations are hereby enacted by the Public Works Commission as amendments to Appendix C, Rules and Regulations of the Traffic Commission, and the City of Burlington’s Code of Ordinances: 7A Accessible spaces designated. No person shall park any vehicle at any time in the following locations, except automobiles displaying special handicapped license plates issued pursuant to 18 V.S.A. § 1325, or any amendment or renumbering thereof: (1)-(169) As Written (170) On the south side of Adams Court beginning three hundred forty-seven (347) feet east of Shelburne Street and extending east for a distance of twenty (20) feet. Adopted this 18th day of July, 2018 by the Board of Public Works Commissioners: Attest Norman Baldwin, P.E. Assistant Director – Technical Services Adopted 07/18/18; Published 08/08/18; Effective 08/29/18. Material in [Brackets] delete. Material underlined add. CITY OF BURLINGTON TRAFFIC REGULATIONS The following traffic regulations are hereby enacted by the Public Works Commission as amendments to Appendix C, Rules and Regulations of the Traffic Commission, and the City of Burlington’s Code of Ordinances:


SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS 13 No parking any time except trucks loading or unloading. No person shall park a vehicle at any time on the following streets, unless the same is a truck actually engaged in loading or unloading, and for no more than thirty (30) minutes: (1)-(3) As Written. (4) [Reserved.] On the south side of Main Street, in the first, second, and third parking space east of St. Paul Street, Monday through Friday from 7:00 AM 4:00 PM. (5)-(7) As Written. Adopted this 18th day of July, 2018 by the Board of Public Works Commissioners: Attest Norman Baldwin, P.E. Assistant Director – Technical Services Adopted 7/18/18; Published 08/08/18; Effective 08/29/18. Material in [Brackets] delete. Material underlined add. CITY OF BURLINGTON TRAFFIC REGULATIONS The following traffic regulations are hereby

enacted by the Public Works Commission as amendments to Appendix C, Rules and Regulations of the Traffic Commission, and the City of Burlington’s Code of Ordinances: 13 No parking any time except trucks loading or unloading. No person shall park a vehicle at any time on the following streets, unless the same is a truck actually engaged in loading or unloading, and for no more than thirty (30) minutes: (1) As Written. (2) [Reserved.] On the north side of College Street, in the first four (4) spaces east of Saint Paul Street, between 7:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m. (3)-(7) As Written. Adopted this 18th day of July, 2018 by the Board of Public Works Commissioners: Attest Norman Baldwin, P.E. Assistant Director – Technical Services Adopted 7/18/18;

Published 08/08/18; Effective 08/29/18. Material in [Brackets] delete. Material underlined add. CITY OF BURLINGTON TRAFFIC REGULATIONS The following traffic regulations are hereby enacted by the Public Works Commission as amendments to Appendix C, Rules and Regulations of the Traffic Commission, and the City of Burlington’s Code of Ordinances: 17 Designation of parking meter zones. (e) Three (3) hour zones. The following streets or portions of streets are hereby designated as three (3) hour parking: (1)-(18) As Written. (19) [Reserved.] On the west side of St. Paul Street from King to Maple Streets. (20)-(21) As Written. (22) [Reserved.] St. Paul Street from Main to King Streets. (23)-(71) As Written. Adopted this 18th day of July, 2018 by the Board of

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Public Works Commissioners: Attest Norman Baldwin, P.E. Assistant Director – Technical Services Adopted 07/18/18; Published 08/08/18; Effective 08/29/18. Material in [Brackets] delete. Material underlined add. NOTICE & WARNING SPECIAL CITY MEETING The legal voters of the Central District (Ward 2 and Ward 3) in the City of Burlington, Vermont are hereby notified and warned to come and vote at a Special City Meeting on Tuesday, the 14th day of August, 2018 between 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. in their respective wards, at the voting place hereinafter named, for the purpose of electing a certain city officer as follows: CENTRAL DISTRICT – One School Commissioner to complete a two-year term which began on April 4, 2017 and which will expire on April 1, 2019, such seat having become vacant by resignation.

The following are designated as polling places, viz: WARD TWO – H.O. Wheeler School, 6 Archibald Street.; WARD THREE – Lawrence Barnes Elementary School, 123 North Street. The polls open at 7:00 a.m. and close at 7:00 p.m. Signed: Miro Weinberger, Mayor Publication Dates: August 8, 2018 Burlington, Vermont NOTICE TO VOTERS For August 14, 2018 Central District School Commissioner Special Election BEFORE ELECTION DAY: CHECKLIST POSTED at Clerk’s Office by Sunday July 15, 2018. If your name is not on the checklist, then you must register to vote. SAMPLE BALLOTS will be posted by Saturday, August 4, 2018. HOW TO REGISTER TO VOTE: There is no deadline to register to vote. You will be able to register to vote at your designated polling place on the day of the

Open 24/7/365. Post & browse ads at your convenience. election. You can register prior by visiting the town clerk’s office or going online to olvr.sec.state. vt.us. REQUEST EARLY or ABSENTEE BALLOTS: You or a family member can request early or absentee ballots at any time during the year of the election in person, in writing, by telephone, email, or online at mvp. sec.state.vt.us. The latest you can request ballots for the August 14, 2018 Central District School Commissioner Special Election is the close of the Town Clerk’s office at 5:00pm on Monday, August 13, 2018. (Any other person authorized by you who is not a family member must apply in writing or in person for a ballot for you.) WAYS TO VOTE YOUR EARLY BALLOT: • You may vote in the town clerk’s office before the deadline. • Voter may take his or her ballot(s) out of the clerk’s office and return in same manner as if the ballots were received by mail. • Have ballot mailed to you, and mail or deliver it back to the clerk’s office before Election Day or to

the polling place before 7:00 p.m. on Election Day. • If you are sick or disabled before Election Day, ask the town clerk to have two justices of the peace bring a ballot to you at your home. (Ballots can be delivered on any of the eight days preceding the day of the election or on the day of election.) ON ELECTION DAY: If your name was dropped from the checklist in error, or has not been added even though you submitted a timely application for addition to the checklist, you can fill out a new registration form. ! If the clerk or Board of Civil Authority does not add your name, you can appeal the decision to a superior court judge, who will settle the matter on Election Day. Call the Secretary of State’s Office at 1-800-439-VOTE (439-8683) for more information. If you are a first time voter who submitted your application to the checklist individually by mail and did not submit the required document, you must provide a current and valid photo identification, or a bank statement, utility bill, or

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government document that contains your name/ current address. If you have physical disabilities, are visually impaired or can’t read, you may have assistance from any person of your choice. If any voters you know have disabilities let them know they can have assistance from any person of their choice. If you know voters who cannot get from the car into the polling place let them know that ballot(s) may be brought to their car by two election officials. If you have any questions or need assistance while voting, ask your town clerk or any election official for help. NO PERSON SHALL: ! Vote more than once per election, either in the same town or in different towns. ! Mislead the Board of Civil Authority about your own or another person’s true residency or other eligibility to vote. ! Hinder or impede a voter going into or from the polling place. ! Socialize in a manner that could disturb other

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» SEVENDAYSVT.COM 08.08.18-08.15.18 SEVEN DAYS CLASSIFIEDS C-5


immediately by passing outside the guardrail.

[CONTINUED] voters in the polling place. ! Offer, bribe, threaten or exercise undue influence to dictate or control the vote of another person. FOR HELP OR INFORMATION: Call the Secretary of State’s Office at 1-800439-VOTE (439-8683). (Accessible by TDD)

C-6 CLASSIFIEDS

SEVEN DAYS

08.08.18-08.15.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

If you believe that any of your voting rights have been violated, you may file an Administrative Complaint with the Secretary of State’s Office, 128 State Street, Montpelier, VT 05633. If you believe you have witnessed efforts to commit any kind of fraud or corruption in the voting process, you may report this to your local United States Attorney’s Office. If you have witnessed actual or attempted acts of discrimination or intimidation in the voting process, you may report this to the Civil Rights Division of the United States Department of Justice at (800) 253-3931. INSTRUCTIONS FOR VOTERS using Vote Tabulator Ballots CHECK-IN AND RECEIVE BALLOTS: • Go to the entrance checklist table. • Give name and, if asked, street address to the election official in a loud voice. • Wait until your name is repeated and checked off by the official. • An election official will give you a ballot. • Enter within the guardrail and go to a vacant voting booth. MARK YOUR BALLOT: For each office listed on the ballot, you will see instructions to “Vote for not more than one, or Vote for not more than two, etc.” • To vote for a candidate, fill in the oval to the right of the name of the candidate you want to vote for. • WRITE-IN candidate(s). To vote for someone whose name is not printed on the ballot, use the blank “write-in” lines on the ballot and either write-in the name or paste on sticker, then fill in the oval. CAST YOUR VOTE by depositing your voted ballot into the vote tabulating machine. LEAVE the voting area

NOTICE OF SELF STORAGE LIEN SALE, JERICHO MINI STORAGE 25 North Main Street, Jericho, VT 05465. The contents of the following self storage units will be sold at public auction, by sealed bid, on August 22, 2018 at 12:00 PM. Daryk Beaulieu#34, Terry Kirkland#62, Patrick Densham #126 Units will be opened for viewing for auction, sale by sealed bid to the highest bidder, cash only. Contents of entire storage unit will be sold as one lot. PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE BURLINGTON COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT ORDINANCE ZA-19-01 GROCERY IN E-LM ZA-19-02 ADDITIONAL RESIDENTIAL UNIT IN RL ZA-19-03 PARKING AMENDMENTS Pursuant to 24 V.S.A. §4441 and §4444, notice is hereby given of a public hearing by the Burlington Planning Commission to hear comments on the following proposed amendments to the City of Burlington’s Comprehensive Development Ordinance (CDO). The public hearing will take place on Tuesday, August 28, 2018 beginning at 6:45pm in Conference Room 12, City Hall, 149 Church Street, Burlington, VT. Pursuant to the requirements of 24 V.S.A. §4444(b): Statement of purpose: This amendment is proposed to the Burlington CDO as follows: • ZA-19-01: The purpose of this proposed amendment is to expand the allowable size for grocery stores within the Enterprise-Light Manufacturing Zoning District to 35,000 square feet. • ZA-19-02: The purpose of this proposed amendment is to remove the provision for an additional unit to be added to an existing multi-family structure within the Residential-Low Density zone. • ZA-19-03: The purpose of this amendment is to add parking requirements for Art Gallery/ Studio uses, align parking requirements for small daycares/preschools with those of large daycares/ preschools, to allow tandem parking for all dwelling units and to clarify its arrangement when used for multifamily structures, and to allow parking within a front yard setback within a driveway when there

is room for at least one parking space beyond the setback. Geographic areas affected: the proposed amendments are applicable to the following areas in the City of Burlington: • ZA-19-01: The proposed amendment applies to the portion of the Enterprise Light Manufacturing zoning district between Home and Flynn Avenues. • ZA-19-02: The proposed amendment applies to all properties zoned Residential-Low Density. • ZA-19-03: The proposed amendment applies to all parts of the city. List of section headings affected: • ZA-19-01: The proposed amendment modifies Footnote 26 in Appendix A- Use Table. • ZA-19-02: The proposed amendment deletes Section 4.4.5 (d) 5. A. • ZA-19-03: The proposed amendment modifies Table 8.8.1-1, Sec 8.1.12 (c), andSec. 8.1.14 (b). The full text of the Burlington Comprehensive Development Ordinance and the proposed amendment is available for review at the Department of Planning and Zoning, City Hall, 149 Church Street, Burlington Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. or on the department’s website at www.burlingtonvt. gov/pz. STATE OF VERMONT FRANKLIN UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT DOCKET NO: 148-4-17 FRCV FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION v. JOHN B. GARROW, GLENDA R. GARROW AND VERMONT FEDERAL CREDIT UNION OCCUPANTS OF: 207 Church Street, Village of Enosburg Falls, Town of Enosburg VT MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF

REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered November 29, 2017, in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by John B. Garrow and Glenda R. Garrow to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for PHH Mortgage Corporation, dated April 5, 2013 and recorded in Book 123 Page 515 of the land records of the Town of Enosburg, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of the following Assignments of Mortgage: (1) Assignment of Mortgage from Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for PHH Mortgage Corporation to PHH Mortgage Corporation dated August 6, 2015 and recorded in Book 128 Page 674 and (2) Assignment of Mortgage from PHH Mortgage Corporation to Federal National Mortgage Association dated December 22, 2015 and recorded in Book 129 Page 537, both of the land records of the Town of Enosburg for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 207 Church Street, Village of Enosburg Falls, Town of Enosburg, Vermont on August 22, 2018 at 11:30 AM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage,

LANDS OF THE METHODIST CHURCH; EASTERLY BY SAID CHURCH STREET; SOUTHERLY BY LANDS NOW OR FORMERLY OF MRS. CALVING HAMMOND; AND WESTERLY BY LANDS NOW OR FORMERLY OF MRS. ARDELL GIBSON. BEING AND MEANING ALL AND THE SAME LANDS AND PREMISES CONVEYED TO THE GRANTORS HEREIN BY WARRANTY DEED OF MANLEY P. WETHERBEE AND MARIAN C. WETHERBEE DATED JANUARY 14, 1976 AND RECORDED IN BOOK 57, PAGE 179 OF THE ENOSBURG LAND RECORDS. THIS INSTRUMENT SHALL ALSO CONSTITUTE A BILL OF SALE AND IS EVIDENCE OF DELIVERY OF THE FOLLOWING ITEMS OF PERSONAL PROPERTY LOCATED IN AND ABOUT THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PREMISES; THREE (3) CORDS OF WOOD, FUEL OIL IN THE TANK, ONE (1) MAGIC CHEF BUILT-IN DISHWASHER PRESENTLY LOCATED IN THE FIRST FLOOR APARTMENT, ONE (1) ELECTRIC STOVE PRESENTLY LOCATED IN THE SECOND FLOOR APARTMENT, ONE (1) TELEVISION ANTENNA PRESENTLY LOCATED ON

To wit: A CERTAIN PIECE OF LAND IN ENOSBURG FALLS IN THE COUNTY OF FRANKLIN AND STATE OF VERMONT, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, VIZ: A LOT OF LAND TOGETHER WITH THE DWELLING HOUSE AND OTHER BUILDINGS THEREON, SITUATE ON THE WESTERLY SIDE OF CHURST STREET IN THE VILLAGE OF ENOSBURG FALLS, AND BOUNDED SUBSTANTIALLY AS FOLLOWS: NORTHERLY BY

Residential, Multifamily & Foreclosure Expert

EXCEPT EASEMENTS AND RIGHTS OF WAY OF RECORD, IF ANY, AND EXCEPT REAL ESTATE TAXES ASSESSED ON THE PREMISES FOR THE TAXABLE YEAR COMMENCING APRIL 1, 1986, WHICH ARE TO BE PRORATED TO THE DATE OR DELIVERY OF THIS INSTRUMENT. TAX ID #: CH0207 For information only: Property Address: 207 CHURCH STREET, ENOSBURG FALLS, VT 05450 Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description. Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described. TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the

TED N E R

time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale.

STATE OF VERMONT FRANKLIN UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT DOCKET NO: 365-1016 FRCV HOMEBRIDGE FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC. v. LORI GROFF OCCUPANTS OF: 176 Wilkins Road, Fairfax VT

In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered September 22, 2017, in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Lori Groff to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as a nominee for HomeBridge Financial Services, Inc., dated December 19, 2014 and recorded in Book 239 Page 50 of the land records of the Town of Fairfax, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of an Assignment of Mortgage from Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as a nominee for HomeBridge Financial Services, Inc to HomeBridge Financial Services, Inc. dated February 5, 2016 and recorded in Book 245 Page 317 of the land records of the Town of Fairfax for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 176 Wilkins Road, Fairfax, Vermont on August 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage,

MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF

To wit: Being all and the same

The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale. DATED: July 20, 2018 By: /S/Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032

1 BED 1 BATH $1300 HEAT & HOT WATER INCLUDED AIR CONDITIONING IN EACH UNIT

REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq.

NOW LEASING 1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments

2 BED 2 FULL BATH $1600 RESERVED UNDERGROUND PARKING NON-AGRESSIVE PET WITH $500 DEPOSIT,

BRAND NEW CONSTRUCTION 100 GRIFFIN LANE, ESSEX, VT 05452

current vet/vaccination records, and proof of renters insurance is required

www.coburnfeeley.com | (802) 864-5200 ext 225 | coburnfeeleyleasing@coburnfeeley.com 12h-coburnfeeley062718.indd 1

6/25/18 3:49 PM

FOR SALE BY OWNER • $1.5M FIRM Incredible opportunity. First time on market since 1955!

Robbi Handy Holmes • 802-951-2128 robbihandyholmes@c21jack.com Find me on Making it happen for you!

Approximately ¾ of an acre on Shelburne Bay, facing west. 100 feet of owned lakefront in quiet, private community of beautiful homes on a paved road. City water and sewer. One of the very last buildable spots on the lake in this area. Stay in the original 1920’s camp while your home is built. Don’t miss your chance!

No brokers. No realtors. Serious inquiries only. Email only: estherfiddes@gmail.com 6h-fiddes080118.indd 1

16t-robbihandyholmes092717.indd 1

THE ROOF, ALL CURTAINS AND DRAPES PRESENTLY LOCATED IN THE FIRST FLOOR APARTMENT.

9/25/17 11:58 AM

7/30/18 3:28 PM


SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

Date: 8/1/18 /s/ James Leary, Esq. Signature of Fiduciary James Leary, Esq. Executor/Administrator: 39A Center Street Brandon, VT 05733 jimleary@sover.net 802-247-9595 Name of publication Seven Days

Publication Dates: August 8, 2018 Name and Address of Court: Chittenden Unit Probate Division 175 Main Street Burlington, VT 05402 STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT CHITTENDEN UNIT PROBATE DIVISION DOCKET NO. 821-6-18 CNPR In re estate of Raymond E. Leary.

Publication Dates: 8/8/18 Name and Address of Court: Chittenden Superior Court Probate Division PO Box 511 Burlington, VT 05402

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

FROM P.C-4

Post & browse ads at your convenience. STATE OF VERMONT WASHINGTON UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT DOCKET NO: 440-7-16 WNCV WILMINGTON TRUST, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO CITIBANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR BEAR STEARNS ALT-A TRUST 2007-2, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-2 v. ETSURO NISHIYACHI OCCUPANTS OF: 240 Spring Hollow Lane, Montpelier VT MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq.

Parcel 1: Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to Stuart M. Abbiati and Georgianne S. Abbiati by deed of John J. Staab and D. Bruce Clewley, Trustee of Towne Hill Development Trust, said deed being dated November 14, 1967 and recorded in Volume 121 at Page 171 of the City of Montpelier land records and being more particularly described as follows, viz: Being a lot of land with all buildings and improvements thereon, and being shown and depicted as Lot No. 41 on a plan of lots entitled: “Property of Staab and Johnston, Towne Hill Road, Montpelier, Vermont, surveyed in 1959 by L. Carlson and amended as to Lots 29 and 30, January 1966,” and of record in the City of Montpelier Land Records. Parcel 2: Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to Stuart M. Abbiati and Georgianne S. Abbiati by D. Bruce Clewley, Trustee of Towne Hill Development Trust dated August 15, 1972 and recorded in Volume 133 at Page 173 of the City of Montpelier Land Records. Said lands and premises arc commonly known and designated as 240 Spring Hollow Lane, Montpelier, Vermont. Subject to and benefitted by all rights of ways, easements, covenants, permits and rights of record. Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description. Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description.

the said mortgage above described. TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale. The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale. DATED: July 16, 2018 By: /S/Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032 WANTED TO LEASE BY USDA The US Department of Agriculture in Chittenden County, City of Williston, VT, seeks to lease 3,447 ABOA/net usable square feet, not to exceed 3,965 rentable square feet, class A office space with 28 parking spaces for a 10 year lease term. To be considered, space offered must be located in the delineated area: bound on the North by Mountain View Road/ Industrial Ave; East by Old Stage Road; South by I-89; West by Muddy Brook. (Map available by request.) Offered space must meet Government requirements for fire safety, accessibility, seismic and sustainability standards per the terms of the lease. A fully serviced lease is required. Offered space shall not be in 100year floodplain. Expressions of Interest with contact info and location/size of offered space due by 4:00pm Eastern time August 22, 2018 to: Eran Greenberg, Transaction Manager 1861 International Drive, Suite 300 Mclean, VA 22102 Voice: 703.852.6209 Email: Eran.Greenberg@ cbre.com See www.fbo.gov for more info. Keyword: Williston

CLASSIFIEDS C-7

Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over

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SEVEN DAYS

In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered September 28, 2016, in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Etsuro Nishiyachi and the late Suzanne Austin Nishiyachi to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for CTX MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC, dated December 29, 2006 and recorded in Book 516 Page 149 of the land records of the City of Montpelier, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of the following Assignments of Mortgage: (1) Assignment of Mortgage from Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for CTX MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC to Citibank, N.A., as Trustee for the Certificateholders of Structured Asset Mortgage Investments II Inc., Bear Stearns ALT-A Trust 2007-2, dated April 29, 2009 and recorded in Book 90 page 741 and (2) Corrective Assignment of Mortgage from Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for CTX MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC to Wilmington Trust, National Association, as Successor Trustee to Citibank, N.A., as Trustee for Bear Stearns Alt-A Trust 2007-2, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-2, dated March 4, 2013 and recorded in Book 649 Page 185 of the land records of the City of Montpelier for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 240 Spring Hollow Lane, Montpelier, Vermont on August 23, 2018 at 10:00 AM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage,

To wit: Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to Etsuro Nishiyachi and Suzanne Austin Nishiyachi by Warranty Deed of Timothy M. Heney and Donna M. Heney dated April 28, 1994 and recorded April 29, 1994 in Volume 271 at Page 326 of the City of Montpelier Land Records.

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To the creditors of Karen Abair late of Colchester, VT.

I have been appointed to administer this estate. All creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the first publication of this notice. The claim must be presented to me at the address listed below with a copy sent to the court. The claim may be barred forever if it is not presented within the four (4) month period.

2

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

To the creditors of Raymond E. Leary late of Shelburne, VT.

Open 24/7/365.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

6x

2-

the grid using the numbers 1 - 6 only once in each row and column.

PUZZLE ANSWERS

STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT CHITTENDEN UNIT PROBATE DIVISION DOCKET NO. 362-3-18 CNPR In re estate of Karen Abair.

Name of publication Seven Days

2

Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and as-

DATED: June 28, 2018 By: /S/Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032

Corey F. Wood, Esquire Executor/Administrator: 34 Pearl Street PO Box 174 Essex Junction, VT 05453-0174 802-879-6304 cwood@bpflegal.com

1

Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description.

The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale.

Date: July 30, 2018 /s/ Corey F. Wood Signature of Fiduciary

4

Beginning at a point located on the westerly edge of the right of way of Town Highway #29, which point is marked by a 5/8 inch rebar which point marks the northeasterly corner of the parcel herein and the southeasterly corner of Lot #4; thence extending on a bearing of N 43° 03’ 00” W a distance of 453.1 feet to a point marked by a 5/8 inch rebar; thence turning to the left and extending in a straight

In further aid of this description reference is hereby made to a survey map dated September 26, 1988 prepared by Hannon Associates showing a 5 lot subdivision all on the westerly side of Wilkins Road which map is recorded in Map Volume 3, Page 13 of the Land Records of the Town of Fairfax.

TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale.

I have been appointed to administer this estate. All creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the first publication of this notice. The claim must be presented to me at the address listed below with a copy sent to the court. The claim may be barred forever if it is not presented within the four (4) month period.

6

Being a parcel of land located on the westerly side of Town Highway #29 in Fairfax, Vermont, the Wilkins Road, socalled, and being more particularly described as follows:

Said parcel is bounded on the east by the Wilkins Road, on the north by land now or formerly of Kevin and Leigh Gross and on-the west and south by lands of Arthur and Margaret Webb.

sessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described.

3

Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to John Groff and Susan Groff by Trust Deed of Howard W. Popple and Barbara S. Popple, Trustees of the Popple Trust u/t/a February 24, 1997, dated Deed dated September 28, 2001 of record at Book 130, Page 108 of the Town of Fairfax Land Records. The interest of Susan Goff was conveyed to John U. Groff by Quitclaim Deed dated September 2, 2010 and recorded at Book 207, Page 377 of said land records.

line on a bearing S 28° 14’ 20” W a distance of 250 feet to a point marked by an iron rebar; thence turning to the left and extending on a bearing of S 48° 40’ 50” E a distance of 371.5 feet to a point in a westerly edge of the right of way of Town Highway #29 which point is marked by a 5/8 inch rebar; thence turning to the left and extending along the westerly edge of the right of way of Town Highway #29 a distance of 201 feet to the place of beginning.

View and post up to 6 photos per ad online.

5

lands and premises aquired by Lori Groff by Order Regarding Elections of Spuse dated September 17, 2013 and to be recorded in the Town of Fairfax Land Records.

Show and tell.

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C-8 08.08.18-08.15.18

ATTENTION RECRUITERS: POST YOUR JOBS AT: PRINT DEADLINE: FOR RATES & INFO:

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTMYJOB NOON ON MONDAYS (INCLUDING HOLIDAYS) MICHELLE BROWN, 802-865-1020 X21, MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

YOUR TRUSTED LOCAL SOURCE. JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM American Legion Post 91 is seeking a Lunch cook for approximately 34 hours per week. Lunch served Monday - Friday 11am-2pm. Also pub menu served Friday 5:30-7pm. Number of hours depend on daily prep time. Must be creative with menu options, preparing soups, sandwiches and daily specials along with our regular menu selections. Candidate should have knowledge of proper food handling, labeling and safety. Responsible for making sure kitchen is clean at end of shift. Job requires use of knives and other kitchen wares as well as fryolators, gas range, flat top grill, char grill and convection oven. Must be able to work well with fellow employees. vtalpost91@gmail.com. 3H-AmericanLegionPost91 080818.indd 1

Engaging minds that change the world University of Vermont Center for Health and Wellbeing Counseling and Psychiatry Services The University of Vermont is seeking temporary providers to join our Counseling and Psychiatry Services (CAPS) team for the upcoming academic year. We are searching for providers who exhibit flexibility in both their therapeutic and collegial style and who can work well in the fast-paced and cyclical nature of a college counseling center. Our service model requires the ability to manage a full caseload comprised of students with a wide range of clinical severity within a brief treatment frame. Primary responsibilities include individual counseling with students. Secondary responsibilities may include crisis intervention, consultation with faculty and staff; and campus outreach as needed.

Seven Days Issue: 8/8 Due: 8/6 by noon Size: 1.86 x 7 Administrative Coordinator Cost: $308.55(with 1 week online)

NCSS has an opportunity for someone with enthusiasm to support the operations of the Behavioral Health Division by working closely with the division’s leadership team and a range of programs. The successful candidate will have strong written and oral communication skills, excellent interpersonal skills, and be detail and deadline oriented. This position also provides direct support to our intake service and has potential for growth in supporting a range of initiatives. Join our supportive, missiondriven organization where you can make a difference! Our clinic offers excellent benefits and is located close to Interstate 89 and is a short commute from Burlington and surrounding areas.

LIMITED SERVICE FULL TIME

For a complete description, or to apply online, visit Women, minorities and persons with disabilities are highly encouraged to apply. EOE

4t-CityofBurlington080818.indd 1

Full-Time, Part-Time and Per Diem positions available to assist in safely transporting our clients and their children. Must have a valid driver’s license and clean driving record. This is a great opportunity to work in a meaningful environment empowering others. For a full job description and to apply, visit:

www.goodnewsgarage.org/careers. ASCENTRIA CARE ALLIANCE IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.

8/3/18 10:51 AM

Wake Robin is Expanding! Staff Nurse (LPN or RN) and LNAs

NCSS, 107 Fisher Pond Road, St. Albans, VT 05478 | ncssinc.org | E.O.E.

Drivers in Burlington, Morrisville, Barre/Montpelier and Hartford/WRJ!

Under the supervision of a Senior Public Works Engineer, the Associate Public Works Engineer is responsible for entry level professional and administrative engineering work involved in the development and implementation of various civil engineering projects within the public right-of-way for the City of Burlington, generally including streets, sidewalks, and structures but excluding water, wastewater, and stormwater. Requirements include a Bachelor’s Degree in Civil Engineering, surveying and computer drafting skills experience.

www.governmentjobs.com/careers/burlingtonvt.

To apply for this position please visit our website at www.ncssinc.org/careers or email your resume and cover letter to careers@ncssinc.org.

We’re hiring Drivers!

The University of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, protected veteran status, or any other category legally protected by federal or state law. The University encourages applications from all individuals who will contribute to the diversity and excellence of the institution.

ASSOCIATE PUBLIC WORKS ENGINEER

8/6/18 1:49 PM

These roles require a minimum of a 4t-NCSS080118.indd 1 7/27/18 Master’s in Counseling, Counseling Psychology, or Social Work. Vermont licensed or rostered by time of start date. Demonstrated professional commitment to diversity and inclusiveness is essential. Preference will be given to applicants who are available to work 4 or 5 days per week (30-37.5 hours weekly). Temporary employees are not eligible for benefits. Positions We’re looking for personable and reliable Ready To Go will be for the 2018-19 academic year. Interested individuals should submit a letter of interest and current resume to Lori Abbott, CAPS Administrative Coordinator at Lori.Abbott@uvm. edu.

City of Burlington

Full-Time Nights and Evenings 1:53 PM

Wake Robin seeks health care staff who are licensed in Vermont to work collaboratively to provide high quality care in a fast paced residential and long-term care environment, while maintaining a strong sense of “home”. We offer an opportunity to build strong relationships with staff and residents in a dynamic community setting.

We continue to offer generous shift differentials. Evenings $2.50/hour, Nights $4.50/hour, and weekends $1.55/hour. Wake Robin offers an excellent compensation and benefits package and an opportunity to build strong relationships with staff and residents in a dynamic community setting. Interested candidates please email a cover letter and resume to hr@wakerobin.com or complete an application online at www.wakerobin.com. Wake Robin is an Equal Opportunity Employer.


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***SUPERDAY EVENT ***

WE ARE HIRING!

100 Panton Road, Vergennes VT. Come apply for open positions in ALL levels in Production, Assembly, Maintenance, and Inspection Saturday, August 11, 10 am-4pm On-site interviews day of event! Don’t miss this! Call 802.377.7579 for more information. UTC AEROSPACE IS AN EEO EMPLOYER. 5V-UTCAerospaceSystems080818.indd 1

T OW N O F E S S E X

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

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JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

RECEPTIONIST/ ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT The Vermont Economic Development Authority has an immediate opening for a motivated and upbeat individual to fill the position of receptionist/ administrative assistant. This person should be prompt, professional and possess a strong working knowledge of office procedures and a firm grasp of Microsoft products. A minimum of 5 years’ experience in a related field is required. VEDA offers a competitive salary and benefits package and is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Interested and qualified individuals should submit a resume with references to: Vermont Economic Development Authority Attn: Office Manager 58 East State Street, Suite 5 Montpelier, VT 05602-3044 You may email your resume to cbrown@veda.org.

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08.08.18-08.15.18

R I P TO N V E R M O N T

The North Branch School, an established independent school in Ripton, Vermont, with a low student/teacher ratio seeks a Math Teacher for grades seven, eight and nine. The ideal candidate will have a strong background in and passion for mathematics, and experience teaching middle school age students. We seek a dynamic, energetic, patient, and inspired teacher who mixes rigor, innovation, and creativity. This is a full-time position. Please send resume and cover letter to: nbs@northbranchschool.org

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7/17/17 1:23 PM

MUNICIPAL HIGHWAY MAINTENANCE LEVEL 2A/PLOW OPERATOR The Town of Essex Public Works Department is receiving applications for full time employment as a Highway Level IIA Heavy duty truck driver/plow operator. Applicants are encouraged to apply who have a minimum of two years’ overall experience, a CDL, and at least one year’s winter plowing experience. The salary will be set within the existing job classification system depending on experience and qualification. A hiring bonus may be offered to qualified candidates. This is a full-time position that offers medical, dental, disability, life and retirement benefits. Information on the position and application requirements can be obtained from Travis Sabataso at the Town of Essex Municipal offices, 81 Main St., Essex Junction, VT, 05452 or by calling 1-802-878-1341 or emailing tsabataso@essex.org. The position is open until filled. EOE.

POSITION OPEN FOR POLICE OFFICER The Richmond Police Department is currently accepting applications for full time Police Officer. Richmond offers fulltime employees generous benefits including health, dental, and retirement with paid holidays, vacation and sick time. Starting pay is $18.88 per hour with increases following training and annual steps. The salary range is $19.64 to $23.48 per hour based on experience. Richmond is located in eastern Chittenden County with a population of approximately 4,100 residents. Requirements: Must be US citizen, 21 years of age or older, high school diploma and successfully pass a background check and gain entry into the Vermont Criminal Justice Training Academy. Successful applicants will be paid by the town while training. Interested applicants should contact Geoffrey Urbanik at (802) 434-5170 or send letters of interest to: Town of Richmond, c/o Geoffrey Urbanik, P.O. Box 285, Richmond, VT 05477. Please respond by August 31, 2018. Richmond is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

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JavaScript Developer

8/3/185v-TownofRichmond080818.indd 2:25 PM 1

We have a great opportunity for an experienced JS developer at CSL, one of Vermont’s most innovative software companies. Due to business expansion we need a front end developer experienced in delivering solutions in JavaScript, jQuery, and various JS frameworks. You should also be familiar with SQL server. We need a self-starter who can produce results quickly and accurately. CSL provides a great working environment and benefits package. If you think you’ve got what it takes to join us on our next leap forward, contact the HR Director at jobs@csl-us.com.

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7/30/18 4:10 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

08.08.18-08.15.18

WHERE YOU AND YOUR WORK MATTER...

LOCAL AREA SALES Outside and counter Auto industry experience a plus. Competitive benefits package. Full or part time avail. Team atmosphere. Salary + commission. Call Chaney at Noyes Auto 802-864-6867, chaney@noyesautoandtire.com. Unitarian Church of Montpelier

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When you work for the State of Vermont, you and your work matter. A career with the State puts you on a rich and rewarding professional path. You’ll find jobs in dozens of fields – not to mention an outstanding total compensation package.

VR MATURE WORKER PROGRAM COORDINATOR – WATERBURY Monitors SCSEP grant and sub-contractor adherence to policies and procedures; monitor’s budget, conducts regular on-site visits to local programs throughout Vermont; and writes grant renewal applications. Conducts research into the vocational needs of seniors; work with VR staff to develop a set of best practices; and coordinate with the VR Training Coordinator to establish protocols for staff. Responsible for understanding national/state trends in employment of older persons with disabilities. For more information, contact Hugh Bradshaw at 802241-0319 or hugh.bradshaw@vermont.gov. Department: Disabilities Aging & Independent Living. Status: Full Time. Job ID #623674. Application Deadline: August 16, 2018.

8/3/18 12:38 PM

Membership Coordinator

This part time position, 10 hours/week, including most Sundays from Sept. until June, involves hospitality and member engagement. For a complete job description and to apply please visit

tinyurl.com/UU-Membership-Job.

N ATURAL RESOURCES BOARD LEG AL TECHNICIAN – MONTPELIER

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Natural Resources Board (NRB) Act 250 program seeks a Legal Technician in our Montpelier office. We are dedicated professionals who share the goal of a better future through environment protection and economic smart growth. You excel in case management, and database maintenance, and have superior writing and editing skills. You are a team player who takes pride in every detail. For more information, contact Kimberley Lashua at kimberley.lashua@vermont.gov. Status: Full Time. Job ID #623694. Application Deadline: August 14, 2018.

F RON T OF HOU SE/ L I N E CO OK S Down Home Kitchen in Montpelier is currently hiring for front of house and line cooks for both full and part time positions. The restaurant provides scratch made food with Untitled-14 love to the community and is seeking motivated, responsible, and positive individuals to join our team. If you feel you meet theseamount qualifications, Depending on the we’d lovefont to meet with you. of text, these sizes mayYou change can email your resume to info@downhomekitchenvt.com or swing by the restaurant at EOE statement 100 Main Street, Montpelier. Futura Medium Oblique 7.5 pt ( can be changed to whatever you’d like)

Let’s get to.....

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Learn more at :

1

Headline in arrow: LUNCHBOX BOLD stacked Headline for positions: LUNCHBOX BOLD

TEXT: Futura Medium 8pt / 9

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CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

Vermont Land Trust (VLT) • Montpelier, VT

Now hiring— full and parttime positions

Retail Sales Associates & Tour Guides

Please visit our website for additional job details: http://www.lakechamplainchocolates.com/about-us/employment

jobs.sevendaysvt.com

Information on the position and application requirements can be obtained from Travis Sabataso at the Town of Essex Municipal offices, 81 Main St., Essex Junction, VT, 05452 or by calling 1-802-878-1341 or emailing tsabataso@essex.org. The position is open until filled. EOE.

an equal opportunity employer

Interested in working at our flagship store on Pine Street? Must also enjoy public speaking and conducting daily tours. Year-round, full and part-time positions available. Ability to work weekends, holidays and extended summer hours, a must.

with Futura Heavy keywords

Need extra cash this winter? Looking for a side job? The Town of Essex is seeking qualified plow truck operators who are interested in being hired to work on an as needed basis. Selected candidates would become part of a pool of drivers who can assist our Full-Time staff during winter storms. Applicants must have a valid CDL, be able to pass a DOT pre-employment physical and be proficient at driving an INTERNATIONAL 4300 Low pro or a 7400/7600 INTERNATIONAL, both with plow and wing. Pay will be commensurate with experience and bonus offered at end of the season.

The State of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity Employer

Help us to amaze our customers! Seeking passionate chocolate lovers to join our dynamic retail teams at our Burlington and Waterbury stores. Must enjoy working with the public and care about providing customers with an exceptional experience. Prior retail, barista and food service experience a plus.

Dotted lines LUNCHBOX REGULAR

MUNICIPAL HIGHWAY PLOW OPERATOR

3.83”

careers.vermont.gov

7/30/18 10:03 AM

T OW N O F E S S E X

Our creative and successful team is looking for a financial management professional to join us as our Chief Financial Officer (CFO). The CFO will provide vision, leadership and structure to VLT’s business functions, to best support and facilitate our mission. The CFO will direct and oversee financial planning, operations staff, and HR programs. Reporting to the President, the5.25” CFO will support VLT’s Board of Trustees in monitoring VLT’s ongoing financial health, and risk management. A member-supported land conservation organization, VLT has worked with families, communities, farmers, and forestland owners since 1977 to conserve nearly 2,000 parcels of land important to Vermonters. VLT is among the most successful land trusts in America based on our conservation accomplishments, talented staff, quality of our systems, and the creativity of our programs. To learn the details of this opportunity, and to read about VLT’s history, accomplishments and programs, please go to www. vlt.org. To apply, please send resume and cover letter to Frank Sadowski at fsadowski@gfc.com.

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8/6/18 10:27 AM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

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JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

08.08.18-08.15.18

Outreach Clinician Looking for an opportunity in community mental health? Join our dynamic team of clinicians and work in homes, communities, and schools with children, adolescents, and families with emotional and behavioral challenges and developmental disorders. We believe in a team of supportive colleagues and the importance of regular, high-quality supervision. CSAC is known for our innovative approaches and our success with collaborative, inter-agency efforts. Requirements: Master’s degree in a human services field, plus 2-4 years of relevant counseling experience.

Behavior Interventionist Looking for experience working with children with special needs? Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)? Emotional and behavioral challenges? Are you interested in learning new skills, especially in the growing field of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA)? Join our ABA services team at the Counseling Service of Addison County. We are hiring enthusiastic and team-oriented individuals to provide one on one support and training in behavioral, social, and communicative skills to children in home and school settings. Training and supervision in ABA, trauma-informed supports and ASD interventions provided.

REGISTER NOW

AT WWW.CCV.EDU OR Bachelor’s degree required. Equal opportunity employer. AT THE CCV LOCATION apply@csac-vt.org NEAREST YOU 5V-CounselingServiceofAddisonCo080818.indd 1

Resource Advisor

We seek an energetic and resourceful leader to provide administrative and programmatic leadership for the federally funded TRIO/Student Support Services program which targets low income, first generation college students. Five years’ experience in higher education or related field, with Master’s degree in relevant area required. Expertise in management of staff, budgets and grant projects. Flexible hours and statewide travel are required.

We are currently seeking early childhood leaders who are excellent communicators with strong organizational To view the complete posting and apply: skills to work as Resource Advisors with Northern ccv.edu/learn-about-ccv/employment/ Lights at CCV. Ideal candidates will have experience CCV encourages applications candidates who refl ect our diverse studentThese population.roles CCV is anwill EOE/ working in earlyfromchildhood in Vermont. ADA compliant employer; auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. CVAA is anwith Equal Opportunity Employerand partner require working closely instructors organizations to provide support to professionals in the early childhood workforce. The fast-paced duties handled in these positions require flexibility, strong computer skills, solid decision-making abilities, a positive attitude, and a willingness to adapt and change. Positions are currently available in the Northwest and Southwest regions. Bachelor’s degree required, focus in early childhood education or a related field preferred. Experience in early childhood systems and adult education desired.

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www.flynncenter.org/about-us/employment-andinternship-opportunities.html. Please submit application materials to:

Flynn Center for the Performing Arts Human Resources Department 153 Main Street Burlington, Vermont 05401 or email HResources@flynncenter.org No phone calls, please. EOE

Clara Martin Center

People Helping People

(Location flexible wiwthin CCV Academic Centers)

https://bit.ly/2LMHds4

The role of the House Manager is to provide exemplary customer service that will ensure the well-being and safety of patrons during public events. The HM is in charge of front of house procedures and facilities on show nights, and must thrive in a fast paced environment. This parttime position requires flexible hours, including evenings and weekends. Must be able to sustain physical activity for extended periods of time and lift up to 50 pounds. For a detailed job description and more information, visit our website at:

8/6/185V-FlynnCenter080818.indd 1:25 PM 1

DIRECTOR OF STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

View position details and apply at:

The Flynn Center for the Performing Arts seeks applicants for the position of House Manager to join our team and be a part of northern New England’s premier performing arts center. HOUSE MANAGER Part-time, variable schedule

We are a rural non-profit community 8/3/18 12:45 PM mental health center located in the center of Vermont. We provide a variety of high quality behavioral health services to the residents of the Upper Valley primarily in Orange County and surrounding towns, with multiple offices located in Randolph, Bradford, Chelsea and Wilder.

Looking for a Sweet Job? Our new, mobile-friendly job board is buzzing with excitement.

Behavioral Interventionist We currently have 2 full time positions available to provide support to children in the classroom setting based in the towns of Williamstown (9 year old) and Orange (3 year old). The primary functions are to provide support and related activities (case consultation, attend IEP meetings, treatment team meetings, provide case management) to an individual student in the school setting with a focus towards helping a student to meet their educational goals. Other functions may include modeling of appropriate problem solving skills, social skills, life skills, and a healthy lifestyle, while providing opportunities to enhance vocational skills and participate in physical education programs. This position may serve as a liaison for schools, DCF, and other agencies and may assist in providing de-escalation and behavioral management and support as needed.

Start applying at jobs.sevendaysvt.com

Flexibility, dependability, strong communication, organizational skills, and the ability to be a team player are essential. Bachelor’s Degree Required. ABA Training/Certification Preferred. We offer competitive medical, dental and vision plans; matching 403b plan; and other benefits.

Send your resume to Rachel Yeager, HR Coordinator • ryeager@claramartin.org Clara Martin Center • PO Box G • Randolph, VT 05060 Find other open positions at www.claramartin.org.

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3/6/17 4:48 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

08.08.18-08.15.18

The Cancer Patient Support Foundation (CPSF) seeks a

Part-Time

Children’s Therapist

Operations Manager.

Come see what makes NCSS a great place to work! We are currently hiring for an Outpatient Therapist. This position provides psychosocial evaluations, therapy and consultation for clients of all age groups. The ideal candidate will have an interest in working with children and families and be comfortable with brief and group treatment models. MSW/LICSW or LCMHC preferred or license eligible. This position can receive supervision towards licensure, group supervision, billing and crisis support. The agency provides excellent benefits, competitive salary and it is located close to Interstate 89 and is a short commute from Burlington and surrounding areas.

Responsibilities include maintaining CPSF’s QuickBooks database and daily financial activities, maintaining CPSF’s donor database, overseeing all office operations, providing administrative support and managing all emergency fund disbursements to local cancer patients for the organization’s Emergency Fund, as well as being a key liaison to local medical providers. This position is 28 hours a week. The ideal candidate will have a bachelor’s degree, three years of relevant experience, a proficiency in Microsoft Office programs, and a commitment to CPSF’s mission. Nonprofit experience is a plus.

To apply for this position, please visit our website at www.ncssinc.org/careers or email us your resume and cover letter at careers@ncssinc.org.

Send letter of interest and resume to Sarah Lemnah, Executive Director at slemnah@cpsfvt.org.

NCSS, 107 Fisher Pond Road, St. Albans, VT 05478 | ncssinc.org | E.O.E.

No phone calls please. Interviews will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled. The Cancer Patient Support Foundation supports cancer patients and their families, in Vermont and Northern New York, in a time of extraordinary need, by providing financial assistance, underwriting counseling services, and acting as a resource during diagnosis, treatment, and recovery.

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FOR MORE INFORMATION, GO TO CPSFVT.ORG.

In-Home Sales Consultant

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New, local, scamfree jobs posted every day! sevendaysvt. com/classifieds

7/27/18 12:20 PM

The Sales Consultant provides each prospective BATH FITTER customer with a complete, professional and compelling presentation of Bath Fitter products and services using proven tools and techniques supplied by the company. Tasks and Responsibilities • Meet or exceed closing sales objectives with the appointments given by the company and your self-generation appointments. • Accurately measure and identify tubs or shower bases and walls at the time of the estimate using appropriate checklists and forms. • Using proven Bath Fitter selling and process methods provide the customer with all information he or she needs to make a positive decision. • Submit all checks, cash, credit card information and signed EOIs to the office each day. • Maintain all sales presentation materials in top condition, replacing worn items as soon as necessary.

Job Requirements

• Minimum of 5 years of award winning sales experience. • Passion for home improvement. • Valid driver’s license and maintain a good driving record.

Demonstrated Skills

• Willingness to follow lead generation programs in exchange for ten corporate appointments a week. • Demonstrated ability/desire to perform in high pressure, fast growth retail company environment. • Established reputation as a high integrity top performer.

Apply online at bathfitter.com/career-home or email dspeller@bathfitter.com.

8/6/18 10:19 AM

NAVIGATE NEW CAREER POSSIBILITIES AT NORTHERN DIGITAL INC. – NDI SHELBURNE

We’re proud of our talented, hardworking and diverse team, whose ingenuity is driving exciting new innovations. Our team is growing – won’t you join us? The successful candidates will be joining our team of professionals at the Northern Digital Incorporated (NDI) office located in Shelburne, Vermont.

ELECTRONICS ASSEMBLER Working as part of the Manufacturing Operations Team, the Electronic Technician is responsible for performing electronic assembly and inspection while ensuring all assemblies and sub-assemblies are built and tested meeting quality system objectives. You will be responsible for performing electrical assembly of NDI Shelburne product line, performing mechanical assembly of NDI Shelburne product line, performing process control activities relating to product quality and inventory control and helping improve manufacturing processes.

HARDWARE DESIGN ENGINEER Do you have strong problem-solving skills? Do you have a drive for learning? If yes - NDI Shelburne is the right place for you. R&D team is looking for individuals with curiosity to solve demanding embedded design for EM and optical tracking, AR, VR and medical applications. You must have a strong desire to perform all aspects of embedded hardware and algorithmic system development, apply knowledge in electromagnetic theory, analysis, signal processing, Kalman filtering, computer vision and artificial intelligence to sensor solutions for challenges facing our customers and work independently and on teams to engineer hardware and software solutions. APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS: If you’re interested in furthering your career in a dynamic and innovative organization, please visit www.ndigital.com/careers/ where you can apply online! Equal Opportunity Employer/Protected Veterans/Individuals with Disabilities


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

RECEIVE $500-$1,000 IN SIGN-ON BONUSES!

YOU WILL FIND SUCCESS

Perrigo Nutritionals, in Georgia, VT, currently have excellent job opportunities including Packaging Operators and Production Sanitizers with a $1,000 sign-on bonus.

HALF-TIME SERVICE COORDINATOR Ready to be at the center of the action? Our half-time Service Coordinator works with NPI staff, clients, and vendors to keep our work flowing and our team humming. You will schedule projects and tasks, communicate with everyone involved, and work with NPI’s top-flight technology team to deliver exceptional client satisfaction. To excel, be well-organized, efficient, and interested in technology. Previous experience with scheduling and client service will be helpful. NPI offers excellent benefits, including pet-friendly office, generous time off, matching 401(k), Flexible Spending and Dependent Care Assistance Accounts, and profit-sharing. If you are ready to put your organizing skills to use, learn more at

➢ Excellent Wages ➢ Great benefits at reduced rates ➢ Quarterly and Annual Bonus ➢ Profit sharing ➢ 401 (k) with Employer Match ➢ Tuition & Gym Reimbursement ➢ And more!

POSITION?

For full job descriptions, view other opportunities, and to apply, please visit our website at www.perrigocareers.com.

6/22/184T-Perrigo080818.indd 2:11 PM 1

Digital Marketing Manager Berlin

Northfield Savings Bank is looking for a professional to join our team as a Digital Marketing Manager. This individual will be responsible for the management and coordination of product development, customer mailings and campaigns, the website and digital online portals. The Digital Marketing Manager will perform new product research, collect and interpret customer analytics, and support the CRM database. This individual will manage the development of electronic and print product literature and will also contribute product information for marketing and advertising projects. The position offers a strong opportunity to work for a growing premier Vermont mutual savings bank. The Digital Marketing Manager must possess excellent communication and customer service skills for both internal and external customers. A Bachelor’s degree in marketing, business administration and related field, with pertinent analytical curriculum is required. Five years of experience in marketing, product management, or digital content and two years of experience in the financial industry are preferred. Northfield Savings Bank, founded in 1867, is the largest banking institution headquartered in Vermont. NSB offers a competitive compensation and benefits package including medical, dental, profit sharing, matching 401(K) retirement program, professional development opportunities, and a positive work environment supported by a team culture. Please submit your resume and application in confidence to: Careers@nsbvt.com (Preferred) Or mail: Northfield Savings Bank Human Resources P.O. Box 7180 Barre, VT 05641-7180 Equal Opportunity Employer/Member FDIC

8/6/18 1:27 PM

echnician T s ic n o r t c le E Communications/ The Radio North Group is looking for a Mobile Electronics Technician to provide service in-shop as well as at customer facilities and various work sites. Founded in 1990 as a Motorola Solutions Partner, the Radio North Group provides creative hardware and software solutions for Police, Fire, Education and Health Care customers. We specialize in 2-way portable and mobile radios, and custom communication solutions for Business and Public Safety applications. BASIC QUALIFICATIONS Technical school degree, equivalent Military training or equivalent hands-on experience. Must possess the basic skills and product-related knowledge necessary to work on products so as to successfully meet all essential duties and responsibilities of the position. Experience should include field work in the installation and maintenance of similar electronics equipment, two-way radio, and other computer related and automotive related systems. BENEFITS Radio North Group offers a competitive salary that rewards performance and dedication along with a comprehensive benefit package. Please send resume and / or cover letter to John at john.p@radionorthgroup.com

HUNGRY TO FILL THAT

tinyurl.com/NPI-SC2-SD 4t-NPI062718.indd 1

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Seven Days’ readers are locally sourced and ready to bring something new to the table. Reach them with Seven Days Jobs — our brand-new, mobile-friendly, recruitment website. JOB RECRUITERS CAN:

• Post jobs using a form that includes key info about your company and open positions (location, application deadlines, video, images, etc.). • Accept applications and manage the hiring process via our new applicant tracking tool. • Easily manage your open job listings from your recruiter dashboard. Visit jobs.sevendaysvt.com to start posting!


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

08.08.18-08.15.18

Find jobs on

Para-Transit Drivers

Floral Merchandiser Burlington

$14.00/HR Flexible Shifts

PT, 5 mornings per week, approximately 15-20 hours. Fun and flexible job perfect for a creative person who likes to work independently. Please email resume to homeboy@gmavt.net or simplyreadyflowers@gmail.com.

Personal Assistant for Busy Entrepreneur 7/27/18

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!

Burlington VT entrepreneur seeks a high-energy, detailoriented, flexible, and super-smart personal assistant to support the management of multiple businesses. This job is full-time during the summer, you’ll have some extra free time from October to April, and you’ll get a salary and health benefits year round. Contact burlingtonvt@email.com with resume and cover letter for more information.

4:03 PM

This position is designated as a safety sensitive position under the Federal Transportation (FTA) Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations. Candidates must be willing to submit to criminal background checks and drug testing. Any offer of employment is contingent upon the satisfactory results of these checks. To apply for this position, please download an application from sstarides.org or obtain an application at 2091 Main Street, Colchester, Vermont. SSTA is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

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follow us for the newest: twitter.com/ SevenDaysJobs

SSTA is looking to add to our team. We are currently looking to hire full and part time Para-Transit Drivers. Responsibilities include driving a 27’ passenger van, minivan or sedan; providing reliable door to door para-transit transportation. If you like to meet new people and have a clean driving record, obtain an application at sstarides.org employment opportunities, download an application, or stop by the office at 2091 Main Street Colchester VT. We offer competitive pay, a robust benefits package, paid holidays and vacation.

Business Systems Analyst

7/27/18 4:13 PM

America’s premier manufacturer of high performance wires and cables for over 63 years.

Berlin

Northfield Savings Bank is looking for a professional to join our team as a Business Systems Analyst for our Information Technology department located at our Berlin Operations Center. The Business Systems Analyst will collect, analyze and monitor business area requirements that will lead to the development, upgrade or implementation of computer application programs. This position offers a strong opportunity to work for a growing premier Vermont mutual savings bank.

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY MANAGER

Please submit your resume and application in confidence to: Careers@nsbvt.com (Preferred)

We are looking for a Corporate EHS Manager who will direct the organization’s environmental and safety programs to minimize impacts to the environment, protect the safety of employees, and reduce risk and liability for the corporation. This will be accomplished by keeping abreast of regulatory requirements that impact the business, communicating those requirements to management, training employees, maintaining training files, performing incident investigations, and leading environmental and safety committees. Serves as the business’ ISO 14000 environmental management representative and maintains certification. Formulates work safety standards and enforces procedures. Risk prevention areas include hazardous material exposures, accidents, occupational injuries, fires, and other unsafe conditions. Must be compliant with federal and state regulatory reporting requirements as well as national and international directives related to our products. Usually requires a 4 year degree, preferably in engineering or chemistry, plus 2-4 years’ relevant experience, or equivalent.

Or mail: Northfield Savings Bank Human Resources P.O. Box 7180 Barre, VT 05641-7180 Equal Opportunity Employer/Member FDIC

We offer excellent wages, benefits, and are an EEO employer. Email your resume and cover letter to hr@champcable.com or mail to 175 Hercules Drive, Colchester, VT 05446, Attn: HR Dept.

The Business Systems Analyst will be responsible for testing, updating and correcting problems as they develop for business software systems. This individual will work with Business Areas, investigate systems features and applicability to business need and manage a project’s scope, acceptance, installation and deployment from start to finish. The Business Systems Analyst must possess excellent communication and customer service skills for both internal and external customers. Requirements include: Effective Project Management skills, a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration, Computer Science or Information Technology and two years’ related experience. Direct knowledge of banking software systems and experience in a financial institution is preferred. Northfield Savings Bank, founded in 1867, is the largest banking institution headquartered in Vermont. NSB offers a competitive compensation and benefits package including medical, dental, profit sharing, matching 401(K) retirement program, professional development opportunities, and a positive work environment supported by a team culture.


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NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

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08.08.18-08.15.18

OPEN POSITIONS

PRODUCTION EDITOR Sheridan Journal Services, an established provider of publishing services for scientific, technical, medical, (STM) and scholarly journals, is currently looking to hire Production Editors to join our team in beautiful Waterbury, Vermont! If you have publishing, editorial, copyediting or composition experience, and would love to be a part of the team producing cutting edge publications, please submit your resume and a cover letter to our online application at: https://web1.epicorhcm.com/SH7277CSS/ Default.aspx?Tab=DDB54A17-24F1-480A-8FE4-7E521F94C 2FF&cssUrl=true&Requisition=SJS 8045

At Vermont Creamery, our employees are our greatest resource. We are a community that empowers our team to engage and live our mission every day. We know that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts, and here, the whole is powered by a spirit of collaboration and transparency.

We provide a comprehensive benefits package, including health, medical and dental coverage, 401(K), paid time off, flexible working schedules, relaxed dress code and telecommuting opportunities. We also have a beautiful office and a positive, friendly work culture. This is a great opportunity for you!

Vermont Creamery is currently hiring: • Quality Assurance Technicians • Industrial Mechanic

We know benefits matter, that’s why we offer a competitive package. Our benefits program includes medical, vision and dental insurance, retirement plans and a total well being approach. Perks to keep you healthy and happy include flex schedules, time off and tuition assistance. A certified B Corp since 2014, we’re using our business as a force for good.

Weare are We looking for looking for professional professional servers, We arehosts servers, hosts & looking & bussers!for bartenders! professional servers, hosts & bartenders! Rose Bedard

UpperBedard Deck Server, 10 years of service Rose

Upper Deck Server, 12 years of service

Interested?

Rose Bedard Interested? Upper Deck 10 years Send yourServer, resume to of service

To apply, please call 802-479-9371 or go to www.vermontcreamery.com/our-team.

selena@windjammergroup.com

An Equal Opportunity Employer Send your resume to selena@windjammergroup.com Interested? loca l, fre sh, orig ina l Send your resume to

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Alpine SnowGuards has a job to do. Interested in doing it with us? We are seeking experienced candidates to fill the following full-time positions:

Powder Coater Responsibilities: Washing/drying product, weighing/ measuring chemicals, coatings or paints, setting up and operating machines to coat products, as well as determining paint flow, viscosity and coating quality via visual inspections and the use of appropriate tools. In addition, regulating the operation and observation of gauges and equipment to detect defects (and making necessary adjustments) are the key functions of this position. Performing routine machine maintenance and packaging finished products for shipment are also important components of this position. Qualifications: The ideal candidate should have 3-5 years of powder coating experience, strong computer skills and a high school diploma or equivalent. Manufacturing experience is a plus.

Laborer

Responsibilities: Operating mechanical, pneumatic and hydraulic presses, performing routine equipment maintenance, operating hand tools to facilitate the assembly of products, as well as packaging materials into appropriate shipping boxes. This position will also assist in receiving and storing materials and maintaining a clean work environment. Qualifications: The ideal candidate should have 1-2 years of manufacturing experience, strong computer skills and a high school diploma or equivalent. Lifting heavy objects (50-70 lbs.) is a job requirement. We offer a competitive wage and benefit package including health and dental insurance as well as a retirement plan and profit sharing.

selena@windjammergroup.com

8/6/18 12:47 PMAn Equal Opportunity Employer

Director of Development and Communications

CERF+, a nationally recognized leader in the field of emergency readiness, relief, and recovery for artists, is seeking a Director of Development & Communications. This wellrounded energetic and experienced professional will join our growing team to advance CERF+’s mission by building and sustaining support and increasing awareness of and engagement with our work. Reporting to the Executive Director, and in partnership with the Board of Directors and CERF+ staff, the Director of Development and Communications has primary responsibility for a range of institutional advancement functions: increasing funding from private and public sources and demonstrating the impact of CERF+’s work through a variety of communication platforms. This is a tremendous opportunity for a dynamic, collaborative leader to help take CERF+ to the next level of growth. With offices in Montpelier, VT, CERF+ offers a wonderful quality of life, collegial work environment, and competitive compensation, including an attractive benefits package. For a complete job description, please visit www.cerfplus.org. The application deadline is August 17th 2018. Please send letter of interest and resume to: jobs@craftemergency.org or CERF+ 535 Stone Cutters Way, Suite 202 Montpelier, Vermont 05602

loca l, fre sh, orig ina l

1076 Williston Road, S. Burlington

862.6585 www.windjammerrestaurant.com

1076 Williston Road, S. Burlington

862.6585 www.windjammerrestaurant.com

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Looking for a Sweet Job? Our new, mobile-friendly job board is buzzing with excitement.

Job seekers can: • Browse hundreds of current, local positions from Vermont companies. • Search for jobs by keyword, location, category and job type. • Set up job alerts. • Apply for jobs directly through the site.

Start applying at jobs.sevendaysvt.com

Please direct all inquiries to karen@alpinesnowguards.com.

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ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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08.08.18-08.15.18

DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR

Now hiring for: • Line Cook • Dishwashers • Salad Bar Attendants

Grounds for Health is an international non-profit organization focused on increasing coverage of cervical cancer screening and preventive therapy in low-income countries. Current Grounds for Health programs operate in Ethiopia and Kenya. We are seeking someone with great organizational skills and a passion for fundraising to join our small US based team in Williston. This part-time position provides administrative support as part of the Grounds for Health Development team and engages in a wide range of activities related to fundraising and communications. For more information, check out our website at groundsforhealth.org. To apply, send resume and cover letter to Kathy@groundsforhealth.org.

HEALTH LAW ADVOCATE Vermont Legal Aid seeks a full-time advocate in its Office of the Health Care Advocate Project located in Burlington. Responsibilities include: investigating and resolving complaints and questions from Vermonters regarding health insurance and health care; advising consumers about their rights and responsibilities; assisting beneficiaries with appeals, and maintaining case records. A successful candidate must be able to work on a team, doing extensive telephone work in a busy environment. The position requires excellent communication and research skills as well as the ability to learn quickly. Prior health care, human services, health insurance or advocacy experience, and commitment to social justice are desirable. Bachelor’s degree or equivalent experience required. Starting salary $34,917+, DOE, four weeks paid vacation and excellent fringe benefits. Email your cover letter, resume, contact information for three references, and writing sample as a single PDF file to Eric Avildsen, Executive Director c/o Betsy Whyte (bwhyte@vtlegalaid.org) by August 24, 2018. VLA is an equal opportunity employer committed to cultural competency in order to effectively serve our increasingly diverse client community. Applicants are encouraged to share in their cover letter how they can further this goal. Visit our website for more information and complete application instructions. www.vtlegalaid.org. Seven Days Issue: 8/8 1:28 PM Due: 8/6 by noon EXECUTIVE Size: 3.83 xASSISTANT 5.25 Howard Center is looking for a professional, responsible and self-motivated Cost: $476.85 (with 1 week online) 7-VTLegalAid080818.indd 1

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Engaging minds that change the world Seeking a position with a quality employer? Consider The University of Vermont, a stimulating and diverse workplace. We offer a comprehensive benefit package including tuition remission for on-going, full-time positions. This opening and others are updated daily. Off Shift Systems Technician - Physical Plant Department #S1692PO - Physical Plant Department is hiring an Off Shift Systems Technician to provide first response service for all building/utilities trades equipment and systems (i.e., emergency calls and service calls). This position also performs preventative maintenance service for all building trades and promotes a work place that encourages safety within the shop and in the field. Minimum Qualifications*: High School diploma and three years’ experience/training in the HVAC/plumbing and electrical trades. Valid driver’s license. Initial employment contingent upon successful completion of physical screening. The Department seeks candidates who can demonstrate an ongoing commitment to workplace diversity, sustainability and delivering exceptional value and great experience to our UVM campus customers. *Job posting contains further details on the position and minimum requirements. For further information on this position and others currently available, or to apply online, please visit our website at: www.uvmjobs.com; Job Hotline #802-656-2248; telephone #802-656-3494. Applicants must apply for position electronically. Paper resumes are not accepted. Job positions are updated daily. The University of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, protected veteran status, or any other category legally protected by federal or state law. The University encourages applications from all individuals who will contribute to the diversity and excellence of the institution.

executive assistant to provide daily support to our executive staff ensuring their administrative support needs are met with expert contextual knowledge, technical skills, communication skills, and confidentiality. BA and at least 5 years of administrative experience required. Experience relevant to human services, board support, executive support, legal assistant work and business administration highly preferred. This is a full-time, benefits eligible position.

Perks and Benefits: •• Comprehensive BCBS Medical with agency-paid premium support for individuals, couples, and families •• Delta dental •• Generous time off starting at 36 days of combined time off per year for full-time employees (and increasing with years of service) •• Agency paid 401K retirement and additional incentive match program •• Life insurance •• Flexible spending account •• Childcare stipend •• Employee Assistance Program •• Employee referral program with financial payment •• Discounted online undergraduate/graduate courses through Champlain College truED •• Award-winning workplace wellness program HC4ME including physical fitness groups for staff, financial wellness incentives, and ongoing workplace wellness advocacy and education •• Voluntary benefits from local/international businesses: discounted gym memberships, mobile phone service, ski/snowboard passes, auto/home insurance, and more! Howard Center is proud to be an Equal Opportunity Employer. The agency’s culture and service delivery is strengthened by the diversity of its workforce. Minorities, people of color and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply. EOE/TTY. Visit “About Us” to review Howard Center’s EOE policy.

For more information and to apply for this position, please visit www.howardcentercareers.org. 7-HowardCenter080818.indd 1

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ROOFERS AND LABORERS • Year round, full time employment • Good wages & benefits • Pay negotiable with experience EOE/M/F/VET/Disability Employer Apply in person at: A.C. Hathorne Co. 252 Avenue C Williston, VT 05495

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Assistant Preschool Teacher The Aurora Preschool is looking to hire a part time preschool teacher for our small, nature-based, full time preschool program. If you have experience working with three to five year old children, a genuine love and appreciation for the outdoors, and boundless positive energy, please apply by sending a cover letter, resume and three references to kathleenm@gmavt.net or to Aurora Preschool, 238 Peterson Terrace, Middlebury 05753. Experience working with children, familiarity with emergent curriculum, and a philosophy grounded in play based learning are musts!

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

08.08.18-08.15.18

New, local, scamfree jobs posted every day!

Staff Accountant & Human Resource Manager Positions available. To find out more information regarding these positions, as well as additional openings at Bolton Valley Resort, follow the link below, to apply online.

HR@boltonvalley.com, www.boltonvalley.com/ about-us/employmentand-mountain-hostprogram.

Communications Manager The Communications Manager will play a key role in VMSMA operations through a range of creative, administrative, and technical tasks, working closely with the Executive Director as an active participant in association outreach, planning and communications. Full job description and application information found at

www.vermontmaple.org/jobs.

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Marketing Coordinator

18/6/18 12:51 PM

School Nurse

We’re all about mission at Vermont Student Assistance Corporation (VSAC). Help us fulfill our mission of providing all Vermont students with information and financial resources to reach their educational goals. You’ll work in a relaxed yet challenging environment, including a fabulous on site fitness room & café. You are equal parts creative problem solver and spreadsheet ace. You’re an enthusiastic collaborator and you thrive in a dynamic work environment. You relish getting things done. Your passion and skill will round out a small but mighty team of creative, mission-oriented communicators. We are seeking a creative and curious Marketing Coordinator to support the Marketing Department to develop, deploy, track and evaluate multi-channel (increasingly digital) marketing campaigns that promote our portfolio of savings and education loan products that fund our nonprofit mission as the state advocate for Vermonters who deserve to continue their education and training after high school.

Are you a nurse who loves working with teens? Are you interested in a job that lets you work on a school schedule? Join our supportive work environment and help us keep our students healthy! We’re looking for a licensed RN to counsel and educate students and staff about health issues, communicate with parents and other health providers, and manage medications for students. For more details about the position, visit: www.rockpointschool.org/ school-nurse.

The ideal candidate brings 2+ years’ prior experience in a business setting (internships count!) ideally in a marketing/advertising-related field, a passion for analytics and number2v-RockPointSchool062718.indd crunching (Excel is your friend), excellent problem solving skills (hearing “take a stab at figuring it out” energizes you), digital and social media know-how (you are comfortable and conversant in a range of platforms), hunger to learn, keen eye for detail, ability to reprioritize on a dime and confidence to try new things. Operational and creative support functions will include: proactively and independently maintain campaign tracking and measurement systems; perform results analyses; publish periodic reports and competitive reviews; update and reconcile budgets; assist with email/ direct mail list management, website content, digital search/display campaigns; steward our social media calendar and content; monitor competitive activity; perform ongoing ad hoc administrative tasks. And other stuff we’ll cook up along the way. Sound like you? Review our job description online at www.vsac.org. Apply ONLY online at www.vsac.org.

VERMONT STUDENT ASSISTANCE CORPORATION PO Box 2000, Winooski, VT 05404 EOE/Minorities/Females/Vet/Disabled www.VSAC.org 9T-VSAC080818.indd 1

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COME JOIN OUR CAFE STAFF!

Full time barista/front counter position openings. Previous food service/ cash handling experience necessary.

Please contact Hannah at buyer@redhenbaking.com or 802-223-5200 x19. 8/6/18 12:48 PM

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08.08.18-08.15.18

Lead Installer Position VERMONT CUSTOM CLOSETS is seeking a full-time year-round Lead Installer. Join our team installing custom closets and organizational systems and work for one of Vermont's most well-respected companies. Skills include light carpentry, ability to work independently, attention to detail and a personal commitment to the highest quality work. Exceptional benefits and working environment. Email your resume to todd@vtcustomclosets.com or stop by our showroom and apply in person.

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Carpenters Wanted! Needed Immediately!

7/13/18 11:54 AM

Finish Carpenters, Carpenters and Carpenters Helpers. Good Pay, Full Time and Long Term! Chittenden County.

Maple Confections Maple Candy and Fulfillment (Winooski, VT) For full job description and application download go to: vermontpuremaple.com/ pages/employment-1. To apply, please complete an application, attach a resume if you have one, and return in person or email to: Mount Mansfield Maple Products 450 Weaver Street, Suite 18 Winooski, VT 05404 jobs@mansfieldmaple.com

Call Mike at 802-343-0089 or Morton at 802-862-7602. Champlain Community Services is a growing 2v-MJSContracting080818.indd developmental services provider agency with a strong emphasis on self-determination values and employee and consumer satisfaction.

Champlain Community Services is hiring for a Qualified Developmental Disabilities Professional (QDDP) with strong clinical, organizational and communication skills to add to our dynamic team. The ideal candidate will have supervisory experience, an interest in quality improvement and assurance, and proven leadership. Requirements: Bachelor’s degree in the human service field, QDDP, and demonstrated leadership skills. This is an excellent opportunity to be a part of a distinctive developmental service provider agency during a time of growth. Send your cover letter and application to Elizabeth Sightler, esightler@ccs-vt.org.

Program Manager Coordinate residential and community supports for a humorous woman who leads an active life and enjoys spending time outside. The ideal candidate will enjoy working in a team-oriented position, have strong clinical skills and demonstrated leadership. Client therapeutic needs require a female program manager and two overnight shifts are required for this position. Send your cover letter and application to Scott Broderick, sbroderick@ccs-vt.org.

Direct Support Professional CCS is offering direct support professional positions and per diem shifts. Starting wage is $14.35 per hour, with mileage reimbursement and a comprehensive benefit package. This is an excellent job for applicants entering human services or for those looking to continue their work in this field. Send your cover letter and application to Karen Ciechanowicz, staff@ccs-vt.org.

info@offsethouse.com

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Lund offers hope and opportunity to families through education, treatment, family support and adoption.

8/3/18 2:10 PM

E.O.E.

The Position:

• Full-time position assists the Adoption program development and implementation with a strong focus on data entry, data collection, reporting, file management, quality assurance, documentation and compliance. • Provides administrative assistance to the entire Adoption Department as assigned.

What We Look For:

• Must be organized and detail oriented, have strong verbal and written communication skills, and proficiency with MS Office, Excel and Outlook. • Looking for a motivated self-starter able to work independently. • Bachelor’s preferred. • Valid Driver’s License and access to reliable transportation required; statewide travel may be required.

Why Join Our Team at Lund: • Knowledge of adoption services.

• Ongoing training opportunities available. • Lund is a multi-service nonprofit that has served families and children throughout Vermont for 125 years. • Our mission is to help children thrive by empowering families to break cycles of poverty, addiction and abuse. • Commitment surrounding diversity and cultural competence. • Lund offers a comprehensive benefit package for full-time positions including health, dental, life insurance, disability, retirement, extensive time off accrual and holiday pay. • Excellent opportunity to join strengths-based team of multi-disciplinary professionals. Please send resume and cover letter to: Human Resources, PO Box 4009, Burlington, VT 05406-4009 fax (802) 864-1619 email: employment@lundvt.org 9t-Lund080118.indd 1

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Growing company looking for experienced press operators to run clean and modern equipment. We offer competitive pay and comprehensive benefit package including medical, dental, paid holidays and sick time, and 401K.

Adoption Administrative Assistant

Service Coordinator

ccs-vt.org

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PRESS OPERATOR SHEETFED/WEB

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Executive Director We seek a professional, energetic, and enthusiastic Executive Director to lead our innovative nonprofit based in Central Vermont. Home Share Now (HSN) is at the forefront of the home sharing movement and seeks a leader passionate about housing to direct, manage, and grow our organization. Relevant experience in program or large project management and/ or team leadership strongly preferred. Qualified candidates will demonstrate strong organizational skills, experience implementing programs, clear fiscal management, effective communications and influencing skills along with public speaking and writing; plus ability to exercise good and timely judgment in complex situations, build and sustain relationships/partnerships, develop and implement fundraising strategies, and have great computer skills. This is an excellent opportunity for experienced or director track professionals. EOE. For more information about Home Share Now and a full job posting with application requirements visit www.HomeShareNow.org.

EDITOR/GRAPHICS SPECIALIST

Apply now! Join our team to make a real difference every day.

Cabot Creamery Career Opportunities

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Demand Planner Seeking a full-time salaried Demand Planner to join our team in our Waitsfield Administrative Office building. Responsibilities will include forecasting all finished good item sales for the Cabot Cut & Wrap, Cultured, and Butter manufacturing facilities. The Demand Planner will utilize all available data and resources, to include statistical models, customer portals, IRI data, promotional activity and sales history, and develop a weekly demand plan for production with approximately 300 unique SKUs. Individual will participate in the sales and operations planning process, will analyze trends, and develop reports to drive process and operational efficiency. The Demand Planner will also be responsible for various inventory and product projects – including item setup, data integrity, and working as a liaison between sales and operations to resolve any potential product-related issues.

Vermont PBS is seeking a full-time Editor/Graphics Specialist to provide skilled non-linear editing and motion graphics for various productions including long-format, short subject, on-air promotions, funding credits and other televised needs. Position requires a high level of creativity and collaboration with other production team members and managers on multiple simultaneous projects. An ideal candidate is self driven, dependable, and has a history of working under deadlines. Must be comfortable with various digital formats and technology to access media and work with it across different platforms. A Bachelor’s Degree in Film/Television Production, Communications, Creative Media, or related field and a minimum of 5 years of progressively responsible professional experience in video production required.

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT Vermont PBS is seeking applicants that utilize excellent judgment, organizational skills and administrative organization to support the strategic work of the Vermont PBS executive leadership. Some of the duties are to collaboratively interface with staff and external stakeholders; document and track tasks assigned to departments; provide organizational, clerical and administrative support to CEO; and plan logistics and make arrangements for meetings and other events.

Bachelor’s degree with 3+ years’ relevant experience preferred, or with commensurate education / work experience. Candidates must have strong written, presentation and interpersonal skills, with advanced Excel skills and experience with demand planning/stat modeling a definite plus.

Customer Relationship Representative This full-time hourly position based in our Waitsfield Administrative Office building provides an excellent opportunity to learn multiple business areas to include sales, marketing, accounting, transportation and dispatch. Responsibilities will include interacting with customers on all aspects of fulfilling orders, and providing assistance regarding inventory, logistics and reporting needs. Individual will work directly with our sales team and brokers regarding orders and pricing, with our planning team to communicate promotional information and to allocate inventory, and with our transportation department to ensure that orders are coordinated for efficiency. Computer competency working with multiple screens and systems at the same time is a plus (includes AS400, e-Commerce, Outlook, Excel and other tools/applications), as well as strong analytical, problem solving and processing skills.

At least two years of college-level education or equivalent; basic math, online research, and writing skills required. Proficiency with word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software in Microsoft Outlook also required. Reliable and professional presentations as well as excellent written and oral communication in English, including excellent vocabulary, grammar, and proofreading.

Bachelor’s degree with supply chain and/or customer service experience is required. If you have effective communication skills, solid attention to detail and follow-thru, a positive “can do” attitude, and the ability to multi-task, problem-solve and prioritize under tight time constraints, you could excel in this position.

For more information regarding these positions please visit our website at

Cabot offers a competitive wage and comprehensive benefits package, to include pension plan. Apply in person at our Waitsfield Administrative Office, online to jobs@cabotcheese.com, or send your resume to:

www.vermontpbs.org/careers/. Please submit resume and cover letter by August 17 to:

Cabot Creamery Attn: Human Resources 193 Home Farm Way Waitsfield, VT 05673 EOE: M/F/D/V We are an e-Verify employer

Vermont PBS Attn: HR Dept. 2 204 Ethan Allen Avenue Colchester, VT 05446 An equal opportunity employer and provider.

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08.08.18-08.15.18

Full-time Dental Assistant Providing Innovative Mental Health and Educational Services to Vermont’s Children & Families.

“Make a difference in the life of a child!”- NFI Vermont, a leader in specialized trauma and adolescent development, is looking to expand our team of innovators. Full time and part time positions available. Competitive wages, training opportunities, flexible work schedules and family oriented culture. Excellent benefits with tuition reimbursement offered for 30 or more hour employees. Visit our career page at www.nfivermont.org to learn more!

Family Engagement Specialist

One of our four dental assistants is moving out of state; we are looking to fill a full-time position to begin immediately to start training. This is a well-established, fast paced patient centered general practice, where team members work closely together but also work independently and have a lot of responsibility. We have a strong camaraderie among us, value a solid work ethic, confidence, professionalism and a great sense of humor. Competitive pay and benefits offered for the ideal applicant, who will possess an attention to detail, pleasant demeanor, and have reliable references. Experience a plus but willing to consider all applicants with x-ray certification. Please send resume if interested in scheduling an interview. jen@lisciodental.com 3H-LiscioDental080818.indd 1

Lund’s mission is to help children thrive by empowering families to break cycles of poverty, addiction and abuse. Lund offers hope and opportunity to families through education, treatment, family support and adoption.

St. Albans Programs Family Engagement Specialists work directly with children and families involved with DCF, who experience multi-system issues, including substance abuse, domestic violence, and mental health challenges. Responsibilities include coordinating and facilitating large meetings, teaming with community service providers, creating treatment plans through collaboration with DCF, and parent education. We are looking for candidates with strong communication and documentation skills, who work well in a team setting. Experience with Family Time Coaching, Family Safety Planning and Family Group Conferencing preferred. This full time position, with a $500 sign on bonus, requires a Bachelor’s degree and/or two years’ experience in related field.

Visit Supervisor & Transporter

CLINICIAN

About the Position: •

Work with pregnant and parenting women with mental health and substance abuse disorders in a residential setting.

Facilitate therapeutic groups and individual counseling to support clients to achieve client-identified goals.

Responsibilities include assessment, treatment planning, individual and group therapy, crisis intervention and professional documentation.

Full-time position with annual salary of $47-55K annually depending on education and experience.

Lund offers support in achieving substance abuse licensure through training and supervision.

St. Albans Programs The CFS Program is looking to expand its team to include a person to provide transportation and supervised visits for families involved with DCF. A qualified candidate will be comfortable in giving direct feedback to families and intervene when safety is a concern. We are looking for candidates with strong communication and documentation skills, who work well in a team setting. This 30 hour per week, benefited position requires a Bachelor’s degree and/or two years’ experience in related field. Valid driver’s license required.

Clinical Case Manager $300 Sign on Bonus Community Based Services Looking for an exciting new opportunity? NFI has one for you! Community Based Services is seeking a full time Clinical Case Manager to join our amazing team of mental health professionals and our positive and supportive work environment. Responsibilities include working with children, adolescents, and families with mental health challenges both in the community and in their homes. Ideal candidates work well both autonomously and collaboratively on treatment teams, have a Master’s degree in mental health or social work, have related work experience, have a valid driver’s license, and have reliable transportation. Come be a part of our positive culture. Learn more and apply online at www.nfivermont.org/careers We are an Equal Opportunity Employer and celebrate the diversity of our clients and staff.

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What We Look For: •

Minimum of a Master’s degree in the human services related field is required.

CADC/LADC and mental health licensures or eligibility is preferred.

Valid VT Driver’s License and access to reliable transportation required.

Why Join Our Team at Lund: •

We honor and celebrate the distinctive strengths and talents of our clients and staff.

Our work encompasses collaboration with a strong team of professionals and a strengths-based approach to providing services to families.

Lund’s adoption program provides life-long services to families brought together through adoption.

Lund’s residential and community treatment programs are distinctive as our work focuses on both treatment and parenting.

Lund’s educators believe in laughter, the importance of fun, community-oriented activities, and non-stop learning.

Ongoing training opportunities are available.

Lund offers competitive pay and paid training, as well as a comprehensive and very generous benefit package including health, dental, life, disability, retirement, extensive time off accrual, 11 paid holidays, and wellness reimbursement. EEO/AA Please send resume and cover letter to: Human Resources, PO Box 4009, Burlington, VT 05406-4009 fax (802) 864-1619 email: employment@lundvt.org

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AUGUST

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FOOD 43

Farm Table Fridays, Friday, August 31, 6-9:30 p.m., Stowe Mountain Lodge. $95 per person, plus $30 for beer pairing or $40 for wine pairing. Info, 282-4625, stowemountainlodge.com

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on vacation with their families — they don’t want something hoity-toity or fine dining. They want to enjoy the comfort food.” What’s great for locals is that a worldclass resort supper, served outside on the lawn, offers vacation-style “getaway” pampering for a few hours — and then you can drive home and sleep in your own bed. Throughout the evening, sommelier Tim Wallace circled with wine and beer matched to each course: for the tomatoes, a crisp, mineral-y white; for the pork and savory flan, Iapetus Figure 3, an effervescent and enigmatic 2017 Marquette pétnat grown and fermented by winemaker Ethan Joseph at Shelburne Vineyard. For dessert came golden beignets served with squirt bottles of caramel, crème anglaise, chocolate frosting and red-berry jam. This elicited squeals of delight from 9-year-old twin girls down the table from us. The sweet finish was as unexpected as it was fun to assemble. Visitors decorated their plates with pools of jam and squirted squiggles of caramel and chocolate, then dragged their beignets through the goo. “Doughnuts are not really a dessert,” Chef Jackie told Seven Days after the fact. “But then again, they are a dessert — how can you go wrong?” m

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

“I really wanted to showcase the portfolio of talent out there in our system,” Cochran said. “These people all have their own individual accolades, and I wanted to see: How can we bring that to Vermont?” The visiting-chef model takes a cue from Food & Wine magazine’s Chefs Club restaurants in Aspen, Colo., and New York City, which invite decorated cooks to take over the kitchen for short-term residencies. It’s no coincidence that Chef Jackie helped launch the Aspen location — or that, on July 27, her dinner had all the glitz and polish one might expect from someone who worked for years under acclaimed chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten. After plates of cider-braised pork belly and Maplebrook Farm ricotta flan, the service switched to family style. Long fillets of Atlantic halibut came wrapped in banana leaves with fragrant herb chimichurri. The scent of fresh basil lingered as guests passed around bowls of cheese ravioli and cherry tomatoes warmed with sweet-corn purée. While upscale, the meal was also notably family friendly and approachable, even for staunch meat-and-potatoes types. Platters of grilled and roasted meats came with light gourmet touches. Baked chicken tossed with aji amarillo chile paste, condensed milk and mayonnaise was barely sweet and almost undiscernibly spicy. Pork ribs rubbed with paprika and sugar harbored just a glimmer of garlic. “What I enjoy about cooking in Vermont is the rustic, homey feel,” Jackie said. “It really helps that we are in a resort, so it’s people coming up here


calendar A U G U S T

WED.8

agriculture

FARMER OLYMPICS: Contenders show off their agricultural aptitude in a cornucopia of physical and cerebral challenges. NOFAVT’s mobile pizza oven will be there! Sterling College, Craftsbury Common, 4-8 p.m. Free. Info, 434-4122.

cannabis

GREENER DRINKS: Supporters of commonsense cannabis reform sip beverages and discuss the culture, industry and politics of the agricultural product. Zenbarn, Waterbury, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, info@ vtcannabisbrands.com.

community

COFFEE TALK: Friends, neighbors and AARP Vermont volunteers catch up on upcoming activities and issues facing older Vermonters. Maglianero, Burlington, 9-10 a.m. Free. Info, vt@aarp.org.

crafts

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

FIBER RIOT!: Crafters get hooked on knitting, crocheting, spinning and more at an informal weekly gathering. Mad River Fiber Arts & Mill, Waitsfield, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 496-7746.

education

TOUR BHS: In order to provide feedback to school board commissioners and city councilors, community members witness firsthand the need to provide fully accessible learning spaces. Burlington High School, 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 865-5332.

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fairs & festivals

GUIDED TOURS: A historic Gothic Revival house opens its doors for hourly excursions. Self-guided explorations of the gardens, exhibits and walking trails are also available. Justin Morrill Homestead, Strafford, 10 a.m.5 p.m. $6; free for kids 14 and under. Info, 765-4484.

film

A COURSE IN MIRACLES STUDY GROUP: Participants engage in a study of spiritual transformation. Unitarian Church of Montpelier, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 279-1495.

OPEN MIC NIGHT: Feats of comedy, music, poetry and storytelling fill five-, 10- and 15-minute time slots. Main Street Museum, White River Junction, 7-9 p.m. Donations. Info, info@mainstreetmuseum. org. ROUND-UP ON THE RIVER: Live music and mouthwatering morsels draw locals to this weekly shindig. 40 Bridge St., Waitsfield, 5 p.m. Free. Info, 496-9199. STARGAZING: Clear skies at night mean viewers’ delight when telescope users set their sights on celestial happenings. Call to confirm. Mittelman Observatory, McCardell Bicentennial Hall, Middlebury College, 9-10:30 p.m. Free. Info, 443-2266. WAGON RIDE WEDNESDAYS: Giddyap! Visitors explore the working dairy farm via this time-tested method of equine transportation. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Regular admission, $4-16; free for members and kids under 3. Info, 457-2355.

ADDISON COUNTY FAIR & FIELD DAYS: Vermont’s largest agricultural fair hosts horse shows, tractor pulls, kiddie rides and live entertainment. Addison County Fairgrounds, New Haven, 8:30-midnight. $5-45; free for kids 5 and under; $12-20 for ride bracelets. Info, 866-666-3247.

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘FLYING MONSTERS 3D’: How and why did the pterosaur take to the sky? A captivating motion picture full of 3D filming technology and CGI explores this question. Northfield Savings Bank 3D Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 10:30 a.m., 12:30, 2:30 & 4:30 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $13.50-16.50; admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848. ‘GREAT WHITE SHARK 3D’: Shot on location in South Africa, New Zealand, Mexico and California, this film seeks the truth behind the mythic and stigmatized underwater creature. Northfield Savings Bank 3D Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 11:30 a.m., 1:30 & 3:30 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $13.50-16.50; admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848.

WED.8

LIST YOUR UPCOMING EVENT HERE FOR FREE! ALL SUBMISSIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY THURSDAY AT NOON FOR CONSIDERATION IN THE FOLLOWING WEDNESDAY’S NEWSPAPER. FIND OUR CONVENIENT SUBMISSION FORM AND GUIDELINES AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT. LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY KRISTEN RAVIN AND SADIE WILLIAMS. SEVEN DAYS EDITS FOR SPACE AND STYLE. DEPENDING ON COST AND OTHER FACTORS, CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS MAY BE LISTED IN EITHER THE CALENDAR OR THE CLASSES SECTION. WHEN APPROPRIATE, CLASS ORGANIZERS MAY BE ASKED TO PURCHASE A CLASS LISTING.

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FIND MORE LOCAL EVENTS IN THIS ISSUE AND ONLINE: art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

music

While some runs such as the People’s United Bank Vermont City Marathon & Relay take athletes through city streets and around downtown blocks, the Kingdom Run is all country. Now in its 12th year, this fundraiser for the Northeast Kingdom SpayNeuter Program invites joggers and walkers to stretch their legs in a half marathon or a 5- or 10K run/walk. The out-and-back dirt-road courses begin and end on the historic Irasburg Common and boast stunning views of Jay Peak, farm country and even a castle-style home. Still need convincing? Trees offer shade along much of the route, and there are no monster hills.

KINGDOM RUN Saturday, August 11, registration, 7:15 a.m.; walkers and half marathon, 8:30 a.m.; 5K and 10K runners, 9 a.m., at Irasburg Common. $20-45. Info, 766-5310, kingdomrun.org.

AUG.12 | MUSIC A Special Stage On Sundays throughout the summer, the Burlington Concert Band entertains audiences from the band shell in Battery Park. For its final concert of the 2018 season, the nonprofit community ensemble offers a musical tribute to Joseph Lechnyr, a leader in local music from the 1920s through the ’60s, to whom the stage was dedicated in 1978. Previous conductors from the past 50 years pick up the baton to lead the band in show tunes, marches and pop classics. Listeners should bring their own seating and be prepared to tap their toes along to spirited instrumental selections.

BURLINGTON CONCERT BAND

Find club dates at local venues in the music section and at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com.

Sunday, August 12, 7 p.m., at Battery Park in Burlington. Free. Info, burlingtonconcertbandvt@gmail.com.


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The boundary between the real world and a virtual realm where users can fulfill their sexual and romantic fantasies is blurred in The Nether, a haunting drama by Jennifer Haley. Set in the not-too-distant future, the play explores the dark side of the internet and raises the question of what constitutes a crime in a world of relative realities. “After the show, you will probably not feel like turning on your computer or cellphone,” writes the New York Times. Due to adult themes, kids under high school age are not admitted to this Waterbury Festival Playhouse production ‘THE NETHER’ directed by Melissa Thursday, August 9, through Saturday, Lourie. August 11, 7:30 p.m., at Waterbury Festival Playhouse. See website for additional dates. $15-35. Info, 498-3755, waterburyfestivalplayhouse.com.

AUG.9-11 | THEATER

Unconventional Collaboration ART OF THE DUO Saturday, August 11, 7:30 p.m., at the Unitarian Church of Montpelier. $20 suggested donation. Info, 229-9000. monteverdimusic.org.

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AUG.11 | MUSIC

the twosome’s 2010 album, showcases their fusion of Arabic and Southeast Asian vocabulary with elements of classical and jazz music. Both composers also improvise during their live performance, which is followed by a Q&A called “Creativity, Syria and Sri Lanka.”

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Grammy Award-winning woodwind player Kinan Azmeh and Sri Lankan-born Canadian keyboard master Dinuk Wijeratne defy expectations for clarinet-and-piano music. The instrumentalists join forces for a collaborative project called the Art of the Duo, in which the piano sometimes acts as a rhythmic percussion instrument alongside melodic clarinet playing. Complex Stories, Simple Sounds,

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‘INSIDE OUT’: Amy Poehler and Bill Hader lend their voices to this animated adventure about a young girl whose emotions have a life of their own. Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, 7 p.m. $5. Info, 533-2000. ‘MAUDIE’: Ethan Hawke and Sally Hawkins star in the true story of a romance between a reclusive man and his housekeeper who reaches fame as a folk painter. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600. ‘SEA MONSTERS 3D’: Moviegoers get up close and personal with some of the dinosaur age’s most fearsome marine reptiles. Northfield Savings Bank 3D Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, noon, 2 & 4 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $13.50-16.50; admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848. ‘WILD AFRICA 3D’: Viewers plunge into fantastic places and meet amazing creatures with water as their guide. Northfield Savings Bank 3D Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $13.50-16.50; admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848.

food & drink

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

BEERLINGTON FOAMERS MARKET: Shoppers snag veggies from Three Chimney Farm’s pop-up farm stand and sip Foam Brewers suds. Foam Brewers, Burlington, 5-7 p.m. Free. Info, 391-9047. COMMUNITY SUPPER: A scrumptious spread connects friends and neighbors. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 5-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 300. FIVE CORNERS FARMERS MARKET: Conscious consumers shop local produce, premade treats and crafts. 3 Main St., Essex Junction, 4-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 5cornersfarmersmarket@ gmail.com. ICE CREAM SOCIAL: Sweets lovers spoon up frozen dairy treats alongside food-truck fare. Lawn, Lake Champlain Chocolates Factory Store & Café, Burlington, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 800-465-5909. LEDDY PARK BEACH BITES: Lakeside picnickers enjoy foodtruck fare, a beer garden, kids’ activities and live entertainment. Attendees on two wheels make use of free bike valet service. Leddy Park, Burlington, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 864-0123. MAD RIVER TASTE WEEK: Foodies fête area makers and growers with eight days of tours, tastings and dinners. See mad rivertaste.com for details. Various Mad River Valley locations. Prices vary. Info, 496-3165.

VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: Local products — veggies, breads, pastries, cheeses, wines, syrups, jewelry, crafts and beauty supplies — draw shoppers to a diversified bazaar. Depot Park, Rutland, 3-6 p.m. Free. Info, 342-4727.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: Players have fun with the popular card game. Burlington Bridge Club, Williston, 9:15 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. $6. Info, 872-5722. CRIBBAGE TEAMS: Longtime players and neophytes alike aim for a value of 15 or 31 in this competitive card game. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 223-3322. MAH JONGG: Participants of all levels enjoy friendly bouts of this tile-based game. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 1-3:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. PINOCHLE & RUMMY: Card sharks engage in friendly competition. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 223-3322. TRIVIA NIGHT: Teams of quick thinkers gather for a meeting of the minds. Holiday Inn, South Burlington, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 863-6363.

health & fitness

BONE BUILDERS EXERCISE CLASSES: Folks of all ages ward off osteoporosis in an exercise and prevention class. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 7:30-8:30, 9:15-10:15 & 10:4011:40 a.m. Free. Info, 223-3322. RESILIENCE FLOW: FOR THOSE WITH A HISTORY OF TBI OR BRAIN INJURY: Individuals affected by a traumatic brain injury practice breath work, slow grounded movement and guided meditation. Sangha Studio, Pine, Burlington, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262. TOMGIRL WALKING CLUB: Pups and pals in tow, pedestrians make strides toward health. Tomgirl Juice Co., Burlington, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0337. Y12SR: YOGA OF 12-STEP RECOVERY: Folks in addiction recovery and those affected by the addictive behavior of others are welcome to take part in a sharing circle and themed yoga class. Sangha Studio, Pine, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

language

BEGINNER & INTERMEDIATE/ ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSES: Learners take communication to the next level. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211. LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: SPANISH: ¡Hola! Language lovers perfect their fluency. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

lgbtq

HERE BE DRAGONFLIES: Entomology enthusiasts capture and identify species during this basic introduction to the winged insects. Little River State Park, Waterbury, 2 p.m. $2-4; free for kids 3 and under; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103.

THE SUMMER HEAT POETRY WORKSHOP — DEVELOPING YOUR UNIQUE STYLE AND PRACTICE: An hour of writing prompts paves the way for a discussion on specific topics related to poetry for LGBTQ women and trans and gender nonconforming individuals. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free; for ages 18 and up. Info, poetryxlass@gmail. com.

Find club dates in the music section.

tech

RECOVERY WRITE NOW: Wordsmiths in recovery let their creativity flow in a lively and supportive setting. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 6-7:15 p.m. Free. Info, writelife1@ hotmail.com.

TECHNOLOGY NIGHT: Video streaming services become second nature during a class with Vermont Technical College’s Ken Bernard. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. SA ’ T.11 SS | FIL ME M | ‘L FINE T N AUREL & HARDY, A SILE

BURLINGTON CITY ARTS SUMMER CONCERTS: DANA & SUE ROBINSON: The husbandand-wife duo channel the essence of rural America with the fiddle, guitar, banjo and mandolin. Burlington City Hall Park, noon. Free. Info, 865-7166. CAPITAL CITY BAND: The community ensemble hits all the right notes at a weekly gig on the green. Vermont Statehouse lawn, Montpelier, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 456-7054.

CRAFTSBURY CHAMBER PLAYERS: Classical connoisseurs perk up their ears for compositions by Haydn, Vaughan Williams and others. Elley-Long Music Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, preconcert talk, 6:45 p.m.; concert, 7:30 p.m. $10-25; free for kids 12 and under. Info, 800-639-3443. PIKES FALLS CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL: Instrumentalists hit all the right notes during 11 days of classical music programming. See pikesfallschambermusic festival.com for details. Various southern Vermont locations. Free. Info, 732-586-5455. VCFA MFA IN MUSIC COMPOSITION CONCERT: TALUJON & LOADBANG: Fresh compositions reflect versatile approaches to new music. College Hall Chapel, Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, 8-9:15 p.m. Free. Info, 828-8600.

outdoors

words

LUIS VIVANCO: Cyclists and history buffs find common ground during the University of Vermont professor’s lecture, “Of Wheelmen, the New Woman and Good Roads: Bicycling in Vermont 1880-1920.” Peacham Town Library, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 592-3216.

INTRODUCTION TO GOOGLE DRIVE: Folks who are familiar with using the internet get dialed into the basics of cloud computing. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 865-7217.

music

BOW THAYER: Rootsinspired folk rock fills the meadow. Martha Pellerin & Andy Shapiro Memorial Bandstand, Middlesex, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, thumbsgerkin@comcast.net.

talks

BUGGIN’ OUT: Those with an interest in insects catch and learn about the life cycles of local species. Nature Center, Little River State Park, Waterbury, 1 p.m. $2-4; free for kids 3 and under; preregister; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103.

MAKING TRACKS, SEEING SKINS & SKULLS: Outdoorsy types search for signs of furbearing animals and make plaster-of-paris track casts to take home. Nature Center, Little River State Park, Waterbury, 5 p.m. $2-4; free for kids 3 and under; preregister; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103. PLANTS THAT HURT & PLANTS THAT HELP: Embarking on a botany walk, outdoors lovers get to know medicinal, poisonous and edible species growing in Vermont State Parks. Nature Center, Little River State Park, Waterbury, 3:30 p.m. $2-4; free for kids 3 and under; preregister; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103.

seminars

HOMESHARING INFO SESSION: Locals learn to make the most of spare space in their homes by hosting compatible housemates. HomeShare Vermont, South Burlington, 5-5:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 863-5625.

sports

COMMUNITY ROWING: Active bodies experience a physical workout while enjoying the beauty of Lake Champlain. Perkins Pier, Burlington, 5:157:30 p.m. $10; $175 for season membership; free for first-timers; preregister; limited space. Info, 475-2022, ext. 112.

theater

‘ALWAYS ... PATSY CLINE’: The country crooner’s friendship with Houston housewife Louise Seger anchors this Skinner Barn production. Skinner Barn Theater, Waitsfield, 8-10 p.m. $25. Info, 496-4422. ‘A DOLL’S HOUSE, PART 2’: Staged by Weston Playhouse, this bold new play examines marriage, family and traditional gender roles nearly 150 years after Henrik Ibsen’s original work was written. Weston Playhouse Second Stage at Walker Farm, 2-4:30 & 7:30-9:30 p.m. $43. Info, 824-5288. ‘LIFE AS PERFORMANCE’: Noah Witke weaves words, images and dance into a meditation on queerness, artistic growth and the absurd. Phantom Theater, Edgcomb Barn, Warren, 8 p.m. $15. Info, 496-5997. ‘THE PRODUCERS’ AUDITIONS: Thespians try out for roles in a BarnArts Center for the Arts production of Mel Brooks’ popular musical. Woodstock Town Hall Theatre, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 234-1645.

AUTHORS AT THE ALDRICH: Fans of children’s fiction flock to a talk by William Alexander, who penned A Properly Unhaunted Place. Aldrich Public Library, Barre, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 476-7550.

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST BOOK CLUB: Bookworms weigh in on the memoir Educated by Tara Westover. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Plattsburgh, N.Y., 1:30 p.m. Free. Info, 518-561-6920. WEDNESDAY WORKSHOP: Burlington Writers Workshop members focus on elements of craft when responding to works in progress. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104. WRITING CIRCLE: Words flow when participants explore creative expression in a lowpressure environment. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218.

THU.9 activism

NAGASAKI SILENT VIGIL: Folks honor the victims of the 1945 atomic bombing in Japan and call for the worldwide abolition of nuclear weapons. Top of Church Street, Burlington, 11 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 863-2345. WORLDWIDE PEACE MEDITATION: Joining others around the world, participants come together for a 21-minute transformative process for global tranquility. All Souls Interfaith Gathering, Shelburne, noon-1:30 p.m. Free. Info, 233-2638.

agriculture

FARM TO MEDICINE CABINET PLANT WALK: Clinical herbalist Emma Merritt points out the healing flora found on Vermont’s working lands. Shelburne Farms, 4-5:30 p.m. $15. Info, 985-8686.

‘SEE HOW THEY RUN’: St. Michael’s Playhouse presents a classic British farce propelled by mishaps and mistaken identities. McCarthy Arts Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 8 p.m. $36-45. Info, 654-2281.

HOUSE & FORMAL GARDENS TOUR: Explorations of the inn and its grounds culminate in afternoon tea with sweets and savories. Shelburne Farms, 2:304 p.m. $20; preregister. Info, 985-8686.

‘TALES OF HOFFMAN’: Opera North presents Offenbach’s fantastical story of poet and painter E.T.A. Hoffmann’s quest for love. Lebanon Opera House, N.H., 7:30 p.m. $20-90. Info, 603-448-0400.

MUSIC WHILE YOU PICK: Lively bluegrass tunes by Hot Pickin’ Party keep spirits high as locavores snap up fresh blueberries. Simple Roots Brewery is on hand with refreshing pints. Owl’s Head Blueberry Farm, Richmond, 5-8:30 p.m. Minimum purchase of two quarts per adult, $6 per quart. Info, 434-3387.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

‘SEEDY THOUGHTS: A PANEL DISCUSSION ABOUT REGIONAL SEED DIVERSITY’: Tom Stearns of High Mowing Organic Seeds cultivates a conversation on topics such as what seed companies can do to support seed saving. Simpson Hall, Sterling College, Craftsbury Common, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 586-7711.

etc.

FEAST & FIELD MARKET: Locally grown produce and jazz fusion music by the Afro Yaqui Music Collective are on the menu at a pastoral party. Fable Farm, Barnard, market, 4:30-7:30 p.m.; concert, 5:30-8 p.m. Donations. Info, feastandfield@gmail.com. GENEALOGY DAY: Family-tree enthusiasts get amped up about ancestry and discover their roots at this annual event promoting lineage tracing. Seven Stars Arts Center, Sharon, noon-8 p.m. Free. Info, 578-4225. GUIDED TOURS: See WED.8. JOB HUNT HELP: Community College of Vermont interns assist employment seekers with everything from résumé-writing to online applications. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 2:305:30 p.m. Free. Info, 745-1393. TROPICAL FISH CLUB MONTHLY MEETING: Speakers ranging from local hobbyists to nationally known aquarium aficionados share their expertise. Essex Junction VFW Post, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 372-8716.

fairs & festivals ADDISON COUNTY FAIR & FIELD DAYS: See WED.8, 8 a.m.-midnight.

FOMO?

art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film

music Find club dates at local venues in the music section and at sevendaysvt.com/music.

‘SEA MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.8. STOWE JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL: ‘SHEKINAH RISING’: A documentary film focuses on the aspirations of several Hasidic women. Jewish Community of Greater Stowe, 7 p.m. $10-15. Info, 253-1800. ‘WILD AFRICA 3D’: See WED.8.

food & drink

BURLINGTON EDIBLE HISTORY TOURS: Foodies sample farmfresh eats on a scrumptious stroll dedicated to the Queen City’s culinary past. Awning behind ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 1-4 p.m. $55. Info, 238-8828. COMMUNITY LUNCH: Farmfresh fare makes for a delicious and nutritious midday meal. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 309. MAD RIVER TASTE WEEK: See WED.8. SOUTH END BEERS & VEGGIES: Switchback Brewing beer in hand, healthy eaters snag fresh veggies from a pop-up farm stand. Shoppers may preorder at threechimneyfarm.com. The Tap Room at Switchback Brewing, Burlington, 5-7 p.m. Free. Info, 391-9047. TRUCKS, TAPS & TUNES: Food trucks, craft brews and live music by local acts make for an evening of family-friendly fun. Essex Shoppes & Cinema, Essex Junction, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, info@essexexperience.com. VERMONT BEER PAIRING POPUP SERIES: Gourmands gorge on a three-course meal served alongside a local brew. Village Café at Bolton Valley, 5-9 p.m. $45. Info, 434-3444. WORCESTER COMMUNITY MARKET: Local produce, live bands and kids’ activities bring neighbors together. 52 Elmore Rd., Worcester, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 272-3309.

games

GAME NIGHT: From Monopoly to Bananagrams, players participate in tabletop pastimes. Main Street Museum, White River Junction, 6 p.m. Donations. Info, 356-2776. TRIVIA NIGHT: Teams of quick thinkers gather for a meeting of the minds. Marquis Theatre & Southwest Café, Middlebury, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 388-4841.

health & fitness

BEGINNERS TAI CHI CLASS: Students get a feel for the ancient Chinese practice. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 223-3322.

CHAIR YOGA WITH SANGHA STUDIO: Supported poses promote health and wellbeing. Champlain Senior Center, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 448-4262. COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS: A 20-minute guided practice with Andrea O’Connor alleviates stress and tension. Tea and a discussion follow. Winooski Senior Center, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 233-1161. KARMA KLASS: DONATIONBASED YOGA FOR A CAUSE: Active bodies hit the mat to support local nonprofits. The Wellness Collective, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. Donations. Info, 540-0186. YOGA: A Sangha Studio instructor guides students who are in recovery toward achieving inner tranquility. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 5-6 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

music

Find club dates in the music section. BELLA & THE NOTABLES: Listeners experience a blast from the past with timeless jazz classics. Woodbelly Pizza brings the eats. Old Schoolhouse Common, Marshfield, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

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CRAFTSBURY CHAMBER PLAYERS: See WED.8, Hardwick Town House. DAVID ROSANE & THE ZOOKEEPERS: The folk-rock protest band rallies support for literacy during a stop on its Book of ZOO Library Tour. Bixby Memorial Library, Vergennes, 8 p.m. Donations. Info, 877-2211. ERIN CASSELS-BROWN: Celestial country tunes from 2017’s Northern Lights, Vol. 1 get toes tapping as Bar Hill slushies quench thirst. Hotel Vermont, Burlington, live music, 5-7 p.m.; DJ, 7 p.m.-sundown. Free. Info, 651-0080. HUNGER MOUNTAIN CO-OP BROWN BAG SUMMER CONCERT SERIES: Folkster Alex Smith strikes a chord with audience members. Courtyard, Christ Episcopal Church, Montpelier, noon. Free. Info, 223-9604. MUSIC IN THE VINEYARD SUMMER CONCERT SERIES: Oenophiles let loose with live music by the Ashley O’Brien Band, award-winning wine and mouthwatering eats. BYO seating. Snow Farm Vineyard, South Hero, picnicking begins, 5 p.m.; music, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 372-9463. PIKES FALLS CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL: See WED.8.

THU.9

CALENDAR 47

All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com.

‘GREAT WHITE SHARK 3D’: See WED.8.

SEVEN DAYS

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

‘FLYING MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.8.

CHAIR YOGA: FOR THOSE WITH LIMITED MOBILITY: Props and modifications complement elements of a traditional flow class. Sangha Studio, North, Burlington, 2-3:15 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

08.08.18-08.15.18

Find even more local events in this newspaper and online:

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

SUMMERVALE: Locavores fête farms and farmers at a weekly event centered on food, brews and kids’ activities, with City Market, Onion River Co-op workshops and live music. Intervale Center, Burlington, 5:30-8 p.m. Donations. Info, abby@intervale. org.

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SONGWRITING WORKSHOP: Seth Melvin Cronin guides Burlington Writers Workshop musicians and singers in structuring original strains. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104.

TECH SUPPORT: Need an email account? Want to enjoy ebooks? Bring your phone, tablet or laptop to a weekly help session. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 5-7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-8291, ext. 302.

outdoors

‘ALWAYS ... PATSY CLINE’: See WED.8.

THE MAGIC OF BIRD MIGRATION: Fans of feathered fliers learn how songbirds, shorebirds and other species travel thousands of miles each year with astounding accuracy. Nature Center, Little River State Park, Waterbury, 4 p.m. $2-4; free for kids 3 and under; preregister; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103.

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

sports

CODY CHEVROLET NIGHT: Drivers keep fans on the edge of their seats with laps around the track. A ceremony recognizes Olympic gold medalist and hockey player Amanda Pelkey during intermission. Thunder Road Speed Bowl, Barre, 7 p.m. $3-25. Info, 244-6963.

08.08.18-08.15.18 SEVEN DAYS 48 CALENDAR

MUSHROOMS DEMYSTIFIED: Fungi fanatics learn about different varieties — fabulous and fearsome alike — found throughout the park. Little River State Park, Waterbury, 11 a.m. $2-4; free for kids ages 3 and under; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103. SUNSET AQUADVENTURE PADDLE: Stunning scenery welcomes boaters, who explore the Waterbury Reservoir in search of local wildlife. Contact Station, Little River State Park, Waterbury, 6:30 p.m. $2-4; free for kids 3 and under; preregister; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103.

WE GROW, FRAG AND SELL AQUACULTURED CORALS & MARINE LIFE MAINTENANCE, INSTALLATION & SERVICE AVAILABLE

GREEN MOUNTAIN CORAL 3595 WATERBURY-STOWE ROAD WATERBURY CENTER • (802) 917-4508

tech

VCFA MFA IN MUSIC COMPOSITION CONCERT: LOADBANG & HOUSEWARMING PROJECT: Two ensembles premiere student-written pieces. College Hall Chapel, Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, 8-9:15 p.m. Free. Info, 828-8600.

FOREST BATHING: Folks unplug, slow down and experience nature through a guided mindfulness practice. Shelburne Farms, 6-8 p.m. $25; preregister. Info, 985-8686.

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‘UPHILL & DOWNHILL: THE FUTURE OF MOUNTAIN BIKING AND VERMONT SKI RESORTS’: What’s up with downhill mountain biking? Experts weigh in during a roundtable discussion. Vermont Ski and Snowboard Museum, Stowe, 6:30 p.m. $10; cash bar. Info, 253-9911.

DISC GOLF LEAGUES: Players aim for targets in a fun and social tournament. Bolton Valley Resort, 6 p.m. $7-14. Info, 434-3444.

talks

PEGGY LUHRS: Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom member leads a thought-provoking discussion on female erasure within today’s feminist movement. Peace & Justice Center, Burlington, 5:307 p.m. Free. Info, madel51353@ aol.com.

theater

‘THE BARBER OF SEVILLE’: Vocal pyrotechnics impress opera devotees during Opera North’s production of Rossini’s joyous work. Lebanon Opera House, N.H., 7:30 p.m. $20-90. Info, 603-448-0400. ‘A DOLL’S HOUSE, PART 2’: See WED.8, 7:30-9:30 p.m. ‘LIFE AS PERFORMANCE’: See WED.8. ‘MILLION DOLLAR QUARTET’: Rock hits such as “Blue Suede Shoes” fuel a dramatization of the recording session that brought together Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins. Weston Playhouse Main Stage, 7:30-10 p.m. $54-68. Info, 824-5288. ‘THE NETHER’: Presented by the Waterbury Festival Playhouse, Jennifer Haley’s theater work transports audience members to a virtual wonderland — with a dark side. See calendar spotlight. Waterbury Festival Playhouse, 7:30 p.m. $15-35. Info, 498-3755. THE PIRATES & TUXEDO MURDER MYSTERY CRUISE: Who done it? Suppertime sleuths enjoy a delicious dinner and crack a case presented by the October Theatre Company. Spirit of Ethan Allen, Burlington, 6:30-9 p.m. $52.85. Info, 862-8300. ‘SEE HOW THEY RUN’: See WED.8. ‘THE SHOW-OFF’: First performed in 1924, this dramatic comedy centers on an egotistical braggart and his farcical attempts to retain dignity. Festival Theatre, Marshfield, 7:30 p.m. $10-20. Info, 456-8968. ‘THE TAMING OF THE SHREW’: The Vermont Shakespeare Festival stages the bard’s comedy about the dynamics of malefemale relationships. Circus Lawn, Shelburne Museum, 6 p.m. $18-30; free for kids under 12. Info, 863-5966.

words

BOOK LAUNCH CELEBRATION: Muslim Girls Making Change and Rep. Selene Colburn join author and illustrator Kate Schatz and Miriam Stahl to introduce Rad Girls Can: Stories of Bold, Brave and Brilliant Young Women. Phoenix Books, Burlington, 7 p.m. $3; free for kids under 18. Info, 448-3350. TOWN HOUSE FORUM: A reading and discussion series hosts authors Amy Huyffer and Shannon Varley. Strafford Town House, picnic, 6 p.m.; reading, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 765-4703.

FRI.10

community

FEAST TOGETHER OR FEAST TO GO: Senior citizens and their guests catch up over a shared meal. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, noon-1 p.m. $7-9; preregister. Info, 262-6288.

crafts

CRAFTY CRAP NIGHT: Participants bring supplies or ongoing projects and an adventurous attitude to share creative time with other people in recovery. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150.

dance

BALLROOM & LATIN DANCING: Singles, couples and beginners are welcome to join in a dance social featuring the waltz, tango and more. Williston Jazzercise Fitness Center, 8-9:30 p.m. $8. Info, 862-2269. CONTRA DANCE: Dana DwinellYardley calls the steps at a Queen City Contras shindig with music by Frost and Fire. Bring clean, soft-soled shoes. Shelburne United Methodist Church, beginners’ session, 7:45 p.m.; dance, 8 p.m. $9; free for kids under 12. Info, 862-9719. ECSTATIC DANCE VERMONT: Inspired by the 5Rhythms dance practice, attendees move, groove, release and open their hearts to life in a safe and sacred space. Christ Episcopal Church, Montpelier, 7-9 p.m. $10. Info, fearnessence@gmail.com. TOP OF THE BLOCK SWING DANCE: Music from the roaring ’20s through the rockabilly ’50s fuels an al fresco dance party on a portable, wooden floor. Weather permitting. Top of Church St., Burlington, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, seetherhythm@ yahoo.com.

etc.

FOOD & ART FRIDAYS: Woodfired pizza, farm-fresh produce, visual art, story telling and live performance make for a memorable evening. The Sable Project, Stockbridge, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Free; $5-10 for pizza. Info, info@ thesableproject.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

FRIDAY NIGHT SHUFFLE: A summer celebration of community spirit invites visitors to hop from venue to venue for music, art exhibits and specials from participating businesses. Various Newport locations, 5-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 988-2611. GUIDED TOURS: See WED.8. QUEEN CITY GHOST WALK: DARKNESS FALLS: Local historian Thea Lewis treats pedestrians to tales of madmen, smugglers, pub spirits and, of course, ghosts. Arrive 10 minutes early. Democracy sculpture, 199 Main St., Burlington, 8 p.m. $20. Info, 863-5966. SAINT J SUBARU STARGAZING PARTY: Celestial admirers look to the sky, aiming to set the Guinness World Record for the largest astronomy lesson in the world. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, St. Johnsbury, 5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2372. TAROT READINGS: A spiritual mentor consults her cards to offer guidance and clarity. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 5:30-8:30 p.m. $1 per minute; preregister. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com. VERMONT E-BIKE & BREW TOUR: Electric bicycles transport suds lovers to three local beer producers via scenic routes. Old Mill Park, Johnson, noon-4:30 p.m. $75. Info, 730-0161. WALK-IN ASTROLOGY READINGS: Folks learn how past, present and future planetary transits are affecting their lives. The Astrology Space, Burlington, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $15-25. Info, 730-5594.

fairs & festivals

ADDISON COUNTY FAIR & FIELD DAYS: See WED.8.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘FLYING MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.8.

food & drink

BRANDON FARMERS MARKET: Local farmers, artisans and specialty food producers offer up their goods. Estabrook Park, Brandon, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 273-2655. BURLINGTON EDIBLE HISTORY TOURS: See THU.9. CHAMPLAIN VALLEY DINNER TRAIN: Passengers feast on a three-course meal while riding the Green Mountain Railroad from Burlington to Middlebury and back. Union Station, Burlington, 5:30-8:30 p.m. $85100; preregister for Gold Class tickets and parties of eight or more. Info, 800-707-3530. FOODWAYS FRIDAYS: Foodies use heirloom herbs and veggies to revive historic recipes in the farmhouse kitchen. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Regular admission, $4-16; free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 457-2355. MAD RIVER TASTE WEEK: See WED.8. RICHMOND FARMERS MARKET: An open-air marketplace featuring live music connects cultivators and fresh-food browsers. Volunteers Green, Richmond, 3-7 p.m. Free. Info, info@richmond farmersmarketvt.org.

FOMO? Find even more local events in this newspaper and online:

art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

music Find club dates at local venues in the music section and at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.8, 9:15 a.m. CAPTURE THE FLAG: Adults and kids ages 14 and up practice stealth and strategy as they crawl, hide and run through the woods. Red Rocks Park, South Burlington, 6-9 p.m. Donations; preregister. Info, scoutclubvt@ gmail.com. CRIBBAGE TEAMS: See WED.8. PINOCHLE & RUMMY: See WED.8.

health & fitness

ACUDETOX: Attendees in recovery undergo acupuncture to the ear to propel detoxification. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150. ADVANCED TAI CHI CLASS: Participants keep active with a sequence of slow, controlled movements. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3322. BONE BUILDERS EXERCISE CLASSES: See WED.8, 7:30-8:30 & 10:40-11:40 a.m.

Celebrating a

LIVING RECOVERY: FOR THOSE IN ADDICTION RECOVERY OR AFFECTED BY THE ADDICTIVE BEHAVIOR OF OTHERS: A moderately paced flow class serves folks overcoming substance use. Sangha Studio, North, Burlington, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

CEntury of

REFUGE RECOVERY: A LOVE SUPREME: Buddhist philosophy is the foundation of this mindfulness-based addictionrecovery community. Turning Point Center, Burlington, noon. Free. Info, 861-3150.

music

Find club dates in the music section. ASHLEY STORROW TRIO: Radiant vocals and thoughtfully crafted folk songs grab listeners’ attention. Back lawn, Woodstock History Center, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 457-3981. BIG BLOOD: The husband-andwife duo doles out folk tunes as part of the Exhibitionists Summer Music Series. Wren Kitz and Colby Nathan open. Amy E. Tarrant Gallery, Burlington, 6 p.m. Free; cash bar. Info, 863-5966.

FRI.10

Aug. 11 12

Free Parking, Sand sculptures, Kids’ activities, music, outdoor movie (SaT.) food & more!

enjoyburlington.com produced by:

Sponsored by: CALENDAR 49

‘GREAT WHITE SHARK 3D’: See WED.8.

‘WILD AFRICA 3D’: See WED.8.

SEVEN DAYS

VERMONT ANTIQUE & CLASSIC CAR MEET: This 61st annual exhibition treats auto enthusiasts to a car corral, vintage fashion judging and a flea market. Saturday’s festivities include a parade and a street dance in Waterbury Village. See vtauto.org for details. Farr’s Field, Waterbury, 7 a.m. $12; free for kids 12 and under. Info, rccwrn@ pshift.com.

‘SEA MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.8.

TRUCK STOP: Mobile kitchens dish out mouthwatering meals and libations. Live music and cold beer add to the fun. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 5-10 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 540-0406.

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STRANGEFOLK GARDEN OF EDEN FESTIVAL: The Burlingtonformed band turns up the volume for a weekend of epic jams including sets by Moon Boot Lover, Dead Winter Carpenters and others. Jay Peak Resort, 8 p.m. $40-200. Info, 988-2611.

‘RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK’: Harrison Ford stars as Indiana Jones, an archaeologist hired by the U.S. government to find an ancient artifact. Dartmouth Green, Hanover, N.H., 8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 603-646-2422.

SUN TO CHEESE TOUR: Fromage fanatics go behind the scenes and follow award-winning farmhouse cheddar from raw milk to finished product. Shelburne Farms, 1:45-3:45 p.m. $20 includes a block of cheddar; preregister. Info, 985-8686.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

DANVILLE COMMUNITY FAIR: Games, rides, a parade, live music and plenty of delicious food put smiles on faces. Danville Village Green, 4-10 p.m. Free. Info, 227-3113.

MOVIES IN THE RED BARN: Cinephiles view favorite flicks from female directors. Food and drinks are available. Call for film info and reservations. Mary’s Restaurant, Bristol, 7:30-10 p.m. Free. Info, 453-2432.

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50% OFF SUMMER CLOTHES AND SWIMSUITS Lakewood Commons, Shelburne Road, So. Burlington • 860-2802 M-W 10-6, Th-Fri 10-8, Sat. 10-6, Sun. 12-5 • sportstylevt.com • @sportstylevt 6h-SportsStyle080818.indd 1

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BURLINGTON CITY ARTS SUMMER CONCERTS: DEREK BURKINS BAND: From the traditional to the new, Americana music carries through the air during a lunchtime concert. Burlington City Hall Park, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7166. BURLINGTON CITY ARTS SUMMER CONCERTS: VERMONT YOUTH ORCHESTRA: Young players charm classical connoisseurs. Burlington City Hall Park, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7166. ‘DIE GÄRTNERIN AUS LIEBE’: Middlebury College’s German for Singers language school presents an abbreviated version of a German-language work by Mozart. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, preshow talk, 7:15 p.m.; show, 7:45 p.m. $15; limited space. Info, 382-9222. PIKES FALLS CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL: See WED.8. POINT COUNTERPOINT CHAMBER PLAYERS: A faculty ensemble from the music camp delivers a rousing program including works by Mendelssohn and Brahms. Salisbury Congregational Church, 7:30-9 p.m. Donations. Info, 352-6671. SUMMER CARILLON CONCERT: The melodic sound of bells rings out across the campus in a performance by Amy Heebner. Mead Memorial Chapel, Middlebury College, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168.

SEVEN DAYS

08.08.18-08.15.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

VCFA MFA IN MUSIC COMPOSITION CONCERT: HOUSEWARMING PROJECT & SIRIUS QUARTET: Fresh student works performed by a jazz trio and a string quartet reflect a versatile cross-section of approaches to new music. College Hall Chapel, Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, 2-3:15 p.m. Free. Info, 828-8600.

MASTER’S DEGREE PROGRAM IN

CLINICAL

PSYCHOLOGY

WITH NEW CLINICAL MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING TRACK

Our Master of Arts degree program prepares students for professional psychology positions in the private or public mental health system and study towards a doctoral degree at another institution. We prepare students to be licensed as a clinical psychologist and/or a mental health counselor. The curriculum of our master’s degree program is approved as a step toward licensure by both the Vermont Board of Psychological Examiners and, as of October 2016, the Vermont Board of Allied Mental Health Practitioners.

APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING ACCEPTED. 800.654.2206 50 CALENDAR

smcvt.edu/psych psych@smcvt.edu

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VILLAGE HARMONY TEEN SESSION III: Singers embrace musical traditions from around the globe in a program of international choral music. Bread and Puppet Theater, Glover, 7:30 p.m. $5-15. Info, villageharmony@ gmail.com.

outdoors

COEXISTING WITH BEARS: An interpretive ranger demystifies large furry mammals and other area wildlife. Little River State Park, Waterbury, 7 p.m. $2-4; free for kids 3 and under; preregister; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103. FORESTRY, HISTORY & THE FUTURE: A GUIDED HIKE: An outdoor program familiarizes trekkers with the sustainably managed working forest. Carriage Barn Visitor Center, Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historic Park, Woodstock, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 457-3368, ext. 222.

LITTLE RIVER RAMBLE: With help from a park interpreter, hikers plan the route and duration of a guided trails tour. Little River State Park, Waterbury, 1:30 p.m. $2-4; free for kids 3 and under; preregister; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103. TOUR OF CCC CAMP SMITH: History hounds visit the remains of a 1930s work camp that housed the 3,000 people who built the Waterbury Dam. Camp Smith Trail parking lot, Little River State Park, Waterbury, 11 a.m. $2-4; free for kids 3 and under; preregister; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103.

sports

FRIDAY NIGHT DINGHY RACING: Skippers celebrate the end of the week with some nautical competition. Prior sailing knowledge and passage of CSC’s rental test are required. Community Sailing Center, Burlington, signup, 4:30 p.m.; begin rigging, 5:30 p.m.; first gun, 6 p.m. Free; limited space. Info, 864-2499.

talks

JANE ENGLISH: “Greenland: Ancient Wisdom to Our Changing World” provides an interactive introduction to the traditional teachings of the island country. Shambhala Meditation Center, Burlington, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, erichigleyvt@ gmail.com.

theater

‘AIN’T MISBEHAVIN’: THE FATS WALLER MUSICAL SHOW’: A Tony Award-winning musical revue presented by Depot Theatre celebrates the legendary jazz artist. Depot Theatre, Westport, N.Y., 8 p.m. $20-35. Info, 518-962-4449. ‘ALWAYS ... PATSY CLINE’: See WED.8. ‘A DOLL’S HOUSE, PART 2’: See WED.8, 7:30-9:30 p.m. ‘MILLION DOLLAR QUARTET’: See THU.9. ‘THE NETHER’: See THU.9. ‘THE OR ELSE SHOW’: With the use of cardboard and paper maché, Bread and Puppet Theater stages an ever-changing indoor performance in the Paper Maché Cathedral. Bread and Puppet Theater, Glover, 7:30 p.m. $10. Info, 525-3031. ‘SEE HOW THEY RUN’: See WED.8. ‘THE SHOW-OFF’: See THU.9. ‘TALES OF HOFFMAN’: See WED.8. ‘THE TAMING OF THE SHREW’: See THU.9.

words

FRIDAY MORNING WORKSHOP: Wordsmiths offer constructive criticism on works in progress by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104.

SAT.11

agriculture

GARDENING FOR BUTTERFLIES, BIRDS & BIODIVERSITY: Green thumbs get the dirt on attracting eye-catching creatures to their yards. Nature Center, Little River State Park, Waterbury, 10 a.m. $2-4; free for kids 3 and under; preregister; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103.

bazaars

KIDSAFE COLLABORATIVE COMMUNITY YARD SALE: More than 250 tables boast bargains on household items, clothing, books, collectibles and more at the 15th annual marketplace. Champlain Valley Exposition, Essex Junction, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. $1. Info, 863-9626. YARD SALE: Suitcases, flower pots and household items find new homes. Funds raised support the Alzheimer’s Association. Private residence, Milton, 8 a.m.4 p.m. Free. Info, canne5515@ gmail.com.

dance

FARM TO BALLET PROJECT: Artistry meets agriculture as dancers reinterpret classical ballet pieces to tell the story of a Vermont farm from spring to fall. Sandiwood Farm, Wolcott, 5-9 p.m. $21.69; free for kids. Info, farmtoballet@gmail.com. SECOND SATURDAY SWING DANCE: Quick-footed participants get into the groove. Bring clean shoes with nonmarking soles. Champlain Club, Burlington, beginner lesson, 7:30 p.m.; dance, 8-10:30 p.m. $5. Info, 864-8382.

environment

FLOOD RESILIENCY, RIPARIAN VEGETATION & WATER QUALITY IN YOUR BACKYARD: Engineer Todd Menees leads this seminar with the help of a slide presentation, a river flume table demonstration and an optional outdoor walk. Marsh-BillingsRockefeller National Historical Park, Woodstock, 9-11 a.m. Free. Info, 457-3368, ext. 222.

etc.

CLARE’S SONG & DANCE PARTY: Friends and fans bid farewell to Vermont dancer and singer-songwriter Clare Byrne at a get-together including performances by musical group Lake & Bridge, and dance collective Dance Tramp. Rose Street Artists’ Cooperative and Gallery, Burlington, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Free. Info, clare.s.byrne@gmail.com. GUIDED TOURS: See WED.8. HISTORIC BARN HOUSE TOURS: Attendees view authentic African art, impressive architecture and antique fixtures during a stroll through historic buildings. Clemmons Family Farm, Charlotte, 10-11:30 a.m. $10; preregister. Info, 310-0097.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

INDEPENDENT COMMUNITY MEETING PLACE: Anything goes in an in-person networking group where attendees can share hobbies, play music and discuss current events — without using online social sites. Presto Music Store, South Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 658-0030. LEGAL CLINIC: Attorneys offer complimentary consultations on a first-come, first-served basis. 274 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 383-2118. MAGNIFICENT MAMMALS DAY: Families get familiar with furry friends through a puppet show and wildlife presentations with real-life animals. Face painting, crafts and pizza top off the fun. Vermont Institute of Natural Science Nature Center, Quechee, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Regular admission, $13.50-15.50; free for members and kids 3 and under. Info, 359-5000. QUEEN CITY GHOST WALK: DARKNESS FALLS: See FRI.10. VERMONT E-BIKE & BREW TOUR: See FRI.10.

fairs & festivals ADDISON COUNTY FAIR & FIELD DAYS: See WED.8, 9 a.m.-midnight.

CIDER FEST: Starline Rhythm Boys bring their honky-tonk sound to this celebration of apple-based beverages, including DIY cider-pressing, tie-dyeing and complimentary samples. Cold Hollow Cider Mill, Waterbury Center, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free; additional cost for some activities. Info, 244-8771.

‘SEA MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.8. ‘WILD AFRICA 3D’: See WED.8.

food & drink

BURLINGTON EDIBLE HISTORY TOURS: See THU.9. BURLINGTON FARMERS MARKET: Dozens of stands overflow with seasonal produce, flowers, artisan wares and prepared foods. Burlington City Hall Park, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, burlingtonfarmersmarket.org@ gmail.com. CANS ‘N CLAMS: Steamed clams, lobsters, mussels, lobster rolls, Vermont craft beer and rosé please palates at a pop-up clam shack. Joe’s Kitchen at Screamin’ Ridge Farm, Montpelier, noon-8 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 461-5371. CAPITAL CITY FARMERS MARKET: Meats and cheeses join farm-fresh produce, baked goods, locally made arts and crafts, and live music. 60 State Street, Montpelier, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 793-8347. CHAMPLAIN VALLEY DINNER TRAIN: See FRI.10. CHOCOLATE TASTING IN BURLINGTON: Let’s go bar hopping! With the help of a tasting guide, chocoholics discover the flavor profiles of varieties such as toffee almond crunch and salted caramel latte. Lake Champlain Chocolates Factory Store & Café, Burlington, 11 a.m.4 p.m. Free. Info, 864-1807. CRAFTSBURY FARMERS MARKET: Food, drink, crafts and family-friendly entertainment are on the menu at an emporium of local merchandise. Craftsbury Common, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 586-8022.

DANVILLE COMMUNITY FAIR: See FRI.10, 10 a.m.-11 p.m. JAM FOR THE LAND: Fueled by craft beer and local fare, folks rock out to live music to support the Stowe Land Trust. Stowe Cider, 3 p.m. $15. Info, 253-2065.

Find even more local events in this newspaper and online:

art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

VERMONT ANTIQUE & CLASSIC CAR SHOW: See FRI.10, 7 a.m.-10 p.m.

music

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section.

‘GREAT WHITE SHARK 3D’: See WED.8.

All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com.

VERGENNES FARMERS MARKET: Local foods and crafts, live music, and hot eats spice up Saturday mornings. Kennedy Brothers Building, Vergennes, 9 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 233-9180. VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: See WED.8, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

language

DUTCH LANGUAGE CLASS: Planning a trip to Amsterdam? Learn vocabulary and grammar basics from a native speaker. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, bheeks@ yahoo.com.

lgbtq

expanded Meals on Wheels program is designed to meet your dietary needs. Along with a commitment to quality and locally sourced food—we’re proud to offer a program that enables seniors to remain healthy, independent, and at home—where they want to be.

We need your help. There’s never been a more critical time to get involved. Volunteer or donate today. AGEWELLvt.org/GIVING-BACK

PRIDE YOGA: FOR LGBTQIA+ PEOPLE & ALLIES: Participants hit the mat for a stretching session suited for all levels. Sangha Studio, Pine, Burlington, 5-5:15 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

For more info about receiving meals, please call 1-800-642-5119.

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music

Find club dates in the music section. ART OF THE DUO: Syrian clarinetist Kinan Azmeh and Sri Lankan-born Canadian pianist Dinuk Wijeratne band together for a collaborative concert and Q&A. See calendar spotlight. Unitarian Church of Montpelier, 7:30-9 p.m. $20. Info, 229-9000. ‘DIE GÄRTNERIN AUS LIEBE’: See FRI.10. THE DOG CATCHERS: Rock and rhythm-and-blues stylings keep the dance floor full. VFW Post 6689, Essex Junction, 7-10 p.m. Free. Info, 878-0700. GUITAR OPEN MIC: Instrumentalists test their talents onstage. Pickering Room, Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 658-5792. KATIE TRAUTZ & NATE GUSAKOV: Original compositions and Appalachian old-time tunes ring out on fiddle and banjo. The Den at Harry’s Hardware, Cabot, 5-6 p.m. Free. Info, 563-2291. PIKES FALLS CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL: See WED.8. RANI ARBO & DAISY MAYHEM: Harmony, rhythm and unforgettable songs are the hallmarks of this New England-based folk quartet. Proceeds benefit the Better Selves Fellowship. Knoll Farm, Fayston, 7-10 p.m. $7-21. Info, 496-5686.

SAT.11

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the presses!

Keep this newspaper free for all. CALENDAR 51

‘FLYING MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.8.

Find club dates at local venues in the music section and at sevendaysvt.com/music.

SHELBURNE FARMERS MARKET: Harvested fruits and greens, artisan cheeses, and local novelties grace outdoor tables. Shelburne Parade Ground, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 482-4279.

Healthy food is medicine. Our newly

SEVEN DAYS

STRANGEFOLK GARDEN OF EDEN FESTIVAL: See FRI.10.

MAD RIVER TASTE WEEK: See WED.8.

nutritious with a side meals of friendship

08.08.18-08.15.18

SPRUCE PEAK FOLK FESTIVAL: Vermont buskers bring their talent to a musical celebration featuring Anaïs Mitchell, Josh Ritter and the Royal City Band, and Daniel Rodriguez of Elephant Revival. Green, Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe Mountain Resort, 1-8 p.m. $15-75. Info, 760-4634.

FOMO?

EASY & NUTRITIOUS FOOD PRESERVATION WORKSHOP: QUICK PICKLES & FERMENTED VEGETABLES: Home cooks pick up tips for making provisions last. Bright Street Housing Coop, Burlington, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 861-7395.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

CRAFTSBURY OLD HOME DAY: Town pride runs high during a day of revelry including games, food, door prizes, kids’ activities and a farmers market. Craftsbury Academy, 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, jodismith4280@ gmail.com.

‘LAUREL & HARDY: A SILENT FINE MESS’: Pianist Jeff Rapsis improvises a live score for a series of classic silent comedies. Brandon Town Hall, 7 p.m. Donations. Info, 603-236-9237.

Join the Seven Days Super Readers at sevendaysvt.com/super-readers or call us at 802-864-5684.

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VILLAGE HARMONY TEEN SESSION III: See FRI.10, York Street Meeting House, Lyndon.

outdoors

HERE BE DRAGONFLIES: See WED.8, 3:30 p.m. LARAWAY LOOP HIKE: Trekkers maintain a moderate pace on an 8-mile excursion gaining 1,600 feet in elevation. Contact trip leader for details. Free; preregister. Info, 899-9982. LONG TRAIL DAY: Lovers of the great outdoors join local Green Mountain Club sections for guided hikes followed by stops at area breweries. See greenmountainclub.org for details. The Long Trail, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 244-7037. MONTHLY WILDLIFE WALK: Birders of all ages and abilities survey feathered friends and other species. Otter View Park, Middlebury, 7-10 a.m. Free. Info, 388-1007. MUSHROOMS DEMYSTIFIED: See THU.9, 1:30 p.m. OWL PROWL & NIGHT GHOST HIKE: Flashlight holders spy denizens of dusk on a journey to 19th-century settlement ruins, where spooky Vermont tales await. History Hike lot, Little River State Park, Waterbury, 7 p.m. $2-4; free for kids 3 and under; preregister; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103.

sports

52 CALENDAR

SEVEN DAYS

08.08.18-08.15.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NIGHT OUT AT THE BALLPARK: Sports fans join in to cheer on the Vermont Lake Monsters, who play the Tri-City ValleyCats. Partial proceeds benefit area organizations. Centennial Field, Burlington, 6:05 p.m. $7. Info, 655-6611. KINGDOM RUN: Stunning scenery rewards participants in a half-marathon, 5K, and 10K run and walk. See calendar spotlight. Irasburg Common, registration, 7:15 a.m.; walkers and half-marathon, 8:30 a.m.; 5K and 10K runners, 9 a.m. $20-45. Info, 766-5310. MINI GOLF FUNDRAISER: Animal lovers play 18 holes to support the Central Vermont Humane Society. Rain date: August 12. Lots-O-Balls Mini Golf, Duxbury, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. $6-8. Info, 476-3811.

talks

‘THE BARBER OF SEVILLE’: See THU.9, 2 p.m. ‘BAREFOOT IN THE PARK’ AUDITIONS: Actors vie for roles in an Essex Community Players production of Neil Simon’s romantic comedy about a newlywed couple navigating the choppy waters of marriage. Essex Memorial Hall, 1-4 p.m. Free. Info, 878-9109. ‘A DOLL’S HOUSE, PART 2’: See WED.8. ‘MADAMA BUTTERFLY’: Puccini’s popular opera, presented by Barn Opera, tells of the epic romance between a young Japanese geisha and an American lieutenant. Studio One, Vermont Public Radio, Colchester, 7:30 p.m. $50; preregister; limited space. Info, 800-838-3006. ‘MILLION DOLLAR QUARTET’: See THU.9, 2-4:30 & 7:30-10 p.m. ‘THE NETHER’: See THU.9. NEW YORK THEATRE WORKSHOP: ‘MENTION MY BEAUTY’: In her play in progress, playwright and actress Leslie Ayvazian explores what it meant to be pegged “the pretty one” in her immigrant family. Warner Bentley Theater, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 4 p.m. $9-13. Info, 603-646-2422. NEW YORK THEATRE WORKSHOP: ‘WE LIVE IN CAIRO’: Three years after the fall of President Hosni Mubarak, six friends are confronted with the aftermath of revolution in this work in progress by Daniel Lazour and Patrick Lazour. Warner Bentley Theater, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 7:30 p.m. $9-13. Info, 603-646-2422. ‘THE POWER OF MUSIC: TWELVE SOULS IN SONG: Local performer Carol Ann Jones relays the stories of a dozen individuals nearing the end of life in a music-filled one-woman show. First Congregational Church, Burlington, 4 p.m. $15. Info, 363-3861. ‘SEE HOW THEY RUN’: See WED.8, 2 & 8 p.m. ‘THE SHOW-OFF’: See THU.9. ‘THE TAMING OF THE SHREW’: See THU.9.

SUN.12 activism

LEE STETSON: In two shows in front of Albert Bierstadt’s painting, “The Domes of the Yosemite,” the actor channels John Muir, a naturalist known as the Father of the National Parks. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 4-5 & 7-8 p.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, 745-1393.

SEEING & DISRUPTING RACISM: A workshop geared toward white community members elucidates the concept of white fragility and prepares participants to challenge prejudice. Arrive at 2:30 p.m. for a PJC new volunteer orientation. Peace & Justice Center, Burlington, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 863-2345, ext. 9.

theater

agriculture

‘AIN’T MISBEHAVIN’: THE FATS WALLER MUSICAL SHOW’: See FRI.10, 7 p.m. ‘ALWAYS ... PATSY CLINE’: See WED.8.

BURLINGTON TREE TOURS: Outdoors lovers learn to identify common species on a moderately paced walking tour of the Queen City’s urban forest. The Mounted Cat, Burlington, 1011:30 a.m. $16.75. Info, 343-1773.

bazaars

KIDSAFE COLLABORATIVE COMMUNITY YARD SALE: See SAT.11, 10 a.m.-noon. YARD SALE: See SAT.11.

community

COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS PRACTICE: Sessions in the tradition of Thich Nhat Hanh include sitting and walking meditation, a short reading, and open sharing. Evolution Physical Therapy & Yoga, Burlington, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, newleafsangha@ gmail.com.

dance

BALKAN FOLK DANCING: Louise Brill and friends organize participants into lines and circles set to complex rhythms. Ohavi Zedek Synagogue, Burlington, 3:30-6:30 p.m. $6; free for firsttimers; bring snacks to share. Info, 540-1020. FARM TO BALLET PROJECT: See SAT.11, Moonrise Farm, Essex Junction.

etc.

GUIDED TOURS: See WED.8. ROV SHIPWRECK TOURS: Spectators take a boat ride to the site of a sunken vessel, then view real-time footage of the craft transmitted from a remotely operated vehicle. Arrive 20 minutes early. Lake Champlain Maritime Museum, Vergennes, 1-2 p.m. $20-40; free for kids under 4. Info, 475-2022.

fairs & festivals

VERMONT ANTIQUE & CLASSIC CAR SHOW: See FRI.10.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘FLYING MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.8. ‘GREAT WHITE SHARK 3D’: See WED.8. MIYAZAKI SUMMER SERIES: Cinephiles catch the 2004 animated film Howl’s Moving Castle, shown in English as part of a series spotlighting director Hayao Miyazaki. The Savoy Theater, Montpelier, 10 a.m. Donations. Info, film@savoytheater.com. ‘SEA MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.8. SILENT FILM SERIES: ‘THE KID’: Charlie Chaplin’s character cares for a cast-off child in his first fulllength feature. Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, 3 p.m. $10. Info, 533-9075. ‘WILD AFRICA 3D’: See WED.8.

food & drink

CHOCOLATE TASTING IN BURLINGTON: See SAT.11. CHOCOLATE TASTING IN MIDDLESEX: Candy fanatics get an education on a variety of sweets made on-site. Nutty Steph’s Granola & Chocolate Factory, Middlesex, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Info, 229-2090.

EAT UP ON THE GREEN: Locals skip cooking dinner in favor of food and drink from local purveyors served amid live music, sprinklers and a playground. Camp Meade, Middlesex, 4-9 p.m. Free. Info, 496-2108. KNIFE SHARPENING: Dull blades, be gone! Jim Cunningham of JRC Knife Sharpening whets cutting tools. Chef Contos Kitchen & Store, Shelburne, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. $4-5 per knife. Info, 497-3942. STOWE FARMERS MARKET: An appetizing assortment of fresh veggies, meats, milk, berries, herbs, beverages and crafts tempts shoppers. Red Barn Shops Field, Stowe, 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, 279-3444. VERMONT CHEESEMAKERS FESTIVAL: Fromage lovers sip vino and sample local cheeses while mingling with dozens of artisan food producers at this 10th annual pastoral party. Coach Barn at Shelburne Farms, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $20-175; free for kids under 3. Info, 866-261 8595. VERMONT HOT DOG COOK-OFF: Dozens of teams compete for top honors in a frankfurter throw down complete with cocktails, music and games. Stone Hearth Inn & Tavern, Chester, 1-4 p.m. $10 includes unlimited tastings. Info, stonehearth@vermontel.net.

health & fitness

KARMA YOGA FOR THE BIRDS: An outdoor, all-levels class overlooks the mountains and Lake Champlain. All proceeds benefit Audubon Vermont. Rain location: Yoga Roots. All Souls Interfaith Gathering, Shelburne, 8-9 a.m. $10; preregister. Info, 985-0090. YOGA FOR FOLKS WITH LYME & RECOVERY GROUP: A restorative yoga practice paves the way for an open discussion focused on the path to wellness. Laughing River Yoga, Burlington, 2-3:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 343-8119. YOGA ON CHURCH STREET: Yogis bring their own mat for a guided class with Sukha Yoga’s Cilla and Noah Weisman. Proceeds benefit HOPE Works. Church Street Marketplace, Burlington, 9 a.m. Free. Info, samantha@hopeworksvt.org.

lgbtq

LGBTQ FIBER ARTS GROUP: A knitting, crocheting and weaving session welcomes all ages, gender identities, sexual orientations and skill levels. Pride Center of Vermont, Burlington, noon-2 p.m. Free. Info, 860-7812.

montréal

PIKNIC ÉLECTRONIK MONTRÉAL: DJ sets and beatdriven music propel a dance party of epic proportions. See piknicelectronik.com for details. Plaine des jeux, Montréal, 2-9:30 p.m. $14.50-119; free for kids 12 and under. Info, 514-904-1247.

music

Find club dates in the music section.

BURLINGTON CONCERT BAND: Local musicians present a varied program of show tunes, marches and pop classics. BYO blanket or lawn chair. See calendar spotlight. Battery Park, Burlington, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, burlingtonconcertbandvt@gmail.com. PETE’S POSSE: Three generations of players come together to create dynamic roots music. Old Round Church, Richmond, 7-9 p.m. $15. Info, 434-3654. UKULELE MÊLÉE: Fingers fly at a group lesson on the fourstringed Hawaiian instrument. BYO uke. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 4-6 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211. VERMONT JAZZ ENSEMBLE: The 17-piece group revisits the big-band era at a benefit concert for Island Arts. Picnicking is welcome. Grand Isle Lake House, 6:30 p.m. $20-25; free for kids under 12. Info, 372-8889. VERMONT PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA: A summer concert of current and classic Broadway hits features guest singer Marc Dalio. Rain location: Thatcher Brook Primary School. Moose Meadow Lodge, Duxbury, picnicking, 3 p.m.; concert, 4 p.m. $5-20. Info, 229-4191. VILLAGE HARMONY TEEN SESSION III: See FRI.10, South Hero Congregational Church, 3 p.m. WHISKEY SHIVERS: Bluegrass traditions meet punk sensibilities. The Barnyard Incident open this Levitt AMP St. Johnsbury Music Series concert. Dog Mountain, St. Johnsbury, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600. YOUNG TRADITION SHOWCASE: Up-and-coming artists on the Vermont traditional music scene step into the spotlight at a church benefit concert. Old Round Church, Richmond, 3-5 p.m. Donations. Info, 233-5293.

outdoors

FORESTRY, HISTORY & THE FUTURE: A GUIDED HIKE: See FRI.10. LITTLE RIVER RAMBLE: See FRI.10, 2 p.m. ROCKIN’ THE LITTLE RIVER: TOUR OF THE WATERBURY DAM: Visitors explore a reforested encampment and discover how the Civilian Conservation Corps saved the Winooski Valley from flooded ruin. Meet at the top of the dam, Little River State Park, Waterbury, 11 a.m. $2-4; free for kids 3 and under; preregister; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103. TRAIL WORK DAY: Helping hands learn to repair and build bridges. Bring work gloves. Brook Street Garage, Barre, 8 a.m.noon. Free. Info, 272-6199.

sports

DISC GOLF LEAGUES: See THU.9, noon.

ESSEX MUD VOLLEBYALL TOURNAMENT FOR EPILEPSY: Players bump, set and spike to support the Epilepsy Foundation of Vermont. 1 Chapin Rd., Essex Center, registration, 8 a.m.; games start, 9 a.m. $300-400 per team; preregister; free for spectators. Info, 318-1575. GET YOUR REAR IN GEAR 5K RUN/ WALK: Pedestrians put one foot in front of the other to support local colon cancer patients. Bayside Park, Colchester, 8:30 a.m.-noon. $12-30. Info, rachel@ coloncancercoalition.org.

talks

PAUL ANDRISCIN: In “Ethnic and Cultural Diversity at Mount Independence,” the historian looks at forces that divided and united a group of Revolutionary War soldiers. Mount Independence State Historic Site, Orwell, 2-3:15 p.m. Regular admission, $5; free for kids under 15. Info, 948-2000. RICK WINSTON: The film buff highlights four creative partnerships in “Music in the Movies: Composers and Directors.” Festival Theatre, Marshfield, 7:30 p.m. $10-20. Info, 456-8968. STEVE BADANES: “Devilish Design: An Evening of Architectural Creativity” takes listeners on a journey to innovative buildings across the country and the world. Yestermorrow Design/Build School, Waitsfield, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 496-5545.

theater

‘AIN’T MISBEHAVIN’: THE FATS WALLER MUSICAL SHOW’: See FRI.10, 3 & 7 p.m. ‘ALWAYS ... PATSY CLINE’: See WED.8. ‘BAREFOOT IN THE PARK’ AUDITIONS: See SAT.11, 6-9 p.m. ‘A DOLL’S HOUSE, PART 2’: See WED.8, 3-5:30 p.m. ‘THE GRASSHOPPER REBELLION CIRCUS & PAGEANT’: A spirited Bread and Puppet Theater production performed in the Circus Field pulls advice from several prominent revolutions in human history. Bread and Puppet Theater, Glover, 3 p.m. $10. Info, 525-3031. ‘MILLION DOLLAR QUARTET’: See THU.9, 3-5:30 p.m. ‘NUNSENSE 2: THE SECOND COMING’: A madcap pack of nuns cause mischief and mayhem in this musical comedy staged by Adirondack Regional Theatre. Masonic Lodge, Essex, N.Y., 5 p.m. $15. Info, 518-526-4520. ‘RUMORS’ AUDITIONS: Thespians throw their hats into the ring for roles in an Enosburg Opera House production of Neil Simon’s madcap comedy about a dinner party that takes a hilarious turn. Enosburg Opera House, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 933-6171. ‘TALES OF HOFFMAN’: See WED.8, 5 p.m.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

MON.13

agriculture

COMMUNITY GATHERING: Green thumbs help the Vermont Community Garden Network grow their strategy for strengthening the community-based garden movement by giving voice to what matters most to them. White River Junction St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 5-6:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 861-4769. VERMONT OPEN FARM WEEK: Folks come face-to-face with food producers in a weeklong fête featuring scavenger hunts, hayrides, tastings and fare for purchase. See diginvt.com for details. Various locations statewide. Prices vary. Info, 434-2000.

etc.

AMERICAN VETERANS VERMONT POST 1: Those who have served or are currently serving the country, including members of the National Guard and reservists, are welcome to join AMVETS for monthly meetings. American Legion, Post 91, Colchester, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 796-3098. JOB HUNT HELP: See THU.9, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘FLYING MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.8. ‘GREAT WHITE SHARK 3D’: See WED.8. ‘SEA MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.8. ‘WILD AFRICA 3D’: See WED.8.

food & drink

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.8, 6:30 p.m. CRIBBAGE TEAMS: See WED.8.

PINOCHLE & RUMMY: See WED.8.

ADVANCED SUN-STYLE TAI CHI, LONG-FORM: Elements of qigong thread through the youngest version of the Chinese martial art. Winooski Senior Center, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 735-5467.

BONE BUILDERS EXERCISE CLASSES: See WED.8.

music

Find club dates in the music section. CASPIAN MONDAY MUSIC: Gifted chamber musicians sweep audience members away with music from Mozart, Tchaikovsky and von Dohnányi. Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, 7:30 p.m. $10-20; free for kids under 18; preregister. Info, 533-2000. VILLAGE HARMONY TEEN SESSION III: See FRI.10, Unitarian Church of Montpelier.

seminars

BASIC MAINTENANCE & DIY FLAT FIX: Riders get their gears turning during a lesson on bicycle anatomy, vocabulary, functions and fixes. Wear closed-toe shoes. Old Spokes Home Community Workshop, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, info@oldspokeshome.com.

agriculture

GARDEN TOURS: Horticultural enthusiasts examine beautiful blooms at the Billings Farm & Museum and the Marsh-BillingsRockefeller National Historical Park. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 1 p.m. $16-21; preregister. Info, 457-3368, ext. 222.

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community crafts

COMMUNITY CRAFT NIGHT: Makers stitch, spin, knit and crochet their way through projects while enjoying each other’s company. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211.

presents AT BURLINGTON August

dance

SWING DANCING: Quick-footed participants experiment with different forms, including the Lindy hop, Charleston and balboa. Beginners are welcome. Champlain Club, Burlington, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $5. Info, 448-2930.

THU 9 7PM

etc.

LA LECHE LEAGUE MEETING: Nursing mothers share breastfeeding tips and resources. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 720-272-8841.

READING THROUGH THE BIBLE: Participants gather near the fireplace to peruse the Scriptures. Panera Bread, South Burlington, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 893-6266.

6/28/18 11:41 AM

FEAST TOGETHER OR FEAST TO GO: See FRI.10.

sports

BURLINGTON WRITERS WORKSHOP OPEN MIC NIGHT: Wordsmiths take the stage to read, recite or sing for no more than five minutes. Light Club Lamp Shop, Burlington, 7-9:30 p.m. Free. Info, 383-8104.

For more info, visit uvmvtc.org, call 802-656-0013 or email uvmvtc@uvm.edu

VERMONT OPEN FARM WEEK: See MON.13.

DANCE, PAINT, WRITE!: Creative people end their day with an energetic meditation, music, movement, intuitive painting, free writing and de-stressing. Expressive Arts Burlington, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $15; preregister. Info, 343-8172.

words

VACCINE TESTING CENTER

HOUSE & FORMAL GARDENS TOUR: See THU.9.

NAVIGATING THE ROADWAYS OF SENIOR CARE: Two professionals from Armistead Senior Care demystify the ins-andsouts of planning for long-term care. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-2518.

WARRIORS SOAR GOLF CLASSIC: Players tee up and take a swing to support wounded veterans. West Bolton Country Club, Jericho, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $100. Info, 316-1962.

Participate in a research study to help develop a Zika Vaccine. We are looking for healthy adults aged 18-50. 6 month-long research study involving screening, a dosing visit, and 13 follow-up outpatient visits. Volunteers are eligible for compensation up to $1490.

SAT 11 11AM

STORY TIME WITH CITY MARKET

Featuring The Very Berry Counting Book. Free.

Discover how Make-A-Wish gave Wish Kid Jamie Heath hope and helped her heal. Free.

SAT 18 1-3PM

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WINTER IN AUGUST: A preseason street party with local eats and live entertainment recognizes area ski resorts’ contributions to the regional economy. Merchants Row, Rutland, 5-8 p.m. $10-15. Info, 773-2747.

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With author and illustrator Kate Schatz and Miriam Stahl, plus special guests Muslim Girls Making Change and Rep. Selene Colburn.

MON 13 JAMIE HEATH: 6PM WISHES ARE MEDICINE

TIME-TRAVEL TUESDAYS: Families experience a blast from the past with 19th-century chores and games in the restored 1890 farm house. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Regular admission, $4-16; free for members and kids under 3. Info, 457-2355.

fairs & festivals

LAUNCH EVENT FOR RAD GIRLS CAN

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BACKROADS & BYWAYS OF VERMONT

A meet-and-greet and book signing with Pat Goudey O’Brien and Lisa Halvorsen. Free.

Phoenix Books Burlington events are ticketed unless otherwise indicated. Your $3 ticket comes with a coupon for $5 off the featured book. Proceeds go to Vermont Foodbank.

READING WITHOUT WALLS BINGO A summer reading program for grades 4-8. Read books and win prizes! All locations throughout August. 191 Bank Street, Downtown Burlington • 802.448.3350 2 Carmichael Street, Essex • 802.872.7111 www.phoenixbooks.biz

CALENDAR 53

ADVANCED TAI CHI CLASS: See FRI.10.

LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE: Bring a bag lunch to practice the system of communication using visual gestures. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

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SEVEN DAYS

health & fitness

language

Help your global community.

08.08.18-08.15.18

MAGIC: THE GATHERING — MONDAY NIGHT MODERN: Tarmogoyf-slinging madness ensues when competitors battle for prizes in a weekly game. Brap’s Magic, Burlington, 6:30-10 p.m. $8. Info, 540-0498.

VETERANS YOGA: FOR THOSE WHO HAVE SERVED: Seasoned practitioners and neophytes alike engage in postures of strength and physicality. Participants may bring a friend or other support person. Sangha Studio, North, Burlington, 10:3011:30 a.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

‘TALK OF THE PORCH’: A ‘NEW YORKER’ FICTION DISCUSSION GROUP: Local writers Stark Biddle and Julia Shipley direct a dialogue on a new or classic short story. Craftsbury Public Library, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 586-9683.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

BTV POLY COCKTAILS: Those who are polyamorous, in an open relationship or just curious connect over drinks. Drink, Burlington, 7 p.m.-midnight. Free; for ages 21 and up. Info, 253-310-8315.

SEATED TAI CHI: Movements are modified for those with arthritis and other chronic conditions. Winooski Senior Center, 11 a.m.noon. Free. Info, 735-5467.

HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS NEEDED


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film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘BLOOD FEST’: A scary-movie fest turns into a real-life blood bath in this 2018 comedic horror flick. Palace 9 Cinemas, South Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $12.50. Info, 660-9300. ‘FLYING MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.8. ‘GREAT WHITE SHARK 3D’: See WED.8. ‘SEA MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.8. ‘WILD AFRICA 3D’: See WED.8.

food & drink

CRAFT BEER TUESDAYS: Golfers and nongolfers alike treat themselves to tastings of popular brews and ciders. Stowe Country Club, 6-8 p.m. Cost of drinks. Info, 760-4653. OLD NORTH END FARMERS MARKET: Locavores score breads, juices, ethnic foods and more from neighborhood vendors. Dewey Park, Burlington, 3-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, oldnorth endfarmersmarket@gmail.com.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.8, 7 p.m.

health & fitness

BEGINNER/INTERMEDIATE SUN-STYLE TAI CHI, LONGFORM: Improved mood, greater muscle strength and increased energy are a few of the benefits of this gentle exercise. South Burlington Recreation & Parks Department, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 735-5467.

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

BEGINNERS TAI CHI CLASS: See THU.9.

PAUSE-CAFÉ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Frenchlanguage fanatics meet pour parler la belle langue. Burlington Bay Market & Café, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 430-4652. SOCIAL GATHERING: Those who are deaf or hard of hearing or want to learn American Sign Language get together to break down communication barriers. The North Branch Café, Montpelier, 4-6 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 595-4001.

music

Find club dates in the music section. CASTLETON SUMMER CONCERTS: Satin & Steel’s five-piece horn section propels a performance of classic soul, Motown and R&B stylings. Pavilion. Castleton University, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, 468-6039. FLANAGAN & O’REILLY: Straight from New York City, this rising folk duo doles out poignant original music informed by its members’ rural American and Scottish roots. Phantom Theater, Edgcomb Barn, Warren, 8 p.m. $15. Info, 496-5997. GIFFORD COMMUNITY CONCERT SERIES: The RandolphShizukuishi Exchange Program provides the food for a familyfriendly indie-folk concert by Jennings and McComber. Gifford Park, Gifford Medical Center, Randolph, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 728-2380.

PEACEFUL WARRIOR KARATE: Martial-arts training promotes healthy living for those in recovery. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150.

MELLOW YELLOW: Authentic renditions of 1960s hits transport concertgoers to another time. Rain site: Fairlee Town Hall. Fairlee Town Common, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, contact@ fairleearts.org.

REIKI CLINIC: Thirty-minute treatments promote physical, emotional and spiritual wellness. JourneyWorks, Burlington, 3-5:30 p.m. $10-30; preregister. Info, 860-6203.

MILTON COMMUNITY BAND: Pyrotechnics make the endof-season concert — Summer Goes Out With a Bang! — pop. Bombardier Park West, Milton, 7-8:15 p.m. Free. Info, 893-1398.

YOGA AT THE WINOOSKI VFW: Certified instructors guide veterans and their families through a series of poses. Arrive five to 10 minutes early. Second floor, Winooski VFW Hall, 6-7 p.m. Donations. Info, 655-9832.

OPEN JAM: Instrumentalists band together for a free-flowing musical hour. Borrow an instrument or bring your own. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 300.

YOGA WITH PRANAYAMA: Yoga poses and breathing exercises start simply and become more challenging as this six-week series progresses. Waterbury Public Library, 6-7 p.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, 244-7036.

OPEN MIC: Singers, players, storytellers and poets entertain a live audience at a monthly showcase of local talent. Wallingford Town Hall, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, 446-2872.

language 54 CALENDAR

LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: ITALIAN: Speakers hone their skills in the Romance language over a bag lunch. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

‘LA CAUSERIE’ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Native speakers and learners are welcome to pipe up at an unstructured conversational practice. El Gato Cantina, Burlington, 4:30-6 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0195.

SHAPE NOTE SING: Locals lend their voices to four-part harmonies at this weekly sing-along of early American music in the “fa-sol-la-mi” tradition. Bread and Puppet Theater, Glover, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 525-6972.

TUESDAY NIGHT LIVE: Bluegrass band Beg, Steal or Borrow provide the musical backdrop to a pastoral party featuring good eats. Legion Field, Johnson, 6-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 635-7826. VILLAGE HARMONY TEEN SESSION III: See FRI.10, Norwich Congregational Church.

seminars

MEDICARE & YOU: AN INTRODUCTION TO MEDICARE: Members of the Central Vermont Council on Aging clear up confusion about the application process and plan options. Central Vermont Council on Aging, Barre, 3-5 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 479-0531.

theater

‘THE BARBER OF SEVILLE’: See THU.9. ‘A DOLL’S HOUSE, PART 2’: See WED.8, 7:30-9:30 p.m.

HU CHANT: SOUND OF SOUL: People of all faiths lift their voices in a spiritual exercise followed by contemplation and conversation hosted by Eckankar. Rutland Free Library, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, eck.vermont@gmail.com.

Y12SR: YOGA OF 12-STEP RECOVERY: See WED.8.

ROUND-UP ON THE RIVER: See WED.8.

GERMAN CONVERSATION GROUP: Community members practice conversing auf Deutsch. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211.

WAGON RIDE WEDNESDAYS: See WED.8.

fairs & festivals

ST. AMBROSE LAWN PARTY & CHICKEN BARBECUE: Revelers get their fill of savory poultry, fried dough and baked goods at a community cookout complete with a pie contest, a white elephant table and kids’ activities. Bristol Village Green, 5 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 453-2488.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section.

‘MILLION DOLLAR QUARTET’: See THU.9.

‘FLYING MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.8.

‘ROMEO AND JULIET’: Shakespeare’s tale of starcrossed lovers and warring families plays out in an onscreen production. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. $6-15. Info, 748-2600.

‘GREAT WHITE SHARK 3D’: See WED.8.

words

‘JAWS’: Steven Spielberg’s 1975 shark saga takes moviegoers to a beach community threatened by a terrifying fish that lurks in the deep. Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, 7 p.m. $5. Info, 533-2000.

BURLINGTON POETRY GROUP: Writers of verse ages 18 through 30 field constructive feedback on original works. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, btvpoetry@gmail.com.

JUST-FOR-FUN MOVIES: Film fans keep their eyes glued to the screen for an all-ages flick. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

THE MOTH: COLLABORATION: Wordsmiths have five minutes to tell true tales inspired by a shared theme. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $10; preregister. Info, 540-0406.

MOVIE: Snacks are provided at a showing of a popular flick. Call for details. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

STEVE ALMOND: Vermont Public Radio host Jane Lindholm engages the author in a conversation on his latest page-turner, Bad Stories: What the Hell Just Happened to Our Country. Bear Pond Books, Montpelier, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 229-0774. SUMMER LITERATURE READING SERIES: Ambitious readers cover selected pages of Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 6:308:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104.

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agriculture

VERMONT OPEN FARM WEEK: See MON.13.

cannabis

‘SEA MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.8. ‘WILD AFRICA 3D’: See WED.8.

FIVE CORNERS FARMERS MARKET: See WED.8. ICE CREAM SOCIAL: See WED.8. VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: See WED.8.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.8. CRIBBAGE TEAMS: See WED.8. PINOCHLE & RUMMY: See WED.8.

health & fitness

BONE BUILDERS EXERCISE CLASSES: See WED.8.

GUIDED TOURS: See WED.8.

A COURSE IN MIRACLES STUDY GROUP: See WED.8.

lgbtq

THE SUMMER HEAT POETRY WORKSHOP — DEVELOPING YOUR UNIQUE STYLE AND PRACTICE: See WED.8.

music

Find club dates in the music section. BRUCE MOLSKY BAND: Whether playing fiddle, banjo or guitar, the Grammy Award-nominated instrumentalist delivers winning renditions of Celtic Southern Appalachian rarities. Dartmouth Green, Hanover, N.H., 5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 603-646-2422. BURLINGTON CITY ARTS SUMMER CONCERTS: DUPONT BROTHERS: The Americana duo perform Vermont-made refrains from an outdoor stage. Burlington City Hall Park, noon. Free. Info, 865-7166. BURLINGTON CITY ARTS SUMMER CONCERTS: FRANCESCA BLANCHARD: Guitar in tow, the local singer-songwriter blurs linguistic lines in songs from deux visions sung in English and French. Burlington City Hall Park, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7166. CAPITAL CITY BAND: See WED.8.

COMMUNITY SUPPER: See WED.8.

RESILIENCE FLOW: FOR THOSE WITH A HISTORY OF TBI OR BRAIN INJURY: See WED.8.

FIBER RIOT!: See WED.8.

LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: SPANISH: See WED.8.

BEERLINGTON FOAMERS MARKET: See WED.8.

etc.

crafts

BEGINNER & INTERMEDIATE/ ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSES: See WED.8.

food & drink

HEALTHY LADIES’ NIGHT: A three-part series with wellness experts Kate Greenleaf and Becky Widschwenter puts participants on the path to well-being. Waterbury Public Library, 7-8 p.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, 244-7036.

GREENER DRINKS: See WED.8.

language

TOMGIRL WALKING CLUB: See WED.8.

CRAFTSBURY CHAMBER PLAYERS: World-class musicians deliver rousing renditions of works by Rossini, Mozart and Beethoven. Elley-Long Music Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, preconcert talk, 6:45 p.m.; concert, 7:30 p.m. $10-25; free for kids 12 and under. Info, 800-639-3443. SONG CIRCLE: Singers and musicians congregate for an acoustic session of popular folk tunes. Godnick Adult Center, Rutland, 7:15-9:15 p.m. Donations. Info, 775-1182. WILLA MAMET & PAUL MILLER: Two voices and a six-string work together in folk, country and Americana strains. Martha Pellerin & Andy Shapiro Memorial Bandstand, Middlesex, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, thumbsgerkin@comcast.net.

outdoors

BUGGIN’ OUT: See WED.8. HERE BE DRAGONFLIES: See WED.8. MAKING TRACKS, SEEING SKINS & SKULLS: See WED.8. PLANTS THAT HURT & PLANTS THAT HELP: See WED.8.

sports

COMMUNITY ROWING: See WED.8.

talks

CURRENT EVENTS CONVERSATION: Newsworthy subjects take the spotlight in this informal discussion. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 878-4918. ‘THE EMERGENT MOSAIC’ PANEL: This year’s installment of an ongoing oral history project sheds light on the role of kids in Bread and Puppet Theater productions. Plainfield Community Center, 7 p.m. Free. Info, ninots@ crocker.com.

theater

FOMO?

‘A DOLL’S HOUSE, PART 2’: See WED.8.

Find even more local events in this newspaper and online:

‘MILLION DOLLAR QUARTET’: See THU.9, 2-4:30 & 7:30-10 p.m.

art

words

Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

music Find club dates at local venues in the music section and at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com.

‘RUMORS’ AUDITIONS: See SUN.12, 7 p.m.

AUTHORS AT THE ALDRICH: Fantasy fans flock to a talk by Laurie Forest, who penned the novel The Black Witch. Aldrich Public Library, Barre, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 476-7550. RECOVERY WRITE NOW: See WED.8. WEDNESDAY WORKSHOP: Burlington Writers Workshop members focus on elements of craft when responding to works in progress. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104. WRITING CIRCLE: See WED.8. m


CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES

classes THE FOLLOWING CLASS LISTINGS ARE PAID ADVERTISEMENTS. ANNOUNCE YOUR CLASS FOR AS LITTLE AS $16.75/WEEK (INCLUDES SIX PHOTOS AND UNLIMITED DESCRIPTION ONLINE). SUBMIT YOUR CLASS AD AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTCLASS.

ayurveda 200-HOUR AYURVEDA INTEGRATION PROGRAM: Join us in learning and immerse yourself in the oldest surviving preventative health care system. This program is ideal for yoga teachers, counselors, therapists, bodyworkers, nurses, doctors, wellness coaches, herbalists, etc. VSAC approved and payment plans available. Can transfer hours to Kripalu’s Ayurveda Health Counselor program. More information at ayurvedavermont. com/classes. 2019 schedule: Feb. 9-10, Mar. 9-10, Apr. 6-7, May 17-18, Jun. 8-9, Jul. 13-14, Aug. 17-18, Sep. 14-15, Oct. 19-20, Nov. 16-17. Cost: $2,795. Location: The Ayurvedic Center of Vermont, 34 Oak Hill Rd., Williston. Info: Allison Morse, 872-8898, ayurvedavt@comcast.net.

burlington city arts

EARRINGS: Check out the jewelry and fine metals studio by making your own earrings. Open

FRIDAY ADULT WHEEL: Curious about the pottery wheel? Spend a Friday night with our pottery instructors at the BCA Clay Studio. A ticket includes a wheelthrowing demonstration at the beginning of class, access to a wheel, and time to try making a bowl or cup. Registration is required. Fri., Sep. 21-Nov. 16, 7:30-9 p.m. Cost: $10/per visit; $9/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncity arts.org.

FRIDAY FAMILY CLAY: Spend a Friday night with your family at the BCA Clay Studio. A ticket provides a wheel demonstration at the beginning of class, wheel access (for ages 6+), handbuilding for any age, unlimited clay and time to create. If you’d like your work to be fired and glazed by the studio, there is a $5 fee per piece. Registration is required. Fri., Sep. 21-Nov. 16, 5-7 p.m. Cost: $10/person; $9/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

HANDBUILDING: Learn the basics of handbuilding that will help you create functional and sculptural forms from clay. The class will include an introduction to our clay studio’s equipment and tools, along with helpful demonstrations and discussions. Working with the clay in different stages, from greenware to glaze, will be covered. No previous experience needed. Fri., Oct. 12-Nov. 16, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Cost: $204/person; $183.60/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org. HIGH SCHOOL PHOTOGRAPHY: Tell your story with photographs in this eight-week session for high school students! Students will explore their ideas, go on group photo shoots, process and print digital photos and zines in our digital lab, experiment with film photography in our darkroom, and participate in supportive discussions and critiques. Ages 14-18. Fri., Oct. 12-Dec. 7 (no class Nov. 23), 5-7:30 p.m. Cost: $240/person; $216/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org. JEWELRY: Learn the basics of creating metal jewelry. Techniques covered will include sawing, piercing, filing, annealing, soldering, texturing, cold connections, basic hollow construction, ring sizing and more, so that students can create at least two completed pieces. The class includes copper and brass and use of all basic tools. Option 1: Tue., Sep. 25-Oct. 30, 5:30-8 p.m.; Option 2: Wed., Sep. 26-Oct. 31, 9:30-noon.; Option 3: Tue., Nov. 6-Dec. 18 (no class Nov. 20), 5:30-8 p.m. Cost: $255/ person; $229.50/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

BURLINGTON CITY ARTS

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DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY PROJECTS: Refine your blackand-white darkroom skills and receive feedback on your work in this supportive, project-based class. Guided sessions to help you improve your printing and film-processing techniques and discussion of the technical, aesthetic and conceptual aspects of your work will be included. Bring a selection of recent darkroom prints to the first class. Thu., Sep. 20-Oct. 25, 6-9 p.m. Cost: $270/ person; $243/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

DRAWING: Learn a variety of drawing techniques, including basic perspective, compositional layout, and use of dramatic light and shadow. Students will work mostly from observation and will be encouraged to work with a variety of media including pencil, pen and ink, ink wash, and charcoal in this small group setting. All levels of experience, including beginners, are welcome. Price includes all basic drawing materials, as well as open studio access during the weeks of your class. Mon., Sep. 24-Nov. 5 (no class Oct. 8), 6-8:30 p.m. Cost: $225/ person; $229.50/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

EXPERIMENTAL DRAWING: Discover the expressive possibilities of contemporary abstract drawing. Expand your drawing vocabulary, combining traditional and experimental techniques in a variety of sizes and materials. Create drawings that have a substantial visual impact and a wealth of personal meaning. Benefit from constructive feedback and individual coaching in a small group environment. Prerequisite: Some drawing experience is recommended. Thu., Nov. 1-Dec. 13 (no class Nov. 22), 9:30-12:30 p.m. Cost: $270/ person; $243/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

HAND-PRINTED CARD WORKSHOP: Spend an evening in BCA’s print studio using our inks, tools & printing press to create handmade holiday wrapping paper and cards. This is a great class to get into the holiday mood while making functional crafts and getting to know our studio. All supplies are provided; no experience needed. Mon., Dec. 3, 6-9 p.m. Cost: $25/ person; $22.50/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

SEVEN DAYS

ACRYLIC PAINTING: This class introduces students to the tools and techniques artists use to create successful works of art in one of the most versatile mediums available: acrylic paint. Learn the basics of mixing colors, blending and a variety of acrylic painting techniques. Acrylic paint is the perfect medium for both the beginner

CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT FOR TEACHING ARTISTS: The foundation of a successful class or residency is classroom management. Learn educators’ tips for running a safe and productive learning environment for youth. Basic classroom structure such as shared expectations, open communication and developing consequences will be covered. A discussion of what has or hasn’t worked with other teaching artists will also take place. Thu., Oct. 11, 6-8:30 p.m. Cost: $25/ person; $22.50/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

CONTEMPORARY FIGURE PAINTING: Intermediate and advanced painters, revitalize your painting practice with a contemporary approach to the figure using vibrant color and dynamic composition. Work from live models each week with nontoxic water-soluble oils. Benefit from constructive feedback and individual coaching in a small group environment. Figure drawing experience is recommended. Class price includes paint as well as the use of BCA’s palettes, easels and painting trays. Wed., Sep. 26-Nov. 14, 1:30-4:30 p.m. Cost: $360/person; $324/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

DOCUMENTARY STORYTELLING: Learn how to tell a compelling story with your photographs! This six-week class will introduce participants to the process of documentary storytelling and include discussions of subject matter, composition, editing and story structure. Group discussion and critiques as well as shooting assignments, readings and writing exercises will give participants the opportunity to begin a new photographic project or refine works in progress. Film or digital photography acceptable. Thu., Sep. 20-Oct. 25, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Cost: $180/person; $162/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

to all skill levels. Class includes copper and brass, silver ear wire, and all basic tools. Silver can be purchased separately. Instructor: Sarah Sprague. Thu., Nov. 8, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Cost: $37/ person; $33.30/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

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ABSTRACT PAINTING: Explore the many exciting possibilities of abstract painting through a variety of fun demonstrations and exercises designed to help you open up and work intuitively. Experiment with paint of your choice (water-soluble oils, acrylics or watercolor) and a variety of other mixed media. While prompts will be given for you to respond to, please bring ideas and reference materials for inspiration. Beginners are welcome. Thu., Oct. 25-Dec. 6 (no class Nov. 22), 6-8:30 p.m. Cost: $225/ person; $202.50/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

DIGITAL SLR CAMERA: Explore the basic workings of your digital SLR camera and learn how to make the photographs you envision. Demystify f-stops, shutter speeds, sensitivity ratings and exposure, and analyze the basics of composition. Bring your camera and owner’s manual to the first class. Pair with Adobe Lightroom to learn how to edit and print your images. Mon., Sep. 17-Oct. 29 (no class Oct. 8), 6:30-8:30 p.m. Cost: $180/ person; $162/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

ADOBE LIGHTROOM: Learn how to easily upload, organize, edit and print your digital photographs or files from scanned film using Adobe Lightroom. RAW file management, exposure/white balance corrections and printing high-quality archival inkjet prints on our Epson printers will be covered. Bring a Maccompatible portable drive with your images to the first class. Mon., Nov. 5-Dec. 17 (no class Nov. 12), 6-9 p.m. Cost: $270/person; $243/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org. BLACK & WHITE DARKROOM BASICS: Explore the traditional, analog black-and-white darkroom! Learn how to correctly expose black-and-white film, process film into negatives, and make silver gelatin prints. Students will leave with the skills and confidence to join the darkroom as a member. All film, paper and darkroom supplies included. Bring your manual 35mm or medium format film camera to the first class. Mon., Oct. 22-Nov. 26 (no class Nov. 12), 6-9 p.m. Cost: $225/person; $202.50/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY: Learn the basics of making a great photograph from the initial exposure to editing and printing. Start with an overview of camera controls and functions, including aperture, shutter speed, ISO ratings, shooting in RAW, lens choices, metering techniques and more. Organizing and editing files in Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop will also be covered, and students will leave with a portfolio of prints. A DSLR or digital Mirrorless Rangefinder and a portable hard drive are required. Fri., Oct. 12-Dec. 7 (no class Nov. 23), 10-noon. Cost: $240/person; $216/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 8657166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Call 865-7166 for info or register online at burlingtoncityarts.org. Teacher bios are also available online.

and the experienced artist who wants to try something new. Tue., Oct. 30-Dec. 11 (no class Nov. 20), 9:30-noon. Cost: $255/ person; $229.50/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

COLOR FILM PROJECTS: Learn how to scan, edit and print your color film and receive feedback on your work in this introduction to working with color film in a digital workflow. This class will also explore ideas in contemporary photography through special readings, and we will discuss the technical, aesthetic and conceptual aspects of your work in supportive critique sessions. Bring a selection of recent images to the first class. Thu., Nov. 8-Dec. 20 (no class Nov. 22), 6-9 p.m. Cost: $270/person; $243/ BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncity arts.org.


classes THE FOLLOWING CLASS LISTINGS ARE PAID ADVERTISEMENTS. ANNOUNCE YOUR CLASS FOR AS LITTLE AS $16.75/WEEK (INCLUDES SIX PHOTOS AND UNLIMITED DESCRIPTION ONLINE). SUBMIT YOUR CLASS AD AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTCLASS.

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LIDDED FORMS: In this threeweek class, Jeremy will introduce the elements that are needed to create a successful teapot or lidded form that is ready for daily use. Demonstrations will be given on lid-to-body relationships and how to construct spouts and handles to make your pots genuinely functional and beautiful. Wed., Dec. 5-19, 6-8:30 p.m. Cost: $127.50/person; $114.75/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 8657166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

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LIFE DRAWING DROP-IN: Spend the evening with other local artists drawing one of our experienced models. Please bring your drawing materials and paper. All materials must be water soluble and solvent-free. No registration required. Instructor: Carolyn Zuaro. Fri., Sep. 21-Nov. 16, 7-9 p.m. Cost: $10/person; $9/BCA members. Purchase a drop-in card and get the sixth visit free! Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org. LINOCUT: In this four-week class, you will have the opportunity to create small designs with the relief technique of linoleum block printing. We will print these one-color blocks by hand or with the printing press, and then add color by experimenting with watercolor paints. This class is a fun opportunity to make cards, holiday gift tags or art to share, since we will have the chance to print multiples once you make your block. Please bring ideas or sketches (8 x 10 inches or smaller) to the first class. Thu., Nov. 8-Dec. 6 (no class Nov. 22), 6-8:30 p.m. Cost: $150/ person; $135/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org. MIXED-LEVEL WHEEL THROWING: Mixed-Level Wheel supports students across a range of skill and experience levels who have thrown on the wheel. This eight-week course is rooted in fundamentals and encourages individual projects. Demonstrations and instruction will cover centering, throwing, trimming and glazing, as well as forms and techniques determined by students. Option 1: Wed., Sep. 26-Nov. 14, 9:30-noon; Option 2: Wed., Sep. 26-Nov. 28 (no class Oct. 31 or

Nov. 21), 6-8:30 p.m. Cost: $340/ person; $306/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org. OIL PAINTING: Learn how to paint with nontoxic, watersoluble oils. With an emphasis on studio work, this class will begin with fun exercises. Using direct observational skills, we’ll work on still life and referencing photographs; we’ll explore the landscape. Discover a variety of painting techniques and learn how to apply composition, linear aspects, form and color theory to your work. This supportive class will balance studio time with gentle group discussion and critique. Beginners are welcome. Wed., Sep. 26Nov. 14, 6-8:30 p.m. Cost: $340/person; $306/ BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

experience needed. Option 1: Tue., Sep. 25-Oct. 30, 9:30-noon; Option 2: Thu., Sep. 27-Nov. 1, 6-8:30 p.m. Cost: $255/person; $229.50/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org. SCHOOL BREAK: DIY HALLOWEEN COSTUMES: Students will create one-of-akind Halloween costumes that will blow away those storebought costumes and impress friends. Cut, sew and craft your way to the best Halloween ever! Basic materials are provided; please bring two ideas of what you want to dress up as, and any material or old clothes to help create your costume. Ages 6-12. Fri., Oct. 19, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Cost: $75/person; $67.50/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St,, Burlington. Info: 8657166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

PENDANTS: Check out the jewelry and fine metals studio by making your own copper, brass or nickel pendant using basic cutting, stamping and sawing techniques. Open to all skill levels. All materials included. Instructor: Kate McKernan. Thu., Oct. 18, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Cost: $37/ person; $33.30/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org. PHOTOGRAPHING ARTWORK: Learn how to take professionalquality digital images of your work in this hands-on workshop in our lighting studio. Whether you’re applying to art school, submitting work for an exhibition or putting together a website, you’ll leave this workshop with techniques that will improve your images and enhance your presentations. Bring up to five pieces no larger than 40x60 inches. Thu., Dec. 13, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Cost: $45/ person; $40.50/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org. PRINTMAKING: This introductory class will show you a whole range of printing techniques that can be used on their own or in combination to create unique artwork. Over six weeks, you’ll be introduced to the studio’s equipment and materials and learn techniques such as block printing with linoleum, collograph (a low-relief intaglio technique) and monoprint. No previous

SCREEN PRINT WORKSHOP: Get to know our print studio at this one night-workshop, and explore the possibilities of screen printing. Students will choose from a variety of prepped silkscreen designs to put on a poster or tote bag to bring home. The class includes all materials; no experience necessary. Instructor: Kate McKernan. Mon., Oct. 15, 6-9 p.m. Cost: $25/person; $22.50/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org. SCREEN PRINTING: Expert printer Aaron David will introduce you to screen printing and show you how to design and print t-shirts, posters, fine art and more! Students will learn a variety of techniques for transferring and printing images using handdrawn, photographic or borrowed imagery. Students will learn how to apply photo emulsion, how to use an exposure unit and how to print on a variety of surfaces. No experience necessary! Wed.,

Sep. 26-Nov. 14, 6-8:30 p.m. Cost: $340/person; $306/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org. SUNDAY FAMILY PAINT: Spend an afternoon with our teaching artists in BCA’s painting and drawing studio. Using our paints, brushes, easels and more, your family will create beautiful works of art. All supplies are provided; no experience needed. Adults may assist their child(ren) free of charge. Additional tickets are required for adults who’d like to join the fun and paint on their own. Registration is required. Option 1: Sun., Oct. 14, 2-4 p.m.; Option 2: Sun., Nov. 11, 2-4 p.m.; Option 3: Sun., Dec. 2, 2-4 p.m. Cost: $10/person; $9/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 8657166, burlingtoncityarts.org. THE ARTIST STATEMENT: Learn tips for writing a successful artist statement from artist and curator Meara McGinniss. Communicate what you investigate, observe or want to express with your art, and make your next grant, residency or exhibition proposal stronger. Participants are invited to bring samples of artist statements to be reviewed. Wed., Oct. 24, 6-8:30 p.m. Cost: $25/person; $22.50/ BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

climbing ADULT CLIMBING CLINICS: Adult clinics at Petra Cliffs are a great way to get introduced to the sport of rock climbing or improve your skills while meeting new people and checking out the growing Vermont climbing community. Co-ed Clinics: Tuesdays; Women’s Clinics: Thursdays; and Intro to Lead: Fridays (beginning September 7). Tue., Thu. & Fri., starting Aug. 28. Cost: $105/three two-hour sessions, gear and three additional visits. Location: Petra Cliffs Climbing Center, 105 Briggs St., Burlington. Info: Andrea Charest, 657-3872, andrea@petracliffs. com, petracliffs.com.

computers WEB DEVELOPMENT BOOTCAMP: 12-week immersive coding bootcamp in downtown Burlington. Learn JavaScript programming, agile methodology, work on teams to build portfolio projects, complete career workshops and get 1-on-1 time with our career coach. Learn more at BurlingtonCodeAcademy. com/Bootcamp. Sep. 17-Dec. 12. Cost: $9,950. Location: Burlington Code Academy, 182 Main St., Burlington. Info: 779-1650, ahorner@ BurlingtonCodeAcademy.com.

THROWING SETS: In this four-week class, students will be guided through the process of creating wheelthrown sets. Topics will include making multiples of the same piece, stacking mugs, nesting bowls, and serving sets specific to a type of food or beverage, such as a sake bottle with matching cups or a coffee cup with saucer. This intermediate-level course is intended for students with proficiency in centering, throwing cups and throwing bowls. Wed., Nov. 28-Dec. 19, 9:30-noon. Cost: $170/ person; $153/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org. WHEEL THROWING: This class is an introduction to clay, pottery and the ceramics studio. Students will work primarily on the potter’s wheel, learning basic throwing and forming techniques, while creating functional pieces such as mugs, cups and bowls. Students will also be guided through the various finishing techniques using the studio’s house slips and glazes. No previous experience needed. Option 1: Wed., Sep. 26-Nov. 28 (no class Oct. 31 or Nov. 21), 1:304 p.m.; Option 2: Thu., Sep. 27Nov. 15, 6-8:30 p.m. Cost: $340/ person; $306/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

craft

theshelburnecraftschool.org

985-3648

LANGUAGE 111: LYRICAL PROSE: This creative writing course will center on writing beautiful prose, either fiction or nonfiction.

Students will be guided through three phases: craft, create and critique, as they build a small body of work, either fresh work generated during this course or recent work from students’ passion projects. Supportive feedback given. Thu., 3-5 p.m., Sep. 13-Oct. 18. Cost: $200. Location: Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@shelburnecraftschool.org, shelburnecraftschool.org. PAINT 113: ILLUSTRATED JOURNAL: Learn how to make a unique book to house creative ideas, drawings, paintings, mixed media, illustrations and writing. This course will be a combination of simple bookmaking techniques, as well as instruction in how to create a beautifully illustrated journal and other hybrid forms of text and image. Wed., Sep. 26-Nov. 14, 9:30-11 a.m Cost: $250/person; materials not incl. Location: Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@theshelburnecrafts chool.org, shelburnecraft school.org. PAINT 203: PAINTING PRACTICE: In order to gain mastery in a craft, one must perform the skill over and over again. In this course, students will explore painting still life and en plein air as a performance in practice with guided instruction to produce many small, quick paintings, as well as longer individual paintings. Tue., Sep. 11-Oct 16, 10 a.m.-noon. Cost: $200/person; not incl. materials. Location: Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@shelburnecraftschool.org, shelburnecraftschool.org. STAINED GLASS WORKSHOP: Instructor: Chris Jeffrey. For beginners and those who would like to brush up on their skills. Students will make two small panels and learn how to cut glass and how to put together and solder their panels using the copper-foil technique of stainedglass assembly. Sat. & Sun., Aug. 24 & 25, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Cost: $300/person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org. WOOD 201: DOVETAIL BOX: Interested in woodworking and learning how to make the most useful joinery technique? Join a group of fellow woodworking enthusiasts making a lidded box using traditional hand tools. Students will learn about various Vermont hardwoods and explore joinery layout, sawing and chiseling. Mon., 6-8:30 p.m., Sep.10Oct. 29. Cost: $450/person; materials incl. Location: Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@shelburnecraftschool.org, shelburnecraftschool.org.


CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES

dance DANCE STUDIO SALSALINA: Salsa classes, nightclub-style, group and private, four levels. Beginner walk-in classes, Wed., 6 p.m. $15/person for one-hour class. No dance experience, partner or preregistration required, just the desire to have fun! Drop in anytime and prepare for an enjoyable workout. Location: 266 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Victoria, 598-1077, info@salsa lina.com. DSANTOS VT DANCE CLASSES: New classes, new location! Come join the fun. Weekly classes in salsa, bachata, kizomba, kuduro. No partner or experience needed. Beginner drop-in classes. Salsa, Mon., 7-8 p.m.; Kizomba, Wed., 8-9 p.m.; Bachata, Thu., 6-7 p.m. Cost: $15/1-hour class. Location: Dsantos VT Dance Studio, 294 N. Winooski Ave., Unit 112A, Burlington. Info: Jon Bacon, 227-2572, dsantosvt.com. ENGLISH COUNTRY DANCE CLASSES: Move to joyful music in a relaxed, beginner-friendly atmosphere. These social dances, first published in the mid-17th century, feature different formations (long or short lines, circles, squares) and range in mood from light playfulness to delightful elegance, enthusiastically robust to gloriously stately. For teens and adults who can walk briskly. Wed., 7-9 p.m., Jul. 25, Aug. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29. Cost: $5/2-hour class. Location: Richmond Free Library, 201 Bridge St., Richmond. Info: Val Medve, 881-9732, val. medve@gmail.com, burlington countrydancers.org.

drumming

martial arts JEWELRY TOOL TRAINING: Need access to a jewelry studio? Did you know that Generator is open to members from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. every day? This tool training class provides the fundamental skills and materials knowledge you’ll need for future projects. Learn more about classes at generatorvt.com/classes. Mon., Aug. 27, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Location: Generator, 40 Sears Ln., Burlington. Info: 540-0761. LASER CUT CHAIRS: The Laser Cut Chair course allows students to explore chair design while getting acclimated to Adobe Illustrator. Students will go through the prototyping process before laser cutting full-size creations out of baltic birch ply. Learn more about classes at generatorvt.com/classes. Tue., Sep. 25-Oct. 9, 6-9 p.m. Location: Generator, 40 Sears Ln., Burlington. Info: 540-0761.

OVER NINE THOUSAND ACADEMY: Become a Kung Fu bad@ss and learn to be strong, supple, fierce and centered. We believe in a holistic approach to martial arts and offer both hard and soft styles along with Taoist meditation practices. Classes are offered for adults and children, and we specialize in serving special needs kids. Classes offered Mon-Sat. Location: Onta Studio, 373 Blair Park Rd., Suite #102, Williston. Info: 683-8539, ontastudio@gmail.com, ontastudio.com.

WIND MACHINE WORKSHOP: Come experiment, design and assemble your own unique sculpture that will move in/with the wind. This is a great workshop for someone who likes to be outdoors and create art. Learn more about classes at generatorvt.com/classes. Sat., Aug. 18, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Location: Generator, 40 Sears Ln., Burlington. Info: 540-0761.

LEARN TO MEDITATE: Taught by qualified meditation instructors at the Burlington Shambhala Meditation Center: Wed., 6-7 p.m.; Sun., 9 a.m.noon. Free and open to anyone. Free public meditation weeknights 6-7 p.m.; Tue. and Thu. noon-1 p.m.; Sun. 9 a.m.-noon. Classes and retreats also offered. See our website at burlington. shambhala.org. Location: Burlington Shambhala Center, 187 S. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 658-6795.

INTRO TO MODULAR SYNTHESIS: Get started making sound with modular synthesizers in this afternoon workshop! Topics covered include “Assembling Your Own Synth,” “Synthesis Basics: Oscillators, LFOs, VCAs,” and “Generative Patching.” We’ll conclude with a recital by the participants (which is optional if you’re shy!). Zero to Hero in an afternoon. Code of Conduct, LGBTQ-positive. Aug. 18, 1-5 p.m.; recital 6 p.m. Cost: $100/4-hours instruction + recital. Location: Community of Sound, 4 Howard St., Studio i3, Burlington. Info: Gahlord Dewald, 318-4745, gahlord@mac.com, ofsound.community/classes.

outdoors VERMONT BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU: Brazilian jiujitsu is a martial arts combat style based entirely on leverage and technique. Brazilian jiujitsu self-defense curriculum is taught to Navy SEALs, CIA, FBI, military police and special forces. No training experience required. Easy-to-learn techniques that could save your life! Classes for men, women and children. Students will learn realistic

MORNING SUP EXPEDITION: Join Sensimilla Lifestyle to explore Waterbury Reservoir on a standup paddleboard. SUP rental, one-hour lesson and a CBD-infused brunch are included. Start your Sunday off right with CBD education and movement on this morning paddleboard expedition. Aug., 12, 8 a.m.-noon. Cost: $120/4hour expedition. Location: Waterbury Reservior, Blush Hill

Say you saw it in...

tai chi BEGINNER TAI CHI IN MONTPELIER: We practice Cheng Man-ch’ing’s “simplified” 37-posture Yang-style form. The course will be taught by Patrick Cavanaugh, longtime student and assistant to Wolfe Lowenthal, student of Cheng Man-ching and founder of Long River Tai Chi Circle. Patrick is a senior instructor at LRTTC in Vermont and New Hampshire. Starts Tue., Sep. 4, 7-8 p.m. Cost: $65/mo. Location: Bethany Church, 115 Main St., Montpelier. Info: Long River Tai Chi Circle, Patrick Cavanaugh, 490-6405, patrick@longrivertaichi.org, longrivertaichi.org. SNAKE-STYLE TAI CHI CHUAN: The Yang Snake Style is a dynamic tai chi method that mobilizes the spine while stretching and strengthening the core body muscles. Practicing this ancient martial art increases strength, flexibility, vitality, peace of mind and martial skill. Beginner classes Sat. mornings & Wed. evenings. Call to view a class. Location: Bao Tak Fai Tai Chi Institute, 100 Church St., Burlington. Info: 363-6890, snake-style.com.

yoga EVOLUTION YOGA: Practice yoga in a down-to-earth atmosphere with some of the most experienced teachers and therapeutic professionals in Burlington. New this summer: Yoga on the Lake, 7-8 a.m., four days per week; and Yoga on the Deck overlooking the lake, Tue. and Thu., 7:15-8:15 p.m. All lake classes are at the Community Sailing Center. Daily drop-in classes including $5 community classes, Yoga Wall and Yoga Therapeutics classes led by physical therapists. Dive deeper into your practice or register for our Yoga Teacher Training for Healthcare Providers. $5-$15/ class; $140/10-class card; $5-10/ community class. Location: Evolution Yoga, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington. Info: 864-9642, evolutionvt.com. HONEST YOGA: Honest yoga offers heated yoga for all levels. We hold yoga teacher trainings at the 200- and 500-hour levels, as well as children and dance teacher courses. (YTT includes FREE unlimited membership) Yoga and dance classes for ages 2 and up in our two beautiful practice spaces! Your children can practice in one room while you practice in the other. No need for childcare. Brand-new beginners’ course: This includes two specialty classes per week for four weeks plus unlimited access to all classes. We have daily heated and alignment classes, and kids classes in yoga and dance. Check out our website for dance classes and yoga Summer Camps. Daily classes & workshops. $50/new student (1 mo. unlimited); $18/ class; $145/10-class card; or $110/10-class punch student/ senior/military card; $135/mo. adult memberships; $99/mo. kid memberships. Location: Honest Yoga Center, 150 Dorset St., Blue Mall, next to Eco Bean, South Burlington. Info: 497-0136, honestyogastudio@gmail.com, honestyogacenter.com. SANGHA STUDIO | NONPROFIT, DONATION-BASED YOGA: Sangha Studio builds an empowered community through the shared practice of yoga. Free yoga service initiatives and outreach programs are offered at 17 local organizations working with all ages. Join Sangha in both downtown Burlington and the Old North End for one of their roughly 60 weekly classes and workshops. Become a Sustaining Member for $60/month and practice as often as you like! Daily. Location: Sangha Studio, 120 Pine St. and 237 North Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 448-4262, Info@ sanghastudio.org.

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THE BLACKSMITH’S KNIFE: In this course, you will make a traditional blacksmith’s knife. The blacksmith’s knife is a forged blade — handle and all — from a single piece of steel. Learn more about classes at generator.com/ classes. Wed., Sep. 19-Oct. 10, 6-9 p.m. Location: Generator, 40 Sears Ln., Burlington. Info: 540-0761.

Rd. Boat Launch, Waterbury. Info: Sensimilla Lifestyle, Kaylee Rumley, 881-6336, kaylee@sensimillalifestyle.com, sensimilla lifestyle.com/gda-sup.

SEVEN DAYS

EMBODYING MIND-BODY LEADERSHIP: Learn about how to embody mind-body leadership as a way of life. What we embody creates an energy field that holds everyone around us. Incorporating mind-body meditation, grounding exercises, group discussion and mind-body tools including the Inner Board of Directors, explore how to stay grounded and connected with the flow of life, including

ANNOUNCING SPANISH CLASSES: Spanish classes start in September. Learn from a native speaker via small classes or personal instruction. You’ll always be participating and speaking. Lesson packages for travelers. Lessons for young children; they love it! English as Second Language instruction online. Our 12th year. See our website or contact us for details. Start Sep. 10. Cost: $225/10 weekly classes of 90+ min. each. Location: Spanish in Waterbury Center, Waterbury Center. Info: 585-1025, spanishparavos@ gmail.com, spanishwaterbury center.com.

bully-proofing and self-defense life skills to avoid them becoming victims and help them feel safe and secure. Our sole purpose is to help empower people by giving them realistic martial arts training practices they can carry with them throughout life. IBJJF & CBJJ certified black belt sixth-degree Instructor under Carlson Gracie Sr.: teaching in Vermont, born and raised in Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. A five-time Brazilian National Champion; International World Masters Champion and IBJJF World Masters Champion. Accept no Iimitations! Location: Vermont Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, 55 Leroy Rd., Williston. Info: 598-2839, julio@ bjjusa.com, vermontbjj.com.

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TAIKO AND DJEMBE CLASSES IN BURLINGTON!: New drumming sessions begin weeks of Mar. 3 and May 1. Taiko for Adults: Tue., 5:30-6:20 p.m.; Wed., 6:30-8:20 p.m. Djembe for Adults: Wed., 5:30-6:20 p.m. Taiko for Kids and Parents: Tue., 4:30-5:20 p.m. Djembe for Kids and Parents: Wed., 4:30-5:20 p.m. Drums provided. Conga classes, too! Online schedule, registration. Location: Taiko Space, 208 Flynn Ave., Suite 3G, Burlington. Info: 999-4255, burlingtontaiko.org.

challenging situations requiring us to embody leadership skills. Reflect on what’s in the way of embodying our leadership right now and how to move through these barriers so we can become more emotionally embodied, maintain an intentional presence and be the leaders we can be. Dec. 1, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Cost: $130/before Sep. 15, $145/after Sep. 15. Location: Bishops Booth Conference Center, Rockpoint Rd., Burlington. Info: 860-6203, journeyworksvt.com/embodying-mind-body-leadership-withlinda-marksmsm.


58 MUSIC

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COURTESY OF LUKE AWTRY

music

Rough Francis

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f you’re a music nerd, or have followed Vermont’s music scene throughout the last decade, you probably already know this story: In the 1970s, Bobby, Dannis and David Hackney — three black brothers living in Detroit — nearly changed the course of music history with their proto-punk band, Death. But Death’s time in the spotlight wouldn’t come until years later. Unable to harness the momentum needed to break out, the siblings relocated to Vermont, put down roots and buried their past, only to have everything surface in the late 2000s. The 2012 documentary A Band Called Death chronicles their fascinating, one-of-akind tale. Though Death didn’t find widespread acclaim and notoriety until decades after their inception, their work did inspire Bobby’s sons — Bobby Jr., Julian and Urian — to start a tribute act called Rough Francis just before Death’s story went viral. Soon after, Rough Francis began writing original material. Along with bassist Steve Williams and guitarist Paul Comegno, the punk- and garage-rock quintet has become one of the most popular groups in Vermont, with pockets of fandom all over North America.

Cranked Up Rough Francis’ message is more important than ever BY J O R D AN AD AMS

However, it’s been five years — roughly justice and speaking out against the forces half of Rough Francis’ lifetime — since of evil in the world are perhaps more imthey put out a record. A number of factors portant now than ever. contributed to the delay, such as hitting The band celebrates the new album’s some snags with former label Riot House release on Saturday, August 11, at the Records, building out Higher Ground a custom recording Showcase Lounge studio in Burlington’s in South Burlington, South End and generwith support from ally being perfectionlocals Cave Bees ists — not to mention and Jessica Rabbit UR IAN H AC K NE Y all of that life stuff Syndrome. that happens as you “When we first get older. (Urian, the youngest member, started, a lot of people were excited to was in his mid-teens when the band first see a punk-rock band that had three black started. Now he’s a father.) members in it, because that’s pretty rare The eight tracks contained in the new, to begin with — especially in a place like entirely self-produced LP MSP3: Counter Vermont,” says Bobby, Rough Francis’ Attack are worth the wait. Furthermore, front person. “That helped us stand out. the group’s message of standing up for But, at the same time, we were like, ‘It’s all

IT FEELS GOOD TO MAKE

UNSAFE MUSIC.

about the music. It’s not about the color of [our] skin.’ “But now we’re like, ‘It’s about the color of our skin,’” he continues. “It’s about us being a primarily black band with a message.” When Rough Francis played their first show in December 2008, many Americans had a more hopeful (or naïve) outlook about the country than they do today. After all, a month prior, Barack Obama became the first African American to be elected president of the United States. “When we first started, [there] was a lull,” explains Julian, one of the band’s two guitarists. “[2008] feels like a lifetime ago. [People thought,] Oh, we have a black president. Racism is over. [But] that gave ground to these nationalist organizations. These people were allowed to grow and to become louder and louder. As we’ve seen it happen, we’ve responded to it out of sheer necessity.” Loud and proud, Rough Francis’ message manifests early on the new record’s opening track, “Big Box Law Enforcement.” The band wrote it just after the 2014 police-perpetrated death of unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown in CRANKED UP

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GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

S UNDbites

News and views on the local music scene JORDAN ADAMS

B Y J O RDAN A D A MS

Sean Preece (left) and Jer Coons

PREECE’s Pieces

One Fish, Two Fish, Catfish, Blue Fish

Mighty Mystic & The Hard Roots Movement Higher Education

FRI 8.10

104.7 The Point welcomes

SAT 8.11

Girls Rock Vermont Showcase

TUE 8.14

Agent Orange

WED 8.15

Mitski

SUN 8.19

Enter The Haggis

Fea

Sidney Gish

Big Sam’s Funky Nation Chapter: SOUL

MON 8.20

Eyes Set To Kill

TUE 8.21

The T Sisters

FRI 8.24

Sweet Crude

SAT 8.25

Circles Around The Sun

10.5 10.9 11.10 12.8

Ronny Chieng Atmosphere Kasbo Rubblebucket

Dayshell, Awake At Last, Letting Go

GoldenOak

1214 Williston Road, South Burlington 802-652-0777 @higherground @highergroundmusic

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Cave Bees, Jessica Rabbit Syndrome

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Rough Francis

08.08.18-08.15.18

…Someone is catfishing Coons. OK, that’s not exactly accurate. Someone is catfishing other people as Coons. Do we have an internet slang term for when you discover that someone is erroneously using your own likeness on a dating app? Are they perhaps “dogfishing” you? Feel free to come up with something better than that if you like. If you’re unfamiliar with catfishing, the term — which comes from the 2010 documentary Catfish — refers to personal misrepresentation on the internet and social media. In other words, you fabricate an online persona that isn’t you, steal someone else’s photos and use the new identity to trick people in various ways. For example: In the film, a young photographer tracks down his new outof-state, online girlfriend after he begins to suspect she and her family may not be what they seem. (If you haven’t seen the flick, you should, because it’s one of

SAT 8.11

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Last week, we bid adieu to Burlington indie rockers GESTALT, whose relocation to Seattle is imminent. It’s always sad to see local acts call it quits or move on to far-off places. But one thing that makes it hurt less is that, without fail, a new act springs up to fill the vacuum. With that in mind, consider this the official announcement for new poppunk outfit PREECE. Expect the new project of drummer and perpetual sideman SEAN PREECE (the WELTERWEIGHTS, the GRIFT) and MADAILA bassist JER COONS to be “melodic, fast, fun [and] loud as shit,” according to the duo. In addition to Preece and Coons — who both play guitar in the new outfit — PREECE features DAN SMITH on drums and DANIEL BISHOP on bass. “I’ve been talking with Jer for years about doing this, and finally it’s happening,” Preece, who recently spent two years living in Oakland, Calif., tells Seven Days. The Bay Area — and coastal California in general — is known as an incubator for similarly punkish projects. Preece returned to Vermont brimming with passion for the new project and a burning desire to take on fronting duties. Preece finally steps into the spotlight when PREECE make their debut on Thursday, August 16, at SideBar in Burlington. “What I’m going for is melodic, hard-core pop-punk-rock,” says Preece. “[It’s] the RAMONES meets the DESCENDANTS meets BAD RELIGION meets indie rock.”

But wait, there’s more! Not only is this a new band announcement, it’s a new album announcement. Shortly after their live debut, PREECE will unveil their first full-length LP, Bad Choices Make Good Stories, on Friday, September 14. Recorded at Coon’s Future Field studios, it features guest appearances from fellow Welterweights KELLY RAVIN and LOWELL THOMPSON. Oh, by the way…

the most suspenseful and intimate pop docs of the 21st century.) Anyway, back to Coons’ problem. According to an Instagram post on the 29-year-old’s public account, he claims someone has been using his likeness on dating app Tinder for approximately a year and a half. A screenshot shows a Tinder profile for a 32-year-old named “Andreas” whose profile picture is clearly a shot of Coons rocking the eff out. WTF? “This past week, a friend of mine sent me a message on Facebook,” Coons says. “[She asked,] ‘Did you change your name? Is this you?’ And then I’m like, ‘Oh, my God. This motherfucker is still at it!” Coons tells Seven Days that the issue first popped up mid-2017 and resurfaced this week. After alerting him to the profile, Coons’ friend recently matched with “Andreas” and started chatting online with him in an attempt to discover the catfisher’s true identity. In screenshots of their conversation, also viewable on Instagram, “Andreas” claims to be a musician who, just like the real Coons, co-owns Future Fields and plays in Madaila. “It’s flattering in a weird way, but 99 percent of my feeling about it is just deep discomfort,” says Coons. “Has this person creeped on people on the internet pretending to be me for a year and a half?” Aside from having his likeness and identity stolen, Coons was particularly offended when “Andreas” misquoted a MITCH HEDBERG joke and didn’t even bother to attribute the botched zinger to the deceased comic. When asked why he couldn’t meet up for lunch, “Andreas” told Coons’ friend, “Let’s just say I don’t have a ‘girlfriend,’ but I know a girl who’d be upset if she heard me say that.” Hedberg’s actual joke goes, “I don’t have a girlfriend, I just know a girl who would get really mad if she heard me say that.” If you’re gonna steal, get it right! Consider this a public service announcement: If you match with “Andreas” on Tinder, beware. You are being catfished. Now, is it possible that this whole thing is an elaborate PR stunt for Coons’


music

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

WED.8

burlington

ARTSRIOT: Free Cake for Every Creature, Liza/Liza (indie), 8:30 p.m., $10/12. HALF LOUNGE: DJ Craig Mitchell (house), 10 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. JUNIPER: Mike Lorenz Trio (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free. LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Cody Sargent Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Irish Sessions (traditional), 7 p.m., free. Whole Milk (surf-jazz), 9:30 p.m., free. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Open Mic with Andy Lugo, 9 p.m., free. RADIO BEAN: Asumaya (postpunk, dub), 5:30 p.m., free. Alex Smith (folk), 7 p.m., free. Lily Smith (singer-songwriter), 8:30 p.m., free. Church Girls (indie rock, post-punk), 10:30 p.m., free. RED SQUARE: The Growlers (rock), 7 p.m., free. DJ Cre8 (open format), 11 p.m., free. RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: Gypsy Reel (traditional Irish), 7:30 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Hotel Karaoke, 9 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Pappy (Americana), 7 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Indie Rumble (improv), 8:30 p.m., $5.

chittenden county CITY SPORTS GRILLE: Interactive Video Trivia with Top Hat Entertainment, 7:30 p.m., free.

JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: Bluegrass Session, 7 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: All Request Video, 9 p.m., free. SWEET MELISSA’S: D. Davis (acoustic), 5:30 p.m., donation. Cookie’s Hot Club (gypsy jazz), 8 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

IDLETYME BREWING COMPANY: The Idletyme Band (blues, rock), 8 p.m., free. MOOGS PLACE: New Orleans Soul Project, 7:30 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury ZENBARN: Zach Nugent’s Acoustic Dead (Grateful Dead tribute), 7 p.m., free.

middlebury area CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

champlain islands/northwest

BAYSIDE PAVILION: The Starline Rhythm Boys (rockabilly), 6 p.m., free. NORTH HERO HOUSE INN & RESTAURANT: Mark LeGrand and Sarah Munro (country), 5:30 p.m., free.

60 MUSIC

SEVEN DAYS

08.08.18-08.15.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Cranked Up « P.58 Ferguson, Mo. The song has become the group’s flagship anthem. Over sawtooth riffs and busy drums, Bobby confronts racism head-on: “Shotguns won’t shut me up / Rebel flags don’t really freak me out / The cross you burn / Won’t hold me back / Peace and love / Is my counterattack. “We were fired up,” he says of the band’s reaction to the shooting. “When you hear stuff like that, you don’t know what to do. I felt like the best way I could react was to write a song.” “[With] everything that’s happening in the country right now, I almost get scared listening to [MSP3: Counter Attack],” says drummer Urian, who, as co-engineer, is also hugely responsible for the way the album sounds. “We’re kind of a target. [But] it feels good to make unsafe music.” Safety has been a concern on particular tours. When playing in the South, for instance, the band jokes about having its white members, Comegno and Williams, be in the front seats when

northeast kingdom

FRI.10 // TIME [SYNTH-POP, EXPERIMENTAL]

PARKER PIE CO.: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

outside vermont MONOPOLE: Open Mic with Lucid, 10 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Video Game Night, 7 p.m., free.

THU.9

burlington

ARTSRIOT: Emma Cook & Questionable Company, the Red Newts (indie pop), 8:30 p.m., $8. DELI 126: Aaron Lucci Quintet (jazz), 9:30 p.m., free. DRINK: Downstairs Comedy Open Mic, 8 p.m., free.

4-D Is there any concept as maddening as time? We try to manage and control

FINNIGAN’S PUB: DJ Craig Mitchell (open format), 10 p.m., free.

the hours in a day, yet the tick of the clock can’t be governed — only felt. But certain

HALF LOUNGE: DJ SVPPLY & Bankz (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

Similarly, the work of Gainesville, Fla., synth-pop duo TIME aims to suspend audiences

JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

in a trance-like stasis through ceremonial, transcendental performances. Combining

LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: George Petit Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Randal Pierce (jazz), 7 p.m., free. Shane Hardiman Trio (jazz), 8:30 p.m., $5-10. Sabouyouma, Bassel and the Supernaturals (West-African fusion), 10:30 p.m., $5. NECTAR’S: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. Jerryfest with Blues for Breakfast (Grateful Dead tribute), 9:30 p.m., $7.

driving. It’s more horrifying reality than ha-ha funny. “Being a target is something every black person in America has to deal with on a daily basis,” says Julian. “It’s like breathing at this point.” “The thing going on racially in America — people are just trying to be people,” says Urian. “It’s cool to inspire other brown people, or people who are not part of the white norm, to think, You know what? I want to do that, too. But I’m boxed into this thing because I’m this person or I’m that.” Given Vermont’s nearly 95 percent white population, Rough Francis’ hometown audiences are accordingly similar. But, as Bobby sees it, that’s an opportunity. “We need people to help back us up,” he says. “And most of those people have to be white people. I’m personally done doing emotional labor for white people. Here’s the information. What are you gonna do with it?” Williams — who recently departed from the band to pursue his career in Portland, Ore. — thinks that white people in black-fronted bands have a responsibility to be visibly supportive.

practices, such as meditation, provide a brief respite from the tyranny of time’s arrow.

gothic synth-pop, Hindu mantras and large-scale, geometric set pieces, the group offers an engrossing, vivid spectacle. Check out TIME on Friday, August 10, at the Monkey House in Winooski. BETH HEAD and local electro-pop artist EBN EZRA open. RADIO BEAN: Zach Russack (singer-songwriter), 5:30 p.m., free. Melanie Brulée & Her Bad Manners (Americana), 7 p.m., free. The Year of the Hare (indie), 8:30 p.m., free. The Devon McGarry Band (rock), 10 p.m.,

free. Lyon’s Disciple (reggae, rock), 11:30 p.m., free.

SIDEBAR: Adventure Dog (rock, funk), 9 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE: D Jay Baron (mashup, hip-hop), 11 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Kingfisher (roots-rock, Americana), 8 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ Cre8 (open format), 10 p.m., free.

THU.9

“Obviously, I’m a white man [and] I have white privilege,” he says. “The best thing I can do is stand up beside those guys and say, ‘I support you.’ That’s where a lot of white men need to be.” Comegno notes that being in a primarily black band has been eye-opening. “Ten years ago, I didn’t think about this stuff nearly as often as I do every day now,” he says. “I’ve had some very real conversations with close friends and family since I’ve been in the band — [which] I probably wouldn’t have had if I wasn’t in Rough Francis.” Indeed, the band and its work bring up heavy themes. But messaging isn’t everything. “You can’t take yourself too seriously,” says Bobby. “Even if you have this intense message, at the end of the day, you’re a band. You’re playing music with your friends, and you’re having a good time.” The newest friend to step into the group is Dan Davine, who took over Williams’ spot playing bass. But Davine is by no means new to music in the Burlington scene. He has played with and

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produced/mixed/mastered for numerous local acts. Finding the balance between in-yourface maxims and full-throttle rocking out is something Rough Francis have had 10 years to perfect. And they don’t plan to quit anytime soon. “Whenever I think about this band, I think about doing it when we’re 90 years old,” says Julian. “We have a lot of patience and resilience.” As Bobby notes, the most important takeaway from Rough Francis and MSP3: Counter Attack is for listeners to “be inspired to speak up more, be proud of themselves [and] not take shit.” And Julian reminds fans of a final important detail. “The record should be listened to at maximum volume,” he advises. “But you probably already knew that.” m Contact: jordan@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Rough Francis, Saturday, August 11, 8:30 p.m., Higher Ground Showcase Lounge in South Burlington. $12/14. AA. highergroundmusic.com


GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

S

UNDbites

EVENTS EVENTS ON ON SALE SALE NOW! NOW

C O NT I NU E D F RO M PA G E 5 9

upcoming solo album? Doubtful. I just wanted to segue into briefly mentioning his forthcoming record. We’ll dig deeper into that as the release date — Friday, October 13 — draws nearer. One final thought: This whole thing should probably be explored in the next installment of the Vermont Comedy Club’s 2018 Seven Daysies-winning improv show Tinder Nightmares. Just sayin’. Anäis Mitchell

Burlington Edible History Tours

Listening In If I were a superhero, my superpower would be the ability to get songs stuck in other people’s heads. Here are five songs that have been stuck in my head this week. May they also get stuck in yours. Follow sevendaysvt on Spotify for weekly playlists with tunes by artists featured in the music section. BANANARAMA, “Cruel Summer” DOLE, “Slumberland” VVEREVVOLF, “Braindead” LYKKE LI, “sex money feelings die” FRIDA, “I Know There’s Something

THU.-SAT., AUG. 9-11 OUTSIDE IN THE BACK OF THE ECHO CENTER, BURLINGTON

Peak Season

Burlington Tree Tours

Reggae Night with DJ Big Dog & Jahson

The Homemade Pantry- Child 9+ and Parent/Caregiver

FRI., AUG. 10 ZENBARN, WATERBURY CENTER

FRI., AUG. 10 RUSTY NAIL STAGE, STOWE

TUE., AUG. 14 RICHMOND COMMUNITY KITCHEN

Free Cultivation Class: Harvest Time

Cooking with CBD by Sensimilla Lifestyle

SAT., AUG. 11 GREEN STATE GARDENER, BURLINGTON

Jam for the Land 2018 SAT., AUG. 11 THE DOCK AT STOWE CIDER

Celebrate Your Farmer Pizza Social THU., AUG. 16 WOOD’S MARKET GARDEN, BRANDON

Basket Weaving Workshop SAT., AUG. 18 MOUNTAIN HOLLOW MEDICINALS, CRAFTSBURY COMMON

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MUSIC 61

Fundraisers Festivals Plays Sports Concerts

SEVEN DAYS

VIEW MORE EVENTS ONLINE

WED., AUG. 15 RICHMOND COMMUNITY KITCHEN

08.08.18-08.15.18

COURTESY OF LAURA WILSON

SUN., AUG. 12 HILTON BURLINGTON

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

If you’re looking to bask in the warm and wonderful sounds of some of Vermont’s finest folk musicians, you should head to Stowe for the Spruce Peak Folk Festival on Saturday, August 11. A fine roster of acoustic balladeers descends on the Village Green at Spruce Peak, including headlining Vermonter ANÄIS MITCHELL, plus JOSH RITTER & THE ROYAL CITY BAND and ELEPHANT REVIVAL’s DANIEL RODRIGUEZ. A selection of local “buskers” kicks off the daylong event: Americana singer-songwriter ABBY SHERMAN, Eastern European-tinged band the LAST TRAIN TO ZINKOV, 2018 Daysies winner for best folk artist the DUPONT BROTHERS, Romani-inspired ensemble DANZA DEL FUEGO, and ONEOVERZERO vocalists DAN AND MODOU.

VT rappers MISTER BURNS, EYENINE and 2018 Daysies winner for best hip-hop artist, JARV, team up with Atlantabased rapper DILLON for the Will Rap for Art Tour. The 11-stop trek through the Northeast launches on Thursday, August 9, at the Monkey House in Winooski. In addition to throwing down hot beats and ill rhymes, the crew is raising money for local arts initiatives in each city it visits. To raise money, a different visual artist will create a new work at each show. The painting is raffled off at the end of the night, and proceeds support the chosen arts organization. At the kickoff event, Anthill Collective’s FORTUNE will create the raffle item, with proceeds going to the South End Arts and Business Association. 

SAT., AUG. 11 ZENBARN, WATERBURY CENTER

Afro Yaqui Music Collective

Going On”

Starving Artists

Funky Folk: The Official Spruce Peak Folk Festival After-Party

Josh Ritter

2v-tickets080818.indd 1

8/7/18 4:41 PM


music THU.9

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

« P.60

SOCIAL CLUB & LOUNGE: A Fitting Revenge, No Son of Mine, NO SOUL, Tetsuo (metal, hardcore), 7 p.m., $5. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Jamie Lee (standup), 7:30 p.m., $15-27. Tinder Nightmares (improv), 9 p.m., $5.

chittenden county

Feels Like Old Times Montréal’s

TOPS

recall the warmth and romance of pop-rock’s classic

era. Between soft synth pads, infectious riffs, Fleetwood Mac-style layered harmonies and the ineffable fuzziness of ’70s recordings, the group bleeds retro charm. But for lead vocalist Jane Penny, it’s her bandmates — not vintage icons — who inspire her the most. In a piece for UK music blog the Line of Best Fit, Penny explains, “When I play with TOPS I am always pushing myself … This is my favorite thing in the world.” Catch TOPS on Wednesday, August 15, at Club

FOAM BREWERS: The New Review, Junco (soul, funk), 8 p.m., free. HALF LOUNGE: Four-D (open format), 10 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Hana Zara (indie folk), 7:30 p.m., free. Mike Lorenz, Robinson Morse and Geza Carr (jazz), 9 p.m., $5. DJ Taka (eclectic vinyl), 11 p.m., $5.

MONKEY HOUSE: Selector Sets with Rough Francis (eclectic vinyl), 5 p.m., free. Will Rap for Art Tour featuring Dillon, Jarv, Mister Burns, eyenine (hip-hop), 9 p.m., $8.

NECTAR’S: John Daly Duo (blues, rock), 7 p.m., free. Gang of Thieves, Spring Street Family (rock, funk), 9 p.m., $10.

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Tiny Montgomery (Bob Dylan tribute), 7 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

RADIO BEAN: Hope Waidley (pop), 5:30 p.m., free. Natále (world, folk), 7 p.m., free. Abrielle Scharff, Trae Sheehan (Americana), 8:30 p.m., free. Whiskey Shivers, Duke Aeroplane, the Wrong Numbers (bluegrass), 10 p.m., $10.

SWEET MELISSA’S: Carter Glass (Americana), 8 p.m., free. WHAMMY BAR: Willa Mamet and Paul Miller (folk), 7 p.m., free. Open Mic, 7 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Open Mic with Allen Church, 8:30 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE: The Last Minute (rock), 7 p.m., free. Mashtodon (hip-hop), 11 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury

RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ Raul (salsa, reggaeton), 6 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Jesse Taylor (singersongwriter), 7 p.m., free. DJ SVPPLY (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

LOCALFOLK SMOKEHOUSE: Open Mic with Alex Budney, 8:30 p.m., free.

middlebury area

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Mike Brinkman’s Open Mic, 8:30 p.m., free.

champlain islands/northwest TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: Django Soulo (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom HIGHLAND LODGE: Trivia Night, 6:30 p.m., free.

08.08.18-08.15.18

burlington

CLUB METRONOME: VT Drag Idol: All Stars (drag), 7 p.m., $12.

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Mighty Mystic & the Hard Roots Movement, Higher Education (reggae), 8 p.m., $12/15.

SEVEN DAYS

SAT.11

BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD: In the Pocket (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free.

Metronome in Burlington. Locals J BENGOY and DJ SVPPLY open.

BACKSTAGE PUB & RESTAURANT: Trivia, 9:30 p.m., free.

PARKER PIE CO.: Ron Kelley Quartet (jazz), 7:30 p.m., free.

outside vermont

WED.15 // TOPS [INDIE-POP]

DELI 126: The le duo (jazz, improvisation), 9:30 p.m., free. FOAM BREWERS: Billy Wylder, Adam Wolf (folk, rock), 9 p.m., free. HALF LOUNGE: Fun House (house), 10 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. JUNIPER: Eric George (folk), 9 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Eleanor Elektra, Pinkie Promise, Crispin Swank (art-folk), 7:30 p.m., $5. DJ Taka (eclectic vinyl), 11 p.m., $5.

OLIVE RIDLEY’S: Karaoke with DJ Jon Berry & DJ Coco, 9 p.m., free.

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: DJ Disco Phantom (eclectic dance), 10 p.m., free.

FRI.10

NECTAR’S: Rob Compa (of Dopapod) (acoustic), 7 p.m., free. Phour Point O (Phish tribute), 9 p.m., $5.

burlington

ARTSRIOT: The Renegade Groove, the Happy Fits, Zach Matari (funk), 8:30 p.m., free. BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD: Bird Code (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free.

62 MUSIC

MONOPOLE DOWNSTAIRS: Happy Hour Tunes & Trivia with Gary Peacock, 5 p.m., free.

CLUB METRONOME: Dimensions of Bass featuring Abstractivve, D Fuego, Symbiosa, Shredz, Jack Rabbit (EDM), 9 p.m., $5/10. 18+.

RADIO BEAN: Friday Morning Sing-Along with Linda Bassick & Friends (kids’ music), 11 a.m., free. Happy Hour with DJ Ryan Kick (eclectic), 4 p.m., free. Steph Morin (rock), 7 p.m., free. Clyde of the Milltailers (ragtime, bluegrass), 8:30 p.m., free. The Fobs (garage, punk), 10 p.m., $5. Bike Thiefs, Days on End, Father Figuer (post-punk), 11:30 p.m., $5.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Binger (jam), 8 p.m., free. RED SQUARE: My Mother’s Moustache (folk-rock), 4 p.m., free. B-Town (rock), 7 p.m., free. DJ Craig Mitchell (open format), 11 p.m., free. RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ KermiTT (eclectic), 10 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Gordon Goldsmith (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free. Haitian (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Papas Porch (bluegrass), 8 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Jamie Lee (standup), 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., $15-27.

chittenden county BACKSTAGE PUB & RESTAURANT: Karaoke with Jenny Red, 9 p.m., free.

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Enter the Haggis (Celtic folk-rock), 8:30 p.m., $15/17. JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: Leno, Young & Cheney (rock), 7 p.m., free. MONKEY HOUSE: Untapped: A Night of Burlesque and Drag, 8:30 p.m., $10. TIME, Beth Head, Ebn Ezra (synth-pop, experimental), 11:30 p.m., $3/8. 18+.

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: King Me (acoustic rock), 5 p.m., free. A House on Fire (rock), 9 p.m., free.

TRES AMIGOS & RUSTY NAIL STAGE: Reggae Night with DJ Big Dog, Jahson, 9 p.m., $5.

STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Wild Leek River (country), 7:30 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury

WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: Local Dork (eclectic vinyl), 9 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Helen Hummel (singer-songwriter), 6 p.m., free. Canadian Waves (surf, garage), 9 p.m., free. GUSTO’S: Elizabeth Renaud (rock), 5 p.m., free. Nos4a2 (metal), 9 p.m., $5. SWEET MELISSA’S: Honky Tonk Happy Hour with Mark LeGrand, 5:30 p.m., free. Lightcrusher, Wretched Abomination, Green Chapel, Gravelurker (metal), 9:30 p.m., $5.

stowe/smuggs

EL TORO: Sergio Torres (Latin, Americana), 7 p.m., free. MOOGS PLACE: Greenbush (blues, funk), 9 p.m., free.

ZENBARN: Afro Yaqui Music Collective (jazz, funk), 9 p.m., $9.50.

middlebury area

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: DJ Bounce (hits), 9:30 p.m., free.

champlain islands/northwest

TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: Tony Whedon Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free.

upper valley

THE ENGINE ROOM: GrooveSum (rock, funk), 9 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom HIGHLAND LODGE: Jeanne & Jim (Americana), 7 p.m., free.

outside vermont

MONOPOLE: Ausable Branch (folk-rock), 10 p.m., free.

SMITTY’S PUB: Steady Betty (Lite) (ska, rocksteady), 8 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Jamie Lee (standup), 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., $15-27.

chittenden county THE DOUBLE E LOUNGE AT ESSEX CINEMAS & T-REX THEATER: Erin Cassels-Brown (indie folk), 6:30 p.m., free.

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Girls Rock Vermont Showcase (rock), 12:30 p.m., $5. Rough Francis (Album Release), Cave Bees, Jessica Rabbit Syndrome (punk, garage-rock), 8:30 p.m., $12/14. JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: Front Porch Foursome (folk), 7 p.m., free. LAST STOP SPORTS BAR: Night Protocol (’80s covers, synthwave), 10 p.m., free. ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Graziano, Slim and Schofield (rock), 5 p.m., free. Roy and the Wrecks (rock), 9 p.m., free. STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Ryan Sweezy (singer-songwriter), 7:30 p.m., free.

SAT.11

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GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

REVIEW this Zoë Keating, Snowmelt

(SELF-RELEASED, CD, DIGITAL DOWNLOAD)

Zoë Keating’s four-song EP Snowmelt begins with a sad, solitary cello line. Having established a lonely, windswept musical terrain, the sound shifts to a pulsing beat overlaid with apparent guitar plucking. Yet it’s all done with the cello: Keating is a solo electronic cellist who uses an instrument mic, a laptop and foot pedals to create her looped and layered, three-to-fiveminute pieces. This will come as a surprise to no one, I imagine. Keating, a former member of the acclaimed cellorock band Rasputina, has a global following of more than a million, with whom she is in constant contact via social media and her blog. Through the latter, fans learned of her husband’s death from cancer in 2015 and her move, with her young son, from California to Vermont in 2017 — Keating’s

Pattern Addict, Pattern Addict (SELF-RELEASED, DIGITAL DOWNLOAD)

sister lives here. That sadness in her music is real. As in the opening song, “Forte,” beats appear from the ether in two other pieces, without defining them. “Possible” builds from an ascending three-note unit, repeated with an increasing intensity, to an interlude of suspended action, as if Keating were fortifying herself for the rhythmic climax. She composed the piece to end her 2017 TEDMED talk, a moving and honest recounting of her loss, and the power of music to overcome it. “Nix,” the final song, begins as a halting, evanescent lullaby of bell-like sounds Keating created using her son’s toy musical instruments. It grows minimally beat-centered before calming to a slow, repeating four-note descent on the cello alone, as if the child has fallen asleep. Only the second song, “Icefloe,” eschews a beat — though it, too, has rhythm. The song that sounds most like a string ensemble, it layers ascending glissandos, remotely

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MUSIC 63

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YOU A VT ARTIST OR BAND? SEND US YOUR MUSIC! DIGITAL: MUSIC@SEVENDAYSVT.COM; GET YOUR MUSIC REVIEWED: ARE SNAIL MAIL: MUSIC C/O SEVEN DAYS 255 S. CHAMPLAIN ST., SUITE 5, BURLINGTON, VT 05401

SEVEN DAYS

As good as the rest of the album is, tunes such as the single “Things Get Better” and the Mumford & Sons-influenced THU 16 | FRI 17 | SAT 18 “Sunshine” don’t quite stand out from the pack as much as the band’s weirder material. Those cuts do, however, display a restraint and cleverness in arrangement that’s advanced for a young band, especially on a debut release. It’s best not to get too excited about the potential of a new band, even amid so many promising signs. As a cautionary tale, consider recent local favorites such FAMILY FRIENDLY IMPROV as the Snaz and Gestalt. Both created GOOD CLEAN FUN lots of excitement, not just for what they SATURDAY, AUGUST 18TH | 5PM were doing but for the thought of what they could become, only to depart before realizing their potential. It’s the other side of the local music phenomenon — so many new sounds, so much promise, but so rarely is it allowed to really cultivate (802) 859-0100 | WWW.VTCOMEDY.COM here. 101 main street, BurlingtoN Still, one could be forgiven for getting a little excited after listening to Pattern 8/3/18 Addict. Whether the band follows its folk- Untitled-12 1 rock leanings or delves deeper into other sounds, a group with the tools these kids possess has every chance at a bright future. Pattern Addict is available at patternadict.bandzoogle.com, as well as on Spotify and iTunes.

08.08.18-08.15.18

the record” moment before the players get down to business. When they do, Pattern Addict become a singer-songwriter vehicle, rallying around vocalist/guitarist Liam Manion’s folk-rock stylings. Particularly on songs such as “Foreign Artifacts” and “Little Monster,” one can detect the band’s Americana influences. Manion presents the bare bones with his acoustic guitar and raspy, intelligent melodies before the rest of the band starts to color both inside and outside the lines. Liam Quinlan provides atmospheric touches on lead guitar. The rhythm section of Dan Wagner on drums and Eden Forbes on bass ably adapts to the shifts between folk and indie rock. It is on the latter style where the band finds real sonic footing. Pattern Addict achieve a certain dynamic when they let themselves get spacey and embrace their inner Pavement. “Darkness” is a fascinating song, finding the band in a staggering, contemplative mood. The guitars and keys chime back and forth over a sparse arrangement as Manion swears, “I don’t give anyone anything anymore.”

49 Old Main St., Jeffersonville | 4:30pm - 8pm placed, over ethereally high notes. Like all of her music, this piece seems to contain a narrative: It evokes a stirring under the ice — and perhaps an awakening from pain. Keating has somehow gained the inaccurate moniker “avant-garde.” Unlike, say, the classification-defying electronic strings music of Tod Machover or the younger Joseph Di Ponio’s atonal compositions, her songs center on mainstream chord progressions and fourfour time — the stuff of Irish fiddle music August 15 @ 6pm. |Free admission and pop songs. Then she makes of these Sponsored by Cambridge Arts Council, Great Big Graphics, Smugglers’ familiar elements something unearthly and Notch Resort, N.A.Manosh, Switchback Brewing Co., Martell’s at the Red Fox, Rock Art Brewery, lingeringly beautiful. Aubuchon Hardware, G.W.Tatro Construction, Keating’s concerts are experiments Kingdom Creamery of VT, JFAM in improvisation — and one hopes her Vermont appearances will increase with 12v-jeffersonvillefarmermarket080818.indd 1 7/27/18 her residency. In a recent interview with Vermont Public Radio, she said of performing live, “You don’t know what the result is going to be until you’re doing it, because all those layers of cello together change the outcome.” Snowmelt, by THU 9 | FRI 10 | SAT 11 contrast, is structured and polished, yet no less emotionally raw. Snowmelt is available at music. zoekeating.com.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Music scenes in college towns like Burlington benefit from a constant influx of new blood. Whether young musicians arrive and meet likeminded souls and form bands, or local kids listen to all those bands until they form one themselves, the end result is that the Queen City is usually awash in new ideas and sounds. Witness Pattern Addict, who indeed introduce something new and different on their self-titled debut. These local kids make good with a truly eclectic mix of focused songwriting and tasteful, colorful arrangements that combine to create a nuanced take on indie rock. The album kicks off with an intriguing instrumental number, “The Basement,” which builds mood and momentum through a Radiohead-like piano arrangement over a martial beat. As Creede Burton’s uplifting synths sweep across the song, they inspire a sort of “welcome to

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music SAT.11

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

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barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Irish Session, 2 p.m., donation. CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Red Neckromancer (metal, punk), 9 p.m., free. ESPRESSO BUENO: Jazzyaoke (live jazz band karaoke), 7:30 p.m., $5. GUSTO’S: Robin Sunquiet (pop), 9:30 p.m., free. SWEET MELISSA’S: State Street Scallywags (Americana), 6 p.m., free. New Orleans Soul Project, 9 p.m., $5/10. THE DEN AT HARRY’S HARDWARE: Anniversary Music Fest featuring Backline Collective and the House Band, Rich Brown, Katie Trautz and Nate Gusakov, Trae Sheehan and Abrielle Scharff, Jacob Green (eclectic), 3 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

EL TORO: Blue Fox (blues), 7 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury

ZENBARN: Funky Folk: The Official Spruce Peak Folk Festival After-Party (folk, rock), 10 p.m., $5/8.

middlebury area

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: DJ Earl (open format), 9:30 p.m., free.

rutland/killington RICK & KAT’S HOWLIN’ MOUSE: JJGunn, Soul Shove (rock), 8 p.m., free.

SEVEN DAYS

08.08.18-08.15.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

champlain islands/northwest TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: Jeff and Gina (folk), 7 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom PARKER PIE CO.: Open Mic, 8 p.m., free.

outside vermont

MONOPOLE: Theta (Album Release) (metal), 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Wild Leek River (country), 8 p.m., free.

SUN.12

burlington

CLUB METRONOME: Spiritual Rez (reggae), 8 p.m., $12/14. HALF LOUNGE: STRYTLLR (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Game Night, 7 p.m., free.

64 MUSIC

NECTAR’S: Mi Yard Reggae Night with DJs Big Dog and Jahson, 9 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: Maple Street Six (jazz), 1 p.m., free. Old Sky and Friends (Americana), 6 p.m., free. Sea Level & the Memorial Skylight (electronic, experimental), 8:30 p.m., free. Hilltop (jam), 10:30 p.m., free.

WED.15 // MITSKI [INDIE ROCK]

RED SQUARE: Zach Rhoads Trio (rock), 7 p.m., free. DJ Max Jade (open format), 11 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: North by North, Clever Girls, My Mother’s Moustache (rock), 9 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Bluegrass Brunch, noon, free. Outcalls (pop, experimental), 6 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: She Thicc Variety Hour (musical improv), 7 p.m., $5. Not My Forte (improv, standup), 8 p.m., free.

chittenden county

MISERY LOVES CO.: Disco Brunch with DJ Craig Mitchell, 11 a.m., free. MONKEY HOUSE: Emo Night BTV, 8 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Southern Old Time Music Jam (traditional), 10 a.m., free.

Growing Pains While mocked by some as an invention of entitled twentysomethings, the quarter-life

crisis is a frustratingly real phenomenon. The promises of adulthood — security, prosperity and contentment — are often so far out of reach that they seem fully unattainable. New York City-based singer-songwriter MITSKI chronicles

these pains on her breakthrough 2016 album, Puberty 2. Her versatile indie-rock style incorporates elements of new wave, grunge and sparkling electronic pop. The artist’s latest single — the disco-tinged “Nobody” — heralds a

SWEET MELISSA’S: Lily Smith (singer-songwriter), 6 p.m., free. Live Band Karaoke, 8 p.m., donation.

new album, Be the Cowboy, due out later this year. Mitski performs on Wednesday, August 15, at the Higher Ground

middlebury area

TUE.14

ROUGH CUT: Kelly Ravin (country), 5 p.m., free.

MON.13 burlington

Showcase Lounge in South Burlington. SIDNEY GISH adds support.

burlington

ARTSRIOT: The Moth: Collaboration (storytelling), 7:30 p.m., $10. DRINK: Comedy Open Mic, 9 p.m., free.

HALF LOUNGE: Four-D (open format), 10 p.m., free.

FOAM BREWERS: Local Dork (eclectic vinyl), 6 p.m., free.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Lamp Shop Lit Club (open reading), 8 p.m., free. Lake & Bridge (indie folk), 9:30 p.m., free.

HALF LOUNGE: Moochie (eclectic), 10 p.m., free.

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Karaoke, 9:30 p.m., free.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Pullin’ Yo Chain Comedy Showcase (standup), 7:30 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: Nathan Kairis (ambient), 5:30 p.m., free. Genevieve & Hemmy (folk, rock), 7 p.m., free. Alberta (gothic blues), 8:30 p.m., free. TGTG (indie rock), 10:30 p.m., free. RED SQUARE: DJ KermiTT (eclectic), 7 p.m., free. DJ SVPPLY (hip-hop), 11 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free. Family Night (open jam), 9 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Comedy & Crêpes (standup), 8 p.m., free.

chittenden county

MONKEY HOUSE: Erin CasselsBrown (indie folk), 6 p.m., free. Motown Mondays (Motown DJs), 8 p.m., free.

LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Shane Hardiman Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free.

LINCOLNS: Laugh Shack (standup), 8:30 p.m., $5.

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Trivia with Top Hat Entertainment, 7 p.m., free. WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

NECTAR’S: Auguste and Alden, Honey & Soul, Sophie Ward (rock), 8 p.m., free/$5. 18+.

SWEET MELISSA’S: Blue Fox’s Open Mic, 7 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: Nate Cozzolino (singer-songwriter), 5:30 p.m., free. AliT (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free. Spooky Moulder (Americana), 8:30 p.m., free. The VG Experiment (experimental), 10:30 p.m., free.

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Karaoke with DJ Vociferous, 9:30 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Chris Lyon (solo acoustic, Americana), 6 p.m., free.

middlebury area

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Gyasi Garcia (singer-songwriter), 9:30 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Dead Set (Grateful Dead tribute), 9 p.m., $5.

outside vermont

RED SQUARE: Four-D (house, hip-hop), 7 p.m., free. DJ A-RA$ (open format), 10 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

SIDEBAR: Hotel Karaoke, 9 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Pappy (Americana), 7 p.m., free. THE SPOT ON THE DOCK: DJ Disco Phantom (eclectic dance), 5 p.m., free.

IDLETYME BREWING COMPANY: The Idletyme Band (blues, rock), 8 p.m., free. MOOGS PLACE: Abby Sherman (Album Release) (Americana), 8 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury ZENBARN: Zach Nugent’s Acoustic Dead (Grateful Dead tribute), 7 p.m., free.

middlebury area CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

champlain islands/northwest

BAYSIDE PAVILION: The Starline Rhythm Boys (rockabilly), 6 p.m., free.

WED.15

chittenden county

northeast kingdom

CLUB METRONOME: TOPS, J Bengoy, DJ SVPPLY (indie pop), 8 p.m., $12/14.

CITY SPORTS GRILLE: Interactive Video Trivia with Top Hat Entertainment, 7:30 p.m., free.

burlington

JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Sex Trivia, 7:30 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Ukulele Kids with Joe Baird (sing-along), 9:30 a.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

chittenden county HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Agent Orange (punk, surf), 8:30 p.m., $14/16.

RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: Gypsy Reel (traditional Irish), 7:30 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

NORTH HERO HOUSE INN & RESTAURANT: Cooie & Sergio (Americana), 5:30 p.m., free.

HALF LOUNGE: Open Decks, 10 p.m., free.

MOOGS PLACE: Seth Yacovone (blues), 7 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE: The Tenderbellies (bluegrass), 7 p.m., free. DJ Cre8 (open format), 11 p.m., free.

SWEET MELISSA’S: D. Davis (acoustic), 5:30 p.m., donation. John Lackard Blues Jam, 8 p.m., free.

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Indie Rumble (improv), 8:30 p.m., $5.

SIDEBAR: Ron Stoppable (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Open Mic with Andy Lugo, 9 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

HATCH 31: Erin Cassels-Brown (indie folk), 6 p.m., free. Kelly Ravin and Lowell Thompson (country), 7 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: Cole Blouin (experimental folk), 5 p.m., free. Stephen Callahan Trio (jazz), 6:30 p.m., free. Roderick & the Dreamgoat (singer-songwriter), 8:45 p.m., free. Honky Tonk Tuesday with Ponyhustle, 10 p.m., $5.

free. Ford Theatre Reunion (punk), 9:30 p.m., free.

JUNIPER: The Ray Vega Latin Jazz Sextet, 8:30 p.m., free. LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Paul Asbell Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Irish Sessions (traditional), 7 p.m.,

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Mitski, Sidney Gish (indie rock), 8:30 p.m., $18/20. MONKEY HOUSE: The Curls (art-rock), 6:30 p.m., $3/8. 18+.

barre/montpelier

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: All Request Video, 9 p.m., free.

PARKER PIE CO.: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

outside vermont MONOPOLE: Open Mic with Lucid, 10 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Video Game Night, 7 p.m., free. m


Long Trail Brewing presents

COOLER IN THE MOUNTAINS Free Outdoor Concert Series

Grab a lawn chair and join us Saturdays through September 1st from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Roaring Brook Umbrella Bar in the K-1 Base Area.

AUG THE FUNKY DAWGZ BRASS BAND

11

Details at killington.com/cooler

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art

Lining Up

Scott André Campbell examines 3D space in two dimensions B Y S A D I E W I LLI A M S

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 08.08.18-08.15.18 SEVEN DAYS 66 ART

TALKING ART

SAC: It’s the question of where you’re based versus where you live. I grew up with one parent that was French and one that was from New York. I’ve always had friends and family in both places. And it makes it hard to go for more than a year or a year and a half without going back to check in, say hi and regain that familiarity. SD: How did you support yourself while you were in France? SAC: I was doing IT work. And I was still taking on some production jobs. Good examples are the mural in the foyer of the King Street Center or the bus that the King Street Center has. There were a couple of jobs in there that I felt weren’t so far away from the creative output. They offered the same thing I’ve needed from any type of design client, which is basically complete and total license.

Scott André Campbell

COURTESY OF SCOTT CAMPBELL

SEVEN DAYS: Why do you go by your initials? SAC? SCOTT ANDRÉ CAMPBELL: Because I feel like it would be disingenuous to

LUKE AWTRY PHOTOGRAPHY

I

f you’ve seen the bright green King Street Center bus rolling through Burlington, you’re already familiar with Scott André Campbell’s work. He used digital technology to design the commissioned, map-like work that was then printed onto vinyl and applied to the vehicle’s exterior. Now, a different window into Campell’s creative life is on display at the Karma Bird House Gallery. The exhibit “Deliveries” includes six mixed-media works, two of which form a diptych, that play with architectural concepts in two dimensions. Campbell, 45, whose mother is French and father is American, grew up in Portland, Ore. At age 27, he moved to Burlington and, though Vermont is his chosen home, he’s wont to travel. After four years in France, he moved back to the Queen City last October and dove straight into the creation of “Deliveries.” The new pieces are so titled because they are “the kind of work I want to deliver to the public,” says Campbell. These works explore processes of addition and subtraction, both numerically and through Campbell’s artistic method. He began with silkscreens that he developed in a class with the Iskra Print Collective, just downstairs from the gallery. He then mounted the prints on wood panels and collaged, painted and drew on them. The pieces in “Deliveries” employ precise lines and angles, as well as typography and numerals, evoking architectural drawings or schematics. The works look controlled and precise while describing things that are wholly imagined. No specific building or structure is evident. Instead, the proliferation and overlap of lines and shapes evoke the idea of something that exists beyond — or within — the canvas. Campbell’s work will be on view at the gallery through the end of the month. Seven Days met with the artist in his South End studio to talk about names, his past as a designer for hire and how redaction informs his creative process.

Detail of “Sudo Science – L’arche Extemporain” by Scott André Campbell

come up with a pen name. It’s too much drama for me. SD: So the name of your website isn’t a pen name — Luminome? SAC: Luminome is the name I came up with in 2000 for the sort of ID, or brand mark, that would be a container for the [contract] work I was doing digitally. I used to work way too much in that realm. [The word] “luminome” is nice because it’s a biome, but it’s full of light. What I go by [when deciding names] is a factor of some kind of laziness. I came up with that name, it worked, I got the domain, and we’re good. The naming of things [can be] a great source of suffering. SD: Your website says you’re currently living in Vermont. Do you consider yourself a nomad?

SD: So they really wanted you for your distinct aesthetic? SAC: Yeah. The reason I messed with design for as long as I did was because a couple of my clients were not only repeat clients, but they really wanted me to do what seemed natural, what seemed intuitive. I worked in music for some time, so I did a bunch of stuff for Phish, a bunch of stuff for Higher Ground. And toward the end of that arc, I was working with [the band] Medeski Martin & Wood. These people that were basically like, “We see what you do, we appreciate what you do.” SD: The new works seem to follow architectural lines — linear structures or ideas of structures. What else connects the works? Are there recurring themes? SAC: The idea of a schematic — of using physical tools to describe in twodimensional space a thing, or a group of things, that will eventually exist in three dimensions — and some way to communicate that a space is traversable, or has a Z axis, even. That stuff, for me, is vitally important. I would say that what I’m after is how to evoke a traversable and navigable space in two dimensions, not for a physical sense of space but for the imagination. The work I gravitate toward, that lights me up, is work where your “idea self” can just drop in and go


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explore. I have this math-logic brain and then this dreamy, float brain that wants to go swim in [the work]. SD: You also frequently use numbers in your works. What’s that about? SAC: It’s because I spent a good amount of time close to the tools of graphic clarity. It’s in some ways the hyper mundane — a love for the hyper mundane. SD: Last night, you redacted words from one paragraph of the wall text to make a new sentence. What was that about? SAC: One word answer: Exactly. SD: Can you elaborate? SAC: The main [reason] is that a lot

of what I do in the studio is, I have this layered process. It’s additive, this stacking over time, but there’s a boatload of redaction within the work itself — the kind of imposition of shapes, the obfuscation of other ones. That, for me, is endemic [to my process]. You build up all of this stuff, all of these different marks and expressions. Then you say, I’m going to drop something on top of whatever information was there before, which is now nonessential, and then we’ve changed the conversation. That little bit that was blacked out was a way to speak to process, and it’s a concrete poem. m

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INFO Learn more about Scott André Campbell’s work at luminome.com.

NEW THIS WEEK burlington

f AUGUST ART AUCTION: A silent auction featuring works by area artists benefits the gallery. Bidding available online at augustartauction.com. 9th Birthday Celebration: Thursday, August 9, 5-8 p.m. August 9-24. Info, 578-2512. S.P.A.C.E. Gallery.

barre/montpelier

stowe/smuggs

ART EVENTS

ART IN THE PARK: More than 55 fine art, craft and specialty food vendors gather for this annual community event featuring demonstrations, kids’ activities and live music. Main Street Park, Rutland, Saturday, August 11, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday, August 12, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Info, info@chaffeeartcenter.org.

EXAMINING REVITALIZATION & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

THE

LIVE BROADCASTS FROM

MANDALA STONE PAINTING WORKSHOP: Artist and art therapist Gabrielle Hayward leads participants in creating two painted stones. Chaffee Art Center, Rutland, Wednesday, August 8, 6-8 p.m. $25; $20 for members. Info, 775-0356. MARTHA HULL: “Go Big and Go Home: A 10-year, 6,000-mile Journey Told in Large Paintings,” narrative works created in Burlington and Portland, Ore. Cavendish Gallery & Collective, Burlington. Through August 31. Info, martha@marthahull.com. OPEN ART STUDIO: Seasoned makers and first-timers alike convene to paint, knit and craft in a friendly environment. Bring a table covering for messy projects. Swanton Public Library, second Tuesday of every month, 4-8 p.m. Free. Info, swantonartscouncil@gmail.com. PANEL DISCUSSION: ‘THE EMERGENT MOSAIC’: The seventh annual iteration of the ongoing oral history project that seeks to capture moments in Bread and Puppet Theater history, in participants’ own words. This year’s focus is puppet kids. Plainfield Community Center, Wednesday, August 15, 7 p.m. Info, ninots@crocker.com. POP-UP: SUSAN SMEREKA: Works on paper by the Burlington artist and New City Galerie curator. Towle Hill Studio, Corinth, Saturday, August 11, noon-6 p.m., and Sunday, August 12, noon-3 p.m. Info, susansmereka@gmail.com. ART EVENTS

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SHOW

10 TOWNS IN 10 WEEKS

Interviews with members of local economic development groups and business owners in ten of Vermont’s small towns and cities share their successes and discuss the difficulties they face as their communities work to rejuvenate their economic bases.

9:00 am – 11:00 am

Thursdays Through September 20

Locally Owned and Operated Since 1931 STREAMING Untitled-24 1

ART 67

ARTIST TALK: DON RAMEY: The local sculptor discusses his marble relief sculpture honoring the Vermont volunteers who served in the 54th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment during the Civil War. The Carving Studio & Sculpture Center, West Rutland, Wednesday, August 15, 7 p.m. Info, 438-2097.

FOOD & ART FRIDAY: Wood-fired pizza, artistgrown produce and visual art, storytelling and live performance by guest and resident artists. The Sable Project, Stockbridge, Friday, August 10, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Info, info@thesableproject.org.

Small Towns, Big Ideas

SEVEN DAYS

‘ART IN BLOOM’: The eighth annual benefit event featuring more than 20 floral arrangements inspired by artworks currently on display in the gallery. MAC Center for the Arts, Newport, Friday, August 10, 5-7 p.m., Saturday, August 11, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday, August 12, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. $10 for reception only. Info, 334-1966.

FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS: The 10th annual community art festival featuring some 70 artists exhibiting and selling their work, along with live music, food vendors and kids’ activities. Downtown Jeffersonville, Saturday, August 11, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Info, 644-1418.

Presents

08.08.18-08.15.18

f DOROTHY SIMPSON KRAUSE: “Visions,” mixed-media monoprints, emulsion transfers and lenticular prints. Reception: Thursday, August 9, 5-8 p.m. August 9-September 8. Info, sophie@571Projects.com. 571 Projects in Stowe.

ARTIST TALK: JOHN O’REILLY: The artist-inresidence discusses his work: sculpture that depicts animals from the artist’s own imagination, memory and found images. The Carving Studio & Sculpture Center, West Rutland, Wednesday, August 8, 7 p.m. Info, 438-2097.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

f ‘SHOW 27’: Recent painting, mixed-media, sculpture, photography and more by the gallery’s Vermont-based contemporary artists. Reception: Friday, August 10, 4-8 p.m. August 11-September 30. Info, 552-0877. The Front in Montpelier.

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art ART EVENTS

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Dave Muller & Elizabeth Nelson

SUMMER ARTIST MARKET: A juried market features handmade products by Vermont artists and artisans. Burlington City Hall Park, Saturdays, 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 865-7166.

This month, LA- and Northeast Kingdom-based artist Dave Muller is shaking up the West Glover art scene. His exhibit

TOURS OF THE HISTORIC BARN HOUSE AND EXHIBITS: Visitors can experience African American and African diaspora art and culture, along with a granary and cow barn built between the late 1700s and early 1800s. The 90-minute tour includes authentic African textiles, art and antiquities, and photography exhibits; a Smithsonian National Museum of African-American History and Culture poster series; works by Charlotte environmental artist Nancy Winship Milliken, and more. Sign up for tour at Eventbrite. Clemmons Family Farm, Charlotte, Saturdays, 10-11:30 a.m. . $10 suggested donation. Info, vtcrocks@gmavt.net.

“Seven Posters for Beverly  (and One for Two Pianos)” is on view through August 18 at the Parker Pie Co. These are posters printed from hand-drawn posters that the artist made for other artists’ shows: Kerry James Marshall’s summer 2017 “Mastry” at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, for example, and the Made in L.A. 2016 biennial at the Hammer Museum. About a mile away, Muller has opened a new and unconventional venue: the Ice Fishing

ONGOING SHOWS

Shanty Gallery. Diminutive in scale and vernacular in style,

burlington

the space features evocative, nature-inspired paintings made

ALISON WELD: “Inner Essentials,” abstract paintings by the Westport, N.Y., artist. Through October 18. Info, 355-5440. New City Galerie in Burlington.

by Elizabeth Nelson during her residency in Iceland, on view through August 15. As if this weren’t enough, Muller (a Bread

ANDREW SALKEWICZ: Paintings that represent an interpersonal reflection on the state of affairs in the West over the last year. Through August 8. Info, andrewsalkewicz@gmail.com. Half Lounge in Burlington. ‘ART’S ALIVE FOFA WINNER’S CIRCLE’: Works by Festival of Fine Art award winners, including Kara Torres, Gav’om, Jerry Rayla, Matt Morris, Linda Dulleba and Paul McMillan. Through August 31. Info, 859-9222. SEABA Center in Burlington. THE ARTS COLLECTIVE: Works from a wide range of artists who receive and provide services through Howard Center, as well as artists with lived experience within the community. Through August 31. Info, 859-9222. Gallery at One Main in Burlington. CRYSTAL WAGNER: “Traverse,” an immense, sitespecific installation by the multidisciplinary artist. Through October 7. Info, 865-7166. BCA Center in Burlington.

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DAN BLAKESLEE: “Draw Them In: A Rock Poster Retrospective,” 50 works spanning more than two decades of work by the artist, who is also known for creating the Alchemist’s beer-can art. Through September 4. Info, 540-0131. The Skinny Pancake (Burlington). ‘EXTRA • ORDINARY’: Works by members of “The Art Tribe,” which includes Melanie Brotz, Annie Caswell, LaVerne Ferguson, Kara Greenblott, Holly Hauser, Nancy Hayden, Lynne Reed, Kelley Taft, Linda Van Cooper and Betsy Ward. Through August 31. Info, nancynorthwindarts@gmail.com. Flynndog in Burlington. ‘HORIZONS’: A group exhibition curated by former Flynn Center executive director John Killacky, featuring 17 Vermont artists responding to the wide-open theme of “horizons.” Through September 1. Info, 652-4500. Amy E. Tarrant Gallery in Burlington. ‘HOW PEOPLE MAKE THINGS’: An interactive exhibit that reveals how familiar childhood objects are manufactured and tells the story of the people, ideas and technologies used to transform raw materials into finished products. Through September 3. Info, 864-1848. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain in Burlington. JAMES STEWART: “Solipsism,” an interactive musical installation by the local composer. OLGA VERASEN: “Happy Home,” acrylic paintings and watercolors. Through August 31. Info, 859-9222. The Gallery at Main Street Landing in Burlington.

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MEMBERS ONLY ART EXHIBIT: Works in a variety of mediums by members of the South End Arts and Business Association. Through August 31. Info, 651-9692. VCAM Studio in Burlington. SCOTT ANDRÉ CAMPBELL: “Deliveries,” new mixedmedia works by the Burlington artist that use line and geometric principles to evoke a sense of harmony in tension. Through September 2. Info, sac.673@gmail. com. Karma Bird House in Burlington.

and Puppet Theater performer) also has works at the theater’s Woodshed Gallery, titled “I Love Bread and Puppet and Bread and Puppet Loves Me,” through August 12. Pictured: poster for Made in L.A. 2016, photographed by Joshua White. ‘SUMMER READING AT FFL: A RETROSPECTIVE’: Archival materials and ephemera, including posters, banners and T-shirts, from more than 30 years of the program started to engage young readers during the summer. Through August 31. Info, 863-3403. Fletcher Free Library in Burlington.

chittenden county

‘IN THE GARDEN’: An exhibit featuring fine art, textiles, sculpture, furniture, actual insects and more explores how flowers and bugs have captivated artists’ imaginations over the centuries. Through August 25. Info, 985-3346. Pizzagalli Center for Art and Education, Shelburne Museum. ‘TRANSCENDING THE LIMITS OF AGE’: Photographer Elliot Burg’s portraits of track and field athletes in their seventies, eighties and nineties, taken at the National Senior Games. Through September 30. Info, eburg4@gmail.com. JOY HUCKINS-NOSS: “Moments of Reflection,“ oil paintings by the Calais artist. Through October 5. Info, jhnartz@aol.com. Burlington International Airport in South Burlington. KATE LONGMAID: “Bloom,” floral still lifes. Through August 21. Info, 985-3848. Furchgott Sourdiffe Gallery in Shelburne. KAY GEORGE: The Vermont Pastel Society displays landscapes and still lifes. Through August 31. Info, 425-6345. Charlotte Senior Center. KIMBERLEE FORNEY: Whimsical and colorful paintings and prints. Through August 31. Info, kimberleef@ msn.com. Davis Studio in South Burlington. ‘PLAYING COWBOY: AMERICA’S WILD WEST SHOWS’: Combining period posters with historical film footage, this exhibition explores the profound influence Buffalo Bill and other Wild West shows had on shaping contemporary understandings of the American West, Native American history and the cowboy way of life. Through October 21. Info, 985-3346. Shelburne Museum. TIM DURBROW: Colorful, large-scale landscape and nature photography, accompanied by three vintage photos restored as part of an Underhill Historical Society project. Through September 1. Info, 434-2550. Mt. Mansfield Community Television in Richmond.

VISUAL ART IN SEVEN DAYS:

barre/montpelier

‘ANYTHING FOR SPEED: AUTOMOBILE RACING IN VERMONT’: A yearlong exhibition exploring more than a century of the history and evolution of racing in Vermont through the objects, photographs and recollections that comprise this unique story. Through March 30, 2019. Free from 9 a.m.-noon; $5-7 per person after. Info, 479-8500. Vermont History Center in Barre. HARRY A. RICH: “The Vermont Years, So Far…” largescale acrylic-on-canvas paintings that span the artist’s time living in Vermont, from 1998 to 2018. Through September 28. Info, 375-2940. Vermont Supreme Court Gallery in Montpelier. JENNIFER PALKOWSKI JACQUES: Original watercolor and mixed-media paintings including ghost portraits and skyscapes. Through September 1. Info, 595-4866. The Hive in Middlesex. ‘SCORCHED’: A group show illustrating the effects of heat and fire. JULIA PAVONE: “Ode to Common Things,” found-object paintings. NITYA BRIGHENTI: “Storm: Nihilists, Anarchists, Populists and Radicals,” paintings and drawings. Through August 24. Info, 479-7069. Studio Place Arts in Barre. MARK DANNENHAUER: Photographs by the artist and former Bread and Puppet Theater member, featuring the circus’ recent work and archival photos featuring puppet kids. Through August 26. Info, ninots@crocker.com. Plainfield Community Center. ‘NEW AMERICAN ARTISTS: CELEBRATING TRADITION AND CULTURE’: An exhibit highlighting immigrant and refugee artists in Vermont who participated in Vermont Folklife Center’s traditional arts apprenticeship program developed by Greg Sharrow. Through August 31. Info, 828-3291. Spotlight Gallery in Montpelier. NICK DEFRIEZ: “Hillsides and Hexagons,” paintings and drawings by the Chelsea-based artist. Through September 28. Info, 685-7743. Governor’s Gallery in Montpelier. ORAH MOORE: “Stewards of the Land,” handprinted silverprint photographs of Montana ranchers. Through August 10. Info, 479-7069. Morse Block Deli & Taps in Barre.

ART LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY RACHEL ELIZABETH JONES. LISTINGS ARE RESTRICTED TO ART SHOWS IN TRULY PUBLIC PLACES.

PHYLLIS CHASE: Paintings by the Calais artist. Through August 23. Info, 223-7274. Adamant Music School. ‘POST-APOCALYPSE FOR ¾ EMPIRE’: Woodcuts on cloth banners by Bread and Puppet Theater founder Peter Schumann, inspired by Albrecht Durer’s depictions of the Apocalypse as envisioned by the apostle John of the New Testament. Through September 27. Info, 322-1604. Goddard Art Gallery, Pratt Center, Goddard College in Plainfield. ‘SOLZHENITSYN IN VERMONT’: A celebration of the Russian novelist, historian and Nobel Prize winner turned Vermont resident, in honor of the 100th anniversary of his birth. Through October 27. Info, 828-2291. Vermont History Museum in Montpelier.

f ‘TRANSITION’: Works by members of the Art Resource Association, including Michael Badamo, Jozefa Bala, Maggie Neale, Linda Hogan, Margaret Pulaski, Emily Sloan, Merry Schmidt, Roger Weingarten and more. Reception: Thursday, August 9, 5-7 p.m. SUMMER JURIED EXHIBIT: Featured artists include August Burns, Annie Christopher, Frank DeAngelis, Eddie Epstein, Hasso Ewing, Caroline McKinney, Maggie Neale, Sam Thurston, Ann Young and others. Through August 31. Info, 262-6035. T.W. Wood Gallery in Montpelier.

stowe/smuggs

ANNELEIN BEUKENKAMP: “Different Strokes,” abstract acrylic paintings by the Burlington artist. Through September 9. Info, 253-1818. Green Mountain Fine Art Gallery in Stowe. ‘CURIOUS & COOL’: Unusual and seldom-seen artifacts of ski culture from the museum’s archives. Through October 31. Info, 253-9911. Vermont Ski and Snowboard Museum in Stowe. ‘EXPLORING AIR’: A group exhibition including works of painting, photography and sculpture that address the element of air, curated by Kelly Holt. Through August 30. Info, 760-6785. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe Mountain Resort. ‘EXPLORING AIR II’: One site in a two-part exhibition featuring works that investigate the qualities of air, presented in partnership with the Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center. Through August 30. Info, 760-6785. Edgewater Gallery in Stowe.

GET YOUR ART SHOW LISTED HERE!

IF YOU’RE PROMOTING AN ART EXHIBIT, LET US KNOW BY POSTING INFO AND IMAGES BY THURSDAYS AT NOON ON OUR FORM AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT OR GALLERIES@SEVENDAYSVT.COM.


ART SHOWS

I remember when I sold my first painting. ‘EXPOSED’: The 27th annual outdoor sculpture exhibition features site-specific and participatory work from regional and national artists including Jaume Plensa, Albert Paley, Christopher Curtis, Judith Wrend, Ted Ceraldi and more. Curated by Rachel Moore. Through October 21. Info, 253-8358. ‘RECLAMATION’: Portraits of women painted by nationally acclaimed, contemporary women artists. Curated by August Burns, Diane Feissel and Rachel Moore. Through September 8. Info, 253-8358. Helen Day Art Center in Stowe. ‘FRAGILE’: Works by 24 contemporary artists responding to the concept of fragility. Through August 18. Info, 253-8943. West Branch Gallery & Sculpture Park in Stowe. ‘THE HEAD OF THE CLASS’: An invitational group show of artwork by Lamoille County art teachers. ‘THE SKY’S THE LIMIT’: A juried show of 72 artists whose works feature the sky as the predominant element of the composition. Through September 3. Info, 644-5100. Bryan Memorial Gallery in Jeffersonville. JAMES PETERSON: “Dreamcatcher,” an immersive installation by the artist-in-residence from Los Angeles. Through September 30. Info, 253-8358. Spruce Peak at Stowe. KIMBERLEE FORNEY: Colorful acrylic paintings and prints. Through October 31. Info, kimberleef@msn. com. Green Goddess Café in Stowe. NEIL BERGER: “Men, Mountains, Sky,” en plein air paintings made over a year in Burlington’s Battery Park. VERMONT COMIC CREATORS GROUP EXHIBIT: Works by Vermont-based comic-book creators, cartoonists and other artists who make narrative sequential 2D art. Through September 2. Info, 888-1261. River Arts in Morrisville. SARAH TORTORA: “Ode,” prop-like sculptures influenced by ancient Greek vase painting, Classical architecture, archaeological and geological core samples, and Euclidean space-time diagrams. Through August 9. Info, tara@vermontstudio center.org. Red Mill Gallery at Vermont Studio Center in Johnson.

mad river valley/waterbury

ROB HITZIG: “Colorful Musings,” works that explore color and shape through geometric abstraction in dimensional painted wood. Through August 25. Info, 244-7801. Axel’s Gallery & Frame Shop in Waterbury.

‘THIN PLACES, SACRED SPACES’: Eight local photographers exhibit their interpretations of holy spaces. Through August 19. Info, vtgarden@aol. com. Waitsfield United Church of Christ.

middlebury area

With much gratitude, Katharine Montstream Studio

JANET FREDERICKS: “LAND MARKS … The Land We Mark, Marks Us,” works on paper and canvas inspired by a bird’s-eye view of the land. Through September 9. Info, 382-9222. Jackson Gallery, Town Hall Theater in Middlebury.

f TIMOTHY HORN: “The View From Here,” paintings of rural scenes. Reception: Friday, August 10, 5-7 p.m. Through August 31. Info, 989-7419. Edgewater Gallery on the Green in Middlebury. ‘WORKING METAL, CREATING ART’: Works by Vermont artists Kate Pond, Chris Cleary, Warren Rinehart, John Arthur, Kathy Mitchell and Meg Walker. Through August 12. Info, info@creativespacegallery.org. Creative Space Gallery in Vergennes.

rutland/killington

77 ARTS’ RESIDENCY EXHIBITION: Works from the gallery’s first-ever residency program, featuring Annie Blazejack and Geddes Levenson, Debo Mouloudji, Hanna Washburn, Juna Skenderi, Max Spitzer and Sofia Plater. Through October 26. Info, the77gallery@gmail.com. 77 Gallery in Rutland.

KMMSTUDIO.COM • 862.8752 • MON-SAT 11-5, SUNDAY 12-4 • 4t-montreamstudio080818.indd 1

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Examine how the myth of the cowboy shaped modern perceptions of the West and Native American culture.

DEBORAH GOODWIN: “Fabrications in Clay,” ceramics by the local artist. Through August 28. Info, 247-4956. Brandon Artists Guild.

f ELLEN SHATTUCK PIERCE: “Thirty-six Views of Home,” a collection of prints about motherhood. Reception: Saturday, August 11, 6-8 p.m. Through September 29. Info, vtalleygallery@gmail.com. The Alley Gallery in Rutland. ‘FIREMAN SQUARED’: Sculptures spanning the creative output of Mark Burnett and Glenn Campbell, made with materials including plaster, marble, wood, glass, bronze and steel. Through August 18. Info, 282-2396. Castleton University Bank Gallery in Rutland. FORTY-SEVEN MAIN STREET ARTISTS WITH TOM MERWIN: “The Drawing Water Project,” paintings and poetry that challenge labels of disability, mental illness and poverty to transform barriers into opportunities for mutual beauty and growth. Through August 26. Info, 468-2592. Stone Valley Arts in Poultney. MARY FRAN LLOYD: “Life in the Abstract,” 31 paintings using acrylic paint and collaged paper. Through August 9. Info, maryfranart@aol.com. Rutland City Hall. ‘THEY ARE NOT FORGOTTEN’: Vermont Artists and Poets hosts this exhibition protesting the immigration and refugee policies of the Trump administration. Funds to benefit kind.org. Through August 12. Info, mottst@comcast.net. Merwin Gallery in Castleton. CHAMPLAIN ISLANDS/NORTHWEST SHOWS

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f ANNA DENNIS DIBBLE: “A Crossing Place,” a solo exhibit of new work driven by the artist’s love of, and place within, the natural world and her concern for its future. Reception: Friday, August 10, 5-8 p.m. Through September 30. Info, 877-2173. Northern Daughters in Vergennes.

‘THE FABRIC OF EMANCIPATION’: Works by eight contemporary fiber, textile and needle artists expressing what it means to be of African descent in the Americas, curated by Harlem Needle Arts founder Michelle Bishop. Through October 28. Museum admission. Info, 877-3406. Rokeby Museum in Ferrisburgh.

Thank you to every single person who has ever bought a painting, stopped in for a birthday card, popped in to see an exhibit, or voted for us to win a DAYSIE. Thank you to Al, Char, Tor and Sylvie for encouraging me like crazy, and picking me up when art is hard. Living the dream has never been so real.

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‘1968: THE WHOLE WORLD IS WATCHING’: Prints, photographs, videos, paintings and sculpture from the mid-1960s through the early 1970s that reflect some of the more visible divisions within the art world of the turbulent era. ‘JUST KIDS: PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE NICHOLAS GIFT’: Photographs of children drawn from every corner of the globe and representing a broad spectrum of social and economic circumstances. Through August 12. Info, 443-5007. Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College.

‘ENVIRONMENTAL PORTRAITS’: A group exhibit juried by Elizabeth Avedon featuring works by 34 photographers from around the world. Through September 1. Info, 388-4500. PhotoPlace Gallery in Middlebury.

Now, 33 years later, this is still a thing for us. I can’t really explain how grateful I am to everyone who supports us in this extraordinary community.

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‘THE SAFETY OF OBJECTS: A VISUAL DISCOURSE BETWEEN FATHER AND DAUGHTER’: A juxtaposition of Royal Academy of Art member Michael CraigMartin and his daughter, Vanity Fair photographer Jessica Craig-Martin. Through September 3. Info, 583-5832. Bundy Modern in Waitsfield.

f ELLEN GRANTER: “High Tide,” recent paintings of coastal wetlands by the Brookline, Mass., artist. Reception: Friday, August 10, 5-7 p.m. Through August 31. Info, 458-0098. Edgewater Gallery at Middlebury Falls.

It was August 1985. My friend, Victor, saw this little watercolor of a sunset with a canoe in silhouette. He said he wanted to buy it. I had never sold a painting before. $15 seemed about right. He just smiled and said “I’m giving you $20.”

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BIG RED BARN ART SHOW: Paintings and sculptures from more than 30 Mad River Valley artists, featuring a main exhibition, a small works show and the “Art Stall” of prints and cards. Through August 26. Info, 496-6682. Big Red Barn Gallery at Lareau Farm in Waitsfield.

f ‘DOUGHBOYS & FLYBOYS: WWI STORIES BY VERMONTERS FROM THE HOME AND BATTLEFRONT’: An exhibition that uses archival materials to explore the roles played by Addison County residents in the “War to End All Wars,” in commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the Armistice that ended World War I. Reception: Friday, August 10, 4-6 p.m. ‘WATERFOWL WONDERS & AMUSING ANIMALS’: Carvings by Addison County-based wood carvers Gary Starr, Chuck Herrmann and William Holway. Through November 11. Info, 388-2117. Henry Sheldon Museum of Vermont History in Middlebury.

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‘UNBOUND VOL. VIII’: A juried show exploring the book and how artists use the format as a steppingoff point and/or gateway to new ideas. Through August 25. Info, 457-3500. ArtisTree Gallery in South Pomfret.

champlain islands/northwest ‘NATURAL INSTINCTS’: Sumi-e ink paintings by Philadelphia artist Emily Brown and bowls by Jericho woodworker Russell Fellows. Through August 26. Info, greentaraspace@gmail.com. GreenTARA Space in North Hero.

northeast kingdom

ELIZABETH NELSON: “Dreams of Iceland,” paintings created during the artist’s residency in that country. Through August 18. Info, tdweekend@ earthlink.net. Ice Fishing Shanty Gallery in West Glover.

upper valley

‘AIR WORKS’: An exhibit that explores the properties of air and the science behind its everyday use and includes a 3D air maze, hover table, chain-reaction machine, paper airplane launcher and air-operated bottle organ. Through September 3. Info, 649-2200. Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich.

ERIC AHO: “A Thousand Acres,” paintings that celebrate the landscape in all seasons, drawn from specific bodies of work painted over several years. Through September 9. Info, 533-9075. Highland Center for the Arts in Greensboro. JUDY DALES: Colorful quilts by the Northeast Kingdom artist. Sundays. Info, 563-2037. White Water Gallery in East Hardwick.

‘AND JUSTICE FOR ALL: JUSTIN MORRILL AND THE 14TH AMENDMENT OF THE U.S. CONSTITUTION’: Commemorating the sesquicentennial of the ratification of the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, the exhibit highlights critical aspects of the amendment and elucidates Morrill’s role in drafting it, as well as major legal decisions based on the Equal Protection Clause. WednesdaysSundays. Included with $6 general admission. Info, 765-4288. Justin Morrill Homestead in Strafford. DIAN PARKER: “Oil Paint & Black Walnut,” abstract paintings on canvas and mixed-media works on black-walnut-stained paper by the artist, writer and curator of the White River Gallery. Through September 26. Info, 295-3118. Zollikofer Gallery at Hotel Coolidge in White River Junction.

‘LADIES OF THE CANYON’: An exhibition in tribute to jeweler Marion Stegner, the gallery founder who passed away in January. Through September 4. Info, 533-2045. Miller’s Thumb Gallery in Greensboro.

Ellen Shattuck Pierce

And now for something completely

different: Closing out its expansive street-art show, the Alley Gallery in downtown

QUILT EXHIBITION: The 32nd annual exhibition featuring quilting demos, activities and “challenge quilts” by members of the Delectable Mountain Quilt Guild. Through September 16. Info, 457-2355. Billings Farm & Museum in Woodstock.

Rutland presents prints by Boston-based Rutland native Ellen Shattuck Pierce. “Thirty-

STEPHANIE GORDON: Encaustic paintings by the Piermont, N.H., artist. Through August 31. Info, 295-4567. Long River Gallery & Gifts in White River Junction.

as an artist, mother and homemaker. But she doesn’t simply bask in motherhood’s warm

SUE SCHILLER: “Family,” a selection of prints. Through August 31. Info, 295-5901. Two Rivers Printmaking Studio in White River Junction.

six Views of Home” — named for Japanese ukiyo-e artist Katsushika Hokusai’s “Thirtysix Views of Mount Fuji” — features prints that imaginatively blend Pierce’s experiences glow; exhibition materials describe Pierce as “overwhelmed by giving and by the want to give in, puncture the good will, slice the maternal feelings and sabotage all she has worked so hard to create.” For visual evidence, look for the pink stalactites busting through the kitchen ceiling. A reception is Saturday, August 11, 6 to 8 p.m. Through

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September 29. Pictured: “Lights.”

CALL TO ARTISTS THE BURLINGTON BEAT: The online literary arts magazine welcomes submissions of art, poetry and prose for the next edition. For details and to submit, visit burlingtonbeat.com. Deadline: August 20. Various Chittenden and Washington County locations. Info, theburlingtonbeat@gmail.com. CALL TO ARTISTS AND FOOD VENDORS, FIRST NIGHT NORTH, ST. JOHNSBURY: Now in its 26th year, First Night North is Vermont’s only New Year’s Eve performing arts festival, featuring music, dance, magic, circus arts, puppetry, comedy and more, in 18 family-friendly venues. First-time and former artist candidates are welcome to apply for a spot in this year’s lineup. All types of performance acts are welcome; must be family friendly. To apply for one or two 45-minute performance slots or as a food vendor, visit firstnightnorth.org. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, Through August 19. Info, 748-2600. CENTER FOR CARTOON STUDIES CORNISH RESIDENCY: Cartoonists, illustrators and graphic storytellers are invited to apply for this October 16 to November 16 residency in a remote cabin in Cornish, N.H. The selected resident will receive access to CCS resources as well as a $3,000 honorarium. For further details and to apply, visit cartoonstudies.org. Deadline: August 15. Center for Cartoon Studies, White River Junction. Info, 295-3319. EN PLEIN AIR PAINTING FESTIVAL: The Vermont Institute of Natural Science will host its fourth annual en Plein Air Painting Festival from

September 29 to October 5. It will be followed by a two-week exhibition and sale at the Quechee Nature Center. Visit vinsweb.org for more info. Vermont Institute of Natural Science Nature Center, Quechee. $40. Info, 359-5000 ext 236. FINE ARTISTS & CRAFTSPEOPLE: Vermont artists and artisans are invited to submit works to be sold in the juried gallery gift shop. To apply, visit twwoodgallery.org/call-to-artists. Deadline: September 28. T.W. Wood Gallery, Montpelier. Info, 262-6035. ‘FOR FREEDOMS’: The Vermont component of this national initiative seeks video art that relates to Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms: freedom of speech and worship, freedom from want and from fear. Artists must live in Vermont full time or be a current student or alum of VCFA. For details and to submit, visit vcfa.edu. Deadline: August 20. Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier. Info, 828-8599. THE HUB AT BERLIN MALL: Artists and creatives of all types are invited to submit proposals to use flexible, rent-free space for up to 12 months. Interested parties can receive an application form at the mall manager’s office or by emailing thehub@theberlinmall.com. Deadline is rolling. Berlin Mall. Info, mrushman@pivot.net. MILKHAUS 6: Artists are invited to submit works in any medium to this annual daylong art fest, from painting and sculpture to breakdance, furniture and storytelling. No limit to number of entries, and works may be for sale. To submit, email milkhausart@gmail.com with name,

piece and when it can be delivered to 888 Botsford Rd. in Ferrisburgh. Deadline: August 17. Milkhaus Studios, Ferrisburgh. $8 per entry. Info, milkhausart@gmail.com. OPEN CALL 2018: Photographers are invited to submit works in any genre, style, capture method or process for this upcoming exhibition to be juried by Douglas Beasley. For details and to submit, visit photoplacegallery.com. Deadline: August 13. PhotoPlace Gallery, Middlebury. $35 for up to five images; $6 for each additional. Info, 388-4500. PENTANGLE LIGHT GARDEN: Individual artists and small groups from the community are invited to participate in this sixth annual illuminated sculpture event, taking place September 21 and 22. For more info and to register, email Serena Nelson at info@pentanglearts.org. Deadline: August 17. Woodstock Village Green. Info, info@ pentanglearts.org. ‘ROCK SOLID’: For the 18th year, area artists are invited to share their most compelling stone sculptures and assemblages, as well as paintings and etchings that depict the beautiful qualities of stone. For details and to submit, visit studioplacearts.com. Deadline: August 10. Studio Place Arts, Barre. $10; free for SPA members. Info, 479-7069. ‘A SENSE OF PLACE’: The cultural center welcomes proposals for its fall programming season (September 1 to October 30) for workshops and events that build community through African American and/or African diaspora culinary, visual,

‘LOCKED DOWN! KEYED IN! LOCKED OUT! KEYED UP!’: An exhibition examining the long human relationship to the lock and key, its elegant design and philosophies and practices of securing, safeguarding, imprisoning, escaping and safecracking throughout the ages. Through April 30, 2019. Donations. Info, claredol@sover.net. The Museum of Everyday Life in Glover. RICHARD BROWN: Black-and-white photographs of nostalgic Vermont landscapes and people. Through December 31. Info, 748-2372. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium in St. Johnsbury. SARAH MEYERS BRENT: Sixteen works of painting and assemblage from materials including wallpaper, fabric scraps and dried flowers. Through August 17. Info, 748-2600. Catamount Arts Center in St. Johnsbury.

brattleboro/okemo valley

ART SHOW: Works by three painters and one photographer, accompanied by ceramics. Through August 18. Info, 875-2194. The Fourth Corner Foundation in Windham.

performing and cultural arts. Artist stipends range from $200 to $1,500. For details and to apply, visit clemmonsfamilyfarm.org. Deadline: August 13. Clemmons Family Farm, Charlotte. Info, clemmonsfamilyfarm2art@gmail.com​. SPA STUDIO RESIDENCY PROGRAM: Emerging artists from the greater Barre/Montpelier area are invited to apply for an 11-month residency to take place from November 15, 2018, to October 31, 2019. A small private studio on the second floor of the visual arts center will be provided, with an exhibition at the end of the program. For details and to submit, visit studioplacearts.com/calls-toartists. Deadline: Friday, August 10. Studio Place Arts, Barre. Info, 479-7069. STEAMFEST ART WALK: Seeking artists, artisans and makers working in all media, including but not limited to 2D, 3D, video, data, sound, game design, installation, projection and performance for both indoor and outdoor venues as part of the second annual steAmfest art and innovation festival in Essex Junction on September 21 and 22. For details and to apply, visit steamfestvt.com. Deadline: September 7. Downtown Essex Junction. $35 before August 21; $50 after. Info, steamfestvt@ gmail.com. STEAMFEST: ARTIST & MAKER MARKET: Second annual arts and innovation festival in downtown Essex Junction seeks innovative, creative, fine, wearable and edible arts and artisan goods for outdoor artist and maker market September 21 and 22. For details and to apply, visit steamfestvt.com. Deadline: September 7. Railroad Avenue, Essex Junction. $35. Info, steamfestvt@gmail.com.


ART SHOWS

DAVID RIOS FERREIRA: “And I Hear Your Words That I Made Up,” mixed-media works that conjure a psychic landscape filled with conflicting emotions. Through September 24. DEBRA RAMSAY: “Painting Time,” an installation of strips of color derived from nature, as captured by the artist over a year in New Berlin, N.Y. Through September 24. ROBERT DUGRENIER: “Handle With Care,” sculptures made of glass and farm equipment as part of the artist’s process of mourning the 2015 fire that destroyed his historic barn. Through September 24. ROZ CHAST: “Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?” 139 original illustrations from the New Yorker cartoonist’s graphic memoir. Through September 24. SHONA MACDONALD: “Terrestrial Vale,” a series of silverpoint and graphite works on paper depicting fledgling plants prepared for winter with veils of garden netting. Through September 24. STEVE GERBERICH: “Best of ‘Springs, Sprockets & Pulleys,’” kinetic sculptures by the artist, inventor and packrat. Through October 8. Info, 802-257-0124. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center. ‘HOPE AND HAZARD: A COMEDY OF EROS’: A group exhibition curated by American artist Eric Fischl featuring approximately 65 artists and more than 80 paintings, photographs, works on paper and sculptures selected from the Hall and Hall Art Foundation collections. ‘MADE IN VERMONT’: A group exhibition of new and recently completed paintings, works on paper and sculpture by Vermont artists. $10. ‘THE SOLACE OF AMNESIA’: More than 30 paintings, photographs, works on paper and sculpture by some 25 artists that address human alienation from the natural environment, curated by artist Alexis Rockman and Katherine Gass Stowe. Through November 25. Info, 952-1056. Hall Art Foundation in Reading.

manchester/bennington

‘AFFINITIES’: Works by siblings Susan and Peter Hoffman, who work in fiber and wood, respectively. Through August 26. ‘IN A DIFFERENT LIGHT’: Artist members fill the galleries with a broad spectrum of work, including painting, photography, sculpture and collage. Through August 12. Info, info@svac. org. Southern Vermont Arts Center in Manchester.

NORTH BENNINGTON OUTDOOR SCULPTURE SHOW: Annual public art exhibition featuring works by 38 local and regional sculptors. Through October 23. Info, jrc373@comcast.net. Various locations around North Bennington.

randolph/royalton

BOB EDDY: “A Second Look,” black-and-white photographs of Vermont’s White River Valley from the final years of the film era. Through September 1. Info, 728-9878. Chandler Gallery in Randolph.

LARGEST SELECTION OF SCIENTIFIC AND AMERICAN GLASS IN TOWN

PETER SHVETSOV: Oil paintings and etchings that reflect the artist’s fascination with strange moments in time. Through August 11. Info, 291-2035. Royalton Memorial Library in South Royalton. PETER SHVETSOV: Food portraits in tribute to the restaurant’s celebrated burgers and fries. Through August 11. Info, 291-2035. Worthy Burger in South Royalton. PETER SHVETSOV: Oil paintings and etchings of Vermont landscapes that provide a neutral background for the ever-changing, disappearing color at the end of the day. Through August 11. Info, 291-2035. South Royalton Market.

THE SMOKE SHOP WITH THE HIPPIE FLAVOR E x cl u s i v e deal er of I l l umi nati , I l l ad el p h and S ov erei gnt y G l ass. 75 Main St., Burlington, VT 864.6555 • Mon-Thur 10-9 Fri-Sat 10-10 Sun 10-8

SUSAN G. SCOTT: “Streams of Light,” natureinspired paintings by the Chelsea- and Montréalbased artist. Through August 26. Info, 498-8438. White River Gallery @ BALE in South Royalton.

Must be 18 to purchase tobacco products, ID required

@NorthernLightsVT

outside vermont

2017 JURIED AWARD WINNERS: Works by Bruce Blanchette, Helen Shulman and Susan Wilson. Through August 24. Info, 603-448-3117. AVA Gallery and Art Center in Lebanon, N.H. ‘FROM AFRICA TO THE AMERICAS: FACE-TO-FACE PICASSO, PAST AND PRESENT’: An exhibition using milestones in the life of Pablo Picasso (18811973) and in history to explore the close relationship between the Spanish master and the arts of Africa, Oceania and the Americas, with a focus on the trajectory of changing attitudes. ‘HERE WE ARE HERE: BLACK CANADIAN CONTEMPORARY ART’: Works by 11 contemporary artists who use a variety of disciplines to challenge preconceived notions of blackness in Canada. Through September 16. Info, 514-285-2000. Montréal Museum of Fine Arts. JEAN-MICHEL OTHONIEL: “Motion – Emotion,” works by the French artist that center on the violence of the elements. Through November 11. Info, 514-285-1600. RAFAEL LOZANO-HEMMER: “Unstable Presence,” a major survey of the Montréal-based artist’s work over the past 18 years that brings together 21 pieces, including several large-scale immersive installations. Through September 9. Info, 514-847-6232. Montréal Museum of Contemporary Art. JOHN MCKENNA: “Column II,” a geometric public sculpture made from aluminum, acrylic and wood. Through October 28. Info, 603-469-3444. Aidron Duckworth Museum in Meriden, N.H. S. BOOKER: Sketches, pastels, prints and paintings by the late artist and founder of the center. Through August 31. Info, 518-563-1604. Strand Center for the Arts in Plattsburgh, N.Y. TOYIN OJIH ODUTOLA: “The Firmament,” drawings that ask viewers to consider how conceptions of race are established and promulgated. Through September 2. Info, 603-646-2426. Hood Downtown in Hanover, N.H. m

HAVE YOU

NOTICED OUR LEGAL ADS?

Turn to the Classifieds section (center pull-out) or go to sevendaysvt.com/legals for a list of legal notices including: • Act 250 Permit applications • Foreclosures • Notices to creditors • Storage auctions • Planning and zoning changes

Call Ashley for a quote: 865-1020 x37 ART 71

BONNIE FALLON: Forty-four watercolors showcasing the land and views surrounding the artist’s Brookfield home. Through August 15. Info, 728-2284. Gifford Medical Center in Randolph.

MARION LENT: “Sprites to Live By,” 30 handmade figures made from felted wool, with hand-molded and painted antennae, hands, feet and faces. Through August 18. Info, 889-9404. Tunbridge Public Library in Tunbridge Village.

LARGEST SELECTION OF VAPORIZERS IN VT. LARGE SELECTION OF LOCAL AND FAMOUS GLASS ARTISTS.

SEVEN DAYS

SUMMER SHOW: Abstract works in painting, photography and sculpture by 18 artists including John Richey, Julian Sheres and James Vogler. Through August 18. Info, 768-8498. stART Space in Manchester.

LINDA DUCHARME: “Velvet Brown Disease,” paintings that speak to the artist’s love of horses. Through August 31. Info, 685-2188. Chelsea Public Library.

08.08.18-08.15.18

‘CRASH TO CREATIVITY: THE NEW DEAL IN VERMONT’: Works that shed light on how government-sponsored New Deal projects fueled Depression-era creativity. Through November 4. EDWARD KOREN: “Thinking About Extinction and Other Droll Things,” recent prints and drawings by the Vermont-based New Yorker cartoonist. Through September 9. Info, 447-1571. Bennington Museum.

JOANNE CARSON: “Hyper Flora,” paintings and sculpture that investigate the fraught relationships between humans and nature, alchemy and science. JOHN KEMP LEE: “Wound Up Wound,” sculptures conceived as spirit houses. PETER MORIARTY: “Light & Paper/Mes Plantes,” recent camera-less photographs made with light, paper and plants. Through August 25. Info, 767-9670. BigTown Gallery in Rochester.

JUST ADD WATER

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

CARTOONS FROM THE ‘NEW YORKER’: An exhibition and sale of cartoons by artists including Harry Bliss, George Booth, Roz Chast, Tom Chitty, Frank Cotham, Matt Diffee, Liza Donnelly, Liana Finck, Emily Flake, Sam Gross, William Haefeli, Edward Koren, Bob Mankoff, Michael Maslin, Danny Shannahan, Barbara Smaller, Mick Stevens, Tom Toro, PC Vey and Jack Ziegler. Through September 9. Info, 442-7158. Laumeister Art Center, Southern Vermont College in Bennington.

JACK ROWELL: Thirty-five photographs by the Braintree photographer that span a career of more than 40 years of documenting Vermonters. Through September 30. Info, rowell1655@gmail. com. White River Craft Center in Randolph.

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5/12/15 4:37 PM


movies The Spy Who Dumped Me ★★★★

L

ike an agent lying low until it’s time to rappel through a window, pull a gun and spray mayhem in every direction, The Spy Who Dumped Me stayed in the shadows right up to its release. Last week I caught an ad for the action-comedy on TV. Surprised, I momentarily suspected that what I was seeing was some sort of digital short or parody. What’s this? I wondered. The answer, I discovered two days later, is the breezy, completely bonkers buddy film for which we didn’t know we’d been waiting all summer. Mila Kunis has been on a mission to get a movie like this made. For years, studio after studio passed on her pitch for a spy caper fronted by female leads. Costar after projected costar eventually moved on to other assignments. Planets finally aligned when Kunis, “Saturday Night Live” star Kate McKinnon and director Susanna Fogel (Life Partners) connected with Lionsgate. It didn’t hurt, of course, that Kunis’ shoestring comedy Bad Moms had just stunned Hollywood by cracking the $100 million mark. Suddenly the plan didn’t sound so risky. Kunis and McKinnon play BFFs Audrey and Morgan, respectively. No sooner do we learn that Audrey’s boyfriend, Drew (Justin Theroux), has broken up with her (by text, no less!) than the cad rappels through the window of the LA apartment the women

REVIEWS

MISSION ALMOST IMPOSSIBLE McKinnon and Kunis play besties who bond while saving the world in an action comedy that nearly didn’t happen.

share, pulls a gun and sprays mayhem in every direction. Which is one way to blow your cover as an NPR host. With sinister forces close on his heels, Drew confesses to working for the Central Intelligence Agency. Seconds before being gunned down, he pleads with Audrey to deliver a top-secret trophy to a contact in Austria the following day. The fate of the world, needless to say, hangs in the balance. The statuette and its contents are, natu-

rally, only a MacGuffin, an excuse to unleash the pair on an unsuspecting continent. What follows might be described as a mutant hybrid of Taken and National Lampoon’s European Vacation as executed by Sam Peckinpah. Fogel, who wrote the screenplay with David Iserson, mixes R-rated yuks with wincingly graphic yucks. As McKinnon and Kunis hopscotch among Vienna, Prague, Paris, Amsterdam and Berlin playing wannabe double-0s, they

gleefully subvert a number of espionage tropes and leave a steeper count of grisly casualties in their wake. For every diarrhea or vagina gag, a dozen Eurotrashy baddies are impaled, blown to bits or dismembered. Yet somehow the movie’s lighthearted, screwball vibe never sours. These girls just want to have fun. Even if that occasionally means getting medieval. This is a spy spoof that isn’t all that interested in either spying or spoofing. Rather, Fogel appears to be under orders to drop McKinnon into perilous territory just for the fun of watching her reactions. She’s the picture’s secret weapon, the most quick-witted, absurdist comic force to hit the big screen since Melissa McCarthy. The film has a running gag about Edward Snowden having the hots for Morgan. It’s a completely out-there premise that, like all the others, McKinnon renders credible and good for a data dump’s worth of laughs. More vitally, the chemistry she shares with her costar comes off as warm as it is whacked-out. Nobody’s pretending to reinvent the wheel here. With a plot hinging on the affections of several undercover hunks, this is that rarest of chick-led flicks, one that manages to flunk the Bechdel test with nothing less than flying colors. RI C K KI S O N AK

72 MOVIES

SEVEN DAYS

08.08.18-08.15.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Eighth Grade ★★★★★

I

ndie filmmakers have been telling poignant coming-of-age stories for so long that sometimes one may wonder if any compelling ones are left to tell. YouTube star turned filmmaker Bo Burnham proves the affirmative with his debut feature, Eighth Grade. A hit at January’s Sundance Film Festival, this portrait of one shy girl weathering middle school is one of the funniest, most cringe-inducing and most poignant films of the year. There’s no high concept or stunning twist here. As you may surmise from the title, our protagonist, Kayla (Elsie Fisher), is in eighth grade. With a week to go until her graduation to high school, she opens the time capsule she created in sixth grade and realizes that the popular, confident tween persona she envisioned for herself never materialized. Her YouTube videos, in which she lectures invisible viewers on topics such as “being yourself,” have hardly any hits. Her classmates have voted her “most quiet.” Her affable single dad (Josh Hamilton) thinks she’s cool, but he’s the only one. Desperate to have something to show for her milestone, Kayla forces herself out of her comfort zone. She attends a “cool” girl’s pool party, hangs out with a friendly high schooler (Emily Robinson) and even, in an excruciating scene, tries to convince her oblivious crush (Luke Prael) that she’s worthy of him.

As anyone who’s been through adolescence can guess, none of it goes too well. While social media are central to Kayla’s life, technology doesn’t do much to alter a storyline that could easily have played out in 1998 or 1978. By giving Kayla windows into the lives of classmates and celebrities, Instagram, Snapchat and YouTube simply drive home her own insignificance. Stylistically, though, technology is vital to the film, as Burnham demonstrates Kayla’s immersion using montages that superimpose her reflection on ever-changing screen images. Her comfort zone, we learn, is the island of light defined by her bed and her laptop — a refuge where her dad, well meaning as he is, can’t connect with her. In some scenes, Burnham uses the cinematic equivalents of a photo-app filter — slow motion, light distortions, musical cues — to convey Kayla’s perspective, then switches abruptly back to naturalism. It’s a little bit John Hughes, a little bit François Truffaut. Ultimately, though, naturalism is the core of Eighth Grade, because the whole thing would fall apart without Fisher’s painfully real performance. Though the now 15-yearold actress has a significant résumé, including voicing Agnes in the Despicable Me movies, she never for a second comes across as precocious or playing to a crowd.

SCREEN SCENE Fisher plays a middle schooler who feels safer online than off- in Burnham’s powerful, sensitive debut feature.

Offering advice to her peers on YouTube, Kayla is chirpy and voluble; when it’s time to put her rhetoric into practice at school, she freezes, her eyes glazing over in mute misery. We see her brain working as she recites the scripts she associates with popularity. And we sigh in relief whenever she allows herself to be genuine — even when she’s lashing out at her poor dad for no good reason. It’s impossible to watch Eighth Grade without cringing in secondhand embarrassment — and remembering one’s own mo-

ments of firsthand embarrassment. The film reminds us that adults have their pecking orders, too, with social media making such hierarchies visible as never before. Ultimately, though, Burnham gives Kayla — and us — several merciful rays of hope. He reminds us that, yes, things generally do get better after this most awkward of ages. More importantly, even if they don’t, we get better at dealing with them. MARGO T HARRI S O N


MOVIE CLIPS

NEW IN THEATERS BLACKKKLANSMAN: An African American cop (John David Washington) infiltrates the local chapter of the Ku Klux Klan and attains a leadership position in the latest from director Spike Lee, based on a true story from the 1970s. With Adam Driver, Laura Harrier and Alec Baldwin. (135 min, R. Roxy, Savoy) DOG DAYS: Beloved canines bring a group of Angelenos together in this dog-centric comedy directed by Ken Marino and starring Nina Dobrev, Vanessa Hudgens, Finn Wolfhard and Eva Longoria. (112 min, PG. Majestic, Palace) THE MEG: This tale of a navy man (Jason Statham) tasked with rescuing the occupants of a submersible from a 70-foot prehistoric shark appears to have a sense of humor about its own plausibility, or lack thereof. With Ruby Rose and Rainn Wilson. Jon Turteltaub (Last Vegas) directed. (113 min, PG-13. Essex, Majestic, Palace, Paramount, Stowe, Sunset, Welden) SLENDER MAN: Created as online fiction, which morphed into an influential urban legend, the faceless, ectomorphic child stealer now has his own horror movie. With Joey King, Javier Botet and Julia Goldani Telles. Sylvain White (The Losers) directed. (93 min, PG-13. Essex, Majestic)

NOW PLAYING ANT-MAN AND THE WASPH1/2 The very small superhero (Paul Rudd) teams up with a new partner to investigate secrets from the past in the latest chapter in the Marvel saga, set before Avengers: Infinity War. With Evangeline Lilly, Michael Peña, Walton Goggins and Judy Greer. Peyton Reed returns as director. (118 min, PG-13; reviewed by R.K. 7/11) CHRISTOPHER ROBINHHH Ewan McGregor plays a grown-up version of the A.A. Milne character who rediscovers his relationship with Winnie-the-Pooh in this partially animated Disney production directed by Marc Forster (Finding Neverland). Hayley Atwell and Bronte Carmichael also star. (104 min, PG)

THE DARKEST MINDSHH When teens all over the country develop psychic powers, they must break free from the adults who want to control them in this adaptation of the YA novel by Alexandra Bracken. Amandla Stenberg, Bradley Whitford and Mandy Moore star. Jennifer Yuh Nelson (Kung Fu Panda 3) directed. (105 min, PG-13)

JURASSIC WORLD: FALLEN KINGDOMHH1/2 The dinosaurs of a futuristic theme park need rescuing from an erupting volcano in the sequel to Jurassic World, again starring Chris Pratt and Bryce Dallas Howard. With Rafe Spall and Justice Smith. J.A. Bayona (The Impossible) directed. (128 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 6/27)

THE SPY WHO DUMPED ME: Mila Kunis and Kate McKinnon play best friends whose romantic problems get them embroiled in international espionage in this action comedy directed by Susanna Fogel (Life Partners). With Justin Theroux and Gillian Anderson. (116 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 8/8)

DON’T WORRY, HE WON’T GET FAR ON FOOTHHH1/2 Joaquin Phoenix plays wheelchairusing cartoonist John Callahan in this biopic about his struggle to get sober after an accident. With Jonah Hill, Rooney Mara and Jack Black. Gus Van Sant directed. (114 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 8/1)

THE KINGHHHHH Director Eugene Jarecki (The House I Live In) looks at the changing state of America through the lens of Elvis Presley in this documentary that chronicles a musical road trip in the King’s ’63 Rolls Royce. (107 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 7/25)

EIGHTH GRADEHHHH1/2 In this feature debut from writer-director Bo Burnham, nominated for the Sundance Film Festival’s Grand Jury Prize, a shy girl (Elsie Fisher) tries to negotiate the social minefield of middle school. With Josh Hamilton and Emily Robinson. (93 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 8/8)

LEAVE NO TRACEHHHH A father and daughter living off the grid run afoul of social services and try to return to their wild home in this drama from director and cowriter Debra Granik (Winter’s Bone). Ben Foster and Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie star. (109 min, PG; reviewed by R.K. 7/18)

TEEN TITANS GO! TO THE MOVIESHHH1/2 In this adaptation of the Cartoon Network series, five teen superheroes battle a super-villain while trying to obtain Hollywood glory. With the voices of Kristen Bell, Nicolas Cage, Tara Strong and Stan Lee. Aaron Horvath and Peter Rida Michail, veterans of the show, directed. (92 min, PG)

THE EQUALIZER 2HH1/2 In the second vigilante action flick based on the ’80s TV series, Denzel Washington returns as a retired CIA agent who has appointed himself the protector of the innocent. With Pedro Pascal, Bill Pullman and Melissa Leo. Antoine Fuqua again directed. (121 min, R)

MAMMA MIA! HERE WE GO AGAINHHH Lily James plays the young version of Meryl Streep’s character in the sequel to the ABBA-fueled musical comedy hit, in which we learn how she got pregnant with Sophie (Amanda Seyfried). With Streep, Dominic Cooper, Pierce Brosnan, Christine Baranski and Cher. Ol Parker (Imagine Me and You) directed. (114 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 7/25)

HEREDITARYHHHH1/2 Ari Aster makes his directorial debut with this psychological horror film, much buzzed about at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival, about a family that uncovers disturbing secrets after the death of its matriarch. Toni Collette, Gabriel Byrne and Alex Wolff star. (127 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 6/13) HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 3: SUMMER VACATIONHH1/2 Dracula (voice of Adam Sandler) takes a vacation from his hotel and discovers love on a “monster cruise” in this animated family adventure. With the voice talents of Mel Brooks, Selena Gomez and Kathryn Hahn. Genndy Tartakovsky returns as director. (97 min, PG) INCREDIBLES 2HHH1/2 Pixar’s super-family returns in this animation in which Mr. Incredible (voice of Craig T. Nelson) finds himself at home tending the baby while Mom (Holly Hunter) is busy saving the world. With the voices of Sarah Vowell, Bob Odenkirk and Samuel L. Jackson. Brad Bird is back as writer and director. (118 min, PG; reviewed by M.H. 6/20)

WON’T YOU BE MY NEIGHBOR?HHHH This documentary from Morgan Neville (20 Feet From Stardom) explores how Fred Rogers, trained as a minister, brought heart to kids’ educational TV with his long-running show “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.” (94 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 7/4)

MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE — FALLOUTHHHH1/2 Secret agent Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise) and his team are back for another mission after a misstep in the action series’ sixth installment, directed by Christopher McQuarrie (Mission: Impossible — Rogue Nation). With Henry Cavill, Ving Rhames, Simon Pegg and Rebecca Ferguson. (147 min, PG-13)

ratings

RBGHHHH This documentary from directors Julie Cohen (American Veteran) and Betsy West explores the life and work of 84-year-old U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. (98 min, PG; reviewed by M.H. 6/6)

H = refund, please HH = could’ve been worse, but not a lot HHH = has its moments; so-so HHHH = smarter than the average bear HHHHH = as good as it gets

SORRY TO BOTHER YOUHHHH Hip-hop frontman Boots Riley makes his directorial debut with this surreal satire about a telemarketer (Lakeith Stanfield) who learns that the secret to success is sounding like a white suburban guy. With Tessa Thompson, Jermaine Fowler, Terry Crews and Armie Hammer. (105 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 8/1)

RATINGS ASSIGNED TO MOVIES NOT REVIEWED BY RICK KISONAK OR MARGOT HARRISON ARE COURTESY OF METACRITIC.COM, WHICH AVERAGES SCORES GIVEN BY THE COUNTRY’S MOST WIDELY READ MOVIE REVIEWERS. SEVENDAYSVT.COM

WE

Help your global community. Participate in a research study to help develop a Zika Vaccine. We are looking for healthy adults aged 18-50. 6 month-long research study involving screening, a dosing visit, and 13 follow-up outpatient visits. Volunteers are eligible for compensation up to $1490.

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Receptions and events Weekly picks for exhibits “Movies You Missed” by Margot Harrison News, profiles and reviews

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MOVIES 73

• • • •

SEVEN DAYS

Plan your visual art adventures with the Seven Days Friday email bulletin including:

08.08.18-08.15.18

HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

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THREE IDENTICAL STRANGERSHHHH This fest-favorite documentary chronicles the strangerthan-fiction story of triplets separated at birth who learned of one another’s existence in adulthood. Tim Wardle (Lifers) directed. (96 min, PG-13)


movies

LOCALtheaters

Mission: Impossible — Fallout (2D & 3D) friday 10 — thursday 16 Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again *The Meg (2D & 3D) Mission: Impossible — Fallout (2D & 3D)

(*) = NEW THIS WEEK IN VERMONT. (**) = SPECIAL EVENTS. FOR UP-TO-DATE TIMES VISIT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/MOVIES.

BIG PICTURE THEATER

48 Carroll Rd. (off Rte. 100), Waitsfield, 496-8994, bigpicturetheater.info

wednesday 8 — tuesday 14 Schedule not available at press time.

Summer Vacation Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again *The Meg (Thu only; 2D & 3D) Mission: Impossible — Fallout (2D & 3D) *Slender Man (Thu only) The Spy Who Dumped Me Teen Titans Go! To the Movies

SUNSET DRIVE-IN

155 Porters Point Rd., Colchester, 862-1800, sunsetdrivein.com

wednesday 8 Christopher Robin & Incredibles 2 The Spy Who Dumped Me & Hereditary Mission: Impossible — Fallout & The Equalizer 2 Incredibles 2 & AntMan and the Wasp

friday 10 — tuesday 14

BIJOU CINEPLEX 4 Rte. 100, Morrisville, 888-3293, bijou4.com

wednesday 8 — thursday 9 Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation Incredibles 2 Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again Mission: Impossible — Fallout Won’t You Be My Neighbor? friday 10 — tuesday 14 Schedule not available at press time.

CAPITOL SHOWPLACE 93 State St., Montpelier, 229-0343, fgbtheaters.com

wednesday 8 — thursday 9 Ant-Man and the Wasp Christopher Robin Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again The Spy Who Dumped Me friday 10 — tuesday 14

ESSEX CINEMAS & T-REX THEATER

21 Essex Way, Suite 300, Essex, 879-6543, essexcinemas.com

wednesday 8 — thursday 9 Christopher Robin The Darkest Minds The Equalizer 2 Hotel Transylvania 3:

74 MOVIES

MAJESTIC 10

190 Boxwood St. (Maple Tree Place, Taft Corners), Williston, 878-2010, majestic10.com

wednesday 8 — thursday 9 Ant-Man and the Wasp Christopher Robin The Darkest Minds *Dog Days The Equalizer 2 Incredibles 2 Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again *The Meg (Thu only) Mission: Impossible — Fallout *Slender Man (Thu only) The Spy Who Dumped Me Teen Titans Go! To the Moviesfriday 10 — tuesday 14 Ant-Man and the Wasp Christopher Robin The Darkest Minds *Dog Days The Equalizer 2 Incredibles 2 Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again *The Meg Mission: Impossible — Fallout *Slender Man The Spy Who Dumped Me

Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again

thursday 9 — thursday 16

MARQUIS THEATRE

PALACE 9 CINEMAS

wednesday 8 — thursday 9

wednesday 8 — thursday 9

Christopher Robin Mission: Impossible — Fallout RBG (Wed only)

Christopher Robin The Darkest Minds *Dog Days Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot (Wed only) The Equalizer 2 Incredibles 2 Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again *The Meg (Thu only) Mission: Impossible — Fallout The Spy Who Dumped Me Teen Titans Go! To the Movies **Turner Classic Movies: The Big Lebowski (Wed only)

Main St., Middlebury, 388-4841, middleburymarquis.com

friday 10 — tuesday 14 Christopher Robin Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

MERRILL’S ROXY CINEMAS

222 College St., Burlington, 864-3456, merrilltheatres.net

wednesday 8 — thursday 9 Eighth Grade The King Leave No Trace Mission: Impossible — Fallout RBG Sorry to Bother You Three Identical Strangers Won’t You Be My Neighbor? friday 10 — wednesday 15 *BlackkKlansman Eighth Grade Mission: Impossible — Fallout RBG Sorry to Bother You Three Identical Strangers Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

10 Fayette Dr., South Burlington, 864-5610, palace9.com

friday 10 — tuesday 14 Christopher Robin The Darkest Minds *Dog Days The Equalizer 2 Incredibles 2 Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again *The Meg Mission: Impossible — Fallout **Rooster’s Teeth Blood Fest (Tue only) The Spy Who Dumped Me **Studio Ghibli: Grave of the Fireflies (dubbed: Sun only; subtitled: Mon only) Teen Titans Go! To the Movies

wednesday 8 — thursday 9 The Darkest Minds Mission: Impossible — Fallout friday 10 — thursday 16 The Darkest Minds *The Meg (2D & 3D)

THE SAVOY THEATER 26 Main St., Montpelier, 229-0598, savoytheater.com

wednesday 8 — thursday 9 Sorry to Bother You Three Identical Strangers Won’t You Be My Neighbor? friday 10 — thursday 16 *BlackkKlansman Leave No Trace Three Identical Strangers

WELDEN THEATRE

104 No. Main St., St. Albans, 527-7888, weldentheatre.com

wednesday 8 — thursday 9 The Darkest Minds Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again Mission: Impossible — Fallout friday 10 — thursday 16 The Darkest Minds Incredibles 2 Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again *The Meg Mission: Impossible — Fallout

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You don't have to be 18 to rock the vote!

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Salisbury Common School student Ethan Delorme created this poster for Activity 49 of the Good Citizen Challenge: Make a poster or video encouraging adults to vote. Find out more about this statewide civics project for Vermont's youth at goodcitizenvt.com

DON'T FORGET: Primary elections are August 14. with support from:

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76 FUN STUFF

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Make this year the most exciting, Make thisMake year thethis most exciting, year the most exciting, enriching year ever for you and enriching year ever for you and enriching year ever for you Welcome and your your family. a high your family. Welcome a high school student, 15-18 years school student, 15-18 years a high family. Welcome school student, from Italy, France, Norway, old,15-18 from Italy, France,old, Norway, years fromold, Italy, France, NorDenmark, Spain, Germany, Denmark, Spain, Germany, way, Denmark, Spain, Germany, Brazil, Brazil, Thailand or China as part Brazil, Thailand or China as part of yourof family for afamily school Thailand oraChina your of your family for school as part year (or less) and make an Marco fromand Italy,make 17 yrs.an (or less) year Marco from Italy, 17 yrs. for(or a less) school year make an Julieoverseas fromand Denmark, 16 yrs. Marco from Italy, Loves soccer and would like friend for life. Loves soccer and would like overseas for life. friend Enjoys for gymnastics, swimming overseas life. to learn friend to play baseball. 17 yrs. Loves soccer to learn to play baseball. For more information or to and photography. She’s positive, Marcoinformation is a boy scout and For more or to and like Marco would is a boy scout and select your own student fun or loving and easyexchange to get your enjoys the exchange outdoors. For more information to select select your own student enjoys the outdoors. to learn to play along with. please call: please call: own exchange student please call: baseball. Marco is

Julie from Denmark, 16 yrs. Julie from Denmark, Enjoys gymnastics, swimming 16 yrs. Enjoys and photography. She’s positive, fun loving and easy toswimming get gymnastics, along with. and photography. She’s positive, fun a boy scout and loving and easy to get Alison at (203) 815-5881, or Marcy at 1-800-888-9040 (Toll Free) or e-mail us at info@world-heritage.org enjoys outdoors. along with. Marcy the at 1-800-888-9040 (Toll Free) or usForatprivacy info@world-heritage.org Free) Marcy ate-mail 1-800-888-9040 reasons, photos above (Toll are not photos of actual students

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JEN SORENSEN

RACHEL LIVES HERE NOW HARRY BLISS


REAL FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY AUGUST 8-15

LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22)

You probably gaze at the sky enough to realize when there’s a full moon. But you may not monitor the heavenly cycles closely enough to tune in to the new moon, that phase each month when the lunar orb is invisible. We astrologers regard it as a ripe time to formulate fresh intentions. We understand it to be a propitious moment to plant metaphorical seeds for the desires you want to fulfill in the coming four weeks. When this phenomenon happens during the astrological month of Leo, the potency is intensified for you. Your next appointment with this holiday is August 10 and 11.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you need this advice from mythologist Joseph Campbell: “Your sacred space is where you

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): When he was 20 years old, future U.S. president Thomas Jefferson had an awkward encounter with a young woman who piqued his interest. He was embarrassed by the gracelessness he displayed. For two days afterward, he endured a terrible headache. We might speculate that it was a psychosomatic reaction. I bring this up because I’m wondering if your emotions are also trying to send coded messages to you via your body. Are you aware of unusual symptoms or mysterious sensations? See if you can trace them back to their source in your soul.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): There’s a zone in your psyche where selfishness overlaps generosity, where the line between being emotionally manipulative and gracefully magnanimous almost disappears. With both hope and trepidation for the people in your life, I advise you to hang out in that gray area for now. Yes, it’s a risk. You could end up finessing people mostly for your own good and making them think it’s mostly for their own good. But the more likely outcome is that you will employ ethical abracadabra to bring out the best in others, even as you get what you want, too. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In her poem “Dogfish,” Virgo poet Mary Oliver writes, “I wanted the past to go away, I wanted to leave it.” Why? Because she wanted her life “to open like a hinge, like a wing.” I’m happy to tell you, Virgo, that you now have more power than usual to make your past go away. I’m also pleased to speculate that as you perform this service for yourself, you’ll be skillful enough to preserve the parts of your past that inspire

you, even as you shrink and neutralize memories that drain you. In response to this good work, I bet your life will open like a hinge, like a wing — no later than your birthday and most likely before it.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Libran fashion writer Diana Vreeland (1903-1989) championed the beauty of the strong nose. She didn’t approve of women wanting to look like “piglets and kittens.” If she were alive today, she’d be pleased that nose jobs in the U.S. have declined 43 percent since 2000. According to journalist Madeleine Schwartz writing in Garage magazine, historians of rhinoplasty say there has been a revival of appreciation for the distinctive character revealed in an unaltered nose. I propose, Libra, that in accordance with current astrological omens, we extrapolate some even bigger inspiration from that marvelous fact. The coming weeks will be an excellent time for you to celebrate and honor and express pride in your idiosyncratic natural magnificence. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Maybe happiness is this: not feeling like you should be elsewhere, doing something else, being someone else.” This definition, articulated by author Isaac Asimov, will be an excellent fit for you between now and September 20. I suspect you’ll be unusually likely to feel at peace with yourself and at home in the world. I don’t mean to imply that every event will make you cheerful and calm. What I’m saying is that you will have an extraordinary capacity to make clear decisions based on accurate appraisals of what’s best for you. SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I’ve compiled a list of new blessings you need and deserve during the next 14 months. To the best of my ability, I will assist you in procuring them. Here they are: a practical freedom song and a mature love song, an exciting plaything and a renaissance of innocence, an evocative new symbol that helps mobilize your evolving desires, escape from the influence of a pest you no longer want to answer to, insights about how to close the gap between the richest and poorest parts of yourself, and the cutting of a knot that has hindered you for years.

CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “It has become clear to me that I must either find a willing nurturer to cuddle and nuzzle and whisper sweet truths with me for six hours or else seek sumptuous solace through the aid of eight shots of whiskey.” My Capricorn friend Tammuz confided that message to me. I wouldn’t be surprised if you were feeling a comparable tug. According to my assessment of the Capricorn zeitgeist, you acutely need the revelations that would become available to you through altered states of emotional intelligence. A lavish whoosh of alcohol might do the trick, but a more reliable and effective method would be through immersions in intricate, affectionate intimacy.

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Not even 5 percent of the world’s population lives in a complete democracy. Congratulations to Norway, Canada, Australia, Finland, Ireland, Iceland, Denmark, New Zealand, Switzerland and Sweden. Sadly, three countries where my column is published — the U.S., Italy and France — are categorized as “flawed democracies.” Yet they’re far better than the authoritarian regimes in China and Russia. (Source: the Economist.) I offer this public service announcement as a prelude to your homework assignment. According to my astrological analysis, you will personally benefit from working to bring more democracy into your personal sphere. How can you ensure that people you care about feel equal to you and have confidence that you will listen to and consider their needs and believe they have a strong say in shaping your shared experiences?

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Mystic poet Kabir wrote, “The flower blooms for the fruit: When the fruit comes, the flower withers.” He was invoking a metaphor to describe his spiritual practice and reward. The hard inner work he did to identify himself with God was the blooming flower that eventually made way for the fruit. The fruit was his conscious, deeply felt union with God. I see this scenario as applicable to your life, Pisces. Should you feel sadness about the flower’s withering? It’s fine to do so. But the important thing is that you now have the fruit. Celebrate it! Enjoy it!

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Palestinian American writer Susan Abulhawa writes that in the Arab world, to say a mere “thank you” is regarded as spiritless and ungenerous. The point of communicating gratitude is to light up with lively and expressive emotions that respond in kind to the kindness bestowed. For instance, a recipient may exclaim, “May Allah bless the hands that give me this blessing,” or “Beauty is in the eyes that find me beautiful.” In accordance with current astrological omens, I propose that you experiment with this approach. Be specific in your praise. Be exact in your appreciation. Acknowledge the unique mood and meaning of each rich exchange.

can find yourself again and again.” He says it’s “a rescue land ... some field of action where there is a spring of ambrosia — a joy that comes from inside, not something external that puts joy into you — a place that lets you experience your own will and your own intention and your own wish.” Do you have such a place, Taurus? If not, now is a great time to find one. If you do, now is a great time to go there for a spell and renew the hell out of yourself.

CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES & DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES: REALASTROLOGY.COM OR 1-877-873-4888

SEVEN DAYS FUN STUFF 79

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TRANSLADY Transgender lady looking for men and women for fun and friendship. dani_c, 53

For relationships, dates and flirts: dating.sevendaysvt.com

WOMEN Seeking MEN

SERIOUSLY SEEKING I am a down-to-earth, free-spirited woman who seeks a man of similar qualities. I love life and often experience it to the fullest. In fact, I enjoy time with friends, as well as many indoor and outdoor activities, but prefer giving one-on-one attention. MsBarDee, 49, l FUN, CARING, PASSIONATE My friend is not necessarily on board with the creation of this profile, but honestly ... This lady is one of the kindest people I’ve ever met. She works hard, has wonderful boys and deserves to be treated well. Meet her, and you won’t regret it. Mojitosonthebeach, 50, l LIGHTNESS AND LAUGHTER While we can navigate the days solo, there is more joy when we are beside someone who can get us to smile spontaneously and giggle on occasion. I am seeking a partner who is as willing to go adventuring on foot, bike, board, car or plane as he is to lay in bed drinking great coffee and doing the crossword. SoloTandem, 46, l

NATURE ENTHUSIAST SEEKING A PARTNER Hi! It would be great to meet someone who likes spending time in nature as much as I do. We could go for walks, camp, or just chill and enjoy the surroundings. If you’re someone who likes what they do for a living and can appreciate the little things in life, it would be great to talk with you. OutdoorsyGal802, 38, l

SWEET, OUTRAGEOUS, GORGEOUS Looking for a FWB. I’m a workaholic in need of sweet release. Would like to find a well-endowed man to enrich my days. Please be kind, considerate, clean and fun. Kate, 46

CURIOUS? You read Seven Days, these people read Seven Days — you already have at least one thing in common!

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LIVELY, ADVENTUROUS, SENSUAL, SMART Optimism with a healthy dose of cynical humor (including about myself). I think of life as a pretty great adventure, and I’d love to share all of its joyful, challenging, sexy, sublime and serious experiences with that very special man. Graduate degree, travel internationally for work, living in a Vermont farmhouse, looking for you. VermontGlobal, 53, l KIND, WARM, FRIENDLY Sometimes quiet, sometimes bubbly. Enjoying life on the sunny side of the street. My life is full and happy already. The only improvement would be male company for dancing, swimming, movies, etc. Filling out profiles is not one of my strengths, so let’s give conversation a try. SunnySideOfTheStreet, 60, l CAN-DO GRANDMA Love to meet someone who can think outside the box: develop plans, resolve problems, laugh out loud, dance like an animal, get small when others are trying to be large, and large when others can only be small, be careful with his words, be smokin’ hot when working and be feverish when naked. Why? Because I am. resilientvter, 63, l ADVENTUROUS COUNTRY GIRL Single mom looking for someone to hang out with and get to know. I am a hardworking, adventure-seeking girl who likes to play hard as well. If you like the outdoors, working out, ATVs, snowmobiling, boating, the ocean and traveling, I am the girl for you. I am looking for someone who is honest and straightforward. Sweet79, 38, l

MEN Seeking WOMEN KIND, HAPPY, HONEST I am a very honest and friendly person who likes to share and have great moments with a good companion or partner and reach goals together. JCCB, 37, l

COMING TO VERMONT AUGUST 13 Hello, I live in Florida but started a business in Vermont. I am coming to Vermont August 13 for a few days. I will be back often and for longer periods of time and would like to find a nice lady to spend time with. You could also come down to Florida and warm up from a cold winter. Jason4258, 48, l A GIVER WITH OPEN HEART I don’t want a relationship that will hold me back. I want a best friend I can sleep with, make love to, shop, club and dine, play and work out, spend free time with. I am looking for someone I can laugh and build with. Somebody I can trust with my heart, my money and life. Somebody I am not afraid to lose because I know they’ll always be there for me — but a relationship. I’ll take that! Anas1st, 45, l EAT, SLEEP, NEWS, REPEAT 60 words?? I’m a Vermonter. I love music of all variety. I’m looking for honesty above all. I would love to meet someone with more time on this Earth than myself. I’m not perfect and could never pretend to be. I love food and have been told I’m a pretty good cook. :) Hands-on learner for sure! JerimiahD, 29, l GENTLE SOUL Looking for a special someone to go out on hikes and rides, or just to spend a night snuggling on the couch. I can be a great conversationalist and love learning new things. Twowheeled, 33, l ADVENTUROUS, SPONTANEOUS AND FUN! Looking for someone who is fun, healthy and secure. I love being outside hiking, swimming, paddling and enjoying life staring at the stars. I am much more interested in your ability to have fun, be yourself and let loose than I am in superficial nonsense. And would much rather meet face-to-face and explore the connection than chat online. vtmtnswim, 45, l

LOOKING FOR FWB Looking for FWB who likes to go for long smoke rides and knows how to have some fun. Pics upon request. Gmtattboss, 41

WOMEN Seeking WOMEN STARFLEET CAPT. SEEKS LOGICAL #1 I’m just a lesbian nerd looking for love in the Green Mountain State. I have a good job with a great work/life balance, and I’m looking for a lady who can appreciate this awesome state with me (especially skiing/snowboarding). I’m OK with you being weird if you’re OK with me being weird. Cornholio, 30, l

ADVENTURE-SEEKING, FUN-LOVING I am a divorced mom of two (grown) children, and now life is a little more about me! Learning about me, enjoying life and not being held back. I am an independent, spirited woman who has a complete “can do” attitude. I think I am very nonjudgmental and love to be outdoors (kayaking or hiking). Look me up! imagine1203, 48, l LOOKING FOR A LITTLE SPICE Married couple seeking female to spice up the mix. New to this but hoping to explore. Let’s meet up for a drink and go from there. vtcouple802, 41

MEN Seeking MEN

SWEET SISSY I’m a slender, non-hairy older guy, fairly intelligent, musical, interested in various fields, who would like to meet a reasonably dominant man who is nonviolent, disease-free and dramafree. I’m comfortable in an old-fashioned submissive female role. I genuinely like all kinds of people and could be an easy “girlfriend” for someone. Brook11, 74 KIND, WITTY, GOOD-NATURED Looking for creative ways to “relax.” Maybe share a good massage? mavverrickk, 58 BI-CURIOUS? DISCREET? READ ON. Looking for an athletic bi-curious friend. Need to be attracted; chemistry is of the utmost importance. We need to click without effort. I need discreet, too. cyclist, 53

80 PERSONALS

SEVEN DAYS

08.08.18-08.15.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

LIVING LIFE! Camping, downtown, thrift stores, museums, local restaurants, antique shops, hiking with my dogs, gardening. Kindness, recycling, happiness, live music, dancing, picnics, downsizing. Acadia, Lake Champlain, White Mountains, the ocean. If you are happy with the current administration, do not contact me. I am not a tRump supporter and never will be. Thank you. Mefdeer, 57, l

NEW GIRL IN TOWN Am busy setting up the next chapter of my life. A fit, vibrant, independent, educated skier/hiker/snowshoer/ runner who loves travel, art, books, gardening. A new part-time Vermonter exploring my new hometown(s). Would love to share a local beverage and find out about you — especially if you have gained wisdom from hard work, heartbreak and having lived an interesting life. MoycaNewell, 60, l

INTELLIGENT, UNIQUE, UNCONVENTIONAL AND LOVING Have lived a very interesting, unconventional life, all in the Northeast. I’m an honest, passionate man into the arts, especially music and performance, looking for the same in a woman. Need to share intimacy and love to please. Let’s meet and find out if we might be interested in getting to know each other better. Gottobeme, 68, l

FRIENDS FIRST, THEN DOMESTIC PARTNERS Kindhearted socially awkward young man would like to be your friend first and then see where it takes us. BBClovingguy, 23, l

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Responsible couple looking for another female to join us in a threesome. We are in the Kingdom of Vermont. Has to be willing to travel. Also will have to get to know us and be clean. #L1213 56-y/o woman looking for love beyond belief. He should have pride in himself. Romantic tendency. Honest. One-woman man. True to himself and me. Happy. Patient. Huggable. Nonsmoker. No drugs, please. Lovable. Want to be loved. #L1212

I’m a SWM, 58, Burlington. Seeking a partner in crime! Gregarious, outgoing and altruistic. Appreciates meaningful and real connections/conversation. Not into party scene or drama. Varied interests. Open to all new experiences. Would love to hear from you! #L1221 I’m a submissive bi WM seeking a dominant male or female for a master or mistress for hard discipline and complete oral servitude. I’m middle-aged and in very good shape, ready for anything. #L1218

Mid-60s SWM desires female companion for local car trips and conversation, which includes topics in the arts and metaphysical/spiritual subjects. I am thoughtful, creative, compassionate. You possess curiosity, wit, capacity for genuine interchanges. We both enjoy humor and life’s range of absurdities. #L1215 We’re a married, bi-curious couple (42 and 45) seeking a male-and-female couple. 43, blond hair, brown eyes, 135 pounds, 5’3, 38C chest. 45, black hair, 140 pounds, 5’9. Married for 20 years. Looking to swing with dinner, drinks, fun. #L1214

HOW TO REPLY TO THESE MESSAGES:

MAIL TO: Seven Days Love Letters

P.O. Box 1164, Burlington, VT 05402 PAYMENT: $5/response. Include cash or check

Hello, my name is Sherry M. I’m looking for companionship or a boyfriend to spend my time with. I smoke cigarettes, and I like to drink beer. I also like to go out to eat and do a little bit of dancing. I’m looking for a trusting man who is 55 to 62. If interested, please write. #L1202 Retired professional seeks happy, healthy, orthodox Catholic lady for marriage. My 60-ish appearance belies greater calendar age and an optimistic, active social, athletic (lake and mountain), and spiritual life. The companion sought is mature, thrifty, more lovely inside than out. #L1198 I’m a GWM, late 50s, seeking a gay man, 21+, for companionship and friendship. I enjoy movies, restaurants, coffee, conversation, traveling. Tell me about yourself. #L1183

I’m a 48-y/o male seeking a 30- to 55-y/o female. I am eclectic and outdoorsy. Love cooking, fishing, camping and snuggling. Looking for liberal romantic who enjoys same. Nonjudgmental and openminded. Looking for same. LTR. #L1197 Married bi-curious guy. Blond, blue eyes, thin build. Looking for other bi-curious to explore with. Newbie here. Very, very discreet. #L1194 SWF, 66, seeks SM, 60 to 70, for friendship before relationship. I am honest, positive and grounded. If you walk toward today, not run to tomorrow, appreciate mornings, garden, read, listen to VPR, attend plays and ice hockey games, enjoy conversation, are creative, and don’t smoke, do drugs or drink, we already have things in common! Plus, I have a shamelessly affectionate golden retriever looking for dog friends. Burlington area. #L1191

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(made out to “Seven Days”) in the outer envelope. To send unlimited replies for only $15/month, call Ashley at 802-865-1020, ext. 37 for a membership (credit accepted).

I’m reluctantly reentering the dating world. Seeking SWM 55 to 65. I like gentlemen with neat appearances. I’m easygoing, outgoing, don’t like to argue or be controlled. My wardrobe is 90 percent jeans and blouses. I’m 5’5, brunette, English descent. Leave number. Friends first, please. #L1209

I’m a SWM, 69 y/o, seeking a GWM. Looking for NSA fun in Northeast. My place or yours. Discreet and disease-free. #L1206

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Seal your reply — including your preferred contact info — inside an envelope. Write your penpal’s box number on the outside of that envelope and place it inside another envelope with payment.

I’m a SWM (63) seeking a SWF (50 to 62). Tall, slender, athletic, gracious, educated, soft-spoken, vegetarian male seeks gentle, comely, socially conscious female with similar qualities. Scrabble, day hikes, folk music, bicycle rides, banana daiquiris, a trip to Nova Scotia — are you on board? #L1211

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ERIN, THE CUTE GNC GIRL Just wanted to say thanks again for your help today.  Hopefully I’ll see you next time! —That grateful guy. When: Saturday, August 4, 2018. Where: a GNC store. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914472 FALLING HARD FOR YOU You were the cute sandwich boy. I was the girl in the black dress. You made me a delicious spinach melt and were patient when my card wasn’t working. Standing up to leave, I tripped on my dress and made a weird sound. You could say I fell for you. Another chance (and another spinach melt) sometime? When: Friday, August 3, 2018. Where: Red Onion Café, Church Street. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914471 TORTILL-Y EMBARRASSED IN CITY MARKET You saved me from myself when I awkwardly asked a non-employee where I could find tortillas. “Aisle 2,” you said, dreamily. Quesadillas sometime? When: Thursday, July 26, 2018. Where: City Market South End. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914470

82 PERSONALS

SEVEN DAYS

08.08.18-08.15.18

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MONTPELIER TOY STORE GODDESSES I understand your curiosity, but I won’t give it up that easily. You are also right regarding the numerous beautiful, intelligent, witty women each possessing a unique and extremely attractive quality or qualities. I am hoping some of those qualities overlap. The thought of you sharing a love for fun and adventure sends my mind into overdrive. When: Tuesday, July 31, 2018. Where: Montpelier toy store. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914469 BEST HEADBANGER Saw you see me at that concert. Long beard, tight vest. You put out an iSpy for me. Can hardly believe it’s been four months of adventures. Leinenkugel’s, mountains, lakes, music, magic. If I’m the Valkyrie, I’ll follow you into the dark; gotta make sure you make it safely to Valhalla. Thank you for all the things. Miss you. When: Monday, March 19, 2018. Where: Higher Ground. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914468 CITIZEN CIDER I came in late with friends who were visiting. You were our server. I appreciated your sarcasm and patience. I was wearing a white button-down with umbrellas on it. I asked your name. I think you’re hilarious and would love to see you again if you’re up for it. By the way, the water store is closed. When: Sunday, July 29, 2018. Where: Citizen Cider. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914467 STAMPEDE IN BRISTOL We first saw each other at the silent auction, then the next tent. I left when you and your kid on a kids’ trike were leaving. You stopped. I passed you in my wheelchair, and you mentioned to your kid to follow him. I wanted to tell you how beautiful you were, but I am a little shy. When: Saturday, July 28, 2018. Where: Bristol Stampede. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914466

REWIND TO RED HEN I was walking in from the parking lot when I noticed you from behind ... only you were walking backward. I was quick enough to make a halfwitted comment about the direction you were headed and was rewarded with your natural beauty and sense of humor. Are you available to share a coffee and conversation? When: Wednesday, July 25, 2018. Where: Red Hen. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914465 BEAUTIFUL BRUNETTE WOMAN We literally ran into each other in the cafeteria at the UVM Medical Center. Beautiful brunette/brown-eyed woman with the sweetest smile. For a moment, my heart stopped. You spilled a little water on me and were shy and embarrassed. If you happen to see this ad, I would be thrilled if you would join me for a coffee sometime. When: Friday, July 27, 2018. Where: medical center. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914464 TALL GLASS OF WATER; I’M THIRSTY I saw you in the park by the school playing Frisbee with your dad (?). Only you could pull off the blue shirt with the skiing squirrel on it; it captures your adventurous spirit. I’m obsessed with English sheepdogs and would love to know yours better! Get some food with me soon? I’m gluten-free; hope that’s not a problem.  When: Wednesday, June 27, 2018. Where: Calahan Park. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914463 MONTPELIER TOY STORE SIGHTING Montpelier toy store admirer: There are many sexy, witty, intelligent women working here. You may have to narrow it down for us. Curiosity is killing these felines! When: Friday, July 27, 2018. Where: Montpelier. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914462 OUR SAME ORANGE CARS I bumped into your friend with her orange car parked next to my car — exactly the same color/make/ model! We grinned. Her passenger grinned, had fun and was sweet to me for letting me in my car. I signed thank you. She signed you’re welcome with her pretty eyes. I would like to meet her and also her friend to be new friends! When: Friday, July 20, 2018. Where: Staples, Burlington. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914461 HUMMINGBIRD WRIST TATTOO, U MALL TO DOWNTOWN We shared the 11:25 bus, U Mall to downtown. You wore a purple T-shirt. We spoke briefly near the mall entrance. I wanted to talk again but couldn’t get a seat. I saw a colorful bird tattooed on your inner left wrist. You have a rare beauty and great energy. A cosmic attraction. I’d love to meet you. When: Thursday, July 26, 2018. Where: on the bus. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914460 CYNICALBOY I see you’re still searching, my cynical boy, so I guess I’m confused. When: Tuesday, July 10, 2018. Where: in my life. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914437

HANNAFORD, SHAW’S, SMALL CITY VERGENNES June. I saw you three times. My daughter was with me; you were alone. First time in line at Hannaford on Shelburne Road. Then again at Shaw’s in Vergennes. Then 6 a.m. Wednesday morning getting gas at Small City Market in Vergennes. Me: tall, middle-aged, long blond hair, wearing black with jeans. You: tall, rugged, fit, middle-aged, dark beard. Super handsome. When: Monday, June 18, 2018. Where: Hannaford, Shelburne Rd.; Shaw’s and Little Red, Vergennes. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914459 I DON’T THINK SO Flash to the moment you left me. Maybe you’ll come back to me. But I don’t think so. Maybe when we’re older, get our shit together, when you’re sober, when it’s summer. But I don’t think so. Part of the reason we hold on is thinking love like this is raw and right and only comes once. But I don’t think so. When: Sunday, June 17, 2018. Where: many years in Burlington. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914458

SCARLETTLETTERS Dear Scarlett,

A few weeks ago, a female coworker of mine sent me a few flirtatious texts. I didn’t respond and thought it was harmless, until my wife read them on my phone when I was asleep and accused me of cheating. I told her that I am not cheating but was upset that she went though my phone, and I said it felt like a violation of my privacy. She said that she had the right because we’re married. Things have calmed down, but the other day I caught her looking through my phone again. Yes, we are married, but that doesn’t mean I have no privacy at all. Does it?

Signed,

Mr. Right? (male, 43)

FINDING YOUR SOUL MATE White T-shirt, sexy blue pants that match your dreamy eyes. Time spent with you stirs up a connection I’ve never experienced before. Such relief knowing I’ve found my person and can stop searching for you. I am falling more in love with you every moment we spend together. I’m all in. Let’s enjoy this lifetime together. When: Monday, July 23, 2018. Where: Burlington Farmers Market. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914457 CUTE GIGGLE ON NORTH WILLARD You are a tall beauty with creamy skin and wild lioness hair. When I heard you giggle, I remembered why I’m alive. I believe you said you were Croatian. I’m just a guy. Maybe grab a matcha with me someday? When: Friday, July 6, 2018. Where: N. Willard St. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914455 THE LAXATIVE AISLE The way your brown eyes gazed at me while you helped me decide which laxative would work best, I felt a connection. Let’s meet for coffee when you’re not bloated? When: Saturday, July 21, 2018. Where: CVS, Burlington. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914454 A MIDSUMMER’S KNIGHT Magic on a midsummer’s night. A valiant knight and endearing lady dancing in moonlight, burning candles ‘til dawn. This lady never felt so alive, resonating with happiness. If our paths cross again, reminisce how perfect everything was and seek shelter from storms in my embrace. For to you, my fair Sir, I would give it all. When: Saturday, June 30, 2018. Where: realm of the fairies. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914453 CHASING RABBITS I was admiring a sweet gray bunny on someone’s lawn when I noticed you on the porch: dark hair, dark eyes, soaking in the cool early evening air. You waved and flashed me a smile that sent my heart into a wild bunny hop. Shall we share a mad tea party or a walk through wonderland? Signed, Alice. When: Wednesday, July 18, 2018. Where: South Union St. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914452

Dear Mr.,

You are right: Your wife doesn’t have carte blanche to rifle through your phone — especially after you explicitly asked her not to. Her actions communicate a lack of trust and a disregard for your privacy, not to mention dishonesty and sneaking on her part. My guess is that you feel smothered and/or controlled. Everyone needs a certain amount of privacy, and there are many reasons — other than infidelity — for a person not to want others looking at their phone. For some, a phone or computer is an album of personal thoughts and conversations. Married or not, you should be allowed to have those thoughts and conversations in private. Marriage is not a one-way street, however. Regardless of who’s right and who’s wrong, it’s both of your jobs to rebuild trust and respect each other’s personal freedom. Ask yourself: What are the sources of insecurity in your marriage? Is there something you may have done to breed it? Has your wife been feeling down on herself? Perhaps she needs reassurance. Or, do you think she feels entitled to supervise your relationships? If so, how can you regain some control and set boundaries? Bottom line: It’s important to assert your right to privacy, but even more important to get to the root of this impasse together.

Signed,

Scarlett

Got a red-letter question? Send it to scarlett@sevendaysvt.com.


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