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ADIRONDACK V E RMON T’S INDE P ENDE NT VO IC E JULY 25-AUGUST 1, 2018 VOL.23 NO.45 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ISSUE

THE

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THE

ADIRONDACK ISSUE

SNEAK PEEK Festival of Fools August 3-5

PROGRAM GUIDE INSIDE

THE

ADIRONDACK ISSUE

TRAIL AHEAD Hikes and history in Westport PAGE 36

MAKING WAVES Weird science on Lake George PAGE 38

FREED JAZZ

Westport trumpeter finds his groove PAGE 40

Former Wall Street maverick Sandy Lewis is an Adirondack agitator ... who may be on to something

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Lakeside eats in Essex, N.Y. PAGE 44


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THE LAST WEEK IN REVIEW JULY 18-25, 2018 COMPILED BY SASHA GOLDSTEIN, MATTHEW ROY & ANDREA SUOZZO

The U.S. Olympic Committee has ordered Oxbow High School in Bradford to stop using “Olympian” as its school mascot. Sensitive.

FAR OUT

MAP QUESTIONING

Karen Paul

A truck driver following his GPS tried to go over the Cornish-Windsor Covered Bridge — and smashed it up in the process. It pays to look up sometimes.

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MOST POPULAR ITEMS ON SEVENDAYSVT.COM

1. “The Friendly Toast Opens in Downtown Burlington” by Sally Pollak. The popular New England chain has locations in Massachusetts, New Hampshire and, now, the Queen City. 2. “Agencies Alarmed by Bhutanese Refugee Suicides” by Kymelya Sari. Two local Bhutanese refugees have died by suicide this year, raising concerns among health officials and social support agencies. 3. “Walters: Former Sanders Adviser Named in Manafort Trial Documents” by John Walters. Tad Devine’s name appears in numerous exhibits in the prosecution of President Donald Trump’s former campaign chair. 4. “Burlington City Council Urges Nurses, Hospital to Settle Their Differences” by Katie Jickling. The council unanimously passed a resolution urging University of Vermont Medical Center and its nurses to come to an agreement. 5. “The Cannabis Catch-Up: What’s the Deal With Gifting?” by Sasha Goldstein. Three weeks after recreational marijuana became legal, questions remained about enforcement.

tweet of the week: @RowGirlVT When you avoid updating the 5 wk family calendar because you’ll have to add the 1st day of school to it #summergoingtoofast FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSVT OUR TWEEPLE: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/TWITTER

WHAT’S WEIRD IN VERMONT

SOAK UP THE SUNSCREEN

LAST SEVEN 5

reason for the high rate is unknown, but it might be connected to Vermont’s largely “fair-skinned” population, she said. Another hypothesis is that Vermonters spend so much of the year bundled up that they forget to practice safe-sun behaviors when they go out in the summer, said Mallory. Despite the risks, she had a simple message: Don’t let fear of cancer keep you indoors.   “Being active and being outside is a really important part of being a Vermonter … We are healthy because of it,” Mallory said. “We want people to get out there and be active. Enjoy your parks, but let’s just be aware of being sun safe.” SARA TABIN

SEVEN DAYS

on’t stress if you forget to slather up with sunscreen before a trip to a Vermont beach or state park this summer. The state Department of Health has your back. Officials have put up lotion dispensers, some bearing the slogan “SPF is your BFF,” at sites throughout the state in an effort to reduce skin cancer, according to Sharon Mallory, the health department’s comprehensive cancer control program director. The first was installed in May at Bombardier Park in Milton. Other dispensers, filled with SPF 30 sunscreen, are in

use at nearly a dozen state parks, green spaces in Burlington and at Sugarbush Resort. The state is also planning school programming to encourage cancer-preventative behavior such as wearing hats and seeking shade, and to inform students about the dangers of indoor and outdoor tanning. The entire initiative will cost $20,000 over two years but will be covered by an annual grant from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vermont has the second-highest skin cancer rate in the country, according to Mallory. She said that more than 260 new cases of melanoma are diagnosed in the state every year and about 21 Vermonters die annually from the cancer. The exact

07.25.18-08.01.18

SARA TABIN

COMPETITIVE EDGY

Gov. Phil Scott signed a sisterstate agreement with the Japanese governor of the Tottori prefecture. Gov. Shinji Hirai sang “Edelweiss” at the Statehouse to celebrate.

D A sunscreen dispenser

Middlebury College officials aim to save $8 million by buying out faculty and staff members. It’s the only Vermont college no one was worried about…

That’s the sum of Vermont’s fiscal year 2018 tax surplus, officials announced last week. The extra cash, mostly from personal income taxes, is due in part to changes in the federal tax system.

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MATTHEW THORSEN

W

hat is in the email that Burlington City Councilor Karen Paul wrote to Mayor Miro Weinberger shortly before she announced she’d recuse herself from voting on the sale of Burlington Telecom? We may never know. The communication is exempt from disclosure under the Vermont Public Records law, a judge ruled Monday. Vermont Superior Court Judge Robert Mello decided the case in favor of the City of Burlington and against Da Capo Publishing, the parent company of Seven Days. The newspaper requested the email — and other records — last year, citing the state’s public records law. The city turned over some of the material sought but withheld the Paul email, leading Seven Days to file suit. Mello agreed with city lawyers who said the email falls under a provision of the law that shields communications between departments when they are preliminary to a policy determination or action. During a hearing last week, attorney Jared Carter of the nonprofit Vermont Community Law Center argued on Seven Days’ behalf that a city councilor is not a department. He argued further against a broad interpretation of the exemption in question, saying it would threaten government transparency and the spirit of the law. After reviewing the email privately, Mello made his decision to shield it. The email, the judge wrote in his decision, does not include discussion about Paul’s decision to recuse herself. But it does include her opinions and observations regarding a vote on the sale of Burlington Telecom. Paul had initially announced her intention not to vote on the sale, based on a professional conflict of interest that she did not explain. Afterward, she quit a job at an accounting firm. She then voted on the closely watched sale — but never divulged the reason she initially said she wouldn’t. Read reporter Molly Walsh’s full story on sevendaysvt.com.

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NEWS & POLITICS editor Matthew Roy deputy editor Sasha Goldstein politiCAl editor Paul Heintz Consulting editor Candace Page politiCAl Columnist John Walters stAff writers Mark Davis, Taylor Dobbs,

Alicia Freese, Katie Jickling, Molly Walsh news intern Sara Tabin ARTS & LIFE editor Pamela Polston AssoCiAte editor Margot Harrison AssistAnt editors Dan Bolles, Elizabeth M. Seyler food writer Hannah Palmer Egan musiC editor Jordan Adams CAlendAr writer Kristen Ravin speCiAlty publiCAtions mAnAger Carolyn Fox stAff writers Rachel Elizabeth Jones, Ken Picard,

Sally Pollak, Kymelya Sari, Sadie Williams

proofreAders Carolyn Fox, Elizabeth M. Seyler 7/1/14 6:22 AM

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D I G I TA L & V I D E O digitAl editor Andrea Suozzo digitAl produCtion speCiAlist Bryan Parmelee senior multimediA produCer Eva Sollberger multimediA journAlist James Buck DESIGN CreAtive direCtor Don Eggert Art direCtor Rev. Diane Sullivan produCtion mAnAger John James stAff photogrApher Matthew Thorsen designers Brooke Bousquet,

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SALES & MARKETING direCtor of sAles Colby Roberts senior ACCount exeCutive Michael Bradshaw ACCount exeCutives Robyn Birgisson,

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READER REACTION TO RECENT ARTICLES

SOME SERIES

NO FISH I just want to thank STORY you for the terrific and important series [“Give and Take: Examining Vermont’s Nonprofit Economy,” June FUNNY PAGES DIY DINNERS IN THE GROOVE 20-July 18]. This is a real piece of researched journalism — the likes of which we very seldom get to read in our clubby little state. Please give us more.

Tied flies and nonprofit law

PAGE 22

What’s the future of Vermont philanthropy ?

SPECIAL REPOR

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CHARLOTTE NEWS IS A LABOR OF LOVE

[Re “Nonprofit News,” July 11]: While it’s always fun to see one’s name in print, it would have been even better if Paul Heintz’s reference to “tony Charlotte” and its ability to sustain our beloved newspaper, the Charlotte News, had included more of the truth: that the paper, founded 60 years ago by a group of teenagers in a local church basement, continues to exist largely because so many of our contributors do so without expecting to be compensated. The writers and photographers whose work fills the pages of this paper contribute because sustaining a community newspaper matters to them. And, too, we have a skeleton staff of three part-timers who pull the paper together every other week using elbow grease, shoestring, ingenuity and love. The Charlotte News faces the very same challenges every other newspaper faces today: In a journalism terrain where advertising dollars are disappearing with alarming speed, we, too, are constantly seeking creative ways to keep the ship afloat. We are not, as many would like to think because of our zip code, awash with cash. The Charlotte News’ greatest asset isn’t that it’s in “tony Charlotte.” The Charlotte News is alive and well largely because it is a shining example of what can be accomplished when people in a community work together to keep an important piece of the fabric of that community alive. Melissa O’Brien CHARLOTTE

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Make this year the most exciting, Make thisMake year thethis most exciting, year the most exciting, enriching year ever for you and enriching year ever for you and enriching year ever for you Welcome and your your family. a high your family. Welcome a high school student, 15-18 years school student, 15-18 years a high family. Welcome school student, from Italy, France, Norway, old,15-18 from Italy, France,old, Norway, years fromold, Italy, France, NorDenmark, Spain, Germany, Denmark, Spain, Germany, way, Denmark, Spain, Germany, Brazil, Brazil, Thailand or China as part Brazil, Thailand or China as part of yourof family for afamily school Thailand oraChina your of your family for school as part year (or less) and make an Marco fromand Italy,make 17 yrs.an (or less) year Marco from Italy, 17 yrs. for(or a less) school year make an Julieoverseas fromand Denmark, 16 yrs. Marco from Italy, Loves soccer and would like friend for life. Loves soccer and would like overseas for life. friend Enjoys for gymnastics, swimming overseas life. to learn friend to play baseball. 17 yrs. Loves soccer to learn to play baseball. For more information or to and photography. She’s positive, Marcoinformation is a boy scout and For more or to and like Marco would is a boy scout and select your own student fun or loving and easyexchange to get your enjoys the exchange outdoors. For more information to select select your own student enjoys the outdoors. to learn to play along with. please call: please call: own exchange student please call: baseball. Marco is

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WEEK IN REVIEW

TIM NEWCOMB

TOO NEGATIVE ON NONPROFITS

John McClaughry

KIRBY

Lauren-Glenn Davitian

BURLINGTON

Davitian is executive director of Common Good Vermont.

A CLOSER LOOK AT KAVANAUGH

Thank you for your great article detailing how Vermont’s House members voted on the various changes to Vermont’s gun laws [Off Message: “Analysis: How Gun Votes Divided the Vermont House,” March 28]. I am looking for candidates to support, and you made it very easy for me to enter the House member’s name and immediately see how they voted. A great service and a wonderful way to hold them all accountable for their votes. Mary Evslin

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In this newspaper, U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) issued a full-throated blast at Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh, telling your reporter Taylor Dobbs that Kavanaugh, in a 2009 Minnesota Law Review article, wrote that “the president should be above the law when they’re president” [Off Message: “Leahy: Trump’s Supreme Court Pick ‘More Than Frightening,’” July 10]. Dobbs, in an example of good journalism, then accurately quoted the Law Review article as arguing “that sitting presidents should not be subject to indictments, civil lawsuits or criminal investigations.” I have actually read the article in question. In it, Kavanaugh writes: “The first [counterargument to that proposal would be] that no one is above the law in our system of government. I strongly agree with that principle. But it is not ultimately a persuasive criticism of these suggestions. The point is not to put the President

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CNBC recently recognized Vermont as the best place to live in the United States, due in large part to the vital work of Vermont’s nonprofits. Affordable housing, great schools, quality health care and a clean environment are largely driven by our state’s social sector. Representing 20 percent of Vermont’s economy, our nonprofits merit a closer look. But Seven Days’ “Give and Take” series [June 20-July 18] seems more concerned with what we “take” than how we meaningfully contribute to the well-being of our state. The series’ preoccupation with the pay of top executives, “shadow government” and improprieties tells a shadow of the story.  Vermont’s nonprofits are remarkably productive given that 85 percent of more than 6,000 nonprofits operate with budgets of less than $500,000. These organizations, large and small, are responsible for addressing our most pressing social issues — from child and elder care to community safety and equal opportunity. Nonprofit workers (45,000 plus) are effective managers and community leaders able to weave together rural and urban Vermont with limited resources and unlimited resourcefulness.  If you’d like to know more about nonprofit organizations than simply the salaries of the top executives, take a look at Common Good Vermont’s analysis of Internal Revenue Service data here: blog. commongoodvt.org/2015/02/fast-factsthe-economic-power-of-vermonts-nonprofit-sector. 

And if you’d like to understand more about how our nonprofits are working to daily ensure a top-rated quality of life for Vermonters, visit commongoodvt.org. We serve more than 4,000 nonprofit staff, board members and allies who, working together, yield results for our state.

above the law or to eliminate checks on the President, but simply to defer litigation and investigations until the President is out of office.” Kavanaugh based that conclusion on the tribulations of Bill Clinton’s presidency: “Looking back to the late 1990s, for example, the nation certainly would have been better off if President Clinton could have focused on Osama bin Laden without being distracted by the Paula Jones sexual harassment case and its criminal-investigation offshoots.” That does not add up to Leahy’s inflammatory charge that the judge believes “the president should be above the law when they’re president.” Leahy’s party — the party of Clinton — is terrified that a majority of the Supreme Court might actually come to operate on the principle that judges aren’t free to write their own Constitutions but must confine themselves to interpreting the Constitution the people approved.  You will hear a lot of wild charges about Kavanaugh over the next two months. Don’t take Leahy’s word on any of them.

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contents

LOOKING FORWARD

JULY 25-AUGUST 1, 2018 VOL.23 NO.45

The Adirondack Mountains are more than just a pretty Whiteface. The northern New York region’s 6 million acres are full of countless mountains, lakes, rivers, towns and cities — and stories. So each year, Seven Days ventures west to find them. After fueling up with LAKESIDE EATS IN ESSEX, we visited VIALL’S CROSSING in Westport, where hiking, history and farming grow community spirit. Just down the road, jazz trumpeter TAYLOR HASKINS practices a new kind of sonic sorcery. Weird science is afoot in the PRISTINE WATERS OF LAKE GEORGE that could one day help keep Lake Champlain clean. That would please PLATTSBURGH MAYOR COLIN READ as he puts the “lake” back in Lake City. It’s hard to say what would please SANDY LEWIS, “THE MOST ORNERY MAN IN THE ADIRONDACKS,” as Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist James Bandler discovered.

THE

K A D I RI OS SNUDE A C 14

Future Fix: Drug Detox Beds Needed in the North Country

20

Another Vermont Pol Promises Broadband. Could It Work This Time? BY TAYLOR DOBBS

18

In Plainfield, Mexican Citizens Line Up for Their Papers

22

Excerpts From Off Message

27

ARTS NEWS 24

The King in the Queen City: A Conversation With Filmmaker Eugene Jarecki

Middlebury’s Town Hall Theater Welcomes New Executive Director

BY MARGOT HARRISON

BY JAMES BANDLER

Tracking Changes

Adirondack Issue: At a Westport rail crossing, a hiking trail and young farmers share space BY SADIE WILLIAMS

38

Deep Dive

Adirondack Issue: The Jefferson Project is turning Lake George into the world’s smartest lake BY KEN PICARD

Stuck in Vermont: The Children's

Literacy Foundation brought Vermont author Jason Chin to the summer program at JFK Elementary School in Winooski, where he talked about his work and joined the kids for some quiet reading time.

Cold Fusion

Adirondack Issue: Taylor Haskins melds jazz and electronic music in Westport, N.Y. BY DAN BOLLES

43

Factory Finish

mr. brunelle explains it all deep dark fears this modern world edie everette iona fox red meat jen sorensen harry bliss rachel lives here now free will astrology personals

River City Stoke

Food: Chill vibes and “craveworth” eats at the Upper Valley’s Trail Breaks Taps + Tacos

CLASSIFIEDS

Mix It Up

vehicles housing services homeworks buy this stuff fsbo music, art legals crossword calcoku/sudoku puzzle answers jobs

Music: West End Blend’s Erica Bryan talks fronting the band, the new release, and representation BY JORDAN ADAMS

COLUMNS + REVIEWS 12 29 45 63 67 70 76 86

Fair Game POLITICS Hackie CULTURE Side Dishes FOOD Soundbites MUSIC Album Reviews Talking Art Movie Reviews Scarlett Letters SEX The Magnificent 7 Life Lines Calendar Classes Music Art Movies

Theater review: Skeleton Crew, Dorset Theatre Festival

C-2 C-2 C-2 C-3 C-4 C-4 C-4 C-4 C-5 C-7 C-8 C-9 COVER IMAGE GLENN RUSSELL

COVER DESIGN BROOKE BOUSQUET

THE

ADIRONDACK ISSUE

SECTIONS 11 23 50 60 62 70 76

80 80 80 80 81 81 82 82 82 83 84

THE

ADIRONDACK ISSUE

THE

ADIRONDACK ISSUE

THE

ADIRONDACK ISSUE

SNEAK PEEK Festival of Fools August 3-5

PROGRAM GUIDE INSIDE

THE

ADIRONDACK ISSUE

TRAIL AHEAD Hikes and history in Westport PAGE 36

MAKING WAVES Weird science on Lake George PAGE 38

FREED JAZZ

Westport trumpeter finds his groove PAGE 40

Former Wall Street maverick Sandy Lewis is an Adirondack agitator ... who may be on to something

FERRY FARE

Hurricane

Lakeside eats in Essex, NY PAGE 44

SANDY

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

40

Underwritten by:

48

Hurricane Sandy

Quick Lit: The Aftermath 36

FUN STUFF

BY SALLY POLLAK

62

FEATURES 30

Food by Ferry

Food: Sampling the eats in Essex, on Lake Champlain’s western shore

BY HANNAH PALMER EGAN

Adirondack Issue: Former Wall Street maverick Sandy Lewis is an Adirondack agitator ... who might be on to something

Online Thursday

44

BY JACQUELINE LAWLER

BY RICK KISONAK

25

Discussion Continues on Burlington Mural ‘Everyone Loves a Parade!’ BY SADIE WILLIAMS

BY SEVEN DAYS STAFF

BY KATIE JICKLING

VIDEO SERIES

26

BY MOLLY WALSH

BY KATIE JICKLING

16

Plattsburgh’s Mayor Talks Big Plans — Even as He Slashes Spending

VERMONT’S INDEP ENDENT VO ICE JULY 25-AUGUST 1, 2018 VOL.23 NO.45 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEWS

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CONTENTS 9

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LOOKING FORWARD

the

MAGNIFICENT MAGNIFICENT MUST SEE, MUST DO THIS WEEK COMPI L E D BY K R ISTEN RAVIN

SATURDAY 28

All Natural From walks to demos to a makers market, all things herbal are on the menu at the Summer Herbal Fair. This festival of flora hosted by the Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism features an abundance of fun and educational activities focused on plants with culinary and medicinal properties. Folks can even cool off with herbal popsicles, snow cones and mocktails. Yum! SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 55

THURSDAY 26-SUNDAY 29

Setting Sail WEDNESDAY 1

SINGING PRAISES Who hasn’t occasionally hummed along to “Ain’t No Sunshine” or “Just the Two of Us”? Jazz singer José James (pictured) honors Bill Withers, the author and performer of these R&B classics, with the musical program “Lean on Me: José James Celebrates Bill Withers.” He puts a contemporary twist on top-10 hits and rare tracks in a Dartmouth College concert. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 59

For many Vermonters, there’s nothing like the shore of Lake Champlain in the summer. The Lake Champlain Maritime Festival invites folks to various waterfront venues for seafaring fun — think standup paddleboarding, an antique boat show, and evening concerts by the likes of Phil Lesh & the Terrapin Family Band and Ween. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 53

FRIDAY 27-SUNDAY 29

Picker’s Paradise You know what they say about one person’s trash. Take-home treasures tempt shoppers at the annual Three Day Stampede. Thirty tents on the Bristol Recreation Field offer everything from used books and baked goods to clothing and crafts. Proceeds from this multifaceted flea market benefit the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 54

Work It Out SATURDAY 28 & SUNDAY 29

SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 55

SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 57

SATURDAY 28

Community Spirit

SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 55

MAGNIFICENT SEVEN 11

The Ramble, a neighborhood block party in Burlington’s Old North End, marks its 15th anniversary in style with an extensive lineup of quirky and creative events. A spirited celebration of community, this grassroots arts festival boasts live music, visual art, yard sales, theatrical performances and plenty of surprises.

SEVEN DAYS

The Champlain Valley Gem, Mineral & Fossil show gives new meaning to the phrase “rock show.” Guided by the theme Colorful Minerals, this 39th annual exhibition showcases thousands of natural specimens alongside eye-catching jewelry. Exhibits, lectures and kids’ activities round out two dazzling days.

07.25.18-08.01.18

Rolling Stones

Care for a little Sunday morning exercise? The 34th annual Colchester Triathlon’s got you covered. Ambitious athletes put their endurance to the test in a 500-meter swim or 1.5-mile kayak, a 12-mile bike ride, and a three-mile run. Now, that ought to jump-start your day!

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or Democrats and progressives across the country, the priority 1335 Shelburne Road, this year is winning a majority S. Burlington • 802-859-8966 in the U.S. House or Senate to break the Republican hold on legislaSouth of Holmes Road tive power. Vermont already has an allIn the same building as Hertz Rental Cash, credit card or check blue congressional delegation, so some activists in the state have turned their attention to close races elsewhere — es16t-upstairsantiques072518.indd 1 7/23/18 3:43 PM pecially in neighboring states. “One of the best things Vermont can do for the nation is to be a strong antiTrump state,” said JAMES HASLAM, executive director of Rights & Democracy, a progressive organization that’s active in both Vermont and New Hampshire. CHANNEL 15 “More and more people realize that what happens in nearby states affects us.” SONGWRITER’S One prime target is New York’s 21st NOTEBOOK congressional district, which includes the Adirondack Park and extends to SUNDAYS > 4:30 P.M. Lake Champlain’s western shore. GET MORE INFO OR “We share so many issues with that WATCH ONLINE AT district,” said GORDON MILLER, a real estate VERMONTCAM.ORG broker from Huntington. “Stewardship of the lake, an aging population, an ailing dairy industry, border concerns, the 16T-VCAM-072518.indd 1 7/18/18 2:18 PM tourism industry.” Miller is a donor and volunteer for TEDRA COBB, the Democrat who is challenging U.S. Rep. ELISE STEFANIK (R-N.Y.). “It’s in our best interests to give Congressman [PETER] WELCH (D-Vt.) an ally, not an adversary,” said Miller. He plans to organize a bi-state fundraiser for Cobb, perhaps on a Lake Champlain tour boat. ELIZABETH DEUTSCH of Hinesburg, a registered nurse at the University of Vermont Medical Center, is taking a different tack. “I want to raise awareness of Elise Stefanik’s record,” Deutsch said. “She has voted right down the line with [House Speaker] PAUL RYAN (R-Wis.). She’s a good little foot soldier.” Deutsch also plans to get involved in New York’s 19th congressional district, which includes the northern Hudson Valley and Catskill Mountains and extends northward to the Vermont border near Bennington. The contest features U.S. Rep. JOHN FASO (R-N.Y.) and Democrat ANTONIO DELGADO. l oc al, fr es h, ori gi nal The race is widely considered to be a squeaker and has drawn the attention of some deep-pocketed Vermonters. PAUL and ELAINE GROWALD of Shelburne have donated more than $10,000 to Delgado’s 1076 Williston Road, S. Burlington campaign. Former education secretary REBECCA HOLCOMBE gave $1,000 to the chal862.6585 lenger, and former Vermont Democratic www.windjammerrestaurant.com Party chair FAISAL GILL gave $2,700. Untitled-21 1

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“The No. 1 goal is to flip the [U.S.] House,” Gill explained. “I’m looking at people who have a chance at winning. If there’s any seat we should be able to flip, it’s this one.” The 19th district enjoyed a burst of national attention last week when Faso publicized an album recorded by Delgado, who’s now a lawyer but used to be a rapper. Delgado, who is black, used the N-word on the 2007 album and included lyrics critical of capitalism and racial injustice. Faso told the New York Times that the lyrics are “inconsistent with the views of the people of the 19th district and America.” Delgado’s allies have accused Faso of unsubtle race-baiting.

THE NO. 1 GOAL IS TO

FLIP THE [U.S.] HOUSE. FAI S AL GI L L

The nonpartisan Cook Political Report rates NY-19 as a “toss-up,” one of 25 Republican congressional seats in that category. The Democrats would need a net gain of 24 seats to take control of the House. Swing Left, an advocacy group seeking to turn the House blue, has identified 65 districts that could flip from one party to the other. NY-19 is on Swing Left’s list, but Stefanik’s district, NY-21, is not. Cook also considers the 21st a safe Republican seat. Swing Left is one of many organizations encouraging blue-state voters to support liberal candidates in more competitive states. Let America Vote targets states in which Republican legislative majorities have enacted laws designed to make it harder to vote. Flippable and the Sister District Project focus on state legislatures, which will become crucial for redrawing legislative districts after the 2020 census. Several Vermont chapters of Indivisible, a national progressive organization, are taking part in nearby campaigns. ANN SMITH of Waterbury, former executive director of Friends of the Winooski River, has joined forces with six central Vermont residents to form their own organization called Lean Left. “We wanted to work on elections in other states,” she said. They gathered information from progressive groups and political news

outlets and honed in on NY-19, as well as New Hampshire’s 1st congressional district and Maine’s 2nd. (Lean Left is also working on two Pennsylvania legislative races assigned by the Sister District Project.) NH-1, from which U.S. Rep. CAROL SHEA-PORTER (D-N.H.) is retiring, is “one of the swingiest seats in the country,” Smith said. “It’s one of the few that Republicans think they can pick up.” Some activists are holding fire until after the September 11 New Hampshire primary. “There are 11 Democratic candidates,” Haslam explained. “We’re getting ready for the general election. We need to unify people and stay involved.” Groups such as Swing Left, Flippable and the Sister District Project make it simple for blue-state Democrats to support candidates in competitive races. But this trend isn’t great for Democratic parties in blue states. “A lot of our traditional big donors have gone to other groups,” said Vermont Democratic Party chair TERJE ANDERSON. “Vermont donors are showing up for candidates across the country. We need to remind them to support candidates closer to home.” Fundraising totals for Vermont gubernatorial candidates have lagged far behind 2016 levels. And this week’s public opinion poll commissioned by Vermont Public Radio and Vermont PBS provided more support for the notion that Vermonters are more engaged in national politics than their own state’s. Few respondents had even heard of this state’s four gubernatorial Democratic candidates, the poll found. For liberal Vermonters, President DONALD TRUMP and the Republican Congress are much more important targets than their relatively moderate Republican governor, PHIL SCOTT, who will be very tough to beat. Folks like Miller say they aren’t ignoring Vermont. “I’m certainly supporting local representatives and senators,” he said. Rights & Democracy’s in-state priorities, said Haslam, are “a House majority capable of overriding gubernatorial vetoes, and the governor’s race.” Of course, putting first priority on veto overrides kind of assumes a Republican will still be governor next year, doesn’t it?

Six for the Senate State legislative campaigns often suffer from a dearth of competition. That’s definitely not the case for the Democratic


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state Senate primary in Washington County. There are six candidates running for three nominations, including Sens. ANN CUMMINGS (D-Washington) and ANTHONY POLLINA (P/D-Washington). Their seatmate, Sen. FRANCIS BROOKS (D-Washington), is not seeking reelection “I’ve never had this level of primary,” said Cummings. “All the candidates are exceptionally well qualified. We have an abundance of riches.” Washington County Deputy State’s Attorney ASHLEY HILL is making her second bid for the Senate. She came in fourth place in 2016, a single vote behind Brooks. “It’s wonderful that a bunch of folks saw this as the time to step up,” she said. “People see a need for change in the legislature.” A subtle dig at the incumbents? “They’ve done wonderful work,” Hill said. “I admire them. But having a diversity of personalities and experiences is good.” Other challengers deliver hints of their own. “This is a time when there’s a need for new voices,” said THEO KENNEDY, an attorney, lobbyist and owner of Chill Vermont Gelato in downtown Montpelier. “I hear it a lot, without any malice intended, that it’s time for new blood,” said ANDREW BREWER, former owner of Onion River Sports in Montpelier. The challengers acknowledge that Washington County tends to be loyal to incumbents. Cummings is in her 22nd year; Pollina has served for four terms; and former Republican senator BILL DOYLE represented the county for an astounding 48 years until he was narrowly defeated in 2016 at age 90. Don’t think the two incumbents are resting on their laurels. “We’ve had relatively easy wins, but we don’t take it for granted,” said Pollina, who has battled Parkinson’s disease in recent years. At a recent candidates’ forum in Barre, he remained seated throughout, while the other five hopefuls stood when speaking. Pollina said he had surgery last week to remove a cyst in his back. “It feels a heck of a lot better,” he said. He claimed that constituents don’t see his health problems as an impediment to service. “People have been encouraging me,” said Pollina, a Progressive fixture in state politics who has twice run for governor. “They want me to be the kind of voice I’ve been in the Senate.” Past experience teaches Cummings to take nothing for granted. In the fraught campaign of 2000, following the establishment of same-sex civil unions, she won reelection by a mere 223 votes.

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“I was behind on election night and I had given up,” she recalled. “I got a call from [then-Senate president pro tempore] PETER SHUMLIN after midnight. He said, ‘You’re 50 votes behind, and Plainfield and Calais aren’t in yet. You can pick up 50 votes in those hippie towns, can’t you?’” Yes, she could. The four challengers realize they may be competing for a single nomination. “Anything’s possible,” said ANDREW PERCHLIK, director of the state’s Clean Energy Development Fund. But, he added, “I’d be very surprised if Ann or Anthony didn’t get elected.” Well, nominated anyway. The three Democratic winners will face three Republican candidates in November, and those three don’t have to spend time and money on a contested primary.

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Vermont’s oldest weekly newspaper is battling to overcome its second natural disaster in seven years. The latest calamity was a fire in the early hours of Monday, July 16, that devastated the downtown Woodstock offices of the Vermont Standard. The Standard has never missed publication in its 165-year history. Even before he could fully assess the damage, president PHIL CAMP promised that the streak would not be broken. He made good on that vow, although it took a little extra time. The paper hit the streets on Thursday night instead of the usual Thursday morning. And on the bright side, “I couldn’t have found a better picture to sell newspapers,” Camp said. This isn’t his first comeback. The Standard offices were wiped out by Tropical Storm Irene in 2011, but the paper kept on publishing despite the floodwaters. “That totally destroyed us,” said Camp. “This [fire] wasn’t quite that bad.” Camp praised firefighters for entering the building to save the paper’s computers. He was amazed at the community response. “It was almost a problem, the number of people who volunteered to do anything to help,” he said. Woodstock’s Norman Williams Public Library offered temporary space to the Standard, and Camp will now begin looking for a new headquarters. The 82-year-old newspaperman’s sense of humor is unaffected by tribulation. “My son told me, ‘You’ve lived through a flood. Now you’ve lived through a fire. Locusts are next!’” m


LOCALmatters

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ADIRONDACK ISSUE

Future Fix: Drug Detox Beds Needed in the North Country

THE

ADIRONDACK ISSUE

B Y KATI E JI CK LI N G

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 07.25.18-08.01.18 SEVEN DAYS 14 LOCAL MATTERS

COURTESY OF SABLE LABOUNTY

KATIE JICKLING

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n August 8, 2016, Sable LaBounty showed up at Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital in Plattsburgh, N.Y., ready to get clean. Six years before, she’d been prescribed painkillers for back surgery. What started as four pills a day skyrocketed to 30. When doctors would no longer fill her prescription, the 25-yearold said she took to the streets, consuming “whatever was in front of me” to relieve her craving. Her life had deteriorated by the time she sought help: She was suicidal, her relationship with her fiancé had started to fall apart, and her family was growing increasingly concerned. But when LaBounty arrived at the hospital, a doctor informed her she’d have to find her own detox services and long-term rehab treatment. Over the next three days, she contacted 30 facilities across New York, Vermont and New Hampshire, waking up at 6 a.m. to be the first caller. Every one of them was full. “When you’re in that moment and wanting to get help, and being rejected, you become hopeless,” said LaBounty, a resident of Peru, N.Y. Detoxing is the first step in recovery for opioid users, who go through intense withdrawal symptoms after giving up drugs. But finding a place to dry out can be difficult in the North Country: Across 13 counties between Lake Champlain and Lake Ontario, and from Saratoga Springs to the Canadian border, there’s only one detox facility: a seven-bed operation in the town of Gouverneur — 122 miles west of Plattsburgh. Detox facilities are “that first line that gets people in there” said Sue Martin, who started advocating for better treatment options in the North Country in 2014, when her son decided to seek treatment for his opioid addiction. “If you get the three days of detox, it gives you a fighting chance at treatment.” Many inpatient programs also require that addicts first go to detox, she pointed out. In some cases, there’s also an insurance catch-22. New York State health insurance will only pay for inpatient rehab treatment if the user has already gone through withdrawal. The dearth of detox facilities has left

Connie Wille

Sable LaBounty

Current/Planned Detox Sites in the Adirondacks Franklin County

Clinton County

St. Lawrence County

Plattsburgh PLANNED SITE SCHUYLER FALLS

GOVERNEUR

PLANNED SITE SARANAC LAKE

Essex County

Burlington

Hamilton County

a conspicuous gap in the region’s treatment options. St. Joseph’s Addiction Treatment & Recovery Centers operates six outpatient clinics in Franklin and Essex counties, plus a 67-bed inpatient facility in Saranac Lake, under the direction of CEO and president Bob Russ. Plattsburgh has three outpatient care facilities, including the Champlain Valley Family Center, according to executive director Connie Wille — but no detox. It’s been “a huge missing link,” Wille said.

The situation is slowly improving as a result of advocacy by Wille, Russ and Martin. Wille plans to open an 18-bed facility for detox and inpatient services this October in Schuyler Falls, 11 miles south of Plattsburgh. Another 10-bed detox and outpatient clinic, run by St. Joe’s, is on track for Saranac Lake in early 2019. “This is going to triple the number of beds available in the North Country,” said Martin, who splits her time between Plattsburgh and Saratoga Springs. “It’s huge; it’s fabulous.”

THE

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Unfortunately, she predicted, “they’re going to fill up.” Martin’s son had been addicted for nine years when he finally agreed to get help. He was turned away from a hospital three times, she said: once as a result of insurance issues; twice because doctors said he wasn’t sick enough to stay. He started getting treatment the next year — after he was arrested for stealing to support his habit and got a court order for treatment, according to Martin. He later relapsed and overdosed twice. Each time, the hospital discharged him within hours, Martin said. Her son is now in recovery. The experience spurred Martin to action. Last year, she started a petition asking the state to require detox services in every hospital. More than 5,000 people signed it, and last December, members of the New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services agreed to meet with Martin and other advocates. In March, and in response to Martin’s request, the state sent a letter to every hospital, notifying them that they can provide detox care without a separate state certification. Nonetheless, Martin said she still regularly fields calls from patients who want to stay in the hospital to get treatment but are being turned away. Earlier this year, for example, she counseled a patient on how to refuse and appeal the hospital’s discharge and get a patient advocate. It worked: The hospital admitted the patient, who three days later was transferred from detox to inpatient treatment, according to Martin. Now Martin wants New York officials to mandate that hospitals accept detox patients. “We’re still fighting one doctor, one patient, one hospital at a time,” she said of the phone calls for help. “It’s exhausting.” Hospitals will accept patients who meet criteria for the most severe withdrawal, said Kent Hall, vice president and chief medical officer at Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital and Alice Hyde Medical Center in Malone, N.Y. — both of which are part of the University of Vermont Medical Center network. Those in less serious withdrawal fall through the cracks: They

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LOCAL MATTERS 15

aren’t sick enough for a hospital bed, counties are also being revived with the though their detox pain makes it likely overdose-reversing drug Narcan: The that they’ll relapse. number went from 74 in 2016 to 86 in According to Hall, the detox facilities 2017. shouldn’t be seen as an easy solution to The need is particularly acute in a complex problem. He the Adirondacks, where noted that when pospublic transportation is sible, the hospital refers nearly nonexistent and patients to other treatthe sparsely populated ment programs. towns are too small to “There are a number financially support hosof components, or pital services. Hamilton modules, to caring for County, for instance, has people who are in the no hospital and averages throes of substance-use fewer than six people per disorder. Detox is one of square mile, according to those,” he said. “It’s not the county’s director of a stand-alone.” community services, Bob It’s certainly cheaper. Kleppang. SABL E L ABOUNT Y A hospital stay is costly, Kleppang and more upwards of $1,000 a day. than half a dozen providThe new Schuyler Falls facility, mean- ers said they worried that those seeking while, will charge patients about $150 a treatment often couldn’t make it to their day, according to Wille. appointments because of snowstorms While advocates and providers alike or a ride that fell through. agree that the new facilities will help Despite severe challenges, LaBounty’s fill a need, New York still has a long story took a positive turn. way to go, said John Coppola, executive When she stopped using drugs on director of the New York Association August 27, 2016, withdrawal was so of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse painful that her fiancé had to carry her Providers, which represents doctors up the stairs to use the bathroom. “I laid and treatment facilities across the state. in bed for hours begging for it to stop,” The state is just now adopting the she said. hub-and-spoke system that Vermont LaBounty toughed it out. She evenhas embraced for years, he pointed out, tually got into an inpatient facility six adding: “There hasn’t been any cause hours away, though her state health for optimism that we expect the number insurance refused to pay for it. So she of overdose deaths to start leveling off tried outpatient at Clinton County or going down.” Mental Health and Addiction Services, Since 2010, opiate overdose deaths in attending counseling and appointments New York have increased more than 220 daily for six months. percent, from 1,760 in 2010 to 3,894 in Two years later, LaBounty is clean 2016 — the most recent figures available. and has a job as a peer navigator at the Other stats also show that the crisis same organization. is worsening. In Clinton, Essex and She said it would have been ideal to Franklin counties, the number of people avoid the pain of detox but now sees admitted to state-certified treatment it as a necessary part of her recovery. programs has risen from 806 in 2013 to “Everything happens for a reason,” she 909 in 2017, according to data from the said. LaBounty hopes the addition of Rockefeller Institute of Government. new detox beds in the area will help So far this year, the Alliance for ease the process for others. Positive Health has collected more than “More availability will always help,” 37,000 syringes through its exchanges she said. “If there is that opening, it’s in Plattsburgh and Ticonderoga, 75 per- going to save someone’s life. It’s never cent more than the group collected all going to hurt to have more options of last year, said regional director Diana around here.” m Aguglia. More people in six North Country Contact: katie@sevendaysvt.com


LOCALmatters

Another Vermont Pol Promises Broadband. Could It Work This Time?

POLITICS

B Y TAYLO R D O B B S

07.25.18-08.01.18 SEVEN DAYS

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16 LOCAL MATTERS

hasn’t promised universal coverage, but Wilson said his administration is “currently developing additional policy proposals” to expand broadband and cellular access. Democratic gubernatorial candidate James Ehlers, the executive director of Lake Champlain International, said he sees broadband as important for economic development but not as the first priority for most Vermont communities, which struggle with “insufficient water and wastewater infrastructure.” “Hmmm, cat videos or safe water?” Ehlers later quipped in a text message. Hallquist considers internet connectivity the backbone of the modern economy — cat videos and all. She said that, if elected, her administration would work quickly to implement her vision. “We would have legislation ready to go,” Hallquist said. Her plan is simple in its basics: Instead of relying on telecoms to bring service to addresses they’ve never reached, she wants electric utilities to be responsible for a statewide fiber network. Hallquist says her 12 years’ experience as CEO of the Vermont Electric Coop gave her the expertise needed to lead state government through the legal and regulatory changes required to accomplish the task. Purvis, at the Department of Public ALTHA

Clay Purvis, who oversees the state’s broadband deployment, said the legislature now devotes a few hundred thousand dollars per year to expanding high-speed internet access. “It’s not the solution to getting every home with good broadband service, but it does help,” said Purvis, the Department of Public Service’s telecommunications and connectivity director. “It does make a difference in the areas where we are spending our money.” Between 2016 and 2017, according to state data, the department awarded more than $1 million in grants to telecom companies such as FairPoint and ECFiber for broadband expansion in Randolph, Royalton, Peru and other underserved communities. Five years after Shumlin’s deadline, Purvis said about 20,000 addresses in Vermont — out of a total of nearly 305,000 — lack access to internet with a download speed of at least four megabits per second. “That’s really basic broadband,” Purvis said. “Anything less than that is not functionally useful anymore.” The Federal Communications Commission’s definition of broadband requires 25 megabits-per-second download speed. By that standard, according to the department’s data, more than 63,000 Vermont addresses lack access. Providing universal broadband has proven so difficult that most candidates for governor seem to have just given up. First-term Republican Gov. Phil Scott won’t promise expansion until after the state’s economy has grown. Of the four Democrats running to replace him, only Hallquist mentions broadband or connectivity on her website. Democratic candidate Brenda Siegel of Newfane said she knew better than to make any specific pledges. “I understand that there’s a giant problem,” she said. “I also know that many governors have promised that connectivity and not delivered on it, so I want to be careful about the way we talk about it.” Scott campaign manager Brittney Wilson said the governor’s administration has created a more predictable regulatory environment for telecommunications projects and has continued funding broadband expansion. Scott

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ubernatorial candidate Christine Hallquist has a bold promise that sets her apart from her Democratic rivals: to deliver fiber-optic internet connections to every home and business in Vermont. If elected, she said, workers in bucket trucks would take to the roads to hang cable by the end of her first term. “Vermont is not going to grow its economy without getting connectivity in rural Vermont,” she said. Promises of universal high-speed internet are nothing new in Vermont politics, but every attempt to deliver it has fallen short. In his 2007 inaugural address, Republican governor Jim Douglas pledged to connect the state by 2010. He worked with the legislature to create the Vermont Telecommunications Authority, which had broad power to fund and build broadband using state and federal dollars. By the time Douglas left office in 2011, the work still wasn’t done. When Democratic governor Peter Shumlin succeeded Douglas, he promised universal broadband and cellular coverage by the end of 2013. The state kept issuing grants for broadband expansion, and millions of federal dollars poured in — mostly in the form of U.S. Department of Agriculture grants — to help connect rural homes and businesses. Shumlin’s administration wasn’t able to sweeten the economics enough to prompt private investment. His unfulfilled pledge became a political liability at the end of 2013, when he falsely claimed that he’d only promised broadband, not also universal cellular coverage. In fact, as the Vermont Republican Party gleefully pointed out, Shumlin promised — and failed to deliver — both. Some of the projects worked, and regional success stories have brought high-speed internet where it wasn’t available before. But many rural communities, such as Orwell, Halifax and Lowell, still lag far behind population centers. The state shuttered the Vermont Telecommunications Authority in 2015 and handed responsibility for broadband rollout to the Department of Public Service.

Service, said previous attempts at broadband deployment fell short for many reasons, but the biggest problem was cost. Hallquist’s answer is to have power companies string state-of-the-art fiber cables to homes and then bill users for it as they do utility costs. Internet service providers would pay to use the network and provide telecommunications packages for subscribers. While the basics of her plan are clear, Hallquist has not proposed a specific payment structure to fund the system; she said the state’s regulatory Public Utility Commission would ultimately decide. The commission has the authority to dictate how electric utilities can charge customers and how much different types of customers — industrial versus residential, for example — have to pay for electricity. The fiber systems could be partially funded through a small fee on all electric customers’ bills, Hallquist said, or the commission may decide that only fiber users should be required to pay. Another unknown is the price tag. Hallquist said she isn’t sure how much it would cost to install a statewide fiber network. The concept is untested in Vermont, but Hallquist looks elsewhere around the country for inspiration. In Iowa, Maquoketa Valley Electric Cooperative has already installed a fiber network throughout its entire service area. It’s one of dozens of cooperatives nationally, from Idaho and Montana to Minnesota and Missouri, that operate networks. Maquoketa Valley CEO Jim Lauzon (whose brother, Thom Lauzon, is coincidentally the former mayor of Barre, Vt.) said the model is a logical solution. “We own the poles, so we are able to string the fiber on our poles, which is significantly less expensive than burying the fiber,” he said. The Iowa system is structured differently than Hallquist’s proposal in that Maquoketa Valley is also an internet service provider. Instead of leasing capacity on its fiber network to another company, the co-op sells internet service directly to its customers. Lauzon said users’ monthly internet bills cover the cost of the company’s 2,500-mile, $65 million fiber system.


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Rates range from $60 per month for a basic residential package to $350 per month for the fastest business connection — a gigabit (1,000 megabits) of download speed. While fiber internet connections will be available to all 17,000 customers on the co-op’s electrical system, Lauzon said the economics would work with less than half of those customers paying to use the network, which is still under construction. “Every meter will have access to our fiber system, but we expect only about 6,800 members to actually connect to our system within the first five years,” Lauzon said. Construction on the project began in November 2016, according to a company newsletter, and the first internet customer was hooked up by February 2017. Lauzon, who used to work for Green Mountain Power, said the Maquoketa Valley co-op has made fiber work because the company only has to break even; it doesn’t have to come up with a profit for shareholders. Green Mountain Power, owned by Montréal-based Gaz Métro, does answer to shareholders.

“I think Christine’s concept makes sense,” he said, referring to Hallquist’s campaign proposal, “but each company’s going to have to do their own economic analysis to decide if they can make it happen.”

MANY GOVERNORS HAVE PROMISED THAT CONNECTIVITY AND NOT DELIVERED ON IT,

SO I WANT TO BE CAREFUL ABOUT THE WAY WE TALK ABOUT IT. BR E N D A S I E GE L

Morrisville Water & Light has already done that analysis. General manager Craig Myotte said the municipal utility found that the model could work, as long as enough of the company’s 4,000 customers are willing to pay for it.

“[I]t hinges on the level of participation that we’re able to get from the different customers,” Myotte said. “I want fiber installed at my house, but for every one like me, we have two customers that either they can’t afford it or they just don’t have the interest. And that’s going to be the hurdle to getting this project done, is figuring out how to get everybody involved.” Green Mountain Power spokeswoman Kristin Kelly said an inquiry from Seven Days  was the first company officials had heard of Hallquist’s plan. As the state’s largest electric utility —  it serves about 75 percent of Vermont addresses — GMP would be a major player in implementing the initiative. “We’re open to looking at it, but we would certainly need to know a lot more about what it means and what it would mean for all of our customers,” Kelly said. Chris Campbell, who served as executive director of the now-defunct Vermont Telecommunications Authority, acknowledged that Hallquist’s idea has worked elsewhere in the country, but said the concept is at odds with the way Vermont has regulated utilities for decades.

The state’s Public Utility Commission oversees telecom issues such as service quality and permitting for cell towers, but the state isn’t involved in controlling how much telecoms spend or setting customer rates. For power companies, regulators closely watch infrastructure spending and have the power to set customer rates. “This proposal would potentially blur those lines,” Campbell said. “I don’t think that’s a reason not to consider it, but that’s something that very definitely would be a policy change.” Whether Hallquist’s plan is viable or not, Campbell said a focus on high-speed internet is a must in Vermont, where the state’s economy is a major issue for voters and politicians alike. Siegel agrees that broadband must be a priority for the next administration, but she acknowledged that she doesn’t have the expertise to come up with a specific plan. “Were I to be governor, I would hire Christine to work on this issue,” Siegel said. m Contact: taylor@sevendaysvt.com

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In Plainfield, Mexican Citizens Line Up for Their Papers B Y KATI E JI CK LI N G

07.25.18-08.01.18 SEVEN DAYS 18 LOCAL MATTERS

gelled hair from Essex Junction. He asked that Seven Days identify him by his first name only. “Vermont is like a little community.” He said he needed to renew his expired passport so that he would have a photo ID and could board a plane if he wanted. A consulate employee handed out paperwork and hustled around with a clipboard, calling out names for appointments. Fifty-seven people had signed up with the consulate in advance; dozens more arrived without an appointment. Manuel was among the latter. He settled in for a long wait. Organizers occasionally made announcements, some of which included

PARENTS WANT TO ENSURE THAT THEY HAVE THE PAPERS NEEDED TO TAKE THEIR CHILDREN TO MEXICO

not-so-subtle references to President Donald Trump and his uncompromising immigration policies. “I know it’s hard at this time,” the consulate’s coordinator of community affairs, Oscar Daniel Escobar Mayorquin, told the crowd. Documents are important, he added, “so you have one less battle.” Though the pace was steady, the number of participants was down, said Joseph Gainza, who helped coordinate the volunteer effort as a member of the Central Vermont Farm Workers Coalition. Last year, 86 people had attended the Plainfield event. In 2016, 157 Mexicans had come, Gainza said. Why the plummeting numbers?

Gainza shrugged. Some may have gotten the documents they needed in past sessions, he suggested. “Or it’s just that they don’t want to venture out,” Gainza said, alluding to the heightened immigration enforcement under Trump. Last year, organizers recruited “spotters” to stand watch down the road from the building in case Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents showed up. They didn’t take that same precaution this year, but “it’s a great concern,” Gainza said. Advocacy organizations had set up tables, job-fair style, with free pens and leaflets. The building crawled with volunteers, all handing out pamphlets or offering services. Nurses provided KATIE JICKLING

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

I

n a drab, concrete building on the Goddard College campus in rural Plainfield, the Consulate General of Mexico set up shop Saturday to help its citizens obtain government-issued documents. Finding the Eliot Pratt Center was no easy task. Several drivers had to double back after they failed to notice lawn signs sporting the Mexican flag with arrows pointing to the consulado movil, or mobile consulate. But by 9 a.m., attendees were making their way inside the building, home to a library, a computer lab, administrative offices and the WGDR radio station. “Welcome, welcome,” a volunteer whose name tag read “Katie K” told the arrivals. Twice a year, the Boston-based consulate that serves much of New England comes to the Green Mountain State to give Mexicans a chance to procure passports, birth certificates and photo IDs. The documents issued during the daylong event can enable people to open a bank account or board a plane. The guests headed downstairs and took seats in folding chairs around plastic tables. Fabric banners from Bread and Puppet Theater adorned the walls, with slogans such as “Resistance of the heart against business as usual” and “Courage.” The crowd was mostly young men who wore stiff jeans and button-up shirts. Some filled Styrofoam mugs with coffee and heaping spoonfuls of sugar and leaned against the walls to wait. Many of the Mexicans living in Vermont are farmworkers, and some are undocumented. The consulate doesn’t ask about immigration status, consulate director of communications Camila Aviña Zavala said. The windowless basement had the bureaucratic feel of a department of motor vehicles office. In a hallway, consulate staffers manned workstations with printers, fingerprinting machines and cameras on tripods. As the room filled, the gathering turned jovial and familiar. “¿Qué onda?” people greeted each other. “What’s up?” Mothers passed their babies around for friends to entertain and admire. “Everyone knows each other,” explained Manuel, a 27-year-old with

IN CASE THEY ARE DEPORTED.

Mexican Consul General Emilio Rabasa speaking to attendees


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nutrition information, blood pressure checks and HIV testing to patients who sat on stools in semiprivate corners of the library upstairs. A dentist taught a 5-year-old girl how to floss by threading the dental tape through her fingers. She giggled. Citizens Bank dispensed water bottles, pens and information about opening a bank account. University of Vermont Extension workers circulated, volunteering to translate. Staff from the advocacy group Migrant Justice surveyed attendees about work conditions, health and domestic abuse, marking their answers on clipboards. For the first time, the consulate offered a financial workshop — partly to help those who are deported access their money, according to Ivan Guzman, who works at the consulate in New York. Sixteen people attended the session. Guzman asked people with bank accounts to raise their hands. None did. The first step, he advised: Open a bank account, so you can wire the money to a bank in Mexico if necessary.

Another must-have? “Presupuesto,” he wrote on a white board: “Budget.” “Could you survive three months without work?” Guzman asked the group. “Maximum, a week,” a man muttered in the back of the room. At lunchtime, the food truck Caja Madera arrived, and people lined up for tacos. They popped open sodas and sat on the steps of the building, legs outstretched. Manuel chatted with Seven Days while he waited. He has been in the U.S. for five years, he said, and worked on a dairy farm in Connecticut, then on one in Vermont. Earlier this year, tired of farming and unable to find other work without documents, he started his own business. He makes bimonthly trips to New Jersey to buy tortillas, spices and Mexicanmade products that people can’t find in Vermont. He gets up at 6 a.m. most days to sell the goods to workers at dairy farms. Others, too, told Seven Days why they were there. Like Manuel, each asked to be identified only by his or her first name.

A man named Ruli wanted to open a bank account so he and his girlfriend could save some money. Martín had come from Derby Line to renew his passport. He’d been in the U.S. for nine years and hadn’t seen his daughter, who was just a few months old when he left home, since. She and his wife might eventually come to Vermont, he said hopefully. As the day wore on, sweat beaded on the faces of the six consul workers processing the paperwork. Babies fussed. More and more people are getting documents for their children, said Aviña Zavala. Parents want to ensure that they have the papers needed to take their children to Mexico in case they are deported. “People are very afraid,” she said. One woman brought her 7-month-old son, Matías. He had been born in the U.S. but got a Mexican birth certificate at the event. With dual citizenship and a passport, he might travel to Mexico to meet his grandparents, she explained. As she held Matías up for the camera, a crowd gathered, shaking a stuffed

animal in front of him, clapping, cooing and calling his name. When the camera snapped, the crowd applauded. The passport photo captured the infant’s wide-eyed surprise. The event dragged past 2 p.m., when it was scheduled to conclude. At 4 p.m., Manuel sat down with a consulate staff member who took his expired passport, proof of address and driver’s license. Manuel wanted a six-year passport renewal, he said. The worker reviewed his information and readied the camera. “One, two, three,” she said, and the shutter clicked. She took his fingerprints, and he signed a document. Manuel handed over the $101 fee and accepted the glossy new passport. After six hours of waiting, it had taken all of 10 minutes. As Manuel left, he said he wouldn’t be back for a few years — assuming all goes as planned. m Contact: katie@sevendaysvt.com

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Plattsburgh’s Mayor Talks Big Plans — Even as He Slashes Spending B Y M O LLY WA LSH

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 07.25.18-08.01.18 SEVEN DAYS 20 LOCAL MATTERS

MOLLY WALSH

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lattsburgh, N.Y., Mayor Colin Read left city hall and walked toward Lake Champlain on a sweltering July morning. He passed railroad tracks, the Saranac River and the city sewage treatment plant before arriving at Plattsburgh City Marina, which has a spectacular view of the water and Vermont’s Green Mountains. Read would like to make that stroll more pleasant, with new walkways, signs and benches along the route. “We call ourselves the Lake City, but to be honest, it’s actually kind of difficult for most of our residents to get to the lake,” Read said. He pointed to an 11-acre area by the marina that he says could one day become home to a museum and perhaps a hotel and a splash pool for tots. The city has issued a request for proposals. Another project originally called for a $1.5 million expansion of the small city marina, which has a waiting list for slips. The mayor said a scaled-down expansion will be done by next summer, using donated docks and city employees rather than contractors. Read pointed across the lake toward the Queen City, which he sees more as inspiration than rival. “I think Burlington does a lot of things really well, and if we can emulate them, we should,” Read said. The trim, curly-haired 58-year-old academic is almost halfway through his first four-year term. He’s in charge of a not-so-thriving city of 20,000 that is trying to attract new investment and rebrand itself on street banners as the Adirondack Coast. But when Plattsburghers think about Read’s waterfront, ambitious development plans aren’t what comes to mind. Instead, they’re incensed about fewer lifeguards at the city beach. The mayor inherited a financial mess in city hall — and has attacked it with aggressive cuts, rankling many. How bad was the situation? “Really, the reason I ran was because we were on the verge of financial Armageddon,” Read said. The professor and former dean of the School of Business and Economics at the State University of New York at Plattsburgh, located just blocks from

Plattsburgh Mayor Colin Read

city hall, is teaching a real-world application of economic theory. The 101? Don’t spend money you don’t have. Read has merged four city departments, had the county assessor’s office take over city assessments, laid off roughly 10 people and left many other positions unfilled after employees departed. Several department heads and other employees have resigned, blaming Read for plummeting morale in city hall. Last year, the New York State Financial Restructuring Board for Local Governments urged dramatic action to address Plattsburgh’s deficit, ballooning pension obligations and a bounty of retroactive wages owed to firefighters after a lengthy labor dispute. The board noted the city’s declining bond rating and worrisome pattern of spending more than it took in. The problem exploded in 2016, when Plattsburgh posted a deficit of $6.9 million and a property tax increase of nearly 7 percent. The gloomy financials and the prospect of double-digit tax increases helped Read, a Democrat, defeat incumbent mayor James Calnon, an independent. Read took office in January 2017. The cuts he made to the existing budget reduced the 2017 deficit from more than $1 million to $308,000, he said. This year,

property taxes increased a modest 2.8 percent, the budget grew only 2.5 percent and Read expects the city to finish the year with a small surplus. Still, cuts of more than $1 million have triggered heated criticism and even an anonymously administered Impeach Mayor Colin Read Facebook page. It weaves snarky memes with legitimate beefs, such as the culled lifeguards. The page claims that Read exhibits the “signs of a sociopath” with “superficial charm’’ and a tendency to “dominate and win at all costs.” Some commenters have defended the mayor, including one who posted: “I think, given the unholy mess Read took on, things could be a lot worse.” The spotlight doesn’t bother the native of Canada, who has dual Canadian and U.S. citizenship. Read supports the relatively big-government approach of his native country but said that Plattsburgh’s cuts were needed. “It’s just part of the job,” he said. “If you’re going to change things, you can’t avoid having some people who get upset.” Evidently. There have been fireworks on the six-member Plattsburgh Common Council. On February 8, Democrat Becky Kasper abruptly quit, citing a “tyranny of despair” in city hall. For months, Kasper

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ADIRONDACK ISSUE

had questioned the city layoffs and department consolidations. Her feelings about Read’s performance have not mellowed. “You can’t just cut,” Kasper told Seven Days last week. “Extreme austerity has proven to be a way of causing the demise of a community.” Republican Councilor Dale Dowdle worries that the mayor is tackling the city’s financial problems too aggressively. He also faulted the mayor for exaggerating. Read often says that the property tax burden could force seniors to sell their homes, for example. Dowdle disagrees. “I think that’s an overplay,” he said. “Most seniors who give up their homes are doing it for different reasons.” Even some councilors who strongly backed Read’s candidacy are now lukewarm. “Though I respect the mayor’s efforts and credit him with some success, I think that the implementation of his plan has been bumpier than necessary,” Democratic Councilor Rachelle Armstrong said via email. But Read still has fans on the council. Democratic Councilor Michael Kelly portrays the mayor as courageous for making needed but unpopular decisions. “It’s easy to grow government. It’s really hard to shrink it,” Kelly said, adding: “I just feel like he’s going to get the job done in Plattsburgh.” The mayor took flak after a conversation he and Kelly had last year was caught on video and posted to YouTube. Read questioned union raises based on longevity. “That guy who’s sitting on the back of a garbage truck, is he really getting more productive?” the mayor asked. He apologized, but the comment still resonates. “It was felt kind of hard by the guys,” said Jason Keable, a heavy equipment operator and president of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, Council 66, Local 788, which represents 90 workers. Keable thinks Read would be more sympathetic if he knew what it was like to pick up 10 tons of garbage in 95degree weather. Read doesn’t let criticism dull his enthusiasm. He was full of ideas and good humor on July 16, when a Seven Days reporter joined him at several meetings and for a walk around Plattsburgh. By stabilizing the tax rate and balancing the budget, Plattsburgh can better

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attract private development and innovative ideas, he said. Read also wants to consider new uses for public property. Why not build a small group of affordable tiny houses downtown, he suggested to Plattsburgh Housing Authority executive director Mark Hamilton during one meeting. Walking past the city lighting department near Lake Champlain, Read said that he wants to move the facility to develop housing there. Circling back toward downtown, Read crossed a bridge over the Saranac River. He said he hopes to expand the limited trail along its banks. And at a city parking lot, Read shared his vision of using a $10 million state Downtown Revitalization Initiative grant to create green space, expand a farmers market and attract a private development. Earlier this month, the council voted to retain Burlington’s White + Burke Real Estate Investment Advisors as consultants on the project. Whether he can complete these grand schemes is an open question. Critics, including Kasper, noted that the city might pass on a $1.1 million state grant for the Saranac River Trail. That would

be a terrible mistake, she suggested. Last week, the common council discussed but delayed asking Read to decline the grant, which requires a local match of $232,000. Read initially supported putting the grant on hold but has since said the city should accept it and that he has negotiated a more flexible implementation.

Similarly, there is no verdict on whether Read can meet another of his goals: to attract and keep twentysomethings in a reinvigorated downtown. Katie Dowling, 24, graduated from SUNY Plattsburgh in 2016. The bartender and server at Our House Bistro sings at local clubs. The city just doesn’t

He was a professor at the University of Alaska Fairbanks for 15 years and dean of the business school at Central Connecticut State University before he moved to Plattsburgh in 2005 to take the SUNY business school job. He quickly grew fond of the North Country city. With his wife, Natalie Peck, Read planted a vineyard of cold-hardy grapes north of the city. They sold the wine from a downtown shop, since closed, and Read became interested in revitalization. He wrote weekly columns about business for the Press-Republican for several years and was never at a loss for ideas. In his spare time, Read tinkers with a Cessna 180 floatplane and flies it around the lake. Read has lived in the U.S. most of his adult life and became a U.S. citizen in 2010. He wanted to get involved in civic life and has plunged in as mayor. Will he seek another term in 2021? Maybe, maybe not, Read said. “If I run again, it will be because I didn’t get enough done in my first four years.” m

THE MAYOR INHERITED A FINANCIAL MESS IN CITY HALL — AND HAS ATTACKED IT WITH AGGRESSIVE CUTS, RANKLING MANY.

Read is generating more headlines than his predecessors, said Joe LoTemplio, who has covered seven mayors in his 33 years as a writer at the Press-Republican. “What he did last year was kind of drastic,” LoTemplio said. “He eliminated four big departments. That kind of change, I’ve never seen anything like it.” Not all residents are worried, according to the city hall scribe: “The jury’s kind of still out. There’s another mindset in the city that says, ‘Yeah, this city has been kind of fat and could use some trimming.’”

have enough going on, she said. “I picture Burlington as, like, a more hip place,” said Dowling, who plans to move to the Queen City next year. Plattsburgh, founded by Zephaniah Platt in 1785, has a century-old city hall and retains many historic buildings. But some are vacant, and the paint is peeling on the window frames at city hall. It’s certainly not Vancouver, the shiny, cosmopolitan city where Read grew up. From an early age, he was attracted to academic pursuits. He eventually earned five advanced degrees, including a PhD in economics.

Contact: molly@sevendaysvt.com

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LOCAL MATTERS 21

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EXCERPTS FROM THE BLOG

Dems Largely Unknown in Vermont Gubernatorial Race, Poll Shows

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 07.25.18-08.01.18 SEVEN DAYS

JOHN WALTERS

political columnist

Former Sanders Adviser Named in Manafort Trial Documents

Tad Devine, who served as senior adviser to Sen. Bernie Sanders’ (I-Vt.) 2016 campaign for president, got an unwelcome reminder last week of his political past: His name appears on numerous exhibits in the prosecution of Paul Manafort, the former chair of President Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign. Devine worked with Manafort on the 2006 and 2010 campaigns of Viktor Yanukovych for president of Ukraine. Yanukovych won in 2010, but he was forced from power in 2014 after concerns about his pro-Russian policies sparked a popular uprising. Yanukovych fled to Russia; he is wanted in Ukraine on charges of high treason. Manafort faces trial in federal court starting July 31 on bank fraud and tax-related charges. The office of special

prosecutor Robert Mueller released a list of more than 500 potential exhibits last Thursday; the list includes 16 emails, email chains, memos and invoices involving Devine, Manafort and others in the years 2006, 2010-12 and 2014. The contents of the documents were not disclosed. The exhibit list includes the names of senders and recipients and subject lines. Two examples: “2010.02.03 Email T. Devine to P. Manafort re Election Night Speech” and “2010.02.15 Email T. Devine to P. Manafort, et al re Job Well Done.” According to the New York Times, Devine severed ties with Yanukovych in 2012 after the Ukrainian leader jailed a political opponent. Five of the emails included in the exhibit list were sent in 2014 — after Yanukovych’s ouster — by Devine to Manafort associates Rick Gates and Konstantin Kilimnik. (Gates and Kilimnik have also been indicted by Mueller; Gates has reached a plea agreement and is cooperating with the investigation.) Since the emails’ contents have not been released, it’s unclear why Devine was exchanging Ukraine-related communications long after his supposed departure and less than six months before he joined the Sanders campaign in late 2014.

SASHA GOLDSTEIN

Tad Devine

FILE: PAUL HEINTZ

22 LOCAL MATTERS

TAYLOR DOBBS

Selling an item or offering a service that comes with some “free” cannabis is illegal under Vermont’s new recreational marijuana law, Attorney General T.J. Donovan declared in an advisory Monday. The interpretation of the law, which went into effect July 1 and is known as Act 86, comes after several businesses began offering cannabis, edibles and vape cartridges in exchange for a delivery fee. Some entrepreneurs were also selling an overpriced item such as a sticker, T-shirt or bracelet and would throw in a “gift” of marijuana on the side. That kind of transaction is considered a marijuana sale, according to Donovan. “Any transfer of marijuana for money, barter, or other legal consideration remains illegal under Vermont law,” Donovan wrote in the advisory. He added: “Individuals may gift pursuant to the parameters set forth in the law.” Act 86 allows Vermonters to possess up to an ounce of marijuana and two mature and four immature cannabis plants. Consuming cannabis in public remains illegal, as does driving under the influence of the drug. The legislation did not create a taxed-andregulated market for selling cannabis, something advocates derided because it makes obtaining marijuana, or seeds to grow the drug, more difficult. The lack of regulation gave instant rise to a gifting “gray market.” Such a market also exists in Washington, D.C., which has a law similar to Vermont’s. Some businesses, such as Rolling Flower, opened up shop on the first day of legalization in the Green Mountain State, offering weed for a delivery fee. Tim Fair, an attorney who runs a firm focused on cannabis law, said he met with Donovan and others in the Attorney General’s Office last week to discuss the issue of gifting. Following the AG’s ruling, Fair said he’d advise his clients, including Rolling Flower, to put an end to the practice “until we have a tax-and-regulate bill.” Fair said he didn’t necessarily agree with Donovan’s interpretation of the law, “but it’s either play ball or fight, and fighting doesn’t get us anywhere. “We have to think long-term,” Fair continued. “By working collaboratively, we can grow this the right way.”

FILE: LUKE EASTMAN

FILE: JOHN WALTERS

Forty-three percent of Vermonters approve of first-term Republican Gov. Phil Scott’s job performance, according to a new public opinion poll, while 28 percent disapprove. Scott’s Democratic and Republican rivals, meanwhile, are struggling to gain traction ahead of the state’s August 14 primary election — and remain largely unknown to those surveyed. The poll, commissioned by Vermont Public Radio and Vermont PBS, is the first conducted by in-state media organizations since the 2016 election. For that reason, according to Castleton University professor Rich Clark, it’s difficult to determine how and why Scott’s popularity has waxed and waned during his first term. “This is what we miss by not having some regular polling in the state,” said Clark, who ran the Castleton Polling Institute until the university shut it down in March. The public media poll surveyed 603 Vermonters on landlines and cellphones between July 6 and July 16. Its margin of error is plus or minus 4 percent, though the margin is greater for subgroups of data, such as political party Gov. Phil Scott affiliation. VPR and Vermont PBS hired Clark to craft the questions and analyze the data; New Jersey-based Braun Research made the calls. The poll suggests that Scott has little to fear in the August primary. Seventy-two percent of those surveyed had never heard of his sole Republican opponent, Springfield grocer Keith Stern. Among Republican voters, 10 percent said they had a favorable opinion of Stern, while 2 percent said they had an unfavorable opinion. The four Democratic gubernatorial candidates on the ballot are also largely unknown. Fifty-nine percent said they had never heard of former Vermont Electric Coop CEO Christine Hallquist. More than 70 percent were unfamiliar with her primary-election rivals: Southern Vermont Dance Festival director Brenda Siegel, Lake Champlain International executive director James Ehlers and 14-year-old Ethan Sonneborn of Bristol. Of those who disapprove of Scott’s performance in office, one demographic group stood out: members of his own political party. While 49 percent of Republicans approved of his job performance, 35 percent did not. That’s a higher disapproval rating than among independents (50 and 24 percent) and Democrats (41 and 28 percent).

Vermont AG: It’s Illegal for Businesses to ‘Gift’ Marijuana

Devine is a prinicipal in the Washington, D.C., political consulting firm Devine Mulvey Longabaugh, which operates domestically and internationally. He did not return a call from Seven Days.


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lifelines OBITUARIES

Donald A. Brown

musical appreciation, which ran from Supertramp to Rachmaninoff. Don also was a talented craftsman. As the owner with his son, Mark, of Things Unlimited for years, he had an eye for old furniture and the ability to repair and restore his finds. Notable was his talent in caning and rushing chairs — he won many first-prize awards for his work and now leaves a legacy of work for his family and friends.  Don was father to three children: Mark V. Brown (deceased), Faith Brown and Martha Brown, who — with their partners, Lynn Mansfield and Rob Donaldson — miss him terribly. Mark’s wife, Patricia Brown, and Mark’s children, Tabatha Soliz and Joseph Brown, survive Don. Don’s family gives special thanks to his best friend for 40 years, Renie Zaneloni, who was a critical support to him throughout his life but especially in his last years.  Don’s family also wishes to thank Dr. Jania Clough, Ally Parker, Tom Paquette, Sharon Keegan, the staff at Vermont Respite House and Dr. Mark Pitcher. A grateful mention goes to Susan Abel for her help with the writing of this obituary. A memorial service and interment is planned for October 27 at Mount Calvary Annex Cemetery in Burlington. Donations in Don’s name may be made to Franklin County Animal Rescue (franklincountyanimalrescue.org) or VNA Vermont Respite House (vnacares. org/hospice-care/mccluremiller-vna-respite-house).

Linda Pervier

1951-2018, BURLINGTON Linda Pervier, 67, passed away peacefully on July 10, 2018, at the McClure Miller VNA Respite House following a courageous fight with cancer. She lived a remarkably full and rich life with many cherished friends, esteemed colleagues, and a close and loving family. Linda leaves behind six grieving brothers and sisters: Jerrold (Lynn), Richard (Shuree), Felton Jr. (Alan), Susan (Stephen), Roderick (Beth) and Loretta (Lawrence), along with many adoring nieces, nephews, and great-nieces and -nephews. Linda was born in Brunswick, Maine, into a large musical family. She enjoyed piano, guitar and vocals, performing solo and in many groups and choirs. She traveled with the New Vaudeville Movement, giving music workshops throughout the American South and Hawaii, recalling with particular fondness her stint as vocalist and guitarist for Blue Sky Serenaders. In recent years, she performed with the

local Chickpeas trio and found great joy singing with the Unitarian Universalist chancel choir. Linda earned a BA in English and taught at the high school level and a memorable year to elementary students on the island of Pohnpei. She spent the majority of her professional life with nonprofit organizations, managing civic and entertainment events in southern Maine and the Burlington area. She recently retired after 15 years as development associate for the Shelburne Museum. Linda maintained a residency in New England all of her life, but her love of traveling and passion for French language and culture led to many excursions. She lived in France on two different occasions, with numerous other visits to Paris, Provence, the French Caribbean and Québec. She earned an MA in Romance Languages: New French Society and Civilization from the University of Vermont, with various awards for service there. Linda joined the Alliance Française of the Lake Champlain Region, twice serving as president, and

substantively supporting Burlington’s business community in providing a welcoming French-speaking presence for its many francophone visitors. She was decorated by the French Ministry of Education with les Palmes académiques in recognition of her work on behalf of the French language. A celebration of Linda’s life is set for Saturday, July 28, 2 p.m., at the Unitarian Universalist Society, 152 Pearl Street, Burlington, VT. In lieu of flowers, the family requests generous donations to the McClure Miller VNA Respite House, 3113 Roosevelt Hwy., Colchester, VT 05446 (vnacares.org/donating-to-vna/ make-an-online-donation).

BIRTHS Oliver Leon Lafayette On June 30, 2018, at Porter Medical Center, Edward Lafayette and Roberta Sinnock welcomed a son, Oliver Leon Lafayette.

Want to memorialize a loved one in Seven Days? Post your remembrance online and in print at lifelines.sevendaysvt.com. Or contact us at lifelines@sevendaysvt.com or 865-1020, ext. 37.

LIFE LINES 23

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Mark your family’s milestones in lifelines.

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have earned his Eagle Scout rank. He spent summers working as a lifeguard and winters playing in the snow. He attended the Nazareth School and graduated from Burlington High School, where he was selected as “Best Looking in the Class.” After stints in both the Navy and the Army, Don attended the University of Vermont and started his teaching career in Shoreham. It was during that time that he met his future wife, Dorothy Seale, a nurse at the Mary Fletcher Hospital. After their marriage, he taught in Hinesburg and then went to graduate school at Syracuse University. Don’s career path was focused on education. He was a well-loved and respected vice principal and principal in Winooski, Burlington and St. Albans. He was known for his ability to listen and was considerate of others’ opinions, even if they differed from his own. He brought a sense of fun and playfulness to his work life. Don had a long-held love of the outdoors; he was an avid fisherman and occasional hunter. Through him, his family learned to love camping and hiking. A trip to Alaska was a big influence on his life. He had profound respect for the environment and loved all living things, especially the birds, chipmunks and squirrels he fed all year round. Don also loved music and was a volunteer for the Vermont Symphony Orchestra for many summers. His family was amazed at the range of his

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

1927-2018, SOUTH BURLINGTON Donald A. Brown, educator, fly fisherman, music lover, master furniture refinisher and raconteur, died at VNA Vermont Respite House on May 27, 2018. Don was born on October 26, 1927, at the Fanny Allen Hospital in Colchester to Isabelle Duprat Brown and Victor Pierre Brown during the Great Flood of 1927. When it was time to return home to Burlington after Don’s birth, his mother had to cross the Winooski River by boat. He was the youngest of three siblings, Leola Hebert and Robert V. Brown, both of whom predeceased him. Don was raised in the Old North End of Burlington, where he made many lifelong friends. He was a Boy Scout and learned many of his outdoor skills in the woods in Underhill. He was proud to

OBITUARIES, VOWS, CELEBRATIONS


The King in the Queen City: A Conversation With Filmmaker Eugene Jarecki

Elvis Presley and America on a road trip through the heartland. It opened last week at Merrill’s Roxy Cinemas in Burlington. We spoke with Jarecki by phone about Presley, politics and more.

B Y RI CK K I SO N A K

ELVIS IS PART

OF OUR DNA. E U GE N E JARE C KI

COURTESY OF EUGENE JARECKI

FILM

SEVEN DAYS: Your work has traditionally provided insight into the lives and minds of historically significant figures like Kissinger, Eisenhower and Reagan. What inspired the pivot to Elvis Presley? EUGENE JARECKI: The symbolism, the meaning of Elvis is almost inextricable from the meaning of the American dream itself. When I was growing up, Elvis was part and parcel of it. As I got older and started to rethink the American dream, with its undertow, complications and shortcomings, Elvis naturally rose into the same reflective lens.

24 STATE OF THE ARTS

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SD: You suggest his rise and decline are a metaphor for what’s happened to this country. EJ: Right, though with a real love, I guess a tough love. Tough love asks questions and seeks the best for the one you love. SD: I love the whole concept of The King. Who would ever have imagined you’d make a movie starring a used car? EJ: Ha, well, originally we were just making a film that was a political reflection about a man and the country he left behind, about the allegoric parallels between Elvis and the USA — in the way he struggled with premature power, as we do; the way he developed all kinds of fissures and fractures in his identity, as we have. But that film had no car. A still from The King

T

alking Trump-era politics with EUGENE JARECKI is probably the equivalent of playing chess with Boris Spassky or standing across a tennis court from Roger Federer. The field is not level. You are not remotely in the same league. And that’s what makes it so much fun. The Peabody and Emmy awardwinning director of such acclaimed documentaries as The Trials of Henry Kissinger (2002), Why We Fight (2005), Reagan (2011) and The House I Live In (2012), the Mad River Valley resident has been named a Soros Justice Fellow at the Open Society Foundations and a senior fellow at Brown University’s Watson Institute for International & Public Affairs. But wait, there’s more. He’s also

founder and executive director of the Eisenhower Project, a public policy organization dedicated to raising awareness of the forces shaping U.S. foreign and defense policy. In his downtime, Jarecki authors penetrating tomes such as 2008’s The American Way of War: Guided Missiles, Misguided Men, and a Republic in Peril — which has to be the funniest title ever for a book about the Iraq War. “Combining the skills of journalist and poet,” Variety has declared, Jarecki “sets the gold standard for political docus.” High praise. And precisely the skill set required to unpack the implications of an America run by a guy who tweets on a golden toilet. Jarecki’s latest documentary, The King, explores the connection between

SD: So how did his 1963 Rolls Royce come into the picture? EJ: A member of my team told me Elvis’ Rolls was about to be auctioned, and a light bulb went off. I realized we could make the Great American Road Movie here — starring Elvis Presley, no less. We could follow his ghost across the country and visit the places where he once laid his head. SD: Was that in the budget? EJ: God, no. I had to ask whether the company behind the film would step up and purchase the car for it, with the idea that at the end, if I didn’t accidentally drive it off the Grand Canyon, we’d sell it again. Thankfully, they went for it. SD: The folks who come along for the ride are a fabulous, thoughtful variety pack of humans: Emmylou Harris, James Carville, Ethan Hawke, Mike Myers, John Hiatt, Greil Marcus,

EmiSunshine & the Rain, even Burlington’s own Kat Wright, among others. EJ: It is unabashedly a musical road trip in Elvis’ car. But the musical side of it is a way for people to join the journey and not be in an eggheady documentary. SD: That’s a powerful moment when John Hiatt climbs in, realizes where he is and dissolves in tears. EJ: You know, when you’re working on a film, you quickly learn whether you’re blowing against the wind or finding kindred spirits. When John had that reaction, I immediately started to understand just how powerful this vessel was going to be. People were going to be asked to look at this country through the eyes of someone they loved and lost. Elvis is part of our DNA. SD: That’s some sad, sobering footage of him toward the end. I hadn’t seen images from that era in a while. EJ: There’s a crucial cautionary tale in the way Elvis died at 42 buried in all the seductions that had been thrust upon him. His demise makes him very much a canary in the coal mine of the exact tragedy we’re experiencing right now. He was just, as ever, way ahead of his time. SD: I read that candidate Trump wanted to sit in the Rolls but you felt you couldn’t do that to Elvis’ car. EJ: I don’t use the name of this rapacious president. I don’t want to plug his brand. He’s the embodiment of everything that destroyed Elvis Presley and which will destroy America as a republic if we don’t rise up to demand that the standards of this country be shifted back toward our first principles. SD: He appears to prefer walking back to shifting back. Seen any signs of hope lately? EJ: On the watch of this president, we’ve seen the birth of some of the most significant social movements of my lifetime, out of repulsion at him. #MeToo, Time’s Up, the Parkland students, mayoral uprisings in the sanctuary cities, protests to block the administration’s decision to create juvenile concentration camps in this country. Americans who were asleep are suddenly awake. m Contact: kisonak@sevendaysvt.com

INFO The King, directed by Eugene Jarecki, currently playing at Merrill’s Roxy Cinemas in Burlington. See “Movies” for a review and online showtimes for more info.


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7/31/12 8v-quarryhill01618.indd 11:04 AM Examine how the myth of the cowboy shaped modern perceptions of the West and Native American culture.

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PLAYING COWBOY

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Treasure.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Certain kinds of crime rip through a small town’s communal fabric, and the bonds of trust may take years to rebuild. July 24 will see the release of two novels by Vermont authors that focus on the aftermath of bad things happening in tight-knit communities — one for teens, the other for adults. “We won’t take long, just a little scare.” That’s what a 17-year-old boy tells his girlfriend as he prepares to commit a hate crime in Aesop Lake, the first young-adult novel from Williston’s SARAH WARD. From a family teetering on the brink of poverty, Leda considers herself lucky to be dating popular David. But he, equal parts possessive and homophobic, doesn’t approve of her friendship with a gay classmate. When David spots the classmate and his boyfriend making out at the town reservoir, he springs into disastrous action. One boy is seriously injured, and David strong-arms Leda into being his alibi. It’s not easy to empathize with a protagonist who helps cover up a vicious attack. Scared and vulnerable as Leda is, readers may feel impatient with this would-be ally who wilts the first time she has to risk something of her own. Ward minimizes that impatience by alternating between two first-person narrators: Leda and one of the attack’s survivors. We’re always aware of the consequences of violence, even as Leda flees to a job at an idyllic camp at Aesop Lake. When the survivor turns up there, too, fully aware of her dark secret, she can’t run anymore. The name of the fictional lake signals Ward’s didactic intent, which she reinforces by prefacing each of the book’s three sections with an Aesop fable. This overt messaging (“A bad excuse is good enough for a bully”) could feel a little blunt to a teen audience. But the ultimate message is a timely reminder that good intentions aren’t enough to stop bad actors. Leda enables the town bullies out of fear of losing her own tenuous position in the community — until she learns what it means to step up. Ward includes a list of anti-bullying resources and a discussion guide for the classroom conversations her novel is bound to inspire. Unproved suspicions turn a young college professor into the black sheep of his village in What Remains of Her, the latest suspense novel from ERIC RICKSTAD. Unlike his best-selling Canaan series, which kicked off with The Silent Girls, this is less police procedural than dark character study. When a woman and her young daughter vanish, the first suspect is her husband, Jonah Baum, a man full of rage left over from an abusive childhood. His best friend, the town sheriff, manages to keep him out of jail, but Jonah becomes a bitter recluse. Twenty-five years after the disappearances, Jonah discovers a naked, bloody child in the woods and brings her home, believing her to be the reincarnation of his lost daughter. Meanwhile, sheriff’s deputy Lucinda — Jonah’s daughter’s childhood friend — searches for the new missing girl. Keeping readers guessing until the end, What Remains of Her is full of tantalizing ambiguities. Is Jonah the child’s savior, or has he become an abuser in his turn? Was he really the exemplary

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Discussion Continues on Burlington Mural ‘Everyone Loves a Parade!’ B Y S A D I E W I LLI A M S

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 07.25.18-08.01.18 SEVEN DAYS 26 STATE OF THE ARTS

SADIE WILLIAMS

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f any humor can be found in the current controversy over Burlington’s “Everyone Loves a Parade!” mural, it’s in the title. Some locals don’t love the mural at all and have accused it of whitewashing history. In response to the outcry, the city council created a public task force in May to come up with recommendations for how to deal with the piece. If you’re new to this public art kerfuffle, here’s a recap: In 2009, Québécois artist Pierre Hardy was commissioned to paint “Everyone Loves a Parade!” for the Church Street Marketplace — actually, in the alleyway linking Church Street to the parking garage. The piece was intended to commemorate Samuel de Champlain’s “discovery” of Lake Champlain and the ensuing 400 years of local history. Completed in 2012, the mural is emblazoned with corporate logos of companies that sponsored its creation. In November 2017, activist ALBERT PETRARCA spray-painted the mural’s legend with the words “Off the Wall.” Petrarca was charged with unlawful mischief but has continued to rally against the mural, saying it misrepresents the Abenaki. Critics have also complained about the mural’s dearth of people of color. According to emails from Hardy released by the city, the Native person depicted in the mural is meant to be a Huron who accompanied de Champlain. The task force has met almost weekly since May. Its members include University of Vermont master’s of community development and applied economics candidate WEIWEI WANG, Sweetwaters owner TERRI MELINCOFF (a mural sponsor), artist JEN BERGER, lawyer BRIAN SULLIVAN, folklorist THOMAS CARROLL, historian and mental health professional GARY DE CAROLIS, and UVM adjunct professor PATRICK BROWN. BURLINGTON CITY ARTS executive director DOREEN KRAFT advises the panel, as does assistant city attorney ANTHEA DEXTER-COOPER. On Wednesday, July 18, the task force members held a public comment session in city hall. Six Burlington residents showed up to voice their

ART complaints; all advocated for the removal of the mural. “I feel like a historical minstrel,” said clinical mental health counselor VICKI GARRISON, who is African American. “I’m put in a position to share my heart’s truth, and white people are in a position to erase that truth, regardless of how painful it is.” As Garrison’s remark implied, the task force is largely white, as are the city council members who will decide the mural’s fate. She added that “the mural does exactly what I’ve experienced my entire life. It promotes … erasure of people of color.” Before the session closed, Kraft read a statement from VERMONT ARTS COUNCIL executive director KAREN MITTELMAN. It noted that the issue of racism in public artworks is on trial across the country, not just in Burlington. “The challenge for any community is to find meaningful ways to keep the past and present in an ongoing dialogue,” Mittelman wrote. “Ideally, public art and artists play a key role in broadening our vision and helping us all to find ethical and inclusive ways to represent our community.” After the meeting, task force chair

THE TASK FORCE HAS MET

ALMOST WEEKLY SINCE MAY.

Burlington’s “Everyone Loves a Parade!” mural

The mural’s public task force

Wang said, “It’s great that we do have this opportunity to have these discussions and be able to provide these recommendations — as opposed to no process at all.” Those discussions are often aided by testimony from community members and artists, including Hardy himself. After the July 10 meeting, the mural artist sent a letter to the task force at Melincoff’s request. That letter was not read at the July 18 meeting and has not yet been entered into the public record, but DexterCooper gave a copy to Seven Days. In it, Hardy requests “a nice acknowledgment and a simple thank you” from Chief Don Stevens. His reasoning? Recent events

have helped the Vermont Abenaki Alliance gain recognition, Hardy believes. One example: a partnership with Burlington to host events and exhibits showcasing Abenaki culture. The artist’s letter can be read in full in the online version of this article. The mural task force will meet twice more to solidify its recommendations and will submit them to the city council for consideration at an August 13 meeting. m Contact: sadie@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Task force meeting times and locations are posted at burlingtonvt.gov.


Bizarre Bazaar

Middlebury’s Town Hall Theater Welcomes New Executive Director

Bike parts, tools, accessories, gear, vintage novelties, and bizarre accoutrements. Priced to sell!

B Y JA C Q UELI N E L AW LER

COURTESY OF TOWN HALL THEATER

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Mark Bradley

T

THEATER

CLINICAL

PSYCHOLOGY

WITH NEW CLINICAL MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING TRACK

Our Master of Arts degree program prepares students for professional psychology positions in the private or public mental health system and study towards a doctoral degree at another institution. We prepare students to be licensed as a clinical psychologist and/or a mental health counselor. The curriculum of our master’s degree program is approved as a step toward licensure by both the Vermont Board of Psychological Examiners and, as of October 2016, the Vermont Board of Allied Mental Health Practitioners.

SEVEN DAYS

APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING ACCEPTED. STATE OF THE ARTS 27

MIDDLEBURY’S TOWN HALL

MASTER’S DEGREE PROGRAM IN

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board spent the preceding decade working to establish the space. Their initial capital campaign raised $5 million to renovate the dilapidated building, which was Middlebury’s first town hall in 1883. Anderson recalled, “We had no idea how much work the place would need. Like, we thought we needed to reinforce the 100-year-old slate roof, but once we got up there, we realized if you even picked up a piece of slate it would disintegrate in your hand.” Fast-forward to today: THT is a thriving community space, hosting about 165 events a year, according to Anderson. That’s more than 1,500 community events since the venue opened. Not only does THT host 12 resident companies, ranging from theater and opera companies to choruses and filmmakers, but it also serves as a mixed-use space, by design. “I’ve always thought that a town needs a big room,” Anderson said, “and we can’t be precious about what happens in that room. We made the space as flexible as possible, so that in one weekend we could have a performance, a wedding and a Halloween party. It’s been a key to our success, and the community has really embraced it.” Tasked with the labor-intensive project of stewarding the building and the organizational challenge of facilitating hundreds of venue rentals, Anderson

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his August, DOUG ANDERSON, founder of Middlebury’s TOWN HALL THEATER, will step down from his role as executive director after 10 years. MARK BRADLEY will take over the position. But Anderson isn’t going far — just up the stairs from his current office to a newly created position as artistic director. As he put it, “I’m firing myself as executive director to find someone who can take [THT] to the next level. Running a business was something I was never trained to do.” Enter Bradley, who joins THT from LEBANON OPERA HOUSE in New Hampshire. An artist himself, Bradley majored in clarinet performance at McGill University, a choice that he acknowledged “was a little esoteric” but reflected his love of music. After about five years of freelancing in Montréal as a musician and artistic promoter, he recalled, “It dawned on me that I found working with venues to be really exciting. The business side of arts is a challenge I really enjoy.” With this revelation in mind, he moved to Toronto to get his MBA, then, in 2016, to New England to take a position as assistant director of Lebanon Opera House and be closer to family. Bringing in someone with Bradley’s passion for the business side of theater has been a great relief, Anderson said. Though THT has been operational for 10 years, he and other members of the

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Bradley, folks are buzzing about the fate of the little diner, which closed earlier needed to work 80-hour weeks if he this summer. “We have an obligation to wanted to direct big operas and musi- make sure that [the Diner] is not shutcals. About three years ago, he pitched tered up, and to respect its role as part of his board the idea of hiring someone to the downtown,” he said. “So we’ll have help. “Luckily,” he said, “I have a very to sift through the various ideas to find one that makes sense committed, hands-on for us and fits strategiand proactive board cally with the growth who all immediately pattern of THT.” agreed that we should Bradley also envido this.” sions making THT To fund the new into more of a regional position, THT used touring destination. those three years to “THT could take raise its endowment a greater role as a from $500,000 to $1.7 roadhouse in this million, substantially little corner of New offsetting the cost of M A R K B R A D LE Y England, and for cerBradley’s hire. Though tripling the endowment was a monu- tain niche genres has the potential for mental task, Anderson said, “It was being a fun touring spot,” he said. Bradley and Anderson spoke of each wonderful to go to donors and have a specific reason to raise the endowment, other with congenial respect, expressone that will ensure the longevity of this ing excitement about curating THT’s programming together. Anderson is institution.” Anderson said THT will continue particularly looking forward to creatto increase its endowment to pay for ing a children’s theater company — that the incidental costs of owning a his- is, theater made for children and pertoric building that is a perpetual fixer- formed by adults. “It’ll be awesome to upper. But he’s glad to pass that duty be able to do that kind of creative work on to Bradley. Asked whether he would during a standard work day, instead of miss any aspect of running the space, from five to nine in the morning, and Anderson didn’t hesitate before saying, then seven to 10 at night,” he said. For his part, Bradley is eager to make “Not one thing. Walking out of that office and moving upstairs will be a very new connections in Middlebury, where he’ll move in a couple of weeks. “Doug happy day for me.” Bradley is prepared to take on the has worked really hard with the board challenge with enthusiasm. “I feel like and other people in the community to everything I’ve been working on for the build a foundation,” he said. “Now I past 10 years has been training me for have to get closer to the community and figure out where THT can fit more of this job,” he said. He’s particularly excited about man- those needs.” m aging THT’s latest purchase, a local fixture called simply the Diner, adjacent INFO to the THT property. According to Learn more at townhalltheater.org.

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Quick Lit « P.25

28 STATE OF THE ARTS

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family man he thinks he was? Is anyone in this bleak rural burg a moral exemplar? Promising as the material is, the novel doesn’t always feel fully realized, especially in its first act. A surfeit of short chapters ending in forced cliff-hangers suggests the literary equivalent of a horror movie full of jump scares. In the past, Rickstad has used a deft mixture of pulp plotting and literary prose to build dread; here he seems to be grabbing us a little too hard by the collar. Still, fans of Rickstad’s Canaan novels will undoubtedly want to

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explore another landscape full of sinister omens, broken families and shattered dreams. Here, as in Ward’s novel, communal silence perpetuates cycles of violence, and it takes bravery to change the tide. MARGOT HARRISON

Contact: margot@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Aesop Lake by Sarah Ward, Green Writers Press, 200 pages. $10.99. Ward discusses her book on Thursday, July 26, 6:30 p.m. at Phoenix Books Rutland. Free. What Remains of Her by Eric Rickstad, William Morrow Paperbacks, 416 pages. $14.99.


HACKIE

I

A VERMONT CABBIE’S REAR VIEW BY JERNIGAN PONTIAC

Big Softies away. “Not to worry,” I assured Roland. “They run on the half hour.” At the booth, I discovered my error. The ferry did run on the half hour, but only until 7 p.m. Then it was on the hour, which meant we were facing an hour’s wait. I briefly considered shooting up north to catch the Plattsburgh ferry, which runs about every 20 min-

Working guys like this man and Roland have essentially no dress code on the job, I thought. That’s kind of the case for me, too, though I do strive to appear presentable for my customers. I nodded at him in acknowledgment and smiled: Yes, we are both human beings whom God or the universe or random fate (take your pick) has brought together

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utes, but that would entail an hour’s ride. The Champlain Bridge, farther south in Addison, provided another alternate route, but that, too, made no sense time-wise. “My bad, Roland,” I said. “I should have double-checked the schedule beforehand.” “Don’t worry about it, man,” he replied, graciously accepting my apology. “Lemme just call my wife to give her an updated ETA.” We parked in the queue (first position, a dubious distinction), and, leaving Roland on his own to speak with his wife, I exited the cab to stretch my legs and contemplate the incipient sunset. A couple of minutes later, I watched a Sprint repair van pull to a stop behind my cab. The driver stepped out and, hands in pockets, meandered in my direction at dock’s end. The dude was rocking some baggy, beat-up dungarees, a Grace Potter T-shirt and a backward baseball cap. Rounding out the look, he sported a funky, scraggly beard reminiscent of a moose.

in the summer dusk at this ferry dock in Charlotte, Vt., 2018. The guy smiled back and approached me. As soon as we began chatting, it was apparent we hit it off. An instant connection like that is inexplicable, the darndest thing. Not that I’d know from experience, but, minus the sex, isn’t it the point of Tinder? “So, what do they got ya doing at Sprint?” I asked. “I maintain the fiber-optic system. There’s always glitches and accidents, and I help keep the thing up and running. The job suits me. I’m on my own most of the time, and I range all over upstate New York and Vermont.” “Very cool,” I said. “Like an updated version of the Wichita lineman.” “Exactly!” he said, chuckling. As he spoke, the man held his right hand up to his forehead, shielding his eyes from the setting sun. I subtly shifted my standing position to mitigate the problem for him, and he followed course. As is typical of men when they converse, we didn’t directly face each other but

aligned our bodies at about a 120-degree angle. “You got a wife and kids back home in — what did you say? — Syracuse?” “I do, and here’s the whole saga. I had two daughters with my first wife. They’re now 24 and 27, and both doing great. Sarah was and is a lovely person and a great mother, but we were never really compatible. Jill, my second wife, who I was with for six years, died of brain cancer. That was brutal and just about broke my heart permanently. But a couple of years ago, I reconnected on Facebook with Nina, my high school sweetheart. It was the perfect time for both of us, and we’ve been together since then.” “That is just beyond wonderful,” I said. “It’s like, if you don’t close yourself off, if you somehow manage to stay open, love will find you. I really believe that.” “If you had told me that in the wake of Jill’s death, I would have laughed in your face. I was bitter, and for a long time. But since Nina came back in my life, I’ve become a big softie and, I guess, a believer in love.” Chuckling, I placed a hand on the man’s shoulder. “Nothing wrong with being a big softie,” I said. “I’m one myself.” m All these stories are true, though names and locations may be altered to protect privacy.

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’m a mason,” my customer told me. “I started when I was a teenager working with my uncle. I’ve worked jobs all over the North Country, sometimes in Vermont, too.” I was driving Roland Couture back to his home in Au Sable, a small New York town across the lake at approximately the same latitude as Burlington. His truck had broken down on Shelburne Road, and the repair was going to take a few days, pending parts delivery. As the crow flies, the direct route to Au Sable incorporates the Burlington ferry to Port Kent. However, the Port Kent crossing traverses the lake at its widest point and takes three times as long as either of the two ferries to the north and south, at more than twice the price. I had done the Google Maps thing before I picked up Roland and determined that, for the Au Sable destination, the southern crossing — Charlotte to Essex — was 15 miles shorter than the northern. So that’s where we were bound. “Oh, man,” I enthused. “I’m fascinated by masonry. It’s such an ancient profession. Do you ever work with granite? I understand some of the finest granite in the world is quarried in Vermont.” “All the time,” he replied. “We use a lot of ‘Adirondack green,’ which has a greenish tint. The Vermont stuff is this beautiful white, which comes mostly out of Barre. In the trade, we call it ‘Barre white.’” “I love it! An homage to Barry White, the heavyset soul singer from the ’70s.” We arrived at the Charlotte dock just as the seven o’clock ferry was pulling

Hackie is a twice-monthly column that can also be read on sevendaysvt.com. To reach Jernigan, email hackie@sevendaysvt.com. 07.25.18-08.01.18

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Former Wall Street maverick Sandy Lewis is an Adirondack agitator ... who might be on to something

Hurricane

SANDY

BY JAMES BANDL E R | P H O TO S BY GL E NN R US S E L L

ot long after he moved from New Paltz to Essex, N.Y., Mark Kimball had an unexpected visitor. A man in a big pickup truck pulled on to his land, now Essex Farm, and fixed his steely blue eyes on Kimball, like a raptor that had just found dinner. He uttered four words: “You’re going to fail.” Kimball was only momentarily flummoxed. “Oh,” he said. “You must be Sandy Lewis.” “How do you know my name?” the man demanded. Kimball replied, “You’re the only person in the community who would introduce yourself that way.” Kimball had already heard plenty about Salim “Sandy” Lewis, a 79-yearold Wall Street-dealmaker-turned-beeffarmer who owns a verdant 1,100-acre swath of land along the southern edge of town. The reputation of Kimball’s neighbor preceded him. “There’s not a dinner party within 50 miles where conversation doesn’t turn to Sandy Lewis,” said one Essex resident who did not want to be named for fear of provoking the most ornery man in the Adirondacks. Lewis’ rough wake has reached the Vermont side of the lake, too, rocking Middlebury College president Laurie Patton, University of Vermont president Tom Sullivan, and environmental activist and author Bill McKibben, to name a few. On Wall Street, where Lewis ran a small but respected investment house, he was known for his brilliance and outspokenness. He was viewed as an upright reformer, but his career was cut short when he pleaded guilty to financial crimes. Lewis later received a full and unconditional presidential pardon, and a judge all but exonerated him. He and his wife, Barbara, eventually retreated to upstate New York, where Lewis reinvented himself as a Carhartt-clad Jeremiah, ringing the bell of doom. Some of his crusades — which once sounded fringe — have since proved prescient. Before the 2008 financial crisis kicked into gear, Lewis was one of the first to raise alarms about the health of investment bank Bear Stearns, which later collapsed. He sounded off about sexual abuse in elite boarding schools, inadequate medical care in the North Country, small-town corruption and drug addiction, long before these issues dominated the news. Most famously in these parts, he waged a successful, against-the-odds legal campaign against his perennial whipping boy, the Adirondack Park Agency, the powerful state land-use regulator.


ACK

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THE

ADIRONDACK ISSUE

ADIRONDACK

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on the phone, he’s almost impossible to interrupt. Lewis’ haiku-like chain emails — addressed to a who’s who in the media and academic elite — are similarly overwhelming and puzzling. Fiona Harvey, a reporter for the Guardian, demanded that he stop copying her on electronic missives that also go to former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg, New York Times publisher A.G. Sulzberger, university presidents and health care luminaries. “Your elliptical references and hints, while refusing to say anything substantial, are just pointlessly mystifying,” Harvey scolded. Lewis was undeterred. “As for reaction, I confess I could not care less,” he replied. “I do apologize, but not really.” Lewis’ flamboyantly unorthodox be-

Whoever gets in my way, bam!

I JUST TAKE THEM OUT.

Wretched Excess on Wall Street, which told the story of the rise and fall of Bear Stearns and prominently featured Lewis’ banker father, the legendary Salim “Cy” Lewis. Since then, Cohan and Lewis have collaborated on two New York Times opinion pieces, including a recent op-ed on Lewis’ campaign to alert the world to the threat that the misuse of antibiotics poses to the human gut biome. “Sandy weaves stories and spells,” says Cohan. “He’s obviously brilliant, but he’s brilliant in a way that someone on the spectrum is brilliant ... If there’s a normal IQ curve, he’s several standard deviations of smarter.” Many of his methods are maddening — even for the most patient reporter. “No one else I know will call at six in the morning and leave a four-minute message and keep calling,” Cohan says. “There’s no filter. No carburetor. There is nothing.” Cohan sighs. “Is he like a broken clock right twice a day? Is he deserving a Nobel Prize, or a menace to society or all three wrapped into one?” After 11 years of dealing with Lewis, Cohan says he still doesn’t know.

NOT SO NEIGHBORLY

SANDY LEWIS

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havior raises the question: How could he have been so successful? His friends say this has always been his MO, and it’s a mistake to underestimate him. Former World Bank president James Wolfensohn, a onetime investor with Lewis’ firm and a longtime friend, says Lewis is a “very creative thinker” — though not always logical — and a talented networker. He adds that while a good portion of what Lewis says is outlandish and tied to his own defense mechanisms, there are valuable nuggets: “I think there is 25 to 30 percent of what he says that is pure gold.” Award-winning financial journalist William Cohan has spent a lot of time with Lewis over the years — so much that he’s known as a “Lewis whisperer.” Lewis was a source for Cohan’s book House of Cards: A Tale of Hubris and

Lewis casts a long shadow in the North Country. He is best known for the multiyear legal fight he waged against the Adirondack Park Agency, the state regulator that oversees private and public land use within the 5.9-millionacre park. Many locals resent the APA for micromanaging use of their own land. The dispute with the Lewis Family Farm centered around three houses he built on his property. Because the houses were meant for agriculture workers, Lewis argued, he did not need a permit. Today, Lewis says he constructed those houses — at a cost of about $1.2 million — for one reason: to goad the APA into fining and suing him. He succeeded. After nearly four years of fighting, Lewis defeated the APA in court, effectively circumscribing the agency’s power to regulate farms. Lewis didn’t just beat the APA; he humiliated it. He got so deep under the skin of the agency’s top enforcement official that the man fired off an email calling Lewis a “sociopath.” The official then apologized and resigned. Twelve years after they were built, the houses remain unoccupied shells. The APA battle should have made Lewis a universal hero to working people and farmers in the region who viewed the agency as high-handed and elitist, but it didn’t. Lewis, who says he

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Now his igneous anger stern to beseeching. “You is surging through the are not letting me do the cracks of a new vein: job of a president,” she Lewis’ self-proclaimed said before hanging up. raison d’être is the safety “Sandy! You have  to unof the foodT Hsupply — in derstand this.” T H E E particular, the overuse and misuse of antibiotics in CRANK CALLER ISSUE I S S Uhumans. E Can polite, civilized livestock and He people change the world? found this purpose three Lewis doesn’t think so. years ago, when cows he purchased from out of state came to his Essex farm inOver the course of his tumultuous fected with anaplasmosis. An exhaustive life, Lewis has always conducted himresearch project followed, and Lewis self the same way, according to friends became convinced that Big Ag and Big and enemies. He aligns action in accorPharma are in cahoots: He believes they dance with principle, and then, like a are intentionally infecting animals with bull in pursuit of a flapping red cape, he the disease to justify their use of growth- charges.  inducing antibiotics. “Whoever gets in my way, bam! I just People inadvertently consume these take them out,” Lewis says.  “I mean, drugs through meat, which has the potential to kill off essential bacteria in the human gastrointestinal tract. Lewis predicts that this practice —  not an Ebola epidemic or nuclear war — is what will lead to our extinction. Lewis’ crusade  has generated heat and headlines, including two major stories in the New York Times. Middlebury College, which buys the Lewis Family Farm’s grass-fed beef, agreed to let Lewis help organize a campus conference on the misuse of antibiotics in agriculture. But Lewis has a way of biting all of the hands that feed him. After the Times stories fell short of his expectations, he sent a mass email calling out one of the reporters as a “coward.” He added that the editor “needed a seeing-eye dog.” Lewis repaid his customer, Middlebury College, by sending mass emails and leaving voicemails insinuating that members of the college’s dining services group had been corruptly influenced by a food vendor that sells meat for about half of what he charges, according that’s what we should all be doing. We to Middlebury officials. Middlebury flatly denies Lewis’ alle- should be acknowledging that there’s a gation. “It’s ridiculous. He has zero evi- lot of crap going on, and we should be dence. He throws allegations willy-nilly decking it. We should be standing up without any regard for the truth,” says and saying, ‘I object.’” Peter J. Solomon, an investment college spokesperson Bill Burger. When planning for his conference banker who has known Lewis since began earlier this year, Lewis phoned elementary school, calls him the most Patton, the college’s president, inces- intense person he’s ever encountered. santly. One middle-of-the-night call “You don’t meet a lot of people with prompted a voicemail response that he his level of fervor and commitment,” Solomon says. “It’s like dealing with a saved and shared with Seven Days. “You cannot continue to harass fire hydrant. It comes out full force and my staff on the phone and bad-mouth does a lot of good. Sometimes it floods.” Always marked “urgent,” the classic them,” Patton admonished, as if to an obstreperous 13-year-old. “I can afford voicemail message from Lewis starts to roll my eyes when you accuse people out as a stern but reasonable-sounding of all sorts of things. My staff cannot. soliloquy that picks up momentum and They are vulnerable … You have already volume and vehemence and sometimes created a huge problem in stress with vitriol as he moves from one seemingly my staff!” Patton’s tone shifted from random thought to another. In person or


Hurricane

SANDY

waged the fight on behalf of “indigenous, poor « P.31 white trash,” is too divisive a figure to be widely revered. “I think they tolerate him,” says Michael Pratt, a former town official who once clashed with Lewis but now calls himself a fan. “He has a very strong way of coming across to people that ... probably alienates them.” While others shirk from getting involved in politics, Pratt says Lewis has eagerly jumped into the fray: “The bigger the fight, the bigger the opponent, the more he’s ready to take them on.” On the eastern shores of the lake, Sullivan, the UVM president, has been in Lewis’ crosshairs for a year, since he agreed to discuss the farmer’s views on antibiotics and agriculture. UVM donor Harry Nelson, a former Wall Street colleague and friend of Lewis, suggested the two should meet. “I knew if he played his cards carefully, he might make a friend of Sandy,” Nelson says of Sullivan. “But he didn’t do that.” The UVM president’s mistake? “He didn’t take Sandy seriously enough,” Nelson says. When Lewis got the invitation to meet with Sullivan and several senior administrators, the Essex farmer requested that it take place in an auditorium with students and journalists present and microbiologists and veterinarian experts dialing in by speaker phone. Sullivan refused and said the university’s Phi Beta Kappa Room would have to suffice. Lewis was furious. He didn’t believe he could deliver a proper presentation without the help of experts. Bringing a videographer along to document the meeting, Lewis began his disquisition by throwing on the table a series of books that he had assigned as reading. Sullivan attempted to take charge by asking his subordinates to introduce themselves, but Lewis just talked over them. He paced the room, careening from one point to another in a filibuster that dragged on for two hours — part bio-epic and part diatribe. Sitting as quiet as mice, the administrators shifted in their seats when Lewis mentioned his childhood in a home for disturbed children. “I can drive somebody absolutely crazy,” Lewis said in Sullivan’s direction.

“I know absolutely how to do it. You can’t live in a mental institution ... for six and a half years and not know something about how to drive people crazy.” Over the next months, Lewis launched a fusillade of emails baiting Sullivan. “I found Mr. E. Thomas Sullivan pathetic,” Lewis wrote later, adding that the president had a “feminine” handshake. “He’s a second-rate lawyer running a weak state school.” Sullivan is a big fish, but many of Lewis’ targets include small-fry neighbors and town officials. Some — including a town clerk whom Lewis reported for child pornography — got their just desserts. But some of the other battles seemed unwarranted. Lewis, for instance, boasts of shooting a neighbor’s errant bull, which had wandered onto his property. Most recently, he sued a veterinarian who he claims negligently reused needles, infecting the rest of his herd with anaplasmosis. Last month, after Lewis repeatedly circulated mass emails that disclosed the vet’s personal medical problems, a judge issued a protective order barring Lewis from contacting the Vermont man. The lawsuit with the vet is coming to an end; the vet’s insurance company agreed last week to pay $100,000 to settle the matter. “He’s going to fire a cannon that’s just as big at a squirrel as at an elephant,” says Kimball, the Essex neighbor. “He always travels with large ordnance; he is unable to see the difference between a world war and a petty skirmish.”

— a childhood in a mental hospital, several bouts of cancer, a criminal conviction, the drowning death of an adult son in a kayak accident — Lewis possesses a freakishly acute radar for human suffering. He has a special place in his heart for orphans, victims of war atrocities and those who have been sexually abused. He goes out of his way to help social outcasts, including prisoners, alcoholics and drug addicts. This aid takes the form of civic acts both large and small. To the consternation of his neighbors in Essex, Lewis has twice — once in 1998 and again in 2010 — championed the construction of a large residential drug treatment center close to his property, arguing that the community has a duty to put such a facility in its own backyard.

Living under Lewis’ roof, though, was not always easy. “Sandy,” she says, “is someone with a uniquely high threshold for tension and confrontation.” He once arranged for her to play before 400 inmates at Clinton Correctional Facility, aka Dannemora. Baillie also witnessed a number of his beatdown sessions, including one of McKibben, the environmental activist and Middlebury College faculty member, in 2008. In his 2005 travelogue about Vermont and the Adirondacks, Wandering Home, McKibben wrote glancingly about Lewis: “One of Ivan Boesky’s former business partners, for instance, has a big spread and farms it as if he were in Kansas, removing every hedgerow to make life easier for his trac-

The Lewis home has served as a children’s shelter of sorts, and he’s been a surrogate father to numerous young people who say that without his strong hand, they would have slipped through the cracks. “He has given me so much,” says violinist Helena Baillie, whom Lewis mentored along with her twin sister. “What’s unusual about him as a benefactor ... is that he was addressing the whole human being from the beginning. He was putting my interests above his own, living in accordance with a set of values guided by an unwavering inner compass.”

tor.” Though the passage didn’t mention him by name, Lewis was incensed to be so linked to Boesky, the face of Wall Street greed. Lewis had only worked for Boesky briefly before quitting. Lewis demanded a meeting with McKibben in the Middlebury College president’s office. Baillie says McKibben avoided eye contact as Lewis tore into him. “He was unsparing,” Baillie says of her mentor. “Sandy orchestrated the dynamic in the room like a conductor leading a complex symphony.” A decade later, Lewis is still enraged by McKibben’s refusal to apologize.

In upstate New York, Lewis reinvented himself as a

Carhartt-clad Jeremiah,

32 FEATURE

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ringing the bell of doom.

PRISONERS, ALCOHOLICS AND DRUG ADDICTS

Lewis is a paradox. On the one hand, he seems to delight in being nasty. His emails are laced with invective, gratuitous references to the race and physical attributes of the people he is targeting, as well as innuendos about their sexual proclivities, health problems and mental states. And yet, the same person is also known for gestures of staggering kindness. This includes kicking open the doors of elite hospitals for almost anyone suffering from serious illness, including people he’s previously savaged. Lewis is drawn to those who have been victimized, deformed or hurt. Perhaps because of his own difficult life


McKibben tells Seven Days he has “no real memory” of the decade-old event. This perseveration over tiny slights is one reason Lewis’ North Country neighbors work to avoid his attention. “Sandy Lewis? I don’t dare to say anything about him,” said one woman, flinching after being buttonholed by this reporter as she and her husband paused briefly on a country road. “Why?” “He takes everyone to court.” Added her husband: “If you’ve got any dealings with him, get out of it.” “He’s a rough character,” the wife continued. They chortled nervously. The husband shook his head. “He didn’t move up here to make friends.”

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Lewis attributes his volatility to his troubled childhood. His father, known as “the Bear” of Bear Stearns, was a hustling bond trader who rose to the pinnacle of finance. But according to Lewis, he was also a philanderer and an alcoholic. His marriage to Lewis’ mother, Diana, became a deeply unhappy one. A former actress and model who had been married and divorced twice before, Diana gave birth to four children. Lewis, her eldest son, was quiet, solemn and reserved. He says his relationship with his mother was shaped by violence and neglect. He recalls that she told him she did not love him. Some 70 years later, the memories are still raw. After one of his mother’s beatings, Lewis says, he threatened to kill himself. “I went out and stood in the window,” Lewis recalls. “I said, ‘You come one step closer, I’m jumping. Do not touch me again.’” That stopped the physical abuse, but not the anger. Lewis says he spent almost every day of his childhood trying to figure out how to get sent away from home, which he still refers to as “778 Park Avenue.” His dentist inadvertently assisted when Lewis bit one of the man’s fingers. The 10-year-old was shipped off to the Sonia Shankman Orthogenic School at the University of Chicago. Director Bruno Bettelheim, a Holocaust survivor and author of best-selling books on child development, was later exposed for having falsified and plagiarized his research. Bettelheim noted the depth of the new boy’s depression and the intensity of his disturbance, according to school records from the time and later court proceedings. “The chaos of his inner life caused him to swing from moody

isolation to outbursts painful to himself and others,” Bettelheim wrote of Lewis. In a letter to Lewis’ parents four months after the boy’s arrival, Bettelheim wrote that Lewis had a tendency to boast and to annoy other children. “Sandy,” Dr. Bettelheim wrote, “still tries to disrupt the group in many ways. He still refuses to accept limitations as applying to himself.” As years passed, Lewis became more confident. Bettelheim observed that he displayed “a blend of tenderness, kindness, integrity and blunt frankness (which was often experienced as intrusive and discomfiting) such as I have seldom seen.” At the age of 14, Lewis was deemed healthy enough to take classes at the University of Chicago’s Laboratory Schools. From there, he moved to the University of Chicago. By then, he was deeply in love with Barbara Lisco, a teacher and the daughter of a professor. Where Lewis was fiery and volatile, Barbara was even-keeled and gentle. They married in 1960. His schoolwork languished, and he dropped out to spend a year working as a counselor back at the Orthogenic School. In 1964, Lewis started retracing his father’s footsteps — first, by taking a job at the Chicago office of Salomon Brothers. The same year he moved Barbara and their first two kids to New Jersey to work in the company’s Wall Street office. During commutes back and forth to Manhattan, his colleague Nelson explained how markets worked. “My first impressions were, this was an extremely smart fellow with an intense curiosity,” says Nelson, who would later introduce Lewis to UVM president Sullivan. “He was  a different kind of personality than almost anyone I’d met before.” Although talented, Lewis was difficult to manage. He cycled through a number of top-shelf banks and brokerage houses, either because he resigned or got fired. His problem: He could never stop blowing the whistle on the misdeeds and ethical transgressions of his colleagues. “If you want somebody to say that the emperor really has no clothes, you can depend on Sandy,” Bloomberg, a onetime partner with Salomon, told the Wall Street Journal in a page-one profile of Lewis in 1984. Despite the drama he created, Lewis was by then highly regarded, having advised two separate U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission chairs. In 1980, he started his own firm, S.B. Lewis

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SANDY

& Co., where being. Were he sent to jail, I believe it he specialized would utterly destroy him.” in arbitrage, The judge listened. Lewis got three « P.34 trading on take- years of probation with community overs, and soon service to be performed at a drug treatmoved into matchmaking for corporate ment center. The light sentence was mergers. This loather of big institu- due, in part, the judge ruled, to “the tions engineered the 1981 merger of uniqueness” of the crime — Lewis didn’t scrappy Shearson Loeb with venerated personally benefit from it — and the American Express. The biggest merger “uniqueness” of the man whose good of two financial companies at the time, works, she noted, had been a part of his the deal marked the beginning of a new life long before his legal troubles. age defined by the consolidation of small “To me,” she said, “that’s impressive.” banks into large, diversified financial FRIEND OF BILL? companies. In 1986, everything seemed to be Lewis was a felon — until the president going Lewis’ way. In addition to the of the United States got involved. After Lewis’ prosecution and before success of his firm and the respect he commanded in business circles, he was the Monica Lewinsky scandal broke, thriving personally, with six healthy Lewis’ lawyer and friend Douglas children and a strong marriage. Less Eakeley helped engineer a meeting bewell known was his role as a protector tween Lewis and president Bill Clinton and supporter of many talented but dis- at a hotel in Maine. The lawyer believed that Lewis could help Clinton contain advantaged youth. Then the U.S. attorney for the Southern his extramarital affairs and also advise District of New York, Rudolph Giuliani, him on policy issues, including the econcame knocking. Lewis was indicted on 22 omy and drug addiction. And, perhaps, it would help Lewis secure a pardon. counts of securities law violations. “You don’t want me to do this,” Lewis Lewis did not deny the main facts of the case, but he argued that his plan had says he warned his lawyer. The meeting didn’t go as hoped. After been motivated by vigilantism, a desire to stop speculators from “shorting the Lewis told the president he had somesyndicate” — driving stock down in a thing very sensitive to tell him, Clinton maneuver that is now illegal. He acted escorted him to a kitchen, where everyto help a friend, whose firm held the one left except the president, Barbara stock, and to thwart these speculators and a friend Lewis had brought along by enlisting others to buy up the shares, as a witness. Lewis told Clinton that thus buoying the price. Prosecutors Eakeley thought the two of them should claimed his firm abetted the falsification spend a weekend together. “Sir, this is about your most personal of records to conceal the wrongdoing. Because Lewis faced the prospect of business. You probably won’t be too a lengthy incarceration, Barbara pressed happy with me by Monday morning, but him to plead guilty to three counts in I think we can avoid a train wreck,” Lewis exchange for leniency in sentencing. said he told the president, according to Letters poured in from friends asking a New York Times article that described the judge to be merciful. “It scares me the encounter. Clinton looked furious, to think of where I’d be without Sandy’s and Lewis’ friend was shocked, he told the Times, realizing that generous help in he’d been brought along my adolescence Sandy’s Sound & Fury to witness an intervenand young adulttion regarding the presihood,” Valerie To hear a voicemail message dent’s love life. Ford Jacob from Sandy Lewis or watch video of him explaining his At the time, Lewis’ wrote the court. anti-antibiotic theory, check out this advocates thought the Orphaned as a story online at sevendaysvt.com. meeting had backfired teenager and so badly that no pardon raised by Lewis, would be forthcoming. she credited him for her successful law career. Former However, on January 20, 2001, president Securities and Exchange Commission Clinton granted Lewis a pardon — one of chair Roderick Hills called Lewis “a his last acts in office. No one but Clinton man of enormous integrity” with a knows whether Lewis’ intervention had “crusader’s drive” to correct societal ills. anything to do with it. Soon, Sandy and Barbara Lewis And Lewis’ original rescuer weighed in. Bettelheim, now retired, pleaded with moved out of New Jersey and settled full the judge not to send his former patient time in their Essex farmhouse. She manto prison. “Sandy Lewis is unquestion- aged the accounts, and he supervised ably a fragile — very fragile — emotional the agricultural operation, which has

In the North Country,

Lewis casts a long shadow. expanded from five to 1,100 acres that extend down to Lake Champlain. Over the years, Lewis’ team cleared tons of junk from the land, including old cars. They repaired damaged soil and buried miles of drainage pipes. No one disputes the high standards of the farm or the quality of its 100 percent organic grass-fed beef. But to break even, the Lewises need to be able to charge $10 a pound for their ground beef. Getting restaurants, prep schools and colleges to buy at that price is the farm’s biggest challenge. Lewis says if he can’t get a fair price for his beef, the farm won’t survive. By Barbara’s estimation, the Lewises have pumped more than $20 million into the venture, and it’s still losing money. She is worried. Yes, the farm managed to get Massachusetts’ Deerfield Academy and Middlebury College on board as customers, but those relationships are fragile. Lewis hasn’t been able to mend the fence with Patton since his middleof-the-night call to her. Even his allies on campus feel bruised by his attacks on the integrity of people who work for the college’s dining services organization. What’s more, some experts in the field of gut biome research won’t attend a conference if it is organized by Lewis, according to Middlebury College officials; he is too polarizing. Belinda Thompson, an assistant clinical professor at Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, is one of the few academic vets in the field whom Lewis trusts. She was the first to diagnose his cows with anaplasmosis, and she shares his concern about the overuse of pharmaceuticals on farms. But she rejects some of his specific theories. For example: that antibiotics, whether given to people or cows, should always be given by injection — not orally. Thompson does not accept that farmers are intentionally infecting their cows so they can administer growth-enhancing antibiotics. “I don’t know anyone who

would welcome a disease into their herd,” she says. “It’s hard to say whether what he’s doing is a good idea or not,” she says of Lewis and his anti-antibiotic campaign. “He certainly wears us all out.” Nevertheless, Thompson keeps talking to Lewis. Her view is that society needs gadflies, however disagreeable.

‘I’M AN UNPLEASANT PERSON’

Time is running out for Lewis, who is just a year shy of 80. Space, too. On a recent visit, he paced between the bedroom, living room and kitchen, his range of motion limited by the length of his landline phone cord and a sore foot that he would later discover he’d broken — he has no idea how. Some say he’s mellowing. “The ratio of vitriol to normal is better than it was 10 years ago,” one neighbor suggests. Recently, Kimball, the neighbor whom Lewis predicted would fail, sent Lewis a friendly email to ask about his hurt foot and the gut biome campaign. Lewis forwarded the email to Seven Days, along with some harsh criticisms of his fellow farmer, but then added that Kimball was “the best we have — and the only.” That’s high praise from Lewis. Could it be a sign of a sunnier attitude? Both Lewis and his wife dispute that. “I’ve been this way all my life,” Lewis says. “I’m an unpleasant person, and I know that. Barbara says, ‘Won’t you please take it easy?’ The answer is, ‘No, I will not.’” m Vermont journalist James Bandler got his start as a Sunday writer for the Rutland Herald and Barre-Montpelier Times Argus. He moved on to the Boston Globe and then the Wall Street Journal, where he won a Pulitzer Prize. He was also a staff writer at Fortune magazine. He lives in Norwich with his wife and two children.


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CALEDONIA COUNTY FARMERS MARKET

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Sarah Meyers Brent, In the Garden, 2017, charcoal, acrylic/canvas, 48 x 60 inches

JUNE 30-AUGUST 17 Sarah Meyers Brent: In the Garden

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A celebration of friends with wings, fur, tails or hooves. & MOVIES Hosted byMUSIC Discover in the PARK St. Johnsbury and Dog Mountain with help from community sponsors. FREE FAMILY FUN!

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PHOTOS: SADIE WILLIAMS

Tracking Changes At a Westport rail crossing, a hiking trail and young farmers share space BY SA D I E W I L LIAMS

Viall’s Crossing

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t first glance, Viall’s Crossing is a pastoral wonder. The 132.5-acre farm sits on the outskirts of the tiny town center of Westport, N.Y. It’s equal parts rolling, farmable fields and verdant forest. But what looks like a familiar landscape — white house, hayfields, dirt driveway — is actually a property that hosts literal and figurative crossroads: a road, a railway, a hiking trail, and a family exploring the intersections of rural living and big-city culture. Until recently, 75-year-old Harold White owned Viall’s Crossing, whose name has a dual purpose. It honors his ancestor, Asa Viall, who was friends with abolitionist John Brown and transported Brown’s body in his farm cart after his execution. And it identifies the only railroad crossing for miles: a small path used by farmers, and now hikers, to get to the other side of the Canadian Pacific Railway, which runs from New York to Montréal. Viall’s story would have been forgotten if not for two conservation nonprofits that came together to preserve the property. First, the Eddy Foundation, based in Essex, N.Y., bought it outright from White. It then sold the house and land to a young farming couple with a conservation easement that ensures the railroad crossing will remain part of the Champlain Area Trails network. The results? The second nonprofit, CATS, is one step closer to achieving its mission of crisscrossing the Champlain Valley with hiking and cross-country ski trails. And Lindsay Willemain and

Nick Rowe get to own a homestead at a reduced rate. CATS executive director Chris Maron had his eye on Viall’s Crossing even before it went on the market. The railroad crossing was crucial to future trails, but CATS couldn’t afford the property. After a real estate agent walked into his office and asked if he was interested, Maron approached the Eddy Foundation, on whose board he sits. The nonprofit agreed to team up to preserve Viall’s Crossing by purchasing the property before a developer could.

Nick Rowe, Lindsay Willemain and their son Augustus

The foundation promptly sold the property to Willemain, 39, a poet and organic farmer, and Rowe, 38, a retired U.S. Marine who studied ethnomusicology at Columbia University. The couple, who have a 2-year-old son, bought the house in April and promptly left their apartment in New York City. The conservation easement was an

Chris Maron

integral part of the deal, making Viall’s Crossing more affordable for Willemain and Rowe. It also allows CATS to preserve the property’s lush forests and hayfields and to create a hiking trail that hops the tracks in the only legal crossing for miles. “Railroad tracks and right-of-ways are private property,” Maron explains. “They have their own police department, and you can only walk across in a few designated locations.” This particular crossing brings CATS a step closer to one of its goals: creating a trail loop that links Westport to its northerly neighbor, Essex. “We’re in the Champlain Valley,” Maron says, “and we’re known for outdoor recreation and hiking. Yet here, people can’t really do that. We want to have places we can hike, and we also want it so outdoor recreation helps our local economy.” He’s referring to the boost that hikers

will give Westport and Essex by shopping and dining at local establishments. So far, CATS has conserved and maintained 40 miles of trails, according to its website, and aims eventually to connect them to trails across the lake. Having solidified one route from Westport to Essex, the nonprofit plans to circle back with a trail that curves down to the east. Some portions of the Essex-Westport route run along roadways, and, though they’re scenic, Maron plans to move the whole operation off-road. Viall’s Crossing is one piece of the property puzzle that will make his goal possible. Maron says most of the properties on the Adirondack side of the Champlain Valley are privately owned, so conservation easements must be secured from the owner of each parcel over which a prospective trail would pass. If White’s property had ended up subdivided, Maron would have needed


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to secure multiple easeShe didn’t think ments. That’s one reason about farming as an he worked so hard to option until she heard AUNT JACK JACK screwball comedy by S.P. Monahan AUNT screwball comedy by S.P. Monahan Fri, July 20July & Sat, July 28 atJuly 7:30 pm find a young family to a National Public Radio Fri, 20 & Sat, 28 at 7:30 pm Monahan screwball comedy by S.P. PERFECT FIT sexual-identity drama by Lia Romeo take it over — that and story on Kristin Kimball, Fri, July 20A & Sat, July 28FIT atJuly 7:30 A PERFECT sexual-identity Saturday, July 21 & Sunday, 29 atpm 7:30 pm drama by Lia Romeo the strategically located author of The Dirty Life: Saturday, July 21 & Sunday, July 29 at 7:30 pm BRIGHT HALF LIFE relationship study by Tanya Barfield crossing. A Memoir of Farming, drama by Lia Romeo THE H E book Sunday, July 22 &sexual-identity Friday, JulyLIFE 27 at 7:30 pm THE BRIGHT HALF relationship study by Tanya Barfi While the crossing is Food, and Love.T The Saturday, July 21 & Sunday, July 29 at 7:30 pm Sunday, July 22 & Friday, July 27 at 7:30 pm FREE Screening of the Oscar-Winning Film essential to Maron, for details Kimball’s first PHILADELPHIA Wednesday, July 25 at 7 pm Willemain the tracks year as cofounder of the FREE Screening of the Oscar-Winning Film ISSUE I S S U E I S S U E relationship by Tanya Ba ART EXHIBIT Gabriel Q’s masks, puppets, study and costumes are more of a source of horse-powered Essex PHILADELPHIA Wednesday, July 25 at 7 pm on display July 11-29 Sunday, July 22 & Friday, July 27 at 7:30 pm reflection. Farm. ART EXHIBIT Gabriel Q’s masks, puppets, and costum “We live very remotely,” she says, Willemain caught the bug. Soon she Aunt Jack TICKETS on displayOscar-Winning July 11-29 FREE Screening Film ADULTS:of $20the advance, $22 at the door “and yet the train comes through. So was working on farms in New York, FRIDAY, JULY 20 to STUDENTS: $15 in advance, $17 at the door what do you make space for?” in Jamaica and outside her native Wednesday, July 25 at 7 pm Aunt Jack PRIDETICKETS 3-PACK: Any 3 admissions: $50 adults advance, SUNDAY, JULY 29 The answer: organic farming and Baltimore. In 2012, she landed a posi$20 advance, $22 at the door $55 at ADULTS: the door, $35 students an eventual artists’ residency. For now, tion working with Kimball at Essex Gabriel masks, and costu FRIDAY, JULY 20 to TicketsSTUDENTS: $15 in Q’s advance, $17 atpuppets, the door CHANDLER CENTER available online at CHANDLER-ARTS.ORG though, that vision remains partly aspi- Farm, a scant 10 miles from the property FOR THE ARTS PRIDE 3-PACK: 3 admissions: via telephone after July Any 9 at (802) 728-6464. $50 adults advance, on display 11-29 SUNDAY, JULY 29 orJuly 71-73 Main Street, Randolph, VT ration as the couple grapples with the that would one day be her home. $55 at the door, $35 students dull and dangerous reality that their Like the Kimballs, Willemain wants CHANDLER CENTER Tickets available online at CHANDLER-ARTS.ORG Untitled-22 1 7/6/18 12:00 PM new home is riddled with lead paint. to use horses “for anything that requires Aunt FORJack THE ARTS or via telephone after July 9 at (802) 728-6464. 71-73 Main Street, Randolph, VT Willemain is hard at work scraping it field work or implements.” She’s already ADULTS: $20 advance, $22 at the door off the walls and ceilings in almost every moving in that direction; her Amish STUDENTS: $15 in advance, $17 at the door room, plus the wraparound porch. The neighbors mowed her fields last week upstairs rooms are uninhabitable, so with their draft horses. In exchange for PRIDE 3-PACK: Any 3 admissions: $50 adults advance, she’s moved her family into a down- hay, they’ll help her fix broken fences. $55 at the door, $35 students stairs living area. She’s also planted a small orchard of fruit and nutCHANDLER trees with her son. Next CENTER Tickets available online at CHANDLER-ARTS.ORG up, “I want toFOR get some meat goats THE ARTS and or via telephone after July 9 at (802) 728-6464. have some chickens andStreet, a couple of 71-73 Main Randolph, VT horses,” Willemain says. She also needs a potable water source; she’s currently NOW THROUGH JULY 31 filling jugs of drinking water at her son’s daycare facility. For now the priority is the house, but Willemain won’t set aside her other passions, poetry among them. “It’s hard for me not to embody both of those things,” she says of her creative life and her fascination with farming. In the years ahead, she and Rowe CHRIS MARON want to create an artists’ residency During an interview at her chic that will balance their love of organic dining room table — which stands out agriculture and the natural landscape amid the faux-wood paneling and flow- with their appreciation of music and ery wallpaper from White’s tenure — a literature. postal driver leaves a package on her “The conservation work and the crowded porch. “Those are attachments presence of this very loud train that for my HEPA vac,” Willemain says with I’m trying to embrace, and thinking a laugh. about what we’ll be leaving in New York The farmer laughs a lot, despite the has me thinking about what belongs, amount of labor she’s putting into lead what will come — these big questions,” remediation. It’s more than necessary. Willemain says. “And how do we make Her son’s lead levels have risen since space for the exploration of those they moved from New York City two questions?” months ago, she says. The inquiry may be cerebral, but Maybe her laughter comes so easily the landscape on which it will play out because fixing the dilapidated house is real. Willemain and Rowe have 132.5 brings Willemain closer to owning the acres to explore — and a hiking trail, homestead she’s dreamed of. Her inter- railway and road that will undoubtedly ests are varied but generally creative. bring a few explorers to them. m She has worked as a lawyer, a mediator, a yoga teacher and a production assis- Contact: sadie@sevendaysvt.com QUESTIONS?: tant at the avant-garde feminist poetry INFO@EDGEVT.COM collective Belladonna*. INFO “I was really unhappy as a lawyer,” Learn more at champlainareatrails.com. 802-860-EDGE ESSEX | SOUTH BURLINGTON | WILLISTON edgevt.com/join Willemain says.

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Deep Dive The Jefferson Project is turning Lake George into the world’s smartest lake B Y KEN PICAR D

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oaters on Lake George may be forgiven for motoring past the 10-foot-long floating sensor platform, moored in the lake’s southern basin, without giving it a moment’s thought. At first glance, the unmanned, yellow-and-white buoy bobbing gently in the waves looks like a swim dock or small pontoon boat, albeit a high-tech one that’s outfitted with solar panels and a robotic winch. In fact, this vertical profiler, as it’s called, is constantly monitoring its aquatic surroundings from water surface to lake bottom. Sensors measure and record subtle changes in the water’s temperature, pH, oxygen content, salinity and dissolved organic matter. The profiler is part of a network of 42 sensor platforms that, by year’s end, will be fully deployed in and around the 32-mile-long lake. Similar platforms on Lake George serve as weather stations, gauging air temperature, wind speed, barometric pressure, humidity and solar irradiance. Some use Doppler technology to track water speed and direction, creating 3D images of water currents, the movements of nutrients and the presence of invasive species. Still others monitor the lake’s tributaries for their volume, temperature, turbidity, chlorophyll levels and other organic content. Together, this web of sensors, linked by IoT (internet of things) technology, generates a river of digital data points — about nine terabytes annually — that flows to remote supercomputers. There, the data are processed, fed into predictive computer models and used in laboratories to create what is arguably the most comprehensive scientific understanding of any major body of water in the world. All this is the work of the Jefferson Project at Lake George, a unique partnership among Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, IBM Research and the FUND for Lake George. Founded in 2013, the Jefferson Project is turning Lake George into what it calls “the world’s smartest lake,” with the goal of better understanding, protecting and sustaining this crown jewel of the Adirondack region. The multimillion-dollar collaboration was named for Thomas Jefferson, who

visited Lake George in 1791 and described it, in a letter to his daughter, as “without question, the most beautiful water I ever saw.” Rick Relyea, the project’s director, is based at RPI’s main campus in Troy, N.Y., but he grew up in Clarksville, N.Y., and often visited Lake George as a child. As he explained in a recent interview, Lake George lends itself well to this level of research; neither too large nor too small, it’s in the Goldilocks zone of “just the right level of complexity.” The project began in 2013 with a bathymetric survey that mapped the entire lake floor, confirming its topographical richness and diversity, Relyea said. Lake George contains more than 170 islands and is surrounded by mountains and valleys, making accurate weather and hydrological modeling challenging. Its ecosystem is home to a complex food web, ranging from microscopic organisms to large aquatic species. Lake George is also nearly pristine, Relyea emphasized. Despite considerable development and human impact over the past 40 years and its proximity to major population centers, it’s still one of the clearest lakes in the world. The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has designated Lake George as Class AA Special, its highest water quality rating. This means the lake’s water is clean enough to drink — and thousands of residents do just that. Finally, Lake George has unparalleled economic significance to the North Country. “As goes the water quality of Lake George, so goes the regional economy,” said Eric Siy, executive director of the FUND for Lake George, a not-for-profit environmental advocacy organization based in Lake George Village. Environmental conservation in the Adirondacks has generated its share of controversy and rancor, but the Jefferson Project appears to be an exception. Siy noted that the project, which grew from a decades-long relationship between the FUND and RPI’s Darrin Fresh Water Institute in Bolton Landing, N.Y., has enjoyed remarkable community support. “Because Lake George is the economic engine for the region, it’s the

Bathymetric map

Vertical profiler

Outdoor tanks functioning as lake simulators


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lifeblood for a $2 bilsaid. Constantly comlion tourism industry,” municating with one Siy said. “So all sectors another, the platforms were very concerned comprise a highly accuabout what the science rate network of weather showed.” stations. If an intense THE For storm is approaching, for T H E years, what that science indicated example, “We can give wasn’t encouraging. In you a weather predicISSUE I S Sthe U E FUND and 2014, tion within 333 meters the Darrin Institute of wherever you want to released a report be in the entire watercalled “The State of the Lake: Thirty shed … every 10 minutes for the next 36 Years of Water Quality Monitoring on hours,” Kolar noted. Lake George.” It identified three primary Responding to such stimuli, one threats to the lake: invasive species, platform can tell another to increase its rising salinity due to road-salt runoff, salt-sampling regimen from taking meaand declining water quality and clar- surements once every 15 minutes to once ity. Together, those threats became the per minute. focal points of research for the Jefferson The network allows the researchers Project. to test the accuracy of their computer It’s not easy to wrap one’s head around models, to which it is linked using artifithe project’s complexity. Over the past cial-intelligence technology. four years, Relyea noted, it has involved Based on what the sensors more than 250 people, including biolo- observe, they can determine gists, limnologists, chemists, engineers, the accuracy of models’ hydrologists, computer scientists and predictions. undergraduates from multiple universiBut even these high-tech ties. Together, they’ve generated dozens tools provide only part of the of reports, journal articles, computer picture. Researchers also models and conference presentations. wanted to know whether alTo understand their work, consider ternative forms of road salt, just one piece of the puzzle: road salt. such as magnesium chloride Until recently, Relyea explained, road or calcium chloride, would salt was a topic that had “flown under be safer for the lake’s plants the radar” for most water quality re- and animals. searchers. But in 2014, the “State of the “The answer was, E R IC Lake” report revealed that the salt level no one knew,” Relyea in Lake George had tripled since 1980. said. That’s where the “What we didn’t know,” Relyea said, Jefferson Project’s laboratories came in. “was the impact of that level of salt on Researchers on RPI’s Troy campus set the plants and animals of the lake.” Also up hundreds of large outdoor tanks to unknown was how much salt was flow- create “mesocosms,” or lake simulators, ing into the lake from its tributaries, to study and compare the effects of difwhat could be done to reduce it and ferent road salts on aquatic species. (The whether there were safer alternatives. tanks are also used to study the effects of Since salt runoff tends to increase invasive species and of excess nutrients during and immediately after storms, from septic systems and wastewater researchers wanted to create a network treatment plants.) of sensors that could not only measure Eventually, Relyea said, researchers the salinity of the lake and its tributaries, concluded that road-salt alternatives but also predict, react to and adjust to were actually more harmful to the changing weather and lake conditions. environment than traditional sodium Harry Kolar is the Jefferson Project’s chloride rock salt. These findings are associate director, an IBM Fellow and now guiding the policies of townships an engineer of environmental science surrounding Lake George in reducing based at IBM Research’s headquarters their application of road salt and finding in Yorktown Heights, N.Y. As Kolar ex- new ways to control snow and ice. plained, because they wanted sensors Kolar noted that the Jefferson Project that were “smarter” and more sophisti- is working with municipalities to put cated than what was commercially avail- instrumentation on GPS-tagged salt able, engineers at IBM and RPI designed trucks. The aim is to learn precisely and built them themselves. when, where and how much salt they “The sensor platform is very intel- apply to roads — and then measure ligent. It knows what’s going on,” Kolar where it goes.

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Those findings are crucial because, as the Jefferson Project discovered, Lake JFAM MTN. JAM George’s tributaries can carry as much as MUSIC SERIES 100 times the salt that naturally occurs 49 Old Main St., Jeffersonville 4:30pm - 8pm | Music 5:30 in the environment. Such data can be used to strategically reduce road-salt ap7/25: Al’s Pals plication, saving municipalities money 8/1: Dale & Darcy without affecting road conditions. 8/8: Buckhollers “It’s a clear win-win,” Relyea said. 8/15: Jamie Lee Thurston “You make it better for the lake … and 6pm. Free admission. you don’t do it at the cost of more dan8/22: Bardela gerous roads.” This confluence of state-of-the-art 8/29: John Lackard Blues Band Sponsored by sensor technology, big-data analytics Cambridge Arts Council, Great Big Graphics, Smugglers’ and laboratory research is also being Notch Resort, N.A.Manosh, Switchback Brewing Co., Martell’s at the Red Fox, Rock Art Brewery, used to tackle other complex threats Aubuchon Hardware, G.W.Tatro Construction, Kingdom Creamery of VT, JFAM to Lake George, Relyea noted. These include invasive species — Lake George already has the most rigorous mandatory boat inspection and decontamina12v-jeffersonvillefarmersmarket072518.indd 1 7/19/18 4:30 PM tion program in the state — and excess nutrient loads from septic tanks, aging wastewater treatment plants, lawn fertilizers, and agriculture. Harmful algal blooms, such as the blue-green presents algae that has hit Lake AT BURLINGTON Champlain and other lakes July in the region, haven’t yet affected Lake George. That SAT 28 NASH PATEL & LEDA 6-8PM SCHEINTAUB: DOSA KITCHEN status allows it to serve as Book signing and delicious the “control lake” in a $65 samples! Free. million initiative, launched last year by New York August Governor Andrew Cuomo, THU 9 LAUNCH EVENT FOR to combat such blooms on 7PM RAD GIRLS CAN S IY 12 regional lakes. It’s but With author and illustrator Kate Schatz and Miriam Stahl, plus one example of how the special guests Muslim Girls Jefferson Project is extending its influMaking Change and Rep. Selene ence beyond its own watershed. Colburn. “From day one, the plan has always SAT 11 STORY TIME WITH been to demonstrate that we can do this 11AM CITY MARKET All ages. Free. on Lake George and take everything Phoenix Books Burlington events are ticketed we’ve learned and bring it to other lakes unless otherwise indicated. Your $3 ticket comes around the region and around the world,” with a coupon for $5 off the featured book. Proceeds go to Vermont Foodbank. Siy said. “That’s the power of what we’re doing. We believe we now have a model AT ESSEX for what it takes to protect a threatened July water body and watershed.” JULY FIND WALDO IN ESSEX! As for those boaters who now motor Where’s Waldo? You can find 1-31 past the floating sensor platforms withhim around town and win great prizes! out taking notice, one day they may be able to access the Jefferson Project’s vast TUE 31 FIND WALDO GRAND FINALE Join us for the party - and get 6PM data stream and know, with pinpoint to meet Waldo! All ages. accuracy, when it’s going to rain on the Phoenix Books Essex events are free and open to all. island where they’re camping, which fish live in the area and how the water READING WITHOUT WALLS BINGO temperature is for swimming. Now that’s one smart lake. m A summer reading program for grades

AS GOES THE WATER QUALITY OF LAKE GEORGE,

SO GOES THE REGIONAL ECONOMY.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 07.25.18-08.01.18

SEVEN DAYS

INFO For more info, visit jeffersonproject.rpi.edu.

4-8. Read books and win prizes! All locations throughout July and August.

191 Bank Street, Downtown Burlington • 802.448.3350 2 Carmichael Street, Essex • 802.872.7111 www.phoenixbooks.biz

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FEATURE 39

Contact: ken@sevendaysvt.com

7/18/18 3:48 PM


COURTESY OF BEN STECHSCHULTE

Taylor Haskins

Cold Fusion

Taylor Haskins melds jazz and electronic music in Westport, N.Y. B Y D AN BOL L ES

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s the laboratories of mad scientists go, Taylor Haskins’ is awfully damn scenic. From a lofty perch, its floor-to-ceiling windows open on a long, sweeping view. Beyond leafy tree branches, you can see the sleepy hamlet of Westport, N.Y., nestled along the shore of twinkling Lake Champlain. In the distance, the rolling western slopes of Vermont’s Green Mountains give shape to the horizon. Inside, you won’t find bubbling beakers or gurgling test tubes. Haskins’ brand of alchemy is of the musical variety, and his workshop is called Recombination Labs. Along one wall sits an Estey upright piano, its gleaming golden guts exposed above a well-worn keyboard. Beside it, a rack holds several of the piano’s space-age cousins: synth keyboards of various vintages. A drum set dominates the far end of the open room, flanked by a rack of electric guitars, a battery of trumpets and, befitting the forested surroundings, a woodstove. Just to the right of the recording console at the front of the room stands the studio’s nerve center: an interlocking array of modular synths that together form an unusual wind instrument. The Steiner-Crumar analog EVI, or electronic valve instrument, has become Haskins’ signature. Connected by a rainbow assortment of cords and dotted with innumerable pulsing lights as well as knobs and faders, the setup looks like

the bridge of a spaceship in a campy 1950s sci-fi flick. In this remote mountainside studio on the easternmost edge of the Adirondacks, the 46-year-old trumpeter and composer experiments endlessly with an almost unnatural synthesis of improvisational jazz and electronic music. Whether Haskins is working with his shape-shifting ensemble Gnosis, with his largely Vermont-based group Green Empire or in myriad other heady collaborations, he doesn’t just blur the line between organic and inorganic sounds; he attempts to erase it. Haskins grew up in southern New Hampshire. No one else in his family was musical, he says, though a distant uncle had a big band in Haverhill, Mass. When he was 4, Haskins began plunking out melodies on the piano in his house — mostly cartoon themes and, perhaps foreshadowing his musical future, commercial jingles. “I think the first one was McDonald’s or something,” Haskins says, seated by his recording console. He took piano lessons for 10 years before taking up the trumpet as a teenager. It wasn’t his first choice. “I wanted to play the trombone,” Haskins recalls, explaining that he was intrigued by the instrument’s slide. His father, who worked in corporate real estate, had another idea. “He said, ‘I think you should consider the trumpet,’”

Haskins says, chuckling. “‘You’ll probably get more solos.’” His dad had a point. Haskins excelled on the trumpet and earned scholarships to both undergraduate and grad school. He attained a master’s degree at the Manhattan School of Music, where he studied closely under jazz trumpeter Lew Soloff, best known as a founder of Blood, Sweat & Tears. After graduating in 1996, Haskins pursued playing trumpet for a living, both in the New York City jazz scene and as a member of Broadway orchestras. He was successful, but the rigors and restrictions of the profession quickly wore on him. “I was doing the New York thing,” Haskins says, “and I didn’t like it.” In short, he had a musical identity crisis. “I never really had a specific idea of who I was in music,” Haskins explains. “I just enjoyed playing the trumpet so much that I kept doing it. But I got there and thought, This is really not what I want to do with the trumpet.” Haskins began exploring other avenues for earning money in music. On a lark, he answered a classified ad in the New York Times seeking MIDI transcribers. “I thought, I know how to do that, but who the hell would want to hire MIDI transcribers?” he says. The gig involved helping to program

artificially intelligent music software by creating a database of MIDI transcriptions of pop, rock, jazz and classical music from which the program would pull and create new works. Haskins excelled at the job and advanced quickly. He eventually landed at a hip commercial music firm called tomandandy that, among many other credits, had created the soundtrack for the 1993 film Killing Zoe. “They got all the coolest work in New York because of that movie,” says Haskins. He worked as a commercial composer at the company for six years. Coincidentally, his first composition was a boogaloo for a McDonald’s ad. After tomandandy dissolved in the early 2000s, Haskins spent 15 years doing freelance commercial and film work. For most of the past eight, he’s worked from Westport, where he lives with his wife and son. Recombination Labs is about a mile from their home. “I could really do that work from anywhere,” Haskins says. But the technology that enabled him to work remotely also helped drive him from the industry. Haskins recently gave up commercial work, citing a digital-age market flooded with electronic composers. “It had stopped being fun a long time ago,” he says. “And, since practically anyone with a laptop can compose for commercials now, it’s become very competitive.” So Haskins turned his fertile mind to something else. “I’m doing a bit of an experiment here of how to be a musician in the middle of the woods by myself,” he says with a grin. A key theorem behind that experiment is that Haskins can blend his seemingly opposing passions: electronic music and improvisational jazz. It may not quite be his eureka moment, but his 2017 album Gnosis is evidence that he’s on to something. As Downbeat magazine’s Brian Zimmerman described it, the record is “a shifting tableau of swarming mesmeric electronica and acoustic jazz of an achingly human sort.” Zimmerman concludes, “This is fusion of an entirely 21st-century sort.” That’s not only true of the music. Haskins’ method of concocting sound is equally modern and part of his grand experiment. The bandleader recruited an ace team of guest musicians for the album, including the core players in the current


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FEATURE 41

incarnation of Gnosis, a like-minded crew, the band: guitarist Nir rounded out by T H Epedal THE THE Felder, synth player steel player Brett Henry Hey and drumLanier and drummer mer Zach Danziger. Geza Carr. Each is Most of those players considered an elite recorded their parts and progressive player, remotely and transmitted them elec- for reasons evident on the band’s 2017 tronically to Westport. debut, The Point. There, Haskins stitched them On that album, Haskins plays solely all together. Think of the record as the EVI. The record’s intrigue lies in Frankenstein’s monster by way of how the chameleonic instrument blends Haskins’ idol, Herbie Hancock. “It’s into its acoustic jazz surroundings. On definitely a strange way to collaborate,” “Palisades,” the EVI almost takes on Haskins admits. the eerie “The Twilight Zone” tones of But he says the piecemeal approach a theremin, pirouetting with Lanier’s has advantages, too. He typically offers blooming steel lines and Carr’s tumminimal instructions for each part; bling drums. But on the following cut, it’s up to each player to interpret. “It’s “Dandelion Winter,” Haskins’ unusual never exactly what I have in mind,” says wind instrument adopts a more natural Haskins of the resulting performances. sound, evoking a loon call floating on “But it’s almost always what the song the serene ripples of Chorney’s acousneeds.” tic guitar. On “Theme for a Farmer,” He figures that by allowing players Haskins’ spacey, yawning licks flicker to record in their own spaces, away like a UFO above a rolling field of pastofrom the prying ral sounds. eyes of other musi“His improvisacians or impatient tion is like comstudio engineers, position, and his he’s getting a purer composition is like performance. improvisation,” says “If someone is Morse. playing in their bed“Where we all room, as opposed meet is from a very to a studio with a simple place: our dozen other people love of music and around, they’re a mutual take on TAYLOR HASKINS probably going to what makes it excitbe more relaxed,” ing,” says Chorney. Haskins explains. “So I prefer to let “And it all goes back to that sense of people be who they are as much as I adventure and curiosity.” can.” Those two qualities have informed “He’s one of the easiest master mu- Haskins’ path since he started hitting sicians to be around I’ve met, and I’ve the keys on his parents’ piano as a child. known a few of them,” says Robinson They continue to do so, even if he’s not Morse. The noted Vermont bassist plays entirely sure where that path is leading. with Haskins in Green Empire, and “I have goals, like everybody has Haskins is a member of Morse’s ensem- goals,” says Haskins. “But I try to step ble Sound of Mind. Haskins produced, back as much as possible and let life dicperformed on and, with Vermont drum- tate to me opportunities and hone my mer Caleb Bronz, co-engineered Sound instincts to recognize them better. of Mind’s 2017 album Enough Is Plenty “I honestly have no idea what I’m at Recombination Labs. doing right now,” he confesses. “But I “The man is a virtuoso,” says Vermont feel like my music is moving to the place composer, guitarist and bandleader where it was always meant to go.” m Michael Chorney, who is also a member of Green Empire. “He’s a master player Contact: dan@sevendaysvt.com on his instrument and in his thinking, and yet he never just settles into that or INFO relies on it in any way. He always brings Gnosis, Wednesday, August 22, 11:30 curiosity and a spirit of adventure.” p.m., at Radio Bean in Burlington. Free. In Green Empire, Haskins found taylorhaskins.com

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SOFIA AND MAURO

FLYNN TICKETS ON SALE Members now Public 8/1 FRÉDÉRIC SILBERMAN

LARGEST SELECTION OF VAPORIZERS IN VT. LARGE SELECTION OF LOCAL AND FAMOUS GLASS ARTISTS. LARGEST SELECTION OF SCIENTIFIC AND AMERICAN GLASS IN TOWN

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2018-19 FLYNN SEASON ON SALE

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8/22 WE

QUEEN CITY GHOST WALK

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Vermont Shakespeare Festival

THE TAMING OF THE SHREW

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QUEEN CITY GHOST WALK

Darkness Falls Meets at sculpture at Courthouse Plaza (8/3-11/3)

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BURLINGTON LATIN JAZZ ORCHESTRA

Directed by Ray Vega FlynnSpace

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Flynn’s Tarrant Gallery (FREE)

LAKE CHAMPLAIN CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL (LCCMF)

Elley-Long Music Center, Colchester (8/18-26)

FlynnSpace (8/2-5)

Champlain College (8/3-5)

8/9 TH

8/10 FR Exhibitionists Music Series

Order by 9/15 & save up to 15%. Tix: online, in person, by phone. 8/18 SA Flynn Youth Theater Company

Ghosts and Legends of Lake Champlain Meet at the Fountain in Battery Park (8/2-10/25)

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FlynnSpace

OLD DOMINION

Champlain Valley Fair, Essex

GABRIEL “FLUFFY’ IGLESIAS

Champlain Valley Fair, Essex 8/26 SU

NIGHT OF FIRE AND DESTRUCTION

Champlain Valley Fair, Essex 8/29 WE

DOUBLE FIGURE 8 RACING

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Snag a spot and rappel nine stories! Or cheer with us on the ground!

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COURTESY OF JOEY MORO

Factory Finish Theater review: Skeleton Crew, Dorset Theatre Festival B Y A L E X BROW N

From left: Leland Fowler, Gabriel Lawrence, Brenda Pressley and Mirirai Sithole

I

tension at a quiet boil by drawing out performances that show the smallest choices are about survival. Faye, the 29-year veteran and union rep, can’t protect her coworkers from layoffs. Dez, the volatile tough guy, knows his strength is nothing to the company’s power over him. Shanita, the hard worker, can’t count on good performance to keep her job. And Reggie, their supervisor, is torn between backing the boss and supporting his peers. From moment to moment, the break

A CAPTIVATING ENSEMBLE CAST

Contact: alex@sevendaysvt.com

SEVEN DAYS

INFO Skeleton Crew by Dominique Morisseau, directed by Jade King Carroll, produced by Dorset Theatre Festival. Through August 4: Wednesday through Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Wednesday and Sunday, plus Saturday, August 4, 2 p.m., at Dorset Playhouse. $4858. dorsettheatrefestival.org

FEATURE 43

room is a haven or a setting for confrontation. Shanita is far along in pregnancy, and the father is far out of the picture. Dez flirts with her, and she shuts him down with such grace that their relationship is stronger for it. Reggie confides in Faye about the plant’s future, making her a hostage of his secrets. Dez and Reggie bristle, refusing to trust each other. The exchanges seem commonplace, but Morisseau makes the texture of everyday life convey the choices that forge identity. Morisseau is a playwright on the rise,

07.25.18-08.01.18

PORTRAYS THE HOPE THAT FLICKERS IN HARD TIMES.

widely produced at regional theaters. Skeleton Crew is part of her three-play Detroit Project, structurally reminiscent of August Wilson’s Pittsburgh Cycle. Morisseau acknowledges Wilson’s influence, saying she sought to create characters that would make people from her hometown of Detroit feel visible. Her command of dialect lends a bright tang of realism to the depiction of characters whose lives are ordinary and who are worth watching because of it. The play is built of short scenes with a tilt toward brief monologues that reveal each character’s struggles. Outside the break room is the formless adversity of a failing economy; inside, the conversation is naturalistic with the particular poetry of honest expression. Leland Fowler gives Dez street smarts plus the capacity to dream. With his Tigers ball cap turned backward and a lanky ease of movement, Dez flirts with Shanita as if a steady drip of smooth will one day turn the tide. He’s ready to tussle with Reggie over anything. When Reggie treats him with suspicion, Dez is reduced to a noble stillness that defines the pain of not being trusted. As Shanita, Mirirai Sithole is small but unmistakably mighty, her hard hat settled above a purposeful face. She loves her work. When she banters with Dez, Sithole keeps Shanita light enough not to crush him, and firm enough to protect herself and her unborn child. She has

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

n Detroit at the height of the 2008 recession, there might be no one more powerless than the automobile assembly-line worker. In Dominique Morisseau’s Skeleton Crew, four African American workers have heard rumors their plant is closing. Their future is unknown, but economic uncertainty is always a given. This isn’t a story of larger-than-life conflict but of the everyday strength of working-class blacks. In Dorset Theatre Festival’s production, a captivating ensemble cast portrays the hope that flickers in hard times. The setting is the auto plant’s employee break room, with its cast-off chairs, bulletin board and makeshift kitchen. A sense of urgency settles over the four characters, even though their talk is of simple things. Faye has got to stop smoking in the break room; Shanita wants to know who used her salad dressing; Dez is probably dreaming when he imagines saving enough to open an auto repair shop. These topics seem light, but contrasted with the likely plant closing, they become the last glimpses of security. And what is each character really deciding? Whether to break a rule. Whether to act for themselves or for the company — or for each other. Director Jade King Carroll adds a sense of dance and movement to the characters’ daily rituals and keeps the

THEATER

the courage to carve out space for hope and the wisdom to stay pragmatic. Brenda Pressley portrays Faye as a survivor who has nearly run out of ways to carry on but will fight to the end. Alone in the break room, she does a fierce and funny little dance to Aretha Franklin’s “Respect” that proves the song is still a rallying cry. She’s the group’s conscience but is carrying a private sense of shame. As Reggie, Gabriel Lawrence turns his strong physique into a clenched ball. When Reggie is pulled in opposite directions, Lawrence gives him the gestures of a boxer starting a punch but hauling it back in. In taut scenes with Dez and Faye, Reggie’s frustrations seem about to spill over, but he tamps them back down again and again. Reggie can’t satisfy both labor and management; Lawrence shows that failure means he can’t satisfy himself. Scenic designer Kristen Robinson and lighting designer Michael Giannitti have created a worn-out break room that immediately signals the play’s realism and hints at its fatalism. The concreteblock walls aren’t just cold and utilitarian; they carry the grime of hands that have worked in this plant for decades. Giannitti is fearless about incorporating fluorescent fixtures in a light plot that makes even sunlight bleak when it signals the start of the workday through grimy windows. Robinson fills the space with storytelling touches, including an Obama campaign sticker on Shanita’s locker, the only reference to the politics outside the room. Joey Moro’s projections between the scenes stylize both the images and the motion of an assembly line. Alice Tavener’s costume design gets the wardrobe right but doesn’t convey the age and wear of the clothes. The characters are rubbed raw by uncertainty, without defenses. Holding on to hope is nearly impossible for people with so little control of their economic lives. Morisseau never veers toward pathos and won’t use sensational events to tell a story that’s rooted in ordinary life. Shanita, Dez, Faye and Reggie are strong people whose integrity is tested, but they aren’t to be pitied. They’re to be seen, and heard. 


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food+drink

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Food by Ferry THE

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I S S UsE western shore I S S U E Sampling the eats in Essex, on Lake Champlain’

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B Y SA L LY POL L AK PHOTOS: GLENN RUSSELL

Restaurant & Marina, beside the ferry dock, has a patio on the lake and indoor seating, as well as a 25-slip marina. The night we ate at the restaurant, a seaplane was parked at the neighboring beach. Also within walking distance is the Essex Inn on the Adirondack Coast. A couple of blocks from the boat landing, it’s a farm-to-table restaurant with marbletopped tables on the front porch and a dining room and bar inside. Don’t linger in New York too long: The last boat home to Vermont leaves at 9:30 p.m. But the 8:30 ride is well timed for a midsummer sunset at mid-lake.

THE OLD DOCK RESTAURANT & MARINA

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2754 Essex Road, Essex, N.Y., 518-963-4232

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iding a boat to dinner turns what might have been an ordinary occasion into a special event. For Vermonters who want to dine in the Adirondacks without driving on the far side of Lake Champlain, the first stop is the ferry landing in Charlotte. Leave your car there and walk aboard the boat for a 20-minute ride that is a beautiful and peaceful way to start an evening. Restaurants in Essex, N.Y., where the boat docks, are an easy walk from the ferry landing. Traversing the lake, the vessel faces the Adirondacks to the west. As the shore nears, the village of Essex, with its marina, shops, homes and restaurants, comes into view. Looking back toward Vermont, you’ll see the horizon filled with familiar shapes: Camel’s Hump and Mount Mansfield. The sky puts on a show of its own, as we saw on two recent excursions to Essex. One night, the crescent moon rose above the lake on our voyage home

FOOD LOVER?

GET YOUR FILL ONLINE...

YOU CAN’T PICK A BETTER BACKDROP, A BETTER ATMOSPHERE, FOR DINNER THAN BEING RIGHT ON THE LAKE. L E AH C H IO FAR O

Good restaurant service can take many forms, and I witnessed a new one on a recent visit to the Old Dock. Before the server cleared the remains of my friend’s Patrons on the deck of the first course — a plate of steamed clams — Old Dock Restaurant & Marina watching the arrival of the ferry she paused to drop him a hint. “There’s one left in its shell,” she told him. Then she waited while he fished out the last crustacean. O u r l e i s u re l y meal started with a summery cocktail and ended with sorbet and apple pie à la mode. The side of vegetables served with my trout — summer squash, tomatoes, onions — was lovely. A few kinks along Tuscan bruschetta flatbread at the Old Dock the way, including a Greek flatbread that

after dinner. The next evening, pink streaks in the western sky matched the raspberry sorbet cone we got for dessert at the Essex Ice Cream Café. For more substantial fare, the Old Dock

LISTEN IN ON LOCAL FOODIES...

BROWSE READER REVIEWS OF 1,000+ RESTAURANTS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/FOOD. REGISTER TO JOIN OUR BITE CLUB. YOU’LL GET FOOD NEWS IN YOUR INBOX EACH TUESDAY.

FOOD BY FERRY

» P.46

LOOK UP RESTAURANTS ON YOUR PHONE:

CONNECT TO M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM ON ANY WEB-ENABLED CELLPHONE AND FIND LOCAL RESTAURANTS BY LOCATION OR CUISINE. FIND NEARBY EVENTS, MOVIES AND MORE.


Humane

Society of Chittenden County

Boy AGE/SEX: 5-year-old neutered male ARRIVAL DATE: May 18, 2018

COURTESY OF KELLY SCHULZE/MOUNTAIN DOG PHOTOGRAPHY

REASON HERE: Transferred from another shelter ENERGY LEVEL/SIZE/WEIGHT: High energy, medium size, 55 pounds DOGS/CATS/CHILDREN: He should be the only dog in the household. His experience with cats and children is unknown.

housing »

APARTMENTS, CONDOS & HOMES

DID YOU KNOW? By donating $100 to HSCC, an ID tag can be engraved in memory of or in honor of a cherished pet, relative or friend and displayed on the fence outside of the shelter. You and your loved ones can visit the shelter to see your tag and the animals your donations have helped!

SUMMARY: Boy thinks his name is actually Good Boy, so we’ll allow him to

carry that title. A lover of people, squeaky toys and hot dogs, Boy is a smart and active pup who enjoys the finer things in life: food puzzles, Kongs, squishy beds, the usual! He hopes his new family comes with all the finishing touches and can give him all the affection and love he deserves! Originally a stray in North Carolina, Boy was found with an embedded collar. He is doing much better now, and we feel that Vermont is his second chance at a happy life, so let’s give it to him!

on the road »

CARS, TRUCKS, MOTORCYCLES

pro services »

CHILDCARE, HEALTH/ WELLNESS, PAINTING

buy this stuff »

APPLIANCES, KID STUFF, ELECTRONICS, FURNITURE Sponsored by:

Visit HSCC at 142 Kindness Court, South Burlington, Tuesday-Friday from 1 to 6 p.m., or Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 862-0135 for more info.

NEW STUFF ONLINE EVERY DAY! PLACE YOUR ADS 24-7 AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM.

music »

INSTRUCTION, CASTING, INSTRUMENTS FOR SALE

jobs »

NO SCAMS, ALL LOCAL, POSTINGS DAILY


CLASSIFIEDS on the road

CARS/TRUCKS 1978 MG MIDGET Asking $4,900. Color red. In great shape, runs well, no rust. Always garaged, located in central Vermont. mg78invt@gmail.com. 2013 BMW FOR SALE BMW 328xi AWD. 67K miles. White w/ tan interior. Asking $15,500. Call 793-2788.

HOUSING housing

FOR RENT

07.25.18-08.01.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

1-BR APT. $900/mo. Bright, small, fully furnished. Close to colleges, near bike path & lake, 3 miles from downtown. Electric incl. Cable & internet incl. NS/pets. Avail. now. Contact thomas businessagency@ comcast.net for online application. Paula, 864-0838.

We Pick Up & Pay For Junk Automobiles!

Route 15, Hardwick

802-472-5100

BURLINGTON Single room, Hill Section, on bus line. No cooking. Linens furnished. 862-2389, 2-6 p.m. No pets. BURLINGTON 1-BR APT. Small, close to everything. 122 Maple St., Suite 2. Clean, remodeled, W/D. Offstreet parking. No pets. $1,000/mo. 233-0120. BURLINGTON CLEAN SPACIOUS HOUSE Downtown 4-BR. Near UVM & downtown. 2 large living rooms, entrance way, storage, full basement. Parking. No pets. Avail. now. $2,800/mo. Ray, 233-2991, mbenway@ sunrayvt.com.

SEVEN DAYS

Valley Painting

Interior/exterior Painting Sheetrocking & Taping Cathedral Ceilings Custom Carpentry Any Size Job Free Estimates Fully Insured

Call TJ NOW!

355-0392

display service ads: $25/$45 homeworks: $45 (40 words, photos, logo) fsbos: $45 (2 weeks, 30 words, photo) jobs: michelle@sevendaysvt.com, 865-1020 x21

TAYLOR PARK RESIDENCES St Albans. 8 modern, new construction 1-BR, 2-BR, 1-BR w/ den, & 2-BR w/ den apts., located in the heart of downtown in a beautiful historic building. Easy access to I-89, Route 7 & Route 105. Overlooks Taylor Park. Elevator onsite & W/D in each apt. Landlord pays trash/ recycling & HW. Tenant pays electric. Electric heat & A/C. Rent ranges from $1,250-1,975/ mo. Showings begin mid-Jun. Leasing for Aug. 1, 2018. Contact Christine for a showing! cgolden@neddere. com, 802-373-5893, taylorparkresidences. com.

HOUSEMATES

BURLINGTON PEARL ST. VICTORIAN LOVELY 4-BR HOME 1-BR apt. avail. 2 lg-valleypainting112614.indd 1 12:11 PM FOR RENT 11/24/14 blocks from Church NEED A ROOMMATE? Dorset Park neighborSt. $1,050/mo. Heat & Roommates.com will hood, minutes from HW incl. 1-year lease. help you find your downtown, UVM, Refs. req. NS/pets. Call perfect match today! airport, great schools. 802-391-7288. (AAN CAN) 4-BR, 2.5-BA, corner BURLINGTON, DIRECTLY DOWNTOWN Furnished, stylish, newly renovated 2-BR apt. Off-street parking, private W/D, new carpets. Wi-Fi & cable TV in all rooms incl. No pets. $1,700/mo. incl. all utils. Avail. immed. & for mo. of Aug. Dennis, 520-203-5487. EAST MIDDLEBURY Furnished 2-room suite. Private entrance, private BA, kitchen. All incl.; W/D, Wi-Fi, utils., off-street parking. Tasteful. Immaculate. Serene. In classic 1840 home. $500/ mo. Call/text Susan, 802-989-8941. KEEN’S CROSSING IS NOW LEASING! Keen’s Crossing is now accepting applications for our Affordable Waitlist! 1-BR: $1,054. 2-BR: $1,266. Income restrictions apply. Call for details. 802-655-1810, keenscrossing.com.

lot, updated kitchen, granite, stainless appliances. 4-star energy rating. Clubhouse, pool, tennis courts. ricky@ fpmvt.com, fpmvt.com/ rentals.

TAFT FARM SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITY 10 Tyler Way, Williston, independent senior living. Newly remodeled 2-BR unit on 2nd floor avail., $1,330/mo. incl. utils. & cable. NS/ pets. Must be 55+ years of age. cburns@ coburnfeeley.com or 802-879-3333. TAFT FARM SENIOR LIVING COMMUNTY 10 Tyler Way, Williston, independent senior living. Newly remodeled 1-BR unit on main floor avail., $1,135/mo. incl. utils. & cable. NS/ pets. Must be 55+ years of age. cburns@ coburnfeeley.com or 802-879-3333.

802-793-9133

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 and similar Vermont statutes which make it illegal to advertise any preference, limitations, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, sexual orientation, age, marital status, handicap, presence of minor children in the family or receipt of public assistance, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or a discrimination. The newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate, which is in violation

ROOM FOR RENT, AVAIL. NOW Monkton farmhouse on 20 acres, all amenities incl., garden space, 13.5 miles to I-89. Start $400/mo. 453-3457.

OFFICE/ COMMERCIAL OFFICE/RETAIL SPACE AT MAIN STREET LANDING on Burlington’s waterfront. Beautiful, healthy, affordable spaces for your business. Visit mainstreetlanding.com & click on space avail. Melinda, 864-7999.

SERVICES

of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Any home seeker who feels he or she has encountered discrimination should contact: HUD Office of Fair Housing 10 Causeway St., Boston, MA 02222-1092 (617) 565-5309 — OR — Vermont Human Rights Commission 14-16 Baldwin St. Montpelier, VT 05633-0633 1-800-416-2010 hrc@vermont.gov

PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1,000/week mailing brochures from home! Genuine opportunity. Helping home workers since 2001! Start immediately! incomecentral. net. (AAN CAN)

CLOTHING ALTERATIONS SOMETHING SEW RIGHT Professional clothing alterations since 1986. Creative, quality work from formal wear to leather repairs. 248 Elm St., 2nd floor, Montpelier. 229-2400, pmorse52@live.com.

ENTERTAINMENT DISH TV $59.99 For 190 channels + $14.95 high-speed internet. Free installation, smart HD DVR included, free voice remote. Some restrictions apply. Call now: 1-800-373-6508. (AAN CAN) LIVELINKS CHAT LINES Flirt, chat & date! Talk to sexy real singles in your area. Call now! 844-359-5773. (AAN CAN)

print deadline: Mondays at 4:30 p.m. post ads online 24/7 at: sevendaysvt.com/classifieds questions? classifieds@sevendaysvt.com 865-1020 x37

HEALTH/ WELLNESS HUMAN TOUCH SESSIONS Human Touch Sessions: consensual, nonsexual connection. We all need it. Daily. Greater Burlington area. Call or email for consultation: 989-277-7505 or kay@ humantouchvision.com. INTUITIVE COACHING & ENERGY HEALING Open to joy! Experience emotional freedom, balance & renewal. Rediscover your wholeness by connecting to & expressing your inner truth, wisdom & joy. Naomi Mitsuda, intuitive coach & energy healer, is a certified practitioner of EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques), energy medicine, intuitive awareness & expressive arts. 802-658-5815, naomimitsuda@gmail. com. MASSAGES BY M-TO-F TRANS I offer deep tissue Swedish & stressreleasing massages for $60/hour in a discreet & private studio. Hours are by appt. Sage, 802-503-5092.

TED N E R

CLASSIFIEDS KEY appt. appointment apt. apartment BA bathroom BR bedroom DR dining room DW dishwasher HDWD hardwood HW hot water LR living room NS no smoking OBO or best offer refs. references sec. dep. security deposit W/D washer & dryer

PSYCHIC COUNSELING Psychic counseling, channeling w/ Bernice Kelman, Underhill. 30+ years’ experience. Also energy healing, chakra balancing, Reiki, rebirthing, other lives, classes, more. 802-899-3542, kelman.b@juno.com. STRUGGLING W/ DRUGS OR ALCOHOL? Addicted to pills? Talk to someone who cares. Call the Addiction Hope & Help Line for a free

1 BED 1 BATH $1300 HEAT & HOT WATER INCLUDED AIR CONDITIONING IN EACH UNIT

NOW LEASING 1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments

assessment. 800-9786674. (AAN CAN) SWEDISH MASSAGE SPECIAL Transformative Bodywork provides a safe, comfortable environment for people seeking relaxation, revitalization & relief from injury through massage. $40 for your first Swedish massage! 802-375-7641.

BUY THIS STUFF » 2 BED 2 FULL BATH $1600 RESERVED UNDERGROUND PARKING NON-AGRESSIVE PET WITH $500 DEPOSIT,

BRAND NEW CONSTRUCTION 100 GRIFFIN LANE, ESSEX, VT 05452

current vet/vaccination records, and proof of renters insurance is required

www.coburnfeeley.com | (802) 864-5200 ext 225 | coburnfeeleyleasing@coburnfeeley.com

services

BIZ OPPS

3842 Dorset Ln., Williston

sm-allmetals060811.indd 7/20/15 1 5:02 PM

C-2 CLASSIFIEDS

housing ads: $25 (25 words) legals: 52¢/word buy this stuff: free online services: $12 (25 words)

LOCAL FLOWER SHOP FOR SALE Well-located, profi table and highly respected business. Motivated seller but willing to train before retiring. Revenues of $450,000. Owner draws $75,000. Contact broker: John Stimets; jstimets@ countrybusiness.net; 802-879-0108.

12h-coburnfeeley062718.indd 1

6/25/18 3:49 PM

Bid to Buy Your Next Car!

Call for a free seller or buyer consultation.

PUBLIC AUTO AUCTION Saturday, July 28 @ 9AM (Register to Bid from 7:30AM)

2017 NVBR REALTOR OF THE YEAR

298 J. Brown Dr., Williston, VT

Robbi Handy Holmes • 802-951-2128 robbihandyholmes@c21jack.com Find me on Making it happen for you!

16t-robbihandyholmes120617.indd 1

See the Auction Calendar at THCAuction.com

It’s FAST, FUN, and a GREAT Way to Buy A Car Like the Dealers Do!

Thomas Hirchak Company 800-474-6132 • THCAuction.com

12/4/17 Untitled-2 12:54 PM 1

7/23/18 10:20 AM


REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS: List your properties here and online for only $45/week. Submit your listings by Mondays at noon to homeworks@sevendaysvt.com or 802-865-1020, x37.

BROWSE THIS WEEK’S OPEN HOUSES: sevendaysvt.com/open-houses DESIGNED FOR YOUR LIFESTYLE!

BTV APARTMENT BUILDING

SOUTH BURLINGTON | 30 LAURENTIDE LANE

BURLINGTON | 46-50 PERU STREET | #4706624

EXCEPTIONAL CARRIAGE HOME

SO. BURLINGTON | 170 SOUTH POINTE DRIVE | #4703152

OPEN 1-4

Thur-Sun

Check out this wonderful 8-unit building with six easy 2-bedroom rentals plus a 1 bedroom and studio apartment. Lots of recent improvements, separate utilities, & parking. Just a few blocks from Church Street, Lake Champlain, colleges & hospital. $950,000

Explore the Model Home and Design Center at Hillside at O'Brien Farm. Located on a picturesque hillside, this 30+ acre neighborhood offers 118 energyefficient homes in the heart of South Burlington. Choose from 20 unique home designs, floor plans, and finishes. Prices Starting at $334,500.

Steve Lipkin 846.9575 LipVT.com

NEW TO MARKET!

With extra large energy-efficient windows throughout, the light pours into this charming 4 bedroom home with 2,900 finished sqft. on 2 levels. A vaulted ceiling and gas fireplace in the large living room/dining room complements the grand piano & luster of the Brazilian cherry floors. $511,900

Steve Lipkin 846.9575 LipVT.com

VILLAGE LIVING

MONKTON | 2315 HARDSCRABBLE RD. | #4708286

Bobbe Maynes 846.9550 BobbeMaynes.com

CUSTOM BUILT IN PRIVATE SETTING

ESSEX JUNCTION | 8 SOUTH STREET | #4703653

NORTH HERO | 947 SAVAGE POINT ROAD | #4645768

OPEN

Sunday, 7/29

1-3

Margo Plank Casco 802-453-4190 vermontgreentree.com

Desirable Essex Junction Village home with three spacious bedrooms, large open kitchen to dining area. New laminate flooring, hardwood floors, and new carpet and fresh paint throughout and new heating system before closing. Ideal location with easy commute to work, shopping, schools, farmers market, Maple Street Pool! $319,900.

OFF GRID HOME ON 53 ACRES 7/23/18HW-Holmes1-072518.indd 2:24 PM

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BROOKFIELD | 691 CEMETERY STREET | #4703200

Holmz4homz@aol.com, 802-488-3411, www.BlueRibbonResults.com

7/23/18HW-KathyHolmes-KW-061318.indd 2:08 PM 1

homeworks

7/20/18 1:37 PM

SEVEN DAYS

List your properties here and online for only $45/ week. Submit your listings by Mondays at noon. Ginny Hanson

CLASSIFIEDS C-3

ginnyhansonvt @gmail.com 802-989-9498 lincolnpeak properties.com

Call or email Ashley today to get started: 865-1020 x37, homeworks@sevendaysvt.com Untitled-25 1

HW-LP-072518.indd 1

Century 21 Jack Associates 802-951-2128 robbihandyholmes@c21jack.com

The Holmes Team

07.25.18-08.01.18

Natural beauty surrounds this 1 bedroom 1 bath solar powered house with 2 car garage. Gambrel house with large screened in porch, newly renovated kitchen, wood stove, and open floor plan. Fruit trees, berry bushes, organic gardens with meadows and views. $292,000.

1

Robbi Handy Holmes

Still time to buy it and enjoy the rest of your summer. Situated on 10 private acres, offering 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, a full basement, 2 car garage, fieldstone fireplace and loft, plus 225’ of owned (non-contiguous) lakeshore on Carry Bay. Priced well below town assessment at $319,000.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Affordable, charming and well maintained only begin to describe this home! Open floor plan, large master bedroom with two additional bedrooms. Recently updated bathroom with laundry. Attached garage, large deck for morning coffee and outdoor dining. Wonderful curb appeal with beautiful stone wall, gardens and lilac lined fence. $207,000.

7/23/18 10:45 AM

6/6/16 4:30 PM


fsb

FOR SALE BY OWNER

List your property here for 2 weeks for only $45! Contact Ashley, 864-5684, fsbo@sevendaysvt.com.

HISTORIC GREEK REVIVAL

RARE NEW NORTH END COLONIAL

Poultney Village 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom, English barn, workshop, two car garage bay. New high efficiency furnace, circulators, tank. Hardwood floors. $154,000. jettaguy2@aol.com 802-294-2525

SUNNY AFFORDABLE HOME

BUY THIS STUFF

FSBO-JimRyan071118.indd 1

buy this stuff

GARAGE/ESTATE SALES

07.25.18-08.01.18

CHEAP AIRLINE FLIGHTS! We get deals like no other agency. Call today to learn more: 800-7670217. (AAN CAN) HEAR AGAIN! Try our hearing aid for just $75 down & $50/ mo. Call 866-787-3141 & mention 88271 for a risk-free trial! Free shipping. (AAN CAN) HUGHESNET SATELLITE INTERNET 25mbps starting at $49.99/mo! Fast download speeds. Wi-Fi built in! Free standard installation for lease customers! Limited time. Call 1-800-4904140.

C-4 CLASSIFIEDS

money out of pocket. (AAN CAN) PENIS ENLARGEMENT PUMP Get stronger & harder erections immediately. Gain 1-3 inches permanently & safely. Guaranteed results. FDA licensed. Free brochure: 1-800354-3944, drjoelkaplan. com. (AAN CAN) SEEKING LUMBER & FENCING DONATIONS I take in unwanted animals, & I’m looking for supplies. Thank you! 299-8553.

MISCELLANEOUS PETS

SEVEN DAYS

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ESTATE SALE, COLCHESTER 10 a.m. daily. 67 Creek Farm Rd., Suite 1, Colchester.

LUNG CANCER? & AGE 60+? You & your family may be entitled to significant cash award. Call 844-898-7142 for information. No risk. No

Open floor plan that features large kitchen overlooking family room. Formal sitting/dining room and spacious master suite. Great location close to bike path, dog park, schools and Lake Champlain. www.42grey meadow.com/

NEWFAUSSIE PUPPIES DOB Jun. 16, 2018. 1st shots, deworming, health check. Now taking deposits. On Facebook & YouTube. High Country Newfaussie. newfaussie@gmail.com.

WANT TO BUY CASH PAID FOR COMICS! Batman, Spider-Man & Wonder Woman! If these names sound familiar, this ad is for you! Eric Mowery, worldfamous comic book buyer, will be coming through your area soon, & he’s looking to buy your vintage comic book collection. Pre-Code horror, superhero titles & graded books are a plus! Eric is backed by a company w/ over 25 years of experience, & he prides himself on being polite &

Fully equipped operating restaurant in Enosburg. Busy location on Main Street in route to Jay Peak and near rail trail. Great opportunity. $18,000. Email for more info j.ahalvorson@ yahoo.com

GREAT WILLISTON NEIGHBORHOOD 367 White Birch 7/23/18 FSBO-JaneHalvorson072618.indd 10:56 AM 1 Lane 4-BR, 2.5-BA, 2100 sq.ft. Updated openflow home, HDWD floors, 2 fireplaces, OtterCreek Porch, custom cabinets, zoned heat, natural gas/efficient furnace. Minutes to UVM, I-89. $309,000. 216-8492669, Kandelxibt@ sbcglobal.net.

3 bedroom 1860’ s 6/25/18 FSBO-EmilySpence072518.indd 3:42 PM 1 cape in lower Cabot Village. Currently a single home but has a second kitchen for ABNB, rental or mother-in-law potential. Completely updated. 20 miles to Montpelier. $185,000. wchollow@hotmail.com.

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RESTAURANT FOR SALE

List your property here for 2 weeks for only $45! Contact Ashley, 864-5684, fsbo@sevendaysvt.com.

INSTRUCTION

professional. No col7/9/18 FSBO-S.L.Kandel071118.indd 12:01 PM 1 lection is too big or too small. Top prices paid in cash! Call today for an ANDY’S MOUNTAIN appt. 716-534-7452. MUSIC

MUSIC music

BANDS/ MUSICIANS BLUEGRASS SLOW JAM Mandolin player, intermediate, looking for others to play, practice, jam old-time/ bluegrass. Seeking guitar, bass, fiddle, banjo, etc. Low-key, fun. Michael, mjrubin99@ gmail.com.

Affordable, accessible, no-stress instruction in banjo, guitar, mandolin, more. All ages/skill levels/interests welcome! Dedicated teacher offering references, results, convenience. Andy Greene, 802-658-2462, guitboy75@hotmail. com, andysmountainmusic.com. BASS LESSONS W/ ARAM For all ages, levels & styles. Beginners welcome! Learn songs, theory, technique & more on Pine St. Years of pro performing, recording & teaching experience. 1st lesson half off! 598-8861, arambedrosian.com,

UPSTAIRS ANTIQUES RETIREMENT SALE

45% OFF!

Everything must go! Dressers, bookcases, stool, desks, stands, tables, mirrors, prints, maps, glassware, planters, vinyl LPs, books, camera, toolboxes

1335 Shelburne Road, S. Burlington • 802-859-8966

lessons@arambedrosian.com.

STUDIO/ REHEARSAL

7/23/18 11:11 AM

BASS, GUITAR, DRUMS, VOICE LESSONS & MORE! Learn bass, guitar, drums, voice, flute, sax, trumpet, production & beyond w/ some of Vermont’s best players & independent instructors in beautiful, spacious lesson studios at the Burlington Music Dojo on Pine St. All levels & styles are welcome, incl. absolute beginners! Gift certificates avail. Come share in the music! burlingtonmusicdojo. com, info@burlingtonmusicdojo.com, 540-0321. GUITAR INSTRUCTION Berklee graduate w/ 30 years’ teaching experience offers lessons in guitar, music theory, music technology, ear training. Individualized, step-by-step approach. All ages, styles, levels. Rick Belford, 864-7195, rickb@rickbelford.com. GUITAR LESSONS W/ GREGG All levels/ages. Acoustic, electric, classical. Patient, supportive, experienced, highly qualified instructor. Relax, have fun & allow your musical potential to unfold. Gregg Jordan, gregg@ gjmusic.com, 318-0889.

SOLO & BAND REHEARSAL SPACE Air-conditioned, soundtreated band rehearsal space avail. on Pine St. in the evening. Pernight & regular weekly spots avail. Some gear on-site. Check out burlingtonmusicdojo. com for more info.

ART art

FOR SALE NEW VT WRITER CHAPBOOK Preorder information for VT poet Ron Lavalette’s chapbook “Fallen Away” can be found at rlavalette. wordpress.com. Please support Vermont artist’s 1st publication! W/ gratitude, Ron. rdlbarton@netscape. net.

Say you saw it in...

South of Holmes Road

In the same building as Hertz Rental Cash, credit card or check

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7/23/18 2:01 PM

7/23/18mini-sawit-white.indd 3:43 PM 1

sevendaysvt.com

ACT 250 NOTICE MINOR APPLICATION #4C0329-17F-3 10 V.S.A. §§ 6001 - 6093 On July 13, 2018, Regal Real Estate, LLC, 29 Cedar Street, Essex Junction, VT 05452 and Regal Gymnastics Academy, LLC, c/o Tom & Erika Reeves, 29 Cedar Street, Essex Junction, VT 05452 filed application #4C0329-17F-3 for a project generally described as construction of a 9,040 square foot expansion to the rear of the existing Regal Gymnastics building. The Project is located at 2 Corporate Drive (on Lot #2 of Saxon Hill Industrial Park’s Lot “C”) in Essex Junction, Vermont. The District #4 Environmental Commission is reviewing this application under Act 250 Rule 51 — Minor Applications. A copy of the application and proposed permit are available for review at the office listed below. The application and a draft permit may also be viewed on the Natural Resources Board’s web site (http://nrb.vermont. gov) by clicking on “Act 250 Database” and entering the project number “4C0329-17F-3”.

11/24/09 1:32:18 PM

No hearing will be held and a permit may be issued unless, on or before August 10, 2018, a person notifies the Commission of an issue or issues requiring the presentation of evidence at a hearing or the Commission sets the matter for hearing on its own motion. Any hearing request must be in writing to the address below, must state the criteria or subcriteria at issue, why a hearing is required and what additional evidence will be presented at the hearing. Any hearing request by an adjoining property owner or other interested person must include a petition for party status. Prior to submitting a request for a hearing, please contact the district coordinator at the telephone number listed below for more information. Prior to convening a hearing, the Commission must determine that substantive issues requiring a hearing have been raised. Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law will not be prepared unless the Commission holds a public hearing. If you feel that any of the District Commission members listed on the attached Certificate of Service under “For Your Information” may have a conflict of interest, or if there is any other reason a member should be disqualified from sitting on this case, please contact the district coordinator as soon as possible, no later than prior to the


SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS response date listed above. Should a hearing be held on this project and you have a disability for which you are going to need accommodation, please notify us by August 10, 2018. Parties entitled to participate are the Municipality, the Municipal Planning Commission, the Regional Planning Commission, affected state agencies, and adjoining property owners and other persons to the extent they have a particularized interest that may be affected by the proposed project under the 10 criteria. Non-party participants may also be allowed under 10 V.S.A. Section 6085(c)(5). Dated at Essex Junction, Vermont this 20th day of July, 2018. By: Stephanie H. Monaghan District #4 Coordinator 111 West Street Essex Junction, VT 05452 802/879-5662 stephanie.monaghan@ vermont.gov

ACT 250 NOTICE MINOR APPLICATION #4C0427-8 10 V.S.A. §§ 6001 - 6093 On June 18, 2018, Tatro 368 VT Route 15 Properties, LLC filed application #4C0427-8 for a project generally described as the demolition of an existing building; subdivision of the parcel into two lots (Lot 2A consisting of 0.23-acres and Lot 2B consisting of 0.38-acres) and two common lots (Common Area 1 consisting of 0.06-acres and Common Area 2 consisting of 0.37-acres); the construction of a new 2,136 square foot bank building on Lot 2A; and the construction of parking areas. The project is located at 368 Route 15 in Jericho, Vermont. The District #4 Environmental Commission is reviewing this application under Act 250 Rule 51 - Minor Applications. A copy of the application and proposed permit are available for review at the office listed below. The application and a draft permit may also be viewed on the Natural Resources Board’s web site (http://nrb.vermont.

gov) by clicking on “Act 250 Database” and entering the project number “4C0427-8”. No hearing will be held and a permit may be issued unless, on or before August 8, 2018, a person notifies the Commission of an issue or issues requiring the presentation of evidence at a hearing or the Commission sets the matter for hearing on its own motion. Any hearing request must be in writing to the address below, must state the criteria or subcriteria at issue, why a hearing is required and what additional evidence will be presented at the hearing. Any hearing request by an adjoining property owner or other interested person must include a petition for party status. Prior to submitting a request for a hearing, please contact the district coordinator at the telephone number listed below for more information. Prior to convening a hearing, the Commission must determine that substantive issues requiring a hearing have been raised. Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law will not be prepared

crossword

Show and tell.

»

View and post up to 6 photos per ad online.

unless the Commission holds a public hearing. If you feel that any of the District Commission members listed on the attached Certificate of Service under “For Your Information” may have a conflict of interest, or if there is any other reason a member should be disqualified from sitting on this case, please contact the district coordinator as soon as possible, no later than prior to the response date listed above. Should a hearing be held on this project and you have a disability for which you are going to need accommodation, please notify us by August 8, 2018. Parties entitled to participate are the Municipality, the Municipal Planning Commission, the Regional Planning Commission, affected state agencies, and adjoining property owners and other persons to the extent they have a particularized interest that may be affected by the proposed project under the 10 criteria. Non-party participants may also be allowed under 10 V.S.A. Section 6085(c)(5).

LAST WISH ANSWERS ON P. C-8

Dated at Essex Junction, Vermont this 11th day of July 2018. By: /s/ Rachel Lomonaco Rachel Lomonaco District #4 Coordinator 111 West Street Essex Junction, VT 05452 802-879-5658 Rachel.lomonaco@ vermont.gov ACT 250 NOTICE MINOR APPLICATION #4C0662-3 10 V.S.A. §§ 6001 - 6093 On July 16, 2018, Old Stage Estates Homeowners’ Association, c/o Myra Boenke, 348 Southfield Drive, Williston, VT 05495, filed application #4C0662-3 for a project generally described as the construction of stormwater pond improvements to two existing ponds located on the neighborhood open space parcel. The Project is located on Southfield Drive, near its intersection with Paddock Lane, in Williston, Vermont. The District #4 Environmental Commission is reviewing this application under Act 250 Rule

Open 24/7/365. Post & browse ads at your convenience. 51 — Minor Applications. Copies of the application and proposed permit are available for review at the office listed below. The application and a draft permit may also be viewed on the Natural Resources Board’s web site (www.nrb.state. vt.us/lup) by clicking on “Act 250 Database” and entering the project number “4C0662-3”. No hearing will be held and a permit may be issued unless, on or before August 8, 2018, a person notifies the Commission of an issue or issues requiring the presentation of evidence at a hearing or the Commission sets the matter for hearing on its own motion. Any hearing request must be in writing to the address below, must state the criteria or subcriteria at issue, why a hearing is required and what additional evidence will be presented at the hearing. Any hearing request by an adjoining property owner or other interested person must include a petition for party status. Prior to submitting a request for a hearing, please contact the district coordinator at the telephone number listed below for more

information. Prior to convening a hearing, the Commission must determine that substantive issues requiring a hearing have been raised. Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law will not be prepared unless the Commission holds a public hearing. If you feel that any of the District Commission members listed on the attached Certificate of Service under “For Your Information” may have a conflict of interest, or if there is any other reason a member should be disqualified from sitting on this case, please contact the district coordinator as soon as possible, no later than prior to the response date listed above. Should a hearing be held on this Project and you have a disability for which you are going to need accommodation, please notify us by August 8, 2018. Parties entitled to participate are the Municipality, the Municipal Planning Commission, the Regional Planning Commission, affected state agencies, and adjoining property owners

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and other persons to the extent they have a particularized interest that may be affected by the proposed project under the 10 criteria. Non-party participants may also be allowed under 10 V.S.A. Section 6085(c)(5). Dated at Essex Junction, Vermont this 19th day of July, 2018. By: Stephanie H. Monaghan District #4 Coordinator Natural Resources Board 111 West Street Essex Jct., VT 05452 802-879-5662 stephanie.monaghan@ vermont.gov ACT 250 NOTICE MINOR APPLICATION #4C0846-1D 10 V.S.A. §§ 6001 - 6093 On July 13, 2018, Richard L. and Jane A. Mittlebusher, 12 Tawpoot Road, Nantucket, MA 02554 and Alexander H. and Lydia O. Slauson, 129 Hayward Street, Burlington, VT 05401 filed application #4C0846-1D for a project generally described as construction of a four-bedroom, single-family residence

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» SEVENDAYSVT.COM 07.25.18-08.01.18 SEVEN DAYS CLASSIFIEDS C-5


conflict of interest, or if there is any other reason a member should be disqualified from sitting on this case, please contact the district coordinator as soon as possible, no later than prior to the response date listed above.

[CONTINUED]

Should a hearing be held on this project and you have a disability for which you are going to need accommodation, please notify us by August 10, 2018.

on Lot 9 of a previouslyapproved subdivision. The Project is located off of LaCasse Lane in Williston, Vermont.

C-6 CLASSIFIEDS

SEVEN DAYS

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

The District #4 Environmental Commission is reviewing this application under Act 250 Rule 51 — Minor Applications. A copy of the application and proposed permit are available for review at the office listed below. The application and a draft permit may also be viewed on the Natural Resources Board’s web site (http://nrb.vermont. gov) by clicking on “Act 250 Database” and entering the project number “4C0846-1D”. No hearing will be held and a permit may be issued unless, on or before August 10, 2018, a person notifies the Commission of an issue or issues requiring the presentation of evidence at a hearing or the Commission sets the matter for hearing on its own motion. Any hearing request must be in writing to the address below, must state the criteria or subcriteria at issue, why a hearing is required and what additional evidence will be presented at the hearing. Any hearing request by an adjoining property owner or other interested person must include a petition for party status. Prior to submitting a request for a hearing, please contact the district coordinator at the telephone number listed below for more information. Prior to convening a hearing, the Commission must determine that substantive issues requiring a hearing have been raised. Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law will not be prepared unless the Commission holds a public hearing. If you feel that any of the District Commission members listed on the attached Certificate of Service under “For Your Information” may have a

Parties entitled to participate are the Municipality, the Municipal Planning Commission, the Regional Planning Commission, affected state agencies, and adjoining property owners and other persons to the extent they have a particularized interest that may be affected by the proposed project under the 10 criteria. Non-party participants may also be allowed under 10 V.S.A. Section 6085(c)(5). Dated at Essex Junction, Vermont this 20th day of July, 2018. By: Stephanie H. Monaghan District #4 Coordinator 111 West Street Essex Junction, VT 05452 802/879-5662 stephanie.monaghan@ vermont.gov ACT 250 NOTICE MINOR APPLICATION #4C1203-2 10 V.S.A. §§ 6001 - 6093 On July 10, 2018, Argosy Holdings, LLC, 950 Route 7 South, Milton, VT 05468 and Charlebois Truck Parts, Inc., 950 Route 7 South, Milton, VT 05468 filed application #4C1203-2 for a project generally described as construction of a 23,430 square foot building to be used for wholesale, retail, distribution, and warehousing truck parts on an existing developed lot used by Premier Coach and R.R. Charlebois. The project is located on Lot #1 at 950 Route 7 South in Milton, Vermont. The District #4 Environmental Commission is reviewing this application under Act 250 Rule 51 — Minor Applications. A copy of the ap-

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plication and proposed permit are available for review at the office listed below. The application and a draft permit may also be viewed on the Natural Resources Board’s web site (http:// nrb.vermont.gov) by clicking on “Act 250 Database” and entering the project number “4C1203-2”.

the Regional Planning Commission, affected state agencies, and adjoining property owners and other persons to the extent they have a particularized interest that may be affected by the proposed project under the 10 criteria. Non-party participants may also be allowed under 10 V.S.A. Section 6085(c)(5).

One Opening

No hearing will be held and a permit may be issued unless, on or before August 8, 2018, a person notifies the Commission of an issue or issues requiring the presentation of evidence at a hearing or the Commission sets the matter for hearing on its own motion. Any hearing request must be in writing to the address below, must state the criteria or subcriteria at issue, why a hearing is required and what additional evidence will be presented at the hearing. Any hearing request by an adjoining property owner or other interested person must include a petition for party status. Prior to submitting a request for a hearing, please contact the district coordinator at the telephone number listed below for more information. Prior to convening a hearing, the Commission must determine that substantive issues requiring a hearing have been raised. Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law will not be prepared unless the Commission holds a public hearing.

Dated at Essex Junction, Vermont this 18th day of July, 2018.

Board for Registration of Voters Term Expires 6/30/23 One Opening

If you feel that any of the District Commission members listed on the attached Certificate of Service under “For Your Information” may have a conflict of interest, or if there is any other reason a member should be disqualified from sitting on this case, please contact the district coordinator as soon as possible, no later than prior to the response date listed above. Should a hearing be held on this project and you have a disability for which you are going to need accommodation, please notify us by August 8, 2018. Parties entitled to participate are the Municipality, the Municipal Planning Commission,

By: Stephanie H. Monaghan District #4 Coordinator 111 West Street Essex Junction, VT 05452 802/879-5662 stephanie.monaghan@ vermont.gov NOTICE OF LEGAL SALE View Date: 8/2/2018 Sale Date: 8/3/2018 Kimisha Drummond Unit #405 Easy Self Storage 46 Swift Street South Burlington, VT 05403 (802)863-8300 NOTICE OF PERMANENT GUARDIANSHIP PROCEEDING To: Jennifer Hayward, mother of D.J., born August 1, 2002 in Burlington, Vermont: You are hereby notified that a hearing to establish permanent guardianship over juvenile D.J. will be held September 10, 2018 at 3:00 p.m. at the Superior Court of Vermont, Family Division, 32 Cherry St. Burlington, Vermont. You are notified to appear in this case. If you do not appear the hearing will be held without you, and Roxanne Jenot could become the permanent guardian of D.J. for the remainder of his minority. If permanent guardianship were established, you would not be able to petition the Court to terminate or modify the permanent guardianship. BY ORDER OF THE SUPERIOR COURT, CHITTENDEN FAMILY DIVISION. OPENINGS BURLINGTON CITY COMMISSIONS/ BOARDS Conservation Board Term Expires 6/30/21

Fence Viewers Term Expires 6/30/19 Three Openings Board of Tax Appeals Term Expires 6/30/19 One Opening Vehicle for Hire Board Term Expires 6/30/21 One Opening

Applications may be submitted to the Clerk/ Treasurer’s Office, 149 Church Street, Burlington, VT 05401 Attn: Lori NO later than Wednesday, August 22, 2018, by 4:30 pm. If you have any questions, please contact Lori at (802)865-7136 or via email lolberg@burlingtonvt.gov. City Council President Wright will plan for appointments to take place at the August 27, 2018 City Council/City Council With Mayor Presiding Meetings. PUBLIC NOTICE The Annual meeting of the Board of Directors for VERMONT DENTAL CARE PROGRAMS will be held on Monday September 24 at 5:30pm at the office of Vermont Dental Care at 32 Malletts Bay Ave, Winooski, Vermont. For further information please call Sandra at 655-2385. REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS COORDINATOR OF THE GOVERNORS COMMITTEE FOR THE EMPLOYMENT OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES (GCEPD) STATE OF VERMONT The State Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is seeking a Contractor to be the Coordinator for the GCEPD. This is an ideal opportunity for an individual seeking home-based selfemployment. The GCEPD Coordinator must be a well-organized, selfdirected individual with strong leadership skills and the expertise to organize a large committee with a diverse membership. The complete Request for Proposal (RFP) document, instructions and disclosures can be found at: https://

bit.ly/2KCrQlk. Proposals must be submitted to the State by no later than 4:00PM EST on Tuesday, August 7, 2018. STATE OF VERMONT FRANKLIN UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT DOCKET NO: 148-417 FRCV FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION v. JOHN B. GARROW, GLENDA R. GARROW AND VERMONT FEDERAL CREDIT UNION OCCUPANTS OF: 207 Church Street, Village of Enosburg Falls, Town of Enosburg VT MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered November 29, 2017, in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by John B. Garrow and Glenda R. Garrow to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for PHH Mortgage Corporation, dated April 5, 2013 and recorded in Book 123 Page 515 of the land records of the Town of Enosburg, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of the following Assignments of Mortgage: (1) Assignment of Mortgage from Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for PHH Mortgage Corporation to PHH Mortgage Corporation dated August 6, 2015 and recorded in Book 128 Page 674 and (2) Assignment of Mortgage from PHH Mortgage Corporation to Federal National Mortgage Association dated December 22, 2015 and recorded in Book 129 Page 537, both of the land records of the Town of Enosburg for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 207 Church Street, Village of Enosburg Falls, Town of Enosburg, Vermont on August 22, 2018 at 11:30 AM all and singular the

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premises described in said mortgage, To wit: A CERTAIN PIECE OF LAND IN ENOSBURG FALLS IN THE COUNTY OF FRANKLIN AND STATE OF VERMONT, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, VIZ: A LOT OF LAND TOGETHER WITH THE DWELLING HOUSE AND OTHER BUILDINGS THEREON, SITUATE ON THE WESTERLY SIDE OF CHURST STREET IN THE VILLAGE OF ENOSBURG FALLS, AND BOUNDED SUBSTANTIALLY AS FOLLOWS: NORTHERLY BY LANDS OF THE METHODIST CHURCH; EASTERLY BY SAID CHURCH STREET; SOUTHERLY BY LANDS NOW OR FORMERLY OF MRS. CALVING HAMMOND; AND WESTERLY BY LANDS NOW OR FORMERLY OF MRS. ARDELL GIBSON. BEING AND MEANING ALL AND THE SAME LANDS AND PREMISES CONVEYED TO THE GRANTORS HEREIN BY WARRANTY DEED OF MANLEY P. WETHERBEE AND MARIAN C. WETHERBEE DATED JANUARY 14, 1976 AND RECORDED IN BOOK 57, PAGE 179 OF THE ENOSBURG LAND RECORDS. THIS INSTRUMENT SHALL ALSO CONSTITUTE A BILL OF SALE AND IS EVIDENCE OF DELIVERY OF THE FOLLOWING ITEMS OF PERSONAL PROPERTY LOCATED IN AND ABOUT THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PREMISES; THREE (3) CORDS OF WOOD, FUEL OIL IN THE TANK, ONE (1) MAGIC CHEF BUILT-IN DISHWASHER PRESENTLY LOCATED IN THE FIRST FLOOR APARTMENT, ONE (1) ELECTRIC STOVE PRESENTLY LOCATED IN THE SECOND FLOOR APARTMENT, ONE (1) TELEVISION ANTENNA PRESENTLY LOCATED ON THE ROOF, ALL CURTAINS AND DRAPES PRESENTLY LOCATED IN THE FIRST FLOOR APARTMENT. EXCEPT EASEMENTS AND RIGHTS OF WAY OF RECORD, IF ANY, AND EXCEPT REAL ESTATE TAXES ASSESSED ON THE PREMISES FOR THE TAXABLE YEAR COMMENCING APRIL 1,

1986, WHICH ARE TO BE PRORATED TO THE DATE OR DELIVERY OF THIS INSTRUMENT. TAX ID #: CH0207 For information only: Property Address: 207 CHURCH STREET, ENOSBURG FALLS, VT 05450 Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description. Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described. TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale. The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale. DATED: July 20, 2018 By: /S/Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032 STATE OF VERMONT FRANKLIN UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT DOCKET NO: 365-1016 FRCV HOMEBRIDGE FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC. v. LORI GROFF OCCUPANTS OF: 176 Wilkins Road, Fairfax VT MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered September 22, 2017, in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Lori Groff to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as a nominee for HomeBridge Financial Services, Inc., dated December 19, 2014 and recorded in Book 239 Page 50 of the land records of the Town of Fairfax, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of an Assignment of Mortgage from Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as a nominee for HomeBridge Financial Services, Inc to HomeBridge Financial Services, Inc. dated February 5, 2016 and recorded in Book 245 Page 317 of the land records of the Town of Fairfax for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 176 Wilkins Road, Fairfax, Vermont on August 22, 2018 at 10:00 AM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To wit:

Being all and the same lands and premises aquired by Lori Groff by Order Regarding Elections of Spuse dated September 17, 2013 and to be recorded in the Town of Fairfax Land Records.

northeasterly corner of the parcel herein and the southeasterly corner of Lot #4; thence extending on a bearing of N 43° 03’ 00” W a distance of 453.1 feet to a point marked by a 5/8 inch rebar; thence turning to the left and extending in a straight line on a bearing S 28° 14’ 20” W a distance of 250 feet to a point marked by an iron rebar; thence turning to the left and extending on a bearing of S 48° 40’ 50” E a distance of 371.5 feet to a point in a westerly edge of the right of way of Town Highway #29 which point is marked by a 5/8 inch rebar; thence turning to the left and extending along the westerly edge of the right of way of Town Highway #29 a distance of 201 feet to the place of beginning.

Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to John Groff and Susan Groff by Trust Deed of Howard W. Popple and Barbara S. Popple, Trustees of the Popple Trust u/t/a February 24, 1997, dated Deed dated September 28, 2001 of record at Book 130, Page 108 of the Town of Fairfax Land Records. The interest of Susan Goff was conveyed to John U. Groff by Quitclaim Deed dated September 2, 2010 and recorded at Book 207, Page 377 of said land records. Being a parcel of land located on the westerly side of Town Highway #29 in Fairfax, Vermont, the Wilkins Road, socalled, and being more particularly described as follows:

Said parcel is bounded on the east by the Wilkins Road, on the north by land now or formerly of Kevin and Leigh Gross and on-the west and south by lands of Arthur and Margaret Webb.

Beginning at a point located on the westerly edge of the right of way of Town Highway #29, which point is marked by a 5/8 inch rebar which point marks the

In further aid of this description reference is hereby made to a survey map dated September 26, 1988 prepared by Hannon Associates showing a 5 lot subdivi-

Calcoku

Using the enclosed math operations as a guide, fill the grid using the numbers 1 - 6 only once in each row and column.

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Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described. TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale. The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage,

including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale. DATED: June 28, 2018 By: /S/Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032 STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT CHITTENDEN UNIT CIVIL DIVISION DOCKET NO. 204-2-17 CNCV U.S. Bank, National Association, Successor Trustee to Bank of America, N.A., as Successor Trustee to Lasalle Bank, N.A., as Trustee for the Holders of the First Franklin Mortgage Loan Trust, Mortgage Loan AssetBacked Certificates, Series 2007-FF1 Plaintiff v. Bridgette A. Brassord a/k/a Bridgette Brassard a/k/a Bridgette A. Brassard-Hammond, Royal Parke Homeowners Association, Inc. a/k/a Royal Park Condominium Association, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems,

Sudoku

Inc., NationPoint a division of National City Bank n/k/a PNC Bank, National Association and Occupants residing at 86 Pinecrest Drive, Unit 12D, Essex, Vermont, Defendants NOTICE OF SALE By virtue and in execution of the Power of Sale contained in a certain mortgage given by Bridgette A. Brassord a/k/a Bridgette Brassard a/k/a Bridgette A. Brassard-Hammond to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Nominee for NationPoint a division of National City Bank, dated November 10, 2006 and recorded in Volume 704, Page 453, which mortgage was assigned to U.S. Bank, National Association, Successor Trustee to Bank of America, N.A., as Successor Trustee to Lasalle Bank, N.A., as Trustee for the Holders of the First Franklin Mortgage Loan Trust, Mortgage Loan AssetBacked Certificates, Series 2007-FF1 by an instrument dated April 1, 2008 and recorded on May 30, 2008 in Volume 749, Page 724 of the Land Records of the Town of Essex. Pursuant to the power of sale in

Complete the following puzzle by using the numbers 1-9 only once in each row, column and 3 x 3 box.

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To Wit: Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to Bridgette A. Brassord by Deed of Heidi M. Danforth and Shaun L. Danforth of approximate even date herewith and to be recorded in the Town of Essex Land Records. Said lands and premises being more particularly described as follows: Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to Heidi M. Danforth and Shaun L. Danforth by Warranty Deed of Karen J. Unsworth, Trustee of the Martinez and Unsworth Irrevocable Trust, said Deed dated 12/7/00 and recorded 12/8/00 at Book 440, Page 561-562 of the Land Records of the Town of Essex. Said lands and premises being more particularly described as follows: Being Unit 12D, together with undivided percentage interest, 1.381 percent, in the common areas and facilities and the limited common areas and facilities of the Royal Parke Condominium. Terms of Sale: $10,000.00 to be paid in cash or cashier’s check by purchaser at the time of sale, with the balance due at closing. The sale is subject to taxes due and owing to the Town of Essex and any liens against the property. The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale.

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: HHH

Fill the grid using the numbers 1-6, only once in each row and column. The numbers in each heavily outlined “cage” must combine to produce the target number in the top corner, using the mathematical operation indicated. A onebox cage should be filled in with the target number in the top corner. A number can be repeated within a cage as long as it is not the same row or column.

Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each 9-box square contains all of the numbers one to nine. The same numbers cannot be repeated in a row or column.

ANSWERS ON P. C-8 6 8 H7H = CHALLENGING 1 3 2 H 9HH4= HOO, 5 BOY! H = MODERATE

Dated at South Burlington, Vermont this 5th day of July, 2018.

CALCOKU

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Difficulty - Medium

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

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SUDOKU

Difficulty: Hard

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

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U.S. Bank, National Association, Successor Trustee to Bank of America, N.A., as Successor Trustee to Lasalle Bank, N.A., as Trustee for the Holders of the First Franklin Mortgage Loan Trust, Mortgage Loan Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2007-FF1 By: Grant C. Rees, Esq. Grant C. Rees Attorney, PLC 30 Kimball Ave., Ste. 307 South Burlington, VT 05403 Attorney for Plaintiff 581-14 STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT IN RE CHAMPLAIN PARKWAY STORMWATER DISCHARGE PERMIT ENVIRONMENTAL DIVISION DOCKET NO. 76 -7- 18 VTEC NOTICE OF APPEAL Fortieth Burlington, LLC, (“Fortieth Burlington”), a property owner along Lakeside Avenue, in Burlington, Vermont, by and through its counsel, Lisman Leckerling, P.C., appeals to the Environmental Division of the Vermont Superior Court from the June 19, 2018, decision of the Agency of Natural Resources, Department of Environmental Conservation, Watershed Management Division, Stormwater Management Program, to Issue a Stormwater Discharge Permit to the City of Burlington to discharge stormwater runoff from the Champlain Parkway from approximately Pine Street to Lakeside Avenue and from additional project components from Lakeside Avenue to approximately Howard Street in Burlington Vermont to Englesby Book and Pine Street Barge Canal (draining to Lake Champlain). A copy of the June 19, 2018, Stormwater Discharge Permit, Permit No. 3368-INDS.RAR being appealed is attached as Exhibit A. Fortieth Burlington claims party status pursuant to 10 V.S.A. §8504 (a). Fortieth Burlington complies with 10 V.S.A. 8504 (d) (2), and has provided written comment to the Secretary during the comment period. A copy of Fortieth’s comment is attached as Exhibit B. Pursuant to V.R.E.C.P.

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CLASSIFIEDS C-7

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: HH

Other terms to be announced at the sale or inquire at Grant C. Rees Attorney, PLC, 30 Kimball Avenue, Ste. 307, South Burlington, VT 05403, (802) 6609000. This sale may be cancelled at any time prior to the scheduled sale date without prior notice.

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the subject mortgage, of which Plaintiff is the present holder, for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purposes of foreclosing the same, the collateral property will be sold at Public Auction at 10:00 A.M. on August 8, 2018, at 86 Pinecrest Drive, Unit 12D, Essex, Vermont all and singular the premises described in said mortgage:

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Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description.

Post & browse ads at your convenience.

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sion all on the westerly side of Wilkins Road which map is recorded in Map Volume 3, Page 13 of the Land Records of the Town of Fairfax.

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Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described. TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale. The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by pay-

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Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description.

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Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description.

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Subject to and benefitted by all rights of ways, easements, covenants, permits and rights of record.

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C-8 CLASSIFIEDS

Said lands and premises arc commonly known and designated as 240

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PUZZLE ANSWERS

To wit: Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to Etsuro Nishiyachi and Suzanne Austin Nishiyachi by Warranty Deed of Timothy M. Heney and Donna M. Heney dated April 28, 1994 and recorded April 29, 1994 in Volume

Parcel 2: Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to Stuart M. Abbiati and Georgianne S. Abbiati by D. Bruce Clewley, Trustee of Towne Hill Development Trust dated August 15, 1972 and recorded in Volume 133 at Page 173 of the City of Montpelier Land Records.

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By: /s/Judith L. Dillon, Esq. ERN: 5040 Lisman Leckerling, P.C. 84 Pine Street, P.O. Box 728 Burlington, VT 05402 (802) 864-5756 jdillon@lisman.com 25074/017

In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered September 28, 2016, in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Etsuro Nishiyachi and the late Suzanne Austin Nishiyachi to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for CTX MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC, dated December 29, 2006 and recorded in Book 516 Page 149 of the land records of the City of Montpelier, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of the following Assignments of Mortgage: (1) Assignment of Mortgage from

Being a lot of land with all buildings and improvements thereon, and being shown and depicted as Lot No. 41 on a plan of lots entitled: “Property of Staab and Johnston, Towne Hill Road, Montpelier, Vermont, surveyed in 1959 by L. Carlson and amended as to Lots 29 and 30, January 1966,” and of record in the City of Montpelier Land Records.

6

LISMAN LECKERLING, P.C. Attorneys for Fortieth Burlington, LLC.

Parcel 1: Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to Stuart M. Abbiati and Georgianne S. Abbiati by deed of John J. Staab and D. Bruce Clewley, Trustee of Towne Hill Development Trust, said deed being dated November 14, 1967 and recorded in Volume 121 at Page 171 of the City of Montpelier land records and being more particularly described as follows, viz:

Spring Hollow Lane, Montpelier, Vermont.

3

DATED at Burlington, Vermont this 18th day of July, 2018.

MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq.

271 at Page 326 of the City of Montpelier Land Records.

2

5(b)(3), Fortieth Burlington, hereby notifies all interested persons that they must enter an appearance in writing with the Court within 20 days of receiving the Notice of Appeal, or in such other time as may be provided in V.R.E.C.P. 5(c), if they wish to participate in the appeal.

Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for CTX MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC to Citibank, N.A., as Trustee for the Certificateholders of Structured Asset Mortgage Investments II Inc., Bear Stearns ALT-A Trust 2007-2, dated April 29, 2009 and recorded in Book 90 page 741 and (2) Corrective Assignment of Mortgage from Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for CTX MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC to Wilmington Trust, National Association, as Successor Trustee to Citibank, N.A., as Trustee for Bear Stearns Alt-A Trust 2007-2, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-2, dated March 4, 2013 and recorded in Book 649 Page 185 of the land records of the City of Montpelier for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 240 Spring Hollow Lane, Montpelier, Vermont on August 23, 2018 at 10:00 AM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage,

5

[CONTINUED]

STATE OF VERMONT WASHINGTON UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT DOCKET NO: 440-7-16 WNCV WILMINGTON TRUST, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO CITIBANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR BEAR STEARNS ALT-A TRUST 2007-2, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-2 v. ETSURO NISHIYACHI OCCUPANTS OF: 240 Spring Hollow Lane, Montpelier VT

ing the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale. DATED: July 16, 2018 By: /S/Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032 STATE OF VERMONT WASHINGTON UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT DOCKET NO: 784-1215 WNCV WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR SECURITIZED ASSET BACKED RECEIVABLES LLC TRUST 2006-OP1, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-OP1 v. ROBIN M. MCKENNA, DONALD T. MCKENNA AND NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC OCCUPANTS OF: 4408 Vermont Route 12A, Northfield VT MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered May 10, 2018, in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Robin M. McKenna, Donald T. McKenna to Option One Mortgage Corporation, dated June 15, 2005 and recorded in Book 161 Page 694 of the land records of the Town of Northfield, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of an Assignment of Mortgage from American Home Mortgage Servicing, Inc. as successor-in- interest to Option One Mortgage Corporation to Wells Fargo Bank, National

Association, as Trustee for Securitized Asset Backed Receivables LLC Trust 2006-OP1, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-OP1 dated August 8, 2008 and recorded in Book 1771 Page 628 of the land records of the Town of Northfield for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 4408 Vermont Route 12A, Northfield, Vermont on August 7, 2018 at 11:30AM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To wit: Being all and the same lands and premises as conveyed to Donald T. McKenna and Robin M. McKenna by warranty deed of Douglas D. Duquette (a/k/a Douglas T. Duquette, Sr.) and Kimberly J. Duquette, dated June 15, 2005, and about to be recorded herewith in the Northfield Land Records. Being all and the same lands and premises as conveyed to Douglas D. Duquette (a/k/a Douglas T. Duquette, Sr.) and Kimberly J. Duquette by warranty deed of Vermont Housing Finance Agency, dated June 20, 2002, and recorded at Book 139, Page 300 of the Northfield Land Records. Said premises are known and numbered as 4408 VT RT 12A in the town of Northfield, Vermont. The within conveyed premises are subject to a 30’ wide utility right of way conveyed by Douglas D. Duquette and Kimberly J. Duquette to the Central Vermont Public Service Corporation and Northfield Telephone Company on November 17, 2003, and recorded at Book 152, Page 939 of the Northfield Land Records. This conveyance is made subject to and

Say you saw it in... sevendaysvt.com

with the benefit of any utility easements, public rights-of-way, spring rights, easements for ingress and egress, and rights incidental to each of the same as may appear more particularly of record; provided, however, that this paragraph shall not reinstate any such encumbrance previously extinguished by the Marketable Record Title Act, Chapter 5, Subchapter 7 of Title 27, Vermont Statutes Annotated. If it should be determined that all or a portion of the conveyed lands and premises are Vermont perpetual lease land, then same are conveyed as such. Reference is hereby made to the abovedescribed documents, and the documents described therein and to the municipal land records in aid of this description. Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description. Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described. TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale. The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale. DATED: June 21, 2018 By: /S/Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032


C-9 07.25.18-08.01.18

ATTENTION RECRUITERS: POST YOUR JOBS AT: PRINT DEADLINE: FOR RATES & INFO:

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTMYJOB NOON ON MONDAYS (INCLUDING HOLIDAYS) MICHELLE BROWN, 802-865-1020 X21, MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

YOUR TRUSTED LOCAL SOURCE. JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM ROOFERS AND LABORERS

Green Mountain CBD is seeking a Manufacturing Associate to join their growing team at their manufacturing facility in Hardwick, VT.

• Year round, full time employment

To be considered or for more information, email VTjobs.recruiter@gmail.com.

Manufacturing Associate

• Good wages & benefits • Pay negotiable with experience

Full spectrum hemp products | Naturally extracted | Made in VT

2h-GreenMountainCBD072518.indd 1

EOE/M/F/VET/Disability Employer

802-316-5247 • lcallahan@bayada.com

7/23/18 2h-Bayada062718.indd 11:31 AM 1

Disability Rights Vermont, our state’s non-profit Protection & Advocacy system, is seeking a skilled, responsible Office Manager. The position includes providing assistance to the Executive Director in a variety of tasks and logistical support to Advocates, Attorneys, Business Manager and the Board of Directors.

802-862-6473

Part Time Client 4/16/18 Service Associate

The South Burlington Home Health office located in Williston, VT is hiring a full time nurse to make home visits. Please contact Lauren Callahan, Recruiter, if you are interested. Contact info is below:

6/22/18 11:08 AM

DRVT seeks an Office Manager

Apply in person at: A.C. Hathorne Co. 252 Avenue C Williston, VT 05495

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BAYADA is hiring!

2:43 PM

Applicant must have excellent communication and computer skills and be organized and detail-oriented. Light bookkeeping, general office management, IT support skills, web and graphic design experience preferred. College graduate preferred. DRVT is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Champlain Community Services is a growing developmental services provider agency with a strong emphasis on selfdetermination values and employee and consumer satisfaction.

Service Coordinator CCS is seeking a Service Coordinator with strong clinical and organizational skills to join our dynamic team. The ideal candidate will enjoy working in a fast-paced, team-oriented position and have demonstrated leadership.

We are looking for a This is a great opportunity to join a distinguished developmental candidate who can provide Please send a letter of interest, résumé, and three references to: service provider agency during a time of growth. Please send your marketing support for a cover letter and application to Elizabeth Sightler, Financial Advisor in our Ed Paquin, Executive Director esightler@ccs-vt.org. DRVT, 141 Main St., Suite 7, Montpelier, VT 05602 South Burlington, Vermont, or email to Ed@DisabilityRightsVt.org office. Series 7 and 66 ccs-vt.org E.O.E. licenses preferred. This role will be 20 hours per week, schedule is flexible. Ideal 7/16/18 4t-ChamplainCommServices071818.indd 10:47 AM 1 7/16/18 11:51 AM candidate has experience 4t-DisabilityRightsVT071818.indd 1 using Microsoft office products, is detail oriented MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN PEOPLES LIVES! and can work independently. Does that sound like you? 2 Full time AmeriCorps positions with a Then you have the right stuff National Leader in Affordable Housing Exciting Opportunity from a Well Established to join us. Apply now. Send Catering Company. Bevo is hiring an assistant event resumes to: Champlain Housing Trust’s HomeOwnership Center, serving the coordinator/lead bartender. Experience not necessary affordable housing needs of Chittenden, Franklin and Grand Isle Andrea.Chamberlain@UBS.com (but beneficial.) The following attributes are a MUST: Counties, is seeking a Home Education Coordinator and UBS is an Equal Opportunity Shared Equity Coordinator. These dynamic 11+ month • Physically demanding (lifting 50+ lbs & long hours) Employer. We respect and positions require a Bachelors degree or related work experience, • Detail Oriented seek to empower each proficient computer and writing skills, and a commitment to • Positive Attitude (smiles after 12 hour days!) individual and support community service. Experience in housing, teaching, or lending • Follow direction well & open to learning the bevo way the diverse cultures, is a plus. Positions start September 10, 2018. Applications will be • Guest Service perspectives, skills and accepted until the positions are filled. • Professional Appearance experiences within our This is a wonderful opportunity to learn this fun, fast paced Visit www.getahome.org/careers for more info. workforce. business from the ground up. Excellent pay will be discussed Questions? Contact Barbara or Jaclyn at 862-6244 during interviews if you have what it takes. Please send or Toll-free 877-274-7431.

Service Opportunity

EQUAL OPPORTUNIT Y EMPLOYER - COMMIT TED TO A DIVERSE WORKPLACE.

Assistant Event Coordinator/ Lead Bartender

resume & references to TARA - bevostaff@gmail.com.


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-10

POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

07.25.18-08.01.18

NORTHEAST ORGANIC FARMING ASSOCIATION OF VERMONT (NOFA-VT)

Executive Director

VERMONT ORGANIC FARMERS LLC (VOF)

We seek a professional, energetic, and enthusiastic Executive Director to lead our innovative nonprofit based in Central Vermont. Home Share Now (HSN) is at the forefront of the home sharing movement and seeks a leader passionate about housing to direct, manage, and grow our organization. Relevant experience in program or large project management and/ or team leadership strongly preferred. Qualified candidates will demonstrate strong organizational skills, experience implementing programs, clear fiscal management, effective communications and influencing skills along with public speaking and writing; plus ability to exercise good and timely judgment in complex situations, build and sustain relationships/partnerships, develop and implement fundraising strategies, and have great computer skills. This is an excellent opportunity for experienced or director track professionals. EOE. For more information about Home Share Now and a full job posting with application requirements visit www.HomeShareNow.org.

NOFA-VT was founded in 1971, and works to support organic farms, healthy food and strong communities. VOF, the USDA accredited organic certification program of NOFA-VT, provides Vermont producers with a credible verification program for their organic production practices. Our offices are located in Richmond, Vermont.

We are announcing openings for the following positions. • Educational and Outreach Events Coordinator • Certification Specialist (Crop & Livestock) • Organic Inspectors for Hire (Dairy, Maple & Processing)

For full job descriptions and more information about our organization, visit our website at nofavt.org/about-us/join-our-team.

Apply now! Join our team to make a real difference every day. 5h-HomeShareNow032118.indd 1

WHERE YOU AND YOUR WORK MATTER...

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7/20/18 10:01 AM

Myer’s Bagels is Vermont’s favorite bagel shop for the last 5 years! -7daysvt.com Myer’s is looking for positive, energetic candidates to join our staff as a Cafe/ Kitchen Manager. Duties include, but not limited to: • Extremely positive customer service • Running POS/Register system • Grilling and sandwich assembly • Food prep: slicing, mixing, cooking, baking • Cleaning, bagging, restocking • General supervision of shift employees; guiding in proper techniques, procedures, and side responsibilities

Voc Rehab Vermont is seeking a team-orientated individual with very strong customer service, interpersonal and administrative skills for our Burlington office. This candidate will be the first point of contact a consumer will have with the organization. Must be able to juggle multiple priorities and perform complex tasks involving state/federal programs and have solid computer skills. Tasks include reception, clerical support to counselors and VABIR staff, technical support, and other duties. For more information, contact Mark Ciociola at (802) 651-1832 or mark.ciociola@ vermont.gov. Status: Full Time – Temp. Department: Disabilities Aging and Independent Living. Job ID #623618. Application Deadline: August 5, 2018.

JOB COACH – BARRE

• Possible opening procedure and/or closing countdown, cash reconciliation. Food service experience a plus but not required. Self-motivated individuals who can learn tasks, and then do them quicker and more efficiently are ideal for this job. We pay a competitive hourly wage, pooled tips, free food and paid breaks....plus Vermont’s Best Bagels...FREE! Send resumes to: myersbagels@hotmail.com.

PROGRAM TECHNICIAN I (TEMPORARY) – BURLINGTON

The Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Job Coach will provide time limited onsite support for State/VR consumers in education and or training settings. The VR Job Coach may assist VR counselors in preparing consumers to apply for competitive employment. This might include direct, one to one, support at job specific trainings, or tutoring at workshops or classes. May provide hands-on job training and job coaching in a work place to help consumer become fully independent. Local travel required. For more information, contact William Sugarman at (802) 917-4143 or William. sugarman@vermont.gov. Status: Part-Time – Temp. Department: Disabilities Aging and Independent Living. Job ID #623619. Application Deadline: August 5, 2018.

JOB COACH – NEWPORT

For more information, contact Hibbard Doe at (802) 498-4935 or hibbard. doe@vermont.gov. Status: Part-Time – Temp. Department: Disabilities Aging and Independent Living. Job ID #623624. Application Deadline: August 5, 2018.

JOB COACH – MIDDLEBURY

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7/23/18

For more information, contact Mark Ciociola at (802) 382-4041 or mark. 11:08 AMciociola@vermont.gov. Status: Part-Time – Temp. Department: Disabilities Aging and Independent Living. Job ID #623623. Application Deadline: August 5, 2018.

JOB COACH – BENNINGTON

For more information, contact Will Pendlebury at (802) 447-2865 or william. pendlebury@vermont.gov. Status: Part-Time – Temp. Department: Disabilities Aging and Independent Living. Job ID #623625. Application Deadline: August 5, 2018.

Learn more at :

careers.vermont.gov Untitled-4 1

3/16/18 4:22 PM

Sales Assistant & Ticketing Specialist Seven Days is seeking a full-time sales assistant and ticketing specialist to fill a rare vacancy on our successful sales team. If you’re smart, personable and organized – and think you’ll feel right at home among our innovative, entrepreneurial staff – we want to learn more about you. To join our team, you must be an excellent communicator, unfazed by internet commerce, meticulous about all the details and enthusiastic about working with clients of varied abilities on a day-to-day basis. Preference will be given to candidates who have demonstrated experience selling products, managing projects, speaking to groups of people and working independently when needed. The main responsibilities for this position include, but are not limited to: 1.

Managing Seven Days Tickets: Selling the service to local event promoters, teaching them the software, promoting their events in Seven Days channels, providing technical assistance and supporting ticket buyers when necessary.

2.

Providing administrative support for the sales team.

3.

Assisting the marketing and events director with contests, promotions and public events.

Send cover letter and resume by July 30 at 5 p.m. to salesjob@sevendaysvt.com. Please describe your current employment situation and provide three professional references. No phone calls or drop-ins, please.

The State of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity Employer

7/23/18 6t-SevenDaysmarketing072518.indd 10:24 AM 1

7/23/18 11:02 AM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

C-11 07.25.18-08.01.18

Restorative Reintegration Specialist The Franklin Grand Isle Restorative Justice Center is hiring a full-time Restorative Reintegration Specialist (RRS). The RRS is responsible for the management of the Circle of Support and Accountability Program (COSA) as well as the development of new restorative programs, processes, and interventions for the Franklin Grand Isle Restorative Justice Center’s offender reentry programs. The RRS is a member of the Transitional Housing Team and works with community volunteers and other reentry team staff to support high-risk high-need offenders who have been released from prison to successfully re-enter the community through a restorative team approach. Please forward cover letter, resume and 3 references by Monday, July 30th to Rob Thayer Restorative Reintegration Specialist rob@fgirjc.org. For a complete job description, please visit the City of St. Albans website at www.stalbansvt.com and click on Employment Opportunities.

EXECUTIVE CHEF Full Time, Benefit Eligible Goddard College seeks an Executive Chef to bring culinary expertise and enthusiasm for sourcing and serving healthy, local, and sustainably-sourced foods to our Plainfield, VT campus. This exciting position directs all aspects of Goddard College’s food service operations, including: creating high-quality meals, inclusive of non-vegetarian, vegan, vegetarian, gluten-free, and special dietary choices; managing budget, supervising staff, purchasing and inventory; maximizing use of local and sustainable products; ensuring that all health, safety, and sanitation standards are met; and directing front-of-house operations and cash management. Position description and application instructions are available here:

www.goddard.edu/about-goddard/employment-opportunities/. 5h-GoddardCollegeCHEF071818.indd 1

7/13/18 12:08 PM 4t-FranklinGrandIsleRestorativeJusticeCtr071818.indd 1

Business Systems Analyst Berlin

Northfield Savings Bank is looking for a professional to join our team as a Business Systems Analyst for our Information Technology department located at our Berlin Operations Center. The Business Systems Analyst will collect, analyze and monitor business area requirements that will lead to the development, upgrade or implementation of computer application programs. This position offers a strong opportunity to work for a growing premier Vermont mutual savings bank. The Business Systems Analyst will be responsible for testing, updating and correcting problems as they develop for business software systems. This individual will work with Business Areas, investigate systems features and applicability to business need and manage a project’s scope, acceptance, installation and deployment from start to finish. The Business Systems Analyst must possess excellent communication and customer service skills for both internal and external customers. Requirements include: Effective Project Management skills, a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration, Computer Science or Information Technology and two years’ related experience. Direct knowledge of banking software systems and experience in a financial institution is preferred. Northfield Savings Bank, founded in 1867, is the largest banking institution headquartered in Vermont. NSB offers a competitive compensation and benefits package including medical, dental, profit sharing, matching 401(K) retirement program, professional development opportunities, and a positive work environment supported by a team culture.

The Radio North Group is looking for a Mobile Electronics Technician to provide service in-shop as well as at customer facilities and various work sites. Founded in 1990 as a Motorola Solutions Partner, the Radio North Group provides creative hardware and software solutions for Police, Fire, Education and Health Care customers. We specialize in 2-way portable and mobile radios, and custom communication solutions for Business and Public Safety applications. BASIC QUALIFICATIONS Technical school degree, equivalent Military training or equivalent hands-on experience. Must possess the basic skills and product-related knowledge necessary to work on products so as to successfully meet all essential duties and responsibilities of the position. Experience should include field work in the installation and maintenance of similar electronics equipment, two-way radio, and other computer related and automotive related systems. BENEFITS

Please submit your resume and application in confidence to: Careers@nsbvt.com (Preferred)

Radio North Group offers a competitive salary that rewards performance and dedication along with a comprehensive benefit package.

Or mail: Northfield Savings Bank Human Resources P.O. Box 7180 Barre, VT 05641-7180 Equal Opportunity Employer/Member FDIC

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Technician s ic n o r t c le E s/ Communication

Please send resume and / or cover letter to John at john.p@radionorthgroup.com

7/23/18 10:56 AM

7/16/18 4:06 PM

Office Manager/Bookkeeper Nedde Real Estate is seeking candidates for an Office Manager/Bookkeeper. We specialize in commercial real estate brokerage, acquisitions, development and management. Looking for someone with bookkeeping experience (Quickbooks particularly), a “can-do” attitude and strong communication and organizational skills. Office Manager/Bookkeeper will also be assisting with marketing and administrative tasks. Salary is commensurate with experience. Health and dental insurance is provided. Please submit cover letter and resume to: Christine Golden cgolden@neddere.com P. 802-651-6888 F. 802-651-6894 Learn more about us at www.NeddeRealEstate.com

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7/13/18 10:54 AM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-12

POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

07.25.18-08.01.18

Security Officer

Full Time Days Wake Robin, Vermont’s premier continuing care retirement community, seeks an experienced Security Officer to ensure that our community is secure and that our residents are safe throughout the nighttime hours. Duties include addressing emergency or comfort concerns of residents, responding to and assessing situations involving the physical plant, and ensuring that all buildings are secured according to appropriate schedules. We seek an individual with a background in security or as a first responder, with the compassion and problem solving skills to interact with our senior population. At least 3 years of relevant experience is required. Interested candidates please send resume and cover letter to HR@wakerobin.com or visit our website, www.wakerobin.com, to complete an application.

SOUTH BURINGTON SCHOOL DISTRICT

Communications Coordinator Under the supervision of the Superintendent, develops, implements, and manages a district communication strategy and program. Collaborates with employees, students, board members, and other community members to promote a positive image and advance the interests of the district. Responsible for brand development and implementation, print, electronic, and social media messaging, website management, and district wide calendar of events. 20 Hours/Week. If you decide to mail your information, you will need to include the following: cover letter, resume, and three current references. Please forward them to: South Burlington School District, Attn: Diane Kinnon, 500 Dorset St, South Burlington, VT 05403. EOE.

Wake Robin is an equal opportunity employer. 5h-WakeRobin072518.indd 1

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7/23/18 10:48 AM

7/23/18 11:14 AM

Digital Marketing Manager Berlin

Looking for a Sweet Job? Our new, mobile-friendly job board is buzzing with excitement. Job seekers can: • Browse hundreds of current, local positions from Vermont companies. • Search for jobs by keyword, location, category and job type. • Set up job alerts. • Apply for jobs directly through the site.

Northfield Savings Bank is looking for a professional to join our team as a Digital Marketing Manager. This individual will be responsible for the management and coordination of product development, customer mailings and campaigns, the website and digital online portals. The Digital Marketing Manager will perform new product research, collect and interpret customer analytics, and support the CRM database. This individual will manage the development of electronic and print product literature and will also contribute product information for marketing and advertising projects. The position offers a strong opportunity to work for a growing premier Vermont mutual savings bank. The Digital Marketing Manager must possess excellent communication and customer service skills for both internal and external customers. A Bachelor’s degree in marketing, business administration and related field, with pertinent analytical curriculum is required. Five years of experience in marketing, product management, or digital content and two years of experience in the financial industry are preferred. Northfield Savings Bank, founded in 1867, is the largest banking institution headquartered in Vermont. NSB offers a competitive compensation and benefits package including medical, dental, profit sharing, matching 401(K) retirement program, professional development opportunities, and a positive work environment supported by a team culture. Please submit your resume and application in confidence to: Careers@nsbvt.com (Preferred)

Start applying at jobs.sevendaysvt.com

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Or mail: Northfield Savings Bank Human Resources P.O. Box 7180 Barre, VT 05641-7180 Equal Opportunity Employer/Member FDIC

4/10/176t-NorthfieldSavingsBank072518.indd 4:59 PM 1

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY RELATIONS Reporting to the president, this newly created role will enhance and increase awareness of the organization’s expanding services, both in Vermont and around the country; ensure positive relationships with key community partners, stakeholders, and government agencies; and expand the organization’s grant management program. Key qualifications include deep experience and related knowledge in advocacy or policy and programs related to community development; excellent interpersonal, oral and written communication skills; a passion for building relationships with diverse constituents and partners; marketing and media relations savvy; and proven experience identifying and securing grants. This is a great opportunity for someone with an entrepreneurial and collaborative approach to their work, a love of storytelling and information sharing, and a desire to help make a positive impact on people’s lives. Housing Vermont, a nonprofit syndication and development company founded in 1988, creates permanently affordable rental housing and enables investments in economic and community development to benefit Vermonters through partnerships with local organizations, public agencies and the private sector. Housing Vermont is an Equal Opportunity Employer. To apply for this position, please submit a cover letter and resume to our recruitment partner, Beth Gilpin Consulting, at beth@bethgilpin.com. You may also request a confidential conversation with Beth if you’d like more information before deciding whether or not to apply. She looks forward to hearing from you.

7/20/18 6t-HousingVT072518.indd 12:28 PM 1

7/20/18 12:53 PM


NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

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Assistant Nursing Director:

PRODUCTION EDITOR

The Manor, located in Morrisville, VT, 9 miles north of Stowe, has an exciting opportunity for the right candidate to expand your knowledge in long term care while working with a dynamic, successful Nursing Director. Candidate must be able to work collaboratively with a talented and committed nursing team. Past experience developing an engaged staff is a must. Strong leadership and management abilities required.

Sheridan Journal Services, an established provider of publishing services for scientific, technical, medical, (STM) and scholarly journals, is currently looking to hire Production Editors to join our team in beautiful Waterbury, Vermont! If you have publishing, editorial, copyediting or composition experience, and would love to be a part of the team producing cutting edge publications, please submit your resume and a cover letter to our online application at: https://web1.epicorhcm.com/SH7277CSS/ Default.aspx?Tab=DDB54A17-24F1-480A-8FE4-7E521F94C 2FF&cssUrl=true&Requisition=SJS 8045

The Manor is a quality award recipient with excellent benefits including 25 days of ETO per year and 403B retirement savings plan with employer match.

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Administrative Assistant C2 is seeking a highly organized individual with excellent customer relationship skills to join as our Administrative Assistant. The successful candidate will be able to work in a fast-paced environment, be tech-savvy and have working knowledge of Microsoft Office products. The Administrative Assistant is responsible for a variety of administrative, office and clerical functions including reception, providing clerical support to managers and other employees, making travel arrangements, maintaining office and kitchen supplies, shipping and handling mail and providing support for our company and marketing events.

Responsibilities • Greet visitors, answer the phone and screen calls in a professional manner • Provide administrative support to management and others within the company as required; including typing, data entry, expense reports, meeting arrangements, company mailings, proofreading and filing • Prepare travel arrangements for the company; research and make flight, hotel, rental car and conference reservations • Coordinate facilities issues with the building’s property management company • Schedule and coordinate candidate interviews, meetings and conference rooms • Receive, sort and forward incoming mail • Coordinate the pick-up and delivery of express mail services (FedEx, UPS, etc.) • Maintain the appearance of the reception area, conference room, copy/mail room, supply closet, coat closet and kitchen area • Order and stock office and kitchen supplies • Assist marketing with social media efforts and event coordination

Required Knowledge and Skills • Associate’s degree or equivalent combination of education and experience • One to three years of relevant experience • Proficient in Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint • Strong organizational skills • Excellent customer relationship and interpersonal skills • Excellent verbal and written communication skills • Experience with Salesforce a plus • Experience with social media platforms a plus Apply at: www.competitive.com/careers.

C-13 07.25.18-08.01.18

We provide a comprehensive benefits package, including health, medical and dental coverage, 401(K), paid time off, flexible working schedules, relaxed dress code and telecommuting opportunities. We also have a beautiful office and a positive, friendly work culture. This is a great opportunity for you! 6/25/18 2:26 PM 4t-SheridanJournalServices071818.indd 1

REGISTERED NURSES

Collaborative Solutions’ Second Spring programs offer exceptional, evidence-based clinical care to adults with psychiatric illness. As an alternative to hospitalization, we provide a place for patients to heal and grow in Vermont country inn settings, with beautiful common areas, porches, — all surrounded by rolling hills, hiking trails, ponds, and talented, dedicated staff.

Care Services Coordinator

7/13/18 3:11 PM

Full Time

Report to the Director of Care Services located in Concord, NH. The successful candidate will work remotely from the greater Burlington area. Travel required.

Requirements: Minimum 3 years’ experience and BA/BS degree in a health/human service related field. Go to full job description at

We are currently seeking registered nurses, alsa.org/about-us/careers/. both per diem and full time, to join our highlycollaborative, results-oriented treatment team, which includes psychiatrists, nurses, therapists, vocational specialist, case managers, residential support staff, music therapist, and social workers. 2v-ALSnnechapter072518.indd 1 7/23/18 1:57 PM Our RNs are successful when they can be a great teammate with excellent communication EarthWalk Vermont is seeking skills, have a Vermont RN license, a high level a full-time Village School of compassion, ability to think outside the box, Mentor and a full-time Field Director to start at the end and an unshakable dedication to the recovery and of August 2018. EarthWalk well-being of our patients. Nurses with a holistic Vermont, founded in 2005, view of wellness are encouraged to apply! We have is a non-profit community various shift schedules available. and nature based education Benefit eligible positions offer competitive wages, benefits, generous time off package and also a 403B retirement match. Valid driver’s license, excellent driving record and safe, insured vehicle also required. Marianne Mullen, Director of Team Development

MarianneM@cscorp.org (802-433-0202)

organization located on Goddard College campus in Plainfield, Vermont. EarthWalk Vermont’s mission is to inspire and empower children, families, and communities to reconnect with and care for one another and the Earth. Please see our website, www.earthwalkvermont.org, for more information.


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

07.25.18-08.01.18

Developmental Disability Professional

Waitsfield and Champlain Valley Telecom, a Vermont based telecommunications solutions provider located in central Vermont, is seeking a qualified individual to join our team:

Unique, forward-thinking organization wants to welcome you to our positive, flexible, team-oriented atmosphere!

CUSTOMER SERVICE AND INTERNET SUPPORT ASSOCIATE Entry-level position for Waitsfield and Champlain Valley Telecom’s Customer Service Department; responsibilities include providing high quality telephone, broadband, and technical support services to WCVT’s customers via telephone, internet, live-chat, mail, and office contacts. Also responsible for sales of appropriate products and services, as well as processing service requests. Qualified applicants must possess a minimum of one year customer service and/or sales experience; however, demonstrated work experience within a call-center environment with established sales experience preferred. Additionally, general internet experience both from a technical and sales aspect with knowledge regarding e-mail, web hosting, broadband, and wireless connectivity services preferred. Knowledge of both hardware and software applications is desirable, including knowledge of a variety of mobile, wireless, and streaming devices and their corresponding operating systems. Applicant must have strong interpersonal communications skills necessary to maintain productive relationships with customers in resolving service and billing-related questions, as well as marketing new services, including the ability to enthusiastically work with co-workers and customers in a constructive and cooperative manner. Proficiency in Microsoft Office software applications preferred.

We facilitate the statewide self-directed services option through information, guidance and oversight. • • • • • • •

Honest, open and genuine approach Creative thinking in unique scenarios Versatility working with various people, values, and situations Exceptionally strong oral & written communication Time management, attention to detail, highly organized Motivated to learn & guide others to problemsolve Ability to work autonomously with natural investment in teamwork

Please submit letter of interest, resume, and application to the address below. No telephone calls please. Job applications can be found on our website: www.wcvt.com under “Company.”

Statewide travel required (mileage reimbursement) Full-time with excellent benefit package (health, dental, life, disability, retirement, sick, vacation, holiday)

Waitsfield and Champlain Valley Telecom Attn: Human Resources PO Box 9, 3898 Main Street Waitsfield, VT 05673 Fax: (802)496-8342 Email: hr@corp.wcvt.com

Cover Letter and Resume to:

kara@transitionii.com

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3/28/16 4:41 PM

Providing Innovative Mental Health and Educational Services to Vermont’s Children & Families.

“Make a difference in the life of a child!”- NFI Vermont, a leader in specialized trauma and adolescent development, is looking to expand our team of innovators. Full time and part time positions available. Competitive wages, training opportunities, flexible work schedules and family oriented culture. Excellent benefits with tuition reimbursement offered for 30 or more hour employees. Visit our career page at www.nfivermont.org to learn more!

Allenbrook Program Full-Time Awake Overnight Counselor Relief Awake and Sleep Overnight Counselors NFI Vermont’s Allenbrook Program, in South Burlington, is looking for full time awake, relief awake, and relief sleep overnight counselors, to provide supervision and support throughout evening hours. Allenbrook is a co-ed group home for teenagers located in South Burlington, VT. Experience with teenagers or residential care preferred. Qualified candidates will have a bachelor’s degree or equivalent and reliable transportation. Competitive salary with shift differential, supportive team, and comfortable work environment included. Criminal background check required. Please apply online at

Central Vermont Substance Abuse Services A non-profit organization in Berlin, VT, providing substance abuse services to central Vermont residents. Services include outpatient, intensive outpatient intervention, education, prevention, intervention and treatment.

HUB Clinician:

Clinical Supervisor:

We are seeking clinicians to work with adults as

We are currently seeking a dynamic and clinically talented person to serve in the supervisory role for our Outpatient and Intensive Outpatient Substance Abuse programs. This position leads a dedicated group of direct care workers while ensuring case coordination, follow up and quality of care in the delivery of substance abuse services to adults and adolescents in the Barre VT region. Focusing on coaching, developing and supervising staff to create a cohesive team through regular clinical supervision and facilitation of team meetings, this position also includes some direct assessments of the needs of our clients and ensuring that those needs are being met. Functions include conducting intake evaluations, developing treatment plans, making case assignments, monitoring and evaluating caseloads and funding compliance. Master’s Degree and Licensed required.

HUBaClinicians: TheHub Hub& Clinician is a Master or Bachpart of our Spokeposition medication assisted elor’s level clinician position working with adults as a part of our therapy (MAT) program. This position will focus Hub & Spoke medication assisted therapy (MAT) program. This onwill access, engagement, stabilization to help position focus on access to care and providing a bridge from the clients build a bridge from theservice MAToptions. program MAT program to referrals to the treatment Work will involve assessments, group & individual therapy,Work case manageto other local MAT treatment options. will ment as wellassessments, as coordination with Department of Corrections. involve casethe management, treatment Previous experience working with people in recovery from addicplanning, group & individual counseling, referral, tions is preferable. A LADC is preferred. Working hours roughly 6:00and a.m. coordination to 2:00 p.m. with community partners such

Equalor opportunity as the DOC, DCF, otherEmployer treatment providers. Send yourworking resume with to people in Previous experience Rachel Yeager, HR Coordinator ryeager@claramartin.org recovery from addictions is• preferable. A Master Clara MartinisCenter • PO Box G •Bachelor Randolph, VT 05060 Degree strongly preferred, Degree Find other open experience positions at www.claramartin.org with previous will be considered. Must obtain AAP credential and be actively working towards LADC licensure. Working hours are roughly from 6:00a.m. to 2:00p.m. This is based at the Central Vermont Addiction Medicine located in Berlin.

www.nfivermont.org/careers. We are an Equal Opportunity Employer and celebrate the diversity of our clients and staff.

7/23/18 11:00 AM

We offer health, dental and vision benefits, matching 403b retirement plan and a generous time-off policy among other company-paid benefits.

Send your resume to Rachel Yeager, HR Coordinator • ryeager@claramartin.org Clara Martin Center • PO Box G • Randolph, VT 05060 Find other open positions at www.claramartin.org 7t-ClaraMartin071818.indd 1

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7/13/18 3:17 PM

A nonprofit organization located in Berlin, VT, providing substance abuse services to central Vermont residents. The range of services provided includes outpatient, intensive outpatient, intervention, education, prevention, intervention, and treatment services.

7/16/18 10:57 AM


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Pathways Vermont Support Line Operator

Multiple Like to Positions talk? Like to listen? Like to get paid to do both? Available! Pathways Vermont is hiring an entry level Support Line Operator. Barre & Burlington. Pathways Vermont, a statewide non-profit organization, seeks Visit ourboth website to learn more motivated individuals to fill programmatic & administrative www.pathwaysvermont.org/who-we-are/careers/. positions. Since 2009, Pathways Vermont has presented alternatives within Vermont’s mental health system. We are dedicated to ending chronic homelessness and supporting individuals chosen paths to wellness in an atmosphere of dignity & choice.

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7/20/18

www.pathwaysvermont.org/ jobs.html

NOT JUST ANOTHER JOB...

...but an opportunity to work for one of the best insurance companies in the country and reap the rewards that go along with that level of success. We’re a 190 year old company that works hard not to act our age; as a result, we have been recognized as one of the “Best Places to Work in Vermont”. An open and collaborative environment, coupled with exceptional compensation and benefits help to make us one of the most attractive employment opportunities in the country. Thanks to our continued success, we are looking for qualified candidates to join our high-performing team in the following areas:

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

If you have the qualifications outlined above or other experience and qualifications that you feel would allow you to contribute to the continued success of Vermont Mutual, we’d love to hear from you. To apply for these positions and others, please visit:

VermontMutual.com/Careers

89 State Street, P.O. Box 188, Montpelier, VT 05601 Untitled-19 1

07.25.18-08.01.18

Production Cooks and Pastry Assistant Needed!

LEGAL ASSISTANT(S) AND OFFICE ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT POSITIONS

Philo Ridge Farm is a 400-acre historic farm in Charlotte looking to hire Production Cooks and Pastry Assistant for our new farm market. We are offering competitive wages plus FULL BENEFITS including: 3 weeks paid vacation the first year and amazing health care. This is a 40 hour a week full time position. Candidates please apply to kitchen@philoridgefarm.com.

Gravel & Shea PC, a prominent law firm in downtown Burlington, Vermont, has openings for two legal assistants and one office administrative assistant. The ideal candidates for the legal assistant positions will have law firm experience in either litigation and/or real estate and 11:57 AM corporate practice areas, and a comprehensive knowledge of Microsoft Office software. In addition, these positions require a strong work ethic, an eagerness to learn and excellent writing, communication and typing skills. Minimum of three years’ law firm experience preferred.

Qualified candidates will be contacted directly. No phone calls please.

The office administrative assistant must be computer literate, have excellent typing skills, attention to detail and an eagerness to learn. No law firm experience necessary. We offer a competitive salary and benefits package, including market-leading paid parental leave and a generous retirement package.

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7/20/18 12:45 PM

Please e-mail cover letter, résumé and references to: fmiller@gravelshea.com www.gravelshea.com We currently have the following positions available:

Gravel & Shea PC is an Equal Opportunity Employer

SENIOR SERVER ADMINISTRATOR 5v-GravelShea070418.indd We are seeking an experienced IT professional to support system administration for Linux/Windows servers. The successful candidate has strong analytical and problem-solving skills, a selfstarter attitude, strong communication skills, and experience with the installation, configuration, patching securing and maintenance of servers, software and associated peripheral devices. Occasional night and weekend work will be required. DATABASE DEVELOPER We are looking for an experienced Database Developer with design, development, and administration experience. The ideal candidate will have some knowledge of Property and Casualty insurance industry, is a self-starter, with excellent planning, organizational, time management, math, research, and problem-solving skills. Periodically will be needed to support scheduled implementations on weekends.

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• Youth Development Coordinator – Part Time • Mentoring Program Assistant – Part Time • Supported Housing Evening Case Manager Please visit Spectrumvt.org for full details and to apply.

Champlain Community Services is a growing developmental services provider agency with a strong emphasis on selfdetermination values and employee and consumer satisfaction.2v-Spectrum072518.indd

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7/20/18 1:33 PM

Program Manager Coordinate residential and community supports for a humorous woman who leads an active life and enjoys spending time outside. This individual works best with female staff. The ideal candidate will enjoy working in a team-oriented position, have strong clinical skills and demonstrated leadership. Two overnight shifts required. Send your cover letter and application to Scott Broderick, sbroderick@ccs-vt.org.

Direct Support Professionals

We are currently offering benefitted direct support positions and per diem shifts. This is an excellent job for applicants entering human services or for those looking to continue their work in this field. This is a great opportunity to join a distinguished developmental service provider agency during a time of growth Send your cover letter and application to Karen Ciechanowicz, staff@ccs-vt.org.

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E.O.E.

COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER VSJF seeks a Communications Manager to execute our communications and marketing strategies, provide overall communications support to program directors and our strategic operating plan. Job description for the position available at www.vsjf.org.

Send cover letter, resume and short writing sample to jobs@ vsjf.org by 5pm on 7/31/18.

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7/9/18 10:56 AM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

07.25.18-08.01.18

Pathways Vermont Support Line Operator

Multiple Positions Night owl? Like talking? The Vermont Support Line at Pathways Vermont is hiring Available!for the late night shift! Barre & Burlington. SPECIAL OLYMPICS VERMONT IS GROWING!

Thisaisstatewide a $15/hour entry level position. Pathways Vermont, non-profit organization, seeks Visit individuals www.pathwaysvermont.org/who-we-are/careers/ motivated to fill both programmatic & administrative to learn more and apply today! positions.

Join our team and help Since 2009, Pathways Vermont build inclusion for people of has presented alternatives 2h-PathwaysVTSUPPORTline072518.indd 1 all abilities. within Vermont’s mental health

Events Coordinator: • Plan and implement competition and fundraising events including the Penguin Plunge

School and Youth Programs Manager: • Expand sports and leadership programs in Vermont schools For full job descriptions and application information visit specialolympicsvermont. org/about-us/careers/.

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7/9/18 10:42 AM

Bread Baker

We’re looking for someone who values good bread and enjoys work that exercises your body and your mind. Professional food experience is required. Red Hen is a mid-sized bread bakery focused on hand-crafted, long-fermented breads. We opened in 1999 and remain dedicated to the integrity of the bread baking processes and creating an environment for our bakers to thrive. We offer great pay and benefits as well as the satisfaction of making great food with a great team. Must be able to work weekends. Contact Randy at 223-5200 x12 or email randy@redhenbaking.com.

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system. We are dedicated to ending chronic homelessness and supporting individuals chosen paths to wellness in an atmosphere of dignity & choice.

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

www.pathwaysvermont.org/ jobs.html RuralEdge (RE), located in Vermont’s

Northeast Kingdom, is seeking an experienced executive who will provide skilled leadership to a nonprofit organization whose mission is to create and preserve affordable housing opportunities. RE’s service area spans 2,000 square miles in the state’s largest and most rural region.

The Executive Director is responsible for overall management of multiple lines of business including real estate development, asset and property management, homeownership lending and the Support And Services at Home (SASH) program. The Executive Director has primary responsibility for managing a $5M annual budget and $20M in assets which includes a portfolio of almost 600 units of scattered site housing. Serving as the public face of the organization to multiple public and private external partners, the Executive Director supports an active and engaged seven-member Board of Directors and leads a staff of 42. The Executive Director works with the Board to ensure the organization’s strategic planning goals are developed and advanced.

Candidates for the Executive Director position must have demonstrated success in securing and maintaining the long-term sustainability of a nonprofit organization, developing and managing affordable housing, and cultivating and growing broad-based fundraising programs, staff supervision, and effective public relations.

Requirements:

• Bachelor’s degree

• Experience in nonprofit administration, finance, real estate development, community development, staff supervision, and fundraising.

• Proven ability to prepare an annual budget that meets the goals and needs of an organization and maintains its fiscal health and sustainability. • Proven ability to ensure that financial management systems and policies are appropriate and effective, provide for monthly reporting, and support the longterm viability of the organization. • Experience working in a rural environment.

For more information, visit here: RuralEdge.org.

Lead Installer Position VERMONT CUSTOM CLOSETS is seeking a full-time year-round Lead Installer. Join our team installing custom closets and organizational systems and work for one of Vermont's most well-respected companies. Skills include light carpentry, ability to work independently, attention to detail and a personal commitment to the highest quality work. Exceptional benefits and working environment. Email your resume to todd@vtcustomclosets.com or stop by our showroom and apply in person.

Please submit your letter of interest, resume and three references with contact information by August 20, 2018, to: Laurie Degreenia | LaurieD@RuralEdge.org

Se Iss Du Siz Co

7/13/18 11:54 AM

Engaging minds that change the world Seeking a position with a quality employer? Consider The University of Vermont, a stimulating and diverse workplace. We offer a comprehensive benefit package including tuition remission for on-going, full-time positions. These openings and others are updated daily. 4-H Educator, Washington and Orange Counties - UVM Extension #S1678PO - Provide program development, coordination, and teaching for county and regional UVM Extension 4-H Youth Programs focused on life and job skills development, to include clubs, after school programs and special interest programs. This will include supervising and collaborating with volunteers and community partners, promoting and helping to expand 4-H efforts, and collaborating with a statewide team of 4-H educators, program coordinators and program director. Ideal candidate will have a background in youth or family development with additional volunteer development experience preferred, and the ability to plan, organize, coordinate, teach and evaluate educational programs. Experience with tractor education a bonus but not required. Effective interpersonal skills and the ability to work with both youth and adult volunteers, including community partners, in a team environment to develop and sustain successful community partnerships. The position requires effective verbal and written communication skills. Experience in generating financial support for programs desired. Computer and electronic communication proficiency a necessity. Ability to provide leadership in a collaborative environment, with a commitment to diversity required. Ability to work a flexible schedule which will include evenings, weekends and willingness and ability to travel, primarily within the state. Office is located in Berlin. Candidate must complete a successful background check. The University is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity of the institution and deliver high quality outreach programs to a broad audience. Applicants are encouraged to include in their cover letter information about how they will further this goal. IT and Accessibility Contract Analyst - Information Security Office #S1679PO - The University of Vermont is looking for an information technology and accessibility contract analyst with the expertise and skills to manage our vendor contracts and relationships to ensure information technology and accessibility standards are met. UVM is a comprehensive research university comprising eight schools and colleges, and offers its employees competitive salaries, outstanding benefits including tuition remission, and a superior academic workplace. This position can have a flexible working schedule. Qualifications: • Bachelor’s degree • Two to four years of related experience in contract management. • Basic working knowledge of the Americans with Disabilities Act and accessibility. • Basic working knowledge of information security and data integration issues. • Basic working knowledge of data privacy and security laws and regulations. • Computer experience with a variety of software packages, such as word processing, spreadsheet, and Adobe applications. • Strong communication skills, verbal and written. • Strong analytical skills for problem resolution and complex contract analysis. • Ability to interact with many levels of University staff and external suppliers. • Ability to set priorities, monitor workload, and meet required deadlines. For further information on these positions and others currently available, or to apply online, please visit our website at: www.uvmjobs.com; Job Hotline #802-656-2248; telephone #802-656-3494. Applicants must apply for position electronically. Paper resumes are not accepted. Job positions are updated daily. The University of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, protected veteran status, or any other category legally protected by federal or state law. The University encourages applications from all individuals who will contribute to the diversity and excellence of the institution.


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

C-17 07.25.18-08.01.18

Discover the many sides of AAA. Family Support Programs Coordinator

President’s Assistant The Vermont Studio Center, the largest international artists & writers residency program in the U.S., seeks an experienced executive assistant to perform a wide range of high-level administrative tasks in the role of President's Assistant. This is a part-time position requiring exceptional organizational and interpersonal skills, the ability to work independently with exacting attention to detail, and fluency with a variety of office tools and technologies. Confidentiality in all matters is essential and non-negotiable. Benefits include free shift meals, paid holidays, and paid vacation and sick time.

WE’RE HIRING JOIN US IN MONTPELIER! There’s a side of AAA that many people don’t always see. More than travel discounts and legendary

To apply, email resume/CV & cover letter to HR Director Maxine Kelly:

roadside assistance, we’re a company that can offer you a great career with advancement opportunities.

maxine@vermontstudiocenter.org

Branch Manager (19469)

Complete job description at: vermontstudiocenter.org/board-directors-staff#jobs

5 – 7 years of progressive experience in branch office operations and/or successful P&C sales experience and prior managerial experience preferred.

Insurance Sales Agents (18445)

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HP-1903 AAA 3.83” x 10.63”

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Our extensive on-the-job and paid training auto, homeowners, watercraft and personal umbrella insurance.

Branch Member Associate (19304) From providing maps and tour books, to making car and hotel reservations, you’ll enhance member relationships and advise them of other available services - all adding to the value of their membership.

Benefits include: • Health Coverage for Medical, Dental, Vision • Paid time off including Vacation, Illness and Holidays • 401k Savings Plan • Employee Discounts & More!

your resume today! Apply online at AAA.com/careers Search by Job #

Now Hiring: Infection Control / Patient Safety Coordinator The VNA is looking for an Infection Control and Patient Safety Coordinator to coordinate infection control activities for the Agency as well as act as Safety Coordinator in collaboration with our Emergency Management and Safety team.

Apply Online: bit.ly/VNA-InfectionControlJob AAA is an Equal Opportunity Employer

7/20/18 11:35 AM

Service MultipleCoordinator Positions - Housing First Available! Services Pathways Vermont, a statewide

program prepares you to sell AAA memberships,

Learn more about what AAA has to offer and submit

Prevent Child Abuse Vermont is seeking a Family Support Programs Coordinator for Washington, Orange, and Windsor Counties to develop and oversee parent education and support groups. Based in Montpelier, the position involves travel around the central region of Vermont. Duties include recruitment, training and supervision of volunteers and collaborating with community partners. Knowledge of child development and child abuse, love of parent education/support, and reliable transportation required. Bachelor’s degree in human services or related field required. Please send cover letter, resume and 3 references to: Prevent Child Abuse Vermont, Coordinator Search, PO Box 829, Montpelier, VT 05601 or email pcavt@pcavt.org. EOE

non-profit Vermont’s organization, seeks Pathways Housing motivated individuals to fill both First Program seeks both programmatic & administrative apositions. full-time and part-time Service Coordinator in Since 2009, Pathways Vermont Chittenden County toalternatives has presented within Vermont’s mental provide a broad range of health system. We are dedicated to community-based support ending chronic homelessness services to individualsindividuals who and supporting chosen paths to have a history of wellness persistentin an atmosphere of dignity & choice. mental health challenges and www.pathwaysvermont.org/ have experienced chronic jobs.html homelessness. Primary responsibilities include building relationships with marginalized individuals, coordinating support services and benefits, and using a person-centered, harm-reduction approach to empower people to build meaningful lives.

Visit pathwaysvermont.org to view a full job description or to apply for these positions.


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

07.25.18-08.01.18

COME WORK FOR THE LEADING OFFICE FURNITURE DEALER IN THE NORTHEAST

Independent Registered Nurse

DISPATCHER/SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR

Perfect for retired nurses looking for periodic work to supplement their income. Clinical medical experience, computer knowledge and statewide travel required. Perform functional assessments for Vermonters with disabilities living at home. Schedule appointments. Travel to individual homes. Knowledge of individual living assessments and choices for care program preferred.

Applications are invited for a full-time Dispatcher/Switchboard operator for Public Safety/Fire & Rescue Departments at Saint Michael’s College to dispatch radio calls and operate the College switchboard. This person will be responsible for answering all incoming calls and directing calls to the appropriate party quickly, accurately and professionally. All emergency calls are received for SMC campus and the surrounding community. Dispatch, switchboard, emergency services experience desirable, but we will provide training for a motivated and dependable person with demonstrated aptitude. Benefits include health, dental, vision, life, disability, 401(k), generous paid time off, employee and dependent tuition benefits, and discounted gym membership. For full job description and to apply online go to: smcvt.interviewexchange.com/.

Come join the OE Team! We're looking for Delivery and Installation Specialists. The ideal candidate must have valid, insurable VT driver’s license with clean record. Able to For more information or to submit operate 23 ft. delivery cover letter and resume contact: truck. Good mechanical skills with the ability to Kara Artus at kara@transitionii.com. creatively solve problems on-site. Capable of lifting heavy objects, general warehouse duties, 4t-TransitionII032118.indd 1 shipping, receiving, delivery and installation Artisanal Bagel Baker of office furniture. Willing to train. Great pay, full Vermont’s best bagel shop is looking for the best bagel bakers! benefits and 401K. Please email resume if interested to kkelley@oei-vt.com.

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7/23/18

Outreach & Marketing Coordinator (Full Time)

Immediate Opening. For position details and application process, visit schoolspring.com, job #2979588, or send cover letter, resume, certifications and three letters of recommendation to:

Leeann Wright, Director Northwest Technical Center 71 South Main Street St. Albans, VT 05478-2274

Myer’s Bagels stands out from the rest because of how we make bagels...and it all starts with you. Unlike many other bagel shops, we hand roll and, in an true artisan fashion, bake our bagels in one of the largest wood-fired ovens in North America. No proofing, no “press 11:15 AM a button” and watch the carousel move in the oven...your skills start with making our unique dough, rolling the perfect bagel with your hands and managing a wood-fired oven, all while baking a golden-brown bagel and tossing it into the “chute.”

Baker responsibilities include but are not limited to: • Punctual arrival at 2, 3, or 4am! • Ability to start wood fire • Making dough, lifting 25-50lbs comfortably • Hand rolling bagel dough • General clean-up and maintenance of area, equipment, and keeping to Code standards • Standing for 6-8 hours at a time, working in front of high temperatures. • Good, clean general hygiene • Friendly, upbeat personality to interact with customers If you are looking for great experience in baking and like to go to work early, get out early and enjoy your day, then stop by our Bakery and ask for Lloyd or Adam. You can also send in your resume to myersbagels@hotmail.com. We look forward to hearing from you soon!

7/23/18 11:12 AM

7/20/18 1:17 PM

Help Vermonters pursue their education goals!

Aspirations Project Coordinator We’re all about mission at Vermont Student Assistance Corporation (VSAC). Help us fulfill our mission of providing all Vermont students with information and financial resources to reach their educational goals. You’ll work in a relaxed yet challenging environment. We offer many top notch benefits, plus a fabulous on site fitness room & café.

VSAC is looking for a goal oriented, student focused change agent to join its Aspirations Project team. This part-time, 48-week/year position is instrumental in working directly with K-12 students and school staff to increase exposure to careers and preparation for careers after high school. The Aspirations Project provides resources and access to career and college readiness preparation through information and activities designed with host schools. The Aspirations Project Coordinator plans with VSAC and the host school Aspirations team to implement strategies, offer on-site support, and coordination of services with students and the educational community. The Aspirations Coordinator will work in the assigned school setting. The ideal candidate will have a Bachelor’s Degree in Education, Counseling or related field, experience in working with school and college age youth, a valid driver’s license and a satisfactory background check. Candidate must also successfully complete a criminal background check. This is a grant funded position that is contingent upon continued grant funds. Apply ONLY online at www.vsac.org.

VERMONT STUDENT ASSISTANCE CORPORATION PO Box 2000, Winooski, VT 05404 EOE/Minorities/Females/Vet/Disabled www.VSAC.org 9t-VSAC071818.indd 1

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7/13/18 3:18 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

Mansfield Hall is a private, innovative residential college support program for students with diverse learning needs. We are looking for dynamic individuals to fill the following position:

NIGHT CUSTODIANS

STUDENT LIFE COACH (with academic coaching responsibilities) The ideal candidate will possess a bachelor’s degree in a related field and have a background in mental health and/ or educational programming. Academic coaching is a component of this position, so experience is a plus. Applicants should be able to have some flexibility in their schedule. Full and part-time positions are available.

Applicant information is available at www.mansfieldhall.org. 3H-MansfieldHall071118.indd 1

7/6/18 11:56 AM

Executive Director Vermont Housing Finance Agency (VHFA), located in Burlington VT, is seeking an Executive Director who will serve as the Chief Executive Officer of the Agency and as such directs and administers all programs, operations, and activities, and oversees the organization of the staff and departments. The Executive Director serves at the pleasure of the Board of Commissioners and performs such duties and functions as they may prescribe, as well as fulfilling the role of Secretary of the Agency.

• Advocacy and development of the housing finance industry. Works within Vermont and nationally with a variety of key public and private partners to develop policies and programs to promote sustainable housing opportunities for low and moderate income Vermonters, and supports the vitality and economic development of Vermont communities. • Financing and development of affordable housing stock. Formulates specific housing program goals, financial objectives and priorities to encourage the investment of private capital and housing tax credits to stimulate the construction and rehabilitation of affordable housing, and the purchase and sale of existing homes throughout the State through the use of public financing.

Harwood Unified Union School District has immediate openings for night custodians. These positions are at Harwood Union High School (2 full time), and .5 FTE in both Fayston Elementary School and Warren Elementary School (may be combined as one full time position). Experience is preferred, but not required. Competitive rate of pay and benefits offered. Please submit a letter of interest, resume, and 3 letters of reference to: Ray Daigle Harwood Unified Union School District 340 Mad River Park, Suite 7 Waitsfield, VT 05673

VHFA strives to be a housing resource for all of Vermont and this position is expected to provide the leadership to achieve that goal. The Executive Director will focus on three primary areas:

EOE

07.25.18-08.01.18

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Full-time Highway Equipment Operator The routine duties of the position include year-round road maintenance using appropriate trucks, equipment, manual labor, and other duties as assigned by the Road Foreman. The Town of Johnson offers a competitive wage and benefits package. Candidates must be eligible to work in the U.S., at least 18 years of age, must have a valid Commercial Driver’s License (with at least a Class B endorsement), and a high school diploma. See our website at townofjohnson.com/ or call 802-635-2611 and ask for Brian Story for more information and how to apply. Town of Johnson is an EOE.

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Downtown Burlington law firm is seeking an Office Coordinator.

• Internal and external leadership. Represents the Agency before public and industry groups, the State Legislature and its committees, and individuals involved with VHFA in any capacity. Works closely with Vermont’s congressional delegation to promote the availability of federal housing programs to serve Vermonters.

Experience in office administration is strongly preferred. Qualifications: ability to prioritize and manage many tasks simultaneously, strong proofing skills, familiarity with Microsoft Office, Adobe, and comfort with learning new software. Specific responsibilities include: reception, property management in coordination with Managing Partner, scheduling, ensuring dayto-day office functioning, and support of attorneys and paralegals. Competitive benefits and salary. Interested persons please e-mail letter and resume to applications@ dunkielsaunders.com by July 31, 2018.

The candidate must have knowledge of the public finance programs and housing policies. Candidates must have a bachelor’s degree (master’s degree or equivalent experience preferred) and ten years’ experience in a progressively more responsible role within the affordable housing and/or public finance arenas. The ideal candidate would have five years’ management experience and knowledge of or experience working in Vermont. Familiarity and experience navigating the political process is desirable, as are strong technical and computer skills. Candidates must demonstrate exceptional leadership skills, possess excellent written and verbal communication skills, and be able to manage multiple priorities in a fluid environment. VHFA has a strong cohesive team environment and is looking for an individual who desires to lead that team in pursuit of their mission. This position requires some travel inside and outside of Vermont and dependable personal transportation. A desire to help the Agency fulfill its mission and vision through excellence and innovation are paramount. Named a “Best Small/Medium Place to Work in Vermont” in 2016, 2017 and 2018, VHFA offers a competitive salary and excellent benefits. This posting and a summary of benefits is available at www.vhfa.org/careers. Please send cover letter, resume and references to HR@vhfa.org by 4:00 pm, August 1, 2018. Position will be open until filled. VHFA is an equal opportunity employer and is committed to a diverse workplace. We highly encourage women, persons with disabilities, and people from diverse racial, ethnic and cultural backgrounds to apply.

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JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

2/23/18 9:11 AM

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ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

07.25.18-08.01.18

PERSONAL CARE ASSISTANT/COMPANION In need of full or part time person to care for male young adult with disabilities. Flexible hours for the right person. Must pass background check.

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VTDigger.org News in pursuit of truth

Office Manager

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The University of Vermont Office of Student and Community Relations is looking for a full-time Office Manager to join our team. Reporting to the Director, this position supports and performs financial and human resource activities for the office. In addition, the Office Manager coordinates all front desk activities; provides basic technology support; disseminates information to students, staff, and the public; assists with marketing efforts; and helps manage and carry out events. This individual is responsible for promoting a safe and welcoming reception for students, staff, and community members.

OpenTempo is a Vermont-based company that builds and supports software helping health care providers make smart staffing decisions, manage clinical capacity and cost, measure productivity, 2:32 PM and empower clinicians to take control of their time.

Available Roles: Product Owner - Domain specialist who works with Product Management to

own and drive the vision for product development projects from conception to launch. A vital member of the Agile Team, this role serves as the customer proxy, translating requests into user stories and requirements.

Business Intelligence/Data Warehouse Architect – A data analytics expert responsible for building, maintaining, and supporting OpenTempo’s Insights Business Intelligence platform, currently hosted in GoodData.

For further information on this position, or to apply online, please visit our website at www.uvmjobs.com and look for posting S1676PO. Applicants must apply for positions electronically. Paper resumes and direct e-mails are not accepted. THE UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER. APPLICATIONS FROM WOMEN, VETERANS, INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES AND PEOPLE FROM DIVERSE RACIAL, ETHNIC, AND CULTURAL BACKGROUNDS ARE ENCOURAGED.

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7/23/18

Management Consultant – A client-facing OpenTempo expert that helps

assigned clients define and implement strategies for managing their clinical workforce. This role provides direction, governance, and guidance throughout the relationship as well as leading the streamlining of processes and change management.

Implementation Specialist – A leading technical expert in OpenTempo

clinical workforce management software, aligning strategies with product configuration options. This role is vital in guiding the client to successful adoption of the OpenTempo product. 11:18 AM

The UVM Foundation is seeking a dynamic career-minded individual with a high level of professionalism, discretion, customer service, and excellent computer skills to join our team. Successful applicant will be performance-oriented to succeed in a demanding environment.

DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANT AND RECEPTIONIST

Provide direct administrative support to multiple traveling fundraising officers. Job responsibilities include: assisting with prospect portfolio management, recording donor contact and facilitating donor follow up; managing officers’ travel logistics and calendars, and coordinating officers’ meeting schedules; producing donor reports and correspondence. This position will also serve as the first point of contact for the UVM Foundation, greeting visitors and managing in coming phone calls. This position will report to the Vice President for Development. For a detailed description of the position and information on how to apply, please visit our website UVMFoundation.org/Careers.

Training Specialist –An expert in identifying training needs to ensure

the success of clients and staff alike. This role develops, maintains and delivers comprehensive documentation and educational media about the OpenTempo product and key processes while staying current on industry requirements and learning styles.

Services Consultant – A client-facing domain and functionality expert in OpenTempo software providing guidance and technical assistance to clients. This role is vital to long-term success of the client’s workforce management solution, ensuring it continues to operate at its peak efficiency throughout the relationship via consultation of best practices, configurations, and changing client needs. Visit opentempo.com for complete job descriptions and if interested, email your resume to hiring@opentempo.com and tell us why you would be a great fit for OpenTempo. Our compensation package is very competitive. Get ready to be challenged, innovative and have fun. 10v-OpenTempo072518.indd 1

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SERVING UP FOOD NEWS

SIDEdishes

COURTESY OF POKÉWORKS

Poke bowls from Pokéworks

Harvest Yield NEW OWNERS AT BTV’S GREAT HARVEST GREAT HARVEST BREAD, a bakery

hands-on connection with the bakery. “I love that garden,” she said. “I think I’ll probably continue to tend to it.” Sally Pollak

Crumbs VERMONT FOODBANK RECEIVES $80K; BEER NAMED FOR KOCHALKA; MORE POKE COMING

1 large, 1-topping pizza, 12 boneless wings, 2 liter Coke product

$20.99

2 large, 1-topping pizzas & 2-liter Coke product

$25.99

In 2011, JAMES KOCHALKA Plus tax. Pick-up or delivery only. Expires 7/31/18. made history by becoming Limit: 1 offer per customer per day. Vermont’s first cartoonCheck us out on Facebook & Instagram! ist laureate. Now, the Burlington comic-book 973 Roosevelt Highway author and performer will Colchester • 655-5550 again be immortalized … on www.threebrotherspizzavt.com a beer can of his own design. On Friday, July 27, 7/9/18 11:21 AM Kochalka will be at MAGIC HAT12v-threebros071118.indd 1 BREWING for the release of a floral, peppery farmhouse ale called Local Rocker in his honor. The beer is the latest in the brewery’s series of Vermont-only brews. Hannah Palmer Egan

Our goal  is  to  take  you   to  Istanbul  and  back   with  every  bite!  

Burlington’s only  

RooEop   Dining  

SEVEN DAYS

Some nine months after the opening of the SCALE POKÉ BAR in Williston, Chittenden County’s first poke restaurant, a new poke eatery is expected to occupy the space at 40 Church Street on the Marketplace in Burlington. POKÉWORKS, a chain that started in Manhattan in 2015, plans to open its Burlington location in December, a company spokeswoman said by email. Pokéworks currently has eight franchises, with a ninth to come by the end of July, she added. The Burlington restaurant is one of 28 new franchises “in the pipeline” for this year. Poke (pronounced poh-keh), a raw seafood dish from Hawaii, has become a national trend in recent years. It is often served in bowls that combine fish with many other ingredients.

Delicious &  Healthy   Mediterranean  Cuisine  

S.P.

Open 7  Days  Lunch,  Dinner,  Take  Out  

FOOD 45

CONNECT Follow us for the latest food gossip! On Twitter: Hannah Palmer Egan: @findthathannah; Sally Pollak: @vtpollak. On Instagram: @7deatsvt.

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On Monday, the VERMONT FOODBANK announced receipt of an $80,000 grant from the Walmart Foundation — yes, that Walmart — to beef up outreach programming to help Vermonters enroll in the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, or “food stamps”). SNAP is administered locally as 3SQUARESVT through the Vermont Department for Children and Families. Since 2013, the Foodbank has helped enroll more than 1,200 Vermonters in the program. The new funding will go toward enrolling eligible “seniors, families with children, and other vulnerable

JULY SPECIAL

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

and café at 382 Pine Street in Burlington, will be sold on July 31, said co-owner SARA BROWN, who announced the sale last week on Facebook. The business is a franchise of the Montana-based company of the same name. Brown started it with her husband, ETHAN BROWN, 15 years ago, before the neighborhood emerged as a food hub. The couple have been hands-on owners ever since. Ethan milled whole-wheat flour, baked bread and served customers. Sara managed the business and its employees, made soup for the café in her nearby home kitchen (equipped with a caterer’s license), and tended the hillside garden she planted in front of the bakery as Great Harvest put down roots in the South End. The new owners are married couple CHRIS BROWN and JOANNE CASALE. The bakery will be open and running the day after the sale, Sara said, and “it will be all the same people [working] here, minus me.”

Chris Brown, no relation to Sara and Ethan, is a seventh-generation Vermonter who has worked at KEURIG GREEN MOUNTAIN. Joanne is from upstate New York, where her family owned an Italian restaurant, according to Sara. Ethan has started a new job as regional field representative for Great Harvest, serving as a liaison between bakery owners and the company. (The current owners met at a Great Harvest bakery in Missoula, Mont.) A high school science teacher before she and Ethan started their business, Sara said she’d like to return to a career in education. “I have been first and foremost an employer,” she said. “I would love to continue working with young people.” She and Ethan have three children, ages 13 to 7. Sara jokes that, after the bakery is sold, she will take the maternity leave she never had. And she imagines keeping a

populations,” according to a press release. The release also notes that, nationally, nearly 20 percent of non-seniors who qualify for food stamps do not participate in the program, and that number climbs to 58 percent in the senior population.


07.25.18-08.01.18 SEVEN DAYS

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Essex Inn executive chef Jordan Sauter

ESSEX INN ON THE ADIRONDACK COAST

2297 Main Street, Essex, N.Y., 518-963-4400, essexinnessex.com

The enticing smell of barbecue wafted through the village as we disembarked from the ferry. We followed it a couple of blocks south and found its source: the Monday night barbecue at the Essex Inn. Executive chef Jordan Sauter prepares the informal meal on summer Mondays. Several choices were available the evening we visited: cheeseburgers, grilled veggies, grilled salmon and pulled pork. For $15, each came with sides of coleslaw and potato salad that were made from ingredients grown and purchased at nearby farms. The meat was also locally raised, Sauter told me, including pork from Mace Chasm Farm & Butcher Shop in Keeseville, N.Y. I chose pulled pork, and it was excellent — smoky, flavorful, tender and plentiful. My daughter, not a fan of coleslaw, gobbled up Sauter’s mayo-free version. With

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Pork sandwich at the Essex Inn

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Contact: sally@sevendaysvt.com SALLY POLLAK

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If diners appreciate the atmosphere and scenery of Essex, so does the chef, who moved from Philadelphia to the Adirondacks with his wife and young sons. “I can walk out the kitchen door and see the lake,” he said. “I can see you guys over there in Vermont. Compared to what I was used to — walking out back into an alleyway with dumpsters in it — this is a very welcome change. It’s beautiful.” m

AP

was missing its chicken and dessert that went MIA for a time, didn’t detract from the evening’s pleasures. Some diners arrived in their own boats and parked at a restaurant slip. Others came by ferry. The big boat’s coming and going, visible from our lakeside table, was the meal’s metronome. Kids played mini-golf and romped by the swings in a play area to one side of the restaurant. These outdoor amenities are the work of owner Copey Houghton, a Vermonter who purchased the Old Dock business three years ago and is finalizing a deal on the property this summer. Houghton, 57, is the longtime owner of the Daily Planet in downtown Burlington. But his ties to Essex run deep: His great-grandfather settled a family camp there in 1908, and Houghton has been eating at the Old Dock his whole life. Owning the restaurant, he said, “was always a dream of mine.” Some menu items hark back to Houghton’s earliest days making food for others. As a young teen in Charlotte, he operated a catering business that served burgers and chicken from the grill with sides of salad. The Old Dock offers sandwiches and burgers, as well as entrées such as lobster, lamb and steak. Houghton’s menu has less fried food than his predecessor’s, he said, and uses vegetables grown at a friend’s garden and beef from South Farm, former New York governor George Pataki’s farm in Essex. The night we dined at the Old Dock, Leah Chiofaro of Essex, Vt., arrived by boat for dinner with her extended family. Her passengers included two dogs wearing life jackets who hung out in the boat while the family ate. Chiofaro, owner of Hydrangea Too on College Street in Burlington, had a burger and fries. “I’ve been boating on the lake close to 20 years,” she said in an interview later. “Let’s put it this way: You can’t pick a better backdrop, a better atmosphere, for dinner than being right on the lake.” Her trip back to Perkins Pier in Burlington took about 20 minutes at “full speed,” she noted. “It was beautiful and calm that night,” Chiofaro said. “Being able to watch the sunset is just fantastic. You can’t really get a better view than that.”

the grilled bun that came on the side, I made a sandwich of pork and slaw and still had some of each for extra eating. We ate our picnicky meal in two places: My daughter and her friend chose the air-conditioned bar. My cousin and I preferred the evening air and sat on the front porch, where his dog joined us. A server graciously set a bowl of water in front of Arlo and stepped around him as she served outside diners. The Monday night meals are an end-of-the-week break in routine for Sauter, who prepares multicourse dinners Thursday through Sunday. On those nights, crafting a menu that changes by the week, he makes dishes such as housemade burrata with heirloom tomatoes and olive oil; veal cotechino with poached egg, lentils and house Dijon; and housemade ramp fettuccine (with ramps he harvests himself ), served with spicy lamb ragout and golden raisins. “It’s an ideal situation for a chef,” said Sauter, 33, of his gig at the Essex Inn, where he’s worked for two years, “rather than me waiting on a truck with vegetables in a box that have no attachment to anything.” He begins his week by making the rounds at local farms, where he purchases (and sometimes picks) food for the coming week. Back in the restaurant kitchen, Sauter starts his prep by making bread dough.

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Food by Ferry « P.44

The Adirondack Mountains as seen from the Lake Champlain Transportation Company ferry


food+drink

TASTY BITS FROM THE CALENDAR AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM

We may be known for our steaks... but we know seafood! FISH • SCALLOPS • SALMON SHRIMP • LOBSTER

COURTESY OF KNOLL FARM

Fire & Ice

Vermont’s Iconic steakhouse 26 Seymour Street | Middlebury | 802.388.7166 | fireandicerestaurant.com 6H-fire&ice052516.indd 1

5/24/16 11:35 AM

Animals at Knoll Farm

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The Boat Club at

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Peter Forbes and Helen Whybrow welcome visitors to their picturesque Waitsfield hill farm for a Moroccan-inspired garden supper. On the menu: wood-fired Knoll Farm lamb kebabs, pillowy handmade lavash and roasted garden vegetables served al fresco on picnic blankets in the garden (or in the barn if it’s raining). Live music and homemade berry pies make for a sweet finish. BYOB. KEBAB NIGHT! FARM-TO-TABLE DINNER Friday, July 27, 6-9 p.m., Knoll Farm, Waitsfield. $25 ($5 for dessert only). Info, knollfarm.org.

GROW YOUR OWN MUSHROOMS Fungi fans get the lowdown on growing mycelium marvels for food and medicine. Sunday, July 29, 2-5 p.m., Peaceful Harvest Mushrooms, Worcester. $30-40. Info, 343-4122, nofavt.org.

FOOD 47

BREAKFAST ON THE FARM: KAYHART BROTHERS DAIRY Early birds pay visits to the cows during a self-guided farm tour, then enjoy a pancake breakfast. Saturday, July 28, 8 a.m.-1 p.m., Kayhart Brothers Dairy, West Addison. Free. Info, 8282430, vermontbreakfast onthefarm.com.

SEVEN DAYS

FARM TABLE FRIDAYS Mountain visitors gather on the green at Stowe Mountain Resort’s Spruce Peak Village for a summery feast by chef Jacqueline Cochran. Friday, July 27, 6-9:30 p.m., Stowe Mountain Lodge. $95-135. Info, 760-4058, stowe.com.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Juniper Patio Open daily 7 am - 11 pm

BASINHARBOR.COM • 802.475.2311 Untitled-2 1

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FOOD

River City Stoke

Chill vibes and “crave-worthy” eats at the Upper Valley’s Trail Break Taps + Tacos B Y HA NNA H PA L ME R EGAN

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PHOTOS: SARAH PRIESTAP

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n White River Junction, the stoke is real. Or it is, at least, for Trail Break Taps + Tacos owner Topher Lyons. For those unfamiliar with “the stoke,” it’s the feeling one catches when riding a big wave on a surfboard, or shredding a sweet arc on skis, or hitting the line just right on a mountain bike. It is, in short, the life-affirming ebullience that outdoor enthusiasts find in the mountains and on the water. Lyons aspires to offer it in the form of tacos and beers at Trail Break, which opened in a bright, clean new building at 129 South Main Street in November. On the menu are Gnargaritas and Mo-bettah-jitos, along with “vertical eats” (burritos) and “horizontal eats” (tacos). Everything at the restaurant, from the quirky menu language to the bold color scheme to the surf and ski movies projected on a screen near the bar, politely insists that visitors hop on board for the ride. “I came at this [to provide] a more allencompassing experience,” said Lyons. “The brand, the atmosphere — those things can accentuate the food. I think a lot of restaurants leave quite a bit on the table by not factoring in how the general aesthetics play into the brand.” For $20, you can get a “big-ass bowl” (portioned for two) of a drink called the Hot Box Time Machine, which blends SILO Distillery’s maple whiskey with Halyard Brewing’s Volcano Juice gingerbeer shandy, Triple Sec, tropical juices, cinnamon and bitters.

A three-taco plate with carne asada, pork and ahi tuna at Trail Break Taps + Tacos

Sound good? You gotta sit in the gondola — one of Killington Ski Resort’s original four-seater skier cars, painted orange, parked on cinder blocks on the patio — to order it. Consider the drink a reward for crowding into hot, cramped quarters on a breezy afternoon. On the bright side, it’s clutch seating for a rainy day… But raining it was not last Thursday evening. My husband and I felt lucky to

snag the last non-gondola patio table for our 6:30 supper. Most days, I’m told by friends who are regulars, prime-time dinner seats here come with at least a 30-minute wait. We settled into plastic lawn chairs spray-painted shades of turquoise, orange and lime green. Overhead, a string of Edison bulbs bobbed in the breeze, rigged on cables that convened on a post atop the gondola.

Décor on the Trail Break patio gives the DIY impression of one’s own backyard, if one were to spend a decent amount of time and cash ensuring that everything adhered to health and safety codes. If it’s all rather boot-strappy, the idea seems to be to pack in as much fun and good cheer as possible on a shoestring budget. Lyons, who has worked in restaurants since graduating with a degree in hospitality management from the University of New Hampshire’s Whittemore School of Business and Economics in 2008, spent years working on his business plan. He originally sought to do business in his native California, but life — a lady love, more specifically — kept him in New England as planning gave way to action. A lack of startup capital kept the project on ice for years. “I had no money, and I had never owned a business,” Lyons said, recalling approaching banks for business loans. “And the hospitality business is kind of a red flag for most banks.” He started hitting up small community banks, having heard they were sometimes more friendly to local startups. Eventually, Mascoma Bank, based in Lebanon, N.H., just across the Connecticut River, agreed to fund the project. “There’s a lot of money being put into [White River right now], which was once very vibrant and which is becoming a cool scene again,” Lyons said. “I think I came at the right time, when everyone, including the banks, can see the growth

Summertimes are made for Outdoor Dining

48 FOOD

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Relax, open the window, and savor a delicious dinner on the rails

Burlington’s newest dining attraction features much more than just fine food! Enjoy a round-trip train ride through the beautiful Champlain Valley on board our fully-restored, historic dining cars. On the way you’ll be served delicious dishes and signature drinks. Trains depart Burlington Union Station on Friday and Saturday evenings now through September 1st. For more information and reservations visit our website:

www.trainridesvt.com CLASSIC DINNER TRAIN Untitled-31 1

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food+drink tortilla, fully melted cheese, Topher Lyons pouring a pint of River tender and savory pork, Roost Mas Verde IPA still-crisp apples. If it came across as somewhat pedestrian, I blame the form, not the kitchen; I’ve yet to meet a restaurant quesadilla that was truly worth remembering.

its work at a relaxed but efficient pace. At a table near us, a pair of boomers chatted about work; beside them, a young family talked about summer camp and weekend plans. In the gondola, a man in his twenties discussed work and roommates. Across from him, a young woman emptied a can of Fancy Feast into Tupperware for her kitten, who sniffed at the food, then climbed into the cool shade beneath the gondola. The feline lay down and splayed out her back legs, taking in the scene from the end of a red leash. From a booster seat nearby, a baby looked on, idly gnawing at the corner of a quesadilla, foot bouncing to the soft rhythm of the indie-pop tunes floating over the airwaves. m Contact: hannah@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Trail Break Taps + Tacos, 129 South Main Street, White River Junction, 281-3208. trailbreakwrj.com

Nachos with chorizo chili

Grilled Anaheim peppers imparted mild heat to my husband’s B.A.D. Burrito ($11), a fat wrap loaded with scrambled eggs, chorizo chili and crunchy potato shreds. Those über-brittle spuds also lined the bottom of my ahi tuna taco ($5). With its cool, fork-tender hunks of fish, tossed with avocado and splashed with redpeppered cream, it evoked tuna tartare in taco form. And the tender, smoke-kissed steak was a pleasant foil to the pickled onions and cilantro in a carne asada taco ($4.75).

moments of greatness Chef Dennis Marcoux in the kitchen to elevate a picture from “good enough” to “really good.” Likewise, a glass of orange agua fresca ($4) spiked with grilled green poblano was perfect: delicately flavored, sugary but not cloying, and refreshing and cool, as any good agua fresca aspires to be. As the sun set, the restaurant did

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

potential there and are maybe willing to take a little more risk.” The plan was simple enough: to offer affordable, “crave-worthy” food in a lively, casual setting. Lyons doesn’t mince words about sourcing locally. He and chef Dennis Marcoux buy local when they can, he said. But the goal is to offer dinner, a drink or two, and a good time for about $20 per person — a price point most WRJ locals can stomach with some frequency — and that’s not realistic by any reasonable farm-to-table standard. Still, the food is fresh, thoughtful and tasty enough. At our table, a pan of nachos ($9.75 for a half order) brought crisp corn tortillas laced together with melted cheddar and strewn with dark and smoky chorizo chili. Serrano peppers, grilled and smashed, gave extra character to dollops of guac, while cilantro and lime enlivened an ample squirt of sour cream. A quesadilla ($13, called “Tacky Tortillas” on the menu) stuffed with shredded pork and apple brought just what it promised: browned and crunchy

But the star of my taco plate ($11.50 to $15.50 for two or three tacos, plus a side) was a petite bowl of chickpea hash, in which an ample dusting of chili powder married the sweetness of yams and the cool beaniness of the garbanzos in a way that was brilliant but so, so simple. I found myself wondering how I might duplicate it at home so I could eat it every day. The side reminded me that sometimes the supporting cast offers enough

07.25.18-08.01.18

WEEKLY SPECIALS!

SEVEN DAYS

TACO TUESDAY $2 Chicken or Shredded Beef Tacos & $3 Long Trails

THURSDAY 1/2 PRICE NACHOS

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK FOR LUNCH AND DINNER

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN CUISINE

FOOD 49

authentic mexican cuisine

802-540-3095 • 169 Church St. • Burlington • 802-662-4334 • 4 Park St. • Essex Junction (Lincoln Inn) www.ElGatoCantina.com • info@elgatocantina.com 8h-elgato072518.indd 1

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calendar

J U L Y

2 5 - A U G U S T

WED.25 cannabis

EDIBLE WELLNESS: A Q&A demystifies the benefits of consuming cannabidiol. Attendees treat themselves to sweet CBD delights. Nutty Steph’s Granola & Chocolate Factory, Middlesex, 5-6 p.m. Free. Info, 229-2090. GREENER DRINKS: Supporters of commonsense cannabis reform sip beverages and discuss the culture, industry and politics of the agricultural product. Zenbarn, Waterbury, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, info@ vtcannabisbrands.com.

community

SERVE WEEK: ANEW Place raises awareness of homelessness and inspires action by organizing six days of volunteer opportunities at local organizations. See anewplacevt.org for details. Various Burlington locations. Free; preregister. Info, 862-9879, ext. 1006.

crafts

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SEVEN DAYS

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

FIBER RIOT!: Crafters get hooked on knitting, crocheting, spinning and more at an informal weekly gathering. Mad River Fiber Arts & Mill, Waitsfield, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 496-7746. GREEN MOUNTAIN CHAPTER OF THE EMBROIDERERS’ GUILD OF AMERICA STITCHIN: Community members may observe or stitch along as these needle-and-thread enthusiasts fine-tune their techniques. South Burlington Community Library, University Mall, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 372-4255.

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A COURSE IN MIRACLES STUDY GROUP: Participants engage in a study of spiritual transformation. Unitarian Church of Montpelier, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 279-1495. DEATH CAFÉ: Folks meet for a thought-provoking and respectful conversation about death, aimed at accessing a fuller life. Pyramid Holistic Wellness Center, Rutland, 7-9 p.m. Free; donations accepted. Info, 353-6991. GUIDED TOURS: A historic Gothic Revival house opens its doors for hourly excursions. Self-guided explorations of the gardens, exhibits and walking trails are also available. Justin Morrill Homestead, Strafford, 10 a.m.5 p.m. $6; free for kids 14 and under. Info, 765-4484. NURSING BEYOND A YEAR MEET-UP: Breastfeeding parents connect over toddler topics such as weaning and healthy eating habits. Aikido of Champlain Valley, Burlington, 9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 985-8228. PARENT-IN MEETUP: Caregivers aim to be their best by tapping into a variety of skills, styles and activities. Childcare is available upon request. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 5:45-6:45 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 652-0997. ROUND-UP ON THE RIVER: Live music and mouthwatering morsels draw locals to this weekly shindig. 40 Bridge St., Waitsfield, 5 p.m. Free. Info, 496-9199.

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happenings. Call to confirm. Mittelman Observatory, McCardell Bicentennial Hall, Middlebury College, 9-10:30 p.m. Free. Info, 443-2266. WAGON RIDE WEDNESDAYS: Giddyap! Visitors explore the working dairy farm via this time-tested method of equine transportation. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Regular admission, $4-16; free for members and kids under 3. Info, 457-2355. WATERBURY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MEETING: A potluck dinner leads to an engaging presentation by Steve Cormier, the new general manager of the Waterbury-based radio station WDEV. Bring a chair and a dish to share. Hope Davey Memorial Park, Waterbury Center, potluck, 6 p.m.; program, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 244-8089.

fairs & festivals

BARRE HERITAGE FESTIVAL: Arts, culture, music, food and history join forces at this celebration of the Granite City’s past and present. See barreheritagefestival.org for details. Various Barre locations, 8:30 a.m.-8 p.m. Prices vary. Info, info@barreheritagefestival.org. A SUMMER’S EVE: Toting picnic dinners, blankets and chairs, revelers sample 18th-century treats, take part in historic games and activities, and hear an evening fife-and-drum concert. Ethan Allen Homestead Museum, Burlington, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 865-4556.

STARGAZING: Clear skies at night mean viewers’ delight when telescope users set their sights on celestial WED.25

LIST YOUR UPCOMING EVENT HERE FOR FREE! ALL SUBMISSIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY THURSDAY AT NOON FOR CONSIDERATION IN THE FOLLOWING WEDNESDAY’S NEWSPAPER. FIND OUR CONVENIENT SUBMISSION FORM AND GUIDELINES AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT. LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY KRISTEN RAVIN AND SADIE WILLIAMS. SEVEN DAYS EDITS FOR SPACE AND STYLE. DEPENDING ON COST AND OTHER FACTORS, CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS MAY BE LISTED IN EITHER THE CALENDAR OR THE CLASSES SECTION. WHEN APPROPRIATE, CLASS ORGANIZERS MAY BE ASKED TO PURCHASE A CLASS LISTING.

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FIND MORE LOCAL EVENTS IN THIS ISSUE AND ONLINE: art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

music Find club dates at local venues in the music section and at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com.

FAMILY BAND

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rom Johnny and Rosanne Cash to Bob and Jakob Dylan, shared talent between parent and child is a musical tradition — one that includes Jeff Daniels (pictured) and his son, Ben. Though best known for acting in films such as Dumb and Dumber and The Squid and the Whale, the elder Daniels has forged a substantial music career, releasing nine live and studio albums of Americana music, including two with Ben. Father and son share the stage, along with the rest of the Ben Daniels Band, as part of their Acoustically Speakin’ Summer ’18 tour. For a preview, check out their joint live album, Acoustic Sittin’ Tour 2018. JEFF DANIELS & THE BEN DANIELS BAND

Wednesday, August 1, 7 p.m., at Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe Mountain Resort. $30-40. Info, 760-4634, sprucepeakarts.org.


Making the Strings Sing

JUL.31 | MUSIC

The members of the Telegraph Quartet came together in 2013 with a shared passion for the standard chamber music repertoire and contemporary nonstandard works. Through their ardor and artistry, the string players have earned accolades such as the grand prize at the 2014 Fischoff National Chamber Music Competition and the position of Quartetin-Residence at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. Cellist Jeremiah Shaw, violist Pei-Ling Lin, and violinists Eric Chin and Joseph Maile captivate classical music lovers in a concert with pianist Ilya Yakushev, presented by Summer Music From Greensboro.

TELEGRAPH QUARTET Tuesday, July 31, 7:30 p.m., at Greensboro United Church of Christ. $20; free for youth age 18 and under. Info, summermusicfromgreensboro@gmail.com, summermusicfromgreensboro.net.

Summer Reading Avid readers revel in the written word during the 10th annual Bookstock Literary Festival. This three-day celebration of established and emerging talent draws bookworms to downtown Woodstock for presentations and readings by more than 40 novelists, poets and nonfiction authors. Book sales, live music, kids’ activities, workshops on poetry and nature writing, and the book-themed art exhibit “Unbound VOL.VIII” fill out the agenda. Featured artists include prolific author Reeve Lindberg, best-selling novelist Richard Russo and three-term U.S. poet laureate Robert Pinsky (pictured). On Saturday evening, Pinsky presents PoemJazz, a unique conversation between language and instrument that evokes a literary and musical muse.

BOOKSTOCK LITERARY FESTIVAL Friday, July 27, 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m.; Saturday, July 28, 9 a.m.-9 p.m.; and Sunday, July 29, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., in downtown Woodstock. Free. Info, 989-4338, bookstockvt.org.

JUL.27-29 | FAIRS & FESTIVALS SEVENDAYSVT.COM SEVEN DAYS CALENDAR 51

Based on the 1988 cult-classic film starring Winona Ryder, Heathers: The Musical deals with issues of bullying, suicide and mental illness through dark comedy. For Stowe Theatre Guild’s production, director Brita Down was especially thoughtful in her portrayal of one particular theme: gun violence. Conscious of recent school shootings, Down got creative and found ways to elicit the illusion of firearms without ever showing one onstage. The play isn’t all doom and gloom. As cast member Jaylin Rae says in a ‘HEATHERS: THE MUSICAL’ press release, “Through the Wednesday, July 25, through murders, teenage sex, partying Saturday, July 28, 7:30 p.m., and bullying, Heathers still at Stowe Town Hall Theatre. manages to send the message See website for additional dates. $18-20. Info, that life is beautiful, and tickets@stowetheatre.com, everyone belongs somewhere.” stowetheatre.com.

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JUL. 25-28 | THEATER

Mean Girls


calendar See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘10 THINGS I HATE ABOUT YOU’: Julia Stiles and Heath Ledger star as a strong-willed student and the rebel set on winning her heart. Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, 7 p.m. $5. Info, 533-9075.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 07.25.18-08.01.18 SEVEN DAYS 52 CALENDAR

MOVIE: Snacks are provided at a showing of a popular flick. Call for details. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. ‘PHILADELPHIA’: Vermont Pride Theater shows Jonathan Demme’s 1993 Academy Awardwinning drama about a gay lawyer with HIV and his fight for justice. Chandler Center for the Arts, Randolph, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 728-6464. ‘PRINCESS MONONOKE’: A young warrior finds himself in the middle of a battle between forest gods and a mining colony in this 1997 Japanese animated adventure. Shown Sunday and Wednesday with English dubbing and Monday with English subtitles. Palace 9 Cinemas, South Burlington, 7 p.m. $12.50. Info, 660-9300. ‘SEA MONSTERS 3D’: Moviegoers get up close and personal with some of the dinosaur age’s most fearsome marine reptiles. Northfield Savings Bank 3D Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, noon, 2 & 4 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $13.50-16.50; admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848.

COMMUNITY SUPPER: A scrumptious spread connects friends and neighbors. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 5-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 300. COOK THE BOOK: Foodies bring a dish from Yotam Ottolenghi’s Plenty More: Vibrant Vegetable Cooking From London’s Ottolenghi to a palate-pleasing potluck. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. FIVE CORNERS FARMERS MARKET: Conscious consumers shop local produce, premade treats and crafts. 3 Main St., Essex Junction, 4-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 5cornersfarmersmarket@ gmail.com. ICE CREAM SOCIAL: Sweets lovers spoon up frozen dairy treats alongside food-truck fare. Lawn, Lake Champlain Chocolates Factory Store & Café, Burlington, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 800-465-5909. LEDDY PARK BEACH BITES: Lakeside picnickers enjoy foodtruck fare, a beer garden, kids’ activities and live entertainment. Attendees on two wheels make use of free bike valet service. Leddy Park, Burlington, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 864-0123. VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: Local products — veggies, breads, pastries, cheeses, wines, syrups, jewelry, crafts and beauty supplies — draw shoppers to a diversified bazaar. Depot Park, Rutland, 3-6 p.m. Free. Info, 342-4727.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: Players have fun with the popular card game. Burlington Bridge Club, Williston, 9:15 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. $6. Info, 872-5722. CRIBBAGE TEAMS: Longtime players and neophytes alike aim for a value of 15 or 31 in this competitive card game. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 223-3322.

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‘THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE TWO TOWERS’: Frodo’s quest toward Mordor continues with the help of his friend Sam and the shifty Gollum in the second installment of director Peter Jackson’s trilogy. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600.

BEERLINGTON FOAMERS MARKET: Shoppers snag veggies from Three Chimney Farm’s pop-up farm stand and sip Foam Brewers suds. Foam Brewers, Burlington, 5-7 p.m. Free. Info, 391-9047.

PINOCHLE & RUMMY: Card sharks engage in friendly competition. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 223-3322.

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‘GREAT WHITE SHARK 3D’: Shot on location in South Africa, New Zealand, Mexico and California, this film seeks the truth behind the mythic and stigmatized underwater creature. Northfield Savings Bank 3D Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 11:30 a.m., 1:30 & 3:30 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $13.50-16.50; admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848.

food & drink

LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: SPANISH: ¡Hola! Language lovers perfect their fluency. KelloggHubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

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‘FLYING MONSTERS 3D’: How and why did the pterosaur take to the sky? A captivating motion picture full of 3D filming technology and CGI explores this question. Northfield Savings Bank 3D Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 10:30 a.m., 12:30, 2:30 & 4:30 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $13.50-16.50; admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848.

‘WILD AFRICA 3D’: Viewers plunge into fantastic places and meet amazing creatures with water as their guide. Northfield Savings Bank 3D Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $13.50-16.50; admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848.

MAH JONGG: Participants of all levels enjoy friendly bouts of this tile-based game. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 1-3:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

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film

STOWE JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL: ‘ITZHAK’: A 2017 documentary provides a warm and personal portrayal of world-renowned violinist Itzhak Perlman. Jewish Community of Greater Stowe, 7 p.m. $10-15. Info, 253-1800.

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health & fitness

BONE BUILDERS EXERCISE CLASSES: Folks of all ages ward off osteoporosis in an exercise and prevention class. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 7:30-8:30, 9:15-10:15 & 10:4011:40 a.m. Free. Info, 223-3322. FIVE STEPS TO COPE WITH LYME DISEASE: Yoga therapist Ragan Sheridan Royer shares simple techniques for reducing stress, cultivating peace and restoring hope for those living with the tick-borne illness. Community Room, Hunger Mountain Co-op, Montpelier, 6-7:15 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, info@hungermountain.coop. QIGONG: Gentle movements promote strength, balance and wellbeing. Waterbury Public Library, 11-11:45 a.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, 244-7036. RESILIENCE FLOW: FOR THOSE WITH A HISTORY OF TBI OR BRAIN INJURY: Individuals affected by a traumatic brain injury practice breath work, slow grounded movement and guided meditation. Sangha Studio — Pine, Burlington, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262. TOMGIRL WALKING CLUB: Pups and pals in tow, pedestrians make strides toward health. Tomgirl Juice Co., Burlington, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0337. Y12SR: YOGA OF 12-STEP RECOVERY: Folks in addiction recovery and those affected by the addictive behavior of others are welcome to take part in a sharing circle and themed yoga class. Sangha Studio — Pine, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

language

ALLIANCE FRANÇAISE OF THE LAKE CHAMPLAIN REGION SOCIAL HOUR: Francophones fine-tune their French-language conversation skills over cocktails. Juniper, Burlington, 5-7 p.m. Free. Info, info@aflcr.org. BEGINNER & INTERMEDIATE/ ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSES: Learners take communication to the next level. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211.

JUST FOR LAUGHS FESTIVAL: The biggest names in comedy descend upon Montréal with gut-busting material. See hahaha.com for details. Various Montréal locations. Prices vary. Info, 514-845-2322.

music

Find club dates in the music section. BLACKWATER TRIO: Hailing from Clarksdale, Miss., the threesome thrills audience members with Americana, folk, roots and rock numbers. Martha Pellerin & Andy Shapiro Memorial Bandstand, Middlesex, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, thumbsgerkin@ comcast.net. BURLINGTON CITY ARTS SUMMER CONCERTS: HANA ZARA: Friends and coworkers convene for a lunchtime indiefolk set. Burlington City Hall Park, noon. Free. Info, 865-7166. CAPITAL CITY BAND: The community ensemble hits all the right notes at a weekly gig on the green. Vermont Statehouse lawn, Montpelier, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 456-7054. CLASSICAL MUSICAL ENCOUNTERS: Henry and Nathan Wu share their love of the genre by playing piano, violin and cello selections by Bach, Beethoven and others. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955. CRAFTSBURY CHAMBER PLAYERS: Classical connoisseurs perk up their ears for compositions by Brahms, Hindemith and others. Elley-Long Music Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, preconcert talk, 6:45 p.m.; concert, 7:30 p.m. $10-25; free for kids 12 and under. Info, 800-639-3443. GINKGOA: Nicolle Rochelle and Antoine Chatenet combine electronica and vintage jazz with a highly danceable result. Rain location: Spaulding Auditorium. Dartmouth Green, Hanover, N.H., 5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 603-646-2422. JUNK MUSIC & SOUND EXPERIMENTS: Listening exercises, rhythm games and sound improvisations help participants develop their ears. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581. MAYFLY: Katie Trautz and Julia Wayne deliver original songs alongside old-time New England and Appalachian music as part of the Young Tradition Vermont Trad Camp Lunchtime Concert Series. High School Campus, Lake Champlain Waldorf School, Shelburne, 12:15-12:45 p.m. Free. Info, 233-5293. THE STRAGGLERS: A lively mix of bluegrass, Americana, vintage country and classic rock entertains onlookers. Mills Riverside Park, Jericho, 6-8 p.m. Donations. Info, 899-2693.

TRAD CAMP SHOWCASE: Core instructors and campers are among the performers at this Young Tradition Vermont exhibition of song and dance. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 863-3403. VILLAGE HARMONY TEEN SESSION II: A dozen teen singers regale listeners with a program of international choral music. Unitarian Church of Montpelier, 7:30 p.m. $5-15. Info, 426-3210.

outdoors

FINDING BIRDS BY EAR #1: Fans of feathered fliers meet 45 different species that live in and around the park. Little River State Park, Waterbury, 7 p.m. $24; free for kids 3 and under; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103.

politics

PRIMARY ELECTION CANDIDATE FORUMS: Republican gubernatorial candidates Phil Scott and Keith Stern vie for votes during public discussions hosted by Channel 17/Town Meeting Television. CCTV Channel 17 Studios, Burlington, 5:25 p.m. Free. Info, 552-3495.

sports

COMMUNITY ROWING: Active bodies experience a physical workout while enjoying the beauty of Lake Champlain. Perkins Pier, Burlington, 5:157:30 p.m. $10; $175 for season membership; free for first-timers; preregister; limited space. Info, 475-2022, ext. 112. MARK RABIN MEMORIAL GOLF TOURNAMENT: Four-person teams tee off in a scramblestyle tournament. Harmony Golf Club & Community, Port Kent N.Y., shotgun starts, 8 a.m. & 1 p.m.; lunch, 11:15 a.m.-12:45 p.m. $19.99-49.99; preregister. Info, 518-564-4169.

talks

ALAN BOYE: In “A Stroll Through Time — the People and Places of the Bayley-Hazen Road,” the Northern Vermont University Lyndon professor discusses the road that travels almost the entire length of the Northeast Kingdom. Ryegate Corner Presbyterian Church, 7 p.m. Free. Info, newburyhistorical@gmail.com. MARK GREENBERG: “Solidarity Forever: Songs of Unions and Labor” surveys American labor songs from the Industrial Revolution through the coal wars of the 1930s. South Hero Community Library, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 372-6209.

tech

TECH HELP WITH CLIF: Electronics novices develop skill sets applicable to smartphones, tablets and other gadgets. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, noon & 1 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-6955.

theater

‘ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA’: Academy Theatre’s production of Shakespeare’s tale of love

and power in the ancient world stars Peter M. Gair and Alice Morrison. Outdoor amphitheater. St. Johnsbury Academy, 7 p.m. $5-10. Info, jwarner-ashley@ stjacademy.org. ‘CHAPATTI’: Two animal lovers rediscover the importance of human companionship in a poignant and humorous Irish play by Christian O’Reilly. McCarthy Arts Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 8 p.m. $3645. Info, 654-2281. DEPOT DAY: Light refreshments, guided backstage tours, and meet and greets with the cast of The 39 Steps reward donors, partners and community members for 40 years of support. Depot Theatre, Westport, N.Y., 4-7 p.m. Free. Info, 518-962-4449. ‘FUN HOME’: Cartoonist Alison Bechdel’s graphic novel is the basis of this award-winning musical about viewing one’s parents through grown-up eyes. Weston Playhouse Second Stage at Walker Farm, 2 & 7:30 p.m. $47. Info, 824-5288. ‘GYPSY’: Broadway veterans Peter Boynton and Nick Corley codirect the musical adaptation of the story of vaudeville star Gypsy Rose Lee. Skinner Barn Theater, Waitsfield, 8-10:30 p.m. $25. Info, 496-4422. ‘HEATHERS: THE MUSICAL’: Stowe Theatre Guild stages the darkly comic story of a brainy and beautiful teenage misfit who hustles her way into a ruthless clique. See calendar spotlight. Stowe Town Hall Theatre, 7:30-10 p.m. $18-20. Info, tickets@ stowetheatre.com. ‘A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM’: The Vermont Suitcase Company raises the curtain on its Green Mountain Statethemed version of Shakespeare’s comedy about lovers, actors and meddling fairies. Lost Nation Theater, Montpelier City Hall, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $10-15. Info, 229-0492. ‘ROALD DAHL’S JAMES AND THE GIANT PEACH’: Northern Stage Summer Musical Theater Intensive students ages 10 through 18 act out the whimsical story of an orphaned boy who escapes miserable circumstances and becomes a hero. Barrette Center for the Arts, White River Junction, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $19-25. Info, 296-7000. ‘WEST SIDE STORY’: A modern, musical retelling of Romeo and Juliet sees two young lovers caught between rival New York City street gangs in a Weston Playhouse presentation. Weston Playhouse Main Stage, 2 & 7:30 p.m. $54-68. Info, 824-5288.

words

AUTHORS AT THE ALDRICH: Lit lovers lend their ears for a talk by master craftsman Dan Snow, who penned the 2008 title Listening to Stone: Hardy Structures, Perilous Follies and Other Tangles With Nature. Aldrich Public Library, Barre, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 476-7550.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

RECOVERY WRITE NOW: Wordsmiths in recovery let their creativity flow in a lively and supportive setting. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 6-7:15 p.m. Free. Info, writelife1@hotmail.com. WEDNESDAY WORKSHOP: Lit lovers analyze works in progress penned by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104. WRITING CIRCLE: Words flow when participants explore creative expression in a lowpressure environment. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218.

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agriculture

CROPS & SOILS FIELD DAY: Educational sessions on topics such as pollinators, hemp irrigation and hop quality shed light on how the Northwest Crops & Soils Program is tackling challenges facing Vermont farmers. Borderview Farm, Alburgh, 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. $10-25. Info, 524-6501. HOUSE & FORMAL GARDENS TOUR: Explorations of the inn and its grounds culminate in afternoon tea with sweets and savories. Shelburne Farms, 2:304 p.m. $20; preregister. Info, 985-8686.

business

MEMORY CAFÉ: People experiencing memory loss and their caregivers connect in a relaxed atmosphere. American Legion Post 20, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 1-3:30 p.m. Free. Info, 518-564-3369.

fairs & festivals

BARRE HERITAGE FESTIVAL: See WED.25, 8:30 a.m.-10 p.m. LAKE CHAMPLAIN MARITIME FESTIVAL: Continuous music maintains an upbeat mood at this four-day waterfront fête featuring kids’ activities, an international food court, a boat show and much more. See lcmfestival.com for details. Various waterfront locations, Burlington, 6-10 p.m. Free; additional cost for some activities. Info, 355-1781. NOTOWN MUSIC FESTIVAL: Four days of music, community and camping include performances by Bow Thayer, Hamjob and others. 2056 Route 100, Stockbridge. $35-125. Info, 746-8368. SUMMERVALE: Locavores fête farms and farmers at a weekly event centered on food, brews and kids’ activities, with City Market, Onion River Co-op workshops and live music. Intervale Center, Burlington, 5:30-8 p.m. Donations. Info, abby@intervale. org.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘FLYING MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.25. ‘GREAT WHITE SHARK 3D’: See WED.25.

FOMO?

etc.

Find even more local events in this newspaper and online:

SERVE WEEK: See WED.25.

FEAST & FIELD MARKET: Locally grown produce and acoustic Americana music by Jes Raymond and the Blackberry Bushes are on the menu at a pastoral party. Fable Farm, Barnard, market, 4:30-7:30 p.m.; concert, 5:30-8 p.m. Donations. Info, feastandfield@gmail.com. JOB HUNT HELP: Community College of Vermont interns assist employment seekers with everything from résumé-writing to online applications. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 2:305:30 p.m. Free. Info, 745-1393.

Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

music Find club dates at local venues in the music section and at sevendaysvt.com/music.

Thank You.

‘SEA MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.25. ‘WILD AFRICA 3D’: See WED.25.

food & drink

BURLINGTON EDIBLE HISTORY TOURS: Foodies sample farmfresh eats on a scrumptious stroll dedicated to the Queen City’s culinary past. Awning behind ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 1-4 p.m. $55. Info, 238-8828. COMMUNITY LUNCH: Farmfresh fare makes for a delicious and nutritious midday meal. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 309. SOUTH END BEERS & VEGGIES: Switchback Brewing beer in hand, healthy eaters snag fresh veggies from a pop-up farm stand. Shoppers may preorder at threechimneyfarm.com. The Tap Room at Switchback Brewing, Burlington, 5-7 p.m. Free. Info, 391-9047. TRUCKS, TAPS & TUNES: Food trucks, craft brews and live music by local acts make for an evening of family-friendly fun. Essex Shoppes & Cinema, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, info@essexexperience.com. VERMONT BEER PAIRING POPUP SERIES: Gourmands gorge on a three-course meal served alongside a local brew. Village Café at Bolton Valley, 5-9 p.m. $45. Info, 434-3444. WORCESTER COMMUNITY MARKET: Local produce, live bands and kids’ activities bring neighbors together. 52 Elmore Rd., Worcester, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 272-3309.

Thank you for your tremendous support while we were on strike July 12th and 13th. Thank you for showing up on the picket line with food and water, and honking as you passed. Above all, thank you for understanding that our fight for safe staffing and family-supporting jobs at UVM Medical Center is a fight for all of us. Vermont Federation of Nurses and Health Professionals www.vfnhp.org | 802.657.4040 | arleen@vfnhp.org Untitled-3 1

7/23/18 10:23 AM

Can you name the three branches of government?

BEGINNERS TAI CHI CLASS: Students get a feel for the ancient Chinese practice. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 1011 a.m. Free. Info, 223-3322.

In 2016, the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania found that only a quarter of all adults surveyed could name all three branches of government; a third could not name a single one.

CHAIR YOGA: FOR THOSE WITH LIMITED MOBILITY: Props and modifications complement elements of a traditional flow class. Sangha Studio — North, Burlington, 2-3:15 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

Help Seven Days and Kids VT raise the profile of civics education by encouraging your kids (or kids you know) to complete the Good Citizen Challenge — a fun and educational summer activity for Vermont’s youth. Get started at goodcitizenvt.com

health & fitness

CHAIR YOGA WITH SANGHA STUDIO: Supported poses promote health and wellbeing. Champlain Senior Center, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 448-4262. THU.26

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CALENDAR 53

All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com.

Dear neighbors, patients, and colleagues,

SEVEN DAYS

GUIDED TOURS: See WED.25.

art

‘THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE RETURN OF THE KING’: Peter Jackson directs this 2003 adventure in which Frodo and Sam continue their perilous journey toward the fires of Mount Doom. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600.

07.25.18-08.01.18

community

‘LET THE SUNSHINE IN’: Juliette Binoche stars as a divorced Parisian artist looking for love. Shown in French with English subtitles. Film House, Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, 7 p.m. $5-8; free for Vermont International Film Foundation members. Info, 660-2600.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

CENTRAL VERMONT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE MIXER: Area professionals rub elbows over refreshments. Mayo Residential Care, Northfield, 5-7 p.m. $10-15; preregister. Info, 229-5711.

LA SOIRÉE SUCRÉE: Barre’s Québecois heritage takes center stage during a French dessert competition and tasting and a performance of Franco-American music by Michele Choiniere. Old Labor Hall, Barre, 5:30-8 p.m. $6-15. Info, 505-0405.

ANSWER: EXECUTIVE, LEGISLATIVE, JUDICIAL

BOOK SALE IN STOWE: A long-running library fundraiser features more than 25 categories of page-turners. Stowe Free Library, 7 a.m.-8 p.m. Free. Info, 253-6145.


calendar

YOGA: A Sangha Studio instructor guides students who are in recovery toward achieving inner tranquility. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 5-6 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

montréal

JUST FOR LAUGHS FESTIVAL: See WED.25.

music

Find club dates in the music section.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 07.25.18-08.01.18 SEVEN DAYS 54 CALENDAR

DUELING PIANOS: Two players tickle the ivories while music lovers sip beverages and sing along to hit after hit. Hotel Vermont, Burlington, 5 & 7:30 p.m. $15. Info, 651-0080. EMALOU & THE BEAT & THE PHINEAS GAGE PROJECT: A mix of contemporary and classic folk, rock and roll, and funk stylings put smiles on faces. Round Church, Richmond, 7-9 p.m. $10. Info, 434-3220. HUNGER MOUNTAIN CO-OP BROWN BAG SUMMER CONCERT SERIES: Jazz singer Allison Mann strikes a chord with audience members. Courtyard, Christ Episcopal Church, Montpelier, noon. Free. Info, 223-9604. LOW CUT CONNIE: Front man Adam Weiner pounds the black and white keys to highly danceable rock-and-roll tunes. Battery Park, Burlington, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-2396. MUSIC IN THE VINEYARD SUMMER CONCERT SERIES: Oenophiles let loose with live music by Quadra, award-winning wine and mouthwatering eats. BYO seating. Snow Farm Vineyard, South Hero, picnicking begins, 5 p.m.; music, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 372-9463.

VERMONT MOZART FESTIVAL CHAMBER PLAYERS: Classical musicians hit all the right notes in a concert celebrating Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Charlotte Town Beach, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 598-9520.

outdoors

AN EVENING OF BATS: Fans of nocturnal fliers get a lesson from Barry the Bat Guy before watching the winged creatures take to the night sky. Shelburne Farms, 7:30-9 p.m. $6; preregister. Info, 985-8686. FINDING BIRDS BY EAR #2: IN SEARCH OF THE BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO: Outdoorsy types see what species are singing and flying in the woods near the lower Little River. Meet at Camp Smith Trailhead, Little River State Park, Waterbury, 10 a.m. $2-4; free for kids 3 and under; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103. MUSHROOMS DEMYSTIFIED: Fungi fanatics learn about different varieties — fabulous and fearsome alike — found throughout the park. History Hike Picnic Area. Little River State Park, Waterbury, 11 a.m. $2-4; free for kids ages 3 and under; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103. RIVER OF LIGHT FULL MOON PADDLE: Nature lovers afloat in brightly lit boats embark on an evening excursion on the Winooski River, howling at Earth’s satellite along the way. Heineberg Bridge River Access, Colchester, 7-10 p.m. Free. Info, info@winooskiriver.org.

politics

PRIMARY ELECTION CANDIDATE FORUMS: Democratic candidates for U.S. Senate, Folasade Adeluola and Bernie Sanders, vie for votes during public

talks

HOT TOPICS SUMMER LECTURE SERIES: Natacha Mesa Tejede of the University of Havana delivers “Foreign Investment and the Environment in Cuba.” Room 012,Oakes Hall, Vermont Law School, South Royalton, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 831-1371. SHIRLEY JOHNSON: Using photos and stories, the speaker takes listeners on a virtual tour in “Penguins and Pumas, Plovers and Pelicans, Plant-Cutters and Parakeets: Chile Has It All” Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, 6:30-8 p.m. $10. Info, 434-2167. STEVE PERKINS: In “Traveling Treasures,” the Vermont Historical Society executive director showcases and discusses intriguing objects from VHS’ collection. Stowe Historical Society, 4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 479-8500.

tech

TECH SUPPORT: Need an email account? Want to enjoy ebooks? Bring your phone, tablet or laptop to a weekly help session. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 5-7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-8291, ext. 302.

theater

‘THE 39 STEPS’: An onstage plane crash, missing fingers and romance drive Patrick Barlow’s Tony Award-winning adaptation of Alfred Hitchcock’s 1935 film. Depot Theatre, Westport, N.Y., 5 p.m. $20-35. Info, 518-962-4449. ‘ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA’: See WED.25, 7 p.m. ‘AS YOU LIKE IT’: Rosalind and Orlando face the trials and triumphs of love in Shakespeare’s romantic comedy, presented by the Hour Glass Youth Theatre. Bixby Memorial Library, Vergennes, 6:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 877-2211. ‘CHAPATTI’: See WED.25. ‘DIANA OF DOBSON’S’: A woman outsmarts the men who would control her life in this 1908 play by Cicily Hamilton. Unadilla Theatre, Marshfield, 7:30 p.m. $10-20. Info, 456-8968. ‘FUN HOME’: See WED.25, 7:30 p.m. ‘GYPSY’: See WED.25.

‘PAINTING CHURCHES’: Essex Theatre presents a staged reading of Tina Howe’s comic drama about the coming of old age in a prominent family of three in Beacon Hill, Mass. Masonic Lodge, Essex, N.Y., 7:30 p.m. $1012. Info, 518-526-4520. THE PIRATES & TUXEDO MURDER MYSTERY CRUISE: Who done it? Suppertime sleuths enjoy a delicious dinner and crack a case presented by the October Theatre Company. Spirit of Ethan Allen, Burlington, 6:30-9 p.m. $52.85. Info, 862-8300.

SARAH WARD: What does it mean to speak the truth when a lie protects the ones you love? The Williston author’s new young adult novel, Aesop Lake, examines this question. Phoenix Books Rutland, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 448-3350.

FRI.27 bazaars

THREE DAY STAMPEDE: There’s something for everybody among the 30 tents at this weekendlong craft and flea market. Funds raised benefit the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. Bristol Recreation Field, 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Free. Info, 453-4305.

community

FEAST TOGETHER OR FEAST TO GO: Senior citizens and their guests catch up over a shared meal. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, noon-1 p.m. $7-9; preregister. Info, 262-6288. SERVE WEEK: See WED.25.

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DAVID ROSANE & THE ZOOKEEPERS: The folk-rock protest band rallies support for literacy during a stop on its Book of ZOO Library Tour. Joslin Memorial Library, Waitsfield, 7-9 p.m. Donations. Info, 496-4205.

SUSANNAH BLACHLY & PATTI CASEY: Two Vermont singers showcase their voices and songwriting abilities. Caja Madera brings the eats. Old Schoolhouse Common, Marshfield, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

DISC GOLF LEAGUES: Players aim for targets in a fun and social tournament. Bolton Valley Resort, 6 p.m. $7-14. Info, 434-3444.

‘OKLAHOMA!’: Songs such as “Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’” delight fans of this spirited musical. Enosburg Opera House, 7 p.m. $12-15. Info, 933-6171.

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CRAFTSBURY CHAMBER PLAYERS: See WED.25, Hardwick Town House.

PUNCH BROTHERS: The theme of committed relationships in the present day threads through songs from All Ashore, the acoustic quintet’s latest album. Madison Cunningham opens. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, 8 p.m. $38.75-179. Info, 863-5966.

sports

‘HELLO, DOLLY!’: Spirited musical numbers propel the Lamoille County Players’ presentation of the Tony Award-winning play about a socialite-turned-matchmaker. Hyde Park Opera House, Through July 28, Info, 888-4507.

ER FRI.2 7 | THEAT

BURLINGTON CONCERT BAND REHEARSALS: Enthusiastic players of brass, woodwind and percussion instruments find perfect harmony. Burlington High School, 6:45-8:45 p.m. Free. Info, joelatherton8@gmail.com.

PHIL LESH & THE TERRAPIN FAMILY BAND: Led by a founding member of the Grateful Dead, the dynamic band blends rock, folk, punk, jazz and classical backgrounds into a hard-rocking sound. Midnight North open. Waterfront Park, Burlington, 7 p.m. $49-53; free for kids 12 and under. Info, 877-987-6487.

PRIMARY ELECTION CANDIDATE FORUMS: Republican candidates for U.S. Senate, Roque “Rocky” de la Fuente, H. Brooke Paige, Jasdeep Pannu and Lawrence Zupan, vie for votes during public discussions hosted by Channel 17/Town Meeting Television. CCTV Channel 17 Studios, Burlington, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 862-3966.

‘HEATHERS: THE MUSICAL’: See WED.25.

R DO M ARCH

EARTH: REMEDIES FOR DIGESTION & ENERGY: Baylen Slote of Black Turtle Taoist Clinical Medicine touts supplements, acupressure tools and other methods for boosting wellbeing. Community Room, Hunger Mountain Co-op, Montpelier, 6-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, info@ hungermountain.coop.

discussions hosted by Channel 17/Town Meeting Television. CCTV Channel 17 Studios, Burlington, 5:25 p.m. Free. Info, 862-3966.

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COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS: A 20-minute guided practice with Andrea O’Connor alleviates stress and tension. Tea and a discussion follow. Winooski Senior Center, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 233-1161.

PASCAL GEMME & MARIESOLEIL PILETTE: French Canadian fiddling meets Québecois jigging and contemporary dance styles as part of the Young Tradition Vermont Trad Camp Lunchtime Concert Series. High School Campus, Lake Champlain Waldorf School, Shelburne, 12:15-12:45 p.m. Free. Info, 233-5293.

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‘ROALD DAHL’S JAMES AND THE GIANT PEACH’: See WED.25. ‘TRUE WEST’: Two estranged brothers must face their issues when under the same roof in Sam Shepard’s dark comedy, produced by the Parish Players. Eclipse Grange Theater, Thetford, 7:30-9 p.m. $10-15. Info, 785-4344. ‘TWELFTH NIGHT’: Lost Nation Theater thespians shine in Shakespeare’s comedy about love, assumed identities and the hilarious intersection of the two. Lost Nation Theater, Montpelier City Hall, 7:30 p.m. $10-30. Info, 229-0492.

CRAFTY CRAP NIGHT: Participants bring supplies or ongoing projects and an adventurous attitude to share creative time with other people in recovery. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150. FIBER ARTS FRIDAY: Grown-up yarn lovers get together for tea and casual project time. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 985-5124.

dance

BALLROOM & LATIN DANCING: Singles, couples and beginners are welcome to join in a dance social featuring the waltz, tango and more. Williston Jazzercise Fitness Center, 8-9:30 p.m. $8. Info, 862-2269. ECSTATIC DANCE VERMONT: Inspired by the 5Rhythms dance practice, attendees move, groove, release and open their hearts to life in a safe and sacred space. Christ Episcopal Church, Montpelier, 7-9 p.m. $10. Info, fearnessence@gmail.com.

‘UNCLE VANYA’: Russian playwright Anton Checkhov’s comic and poignant theater work captures a world on the verge of revolution. Festival Theatre, Marshfield, 7:30 p.m. $10-20. Info, 456-8968.

TOP OF THE BLOCK SWING DANCE: Music from the roaring ’20s through the rockabilly ’50s fuels an al fresco dance party on a portable, wooden floor. Weather permitting. Top of Church St., Burlington, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, seetherhythm@yahoo.com.

‘WEST SIDE STORY’: See WED.25, 7:30 p.m.

etc.

words

BOOK SALE IN STOWE: See WED.25. CANAAN MEETINGHOUSE READING SERIES: Writers Howard Mansfield and Robin MacArthur share portions of their work. Meetinghouse, Canaan, N.H., 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, ppochoda@gmail.com.

COMMUNITY COFFEE HOUSE: Musicians, poets and artists of all ages showcase their talents. Coffee and refreshments are provided. Fairfax Community Library, 6:30-8 p.m. Free; preregister to perform. Info, 849-2420. FOOD & ART FRIDAYS: Woodfired pizza, farm-fresh produce, visual art, story telling and live performance make for a memorable evening. The Sable Project, Stockbridge, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Free; $5-10 for pizza. Info, info@ thesableproject.

GUIDED TOURS: See WED.25. QUEEN CITY GHOST WALK: DARKNESS FALLS: Local historian Thea Lewis treats pedestrians to tales of madmen, smugglers, pub spirits and, of course, ghosts. Arrive 10 minutes early. Democracy sculpture, 199 Main St., Burlington, 8 p.m. $20. Info, 863-5966. TAROT READINGS: A spiritual mentor consults her cards to offer guidance and clarity. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 5:30-8:30 p.m. $1 per minute; preregister. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com. VERMONT E-BIKE & BREW TOUR: Electric bicycles transport suds lovers to three local beer producers via scenic routes. Old Mill Park, Johnson, noon-4:30 p.m. $75. Info, 730-0161.

fairs & festivals

BARRE HERITAGE FESTIVAL: See WED.25, 8 a.m.-11 p.m. BOOKSTOCK LITERARY FESTIVAL: Bestselling novelist Richard Russo and three-term United States poet laureate Robert Pinsky headline this literary fest featuring talks and readings, live music, a poetry jam, and book sales. See calendar spotlight. Downtown Woodstock, 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Free. Info, 989-4338. LAKE CHAMPLAIN MARITIME FESTIVAL: See THU.26, 11 a.m.-11 p.m. NOTOWN MUSIC FESTIVAL: See THU.26. THETFEST: Deakin, the Dead Shakers, Greg Davis and others are on the bill at this third annual music festival. Thetford Center, 3 p.m. $25-45. Info, thetfest@gmail.com. TUMBLE DOWN: Twiddle headline a waterfront festival featuring yoga, charity disc golf, and tunage by Matisyahu, Pigeons Playing Ping Pong and others. Waterfront Park, Burlington. $42-65; free for kids 12 and under. Info, 877-987-6487.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘FLYING MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.25. ‘GREAT WHITE SHARK 3D’: See WED.25. MOVIES IN THE RED BARN: Cinephiles view favorite flicks from female directors. Food and drinks are available. Call for film info and reservations. Mary’s Restaurant, Bristol, 7:30-10 p.m. Free. Info, 453-2432. ‘SEA MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.25. ‘WILD AFRICA 3D’: See WED.25.

food & drink

BRANDON FARMERS MARKET: Local farmers, artisans and specialty food producers offer up their goods. Estabrook Park, Brandon, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 273-2655. BURLINGTON EDIBLE HISTORY TOURS: See THU.26.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

CASUAL FRIDAYS: Patrons start the weekend in style with snacks from a diverse menu and a full bar with drink specials and local beers. The Woods Lodge, Northfield, 5:30-10 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 778-0205. CELEBRATE YOUR FARMER SOCIAL: A certified organic dairy producer plays host at a NOFAVT wood-fired pizza party, followed by a tour of the grounds. Molly Brook Farm, West Danville, 6-11 p.m. $10. Info, 434-3821. CHAMPLAIN VALLEY DINNER TRAIN: Passengers feast on a three-course meal while riding the Green Mountain Railroad from Burlington to Middlebury and back. Union Station, Burlington, 5:30-8:30 p.m. $85100; preregister for Gold Class tickets and parties of eight or more. Info, 800-707-3530. FARM TABLE FRIDAYS: Foodies gather ’round the family table to take in a summer evening and Vermont-inspired cuisine prepared by distinguished guest chefs. Stowe Mountain Lodge, 6-9:30 p.m. $95; preregister; limited space. Info, 760-4058. FOODWAYS FRIDAYS: Foodies use heirloom herbs and veggies to revive historic recipes in the farmhouse kitchen. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Regular admission, $4-16; free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 457-2355. FRIDAY NIGHT COOKOUTS: Grilled items, seasonal salads and decadent desserts please palates at a weekly feast. Adamant Co-op, 5:30-7 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 223-5760.

SUN TO CHEESE TOUR: Fromage fanatics go behind the scenes and follow award-winning farmhouse cheddar from raw milk to finished product. Shelburne Farms, 1:45-3:45 p.m. $20 includes a block of cheddar; preregister. Info, 985-8686.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.25, 9:15 a.m.

health & fitness

ACUDETOX: Attendees in recovery undergo acupuncture to the ear to propel detoxification. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150.

montréal

JUST FOR LAUGHS FESTIVAL: See WED.25.

music

Find club dates in the music section. BLUEGRASS & BARBECUE: The DuPont Brothers entertain revelers, who feast on Bluebird Barbecue eats and Sisters of Anarchy Ice Cream treats. Shelburne Vineyard, 6-9 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 985-8222. BURLINGTON CITY ARTS SUMMER CONCERTS: ANDRIC SEVERANCE XTET: A smoking jazz set highlights the local band’s Afro-Cuban, Brazilian and Latin American influences. Burlington City Hall Park, noon. Free. Info, 865-7166. DEB BRISSON & THE HAY BURNERS: Backed by her band, the vocalist moves effortlessly between rock, folk and country selections from Heart Shaped Stone. Salisbury Congregational Church, 7:30-9 p.m. Donations. Info, 352-6671. FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE: Familyfriendly activities and palatepleasing provisions warm up the crowd for British-born singer John Waite’s rocking set. Downtown Rutland, 5-10 p.m. Free. Info, 773-9380. JOHN O’CONNOR & NAT WILLIAMS: Folk and labor songs find eager ears at an open-air concert. Back lawn, Woodstock History Center, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 457-3981. RED BRICK COFFEE HOUSE: Hot beverages are provided at an open mic and jam session where community members connect over music, cards and board games. Red Brick Meeting House, Westford, 7-10 p.m. Donations. Info, mpk802vt@gmail.com. SAKIKO OHASHI: Joined by cellist Maxim Kozlov, the pianist tickles the ivories in an evening of chamber music. North Universalist Chapel Society, Woodstock, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 672-1958.

‘CHAPATTI’: See WED.25.

VERMONT MOZART FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA: Fireworks follow a recital of works by the Austrian composer. Trapp Family Lodge Concert Meadow, Stowe, 7 p.m. $30; free for kids. Info, 598-9520.

outdoors

FORESTRY, HISTORY & THE FUTURE: A GUIDED HIKE: An outdoor program familiarizes trekkers with the sustainably managed working forest. Carriage Barn Visitor Center, Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historic Park, Woodstock, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 457-3368, ext. 222.

sports

FRIDAY NIGHT DINGHY RACING: Skippers celebrate the end of the week with some nautical competition. Prior sailing knowledge and passage of CSC’s rental test are required. Community Sailing Center, Burlington, sign-up, 4:30 p.m.; begin rigging, 5:30 p.m.; first gun, 6 p.m. Free; limited space. Info, 864-2499.

theater

‘THE 39 STEPS’: See THU.26, 7 p.m. ‘ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA’: See WED.25, 7 p.m. ‘AS YOU LIKE IT’: See THU.26, Charlotte Senior Center, 1 p.m. Donations. Info, 425-6345.

‘DIANA OF DOBSON’S’: See THU.26. FROST & DODD STUDENT PLAY FESTIVAL: Dartmouth College students present staged readings and full productions of original, competition-winning works. Warner Bentley Theater, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 8 p.m. $3. Info, 603-646-2422. ‘FUN HOME’: See WED.25, 7:30 p.m. ‘GYPSY’: See WED.25. ‘HAMLET OR ELSE’: With the use of cardboard and paper maché, Bread and Puppet Theater stages a deconstructed version of Shakespeare’s tragedy — or something else. Bread and Puppet Theater, Glover, 7:30 p.m. $10. Info, 525-3031. ‘HEATHERS: THE MUSICAL’: See WED.25. ‘HELLO, DOLLY!’: See THU.26. ‘A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM’: Student actors stage a highly physical version of Shakespeare’s comedy about lovers, actors and meddling fairies. Rain location: Chelsea Town Hall. Tunbridge Central School, 6 p.m. Donations. Info, chelseafunnery@gmail.com. ‘OKLAHOMA!’: See THU.26. ‘PAINTING CHURCHES’: See THU.26. ‘ROALD DAHL’S JAMES AND THE GIANT PEACH’: See WED.25. ‘THE TAMING OF THE SHREW’: The Vermont Shakespeare Festival stages the bard’s comedy about the dynamics of male-female relationships. Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, 7:30 p.m. $10-35. Info, 533-2000. ‘TRUE WEST’: See THU.26. ‘TWELFTH NIGHT’: See THU.26.

FOMO? Find even more local events in this newspaper and online:

art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

music Find club dates at local venues in the music section and at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com.

‘UNCLE VANYA’: See THU.26. ‘WEST SIDE STORY’: See WED.25, 7:30 p.m.

words

BOOK SALE IN STOWE: See WED.25. FRIDAY MORNING WORKSHOP: Wordsmiths offer constructive criticism on works in progress by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104. SARAH HEALY: The novelist behind The Sisters Chase addresses listeners in the library’s 12th annual Vermont Author Talk. South Hero Community Library, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 372-6209. SUMMER BOOK SALE: Thousands of titles delight bookworms and bargain shoppers alike. Aldrich Public Library, Barre, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. Info, 476-7550.

SAT.28 activism

Acoustic. Barre Elks Club, corn hole registration, noon-2 p.m.; tournament, 2:15 p.m.; live music, 2-6 p.m. Free; $10 for corn hole. Info, 479-9522. QUEEN CITY GHOST WALK: DARKNESS FALLS: See FRI.27. TAROT READINGS WITH RACHEL: The truth is in the cards as an experienced reader offers divination services. Phoenix Books Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m. $5-10. Info, 448-3350. VERMONT E-BIKE & BREW TOUR: See FRI.27.

VETERANS FOR PEACE: Those who have served their country attend a morning meeting to discuss conflict resolution. KelloggHubbard Library, Montpelier, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, rczaplinski@madriver.com.

fairs & festivals

agriculture

LAKE CHAMPLAIN MARITIME FESTIVAL: See THU.26, 9 a.m.-11 p.m.

COUNTRY GARDEN TOUR: Green thumbs take a self-guided route through eye-catching landscape designs. A presentation by pollinator conservationist John Hayden rounds out the event. Various Jericho and Underhill locations, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. $20. Info, 899-3820. VERMONT BREAKFAST ON THE FARM: Come and get it! A morning meal gives way to a selfguided tour of a dairy-producing facility. Kayhart Brothers Dairy, West Addison, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 828-2430.

bazaars

CLUTTER BARN TAG SALE: Folks check out secondhand books, toys, clothing and household goods. United Church of Underhill, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, 899-3572. THREE DAY STAMPEDE: See FRI.27.

community

SERVE WEEK: See WED.25.

etc.

CHAMPLAIN VALLEY GEM, MINERAL & FOSSIL SHOW: Sparkling specimens dazzle attendees during a weekend of eye-catching exhibits, lectures and more. Frederick H. Tuttle Middle School, South Burlington, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $3-4; free for kids under 16 with a paying adult. Info, bob.arden.f@gmail.com. GUIDED TOURS: See WED.25. INDEPENDENT COMMUNITY MEETING PLACE: Anything goes in an in-person networking group where attendees can share hobbies, play music and discuss current events — without using online social sites. Presto Music Store, South Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 658-0030. LEGAL CLINIC: Attorneys offer complimentary consultations on a first-come, first-served basis. 274 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 383-2118. PARKING LOT PARTY & CORN HOLE: A cash bar keeps spirits high at an open house offering a charity corn hole tournament and live tunes by the Growlers

BARRE HERITAGE FESTIVAL: See WED.25, 7:30 a.m.-11:30 p.m. BOOKSTOCK LITERARY FESTIVAL: See FRI.27, 9 a.m.-9 p.m.

NOTOWN MUSIC FESTIVAL: See THU.26. THE RAMBLE: Art lovers flock to this celebration of creativity and community in the Old North End, which features the ONE World Market and evening music. See theramble.org for map and details. Various Old North End locations, Burlington, 7-1:30 a.m. Free. Info, rambler@theramble. org. SUMMER HERBAL FAIR: Live music by Nate Gusakov and Jane Keir, a farmers market, classes and demos make up a flora-focused fiesta. Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism, Montpelier, 3-7 p.m. $3-10. Info, 224-7100. THETFEST: See FRI.27 . TUMBLE DOWN: See FRI.27. WATER WORKS FAIR: Local lake-based organizations offer hands-on educational activities as part the Lake Champlain Maritime Festival. Waterfront Park, Burlington, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 864-2499.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘COCO’: Gael García Bernal and Benjamin Bratt voice characters in this 2017 animated adventure about a boy who enters the Land of the Dead to find his great-great-grandfather. Movie begins at dusk. Lawn, Stowe Free Library. Free. Info, 585-5131. ‘FLYING MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.25. ‘GREAT WHITE SHARK 3D’: See WED.25. ‘SAILOR MOON R THE MOVIE’ & ‘SAILOR MOON S THE MOVIE’: The animated Japanese heroine with a magical brooch is the star of this cinematic event. Shown on Saturday with English dubbing and Monday with English subtitles. Palace 9 Cinemas, South Burlington, 12:55 p.m. $15. Info, 660-9300. ‘SEA MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.25.

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PINOCHLE & RUMMY: See WED.25.

REFUGE RECOVERY: A LOVE SUPREME: Buddhist philosophy is the foundation of this mindfulness-based addictionrecovery community. Turning Point Center, Burlington, noon. Free. Info, 861-3150.

TRAD CAMP INSTRUCTORS: Pete Sutherland, Brian Perkins, Sarah Hotchkiss and others get toes tapping as part of the Young Tradition Vermont Trad Camp Lunchtime Concert Series. High School Campus, Lake Champlain Waldorf School, Shelburne, 12:1512:45 p.m. Free. Info, 233-5293.

‘WRITERS AND THEIR MOTHERS’: Contributors Rachel Hadas, Reeve Lindbergh, Martha Oliver-Smith and Gardner McFall read from this essay collection illuminating the influence of moms upon their literary offspring. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 745-1393.

SEVEN DAYS

CRIBBAGE TEAMS: See WED.25.

LIVING RECOVERY: FOR THOSE IN ADDICTION RECOVERY OR AFFECTED BY THE ADDICTIVE BEHAVIOR OF OTHERS: A moderately paced flow class serves folks overcoming substance use. Sangha Studio — North, Burlington, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

‘BRIGHT HALF LIFE’: This Vermont Pride Theater production examines a lesbian relationship non-chronologically over 45 years. Chandler Center for the Arts, Randolph, 7:30 p.m. $1522;. Info, 728-6464.

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TRUCK STOP: Mobile kitchens dish out mouthwatering meals and libations. Live music and cold beer add to the fun. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 5-10 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 540-0406.

BONE BUILDERS EXERCISE CLASSES: See WED.25, 7:30-8:30 & 10:40-11:40 a.m.

SUMMER CARILLON CONCERT: The melodic sound of bells rings out across the campus in a performance by Tiffany Ng. Mead Memorial Chapel, Middlebury College, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

RICHMOND FARMERS MARKET: An open-air marketplace featuring live music connects cultivators and fresh-food browsers. Volunteers Green, Richmond, 3-7 p.m. Free. Info, info@richmondfarmersmarketvt.org.

ADVANCED TAI CHI CLASS: Participants keep active with a sequence of slow, controlled movements. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3322.

‘WILD AFRICA 3D’: See WED.25. SAT.28

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calendar BACKCOUNTRY MEAL WORKSHOP: Adventurous eaters sample freeze-dried and homemade trail meals, and learn how to choose the right foods and cooking equipment for a trip. Fjällräven, Burlington, 3-7 p.m. Free. Info, 448-7197. BURLINGTON EDIBLE HISTORY TOURS: See THU.26. BURLINGTON FARMERS MARKET: Dozens of stands overflow with seasonal produce, flowers, artisan wares and prepared foods. Burlington City Hall Park, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, burlingtonfarmersmarket.org@gmail.com. CANS ‘N CLAMS: Steamed clams, lobsters, mussels, lobster rolls, Vermont craft beer and rosé please palates at a pop-up clam shack. Joe’s Kitchen at Screamin’ Ridge Farm, Montpelier, noon-8 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 461-5371.

CHOCOLATE TASTING IN BURLINGTON: Let’s go bar hopping! With the help of a tasting guide, chocoholics discover the flavor profiles of varieties such as toffee almond crunch and salted caramel latte. Lake Champlain Chocolates Factory Store & Café, Burlington, 11 a.m.4 p.m. Free. Info, 864-1807.

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GIN & TONICS & TACOS: Cocktails whet foodies’ appetites for Taco Truck All Stars provisions. Wild Hart Distillery, Shelburne, noon-3 p.m. Free. Info, 489-5067. ICE CREAM SOCIAL: Sweets lovers spoon up frozen dairy treats. Family activities add to the excitement. Pittsford Village Farm, 1-3 p.m. Free. Info, info@ pittsfordvillagefarm.org. SHELBURNE FARMERS MARKET: Harvested fruits and greens, artisan cheeses, and local novelties grace outdoor tables. Shelburne Parade Ground, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 482-4279. VERGENNES FARMERS MARKET: Local foods and crafts, live music, and hot eats spice up Saturday mornings. Kennedy Brothers Building, Vergennes, 9 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 233-9180. VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: See WED.25, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

games

BOARD GAME CAFÉ: Friends whet their whistles with tea or coffee while playing games from the library’s extensive collection. Fairfax Community Library, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 849-2420. MUSICAL CHAIRS TOURNAMENT: Kids, teens and adults vie for prizes in a party-game tournament. Middle school lawn. Bellows Free Academy, Fairfax, 10-11 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 849-2420.

PRIDE YOGA: FOR LGBTQIA+ PEOPLE & ALLIES: Participants hit the mat for a stretching session suited for all levels. Sangha Studio — Pine, Burlington, 5-5:15 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

montréal

JUST FOR LAUGHS FESTIVAL: See WED.25.

music

Find club dates in the music section. BELL CONCERT SERIES: Picnics and lawn chairs in tow, listeners revel in the vibrations of the largest musical instrument in the world, the carillon. A demonstration follows. Upper Parade Ground, Norwich University, Northfield, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 485-2100. BRITT CONNORS & BOURBON RENEWAL: Concertgoers stomp and sway to Americana tunes by the Boston-based band. Brandon Music, 7:30 p.m. $20; $45 includes dinner; preregister; BYOB. Info, 247-4295. DAVID ROSANE & THE ZOOKEEPERS: See THU.26, H.F. Brigham Free Central Library, Bakersfield. Info, 827-4414. HOMES FOR REFUGEES BENEFIT CONCERT: An evening of music for worship, healing and encouragement supports the construction of a Vermod Homes abode for an adopted refugee family. North Avenue Alliance Church, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Donations. Info, 338-8994.

FOMO? Find even more local events in this newspaper and online:

art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

music Find club dates at local venues in the music section and at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com.

VERMONT MOZART FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA: A recital of works by the Austrian composer benefits the Vermont FEED farmto-school project. Breeding Barn. Shelburne Farms, 7-9 p.m. $30; free for kids. Info, 598-9520.

outdoors

BIRD MONITORING WALK: Adults and older children don binoculars and keep an eye out for winged wonders. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, 7:30 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 434-2167.

community

‘A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM’: See FRI.27, 5 p.m. MIKE SUPER: Magic tricks inspire shock and awe. Strand Center Theatre, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 7:30 p.m. $10-30. Info, 518-5631604, ext. 105. ‘OKLAHOMA!’: See THU.26. ‘PAINTING CHURCHES’: See THU.26. ‘ROALD DAHL’S JAMES AND THE GIANT PEACH’: See WED.25, 2-4 & 7:30-9:30 p.m ‘THE TAMING OF THE SHREW’: See FRI.27. ‘TRUE WEST’: See THU.26. ‘TWELFTH NIGHT’: See THU.26. ‘UNCLE VANYA’: See THU.26. ‘WEST SIDE STORY’: See WED.25.

FOREST BATHING WALK: Folks unplug, slow down and experience nature through a guided mindfulness practice. Meet at the trail entrance sign, Hardwick Trails, 10 a.m.-noon. $5-10. Info, 755-6336. HERE BE DRAGONFLIES: Entomology enthusiasts capture and identify species during this basic introduction to the winged insects. B-Side Beach, Little River State Park, Waterbury, 2 p.m. $24; free for kids 3 and under; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103. WORKING WOODLANDS WORKSHOP: INTERNATIONAL MONARCH MONITORING BLITZ: A one-hour presentation on Vermont’s state butterfly paves the way for an outdoor survey. Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park, Woodstock, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 457-3368, ext. 222.

talks

PAUL ANDRISCIN: History buffs get a lesson on two very different Revolutionary War officers in “Inquiry Into the Revolutionary Mind: Philip Schuyler and Seth Warner.” Mount Independence State Historic Site, Orwell, 2-3:30 p.m. $5; free for kids under 15. Info, elsa.gilbertson@vermont.gov.

theater

‘THE 39 STEPS’: See THU.26, 3 p.m. ‘ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA’: See WED.25. ‘AUNT JACK’: In a comedic Vermont Pride Theater presentation, hot-button LGBTQ issues are portrayed through a family lens. Chandler Center for the Arts, Randolph, 7:30 p.m. $15-22. Info, 728-6464. ‘CHAPATTI’: See WED.25, 2 & 8 p.m. ‘DIANA OF DOBSON’S’: See THU.26. FROST & DODD STUDENT PLAY FESTIVAL: See FRI.27. ‘FUN HOME’: See WED.25. ‘GYPSY’: See WED.25. ‘HEATHERS: THE MUSICAL’: See WED.25. ‘HELLO, DOLLY!’: See THU.26.

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CHAMPLAIN VALLEY DINNER TRAIN: See FRI.27.

lgbtq

JEEZUM CROW FESTIVAL: Music lovers get their fill at this mountaintop fest featuring Gov’t Mule, Robert Randolph & the Family Band, and others. Jay Peak Resort, 1 p.m.-midnight. $45; free for kids 6 and under. Info, 988-2611.

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CAPITAL CITY FARMERS MARKET: Meats and cheeses join farm-fresh produce, baked goods, locally made arts and crafts, and live music. 60 State Street, Montpelier, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 793-8347.

DUTCH LANGUAGE CLASS: Planning a trip to Amsterdam? Learn vocabulary and grammar basics from a native speaker. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, bheeks@ yahoo.com.

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BOOK SALE IN STOWE: See WED.25. BOOK SALE IN WEST PAWLET: Bibliophiles browse thousands of titles at this annual blowout benefiting the Pawlet Public Library. Mettawee Community School, West Pawlet, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 325-3123. NASH PATEL & LEDA SCHEINTAUB: Foodies savor free samples at a meet and greet with the authors of Dosa Kitchen: Recipes for India’s Favorite Street Food. Phoenix Books Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 448-3350. SLAM POETRY: Young wordsmiths Muslim Girls Making Change promote social justice through performance poetry. Rochester Public Library, 4:30-6 p.m. Free. Info, robinlloyd8@ gmail.com. SUMMER BOOK SALE: See FRI.27, 7:30 a.m.-2 p.m.

COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS PRACTICE: Sessions in the tradition of Thich Nhat Hanh include sitting and walking meditation, a short reading, and open sharing. Evolution Physical Therapy & Yoga, Burlington, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, newleafsangha@ gmail.com.

dance

DANCE TO BENEFIT VISION GUATEMALA: Moving in styles such as square, round, contra, line and swing dancing, hoofers cut a rug for a cause. A raffle and silent auction round out the fun. St. Albans City Hall, 3-6 p.m. $7. Info, 393-1336. ROYAL OPERA HOUSE PRESENTED IN DIGITAL HD: ‘THE BERNSTEIN CENTENARY’: A three-part ballet program shown on the big screen is set to the music of American composer Leonard Bernstein. Loew Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 4 p.m. $13-23. Info, 603-646-2422.

etc.

BATTLEFIELD FOURTH SUNDAY: DESCENDANTS OF GREEN MOUNTAIN BOYS: Progeny of a group of early New England settlers, members of the group discuss their organization and share stories about their familytree discoveries. Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site, 1-2:15 p.m. $3; free for kids under 15. Info, 273-2282. BLAST FROM THE PAST: HISTORIC CLOCKS & WATCHES AFTERNOON: Green Mountain Timekeepers Society members discuss the history and repair of antiquated timepieces. Bring old clocks and watches to learn more. Chimney Point State Historic Site, Addison, noon-4 p.m. $5; free for kids under 15. Info, 759-2412. CHAMPLAIN VALLEY GEM, MINERAL & FOSSIL SHOW: See SAT.28. GUIDED TOURS: See WED.25. SUNDAY TEA: Friends sit, sip and listen to the sounds of the Green Mountain Horn Club in a lakeside setting. Fisk Farm Art Center, Isle La Motte, tea, 1-5 p.m.; music, 2-4 p.m. Free. Info, 928-3364.

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fairs & festivals

VETERANS HOMESTEAD SERIES: DESIGNING THE MOBILE CHICKEN COOP: Veterans and family members gain the tools to cultivate homegrown foods. Details provided upon registration. Papineau Family Farm, Highgate Center. Free; preregister. Info, 377-1214.

BOOKSTOCK LITERARY FESTIVAL: See FRI.27, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

agriculture

bazaars

THREE DAY STAMPEDE: See FRI.27, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.

BARRE HERITAGE FESTIVAL: See WED.25, 8 a.m.-noon.

LAKE CHAMPLAIN MARITIME FESTIVAL: See THU.26, 10 a.m.10 p.m. NOTOWN MUSIC FESTIVAL: See THU.26.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘FLYING MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.25. ‘GREAT WHITE SHARK 3D’: See WED.25.

‘SEA MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.25. ‘WILD AFRICA 3D’: See WED.25.

food & drink

100 YEARS & COUNTING: Fans of the popular eatery celebrate its centennial anniversary with complimentary ice cream and a dazzling fireworks display. Wayside Restaurant, Bakery & Creamery, Montpelier, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-6611. CHOCOLATE TASTING IN BURLINGTON: See SAT.28. CHOCOLATE TASTING IN MIDDLESEX: Candy fanatics get an education on a variety of sweets made on-site. Nutty Steph’s Granola & Chocolate Factory, Middlesex, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Info, 229-2090. EAT UP ON THE GREEN: Locals skip cooking dinner in favor of food and drink from local purveyors served amid live music, sprinklers and a playground. Camp Meade, Middlesex, 4-9 p.m. Free. Info, 496-2108. GREEK SUMMER FOOD FESTIVAL: Authentic fare fuels a cultural celebration complete with live music and traditional dancing. Greek Orthodox Church Community Center, Burlington, noon-5 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 862-2155. STOWE FARMERS MARKET: An appetizing assortment of fresh veggies, meats, milk, berries, herbs, beverages and crafts tempts shoppers. Red Barn Shops Field, Stowe, 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, 279-3444.

health & fitness

KARMA YOGA FOR THE BIRDS: An outdoor, all-levels class overlooks the mountains and Lake Champlain. All proceeds benefit Audubon Vermont. Rain location: Yoga Roots. All Souls Interfaith Gathering, Shelburne, 8-9 a.m. $10; preregister. Info, 985-0090.

montréal

JUST FOR LAUGHS FESTIVAL: See WED.25. PIKNIC ÉLECTRONIK MONTRÉAL: DJ sets and beatdriven music propel a dance party of epic proportions. See piknicelectronik.com for details. Plaine des jeux, Montréal, 2-9:30 p.m. $14.50-119; free for kids 12 and under. Info, 514-904-1247.

music

Find club dates in the music section. A CAPELLA LOLLAPALOOZA: Chordination, Root 7 and the Green Mountain Chorus deliver pitch-perfect performances. Grand Isle Lake House, picnicking, 5:30 p.m.; show, 6:30 p.m. $20-25; free for kids under 12. Info, 372-8889. ADAAWE: A genre-defying seven-piece band serves up a vibrant fusion of pop and R&B steeped in world-music influences. A2VT open this Levitt AMP St. Johnsbury Music Series concert. Dog Mountain, St. Johnsbury, 4-7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

BURLINGTON CONCERT BAND: Local musicians present a varied program of show tunes, marches and pop classics. BYO blanket or lawn char. Battery Park, Burlington, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, burlingtonconcertbandvt@ gmail.com.

WEEN: An alt-rock concert captivates new and longtime fans alike. Waterfront Park, Burlington, 7 p.m. $43-47; free for kids 12 and under. Info, 877-987-6487.

DUSTBOWL REVIVAL: The California-based collective melds blues, bluegrass, gospel and New Orleans swing stylings for a genre-hopping dance party. Trapp Family Lodge Concert Meadow, Stowe, 7 p.m. $11.2532.25; free for kids 4 and under. Info, 863-5966.

FORESTRY, HISTORY & THE FUTURE: A GUIDED HIKE: See FRI.27.

GIRL POWER: Singer-songwriter Erin Powers brings her brand of country, blues and rock music to an outdoor audience. Rain location: Red Brick Meeting House. Westford Common, 7-8 p.m. Donations. Info, 363-0930. ‘SCENES & ARIAS’: Vermont Italian Opera Intensive participants lift their voices in a semi-staged concert. Waterbury Congregational Church, 4-6 p.m. Donations. Info, mjpaustin@ aol.com. VERMONT MOZART FESTIVAL CHAMBER PLAYERS: See THU.26, Burlington Country Club, dinner, 5:30 p.m.; concert. 7 p.m. $15-40; free for kids.

outdoors

LITTLE RIVER RAMBLE: With help from a park interpreter, hikers plan the route and duration of a guided trails tour. Little River State Park, Waterbury, 2 p.m. $2-4; free for kids 3 and under; preregister; call to confirm. Info, 244-7103.

sports

COLCHESTER TRIATHLON: Ambitious athletes bike, run and kayak or swim to the finish line. Bayside Park, Colchester, 8:30-11:30 a.m. $50-105. Info, 264-5640. DISC GOLF LEAGUES: See THU.26, noon.

talks

MICH KABAY: The Norwich University professor of computer information systems weighs in on artificial intelligence as part of a lecture series titled “The Politics of Cyberspace.” Jewish Community of Greater Stowe, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 253-1800.

theater

‘ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA’: See WED.25, Stuart Black Box. Morse Center for the Arts, St. Johnsbury Academy, 2 p.m. CIRQUE US: Acrobats defy gravity in StarStruck: A Cosmic Circus. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe Mountain Resort, 3 p.m. $20. Info, 760-4634. FROST & DODD STUDENT PLAY FESTIVAL: See FRI.27, 4 & 8 p.m. ‘THE GRASSHOPPER REBELLION CIRCUS & PAGEANT’: A spirited Bread and Puppet Theater production performed in the Circus Field pulls advice from several prominent revolutions in human history. Bread and Puppet Theater, Glover, 3 p.m. $10. Info, 525-3031. ‘GYPSY’: See WED.25. ‘HELLO, DOLLY!’: See THU.26, 2-4 p.m. ‘OKLAHOMA!’: See THU.26, 2 p.m. ‘A PERFECT FIT’: A daughter’s new lesbian relationship prompts her mom to question her own sexuality in this Vermont Pride Theater production. Chandler Center for the Arts, Randolph, 7:30 p.m. $15-22. Info, 728-6464. ‘ROALD DAHL’S JAMES AND THE GIANT PEACH’: See WED.25, 2-4 p.m.

‘THE TAMING OF THE SHREW’: See FRI.27, 2 p.m. ‘TRUE WEST’: See THU.26, 3-4:30 p.m. ‘TWELFTH NIGHT’: See THU.26, 2 p.m. ‘UNCLE VANYA’: See THU.26. ‘WEST SIDE STORY’: See WED.25, 3 p.m.

words

BOOK SALE IN STOWE: See WED.25. BOOK SALE IN WEST PAWLET: See SAT.28, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. JOAN HUTTON LANDIS SUMMER READING SERIES: Fans of the written word hear from fiction writer Jensen Beach and poet Bianca Stone. BigTown Gallery, Rochester, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 767-9670. TO SING OF COMMON THINGS: Teenage spoken word artists Lena Ginawi and Kiran Waqar share how they use art to express their feelings and take action. Clemmons Family Farm, Charlotte, 3-4:30 p.m. Donations; preregister; limited space. Info, 310-0097.

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film

FRESHTRACKS ROAD PITCH: Business professionals ride motorcycles from town to town to hear pitches from budding entrepreneurs. See roadpitch. co for details. Various Vermont locations, Montpelier. Free. Info, 923-1504.

‘FLYING MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.25.

business

environment

CLEAN WATER WEEK CELEBRATION: Environmentally friendly folks of all ages contemplate the importance of clean water while watching live animal demos and making land formations on a stream table. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Regular admission, $11.5014.50; free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848.

etc.

INSURRECTION MASS WITH FUNERAL MARCH FOR A ROTTEN IDEA: Participants process cultural and political disasters by bidding farewell to bad thoughts. Haybarn Theatre, Goddard College, Plainfield, 7:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 322-1604.

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section.

‘GREAT WHITE SHARK 3D’: See WED.25. ‘SAILOR MOON R THE MOVIE’ & ‘SAILOR MOON S THE MOVIE’: See SAT.28, 7 p.m. ‘SEA MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.25. ‘WILD AFRICA 3D’: See WED.25.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.25, 6:30 p.m. CRIBBAGE TEAMS: See WED.25. MAGIC: THE GATHERING — MONDAY NIGHT MODERN: Tarmogoyf-slinging madness ensues when competitors battle for prizes in a weekly game. Brap’s Magic, Burlington, 6:30-10 p.m. $8. Info, 540-0498. PINOCHLE & RUMMY: See WED.25. SUMMER CHESS CLUB: Checkmate! Players make strategic moves and vie for the opposing king. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955.

JOB HUNT HELP: See THU.26, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. MON.30

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calendar ADVANCED SUN-STYLE TAI CHI, LONG-FORM: Elements of qigong thread through the youngest version of the Chinese martial art. Winooski Senior Center, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 735-5467. ADVANCED TAI CHI CLASS: See FRI.27.

GARDEN TOURS: Horticultural enthusiasts examine beautiful blooms at the Billings Farm & Museum and the Marsh-BillingsRockefeller National Historical Park. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 1 p.m. $16-21; preregister. Info, 457-3368, ext. 222.

BONE BUILDERS EXERCISE CLASSES: See WED.25.

HOUSE & FORMAL GARDENS TOUR: See THU.26.

SEATED TAI CHI: Movements are modified for those with arthritis and other chronic conditions. Winooski Senior Center, 11 a.m.noon. Free. Info, 735-5467.

business

LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE: Bring a bag lunch to practice the system of communication using visual gestures. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

music

Find club dates in the music section.

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CASPIAN MONDAY MUSIC: The Justin Stanley Trio breathes life into works by Tyler Kline, Astor Piazzolla and others. Caledonia Grange, East Hardwick, 7:30 p.m. $10-20; free for kids under 18. Info, caspianmondaymusic@ gmail.com. SAMBATUCADA OPEN REHEARSAL: Newbies are invited to help keep the beat as Burlington’s samba streetpercussion band sharpens its sound. Instruments are not required. 8 Space Studio Collective, Burlington, 6-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 862-5017.

tech

TECH HELP WITH CLIF: See WED.25.

words

READING THROUGH THE BIBLE: Participants gather near the fireplace to peruse the Scriptures. Panera Bread, South Burlington, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 893-6266. SUMMER BOOK SALE: Thousands of gently used CDs, DVDs, puzzles and page-turners pique shoppers’ interest. Rutland Free Library, 4-8 p.m. Free. Info, 773-1860.

‘SEA MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.25. ‘WILD AFRICA 3D’: See WED.25.

community

FEAST TOGETHER OR FEAST TO GO: See FRI.27.

crafts

COMMUNITY CRAFT NIGHT: Makers stitch, spin, knit and crochet their way through projects while enjoying each other’s company. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211.

dance

SWING DANCING: Quick-footed participants experiment with different forms, including the Lindy hop, Charleston and balboa. Beginners are welcome. Champlain Club, Burlington, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $5. Info, 448-2930.

education

TOUR BHS: In order to provide feedback to school board commissioners and city councilors, community members witness firsthand the need to provide fully accessible learning spaces. Burlington High School, 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 865-5332.

environment

CLEAN WATER WEEK CELEBRATION: See MON.30.

etc.

DANCE, PAINT, WRITE!: Creative people end their day with an energetic meditation, music, movement, intuitive painting, free writing and de-stressing. Expressive Arts Burlington, 6:308:30 p.m. $15; preregister. Info, 343-8172. TIME-TRAVEL TUESDAYS: Families experience a blast from the past with 19th-century chores and games in the restored 1890 farm house. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Regular admission, $4-16; free for members and kids under 3. Info, 457-2355. TOWN HALL THEATER’S 10TH BIRTHDAY PARTY: Locals celebrate with cake and live entertainment. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, 5-7 p.m. Free. Info, 382-9222.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘FLYING MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.25.

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PEACEFUL WARRIOR KARATE: Martial-arts training promotes healthy living for those in recovery. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150.

GORDON LIGHTFOOT: The “Sundown” singer treats fans to his top tunes along with some deep album cuts. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, 8 p.m. $44.75-90. Info, 863-5966.

REIKI CLINIC: Thirty-minute treatments promote physical, emotional and spiritual wellness. JourneyWorks, Burlington, 3-5:30 p.m. $10-30; preregister. Info, 860-6203.

MUSIC WHILE YOU PICK: Rock cover band the Decoys keep spirits high as locavores snap up fresh blueberries. Owl’s Head Blueberry Farm, Richmond, 5-8:30 p.m. Minimum purchase of two quarts per adult, $6 per quart. Info, 434-3387.

YOGA AT THE WINOOSKI VFW: Certified instructors guide veterans and their families through a series of poses. Arrive five to 10 minutes early. Second floor, Winooski VFW Hall, 6-7 p.m. Donations. Info, 655-9832.

FRESHTRACKS ROAD PITCH: See MON.30.

29 N.

language

‘LOST IN TRANSLATION’: A dwindling movie star and a lonely young woman become unlikely friends in this 2003 drama directed by Sofia Coppola. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600.

SU

VETERANS YOGA: FOR THOSE WHO HAVE SERVED: Seasoned practitioners and neophytes alike engage in postures of strength and physicality. Participants may bring a friend or other support person. Sangha Studio — North, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

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agriculture

‘GREAT WHITE SHARK 3D’: See WED.25.

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food & drink

CRAFT BEER TUESDAYS: Golfers and nongolfers alike treat themselves to tastings of popular brews and ciders. Stowe Country Club, 6-8 p.m. Cost of drinks. Info, 760-4653. THE GRAND KITCHEN: Foodies from across generations sharpen their culinary skills in a class designed for children to learn to cook with a grandparent or another older adult. Vermont Farmers Food Center, Rutland, 1-3 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 786-5990. OLD NORTH END FARMERS MARKET: Locavores score breads, juices, ethnic foods and more from neighborhood vendors. Dewey Park, Burlington, 3-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, oldnorthendfarmersmarket@gmail.com.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.25, 7 p.m. CHESS CLUB: Players of all ages put on their thinking caps in a relaxed, supportive atmosphere. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 985-5124.

health & fitness

BEGINNER/INTERMEDIATE SUN-STYLE TAI CHI, LONGFORM: Improved mood, greater muscle strength and increased energy are a few of the benefits of this gentle exercise. South Burlington Recreation & Parks Department, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 735-5467. BEGINNERS TAI CHI CLASS: See THU.26. LYME DISEASE & TICK-BORNE ILLNESSES: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: Pat Bannerman, vice president of vtlyme.org, shares her knowledge of the disease, prevention strategies and educational resources. CarpenterCarse Library, Hinesburg, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 482-2878.

YOGA WITH PRANAYAMA: Yoga poses and breathing exercises start simply and become more challenging as this six-week series progresses. Waterbury Public Library, 6-7 p.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, 244-7036.

language

‘LA CAUSERIE’ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Native speakers and learners are welcome to pipe up at an unstructured conversational practice. El Gato Cantina, Burlington, 4:30-6 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0195. LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: ITALIAN: Speakers hone their skills in the Romance language over a bag lunch. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338. PAUSE-CAFÉ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Frenchlanguage fanatics meet pour parler la belle langue. Burlington Bay Market & Café, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 430-4652. SOCIAL GATHERING: Those who are deaf or hard of hearing or want to learn American Sign Language get together to break down communication barriers. The North Branch Café, Montpelier, 4-6 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 595-4001.

music

Find club dates in the music section. BLACKWATER TRIO: See WED.25, Art Gallery, Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, 5 p.m. Free. Info, 533-2000. BOB AMOS & CATAMOUNT CROSSING: Traditional bluegrass tunes put smiles on faces. Rain site: Fairlee Town Hall. Fairlee Town Common, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, contact@fairleearts.org. CASTLETON SUMMER CONCERTS: The Party Crashers entertain onlookers with funk, soul and rock melodies. Pavilion, Castleton University, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, 468-6039. GIFFORD COMMUNITY CONCERT SERIES: The Orange County Sheriff’s Department provides the food for a family-friendly country concert by Tim Brick. Gifford Park, Gifford Medical Center, Randolph, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 728-2380.

OPEN JAM: Instrumentalists band together for a free-flowing musical hour. Borrow an instrument or bring your own. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 300. SHAPE NOTE SING: Locals lend their voices to four-part harmonies at this weekly sing-along of early American music in the “fa-sol-la-mi” tradition. Bread and Puppet Theater, Glover, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 525-6972. TELEGRAPH QUARTET: Lauded for their tonal beauty and attention to detail, the foursome takes the stage with pianist Ilya Yakushev as part of Summer Music From Greensboro. See calendar spotlight. Greensboro United Church of Christ, 7:30 p.m. $20; free for kids under 18. Info, summermusicfromgreensboro@gmail.com. TUESDAY NIGHT LIVE: Prince tribute band Purple provide the musical backdrop to a pastoral party featuring good eats. Legion Field, Johnson, 6-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 635-7826. VERMONT MOZART FESTIVAL: Accomplished young players present the program “Mozart Lite.” Hotel Vermont, Burlington, 5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 598-9520.

talks

HOT TOPICS SUMMER LECTURE SERIES: Roseanne Gerin of Radio Free Asia provokes thought with “The Environmental Impact of Hydropower Dam Projects in Southeast Asia.” Room 012, Oakes Hall, Vermont Law School, South Royalton, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 831-1371.

theater

‘WEST SIDE STORY’: See WED.25, 7:30 p.m.

words

BURLINGTON POETRY GROUP: Writers of verse ages 18 through 30 field constructive feedback on original works. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, btvpoetry@gmail.com. READING FREDERICK DOUGLASS: People honor the civil rights champion with a participatory recitation of his hardhitting Fourth of July address. South Burlington Community Library, University Mall, noon. Free; preregister to read. Info, 846-4041.

SUMMER LITERATURE READING SERIES: Ambitious readers cover selected pages of Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 6:308:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104.

WED.1 business

FRESHTRACKS ROAD PITCH: See MON.30.

cannabis

GREENER DRINKS: See WED.25.

crafts

FIBER RIOT!: See WED.25.

environment

CLEAN WATER WEEK CELEBRATION: See MON.30. KINGDOM COMMUNITY WIND TOUR: Attendees are blown away by a tour of energyproducing turbines. Kingdom Community Wind, Lowell, 10 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, windtours@greenmountainpower.com. PUBLIC BOAT TRIPS ON LAKE CHAMPLAIN ABOARD THE R/V MELOSIRA: Citizen scientists board a University of Vermont research and education vessel to learn about the lake and its watershed. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 5:30-7:45 p.m. $25; preregister. Info, 656-8504.

etc.

CHITTENDEN COUNTY STAMP CLUB MEETING: First-class collectibles provide a glimpse into the postal past at this monthly gathering. Williston Fire Station, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 660-4817.

FOMO? Find even more local events in this newspaper and online:

art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

music Find club dates at local venues in the music section and at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

A COURSE IN MIRACLES STUDY GROUP: See WED.25. GUIDED TOURS: See WED.25. PARENT-IN MEETUP: See WED.25. ROUND-UP ON THE RIVER: See WED.25. STARGAZING: See WED.25. VERGENNES AREA LIONS CLUB CHARITY AUCTION: Furniture, antiques, artwork, gift certificates and white elephant items provoke a lively bidding war. St Peter’s Parish Hall, Vergennes, preview, 5 p.m.; auction, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 545-8181. WAGON RIDE WEDNESDAYS: See WED.25.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘FLYING MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.25. ‘GRATEFUL DEAD MEET-UP AT THE MOVIES’: Deadheads rock out at a screening of the band’s July 7, 1989 concert at Philadelphia’s John F. Kennedy Stadium. Palace 9 Cinemas, South Burlington, 7 p.m. $12.50. Info, 660-9300. ‘GREAT WHITE SHARK 3D’: See WED.25. ‘SEA MONSTERS 3D’: See WED.25. ‘WILD AFRICA 3D’: See WED.25.

food & drink

BEERLINGTON FOAMERS MARKET: See WED.25. COMMUNITY SUPPER: See WED.25. FIVE CORNERS FARMERS MARKET: See WED.25. ICE CREAM SOCIAL: See WED.25. VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: See WED.25.

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.25. CRIBBAGE TEAMS: See WED.25. PINOCHLE & RUMMY: See WED.25.

health & fitness

BONE BUILDERS EXERCISE CLASSES: See WED.25. QIGONG: See WED.25.

Y12SR: YOGA OF 12-STEP RECOVERY: See WED.25.

language

BEGINNER & INTERMEDIATE/ ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSES: See WED.25. GERMAN CONVERSATION GROUP: Community members practice conversing auf Deutsch. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211.

THE CORETET: Jazz, funk and hip-hop intersect in a Winooski Wednesdays summer concert series performance. A beer garden and free meals for kids 18 and under top off the fun. Rotary Park, Winooski, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 777-1621. CRAFTSBURY CHAMBER PLAYERS: World-class musicians deliver rousing renditions of works by Boccherini, Grieg and Mozart. Elley-Long Music Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, preconcert talk, 6:45 p.m.; concert, 7:30 p.m. $10-25; free for kids 12 and under. Info, 800-639-3443. JASON MRAZ: SOLD OUT. The two-time Grammy Awardwinning artist doles out folk-pop numbers as part of Ben & Jerry’s Concerts on the Green. Brett Dennen opens. Shelburne Museum, 7 p.m. $46.50-53.50; free for kids 12 and under. Info, 877-987-6487. JEFF DANIELS & THE BEN DANIELS BAND: Father and son take the stage as part of their Acoustically Speakin’ Summer ’18 tour. See calendar spotlight. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe Mountain Resort, 7 p.m. $30-40. Info, 760-4634. JOSÉ JAMES: The young jazz singer puts a contemporary spin on hits such as “Ain’t No Sunshine” and “Just the Two of Us” in the musical program “Lean On Me: José James Celebrates Bill Withers.” Spaulding Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 8 p.m. $12.50-30. Info, 603-646-2422. KING ME: Fans from across generations get down to cover songs from the 1960s through current hits. Mills Riverside Park, Jericho, 6-8 p.m. Donations. Info, 899-2693. PIKES FALLS CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL: Instrumentalists hit all the right notes during 11 days of classical music programming. See pikesfallschambermusicfestival.com for details. Various southern Vermont. Free. Info, 732-586-5455. POINT COUNTERPOINT: Instructors of the chambermusic camp perform works by Schumann, Mozart and Janacek. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, 7:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 382-9222. VERMONT MOZART FESTIVAL CHAMBER PLAYERS: See THU.26, Trapp Family Lodge, Stowe, 7 p.m. $15; free for kids.

FEATURING

Full Greek Menu and Greek Pastries Live Greek Music and Dancing Church Tours Available

sports

COMMUNITY ROWING: See WED.25. FOX U.S. OPEN OF MOUNTAIN BIKING: Over five days, pedal pushers vie for prizes in competitions such as downhill, enduro and adaptive mountain biking. See killington.com for details. Killington Resort. Free for spectators. Info, 800-734-9435.

tech

INTRODUCTION TO POWERPOINT: Those new to the program practice making slide shows, charts, footers and animation. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 865-7217.

Greek Orthodox Church • 862-2155 Corner of Ledge Rd. & S. Willard St. Additional parking at Christ the King Church 8h-greekfest072518.indd 1

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7/23/18 4:45 PM

art

VERMONT

Vermont Antique Car Show Ad 4.75wX5.5h Plan your art adventures with the Seven Days Friday email bulletin including: Seven Days

theater

‘ALWAYS ... PATSY CLINE’: The country crooner’s friendship with Houston housewife Louise Seger anchors this Skinner Barn production. Skinner Barn Theater, Waitsfield, 8-10 p.m. $25. Info, 496-4422. ‘HEATHERS: THE MUSICAL’: See WED.25. ‘A TALE OF TWO CITIES’: Brian McEleney directs the Bread Loaf Acting Ensemble in his own adaptation of Charles Dickens’ novel centered on the French Revolution. Burgess Meredith Little Theatre, Bread Loaf Campus, Ripton, 8 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 443-2771.

• • • •

Receptions and events Weekly picks for exhibits “Movies You Missed” by Margot Harrison News, profiles and reviews

sevendaysvt.com/RevIeW

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‘WEST SIDE STORY’: See WED.25.

words

AUTHORS AT THE ALDRICH: Lit lovers lend their ears for a talk by novelist Katherine Arden, who penned The Bear and the Nightingale. Aldrich Public Library, Barre, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 476-7550. RECOVERY WRITE NOW: See WED.25. WEDNESDAY WORKSHOP: Burlington Writers Workshop members focus on elements of craft when responding to works in progress. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104. WRITING CIRCLE: See WED.25. m

August 10-12, 2018 NEW LOCATION: Farr’s Field, US Rt. 2, Waterbury, VT Over 700 show cars displayed, 30+ judged vehicle classes, huge automotive flea market & car corral, show car parade, street dance, awards ceremony & much more!

See the special display of antique race cars! For more info contact: Chris at 802-223-3104 cgeeb99@gmail.com • www.vtauto.org FORMERLY THE STOWE ANTIQUE & CLASSIC CAR MEET SPONSORED BY THE VERMONT AUTOMOBILE ENTHUSIASTS Untitled-3 1

7/24/18 10:15 AM

CALENDAR 59

LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: SPANISH: See WED.25.

CAPITAL CITY BAND: See WED.25.

NOON-5PM, RAIN OR SHINE • FREE ADMISSION

SEVEN DAYS

TOMGIRL WALKING CLUB: See WED.25.

BURLINGTON CITY ARTS SUMMER CONCERTS: VIOLET BELL: Friends and coworkers convene for a lunchtime folk concert. Burlington City Hall Park, noon. Free. Info, 865-7166.

SUNDAY, JULY 29

CAMPFIRES, BUGS AND BATS: WE LOVE TWO OF THEM!: Acoustical monitoring equipment in tow, Vermont Bat Center’s Barry and Maureen Genzlinger share stories and facts about the nocturnal fliers. Milton Historical Museum, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 893-1604.

07.25.18-08.01.18

RESILIENCE FLOW: FOR THOSE WITH A HISTORY OF TBI OR BRAIN INJURY: See WED.25.

Find club dates in the music section.

FOOD FESTIVAL

outdoors

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

games

music

ANNUAL GREEK


classes THE FOLLOWING CLASS LISTINGS ARE PAID ADVERTISEMENTS. ANNOUNCE YOUR CLASS FOR AS LITTLE AS $16.75/WEEK (INCLUDES SIX PHOTOS AND UNLIMITED DESCRIPTION ONLINE). SUBMIT YOUR CLASS AD AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTCLASS.

ayurveda 200-HOUR AYURVEDA INTEGRATION PROGRAM: Join us in learning and immerse yourself in the oldest surviving preventative health care system. This program is ideal for yoga teachers, counselors, therapists, bodyworkers, nurses, doctors, wellness coaches, herbalists, etc. VSAC approved and payment plans available. Can transfer hours to Kripalu’s Ayurveda Health Counselor program. More information at ayurvedavermont. com/classes. 2019 schedule: Feb. 9-10, Mar. 9-10, Apr. 6-7, May 17-18, Jun. 8-9, Jul. 13-14, Aug. 17-18, Sep. 14-15, Oct. 19-20, Nov. 16-17. Cost: $2,795. Location: The Ayurvedic Center of Vermont, 34 Oak Hill Rd., Williston. Info: Allison Morse, 872-8898, ayurvedavt@comcast.net.

60 CLASSES

SEVEN DAYS

07.25.18-08.01.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

burlington city arts

Call 865-7166 for info or register online at burlingtoncityarts.org. Teacher bios are also available online. LIFE DRAWING DROP-IN: Spend the evening with other local artists drawing one of our experienced models. Please bring your drawing materials and paper. All materials must be water soluble and solvent free. No registration required. Instructor: Carolyn Zuaro. Fri., Jul. 13-Aug. 17, 7:30-9 p.m. Cost: $10/person; $9/BCA members. Purchase a drop-in card and get the sixth visit free. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org. PASTEL WORKSHOP: Spend an evening in our drawing and painting studio with versatile and colorful pastels. In this fun, onenight class you’ll discover basic drawing and blending techniques to create an abstract or realistic piece of paper that you’ll be excited to bring home. All basic materials included. No experience necessary. Instructor: Janet Armentano. Jul. 25, 6-9 p.m. Cost: $25/person; $22.50/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

FINE METAL JEWELRY INSTITUTE: Join us for this week-long fine metals course, specially designed for teens with a passion for art. Use professional jewelry tools to make rings, pendants and bracelets with brass and silver. Learn basic jewelry techniques, including sawing, filing, soldering, texturing, ring sizing and more. Individual projects will be encouraged in this small class based on students’ interests. Lead-free solder and safe-flux are used during the camp. Ages 15-18. Jul. 30-Aug. 3, noon-3 p.m. Cost: $180/person. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org. HIGH SCHOOL PHOTOGRAPHY INSTITUTE: Immerse yourself in the photographic process and develop your artistic vision in this dynamic one-week program! Students will use both the traditional darkroom and the digital lab to create a portfolio of quality images. Instruction in film and digital shooting methods, darkroom printing, image processing in Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom, group photo shoots, and more will be covered throughout the week. Experience in photography is not required to participate. Scholarships available. Ages: 15-18. Aug. 13-17, 8 a.m. -3 p.m. Cost: $360/ person; $324/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org. MACRO PHOTOGRAPHY: Learn how to use your digital camera to see and share the wonder found in small and often unnoticed details in the natural world! In this four-week class, participants will learn how to train their eyes to see tiny subjects out in nature, to figure out the macro capabilities of their cameras, and to compose a visually compelling photograph. Classes will be a mix of outdoor photo shoots and in-class group discussions. Point and shoot and DSLR cameras are both welcome. No experience necessary. Instructor: Laura Hale. Thu., Jul. 12-Aug. 2, 4-6 p.m. Cost: $120/ person; $108/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org. PRINTMAKING INSTITUTE: Join a week-long printmaking course, designed for teens with a passion for art. Students will work in BCA’s print studio and learn about silkscreening and how to

apply photo emulsion, use a silkscreen exposure unit and print images using water-based inks. Students will develop a deeper understanding of professional 2D artistic techniques and will leave with prints, silkscreened T-shirts and posters to add to their art portfolio. Aug. 6-10, 12-3 p.m. Cost: $180/person. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

craft

theshelburnecraftschool.org

985-3648

CLAY 101: BEGINNER WHEEL: Interested in wheel throwing and looking for how to get started? This introductory course is designed to give beginner students the most common techniques used in making vessels on a clay wheel. Each session begins with a demonstration followed by oneon-one instructor support and time to practice. Mon., 8 weeks, 10 a.m.-noon. Cost: $360/person; materials & first bag of clay incl. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: Shelburne Craft School, 985-3648, info@ shelburnecraftschool.org, shelburnecraftschool.org. CLAY 201: MIXED-LEVEL WHEEL: Are you looking for a way to improve your wheel-throwing skills? This course offers time to practice and to explore techniques for all skill levels. Students new to working with clay will get a basic understanding of techniques, while more experienced students will grow and expand their skills. Tue., Sep. 25-Nov.13, 6-8 p.m. Cost: $360/person; materials & first bag of clay incl. Location: Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@shelburnecraftschool.org, shelburnecraftschool.org. CLAY 202: HAND AND WHEEL: What is it about getting your hands dirty that is so thrilling? This beginner- to intermediatelevel course is designed for clay enthusiasts who want to incorporate hand building with wheel throwing. Begin each session with a demonstration and then work one-on-one with the instructor on advancing your ability. Sat., Sep. 29-Nov.17, 9-11 a.m. Cost: $360/person; materials & first bag of clay incl. Location: The Shelburne Craft School , 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 9853648, info@shelburnecraftschool. org, shelburnecraftschool.org.

CLAY 203: ALTERNATIVE FIRING: Ever wonder how to get a smoky earthen patina with ceramics? This intermediate-level course explores slow alternative methods from Japanese Raku, to Eastern European Obvara, to ancient “baked clay” pit firing. Students set independent project goals for exploring their own practice. Demonstrations are tailored based on class request. Mon., 8 weeks, 6-8 p.m. Cost: $360/person; materials and first bag of clay incl. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: Shelburne Craft School, 985-3648, info@ shelburnecraftschool.org, shelburnecraftschool.org. PAINT 101: INTRO TO DRAWING: Interested in learning how to draw but not sure where to start? This course introduces students to the fundamental foundation of drawing using graphite, charcoal and ink to explore line, tone, plane and perspective. Mon., 10 a.m.-noon, Sep. 24-Oct. 29 Cost: $200/person; does not incl. materials. Location: Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@shelburne craftschool.org, shelburnecraft school.org.

PAINT 301: LIFE DRAWING: Drawing the human figure is one of the most universal themes in visual art and is a practice in observation and gesture. Guided by an instructor, students capture the essence of the human form while a live model positions themselves in a series of short to long poses. Mon., 6-8 p.m., Sept. 24-Oct. 15. Cost: $140/person; materials not incl. Location: The Shelburne Craft School , 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: Shelburne Craft School, 9853648, info@shelburnecraftschool. org, shelburnecraftschool.org. WOOD 101: SHAKER TABLE: Interested in woodworking and looking for a way to get started? This introductory course is designed to give beginner students the basics in using hand tools and shop machinery to design and make a beautiful one-of-a-kind project. Wed., Sept. 12-Nov.14, 6-9 p.m. Cost: $575/ person; materials incl. Location: Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@shelburnecraftschool.org, shelburnecraftschool.org.

a.m-4 p.m. Cost: $1,250/person; incl. all course materials & daily meals. Affordable housing avail. on campus. Location: Sterling College, 16 Sterling Dr., Craftsbury Common. Info: Weylin Garnett, 586-7711-163, newamericanfarm stead@sterlingcollege.edu, sterlingcollege.edu/course/ artisan-breadmakingheritage-grains.

WOOD 111: BRANCH TO SPOON: Are you looking for a lowcommitment, one-day workshop that teaches a life-long skill? Students will learn how to identify and harvest locally sourced species of green wood to carve using Swedish carving methods into a useful cooking spoon. Students get to keep their tools, too! Sat., Sep. 15, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost: $180/person; materials & tools incl. Location: Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@shelburnecraftschool.org, shelburnecraftschool.org. WOOD 114: LONGBOARD DECK: Are you looking for a one-day workshop that will teach you the basic skills to make a longboard cruiser deck? Students will learn about shop safety and how to use a wide variety of hand tools such as files, rasps and wood burners. Grip-tape, trucks and wheels included! Sat., Sep. 22, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Cost: $210/person; materials incl. Location: Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@shelburnecraft school.org, shelburnecraft school.org. WOOD 201: DOVETAIL BOX: Interested in woodworking and learning how to make the most useful joinery technique? Join a group of fellow woodworking enthusiasts making a lidded box using traditional hand tools. Students will learn about various Vermont hardwoods and explore joinery layout, sawing and chiseling. Mon., 6-8:30 p.m., Sep.10Oct. 29. Cost: $450/person; materials incl. Location: Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ shelburnecraftschool.org, shelburnecraftschool.org.

culinary BREADMAKING WITH RICHARD MISCOVICH: Flour, water, salt and wild yeast combined with time, handwork and the heat of an oven become a delicious form of sustenance that has marked history throughout the ages. Discover the gifts of fresh-milled flours and a wood-fired oven along the way. Led by renowned instructor Richard Miscovich. Daily: Mon.-Fri., Aug. 13-17, 8:30

LIVING FOODS: FERMENTATION: Be confident about fermenting foods for added nutrition and flavorful delights! From the basic techniques of vegetable fermentation to tonic beverages, incorporating sourdough into unexpected surprises, and culturing dairy into tasty yogurt, kiefer and simple cheeses; all using fresh, local ingredients from the Sterling College farm, field and forest. Daily, Wed.-Fri., Aug. 1-3, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost: $425/All materials & lunch incl. Location: Sterling College, 16 Sterling Dr., Craftsbury Common. Info: Weylin Garnett, 586-7711163, newamericanfarmstead@ sterlingcollege.edu, sterlingcollege.edu/school-of-the-newamerican-farmstead.

dance DANCE STUDIO SALSALINA: Salsa classes, nightclub-style, group and private, four levels. Beginner walk-in classes, Wed., 6 p.m. $15/person for one-hour class. No dance experience, partner or preregistration required, just the desire to have fun! Drop in anytime and prepare for an enjoyable workout. Location: 266 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Victoria, 598-1077, info@salsalina.com, DSANTOS VT DANCE CLASSES: New classes, new location! Come join the fun. Weekly classes in salsa, bachata, kizomba, kuduro. No partner or experience needed. Beginner drop-in classes. Salsa, Mon., 7-8 p.m.; Kizomba, Wed., 8-9 p.m.; Bachata, Thu., 6-7 p.m. Cost: $15/1-hour class. Location: Dsantos VT Dance Studio, 294 N. Winooski Ave., Unit 112A, Burlington. Info: Jon Bacon, 227-2572, dsantosvt.com. ENGLISH COUNTRY DANCE CLASSES: Move to joyful music in a relaxed, beginner-friendly atmosphere. These social dances, first published in the mid-17th century, feature different formations (long or short lines, circles, squares) and range in mood from light playfulness to delightful elegance, enthusiastically robust to gloriously stately. For teens and adults who can walk briskly. Wed., 7-9 p.m., Jul. 25, Aug. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29. Cost: $5/2-hour class. Location: Richmond Free Library, 201 Bridge St., Richmond. Info: Val Medve, 881-9732, val.medve@gmail.com, burlingtoncountrydancers.org.


CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES

drumming TAIKO AND DJEMBE CLASSES IN BURLINGTON!: New drumming sessions begin weeks of Mar. 3 and May 1. Taiko for Adults: Tue., 5:30-6:20 p.m.; Wed., 6:30-8:20 p.m. Djembe for Adults: Wed., 5:30-6:20 p.m. Taiko for Kids and Parents: Tue., 4:30-5:20 p.m. Djembe for Kids and Parents: Wed., 4:30-5:20 p.m. Drums provided. Conga classes, too! Online schedule, registration. Location: Taiko Space, 208 Flynn Ave., Suite 3G, Burlington. Info: 999-4255, burlingtontaiko.org.

flynn arts’

JAZZ IMPROV. FOR BEGINNERS: Ages 8-12 (Recommended for students who have played for a minimum of one year). Instructor: George Voland. Want to join your school’s jazz band or play in a jazz combo? Work on your improvisational and ensemble skills with acclaimed trombonist George Voland. Campers perform for friends and family in FlynnSpace at week’s end. Mon.-Fri., Aug. 6-10, 8:30-11:30 a.m. Cost: $200/ person; incl. jazz performance ticket. Location: Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: 652-4537, flynncenter.org.

PRACTICE YOUR FRENCH THIS SUMMER: Alliance Française is offering a late summer session starting on July 30 at our Burlington location. This six-week session will offer courses for all language levels, including Phonetics, Literature, Conversation and Grammar. Go to aflcr.org to discover our offerings, or contact Micheline at michelineatremblay@gmail. com with questions. Location: Alliance Française, 43 King St., Burlington. Info: aflcr.org.

3D PRINTER TRAINING: Rapid prototyping tools like the 3D printer are great for instant gratification. Learn how to prepare a 3D design file so that a digital object can be brought to life by being printed in a variety of materials. Learn more about classes at generatorvt. com/classes. Sun., Aug. 12,1012:30 p.m. Location: Generator, 40 Sears Ln., Burlington. Info: 540-0761. BOOK SAFE: Book safes are easy for their owners to recognize, but they do not stand out to a thief or other intruder. The laser cutter is the perfect tool to create the negative space for an object. Learn more about classes at generatorvt.com/classes. Mon., Aug. 13 & 20, 6-8:30 p.m Location: Generator, 40 Sears Ln., Burlington. Info: 540-0761. MIG WELDING TOOL TRAINING: This class provides instruction on welding safety, machine setup and settings, basic welding practices (tack, t-joint, and butt-joint or v-groove), and troubleshooting. This tool training is required for Generator members to have free access to use the MIG welder. Learn more about classes at generatorvt. com/classes. Thu., Aug. 9, 5:308:30 p.m. Location: Generator, 40 Sears Ln., Burlington. Info: 540-0761.

herbs

OVER NINE THOUSAND ACADEMY: Become a Kung Fu bad@ss and learn to be strong, supple, fierce and centered. We believe in a holistic approach to martial arts and offer both hard and soft styles along with Taoist meditation practices. Classes are offered for adults and children, and we specialize in serving special needs kids. Classes offered Mon-Sat. Location: Onta Studio, 373 Blair Park Rd., Suite #102, Williston. Info: 683-8539, ontastudio@gmail.com, ontastudio.com. MARTIAL WAY: Colchester and Milton locations. Classes in selfdefense, karate, kung fu, jiu jitsu and tai chi. We have 14 different age and experience levels, so the training is always age- and skill-appropriate. Beginner or experienced, fit or not yet, young or not anymore, we have a class for you! Days and evenings; see website for schedule and fees. Location: Martial Way Self Defense Center, 73 Prim Rd., Colchester, Colchester. Info: David Quinlan, 893-8893, info@ martial, wayvt.com, martialwayvt.com.

LEARN SPANISH OR ENGLISH, SWC: We provide high-quality, affordable instruction in the Spanish language for adults, students and children. Travelers’ lesson package. Small classes or private lessons. Our online English classes are live, engaging face-to-face interactions, not computer exercises. In our 12th year. See our website for complete information or contact us for details. Location: Spanish in Waterbury Center, Waterbury Center. Info: 585-1025, spanishparavos@gmail.com, spanishwaterburycenter.com.

martial arts

LEARN TO MEDITATE: Taught by qualified meditation instructors at the Burlington Shambhala Meditation Center: Wed., 6-7 p.m.; Sun., 9 a.m.-noon. Free and open to anyone. Free public meditation weeknights 6-7 p.m.; Tue. and Thu. noon-1 p.m.; Sun. 9 a.m.-noon. Classes and retreats also offered. See our website at burlington.shambhala.org. Location: Burlington Shambhala Center, 187 S. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 658-6795.

SNAKE-STYLE TAI CHI CHUAN: The Yang Snake Style is a dynamic tai chi method that mobilizes the spine while stretching and strengthening the core body muscles. Practicing this ancient martial art increases strength, flexibility, vitality, peace of mind and martial skill. Beginner classes Sat. mornings & Wed. evenings. Call to view a class. Location: Bao Tak Fai Tai Chi Institute, 100 Church St., Burlington. Info: 363-6890, snake-style.com.

the media factory

SCREENWRITING: 3-ACT STRUCTURE: Learn the fundamentals of screenwriting and story structure, using Hollywood’s famous Three-Act Structure as a guide. We’ll also investigate the underlying principles of Three-Act Structure to understand why it is the way it is. Please call to reserve your spot. Thu., Jul 26, 7 p.m. Free. Location: The Media Factory, 208 Flynn Ave., #2G, Burlington. Info: 651-9692. VCAM EDITING CERTIFICATION: This free certification class is for registered VCAM users who want to be certified for using our fully equipped video editing suites with Adobe Creative Cloud, including Adobe Premiere, and to gain access to VCAM’s networked storage for your video project. Please call to reserve your spot. Sat., Jul. 28, 11 a.m. Free. Location: The Media Factory, 208 Flynn Ave., #2G, Burlington. Info: 651-9692.

spirituality 34TH ANNUAL ELDERS GATHERING: All are welcome. Sacred Fire. Healing Ceremony. Indigenous Wisdom. Meditation. Nature & Science. Camping. Traditional teachings from Tsalagi, Abenaki, Algonquin, Mayan and Narragansett Elders. Tibetan Buddhist Dharma and modern astrophysics interwoven. Beautiful mountain setting. By donation. Children welcome. Meals available for purchase. Jul. 27-29. Cost: $75/day suggested donation. Location: Sunray Peace Village, 2202 Dowingsville Rd., Lincoln. Info: Sunray Meditation Society, Catherine Dyer, 647-688-0984, cdyer@sunray.org, sunray.org/programs/ elders-gathering.

IMOVIE EDITING FOR COMPUTERS: In this two-hour workshop, you’ll learn and practice essential iMovie editing skills including creating and managing new projects; importing videos and photos; inserting and trimming clips; and adding music, text and graphics. RETN will supply iMac computers for

your use during this workshop. Register at retn.org/workshops. Mon., Jul. 30, 6 p.m. Cost: $25/ suggested donation. Location: Media Factory, 208 Flynn Ave., #2G, Burlington. Info: 651-9692, Bit.ly/btvmediafactory.

yoga SANGHA STUDIO | NONPROFIT, DONATION-BASED YOGA: Sangha Studio builds an empowered community through the shared practice of yoga. Free yoga service initiatives and outreach programs are offered at 17 local organizations working with all ages. Join Sangha in both downtown Burlington and the Old North End for one of their roughly 60 weekly classes and workshops. Become a Sustaining Member for $60/month and practice as often as you like! Daily. Location: Sangha Studio, 120 Pine St. and 237 North Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 448-4262, Info@ sanghastudio.org. HONEST YOGA: Honest yoga offers heated yoga for all levels. We hold yoga teacher trainings at the 200- and 500-hour levels, as well as children and dance teacher courses. (YTT includes FREE unlimited membership) Yoga and dance classes for ages 2 and up in our two beautiful practice spaces! Your children can practice in one room while you practice in the other. No need for childcare. Brand-new beginners’ course: This includes two specialty classes per week for four weeks plus unlimited access to all classes. We have daily heated and alignment classes, and kids classes in yoga and dance. Check out our website for dance classes and yoga Summer Camps. Daily classes & workshops. $50/new student (1 mo. unlimited); $18/ class; $145/10-class card; or $110/10-class punch student/ senior/military card; $135/mo. adult memberships; $99/mo. kid memberships. Location: Honest Yoga Center, 150 Dorset St., Blue Mall, next to Eco Bean, South Burlington. Info: 497-0136, honestyogastudio@gmail.com, honestyogacenter.com. EVOLUTION YOGA: Practice yoga in a down-to-earth atmosphere with some of the most experienced teachers and therapeutic professionals in Burlington. New this summer: Yoga on the Lake, 7-8 a.m., four days per week; and Yoga on the Deck overlooking the lake, Tue. and Thu., 7:15-8:15 p.m. All lake classes are at the Community Sailing Center. Daily drop-in classes including $5 community classes, Yoga Wall and Yoga Therapeutics classes led by physical therapists. Dive deeper into your practice or register for our Yoga Teacher Training for Healthcare Providers. $5-$15/ class; $140/10-class card; $5-10/ community class. Location: Evolution Yoga, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington. Info: 864-9642, evolutionvt.com.

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VERMONT BRAZILIAN JIUJITSU: Brazilian jiujitsu is a martial arts combat style based entirely on leverage and technique. Brazilian jiujitsu self-defense curriculum is taught to Navy SEALs, CIA, FBI, military police and special forces. No training experience required. Easy-to-learn techniques that could save your life! Classes for men, women and children. Students will learn realistic bully-proofing and self-defense life skills to avoid them becoming victims and help them feel safe and secure. Our sole purpose is to help empower people by giving them realistic martial arts training practices they can carry with them throughout life. IBJJF & CBJJ certified black belt sixth-degree Instructor under Carlson Gracie Sr.: teaching in Vermont, born and raised in Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. A five-time

meditation

tai chi

SEVEN DAYS

TOOLS FOR WORKING W/ ADDICTION: Using a harmreduction framework, learn to work with people experiencing addiction using herbs, nutrition and ear seeds, following the NADA acudetox protocol. We’ll discuss how to do this both on an individual basis and in community-wide structures. We will discuss supporting folks who choose to continue using, as well as those working to quit. Sat. & Sun., Aug. 4 & 5, 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Cost: $150/14-hour class. Location: Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism, 252 Main St., Montpelier. Info: 224-7100, vtherbcenter.org.

Brazilian National Champion; International World Masters Champion and IBJJF World Masters Champion. Accept no Iimitations! Location: Vermont Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, 55 Leroy Rd., Williston. Info: 598-2839, julio@ bjjusa.com, vermontbjj.com.

07.25.18-08.01.18

DISNEY’S FROZEN KIDS THEATER CAMP: Ages 9-13. Instructor: Tim Maynes. Come act, sing and dance with us as we mount a workshop production of Disney’s Frozen Kids, a 30-minute musical adapted and developed exclusively for elementary and middle school students. This musical theater camp culminates in one of the first select pilot productions of this new show in the country. Mon.-Fri., Aug. 6-10, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost: $350/person. Location: Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: 652-4537, flynncenter.org.

KINETIC SCULPTURE WORKSHOP: Join guest teacher Patrick O’Shea for hands-on learners. You will be exploring natural, electronic and mechanical ways to create movement. We will experiment with, design and build kinetic sculptures in a fun group environment. Learn more about classes at generatorvt. com/classes. Sat., Aug. 18, 10-5 p.m. Location: Generator, 40 Sears Ln., Burlington. Info: 540-0761.

language

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

LATIN JAZZ INTENSIVE: Ages 13+. Instructors: Ray Vega & Alex Stewart. A team of instructors joins camp director and founder Alex Stewart to inspire students to reach new heights of creativity and proficiency, with rich opportunities to hone individual skills and master the cooperative team effort of live performance. Students work with jazz trumpet luminary and program founder Ray Vega and a variety of other artist-educators. Mon.-Fri., Aug. 6-10, 12:30-5 p.m. Cost: $315/ person; incl. jazz performance ticket. Location: Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, 153 Main Street, Burlington. Info: 6524537, flynncenter.org.

generator


music

Mix It Up COURTESY OF COLEY KRYSTYNA

West End Blend’s Erica Bryan talks fronting the band, the new release, and representation

62 MUSIC

SEVEN DAYS

07.25.18-08.01.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

BY JOR D AN ADAMS

B

orn during a Halloween basement party in 2012, funk ensemble West End Blend of Hartford, Conn., have been more or less in flux since their inception. Formerly a massive ensemble of nearly 20 people, including a rapper and a larger horn section, the group has scaled down to a more manageable eight-piece. And its music has gotten tighter, more dynamic and streamlined in the process. The “blend” of soul and funk, as it were, is becoming fully emulsified. The 2017 EP Attitude showcases the octet’s current lineup and sound. Much like Burlington’s Kat Wright & the Indomitable Soul Band (now called simply Kat Wright), West End Blend was established at a weekly jam in Hartford. The group — composed mostly of students from the University of Hartford’s music conservatory, the ERICA B RYAN Hartt School — played a jukebox selection of funk hits. But as the residency progressed, the bandmates began exploring original songwriting. Now it’s the bulk of their repertoire. Utterly infectious and known for getting crowds on their feet and onto the dance floor, West End Blend have become a staple of both the jam and funk scenes in the region. They perform on Saturday, July 28, as part of

TO FEEL REPRESENTED

IS INVALUABLE.

Twiddle’s Tumble Down music festival at Burlington’s Waterfront Park. Seven Days caught up with front woman Erica Bryan by phone. SEVEN DAYS: Early on in West End Blend’s lifetime, you told the Hartford Courant, “I really didn’t know much about how to present this music in this way, for a live setting. That was something I had to learn.” How do you relate to that statement now? ERICA BRYAN: Yeah, I do remember saying that — and how I felt at the time. I came from a classically trained vocal background. I hadn’t been much of a front woman in the live setting with high-intensity funk music until West End Blend. So, when I was asked to do this, it was a little outside of my comfort zone. It was interesting to [become] an MC, a leader [and], in some ways, the face of it. I have to look like I’ve been doing this forever. Generally speaking, it became easier and easier over time. My thing, growing up: I was always the one who danced. Every performance setting that I was in — even when I was probably not supposed to — I was dancing while I was singing. This music that we perform seems to fit that personality. So it came a little bit more naturally than I expected. SD: What did you imagine you’d be doing after graduating from the Hartt School? EB: When I first started school, I hoped I’d be

performing music after it all was said and done. But I don’t know if I had a specific plan that was much like this. I had an idea in my head that I was going to be forming some kind of jazz combo, [doing] occasional regional gigs. But never did I expect, in my sophomore year when West End Blend started, that it would turn into something by the time I graduated. SD: I understand the band just recorded a live album. EB: Yeah! It was just this past weekend over at our home away from home. It’s this place called the Waterhole in Saranac Lake, N.Y. Everybody up there just gets down and parties. We have so much music that hasn’t been recorded but we’ve been performing live for a while now. It’s so hard for us to get together and do a full studio recording. It just made sense to do it [there]. SD: Will we be able to hear it by the end of the year? EB: Stay tuned. SD: I read that you shared a stage with Charles Bradley before he passed away last year. Were you able to interact with him at all? EB: Yes. That was probably one of the most special moments of my career. I don’t think I even fully realized it at the time. We got this crazy opportunity to perform right before him. He was as vibrant in person as you’d MIX IT UP

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GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

COURTESY OF RICK LEVINSON

S UNDbites

News and views on the local music scene B Y J O RDA N A D A MS

Show and Tell

Guster with the Vermont Symphony Orchestra

Match Made in Heaven

conclusion to the Roseland NYC Live version of PORTISHEAD’s “Strangers.”) “Mister Sun,” on the other hand, sounded almost like it could have been lifted from a children’s TV show with its twinkling glockenspiel and bright horns. While we don’t know when we’ll hear the final versions of these early singles, Miller confirmed via email that we should expect a ton of content to be released between now and the new record’s release. As VSO executive director BEN CADWALLADER told us in last week’s Soundbites, we can anticipate more crossover events in the future. You’d be wise to check out the next one — whatever it may be. Guster head off on a Midwest/East Coast tour this week, culminating with On the Ocean, their weekend fest in Portland, Maine, Friday through Sunday, August 3 through 5.

THU 7.26

Phil Lesh After Party

FRI 7.27

Tumble Down After Party

Jazz is PHSH

Mihali & Frends ft. Matisyahu

FRI 7.27

Charlie Parr

SAT 7.28

Tumble Down After Party

Everyone Orchestra

MON 7.30

Chris Webby

THU 8.2

No Small Children

FRI 8.3

ANoyd, Brodie Fresh, ROOK

Svvillbillie

First Friday

ft. Antara w/ Chris Cheney, DJ Llu, DJVU

SAT 8.4

Billy Bob Thornton & The Boxmasters

SUN 8.5

Descendents

THU 8.9

Mighty Mystic & The Hard Roots Movement

A Wilhelm Scream, Pavers

10.3 The Chris Robinson Brotherhood 10.6 Cat Power 10.19 Low Cut Connie 10.25 Aqueous 1214 Williston Road, South Burlington 802-652-0777 @higherground @highergroundmusic

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Toots & The Maytals

SEVEN DAYS

SOUNDBITES

104.7 The Point welcomes

07.25.18-08.01.18

COURTESY OF PHIN TOTTEN

99 Neighbors

Between rotating bands and DJs — not to mention foodstuffs literally by the truckload — ArtsRiot’s weekly Truck Stop is already a feast for the senses. But for this week’s edition on Friday, July 27, Burlington hip-hop and lifestyle collective 99 NEIGHBORS transform the venue’s performance space into a veritable show-and-tell of everything the crew has been working on for the last year. Called Open House, the loosely structured presentation culminates later in the evening with a group performance. “It’s a collection of all of the things that we’re working towards,” rapper HANKNATIVE, aka HANK COLLINS, tells Seven Days. “That’s clothing, that’s music, that’s graphic design-oriented [work].” We can expect video projections, paintings and specialty clothing to be in the mix. During the past year or so, a nebulous horde of MCs, producers, fashion designers, photographers, videographers and other artists has snowballed into what’s now known as 99 Neighbors. MCs Hanknative and SAM (PAULINO) and producer SOMBA are the most visible members. Formerly known as POSSIBLY HUMAN, the outfit made a strong impression in 2017 with Sam and Somba’s divine The South Cove EP. After wading through growing pains and a mild identity crisis, they’re just now unveiling what they’ve grown into over the past 12 months. “We, as musicians, kind of had no identity,” says Somba, real name CALEB HOH. He refers to the somewhat piecemeal string of singles and videos the collective uploaded to the web over the last year. “[We] just stopped wanting to say, ‘Hi, we’re possibly.’ We know we’re human, and I don’t like saying, ‘I’m possibly.’” “It was a working title,” adds Collins. The new name, 99 Neighbors, derives directly from the pack’s creative experience. “It’s a by-product of our lifestyle,” says Hoh. “We were living in one of the most jenk apartments I’ve ever seen.” “It was a trap,” says Collins. “It eventually invigorated this microscene,” says Hoh. “Next thing we know,

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Holy crap. That’s what I kept thinking during (and after) GUSTER’s mindblowing collaboration with the VERMONT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA on Saturday. In front of a massive audience at the Shelburne Museum, the 29-piece classical ensemble supported the seasoned rockers in one of the most outstanding Vermont performances of 2018. Under the steady hand of conductor BENJAMIN KLEMME, music director of the VERMONT YOUTH ORCHESTRA, the two groups flowed with cohesive clarity. You’d never know that they’d had just one rehearsal prior to the show, earlier in the day on Saturday. Aside from being flooded with vivid sense memories and flashbacks to my teenage years — Guster’s beloved 1999 album Lost and Gone Forever came out when I was a junior in high school — my excitement for the band’s upcoming, untitled studio album was truly piqued. Guster front man and Williston resident RYAN MILLER made sure to note a pair of new songs, “Mind Kontrol” and “Mister Sun” — the titles of which could change, given that we’re likely still a ways off from the new album’s as-yet-unknown release date. Now, I haven’t heard the album versions yet, so what we heard on Saturday might not be an entirely accurate portrayal of how the songs will sound blaring out of your home stereo. But the new cuts couldn’t be more different from each other in terms of tone and overall vibe. Backed with all of the heft you’d expect from an orchestra’s string section, “Mind Kontrol” was a menacing maelstrom of pure, raw power. (I kept thinking of the thunderous, orchestral

WED 8.1

7/20/18 2:25 PM


music

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

Big Top In darkened alleyways, dusty back rooms

WED.25 burlington

and musty cellars lurks a nomadic troupe of misfits called

ARTSRIOT: This Is the Kit, Paper Castles (alt-rock), 8:30 p.m., $15.

PEOPLE LIKE YOU.

and accept any and all willing audiences. The Portsmouth,

HALF LOUNGE: DJ Craig Mitchell (house), 10 p.m., free.

folk.” Incorporating gypsy-infused rustic Americana

N.H., outfit describes its sound as “freewheelin’ freak-

JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

and punk-rock elements into its gnarly sound, the group

JUNIPER: The Ray Vega Latin Jazz Sextet, 8:30 p.m., free.

sounds like the house band at a haunted carnival. It conjures brethren such as DeVotchKa, Bella’s Bartok and

LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Dayve Huckett (jazz), 7 p.m., free.

Man Man. Catch People Like You on Friday, July 27, at

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Irish Sessions (traditional), 7 p.m., free. Tom Pearo (ambient, jazz), 9:30 p.m., $5.

Charlie-O’s World Famous in Montpelier. DRINK: Downstairs Comedy Open Mic, 8 p.m., free.

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Open Mic with Andy Lugo, 9 p.m., free.

FINNIGAN’S PUB: DJ Craig Mitchell (open format), 10 p.m., free.

NECTAR’S: Swimmer, Litz (jam), 8 p.m., free/$5. 18+. RADIO BEAN: Jonathan Foster (folk), 7 p.m., free. Hailey Ward (indie pop), 8:30 p.m., free. Vermont, Days on End, APB (alternative), 10:30 p.m., free. RED SQUARE: Roughhead Blenny (rock), 7 p.m., free. DJ Cre8 (open format), 11 p.m., free. RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: Gypsy Reel (traditional Irish), 7:30 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Hotel Karaoke, 9 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Justin Panigutti (rock), 7 p.m., free.

chittenden county CITY SPORTS GRILLE: Interactive Video Trivia with Top Hat Entertainment, 7:30 p.m., free.

FRI.27 // PEOPLE LIKE YOU [FREAK-FOLK]

HALF LOUNGE: SVPPLY & Bankz (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: Bluegrass Session, 7 p.m., free. MONKEY HOUSE: Ellen Degenerates, Shining Mirrors (indie rock), 8:45 p.m., $3/8. 18+. STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Open Mic Night, 7:30 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Rhetta Morgan (gospel), 6 p.m., free. CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: All Request Video, 9 p.m., free. SWEET MELISSA’S: D. Davis (acoustic), 5:30 p.m., donation. Toussaint (poetry, jazz), 8 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

IDLETYME BREWING COMPANY: The Idletyme Band (blues, rock), 8 p.m., free.

MOOGS PLACE: Jim Charanko (Americana), 7:30 p.m., free.

07.25.18-08.01.18 SEVEN DAYS West End Blend

northeast kingdom

LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Queen City Hot Club (gypsy jazz), 7 p.m., free.

outside vermont

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Randal Pierce (jazz), 7 p.m., free. Shane Hardiman Trio (jazz), 8:30 p.m., $5-10.

PARKER PIE CO.: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury ZENBARN: Zach Nugent’s Acoustic Dead (Grateful Dead tribute), 7 p.m., free.

MONOPOLE: Open Mic with Lucid, 10 p.m., free.

OLIVE RIDLEY’S: Completely Stranded (improv), 7:30 p.m., free.

middlebury area CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Video Game Night, 7 p.m., free.

champlain islands/northwest

THU.26

BAYSIDE PAVILION: The Starline Rhythm Boys (rockabilly), 6 p.m., free.

burlington

NORTH HERO HOUSE INN & RESTAURANT: The DuPont Brothers (folk), 5:30 p.m., free.

ARTSRIOT: Jeff Rosenstock, Sean Bonnette, Worriers (punk), 8:30 p.m., $15.

COURTESY OF READY FOR THE AFTERGLOW

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Femi Kuti & the Positive Force, Jupiter & Okwess (Afrobeat), 8:30 p.m., $30/33.

64 MUSIC

Their ambiguous name seems to invite

CLUB METRONOME: Kastaway, D Fuego, Abstractivve, PATH (EDM), 9 p.m., free/$5. 18+.

NECTAR’S: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. RADIO BEAN: Hayley Harrington (Ransom Pier) and Josey Blue (folk), 5:30 p.m., free. Hayes Peebles, Dead Gowns (folk-rock, Americana), 7 p.m., free. Mosa (singer-songwriter), 9 p.m., free. Roots, Rhythm & Dub (reggae fusion), 10:30 p.m., free. RED SQUARE: Joe Agnello Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free. D Jay Baron (mashup, hip-hop), 11 p.m., free. RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ Cre8 (open format), 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Nina’s Brew (roots, blues), 10 p.m., free.

Mix It Up « P.62 think he would be. Knowing the pain that he was probably in, it was unbelievable that he was still willing to come and talk to people afterwards. He was so kind. He took a picture with each of us. Signed a CD. All the typical fangirl/fanboy things. He told me — and I’m trying to remember exactly how he said it — he really loved my voice. He said something like, “You got it.” And that was just pretty unreal. SD: I’m sure you know that you’re one of only a few women playing Tumble Down. Given that West End Blend works the male-dominated jam circuit, I imagine this isn’t your first time being one of the few. Without casting judgment on why that might be, I wonder how that makes you feel.

chittenden county

BACKSTAGE PUB & RESTAURANT: Trivia, 9:30 p.m., free. HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Jazz is PHISH featuring the Chase Brothers, Dave Grippo, Felix Pastorius, Chris Bullock, Josh Dobbs, Ryan Dempsey (Phish tribute), 11 p.m., $15/20. ON TAP BAR & GRILL: The Jeff Salisbury Band (blues), 7 p.m., free. STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Jonathan Foster (folk, Americana), 7:30 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Italian Session (traditional), 6 p.m., free. SWEET MELISSA’S: Thomas Gunn (singer-songwriter), 6 p.m., free. The Siren and the Waves (singer-songwriter), 8 p.m., free. WHAMMY BAR: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Open Mic with Allen Church, 8:30 p.m., free. THU.26

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EB: I think, when that was pointed out to me, I [felt] a combination of pride and a little extra confidence — but also a little bit of pressure. I don’t want to think of myself  in any way as an ambassador of an entire group of people. [But] most of the time, it doesn’t really cross my mind — possibly because it’s so prevalent. I think it is an honor to be able to share that space with artists like Hayley Jane and the Primates. Hayley Jane is always this magnanimous, vibrant force of positive change and very feminist. When I get onstage, all I know is that, if women and girls who go to this festival have been seeing a lot of male front people, and they see me, I hope there’s a light bulb that goes on. SD: I don’t want to put words in your mouth, but I imagine the same


GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

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UNDbites

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all of these artists were coming through, making music and painting there.” On the horizon, Hanknative’s first “cohesive body of work,” tentatively titled Problem Child, should be released at some point in the not-too-distant future. You’re likely to hear a preview during Friday’s performance.

Major Thet

COOLER IN THE MOUNTAINS Free Outdoor Concert Series

Listening In If I were a superhero, my superpower would be the ability to get songs stuck in other people’s heads. Here are five songs that have been stuck in my head this week. May they also get stuck in yours. Follow sevendaysvt on Spotify for weekly playlists with tunes by artists featured in the music section. CHAOS CHAOS, “Do You Feel It?” WET, “Weak” AMBER MARK, “Love Me Right” MARTIN CARR, “The Main Man” KIMBRA, “Top of the World (Featuring Snoop Dogg)”

“Got a song? Send it along. We don’t discriminate,” reads a post on WDL’s website. With criteria as scant as that, I don’t see any good reason why any music-makers reading this shouldn’t proffer a track. WDL’s last comp, 2016’s Hot Garbage & Sunscreen, leans heavily toward alternative (and really alternative) rock sounds — but no genres are specified in the submission guidelines for the new collection. The submission period ends August 15. Visit whatdothlife.com for more info. 

INFO West End Blend perform on Saturday, July 28, as part of the Tumble Down music festival at Waterfront Park in Burlington. Gates open at 3 p.m. $42/47. AA. highergroundmusic.com

Details at killington.com/cooler

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Josh Ritter & the Royal City Band Anaïs Mitchell Daniel Rodriguez of Elephant Revival with

VT Busker acts:

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Dan and Modou Danza Del Fuego Last Train to Zinkov The Dupont Brothers Abby Sherman Reid

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SD: What do you think about all-women festivals? I imagine some might think they’re essential, but I’ve heard others say that all-women festivals turn

Contact: jordan@sevendaysvt.com

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HAYLEY JANE & THE PRIMATES

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“women-fronted” or “womencentric” into a de facto genre, which some view as even more marginalizing. EB: To just have a space where you’re not being judged as a woman — it’s the same as any sort of pride parade or thing that elevates any sort of group of people. It’s not about you as the majority feeling oppressed by this thing that you think marginalizes that group of people. It’s about them having a place to express themselves freely. To feel represented is invaluable. 

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can be said for jam audiences and people of color onstage. EB: Mm-hmm. Even more so. That actually is something I think about possibly even more than just being a front woman in the jam scene. [I’m] a black front woman in the jam and funk scene. There are some [others]. Erica Falls [of ] Galactic, and Chaka Khan, if you want to think of another generation of incredible artists who I deeply admire. I just want to see more of it. I want somebody to come to this festival and say, “Hey, this is something different that I haven’t seen yet.”

Grab a lawn chair and join us Saturdays through September 1st from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Roaring Brook Umbrella Bar in the K-1 Base Area.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

You have not been to enough festivals yet this summer. Don’t try to argue. Don’t give me excuses. In two days, just pack up your car and head down to Thetford for Thetfest. Over Friday and Saturday, July 27 and 28, tons of kickass artists — many of them VT-based — rock the Upper Valley shindig. The eclectic lineup should please a wide range of tastes: jam staples SWIMMER, indie darlings J BENGOY and avant-garde auteur GREG DAVIS, among others, are on board — not to mention ANIMAL COLLECTIVE founding member DEAKIN. Also of note is Montréal-based ambient composer KARA-LIS COVERDALE, who was scheduled to perform in Burlington last year as part of Davis’/Soundtoys’ Signals Series. Coverdale unfortunately had to cancel for visa-related issues. Those hoping to get an earful of her celestial compositions last summer should take note of this second chance. In addition to curating the festival, the folks at Windsor-based recording co-op What Doth Life seek submissions for a new compilation.

Long Trail Brewing presents

sprucepeakarts.org Spruce Peak Folk Untitled-28 1 Festival Quarter Page.indd 1

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music THU.26

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mad river valley/ waterbury

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Jeff & Colleen (rock), 5 p.m., free. The Hitmen (rock), 9 p.m., free.

TUE.31 // BIT BRIGADE PERFORM THE LEGEND OF ZELDA [ROCK]

barre/montpelier

LOCALFOLK SMOKEHOUSE: Open Mic with Alex Budney, 8:30 p.m., free.

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Irish Session, 2 p.m., donation.

middlebury area

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Zeus Springsteen, Secret Family (rock), 9 p.m., free.

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Open Mic, 6:30 p.m., free.

DEMENA’S: Bella and the Notables (jazz), 8 p.m., $5.

northeast kingdom

GUSTO’S: The Thunderballs featuring NL Dennis (reggae), 9:30 p.m., free.

HIGHLAND LODGE: Trivia Night, 6:30 p.m., free. PARKER PIE CO.: Geoff Hewitt Poetry and Music Slam, 7:30 p.m., free.

MINGLE NIGHTCLUB: Mardi Gras in July with DJ LaFountaine (hits), 9 p.m., $5.

outside vermont

SWEET MELISSA’S: Eli West (singer-songwriter), 6 p.m., free. Sweet M’s Hot Mess (open-stage burlesque), 9 p.m., free.

OLIVE RIDLEY’S: Karaoke with DJ Jon Berry & DJ Coco, 9 p.m., free.

THE DEN AT HARRY’S HARDWARE: Ricky Golden (rock), 7 p.m., free.

FRI.27

WHAMMY BAR: Second Wife (Americana), 7 p.m., free.

burlington

stowe/smuggs

ARTSRIOT: 99 Neighbors (hip-hop), 9:30 p.m., free. BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD: Warm Water (soul, jazz), 8:30 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. JUNIPER: DJ Cre8 (open format), 9 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: House Ways and Means, Mother Octopus (chamber jazz), 7:30 p.m., $5. DJ Disco Phantom (eclectic dance), 11 p.m., $5. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: DJ Moar Mead (house, hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

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07.25.18-08.01.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NECTAR’S: Seth Yacovone (solo acoustic blues), 7 p.m., free. RADIO BEAN: Friday Morning Sing-Along with Linda Bassick & Friends (kids’ music), 11 a.m., free. Happy Hour with DJ Ryan Kick (eclectic), 4 p.m., free. Lady Mondegreen (witch-lounge), 7 p.m., free. Ian Steinberg (indie folk), 8:30 p.m., free. Kuf Knotz and Christine Elise (hip-hop, soul), 10 p.m., $5. Safety Squad (jazz), 11:30 p.m., $5. RED SQUARE: Zach Rhoads (singer-songwriter), 4 p.m., free. Discoliscious (disco), 7 p.m., free. DJ Craig Mitchell (open format), 11 p.m., free. RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ KermiTT (eclectic), 10 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Justin LaPoint (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free. Rekkon (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

MOOGS PLACE: Mark LeGrand (honky-tonk), 9 p.m., free.

Playing With Power You played games on the original Nintendo Entertainment System until

TRES AMIGOS & RUSTY NAIL STAGE: Girls Night Out the Show (all-male revue), 9:30 p.m., $21.95/39.95.

you also know the game system’s classic, 8-bit soundtracks by heart. Relive your childhood obsession with a little help

mad river valley/ waterbury

your eyes bled. Not only do you know how to access hidden levels, beat every boss and find special power-ups, but from BIT BRIGADE. The Athens, Ga.-based instrumental rock group reimagines classic NES scores and brings them to life with staggering heft. On the heels of reinventing the music of Mega Man II and Castlevania, the bandmates take on the epic role-playing adventure game The Legend of Zelda. Cast off with Bit Brigade on Tuesday, July 31, at ArtsRiot in Burlington. Locals DOOM SERVICE open.

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Charlie Parr (folk), 8 p.m., $12/15. JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: Robin Gottfried Band (rock), 7 p.m., free. MONKEY HOUSE: Dark Star Project (Grateful Dead tribute), every third Friday, 5 p.m., free. ON TAP BAR & GRILL: The Natural Selection (rock), 5 p.m., free. Shane Murley Band (Americana), 9 p.m., free. STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Deep River Saints (folk-rock), 7:30 p.m., free. WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: Dakota (hip-hop), 9 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): The Melting Nomads (rock, funk), 10 p.m., free.

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: John Smyth (singer-songwriter), 6 p.m., free. People Like You (freak-folk), 9 p.m., free.

chittenden county

ESPRESSO BUENO: Bueno Comedy Showcase, 8:30 p.m., $8.

BACKSTAGE PUB & RESTAURANT: Karaoke with Jenny Red, 9 p.m., free.

THE DOUBLE E LOUNGE AT ESSEX CINEMAS & T-REX THEATER: Kind Bud’s Kind Dubs (rock), 6 p.m., free. HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Mihali & Frends featuring Matisyahu (jam), 11 p.m., $18/23.

GUSTO’S: Joe Sabourin (singersongwriter), 5 p.m., free. Lazer Dad (rock covers), 9 p.m., $5. MINGLE NIGHTCLUB: Mardi Gras in July with DJ Triple-J (hits), 9 p.m., $5. SWEET MELISSA’S: Honky Tonk Happy Hour with Mark LeGrand, 5:30 p.m., free. Dark Star Project

(Grateful Dead tribute), 9 p.m., $5. WHAMMY BAR: Blackwater Trio (Americana), 7 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Chris Lyon (solo acoustic, Americana), 6 p.m., free. Abby Sherman (Album Release) (Americana), 8 p.m., free. TRES AMIGOS & RUSTY NAIL STAGE: Ron Jeremy (storytelling, comedy), 9 p.m., $20/40.

mad river valley/ waterbury ZENBARN: Tom Pearo Trio (ambient, jazz), 9 p.m., $3.

middlebury area

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Toast (rock), 9:30 p.m., free.

champlain islands/northwest TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: AmerikanaBlue (Americana), 7 p.m., free.

upper valley

THE ENGINE ROOM: Fu’Chunk (funk, soul), 8 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom outside vermont

RADIO BEAN: Jamie Kalestad (singer-songwriter), 5:30 p.m., free. Prateek (indie folk), 7 p.m., free. Disco Ball and 3-Year Taka-versary (eclectic vinyl), 9 p.m., $5.

MONOPOLE DOWNSTAIRS: Happy Hour Tunes & Trivia with Gary Peacock, 5 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE: Left Eye Jump (blues), 3 p.m., free. Good Trees River Band (psychedelic fusion), 7 p.m., free. Mashtodon (hip-hop), 11 p.m., free.

NAKED TURTLE: Craig Hurwitz (acoustic rock), 6 p.m., free. Glass Onion (The Tragically Hip tribute), 9 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ Raul (salsa, reggaeton), 6 p.m., free. DJ ATAK (house, techno), 11 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Helen Hummel (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free.

SIDEBAR: T-Rextasy (indie), 8 p.m., free. Dakota (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

SAT.28

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Kuf Knotz and Christine Elise (hip-hop, soul), 8 p.m., free.

HIGHLAND LODGE: Blue Fox (blues), 7 p.m., free.

MONOPOLE: Peak (psychedelic, funk), 10 p.m., free.

burlington

BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD: James Harvey (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free. FOAM BREWERS: B-Town (rock, blues), 5 p.m., free. HALF LOUNGE: Gordon Goldsmith (singer-songwriter), 8 p.m., free. Parks, Gunn, D-Lav, Matt Mus (house), 10 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. JUNIPER: Lowell Thompson (alt-country), 9 p.m., free.

SMITTY’S PUB: Ryan Hanson (rock, country), 8 p.m., free.

chittenden county HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Everyone Orchestra (jam), 11 p.m., $18/23.

JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: Hot Box Honey (swing, Latin), 7 p.m., free. MONKEY HOUSE: Iron Chic, Doom Service, the Path (punk), 7:30 p.m., $12/15.

ZENBARN: Drunk & in the Woods (funk, soul), 9 p.m., $3.

middlebury area

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: DJ Earl (open format), 9:30 p.m., free.

champlain islands/northwest TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: Waves of Adrenaline (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free.

upper valley

THE ENGINE ROOM: Troy Ramey (soul-rock), 8:30 p.m., $12/15.

outside vermont MONOPOLE: The Bayrats (funk-rock), 10 p.m., free.

NAKED TURTLE: Glass Onion (The Tragically Hip tribute), 9 p.m., free. Barbie-N-Bones (rock), 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Heatwave Burlesque, 9 p.m., $15/18.

SUN.29 burlington

HALF LOUNGE: STRYTLLR (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Game Night, 7 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Mi Yard Reggae Night with DJs Big Dog and Jahson, 9 p.m., free.

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GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

REVIEW this Pappy, Back to the Basics (SELF-RELEASED, CD, DIGITAL DOWNLOAD)

There are a few basic tenets for good bluegrass. Well, depending on your level of adeptness in the field, there are probably a lot of tenets. I don’t have that many: I want songs that make me feel like I’m right smackdab in the fucking Blue Ridge Mountains; I want songs about being lonely as hell; I want ripping mandolin and banjo; and I want to be transported to a magical place from another time. Maybe that’s just me. Either way, the good news for this guy is that Pappy’s new EP, Back to the Basics, checks off the whole list and then some. Pappy, aka Pappy Biondo, is starting a second phase of his career. The acclaimed banjo player and songwriter was once part of the Pennsylvania-based progressive jam-grass outfit Cabinet, which went on indefinite hiatus in 2017. Where that

group was renowned for its fusion of styles, Pappy has embraced tradition on his new five-song EP. The title track lays it all on the line. Clearly, Pappy was feeling things had become a bit complicated at some point — either musically or in life, or both. He’s found the answers to those troubling questions by simplifying. “Well, back to the basics you should go / gonna find out what is ailing you,” Pappy sings as his new band soars behind him, twisting and turning. A newly minted Vermonter, Pappy has assembled quite a lineup of local musicians, including Matt Flinner on mandolin, Pat Melvin on upright bass, Caleb Elder on fiddle and Doug Perkins on guitar. If those names alone don’t alert you to the highlevel chops on display here, consider this: After a session to work out arrangements, the group — along with Pappy himself on banjo and vocals — went into Dan Davine’s Essex Junction recording studio and put the whole EP on analog tape. Live.

No overdubs. No digital trickery. And it sounds immaculate. The back-to-basics approach highlights both the prowess of the band and the charm of Pappy’s songs. “Poorman’s Blues” and “Leave Me Lonley” both hit some of my prerequisites for the genre. The former is an oldfashioned “it sucks to be poor” tune, which borders on being an anthem about escaping gentrification. The latter cut is your traditional “my lady cheated on me, so I drowned her” yarn. The murder ballad is, generally speaking, a bit of a played-out trope, but the mournful nature of this song carries it through. The final two tracks are hot-fire instrumentals that let both Pappy’s expert banjo picking and his band’s prowess come to the fore. But I was honestly sold about 15 seconds in on this record. The spirit Pappy is going for on the EP — returning to one’s roots, keeping it simple to survive — he embodies instantaneously. Back to the Basics is available at pappymusic.com. Pappy performs with his full band this Friday, July 27, at Burlington’s Waterfront Park as part of Twiddle’s Tumble Down music festival.

CHRIS FARNSWORTH

COMEDY

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Question the MC & ILLu, Textbook (EQUAL EYES RECORDS, DIGITAL DOWNLOAD)

THU 2 | FRI 3 | SAT 4

CHRIS

GETHARD THU 9 | FRI 10 | SAT 11

JAMIE

LEE

SORRY WE’RE

CLOSED JULY 22ND - JULY 31ST

ORDER YOUR TICKETS TODAY! (802) 859-0100 | WWW.VTCOMEDY.COM 101 main street, BurlingtoN

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YOU A VT ARTIST OR BAND? SEND US YOUR MUSIC! DIGITAL: MUSIC@SEVENDAYSVT.COM; GET YOUR MUSIC REVIEWED: ARE SNAIL MAIL: MUSIC C/O SEVEN DAYS 255 S. CHAMPLAIN ST., SUITE 5, BURLINGTON, VT 05401

A WEEK

SEVEN DAYS

JUSTIN BOLAND

5 NIGHTS

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Finally, Colby Stiltz comes through for “Who” and delivers a funny, clever and raw verse. It’s obvious that these artists all respect Question the MC enough to bring their A-plus game. Speaking of which, ILLu’s production work shines throughout Textbook. He consistently nails a lush, timeless tone, and the beats are mostly bright soul-chop bangers. The exceptions are exceptional, such as the crushing, cinematic “Up in Your Home,” which hits like RZA back in his Wu-Tang Forever prime. Closing cut “The Strategy” inverts a familiar movie theme into a perfect canvas for Question the MC to deliver one of his strongest performances. As the first rap album released on Equal Eyes Records, Textbook is a home run. It fits the imprint’s emerging aesthetic perfectly, too. Question the MC & ILLu go against the grain of contemporary rap fads to deliver an uncompromising vision. The result is a mature, thoughtful LP with top-notch production. Anyone who appreciates beats and rhymes should give Textbook a listen. Textbook is available at equaleyesrecords.bandcamp.com.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Burlington producers ILLu and Rico James launched their hip-hop label, Equal Eyes Records, in March and have been hustling hard ever since. Textbook, by the new tandem of Question the MC & ILLu, is the label’s fourth release in as many months. The album suggests a promising future for both artists and label. On the mic, Question the MC’s deadpan delivery is reminiscent of Boston legend Guru, best known for his work with Gang Starr. The rapper is a firm believer in hip-hop as life education, and every track here features hard-won advice from a man who knows that doing the right thing is easier said than done. It ain’t hard to tell that Textbook was patterned after hip-hop’s most iconic debut LP: Illmatic, by New York City rapper Nas. Both boast 10 tracks and are deeply personal albums. And Textbook actually opens with a two-minute sample

of Nas discussing his early inspirations, challenges and love for music. That might sound like a heavy-handed approach. But in the context of the duo’s album, it’s an inspired move. As the tracks unfold, it becomes clear the intro is more than just a tribute — the monologue establishes the themes that shape the album. Textbook is about the challenges of negotiating adulthood, the importance of family and fanatical devotion to hip-hop as an art form. The guest appearances on Textbook reaffirm those ideas. (They also reflect the close-knit scene that’s grown out of Anthill Collective’s monthly 3rd Thursdays event at the Monkey House in Winooski.) First up is Humble, local farmer and member of Bless the Child, on “Far Reaches.” It’s a funky, melodic track, and the two rappers have real chemistry. “Visions of the Past” is a bluntly intimate song about friendships falling apart. It’s a perfect showcase for Drive, a standout newcomer who makes the most of the opportunity.

7/23/18 4:57 PM

7/12/18 12:12 PM


CLUB DATES

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RADIO BEAN: Traditional Pub Sing-Along, 3:30 p.m., free. Jason Baker (singer-songwriter), 6 p.m., free. Shawna Rice (soul), 7:30 p.m., free. Cup of Comedy: A Standup Showcase, 9 p.m., free. JULIA. (funk), 11 p.m., free. RED SQUARE: John Lackard Blues Band, 7 p.m., free. DJ Max Jade (open format), 11 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: DJ A-RA$ (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Bluegrass Brunch, noon, free.

barre/montpelier

POSITIVE PIE TAP & GRILL: Elle Carpenter and Colin McCaffrey (Americana), 6 p.m., $5-20. SWEET MELISSA’S: Black Water Trio (Americana), 6 p.m., free. Live Band Karaoke, 8 p.m., donation.

middlebury area ROUGH CUT: Kelly Ravin (country), 5 p.m., free.

outside vermont

NAKED TURTLE: Barbie-N-Bones (rock), 10 p.m., free.

MON.30 burlington

HALF LOUNGE: Four-D (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Lamp Shop Lit Club (open reading), 8 p.m., free. Giovanina Bucci and Brad Hester (jam), 9:30 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: Hailey Ward (indie pop), 7 p.m., free. Sour Widows (rock), 8:30 p.m., free. Lines in the Sky (progressive rock, alternative), 10:30 p.m., free. The Twotakes (alt-rock), midnight, free. RED SQUARE: DJ KermiTT (eclectic), 7 p.m., free. SVPPLY (hip-hop), 11 p.m., free.

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THE SPOT ON THE DOCK: DJ Disco Phantom (eclectic dance), every other Wednesday, 5 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Comedy & Crêpes (standup), 8 p.m., free.

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Carmen Lagala (standup), 8:30 p.m., $8.

chittenden county

chittenden county CITY SPORTS GRILLE: Interactive Video Trivia with Top Hat Entertainment, 7:30 p.m., free.

HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Chris Webby (hip-hop), 8:30 p.m., $20-50.

MONKEY HOUSE: Erin CasselsBrown (indie folk), 6 p.m., free.

HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Toots & the Maytals (rocksteady, reggae), 8:30 p.m., $32/35.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Seth Yacovone (blues), 7 p.m., free.

TUE.31

barre/montpelier

WED.1 // TOOTS & THE MAYTALS [ROCKSTEADY, REGGAE]

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: All Request Video, 9 p.m., free.

Pressure Drop One of the most established and recognizable names

burlington

ARTSRIOT: Bit Brigade perform ‘The Legend of Zelda,’ Doom Service (rock), 8:30 p.m., $10. DRINK: Comedy Open Mic, 9 p.m., free.

in ska and rocksteady music,

TOOTS & THE MAYTALS

have been skankin’ it up since the

1960s. Hailing from the genre’s epicenter of Kingston, Jamaica, the pioneering outfit is sometimes credited with popularizing the term “reggae,” which appeared in the title of its 1968 track, “Do the Reggay.” The group’s lineup has changed over the years

FOAM BREWERS: Local Dork (eclectic vinyl), 6 p.m., free.

— except for front man Toots Hibbert. Five decades after the band’s inception, his legacy

HALF LOUNGE: Moochie (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

echoes through the broad spectrum of popular music. Toots & the Maytals perform on

LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Cody Sargent Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free.

Wednesday, August 1, at the Higher Ground Ballroom in South Burlington.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Everyday Museum, Coco (indie rock), 9 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Ukulele Kids with Joe Baird (sing-along), 9:30 a.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

chittenden county

middlebury area

LINCOLNS: Laugh Shack (standup), 8:30 p.m., $5. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Knights of the Brown Table (Ween tribute), 9:30 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Dead Set (Grateful Dead tribute), 9 p.m., $5. RADIO BEAN: Open Mic with Eric George, 7 p.m., free. Honky Tonk Tuesday with Ponyhustle, 10 p.m., $5. RED SQUARE: Four-D (house, hip-hop), 7 p.m., free. DJ A-RA$ (open format), 10 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Sean Kehoe (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free. Ron Stoppable (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

MONKEY HOUSE: The Full Cleveland (yacht rock), 9 p.m., free.

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Trivia with Top Hat Entertainment, 7 p.m., free. WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

MOOGS PLACE: Cal Stanton (acoustic), 7:30 p.m., free.

HATCH 31: Erin Cassels-Brown (indie folk), 6 p.m., free. Kelly Ravin and Lowell Thompson (country), 7 p.m., free.

outside vermont

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Irish Sessions (traditional), 7 p.m., free. Violet Bell (folk, eclectic), 9:30 p.m., free. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Open Mic with Andy Lugo, 9 p.m., free. RADIO BEAN: Heavy Gaze (indie), 5:30 p.m., free. Ensemble V (jazz), 7 p.m., free. Grant Wallace Band (folk), 8:30 p.m., free. The Wiseacres (eclectic), 10:30 p.m., free. Way of the Headband (alternative rock), midnight, free. RED SQUARE: DJ Cre8 (open format), 11 p.m., free.

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Karaoke with DJ Vociferous, 9:30 p.m., free.

WED.1

SWEET MELISSA’S: Gold Tooth Gator (blues), 5 p.m., free. Blue Fox’s Open Mic, 7 p.m., free.

JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: Gypsy Reel (traditional Irish), 7:30 p.m., free.

burlington

JUNIPER: The Ray Vega Quartet (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free.

SIDEBAR: Hotel Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

SWEET MELISSA’S: D. Davis (acoustic), 5:30 p.m., donation.

stowe/smuggs

IDLETYME BREWING COMPANY: The Idletyme Band (blues, rock), 8 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury ZENBARN: Zach Nugent’s Acoustic Dead (Grateful Dead tribute), 7 p.m., free.

middlebury area CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

champlain islands/northwest

BAYSIDE PAVILION: The Starline Rhythm Boys (rockabilly), 6 p.m., free. NORTH HERO HOUSE INN & RESTAURANT: Carol Ann Jones Duet (country, rock), 5:30 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom PARKER PIE CO.: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

outside vermont MONOPOLE: Open Mic with Lucid, 10 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Video Game Night, 7 p.m., free. m

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SEVEN DAYS

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Rubblebucket

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ECCENTRIC INDIE POP BAND WITH VERMONT ROOTS

JULY 12

Natalie Prass

GROOVY UP AND COMING ARTIST WITH JOYOUS POP ACCESSIBILITY

07.25.18-08.01.18

JULY 19

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SEVEN DAYS

Low Cut Connie

HIGH ENERGY ROCK BAND WITH AN INFECTIOUS LIVE SHOW

NO ALCOHOL OR GLASS CONTAINERS ALLOWED

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art

Home Truths W

Artist Alison Weld talks about abstraction, domesticity and autobiography B Y RA CHEL ELI ZA BET H JONES

domestic materials to merge her neo-expressionist style with considerations of house, home and gender roles. She would maintain that commitment for the next four decades of her career. Now 65, Weld has been based in Westport, N.Y., full time since 2009. Last year she had her first showing of works in Vermont, when BigTown Gallery director and curator Anni Mackay included several of Weld’s pieces in her two-part homage to founding surrealist André Breton. This summer, Mackay featured Weld in “Light Field,” a small solo exhibition in the Rochester gallery’s

project space. Next Friday, August 3, a Weld retrospective, titled “Inner Essentials,” will open at Burlington’s New City Galerie. Vermont artist Susan Smereka curated the show. To date, Weld estimates she’s mounted 26 or 27 solo exhibitions — just under half of them this year. She joins other mid-to-late-career female artists who are currently enjoying a belated response to their creative outputs. In anticipation of her New City Galerie exhibition, Seven Days spoke with Weld about her career, her recent foray into “pure abstraction,” and being a woman and an artist.

COURTESY OF NEW CITY GALERIE

e live in a brave new world. Among the many, many strange cultural twists we’ve seen of late is a slogan shirt in Dior’s 2018 line that references a question posed by feminist art historian Linda Nochlin in 1971: “Why have there been no great women artists?” Eight years after Nochlin’s brilliant provocation, 26-year-old Alison Weld, a graduate of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, moved to New York and began painting on shower curtains. Working in the shadow of the notoriously male-associated abstract expressionism movement, Weld deliberately used

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

“Field to Field 1”

I DON’T MAKE DECORATIVE ABSTRACTION.

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AL I S O N W E LD

“Eye of Spring 1”

“Shell of Silence 4”

SEVEN DAYS: Does being both a woman and an artist mean something different to you now than it did earlier in your career? ALISON WELD: I’ve always wanted to discuss myself as a female, and so I starting painting with disposable chopsticks in 1979. When I was new to New York, I painted on shower curtains because I wanted to make a reference to the domestic history of the female. I still paint with chopsticks now. When I was in my twenties, it was a very male-dominated world, and I didn’t feel as if I could have children. I think there were a handful of woman artists who felt the same way, that they couldn’t do both: have a serious body of work and have a family. So that was a difficult life choice to make. But I’m from a very large family and helped raise my younger siblings as the oldest girl in a family of six kids. [So] I didn’t love the idea of having a family. I think I’m not painting female consciousness these days — I’m really talking about old age, which is shared by everyone. SD: Tell me about your most recent works, the “Liminal Series.” AW: I started the “Liminal Series” in December of 2016. The [works are] about the spirit, the soul, the light of a hayfield where my studio is. It’s pure abstraction,


ART SHOWS

you know. I had just finished treatments for breast cancer. I felt spiritually very strong. When I was dealing with the treatments, I didn’t paint at all. Chemotherapy is very difficult to go through. I suppose I feel really good about doing pure painting; I find it soulful. I guess, living on 30 acres of a hayfield, I don’t think as much about external society as I did when I was living in the greater New York area and Jersey City. Then, I thought about external society throughout the day, and so I made these [“Home Economics”] diptychs.

TALKING ART

SD: The structure of your career seems very focused on series as discrete entities. Can you talk about this? AW: I have discrete bodies of work from my early neo-expressionism shower curtains to the “Striations” I started in January of 1985, when I switched to oil paint. I used and still use a cold wax medium. Then I started to create these assemblages of paintings. I incorporated plants and pampas grasses before I started the “Home Economics” series. The “Tonal Variation” series I started in 2015 — that series definitely talks about myself; it’s autobiographical. I’m not saying it’s strictly female, because I don’t think it is. I have around 43 of those. I don’t want to use all of my previous paintings. Putting them together, there’s a lot of asymmetry in the juxtaposition. I’m very excited about this series. One of my aphorisms about abstraction is that a painting’s surface is a film of consciousness. That concept is evident in all of my work. I don’t make decorative abstraction. m

INFO “Alison Weld: Inner Essentials” opens Friday, August 3, at New City Galerie in Burlington with a reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Through October 25. newcitygalerie.org, alisonweld.com

‘ABUNDANCE: CELEBRATING CREATIVITY IN MENTAL HEALTH, WELLNESS AND RECOVERY’: The Clara Martin Center invites artists and friends of mental health to submit poetry and artworks to be considered for a fall exhibition. Applicants must be Vermont residents, and preference will be given to artists/writers in the White River and Upper valleys. Works must be ready to hang. For details and to submit, visit claramartin.org. Deadline: July 31. Chandler Gallery, Randolph. Info, dlittlepage@claramartin.org. ART IN THE PARK: Seeking vendors to show work and wares at this 57th annual event in Rutland’s Main Street Park on August 11 and 12 and October 6 and 7. For details and to apply, visit chaffeeartcenter.org. Deadline is rolling. Chaffee Art Center, Rutland. Info, 775-0356. ‘ART IS VITAL’: Artists interested in exhibiting work at a pop-up gallery space in downtown Rutland are invited to send a résumé, website and images to william. ramage@castleton.edu. Deadline: August 1. Info, 299-7511. ‘THE BURLINGTON BEAT’: The online literary arts magazine welcomes submissions of art, poetry and prose for the next edition. For details and to submit, visit burlingtonbeat. com. Deadline: August 20. Info, theburlingtonbeat@gmail.com. CALL TO ARTISTS AND FOOD VENDORS, FIRST NIGHT ST. JOHNSBURY: Now in its 26th year, First Night North is Vermont’s only New Year’s Eve performing arts festival, featuring music, dance, magic, circus arts, puppetry, comedy and more in 18 familyfriendly venues. First-time and former artist candidates are welcome to apply for a spot in this year’s lineup. All types of performance acts are welcome; must be family-friendly. To apply for one or two 45-minute performance slots, or as a food vendor, visit firstnightnorth.org. Deadline: August 19. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury. Info, 748-2600. CENTER FOR CARTOON STUDIES CORNISH RESIDENCY: Cartoonists, illustrators and graphic storytellers are invited to apply for this October 16 to November 16 residency in a remote cabin in Cornish, N.H. The selected resident will receive access to CCS resources as well as a $3,000 honorarium. For further details and to apply, visit cartoonstudies. org. Deadline: August 15. Center for Cartoon Studies, White River Junction. Info, 295-3319.

EN PLEIN AIR PAINTING FESTIVAL: The Vermont Institute of Natural Science will host its fourth annual en Plein Air Painting Festival from September 29 to October 5. This will be followed by a two-week exhibition and sale at the Quechee Nature Center. Visit vinsweb.org for more info. Deadline: August 19. Vermont Institute of Natural Science Nature Center, Quechee $40. Info, 359-5000, ext 236. FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS: Artists and artisans are invited to apply for a booth at the 10th annual sidewalk arts festival on August 11. For more information and to register, visit cambridgeartsvt.org/fota. Deadline is rolling. Downtown Jeffersonville. $40; $25 for students. Info, cambridgeartsvt@gmail.com. ‘FOR FREEDOMS’: The Vermont component of this national initiative seeks video art that relates to Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms: freedom of speech and worship, freedom from want and fear. Artists must live in Vermont full time or be a current student or alum of VCFA. For details and to submit, visit vcfa.edu. Deadline: August 20. Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier. Info, 828-8599. THE HUB AT BERLIN MALL: Artists and creatives of all types are invited to submit proposals to use flexible, rent-free space for up to 12 months. Interested parties can receive an application form at the mall manager’s office or by emailing thehub@ theberlinmall.com. Deadline is rolling. Berlin Mall. OPEN CALL 2018: Photographers are invited to submit works in any genre, style, capture method or process for this upcoming exhibition to be juried by Douglas Beasley. For details and to submit, visit photoplacegallery.com. Deadline: August 13. PhotoPlace Gallery, Middlebury. $35 for up to five images; $6 for each additional. Info, 388-4500. PENTANGLE LIGHT GARDEN: Individual artists and small groups from the community are invited to participate in this sixth annual illuminated sculpture event, taking place September 21 and 22. For more info and to register, email Serena Nelson at info@pentanglearts.org. Deadline: August 17. Woodstock Village Green. Info, info@ pentanglearts.org. ‘ROCK SOLID’: For the 18th year, area artists are invited to share their most compelling stone sculptures and assemblages, as well as paintings and etchings that depict the beautiful qualities of stone. For details and to submit, visit studioplacearts.com. Deadline: August 10. Studio Place Arts, Barre. $10; free for SPA members. Info, 479-7069.

SEEKING VISUAL ARTISTS FOR CHILDREN’S BOOK: Goddard master’s of arts in education student seeks to collaborate with visual artists working in all mediums to create a multimedia illustrated book for adults about talking with young children about racism and the myth of white supremacy. Respond with interest and examples of work to emma. redden@goddard.edu by July 31. Goddard College, Plainfield. ‘A SENSE OF PLACE’: The cultural center welcomes proposals for its fall programming season (September 1 to October 30) for workshops and events that build community through African American and/or African diaspora culinary, visual, performing and cultural arts. Artist stipends range from $200 to $1,500. For details and to apply, visit clemmonsfamilyfarm.org. Deadline: August 13. Clemmons Family Farm, Charlotte. Info, clemmonsfamilyfarm2art@gmail.com. SPA STUDIO RESIDENCY PROGRAM: Emerging artists from the greater Barre/ Montpelier area are invited to apply for an 11-month residency to take place from November 15, 2018, to October 31, 2019. A small private studio on the second floor of the visual arts center will be provided, with an exhibition at the end of the program. For details and to submit, visit studioplacearts. com/calls-to-artists. Deadline: Friday, August 10. Studio Place Arts, Barre. Info, 479-7069. STEAMFEST ART WALK: Seeking artists, artisans and makers working in all media including but not limited to 2D, 3D, video, data, sound, game design, installation, projection and performance for both indoor and outdoor venues as part of the second annual steAmfest art and innovation festival in Essex Junction on September 21 and 22. For details and to apply, visit steamfestvt. com. Deadline: September 7. Downtown Essex Junction. $35 before August 21; $50 after. Info, steamfestvt@gmail.com. STEAMFEST: ARTIST & MAKER MARKET: Second annual arts and innovation festival in downtown Essex Junction seeks innovative, creative, fine, wearable and edible arts and artisan goods for outdoor artist and maker market September 21 and 22. For details and to apply, visit steamfestvt.com. Deadline: September 7. Railroad Avenue, Essex Junction. $35. Info, steamfestvt@gmail.com.

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CALL TO ARTISTS

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E D G E WA T E R G A L L E R Y 6 merchants row • middlebur y • 802.989.7419 • edgewater galler y.co 7/20/18 1:24 PM


art « P.71 NEW THIS WEEK

Kate Longmaid Writing

for

burlington

Review

Los

CALL TO ARTISTS

THE ARTS COLLECTIVE: Works from a wide range of artists who receive and provide services through Howard Center, as well as artists with lived experience within the community. August 1-31. Info, 859-9222. Gallery at One Main in Burlington.

barre/montpelier

MARK DANNENHAUER: Photographs by the artist and former Bread and Puppet Theater member, featuring the circus’ recent work and archival photos featuring puppet kids. July 30-August 26. Info, ninots@crocker.com. Plainfield Community Center. SUMMER JURIED EXHIBIT: Featured artists include August Burns, Annie Christopher, Frank DeAngelis, Eddie Epstein, Hasso Ewing, Caroline McKinney, Maggie Neale, Sam Thurston, Ann Young and others. July 30-August 31. Info, 262-6035. T.W. Wood Gallery in Montpelier.

f VCFA MFA IN VISUAL ART EXHIBITION: Works in a variety of mediums by new and returning students. Reception: Wednesday, July 25, 7:15-8:30 p.m. July 26-31. Info, 866-934-VCFA. Alumni Hall, Vermont College of Fine Arts, in Montpelier.

upper valley

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

expand the role of femininity in art-making by reclaiming symbols and aesthetics that once signified

ONGOING SHOWS

frailty and coquetry.” The many

burlington

floral still lifes on view in “Bloom” at Shelburne’s Furchgott Sourdiffe

ALEX COSTANTINO: “Avalon,” landscape installations. Through July 28. Info, 578-2512. The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery in Burlington.

Gallery don’t necessarily constitute

f ANDREW SALKEWICZ: Paintings that represent

a politically radical body of work. But when held in consideration with Longmaid’s recent “Hear Our Voice” series of charged portraits of women, they provide a welcome overlap of aesthetic and political interests. Through August 21. Pictured: “Poppies.”

middlebury area

f TIMOTHY HORN: “The View From Here,” paintings of rural scenes. Reception: Friday, August 10, 5-7 p.m. August 1-31. Info, 989-7419. Edgewater Gallery on the Green in Middlebury. ‘AND JUSTICE FOR ALL: JUSTIN MORRILL AND THE 14TH AMENDMENT OF THE U.S. CONSTITUTION’: Commemorating the sesquicentennial of the ratification of the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, the exhibit highlights critical aspects of the amendment and elucidates Morrill’s role in drafting it, as well as major legal decisions based on the Equal Protection Clause. Info, 765-4288. Justin Morrill Homestead in Strafford. QUILT EXHIBITION: The 32nd annual exhibition featuring quilting demos, activities and “challenge quilts” by members of the Delectable Mountain Quilt Guild. July 28-September 16. Info, 457-2355. Billings Farm & Museum in Woodstock.

f ‘UNBOUND VOL. VIII’: A juried show exploring the book and how artists use the format as a stepping-off point and/or gateway to new ideas. Reception: Friday, July 27, 5:30-7:30 p.m. July 27-August 25. Info, 457-3500. ArtisTree Gallery in South Pomfret.

northeast kingdom

f JUDY DALES: Colorful quilts by the Northeast

Kingdom artist. Reception: Sunday, July 29, 4-7 p.m. Info, 563-2037. White Water Gallery in East Hardwick.

randolph/royalton

f JOHN KEMP LEE: “Wound Up Wound,” sculp-

tures conceived as spirit houses. Reception and artist talk: Sunday, July 29, 4 p.m. July 25-August 25. BigTown Gallery in Rochester.

VISUAL ART IN SEVEN DAYS:

WORKSHOP: PAINT WHAT YOU HEAR: MC Baker will lead artists of all levels to create a painting inspired by musical sounds and rhythms. Preregistration required. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, Monday, July 30, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Info, 878-4918.

retooling the flower in order to

99 NEIGHBORS OPEN HOUSE: A community event featuring a gallery of local artists, live painting, screening of short films, DJs and a live performance by Burlington hip-hop group 99 Neighbors. ArtsRiot, Burlington, Friday, July 27, 5:30-10 p.m. Info, possiblyhuman.booking@gmail.com.

of coastal wetlands by the Brookline, Mass., artist. Reception: Friday, August 10, 5-7 p.m. August 1-31. Info, 458-0098. Edgewater Gallery at Middlebury Falls.

07.25.18-08.01.18

Angella

d’Avignon observes, “Artists are

ART EVENTS

f ELLEN GRANTER: “High Tide,” recent paintings

SEVEN DAYS

Angeles,

Art

f VCFA MFA IN VISUAL ART GRADUATING

STUDENTS: An exhibition of works in a variety of mediums. Reception: Friday, July 27, 7:45-9:15 p.m. July 28-31. Info, 866-934-VCFA. College Hall Gallery, Vermont College of Fine Arts, in Montpelier.

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Contemporary

WORKSHOP: HOW TO CREATE AN EFFECTIVE BUSINESS PLAN: Artist and entrepreneur Corrina Thurston guides participants in building their creative business. Milton Art Center & Gallery, Thursday, July 26, 6-7:30 p.m. Info, bonnieandray216@gmail.com.

ART AT HAND TOUR: ‘IN THE GARDEN’: Visitors who are blind or visually impaired explore this exhibition with specially trained guides, hearing detailed descriptions of works of art and using tactile pieces related to the collections. Preregistration required at artathandinthegarden.eventbrite.com. Shelburne Museum, Friday, July 27, 8:30-10:30 a.m. Info, 985-3346 x3394. CANVAS, CORK AND CASCADE: An evening of plein air painting and flower pressing. BYOB and some friends for a relaxing evening of art in the gardens. Materials and brief instruction provided. Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park, Woodstock, Friday, July 27, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 457-3368. FOOD & ART FRIDAY: Wood-fired pizza, artistgrown produce, and visual art, storytelling and live performance by guest and resident artists. The Sable Project, Stockbridge, Friday, July 27, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Info, info@thesableproject.org. ‘FROM AWAY’: Curatorial initiative Overnight Projects activates the deserted motel with site-specific works by Wren Kitz, Angus McCullough, Sarah O Donnell, Charmaine Wheatley and Mary Zompetti. Sandbar Inn, South Hero, Friday, July 27, through Sunday, July 29, 4-9 p.m. Info, overnightprojects@gmail.com. MANDALA STONE PAINTING WORKSHOP: Artist and art therapist Gabrielle Hayward leads participants in creating two painted stones. Chaffee Art Center, Rutland, Wednesday, July 25, 6-8 p.m. $25; $20 for members. Info, 775-0356. ‘OUT OF OUR HANDS’ SALE: Second annual pottery open studio sale featuring the work of Sherry Corbin and Tamara Cameron, with weekend-long raku firing demos. Across the Grain Studio, South Hero, Saturday, July 28, and Sunday, July 29, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Info, 999-1891. STOWE ARTS WEEK: This inaugural event celebrates Stowe’s long history in performance, music, film and visual art with a wide variety of local arts and cultural organizations. Visit stoweartsweek. org for a full schedule. Various Stowe locations, Through July 29. Info, gallery@helenday.com.

ART LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY RACHEL ELIZABETH JONES. LISTINGS ARE RESTRICTED TO ART SHOWS IN TRULY PUBLIC PLACES.

SUMMER ARTIST MARKET: A juried market features handmade products by Vermont artists and artisans. Burlington City Hall Park, Saturday, July 28, 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 865-7166. TOURS OF THE HISTORIC BARN HOUSE AND EXHIBITS: Visitors can experience African American and African-diaspora art and culture, along with a granary and cow barn built between the late 1700s and early 1800s. The 90-minute tour includes authentic African textiles, art and antiquities, and photography exhibits; a Smithsonian National Museum of African-American History and Culture poster series; works by Charlotte environmental artist Nancy Winship Milliken, and more. Sign up for tour at Eventbrite. Clemmons Family Farm, Charlotte, Saturday, July 28, 10-11:30 a.m. $10 suggested donation. Info, vtcrocks@gmavt.net. TRUNK SHOW & SALE: More than 100 artists and artisans show and sell their wares, accompanied by demonstrations. Grand Isle Art Works, Saturday, July 28, and Sunday, July 29, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Info, 378-4591. VCFA MFA IN VISUAL ART SUMMER RESIDENCY: Artist-in-residence Gala Porras-Kim presents some of her past and ongoing projects dealing with the social and political contexts that influence the representation of language and history. The work comes from a research-based practice that aims to consider how intangible things have been represented through different methodologies in the fields of linguistics, history and conservation. College Hall Chapel, Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, Wednesday, July 25, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 866-934-8232. VCFA MFA IN VISUAL ART: TRANSLATING FEMINISMS: “Communication and Collectivity Across Diverse Feminist Thought and Histories,” presentations and a panel discussion with Faith Wilding (who will receive an honorary doctorate), Michelle Dizon, Gala Porras-King and Eshrat Erfanian. College Hall Chapel, Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, Monday, July 30, 9 a.m.-noon. Info, 866-934-8232. ‘VOICES FROM THE FIELD’ COMMUNITY CONVERSATION: Vermont Arts Council trustees and staff speak with community members about how the organization can better serve artists, arts organizations and creatives. All are invited. Manchester Community Library, Manchester Center, Thursday, July 26, 7:30-8:30 a.m. Info, 828-3291.

GET YOUR ART SHOW LISTED HERE!

IF YOU’RE PROMOTING AN ART EXHIBIT, LET US KNOW BY POSTING INFO AND IMAGES BY THURSDAYS AT NOON ON OUR FORM AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT OR GALLERIES@SEVENDAYSVT.COM.

an interpersonal reflection on the state of affairs in the West over the last year. Reception: Friday, July 27, 8-10 p.m. Through August 8. Info, andrewsalkewicz@gmail.com. Half Lounge in Burlington.

‘THE ART SHOW VIII’: An open-call, communitysourced art exhibition featuring the “People’s Choice Mini Grant” cash prize. Through July 27. Info, publicartschool@gmail.com. RL Photo Studio in Burlington.

f ‘ART’S ALIVE FOFA WINNER’S CIRCLE’: Works by Festival of Fine Art award winners, including Kara Torres, Gav’om, Jerry Rayla, Matt Morris, Linda Dulleba and Paul McMillan. Reception: Friday, August 3, 5-8 p.m. Through August 31. Info, 859-9222. SEABA Center in Burlington. THE BELLCATE SCHOOL: Works by students who have been experimenting with fiber, folk art and upcycling. Through July 31. Info, 859-9222. Gallery at One Main in Burlington. CRYSTAL WAGNER: “Traverse,” an immense, sitespecific installation by the multidisciplinary artist. Through October 7. NICOLE CZAPINSKI: “forever, a little ghost,” sculptural “drawings” in thread, which the artist will activate and alter over the course of the show. Through August 5. Info, 865-7166. BCA Center in Burlington. DAN BLAKESLEE: “Draw Them In: A Rock Poster Retrospective,” 50 works spanning more than two decades of work by the artist, who is also known for creating the Alchemist’s beer-can art. Through September 4. Info, 540-0131. The Skinny Pancake in Burlington. ‘EXTRA • ORDINARY’: Works by members of the Art Tribe, which includes Melanie Brotz, Annie Caswell, LaVerne Ferguson, Kara Greenblott, Holly Hauser, Nancy Hayden, Lynne Reed, Kelley Taft, Linda Van Cooper and Betsy Ward. Through August 31. Info, nancynorthwindarts@gmail.com. Flynndog in Burlington. GEEBO CHURCH: “Small Landscapes,” oil paintings. Through July 31. Info, 860-4972. Black Horse Gallery in Burlington. ‘HORIZONS’: A group exhibition curated by outgoing Flynn Center executive director John Killacky, featuring 17 Vermont artists responding to the wide-open theme of “horizons.” Through September 1. Info, 652-4500. Amy E. Tarrant Gallery in Burlington. ‘HOW PEOPLE MAKE THINGS’: An interactive exhibit that reveals how familiar childhood objects are manufactured and tells the story of the people, ideas and technologies used to transform raw materials into finished products. Through September 3. Info, 864-1848. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain in Burlington. JAMES STEWART: “Solipsism,” an interactive musical installation by the local composer. OLGA VERASEN: “Happy Home,” acrylic paintings and watercolors. Through August 31. Info, 859-9222. The Gallery at Main Street Landing in Burlington.


ART SHOWS

JORDAN DOUGLAS: A selection of alternative silver-gelatin photographs, including reinterpretations of found vintage photographs and medium-format prints from the $25 plastic Holga camera. Through July 31. Info, 338-7441. Thirty-odd in Burlington. JULY EXHIBITION: Works by Dug Nap, Daryl Storrs and Terry Zigmund. Through July 29. Info, 863-6458. Frog Hollow Vermont Craft Gallery in Burlington. KARA TORRES: “Fantasy Self,” works in a variety of media that explore the discrepancy between the artist’s future dreams and the personal and structural realities that prevent reaching those dreams. Through July 31. Info, fineforagerarts@ gmail.com. Cavendish Gallery & Collective in Burlington. MEMBERS ONLY ART EXHIBIT: Works in a variety of mediums by members of the South End Arts and Business Association. Through August 31. Info, 651-9692. VCAM Studio in Burlington. MICHAEL-VINCENT LAVIOLETTE: “American Summer: An Art Show in Red, White & Blue,” screen-prints and animation inspired by midcentury American graphic design, with a dollop of clichés. Through July 27. Info, audrie@ thekarmabirdhouse.com. Karma Bird House in Burlington. ‘SUMMER READING AT FFL: A RETROSPECTIVE’: Archival materials and ephemera, including posters, banners and T-shirts, from more than 30 years of the program started to engage young readers during the summer. Through August 31. Info, 863-3403. Fletcher Free Library in Burlington.

chittenden county

‘IN THE GARDEN’: An exhibit featuring fine art, textiles, sculpture, furniture, actual insects and more explores how flowers and bugs have captivated artists’ imaginations over the centuries. Through August 25. Info, 985-3346. Pizzagalli Center for Art and Education, Shelburne Museum.

KATE LONGMAID: “Bloom,” floral still lifes. Through August 21. Info, 985-3848. Furchgott Sourdiffe Gallery in Shelburne. KIMBERLEE FORNEY: Whimsical and colorful paintings and prints. Through August 31. Info, kimberleef@msn.com. Davis Studio in South Burlington.

‘A NEW AMERICAN FAMILY’: An exhibit honoring the Bhattarai family, featuring photos of the family, an account of how they got from Bhutan to Winooski, and quotes from family members describing the journey and their life here. Through July 31. Info, 985-8328. O’Brien Community Center in Winooski.

ESSEX ART LEAGUE AND MILTON ARTISTS GUILD: Members of the arts organizations exhibit works in a variety of mediums. Through July 28. Info, 262-6035. T.W. Wood Gallery in Montpelier. HARRY A. RICH: “The Vermont Years, So Far…” large-scale acrylic-on-canvas paintings that span the artist’s time living in Vermont, from 1998 to 2018. Through September 28. Info, 375-2940. Vermont Supreme Court Gallery in Montpelier. HEIDI BRONER: “Inner Lives,” realist portraits by the self-taught painter. Through August 3. Info, 279-6403. Central Vermont Medical Center in Berlin. JENNIFER PALKOWSKI JACQUES: Original watercolor and mixed-media paintings including ghost portraits and skyscapes. Through September 1. Info, 595-4866. The Hive in Middlesex. JULIA PAVONE: “Ode to Common Things,” found-object paintings. NITYA BRIGHENTI: “Storm: Nihilists, Anarchists, Populists and Radicals,” paintings and drawings. ‘SCORCHED’: A group show illustrating the effects of heat and fire. Through August 24. Info, 479-7069. Studio Place Arts in Barre.

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‘NEW AMERICAN ARTISTS: CELEBRATING TRADITION AND CULTURE’: An exhibit highlighting immigrant and refugee artists in Vermont who participated in Vermont Folklife Center’s traditional arts apprenticeship program developed by Greg Sharrow. Through August 31. Info, 828-3291. Spotlight Gallery in Montpelier. NICK DEFRIEZ: “Hillsides and Hexagons,” paintings and drawings by the Chelsea-based artist. Through September 28. Info, 685-7743. Governor’s Gallery in Montpelier. ORAH MOORE: “Stewards of the Land,” handprinted silverprint photographs of Montana ranchers. Through August 10. Info, 479-7069. Morse Block Deli in Barre. PHYLLIS CHASE: Paintings by the Calais artist. Through August 23. Info, 223-7274. Adamant Music School. ‘POST-APOCALYPSE FOR 3/4 EMPIRE’: Woodcuts on cloth banners by Bread and Puppet Theater founder Peter Schumann, inspired by Albrecht Durer’s depictions of the Apocalypse as envisioned by the apostle John of the New Testament. Through September 27. Info, 322-1604. Goddard Art Gallery, Pratt Center, Goddard College, in Plainfield. ‘SHOW 26: NEW MEMBERS’: The latest group exhibition of the collective gallery’s Vermont-based contemporary artists, including recent additions Jason Galligan-Baldwin, Kate Burnim, Sam Colt, Mark Lorah, Ned Richardson and Michelle Saffran. Through August 4. Info, 552-0877. The Front in Montpelier. ‘SOLZHENITSYN IN VERMONT’: A celebration of the Russian novelist, historian and Nobel Prize winner turned Vermont resident, in honor of the 100th anniversary of his birth. Through October 27. Info, 828-2291. Vermont History Museum in Montpelier.

STOWE/SMUGGS SHOWS

ART 73

TIM DURBROW: Colorful, large-scale landscape and nature photography, accompanied by three vintage photos restored as a part of an Underhill Historical Society project. Through September 1. Info, 434-2550. Mt. Mansfield Community Television in Richmond.

ELLIOT BURG: “Heart and Eye,” high-contrast black-and-white portraits taken in Myanmar, Laos, Ukraine, Cuba, Brooklyn, Washington, D.C., and Vermont. Through July 31. Info, eburg4@gmail.com. Capitol Grounds Café in Montpelier.

SEVEN DAYS

‘PLAYING COWBOY: AMERICA’S WILD WEST SHOWS’: Combining period posters with historical film footage, this exhibition explores the profound influence Buffalo Bill and other Wild West shows had on shaping contemporary understandings of the American West, Native American history and the cowboy way of life. Through October 21. Info, 985-3346. Shelburne Museum.

‘ANYTHING FOR SPEED: AUTOMOBILE RACING IN VERMONT’: A yearlong exhibition exploring more than a century of the history and evolution of racing in Vermont through the objects, photographs and recollections that comprise this unique story. Through March 30, 2019. Info, 479-8500. Vermont History Center in Barre.

07.25.18-08.01.18

LYNDA REEVES MCINTYRE: “Azores to Abiquiu,” recent landscape paintings by the Vermont artist. Through July 31. Info, 985-8922. Village Wine and Coffee Winemakers Gallery in Shelburne.

barre/montpelier

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

‘TRANSCENDING THE LIMITS OF AGE’: Photographer Elliot Burg’s portraits of track and field athletes in their seventies, eighties and nineties, taken at the National Senior Games. Through September 30. Info, eburg4@gmail.com. JOY HUCKINS-NOSS: “Moments of Reflection,” oil paintings by the Calais artist. Through October 5. Info, jhnartz@aol.com. Burlington International Airport in South Burlington.

‘WHEN I WAS OLDER’: Mixed-media works by Nina Dubois and Art2D2 Industries, aka Jason Galligan-Baldwin. Through July 29. Info, 985-9511. Rustic Roots in Shelburne.

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Mark Dannenhauer

stowe/smuggs

As a former Bread and Puppet Theater

ANNELEIN BEUKENKAMP: “Different Strokes,” abstract acrylic paintings by the Burlington artist. Through September 9. Info, 253-1818. Green Mountain Fine Art Gallery in Stowe.

member

Schumann’s documentary

SEVEN DAYS

07.25.18-08.01.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

KIMBERLEE FORNEY: Colorful acrylic paintings and prints. Through October 31. Info, kimberleef@ msn.com. Green Goddess Café in Stowe. NEIL BERGER: “Men, Mountains, Sky,” en plein air paintings made over a year in Burlington’s Battery Park. VERMONT COMIC CREATORS GROUP EXHIBIT: Works by Vermont-based comic-book creators, cartoonists and other artists who make narrative sequential 2D art. Through September 2. Info, 888-1261. River Arts in Morrisville. POP-UP EXHIBIT: ‘PHOTOGRAPHER’S WORKROOM’: Works by eight area photographers. Through July 28. Info, 617-413-5494. Art Barn in Stowe. SARAH TORTORA: “Ode,” prop-like sculptures influenced by ancient Greek vase painting, Classical architecture, archeological and geological core samples and Euclidean space-time diagrams. Through August 9. Info, tara@vermontstudiocenter. org. Red Mill Gallery at Vermont Studio Center in Johnson.

mad river valley/waterbury

GREEN MOUNTAIN WATERCOLOR EXHIBITION: More than 100 watercolors from artists across North America. Through July 28. Info, 496-6682. The Big Red Barn at Lareau Farm in Waitsfield.

74 ART

ROB HITZIG: “Colorful Musings,” works that explore color and shape through geometric abstraction in dimensional painted wood. Through August 25. Info, 244-7801. Axel’s Gallery & Frame Shop in Waterbury. ‘THE SAFETY OF OBJECTS: A VISUAL DISCOURSE BETWEEN FATHER AND DAUGHTER’: A juxtaposition of Royal Academy of Art member Michael CraigMartin and his daughter, Vanity Fair photographer Jessica Craig-Martin. Through September 3. Info, 583-5832. Bundy Modern in Waitsfield.

troupe,

photographs

at

the

includes images of the year’s rehearsals and performances as well as archival material focusing on the radical circus’

‘EXPLORING AIR’: A group exhibition including works of painting, photography and sculpture that address the element of air, curated by Kelly Holt. Through August 30. Info, 760-6785. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe Mountain Resort.

JAMES PETERSON: “Dreamcatcher,” an immersive installation by the artist-in-residence from Los Angeles. Through September 30. Info, 253-8358. Spruce Peak at Stowe.

Peter

“Bread & Puppet: The Emergent Mosaic,”

exhibition featuring works that investigate the qualities of air, presented in partnership with the Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center. Reception: Friday, July 27, 4-6 p.m. Through August 30. Info, 760-6785. Edgewater Gallery in Stowe.

‘THE HEAD OF THE CLASS’: An invitational group show of artwork by Lamoille County art teachers. ‘THE SKY’S THE LIMIT’: A juried show of 72 artists whose works feature the sky as the predominant element of the composition. Through September 3. Info, 644-5100. Bryan Memorial Gallery in Jeffersonville.

groundbreaking

of

Plainfield Co-op. The seventh iteration,

f ‘EXPLORING AIR II’: One site in a two-part

‘FRAGILE’: Works by 24 contemporary artists responding to the concept of fragility. Through August 18. Info, 253-8943. West Branch Gallery & Sculpture Park in Stowe.

chronicler

the Vermont artist once again mounts

‘CURIOUS & COOL’: Unusual and seldom-seen artifacts of ski culture from the museum’s archives. Through October 31. Info, 253-9911. Vermont Ski and Snowboard Museum in Stowe.

‘EXPOSED’: The 27th annual outdoor sculpture exhibition features site-specific and participatory work from regional and national artists including Jaume Plensa, Albert Paley, Christopher Curtis, Judith Wrend, Ted Ceraldi and more. Curated by Rachel Moore. Through October 21. ‘RECLAMATION’: Portraits of women painted by nationally acclaimed, contemporary women artists. Curated by August Burns, Diane Feissel and Rachel Moore. Through September 8. Info, 253-8358. Helen Day Art Center in Stowe.

and

children participants. A panel discussion on kids’ role in the productions will take place Wednesday, August 15, at 7 p.m. Through August 26.

middlebury area

‘1968: THE WHOLE WORLD IS WATCHING’: Prints, photographs, videos, paintings and sculpture from the mid-1960s through the early 1970s that reflect some of the more visible divisions within the art world of the turbulent era. ‘JUST KIDS: PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE NICHOLAS GIFT’: Photographs of children drawn from every corner of the globe and representing a broad spectrum of social and economic circumstances. Through August 12. Info, 443-5007. Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College. ‘BLADES WILL SPROUT’: Paintings by Anne Cady, Julia Jensen and Jessica Smith, whose works use landscape as an entry point but differ stylistically. Through July 29. Info, 877-2173. Northern Daughters in Vergennes. ‘THE FABRIC OF EMANCIPATION’: Works by eight contemporary fiber, textile and needle artists expressing what it means to be of African descent in the Americas, curated by Harlem Needle Arts founder Michelle Bishop. Through October 28. Museum admission. Info, 877-3406. Rokeby Museum in Ferrisburgh. JANET FREDERICKS: “LAND MARKS … The Land We Mark, Marks Us,” works on paper and canvas inspired by a bird’s-eye view of the land. Through September 9. Info, 382-9222. Jackson Gallery, Town Hall Theater, in Middlebury. JONATHAN D. EBINGER: “Breathing Life Into Metal,” welded sculpture from stainless steel nuts, bolts, washers and rods. Through July 31. Info, 989-7419. Edgewater Gallery on the Green in Middlebury. KILEIGH HANNAH: “Halcyon Days,” nature-inspired abstract paintings by the Colchester artist, whose preferred mediums include traditional acrylic, graphite, table salt and homegrown sodium borate crystals. Through July 29. Info, 917-686-1292. Steven Jupiter Gallery in Middlebury. SCOTT ADDIS: “Sweet Corn,” a solo exhibition of landscape paintings by the Montréal artist. Through July 31. Info, 458-0098. Edgewater Gallery at Middlebury Falls. ‘WATERFOWL WONDERS & AMUSING ANIMALS’: Carvings by Addison County-based wood carvers Gary Starr, Chuck Herrmann and William Holway. Through November 11. Info, 388-2117. Henry Sheldon Museum of Vermont History in Middlebury. ‘WORKING METAL, CREATING ART’: Works by Vermont artists Kate Pond, Chris Cleary, Warren Rinehart, John Arthur, Kathy Mitchell and Meg Walker. Through August 12. Info, info@ creativespacegallery.org. Creative Space Gallery in Vergennes.

rutland/killington

77 ARTS’ RESIDENCY EXHIBITION: Works from the gallery’s first-ever residency program, featuring Annie Blazejack and Geddes Levenson, Debo Mouloudji, Hanna Washburn, Juna Skenderi, Max Spitzer and Sofia Plater. Through October 26. Info, the77gallery@gmail.com. 77 Gallery in Rutland. DEBORAH GOODWIN: “Fabrications in Clay,” ceramics by the local artist. Through August 28. Info, 247-4956. Brandon Artists Guild. ED SMITH: Works in bronze and plaster that use classical imagery to explore the mythic and heroic aspects of the artist and humankind. Through August 5. Info, 438-2097. The Carving Studio & Sculpture Center in West Rutland. ‘FIREMAN SQUARED’: Sculptures spanning the creative output of Mark Burnett and Glenn Campbell, made with materials including plaster, marble, wood, glass, bronze and steel. Through August 18. Info, 282-2396. Castleton University Bank Gallery in Rutland. MARY FRAN LLOYD: “Life in the Abstract,” 31 paintings using acrylic paint and collaged paper. Through August 9. Info, maryfranart@aol.com. Rutland City Hall.

f ‘MY FIRST STREET HE(ART): NYC’: Works by 45 national and international street artists, curated by Alison Wallis, founder of Bushwick’s Ad Hoc Gallery. Closing reception: Saturday, July 28, 5-8 p.m. Through July 28. Info, vtalleygallery@gmail.com. The Alley Gallery in Rutland. ‘THEY ARE NOT FORGOTTEN’: Vermont Artists and Poets hosts this exhibition protesting the immigration and refugee policies of the Trump administration. Funds to benefit kind.org. Through August 12. Info, mottst@comcast.net. Merwin Gallery in Castleton.

champlain islands/northwest

DIAN PARKER: “Oil Paint & Black Walnut,” abstract paintings on canvas and mixed-media works on black-walnut-stained paper by the artist, writer and curator of the White River Gallery. Through September 26. Info, 295-3118. Zollikofer Gallery at Hotel Coolidge in White River Junction. STEPHANIE GORDON: Encaustic paintings by the Piermont, N.H., artist. Through August 31. Info, 295-4567. Long River Gallery & Gifts in White River Junction.

northeast kingdom

‘A COMMON THREAD: STITCHES AND STORIES FROM FIBER ARTISTS NEAR AND FAR’: Fiber works by Northeast Kingdom artists. Through July 28. Info, 334-1966. MAC Center for the Arts Gallery in Newport.

f ERIC AHO: “A Thousand Acres,” paintings that celebrate the landscape in all seasons, drawn from specific bodies of work painted over several years. Reception: Thursday, July 26, 5 p.m. Artist talk: 5:45 p.m. Through September 9. Info, 533-9075. Highland Center for the Arts in Greensboro. ‘LADIES OF THE CANYON’: An exhibition in tribute to jeweler Marion Stegner, the gallery founder who passed away in January. Through September 4. Info, 533-2045. Miller’s Thumb Gallery in Greensboro. ‘LOCKED DOWN! KEYED IN! LOCKED OUT! KEYED UP!’: An exhibition examining the long human relationship to the lock and key, its elegant design and philosophies and practices of securing, safeguarding, imprisoning, escaping and safecracking throughout the ages. Through April 30, 2019. Info, claredol@sover.net. The Museum of Everyday Life in Glover. RICHARD BROWN: Black-and-white photographs of nostalgic Vermont landscapes and people. Through December 31. Info, 748-2372. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium in St. Johnsbury.

‘NATURAL INSTINCTS’: Sumi-e ink paintings by Philadelphia artist Emily Brown and bowls by Jericho woodworker Russell Fellows. Through August 26. Info, greentaraspace@gmail.com. GreenTARA Space in North Hero.

SARAH MEYERS BRENT: Sixteen works of painting and assemblage from materials including wallpaper, fabric scraps and dried flowers. Through August 17. Info, 748-2600. Catamount Arts Center in St. Johnsbury.

‘WOMEN SPEAK: RESISTANCE ART SHOW’: Works by Sarah Rosedahl, Meta Strick and India Tressely. Through July 31. Info, 378-4591. Grand Isle Art Works.

‘WATER IS LIFE’: Works celebrating water by Northeast Kingdom artists. Through July 28. Info, 748-0158. Northeast Kingdom Artists Guild in St. Johnsbury.

upper valley

brattleboro/okemo valley

‘AIR WORKS’: An exhibit that explores the properties of air and the science behind its everyday use and includes a 3D air maze, hover table, chain-reaction machine, paper airplane launcher and air-operated bottle organ. Through September 3. Info, 649-2200. Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich.

ART SHOW: Works by three painters and one photographer, accompanied by ceramics. Through August 18. Info, 875-2194. The Fourth Corner Foundation in Windham. DAVID RIOS FERREIRA: “And I Hear Your Words That I Made Up,” mixed-media works that conjure a psychic landscape filled with conflicting emotions.


ART SHOWS

Through September 24. DEBRA RAMSAY: “Painting Time,” an installation of strips of color derived from nature, as captured by the artist over a year in New Berlin, N.Y. Through September 24. ROBERT DUGRENIER: “Handle With Care,” sculptures made of glass and farm equipment as part of the artist’s process of mourning the 2015 fire that destroyed his historic barn. Through September 24. ROZ CHAST: “Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?” 139 original illustrations from the New Yorker cartoonist’s graphic memoir. Through September 24. SHONA MACDONALD: “Terrestrial Vale,” a series of silverpoint and graphite works on paper depicting fledgling plants prepared for winter with veils of garden netting. Through September 24. STEVE GERBERICH: “Best of ‘Springs, Sprockets & Pulleys,’” kinetic sculptures by the artist, inventor and packrat. Through October 8. Info, 257-0124. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center. HEATHER J. GEOFFREY: “Borderlands,” works exploring borders and interstitial spaces through a variety of mediums including acrylic painting, digital photography, the written word and performance. Through July 31. Info, 869-2960. Main Street Arts in Saxtons River. ‘HOPE AND HAZARD: A COMEDY OF EROS’: A group exhibition curated by American artist Eric Fischl featuring approximately 65 artists and more than 80 paintings, photographs, works on paper and sculptures selected from the Hall and Hall Art Foundation collections. ‘MADE IN VERMONT’: A group exhibition of new and recently completed paintings, works on paper and sculpture by Vermont artists. ‘THE SOLACE OF AMNESIA’: More than 30 paintings, photographs, works on paper and sculpture by some 25 artists that address human alienation from the natural environment, curated by artist Alexis Rockman and Katherine Gass Stowe. Through November 25. Info, 952-1056. Hall Art Foundation in Reading.

manchester/bennington

CARTOONS FROM THE ‘NEW YORKER’: An exhibition and sale of cartoons by artists including Harry Bliss, George Booth, Roz Chast, Tom Chitty, Frank Cotham, Matt Diffee, Liza Donnelly, Liana Finck, Emily Flake, Sam Gross, William Haefeli, Edward Koren, Bob Mankoff, Michael Maslin, Danny Shannahan, Barbara Smaller, Mick Stevens, Tom Toro, PC Vey and Jack Ziegler. Through September 9. Info, 442-7158. Laumeister Art Center, Southern Vermont College in Bennington.

NORTH BENNINGTON OUTDOOR SCULPTURE SHOW: Annual public art exhibition featuring works by 38 local and regional sculptors. Through October 23. Info, jrc373@comcast.net. Various locations around North Bennington.

randolph/royalton

Participate in a research study to help develop a Zika Vaccine. We are looking for healthy adults aged 18-50. 6 month-long research study involving screening, a dosing visit, and 13 follow-up outpatient visits. Volunteers are eligible for compensation up to $1490.

LINDA DUCHARME: “Velvet Brown Disease,” paintings that speak to the artist’s love of horses. Through August 31. Info, 685-2188. Chelsea Public Library.

VACCINE TESTING CENTER

MARION LENT: “Sprites to Live By,” 30 handmade figures made from felted wool, with hand-molded and painted antennae, hands, feet and faces. Through August 18. Info, 889-9404. Tunbridge Public Library. PETER SHVETSOV: Oil paintings and etchings that reflect the artist’s fascination with strange moments in time. Through August 11. Info, 291-2035. Royalton Memorial Library in South Royalton.

For more info, visit uvmvtc.org, call 802-656-0013 or email uvmvtc@uvm.edu 6h-uvmdeptofmed(zikatree)062718.indd 1

6/28/18 11:41 AM

PETER SHVETSOV: Food portraits in tribute to the restaurant’s celebrated burgers and fries. Through August 11. Info, 291-2035. Worthy Burger in South Royalton. PETER SHVETSOV: Oil paintings and etchings of Vermont landscapes that provide a neutral background for the ever-changing, disappearing color at the end of the day. Through August 11. Info, 291-2035. South Royalton Market.

f SUSAN G. SCOTT: “Streams of Light,” nature-inspired paintings by the Chelsea- and Montréal-based artist. Reception and artist talk: Saturday, August 4, 4-6 p.m. Through August 26. Info, 498-8438. White River Gallery @ BALE in South Royalton.

outside vermont

2017 JURIED AWARD WINNERS: Works by Bruce Blanchette, Helen Shulman and Susan Wilson. Through August 24. Info, 603-448-3117. AVA Gallery and Art Center in Lebanon, N.H. ‘FROM AFRICA TO THE AMERICAS: FACE-TO-FACE PICASSO, PAST AND PRESENT’: An exhibition using milestones in the life of Pablo Picasso (18811973) and in history to explore the close relationship between the Spanish master and the arts of Africa, Oceania and the Americas, with a focus on the trajectory of changing attitudes. ‘HERE WE ARE HERE: BLACK CANADIAN CONTEMPORARY ART’: Works by 11 contemporary artists who use a variety of disciplines to challenge preconceived notions of blackness in Canada. Through September 16. Info, 514-285-2000. Montréal Museum of Fine Arts. JEAN-MICHEL OTHONIEL: “Motion – Emotion,” works by the French artist that center on the violence of the elements. Through November 11. Info, 514-285-1600. RAFAEL LOZANO-HEMMER: “Unstable Presence,” a major survey of the Montréal-based artist’s work over the past 18 years that brings together 21 pieces, including several large-scale immersive installations. Through September 9. Info, 514-847-6232. Montréal Museum of Contemporary Art. JOHN MCKENNA: “Column II,” a geometric public sculpture made from aluminum, acrylic and wood. Through October 28. Info, 603-469-3444. Aidron Duckworth Museum in Meriden, N.H. TOYIN OJIH ODUTOLA: “The Firmament,” drawings that ask viewers to consider how conceptions of race are established and promulgated. Through September 2. Info, 603-646-2426. Hood Downtown in Hanover, N.H. m

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obsessed? Find, fix and feather with Nest Notes — an e-newsletter filled with home design, Vermont real estate tips and DIY decorating inspirations. Sign up today at sevendaysvt.com/enews. 12h-nest.indd 1

ART 75

BOB EDDY: “A Second Look,” black-and-white photographs of Vermont’s White River Valley from the final years of the film era. Through September 1. GABRIEL QUIRK: “Articles of Transformation,” a collection of Venetian-style papier-mâché masks, costumes, puppets and props, along with images from the performer’s career as a variety entertainer. Through July 30. Info, 728-9878. Chandler Gallery in Randolph.

JOANNE CARSON: “Hyper Flora,” paintings and sculpture that investigate the fraught relationships between humans and nature, alchemy and science. PETER MORIARTY: “Light & Paper/Mes Plantes,” recent camera-less photographs made with light, paper and plants. Through August 25. Info, 767-9670. BigTown Gallery in Rochester.

SEVEN DAYS

SUMMER SHOW: Abstract works in painting, photography and sculpture by 18 artists including John Richey, Julian Sheres and James Vogler. Through August 18. Info, 768-8498. stART Space in Manchester.

Help your global community.

07.25.18-08.01.18

‘IN A DIFFERENT LIGHT’: Artist members fill the galleries with a broad spectrum of work, including painting, photography, sculpture and collage. Through August 12. Info, info@svac.org. Southern Vermont Arts Center in Manchester.

JACK ROWELL: Thirty-five photographs by the Braintree photographer that span a career of more than 40 years of documenting Vermonters. Through September 30. Info, rowell1655@gmail.com. White River Craft Center in Randolph.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

‘CRASH TO CREATIVITY: THE NEW DEAL IN VERMONT’: Works that shed light on how government-sponsored New Deal projects fueled Depression-era creativity. Through November 4. EDWARD KOREN: “Thinking About Extinction and Other Droll Things,” recent prints and drawings by the Vermont-based New Yorker cartoonist. Through September 9. Info, 447-1571. Bennington Museum.

BONNIE FALLON: Forty-four watercolors showcasing the land and views surrounding the artist’s Brookfield home. Through August 15. Info, 728-2284. Gifford Medical Center in Randolph.

HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

11/18/15 12:07 PM


movies

DEAL WITH THE DEVIL Jarecki considers our dire national moment through the prism of Presley’s numerous Faustian pacts.

The King ★★★★★

W

hat’s more fascinating than watching a true artist do what they do, following the development of their style and the evolution of their vision? If your medulla is oblongata, I don’t see how it gets better. In five years, the Beatles somehow got from “She Loves You” to “I Want You (She’s So Heavy).” Since 2002, Eugene Jarecki has been thinking out loud about what’s gone awry with the great American experiment. His films comprise an intellectually rigorous record of his investigations into everything from the military-industrial complex (Why We Fight, 2005) to the commercialization of the criminal justice system (The House I Live In, 2012). While his latest continues that inquiry, it also marks a milestone. With The King, Jarecki debuts a new aesthetic and attains a stunningly upgraded level of artistry. As much as any filmmaker, he created the blueprint for the modern political documentary. You know: meticulously researched thesis, archival footage, graphs, expert talking heads. I imagine any form eventually feels constraining to an artist whose gifts are

REVIEWS

still multiplying and expanding. Here, Jarecki leaves all that behind for something as thrillingly unexpected as John Lennon following “In My Life” with “A Day in the Life.” OK, enough Beatle analogies. This is a movie about Elvis Presley. Well, Elvis and the American dream. Elvis as metaphor. His rise and decline as an allegory for the American trajectory. It’s safe, I think, to say few filmmakers are visionary enough to conceive of a project this ambitious, much less pull it off. Jarecki pulls it off in spades. The star of The King is a used car: the Rolls Royce Phantom V Presley had custom made (Blaupunkt Köln radio, AC, bar and microphone) in 1963. The instant the director realized he could cast the vehicle, his themes and theories crystallized into a deceptively simple plan. Forty years after Elvis’ death, he would drive across the country through the places that made Presley who he was, pick up interesting, insightful passengers and emerge with a meaningful tapestry of images, music, impressions and comments on our national moment. Among those along for the ride are James Carville, Emmylou Harris, Ethan Hawke, Greil Marcus, Van Jones, Chuck D and John Hiatt, who dissolves in tears seconds after sitting in the back seat, nearly wrecking a

perfectly good guitar. What Jarecki achieves by weaving together the elegantly lensed picture’s strands transcends the perceptive or thought provoking. It approaches the psychedelic. I’ve never seen anything like it. Here’s a sampling: “Forty years ago,” Carville muses at a burger joint, “a guy could come out of high school, get a job at the plant ... send kids to college. That was the American dream. It’s gone.” “You didn’t see Elvis in the middle of no civil rights marches,” Chuck D reminds Jarecki vis-à-vis Presley’s musical debt to black culture. “Think about the alternative Elvis,” challenges Van Jones. “Imagine him marching with Dr. King. Marlon Brando marched.”

“Elvis at every turn picked money,” Hawke observes. “‘There’s more money at RCA [than at Sun Records].’ ‘It’s the biggest movie deal ever; let’s take it.’ ‘Should I take the biggest offer a performer’s ever had?’ — in Vegas. And where did it get him? Dead and fat on the toilet at 42.” One thing on which everyone in the film agrees is that American democracy, while not dead, is decidedly in the toilet. “Suspicious Minds” control the White House. The 1 percent gets fatter as more and more live “In the Ghetto.” Vote. March. Something, the King decrees. “It’s Now or Never.” RI C K KI S O N AK

76 MOVIES

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Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again ★★★

S

ometimes a film’s saving grace is that it doesn’t even contemplate taking itself seriously. Almost everything about the sequel to the 2008 jukebox musical hit Mamma Mia! is ridiculous, and only the ABBA-fueled numbers and costumes show evidence of much artistry or forethought. But longish stretches of the movie are still infectiously fun. This is a film that can get away with casting Cher (born 1946) and Meryl Streep (born 1949) as mother and daughter, respectively, because it couldn’t care less about realism. Who needs reality on a sunny Greek island, anyway? seems to be the general attitude of this movie, directed by Ol Parker (replacing Phyllida Lloyd). And who needs a story? While the first movie, based on the stage musical, was a midlife rom-com full of farcical twists and turns, Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again shambles back and forth between present and past, functioning as half sequel and half prequel. Since Meryl Streep opted not to reprise her starring role as free-spirited disco queen Donna, the sequel’s ostensible protagonist is Donna’s daughter, Sophie (Amanda Seyfried), who is reopening her mother’s inn on the island of Kalokairi just as she reaches a crisis in her long-distance relationship with her husband (Dominic Cooper). The celebration is also menaced by a storm and the likelihood that two of Sophie’s three possible fathers (Colin Firth and Stellan Skarsgård) won’t show.

DANCING QUEENS Seyfried steps into Streep’s place in Parker’s sequel to the hit ABBA musical.

None of these threats generates much tension, partly because we know they’ll be quickly resolved and partly because Sophie is a paper-thin character. (Her mom’s two besties [Julie Walters and Christine Baranski], who are way more entertaining, don’t get enough screen time.) To distract us from this problem, the film offers flashbacks in which Lily James plays the young Donna, and we gawk at outrageous ’70s fashion and learn how (if still not by whom) Sophie was conceived.

Unfortunately, this split structure means that the older actors, the real strength of this movie, are featured considerably less than their younger counterparts. It’s difficult to get excited about James and her nigh-onindistinguishable swains smiling through bad dialogue and slapstick pratfalls when we could be watching Walters and Baranski trading barbs, or Firth, Skarsgård and Pierce Brosnan goofing off like high school thespians — a genuine pleasure, if a cheap one.

Of course, whenever an exuberant pop number starts, the bland casting and poor characterization cease to matter. While the old Hollywood-style choreography isn’t exactly groundbreaking, it’s never less than lively and colorful. This is the kind of movie shameless enough to name a supporting character Fernando (Andy Garcia) to set up a rendition of “Fernando” — sung by a very special guest star. The payoff moment is so deliriously absurd that it draws laughs from the audience, but they’re laughs of delight. In short, Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again is the Guardians of the Galaxy of musicals: at its best when it embraces the silliness. “You think too much, you get unhappy” is the advice young Donna gets from an earthy Greek bar singer, and Parker and his cowriters and cast appear to have taken that to heart. Cher fits right into this universe, giving acerbic delivery to some of the script’s funniest lines. When the movie does pull off one surprisingly poignant moment, without glitter, full orchestration or standard tear-jerking tactics, it’s a pleasant surprise. The characters may not be deep or even believable, but in its glitzy, variety-show way, the film offers a full-throated celebration of the motherdaughter bond. It’s a fine intergenerational folly for a summer’s day. MARGO T HARRI S O N


MOVIE CLIPS

NEW IN THEATERS DON’T WORRY, HE WON’T GET FAR ON FOOT: Joaquin Phoenix plays wheelchair-using cartoonist John Callahan in this biopic about his struggle to get sober after an accident. With Jonah Hill, Rooney Mara and Jack Black. Gus Van Sant directed. (114 min, R. Palace) MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE — FALLOUT: Secret agent Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise) and his team are back for another mission after a misstep in the action series’ sixth installment, directed by Christopher McQuarrie (Mission: Impossible — Rogue Nation). With Henry Cavill, Ving Rhames, Simon Pegg and Rebecca Ferguson. (147 min, PG-13. Bijou, Essex, Majestic, Marquis, Palace, Paramount, Roxy, Stowe, Sunset, Welden) SORRY TO BOTHER YOU: Hip-hop frontman Boots Riley makes his directorial debut with this surreal satire about a telemarketer (Lakeith Stanfield) who learns that the secret to success is sounding like a white suburban guy. With Tessa Thompson, Jermaine Fowler, Terry Crews and Armie Hammer. (105 min, R. Roxy) TEEN TITANS GO! TO THE MOVIES: In this adaptation of the Cartoon Network series, five teen superheroes battle a super-villain while trying to obtain Hollywood glory. With the voices of Kristen Bell, Nicolas Cage, Tara Strong and Stan Lee. Aaron Horvath and Peter Rida Michail, veterans of the show, directed. (92 min, PG. Essex, Majestic, Palace) THREE IDENTICAL STRANGERS: This fest-favorite documentary chronicles the stranger-than-fiction story of triplets separated at birth who learned of one another’s existence in adulthood. Tim Wardle (Lifers) directed. (96 min, PG-13. Roxy, Savoy)

NOW PLAYING ANT-MAN AND THE WASPH1/2 The very small superhero (Paul Rudd) teams up with a new partner to investigate secrets from the past in the latest chapter in the Marvel saga, set before Avengers: Infinity War. With Evangeline Lilly, Michael Peña, Walton Goggins and Judy Greer. Peyton Reed returns as director. (118 min, PG-13; reviewed by R.K. 7/11)

THE FIRST PURGEHHH The disturbingly relevant dystopian franchise goes back in time to show us what happened the first time Americans were given 12 hours to commit crimes with impunity. Marisa Tomei, Lex Scott Davis and Melonie Diaz star. Gerard McMurray (Burning Sands) directed. (97 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 7/11)

H = refund, please HH = could’ve been worse, but not a lot HHH = has its moments; so-so HHHH = smarter than the average bear HHHHH = as good as it gets

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THE KINGHHHHH Director Eugene Jarecki (The House I Live In) looks at the changing state of America through the lens of Elvis Presley in this documentary that chronicles a musical road trip in the King’s ’63 Rolls Royce. (107 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 7/25) LEAVE NO TRACEHHHH A father and daughter living off the grid run afoul of social services and try to return to their wild home in this drama from director and cowriter Debra Granik (Winter’s Bone). Ben Foster and Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie star. (109 min, PG; reviewed by R.K. 7/18) MAMMA MIA! HERE WE GO AGAINHHH Lily James plays the young version of Meryl Streep’s character in the sequel to the ABBA-fueled musical comedy hit, in which we learn how she got pregnant with Sophie (Amanda Seyfried). With Streep, Dominic Cooper, Pierce Brosnan, Christine Baranski and Cher. Ol Parker (Imagine Me and You) directed. (114 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 7/25) OCEAN’S 8HHH Debbie Ocean (Sandra Bullock) leads an all-female crew on a bold heist of the Met Gala in this crime caper directed and cowritten by Gary Jones (The Hunger Games). Among her cohorts are Cate Blanchett, Anne Hathaway, Rihanna and Mindy Kaling. (110 min, PG-13)

7/20/18 2:15 PM

96.1 96.5 98.3 101.9 AM550

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RBGHHHH This documentary from directors Julie Cohen (American Veteran) and Betsy West explores the life and work of 84-year-old U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. (98 min, PG; reviewed by M.H. 6/6) SKYSCRAPERHH In this wannabe mash-up of Die Hard and The Towering Inferno, Dwayne Johnson plays a war veteran who must save his family from the world’s tallest building after someone sets it ablaze. With Neve Campbell, Pablo Schreiber and Noah Taylor. Rawson Marshall Thurber (Central Intelligence) wrote and directed. (102 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 7/18) SICARIO: DAY OF THE SOLDADOHHHH1/2 Josh Brolin and Benicio del Toro are back to fight the drug trade on the U.S.-Mexico border, but Emily Blunt and director Denis Villeneuve are not, in this action-oriented sequel directed by Stefano Sollima (“Gomorrah”) and written by Taylor Sheridan (Wind River). (122 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 7/4) WON’T YOU BE MY NEIGHBOR?HHHH This documentary from Morgan Neville (20 Feet From Stardom) explores how Fred Rogers, trained as a minister, brought heart to kids’ educational TV with his long-running show “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.” (94 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 7/4)

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Interviews with members of local economic development groups and business owners in ten of Vermont’s small towns and cities share their successes and discuss the difficulties they face as their communities work to rejuvenate their economic bases.

9:00 am – 11:00 am

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RATINGS ASSIGNED TO MOVIES NOT REVIEWED BY RICK KISONAK OR MARGOT HARRISON ARE COURTESY OF METACRITIC.COM, WHICH AVERAGES SCORES GIVEN BY THE COUNTRY’S MOST WIDELY READ MOVIE REVIEWERS.

JURASSIC WORLD: FALLEN KINGDOMHH1/2 The dinosaurs of a futuristic theme park need rescuing from an erupting volcano in the sequel to Jurassic World, again starring Chris Pratt and Bryce Dallas Howard. With Rafe Spall and Justice Smith. J.A. Bayona (The Impossible) directed. (128 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 6/27)

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INCREDIBLES 2HHH1/2 Pixar’s super-family returns in this animation in which Mr. Incredible (voice of Craig T. Nelson) finds himself at home tending the baby while Mom (Holly Hunter) is busy saving the world. With the voices of Sarah Vowell, Bob Odenkirk and Samuel L. Jackson. Brad Bird is back as writer and director. (118 min, PG; reviewed by M.H. 6/20)

SUMMER SALE

07.25.18-08.01.18

HEARTS BEAT LOUDHHH1/2 A record-store owner (Nick Offerman) convinces his musical daughter (Kiersey Clemons) to form a duo with him in this drama that premiered at the Sundance Film Festival. With Ted Danson and Toni Collette. Brett Haley (The Hero) directed. (97 min, PG-13)

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 3: SUMMER VACATIONHH1/2 Dracula (voice of Adam Sandler) takes a vacation from his hotel and discovers love on a “monster cruise” in this animated family adventure. With the voice talents of Mel Brooks, Selena Gomez and Kathryn Hahn. Genndy Tartakovsky returns as director. (97 min, PG)

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THE EQUALIZER 2HH1/2 In the second vigilante action flick based on the ’80s TV series, Denzel Washington returns as a retired CIA agent who has appointed himself the protector of the innocent. With Pedro Pascal, Bill Pullman and Melissa Leo. Antoine Fuqua again directed. (121 min, R)

HEREDITARYHHHH1/2 Ari Aster makes his directorial debut with this psychological horror film, much buzzed about at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival, about a family that uncovers disturbing secrets after the death of its matriarch. Toni Collette, Gabriel Byrne and Alex Wolff star. (127 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 6/13)

STREAMING Untitled-17 1

7/6/18 10:32 AM


Participants Needed for a Research Study on the Brain

movies

LOCALtheaters (*) = NEW THIS WEEK IN VERMONT. (**) = SPECIAL EVENTS. FOR UP-TO-DATE TIMES VISIT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/MOVIES.

Healthy, non-smoking participants (18-30 years old) needed for a 4 visit UVM study on a chemical system in the healthy brain. Participants will receive $400 for completion of the study.

Contact us at 847-8248 or brainage@uvm.edu. CLINICAL NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH UNIT

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BIG PICTURE THEATER

48 Carroll Rd. (off Rte. 100), Waitsfield, 496-8994, bigpicturetheater.info

wednesday 25 — tuesday 31 Schedule not available at press time.

BIJOU CINEPLEX 4

Rte. 100, Morrisville, 888-3293, bijou4.com

wednesday 25 — thursday 26 Ant-Man and the Wasp Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation Incredibles 2 *Mission: Impossible — Fallout (Thu only) Skyscraper

6/28/18 11:38 AM

friday 27 — tuesday 31 Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation Incredibles 2 *Mission: Impossible — Fallout Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

CAPITOL SHOWPLACE 93 State St., Montpelier, 229-0343, fgbtheaters.com

wednesday 25 — thursday 2 Ant-Man and the Wasp The Equalizer 2 Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation (2D & 3D) Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again

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Conquer your weekend NOW with Notes on the Weekend. This e-newsletter maps out the best weekend events every Thursday. Visit sevendaysvt.com/ enews to sign up.

MAJESTIC 10

190 Boxwood St. (Maple Tree Place, Taft Corners), Williston, 878-2010, majestic10. com

wednesday 25 — thursday 26 Ant-Man and the Wasp The Equalizer 2 The First Purge (Wed only) Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation Incredibles 2 Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again *Mission: Impossible — Fallout (Thu only; 2D & 3D) Ocean’s 8 Skyscraper *Teen Titans Go! To the Movies (Thu only) Won’t You Be My Neighbor? friday 27 — wednesday 1 Ant-Man and the Wasp The Equalizer 2 Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation Incredibles 2 Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again *Mission: Impossible — Fallout (2D & 3D) Skyscraper *Teen Titans Go! To the Movies

MARQUIS THEATRE Main St., Middlebury, 388-4841, middleburymarquis.com

wednesday 25 — thursday 26

ESSEX CINEMAS & T-REX THEATER

21 Essex Way, Suite 300, Essex, 879-6543, essexcinemas.com

Ant-Man and the Wasp Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation friday 27 — thursday 2

wednesday 25 — thursday 26

*Mission: Impossible — Fallout

Ant-Man and the Wasp The Equalizer The First Purge Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation Incredibles 2 Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again *Mission: Impossible — Fallout (Thu only; 2D & 3D) Skyscraper *Teen Titans Go! To the Movies (Thu only) Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

Rest of schedule not available at press time.

friday 27 — wednesday 1 Ant-Man and the Wasp The Equalizer Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation Incredibles 2 Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again *Mission: Impossible — Fallout (2D & 3D) *Teen Titans Go! To the Movies (with sensory-friendly screening Sat only)

MERRILL’S ROXY CINEMAS

222 College St., Burlington, 864-3456, merrilltheatres.net

wednesday 25 — thursday 26 Ant-Man and the Wasp The King Leave No Trace *Mission: Impossible — Fallout (Thu only) RBG Skyscraper Won’t You Be My Neighbor? friday 27 — thursday 2 The King Leave No Trace *Mission: Impossible — Fallout RBG *Sorry to Bother You *Three Identical Strangers Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

Princess Mononoke

PALACE 9 CINEMAS

STOWE CINEMA 3 PLEX

wednesday 25 — thursday 26

wednesday 25 — thursday 26

Ant-Man and the Wasp **Disney’s Newsies: The Broadway Musical! (Thu only) The Equalizer 2 Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation Incredibles 2 Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again *Mission: Impossible — Fallout (Thu only) Ocean’s 8 Skyscraper **Studio Ghibli: Princess Mononoke (dubbed: Wed only) Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

Ant-Man and the Wasp The Equalizer 2 Sicario: Day of the Soldado

10 Fayette Dr., South Burlington, 864-5610, palace9.com

friday 27 — tuesday 31 Ant-Man and the Wasp *Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot The Equalizer 2 **Exhibition on Screen: Canaletto (Sun & Tue only) Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation Incredibles 2 Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again *Mission: Impossible — Fallout **Sailor Moon R and S — The Movies (dubbed: Sat only; subtitled: Mon only) *Teen Titans Go! To the Movies

PARAMOUNT TWIN CINEMA

241 North Main St., Barre, 479-9621, fgbtheaters.com

wednesday 25 — thursday 26 Incredibles 2 *Mission: Impossible — Fallout (Thu only) Skyscraper friday 27 — thursday 2 Incredibles 2 *Mission: Impossible — Fallout (2D & 3D)

THE SAVOY THEATER 26 Main St., Montpelier, 229-0598, savoytheater.com

wednesday 25 — thursday 26

78 MOVIES

Heart Beats Loud Won’t You Be My Neighbor? friday 27 — thursday 2

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GO TO SEVENDAYSVT.COM ON ANY SMARTPHONE FOR FREE, UP-TO-THE-MINUTE MOVIE SHOWTIMES, PLUS OTHER NEARBY RESTAURANTS, CLUB DATES, EVENTS AND MORE.

Heart Beats Loud *Three Identical Strangers Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-4678, stowecinema.com

friday 27 — thursday 2 The Equalizer 2 Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again *Mission: Impossible — Fallout (2D & 3D)

SUNSET DRIVE-IN

155 Porters Point Rd., Colchester, 862-1800, sunsetdrivein.com

wednesday 25 Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation & The Equalizer 2 Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom & Deadpool 2 Incredibles 2 & Ant-Man and the Wasp Skyscraper & The First Purge thursday 26 — thursday 2 *Mission: Impossible — Fallout & Hereditary Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation & The Equalizer 2 Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom & Skyscraper Incredibles 2 & Ant-Man and the Wasp

WELDEN THEATRE

104 No. Main St., St. Albans, 527-7888, weldentheatre.com

wednesday 25 — thursday 26 Ant-Man and the Wasp The Equalizer 2 Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation *Mission: Impossible — Fallout (Thu only) Skyscraper friday 27 — thursday 2 Ant-Man and the Wasp The Equalizer 2 Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation *Mission: Impossible — Fallout


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REAL FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY JULY 26-AUG 1

LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22)

As you wobble and stumble into the New World, you shouldn’t pretend you understand more than you actually do. In fact, I advise you to play up your innocence and freshness. Gleefully acknowledge that you’ve got a lot to learn. Enjoy the liberating sensation of having nothing to prove. That’s not just the most humble way to proceed; it’ll be your smartest and most effective strategy. Even people who have been a bit skeptical of you before will be softened by your vulnerability. Opportunities will arise because of your willingness to be empty and open and raw.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Be extra polite

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Your past is not quite what it seems. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to find out why —

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): One of the most famously obtuse book-length poems in the English language is Robert Browning’s Sordello, published in 1840. After studying it at length, Alfred Tennyson, who was Great Britain’s Poet Laureate from 1850 to 1892, confessed, “There were only two lines in it that I understood.” Personally, I did better than Tennyson, managing to decipher 18 lines. But I bet that if you read this dense, multilayered text in the coming weeks, you would do better than me and Tennyson. That’s because you’ll be at the height of your cognitive acumen. Please note: I suggest you use your extra intelligence for more practical purposes than decoding obtuse texts. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Ready for your

financial therapy session? For your first assignment, make a list of the valuable qualities you have to offer the world, and write a short essay about why the world should abundantly reward you for them. Assignment 2: Visualize what it feels like when your valuable qualities are appreciated by people who matter to you. 3: Say this: “I am a rich resource that ethical, reliable allies want to enjoy.” 4: Say this: “My scruples can’t be bought for any amount of money. I may rent my soul, but I’ll never sell it outright.”

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Since 1358, the city of Paris has used the Latin motto Fluctuat nec mergitur, which can be translated as “She is tossed by the waves but does not sink.” I propose that we install those stirring

words as your rallying cry for the next few weeks. My analysis of the astrological omens gives me confidence that even though you may encounter unruly weather, you will sail on unscathed. What might be the metaphorical equivalent of taking seasickness pills?

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The Spanish word delicadeza can have several meanings in English, including “delicacy” and “finesse.” The Portuguese word delicadeza has those meanings, as well as others, including “tenderness,” “fineness,” “suavity,” “respect” and “urbanity.” In accordance with current astrological omens, I’m making it your word of power for the next three weeks. You’re in a phase when you will thrive by expressing an abundance of these qualities. It might be fun to temporarily give yourself the nickname Delicadeza. SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Uninformed scientists scorn my oracles. Reductionist journalists say I’m just another delusional fortune-teller. Materialist cynics accuse me of pandering to people’s superstition. But I reject those naive perspectives. I define myself as a psychologically astute poet who works playfully to liberate my readers’ imaginations with inventive language, frisky stories and unpredictable ideas. Take a cue from me, Scorpio, especially in the next four weeks. Don’t allow others to circumscribe what you do or who you are. Claim the power to characterize yourself. Refuse to be squeezed into any categories, niches or images — except those that squeeze you the way you like to be squeezed.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “I have

no notion of loving people by halves; it is not my nature. My attachments are always excessively strong.” So said Sagittarian novelist Jane Austen. I don’t have any judgment about whether her attitude was right or wrong, wise or ill-advised. How about you? Whatever your philosophical position might be, I suggest that for the next four weeks you activate your inner Jane Austen and let that part of you shine — not just in relation to whom and what you love but also with everything that rouses your passionate interest. According to

my reading of the astrological omens, you’re due for some big, beautiful, radiant zeal.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “There are truths I haven’t even told God,” confessed Brazilian writer Clarice Lispector. “And not even myself. I am a secret under the lock of seven keys.” Are you harboring any riddles or codes or revelations that fit that description, Capricorn? Are there any sparks or seeds or gems that are so deeply concealed they’re almost lost? If so, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to bring them up out of their dark hiding places. If you’re not quite ready to show them to God, you should at least unveil them to yourself. Their emergence could spawn a near-miracle or two. AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): What are your goals for your top two alliances or friendships? By that I mean, what would you like to accomplish together? How do you want to influence and inspire each other? What effects do you want your relationships to have on the world? Now, maybe you’ve never even considered the possibility of thinking this way. Maybe you simply want to enjoy your bonds and see how they evolve rather than harnessing them for greater goals. That’s fine. No pressure. But if you are interested in shaping your connections with a more focused sense of purpose, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to do so.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In Janet Fitch’s novel White Oleander, a character makes a list of “twenty-seven names for tears,” including “Heartdew. Griefhoney. Sadwater. Die tränen. Eau de douleur. Los rios del corazón.” (The last three can be translated as “The Tears,” “Water of Pain” and “The Rivers of the Heart.”) I invite you to emulate this playfully extravagant approach to the art of crying. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to celebrate and honor your sadness, as well as all the other rich emotions that provoke tears. You’ll be wise to feel profound gratitude for your capacity to feel so deeply. For best results, go in search of experiences and insights that will unleash the full cathartic power of weeping. Act as if empathy were a superpower.

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and deferential. Cultivate an exaggerated respect for the status quo. Spend an inordinate amount of time watching dumb TV shows while eating junk food. Make sure you’re exposed to as little natural light and fresh air as possible. Just kidding! I lied! Ignore everything I just said! Here’s my real advice: Dare yourself to feel strong positive emotions. Tell secrets to animals and trees. Swim and dance and meditate naked. Remember in detail the three best experiences you’ve ever had. Experiment with the way you kiss. Create a blessing that surprises you and everyone else. Sing new love songs. Change something about yourself you don’t like. Ask yourself unexpected questions, then answer them with unruly truths that have medicinal effects.

and make the necessary adjustments. A good way to begin would be to burrow back into your old stories and unearth the half-truths buried there. It’s possible that your younger self wasn’t sufficiently wise to understand what was really happening all those months and years ago and, as a result, distorted the meaning of the events. I suspect, too, that some of your memories aren’t actually your own but rather other people’s versions of your history. You may not have time to write a new memoir right now, but it might be healing to spend a couple of hours drawing up a revised outline of your important turning points.

CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES & DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES: REALASTROLOGY.COM OR 1-877-873-4888

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...AND LOVIN’ IT!

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ADVENTURE, NATURE, COMPASSION High adventure. Love life and the great outdoors. Active. Positive (the glass is full). Affectionate. Good nature and disposition. Hopefully you are, too. The only thing missing is the right person. Mountains, 65

For relationships, dates and flirts: dating.sevendaysvt.com

WOMEN Seeking MEN

CAN-DO GRANDMA Love to meet someone who can think outside the box: develop plans, resolve problems, laugh out loud, dance like an animal, get small when others are trying to be large, and large when others can only be small, be careful with his words, be smokin’ hot when working and be feverish when naked. Why? Because I am. resilientvter, 63, l ADVENTUROUS COUNTRY GIRL Single mom looking for someone to hang out with and get to know. I am a hardworking, adventure-seeking girl who likes to play hard as well. If you like the outdoors, working out, ATVs, snowmobiling, boating, the ocean and traveling, I am the girl for you. I am looking for someone who is honest and straightforward. Sweet79, 38, l FUN, LOYAL AND RETIREMENT SOON Soon due to retire. Looking for a companion first, and let’s see where it goes. I am open to a life partner. Love traveling, seeing new places. The ocean is just the most beautiful thing you can enjoy. I am a laid-back female looking for a male who is emotionally stable and enjoys life, family and friends. mernster29, 60, l

84 PERSONALS

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LIFE IS A CRAZY RIDE Wow, OK. I am a professional with almost-grown kids looking at the next phase of life. I have a beautiful family, wonderful kids and a wellcared-for home. I am a do-it-yourself, fix-yourself, make-it-work kind of woman. I exercise daily, balance work and garden, food and spirits. Next chapter, here we go. Cuteypie, 54, l FUN AND FROLICKING I am a pretty straightforward person. Having grown up in the ’60s and ’70s, I appreciate my carnal nature. I have a gentle touch and love to give massages. I like to have an intelligent discourse regarding what is happening on our planet. GypsyPoppins, 61, l RUNNING ON ICE Me? I’m honest, open, nonjudgmental. I enjoy being out or being at home with someone I like. I enjoy learning and pressing my own boundaries a little. I like kayaking, walking and gardening, day trips sitting by the river, finding pretty rocks. I’m the easy button. I’m looking for someone flexible, not clingy, but who wants to spend time together. Nowforthenextfifty, 53, l I’M BACK! WATER & FIRE I’m back! Still lively, still lovely. My gardens and interests are wideranging. I’m interested in ideas, good books, great movies, excellent food, new science concepts. I keep fit with yoga, extensive gardening, walking, singing. Let’s meet if you are energetic, smart, curious, like to laugh and like to discuss what intrigues you. I am a good listener — and a good storyteller. Steamwoman, 70, l

CLASSY, SASSY, WITTY, FEISTY I know where and where not to use a comma! Do you know when you use a semicolon and not a comma? I am the queen of wit. I am feisty (grew up just south of Boston). I am a voracious reader. I am looking for a sincere, honest, loving man. Pattimaccomma, 58, l SMART, INDUSTRIOUS, OPEN & HONEST I live in Maryland and want to relocate to New England. I like old houses, chemical-free gardening and living, and if the weather is nice, I am most likely outside. I am strong-willed but kind and good. I am attracted to a curious mind, sense of humor, stable finances, animal lover and someone not too shy to dance. MarylandTransplant, 50, l FUN-LOVING, TREE-HUGGING SPIRIT I spend most of my time hiking and enjoying nature. On a typical summer day, I enjoy music, reading and writing, swimming, gardening, preparing healthy meals, and dancing around with my beloved dog. My house is always full of music, healthy food, books and good vibrations. I would like to meet someone to share time with. LadyL0664, 52, l EXPLORING, CHATTING, OUTSIDE I’m excited to meet someone to share new activities with and keep me smiling about the small things in life. I love the summers and enjoy hiking, kayaking, biking, walking, exploring, eating good food, etc. I am a 28-y/o teacher interested in finding someone who is looking for a serious relationship but starting out as friends first. NativeVTer90, 28, l

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LOOKING FOR A NEW ADVENTURE Looking to make some new friends while enjoying my time in this beautiful state. Looking for recommendations for good hikes/swimming holes. SnowBird90, 28

VIVACIOUS, PLAYFUL AND CURIOUS Honestly not sure what I am looking for. I placed an I-Spy ad and thought some kind of profile would be appropriate. C12B57, 61

GOTHIC, LAZY, SOUTHERNER New to this. Looking for someone close to my age who’s fun and local. Though I’ve yet to find that, I still look. JonnyRavenous, 30, l

CHARMING AND LOVE TO LAUGH Smart, serious with a love of laughter and appreciation of your sense of humor. chapter1, 58

FAIR, OPEN-MINDED, STRUCTURE, DIALOGUE I am kind, fair-minded, independent nonjudgmental. Know what it is that I want. Enjoy vegetable gardening, like riding my motorcycle, enjoy board games and cards, up for an occasional hike. I need my own space. grnworldusa, 63, l

FAT LADY SEEKING COSTCO MEMBER I’m really just looking for someone with a Costco membership so I can walk in the door with you and head over to its food court for some delicious chow. But if our relationship turns into something more than that, I guess that’s all right. churrofan, 33 MUSIC FOR MECHANICS 34 New to the area. Seeking good company. I love rock and roll. Love my job, but dream of starting a farm-to-table community space. Health conscious. Care a lot about environment and lifestyle. I have tons of interests and passions. Intelligent. Love teaching, learning and creating. Honest. No room for emotional immaturity or games. Friends first. TankGirl, 34, l

WHERE WERE YOU IN ’62? Star children on the back road to salvation / Children of the forest, child of the Woodstock nation / Gotta care for the needs of your planet / Catch the dawn that once was gone / First-born atomic generation / Come on and join us on the other side of the sun. ATWA, 58, l FUN, ENERGETIC, STRONG, LASTING So, honestly, I’m here to find a quick hookup and not much more! Chowda3030, 28, l

ACTIVE, LAKE LIFE AND SEX-POSITIVE I am trying to age well by making diet and exercise choices to promote health. I am looking for the same in a partner. I expect to engage intellectually and physically with you. I like a good storyteller (“The Moth,” “This American Life”) so I hope you can tell me some stories. curiousme, 56, l

LOOKING FOR SOME EXCITEMENT? Looking forward to making friends to spend quality time with. Life is short. Let’s go try something new together! Open to casual sex, but drama is a huge turn-off. Looking for someone who can be an adult about it. I love the outdoors, traveling and having stimulating conversations. Let’s go on an adventure and enjoy one another’s company! Adventurous_, 42, l

SUMMER AT LAST! I can appreciate your kindness, compassion and sense of humor. Being quirky and goofy is definitely acceptable. :) While I enjoy volunteering in the community and going to events, I also enjoy time alone to work on projects, read and make art. Join me for some traveling, biking, kayaking or live music. BirdsEyeView, 30, l

NERDY, FUN, LOVES (MOST) MUSIC I love going out and having fun but am looking for someone to share that time with. I know that someone out there appreciates our time together. I hope someday I find a woman who helps me to be a better person, father and partner. That is what I hope to find someday. loukie00, 43

MEN Seeking WOMEN GENTLE SOUL Looking for a special someone to go out on hikes and rides, or just to spend a night snuggling on the couch. I can be a great conversationalist and love learning new things. Twowheeled, 33, l

NATURE GUY, COME ENJOY LIFE I’m a nature-lovin’ lad lookin’ for a lovely lass. In my free time, I bike, disc golf, swim, tend my garden and cook. I’m looking for someone who likes to be active but also knows how to chill. The heat this summer has a nice upside; I go walk the dogs and dip in a mountain river. :) Apexx42, 30, l CAR GUY Just looking to meet new people and enjoy life more. Laid-back. Not an asshole. Coolgan, 21

PRACTICAL MYSTIC Fascinated by the inside story, what really happened, how anything works. I’m serious about the arts, follow world news and natural science. Like to create and improve, wrangle words, experience different world, subtle humor. Would love to meet a companion who blends intellect and sensuality with a sense of adventure with warmth, intimacy, connection, Outdoor activities, film, music, projects, coffee. Beeline, 66, l AGELESS RENAISSANCE MAN Moved from Pennsylvania, love Vermont life. I hope to share that love of life with you. I enjoy a variety of activities. Learning something new every day is my lifelong ambition. Learning and experiencing together is so much more fulfilling when it happens with the right person. Mutual honesty and respect are paramount. Time is precious and too limited to waste. Nice2CU, 57, l

PASSIONATE, KIND AND GIVING A very clean-cut gentleman with a college degree who loves to stay active. Pride myself on honesty and integrity. Life has its ups and downs, but always enjoy making the best of what is dealt. Honesty and integrity play a huge role in my life, and pure passion is needed to fulfill. cvtfun2018, 49 TOURIST THOUGH I LIVE HERE Slightly feral, financially stable, debt-free and way-divorced (2002) guy looking for a reasonably fit woman for fun and friendship and, if the stars align, LTR. I like live music in small outdoor venues. Love the outdoors. Not into camping; like a B&B much better. A semi-date to hit tennis balls is also good. Hard to find players. oneplank, 60, l CHEERFUL & THOUGHTFUL DESIGNER I am a father, artist, painter, architect, occasional illusionist and past EMT with a cheerful attitude toward life. I love designing buildings, lighting and furniture, and raising money for cancer research. I live in a friendly community that I founded many years ago with my deceased wife. Enjoy biking, hiking and traveling to warm places in the winter. Designer71, 71, l

WOMEN Seeking WOMEN

LOOKING FOR A GIRLFRIEND Hi. I am 43, female, 5’3, 135 pounds, blond long hair, 38C chest, brown eyes, size 5 jeans. Married 20 years. Much still in love, but my husband knows that I am into women, too, so he is allowing me to have a girlfriend on the side. I don’t do any drugs. I don’t smoke. Three beers when I drink. 19751975Tammy, 43 LOOKING FOR A LITTLE SPICE Married couple seeking female to spice up the mix. New to this but hoping to explore. Let’s meet up for a drink and go from there. vtcouple802, 41

MEN Seeking MEN KIND, WITTY, GOOD-NATURED Looking for creative ways to “relax.” Maybe share a good massage? mavverrickk, 58

MATURE TOP FOR LOVING CHUB Mature ethnic professional, fun, relaxed top, seeking regular self-care and mild kink with a clean pleasant bottom chub. I host good times in and out, just be real. Not into hookup culture. Prefer that you’re seeking a bond: friendship with freedom of being you and what you like. Bi is OK, but no sneaking around, hidden agendas. Sincere response gets reply. agednorthcocotop, 50 CLEAN GUY FOR NAKED FUN I’m no Schwarzenegger. I had fun as a teen growing up with a friend up the street. We went from strutting around in undies to very regular oral sessions. I’m looking for a similar man, no drama, no head games, friendship with a side of oral. I swallow. Not mandatory in return, but appreciated. kevjones888, 63 BI-CURIOUS? DISCREET? READ ON. Looking for an athletic bi-curious friend. Need to be attracted; chemistry is of the utmost importance. We need to click without effort. I need discreet, too. cyclist, 53


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I’m a SWM, 69 y/o, seeking a GWM. Looking for NSA fun in Northeast. My place or yours. Discreet and disease-free. #L1206 Hello, my name is Sherry M. I’m looking for companionship or a boyfriend to spend my time with. I smoke cigarettes, and I like to drink beer. I also like to go out to eat and do a little bit of dancing. I’m looking for a trusting man who is 55 to 62. If interested, please write. #L1202

I’m a SWM, 58, Burlington. Seeking a partner in crime! Gregarious, outgoing and altruistic. Appreciates meaningful and real connections/conversation. Not into party scene or drama. Varied interests. Open to all new experiences. Would love to hear from you! #L1221 I’m a 62-y/o male seeking M or F for friendship. Wonderful, caring person, 5’9, 150 pounds, looking for a connection to M or F. Nonsmoking. Some of my interests are literature, writing, running, jazz, poetry, travel, drawing, kindness and values, self-reliance, Emerson essays. #L1219

I’m a submissive bi WM seeking a dominant male or female for a master or mistress for hard discipline and complete oral servitude. I’m middle-aged and in very good shape, ready for anything. #L1218 I’m a SWM (63) seeking a SWF (50 to 62). Tall, slender, athletic, gracious, educated, soft-spoken, vegetarian male seeks gentle, comely, socially conscious female with similar qualities. Scrabble, day hikes, folk music, bicycle rides, banana daiquiris, a trip to Nova Scotia — are you on board? #L1211

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Mid-60s SWM desires female companion for local car trips and conversation, which includes topics in the arts and metaphysical/spiritual subjects. I am thoughtful, creative, compassionate. You possess curiosity, wit, capacity for genuine interchanges. We both enjoy humor and life’s range of absurdities. #L1215 We’re a married, bi-curious couple (42 and 45) seeking a male-and-female couple. 43, blond hair, brown eyes, 135 pounds, 5’3, 38C chest. 45, black hair, 140 pounds, 5’9. Married for 20 years. Looking to swing with dinner, drinks, fun. #L1214

Responsible couple looking for another female to join us in a threesome. We are in the Kingdom of Vermont. Has to be willing to travel. Also will have to get to know us and be clean. #L1213 56-y/o woman looking for love beyond belief. He should have pride in himself. Romantic tendency. Honest. One-woman man. True to himself and me. Happy. Patient. Huggable. Nonsmoker. No drugs, please. Lovable. Want to be loved. #L1212 I’m reluctantly reentering the dating world. Seeking SWM 55 to 65. I like gentlemen with neat appearances. I’m easygoing, outgoing, don’t like to argue or be controlled. My wardrobe is 90 percent jeans and blouses. I’m 5’5, brunette, English descent. Leave number. Friends first, please. #L1209 Married bi-curious guy. Blond, blue eyes, thin build. Looking for other bi-curious to explore with. Newbie here. Very, very discreet. #L1194

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SWF, 66, seeks SM, 60 to 70, for friendship before relationship. I am honest, positive and grounded. If you walk toward today, not run to tomorrow, appreciate mornings, garden, read, listen to VPR, attend plays and ice hockey games, enjoy conversation, are creative, and don’t smoke, do drugs or drink, we already have things in common! Plus, I have a shamelessly affectionate golden retriever looking for dog friends. Burlington area. #L1191

60-y/o female Upper Valley resident seeking man 55 to 65. Looking for LTR to enhance my life, not consume it. Enjoy going to plays and movies, out to dinner, or just going for a walk in nature. I am honest, settled and grounded. Looking for a man who is also. Not religious, but spiritual. Always striving for self-improvement. #L1176

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I’m a 48-y/o male seeking a 30- to 55-y/o female. I am eclectic and outdoorsy. Love cooking, fishing, camping and snuggling. Looking for liberal romantic who enjoys same. Nonjudgmental and openminded. Looking for same. LTR. #L1197

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VIRGO I wonder if you’re at Duff? You prance around town like you were raised by elks and point out the witch houses like you could be one yourself! I hope you see how much you mean to me, you beautiful goddess. Let’s get some margaritas and guac! When: Sunday, July 22, 2018. Where: Pearl St. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914456 CUTE GIGGLE ON NORTH WILLARD You are a tall beauty with creamy skin and wild lioness hair. When I heard you giggle, I remembered why I’m alive. I believe you said you were Croatian. I’m just a guy. Maybe grab a matcha with me someday? When: Friday, July 6, 2018. Where: N. Willard St. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914455 THE LAXATIVE AISLE The way your brown eyes gazed at me while you helped me decide which laxative would work best, I felt a connection. Let’s meet for coffee when you’re not bloated? When: Saturday, July 21, 2018. Where: CVS, Burlington. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914454

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A MIDSUMMER’S KNIGHT Magic on a midsummer’s night. A valiant knight and endearing lady dancing in moonlight, burning candles ‘til dawn. This lady never felt so alive, resonating with happiness. If our paths cross again, reminisce how perfect everything was and seek shelter from storms in my embrace. For to you, my fair Sir, I would give it all. When: Saturday, June 30, 2018. Where: realm of the fairies. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914453 CHASING RABBITS I was admiring a sweet gray bunny on someone’s lawn when I noticed you on the porch: dark hair, dark eyes, soaking in the cool early evening air. You waved and flashed me a smile that sent my heart into a wild bunny hop. Shall we share a mad tea party or a walk through wonderland? Signed, Alice. When: Wednesday, July 18, 2018. Where: South Union St. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914452 INDIANA JONES WITH METAL DETECTOR I saw you on South Union Street last week. We chatted about Spanish coins, buffalo nickels and gelato. Care to get a gelato sometime? Maybe I could help you dig for treasure? When: Tuesday, July 10, 2018. Where: South Union St. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914451 RED BEARD, WHITE TRUCK Lamoille County lover? You were pulling into the Morrisville Hannaford at the same time as me. You: handsome with the perfect beard driving a white truck. Me: driving a red Honda Accord. We both shopped, and I saw you again in the aisle. Wish I had the courage to talk to you. Drinks at night? Pancakes in the morning? When: Sunday, June 24, 2018. Where: Hannaford, Morrisville. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914450

MONTPELIER TOY STORE You are witty, intelligent, sexy and absolutely stunning. I get lost in dirty thoughts and want more than anything to share them with you. But I am having a hard time reading you and am way too polite to ask if you’re interested. Are you? If so, please let me know. When: Thursday, July 19, 2018. Where: Montpelier. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914449 BETTER CARDIO ACTIVITIES THAN RUNNING I see you periodically at work and enjoy our conversations. I find myself thinking about wonderfully exciting activities I want to do with you. I know the chance of you seeing this is slim and the chance of us working out together is even slimmer, but work is so boring and we both need the excitement! When: Thursday, July 19, 2018. Where: Montpelier. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914448 IT’S HOT IN HERE! You work for CSI. I don’t care what climate you are in, you are hot! Thanks for visiting my work today and making me blush. Keep up the good work! When: Wednesday, July 18, 2018. Where: Burlington. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914447 OFFERED HELP KEEPING DOGS APART! You pulled off Lincoln Street near Five Corners in Essex Junction, late afternoon, to offer help keeping dogs separated. I had my hands full! Please pardon that, in the urgency of the moment, I neglected to express my appreciation. Thank you, good woman! You impress! I’m certain that your nature inspires many to build community! When: Monday, July 16, 2018. Where: Route 2A North, near Five Corners. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914446 SUNDAY MORNING, SHELBURNE BUS You’re blond with a few tattoos. You were wearing gray shorts and carrying a Coach bag. (Maybe. I’m not great with those things.) I really wanted to talk to you, but you seemed deep in thought, and I didn’t want to be rude. Hoping maybe I’ll run into you again someday and get to have that conversation after all. When: Saturday, July 14, 2018. Where: Shelburne bus. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914445 MIDD FOOD CO-OP, LANE 1 I was ahead of you in line. You: a green tank top, longish dark hair and beautiful! I hung around, but you walked to a red Mini Cooper and took off. Are you around? When: Saturday, July 14, 2018. Where: Middlebury Natural Foods Co-op. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914444 SHELBURNE JIFFY MART You: pumping gas into a champagnecolored truck. Me: watching you watch me walk into store. I went to leave; you held the door for me. I said, “Thank you so much” and “Have a great day.” You answered, “You, too.” Single? Coffee sometime? When: Thursday, July 12, 2018. Where: Shelburne Jiffy Mart. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914443

EVERYONE LOVES JEEPS You had your little guy, and I had mine. My son was enamored by your black, lifted Jeep, so we came over to say hi. I feel a little silly posting this, but why not, right? When: Monday, July 2, 2018. Where: North Beach. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914442 FREQUENT ENCOUNTERS Not sure how to handle these feelings that have, over time, developed in me. I’ve come to the realization that I am absolutely crazy about you. Sometimes it seems you feel it, too. Other times I hesitate to approach you, as I would never want to make you uncomfortable or bothered by me. That is how I am feeling today. When: Wednesday, July 11, 2018. Where: around. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914441 LATE-NIGHT PHONE CALLS Slowly getting to know you has been like reading a menu full of my favorite foods: I just can’t decide what I love most. I have yet to witness your beauty with my own eyes, but I already know wherever we go, you will be the prettiest woman in every room. When: Wednesday, July 11, 2018. Where: on the phone. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914440 ERLENMEYER13, WAS I DREAMING? I first saw your picture a few years ago but was too shy to message you, then you were gone. I was looking again late two nights ago, and there you were! Could it be another chance? I wanted to wait until I was rested before I sent a message; now you’re gone again. Was it all a dream? When: Tuesday, July 10, 2018. Where: online. You: Woman. Me: Woman. #914439 RUSH-HOUR WAVE Stopped in traffic on Main Street near University Place. You were heading toward downtown, and I was going the other way. You have a nice smile. When: Tuesday, July 10, 2018. Where: Burlington. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914438 CYNICALBOY I see you’re still searching, my cynical boy, so I guess I’m confused. When: Tuesday, July 10, 2018. Where: in my life. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914437 GENTLEMAN BY THE RIVER English yellow lab and tall blond/ginger fellow. My brindle dog ran up to greet her. I couldn’t resist saying hi. I feel like it could have been more, but I was leaving. We exchanged smiles as we left. Let’s grab a beverage? Me: tall ginger lady with a straw hat. When: Monday, July 9, 2018. Where: Bolton Potholes. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914436 JUNE 2003 ON NORTH WILLARD You were stunning in a blue shirt and shorts with amazing eyes. I stopped you to talk, and it ended up being one of the most important moments in my life. —SK. When: Monday, June 10, 2013. Where: Burlington. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914435 FIELD HOCKEY NATURALIST You manifested in my dreams before I saw your arms. You wander among the secret woodland fairies and notice the tiny things others can’t see. It took years, but here we are. I love you. Let’s have fun. Coffee in the Lounge? —Aquaman. When: Tuesday, July 9, 2013. Where: in woodland mists. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914434

SCARLETTLETTERS Dear Scarlett,

My husband of nearly five decades passed away after years of serious illness. We had wonderful sex, but intimacy was pretty much impossible after he first got sick. I am in my early seventies and can’t imagine being with anyone else. But I also can’t imagine not ever having sex again. Has that shipped sailed?

Signed,

Many Shades of Gray (female, 72)

Dear Many,

Sex and intimacy are key ingredients of happiness and well-being — throughout the life cycle. It may take some time before you’re comfortable having a physical relationship with someone else, but that doesn’t mean your sex life is over. Our society tends to associate aging with diminished sex drive. For many people, however, getting older and losing loved ones actually increases the need for sexual release and companionship. A recent study by the University of Michigan and AARP found that 40 percent of people surveyed between the ages of 65 and 80 were sexually active. The vast majority of them said that sex is important to a relationship. It’s true that there are challenges. Sexual dysfunction is more common among older adults due to boredom, fatigue or grief. Physical ailments and side effects from medications also can get in the way. Men may suffer from erectile dysfunction; women may experience decreased vaginal lubrication. Joint pain can make intercourse uncomfortable, as can chronic pain and serious illnesses such as heart disease and diabetes. Keep in mind that intercourse is not the only way to experience intimacy. Kissing, cuddling and fondling can satisfy your need for affection, and genital stimulation (oral or digital) can gratify your sexual desires. Don’t hold back on masturbation, as it too brings pleasure and helps maintain blood flow. If you do become sexually active, make sure to protect yourself. You may not be able to get pregnant, but you can get an STD — they are on the rise among seniors. As for finding someone special, online sites such as SilverSingles and SeniorPeopleMeet — and Seven Days’ snail-mail Love Letters — are great ways to meet others looking for physical and emotional companionship. The ship has not sailed! But you may need to cast about for that catch.

Love,

Scarlett

Got a red-letter question? Send it to scarlett@sevendaysvt.com.


go over the edge support the flynn center

rappel 9 stories

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

september 1

courtyard marriott burlington harbor

07.25.18-08.01.18 SEVEN DAYS

PHOTO STEVE MEASE

flynncenter.org/overtheedge.html

To benefit the Flynn’s cultural and educational programs. The Flynn is a not-for-profit, 501(c)(3) organization. 87

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CCV. Because...

I will be able to graduate debt free.

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Krishna Bista CCV Student Burlington

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Thanks to our generous sponsors, the Festival is going strong and continuing to grow every year. Burlington City Arts does an outstanding job coordinating and producing this Festival and so many other exciting summer events in Burlington’s downtown, including the Summer Concert Series in City Hall Park and the Discover Jazz Festival.

#FESTIVALOFFOOLS

#BTVCITYARTS

I encourage you all to support BCA by becoming a member and hope to see you during the Foolish parade on Church Street.

BURLINGTON CITY ARTS

FESTIVAL OF FOOLS

2018

Warmly, Miro Weinberger Mayor, City of Burlington

FESTIVAL OF FOOLS STAFF

BURLINGTON CITY ARTS STAFF

Festival Director: Zach Williamson Artistic Director & Co-Founder: Woody Keppel Creative Partner and Music Programming: Signal Kitchen Operations Manager: Regina Riccitelli Company Manager: Tim Furst Volunteer Coordinator: Kyla Waldron Operations Team: Kit Kat Colson, Abra Clawson, Peter Crummy, Graham Peterson Technicians: Leo Ashby, Mark Kalbfleisch Catering: Treetop Kitchen Security: Chocolate Thunder Security Services Audio: Kevin Healey Lighting: Patrick Orr

Executive Director: Doreen Kraft Assistant Director: Sara Katz Communications Director: Andrew Krebbs Art Director: Ted Olson Event & Production Manager: Zach Williamson Development Projects: Deb Caulo


SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE ALL PERFORMANCES AND ACTIVITIES ARE FREE UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 3

SATURDAY, AUGUST 4

SUNDAY, AUGUST 5

Noon | City Hall Park

11 a.m. | City Hall Park/Dealer.com Stage

10 a.m. | BCA Plaza in City Hall Park

11-10 p.m.

11-6 p.m

Noon | City Hall Park

Noon | City Hall Steps

1 p.m. | City Hall Park/Dealer.com Stage

1:45 p.m. | City Hall Steps

MUSIC BEGINS AT RED SQUARE/ SAM ADAMS PITCH

2 p.m. | Steps of City Hall

2 p.m. | City Hall Park/Dealer.com Stage

4 p.m.

3 p.m.

2-6 p.m. | City Hall Park

BCA SUMMER CONCERTS PRESENT JUST FOR KICKS Noon-10 p.m.

BUSKING ON CHURCH STREET 3 p.m. | Top Block

SCHOOL OF FOOLERY PERFORMANCE 4 p.m.

BANK STREET PITCH OPENS WITH A PERFORMANCE BY FLOR DE TOLOACHE

FLOR DE TOLOACHE

BUSKING ON CHURCH STREET SABAR DRUM CLASS SPIRIT FAMILY REUNION

WHAT CHEER? BRIGADE MUSIC BEGINS AT RED SQUARE/ SAM ADAMS PITCH

OPERA: BASTIEN UND BASTIENNE BUSKING ON CHURCH STREET WHAT CHEER? BRIGADE SPIRIT FAMILY REUNION MR. CHRIS AND FRIENDS KIDS ROCK THE PARK! 3 p.m.

3 p.m. | Bank Street Pitch

SPIRIT FAMILY REUNION

MUSIC BEGINS AT RED SQUARE/ SAM ADAMS PITCH

JOIN US FOR A FOOLISH PARADE ON CHURCH STREET

4:30 p.m. | Top Block Pitch

3 p.m. | City Hall Park

5:45 p.m | Steps of City Hall

6 p.m. | Bank Street Pitch

5:30 p.m.

MAYORAL PROCLAMATION 6 p.m. | Steps of City Hall

WHAT CHEER? BRIGADE 7:30 p.m. | Ticketed VT Comedy Club/Hendrick’s Pitch

CHRIS GETHARD 8 p.m. | Top Block

LEE ANDERSON’S aMAZEment EXPERIENCE 8:30 p.m. | Ticketed

FOOLS AFTER PARTY AT CLUB METRONOME 9:30 p.m. | Ticketed VT Comedy Club/Hendrick’s Pitch

CHRIS GETHARD

FLOR DE TOLOACHE

MARCO BENEVENTO

6:30 p.m. | City Hall Park/Dealer.com Stage

JEH KULU DRUM AND DANCE THEATER 4 p.m. | City Hall Park/Dealer.com Stage

MR. CHRIS AND FRIENDS

FOOLS PARTY WITH MAL MAIZ AND WHAT CHEER? BRIGADE

5 p.m. | City Hall Park/Dealer.com Stage

7:30 p.m. | Ticketed VT Comedy Club/Hendrick’s Pitch

6 p.m. | City Hall Park/Dealer.com Stage

CHRIS GETHARD

8:30 p.m. | Ticketed

FOOLS AFTER PARTY AT CLUB METRONOME 9:30 p.m. | Ticketed Vermont Comedy Club/Hendrick’s Pitch

CHRIS GETHARD

THE HOKUM BROTHERS

THE LAST LAUGH FESTIVAL VARIETY SHOW

Since this is an outdoor festival, locations and times for each performance could change. Visit vermontfestivaloffools.com or visit the information booth during the event, located in front of City Hall.


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BURLINGTON CITY ARTS

FESTIVAL OF FOOLS

2018

#FESTIVALOFFOOLS

#BTVCITYARTS


How does this Fools weekend work? Festival of Fools overtakes Church Street Marketplace and City Hall Park for three consecutive days of urban insanity. On Church Street, there are new performances every hour at four different performance pitches. You can watch one performance by Leunig’s at 2 p.m. and then catch a different act in front of City Place Burlington at 3 p.m. Just about everything is free, but tipping the performers at the end of an act is the standard practice for street performances. Don’t be shy. During the Farmer’s Market on Saturday, we’ll animate City Hall Park with our Dealer.com Stage and bring genuinely unique music and

dance to the Market. On Sunday, our Kids Rock the Park afternoon is a truly awesome experience for the young and young at heart. Where else can you hear Mr. Chris tell you, “you’re something beautiful,” hold a snake, shoot a PVC sling-shot and play with a cardboard pinball creation? It all happens while shows are happening every hour on Church Street. And comedy at the Vermont Comedy Club. And music in front of City Hall. And a parade. And some after-parties at Club Metronome. It’s a whirlwind. It’s Festival of Fools!

LEE ANDERSON’S AMAZEMENT EXPERIENCE TOP OF BLOCK PITCH

CITY PLACE BURLINGTON PITCH

LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFE PITCH

SAM ADAM’S PITCH RED SQUARE CITY HALL

HENDRICK’S GIN PITCH VT COMEDY CLUB

In the event of inclement weather, performances will be paused and/or cancelled. When the weather clears, we will re-start our performances outside. In the event of a complete rain-out, we will move select programs into Contois Auditorium in City Hall.


FREE SPECIAL EVENTS

JUST FOR KICKS KICK OFF PARADE AT THE BCA AND MAYORAL SUMMER CONCERT PROCLAMATION SERIES

BURLINGTON CITY ARTS

FESTIVAL OF FOOLS

2018

#FESTIVALOFFOOLS

#BTVCITYARTS

Friday, August 3, Noon BCA Plaza in City Hall Park Get the Festival weekend started with some swing in your step! Join us for our noon performance with Burlington’s Just For Kicks on the BCA Plaza, part of the Summer Concert Series, presented by VSECU and Burton. Watch this troupe’s moves as they perform their classic routines in City Hall Park! Just For Kicks extends their raw energy and joy on the wings of the 1920s, 30s and 40s authentic jazz. And they wear the clothes to match! The hour-long show will be both a performance and an opportunity for the audience to work on their moves and get some informal instruction. Come watch and learn!

Friday, August 3, 5:30 p.m. Church Street Marketplace Help the City end the work week and usher in the 11th Annual Festival of Fools weekend. This rag-tag parade of Fools begins at the top of Church Street and ends at the steps of our fair City Hall, where the Mayor shall declare the weekend a Fools Weekend. It’s not a parade for bystanders and spectators! Find your inner foolishness and join in the fun! Parade yourself down the street with music by What Cheer? Brigade alongside our ensemble of Fools performers, the campers from the School of Foolery, the swinging moves of Just For Kicks, a juggling Mayor Miro Weinberger and the Community Bank staff. Following the Mayoral proclamation, get your groove on with an on-the-street performance by What Cheer? Brigade. This party brigade will get the weekend party started with loud brass and drumming. Not to be missed.

LEE ANDERSON’S aMAZEment PARK Friday, August 3, 8 p.m. Top Block of Church Street The aMAZEment Park: saunter through a living vaudevillian tableau. An obstacle course of the absurd through a jungle of jingles, jesters, and jolly. Sages will show you the way to go and not to go to get where you got to go or not to go. The walls are thin, thin enough to hear the solution but the ‘where?’ is thick, thick enough to sustain the confusion. The end is near the end of near... so they say, don’t they?

FOOLS IN THE PARK W/ WHAT CHEER? BRIGADE & MAL MAIZ Saturday, August 4, 6-9:45 p.m. City Hall Park Friends, family, and fools from far and wide, come join us at Burlington’s City Hall Park on Saturday, August 8 to celebrate the 11th annual Festival Of Fools. 20-piece brass band The What Cheer? Brigade and Costa Rican gypsy devil Mal Maiz and his Afro-Cumbia Orchestra will bring the dance vibes. There will be a full bar with speciality cocktails from Hendricks Gin. And thanks to our pals at Dealer.com, this event is free!


VERMONT MOZART KIDS ROCK FESTIVAL OPERA: THE PARK BASTIEN UND Sunday, August 5, 2-6 p.m. BASTIENNE

LAST LAUGH VARIETY SHOW Sunday, August 5, 6 p.m. City Hall park/Dealer.Com Stage

City Hall Park

Sunday, August 5, 10 a.m. BCA Plaza in City Hall Park Oh Festival of Fools, you never stay in your lane! Why not stage a family opera on Sunday morning? We figure a fair number of you will be still getting your day going, but the families – we know you’re up and looking for something to do! We’re excited to partner with the Vermont Mozart Festival to present a semi-staged Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart one-act opera comedy, Bastien und Bastienne, on Sunday, August 5 on the BCA Plaza in City Hall Park at 10 a.m. Free and family ready. And we’ll have free coffee from our park neighbors, Monarch and the Milkweed. Sung in English, the roles will be sung by Vermont’s favorite singers including Sarah Cullins (soprano), Adam Hall (tenor) and Erik Kroncke (bass), in collaboration with the Vermont Mozart Festival Orchestra. This songful and light Mozart opera combines the brilliance of music written at the age of 12 with a story about a Shepherd, Shepherdess, and a Soothsayer or Magician. This production is especially appropriate for audiences of young children and families.

It’s true. Kids Rock. And on Sunday, August 5, we let ‘em rock all over City Hall Park. Kids Rock the Park is an excellent afternoon with fun and foolish activities for kids and their older counterparts. We set up the park with activities and fun experiences from 2-6 p.m. Headlining the Dealer.com Stage in City Hall Park is none other than Mr. Chris and Friends! He’ll play your favorites at 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. At 3 p.m. you can shake your booty with an interactive lawn performance by Jeh Kulu Drum and Dance Theater. It’s their first appearance at Festival of Fools, but we’re pleased to present them during Kids Rock the Park and get their drums blazing in the afternoon sun. Throughout the afternoon, catch an aerial extravaganza with Nicole and Natalie. Then spend some time with the Big Blue Trunk and their PVC inventions, sure to keep the kids and their creative minds humming for at least an hour! Snakes in the Park!!! Kevin Clarkson, of 802 Reptiles, will be back again this year doing a super fun reptile meet and greet for Festival of Fools, from 3-5 pm.

It’s a hands-on experience that will give you the opportunity to pet, hold and take pictures with various lizards and snakes. We’ll also have Dux the Balloon Guy making fools-inspired balloon creations, the crazy PinBox 3000 Inventors and the BCA Studios providing make and take art activities. At 5 p.m. grab your spot in front of the Dealer.com Stage to catch a performance by the Hokum Bros. This show leads directly into the Last Laugh Variety Show.

RED SQUARE FREE EVENTS* Friday, August 3 THE RIGHTLY SO 4 p.m. THE DIRK QUINN BAND 7 p.m. DJ KERMIT (BLUE ROOM) 10 p.m. DJ CRAIG MITCHELL (BLUE ROOM) 11 p.m.

And that’s a wrap folks! As the Sunday sun sets on another great Festival of Fools, join us in the park for the Last Laugh. There’s no better way to see the breadth of performers that we had all weekend, from the Kif-Kif Sisters to USA Breakdancers. We do a mash-up of all of our 2018 performers and stage an offthe-cuff, never rehearsed variety show featuring the best of the Festival. It’s all backed by tunes from the Hokum Bros. that keeps things moving.

Saturday, August 4 LEFT EYE JUMP 3 p.m. LOS ELK 7 p.m. DJ MASHTODON 11 p.m. DJ RAUL (BLUE ROOM) 6 p.m. DJ ATAK (BLUE ROOM) 11 p.m.

Sunday, August 5 SUN KILLER INSTINCTS 3 p.m. LAZER DAD 7 p.m. DJ MAX JADE 11 p.m.

* Cover charge applies after 9 P.M.


BURLINGTON CITY ARTS

FESTIVAL OF FOOLS

2018

#FESTIVALOFFOOLS

#BTVCITYARTS

PERFORMERS

ALAKAZAM

CATE GREAT

FLIP

Sydney, Australia

Boston, MA

Quebec, Canada

Can you even touch your toes? If you’re one of those people who struggles to cross your legs while seated, your jaw will drop in awe upon seeing Alakazam. Al is coming back to Festival of Fools, and he’s one of our original performers, having been a good friend of the Festival since its beginning eleven years ago. He’s been in knots with it ever since and hasn’t been back since 2013.

Festival of Fools is pleased to welcome back Boston’s Cate Great. Last seen gracing our streets in 2015, Cate skillfully and insanely combines comedy, acrobatics and athletic prowess to the delight of her fans. She blends high-end circus with her unique brand of comedy. You will be charmed by her wit and astounded by her skill. Whether she is precariously balanced on her rolla bolla or defying gravity balanced on her hands, you will be thrilled and amazed. “Rolla bolla” you say? Come check her out.

The fearless foursome family of fools is returning to Festival of Fools after their fantastic performances last summer. If you see someone flying through the air above the crowds, it must be FLiP! The sassy flavor of this candy-coated performance artistry offers acrobatic prowess and impeccable physical timing wrapped in a hilarious crinkly wrapper. A real treat that’s sure to please!

Born in Sydney, Australia, Al is literally a human knot and has performed his one-person show in 36 countries over the past 20 years. Through body contortions, truckloads of Aussie charm and daredevil feats, you’ll marvel at Al’s fast-paced and hilarious show and see why he’s considered one of the world’s best buskers. One of the world’s best here on Church Street.

Trained at The Quebec Circus School, Cate is a seventeen-year veteran of circus stage and street. She’s performed all over - in eleven different countries including Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and Dubai as well as most of the United States and Canada. She’s charming, she’s talented–she’s not just great, she’s Cate Great!

Martin Varallo and Dominique Major have performed and toured with Cirque du Soleil, Teatro Zinzanni, Pomp, Duck & Circum-stance as well as the world’s major Festivals. They have a circus school for young performers in Quebec, called FLiP!


FLOR DE TOLOACHE

THE HOKUM BROS.

KIF-KIF SISTERS

New York, NY

Charlotte, VT

Montreal, Canada

Mariachi music on Church Street? Played and sung by Grammy Award winners? It must be the Festival of Fools weekend! We are incredibly lucky to have the four members of New York’s Flor de Toloache with us all weekend. Catch them performing on the street and on our City Hall Park Stage. Unique and awesome, seeing them up close and un-mic’d on the Marketplace is an experience you won’t soon forget. These Latin Grammy winners made New York City history as its first and anly all-women mariachi group. Founded in 2008, Flor de Toloache is lead by singers Mireya I. Ramos & Shae Fiol. Reminiscent of the early days of mariachi the group started as a trio. Today, Flor De Toloache performs as a full Mariachi ensemble. The members hail from diverse cultural backgrounds such as Mexico, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Cuba, Colombia, Germany, Italy and the United States. This defines their unique flavor and sound. The result of this cultural bouquet is an edgy, versatile and fresh take on traditional Mexican music. While working to preserve centuries old traditions of Mariachi, their melange of the traditional and the modern pushes the boundaries of the genre and brings Mariachi music to new audiences. Not to be missed.

These characters are favorites of the Festival. You can always count on the Hokum Bros to bring the Fool quotient to a new level with their songs and stage antics. Rare and original, their songs are catchy and integrated with humor, while their style of play is multifarious. Their lyrics speak of true-life experiences with a thread of the earliest cultural fabric we call Americana. Rare and original, The Hokum Bros. sing and patter their way into inspired silliness and offer enough sly satire and social commentary to ensure you’ll be wearing your happy face long after the show is over.

Flying bunnies, speeding French fries! The twins from the North have returned! Back by popular demand after their hilariously quirky debut in 2017, these identical twins fight giant pink monsters, practice the art of snacking and ensure the triumph of the umbilical cord. The Kif-Kif Sisters mix surprising comedy and audience interaction with enough happiness to make vegetables explode. These sisters have been inseparable since the womb and have many years of street performing all over the world, from the Americas to Asia. Their primary sources of inspiration are tenderness and riots.

ADDITIONAL TICKETED SHOW: Fools After Party at Club Metronome, Aug 3. $15

“Kif-Kif” means “same same” in French. They are a young duo formed by two identical twins that spread their creations in Quebec City (Canada) and around the world. Humor, twinship and saturated colors are at the heart of their performances. They’re charming and unique and we’re so pleased to have them return to the festival.


BURLINGTON CITY ARTS

FESTIVAL OF FOOLS

2018

#FESTIVALOFFOOLS

#BTVCITYARTS

PERFORMERS

MAL MAIZ

MARCO BENEVENTO MC SHOEHORN

Burlington, VT

New York, NY

Portland, OR

Costa Rican gypsy devil Maiz Vargas Sandoval and his Afro-Latino Orchestra are returning to the Festival of Fools! It’s becoming a habit! Last year they put on an amazing and exciting show in City Hall Park, the middle of Main Street and a very amazing fire show in front of City Hall. This year this hot dance band will be rocking out on our City Hall Park Saturday night with both traditional and modern flair.

Ok – Marco Benevento fans listen up: Marco will be at the Festival for ONE AMAZING, FREE performance. ONE. He’s going to be popping up and doing a solo acoustic set in the middle of Bank Street. We’re as excited as you are! And if we can’t stop the traffic, we know he will. Check back later or follow us socially for exact time and location details. It’s a Festival first.

A one, a two, a one two three four! Ok, just one. MC Shoehorn is a one-of-a-kind oneperson band that will blow your socks off. A performance artist who creates music with his feet and dances with his horn, Michael “Shoehorn” Conley combines body rhythms and sophisticated jazz forms into an entertaining spectacle. (Shoehorn, get it?) While specializing in sax and tap dance, he is a multi-instrumentalist, arranger, and composer, utilizing a variety of wind and percussion instruments, classic and original songs, and an ear for music from around the world. We’re pleased to bring him from the Northwest to the Northeast to busk his foolish talents on Church Street. He’s a shoe-in for Festival of Fools!

Based out of Burlington, Mal Maiz blends traditional cumbia, latin, reggae, and AfroCaribbean sounds. The band features John Thompson-Figuroa, Mike Hartigan, Colin Henkel, Graham Thompson and others. We’ll see you in City Hall Park for this free party!

And then for those of you who don’t know, for more than a decade pianist Marco Benevento has been amassing an extensive body of work. His studio albums and live performances set forth a vision that connects the dots in the vast space between LCD Soundsystem and Leon Russell, pulsating with dance rock energy, but with smart, earthy songwriting to match. It has led to numerous high profile appearances, ranging from Carnegie Hall to Pickathon, Mountain Jam to Treefort Festival, while headlining shows coast to coast. As anybody who’s seen Marco Benevento perform can attest, with eyes closed, smile wide across his face and fingers free-flowing across the keys, he’s a satellite to the muse. With a devout and growing fan-base, Benevento is an artist whose story is only beginning to unfold. ADDITIONAL TICKETED SHOWS: Fools After Party at Club Metronome Aug 3 & 4. $15


MICHAEL TRAUTMAN

MR. CHRIS AND FRIENDS

NATALIE & NICOLE AERIAL ACT

Portland, ME

Shelburne, VT

Burlington, VT

What are all of these ping pong balls on Church Street? Oh, it’s Michael Trautman! He’s back and we’re thrilled! Michael Trautman began studying mime in 1976, and in 1977 was invited to become a founding member of MIMEWOCK, a Kansas City-based school, and performing company. He went on to train with Tony Montanaro at Celebration Barn, working with Tony for over twenty years. In 1987, he trained with Jacques Lecoq at Ecole Jacques Lecoq. Throughout his 40+ years as a performing artist, he has been having fun traveling throughout the world and has achieved a very high level of fulfillment from providing comic relief to those in need.

You’ve seen him on Vermont PBS. You’ve seen him at Burger Night. Your kids know the lyrics to his catchy and smart tunes. Your whole family knows the dance moves to Let’s Grow Kids’ brilliant ‘Something Beautiful.’ Now catch Mister Chris & Friends as they headline our Kids Rock The Park day! Families young and old gather in City Hall Park on Sunday, August 5 for this fun and foolish family day from 2-5 p.m.

There’s something in the air! There’s something in the sky! Local performing artists and aerial masters Natalie Cronin and Nicole Dagesse will showcase sultry solos and dazzling duets; incorporating exhilarating drops, innovative fabric manipulation, and creative ground dance. We’ll be setting up their aerial rig on the Top Block of Church Street on Friday and then in City Hall Park on Saturday and Sunday. You know, just a regular weekend in Burlington.

Variously identified as a visual comic, performance artist, new vaudevillian, mime (gasp), physical comedian, storyteller, magician, and fool, he claims only to be a clown…and not a very traditional clown at that. He has appeared in the New York International Festival of Clown Theater, Festival D’Ete in Quebec, the Just For Laughs Festival, and The Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. He has little discretion and we’re pleased he makes time to make Burlington laugh all weekend.

Mister Chris & Friends is a musical project focused on the simple beauty of childhood, parenthood, and community. Singersongwriter and educator, Chris Dorman, writes, records, and performs thoughtful and tender songs that captivate multigenerational audiences. These original songs are written with the most sensitive ears in mind and are the foundation for the music and movement program, Music For Sprouts, as well as a new children’s television show called Mister Chris and Friends, created by Chris and produced by Vermont PBS. Chris lives with his family on their community farm, Bread & Butter Farm, in Shelburne/South Burlington. Playing the Festival of Fool is a first for Mister Chris & Friends, and we couldn’t be happier. “Jump, jump, jump all around. Jump until your feet hit the ground.”

Nicole Dagesse, artistic director of Murmurations Dance and World Tree Yoga, teaches classes in aerial dance, improvisation, and choreography (North End Studios) and aerial yoga (Sangha Studio) to both children and adults. Natalie Cronin is the advanced aerial teacher at World Tree and specializes in creative sequencing and rigorous conditioning for aerial silks. All ages and levels are encouraged to experience aerial dance to develop increased strength, flexibility, and creativity in a collaborative and supportive environment. Come and get a taste of what they can do with their free shows at Festival of Fools. We’re pleased to be presenting local talent!


PERFORMERS

SPIRIT FAMILY REUNION

BURLINGTON CITY ARTS

FESTIVAL OF FOOLS

2018

#FESTIVALOFFOOLS

#BTVCITYARTS

New York, NY From the street, to the stage, and with the Festival of Fools, back to the street! We’re pleased to welcome Spirit Family Reunion to our unique weekend here in Burlington. Spirit Family began singing together on the street corners of New York City in 2009. Since that time they have traveled the highways of America delivering raw, high energy, honest music. They have shared the stage with musical heroes such as Pete Seeger and Levon Helm, and have given notable performances at festivals including Stage Coach, Austin City Limits, Hardly Strictly Bluegrass, and the legendary Newport Folk Festival three times. The band has self-produced and self-released two full-length studio albums – “No Separation” (2012) and “Hands Together” (2015) – along with multiple songbooks and other collections of recordings. They are currently working on a new record and are taking time to come and have fun. Catch them on our City Hall Park Stage during the Farmers Market on Saturday and then look for them doing unique acoustic sets on Church Street on Saturday and Sunday. ADDITIONAL TICKETED SHOW: Fools After Party at Club Metronome Aug 4. $15

USA BREAKDANCERS WHAT CHEER? Tampa, FL BRIGADE We’re importing this pair from Tampa so they can break it down on the bricks of the Marketplace all weekend. The USA Breakdancers are an award-winning street show and are considered one of the top street acts in the world. Julio “Klown” Santiago is the founder of The USA Breakdancers. He is a 32-year veteran street performer and legendary street dancer. He is a former cast member of Micheal Jackson “The Immortal World Tour” by Cirque Du Soleil and had the honor of meeting The Jackson’s. Joining him is Justin “Animal” Scott a top B-boy and former cast member of the legendary Harlem Globetrotters Trotters. Together this odd couple will perform a high energy, interactive, family fun show that will have you begging for more. As you stroll the Marketplace, listen for their beats and look for their impressive moves. We’re pleased they’re joining us for their Vermont premiere!

Providence, RI The Festival of Fools always thrives with a great brass group. We scored this year and are thrilled to present What Cheer? Brigade for three high-energy days in Burlington. The Brigade is a 20-piece brass band hailing from Providence, RI. They easily prove that great parties need no electricity. We talked to them about what mics and stage size they need for their stage show – all the standard questions. They wrote back and said they don’t need mics and don’t like stages. They want to party with the people. Perfect.

“Thrillingly competent, with undimmable energy…an explosion of good cheer.”- The New York Times “They never actually took a stage, but Providence, RI’s What Cheer? dominated the Newport Folk Fest like a headliner.”-SPIN Since 2005, the band has been as likely to appear at community benefits as at all-night parties, playing bars, clubs, streets, libraries, cemeteries, weddings, bus stops, and playgrounds, and now Church Street. Look for them popping up all over the Church Street all weekend and then see them (in front of) our City Hall Park stage on Saturday evening. They will also lead our Festival Parade down Church Street on Friday at 5:30.


YO YO GUY Portland, ME Last year we had a great time introducing you all to Yo-Yo mastery with Mark Hayward. This year, join us as our collective jaws drop while watching John Higby, the YoYo Guy! John presents a high-energy, high skill comedy show that has been seen in 26 countries. He has five Guinness World Records under his belt and was recently featured at the Melbourne Comedy Festival in Australia and the Gong Show on ABC. Come out and see the Yo-Yo Guy perform on Church Street all weekend. Not to be missed.

ZIPCODE MAN Boulder, CO Zip codes. Those tricky five-digit numbers are hard to remember for most of us. We’re pleased to introduce you to a very memorable man, Zipcode Man. New to the Festival, Boulder’s David Rosdeitcher began as a touring street performer presenting more traditional fair. As he toured, he started memorizing zip codes. He soon realized his potential – he could become ZIPCODE MAN ... nailed it. Zipcode man has memorized thousands of zip codes. Thousands. He can even tell you something about the locale – like the restaurant on the corner across from the train station. With this arsenal, he’s traveled the world and been interviewed by NPR. We can’t wait to see you try to stump him!

CHRIS GETHARD New York, NY Festival of Fools is pleased to partner with the Vermont Comedy Club again this year. Too much time outside on the street? Get your tickets and save your seat in Vermont’s top-rated comedy venue. Foolishness rolls downhill, right to the doors of VCC where you’ll find Chris Gethard! Chris Gethard is the host and star of Funny or Die’s “The Chris Gethard Show” on TruTV and the host of the popular Earwolf podcast “Beautiful Stories from Anonymous People.” Chris recently starred in the Mike Birbiglia film, “Don’t Think Twice” and can be seen as ‘Todd’ on Comedy Central’s “Broad City.”Other credits include Comedy Central’s “Inside Amy Schumer,” NBC’s “Parks and Recreation,” “The Office” and the film “The Heat.” Chris is the author of the book “A Bad Idea I’m About to Do,” and his first stand-up album (“My Comedy Album”) debuted at # 2 on Billboard’s Heatseekers chart in 2014.Chris’s one-person show, “Career Suicide” (produced by Judd Apatow) just premiered on HBO after completing a successful off-broadway run at The Lynn Redgrave Theatre in NYC. It’s your chance to catch Chris on the Vermont Comedy Club’s Stage. Also featured will be Fools and Sam Adam’s inspired drinks, crafted by VCC’s award-winning staff. TICKETED SHOWS: VT Comedy Club, Aug 3 & 4, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. $25 general admission, $32 VIP Tickets


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Smiles all around!

We are proud to support our local Burlington community and are happy to be supporting the 11th annual Festival of Fools. At Community Bank, our philosophy is simple: We put our customers first in everything we do. So we work not only to understand your financial goals, but to get to know you as well. Stop into any branch and say hi, or visit us online. And see what it means to bank happy.

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Seven Days, July 25, 2018  

The Adirondack Issue: Former Wall Streeter Sandy Lewis Is an ADK Agitator; A Project That’s Turning Lake George ‘Smart’; Trumpeter Taylor Ha...

Seven Days, July 25, 2018  

The Adirondack Issue: Former Wall Streeter Sandy Lewis Is an ADK Agitator; A Project That’s Turning Lake George ‘Smart’; Trumpeter Taylor Ha...

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