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SPECIAL REPORT: WEEK TWO Examining Vermont’s Nonprofit Economy

V E RMO NT ’S IN DEPE NDEN T VO IC E JUNE 27-JULY 04, 2018 VOL.23 NO.41 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

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True

Believer At 80, Burlington peace activist Robin Lloyd is still up for the good fight BY KEN PICAR D, PAGE 32

SHE’S THE FIRST CLIENT I’VE EVER HAD WHO WANTED TO GO TO JAIL. SANDY BAIRD

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JUNE 20-27, 2018 COMPILED BY SASHA GOLDSTEIN, MATTHEW ROY & ANDREA SUOZZO

THE 6 PERCENT

Encore

Last week’s U.S. Supreme Court decision means Vermont can force online retailers to collect a sales tax, even if they don’t have a physical presence in the state. Tariff-ic!

Memorial Auditorium’s

T

he City of Burlington is urging citizens to participate in an online survey about the future of Memorial Auditorium, which could be key to deciding the fate of the historic structure. Neale Lunderville, the interim director of the Community & Economic Development Office, said Monday that the survey could lead to a bond vote to fund renovations of the building. It had fallen into disrepair and was vacated in 2016. “We want to see what the public thinks is the highest and best use for the building,” Lunderville told reporter Katie Jickling. That means the city will also host public forums before any vote takes place in November or during Town Meeting Day in March. Built in 1927, the building has hosted the winter Burlington Farmers Market, sporting events, a preschool, the teen center 242 Main and many famous performing artists. Bob Marley, Public Enemy, Yo-Yo Ma and Bob Dylan, among others, have played there.

That’s how much Keurig Green Mountain has agreed to pay investors in a class-action suit alleging that the company made false statements in 2011 that artificially boosted stock prices.

TOPFIVE

MONEY TO BERN

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) made more than $1 million in 2017, the second consecutive year he’s passed that milestone. Now the populist politician is collecting “royalties.”

Fixes won’t be cheap: The city previously estimated that it could cost $4 million just to bring the auditorium up to code; a full renovation could run $17 million. Mayor Miro Weinberger had previously considered allowing the University of Vermont to build a sports arena on the site. Burlington’s neighborhood planning assemblies organized a meet-up last year during which many residents waxed nostalgic about the auditorium and urged the city to save it. That’s the plan now, said Lunderville, adding that a consultant is working on architectural and engineering studies. Monday, Weinberger praised Lunderville’s presentation and said he never actually wanted to sell the building. “I think we should put in front of the people of Burlington a clear, good plan,” Weinberger said, and residents will decide “what it will take for us to continue the historic use of this building as a publicly owned public gathering space.”

FURIOUS FEEDBACK The U.S. Food & Drug Administration is reconsidering a proposal to put “added sugars” on maple syrup labels. Sweet.

MOST POPULAR ITEMS ON SEVENDAYSVT.COM

1. “Magnolia Bistro Owner’s Facebook Post Sparks Calls for Boycott” by Katie Jickling. The Burlington business owner’s social media posts triggered a firestorm of outrage. 2. “Some of Vermont’s Highest-Paid Execs Run Nonprofits” by Paul Heintz. At least 60 employees of 16 Vermont nonprofits earned more than half a million dollars during the most recent year for which records are available. 3. “South Burlington Motel Residents Worry About Its Planned Demolition” by Molly Walsh. Gas mogul Skip Vallee is seeking to demolish the extended-stay Maple Leaf Motel in South Burlington. 4. “How Vermont’s Nonprofit Sector Became a $6.8 Billion Industry” by Paul Heintz. By some estimates, Vermont has more nonprofits per capita than any other state in the Union. 5. “GlobalFoundries Cuts Jobs at Essex Junction Manufacturing Facility” by Molly Walsh. The plant trimmed some 130 people from its workforce last week.

MATTHEW THORSEN

Memorial Auditorium in Burlington

S

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“A lot of people don’t associate cars with Vermont, but we actually have a rich history here in Vermont,” said Scott. “The first race was in 1903 at the Caledonia Fair, and we have been going strong ever since.” Cars started arriving at about 5:30 p.m. and were parked on Church Street until 8. Drivers scattered for dinner and drinks, leaving the cars for passersby to gawk at and photograph. The three Vermont teams racing this year were among the first of the evening’s arrivals. Brent Herrmann and William Burns of Dorset drove a green 1946 GMC pickup truck that originally belonged to Herrmann’s father. Burns, the team’s navigator, brought a wooden box with the ashes of his father, who passed away in December, so he could race with them in spirit.

Herrmann and Burns grew up racing “anything motorized” with their auto-enthusiast fathers. “We were best friends growing up, and our dads were best friends,” said Burns. “Without our dads, we wouldn’t be racing.” Steve Boutin, a racer from Essex Junction, said he was happy to spend the night in his own bed. Despite the gasoline fumes and the revving of engines, spectators seemed pretty excited. Enosburg Falls’ Amanda Collins hadn’t heard about the race until it arrived but thought seeing the cars was “neat.” Jeanne Armstrong, a tourist from Indiana, said she was pleasantly surprised by the vintage invasion. The drivers were expected on New Hampshire’s Mount Washington for lunch on Tuesday. SARA TABIN

SARA TABIN

WHAT’S WEIRD IN VERMONT

Great Race participants on Church Street

LAST SEVEN 5

ome Church Street-goers got an unexpected show Monday evening when 114 collector cars rolled through Burlington’s downtown pedestrian mall. The 2018 Great Race, an annual competitive road rally for model years 1972 and older, made an overnight stop in the Queen City amid a nine-day journey from Buffalo, N.Y., to Halifax, Nova Scotia. Gov. Phil Scott, who has decades under his belt racing cars at Thunder Road Speedbowl, shook hands with drivers alongside Mayor Miro Weinberger. Both men spoke at the evening’s opening ceremony.

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FEEDback READER REACTION TO RECENT ARTICLES

IMITATING ESCHER

Last week’s cover art will look familiar to anyone who has seen M.C. Escher’s reality-bending artwork, but I don’t see any credit offered to Escher. Instead the graphic is credited to Thomas James, who has clearly plagiarized Escher’s 1953 lithograph “Relativity.” It also is not clear that the graphic has anything to do with the article it is supposed to be illustrating about Vermont’s nonprofit organizations [“Nonprofit Margins,” June 20]. Heidi Champney

STARKSBORO

Editor’s note: Lots of illustrators have played with Escher’s motif, as with other iconic works by artists from Leonardo da Vinci to Andy Warhol. The assumption is that the work is so well known it doesn’t require an acknowledgment of the original. James’ cover art wasn’t attached to any particular story but was meant to illustrate the overarching subject of our special “Give and Take” report on Vermont’s nonprofit economy. We thought it succeeded.

ADDICTS ARE EVERYWHERE

I recently read some comments from Shannon Reilly, the owner of Magnolia Bistro [Off Message: “Magnolia Bistro Owner’s Facebook Post Sparks Calls for Boycott,” June 18]: The comments — specifically “Sorry. So fuckin pathetic employing people spaced out on bupe. Fuckin useless. Let them die” — hit a nerve. I am one of those “fuckin useless,” “spaced out on bupe” employees. I happen to work for a very well-known legal firm. I happen to be in recovery, and I happen to be on a very low dose of Suboxone, tapering lower and lower every month. I suspect I will be done soon.

CORRECTIONS

Last week’s Soundbites column contained an error about the Nightshade Festival. Food was available for purchase once attendees paid the entrance fee. Last week’s Side Dishes item “Oven’s Cold,” about the closure of Junior’s Italian in Colchester, failed to mention that Amir Jusufagic and Sani Pasagic took over operations at Junior’s Downtown in 2013.


WEEK IN REVIEW

first I was for Bernie. But then, on roughly February 1, 2016, the man turned into an unpatriotic, anti-progressive, anti-liberal anti-Democrat making vicious, slanderous attacks on Hillary Clinton. Now the unusually smart people of Vermont have an unusually obvious opportunity to help the national Democratic Party regain control in Washington, D.C. I suggest: Vote to send Bernie into retirement from the U.S. Senate. In retirement, Bernie and Jane Sanders can resurrect Burlington College. Bernie can find his income tax returns. I feel confident that Vermont will replace Bernie with a registered Democrat. Bernie helped Trump last time. Please, not again.

TIM NEWCOMB

Andy Johnson

JACKSONVILLE, FL

SCOTT FREE? I have news for you, Reilly: We are everywhere. We are your doctors, your nurses, your firemen. We are the police, we are your chefs, your restaurant owners and your children. Brothers, sisters, wives, cousins. We are everywhere. This may be really dumb of me, putting my own personal experience out there, but I will not stay silent any longer. This is abhorrent, disgusting and inaccurate. We are everywhere — except at your restaurant. Jennifer M. Fredette

BURLINGTON

SAN JOSE, CA

Fadem is a student at Bennington College studying political science, environmental studies and art.

SICK OF BERNIE!

Al Salzman

FAIRFIELD

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[Re “In a Third Term, Would Bernie Sanders Show Up to Work?” May 30]: Once upon a time, I spent four wonderful years at Dartmouth College. I fell in love with Vermont. As a freshman, I hitchhiked all over your beautiful state. Later, when I had a car, I did short and long trips to Burlington, Rutland and Bennington. Your mountains were my first; I had lived my entire life in Jacksonville, Fla. I also fell in love with Vermont people. Is it your crispy air? Something about Vermont always seemed to help people think more clearly. Years later, I fell in love with Bernie Sanders. He seemed to have a healthy, unselfish, patriotic progressive view. Then Sanders ran for president. At

SAY CHEESE

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[Re Off Message: “Scott Vetoes Vermont State Budget, Tax Bills,” May 26]: Carbon pricing has been a hot-button issue in Vermont for at least the past four years. As a Vermonter, student at Bennington College and young person, I feel a dedication and responsibility to supporting my state economically while mitigating the worst effect of climate change. In Vermont, we don’t need convincing that maintaining our environment — and major industries such as sugaring, skiing and leaf peeping — means immediate and regenerative action on climate. For the past two years, I have worked with hundreds of students across the state, at more than 10 college campuses, to demonstrate and advocate for the effectiveness and necessity of carbon pricing in our great state. Through student organizing — including petitions, citizen advocacy and large-scale art installations — we have secured endorsements from four higher education institutions, namely Bennington College, Champlain College,

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Green Mountain College and School for International Training. These endorsements represent a population of 3,800 students and more than 1,000 staff and faculty. We love our green state. And while we have earned ourselves the No. 1 spot in 2018’s Greenest States by WalletHub, Gov. Phil Scott’s refusal to push for this economically and environmentally sound legislation is a missed opportunity for new commerce and as an avenue for keeping young Vermonters in the state after school. Scott, don’t delay climate action. Instead, support the Joint Fiscal Office study of the economic benefits of carbon pricing in our state.

[Re Fair Game: “Ethical Charades,” June 13]: “Sleaze” rhymes with “disease” — and the disease is spreading from the Oval Office to the Pavilion Building, where sits Gov. Phil Scott. It’s becoming a contagion, a plague of corruption. President Donald Trump’s sleaziness is endemic throughout the land. The Donald’s actions have set a new low standard for ethical behavior. Conflicts of interest? What conflicts of interest? Making $75,000 last year from interest on a multimillion-dollar loan to his former business partner at DuBois Construction doesn’t seem to register on Scott’s conscience. That this same construction company is still getting state contracts funded by Vermont taxpayers while Scott merrily vetoes a livable wage, paid family leave and any other legislation that might help hardworking families rubs salt in open wounds. As for our newly established so-called State Ethics Commission with only the power to go “Tsk! Tsk!” — don’t make me laugh!

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contents

LOOKING FORWARD

JUNE 27-JULY 04, 2018 VOL.23 NO.41

24

16

22

NEWS 14

Cheap Date?

Give and Take: Defining the deal between the state and nonprofits BY ALICIA FREESE

18

The Squeaky Nonprofit

Give and Take: 501c3s lobby for more state funding

ARTS NEWS 24

26

BY KATIE JICKLING

Fat Chance

Flynn Center's John Killacky Looks Back, and Ahead

BY PAMELA POLSTON

Burlington Boosts Funding for Social Service Nonprofits

20

Keeping Tabs

Give and Take: Olde Northender Pub funds its own charity with gambling

An Exhibit Documents Solzhenitsyn’s Vermont Years

32

26

Quick Lit: The Hippie Takeover

38

True Believer

Activism: At 80, Burlington peace activist Robin Lloyd is still up for the good fight

Puff Piece

Cannabeat: Behold, the 2018 Weeders Survey results are in BY DAN BOLLES

40

Dazed and Confused

Cannabeat: Weeders will party en masse July 1. Is that legal? BY SARA TABIN

43

BY JAMES BANDLER

BY MATTHEW ROY

VIDEO SERIES

COLUMNS + REVIEWS

BY KEN PICARD

BY RACHEL ELIZABETH JONES

Give and Take: Vermont gambles that the nonprofit gaming industry can police itself

48

FEATURES

BY MATTHEW ROY

BY ALICIA FREESE

18

38

Days of Our Lives

Theater review: Our Town, Weston Playhouse BY ALEX BROWN

Online Thursday

44

Sun Is High

12 28 29 45 67 71 74 80 90

FUN STUFF

Fair Game POLITICS Drawn & Paneled ART Hackie CULTURE Side Dishes FOOD Soundbites MUSIC Album Reviews Art Review Movie Reviews Scarlett Letters SEX

straight dope mr. brunelle explains it all deep dark fears this modern world edie everette iona fox red meat jen sorensen harry bliss rachel lives here now free will astrology personals

CLASSIFIEDS

SECTIONS 11 50 63 66 74 80

30 84 84 84 84 85 85 86 86 86 87 88

vehicles housing homeworks services fsbo buy this stuff music, art legals crossword calcoku/sudoku puzzle answers jobs

The Magnificent 7 Calendar Classes Music Art Movies

Food: One Dish: At Wild Roots, a new chef explores Vermont’s micro-seasons

C-2 C-2 C-3 C-3 C-4 C-4 C-4 C-4 C-5 C-7 C-8 C-9

BY HANNAH PALMER EGAN

Mixing It Up

Food: Bartenders went head to head at the Great Shakes cocktail competition BY SADIE WILLIAMS

66

Far Out

COVER IMAGE GLENN RUSSELL SPECIAL REPORT: WEEK TWO

COVER DESIGN REV. DIANE SULLIVAN

Stuck in Vermont: Steve "Wish" Shannon

organized an all-ages hip-hop jam at the Swan Dojo in downtown Burlington last Saturday. DJs spun records, Anthill Collective worked on graffiti art and B-boys competed in a breakdance battle.

PAGE 14

True

Believer At 80, Burlington peace activist Robin Lloyd is still up for the good fight

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Music: The Barrage brings eclectic, DIY concerts to the Northeast Kingdom BY JORDAN ADAMS

Underwritten by:

Examining Vermont’s Nonprofit Economy

COVER INSET IMAGE COURTESY OF ROBIN LLOYD VER MON T’ S INDEPE NDEN T V OICE JUNE 27-JULY 04, 2018 VOL.23 NO.41 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

48

B Y K EN PIC ARD , PAG E 3 2

SHE’S THE FIRST CLIENT I’VE EVER HAD WHO WANTED TO GO TO JAIL. SANDY BAIRD

EXIT POLL

PAGE 38

Weeders Survey results

SMOKE SCREEN

PAGE 40

Legal pot raises questions

WILD COURSES

PAGE 44

Chef explores micro-seasons

06.27.18-07.04.18

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The Killington Adventure Center is a playground for all ages. Test your skills in the Woodward WreckTangle, a timed ninja style obstacle course, and try over 15 family friendly attractions. Our playground has MORE. killington.com

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DREAMSTIME.COM

LOOKING FORWARD

the

MAGNIFICENT

THURSDAY 28

Family Band “We’re a family. We do real work, and we keep moving forward,” says 10,000 Maniacs keyboardist Dennis Drew, according to a press release. The longtime alt-rock band embraces its entire catalog, from early ’90s hits such as “Candy Everybody Wants” to its 2015 album, Twice Told Tales. The platinum-selling band performs in Stowe with lead singer Mary Ramsey.

MUST SEE, MUST DO THIS WEEK COMPI L E D BY K RI STEN RAVIN

SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 53

FRIDAY 29-SUNDAY 1

On Fire Flames flicker and sparks fly during RockFire, an annual celebration of Barre’s granite heritage. Folks warm up to the area’s natural treasures at an elemental experience incorporating music, history and brilliant blazes. This year’s expanded schedule includes Friday’s Heritage Walk, a shorter, more family-friendly version of the signature FireWalk. These flame-lit excursions feature live music and actors telling tales of Barre’s past.

TUESDAY 3

YOU’RE A FIREWORK

SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 54

Burlington’s Independence Day Celebration is a big deal. Food vendors, activities for all ages and live music by the likes of Kat Wright and Red Hot Juba in several waterfront parks pave the way for a sparkling fireworks display over Lake Champlain. See our special Independence Day calendar or visit sevendaysvt.com for more festivities taking place around the state.

SATURDAY 30

Break a Sweat Do summer barbecues have you feeling sluggish? Beginner and intermediate athletes can earn their hot dogs and hamburgers in the Great Race. Starting at St. Albans Bay, the challenge includes a 3.1-mile run, 12-mile bike ride and 3-mile paddle. Teams of up to four participants are welcome. Food, kids’ games and Bay Day activities follow. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 57

FRIDAY 29

Earning Votes

True Representation

FRIDAY 29

All Night Long

Ginny by Alice Neel

SEE SOUNDBITES ON PAGE 67

MAGNIFICENT SEVEN 11

SEE REVIEW ON PAGE 74

GLAM Vermont, the Pride Center of Vermont’s social program for gay, bi and trans folks, ends LGBT Pride Month in style with an epic bash at South Burlington’s Higher Ground Showcase Lounge. Revelers at the Pink Pride Party dance the night away to favorite tracks spun by DJs VU and Craig Mitchell, chat with sexperts, and snag sensual party favors.

SEVEN DAYS

With the exhibition “Reclamation,” the Helen Day Art Center challenges how women have been traditionally portrayed in art. Rather than passive objects of beauty, the women in these works are active participants in their lives and environments, painted by nationally acclaimed, contemporary female artists. Amy Lilly reviews the collection.

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COURTESY OF HELEN DAY ART CENTER

ONGOING

Green Mountain State residents bring their most pressing issues and questions to Whose Vermont? Our Vermont!, a gubernatorial forum hosted by Rights & Democracy and the Rutland Area NAACP. Democratic candidates for the state’s highest office, including Brenda Siegel, Christine Hallquist, James Ehlers and Ethan Sonneborn, weigh in on what they would do for the state and its citizens.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

SEE CALENDAR LISTINGS ON PAGE 61


FAIR GAME OPEN SEASON ON VERMONT POLITICS BY JOHN WALTERS

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Tradin’ Paint

Chill

at Quarry Hill

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ometimes you need a really strong thunderstorm to clear the air. So it seems, now that last Friday’s episode of Disasterpiece Theatre has been followed by the end of Vermont’s long budget stalemate — quickly, quietly and with a complete absence of drama. The House and Senate agreed Monday on their third budget bill, and Gov. PHIL SCOTT let it become law without his signature.  That outcome would have seemed impossible less than 72 hours earlier, when a marathon session ended in late-night uproar. Minority Republicans rushed the podium, surrounding House Speaker MITZI JOHNSON (D-South Hero) and hectoring her for, in their minds, pulling a parliamentary fast one.  And that, in turn, was just the capper to a roller-coaster ride of frustration, miscommunication, and accusations of perfidy and betrayal.  The final act of the 2018 session began on June 14, when Scott vetoed the legislature’s second budget, H.13, because it did nothing to prevent a statutory Untitled-12 1 4/12/18 10:51 AM increase in nonresidential property tax rates. Lawmakers had agreed to use onetime money to keep homestead property tax rates level but balked at using even more to buy down nonresidential rates.  Time to write Budget 3.0. On June 20, three Senate committees reached agreement on a revised version of H.13, which was dubbed H.16. Senators moved slightly toward Scott on taxes, trimming the nonresidential rate by one penny. They also included a provision to establish statewide teacher health care negotiations — a top priority for Team Scott. The following day, the Senate approved H.16 on a 27-0 vote. Senate leadership left the floor with a sense of confidence. “We thought we were in full agreement with the House” on the new budget, said Sen. Single person pool pass: $150 ANN CUMMINGS (D-Washington), chair of 2 Swimming Pools the Finance Committee. Club House Café & Bar “We felt good after Thursday,” Landscaped setting said Senate Majority Leader BECCA BALINT (D-Windham). Leadership had Poolside 16oz Frozen gotten a unanimous vote. And even Margaritas $5.95 better, three Republicans — JOE BENNING Daily Food & Drink specials (R-Caledonia), RANDY BROCK (R-Franklin) and PEG FLORY (R-Rutland) — publicly Sign up for membership endorsed the budget and urged the govat quarryhillclub.com! ernor to sign it. But House leaders were not on board. While Senate leaders were confident that Scott would bend, Johnson was 259 Quarry Hill Rd, S. Burlington deeply concerned about another veto. 8v-quarryhill062718.indd 1

6/25/18 12:32 PM

So she struck out on her own, holding a one-on-one meeting with the governor. Scott offered a variation on his no-tax theme: using any extra revenue from this month to close the gap between the two sides. Johnson floated the idea that the governor might let H.16 pass into law without his signature. Which is exactly what happened in the end; but at the time, Scott’s idea took center stage.

I DON’T LOVE IT, I DON’T HATE IT, BUT AT THIS POINT,

I DON’T CARE. RE P. KI T T Y T OL L

Was Johnson being played by the governor? Perhaps. He clearly drove a wedge between House and Senate. Later last Thursday, Johnson met with Finance Commissioner ADAM GRESHIN and fiscal analysts for the legislature and administration. They worked out a rough agreement: Any extra June revenue would be split. Half would go to the underfunded teacher pension fund, a legislative priority, and the rest would go to the education fund to help lower property tax rates. “There was a meeting Friday morning at 7:30 with all parties to cement the deal,” said Greshin. By “all parties,” he meant the House and administration. No one from the Senate was there. And, less than 24 hours after the Senate had unanimously approved H.16, fully expecting the House to concur, Johnson and Scott reached a different agreement. This is where recollections diverge. Scott believed he had a deal to resolve the budget standoff.  Johnson demurred. “I was clear with him that the Senate had not been involved,” she said. And that’s kind of important. Crucially, the Senate was not even in the building. It had adjourned on Thursday after voting out H.16. PETER STERLING, aide to Senate President Pro Tempore TIM ASHE (D/P-Chittenden) was there, but he was pretty much by himself. Virtually all the key players spoke to me for this story, but Ashe repeatedly declined an interview.

At midmorning Friday, Johnson was briefing her leadership team. Scott was telling his people that a deal was in place. Senate leaders say they were still out of the loop. Johnson and Scott sought support for their agreement from the Republican House caucus. “It got mixed reviews in caucus, but all agreed it was a deal,” said Scott’s chief of staff, JASON GIBBS. At least some Republicans agreed to sign on. Key senators say they learned of the “deal” around midday Friday. “We were a little shocked,” said Cummings. “Tim, JANE [KITCHEL (D-Caledonia), chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee] and I met with the speaker for almost two hours, telling her our position and our surprise at the new agreement.” By the end of that meeting, the 50/50 deal was practically dead. Or, as Gibbs put it, legislative leaders “reneged” on a deal. And he blamed the Senate.  “Ashe was aware of the framework of this agreement on Thursday before the Senate voted,” Gibbs asserted. “He allowed the speaker to seek support and ask for cosponsors. After all that, he intervened and demanded that she take the agreement off the table.” Gibbs characterized it as a power play by Ashe that left the House in a subservient position to the Senate.  “They are welcome to their perspective,” Johnson responded. “But I was very clear with the governor that I was negotiating on behalf of the House, that we had to get the Senate on board.”  In retrospect, Johnson got out over her skis. She should have consulted with Senate leaders much earlier. But events were moving very quickly, and again, senators were not in the building. That was a mistake by Senate leadership.  It’s also clear administration officials were trying to exploit the House-Senate divergence. It’s touching that Gibbs cares so deeply about the prestige of the House, but it’s also hard to believe. More likely, he’s slamming the chamber that took a hard line, while praising the body that offered a compromise acceptable to his boss.  Meanwhile, House leaders were scrambling to find a new compromise. Rep. KITTY TOLL (D-Danville), chair of the House Appropriations Committee, devised a three-way split in place of the 50/50 idea. The third recipient would be the General Fund; it was Toll’s effort to assuage key senators, who wanted more


GOT A TIP FOR JOHN? JOHNWALTERS@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

(R-Milton) left the floor to work things out. When they emerged, Johnson announced that the House would return on Monday for debate and a revote on H.16. This being Vermont, Johnson and Turner reestablished diplomatic relations during a Sunday afternoon meeting over fries and shakes.  It seemed as though Friday’s turmoil sharpened everyone’s resolve to get this thing done and get out of town. A few hours before Scott announced his intention to allow H.16 to become law, Gibbs offered a bit of oblique foreshadowing. “There will be some type of budget in place,” he said, adding, “The administration will continue to advocate for rate relief.” So, did Scott capitulate? Did he “lose”? It’s plausible that he’d accepted this outcome last week, as Senate leadership had inferred. In last week’s column, I speculated that Scott might actually win by losing; he could get out of the budget mess and blame the Dems for raising taxes. This could be a simple variation on that theme. Scott certainly wasted no time turning his “defeat” into political capital. “By abandoning two agreed-upon compromises and rejecting multiple proposals to fund government beyond July 1, legislative leaders have now pushed us to the brink of a shutdown,” Scott wrote in a Monday night press release announcing his budget decision.  Coming from a guy who made his bones as a conciliator, that’s a remarkably partisan statement.  First, there were no agreed-upon compromises. There was one that didn’t include the Senate; the other was dropped after Republicans refused to sign on. Second, the legislature rejected proposals to fund government beyond July 1 out of principle: Lawmakers believe it’s bad policy not to have a budget in place.  And third, it was Scott himself who set the stage for all this drama when, for a second year in a row, he introduced a major reform package late in the session. Maybe Scott is used to this from his days on the stock car circuit. Passing in tight quarters, drafting on the lead car’s bumper, tradin’ a little paint in the corners. It’s all part of the deal.  It’s a great way to race. It’s a lousy way to make policy. m

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Disclosure: Tim Ashe is the domestic partner of Seven Days  publisher and coeditor Paula Routly. Find our conflictof-interest policy here:  sevendaysvt.com/ disclosure.

FAIR GAME 13

spending flexibility for the onetime money. The recess dragged on. At 6 p.m., Johnson ordered pizzas for House members and staff. It was a brief politics-free moment in a long, difficult day. After the pizza break, the House finally took the floor and Toll presented her plan. The House then recessed for party caucuses. Toll made the rounds, explaining the concept to Democrats and Republicans alike. After her meeting with Republicans, she encountered Scott in the hallway. “I don’t love, it, I don’t hate it, but at this point, I don’t care,” she told the governor,  The House remained in recess as leadership tried to gin up support.  “I thought I had something,” said Johnson. “We had some Republicans who were supportive.” But, she added, Republican leadership was “giving really mixed messages.”  The administration was laying low. Scott said he would wait to see how it all worked out before making a commitment. Sometime close to 10 p.m., House leadership gave up on Johnson’s effort to find a compromise.  “We were not building coalitions; we were fracturing them,” Johnson said. “It was clear that the plan was not viable.” Gibbs insisted on Monday that the administration “would have accepted” Toll’s three-way split. Perhaps, but Team Scott should have made that clear Friday evening. The House returned to the floor, and Toll introduced a version of H.16 with only modest changes to the Senate bill. Debate began; a couple of amendments were proposed and defeated. More amendments were on the calendar, and Republicans were expecting that all of them would be considered.  Then Johnson called for a vote on Toll’s proposal. Republicans were apparently not paying attention. And on a voice vote with little dissent, the House approved H.16. Those who had been diligently following the action were aware of what had happened. Republicans blew their tops. They rushed to the front of the chamber and demanded that Johnson take it all back. After consulting with House Clerk Bill MaGill, the chamber’s parliamentary expert, Johnson told Republicans that she had followed procedure and that nothing could be done. Republicans pressed their case. Johnson and Minority Leader DON


Cheap Date?

Defining the deal between the state and nonprofits B Y ALI CI A FR EESE

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 06.27.18-07.04.18 SEVEN DAYS 14 LOCAL MATTERS

THOMAS JAMES

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ver the last 50 years government in the Green Mountains has withdrawn from providing many direct services to Vermonters in need. Instead, the state has outsourced that job — and hundreds of millions of dollars — to an ad hoc network of dozens of private nonprofit groups. They feed the hungry, house the homeless, care for the mentally ill and assist the developmentally disabled. These organizations tend to be more nimble, innovative and attuned to the needs of their community. Often they can deliver services at a bargain compared to state government. The arrangement seems appropriate in a state that cherishes local decision making but lacks county government, which might otherwise do the work. It fulfills the conservative desire for limited government and liberal support of humane, community-based programs. But this public-private safety net has vulnerabilities. It has grown so large and sprawling that no one in state government is able to say exactly how much taxpayer money goes to the nonprofit agencies. “It’s millions and millions of dollars,” said Sen. Jane Kitchel (D-Caledonia), chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee and a former secretary of the Agency of Human Services. “Is there a master list? Uh, no, I don’t think so.” “Nobody knows who’s doing what,” added Human Services Secretary Al Gobeille, describing the hodgepodge of social service organizations, some of which have similar or overlapping missions. And while the network of organizations has grown, funding for essential services has shrunk, straining the system and making some policy leaders question whether government is shirking its duties to residents by underpaying the nonprofits that provide critical state services. The theory was “You could do it cheaper in the community than you could in state government,” said Scott Johnson, who worked in state

government and led one of Vermont’s 15 nonprofit parent-child centers, the Lamoille Family Center. “That worked fine for 25, 30 years — as long as there was money.” A total of 498 Vermont nonprofits reported income from government grants on their most recent federal tax forms, according to Seven Days’ database of Internal Revenue Service filings. Many were founded, or grew into expanded roles, in the 1960s and 1970s as a result of two big changes in how social services are delivered in the United States.

President Lyndon Johnson’s War on Poverty in the ’60s spawned more than 1,000 “community action agencies,” publicly funded private nonprofits charged with rooting out poverty within their communities. Vermont has several such agencies today, whose missions encompass a broad range of activities: housing assistance, preschool, domestic violence support, weatherization and heating fuel subsidies, to name a few. They rely almost exclusively on government funding and receive a lot of it. In fiscal year 2017, the state paid

$6.9 million to Capstone Community Action, which serves central Vermont. Northwest Vermont’s Champlain Valley Office of Economic Opportunity got $6.7 million. Another wave of nonprofits grew up as Americans rejected the practice of warehousing people with mental illness and disablities in state-run institutions. In 1993, Vermont closed the Brandon Training School, the state’s facility for those with developmental disabilities, and began moving individuals out of the Vermont State Hospital, which once housed more than 1,000 patients. Its


census had declined to about 50 people by the time Tropical Storm Irene flooded and permanently closed the Waterbury facility in 2011. State officials came to agree that it was more humane to treat such individuals in venues closer to their families. To deliver that care, Vermont turned to social service nonprofits such as Washington County Mental Health and Northeast Kingdom Human Services, giving them regional monopolies and assigning them legal responsibility for the mentally ill and developmentally disabled in their communities.

IT’S MILLIONS AND MILLIONS OF DOLLARS.

IS THERE A MASTER LIST? UH, NO, I DON’T THINK SO. S E N. JA NE K I TCHEL

Labor of Love Hundreds of Vermont social service agencies receive checks from Montpelier, but other nonprofits get government funding, too.

on Temporary Shelter and Middlebury College. Certain nonprofits — including churches, semigovernmental entities and those with annual revenue of $50,000 or less — report more limited information. And as with any tax filings, the Form 990s may contain errors. Why are we making this available? Because public information is a powerful tool, and transparency fosters accountability. Happy searching.

LOCAL MATTERS 15

Now you can, too, at nonprofits.sevendaysvt.com. The database is a valuable resource. You can search by name, location, assets and annual revenue. Look up categories of nonprofits, such as those dedicated to the environment, arts and animals. Check out board members. A click of the mouse reveals top salaries. The Vermont Cheese Council? It’s in there. The Green Mountain Horse Association? Yup. So is the Brattleboro Retreat, the Committee

Suggest a story via email at nonprofits@sevendaysvt.com or leave a message at 802-488-5074.

SEVEN DAYS

To report its “Give and Take” series, Seven Days needed searchable data — specifically, the newly available digital Form 990s that many Vermont nonprofits file with the Internal Revenue Service. So digital editor Andrea Suozzo turned those thousands of filings into a database. Our reporters and editors have been mining it in search of stories, looking for patterns and aberrations.

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VT’S NONPROFIT SHADOW GOVERNMENT ............... WHY NONPROFITS LOBBY THE LEGISLATURE ................ CHARITIES CHANCE IT ON BREAK-OPEN TICKETS..... IT’S NOT JUST A PUB… IT’S A 501C3 ................

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SEVEN DAYS PUTS NONPROFIT DATA AT YOUR FINGERTIPS

CHEAP DATE?

Vermont has eight times as many nonprofits as it has dairy farms — and unlike the milk industry, the state’s charitable sector just keeps growing. Vermont’s 6,044 nonprofits reported $6.8 billion in revenue and $13.2 billion in assets in their latest Internal Revenue Service filings. The federal Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that nearly 18 percent of IN THIS ISSUE: the state’s workers are employed by 501c3s.  Though they’re undergirded by PAGE 14 generous tax breaks and government expenditures, these organizations rarely make PAGE 18 the news — save for the occasional embezzlement scandal or multimilliondollar donation.  PAGE 20 In its “Give and Take” series, Seven Days is examining the state’s PAGE 22 nonprofit ecosystem, from tiny local charities to one of the biggest enterprises in the state: the $1.29 billion University of Vermont Medical Center. Yep, it’s a nonprofit. What do these mostly tax-exempt organizations have in common? What does their proliferation mean for Vermont?  To find out, Seven Days digital editor Andrea Suozzo built a database so our news team could analyze revenues reported by the 6,044 federally recognized nonprofit organizations that were based in Vermont as of May. The reporters looked closest at 1,873 that now submit detailed Form 990 tax filings in a digital format. Then they started making phone calls.  The “Give and Take” series is the product of their findings. Look for multiple stories in each issue and read the entire series online at sevendaysvt.com/nonprofits. 

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Today, these 11 regional “designated agencies” plus five “specialized service agencies,” which provide more individualized services, care for 35,000 clients a year, at a cost of about $414 million. The state and federal government pay more than 90 percent of the bill. The state also began contracting with several private nonprofit hospitals, such as the Brattleboro Retreat, to provide beds to patients who require intensive mental health care. Vermont’s annual tab for inpatient psychiatric care in 2017 was roughly $38 million.

The state relies on nine housing authorities as well 16 land trusts and housing development corporations to provide affordable housing and conserve land. Twelve regional development corporations are charged with spurring economic development. Vermont even relies on a nonprofit to maintain its network of snowmobile trails. In 1997, the state turned the job of running several highway rest areas over to nonprofit chambers of commerce. More recently it created Vermont Parks Forever, a private nonprofit to promote state parks. There’s good reason to rely more on nonprofits, according to Steve Dale, a former Department for Children and Families commissioner who previously worked at the Howard Center, the Burlington-based provider of mental health, disability and addiction treatment that is the state’s largest designated agency. Dale said nonprofits are less constrained by politics and more concerned with their communities’ needs, in part because the board members who oversee them are locals. He offered an example: When he was at the Howard Center in the early 2000s, governor Howard Dean and other state leaders resisted opening a methadone clinic to treat opioid addiction. But, as Dale recalled it, the Howard Center board, which had an up-close view of Chittenden County’s escalating addiction problem, overcame state-level opposition to open a clinic in Burlington in 2002. “It was the perfect example of local people taking responsibility that would not likely have been taken if it was a state agency,” Dale said. “I think one of the real strengths of our system is local involvement,” agreed Doug Racine, a former lawmaker who was human services secretary under governor Peter Shumlin.


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Cheap Date? « P.15 Another advantage: “The taxpayer is getting a great bang for the buck by having nonprofits doing this,” said Mark Redmond, executive director of Spectrum Youth & Family Services, a Burlington-based nonprofit that serves at-risk youth. Nonprofit directors in Vermont have described their organizations as both a cheap date for state government and its bastard child. While government largesse has always ebbed and flowed, money has been particularly tight since the Great Recession. Without bargaining power and labor union protections for their employees, nonprofits make an easy target for budget cuts. “The government can shortchange them,” Racine said. Many nonprofit directors report that state funding has been reduced or has failed to keep pace with inflation and rising caseloads. They turn to private donors to make up the difference, which can be a costly endeavor. Johnson estimated that the Lamoille Family Center had doubled its fundraising in the past eight years but noted that there is “a tremendous amount of competition at the local level.” Bleeding these organizations to death, as Johnson put it, is “unconscionable.” Nonprofit workers are generally paid lower salaries and receive fewer benefits than state employees, who are represented by a powerful union that negotiates annual raises on their behalf. Last year, the legislature gave the designated agencies an additional $8 million to ensure that their workers were making at least $14 an hour. But according to the designated agencies’ analysis, it would take another $70 million to bring their employees’ pay up to what equivalent state workers make. Similarly, parent-child centers have determined it would take $8 million to close their wage gap. As a result, nonprofits regularly lose staff — sometimes to state government. Johnson said several Lamoille Family Center employees left for state jobs and immediately began making approximately $10,000 more. Turnover forces organizations to expend limited dollars to hire and train new staff members. The Howard Center is among those that have struggled to find and keep employees. Legislation prompted the Green Mountain Care Board to review the designated agency’s finances in 2016.

STATE PAYMENTS TO VERMONT NONPROFITS IN 2017 Blue Cross Blue Shield of Vermont University of Vermont Vermont State Colleges Vermont Education Health Initiative Vermont Student Assistance Corporation Howard Center Washington County Mental Health Services Health Care and Rehabilitation Services of Southeastern Vermont Capstone Community Action, Inc. University of Vermont Medical Center Champlain Valley Office of Economic Opportunity Vermont Information Technology Leaders Lund Family Center Vermont Adult Learning Vermont Land Trust

$140,044,735 $60,906,374 $35,332,387 $33,491,229 $20,570,217 $12,270,585 $9,650,995 $9,632,390 $6,933,257 $6,922,809 $6,758,389 $6,645,294 $5,639,699 $5,019,380 $4,941,878

This data excludes some state payments, including confidential ones. Source: Vermont Department of Finance

It concluded, “We believe that underfunding of the organization, resulting in significant staffing gaps and challenges, in turn leads to substantial unmet needs in the community Howard Center serves and hardship for those individuals and families.” At the time, the center had 104 open positions. Racine’s take: “We as a society and government are taking advantage of folks who are willing to work for lower pay because they are really committed to others.”

Money’s Worth The Vermont State Employees’ Association isn’t pleased with the arrangement, either, viewing privatization as a threat to its members. The union points to the example of the Vermont Association of Business Industry and Rehabilitation, whose roughly 80 employees help find jobs for Vermonters with developmental disabilities. The nonprofit works almost exclusively with the State of Vermont, and its

employees sit alongside state workers, rent free. Diane Dalmasse, who directs the Department of Disabilities, Aging and Independent Living’s vocational rehabilitation program, described VABIR, which has partnered with the state since 1979, as “our employer arm.” Dalmasse said the model is highly effective and vigorously disputed the union’s claim that the nonprofit’s employees had replaced laid-off state workers. At the same time, she was unable to explain why a nonprofit was better equipped to provide those services than state government. “If the administration and the legislature wanted to give us 80 positions, that would be fine,” she said. While there’s a general sense that nonprofits do more than the state government pays them for, no one seems to know how much the government spends on them collectively. “We’re trying to get it under control,” said Gobeille, who explained that his agency has worked for months to catalog the various grants awarded to

organizations. Gobeille said most recipients are nonprofits, but the review didn’t distinguish between nonprofit and forprofit entities. In fiscal year 2017, the Agency of Human Services paid $414 million to the designated and special services agencies; gave 686 grants totaling $121 million in federal money and $77 million in state money to other private organizations; and awarded millions more — it hasn’t calculated how much — in contracts for specific services not covered by grants. And, of course, that’s just one agency. “I think we’re working on it,” Kitchel said of the oversight challenge, but there are still times when “we are not disciplined enough to go back and say, ‘Did we get what we should have?’” In 2014, State Auditor Doug Hoffer found that the Department of Mental Health and the Department of Disabilities, Aging and Independent Living weren’t always following up to make sure designated agencies provided the services paid for by the state. In response to that audit, and at the urging of federal officials, Gobeille is trying to move away from the state’s practice of paying nonprofits before services are rendered. The change wouldn’t apply to certain block grants, but it could affect a wide array of organizations. The prospect of getting compensated after the fact is extremely unsettling for small organizations that lack the cash to cover their costs in the meantime. Mary Paul “Pixie” Loomis is the outgoing director of Vermont Adult Learning, one of four nonprofits the state pays to teach English language learners, high school dropouts and others. She warned that the change could be a “kiss of death” for her nonprofit, which was already “shriveling on the vine in an environment of level funding.” Gobeille said the state might make exceptions in transitioning to the new payment method. “I don’t want this to be painful,” he said. Tightening protocols is one thing; ensuring the work is done well is an entirely different challenge. That was one of Racine’s unrealized goals when Shumlin fired him. “What I was pushing for was greater accountability,” he said. “I wanted to produce more data on how different organizations in different parts of the state were doing … I knew anecdotally that some were stronger and some were weaker, but I didn’t have the tools to measure it.” Hoffer said that in most cases, his office is only authorized to determine


whether nonprofits are meeting the requirements of their agreements with the state — meaning his oversight ability is only as strong as those requirements. Departments typically have employees dedicated to the task of overseeing grants and contracts, but during his audit of designated agencies, Hoffer noted that some of these state positions had been cut. In recent years, the state has worked to create more metrics that gauge the quality, not just the quantity, of the services it commissions — but it’s a work in progress. An open question, according to Kitchel, is, “Are we measuring the right outcomes?”

‘It’s Just Tons of Money’ The inconsistent and byzantine nature of the system frustrates nonprofits, many of which juggle dozens of grants from multiple departments, each with different requirements, some more rigorous than others.

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LOCAL MATTERS 17

“Oh, it’s terrible for them,” said Gobeille. “We are wasting a ton of money and time.” Rep. Barbara Rachelson (D-Burlington) is the executive director of the Lund Center, a nonprofit that provides adoption services, substance abuse treatment, education and family support programs. Rachelson recalled working with the Shumlin administration in 2014 to try to simplify the number of governments grants her organization received. She was shocked when the state brought together all its employees who oversaw Lund’s funding — they filled a large conference room. The effort never went anywhere. Having inventoried the 686 grants, Gobeille said he now wants to figure out whether the agency can dole out money more effectively. Could that mean cutting down on duplicative programs?

MATTRESSES

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WHO ARE WILLING TO WORK FOR LOWER PAY BECAUSE THEY ARE REALLY COMMITTED TO OTHERS.

Possibly, Gobeille said. But until there’s evidence of that problem, “I don’t want everybody worrying.” In fact, it could lead to more replication by making it easier for the state and its grantees to share strategies. In some cases, the state paid for a program, and then “We never studied it; we never saw if it was a best practice, and then we never replicated it,” said Gobeille. “It’s just tons of money,” Gobeille said, “and it’s something that should be managed.” Cautionary examples can be found elsewhere in state government. In 2005, governor Jim Douglas signed legislation that created the Vermont Information Technology Leaders, a nonprofit tasked with building a statewide database of health records. Douglas officials hoped it would bring in private money, putting less strain on the state budget, but that didn’t pan out. Instead, the state went on to allocate more than $40 million to the organization, and even so, VITL struggled at one point to make payroll. After a 2016 audit concluded that the state was failing to oversee VITL, lawmakers commissioned an independent report. It found that, more than a decade after it was created, the nonprofit had only managed to put 19 percent of medical records into its database. The VITL case highlights another obstacle to accountability: Arguing that it wasn’t a public entity, the organization fought public records requests from citizen-advocate Stephen Whitaker of Montpelier all the way to the Vermont Supreme Court, which forced the nonprofit to release documents. For better or worse, the divide between the public and private sectors has become decidedly blurry. Gretchen Morse, a former state rep who became then-governor Madeleine Kunin’s human services secretary in 1985 and later led the nonprofit United Way of Chittenden County, recalled that when the state began handing more responsibility to designated agencies and other nonprofits, “we used to really ponder: What’s the role of the community and what’s the role of the state?” Both she and Kitchel suggested it might be time for the state to revisit that question. “At some point, we need to define what are the core services [of government] and fund them adequately,” Kitchel said. That, she cautioned, could lead to “hard choices about what we don’t provide.” m


The Squeaky Nonprofit Vermont-funded 501c3s lobby for more state funding B Y ALI CI A FR EESE

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 06.27.18-07.04.18 SEVEN DAYS 18 LOCAL MATTERS

In this age of austerity, lobbying has become a necessary survival strategy for many nonprofits. “I think, over the past several years, it’s become more important for organizations to make the case that they are worth the investment,” said Amy Shollenberger, whose lobbying firm, Action Circles, now represents the parent-child centers. Those centers aren’t seeking dollars to start new programs, Shollenberger said. They’re simply asking the state to cover the full costs of the services it already commissions. Nonprofits are legally allowed to lobby, and they do plenty of it. In fact, the three highest individual spenders on lobbying during the 2018 Vermont legislative session were all nonprofits — and they shelled out significantly more than large, for-profit companies such as Entergy, Green Mountain Power and GlobalFoundries. Organizations lobby for a cause, funding or both. Limits apply to nonprofits with a federal 501c3 status, which entitles them to the most generous tax benefits. They can lobby only as long as it isn’t a “substantial” part of their activity. The Internal

CITY OF BURLINGTON BOOSTS FUNDING FOR SOCIAL SERVICE NONPROFITS

F

ive gray-haired women headed to Burlington City Hall last month to advocate for the Heineberg Community Senior Center, which hadn’t received an anticipated grant from the United Way of Northwest Vermont. Altana Bullard, who goes to the New North End center regularly to socialize, play bridge and get her blood pressure checked, asked the city council to fill the gap in the center’s $125,000 annual budget. “We are a significant organization in this community,” added board president Linda Ayer. The councilors listened. On June 18, they approved a municipal budget that includes $58,000 for Heineberg,

up from $40,000 last year. The financial plan also allocates more than $700,000 to address early childhood education, homelessness, community programs and mental health crises. In the last two years, the City of Burlington has increasingly played the role of benevolent philanthropist, funding nonprofits that have traditionally been bankrolled by the state and private donors. Mayor Miro Weinberger said that in the face of shrinking outside funding sources and “major emerging social challenges” such as the opiate epidemic, the city has had little choice but to open its wallet. “If we don’t step up, no one’s going to be there to do it,” he said.

THOMAS JAMES

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fter struggling for a decade with rising costs and stagnant state funding, Vermont’s 15 nonprofit parent-child centers came to a conclusion: It was time to hire a lobbyist to fight for more money. “We decided we didn’t have a choice,” said Scott Johnson, who until recently led the Lamoille Family Center. “We needed to have boots on the ground under the [Statehouse] dome on a regular basis.” The independent centers support low-income families with a wide range of services, including parenting classes, childcare and home visits. A 1989 state law entitled them to government funding, and the state currently provides about $17 million of the centers’ combined $24 million budget. That’s not as generous as it may seem, according to Rep. Dave Yacovone (D-Morrisville), a former commissioner of the Department for Children and Families. He described parent-child centers as “the orphans” of the state social services system — easily overlooked when lawmakers write a budget.

Dozens of Vermont legislators work for nonprofit organizations or serve on a board of directors. For a list, go to sevendaysvt.com.

Revenue Service doesn’t define “substantial” but does provide some guidance about staying below that threshold. The top three spenders in Vermont have different IRS nonprofit designations that allow them to engage in unlimited lobbying: Vermont Public Interest Research Group, a 501c4 advocacy organization; Vermont State Employees’ Association, a 501c5 labor union; and the Vermont Association of Hospitals and Health Systems, a 501c6 trade organization. Each spent more than $100,000 during the 2018 session. Adding nonprofit hospitals’ individual lobbying expenses to that of VAHHS, they collectively spent $356,180. Meanwhile, nonprofit private schools collectively spent $129,466, and

In 2017, the mayor allocated $500,000 to help for-profit and nonprofit daycare centers expand capacity for low-income children. The same year, the city designated $77,500 in new funding to the Howard Center’s street outreach team, which responds to people in crisis, backfilling lost state funding, according to Weinberger. Both allocations were renewed this year and will likely become permanent, the mayor said. The city has also budgeted $60,000 to expand the operating season for the Community Health Centers of Burlington’s winter warming shelter, which will allow it to stay open until June 15 in 2019. Councilor Jane Knodell (P-Central District) said Weinberger has been “wise

nonprofit chambers of commerce spent $85,329. Both types of entities receive public funding. Since 1990, the federal government has prohibited any organization it funds from using that money to lobby it. Vermont’s lobbying law contains no comparable restriction, creating the potential for an incestuous cycle in which organizations use state money to lobby the state for more money. Even nonprofits that are offshoots of state government — including Vermont Information Technology Leaders and the Vermont Student Assistance Corporation — lobby the state. The technology nonprofit retains a lobbying firm and spent $38,372 during the 2017-18 biennium, including $12,467 this year. VSAC, which has also hired a firm, spent $37,625 this year and $90,626 over the biennium. Although predominantly state funded, both organizations say they do not use any state money for lobbying.

to respond” to the opiate crisis and the needs of the homeless, though she warned that such support becomes an ongoing commitment. That’s the case for Heineberg, acknowledged director Beth Hammond, who said she’s looking for “a closer partnership” with the city. She pointed to the Champlain Senior Center, which Burlington saved from closure in 2016. Now, the city’s Department of Parks, Recreation & Waterfront runs it. The cost to the city is the same as its spending on Heineberg: $58,000. The Community Health Centers of Burlington wouldn’t have extended its shelter’s operation without a stable funding source, said Kim Anderson, the organization’s director of development and communications.


IF WE DON’T STEP UP,

BUR L I N GT ON M AYOR MIRO W E I N BE RGE R

FILE: SEAN METCALF

Contact: alicia@sevendaysvt.com

social services — though, he added, he has no way to be sure. He said it sounds to him as if Burlington had “just chosen to do more.” The city’s goal to expand access to opiate addiction treatment could require additional municipal investment. Hartnett said he has further proposed using city funds to prop up Steps to End Domestic Violence, which also lost United Way funding. As long as Burlington property tax rates don’t increase, few people will object, said Knodell. “In future years, when we have tighter budgets, we’re not going to be able to maintain the level of city services without tax rate increases,” she said. “That’s when our resolve will be tested.” KATIE JICKLING

nonprofits that spent the most on lobbyists during the 2018 session   Nonprofit

Amount

1

Vermont Public Interest Research Group

$113,739

2

Vermont State Employees’ Association

$110,476

Vermont Association of Hospitals and Health Systems

$105,871

The University of Vermont Health Network

$53,896

VermontNational Education Association

$52,555

6

Vermont Bar Association

$48,000

7

Vermont Chamber of Commerce

$47,666

8

Planned Parenthood

$46,843

9

Brattleboro Retreat

$45,127

Marijuana Policy Project

$44,474

3

4 5

10

Source: Vermont Secretary of State

LOCAL MATTERS 19

Vermont Agency of Human Services Secretary Al Gobeille said he hasn’t heard of other municipalities making similar investments in

Disclosure: Tom Little serves as legal counsel to Seven Days.

TOP 10

SEVEN DAYS

NO ONE’S GOING TO BE THERE TO DO IT.

said, referring to appropriations chair Sen. Jane Kitchel (D-Caledonia) and Senate President Pro Tempore Tim Ashe (D/P-Chittenden). Rep. Barbara Rachelson (D-Burlington) is executive director of the Lund Center, a Burlington social services nonprofit that receives state funding. She’s careful not to advocate for Lund causes during the session, Rachelson said, instead relying on Jeanne Kennedy, a longtime lobbyist who serves on Lund’s board and does the job pro bono. At the same time, Rachelson wishes more of her fellow lawmakers came from the nonprofit sector. She suggested that the state still provides some services that nonprofits could deliver more effectively only because the state employees union lobbies to keep them in-house. She said she’s considered organizing a nonprofit caucus — a group of lawmakers that could advocate for the organizations — but has held off out of concern that it might look like a conflict of interest. For the parent-child centers, spending $57,500 on lobbying this biennium appears to have paid off. In fiscal year 2017, the centers’ annual collective state appropriation grew by $190,000 — their first such increase in 10 years. “Frequently, things go to the people who lobby the most effectively,” Rachelson observed, noting that, unfortunately, one organization’s victory in the fight for state funding can be another’s loss. “It feels very dog-eat-dog.” 

06.27.18-07.04.18

“There needs to be a structured plan,” she said — “a little more than just, ‘Let’s just try and fundraise for this.’” Each time the city has stepped up, Weinberger said, “We see a very compelling local need, an intersection with municipal interest. We’re not just indiscriminately writing checks.” Councilor Dave Hartnett (D-North District) agreed. “The money we have doled out to the Heineberg Senior Center is the difference between them making it and not making it,” he said.

association earlier in his career. He made the case that nonprofits can freely communicate the needs of their clients, whereas state government employees may be constrained about what they can say, depending on the priorities of the sitting governor. Yacovone said he’s familiar with the argument against such an arrangement, which he paraphrased as, “Oh, my God, they’re spending some of their precious grant money to hire a lobbyist.” But in his view, “It’s the cost of doing business.” The revolving door between the nonprofit and public sector is well trafficked. A number of nonprofits employ former and current state officials. According to a Seven Days analysis of their financial disclosure reports, at least 22 legislators work for nonprofits, and at least 47 serve on nonprofit boards. Sen. Richard Westman (R-Lamoille) sits on the Senate Appropriations Committee and is also manager of the Vermont Higher Education Investment Plan at VSAC. “If I have an opinion on anything even remotely related to VSAC, I’m very clear to tell everyone that I work for VSAC,” Westman said. But he doesn’t see the need to recuse himself from those conversations because the state appropriation “has absolutely no effect on my salary.” Westman acknowledged that his presence, and connections, on the committee likely bring some benefits to VSAC. “Being able to offer straight information about what’s going on with the populations we’re trying to serve — that’s got to be an advantage,” he said. When VSAC helped organize a financial aid conference in Burlington several weeks ago, “I think I probably helped get Jane and Tim to show up,” Westman

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

“Is it appropriate? It’s in the eyes of the beholder,” said Mike Smith, who helped create VITL when he was governor Jim Douglas’ secretary of administration. He was hired earlier this year to lead the struggling organization, which has made slow progress on building a medical records database, despite spending millions on the effort. “I think that any organization has to look out for its own well-being in the legislature.” Hiring a firm rather than relying on staff to communicate with state officials “is the most effective and efficient method to monitor legislative action while at the same time have staff stay focused on our mission,” Smith said. VSAC, created by the legislature in 1965 as a public nonprofit agency, provides financial aid to Vermont students and gets more than $20 million from the state to do so. That appropriation has remained flat for the past 10 years, according to Tom Little, VSAC’s vice president and general counsel. “The State of Vermont has generally been underfunding or defunding higher education since the early 1980s,” Little continued. “We’ve been losing ground mainly to things that appear at the time to the General Assembly to be more urgent.” Asked whether he thought an instrument of the state should be in the business of lobbying the state, Little responded, “I think it depends on the context of what they’re actually lobbying or advocating for.” VSAC’s mission, Little said, includes advocating for students, and “if we banned ourselves from going to the Statehouse, we’d be kind of falling short on the mission.” “I think it’s healthy,” said Rep. Yacovone, who lobbied for the hospital


Fat Chance

Vermont gambles that the nonprofit gaming industry can police itself B Y M AT THEW R OY

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 06.27.18-07.04.18

THOMAS JAMES

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he beer taps were flowing on a recent Thursday night at the Spanked Puppy in Colchester. Although the sports-bar crowd didn’t seem interested in the Red Sox game on TV, the room came alive when the jukebox played a ’70s hit about unrequited love, “Living Next Door to Alice.” “Alice!” people called out in unison. “Who the fuck is Alice?” The bartenders were serving up more than suds. Several customers bought stacks of “break-open” tickets, an instant-lottery-style game that is wildly popular at many Vermont watering holes. Players peel back tabs on the front of the business-card-size tickets to see if any of them match the winning patterns on the back. At the Spanked Puppy, patrons up and down the bar plunked down twenties to buy dozens of the $1 tickets in hopes of winning $100 or more. “Skunked,” said one young man, as he tossed the last of his losing tickets onto a small heap on the bar. Aside from the state lottery, most gambling is illegal in Vermont — but there’s an exception: Nonprofit organizations are permitted to use games of chance such as bingo, raffles and break-open tickets to raise money. The last of those methods is by far the most common form of charity gambling. Many bars sell the lottery-style tickets

on behalf of charities and are supposed to turn over the proceeds, minus payouts, to their beneficiaries. The Spanked Puppy’s recipient is the Colchester Hockey Boosters Association, which funds the town’s high school program. Nonprofit gaming is a surprisingly large and widespread industry in Vermont — one that hauls in millions of dollars with little regulation or oversight. In the year ending May 2, 216 charitable organizations purchased 39.3 million tickets from wholesale distributors,

Fraternal Organizations $0

Other Charities $400K

$800K

$1.2M

$1.6M

$0

$1,592,925

Bristol

SEVEN DAYS

A few hundred of the tickets provide a $1 prize; a handful delivers $5 to $50; and 16 tickets award the biggest prize, $100. If all the tickets in the box are sold, the charity nets $921, Temer said. Trouble is, nobody in state government checks whether the gaming profits actually reach the charities. In one recent case, a South Burlington bar owner was charged with embezzlement. A bar owner in West Rutland was ordered to pay restitution a few years ago for taking $7,000 meant for an athletic program. The head of the liquor control

BREAK-OPEN KINGS Organizations listed by highest annual revenue. After expenses, they net less. AMERICAN LEGION POST 19

$125K

CHITTENDEN HOUSING CORPORATION

South Burlington

$1,262,195

SUTHERLAND FALLS HOSE CO.

$127,314

Proctor

BENEVOLENT & PROTECTIVE ORDER OF ELKS OF THE USA

$1,239,914

BRANDON AREA RESCUE SQUAD

FRATERNAL ORDER OF EAGLES Milton

$1,220,694

CHILD FIRST ADVOCACY CENTER ROCKINGHAM CHARITIES LIMITED

$1,095,706 Net income

Source: Most recent Internal Revenue Service filings, 2015 or 2016

$102,544

$72,188

Rutland

AMERICAN LEGION

Vergennes

Gross receipts

Bellows Falls

$250K

$375K

$500K

$472,088

Winooski

FRATERNAL ORDER OF EAGLES

St. Johnsbury

20 LOCAL MATTERS

according to records from the Vermont Department of Liquor Control, which maintains the data. Most of the breakopens, also called pull-tab tickets, retail for $1 or $2. When run properly, the system works like this: A nonprofit buys the tickets from a wholesaler such as Best Bingo Supplies in Colchester, which offers boxes at various prices depending on customers’ needs. For example, charities can purchase a box of 3,159 tickets for $62, co-owner Jeff Temer said. Gamblers pay $1 for a ticket and peel back the tab.

$60,949


department’s enforcement division, Skyler Genest, said the office investigates a handful of cases each year. “It’s a cash game,” he said. “There’s a lot of room for diversion of funds.” Further complicating matters: Some bars stop selling tickets from a box after the big prizes have been paid out, creating so-called “dead-soldier” tickets. That makes it more difficult to audit the system or calculate how much the benefiting charity should have been paid.

I KNOW HOW THIS LOOKS,

LIKE I’M AN ASSHOLE STEALING FROM A CHARITY. N I C HO L AS B ER MUD EZ

06.27.18-07.04.18 SEVEN DAYS LOCAL MATTERS 21

FAT CHANCE

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Groups from every corner of Vermont raised money with break-open tickets last year. They are a favorite fundraising tool of fraternal organizations including the American Legion, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Loyal Order of Moose, and the Fraternal Order of Eagles, which typically sell them at their in-house establishments. The Elks in St. Johnsbury bought more than 1.2 million tickets in the past year, more than any other organization. Why are the tickets so popular with gamblers? In part, Temer said, it’s because on average more than 80 percent of the cash that players collectively plunk down is returned to them as prizes. That’s more than the roughly 65 percent that state lottery players win back, Temer said. How does it play out for charities? Seven Days examined federal tax returns for Vermont’s larger nonprofit organizations, and these data show that nonprofits typically get only a fraction of the proceeds from games of chance. In their most recent IRS filings, mostly from 2015 and 2016, nonprofits reported $24 million in gambling revenues, but after expenses — mostly payouts to winners — they netted just $3.9 million, or 16 percent. The return was even lower for Winooski’s nonprofit Chittenden Housing Corporation. The affordable housing group’s 2015 tax filing showed its gaming revenue topped $808,779, but after expenses — including cash prizes and rent for a bingo hall — it netted $35,139, or 4.3 percent.

Montpelier has certainly noticed this unregulated industry. In his 2013 budget address, then-governor Peter Shumlin floated the notion of taxing break-open ticket sales, estimating it would generate $17 million in new revenue for the state. Nonprofit organizations howled in protest, some of the governor’s projected figures turned out to be inflated, and the idea quickly fizzled. To better spot problems, the Department of Liquor Control persuaded the legislature last year to require nonprofits to report their gaming revenues to the state, deputy commissioner Gary Kessler said. “There’s certainly the potential, and people have taken advantage of the potential and have been stealing from charities,” he said. An online reporting system is still being developed to carry out the law. For now, enforcement is sporadic. Bars must inform the liquor department when they plan to sell break-open tickets, and staffers vet the charities that are supposed to benefit. The department also checks out complaints. Other than that, Genest said, his 11 investigators, who are primarily concerned with liquor laws, can do little to ensure that charities are receiving what they should. “I don’t have any resources to dedicate to any sort of routine compliance or routine audit of the system,” Genest said. “Typically, when we get involved with these cases, it’s on some sort of complaint or internal intelligence that we’ve developed.” “We don’t want to be the gambling police,” he said, “but when it involves one of our licensees, we make an effort to investigate.” An anonymous tipster led the department last year to examine ticket sales at the Sugar House Bar & Grill in South Burlington, formerly Franny O’s, which was owned by Nicholas R. Bermudez of Milton. Investigator Matthew J. Gonyo quizzed Bermudez, 32, about his sales for two groups: Jones Music Media, which hadn’t existed for a year and therefore couldn’t benefit from the gaming proceeds, and the Burlington Amateur Hockey Association. According to an affidavit, Bermudez told Gonyo that he had few records from months of ticket sales, and he could not detail where the profits went. He contended that he paid the charities, usually in cash. He told the

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6/25/18 10:58 AM


Keeping Tabs: Olde Northender Pub Funds Its Own Charity With Gambling B Y K ATI E J I CK LING

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 06.27.18-07.04.18 SEVEN DAYS 22 LOCAL MATTERS

Fat Chance « P.21 investigator he suspected his employees had been stealing some of the proceeds. “I know how this looks, like I’m an asshole stealing from a charity,” Bermudez said. Bermudez was charged with embezzling. The department first said he’d misappropriated $168,181. Gonyo later acknowledged errors in his audit and said the missing amount was much less — $38,808.

MATTHEW THORSEN

B

ob Beauvais operates his nonprofit from behind the bar of the Olde Northender Pub, his dimly lit neighborhood watering hole on lower North Street in Burlington. The 501c3, called Old North End Charities, is the entity through which Beauvais collects and distributes proceeds from the break-open tickets sold at his tavern. Most bars that offer the $1 or $2 tickets do so as agents of an area nonprofit such as a local foundation or sports boosters group. But Beauvais puts the cash earned from the tickets into the not-for-profit he founded and runs. Old North End Charities divvies up the money between a dozen area and national nonprofits, Beauvais said one Thursday morning as three customers sipped beers and watched golf on flatscreen TVs overhead. He listed some of them: Special Olympics Vermont, a wounded veterans association, a war vets assistance group, a program for junior golfers, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, the American Cancer Society and Smile Train. “We’re inundated with requests for money,” Beauvais said. But Sue Minter, president and CEO of Special Olympics Vermont, said she was not able to find Beauvais or Old North End Charities in her organization’s donor database. Beauvais said he founded his charity in 2008 to keep the break-open proceeds separate from those of his for-profit pub. He said that other bar

Olde Northender Pub

owners have been known to pocket the ticket sale money; by creating Old North End Charities, he aimed to make the accounting more transparent, “for the legalities of the thing.” Bartender Doug Jewett is one of the charity’s three board members, according to Internal Revenue Service filings, but he said he couldn’t explain how the organization works, where the money goes or how Beauvais selects the nonprofit recipients. “We don’t meet as a board,” Jewett said last week. “I just work a couple days a week and then go home.” He said he does sell break-open tickets to customers and occasionally gets a tip after a payout. He added, “There aren’t that many winners.” Last year, Old North End Charities

The amounts the two charities got from the gaming? Jones Music took in $712, and Burlington hockey association netted $5,789, according to Gonyo’s affidavit. Bermudez’s case is pending. He did not respond to a request for comment. Despite the risk, hundreds of nonprofits rely on income from break-open tickets to survive. The gaming pays for expensive ice time and hockey equipment, for example, said Chris Rosato, a hockey parent who is president of the Colchester

netted $45,505 and gave away $31,385, according to its 2017 IRS filings. The group reported spending more than $3,000 to buy the tickets, as well as an additional $2,700 in unspecified other expenses. Beauvais hasn’t always distributed the money expeditiously. Between 2013 and 2017, the pub’s nonprofit arm made more than $155,000 from selling the tickets. At the end of last year, it had about $112,000 in its coffers. Beauvais said that he now has about “$70,000 or $80,000” on hand but didn’t explain why it hadn’t been transferred to other nonprofits. He originally planned to use the money to finance drug rehab treatment for recovering addicts, he said. About seven years ago, he said,

Hockey Boosters Association. “It’s vital to us,” he said. “If that goes away, then we lose a team sport, basically. It’s the only thing that keeps us on the ice, really.” A second Colchester pub, the Clover House, also sells tickets for the hockey nonprofit, which hosts games at Broadacres Bingo Hall on a hill behind Dick Mazza’s General Store in Malletts Bay. When they host a bingo night there, hundreds of gamblers can buy their pull tabs.

he paid $20,000 for a local addict to attend Narconon, a rehabilitation center in California affiliated with the church of Scientology. He wouldn’t identify the person. Beauvais said he hasn’t been able to find any suitable rehab candidates since. Instead, the money he’s given away has gone to other nonprofits. Gary Kessler, deputy commissioner of the Department of Liquor Control, said he’d never heard of a bar creating its own nonprofit and was concerned that such an arrangement could allow an owner to funnel the money back into his own pocket. He noted that Beauvais has not filed a required Schedule O tax form that specifies which charities received money and how much. “This is potentially a worst-case scenario,” he said. Beauvais may mean well, Kessler allowed, but what his pub is doing is exactly why Kessler advocated for stricter regulation of break-open tickets in 2017. Lawmakers didn’t enact any new controls that would affect this particular situation. Back at the Olde Northender, Beauvais offered only brusque answers to a reporter’s questions. As she headed out the door he offered a final admonition: “Don’t call us a dive bar.” “We don’t even have a pool,” a middle-aged drinker chimed in, to the delight of his barstool buddies.  Contact: katie@sevendaysvt.com

How many? Last year, the hockey nonprofit purchased more than 1 million break-open tickets to sell at the three Colchester establishments. The group reported $44,245 in gaming profits after expenses on its fiscal year 2016 tax return, the most recent available. Rosato said he’s confident that the charity is not being shortchanged. Still, he acknowledged that there’s little accountability from bars, since some discard unsold tickets. “Even if I went to the Spanked Puppy and said, ‘Can you show me


WANT TO GROW CANNABIS? your numbers?’ I’m sure they’re not tracking it,” Rosato said. “There’s no way to really account for the difference if they’re throwing away large numbers of tickets, which I suspect they do.” Seven Days left messages for the Spanked Puppy’s owner in person and by phone but did not get a response. Bars are supposed to keep the unsold tickets, and many comply, according to Kessler. Investigators have found them stuffed into garbage bags, though, making audits difficult. Rosato insisted the hockey nonprofit is getting paid what it should, citing longterm relationships with the sellers. Many of its members patronize the Spanked

“If we didn’t have pull tabs, we probably wouldn’t be doing a bingo.” After expenses — including rent for the facility and cash prizes — the association netted $84,191 from gaming, according to its 2016 tax filing. The money pays for trainers to help visually impaired people navigate their homes and neighborhoods, and for costly devices to enhance poor vision, Pouliot said. “It’d make a huge difference to us if we didn’t have that funding,” he said. The Fraternal Order of Eagles No. 793 on Shelburne Road in South Burlington bought nearly 900,000 wholesale tickets last year. The Eagles adhere to strict accounting methods mandated by their national organization, said

BIGGEST PURCHASES OF BREAK-OPEN TICKETS BY NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS IN 2017 Elks Lodge No. 1343, St. Johnsbury American Legion Post 25, Windsor Colchester Hockey Boosters Fraternal Order of Eagles No. 4218, Milton VFW Post 793, St. Johnsbury Fraternal Order of Eagles No. 793, South Burlington Chittenden Housing Corporation VFW Post 1332, Bennington American Legion Post 19, Bristol Elks Lodge No. 1665, Windsor

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Karl Hubbard, a past president. Revenues from sales go into a charity fund that in turn benefits groups such as the Epilepsy Foundation of Vermont, he said. According to Genest, fraternal organizations that sell tickets in-house have fewer problems. Those organizations will not be subject to the liquor department’s new online reporting system. Once it’s in place, Kessler expects to get quarterly revenue reports from charities — data that could reveal “gross irregularities,” he said. He hopes that when word spreads that the system exists, and that regulators in Montpelier can easily do the math on break-open tickets, fewer people will take a chance on cheating. 

• • • • •

06.27.18-07.04.18

Puppy, and the group holds its meetings there. Further, he said, the owner of the Clover House was once a hockey player and coach. Rosato also has faith in Temer’s wholesale company. A year or so ago, Rosato said, Temer called to let him know that a bar was trying to obtain tickets in his organization’s name. That was news to the nonprofit, which put the kibosh on it. The system works, Rosato said, and helps make ice hockey accessible to more kids. Leaders of other charities expressed similar sentiments. The Vermont Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired, based in South Burlington, hosts bingo games twice a week at Broadacres. The bingo loses money, but the break-open tickets keep the group in the black. “The gravy is from the pull tabs,” said Steven Pouliot, the executive director.

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Flynn Center Executive Director John Killacky Looks Back, and Ahead B Y PA MEL A PO LSTON

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 06.27.18-07.04.18 SEVEN DAYS 24 STATE OF THE ARTS

PERFORMING ARTS

performance center with a (now) $7.7 million annual operating budget and $11 million endowment. The theater alone is a restored art deco jewel in the Queen City’s crown; its performing arts season, year-round educational offerings and artist residencies rival those of much larger facilities. As CHICO LAGER put it, “Andrea practically invented the Flynn.” He was on

the committee that chose Killacky to step into her very large shoes. Lager, a former Ben & Jerry’s CEO, has been on the Flynn board longer than he can remember — “probably 13 or 14 years,” he guesses. Having chaired the board at the end of Rogers’ tenure and the beginning of Killacky’s, he’s in a good position to assess these past eight years. “The great thing about John is, he knew he was coming into a very successful organization and that Andrea had done an incredible job making [the Flynn] one of the predominant arts organizations in Vermont,” Lager says. “He honored and celebrated everything Andrea and her team had done. He took his time to get acclimated, meet people, integrate into the job and the community.” The change, he adds, was “evolutionary, not revolutionary.” Lager recalls being impressed by how quickly Killacky embraced his new community — and it embraced him back. “One significant difference was that he really set about trying to foster collaboration, both outside of and within the Flynn,” Lager says. Although the center presents a performing arts season, it is also a rental venue and home to other arts organizations, including LYRIC THEATRE and VERMONT STAGE. “John saw that the Flynn could be more supportive of resident companies and rentals,” Lager adds. One small but significant gesture was to begin including their shows in the Flynn’s print and online materials. Rather than competing with other organizations, says Lager, “John said a rising tide lifts all boats — we’re going to help our partners. He really championed this.” For his part, Killacky shares an anecdote that underscores his belief in what would become a catchphrase: “One Flynn.” “When I first came to town, my cab driver told me that he’d been the first person to take a bow at the Flynn — he’d been the conductor at the first Lyric performance in 1974,” Killacky says. “He [later] gave me the conductor baton and the program from that show. It was How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying. Right from the beginning, [the OLIVER PARINI

I

t’s a warm Father’s Day morning, and JOHN KILLACKY is at Windswept Farm in Williston tending to Pacific Raindrop, his Shetland pony. Eight years ago, Seven Days met him and Raindrop at this very spot, shortly after Killacky was hired as the executive director of the FLYNN CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS. Coming full circle, this morning’s interview marks his exit. Last September, Killacky announced he would be stepping down; last week, the Flynn introduced his successor, Anna Marie Gewirtz, currently CEO at State Theatre New Jersey. Next month, Killacky will hand her the reins. Right now, though, he’s more concerned about the reins attached to Raindrop. Sitting in the little cart that the pony pulls in a loop around the barn, Killacky explains that she got jittery rounding the corner after switching directions. In turn, he began to hold the reins a little tighter in that moment, oh-so-subtly signaling his own nervousness. Horses are sensitive to the tiniest changes, Killacky notes. Now he’s focused on loosening his grip, and Raindrop is beginning to relax on the curves. Later, Killacky extrapolates this behavioral exchange to human interactions. The take-away: Be in charge but not controlling. That could be his leadership mantra. When he came from California to work at the Flynn in 2010 — with his husband, LARRY CONNOLLY, and his beloved little horse — Killacky had a striking résumé in hand. He had been program director of the philanthropic San Francisco Foundation for seven years and executive director of the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts for another seven prior. Before moving to the West Coast, Killacky John Killacky was curator of the performing arts at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis will. It is also why, as Killacky told Seven for eight years and program officer at the Days in 2010, “I don’t sweat the small Pew Charitable Trusts for two. stuff.” In his final year at the Walker, Killacky All these experiences and qualities experienced the surgical mishap that brought him to the Flynn, where he sucwould render him — a former dancer ceeded ANDREA ROGERS. In her 30 years and runner — a paraplegic. That he can there, Rogers was the visionary — and now walk with the minimal assistance of master fundraiser — behind the facility’s a cane is less a miracle than a testament transformation from run-down former to his positivity, discipline and sheer movie house to nonprofit state-of-the-art


Chill

Flynn] was meant to be a house for local But Killacky’s ability to procure grants performing organizations.” related to education and disabilities “alThis open disposition motivated one lowed us to go down that path,” he says. of Killacky’s most notable contributions Occasionally, differently abled perto the Flynn, and the community: ex- formers appear onstage at the Flynn, panding the organization’s commitment too. This past season included British to access and inclusiveness. Building on dancer Claire Cunningham, who uses the outreach established under Rogers’ crutches, and violinist/songwriter leadership, the Flynn now works Gaelynn Lea, who has a congenital with 81 human and social physical disability. service agencies to provide It’s no coincidence that discounted tickets to their a fund recently created to clients. Of the 38,000 schoolhonor Killacky’s legacy is children who attend shows called “Everybody Belongs at annually, more than 7,000 do the Flynn.” So far, says Lager, so for free. The Flynn generthat campaign has raised Single person pool pass: $150 ates $30,000 annually for more than $2.6 million. The JOHN scholarships to classes and donations will be channeled 2 Swimming Pools KIL L ACKY Club House Café & Bar camps. into an endowment focused Landscaped setting For Killacky, though, inon access and inclusion, as clusivity is about more than well as a bridge fund to help Poolside 16oz Frozen different income levels; it’s about dif- with any near-future budget gaps. Margaritas $5.95 ferent abilities. His dedication to both Killacky has achieved another goal at the spirit and the deed of “access” has the Flynn. When he was hired in 2010, Daily Food & Drink specials manifested in multiple ways. A recent he says, “I told the board I would probexhibition titled “Flourish” at the ably stay five to seven years and would Sign up for membership Flynn’s AMY E. TARRANT GALLERY — which help transition [its] intergenerational at quarryhillclub.com! Killacky himself has curated in recent leadership.” Killacky had observed that years — featured works by artists with several longtime Flynn personnel bedisabilities. The show was presented in sides Rogers were due to retire, accord259 Quarry Hill Rd, S. Burlington conjunction with VSA VERMONT and the ing to Lager. Most of those torches have Vermont Association for the Blind and now been passed, and the executive Visually Impaired. director is ready to take his turn. 6/25/13 8v-quarryhill062718.indd 12:21 PM 1 6/25/18 12:32 PM Programming the Flynn’s season “I don’t want to be in the way,”8V-JacobAlbee062613.indd 1 is the job of artistic director STEVE Killacky says. “I’m ready for a change.” But “retirement” is not exactly his MACQUEEN, but there, too, Killacky’s sensitivity to the “differently abled” has had game plan. When he announced his an impact. The Flynn has added “sen- departure last fall, Killacky was sure he sory-friendly” shows for kids who are didn’t want to run another arts organion the autism spectrum or, as Killacky zation and did want to stay in Vermont.COLORFUL Enjoy the puts it, “experience things differently.” He and Connolly — an actor and in-TABLE LINENS At such shows, house lights are dim but structor in the University of VermontBENNINGTON garden’s not dark, the volume is lower, and kids Department of Theatre — are happyPOTTERY bounty are provided fidgets, coloring books or here. So, by all appearances, is Raindrop.DECORATIVE with weighted blankets as needed; in most Their family has grown by a catACCESSORIES Bennington and a dog. cases, they’re allowed to move around. GLASSWARE bowls & This spring, Vermont Rep. HelenVT MADE, In a commentary on Vermont Public acacia wood Head (D-South Burlington) decided not Radio, Killacky reflected on the 2017 FAIR TRADE to seek reelection. Killacky decided to servers residency of the Chicago Children’s & RECYCLED a Theatre, which presents multisensory, run for her seat. In April, he filed as OPTIONS experiential theater for youngsters on Democratic candidate in the district. CANDLES Killacky, who just turned 66, is notGREETING the autism spectrum. He sat in on a show called Red Kite, Brown Box, each without relevant experience for theCARDS performance of which could be at- role. In addition to testifying beforeBAKEWARE tended by no more than 12 children and the legislature on matters germane toHOLIDAY their adult caregivers. Killacky watched arts nonprofits, he has served on theDECORATIONS in wonder as the four adult performers Vermont Tax Department AdvisoryFUN Come wander in our store—3 floors of pottery gradually and gently turned withdrawn Board, among others. STOCKING and home goods for design inspiration “It’s great to have advocates for theSTUFFERS kids into delighted participants. “I wept with joy and gratitude for arts in the legislature,” MacQueen says.FURNITURE these artists and the support the Flynn “I’m all about him going into politics.” MUCH MORE Whether or not he wins, Killacky is bennington has to enable this,” Killacky said in the clear on how he feels about his time — commentary. “I am more alive because potters so far — in Vermont: “This has been the of this experience.” 127 college street, | open every day | 802.863.2221 127burlington COLLEGE STREET, BURLINGTON As programmer, MacQueen says, greatest eight years of my life.” m M-F 10-9; SAT 10-6; SUN 11-5 * 802 863 2221 “I’ve had total freedom to do whatever I FREE GIFT WRAPPING * WE SHIP ANYWHERE * GIFT CERTIFICATES wanted, and that’s a testament to John.” Contact: pamela@sevendaysvt.com

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Exile in Cavendish: An Exhibit Documents Solzhenitsyn’s Vermont Years B Y RA CHEL ELI ZA BET H JONES

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 06.27.18-07.04.18 SEVEN DAYS 26 STATE OF THE ARTS

This year will also see the publication in English of The Red Wheel, the author’s multi-volume opus about the Russian Revolution. In October, the Solzhenitsyn Center will release his autobiographical account Between Two Millstones, Book 1: Sketches of Exile, 1974-1978. In 1962, Solzhenitsyn published One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, a novel set in a Soviet labor camp. The author himself had been imprisoned in one such camp from 1945 to 1953 for having described Josef Stalin in derogatory language. His novel Cancer Ward appeared in 1966 and was banned in the Soviet Union the following year. It and In the First Circle (1968) were both published in English outside the U.S.S.R. Solzhenitsyn was exiled from Russia after publication of The Gulag Archipelago in late 1973 (the English translation appeared in ’74). He and his family first lived in Switzerland. After being hounded by paparazzi, they set their sights on Canada. But, as Solzhenitsyn’s wife, Natalia, commented in an oral-history interview for the

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Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn in Cavendish

Cavendish Historical Society, “although Canada is a most beautiful country, it is somewhat like a pillow. It is a little too boring, and it is too far removed both geographically and in terms of culture.” Solzhenitsyn settled in Cavendish in June 1976 and was joined by Natalia and

children Yemolai, Ignat, Stephan and stepson Dmitri in July. The appeal of Cavendish, according to UVM professor and Solzhenitsyn scholar KEVIN MCKENNA, was “first and foremost, the seclusion of Vermont.” He continued, “The Cavendish area is very

QUICK LIT: THE HIPPIE TAKEOVER Imagine that Vermont’s gambit to pay out-of-state telecommuters up to $10,000 to settle here catches fire. It’s not much more than a marketing stunt, but suspend disbelief for a moment: What if e-workers did come in droves? Would the hordes of pajama-clad work-from-homers unite and seize power? If the idea of Vermont as a mobileprofessional mecca seems remote, read YVONNE DALEY’s timely Going Up the Country: When the Hippies, Dreamers, Freaks and Radicals Moved to Vermont. The fourth book by a former longtime Rutland Herald reporter, it chronicles Vermont’s last great mass migration, the so-called “hippie invasion” of the late ’60s and ’70s. That influx, coming after decades of population stagnation, also seemed improbable. Between 1950 and 1960, 15,000 Vermonters between the ages of 20 and 44 left the state, Daley writes.

From Brattleboro to St. Albans, residents wrung their hands over the economic impact of losing young workers to other states. Soon Vermont media were sounding the alarm about an entirely different phenomenon: the arrival of tens of thousands of back-tothe-landers, disgruntled antiwar protestors, suburban drop-outs, socialists and communards. According to Daley, “By 1970, approximately 35,800 hippies were estimated to be living in Vermont, representing 33 percent of the total population of 107,527 Vermont residents between the ages of eighteen and thirty-four.” The Rutland-based author was one of those back-to-the-landers. Her book weaves the young transplants’ stories with analysis of the impact of this great migration on Vermont’s politics, culture and economy. As Daley notes, the émigrés steadily turned a state

that had been solidly Republican into the progressive bastion that eventually launched the presidential campaign of Sen. BERNIE SANDERS (I-Vt.). Over time, some socialists evolved into savvy and socially conscious capitalists. They gave birth to organic food, craft beer and green energy movements that today are integral to Vermont’s brand and big drivers of its economy. Daley explores other changes wrought by the new arrivals, too, including the flourishing of the music scene, the advent of women’s health clinics and the newcomers’ demands for stepped-up government services, such as better roads and schools. Daley’s gaze does not overlook the darker side of the influx, including misogyny and drug abuse at some of the communes. She also explores tensions that endure today between natives and flatlanders, conservatives and liberals, and urban and rural

folk. Indeed, many who’ve watched Vermont change report feeling colonized. “The irony is that the people who came here espousing freedom turned into the controllers,” says RUTH DWYER as quoted by Daley. Dwyer, a Thetford conservative and two-time unsuccessful gubernatorial candidate, declares, “They won, we lost.” Dwyer and others might be encouraged by Daley’s observation that nothing lasts forever. From Millerites to Swedenborgians to Garrisonians, utopian communities and reformist movements have come to Vermont, made waves and then disappeared. A half century after they arrived, the old hippies need new hips and other medical care. Many of their children have moved away. “It all seemed like a good idea — the dome, the teepee, the house with the root cellar — these were a response to

COURTESY OF THE ALEKSANDR SOLZHENITSYN CENTER.

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leksandr Solzhenitsyn, the world-renowned, Nobel Prizewinning Russian author and political dissident, lived a long life filled with hardship and contemplation. Seventeen of those years were spent in the tiny town of Cavendish, Vt. Now on view at the VERMONT HISTORY MUSEUM in Montpelier, the poster-andphoto exhibit “Solzhenitsyn in Vermont” aims to shed light on the writer’s life and legacy, with particular emphasis on his time in the Green Mountain State. “[Cavendish] pretty easily could be considered the address [Solzhenitsyn] had the longest anywhere in his life,” said MARGO CAULFIELD, director of the CAVENDISH HISTORICAL SOCIETY and author of the biographical children’s book Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn: The Writer Who Changed History. A little more than a year ago, Caulfield began working with the Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn Center in Worcester, Mass., the VERMONT HISTORICAL SOCIETY and the University of Vermont to bring the exhibit to fruition. The timing is appropriate: 2018 marks the centennial of Solzhenitsyn’s birth.


COME CELEBRATE OUR reminiscent of the kinds of places that Solzhenitsyn associates with Mother Russia: rural, beautiful, tranquil — small, country environments.” A secondary attraction was the town’s proximity to Dartmouth College and its academic libraries and archives. It would seem that Solzhenitsyn found the privacy he sought. “He really kept to himself,” said Caulfield. “He was here to write; he was here to raise his family.” Caulfield, who moved to Cavendish in 1992, described the protective attitude that townspeople took toward their famous resident. “It was a wonderful secret that the town shared: We know where he lives, but damned if we’re going to tell you.” One photo in the exhibit shows Cavendish store owner Joe Allen posing beside two signs. One reads, “No restrooms, no bare feet.” The other: “No directions to the Solzhenitsyn home.” Upon the author’s return to Russia in 1994, the sign was removed. Solzhenitsyn died in 2008 in Moscow. To this day, though, Caulfield said, “Nobody’s going to give you directions to his home,” which Solzhenitsyn’s children still own and use. “One of his biggest legacies to this town was his kids.” Caulfield, McKenna and others aware of Solzhenitsyn’s literary significance hope to kindle further awareness of the writer and his works.

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Daley’s book makes one ponder the changes telecommuters are already making locally, as well as the accommodations the state might make for them in the future. In some quarters, there is already fierce debate about whether globetrotting selectmen should be able to attend meetings via Skype. Going Up the Country suggests a new migration might well bolster Vermont’s prosperity, reshaping its communities and lifestyles in unexpected ways.

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response to the rigidness of the fifties,” one now-adult child of a hippie told Daley. He lives in Texas. “My generation discovered that there’s not a huge job base in Vermont and taxes are high, so it’s hard to stimulate business.” Vermont is still losing young people, employers struggle to find skilled workers — particularly in the emerging high-tech sector — and the state is attempting to lure e-workers with cash inducements.

“He was much more known into the early 2000s than he is at this point,” said McKenna, who is currently at work on a manuscript about Solzhenitsyn’s unique use of the Russian language and its proverbs. “That’s why this centennial will be a shot in the arm in terms of making him more known in the area.” Caulfield put her primary hope for the exhibition in plain terms: “I hope that people read his work.” The Cavendish Historical Society has its own Solzhenitsyn presentation, featuring pictures from the family, videos, oral histories from Natalia, Natalia’s mother and her sons Stephan and Ignat, and artworks honoring Solzhenitsyn. Caulfield noted this will become a permanent exhibition when the society relocates to the Cavendish Universalist “Stone” Church. “Solzhenitsyn’s whole life had a magical quality,” Caulfield said. “This is a man who followed the hero’s journey.” “We as a historical society have a real responsibility to future generations to record and accurately provide information,” she continued, “because, as the years go by, the number of people that knew him dwindles.” 


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HACKIE

A VERMONT CABBIE’S REAR VIEW BY JERNIGAN PONTIAC

An Englishman in New York

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central casting to play an eccentric, aged Englishman. His gray hair was slicked back with some oil product, if I had to guess, and he wore pale plastic bifocals. His corduroy trousers were a yellowish-brown evocative of a healthy infant’s oozy stools and were belted somewhere north of his waist. I can’t recall the precise array of colors that

he would place his food on the engine to heat it up while he idled.” “How about you? Did you experience the blitzkrieg as a kid?” “I did. We lived in the Midlands, outside of Birmingham, which had many industrial plants. So the city was a ripe target for the Germans. I remember once waking up at dawn to a droning sound in the sky.”

I COULDN’T TELL WHO WAS PULLING WHOSE LEG,

BUT IT FELT LIKE THE ICE WAS BROKEN.

comprised his plaid shirt, only that the mix was an affront to nature. But, despite his manifest sartorial crimes, I dug this guy. “OK, I’d say you’re definitely in your eighties, maybe 84.” “I’m 86 years old,” Reggie stated for the record. “Well, you don’t look a day over 84,” I said. “Thank you,” he replied with a formal nod of his head. By this point, I couldn’t tell who was pulling whose leg, but it felt like the ice was broken. A ferry ride across the lake affords a unique window to chat with a customer while not driving; I can put my feet up for a solid 20-minute schmooze. I did the math in my head and asked, “So, Reggie, I guess you were a prewar baby. Did your father serve in World War II?” “He fought in the First World War.” “Did he see any action? Along the front in the trenches?” “He was at the front but as a lorry driver, delivering supplies. This was one of the reasons he survived — because he was able to eat hot food. He told me how

He then imitated the low vmmmmvmmmm of what I assumed was the Messerschmitt warplanes used by the Luftwaffe. “The German aircraft made a distinct eerie sound, much different than the planes used by our boys. And a few minutes later, the bombs exploded a few miles to the east, the site of a munitions factory. Only then did the air raid sirens go off. After the raid was over, my parents made me eat breakfast before biking over with my friends to view the bomb damage.” The lake was calm, nary a whitecap, as we ferried towards Plattsburgh. Birds skimmed the water, seemingly inches from the surface. A few boaters were out enjoying the sunny afternoon, the peace and the precious tranquility. I rarely stop to feel gratitude, it occurred to me, for the blessing of living in a time and place where bombs are not raining down. “So, your dad continued to work through the war?” “Yes, he worked a full shift at a textile mill in Birmingham. Then he would take the train eight miles back to our home and eat dinner with us before returning to

the city to stand vigil with the Brummies — that’s what we called the people from Birmingham. He’d spend all night on a rooftop with sand and a bucket, scanning the night skies for German planes and helping with the fires.” As the ferryboat eased into the dock in Plattsburgh, I began to sing, “I am the very model of a modern Major-General. I’ve information vegetable, animal and mineral.” For the first time since I met the guy, I think I detected the hint of a smile. “How on earth do you know of Gilbert and Sullivan?” he asked. “For some reason, my dad was a big fan. At home, he’d play the cast recordings from the operettas. One time we actually saw the D’Oyly Carte Opera Company when they appeared in New York City.” “After the war, my dad took me to see the D’Oyly Carte company in London,” Reggie shared. “I think that night they performed The Mikado.” Ah, Reggie and I have come a long way, I mused as we proceeded off the boat onto dry New York State land. All the way from “not answering any further personal questions” to bonding over dads who loved Gilbert and Sullivan. I do believe I’ve charmed this old limey, I thought, chuckling to myself. “Well, Reggie,” I said, nearly tagging on “you old sod” before thinking the better of it, “that’s something the two of us have in common.” m All these stories are true, though names and locations may be altered to protect privacy.

INFO Hackie is a twice-monthly column that can also be read on sevendaysvt.com. To reach Jernigan, email hackie@sevendaysvt.com.

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o ahead, then — how old do you think I am?” Reggie Alcock, my customer, asked me that question as we sat parked in the queue for the ferry to Plattsburgh. I was taken aback at this sudden invitation to converse. All I’d gleaned from his phone call to book my services was that he’d been visiting his birth country of England — his accent reflective of his roots — and that I would be driving him back to his home in Cadyville, New York. At the airport when I’d picked him up, the elderly gentleman using a cane didn’t speak three words to me. On the ride up to the ferry in Grande Isle, I had attempted some small talk, and he had volunteered that his wife died two years ago. When I asked whether they had “reproduced” — a weak stab at jocularity — he replied peremptorily, “I’m not answering any further personal questions.” I took no offense, understanding his brusque reaction in cultural terms. Generally speaking, Americans are open and revealing about their personal lives, even with strangers. Brits, by contrast, are reserved and private, and it’s considered “bad form” to pry. So, pleasantly surprised at his newfound sociability at the ferry dock, I replied, “OK, Reggie — but I’m gonna be honest with you. Now, if you were a woman, I’d knock off a few years, but for you I won’t be currying any favor.” This represented more of my delightful jocularity, though I doubted it was received as such. I pivoted in my seat to take a cool gander at the man sitting shotgun. Reggie appeared as if chosen by

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robably not, but you don’t have to take my word for it. Just ask the Federal Trade Commission, which together with the New York Attorney General filed a lawsuit last year over those claims you’re wondering about, Rob, calling them “false and unsubstantiated.” A little catch-up for those TV-shunning readers who consequently have never heard of this stuff: Prevagen is a dietary supplement whose key ingredient is a protein extracted from jellyfish, called apoaequorin. Wisconsin-based Quincy Bioscience, the manufacturer, claims apoaequorin aids cognitive function and memory by supplementing proteins lost in the brain during aging. The bone of contention here is their commercials’ reference to a “doubleblind, placebo-controlled study” — sounds legit, no? — in which folks who took the pills daily were said to have demonstrated rapid improvement in recall ability: 20 percent better in 90 days. Just one problem: The clinical trial cited apparently didn’t show anything of the sort. In this

down in the digestive process. So the answer to your question, Rob, is: Who knows if Prevagen works, but you’re still welcome to shell out $24 to $68 a bottle and see what happens. Then again, there are currently scores of other brain supplements on the market you could sample instead, though these don’t come with a lot of scientific backup, either. Welcome to the burgeoning field referred to as nootropics (from Greek words for “mind” and “bending”), awash with various arcanesounding products all claiming to improve mental function. Why so much interest now? Well, one reason is that baby boomers are getting to that age where at best they keep misplacing their keys; at worst, they’re developing conditions such as Alzheimer’s. (The FTC claimed the Prevagen ads “preyed on the fears of older consumers experiencing age-related memory loss.”) Another major driver here is Silicon Valley, which is on fire with the idea that the brain can be “hacked” into greater productivity, ideally using drugs that are easier to get (and tolerate)

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supplements on the market have come concerns, as with Prevagen, of unscrupulous marketers selling useless or even harmful products to credulous consumers and facing few consequences. Speaking to Wired, a supplements expert from Harvard med school said, “If I were looking for opportunities to make a lot of money while deceiving people, I think going into the brain supplement business would be real high on my list.” Will they continue to get away with it? No reason to think not. Quincy Bioscience’s strategy on the FTC suit, filed in January 2017, seemed to be to wait it out; the company characterized the plaintiff as an overreaching lame-duck regulatory body that’d be reined in by the Trump administration. The suit was thrown out last September and is now in the appeals process, but the company’s sanguinity reflected that of the supplements industry at large, which was described by one trade website as feeling “bullish” about its prospects under the current anti-regulatory regime. In some quarters at least, it’s evidently reassuring to know there’s a snake-oil salesman in the White House.

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study, 218 subjects with “self-reported memory concerns” were given either apoaequorin or a placebo, then took a test gauging verbal recall. The results? Zip — no difference between the treatment group and the control group. The FTC suit alleges that Quincy’s researchers (on the company payroll, let’s note) basically sliced and diced these unpromising numbers via what’s called post-hoc analysis: going back into the data and poking around in search of correlations you didn’t predict beforehand. Post-hoc findings can be useful as a basis for further study, but seemingly Quincy just took three such analyses that tentatively pointed to some cognitive improvement (ignoring 27 others that didn’t) and touted those results on TV. On top of that, the complaint alleges, Quincy hasn’t proven satisfactorily that apoaequorin ingested orally can cross the blood-brain barrier: Even if it were an effective brain supplement, in other words, it would presumably need to get to your brain to work its magic, whereas all evidence points to it breaking

than prescription-only pills like Adderall. A 2017 Washington Post article profiled one Bay Area entrepreneur who was taking 25 pills a day to give him “the cognitive edge he needs” to do business. I’ll confess I find this all a bit dispiriting. Remember when we used to take unlicensed mind-altering drugs for fun? It’d be tough to make any broad claims for the effectiveness of this stuff, simply because there’s so much of it out there: from Huperzine A, a moss-derived supplement thought to improve short-term memory, to the amino acid L-carnitine, which hasn’t yet been demonstrated to provide meaningful cognitive benefit, though on the plus side it may impart a fishy smell to your bodily secretions. But beyond the merits of any one product lurks a bigger issue: Because these are marketed as supplements, they’re unregulated by the Food and Drug Administration. The Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994, or DSHEA, places such products outside the FDA’s ambit — essentially they’re considered food, not medicine. With the uptick in allegedly brain-boosting

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True

Believer At 80, Burlington peace activist Robin Lloyd is still up for the good fight

06.27.18-07.04.18 SEVEN DAYS 32 FEATURE

GLENN RUSSELL

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s guests arrived at the Saturday afternoon party to celebrate the 80th birthday of Burlington activist, philanthropist and filmmaker Robin Lloyd, they were greeted at the garden gate by a wooden bowl filled with origami birds tied to strings. A handwritten sign suggested, “Hang a peace dove somewhere!” This small, symbolic gesture was just one of several acts of solidarity that guests could undertake to honor Lloyd’s milestone. At one end of the dinner buffet, a card table was lined with political pamphlets, including pledge cards to support one of Lloyd’s latest projects: a forthcoming documentary by Massachusetts filmmaker Robbie Leppzer, titled Theater of the Possibilitarians: The Story of Bread & Puppet, which chronicles the Gloverbased political theater troupe. It was classic Lloyd: One doesn’t visit her longtime home in Burlington’s

Hill Section and expect to be a passive observer. Once you enter her sphere of influence, everyone steps up and plays a part, no matter how small. Doreen Kraft, executive director of Burlington City Arts, is one of Lloyd’s oldest friends and collaborators; for more than a decade, the pair traveled together through Haiti and Central America making films. At the birthday party, Kraft shared the story of how, upon meeting Lloyd in Rochester, Vt., in the early ’70s, Lloyd asked her to help give an arts presentation at a local church. Five months after the event, the two were still there, sewing banners with church members. “That’s one of the most magical things about Robin,” Kraft said. “You go somewhere new, and you can end up ensconced in a new adventure.” For most of her adult life, Lloyd has thrown herself into all kinds of adventures, hanging her “peace doves”

across the land. A documentary filmmaker could recount the history of the American social justice movement in the last half century just by tracing the many projects, organizations and grassroots campaigns in which she’s been involved. The fruits of Lloyd’s labors were well represented at her party. The 60 or so guests, who sipped wine and nibbled appetizers in her garden, hailed from a cross-section of organizations that she either founded or has supported. At one table sat a group of whitehaired activists from the Women’s International League of Peace and Freedom, a peace organization cofounded in 1915 by Lola Maverick Lloyd, Robin’s paternal grandmother. Robin has long been a financial contributor, board member and activist for WILPF. At another table sat Wendy Coe; she and Lloyd cofounded Burlington’s Peace & Justice Center (initially the Burlington Peace Coalition) in 1979. Nearby was

James Haslam, executive director of Rights & Democracy. Previously, he ran the Vermont Workers’ Center and, before that, PJC’s livable-wage campaign. Lloyd has contributed to all three. Haslam noted that Lloyd was one of the first people he met when he joined Vermont’s social justice movement in 1999. Since then, he’s been impressed by the breadth of issues in which she’s been involved, he said, “building an infrastructure” that’s endured for decades. “It’s not hard to get wealthy people to invest in heartstring issues,” Haslam added. “Robin invests in justice.” And her investments aren’t just monetary. Time and again, Lloyd has proven her activist cred through nonviolent civil disobedience. In February 2012, as part of a campaign to close the Vermont Yankee nuclear power station in Vernon, Lloyd was one of nine women who donned death masks and were arrested


“Filmmakers don’t always have people who understand their work,” O’Brien added, “but Robin totally gets it.” Lloyd’s activism is often close to home, literally. Since the 1980s, she has routinely opened her house to refugees, asylum seekers and others in need of shelter — for days, weeks, even months. Garry Davis, the international peace activist who created the World Passport, was among her more famous houseguests.

“It was a terrible thing,” Lloyd recalled of that horrific, high-profile crime, “but we just felt that he was an underaged kid who deserved a second chance, despite the sadness of the act he performed.” He only stayed a short time — perhaps a few days to a week — and then moved out of state. As a lifelong Quaker dedicated to compassion and nonviolence, Lloyd occasionally takes positions far removed from the political mainstream. As Burlington attorney, activist and longtime friend Sandy Baird pointed out, Lloyd was a vocal supporter of the rights of the Palestinian people years before that was an acceptable position to express publicly, even among fellow progressives. But Lloyd has never shied away from alienating potential allies. In May 1999, she condemned then-Rep. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) for his support of NATO’s bombing of Yugoslavia. “We had depended on you to speak truth to power in Washington,” she told him before a crowded public forum in Montpelier. Peter Clavelle, Burlington’s seven-term Progressive mayor who hosts this week’s VTIFF Community Champion Award event, once called Lloyd “the conscience of our community.” But he admitted that she also could be “a pain in the butt sometimes.” Why? As Guma put it, Lloyd is a “true believer” who cleaves to positions, including unpopular ones, that she believes are moral and just. In May 2011, she and Baird called a press conference to condemn the assassination of al-Qaeda cofounder Osama bin Laden as “an act of murder” by the Obama administration. As Lloyd explained recently, “The rule of law either applies universally, or it doesn’t.” She has even questioned whether it’s morally defensible to kill Islamic State militants. In an op-ed piece published in the Burlington Free Press on April 16, 2017, Lloyd wrote: “Do they hate us, or do they simply want us to get out of their space? … Perhaps some of them are simply poor farmers who have been given a good salary for the first time in their lives.” Critics might roll their eyes at Lloyd’s idealism and seeming naïveté, but Baird sees Lloyd’s principled stances not as weakness but as her greatest strength. COURTESY OF GREG GUMA

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At times, Lloyd has welcomed those shunned by others. In 2004, she hosted newly released parolee Steven Buelow. In August 1988, the then-14-year-old had raped and murdered his 7-year-old stepcousin, Crystal Sumner, in a Bristol cornfield.

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COURTESY OF ROBIN LLOYD

for trespassing in the Brattleboro offices film community to celebrate one of its of the plant’s owner, Entergy. most generous and prolific patrons. That wasn’t her first, or most con“Robin stands tall for her decadessequential, arrest. In November 2005, long commitments to the arts and a Lloyd was taken into custody outside potent and enduring progressive social the Western Hemisphere Institute for vision,” said filmmaker Jay Craven, of Security Cooperation, formerly known Kingdom County Productions in Barnet, as the U.S. Army School of the Americas, in an email. “She has supported my at Fort Benning, Ga. Since 1990, antiwar work for nearly 40 years and has been activists have held annual demonstra- a dear and appreciated friend through tions there because the facility trains thick and thin.” counterinsurgents, some of whom have been linked to human rights abuses. Lloyd served three months in a federal prison for her civil disobedience. “She crossed the line,” said Chris Lloyd, Robin’s younger brother, referring to the nowritualized process of how protesters get arrested at the annual marches. “She’s always crossing the line.” At an age when most of her contemporaries have long since retired, Lloyd still seems to have an unquenchable thirst for the good fight. Admittedly, friends and family say, she’s not as spry as she used to be. Lloyd now walks with a cane, speaks slowly and occasionally pauses mid-sentence to recall a name or detail from a protest, confer- Robin Lloyd banging a drum on ence or project she worked on Burlington’s Church Street with the Peace & Justice Center’s Wendy Coe decades ago. in the background, circa 1980 Nevertheless, those who know her assert that Lloyd’s passion for her causes — opposition to war chief among them — burns as brightly as ever. Ben Dangle is editor of Toward Freedom, the progressive international news journal founded in 1952 by William Bross Lloyd Jr., Robin’s father. Dangle, who’s worked for Robin since 2005, described her as “a visionary” who continually pushes the online magazine’s freelance writers and board members to think and act as idealistically as she does. “She’s always off to another teachin or march or demonstration,” Dangle Left to right: Robin Lloyd; Robin’s mother, said. “It’s incredible to see that level of Mary Norris Lloyd; Jesse Lloyd Guma in arms of Bernard O’Shea; and Greg energy sustained the whole time I’ve the Guma at the Nuclear Freeze Rally in New known her.” York City on June 12, 1982 Journalist Greg Guma, Lloyd’s onetime romantic partner and father to their son, Jesse, said that if Lloyd’s political activism has waned in recent Craven’s partner and fellow filmyears, “I don’t see any sign of it.” maker, Bess O’Brien, echoed that On June 27, the Vermont International sentiment. She marveled at Lloyd’s Film Festival honors Lloyd with its 2018 accessibility and willingness to supVTIFF Community Champion Award, port groundbreaking projects without both for her own cinematic work and for expecting people to jump through supporting other local filmmakers for the hoops of a laborious grant-applicadecades. The occasion allows Vermont’s tion process.


PHOTOS: COURTESY OF JESSE LLOYD GUMA

True Believer « P.33 “Robin is consistently antiwar,” Baird explained. For her, “there are no excuses.” If Lloyd has an Achilles’ heel, Guma suggested, it’s her unwillingness or inability to say no to people who need help. Her son, Jesse Lloyd Guma, noted that his mother often pooh-poohs suggestions that she be more generous to herself when, say, she needs a new appliance. “She’d rather give the money to the Haitian relief fund,” he said. “She’s always been that way.”

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Mavericks and Muckrakers

Lloyd’s storied history began, as she told Seven Days in 2001, with the “anarchist cows.” That’s what she called the cattle that her paternal greatgreat-grandfather, Texas rancher Sam Maverick (1803-1870), refused to brand because he considered the practice inhumane. Through that small kindness, the San Antonio lawyer and land baron introduced the word “maverick” into the American lexicon — and the maverick identity into his bloodline. In many respects, Lloyd has most closely followed in the footsteps of her paternal grandmother — Sam Maverick’s granddaughter — Lola Maverick Lloyd (1875-1944). Lola’s father was Henry Demarest Lloyd (1847-1903), the famed Chicago Tribune journalist and progressive. He was a muckraker long before president Teddy Roosevelt popularized that term, writing searing exposés about John D. Rockefeller and Standard Oil. Lola was a suffragist, pacifist, feminist and philanthropist. She cofounded the Women’s International League of Peace and Freedom and the Woman’s Peace Party in 1915, and was among dozens of women who risked the perilous crossing of the Atlantic Ocean that year in an attempt to stop World War I. “She became convinced that war was a terrible violation of human rights and justice,” Lloyd explained, “so she stuck with that for the rest of her life.” Lloyd herself grew up in the tony Chicago suburb of Winnetka, Ill., one of four children of writers William and Mary Lloyd. Robin’s father was a conscientious objector to World War II; he moved the family to California for two years so that he could perform alternative service as a firefighter. In 1949, the family relocated again, this time to Switzerland, while William completed his book Waging Peace: The Swiss Experience.

Robin Lloyd with son Jesse at a “die-in” during a renovation of Church Street. Her sign reads, “We are all Hibakusha” (Hiroshima bomb survivors).

In 1957 and ’58, Lloyd attended Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio. As part of the school’s foreign studies program, she traveled to Africa with her father, an anti-colonialist campaigner. Lloyd dropped out of Antioch in her junior year to marry Dan Papish, and then followed him to Brandeis University in Massachusetts. He enrolled in graduate school, and Lloyd earned a bachelor’s degree in art history. In 1961, the couple moved to New York City, where Papish became a stockbroker and Lloyd fell in with Manhattan socialists. The marriage didn’t last. In the late ’60s, Lloyd earned a master’s degree in fine arts from Columbia University. In 1970, while she was working on a film about her then boyfriend, an artist, he took his own life. Devastated, Lloyd finished the film and then moved to Rochester, Vt., where her parents had bought 250-acre Wing Farm. While teaching art in Rochester schools, Lloyd met Doreen Kraft. The two friends later relocated to Burlington and eventually bought the house on Maple Street where Lloyd still lives. In 1974, they founded Green Valley Film and Art, now the nonprofit Green Valley Media. In the early ’70s, Lloyd and Kraft traveled repeatedly to Haiti and Central America to make documentary films. Their 20-minute animated folktale “Black Dawn” recounts the story of Haiti’s liberation from French colonial rule.

SHE’S ALWAYS CROSSING THE LINE. C HR I S L L OY D

Robin Lloyd handing out flyers on Church Street with Juan Carlos Vallejo in 2016

Doreen Kraft (left) and Robin Lloyd

In 1976, while working on that film, Lloyd met Greg Guma. At the time, he was an instructor at the Vermont Institute of Community Involvement, which later evolved into Burlington College. (For years, Lloyd was a major donor to the now-defunct college and served on its board of trustees until 2013.) Guma, who’d studied journalism and the history of the muckrakers, said he had read Henry Demarest Lloyd’s 1894 book Wealth and Commonwealth but didn’t make the connection to Robin until years later. Guma eventually moved into the Maple Street house. Jesse was born in 1978. Though Guma and Lloyd never married, and ended their romantic relationship, they’ve remained close friends. Guma has lived in the Burlington home off and on over the years. In 1979, Lloyd launched the Peace & Justice Center, which focused initially on nuclear nonproliferation. “The birth of Jesse was a turning point,” Guma recalled. “Robin was always a progressive type of person, but … that really catapulted her into the peace movement.”


Now 39, Jesse is married and lives in Manhattan. He recalled that when he was young and his mother went to protests, he was “pretty much at her hip through most of it.” In the early ’80s, the Burlington Free Press ran a photo of Jesse as a toddler standing over his mother at a no-nukes “die-in” on Church Street. But he noted that the most seminal experiences of his youth resulted from the near-daily stream of exotic travelers his mother invited to stay in their home. “Sometimes people stayed for three days. Sometimes people stayed for three months,” Jesse recalled. “You never knew what you were going to get, but, amazingly, there was never a bad experience … As a kid, you don’t know that this is not normal.”

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After the reelection of George W. Bush in 2004, which Lloyd called “disastrous,” she decided to get away from U.S. politics for a while — by going to prison. On November 20, 2005, at the age of 67, Lloyd was one of 40 protesters who “crossed the line” at Fort Benning. TRUE BELIEVER

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In 1980, Lloyd ran for Congress on the Citizens Party ticket against incumbent Republican representative Jim Jeffords. Though she was a single-issue candidate, advocating for a nuclear weapons freeze, Lloyd garnered 14 percent of the vote statewide — and 25 percent in Burlington. In March 1984, Lloyd was one of 44 local activists who staged a three-day occupation of the Winooski offices of Vermont’s Republican senator Robert Stafford to protest U.S. military involvement in Central America. At the time, Stafford served on a committee that controlled military funding. In all, 26 protesters were arrested, including Lloyd. The “Winooski 44,” as they were known, included a young peace activist who went on to make her own mark on Vermont: Deb Markowitz, the former six-term Vermont secretary of state and former secretary of natural resources under governor Peter Shumlin. Markowitz had met Lloyd as a teenager through the Burlington peace movement while attending the University of Vermont. With Lloyd’s help, she traveled to Europe to protest first-strike nuclear weapons at “peace camps” that WILPF erected outside of American military bases. Upon her return, Markowitz and her husband, Paul, helped organize the Winooski sit-in. In a sense, the arrests and ensuing court case put the Reagan administration’s foreign policy on trial. Ultimately, a jury acquitted all 26 defendants charged with trespassing, who’d argued that their sit-in was necessary to end the bloodshed in Central America. And, as Markowitz pointed out, the protest

convinced Stafford to change his vote to end the military funding. “Robin was an incredibly important presence because she held the moral compass,” Markowitz explained. “She’s a quiet, unassuming person. And yet, her leadership in those years was really important.” In the 1990s, with the collapse of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War, Lloyd shifted her activism to other global issues. In 1995, to mark the 80th anniversary of WILPF, Lloyd was among 240 women from 42 countries who rode a chartered “peace train” from Helsinki, Finland, to Beijing, China, to attend the United Nations’ Fourth World Conference on Women. Six years later, she flew to Durban, South Africa, to attend the 2001 World Conference Against Racism. The global progressive movement was feeling optimistic, Lloyd remembered, buoyed by the success of the “Battle of Seattle” in 1999. There, environmentalists, labor organizers and human rights activists had marched together and successfully shut down a meeting of the World Trade Organization. In Durban, the cause for Palestinian rights and African American reparations took over the agenda. When attendees introduced language that equated Zionism to racism, the U.S. and Israel delegations withdrew from the UN-sponsored event in protest. Nevertheless, Lloyd recalled feeling a sense of accomplishment when she returned home. She landed at New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport on a clear September morning. As Lloyd got off her plane, the news was just breaking that another airplane had flown into the World Trade Center. On her drive home to Vermont, she listened on the radio as the towers collapsed. “We knew immediately that everything that had happened at our conference, all the ideas … were probably going to be buried by the World Trade Center [attack],” Lloyd recalled. “Since 9/11, it’s been a battle to even regain a sense of moving forward with the kind of justice structures that are needed.”

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Specifically, she crawled under a wiremesh fence to issue a “citizen’s-arrest warrant” to Col. Gilberto Perez, thendirector of the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation. Her warrant cited the Universal Declaration of Human Rights — adopted by the UN in 1948 — which states in part, “No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.” Lloyd was arrested, charged, fined $500 and sentenced to three months in the Federal Correctional Institution in Danbury, Conn. She described it as “a very middle-class way of getting arrested.” As Burlington attorney Baird recalled, “She’s the first client I’ve ever had who wanted to go to jail and didn’t want me to help her get out.” What did Lloyd expect to accomplish from her incarceration? “In part I was doing it to say to people, this isn’t such a bad thing,” she explained. “Unfortunately, I didn’t convince anyone in Vermont to follow in my footsteps.” Perhaps she didn’t on that issue. But Charlotte Dennett, a Vermont investigative reporter, attorney and longtime friend of Lloyd’s, credits Lloyd for giving her a copy of The Prosecution of George W. Bush for Murder, by Vincent Bugliosi. Famed prosecutor of Charles Manson and coauthor of Helter Skelter: The True Story of the Manson Murders, Bugliosi suggested that Americans had a tool to end the war. “It suddenly hit me that what we could do about it was try to prosecute Bush for this illegal war in a state court,” Dennett explained. “So, I decided to take up Bugliosi’s challenge.” In 2008, the Progressives recruited Dennett to run for Vermont attorney general. Her platform: If elected, she would prosecute Bush. “Robin was right there for me, and her [home] office was turned into our campaign headquarters,” said Dennett, who later wrote a book about the experience. “It was really a blast!” Of all the organizations that Lloyd has supported over the years, the one that didn’t survive was perhaps the most surprising: Burlington College. As a longtime board member, she endorsed moving the campus to the former Catholic Diocese building. That landpurchase deal eventually resulted in the school’s financial collapse. “Looking back, it probably was an overextension of what we could have managed,” Lloyd conceded. “We thought that Jane [Sanders, the college’s

GLENN RUSSELL

True Believer « P.35

THE RULE OF LAW EITHER APPLIES UNIVERSALLY, OR IT DOESN’T. ROBIN L L OYD

Robin Lloyd joining in a song during a Vermont Poor People’s Campaign rally at the Vermont Statehouse

last president] would have the contacts to make it happen.” Ever the idealist — or optimist — Lloyd suggested recently that the school could yet be resurrected. After reading a recent Seven Days story about arts faculty cuts at UVM, Lloyd and Baird have talked about raising money to hire some of those lecturers to teach classes in a Burlington community center. The model would be similar to a course they organized at Burlington College in 2013, taught by local migrants, former refugees and scholars. Though still a nascent idea, Lloyd cautioned, “Maybe it could rise from the ashes.” At a time when much of America’s political attention has turned inward, nationalist and xenophobic, Lloyd said she’s kept her activist gaze focused on global solutions. Over the last 15 years, she’s participated in five World Social Forums — in Brazil in 2003, Kenya in 2007, Michigan in 2010, Tunisia in 2013 and Montréal in 2016. Lloyd described World Social Forums as “global think tanks of progressive/ radical politics that seek to create an alternative future from capitalist globalization.” How does she keep from becoming disheartened in the age of Trump, when so many of her progressive values are under attack? “Because of my connections and involvement with people’s movements around the world, I don’t sink into

depression too much,” Lloyd explained. “As the Indian [author and activist] Arundhati Roy says, ‘Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing.’”

‘The World Pulls Her’

About a year and a half ago, Lloyd informed Kraft that she planned to take a one-year hiatus from politics to focus on her art. Kraft was thrilled. As she explained, many Vermonters don’t realize that Lloyd is an accomplished visual artist. Soon thereafter, Kraft said, Lloyd enrolled for a residency at the Vermont Studio Center in Johnson. “And then, a month later, I see my inbox is filled with political messages [from Lloyd],” Kraft said. “I thought, Well, that didn’t last long. It’s so hard for her to not be an activist. The world pulls her.” Baird agreed. “She’s tried, at times, to stop [her activism], but it’s too much in her blood,” Baird said. “Somehow, Robin’s never been able to give up politics.” “I keep trying to, but it keeps not happening,” Lloyd confessed with a laugh. Currently, she’s got plenty of projects on her plate, including the Bread and Puppet documentary. And, as part of her ongoing work with WILPF, Lloyd plans to bring two hibakusha, or Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors, to Burlington for the UN-sanctioned International Day of Peace on September 21.

A cynic might argue that Lloyd is still waging many of the same battles as her storied ancestors did, against war, racism, corporate hegemony and, now, environmental degradation. What pushes her forward? The recognition, Lloyd noted, that these battles often aren’t won in a single lifetime. “And just waking up to the amazing beauty of the world,” she added. Toward the end of her birthday party, Lloyd shared with her guests a dream she’d recently had. In it, she climbed a staircase in a Winooski building still under construction. She arrived at a space where people were lying on the floor with their heads pressed together, forming the shape of a star. “So, I laid down with them and we put our heads together and had a common dream,” Lloyd told her guests. “The trouble was, I don’t know what the dream was, because that’s when I woke up!” To interpret its meaning, Lloyd drew from her knowledge of Haitian culture. In Haitian Creole, she explained, the phrase tèt kole translates as “heads glued together” — used to describe people collaborating on a common goal. She then looked around her lush gardens and gave shout-outs to the many friends and organizations she’s helped cultivate over the years. “We’re all here,” she said with a smile, “with our heads glued together.” m Contact: ken@sevendaysvt.com


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Puff Piece

Behold, the 2018 Weeders Survey results are in B Y D AN BOL L ES

38 FEATURE

The Basics Overall, Seven Days collected 793 responses to the 2018 Weeders Survey. Of those, 567 respondents answered all 50 questions, which is what the following analysis is based on. That’s a precipitous drop in response rate from 2015, when more than 2,000 people responded and we received 1,704 completed

surveys. What gives? Perhaps with legalization on the horizon, readers simply felt less urgency to weigh in on weed. Or maybe they just forgot? While cannabis users represent a diverse array of the population, in 2015 the “typical” user in Vermont was a youngish, left-leaning, college-educated homeowner who was either married or in a committed relationship. In 2018, the typical marijuana user in Vermont is … a young-ish, left-leaning, college-educated homeowner who is either married or in a committed relationship. Forty-five percent of 2018 respondents are between the ages of 21 and 40; about 40 percent are between 41 and 60. Seventeen percent are near or past retirement age — 61 to 80. A scant 2 percent of Weeders are under 21. The vast majority of respondents — 62 percent — are homeowners. Slightly less than a third are renters, while the remainder still live with the ’rents. One percent of respondents live in either student or government-subsidized housing — where, it should be noted, weed consumption will remain a no-no after July 1. One respondent lives in a retirement home, while another checked “Homeless/transitional/uncertain.” As in 2015, the majority of Weeders in 2018 are well educated: 60 percent have at least a bachelor’s degree. They still report being coupled up, too. More than

True Blue Predictably, almost exactly half of our Weeders lean left, identifying with either Democrats or Progressives. That was roughly true in 2015, too. But within that 50 percent is a subtle and perhaps telling shift from three years ago when politics were, uh, a little different. In 2015, Dems claimed 40 percent of Weeders, but they make up only 32 percent in 2018. Progs, meanwhile, are up from 14 percent in 2015 to 20 now. Independents gained steam, too: 36 percent in 2018, compared to 30 in 2015. A Bernie bump? Republicans and Libertarians each comprise 3 percent of respondents, which collectively equals the 6 percent of Weeders who checked “Other.” That

ILLUSTRATIONS: SEAN METCALF

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reen Mountain staters have a saying: “I’m from Vermont, I do what I want.” Nothing embodies that rhyming chestnut quite as well as the generally relaxed attitude toward cannabis here. Technically, recreational marijuana becomes legal when Act 86 goes into effect on Sunday, July 1. But Vermonters have long had a spot in their hearts — and in their cargo shorts and plastic baggies and little tin canisters — for weed. How do we know? Because, duh. But also: We asked. Three years ago, Seven Days conducted its first-ever Weeders Survey. Though admittedly unscientific, the poll offered some choice nuggets about our readers’ habits and feelings concerning cannabis. For example, a preponderance of respondents claimed that kind bud helped them de-stress, aided creativity and made them, er, kinda hungry. Hey, we never said the results were terribly surprising — the data roughly squared with the perception that most Vermonters are pretty chill about cheeba. After all, cannabis has been decriminalized in the state since 2013, and medical marijuana has been legal since 2004. Still, legalization (see sidebar for what that actually means) is a BFD. Act 86 marks a paradigm shift when it comes to marijuana in Vermont. With that in mind, we thought it high time to run the Weeders Survey again. So, last month we took an updated poll to find out what’s changed — if anything — since 2015 regarding readers’ relationship to reefer and how legalization might affect those views and habits. Like the previous survey, the current edition is not exactly scientific. But once again, the responses were illuminating and entertaining. Here’s what we found.

two-thirds are married, in a committed relationship, coupled but unmarried, or widowed. Twenty percent are single, 6 percent are divorced. Those percentages were roughly the same in the previous survey. Also, as in 2015, the largest number of respondents hails from Chittenden County — close to 47 percent. Washington County is next with 11 percent, followed by Franklin (6 percent), Addison (5 percent) and Lamoille (5 percent) counties. More than 5 percent of respondents reside outside of Vermont, up from 3 percent in 2015. One significant change: Ten percent of Weeders this year are registered medical marijuana patients in Vermont, compared with just 2 percent of 2015 respondents.

category includes several varietals of socialists, a smattering of anarchists, a cofounder of the Liberty Union Party and a person who follows “the demon code.”

First Impressions A full 75 percent of Weeders first smoked pot when they were between 13 and 20. Ten percent started in their twenties or thirties. Just four people claim to have started in their forties or fifties, and one especially late bloomer finally stopped passing on grass at seventysomething. Somewhat alarmingly, 24 people say they took their first toke at 12 or younger.

Smoke Weed Every Day Nearly four in 10 Weeders partake daily, with another quarter of respondents reporting that they do so “most days.” Of those daily or semi-daily users, 90 percent started smoking before their 21st birthday, including 13 of the 24 who did so prior to their teen years. Before you write those folks off as slackers, know that only about 5 percent claim to smoke mainly before or during work or school. Twelve percent do prefer to wake and bake. Perhaps they work the late shift? Or maybe they are, in fact, bakers? Either way, an overwhelming number of Weeders who toke daily or close to it prefer to do so after work/ school or late at night — 82 percent. Smoking weed in public will remain illegal after July 1. But the law hasn’t stopped many users from doing so. Eighty-one percent of all Weeders and 86 percent of daily users claim to have lit up in public. Daily users in particular cite extremely positive effects on stress, overall mental health, creativity, sleep habits and their sex lives, among other benefits. Just about the only negative effect, according to virtually all Weeders, is a decline in motor skills. That’s a bit concerning, given that 79 percent of daily users (and 75 percent of Weeders overall) admit to having driven a car or truck while high. Interestingly, only 41 percent of all respondents cop to riding a bicycle stoned, while 28 percent admit to baked boating. And four people say they’ve flown an aircraft, er, sky high.

Put That in Your Pipe As for how Weeders consume their cannabis, the old standbys still reign supreme. By far, smoking a bowl or a joint are the most preferred methods of ingestion. That’s true across every demographic but one: The under-21 crowd is more partial to bong hits. Ah, youth.


percentages of folks whose boss or coworkers know. As for whether Weeders will be more or less open about their usage after July 1, 58 percent say they won’t advertise it but won’t hide it, either. A little more than a quarter say they’ve never cared who knows, and 15 percent plan to remain in the closet even when weed is legal. Seven respondents said they’re getting a pot-leaf tattoo after July 1. We’d like pictures, please. Interestingly, while the vast majority of parents are willing to talk to their kids about marijuana, comparatively few are willing to use it in front of them — legal or not. One third of the 281 Weeders with kids currently toke in their presence. Only five of the 188 parents who don’t partake in front of their kids say they will once weed is legal. Another 33 say they will once their kids are older.

Know Your Stuff In addition to their college degrees, Weeders are pretty well educated about cannabis, too. Three quarters can tell you the difference between Indica and Sativa strains of marijuana (the former offers a more relaxing high; the latter is a bit more invigorating). Forty-five percent can tell you exactly what their preferred strain of weed is called. Gorilla Glue, Sour Diesel, Pineapple Express and Girl Scout Cookies were particularly popular responses. The locavore movement isn’t just for chicken and kale anymore. Thirty-five percent of Weeders say their marijuana is grown in Vermont; another 28 percent claim they get both in-state and out-ofstate varietals. Only 25 percent of respondents didn’t know where their herb is grown. Speaking of which…

Green Thumbs

Vermont’s cannabis legislation has left a lot of folks scratching their heads about what, exactly, the new law means. Below, we try to answer some of the most common queries about Act 86.

their own or buy it on the black market. That said, while selling weed is still illegal, gifting it is not.

in expensive grow equipment, be smart and ask first.

How and where can I grow my own pot plants?

How much weed can I have on hand at a time? A dime bag? An ounce? A pound?

Act 86 allows Vermonters to cultivate up to two mature (i.e., flowering and budding) plants and up to four immature plants per household. However, the plants must be kept in a private and secured enclosure away from the prying eyes and fingers of children and bored teenagers. For renters, home cultivation is fine provided you get written permission from the property owner, who may forbid it in a lease agreement. Generally, college dorms and public housing facilities do not allow it. In short, before you invest

Whoa! Slow your joint roll, Cheech. Act 86 allows adults 21 and older to possess no more than one ounce of marijuana, or five grams of hashish, at a time, not including plants that are still in cultivation. (Why does the statute refer to English units of measurement for pot and metric units for hash? Because that’s how those products are typically sold on the black market.) Getting nabbed for smoking a doobie in public is a mere civil violation, not a criminal offense, and can result in a fine of no more than

Contact: dan@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Find the full results of the 2018 Weeders Survey at sevendaysvt.com.

$100 the first time. A first offense for exceeding the one-ounce/ five-gram limit can score you up to a $500 fine and six months in the slammer, with fines and jails times increasing for subsequent offenses.

OK, so where can I get high? You cannot smoke cannabis in a car. You cannot smoke it in a bar. In fact, you cannot smoke it in any “public place,” which includes streets, alleys, parks, sidewalks, public buildings or wherever tobacco use is legally prohibited. In short, about the only spot where you can get high is in a private dwelling. That said, you can be high just about anywhere, with a few important exceptions. Which brings us to…

Can I still get busted for weed in Vermont? Yes! In addition to the possession limits on cannabis plants and product, weed is still illegal under federal law, which means that the possession, sale or consumption in places owned or overseen by the feds — airports, military bases, federal offices, courthouses, post offices, prisons — is still a no-no. Also, if you’re caught driving while high — most Vermont police departments now employ drug-recognition experts who are trained to spot your buzz and can seriously harsh your mellow — the legal consequences are equivalent to getting caught driving drunk. Ditto for operating a snowmobile, boat, ATV, rider mower or any other motorized vehicle while stoned.

KEN PICARD

FEATURE 39

Nope. When the legislature legalized marijuana earlier this year, the law — Act 86 — included no provision for setting up a taxed-and-regulated retail marketplace. Though pro-pot activists predict it’ll inevitably happen, for now Vermont’s cannabis consumers must grow

Recreational kush has been kosher for years in Colorado and Washington. Advocates in both states argue that legalization doesn’t lead to higher rates of consumption. The theory is that people who smoke legal weed now are pretty much the same folks who were doing it illegally before. Our survey didn’t ask respondents if they would start smoking legal reefer. Instead, we asked what effect

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I’ll be able to buy weed at every corner store and gas station now, right?

Changes in Attitude

legalization would have on current users’ habit. The result? Eighty-nine percent of Weeders say they plan to puff “about the same” amount after July 1 as before. Only 10 percent say they’ll use more. Seventy-three percent of respondents say that weed’s illegal status wasn’t a deterrent to their previous usage. Nor do Vermonters tend to worry about who knows that they smoke. In 2015, roughly half of Weeders said their family definitely knew, and about a quarter said they had told close family members. Those numbers pretty much held up in 2018. Ditto the

While Act 86 makes it legal for adults 21 and older to possess and consume pot, it will remain illegal to purchase it in Vermont. That wrinkle doesn’t sit well with our Weeders, nearly 90 percent of whom think that marijuana should be commercially available in Vermont. It’s not surprising, then, that nearly same number of respondents agree that Act 86 is “a step in the right direction but kind of half-assed without commercial legalization.” One answer that might be a surprise: Only 22 percent of Weeders said they were high while taking the survey. 

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from “I have no idea” to shopping online to sharing among friends to “None ya fuckin’ business.” Duly noted.

Half-Baked

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Only 18 percent of Weeders currently grow their own weed. A mere 5 percent do so legally in Vermont with a medical marijuana card. Another 3 percent say it’s legal to grow where they live. Twelve percent say they’ve tried and failed to grow cannabis. Act 86 allows for the cultivation of up to two mature pot plants and four immature plants per household. Fifty percent of survey respondents say they’ll grow grass after July 1, while another 35 percent say they’re unsure about that. Only 15 percent flatly say they won’t. But here’s the rub: The new legislation doesn’t identify how to legally procure seeds or starter plants. As for how Weeders plan to do so, responses ranged

FIFTY PERCENT OF SURVEY RESPONDENTS SAY THEY’LL GROW GRASS AFTER JULY 1.


Dazed and Confused Weeders will party en masse July 1. Is that legal? B Y SA RA TA BI N

Willow Crossing Farm mailbox

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 06.27.18-07.04.18 SEVEN DAYS

SARA TABIN

W

illow Crossing Farm in Johnson is a remote 30acre property nestled between rolling hills and the Lamoille River. The tree farm, which has a greenhouse full of hemp, will soon host 2,000 marijuana enthusiasts who are gearing up for Heady Vermont’s Legalization Celebration. The plans for mass marijuana merriment on July 1, the very day pot becomes legal in Vermont, took plenty of twists and turns to reach this out-of-the-way place. Heady Vermont, a cannabis advocacy, news and events organization, first sought to hold the festival at the Barn at Lang

Farm, a wedding venue in Essex Junction. But town officials effectively blocked the event, declaring that smoking weed at the facility would be against the law. The new recreational marijuana law, formally known as Act 86, makes smoking in public illegal. Town of Essex attorney Bill Ellis said that state law broadly defines what is public as including any “place of accommodation,” such as stores, restaurants and other locales open to all. Since anyone can purchase tickets to the festival, the town deemed it public — and demanded a THC-free pot party. “We are going to take actions against

violations of law; we are going to do our job,” said Essex Police Chief Rick Garey. Town officials “just wanted to wage war in any way they could,” fumed Jon Lang, the property owner. “It’s all bureaucratic bullshit.” Tim Fair, an attorney specializing in cannabis and the event’s legal counsel, said that he could have fought any arrests in court. Still, with a deadline looming, Heady pivoted and moved the event to Willow Crossing. The spat in Essex showcases the hazy understanding of aspects of Vermont’s new law. What’s allowed at such gatherings has local officials,

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police and even some state lawmakers scratching their heads. Fair said there’s plenty of potential for confusion. For instance, he said, would an Airbnb room be considered public if it were in a private residence? “Should somebody decide to prosecute these cases, it will be challenged,” Fair declared. Existing cannabis case law will be turned on its head after legalization, he added, predicting that cases will end up in Vermont Supreme Court. The Vermont State Police agree with Fair’s assessment that the courts will ultimately decide what’s legal in some instances. At a roundtable discussion at

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therefore be illegal. Johnson did not say whether he would arrest attendees who smoke, explaining he is working with organizers and will deal with festival issues as they arise. MacDougall said he expects that people will light up at the festival. “If they want to smoke, smoke. It’s legal,” he exclaimed.

legislation for a taxed-and-regulated system, since regulation could resolve some of the gray areas in the law. A not-so-gray area: The Newport Selectboard passed an ordinance last week banning the sale of marijuana within city limits, showing that Dover isn’t the only place hesitant to host marijuana dispensaries.

THE SPAT IN ESSEX SHOWCASES THE HAZY UNDERSTANDING OF VERMONT’S NEW LAW. But he said he will hire plainclothes security officers to throw out anyone caught dealing marijuana, which will remain illegal. The event will end by 8 p.m., and its planners took steps to make it as acceptable to the town as possible, said MacDougall. Sen. Joe Benning (R-Caledonia), who sits on the Governor’s Marijuana Advisory Commission, said he believes the law is clear. A commercial enterprise, including a wedding venue or a tree farm, is not a private place in the eyes of the law, he said. “If somebody was to come to me that owns one of those properties and ask me if they would be in violation of the law for holding a festival for some group of people to come and smoke,” Benning said, “I would argue to them that they are in fact a public accommodation and that would be illegal.” Marijuana commission member Sen. Dick Sears (D-Bennington) said he was not sure whether smoking at a festival would be legal. He said his goal is to pass

The Heady festival has thus far gotten a warmer reception in Johnson, which does not require an outdoor-event permit. The selectboard voted to grant a onehour extension to the town’s noise ordinance, provided organizers met several demands, including having security and emergency medical services on-site. Keith Morris, who owns Willow Crossing Farm, emphasized that the festival is about networking within the cannabis business community and fighting stigmas around marijuana — not just getting high. “Most people have matured from that it’s-about-getting-fucked-up mentality,” he said. Still, Morris asserted that the ticketed festival is “private,” meaning attendees will be able to smoke legally.

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Nat Kinney, a Johnson Selectboard member, said the event is totally legal and that the town has no authority to stop it. “Ultimately, if it is well run, it has the effect of bringing more people into Johnson, which is an awesome town,” Kinney said. “People can come see a really wonderful little town with shops, a great little grocery store, a great farmstand with fresh organic produce.” Johnson Selectboard Chair Eric Osgood had a different take. Given drug issues already plaguing Johnson, a festival celebrating cannabis sends the wrong message, he said. But he noted that the farm has a good track record for public events and that hosting the festival is within organizers’ rights.   “It’s legalized in Vermont now; you have to respect that,” said Osgood. As for the local police? Lamoille County Sheriff Roger Marcoux Jr. said public safety is his biggest priority. He’s met with organizers to prepare for the crowd and said he was impressed with the Heady team, which agreed to pay the department’s costs.  Marcoux also reviewed safety preparations with State Police Capt. Robert Cushing. They discussed whether the festival would be a private or public gathering but did not come to a firm conclusion. “We both agreed it was pretty ambiguous,” Marcoux said. “It seems private to us — but we are not attorneys.” m Contact: sara@sevendaysvt.com

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headquarters in Waterbury last week, Capt. James Whitcomb said that, for now, troopers plan to work closely with local state’s attorneys as they consider whether to bring criminal cases. Heady’s event isn’t the only one prompting questions. In tiny West Dover in southern Vermont, another July 1 legalization celebration has caused controversy. Sandy MacDougall, owner of Layla’s Riverside Lodge, ran into resistance when he asked local officials to provide $14,000 in town economic development funds to hold a festival in partnership with the Lodge at Mount Snow. Dubbed the Original Green Mountain Cannabis and Music Festival, the concert’s online banner advertises “Smoke Easy Sunday.” Dover Selectboard chair Joshua Cohen said the request came even as the town was circulating a survey gauging whether voters would support an ordinance banning local medical or recreational cannabis dispensaries. Without those results, Cohen said, he had to err on the side of caution and deny the funds. When survey results were reported on June 18, a majority of participants favored barring both kinds of dispensaries in town. MacDougall accused the selectboard of being anti-cannabis but said the festival will go forward as planned. He expressed enthusiasm about the tourism the event will spur.   “If you look at what we have here during the summertime, it’s a ghost town,” MacDougall said. Dover’s police chief, Randall Johnson, agreed with Essex Police Chief Garey that a festival on a commercial property is public and that smoking would

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Days of Our Lives

Christopher Lloyd (center) and cast of Our Town

B Y A L E X BROW N

I

THEATER dissolves the enchantment and lets another magic bubble up: the audience’s imagination. The town is small, but Wilder shrinks it smaller still by concentrating on the Gibbs and Webb families, next-door neighbors. George Gibbs is a high school baseball star and son of the town doctor and his wise wife. Emily Webb gives impressive class speeches about such things as the Louisiana Purchase and is the daughter of the newspaper editor and his wise wife. Wilder’s stage directions call for minimal scenery and props, to banish the comforting deception of the theater. Actors mime activities, and this cast worked diligently to produce a sense of real weight in those imaginary objects. As Mrs. Gibbs smooths a tablecloth flat or Mr. Webb mows his lawn, the truth of the gestures lets the audience do the work of imagining a world.

THE UNRUSHED QUALITY FOCUSES ATTENTION ON ATTENTION ITSELF,

WILDER’S TRUE SUBJECT MATTER.

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Contact: alex@sevendaysvt.com

06.27.18-07.04.18

INFO Our Town by Thornton Wilder, directed by Steve Stettler, produced by Weston Playhouse. Through July 7: Tuesday through Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Wednesday and Saturday, 2 p.m.; Sunday, 3 p.m.; at Weston Playhouse. $25-60. westonplayhouse.org

FEATURE 43

A dispassionate tone is important, but the characters must emerge from universality with vivid precision. Stettler steers the actors past the obstacles of lifeless abstraction and over-emotional sentimentality. He opens the play outward in time, with a languid pace that allows thoughts to form, including the audience’s reflections. The unrushed quality focuses attention on attention itself, Wilder’s true subject matter. As the Stage Manager, Lloyd takes his time to look at the characters and, powerfully, at the audience. With one hand stuffed in a trouser pocket, he gains authority from methodical contemplativeness. Lloyd summons the gravity of the role but never tangles the character in godlike powers. He pulls the audience into the play’s humor with sly, deadpan delivery, and the clarity of his observations resonates like plucked strings. Julie Benko sets Emily fluttering between shyness and exhilaration. Her gaze devours everything around her, and we see Emily aching to uncover the world. In

Friday’s performance, as Emily grasps an elemental truth in the final act, Benko wept as she experienced it. As George, Vichet Chum conveys youthful eagerness. When he tugs up his jacket and hops through puddles between his house and Emily’s, we can see the rain he doesn’t notice, his thoughts centered only on her. Each member of the large cast illuminates daily life with stunning precision. From Barbara’s Lloyd’s acute Mrs. Soames to Jim Raposa’s amiable milkman to Philip Kerr’s earnest Professor Willard, the notes are all neatly struck. As Dr. Gibbs, Raphael Peacock glows with warmth for his family. Brandy Zarle, as Mrs. Gibbs, is sincerely buffeted by small joys and sorrows. Christine Toy Johnson is a bustling Mrs. Webb, and Tim Rush, as Mr. Webb, carves out little flashes of emotion with neat offhandedness. Michael Hicks, as Simon Stimson, shows the choir director’s fierce balance of disdain and misery. Sound is this production’s highlight, and Stettler uses it to show both time and space. Music director Jake Turski has shaped humbly beautiful choral singing from the cast, and hearing it conjures up a smalltown evening. Sound designer Daniel Kluger supplies some original music and developed the sound effects that are executed live. The Stage Manager tells us, “Nobody remarkable ever came out of Grover’s Corners, s’far as we know.” Wilder’s sturdy masterwork, s’far as anyone knows, is being performed somewhere in the world every day. He gives the audience a place to perch in order to see what’s fleeting and what’s eternal. In this production, the sound of rain pattering on umbrellas during the graveside scene marks the line between the dead and the living. Rain is what we take for granted until a play like this helps us hear it, and marvel at our own lives. m

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

n 1937, Thornton Wilder was writing Our Town at the MacDowell Colony in Peterborough, N.H. About an hour away, the Weston Playhouse marked its first year as a professional theater. The play that uses a small town to reveal large ideas was last performed at Weston in 1973 with Sam Lloyd Sr. playing the Stage Manager. In that role in the current production is his brother, Christopher Lloyd (Back to the Future, “Taxi”). This production brings out the play’s abundant humor and warmth. Director Steve Stettler, retiring after 30 years as Weston’s producing artistic director, has made his final project one that celebrates the playhouse and the town of Weston itself. The cast includes acting company regulars and newcomers. Stettler puts the actors in modern dress and populates the play’s mythical Grover’s Corners with a cast of racial and ethnic diversity. The events in Our Town couldn’t be more commonplace. A town’s milkman, constable and paperboy go about the most routine moments of their lives. The newspaper editor mows his lawn. The doctor’s wife feeds her chickens. The choir director shuffles home, drunk, still guarding the grief that will later lead him to suicide. And two high school kids decide to spend the rest of their lives together after sipping ice cream sodas at the drugstore. The story is about our common milestones: birth, graduation, marriage, death. These moments are intensely personal yet universal, and Wilder uses them to show humanity’s common shape, and how the ordinary becomes transcendent when seen from a little distance. To gain that perspective, Wilder places the story not so much in Grover’s Corners as in the theater itself. The Stage Manager acts as narrator and takes up small roles. He speaks to the audience with knowledge of the characters’ entire lives, and this perspective quietly invites viewers to see the world around them more fully, as well. Stettler stages the action with every inch of the playhouse visible, letting viewers create Grover’s Corners inside it. The old radiators on the stage’s back wall are laid bare, the lighting grid exposed. The actors enter through the house, summoned by the Stage Manager, who’s been watching as theatergoers take their seats. Putting attention on the source of theatrical artifice

COURTESY OF HUBERT SCHRIEBL

Theater review: Our Town, Weston Playhouse


Wild Roots’ razor clams with peas and pea crema

Sun Is High

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44 FOOD

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BY HA NNA H PALME R EGAN

E

ven at 7 p.m., the solstice sun hung high over the hills above the White River Valley. Seated in Adirondack chairs on the lawn behind Wild Roots restaurant, my friend and I dug our bare toes into the high grass, chattering about work and neighborhood gossip at the end of a long day. She sipped a sparkling vodka cocktail, scented with fresh basil and stained pink with muddled strawberries. Blue sage blossoms floated atop my drink, a honeyed gin-and-lemon number shrouded in velveteen egg-white froth. In May, the restaurant celebrated its first anniversary. But preceding that milestone — a big deal for any food business — was a stressful spring. Weeks earlier, opening chef Peter Varkonyi had taken his leave, a move that saddened regulars and called the restaurant’s very existence into question. Wild Roots suffers from

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the same dearth of competent cooks that afflicts most high-end Vermont eateries. “It was a scary time,” said Jayne Sully Cole, who owns the restaurant with her husband, Josh Walker. Where would they

oats to Ossabaw Island pigs, to continue. They pushed out job ads through every imaginable channel, local and otherwise, hoping against hope that someone good would come along.

THE PEAS WERE THE SEASON’S FIRST;

THE TART AND CRUNCHY CATTAILS, PULLED FROM A NEARBY MARSH. find a new chef who could match Varkonyi’s skill level, ethics and ambition? “We had to do some real soul searching,” Sully Cole added. “It was a lot of, ‘What is this restaurant?’” But they felt they owed it to the farmers, who supply their kitchen with everything from rolled LISTEN IN ON LOCAL FOODIES...

Then Robert Mahoney responded — via Craigslist, of all places. The softspoken 31-year-old cook’s résumé includes years in sous-chef positions at Michelin-starred New York City restaurants Aureole and Piora. “I’ve been wanting to work in a 100

BROWSE READER REVIEWS OF 1,000+ RESTAURANTS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/FOOD. REGISTER TO JOIN OUR BITE CLUB. YOU’LL GET FOOD NEWS IN YOUR INBOX EACH TUESDAY.

percent farm-to-table setting for a while,” Mahoney told Seven Days last week. “And there are not many restaurants out there that are not chef-owned doing that.” So things worked out. Mahoney, who was living in northern New Hampshire, packed his bags and moved to Vermont. He arrived in early April, just in time to catch the end of a winter that wouldn’t quit. SUN IS HIGH

» P.46

LOOK UP RESTAURANTS ON YOUR PHONE:

CONNECT TO M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM ON ANY WEB-ENABLED CELLPHONE AND FIND LOCAL RESTAURANTS BY LOCATION OR CUISINE. FIND NEARBY EVENTS, MOVIES AND MORE.

SARAH PRIESTAP

food+drink


SIDEdishes d SERVING UP FOOD NEWS

JUNE SPECIAL

Pies in the Hood

$20.99

PIZZA 44 COMING TO BURLINGTON’S SOUTH END

$25.99

CO U R TE S Y O F D R EAM

S TI M

E

Sicilian style pizza

SWAMI’S KITCHEN & LOUNGE TO OPEN IN MORRISVILLE

People have long used literature to share stories and ideas across cultures. On July 2, when SWAMI’S KITCHEN & LOUNGE opens for weekday lunch service at 34 Pleasant Street in Morrisville, owner DOV MICHAEL SCHILLER hopes to harness the unifying power of food in a similar fashion. The new Mediterranean café shares a roof with the Literary, the quirky usedbooks shop and café that opened at the same address last December.

Our goal  is  to  take  you   to  Istanbul  and  back   with  every  bite!  

Burlington’s only  

RooEop   Dining  

06.27.18-07.04.18

Sally Pollak

Middle Lamoille

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

part of the building’s renovation, it will expand to encompass a room for community events and storage. Those events could include live music, brewery co-owner PAUL HALE said. The taproom, currently accessible from the rear of the building, will gain an entry in the front. Pizza 44 customers will have the option of ordering to go and eating in the brewery, Hale said. “It’s a good synergy,” he said of the shared space. “I hear [pizza] goes well with beer.” Pizza 44 will be open daily from 11:30 a.m. through dinnertime.

SEVEN DAYS

COURTESY OF SWAMI’S KITCHEN & LOUNGE

Hannah Palmer Egan

CONNECT Swami’s Kitchen & Lounge

Follow us for the latest food gossip! On Twitter: Hannah Palmer Egan: @findthathannah; Sally Pollak: @vtpollak. On Instagram: @7deatsvt.

Open 7  Days  Lunch,  Dinner,  Take  Out  

FOOD 45

People looking for a restaurant meal in the South End of Burlington have plenty of options: burgers, raw fish, gnocchi, salads, curry, bratwurst, pasta, poutine, soups. But if they want pizza, they’re out of luck. That will change in about a month, when PIZZA 44 opens at 703 Pine Street, in the front of the building that houses QUEEN CITY BREWERY. The 50-seat restaurant is owned by TIM WILLIAMS of Shelburne, who reopened ARCHIE’S GRILL in his hometown three years ago. Pizza 44 will serve two varieties of pie, a thickcrusted Sicilian and a crispy, thinner-shelled version, Williams said. They’ll be baked in a hybrid oven that burns wood and uses gas for supplemental heat from below. In addition to pizza, the restaurant will offer salads, a selection of sandwiches, and appetizers. Pizza 44 also will serve beer and wine; its 10 tap lines will pour mostly Vermont beers, including ones from the neighboring brewery. “There’s no legit pizza between downtown and South Burlington,” Williams said. “I’m a lifelong pizza connoisseur and hobbyist. When the space became available, we said, ‘Let’s do it.’” Williams, 56, who also owns an office furniture business called Exterus, said he’s pleased to be joining the South End food scene. “We love it,” he said of the neighborhood. “There’s tons of energy there. We think it’s going to be a great place to do business.” Changes are happening at Queen City Brewery, too; as

The menu is inspired 1 large, 1-topping pizza, by food Schiller ate during 12 boneless wings, 2 liter Coke product childhood, when he lived for two years outside of 2 large, 1-topping pizzas & 2-liter Coke product Tel Aviv, Israel. It includes classic Israeli and Palestinian specialties such as pita Plus tax. Pick-up or delivery only. Expires 6/30/18. Limit: 1 offer per customer per day. sandwiches stuffed with chicken kebab or falafel; Check us out on Facebook & Instagram! and mezze platters with hummus, baba ganoush and 973 Roosevelt Highway mujaddara, a lentil-and-rice Colchester • 655-5550 www.threebrotherspizzavt.com dish. To drink? Teas and juices, including a special cardamom-honey kombu12v-threebros061318.indd 1 6/5/18 3:58 PM cha from Hyde Park’s KIS KOMBUCHA. Schiller has worked in the food and beverage industry most of his adult life, he said, with local experience serving at HUNGER MOUNTAIN CO-OP, the now-closed Swisspot and Moretown’s SPICE OF LIFE Delicious &  Healthy   CATERING. He’s also an accomplished Mediterranean  Cuisine   musician who teaches instrumental performance and is a member of the Greenbush Trio, the Limitless Project, and Tradewinds Improv Ensemble. In addition to serving lunch at Swami’s, Schiller said, he plans to schedule live music showcases there. “It has been a lifelong dream of mine to have something like this,” the musician said, referring to his plan to blend food and beverage service with live music and cultural exchange. And, Schiller added, pointing to his broader mission, “I have lots of thoughts and concerns about that whole region and part of the world. I’m trying to help educate and bridge people and cultures, and to promote peace and awareness through food.”


PHOTOS SARAH PRIESTAP

He’s spent the past two months getting to know the area and building relationships with the many farmers who stock the Wild Roots larder. Mahoney writes and rewrites his menu, sometimes 10 times weekly, to showcase new ingredients the moment they start to bloom. On summer’s longest day, he tossed a jumble of bouncy, sweet-fleshed razor clams, raw and saline with seawater, with house-cured pancetta, cut sugar snaps and diced cattail shoots, then tucked them in a tangle of pea tendrils. On top, pea purée tinted a dollop of shirred crema palest green. The dish, which featured still-living bivalves plucked from the tidal flats off Cape Cod and delivered by Ethan Wood of Wood Mountain Fish, was a sonnet to early summer. The peas were the season’s first; the tart and crunchy cattails, pulled from a nearby marsh. Later in the meal came a hearty plate of crumbled veal sausage, cured a week in sea salt, coriander and dried seaweed and served with softened cattle beans and salt-cured Maine flounder. It was a pungent reminder that, even at the solstice, Vermont’s winter is never far removed. In late June, the growing season is just starting to give back; summer’s coveted tomatoes, eggplants, sweet corn and squash have yet to arrive on the scene. “Right now,” Mahoney said, “it’s still a transition period between the menus of winter and summer, so it’s a progression until we can switch it completely over.” When summer’s vegetable parade gets going, the chef said, he plans to ferment, can, pickle and preserve all he can — the better to keep winter menus varied, lively and local while farm fields are sleeping. Even now, Mahoney is fermenting his way to amped-up flavor profiles. At our table, a whorl of hand-cut alkaline noodles, made with whole wheat from

06.27.18-07.04.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Sun is High « P.44

“I’VE BEEN WANTING TO WORK IN A 100 PERCENT FARM-TO-TABLE SETTING FOR A WHILE, AND THERE ARE NOT MANY RESTAURANTS OUT THERE THAT ARE NOT CHEF-OWNED DOING THAT.” ROBERT MAH O NE Y

Robert Mahoney

Charlotte’s Nitty Gritty Grain Company, was toothsome, nutty and dressed in a rich cream sauce. My friend and I decided the sauce was most certainly milk-based. Not so: Mahoney had spun a purée of hazelnuts — brine-fermented with a splash of kraut juice to kick-start the culture — with roasted shiitakes and leaves of Swiss chard. The dish, though decidedly unshowy, was as dynamic, elegant and packed with savory richness as any fine, broth-soaked risotto dusted with cheese. We were astonished to learn it was vegan. “Mind: blown,” my friend said aloud, twirling the last bit of pasta around her fork. I absolutely agreed. It was one of

the more fascinating dishes I’d eaten in some time. But then, isn’t that why we eat out? At their best, restaurants exist not just to nourish and pleasure us but also to inspire, to show us things we wouldn’t otherwise see or eat at home. And, in late June, the finest ones remind us that when it comes to summer in Vermont, you’ve got to get it while you can.  Contact: hannah@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Wild Roots, 5615 Route 14, South Royalton, 763-0440. wildrootsvt.com

Wild Roots’ veal sausage with egg

Summertime is made for Outdoor Dining

46 FOOD

SEVEN DAYS

Relax, open the window, and savor a delicious dinner on the rails

Burlington’s newest dining attraction features much more than just fine food! Enjoy a round-trip train ride through the beautiful Champlain Valley on board our fully-restored, historic dining cars. On the way you’ll be served delicious dishes and signature drinks. Trains depart Burlington Union Station on Friday and Saturday evenings now through September 1st. For more information and reservations visit our website:

www.trainridesvt.com CLASSIC DINNER TRAIN Untitled-5 1

6/22/18 4:28 PM


Humane

Society of Chittenden County

Sasha Fierce AGE/SEX: 13-year-old spayed female ARRIVAL DATE: May 21, 2018 REASON HERE: Found as a stray

COURTESY OF KELLY SCHULZE/MOUNTAIN DOG PHOTOGRAPHY

DOGS/CATS/KIDS: Sasha Fierce’s history with dogs is unknown.

She has been interested in them at HSCC. Her history with cats and children is unknown.

SUMMARY: You’re sure to smile when you lay your eyes on Miss Sasha

Fierce! Her plumpness, her adorable ears and her inquisitive face make her a recipe for cuteness. Sasha Fierce was found as a stray, and she’s not quite sure how she became homeless for her golden years, but she’s counting on a new family to walk through the door any minute! She is a sweet, gentle, sophisticated beauty with tons of love to give! When looking for your next dog, consider a senior, and consider Ms. Fierce: a Certified Pre-Owned Pet! What's that? Check out our website for details.

housing »

DID YOU KNOW? HSCC has a dog trainer who works with our furry friends who may need a bit of extra help learning their manners! For certain dogs in our care, your adoption fee covers training sessions so your new pooch can continue to progress with training in his or her new home.

Sponsored by:

Visit HSCC at 142 Kindness Court, South Burlington, Tuesday through Friday from 1 to 6 p.m., or Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 862-0135 for more info.

NEW STUFF ONLINE EVERY DAY! PLACE YOUR ADS 24-7 AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM.

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NO SCAMS, ALL LOCAL, POSTINGS DAILY


CLASSIFIEDS on the road

CARS/TRUCKS 1993 BURGUNDY CORVETTE 40th anniversary edition. Asking $5,900/ OBO. 482-3935. 2002 SUZUKI AERIO SX Hatchback. 4 cylinder. 5 speed. Only 112K miles. Runs excellent, just inspected. $1,300. 802-863-0176. 2015 BMW X3 X-DRIVE 28I 7K miles. White. Showroom condition. Loaded, no winter, no accidents, 1-year warranty. $32,000. Custom build. Please call 343-9972.

housing

FOR RENT 1-BR APT. $900/mo. Bright, small, fully furnished. Close to colleges, near bike path & lake, 3 miles from downtown. Electric incl. Cable & internet incl. NS/pets. Avail. now. Contact thomasbusinessagency@ comcast.net for online application. Paula, 864-0838.

06.27.18-07.04.18

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CLASSIFIEDS KEY

SEVEN DAYS

Valley Painting

Interior/exterior Painting Sheetrocking & Taping Cathedral Ceilings Custom Carpentry Any Size Job Free Estimates Fully Insured

Call TJ NOW!

display service ads: $25/$45 homeworks: $45 (40 words, photos, logo) fsbos: $45 (2 weeks, 30 words, photo) jobs: michelle@sevendaysvt.com, 865-1020 x21

KEEN’S CROSSING IS NOW LEASING! Keen’s Crossing is now accepting applications for our affordable waitlist! 1-BR: $1,054/ mo. 2-BR: $1,266/mo. Income restrictions apply. Call for details. 802-655-1810, www. KeensCrossing.com. PINECREST AT ESSEX 7 Joshua Way, independent senior living. 2-BR, 2-BA avail. Jul 1. $1,455/ mo. incl. utils. & parking garage. Very desirable corner unit, 1,058 sq.ft. Must be 55+ years. NS/ pets. 802-872-9197 or rrappold@coburnfeeley. com.

355-0392

TAFT FARM SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITY 10 Tyler Way, Williston, independent senior living. Newly remodeled BURLINGTON 2-BR unit on second Single room, Hill BURLINGTON11/24/14 CLEAN lg-valleypainting112614.indd 1 12:11 PM floor avail., $1,330/ SPACIOUS HOUSE Section, on bus line. mo. incl. utils. & cable. Downtown 4-BR. Near No cooking. Linens NS/pets. Must be 55+ UVM & downtown. furnished. 862-2389, years of age. cburns@ 2 lg. living rooms, 2-6 p.m. No pets. coburnfeeley.com or entranceway, storage, 802-879-3333. full basement. Parking. BURLINGTON Church St. Marketplace studio. W/D. No parking. NS/pets. Avail. 7/1. $838/mo. + utils. 922-8518.

C-2 CLASSIFIEDS

housing ads: $25 (25 words) legals: 52¢/word buy this stuff: free online services: $12 (25 words)

appt. appointment apt. apartment BA bathroom BR bedroom DR dining room DW dishwasher HDWD hardwood HW hot water LR living room NS no smoking OBO or best offer refs. references sec. dep. security deposit W/D washer & dryer

No pets. Avail. 6/1. $2,800/mo. Ray, 233-2991, mbenway@ sunrayvt.com.

BURLINGTON PEARL ST. VICTORIAN Studio & 1-BR apts. avail. $935-$1,050/mo. Heat & HW incl. 1-year lease. Refs. req. NS/ pets. Studio avail. July 1; 1-BR avail. Aug. 1 Call 802-391-7288. HOUSE FOR RENT IN WESTFORD Small cape on farmland on Cambridge Rd. New floors, paint, W/D. $1,700/mo. + utils. Avail. Jun. 1. 802-878-7405.

We Pick Up & Pay For Junk Automobiles!

Route 15, Hardwick

802-472-5100

3842 Dorset Ln., Williston

802-793-9133

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 and similar Vermont statutes which make it illegal to advertise any preference, limitations, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, sexual orientation, age, marital status, handicap, presence of minor children in the family or receipt of public assistance, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or a discrimination. The newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate, which is in violation

TAFT FARM SENIOR LIVING COMMUNTY 10 Tyler Way, Williston, independent senior living. Newly remodeled 1-BR unit on main floor avail., $1,135/mo. incl. utils. & cable. NS/ pets. Must be 55+ years of age. cburns@ coburnfeeley.com or 802-879-3333. TAYLOR PARK RESIDENCES St Albans. 8 modern, new construction 1-BR, 2-BR, 1-BR w/ den, & 2-BR w/ den apts. located in the heart of downtown in a beautiful historic building. Easy access to I-89, Route 7 & Route 105. Overlooks Taylor Park. Elevator onsite & W/D in each apt. Landlord pays trash/ recycling & HW. Tenant pays electric. Electric heat & A/C. Rent ranges from $1,250-$1,975/ mo. Showings begin mid Jun. Leasing for Aug. 1, 2018. Contact Christine for a showing! cgolden@neddere. com, 802-373-5893. Taylorparkresidences. com.

HOUSEMATES ALBURGH Share a home w/ lovely lake views! Seeking female housemate to cook twice/week & share some companionship w/ hosts who enjoy writing, photography & nature shows. $300/ mo all incl. Private BA; shared kitchen. NS/ pets. 863-5625, homesharevermont.org for application. Interview, refs., background check req. EHO

income eligible, bright & freshly renovated, & offer 24-hour, on-call maintenance. Off-street parking, on-site laundry, heat & utils. incl. in rent. For info & application, call 802-655-2360. EHO.

NEED A ROOMMATE? Roommates.com will help you find your Perfect Match today! (AAN CAN) ROOM FOR RENT, AVAIL. NOW Monkton farmhouse on 20 acres, all amenities incl., garden space, 13.5 miles to I-89. Start $400/mo. 453-3457. WILLISTON Seeking female housemate to provide occasional transportation for active senior woman who enjoys Mahjong, classical music, reading. $450/

TED N E R

mo. all incl. Private BA; spacious BR, shared kitchen. No sec. dep. 863-5625, homesharevermont.org for application. Interview, refs., background checks req. EHO

HOUSING WANTED SMALL APT. WANTED SHORT TERM Need small apt. for N/S professional older woman & well-behaved dog for 6 months or less & for < $1,000/mo. 518-837-2632.

1 BED 1 BATH $1300 HEAT & HOT WATER INCLUDED AIR CONDITIONING IN EACH UNIT

NOW LEASING 1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments

OFFICE/ COMMERCIAL BURLINGTON ST. PAUL ST. New to market, former TOMGIRL location, turnkey, approved for retail cafe. Approx. 800 sq.ft. Lease, sec. dep., credit check. Avail. 8/1. 233-0359.

m 2 BED 2 FULL BATH $1600 RESERVED UNDERGROUND PARKING NON-AGRESSIVE PET WITH $500 DEPOSIT,

BRAND NEW CONSTRUCTION 100 GRIFFIN LANE, ESSEX, VT 05452

current vet/vaccination records, and proof of renters insurance is required

www.coburnfeeley.com | (802) 864-5200 ext 225 | coburnfeeleyleasing@coburnfeeley.com 12h-coburnfeeley062718.indd 1

6/25/18 3:49 PM

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT Spacious, well maintained office space for rent in a quiet setting in the Fort Ethan Allen ColChamplain Community Services, Inc. chester. The space has four distinct offices and two conference rooms that can also be used for workplaces. Parking and utilities included, $1880 per month. Contact Elizabeth Sightler at 655-0511 ext. 120 or esightler@ccs-vt.org Contact Elizabeth Sightler at 655-0511 ext. 120 or esightler@ccs-vt.org 12h-ccs060618.indd 1

6/4/18 2:44 PM

College & Independent School Planning Application Preparation • Essay Writing

sm-allmetals060811.indd 7/20/15 1 5:02 PM WINOOSKI: of the law. Our readers are hereby COURTYARD APTS. informed that all dwellings advertised A 100-unit, affordable in this newspaper are available on an senior-housing facility equal opportunity basis. Any home is accepting applicaseeker who feels he or she has encountions. These units are tered discrimination should contact: HUD Office of Fair Housing 10 Causeway St., Boston, MA 02222-1092 (617) 565-5309 — OR — Vermont Human Rights Commission 14-16 Baldwin St. Montpelier, VT 05633-0633 1-800-416-2010 hrc@vermont.gov

print deadline: Mondays at 4:30 p.m. post ads online 24/7 at: sevendaysvt.com/classifieds questions? classifieds@sevendaysvt.com 865-1020 x37

THRIVEed.com Full Service College & Independent School Consulting and Educational Advising Marta Beede, Ed.D. & Susan Wertheimer, M.Ed. 6h-thrive062718.indd 1

6/25/18 11:00 AM


REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS: List your properties here and online for only $45/week. Submit your listings by Mondays at noon to homeworks@sevendaysvt.com or 802-865-1020, x37.

BROWSE THIS WEEK’S OPEN HOUSES: sevendaysvt.com/open-houses DOWNTOWN BURLINGTON

DESIGNED FOR YOUR LIFESTYLE!

BURLINGTON | 70-72 NORTH AVENUE | #4698070

CLOSE TO TOWN, SCHOOLS & LAKE IROQUOIS HINESBURG | 862 POND ROAD | #4652101

SOUTH BURLINGTON | 30 LAURENTIDE LANE

OPEN Sunday 1-3

OPEN 1-4

Thur-Sun

Don't miss this BTV Triplex near the waterfront! Offering a large 3 bedroom apartment perfect for owner occupier, plus two easy to rent 1 bedroom units upstairs. Plenty of parking and wonderful, partially fenced yard. Just blocks to Battery Park & downtown. $409,000

Explore the Model Home and Design Center at Hillside at O'Brien Farm. Located on a picturesque hillside, this 30+ acre neighborhood offers 118 energyefficient homes in the heart of South Burlington. Choose from 20 unique home designs, floor plans, and finishes. Prices Starting at $334,500.

Steve Lipkin 846.9575 LipVT.com

CONVENIENT COUNTRY CAPE

3 bedrooms, 2 baths & garage all flooded with sun on 2.8 acres. Cozy gas fireplace in the living room. Custom cherry cabinets in the kitchen with breakfast nook or sitting area. Extra large yard space. New furnace, oil tank & roofing in 2017 and a freshly painted interior. $334,900

Steve Lipkin 846.9575 LipVT.com

5+/- ACRES IN SHELBURNE

MILTON | 5 BLACK LOCUST DRIVE | 4702000

List your properties here and online for only $45/ week. Submit your listings by Mondays at noon.

Century 21 Jack Associates 802-951-2128 robbihandyholmes@c21jack.com

welding (stainless steel, aluminum, mild steel),

BIZ OPPS PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1,000 a week mailing brochures from home! Genuine opportunity. Helping home workers since 2001. Start immediately. incomecentral. net (AAN CAN)

SOMETHING SEW RIGHT Professional clothing alterations since 1986. Creative, quality work from formal wear to leather repairs. 248 Elm St., 2nd floor, Montpelier. 229-2400, pmorse52@live.com.

CREATIVE

ENTERTAINMENT DISH TV $59.99 For 190 channels + $14.95 high speed internet. Free installation, smart HD DVR included, free voice remote. Some restrictions apply. Call now: 1-800-373-6508 (AAN CAN)

GENTLE TOUCH MASSAGE Specializing in deep tissue, reflexology, sports massage, Swedish and relaxation massage for men. Practicing massage therapy for over 12 years. Gregg, jngman@charter. net, 802-962-1116, text only please. INTUITIVE COACHING & ENERGY HEALING Open to Joy! Experience emotional freedom, balance and renewal.

Rediscover your wholeness by connecting to

6/25/18 5:25 PM 1 your andUntitled-26 expressing

inner truth, wisdom and joy. Naomi Mitsuda, intuitive coach and energy healer, is a certified practitioner of E.F.T. (Emotional Freedom Techniques), energy medicine, intuitive awareness and expressive arts. 802-658-5815, naomimitsuda@gmail.com. PSYCHIC COUNSELING Psychic counseling, channeling w/ Bernice Kelman, Underhill. 30+ years’ experience. Also energy healing, chakra balancing, Reiki, rebirthing, other

Say you saw it in...

J

mini2col-sawit-3Dcmyk.indd 1

lives, classes, more. 802899-3542, kelman.b@ juno.com.

802-730-1344 or email CF_Service@hotmail. 6/6/16 4:34 PM com.

HOME/GARDEN

MOWING SERVICES, YARD WORK We can trailer out brush & leaves. Raking, cleaning out flower beds, weeding. Call or text 802-355 4099.

CLASSIC SHADES PAINTING Interior/exterior painting. Lead certified. Fully insured. Local refs. avail. Call now & book your free estimate. 802-345-2038. classicshadespainting@ gmail.com. FIREWOOD Cut, split, delivered. $265/cord. Custom cuts avail. Taking orders now. Call CF Services at

NOW IN sevendaysvt.com

3D!

1/12/10 9:51:52 AM

PET GOLDENDOODLE PUPPIES $1,100. Taking deposits now. 802-373-1263. SMALL DOG DAYCARE/ BOARDING Service in our Essex home has openings. Daycare $15/day. Boarding $30/night. Email furbabyvt@ gmail.com for more information.

BUY THIS STUFF »

CLASSIFIEDS C-3

WELDING SOLUTIONS Have a metal project, maybe a broken object in need of repair? Or could you use help deciding how to design & build w/ metal? Is it stainless, aluminum or mild steel? I offer portable

consulting. Residential & commercial. 12 years of experience. Free estimates. 802-7300357. facebook.com/ metalfabvt/.

HEALTH/ WELLNESS

SEVEN DAYS

DECK CONTRACTOR WANTED HOA in Burlington seeks bids for maintenance on 7 wood decks & to pour concrete slab for garbage dumpster. Insurance required. 802-922-0741, northbend.condos@ gmail.com.

Wade Weathers

802-238-6362 802-488-0120 acook@landvest.com wweathers@landvest.com

6/25/18HW-Landvest062718.indd 3:37 PM 1 fabrication, design &

services

Call or email Ashley today to get started: 865-1020 x37, homeworks@sevendaysvt.com

06.27.18-07.04.18

SERVICES

Averill Cook

CLOTHING ALTERATIONS

OFFICE/RETAIL SPACE

AT MAIN STREET HW-Holmes062718.indd 1

LANDING on Burlington’s Waterfront. Beautiful, healthy, affordable spaces for your business. Visit mainstreetlanding.com & click on space avail. Melinda, 864-7999.

Completely renovated Cape farmhouse on 5 acres with westerly views and underground utilities. 3,450 sf includes an open floor plan with chef’s kitchen, 4 BR, 3 BA, a first floor master bedroom wing, partially finished basement and an attached 2-car garage.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Robbi Handy Holmes

846.9578 CindyFeloney.com

homeworks

SHELBURNE | 44 FRANK’S WAY | #4697701

OPEN Sunday 1-4 Fantastic three bedroom cape nestled on private road. Hardwood floors throughout the first floor with large living room, open concept kitchen to dining area along with first floor half bath with laundry. Upstairs boast 3 bedrooms, 1 full bath and plenty of closet space. $289,900

Cindy Feloney


fsb

FOR SALE BY OWNER

List your property here for 2 weeks for only $45! Contact Ashley, 864-5684, fsbo@sevendaysvt.com.

MOVE-IN READY IN CAMBRIDGE

WATERFRONT LOT, ESSEX COUNTY, NY

Ready for your family! 4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, cape, full basement. Just refreshed, new floors throughout. Private location, easy access to Rt 15, near Boyden Winery. Centrally located for commutes to Essex Jct, Morrisville, St. Albans. 1750 sq ft. $238,000. 355-4404.

4.09 acre surveyed lot with 210 foot waterfront on Lake Champlain. Town water, private with spruce trees on north & south sides and NYS route 22 on west, 2 miles north of Essex ferry dock. Ideal for second home. $400,000. 518-963-8922.

WILLSBORO DUPLEX

BUY THIS STUFF

$300. 802-893-7091 or

FSBO-LeannaDeNeale062718.indd 1 alouiseh@comcast.net.

buy this stuff

($550 new).

DOWNSIZING Garden tools, vintage Christmas decorations, furniture and many more items for sale. Call to make an appointment to stop by and shop, 879-1248.

GARAGE/ESTATE MISCELLANEOUS SALES

C-4 CLASSIFIEDS

SEVEN DAYS

06.27.18-07.04.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ESTATE SALE 14 Summer St., Burlington. Jul 1, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Low prices.

HOUSEHOLD ITEMS BELLAVITA BATH LIFT Like new! Used three times. Light, easy, no tool installation. Safe. Best on market.

1992 JOHN DEERE 5400 4WD 1,200 hours, w/ loader, 10A frame mount backhoe, joystick, toolbox, w/ out any mechanical problems. $2,250. Call: 802-676-4034. HAY FOR SALE 2018 1st cut large square bales: Alfalfa/ Orchard & Timothy/ Brome/Orchard, 8 feet. Very palatable. Great horse hay. $50-60/bale.

Call for a free seller or buyer consultation. 2017 NVBR REALTOR OF THE YEAR

16t-robbihandyholmes120617.indd 1

Ton pricing avail. 2018 6/25/18 FSBO-LydiaMakau053018.indd 3:47 PM 1 LUNG CANCER? AND 1st cut small squares: AGE 60+? Alfalfa/Orchard, You and your fam$3.50-4.50. 2018 1st ily may be entitled to cut wrapped square significant cash award. bales, 6 feet, $50-60. Call 844-898-7142 for Feed analysis avail. Information. No risk. No Delivery avail. Call Jack money out of pocket. 802-989-8968 or email (AAN CAN) jackgkennett@gmail. com. HOUSE PLANTS FOR SALE Starting at $2 each. Pots incl. Please call or text 802-343-0065. HUGHESNET SATELLITE INTERNET 25mbps starting at $49.99/mo. Fast download speeds. WiFi built in! Free standard installation for lease customers. Limited time, call 1-800-4904140.

WOOD COTTAGE IN QUEBEC

Total renewed building in center 6/11/18 FSBO-Dennis 1:09 PM Keimel-032818.indd 1 of picturesque Greensboro, steps from Caspian Lake, retail/office space, currently art gallery, beautiful modern apartment upstairs, walkout basement (workspace), double garage. Property in compliance with building code and handicap accessible. Growing summer resort town, art community, world level theatre, attracting people from all over. Live and work in one location. $395,000. Call owner 941-227-2494 or 802-533-2635.

PETS

EVERYTHING POULTRY Fully grown rheas, chicks, fertile eggs avail. 520-800-3388, myexoticpoultry.com.

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MUSIC music

FOR SALE BUILD ACOUSTIC BASS GUITAR Business opportunity. Everything needed to complete custom project. Modified machinery, jigs/fi xtures, vacuum platen, process sheets, locally sourced materials. Play prototype. Price negotiable. 802-644-2021, 6-9 p.m.

INSTRUCTION

lessons@arambedro-

5/28/18 FSBO-Michè 1:52 PMleStJacques062018.indd 1 sian.com.

ANDY’S MOUNTAIN MUSIC Affordable, accessible, no-stress instruction in banjo, guitar, mandolin, more. All ages/skill levels/interests welcome! Dedicated teacher offering references, results, convenience. Andy Greene, 802-658-2462, guitboy75@hotmail. com, andysmountainmusic.com BASS LESSONS W/ ARAM For all ages, levels & styles. Beginners welcome! Learn songs, theory, technique & more on Pine St. Years of pro performing, recording & teaching experience. First lesson half off! 598-8861, arambedrosian.com,

Bid to Buy Your Next Car!

EMAILED ADVERTISEMENT 3-Unit Building on 1.20± Acres

Sat., June 30 @ 9AM

Thursday, July 19 @ 11AM Thomas Hirchak Company 338 Rockydale Rd., Bristol, VT

PUBLIC AUTO AUCTION

FORECLOSURE AUCTION ADVERTISING INSERTION ORDER

(Register to Bid from 7:30AM)

FROM: Terra Keene Phone: 800-634-7653 Advertising2@THCAuction.com

298 J. Brown Dr., Williston, VT

Robbi Handy Holmes • 802-951-2128 robbihandyholmes@c21jack.com Find me on Making it happen for you!

Poultney Village 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom, English barn, workshop, two car garage bay. New high efficiency furnace, circulators, tank. Hardwood floors. $154,000. jettaguy2@aol.com 802-294-2525

GREENSBORO

Early 1900’s com6/25/18 FSBO-DeNeale061318.indd 2:52 PM 1 pletely gutted and remodeled duplex. Surveyed half-acre lot with frontage on Boquet River in Willsboro. Newly refinished floors. One apartment is 1-bedroom and the other is 2-bedroom. Appliances are fairly new. $140,000. 518963-8922.

FSBO-Beauregard062718.indd 1

HISTORIC GREEK REVIVAL

’16 Jeep Patriot ’13 Chevy Malibu ’09 Chevy Cobalt

12/4/17 Untitled-8 12:54 PM 1

’09 Ford F-250 SD ’08 Buick LaCrosse ’08 Chevy Cobalt ’08 Nissan Altima ’07 Chevy Impala ’07 Chrysler Pacifica ’06 Subaru Impreza ’05 Toyota Camry AND MORE!

List Subject to Change

Thomas Hirchak Company 800-474-6132 • THCAuction.com

TO: Logan COMPANY: Seven Days 3-unit property with a total of 5BR and PHONE: 802-865-1020 x223BA.

BASS, GUITAR, DRUMS, VOICE LESSONS & MORE! Learn bass, guitar, drums, voice, flute, sax, trumpet, production and beyond with some of Vermont’s best players and independent instructors in beautiful, spacious lesson studios at the Burlington Music Dojo on Pine St. All levels and styles are welcome, including absolute beginners! Gift certificates available. Come share in the music! burlingtonmusicdojo.com, info@ burlingtonmusicdojo. com, 540-0321. GUITAR INSTRUCTION Berklee graduate w/ 30 years’ teaching experience offers lessons in guitar, music theory, music technology, ear training. Individualized, step-by-step approach. All ages, styles, levels. Rick Belford, 864-7195, rickb@rickbelford.com.

ART art

6/22/18Untitled-8 4:42 PM 1

SIZE OF AD: 1/16 (2.30 x 2.72) 6/22/18

studio spaces for rent 6/18/18 to artists/crafters or 11:08 AM compatible professionals. Call Gillian, 985-9186.

BURLINGTON PARKS, RECREATION & WATERFONT ISSUES REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL: PROFESSIONAL DESIGN/ENGINEERING SERVICES FOR THE REHABILITATION OF THE BURLINGTON GREENWAY - PHASE 3 BPRW invites responses from qualified and experienced professional design and engineering consultants to assist the City of Burlington Department of Parks, Recreation & Waterfront in the rehabilitation of the Burlington Greenway (Bike Path), specifically in regards to design development and permitting. Questions concerning this RFP must be made via email per the schedule outlined below.

CREATIVE SPACE

Complete details of the RPF and responses to all questions will be posted as they are received at: http://enjoyburlington. com/opportunities/ requests-for-proposals/

207 Webster Rd. in Shelburne has attractive first-floor office/

Questions due: July 2, 2018 by 5:00 PM Proposals due:

210±’1/16= frontage the New Haven River. 1.2±1C: 2.3 x 2C: 3.67 1C:on2.30 x 1C: 2.72; 1/12= acres.1/8= Investors, grow your real estate portfolio. 1C: 2.30 x 3C: 5.56; 1/6= 1C: 2.3 x ATTRACTIVE 4C: 7.46 STUDIO Check town of Bristol for permitted uses. Great SPACES Roadhouse Studios, summer renovation project.

TODAY’S DATE: 06/22/2018 Thomas Hirchak Company NAME OF FILE: VEH_7D THCAuction.com • 800-634-7653 DATE(S) TO RUN: 06/27/18

Wood cottage, 950 3:42 PM 6/25/18 sq.ft., Baie Ste-Catherine facing Tadoussac, living room panoramic view on St. Laurence River, 1946, 3-BR, 1 boudoir, 2-BA, wooded lot 96,500 sq.ft., screen porch. $152,000, negotiable. michelecentre@gmail.com.

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS July 11, 2018, by 5:00 PM Inquiries/submissions to: Jon Adams-Kollitz, Parks Project Coordinator Burlington Parks, Recreation & Waterfront 645 Pine Street, Suite B, Burlington, VT 05401 jadamskollitz@burlingtonvt.gov (802) 540-0363 CITY OF BURLINGTON IN THE YEAR TWO THOUSAND EIGHTEEN AN ORDINANCE IN RELATION TO HOUSING – FEES ORDINANCE 4.28 Sponsor: Code Enforcement Office, Bd. of Finance Rules suspended and placed in all stages of passage: 06/18/18 Date: 06/18/18 Signed by Mayor: 06/21/18 Published: 06/27/18 Effective: 07/18/18 It is hereby Ordained by the City Council of the City of Burlington as follows: That Chapter 18, Housing, of the Code of Ordinances of the City of Burlington be and hereby is amended by amending Sec. 18-30,

Fees, thereof to read as follows: 18-30 Fees. (a) Registration fee. Pursuant to Section 18‑15, a registration fee shall be charged to the owner of every rental unit in the city that is subject to periodic inspections. This fee shall be in an amount determined by and dedicated solely to the cost of providing rental housing inspection services, clerical, administrative and mediation support services for the housing board of review and landlord/tenant resource services. Any surplus remaining in this fund at the end of a fiscal year shall remain part of the fund and shall be carried forward to the next fiscal year. This fee shall be reviewed annually by the finance board. The fee shall be in the amount of one hundred One hundred ten dollars ($100.00 $110.00) per unit per year except for owner occupied dwellings with two (2) or less units, in which case the fee shall be seventy-five eighty dollars ($75.00 $80.00). A rental unit for which a registration fee as required in this section

has not been paid shall be in violation of the city minimum housing ordinance and subject to the penalties set forth herein. In addition, if the enforcement agency determines that a person has failed to pay the registration fee due under this section or the transfer fee due under Section 18-15(b), the agency shall mail to such person a statement showing the balance due and shall add thereto a thirteen twenty-five dollar ($13.00 $25.00) late payment or interest at a rate of twelve (12) percent per year, whichever is greater. That unpaid balance and penalty total shall be subject to interest at a rate of twelve (12) percent per year from the due date until the date of payment. The charges levied in this chapter shall constitute a lien upon the property on which the rental unit is situated and may be enforced within the time and manner provided for the collection of taxes on property. A rental unit shall be exempt from the registration fees required herein if: (1) That unit is currently

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maintained as part of a nursing facility or community care home under license from the state; or (2) That unit meets all three (3) of the following tests: a. The unit is currently maintained as “affordable” housing for “low-income” or “very low-income” households, as these terms are currently defined by Section 8 programs of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; and b. The unit is currently maintained as “affordable” housing for “low-income” or “very low-income” households using public subsidies provided by federal, state or municipal government(s); and c. The unit is currently owned by a municipal corporation or a 501(c) (3) tax-exempt, nonprofit corporation whose purpose is creating or preserving affordable housing for low-income households; (3) That unit is the owner-occupied portion of a rental unit which is subject to periodic

inspections pursuant to Section 18‑16. (b) Reinspection fee. The following fees shall be paid by the owner of each property for a reinspection that is required due to the existence of violations of this division: (1) First reinspection, per unit: Sixty Seventy-five dollars ($60.00 $75.00). (2) Second reinspection, per unit: One hundred One hundred fifty dollars ($100.00 $150.00). (3) Third and subsequent reinspection, per unit: Two Three hundred dollars ($200.00 $300.00). Reinspection fees assessed under this provision shall be due within thirty (30) days of the date the enforcement agency provided the notice that these fees are owed. In the event the owner does not pay the reinspection fee that is owed, the agency shall mail a statement showing the balance due and shall add thereto a thirteen-dollar ($13.00) late payment or interest at a rate of twelve (12) percent per year, whichever is greater. That unpaid balance

Open 24/7/365. Post & browse ads at your convenience. and penalty total shall be subject to interest at a rate of twelve (12) percent per year from the due date until the date of payment. The charges levied in this chapter shall constitute a lien upon the property on which the rental unit is situated and may be enforced within the time and manner provided for the collection of taxes on property. The failure to pay reinspection fees when due shall also be a violation of the city minimum housing ordinance and subject to the penalties set forth herein. (c) Complaint inspection fee. If the agency receives a complaint regarding a rental unit that is exempt from periodic inspections under Section 18-16, a fee of fifty dollars ($50.00) shall be charged to the property owner for the inspection of that unit should any violations of the minimum housing standards ordinance be found during the inspection. Complaint inspection fees assessed under this provision shall be due within thirty (30) days of the date the enforcement agency provided the notice that these fees are owed. In the

event the owner does not pay the complaint inspection fees that are owed, the agency shall mail a statement showing the balance due and shall add thereto a thirteen-dollar ($13.00) late payment or interest at a rate of twelve (12) percent per year, whichever is greater. That unpaid balance and penalty total shall be subject to interest at a rate of twelve (12) percent per year from the due date until the date of payment. The charges levied in this chapter shall constitute a lien upon the property on which the rental unit is situated and may be enforced within the time and manner provided for the collection of taxes on property. The failure to pay reinspection fees when due shall also be a violation of the city minimum housing ordinance and subject to the penalties set forth herein. No fee shall be charged if the unit is free from violations. The fee for reinspections shall be as described in subsection (b) of this section. (d) A relocation cost administrative fee of fifty dollars ($50.00) shall be assessed on all owners who fail to pay the relo-

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cation costs established in Section 18-28(c) within the time required in Section 18-28(d). In the event the owner does not pay the relocation costs and/or relocation cost administrative fee that is owed, the agency shall mail a statement showing the balance due and shall add thereto a thirteen-dollar ($13.00) late payment or interest at a rate of twelve (12) percent per year, whichever is greater. That unpaid balance and penalty total shall be subject to interest at a rate of twelve (12) percent per year from the due date until the date of payment. The charges levied in this chapter shall constitute a lien upon the property on which the rental unit is situated and may be enforced within the time and manner provided for the collection of taxes on property. The failure to pay reinspection fees when due shall also be a violation of the city minimum housing ordinance and subject to the penalties set forth herein. (Ord. of 4-12-93; Ord. of 1-18-00; Ord. of 9-11-00; Ord. of 12-15-03, eff. 1-2804; Ord. of 12-9-13; Ord. of 12-1-14(1))

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM 06.27.18-07.04.18 SEVEN DAYS CLASSIFIEDS C-5


to sell your personal property, located in a self-storage unit at Chase Moving, 165 Shunpike Rd., Williston, VT, for failure to make payment. Sale/Disposal to occur June 28.

[CONTINUED]

NOTICE OF LEGAL SALE View Date: 7/5/2018 Sale Date: 7/6/2018

* Material stricken out deleted. ** Material underlined added.

Jordon Orcutt Unit #221

NOTICE OF SELF STORAGE LIEN SALE MALLETTS BAY SELF STORAGE, LLC 115 HEINEBERG DRIVE COLCHESTER, VT 05446 Notice is hereby given that the contents of the self storage units listed below will be sold at public auction by sealed bid. Name of Occupant Storage Unit

C-6 CLASSIFIEDS

SEVEN DAYS

06.27.18-07.04.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

That Chapter 14, Waste, of the Code of Ordinances of the City of Burlington be and hereby is amended by amending Sec. 14-14, waste generation tax, thereof to read as follows:

* Material stricken out deleted. ** Material underlined added. NOTICE OF INTENT TO SELL TO: Eli Barton, Burlington, VT One Self-storage units. This is a Notice of Intent

(INCLUDE 40 WORDS + PHOTO). SUBMIT TO: ASHLEY@SEVENDAYSVT.COM BY MONDAYS AT NOON.

BURLINGTON 4-UNIT

BURLINGTON | 137 SHELBURNE STREET | #4701136

Said sales will take place on 7/6/18, beginning at 10:00am at Malletts Bay Self Storage, LLC, (MBSS, Mary Beth Bowman, 1 Dark Star Properties, LLC)115 Heineberg Dr,HW-Nedde-062718.indd LLC, Peter Erb, CathColchester, VT 05446. erine Goldsmith, James Goldsmith, Deborah GouUnits will be opened for dreau, Lindsay Hay, Jean viewing immediately Kiedaisch, Rolf Kielman, prior to auction. Sale Natacha Luizzi, William shall be by sealed bid Marks, Chuck Reiss, Sally to the highest bidder. Reiss, Kate Schubart, Contents of entire storWilliam Schubart, age unit will be sold as Barbara Segal, Heidi one lot. The winning bid Simkins, Michael Sorce, must remove all conJulie Soquet, Stephanie tents from the facility Spencer, Robert Thiefels, at no cost to MBSS, LLC and Responsible Growth on the day of auction. Hinesburg, by and MBSS, LLC reserves the through the Law Office right to reject any bid of James A. Dumont, lower that the amount Esq., PC, and they appeal owed by the occupant or to the Environmental that is not commercially reasonable as defined by Division of the Superior Court the Water Quality statute. Certification dated June 7, 2018. STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT The statutory and legal ENVIRONMENTAL bases for the appeal DIVISION and interested person RE: WATER QUALITY status are 10 V.S.A. § CERTIFICATION FOR 8504(a) and § 8503, and MARTIN’S FOODS OF Vermont Environmental SOUTH BURLINGTON, Court Rules 2 and 5. INC. CERTIFICATION The project applicant is #2016-003 Martin’s Foods of South Burlington, Inc. The NOTICE OF APPEAL of property is the wetland WATER QUALITY CERTIin Hinesburg between FICATION Commerce Street and Mechanicsville Road, Now come Brian Bock,

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foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 80 Duke Street, St. Johnsbury, Vermont on July 18, 2018 at 10:00 AM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To wit: Being a parcel of land, together with a dwelling and other improvements thereon, known and numbered as 80 Duke Street, in the Town of St. Johnsbury, Vermont; and being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to Paul Ste. Marie and Taffy Ste. Marie by Warranty Deed of Dana Emery, dated of even or near date and recorded prior to or simultaneously herewith in the St. Johnsbury Land Records.

And being further described as all and the same lands and premises conveyed to Dana Emery by Warranty Deed of William Hartranft, dated March 11, 2010, and recorded in Book 346 at Page 10 of the St. Johnsbury Land Records; and Christine Golden being all and the same cgolden@neddere.com lands and premises 802-651-6888 conveyed to William Nedde Real Estate Hartranft by Executor’s Deed of Julius M. Proia, Jr., Executor of the Elena Proia Estate, dated June south of and adjacent TAFFY A. WHITE AND 5, 2002, and recorded in 6/25/18 to the lands of Dark Star PAUL J. STE MARIE OC- 2:50 PM Book 269 at Page 280 of Properties, LLC, and CUPANTS OF: 80 Duke the St. Johnsbury Land east of Route 116. The Street, St. Johnsbury VT Records. property owner is the Giroux Family Trust. The MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE Reference may be had wetland is part of land OF FORECLOSURE SALE to the aforementioned identified by the Town OF REAL PROPERTY as Lot 15. UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 deeds and the records thereof and to all prior et seq. deeds and their records All interested persons for a further and more are hereby advised that In accordance with the complete description of they must enter an apAmended Judgment the land and premises pearance in writing with Order and Decree of hereby conveyed. the court within 20 days Foreclosure entered of receiving this notice, July 11, 2017 in the Reference is hereby or in such other time above captioned action as may be provided in brought to foreclose that made to the above instruments and to the Vermont Environmental certain mortgage given records and references Court Rule 5(c), if they by Taffy Ste Marie aka contained therein in wish to participate in the Taffy A. White and Paul further aid of this deappeal. J. Ste Marie to Union scription. June 21, 2018 /s/James Bank, dated February A. Dumont 15, 2013 and recorded Terms of sale: Said in Book 367 Page 119 of premises will be sold James A. Dumont, Esq. the land records of the and conveyed subject to PO Box 229, 15 Main Town of St. Johnsbury, all liens, encumbrances, Street, Bristol, VT 05443 of which mortgage the unpaid taxes, tax titles, Plaintiff is the present municipal liens and asholder, by virtue of an STATE OF VERMONT Assignment of Mortgage sessments, if any, which CALEDONIA UNIT, CIVIL from Union Bank to U.S. take precedence over DIVISION the said mortgage above Bank National AssociaVERMONT SUPERIOR described. tion dated February 15, COURT 2013 and recorded in DOCKET NO: 208-9TEN THOUSAND Book 367 Page 188 of 16 CACV ($10,000.00) Dollars of the land records of the the purchase price must U.S. BANK NATIONAL AS- Town of St. Johnsbury be paid by a certified SOCIATION for breach of the condicheck, bank treasurer’s v. tions of said mortgage or cashier’s check at the TAFFY STE MARIE AKA and for the purpose of

This Burlington investment property is fully leased with dependable, long term tenants. Four units with two bedrooms each plus 2 storage bays that are also rented out. Updates throughout. This work horse of an investment property brings in great returns. $650,000.

Jennifer C Dame #77

It is hereby Ordained by the City Council of the City of Burlington as follows:

Balance of section as written.

ATTENTION REALTORS: LIST YOUR PROPERTIES HERE FOR ONLY $35

Easy Self Storage 46 Swift Street South Burlington, VT 05403 (802)863-8300

CITY OF BURLINGTON IN THE YEAR TWO THOUSAND FIFTEEN AN ORDINANCE IN RELATION TO WASTE— WASTE GENERATION TAX ORDINANCE 4.29 Sponsor: Department of Public Works; Transportation, Energy, Utilities Committee; Bd. of Finance Rules suspended and placed in all stages of passage: 06/18/18 Date: 06/18/18 Signed by Mayor: 06/21/18 Published: 06/27/18 Effective: 07/18/18

Sec. 14-14. waste generation tax. (II) TAXES IMPOSED (a) As written. (b) The tax shall be imposed upon waste haulers and collectors at the rate of three four dollars and seventy twenty cents ($3.70 $4.20) per month per residential dwelling unit served in Burlington. (c) As written.

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time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale. The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale. DATED : June 6, 2018 By: /S/Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032 STATE OF VERMONT LAMOILLE UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION LAMOILLE UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION DOCKET NO: 50-3-17 LECV U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION v. CHRISTOPHER LEE RONDEAU, AMANDA MARIE RONDEAU AND NORTHCOUNTRY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION OCCUPANTS OF: 21 Wild Apple Lane, Village of Jeffersonville, Town of Cambridge VT MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered February 13, 2018, in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Christopher Lee Rondeau and Amanda Marie Rondeau to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for U.S. Bank, N.A., dated May 22, 2009 and recorded in Book 344 Page 208 of the land records of the Town of Cambridge, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of an Assignment of Mortgage from Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for U.S. Bank, N.A. to U.S. Bank National Association dated August 15, 2014

and recorded in Book 402 Page 172 of the land records of the Town of Cambridge for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 21 Wild Apple Lane, Village of Jeffersonville, Town of Cambridge, Vermont on July 24, 2018 at 10:00AM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To wit: Being all and the same land and premises conveyed to Christopher Lee Rondeau and Amanda Marie Rondeau by the Warranty Deed of Alan F. Giguere and Julie A. Giguere dated May 22, 2009 and being recorded in the Cambridge Land Records and being a portion of and the same land and premises conveyed to Alan F. Giguere and Julie A. Giguere by the Warranty Deed of 3965121 Canada, Inc. dated December 14, 2006 and of record in Book 239, Pages 93-95 of the Cambridge Land Records and being all and the same land and premises conveyd to Alan F. Giguere and Julie A. Giguere by the Quit Claim Deed of Brian M. Kaplan dated March 19, 2009 and received for recording on May 11, 2009 at 1:30 PM in the Cambridge Land Records and being further described as being a portion of all and the same lands and premises conveyed to 3965121 Canada, Inc. by Warranty Deed of Solguy Vermont, Inc. which deed is dated December 28, 2001 and recorded in Book 234, Pages 117-119 of the Cambridge Land Records. The property is more particularly described as being a parcel of land containing 0.273 aces, more or less, and depicted Lot 5 on a survey entitled “Brewster Place Subdivision Property of 3965121 Canada, Inc. Wild Apple Lane, Cambridge, Vermont” dated May 18, 2006 and prepared by and bearing the seal and signature of William H. Hannon, Registered Land Surveyor, and recorded on Map Slide203D in the Plat/Survey Cabinet in the Cambridge Land Records and depicted as #21 on the plan entitled” Boundary Line Adjust-

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS ment Giguere & Kaplan 21 & 53 Wild Apple Land, Jeffersonville, Vermont”dated February 10, 2009 and prepared by Ridge Consulting Engineers. 434 Shelburne Road, Burlington, Vermont 05406, bearing the seal and signature of David W. Fuqua, Class B Licensed Designer, Project Number 08611 and received for recording on May 11, 2009 at 1:30 PM in the Cambridge Land Records which survey and plan shall govern this description in the event of any question or ambiguity. Reference is made to the above noted deeds, plan, survey and their records and to all former deeds and their records for a more particular description of the land and premises being described herein. Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description. Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over

the said mortgage above described.

MASTER PARTICIPATION TRUST v. JAMES D. SHEPHERD, MARTHA W. SHEPHERD, STERLING WOODS COMMUNITY OWNERS ASSOCIATION AND DANIEL W. BURGESS OCCUPANTS OF: 117 Sterling Woods, Stowe VT

TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale.

MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq.

The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale. DATED: June 8, 2018 By: /S/Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032

STATE OF VERMONT LAMOILLE UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT DOCKET NO: 167-8-15 LECV U.S BANK TRUST, N.A., enclosedASmath operations TRUSTEE FOR LSF9

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In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered July 12, 2017, in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by James D. Shepherd and Martha W. Shepherd to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for IndyMac Bank, F.S.B., dated December 22, 2006 and recorded in Book 670 Page 171 of the land records of the Town of Stowe, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of the following Assignments of Mortgage: (1) Assignment of Mortgage from Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for IndyMac Bank, F.S.B. to Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC dated June 30, 2014 and recorded in Book 891 Page 23 and (2) Assign-

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Being Lot No. 8 as shown on a survey plan titled “Sterling Woods Community” by Paul C. Harrington dated September, 1983, as recorded in Map Book 4 at Pages 114-115 of the

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Excepting and reserving unto Grantor, his heirs, successors and assigns as a right appurtenant to Lot 12, at all points within a 100 foot radius of the pin marking the common corner of Lots 8 and 9 and which is in the sideline of Lot 12, the right to conduct all surface activities including, without limitation, the right to landscape, plant or remove vegetation and to alter the surface of the area excepted and reserved unto Grantor provided however, that the right to conduct surface activities excepted and reserved shall not include the right to erect any building or structure on any part of the land and premises excepted and reserved. As to all points more than 100 feet but less than 175 feet from the above-referenced pin, no cutting of live trees or fencing activities shall occur except with the mutual consent of Grantor and Grantee and their heirs, successors and assigns.

Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described.

Tax/Parcel ID: 19067-110

DATED: June 1, 2018 By: /S/Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032

Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in

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The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale.

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4 6 7

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TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale.

Complete the following puzzle by using the numbers 1-9 only once in each row, column and 3 x 3 box.

9 13+

7 9

4 5

8

Difficulty - Medium

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

No. 438

SUDOKU

Difficulty: Hard

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: HHH

Fill the grid using the numbers 1-6, only once in each row and column. The numbers in each heavily outlined “cage” must combine to produce the target number in the top corner, using the mathematical operation indicated. A onebox cage should be filled in with the target number in the top corner. A number can be repeated within a cage as long as it is not the same row or column.

Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each 9-box square contains all of the numbers one to nine. The same numbers cannot be repeated in a row or column.

6

1

5

2

3

4

3

5

4

6

2

1

4

2

1

3

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6

9 5 2 8 6 7 3 1 4 ANSWERS 1 ON 8 P. C-8 3 4 5 2 9 6 7 H = MODERATE HH = CHALLENGING HHH = HOO, BOY! 6 4 7 1 9 3 8 2 5 4 6 8 2 3 9 7 5 1

By virtue and in execution of the Power of Sale contained in a certain mortgage given by Gary Marcotte a/k/a Gary N. Marcotte to Sovereign Bank dated August 3, 2005 and recorded in Volume 327, Page 336, which mortgage was assigned to Wilmington Savings Fund Society, FSB Doing Business as Christiana Trust, Not in its Individual Capacity but Solely as Trustee for BCAT 2014-10TT by an instrument dated January 27, 2016 and recorded on February 16, 2016 in Volume 430, Page 862 of the Land Records of the Town of Shelburne. Pursuant to the power of sale in the subject mortgage, of which Plaintiff is the present holder, for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purposes of foreclosing the same, the collateral property will be sold at Public Auction at 12:00 P.M. on July 24, 2018, at 576 Falls Road, Shelburne, Vermont all and singular the premises described in said mortgage: To Wit: Being a lot of land with all buildings thereon, situated on the westerly side of the highway leading from Shelburne Village to Shelburne Falls, which highway is commonly known as Falls Road, and said lot of land being all of Parcel B as shown and depicted on a plan entitled: “Property Subdivision for Paul F. Shedlock” prepared by Harwell Associates, Inc., dated September, 1968 and recorded in Volume B (Maps) on Page 125 of the Land Records of the Town of Shelburne. Terms of Sale: $10,000.00 to be paid in cash or cashier’s check by purchaser at the time of sale, with the balance due at closing. The sale

is subject to taxes due and owing to the Town of Shelburne and any liens against the property. The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale or inquire at Grant C. Rees Attorney, PLC, 30 Kimball Avenue, Ste. 307, South Burlington, VT 05403, (802) 6609000. This sale may be cancelled at any time prior to the scheduled sale date without prior notice. Dated at South Burlington, Vermont this 20th day of June, 2018. By: Grant C. Rees, Esq. Grant C. Rees Attorney, PLC 30 Kimball Ave., Ste. 307 South Burlington, VT 05403 Attorney for Plaintiff STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT CHITTENDEN UNIT CIVIL DIVISION DOCKET NO. 267-3-17 CNCV Ditech Financial LLC f/k/a Green Tree Servicing LLC, Plaintiff v. Michael L. Riley, Heather Riley and Occupants residing at 44 Center Road, Essex, Vermont, Defendants NOTICE OF SALE By virtue and in execution of the Power of Sale contained in a certain mortgage given by Michael L. Riley and Heather Riley to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Nominee for Homecomings Financial Network, Inc. dated January 23, 2002 and recorded in Volume 476, Page 374, which mortgage was assigned to Ditech Financial LLC f/k/a Green Tree Servicing LLC by an instrument dated April 29, 2013 and recorded on May 10, 2013 in Volume 897, Page 1004 of the Land Records of the Town of Essex. Pursuant to the power of sale in the subject mortgage, of which Plaintiff is the present holder, for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purposes of foreclosing the same, the collateral property will be sold at Public Auction at 11:30 A.M. on July 23, 2018, at

LEGALS »

CLASSIFIEDS C-7

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: HH

NOTICE OF SALE

There’s no limit to ad length online.

SEVEN DAYS

2

STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT CHITTENDEN UNIT CIVIL DIVISION DOCKET NO. 249-3-17 CNCV Wilmington Savings Fund Society, FSB Doing Business as Christiana Trust, Not in its Individual Capacity but Solely as Trustee for BCAT 2014-10TT, Plaintiff v. Gary Marcotte a/k/a Gary N. Marcotte, KeyBank, National Association, Melissa Mendelsohn and Occupants residing at 576 Falls Road, Shelburne, Vermont, Defendants

Extra! Extra!

06.27.18-07.04.18

5

CALCOKU

further aid of this description.

7 5

8x

To wit: All that certain parcel of land being situated in the Town of Stowe, County of Lamoille, State of Vermont, being known and designated as a part of all and the same land and premises conveyed to Nelson S. Riley, III, by Sterling Valley, a Limited Partnership, by its Warranty Deed dated August 7, 1981, and of record in Book 103 at Pages 137138 of the Town of Stowe Land Records.

Post & browse ads at your convenience.

Town of Stowe Land Records.

1

9+ 2÷

ment of Mortgage from Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC to U.S Bank Trust, N.A., As Trustee For LSF9 Master Participation Trust dated April 27, 2016 and recorded in Book 959 Page 318, both of the land records of the Town of Stowe for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 117 Sterling Woods, Stowe, Vermont on July 10, 2018 at 1:00 PM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage,

24x

3-

Open 24/7/365.

View and post up to 6 photos per ad online.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

7+

Show and tell.

»


2-9 1 9+ 6 4 7 8x 3 2 8 5 7+

5 2 8 3 4 7 62÷ 8 2 9 1 5 9 6 3 1 7 4

5 8 7+ 4 1 3+ 2 5 2÷ 6 7 9 3

6 2 63- 7 5 2 9 3 3 9 8 1 7 4 113+5 4 6 2 8

3-

5 2 3

3 6 1 4

3 1 4 9 6 7 5 8 2 5 16x 5 2- 1 7 6 4 3 2 8 9 4 3 8 5Difficulty 7 - Medium 2 1 9 6 5+

24x

Using the enclosed math operations as a guide, fill the grid using the numbers 1 - 6 only once in each row and column.

Calcoku

06.27.18-07.04.18

1

6

4

3

4

SEVEN DAYS

5

3

1

1

C-8 CLASSIFIEDS

2

2

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

FROM P.C-7

4

FROM P.C-5

1

6/12/12 3:25 PM

Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description.

6

Name and Address of Court: Chittenden Unit Probate Division

Commonly known as: 2 Hutchins Circle, Barre, VT 05641

5

Publication Dates: 6/27/2018

4

PUZZLE ANSWERS

Name of publication Seven Days

Being the same property conveyed to Joseph R. Hebert and Michelle A. Eno, husband and wife, as tenants by the entirety, by deed dated August 29, 2003 of record in Deed Book 190, Page 986, in the County Clerk’s Office.

6

By: Grant C. Rees, Esq. Grant C. Rees Attorney, PLC 30 Kimball Ave., Ste. 307 South Burlington, VT 05403 Attorney for Plaintiff

2

4v-free-colors.indd 1

Ditech Financial LLC f/k/a Green Tree Servicing LLC

Jennie Elsman Executor/Administrator: 25 Crombie Street Burlington, VT 05401 Jennieapwu570@yahoo. com 802-864-9329

In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered November 7, 2017, in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Joseph R. Hebert and Michelle A. Eno to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as a nominee for Quicken Loans, Inc., dated January 20, 2012 and recorded in Book 258 Page 814 of the land records of the Town of Barre, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of an Assignment of Mortgage from Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as a nominee for Quicken Loans, Inc. to Quicken Loans Inc. dated August 17, 2016 and recorded in Book 288 Page 417 of the land records of the Town of Barre for breach of the conditions of said mort-

A PARCEL OF LAND, WITH HOUSE THEREON, KNOWN AS 2 HUTCHINS CIRCLE, BARRE TOWN, VERMONT: AND BEING ALL AND THE SAME LANDS AND PREMISES CONVEYED TO ALAN LAPIERRE AND BETH LAPIERRE BY WARRANTY DEED OF STEVEN M. BIGRAS AND CHRISTINA M, BIGRAS DATED OCTOBER 30, 2000 AND RECORDED IN BOOK 161, PAGE 944 OF THE BARRE TOWN LAND RECORDS.

3

for all.

Dated at South Burlington, Vermont this 20th day of June, 2018.

Date: 6/25/2018 /s/ Jennie Elsman Signature of Fiduciary

MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq.

To wit: Land Situated in the Town of Barre in the County of Washington in the State of VT

2

styling.

Other terms to be announced at the sale or inquire at Grant C. Rees Attorney, PLC, 30 Kimball Avenue, Ste. 307, South Burlington, VT 05403, (802) 6609000. This sale may be cancelled at any time prior to the scheduled sale date without prior notice.

I have been appointed to administer this estate. All creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the first publication of this notice. The claim must be presented to me at the address listed below with a copy sent to the court. The claim may be barred forever if it is not presented within the four (4) month period.

6

wheeling.

To Wit: Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to Michael L. Riley and Heather Riley by Warranty Deed of Daniel A. Coane and Kathleen F. Coane dated August 18, 1999 and recorded in Volume 415 at Pages 1415 of the Land Records of the Town of Essex and being more particularly described as follows: “Being a parcel of land with buildings thereon situated on the northerly side of Route 15 and having a frontage of 206.85 feet, a westerly sideline of 229.95 feet, a northerly sideline of 219.87 feet, and an easterly sideline of 246.36 feet.” “Said land and premises are hereby subject to all rights of way of record and particularly a 10-foot wide easement of record over the southeasterly corner of said lands and premises. Said lands and premises are more particularly shown on a plan of land identified as ‘Heritage Estates Plan’ of record in

The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale.

To the creditors of Pauline C. Robar late of Burlington, VT.

5

44 Center Road, Essex, Vermont, all and singular the premises described in said mortgage:

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

STATE OF VERMONT WASHINGTON UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT DOCKET NO: 650-11-16 WNCV QUICKEN LOANS INC. v. JOSEPH R. HEBERT AND MICHELLE A. ENO OCCUPANTS OF: 2 Hutchins Cir., Barre VT

gage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 2 Hutchins Cir., Barre, Vermont on July 23, 2018 at 10:00 AM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage,

3

[CONTINUED]

PO Box 511 Burlington, VT 05402

4

thinking.

Terms of Sale: $10,000.00 to be paid in cash or cashier’s check by purchaser at the time of sale, with the balance due at closing. The sale is subject to taxes due and owing to the Town of Essex and any liens against the property.

STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT CHITTENDEN UNIT PROBATE DIVISION DOCKET NO. 832-6-18 CNPR In re estate of Pauline C. Robar.

1

Book 73, Page 497 of said Land Records.”

Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described. TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale. The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale. DATED: May 18, 2018 By: /S/Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032 SUPERIOR COURT CHITTENDEN UNIT FAMILY DIVISION DOCKET NO. 447-11-17 IN RE: J.S. NOTICE OF PERMANENT GUARDIANSHIP PROCEEDING TO: The natural father of J.S., born May 7, 2008 in Burlington, Vermont, to Samantha Simms: You are hereby notified that a hearing to establish permanent guardianship over the juvenile J.S. will be held July 30, 2018 at 10 a.m. at the Superior Court of Vermont, Family Division, Chittenden County, Costello Courthouse, 32 Cherry St. Burlington, Vermont. You are notified to appear in this case. If you do not appear, the hearing will be held without you, and Jeff and Julie Ladue could become the permanent guardians of J.S. for the remainder of his minority. If permanent guardianship is established, you would not be able to petition the Court to terminate or modify the permanent guardianship. Signed: Alison Arms Superior Court Judge Date: 6/11/2018


C-9 06.27.18-07.04.18

ATTENTION RECRUITERS: POST YOUR JOBS AT: PRINT DEADLINE: FOR RATES & INFO:

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTMYJOB NOON ON MONDAYS (INCLUDING HOLIDAYS) MICHELLE BROWN, 802-865-1020 X21, MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

YOUR TRUSTED LOCAL SOURCE. JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM HEALTHCARE ARCHITECT/ DESIGNER Immediate Openings Archies Grill has full and part time immediate openings. We are a family operated, family friendly restaurant in Shelburne preparing fresh foods with local ingredients. Experienced professional grill, prep and salad positions available. We offer a very competitive wage plus tips. Total wage package ranges from $15$20 per hour depending on experience. If you are a reliable professional in search of growing opportunities and wish to be part of a family team, please respond with your resume and plan to come for an interview.

info@archiesgrill.com

CUSTODIAN Colchester School District is seeking applicants for a full-time, full-year Custodian. Responsibilities include, but are not limited to, sweeping, mopping, vacuuming, trash disposal, cleaning bathrooms, waxing floors, moving furniture, set-up and breakdown for events, shoveling snow from walkways in the winter. To apply, please visit www.SchoolSpring.com. Job #2911063 Custodian. Applications are also available at Colchester School District Central Office, 125 Laker Lane, Colchester, VT.

6/25/18 3v-ColchesterSchoolDistrict062718.indd Wanted! Applicants for10:58 AM Culinary Job Training Program

3V-Archies062718.indd 1

1

BAYADA is hiring! The South Burlington Home Health office located in Williston, VT is hiring a full time nurse to make home visits. Please contact Lauren Callahan, Recruiter, if you are interested. Contact info is below:

E4H Environments for Health is looking for a high energy architect or designer with a passion for healthcare to join our Williston location. • Five to eight years of experience; some or all in healthcare architecture.

802-316-5247 • lcallahan@bayada.com 2h-Bayada062718.indd 1

• Licensure preferred or recent demonstrated effort on the path to licensure. • Proficiency in Revit Send resume, cover letter, work samples/link to portfolio and targeted salary range to Janet Tatten, HR Director,

jtatten@e4harchitecture.com.

6/22/18 Communications Director

11:08 AM

Ski Vermont/the Vermont Ski Areas Association is seeking an organized, detail-oriented person with excellent written and verbal communication skills and communications or marketing experience to promote the Ski Vermont brand in collaboration with member areas and partners. Main responsibilities include creating and executing an annual communications plan, media/influencer relations, content, magazine and newsletter development and directing social media engagement. Degree in communications and/or related work experience is required. Experience or familiarization with travel, hospitality and ski industry preferred. Website, Adobe Photoshop and Indesign experience is a plus. This position requires some travel, weekend/evening schedule flexibility and minimum of advanced intermediate skiing or snowboarding ability. Interested candidates should email a letter of interest and resume to info@skivermont.com. More info here:

skivermont.com/new-blog

6/25/18 3v-e4H061318.indd 10:06 AM 1

6/11/184t-VtSkiAreasAssociation(SkiVT)062718.indd 2:03 PM 1

6/25/18 1:59 PM

Community Kitchen Academy (CKA) is currently accepting applications for student enrollment in its successful culinary job training program located in Barre and Burlington. CKA is a program of the Vermont Foodbank that prepares underemployed and unemployed Vermonters for a career in the food service industry and lifelong learning through an intensive program of culinary skills development, career readiness and job placement. Students actively develop and apply new skills by creating wholesome meals for those at risk of hunger using food that has been gathered from within our communities that may otherwise go to waste. The job training program is 12 weeks long. Complete financial assistance is offered to applicants who are income eligible. The training is operated in partnership with Capstone Community Action in Barre and Chittenden Emergency Food Shelf in Burlington. Apply online at www.vtfoodbank.org/cka.

MARKETING SPECIALIST Country Home Products, the home of DR Power Equipment, is looking for a Marketing Specialist to develop and manage our fast-growing business-to-business (B2B) marketing program. You will report to the VP of Marketing, liaise with the B2B group, and shepherd marketing projects from concept through publication (in print and/or online). Beyond scheduling and coordinating projects, you will be take an active role in the creation of marketing materials, including copywriting, design, photography, videography...anything else that is necessary to get the job done! Your own resourcefulness, drive to complete projects, collaborative abilities, and attention to detail are key to success in this position. Visit our careers site for more information and to apply with a cover letter and resume.

Visit www.drpower.com/careers Untitled-12 1

6/25/18 10:32 AM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-10

POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

06.27.18-07.04.18

Join our team! The Washington County Youth Service Bureau seeks a dynamic individual to help support the Vermont Youth Development Corps AmeriCorps State and Vermont Youth Tomorrow AmeriCorps VISTA programs.

Farrell Distributing is seeking hardworking, motivated individuals to join our warehouse team for nighttime and material handling positions. Must be reliable and determined to succeed!

Assistant Director of National Service Programs: Looking for an organized and detail-oriented person with good written and verbal communication skills, computer proficiency, administrative experience, and a positive attitude. This position is one of three Assistant Directors who help manage two statewide AmeriCorps programs. Duties: recruit, support, and manage AmeriCorps members and sites; manage grants and write reports; coordinate and facilitate monthly training; implement public relations campaigns; maintain data bases and websites; and monitor members and sites. Send cover letter and resume to Hiring Committee at vyt.vydc@wcysb.org by 3 July 2018. Position starts in late July or early August.

Send resumes to luker@fdcvt.com.

2v-FarrellDistributing-070815.indd 1

7/6/15 3:17 PM

ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN

Salary Range $37,000 – 43,000. Health Insurance & Generous Leave Policy. We are an equal opportunity employer. Background Check Required.

An Associate’s Degree in Mechanical, Chemical, or Electrical Engineering is preferred. Previous technician experience is a plus. A full Job Description and Application can be found at instrumart.bamboohr. com/jobs. Instrumart is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer. We consider applicants for all positions without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, age, marital, disability or veteran status.

4v-Instrumart062018.indd 1

The City of Winooski seeks a part-time City Treasurer. This position fills an essential role in our City by working within municipal charter to ensure that City Council has access to the City’s financial and budgetary statuses throughout the course of the year. This position receives a stipend of $9670 (annually) and is anticipated require 2 to 4 hours of time in a week. For more information about this opportunity please visit

www.winooskivt.org

4t-CityofWinooskiTREASURER062718.indd 1

6/22/18 12:09 PM

We are looking to expand our Technical Staff with two or more

Instrumart is a leading supplier of test & measurement instruments, located in South Burlington. 5v-WCYSB062018.indd Our Engineering Technician specializes in the repair and calibration of our instrumentation, and also specialize in the production, modification, and customization of existing process control equipment and devices.

City Treasurer

FIRE & SECURITY ALARM TECHNICIANS

1

6/15/18 1:52 PM

Specialist in Built in Central Vacuum Systems. We are expanding our installation/service staff. Immediate Opening for a

Junior Accountant Put your aptitude for numbers and strong communication, analytical and Excel skills to work at our growing company! This full-time role handles a wide range of tasks including payables, payroll, credit card and expense reports, account reconciliation, and preparation of schedules and reports for our senior accountant. The ideal candidate is a team player who thrives in a fast-paced office environment, has demonstrated a high level of accuracy in detailed work, and has experience with accounting software. Bee’s Wrap is a quickly growing company in Bristol, Vermont that produces and distributes a sustainable alternative to plastic wrap for food storage, made from beeswax and cloth. We strive to be a place of productive and creative work by providing a place of employment that is engaging, supportive and open-minded. Bee’s Wrap is committed to using our business as a vehicle for social change and to bettering the lives of our customers, employees, community and planet. To apply for this role, kindly submit a cover letter and resume to our recruiting partner, Beth Gilpin at beth@bethgilpin.com, or check out our full posting at www.bethgilpin.com/currentsearches.

6/18/18 5V-BeesWrap062718.indd 2:43 PM 1

At least one position (Fire Alarm Technician) requires a Type-S Journeyman’s license/TQP Qualified. (For Security technician positions, having a Type-S Journeyman license would be a plus!) This is an Opportunity to join an established company of team players. We are seeking reliable employees with good customer service skills to install, inspect & service Security/Fire Alarm System, CCTV, Access Control, etc. Experience is necessary and a valid driver’s license is a must!

CENTRAL VACUUM INSTALLER/ SERVICE PERSON. Challenging opportunity for an individual that is Aggressive, Self-motivated and Reliable. Candidate must take pride in workmanship and should be available for some overtime. Aptitude in the building trades with good Carpentry/ Mechanical/Plumbing Abilities desired. Must have good communication skills and the willingness to promote our company and its products. • A Valid Driver’s License is a Must. • Company Vehicle Provided for Work. • Salary Commensurate with experience. We offer competitive wages, benefits and vacation time. Mail or email resume to mbenway@sunrayvt.com or call to schedule an interview. (802)878-9091 Sun Ray Fire & Security/Vermont Central Vacuum One Town Marketplace Unit #29 Essex Junction, VT 05452 mbenway@sunrayvt.com 802-878-7800

Member of Home Builders Assoc. of Northern VT, lnc.

6/25/186t-SunRay062018-color.indd 2:37 PM 1

6/18/18 12:38 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

VPR has an exciting opportunity for an experienced Human Resources and Finance professional.

Feel good about where you work and what you do! We are The Institute of Professional Practice, a non-profit human services agency making a meaningful difference in the lives of adults and children with autism and other disabilities. We provide residential programs, day support, special education, and employment services in partnership with families and in collaboration with public and private health, human service, education and other government agencies. THE ACCOUNTS PAYABLE ACCOUNTANT: CLIENT FUNDS Client Funds reports to the Accounts Payable Supervisor and is responsible for recording client SSA receipts and distributing the funds as appropriate. He/she works with our operations locations to ensure allowances are paid correctly and timely. This position serves as a backup to the Accounts Payable Accountant role. As part of the accounting team, he/she will participate in efficiency planning and implementation as it related to payables processing. We are also looking for at least 3 years of accounting or bookkeeping experience and experience with General Ledger software. Great Plains software expertise is a definite advantage but not required. High-level Excel skills (pivot tables, working with formulas, Vlookups) absolutely necessary. A track record of reliability and professionalism is critical. Finally, an associate’s degree in accounting or closely related field is the minimal education requirement. Join us in a fabulous and friendly working environment in our Berlin, VT office. We offer great benefits including medical, dental, vision, disability and retirement plans. We also offer tuition reimbursement, educational opportunities and much more. Visit our website for more information: www.ippi.org.

6t-IPPI062718.indd 1

SUCCESS CRACK OPEN YOUR FUTURE... with our new, mobile-friendly job board.

Job seekers can: • Browse hundreds of current, local positions from Vermont companies. • Search for jobs by keyword, location, category and job type. • Set up job alerts. • Apply for jobs directly through the site. START APPLYING AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

• Good wages & benefits • Pay negotiable with experience EOE/M/F/VET/Disability Employer Apply in person at: A.C. Hathorne Co. 252 Avenue C Williston, VT 05495

802-862-6473 2v-ACHathorne041818.indd 1

Essential skills required include strong organizational, communications and interpersonal skills. Find the full job description and application process at vpr.net/careers.

4/16/18 2:43 PM

DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT

Lake Champlain Maritime Museum is looking to hire a new Director of Development. This position directs and 5v-VPR062718.indd 1 6/22/18 12:46 PM manages all development efforts in direct support of the Museum. The range of responsibilities includes annual fundraising, grant HUMAN RESOURCES SPECIALIST writing, budgeting, online Aurora North Software, Inc. is a Burlington, VT based software giving, planned giving, capital company developing customized legal software and providing campaign, endowments, RBA related consulting services. We develop and implement core systems at some of the country’s most prestigious law firms. prinicipals, Form 990, and events. Aurora North has an immediate opening for a F/T Human Resources VPR is an Equal Opportunity Employer

Specialist with a bachelor’s degree or equivalent in human resources and 3+ years of related experience with compliance, benefits administration, record keeping and HR software. Specialist works on HR initiatives and reports to the Chief Human Resources Officer. The HRS facilitates efficiency and organization of internal HR processes and assists in engagement and development of all employees. The HRS will continue self-education to ensure success and growth within this position. Candidates’ skills should include a positive approach to problem solving and a high competency with the Microsoft Office Suite. Very strong organizational skills and attention to detail are required, plus a high level of reliability, follow-through, discretion and integrity. The ability to successfully interact with co-workers is essential. The HRS will work as a member of the Administrative Team on special projects and company operations, as needed.

6/25/18 2:10 PM

YOU WILL FIND

• Year round, full time employment

The Director of Human & Financial Resources is responsible for VPR’s finance and human resources activities: HR administrative activities including monitoring our performance review process, supporting supervisors, recruiting, compensation and benefits planning, and compliance; and all financial-related activities including AP, general ledger, payroll, developing and monitoring progress against the annual budget, supporting assigned committees of the Board of Directors, and overseeing the external audit. Requirements include a bachelor’s degree and several years of relevant experience in accounting and human resources.

06.27.18-07.04.18

ROOFERS AND LABORERS

Director of Human & Financial Resources ACCOUNTS PAYABLE ACCOUNTANT: CLIENT FUNDS

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

Our employees describe the work environment as fairly intense, fast-paced, tightly run, and fun. Aurora offers a comprehensive compensation and benefits package. If you have a passion for perpetual improvement, enjoy a diversity of projects, relish autonomy, and play well with others, we’d love to hear from you.

Please send your resume and cover letter to: careers@auroranorthsoftware.com.

We’re looking someone with a Bachelor’s degree, five or more years of non-profit development experience, exceptional written and oral communication skills; knowledge of fundraising data reporting and analysis, a high comfort level in engaging potential supporters, strong work ethic, organized, conscientious, flexible, responsible and very much a team player. For more information, please visit:

www.lcmm.org/jobopening-director-ofdevelopment.


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-12

POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

06.27.18-07.04.18

Lead Sales Associate

T OW N O F J E R I C H O Residential Educator Rock Point School, a small independent boarding school, is looking for Residential Educators to join our staff! Our Residential Educators are key members of our school team, teaching our students life skills, taking them on outdoor adventures, and supporting them to form healthy relationships. This is a full-time position and includes weekend and evening hours. For more details about the position and to submit your resume visit: www.rockpointschool.org/ residential-educator.

2V-RockPointSchool-Residential-062718.indd 6/25/18 1 2:00 PM

Case Manager

Full-Time

Highway Maintenance Worker The Town of Jericho is accepting applications for a Highway Maintenance Worker Level 3. This is a full-time position which requires a CDL (min. Class “B”) and the ability to respond to emergencies and snow removal outside of regular working hours. The ideal candidate will have at least five years of experience in highway maintenance, construction procedures and methods and the operation of large trucks, graders and excavators, preferably at the municipal level. Supervisory experience is a plus. Work includes general laboring duties, heavy lifting, physical work, equipment operation, and on-call duty (nights, weekends and holidays).

mdindo@uvs-vt.org.

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To get started on this new and exciting path please send resume and cover letter to edsalesearch@gmail.com. Office located in the greater Burlington, VT area.

An application and job description can be downloaded from 4T-Exemplars(2)062718.indd www.jerichovt.gov. They are also available at the Jericho Town Hall, at 67 VT Rt. 15, Jericho, M-Th 7:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Program Manager

uvs-vt.org.

The ideal candidate has a keen interest and an established record in new account development and management, as well as an ability to stay current with new and emerging trends and industry information. A Bachelor’s Degree and direct sales experience is required. Knowledge about educational curriculum is a plus!

The starting hourly wage is $17.50-$19.00 depending on qualifications. The Town of Jericho offers excellent benefits, including health and dental insurance, and a retirement plan.

Provide individual support of an assigned caseload Completed applications can be submitted to Paula Carrier in through coordination person, via email at pcarrier@jerichovt.gov or via mail to PO of clinical, residential, educational/vocational Box 39, Jericho, VT 05465. components; in addition to development of a Applications will be accepted until position is filled. professional clinical relationship with the individuals served by Upper Valley Services, their 5v-TownofJericho062018.indd 1 6/18/18 parents, guardians and families, the community, and other human service agencies and the Department of Developmental and Mental Health Services. This requires the employee to be mentally alert, on call 24 hours a day, uphold vigilant and disciplined accuracy with prioritizing tasks, Champlain Community Services is a growing developmental record keeping, and meeting services provider agency with a strong emphasis on selfdeadlines. In addition, to determination values and employee and consumer satisfaction. meet the often stressful and unpredictable responsibility demands of this position’s objective, employees need Coordinate residential and community supports for a humorous to maintain mental and woman who leads an active life and enjoys spending time outside. physical preparedness. Bachelor’s degree, preferred in Human Services or related field with at least 2 years of experience working with individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. Must be a Qualified Developmental Disabilities Professional (QDDP), or work under the direct supervision of a QDDP.

Established over two decades ago, our educational publishing company possesses an established brand, business model, and clientele. We are looking for a dynamic Lead Sales Associate with experience in business-to-business sales to promote our researchbased materials.

This individual works best with female staff. The ideal candidate will enjoy working in a team-oriented position, have strong clinical skills and demonstrated leadership. Two overnight shifts required. Send your cover letter and application to Scott Broderick, sbroderick@ccs-vt.org.

Direct Support Professionals

We are currently offering benefitted direct support positions and per diem shifts. This is an excellent job for applicants entering human services or for those looking to continue their work in this field. This is a great opportunity to join a distinguished developmental service provider agency during a time of growth Send your cover letter and application to Karen Ciechanowicz, staff@ccs-vt.org.

ccs-vt.org

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6/25/18 2:40 PM

Engaging minds that change the world

Seeking a position with a quality employer? Consider The University of Vermont, a stimulating and diverse workplace. We offer a comprehensive benefit package including tuition remission for on-going, full-time positions. This opening and others are updated daily. Administrative Professional - The Professional Development & Training Department - #S1639PO - Join a vibrant campus community where we seek to be an exemplar of diversity, equity, and inclusion by creating an environment where anyone can excel in their learning, teaching, and work. The University of Vermont is a place where your expertise will be 6:11 PMvalued, your knowledge expanded and your abilities challenged. The Professional Development & Training department is seeking a Diversity Educator (Administrative Professional). This position designs, delivers and coordinates dynamic and effective course content on a variety of workplace effectiveness topics for University employees. Primary focus of this position will be coordinating and delivering learning programs in the area of diversity, equity and social justice. Commitment to and experience in teaching social justice and diversity & equity are essential for position. This position will also participate in onboarding program for new employees. There may be times when teaching in other areas of workplace effectiveness is needed. The position requires Bachelor’s degree and two to four years related experience required. Experience in design, and delivery of adult education required. Experience in the delivery of diversity and inclusion training required. Skills in making effective oral presentations before large groups. Demonstration of strong organizational skills, a willingness to take initiative, excellent interpersonal skills and strong editing and writing skills. Strong interpersonal and intercultural communication skills required. Demonstrated ability to serve as an effective team member on collaborative projects. Demonstrated success working with a range of culturally and ethnically diverse populations and evidence of commitment to fostering a collaborative multicultural environment. Desired but not required: a participant in social justice trainings or course work on traditionally marginalized populations domestically. To learn more about the Professional Development & Training department, please visit: http://www.uvm.edu/develop. Applications will be accepted until position is filled. The University is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the institution. Applicants are encouraged to include in their cover letter information about how they will further these goals. For further information on this position and others currently available, or to apply online, please visit our website at: www.uvmjobs.com; Job Hotline #802-656-2248; telephone #802-656-3494. Applicants must apply for position electronically. Paper resumes are not accepted. Job positions are updated daily. The University of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, protected veteran status, or any other category legally protected by federal or state law. The University encourages applications from all individuals who will contribute to the diversity and excellence of the institution.

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6/25/18 12:41 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

Real Estate Attorney

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF THE BUSINESS OFFICE Full Time, Benefit Eligible EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT & CLERK TO THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES Full Time, Benefit Eligible

CAREER EDUCATION COACH

Goddard College is committed to creating a college representative of a diverse global community and capable of creating change. To that end, we are actively seeking applications from qualified candidates from groups currently underrepresented in our institution for this position.

To learn more, please visit: www.goddard.edu/about-goddard/employmentopportunities/.

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WE LOVE W H AT WE DO

6/22/18 2:23 PM

Saint Michael’s College seeks an energetic and self-motivated professional for the full-time position of Career Education Coach within the Career Education & Alumni Engagement Center; part of Institutional Advancement. Specifically, the Career Coach will work with students, alumni, faculty, staff and employers in the Education, Human Services, Government & Law industries. The Career Coach will counsel and advise students and alumni in these industries in a broad range of career development issues from résumé and cover letter development to interviewing and job searching as well as personal branding. This position also requires outreach to employers to secure internship and job opportunities and working with assigned academic departments to plan targeted programming. Additionally, this person will coordinate Career Education assessment efforts, particularly gathering data and reporting on First Destinations. Salary will be commensurate with the successful candidate’s level of experience. Benefits include health, dental, vision, life, disability, 401(k), generous paid time off, employee and dependent tuition benefits, and discounted gym membership. For full job description and to apply online go to:

smcvt.interviewexchange.com/.

I F YO U LOVE WH AT YOU D O, IT MATT E R S W HERE YO U WOR K. JOIN OU R TEA M!

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Why BAYADA Hospice? • Mission over profits; guided by compassion, excellence, and reliability • More than 40 years of national home care leadership • Easily navigated electronic documentation • Recognition programs, scholarships, and tuition reimbursement • We love what we do! With BAYADA Hospice, you can enjoy: • Meaningful one-on-one patient care • Autonomy with expert clinical support • Flexible schedules to fit your lifestyle • Exceptional interdisciplinary care team We offer great earning potential, various growth opportunities, and a talented and dedicated team. Call us today! Contact Maryellen Corliss at 802-448-1610 or mcorliss@bayada.com.

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Join Our Public Works Team! Equipment Operator II - Facilities Full-Time - $18.89 – 19.27/hour The EO II Facilities provides essential services associated with maintaining City’s facilities including the O’Brien Community Center, Winooski Senior Center, Dog Parks and occasionally other facilities. The individual in this role performs routine building maintenance, maintains the common areas City buildings and coordinates or executes the maintenance and repair of the City’s physical assets. High school diploma or equivalent level of education required with two years of experience and one of the following certifications: Journeyman’s license in plumbing or electric, Carpentry union card or licensure, or similar licensure. Valid driver’s license is also required. A Commercial Driver’s License is preferred but not required. Interested in joining our team? For additional information, including complete position posting and job requirements please visit our website at www.winooskivt.org.

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Wick and Maddocks Law Offices-Essex is seeking an attorney to join our office to assist with our busy Real Estate, Small Business and Estate Planning business. Duties will include title searching, conducting Real Estate closings, developing Estate plans, and assisting clients involved in starting and financing small businesses. We are interested in selfmotivated and personable individuals who are able to successfully interact with a wide variety of clients. Please send inquiries and resumes to Jason R. Tiballi at: jason@ wickandmaddocks.com or Donald Maddocks at: don@ wickandmaddocks.com. All inquiries will be kept in strict confidence.

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Hospice RN Case Manager–Full-time, part-time, or per diem Hospice RN Clinical Manager–Full-time Hospice Medical Social Worker–Full-time or part-time Hospice Bereavement Coordinator–Full-time or part-time Hospice Licensed Nursing Assistant–Full-time, part-time, or per diem

bayada.com/hospice

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6/22/18 9:02 AM

TOWN OF COLCHESTER, VERMONT ASSISTANT CLERK

The Town is seeking an Assistant Clerk for customer service and team support in our Town Clerk’s office. Ability to remain calm under stress is a must. High School diploma and 3-4 years’ computer and customer service experience are required. The applicant will be required to complete Clerk trainings, learn multiple software programs and maintain passport agent certification. Please submit cover letter, resume and completed job application by July 6, 2018 to Slabarge@colchestervt.gov. Hourly rate - $19.32-$20.37. For full job description visit bit.ly/assistant-town-clerk. E.O.E.

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6/25/18 2:04 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

06.27.18-07.04.18

PERSONAL CARE ASSISTANT/COMPANION In need of full or part time person to care for male young adult with disabilities. Flexible hours for the right person. Must pass background check. Please call Lynda at 802-355-3904.

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Office Administrator - Hunger Free Vermont is seeking a full-time Office Administrator to provide principal support to the leadership team and board of directors, manage donation processing, and ensure smooth day-to-day operations in an office of hard-working professionals. If you have demonstrated experience, strong attention to detail, and a passion for efficiency, we’d like to hear from you. Please submit resume and cover letter by July 31st to adminjob@hungerfreevt.org. Full position description and benefits summary at www.hungerfreevt.org/employment.

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6/25/18 11:23 AM

School Nurse Are you a nurse who loves working with teens? Are you interested in a job that lets you work on a school schedule? Join our supportive work environment and help us keep our students healthy! We’re looking for a licensed RN to counsel and educate students and staff about health issues, communicate with parents and other health providers, and manage medications for students. For more details about the position, visit: www.rockpointschool.org/ school-nurse.

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Ready to be at the center of the action? Our half-time Service Coordinator works with NPI staff, clients, and vendors to keep our work flowing and our team humming. You will schedule projects and tasks, communicate with everyone involved, and work with NPI’s top-flight technology team to deliver exceptional client satisfaction. To excel, be well-organized, efficient, and interested in technology. Previous experience with scheduling and client service will be helpful.

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This is a unique opportunity to work in a spectacular setting at a rural, financially stable, non-profit hospital with a progressive philosophy, supportive administrative team and advanced technology.

Contact: Betina Barrett-Gallant at 802-728-2104 or bbarrett-gallant@gifffordmed.org

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6/25/18 4:30 PM

NPI offers excellent benefits, including pet-friendly office, generous time off, matching 401(k), Flexible Spending and Dependent Care Assistance Accounts, and profit-sharing. If you are ready to put your organizing skills to use, learn more at

tinyurl.com/NPI-SC2-SD 6/22/18 2:11 PM

Central Vermont Substance Abuse Services

INTERIOR PAINTER

Over 40 years in business, High-End, Residential Work, Very competitive pay 863-5397 LafayettePaintingInc.com

Gifford in beautiful Randolph, Vermont, is seeking a dynamic licensed psychotherapist to provide individual, family, and group counseling in our Behavioral Health clinic. This clinician will work as an integrated member of Gifford’s Primary Care practices, a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC), to deliver outpatient mental health treatment in collaboration with other therapists, primary care providers, psychiatrists, the Addiction Treatment program, and other Gifford Health Care providers.

Experience working with all ages, including children and adolescents desired. Current Vermont LICSW or LCMHC required. EOE

HALF-TIME SERVICE COORDINATOR

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Must have: • 2 years’ experience • Good work ethic • Ability to work well with a team • Full-time availability • License and vehicle

Therapist

A nonprofit organization located in Berlin, VT, providing substance abuse services to central Vermont residents. The range of services provided includes outpatient, intensive outpatient, intervention, education, prevention, intervention, and treatment services.

Master Level Clinicians: We currently have several Master Level Clinician positions available who will provide outpatient psychotherapy, supportive counseling, case consultation, case management, and assessment services on an outpatient basis in the office and community. Duties include conducting clinical assessments, formulating diagnosis, and making recommendations for treatment. Master’s degree and/or license/certification in Psychology and/or related field. Counseling experience with a wide variety of individuals and circumstances preferred. Assessment, diagnostic, and counseling skills are essential.

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We offer a competitive salary & benefits, generous time off policy and matching 403B plans. Equal opportunity Employer

Send your resume to Rachel Yeager, HR Coordinator • ryeager@claramartin.org Clara Martin Center • PO Box G • Randolph, VT 05060 Find other open positions at www.claramartin.org

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F/T CLEANERS

Locally owned environmentally-friendly cleaning service seeks cleaners with some experience to maintain commercial properties in the greater Burlington area. Help make our world healthier by providing high quality cleaning services that are healthy for our clients, healthy for the environment, and healthy for you – our employees. Healthy Habitat is committed to creating livable wage jobs for residents in our community. Begin at $14 per hour. Certain F/T jobs will reach $18 per hour within a year. Healthy Habitat understands that our employees and their families are our greatest asset and we seek to consistently maintain a safe, healthy and meaningful workplace. Our current openings are for full time positions but part time work is often available. Full time work has flexible evening hours, vacation and sick time and other benefits. Full time applicants do need a vehicle and valid license. Check out our website at www.healthy-habitat.com, email info@healthy-habitat.com or call us at 802-861-4500 to learn more.

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6/18/18 6:15 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

06.27.18-07.04.18

Educational Sales Associate

LNA Training Program Offered

Are you an educator or former educator interested in trying something new with your skill set? Established over two decades ago, our educational publishing company possesses an established brand, business model, and clientele. We are looking for a dynamic Educational Sales Associate to promote our research-based materials.

Session starts on August 21, 2017. Wake Robin, in partnership with Vermont MedEd, is happy to announce our LNA training program. Wake Robin is Vermont’s premiere retirement community and ranks among the top 100 nursing homes in the country; an award due in large part to our excellent staff and facility. Our goal is to provide training and employment opportunities consistent with Wake Robin’s unique brand of resident-centered care.

This position works with school and district decision makers to conduct Business-to-Business sales. It also works with lead teachers to promote our resources to their administrators and manages current accounts. Prior sales experience a plus!

If you have at least 2-years experience in caregiving, wish to grow your skills among the best, and begin your career as an LNA, contact us.

To get started on this new and exciting path please send resume and cover letter to edsalesearch@gmail.com.

Please send resume and cover letter via email to hr@wakerobin.com. For additional information see our Employment page at www.wakerobin.com. EOE. 5H-WakeRobin062718.indd 1

Office located in the greater Burlington, VT area.

6/25/18 12:33 PM

Counter Servers Needed! 6/25/18

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The CRT Program at CSAC is seeking an RN to be part of dynamic community based teaming in working with adults coping with life impacting mental health conditions. The role would include oversight of medications at our residential programs, facilitation of healthcare follow up for clients, and help with wellness engagement. We are looking for someone with excellent interpersonal and organizational skills who would welcome being part of a collaborative and innovative work environment.

Direct Care Provider Are you seeking an opportunity to make a difference in people’s lives? Be part of a 24/7 team providing residential supports to CRT consumers in residential setting. Support consumers around daily living skills. Experience in working with mentally ill preferred. Knowledge of, or desire to learn about, the needs and abilities of the mentally ill. Ability to deal with clients in all types of situations with patience, insight, and compassion. Ability to work effectively with other agency personnel in the implementation of client program and goals. Valid driver’s license, good driving skills, use of car necessary occasionally. Comprehensive benefits for Full Time employees.

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Along with the entire market team, the Counter Server will be responsible for upholding the highest standards for customer service and enthusiastically assist our guests with their shopping needs. Counter Server will have a passion for food and intrinsic understanding of hospitality. We are offering a supportive and flexible work environment with full benefits. Compensation $15 per hour. Please visit our website at philoridgefarm. com for a complete job listing.

Community Mental Health Nurse

Now Hiring Nurses! Sign on bonuses of up to $6,000 Ambulatory RNs

Ambulatory RNs work in our primary care and specialty clinics, serving as expert members of Personal Care Assistant 2v-PhiloRidgeFarm062718.indd 1 6/22/18 10:17 AM the care team by triaging patient.

Equal Opportunity Employer. Please apply at www.csac-vt.org.

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

LEARN MORE & APPLY:

bit.ly/7Days-AmbulatoryRN

Inpatient Rehab RNs Inpatient Rehabilitation RNs care for individuals affected by chronic illness or physical disability. LEARN MORE & APPLY:

bit.ly/7Days-RehabRN

The Personal Care Assistant performs personal care and assists consumers with daily living who require moderate/ substantial to total assistance to perform activities to maintain health. Responsibilities also include assisting with housekeeping functions, running errands, and providing companionship and interaction within their community. Work schedule requires weekends and overnights with sleep time pay from 10pm-6am. High School diploma or equivalent. Prior personal care experience a plus. uvs-vt.org mdindo@uvs-vt.org

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ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

06.27.18-07.04.18

Operations and Help Desk Supervisor

Deck Contractor Wanted HOA in Burlington seeks bids for maintenance on up to seven wood decks, and to pour concrete slab for garbage dumpster. Insurance required. 802-922-0741/ northbend.condos@gmail.com.

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6/19/18

Employees at DI’s Vermont Headquarters enjoy: • • • •

Talented and hard working colleagues Dog friendly office Challenging and interesting work Having a direct impact on healthcare worldwide • On-site fitness room • Parking lot BBQs

We’re all about mission at Vermont Student Assistance Corporation (VSAC). Help us fulfill our mission of providing all Vermont students with information and financial resources to reach their educational goals. You’ll work in a relaxed yet challenging environment. We offer many top notch benefits, plus a fabulous on site fitness room & café. We’re looking for an experienced person to join our Information Technology Team. You will oversee desktop/ laptop help desk activities, direct a team, ensure cost-effective operations, help forecast 6:43 PM equipment and software needs for VSAC and oversee IBM iSeries operations. Our ideal candidate will be a strong team leader who is proficient in a variety of technical applications, tools, and operating systems (mostly Windows), has great interpersonal and communication skills and wants to continue to learn and grow both themselves and those around them. If you have about five years of experience in a service oriented leadership position in a technical area, can help lead our back office operations and our front line help desk team as we all work together to serve Vermonters we want to hear from you. (Experience with project management, a Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Science or related discipline and IBM iSeries administration would be preferred, but don’t let that hold you back if you’re the right person to join our team.)

Now Hiring Support Engineers DI is seeking high-energy, confident professionals with an infectious enthusiasm for technology. Support REGISTER NOW support to Engineers provide exceptional technical Data Innovations’ customers and Business Partners. Find more AT information and apply today at: WWW.CCV.EDU OR www.datainnovations.com/careers AT THE CCV LOCATION NEAREST YOU

VSAC offers a dynamic, professional environment with competitive compensation and generous benefits package. Apply ONLY online at www.vsac.org.

VERMONT STUDENT ASSISTANCE CORPORATION PO Box 2000, Winooski, VT 05404 EOE/Minorities/Females/Vet/Disabled www.VSAC.org 7t-VSAC062718.indd 1

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6/18/18 6:39 PM

DIRECTOR OF STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

Registry Manager (Location flexible wiwthin CCV Academic Centers)

ACADEMIC CENTER LOCATION NEGOTIABLE

We seek an energetic and resourceful leader to provide administrative and programmatic leadership for

the federally funded TRIO/Student Support programindividual which targets low income, first generation We are seeking a dynamic andServices engaging with a welcoming college students. Five years’ experience in higher education or related field, with Master’s degree in demeanor and strong organizational skills to work as our Northern relevant area required. Expertise in management of staff, budgets and grant projects. Flexible hours and Lights Registry Manager. Our ideal candidate will be an statewide travelatareCCV required. excellent communicator with experience managing complex systems To view the complete posting and apply: and a demonstratedccv.edu/learn-about-ccv/employment/ ability to work collaboratively. This position requires strong computer skills, solid decision-making abilities, a CCV encourages from a candidates who reflectto ouradapt diverse student CCV is an EOE/ positive attapplications itude, and willingness andpopulation. grow. Some travel ADA compliant employer; auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with and schedule fl exibility required. disabilities. CVAA is an Equal Opportunity Employer

Knowledge, Skills and Abilities:

Ability to work collaboratively across Northern Lights and CCV administrative and academic offices, as well as represent Northern Lights and CCV for registry issues. Direct and manage early childhood and afterschool professional records development, and direct and carry out a wide range of Northern Lights at CCV registry systems functions. Bachelor’s degree in an appropriate discipline required (master’s degree preferred), plus four to six years of leadership experience in records management or data systems, or a combination of education and experience from which comparable knowledge and skills are acquired. Knowledge of and experience with early childhood systems in Vermont desired.

Apply at:

6/25/18 2:07 PM

New, local, scam-free jobs posted every day! sevendaysvt.com/ classifieds

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6/18/18 5:05 PM

6/25/18 3:40 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Floral Merchandiser

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

Sterling College

Morrisville and Burlington

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

06.27.18-07.04.18

WE’RE HIRING!

Working Hands.Working Minds.

We offer competitive salary & awesome benefits!

P.T, 5 mornings per week, approximately 15-20 hours. Fun WE OFFER: Flexible Controller scheduling,for full-time/partand flexible job perfect for a creative personSterling who likes to the leading voice in higher education College, for environmental stewardship, invites applications a time opportunities, shift meals work independently. Please email resume to The Controller reports to the Vice President and Chief Operprovided, Employee Assistance ating Officer and is responsible for overseeing and managing homeboy@gmavt.net or simplyreadyflowers@gmail.com. Programs, career development

UVM Dining, as managed by Sodexo is a proud dining partner of the University of Vermont. Nestled in-between Lake Champlain and the Green Mountains, our talented culinary team is dedicated to serving up fresh ingredients and healthy options to a diverse campus community. With a strong commitment to sustainability and social responsibility, we source from an ever growing network of local farms.

Marketing Coordinator

Join our team; discover our unique dining spaces and experience the taste of Vermont all the while enjoying some awesome benefits! • Competitive salary

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the business office and for planning, organizing, directing, and performing the accounting and financial reporting activities of the College. With a professional staff of two, the Controller assists the Vice President and Chief Operating Officer in the preparation and monitoring of departmental budgets, overseeing financial audits, ensuring compliance with state and federal regulations, and providing strong financial leadership and management.

• Generous accrued paid time off

opportunities, tuition reimbursement, etc.

• 401(K) - 1% automatic enrollment with a 6% max match • Free meal during your shift!

• Home for the holidays! (except for catering)

Sterling College, a college of environmental stewardship in Craftsbury ComFOR MORE DETAILS AND TO APPLY TODAY GO TO: mon, Vermont invites applications for the position of a Marketing CoordinaSODEXO.BALANCETRAK.COM (SEARCHand VERMONT) tor. The Marketing Coordinator supports Sterling’s recruitment effort WE’RE HOSTING A JOB FAIR the Office of Admission to reach its enrollment goals of both degree cerEVERY and TUESDAY & THURSDAY AT THE HARRIS MILLIS DINING For full position descriptions and information on how to apply, tificate students by driving relevant users to the Sterling website using organic HALL LOCATED AT: 67 SPEAR ST, please visit sterlingcollege.edu/more/employment/. BURLINGTON, VT 05405. search, paid search, and social media outlets consistent with Sterling’s brandAboutconversions Sterling on the college’s website. The ing and mission in order to increase Go where you’re needed. Founded in 1958 in Craftsbury Common, Vermont, Sterling Marketing Coordinator reports to the Director of Marketing. Make a Difference! College is the leading voice in higher education for environ6/18/18 3:21 PM

• Career growth opportunities including, culinary training, mentoring and job shadowing • Company discounts: Theme Parks | Cellphones | Tuition Reimbursement Clothing/Accessories | Computers | Home Goods Financial Establishment | Vehicle Rental and Purchase Health & Wellness | Sporting Events etc.

• Employee Resource Groups & Company wide networking events • Employee Assistance Programs through LifeWorks • Work/Life balance

• Employee recognition programs

Apply today! Sodexo.Balancetrak.com (search Vermont)

Sodexo is an EEO/AA/Minority/Female/Disability/Veteran employer

SODEXO IS AN EEO/AA/MINORITY/ FEMALE/DISABILITY/VETERAN EMPLOYER

mental stewardship and rural placed based education. The

Barista Needed!6/25/18

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Vermont Youth Tomorrow AmeriCorps VISTA ForProgram a full description of the position, The Barista will be responsible College was among the firstplease collegesvisit in thewww.sterlingcollege.edu/jobs. United States to (VYT) places 21 VISTAs throughout VT at innovative for establishing our coffee focus on sustainability through academic majors in Ecology, organizations committed to ending poverty by supporting and tea program that is in line Environmental Humanities, Sustainable Agriculture & Food Theprevention College is seeking applicants with a unique eye for photography, a workinitiatives that promote mentoring, food equity, with the Philo Ridge Farm Systems, and Outdoor Education. Sterling is home to the mission and philosophy. Should of opioid and other substance use, literacy, community ing knowledge ofSchool both and social ability tohaveconceive, of theWordPress New American Farmstead and themedia, Wendell Berry a deep understanding development, job skills, and other programs designed to Farming Program, is accredited by the New England Associashort movies in iMovie or Adobe Premier, ofand strong and pulse on the current tion of Schools and Colleges, and is one of only nine federally support youth and families.shoot, edit, and cut

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written marketrésumé, and sales. Will have a VYT VISTAs serve full time for 1 year (Augustcommunication skills. Applications (including a cover letter, passion for food and intrinsic and the names and contact information of three references) must be sent via 2018-2019) and receive understanding of hospitality. We trends in coffee production,

recognized Work Colleges in the nation.

A living allowance e-mail to klavin@sterlingcollege.edu. 5v-SterlingCollege062718.indd 1 6/22/18 Health care benefits & employee assistance plan Sterling College is an Equal Opportunity Employer Comprehensive professional development training $5,920 education award or $1,800 cash stipend after completing service • If eligible, relocation costs, school loan forbearance, VISTA Positions Available! & childcare assistance Marketing Coordinator 7days.indd AmeriCorps 1 SerVermont currently has multiple AmeriCorps VISTA • Valuable experience • • • •

Qualified applicants will • Have a strong commitment to social justice • Have a college degree or 2 years of relevant experience • Be mature, organized, and self-directed VT locations are in and around Burlington, Greensboro, Londonderry, Middlebury, Montpelier, Morrisville, Randolph, Springfield & Swanton. Please apply by 15 July 2018 through my.americorps.gov/mp/listing/publicRequestSearch.do (Program Name: type “VYT”). For more information, contact VYT staff at 802.229.9151, vyt.recruitment@wcysb.org Website: www.vermontyouthamericorps.org. EOE

positions available across Vermont beginning in August 2018. The SerVermont VISTA Project places members in oneyear terms at organizations and state agencies across the state that fight poverty and increase opportunity for low-income individuals. Our VISTAs gain professional development experience while building capacity for host site organizations through activities like fundraising, volunteer management, program development, and outreach. This is a year-long, full-time volunteer position that offers a monthly living allowance, relocation assistance, and a choice of an Education Award of $5,920 to use towards past or future education expenses OR an end of service cash-stipend of $1,800. In addition to on-site training, members have access to a monthly professional development series and additional opportunities to assist them in their service and beyond. To learn more about specific opportunities, please visit my.americorps.gov and search for VISTA opportunities in Vermont. You can read about various positions and submit your application online.

are offering a supportive and flexible work environment with full benefits. Compensation $15 per hour. Please visit our website at philoridgefarm.com for a complete job listing.

11:56 AM

6/23/16 4:13 PM

Now Hiring!

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6/22/18 10:19 AM

350Vermont seeks a Field Organizer and Development & Communications Manager to join our team! Ideal candidates will be flexible, ambitious, independent and passionate about climate justice! Find full descriptions at 350vermont.org/jobopenings/ Apply by July 6 for best consideration!


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

06.27.18-07.04.18

WHERE YOU AND YOUR WORK MATTER...

We are passionate about helping people thrive. Check out this great opportunity!

SPANISH TEACHER Missisquoi Valley Union Middle/High School is looking for a dynamic teacher to work with students in grades 7-12 in courses possibly including Middle Level Spanish, Spanish, I, II, III and Advanced Spanish. The successful candidate has a strong belief that all students can achieve at high levels, a commitment to building relationships with students, and an instructional approach grounded in personalization and proficiency based assessment and instruction. Familiarity and experience with Act 77 is preferred. The successful candidate will also work collaboratively with other teachers to align curriculum with proficiency based graduation requirements based on standards, and design and study formative assessment data to improve instructional effectiveness. Must hold a valid Vermont teaching license in the content area or eligible for licensure.

ADMINIS TRATIVE SERVICES COORDIN ATOR – WATERBURY Vocational Rehabilitation is seeking a team-orientated individual with strong customer service, interpersonal and administrative skills for the VR Central Office as well as to the field. This position will be the primary support to the Director and senior and program managers and will be responsible for scheduling numerous meetings/events. This position will also have programmatic responsibility for grants with the Designated Agencies and the Social Security Ticket to Work and Cost Reimbursement programs. Department: Disabilities Aging & Independent Living. For more information, contact Wendy Madigan at wendy.madigan@vermont.gov or (802) 241-0340. Reference Job ID #623468. Status: Full Time. Application Deadline: July 1, 2018.

In matters related to employment, the school district does not permit or condone discrimination based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, genetic information, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, marital/civil union status, HIV status, or any other characteristic protected by Federal or State Law. EOE. Send resumes to: ltougas@fnwsu.org

Learn more at: careers.vermont.gov

The State of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity Employer

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Lund offers hope and opportunity to families through education, treatment, family support and adoption. Residential Counselor – multiple positions available About the Position:

• Awake Overnight Counselor position available immediately. Position hours are late evening through early morning. • Potential daytime and evening positions open in near future.

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• Counselor will have the opportunity to provide parent education and life skill support to pregnant and parenting women and their children in residential treatment setting. • Starting rate $15.50/hour. • Shift differential offered for 12am-7am hours.

SUBSTITUTE POSITIONS ALSO AVAILABLE! Sub rate $15/hour. What We Look For:

Come work for one of Central Vermont’s best employers!

We are hiring for the following positions: Bread Baker: Come make bread with us! We’re looking for someone who enjoys work that exercises your body and your mind and is interested in pursuing the craft of bread making. Professional food experience is required. Red Hen is a mid-sized bread bakery focused on hand-crafted breads. This is a full-time job with great pay and benefits. Contact Randy at 223-5200 x12 or randy@redhenbaking.com.

Part-time Night Bread Packer: If you like going to work when most others are headed home, we’ve got just the job for you! We’re looking for a night owl to fill wholesale bread orders two to three nights a week. Applicants must enjoy physical work, be detail oriented and work well with others as well as alone. Basic computer skills a must. Please e-mail a letter of interest and resume to randy@ redhenbaking.com, come to our cafe to fill out an application, or go to redhenbaking.com/about/jobs.

• Minimum of Bachelor’s degree in human services related field. • Experience providing care to young children. • Ability to multi-task and work in a fast-paced environment; flexibility, adaptability, and openmindedness necessary. • Experience working in residential treatment setting preferred. • Valid driver’s license required.

Why Join Our Team at Lund: • Knowledge of adoption services. • Ongoing training opportunities available. • Lund is a multi-service nonprofit that has served families and children throughout Vermont for 125 years. • Our mission is to help children thrive by empowering families to break cycles of poverty, addiction and abuse. • Commitment surrounding diversity and cultural competence. • Lund offers a comprehensive benefit package for full-time positions including health, dental, life insurance, disability, retirement, extensive time off accrual (24-29 days annually) and holiday pay (11 days annually). • Excellent opportunity to join strengths-based team of multi-disciplinary professionals.

Please send resume and cover letter to: Human Resources, PO Box 4009, Burlington, VT 05406-4009 fax (802) 864-1619 email: employment@lundvt.org 9t-Lund051618.indd 1

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6/25/18 2:47 PM


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Assistant Nursing Director: The Manor, located in Morrisville, VT, 9 miles north of Stowe, has an exciting opportunity for the right candidate to expand your knowledge in long term care while working with a dynamic, successful Nursing Director. Candidate must be able to work collaboratively with a talented and committed nursing team. Past experience developing an engaged staff is a must. Strong leadership and management abilities required.

ADMINISTRATIVE COORDINATOR APPLIED LINGUISTICS DEPARTMENT Applications are invited for a full-time (40 hours a week) administrative coordinator position for the Applied Linguistics Department. Applicants should have strong administrative assistant skills, be detail-oriented, and be motivated to contribute to the successful operations of a close-working team.

The Manor is a quality award recipient with excellent benefits including 25 days of ETO per year and 403B retirement savings plan with employer match.

Benefits include health, dental, vision, life, disability, 401(k), generous paid time off, employee and dependent tuition benefits, and discounted gym membership. For full job description and to apply online go to: smcvt.interviewexchange.com/.

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6/25/18 2:26 PM 4t-StMichaelsCollegeADMIN062718.indd 1

6/22/18 10:11 AM

WE ARE HIRING!!!!

Purchasing & Service Position

Education and Training Resources (ETR) is seeking to fill the following critical positions:

Purchasing and service position open at a small manufacturing company in Charlotte with competitive compensation. Please submit your resume to

• Security Officers – Safety and Transportation. • Campus Monitors - starting @14.50/hour. High School Diploma required. • Residential Counselors –starting at $50,000/year. (Must have a Bachelor’s degree and 15 credits of social service/social science classwork. Evening, Overnights, & Weekends)

lminkler@logicalmachine.com.

802-425-2888

• Logistics Assistants - starting at $14.50/hour. High School Diploma required. • Health & Wellness Manager – Center wellness subject matter expert (must be a Registered Nurse).

Let’s get to.....

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• Student Personal Officer/SGA – (Incentive and Disciplinary duties).

6/25/18 4:36 PM

• Outreach/Admissions Counselor – starting at $40,000/year. • Food Services – Cook’s Assistants. • P/T TEAP Specialist - this position is responsible for providing education on drugs and requires a CADC (Certified Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselor) certification. Please email njccemployment@etrky.com to request an employment application or obtain one in person on center at Northlands Job Corps. If you are chosen for an interview, you will be contacted to schedule an interview. Employment will be at a Federal Department of Labor facility. All applicants will be subject to drug testing and a full background check. NORTHLANDS JOB CORPS IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER FEMALE / MINORITY 100A MacDonough Drive • Vergennes, VT 05491 • 802-877-0159 jobs.sevendaysvt.com 11-NorthlandsJobsCorps062718.indd 1

6/25/18 10:54 AM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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06.27.18-07.04.18

United States

Probation Officer

Secretary/Assistant Volunteer Coordinator (CL-27/28) $48,170 to $93,831

U.S. Probation Officers work for the federal court, conduct bail and pre-sentence investigations, and supervise federal defendants released to community supervision. The minimum requirement is a bachelor’s degree in an approved major. The position is hazardous duty law enforcement with a maximum age of 37 at appointment. Prior to appointment, applicants considered for this position will undergo a full background investigation, as well as undergo a medical examination and drug screening. Starting salary range is from $48,170 to $93,831 (CL 27 to CL 28), depending on qualifications. For further information and application instructions visit www.vtp.uscourts.gov/career-opportunities. Deadline for complete applications is the close of business July 13, 2018. EOE

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6/1/18 2:31 PM

Wake Robin is adding new members to its team!

Housekeeper FULL TIME Sometimes “cleaning” just isn’t enough. Our housekeepers care for people by caring for their homes. Housekeepers are critical to the wellbeing of residents, and the residents tell us this every day. If you love to clean and want to be an active part of our residents’ well-being, this is the community for you. We offer a beautiful work environment, excellent benefits, and a chance to be thanked every day. Candidates with previous training or experience as professional cleaners preferred.

Dishwasher FULL-TIME Our Dishwasher will perform a variety of services in the kitchen area such as dishwashing, basic food prep, linen prep, food storage, general kitchen cleaning and, as assigned, they may also perform bus services in the main or auxiliary dining rooms. This shift is fulltime, with weekends included. Wake Robin offers an excellent compensation and benefits package and an opportunity to build strong relationships with staff and residents in a dynamic community setting. Interested candidates can send their resumes to hr@wakerobin.com or fill out an application at www.wakerobin.com. Wake Robin is an EOE.

Secretary/Assistant Volunteer Coordinator for the Vermont Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired in our South Burlington office. Skilled in Microsoft Office; accurate record keeping and data entry; good telephone and people skills; multi-task and detail oriented; database experience is desirable but will train. Permanent, 30 hours per week. Excellent benefits. EOE. Call Lori at 863-1358 ext. 231 or e-mail resume to lnewsome@vabvi.org 3H-VTAssociationfortheBlind062718.indd 1

Loan Review and Compliance Specialist VEDA is looking to hire a half-time Loan Review and Compliance Specialist whose primary responsibilities will be to complete comprehensive loan reviews in order to ensure compliance with internal Credit Policy and specific State/Federal loan program requirements, and to identify any credit analysis, servicing, or documentation weaknesses. The Loan Review and Compliance Specialist will also compile and submit compliance-related financial reporting, as needed, for compliance with State and Federal Programs and with private financial institutions with which the Authority does business. VEDA’s Loan Review and Compliance Specialist is a member of VEDA’s Compliance Team, working under the supervision of the Chief Compliance and Loan Review Officer. Among the position’s responsibilities, VEDA’s Loan Review and Compliance Specialist will perform comprehensive loan reviews of commercial and agricultural loans, identify areas for improvement, work collaboratively with loan staff members, and provide risk-oriented report of findings to management. In addition, this position will be responsible for compliance related financial reporting for State and Federal loan programs and for VEDA debt providers. The Loan Review and Compliance Specialist also performs assigned internal control monitoring to assist in minimizing VEDA’s exposure to regulatory risk. Minimum Education/Experience • A Bachelor’s Degree and 5-7 years’ related experience and/or training or comparable combination of education and experience; • Prior lending, loan review, or audit/examination experience strongly preferred, with demonstrated thorough and practical working knowledge of corporate, small business, CRE, and agricultural lending concepts, financial analysis methods, risk assessment, and accounting principles; • SBA and USDA loan experience preferred; and • Federal reporting experience preferred. Knowledge/Skills/Abilities Required • Attention to detail; • Ability to work independently, and at times, collaboratively with lenders and lending staff; • Ability to read, analyze, interpret federal rules, guidelines and procedures, and governmental regulations/statutes; • Ability to effectively present information and respond to questions from staff, management and other professionals; • Ability to assimilate information relating to complex loans; • Ability to use discretion in decision making, be creative and innovative in problem-solving, and use good judgment; • Comfort in evaluating lending and administrative processes, controls and procedures for potential exposure to operational risk; • Ability to write reports, business correspondence, and procedures; and • Computer software proficiency in word processing and EXCEL, and ability to learn new software systems (i.e., loan documentation retention software, accounting software, etc.). Visit www.veda.org to see a complete job description. VEDA offers a competitive salary and benefits package and is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer. Please email resume to:

Cheryl Houchens, Chief Compliance and Loan Review Officer Vermont Economic Development Authority. chouchens@veda.org. 10v-VEDA062018.indd 1

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6/25/18 1:03 PM

6/18/18 6:38 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

Mansfield Hall is a private, innovative residential college support program for students with diverse learning needs. We are looking for dynamic individuals to fill the following positions:

06.27.18-07.04.18

Customer Care Manager

STUDENT LIFE COACH The ideal candidate will possess a bachelor’s degree in a related field and have a background in mental health and/or educational programming. Applicants should be able to have some flexibility in their schedule. Full and part-time positions are available.  Applicant information is available at www.mansfieldhall.org. 3H-Mansfield Hall 062718.indd 1

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

6/25/18 1:49 PM

The Humane Society of Chittenden County is seeking a highly skilled, experienced manager and people-person who has a love forExecutive animals to Officer manage the customer care team. Chief The Customer Care Manager is responsible for thea overall The Humane Society of Chittenden County is seeking new customer andorganization for ensuring all customers receive a CEOexperience to join a dynamic entering the next stage of its evolution. successful candidate will bring strategic high standard of The service. thinking, energy, and a commitment to HSCC’s mission, along

If you with are the a charismatic, flexible and customer-driven skills to expand the organization’s vision, leadership role, andwith collaboration within the record community. professional a proven track of successfully managing staff, may this or is may an outstanding for you to Candidates not come from opportunity the animal welfare field, a butdynamic it will be essential that they understand and can work work with and dedicated team! effectively within the unique culture of a mission-driven organi-

Visit our website, zation such aswww.chittendenhumane.org/Join-Our-Team HSCC. Experience working as lead executive in organization providing and humane services is highly desirable. for theanfull job description information on how to apply. For more information and details on how to apply, please visit:

www.chittendenhumane.org

NAVIGATE NEW CAREER POSSIBILITIES AT NORTHERN DIGITAL INC. – NDI SHELBURNE

EOE.

We’re proud of our talented, hardworking and diverse team, whose ingenuity is driving exciting new innovations. Our team is growing – won’t you join us? The successful candidates will be joining our team of professionals at the Northern Digital Incorporated (NDI) office located in Shelburne, Vermont.

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At Copley, taking care of our patients starts with taking care of our employees.

MECHANICAL DESIGNER We are looking for a Mechanical Designer/Engineer (6-month contract) to work with our R&D team in the development and update of embedded systems for use in consumer electronics, medical devices and simulations. We have a backlog of design improvements, engineering support activities, and manufacturing tooling updates that require a dedicated resource to plan, design and/or make necessary updates to drawings, models, and other design documentation, coordinate reviews, and release for engineering approval.

MEDICAL LAB TECHNOLOGISTS NEEDED: competitive pay & shift differentials professional development opportunities work-life balance community impact

SOFTWARE ENGINEER We are looking for an experienced Software Engineer to join our R&D team in the development of embedded systems for use in augmented and virtual reality systems. You will be responsible for porting and integration of NDI signal and data processing modules into the OEM systems, as well as development of multiple software solutions as required for our OEM partners. This role requires someone with a proven record of implementing and troubleshooting real-time embedded applications. The successful candidate will be highly organized, results-driven and effective at software design, implementation and testing. The successful candidate will be remotely stationed at our partner OEM locations (Florida and California) for a minimum of 75% of the time, with the remainder spent at our R&D facility in Shelburne Vermont.

ELECTRONICS ASSEMBLER Working as part of the Manufacturing Operations Team, the Electronic Technician is responsible for performing electronic assembly and inspection while ensuring all assemblies and sub-assemblies are built and tested meeting quality system objectives. You will be responsible for performing electrical assembly of NDI Shelburne product line, performing mechanical assembly of NDI Shelburne product line, Performs process control activities relating to product quality and inventory control and helping improving manufacturing processes.

E XC E P T I O N A L

C A R E .

CO M M U N I T Y

F O C U S E D. E.O.E

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APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS: If you’re interested in furthering your career in a dynamic and innovative organization, please visit www.ndigital.com/careers/ where you can apply online!

Looking for a Sweet Job?

6/14/18 10:51 AM

Our new, mobile-friendly job board is buzzing with excitement. Start applying at

Equal Opportunity Employer/Protected Veterans/Individuals with Disabilities 10v-NDI(AscensionTech)062718.indd 1

Visit www.copleyvt.org/careers or apply in person: Human Resources Office Health Center Building 2nd Floor 528 Washington Highway Morrisville, VT 05661

OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY | ORTHOPAEDICS | CARDIOLOGY EMERGENCY SERVICES | ONCOLOGY | REHABILITATION SERVICES GENERAL SURGERY | DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING

HARDWARE DESIGN ENGINEER We are looking for an experienced Hardware Designer to join our R&D team in the development of embedded systems for use in medical devices and simulations. You will be responsible for detailed design and development of DSP and ARM based systems, FPGA and low level wireless communication interfaces, and will work as part of a cross-functional R&D team building solutions for our OEM partners. This role requires someone with a proven record of implementing embedded hardware systems. The successful candidate will be highly organized, results-driven and effective at hardware design, implementation and testing.

6/25/18 5:48 PM

jobs.sevendaysvt.com 6/22/18 1:26 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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06.27.18-07.04.18

Seeking Community Energy Coordinator AmeriCorps Member

Burlington Free Press is seeking independent contractors to deliver newspapers in the early morning hours. All contracts are based on negotiated rates per paper delivered. Please contact 802-6601811 for more details. Don’t wait too long, or all the contracts will be filled! Tips included!

Seeking a fun, interesting, meaningful opportunity to collaborate with diverse stakeholders and local leaders to help Vermont transition to a clean energy future? The Vermont Natural Resources Council, coordinator of the Vermont Energy & Climate Action Network, seeks a motivated individual with interest and expertise in community outreach, communications, clean energy and climate action. 2h-BurlingtonFreePress062718.indd

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6/22/18 11:46 AM

Actuarial Health Care Analyst

Find out more and apply: www.vhcb.org/our-programs/vhcbamericorps/americorps-positions Applications are due July 20, 2018. VNRC is an EOE. www.vnrc.org. www.vecan.net.

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6/25/18 2:35 PM

SENIOR CIRCULATION SPECIALIST EVENING SUPERVISOR This full-time position manages the library building and all circulation operations during evening hours (generally 4:00 pm-midnight Sunday-Thursday during the academic year) and supervises student workers. This position supports the use of library services by students, faculty, and staff, including circulation and research. Benefits include health, dental, vision, life, disability, 401(k), generous paid time off, employee and dependent tuition benefits, and discounted gym membership. For full job description and to apply online go to: smcvt.interviewexchange.com/.

United States Probation

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6/22/18 10:14 AM

is Seeking Treatment Providers The U.S. Probation Office in the District of Vermont believes that federal defendants and offenders under our supervision deserve access to quality, evidence-based treatment in the community if they are suffering from mental illness or substance use disorders. In addition, sex offenders should undergo sex offender-specific treatment to address their unique needs. To that end, the District of Vermont will be soliciting for drug/alcohol, mental health and sex offender treatment services for fiscal years 2019, 2020 and 2021.

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Vermont (BCBSVT) is looking for an actuarial health care analyst to work closely with our actuarial and enterprise data repository (EDR) team. The analyst is expected to be a subject matter expert in health care data and informatics, including holistic view of company-wide datasets included in the EDR. Strong business acumen is essential, as is the ability to communicate your findings in a way that can influence how an organization approaches a business challenge. Primary responsibilities include ensuring that the data in the Actuarial Views is complete and reconciles to financial data, working with the EDR team to fix issues and make necessary changes to the Views as well as maintaining the Actuarial Views Data Dictionary. Qualified candidates will have a BS/BA in Actuarial Science, Business, Medical Informatics or a closely-related field, and three to five years of experience in actuarial science or data analysis/ data integration, with two years in the health industry. Working knowledge of SAS and a background in actuarial science is preferred. Experience in planning and supporting the gathering of data requirements is required. At BCBSVT, we know that our employees are our most valuable resource. That’s why we offer each employee more than just competitive salary and benefits packages. We offer an exciting health and wellness program and a large selection of onsite professional development classes and opportunities for career advancement—all in a friendly, positive work environment. To learn more about the position and apply, visit us at www.bcbsvt.com/careers.

Interested providers can contact Parish_Gibson@vtp.uscourts.gov to be added to the bidder’s mailing list. Please provide your name, address, and type of treatment provided, i.e. substance abuse, mental health, or sex offender. BCBSVT_Actuarial Untitled-55 1 Health Care Analyst_June2018.indd 1

6/12/2018 6/18/18 4:33:56 5:13 PMPM


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Lund’s mission is to help children thrive by empowering families to break cycles of poverty, addiction and abuse. Lund offers hope and opportunity to families through education, treatment, family support and adoption. CURRENTLY HIRING FOR THE FOLLOWING FULL-TIME POSITIONS: CLINICAL PROGRAM SUPERVISOR – BURLINGTON AND NEWPORT FAMILY SERVICES DISTRICTS

About the Position:

• Clinical supervisor will assist with implementation and provide oversight of innovative program that bridges child welfare and family treatment in an effort to provide immediate, holistic, family-centered services and increase the collaborative capacity of the community to respond effectively to support family systems impacted by substance use. • This position supervises clinicians and family engagement specialist staff co-located in Burlington and Newport Family Services (FSD) district offices and works collaboratively with the FSD staff. • Primary responsibilities include supervision of staff that are providing clinical and family support services to families working with FSD, as well as program and grant management. • $5000 sign-on bonus offered with half to be paid upon start and half paid after 6 months of employment.

What We Look For:

• Minimum of Master’s degree in human services related field with mental health treatment licensure. • Substance abuse treatment licensure preferred. • Experience delivering family centered care preferred. • Two years’ supervisory experience preferred. • Strong desire and ability to work with the identified population and effectively communicate and collaborate with interagency programs and community partners required. • Experience working with family services/child welfare preferred.

CO-LOCATED ASSESSMENT CLINICIAN

About the Position:

• Clinician conducts comprehensive Substance Use Disorder Assessments utilizing ASAM criteria and serves as a Substance Use Disorder resource specialist to DCF-FSD Staff at the Burlington DCF Office. • This position is co-located at the Burlington DCF office and is part of the Regional Partnership Program teaming with a Substance Abuse Case Manager, Social Workers and community providers to assist in providing immediate, holistic, family centered services. • Clinician is part of a collaborative effort to increase knowledge and understanding of responding effectively to support family systems impacted by substance use disorders. • Clinician may facilitate groups at Lund, although outpatient counseling is not required for this position, consideration will be taken for the right candidate and those working toward Licensure • Salary $45K-$55K annually based on education and experience.

What We Look For:

• Master’s in psychology, social work, or counseling required. Licensure or

• • • •

working toward licensure required; dual licensure in Substance Abuse and Mental Health or Social Work preferred. Solid assessment, ASAM, DSM V, documentation and narrative writing skills essential. Must work well independently yet collaboratively in a child welfare setting with a multi-disciplinary team with ability to take a family centered approach to treatment recommendations Must be able to communicate effectively and be creative with flexibility to meet the needs of cases in a fast paced environment Co-Located Community Clinician

CO-LOCATED COMMUNITY CLINICIAN

About the Position:

• Clinician provides therapeutic, primarily home based, family support through new program implementing family support services to families involved with DCF. • Co-located at the Burlington DCF office, partnering with DCF and community providers to assist in providing immediate, holistic, home based, family centered services. • Clinician is part of a collaborative effort to improve practice in responding effectively to support family systems impacted by substance use disorders. • Salary $45K-$55K annually based on education and experience.

What We Look For:

• Master’s in psychology, social work, or counseling required. Licensure or working toward licensure required. Experience with family centered practice preferred. • Solid assessment, documentation and narrative writing skills essential. • Must work well independently yet collaboratively in a child welfare setting with a multi-disciplinary team.

Why Join Our Team at Lund:

• We honor and celebrate the distinctive strengths and talents of our clients and staff. • Our work encompasses collaboration with a strong team of professionals and a strengths-based approach to providing services to families. • Lund’s adoption program provides life-long services to families brought together through adoption. • Lund’s residential and community treatment programs are distinctive as our work focuses on both treatment and parenting. • Lund’s educators believe in laughter, the importance of fun, communityoriented activities, and non-stop learning. • Ongoing training opportunities are available. • Lund offers competitive pay and paid training, as well as a comprehensive and very generous benefit package including health, dental, life, disability, retirement, extensive time off accrual (24 days first year, 29 days second year), 11 paid holidays, and wellness reimbursement. EEO/AA

Please send resume and cover letter to: Human Resources, PO Box 4009, Burlington, VT 05406-4009 fax (802) 864-1619 email: employment@lundvt.org 15t-Lund062018.indd 1

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THE BAR AT BLEU & OUTSIDE PATIO TOO! 4 P M D A I LY/ B L E U V T. C O M Untitled-70 1

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The Philippines has a long, storied history with the West, beginning with Spanish colonization in the 1500’s, and American occupation up until July 4, 1946. The result is a cuisine that combines Eastern and Western ideas and is strongly influenced by Chinese, Spanish and American traditions.

The original Fusion Food? We’d like to think so.

Shacksbury Dry Craft Cider

Cider-Day, Sunday

* Actually observed on June 12, the day in 1898 when independence from Spain was proclaimed. The Treaty of Manila was signed on July 4, 1946, declaring Philippine independence from America. Today, July 4th is Philippine-American Friendship Day.

FIRST SUNDAYS X SHACKSBURY Sunday, July 1, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., Shacksbury Cider in Vergennes. Cost of food and drink. Info, 458-0530, shacksbury.com.

COLD BREW WORKSHOP Visitors tour Brio’s Pine Street roastery, sample coffees and take in tips on making quality cold caffeinated beverages. Saturday, June 30, 10-11:30 a.m., Brio Coffeeworks, Burlington. $5-10, preregister. Info, 777-6641, briocoffeeworks.com.

We may be known for our steaks... but we know seafood!

6/22/18 3:56 PM

FISH • SCALLOPS • SALMON SHRIMP • LOBSTER

TIKI PARTY // SILO DISTILLERY Island time commences with tiki cocktails, snacks from Artisan Eats Vermont, and the sweet melodies of steel drums. Sunday, July 1, noon-5 p.m., SILO Distillery, Windsor. Cost of food and drink. Info, silodistillery.com.

SEVEN DAYS

Fire & Ice

Vermont’s Iconic steakhouse 26 Seymour Street | Middlebury | 802.388.7166 | fireandicerestaurant.com 6H-fire&ice052516.indd 1

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FRIDAY NIGHT FIRES AT FRESH TRACKS FARM Oenophiles imbibe estate-grown wines while enjoying pizzas from Field Stone Farm and tunes from Thea Wren Trio. Friday, June 29, 6-9 p.m., Fresh Tracks Farm Vineyard & Winery, Berlin. Cost of food and drink. Info, freshtracksfarm.com/ events.

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For the first installation of their summer Sunday event series, Shacksbury cofounders Colin Davis and David Dolginow have matched their apple-y pours with savory snacks from the Pioneer Food Truck & Catering Co., as well as sweets, treats and caffeine pick-me-ups by Miss Weinerz, Lu•Lu ice cream, and Brio Coffeeworks — with patio games to boot. What are you doing on Sunday?

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

1214 Main Street * (802)424-1585 * www.pica-pica.us Wed-Sat: 11am-8pm; Sun: 10am-2pm


Mixing It Up

Bartenders went head to head at the Great Shakes cocktail competition S TO RY & PHOT OS B Y SADIE WILLIAMS

Danny Decelles (right) working with his barback, Alex Carrol

manager, had gathered the bartenders at the back of the restaurant to go over the contest’s rules. This year’s lineup featured representatives of eight restaurants and bars, most of which are in Burlington: Jim Martin of A Single Pebble, Danny Decelles of the Archives, Antoine Lefevre of Monarch & the Milkweed, Milo Ryerson of Pizzeria Verità, Bryan Buley of Waterworks, Tyler Mello of Butch + Babe’s, Peyton White of Honey Road, and Celia Savoie of the Bearded Frog Bar & Grill in Shelburne. Most of the competitors wore casual attire — collared shortsleeved shirts on the men, plus shorts and practical closed-toe shoes. Decelles

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ast Wednesday, eight bartenders filed into Winooski’s Waterworks Food + Drink for the fifth annual Great Shakes competition. Light streamed through the tall windows overlooking the river as DJ Craig Mitchell warmed up the crowd with casual dance numbers. The barkeeps fretted, prepping garnishes and ingredients so everything would be primed and ready once they jumped behind the bar. They would need to impress both their peers and the crowd at this annual competition cohosted by Vermont Wine Merchants and the state chapter of the U.S. Bartenders’ Guild. Part of the Burlington Wine & Food Festival, Great Shakes has taken place at Waterworks for the past five years. Each bartender is assigned one of a variety of Vermont liquors around which to construct a cocktail. A panel of bartenders and the crowd judge the final products, handing out two awards. Lined up at the bar with their backs to the raging river, this year’s judges were Eddie DiDonato, vice president of the guild’s Vermont chapter and bar manager at Monarch & the Milkweed; Emily Morton, bar general manager at Deli 126; and bartender Matthew Rotella of Misery Loves Co. Waterworks owner David Abdoo noted with pride that all three have worked behind his bar in the past. Earlier, Sam Nelis, president of the guild’s Vermont chapter and former Waterworks bar

Left to right: Twelfth Dynasty by Milo Ryerson, Herbal Spice by Danny Decelles, Barbecue Berry by Jim Martin, Blindsided by Peyton White and Nine Juan Juan by Antoine Lefevre

contributed to the hipster vibe with a white collared shirt, black suspenders and a wool newsboy cap. “Getting bartenders together is like herding cats,” Nelis said to the circle. He attributed the herding skills responsible for assembling this particular group to Nadia Womble, Waterworks’ current bar manager. Nelis explained that, while the competition wouldn’t be timed, bartenders shouldn’t “build their drinks one at a time.” (Each bartender would make four of the same cocktail: one for each judge and one for

photographers.) Essentially, they were told to get in, get it done and present their creations. From the moment the bartenders exited the back room, the competition moved along at a steady pace. It was a smooth operation. One bartender would hop behind the bar to mix four drinks, then present them to the judges and move down the line to craft a tray-load of samples for the crowd. The next competitor filed in to begin the whole process over again. Rotella showed this reporter the Bartenders’ Guild scorecard used to evaluate each drink, with points awarded for taste, appearance, aroma and creativity. Sure enough, we were in for a full sensory experience. The first competitor behind the bar was Martin, who used Smugglers’ Notch Distillery Maple Bourbon Whiskey to craft his Barbecue Berry. The rich combination of Solerno, whiskey and smokedstrawberry maple syrup got a grassy, herbal twist from a thyme garnish. With that simple addition, Martin was the first of many competitors to demonstrate the powerful impact of aroma on taste. The thyme gave complexity to what might otherwise have been an overwhelmingly fruity concoction. Judge Morton saw a trend there; in an interview after the competition, she


food+drink

THE PEOPLE’S CHOICE COCKTAIL: LAV & CORI ANDER, BY BRYAN BULEY OF WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK INGREDIENTS:

3 pinches of dried lavender

3/4 ounce housemade coriander syrup

2 ounces SILO Lavender vodka

3/4 ounce housemade ginger liqueur

3/4 ounce fresh lemon juice

Ice

Soda water

4 cilantro sprigs

DIRECTIONS:

Muddle dried lavender with coriander syrup in a shaker tin. Add vodka, ginger liqueur and lemon juice; shake with ice. Double-strain into a chilled Collins glass. Add crushed ice and top with soda water. Use cilantro sprigs as garnish.

Find, fix and feather with Nest Notes — an e-newsletter filled with home design, Vermont real estate tips and DIY decorating inspirations.

FRAGILE Saturday, July 7 5-7

& Cori Ander, relied on their garnish for punch. An inch of cilantro and a sprinkling of lavender petals finished off this Artists’ response to the green concoction — and the aroma hit challenges of our times your nose like a verdant brick. Buley’s cocktail was the People’s west branch gallery Choice at the end of the evening. The Sign up today at judges, after lengthy deliberation, sevendaysvt.com/enews. westbr anchgaller y.com selected Decelles’ concoction. “It was a close call,” DiDonato 8v-nest.indd 1 11/18/15 Untitled-29 12:06 PM 1 6/25/18 2:28 PM said by phone after the competition, “but, from a presentation standpoint, highlighting Bar Hill and attention to detail — smoking out the glass with all the different aromatics, [and] the flavors went really well together — it was a very balanced drink. And appearance and presentation go a long way when you’re talking about a competition cocktail.” Abdoo lauded the judges after the competition. “They’re doing a great job,” he said, noting how each has shaped bar menus at local restaurants. While it was fun to see the virtuosity on display at the competition, in his view, a bartender’s priority is still creating appealing experiences for customers. “The one thing we always have to remember is that [bartenders] are getting very talented, but hospitality is what that industry has always been about.” And what could be more hospitable than a cocktail crafted to stimulate multiple senses? Cheers to that. 

THE AROMA HIT YOUR NOSE

LIKE A VERDANT BRICK.

A STATEMENT IN A CAN

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SEVEN DAYS

Introducing VT IPA: Our take on the hazy, hoppy style coming from the greenest state around.

Contact: sadie@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Learn more at burlingtonwineandfoodfestival.com.

FOR TASTING NOTES AND RELEASE PARTIES, VISIT:

LONGTRAIL.COM/VTIPA Untitled-35 1

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noted that garnishes are receiving more attention for their impact on the cocktail experience. “People were using flowers, floral notes,” she said. “A lot of them were edible. If you have a flower in there, that kind of adds flavor. It’s not only visual, it’s not only aromatic; it contributes to taste.” Decelles demonstrated the power of garnishes with his Herb Spiral, using Caledonia Spirits’ Barr Hill gin. Speaking to the audience before he popped behind the bar, the 23-yearold barkeep said he “always wanted to make a gin egg-white sour that didn’t taste like paper.” To create it, Decelles used a whopping 15 ingredients, including the smoke released by burning cinnamon and cardamom. The pungent, homey smell of those spices filled the air as he charred them lightly in rocks glasses, then set a coupe glass on top of each glass to capture the smoke. As he held a blowtorch to cinnamon sticks and charred them into a garnish, the air lit up with the scent. While warm, spicy tones were certainly present in Decelles’ finished cocktail, they were balanced by the sweet floral notes of his edible pansy and violet garnishes, as well as by hibiscus and lavender tinctures in the drink. Somehow, as these floral and woody notes commingled, Barr Hill Gin’s distinctive hint of honey shone through. Another intriguing garnish was the foamed sour cream in Lefevre’s cocktail — which, unfortunately, dissolved after the first sip from the flute glass. Savoie’s cocktail, Remix to Ignition, was topped with flaming absinthe in tiny sugar-cane boats. Some cocktails, such as Buley’s Lav

obsessed?

4/9/18 1:11 PM


calendar CENTRAL VERMONT YOUNG PROFESSIONALS TRAVEL HACKS: Millennials pick up tips for reducing cost, time and stress when planning trips for business or pleasure. Fresh Tracks Farm Vineyard & Winery, Berlin, 5:15-7:15 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 229-5711.

DROP-IN HIP-HOP DANCE: Beginners are welcome at a groove session inspired by infectious beats. Swan Dojo, Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m. $17. Info, 540-8300.

EDIBLE WELLNESS: A Q&A demystifies the benefits of consuming cannabidiol. Attendees treat themselves to sweet CBD delights. Nutty Steph’s Granola & Chocolate Factory, Middlesex, 5-6 p.m. Free. Info, 229-2090. GREENER DRINKS: Supporters of commonsense cannabis reform sip beverages and discuss the culture, industry and politics of the agricultural product. Zenbarn, Waterbury, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, info@ vtcannabisbrands.com. WOMEN OF CANNABIS NETWORKING: Female leaders in Vermont’s growing cannabis community cultivate connections. Clover Gift Shop, Woodstock, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, info@headyvermont.com.

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

crafts

FIBER RIOT!: Crafters get hooked on knitting, crocheting, spinning and more at an informal weekly gathering. Mad River Fiber Arts & Mill, Waitsfield, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 496-7746.

dance

CONTACT IMPROV: Movers engage in weight-sharing, play and meditation when exploring this style influenced

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happenings. Call to confirm. Mittelman Observatory. McCardell Bicentennial Hall, Middlebury College, 9-10:30 p.m. Free. Info, 443-2266.

HIP-HOP DANCE: A high-energy class mixes urban styles of dance. Women’s Room, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $16. Info, beth@prenatalmethod.com.

SUNSET ON THE LAKE: Sustained by appetizers and drinks, cinephiles support the Vermont International Film Festival and honor VTIFF community champion Robin Lloyd. Private residence, South Burlington, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $30-250; preregister. Info, 660-2600.

etc.

film

A COURSE IN MIRACLES STUDY GROUP: Participants engage in a study of spiritual transformation. Unitarian Church of Montpelier, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 279-1495. DEATH CAFÉ: Folks meet for a thought-provoking and respectful conversation about death, aimed at accessing a fuller life. Pyramid Holistic Wellness Center, Rutland, 7-9 p.m. Free; donations accepted. Info, 353-6991. GUIDED TOURS: A historic Gothic Revival house opens its doors for hourly excursions. Self-guided explorations of the gardens, exhibits and walking trails are also available. Justin Morrill Homestead, Strafford, 10 a.m.5 p.m. $6; free for kids 14 and under. Info, 765-4484. NURSING BEYOND A YEAR MEET-UP: Breastfeeding parents connect over toddler topics such as weaning and healthy eating habits. Aikido of Champlain Valley, Burlington, 9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 985-8228. STARGAZING: Clear skies at night mean viewers’ delight when telescope users set their sights on celestial

LIST YOUR UPCOMING EVENT HERE FOR FREE! ALL SUBMISSIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY THURSDAY AT NOON FOR CONSIDERATION IN THE FOLLOWING WEDNESDAY’S NEWSPAPER. FIND OUR CONVENIENT SUBMISSION FORM AND GUIDELINES AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT. LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY KRISTEN RAVIN AND SADIE WILLIAMS. SEVEN DAYS EDITS FOR SPACE AND STYLE. DEPENDING ON COST AND OTHER FACTORS, CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS MAY BE LISTED IN EITHER THE CALENDAR OR THE CLASSES SECTION. WHEN APPROPRIATE, CLASS ORGANIZERS MAY BE ASKED TO PURCHASE A CLASS LISTING.

Nature Sounds

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section.

Majestic rivers, verdant fields and gardens manifest through music in “Gifts of Nature,” the Vermont Symphony Orchestra’s 2018 TD Bank Summer Festival Tour program. With guest conductor Sarah Hicks, the traveling ensemble, with 22-year-old Venezuelan violin virtuoso Rubén Rengel, delights concertgoers with works inspired by the natural world. Selections include Johann Strauss Jr.’s “Voices of Spring Waltz,” Percy Grainger’s “Country Gardens” and an excerpt from George Frideric Handel’s “Water Music.” A patriotic finale features a rousing rendition of John Philip Sousa’s “The Stars and Stripes Forever” and a dazzling fireworks display.

‘SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING’: Balancing his dual identity as a high school student and a superhero, Peter Parker defends New York City from a menacing villain. Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, 7 p.m. $5. Info, 533-9075. ‘WILD AFRICA 3D’: Viewers plunge into fantastic places and meet amazing creatures with water as their guide. Northfield Savings Bank 3D Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $13.5016.50; admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848.

VERMONT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA TD BANK SUMMER FESTIVAL TOUR

food & drink

AFTERNOON HIGH TEA PARTY: Piano music and conversation carry through the air at an annual gathering replete with finger sandwiches, delectable pastries, a tea-cup auction and more. Private residence, Sheldon, 3-5 p.m. $25. Info, 933-4630. WED.27

Sunday, July 1, at Suicide Six Ski Area in South Pomfret; Monday, July 2, at Hunter Park in Manchester; Tuesday, July 3, at Grafton Pond Trails & Outdoor Center; and Wednesday, July 4, at Shelburne Museum; gates open for picnicking, 5:30 p.m.; concert, 7:30 p.m. See website for additional dates. $5-35; free for kids 4 and under. Info, 864-5741, vso.org.

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FIND MORE LOCAL EVENTS IN THIS ISSUE AND ONLINE: art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

music Find club dates at local venues in the music section and at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com.

COURTESY OF GARETH JONES

by aikido and other somatic practices. The Everything Space, Montpelier, 7-8:30 p.m. $5-10. Info, 232-3618.

cannabis

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COURTESY OF LOCAL MOTION

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COURTESY OF WILLIAM JALBERT

J U N E


CLASSIC ROCK

Mark Morris Dance Group’s imaginative work, Pepperland, offers a fresh take on classic music by the Beatles. Inspired by the groundbreaking 1967 album, Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, dancers clad in colorful mod-style costumes perform nuanced choreography that evokes the energy of the transformative decade. Music, of course, is central. Jazz composer and former Bad Plus pianist Ethan Iverson’s original score features Iverson’s own compositions and updated arrangements of the album’s iconic songs. An octet ‘PEPPERLAND’ including theremin and harpsichord provides live Thursday, June 28, through Saturday, June 30, 8 accompaniment for the multifaceted production p.m., at Moore Theater, Hopkins Center for the Arts, that the Telegraph calls “a brilliant homage to one of Dartmouth College, in Hanover, N.H. $12.50-60. Info, 603-646-2422, hop.dartmouth.edu. the great rock albums.”

Music in the Mountains A video loop on the home page of the Frendly Gathering website shows festivalgoers camping, smiling, embracing and grooving to live tunes. For the eighth year, the music festival produced by professional snowboarder Danny Davis and TV personality Jack Mitrani draws revelers of all ages for an uplifting and inclusive experience. Over three days, more than 30 musical acts, including headliners Twiddle, Greensky Bluegrass and Kamasi Washington, perform on multiple outdoor stages in a picturesque mountain setting. Art, yoga, local food, skateboarding and dance workshops keep the good vibes flowing.

JUN.28-30 | DANCE

Thursday, June 28, through Saturday, June 30, at Sugarbush Resort in Warren. $60-350. Info, info@ frendlygathering.com, frendlygathering.com.

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JUN.28 | ETC.

JUN.28-30 | FAIRS & FESTIVALS

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After the Colchester Causeway was damaged during a storm in May, Local Motion, a Vermont nonprofit that advocates for walkable and bikeable communities, announced that its Island Line Bike Ferry service would be canceled for the summer. To the delight of local pedal pushers, the Vermont Agency of Transportation agreed to fund and contract for repairs to the four-mile trail extending into Lake Champlain. According to Local Motion’s website, the boat that carries cyclists from the Island Line Trail to the Champlain Islands will resume service in early July. Local Motion invites two-wheeled travelers to celebrate BIKE FERRY PARTY with barbecue bites by Love Local Catering, live music by Thursday, June 28, 6-9 p.m., at the Community Sailing Center in Zach Nugent’s Acoustic Dead and spectacular views from the Burlington. $10-25; cash bar. Info, 861Community Sailing Center’s new deck. 2700, localmotion.org.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Land and Water

COURTESY OF ALI KAUKAS

FRENDLY GATHERING

CALENDAR 51


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BEERLINGTON FOAMERS MARKET: Shoppers snag veggies from Three Chimney Farm’s pop-up farm stand and sip Foam Brewers suds. Foam Brewers, Burlington, 5-7 p.m. Free. Info, 391-9047. COMMUNITY SUPPER: A scrumptious spread connects friends and neighbors. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 5-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 300. FIVE CORNERS FARMERS MARKET: Conscious consumers shop local produce, premade treats and crafts. 3 Main St., Essex Junction, 4-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 5cornersfarmersmarket@ gmail.com. LEDDY PARK BEACH BITES: Lakeside picnickers enjoy foodtruck fare, a beer garden, kids’ activities and live entertainment. Attendees on two wheels make use of free bike valet service. Leddy Park, Burlington, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 864-0123. VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: Local products — veggies, breads, pastries, cheeses, wines, syrups, jewelry, crafts and beauty supplies — draw shoppers to a diversified bazaar. Depot Park, Rutland, 3-6 p.m. Free. Info, 342-4727.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: Players have fun with the popular card game. Burlington Bridge Club, Williston, 9:15 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. $6. Info, 872-5722. MAH JONGG: Participants of all levels enjoy friendly bouts of this tile-based game. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 1-3:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

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health & fitness

ALL-LEVELS HATHA YOGA: With a focus on connecting breath to movement, this class offers yoga for everybody. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 6-7 a.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com. BONE BUILDERS EXERCISE CLASSES: Folks of all ages ward off osteoporosis in an exercise and prevention class. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 7:30-8:30, 9:15-10:15 & 10:4011:40 a.m. Free. Info, 223-3322. BUTI YOGA: A fusion of vinyasa yoga, plyometrics and dance is set to upbeat music. Bring water and a towel. Women’s Room, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. $16. Info, beth@prenatalmethod.com. CHAIR TAI CHI: Age and ability level are no obstacles to learning this slow, easy exercise routine. Champlain Senior Center, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 316-1510.

mat for an all-levels class. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 9-10 a.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com. GINGER’S EXTREME BOOT CAMP: Triathletes, Spartan racers and other fitness fanatics challenge themselves to complete Navy Seal exercises during an intense workout. Come in good shape. Private residence, Middlebury, 7-8 a.m. $8-12; for ages 16 and up. Info, 343-7160. NIA WITH LINDA: Eclectic music and movements drawn from healing, martial and dance arts propel an animated barefoot workout. South End Studio, Burlington, 8:30-9:30 a.m. $14; free for first-timers. Info, 372-1721. PILATES: Students are put through the paces in a strengthand mobility-boosting workout. Women’s Room, Burlington, 4:30 p.m. $16. Info, beth@prenatalmethod.com. PRENATAL YOGA: Moms-to-be prepare their bodies for labor and delivery. Women’s Room, Burlington, 12:15 p.m. $16. Info, beth@prenatalmethod.com. QIGONG: Gentle movements promote strength, balance and wellbeing. Waterbury Public Library, 11-11:45 a.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, 244-7036. RESILIENCE FLOW: FOR THOSE WITH A HISTORY OF TBI OR BRAIN INJURY: Individuals affected by a traumatic brain injury practice breath work, slow grounded movement and guided meditation. Sangha Studio — Pine, Burlington, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262. RESTORATIVE YOGA: Props support the body, leaving participants free to truly relax into long-held poses. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 5:30-6:30 p.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com. TAI CHI: A gentle outdoor lesson promoting strength, balance and active relaxation incorporates fall prevention and mindful walking. Waterbury Public Library, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 244-7036. TOMGIRL WALKING CLUB: Pups and pals in tow, pedestrians make strides toward health. Tomgirl Juice Co., Burlington, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0337. Y12SR: YOGA OF 12-STEP RECOVERY: Folks in addiction recovery and those affected by the addictive behavior of others are welcome to take part in a sharing circle and themed yoga class. Sangha Studio — Pine, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 448-4262. YOGA ON THE LAKE: Yogis greet the day with a waterfront practice. Community Sailing Center, Burlington, 7-8 a.m. $15; free for members. Info, 864-9642.

language

EMPOWERED YOGA FLOW: A rejuvenating practice for all levels weaves together movement, breath and mental focus. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 9-10 a.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com.

BEGINNER & INTERMEDIATE/ ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSES: Learners take communication to the next level. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211.

GENTLE YOGA IN WATERBURY: Practitioners with limitations and seasoned students alike hit the

INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: Pupils improve their speaking and grammar mastery.

Private residence, Burlington, 6 p.m. $20. Info, 324-1757. LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: SPANISH: ¡Hola! Language lovers perfect their fluency. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

montréal

MTL EN ARTS: Emerging and established artists exhibit the fruits of their labor at this 19th annual downtown festival. St. Catherine St., downtown Montréal. Prices vary. Info, 514-370-2269.

music

Find club dates in the music section. BURLINGTON CITY ARTS SUMMER CONCERTS: BINGER: Progressive psych rock meets jazz-minded hip-hop in an openair performance. Burlington City Hall Park, 5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7166. BURLINGTON CITY ARTS SUMMER CONCERTS: DANZA DEL FUEGO: Romani-inspired world music rings out during an outdoor gig. Burlington City Hall Park, noon. Free. Info, 865-7166. CAPITAL CITY BAND: The community ensemble hits all the right notes at a weekly gig on the green. Vermont Statehouse lawn, Montpelier, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 456-7054.

seminars

HOMESHARING INFO SESSION: Locals learn to make the most of spare space in their homes by hosting compatible housemates. HomeShare Vermont, South Burlington, 4-4:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 863-5625. THE PATH OF THE HUNTRESS: FIRST STEPS: No matter their gender identity, participants learn the basics of hunting as a whole foods lifestyle. Community Room, Hunger Mountain Co-op, Montpelier, 5:30-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, info@hunger mountain.coop.

tech

DIGITAL PHOTO EDITING: Neophytes become versed in the photo editing platform Adobe Photoshop Elements. Waterbury Public Library, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 244-7036. TECH HELP WITH CLIF: Electronics novices develop skill sets applicable to smartphones, tablets and other gadgets. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, noon, 1, 6 & 7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-6955.

theater

‘ANNE OF GREEN GABLES’: A spunky orphan wins over her new family, school and neighbors in an adaptation of L.M. Montgomery’s novel, brought to life by Weston Playhouse. Weston Playhouse Second Stage at Walker Farm, 4 p.m. $10-20. Info, 824-5288. ‘GYPSY’: A Stowe Theatre Guild musical production tells the

story of vaudeville star Gypsy Rose Lee. Stowe Town Hall Theatre, 7:30 p.m. $14-20. Info, tickets@stowetheatre.com.

THU.28

résumé-writing to online applications. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 2:30-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 745-1393.

‘THE MERCHANT OF VENICE’: Compagnia de’ Colombari breathes life into the Bard’s tragic comedy about love, greed and the intersection of the two. Bema Outdoor Amphitheater, College Park, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 8 p.m. $10-45. Info, 603-646-2422.

FARM TO MEDICINE CABINET PLANT WALK FOCUSING ON PLANT PROPAGATION: Herbalist Julie Mitchell points out the healing flora found on Vermont’s working lands. Shelburne Farms, 6-8 p.m. $15; preregister. Info, 985-8686.

fairs & festivals

THE METROPOLITAN OPERA LIVE IN HD: ‘IL TROVATORE’: Anna Netrebko portrays Verdi’s heroine, who sacrifices her life for the love of a gypsy troubadour in an onscreen production. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. $6-15. Info, 748-2600.

agriculture

HOUSE & FORMAL GARDENS TOUR: Explorations of the inn and its grounds culminate in afternoon tea with sweets and savories. Shelburne Farms, 2:304 p.m. $20; preregister. Info, 985-8686.

cannabis

‘ONCE’: A street musician and a Czech immigrant fall in love in this modern musical set in the streets of Dublin and staged by Saint Michael’s Playhouse. McCarthy Arts Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 8 p.m. $36-45. Info, 654-2281.

THE NEW VERMONT MARIJUANA LAW — PANEL DISCUSSION: Representatives from the City of Burlington break down the basics of Vermont’s recent cannabis regulations. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 863-3403.

‘OUR TOWN’: Small-town drama plays out in Thornton Wilder’s Pulitzer Prize-winning work. Weston Playhouse Main Stage, 2-4:30 & 7:30-10 p.m. $49-60. Info, 824-5288.

conferences

words

AMY SISKIND AUTHOR INTERVIEW: An audience-led discussion with the author of The List: A Week-By-Week Reckoning of Trump’s First Year delves into defending democracy. BYO blanket or lawn chair. Shelburne Vineyard, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, catecdesign@gmail.com. AUTHORS AT THE ALDRICH: Children’s book creators Jason Chin and Deirdre Gill discuss and sign titles such as Grand Canyon and Trains Don’t Sleep. Aldrich Public Library, Barre, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 476-7550. POETRY RIOT: Rajnii Eddins hosts an open mic for seasoned and budding wordsmiths. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. $3. Info, 540-0406. READINGS IN THE GALLERY: JEFF FRIEDMAN: Poetry pundits turn their attention toward the author of Floating Tales. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 745-1393. RECOVERY WRITE NOW: Wordsmiths in recovery let their creativity flow in a lively and supportive setting. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 6-7:15 p.m. Free. Info, writelife1@ hotmail.com. WEDNESDAY NIGHT WORKSHOP: Burlington Writers Workshop members focus on elements of craft when responding to works in progress. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104. WRITING CIRCLE: Words flow when participants explore creative expression in a lowpressure environment. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218.

INTERNATIONAL RESTORATIVE JUSTICE CONFERENCE: “Global Unity and Healing: Building Communities With a Restorative Approach” guides three days of workshops, panels, presentations and keynote addresses for researchers, policy makers and practitioners. Davis Center, University of Vermont, Burlington, 7:30 a.m.-9 p.m. $104-4,212; preregister. Info, 656-5665, ext. 2.

dance

FOR REAL WOMEN SERIES WITH BELINDA: GIT UR FREAK ON: R&B and calypso-dancehall music is the soundtrack to an empowering sensual dance session aimed at confronting body shaming. Swan Dojo, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. $15. Info, bestirred fitness@gmail.com. ‘PEPPERLAND’: Fans of the Fab Four flock to Mark Morris Dance Group’s tribute to the Beatles’ 1967 album, Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. See calendar spotlight. Moore Theater, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 8 p.m. $12.50-60. Info, 603-646-2422.

etc.

BIKE FERRY PARTY: Cyclists and Local Motion representatives celebrate the season with barbecue fare, live music and spectacular views of Lake Champlain. See calendar spotlight. Community Sailing Center, Burlington, 6-9 p.m. $10-25; cash bar. Info, 861-2700. FEAST & FIELD MARKET: Locally grown produce and the folk stylings of Dana and Susan Robinson are on the menu at a pastoral party. Fable Farm, Barnard, market, 4:30-7:30 p.m.; concert, 5:30-8 p.m. Donations. Info, feastandfield@gmail.com. GUIDED TOURS: See WED.27. JOB HUNT HELP: Community College of Vermont interns assist employment seekers with everything from

FRENDLY GATHERING: Positive people unite! Twiddle, Greensky Bluegrass and Kamasi Washington headline a weekend of live acts, camping, skateboarding, yoga and more. See calendar spotlight. See friendlygathering.com for details. Sugarbush Resort, Warren. $60-350. Info, info@frendlygathering.com.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘THE KIDS ARE ALRIGHT’: Annette Benning and Julianne Moore star in a 2010 comedic drama centered on two children who bring their biological father into their family life. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600. ‘THIS IS OUR LAND’: Shown in French with English subtitles, this 2017 drama seeks to analyze the dangerous appeal of reactionary populism. Film House, Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, 7 p.m. $5-8; free for Vermont International Film Foundation members. Info, 660-2600. ‘WILD AFRICA 3D’: See WED.27.

food & drink

BURLINGTON EDIBLE HISTORY TOURS: Foodies sample farmfresh eats on a scrumptious stroll dedicated to the Queen City’s culinary past. Awning behind ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 1-4 p.m. $55. Info, 238-8828. COMMUNITY LUNCH: Farm-fresh fare makes for a delicious and nutritious midday meal. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 309. COWS, CHEESE & COCKTAILS: Fans of fromage visit a mobile cheese plant, chat over wine and beer, and learn showmanship skills with calves. Fairmont Farm, East Montpelier, 5-8 p.m. $25; preregister. Info, fairmontfarmvt@gmail.com. VERMONT BEER PAIRING POPUP SERIES: Gourmands gorge on a three-course meal served alongside a local brew. Village Café at Bolton Valley, 5-9 p.m. $45. Info, 434-3444. WORCESTER COMMUNITY MARKET: Local produce, live bands and kids’ activities bring neighbors together. 52 Elmore Rd., Worcester, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 272-3309.

health & fitness

ALL-LEVELS YOGA CLASS: Students practice linking body, breath and mind in a lesson for both beginners and experienced practitioners. Chaffee Art Center, Rutland, 10 a.m. $5. Info, 775-0356. BEGINNERS TAI CHI CLASS: Students get a feel for the ancient Chinese practice. Twin Valley


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

Senior Center, East Montpelier, 1011 a.m. Free. Info, 223-3322. BUDDHIST BABES GENTLE YOGA: Lessons for peaceful living pave the way for a moderate flow-style practice set to music. Women’s Room, Burlington, 5 p.m. $16. Info, beth@prenatal method.com. CHAIR YOGA: FOR THOSE WITH LIMITED MOBILITY: Props and modifications complement elements of a traditional flow class. Sangha Studio — North, Burlington, 2-3:15 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262. CHAIR YOGA WITH SANGHA STUDIO: Supported poses promote health and wellbeing. Champlain Senior Center, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 448-4262. COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS: A 20-minute guided practice with Andrea O’Connor alleviates stress and tension. Tea and a discussion follow. Winooski Senior Center, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 233-1161. FORZA: THE SAMURAI SWORD WORKOUT: Students sculpt lean muscles and gain mental focus when using wooden replicas of the weapon. North End Studio A, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. $10. Info, 578-9243. GENTLE FLOW YOGA: Individuals with injuries or other challenges feel the benefits of a relaxing and nourishing practice. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 9-10 a.m. $12. Info, studio@ zenbarnvt.com. SLOW FLOW YOGA: Tailored to meet students’ needs, this foundational class facilitates overall wellness. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 7:30-8:30 a.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com.

FOMO?

art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film

music Find club dates at local venues in the music section and at sevendaysvt.com/music.

YOGA ON THE LAKE: See WED.27.

language

BEGINNER-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: Basic communication skills are on the agenda at a guided lesson. Private residence, Burlington, 6 p.m. $20. Info, 324-1757.

lgbtq

LGBTQ+ MONTHLY POTLUCK: Community bonds grow stronger over a shared meal. Bring a dish or beverage to share. Pride Center of Vermont, Burlington, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 860-7812.

montréal

MONTRÉAL INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL: Legendary performers including Herbie Hancock and Cécile McLorin Salvant deliver jazz, blues and contemporary tunes alongside rising talents. See montrealjazzfest.com for details. Various Montréal locations. Prices vary. Info, 514-871-1881. MTL EN ARTS: See WED.27.

music

Find club dates in the music section. 10,000 MANIACS: Singer Mary Ramsey fronts the veteran alt-rock band known for hits such as “These Are the Days” and “Like the Weather.” See calendar spotlight. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe Mountain Resort, 7 p.m. $25-65. Info, 760-4634. BURLINGTON CONCERT BAND REHEARSALS: Enthusiastic players of brass, woodwind and percussion instruments find perfect harmony. Burlington High School, 6:45-8:45 p.m. Free. Info, joelatherton8@gmail.com.

GEOLOGY HIKE: Trekkers meet to carpool, then head into the great outdoors for a guided walk. Williston Public Works Department, 5:15-7 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

seminars

AARP SMART DRIVER CLASS: Drivers ages 50 and up learn to safely navigate the road while addressing the physical changes brought on by aging. Charlotte Senior Center, 9:30 a.m. $15-20; preregister; limited space. Info, 425-6345. EATING HEALTHY ON A BUDGET: Rebecca Flewelling of Balanced Bodies, Balanced Lives serves up strategies for cutting back on food costs without sacrificing good nutrition. New England Federal Credit Union, Williston, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 879-8790.

sports

SPORTS LIVE IN HD: Soccer fans cheer for their favorite teams as FIFA World Cup games are broadcast to the big screen. Paramount Theatre, Rutland, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 775-0903.

talks

HOT TOPICS SUMMER LECTURE SERIES: Dave Owens of University of California, Hastings College of Law shares his expertise in “Consultants, the Environment and the Law.” Room 012, Oakes Hall, Vermont Law School, South Royalton, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 831-1371. MICHAEL PHILLIPS: In “Fungal Consciousness,” the New Hampshire orchardist offers insight into the invisible world of mycorrhizae and plant roots beneath our feet. Simpson Hall, Sterling College, Craftsbury Common, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 586-7711.

HALEY RICHARDSON & DON PENZIEN: Dynamic fiddling and traditional guitar playing combine for a recital of exciting Irish tunes. Burlington Violin Shop, 6-8 p.m. $15. Info, 862-0349.

RANDALL BALMER: The professor sets the stage for the Beatles tribute dance production Pepperland with a talk on the revolutionary 1960s. Top of the Hop, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 7 p.m. Free. Info, 603-646-2422.

INTERPLAY JAZZ ART IN THE PARK: Students and faculty perform an all-American concert. Artistic listeners use provided materials to capture the music on paper. Back lawn, Woodstock History Center, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 457-3981.

TIM & BOBBIE NISBET: Armchair travelers experience a cross-country road trip from the rider’s seat of a Harley Davidson via a slide presentation of the pair’s 2017 adventure to Alaska. Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 533-9075.

MOSES SEBAGADO & JAY SAND: Joyous African music lifts spirits. Proceeds benefit 360 Degrees of Healing. Ohavi Zedek Synagogue, Burlington, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $18. Info, snobunny@pshift.com.

tech

MUSIC IN THE VINEYARD SUMMER CONCERT SERIES: Oenophiles let loose with live music by Dark Horse,

TECH SUPPORT: Need an email account? Want to enjoy ebooks? Bring your phone, tablet or laptop to a weekly help session. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 5-7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-8291, ext. 302. THU.28

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Participate in a research study to help develop a Zika Vaccine. We are looking for healthy adults aged 18-50. 6 month-long research study involving screening, a dosing visit, and 13 follow-up outpatient visits Volunteers are eligible for compensation up to $1490.

VACCINE TESTING CENTER

For more info, visit uvmvtc.org, call 802-656-0013 or email uvmvtc@uvm.edu

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CALENDAR 53

All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com.

outdoors

Help your global community.

SEVEN DAYS

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

YOGA CORE FOR BABES: An empowering practice focuses on the abs and the pelvic floor. Women’s Room, Burlington, 12:15 p.m. $16. Info, beth@prenatalmethod.com.

06.27.18-07.04.18

Find even more local events in this newspaper and online:

award-winning wine and mouthwatering eats. BYO seating. Snow Farm Vineyard, South Hero, picnicking begins, 5 p.m.; music, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 372-9463.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

SUNSET YOGA ON THE LAKE: Views of Lake Champlain reward participants in an all-levels vinyasa class. BYO mat. Community Sailing Center, Burlington, 7:158:15 p.m. $15; free for members. Info, 864-9642.

YOGA: A Sangha Studio instructor guides students who are in recovery toward achieving inner tranquility. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 5-6 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS NEEDED


calendar

Vermont & NYS Certified

THU.28

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theater

‘ANNE OF GREEN GABLES’: See WED.27. ‘AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY’: Repressed truths and unsettling secrets come to light when a midwestern patriarch goes missing in a Waterbury Festival Playhouse production. Waterbury Festival Playhouse, 7:30 p.m. $15-35. Info, 498-3755. ‘GYPSY’: See WED.27. ‘THE MERCHANT OF VENICE’: See WED.27. ‘ONCE’: See WED.27. ‘OUR TOWN’: See WED.27, 7:3010 p.m.

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Examine how the myth of the cowboy shaped modern perceptions of the West and Native American culture.

THE PIRATES & TUXEDO MURDER MYSTERY CRUISE: Who done it? Suppertime sleuths enjoy a delicious dinner and crack a case presented by the October Theatre Company. Spirit of Ethan Allen, Burlington, 6:30-9 p.m. $52.85. Info, 862-8300. ‘PLEVNA’: Performed by Alex Draper, this play by Howard Barker is a one-person meditation on the aftermath of the 1877 Russian takeover of a Turkish town. Seeler Studio Theatre, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 8-10 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168.

words

CLIFFORD THOMPSON: The visiting creative nonfiction writer regales listeners with selected works. College Hall Chapel, Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 828-8600.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 06.27.18-07.04.18 SEVEN DAYS 54 CALENDAR

‘PATIENCE’: A comic opera by W.S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan, presented by Vermont Theatre Festival, satirizes the aesthetic movement of 19th-century England. Unadilla Theatre, Marshfield, 7:30 p.m. $10-20. Info, 456-8968.

HOW TO WRITE AN EFFECTIVE ARTIST STATEMENT: Corrina Thurston guides creatives in crafting descriptions of their work. Milton Art Center & Gallery, 6-7:30 p.m. Donations; preregister. Info, magvtwork shops@gmail.com. MATTHYS LEVY: The bestselling author and designer introduces his first novel, Building Eden. Phoenix Books Rutland, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 855-8078.

PLAYING COWBOY

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community

FEAST TOGETHER OR FEAST TO GO: Senior citizens and their guests catch up over a shared meal. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, noon-1 p.m. $7-9; preregister. Info, 262-6288.

O June 23october 21 2018

conferences

shelburnemuseum.org

INTERNATIONAL RESTORATIVE JUSTICE CONFERENCE: See THU.28, 7:30 a.m.-8 p.m.

crafts

CRAFTY CRAP NIGHT: Participants bring supplies or ongoing Untitled-44 1

6/18/18 11:17 AM

projects and an adventurous attitude to share creative time with other people in recovery. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150.

dance

BALLROOM & LATIN DANCING: Learn new moves with Ballroom Nights, then join others in a dance social featuring the waltz, tango and more. Singles, couples and beginners are welcome. Williston Jazzercise Fitness Center, lesson, 7-8 p.m.; dance social, 8-9:30 p.m. $10-14; $8 for dance only. Info, 862-2269. ECSTATIC DANCE VERMONT: Jubilant motions with the Green Mountain Druid Order inspire divine connections. Christ Episcopal Church, Montpelier, 7-9 p.m. $10. Info, 505-8011. ‘PEPPERLAND’: See THU.28, 8 p.m. TOP OF THE BLOCK SWING DANCE: Music from the roaring ’20s through the rockabilly ’50s fuels an al fresco stepping session. Weather permitting. Top of Church St., Burlington, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, seetherhythm@yahoo.com.

etc.

BIKE DECORATING: Folks planning to participate in RiseVT Chittenden County’s community float in the Richmond Independence Day parade beautify their human-powered vehicles with provided supplies. Richmond Town Park, 3-7 p.m. Free. Info, robin.katrick@uvmhealth.org. FOOD & ART FRIDAYS: Woodfired pizza, farm-fresh produce, visual art, story telling and live performance make for a memorable evening. The Sable Project, Stockbridge, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Free; $5-10 for pizza. Info, info@ thesableproject. GUIDED TOURS: See WED.27. OPEN MIC NITE: Young talent ages 19 and under entertain

FOMO? Find even more local events in this newspaper and online:

art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

music Find club dates at local venues in the music section and at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com.

onlookers with acts of all kinds. Fisher Brothers Farm, Shelburne, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 846-7370. SENIOR PROM: It’s just like high school, but better! Music, dancing, a photo booth and a silent auction make for a night to remember. Capitol Plaza Hotel & Conference Center, Montpelier, 7-10:30 p.m. $25. Info, 225-8694. TAROT READINGS: A spiritual mentor consults her cards to offer guidance and clarity. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 5:30-8:30 p.m. $1 per minute; preregister. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com.

fairs & festivals

FRENDLY GATHERING: See THU.28. ROCKFIRE: A tribute to Barre’s granite heritage includes treks by firelight set to live music, a molten-metal performance and more. Trails are open for exploration on Sunday. See rockfirevt.com for details. Millstone Hill Touring Center, Websterville, 7 p.m.-midnight. $5-25. Info, 476-8188.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ANIMÉ NIGHT: Enthusiasts view and chat about the latest animated shows from Japan. Laboratory B, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 777-9012. ‘WILD AFRICA 3D’: See WED.27.

food & drink

BRANDON FARMERS MARKET: Local farmers, artisans and specialty food producers offer up their goods. Estabrook Park, Brandon, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 273-2655. BURGER NIGHT: Chaque Fois! provide a Cajun-music backdrop to a family-style meal and farming-inspired activities. Bread & Butter Farm, Shelburne, 4:30-6:30 p.m. $10-25; preregister. Info, 985-9200. BURLINGTON EDIBLE HISTORY TOURS: See THU.28. CHAMPLAIN VALLEY DINNER TRAIN: Passengers feast on a three-course meal while riding the Green Mountain Railroad from Burlington to Middlebury and back. Union Station, Burlington, 5:30-8:30 p.m. $85100; preregister for Gold Class tickets and parties of eight or more. Info, 800-707-3530. FOODWAYS FRIDAYS: Foodies use heirloom herbs and veggies to revive historic recipes in the farmhouse kitchen. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Regular admission, $4-16; free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 457-2355. RICHMOND FARMERS MARKET: An open-air marketplace featuring live music connects cultivators and fresh-food browsers. Volunteers Green, Richmond, 3-7 p.m. Free. Info, info@richmondfarmersmarketvt.org. SUN TO CHEESE TOUR: Fromage fanatics go behind the scenes and follow award-winning farmhouse cheddar from raw milk to finished product. Shelburne Farms, 1:45-3:45 p.m.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

$20 includes a block of cheddar; preregister. Info, 985-8686.

Center & Gallery, South Pomfret, 7-9 p.m. $10. Info, 457-3500.

TRUCK STOP: Mobile kitchens dish out mouthwatering meals and libations. Live music and cold beer add to the fun. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 5-10 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 540-0406.

POINT COUNTERPOINT CHAMBER PLAYERS: A faculty ensemble from the music camp delivers a program including works by Popper, Faure and Schubert. Salisbury Congregational Church, 7:30-9 p.m. Donations. Info, 352-6671.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.27, 9:15 a.m.

health & fitness

ACUDETOX: Attendees in recovery undergo acupuncture to the ear to propel detoxification. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150. ADVANCED TAI CHI CLASS: Participants keep active with a sequence of slow, controlled movements. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3322. BONE BUILDERS EXERCISE CLASSES: See WED.27, 7:30-8:30 & 10:40-11:40 a.m. BUTI YOGA: See WED.27. FELDENKRAIS AWARENESS THROUGH MOVEMENT: Aches and pains, be gone! The physically challenged to the physically fit increase flexibility and body awareness with this form of somatic education. The Wellness Collective, Burlington, 12:30-1:30 p.m. $10. Info, 560-0186. LIVING RECOVERY: FOR THOSE IN ADDICTION RECOVERY OR AFFECTED BY THE ADDICTIVE BEHAVIOR OF OTHERS: A moderately paced flow class serves folks overcoming substance use. Sangha Studio — North, Burlington, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

Y12SR CLASS: Modeled after the structure of 12-step meetings, this session includes a group sharing circle and an intentional yoga practice. Sangha Studio — Pine, Burlington, 7-8:15 p.m. Donations. Info, 448-4262.

politics

WHOSE VERMONT? OUR VERMONT!: Candidates for the state’s highest office field questions from local residents at a forum hosted by Rights & Democracy. Our Revolution president Nina Turner speaks. Unitarian Universalist Church, Rutland, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, elise@radvt.org.

sports

FRIDAY NIGHT DINGHY RACING: Skippers celebrate the end of the week with some nautical competition. Prior sailing knowledge and passage of CSC’s rental test are required. Community Sailing Center, Burlington, signup, 4:30 p.m.; begin rigging, 5:30 p.m.; first gun, 6 p.m. Free; limited space. Info, 864-2499.

talks

ETHAN IVERSON: The composer and musical arranger for the Beatles-inspired dance piece Pepperland discusses the lasting influence of the group’s 1967 album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart’s Club Band. Top of the Hop, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 7 p.m. Free. Info, 603-646-2422.

theater

‘ALWAYS ... PATSY CLINE’: The country crooner’s friendship with Houston housewife Louise Seger anchors this Depot Theatre production. Depot Theatre, Westport, N.Y., 8 p.m. $20-35. Info, 518-962-4449. ‘ANNE OF GREEN GABLES’: See WED.27.

montréal

‘AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY’: See THU.28.

MONTRÉAL INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL: See THU.28. MTL EN ARTS: See WED.27.

music

BURLINGTON CITY ARTS SUMMER CONCERTS: ABOUT TIME: Friends and coworkers catch a lunchtime concert by a funk-focused Vermont band. Burlington City Hall Park, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7166.

‘INTO THE WOODS’: Classic Grimm characters get entangled in the darker side of fairy tales in a Hazen Union High School production of Stephen Sondheim’s Tony Award-winning musical. Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, 7:30 p.m. $5-10. Info, 533-9075. ‘IT CAN’T HAPPEN HERE’: BarnArts Center for the Arts presents Sinclair Lewis’ cautionary satire about the

‘OUR TOWN’: See WED.27, 7:3010 p.m. ‘OUT-OF-JOINT HAMLET’: With the use of epic marionettes, Bread and Puppet Theater reimagines Shakespeare’s tale of the indecisive Prince of Denmark. Bread and Puppet Theater, Glover, 7:30 p.m. $10. Info, 525-3031. ‘PATIENCE’: See THU.28. SHOWINGS OF WORKS IN PROGRESS: ‘BRECHT ON BRECHT’: PTP/NYC treats audience members to a theatrical collage of writings and songs by German theater practitioner Bertolt Brecht. Seeler Studio Theatre, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168. SHOWINGS OF WORKS IN PROGRESS DOUBLE BILL: PTP/ NYC stages selections from Howard Barker’s The Possibilities and Caryl Churchill’s The AfterDinner Joke. Seeler Studio Theatre, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 2-4 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168.

BASINHARBOR.COM • 802.475.2311 Untitled-25 1

VOXEST: ‘OUTLAW’: Notorious Australian criminal Ned Kelly is central to this musicalin-progress. Warner Bentley Theater, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 8 p.m. Free. Info, 603-646-2422. VOXEST: ‘PROJECT BLACK PLAGUE’: A solo sound, video and live performance piece examining racism hits the stage as part of a series of developing works. Warner Bentley Theater, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 5 p.m. Free. Info, 603-646-2422.

words

FRIDAY MORNING WORKSHOP: Wordsmiths offer constructive criticism on works in progress by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104.

presents AT BURLINGTON July TUE 24 7PM

SAT 28 6-8PM

PEONY DAYS: Artist Jo Mackenzie opens her home studio to visitors who gaze upon fragrant flowers in full bloom. Details provided upon registration. Jo Mackenzie Watercolors,

SAT.30

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Launch celebration! Free.

NASH PATEL & LEDA SCHEINTAUB: DOSA KITCHEN Book signing and delicious samples! Free.

AT ESSEX July JULY 1-31

activism

agriculture

SARAH WARD: AESOP LAKE

Phoenix Books Burlington events are ticketed unless otherwise indicated. Your $3 ticket comes with a coupon for $5 off the featured book. Proceeds go to Vermont Foodbank.

SAT.30 BLUE WAVE CONCERT: Songsters Patti Casey and Susannah Blachly lend their talents to a fundraiser for Democratic and Progressive 2018 midterm election candidates. Invisible Calais provides light refreshments. Private residence, North Calais, 7-9:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 456-8804.

6/25/18 2:09 PM

TUE 10 6PM

FIND WALDO IN ESSEX!

Where’s Waldo? This July, you can find him around town and win great prizes! Be sure to join us for the Find Waldo Grand Finale on July 31st.

ALPACA LUNCH LAUNCH PARTY

Join John and Jennifer Churchman to celebrate the release of the newest Sweet Pea & Friends book!

Phoenix Books Essex events are free and open to all.

READING WITHOUT WALLS BINGO A summer reading program for grades 4-8. Read books and win prizes! All locations throughout July and August. 191 Bank Street, Downtown Burlington • 802.448.3350 2 Carmichael Street, Essex • 802.872.7111 www.phoenixbooks.biz

CALENDAR 55

LYDIA GRAY & ED EASTRIDGE: Drummer Marcus Copening and bassist Andy Bourke join the duo for a CD-release concert for the album Summer Samba. ArtisTree Community Arts

‘GYPSY’: See WED.27.

‘ONCE’: See WED.27.

SEVEN DAYS

Find club dates in the music section.

CIRCUS SMIRKUS BIG TOP TOUR: Performers pull off daring and dazzling acts of acrobatics, juggling and more in “Vaudeville.” Circus Smirkus Barn, Greensboro, 1-3 & 6-8 p.m. $16-22. Info, 533-7443.

Dining at

06.27.18-07.04.18

YOGA ON THE LAKE: See WED.27.

fragility of democracy. Fable Farm, Barnard, 7-9 p.m. $15-20. Info, 803-234-1645.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

REFUGE RECOVERY: A LOVE SUPREME: Buddhist philosophy is the foundation of this mindfulness-based addictionrecovery community. Turning Point Center, Burlington, noon. Free. Info, 861-3150.

RED BRICK COFFEE HOUSE: Hot beverages are provided at an open mic and jam session where community members connect over music, cards and board games. Red Brick Meeting House, Westford, 7-10 p.m. Donations. Info, mpk802vt@gmail.com.

SUMMER HERE IS DELICIOUS.


FRESH DEAS For Summer SHOP VERMONT’S BEST SELECTION of teak, wicker, wrought iron and aluminum furniture. We have styles to match any decor with prices to meet any budget.

calendar SAT.30

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Adamant, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $25; preregister. Info, 454-7330. ‘POLLINATE NEW ENGLAND AND POLLINATOR-FRIENDLY GARDENING’: Professionals from the New England Wildflower Society sow seeds of knowledge with a lecture for green thumbs. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 6-8:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 229-6206. POLLINATE NEW ENGLAND GARDEN INSTALLATION: Novice gardeners learn the ins and outs of creating a habitat for insects, birds and other pollen-depositing species in a hands-on workshop. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 1-4 p.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, 229-6206.

conferences

INTERNATIONAL RESTORATIVE JUSTICE CONFERENCE: See THU.28, 7:30 a.m.-2:45 p.m.

dance

DANCE MASTER CLASS: Clad in comfortable clothes, students ages 16 and up learn new moves in an intermediate-level modern class, including choreography from the Beatles-inspired piece Pepperland. Straus Dance Studio, Berry Sports Center, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., noon-1:30 p.m. $10. Info, 603-646-2422.

Shop all the

NEW FURNITURE DESIGNS!

‘PEPPERLAND’: See THU.28.

etc.

40TH ANNIVERSARY SEASON GALA & AWARDS DINNER: Patrons of the arts celebrate four decades of the Depot Theatre with an auction, live music by Le Groove and the 2018 Adirondack Awards presentation. Westport Yacht Club, N.Y., cocktails, 6 p.m.; dinner and program, 7 p.m. $125. Info, 518-962-4449. SEVENDAYSVT.COM

BIKE DECORATING: See FRI.29,. Smilie Memorial School, Bolton, 10 a.m.-noon. Richmond Elementary School, 1-3 p.m. INDEPENDENT COMMUNITY MEETING PLACE: Anything goes in an in-person networking group where attendees can share hobbies, play music and discuss current events — without using online social sites. Presto Music Store, South Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 658-0030.

06.27.18-07.04.18 SEVEN DAYS

‘OUR MAN FLINT’: James Coburn stars as a man of mystery in this 1966 James Bond spoof, shown on 16mm film. Newman Center, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 7 p.m. Donations. Info, serious_61@ yahoo.com. ‘PETER AND THE FARM’: The Woodstock Vermont Film Series continues with a showing of a 2016 documentary on Peter Dunning, the proprietor of Vermont’s Mile Hill Farm. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 5 & 7 p.m. $9-11. Info, 457-2355. ‘WILD AFRICA 3D’: See WED.27.

food & drink

BREWHOP: Bottoms up! Imbibers board a spacious bus for a flavorful excursion to five craft breweries. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, noon-6 p.m. $49. Info, info@bestinvt.com. BURLINGTON EDIBLE HISTORY TOURS: See THU.28. BURLINGTON FARMERS MARKET: Dozens of stands overflow with seasonal produce, flowers, artisan wares and prepared foods. Burlington City Hall Park, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, burlingtonfarmersmarket.org@gmail.com. CANS ‘N CLAMS: Steamed clams, lobsters, mussels, lobster rolls, Vermont craft beer and rosé please palates at a pop-up clam shack. Joe’s Kitchen at Screamin’ Ridge Farm, Montpelier, noon-8 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 461-5371. CAPITAL CITY FARMERS MARKET: Meats and cheeses join farm-fresh produce, baked goods, locally made arts and crafts, and live music. 60 State Street, Montpelier, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 793-8347.

GUIDED TOURS: See WED.27.

LEGAL CLINIC: Attorneys offer complimentary consultations on a first-come, first-served basis. 274 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 383-2118.

FREE DELIVERY

in Chittenden County

fairs & festivals

FRENDLY GATHERING: See THU.28.

Lighting or Porch and Patio Furniture, Doesn’t Matter.

WE BEAT INTERNET PRICING. PERIOD.

56 CALENDAR

silhouettes. Pianist Jeff Rapsis provides live accompaniment for this 1926 animated silent film. Brandon Town Hall, 7 p.m. Donations. Info, 603-236-9237.

ROCKFIRE: See FRI.29.

film

RT 7 Shelburne Rd • 985-2204 Hours: Mon. – Fri. 9 - 5:30, Sat. 9 - 5, Sun. 10 - 4

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘THE ADVENTURES OF PRINCE ACHMED’: The story of a heroic prince and his escapades plays out through hand-cut

Open 7 Days for your shopping Convenience www.TheLightingHouse.net Untitled-9 1

6/22/18 4:43 PM

FOMO? Find even more local events in this newspaper and online:

art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

music Find club dates at local venues in the music section and at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com.

CHAMPLAIN VALLEY DINNER TRAIN: See FRI.29. CHOCOLATE TASTING IN BURLINGTON: Let’s go bar hopping! With the help of a tasting guide, chocoholics discover the flavor profiles of varieties such as toffee almond crunch and salted caramel latte. Lake Champlain Chocolates Factory Store & Café, Burlington, 11 a.m.4 p.m. Free. Info, 864-1807. COLD BREW WORKSHOP: Members of the Brio Coffeeworks team elucidate various methods for getting the most out of buzzinducing beans. Brio Coffeeworks, Burlington, 10-11:30 a.m. $5-10. Info, 861-9700. SHELBURNE FARMERS MARKET: Harvested fruits and greens, artisan cheeses, and local novelties grace outdoor tables. Shelburne Parade Ground, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 482-4279. VERGENNES FARMERS MARKET: Local foods and crafts, live music, and hot eats spice up Saturday mornings. Kennedy Brothers Building, Vergennes, 9 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 233-9180. VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: See WED.27, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

games

BOARD GAME CAFÉ: Friends whet their whistles with tea or coffee while playing games from the library’s extensive collection. Fairfax Community Library, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 849-2420.

health & fitness

BACKYARD BOOT CAMP: Exercise enthusiasts prepare for summer with pushups, burpees, tire flips and other fun yet challenging activities. Private residence, Middlebury, 8-9 a.m. $12. Info, 343-7160. BUTI FLOW: Yogis benefit from power yoga and deep abdominal toning. Women’s Room, Burlington, 9 a.m. $16. Info, beth@prenatalmethod.com. CAPOEIRA: A blend of martial arts, music and dancing challenges adults and kids. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 1-2 p.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com. POUND ROCKOUT WORKOUT: Fitness fanatics sweat it out in a full-body cardio session combining light resistance with constant simulated drumming. Colchester Health & Fitness, 10:15-11 a.m. $15. Info, 860-1010. R.I.P.P.E.D.: Resistance, intervals, power, plyometrics, endurance and diet define this high-intensity physical-fitness program. North End Studio A, Burlington, 9-10 a.m. $10. Info, 578-9243. YIN YOGA: Students hold poses for several minutes to give connective tissues a good stretch. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 8-9:30 a.m. $12. Info, studio@ zenbarnvt.com.

language

ARMENIAN LANGUAGE: Singing, dancing, drama and games promote proficiency. Community Room, Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 2-3 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

DUTCH LANGUAGE CLASS: Planning a trip to Amsterdam? Learn vocabulary and grammar basics from a native speaker. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, bheeks@ yahoo.com.

lgbtq

CINESLAM FILM FESTIVAL: In honor of the 50th anniversary year of the Stonewall riots, Vermont’s first LGBTQ film festival presents a program of short motion pictures. Latchis Hotel & Theater, Brattleboro, 4:30 p.m. $10. Info, stonewal@sover.net. LGBTQ WOMEN’S BBQ: Attendees bring their own protein to a lakeside get-together. Rain location: Pride Center of Vermont. Leddy Park, Burlington, noon. Free. Info, 860-7812. PRIDE YOGA: FOR LGBTQIA+ PEOPLE & ALLIES: Participants hit the mat for a stretching session suited for all levels. Sangha Studio — Pine, Burlington, 5-5:15 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

montréal

MONTRÉAL INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL: See THU.28. MTL EN ARTS: See WED.27.

music

Find club dates in the music section. ARTURO DELMONI & PETER SANDERS: Violin and cello in hand, the Middlebury Chamber Music Festival visiting artists charm classical connoisseurs with a program of duets and solo pieces. Violinist Emily Sunderman and violist Elizabeth Reid join in for string quartets. Champlain Valley Unitarian Universalist Society, Middlebury, 7-8:30 p.m. $15. Info, 989-7538.

RY COODER: Joined by his sevenpiece band, the consummate guitarist treats fans to career highlights. Joachim Cooder opens. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, 8 p.m. $25-65. Info, 863-5966.

outdoors

‘ALWAYS ... PATSY CLINE’: See FRI.29, 4 p.m. ‘ANNE OF GREEN GABLES’: See WED.27. ‘AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY’: See THU.28. ‘GYPSY’: See WED.27. ‘INTO THE WOODS’: See FRI.29. ‘IT CAN’T HAPPEN HERE’: See FRI.29. ‘ONCE’: See WED.27, 2 & 8 p.m. ‘OUR TOWN’: See WED.27. ‘PATIENCE’: See THU.28. VOXFEST: ‘CHOICES PEOPLE MAKE’: Presented as part of a series of developing works, Jessica Andrewartha’s play about artificial intelligence raises tough questions. Warner Bentley Theater, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 603-646-2422. VOXFEST: ‘MAIDS’: Dartmouth College alumna Carol Brown wrote this darkly comic exploration of power dynamics set in an Ohio steel town. Warner Bentley Theater, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 4 p.m. Free. Info, 603-646-2422.

words

POETRY READING & BOOK LAUNCH: A woman of words, Sue Burton releases two poetry books titled Box and Little Steel with a reading, signing, nibbles and a cash bar. BCA Center, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 862-9569.

SUN.1

agriculture

PEONY DAYS: See SAT.30.

cannabis

LEGALIZATION CELEBRATION: Folks fête Vermont’s legalization of recreational cannabis use for adults at a Heady Vermonthosted fest featuring camping, swimming, vendors, disc golf, yoga, growing demos and more. Willow Crossing Farm, Johnson, noon-10 p.m. $50; free for Heady Vermont members. Info, info@ headyvermont.com.

community

COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS PRACTICE WITH NEW LEAF SANGHA: Sessions in the tradition of Thich Nhat Hanh include sitting and walking meditation, a short reading, and open sharing. Evolution Physical Therapy & Yoga, Burlington, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, newleafsangha@ gmail.com.

dance

BALKAN FOLK DANCING: Louise Brill and friends organize participants into lines and circles set to complex rhythms. Ohavi Zedek Synagogue, Burlington, 3:30-6:30 p.m. $6; free for firsttimers; bring snacks to share. Info, 540-1020. SALSALINA SUNDAY PRACTICE: Salsa dancers at all levels hone their skills in a lesson, then stick around for a casual social. Salsalina Dance Studio, Burlington, 5-8 p.m. $10 for lesson and social; $5 for social only. Info, eingelmanuel@hotmail.com.

etc.

GUIDED TOURS: See WED.27. HU CHANT: SOUND OF SOUL: Folks of all faiths lift their voices in a spiritual exercise followed by contemplation and conversation hosted by Eckankar. Upper Valley Food Co-op, White River Junction, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 800-772-9390. SUMMER PARTY & THANK YOU CELEBRATION: Live tunes, a dance presentation and kids’ activities pave the way for a tribute to Rita Fuchsberg, Irene Minkoff and Paul Bruhn for their efforts on behalf of the community arts organization. Stone Valley Arts, Poultney, 2-5 p.m. Free. Info, 884-8052.

fairs & festivals

ORIGINAL GREEN MOUNTAIN CANNABIS & MUSIC FESTIVAL: Education and entertainment entwine during a first-annual bash featuring food trucks, vendors, and live tunes by Badfish, Jen Durkin’s Soul Power and others. Layla’s Riverside Lodge, West Dover, noon-8 p.m. $40100. Info, greenmountaincannabismusicfest@gmail.com.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘WILD AFRICA 3D’: See WED.27.

food & drink

CHOCOLATE TASTING IN BURLINGTON: See SAT.30.

Burlington Edible History Tours

THU.-SAT., JUN. 28-30 OUTSIDE AT THE BACK OF THE ECHO CENTER, BURLINGTON

Rumourz- The Fleetwood Mac Experience SAT., JUN. 30 RUSTY NAIL STAGE, STOWE

SAT., JUN. 30 ZENBARN, WATERBURY CENTER

SUN.1

Strawberry Shortcake! For kids ages 3-4 with their caregiver

Garden Harvest Basket Weaving Workshop SAT., JUL 7 THE POUGHKEEPSIE UNDERWEAR FACTORY, N.Y.

1st Annual Original Green Mountain Cannabis and Music Festival SUN., JUL. 1 LAYLA’S RIVERSIDE LODGE, WEST DOVER

NE X T WE E K

Burlington Edible History Tours

THU.-SAT., JUL. 5-7 OUTSIDE AT THE BACK OF THE ECHO CENTER, BURLINGTON

Celebrate Your Farmer Social WED., JUL. 11 HURRICANE FLATS, SOUTH ROYALTON

NE X T WE E K

NE X T WE E K

NE X T WE E K

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SAT., JUL. 7 RICHMOND COMMUNITY KITCHEN

Hot Pickin’ Party & Smokin’ Grass

CHOCOLATE TASTING IN MIDDLESEX: Candy fanatics get an education on a variety of sweets made on-site. Nutty Steph’s Granola & Chocolate Factory, Middlesex, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Info, 229-2090. FIRST SUNDAYS X SHACKSBURY CIDER: Cider and eats from local vendors such as Pioneer Food Truck & Catering and Lu•Lu Ice Cream satiate friends and families who gather for fun and games. Shacksbury Tasting Room, Vergennes, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, grace@shacksbury.com.

Reggae Night with DJ Big Dog & Jahson

• Built-in promotion • Custom options

MADIE AHRENS 865-1020 ext. 10 tickets@sevendaysvt.com

CALENDAR 57

BIRD MONITORING WALK: Adults and older children don binoculars and keep an eye out for winged wonders. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, 7:30 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 434-2167.

theater

EVENTS EVENTS ON ON SALE SALE NOW! NOW

» P.58 2v-tickets0627.indd 1

SEVEN DAYS

MARSHALL TUCKER BAND: The “Heart It In a Love Song” hitmakers kick off the Stratton Mountain Music summer concert series. Hannah Wicklund & the Steppin Stones open. Stratton Mountain Resort, 6 p.m. $25-30; free for kids 10 and under.

THE GREAT RACE: Ambitious athletes push their limits on a 3.1-mile run, 12-mile bike and 3-mile paddle. St. Albans Bay Park, 10 a.m. $55-135; preregister. Info, 524-2444.

COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS WITH THE CENTER FOR MINDFUL LEARNING: Peaceful people gather for guided meditation and interactive discussions. Burlington Friends Meeting House, 5-7 p.m. $10. Info, assistant@centerfor mindfullearning.org.

06.27.18-07.04.18

GYPSY REEL: The longtime local band taps into Celtic traditions for a high-energy concert. Brandon Music, 7:30 p.m. $20; $45 includes dinner; preregister; BYOB. Info, 247-4295.

SPORTS LIVE IN HD: See THU.28, 10 a.m. & 2 p.m.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

DAVID ROSANE & THE ZOOKEEPERS: The folk-rockprotest band kicks off a benefit tour for 13 Vermont libraries with a spirited recital, a video projection and a meet and greet. Montgomery Center for the Arts, 7 p.m. $10-25. Info, david rosane@gmail.com.

sports

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STOWE FARMERS MARKET: An appetizing assortment of fresh veggies, meats, milk, berries, herbs, beverages and crafts tempts shoppers. Red Barn Shops Field, Stowe, 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, 279-3444.

health & fitness

KARMA YOGA: Attendees practice poses while supporting the Richmond Food Shelf. Balance Yoga, Richmond, 10:30-11:30 a.m. $10; $5 with a food donation. Info, balanceyogavt@gmail.com. MUSIC, YOGA & MEDITATION: Locals loosen up with breathing exercises, asanas and mindfulness practices accompanied by live instrumental sounds. Old Schoolhouse Common, Marshfield, 2-3:15 p.m. $5-15. Info, jmacadam9854@gmail.com. TRADITIONAL YOGA FLOW: Breath accompanies each transition during a vinyasa flow focused on body awareness and self-acceptance. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 9-10:15 a.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com.

montréal

MONTRÉAL INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL: See THU.28. MTL EN ARTS: See WED.27. PIKNIC ÉLECTRONIK MONTRÉAL: DJ sets and beat-driven music

propel a dance party of epic proportions. See piknicelectronik. com for details. Plaine des jeux, Montréal, 2-9:30 p.m. $14.50-119; free for kids 12 and under. Info, 514-904-1247.

music

Find club dates in the music section. BURLINGTON CONCERT BAND: Local musicians present a varied program of show tunes, marches and other classics. BYO blanket or lawn char. Battery Park, Burlington, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, band@burlingtonconcert band.org. MARCOLIVIA & MIHO WEBER & JON WEBER: Performing as Middlebury Chamber Music Festival guest artists, the instrumentalists shine in a concert of duets and string quartets. Champlain Valley Unitarian Universalist Society, Middlebury, 7-8:30 p.m. $15. Info, 989-7538. MYRA FLYNN: Music fans swoon over the indie singer’s soulful stylings. Kingdom All Stars open this Levitt AMP St. Johnsbury Music Series concert. Rain location: Fenton W. Chester Arena. Dog Mountain, St. Johnsbury, 4-7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600. VERMONT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 2018 TD BANK SUMMER FESTIVAL TOUR: The outdoor-inspired program

“Gifts of Nature” culminates in a fireworks display. Suicide Six Ski Area, South Pomfret, gates open for picnicking, 5:30 p.m.; concert, 7:30 p.m. $5-35; free for kids 4 and under with adult ticket purchase. Info, 864-5741. VILLAGE HARMONY TEEN WORLD MUSIC ENSEMBLE: Singers embrace musical traditions from around the globe in a program of international choral music. Strafford Town House, 7:30 p.m. $5-15. Info, 426-3210.

outdoors

MANSFIELD RIDGE HIKE: Outdoor adventurers tackle a difficult 9-mile trek gaining 2,600 feet in elevation. Contact trip leader for details. Free; preregister. Info, 899-9982. PLANT ID WORKSHOP & WALK: With Newcomb’s Guide to the Wildflowers as their tool, outdoorsy types learn to distinguish between different types of flora. Wisdom of the Herbs School, Woodbury, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $15-25. Info, 456-8122.

sports

SPORTS LIVE IN HD: See THU.28, 10 a.m. & 2 p.m.

talks

MICH KABAY: Are online sites responsible for content posted by users? The Norwich University

Find your direction

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

AND FOLLOW IT.

06.27.18-07.04.18

There is still time to apply. Apply today at NorthernVermont.edu/Apply

professor of computer information systems weighs in as part of a lecture series titled “The Politics of Cyberspace.” Jewish Community of Greater Stowe, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 253-1800.

theater

‘ALWAYS ... PATSY CLINE’: See FRI.29, 3 & 7 p.m. ‘GRASSHOPPER REBELLION’: A spirited Bread and Puppet Theater production pulls advice from several prominent revolutions in human history. Bread and Puppet Theater, Glover, 3 p.m. $10. Info, 525-3031.

MON.2 dance

CONTACT IMPROV: See WED.27, Aikido of Champlain Valley, Burlington, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $4. Info, 864-7306.

ADVANCED TAI CHI CLASS: See FRI.29.

etc.

FOOD SHELF YOGA: An all-levels class culminates in a relaxing gong savasana. Partial proceeds benefit the Williston Food Shelf. Balance Yoga, Richmond, 10:3011:45 a.m. $10. Info, balance yogavt@gmail.com.

‘INTO THE WOODS’: See FRI.29, 3 p.m. ‘IT CAN’T HAPPEN HERE’: See FRI.29, 4-6 p.m.

film

‘PATIENCE’: See THU.28.

words

BURLINGTON WOMEN’S POETRY GROUP: Female writers seek feedback from fellow rhyme-and-meter mavens. Email for details. Private residence, Burlington, 3 p.m. Free. Info, jcpoet@bellsouth.net. DANIELLE EVANS: Lit lovers lend their ears for a reading by the visiting fiction writer. College Hall Chapel, Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 828-8600.

ADVANCED SUN-STYLE TAI CHI, LONG-FORM: Elements of qigong thread through the youngest version of the Chinese martial art. Winooski Senior Center, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 735-5467.

SALSA MONDAYS: Dancers learn the techniques and patterns of salsa, merengue, bachata and cha-cha. North End Studio A, Burlington, fundamentals, 7 p.m.; intermediate, 8 p.m. $12. Info, 227-2572.

JOB HUNT HELP: See THU.28, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

‘OUR TOWN’: See WED.27, 3-5:30 p.m.

health & fitness

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘WILD AFRICA 3D’: See WED.27.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.27, 6:30 p.m. MAGIC: THE GATHERING — MONDAY NIGHT MODERN: Tarmogoyf-slinging madness ensues when competitors battle for prizes in a weekly game. Brap’s Magic, Burlington, 6:30-10 p.m. $8. Info, 540-0498.

ALL-LEVELS HATHA YOGA: See WED.27. BONE BUILDERS EXERCISE CLASSES: See WED.27. BUTI YOGA: See WED.27.

GENTLE HONEY FLOW: A slowmoving yoga class awakens the body for the week ahead. Women’s Room, Burlington, 12:15 p.m. $16. Info, beth@prenatalmethod.com. MEDITATION: A group practice including sitting, walking, reading and discussion promotes mindfulness. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com. POWER YOGA: Yogis move, sweat and rock out to fun music. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 6-7 p.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt. com.

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LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

SEATED TAI CHI: Movements are modified for those with arthritis and other chronic conditions. Winooski Senior Center, 11 a.m.noon. Free. Info, 735-5467. TIBETAN YOGA: A cleansing practice leads to greater clarity off the mat. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, noon-1:15 p.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com.

SPANISH GROUP CLASSES: Speakers brush up on their language skills en español. New Moon Café, Burlington, 5-6:30 p.m. $25. Info, maigomez1@ hotmail.com.

montréal

MONTRÉAL INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL: See THU.28.

VETERANS YOGA: FOR THOSE WHO HAVE SERVED: Seasoned practitioners and neophytes alike engage in postures of strength and physicality. Participants may bring a friend or other support person. Sangha Studio — North, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

music

YIN YOGA: See SAT.30, noon-1:15 p.m.

VILLAGE HARMONY TEEN WORLD MUSIC ENSEMBLE: See SUN.1, Unitarian Church of Montpelier, 7:30 p.m.

YOGA ON THE LAKE: See WED.27.

language

ADVANCED-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: Language learners perfect their pronunciation with guest speakers. Private residence, Burlington, 4:30-6 p.m. $20. Info, 324-1757. LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE: Bring a bag lunch to practice the system of communication using visual gestures. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

Find club dates in the music section. VERMONT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 2018 TD BANK SUMMER FESTIVAL TOUR: See SUN.1, Hunter Park, Manchester. Info, 863-5966.

words

JEFFREY THOMAS LEONG: Original excerpts read by the visiting alumni poet and translator captivate audience members. College Hall Chapel, Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 828-8600. MEMOIR CLASS FOR SENIORS 65+: Writing prompts get creative juices flowing in a sixweek program. Call for details. Cathedral Square, Burlington, 1-2:30 p.m. Free; limited space. Info, 859-8849.

READING THROUGH THE BIBLE: Participants gather near the fireplace to peruse the Scriptures. Panera Bread, South Burlington, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 893-6266. WRITING POWER: A WRITING WORKSHOP TO UNLEASH THE WRITER WITHIN: Whether they’re interested in poetry, memoir or fiction, aspiring authors learn practical methods for overcoming obstacles to creativity. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 6-7:45 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

TUE.3

agriculture

HOUSE & FORMAL GARDENS TOUR: See THU.28.

community

dance

BEGINNER WEST COAST SWING & FUSION DANCING: Pupils get schooled in the fundamentals of partner dance. North End Studio B, Burlington, 8-9 p.m. $11-16. Info, burlingtonwestie@gmail.com.

FOMO? Find even more local events in this newspaper and online:

art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film

FEAST TOGETHER OR FEAST TO GO: See FRI.29.

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

crafts

music

COMMUNITY CRAFT NIGHT: Makers stitch, spin, knit and crochet their way through projects while enjoying each other’s company. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211.

Find club dates at local venues in the music section and at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com.

INTERMEDIATE & ADVANCED WEST COAST SWING: Fun-loving folks learn the smooth, sexy stylings of modern swing dance. North End Studio A, Burlington, 7-9 p.m. $11-16. Info, burlingtonwestie@gmail.com. SWING DANCING: Quick-footed participants experiment with different forms, including the Lindy hop, Charleston and balboa. Beginners are welcome. Champlain Club, Burlington, 7:309:30 p.m. $5. Info, 448-2930.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘WILD AFRICA 3D’: See WED.27.

food & drink

THE GRAND KITCHEN: Foodies from across generations sharpen their culinary skills in a class designed for children to learn to cook with a grandparent or another older adult. Vermont Farmers Food Center, Rutland, 1-3 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 786-5990. OLD NORTH END FARMERS MARKET: Locavores score breads, juices, ethnic foods and more from neighborhood vendors. Dewey Park, Burlington, 3-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, oldnorthendfarmersmarket@gmail.com.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.27, 7 p.m.

health & fitness

BEGINNER/INTERMEDIATE SUN-STYLE TAI CHI, LONGFORM: Improved mood, greater muscle strength and increased energy are a few of the benefits of this gentle exercise. South Burlington Recreation & Parks Department, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 735-5467. BEGINNERS TAI CHI CLASS: See THU.28. DE-STRESS YOGA: A relaxing and challenging class lets healthy bodies unplug and unwind. Balance Yoga, Richmond, 5:45-7 p.m. $15. Info, 434-8401. FELDENKRAIS AWARENESS THROUGH MOVEMENT: See FRI.29, 5:30-6:30 p.m. GENTLE FLOW YOGA: See THU.28. GENTLE YOGA WITH TIBETAN BOWLS & CACAO: Breath, movement, sound and a cacao ceremony combine for deep relaxation and self-healing. Balance Yoga, Richmond, 1011:30 a.m. $15. Info, balanceyogavt@gmail.com.

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HATHA YOGA FLOW: This practice provides a great stretch and strengthens the body through a combination of sustained and flowing poses. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 5:30-6:45 p.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com. LOW-IMPACT FITNESS BOOT CAMP: Strength, agility, coordination and heart-healthy exercises are modified for folks of all ability levels. Charlotte Senior Center, 9:15-10 a.m. $10. Info, 343-7160. PEACEFUL WARRIOR KARATE: Martial-arts training promotes healthy living for those in recovery. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150. PILATES: See WED.27, Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 7:30-8:30 a.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com. REIKI CLINIC: Thirty-minute treatments promote physical, emotional and spiritual wellness. JourneyWorks, Burlington, 3-5:30 p.m. $10-30; preregister. Info, 860-6203. R.I.P.P.E.D.: See SAT.30, 6-7 p.m. SUNSET YOGA ON THE LAKE: See THU.28. YOGA AT THE WINOOSKI VFW: Certified instructors guide veterans and their families through a series of poses. Arrive five to 10 minutes early. Second floor, Winooski VFW Hall, 6-7 p.m. Donations. Info, 655-9832. YOGA CORE FOR BABES: See THU.28.

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Find club dates in the music section. CASTLETON SUMMER CONCERTS: The five-member Latin jazz, funk and reggae group brings more than 20 years of experience to the stage. Pavilion, Castleton University, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, 468-6039. OPEN JAM: Instrumentalists band together for a free-flowing musical hour. Borrow an instrument or bring your own. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 300. SHAPE NOTE SING: Locals lend their voices to four-part harmonies at this weekly sing-along of early American music in the “fa-sol-la-mi” tradition. Bread and Puppet Theater, Glover, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 525-6972. VERMONT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 2018 TD BANK SUMMER FESTIVAL TOUR: See SUN.1, Grafton Trails & Outdoor Center. Info, 863-5966. VILLAGE HARMONY TEEN WORLD MUSIC ENSEMBLE: See SUN.1, Heartbeet Lifesharing, Hardwick. WYLD NIGHTZ: An exciting mix of rock and dance music gets listeners moving and grooving. Rain site: Fairlee Town Hall Auditorium. Fairlee Town Common, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, contact@fairleearts.org.

theater

‘OUR TOWN’: See WED.27, 7:3010 p.m.

words

BURLINGTON POETRY GROUP: Writers of verse ages 18 through 30 field constructive feedback on original works. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, btvpoetry@gmail.com.

LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: ITALIAN: Speakers hone their skills in the Romance language over a bag lunch. KelloggHubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

MARY RUEFLE: Lovers of verse revel in a reading by the visiting poet. College Hall Chapel, Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 828-8600.

PAUSE-CAFÉ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Frenchlanguage fanatics meet pour parler la belle langue. Burlington Bay Market & Café, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 430-4652.

STORYTELLING VT: Locals tell true tales before a live audience. Light Club Lamp Shop, Burlington, 7:30-9 p.m. Free. Info, deenastories@gmail.com.

SOCIAL GATHERING: Those who are deaf or hard of hearing or want to learn American Sign Language get together to break down communication barriers. The North Branch Café, Montpelier, 4-6 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 595-4001.

MONTRÉAL INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL: See THU.28.

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‘LA CAUSERIE’ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Native speakers and learners are welcome to pipe up at an unstructured conversational practice. El Gato Cantina, Burlington, 4:30-6 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0195.

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language

music

SUMMER LITERATURE READING SERIES: Ambitious readers cover selected pages of Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 6:308:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104.

WED.4

GUIDED TOURS: See WED.27. SUMMER SMASH: Crashing and bashing ensues during an annual demolition derby. Fireworks follow. Vermont State Fairgrounds, Rutland, 2-9:30 p.m. $11.50-135. Info, 775-5200.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘WILD AFRICA 3D’: See WED.27.

food & drink

BEERLINGTON FOAMERS MARKET: See WED.27. ICE CREAM SOCIAL: Sweets lovers spoon up frozen dairy treats alongside bites of homemade cake and pie. Salisbury Congregational Church, 1:30-4:30 p.m. Cost of food. Info, 352-6671. VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: See WED.27.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.27.

health & fitness

ALL-LEVELS HATHA YOGA: See WED.27. EMPOWERED YOGA FLOW: See WED.27. GENTLE YOGA IN WATERBURY: See WED.27. GINGER’S EXTREME BOOT CAMP: See WED.27. RESTORATIVE YOGA: See WED.27. TOMGIRL WALKING CLUB: See WED.27. YOGA ON THE LAKE: See WED.27.

language

INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: See WED.27.

montréal

MONTRÉAL INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL: See THU.28.

music

Find club dates in the music section. CAPITAL CITY BAND: See WED.27. GUAGUA: African, Caribbean and Brazilian polyrhythms thread through original psychotropical jazz in a Winooski Wednesdays summer concert series performance. A beer garden and free meals for kids 18 and under top off the fun. Rotary Park, Winooski, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 777-1621. VERMONT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 2018 TD BANK SUMMER FESTIVAL TOUR: See SUN.1, Shelburne Museum. Info, 863-5966.

dance

CONTACT IMPROV: See WED.27.

VILLAGE HARMONY TEEN WORLD MUSIC ENSEMBLE: See SUN.1, Grange Hall, Bridgewater, 7 p.m.

DROP-IN HIP-HOP DANCE: See WED.27.

theater

HIP-HOP DANCE: See WED.27.

etc.

A COURSE IN MIRACLES STUDY GROUP: See WED.27.

‘OUR TOWN’: See WED.27. m


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

Bakersfield

BAKERSFIELD INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATION:

Spirits run high at a community celebration complete with a parade, chicken barbecue, air show, cow-plop contest and fireworks at dusk.

INDEPENDENCE DAY

July 7, 9 a.m.-10 p.m., intersection of Route 108 and Route 36. Free. Info, 827-6145, sites.google.com/ view/bakersfieldvermont.

South Londonberry

MOUNTAIN FRIENDS & FREEDOM: Families fête

Independence Day with fireworks, hikes, gondola rides, live music, barbecues and more. June 29-July 2, Stratton Mountain Resort. Prices vary. Info, 800-787-2886, stratton.com.

St. Albans

Barre

Thunder Road Speed Bowl. $3-25; free for kids 5 and under. Info, 244-6963, thunderroadspeedbowl.com.

BAY DAY: An annual bash begins with the Great Race, a 3.1-mile run, 12-mile bike and 3-mile canoe race. Town celebrations continue with live music, outdoor sports and a sparkling fireworks display at dusk. June 30, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., St. Albans Bay Park. Free; $55-135 for the Great Race. Info, 524-2444, fcrccvt.com.

Barton

Stowe

AUBUCHON HARDWARE HOLIDAY SPECTACULAR:

Thrill seekers watch racetrack action before an awe-inspiring fireworks show. July 3, 7 p.m.,

JULY FOURTH EVENTS: Agricultural amusements

— ranging from a tractor pull to a professional lumberjack roundup — kick off the festivities. A grand parade at 2 p.m. leads from downtown to the fairgrounds; fireworks follow at dusk. July 4,

9 a.m.-dusk, Orleans County Fairgrounds. $8; free for kids under 10. Info, orleanscountyfair.net.

20

18

Brandon

BRANDON INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATION:

The fun begins on Friday with a family-friendly street dance. Saturday’s revelers find a silent auction, a parade, live music by Moose Crossing and fireworks bursting over the village at sunset. July 6, 6-10 p.m., and July 7, all day, various Brandon locations. Free. Info, 247-3635, brandon.org.

Bristol

BRISTOL FOURTH OF JULY: The small town cel-

ebrates the fourth in a big way with DJ’ed tunes, games, crafts and a bright lights show ending Tuesday evening with a bang. The Great Bristol Outhouse Race, a 5K road race and a parade extend the fun to Wednesday. July 3, 6 p.m.-dusk, and July 4, 7:30 a.m., various downtown locations. Free; additional cost for some activities. Info, cecil@gmavt.net, bristol4th.com.

Burlington

BURLINGTON INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATION:

Colchester

COLCHESTER FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION:

East Burke

Essex Junction

Milton

Warren

of popular songs amid a family-friendly activities such as games, face painting and an obstacle course. Rain location: Essex Skating Facility. Fireworks, 9:30 p.m. July 4, 6 p.m., Maple Street Park. Free. Info, 878-1375, ejrp.org.

and live music by the Milton Community Band culminate in a spectacular fireworks display. July 4, 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Bombardier Park West. Free. Info, 893-6655.

to attend this wild and wacky parade. After, they move and groove to live music, enjoy kids’ activities, and gaze at dazzling fireworks come nightfall. July 4, 10 a.m., various Warren locations. $1. Info, 498-8545, madrivervalley.com.

TREVOR CONTOIS AND FRIENDS perform covers

MILTON JULY FOURTH INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATION: A parade, a chicken barbecue

Fairfax

Montpelier

two-mile parade route leads to vendors, activities and the always-popular Ducky Race at the recreation park. July 4, 1 p.m., Fairfax Community Park. Free; additional cost for Ducky Race. Info, 849-6111, ext. 20, fairfaxrecreation.com.

Patriots catch competitive games, food and craft vendors, the Montpelier Mile foot race, a parade, a concert, and a fireworks show. July 3, 3-11 p.m., downtown Montpelier. Free; $5-15 for the Montpelier Mile. Info, 223-9604, montpelieralive.org.

FOURTH OF JULY PARADE & COMMUNITY DAY: A

Greensboro

FUNKY FOURTH: A lively procession gives

way to activities on the green. July 7, 11 a.m., Greensboro Town Hall Green. Free. Info, 5332911, greensborovt.org.

Hinesburg

HINESBURG’S OLD HOME WEEK: Six days of revelry — think a parade, a book sale, a barbecue and live music — culminate in a dazzling fireworks presentation on Independence Day. June 29-July 4, various Hinesburg locations. Prices vary. Info, 482-2281, hinesburg.org.

Jeffersonville

AN OLD-FASHIONED TOWN PARADE kicks off fami-

JULY THIRD INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATION:

Newport

NEWPORT JULY FOURTH CELEBRATION: Families

enjoy this spirited shindig featuring music, a parade, kids’ activities, food and, naturally, fireworks. Don’t miss the infamous bed races. July 4, 4-10 p.m., Gardner Memorial Park. Free. Info, 334-6345, newportrecreation.org.

Richmond

RICHMOND FOURTH OF JULY COMMUNITY CELEBRATION: A spectacular show in the sky

follows a flea market, a parade, a car show, a fun run, a duck race and more. July 4, 9:00 a.m.-dusk, Richmond Town Park. Free. Info, 434-2221, users. gmavt.net/blackfork/4th-of-July/home.html.

ly-friendly entertainment complete with live music, kids’ games and a frog-jumping contest. Head to Smugglers’ Notch Resort at 5 p.m. for the Firemen’s Barbecue on the Green, patriotic music by the Vermont National Guard 40th Army Band and mountaintop fireworks. July 4, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., various Jeffersonville locations. Prices vary. Info, 332-6854, smuggs.com.

Rutland

Middlebury

Shelburne

VERMONT PHILHARMONIC POPS CONCERT:

Lou Kosma conducts a program of Broadway standards, film favorites and patriotic numbers, featuring guest vocalist Marc Dalio. A fireworks show follows. July 2, grounds open for picnicking, 5:30 p.m.; concert, 7:30 p.m., lawn, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College. Rain location: Kenyon Arena. $10-25; free for kids under 12. Info, 388-2117, henrysheldonmuseum.org.

FOURTH OF JULY FIREWORKS EXTRAVAGANZA:

Award-winning fireworks at 9:45 p.m. cap off Summer Smash 2018, which includes a flea market, concessions and a demolition derby. July 4, 9:45 p.m., Vermont State Fairgrounds. Free. Info, 773-2747, rutlandvermont.com.

AUCTION, CHICKEN BARBECUE & WHITE ELEPHANT SALE: In a long-standing tradi-

tion, the church hosts an auction and bazaar, followed by its famed chicken barbecue with all the fixings. July 4, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Shelburne United Methodist Church. Cost of meal. Info, 985-3981, shelburneumc.org.

WARREN FOURTH OF JULY PARADE & FESTIVITIES: Thousands don red, white and blue

Waterbury

NOT QUITE INDEPENDENCE DAY FESTIVAL:

Families fête the holiday with a parade, lawn games, food trucks, a beer tent, live music and explosions in the sky. June 30, 2 p.m., various Waterbury locations. Donations. Info, waterburynqid.com.

West Haven

FIRECRACKER SPECTACULAR: Racing fans gather at the track for automotive adventures followed by an epic fireworks celebration. July 3, 6 p.m., Devil’s Bowl Speedway. $5-35; free for kids 12 and under. Info, 265-3112, devilsbowlspeed wayvt.com.

Williston

WILLISTON JULY FOURTH CELEBRATION: Families get into the patriotic spirit with an ice cream social and the Firecracker 5K Fun Run. On Wednesday, a parade, kids’ activities and music pave the way for fireworks at dusk. July 3, 6 p.m., and July 4, 10 a.m.-dusk, various Williston locations. $20-25 for 5K. Info, 876-1160, willistonrec.org.

Woodstock

OLD VERMONT FOURTH: Celebrate the Fourth

the old-fashioned way — with wagon rides, sack races, a spelling bee and a reading of the Declaration of Independence. July 4, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Billings Farm & Museum. Regular admission, $4-16; free for members and kids under 3. Info, 457-2355, billingsfarm.org. WOODSTOCK JULY FOURTH: Independence Day starts off on the right foot with a road race, followed by live music, a community cookout, a flag ceremony and booming fireworks at dusk. July 4, 10 a.m.-dusk, various Woodstock locations. Prices vary. Info, 457-3456, townof woodstock.org. 

CALENDAR 61

INDEPENDENCE DAY FIREWORKS: One of the largest fireworks displays in the Northeast Kingdom comes complete with family fun, live music, scenic chairlift rides and mouthwatering eats. Rain date: July 8. July 7, 5-10 p.m., Burke Mountain Resort. $5. Info, 626-7300, skiburke.com.

ahh as fireworks illuminate the evening sky above the Red Mill Restaurant. July 3, 8-8:30 p.m., Basin Harbor. Free. Info, 475-2311, basinharbor.com.

SEVEN DAYS

Amateur athletes make strides at a fun run, then take in a Main Street parade and an evening concert before a fireworks finale at Bayside Park. July 4, 8 a.m.-10 p.m., various Colchester locations. Free; $5 for fun run. Info, 264-5640, colchestervt.gov.

VERGENNES FIREWORKS SHOW: Folks ooh and

06.27.18-07.04.18

Live bands and fun-filled activities set the scene for spectacular fireworks over Lake Champlain. July 3, food and activities, 5 p.m.; fireworks, 9:30 p.m., various waterfront locations. Free. Info, 864-0123, btvjuly3.com. ROCK THE DECK: A festive fundraiser for the McConnell Scholarship Fund features food and drink, dancing and front-row seating for the Burlington fireworks show. July 3, 6:30-11 p.m., Community Sailing Center. $35-850. Info, 8642499, communitysailingcenter.org.

Vergennes

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

INDEPENDENCE DAY FLYER: Choo-choo! To bypass traffic and parking hassles, folks hop aboard a train headed for the waterfront fireworks. Trains run between Charlotte and Burlington, with stops in Shelburne and South Burlington. July 3, various times and locations. $15; free for lap riders under 3. Info, 800-7073530, trainridesvt.com.

C E L E B R AT I O N S

AN OLD-FASHIONED FOURTH OF JULY: This daylong celebration begins with a Moscow parade. An Old-Fashioned Village Festival complete with street performers, local artisans and a climbing wall follows. The fun continues at Mayo Farm at 6 p.m., with fireworks at dusk. July 3, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., various Stowe locations. Free. Info, 253-7321, gostowe.com.


The 16th Annual

READERS’ PICKS

YOU REALLY

ROCKED THE VOTE!

LISTEN EVERY DAY FOR PRIZES, GIVEAWAYS, TICKETS AND MORE!

What’s next?

The results will be included in the August 1 issue of Seven Days. So until then, sit tight and try not to explode with anticipation.

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06.27.18-07.04.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

More than 20,000 people participated this year — doubling our previous record.

Your home for Classic Hip Hop.

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CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES

classes THE FOLLOWING CLASS LISTINGS ARE PAID ADVERTISEMENTS. ANNOUNCE YOUR CLASS FOR AS LITTLE AS $16.75/WEEK (INCLUDES SIX PHOTOS AND UNLIMITED DESCRIPTION ONLINE). SUBMIT YOUR CLASS AD AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTCLASS.

agriculture HERITAGE POULTRY, FRANK REESE: Explore the pitfalls of America’s No. 1 white meat with expert breeder Frank Reese from Good Shepherd Poultry Ranch. Frank specializes in heritage breeds and has a lot to say about modern production practices, bird health and genetics, and the impact on humans consuming them. Frank’s farm is highlighted in the movie “Eating Animals” now in theaters. Fri., Jun. 20, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost: $35/person; all course materials & lunch incl. Location: Sterling College, 16 Sterling Dr, Craftsbury Common. Info: School of the New American Farmstead, 802-586-7711-163, NewAmericanFarmstead@ sterlingcollege.edu, sterling college.edu/snaf.

silver gelatin prints. Students will leave with the skills and confidence to join the darkroom as a member. All film, paper and darkroom supplies included. Bring your manual 35mm or medium-format-film camera to the first class. Instructor: Rebecca Babbitt. No experience necessary. Mon., Jul. 23-Aug. 13, 6-9 p.m. Cost: $180/person; $162/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 802-865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

fitness dance

DSANTOS VT DANCE CLASSES: New classes, new location! Come join the fun. Weekly classes in salsa, bachata, kizomba, kuduro. No partner or experience needed. Beginner drop-in classes. Salsa, Mon., 7-8 p.m.; Kizomba, Wed., 8-9 p.m.; Bachata, Thu., 6-7 p.m. Cost: $15/1-hour class. Location: Dsantos VT Dance Studio, 294 N. Winooski Ave., Unit 112A, Burlington. Info: Jon Bacon, 802227-2572, dsantosvt.com.

culinary ART & SCIENCE OF CRAFT BREWING: Take your brewing to the next level! A mix of profound science, brewing artistry and wild tales from Danish

POLE DANCE FITNESS : Come try pole dancing at Bohemienne Fitness in Burlington! Absolute beginners are welcome to join our fun-loving dance community. Gain strength and flexibility with this mesmerizing form of dance fitness. We know you’ve always wanted to try it! Buy a pass and register online at polefitvt.

R.I.P.P.E.D.: This total body program, utilizing free weights and body weight, combines resistance, intervals, power, plyometrics, endurance and core. With motivating music, participants jam through R.I.P.P.E.D. with smiles, determination and strength. For all levels, R.I.P.P.E.D. is effective and tough yet doable; R.I.P.P.E.D. will absolutely challenge your levels of fitness and endurance! Tue., 6-7 p.m. & Sat., 9-10 a.m. Cost: $10/1hour class. Location: North End Studio A, 294 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: Tweak Your Physique, Stephanie Shohet, 802-578-9243, steph.shohet@ gmail.com, rippedplanet.com/ instructor/stephanie_shohet.

flynn arts

ACTIVIST THEATER: FOOD & SOCIAL JUSTICE THEATER CAMP: Ages 11-14. Instructors: Allison Talis & Chelsea Frisbee. Experience food justice firsthand at the Intervale Center, “Burlington’s Central Park.” Campers learn about farms, gardens, and Intervale Gleaning and Food Rescue, one of Vermont’s FLYNN ARTS

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CLASSES 63

PASTEL WORKSHOP: Spend an evening in our drawing and painting studio with versatile and colorful pastels. In this fun, one-night class you’ll discover basic drawing and blending techniques to create an abstract or realistic piece of paper that you’ll be excited to bring home. All basic materials included. No

TINY-HOUSE WORKSHOP: A crew of beginners will help instructor Peter King frame and sheath a 16-foot x 20-foot tiny house in Jeffersonville. Plenty of hands-on experience. Tools provided; safety glasses required. On-site camping avail. Jun. 30-Jul. 1. Cost: $250/workshop. Info: Peter King, 802-933-6103, vermonttinyhouses.com.

TAIKO AND DJEMBE CLASSES IN BURLINGTON!: New drumming sessions begin weeks of Mar. 3 and May 1. Taiko for Adults: Tue., 5:30-6:20 p.m.; Wed., 6:30-8:20 p.m. Djembe for Adults: Wed., 5:30-6:20 p.m. Taiko for Kids and Parents: Tue., 4:305:20 p.m. Djembe for Kids and Parents: Wed., 4:30-5:20 p.m. Drums provided. Conga classes, too! Online schedule, registration. Location: Taiko Space, 208 Flynn Ave., Suite 3G, Burlington. Info: 802-999-4255, burlingtontaiko.org.

DANCE STUDIO SALSALINA: Salsa classes, nightclub-style, group and private, four levels. Beginner walk-in classes, Wed., 6 p.m. $15/person for one-hour class. No dance experience, partner or preregistration required, just the desire to have fun! Drop in anytime and prepare for an enjoyable workout. Location: 266 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Victoria, 802-598-1077, info@salsalina.com.

MACRO PHOTOGRAPHY: Learn how to use your digital camera to see and share the wonder found in small and often unnoticed details in the natural world! In this four-week class, participants will learn how to train their eyes to see tiny subjects out in nature, to figure out the macro capabilities of their cameras, and to compose a visually compelling photograph. Classes will be a mix of outdoor photo shoots and in-class group discussions. Point and shoot and DSLR cameras are both welcome. No experience necessary. Instructor: Laura Hale. Thu., Jul. 12-Aug. 2, 4-6 p.m. Cost: $120/ person; $108/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 802-8657166, burlington cityarts.org.

design/build

drumming

craft NATURAL HIDE TANNING, LEATHER: Learn how to transform raw animal skins into beautiful, functional buckskin leather without the use of toxic chemicals. In this course, you will be guided through each step of the wet-scrape tanning process. Skinned hides, all materials and lunch daily included in price. Daily, Mon., Jul. 30-Fri., Aug. 3, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost: $750/person; all materials & lunch daily incl. Location: Sterling College, 16 Sterling Dr., Craftsbury Common. Info: Weylin Garnett, 802-586-7711163, NewAmericanFarmstead@ sterlingcollege.edu, sterling college.edu/course/natural-hidetanning-leather-crafting.

com. Fri, 6:45-7:45 p.m. Cost: $15/class. Special: 2 Intro to Pole classes for $30. Location: North End Studio B, 294 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: Bohemienne Fitness, 321-4392275, polefitvt.com.

SEVEN DAYS

DARKROOM CRASH COURSE: Explore the traditional, analog black-and-white darkroom! Learn how to properly expose black-and-white film, process film into negatives, and make

DOCUMENTARY STORYTELLING: Learn how to tell a compelling story with your photographs! This six-week class will introduce participants to the process of documentary storytelling and include discussions of subject matter, composition, editing and story structure. Group discussions and critiques as well as shooting assignments and writing exercises will give participants the opportunity to begin a new photographic

WATERCOLOR: Learn to paint with watercolor. This class focuses on observational painting from still life, figure, landscape and photos. Students will paint on watercolor paper and will gain experience with composition, color theory, layering, light and shade. The class may move outdoors to paint en plein air on beautiful days. No experience necessary. Price includes all basic materials. Instructor: Janet Armentano. Thu., Jul. 12-Aug. 2, 6-8:30 p.m. Cost: $150/person; $135 BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 802865-7166, burlington cityarts.org.

brewmasters Anders Kissmeyer and Jan Paul’s careers are sure to up your brewing game.This eight-day intensive features exclusive tours by the founders of Hill Farmstead, Alchemist and Lost Nation breweries. Daily, Tue., Jul. 24-Thu., Aug. 2, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. No class over the weekend. Cost: $2,100/person; incl. all course materials & daily meals. Affordable housing avail. on campus. Location: Sterling College, 16 Sterling Dr., Craftsbury Common. Info: Weylin Garnett, 802-586-7711163, NewAmericanFarmstead@ sterlingcollege.edu, sterlingcollege.edu/course/ the-art-science-of-brewing-2.

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Call 865-7166 for info or register online at burlingtoncityarts.org. Teacher bios are also available online.

DIGITAL SLR CAMERA: Explore the basic workings of the digital SLR camera and learn how to take the photographs you envision. Demystify f-stops, shutter speeds, sensitivity ratings and exposure, and analyze the basics of composition. Bring your camera and owner’s manual to the first class. Prerequisite: No experience necessary. Instructor: Liza Semler. Thu., Jul. 12-Aug. 16, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Cost: $180/ person; $162/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine Street, Burlington. Info: 802865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

experience necessary. Instructor: Janet Armentano. Jul. 25, 6-9 p.m. Cost: $25/person; $22.50/ BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 802-865-7166, burlington cityarts.org.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

burlington city arts

HIGH SCHOOL PHOTOGRAPHY INSTITUTE: Immerse yourself in the photographic process and develop your artistic vision in this dynamic one-week program! Students will use both the traditional darkroom and the digital lab to create a portfolio of quality images. Instruction in film and digital shooting methods, darkroom printing, image processing in Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom, group photo shoots, and more will be covered throughout the week. Experience in photography is not required to participate. Scholarships available. Option 1: Jul. 9-12, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Option 2: Aug. 13-17, 8 a.m. -3 p.m. Ages: 15-18. Cost: $360/ person; $324/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 802-8657166, burlingtoncityarts.org. LIFE DRAWING DROP-IN: Spend the evening with other local artists drawing one of our experienced models. Please bring your drawing materials and paper. All materials must be water soluble and solvent free. No registration required. Instructor: Carolyn Zuaro. Fri., Jul. 13-Aug. 17, 7:30-9 p.m. Cost: $10/person; $9/BCA members. Purchase a drop-in card and get the sixth visit free! Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 802-8657166, burlingtoncityarts. org.

art REWILD YOUR ART!: Renew your creative nature! Craft art tools and materials directly from the wild. Make paint from stones; brushes from furs, feathers, fibers; pens from wooded and winged critters; inks from plants; and charcoal from trees. Daily, Mon., Jul. 16-Fri., Jul. 20. Cost: $750/person; all course materials & daily lunch incl.; low-cost housing avail. on campus. Location: Sterling College, 16 Sterling Dr., Craftsbury Common. Info: Weylin Garnett, 802-586-7711-163, NewAmericanFarmstead@sterlingcollege.edu, sterlingcollege. edu/course/rewild-art-makingpaint-ink-landscape.

project or refine works in progress. Film or digital photography acceptable. Prerequisite: DSLR camera or equivalent knowledge. Instructor: Liza Semler. Mon., Jul. 9-Aug. 13, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Cost: $180/person; $162/BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 802-865-7166, burlingtoncity arts.org.


CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES

classes THE FOLLOWING CLASS LISTINGS ARE PAID ADVERTISEMENTS. ANNOUNCE YOUR CLASS FOR AS LITTLE AS $16.75/WEEK (INCLUDES SIX PHOTOS AND UNLIMITED DESCRIPTION ONLINE). SUBMIT YOUR CLASS AD AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTCLASS.

FLYNN ARTS

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fast-growing food-access projects. The week culminates with a performance created by students based on their learning throughout the camp. In partnership with Intervale. Mon.-Fri., Jul. 23-27, 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Cost: $325. Location: Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: 802-6524537, flynncenter.org.

on your improvisational and ensemble skills with acclaimed trombonist George Voland. Campers perform for friends and family in FlynnSpace at week’s end. Mon.-Fri., Aug. 6-10, 8:3011:30 a.m. Cost: $200/person; incl. jazz performance ticket. Location: Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: 802-652-4537, flynncenter.org.

BALLET LEVEL I & II: For teens and adults. Instructor: Elizabeth Brody. Mon., Jun. 4-Jul. 23. Level I: 5:30-6:30 p.m. Level II: 6:45-7:45 p.m. Cost: $110/8week series; drop-ins welcome, $15/1-hour class. Location: Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: 802-652-4537, flynncenter.org.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 06.27.18-07.04.18 SEVEN DAYS 64 CLASSES

DISNEY’S FROZEN KIDS THEATER CAMP: Ages 9-13. Instructor: Tim Maynes. Come act, sing and dance with us as we mount a workshop production of Disney’s Frozen Kids, a 30-minute musical adapted and developed exclusively for elementary and middle school students. This musical theater camp culminates in one of the first select pilot productions of this new show in the country. Mon.-Fri., Aug. 6-10, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost: $350/person. Location: Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: 802-652-4537, flynncenter.org. JAZZ IMPROV. FOR BEGINNERS: Ages 8-12 (Recommended for students who have played for a minimum of one year). Instructor: George Voland. Want to join your school’s jazz band or play in a jazz combo? Work

complete information or contact us for details. Location: Spanish in Waterbury Center, Waterbury Center. Info: 802-585-1025, spanishparavos@gmail.com, spanishwaterburycenter. com.

generator

LEARN JAPANESE ARCHERY: Train to take your “first shot” in Kyudo, one of the oldest arts of the Japanese tradition of contemplative warriorship. Working with the precision of the form, a natural process unfolds through which the practitioner has the opportunity to see the mind more clearly. The target is heart and mind. Jun. 29-Jul. 1. Cost: $305/person; incl. meals. Location: Karme Choling Meditation Retreat Center, 369 Patneaude Ln., Barnet. Info: Guest Services, 802-633-2384, marketing@karmecholing.org, karmecholing.org/programs.

BOOK SAFE: Book safes are easy for their owners to recognize, but they do not stand out to a thief or other intruder. The laser cutter is the perfect tool to create the negative space for an object. Students will work in Adobe Illustrator to create designs and will leave with 2-3 hideaway books. Learn more about classes at generatorvt. com/classes. Mon., Aug. 13-20, 6-8:30 p.m. Location: Generator, 40 Sears Ln., 05401. Info: 802-540-0761. KINETIC SCULPTURE WORKSHOP: Kinetic workshop for hands-on learners. You will be exploring natural, electronic and mechanical ways to create movement. We will experiment, design and build kinetic sculptures in a fun group environment. Learn more about classes at generatorvt. com/classes. Sat., Jul. 14, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Location: Generator, 40 Sears Ln., Burlington. Info: 802-540-0761.

BURLESQUE LEVEL I & II: For ages 18+. Instructor: Doctor Vu. Mon., Jun. 4-Jul. 23, Level I: 7-8 p.m. Cost: $110/8-week series; drop-ins welcome, $15/1-hour class. Location: Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: 802-652-4537, flynncenter.org. CABARET JAZZ EXTRAVAGANZA: For teens and adults. Instructors: Isaac Euler & Hanna Satterlee. Tue., Jun. 5-Jul. 17 (no class Jul. 3), 6-7 p.m. Cost: $80/6-week series; dropins welcome, $15/1-hour class. Location: Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: 802-652-4537, flynncenter.org.

STREET JAZZ AND HIP-HOP FUSION: For teens and adults. Instructor: Rose Bedard. Thu., Jun. 14-Jul. 26, 5:30-7 p.m. Cost: $140/7-week series; drop-ins welcome, $22.50/1.5-hour class. Location: Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: 802-652-4537, flynncenter.org.

LATIN JAZZ INTENSIVE: Ages 13+. Instructors: Ray Vega & Alex Stewart. A team of instructors joins camp director and founder Alex Stewart to inspire students to reach new heights of creativity and proficiency, with rich opportunities to hone individual skills and master the cooperative team effort of live performance. Students work with jazz trumpet luminary and program founder Ray Vega and a variety of other artist-educators. Mon.-Fri., Aug. 6-10, 12:30-5 p.m. Cost: $315/ person; incl. jazz performance ticket. Location: Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, 153 Main Street, Burlington. Info: 802652-4537, flynncenter.org. SENSORY ADVENTURES CAMP: Ages 5-18. Instructor: Kat Redniss. Designed for young people on the autism spectrum and with sensory sensitivities in mind, Sensory Adventures provides a safe and creative environment to explore, discover, interact, connect and play. Mon.Fri., Jul. 16-20, 12-3 p.m. Cost: $200/person. Location: Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: 802-652-4537, flynncenter.org.

LASER CUTTER MATERIAL EXPLORATION: Learn how to design and create products with an Epilog laser cutter. This class will guide you through the creative process, from concept sketches to laser cutting the finished piece with a 60-watt CO2 laser. Learn more about classes at generatorvt.com/ classes. Mon., Jul. 9-30, 6-8:30 p.m. Location: Generator, 40 Sears Ln., Burlington. Info: 802-540-0761. VR-3D PRINTING: Virtual reality makes it possible to create something from literally nothing! Using virtual reality (HTC vive) you will create your own 3D sculptures and bring them to life! Learn more about classes at generatorvt.com/classes. Sun., Jul. 22, 1-4 p.m. Location: Generator, 40 Sears Ln., Burlington. Info: 802-540-0761.

language LEARN SPANISH OR ENGLISH, SWC: We provide high-quality, affordable instruction in the Spanish language for adults, students and children. Travelers’ lesson package. Small classes or private lessons. Our online English classes are live, engaging face-to-face interactions, not computer exercises. In our 12th year. See our website for

yoga EVOLUTION YOGA: Practice yoga in a down-to-earth atmosphere with some of the most experienced teachers and therapeutic professionals in Burlington. New this summer: Yoga on the Lake, 7-8 a.m., four days per week; and Yoga on the Deck overlooking the lake, Tue. and Thu., 7:15-8:15 p.m. All lake classes are at the Community Sailing Center. Daily drop-in classes including $5 community classes, Yoga Wall and Yoga Therapeutics classes led by physical therapists. Dive deeper into your practice or register for our Yoga Teacher Training for Healthcare Providers. $5-$15/ class; $140/10-class card; $5-10/ community class. Location: Evolution Yoga, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington. Info: 802-864-9642, evolutionvt.com.

martial arts

MARTIAL WAY : Colchester and Milton locations. Classes in selfdefense, karate, kung fu, jiu jitsu and tai chi. We have 14 different age and experience levels, so the training is always age- and skill-appropriate. Beginner or experienced, fit or not yet, young or not anymore, we have a class for you! Days and evenings; see website for schedule and fees. Location: Martial Way Self Defense Center, 73 Prim Rd., Colchester, Colchester. Info: David Quinlan, 802-893-8893, info@martialwayvt.com, martialwayvt.com. VERMONT BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU: Brazilian jiujitsu is a martial arts combat style based entirely on leverage and technique. Brazilian jiujitsu self-defense curriculum is taught to Navy SEALs, CIA, FBI, military police and special forces. No training experience required. Easy-to-learn techniques that could save your life! Classes for men, women and children. Students will learn realistic bully-proofing and self-defense life skills to avoid them becoming victims and help them feel safe and secure. Our sole purpose is to help empower people by

giving them realistic martial arts training practices they can carry with them throughout life. IBJJF & CBJJ certified black belt sixthdegree Instructor under Carlson Gracie Sr.: teaching in Vermont, born and raised in Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. A five-time Brazilian National Champion; International World Masters Champion and IBJJF World Masters Champion. Accept no Iimitations! Location: Vermont Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, 55 Leroy Rd., Williston. Info: 802598-2839, julio@bjjusa.com, vermontbjj.com.

meditation LEARN TO MEDITATE: Taught by qualified meditation instructors at the Burlington Shambhala Meditation Center: Wed., 6-7 p.m.; Sun., 9 a.m.-noon. Free and open to anyone. Free public meditation weeknights 6-7 p.m.; Tue. and Thu., noon-1 p.m.; Sun. 9 a.m.-noon. Classes and retreats also offered. See our website at burlington.shambhala.org. Location: Burlington Shambhala Center, 187 S. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 802-658-6795.

tai chi SNAKE-STYLE TAI CHI CHUAN: The Yang Snake Style is a dynamic tai chi method that mobilizes the spine while stretching and strengthening the core body muscles. Practicing this ancient martial art increases strength, flexibility, vitality, peace of mind and martial skill. Beginner classes Sat. mornings & Wed. evenings. Call to view a class. Location: Bao Tak Fai Tai Chi Institute, 100 Church St., Burlington. Info: 802-864-7902, ipfamilytaichi.org.

HONEST YOGA: Honest yoga offers heated yoga for all levels. We hold yoga teacher trainings at the 200- and 500-hour levels, as well as children and dance teacher courses. (YTT includes FREE unlimited membership) Yoga and dance classes for ages 2 and up in our two beautiful practice spaces! Your children can practice in one room while you practice in the other. No need for childcare. Brand-new beginners’ course: This includes two specialty classes per week for four weeks plus unlimited access to all classes. We have daily heated and alignment classes, and kids classes in yoga and dance. Check out our website for dance classes and yoga Summer Camps. Daily classes & workshops. $50/new student (1 month unlimited); $18/class; $145/10-class card; or $110/10-class punch student/ senior/military card; $135/mo. adult memberships; $99/mo. kid memberships. Location: Honest Yoga Center, 150 Dorset St., Blue Mall, next to Eco Bean, South Burlington. Info: 802-497-0136, honestyogastudio@gmail.com, honestyogacenter.com. SANGHA STUDIO | NONPROFIT, DONATION-BASED YOGA: Sangha Studio builds an empowered community through the shared practice of yoga. Free yoga service initiatives and outreach programs are offered at 17 local organizations working with all ages. Join Sangha in both downtown Burlington and the Old North End for one of their roughly 60 weekly classes and workshops. Become a Sustaining Member for $60/month and practice as often as you like! Daily. Location: Sangha Studio, 120 Pine St. and 237 North Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 802-448-4262, Info@sangha studio.org.


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ADMISSION & $25 PARKING TO SUPPORT BRANCHES OF HOPE CANCER PATIENT FUND

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Introducing BERNER IPA: Fresh out of the studio with a new track of tropical fruit and citrus hop flavors coming from a chorus of Galaxy, Citra, Simcoe and Cascade hops. SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Can you name the three branches of government?

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DOGOODFEST.COM

06.27.18-07.04.18 SEVEN DAYS

In 2016, the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania found that only a quarter of all adults surveyed could name all three branches of government; a third could not name a single one. Help Seven Days and Kids VT raise the profile of civics education by encouraging your kids (or kids you know) to complete the Good Citizen Challenge — a fun and educational summer activity for Vermont’s youth. Get started at goodcitizenvt.com with support from:

powered by:

ANSWER: EXECUTIVE, LEGISLATIVE, JUDICIAL

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Andy Bouchard in front of the Barrage

music

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 06.27.18-07.04.18 SEVEN DAYS 66 MUSIC

epending on where you’re coming from, you’re likely to spend a good while in the car to get to the Barrage in Holland, Vt. But for those whose greatest prize at the end of a journey is a memorable concert experience, the off-the-grid concert venue in the Northeast Kingdom is a worthy road trip. Along the way, plenty of Vermont’s wonders await: fields of wildflowers, winding rivers, derelict buildings, cows parading from barn to pasture, dense stretches of forest. At the last leg of the trek, a small sign reading “rock and roll” points travelers in the right direction along a dirt road toward a modest house, next to which is an unassuming outbuilding: the Barrage. The makeshift venue has become a hub for the closeknit scene and community that owner Andy Bouchard is fostering in an effort to fill a musical void in the NEK. On a recent summer evening in late June, a crowd gathered to see a trio of acts: NEK singer-songwriter Kyle Woolard (of the Charlottesville, Va., group the Anatomy of Frank), Denverbased pop-punk band the Windermeres, and Burlington rockers Clever Girls. As bands and guests arrived in dribs and drabs, a sense of familiarity set in. Some folks pitched in to help set up chairs and get things ready. Bouchard’s girlfriend, Maire Folan, laid out a complimentary taco buffet. A chubby

BY JORDAN ADAMS

Clever Girls at the Barrage

orange-and-white cat named Milky greeted visitors at a nearby picnic table. The vibe was like that of a family reunion or neighborhood cookout — that is, if your family or neighbors happened to include the hip local and touring bands that typically play the Barrage. Bouchard, 35, is a South Burlington native who purchased his current home in 2007, when he started teaching special education at North Country Union High School. But he’s only been running the Barrage, a portmanteau of “barn” and “garage,” since August 2017. Earlier that

PHOTOS: JORDAN ADAMS

FAR OUT D

The Barrage brings eclectic, DIY concerts to the Northeast Kingdom

year, he’d returned to booking shows after years of inactivity — the Castleton University alum was a talent booker at his alma mater. Now, Bouchard books shows at various locations under the name Borderline Entertainment, a reference to the fact that his land sits literally at the edge of the country. From his house, you can walk through the woods to the Canadian border. Feeling inspired by some off-the-grid shows in Burlington — not to mention his slight frustration with the sparse and disparate scene in his neck of the woods

— Bouchard decided to take matters into his own hands. “I realized I’ve got this place right here,” he said, gesturing at the wooden outbuilding-cum-rock-club. By no means is the NEK a musical desert. Between Greensboro’s Highland Center for the Arts, Catamount Arts in St. Johnsbury and year-round concerts at Jay Peak Resort — not to mention smaller shops such as Parker Pie Co. in West Glover and Newport’s Jasper’s Tavern — area residents have access to quite a bit of entertainment. But those places are far flung, and their lineups generally don’t hit Bouchard’s strike zone in terms of the types of entertainment he’s most interested in seeing. “I try to [put together] a diverse bill,” he said, noting his desire to book “really modern music that you would not see or hear” outside of bigger regional markets. In 2017, Bouchard overhauled the outbuilding, which had been used as an auto garage decades before he acquired the property. Its interior balances grit with hominess. Visitors find a collection of books, bric-a-brac, Bouchard’s family’s athletic equipment, and signatures from the artists who’ve played there — these scrawled across a staircase leading up to a loft. On the building’s façade, a cattle skull affixed below a red floodlight adds a quirky, David Lynchian atmosphere. FAR OUT

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GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

MON 7.2

The Anatomy of Frank

and keyboardist/percussionist JENNIFER GROSSI, brings its gothic-tinged folk-rock to a string of Vermont libraries and other locations throughout July and August. The tour kicks off on Saturday, June 30, at the Montgomery Center for the Arts. “We want to shine a light on our libraries as major contributors to freedom of speech and the functioning of democracy,” Rosane recently told the Rutland Herald. “Economically challenged areas can have lower voter turnouts. Promoting libraries and literacy can help people enjoy a better grasp of the issues and encourage them to participate in the democratic process.” From Fairfax to Bradford, the tour includes 14 libraries total. Funds raised at each stop benefit the library itself and its literacy programs. The tour also promotes the group’s brand-new LP, Book of Zoo. Be on the lookout for a Seven Days review in the coming weeks.

S UNDbites

News and views on the local music scene B Y J OR D A N A D A MS

Missing Pieces

Book Worms

Pretty in Pink

David Rosane & the Zookeepers

SAT 6.30

The Voidz

SAT 6.30

Scissorfight

FRI 7.6

First Friday

TUE 7.10

Poor Man’s Whiskey

FRI 7.13

The Social Animals

SAT 7.14

Real Talk, Dear Youth

THU 7.19

Spag Heddy

THU 7.19

Victory

FRI 7.20

Featuring DJ VU & DJ Craig Mitchell

Porches

Murcielago, The Roadtrash Band

Ft. Steph Pappas, DJ Llu, DJVU

Los Elk

Saving Vice, Doom Service

D Fuego

Voices in Vain

Ghastly Sound, Wolfhand, Brain Habits, Subtleties

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Jazz is PHSH

8.21

The T Sisters

8.24

Sweet Crude

9.14

Real Estate

1214 Williston Road, South Burlington 802-652-0777 @higherground @highergroundmusic

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Pink Pride Party

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On Saturday, the folks at GLAM Vermont — an empowerment project under the Pride Center of Vermont’s umbrella — host a Pink Pride Party at the Higher Ground Showcase Lounge in South Burlington. For many years, Vermont’s official Pride Celebration has been in September, as it will be this year. But given that June is historically LGBT Pride Month — and since most major cities hold their festivities during one of the weekends in June — it makes sense that the group would want to help folks in the Green Mountains stave off FOMO by holding their own shindig. The Pride Center’s health and wellness coordinators, TAYLOR SMALL and TRAVIS MILLER, give us the lowdown. “The reason why Pride was moved to September was because of the migration of the queers all around the country to go to all of the bigger, better celebrations happening in places like Boston, New York City [and] Montréal,” says Small.

Ft. Nels Cline of Wilco, Julian Lage, Dave King & Devin Hoff

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Richford-based singer-songwriter DAVID ROSANE kicks off a super neat benefit tour this week with his band, the ZOOKEEPERS. The group, which also includes guitarist/bassist DON SINCLAIR

COURTESY OF ANNE LISBET TOLLANES

Did y’all get a chance to read about Northeast Kingdom DIY venue the Barrage? You can find all the details over on page 66. Everything you absolutely need to know is included — but there’s always more to a story than what can fit on the page. That’s the beauty of having this column: I can always sneak in those extra tidbits if they don’t flow with a feature’s narrative. So, I want to shed a little light on an interesting thing I learned while rocking out in Holland, Vt. Before opening his set last Friday night, NEK-based singer-songwriter KYLE WOOLARD — of the Charlottesville, Va., band the ANATOMY OF FRANK — clued me in to a pretty cool long-term project he and his cronies are working on. Though now living in different states, Woolard and company are in the process of recording a series of seven albums — one for each continent. And by “for each continent,” I mean the group is actually recording the albums on each continent. So far, they’ve knocked off North and South America, the latter being the indie-folk group’s most recent release, which was recorded in Ecuador. Asia, Africa, Europe and Australia seem within the realm of realistic possibilities — but what about motherflippin’ Antarctica? South Pole tourism certainly is a thing, but you can’t just, like, show up on your own. I would think setting up a recording studio in such a controlled and hostile environment would be difficult, to say the least.

But Woolard, a former student of astrophysics, has some scientifically inclined friends currently toiling away at the McMurdo Station who will help him get situated, he says. So the Antarctic edition of the band’s continental series might actually be easier than others. Visit theanatomyoffrank.bandcamp. com to hear North America and South America.

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music

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

WED.27

CLUB METRONOME: Summer Solstice Jame 2018 (hip-hop), 9 p.m., free.

burlington

DELI 126: Andriana Chobot (singer-songwriter), 9:30 p.m., free.

ARTSRIOT: Poetry Riot, 6 p.m., $3. DELI 126: Jazz Jam and Open Mic, 8 p.m., free.

HALF LOUNGE: J’Beau (R&B, electro-pop), 8 p.m., free. DJ Cre8 (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

HALF LOUNGE: DJ Craig Mitchell (house), 10 p.m., free.

JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

JUNIPER: DuPont & Deluca (folk), 9 p.m., free.

JUNIPER: The Ray Vega Latin Jazz Sextet, 8:30 p.m., free.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Katy Hellman (singer-songwriter), 7:30 p.m., free. The Brother Brothers (folk), 9 p.m., free.

LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Paul Asbell Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Irish Sessions (traditional), 7 p.m., free. Mark Daly (pop), 9:30 p.m., $5.

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: DJ Moar Mead (house), 10 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Seth Yacovone (solo acoustic blues), 7 p.m., free. Blues for Breakfast, 9 p.m., $7.

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Open Mic with Andy Lugo, 9 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: Friday Morning Sing-Along with Linda Bassick & Friends (kids’ music), 11 a.m., free. Happy Hour with DJ Ryan Kick (eclectic), 4 p.m., free. Dizzy Bats (solo), Patch Kid (alternative), 7 p.m., free. Dylan Fitzsimmons (folk, Americana), 8:30 p.m., free. Swale (indie rock), 10 p.m., $5. Jared Mancuso & the Very Pleasant People (alternative), 11:30 p.m., $5.

NECTAR’S: Hayley Jane (acoustic), 6:30 p.m., free. Zach Deputy, Christopher Hawley (hip-hop, funk), 9 p.m., $15. RADIO BEAN: Austin Kopec (R&B, soul), 5:30 p.m., free. Meghan Lynch (country-pop), 7 p.m., free. Jason Baker (folk, Americana), 8:30 p.m., free. Ponder, the Schroons (jam), 10:30 p.m., free. RED SQUARE: DJ Cre8 (hip-hop), 11 p.m., free.

Cait Simpson and Chris Merritt did when they started the

SIDEBAR: Hotel Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

bass and Simpson’s sung and spoken vocals. The Northampton, Mass., group has since grown into a four-piece with

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): High Summer (soul, pop), 8 p.m., free.

the inclusion of drummer Josh Daniel and keyboardist Mara Penatzer. Jazz sensibilities lie at its core, yet the quartet

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free. Indie Rumble (improv), 8:30 p.m., $5.

June 28, at Radio Bean in Burlington. MAD HABITS add support.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

CITY SPORTS GRILLE: Interactive Video Trivia with Top Hat Entertainment, 7:30 p.m., free.

JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: Bluegrass Session, 7 p.m., free. MONKEY HOUSE: David Vassalotti (of Merchandise), David West, the Mountain Carol (indie), 9 p.m., $5/10. 18+.

06.27.18-07.04.18

STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Open Mic Night, 7:30 p.m., free.

SEVEN DAYS

Bare Bones Sometimes you have to strip everything down to the basics to find your voice. That’s what

RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: Gypsy Reel (traditional Irish), 7:30 p.m., free.

chittenden county

68 MUSIC

THU.28 // THE GREYS [JAZZ, EXPERIMENTAL]

barre/montpelier

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: All Request Video, 9 p.m., free. SWEET MELISSA’S: D. Davis (acoustic), 5:30 p.m., donation. Umlaut (Kraut-rock), 8 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

IDLETYME BREWING COMPANY: The Idletyme Band (blues, rock), 8 p.m., free.

which originally featured only Merritt’s upright

explores all manner of Americana styles with familiar and unconventional methods. Check out the Greys on Thursday,

middlebury area CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

champlain islands/northwest

BAYSIDE PAVILION: The Starline Rhythm Boys (rockabilly), 6 p.m., free. NORTH HERO HOUSE INN & RESTAURANT: The Hubcats (folk, rock), 5:30 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom PARKER PIE CO.: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

outside vermont MONOPOLE: Open Mic with Lucid, 10 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Video Game Night, 7 p.m., free.

MOOGS PLACE: Jim Charanko (Americana), 7:30 p.m., free.

THU.28

mad river valley/ waterbury

DELI 126: Dan Ryan Express (jazz), 9:30 p.m., free.

ZENBARN: Zach Nugent’s Acoustic Dead (Grateful Dead tribute), 7 p.m., free.

GREYS,

HALF LOUNGE: SVPPLY & Bankz (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Randal Pierce (jazz), 7 p.m., free. Shane Hardiman Trio (jazz), 8:30 p.m., $5-10. Aaron Lucci Quintet (jazz), 10:30 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. The SuperGroove Sessions: Reggae Showcase, 9:30 p.m., $5/10. 18+. RADIO BEAN: Nathan Byrne (singer-songwriter), 5:30 p.m., free. Alex Smith (folk), 7 p.m., free. Dylan Miller (singersongwriter), 8:30 p.m., free. Brushstroke (psych-pop), 10 p.m., free. The Greys, Mad Habits (jazz, experimental), 11:30 p.m., free. RED SQUARE: The Brevity Thing (rock, folk), 7 p.m., free. D Jay Baron (mashup, hip-hop), 11 p.m., free. RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ Cre8 (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

burlington

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Handsome Hound (rock), 7:30 p.m., free.

DRINK: Downstairs Comedy Open Mic, 8 p.m., free.

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Jon Fisch (standup), 7:30 p.m., $15-27. The Mainstage Show (improv), 9 p.m., $5.

FINNIGAN’S PUB: DJ Craig Mitchell (open format), 10 p.m., free.

chittenden county

BACKSTAGE PUB & RESTAURANT: Trivia, 9:30 p.m., free. BRISTOL BAKERY & CAFÉ (HINESBURG): Acoustic Roundtable: Session 1 featuring Jacob Weiss, Nate Gusakov, and Pat Melvin, and Open Mic (Cajun, old-time), 6:30 p.m., free. MONKEY HOUSE: C. Shreve the Professor, QWYK, Boomslang (hip-hop), 9 p.m., $3. ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Joe Moore Blues Band, 7 p.m., free. STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Dylan Fitzsimmons (Americana), 7:30 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Italian Session (traditional), 6 p.m., free. CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Dose (jazz), 9 p.m., free. SWEET MELISSA’S: Dave Langevin (piano), 6 p.m., free. Jeff Przech (singer-songwriter), 8 p.m., free. WHAMMY BAR: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Open Mic with Allen Church, 8:30 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE: The Screaming Hearts (rock), 7 p.m., free. DJ Craig Mitchell (open format), 11 p.m., $5. RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ KermiTT (eclectic), 10 p.m., $5. RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: DJ Supersounds (hits), 10 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: The Get Messy (funk, rock), 7 p.m., free. Roost, the Mangroves (rock), 9 p.m., $3.

mad river valley/ waterbury

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Troy Millette and Dylan Gombas (folk-rock), 8 p.m., free.

LOCALFOLK SMOKEHOUSE: Open Mic with Alex Budney, 8:30 p.m., free.

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Jon Fisch (standup), 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., $15-27.

ZENBARN: The Michele Fay Band (Americana), 7 p.m., free.

chittenden county

champlain islands/northwest TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: Chris and Erica (rock, country), 7 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom HIGHLAND LODGE: Trivia Night, 6:30 p.m., free.

PARKER PIE CO.: Monte Verde Brass Band (jazz), 7:30 p.m., free.

outside vermont

OLIVE RIDLEY’S: Karaoke with DJ Jon Berry & DJ Coco, 9 p.m., free.

FRI.29

burlington

ARTSRIOT: Karikatura (indie, soul), 9 p.m., free. BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD: Chris Peterman Quartet (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free.

BACKSTAGE PUB & RESTAURANT: Karaoke with Jenny Red, 9 p.m., free.

THE DOUBLE E LOUNGE AT ESSEX CINEMAS & T-REX THEATER: King Me (acoustic covers), 7 p.m., free. HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Pink Pride Party with DJ VU and DJ Craig Mitchell (hits, drag), 8:30 p.m., $5/10. JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: Roy & the Wrecks (country), 7 p.m., free. ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Lokey (rock), 5 p.m., free. Photobomb (rock), 9 p.m., free. STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Shane Murley (singersongwriter), 7:30 p.m., free. WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: DJ C-Low (reggae), 9 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Maura Scanlin and Eamon Sefton (Scottish folk), 6 p.m., free. FRI.29

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S

UNDbites

THE MONKEY HOUSE PRESENTS

CO NT I NU E D F RO M PAG E 6 7

“We’ve heard from our community members time and time again, ‘What’s going on with Pride? We want Pride!’” Miller says. “We’re just responding [to that] and giving them Pride.” A big component of GLAM Vermont — other than its primary objective of fostering community through leisurely activities — is its public health initiative. Educating and supporting gay, bisexual, transgender and gender nonconforming people who may be engaging in potentially risky sexual activity is one of the group’s cornerstones. “We’re sex positive [and] empowering of people making the best decisions for themselves and their lives,” says Miller. As for the party itself, DJs VU and CRAIG MITCHELL keep the energy ramped up with megahits all night long. But the component that ties everything together is the Blue Lounge: a cordoned-off area where members of the MSM community (men who have sex with men) can obtain information about PrEP — antiviral drugs that reduce the risk of contracting HIV by up to 90 percent. As always, visit pridecentervt.org for additional support and resources.

Strings and Things

Sarah Hicks

teamed up with RUBBLEBUCKET’s ALEX TOTH and others in mid-2016 for a tribute to DAVID BOWIE at the ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain in Burlington. I’ve just discovered she’s on the roster as I’m typing this, so now I feel extremely distracted and need to figure out if I already have plans on Friday, July 6, when Kimbra plays Club Soda. Be sure to give yourself extra time to cross the Canadian border and to get into the city itself. The fest can really muck up traffic! 

$5 FOR 21+ / $10 FOR 18+ DOORS 8:45PM / SHOW 9:15PM

30 MAIN STREET | WINOOSKI, VT 4t-monkeyhouse062718.indd 1

6/26/18 1:04 PM

06.27.18-07.04.18

Listening In

CIDER HOUSE TANK SERIES RELEASE! Join us at the Woodchuck Cider House beginning Thursday, June 28th for the release of our next Tank Series Cucumber Mint.

MUSIC 69

Check it out at: woodchuck.com/ciderhouse ©2018 Vermont Cider Co. 1321 Exchange St, Middlebury, VT 05753. Revel Responsibly®

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SEVEN DAYS

If I were a superhero, my superpower would be the ability to get songs stuck in other people’s heads. Here are five songs that have been stuck in my head this week. May they also get stuck in yours. Follow sevendaysvt on Spotify for weekly playlists with tunes by artists featured in the music section. BØRNS, “Man” THE BLUE NILE, “Headlights on the Parade” CHRIS MCCLENNEY, “sidetoside” PHASES, “Vertigo” SMALLTALKER, “Wildcard”

AT

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

A couple of hot tips regarding summer festivals: The VERMONT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA commences its Gifts of Nature tour on Sunday, July 1, at the Suicide Six Ski Area in South Pomfret. Guest conductor SARAH HICKS leads the ensemble through works by numerous famous composers, including RICHARD STRAUSS, CLAUDE DEBUSSY, PYOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY and JOHN PHILIP SOUSA. The eight-day fest hits various towns across the state and concludes on Sunday, July 8, at the Trapp Family Lodge in Stowe. Also launching this weekend is the annual Festival International de Jazz de Montréal. From Thursday, June 28, through Saturday, July 7, eclectic artists from all over the world flood the city’s various performing arts centers, cafés, clubs and streets with jazz, rock, folk and pretty much any dang genre you can think of. The overwhelmingly enormous lineup includes one of my favorite artists: the indelible KIMBRA. If you recall, the soulful New Zealander

w/ CAVE BEES and BLUE BUTTON

6/25/18 12:38 PM


music FRI.29

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

« P.68

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Nate Byrne (acoustic), 6 p.m., free. C. Shreve the Professor, QWYK, Boomslang, Jarv (hip-hop), 9 p.m., free.

Stroke of Genius New York City rockers the Strokes took the world by storm in the early 2000s,

establishing themselves as rock-and-roll royalty. The band’s charismatic front man, Julian Casablancas, went on to pursue both a solo career and a side project called the VOIDZ. Born out of Casablancas’ backing band from his first

GUSTO’S: Jeff Przech (singersongwriter), 5 p.m., free. High Def (rock covers), 9 p.m., $5.

solo tour, the group distinguishes itself from the Strokes with inclinations toward goth and dance music. Driving

SWEET MELISSA’S: Honky Tonk Happy Hour with Mark LeGrand, 5:30 p.m., free. Green Chapel (metal), 9 p.m., free.

Saturday, June 30, at the Higher Ground Ballroom in South Burlington. PORCHES open.

synth bass and trip-hop-inspired beats fill in the spaces between band’s jangly rock sounds. The Voidz perform on

MOOGS PLACE: Chris Lyon (solo acoustic, Americana), 6 p.m., free. Lesley Grant Band (Americana), 9 p.m., free.

SWEET MELISSA’S: Live Band Karaoke, 8 p.m., donation.

middlebury area

ROUGH CUT: Kelly Ravin (country), 5 p.m., free.

middlebury area

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB, DJ Bounce, (hits), 9:30 pm, free

MON.2

champlain islands/northwest

burlington

TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: Jesse Taylor (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Lamp Shop Lit Club (open reading), 8 p.m., free. Aurora Birch (indie folk), 9:30 p.m., free.

upper valley

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Karaoke, 9:30 p.m., free.

THE ENGINE ROOM: The Adam McMahon Trio (rock, country), 9 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom HIGHLAND LODGE: The Ron Kelley Quartet (jazz), 7 p.m., free.

outside vermont

MONOPOLE: The Stinky Boots String Band (Americana), 10 p.m., free.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Sir Sly (sold out) (electro-pop), 7:30 p.m., $.99.

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Eric Friedman (folk), 11 a.m., free.

EL TORO: Rebecca Padula (Americana), 7 p.m., free.

MONOPOLE DOWNSTAIRS: Happy Hour Tunes & Trivia with Gary Peacock, 5 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Handsome Hound (rock), 8 p.m., free.

SAT.30

burlington 06.27.18-07.04.18

chittenden county

barre/montpelier

stowe/smuggs

SEVEN DAYS

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Kamikaze Comedy (improv), 7 p.m., $5. Sandwitches, 8 p.m., free.

MONKEY HOUSE: Body Void (drone-doom), 8:30 p.m., $5/10. 18+.

WHAMMY BAR: Papa’s Porch (bluegrass), 7 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: Andrew of the North (piano rock), 7 p.m., free. Jordan Collins (indie folk), 8:30 p.m., free. Lady Lupine (soul, rock), 10:30 p.m., free. Lenina Crowne (indie rock), midnight, free.

SAT.30 // THE VOIDZ [ROCK]

DJ Taka (eclectic vinyl), 11 p.m., $5. NECTAR’S: Studio Two (The Beatles tribute), 7 p.m., $15/18. Cozy O’Donnell, Robin Sunquiet (rock, soul), 10 p.m., $5. RADIO BEAN: leisure (indie folk), 5:30 p.m., free. Liana Gabel and Kaylah Bell (folk, jazz), 7 p.m., free. Maura Scanlin and Eamon Sefton (Scottish folk), 8:30 p.m., free. Kenya Hall (singersongwriter), 9 p.m., free. The Nancy Druids (indie psych-pop), 10 p.m., $5. Nina’s Brew (blues, roots), 11:30 p.m., $5.

chittenden county THE DOUBLE E LOUNGE AT ESSEX CINEMAS & T-REX THEATER: Jason Lee Duo (Americana), 7 p.m., free.

HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: The Voidz, Porches (rock), 8:30 p.m., $25/28. HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Scissorfight, Murcielago, the Roadtrash Band (hardcore), 8 p.m., $13/15. JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: AmerikanaBlue (bluegrass), 7 p.m., free.

ARTSRIOT: Refugee Outreach Club Fundraiser featuring Sabouyouma (Afro-funk fusion), 8 p.m., $15.

RED SQUARE: Left Eye Jump (blues), 3 p.m., free. The Tricksters (rock), 7 p.m., free. Mashtodon (hip-hop), 11 p.m., $5.

MONKEY HOUSE: Bag of Panties, Cave Bees, Blue Button (rock, experimental), 9:15 p.m., $5/10. 18+.

BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD: Anthony Santor (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ Raul (salsa, reggaeton), 6 p.m., free. DJ Reign One (EDM), 11 p.m., $5.

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Graziano, Slim and Schofield (blues), 5 p.m., free. Hullahballoo (rock), 9 p.m., free.

RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: Church Street DJs (eclectic), 10 p.m., free.

STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Cooper-Childs Duo, Deep River Saints (jazz), 7:30 p.m., free.

DELI 126: Maple Street Six (jazz), 9:30 p.m., free.

SIDEBAR: DJ Fattie B (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

HALF LOUNGE: 99 Neighbors with Loupo (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Jeff Przech (singer-songwriter), noon, free. Delvon Lamarr Organ Trio (jazz), 8 p.m., free.

CLUB METRONOME: Akae Beka: The Voice of Midnight featuring DJs Big Dog and Jahson (reggae), 9 p.m., $25/30.

JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. JUNIPER: Jeff Przech (singersongwriter), 9 p.m., free. 70 MUSIC

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Bluegrass Brunch, noon, free.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Lorking O’Reilly and Felix M-B (Celtic, Americana), 7 p.m., free.

SMITTY’S PUB: J&M Boutique (rock), 8 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Jon Fisch (standup), 7:30 & 9:30 p.m., $15-27.

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Irish Session, 2 p.m., donation. Jason Baker (folk, Americana), 6 p.m., free. CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Tin Talisman, the Hate Girls (punk), 9 p.m., free. DEMENA’S: Joel Cage (acoustic rock), 8 p.m., $5. GUSTO’S: DJ LaFountaine (hits), 9:30 p.m., free.

SWEET MELISSA’S: Liz Beatty and the Alternates (blues), 6 p.m., free.

champlain islands/northwest

RED SQUARE: DJ KermiTT (eclectic), 7 p.m., free. SVPPLY (hip-hop), 11 p.m., free.

THE DEN AT HARRY’S HARDWARE: Dwayne Benjamin (bluegrass), 7 p.m., free.

TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: Bob McKenzie Blues Band, 7 p.m., free.

SIDEBAR: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free. Family Night (open jam), 9 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

outside vermont

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Comedy & Crêpes (standup), 8 p.m., free.

MOOGS PLACE: Mark LeGrand (honky-tonk), 9 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): The Pillsbury Slow Boys (blues), 8 p.m., free.

EL TORO: Joe Sabourin (folkrock), 7 p.m., free.

TRES AMIGOS & RUSTY NAIL STAGE: Rumourz: The Fleetwood Mac Experience, 8:30 p.m., $8.

mad river valley/ waterbury

CORK WINE BAR & MARKET (WATERBURY): Wes Hamilton (folk), 6 p.m., free. ZENBARN: The Hot Pickin’ Party, Smokin’ Grass (bluegrass), 9 p.m., $8/10.

middlebury area

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: DJ Earl (open format), 9:30 p.m., free.

rutland/killington

RICK & KAT’S HOWLIN’ MOUSE: Absence of Salvation, Enemy of the State, Chronovore, Crypitus, Abaddon (metal), 7:30 p.m., $5.

MONOPOLE: Edison’s Rig (rock), 10 p.m., free.

chittenden county

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: The Nels Cline 4 (jazz), 8:30 p.m., $25/27.

SUN.1

MONKEY HOUSE: Erin Cassels-Brown (indie folk), 6 p.m., free. TV Girl, Infinity Crush (indie-pop), 8:45 p.m., $10.

FOAM BREWERS: Nina’s Brew (roots, blues), noon, free.

stowe/smuggs

burlington

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Bean Screen presents ‘Tampopo’ (film screening), 7 p.m., free. Game Night, 7 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Mi Yard Reggae Night with DJs Big Dog and Jahson, 9 p.m., free. RADIO BEAN: Pete Sutherland and Tim Stickle’s Old Time Session (traditional), 1 p.m., free. Dave Lyden (alternative, pop-punk), 5:30 p.m., free. Christopher Gregory (country, folk), 7 p.m., free. In Ivy (folk), 8:30 p.m., free. The Adventure Soundtrack (jam), 10:30 p.m., free. ggpeach (pop-rock), midnight, free.

MOOGS PLACE: Seth Yacovone (blues), 7 p.m., free.

TUE.3

burlington

ARTSRIOT: Trivia Night, 7:30 p.m., free. CLUB METRONOME: Dead Set (Grateful Dead tribute), 9 p.m., $5. DRINK: Comedy Open Mic, 9 p.m., free. FOAM BREWERS: Local Dork (eclectic vinyl), 6 p.m., free.

TUE.3

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GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

REVIEW this smalltalker, Talk Small

(SELF-RELEASED, DIGITAL DOWNLOAD)

The titles of R&B ensemble smalltalker’s twin EPs — 2017’s Walk Tall and the recently released Talk Small — sound like a mantra when lumped together: walk tall, talk small; walk tall, talk small. Repeat ad infinitum. The complete phrase implies confidence and humility, two qualities the band exhibits across the new four-song collection. Though some of its members hail from disparate places such as New York City and New Hampshire, they identify as a Burlington-based group. The chameleonic outfit’s nuanced sound is likely to please soul, jazz and pop diehards. Multiple lead vocalists and dazzling musicianship — including a bright horn section — consistently invigorate the 10-piece’s remarkable songcraft. Smalltalker take a much deeper dive into jazz on Talk Small than on their previous

Bag of Panties, Half in the Bag (ICEBOX RECORDS, DIGITAL DOWNLOAD, VINYL)

5 NIGHTS

A WEEK EP. Compositions are more complex and modern with daring harmonies and perpendicular rhythmic components. That’s not to say that Walk Tall lacked these ingredients. But the band has found a new sense of boldness in the way it mixes avantgarde elements into party-ready neo-soul tunes. “Wildcard” is a brisk ode to self-reliance: “And if I stumble / If I fall / I’m not worried at all / I’m a genie in a bottle / I grant my own wish.” Vocalists Stephanie Heaghney and Claire Sammut lead with infectious mirth over waves of organ, gently tapped cymbals and softly plucked guitar. Culminating in a near-theatrical apex, a syncopated statement (“You know who we are / We are the wildcard”) punctuates the cut’s oil-slick instrumentation. Brash horns open the harmonious “One Too.” Working in tandem, vocals and piano enter a meandering lockstep over a brusque backbeat. A stark hook (“You’re one, too”) finds congruity with loose horns, which ebb and flow in congress with the vocals.

A Latin-tinged, clickety-clack beat and staccato piano chords introduce the EP’s most intricate track, “To Choose.” The song’s inscrutable time signature aligns with its themes of unrest and indecision. After a sparse verse, the chorus sweeps in with a tidal wave of piano. Oscillating to a down-tempo, 4/4 time signature on the brief bridge, the track ramps back up to its confounding meter with swells of sax. “Sorry,” a soulful slow jam, closes out the EP. Its wistful sentiments glide along NEXT WEEK a jangly piano line and quivering organ. Working through another time signature breakdown before an acid-jazz sax freakout, the track balloons into an irrepressible climax. Talk Small packs a lot of ambitious ideas into a tight bundle. Thoroughly enjoyable and genre defying, it raises a question for smalltalker: How much further can this crack team of players push their sound? Based on the strides made between their two EPs, the answer might well be this: as far as they want. Talk Small is available at smalltalker. bandcamp.com. Smalltalker perform on Friday, June 29, at the Frendly Gathering music festival in Waitsfield.

JORDAN ADAMS

THU 28 | FRI 29 | SAT 30

JON

FISCH THU 5

JULIA

DIFERDINANDO FRI 6 | SAT 7

wellRED

COMEDY TOUR ORDER YOUR TICKETS TODAY! (802) 859-0100 | WWW.VTCOMEDY.COM

Untitled-38 1

SEVEN DAYS

the Jerky Boys. It’s epically silly and will certainly offend delicate sensibilities. But in the right mood, it’s also hilarious: “You’re playin’ Tic Tac Toe, you get O’s and X’s / I’m burning up the panties like Waco, Texas / A lot of people say that I’m pathetic / But I’m making shit run like a diuretic.” MCA is rolling in his grave. But the song does strike a certain adolescent funny boner, er, bone. And that’s largely true over the record’s 14 cuts. Stylistically, Half in the Bag is very much of the ’90s, though it’s a twisted reflection of the decade. For example, “Chris Lentz Is on Food Stamps” sounds like Soul Coughing on bad acid. Bits of Mellow Gold-era Beck, Pure Guava-era Ween and myriad shades of hip-hop are peppered throughout the record. But it’s never quite clear if Lentz and Cooley were paying homage to those influences or merely fucking around with them because they could. Maybe both? Half in the Bag is available at bagofpanties.bandcamp.com. Bag of Panties play a reunion show on Saturday, June 30, at the Monkey House in Winooski with Cave Bees and Blue Button.

6/21/18 4:25 PM

06.27.18-07.04.18

around with a 4-track owned by another roommate, Eric Hutchins, bassist of the Pants. What was intended as a “Happy Flowers-type noise project,” according to Cooley, morphed into … something else. Cooley, now best known as the front man of Blue Button, describes the record as “very much a friendship album.” And that’s obvious, though not in an earnest, coming-of-age way. Half in the Bag is a colossally juvenile album, loaded with the sorts of off-color in-jokes that almost all close friends share — especially in their early twenties — but that most have the good sense to keep to themselves. An unrelenting mishmash of styles and samples and dick jokes, the album’s sole intention seems to have been to crack up its creators. Indeed, Cooley and Lentz would often work on the album in turns while the other was at work. But here’s the thing: It’s pretty damned entertaining. For instance, take “Theme From Bag of Panties,” which is something like a Beastie Boys pastiche as performed by

101 main street, BurlingtoN

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Some two decades afterward, the Burlington rock scene of the 1990s has become the stuff of legend. From the Pants to Envy to Rocketsled to Guppyboy, the bands of that alt-rock heyday are approaching sanctity, their names etched in the marbled pantheon of Queen City greats. Bag of Panties are not one of those bands. And that’s OK! In fact, as their recently reissued 1997 album Half in the Bag suggests, it’s actually kind of the point. For those under the age of 35, Bag of Panties were/are Jason Cooley and Chris Lentz. Both were also members of fabled ’90s Burlington punk band the Fags, fronted by a young Eugene Hütz. He’s now the leader of famed gypsy punks Gogol Bordello. In 1997, Cooley and Lentz left the Fags. Best friends since high school, the two moved in together and started messing

COMEDY

DAN BOLLES

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MUSIC 71

YOU A VT ARTIST OR BAND? SEND US YOUR MUSIC! DIGITAL: MUSIC@SEVENDAYSVT.COM; GET YOUR MUSIC REVIEWED: ARE SNAIL MAIL: MUSIC C/O SEVEN DAYS 255 S. CHAMPLAIN ST., SUITE 5, BURLINGTON, VT 05401

6/25/18 2:18 PM


music TUE.3

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

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HALF LOUNGE: DJ Taka (eclectic), 10 p.m., free. LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Dayve Huckett (jazz), 7 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: StorytellingVT, 7:30 p.m., free. Good Morning Bedlam (indie folk), 9:30 p.m., $5. Dance Party for American featuring DJ Cre8 (hip-hop), 11:30 p.m., free. LINCOLNS: Laugh Shack (standup), 8:30 p.m., $5. NECTAR’S: Burning Monk (Rage Against the Machine tribute), 9 p.m., free. RADIO BEAN: Gua Gua (psychotropical jazz), 6:30 p.m., free. Strangled Darlings (Americana, doom-pop), 8:45 p.m., free. Honky Tonk Tuesday with Ponyhustle, 10 p.m., $5. RED SQUARE: Four-D (house, hip-hop), 7 p.m., free. DJ A-RA$ (open format), 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Ukulele Kids with Joe Baird (sing-along), 9:30 a.m., free.

chittenden county

SWEET MELISSA’S: Blue Fox’s Open Mic, 7 p.m., free.

SWEET MELISSA’S: D. Davis (acoustic), 5:30 p.m., donation.

middlebury area

THE DEN AT HARRY’S HARDWARE: Philip Roebuck (roots-rock, blues), 1 p.m., free.

HATCH 31: Erin Cassels-Brown (indie folk), 6 p.m., free. Kelly Ravin and Lowell Thompson (country), 7 p.m., free.

MONOPOLE: Adrian Aardvark (psychedelic grunge-folk), 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

WED.4

burlington

CLUB METRONOME: Metal Monday presents: Alive and Well, Abaddon, Wreck, Stream Devils, Patrick Brownson, 8 p.m., $10.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Mature Audiences

TV GIRL

pair dreamy, sample-laden

jams with unperturbed, occasionally murmured vocals. With an ear for the lo-fi sounds of rock’s golden age, the Los Angeles-based group blends classic pop architecture and cynical, wry lyrics. One of its earliest hits, “If You Want It,” recycles the hook from Todd Rundgren’s “Hello It’s Me” while detailing a dysfunctional bedroom romp. Sex often fuels pop music, but TV Girl’s libidinously inclined tunes go beyond titillating. They land right in the sweet

JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

spot between dejected and provocative. Catch TV Girl on Monday, July 2, at the

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Irish Sessions (traditional), 7 p.m., free. Tom Pearo (ambient, jazz), 9:30 p.m., $5.

Monkey House in Winooski. INFINITY CRUSH add support.

8:30 p.m., free. Quinn & the Confluence (folk-rock), 10:30 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Justin Panigutti (rock), 7 p.m., free.

WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

NECTAR’S: Swimmer, the Freeway Revival (jam), 8 p.m., free/$5. 18+.

RED SQUARE: DJ Cre8 (hip-hop), 11 p.m., free.

THE SPOT ON THE DOCK: DJ Disco Phantom (eclectic dance), every other Wednesday, 5 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: Shiona Davene (singer-songwriter), 5:30 p.m., free. Ensemble V (free-jazz), 7 p.m., free. Amber Belle (folk),

Far Out « P.66

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mad river valley/ waterbury

MON.2 // TV GIRL [INDIE-POP]

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Open Mic with Andy Lugo, 9 p.m., free.

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Karaoke with DJ Vociferous, 9:30 p.m., free.

SEVEN DAYS

IDLETYME BREWING COMPANY: The Idletyme Band (blues, rock), 8 p.m., free.

outside vermont

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Trivia with Top Hat Entertainment, 7 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

72 MUSIC

stowe/smuggs

“You should’ve seen the place before he renovated it,” said neighbor Mitch Wonson. The Holland resident attends every Barrage show and showed pride in the work Bouchard has put into making it a usable space. “It’s a great thing for the community — and for an old fart like me,” said Wonson, who turns 70 later this year. “[If ] you hang around with the young kids, you stay young.” Another guest, music therapist RoseAnna Cyr, said she’s been coming to the Barrage since it started up last year. She recalled a show last summer with spoken-word artist Chris Bernstorf. “He started doing his performance just with the light of [a single] light bulb,” she explained. “It was such a surreal, engaging and artistic experience. It’s not something you’d ever expect: to come to Holland, Vt., [to] hang out in someone’s garage and [see] that type of performance.” By the time Woolard opened the show with his solo acoustic set, about 30 people had arrived. That number climbed to 40-ish before a cotton-candy-pink and orange-sherbet sunset exploded on the horizon. Bouchard said his neighbors and the town have been supportive of his concert endeavors. Barrage shows are BYOB and usually end around 10 p.m. Admission is by donation, and all money collected goes to the performing artists. “There have been some bands that made more money

RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: Gypsy Reel (traditional Irish), 7:30 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Hotel Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free. Indie Rumble (improv), 8:30 p.m., $5.

here [selling] merch than any other show,” Bouchard claimed. The Windermeres were thrilled to squeeze in the Barrage show between slots in Montréal and New York City. In part, suggested drummer Jeremy Van Zandt, that’s because attendees at unconventional venues tend to be more rabid fans.

YOU HAVE TO BE INTO MUSIC AND KNOW HOW TO GO OUT OF YOUR WAY

TO GET TO PLACES LIKE THIS. J E R E MY VAN ZAND T

“I think the people actually care about the music a lot more,” he said. “Stuff like [the Barrage], you have to know about it. You have to be into music and know how to go out of your way to get to places like this.” Clever Girls front woman Diane Jean echoed that sentiment. Prior to playing the Barrage, the group had recently returned from its biggest tour to date. “We’d never done a tour where we were played every day of the week,” said Jean. “We tried to fill the early days of the week with DIY shows. Those are the communities that turn up. They come out and they donate because they want bands to come back.”

ZENBARN: Zach Nugent’s Acoustic Dead (Grateful Dead tribute), 7 p.m., free.

middlebury area CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

champlain islands/northwest

BAYSIDE PAVILION: The Starline Rhythm Boys (rockabilly), 6 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom PARKER PIE CO.: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

chittenden county CITY SPORTS GRILLE: Interactive Video Trivia with Top Hat Entertainment, 7:30 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

outside vermont MONOPOLE: Open Mic with Lucid, 10 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Video Game Night, 7 p.m., free. m

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: All Request Video, 9 p.m., free.

After playing a full set of selections from their recent releases Luck and Loose Tooth, Clever Girls closed the night with a rousing cover of the Cranberries’ “Dreams.” The crowd shouted the lyrics right along with them and danced up a storm. Even Bouchard’s kids were in on the action. “I think it’s pretty cool,” said Harvest, Bouchard’s son. However, the 11-year-old added that he was initially skeptical about the idea of hosting rock concerts in the family garage: “I thought it was kind of crazy when [my dad] first mentioned it.” Bouchard is careful not to overdo Barrage concerts, citing fear of oversaturation. “Timing is a big thing,” he said. “This area, the market can’t sustain constant shows. And I don’t want to do constant shows.” But, judging by the crowd’s obvious enjoyment, it’s likely that those in the know would come back as often as Bouchard would have them. “Just to be able to come to a place like this and listen to really, really good music in a really comfortable atmosphere — it’s a treasure,” said Cyr. m Contact: jordan@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Local rapper Mister Burns performs on Friday, July 6, 7:30 p.m., at the Barrage in Holland. Donations. facebook.com/borderline.vt.us


Battery Park

Free Concert Series JULY 5

Rubblebucket

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ECCENTRIC INDIE POP BAND WITH VERMONT ROOTS

JULY 12

Natalie Prass

GROOVY UP AND COMING ARTIST WITH JOYOUS POP ACCESSIBILITY

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JULY 19

The DuPont Brothers VERMONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S OWN INDIE-FOLK-ROCK DUO

JULY 26 Thursdays starting at 6:30 PM

SEVEN DAYS

Low Cut Connie

HIGH ENERGY ROCK BAND WITH A WITH AN INFECTIOUS LIVE SHOW

NO ALCOHOL OR GLASS CONTAINERS ALLOWED

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Women’s Work

art

“Reclamation,” Helen Day Art Center

06.27.18-07.04.18 SEVEN DAYS 74 ART

PHOTOS COURTESY OF HELEN DAY ART CENTER

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

B Y A MY LI LLY

“Self-Portrait With Raspberry Sorbet” by Lee Price

T

he place of modern-realist portraiture in contemporary art is generally considered neither major nor radical. But the 25 portraits of women that comprise the exhibit “Reclamation” at Helen Day Art Center in Stowe are arguably both. The show’s importance lies at the nexus of the paintings’ authorship, content and historical moment. Female artists painted all of these works. In the era of #MeToo and Time’s Up, movements that address violence against women and inequality in the

workplace, a show featuring solely women artists helps right a persistent imbalance in the art world. According to studies cited by the National Museum of Women in the Arts, work by women makes up only 3 to 5 percent of the collections in major museums and galleries in the U.S. and Europe. Meanwhile, 51 percent of practicing artists today are women. Statistics aside, the combined visual effect of the paintings in “Reclamation” is powerful. About half the subjects contemplate the viewer directly, with

expressions ranging from sanguine to fearful to confrontational. Their bodies, dressed or nude, conform to no particular image of beauty; they are far from Renoir’s soft-cheeked paragons of motherhood or Klimt’s jewel-like allegories of femininity. Nevertheless, they radiate beauty through emotionally vivid, arresting poses and expressions. “Reclamation” is one of several artist-driven attempts in recent decades to redress the disparity between female artists’ output and their low level of institutional inclusion. These efforts

range from the feminist activist collective Guerrilla Girls (formed in 1985) to the blog Women Painting Women, which began promoting overlooked female figurative painters in 2009. After seeing a Women Painting Women show, Middlesex portraitist August Burns approached Helen Day executive director and artist Rachel Moore with the idea of hosting a similar one. They invited WPW cofounder Diane Feissel to cocurate. “Reclamation” differs from the typical WPW show, says Moore, in its focus on representations of women. In encompassing a variety of bodies, attitudes and emotional states, it celebrates diversity while also granting the femaleimagined female figure “a voice within the history of art and in contemporary art.” The exhibit is an intervention in what Burns describes in a brochure as the centuries-long tradition in Western art of woman as a “passive and sensual” muse for the male artist. The show’s largest challenge to that artistic convention, at 94 by 76 inches, is Aleah Chapin’s “And We Were Birds.” In it, two nude women, perhaps in their sixties, stand back to back with arms linked, one supporting the weight of the other. They appear in a flat landscape whose horizon line, where it meets a pale sky, tilts right — the same direction in which the pair leans. Three other women’s legs are visible in the right lower corner, where they appear to be watching from the ground. The standing women smile serenely; the sense of celebration is almost palpable. What is there to celebrate? Their white, roseate bodies are aged and used: Breasts and stomachs sag, wrinkles abound. But their figures also hint at long, rich life stories, childbearing among them; their skin has a luminous depth, somehow conveying warmth through paint. Margaret Bowland’s 74-by-54-inch “The Artist” dominates an adjacent wall. Bowland is controversial for her decision, as a white artist, to paint mainly African American models in whiteface. She has explained it as a metaphor for society’s attempts to efface people’s identities and project preferred ones onto them. Here Bowland’s somber subject, a black girl set against a background of cheerful Japanese drawings, complicates even this narrative: She holds the


ART SHOWS

“The Artist” by Margaret Bowland

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is Making it is not :( Keep this newspaper free for all. Join the Seven Days Super Readers at sevendaysvt.com/super-readers or call us at 802-864-5684. 8h-SuperReader062718.indd 1

“Defiance of Erebus” by Ellen Cooper

JUST ADD WATER LARGEST SELECTION OF VAPORIZERS IN VT. LARGE SELECTION OF LOCAL AND FAMOUS GLASS ARTISTS.

06.27.18-07.04.18

Yet the style seems the perfect vehicle for an exhibit about “reclamation.” The word is only part of this show’s description; it goes on to include a phonetic transcription and two definitions: “the process of claiming something back or of reasserting a right” and “rescuing from error or returning to a rightful course.” The clarity of these paintings, the unabashed realism of their subjects, only increases the impact of an exhibit that asserts the power of women — on both sides of the canvas. m

6/25/18 5:17 PM

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LARGEST SELECTION OF SCIENTIFIC AND AMERICAN GLASS IN TOWN

SEVEN DAYS

Contact: lilly@sevendaysvt.com

INFO “Reclamation,” through September 8 at Helen Day Art Center in Stowe. A series of short and feature-length films directed or edited by and/or starring women runs on a loop in the West Gallery. “Reclamation Talks,” a discussion of cultural change featuring speakers from artists to social justice advocates, takes place Saturday, August 4, 7 p.m., at the Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe Mountain Resort. Free. helenday.com

THE SMOKE SHOP WITH THE HIPPIE FLAVOR E x cl u s i v e deal er of I l l umi nati , I l l ad el p h and S ov erei gnt y G l ass. 75 Main St., Burlington, VT 864.6555 • Mon-Thur 10-9 Fri-Sat 10-10 Sun 10-8 Must be 18 to purchase tobacco products, ID required

@NorthernLightsVT

ART 75

white-paint-tipped brush. Is she complicit in her own identity’s obliteration? Even if so, the girl’s agency, direct gaze and beauty establish her as a complete and confident individual. No less assertive is the gaze of Ellen Cooper’s older, well-dressed female subject, depicted in full length in “Defiance of Erebus.” Her tight-lipped, determined expression hints at a woman who won’t go gently into Hades. Her black umbrella and the setting, a wet city sidewalk bordered by an iron fence, recall a Parisian scene by Gustave Caillebotte. Cooper’s technique in this 36-by-62-inch work is remarkable: The fall leaves littering the sidewalk are painted in impressionist red and gold daubs, while the detail in the woman’s fur-lined coat and expensive silk scarf is worthy of a Renaissance portrait. Technique is notable throughout “Reclamation,” but Lee Price achieves near photorealism in “Self-Portrait With Raspberry Sorbet.” The painting is part of her “Women and Food” series, an exploration of compulsive eating that arose from her own childhood eating disorder. Instead of hiding the compulsion, the subject devours her sorbet with eyes trained on the viewer. Her dress and the background match the color of the sorbet, creating a picture of defiant indulgence. Perhaps the most powerful gaze is the one viewers don’t see, in Sylvia Maier’s “Sybrina Fulton, Mother of Trayvon Martin.” Facing the viewer with her eyes closed and a lighted candle in her hands, the subject communicates strength and despair at once. Maier’s painting is part of a series featuring women who lost young black sons to senseless gun violence. “Reclamation” includes two prints by Alice Neel, the show’s only noncontemporary artist — and one who has wielded an outsize influence on female figurative portraiture. Neel’s daughter-in-law, Ginny Neel, is a local who has supported the Helen Day since its inception. She loaned the 1976

serigraph “Ginny” — a seated portrait of herself — and donated the 1982 lithograph “Nancy and Olivia” to a raffle fundraiser for the center. In the latter, motherhood appears to be something of a shock to Nancy, whose eyes are wide and startled as she cradles her equally wide-eyed baby. In a 2014 interview for the Huffington Post, Bowland commented about figurative realism, “I have been told by current artists that the very way that I paint marks me as unsophisticated, backward. One can paint the figure now, but only in a somewhat careless way, or in a cartoon-like format.” That is to say, with irony.


art John Cross Sixty years after graduating from Middlebury College

NEW THIS WEEK burlington

with a degree in economics, John Cross is being recognized in town for a

 ‘ART’S ALIVE FOFA WINNER’S CIRCLE’: Works

very different achievement: his whimsical cast of wooden characters. Now on

by Festival of Fine Art award winners, including Kara Torres, Gav’om, Jerry Rayla, Matt Morris, Linda Dulleba and Paul McMillan. Reception: Friday, August 3, 5-8 p.m. July 1-August 31. Info, 859-9222. SEABA Center in Burlington.

view on the second floor of the Henry Sheldon Museum of Vermont History, “American Wood Sculptor John Cross: A Contemporary Figurative Folk Artist” features a variety of figures — baseball players and fans, swimmers, entertainers,

 CRYSTAL WAGNER: “Traverse,” an immense,

and even Adam and Eve — rendered with a soft touch and painted in muted

site-specific installation by the multidisciplinary artist. Reception: Friday, June 29, 6-8 p.m. June 29-October 7. Info, 865-7166. BCA Center in Burlington.

pastels. Cross’ ability to capture emotion should not be underappreciated: Eve’s haggard, sagging face in particular speaks volumes of the shame in that



KARA TORRES: “Fantasy Self,” works in a variety of media that explore the discrepancy between the artist’s future dreams the personal and structural realities that prevent reaching those dreams. Reception: Friday, July 6, 4-7 p.m. July 1-31. Info, fineforagerarts@gmail.com. Cavendish Gallery & Collective in Burlington.

chittenden county

 TIM DURBROW: Colorful, large-scale landscape and nature photography, accompanied by three vintage photos restored as a part of an Underhill Historical Society project. Reception: Saturday, June 30, 3-5 p.m. June 30-September 1. Info, 434-2550. Mt. Mansfield Community Television in Richmond.

barre/montpelier

ELLIOT BURG: “Heart and Eye,” high-contrast black-and-white portraits taken in Myanmar, Laos, Ukraine, Cuba, Brooklyn, Washington, D.C., and Vermont. July 1-31. Info, eburg4@gmail.com. Capitol Grounds Café in Montpelier.

 ESSEX ART LEAGUE AND MILTON ARTISTS

SEVEN DAYS

06.27.18-07.04.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

GUILD: Members of the arts organizations exhibit works in a variety of mediums. Reception: Thursday, July 12, 5-7 p.m. July 5-July 28.  SUMMER JURIED EXHIBIT: Featured artists include August Burns, Annie Christopher, Frank DeAngelis, Eddie Epstein, Hasso Ewing, Caroline McKinney, Maggie Neale, Sam Thurston, Ann Young and others. Reception: Thursday, July 12, 5-7 p.m. July 5-August 31. Info, 262-6035. T.W. Wood Gallery in Montpelier.

 SCOTT ADDIS: “Sweet Corn,” a solo exhibition of landscape paintings by the Montréal artist. Reception: Friday, July 13, 5-7 p.m. July 1-31. Info, 458-0098. Edgewater Gallery at Middlebury Falls.  ‘WORKING METAL, CREATING ART’: Works by

Vermont artists Kate Pond, Chris Cleary, Warren Rinehart, John Arthur, Kathy Mitchell and Meg Walker. Reception: Friday, June 29, 5-8 p.m. June 29-August 12. Info, info@creativespacegallery.org. Creative Space Gallery in Vergennes.

rutland/killington

DEBORAH GOODWIN: “Fabrications in Clay,” ceramics by the local artist. June 29-August 28. Info, 247-4956. Brandon Artists Guild.

champlain islands/northwest

 ‘WOMEN SPEAK: RESISTANCE ART SHOW’: Works by Sarah Rosedahl, Meta Strick and India Tressely. Reception: Wednesday, July 11, 5-7 p.m. July 1-31. Info, 378-4591. Grand Isle Art Works.

brattleboro/okemo valley

PHYLLIS CHASE: Paintings by the Calais artist. July 1-August 23. Info, 223-7274. Adamant Music School.

 HEATHER J. GEOFFREY: “Borderlands,” works exploring borders and interstitial spaces through a variety of mediums including acrylic painting, digital photography, the written word and performance. Reception: Friday, July 6, 5:30-7 p.m. June 27-July 31. Info, 869-2960. Main Street Arts in Saxtons River.

stowe/smuggs

randolph/royalton

 ANNELEIN BEUKENKAMP: “Different Strokes,”

abstract acrylic paintings by the Burlington artist. Reception: Saturday, June 30, 4-6 p.m. June 30-September 9. Info, 253-1818. Green Mountain Fine Art Gallery in Stowe.



‘EXPLORING AIR,’ EDGEWATER: One site in a two-part exhibition featuring works that investigate the qualities of air, presented in partnership with the Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center. Reception: Friday, July 27, 4-6 p.m. July 2-August 30. Info, 760-6785. Edgewater Gallery in Stowe. ‘THE HEAD OF THE CLASS’: An invitational group show of artwork by Lamoille County art teachers. June 28-September 3. Info, 644-5100. Bryan Memorial Gallery in Jeffersonville.

 NEIL BERGER: “Men, Mountains, Sky,” en plein air paintings made over a year in Burlington’s Battery Park.  VERMONT COMIC CREATORS GROUP EXHIBIT: Works by Vermont-based comic-book creators, cartoonists and other artists who make narrative sequential 2D art. Reception and artist talk: Thursday, July 5, 5-7 p.m. June 28-September 2. Info, 888-1261. River Arts in Morrisville. ‘THE SKY’S THE LIMIT’: A juried show of 72 artists whose works feature the sky as the predominant element of the composition. June 28-September 3. Info, 644-5100. Bryan Memorial Gallery in Jeffersonville.

middlebury area

 JONATHAN D. EBINGER: “Breathing Life Into

76 ART

Christian origin story. Through July 8. Pictured: “Man With Cigar.”

Metal,” welded sculpture from stainless steel nuts, bolts, washers and rods. Reception: Friday, July 13, 5:30-7 p.m. July 1-31. Info, 989-7419. Edgewater Gallery on the Green in Middlebury.

 JOANNE CARSON: “Hyper Flora,” paintings and sculpture that investigate the fraught relationships between humans and nature, alchemy and science.  PETER MORIARTY: “Light & Paper/Mes Plantes,” recent camera-less photographs made with light, paper and plants. Reception: Saturday July 14, 5-7 p.m. July 4-August 25. Info, 767-9670. BigTown Gallery in Rochester.  MARION LENT: “Sprites to Live By,” 30

handmade figures made from felted wool, with hand-molded and painted antennae, hands, feet and faces. Reception: Sunday, July 1, 2-4 p.m. July 1-August 18. Info, 889-9404. Tunbridge Public Library in Tunbridge Village.

ART EVENTS ‘ART SEED’: A community event featuring work from the multidisciplinary residency’s artists, including performance, open studios and readings. Marble House Project, Dorset, Saturday, June 30, 2-5 p.m. Info, info@marblehouseproject.org. ARTIST TALK: GARY STARR: The self-taught wood carver presents the illustrated lecture “A Life Among Birds: Carved and Flying” in conjunction with his current exhibition. Henry Sheldon Museum of Vermont History, Middlebury, Wednesday, June 27, noon. Info, 388-2117. OPEN HOUSE AND BOOK SIGNING: DANIELLE CORSETTO: The longtime web cartoonist signs

VISUAL ART IN SEVEN DAYS:

copies of her Complete Girls With Slingshots book tour. Words & Pictures, Essex Junction, Friday, June 29, 6-9 p.m. Info, wordsandpicturesvt@gmail.com. ‘PERSONAL PERSPECTIVE’: An exhibition juried by Saul Robbins featuring photographs by local, national and international photographers. Darkroom Gallery, Essex Junction, Through July 15. Info, 777-3686. PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP: Amateur photographers are invited to learn how the elements of exposure affect images and to bring any questions about the many adjustable features built into digital and film cameras. BYO camera and owners manual. Preregistration required. Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge, Swanton, Saturday, June 30, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 868-4781. STITCH & BITCH!: Hang out and stitch/work on your fiber arts in good company. BYO materials and projects. Words & Pictures, Essex Junction, Wednesday, June 27, 6-8 p.m. $5 suggested donation. Info, wordsandpicturesvt@gmail.com. WORCESTER ART GROUP EXHIBIT AND SALE: Works by members of the local artists group. Worcester Town Hall, Wednesday, July 4, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Info, 505-1764. WORKSHOP: HOW TO WRITE AN EFFECTIVE ARTIST STATEMENT: Artist and entrepreneur Corrinna Thurston leads this workshop on using language to effectively market yourself. Register in advance online. Milton Art Center & Gallery, Thursday, June 28, 6-7:30 p.m. Info, MAGVTWorkshops@gmail.com.

ONGOING SHOWS burlington

AMANDA AMEND: Watercolors by the Vermont artist. Through July 6. Info, amanda.amend@gmail. com. The Daily Planet in Burlington. ‘THE ART OF THE BOOK’: An exhibition of handmade artists’ books by members of the Book Arts Guild of Vermont. Through June 30. Info, 863-6458. Frog Hollow Vermont Craft Gallery in Burlington. ART’S ALIVE FESTIVAL OF FINE ART: An annual juried exhibition of Vermont visual artists. Through June 30. Info, 859-9222. Art’s Alive Gallery @ Main Street Landing’s Union Station in Burlington. ‘FLOURISH’: Thirty-one works by Vermont artists with disabilities, featuring painting, drawing, photography, ceramics, textiles, and mixed-media sculpture and assemblage. Through June 30. Info, 652-4500. Amy E. Tarrant Gallery in Burlington. GEEBO CHURCH: “Small Landscapes,” oil paintings. Through July 31. Info, 860-4972. Black Horse Gallery in Burlington. ‘HOW PEOPLE MAKE THINGS’: An interactive exhibit that reveals how familiar childhood objects are manufactured and tells the story of the people, ideas and technologies used to transform raw materials into finished products. Through September 3. Info, 864-1848. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain in Burlington.

ART LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY RACHEL ELIZABETH JONES. LISTINGS ARE RESTRICTED TO ART SHOWS IN TRULY PUBLIC PLACES.

‘THE GENDER & IDENTITY RESEARCH PROJECT’: Teacher and Goddard College graduate student Julie Montera presents findings from interviews with children centered around gender and identity, as well as photographs that show the gendered messages of children’s clothing. Through July 8. ‘SUMMER READING AT FFL: A RETROSPECTIVE’: Archival materials and ephemera, including posters, banners and T-shirts, from more than 30 years of the program started to engage young readers during the summer. Through August 31. Info, 863-3403. Fletcher Free Library in Burlington. JAMES VALASTRO: Fowl-centric “HenArt” cartoons by the local cartoonist, photographer and videographer. Through June 30. Info, 658-6016. Speeder & Earl’s Coffee in Burlington. ‘JAZZ TRIO’: Artworks inspired by musicians by Sam Handler, Brooke Monte and Lynne Reed. Through June 30. Info, 233-6811. Box Art Studio in Burlington. JOHN DOUGLAS: A video installation by the Burlington artist. Info, sarah@seaba.com. TATIANA E. ZELAZO: “UnderCurrent,” the first solo show of works by the Vermont painter and photographer. Through June 30. Info, 859-9222. The Gallery at Main Street Landing in Burlington. MARY LUNDQUIST: “In No Time,” a series of works on paper by the Burlington artist. Through June 30. Info, maryclundquist@gmail.com. The Hive Collective in Burlington. MATTHEW THORSEN: “Thorever,” a celebration of the life and work of the Burlington photojournalist and Seven Days staff photographer. Through July 15.  NICOLE CZAPINSKI: “forever, a little ghost,” sculptural “drawings” in thread, which the artist will activate and alter over the course of the show. Reception: Friday, June 29, 6-8 p.m. Through August 5. Info, 865-7166. BCA Center in Burlington.

 MEMBERS ONLY ART EXHIBIT: Works in a variety of mediums by members of the South End Arts and Business Association. Reception: Friday, July 6, 5-8 p.m. Through August 31. Info, 651-9692. VCAM Studio in Burlington. (MICHAEL SMITH): Drawings made on black paper with correction fluid and other white mark-making implements by the self-taught Underhill artist. Through June 30. Info, 859-9222. SEABA Center in Burlington. ‘OPTIMIST PRIME’: An exhibition guest-curated by Michael Shoudt, featuring work by Liv Aanrud, Peter Gallo, Tamara Gonzales, Catherine Haggarty, Katie Hector, Steven Mayer, Dustin Metz and Grant Newman. Through July 24. Info, joseph@ newcitygalerie.org. New City Galerie in Burlington. STEVE SHARON: Abstract paintings by the Burlington artist and musician. Through July 10. Info, 2kdeep@gmail.com. Half Lounge in Burlington. ‘YOU KNOW WHAT I MEAN?’: A group exhibition of abstractions by Ashley Roark, Blake Larsen, Dan Siegel, Longina Smolinksi and Steve Sharon. Through June 30. Info, 578-2512. The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery in Burlington.

GET YOUR ART SHOW LISTED HERE!

IF YOU’RE PROMOTING AN ART EXHIBIT, LET US KNOW BY POSTING INFO AND IMAGES BY THURSDAYS AT NOON ON OUR FORM AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT OR GALLERIES@SEVENDAYSVT.COM.


DONNA BOURNE: Plein air landscape paintings. Through June 30. Info, 985-8222. Shelburne Vineyard. ‘HISTORY AT THE HEART OF THE VILLAGE’: Documentary photographs from the dedication of the Brownell Library on July 20, 1926. Through June 30. Info, 878-6955. Brownell Library in Essex Junction. ‘IN THE GARDEN’: An exhibit featuring fine art, textiles, sculpture, furniture, actual insects and more explores how flowers and bugs have captivated artists’ imaginations over the centuries. Through August 25. Info, 985-3346. Pizzagalli Center for Art and Education, Shelburne Museum. ‘INTO THE LIGHT’: A group exhibition featuring the works of Castleton artist Dick Weis and 15 others. Through July 17. Info, 985-3848. Furchgott Sourdiffe Gallery in Shelburne. KIMBERLEE FORNEY: Whimsical and colorful paintings and prints. Through August 31. Info, kimberleef@msn.com. Davis Studio in South Burlington. ‘LUMINOUS LANDSCAPES OF VERMONT’: Vermont landscape photographs by Mary Claire Carroll and paintings by Julie J. McGowan, both of Richmond. Through July 15. Emile A. Gruppe Gallery in Jericho. LYNDA REEVES MCINTYRE: “Azores to Abiquiu,” recent landscape paintings by the Vermont artist. Through July 31. Village Wine and Coffee Winemakers Gallery in Shelburne. ‘A NEW AMERICAN FAMILY’: An exhibit honoring the Bhattarai family, featuring photos of the family, an account of how they got from Bhutan to Winooski, and quotes from family members describing the journey and their life here. Through July 31. Info, 985-8328. O’Brien Community Center in Winooski. ‘PLAYING COWBOY: AMERICA’S WILD WEST SHOWS’: Combining period posters with historical film footage, this exhibition explores the profound influence Buffalo Bill and other Wild West shows had on shaping contemporary understandings of the American West, Native American history and the cowboy way of life. Through October 21. Info, 985-3346. Shelburne Museum.

‘WHEN I WAS OLDER’: Mixed-media works by Nina Dubois and Art2D2 Industries, aka Jason Galligan-Baldwin. Through July 29. Info, 985-9511. Rustic Roots in Shelburne.

barre/montpelier

‘BEYOND WORDS’: Artworks by members of the Book Arts Guild of Vermont. ‘JACK ROWELL, CULTURAL DOCUMENTARIAN: PORTRAITS OF VERMONT PEOPLE AND OTHER WILDLIFE’: Photographs from the fifth-generation Vermonter’s 30-plus-year career. ‘TELL ME’: Artwork by 19 local artists that explores language and communication. Through June 30. Info, 479-7069. Studio Place Arts in Barre.

JOAN MARIE DAVIDSON: Recent acrylic paintings, collaged handmade paper and mixed-media compositions. Through June 30. Info, joani@tds. net. City Center in Montpelier. ORAH MOORE: “Stewards of the Land,” handprinted silverprint photographs of Montana ranchers. Through August 10. Info, 479-7069. Morse Block Deli in Barre. ‘PALETTEERS OF VERMONT MEMBER SHOW’: Members of the central Vermont artists group show works in oil, watercolor, pastel, pen and ink, colored pencil, and photography. RONALD SLAYTON: “Master of Watercolor,” paintings from the private collection of Billi and Bobby Gosh, including 12 of the WPA-era artist’s later watercolors. Through June 29. Info, 262-6035. T.W. Wood Gallery in Montpelier. ‘SHOW 26: NEW MEMBERS’: The latest group exhibition of the collective gallery’s Vermont-based contemporary artists, including recent additions Jason Galligan-Baldwin, Kate Burnim, Sam Colt, Mark Lorah, Ned Richardson and Michelle Saffran. Through August 4. Info, 552-0877. The Front in Montpelier. ‘SOLZHENITSYN IN VERMONT’: A celebration of the Russian novelist, historian and Nobel Prize winner turned Vermont resident, in honor of the 100th anniversary of his birth. Through October 27. Info, 828-2291. Vermont History Museum in Montpelier.

7/1 SU

7/2 MO 7/3 TU 7/4 WE 7/5 TH

STANLEY FOLSOM: “Vermont Trains and Stations,” detailed drawings. Through July 5. Info, 426-3581. Jaquith Public Library in Marshfield. TOM MERWIN: “The Effects of Bird Song on Shifting Strata,” abstract oil paintings. Through June 28. Info, 828-0749. Vermont Supreme Court Gallery in Montpelier.

‘EXPLORING AIR’: A group exhibition including works of painting, photography and sculpture that address the element of air, curated by Kelly Holt. Through August 30. Info, 760-6785. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe Mountain Resort.

f GEORGE PEARLMAN: “Plastic Expression,” paintings. Closing reception: Wednesday, July 4, 6-8 p.m. Through July 5. Info, 635-2727. Vermont Studio Center in Johnson. JAMES PETERSON: “Dreamcatcher,” an immersive installation by the artist-in-residence from Los Angeles. Through September 30. Info, 253-8358. Spruce Peak at Stowe. KIMBERLEE FORNEY: Colorful acrylic paintings and prints. Through October 31. Info, kimberleef@msn. com. Green Goddess Café in Stowe. NORTHERN VERMONT ARTISTS ASSOCIATION JUNE JURIED SHOW: The 87th annual exhibition of works by artist association members. Through July 7. Info, 644-8183. Visions of Vermont Art Galleries in Jeffersonville. RACHEL MOORE: “Traces,” selections of works by the multidisciplinary artist and Helen Day Art Center executive director, who uses mixed-media STOWE/SMUGGS SHOWS

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VSO SUMMER TOUR VSO SUMMER TOUR

Grafton Ponds, Grafton

VSO SUMMER TOUR

7/6 FR

Brunswick School, Randolph

VSO SUMMER TOUR

Trapp Concert Meadow, Stowe Flynn MainStage

7/10 TU

VSO SUMMER TOUR

Shelburne Museum, Shelburne

VSO SUMMER TOUR

JOE JACKSON

Hunter Park, Manchester

2018-19 FLYNN SNEAK PREVIEW

Flynn MainStage 7/15 SU

ANNUAL FLYNN GARDEN TOUR

Mountain Top Inn and Resort, Chittenden

Various gardens in Charlotte

QUEEN CITY GHOST WALK

Trapp Concert Meadow, Stowe

Ghosts and Legends of Lake Champlain Meet at the Fountain in Battery Park (7/5-10/25)

stowe/smuggs

‘CURIOUS & COOL’: Unusual and seldom-seen artifacts of ski culture from the museum’s archives. Through October 31. Info, 253-9911. Vermont Ski and Snowboard Museum in Stowe.

VSO SUMMER TOUR 7/7 SA Suicide Six Resort, South Pomfret (Tickets for 7/1 available through 7/8 SU Pentangle Arts Council)

MARCIA BALL

7/17 TU 7/19 TH

QUEEN CITY GHOST WALK

MIZUKA OHNISHI

Amy E. Tarrant Gallery, Flynn

GILLIAN WELCH

Flynn MainStage

Flynn Youth Theater Company

CRY-BABY

Darkness Falls FlynnSpace (7/19-22) Meets at sculpture at Courthouse 7/20 FR BRUCE HORNSBY Plaza (7/6-11/3) Flynn MainStage

ON SALE & COMING SOON

2018-19 Flynn Season on sale How to Succeed in Business... Over the Edge for the Flynn I’m With Her CVE Motor Sport events: Demo Derby, Figure 8 Racing, Freestyle Motocross, Night of Fire and Destruction

7/26 TH 7/29 SU

PUNCH BROTHERS

Flynn MainStage

THE DUSTBOWL REVIVAL

Trapp Concert Meadow, Stowe 7/31 TU

GORDON LIGHTFOOT

Flynn MainStage

802-863-5966 l 153 Main St., Burlington Untitled-7 1

6/25/18 7:23 PM

ART 77

CAROLYN EGELI: “For the Love of Vermont,” oil paintings by the Braintree artist. Through June 28. Info, 828-0749. Governor’s Gallery in Montpelier.

JENNIFER PALKOWSKI JACQUES: Original watercolor and mixed-media paintings including ghost portraits and skyscapes. Through September 1. Info, 595-4866. The Hive in Middlesex.

SEVEN DAYS

‘ARTISTS TO WATCH PART II’: Ric Kasini Kadour and six guest curators showcase Vermont artists of note. Through June 29. Info, 828-3291. Spotlight Gallery in Montpelier.

TICKETS ON SALE Members 7/17 Public 8/1

06.27.18-07.04.18

‘ANYTHING FOR SPEED: AUTOMOBILE RACING IN VERMONT’: The center celebrates the opening of its yearlong exhibition exploring more than a century of the history and evolution of racing in Vermont through the objects, photographs and recollections that comprise this unique story. Through March 30, 2019. Info, 479-8500. Vermont History Center in Barre.

FLYNN

HEIDI BRONER: “Inner Lives,” realist portraits by the self-taught painter. Through August 3. Info, 279-6403. Central Vermont Medical Center in Berlin.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

SHELBURNE CRAFT SCHOOL GROUP SHOW: Works by artists from the school’s advanced oil painting class, including Jane Guyette, Diane Lavallee, Sid Miller, Fred Morgan, Deborah Boutilier Paolantonio, Suzie Quinn and instructor Sage Tucker-Ketcham. Through July 7. Info, 425-6345. Charlotte Senior Center.

‘EXPLORERS OF NORWICH’: An exhibition exploring the lives of Norwich University alumni who shaped and changed the U.S. during the mid-19th and early 20th centuries. Through June 30. Info, 4852183. Sullivan Museum & History Center, Norwich University, in Northfield.

FRÉDÉRIC SILBERMAN

chittenden county

SOFIA AND MAURO

ART SHOWS


art STOWE/SMUGGS SHOWS

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‘REBEL, REBEL’: Paintings on broken snowboards, skateboards, wood and canvas by Trevor Corp, Ian Hutchings and Drew Lalonde. ​Through July 10. Info, montgomerycenterarts@gmail.com. Montgomery Center for the Arts.

sculpture, installation, drawing and social practice to address themes including climate change and global migration patterns. Through June 29. Info, 760-6785. Edgewater Gallery in Stowe.

upper valley

‘RECLAMATION’: Portraits of women painted by nationally acclaimed, contemporary women artists. Curated by August Burns, Diane Feissel and Rachel Moore. Through September 8. Info, 253-8358. Helen Day Art Center in Stowe.

‘AIR WORKS’: An exhibit that explores the properties of air and the science behind its everyday use and includes a 3D air maze, hover table, chain-reaction machine, paper airplane launcher and air-operated bottle organ. Through September 3. Info, 649-2200. Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich.

‘VERMONT LANDSCAPES’: An exhibition featuring 38 landscape paintings by 19 Vermont artists. Through June 30. Info, 644-5100. Lamoille County Courthouse in Hyde Park.

CAROL LIPPMAN: “Seen/Unseen,” prints by the artist who splits her time between West Newbury and Syosset, N.Y. Through June 30. Info, 295-5901. Two Rivers Printmaking Studio in White River Junction.

mad river valley/waterbury

GREEN MOUNTAIN WATERCOLOR EXHIBITION: More than 100 watercolors from artists across North America. Through July 28. Info, 496-6682. The Big Red Barn at Lareau Farm in Waitsfield. MAIYA KECK: Gestural oil and acrylic paintings by the Rhode Island School of Design graduate. Through June 30. Info, 244-7801. Axel’s Gallery & Frame Shop in Waterbury. ‘THE SAFETY OF OBJECTS: A VISUAL DISCOURSE BETWEEN FATHER AND DAUGHTER’: A juxtaposition of Royal Academy of Art member Michael CraigMartin and his daughter, Vanity Fair photographer Jessica Craig-Martin. Through September 3. Info, 583-5832. Bundy Modern in Waitsfield.

middlebury area

‘1968: THE WHOLE WORLD IS WATCHING’: Prints, photographs, videos, paintings and sculpture from the mid-1960s through the early 1970s that reflect some of the more visible divisions within the art world of the turbulent era. ‘JUST KIDS: PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE NICHOLAS GIFT’: Photographs of children drawn from every corner of the globe and representing a broad spectrum of social and economic circumstances. Through August 12. Info, 443-5007. Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College.

78 ART

SEVEN DAYS

06.27.18-07.04.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

‘BIRDS, BEES AND BUTTERFLIES IN THE LAND OF MILK AND HONEY’: A group exhibition of art and poetry organized by artist and avid gardener Klara Calitri. Through July 8. Info, 382-9222. Jackson Gallery, Town Hall Theater, in Middlebury. ‘BLADES WILL SPROUT’: Paintings by Anne Cady, Julia Jensen and Jessica Smith, whose works use landscape as an entry point but differ stylistically. Through July 29. Info, 877-2173. Northern Daughters in Vergennes. ‘FISH & FEATHER’: Wildlife paintings by Nick Mayer and bird carvings by Gary M. Starr. Through July 1. Info, 238-6607. Art on Main in Bristol. JOHN CROSS: “American Wood Sculptor John Cross: A Contemporary Figurative Folk Artist,” whimsical wood carvings by the Middlebury College alum. Through July 8. ‘OUR TOWN: LOVE, JOY, SADNESS AND BASEBALL’: Thirty-six historic photographs from the museum’s archives, curated by retired National Geographic photographer James P. Blair

Art’s Alive Festival of Fine Art Saturday, June 30, is

the last chance to check out this annual juried exhibition featuring artworks by a broad swath of Vermont artists, on view at Burlington’s Union Station. Judged by Justin Gural of Ben & Jerry’s and Mariah Riggs of Main Street Landing, the show features several award winners, including first place to Kara Torres for their fiercely energetic acrylic painting “The Wonderful Garden” (pictured). This work, along with those of fellow award winners Gav’om (second place), Jerry Rayla and Matt Morris (tie for third place), Linda Dulleba (Roberto W. Fitzgerald Award), and Paul McMillan (Artist Choice), will be shown at the SEABA Center in July. Meantime, head down to the train station and be your own judge. and Sheldon archivist Eva Garcelon-Hart. Through July 8. ‘WATERFOWL WONDERS & AMUSING ANIMALS’: Carvings by Addison County-based wood carvers Gary Starr, Chuck Herrmann and William Holway. Through November 11. Info, 388-2117. Henry Sheldon Museum of Vermont History in Middlebury. KILEIGH HANNAH: “Halcyon Days,” nature-inspired abstract paintings by the Colchester artist, whose preferred media include traditional acrylic, graphite, table salt and homegrown sodium borate crystals. Through July 29. Info, 917-686-1292. Steven Jupiter Gallery in Middlebury. ‘THE WAY WE SEE IT’: Abstract, mixed-media works by Jane Davies and dreamlike landscapes by Alexis Serio. Through June 30. Info, 458-0098. Edgewater Gallery at Middlebury Falls. ‘THE WAY WE SEE IT’: Floral photographic studies by Kirsten Hoving and paintings on wooden sheets by Michele Kishita. Through June 30. Info, 989-7419. Edgewater Gallery on the Green in Middlebury.

rutland/killington

DARRYL LAUSTER: “For the Time Being,” recent works in marble and bronze by the Texas artist. Through June 30. Info, 438-2097. The Carving Studio in West Rutland.

CALL TO ARTISTS ‘ABUNDANCE: CELEBRATING CREATIVITY IN MENTAL HEALTH, WELLNESS AND RECOVERY’: The Clara Martin Center invites artists and friends of mental health to submit poetry and artworks to be considered for a fall exhibition. Applicants must be Vermont residents, and preference will be given to artists/writers in the White River and Upper valleys. Works must be ready to hang. For details and to submit, visit claramartin.org. Deadline: July 31. Chandler Gallery, Randolph. Info, dlittlepage@claramartin.org. CENTER FOR CARTOON STUDIES CORNISH RESIDENCY: Cartoonists, illustrators and graphic storytellers are invited to apply for this October 16 to November 16 residency in a remote cabin in Cornish, N.H. The selected resident will receive access to CCS resources as well as a $3,000 honorarium. For further details and to apply, visit cartoonstudies.org. Deadline: August 15. Center for Cartoon Studies, White River Junction. Info, 295-3319.

DAVID FIFIELD: “Head in the Clouds,” recent abstract paintings. Through June 29. Info, 247-4956. Brandon Artists Guild. ‘FIREMAN SQUARED’: Sculptures spanning the creative output of Mark Burnett and Glenn Campbell, made with materials including plaster, marble, wood, glass, bronze and steel. Through August 18. Info, 2822396. Castleton University Bank Gallery in Rutland. MARY FRAN LLOYD: “Life in the Abstract,” 31 paintings using acrylic paint and collaged paper. Through August 9. Info, maryfranart@aol.com. Rutland City Hall. ‘MY FIRST STREET HE(ART): NYC’: Works by 45 national and international street artists, curated by Alison Wallis, founder of Bushwick’s Ad Hoc Gallery. Through July 28. Info, vtalleygallery@gmail.com. The Alley Gallery in Rutland. PASTEL SOCIETY EXHIBIT: Works by more than 40 members of the Vermont Pastel Society. Through July 21. Info, 775-0356. Chaffee Art Center in Rutland.

champlain islands/northwest

NATELI BOZE & BECKY COOK: “Miss Match: Pixels to Paint, Photos Re-Imagined,” a collaboration of the photographer Boze and painter Cook. Through June 30. Info, 649-1047. Norwich Public Library. STACY HOPKINS: “Rebirth,” a solo exhibition of non-jewelry works by the artist and jewelry designer. Through June 30. Info, scavenger.gallery@gmail.com. Scavenger Gallery in White River Junction. STEPHANIE GORDON: Encaustic paintings by the Piermont, N.H., artist. Through August 31. Info, 295-4567. Long River Gallery & Gifts in White River Junction.

northeast kingdom

‘CELEBRATION OF VERMONT ARTS’: A group exhibition featuring works by more than 80 Vermont artisans, with a focus on those from the Northeast Kingdom. Through July 8. Info, 533-2045. Miller’s Thumb Gallery in Greensboro. ‘A COMMON THREAD: STITCHES AND STORIES FROM FIBER ARTISTS NEAR AND FAR’: Fiber works by Northeast Kingdom artists. Through July 28. Info, 334-1966. MAC Center for the Arts Gallery in Newport. ‘EARTH LIKE’: Works by Jake Harnish and Brittany Miracle. Through July 15. Info, 563-2037. White Water Gallery in East Hardwick. KATHY STARK: Select mixed-media paintings. Through July 23. Info, 525-3366. Parker Pie Co. in West Glover. ‘LOCKED DOWN! KEYED IN! LOCKED OUT! KEYED UP!’: An exhibition examining the long human relationship to the lock and key, its elegant design and philosophies and practices of securing, safeguarding, imprisoning, escaping and safecracking throughout the ages. Through April 30, 2019. Donations. Info, claredol@sover.net. The Museum of Everyday Life in Glover. RICHARD BROWN: Black-and-white photographs of nostalgic Vermont landscapes and people. Through December 31. Info, 748-2372. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium in St. Johnsbury.

‘ABSTRACT CONSTRUCTIONS: SOLID & LIGHT’: Mixed-media “Landscape Constructions” by Edwin Owre and glass “Abstract Landscapes” by Holly Rae Taylor. Through July 15. Info, 355-2150. GreenTARA Space in North Hero.

CREATION GRANT: Vermont artists and artist groups seeking Creation Grants are invited to apply for funding to support the development of new work, including time, materials and space rental. For details and to apply, visit vermontartscouncil.org. Deadline: June 28. Vermont Arts Council, Montpelier. Info, 828-5425.

exhibits, sculpture, fashion shows, music, live demos, artist markets, juried show and Kids Hop. Register as an artist, artist market, South End business site, fashion designer, indoor and outdoor juried shows, and more at seaba.com. Deadline: July 2. South End Arts District, Burlington. $47 and up. Info, info@seaba.com.

‘MORRISVILLE — FAVORITE PLACES’: Photographers are invited to submit images of the town for a two-part exhibition opening in September. For details and to submit, visit riverartsvt.org. Deadline: July 20. River Arts, Morrisville. Info, 888-1261.

SPA STUDIO RESIDENCY PROGRAM: Emerging artists from the greater Barre/Montpelier area are invited to apply for an 11-month residency to take place from November 15, 2018, to October 31, 2019. A small private studio on the second floor of the visual arts center will be provided, with an exhibition at the end of the program. For details and to submit, visit studioplacearts.com. Deadline: Friday, August 10. Studio Place Arts, Barre. Info, 479-7069.

‘ROCK SOLID’: For the 18th year, area artists are invited to share their most compelling stone sculptures and assemblages, as well as paintings and etchings that depict the beautiful qualities of stone. For details and to submit, visit studioplacearts.com. Deadline: August 10. Studio Place Arts, Barre. $10; free for SPA members. Info, 479-7069. SOUTH END ART HOP REGISTRATION: 2018 marks the 26th South End Art Hop, a celebration of the arts occurring September 7-9. The Art Hop attracts more than 30,000 visitors to view hundreds of

‘STILL LIFE: ELEVATING THE MUNDANE’: Artists are invited to submit photographs, made using any process, that fall within the category of still life for this upcoming exhibition to be juried by Kimberly Witham. For details and to apply, visit photoplacegallery. com. Deadline: July 9. PhotoPlace Gallery, Middlebury. $35 for up to five images; $6 for each additional. Info, 388-4500.


ART SHOWS

WIN an Evening with The Eagles

SUSAN ABBOTT: “One Way, Many Paths: An Artist Walks the Camino,” paintings inspired by the artist’s journey along the historic pilgrimage El Camino de Santiago. Through July 8. Info, info@ highlandartsvt.org. Highland Center for the Arts in Greensboro. ‘WATER IS LIFE’: Works celebrating water by Northeast Kingdom artists. Through July 28. Info, 748-0158. Northeast Kingdom Artists Guild in St. Johnsbury.

Sept 15th at THE FORUM in L.A.

brattleboro/okemo valley

DAVID RIOS FERREIRA: “And I Hear Your Words That I Made Up,” mixed-media works that conjure a psychic landscape filled with conflicting emotions. Through September 24. DEBRA RAMSAY: “Painting Time,” an installation of strips of color derived from nature, as captured by the artist over a year in New Berlin, N.Y. Through September 24. ROBERT DUGRENIER: “Handle With Care,” sculptures made of glass and farm equipment as part of the artist’s process of mourning the 2015 fire that destroyed his historic barn. Through September 24. ROZ CHAST: “Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?” 139 original illustrations from the New Yorker cartoonist’s graphic memoir. Through September 24. SHONA MACDONALD: “Terrestrial Vale,” a series of silverpoint and graphite works on paper depicting fledgling plants prepared for winter with veils of garden netting. Through September 24. STEVE GERBERICH: “Best of ‘Springs, Sprockets & Pulleys,’” kinetic sculptures by the artist, inventor and packrat. Through October 8. Info, 257-0124. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center. ‘GIVE & TAKE’: Collaborative collages of images and words by poet Gordon Korstange and painter Matt Peake. Through June 29. Info, 869-2960. Main Street Arts in Saxtons River.

randolph/royalton

Five Day Trip to Los Angeles

Round Trip Airfare

LISTEN FOR CONTEST DETAILS

Hotel Accomodations

$1000 Spending Cash

Tickets to Show

Runner Up Prizes Include: Yamaha Mini Stereo Systems From Creative Sound $250 Cash!

BOB EDDY: “A Second Look,” black-and-white photographs of Vermont’s White River Valley from the final years of the film era. Through September 1. Info, 728-9878. Chandler Gallery in Randolph.

SEVEN DAYS

CARRIE CAOUETTE-DE LALLO: “Common Objects & Uncommon Places,” a selection of acrylics on paper and landscapes from the artist’s travels through the United States, Portugal and Spain. Through June 30. Info, 685-2188. Chelsea Public Library.

06.27.18-07.04.18

‘DARTMOUTH INFLUENCE’: Works by 11 Dartmouth College-affiliated women artists: Virginia Beahan, Jennifer Caine, Kari Cholnoky, Louise Hamlin, Karolina Kawiaka, Stina Köhnke, Hannah Olivia Nelson, Colleen Randall, Christina Seely, Esmé Thompson and Zenovia Toloudi. Through June 30. Info, 767-9670. ALISON WELD: “Light Field,” recent abstract paintings by the upstate New York artist. Through July 21. Info, 767-9670. BigTown Gallery in Rochester.

GRAND PRIZE includes

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

‘HOPE AND HAZARD: A COMEDY OF EROS’: A group exhibition curated by American artist Eric Fischl featuring approximately 65 artists and more than 80 paintings, photographs, works on paper and sculptures selected from the Hall and Hall Art Foundation collections. ‘MADE IN VERMONT’: A group exhibition of new and recently completed paintings, works on paper and sculpture by Vermont artists. ‘THE SOLACE OF AMNESIA’: More than 30 paintings, photographs, works on paper and sculpture by some 25 artists that address human alienation from the natural environment, curated by artist Alexis Rockman and Katherine Gass Stowe. Through November 25. Info, 952-1056. Hall Art Foundation in Reading.

JAN FOWLER: “Reverence,” landscape paintings of Vermont, New England, Europe, Florida and the American Southwest by the Randolph artist. Through June 28. Info, 889-9404. Tunbridge Public Library in Tunbridge Village. m

CHAMPLAIN VALLEY & NORTHERN VERMONT

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movies First Reformed ★★★★★

I

doubt the man who wrote Taxi Driver could engineer a more perfect career bookend. In writer-director Paul Schrader’s gloriously bleak First Reformed, a parish priest simultaneously undergoes crises of faith, bodily health, paternal guilt, substance abuse, depression and homicidal ideation. And, smack in the middle of his personal apocalypse, who do we encounter? Cedric the Entertainer. Just as, smack in the middle of Travis Bickle’s, audiences found Albert Brooks, then a standup familiar from “The Ed Sullivan Show.” Like Bickle, Reverend Ernst Toller (Ethan Hawke) is a loner. Also like that iconic creation, Toller pursues a calling that brings him into contact with human beings in a manner unconducive to normal connection. The actor keeps his recent winning streak alive with a meticulously measured, quietly mind-blowing performance. Toller is the pastor of a historically significant but culturally irrelevant church in upstate New York, with Protestant roots going back to the Revolutionary War. Indeed, the pastor ministers to more tourists than parishioners as its 250th anniversary celebration approaches. The reverend is tormented. Not so much

by the dwindling of his flock, the blood in his urine, his skyrocketing liquor tab or even the death of a son he urged to serve in Iraq as by the sense that God has stopped taking his calls. He keeps a journal in an effort to bring order to the chaos in his mind, his inner commentary providing a voice-over as Bickle’s did in Martin Scorsese’s misanthropic 1976 masterwork. “When writing about oneself,” Toller tells us, “one should show no mercy.” “You’re always in the garden,” he’s told by the friendly but concerned pastor of Abundant Life, the nearby megachurch. Cedric Kyles is entertaining and a revelation in the role. Just when you’re sure Toller can’t possibly bear one more cross, a pregnant member of his parish named Mary (Amanda Seyfried) asks him to counsel her husband. Philip Ettinger plays an environmental activist who wants his wife to get an abortion. In a single scene, he makes his case against bringing a child into a doomed world: Industrial contamination, corporate corruption and climate change, he contends, will render the Earth unlivable in their lifetime. The intervention backfires. The cleric,

REVIEWS

MASS APPEAL Hawke is quietly mind-blowing in the role of a man of God going through holy hell.

it turns out, is the one who sees the light. Rage against defilers of God’s creation quickly proves a volatile new bitter in the cocktail of troubles bubbling inside him. Of course, it doesn’t help that the church’s biggest benefactor is an energy company with a toxic track record, owned by a congregant. Or that Toller and Mary grow increasingly close. Or that she discovers a suicide vest in her garage and turns it over to the ever-lessstable clergyman. Schrader, 71, knows what you’re thinking. He knows you’ve seen Taxi Driver. He knows you can’t help but do the modern math: Righteous wrath plus explosives equals crowded celebration with made-for-TV mass casualties.

At the same time, you never know where a true artist at the height of his powers might go with the primary theme of his life’s work. Long before he scripted The Last Temptation of Christ, Schrader considered becoming a priest. (He did briefly become a movie critic.) Along with Brian Williams’ muted soundscape and Alexander Dynan’s austere digital lensing, Schrader’s vision works in mysterious ways toward a resolution as surprising as it is sublime. Given today’s comic-bookdriven climate, a picture this profound is honestly a little like a miracle. RI C K KI S O N AK

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Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom ★★★

W

hen Steven Spielberg made Jurassic Park in 1993, he injected fear into the veins of the family-oriented blockbuster. The digital dinosaurs were cool and wondrous, but they were also scary, a matter less of technical wizardry than of old-fashioned tools such as haunted-house-movie pacing. Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, the sequel to 2015’s Jurassic World, features an actual haunted house (well, technically, a ridiculously huge gothic mansion). Its director, J.A. Bayona, made the excellent Spanish chiller The Orphanage. Yet this movie barely summons a shiver. Why not? Maybe because the blockbuster template of 2018 no longer permits the kind of slow burn that Spielberg used so effectively. If Jurassic Park were made today, the terrifying T. rex wouldn’t be introduced gradually, to build anticipation — it would be rampaging in the first scene. Fallen Kingdom opens with full-blown (but PG-13) carnage on Isla Nublar, where dinos overran their own theme park in the preceding film. Three years have passed, and a volcano menaces the remaining reptiles. While Congress debates whether to let dinosaurs go extinct again (with Jeff Goldblum’s Ian Malcolm saying yea), profiteers arrive to harvest their DNA for further cloning. There are casualties. Once the film has grabbed our atten-

HUMAN SCALE Dino danger invades domestic spaces in Bayona’s strange mishmash of a sequel.

tion with a chomping Mosasaurus, it reintroduces us to Claire Dearing (Bryce Dallas Howard), formerly the cynical operations manager of Jurassic World and now a crusader for dino rights. How she got so warm and fuzzy is never explained, but since none of the film’s characters have any depth — or much charisma — it’s hard to care. Millionaire Benjamin Lockwood (James Cromwell), former partner of the original film’s John Hammond, pitches Claire a plan to move the surviving dinosaurs to an island

refuge. Owen Grady (Chris Pratt) will come along to handle the superintelligent Velociraptor Blue and provide (not enough) comic relief. While standard blockbuster heroics happen on Isla Nublar, it’s soon clear that dark intrigue is afoot in Lockwood’s California manor. When his little granddaughter, Maisie (Isabella Sermon), ventures into the basement, a talon looms in the gloom, and dinosaurs briefly become scary again. Screenwriters Colin Trevorrow and Der-

ek Connolly seem to have decided that, since Jurassic Park is basically a mad-scientist story, they might as well take it all the way back to its Frankenstein roots. It’s a bold decision, and the film’s latter half is definitely more interesting, if only by dint of clashing bizarrely with the first. When the film goes full gothic, Bayona pulls off lovely plays of light and shadow, evoking classic horror cinema. But visuals can’t obscure the lack of a compelling protagonist or the fact that the new dinosaur we’re supposed to find scarier than any dinosaur ever is just another rehash. Upping the ante is the MO of modern sequels, but maybe the Jurassic movies need to stop trying to terrorize us with new creatures and find better ways to use the ones they have. The T. rex didn’t have to be smart to scare us, and Velociraptors didn’t have to be huge; it was enough that both could hunt us down and eat us, and Spielberg used all his tricks to make us feel like prey. In Fallen Kingdom, genetic engineering has given us dinosaurs so advanced they barely seem reptilian; at times, we could be watching an alien-invasion movie. And with that, the franchise loses what set it apart: a commitment to re-creating monsters that once existed. It’s hard to tremble at the awesome power of nature when what you’re seeing is clearly a fantasy. MARGO T HARRI S O N


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NOW PLAYING

AMERICAN ANIMALSHHHHH Bart Layton (The Imposter) directed this fact-based drama about three young men who attempt a daring heist with less-than-amazing results. Evan Peters, Ann Dowd and Blake Jenner star. (116 min, R. Roxy, Savoy; reviewed by R.K. 6/20)

ADRIFTH1/2 In the wake of a hurricane, two avid sailors (Shailene Woodley and Sam Claflin) find themselves stranded in the Pacific in this factbased romantic survival tale. Baltasar Kormákur (Everest) directed. (120 min, PG-13; reviewed by R.K. 6/6) AVENGERS: INFINITY WARHHH1/2 Marvel’s master-narrative comes to a head as the Avengers join forces with the Guardians of the Galaxy to protect the Infinity Stones from villainous Thanos (Josh Brolin). Starring Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson, Chris Pratt and the rest of the usual gang. Anthony and Joe Russo (Captain America: Civil War) directed. (149 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 5/2)

BEAST: A depressed young woman (Jessie Buckley) gets involved with a guy (Johnny Flynn) who just might be a serial killer in this fest-acclaimed drama, the feature debut of writer-director Michael Pearce. (107 min, R. Roxy) THE FIRST PURGE: The disturbingly relevant dystopian franchise goes back in time to show us what happened the first time Americans were given 12 hours to commit crimes with impunity. Marisa Tomei, Lex Scott Davis and Melonie Diaz star. Gerard McMurray (Burning Sands) directed. (97 min, R. Sneak preview Tuesday, July 3, at Essex Cinemas; starts Wednesday, July 4) SICARIO: DAY OF THE SOLDADO: Josh Brolin and Benicio del Toro are back to fight the drug trade on the U.S.-Mexico border, but Emily Blunt and director Denis Villeneuve are not, in this action-oriented sequel directed by Stefano Sollima (“Gomorrah”) and written by Taylor Sheridan (Wind River). (122 min, R. Capitol, Essex, Majestic, Palace) UNCLE DREW: A street-ball player determined to win a tournament meets up with a septuagenarian basketball legend (Kyrie Irving) and his old squad in this comedy based on a web-series, also starring Lil Rey Howery and Shaquille O’Neal. Charles Stone III (Step Sisters) directed. (103 min, PG-13. Essex, Sunset)

BOOM FOR REAL: THE LATE TEENAGE YEARS OF JEAN-MICHEL BASQUIATHHH1/2 Sara Driver’s documentary explores how the art and street cultures of New York in the late ’70s helped shape the celebrated artist. (78 min, NR)

JURASSIC WORLD: FALLEN KINGDOMHH1/2 The dinosaurs of a futuristic theme park need rescuing from an erupting volcano in the sequel to Jurassic World, again starring Chris Pratt and Bryce Dallas Howard. With Rafe Spall and Justice Smith. J.A. Bayona (The Impossible) directed. (128 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 6/27) OCEAN’S 8HHH Debbie Ocean (Sandra Bullock) leads an all-female crew on a bold heist of the Met Gala in this crime caper directed and cowritten by Gary Jones (The Hunger Games). Among her cohorts are Cate Blanchett, Anne Hathaway, Rihanna and Mindy Kaling. (110 min, PG-13) ON CHESIL BEACHHHH Saoirse Ronan and Billy Howle play a young couple who weather an awkward wedding night in 1962 England in this adaptation of Ian McEwan’s novel, with Emily Watson. Dominic Cooke (“The Hollow Crown”) directed. (110 min, R)

DEADPOOL 2HH1/2 Ryan Reynolds returns as the “merc with a mouth” in the sequel to the spoofy Marvel hit, in which Deadpool must assemble a gang of mutants to protect a young boy with supernatural powers. With Josh Brolin as the heavy, Morena Baccarin and Zazie Beetz. David Leitch (Atomic Blonde) directed. (119 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 5/23) FIRST REFORMEDHHHHH Ethan Hawke plays a small-town priest questioning his faith in the midst of personal turmoil in this Golden Lion nominee from writer-director Paul Schrader (Light Sleeper, American Gigolo, Hardcore). With Amanda Seyfried and Cedric the Entertainer. (113 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 6/27) HEREDITARYHHHH1/2 Ari Aster makes his directorial debut with this psychological horror film, much buzzed about at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival, about a family that uncovers disturbing secrets after the death of its matriarch. Toni Collette, Gabriel Byrne and Alex Wolff star. (127 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 6/13)

A QUIET PLACEHHHHH John Krasinski and Emily Blunt play a couple trying to raise their family in a world where the slightest sound could summon monsters in this horror thriller, which Krasinski also directed. With Noah Jupe and Millicent Simmonds. (90 min, PG-13; reviewed by R.K. 4/11) RAMPAGE 1/4H Dwayne Johnson plays against type as a shy primatologist who must save the world from monstrous animals created by a genetic experiment in this video-game-based adventure from director Brad Peyton (San Andreas). With Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Malin Akerman and Joe Manganiello. (107 min, PG-13)

RBGHHHH This documentary from directors Julie Cohen (American Veteran) and Betsy West explores the life and work of 84-year-old U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. (98 min, PG; reviewed by M.H. 6/6) THE RIDERHHHH1/2 A young rodeo cowboy (Brady Jandreau) must reevaluate his life after being seriously injured in this acclaimed drama from writer-director Chloé Zhao (Songs My Brothers Taught Me), in which non-professional actors re-create events that happened to them. With Jim Jandreau and Lily Jandreau. (104 min, R) THE SEAGULLHHH Elisabeth Moss, Saoirse Ronan, Corey Stoll and Annette Bening star in this screen version of Anton Chekhov’s play in which a famous actress pays a visit to her less-successful relations, and drama ensues. Michael Mayer (A Home at the End of the World) directed. (98 min, PG-13) SOLO: A STAR WARS STORYHHH Disney’s stand-alone Star Wars movies continue with this blast from the past, in which a young Han Solo (Alden Ehrenreich) explores the galaxy’s criminal underworld and meets his buddies Chewbacca (Joonas Suotano) and Lando Calrissian (Donald Glover). Ron Howard directed. (135 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 5/30) SUPERFLYHH1/2 In this action-oriented remake of the 1972 “blaxploitation” flick, Trevor Jackson plays Youngblood Priest, an Atlanta drug dealer who needs to pull off one last score. With Jason Mitchell and Jennifer Morrison. Music-video veteran Director X. directed. (116 min, R) SUPER TROOPERS 2HH The inept Vermont cops of the stoner comedy cult classic return after 17 years, and this time they’re engaged in a border dispute with our northern neighbor. With Jay Chandrasekhar (who also directed), Kevin Heffernan, Brian Cox, Steve Lemme, Paul Soter, Erik Stolhanske, and celebrity guests Rob Lowe and Lynda Carter. (100 min, R) TAGHHH Former classmates gather from all over the country for an elaborate annual game of tag in this comedy from director Jeff Tomsic (“Idiotsitter”), starring Isla Fisher, Annabelle Wallis, Jake Johnson, Jon Hamm and Jeremy Renner. (100 min, R) TRUTH OR DAREHH A game among friends becomes deadly when a supernatural entity starts enforcing the rules in this horror flick starring Lucy Hale and Tyler Posey, directed by Jeff Wadlow (KickAss 2). (100 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 4/25)

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WON’T YOU BE MY NEIGHBOR?: This documentary from Morgan Neville (20 Feet From Stardom) explores how Fred Rogers, trained as a minister, brought heart to kids’ educational TV with his long-running show “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.” (94 min, PG-13. Roxy)

BOOK CLUBHH1/2 Reading 50 Shades of Grey somehow revolutionizes the lives of four friends in this comedy from first-time director Bill Holderman, starring Jane Fonda, Diane Keaton, Candice Bergen and Mary Steenburgen. (104 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 5/23)

INCREDIBLES 2HHH1/2 Pixar’s super-family returns in this animation in which Mr. Incredible (voice of Craig T. Nelson) finds himself at home tending the baby while Mom (Holly Hunter) is busy saving the world. With the voices of Sarah Vowell, Bob Odenkirk and Samuel L. Jackson. Brad Bird is back as writer and director. (118 min, PG; reviewed by M.H. 6/20)

HIV/AIDS Seizures PTSD Glaucoma

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BIG PICTURE THEATER

48 Carroll Rd. (off Rte. 100), Waitsfield, 496-8994, bigpicturetheater.info

wednesday 27 — tuesday 3 Schedule not available at press time.

BIJOU CINEPLEX 4 Rte. 100, Morrisville, 888-3293, bijou4.com

wednesday 27 — thursday 28 Incredibles 2 Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Ocean’s 8 Tag friday 29 — tuesday 3 Schedule not available at press time.

CAPITOL SHOWPLACE 93 State St., Montpelier, 229-0343, fgbtheaters.com

wednesday 27 — thursday 28 Deadpool 2 Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (2D & 3D) Ocean’s 8 Solo: A Star Wars Story Tag friday 29 — wednesday 4 Deadpool 2 Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (2D & 3D) Ocean’s 8 *Sicario: Day of the Soldado Solo: A Star Wars Story

ESSEX CINEMAS & T-REX THEATER

STOWE CINEMA 3 PLEX

wednesday 27 — thursday 28

wednesday 27 — thursday 28

Incredibles 2 Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (2D & 3D) Ocean’s 8 Solo: A Star Wars Story Superfly Tag

Incredibles 2 Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Ocean’s 8

21 Essex Way, Suite 300, Essex, 8796543, essexcinemas.com

friday 29 — wednesday 4 Incredibles 2 (2D & 3D) Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (2D & 3D) Ocean’s 8 (except Wed) Tag

friday 29 — wednesday 4 *The First Purge (Tue & Wed only) Incredibles 2 (with sensoryfriendly screening Sat only) Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (2D & 3D) Ocean’s 8 *Sicario: Day of the Soldado Tag *Uncle Drew

Superfly

SUNSET DRIVE-IN

155 Porters Point Rd., Colchester, 8621800, sunsetdrivein.com

MARQUIS THEATRE

PALACE 9 CINEMAS

Main St., Middlebury, 388-4841, middleburymarquis.com

10 Fayette Dr., South Burlington, 864-5610, palace9.com

PARAMOUNT TWIN CINEMA

wednesday 27 — thursday 28

241 North Main St., Barre, 479-9621, fgbtheaters.com

wednesday 27 — wednesday 4

wednesday 27 — thursday 28

MAJESTIC 10

Incredibles 2 Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom

wednesday 27 — wednesday 4

wednesday 27 — thursday 28

MERRILL’S ROXY CINEMAS

Adrift (Thu only) **Bandstand: The Broadway Musical! (Thu only) Book Club Deadpool 2 Hereditary Incredibles 2 Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom **Met Summer Encore: Il Trovatore (Wed only) Ocean’s 8 Solo: A Star Wars Story Superfly Tag **Turner Classic Movies: West Side Story (Wed only) friday 29 — wednesday 4

friday 29 — thursday 5

190 Boxwood St. (Maple Tree Place, Taft Corners), Williston, 878-2010, majestic10.com

Avengers: Infinity War Deadpool 2 Hereditary Incredibles 2 Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (2D & 3D) Ocean’s 8 Solo: A Star Wars Story Superfly Tag

222 College St., Burlington, 864-3456, merrilltheatres.net

friday 29 — tuesday 3

*American Animals *Beast First Reformed Hereditary Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Ocean’s 8 RBG The Rider *Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

Deadpool 2 Hereditary Incredibles 2 Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (2D & 3D) Ocean’s 8 *Sicario: Day of the Soldado Solo: A Star Wars Story Tag

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Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-4678, stowecinema.com

wednesday 27 — thursday 28 First Reformed Hereditary Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Ocean’s 8 RBG friday 29 — wednesday 4

Book Club Deadpool 2 **Fireworks (Tue only; subtitled) Incredibles 2 Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Ocean’s 8 **Ocean Film Tour Vol. 5 (Fri only) *Sicario: Day of the Soldado Solo: A Star Wars Story Tag

Incredibles 2 (2D & 3D) Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (2D & 3D)

THE SAVOY THEATER 26 Main St., Montpelier, 229-0598, savoytheater.com

wednesday 27 — thursday 28 Boom for Real: The Late Teenage Years of Jean-Michel Basquiat On Chesil Beach RBG The Seagull *American Animals **Mantra: Sounds Into Silence (Sun only) On Chesil Beach RBG The Seagull

Incredibles 2 & Solo: A Star Wars Story Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom & Truth or Dare Super Troopers 2 & Tag & Deadpool 2 Rampage & *Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom friday 29 — wednesday 4 Incredibles 2 & Avengers: Infinity War Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom & Rampage (Fri & Sat only) & Deadpool 2 Adrift & Hereditary & A Quiet Place *Uncle Drew & Tag & Adrift

WELDEN THEATRE

104 No. Main St., St. Albans, 527-7888, weldentheatre.com

wednesday 27 — wednesday 4 Book Club Incredibles 2 Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Ocean’s 8

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REAL FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY JUNE 28-JULY 4

CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22)

In the coming weeks, you will have an excellent chance to dramatically decrease your Wimp Quotient. As the perilously passive parts of your niceness toughen up, I bet you will encounter brisk possibilities that were previously off-limits or invisible to you. To ensure you remain in top shape for this delightful development, I think you should avoid entertainment that stimulates fear and pessimism. Instead of watching the latest flurry of demoralizing stories on Netflix, spend quality time summoning memories of the times in your life when you were unbeatable. For extra credit, pump your fist ten times each day as you growl, “Victory is mine!”

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “It is always what is under pressure in us, especially

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Introductory of-

fers are expiring. The bracing thrills of novelty must ripen into the cool enjoyments of maturity. It’s time to finish the dress rehearsals so the actual show can begin. You’ve got to start turning big, bright fantasies into crisp, no-nonsense realities. In light of these shifting conditions, I suspect you can no longer use your good intentions as leverage but must deliver more tangible signs of commitment. Please don’t take this as a criticism, but the cosmic machinery in your vicinity needs some actual oil, not just your witty stories about the oil and the cosmic machinery.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): It’s not so bad to temporarily lose your bearings. What’s bad is not capitalizing on the disruption that caused you to lose your bearings. So I propose that you regard the fresh commotion as a blessing. Use it as motivation to initiate radical changes. For example, escape the illusions and deceptions that caused you to lose your bearings. Explore unruly emotions that may be at the root of the superpowers you will  fully develop in the future. Transform yourself into a brave self-healer who is newly receptive to a host of medicinal clues that were not previously accessible.  VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Here’s my list of demands: 1. Avoid hanging out with people who are unreceptive to your influence. 2. Avoid hanging out with people whose influence on you is mediocre or dispiriting. 3. Hang out with people who are receptive to your influence and whose influence on you is healthy and stimulating. 4. Influence the hell out of the people who are receptive to your influence. Be a generous catalyst for

them. Nudge them to surpass the limits they would benefit from surpassing. 5. Allow yourself to be deeply moved by people whose influence on you is healthy and stimulating.

ing to my analysis of the astrological rhythms, these messages will help you make the most of the bewildering but succulent opportunities that are now arriving in your vicinity.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “If I didn’t define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people’s fantasies for me and eaten alive.” Activist author Audre Lorde said that, and now, in accordance with your current astrological and psychological needs, I’m offering it to you. I realize it’s a flamboyant, even extreme, declaration, but in my opinion, that’s what is most likely to motivate you to do the right thing. Here’s another splashy prompt, courtesy of philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre: “We only become what we are by the radical and deep-seated refusal of that which others have made us.”

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In accordance with the astrological beacons, I have selected two pieces of advice to serve as your guiding meditations during the next seven weeks. You might want to write them on a piece of paper that you  will  carry in your wallet or pocket. Here’s the first, from businessman Alan Cohen: “Only those who ask for more can get more, and only those who know there is more, ask.” Here’s the second, from writer G.K. Chesterton: “We need to be happy in this wonderland without once being merely comfortable.”

SCORPIO

in Mexico City investigated why certain sparrows and finches use humans’ discarded cigarette butts in building their nests. They found that cellulose acetate, a chemical in the butts, protects the nests by repelling parasitic mites. Is there a metaphorical lesson you might draw from the birds’ ingenious adaptation, Aquarius? Could you find good use for what might seem to be dross or debris? My analysis of the astrological omens says that this possibility is worth meditating on.

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): André René Roussimoff, also known as André the Giant, was a French actor and professional wrestler. He was 7 feet, 4 inches tall and weighed 520 pounds. As you might imagine, he ate and drank extravagantly. On one festive occasion, he quaffed 119 bottles of beer in six hours. Judging from your current astrological indicators, Scorpio, I suspect you may be ready for a binge like that. Just kidding! I sincerely hope you won’t indulge in such wasteful forms of “pleasure.” The coming days should be a time when you engage in a focused pursuit of uplifting and healthy modes of bliss. The point is to seek gusto and amusement that enhance your body, mind and soul.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): On her

90th birthday, my Great-Aunt Zosia told me, “The best gift you can give your ego is to make it see it’s both totally insignificant and totally important in the cosmic scheme of things.” Jenna, my girlfriend when I was 19, was perhaps touting a similar principle when, after teasing and tormenting me for two hours, she scrawled on my bathroom mirror in lipstick, “Sometimes you enjoy life better if you don’t understand it.” Then there’s my Zen punk friend Arturo, who says that life’s goodies are more likely to flow your way if you “hope for nothing and are open to everything.” Accord-

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Ecologists

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I suspect that sometime soon you will  come into possession of an enchanted potion or pixie dust or a pouch full of magic beans — or the equivalent. If and when that occurs, consider the following protocols: 1. Before you use your new treasure, say a prayer to your higher self, requesting that you be guided to use it in such a way as to make yourself wiser and kinder. 2. When you use it, be sure it harms no one. 3. Express gratitude for it before and during and after using it. 4. Use it in a way that benefits at least one other person or creature in addition to you. 5. See if you can use it to generate the arrival of more pixie dust or magical beans or enchanted potion in the future. 6. When you use it, focus on wielding it to get exactly what you want, not what you sort of want or temporarily want.

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ARIES (March 21-April 19): Your best ideas and soundest decisions will  materialize as if by magic while you’re lounging around doing nothing in a worry-free environment. So please make sure you have an abundance of relaxed slack and unhurried grace. Treat yourself to record-setting levels of comfort and self-care. Do whatever’s necessary for you to feel as safe as you have ever felt. I realize these prescriptions might ostensibly clash with your fiery Aries nature. But if you meditate on them for even two minutes, I bet you’ll agree they’re exquisitely appropriate for you right now.

under pressure of concealment — that explodes in poetry.” Taurus poet Adrienne Rich wrote that in an essay about the poet Emily Dickinson. She was describing the process of tapping into potent but buried feelings so as to create beautiful works of literature. I’m hoping to persuade you to take a comparable approach: to give voice to what’s under pressure inside you, but in a graceful and constructive way that has positive results.

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LONELY WIDOWER A woman who loves touching and who is willing to help me get back to enjoying slow foreplay, help an older man to enjoy life. Not looking for a long-term relationship unless we really hit it off. johnM, 71

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WOMEN Seeking MEN EXPLORING, CHATTING, OUTSIDE I’m excited to meet someone to share new activities with and keep me smiling about the small things in life. I love the summers and enjoy hiking, kayaking, biking, walking, exploring, eating good food, etc. I am a 28-y/o teacher interested in finding someone who is looking for a serious relationship but starting out as friends first. NativeVTer90, 28, l VIVACIOUS, PLAYFUL AND CURIOUS Honestly not sure what I am looking for. I placed an I-Spy ad and thought some kind of profile would be appropriate. C12B57, 61 AWESOME TEACHER SEEKING NEXT CHAPTER Down-to-earth, sincere, great sense of humor, kind. Volunteer, advocate for vets. Ethical, full of surprise — such as, this teacher is good with a .22 rifle! Would like to meet a downto-earth man who enjoys history, founding fathers, rides through New Hampshire and Vermont. I believe mutual chemistry is sparked by a sharp mind. Dog lover. sarahsmile, 52, l

SHY GIRL LOOKING FOR FUN I was in a long-term relationship that had to end, but now I’m looking for something much more casual. I’m a bit shy, which is why I am on here instead of attempting to talk to new people in person. BonnieBunnie, 30 CONCEIVED IN VERMONT I’m a kind and caring woman who loves animals as much as I love people. Aryana, 61

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FAT LADY SEEKING COSTCO MEMBER I’m really just looking for someone with a Costco membership so I can walk in the door with you and head over to its food court for some delicious chow. But if our relationship turns into something more than that, I guess that’s all right. churrofan, 32

COUNTRY AT HEART AND FREE I’m looking for a good guy who likes to eat, hang out, go fishing and camping, and enjoys my company. I love to please my man and make him happy. Looking for the same. I grew up in the Burlington area and am of French and German descent. Oldergal, 63 THRILLS AND GIGGLES I am looking for distraction that includes fun, giggles, physical release and good company that doesn’t want too much. DBhastime, 48 FEISTY YOGA GIRL EXPANDING CONNECTIONS I am hesitantly reentering the dating world. Looking for a patient, kind, humorous and fun-loving companion to enjoy movies, music, walks and bike rides. FlannelGirl, 62, l

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MUSIC FOR MECHANICS 34 New to the area. Seeking good company. I love rock and roll. Love my job, but dream of starting a farm-to-table community space. Health conscious. Care a lot about environment and lifestyle. I have tons of interests and passions. Intelligent. Love teaching, learning and creating. Honest. No room for emotional immaturity or games. Friends first. TankGirl, 34, l

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DARE TO TRY SOMETHING NEW! Divorced WM, 53 y/o, relatively fit, 5’11, 180 pounds, with kind heart seeking communicative, affectionate, adventurous, fun and attractive female partner to accompany me to some clothing-optional-friendly places to walk, hike, swim, soak up the sun, talk and laugh with — and just play together without the constraints of clothing. Experience the exhilaration, sense of absolute freedom, lowered stress, and improved overall health, body acceptance and bonding/ intimacy with any relationship. Take a chance, “step off the island,” open your mind! This life truly can be too short, so what do you say? BZ65, 53, l PASSIONATE, KIND AND GIVING A very clean-cut gentleman with a college degree who loves to stay active. Pride myself on honesty and integrity. Life has its ups and downs, but always enjoy making the best of what is dealt. Honesty and integrity play a huge role in my life, and pure passion is needed to fulfill. cvtfun2018, 49 TOURIST THOUGH I LIVE HERE Slightly feral, financially stable, debt-free and way-divorced (2002) guy looking for a reasonably fit woman for fun and friendship and, if the stars align, LTR. I like live music in small outdoor venues. Love the outdoors. Not into camping; like a B&B much better. A semi-date to hit tennis balls is also good. Hard to find players. oneplank, 60, l

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CHEERFUL & THOUGHTFUL DESIGNER I am a father, artist, painter, architect, occasional illusionist and past EMT with a cheerful attitude toward life. I love designing buildings, lighting and furniture, and raising money for cancer research. I live in a friendly community that I founded many years ago with my deceased wife. Enjoy biking, hiking and traveling to warm places in the winter. Designer71, 71, l HANDSOME, ATHLETIC, ATTENTIVE (IN BED) I don’t want to get too wordy here. Direct and to the point, I always say. I am looking for a woman to give me what is missing in my life: sexual euphoria. I’m not looking for a girlfriend or wife. I’m looking for what we all secretly are looking for: passion. Message me if you want to talk. Ted269, 47, l ARTICULATE SENSUALIST SEEKS INSATIABLE GODDESS I am a single, kinky, open-minded professional. I am respectful, communicative. Interested in meeting a sensual woman who seeks intimate connection. Chemistry is a wonderful thing, and I’d love to explore the places we’ll venture together once we establish trust, communication and mutual desire. I would love to discuss with you which one of us gets blindfolded first. kinderedspirit, 49, l WIT, WISDOM AND WINE Yikes! How do I capture my soul in this little box? More to follow... Just one request of you: Please be insightful, witty, feisty, and know when and when not to use a comma. Jellobmw, 62, l CURIOUS ABOUT POSSIBILITIES I am looking for a special partner. I’d like a FWB where we can explore and grow and not be judged. Frankly, I would like to explore bi, three-ways with each sex and anything that strikes a chord. I am a sane, kind and funny guy, but I have a strong sex drive and an open mind. Hoping to find the same. melp, 49, l LOOKING FOR STRONG, DOMINANT TYPE I am a guy who wants to be fem and looking for a woman to be dominant/ sensitive. I want to wear ladies’ clothes and find the right girl. Control me. I want to be your girl. Shycdguy, 48, l

WOMEN Seeking WOMEN ADVENTURE-SEEKING, FUN-LOVING I am a divorced mom of two (grown) children, and now life is a little more about me! Learning about me, enjoying life and not being held back. I am an independent, spirited woman who has a complete “can do” attitude. I think I am very nonjudgmental and love to be outdoors (kayaking or hiking). Look me up! imagine1203, 48, l

INDEPENDENT, VISIONARY ADVENTURESS In a small nutshell, I’m genuinely interested in listening and sharing, incredibly passionate, and always want to do things. Based on my somewhat angelic appearance, people are often surprised to hear my crazy stories and that I swear a lot. missselenious, 28, l FUN, CARING DANCER If you are looking for someone with whom to hang out, go to cider tastings and breweries, or listen to live music and do some dancing, I’m your woman. I enjoy nice hikes or just walking trails and new adventures outdoors. I am a caring and fun person. I enjoy all kinds of music and music festivals. Let’s get together and have some fun together. Musiclove43, 43, l

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DIAPER LOVER SEEKS COMPANION Yes, I’m a diaper lover. I wear and use adult diapers. I work in retail, and I love writing, taking pictures and making short videos. I’m auditing courses in the fall to improve my writing. Looking for someone who can accept me for who I am and not who they want me to be. Recently checked, I am disease free. TheWolfEmperor, 35, l LICKER I’m semi-straight which means I like oral more than penetration. Really love nudity and hanging out. I’m mostly interested in being and having a regular friend. aboat, 66, l LET’S SEE WHATS GOIN’ ON Just looking for some discreet fun, or maybe a couple to get down with. ;) Whatsoutthere, 33 LOOKING FOR A STUD Looking for a stud to hang with my wife and me for some adult fun. You must be a fit, good-looking athlete. Holygrail28, 49

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Retired professional seeks happy, healthy, orthodox Catholic lady for marriage. My 60-ish appearance belies greater calendar age and an optimistic, active social, athletic (lake and mountain), and spiritual life. The companion sought is mature, thrifty, more lovely inside than out. #L1198 I’m a 48-y/o male seeking a 30- to 55-y/o female. I am eclectic and outdoorsy. Love cooking, fishing, camping and snuggling. Looking for liberal romantic who enjoys same. Nonjudgmental and openminded. Looking for same. LTR. #L1197 Hello, my name is Sherry M. I’m looking for companionship or a boyfriend to spend my time with. I smoke cigarettes, and I like to drink beer. I also like to go out to eat and do a little bit of dancing. I’m looking for a trusting man who is 55 to 62. If interested, please write. #L1202 A handsome, kind, sincere, sensitive and honest person. SWM, 53. Looking for FWB, friendship to long-term relationship, ages 43 to 57. Interests are holding hands, hiking, dining out, cooking together, beaches, travel, watching movies together. Healthy lifestyle. #L1201

SWM, 5’8, seeking serious relationship with SWF, 43 to 57. FWB and casual sex don’t work for me. Want sex mornings, nights — one to three times weekly. Love fun and long sex. #L1200 25-y/o gay guy. Born and raised in Vermont but lived in Bayonne, N.J., during my teenage years. Looking to meet a guy who wants to go to the shooting at the range with me as a first date. Please be around my age. #L1199 GWM seeking bi male. Looking to go have some drinks and some fun. If interested, please write. #L1162

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Married bi-curious guy. Blond, blue eyes, thin build. Looking for other bi-curious to explore with. Newbie here. Very, very discreet. #L1194

My stud-muffin is moving away. Taking applications for a replacement. I am a frisky gal looking for the same in a 70-ish guy. Must lean left. Love of good books, music and gingersnaps all work in your favor. #L1193 I’m a bi WM, 64 y/o, seeking a GWM, 50 to 65 y/o. New to area, looking to meet new friends. I am 5’9, tall, 180 pounds, and into the outdoors, dining and good conversation. #L1192 SWF, 66, seeks SM, 60 to 70, for friendship before relationship. I am honest, positive and grounded. If you walk toward today, not run to tomorrow, appreciate mornings, garden, read, listen to VPR, attend plays and ice hockey games, enjoy conversation, are creative, and don’t smoke, do drugs or drink, we already have things in common! Plus, I have a shamelessly affectionate golden retriever looking for dog friends. Burlington area. #L1191

I’m a GWM, late 50s, seeking a gay man, 21+, for companionship and friendship. I enjoy movies, restaurants, coffee, conversation, traveling. Tell me about yourself. #L1183 60-y/o female Upper Valley resident seeking man 55 to 65. Looking for LTR to enhance my life, not consume it. Enjoy going to plays and movies, out to dinner, or just going for a walk in nature. I am honest, settled and grounded. Looking for a man who is also. Not religious, but spiritual. Always striving for self-improvement. #L1176 Boomer homesteader (male) seeks Northeast Kingdom witch (female) with altar, herbs, oils and amulets for candlelit ritual consultation about planting a winter’s supply of flour, corn, beans and squash in just the right moon phases. #L1174 I’m a SWM, 67, seeking a female 58 to 67 for hiking, kayaking and most other outdoor things. Dance, too. Friends or more if we click. #L1173

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I’m a 56-y/o woman looking for love. A friend, a companion, a lover — in that order. Take time to know one another. Not in a rush. Honest, one-woman man. Caring. Not pushy. Sincere, truthful, romantic, old-school. Let’s take a chance. #L1195

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I’m a SWM, 73, divorced, seeking a SWF, 58 to 74. Retired, brown hair, blue eyes, love to cook and cuddle. Seeking LTR. One-man woman. Easy to please and laid-back. Rutland area. #L1196

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CUTE DAD AT BAGEL COMPANY You were with a cute little blond toddler wearing black, white and pink. I was with my two kids a few tables over. I glanced quite a few times and wonder if you were glancing, too? While loading into my car, you were also on your way to yours, and we exchanged a quick “Your kiddo is cute” convo. Coffee sometime? When: Sunday, June 24, 2018. Where: Bagel Company. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914409 ATTRACTIVE GAL, COLCHESTER BIKE PATH Crossed paths on entrance to path. You: white and light blue top with Sidi shoes. Me: red top on a Seven with Scott shoes. I allowed you right of way as we came from opposite directions. We traveled the same path. I got lost, but you helped. We kept crossing paths; you smiled. Maybe we can ride sometime. Rubber side down! When: Wednesday, June 20, 2018. Where: Bay Road bike path, Colchester. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914408

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GORGEOUS BRUNETTE AT RED ROCKS! Passed you standing on the rocks overlooking the lake. I was with a lady friend. We briefly said hi, and you mentioned the summer solstice being that day. For some reason, I felt an immediate connection with you and thought you were stunningly beautiful! Would love to see you again to talk, walk and see where things may lead. When: Wednesday, June 20, 2018. Where: Red Rocks Park, South Burlington. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914407 PAYING FOR MY DRYER SHEETS You offered to buy dryer sheets at around 1:45. I gave you some change for just a couple of them, and before you left you said, “Hope your clothes come out smelling good!” You were in a car with two older men. Motorcycle ride for a creemee sometime? You’re gorgeous! Thanks again! When: Monday, June 18, 2018. Where: Busy Bubble, Barre. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914406 BUMBLE NIGHTMARE We met in April on Bumble and hit it off at Three Needs. We fell for each other, or so I thought. Now you’ve pushed me away. This is no longer a plea to be together, but rather one to acknowledge our own Bumble nightmare. I do hope the best for you, but not at the expense of respect for me. When: Monday, April 23, 2018. Where: Three Needs and my heart. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914405 MILTON HANNAFORD PARKING LOT You were sitting in your car for a bit before you got out to shop. I was in the black car next to you. We were parked a way out from the store. Thought you were very handsome. When I returned to my car with my groceries, you too were returning. I smiled; you smiled back. I then drove away. Would love to “see” you again. When: Friday, June 15, 2018. Where: Hannaford, Milton. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914404

STILL IN AWE From the first time, on tip toes at the co-op, to the last time I saw you behind the bar at K. The morning after your birthday comes to mind, and every night that I catch a glimpse of your beautiful face and ass. You know what I want, and you give it to me. Mmm-mm-mmmm. When: Wednesday, June 13, 2018. Where: middle of no place. Upstairs. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914403 MY LIFE IN FIVE WORDS So here’s the thing: I see you everywhere, but you don’t have a name. I’m consistently unhappy, but I am to blame. If there were ever a reason, I’d still stay the same. If I miss the connection, CM is your name. I’d fight for this at any point, but you turn me away. I’d fly like a bird, but to you I’m not the same. When: Saturday, April 14, 2018. Where: Montpelier. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914402 SUZUKI SAVAGE I saw you riding last night. You confirmed that it was a Savage; nice bike! Want to go for a ride sometime? When: Wednesday, June 13, 2018. Where: N. Winooski Ave. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914401 BOOTS WITHOUT SOCKS, CITY MARKET LOT We were parked next to each other. Me: black truck. You: blue wagon. We shared a smile as I struggled to put on my boots without socks. Always happy to laugh at myself with a stranger. Later I biked passed you on the bike path on my way to a picnic. Wished I’d acknowledged my curiosity in the moment. I’m still curious, though. When: Tuesday, June 12, 2018. Where: City Market parking lot. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914400 WINDY EVENING ON CHURCH STREET You: sleeves half rolled, head half shaved, enjoying a wrap. Me: creepin’ from across the street. Looked like you were on a date. I sincerely hope it was going well. If not, good gravy, NOTICE ME, SENPAI! When: Wednesday, June 13, 2018. Where: Sweetwaters around 5:30. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914399 SAW YOU AT UVM MEDICAL CENTER You: in a pink dress shirt and a tie; older but attractive, with a crew cut and perfect teeth. Me: tall, slender blonde with short hair. Maybe you can take me for a ride in your WAR WAGON. When: Sunday, June 10, 2018. Where: University of Vermont Medical Center. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914398 SCRUBS IN COLCHESTER’S NEW DELI I was having lunch at the new deli when you stopped by, wearing scrubs. I couldn’t help checking you out as you came in, ordered, left and took off in your Honda. Wish you ate there — I would have joined you. Maybe you will stop by again? When: Friday, June 8, 2018. Where: Big Apple Deli, Colchester. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914397

LOST IN GRAND ISLE You were driving a cream-colored Mini Cooper. You were lost looking for the Grand Isle House; I was out doing lawn work when you stopped for directions. I asked if you were Alan. If you ever get lost in Grand Isle again, I would love to get lost with you. When: Saturday, June 9, 2018. Where: on the wrong road in Grand Isle. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914396 MORE ENCOUNTERS I love talking to you and shocking you once in a while with things I say. Your reactions are priceless. I can be quite the brat, and I do like to play with you. I think you like to play with me, too. You have touched my heart, and when we get close to one another, I tremble. Any idea yet? When: Tuesday, June 12, 2018. Where: around. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914395 DEAL ON COLLEGE STREET We chatted for a few seconds. You’re a pink-haired gardener (?); I was in blue. Were you flirting? I was distracted. Try again? When: Monday, June 11, 2018. Where: College Street outside of Onyx Tonics. You: Man. Me: Man. #914394 GIRL WITH THE OREO DOGS I drove by you the other night while you were walking your dogs. You looked up as I drove by and smiled. Your smile is beautiful, and I can’t help but hope that it was for me. Can I say hello next time? When: Friday, June 1, 2018. Where: Colchester. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914393 WORCESTER MOUNTAIN HIKER Hi, Worcester Mountain uphill hiker Carl. It’s downhill hiker Susan. I got a feeling I wanted to talk with you more last Sunday. If you’d like to take a walk sometime, please get in touch. :) Easygoing-ly, Susan. When: Sunday, June 10, 2018. Where: Worcester Mountain trail. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914392 LOOONG DOWNHILL IN THE NOTCH I was relaxing by the roadside, and you and your man (?) were headed down. We exchanged pleasantries, and you commented on the aroma in the air, which I thought was cool. I wanted to offer you a ride but didn’t want to cause problems. I’d love to take you for a ride another time! Hit me up, and we’re off. When: Sunday, June 10, 2018. Where: the Notch. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914391 EACH THE OTHER’S WORLD ENTIRE July 20. You are my everything, T! Looking forward to so many years and so many laughs. Thank you for being you and for loving me. When: Thursday, November 10, 2016. Where: always hoped I would find you, and then I did!. You: Woman. Me: Woman. #914390

SCARLETTLETTERS Dear Scarlett,

My current boyfriend claims that he loves to go down on me, and he tries to often, but most of time I don’t feel amazing or super good, and I have never come, even though I love clitoral stimulation. I’ve tried to talk to him, and maybe I didn’t say the right things. He’s the only person who has ever gone down on me before, so I can’t tell if he just sucks at oral or if I was expecting too much?

Signed,

Confused (female, 18)

Dear Confused,

Kudos to your man for enthusiastically trying to please you. It sounds like he doesn’t suck at being a good boyfriend. This may be a case of you expecting too much and him not stimulating you in the best way. So first off, relax! A lot of women don’t climax from oral because they do not allow themselves to. They feel disconnected or think they’re obliged to come. When orgasm doesn’t happen, feelings of disappointment and inadequacy set in. Some women just fake it and go unsatisfied. Instead of chasing the big “O,” try to figure out what does and doesn’t feel good. Masturbate to get a sense of where and how you like to be touched, then have him do it with his fingers. Once you two get that down, he can try with his mouth. You might also ask him to vary the movement of his tongue — like flicking it back and forth across your clitoris or using the tip to trace figure eights. He can start by teasing you down there, then add pressure. Stimulating other parts of your body can help. Ask him to caress your nipples while he’s at it, or finger your behind, if you like that. Penetration can help, too. Try having him lick your clitoris while entering your vagina with his fingers or a sex toy, such as a dildo or vibrator. Finally, don’t worry about doing or saying the right things. Ask for whatever feels sexy and good, and allow yourself to fantasize. Pretty soon, you might find oral sex is lip-smackin’ good.

Love,

Scarlett

JAZZ FEST WATERFRONT: 21+ WRISTBAND GUY You were working the over-21 wristband table. I walked up and asked how your night was. Your response: “Way better now.” Realized today I should have gone back to find out more. When: Saturday, June 9, 2018. Where: Jazz Fest Waterfront Tent. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914389 CITY MARKET WIT We worked on a play together a couple years back and ran into each other a few days ago. Would you have any interest in getting tea? When: Saturday, May 19, 2018. Where: City Market. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914371

Got a red-letter question? Send it to scarlett@sevendaysvt.com.


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6/22/18 4:36 PM

Seven Days, June 27, 2018  

At 80, Peace Activist Robin Lloyd Is Still Crossing the Line; Give and Take: Special Report on Vermont Nonprofits, Week 2, The 2018 Weeders...

Seven Days, June 27, 2018  

At 80, Peace Activist Robin Lloyd Is Still Crossing the Line; Give and Take: Special Report on Vermont Nonprofits, Week 2, The 2018 Weeders...

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