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E J _______L

' ’I r

Iquestion I

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— Annie Nessen Manager, Waterfront Video M iddlebury

FREYNE R IG H T T H E FIR ST T IM E So LaTulippe is not the ideal poster kid for an anti-hazing campaign, and his motives may be less than “pure.” Big deal. Check o u t a few o f the folks basking in the governm ents w it­ ness protection program, or who have gone scot-free for their own sins in exchange for public testi­ m ony that put an end to other crimes. W hy Freyne’s sudden contri­ tion and awkward attem pt to re­ anoint the U VM hierarchy just because the context o f the details was a bit distorted in the first telling o f hockey hazing [Inside Track, M ay 17]? O r does he real­ ly expect us to believe there was N O H A Z IN G at UVM whatso­ ever? N o drunken bashes, no “elephant walk?” Just because at least one juvenile macho now admits he enjoys flashing and under-age drinking?

802/382.9474

C ’mon, Peter. You were right the first time. Hazing doesn’t build team spirit (unless you’re talking to a bunch of social mis­ fits or street gangs). And UVM didn’t have the smarts to catch on or the balls to do anything about it — from the president to the coaches — until they were forced to, thanks to the press. Yes, Peter, you were right to shame UVM for looking the other way on the subject o f haz­ ing for so many years. And it will be another shame if the recent revelations about Mr. LaTulippe’s wayward ways diminish latebloom ing insights on the hill. Let’s hope none of them read your latest penning (an after­ m idnight slip-up?). O r maybe they had the good sense to ignore it. Good character, sportsm an­ ship and survival in the face of adversity are never built on hum iliation and fear, let alone

T braggadocio. Maybe it’s time to put Victor Frankel’s M ans Search fo r Meaning back on everyone’s reading list. — Lisa Carlson Hinesburg M O R E IC E CREAM How about a few more ice cream flavors du jour [“W hat’s Eating Vermont?” April 26]: Conglomerate. Mess of Pottage. Trojan Horse. 50 Ways to Leave Unilever. Cherry Pitts. Dough, Re, Mi. — Jerrie Nash Marshfield

example by not spraying toxic herbicides or insecticides on its rights-of-way for 15 years now. This contrasts with CVPS, which has applied every year for permits to spray year after year. G M P has shown it is perfectly possible to control growth by cutting, not poisoning. As herbicides, which mimic estrogen, are being linked more and more with prostate cancer and breast cancer, this is an im portant precedent. — P.A. Davies Waitsfield Letters P olicy: SEVEN DAYS wants your rants and raves, in 250 words

N O G M P SPRAYING Further to your article on Greenm ountain.com [“Crude Awakening,” May 10], I think a lot o f people will confuse this with Green M ountain Power, which is quite separate. Ecologically speaking, Green M ountain Power has set an

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SEVEN DAYS

may 2 4 , 2000


Money’s the Best Medicine!

with the moustache, called it “an incredible, noholds-barred lobbying effort.” Obie, speaking from It certainly would have been a huge public rela­ the losing side’s dressing room, told Seven Days it tions headache for the pharmaceutical industry if was “the most intensive lobbying effort” he’s seen in little Vermont had followed Maine’s lead and passed 28 years at the Statehouse. Up against Team a law that threatened to cap the exorbitant prices Pharmaceutical, he said, “Regular Vermonters didn’t Big Pill charges sick Americans for their precious have a chance.” Democrat majority leader, John little tablets. One state standing up to the most Patrick Tracy, could not hold his majority together. profitable industry on Earth is an aberration. Two It wasn’t pretty. states makes it a growing trend. So Big Pill reached The handful of “white hat” lobbyists represent­ for the checkbook and wrote its own prescription. ing the elderly and consumers, like AARP and the In Washington, Congressman Bernie Sanders Council on Vermont Elders, and the once-potent has led the charge against Big Pill. His bus trips to liberal Democrat leadership got stuffed. Crunched. Montreal with senior citizens have Steam-rolled. (Both on pre­ made national news. If you com­ scription drugs and the paid pare prescription drug prices family leave bill). It was like between a Vermont pharmacy and watching Notre Dame against a Canadian pharmacy, you don’t Norwich. A complete mismatch. have to be a police detective to And there’s more. The drug realize there’s a crime in progress. bill died in the House because Money is no object. The phar­ of the key 12-18 swing votes maceutical industry is, after all, controlled by the moderate awash in the cash of the sick and Democrats, the Blue Dogs. And dying while benefiting from tax­ when it comes to prescription payer-funded research. The num­ drugs, a couple of the Blue bers don’t lie. Big Pill is the lead­ Dogs are very familiar with the ing political campaign contributor subject matter. in America, the cock of the rock. You see, Reps. Michael So it’s not a shock to learn that Flaherty of South Burlington despite the support of Gov. and H ank Gretkowski of Howard B. Dean M.D. and the Burlington are retired sales reps Democrat leadership in both for Big Pill. Mike retired from House and Senate, the pharmaceu­ Merck and Hank retired from tical bill, which would have threat­ American Home Products. All ened the pill industry with price that meant, said Flaherty, was regulation, died a brutal and ugly that “We were more knowledge­ death. able” about the issue. Blue Dog We count no fewer than 18 Mike told Seven Days the high Statehouse hired-gun business lob­ BY P E T E R F R E Y N E prices charged for prescription byists from six established drugs is a “national issue” that Vermont lobbying firms on the requires a “national solution” — not a Band-Aid payroll of Big Pill this session. Unprecedented! from one little state. Logical, right? T hat’s enough meat and muscle to field two com­ Against a team like that, you see why grandma plete baseball teams. In living memory, we cannot and grandpa didn’t stand a chance. Big Pill signed recall more business-sector lobbyists ever signing on up almost every single hired-gun lobbyist in the to work the hallways for one special interest before. Statehouse. They’re a talented, seasoned and persist­ Corporate Greed won this one hands-down, and it’s ent bunch. And you know what? only appropriate to give credit where credit’s due — It worked! to the winning team. "U ' But Big Pill’s victory comes with a warning The envelope, please! attached: “I believe that there is a corrosive influ­ This year’s Corporate Greed Oscar lor best per­ ence of money on our political system,” said State formance by a multinational monster in a horror Sen. Cheryl Rivers. “We saw it in Montpelier with movie goes to — Big Pill! Hearty congratulations! the defeat of the drug bill. I think democracy is in Accepting the Oscar on behalf of Big Pill are the trouble.” following Vermonters: Great. W ho’d like a couple aspirins? Show of Andrew MacLean, David Wilson and hands? Christopher Rice, representing the Pharmaceutical Polish Connection — You bet Speaker Researchers and Manufacturers of America, Big Obuchowski attended Sunday’s keynote address at Pill’s national trade association. Mr. MacLean was the Middlebury College graduation given by one of the point man on this one. Nice job, Andrew! his true heroes — Lech Walesa. Obie’s champi­ Congratulations. oning of the have-nots in this state has earned him Attorney M. Jerome Diamond (former the title “The Lech Walesa of Vermont,” in honor Democrat attorney general) and the Capital of the man who led the famous strike at the Strategies Inc. trio of Susan Auld, Betsy Bishop her Gdansk shipyard and went on to overthrow com­ daughter, and Will Adams, who toiled on behalf of munism and become Poland’s first democratically Bristol Myers Squibb. elected president. Obie told Seven Days he shook Allison Crowley Demag, daughter of former Lech’s hand four times! State Sen. Tom Crowley, and Jerry Morris of New “One of the finer experiences of my life,” said England Public Affairs Inc., who carried the cause the kid from Vermont’s Polish enclave of Bellows of Pfizer, makers of Viagra, the hot erection-maker Falls. “It was very emotional to think of what the blue pill. man has done,” said Obuchowski, “and to see how John Hollar and Lisa Birmingham for Glaxohumble he is.” Middlebury even served kielbasa and Wellcome. sauerkraut, said Obie. Anthony Otis and Tim othy Meehan, who did LaTulippe O n Tip-Toes? — One of the big ques­ stellar work on behalf of the chain drug stores and tions remaining in the UVM Hockey Hazing Story the retail pharmacists. Bravo, boys! is whether or not the former freshman tryout goalie The Shouldice Associates team of William will face any consequences for lying under oath to Shouldice III, daughter Shawn Banfield, and the attorney general’s investigators. Corey David Rice, representing the wishes and dreams of LaTulippe and his lawyers blew the whistle on haz­ Merck. Nice work, gang! ing on the hockey team last fall and have a lawsuit Margaret Laggis, the eyes and ears of pending against UVM President Judith Ramaley, Monsanto, the multi-billion dollar, multinational Coach Mike Gilligan, other administrators and a chemical giant of BST fame that is now into phar­ bunch of former teammates. maceuticals, too. You’ll recall Mr. Sorrell saying at the press con­ And last but not least, Col. Ed Miller, who ference, at which he released the report of his inves­ voiced the viewpoint of the National Wholesale tigation, “W hat happened to Corey LaTulippe was Druggists and Monsanto, too. a crime.” In the weeks after the civil-unions bill passed, Over the weekend we ran into Mr. Sorrell at the the Statehouse emptied out. The daily throngs that Democratic Convention at Memorial Auditorium packed the building all winter vanished. In the vac­ and asked if he still thinks what happened to uum, the Bill Pill lobbying team stood out like LaTulippe was a crime. muscle-men lifeguards at Bikini Beach. House Speaker Michael Obuchowski, the man

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may 2 4 , 2000

SEVEN

page 5


Arresting Developm ent

Renato Di Paolo, 23, acci­ dentally hanged him self during an Easter passion play in Cam erata Nuova, Italy, while playing the part o f Judas Iscariot, the apostle who betrayed Jesus, then hanged him self in remorse. D i Paolo jum ped from a height o f about a foot w ith the noose around his neck, b u t police said it apparently pulled too tight. The actor lay unconscious on the ground while the play contin­ ued until a fellow actor noticed that he looked too rigid.

ordinance banning the sale of alcohol. Customers pay a $7 cover charge at the Neon Cowboy, which offers nude dancers but no alcohol. If a patron wants a beer, he simply tells security. Then he is whisked in a golf cart the 1000plus-feet east to Boss Hawgs II Bikini Co., where waitresses are clad in bikinis but the beer flows freely. T he golf cart ride is free and there’s no cover charge at Boss Hawgs. Neon Cowboygoers can swig soft drinks while they watch dancers shed their clothing.

Lu ck y Loopholes

Floss and Flee

Bob Lemke, the operator o f a Stratford, W isconsin, tavern fea­ turing nude dancing, found a way around a new ordinance setting limits on adult entertain­ ment. W hen the Cleveland Town Board adopted the mea­ sure, it granted exemptions for performing arts centers, civic centers and dinner theaters. At first, Lemke said he would chal­ lenge the law, b u t the thought o f paying a lawyer made him seek a cheaper solution. He changed the name o f his busi­ ness from the Prime Tim e Saloon to Teasers Exotic Dancer D inner Theater. “I’m a dinner theater,” he insisted. “I serve pizza.” • A nude dancing club in Fort Valley, Georgia, found a clever way to skirt a Peach C ounty

Convicted murderer Vincenzo Curcio escaped from high-security Vallette prison in Turin, Italy, by sawing through the bars o f his cell using dental floss. Authorities said Curcio discovered that the bars are made of ductile steel, which contains no carbon and is softer than steel or normal iron, because the prison was designed in the 1970s more to withstand terrorist attacks from outside than to prevent escapes from w ithin. Curcio took several days to saw through the bars, then tied bedsheets together, lowered him self to the ground and climbed over the jail fence, aided by the alarm system’s being out o f order.

M ethod A ctin g

nEWs QuiRkS

A group of women stormed a Kenyan police sta­ tion to demand officers either make love to them or close illegal drinking dens they said made their husbands impotent. T he local People newspaper said the women, from Kandara, north o f Nairobi, brought busi­ ness in the town to a halt with their day-long protest against excessive drinking by their m en­ folk. The women said the pop­ ulation of the district was falling as a result of the poor sexual performance o f the men. “O ur men have turned to veg­ etables,” one woman com ­ plained. “They leave hom e early and come back intoxicated. There is nobody to meet the sexual needs of wives.”

W eighty Matters A 51-year-old woman who was sentenced to two and a half m onths in jail for making and selling moonshine at her apart­ ment in Norrland, Sweden, appealed her sentence, arguing that she was too fat to go to jail. After the 350-pound woman explained she needs help with personal hygiene and dressing, the court let her off with a $1737 fine. • M ark Mosher was convicted o f murder, despite his attorney’s claim that he was too fat to com m it the crime. The Massachusetts Superior C ourt

BY ROLAND SW EET jury rejected the defense’s argu­ m ent that the 450-pound Mosher couldn’t have fit behind the wheel o f the pickup truck that prosecutors say the killer used to drive to the victim’s home. • Police in Englewood, Colorado, accused 350-pound Darrell Moore, 30, o f suffocat­ ing his 32-year-old wife during an argum ent by pushing her to the ground and lying or sitting on top o f her “for five to 15 m inutes.” • After Philippine police chief Panfilo Lacson announced a physical fitness campaign to reduce the num ber o f over­ weight police officers, the police chief o f Central Luzon ordered officers whose waists measure more than 34 inches to climb M ount Pinatubo once a month. “This is not going to be a pic­ nic,” warned C hief Roberto Calinisan, who said he would lead the climb. “We will be bringing food but not sum ptu­ ous meals, because it will just defeat the purpose.” • Lisa Evans, 26, threatened to file a complaint after she was fired from her job at an Edm onton, Alberta, adultentertainm ent club, where she

worked at a nude peep show “fantasy booth.” T he club’s management insisted that the firing was justified, noting that customers had complained the woman, who weighs 270 pounds, is difficult to fantasize about.

S ticky Situation A group o f Swedish cham ­ bermaids wants protection from male hotel customers who lose control of themselves after watching pornography on tele­ vision. “Chambermaids are always having to come face to face with over-excited guests watching porn movies,” said the women, members of the Swedish Hotel Workers Federation, who dem anded the maids be allowed to work in pairs and be given alarms to use in case of attacks. They added that their work has become not just dangerous, but also physi­ cally disgusting since hard-core pornography started being shown in hotels. “We have to dry off sticky television screens and clean stained sheets, as well as picking up used tissues thrown under beds,” they com ­ plained. ®

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FINAL EXIT? Blake Robison has played all the parts at Vermont Stage Company — play­ wright, actor, direc­ tor, marketer, grant writer, schmoozer. Last week the 34year-old Middlebury native performed one last task for the B la k e RobiSOII theater company he founded six years ago in Burlington: He wrote himself out of the script. In June, Robison will take over as artistic director of the Clarence Brown Theater at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville — a plum job that combines academic duties with the production and presenta­ tion of a world-class theater season. Oh, and a $12 million endowment left by the late, great Hollywood director of Anna Karenina, National Velvet, The Woman o f Affairs and Intruder in the Dust. As a career opportunity, says Robison, “it was just too good to pass up.” It’s been a slow exit for Robison, who started cutting back nearly two years ago when he took over as producing director of the National Shakespeare Company in New York City. Playwright and executive director Dana Yeaton picked up some of the slack, but Robison remained the man behind the scenes, directing plays like The Last Station and Amadeus, landing an ongoing grant to fund new plays, and negotiating for a per­ manent home in the new black-box performance space at the Flynn Theatre. For the last several years, Vermont Stage has been based at Royall Tyler Theatre, thanks to a history-making deal Robison struck with the University of Vermont. It was the envy of every other local theater company in the area. As comfortable on stage as he is in the board room, Robison is a smooth operator, with a genetic predisposi­ tion to diplomacy — his father, Olin Robison, was president of Middlebury College before he took over as president of the Salzburg Seminar. Robison the younger was not going to turn down an offer “way bigger than Shakespeare,” as he puts it. “I am really thrilled that I can make this transition in my life and leave Vermont Stage in such a good place,” Robison says. Enter Vermont actor and teacher Mark Nash, who was summoned back from New York City to follow Robisons ultra-tough act. The son of sculptor Paul Aschenbach, Nash has definitely paid his local drama dues. And he is acting teacher to two members on the Vermont Stage board. “We could have done a national search,” Robison says, “but we thought it would be bet­ ter with someone from our Vermont family of artists.” In other words, the “incest” was intentional. “Mark knows every M ark Nash actor in northern Vermont. I think the local arts community should feel excited and reassured. He’s got an awareness o f where they’re coming from.” Although he won’t be directing anything until next spring, Nash will definitely be laboring for the October delivery of Midwives in the new Flynn space, a stage version of the best-selling novel by Lincoln author Chris Bohjalian. Yeaton is adapting the script, while the organization searches for a guest director to start the season off with a bang — no, make that a blood-curdling scream. Although Midwives is hardly a risky venture, Nash hopes the company can continue to be a testing ground for new scripts. “So many theater seasons are a combination o f warmed-over classics or the latest off-Broadway hits,” he says. While his predecessor runs off to join the 66-member League o f Resident Theater Companies — which includes the esteemed Guthrie and Yale Rep — Nash prom­ ises “by God, someday Vermont Stage will be 67th.” IN BRIEF: Vermont filmmaker Jay Craven is on a roll. After he signed up Kris Kristofferson to play the lead in his next movie, Disappearances, “We’re now working to...accelerate fundraising, both in Vermont and within the film industry,” he writes in a recent press release. The cash he’ll be collecting at a tribute dinner in Lake Placid for film director Milos Forman goes to a different pot, though — Craven’s new Adirondack Fledgling Films Program is an upstate adap­ tation of the movie mentor program he launched for teens in Vermont. Just in time for the Lake Placid Film Forum . . . Here’s some icebreak­ ing news: David G iancola’s latest snow-holds-barred action pic is final­ ly available in the United States, at Blockbuster Video. It’s out two months earlier than expected, but could be a hot seller for summer couch potatoes. It’s not The World Is Not Enough, or even Spellbound, but you’ll see Killington from a whole new angle — the terrorist’s. (Z)

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may 2 4 , 2000

SEVEN DAYS

page 7


PHOTOSi MATTHEW THORSEN

By Pamela P olston

One Vermont collector eees the big picture — and buys It, too

ou could say it all started with the mole crab. W hen Mark Waskow, then age five, found a mysterious critter in the Pelham Bay near his Bronx home, he did what any budding scientist would do: He took it to the American Museum of Natural History for identification. Everyone knew it was a crab, but the museum staff didn’t know what species it belonged to, Waskow says. Finally he found himself in the fifth-floor office of an eightysomething entomologist — the kind of classic field researcher who knew everything, Waskow recalls. The old man provided a species name, but was less intrigued by the creature than by the curi­ ous lad. “He was so taken by my interest and enthusiasm that he invited me back and told me to talk to the departm ent o f edu­ cation,” Waskow says with typical candor. “They were starting weekend workshops for young people. At the age o f seven I started teaching classes to people my age and a little older.” By the time he was a teen, he had his own office at the muse­ um. The scenario signaled at least three things about Waskow: his voracious desire for knowledge, his unflagging, enterprising pursuit o f a goal and his need to catego­ rize. But while his boyish interest in creepy crawly things and classification systems augured his eventual studies in entom olo­ gy and invertebrate zoology, it wasn’t nec­ essarily a clue that M ark Waskow would, almost four decades later, become the biggest art collector in Burlington, Vermont. Born with the collector gene, Waskow began amassing objects as a child, starting with tokens and bottles and moving on to art glass, Statue of Liberty and W orld’s Fair memorabilia and just about anything

insect-related. But the attraction to visual art began just a couple o f years ago, long after Waskow had abandoned a scheduled academic career for a far more lucrative one in insurance. T he Waskow Group, headquartered in Burlington, specializes in corporate investment strategies for tax planning and employee benefits. “In the early to m id-’90s I was em pire-building,” Wascow says. “Now my business exists to support my art collecting.” Forty-three-year-old Waskow may be known for suit-and-tie. financial transac­ tions in some quarters, but he’s got a growing rep among artists, gallery owners and other collectors as a man with a plan. Make that a vision. And that’s not just to create the largest personal collection of art­ work in the area and hopefully inspire other potential collectors to do the same. Wascow also intends to archive the con­ temporary history o f Vermont’s visual art scene, and to “put Vermont on the map as an art destination.” It’s a tall order, but someone’s got to do it. And half an hour with the indefatiga­ ble, fast-talking collector — still child-like in his enthusiasm — convinces you that if anyone could achieve all three o f those goals, it’s him. In less than two years, Wascow’s collection o f artwork, mostly by Vermont emerging artists, already num ­ bers in the hundreds — 230 pieces in the gallery, about 140 at home, and a few hundred more unframed works in a mas­ sive, 10-drawer flat file. And that was last week’s estimate. W hen Waskow likes an artist’s work, he tends to buy in multiples, causing his collection to grow by leaps and bounds, and providing quite a pleasant windfall for the artist. “W hen you buy 50 works in a week,” he says, “that’s collect­ in g ” T he only thing Waskow is reluctant to talk about is w hat all this art is worth, though after some prodding, he acknowl­ edges it may be approaching half a million


dollars. “I would steer away from a m one­ tary evaluation,” he says. “N one o f this is about money; its about being surrounded by what you like, about pleasure and doing what you w ant to do.” Waskow also doesn't want to give the impression that only the wealthy can buy art. Collecting is also about helping others, he adds, and, given his predilection for emerging artists, he’s actually able to help out quite a bit: T heir work simply doesn’t cost that m uch yet, and the relative bar­

fortunate enough to have a job that pays me to be in the art scene; Mark’s buying his way into it, as it were.” Spengemann admits that he questioned Waskow’s col­ lecting in the beginning — wondering whether it was more about the act of col­ lecting than about the actual art. He’s sub­ sequently changed his mind. “M ark speaks eloquently about Vermont artists; he knows their back­ grounds,” Spengemann notes with obvious admiration. “He talks with conviction

“If there were more Mark Waekows9 arts organizations wouldn't need to exist." — Pascal Spengemann, Firehouse Gallery gains are not lost on Waskow. Furthermore, “people remember you when you’ve helped them out early in their careers,” he notes. T hough Waskow admits he’s spent up to 10 grand on a single piece, most o f the collection consists o f smaller works by still-unknowns — in the bigger picture, anyway. For the most part, he’s averse to dropping big bucks on single works — and nam e-brand artists — because “I don’t want to com m it that much resource base to one thing. I don’t really buy into the ‘value’ system created by the gallery w orld,” Waskow adds. “I tend to think an artist’s work is best when they’re emerging — they’re at their most creative and fresh.” T hat hasn’t prevented him from becom­ ing a familiar and welcome face at local art galleries, however, around exhibits o f more established artists. “In this arts scene in particular it’s been great having someone who gets art that’s abstract, cutting-edge, not just your typical pretty scene,” remarks Stephen Doll, curator o f the Doll-Anstadt Gallery. “It’s im portant that a com m unity has someone who fills the role o f buying it. It’s very exciting for artists to have some­ one like that around, because they can go outside the boundaries, stretch a little bit and be com pensated.” Sculptor Leslie Fry agrees; she calls Waskow’s appetite for acquiring art — including several pieces o f her own — “voracious.” And she means that in a good way. “I hope M ark’s enthusiasm for buying and collecting art in Vermont inspires o th ­ ers to do the same,” she says, “and at the very least takes away any scary sacredness about appreciating art and taking it hom e.” But money isn’t all that matters to the artists, either, Waskow says. He believes simply paying attention and getting to know artists and their work provides “psy­ chic income” that’s just as valuable as the financial boost. “I spend a lot o f time with the artists and give them encouragem ent,” he says. “T he feedback provided by a col­ lector can be im portant because it can help them to crystallize their thinking as they develop.” O f course, the pleasure goes both ways: Waskow acknowledges that artists are a most interesting, creative species. “Artists spend more tim e asking questions and working them out in their lives. T hey also have a lot o f energy, and I respond to that energy,” he says. “I love watching the developmental process o f a young artist.” “M ark and I have a lot in com m on,” posits Pascal Spengemann, curator o f Burlington’s Firehouse C enter for the Visual Arts. “We’re both art groupies. I’m

about what he likes. He’s single-minded and efficient — that’s not a term you usu­ ally associate with collecting. And he goes to three times as many openings as I do.” He speculates that Waskow is “demystify­ ing” the process of collecting. And certain­ ly his “psychic” input often includes practi­ cal advice about distribution and market­ ing — something right-brain types often find overwhelming. “He doesn’t really believe in arts organi­ zations; he wants to support artists direct­ ly,” observes Spengemann. “H e’s like patrons the way they used to be. If there were more Mark Waskows, arts organiza­ tions wouldn’t need to exist.”

askow’s own “gallery” is a rented office space in downtown Burlington that is already burst­ ing with two- and three-dimensional works on the walls, displayed on antique tables or in glass-covered cases. It also includes a num ber o f his earlier obsessions, such as bug artifacts, superhero figures and popculture doodads. He will show the works by appointm ent, but not to other buyers. “I don’t collect to resell,” Waskow says adamantly. “I just like to be surrounded by art.” He also loves to give the tour, complete with as much as a visitor wants to know about each artist. Waskow reveals what he calls his “near-photographic memory” as he rattles o lf the artists’ names, histories and influences and titles of the works — just recalling their names at this point would be an achievement. The annotations along the way are telling: “I love his dark, gothic sensibilities,” he says o f New York-based Vermonter Eric Kidhardt. “I have his very first painting he ever did.” Calling New Hampshire assemblage artist Greg Brower “insanely brilliant,” Waskow notes his good sense of composi­ tion. Brower uses “discarded and post­ industrial materials,” he notes approvingly. “A lot are personal, dealing with topics he’s going through in his life.” “It’s strong work,” he says of Burlington abstract painter Tom Lawson. “A lot o f artists can’t make the leap from small to large, whereas Tom’s work holds together well. He has a lot o f obvious influences from the masters — Picasso, M iro, Kandinsky — but he’s put his own stamp on it.” It’s impossible to pin Waskow down to a favorite am ong all his works; that’s like asking him to pick the child he loves best. But he’s liberal with compliments to the

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artists and boasts with near-paternal pride about their achievements. Waskow is clear­ ly delighted with his discoveries. T he collection also points to another — and, perhaps, previously unknown — talent of his own: packaging artwork. “I believe the presentation o f a piece is as im portant aesthetically as the piece itself,” Waskow says. “A lot o f artists don’t take the time to properly frame their work, but it really improves the work and makes it more sellable.” W hile he’s happy if an artist has made the effort, “I happen to have a knack for framing,” he states matter-offactly. Jennifer Koch can vouch for that. Proprietor of Frames for You and M ona Lisa Too in Burlington, Koch has been blessed with all Waskow’s business. “He goes in phases, but I always have some­ thing going,” she attests. “His requests are not normal, either, not run o f the mill.” It’s not uncommon for Waskow to have an idea for a frame that doesn’t really exist, Koch says, “and my challenge is to create it. It’s been fun for me because I am so intrigued with collections. He gets so excit­ ed and enthusiastic about everything he buys.” W ith his first gallery space at capacity, Waskow has just rented another one on the next floor up. His Burlington apartm ent is quite full already, and his business office has long been crammed with his collec­ tions of insurance memorabilia and other historic items. “This is a good indication of how focused I am when I’m into some­ thing,” he says.

askow’s focus, and intensity, were never in question. D uring his stint at the Natural History Museum, he was exposed not only to the vast family of invertebrates but also to New York’s rich tapestry of visual arts. His mother had been a commer­ cial artist and took her only son frequently to galleries and museums. Waskow says he inherited none o f his con­ tractor father’s skills as a “high-level handy man” — but it appears some o f that industry and resourcefulness rubbed off. Waskow went to Cornell University at age 16, on a full scholarship, and spent summers on research in the W hite M ountains — his introduction to New England. He finished college at 19, with a degree in ento­ mology and invertebrate zoology, but it was a close call: Waskow fell ill with a rare form of pneum onia just before graduation — and before his blackbelt exam in Tae Kwon Do. “I’m the only person who has survived it,” Waskow says o f the adenovirus 21. “W hen I did survive, people thought I wouldn’t be able to walk uphill. O f course, I went back to Tae Kwon Do. W hen people tell me I can’t do something, I go do it better.” Circumstances conspired to deter Waskow from a life o f studying bugs, how­ ever. For one thing, his father had passed away during his first year at college, and the death revealed that his family had no life insurance and little savings. T hen there were Waskow’s hospital expenses. A large phone bill was the last straw. About this time Waskow saw an ad that seemed to offer a way out. “It said, ‘Stop! Ask yourself what you’ll be doing in five years,”’ he recalls. “T he ad was about insurance, and I had this problem that had to do w ith lack o f insurance and planning.”

Waskow quickly figured o ut that, even at the top o f his field, he would make about $40,000 a year, and it w ould take years to get there. “So I started w hat proved to be a marvelous career in life insurance,” he says. “From 1979 to 1985 I did it. By the end o f ’81 I was the top salesman for that com pany internationally. By the end o f ’82 I was top district m an­ ager. By the end o f ’85 I was completely b u rnt o u t.” T h at’s when Waskow decided to go independent; after an initial affiliation with N ational Life, he w ent on his own in 1987. T h e career change also brought him to Vermont. T hroughout these years, Waskow collected, and his preferences evolved. “In the early ’80s I sold about 40,000 bottles and used the proceeds to get about 800 to 900 really good bottles. N ow I ’m more interested in Vermont bot­ tles and glass perfume bottles,” he says. A nd though Waskow claims he’s cut­ ting down on his non-art collecting, “cut­ ting down” is a relative term. As in, “I’ve reduced my W orld’s Fair memorabilia to only 30 or 40 categories. I used to buy hundreds o f Statue o f Liberty items a year; now it’s only 50 to 60 a year. Tastes change and get more sophisticated — or at least different,” he observes. “’I’m par­ ing down as my vision gets tighter and more refined.” Waskow says his 11 -year-old son Alexander has promised to continue the Statue o f Liberty collection, though right now he’s more interested in Pokemon, and

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has already been-there-done-that with Star Wars and Power Rangers. So far, fouryear-old Destiny has not exhibited the col­ lecting gene. “But she can dance,” Waskow exclaims — the proud papa is reportedly no slouch on the dance floor himself. Divorced nearly three years ago, Waskow has his kids every Wednesday and every other weekend. “W hen I’m w ith them I feel like the luckiest m an in the w orld,” he gushes. A nd w hether or not they yet share his latest passion, their room at D ad’s house is filled w ith art. O ne thing W askow did pare down was his waistline: D uring his “em pire-build­ ing” years he had ballooned to 276 pounds — on a 5’9” frame, But along w ith learning about art, W askow seems to have acquired a new zeal for self-improve­ m ent — this from a man w ho already reads eight to 10 books weekly, and needs

C on tin ued on page 38

may 2 4 , 2000

SEVEN DAYS

page 9


Feeding Fre n zy T h e O n io n R iv e r C o - o p a i m s to s a t i s f y its c ritic s w ith big p la n s a n d in te rim

C om m unity Action. “T he vouchers give people choice, and that is som ething we cannot forget as we continue to work on making sure people have access to food in Burlington,” she says. Since Price C hopper closed down its Cherry Street store a year ago, many sen­ iors and low-income residents have had difficulty finding affordable food in Burlington. To make matters worse, fewer than 50 percent o f O ld N orth End resi­ dents own cars and most large grocery stores are in the suburbs. W hen the O nion River Co-op was chosen last year to build a downtown supermarket, one stipulation called for the Co-op and the city to create an interim market. T hat store, city officials now say, is unlikely to ever open because there sim-

B y S hay T o tten his week, Burlington Mayor Peter Clavelle will announce increased financial support for a program that gives city residents free cab rides to area supermarkets. It’s the latest in a series of interim measures aimed at curbing the hunger for a downtown supermarket. The cab voucher idea was dreamed up by W anda Hines, executive director o f the C hittenden Emergency Food Shelf, and will be funded by a United Way grant through October. T he city has agreed to extend funding with taxpayer monies through April 2001. Hines says the program is gaining pop­ ularity, providing a maximum o f 50 vouchers per m onth through Chittenden

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ply isn’t space available near the city’s cen­ ter. Meanwhile, the Co-op is offering a delivery service that supplies food to a buyers’ club o f residents at 230 St. Paul Street. O ther buying clubs are in the works at area senior housing projects, says Michael M onte, director o f B urlington’s C om m unity and Economic Development Office. There are also special bus runs to grocery stores at limited times, and the Special Services Transportation Agency operates a door-to-door service for the eld­ erly and people with disabilities. “I think the stores set up at the senior housing project and other buildings are good, but it doesn’t address the needs for the rest o f the population,” says Hines. “In a perfect world, it would be nice if we could open [an interim market], but in the m eantim e we need more creative ideas that will accom m odate everybody.” A ccom m odating everyone is a difficult job in a city with such wide-ranging gastronomical wants and desires. And that’s what the Co-op is slowly trying to prove it can do. Since being tapped by the city to build the dow ntow n market, board m em ­ bers and staff have been working on site designs, financing proposals and outreach to the community. M any residents are skeptical o f a long-standing “alternative” market’s ability to run a conventional supermarket with deli meats, non-organic food and pre-packaged convenience foods. “T he public hearings have been very im portant,” says C ity C ouncilor Phil Fiermonte, a Ward 3 Progressive. “I think they were a little late in getting out infor­ mation to the general public, but the fly­ ers they distributed last week described the new store well, as a place which will be open to everyone and have conventional items,” he says. “I have felt there is a

tremendous misunderstanding among people about what this store will be, and I think that’s changing.” Fiermonte, who lives in a College Street apartm ent abutting the property of the proposed market, says residents in his building were concerned about the C o­ op’s plans. Those fears were allayed last week during a series o f public hearings, at which Co-op leaders outlined their plans to deal with neighborhood traffic, light­ ing, noise and garbage. “Residents came away with a feeling that there is a willingness and openness with the Co-op to address these issues,” Fiermonte adds. M onte is also pleased with the Co-op’s outreach to date. “I think the next big step is designing w hat’s in the store, and I mean that not just in how the store is designed, but from what products will be offered. We’ll be much more involved in that discussion.” T he Co-op is currently designing the interior o f the store, roughly 15,000 square feet, says Co-op General Manager Ned Flynn. They are still making changes to the overall site plan, from traffic circu­ lation on the property to the facade of the building. At a series o f public hearings last week, many residents said the brick facade should be changed. “People seem to think there is enough brick dow ntow n,” says Flynn. O nion River’s site plan was reviewed this week by the Zoning Board of A djustm ent and, if all goes well, heads off to the Planning Commission in the com ­ ing weeks. T he Co-op hopes to break ground in September and be open by July 2001. An initial concern among critics o f the Co-op plan was its ability to garner the

e are stepping up to the plate. People ire is such a need for a downtown

What remains clear is that the public hungers for its teeth into — not just a social mission and a ood site plan.

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necessary financing to build the store — estimated at $4.2 million. Flynn says the store’s board of directors has received five responses from area banks to the Co-op’s business plan for the venture and will begin to review those proposals soon. Also, Co-op representatives are talking with officials at the U.S. D epartm ent of Agriculture’s Rural Development Program, which will guarantee repayment up to 80 percent of bank loans for certain coopera­ tive projects. The Co-op’s plan for Burlington is reportedly being strongly considered by US DA. O nion River is also looking to its own members to finance the new store. Three weeks ago, letters were sent to current members asking them to set aside a few thousand dollars in low-interest, unse­ cured loans. “We’ve had a num ber o f posi­ tive responses so far,” says Flynn. “A lot o f

I? new location may come a new way to become a C o-op member. A com m ittee is looking at ways to make that easier, by allowing annual membership to be paid over a 10-year period, and by establishing a fund to subsidize m em ber­ ship fees that could be raised to as much as $100 a year from the current $35. T he Co-op may also revert to a patronage-refund system rather than the current model o f handing out refunds at the regis­ ter each time a person shops. A patronage system gives out lum p refund sums each year based on a num ber o f factors, includ­ ing the am ount an individual or family spends and the overall profitability o f the store. T he future o f the existing store on N orth W inooski Avenue also remains to be decided. W ith more revitalization occurring in the neighborhood, some O ld N orth End residents w ould like to keep that store open. However, it may not be economically possible. W hat remains clear is that the public hungers for som ething to sink its teeth into — not just a social mission and a good site plan. Co-op officials remain optim istic that the new store will not only quiet those stomach pangs, b ut nourish as well. “I think a lot o f that change will occur when people come into the new store,” says Flynn. “Some people’s perceptions will probably never change, but the best we can do is open a store w ith the kind of products they w ant and let them come see for themselves. This will really be a store for everybody.” ®

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SEVEN DAYS

may 2 4 , 2000

By P ip V aughan-H ughes t seems almost incredible that we have left the 20th century behind. Two W orld Wars and innumerable other horrors can now be dropped into the filing cabinet o f history. In the West at least, few people under 40 have anything more than a vague notion o f w hat war means. Given our record as a species, that’s nothing short o f miraculous. But with peace and the passing of time comes the tem ptation to forget the nightmares o f the past — or worse, to romanticize them. Romance has very little place in war, at least to those whom war touches. So it’s ironic that the most universally recognized photograph — and later sculp­ ture — from W orld War II should be so disturbingly rom an­ tic: Six warriors, their feet lost in a savage tangle o f broken rock and twisted metal, strive to lift a long pole, from the end o f which the American flag is unfurling. You can almost hear the snap as the cloth straightens in the wind. Behind, below and far away, the featureless landscape ends in a sharp horizon. It was February 23, 1945, and the place was M ount Suribachi, on the tiny Pacific island o f Iwo Jima. O ne o f the six men was John Bradley, a M arine corpsman who, later in the battle for the island, won the Navy Cross for his bravery under fire. He and two other men made it off the island alive. T he other three were killed in action days after the famous photograph was taken, victims o f a campaign that caused 25,851 U.S. casualties — 7000 o f them fatal — and claimed the lives o f most o f the 22,000 Japanese defenders.

John Bradley died in 1994, and it was only then his son James found out about his father’s Navy Cross. The younger Bradley set out to learn the truth behind the immortal image. Flags o f our Fathers is plainly a labor of love, undertaken with the help o f Vermont writer Ron Powers. Bradley had known his father as the well-respected, well­ loved owner o f a funeral home in Antigo, Wisconsin — a man so reticent about his part in the flag-raising that he avoided every approach from journalists and historians. To all requests, his family knew to say that he was “unavailable, fishing in Canada.” “I don’t remember him ever articulating why he did not want to speak to the callers,” Bradley writes. “T he best he could do was to give a barely perceptible shake o f his head, as if he were dealing with a com m on incon­ venience like hay fever or near­ sightedness. It was his personal affliction.” Trying to find what lay behind this silence, Bradley talked to surviving veterans, comrades o f his father and their families. He managed to piece together a picture o f the final m om ents o f fellow flag-raisers Michael Strank, Franklin Sousley and H arlon Block: Strank, the archetypal M arine sergeant, was killed by friendly fire; Block, the Texas football star, was struck by a shell; Franklin, the farm boy from Kentucky, was shot by a sniper. T he survivors — John Bradley, Ira Hayes and Rene Gagnon — were caught up in the explosion o f public feeling that followed the photo’s publica­ tion. Bona fide heroes, they were co-opted as the stars o f the last great w ar-bond tour. Hayes, a

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Hero W o r s h ip ? Pima Indian from Arizona, was undoubtedly destroyed by his fame. In 1955 He suffered a lone­ ly, squalid death from the alco­ holism that had dogged him for years. Gagnon, a mill-worker from New Hampshire, also never adjusted to his peace-time role as celebrity — a role that brought acclaim but few benefits. He also died alone, in 1979, working as a janitor. Only John Bradley was able "d continue his life unscathed — at least on the outside — by con­ structing an inviolable wall of privacy around himself. But, as his son relates in Flags o f Our Fathers., Iwo Jima left deep scars that would never really heal. “I’ve forgotten everything,” he would say. Most of all, he disdained his hero sta- — tus. “I want you to ™ always remember 1 som ething,” he would tell nine-year-old James. “The heroes of Iwo Jima are the guys who didn’t come back.” Bradley paints a fairly detailed picture ^ of all these men, but I found myself wishing he had gone deeper. His father’s vocation as a funeral-home director is touched upon, but surely deserved greater attention. You don’t have to be a literary deconstructionist to see a connection between corpsman and mortician. Flags o f Our Fathers also explores the story o f the photo­ graph itself. The supreme irony, of course, is that it captures an event that was to its subjects a non-event. T he first American flag to fly over Suribachi had been raised earlier in the day, and the flag raised by Bradley, Strank, Hayes and the others was a replacement, an afterthought. The surviving flag-raisers would always be puzzled by the fuss made over som ething that had seemed minor to them at the time. . -“ “As significant an event as going to the mailbox,” reflected Gagnon. “If only there hadn’t been a flag on that pole,” Bradley

remembers his father saying. That pole. He always called it a “pole.” “Helping Mike Strank with a pole — that’s what my father did. T he phrase ‘raising Old Glory’ was much too grand for my father and what he thought he did that day.” Flags o f Our Fathers is fasci­ nating as the story of one of the greatest images o f an imageobsessed age. As the story of a son’s search for his father, too, it is affecting. As a book about war and the concept of heroism, however, it is less successful. The Pacific Theater o f World War II seems to occupy a place in American history and culture similar to the one the First W orld

would have been improved by liberal use o f an editor’s red pen, lays it on with mawkish vigor. Describing Strank’s death, he says: “T he shell got Mike where he gave it. T he impact tore a hole in his chest and ripped out his heart.” All the com batants on Iwo are called “boys” throughout, even though four of the six flagraisers were over 20 in 1945. This gives the story a tinge of hokey sentim ent that, rather than hum anizing it, seems to under­ value the grotesque experiences and pathetic deaths of adults who were well aware of what they were going through. It is fitting that Stephen Ambrose provides a lengthy endorsement on the book’s jacket.

“ The phrase ‘raising 01R lory’ was much too grand for my father and what he nought he did that day.” ames Bradley War holds in Britain and France: a grinding conflict devoid of mercy that brutalized everyone involved. Pacific veterans are notorious­ ly reticent to share their experi­ ences, as were those who survived the trenches in 1914 to 1918. They experienced too much relentless horror, apparently, to talk m uch about it. T here’s a lot to be said for bringing the stories of these men into the limelight, for giving their deeds the recog­ nition they deserve. But, as Bradley points out again and again, the participants were and are united by one common desire: to avoid being known as heroes. So its a shame that Bradley’s great theme is to prove we must’ proclaim victims and veterans as heroes despite their.own objec­ tions. Bradley, whose writing

Ambrose brings a kind of muscu­ lar, Homeric populism to his own military histories — war as an epic of will and deed — that Bradley echoes in his own writing. Even though he closes by agreeing reluctantly with his father, that the Iwo combatants “certainly weren’t heroes,” everything else in the book disputes this. Surely the lesson we should learn from these men, living or dead, is that war creates only vic­ tims. Although presumably it is . the last thing Bradley intended, the inform ing spirit o f these pages is John Wayne in The Sands o f Iwo Jima, a movie in which John Bradley him self was a reluctant bit-part actor. In seek­ ing to breathe life into old sto­ ries, he has fallen into the rom antic trap which that flag on Suribachi baited for future gener­ ations. (7)

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Four-Twenty: A Primer By Jernigan P ontiac he date was April 19. As I glided into downtown, I noticed the synchronized blinking orange-and-gold mar| quis lights o f the Flynn Theatre. m Call it “art deco,” call it “retro,” a call it “cheesy,” I dig it. The 1 Flynn — along with Nectar’s Restaurant — are as Burlington I as you can get. My attitude is, 1 long may they shine. T he Flynn lights are aglow I only on show nights, and, as I II drove by, I scanned the marquis 8 to see who was playing. The big, black block letters read, “The String Cheese Incident.” I had no idea. Idling at the taxi stand, I ® absent-m indedly noticed a proI fusion o f latter-day m hippies milling about. * Colorful, scruffy peoI pie were frolicking in City Hall Park, cam p­ ing on the sidewalks, I skipping barefoot * along M ain Street. / W e’re talking dreadlocks, long patchwork 1 skirts, Birkenstocks, I American Spirit ciga’ rettes — the whole I nine yards. In this, the p hom etown o f Phish, ® we’re certainly accus­ tomed to the presence ^ o f this segment of I youth culture. But this night, for some reason unbeknownst I to me, Burlington was m looking like W oodstock III. 8 My next fare — a couple of 1 St. M ike’s students bound for the concert — cleared up this I middle-aged cluelessness. The I String Cheese Incident, these 9 students informed me, are one | o f those rollicking, jam -happy bands so favored by the erst* while Grateful Dead gang. I Hence the downtown hippie hordes. i Sometime pre-m idnight, the I show let out. Shortly thereafter, 8 I was hailed by a group o f the | concert-goers — three guys and a young wom an. They were 1 high, and I don’t mean merely | on the good vibes o f the Cheese concert they’d just attended. | Although it’s been 20 years for I me, one never forgets the pun* gent aroma: These folks reeked | o f marijuana smoke. By way o f full journalistic I disclosure — or is it disclaimer? | — let me state that, in com m on * with many o f my baby-boomer | peers, I “experim ented.” In my

case the experiment was a resounding success: Unlike some heads o f state, I did inhale. Deeply. I passed much o f my late teenagedom in a smoky haze. I haven’t, however, touched the stuff since the Carter administration, so I’m not exactly up to speed with the customs, favored bands and general modus operandi of your present-day stoners. “Feathers,” the young woman said, leaning over the front seat to address her friend, “that was, like, the bomb! It felt like I was at a Dead show.” “N o way, Tanya,” Feathers replied. O f the four of them, this guy appeared the most stoned: Feathers was slowly list­ ing in his seat as if aboard the

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“Dude, it’s, like, a joke,” Tanya said. “It’s not funny,” he replied. “Ya got a better punch line?” I asked, not aggressively, but out of genuine curiosity. W hat, pray tell, might Feathers come up with? I did not go unreward­ ed. “Yeah,” he said. “T he dude goes, W h a t the hell happened to all my acid?”’ Now we were all laughing with raucous abandon, includ­ ing Feathers. His sheer goofi­ ness was funnier then the joke itself. If there’s really such a thing as a “contact high,” I think I caught it. At that m om ent, the church bells began the 12 tones signify­ ing midnight. “W oo-hoo!” Tanya said. “It’s April 20th — that’s fourtwenty. Tim e to party!” “Okay, that’s the sec­ ond time I heard that today,” I said. “W hat’s the deal with ‘fourtwenty?’” Feathers began chuck­ ling. “D ude,” he said. “Fourtwenty is, like, the internation­ al time for dope smoking. So, like, 4:20 in the m orning is the time to totally toke up.” “Yeah, and on April 20th, that means all day!” Tanya added. “Well, thank you, guys,” I said. “You have taught me something I did not know.” I’d like to believe I’m still in the loop, but I haven’t been since, say, 1982. It’s not as if you’re in the loop one day and out the next. Loop eviction is a slow, draw n-out affair, allowing rich opportunity for self-decep­ tion. But that night — the m em ­ orable night o f four-twenty — the fog had at long last lifted, revealing the glare o f naked truth: I am officially and defini­ tively out o f the loop. My God, I think the 12steppers are on to something: A dm itting the truth is the first step to healing. I feel better already. ®

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deck o f a sailboat adrift upon mildly choppy seas. “It sucked. It was just a bunch o f hippies dancing. No way you can com ­ pare it to a Dead show.” T he guy’s vehemence struck me as over the top, particularly considering he could barely keep his eyes in focus. I thought, here’s a guy who might truly appreciate the Grateful Dead joke. “Hey, m an,” I said. “W hat’d the Deadhead say when he ran out o f acid?” Feathers turned and looked at me like I was from N eptune, and speaking Neptunese. From the back, one o f his friends pitched in: “We dunno. W hat?” “Jeez, this music sucks” I said. Laughter exploded from the rear. “D ude,” Tanya said, “that’s, like, hilarious.” Feathers glared at me in dis­ belief. “W hat the hell does that mean?” he said.

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"An Edible Sidewalk Sale on the Church Street Marketplace."

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■ Art's Alive Festival from 10 am to 4 p.m. Art M aking W orkshop, artist dem onstration, studio street sale, chalk painting com petition with prizes ■ Free Jazz C oncert by the VT Jazz Ensemble 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., 2nd Block Presented by The Body Shop and Sweet Tomatoes S PONSORED BY

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SEVEN DAYS *

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what it costs to keep this thing on the air. In fact, I already pay taxes for lots o f stuff I like way less.” We used to argue about “Providence,” but I’m turning into a chick, apparently, because now I actually look forward to Friday nights. Maybe my wife is stirring estrogen into my marti­ nis, I don’t know, but we both got a big kick out of the special sea­ son-ending coma double-episode. I think I might have gotten an even bigger kick than she did. You just don’t see enough comas on T V these days. We had marital difficulties over last week’s Daytime Emmy Awards presentation, though. I thought the ABC broadcast shouldn’t have spent so much time honoring soap operas, and my wife thought I should zip it so she could focus on lusting after Eric Braeden — the, like, 105year-old guy with the moustache and exotic accent who plays bil­ lionaire Victor Newman on “The Young and the Restless.” W hat kind o f goofball accent is that, anyway? I bet it’s a fake and he’s really from New Hampshire. T he annual show had its usual gaping holes. I saw, for example, awards for the programs kids watch in the morning, but none for those their parents tune into. T he weirdest thing, though, was that it gave not one but two dif­ ferent awards to “W ho Wants to Be a Millionaire?” Me: “Since when is “Millionaire” on in the

Family Feud? atching television together leads to regular raging debates, which my wife and I tend to find at least as entertaining as whatever happens to be on TV. D uring a sweeps period, though, the give and take can approach the fever pitch o f a blood sport. Take the flurry o f season finales, with its m andatory brush­ es with death and will-they-orwon’t-they love connections. Since w ere almost total opposites in terms o f the way we process the world, my wife and I had a field day this May. I’m jaded and espy the shaping hand o f show biz behind absolutely everything, so I had a hard time with, for instance, ABC’s glom m ing ratings at the expense o f Michael J. Fox’s physical deterioration. M y wife, on the other hand, is trusting and

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without guile, so she hung on every word in the Diane Sawyer interview. In the end, the only thing we agreed on was that “Spin City” looks like a stupid show and we’re no more likely to watch the Special Farewell Episode than we were any o f the dozens which led up to it. True love. On the “Friends” front, the real cliffhanger, o f course, had nothing to do with Chandler proposing to Monica and Richard showing up at just the wrong moment. Rather, it involved the dramatic, last-minute decision between N BC and the cast to renew their vows. My wife: “$750,000 an episode each? Look how many o f them there are! That just seems wrong.” Me: “Until we have to help fund their salaries with our taxes, I don’t care

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daytime?” H e ^ “Shhh. I think - > that’s V ictor ^ j j a g right b jg 0 $ d ^ Regis.” . • ... I mentioned that I didn’t notice Maury Povich or Sally Jesse Raphael picking up awards for their contributions to daytime television, or for their selfless humanitarian work, either. The wife: “D on’t start.” See, one of our biggest raging debates over the past few weeks has concerned the latest trend in seamy morning talk T V — another category they left out of the Emmys: parents sending problem kids off to Boot Camp. Like two scientific geniuses on opposite sides o f the world mak­ ing the same discovery at the same moment, the bottom -feed­ ing Povich and perennially loath­ some Raphael evidently came up with this new bar-lowering break­ through recently at more or less the same time. Viewers have been growing weary with the parade o f rubes served up on these shows, so what Povich and Raphael decided to do is take the spotlight off people with bad relationships, bad m an­ ners and bad teeth and put it instead on their bad kids. About every other day now what both shows do is round up a halfdozen or so mouthy, slutty, just all-around repellent juvenile delinquents, drug abusers and criminals, seat them on stage next to the mothers they cold-blood­ edly abuse — the fathers in gen­

eral have long since bailed t—and magically change them into - * model citizens. This is riveting TV. T he kids strut on stage dressed like little gangsta rappers and prostitutes. T he audience boos and expresses sympathy for their poor mothers. T he wayward kids, who range in age from six to 15, give the crowd the finger, tell audience members to shut their faces, and call their mothers names which must be bleeped. T hen M aury and Sally call in the troops. Like a SWAT team, uni­ formed military types swarm the set and immediately get in the kids’ faces, confronting them loudly with the error o f their ways and promising them that life as they know it is over. Because they are going to Boot Camp. They are going to scrub toilets. They are going to drop and do push-ups. They are going to have gale-force insults hollered at them at close range until their tough facades and individuality are history. Until each miniature . thug has been reduced to a quiv­ ering mass o f reformed, apolo­ getic goodness. T he process can take anywhere from a few hours to two weeks. T he shows are divided into “before” and “after” segments, so they always end with the bornagain angels taking the stage in clothes reflecting their new-andimproved outlooks. Girls who dressed like hookers half an hour

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I don’t know, but we both got a big kick out of the special season-ending j coma double-episode. earlier suddenly look like Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm. They hug their mothers, say they’re sorry, and promise to be good from now on. It’s a fairy-tale ending of life to be lived happily ever after, only its real life, packaged neatly into a 60-m inute slot and the fairy godm other and godfather are Raphael and Povich. Naturally, I see the whole thing as a scam, suspect the kids are put up to much of their on­ screen behavior, and doubt that the effects of TV detention last more than a week or two, if that long. Also, I’m too busy thinking about how inept these parents must be to feel bad for them. Meanwhile, my wife is appalled, but, unlike me, believes that none of this is a put-on. She thinks the kids really do see the error of

their ways and are likely to keep their promises to be good, because they’ve glimpsed the penal hell that awaits the bad. And because they fear that, if they don’t, they might get sent back to Boot Camp. Me: “In the First place, if you could save kids this way, M other Theresa w ould’ve thought of it, not M aury Povich. In the second, there aren’t even any real bad-kid camps to get sent back to. Maury and Sally’s production companies just make arrangements with m inimum-security prisons and juvenile-correction centers to shoot shows there. Once the show’s over, it’s over. It’s not like Sally’s the warden of a real kid prison and mothers can call her to send a squad car for their daughters if they start dressing

like streetwalkers again.” Her: “O h, you think every­ thing’s a scam. It doesn’t look to me like these kids are acting.” Me: “Right. Sally knows so much about what it takes to raise kids — hers committed suicide.” Her: “W hat an awful thing to say!” . Me: “Have you ever noticed Maury has two different hair col­ ors — a gray one for morning and a Grecian Formula one for night, when he does his game show?” Her: T hat’s the sound of her giving me the silent treatment for my suicide remark. It’s the price I have to pay for having deeply felt principles and scathing media insight. So anyway, the debate rages on. The May sweeps are just about over, though. Characters on TV will shortly snap out of their comas, leave all the cliffhanger stuff behind and go back to business as usual. Stay tuned for further developments on the save-the-children front. If Ricki, Jerry and Montel pick up on the Boot Camp motif, too — and do you doubt for a minute they will? — there shouldn’t be a bad kid left in the Western hemi­ sphere this time next year. Then maybe Maury and Sally will win Nobel Peace Prizes and the daytime Emmy can go to “Nightline.” ®

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PHOTO: MATTHEW THORSEN B y Lyn d a M ajarian early 20 residents o f Burlington’s Starr Farm N ursing Center, half o f them in wheelchairs, have formed a ragged semi-circle around Chris Abair — a slender, slightly built m an w ith an impish face, rather like a middle-aged Peter Pan. H ands clasped before him, leaning toward his aged audience, Abair recites his grand­ father’s poetry. A lthough he’s had no professional training in voice or theater, his performance is

N

confident, precise, from the heart. “To bring a woman board a ship/Is sure to bring it grief,” he lilts. T he seniors, most o f them awake, remain silent until he fin­ ishes “T he O ld Buccaneer,” which — like m uch o f his reper­ toire — is a morbid tale o f lost love and grizzly deeds. W hen Abair concludes, the group bursts into applause. “T h at was a good one,” sever­ al murm ur. A resident with snowy hair and thick glasses stands up, as she does after every

poem, and shakes Abair’s hand. “Thank you, Father,” she says somberly. “You ought to be a priest.” “It’s too late for that,” jokes Abair, 49, who has already raised a family in Colchester. If Abair’s presentation is sug­ gestive of the clergy to this elder­ ly fan, perhaps it’s his emotional oratorical style — he brushes tears from his eyes whenever he reads “The M adman of The Mines” — or the religious sub­ text o f the poems. O r maybe it’s because so many of them weave

in God, sin and the hereafter. som ething,” he explains. He has Unabashedly sentimental, the spent the past two years tran­ poems of George Albert Leddy scribing and self-publishing both were written early in the 20th Leddy’s poems and those ot his century, when characters openly great-aunt, M ary Laura Leddy, sobbed and invoked their Maker, whose devotional verses he sprin­ and feeling queer had nothing to kles throughout performances. To do with sexual preference. date, he has memorized 19 Ten years ago, Abair — who poems, which he shares regularly has worked for three decades as a with residents o f several local systems engineer at IBM in Essex nursing homes. Junction — decided to make Colleen Santillo, Starr Farm’s photocopies of his grandfather’s recreational director, says the sen­ two typed, unpunctuated m anu- 1 iors look forward to Abair’s scripts, “to make sure they m onthly “matinees.” “More and wouldn’t be destroyed in a fire or more residents keep coming to

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hear him, and they have their favorites now,” she says. “O n nearly every holiday, my grandfather would write a poem about someone he worked w ith,” Abair tells the audience one recent afternoon, noting that Leddys poetry also concerned issues that marked his genera­ tion, such as Prohibition, correc­ tions and the controversy sur­ rounding w ho discovered the N orth Pole. T he Leddy clan settled in Underhill in the late 1800s after fleeing the Irish potato famine. Young George Leddy left the farm and moved to Burlington, working first in woolen mills, then selling ice cream and candy on C hurch Street, and finally working at the Strong Hardware Store, which occupied the space where Burlington’s C ourthouse Plaza now stands. His second cousin was Judge Bernard Leddy. “I wish I’d spent more time talking with my grandfather before he died in 1967,” Abair says wistfully. “T he poems have always been in the family. But sometimes art is better as it ages.” As children, Abair and his eight siblings paid little attention to their grandfather’s hobby. “We knew he wrote poetry, and now and then we’d steal a few verses when we had to write a poem for school,” he confesses. After he retires from IBM next m onth, Abair aims to share the Leddy legacy with a broader local audience. He has subm itted

a proposal for First Night, and will perform at the Ethan Allen Homestead on July 8. He will continue performing, too, for seniors, many o f whom he’s become attached to, while carving out a niche as a “balladeer” — a seemingly illogical moniker since there is no music in his act. “I call myself a balladeer because these poems are much more lyrical than poems you hear today,” offers Abair, who has little adm iration for modern poets “who just read their work off the page.” Memorization, he insists, is the key to poetry. “You have to

memorize when you put your mind to it,” notes one Starr Farm listener, “especially when you’re young.” “Do you write poetry?” asks another senior. “I dabble,” Abair admits, “but nothing as good as these.” Creativity, though, runs in the Abair family. H e sculpts and plays piano and guitar; brothers Phil and David are popular local musicians, often performing together as The Abair Brothers Band; and sister Carol was a finalist in the competition for Vermont’s official state song.

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take it into yourself, like a prayer,” he says. Abair makes a performance o f poetry by reciting it, but he otherwise has nothing in com m on w ith “slam” poets. H e’s attended slam events at the Rhom bus Gallery, but it’s noth­ ing he wants to get into — his is “an older art,” he says. “It’s amazing what you can

Abair concludes the day’s final poem, thanks his appreciative audi­ ence, and tucks a cardboard Kinko’s box filled with poetry under his arm. “It helps to get your feedback,” he tells the seniors. Abair’s favorite listener offers him a final handshake and a hug. “Remember, Father,” she says, “You started here.” (Z)

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“We were very careful in say­ ing,” replied the general, “Corey LaTulippe told the truth about the so-called ‘Big Night.’ We did not buy hook, line and sinker other aspects of Corey’s state­ ments about the use of a credit card, about the use of a fake ID in a bar. In terms of what went on that night, the October 2 ini­ tiation night, yeah, I think there were a number of crimes commit­ ted and I stand by that.” In fact, two upperclassmen have been charged with furnish­ ing booze to minors. But should LaTulippe, with his tarnished image of sweet young innocence, be prosecuted for perjury? “We would not make that decision,” answered Sorrell, “since we were the ones asking the ques­ tions. That issue would be turned over to the Chittenden County State’s Attorney’s office,” he told us. Mr. Sorrell said he’d he “sur­ prised if a prosecution for perjury , came out given the situation and the issues he allegedly lied about.” State’s Attorney Lauren Bowerman told Seven Days Tuesday she was awaiting the reception of the transcript of LaTulippe’s sworn deposition. Until she has the opportunity to read it, she said, she won’t com­ ment on the matter. The Pollina Law — Hey, c’mon, let’s call it what it is. The new Vermont campaign finance law caps cash contributions, out-of state contributions and limits campaign spending, too. ;M When the law was still just a hill taking shape under Montpeculiar’s golden dome, it was but a gleam in the eye of his biggest lobbyist/supporter — Anthony Pollina of VPIRG. And now that’s it’s a law, who’s the first to nuzzle up to the trough of public financing? Anthony Pollina, Progressive Party candidate for governor! Tony the Prog is on track to meet the requirement of raising $35,000 from 1500 contributors, with no contributions over $50. He’ll then qualify for $265,000 in public financing to run a slambang campaign with all the bells and whistles the Republicans and Democrats use — like lots of quality propaganda in the form of slick television commercials. But Tony the Prog says his 2000 race for governor was not the reason for the gleam in his eye at the Statehouse last year. Pollyanna insisted that he did not decide to run for governor until this February. O f course, if there wasn’t such a law in place, Pollyanna conceded, he would have chosen to remain on the sidelines. “I’m very proud of the role that I played in passing the strongest campaign finance law in the country to get Big Money out of Vermont elections,” replied Pollyanna. “And I’m just as proud now to be involved in a campaign for. governor which is going to replace that Big Money with peo­ ple and grassroots organizing... I’m very proud of the role I played in passing the law and I’m proud of the role that I’m playing


in moving it forward.” Okay, okay, he’s proud. Soon he’ll be rich. But will you vote for him? L’il Sleazy Testifies — The cam­ paign finance trial in federal court has featured a veritable who’s who of Vermont politicos. But among our favorite witnesses was Steve Howard of Rutland, a former state rep, Democratic Party chair­ man and tarnished boy wonder. L’il Stevie Blunder is a political consultant these days and he testi­ fied for the Republican Party, which wants the new law over­ turned. Under oath, L’il Stevie said his political star fell after he came out of the closet. He sug­ gested the Vermont press turned on him because of his sexual pref­ erence. “Often the media focused on the fact I was gay,” testified Howard. “I could speak on 12 issues, but the thing they reported was that I was a gay candidate.” Horse feathers! First of all, L’il Sleazy Howard s political star sunk soon after he got-caught offering his primary opponent, Deb Markowitz, a political bribe to drop out of the secretary of state’s race. Steve promised her the number-two job upon his most assured victory. Second, it was L’il Sleazy him­ self who made a big deal about his coming out. The Statehouse press corps already knew his sexu­ al preference and, frankly, didn’t give a damn. State Sen. Cheryl Rivers, a witness for the state, has a hard time stomaching L'il Sleazy’s spin. “He voted for the campaign finance bill,” noted Rivers, “while saying (on the witness stand) it trampled on the Constitution. I describe that as a bizarre statement, since we take an oath of office that says we won’t vote for anything that tram­ ples on the Constitution.” Yeah, but the rules don’t apply to L’il Stevie, do they? Hail! King Anus! — The color picture at the top of the Vermont section in last Thursday’s Burlington Free Press has been quite the talk around these parts. “OUR ANUS GOVERNOR TRADED COWS FOR QUEERS,” read the sign proudly painted by Joe King of Huntington. He was referring to the new civil-unions law. W hen asked about it Tuesday, Ho-Ho replied, “I regret that the tone of civility is not able to be maintained in this debate. Folks do have a right to their opinions and they have a right to say them in whatever terms they want. I’d prefer that my kids didn’t see that sign on the front page of the sec­ ond section of the Free Press, but they did, and a lot of other peo­ ple’s kids did, too. That’s a matter for the editor of the Free Press and the person who puts up the sign to decide whether that kind of stuff deserves that kind of publici­

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SEVEN DAYS

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her band Juliana’s Pony. The second is as rau­ cous as the first is sensitive and vulnerable. Expect a bit of both at Hatfield’s Higher Ground show this Thursday. Burlington’s own Wide

FLASHBACK COLLEGE PARTY

Wail open.

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(alt-pop), Higher Ground, 9 p.m. $10/12. 18+ OPEN MIKE, Backstage Pub, 9 p.m. NC.

DANCIN’ DEAN (country line dance & instruction), Cobbweb, 7:30 p.m. $5. JENNI JOHNSON (jazz/blues), Chow! Bella, 6 p.m. NC. DJ NIGHT, Naked Turtle Holding Co., 9:30 p.m. NC. OPEN MIKE, Otter Creek Tavern, 9 p.m. NC.

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THURSDAY

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Red Square, 9:30 p.m. NC. HOY (rock), Manhattan Pizza &c Pub, 9:20 p.m. NC. REGGAE NIGHT (DJ), J.P.’s Pub, 9 p.m. NC. TOP 40 NIGHT (ladies’ night w/Triple X), Millennium Nightclub, 9 p.m. $3/7. B0X0-DEAN0 (rock), Trackside Tavern, 9 p.m. NC.

NC.

clowns and lots more. Oh, and don’t let the

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mistress. A fire-eater, a human cannon ball,

Cirkus returns to Higher Ground this Saturday.

Metronome, 7:30 p.m. $3, fol­ lowed by CONEHEAD BUDDHA (groove-rock), 10:30 p.m. $3.

KARAOKE W/MATT & BONNIE DRAKE, Edgewater Pub, 9 p.m.

Of common power tools. A dominatrix circus

for adults only. New York’s Bindlestiff Family

Nectar’s, 9:30 p.m. NC.

KARAOKE W/MATT & BONNIE DRAKE, Edgewater Pub, 9 p.m.

Limits, 9 p.m. NC. OPEN MIKE, Thirsty Turtle, 8 p.m. NC. OPEN MIKE, Charlie O ’s, 9 p.m. NC.

vaudevillians — including a sword swallower

p C W

B, B-Gun, Aqua), Club 156, 10 p.m. $2/3.

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PRESENTS

IN C O N C E R T


TNT KARAOKE, Thirsty

MANSFIELD PROJECT (rock), Trackside Tavern, 9 p.m. $2.

RAISE THE ROOF W/BIG JOE BURRELL & THE UNKNOWN BLUES BAND (benefit for

CUS (adult sideshow/bur-

UNION W/CRAIG M ITCHELL, YOLANDA, TEEN A A N N , THE RHYTHM KITCHEN, DJS

Burlington Community Land Trust), Shelburne Farms Coach Barn, 6 p.m. $50 includes dinner.

M ANSFIEufPRO JECT (rock),;

p.m. NC.

Turtle, 9 p.m. NC. EKIS (reggae/funk/rock), Cafe Delilah, 9 p.m. NC.

(soul/funk; benefit for Pride VT 2000), Higher Ground, 9 p.m. $10.

FRIDAY

KARAOKE W/DAVE HARRI­ SON, Backstage Pub, 9 p.m.

PICTURE THIS (jazz), Upper Deck Pub at the Windjammer, 5:30 p.m. NC.

NC.

NIGHTSHIFT (rock), Edgewater Pub, 9 p.m. NC. JOHN CASSEL (jazz piano), Tavern at the Inn at Essex, 7 p.m. NC. LIVE JA ZZ, Diamond Jim’s Grille, 7:30 p.m. NC.

TAMMY FLETCHER & THE DISCIPLES (acoustic soul/ blues), Dockside, 6 p.m. NC. VANCE GILBERT (singersongwriter), Burlington Coffeehouse, 8 p.m. $10. GREG DOUGLASS (singersongwriter), Borders, 8 p.m. NC. MARC BRISSON (acoustic), Sweetwaters, 9 p.m. NC.

G&B SPECIAL EFFECTS (DJ), Naked Turtle Holding Co., 9:30 p.m. NC. MR. FRENCH (rock), Franny O ’s, 9 p.m. NC. JENNI JOHNSON (jazz/blues), Jake’s, 7 p.m. NC. DISTANT THUNDER (rock), City Limits, 9 p.m. NC.

JUBILEE ALLSTARS & BENNY L. (electronics w/Tom Lawson & Clark Russell; local supergroup; DJ), Club Metronome, 9 p.m. $5.

JOHN LACKARD BLUES BAND, O tter Creek Tavern,

DJS FROSTEE, LITTLE MAR­ TIN, 135 Pearl, 9 p.m. $4/5. TAMMY FLETCHER & THE DISCIPLES (soul/blues), Red

9:30 p.m. NC.

BL00Z0T0MY (jump blues), Thirsty Turtle, 9 p.m. $3.

Square, 9:30 p.m. NC. PERRY NUNN (acoustic), Ruben James, 5 p.m. N C, followed by TOP HAT DJ, 11 p.m. NC.

PROF. FAIRBANKS & TRACY W0LTERS (jazz/swing; violin & piano), Villa Tragara, 6:30 p.m. $5 with dinner. REGGAE DJ, Matterhorn, 9 p.m. $3-5.

DJS ROB DOUGLAS & ALAN PERRY (dance/Top 40), Club

JOEY LEONE & CHOP SHOP

156, 10 p.m. NC.

(blues/rock), Mountain Roadhouse, 9:30 p.m. NC.

ABAIR BROS, (rock), Nectar’s, 9:30 p.m. NC. FRI-2K (r&b/hip-hop; DJs Frostee & Robbie J.), Millen­ nium Nightclub, 9 p.m. $3/10. KARAOKE, J.p.’s Pub, 9 p.m.

GEORGE V0LAND & FRIENDS (jazz), J.P. Morgan’s, 7:30 p.m. NC. DYSFUNKSHUN (hip-hop/ funk), Charlie O ’s, 9 p.m. NC.

NC , : . SALAD DAYS (pop-rock),

sr fg

JB?

Vermont Pub &C Brewery, 9:30 p.m. NC.

SATURDAY

DAN PARKS & THE BLAME

M ELISSA DAVIS (singer-

(rock), Alley Cats, 9 p.m. NC. EM PTY POCKETS (rock), Henry’s Pub, Holiday Inn, 9

weekly

m m

songwriter), Dockside, 6 p.m. NC.

listings

on

lesque), Higher Ground, 9 ft

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KARAOKE W/DAVE HARRI­ SON, Backstage Pub, 9 p.m,

CHAINSAWS AND CHIL­ DREN, DYSFUNKSHUN, GARGANTUAN SOUL, ABSOLUTE ZERO (industrial, hip-hop, punk), 242 Main, 8 p.m. $5. BROOKS WILLIAMS (singersongwriter), Burlington Coffeehouse, Rhombus, 8 p.m. $8. DJ LITTLE MARTIN, 135 Pearl, 10 p.m. $4/5. ABAIR BROS, (rock), Nectar’s, 9:30 p.m. NC. FILM RELEASE PARTY (Boys Don’t Cry), Club 156, 8 p.m. NC, followed by ZOOM (DJ Prana; NY house), 10 p.m. $2/3. RETR0N0ME (DJ; dance pop), Club Metronome, 9 p.m. $2. BEN SWIFT BAND (alt-pop), Red Square, 9:30 p.m. NC. KARAOKE, J.P.’s Pub, 9 p.m. NC.

(country; line dancing), Cobbweb, 8:30 p.m. $7/12.

(hip-hop/r&b), Ruben James, 10 p.m. NC. FLASHBACK (’80s DJ), Rasputin’s, 10 p.m. NC. URBAN DJ NETWORK (DJs Spin & Irie; hip-hop/house), Millennium Nightclub, 9 p.m. $3/10. 0PIUS (groove rock) Vermont Pub & Brewery, 9:30 p.m. NC. GUY C0LASACC0 (singersongwriter), Jake’s, 6:30 p.m. NC. EM PTY POCKETS (rock), Henry’s Pub, Holiday Inn, 9 p.m. NC. SAM ARMSTRONG (jazz favorites), Tuckaway’s, Sheraton Hotel, 9 p.m. NC.

Alley Cats, 41 King St., Burl., 6 6 0 -4 3 0 4 . Angela's, 86 Main St., Middlebury, 3 8 8 -0 0 0 2 . Backstage Pub, 60 Pearl St., Essex Jet., 8 7 8 - 5 4 9 4 . Borders Books & Music, 29 Church St., Burlington, 8 6 5 - 2 7 1 1 .

Trackside Tavern, 9 p.m. $2.

NC.

DJS TIM DIAZ & RUGGER

Adams Apple Cafe, Portland & Main streets, Morrisville, 8 8 8 - 4 7 3 7 .

Bridge St. Cafe, Richmond, 4 3 4 - 2 2 3 3 . Burlington Coffeehouse at Rhombus, 18 6 College St., Burlington, 8 6 4- 58 88 . Cactus Cafe, 1 Lawson Ln. , Burl., 8 6 2 -6 90 0 . Cafe Delilah, 38 Elm St., Montpelier, 2 2 9 - 1 0 1 9 . Cambridge Coffee House, Smuggler’s Notch Inn, Jeffersonville, 6 4 4 - 2 2 3 3 . Capitol Grounds, 45 State St., Montpelier, 2 2 3 - 7 8 0 0 .

NIGHTSHIFT (rock), Edgewater Pub, 9 p.m. NC.

CONRAD SAMUELS BAND

Charlie 0's, 7 0 Main St., Montpelier, 2 2 3 -6 8 2 0 . Chow! Bella, 28 N. Main St., St. Albans, 5 2 4 - 1 4 0 5 . City Limits, 1 4 Grpene St. Vergennes, 8 7 7 - 6 9 1 9 . Club Metronome, 1 88 Main St., Burlington, 8 65 - 45 6 3 . Club 1 5 6 , 1 56 St. Paul St., Burlington, 6 5 8- 39 9 4. Cobbweb, Sandybirch Rd., Georgia, 5 2 7 - 7 0 0 0 . Daily Bread, Bridge St., Richmond, 4 3 4 - 3 1 4 8 . Diamond Jim's Grille, Highgate Comm. Shpg. Ctr., St. Albans, 5 2 4 - 9 2 8 0 .

BLUES FOR BREAKFAST, Naked Turtle Holding Co., 9:30 p.m. NC. KARAOKE W/FRANK, Franny O ’s, 9 p.m. NC.

Dockside Cafe, 20 9 Battery, Burlington, 8 64 - 5 26 6 . Edgewater Pub, 340 Malletts Bay Av e. , Colchester, 8 6 5 - 4 2 1 4 . Egress, 35 S. Main St., Hardwick, 4 7 2 - 5 5 5 7 . Finnigan's Pub, 2 0 5 College St., Burlington, 8 6 4 - 8 2 0 9 . Franny 0's 7 3 3 Queen City Pk. Rd., Burlington, 8 63 -2 9 0 9. Gallagher's, Rt. 1 0 0 , Waitsfield, 49 6 -8 8 0 0 . Good Times Cafe, Hinesburg Village, Rt. 1 1 6 , 4 8 2 - 4 4 4 4 . G Stop, 38 Main St., St. Albans, 5 2 4 - 7 7 7 7 . Halvorson's, 16 Church St., Burlington, 6 5 8 - 0 2 7 8 . Henry’s, Holiday Inn, 1 0 6 8 Williston Rd ., S. Burlington, 8 6 3 - 6 3 6 1 .

PATRICK FITZSIMMONS (acoustic), Bridge St. Cafe, 7:30 p.m. NC. THE IMPOSTERS (rock), Otter Creek Tavern, 9:30 p.m. NC. TOP HAT DJ, City Limits, 9 p.m. NC. TNT DJ, Thirsty Turtle, 9 p.m. $3.

Higher Ground, 1 Main St., Winooski, 6 5 4 -8 8 8 8 . Horn of the Moon Cafe, 8 Langdon St., Montpelier, 2 2 3 -2 8 9 5 . Jake’s, 1 2 3 3 Shelburne Rd., S. Burlington, 6 5 8 - 2 2 5 1 . J.P. Morgan’s at Capitol Pla za , 1 0 0 Main St., Montpelier, 2 2 3 -5 2 5 2 . J.P.’s Pub, 1 39 Main St., Burlington, 6 5 8 - 6 3 8 9 . Leunig's, 1 1 5 Church St., Burlington, 8 6 3 - 3 7 5 9 . Live Art at the Barre Opera House, 4 7 6 - 8 1 8 8 , or Wood Art Gallery, Montpelier, 8 8 3 - 9 3 0 7 . Mad Mountain Tavern, Rt. 1 0 0 , Waitsfield, 4 9 6 - 2 5 6 2 . Mad River Unplugged at Valley Players Theater, Rt. 1 0 0 , Waitsfield, 496-

TAMMY FLETCHER & THE DISCIPLES (soul/blues),

8910. Manhattan Pi z z a & Pub, 1 6 7 Main St., Burlington, 6 5 8 - 6 7 7 6 .

Rusty Nail, 9 p.m. $5. BLUES BUSTERS, Mountain Roadhouse, 9:30 p.m. NC. THE BRODIES (acoustic), The Boonys, 7 p.m. NC.

Matterhorn, 49 6 9 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 2 5 3 - 8 1 9 8 . Millennium Nightclub, 1 6 5 Church St., Burlington, 6 6 0 -2 0 8 8 . The Mountain Roadhouse, 1 6 7 7 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 2 5 3 -2 8 0 0 . Nectar’s, 18 8 Main St., Burlington, 6 5 8 - 4 7 7 1 . The Nightspot Outback, Kiliington Rd., Killington, 4 2 2 - 9 8 8 5 1 3 5 Pearl St., Burlington, 8 6 3 -2 3 4 3 . Otter Creek Tavern, 2 1 5 Main St., Vergennes, 8 7 7 - 3 6 6 7 . Rasputin's, 1 6 3 Church St., Burlington, 8 6 4 - 9 3 2 4 . Red Square, 1 36 Church St., Burlington, 8 5 9 -8 90 9 . Rhombus, 1 86 College St., Burlington, 8 6 5 - 3 1 4 4 .

8 SUNDAY

Ripton Community Coffee House, Rt. 1 2 5 , 3 8 8 - 9 7 8 2 . Ri Ra the Irish Pub, 1 2 3 Church St.. Burlington, 8 6 0 - 9 4 0 1 . Ruben James, 15 9 Main St., Burlington, 8 6 4 - 0 7 4 4 . Rusty Nail, Mountain R d. , Stowe, 2 5 3 -6 2 4 5 . Sandbar Restaurant, Rt. 2, South, Hero, 3 7 2 - 6 9 1 1 . Sha-Booms, 4 5 Lake St., St. Albans, 5 2 4 - 9 0 1 4 . Signal to Noise HQ , 4 1 6 Pine St. (behind Speeder & Earl’s), Burlington, 951

THE HUB CAPS (bluegrass), Borders (outside), 3 p.m. NC.

THE CROPPIES (Irish), Ri

1140. Starksboro Community Coffee House, Village Meeting House, Rt. 1 1 6 ,

Ra, 5 p.m. NC.

Starksboro, 4 3 4 - 4 2 5 4 . Strike Z one , Waterbury Lanes, Rt. 2, Waterbury, 2 4 4 - 8 7 0 2 .

SUNDAY NIGHT MASS (D J;

Sweetwaters, 1 1 8 Church St., Burlington, 8 6 4 - 9 8 0 0 . The Tavern at the Inn at Essex, Essex Jet., 8 7 8 - 1 1 0 0 .

trance/house), Club Metronome, 9 p.m. $2.

Thirsty Turtle, 1 S. Main St., Waterbury, 2 4 4 - 5 2 2 3 . Toadstool Harry's, Rt. 4 , Killington, 4 2 2 - 5 0 1 9 . Trackside Tavern, 18 Malletts Bay A v e ., Winooski, 6 5 5 -9 5 4 2 . Tuckaway's, Sheraton, 8 7 0 Williston Rd., S. Burlington, 86 5- 66 0 0 . UpperDeck Pub at the Windjammer, 1 0 7 6 Williston Rd ., S. Burlington, 862 -

CHAIR 13 , JANIE SUPERSTAR (alt-rock), Nectar’s, 9:30 p.m. NC.

6 58 5. Vermont Pub & Brewery, 1 4 4 College, Burlington, 8 6 5 - 0 50 0 .

continued on page 25

Villa Tragara, Rt. 1 0 0 , Waterbury Ctr., 2 4 4 - 5 2 8 8 .

BINDLESTIFF FAMILY CIR-

www.sevendaysvt.com

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SEVEN DAYS

page 23


again, Cantor demonstrates that not ail the good music is on the charts. And sit tight for his immi­ nent release of new product from Burlington’s reigning bluegrass boys, Breakaway.

WEB OF DECEIT I promised I’d

VIPERLOSS The big news in musi­

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FEAT. SIDESHOW MARVELS. SWORO SWALLOWERS, OAREDEVEIL FEATS. THE TRAPEZE, THE HUMAN BLOCKHEAD. & KINKETTE & HER DISCO DIABLO SUNDAY, M AY 28 • $8 A DVANCE S10 DAY O F SHOW

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RUSTIC OVERTONES DISPATCH

cal chairs this week is the departure of three members from the large acid-jazzy family that is viperHouse. Vocalist Heloise Williams, trumpeter Brian Boyce and percussionist P.J. Davidian are departing, each for different rea­ sons, but all surely the result of the band’s incessant — and financially draining — touring over the past year or so. Williams decided the size of the band was no longer the right fit for her, explains viper Manager NiCOle SaltUS. “She wants to do some other musical projects but will take some time to figure it out.” For his part, Boyce is leaving to teach music at Cabot High School, which he had been doing, but found “teaching plus touring too stressful and strenu­ ous,” Saltus says, adding that Davidian, the youngest member, is going after a better-paying day job and will also continue other musi­ cal projects. “We sort of knew about Heloise and Brian for a while, then P.J. said he was leaving,” says Saltus, “so we just decided to have everyone leave at once so we could make the big change.” Without a lead vocalist, that change will leave room for “more improvisation and experi­

mentation,” Saltus explains. Under the seasoned direction of saxophon­ ist Michael Chorney, the remain­ ing six members have already begun to rehearse music in new directions. The band plays its last nine-mem­ ber show June 10 at Higher Ground, and introduces the septet — with new tenor sax man Zack Tennyson — June 15, at the Mad Mountain Tavern in Waitsfield.

SPINNING OUT THE NON-HITS Mitch Cantor must believe good things come in threes — or fours. Owner of the little local label Gadfly Records, he always seems to release several new CDs at a time, and the latest offering is no excep­ tion. Try Love is a collection of 14 tunes by songwriter Julie Gold, whose career as a songwriter took off after penning Bette Midler’s Grammy-winning “From a Distance” in 1990. Tjalkuri is the eponymous release of Australian pop-rocker Broughton Mitchell, who got his other moniker — and some of his musical influences — from the aboriginal tribe he lived with for some time. And Odd Fellows comes from The Spongetones, North Carolina’s appealing power popsters with dis­ tinct Liverpool influences. Once

get back to you on the mp3 ripoff, but unfortunately there’s not a lot of progress to report. Regular readers will recall a few weeks back that several Burlington bands — including Non Compos Mentis, Never Again and Chin Ho! — had discovered themselves appropriated on mp3.com. That is, someone had altered their band and CD names, even fabricated band bios, influences and favorite other artists, and presented them on pages within the music Web site. In the case of NCM, fake CDs were actually being sold, with a different title but using the band’s real logo and similar CD art. NCM frontman has the proof: He bought one. Matt Roy, guitarist for NCM and Drowningman, actually tracked down the guy — or girl — who did it at an e-mail address (sykoaffect@cs.com), but the perp “claimed someone had hacked into his account, and made it seem like it was someone else,” Roy says. He didn’t buy it, but there wasn’t much he could do, and CompuServe didn’t respond to requests for their e-mail client’s identity. “All the bands getting ripped off were on this one guy’s station,” Roy adds. On mp3, any­ one can create their own “station” — a sort of personal jukebox — with the music they like. Roy notes further that the names and

Band name of the w e e k :

titles the person created — e.g., Tides of Darkness, Warcraft — are from role-playing games, sug­ gesting an adolescent boy. Though mp3 personnel removed the fake pages after receiving complaints from Burlington bands, they have done nothing else. “I don’t think anyone at mp3 cares,” says Roy. “You can stop this person selling, but mp3 gets 50 percent, so where’s our money?”

SINGLE TRACKS Speaking of Drowningman — that’s a photo of frontman Simon Brody on the brand-new 242 Main home page, shot by 19-year-old photog Veronique Ouellette. Designed by Jim Lockridge of Big Heavy World, the Web site is courtesy of Together Networks. Check it out at homepages, together.net/-club242 . . . Chin Ho! has licensed “(I Wish I was a) Girl” for use during the XGames 2000 on ESPN, airing this August and September from San Francisco . . . St. Albans singersongwriter Kate Barclay has another licensing deal, too: Songs from her Sunshine From Mars have been signed up by the media com­ pany Oxygen Media — co-owned by Oprah Winfrey — for use somewhere on the 24-hour cable network. Oxygen also owns Internet sites catering to women (oxygen.com) . . . Finally, the State Song, “These Green Mountains,” penned by Plainfield native Diane Martin, has been safely signed into existence and christened, with a performance by the students ofTwinfield Union School. ®

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page 2 4

SEVEN DAYS

Records) — W ith the advent of jazz-rock fusion in the 1970s came much discussion about what jazz was or was not. The period in question, roughly from Miles Davis’ experiments on Bitches Brew in 1968 to the coming o f Wynton Marsalis in the early 1980s, was one in which jazz players incorporated rock rhythms and electric instruments into the genre, continuing to improvise as they always had. The arrival of Marsalis on the scene marked a new acoustic era in jazz, or, as some might see it, a step backward. Marsalis has since gone on to become an ardent spokesperson for neo-traditionalism, dismissing the fusion years as a wrong turn toward popular music, and attempting to define jazz for the masses from his respected position as head of jazz at Lincoln Center. The music of Jamie Masefield’s Jazz Mandolin Project has the potential to rekindle the flames of this jazz/not jazz discourse. With the release o f Xenoblast, the hybrid power trio that was born in Burlington has hit new heights o f improvisational sophistication, although its instrumentation and its approach are way out­ side o f what Wynton Marsalis calls “the tradi­ tion.” The mandolin, though strong on percus­ sive attack, is a low-volume instrument — or at least it was until Masefield amped it up over the top o f bass and drums in large venues. It is also a tightly strung instrument, which limits its ability to sustain or reverberate. Making the most o f these inherent limitations, Masefield’s playing relies heavily on rhythm, though his melodic and harmonic statements are consider­ ably more sophisticated than those of the so-

called jam band milieu from which JMP emerged seven years ago. He also takes an electric approach to the acoustic instrument, even incorporating electronic sound effects. Much of the material on Xenoblast has an underlying rock groove laid down by the fiery drumming of Ari Hoenig and straight-ahead bass work of Chris Dahlgren, though calling it rock music would trivialize it. The band recently signed with the premier jazz label Blue Note, and the word Jazz is, after all, one third of their name. So are they playing jazz? Listeners can decide for themselves when JMP open up the Discover Jazz Festival next month — June 6 at the Flynn Theatre. — Richard Mayer

ranges from songs by Eric Anderson, Stan Rogers and Si Kahn to a Georgia Sea Islands hymn about the Titanic to lyrics by Rudyard Kipling set to an original melody, but one is left with the distinct impression that this is a home­ grown Vermont production. The meat-andpotatoes of the disc are songs you might hear around a fireplace some winter night, deep in the wilds of rural Rutland County. The music was mainly recorded at Horace Williams’ Little Castle Studios in Starksboro. Little Castle is justly noted as one of the best studios in the state for acoustic production, because of Williams’ affinity for folk music and his will­ ingness to let the musicians call the shots with a minimum of artistic interference. One thing that comes across immediately is that Woodchucks’ Revenge love their music. This is a band that doesn’t just learn someone else’s material and rehash it. The research and care the trio has applied to Fill One Room are evi­ dent in “The Song of the Vermonters,” a W hittier poem set to music by the band. Every song, though, is performed with affection and attention to detail. Peter Cady provides lead vocals on some of the most memorable cuts, WOODCHUCKS’ REVENGE, FILL O N E ROOM including “Brisbane Ladies” and “The Sack of (self-released, CD) — Woodchucks’ Revenge is the Gods” — the Kipling poem. He also sup­ a hard-working band from plies a strong, on-key Pittsford — they play what center for what are seems like hundreds of gigs, 4 sometimes very shaky large and small, all over vocals and harmonies. Vermont every year. Members Fill One Room is the Kristina and Peter Cady and perfect CD for the Sandy Morse recently released band’s many fans who their second CD, Fill One want a true-to-life Room, named after the song recording to entertain penned by Vermont folk-singer them at home between and State Senator (D-Windsor) Woodchuck gigs. Dick McCormack, which closes — Robert Resnik the recording. The material here F i ll O n e R o o m

A3JSM 3jA3JSM 3!A3JSM 3!A3JSM 3!A3JSM 3!A3iSM 3!A3iSM m ay 2 4 , 2000


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tone and wide in range. No matter how modern the jazz accompaniment, his playing evokes an earlier era of European jazz — especially on Chez Toots, an album dedi­ cated to, and filled with, the music of pre-war France. But

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after regular gigs with the likes of Edith Piaf, Thielemans emigrated to the United States and slid easily into the age of be-bop. The rest is a unique slice of American jazz his­ tory. The marvelous Thielemans comes to Discover Jazz

The Garment Gallery "

q

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C'MhLnpf' ...W ould like to take the time to thank all who enjoyed our tastings and dinners over the past 5 m on ths.

June 11 with pianist Kenny Werner at Contois Auditorium.

Our International Dinner and Wine Scries will be taking the month of May o ff for research and travel.

sOUnd AdviCe

David and the gang will be traveling the world this month to bring back more private labels, and recipes to make the International Senes even better.

c o n tin u e d fro m p a ge 2 3

TEEN HIP-HOP PARTY (ages

Higher Ground, 9 p.m. $18/20.

14-20; DJ Derrick Brown), Millennium Club, 8 p.m. $7. TOP HAT DJ (hip-hop), Rasputins, 9:30 p.m. NC. CHILL-OUT NIGHT (DJs; dance/Top 40), Club 156, 8 p.m. NC.

JERRY LAVENE (jazz guitar),

ACOUSTIC JAM W/JACIE & PAUL, Alley Cats, 9 p.m. NC. LEGENDARY PINK DOTS, DEAD VOICES ON AIR (art rock),

9:30 p.m. NC.

Higher Ground, 9 p.m. $8/10. 18+

KARAOKE W/MATT & BONNIE DRAKE, Edgewater Pub, 9 p.m. NC.

JIM BRANCA (acoustic blues), Bridge St. Cafe, 10 a.m. NC.

LIVE MUSIC, Capitol Grounds, 11 a.m. NC.

SHANE & CHARLOTTE BRODIE (acoustic), Sandbar Restaurant, 10 a.m. NC.

MONDAY ALLEY CATS JAM W/DAN PARKS & BOB SENESAC (rock), Alley Cats, 9 p.m. NC. DAVE GRIPPO (funky jazz), Red Square, 9:30 p.m. NC. MOPE ’ N’ IKE (groove-rock), Club Metronome, 9 p.m. $2.

MIKE PELK EY & FRIENDS (acoustic rock), Nectar’s, 9 p.m. NC. OPEN MIKE, Rasputin’s, 9 p.m. NC. GAME NIGHT (Top 40), Club 156, 8 p.m. NC. MACEO PARKER, DAD (funk),

In the meantime, please visit our store at Bolton Valley to pick up the ingredients for your own international dinner at nomc, or visit our website @ www.pandorasfinewine.com for histories o f Pandora's Fine Wine 6 Cheese, the International Scries, and our past months menus.

Chow! Bella, 6 p.m. NC.

OPEN STAGE W/WILLY B. STEELE (acoustic), Horn of the

P a n d o r a s F in e W in e 6 C h e e s e we will new pleasures prove

8 0 2 -4 3 4 -4 2 4 1 www.pandorasfincwine.com

Moon Cafe, 8:30 p.m. NC.

MIGHTY BLUES WORKSHOP JAM , Mountain Roadhouse,

2 6 6 P in e S t r e e t • B u r lin g t o n 8 6 0 .2 3 8 8 • M o n -S a t 1 0 - 5

INItK Partnerships M aking a Difference

TUESDAY

for W omen and Fam ilies worldwide

BEN ALDRIGE QUARTET (jazz), Leunig’s, 7 p.m. NC.

OPEN MIKE (acoustic), Burlington Coffeehouse at Rhombus, 8 p.m. Donations.

SEVEN DAYS

LADY ZEN O ’S DRAG BINGO (benefit for Pride VT 2000), 135 Pearl, 8 p.m. NC. OPIUS (groove rock), Nectar’s, 9 p.m. NC. LUCRETIA CRUMB (alt-rock), Red Square, 9:30 p.m. NC.

Female Volunteers Needed fo r a Research Study

OFF THA LEASH W/TRAUM UNIT (hip-hop DJs LV, Dubee,

conducted by Ira Bernstein, Ml)

Andy, Double; electronica), Millennium Nightclub, 9 p.m. $2/7. BASHM ENT (reggae/dancehall DJs), Ruben James, 10 p.m. NC. 0X0N0ISE (rock), J.P.’s Pub, 9:30 p.m. NC. MEXICALI NIGHT (Top 40 DJ), Club 156, 10 p.m. NC.

DAVE KELLER W/GUEST (acoustic blues), Bridge St. Cafe, 6 p.m. NC. ®

at UVM Dept. o/OB/GYN ,

This study will exam ine blood flow to the uterus during the m enstrual cycle. You may be eligible if you are: • b8-35 years old • have regular cycles (26-32 days apart) • do not smoke • have never been pregnant Financial com pensation of $400 will be offered for participation in study.

656-2669

Dr. N a fis Sadik, E xecu tive D irector U nited N atio n s P op ulation Fund (U N FPA ) The UNFPA provides support to over 160 countries in order to improve repro­ ductive health and family planning services, and to formulate population policies that support women’s education and economic development. Dr. Sadik is a champion of gender equity, speaking with courage and passion about human rights, sustainable development and w om en’s empowerment.

Also speaking: DR. OLIVE SENTUMBWE & DR. JOY KYAZIKE, PPNNE’s Global Partners from the Association of Ugandan Women Medical Doctors, working to ensure adoles.cent-friendly reproductive health care in Uganda.

A forum co-sponsored by Senator Jim Jeffords and Planned Parenthood of Northern New England (PPNNE)

FRIDAY, JUNE 2,2000 • 10AM - NOON Radisson Hotel, SO Battery St., Burlington Free and open to the public. Call Deb at (802) 878-7232 x 279, or email: interntlippnne.org to RSVP. ABOUT THE CO-SPONSORS: PPNNE is nationally recognized for the excellence of its International Program and is the largest rural family planning provider in the United States. Senator Jeffords, a long-time supporter of international family planning, successfully fought to restore $25 million in UNFPA funding in fiscal year 2000.

Aloha, Rick. ______________ from your friends at SEVENDAYS may 2 4 , 2000

SEVEN DAYS

page 25


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Friday, May 26 B U R L IN G T O N • 8pm ‘Union” Dance & Show: Celebration of N ew Civil Union Law, Benefit for Pride Verm o nt 2000 Come and celebrate the passage o f the new Civil Union Law with Craig Mitchell and his band The Orange Factory, and Teena Ann (*69 Recordings) from NYC,The Rhythm Kitchen,Yolanda, and Djs Chia, Moonflower, and Shiva. Higher Ground, Winooski. $I0.

Sunday, May 28 K IL L IN G T O N • 4pm Kick-O ff Party for Pride 2000 Vermont CARES is hosting a party to celebrate the beginning o f Pride Month. Come to the mountain and play outdoors until 4 pm then join us on the deck and listen to cool music from vinyl to C D ’s. Enjoy the bar the restaurant, and the gar­ den. Toadstool Harry's, Route 4. 2 1+, no cover. Information, David Morill (802) 775-5884.

PRIDE DAY « FESTIVAL £ Thursday, June 1 B U R L IN G T O N • 7pm & PARADE ■Movie Night “ O rlando” Sponsored by Both Sides Saturday k. Now, shown at UVM. Information, call Laurie (802) June 17 > 879-1147 o r on the web, www.angelfire.com/vt. Burlington

3 0) fo

B U R L IN G T O N • 6-8:30pm W o m e n ’s Night O u t Sponsored by the W om en o f C olor Alliance at the Emergency Food Shelf, 228 N. W inooski Ave. Call Jenna (802) 660-0606.

B U R L IN G T O N * 10pm Boys N ight O u t Boom, 156 St. Paul St., 658-3994, $5. W atch the boys from Montreal strut their stuff with DJs Rob & Alan.

B U R L IN G T O N • 6pm Pride W o m e n ’s Dance 135 Pearl. 18 & over $5 cover includes Dinner & Dance, DJ E.V. performing live, Karen Grenier

M O N TP E LIE R • thru Monday, June 5 6:30 & 8pm Film presentation: “ Bedrooms and Hallways” From "G o Fish" director Rose Troche. Savoy Theater $7 admission.

Saturday, June 3 M O N TP E LIE R • I pm Pride Kickoff March State House to Peace Park, Main Street join us at the State House lawn as we launch the 30 Days o f Pride with a march in the street to the Peace Park, followed by a picnic in the park. It’s free, so bring your rainbow flags and whistles fo r the parade and your own food and beverage fo r the picnic.

page 26

drama

Friday, June 2

SEVEN DAYS

may 2 4 , 2000

music • Also, see listings in “Sound Advice.” VAUGHAN RECITAL SERIES: Students of Hafiz Shabazz, director of the World Music Percussion Ensemble, perform works from oral music traditions. Faulkner Recital Hall, Hopkins Center, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 603-646-2422. ROCK OPERA: Lotus Blooming in a Sea o f Fire, by student Michael Roberts, centers around the tragic meeting of five U.S. soldiers and five Vietnamese villagers. Spaulding Auditorium, Hopkins Center, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 8 p.m. Free with ticket. Info, 603646-3666.

‘W IT ’: A literature professor faces life-threatening illness in Northern Stage’s presentation of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play. Briggs Opera House, White River Junction, 8 p.m. $20. Info, 296-7000.

film ‘ALL ABOUT MY MOTHER’: In Pedro Almodovar’s Oscar-winning film, a woman searches for her miss­ ing lover against a backdrop of trans­ vestite hookers and a pregnant nun. Cinema North Movieplex 9, Rutland, 7 p.m. $7. Info, 775-5413. ‘PROPAGANDA ON DEMANDA’ DOUBLE FEATURE: Sergei Eisenstein’s Soviet masterpiece, Battleship Potemkin, readies viewers for Leni Riefenstahl’s controversial Nazisponsored documentary of the Olympic Games in Berlin. Loew Auditorium, Hopkins Center,

Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 6:45 & 9 p.m. $6. Info, 603646-2422.

art • Also, see exhibit openings in the art listings. FIGURE DRAWING: The human figure motivates aspiring and accom­ plished artists in a weekly drawing ses­ sion at the Firehouse Gallery, Burlington, 6:30-9:30 p.m. $3-6. Info, 865-7165. GERMAN HISTORY AND ART TALK: An art teacher investigates aes­ thetics and anti-Semitism in Germany from 1930 through the end of World War II. T.W. Wood Gallery, Vermont College, Montpelier, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 828-8743. JAPANESE ART LECTURE: An art history prof discusses the emergence of ukiyo-e painting in conjunction with an ongoing exhibit of Japanese art. Loew Auditorium, Hopkins Center,


WE KNOW WINE So you don’t have to! spring run-off:

It was a war between Greece and Persia that dispatched the first “marathoner” with news from the front. Nowadays the motivations of most runners are more, well, personal. Go the distance -— all 26 miles — in the Queen City qualifier and get a leg up on the next marathon. II shin splints don’t sound like Sunday fun to you, at least show your support by running your mouth. And forget about driving on North Avenue -— or strolling on the bike path — before noon. Sunday, May 28. Battery Park, Burlington, 8 a. m. Free for spectators. Info, 863-8412.

old news:

“The history of the world is but the biography of great men,” noted writer Thomas Carlyle. But the quieter voices may tell a different story. Vermont Voices is a volume of primary sources that cover 400 years of state his­ tory, all the way back to 1609. Included are the words of pioneer settlers, Abenaki Indians, Green Mountain Boys and suffragettes. Editors Samuel Hand and Gene Sessions are likely to pipe up, too, at a reading and discussion. Wednesday, May 24. Borders, Church Street Marketplace, Burlington, 7 p. m. Free. Info, 865-2711.

spring fling: Got a fondness for fon­ due pots? A hankering for hamster cages? A desire for dressers? Find it all, second-hand, at the “Curtain Calls” tag sale, which has been a popular annual event for almost a decade. It’s an opportunity to pick up classy cast-offs, includ­ ing jewelry, furniture, clothing collectibles and glassware — sort of the opposite of spring clean­ ing. Recycling was never so fu n .. .ctional. Friday, May 26, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday, May 27, 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Flynn Theatre warehouse, cor­ ner o f King & St. Paul St. Free. Info, 652-4505.

grin and bear it l

Death may be a requisite part of life, but that doesn’t make it any easier to explain to children. A good theater piece can break the bad news to them — gently. In The Arkansaw Bear, a young girl refuses to accept the impending death of her ailing grand­ father. To deal with it, she enters a fantasy world where a cast of circus characters teach her how to celebrate life, rather than fear death. The Theatre Factory production is geared for families. Friday, May 26, 7 p. m. Saturday, May 27, 2 & 7 p. m. Sunday, May 28, 2 p. m. Mann Hall Auditorium, Trinity College, Burlington. $5Info, 865-7672.

sliding scale: You can find reptiles and amphibians all over Vermont. But what if you want to track down a specific wood frog or garter snake? Middlebury biology prof Jim Andrews has been coordinating efforts to build a comprehensive reptile and amphibian atlas of the state. Amateur and professional herpetolo­ gists not only use it, they can contribute to it — it’s based on reported sightings, preferably with photos, from anyone who comes across a cold­ blooded neighbor. Andrews introduces residents to scaly sights and sounds with slides and an outdoor training session. Saturday, May 27. Vermont Leadership Center, E. Charleston, 10:30 a.m. - 3 p.m. $5. Info, 723-4705.

No Beer No Booze No Deli

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taste the world one glass at a time 133 st. paul st.* burlington, vt '05401 • 802 .951 .wine • wineworks.net

workshop ethic:

Culture-crawlers get an eyeful during Open Studio Weekend — a knock is all it takes to get into workshops of artists around the state. Furniture, fine paint­ ings, pottery hand-blown glass and sculpture are displayed in situ along with their chatty creators. Stephen Huneck unveils his dog chapel, com­ plete with stained-glass canine saints, and the Ferrisburgh Artisan’s Guild’s long-awaited Starry Night Cafe makes its debut for the occasion. Saturday & Sunday, May 27-28. Venues around Vermont, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Free. For maps to vari­ ous locations, 223-3380.

Festival M ike’s Campus WEEK-LONG CLASSES Katherine Kramer • Jazz and Tap Jeh Kulu • West African Pete Sutherland • Polk Dance *Plus Yoga, Experimental Anatomy, Pilates, and more

Call VT Dance Theater 1-800-821-0232 Sponsored by the Vermont Arts Council

Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 5 p.m. Free. Info, 603-646-2808.

Montpelier, 9:30-11 a.m. & noon 1:30 p.m. $6. Info, 229-6206.

words

etc

POETRY & NON-FICTION READING: Local writers Michelle Demers and Karen Kane read from their respective works. Rhombus Gallery, 186 College St., Burlington, 8 p.m. $3-6. Info, 865-0569. ‘VERMONT VOICES’: Editors Samuel Hand and Gene Sessions read from their very Vermont volume trac­ ing the history of the Green Mountain State from the turn of the 17th century. Borders, Church Street Marketplace, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 865-271 1. BOOK DISCUSSION: Read all about The Shipping News, by E. Annie Proulx, as part of the “Fathers and Families” series. S. Burlington Community Library, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 652-7080.

‘EXPO 2000’: The state’s largest busi­ ness and technology trade show fea­ tures Vermont-Canada Trade Day fes­ tivities and e-commerce workshops. Sheraton Hotel, S. Burlington, 7:30 a.m. - 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3443. VOLUNTEER TRAINING: The Clarina Howard Nichols Center offers a session on how to aid victims of domestic or sexual abuse. Johnson Elementary School Library, 6-9 p.m. Free. Info, 888-2584. ‘FRAUD FIGHTER’ TRAINING: Assistant Attorney General Anne Whitten leads a workshop on ways to combat telemarketing fraud. Ladd Hall State Office Complex, Waterbury, 9 a.m. - noon & 1-4 p.m. ‘FENG SHUI IN THE GARDEN’: Get good vibes from your greenery by arranging it the ancient Chinese way. Barnes & Noble, S. Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 864-8001. FOREST SERVICE MEETING: The U.S. Forest Service hears comments from citizens on its proposal to pro­ tect the national forests from logging and road building. Howe Center, Rutland, 6-9 p.m. Free. Info,

kids STORYTIME: Young readers ages three to five learn from lighthearted literature, songs and activities at the I S. Burlington Community Library, U a.m. Free. Register, 652-7080. I Th e LIVES OF HONEYBEES’: What’s the buzz? Preschoolers explore the benefits of beeing there at the North Branch Nature Science Center,

223- 3216. ‘BIRDS OF THE EVENING’: Enjoy

the sounds — and perhaps, the sights — of night birds like the whippoor­ will and woodcock on an outing orga­ nized by the Fairbanks Museum. Copp’s Store, N. Concord, 6-9 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2372.

2 5 four

tnursday music • Also, see listings in “Sound Advice.” VERMONT YOUTH ORCHES­ TRA AUDITIONS: Young musicians tune up and try out with prepared solos and sight readings. Southwick Hall, UVM, Burlington. Free. Register for times, 658-4708. OPEN MIKE: Bring your own talent to a performance potluck at the T. W. Wood Art Gallery, Vermont College, Montpelier, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 229-9494.

dance LATINO DANCE PARTY: Deejay Hector “El Salsero” Cobeo spins discs at a spicy shakedown for Latin lovers. Sh-na-na’s, Burlington, 9 p.m. $3. Info, 862-5082.

drama

unique as your Baby. 1 Outlet Store . 79 Main www.2utano.com

‘W IT ’: See May 24.

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‘THUMBS UP’: Community members with developmental dis­ abilities act up in a show of creative spirit. Burlington City Hall Auditorium, 2 p.m. $5.50. Info,

Champlain Basin Science Center, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Register, 864-1848. STATE HOUSE VOLUNTEERS: Wannabe tour guides and gift shop workers sign up for training ses­ sions and listen to a history lecture over lunch. Statehouse Cafeteria, Montpelier, 11:30 a.m. Free. Register, 828-0387. BIRDING WALK: Look for winged waterside residents, from songbirds to bald eagles, on a walk by the Connecticut River. BarnetNorth Monroe Bridge, 6-9 a.m. Free. Info, 748-2372. ‘EMBODYING EXPERIENCE’: Robert Kest leads an exploration of meditation and movement in daily life. 64 Main St., Montpelier, 79:15 p.m. Free. Info, 229-6989. EMOTIONS ANONYMOUS: Women suffering depression, anxi­ ety or other problems get support through a 12-step program. 86 Lake Street, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 644-1970. HEPATITIS-C SUPPORT GROUP: Three million Americans suffer from this still-incurable liver disease. A support group meets at Burgess Assembly, Fletcher Allen Healthcare, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 453-5532. SEXUAL ASSAULT SURVIVORS GROUP: Victims of violence sup­ port and educate their peers. Puffer United Methodist Church, Morrisville, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 888-5256.

860-3611.

film ‘HEAT AND DUST’: James Ivory’s 1982 film chronicles the journey of a modern women who travels to India in the historic footsteps of her great aunt. Loew Auditorium, Hopkins Center, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 7 p.m. $6. Info, 603-646-2422.

art ■'TT-

• See exhibit openings in the art listings.

words ‘VERMONT VOICES III’ READING: Contributing authors K.K. Wilder, Elizabeth Van Buskirk, Karen Pratt, Nancy Means Wright and Lois Lorimar read works from the Vermont-made anthology. Barnes &c Noble, S. Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 864-8001.

kids FAMILY OUTING CLUB: Parents and their children, from infants to seven-year-olds, hike through old pine forests with views of Lake Champlain. Red Rocks Park, S. Burlington, 9:30 a.m. $4. Register, 244-7037. ‘READING RAINBOW’ STORY­ TIME: The focus is on families, with readings of On the Day You Were Bom and Grandfather’s Journey. Barnes & Noble, S. Burlington, 3:30 p.m. Free. Info, 864-8001.

etc ‘EXPO 2000’: See May 24, 7:30 a.m. - 4 p.m. MUSEUM VOLUNTEERS: Hands-on helpers learn to make the lake come alive through educa­ tional activities at the Lake

LIVE MUSIC:

place, Burlington, 8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-2711. ‘LIES & LEGENDS’: A theatrical, cabaret-style tribute to Harry Chapin celebrates the life and music of the singer-songwriter. Montpelier City Hall Arts Center, 8 p.m. $8. Info, 229-0492. PROFESSOR FAIRBANKS: The six-string violinist mixes jazz, swing and original tunes, with assistance from pianist Tracy Wolters. Villa Tragara, Waterbury Center, 6:30 p.m. $5. Info, 244-5288.

drama ‘THUMBS UP’: See May 25, 7 p.m. ‘W IT’: See May 24. ‘THE ISLAND’: Athol Fugards drama depicts the lives of political prisoners in Africa. Warner Bentley Theater, Hopkins Center, Dart­ mouth College, Hanover, N.H., 8 p.m. $1. Info, 603-646-2422.

art • Also, see exhibit openings in the art listings. ‘SACRED BUFFALO’: The muse­ um’s artist-in-resident, James Durham, discusses the buffalo skeleton he carved over a sevenyear period — the largest single piece of scrimshawed art in exis­ tence. Fairbanks Museum, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2372.

kids ‘MUSIC W ITH ROBERT AND GIGI’: Kids sing songs with Robert Resnik and his fiddle-playing friend Gigi Weisman. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Register, 865-7216. ‘THE ARKANSAW BEAR’: Young audiences can relate to a young girl who creates a circus world to deal with the death of her grandfather. See “to do” list, this issue. Mann Hall Auditorium, Trinity College, Burlington, 7 p.m. $5. Info, 865-7672.

music • Also, see listings in “Sound Advice.” VERMONT YOUTH ORCHES­ TRA AUDITIONS: See May 25. GREG DOUGLASS: The young, Burlington-based singer-songwriter returns for a set of soulful music at Borders, Church Street Market­

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THURSDAY

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film

Traditional Irish music S songs, 5pm-8pm

GROOVE

A

drama ‘W IT’: See May 24. ‘THE ISLAND’: See May 26. ‘SQUIRREL HILL’ AUDITIONS: Actors high-tail it to tryouts for the summer production of Jennifer Bloomfield’s original play. Mann Hall Auditorium, Trinity College, Burlington, 10 a.m. - noon. Free. Info, 652-0761.

S U N D A Y

JA Z Z

3 Sushi Slices

dance CONTRA DANCE: Lausanne Allen calls for Franklin Heyburn and Karen Sutherland at this northern-style community hoedown. Holley Hall, Bristol, 8 p.m. $6. Info, 388-4548.

T H E C R O P P IE S

REAL TA M M Y

SU [ R e t r o n o m e b.c/J a pm, $2

SEVEN DAYS

etc ‘CURTAIN CALLS’ TAG SALE: Pick up classy cast-off furniture, clothing, childrens items and other assorted goodies to benefit the Flynn Theatre. See “to do” list, this issue. Flynn Theatre Warehouse, corner of King & St. Paul St., 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Free. Info, 652-4505. PUBLIC WORKS DAY: Free cot­ ton candy, popcorn and balloons enlivens a day of learning about local public works. Upper Block, Church Street Marketplace, 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Free. Info, 863-9094. MAMMAL LECTURE: A zoology professor leads a slide tour around the globe, contrasting mammals of the Himalayas with those of the Northeast Kingdom. Vermont Leadership Center, E. Charleston, 7:30 p.m. $5. Info, 723-4705. BATTERED WOMEN’S SUP­ PORT GROUP: Battered Women’s Services and Shelter facili­ tates a group in Barre, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 223-0855. GLBTQ SUPPORT GROUP: Gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgendered and questioning youth make new friends and get support. Outright Vermont, Burlington, 6:30-9 p.m. Free. Info, 800-452-2428.

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page 28

music • Also, see listings in “Sound Advice.” VERMONT YOUTH ORCHES­ TRA AUDITIONS: See May 25. ‘LIES & LEGENDS’: See May 26. ‘RAISE THE ROOF’: This benefit bash for the Burlington Com­ munity Land Trust features tunes by Big Joe Burrell and the Unknown Blues Band. Coach Barn, Shelburne Farms, 6-9 p.m. $50. Info, 862-6244. DARTMOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: Anthony Princiotti leads the student ensemble in per­ formances of Tchaikovsky’s Romeo and Juliet Fantasy Overture and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7 in A Major. Hopkins Center, Dart­ mouth College, Hanover, N.H., 8 p.m. $12.50. Info, 603-646-2422.

2

SUSHI

THURSDAY NIGHT 9-llpm at Pacific Rim Cafe

sport OPEN VOLLEYBALL: Servers and spikers mix it up in a game open to all adults. YMCA, Burlington, 1:30-3:30 p.m. Free. Info, 864-7541. SENIOR SWIM: Older adults get aquatic exercise during pool time set aside for seniors only. YMCA, Burlington, 2-4 p.m. Free. Info, 864-7541.

B E C K Y

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cuddle up with a good book at this pro-pajama event. Barnes & Noble, S. Burlington, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 864-8001.

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alendar Hanover, N.H., 7 & 9:15 p.m. $6. Info, 603-646-2422.

art • Also, see exhibit openings in the art listings. OPEN STUDIO WEEKEND: Local artists and craftspeople offer visitors an inside look at the cre­ ative process. See “to do” list, this issue. Venues around Vermont, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Free. For maps to various locations, 223-3380.

words ‘VIBES’: A rowdy poetry and per­ cussion program encourages audi­ ence participation on anything from spoons to readings by Burnham Holmes, Jon Mathewson, Megaera Fitch and Emma Gluckman. St. Stephen’s on the Green, Middlebury, 7:30 p.m. $5. Info, 235-2400. USED BOOK SALE: Search the stacks for secondhand literature to benefit the Pierson Library. Shelburne Village School Gym, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Free. Info, 985-5124. BOOK COLLECTION: Lighten your literary load by donating books for a sale to benefit the Burnham Memorial Library. Old Firehouse, Colchester, 9 a.m. noon. Free. Info, 879-7576.

kids ‘THE ARKANSAW BEAR’: See May 26, 2 & 7 p.m. STORYTIME: Young readers delve into classic and new tales at a laidback, literary happening. Borders, Church St. Marketplace, Burling­ ton, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 865-271 1.

sport AUTO RACING: Kids get free posters and local speed demons tear up the track in an exhilarating exhibition at Airborne Inter­ national Raceway, Plattsburgh, 7:30 p.m. $3-8, $15 for families. Info, 244-6963. LONG TRAIL WALK­ THROUGH: Bring work gloves

and water on a moderate-paced spring cleaning of the Long Trail. Meet at Park & Ride Lot, Richmond, 8:30 a.m. Free. Register, 862-3841. ADVANCED CORRIDOR MONITORING: Forestry fans and current volunteers learn about taking on new outdoor work chal­ lenges. Northern section of the Long Trail, 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Free. Register, 244-7037.

etc ‘CURTAIN CALLS’ TAG SALE: See May 26, 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. MEMORIAL DAY PARADE: The theme of the floats is “Let Freedom Ring” at this musical parade honor­ ing American servicemen and women. Marching begins at the Champlain Valley Fairgrounds, Essex, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 872-8972. PLANT SALE: Proceeds from sales of gorgeous greenery go to benefit the local Parents, Teachers & Neighbors group. Moretown Elementary School, 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Free. Info, 496-5959. NATURE CENTER BIRD WALK: Explore a variety of migra­ tory bird habitats on an early morning stroll. Green Mountain Audubon Nature Center, Huntington, 7:30 a.m. $4. Info, 434-3068. BIRDS, BUTTERFLIES AND BOTANY WALKS: Take in the flora and fauna on a variety of springtime strolls. VINS North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 8:30 a.m. for birds: 10 a.m. for botany; 11:30 a.m. for butterflies. $3 each or $6 for all. Info, 229-6206. ‘TOWN MEETING’ SERIES: Voters interview student Glynda McKinnon, a candidate for state senator, at Woodbury College, 660 Elm Street, Montpelier, 11:40 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 229-0516. REPTILE & AMPHIBIAN TALK: A biology prof takes a hard, cold-blooded look at local lizards and frogs. See “to do” list, this issue. Vermont Leadership Center,

E. Charleston, 10:30 a.m. - 3 p.m. $5. Info, 723-4705. BIRD TOUR: A visit to prime birding territory in the Northeast Kingdom may yield sightings of warblers, boreal chickadees, gray jays and spruce grouses. The Inn at Mountain View Creamery, E. Burke, 7-10 a.m. Free. Info, 748-2372. CRAFT FAIR & FLEA MARKET: Expect bazaar behavior while browsing for new, handmade and used goods. Vermont State Fairgrounds, Rutland, 9 a.m. 4 p.m. Free. Info, 492-2013. FARMERS MARKETS: Look for Vermont-grown agricultural prod­ ucts and crafts at open-air booths. Burlington City Hall Park, 8:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Info, 888-8898188. Taylor Park, St. Albans, 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Info, 933-4703. Corner of Elm and State Streets, Montpelier, 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Info, 426-3800. Depot Park, Rutland, 9 a.m. -2 p.m. Info, 773-5778. WINE TASTING: Get in touch with your inner oenophile at an introduction to various vini. Wine Works, 133 St. Paul St., Burling­ ton, 1-5 p.m. 504 per taste. Info, 951-9463.

Hanover, N.H., 4 p.m. Free. Info, 603-646-2422.

dance ‘UP’: Student Brenda Withers wrote, directed and stars in this movement-based performance. Warner Bentley Theater, Hopkins Center, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 8 p.m. $1. Info, 603-646-2422.

drama ‘THE ISLAND’: See May 26, 2 p.m. ‘W IT’: See May 24, 5 p.m. VARIETY SHOW AUDITIONS: Comics, poets, musicians and entertainers of every sort get a shot at a slot on a public access show. Richmond, 1-4 p.m. Free. Register for directions and time, 434-2604.

film ‘SHORT CUTS’: Robert Altman directed Tim Robbins, Tom Waits, Julianne Moore and Lyle Lovett in this interwoven adaptation of stories by Raymond Carver. Spaulding Auditorium, Hopkins Center, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 7:30 p.m. $6. Info, 603-646-2422.

art

pound the pavement in the Olympic tradition — for 26 miles. See “to do” list, this issue. Leaving from Battery Park, Burlington, 8 a.m. Free to watch. Info, 863-8412. AUTO RACING: The ACT Late Model Sportsman Series continues at this Memorial Day Classic event. Thunder Road, Barre, 1:30 p.m. $5-12, $25 for families. Info, 244-6963. ABBEY POND HIKE: Get away from it all on an easy, 3.8-mile trek in the “real Vermont” woods. Meet at UVM Visitor Lot, Burlington, 9 a.m. Free. Register, 878-6618.

etc WINE TASTING: See May 27. WILDFLOWER WALK: Get a look at trout lilies, trillium, cinque­ foil and other spring blossoms. Green Mountain Audubon Nature Center, Huntington, 2 p.m. $4. Register, 434-3068. EDIBLE & MEDICINAL PLANTS: A local naturalist leads a forest tour of wild plants with spe­ cial purposes. Vermont Leadership Center, E. Charleston, 1-4 p.m. $5. Info, 723-4705.

29

Sunday

• Also, see exhibit openings in the art listings. OPEN STUDIO WEEKEND: See May 27.

music

words

music

• Also, see listings in “Sound Advice.” VERMONT YOUTH ORCHES­ TRA AUDITIONS: See May 25. ‘LIES & LEGENDS’: See May 26, 6:30 p.m. THE HUBCATS: The local bluegrass duo bring their high, lone­ some sound to Borders, Church Street Marketplace, Burlington, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 865-2711. VAUGHAN RECITAL SERIES: Matt Kramer and Katie Lachter harmonize in a senior vocal recital. Faulkner Recital Hall, Hopkins Center, Dartmouth College,

BOOK COLLECTION: See May 27, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

• Also, see listings in “Sound Advice.” VERMONT YOUTH ORCHES­ TRA AUDITIONS: See May 25. OPEN MIKE NIGHT: A perfor­ mance potluck follows the featured acts, Willy B. Steele and O.K. Stevenson, at the Horn of the Moon Cafe, Montpelier, 8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-5342. CHAMPLAIN ECHOES: Harmonious women compare notes at a weekly rehearsal of the all-female barbershop chorus. The Pines, Dorset St., S. Burlington, 79:30 p.m. Free. Info, 862-5900.

kids STORYTIME: See May 27. ‘THE ARKANSAW BEAR’: See May 26, 2 p.m. CHILDREN’S FESTIVAL: A fundraising day of family fun fea­ tures musicians, storytellers, crafts and snacks. Weston Playhouse, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. $5. Info, 824-3405.

sport VERMONT CITY MARATHON: Endurance runners

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page 29


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• See exhibit openings in the art listings.

sport BLUFF MOUNTAIN HIKE: The Northeast Kingdom Mountain Challenge kicks off with a guided hike to the summit. Vermont Leadership Center, E. Charleston, 9 a.m. Donations. Register, 723-6551.

etc VOLUNTEER TRAINING: Sec May 24.

• Women and Film • Psychology and Science Fiction • Visions of the Night: A Dream Retreat ' Cosmology and the Holotropic Mind •Introduction to Oriental Medicine 1A River Runs Through all of it: Paddling to a Greater Awareness of Vermont’s Watersheds Drawing Outdoors Shakespeare Rattle and Roll

Continued on page 32

Join us as we celebrate survivors, remember friends and loved ones who have lost their battle with cancer, and help fundraise to

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continue research and find a cure.

*Want to learn but don’t need college credit? Most courses and workshops can be audited for one-third the cost of regular tuition.

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Burlington

( 8 ° ° ) 8 62-9616 W K & www.burlcol.edu ssHMfi ^ „ o e-mail: admissions@burlcol.edu S E H L iO il6 ? 6 95

Department of Employment & Training, Burlington, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 652-0322. PUBLIC MEDITATION: Take a step on the path to enlightenment in an environment that instructs beginners and supports practiced thinkers. Ratna Shri Tibetan Meditation Center, 12 Hillside Ave., Montpelier, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-5435. BATTERED WOMEN’S SUP­ PORT GROUP: Women Helping Battered Women facilitates a group in Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 658-1996.

Cancer Survivors Wanted. We are looking for cancer survivors to participate in our survivor lap.

Give Yourself Credit! *Film Production *Non-Linear Editing ' 2-D Graphic Animation ► Advanced 35mm Film Production >Midnight Movies ' Internet Research Methods *Web Page Design and Maintenance 1History o f Social Work Shakespeare and Buddhism Steelband: a Model of Community Music Stone Carving

CHICKEN BARBECUE: Fill up on barbecued bird to benefit stu­ dent enrichment programs at* Jericho Elementary School, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. $8. Info, 899-4529. WORKER’S RIGHTS: Employees facing discrimination, unsafe working conditions, insur­ ance problems and other labor issues get help from an advocate at the Workers Rights Center, Burlington City Hall, 4:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7184. NETWORKING GROUP: Employee hopefuls get job leads, connections, skills and support. Career Resource Center, Vermont

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page 30

SEVEN DAYS

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aikido AIKIDO OF CHAMPLAIN VAL­ LEY: Adults, Monday through Friday, 5:45-6:45 p.m. and 7-8:15 p.m. Saturdays, 9-1 1:45 a.m. Children, Tuesdays & Thursdays, 45 p.m.. Aikido of Champlain Valley. 17 E. Allen St., Winooski. $55/month, $120/three months, intro specials. Info, 654-6999 or www.aikidovt.org. Study this graceful, flowing martial art to develop flexibil­ ity, confidence and self-defense skills. AIKIDO OF VERMONT: Ongoing classes Monday through Friday, 6-7 p.m. and 7-8 p.m. Saturday, 9-10:30 a.m. Sunday, 1011:30 a.m. Above Onion River Co­ op, 274 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info, 862-9785. Practice the art of Aikido in a safe and sup­ portive environment.

aromatherapy SOAPMAKING: Thursday, June 1, 6:30-9 p.m. Star Root, Battery St., Burlington. $45. Register, 8624421. Make sweetly scented soaps using a simple recipe.

art ELDER ART PROGRAM: Classes starting in June. Locations in S. Burlington, Bristol, N. Hero and St. Albans. $56. Info, 879-0685, 4535885, 372-4237 or 524-1519. Aspiring artists 55 and up learn to use charcoal watercolor, oil, acrylic and pencil. OPEN ART STUDIO Fridays starting June 2, 4-6 p.m. Grist Mill, Bristol. $10/class. $30/month. Register, 453-5885. Create anything you please in the company of other artists and learn from one another. ARTS EDUCATION TRAINING: Wednesday through Friday, June 7 through 9, 9 a.m. - noon. Firehouse Center for the Visual Arts, 135 Church St., Burlington. Free. Register, 865-7166. Artists and edu­ cators gain skills for teaching the arts to children in pre-school through third grade. ‘PAINT THE LAKE’: Three Saturdays, June 10, 17 and 24, 911:30 a.m. Firehouse Center for the Visual Arts, 135 Church St., Burlington. $60. Register, 865- 7166. Meet at various lakefront loca­ tions to paint with Jean Cannon. STAINED GLASS: Friday, June 16, 5-9 p.m., and Saturday, June 17, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Community College of Vermont, Burlington. $95. Register, 865-4422. Explore materi­ als, tools, techniques and design con­ cepts in the fine art of stained glass. WATER SOLUBLE OILS, PAINT­ ING THE NUDE: Saturday, August 19, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Community College of Vermont, Burlington. $80. Register, 865-4422. Develop your color studies using this versatile new medium, and live models.

business POWERFUL POWERPOINT PRESENTATIONS’: Saturday, June 17, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Community College of Vermont, Burlington. $70. Register, 865-4422. Create effective presentations that will wow your audience.

computers ACCESSING ACCESS’: Saturday,

June 10, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Community College of Vermont, Burlington. $70. Register, 8654422. Learn the basics o f the comput­ er program, including formatting, forms and reports.

KENDO: Ongoing Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 6:45-8:30 p.m. Warren Town Hall. Donations. Info, 496-4669. Develop focus, con­ trol and power through this Japanese samurai sword-fencing martial art.

craft

kids

DECORATIVE DRIFTWOOD’: Saturday, June 10, 3-4:30 p.m. Spirit Dancer Bookstore, 125 S. Winooski Ave., Burlington. $8. Info, 660-8060. Use crystals, feathers and beads to transform driftwood into mobiles and altar pieces. PAINTING CERAMICS: Ongoing classes. Blue Plate Ceramic Cafe, 1 19 College St., Burlington. Free. Info, 652-0102. Learn the funda­ mentals of painting ceramics. POTTERY, PAINTING AND PHOTOGRAPHY: Morning and evening classes, Saturday workshops and parent-child classes. Frog Hollow State Craft Center, Middlebury, Info, 388-3177 or www.froghollow.org. Take classes in calligraphy and collage. POTTERY & SCULPTURE: All ages and abilities, group classes, pri­ vate lessons, studio rental. Day, evening and weekend offerings. Vermont Clay Studio, 2802 Rt. 100, Waterbury Center. Register, 2241 126 ext. 41. Enjoy the pleasures and challenges of working with clay, whether you’ve had a lot, a little or no experience.

‘MAJORS AND MINORS CAMP’: Friday through Sunday, June 16 through 18. Bishop Booth Conference Center, Rock Point School, Burlington. $120, $100 for Burlington residents. Register, 8640123. Girls eight and up share a weekend of adventure with a signifi­ cant woman in their life.

dance ‘MOVING IN TO DANCE’: Thursday through Sunday, May 25 through 28, 6-9 p.m. Patrick Gym, University of Vermont, Burlington. $20/class, $75/all. Info, 864-5006. Take this dance class to get energized for spring. DISCOVERING CREATIVE MOVEMENT AND DANCE: Saturday, June 3, 1-7:30 p.m. Community College of Vermont, Burlington. $65. Register, 8654422. Discover your personal move­ ment vocabulary through structured improvisation . AFRO-CARIBBEAN DANCE: Ongoing Fridays, 5:30-7 p.m. Twin Oaks Sports and Fitness, S. Burlington. Ongoing Thursdays, 10:15 a.m. - noon. Capital City Grange, Montpelier. Info, 985-3665 or 658-0001. Get exercise and have fin while learning dances from Cuba, Haiti and Brazil.

healing ‘DISCOVERING YOUR HEROES W ITHIN’: Two Mondays, June 12 and 19, 6-8 p.m. 119 S. Winooski Ave., Burlington. $40. Register, 8628240. Identify the “gifsyou have to offer”using archetypal theory. PLANT MEDICINE: Saturday, June 17, 9 a.m. - noon. Community College of Vermont, Burlington. $25. Register, 865-4422. Search for local medicinal plants in the fields, woods and wetlands around Bayside Park in Colchester.

juggling JUGGLING CLUB: Ongoing Mondays, 5-7 p.m. Basement of Memorial Auditorium, Burlington. Free. Info, 863-4969. Beginner-toexpertjugglers and unicyclists convene.

kendo

language ITALIAN: Group and individual instruction, beginner to advanced, all ages. Middlebury area. Info, 5452676. Immerse yourself in Italian to get ready for a trip abroad, or to better enjoy the country's music, art and cui­ sine. ESL: Ongoing small group classes, beginners and intermediates. Vermont Adult Learning, Sloan Hall, Fort Ethan Allen, Colchester. Free. Info, 654-8677. Improve your listening, speaking, reading and writ­ ing skills in English as a second language.

massage MASSAGE: Fall enrollment is under­ way. Touchstone Healing Arts School of Massage, 35 King St., Burlington. Info, 658-7715. Take classes to become a massage practitioner. FOOT REFLEXOLOGY: Ongoing classes. S. Burlington Yoga Studio, Barrett St. Info, 658-3766. Learn this fun and easyform o f acu-pressure foot massagefrom a certified reflexolo­ gist.

meditation ZEN MEDITATION: Mondays, 4:45-5:45 p.m., Thursdays, 5:306:30 p.m. Burlington. Free. Info, 658-6466. Meditate with a sitting group associated with the Zen Affiliate of Vermont. ‘THE WAY OF THE SUFI’: Tuesdays, 7:30-9 p.m. S. Burlington. Free. Info, 658-2447. This Sufi-style meditation incorporates breath, sound and movement. MEDITATION: First & third Sundays, 10 a.m. - noon. Burlington Shambhala Center, 187 S. Winooski Ave. Free. Info, 658-6795. Instructors teach non-sectarian and Tibetan Buddhist meditations. MEDITATION: Thursdays, 7-8:30 p.m. Green Mountain Learning Center, 13 Dorset Lane, Suite 203, Williston. Free. Info, 872-3797. Don’t just do something, sit there! GUIDED MEDITATION: Sundays, 10:30 a.m. The Shelburne Athletic Club, Shelburne Commons. Free. Info, 985-2229. Practice guided meditation for relaxation and focus.

mentors ‘FINDING A MENTOR’: Tuesday, June 13, 6-9 p.m. Community College of Vermont, Burlington. $25. Register, 865-4422. Explore the importance of having a mentor, for both professional and personal reasons.

music MUSIC LITERACY FOR BEGIN­ NERS: Saturday, June 10, 9 a.m. - 4

p.m. or two Tuesdays, August 1 and 8, 6-9 p.m. Community College of Vermont, Burlington. $50. Register, 865-4422. Study the fundamentals of sound and music theory, including pitch, rhythm, scales, chords and read­ ing notation.

photography INSTRUCTION: Classes, work­ shops and private instruction, weeklong summer day camps for young people. Info, 372-3104. Take classes in creative and technical camera and darkroom skills while learning to “see” with a photographic eye.

self-defense BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU AND CARDIOBOXING: Ongoing class­ es for men, women and children, Monday through Saturday. Vermont Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Academy, 4 Howard St., Burlington. Info, 6604072. Escape fear with an integrated self-defense system based on technique, not size, strength or speed.

spirit ‘KABBALAH AND HEALING’: Saturday, May 27, 1-4 p.m. Spirit Dancer Books, 125 S. Winooski Ave., Burlington. $15. Info, 6608060. Learn to heal the selfand others based on ancient Jewish mysticism, through lecture, meditation and hands-on practice. ‘DISCOVER YOUR PAST LIVES’: Saturday, June 3, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Rising Sun, 35 King St., Burlington. $50. Register, 860-7286. Experience four of your former selves in group past-life regressions. ‘KABBALAH, MEDITATION AND ECSTASY’: Sunday, June 4, noon - 5 p.m. Forest’s Edge, Warren. $50. Register, 496-9022. Pick up empowering spiritual techniques based on ancient Jewish mysticism.

PSYCHIATRIC SUPPORT GROUP: Thursdays, 7 p.m. Various Burlington locations. Free. Info, 288-1006. Get peer supportfor depression, anxiety or other psychiatric illness. SEX AND LOVE ADDICTS ANONYMOUS: Sundays, 7 p.m. Free. Info, write to P.O. Box 5843, Burlington, 05402. Get help through this weekly 12-step program. VT. RESOLVE INFERTILITY SUPPORT GROUP: Wednesday, June 7, 6-8 p.m. New England Federal Credit Union, Taft Corner, Williston. Info, 657-2542. Talk with others about infertility issues.

voice VOICE AND DICTION, FOR ACTORS AND SPEAKERS: Saturday, June 17, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. or Saturday, August 19, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Community College of Vermont, Burlington. $50. Register, 865-4422. Through practical applica­ tion, learn how to use your voice most effectively.

wine WINE TASTING CLASS: Friday, May 26, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Wine Works, 133 St. Paul St., Burlington. $20. Info, 951-WINE. Explore the wines of Spain.

yoga

KUNDALINI YOGA INTEN­ SIVE: Saturday, June 10, 2-5 p.m. -The Movement Center, 7 Court St., Montpelier. Info, 234-6528. Combine yoga postures, breathing techniques and meditation to end pat­ terns that deplete your energy and potential. S. BURLINGTON YOGA: Ongoing Classes. Barrett St., S. Burlington. Info, 658-3766. Focus on stretching, breathing, relaxation and centering with Hatha yoga. UNION STREET STUDIO: Daily classes for all levels. 306 S. Union SKYDIVING: Ongoing classes. St., Burlington. Info, 860-3991. Vermont Skydiving Adventures, Practice Astanga, Kali Ray and Addison. Info, 759-3483. Experience Kripalu styles with certified instructors “static line, ” tandem and accelerated Ann Burdreski, Arlene Griffin and freefalljumps. Lisa Limoge. YOGA: Tuesdays, 7:30-9 p.m. Main St., Bristol. Info, 877-3863. Practice ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS: yoga for health, strength and peace of Daily meetings in various locations. mind. Free. Info, 658-4221. Want to over­ YMCA YOGA: Ongoing classes. come a drinking probleml Take the YMCA, College St., Burlington. first step — o f 12 — and join a group Info, 862-9622. Take classes in vari­ in your area. ous yoga styles. AL-ANON: Ongoing Wednesdays, YOGA VERMONT: Daily classes, 8 p.m. First Congregational Church, noon, 5:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. N. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Free. Saturday and Sunday, 9:30 a.m. Info, 655-6512. Do you have a friend Chace Mill, Burlington. Info, 660or relative with an alcohol problem? 9718 or yogavermont.com. AstangaAlcoholics Anonymous can help. style “power”yoga classes offer sweaty NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS: fun for all levels of experience. @ Ongoing daily groups. Various loca­ tions in Burlington, S. Burlington and Plattsburgh. Free. Info, 8624516. I f you’re ready to stop using C la s s L is t i n g s : drugs, this group o f recovering addicts can offer inspiration. $ 1 0 / w e e k or OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS: Daily meetings in various locations. $ 3 0 /fo u r w e e k s . Free. Info, 863-2655. Overeaters meet for support around food and ment health issues. PARTNERS AND FRIENDS OF SURVIVORS: Group forming. Info, 655-4907. Partners and friends of childhood abuse survivors share strug­ gles and successes with peers.

sport

support groups

may 2 4 , 2000


W ;~ v - .t

ii

■5-r?C\-vW ‘^

EVERY INCH AND OUNCE A STAR."

kids

Continued from page 30

STORYTIME: See May 24, 10 a.m. & 1 p.m.

- The New York Times ii

HER EVERY MOVE ANNOUNCES THE ARRIVAL OF A PHENOMENON." - The New Yorker

THE TOWH

DIRECT FROM BROADWAY'S

"Whether she's leaving theater goers numb with her exuberant stage performances or amazing nightclub audiences with her introspective interpretation of jazz standards and

^0^

riveting mastery of be-bop and scat

m ;

singing, Lea Delaria is destined to leave an indelible impression on you." -

Entertainment Weekly

etc

tuesday music • Also, see listings in “Sound Advice.” VERMONT YOUTH ORCHESTRA AUDITIONS: See May 25.

dance ‘UP’: See May 28.

art • See exhibit openings in the art listings.

words BOOK DISCUSSION GROUP: Readers round up All the Pretty Horses, by Cormac McCarthy. Borders, Church Street Marketplace, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 865-2711. BURLINGTON WRITERS GROUP: Bring pencil, paper and the will to be inspired to this writerly gathering at the Daily Planet, Burlington, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, 862-9647.

ARTS AWARDS: Acclaimed actor Michael York speaks at this presentation of awards for accom­ plished students of the arts. Spaulding Auditorium, Hopkins Center, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 4 p.m. Free. Info, 603-646-2422. FRENCH CONVERSATION GROUP: Freshen up your French, with a Quebecois accent, in this informal social cercle at Borders, Church Street Marketplace, Burlington, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 660-9823. FATHERS AND CHILDREN TOGETHER: Dads and kids spend quality time together dur­ ing a weekly meeting at the Wheeler Community School, Burlington, 5-7 p.m. Free. Info, 860-4420. BATTERED WOMEN’S SUPPORT GROUP: Battered Women Services and Shelter facilitates a group in Montpelier, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 223-0855. OVEREATERS ANONY-

N O R T H E R N EQ U IN E V ETERIN A RY SERVICES Dr. Steve B. Levine • Routine health care/ dentistry • Lameness evaluations • Reproductive services • Purchase exams, o f equine • Educational programs • Radiography practice • Ultrasound experience. • Endoscopy

Practice Limited to Horses

8 0 2 -6 8 4 -9 9 7 7 254 Rt. 2, Danville, VT 05828

* Practice area limited to eastern Vermont

9TH A N NUAL

S

M

m

i o

FROM "KIDS IN THE NALL" Not your average stand-up comic. Thompson's alternative and outlandish comedy has catapulted his career from the Toronto comedy circuit to television, publishing, the World Wide Web, and the big screen. He has just complet­ ed a 30-city sell-out tour of "Kids in the Hall” and recent­ ly debuted his one-man special on Comedy Central.

Flynn Theatre

Weave your way through 2 floors and the stage full of barn busting, bargains by

^

mind b°gglir>g the bagful!

Redecorate

your digs,

,

reclothe yourself family, too! Don’t event that has year after year!

1

<j j / j l I f p

'jj

/ C f

\

and the whole

\ \ \ \ \ \ \ miss this annual

A\\W

clothing, housebrac, furniture,

People talking Everything from wares>bric-aand books & mu­

sic, to antiques, sporting equipment, kids stuff, and much, much m o re! Proceeds to benefit the Flynn’s educational programs

Friday, May 2 6 9 - 5 Saturday, May 27 9 - 3

FRIDAY, J U N E 1 6

Flynn W arehouse a t King & St. Paul Streets Special thanks to our sponsors

7:30 P.M. FLYNN THEATRE TICKETS ($25, $30, $35) NOW ON SALE AT TH E FLYNN THEATRE BOX OFFICE 153 MAIN STREET, BURLINGTON. VT OR BY PHONE AT 802-86-FLYNN

\6m onl •Tent • Company

SEVEN DAYS

NEW ENGLAND CULINARY INSTITUTE

Champlain Valley Jr. Sen ice League

WVMT Vermont** *1 for Nows A T,

/ v, page 32

SEVEN DAYS

may 2 4 , 2000


a endar MOUS: Addicted to eating? Food abuse is on the table at the First Congregational Church, Essex Junction, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 863-2655.

31

W ednesday

Call now fo r information 862-9616 or 1- 800-862-9616

FIGURE DRAWING: See May 24. ‘IMAGES OF VERMONT’: A slide presentation by a Vermont College prof examines portrayals of the state in popular prints from 1820 to 2000. T.W. Wood Gallery, Vermont College, Montpelier, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 828-8743.

w o rd s

m usic • Also, see listings in “Sound Advice.” VERMONT YOUTH ORCHES­ TRA AUDITIONS: See May 25. ‘FOR THE LOVE... OF LOVE’: Tenor Daniel Blake performs a program of arias and love songs. Stowe Community Church, noon. Free. Info, 253-7792. VAUGHAN RECITAL SERIES: Guitar students strike a chord with performances of classical and mod­ ern works. Faulkner Recital Hall, Hopkins Center, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 603-646-2422.

‘FLASH FICTION 500’: Writers offer original short stories in the poetry slam tradition, allowing audience judges to keep score. Rhombus Gallery, 186 College St., Burlington, 8 p.m. for spectators. 7:45 for readers. $5. Info, 865-0569. ‘LITERATURE OF THE FAR NORTH’: A discussion of NilsAslak Valkeapaa’s The Sun, My Father sheds light on a relatively unknown part of the world. S. Hero Community Library, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 372-6209.

and health screenings. Leddy Park, Burlington, 4:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 864-0123. '

etc VOLUNTEER TRAINING: See May 29. FRAUD FIGHTER’ TRAIN­ ING: See May 24, Northwestern Vermont Medical Center, 9 a.m. noon & 1-4 p.m.

dance art

“ If dogs run free, why not we?” O h , y o u a r e ...

Gwenn Garland. Classes

’ B y e R i c k . W e ’ll m i s s y o u .

are compiled by Lucy Howe. All submissions are

Fact:

due in writing on the Thursday before publication. SEVEN DAYS edits for space and style. Send to: SEVEN DAYS, P.0. Box

kids

The cost of looking better is looking up. Save now on Pratt & Lambert paints.

1164, Burlington, VT 05402-1164.

sp o rt

• Also, see exhibit openings in the art listings.

One-year professional ■ S B certificate program starts August 21 Affordable tuition. Admission is selective. Application deadline July 21. Center for Legal Education Burlington College, 95 North Avenue, Burlington VT 05401

Calendar is written by

STORYTIME: See May 17.

‘UP’: See May 28.

‘SENIOR PLAY DAY’: Older Vermonters shape up for summer with stretching, aerobics, golf chipping, basketball, bocce ball

Email:

Save up to $7/G allon now

calendai@sevendaysvt.com

on Accolade paint

Or fax 802-865-1015.

J^aoCado ^'UIVIACRYUCLATEX•W ALL

Buy

v isit our w eb site

JULY

O N E

16-A U G IIST 6, 2000 WEEK

TWO

w w w .vtm ozart.com WE E K

THREE

Sunday, July 16

Sunday, July 23

Sunday, July 30

27th Grand Opening

Tubby the Tuba

Meadow Melodies

Vermont Teddy Bear Factory Western Brass Quintet

Trapp Family Meadow Vermont Mozart Festival Orchestra Christopher Wilkins, conductor Robert White, tenor

Concert and Dressage South Porch, Shelburne Farms Vermont Mozart Festival Orchestra Gerard Schwartz, conductor Regis Pasquier, violin

Sponsored by Bombardier Capital

Sunday, July 23

Vienna in Vermont

MENDELSSOHN, ANDERSON, COPLAND

Vermont Mozart Festival Orchestra Luis Biava, conductor

Tuesday, August 1

VON SUPPE, HAYDN, STRAUSS JR.

UVM Recital Hall New York Chamber Soloists

MOZART, SCHUMANN, MENDELSSOHN Trapp Family Meadow Sponsored by Earthlogic and IBM

Conductor underwritten by Schoenberg and Assoc.

Tuesday, July 18

Piano Panorama UVM Recital Hall Jean-Claude Pennetier, piano

Sponsored by Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Topnotch and VT Radiologists

Tuesday, July 25

HAYDN, SCHUMANN, DEBUSSY, CHOPIN Vintage Brass Sponsored by Mr. & Mrs. Duncan Brown

ALL MOZART

HANDEL MONTEVERDI, IVES, ELLINGTON Starlit Serenade

Kingsland Bay State Park Pacifica Quartet Regis Pasquier, violin Jean-Claude Pennetier, piano

Wednesday, July 26

La Vie Parisienne

Sponsored by NRG Systems

Friday, July 21

Gilbert & Sullivan Alfresco Basin Harbor Club Vermont Gilbert & Sullivan Singers with members of the Vermont Mozart Orchestra William Metcalfe, conductor Sponsored by M iddlebury College and the Ferrisburgh Artisans Guild

The Paris Piano Trio

BEETHOVEN, FAURE, SCHUBERT Sponsored by Dr & Mrs. Henry Lemaire, Kay Ryder and Richard Ryder, MD, Catharine Rogers

Friday, July 28

Orchestre symphonique de Montreal with Charles Dutoit Flynn Theatre

BEETHOVEN, DEBUSSY, GOLDMARK Presented by HydroQuebec

Saturday, July 22

Summer on the Porch South Porch, Shelburne Farms Vermont Mozart Festival Orchestra Luis Biava, conductor Jean Claude Pennetier, piano

Conductor underwritten by McSoley, McCoy & Co.

m

ED. A

WCAXTV^ * '* » • »

Visit o u r w e b s ite w w w .v t m o z a r t .c o m

f o r r e d e f o f s tr e s s a n d m u s c u la r a c h e s

M argaret Roy Massage Therapist

Gift Certificates Available Phone: 655-1668

^ H a w a iia n S w e d i s h M a s s a g e

Wednesday, August 2 Grand Isle Lake House Robert White, tenor David Fedele, flute

BEETHOVEN, POULENC

S

Sponsored by Herrick, LTD.

Friday, August 4

Year$

- IT’S O U R BIRTHDAY

Viva Vivaldi! Coachyard, Shelburne Farms Vermont Mozart Festival Orchestra

YOU GET THE PRESENTS!

VIVALDI, MOZART Sponsored by Fleischer Jacobs & Dinse, Knapp and McAndrew

9.1

Saturday, August 5

Grand Finale: Mozart's Majesty G r e a t S ig n - u p D is c o u n ts

South Porch, Shelburne Farms Vermont Mozart Festival Orchestra With The Oriana Singers William Metcalfe, conductor

N e w S D S L P ric in g

ALL MOZART

m us a

Sponsored by S.T. Griswold & Vivaldi Flowers

j&m fhe jo avffl

Conductor underwritten by McSoley, McCoy <S Co.

HAYDN, DVORAK, BEETHOVEN Sponsored by Willie Racine's and Mary Siegchrist Hill & Fred Hill

____________________ = = = = = r n

Sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. Reginald Gignoux, Dr. and Mrs. David Babbott, Barbara and Robert Haas

String Symphonia

BEETHOVEEN, MENDELSSOHN, CHAUSSON St. Paul's Cathedral

Mon - F ri 7 -6 315 Pine S t r e e t JhuzJ/aSia.>, S a t 8 - 4 Sun 10-3 B urlington 8 6 3 - 3 4 2 8

Eine Kleine Nachtmusik

Wednesday, July 19

Sponsored by Cheese Traders

SUPPLY CEN TER

GREGORY A BUILDING

Sponsored by Queen City Printers

Snow Farm Winery Western Brass Quintet

S P O N S O R

S ave Up To $2/gallon during Gregory’s Introductory Offer, then use Pratt & Lambert’s mail-in rebate offer to save an additional $5/gallon!

V

•SB WEEK

-

Sunday, August 6 Saturday, July 29

Royal Encore!

Bach Saturday South Porch, Shelburne Farms Vermont Mozart Festival Orchestra

Trapp Family Meadow Vermont Mozart Festival Orchestra William Metcalfe, conductor

ALL BACH

HANDEL, MOZART, HAYDN, VIVALDI

Sponsored by Sirloin Saloon and The Automaster

Sponsored by Union Bank, Stowe Mountain Resort, and Kelliher, Samets, Volk

VERMONT’S SOVEREIGN INTERNET CONNECTION ton

fr e e

(877) 877-2120 • sales@sover.net • www.sover.net

may 2 4 , 2000

page 33


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ira n d Ope;

Oakwoo Farms

2 n d A n n u a l C h a lk P a in t i n g C o m p e t i t i o n

a fin e selection o f Organic Vegetables and Potted Plants

at Citg Hall Park, Burlington. June 3 from 5:00-3:00. Cash and prizes awarded! Chalk provided. Free to participate. Call 564-1557 for information and to register.

GERANIUMS $1.99 ea. 4-inch pots?] (LIMIT 5)

6 WEED ROAD, ESSEX 288-8155

-

JA N C A N N O N P O T T E R Y

"\C>-

N ew work C o n tem po rary

ATCLEARANCE

STONEWARE POTTERY INFLUENCED BY THE CERAMIC TRADITIONS

p r ic e s !

o f A s ia

S econds

G0IN’ TO THE CHAPEL Steph en Huneck is not the first person to notice that ‘dog”spelled backwards is "god. ”A n d he’s not the first

participating in

THE VERMONT CRAFTS COUNCIL OPEN STUDIO WEEKEND

artist to carve canines. B ut he’s gotta be the first person ever to cre­

SAT. & SUN. M A Y 27-28,10 a . m . - 5 p . m . 19 G

< **-

aren

R o a d • E a s t C h a r l o t t e , V T 05445 • 802 - 4 2 5 -6 3 2 0

ate a "Dog Chapel. ’’Along with dozens o f artists statewide,

________________ wwwjcincannonpottery.com________________

Huneck joins in Open Studios this weekend, but he offers a spiri­ tual respite along with the art, at his hilltop fa rm in St. Johnshury. Being in the doghouse never fe lt so good. Pictured, a saintly Lab

THERICKSUTTA GALLERY p a in t in g s

w it h

Ti Church St. (next to M s ) Burlington

Wed. Fri, Sat C Sun 12-5

Join us for

Open Studio Weekend, May 27 & 28

The Gallery Upstairs

Our Manchester, Middlebury & Burlington galleries w ill have craft demonstrations and activities! Our Burlington gallery w ill provide the first 100 visitors with a complementary Tour Bag containing Tour Maps, Lake Champlain Chocolates & a bottle of Vermont Pure Water!

VT Artisans Antiques ~ Gifts

VERM ON T STATE CRAFT CENTER

Fine Art - Clothing -C ards

FROG HOLLOW

Funky Goods & Much More!

MIDDLEBURY 802.388.3177

BURLINGTON 802.863.6458

MANCHESTER 802.362.3321

T h u r/F r i 1-6 • Sat 10-5 • Sun 11-4 O n Rte. 116 in H inesburg • 482-6380

B

B eautiful Take a n

a d d it io n a l

50% o ff

a l l s a le m e r c h a n d is e c u r r e n tly 3 0 - 8 0 %

o ff!

in c lu d e s S p r i n g C l o t h i n g J e w e lr y , & A c c e s s o r ie s

M ay 20-28

uf'T'ilhhiF^

a r tis ts

Caravan Arts is looking for submissions to Bring Your Ow n Theme: A Group Show at the Rose Street Gallery. Deadline is May 27. Info, call 660-9060.

o p e n in g s

im p a c t

A R T FO R E V E R Y D A Y L IV IN G

stained-glass window.

SENIOR STUDENT ART SHOW, a multi-media exhibit of works by high schoolers from the Champlain valley. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 865-7211. Closing reception May 24, 5 p.m. PICK OF THE LITTER, a group show of two- and three-dimen­ sional work inspired by discarded materials and found objects. FlynnDog Gallery, Burlington, 6529985. Reception May 26, 5-8 p.m.

THE FLOWER SHOW: SPIRITS OF THE EARTH, sculptures on the theme of gardening and agriculture by Jennifer Fries. Sungardens, Burlington Square Mall, 8643259. Reception May 26, 6-8 p.m. STEPHEN HUNECK: The artist unveils his .new Dog Chapel and prints from his upcoming book. Spaulding Rd., St. Johnshury, 7482700. Open Studio May 27-28, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. OPEN STUDIO WEEKEND: 175 Vermont artists open their doors to the public May 27-28, 10 a.m. 5 p.m. Sheila McGowan Studio, 23 Vine St., Burlington, 6588823; ceramics by Bob Green, Alan Potter & Doug Jones, Shelburne Craft School, 9853082; Black Bird Ceramics, Jericho, 899-3789; Ziemke Glassblowing Studio, Waterbury, 244-6126. Vermont Clay Studio, Waterbury, 244-1126. Blue Iris Paper, Waterbury, 244-5122. Other sites, get maps from the Vermont Craft Council, 223-

* B e s tJ e w e l r y £$8-4050 * i1S college, street, burU ngton, v t 05401

page 34

SEVEN DAYS

may 2 4 , 2000

weekl y

3380, the Shelburne Craft School, or Jericho Center Community Center and Underhill Center Historical Society, 434-2352.

o n g o in g B U R LIN G TO N A R E A WILDLIFE ART, featuring watercolor trout flies by Lynn Powers. The Gallery Upstairs, Hinesburg, 4826380. Through June. DAN FISHER, new paintings. Furchgott Sourdiffe Gallery, Shelburne, 985-3848. Through June 20. ETHAN MURR0W, recent paintings and mixed-media works. Firehouse Center for the Visual Arts, Burlington, 865-7166. Through June 18.

DEBORAH KAHN & PETER R0CH0N, recent paintings. McCarthy Arts Center, St. Michael’s College, Colchester, 6542535. Through May.

VISIONS OF AN ALCHEMIST, paintings, sculptures and photog­ raphy by Meryl Lebowitz. Frog Hollow Vermont State Craft Center, Burlington, 863-6458. Through June 18. GRANITE BASALT WOOD, pho­ tographs of the American Southwest, the Bay of Fundy and the Winooski River by UVM art prof Tom Brennan. ArtSpace 150 at the Mens Room, Burlington, 864-2088. Through June. ERNIE HAAS, paintings of Lake Champlain and Vermont land­ scapes, and JERRY GEIER, terra

l i sti ngs

cotta sculptures. Blue Heron Gallery, S. Burlington, 863-1866. Through May 24. ABIGAIL BANKS, paintings, CHIL­ DREN’S ART and BONNIE ACKER, paintings. Daily Planet, Burling­ ton, 862-9647. Through May. RETRIEVAL, recent paintings by Crystal Peck. Rhombus Gallery, Burlington, 863-1512. Through May.

2ND ANNUAL H0MESCH00LERS’ ART & TALENT SHOW, featuring the work of local children. Rose St. Gallery, Burlington, 862-3654. Through May 27. THE WYLDE WOMEN, a “virgin art exhibit” by Dee Christie, Joy Cohen, Libby Ingalls, Hollie Ingalls and Kathleen Redman. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 878- 6955. Through May. PETER ARVIDS0N, new paintings. Doll-Anstadt Gallery, Burlington, 864-3661. Through May. ROBERT BRUNELLE, recent oil paintings. Better Bagel, Williston, 879- 2808. Through June. A MIXED BAG, featuring works in mixed-media by Dot Albelo. Cath­ edral Church of St. Paul, Burling­ ton, 864-0471. Through May. MICHAEL M0NTANAR0, past and present works in watercolor, acrylic, pencil and more. Beverly’s Cafe, Burlington, 862-5515. Through May.’ ASPARAGUS, handmade prints by Roy Newton. Red Onion Cafe, Burlington, 865-2563. Through May 30. A WRITER’S VISION: Prints, draw-

on w w w . s e v e n d a y s v t . c o m


ings and watercolors by Nobel Prize-winning writer Gunter Grass. Fleming Museum, UVM, Burlington, 656-0750. Through June 4.

ORNAMENT AND DEC0RATI0N/MATERIALS AND MOTIFS: An exhibit of multi-cultural, everyday objects that show theories of orna­ mentation and decoration. Fleming Museum, UVM, Burlington, 656-0750. Through June 4. RICK SUTTA, oil paintings “with impact.” Rick Sutta Gallery, Burlington, 860-7506. Ongoing.

C H A M P LA IN V A L L E Y TIME ON OUR HANDS, one-of-akind clocks by Wendy Copp and mixed-media collage works by Anna Fugaro. Frog Hollow, Middlebury, 388-3711. Through June 19.

JACK CHASE & EMILY BISSELL LAIRD, sculpture and paintings, respectively. Ferrisburgh Artisans Guild, 877-3668. Through June

CLAY FOR & ABOUT THE GARDEN, pottery works. River Street Potters Gallery, Montpelier, 224-7000. Through May.

19TH-CENTURY PRINTS FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION, featuring etchings and engravings by Thomas Waterman Wood. T.W. Wood Gallery, Montpelier, 8288743. Through July 30.

VERMONT HAND CRAFTERS: Work by local artisans. Vermont By Design Gallery, Waterbury, 244-7566. Ongoing.

SCRAP-BASED ARTS & CRAFTS, featuring re-constructed objects of all kinds by area artists. The Restore, Montpelier, 229-1930. Ongoing. ALICE ECKLES, paintings and mixed media. Old School House, Marshfield, 456-8993. Ongoing.

N O RTH ERN KAREN WINSLOW, traditional realism landscapes and portraits. Vermont Fine Art, Stowe, 2539653. Through May.

STOWE STUDENT ART EXHIBIT,

13 ALUMNI ARTISTS, a juried

works by area elementary, middle and high school students. Helen Day Art Center, Stowe, 253-8358. Through May 27. SACRED BUFFALO, a buffalo skele­ ton carved with scenes from Lakota Sioux traditions. Fairbanks Museum, St. Johnsbury, 7482372. Through August.

exhibition of sculpture, painting, photography and installation art by prominent college alumni. Johnson Memorial Gallery, Middlebury College Museum of Art, 443-5007. Through December 10.

32ND ANNUAL SENIOR STUDIO ART MAJORS SHOW, work in all mediums by graduating students. Middlebury College Museum of Art, Upper Gallery, 443-5007. Through August 13.

SIGNALS AND MESSAGES: CELE­ BRATING 25 YEARS OF GRACE, featuring the works of nine artists in the Grass Roots Art and Community Effort program. Vermont Folklife Center, Middlebury, 388-4964. Through August 12. PAPER OR PLASTIC, paintings and illustrations by Sean Sims. 4 Dogs & a Wish, Middlebury, 3829474. Through May.

C EN TR A L V ER M O N T BARBARA BESKIND, has relief paintings and drawings enhanced by creative stitchery. Spotlight Gallery, Vermont Arts Council, Montpelier, 828-3291. Through June.

ART IN THE SUPREME COURT, Mexican pastels by Sam Kerson. Supreme Court, Montpelier, 8283278. Through May 26. CELEBRATING MAY, featuring art­ work by people involved in the state’s mental health field. City Hall, Montpelier, 223-0924. Through May 30. INGRID BATHE, new sculptures in porcelain clay. Vermont Clay Studio, Waterbury, 244-1126. Through May. SANDRA HELLER BISSEX, sumi brushwork/collage, part of the Women’s Work Project. Sacred Space Gallery, Christ Church, Montpelier, 454-4635. Through May. FOUR HONDURAN ARTISTS, fea­ turing the works of Mario Castillo, Virgilio Guardiola, Rolando Trochez and Xenia Mejia. Chaffee Center for the Arts, Rutland, 7750356. Through June 11. JOAN BRACE O’NEAL, graphite pencil drawings. Capitol Grounds, Montpelier, 223-7800. Through May. PERSONAL LANDSCAPES, studioart quilts by Alicia Lorenzo. Phoenix Rising, Montpelier, 2290522. Through May 27.

19TH AND 20TH CENTURY AMERICAN ARTISTS, including landscape paintings by Vermont artists Kathleen Kolb, Thomas Curtin, Cynthia Price and more. Clarke Galleries, Stowe, 253-7116. Ongoing.

ELS EW H ER E PIPILOTTI RIST, video installa­ tions. Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Benaiah Gibb Pavilion, 514285-1600. Through August 6. FROM BOUCHER TO VUILLARD: French Master Drawings from the Mrs. Marjorie Bronfman Collection, including works from the 16th century to the 1930s. Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Jean-Noel Desmarais Pavilion, 514-285-1600. Through September 3. BILL HOPPER, paintings. BeldonNoble Library, Essex, N.Y., 518963-8079. Through May.

COMPLETING THE PICTURE: HATS, FASHION AND FINE ART, paintings, photographs and man­ nequins featuring millinery fash­ ions from 1820-1930. Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N .H., 603-6462808. Through September 24. SCREENS & SCROLLS, Japanese paintings from the 13th through the 19th century. Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N .H ., 603-646-2808. Through June 18. GENEVIEVE CADIEUX, photo­ graphic and acoustic installations and sculptures. Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Jean-Noel Desmarais Pavilion, 514-285-1600. Through July 2. ®

PLEASE NOTE: Seven Days is unable to accommodate all o f the displays in our readership area, thus these listings must be restricted to exhibits in truly public viewing places. Art in business offices, lobbies and private residences or studios, with occasional exceptions, will not be accepted. Send art listings to galleries@sevendaysvt.com. You can also view art listings at www. sevendaysvt. com.

scape. T he steel-sparred struc­ ture stands astride a low hori­ zon, which divides a wide yel­ low sky from the somber earth. The ground is a long band of gray on top of black. Bright red under-painting is visible beneath the gray, and red appears again in the tower as a bright crimson accent. M urrow’s colors are sep­ arated like a Japanese woodcut. O ther landscapes, such as “California,” have well-blended colors — alizarin crimson, Payne’s gray, olivine greens made from ocher rather than lighter yellows. Divergent lines race into the horizon o f these narrow horizontal pieces. Brushwork is often contrasted by lines of pencil.

hile quantity has a quality all its own, Burlington artist Ethan Murrow provides both at the Firehouse Center for the Visual Arts this month. There are almost no weak spots among the 43 paintings, five drawings, eight prints and a large installa­ tion, “The Extended Family of Chemicals” — all of which were created since late 1999. Murrow’s unifying theme is the complex relationship between Americans and their environment. A limited range of colors tie together the assorted media in a sort of barren Impressionism, with simple images and muted tonali­ ties. Agribusiness archi­ tecture, rural power lines and highways dot recum­ bent landscapes under yellow and gray-blue skies, while Murrow nim ­ bly varies the textures, intensities and values of his paintings with supreme confidence. His drawings o£gallon cans and other containers for household hazardous materials are no less tech­ nically strong. The large-scale oil “Big Boy” is a portrait of A series of silos by Ethan Murrow a grain elevator that is Murrow’s environmental half Pease grain tower and half concerns become more obvious “prairie cathedral.” It leans to in his drawings and prints. T he the left of the composition, most successful o f the drawings opposed by four Naples-yellow is “7 2 BR,” a large pastel and rectangles running down the charcoal still life o f four con­ right edge o f the nearly square tainers. T he bottle and gallon canvas. Three dark-brown cans, suitable for acetone or tur­ patches anchor the lower right. pentine, are com m on artist-stu­ Murrow often solidifies his dio refuse. M urrow maintains compositional matrix by com­ his limited palette o f charcoal bining abstract and literal geo­ black, white, ocher and brown metric elements. The mass of

W

T he mixed-media prints are both intaglio and Xerography. “Rice C ounty Multiples I-V” are four small, agitated works on paper attached to boards. Each is divided in the middle, like mismatched stereoscopic cards. T he realism o f the photocopied silos and corn cribs is scrambled by M urrow’s hurricanes o f black, yellow and red pastel and pencil marks. T he colors and looming forms are more om i­ nous than the Midwestern vistas o f M urrow’s paintings. All semblance o f landscape and still life have been aban­ doned with “T he Extended Family o f Chemicals” in the Firehouse’s rear installation gallery. Narrow sheets o f oil

T B ^ o t U ^ n d g a llo n ^ B ca n s^ u ita m ^ o ^ ce to n e or turpentine, are common artist^tudk^7efuse"^^H “Big Boy” — steely gray on a yellow color field — is counterweighted by thin power lines behind it as well. “National Power” is a simi­ larly asymmetrical composition. This high-tension tower also seems more an architectural por­ trait than an abstracted land­

pastel, smudged and layered on the toothy paper. There is also dashed-off light blue lettering, and arrows pointing up at the containers. M urrow seems to have devised a personal code, like an engineer’s shorthand, o f automatic writing and occasion­ al stencils.

PHOTO: MATTHEW TH0RSEN

21 .

B y M arc A wodey

cloth hung ceiling-to-floor form a backdrop for 28 quart cans, these hung from fishing line flush against the surfaces o f the cloth strips. M urrow has created a room w ithin the room, with black walls on either end and an expanse o f m ottled white in the middle. Daylight from the gallery window seeps through the white sheets, and each o f the cans is roughly painted with the same matte colors that echo through the exhibit. M any of the cans are ripped or peppered with holes, and many have seemingly random letters sten­ ciled on their sides. W h at’s not random is the quart can on the far left — the only one w ith a dollar sign sten­ ciled onto it. Reading left to right as we generally do, this placement seems to indicate that money is where environ- * mental trouble begins. Maybe that’s why so many Burlington artists get their paint for free from the hazardous-waste depot on Pine Street. M urrow is prob­ ably not one o f them , however. His paint quality is just too good to have come from the dum p. ®

“ Rece nt W ork s by Ethan M u r r o w .” Firehou se C enter for the V isua l A rts , B u rlin g to n . Th ro u g h June 1 8 .

may 2 4 , 2000

SEVEN DAYS

page 35


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TOM GREEN’S SCHOOLDAYS The Mtv star plays an undergrad geek. ROAD TRIP***"2 The word I’ve heard used to describe this Film most often, I think, is “uneven.” Next often: “grossout.” The movie comparison I’ve seen made most often? We have a tie between Animal House and There’s Something About Mary. All of which are rea­ sons why you shouldn’t believe everything you read. Except in this column, of course. Because Road Trip is a good-hearted, goofball ride from start to finish, isn’t any grosser than the average Adam Sandler, David Spade or Norm MacDonald comedy, and bears about as much similarity to the movies mentioned above as it does to The Bad News Bears or Dr. Strangelove. Breckin Meyer stars. He’s a talented young actor, but I can’t help wondering: Am I the only one who thinks he looks and sounds exactly like what Noah Wylie would look and sound like after an Acme safe had been dropped on him? Meyer plays the new-millennium model of a prototypical college dude. He’s academically challenged, but hardly a Neanderthal. He’s strongly drawn to the opposite sex, but it’s not like he and his friends are about to drill peep holes in the girl’s shower. And he enjoys the occasional kegger or joint, but isn’t about to major in them. Meyer and his buddies, played by Seann William Scott (who looks like a young Jim Carrey), Paulo Costanzo (who looks like a young Jerry Seinfeld) and D.J. Qualls (who looks like a cross between a young Jim Varney and a baby condor) are breezy, easy-going descendents of the toga-wearing, taboo-obliterating pioneers played nearly a quarter-century ago by John Belushi, Tim Matheson and Peter Riegert in Animal House (coincidentally produced by Ivan Reitman, who produced this, too). These are guys who’ve grown up

FILMS START FRIDAY, MAY 26 showtimes

ETHAN ALLEN CINEMAS 4

All shows daily unless otherwise indicated, ind icates new film.

NICKELODEON CINEMAS

“ ...T h i s is b e a u tifu l film m a k in g .. . ”

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—K en n eth Turan, LO S A N G ELES T IM E S

R E N T IT T O N IG H T

TM, ® & Copyright © 2000 by Paramount Pictures. All Rights Reserved.

VH S O R DVD

College Street, Burlington, 863 -9515 . Mission Impossible 2 * 1, 4 , 7 , 10 . U -571 3 :30 , 9 . Where the Heart Is 12 :40 , 6 :30 . Small Time Crooks 12 :30 , 2 :40 , 4 : 50 , 7 : 15 , 9 : 15 . Road Trip 1 : 15 , 3 : 15 , 5 : 15 , 7 :20 , 9 :30 . Center Stage 12 :20 , 2 : 50 , 6 :20 , 8 :45 . Gladiator 12 :50 , 3 :45 , 6 :45 , 9 :45 . Matinees Sat-Sun only.

CINEMA NINE Shelburne Road, S. Burlington, 864 - 5610 . Mission Impossible 2 * 10 (Fri-Mon only), 12 :30 , 1, 3 :30 , 4 , 6 :45 , 7 , 9 :45 , 10. Shaghai Noon* 10:10 (Fri-Mon only), 12 :45 , 3 :45 , 7 :20 , 10 :05 . Road Trip 10:20 (Fri-Mon only), 12 , 12 :35 , 2 , 2 :40 , 4 : 10 , 4 : 55 , 6 : 50 , 7 :30 , 8 :50 , 10 : 10 . Dinosaur 9:45 (Fri-Mon only), 11:45 , 12: 15 , 2 :05 , 2 :30 , 4 : 15 , 4 :45 , 6 :30 , 7 : 10 , 9 , 9 :30 . Battlefield Earth 3 :40 , 9 :55 . Gladiator 11 :30 , 12 , 3 : 10 , 6 : 15 , 6 :40 , 9 :30 ~AII shows daily unless otherwise indicated.

Williston Road, S. Burlington, 863 -4494 . Shanghai Noon* 11 : 50 , 2 :20 , 4 :45 , 7 : 15 , 9 :50 . Mission Impossible 2 * 12 :30 , 3 :30 , 6 : 50 , 9 :45 . Dinosaur 11:45 , 2 :05 , 4 : 15 , 6 :30 , 9 . The Flintstones: Viva Rock Vegas 12 , 2 : 10 , 4 :30 . Frequency 12 : 15 , 3 :40 , 6 :20 , 9 : 10 . U-571 6 :40 , 9 :20 . Early matinees Sat-Sun only. No matinees Fri.

page 36

SEVEN DAYS

may 2 4 , 2000

listings

North Avenue, Burlington, 863-6040. American Beauty 5 , 9 . Snow Day 1: 15 , 3 , 7 : 15 . The Road to Eldorado 5 : 15 , 9 :45 . My Dog Skip 1 , 3 : 15 , 7 :30 . The Cider House Rules 12 :45 , 4 : 15 , 7 , 9 :30 . Erin Brockovich 12 :30 , 4 , 6 :45 , 9 : 15 . Matinees Sat-Sun only.

BIJOU CINEPLEX 1-2-3-4 Rt. 100 , Morrisville, 888 -3293 . Mission Impossible 2 12:45 & 3:40 (Sat-Mon. only), 6 :40 , 9 (Fri-Sun. only). Road Trip 12:30 & 3:30 (Sat-Mon. only), 6 : 50 , 9:10 (Fri-Sun only). Gladiator 1 & 3:40 (Sat-Sun. only), 7 . Matinees Sat.-Sun. only, late show Fri.Sat. only.

THE SAVOY Main Street, Montpelier, 229 -0509 . Not One Less 6 :30 . Rear Window 8 :40 . Schedules for the following theaters are not available at press time.

CAPITOL THEATRE 93 State Street, Montpelier, 229 -0343 . PARAMOUNT THEATRE 241 North Main Street, Barre,

SHOWCASE CINEMAS 5

w eekly V?/

never having to fight for their right to party because their slobbering, beer-addled forefathers secured that freedom for them a generation ago. So, when a video of Meyer having sex with a girl he just met (Amy Smart) is accidentally mailed to his lifelong sweetheart, the mad cross-country dash to intercept it is less about chugging, puking and making fun of the locals than about taking an unscheduled spring break to make sure someone’s feelings don’t get hurt. T hat’s right. I’m saying there’s an essential wellmeaning, kindhearted quality at the core of this film, and that by itself is enough to set it apart from the hundreds of lesser Animal House and Porky’s clones. Meyer and company don’t have to make fun of someone to be funny. They generate humor as opposed to perpetrating it, if you know what I mean. Anyway, kooky stuff ensues on the way to Austin, naturally. It’s the law. This is a road movie. Things explode, crimes are committed, and a very old man shuffles around a very old house behind a very large erection. Each situation is zanier and more surreal than the one before it and, throughout, director Todd Phillips gives equal time to the relationships between the traveling companions. It’s not every teen comedy in which characters actually wind up better people by the end of the film, but, in an understated, nevercornball way, they somehow manage to do that here. I appreciated in particular the growth curve allowed the character played by Qualls. At the start of the adventure, he’s the nerd the others let come along for the ride because he’s the only one who owns a ride — a car his father bought him. By the time the-four reach Austin, he’s a new man. \Cho needs a new car? Which brings us to Tom Green, Mtv personality and postmodern geek. He’s not a part of the saga itself, but rather plays, a perennial Ithaca undergrade who conducts tours of the campus for prospective applicants and their families. One particular tour, in which he recounts the legendary adventure of his friends’ Austin trip, frames the film and includes the much-buzzed-about scene in which the comedian supposedly devours a small rodent. I feel it my duty as a film critic to correct the impression you’ve probably been given on this point. If you are thinking of buying a ticket to this movie primarily because you believe you’ll see Tom Green eat a live mouse, there are two things you should know: 1. He doesn’t actually eat it, he just puts it in his mouth. 2. T hat’s not why you go to a movie, any­ way. T hat’s why you go to an Ozzie Osborne concert. Green is quasi-humorous, though hardly the dri­ ving comic force behind Road Trip. The good news is, even if he doesn’t contribute a whole lot here that you haven’t seen him do on his show already, in the end neither the madcap refugee from Mtv nor this unex­ pectedly endearing motion picture bites. ®

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shorts

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BATTLEFIELD EARTH,/2 John Travolta brings Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbards 1982 sci-fi adventure to the big screen. T he plot involves tall aliens w ho — are you sit­ ting down? — take over the Earth. Barry Pepper and Forest Whitaker costar. Roger Christian directs. (PG -13)

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ensemble cast. (PG-13) FREQUENCY* * * 172 Gregory H olbit directs the Field o f Dreams-Mke story o f a hom i­ cide detective who discovers that he can com m unicate with his dead father via the old m ans short-wave radio. Dennis Quaid and Jim Caviezel star. (PG -13)

SMALL TIME CROOKS* * * 1' 2

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The latest from W oody Allen (his 32nd) is a caper co m ed y i;i about a married couple who decide to break up the bore­ dom by breaking into a bank. W ith Jon Lovitz, Tracey Ullman and H ugh Grant. (PG) DINOSAUR*** 172 Between the budget for this prehistoric kidflick and the cost to build the digitial studio needed to pro­ duce it, D isney has sunk an estimated $ 350 m illion into this film. A pretty heavy bet for a com ing-of-age cartoon about a cuddly reptile. Featuring the vocal stylings o f D .B . Sweeney, Della Reese and Joan Plowright. (PG) THE BIG KAHUNA*** Kevin Spacey produces and stars in the big-screen version o f Roger R ueff’s award-winning 1992 play, Hospitality Suite, the story o f three industrial-lubricant salesmen com peting to land the biggest deal o f their lives. D anny D e Vito and Peter Facinelli costar. (R) GLADIATOR**** Ridley Scott directs this $ 1 0 0 m illion epic about a Roman general betrayed and sent into exile as a slave. Russell Crowe, Oliver Reed (in his last role) and Joaquin Phoenix star. (R) CENTER STAGE*** Nicholas ( The Madness o f K ing George) Hynter directs the saga o f a group o f young dancers pursu­ ing their dreams o f ballet glory in N ew York. Amanda Schull and Peter Gallagher head the

cowritten by Jonathan {Breakdown) Mostow, this effects-stuffed W W II adven­ ture concerns the plight o f nine American soldiers who board a German sub to steal a spy device and then find them­ selves trapped on it, with a U boat on its way to rescue them. W ith M atthew McConaughey, Harvey Keitel, Jon Bon Jovi and Bill Paxton. (PG-13)

THE FLINTSTONES IN VIVA ROCK VEGAS* Mark Addy and Stephen Baldwin star in this prequel to 1994’s The Flintstones, and portray Fred and Barney in their formative dating years. Brian Levant directs. (PG)

AMERICAN BEAUTY* * * * ,/2 Kevin Spacey and Annette Bening play the heads o f a nuclear family in the process o f m eltdown in the feature debut from from w hite-hot Broadway director Sam ( The Blue Room) M endes. (R)

ERIN BR0CK0VICH**** Julia Roberts flexes her dramatic muscles in this fact-based saga about a struggling single m oth­ er who worked for a law firm and w ound up helping California plaintiffs win a multi-m illion-dollar settlement o f water contam ination claims against Pacific Gas &C Electric in the m id-’90s. Albert Finney costars. Steven Soderbergh

Eating Gilbert Graper) Hallstrom brings the beloved John Irving bestseller about a W W II-era orphan to the big screen with a little help from Tobey Maguire, Michael Caine and Irving himself, who wrote the screenplay. (PG-13) MY DOG SKIP**** Jay Russell directs this family saga about a shy Mississippi boy whose whole outlook on life changes when he gets a dog fo his ninth birthday. Jay O . Sanders costars. Gavin O ’Connor co­ wrote the script and directs. (PG)

THE ROAD TO EL DORADO*** Elton John is writing tunes for ’toons again. This time around, he sings us through the saga o f two 16th-century con men who discover a Latin-American Shangri-la. Featuring the voices o f Kevin Kline and Kenneth Branagh. (PG) SNOW DAY ** School’s out and the kids want it to stay that way in this comedy about an uprising against the neigh­ borhood snowplow guy (Chris Elliot). Chevy Chase and Iggy Pop costar.(PG-13)

WHERE THE HEART IS * * 172 U h-oh — Oprah alert! Natalie Portman plays a young mother making her spunky way in the world in Matt W illiams’ bigscreen version o f the Winfreysanctioned bestseller by Billie Letts. Ashley Judd and Sally Field costar. (PG-13) SHANGHAI NOON*** Jackie Chan and The H auntings Owen W ilson are paired in this action comedy about a Chinese imperial guard sent to the Old West to rescue a princess in distress. W ith Lucy Liu. (PG-13) ®

i is :y r r /■ ' 1

WHO?. WHY?. For more film fun don't forget to watch "Art P atrol" every Thursday, Friday and Sunday on News Channel 5 ! © 2000 Rick Kisonak

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may 2 4 , 2000

SEVEN DAYS

page 3 7


Got Art?

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next to no sleep. H e’s cooled it with the martial arts, but Waskow hired a personal trainer, dropped the unhealthy poundage and, with typical overachieve­ ment, works out four to six times a week — with plans to enter a bodybuild­ ing com ­ petition. It’s just as well; he’s going to need all the strength he can get to transform Vermont — better known for cows than contem po­ rary art — into an “arts destina• » tion.

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— Mark Waskow

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Toots Thielemans with Kenny Werner

WPTZ NewsChannel 5 Friday Night Block Party Dixieland Cruise Magic Hat Block Party Ja zz Parade & Ja zz in the Park Gospel Tent

Volunteers Needed! Call 863-7992

Or order tickets online at

www.discoverjazz.com

code DAYS

page 38

Call 8 0 2 -8 6 -FLY N N for tickets!

SEVEN DAYS

may 2 4 , 2000

U N D E R W R IT T E N BY I W

J J I

VERM O N T

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eople don’t come to Vermont with the W expectation o f a cultur­ al experience,” Waskow laments. H e’d like to change that. Artist Michael O atm an, a Vermonter who now teaches at RPI in Troy and the University at Albany, says that Waskow “is interested in creating this corridor between Vermont and New York and parts in between — I’m taking him to three or four studios around here o f artists I think are good. In a strange way,” O atm an continues, “it seems like M ark is creating the infrastructure” for an arts market in Vermont. In addition to his art visits in the Green M ountains, Waskow makes the round o f galleries at least once a m onth in New York City, as well as frequent trips to other galleries and studios around New England. It was Burlington art dealer and former gallery owner Pat Parsons who, early on, encouraged Waskow to go to New York to inform his taste. “I’m not trying to be elitist about New York, he just has to hone his eye,” she says, “so when he’s judging other pieces he’ll have a set o f standards to go by.” Parsons believes Waskow “really wants to focus on Vermont and basically become a dealer on some level, or a m id­ dle-man. H e wants to get Vermont out there, which is fab­ ulous, but it’s a tough world. N o one is going to say, ‘O h, a great Vermont artist,’ b ut just ‘O h, a great artist.’” For his part, Waskow says, his trips to New York have only con­ firmed for him that “Vermont artists stack up well” and deserve to be marketed and collected. “M y secret goal,” he confides, “is to create one big art and antiques arcade o ut o f C hurch Street.” “O ne o f the things that makes M ark so unusual is to have that kind o f collector in this com m unity,” says Janie Cohen, curator and assistant director o f the Fleming M useum. “In small­ er markets people tend to do smaller collections, and to focus

applauds the near-simultaneous emergence o f Firehouse, DollAnstadt and the Rhombus Gallery — o f which he’s the board chair — the M en’s Room Artspace and other exhibition venues around Burlington, as well as the South End Art H op and the First Friday Art Trolley, as events that help make art more o f a “scene.” And he’s keeping track ol it all: Waskow’s mania for collect­ ing includes a growing archive of Vermont’s contem porary visual arts history. He saves, for instance, the art listings and reviews from this paper every week, along with any other arti­ cle about art he can find. He has tracked down past show announcem ents from galleries around the state and is now working on reassembling the art history of the ’80s, before gal­ leries like Passepartout in W inooski and W ebb & Parsons in Burlington disappeared, leav­ ing a brief lull in exhibition activity. “If I have my way, Vermont will become an art destination, then they’ll ask, ‘So how did this start?’” Waskow speculates. “O r someone will become famous and they’ll ask about their back­ ground. And no one will know, so I ’m trying to create a central repository o f all the institutions, exhibit cards and reviews.” “For me that’s one o f the most novel aspects o f what he’s doing,” O atm an says of Waskow’s archives. “M ark is also unusual in that he wants to know everything about the artist. H e has an incredible visual m em­ ory — he’s a detail guy. It’s an interesting connection to his background as an invertebrate zoologist — he’s got a genealogy o f the works in his collection.” “M ark sees this as a particu­ larly vibrant time in the visual arts in V erm ont,” comments M arc Awodey, an artist, poet and art critic for Seven Days. “By see­ ing this with such an innocent eye he is also making it happen. He introduces many artists to others whom they’ve never heard of, and by his collecting and stu­ dio visits he is pollinating the garden like a bee am ong flowers. H e’d like that bug analogy.” ®


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deadline: monday, 5 pm • phone 8 0 2 .8 6 4 .5 6 8 4 • fax 8 0 2 .8 6 5 .1 0 1 5 EMPLOYMENT LINE ADS: 500 a word. LEGALS: 300 a word. ALL OTHER LINE ADS: 25 words for $7. Over 25: 300 a word. Discounts are available for long running ads and for national ads. DISPLAY ADS: $14 per col. inch. ADULT ADS: $20 per col. inch. Group buys for display ads are available in other regional papers in Vermont. Call for more details. All ads must be prepaid. We take VISA, MASTERCARD and cabh, of course. mmmsmmmmMmmMMM

E M P L O Y M E N T REGIONAL SALES M ANAGER W PTZ and W N N E , NBC affiliates owned by Hearst-Argyle Television, have an im m e d ia te opening for a Verm ont-based Regional Sales manager. Candidates should have a m in im u m o f

3 years in television related experience, and a proven track record in new business develop­ m ent. Knowledge o f ratings and research, plus solid co m p u te r skills are required. Experience w ith station pricing, tra ffic and inventory control needed. College degree preferred. R esponsibilities include tra in in g , forecasting, preparing budgets and reports. M u s t have fine organizational skills and ability to build strong client relationships.

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR The Yestermorrow Design/Build School in Warren, VT is search­ ing for an Executive Director with leadership & experience to grow the school's campus curriculum & enrollment as it moves from summer-only to year-round operation. Yestermorow's mis­ sion is to teach the integrated process of designing & making. Yestermorrow offers 60 classes annually, and ecological sustain­ ability is an integral part of our curriculum. Responsibilities: Report to 12 board members, manage 2 staff, supervise courses & enrollment, build community partnerships, oversee a capital campaign & the school's renovation, expand fund raising, devel­ op & manage the operating budget ($250,000 FY 2000). Qualifications: Proven leadership; personnel management, com­ munications skills; strong fund-raising track record required. Work experience in nonprofit management, education or design/planning field preferred. Salary: in the $40s. Please apply by June 23. Mail two copies of letter of interest & resume to: Yestermorrow Design/Build School Attn: April Smith, Search Coordinator 189 VT Route 100, Warren, VT 05674

Send resum e/cover letter id e n tifyin g where you learned o f this open p o sitio n to: Bruce Lawson, General Sales Manager, 553 Roosevelt Highway, Colchester, VT 05446 . Deadline: May 31, 2000 .

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W ith Seven Days PERSONALS, Iff” th e only hard part is deciding S 5 f L l l | y ll w hat to m ake her for dinner. S MJj Lj \

PR/Advertising Coordinator Frog Hollow Vermont State Craft Center, a non-profit e d u c a tio n a l & v is u a l arts o rg a n iz a tio n , seeks P R /A d v e rtis in g C o o rd in a to r to o p e ra te fro m Middlebury Adm inistrative Offices. Publicize craft class­ es, artists, and exhibitions for all three centers through press releases, calendar listings, and stories; market organization through brochures, print and electronic media; adminster web site. Require undergraduate degree, 3 years experience &. extensive com puter soft­ ware skills including desktop publishing, word process­ ing, and MS front page. M ust be highly organized, team player, and collaborative thinker. Non-profit experience and love o f art helpful. Send letter outlining qualifications and resume to Bill Brooks by mail 73’^ Main Street Middlebury, VT 05753, by fax (802) 388-4526, or by email: bbrooks@ froghollow.org.

FROG HOLLOW

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR for small innovative, 30 year old, multi-service, non-profit agency in Lebanon , NH. Responsible for overall management and operation o f agency, which operates a 24-hour hotline, shelter, and substance abuse and teen Send resume and cover programs. Strong manage­ letter by June 5th/00 to: ment, financial, and HEADREST fundraising skills required. Search Committe Minimum five years P.O. Box 332 experience and master’s Norwich, VT degree in related field. 05055-0332

Start a Sales Career with the Industry Leader. As the nation’s #1 computer training company with over 16 years of incredible growth in a multibillion dollar field and with over 240 locations world wide, New Horizons Computer Learning Center gives you the op­ portunity to start your career with the industry leader. If you are competitive, highly motivated with a strong desire to succeed, this position will provide the personal & financial rewards you are looking for. Full benefits and an aggressive commission plan are included. Interested candidates must possess excellent phone skills, the ability to communicate, an eagerness to learn and a willingness to work hard and have fun at the same time.

N ew Horizons* Computer Learning Centers 257 Pine Street • Burlington, VT • 862-3374, fax 863-1231 email: Matt.luneke@newhorizons.com

F or g ro w in g a ltern a tive w e e k ly new sp ap er. T h a t’s U S ,

SEVEN DAYS! W e ’re l o o k i n g f o r a w r it e r w it h : • a t l e a s t t h r e e y e a r s ’ e x p e r i e n c e as a p r o fe s s io n a l jo u r n a lis t • r e p o r t i n g / in v e s t ig a d v e a n d fe a tu r e -w r itin g sk ills • a k n a c k fo r th e s n a p p y le a d ,

CHAMPLAIN C O L L E G E

STORE Seeks Sales A ssociate. Weekday schedule,

s a tis fy in g m id d le a n d c o n v in c in g e n d • a p a s s i o n f o r n e w s p r in t

good atmosphere, great benefit package.

F u l l - t i m e p o s i t i o n a v a ila b le J u ly 1 . C o m p e t i t i v e sa la r y , b e n e f i t s a n d g r e a t w o r k i n g e n v i r o n m e n t . S e n d r e su m e , co v e r le tte r a n d a t le a s t fo u r p u b ­

Apply to: Champlain College

l i s h e d w r i t i n g s a m p le s to :

Bookstore, E d it o r s ,

Seven D ays

PO B 1164 B u r lin g to n , V T 0 5 4 0 2 (N o p h o n e ca lls, p lease.)

Joyce Learning.Center, 371 Maple Street, Burlington.

G E N E R A L D Y N A M IC S A rm a m e n t S y ste m s

Choose a finer lifestyle. General Dynamics Armament Systems is a worldwide leader in a wide range of munitions and armament systems products and services tor the US DOD and other allied nations. We offer state-of-the-art, growth focused, employee-oriented environment. Currently, we are seeking talented individuals for the following Engineering positions:

Sr./Principal Software D esign Engineer Provide technical direction and develop processes for product SW development. Requires BS in Electrical Engineering (Microprocessor specialization), 3-5 years experience in object-oriented analysis/design, 4-8 years experience in real-time embedded SW development, 3-7 years high-level language code/testing experience, communication and logic skills. Ada design, HW design, and/or project management a plus.

Sr./Principal System s Engineer Develop, lead and support the integration and implementation of military systems in a fast-paced, deadline-driven environment. Requires BS in Mechanical, Electrical, or Systems Engineering, 5 years related experience, DOORS, RTM and/or RDD100, as well as excellent communication, troubleshooting and conflict resolution skills. Military systems development desired. Qualified applicants may submit resumes to: HR Manager, General Dynamics Armament Systems, 128 Lakeside Ave., Burlington, VT 05401. Fax: (802) 657-6292. E-mail; staffing@gdarm.com.

advertHerTaccoulTu^^wa^r^uTufe^lass^leds placement onlyTwe proofreadf r a n ^ lf y H ju i even so mistakes can occur, report errors at once, as seven days w ill not be responsible for errors continuing beyond the first printing adjustm ent for error is lim ited to republication, ' •• \ . » It . .. i . e M.I_ _______ U w ^ ( A r r t m if P I A f il O I I t l r t l / O ITT 1C » h f f 1C C t f h l Q D T T A r O W IQ V A / H \ / C Q \ / a r | Q 3 V S 1 «£>!•» in any event, liability for errors (or omissions) shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error (or omission), all advertising is subject to seven review by seven days reserves the right to edit, properly categorize or decline any ad w ithout comment or appeal. . ■ ■ ■■: ..

may 2 4 , 2000

SEVEN DAYS

39


Rent-a-Geek

Are you on the CUTTING edge of style? THE URBAN SALON

...is looking fo r a P a rt T im e Admin.Assist, fo r bookeeping, advertising, billing, banking, phone, and G e e k dispatch.

enced stylist to join our team.

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Flexible full- or part-time hours.

Northeastern Family Institute A re y o u lo o k in g fo r a jo b w it h lo ts o f

Downtown Burlington.

M u st be organized, selfm otivated, and c o m m itte d to c u s to m e r service. Position begins ~ 6/ 1. E xperience p referred . Call 8 6 4 -9 2 4 5 . N o walk-ins o r emails please.

than tfo re 1 I

TEAM is looking for an experi­

fle x ib ility a n d rew a rd s?

Great work environment.

I f y o u a n s w e r e d , y e s ... t h e n w e m i g h t h a v e j u s t

Excellent commission scale.

th e jo b fo r y o u !

Call today, Stacey

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or Missy at

Vermont Expos are currently looking for:

802 - 862- 1670.

Parking Supervisor

Northeastern Family Institute, a statewide provider of mental health treatment services for children, adoles­ cents and families, is looking for: Paid, Therapeutic Mentor to provide a nurturing, structured, therapeutic mentorship for an interesting 18-year-old male. This engaging young man is pursuing his high school diploma at the Essex High School, and is beginning to pave the road towards independent living. With your help, he hopes to become an independent adult with the support of the Therapeutic Mentorship process. Generous stipend, training, and support are available through Northeastern Family Institute (NFI). A patient, responsible mentor is needed, preferably within the Essex community. NFI would be w illing to assist in the re-location (to the Essex area) for the right candidate.

Responsibilities include: Managing 2 parking lot locations Supervise 7 employees

vs**

VISTAposition available beqinninq in August. Youwill receive excellent mentoringandexperience in a nationally recognizednon-profit doinq innovative workmaking nutrition programs available to low-income children statewide. Livinqallowance, health care, educational awardprovided. Requires BA, energy, excellent organi­ zational andcommunication skills andreliable vehicle.

Qualifications: Great people skills Managerial skills preferred Dependable, Dedicated

* Other Positions Available* For more information: (802) 655-4200 www.vermontexpos.com

Applyby June15to Vermont Campaignto EndChildhood Hunger, 4 laurel Hill Drive % S. Burlington, VT05403. Fax802-865-0266. Emailjheidkampdvtnohunqer.orq

Please contact Beth Relyea at (802) 878-5390, ext. 28

LINE COOK/PREP DISH/PREP Days, Nights, Weekends. Flexible Scheduling. Helpful, friendly staff. Apply in Person.

Shelburne Road, So. Burlington 8 6 2 -1 0 8 1

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT — Rossignol is looking for a dynamic individual to support and organize busy Ski Product Managers. This position requires strong initiative and excellent organizational skills as well as MS Word and Excel. Order entry, data entry and coor­ dination of mass mailings. Backup for reception as needed. Passion for skiing and snowboarding a big

i

n eed sT O U ASSISTANT KITCHEN MANAGER: Experienced line cook wanted for high-volume, quality-conscious position. Must be fast, even-tempered, reliable, and a team player.

...to be a freelance theater critic! T h a t is, i f you: • w rite w ell • have ap p ro p ria te cred

EXPERIENCED LINE COOKS and DISHWASHERS to join our professional kitchen team. Must be honest, motivated and responsible.

• are co nstru ctively critical • are n o t a m e m b e r o f a local th e a te r c o m p an y • have no o th er co nflict o f in terest • have th e tim e to go to , and review, a s h o w every w eek o r so

FLOOR MANAGER experienced, part-time or full-time position available.

plus. Excellent benefits package.

QUEENS... |O SEVEN DAYS

o r kings :

Top paying, benefits.

1834

CALLING ALL D RA M A

T h e s u m m e r th e a te r season starts soon,

Respond with resume to: Rossignol Ski Company, Inc., Department B, PO Box 298, Williston, VT 05495 or email scott@rossignol.com

Please apply in person to the Vermont Pub and Brewery, Corner of College & St. Paul Streets, Burlington, VT 05401

CELLULARONE® W E A R E G R O W IN G !

Accounting Specialist - A/R This position is responsible for daily cash receipts activities as related to the customer data­ base. This individual should possess strong analytical skills and exceptional attention to detail and accuracy. Microsoft Excel and Word experience required. Associate’s Degree or equivalent experience required. This is a full-time position.

Customer Service Representatives These individuals will sell our equipment and services through educating prospective cus­ tomers to the benefits of Cellular One. They will also provide current customers with a high level o f service, via telephone, to ensure customer satisfaction. Successful candidates will be dynamic, detail-oriented, computer literate, and have superior oral and written skills. A back­ ground in customer service and sales is required. This is a full-time position.

Associate Account Executive Our South Burlington retail location is seeking DYNAMIC, customer-oriented, sales pro­ fessionals with excellent communications skills to sell our equipment, services and quality service, as well as educate prospective customers to the benefits of Cellular One. Previous sales and/or customer service experience required. Successful candidates will be flexible, detail-oriented, computer literate, and able to work independently. Must be able to work evenings and weekends. This position includes a base salary plus generous sales commis­ sions. This is a full-time position. Cellular One offers a great working environment, competitive pay, and a great benefit pack­ age. Please mail, fax or email resume with cover letter and salary requirements/history to: Human Resources Mountain View Drive Colchester, VT 05 446 Fax (8 0 2 ) 6 5 4 -5 1 4 8 Julieas@rccw.com

1100

;

Equal Opportunity Employer

page 40

SEVEN DAYS

may 2 4 , 2000

so send w ritin g sam p les and resu m e N O W to:

DM

Editors, Seven D ays, P O B

1164,

B u rlin g to n , V T

05402

(N o ph o n e calls, please.)

The UVM Upward Bound Program is currently hiring for its summer Resident Assistant positions. Must be able to work from 6 /1 4 to 7 /2 8 and enjoy working with high school students. Info, Upward Bound Office at (802) 656-2964.

STAFF ACCOUNTANT Due to a promotion, we are seeking a Staff Accountant with at least 5 years experience and an A.S. degree in Accounting or Business. This person will be able to ensure the timely and proper close out and transfer of

■ ■ U N IV E R S IT Y R f l °1VERMONT

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COOKS WANTED Experienced, motivated and adaptable. Competitive wages for year-round employ­ ment. Please apply in person 2-4pm at:

accounts receivable, cost of sales, inventory and accounts payable transactions for multiple divisions. Generate and post general journal entries. Maintain audit trails for all General Ledger transactions.

Please send your resume, telling us where you saw this ad to: Ultramar Energy, Inc. Attn: Human Resource Mangager 512 Brooklyn St Morrisville, VT 05661 U LTR A M A R ENERGY INC.


Class

WINDJAMMER HOSPITALITY GROUP

Mona’S

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KITCHEN STAFF

Plays Well With Others...

SMOKERS NEEDED HealthyMen&Womenage18-45

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If this describes you...then join our team!

Great work environment

Dishwasher: Im m e d ia te opening, FT & som e w eekend

for energetic, fast culinary

for Cigarette smoking study at UVM

Shelburne M useum

Compensation up to $240

CASHIERS/INFORMATION STAFF

hours. Fast-paced, but fun atm o sph ere.

enthusiasts.

If youareavailable on3 days for 1 hour, and1 weekM-F, 3 times per dayfor 10 minutes inthemorning, afternoon &evening

Night Porter: Im m e d ia te opening, FT & w eekend hours. Clean guest room s & com m on areas. S ta rtin g $ 8 /h r and

Seeking

DISHWASHERS, LINE COOKS, and PANTRY/PREP COOKS.

b enefits.

Shuttle Driver/Continental Breakfast: FT, am hours. N eed valid drivers license.

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Good wages and benefits offered. Employe meals $ 1/day. WINDJAMMER Apply to: Best Western H O SPIT A LIT Y GROUP Windjammer Inn & Conference Center, ■ my a / 1076 Williston Rd„ So. Burlignton, VT 05403 f /

Very competitive wages. Apply in person: Mona’s Restaurant, 3 Main Street, Burlington.

6 4 .5 6 8 4

Please Call 656-9619

Positions available M ay 2 7 through October 15. Seeking enthusiastic, friendly, efficient people, able to assimilate information quickly and handle diverse and busy customer stream. Previous experience as cashier and/or working with public, ability to work weekends preferred. Call Bruce Andrews, 985-3348, x3389 or email bandrews@shelburnemuseum.com

651-0642

WHATAREYOUDOINGABOUTYOURCAREER?

Franklin West Supervisory Union BFA Fairfax O p e n in g s fo r th e 2000-2001 S c h o o l Y ear A

s s is t a n t

P

r in c ip a l

Successful candidate should possess knowledge of Standards, Best Practices and Implemen­ tation of Disciplinary Continuum I PLAN NING ROOM S U PER V ISO R H ig h

s c h o o l

. E n g l is h

(1 full-time & 1 part-time) M S C o n s u l t in g T e a c h e r to work as part of an interdisciplinary team ART

(part-time)

,

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE

(part-time) TECH

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L IB R A R Y A ID E .4 0

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(part-time)

M S T U T O R (part-time summer and full-time school year — to work with male autistic student) SLP

B eh a v io r S p e c ia list (sea rch re-op en ed ) Essex Educational Center is seeking a unique individual to assist in the development and imple­ mentation of our Quest Program, an inclusive school model, serving students with challenging behaviors. Successful candidates will have proven leadership ability; great communication skills; interest in outdoor/adventure based learning; solid understanding of adolescent social emotional and behavioral supports and needs; and the abili­ ty and desire to work as part of a team. Eligible candidates must hold (or be eligible to hold) a VT Special Education or related teaching endorse­ ment. We will also consider candidates who have the necessary experience, education and ability to attain proper state licensure through peer review. Position is full-time. Deadline: Open until filled.

Vice President, Development National Voluntary Health A gency seeks a Vice President, D evelopm ent, to conduct financial developm ent in the states

■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

THE TECHNICAL CONNECTION, INC. An expanding Vermont technology conduit Software Engineers/Developers E-Commerce/Web Design/Mangement Electrical/Mechanical Engineers Database Designers/Managers Facilities Engineers Designers/ Cad Operators Network Technical Support Staff Flexible Work Schedules/Cutting Edge Projects

Confidential inguires can be directed to Chris or Kathie via e-mail -vermontjobs@aot.com or ca ll- 802-658 TEC H -fa x 802-658-0115 web site www.vttechjobs.com- mail PO Box 1402, Burlington, VT 05402

of M E , N H & VT. Travel required. H ands-on Special E vent w ork and supervision of staff. Must have a proven track record in Special Event Fund Raising. Corporate Support, and Foundation Grants. Starting salary of $ 4 0 -$ 4 2 ,0 0 0 with excel­

Interested candidates must send letter, resume, three letters of recommendation, statement of their teaching philosophy, and a copy of their valid VT teaching license (or proof of VT licensure eligibility) to the address below:

(2 part-time OR 1 full-time)

BEHAVIORAL SPECIALIST

3 references, transcripts and licensure to:

C h itte n d e n C e n tr a l S u p e r v is o r U n io n A ttn : H u m a n R e s o u r c e s 7 M eadow T errace E s s e x J e t ., V T 0 5 4 5 2 F a x : (8 0 2 ) 8 7 8 -1 3 7 0

BFA Fairfax, 75 Hunt Street, Farifax, V T 05454

lent benefits. Send resum e with cover letter by M ay 2 6 to:

Arthritis Foundation 257 South Union St. Burlington, VT 05401

EOE

EOE

★ ★ PROMOTIONS MANAGER To manage energetic promotional team. Qualifications needed: 1 to 2 years marketing, managing/people, recruting/interviewing, customer service, excellent written/verbal communication and organizational skills. College degree preferred. Full-time exempt with great benefits package. Representing Red Bull Energy Drink Team based out of Burlington Call 818-831-4132x367 Fax resume 775-406-3059 Email cooke @promowerks,com

promowerks, inc.

Essex

YVYV.

CNSdrerts Choir

EXPANDING CHOIR PROGRAM seeks part-time choir manager and business manager, as well as music teachers. For more info call (802) 878-9733 or send resume to P.O. Box 8374, Essex, VT 05451.

U-32 Jr.-Sr. H igh School 2000-2001 VACANCIES

Visual A rts Teachers One with a focus in photography, and one with an emphasis in drawing and painting to teach Middle School and High School. Successful candidates must be: • Licensed (or eligible for licensure) by the State of VT • Skilled in standards based instruc­ tion & assessment • Experienced with the Vermont Framework; and • Committed to educating all stu­ dents to high standards Applicants should submit a letter of interest, resume & threee current let­ ters of reference. Teaching positions please include transcript, and evi­ dence of licensure. Send to David Royce, Interim Principal, U-32 Jr.-Sr. High School, 930 Gallisan Hill Road. Montpelier, VT 05602. Positions open until filled.

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Wanted: Former wait person or other food service professional to instruct new waitstaff and bus help on proper service techniques. Person must be knowledgable in all aspects of what good service means as well as responsibilities for side work, etc. Apply in person only to L.M. Field, General Manager, at address below.

Dining room cashiers, host person, wait staff and bus persons needed. Day and evening shifts available. Apply in person to address below. Come join our award-winning guest services team.The Holiday Inn Burlington has openings for both a.m. and p.m. desk clerks for our overnight audit shift. We also have an opening for a bellhop (full time or part-time)We offer competitive wages, discount room rates and a benefit season. Please apply in person to Nathan Germond at adress below, or call 863-6363.

Holiday Inn 1068 Williston Road South Burlington

Equal Opportunity Employe,

may 2 4 , 2000

SEVEN DAYS

page 41


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E M WANT TO JUMP-START YOUR CAREER?

JOHNSON^ STATE COLLEGE

Safety Officer/Chemical Hygienist A safety specialist, to be responsible for the chemical hygiene plan, hazardous waste management and the hazard communi­ cation program; to develop and administer health and safety training programs for faculty, staff and students, and to foster a safe working environment. Knowledge of VOSHA, EPA, and ANR regulations and their applications in the natural sciences, studio arts and special programs is essential, as are well-devel-. oped administrative, writing and interpersonal skills. Ability to maintain instruments and perform basic repairs strongly desir­ able. Qualifications include a bachelor's degree in chemistry or biochemistry with two years of experience, or the equivalent; experience jn organic chemistry highly desirable. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled; early application is encouraged. Please send resume, letter of interest, and the names addresses and phone numbers of three references to:

CONSIDER AUTO & TRUCK SALES! We offer: $500 minimum weekly guarantee to start Formal sales training program Over 5000 units (new &used) sold in 1999 Largest auto dealer group in Vermont

1401(k) with company match Dental, medical, &life insurance Sundays off ’20 paid holidays and vacation ’$30-$60K annual income potential

If you're a sales professional looking to change gears, consider enrolling in Heritage's next training program beginning at the end of June. For consideration, send or fax your resume to our HRDept., P0 Box 1100, Burlington, VT05402-1100 (fax 865-8273) or call 865-8271 for more information. Email: hrdepart@heritagevt.com We're BIG, but we're FRIENDLY!

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Dr. Vincent Crockenberg, Academic Dean Johnson State Johnson State College 337 College Hill Johnson, VT 05656-9464

rjjeritage

COMMERCIAL GRAPHIC ARTIST wanted now, to work full time in small, friendly job printshop recognized for quality. This personable team player will use creative talent and Macintosh experience to design printed work for customers. Duties also include some service bureau (film imagesetting) work. This is challenging technical work requiring a long-term commitment. Weekday hours, competitive wage and benefits package. Apply by May 31. IN WRITING ONLY, with references, to: Troll Press, 108 Concord Ave., St. Johnsbury.VT 05819

DO YOU WANT A JOB THAT'S CHALLENGING? A JO B W H E R E Y O U C A N M A K E T H E D IF F E R E N C E ?

Sales

Part-Time/ Inside Sales

- J f l H N S f l N .S T A T E C O L L E G E IS A N E Q U A L O P P O R T U N I T Y E M P I.O V F R

PRODUCT ★ PROMOTIONS

Entertainment Publica­ tion s products help make things happen. Rapid expansion and promotion within has created opportunity for Part-Tim e A ccou n t Representatives in the Burlington area.

Have fun w hile you w ork!!

We require: • High School diploma (college preferred) • Strong customer service & phone skills • Prior sales or fundrais­ ing experience a plus

Consumer Educators Qualifications needed: dependable, high energy/ enthusiasm, customer service, excellent communication skills, and a great team player. Bilingual a plus but not necessary. Must be flexible and able to work weekends/evenings. $10 per hour.

In return we offer: • Generous commission only with draw opportunity • Ability to work at home • Very flexible hours/ 15-25 weekly • Training program

Representing Red Bull Energy Drink Team based out of Burlington Call 818-831-4132x367 Fax resume 775-406-3059 Email cooke ©promowerks,com

Interested candidates may call:

800-568-8521 or fax resume

promowerks, inc.

615-885-9963 E N T E R T A IN M E N T

Northlands Job Corps Center is a residential vocational training program serving youth ages 16-24 throughout New England. As a member of Northlands’ staff you would be helping disadvantaged young people break the cycle of poverty by preparing them for gainful, entry-level employment.

Northlands is presently seeking candidates for the following positions:

A O DA Specialist:

Full-time position responsible for the design, development, and coordination of the Alcohol and Other Drugs of Abuse Prevention/lntervention program on Center. Master’s Degree preferred, with state certification in drug/alcohol counseling.

R esidential Advisor: Full-time and substitute positions super­ vising students in dormitories during leisure time hours. Must have diploma/GED and the commitment to making positive and dramatic changes in the lives of youth. $9.30/hr+ Cook: Full-time position responsible for preparation of Center meals, establishing a menu, and determining quantities of food needed for facility serving three meals daily. High School/GED, as well as at least one year’s experience in institutional food prepara­ tion. OEP Instructor: Part-time (20 hrs/wk) permanent position providing occupational exploration instruction to new Job Corps students. State teaching certification required.

Summer Substitute Teaching Positions also available - $11.57/hr For m o r e inform ation, p lea se contact: Lisa O ’Brien, Human Resources Northlands Job Corps Center I00A MacDonough Drive Vergennes.VT 05491 (800) 869-2901, ext 209 (802) 877-0292 Fax obrienl@jcdc.jobcorps.org Northlands Job CorpsICSD is an equal opportunity employer

TOWN OF PLATTSBURGH ANNOUNCES P o sitio n A vailable

DIRECTOR OF WATER & SEWER UTILITIES

BERGMANS

Traffic Maintenance

D IG IT A L IM A G IN G , M A N A G EM EN T & P R IN T IN G ^

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P ro je c t M a n a g e r

W o rk e r

Minimum qualifications include:

Organized, professional individual needed for customer service and workflow manage­ ment. Knowledge of printing, prepress and online technologies a plus. Competitive salary and full benefits.

'S e a s o n a l

Burling*

P h o to S ty lis t

Digital and traditional photo studio requires creative full or part-time assistant. Experience with soft goods required.

The D epartm ent of P u b lic W orks is looking for a tem porary p erso n to perform co n stru ctio n duties, p arking lot m ain ten an ce, apply pavem ent m a rk in g s and re p a irs to the city ’s sig n a g e and

Immediate openings available for qualified professionals. Send resume and cover letter to: H u m an R e s o u r c e s

m eter sy ste m s. M ust have a valid D river’s lic e n se . $ 8 .0 0 /hour. For m ore inform ation, or for an ap p licatio n ,

B e r g m a n G ra p h ics

co n tact HR at ( 8 0 2 ) 8 6 5 - 7 1 4 5 ,

27 H e r cu le s D rive

Rm 3 3 C ity Hall.

C o lch ester ,

EO E/A A .

VT 0 5 4 4 6 Women, Minorities, and persons with disabilities are strongly encouraged to apply.

page 4 2 v /.V . V. x. ■

SEVEN DAYS

may 2 4 , 2000

The Town of Plattsburgh has a vacancy for the position o f Director of Water and Sewer Utilities. Distinguishing features o f the position include: Responsible for the adm inistration of the r a t e r and sew er utilities departm ent, including the pro p er and continued functioning o f l)th e Town's w ater treatm ent plants and r a t e r distribution and storage system; 2)the Town’s wastewater collec­ tion system and treatm ent facilities; 3)the w ater and sewer utilities office: and 4) local w ater and sewer laws. • Associate’s degree from an accredited college in one of the following curriculums: sanitary’ engineering, civil engineering, environmental sciences o r related field; • Have o r be eligible for a Grade ILA Departm ent of Health Water treatm ent Plant O perator’s Certificate; •Minimum of five years' experience in the r a t e r and wastewater fields, two of which must have been in a supervisory capacity! a bachelor's or m aster's degree may substitute for experience); • Capable o f knowledge in the fields of r a t e r and/or wastewater management; • Capable o f properly performing supervisor duties of a complex, town-wide operation. • Capable o f relating in a positive m anner to fellow employees and the general public; • Good knowledge o f th e practices used and equipm ent required in the operation and maintenance of m odem r a t e r and wastewater treatm ent plants and systems; • Good knowledge of r a t e r and wastewater main and appurtenance installation and repair; • Thorough knowledge of tools, equipment, and supplies used in maintaining and extending such public systems, laterals, and metering devices; • Thorough knowledge of budgetary’, cost analysis, utilities billing, inventory, personnel and o th er general record-keeping practices. The position described above is a com petitive civil service position. Persons applying for this position must be residents of Clinton County or be willing to relocate. Salary com m ensurate with experience. Ml applications m ust be subm itted directly to: The Town of Plattsburgh, 151 BankerRoad Plattsburgh, NY 12901 Attn: Andrew .Abdullah. On o r before May 31st, 2000. For further information call 518-563-8101, Ext. 613 or 622


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Some experience needed.

E x p e rie n c e , o r in te r e s t, in W e b w o r k r e q u ir e d .

Industry experts seek

S e n d r e s u m e to :

conscientious individual

G r e e n M o u n ta in E le c tro m a g n e tic s

fo r entry-level position.

2 1 9 B la k e R o y R o a d

Responsible fo r set-up

n e w a n d e x is tin g c u s to m e r s . D u tie s in c lu d e : p h o n e s , fa x , e -m a il, s h ip p in g , o r d e r in g a n d s c h e d u lin g .

D ish w a sh e r ,

Good pay with great atmosphere. Chefs Corner Willlston 878 5524

M id d le b u ry , V T 0 5753

Natural Foods Market now hiring!

applications at V erm o nt’s NATURAL F O O D S MARKET

D iam ond Preferred Resort:

T OPNOTCH AT STOWE RESORTAND SPA

Phone:802-253-6421 Fax:802-253-6498 Email: remler@sover.net 4000 Mountain Rd. Stowe,VT 05672

Full time S part-time help in vegetarian cafe, grocery & bulk departm ents. Also seek­ ing PT/FT cashiers.

skills a m ust.

EM PLO YM EN T

$500 BONUS! Dancers/Models wanted. Earn up to $600 nightly. Will train. 877-708-6433. ADMINISTRATIVE POSI­ TION. Part-time, approx. 25hrs./wk. For roofing con­ tractor. Flexible schedule, familiar w/ MS Word, MS Excel & Windows applica­ tions. A.C. Hathorne Co., Williston, VT. 862-6473.

TroppTmiiilij £pd<je

C o m p u ter literacy (M ic ro s o ft O ffice) a plus.

35-50 hours

per week.

Send resu m e to: D .C . E nterp rizes, In c.

286

C ollege St.

A ttn : Paul S on ger B u rlin g to n , V T

05401

Call Kelly or Mike at 863-2569 o r apply a t Healthy Living.

FlYMM tftlHtlQH ILLUStMQRS SEVEN DAYS would like to see your s tu ff for potential freelance work. Send samples o f pertinent work for an alternative newsweekly or leave o ff your portfolio at 255 S. Champlain St., Burlington, VT 0 5 4 0 1 . Please include a letter o f interest detailing your prior experi­ ence in print or otherwise.

;€Theatrej3 for the Performing Arts, Ud.

Nusic Artists/ Educators Flynn Theatre’s FlynnArts, opening fall 2000 , year-round classes for children, teens, and adults. Emphasis on early childhood music, composing, singing, and jazz. Call Jean Taylor for application guidelines by 5 /31.

652-4543

No phone calls, please.

Year Round: • FRONTDESKSTAFF FT •LINECOOKS-FT •TEAROOMSERVICEMANAGERFTto supervise the bar/waitstaff • WAISTAFF- FT, breakfast, lunch and dinner shifts available • LAUNDRYATTENDANT- FTor PT • ROOM ATTENDANTS- FT • HOUSEKEEPING SUPERVISORFT • DISHWASHERS- FT&PT Seasonal: • RETAILSALESFTor PT, May 1-0ct 30, YRposi­ tions also available • WAITSTAFF, BUSSERS, DISH­ WASHERS EXCELLENTBENEFITSpkg. available for full-time, YRemploy­ ees. All employees get free shift meals, skiing, useof fitness center, discounts. Apply to: Trapp Family Lodge, Human Resources, PO Box 1428, Stowe, VT 05672 Ph: 802.253.5713 fax: 802.253.5757 EOE

www.trappfamily.com for online application

M a k e a D iffe r e n c e in

th e L iv e s

o f O ld e r V e r m o n te r s . .. Innovative program for ‘home bound’ elders includes in-home visits, case management and inter-agency collaboration. This is a 15 hour per week position. Responsibilities include case management, advocacy, outreach, and support for families and elders. BA in social work, psychology or related Field required. MA and experience work­ ing with families and elders is preferred. Competitive salary and benefits.

P osition s available... N eed One? Join the #1 Team! Call today. Have fun. Make friends. SM U G G LERS' Get paid.

... O r M a k e a D iffe r e n c e in L ife o f a

NOTCH

th e

Y o u n g V e r m o n te r !

L e a r n in g I n t e r v e n t i o n i s t

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www.smuggs.com/jobs

1-888-754-7684 Y O U D ON’ T H EED VOODOO T O FIND RIGHT MAN (IT JU S T F E E L S LIK E IT S O M ET IM ES). Y O U N EED SEVEN D A YS PER SO N ALS . I T ’ S IN T H E B AC K OF T H IS IS S U E.

EOE

\

BEN & JERRY’S. Scoopers wanted. Part-time positions in the BEST place to work. Fun environment. Flexible hours. Quick advancement & bonuses. No experience needed. Contact Ben & Jerry’s, Shelburne Store. 2031 Shelburne Rd. 985-8823.

and tim e m a n a g e m e n t

h&w

T

E M P LO Y M E N T

Excellent organization al

If so... W e are accepting

• PMLINE COOK • AMROUNDSCOOK • CERTIFIED GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTOR • SPANIGHTCLEANER (8 P.M, A.M.) • AM& PMWAIT STAFF • AMBUSER/ROOMSERVICE • AMRESTAURANTHOST • DISHWASHERS (AM&PM) • TOWNHOUSE CLEANER • TENNIS PRO SHOP ATTENDANT • AMLINECOOK • SUMMER POOL ATTENDANTS • SUMMER SPAATTENDANTS • SUMMERWAIT STAFF Topnotch offers Competitive Wages, duty meals, Health and Dental insurance, Health Club access and opportunity for personal and professional growth.

^and breakdow n o f sensory!

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tests and record keeping.

A re you ready to m ake a change?

O n ly Four-Star, Four

____

S ensory Laboratory A pprentice Position

E

To provide comprehensive and intensive day services for an elementary aged child with multiple challenges. High school diploma with significant experience in human services or BA in special ed preferred.

CARPENTER/HELPER want­ ed for house project in Starksboro. Experience pre­ ferred. 434-5485. COORDINATOR or partner to operate a fine art, antique & craft gallery in picturesque, waterfront village of Essex, NY. Housing avail. Box 22, Essex, NY 12936. FILM & TELEVISION. Music Recording. Radio annoucer No experience required. Onthe-job training. Film Companies, Recording Studios,Radio Stations. Parttime, Nights, Weekends. Free Video 1-800295-4433. CAREERCONNETION2000. COM. (AAN CAN) FRONT DESK COORDINA­ TOR for busy rental & sales store. Must have positive attitude, able to juggle 5 things at once. Work every other Saturday. Permanent, full-tim e position w/benefits. Valley Rent-All, 496-5440. GOOD TIMES CAFE is look­ ing for a Dough Roller/Prep Person for early am shifts. Must be responible & pos­ sess a good work ethic. Position incl. some benefits. Restaurant exp. preferred. Call Chris, 482-4444. GOVERNMENT JOBS- $11$33/hour. Paid training on entry level positions. Availability all over the coun­ try. Call now! 1-800320-9353 x2106. (AAN CAN) INTERESTED IN A POLITI­ CAL CAREER? Apply for the 2000 Democratic Campaign Management Program. Housing/living stipend. Learn the nuts and bolts of campaigning from top politi­ cal consultants while elect­ ing progressive Democrats to Congress. Qualified gradu­ ates placed in full-time, salaried positions around the country. Call (773) 539-3222. (AAN CAN) KITCHEN STAFF: Great work environment for energetic, fast culinary enthusiasts. Seeking Dishwashers, Line Cooks and Pantry/Prep cooks. Very competitive wages. Apply in person, Mona’s Restaurant, 3 Main St., Burlington. LABORERS & ROOFERS Good wages & benefits. Women & minorities encour­ aged to apply. Sign-on bonus, $500. A.C. Hathorne. Williston, VT. 862-6473. MAIL BOXES ETC., a leader in the postal, shipping & communications business seeks a part-time, outgoing, customer service oriented person to join our team! If you have good problem solv­ ing skills & a willingness to work hard, please call or apply in person at the Taft Corners, Williston location. 872-8455.

Send resume to: Lamoille County Mental Health Services Inc. Attn: Personnel Manager 520 Washington Highway, Morrisville, VT 05661.

may 2 4 , 2000

SEVEN DAYS

page 4 3


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E M P LO Y M E N T

E M P LO Y M E N T

B U SIN ES S OPP

MARKETING COORDINATOR/Project Mgr. for small creative graphic design firm. Organizational & communi­ cation skills essential. Must be a go-getter. Copy writing talent a big plus. Minimum 3 yrs. experience required. Email resume info to: info@cummingsdesign.com. Cummings Design, 47 Maple St., Burl., VT 05401.

TOWNEPLACE SUITES by Marriott. Full-time service position available w/ a focus toward maintenance. Complete work orders, man­ age a preventative mainte­ nance program, oversee work from outside contractors & be responsible for overall upkeep of hotel. 100 % paid health insurance, excellent wage, monthly bonus plan, worldwide hotel discounts, great training in all aspects of hotel operations. Learn to deliver world class service. Must be available days, including weekends. Call or visit us M-F, 9-5 pm. Located just north of Taft Corners, behind Espresso Restaurant. 872-5900.

BARTENDERS Make $100$250 per night. No experi­ ence necessary. Call 1-800981-8168, ext. 5000. (AAN CAN)

O-BREAD BAKERY. Help wanted! Part-time, full-time from production through delivery. 985-8771. OUTDOOR SUMMER WORK. Socially responsible, serviceoriented, top-end, residential painting company seeks bright, team-oriented men & women for summer employ­ ment. Painters w/some exte­ rior exper. welcome; training avail, for entry-level posi­ tions. Call Paul at Lafayette Painting 863-5397. OUTDOOR WORK from midJune to October. 40 hrs./wk. Energetic person for park maintnance & some trail work. Apply in person Tuesday-Friday, 10-3 by 6/6 at the Winooski Valley Park District office, Ethan Allen Homestead, Burlington. PAINTERS. Full-time/yearround. Call Steve at Expert Painters, 865-9839. PART-TIME DISHWASHER. Great after school job. Apply at Mirabelles, 198 Main St., Burlington. PREP/DISWASHER. Flexible hrs. Part-time. Sign-on bonus. Meals. Excellent envi­ ronment. 2-3 nights/wk., 5:30-11:00 pm. Apply in person or by appointment at Trattoria Delia. 864-5253. RELIGIOUS EDUCATION Coordinator for small Unitarian Universalist fellow­ ship in Jericho. PT. Emphasis on creativity & fun w/ pre K-8 grade children. 11 hrs./mo. $20/hr. Jean, 899-3709. RENTAL YARD PERSON to clean equipment, greet cus­ tomers, building mainte­ nance, deliveries and clean shop. Some lifting. Work every other Saturday. Permanent, full-tim e w/benefits. Valley Rent-All. 2445161.

VT’S FINEST PRIVATE Entertainment service seek­ ing attractive, educated, articulate individuals for part-time evening employ­ ment. Call Tracy 863-9510, 7-10 p.m. WAIT PERSON professional, experienced individual possesing enthusiasm and knowl­ edge of fine wine and food. Part-time eves., year-round. Apply after 5 pm at Trattoria Delia, 152 St. Paul St., Burl. 864-5253. WAITSTAFF for am & pm shifts. Apply in person at Holiday Inn, 1068 Williston Rd., S. Burl. WILDERNESS CAMP COUN­ SELOR. Sleep under the stars. Hike the Appalachian Trail. Canoe the Suwanee. Help at-risk youth. Paid Training. Free room/board. Clothing allowance. Excellent salary/benefits. Details & application: www.eckerd.org. Send resumes: Selection Specialist/AN, Eckerd Youth Alternatives, P.O. Box 7450, Clearwater, FL 33765. EOE. (AAN CAN)

BILLER- UP TO $50K per year possible. Easy medical billing for local physicians. Full support. Computer & modem required. Call 1-888968-7793 ext. 7097. (AAN CAN) ONLINE VT MUSIC SHOP. Largest selection of Vermont music available is at www.bigheavyworld.com! VT bands with CDs to consign call, 800-303-1590. OWN A COMUTER? Put it to work! $25-75/hr. PT/FT Decision pack, $39. www.youcan2 .org, pdmitch@qni.com. TIRED OF LIVING PAYcheck to paycheck? FT-PT. Flexible hours. Full training. Call now. 888-321-2391, code #503.

ANNOUNC E­ M EN TS POLITICAL ORGANIZERS— Help mobilize the African American vote to take back the House in 2000! Receive political training from topprofessionals. Minorities and women encouraged to apply. Call 773-539-3222. (AAN CAN) YOUR CLASSIFIED AD print­ ed in more than 100 alterna­ tive papers like this one for just $950.00! To run your ad in papers with a total cir­ culation exceeding 6.5 mil­ lion copies per week, call Hope at Seven Days, 8645684. No adult ads. (AAN CAN)

A N N O U N C E­ M EN TS DEMOCRATIC CAMPAIGN 2000, Political activists needed to take back the House in 2000! While work­ ing on a top-targeted Congressional race, our train­ ing program covers every aspect of modern political campaigning. Housing/ living stipend. Job placement upon completion of program. Minorities and women encouraged to apply. Call 773-539-3222. (AAN CAN)

A U TO M O TIV E 1989 SUBARU DL white, automatic, front-wheel drive, some body rust. Runs great! $550. Burlington, 860-9515 1998, YAMAHA YZ250. Mint, way too much to list, possibly the fastest 250 in VT. Must ride to understand the quality of bike. $5000 firm. Call or e-mail for more info, 802-734-0243 or erikolsen@adelphia.net ’93 SUBARU LOYALE wagon. 4WD on the fly. Standard shift. A/C. Power Windows. Roof rack. Less than 90K. Very well main­ tained. $5200 o.b.o. 862-9104. ’95, VW GOLF, 67K. Sun roof, A/C, great condition. Green. Good, basic car. New muffler. $8500. 658-2775.

R EA L ESTATE ESSEX: Beautiful, rare, affordable building sites. Views, trails, river, water & sewer. Won’t last. (Subject to, taking reservations) $59, 900. 864-6411. HOMES FROM $5000. Foreclosed and repossessed. No or low down payment. Credit trouble— OK. For cur­ rent listings call, 800-3115048 ext. 3478.

OFFICE/STUDIO SP AC E FOR R EN T BURLINGTON: 24 X24’ Yoga studio for hourly rent. Quiet use only, preferrably without shoes. Good for small class­ es, meditation, massage, etc. Hardwood firs. Super clean. Parking. Sorry, absolutely no trades. Now scheduling MayAug. $20/hr. 660-9718 or yvt@yogavermont.com. BURLINGTON: Waterfront office/studio space. Funky. $250/mo. incl. utils. 6573818. ROOM AVAIL, in home health spa for massage ther­ apist, body worker, health practitioner. Richmond. Exclusively or one day/wk. Kathy or Annie, 434-3846.

’* 5W E E T TALK"

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use p it to k ee p people

FROM iNVAPlNG THEIR W oR LP.

BURLINGTON: Lg., nice, clean & bright 3-bdrm. farm­ house-like apt. Great down­ town location. Parking. Dogs OK. $1375/mo. utils, incl. Avail. 6/1. 862-9973. CHARLOTTE: Beautiful, lg. 1-bdrm., great location, laundry. $700+utils. 4254658. WINOOSKI: 2-bdrm. hdwd. firs., quiet neighborhood, offstreet parking, no pets/smoking. $ 1000/mo. incl. heat. 654-8567.

H O U S EM A TES W A N TED

A P T./H 0 U S E FOR R EN T

BURLINGTON: 2 gay men seek 3rd. Sunny & spacious. W/D on site, off-street park­ ing. Five min. walk to Church St. $375/mo.+utils. 865-9235.

BURLINGTON: 1-bdrm., sin­ gle occupant. Downtown near waterfront, hdwd. firs., porch, off-street parking, no pets/smokers. $650/mo. incl. heat. 654-8567

BURLINGTON: 2-bdrm. avail, for summer in 4-bdrm. house. Great location, wood firs., lg. kitchen & porch. Prefer F. $300/mo. Call Jenna, 781-237-1838.

BURLINGTON: 2-bdrm. downtown condo. Gas heat, parking, W/D, storage. $776/mo.+utils., hot water incl. No smoking or pets. Avail. 7/1. 658-2578.

BURLINGTON: Act now! This offer won’t last! Not sold in stores! We’re looking for cre­ ative, laid-back, open-mind­ ed people to join our funky downtown apartment! Two large rooms available 6/1 for $385/month. (No pets unfortunately!) Keith, 8656889

BURLINGTON: 3-bdrm., no dogs. $750/mo.+utils. Avail., 6/ 1 . 2-bdrm., no dogs. $650/mo.+utils. Avail. 7/1. 865-6065, day. BURLINGTON: Clean, spa­ cious 2-bdrm. Great location. 42 Elmwood Ave. Off-street parking. Gas heat. No smok­ ers, $725/mo. +utils. 8652055. BURLINGTON: Lg. 1-bdrm. on N. Champlain St. Very clean and nice, lg. closet, private deck. Avail. 7/1. $700/mo. 864-8223. BURLINGTON: Lg. 2-bdrm. Victorian Apt. in quiet owneroccupied, Green St. duplex. Porch, parking. $870, incl. heat. Avail, 6/1. Call Ann, 660-2667.

s ~ - f o g r M .K i u t e ^ .&

APT/H O U S E FOR R EN T

BURLINGTON: Close to downown, fully furnished, newly renovated. $450/mo. incl. all. NS F preferred. 660-4347. BURLINGTON: Healthy, active, fun, responsible lifestyle. M-F, non-smoker, mid 20's-30’s, prof./grad. No cats. Avail. 7/1. Call Adam or Ben, 865-6986. BURLINGTON: NS needed to share 3-bdrm. house, close to downtown, W/D, off-street parking, open-minded and sense of humor a must. $275/mo. -4-utils. 4- deposit. 863-8039

WHENEVER A MAN WoULP T R y T o TALK T o BTUBfZ o F THEM...

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RESTAURANT GENERAL MGR.: experienced, profes­ sional, entrepreneurial leader wanted for a unique, creative opportunity. Salary, benefits, Equity share. 734-1207. ROOFERS & LABORERS Good wages & benefits. Women & minorities encour­ aged to apply. Sign-on bonus, $500. A.C. Hathorne. Williston, VT. 862-6473. SELF-STARTER to clean, inventory and prepare dish, linen and catering items for rental. All work must be to high standards. Attention to detail is essential. Valley Rent-All, 244-5161.

lAy@WAYlAy.COM O N E P A y A MAN CAME ALoNG WHO U N P E R S T ooP THEM.

THEy MUTATEP THEIR LANGUAGE T o KEEP IT THEIR oW N ...

BUT HE WAS ABLE T o KEEP COMMUNICATING WITH THEM.

THE OTHER SISTER CoULPN'T KEEP UP S o SHE WAS LEFT BEHlNP.

BUT THE NEXT TIME SoM E oN E BARKEP T o HER, IT S oU N P E P P R E T T y SW EET

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT — Vermont Expos are looking for parking supervisor for the 2000 baseball season. Other positions also avail. For more information, call 655-4200. THE FOUR CORNERS of the Earth Deli — person needed to work 10 hrs./wk. Lunch rush hour. Good pay. 6573 8 6 9 ,8 -3 . '

page 4 4

SEV EN DAYS

O N E OF THE SISTERS FELL IN LoVE w ith Him .

may 2 4 , 2000

THE COUPLE TALKEP IN SECRET/ MUTATING THE LANGUAGE AGAIN.


Classifieds • 864.5884 SITU ATIO NS W A N TED

M ISC. SERVIC ES

VIDEO SERVIC ES

Share a 3bdrm. converted church, hdwd. firs., stained glass windows. Close to downtown & UVM. Off-street parking, * W/D, non-smoking prof./grad. $367/m o.+ l/3 gas. No pets. Avail, in June. 863-3123.

PROF. M A S S A G E therapist/ grad, student seeks free or reduced-cost housing in exchange for massage thera­ py/ housekeeping. Excellent references. Please call Cindy at 244-7466.

Runs errands, waits for appoint­ ments, shops, cleans out closets, walks dogs, house sits, you name it! Lori, 6588719. References. $25/hour.

N O R T H E R N IM A G E V ID E O

Walk to downtown. Porches, small room, Ig. living area. $250/mo.+utils. Avail. 6/1. 863-6695.

family seeks afforabie rental in rural setting within 30 min of Burlington. Good credit and refs. Please call 439-6275.

VACATION R EN T A L

DATING S ER V IC ES

Charming, rustic cabin, w/sleeping loft, over stream & falls, fully equipped, comes with studio cabin, total privacy. 1 - 1/2 hrs. from Burl. $350/wk. 863-5485.

C O M P A T IB L E S :

B O O TH B A Y H A R B O R , M E :

FIN A N C IA L S ER V IC ES

B U R L IN G T O N :

B U R L IN G T O N :

A D IR O N D A C K S :

Private 3-bdrm., adjacent to both, salt water bay & fresh water pond. Avail, weekly. June-Sept. $650/wk. References req. 899-4191. 1858, 4bdrm., 2BA house, fourminute walk to harbor & . shops. Weekly rental, JuneOct. 472-5746.

C A M D E N , M E .:

ELEU TH ER A BAHAM AS:

100 year-old cottage on bay of Governor’s harbor. 3-bdrm. Unique, quiet, friendly peo­ ple, miles of pink sand beaches. Car avail. Twoweeks, $1500. Monthly, $2300. 800-473-1364.

R E S P O N S IB L E F W / animal

Singles meet by being in the same place as other singles. We've made this the best time to connect you. Details, 863-4308. www.compatibles.com.

Bad Credit OK. 1-800-471-5119. Ext. 222. (AAN CAN)

C A SH LO A N S .

$ $ $ N E E D A LOAN?

Consolidate Debts! Same-day approval. Cut payments to 50%! No application fees! 1-800-863-9006 Ext. 838. www.help-pay-bills.com (AAN GAN)

M ISC. S ER V IC ES B LA C K LAB P U P S . Ready to go 6/5, Champion dogs, Guaranteed all around, just females left, $600, call or email for more info, 802734-0243 or erikolsen @adelphia.net

G O -G ETTE R G IR L .

H A IR S TY LIS T: The one and only Tim Melow. “ This cat is tuned into hair like I am tuned into housecleaning,” says Diane H., housekpr. to the stars. Schedule with Tim at Haircrafters, 863-4871. H O T A IR B A LLO O N R ID E S .

Surprise someone special in your life w/ a balloon ride during the Stoweflake Festival, July 7-9. $400 for two people includes ride, Tshirts, Sunday balloonist brunch. Call 253-7355, ext. 5569 to reserve.

age. Strong back & truck provided. You help you save. Or we’ll do the job for you. Please schedule in advance. Call David, 434-7227. P S Y C H IC S H O LD T H E KEY

to your future! Call today! 1-900-267-9999, ext. 8113 $3.99/min. Must be 18 yrs. U-SERV. (619) 645-8434

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in Burlington: reading, writ­ ing, math, science enrich­ ment. Variety of teaching styles. I help build confi­ dence, increase productivity, challenge the mind & sup­ port. Barbara-Anne, 658-2478.

for all occasions and specializing in wedding receptions. Call Carter Tunes, 244-8020.

a

Production & Duplication. High-quality, creative & affordable. Commercials, industrials, PSA’s & docu­ mentaries. Call Bill Meisenzahl, 862-1645, ext. 16.

W EDDING SER VIC ES

r

Dear Tom and Ray: For the past month, I have been trying to get a certain m uf­ fler company to p u t a quiet m uf­ fler on my car. I originally brought the car into the shop because o f an incessant rattle. I was informed that the problem was a hole in the original m uf­ fler. After the mechanic replaced the muffler, I drove the car home. But it was so loud, I brought it back to the shop the next morn­ ing. He told me not to worry. He said the new muffler has to “car­ bon up” before it can be quiet. I askea him to come fo r a ride. He d id and agreed that it sounded like a “motorboat, ” much too noisy fo r a 1993 feep Grand Cherokee. So he p u t in another muffler, a n d guess what? I t’s louder than the last one! He again told me that the muffler needs to “carbon up, ”ana he asked me to drive it fo r a month and then come back. Time’s up. The muffler’s loud, a n d I ’m not happy. W hat do you say? — Len T O M : I’ve got to make a note o f that one. ... “Muffler has to carbon up’ to get quiet.” I’m

N O POW ER? N O P R O B L E M .

Brew what you want when you want! Start-up kits & prize-winning recipes. Gift certifs. are a great gift. VT Homebrew Supply, Rt. 15, Winooski. 655-2070.

ORGANIC PRODUCE in Burlington’s Intervale offers affordably priced farm mem­ berships. Members receive basket of seasonal produce (sweet corn, tomatoes, mesculn, strawberries, more) ea. wk. from Jun.-Nov. Delivery avail. Info: 862-5929.

O R G A N IC FA R M

Flute and piano duo for weddings, tea parties and other social gath­ erings, classical/folk/nostalgia. In/outdoors. Call Mara McReynolds, 862-3581.

T H E B ELLE S :

We have been a hands-on designer/dealer/installer of the best in renewables since 1991. We offer solar, wind and hydro energy compo­ nents and complete systems. We specialize in off-grid and utility intertie/back-up power systems. We do site analysis, repairs and upgrades. Catalog avail. We return phone calls. Vermont Solar Engineering, PO Box 697, Burlington, VT. 05401. 8631202/ 800-286-1252, www.vtsolar.com.

BURL, to W IN.: H eading into Winooski at the crack of dawn? I need a ride! I work 6 am - 4:30 pm, M-F. ( 3 2 5 8 )

CHARLOTTE/N. FERRISBG to BURL.: I am looking to share driving to work. My hours are 9 5 :3 0 , M-F. ( 32 7 3 )

ESSEX JCT. to ESSEX JCT.: I am looking for a ride on my short, 4 mile com m ute to work. I work 7 am - 3 :3 0 pm. M-F. ( 3 2 6 3 )

MILTON to BURL.: I am looking for a ride to work to my new job. My hours are 7 :4 5 - 4:00 pm, MF. ( 3 2 7 4 )

HINESBURG to ESSEX: I work the D 1 shift at IBM and would like to share driving w/someone. (3 2 6 0 )

RICHMOND P&R to COLC.: I am hoping to share driving on my commute to work. My hours are 7 : 15 - 5:00 M-Th. ( 32 7 1 )

JERICHO to COLCH.: I would like to share driving w/someone on my daily com m ute. I need to be at work b/w 8 - 9 am and I work until 5 pm. M-F. ( 1189 )

JERICHO to ESSEX: I work at IBM and need a ride home from work. I get off work at 3 :3 0 pm. M-F and live on Lee River Rd. ( 32 6 4 ) SO. BURL, to SO. BURL.: I am looking for a ride to work on Com munity Drive. My hours are 8 :30 am - 5 :0 0 pm. M-F with some flexibility. ( 3 2 6 6 )

going to try that on my cus­ tomers! T h a t’s very inventive! RAY: He was hoping that in that span o f one m onth, one of several things would happen: A. You’d get used to the noise; B. You’d experience significant hearing loss and cease to be bothered by it; or C. You’d be abducted by space aliens. O r maybe all three. But he lost, so it’s time for him to fix this for you. T O M : There are two possibili­ ties. O ne is that, when chang­ ing the muffler, he accidentally created a hole somewhere else in the exhaust system. T h a t’s easy to test. All he has to do is plug up the end o f the tailpipe with a rag. If there’s no exhaust leak, the car will stall within seconds. If there is a leak, the car will keep running and get louder, helping him pinpoint the leak. RAY: But the more likely possi­ bility is that the aftermarket mufflers he uses don’t have the same baffling as the original factory mufflers. We often have this problem w ith Jeeps in par­ ticular. And the remedy, in this case, is to buy a factory muffler from the Jeep dealer. T O M : This guy can put it in for you. You can even bring him the part. But he should give you your money back for the first muffler and put an

ESSEX/MILTON PARK&RIDE to ST. ALBANS I would like to share driving to work. My hrs. are 6 :3 0 am - 3 pm. M, Tu, Th, F. ( 32 6 2 ) COLCH. to IBM: I work the N8 shift— 7 am to 7 pm W-Sat. and am looking for a ride to work. Pis call me. ( 3 2 5 9 )

MILTON to BURL.: I am looking for a ride into Burl, one day/mo., preferably during the first week of the month. I can go & return at any time of the day. ( 3 2 5 6 ) BURL, to WILLISTON: I am looking for a ride from Shelburne Rd. to W lliston. My hrs are l l a m - 7 pm. M -F ( 3 2 5 4 ) VERGENNES TO MILTON: I would like to share driving on my daily com m ute. I work 7 am3 pm. M-F. ( 3 1 7 2 ) RTE. 15 (COLCH/ESSEX) to BURL.: I work Tu-Fri and have a very flexible schedule. I am hop­ ing to get a ride into Burl, som e­ tim e in the late morning and return anywhere around 4 or 5 pm ( 3 2 4 7 ) HUNTINGTON to COLCHESTER: Going my way? I’m hoping to get a ride to world My hours are 84 -.3 0 , M-F, & are som ewhat flexi­ ble. ( 3 2 4 3 )

VANPOOL RIDERS WANTED Route from: Burlington & Richmond Commuter Lot To: Montpelier Monthly Fare: $85 Work Hours: 7:30 to 4:25 p.m. Contact: Carl Bohlen Phone: 8 2 8 -5 2 1 5

original Jeep muffler in the car. T he part itself will cost you a little more, but tell him it comes “pre-carboned,” so there’s no waiting. Good luck, Len.

JEEP OW NER CAN’T M UFFLE LOUD EXH AUST

M A K E G R EA T B E ER AT H O M E for only 50(2/bottle.

M A P L E LEA F M O V IN G S E R ­ V IC E S . Home, office or stor­

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H O U S EM A T ES W A N TED

Dear Tom and Ray: I own a 1990 Toyota Corolla with a manual transmission. The parking-brake light on the dash­ board has started to come on. This is fin e when I have the parking brake on, but now it happens when I am driving, too. It seems to come on when I depress the regular brake pedal — f or instance, when I ’m slow­ ing down fo r a stop sign. Do you know what’s causing this? — Steven T O M : Yes. You’re low on brake fluid, Steven. RAY: T he “brake” light on the dashboard usually serves two purposes. O ne is to remind you that the parking brake is applied, so you don’t drive to your m other-in-law’s house in D ubuque with the rear brakes smoking. T O M : But the light also comes on when your brake fluid is low. T he fluid can be low because you have a leak. O r because your brake pads are worn out. RAY: M ost likely, the pads have worn out. W hen that happens, the space where the “padding” used to be gets filled by more brake fluid. T hat lowers the fluid in the reservoir and trips the “brake” light. Your pads

V erm o n t

G id e s h a r e

might be right on the hairy edge now, which is why the light is only coming on inter­ mittently. Eventually, though — as the pads get worse — the light will stay on all the time. T O M : But there is a chance that you have a brake-fluid leak. And if you lose enough of your brake fluid, you w on’t be able to stop at all. T h at would be bad, Steven. Ask anyone in an Alfred Hitchcock movie. RAY: So if you’re not dead by the time you read this, please take it in and get it checked out right away. Dear Tom and Ray: M y wife wants to buy a new vehicle, a Toyota Tacoma. I heard many years ago that driving short distances wasn’t good fo r the engine. M y wife works ju st oneand-a-half blocks from our home, and she always drives to work. W ill it harm the engine to drive that short a distance every day? The only alternative I can come up with is that we alternate vehicles every other week. Any comments or suggestions? — Steve RAY: Well, my first com m ent is “wow.” A nd I thought my brother was lazy! T O M : And my suggestion is that you get her a good pair o f walking shoes and give her a map to the sidewalk. RAY: You’re absolutely correct about short trips, Steve. W henever the engine is ru n ­ ning, it’s producing moisture. And when you drive only a

block and a h a lf— or a mile and a half, for that m atter — the engine doesn’t get hot enough to expel that moisture through the crankcase ventila­ tion system. A nd when the m oisture lingers like that, it leads to prem ature engine fail­ ure. A nd the same thing hap­ pens in the exhaust system. T O M : Assuming she’s not dis­ abled, walking to w ork is the answer. She’ll be healthier. She’ll lower her blood pressure, decrease her risk o f heart dis­ ease, feel better and maybe even get to know her neighbors if she walked. RAY: Plus, her car will be healthier, and she won’t need a new muffler every three m onths. T O M : A nd if she walks, you m ight not even need the new car. A nd maybe there’s some­ thing else you guys would like to do w ith that $300-$400 a m onth — after buying her an umbrella and some walking shoes. RAY: Seriously, Steve, you could swap cars w ith her every other day or every other week — that w ould help — but walking is the obyious answer here. Even two knucklehead car colum nists can see that.

may, 2 4 , 2000

Got a question about cars? Write to Click and Clack in care o f this newspaper, or e-mail them by visiting the Car Talk section o f cars.com on the World Wide Web.


lassifieds • 864.5684 B U Y TH IS S T U FF BEDROOM SET. 1940’s Waterfall. Wardrobe, vanity w/lg. mirror & seat, bed frame. $500. Cali 434-3410. DO YOU LOVE beautiful pat­ terns? We have oriental goods, carpets, kilims, pil­ lows, brass, wooden mosaic, fabric, lamps, all form Damascus. Call to come see, 877-3863.

RED MEAT

tarpaper in the tissue dispenser

I been tryin’ to save some money for a new TV, so recently I discovered a cheap way to eat for less than fifty-nine cents a day.'

There's this charity kitchen down the street that serves free m eals three tim es a day.

FUTON: Cherry sleigh. Fullsized sofa w/ thick, 8 ” matress. Brand new, in box, original cost $545. Must sell $265. 658-5031.

SLEIGH BED queen, Cherry wood, matress, box and frame. Never opened. Still in plastic. Cost. $995. Sacrifice, $495. Call 6583707.

WOLFF TANNING BEDS TAN AT HOME BUY DIRECT & SAVE! commerciauhome units FROM $199 LOW MONTHLY PAYMENTS FREE COLOR CATALOG CALL TODAY 1-800-711-0158

FR EE CAST IRON WOODSTOVE: CDR Response made in Flatrock, NC. Includes stovepipe & copper heatshield. Call the Winooski Valley Park District, 8635744.

ART

M USIC

M USIC

EXPERIENCED MODELS WANTED for figure drawing classes at the Firehouse gallery. Call 238-1949.

1997, GIBSON Les Paul Studio — black w/gold hard­ ware & block pearl inlays. Comes with gig bag. Great condition. $650. 524-0422.

DRUM FOR SALE. Latin per­ cussion Djembe. Like new, originally $525, asking $325. Jordan, 425-5436.

MALE MODELS WANTED for B/W photography project. You: 19-30, fit, good-looking. Willing to do nude and sign release. Paid. E-mail: bwphotoguy@aol.com. PRINTMAKING STUDIO OPENING. Interested? Burlington City Arts informa­ tional meeting, Thursday 6/ 8 , 5-6 p.m. Firehouse Center for the Visual Arts. 135 Church St. Info, 865-7165. PRIVATE PHOTOGRAPHY & dark room instruction. Combine theory and practice w/ basic technique. Hourly/ session rates. M. Thorsen, 865-9765. TOP MALE MODEL in VT. Incredibly built, tanned & ripped. To pose for artists. Pose & dance for women. Page, 749-1724.

AD ASTRA RECORDING. Got music? Relax. Record. Get the tracks. 20+ yrs. Exp. from stage to studio. Tenure Skyline Studios, NYC. 24track automated mixdown. lst-rate gear. Wide array of keyboards, drums, more. Ad Astra, building a reputation of sonic integrity. 872-8583. ANALOG/DIGITAL RECORD­ ING STUDIO. Dogs, Cats & Clocks Productions. Warm, friendly, prof, environment. Services for: singer/songwriters, jingles, bands. New digi­ tal mastering/recording. Call Robin, 658-1042. CALLIOPE MUSIC— Full repair service & restoration of all string instruments. Authorized warranty service: Fender, Guild, Martin, Taylor, Takamine. 20 yrs. exper. 202 Main St., Burl. 863-4613.

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SEVEN DAYS

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MOVING SALE: Charlotte, Mtn. Philo Rd., just south of the park. Sat., Sun., Mon., 10-5. Lots of great stuff. ORGANIC GARDENING Supplies avail, at Dirt Works. We have bagged fertilizers, liquid fertilizers, straw, com­ post, bark mulch, topsoil. www.dirtworks.net, 800-7693856. MC/VISA accepted. (9-5), Mon.-Sat.

fro m th e s e c re t file s o f

may 2 4 , 2000

EXCELLENT BASS PLAYER needed for popular working cover band, Empty Pockets. R&R, R&B. Weekend only, bookings through 2001 . 482-5230. GUITARS FOR SALE. Like new, blue Fender Strat Plus. New, $850. Martin Backpacker guitar, never used. Sell both w/cases $450. Call Scott, 860-6776, ext. 208. SEEKING KEYBOARDIST to play funky, jazzy, Latin grooves. Rhodes and B3 a plus. Call Raph, 862-0151.

M USIC IN STRUCTIO N BANJO: Learn old-time style pickin' and strummin’. Emphasis on rhythm, tech­ nique, musicality. $ 20/hr. Call Mara, 862-3581. GUITAR LESSONS for all ages (1-101). Have fun learning folk, funk, Jazz, Bossa Nova, Classical... $ 15/hr. Call Raph, 8620151.

LEG A LS CITY OF BURLINGTON TRAFFIC REGULATIONS The following traffic regula­ tions are hereby enacted by the Public Works Commission as amendments to Appendix C, Motor Vehicles, and the City of Burlington’s Code of ordinances: Sec. 7. No-Parking Areas. No person shall park any vehicle at any time in the fol­ lowing locations:

LEG A LS (495) On the south side of College Street 110 feet west of Church Street, except police vehicles. Adopted this 3rd day of May 2000 by the Board of Public Works Commissioners. Frederick Matthews Engineering Division Adopted 5/3/2000: Published 5-24-00; Effective 6-14-00. Materials in [Brackets] delete. Materials underlined add. CITY OF BURLINGTON TRAFFIC REGULATIONS The following items are enacted by the Public Works Commission as amendments to the City of Burlington’s Code of Ordinances, Appendix C, Traffic Regulations: Sec. 9. Fifteen Minute Parking.

(1) through (494) As Written

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(A) No person shall park any vehicles at any time, longer than fifteen minutes between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 10:00 p.m., Sundays and Holidays excepted in the fol­ lowing areas. (1) through (125) As Written (126) The parking spaces in front of No. 176, 188 and 206 Main Street.

Adopted 5/3/2000; Published 5-24-00; Effective 6-14-00.

AS TR O LO G Y

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ASTROLOGICAL CONSULT­ ING Specialize in esoteric astrology. Influenced by Bailey, Rudhyar, Hickey & Greene. 30 years experience. Peter, 223-0726.

TRANQUIL CONNECTION: Swedish massage, peaceful get-a-way. Unique gift. Helps w/pregancy, calming for brides. Nerves unravel. Stress gone. Private setting. Opt. spa for pre-session relax. 1.5 nrs./$75. $30 special every Mon. Cert, therapist. 2881093. 10 am-6 pm.

EXPERIENCE THE ULTIMATE massage! Treat yourself or a friend to the incredible relax­ ation & effectiveness of exquis­ ite Oriental massage w/ JinShin Acupressure. Assists in stress relief, injury recovery, renewed vitality. Fantastic gift! Gift certifs. avail. $5 discount w/ ad. Acupressure Massage of VT, J. Watkins, 425-4279. WILLIAM COIL: 658-2390. See display ad. LAURA LUCHINI: 865-1233. See display ad.

BERNICE KELMAN: 899-3542. See display ad.)

Adopted this 3rd day of May 2000 by the board of Public Works Commissioners. Frederick Matthews Engineering Division Adopted 5/3/2000; Published 5-24-00; Effective 6-14-00. Materials in [Brackets] delete. Materials underlined add. CITY OF BURLINGTON TRAFFIC REGULATIONS The following items are enacted by the Public Works Commission as amendments to the City of Burlington’s Code of Ordinances, Appendix C, Traffic Regulations: Sec. 7.A. Handicapped Space Designated. No person shall park any vehicles at any time in the following locations, except automobiles displaying spe­ cial handicapped license plates issued pursuant to 18 iV.S.A.1325, or any amend­ ment or renumbering thereof: (1) through (43) As Written (44) First 2 spaces of the [west] east side of St. Paul Street just north of Cherry Street (van [use only] acces­ sible). (45) through (132) As Written

Materials in [Brackets] delete. Materials underlined add. CITY OF BURLINGTON TRAFFIC REGULATIONS The following items are here­ by enacted as amendments to the City of Burlington Code of Ordinances, Appendix C, Motor Vehicles and Traffic, by the Burlington Public Works Commission. Sec. 27. No Parking Except with Resident Parking Permit. No person shall park any vehicle except vehicles with a valid resident parking per­ mit or a valid guest pass and clearly identifiable service or delivery vehicles on any street designated as “ RESI­ DENTIAL Parking.” (a) Streets designated for resi­ dential parking at all times include: (1) Through (31) As Written, (33) Deforest Road. (b) As Written (c) As Written (d) As Written (e) As Written Adopted this 3rd day of May 2000 by the Board of Public Works Commissioners.

G EN ER A L H EA LTH CHECK OUT www.healthysavings.awarebuy.com. The BEST health resource guide for every family! Plus dis­ count on ALL your health care products. PATHWAYS TO WELL BEING has room for a one day or half-time practitioner. Perferably acupunturist, nutrionist, Shiatsu massage or massage therapist. 8620836.

HERBS PURPLE SHUTTER HERBS: Burlington’s only full-service herb shop. We carry only the finest herbal products; many of them grown/produced in VT. Featuring over 400 bulk dried herbs/tinctures. 100 Main St., Burl. 865-HERB. Hours: Mon.-Sat., 10-6.

TREAT YOURSELF TO 75 mins, of relaxation. Deep therapeutic massage. $50/sess. Gift certificates. Located in downtown Burl. Flex, schedule. Aviva Silberman, 872-7069.

La Stone * Therapy j Introductory Offer: $75/5ession (usually $95)

Massage sessions also available Shiatsu L aura L iiciiini • 565-1233

R O LFIN G ROLFING ASSOCIATES: 865-4770. See display ad.

W EIG H TLO S S 29 PEOPLE WANTED TO lose up to 30 lbs. in 30 days. $$Guaranteed. 1-877822-8052.

TOUCHSTONE HEALING ARTS: 658-7715. See dis­ play ad.

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Frederick Matthews Engineering Division Adopted 5/3/2000; Published 5-24-00; Effective 6-14-00. Materials in [Brackets] delete. Materials underlined add.

Adopted this 3rd day of May 2000 by the board of Public Works Commissioners. Frederick Matthews Engineering Division

Straight

Dear Cecil, A subject perhaps worth extensive research: Why is it that poured Guinness Stout bubbles appear to float downward in the glass? — M anuel Martinez, Rancho Cordova, California Spending a lot o f time staring at beer glasses, are we, Manuel? But they say Crick and Watson, who discovered the structure o f D NA, found daily inspiration at the pubs, and IVe done some o f my best work there myself, though my breakthrough, instead o f the double helix, was

Dr. Heather L . Donovan P ro vid in g effective q u a lity care to achieve a n d m a in ta in h e a lth •

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to discover that Stroh’s spelled backwards is “shorts.” Now then. I’m not a big drinker of Guinness, which always seemed to me like something you’d pour on pan­ cakes. But this is the Straight Dope, goddammit. Since I didn’t care to be seen strolling into a gin mill at nine in the morning, I went down to the supermarket and bought myself a bottle of Guinness Stout. W ent home, got a genuine tapered pub-style beer glass given to me by my brother-in-laws English wife. (I recognize that Guinness is made in Dublin — but England, Ireland, it’s all the same, ain’t it?) Poured said stout into said glass. Intensively scoped the bubbles. Noticed that they floated up. Thought, cripes, this Manuel has gotta lay o ff the sauce. But just to be sure, I went on-line and searched for “Guinness Stout” and “bubbles” and “down.” Un-frigging-believable. N ot only do the bubbles float downward under certain conditions, but people have devoted, well, maybe not their lives, but a good two or three days to fig­ uring out why. And not in vain, either. But I’m getting ahead of my story. From my on-line reading I learned that the secret of Guinness’ creamy “mouthfeel,” as the taste experts some­ what indelicately put it, is a mix o f nitrogen and carbon dioxide rather than pure CC> 2 as the bubblizing ingredi­ ent. Nitrogen bubbles are much smaller than C O 2 bub­ bles, a mere 50 microns in diameter, and produce a nice, smooth head. But nitrogen doesn’t produce bubbles as spontaneously as C O 2 . At the corner tap they deal with this by using a special nozzle that aerates the stout with nitrogen as it’s poured. In packaged goods that’s not pos­ sible, so for a long time they were stuck with pure carbon dioxide. But science marches on. Using brain cells that might have cured cancer or solved the third-world debt crisis (but we’ve all got our priorities), a couple engineering types invented a little plastic device, known in brewing circles as a “widget,” that’s placed in each can o f Guinness Draught. (See patent info at www.ivo.se/guinness/patent.html.) When you pop the top and pour, the pres­ sure in the can drops to ambient, stout squirts out o f the

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widget, and nitrogen is liberated from solution and aer­ ates the exiting beverage. Result: nitrogen microbubbles galore, same as if M urphy the barkeep did the pouring. I hustled back to the supermarket, grabbed a fourpack of the tall black cans and gave them a shake. Something inside rattled — a good sign. Took ’em home, stuck ’em in the fridge for the prescribed three hours, then popped one and poured. This was accompanied by a satisfying whoosh and — I tell you, it’s a fascinating thing to watch — cascades of tiny bubbles, sliding down the inside o f the glass. All right, now for the part where I actually answer the question. Tiny or not, nitrogen bubbles ought to have more buoyancy than the surrounding liquid. W hy don’t they? I consulted Clive Fletcher, professor o f computa­ tional fluid dynamics at the University o f New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. Fletcher, a disciple o f the Crick and Watson school o f liquid research, was wondering one day why the bubbles went down. A chemist friend tried to explain the phenomenon in chemical terms (one of these “if all you’ve got is a hammer, everything looks like nails” kind o f guys). Bah, thought Fletcher. Using compu­ tational fluid-dynamics software from Fluent Inc., soft­ ware that essentially models the activity o f the bubbles in the glass, Fletcher found that what occurs is similar to convection — the bubbles rise in the center o f the glass, where you can’t see them because o f the stout’s opacity, then heel over and skitter down the sides, their buoyancy overcome by the viscous drag o f the roiling brew. (See illustration at www.fluent.com/news/pressrel/guinness/tsldOOl.htm.) Simplicity itself, really. To further extend the frontiers o f knowledge, Professor Fletcher says he’s thinking about trying to “per­ suade Moet & Chandon to fund some cross-industry research, with plenty o f field trials.” Sounds like a worthy goal to me. Naturally, professor, you’ll need a second test site north o f the equator, so as to control for the Coriolis effect. Let me know if I can be o f help.

— CECIL ADAMS

Is there something you need to get straight? Cecil Adams can deliver the Straight Dope on any topic. Write Cecil Adams at the Chicago Reader, 11 E. Illinois, Chicago, IL 60611, or e-mail him at cecil@chireader.com.

m ay 2 4 , 2000

SEVEN DAYS ,

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A R IE S

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Your oracle came to me as I waited for a flight at the San Francisco Airport. All morning I’d pondered what to tell you about your immi­ nent future. Despite promising inklings, I’d not yet found the key. Maybe it was because every time I edged towards a definitive vision, I suffered a sneezing fit; my allergies were on the warpath. Minutes before boarding my flight, my head aswim with prayers that I be given a sign, I went to the restroom to gather tissue for my poor nose. There I finally got my breakthrough. Scrawled on a changing table designed for fathers carrying babies, in the florid style of graffiti-writers everywhere, was a shocking message: Real men change diapers. I knew instantly what you Aries folks needed to hear most in order to succeed in the coming week: Be a forceful caretaker; nurture oth­ ers with aggressive aplomb; express profound sensitivity and receptivity with virile heartiness.

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): Dear Dr. Brezsny: I have somehow gotten myself into the absurd situa­ tion of having to decide between doing the right thing and doing the good thing. If I press hard for truth and justice, I’ll turn out looking like a rude boor. And if I opt instead for kindness and sympathy, I’ll appear to be an eager-to-please flake with wob­ bly principles. Why is having integri­ ty such a bitch? —Tormented Taurus. Dear Tormented: I suggest you lose the all-or-nothing shtick. Be willing to be half-right and half­ good. Then integrity might be a bitch, but at least it’ll be a sexy bitch.

G E M IN I

(May 21-June 20): I predict you’ll have a very symbiotic relationship with the planet Mars for the next few weeks. During this time you should be able to tap into its

ACROSS 51 Baltimore 1 Messina or bird Morrison 53 Maestro 4 Address Leinsdorf abbr. 56 Slippery 7 Pass into character? law 57 Source of ills 12 Pillager 59 Like King’s 18 Vein fans contents 61 “Ritorna 19 Historic org. vincitor!” 20 Mideastern singer mall? 63 Mr. Mineo 22 Herbivorous 64 Military reptile chapeau 23 Stocking 65 Uruguayan shade title 24 Indefinite 66 Adjusts an pronoun alarm 25 Benjamin 68 Undiluted Bunny’s 71 Provide creator rooms 27 Theologian 72 Software Thomas 77 Duval’s org. 29 Director 80 Mailer’s .“The Sergio — Park” 30 Lumberjack 81 Stick in the mud tools 31 Rocker 82 Daze Ocasek 86 Marineland 32 “God’s Little performer — " (’58 film) 88 “T h e — Daba 35 Wordless Honeymoon” preetina (’14 song) gr M i 38 Musical 90 Court order? medium 92 Compensa­ 43 Dolls up tion 47 “Whether — 93 Genesis nobler in the peak m in d ..." 97 After taxes 48 Groom’s 99 Ravi-shing gangplank? instrument? 49 He'll give 100 Scott role you a 101 Mil. base squeeze 102 Slanted

page 48

Story, the cosmos would like you to summon unprecedented reserves of courage and resourcefulness.

----uncanny strength as you work on the following projects: 1) learning new secrets about how to fight for what’s yours; 2) making your ambitions more beautiful and ingenious; 3) souping up engines, especially the biological engine that provides your physical and psychic energy; 4) gain­ ing access to huge supplies of will power.

CAN CER

(June 21-July 22): Studies show it’s normal for healthy people to be depressed 6.9 percent of the time. Guess which 6.9 percent of your life cycle you’re likely to be flirt­ ing with in the next couple weeks, Cancerian? As long as you’ve got to hang out here, you might as well milk it for all it’s worth. For starters, don’t even think about hiding your feelings. Try to cry at least twice a day, preferably in front of people who’ll thereby be shocked into giving you anything you want. Sing melan­ choly songs with your car window open, hoping to catch the attention of a bandleader who’s looking for a back-up singer. And always slump as you walk, being sure to drag your ass in such a way as to attract sympa­ thetic stares.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): Astrology serves me well, but I sometimes aug­ ment it with a modern form of div­ ination called videomancy. I formu­ late the question I want the spirits to answer, approach my TV with rever­ ence and flick on the power. The first human speech that pours from the box is my oracle. Here’s what I got for you, Leo, courtesy of the show “Friends.” Question: What should be Leo’s highest goal right now? Oracle (delivered by Chandler): It’d be nice to leave an ass-print on

104 Expert 105 Doesn't have to 107 Myron Floren’s boss 111 Stroke’s implement 112 Seldom seen 113 Joan Van — 114 Blind part 118 Emit 122 Spock’s specialty 126 “Roseanne" actress 131 Pablum variety 132 Conduit fitting 133 Stang or Schwarz­ enegger 134 Author Collins 135 Buckingham (Abbr.) 136 Spider’s snare 137 Tangled 138 Gravel­ voiced 139* Ending for

Capri

140 Boot Boo part DOWN 1 Spanish dance 2 TigrisEuphrates • land 3 Computer

selection list 4 Classical hunk?

5 Cure-all 46 Stowe sight 6 Very, in 47 Hardy Versailles heroine 7 Subside 50 Hersey 8 Rob Roy’s setting refusal 52 Way out 9 Showy shrub 54 Gator's 10 Blanchett of cousin “Elizabeth" 55 “Salome" 11 Starch role source 57 Hale or 12 Bigwig Revere 13 Give it — 58 First name in fashion (try) 14 '87 Streisand 60 Knight's film better half? 15 Base stuff? 62 Believe 16 “— Leaf" 67 Nimble (’71 film) 69 Part of MA 17 Ulrich of 70 Gogol’s “— Metallica Bulba” 21 — Tin Tin 73 Compote 26 Lucy component Lawless role 74 Metropolitan 28 April initials 75 End a space 32 Perplexed flight 33 Ma, for one 76 French 34 Hwy. Sudan, 36 Smell today 37 “David 77 Ostentation Copperfield" 78 React to a character pun 38 She brought 79 Intense out the beast 83 South in men African 39 Oriental province 40 Equal an 84 Pottery opponent defect 41 Cops’ org. 85 Thornfield 42 Forever, so governess - to speak 87 Poker 44 Jeopardize stake 45 Dynamite 89 Inland sea philan­ 91 Notre thropist? Dame's river

may 2 4 , 2000

Mt. Everest. Question: What should Leo’s mantra be? Oracle (from Ross): I need juice! People need juice! Question: Any caveats? Is there any­ thing Leos should beware of? Oracle (from Joey): You can’t go to a muse­ um in your underwear.

V IR G O

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): It’s not a good week to get your lover’s name tattooed on your body. Maybe by mid-June, but not yet. On the other hand, it would be a favorable moment to see if your lovers are will­ ing to get your name tattooed on their bodies. In the same vein, it would be a ripe moment to find out which friends would crawl across broken glass for you, which cowork­ ers would betray you for $5, and which authority figures would rather give you exactly what you want than watch you walk out of their lives. Be sly about how you test ’em all. But test ’em.

LIB R A

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Escape the claustrophobic mazes, Libra, and race towards the wild spaces. Okay? Finish up with the strange subterranean magic and con­ jure up some affable wizardry in more expansive settings. Okay? I assure you that you have paid your dues to the game of Now-You-See-ItNow-You-Don’t; the film noir quality of your life needs to evolve into the mood of a bright, inviting pilgrim­ age. You’re more than ready to come out and frolic on a spiritual play­ ground. One caution: To avoid being spanked by trick endings, make sure all the doors are closed before you begin celebrating.

S C O R P IO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In 19th-century France, a

94 Fuss 95 Moffo or Magnani 96 Fit — fiddle 98 RN’s specialty. 102 Coach Parseghian 103 4 p.m. vehicle? 106 In good shape 108 Inflicts 109 Twist and turn 110 Scrape by, with “o u f 114 Act like a wrestler 115 — Flynn Boyle 116 Em or Bee 117 Jogger’s gait 119 Emulate Betsy Ross 120 Recipe instruction 121 West Coqst sch. 122 London district 123 Salamander 124 T h e People’s Choice” pooch 125 Czech river 127 — de France 128 Hall of Famer Roush 129 Mouth piece? 130 Enchanted

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defrocked Catholic priest named Abbe Boullan came up with a fasci­ nating approach to spirituality. The path to salvation, he taught, was greatly expedited by having sexual congress with archangels and other celestial beings. I haven’t been able to ascertain his exact birth date, but how could he not have been a Scorpio? Your tribe is famous for your certainty that Eros should be at the heart of your relationship with the divine. By the way, the coming weeks will give you abundant oppor­ tunities for proving this belief. It’ll be prime time for you to unleash wor­ shipful devotions to the higher forms of pleasure.

S A G IT T A R IU S (Nov 22-Dec. 21): Make Goldilocks your role model this week, Sagittarius. Remember how she rejected both the options that were too puny and too excessive? Like her, you should decide that a moderate share is the exactly correct amount. I bring this up because I feel it would be under­ standable if, after your recent period of deprivation, you grabbed for way too much gusto. It would be under­ standable, but it would be a mistake. Just enough is just right.

P IS C E S

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): It would be a good week to rent a cat costume and take a vacation from being human. Therefore, Pisces, I urge you to laze around in the sun. Sniff catnip, chase birds, gobble lots of delectable fish, and find an extremely patient saint who’ll pet and stroke you whenever you want and leave you the hell alone whenev­ er you want. Other than that, though, please try to accomplish as little as possible. Ready to begin your grand experiment? Get down on all fours and do a big feline stretch. Next, hiss loudly in the direction of any person that expects you to be endlessly productive. ®

C A P R IC O R N

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You can call Rob Brezsny, day or night for your

expanded weekly horoscope 1 - 900- 903-250 0 $1.39 per minute. IS and otter. Touchtone phone. C /S

G12 /3 7 3 -9 7 8 5

And don’t forget to check out Rob’s Web site at tuvrvr.freetulllastrology.com Updated Tuesday night.

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(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Due to a rare cosmic loophole that impacts your inner teenager, you have become eligible to lose your vir­ ginity again — possibly in the back seat of a car, but more likely in a well-furnished shrine or holy lap of luxury. In fact, Aquarius, this re­ deflowering may not exactly be sexu­ al at all. It might, instead, involve your initiation into the secrets of how and why to be more like a lover everywhere in your life, not just in typically romantic settings.

(Dec. 22Jan. 19): I urge you to mull over what strategies you’ve used to beat your fears in the past. Review as well the role models who have inspired you to be braver than you thought possible. In the weeks ahead, you’ll need all the extra help you can get as you face spooky invitations and mys­ terious challenges. It’s not that they’ll be any stronger or wilder than dilemmas you’ve dealt with before. It’s just that at this point in your life

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A Q U A R IU S

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CAT-LIKE SKILLS: NIBBLING, POUNCING & moist kisses. 35YO, SWF w/short black hair, big hazel eyes and zaftig body reminiscent of Davinci’s women. Call me to arrange a viewing. 2708______________________________ ARE YOU OUT THERE? SWPF, 24, NEW TO VT easy going, friendly, loves all sports— tennis, skiing, nature. Been searching for Mr. Right but have only found Mr. Wrong. LTR. 2711

BURL NUDIST M, 50, ISO FRIEND TO ENJOY : the sun, being outdoors, camp, swim, hike. : Open-minded and adventurous. Let’s enjoy a I Vermont summer as nature intented. 2924 ’ ; ; :

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2946__________________________ EMOTIONAL COMFORT. SWM, 37, YOUNGlooking, good build. ISO slender F, 25-40, who is ISO kindness, sensitivity, passion & trust from a really nice guy with many interests. Call me. 2923_________________________ DWM 53 INDEPENDENT, STUDIOUS, NS, NA, ND, kindly, recovering from debilitating ill­ ness (no STD) ISO F, 40-53, compassionate, intelligent conversationalist with no hangups, who enjoys quiet intimate rural life. 2946

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SM, 44, 6’, SLIM, ARTIST, ORANGE CO. (VT). Interests: music, organic gardening, nature, hiking, heading south for the winter. ISO SF, 34-45, fit, earthy, independent. 2783________

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SAILING COMPANION (NS) ON LAKE CHAMPLAIN & Maine coast. Sailing experience is not a requirement but love of the water, good physical condition & sense of humor a l definite plus. 2707_________________________ ! INTERNATIONAL M MODEL ISO 25-45YO F l for mutual pleasure. Real & only real people l need respond. Respect & discretion a must. I 2816_______________________________________

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SPANISH PF VISITING FROM MIAMI ISO P interesting M w/sense of humor to spend some time w/in VT, Friendship basis. 2802

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SEARCHING FOR A SOULMATE. MID 40’S, DWPF attractive, personable. Enjoys biking, sailing, travel, dining out. ISO an emotional, secure M for companionship & possible LTR. 2921______________________________________

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HAILING FREQUENCIES OPEN: DWF, 38, loves kids, cats, computers, sci-fi, Patriots. Looking for a dinner/movie companion who is honest, caring, intelligent. LTR possible. 2417

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HUNCHBACK LEPER ISO LITTLE PRINCESS. . Must be pure as (VT) snow, able to climb long bell tower stairs, willing to do own ser­ vant duties. Ability to spin gold a plus. 2929

» » * »

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‘ t * ’

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* * * * I

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: * » ’

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5’io ”, BROWN, GREEN, 150 LBS., good-looking. I tove mtn. biking, & sunsets over the lake. ISO LTR good-looking SWF, 20-25. 2798

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I l l t l

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SYMPATHIQUE, INTELLIGENT, BEAU ET amusant. J’aime bien la vie culture, la nature, voyager. Je cherche quelqu’on pour conversation, amitie et peut-etre meme plus. Environ 35-45. Ecris-moi. 2793______________________

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almost. Young 50. 5’io ”, 170 lbs., NS, sense of humor, Harrison Ford likeness. Fit, intelligent, different. A nice guy. Waterfront, Barnes & Noble, Rollerblading, dancing, dining, picnics, VSO concerts. 2790___________________

SUMMER FUN! DWM, 40S, s Y , 150 LBS., youthful, engaging, open-minded, appealing. Likes outdoor activities, Burlington night life, laughing, movies, sunsets, travel, photography, crop circles. ISO lover to share fun l times with. 2789___________________________ : » * 1 »

* J * *

HIGH MARKS FOR INTEGRITY & HUMOR. SPM, 50, financially secure, enjoys friends, sports & working out. ISO partner, 34-50, in shape, attractive & humorous. 2787

Dear Lola, I recently moved to Vermont from a major metropolitan area that has an excellent, and very well-used, public transportation system. I used to ride to and from work at rush hour and enjoy the experience of being p a n of that jiggling hum an crush. In tact, the subway provid­ ed my only opportunity tor consistent hum an contact. Now that I’m liv­ ing in the country and commuting to work alone in my ca r every day, my lite feels sadly empty. How can I replace what I’ve lost? Untouched in Underhill : Dear Untouched, I’m sorry you’re feeling unfulfilled, and I empathize with your need for hum an contactj However, your pailicular approach is not one I would pursue. What you do with yourself, or with another consenting adult, is one thing. But your hobby involves the involuntary and nc doubt unw anted p a rtic i­ p ation of strangers. In other words, it’s exploitative and violat­ ing. Get thee to a coun­ selor, friend, and learn to move beyond simply being part of the crowd and form actual, interpersen relationships. Love,

J

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M

la

Or respond t h e o ld -fa sh ion ed w ay: CALL THE

900

N UM BER.

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SEVEN DAYS

page 49


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m i x&kitiq uxrm i, a m i SINCERE SAGITTARIAN SEEKS MAGICAL : Gemini minx for infinite fun, friendship & t frolic in the furrows. 2709___________________ l COME ACROSS, GROW THE FEELING, AFFECT, ; touch — curious, frank, keen, open for dif- • ferences. !, European (33, 6’3”, 190 lbs.) * blond but intelligent, blue eyes, educated, j athletic, handsome, funny, new in VT, very * successful in my job, but you are missing. * 2Z22________________________________________: FRIENDLY, CARING MID-AGE M, 5’f , 165 lbs. \ ISO kind, warm women. I like hiking, draw- » ing, photography, reading, writing, yard » sales, poetry, long talks, folk-jazz, teaching « and woodworking, NS. 2705_________________ »

32, 5’, SWF ISO 135-148 LBS., 5’ SWF, 34-36 brunette w/ shoulder length hair or longer. 2696______________________________________ ORANGE/BLUE, 20, AQUARIAN GIRL CRAVING an artistic and eccentric F, 20-25, to help drag me from my closet. 2670______________

FOUR YOUNG SWM CULINARY STUDENTS ISO fit, young, attractive F(s) to experiment, ful­ fill fantasies. Clean and discreet. Send letter and photo. 2523 *_________________________

BIWF, STUDENT, 21: DREADS, BOOTS, BICY­ CLE. ISO Bi or GF w/humor, empathy, backass logic. No prissy girly-girls! I’m anti-car, pro-Merlot, neo-Luddite! Don’t spend the summer twilight alone. 2471________________

QUIET, SENSITIVE, NURTURING SM, 36, physician. Novice backpacker ISO younger SF w/similar qualities for weekend Long Trail trips & misc. camping trips around VT. 2522

37YO WF, 5’io ”, 120 LBS., ISO UNATTACHED, hot, bi/curious F, 20-40, for pampering/play. I crave attention while boyfriend is away. 3way play when he’s not. Discretion assured. 2399_________________________________

BUTTERFLY’S SPIRIT WITHIN. CAN YOU grow without being able to see a butterfly’s spirit? Soft life, 4oish, tall, slender, secure, under­ standing, honest, health mind and body, no games ISO same. 2518_____________________

SWM, TALL HEALTHY, EDUCATED, 44, 6’2”, 175 lbs., ISO tall, attractive, adventurous, PF who enjoys intelligent, eclectic conversation and sharing good times. NS, 31-44. 2649

SWM, LTR. I pond. Right.

THE GREAT ONE LOOKING FOR QUEEN. You: 18-21. Smart, great smile, loves to watch wrestling, someone that likes to go out on the town. 2464__________________________

l

2784______________________________ l

*

J *

*

SUBMISSIVE M, 38, WANTS TO SERVE! J Enjoys eating out & more. 2704____________ ♦

physically. I enjoy motorbikes, watersports, inspirational acts and have a passion for life. ISO 19-29, ND, NA, NS P who is ready for a real honest gentleman. 2659__________

* BEAUTIFUL BUT BUSY. 28, ISO FUN, OUT* going, attractive, fit doll that still knows how » to paint the town red. I am a professional j that doesn’t have time for games. I love HONESTY & PASSION, QUALITIES I POSSESS. jj music, skiing, hiking and good food. And ________________ ! My personality & physical prowess, a cut * fishing. 2448

* * music, movies, dining, going for walks. 2644 “ * GWM, 27, BROWN HAIR, EYES, 5*9”, 140 lbs., swimmers build, enjoy outdoors, travel­ * ing, clubs, cooking. I am tired of the mind * games, & 1-night stands. I am easy going & * love to show my “other” side to the special * someone. I also love spoiling my partner w/massages. 2643________________________ J » GWM, 45, 5’9”, 160 LBS., P, STABLE, INDE* pendent. Enjoys movies, music, outdoors, J traveling & more. ISO potential LTR w/ ■ romantic soulmate, 25-45. Someone to share « life with. 2512____________________________ *

29YO, GWM, 5’10”, 175 LBS., BR/BL, ISO M w/dark complexion, hair & eyes, 20-25. Likes dancing, quiet times & the many things you can do outdoors. 2710____________________

» » I’VE BEEN LOOKING FOR LOVE IN ALL THE I wrong places. I’m 37, 5’9”, 175 lbs., ISO

ME: ABOUT TO TURN 40 THIS SPRING. STOP March Madness. ISO good company besides. Break the Silence because “good romance” is the best truth & dare of all! 2642________

: Vermont. 2419___________________________ I S8lM BUDDIES WANTED! GWM, 35, 6’, 180,

» guy(s), under 40, for fun times. Let’s rock

; ; ;

Air Force Fireman. Was married to a F (5 years), then commited to another dude for 7 years. I’m 5’io ”, 175 lbs., short brown crewcut, hazel eyes, ,’stache & goatee. Please be masc. & into LTR. Prefer dudes under 35. 2667_______________________________________

! 45, to use, punish and humiliate me. 2324 » ME SLAVE? YOU MASTER? GIVE A CALL, SIR. * 2323 * * * * *

SPIRITUAL, SMART, SEXY, 40 ISO FRIENDSHIP & partnership. Loves: gardening, animats, basking in the sun, quiet times, dancing, singing, drumming and making magick! Interested? Intrigued? Say hello! 2657_______

J * » * *

BIWM, 5’10*, 185 LBS., RED HAIR, AVERAGE looks & build. ISO D&D free M, 18-46, for discreet good times in Burlington & Rutland at my place. 2652____________________ MASCULINE M, 5’8", 165 LBS., UNCUT, 40S, brown hair, trimmed beard, hairy chest wants guys for country rides, a few beers, woods, phone fun, watching videos together. Call me. 2645

page 5 0 ;

SEVEN DAYS

eO M lPH @ BeUATLANTic.neT

may 2 4 , 2000

SWM, 41, 5’9”, 178 lbs., avg. looks, good heart/personality. Lonely, sexually frustrated. ISO slender F, bi/straight younger than 40, who is selfless, cool, understanding. 2939 ISO TV WHO CAN ASSIST ME IN FUTHERING

my fern side. Any assistance will be greatly appreciated. I want to enhance my technique to look like a woman. 2944_______________ THE WOMEN OF COLOR ALLIANCE PLANS A

weekly support group for all lesbians sensitive to women of color issues. 2698________ FOUND ON PEARL ST. IN BURL. ON 5/3:

green velvet bag with stones, crystals & an amber bracelet. Want it back? 2715________

I LONELY, MaPWM 30, HANDSOME 8. IN good shape. Sexually unsatisfied but still in love. I Would like to dip toes in new water. ISO I MaF who feels the same. Very discreet, catl « or letter. 2647_______________________

*

EXHIBITIONIST? FLASHER? THRILL-SEEKER?

Photo bug? Proud of your body? Sound like you? Amateur camera bug wants to practice skills. Can pose dothed/nude and identity

* can remain anonymous. 2668_______________ l

WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE TRAINED? DOMM

* ISO submissive F. You may expect honesty, * trust and respect. Please call to discuss your l needs. I will keep your confidences. 2664__

: SWM, 40, ISO F TO WATCHADULT MOVIES COULD YOU BE THE “GIRL NEXT DOOR". Contact me for more details. Don’t delay, deadlines are fast approaching. Must be shot in June to meet post date. 2950_______

* with. Age & race unimportant. Loneliness & « discretion a must. 2514____________________ 1

I WANT SILENT SEX. I WANT TO SCRIBBLE/

i : 40ISH WM, HANDY W/TOOLS ISO 30ISH, WF t « (tall preferred). Objective: donuts & light car- l l pentry (plumbing optional). 2953___________ t

* WHERE HAVE ALL THE ANGST KIDS GONE? * There must be a goth scene somewhere in l VT. Where do you hang out/get your gear? » Let’s just say I’m morbidly curious. 2951 * ISO FUN-SEEKING M OR F TO ASSIST MaCU * w/new adventures. Discretion a must. ND, disease-free & no attitudes wanted. 2954

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and a $25 gift certificate to

* STRIP ME OF MY INHIBITIONS BASHFUL

l handsome, rugged type ISO dominant M, 25- * * * HEY DUDES, 35, GWM, MASC ISO SAME. ExI

solvent, literate. Warm, understanding, able J SUGAR MAMA WANTED. TALL, BEAUTIFUL to listen. 67, 5*9”, 170 lbs. Not needy, fat, l SM, 24, ISO ofder, kinky F for erotic ren­ bald, conservative, spiritual or New Age. LTR. * dezvous. Must be wiling to experiment in weii? 2665_________ : the strange and unknown. Discretion needed I AM IN EXCELLENT SHAPE MENTALLY & • and assured. Married OK. 2450_____________

SWPM, 45, ATTRACTIVE, INTELLIGENT, athlet- * k ISO SF w/similar qualities for long walks ; on the links at sunset. 2651 * GWF, 19, SHAVED BLONDE/BLUE/ATHLETIC Come to me like wine comes to this mouth. Grown tired of water all the time. Quench my heart, quench my mind. 2805

used • doseout • new 191 Bank S t, Burlington 860-0190

Dog Team Rd., Middlebury 388-7651

41, INTERESTED IN MEETING A M FOR \ I'M 23, S 81 VERY LONELY. ISO GWM, 21-30, own my own country home w/ river & I to hold, cuddle, love, etc. I am very affec­ Would like to share it & myself w/ Mr. * tionate and passionate. ISO LTR. Enjoy

HUNTING FOR BEAR. TIME TO COME OUT OF hibernation. Young 50s, Daddy ISO mature bears for fun & companionship in Central VT. I am ND, ND, NA & healthy. 2794__________

SWPM, 24, HANDSOME & HUMOROUS. Loves * appropriate, deconstructionist, classical, car­ the outdoors, fishing, canoeing and nival artist. DWM, 48, 6’, 175 lbs. Positive, hiking.lSO beautiful, spontaneous, lady to l handsome, hip, open-minded, erudite, spon­ share VT with. 2666 * taneous, procrastinating, stimulating, cos­ GENTLEMAN, SCHOLAR, ALIEN. Well-educat- : mopolitan hick. ISO interesting F for possied, -mannered, -traveled. Vigorous, healthy, ’ ble nuclear fusion experiments. 2458________

AQfrfdnq womm

• T h e O u td o o r G e a r E x c h a n g : •

THE DOG TEAMTAVERN

GWM, 36, 6’i ”, 260 LBS., HAIRY ISO GWM, l 18-24, for clubbing, dining out & having fun. II I’m fairly new to VT. My goal is LTR. Under J 175 lbs, is a plus. 2815___________________ *

J

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Hiker’s Guide to VT from

DELIVERY DRIVERS WANTED! PSM, 43, ISO delivery drivers, 28-40, for some personal package delivery fun! Something about a man in a uniform! Marital status unimportant. NS/ND. 2948________________________ *

DWPM, FIT, ATTRACTIVE DAD, 48, 6’, LOVES music, dancing, blading, outdoor activities, * working out. Emotionally available, willing to * take risks. ISO happiness & an LTR w/ someSWPM TO SPOIL YOU1 MATURE & RELIABLE, • one special. 2460________________________ yet funny & humorous. Very active and fit. * HANDSOME, 6’4”, 220, BRAND NEW TO Enjoy cooking & dining out. Love to hike, * Burlington. Just turned 27 & didn’t have a swim & dance to rock music. ISO active, fit j strong, intelligent woman to give him a F, 35-45 to share these things & your likes, « spanking. Can you help? 2459______________ too. Fine wine & flowers await you. 2673 * NUCLEAR PHYSICIST, ANTHROPOLOGICALLY

30, who believes “bedroom toys” includes handcuffs and doesn’t mind lying about her slightly red wrists, for fun LTR. 2650

2 9 2 9

TIRED OF STEREOTYPES?! GWM, 35, 6’, 180 lbs. Handsome, straight-acting, work-out nut, off-beat sense of humor, wide range of inter­ ests ISO like-minded adventurers, 25-40, for possibilities? 2925_________________________

DWM, 32, OPEN-MINDED VIRGO W/STYLE & grace. Two children. Dancing, light-hearted, good conversation, honest & professionally secure. ISO SF, 25-? for friendship & possibly more. 2469________________________________

above the rest. Where are you, the elusive « CONSCIENTIOUS DAD W/ TODDLER PARTone I search for? Only 30 words allowed, call » TIME ISO S Mom for ffiendship/companionto learn much more. 2653___________________ * ship. PM, early 40s,5’7”, 159lbs., fit,eduSWM, STUDENT, ACTIVE & HEALTHY. ISO l cated, idealistic, active.Letterswelcome. motivated, healthy, intellectual, perfect F, 20- l 2406

ISO OF LITTLE PRINCESS. MUST BE PURE AS (VER­ MONT) SNOW, ABLE TO CLIMB TALL BELL TOWER STAIRS, WILLING TO DO OWN SERVANT DUTIES. ABIL­ ITY TO SPIN GOLD A PLUS.

msn Mokinq msn

tude on life. Open to change, enjoy, yatch* DWM, CATHOLIC K OF C W/ CHURCH ANNULing, travel. Letters appreciated. Response * ment. 53, ISO Catholic lady, 41-53, with guaranteed. 2701____________________________* same status or S to share good times & VT’s WARRIOR POET. SWM, 35, 220 LBS. FORMER * spring at my Battery Park home. LTR is my athlete & model. Sensitive & caring on « objective. 2507____________________________ Tuesdays. Good listener on Thursdays. ISO F » who revels in exploiting her feminine wiles. * 2622________________________________________: SWPM, 29, CYCLIST/OUTDOOR DISCIPLE, l poet, yoga amateur, committed to health, « learning, simple living. ISO intelligent, sensi- * tive, SWF, 24-32, for sharing mountain air, l slow food, good movies, wonder. Letters * welcome. 2677______________________________ l

HUNCHBACK LEPER

Bi-CURIOUS F, 21, ATTRACTIVE, 5 V , 130. ISO fun, uninhibited, attractive bi-sexual F, 20-23, for frivolous, titillating escapade(s). Very open-minded. Please call. 2270

ONE OF A KIND. DWM, NS, 46, 5’io ”, 195 lbs. Biking, hiking, concerts, museums, etc. SWPM, SOON TO BE MOVING TO BURL 26, l ISO attractive, healthy, sexy, honest, sincere 6’2”, athletic & stable ISO athletic, adventur- * female to share quality time with and possious F, 21-30, who will show me the area and l bly more? 2509______ ______________________ possible LTR. 2700____________________ I SWPM, RUTLAND AREA. 31, ENJOY OUTDOOR GUARANTEED, AUTHENTIC NICE GUY. GOOD- • activities, movies, dining out or in. ISO SF, looking, 50s, outgoing, athletic, positive. * 25-38, NS, ND, for stimulating conversation, Hoping to meet modern lady, outgoing atti- * fun, romance and possible LTR. 2506_______

Personal of the Week receives a gift certificate for a FREE Day

dribble all over your luscious body. Our massive nymphocranium reveals unholy scatological carnality. Submissive vestal virgin boytoy ISO large possessor. Help yourself! * 2521_________ ,______________

* HAPPILY ENGAGED COUPLE ISO BiF TO l assist in making 2 fantasies come true. She * very bi-curious, wants to experience being

l w/F. His fantasy? To watch. 2520____________

* PWM ISO F ISO EROTIC FUN. AGE/APPEAR» ANCE not as important as desire to explore « erotic possibilities. 2519

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I SPY SEXY MOMMA FROM SUDBURY, MA. We met at Five Spice and I think I am in love. Let’s get together for a spicy evening.

J * * ’

KIDS DAY, CHILD WATCH. ID TENT W/OUR daughters. You: blonde, black jeans, next to me in line. Pony rides. Me: Black hair, white jacket. Wishing we met. Please try. 2931

J THURSDAY, s ’l i ”, HIGHER GROUND. YOU * had on a black leather coat & wanted to l talk to me...but didn’t/couldn’t .J wanted * you to take me home. Let’s get together * sometime. 2819___________________________

2940__________________________

LIVE YOUR BISEXUALITY HONESTLY & JOY­ OUSLY. Social/discussion gathering of bisex­ ual M & F. One Saturday evening every month in Burlington. Contact us for details.

2517___________________________ SWM, 18, ISO SEXY. HORNY F TO HAVE HOT encounters with. 2466______________________ I TRAVEL THE USA. I’M AN ATTRACTIVE F. I have fantasies about tying and teasing M or F I also have a nurse fantasy. Discretion a must. Not into pain. Love spike heels. 2409 WANNA COME AND PLAY? TWO SWF ISO Viagra-like M, tall, dark, built, 21-30, who enjoys physical and hands-on activities. Got a friend? Bring him along, too! 2407________ SBPM, 30, ISO THRILLING, STIMULATING, educational experience w/ an older F, 50+. I am an energetic, clean, discreet M. Call & fulfill my fantasy. Race unimportant. 2415

I SPY THE NEXT PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED States. I’m so glad we’re friends! Let’s show this country we mean poetry — Dept, of Rhythm. (Now go check your horoscope!) 2922

we’re open 24 hours a day! KEN, YOU WROTE TO BOX 724, BUT YOU didn’t include your phone number. Please, please, please write again, so we can ca'1. you! 2800_________________________________

$i.99/minute. must be 18+.

LETS JUST GO, SUZETTE. THE MOZART festi­ val tickets have arrived.-! could not bear to ; make that scene without you. Your love slave, Rudi. 2795__________________________ BRIGHT BLUE MG. SMALLER, OLDER M W/ graying hair and dark glasses. We talked at ; Chez Diane’s. Please call— Hortensia! 2702

WILL YOU STILL BE SENDING ME A valen­ tine? (yes) Birthday greetings? (yes) Bottle of » 5/8. JUST LIKE TO THANK DEVON, BRANDON wine? (yes) If I stay out till quarter of three, * & David for being so kind to me while will you lock the door? 2952_______________ l stranded in Burl. & giving me a place to l crash. You all are great. 2811_______________ RED SQUARE 5/12. YOU: SITTING INSIDE W/ I PAULA, SOME LOVE IS FIRE: SOME LOVE IS 3 girlfriends. Me: Holding up wall, grooving l rust, but the fiercest love is lust. Your eyes/ to “Respect yourself.” Your eyes are divine. * heart (?) are on another, but I want you to Can this neophyte Shaman toss bones into the sand w/ a high Priestess? 2957_________ l be my Asian Goddess. 2813________________ SHAKESPEARE’S SISTER? EVER SINCE PENNY Cluse I have been amazed by your mind & your beauty. Perhaps now I can show you just how much? “Never doubt I love." 2935

: 5/8, AT WEIRD AL CONCERT. YOU: EEYORE * tat on ankle. Me: Normally shy, w/orange * autographed shirt. Would like to meet you l again & learn more. Would you? 2810_______

YOU: HUNKY, BLEACHED-BLONDE WORKING at the Olive Garden. Me: Girl of your dreams, baby! You saw me. 2933___________

; RAINY, 5/10, AT UG. HANDSOME BLONDE. * Our eyes kept meeting. You took your refill » to go, but I stayed to meet friends. Let’s » meet. 2808________________________________

I KNOW YOU LOVE CHICKEN CAESARS & * YOU: WOUNDED LEG. ME: WOUNDED HEART. hate your job. I want to know more, my I You are leaving & I will miss you. Don’t forhandsome Halogen. Care to talk w/out a » get, you will always be in my heart. I love counter between us? 2932__________________ t you. 2804_________________________________ MONDAY, 5/15. CHURCH ST. YOU: CUTE ‘ MONDAY, 5/8, BEANIEMAN CONCERT. HVAC guy, (Bruce?), crawling around in our ’ Heather, 20th Birthday in July, with friends ceiling. Me: dark hair, glasses, tongue-tied. l Melissa & her sister. You: very sexy, black Check my thermostat? Call for coffee or * tank top, brown hair. We did great dancing. drinks, if you’re single. 2956 * 2801

I SPY YOU W/ MY KNOTS. EVERYWHERE. >Walking your dog on Church St. Working • across the hall. Shoveling snow. Downtown ■ at Nectar’s. You know who you are. 2716 ! YOU: STONEMASON AT WEST H B81B. ME: slim, helping hand for gardener. The sun : rose when I looked into your eyes. You are ; the perfect M for me. Leave a note on my : car. 2714__________________________________ ; FIRST SAW YOU (COP) TESTIFYING IN court. : Then, every Tuesday at RiRa’s. I want to get ; to know you. Call if you are S or just want ; to hang out. 2712

B R O W S * THE

PERSONALS O N -LIN E S£|/EtfDAYSPT.COM

• To respond to Letters Only ads: Seal your response in an envelope, write box # on the outside and place in another envelope with $5 for each response. Address to: PERSON TO PERSON c/o SEVEN DAYS, P.O. Box 1164, Burlington, VT 05402

AM I ASKING TOO MUCH? ALL I WANT IS A good-looking M escort for summertime events in Burlington. Me? Blonde, blue, early 40s (look younger), tall, fit. Let’s have fun! Make new friends! Box 733_________________ OPEN YOUR HEART 81 YOU WILL FIND ME. IF you’re looking for true love, you found me. 50, DWF, LTR w/DWM, 42-52. Who knows what true love is. Box 734__________________

woman Aaaldnq man EPICURE LOVES BOOKS, BACH-BRUBECK, tightness, trees, adventure, friends, spon­ taneity, hiking, liberal morality, smiles, opti­ mism, humility. Indefatigable F ISO M, 48+, to compare lists, begin again. Drop a line. Box 751__________________________________ NO MORE BAD BOYS - WISER WOMAN ISO grown-up M, 55+, w/sense of humor, joie de v'wre & slightly warped outlook on life’s travails. What do you want? Box 752 SPF, PETITE OF BUILD, PASSIONATE OF spirit ISO handsome, adventerous, college-educated M to love. 40-50 something. Box 749 ATTRACTIVE & PETITE SWF, 38, 5’2”, 105 tbs., long brown hair, brown eyes. Enjoys music, fishing, camping, fast cars and romantic drives. ISO handsome, slender SWM, 25-38. Send photo w/letter. Box 737 PRETTY FLATLANDER ISO FRIEND. 60+, TO share love of culture, nature, & finer things of life. Box 740 ____________ SWF, 60S, NEW-FASHIONED, IRISH, LOVES words, politics, music, film, theater, sexuality, nature...not necessarily in that order. Accidental potter, deliberate writer. Consider carefully, my mind is open...Box 738________ I’M 67 WF NS - INDEPENDENT, HONEST, gardener, reader, humorous, not an extrovert. Enjoy intelligent, down-to-earth people. Can we be friends? Box 732______________________

SWF, 23, NEW IN BURLINGTON ISO 23-27, to hang out. Not into party life. Enjoys eating in, art, mostly cuddling. Must be fun 81 kindhearted. Include photo. Box 725____________ VERY ATTRACTIVE, VOLUPTUOUS, CON­ FIDENT, gregarious DF, 30s, old-fashioned qualities, loves children & pets. Needs DM optimist, 40s, w/appreciation of art, intelli­ gence & romantic qualities. Box 711________ DEEPLY BEAUTIFUL HEART-CENTERED. Preciously rare. Are you there? I am. 40’s. Box 713____________________________________ DPF, 48, INTRIGUED BY LIFE. ADVENTUROUS, sense of humor, love of arts, socially con­ scious, ISO M, 40S-50S, who is smart; funny, fit, passionate. Box 706

man Aaakinq woman VT PRISONER IN NJ JAIL MISUNDERSTOOD. ISO younger F for TLC relationship. SWM, 43, UVM grad. Returns home in 2001. Let’s start something special now! Box 750____________ WM, 50ISH, NS, MED. BUILD, WOULD LIKE to meet F. Age, race, looks unimportant for discreet relationship days or eves. Box 753 OLD WORLD FORTUNE-TELLER ISO GYPSY queen, to greet the sun and share the moon. Box 745

BAD BOY, MID 30S, ISO GOOD GIRL TO help mend my ways. Fly me a kite, you won’t be disappointed. Picture gets picture. Age/race unimportant. Release date 2001. Box 748 DO YA CONSIDER YOURSELF BEAUTIFUL? ISO slender F, late 30s, eco-progressive, requiring support/compassion. Early 40s, Adirondacker, romantic, active lifestyle, etc. Integerity, com­ passion, SOH. Kids/pets friendly. Friendship to start. Box 744___________________________ FUNNY, EDUCATED, JM. WELL- READ, NEED engaging conversation, pursue visual arts, bass on a fly rod, jazz, Bach and Krauss. Later 50s, offbeat but fully civilized. ISO LTR w/independent, smart, fit, playful F. Any bkgrd., 47-57. Picture appreciated. Box 735 WM, 35, MONTPELIER AREA. PART AM. Indian, French, Irish, English, 150 lbs., blue eyes. Never married, ND, NS, Vegetarian. Send photo. Hi, Steve. Box 735_____________ DWM, 50S, TALL, HEALTHY, STABLE, SPIRI­ TUAL, holisitic practitioner desires lady with hypnotic eyes, captivating smile, sensuous feet to canoe, kayak, hike, dance, travel, other, possible LTR. Box 720_______________ GOOD-HUMORED, FIT, LIBERAL CLOSE TO 60. Still optimistic, literate, well-traveled. Loves books, words, cooking, hiking, music, J.S.B. to B.B.K. ISO reasonably sane & fit F, 45+, Central VT. Similar interests. Box 721 PAVLOV’S DOG SEEKS RECONDITIONING. Tall, fit, SW Alpha M repeatedly beaten by loveless mother, ISO angel of mercy to remove my collar &. allow me to stand on two legs. Box 722__________________________ WARM, HANDSOME, FIT, CAPTAIN ISO MATE for love boat. I am a SWPF, 45, 5’9”, Let me spoil you & let’s cruise the beautiful waters of L. Champlain this summer. Box 723

SEVEN DAYS

AT

Just like clockwork!

* * « *

PL 49. IN LOVE WITH NATURE, THE ARTS, spiritual practice, personal & P growth and my two cats. Seeks dance of companionship/ LTR w/ NS kindred spirit. Box 739___________

ATTRACTIVE, MaWCU, EARLY 30S, ISO other MaWCU for occasional intimate meetings. D/D free only. Discretion a must! Send letter, photo phone. Box 754___________________

GWF, 38, SMOKER, ISO MATURE, POSITIVE, spiritual, ND, GWF w/interest in books, cats, hiking and long conversations over coffee. Sincerity, honesty and communication a must. Friendship first. Box 728

SUGAR-DADDY TYPE OF M ISO OF F WHO likes wearing attractive shoes & boots of soft leather. I’m trustworthy, handsome. I’m in Burl. Right F can be anywhere. Box 746

man Makinq man VERY MASCULINE, ATTRACTIVE, MUSCULAR, SBiWM, 34, 6’, 165 lbs., trimmed beard. Clean, sane. Can be dominant or submissive. ISO masculine BiW or BiM, 20S-30S. Very discreet. Only real men need reply. Box 747 AREN’T THERE ANY NS, BURLINGTON-AREA, 31-37, GWPM’s who are looking for friendship/dating/LTR? My magic 8-ball says “signs point to yes.” I know I can’t be the only lonely heart around. Besides, you’ve made worse gambles w/5 bucks! Box 716_________ LOOKING FOR A DATE? WILL YOU DATE ME? I have brown eyes and hair, 200 lbs. I would like to have a relationship in or out or around North East Kingdom. P. S. I won’t mind dating a blck man. Box 741___________ GWM, 40s, 6’i" , ROUGH, TUMBLE TYPE, EDU, neat, clean, lean, spare, masc., ND, NS, tee & cut-offs style. Loves outdoors, hobbies, beer, bike, swim. Spring is here, who will join me? Box 731

HEY 2271, YOU SOUND REALLY NICE. WANT to give me a try? I am 30, voluptuous, blond w/ big beautiful hazel eyes. & big, beautiful everything else. Experienced*-*-!-!! Box 743 MaM LOOKING FOR A LOVER THAT WON’T blow my cover. Central VT area. If you are F, average-to-slender build and like candle light and sensual massage, let’s get togeth­ er. I’m a WM, mid 40’s, 5’7”, 165 lbs., great shape and not hard to look at. Box 745 LETS PARTY TOGETHER. SWM, MID 3o’S. Good build and looks. ISO slender ladies, 25-40, who like myself, enjoy good compa­ ny, passionate kisses & the feeling of lovemaking. Me very clean, nice guy. Box 742

DWF, 50S, FROM EUROPE, NS, PETITE, attractive, independent, secure. Like the out­ doors, dancing, travel, dining out, good con­ versations. ISO fit SPM for friendship. Let’s meet. Box 726

4 digit box numbers can be contacted either through voice mail or by letter. 3 digit box numbers can only be contacted by letter. Send letter along w/ $5 to PO Box 1164, Burlington, VT 05402. LOVE IN CYBERSPACE. POINT YOUR WEB BROWSER TO http ://WWW.SEVENDAYSVT.COM TO SUBMIT YOUR MESSAGE ON-LINE. How to place your FREE! personal ad with Person to Person • F il l o u t t h i s f o r m a n d m a il it t o : P e r s o n a l s , P.O . B o x 1 1 6 4 , B u r l i n g t o n , VT 0 S 4 0 2 o r f a x t o 8 0 2 .8 6 S .1 0 1 S . P l e a s e c ir c l e a p p r o p r i a t e c a t e g o r y b e l o w . Y o u w i l l r e c e i v e y o u r b o x # & p a s s c o d e b y m a il . D e a d l i n e : F r id a y s a t n o o n . • F ir s t 3 0 w o r d s a r e F R E E w it h p e r s o n t o P e r s o n , a d d i t i o n a l w o r d s a r e $ 2 e a c h e x t r a w o r d . • F r e e r e t r ie v a l 2 4 h o u r s a d a y t h r o u g h t h e p r i v a t e 8 0 0 # . ( D e t a i l s w i l l b e m a i l e d t o y o u w h e n YOU PLACE YOUR A D .) IT'S SAFE, CONFIDENTIAL AN D F U N !

How to respond to a personal ad: •C

Confidential Information (W E N E E D T H IS TO R U N Y O U R A D )

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