Page 1

MIRO SHOW, PART III PAGE 5

VE R MO NT ’S INDE PEN DENT VO IC E MARCH 7-14, 2018 VOL.23 NO.25 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Weinberger wins a third term

VERMONT TEENS ARE RAISING THEIR VOICES TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE PAGE 28

CHAMPION POSE

PAGE 36

Competitive yoga in S. Burlington

HART’S ON FIRE

PAGE 40

Shelburne distillery heats up

ENGINE VROOM

PAGE 58

A new nightclub opens in WRJ


Flutter on over to see

Our weekly flyer is now inside.

CALL FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT TODAY.

Dora Sudarsky, O.D.

370 SHELBURNE ROAD BURLINGTON • 497-1676 CHROMAOPTICS.COM

4T-chroma030718.indd 1

3/6/18 10:59 AM

come

&

enjoy our

kid’s menu

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

CHECK IT OUT!

fabulous frames handmade in France

SEVEN DAYS

03.07.18-03.14.18

at the great northern

716 PINE STREET, BURLINGTON, VT

In participating store regions only 2

THEGREATNORTHERNVT.COM

Untitled-53 1 Untitled-28

1/17/18 1/29/18 10:39 2:55 PM AM

Untitled-40 1

3/6/18 2:25 PM


RESERVATIONS ONLINE AT GUILDTAVERN.COM OPEN DAILY AT 4:30

1633 WILLISTON RD SOUTH BURLINGTON (802) 497-1207 Featured in l, reet Journa The Wall St l Gazette ea tr on M , be Boston Glo Pouce and Sur le

Daysies Winners 2012-2017 SMOKED MEAT

LIBATIONS BREWERY

®

Thursday • March 15 • 4-10PM

We're Turning SIX! Throwback Thursday with 1 dollar chopped pork sandwiches * ....Yes, we appreciate you this much! DINE IN ONLY *

SUNDAY BURGER NIGHT • TUESDAY CRAFT DRAUGHTS WEDNESDAY COCKTAIL NIGHT • THURSDAY OYSTER NIGHT

Untitled-35 1

2/19/18 1:30 PM

Brewery opens at 11:30AM every day for LUNCH + SUPPER

23 South Main Street  Waterbury, Vermont  prohibitionpig.com 4T-ProPig030718.indd 1

3/5/18 2:53 PM

MARCH EVENTS |

dinner | sunday brunch events & weddings

trivia

3/13: Medical Dramas 3/20: Seinfeld 3/27: Always Sunny in Philadelphia

3/9: DJ Von Hauer 3/16: DJ Dakota 3/23: Steady Betty

03.07.18-03.14.18

live Music

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

lunch

3/30: DJ Fatti B

waterworksvt.com | 802.497.3525

Located in the Champlain Mill, Winooski — 1 mile from Downtown Burlington!

SEVEN DAYS

189 BANK STREET, BURLINGTON CORTIJOVT.COM

events & theMed nights 3/21: Cuban Night! Havana inspired food & drink specials, featuring DJ Luis Calderin!

3

Untitled-8 1

1/30/18 1:13 PM

4t-waterworks030718.indd 1

3/5/18 1:30 PM


  These shoes will fast become the star of your wardrobe. Star is a fresh take on canvas sneakers perfect for your everyday adventures.

ANNUAL

MARDI GRAS SALE

New Arrivals!

One Day Only Sat. March 10th

 EBRATING 40 YEARS CEL

BURLINGTON

•

COLCHESTER

DanformShoesVT.com

SHELBURNE

•

ST ALBANS

*selection varies by store 2/28/18 4:07 PM

Celebrating 11 Years in Business!

SEVEN DAYS

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Join us for

STOREWIDE!

SHOP EARLY BEFORE THE PARADE! 81 Church St., Burlington • eccoclothesboutique.com • 860.2220 4T-ecco030718.indd 1

3/5/18 4:34 PM

Keeping High Quality CBD affordable.

G IN LL ES SE EC W PI NO ASS GL

Untitled-9 1

•

20% OFF

Take charge of caring for yourself with Vermont made and all natural CBD hemp extract products.

30% off Storewide! Friday, March 9th

COME IN FOR A FREE SAMPLE OF OUR PAIN RELIEF CREAM

and Saturday, March 10th

CBD PRODUCTS CAN HELP TO TREAT:

4

ADD • Anxiety • Arthritis • Blood Pressure • Depression Inflammation • Memory Problems • Pain • Seizures • Skin Conditions

62 Church St. Burlington VT | 802.658.6496 | www.whimboutique.com Untitled-6 1

3/5/18 10:38 AM

81 NORTH MAIN STREET, ST. ALBANS, VT 802.309.3697 | hopefulcbd.com 4t-greenmountainhempco-branding.indd 1

3/6/18 2:28 PM


THE LAST WEEK IN REVIEW

emoji that

FEBRUARY 28-MARCH 7, 2018

LUKE AWTRY

COMPILED BY SASHA GOLDSTEIN, MATTHEW ROY & ANDREA SUOZZO

SOUND CHECK

Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger being greeted by supporters at Nectar’s on Tuesday night

Ben & Jerry’s cofounder Ben Cohen was arrested Saturday for blasting a simulated F-35 jet sound around Burlington. He screams — not just for ice cream.

SMOKE ’N’ SNIFF

QUEEN CITY STICKS WITH

M

WEINBERGER

A car got stuck in a sinkhole on Burlington’s Pine Street. The cause: a watermain break. And winter’s not over!

tweet of the week: @foundbeautyvt A friend from high school lost her 3 year old today after a long struggle with illness since birth. The world is bigger than petty arguments, folks. Be kind. Hug your friends and loved ones. Forgive the assholes out there. Life is beautiful, and tragic, and terribly short. FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSVT OUR TWEEPLE: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/TWITTER

POWER PLAY

Between each level, there are examples of real-life gerrymandered districts, such as Illinois’ 17th Congressional District, which was once known as the “rabbit on a skateboard” for its unique shape. The game can even look up a player’s congressional district and call the representative straight from the player’s web browser, according to Dibble. She acknowledges that the current political climate inspired this creation. “There’s a lot going on,” Dibble said with a laugh. “We can feel a little bit helpless sometimes, so it helps to try and use the tools you have at hand to feel like you’re making a difference.” Still confused by gerrymandering? Check it out for free at playgerrymander.com.

LAST SEVEN 5

Burlington-based tech company has created a game that aims to be fun and educational. GameTheory, which operates out of the Vermont Center for Emerging Technologies’ downtown co-working space, recently released GerryMander, a game that breaks down the complex issue of gerrymandering. “It’s the type of thing that is hard to explain with verbal or written language, but with visualization and hands-on activity, becomes much simpler,” said Marguerite Dibble, GameTheory’s founder and CEO. Gerrymandering is the redrawing of politi-

cal voting maps to give one party or the other an advantage. The game features a grid with red and blue houses. Players must create “districts” that are advantageous to the minority color. The game becomes more difficult as the users advance and the grid size grows. “It’s all about drawing lines in smart ways to change what a group representation looks like for a specific area,” Dibble said. An ongoing gerrymandering case before the U.S. Supreme Court inspired the team to create the tutorial, which is guided by Gerry Mander, a slickly dressed salamander who helps the player along. It’s an obvious play on words, said Dibble. “We thought it would be more of a fun and natural way to get some of the information across,” she said.

SEVEN DAYS

COURTESY OF GAMETHEORY

SINKING FEELING

1. “The Friendly Toast to Open on Burlington’s St. Paul Street” by Sally Pollak. The Massachusetts-based regional chain is opening in the former Bluebird Tavern spot. 2. “In Range: The Week That Changed Vermont’s Gun Politics” by Paul Heintz and Taylor Dobbs. Gun control quickly gained political traction in Montpelier. 3. “Student Who Published ‘Men to Avoid’ List Disciplined by College” by Molly Walsh. Middlebury College sanctioned student Elizabeth Dunn but will not be suspend or expel her. 4. “Woman Shot After Man Opens Fire Into Crowd Outside Burlington Bar” by Katie Jickling and Sasha Goldstein. An innocent bystander took a bullet and was seriously injured outside of Nectar’s. 5. “UVM Protesters Meet With Deans, University President During Daylong Occupation” by Kymelya Sari. Protesters occupied the University of Vermont’s Waterman Building to confront the administration over racial justice on campus.

WHAT’S WEIRD IN VERMONT

A

Gerry Mander, the game’s guide

The Federal Election Commission fined Sen. Bernie Sanders’ (I-Vt.) presidential campaign for an illegal in-kind donation involving Australian volunteers — not Russian bots.

TOPFIVE

MOST POPULAR ITEMS ON SEVENDAYSVT.COM

03.07.18-03.14.18

? 802much

?? ? ?? ? ??

the stepdaughter of Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), which brought some national attention to the race. Her family ties gave her name recognition in a city where Sanders remains enormously popular. But her connection led some to accuse her of riding on the senator’s coattails. At Smitty’s Pub in the New North End, Driscoll told Seven Days that her effort hadn’t been futile. “I think keeping [Weinberger] under 50 percent sends a clear message to him,” she said, adding that he can’t continue to cater to private interests. Culcleasure, who made his first run for public office in a grassroots effort, had promised to bring more public involvement to city hall decision making. “We split the vote!” he exclaimed to loud cheers at his after-party. Asked if a single opposition candidate might have beaten the mayor, Culcleasure told Seven Days, “Yeah, Carina shouldn’t have run. I announced first.” He also said his campaign had “changed the discussion” to emphasize citizen involvement in governing. Read more about this race, the anti-F-35 ballot initiative and other Town Meeting Day contests on sevendaysvt.com.

FOREIGN FRIENDS

That’s the number of states in which emerald ash borer infestations have been found — including Vermont. Botanists discovered the tree-killing insects in the town of Orange.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

iro Weinberger won a third three-year term as Burlington’s mayor on Tuesday, besting two independent opponents who challenged him from the left as a big-money candidate sympathetic to powerful interests. Unofficial results Tuesday showed Weinberger with 48 percent of the vote, compared to 35 percent for Carina Driscoll and 16 percent for Infinite Culcleasure. The mayor said the election involved committed candidates discussing real issues. He told supporters at Nectar’s he’d learned from his opponents: “I’m heading into my next three years as mayor better equipped to serve the Burlington community because of the spirited debate over these past two months.” The mayor, who restored the city’s ailing bond rating, rebuilt public facilities including the bike path. Running on a smart-growth platform, he also backed private development projects such as the ongoing Burlington Town Center venture. Driscoll, who previously served on the Burlington School Board, the city council and in the Vermont legislature, is

A bill in the Vermont House would allow cities and towns to classify marijuana odor as a public nuisance, a ticketable offense. This in a state that smells of manure all summer...

32


TEEN SPIRITED. founders/Coeditors Pamela Polston, Paula Routly owners Don Eggert, Pamela Polston, Cathy Resmer,

Colby Roberts, Paula Routly publisher Paula Routly deputy publisher Cathy Resmer AssoCiAte publishers

Don Eggert, Pamela Polston, Colby Roberts NEWS & POLITICS editor Matthew Roy deputy editor Sasha Goldstein politiCAl editor Paul Heintz Consulting editor Candace Page politiCAl Columnist John Walters stAff writers Mark Davis, Taylor Dobbs,

Alicia Freese, Katie Jickling, Molly Walsh ARTS & LIFE editor Pamela Polston AssoCiAte editor Margot Harrison AssistAnt editors Dan Bolles, Elizabeth M. Seyler food writer Hannah Palmer Egan musiC editor Jordan Adams CAlendAr writer Kristen Ravin speCiAlty publiCAtions mAnAger Carolyn Fox stAff writers Rachel Elizabeth Jones, Ken Picard,

Sally Pollak, Kymelya Sari, Sadie Williams

proofreAders Carolyn Fox, Elizabeth M. Seyler D I G I TA L & V I D E O digitAl editor Andrea Suozzo digitAl produCtion speCiAlist Bryan Parmelee senior multimediA produCer Eva Sollberger multimediA journAlist James Buck DESIGN CreAtive direCtor Don Eggert Art direCtor Rev. Diane Sullivan produCtion mAnAger John James stAff photogrApher Matthew Thorsen designers

Brooke Bousquet, Kirsten Cheney, Todd Scott SALES & MARKETING direCtor of sAles Colby Roberts senior ACCount exeCutive Michael Bradshaw ACCount exeCutives Robyn Birgisson,

Michelle Brown, Kristen Hutter, Logan Pintka mArketing & events direCtor Corey Grenier ClAssifieds & personAls CoordinAtor Ashley Cleare sAles & mArketing CoordinAtor Madeleine Ahrens A D M I N I S T R AT I O N business mAnAger Cheryl Brownell CirCulAtion mAnAger Matt Weiner CirCulAtion deputy Jeff Baron slACktivist Rufus CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Luke Baynes, Justin Boland, Alex Brown, Julia Clancy, Amelia Devoid, Erik Esckilsen, Kevin J. Kelley, Rick Kisonak, Jacqueline Lawler, Amy Lilly, Gary Lee Miller, Bryan Parmelee, Suzanne M. Podhaizer, Jernigan Pontiac, Robert Resnik, Julia Shipley, Sarah Tuff Dunn, Molly Zapp

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS Harry Bliss, Caleb Kenna, Matt Mignanelli, Marc Nadel, Tim Newcomb, Susan Norton, Oliver Parini, Sarah Priestap, Kim Scafuro, Michael Tonn, Jeb Wallace-Brodeur

03.07.18-03.14.18 03.07.18-03.14.18

C I R C U L AT I O N : 3 6 , 0 0 0 Seven Days is published by Da Capo Publishing Inc. every Wednesday. It is distributed free of charge in Greater Burlington, Middlebury, Montpelier, Northeast Kingdom, Stowe, the Mad River Valley, Rutland, St. Albans, St. Johnsbury, White River Junction and Plattsburgh. Seven Days is printed at Upper Valley Press in N. Haverhill, N.H. DELIVERY TECHNICIANS Harry Applegate, Jeff Baron, Joe Bouffard, Pat Bouffard, Caleb Bronz, Colin Clary, Donna Delmoora, Todd Field, Matt Hagen, Nat Michael, Bill Mullins, Dan Nesbitt, Ezra Oklan, Brandon Robertson, Dan Thayer, Andy Weiner, Josh Weinstein With additional circulation support from PP&D.

DAYS SEVEN DAYS

SUBSCRIPTIONS 6-month 1st ClAss: $175. 1-yeAr 1st ClAss: $275. 6-month 3rd ClAss: $85. 1-yeAr 3rd ClAss: $135. Please call 802-864-5684 with your credit card, or mail your check or money order to “Subscriptions” at the address below.

Seven Days shall not be held liable to any advertiser for any loss that results from the incorrect publication of its advertisement. If a mistake is ours, and the advertising purpose has been rendered valueless, Seven Days may cancel the charges for the advertisement, or a portion thereof as deemed reasonable by the publisher. Seven Days reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including inserts, at the discretion of the publishers. DISCLOSURE: Seven Days publisher and coeditor Paula Routly is the domestic partner of Vermont Senate President Pro Tempore Tim Ashe. Routly abstains from involvement in the newspaper’s Statehouse and state political coverage. Find our conflict of interest policy here: sevendaysvt.com/disclosure.

6 FEEDBACK

P.O. BOX 1164, BURLINGTON, VT 05402-1164 802-864-5684 SEVENDAYSVT.COM FACEBOOK: /SEVENDAYSVT TWITTER: @SEVENDAYSVT

©2018 Da Capo Publishing Inc. All rights reserved.

Untitled-33 1

2/5/18 3:58 PM

FEEDback READER REACTION TO RECENT ARTICLES

TASTELESS HEADLINE

Your penchant for the witty pun headline backfired in the February 21 802Much titled “No Food for Thought.” It was a shameful, too-clever-by-half attempt that essentially denigrated a sincere act of selfsacrifice. Unless you provide the backstory that it was John Mejia’s joke, you owe him and your readers an apology for your insensitivity. Tricia Chatary MIDDLEBURY

SHAME ON DEL POZO

[Re “Cop on the Tweet: Chief’s Social Media Posts Draw Criticism,” July 5, 2017]: It seems that Chief Brandon del Pozo is at it again. On his personal Facebook page, he recently posted the mug shots, names and charges of two men who have been arrested by the Burlington Police Department [Off Message: “Men Accused of Shooting 200 Cars in Burlington Over Two-Year Span,” February 15]. His post has been shared more than 200 times, including by City Councilor Joan Shannon (D-South District), and liked 377 times, including by at least four more city councilors: Jane Knodell (P-Central District), Adam Roof (I-Ward 8), Karen Paul (D-Ward 6) and Chip Mason (D-Ward 5). Comments on the post include insults and explicit threats toward both men. Intentionally or not, our police chief and city councilors are leading Burlington in the public shaming of two young men who will at some point need to rehabilitate themselves and reintegrate into our community. If public shaming is part of punishment, should every mug shot from every arrest be posted on Facebook? If not, who chooses which people are shamed on social media and which people are not? What if people are not convicted? In an Associated Press article from July 2017, “Should Police Be Allowed to Shame Suspects on Facebook?,” South Burlington Police Chief Trevor Whipple asks, “Do we want to use our Facebook page to shame people? Legally there’s no problem — all mug shots are public — but the question became, is this what we want to do?” South Burlington’s Police Department has stopped sharing mug shots on social media. It’s time Burlington’s leaders do the same and develop social media


WEEK IN REVIEW

TIM NEWCOMB

There are even some Guernsey churches and buildings in New Hampshire. Anyway, I just wanted to put Bethel on the map. Janet Hayward Burnham BETHEL

Burnham is vice president of the Bethel Historical Society.

BETHEL BOOSTER

timekeepers PAGE 44

A resto group rises in central

VT

LUNAR CYCLE

PAGE 58

Lady Moon sings “cosmic

soul”

FEEDBACK

CHEESE PLEASE Castello Saga Blue Brie 5oz REG $8.99/lb

Sale $2.99/lb Belton Farm Red Fox Cheese 7oz REG $7.99/lb

Sale $2.99/lb Bruschetta Monterey Jack REG $6.99/lb

Sale $4.99/lb WOW WINES OF THE WEEK Feudo Di Santa Tresa Frappato Organic

$12.99

Castello di Stefango Rosso 2015 50% Uva Rara, 40% Croatina &10% Barbera

$13.99 Casa Liliana Good: Chianti

$9.99

FRESH LOCAL EGGS & MILK Local Cage Free Eggs

» P.20

$2.49

SAY SOMETHING!

New everyday low prices!

Seven Days wants to publish your rants and raves. Your feedback must... • be 250 words or fewer; • respond to Seven Days content; • include your full name, town and a daytime phone number. Seven Days reserves the right to edit for accuracy, length and readability. Your submission options include: • sevendaysvt.com/feedback • feedback@sevendaysvt.com • Seven Days, P.O. Box 1164, Burlington, VT 05402-1164

Local 2% Milk

$2.99

1186 Williston Rd. So. Burlington, VT 05403 (Next to the Alpine Shop) Open 7 days 10am-7pm • 802.863.0143 cheeseandwinetraders.com

4v-cheesetraders030718.indd 1

FEEDBACK 7

Last week’s food story “Enchanted Forest” got Ashley Nunez’s alma mater wrong. She attended the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. Also, in Side Dishes, “Cold Rush” contained incorrect information about the Southeast Asian country Timor-Leste. It is a sovereign state.

PAGE 24

Editor out after tweetstorm

PAGE 14

$3.99/8oz

SEVEN DAYS

John Walters’ February 14 Fair Game column misidentified the Statehouse location where Sen. Chris Pearson produced a Facebook video. It was recorded in Lt. Gov. David Zuckerman’s office.

PAGE 30

Off Center names new leader

I urge the Vermont legislature to take leadership and enact long-term funding for cleaning up the state’s waterways [“Treading Water: Vermont’s Pols Are Going Nowhere Fast on Clean Lakes,” February 7]. Pass legislation now, based on the ample studies and facts already in hand. Enact the per-parcel fee plan already under consideration, and establish a Clean Water Authority, as proposed in the Senate. These are the most viable proposals on the table. Water — clean water — is crucial to all life; it is crucial to maple syrup and beer and fresh milk and fresh vegetables and tourism. Once water becomes polluted or contaminated, remediation often is not feasible, and the cost is enormous. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has pressed Vermont for years to address an undeniable decline in water quality, and countless legislative studies and FREEPS BLEEPS reports have focused on the matter. In the face of overwhelming information and need, Gov. Phil Scott refuses to address the funding issue. The administration’s stopgap reliance on capital bonding is not sustainable; it erodes the state’s bonding capacity.

03.07.18-03.14.18

CORRECTIONS

Vermont’s tiny historical societies have a big mission: to preserve and showcase the state’s past

$1.99/24oz Hope Hummus $2.49/8oz

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

I’m sure you’ll be hearing from some of the other historical societies in Vermont wondering why they weren’t included, or at least mentioned, in [“Time Keepers,” January 10]. So — ahem — that’s what I’m doing! This past fall, the Bethel Historical Society won the Richard O. Hathaway Award for a book written by H. William

VERMONT’S INDEPENDENT VOICE JANUARY 10-17, 2018 VOL.23 NO.17 SEVENDAYSVT.C OM

Mike Fife

WINOOSKI

Johansen, one of our members, entitled Vermont Stones, Italian Bones. It’s the story of the Italian immigrants who came to Bethel at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century to work Bethel’s granite — the whitest granite in the world — into some of the most famous buildings in America. Probably the best known is Union Station in Washington, D.C. Another is the capitol in Madison, Wis. The late Johansen, a retired marine biologist who loved research, doesn’t just outline the Bethel granite industry, its success and problems; he also gives the reader a very good feeling of what STAGE DIRECTION THREE’S COMPANY it was like to be an Italian immigrant in the village of Bethel in the early 20th century. Readers come away with a feeling that they’ve been in the homes of these folks. We also wrote a book about George H. Guernsey, Vermont’s Elusive Architect. He designed the Bethel Town Hall, where our historical society has a small museum. Some years ago, when the town decided to renovate the building, we thought we might write up a small pamphlet about him. Turned out he had designed, and sometimes built, structures all over the state — from churches to business blocks.

The Greek Gods Maple Greek Yogurt

Green Mountain Maple Sriracha

ALL WET ON WATER QUALITY

practices and policies that stop this public shaming and instead reflect our community’s values of compassion, kindness and respect.

VERY BEST DEALS OF THE WEEK!

3/6/18 10:43 AM


at the flynn

Explore imaginary worlds through works of art ranging from 19th century marionettes to contemporary installations by local and national artists.

February 17– June 3, 2018

HAYIM HERON

RY COODER JUST ADDED!

shelburnemuseum.org Puppets: World on a String is underwritten by Donna and Marvin Schwartz and the Stiller Family Foundation.

Untitled-18 1

urban bush women

Hair and Other Stories

stand up, sit down & laugh

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Friday, March 9 at 8 pm

paula poundstone

Tuesday, March 27 at 7:30 pm

souleymane badolo

Friday, March 16 at 8 pm

altan

zakir hussain & rakesh chaurasia

SEVEN DAYS

Monday, March 19 at 7:30 pm

mike birbiglia Friday, March 23 at 8 pm

Untitled-15 1

8

March 17– August 26, 2018

ry cooder

Saturday, June 30 at 8 pm on sale to members now; public 3/9

FlynnSpace Sponsor

shelburnemuseum.org

Media

www.flynncenter.org P E R F O R M I N G

GARDEN

Fri. & Sat., March 30 & 31 at 8 pm

ALSO COMING NTL: Hamlet: Mar. 8 NTL: Julius Caesar: Mar. 22

The New One Season Sponsor

In the

Yimbégré

Saturday, March 17 at 8 pm

2/9/18 12:09 PM

In the Garden is sponsored in part by the MARIE AND JOHN ZIMMERMANN FUND, the Oakland Foundation, and Donna and Marvin Schwartz.

A R T S

3/1/18 2:04 PM

Untitled-11 1

3/5/18 10:55 AM


contents

LOOKING FORWARD

MARCH 07-14, 2018 VOL.23 NO.25

34

16

NEWS 14

How Solid Is the Case Against the Accused School-Shooting Plotter?

ARTS NEWS 22

BY MARGOT HARRISON, PAMELA POLSTON, ELIZABETH M. SEYLER & SADIE WILLIAMS

BY MARK DAVIS

16

Vermont’s Psychiatric Bed Crisis Befuddles Policymakers BY ALICIA FREESE

18

Rising Burlington Property Values Knock Assessments Out of Whack

Page 32: Short Takes on Five Vermont Books

24

Island Stage Presents Inaugural Play in South Hero

40

FEATURES 28

34

BY KYMELYA SARI

Ralston Rising

Culture: A gallery exhibit brings the “history” of Burlington’s fictional neighbor to life BY RACHEL ELIZABETH JONES

36

Ready, Set, Flow

Health: A regional yoga competition comes to South Burlington BY PAMELA POLSTON

Excerpts From Off Message

38

BY SEVEN DAYS STAFF

VIDEO SERIES

We the Young People

Politics: Vermont teens are raising their voices to make a difference BY SEVEN DAYS STAFF

BY MOLLY WALSH

19

58

Online Thursday

Checking IDs

Theater review: Disgraced, Northern Stage BY ALEX BROWN

40

COLUMNS + REVIEWS 12 25 27 41 59 63 66 72 82

FUN STUFF

Fair Game POLITICS Drawn & Paneled ART Hackie CULTURE Side Dishes FOOD Soundbites MUSIC Album Reviews Talking Art Movie Reviews Ask Athena SEX

straight dope mr. brunelle explains it all deep dark fears this modern world edie everette iona fox red meat jen sorensen harry bliss rachel lives here now free will astrology personals

CLASSIFIEDS

SECTIONS 11 46 56 58 66 72

26 76 76 76 76 77 77 78 78 78 79 80

vehicles housing services homeworks buy this stuff music legals fsbo calcoku/sudoku crossword puzzle answers jobs

The Magnificent 7 Calendar Classes Music Art Movies

In Good Spirits

Food: Longtime public health colleagues launch a craft distillery

C-2 C-2 C-2 C-3 C-3 C-3 C-3 C-4 C-4 C-5 C-6 C-7

BY MELISSA PASANEN

44

COVER ILLUSTRATIONS AARON SHREWSBURY

Golden Guy

Food: Plate’s Sean Patrick Morrison on cooking California — in Vermont

PAGE 5

Stuck in Vermont: After watching

Totally Stoked

Music: Checking out White River Junction’s Engine Room BY JORDAN ADAMS

a lot of Stuck in Vermont videos, Jennifer and Jesse Bliss and their young daughter left Florida last year to move to Vermont. Eva Sollberger caught up with them recently to find out how they like it here.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Underwritten by:

Weinberger wins a third term

VE RMO NT’S IN D EPE NDE N T VO ICE MARCH 7-14, 2018 VOL.23 NO.25 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

BY HANNAH PALMER EGAN

58

MIRO SHOW, PART III

COVER DESIGN DON EGGERT

VERMONT TEENS ARE RAISING THEIR VOICES TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE PAGE 28

CHAMPION POSE

PAGE 36

Competitive yoga in S. Burlington

HART’S ON FIRE

PAGE 40

Shelburne distillery heats up

ENGINE VROOM

PAGE 58

A new nightclub opens in WRJ

03.07.18-03.14.18

Bringing families home faster with upfront underwriting* and pre-approval!**

SEVEN DAYS

Michael Languasco B R A N C H M A N AG E R NMLS#: 515970

direct: 802.391.0385 michael.languasco@movement.com movement.com/michael.languasco

Untitled-38 1

2/12/18 12:02 PM

Jewelry & Gifts shelburnebay plaza • 2989 shelburne rd • 985.9909 alittlesomethingvt.com • next to the Shelburne Meat Market 8H-alittlesomething022118.indd 1

2/19/18 11:02 AM

CONTENTS 9

*While it is Movement Mortgage’s goal to provide underwriting results within six hours of receiving an application, process loans in seven days, and close in one day, extenuating circumstances may cause delays outside of this window. | ** For qualified buyers | 68 Randall St, South Burlington, VT 05403 | VT-VT515970 | Movement Mortgage, LLC supports Equal Housing Opportunity. NMLS ID# 39179 (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org) | 877-314-1499. Movement Mortgage, LLC is licensed by VT # 6862 & 39179-1. Interest rates and products are subject to change without notice and may or may not be available at the time of loan commitment or lock-in. Borrowers must qualify at closing for all benefits. “Movement Mortgage” is a registered trademark of the Movement Mortgage, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company. 8024 Calvin Hall Rd, Indian Land, SC 29707. CPID 5451 | Exp. 8/2018


BEEN POACHING THE BOLTON BACKCOUNTRY THIS SEASON? Tired of always looking over your shoulder on the way up? Here’s your chance to go legit! Get your

2018-’19 Nordic / Backcountry pass

Ski and Ride for FREE

for the rest of this season when you purchase a

2018 - 2019 All-Access Season Pass

(Includes Alpine, Nordic/Backcountry, and more benefits)

SEVEN DAYS

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

BOLTON VALLEY IS CLOSE TO HOME AND OFFERS NIGHT SKIING UNTIL 10PM, TUESDAYS - SATURDAYS SO YOU CAN SPEND MORE TIME ON THE MOUNTAIN.

BACKCOUNTRY

As many days, as many runs and as 2018 - 2019 Season Pass Prices through April 2 many face shots as you can possibly A family of four saves $520 Adult (26-64): $529 over the retail rate when muster! Youth (7-17):

$109 *

Senior (65-74):

$219

Night (All Ages):

$159

NORDIC, UPHILL, & BACKCOUNTRY:

Guiding Instruction Equipment Rental

Unlimited laps with no blackouts. Just 30 minutes from Burlington.

purchased by April 2!

**NEW THIS YEAR** CHECK OUT OUR 5-YEAR

GREEN PASS

(5TH YEAR is FREE!) 5 YEARS: $2,000

Adult (18+):

$119

Youth (7-17):

$79

Visit BoltonValley.com or call 877-9-BOLTON for complete details and to purchase today.

10

now for only $119 and all your skinning from now through next season will be on the up and up! And up!

* When purchased with a parent’s Adult All Access Season Pass. Multiple youth passes may be purchased for $109, provided all youth are dependents of the adult.

THE PASS for everyone

AGES 18-25

(and full time college students who fall outside the age restrictions.)

THE SKI BUM PASS is valid every day that Bolton Valley is open for skiing and riding during the 2018-19 Season with NO BLACKOUT DATES.

$179 before April 2

Save $120, ski & ride THE REST OF THIS SEASON FREE!


LOOKING FORWARD

the

MAGNIFICENT MUST SEE, MUST DO THIS WEEK COMPI L E D BY K RI STEN RAVIN

SATURDAY 10

Chugging Along If trains are your thing, follow the tracks to the Northwestern Vermont Model Railroad Association’s 31st annual Model Railroad Show. Held at the Collins Perley Sports and Fitness Center in St. Albans, the state’s largest exhibition of its kind treats enthusiasts to multiple operating layouts and more than 100 displays and vendors. All aboard! SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 51

WEDNESDAY 7 & WEDNESDAY 14

SUNDAY 11

DARING MOVES Don’t blink during the Peking Acrobats’ awe-inspiring spectacular, or you may miss a jaw-dropping feat of tumbling, contortion, juggling or trick cycling. Having performed everywhere from Italy to the Hollywood Bowl, the talented Chinese troupe astounds audience members with agility and grace at the Paramount Theatre in Rutland. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 53

A Woman’s Work “She’s not afraid to speak truth to power,” says Hillary Clinton of activist Dolores Huerta in a trailer for the 2017 documentary Dolores. This award-winning film focuses on the life and work of the 20thcentury American labor leader who cofounded what would become United Farm Workers. Vermonters can observe Women’s History Month with screenings in St. Johnsbury and Montpelier. SEE CALENDAR LISTINGS ON PAGES 46 AND 55

FRIDAY 9

Power of the Pen In 2014, filmmaker Bess O’Brien and author Gary Lee Miller created Writers for Recovery to provide writing workshops for people affected by the disease of addiction. Ten-week workshops in Morrisville and Barre culminate in Friday’s Writers for Recovery Reading, wherein participants share original works with a live audience. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 51

Sibling Rivalry

SEE STATE OF THE ARTS ON PAGE 24

WEDNESDAY 7-FRIDAY 30

Think Green

SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 46

SEE CLUB LISTING ON PAGE 64

Genre Hoppers Imagine the boot-stomping, sing-along melodies of the Band Perry paired with dashes of New Orleans swing, blues and roots rock, and you’ve got the Dustbowl Revival. The eight-person group, formed in Venice Beach, Calif., comes to South Burlington’s Higher Ground Showcase Lounge complete with a string-band section and a horn section.

MAGNIFICENT SEVEN 11

WEDNESDAY 14

SEVEN DAYS

Fans can celebrate St. Patrick’s Day for the entire month of March at the Burlington Irish Heritage Festival. In the next seven days alone, this family-friendly fest features lively musical performances by Gypsy Reel and O’hAnleigh, an Irish language-and-culture program, and a genealogy workshop. Visit burlingtonirishheritage.org for details.

03.07.18-03.14.18

Vermont’s new theater company, Island Stage, raises the curtain on its inaugural season with a comedy driven by madness and mayhem. Written by Christopher Durang, Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike centers on three adult siblings steeped in jealousy and resentment. Kymelya Sari introduces readers to the Lake Champlain Islands company.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

FRIDAY 9-SUNDAY 18


FAIR GAME

MARCH SPECIAL

T

Firing Line

he Vermont legislature adjourned for Town Meeting week on the cusp of passing major legislation on guns. Lawmakers will return on Monday with 2 large, 1-topping pizzas & 2-liter Coke product multiple bills atop their agenda; some may be sent to Gov. PHIL SCOTT by the end Plus tax. Pick-up or delivery only. Expires 3/31/18. Limit: 1 offer per customer per day. of next week. And there may be further legislation in Check us out on Facebook & Instagram! the works. Positions continue to evolve, and politicians’ long-standing reluctance 973 Roosevelt Highway on gun issues continues to erode. Colchester • 655-5550 It’s hard to overstate how excepwww.threebrotherspizzavt.com tional this moment in history truly is. It was only three weeks ago that a school 12v-threebros030718.indd 1 3/2/18 3:03 PM shooting in Parkland, Fla., was followed two days later by the arrest of a Vermont teenager on charges of plotting a rampage of his own at Fair Haven Union High School. The latter sent shock Participate in a Research Study waves through the state and its political establishment. and help develop a vaccine You’d have to go back four decades to against Dengue Fever find a moment when Vermont lawmakers responded with such urgency to an event. In 1981, two teenage boys — LOUIS HAMLIN and JAMIE SAVAGE — brutally attacked two 12-year-old girls in Essex Junction. One died, and the other survived to testify against her assailants. • Healthy On the day of the attack, Hamlin was adults, 16; Savage, 15. At the time, Vermont law barred prosecution of anyone under 16 ages 18 as an adult. Hamlin received a life sento 50 tence, but Savage could only be detained until he turned 18. The public outcry was • 7-month overwhelming. vaccine study “That got governor [RICHARD] SNELLING to bring the legislature back” for a special • Earn up to $1900 session, Sen. DICK SEARS (D-Bennington) recalled. “There was extreme presin compensation sure on the legislature. It resulted in a complete rewrite of Vermont’s juvenile laws.” Today, as then, the shock of a crime Call UVM VACCINE TESTING CENTER and an outpouring of public sentiment has rewritten priorities in Montpelier. at 802-656-0013 Five separate gun-related measures for more info and to schedule a screening. seem destined to become law. Before Leave your name, number, Fair Haven, perhaps one or two — if any — might have done so. and a good time to call back. Last week, the Vermont Senate approved two bills containing three Email UVMVTC@UVM.EDU separate gun-control measures. S.221 or visit UVMVTC.ORG would allow judges to issue “extreme risk orders” when individuals appear to pose an imminent threat to themselves or others. S.55 would require universal background checks for gun purchases and raise the minimum legal age for buying guns to 21. Those two bills land 1 large, 1-topping pizza, 12 boneless wings, 2 liter Coke product

$20.99 $25.99

12 FAIR GAME

SEVEN DAYS

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

6v-uvmvaccinetesting(cutemosquitoPurple)011718.indd 11/11/18 10:07 AM

OPEN SEASON ON VERMONT POLITICS BY JOHN WALTERS

in the House next week, and both are poised for quick action. Sears has promised to expedite a House bill, H.422, through his committee within days. That bill would require the seizure of firearms when a person is cited or arrested for domestic violence. No prior court action required. Scott has said he would sign all those bills, although he would like to see conditions on raising the purchasing age that the legislature may not include. Along with legislative leaders, he also favors a ban on bump stocks — devices that increase the speed with which semiautomatic weapons can fire rounds. Such a ban is the purpose of H.876, which is now before a House committee.

FIVE SEPARATE GUN-RELATED MEASURES SEEM

DESTINED TO BECOME LAW. And that may not be all. “We’re going to be talking about limiting magazine size,” said House Speaker MITZI JOHNSON (D-South Hero). “How many bullets do you have to be able to shoot in a row before changing the cartridge?” Scott is at least open to the idea. His chief counsel, JAYE PERSHING JOHNSON, told the Senate Judiciary Committee last week that defining a reasonable limit on magazines is “a difficult area, but that shouldn’t be an impediment to doing it.” She said the same about a concept that seemed unthinkable just a few weeks ago: a ban on assault weapons. “We are willing to discuss, but we need a specific proposal,” she said. Those kinds of statements can be useful political cover for avoiding tough decisions, but in this case Scott seems sincerely open. “I’ve come a long way,” he added, and he’s still traveling down that road. How far he will go, and how far we all will go, remains to be seen. Scott also has to keep watch on his right flank. He recently issued a statement, posted on Facebook by the Chittenden County Republican Party, affirming his strong support for the Second Amendment and framing his newfound support for gun legislation amid a laundry list of other policy ideas. But he maintained the need to balance

gun rights and public safety, a stance that would have been hard to imagine in a pre-Fair Haven world. One other thing for elected officials to ponder. “The high school students who are being so vocal right now, they’re about to be voting this fall,” said Johnson. “And they have never known a time without regular school shootings. They were born after Columbine.” Remember when the Columbine, Colo., school shooting was an unbelievable shocker? That took place fewer than 20 years ago, but it seems like another universe entirely. In this new universe, the perpetual status quo on gun issues in Vermont is suddenly gone. The parameters of the new reality have yet to be established.

Dome Work

One of Vermont’s most frequently photographed landmarks will be hidden from public view for much of the year. During a $2 million renovation project from May until November, the Statehouse’s golden dome will be covered by scaffolding and a scrim — a protective fabric that will catch any debris that comes loose. And, yes, the work includes a fresh new coat of gold leaf. Actual solid gold. What? you may be thinking. Our tax dollars are paying for gold? “People have always said things like that,” observed DAVID SCHÜTZ, Vermont state curator and keeper of Statehouse lore. “And we would point out, well, how much do you think it costs to have people up there working? That’s the real cost.” He’s right. Of the $2 million tab, only about $200,000 is budgeted for gold leaf. Regilding the entire dome will require less than half a bar of gold — 12 pounds or so. The stuff is astonishingly thin. And durable. The dome was last regilded in 1976. The treatment was expected to last 20 years, and it’s held up more than twice as long. When applied properly, gold leaf is remarkably tenacious. “It’s good value,” said Buildings and General Services Commissioner CHRIS COLE. He did offer a historically correct alternative, with tongue firmly in cheek. Before 1906, he noted, the dome was covered in red tile. “So if we wanted to be historic, we could do red, maybe with black checks,” he said. “Kind of the Johnson Woolen Mills look.” Just kidding.


GOT A TIP FOR JOHN? JOHNWALTERS@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Sometime in early May, contractors will build a scaffolding around the dome. “We’ll tie it down through the windows,” explained project manager TRICIA HARPER. “Then the entire scaffolding will be enclosed with a scrim.” The first job is to remove the current gold leaf and undercoats, revealing the copper dome beneath. According to Schütz, there are no real structural issues but, he added, “We have leaks in the copper. It’s the original copper from 1859, so I think we can say this is definitely one of the oldest roofs in Vermont. We’ll be working to make it weathertight once again.” After that, three undercoats will be applied, and then the precious gold leaf. There’s one other key element: replacement of the 14-foot-high statue that stands atop the dome, depicting a robed woman holding a sheaf of wheat. She is commonly called Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture. Schütz prefers the simple “Agriculture,” since the statue was meant to express a concept, not a particular deity. Whatever you call her, she’s in an advanced state of decay. The state will soon seek bids from wood sculptors who can fashion a replacement. Thinking about canceling a Statehouse visit because the dome won’t be visible? You might want to think again. The interior will be unaffected, and that scaffolding will be a sight to behold. Plus, Schütz and his colleagues are making plans to engage visitors. Those could include watching the sculptor at work, an interpretive display explaining the project and showcasing the exterior and rarely seen interior of the dome, and cameras mounted inside the scaffolding with a live feed to monitors in the lobby. So now the big question: What happens to the old gold leaf? It belongs to the state, and it is, after all, “a historic artifact,” as Cole observed. Some of it might be melted down for reuse; some is destined for a historical display. But some of it could help raise money for future restorations. The State of Georgia did just that. After a regilding, flecks of the old gold were embedded in Lucite blocks and offered for sale. Schutz says the idea “has already been discussed.” Seems like a natural.

It’s a long-odds proposition at best. But the odds got even longer when he was rejected by ActBlue, the online fundraising platform that enables small donations to Democratic candidates. And the organization’s rationale seems a little bit fishy. ActBlue boasts of having processed more than $2 billion in donations since its founding in 2004, including massive amounts of money for Sanders. The New York Times says ActBlue “has led the movement toward small online political donations.” Seems like a natural fit for a young, progressive upstart, right? Well, no. Peacock’s inquiry sparked an email exchange with ActBlue customer support specialist MAKAILA MCPHEE. She initially turned him down by explaining that “ActBlue has a strict policy of listing all Democrats in a race and not listing independent candidates that are running against Democrats.” Someone should tell McPhee that there are two declared Democrats in the race: JON SVITAVSKY and FOLASADE ADELUOLA. Sanders is an independent who rejects all party labels. By her reasoning, ActBlue should delist Sanders immediately. When Peacock sought clarification, he got a fresh answer. “In Democratic primaries, we will list all candidates; however, those rules do not apply for independent candidates,” McPhee responded. “In very rare circumstances we will … list independent candidates. Sen. Sanders is one of those unique cases.” McPhee implied that if Peacock ran as a Democrat, he might qualify. But no promises: “If you do … decide to run as a Democrat, please let us know, and we can continue the discussion!” she wrote. Certainly, ActBlue is free to make its own decisions. But it occupies a valuable piece of real estate in the landscape of liberal fundraising. Exclusion is a big deal for a candidate such as Peacock and more than a little ironic for an organization whose mission is fostering the grassroots. ActBlue makes its money by assessing a 3.95 percent fee on every donation. Sanders, with his legion of small donors, is a yuuuge moneymaker for ActBlue. In 2017, according to Federal Elections Commission filings, donations for Sanders netted ActBlue more than $100,000. Its rejection of Peacock smells like preferential treatment for a valued client. I’d love to hear ActBlue’s response, but the organization failed to answer requests for comment. m

POLITICS

“I like hearing footsteps in the house and having the outside light on when I come home.”

Untitled-2 1

863-5625 HomeShareVermont.org FAIR GAME 13

Bringing Vermonters together to share homes

SEVEN DAYS

HOME SHARE

03.07.18-03.14.18

Remember BRAD PEACOCK, the progressive independent candidate for U.S. Senate? He’s running for the seat now held by Sen. BERNIE SANDERS (I-Vt.), in part because he’d like Sanders to leave the Senate and run for president in 2020.

3/5/18 10:25 AM

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Brad Blue

Untitled-1 1

3/5/18 10:27 AM


LOCALmatters

How Solid Is the Case Against the Accused School-Shooting Plotter? B Y M A R K D AV I S

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 03.07.18-03.14.18 SEVEN DAYS 14 LOCAL MATTERS

CRIME

POOL PHOTO: GENN RUSSELL/THE BURLINGTON FREE PRESS

J

ack Sawyer could have passed for a typical teenager as he walked into Rutland Superior Court last Friday — if not for the chains around his ankles and wrists. His wavy brown hair needed a trim. A hint of nascent, unkempt sideburns sprouted on either side of his thin face. His gait was awkward, as if he hadn’t yet grown into his lanky body. While the 18-year-old Vermonter took his seat in the courtroom, lawmakers in Montpelier were debating gun-control legislation inspired by allegations that he had planned a Parkland, Fla.-style massacre at Fair Haven Union High School. Meanwhile, back in Rutland, it was becoming clear that the charges against Sawyer — three counts of attempted murder and one count of attempted aggravated assault with a weapon — might be on shaky legal ground. His two public defenders sought to have the charges dismissed and to revoke an order holding him in prison without bail. They say there is insufficient evidence to prove that Sawyer “attempted” anything. “There is a big difference between planning, or preparing, to make an attempt and attempting a crime,” his attorney Kelly Green told reporters outside the courtroom. “The state has to have evidence that he attempted these crimes. I haven’t heard a word of it.” The prosecutor, Rutland County State’s Attorney Rosemary Kennedy, declined to comment on the case but previously told reporters she stands by the charges she filed on February 16, when Sawyer’s arrest shocked the state. The legal challenge is a tough call, according to attorneys. Even if the charges survive the bid for dismissal, they could be tough to prove beyond a reasonable doubt at trial. “Attempt” charges must include an act “towards the commission” of the offense in Vermont law. Prosecutors assert that Sawyer’s purchase of a 12-gauge shotgun at Dick’s Sporting Goods days before his arrest meets that requirement. Prosecutors have also introduced evidence that Sawyer allegedly made detailed plans to shoot up his old school: Facebook messages he exchanged with a friend in New York in which he

Jack Sawyer with defense attorney Kelly Green in court

discussed his plans, a notebook entitled “Journal of an Active Shooter” explaining his motivations and thinking, and video of his six-hour interrogation by Vermont State Police, during which he matter-of-factly discussed his plot. Will that be enough? The case against Sawyer would be easier to prove if he had driven to his old high school with firearms or had gotten arrested as he walked into the building. Those actions would more clearly represent “commencement of the consummation” of the crime, the standard needed to prove an attempt, according to Vermont Law School associate professor Robert Sand. Sawyer was arrested before taking such a definitive step. In such cases, Sand said, “What gets

complicated, when there is an interruption before the final event, is to decide: Was this in fact the commencement of the consummation, and that final bad thing was only stopped because there was some outside intervention?” Had Sawyer made the transition from planning to overt action? Was he actually going to do it? “He had every intention of following through,” Vermont State Police Det. Sgt. Henry Alberico, who interrogated Sawyer, testified on Friday But that, defense attorneys said, is a subjective conclusion. During two days of hearings last week, Green hammered away at the assumptions behind it. “There is no witness you’re aware of that saw him at the school hallway

with a gun, right?” she asked Alberico on Friday. “Correct.” “There is no witness you’re aware of that saw his car parked at the school?” Green asked. “Correct.” “No one has even seen him in Fair Haven, correct?” “I don’t know … It’s possible,” Alberico said. “You’re unaware of any witness that has seen him in Fair Haven?” “Correct.” In the most straightforward attempted murder cases, a defendant shoots someone who manages to survive. More often, such thorough, indisputable evidence is lacking, Windsor County State’s Attorney David Cahill


GOT A NEWS TIP? NEWS@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

said in an interview. Attempt laws leave fuckers I actually went to school with,” ample room for both judges and juries Sawyer wrote. “I know what they’re to apply “common sense,” Cahill said. like and how idiotic they are.” “In terms of proving a school-shootHe later added, “I will gear up and ing case in a perfect world, would the let loose my anger and hatred. It’ll be prosecutor from an evidentiary per- fantastic.” spective want to see someone walk to On other pages, the journal reads like school with a firearm? Yes,” said Cahill, the immature ramblings of a lost youth. speaking about such cases in general. “I’ve had another change of plans,” he “But in a real-life perspective, do we wrote in an entry dated December 28. ever want things to get that far? No. The He wanted to go live in the woods, he law of attempts provides for criminal wrote, “off of the wild.” liability … where an average joe on the Sawyer suffers from depression and street might not see an anywhere-near- anxiety and had been living in a residencompleted crime.” tial treatment facility in Maine. In his Sawyer’s case has gotten a blizzard journal, he devotes more ink to musing of media attention. But the uncommon about suicide than killing others. At one nature of last week’s point, he wrote about hearing has been wanting to drive into largely lost in the a wall at 100 mph. news. Typically, de“I just want it fendants are brought to happen already,” in for a brief arraignSawyer wrote on ment immediately December 30. “Life after arrest, they is too much to handle plead not guilty, and and I’ve got about 65 their cases go quiet years more if I don’t for months as evidie and if I’m already dence trickles in and sick and tired after 18 lawyers weigh their years, then I know I’ll options. KELLY GREEN just be miserable or Even in the even more so for that most serious cases, matter. I know I’m defendants usually waive so-called wasting my breathe [sic] as I inhale.” “weight of the evidence” hearings, in Judge Thomas Zonay is expected to which prosecutors must show that the rule in the coming weeks on whether evidence of guilt is “great” in order for a the charges against Sawyer will stand. case to proceed. To illustrate how difficult the deci“In this case, there is not sufficient sion could be, Sand, a former prosecuevidence,” Green told Seven Days. tor, recounted a hypothetical scenario “That’s why we’re challenging it now.” he has shared with students: A man Weight-of-the-evidence hearings plans to grow marijuana. He buys grow usually take an hour or two. Sawyer’s lights, fertilizer and books on cultivawas almost a mini-trial, spanning two days and including multiple witnesses. tion techniques, and he researches The hearing focused on two main pieces where to buy seeds. But before he of evidence — Sawyer’s interview with starts, police get a search warrant and Alberico and excerpts from his journal. arrest him. Had the man crossed the line from The handwritten diary, with entries that began in late October and ended preparing for a crime to attempting only a few days before his arrest, reveals one? The scenario sparked heated debate the dichotomy at the heart of the case. among both students and professionIn chilling passages, an angry als: Sand solicited opinions from 10 Sawyer, who acknowledged a fascination with the Columbine High School sitting state’s attorneys in Vermont. On shooting in 1999, seems hell-bent on whether there was enough evidence for an “attempt” case, they were split, five murder. “I’m aiming to kill as many as I can to five. m and whoever I can, but it’d also be more satisfying to kill a lot of the dumb Contact: mark@sevendaysvt.com

THE WORLD IS 71% WATER.

Your kids are 100% curious.

Sign up today for swim lessons that start this week! gbymca.org Untitled-3 1

3/5/18 10:31 AM

MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR SUMMER

THE STATE HAS TO HAVE EVIDENCE

THAT HE ATTEMPTED THESE CRIMES.

03.07.18-03.14.18

 Flexible: on-campus and/or online  Affordable: significant tuition savings  Smart: get ahead, graduate on-time and save money Fun: enjoy adventure excursions, campus and Burlington in the summer

SEVEN DAYS

Learn More – sign up for an online information session at: smcvt.edu/asc 3/6/18 2:19 PM

LOCAL MATTERS 15

802.654.2721 asc@smcvt.edu

Untitled-38 1

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Accelerated Summer College at Saint Michael’s offers flexible course offerings allowing students to complete up to an entire semester in a summer – that is 16 credits in 11 weeks!


LOCALmatters

Vermont’s Psychiatric Bed Crisis Befuddles Policymakers BY AL I C I A FRE E S E

V

built the 25-bed Vermont Psychiatric Care Hospital in Berlin, contracted with Rutland Regional Medical Center to provide seven beds, and made a deal with the Brattleboro Retreat, a private psychiatric facility, to provide another 14 beds. Those 46 beds are reserved for the highest-need patients, who have been hospitalized against their will and placed in the Department of Mental Health’s custody. Many policymakers, and even more hospital staff, are convinced that effort isn’t enough, especially as the need grows. Private hospitals recorded 1,920

who have entered through the criminal justice system. They could include individuals who have been charged with a crime and are awaiting a psychiatric assessment, defendants who have been deemed incompetent to stand trial or found not guilty by reason of insanity, and inmates who experience a psychiatric crisis while in prison. About half of the patients at the Vermont Psychiatric Care Hospital fit one of those descriptions. They tend to stay longer because of the complexity of their legal cases, creating a bottleneck that clogs up the state’s entire inpatient treatment system, according to Gobeille.

16 LOCAL MATTERS

SEVEN DAYS

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

HEALTH CARE

inpatient mental health admissions in 2012. That number rose to 2,104 in 2017, according to data from the Vermont Association of Hospitals and Health Systems. The figure does not include admissions to the Brattleboro Retreat and the Vermont Psychiatric Care Hospital, data for which wasn’t readily available, according to the Department of Mental Health. The doctors’ desperate gesture last summer made an impression on Gobeille, who concluded that the quickest way to reduce pressure on emergency rooms would be to build a 3,000- to 5,000-square-foot addition at the Swanton prison. The temporary forensic psych unit would house patients

In an interview, Emmons explained that she has reservations about investing money in a temporary facility. She suggested that it would be more prudent to add beds to an existing hospital and provide more housing for patients after they’re released. Josephson came away from the committee meeting with a different impression. As he left the room, he said to no one in particular, “Now I get it. They don’t want to pay for it.” Gobeille’s long-term solution centers on a permanent 50-bed forensic facility, but it’s part of a 10-year plan to construct a 925-bed prison complex in St. Albans — an idea that lawmakers and advocates have panned. In a report to the legislature earlier this year, the secretary also recommended creating more state beds at private hospitals and contracting with nursing homes to provide psychiatric care to older patients. Not everyone believes more beds is the answer. “This is not a system that needs more capacity to deal with crisis,” said Wilda White, executive director of Vermont Psychiatric Survivors, a Rutland-based advocacy organization. “This is a system that needs more capacity to deal with prevention and early intervention.” White said Vermont should instead invest in more housing, therapy and community centers that could support people with mental illnesses. The temporary forensic unit proposal didn’t fare better in the House Health Care Committee, which formally rejected the idea in a memo released February 28. Those lawmakers shared Emmons’ concern about spending millions on a temporary building, but they also raised a philosophical objection to segregating patients who have been charged with a crime. “We have never distinguished in Vermont and said, ‘Because you’re coming through the door of the criminal justice system, even though you have the same clinical need, we’re going to THOMAS JAMES

ermont Human Services Secretary Al Gobeille has said his top budget priority this year is creating more beds for psychiatric patients. But last week, some key state lawmakers balked at his plan to locate those beds in a prison complex. Gobeille’s proposal attempts to address a crisis in the state’s mental health system that’s left patients waiting weeks for one of 188 beds in Vermont’s six public and private hospitals. The secretary has asked for $2.9 million to build a temporary 12-bed psychiatric wing at the Northwest State Correctional Facility that would cost $6.5 million annually to operate. The House Health Care Committee formally declared its opposition last week, on financial and policy grounds. While most lawmakers agree on the need for more beds, there’s no consensus on the best solution. That doesn’t bode well for a larger challenge that policymakers have yet to confront: Vermont is three years away from losing millions of federal dollars that help pay for a large portion of inpatient beds in the state system. “We’ve gotta get this moving now,” Gobeille said. The bed shortage reached such a crisis that, last August, emergency room doctors and nurses from Central Vermont Medical Center showed up unannounced at Gov. Phil Scott’s office in Montpelier and demanded to meet with him. The governor wasn’t available, but he sent Gobeille to talk with the group the next day. What the hospital staff told the human services secretary wasn’t news to him: Patients are languishing in emergency rooms, where they occupy badly needed beds without receiving the treatment they require. Officials tend to trace the problem back to Tropical Storm Irene, which flooded the 54-bed Vermont State Hospital in Waterbury and prompted officials to replace it with a decentralized mental health system. The state

Some patients accused or convicted of crimes end up at the Brattleboro Retreat, where they’ve threatened and occasionally injured staff, according to CEO Louis Josephson. On March 1, he told the House Corrections and Institutions Committee about an incident in which two such patients “jumped” an employee as she brought them coffee. Calling Gobeille’s forensic unit a “nobrainer,” Josephson stressed to lawmakers: “I want to be crystal clear that this is an urgent, immediate need in the state.” Committee chair Alice Emmons (D-Springfield) wasn’t buying it. A “forensic [unit], I think, is being seen as a silver bullet, and I’m not convinced it is a silver bullet,” she said.


GOT A NEWS TIP? NEWS@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

WE THINK WE HAVE A PROBLEM NOW?

WE HAVEN’T SEEN ANYTHING.

SPECIALS Pay for 9 months, get 3 months

FREE

Pay for 12 months, get 6 months

FREE

CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS. EXPIRATION: 3/15/18

weekly and monthly payment options now available

Dedicated to improving lives since 1966

EDGEVT.COM | (802) 860-EDGE (3343) | INFO@ EDGEVT.COM

4t- edge030718.indd 1

3/5/18 1:10 PM

DIRT

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

WINE CLUB

03.07.18-03.14.18

The next level wine club for the serious Oenophile.

388 PINE STREET | BURLINGTON, VT | (802) 865-2368 | DEDALUSWINE.COM Untitled-25 1

3/5/18 3:56 PM

LOCAL MATTERS 17

Explore the diverse terroir of the world for $65 a month. Stop by the shop and sign up today.

SEVEN DAYS

segment you somewhere else,’” said urgent.” Institutions Committee chair Rep. Anne Donahue (R-Northfield). Peg Flory (R-Rutland) described it as “a “This would be a big change. It would little frightening.” really need to be thought out.” Flory and others expressed hope that In the meantime, the committee rec- the state could somehow renegotiate ommended that Gobeille’s team come another exemption, but according to up with a different plan — one that Gobeille, the federal government “is not would add beds to a current facility. budging on this at all.” Gobeille has also floated such a soluDespite the concern over the imtion but said he needs more direction pending funding crunch, policymakers from lawmakers. “What I found inter- have yet to put a contingency plan in esting is, they say we need inpatient place. The Agency of Human Services capacity … but [the memo] is pretty non- has outlined several broad options, descript of exactly what to do,” he said. which include reducing the Vermont The Brattleboro Retreat would be a Psychiatric Care Hospital to 16 beds to natural location because it currently has continue to qualify for federal aid. 119 beds and, according to its CEO, has At the moment, lawmakers seem the space and is federally approved to preoccupied with yet another imminent serve 149 patients. threat to the state’s capacity to care for The private psychiatric hospital, the mentally ill. In 2013, the state built a however, is facing what Josephson secure, seven-bed facility in Middlesex deemed an “existential threat” because for patients who don’t need hospitalof a decision at the federal level that level care but aren’t ready to be released could destabilize Vermont’s entire into the community. It was meant to be mental health system. temporary, but nearly five years later, The U.S. government has for years it’s still operating, and the state has barred states from made little progress in spending Medicaid finding a new, permamoney on mental health nent location. facilities with more The state had told than 16 beds, a policy the town selectboard designed to discourage that the facility would the “warehousing” of close by January 2016. mentally ill patients. Last year, the town reFor the last two fused the state’s request decades, Vermont benfor an extension, but efited from an exempthe psychiatric center L OUIS JOSEPHSON tion to the rule that remained. Selectboard allowed the state to use chair Peter Hood isn’t federal money to pay for beds at the happy but said, “I think we’re reconVermont Psychiatric Care Hospital and ciled to our fate that it’s likely that thing the Brattleboro Retreat. But in October is going to be there” for the foreseeable 2016, federal officials ended the ar- future. rangement, notifying Vermont officials Other partners may not be so flexible. that it would phase out its contribution The state built the facility after Tropical to both facilities over six years, starting Storm Irene with $2 million from in 2021. The feds pay 55 percent of the the Federal Emergency Management bill for beds the state uses, meaning Agency on the condition that it would Vermont would lose $23 million annu- be temporary. If it’s not gone within ally if it doesn’t make any changes. four years, Vermont would have to give Along with the 14 state beds at the back the money, Gobeille said. Brattleboro Retreat, the cut would To avoid that scenario, he has proaffect an additional 50 private beds at posed replacing the Middlesex building the facility. Although the state doesn’t with a 16-bed secure residential facility permanently reserve those spots, it still in a location yet to be determined. uses a number of them for patients with He’s asking the legislature for $2 milless intense needs. lion in this year’s capital bill to purchase “We think we have a problem now? property, if necessary, and prepare to We haven’t seen anything,” Josephson build it. Lawmakers seem more inclined warned. to grant this request. “We’ve got to get Lawmakers sound alarmed, too. out of those temporary modular units,” “I’m very concerned,” Emmons said. Emmons said. But she cautioned that “Conversations need to start happening these projects take a while: “We’re now.” not getting a shovel in the ground this Senate Health and Welfare summer.” m Committee chair Claire Ayer (D-Addison) called the situation “pretty Contact: alicia@sevendaysvt.com

P I H S R E B M E M H C R A M


LOCALmatters

GOT A NEWS TIP? NEWS@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Rising Burlington Property Values Knock Assessments Out of Whack B Y M O LLY WA LSH

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 03.07.18-03.14.18 SEVEN DAYS 18 LOCAL MATTERS

the state already applies a formula to correct for real estate fluctuations. How? The state surveys some 20,000 property sales across Vermont for an annual study designed to make state

“From the state perspective, we just want people to be paying a fair amount,” said Douglas Farnham, policy director and economist at the Vermont Department of Taxes. And while the annual CLA correction helps, state law mandates reappraisals when more thorough adjustments are warranted. The last time that happened was in ABOVE OR BELOW? 2010, when the state ordered Concord, The state’s common level of appraisal shows where Salisbury and Whiting to reassess belocal property assessments stand compared with their actual worth. To see where all of Vermont’s cause their common levels of appraisal municipalities stand, go to sevendaysvt.com. fell below 80 percent. It’s more common for the state to MARKET VALUE order reassessments when a separate measure shows that property is assessed unevenly within a municipality. That’s not the case in Burlington, where * data show properties are in compliance. Burlington’s CLA has been drifting downward for several years, from 87.5 percent in 2016 to the current level of just under 80 percent. The community with the second-lowest CLA in the state is Middlebury, at 84.7 percent. Most municipalities in Chittenden County are in the 90th percentile: Winooski at 91.4; South Burlington, *Final figure is still being negotiated. 94.5; and Milton, 98.1. A significant number of towns, esprice last year on a Burlington residence education taxes fair and ensure that pecially in southern Vermont and the was $315,000, up 7.9 percent from 2016, property is taxed at fair market value Northeast Kingdom, are overassessed, according to the Northwest Vermont from town to town. By comparing three according to the tax department. Danby Market Report by Coldwell Banker years of sales in each municipality to has a CLA of 125.2 percent; Guildhall, Hickok & Boardman Realty. Sales prices 120.7. Overassessment of Queen City condos rose only slightly, does not trigger by 0.5 percent, to a median of $235,000. the state to order a The cost of commercial property has community-wide also increased, according to Vickery. reappraisal. Such appreciation has pros and Burlington does cons, said Mayor Miro Weinberger. adjust assessments “I’d say, for property owners, healthy J OH N V I C KE RY, BU RL I N GT O N C I TY A S S E S S O R between citywide reappreciation is a good thing,” he said. appraisals for various It makes real estate a good investment. tax assessments, the state derives a reasons. Major home improvements can “The flip side of that coin is that it figure known as the common-level of trigger an increase, as can mini-trends. A can have a negative impact on afford- appraisal, aka CLA. surge in high-dollar sales for apartment ability,” the mayor continued. Many If the number is more than 100 per- buildings a few years ago prompted new prospective home buyers are already cent, it means property assessments assessments for that class of property. A priced out of the Burlington market. are above actual market value and the slackening in the condo market led to Weinberger, a former developer who school tax rate is adjusted downward. lower assessments for several properadvocates for building new housing If the figure is lower than 100 percent, ties in Burlington. units, was reelected Tuesday. it means assessments are below market Meanwhile, Vickery is researching Tweaks to the property-value calcu- value, and the rate is adjusted upward. potential firms to conduct Burlington’s lation would have the greatest impact In Burlington, much of the nearly citywide appraisal. on the municipal portion of every 8 percent school tax increase associ“I want to start the planning process Burlington homeowner’s tax tab; the ated with the fiscal 2019 school budget now,” he said. “We want our study to be city’s share accounts for approximately that voters approved on Tuesday accurate.”  one-third of the bill. The other two- was a correction due to the city’s Contact: molly@sevendaysvt.com thirds represent the school tax, to which under-assessment.

125.5%

DANBY

RUPERT

112.6%

CAVENDISH

ST. JOHNSBURY

95.3% WILLISTON

84.7% MIDDLEBURY

79.4%

91.4% WINOOSKI

108.8%

116.9%

SOURCE: VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF TAXES

BURLINGTON

inspected properties from the exterior; they looked inside, too, with the permission of property owners. Single-family home sales are driving much of the appreciation. The median

BURLINGTON

Q

ueen City property values are so undervalued for tax purposes that the State of Vermont is likely to order a citywide property reappraisal — a move that could result in higher tax bills for homeowners. The local tax roll lists Burlington’s property at 79.4 percent of its actual value, according to state calculations — making the city the most “under-assessed” of the 256 communities measured in the state. It has been 12 years since the last full reappraisal, and the real estate market has been through some downs and ups. Since the Great Recession hit in late 2007, prices have not only recovered but have risen sharply, particularly for singlefamily homes. Under state law, any percentage below 80 percent triggers a mandatory order for reappraisal. City assessor John Vickery appealed the state’s figure and is negotiating with officials at the Vermont Department of Taxes who’ve tentatively upped it to 79.9 percent. He’ll meet with them later this month to finalize the number. But one way or another, Vickery warned, Burlington will be ordered to reassess this year or next. “It’s needed; it’s time to do one,” he said. If the state issues an order, the city will still have a few years to comply. While the methodology isn’t likely to interest the average joe, the results almost certainly will. Last time around, they generated contentious debate. Some people’s tax bills went down, others stayed the same and some went up. This time around, there will again be winners and losers. “There’s always a lot of energy around the reevaluation, oh boy,” said Vickery. “It affects everyone — at least everyone that pays taxes. So it’s a big deal.” The undertaking would cost about $1 million, and an outside firm would conduct it, according to Vickery. The city could issue a request for proposals later in 2018 with a goal of doing the work in a year or so. Appraisers previously went into neighborhoods and

IT AFFECTS EVERYONE —

AT LEAST EVERYONE THAT PAYS TAXES.


EXCERPTS FROM THE BLOG

Vermont Senate Votes to Increase the Legal Age for Gun Buyers to 21 JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

Rebecca Holcombe

and orderly environment [in schools].” She made the case that walkouts raised safety concerns because “obviously it’s difficult for administrators to maintain and ensure the safety of kids if they don’t know where they are.” School administrators nationwide are grappling with how to handle student protests in the aftermath of the Parkland shooting.

ALICIA FREESE

Elizabeth Dunn

LOCAL MATTERS 19

MOLLY WALSH

TAYLOR DOBBS

SEVEN DAYS

ensued as screenshots circulated on campus. Some students hailed Dunn as a brave leader in the #MeToo movement who was standing up for victims who have been wronged. Others said the list ruined the reputations of innocent people without evidence or due process. Last month, a website called the College Fix published a column by an anonymous Middlebury student who wrote that he has become a pariah on campus after being falsely tagged as a rapist on the list. The site bills itself as “Original. Student reported. Your daily dose of right-minded news and commentary from across the nation.” Associate editor Greg Piper said he verified that the writer is a Middlebury student whose name appeared on the list. The column says, “For the past two months, I’ve dealt with the social and psychological fallout of being anonymously branded a rapist on a small liberal arts campus.” It adds, “Most of my close female friends have abandoned me, and other friends continually make excuses to avoid me. I even considered suicide.”

Disclosure: Tim Ashe is the domestic partner of Seven Days publisher and coeditor Paula Routly. Find our conflictof-interest policy here: sevendaysvt. com/disclosure.

03.07.18-03.14.18

Middlebury College student Elizabeth Dunn has been sanctioned but will not be suspended or expelled for posting a list on Facebook that accused 36 current and former male students by name of sexual assault and harassment. The elite private college disciplined Dunn with a permanent letter in the senior’s academic file, according to a report in the student newspaper, the Middlebury Campus. The college’s review found that Dunn obstructed a campus Title IX investigation into the allegations by refusing to share with college administrators the names of the students who accused the men. Dunn also violated the college’s “respect for persons policy” by publishing the list of “men to avoid,” according to the report in the Campus. Dunn did not respond to a request for comment Wednesday but a friend of hers, Tiff Chang, has confirmed the sanction for Seven Days. College officials declined comment. Other people are still talking about the list. After it was posted in mid-December, Facebook quickly removed it, but an uproar

Orleans) opposed both universal background checks and raising the purchasing age. The government recognizes the maturity of people who are 18 by allowing them to vote and join the military, he said. “I have a son in the Navy who is into guns and hunting,” Rodgers said. “And what you’re saying is, when he comes home off-duty and he’s under 21, he can’t purchase a firearm for hunting or personal protection or anything else.” Sen. Joe Benning (R-Caledonia) also opposed both measures. He recalled attending protests during the Vietnam War in which young people rejected the notion that they could be drafted at 18 but couldn’t vote until age 21. “This is counter to what my generation fought for,” Benning said after the vote, “and counter to what my oath of office requires me to protect.”

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Student Who Published ‘Men to Avoid’ List Disciplined by College

The Vermont Senate passed a bill last Friday that would both raise the legal age for purchasing guns from 16 to 21 and mandate universal background checks. Debate focused on raising the legal age; the Senate had given preliminary approval to universal Sen. John Rodgers background checks last Thursday. The age-limit proposal came from Senate President Pro Tempore Tim Ashe (D/P-Chittenden) and 15 cosponsors, effectively guaranteeing its passage in the 30-member Senate. On the Senate floor, Ashe said the goal behind the proposal was to keep young people from impulsively harming themselves or others. In response to concerns raised by Senate Judiciary Committee chair Dick Sears (D-Bennington), Ashe said the bill was written not to limit the borrowing or gifting of firearms. It also wouldn’t impact hunting traditions, he said. The legislation includes exceptions for members of the military and law enforcement officers who are purchasing guns for their official duties. Sen. John Rodgers (D-Essex/

FILE: MOLLY WALSH

In a February 23 letter to Vermont school administrators, Secretary of Education Rebecca Holcombe praised student activism but sought to dissuade participation in upcoming school protests. Students and teachers across the country are planning a 17-minute walkout on March 14 to honor the 17 victims of a school shooting in Parkland, Fla., and to call for new gun laws. Holcombe opened her memo by declaring support for students’ right to free speech, but she went on to caution that it “does not extend to disrupting classes (which prevents others from learning), nor to leaving school without permission (which potentially creates a safety threat).” “We are in an extraordinary moment of history, and more than ever, our children need the skills of citizenship, so they can lead strong communities for the next generation,” she wrote. “However, this also means teaching them to do so in ways that are not disruptive to the rights of others and in ways that model the skills of democracy.” The secretary urged administrators to find another way for students to express themselves, such as holding a school-wide assembly. “I encourage you to work with your students and support civil and peaceful opportunities for student expression and student voice, while holding all members of your community to your codes of behavior,” she wrote. In an interview, Holcombe said she sent the memo because, “My job is to try to do everything I can to maintain a safe

FILE: PAUL HEINTZ

In Memo, Vermont Ed Secretary Discourages Student Walkouts


FILE: LUKE EASTMAN

and diesel fuel, and use the revenues not to maintain the highway and bridges, but to subsidize electricity and distribute rebates to persons made needy by having to pay the carbon tax. That new tax — which Gov. Phil Scott opposes — would make it much harder to periodically raise per-gallon motor fuel taxes. But some way — taxes, fees or otherwise — must be found to do that, or our highways and bridges will slide ever further into disrepair.

NOT KEEN ON CHRISTINE

John McClaughry

KIRBY

WE DESERVE ‘FREEDOM FROM FEAR’

Likewise, Natural Resources Secretary Julie Moore asserts that unknown factors are reason to defer decisions or action. This procrastinating posture ignores the fact that government is forever awash with unknowns. The time for a long-term funding plan is now, without further studies or reports. Whatever action is taken can be revised if subsequent facts warrant. Here is an immediate need for the legislature to act, regardless of the leadership void in the state’s executive branch.

when they diagnose and treat eye disease. Ophthalmologists do, too. Most important: If you think something’s wrong with your eyes, get them checked because an underlying health problem will likely be covered by insurance. The gray area is routine care — that is, when a patient needs a prescription or a health evaluation but nothing is wrong medically. These comprehensive eye examinations are not usually covered by insurance. Glasses and contact lenses and laser surgery for vision correction aren’t covered, either. Vision care plans try to fill the void, but they can leave a lot to be desired.

Hugo Liepmann

Dora Sudarsky

20 FEEDBACK

SEVEN DAYS

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

MIDDLESEX

OPTOMETRISTS V. OPHTHALMOLOGISTS

As an optometrist in Burlington, I read [WTF: “Why Don’t Basic Insurance Plans Cover Vision and Dental?” February 14] with interest. Patients ask me this question frequently, and it is a tough one to navigate. First, it’s important to understand the difference between “optometrists” —  optometric doctors who, like dentists and podiatrists, go to school for four years post-grad — and ophthalmologists: medical doctors specializing in eyes. Optometrists are trained to treat all visual issues as well as many medical ones, but we cannot do surgery. Ophthalmologists train heavily in all diseases of the eyes, but they do not normally write prescriptions for glasses and contact lenses. For routine care, an optometrist is a great choice. Eye disease is covered by medical insurance. Optometrists bill medical insurance

SOUTH BURLINGTON

Sudarsky is an optometrist and owner of Chroma Optics.

UNFAIR ADVANTAGE

As John Walters explained in [Fair Game, February 14], the State of Vermont is currently simply giving away something the state bought and paid for: electricity to drive electric cars, from state-owned charging stations. Not only that, but the state has declined to impose an annual registration fee surcharge (estimated by the Act 12 study of 2014 at $146) to make EVs pay the equivalent of a gasoline-powered car to the transportation fund to maintain the state’s highways and bridges. This is all part of the recent craze to make ordinary people subsidize everything “renewable” and stamp out the horror of fossil fuels.  The culmination of this craze is the ESSEX carbon-tax plan that would levy a steadily rising per-gallon tax on gasoline

VERMONT’S INDEPENDENT VOICE FEBRUARY 28-MARCH 07, 2018 VOL.23 NO.24 SEVENDAYSVT.CO M

Feedback « P.7

[Re “In Range,” February 28]: We brothers served our nation for nearly 50 years between us. We’re not political sorts of people, normally. Things are not normal. With the most recent gun violence, and the endless string of mass shootings now seen as a new normal, it is apparent to us that what we are missing is any sense of domestic tranquility. The idea that a private citizen could legally acquire an AR-15, or any other highvelocity multiple-shot SICK DAYS MONDAY MONDAY weapon, is absurd and should be illegal. These types of weapons should not be in the hands of any private citizen for any reason. It is way too easy to get a powerful weapon whose purpose is to kill as many as possible in the shortest time possible. They are not hunting weapons. Hunters know and understand the need for extreme safety in the use of weapons. They revere the animals they hunt. They are not a problem. Those who seek powerful, highcapacity, rapid-fire weapons for delusional reasons are a problem. The Second Amendment has merit, but it does not trump the Four Freedoms Americans deserve: the freedom of speech, the freedom of worship, the freedom from want and the freedom from fear. Until we regulate arms better than we now do, we will not have that freedom from fear. We can and must do this. 

Reading the puff piece on Christine Hallquist [Fair Game: “A Transformational Candidate,” January 31] made me wonder if this was the same Hallquist I’d interviewed three times since 2009 for my local cableaccess TV station. Was this the person who misled me about the Lowell windfarm siting and, along with other powercompany execs, fought all rooftop solar installations on very specious grounds, allows leaky and buzzing transformers so bad one cannot listen to AM radio when driving, and has not built out or replaced aging and extremely power-hungry HPS/ MH streetlights with LEDs that would use roughly one-eighth the load, among other things? “Efficiency-minded”? Hardly! “Constancy of purpose” and “clear vision”? I just don’t see it. Vermont Electric Coop has been sitting on its hands with maintenance and efSO LONG, ficiency upgrades and is LAUZON downright duplicitous in its solar-killing excuses that begin at the top, the rank-and-file employees notwithstanding in their duties and hard work. Let’s hope Hallquist doesn’t break an arm back patting nor get buried beneath the praises she’s heaping upon GLOW SCHTICK herself. New contenders vie to become Barre mayor

PAGE 14

The week that changed Vermont’ s gun politics BY PAUL HEINTZ & TAYLOR DOBBS, PAGE 32

PAGE 36

Revisiting Spanish flu in VT

PAGE

Sweet Simone’s specials shine42

Terry and Tim Ryan

HUNTINGTON, VT, AND VIRGINIA BEACH, VA

The Ryans are both retired from the U.S. Navy.

PAGE 62

A newb explores an EDM

bash

Steve Merrill NORTH TROY

FLATLANDERS’ FAULT

[Re Off Message: “Universal Background Checks Clear Vermont Senate,” March 1]: It is very sad to see my state ruined by flatlanders who are only guests here; they have destroyed their states and come here to do the same. Good thing we don’t have billboards in our state; solar fields are much more of an attraction. Richard Snelling was our last governor, when true Vermonters ran the place. We had great jobs and hope. This state ended with Howard Dean and any Democrats from Chittenden County. I feel sorry for flatlanders. It’s not your fault you lack common sense. I am amazed that God likes dumb people so much, because he made so many of you. Oh, well, you can’t fix stupid. Remember, God is watching. Thomas Manley

NORTH CLARENDON

Editor’s note: The legislator who authored Vermont’s billboard law, the late Ted Riehle, was born in New York.


WEST CORK

6TH ANNUAL

DISTILLERS Steeped in long tradition, our authentic whiskies represent Irish Whiskey-making at its finest. Bourbon Cask: A delicate blend of grain and malt whiskey matured in bourbon casks, delivering a smooth and approachable whiskey with a soft vanilla finish.

Irish Owned and Hand Crafted

MARCH 10, 2018 8 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Build relationships, strengthen connections, and enhance regional support for veterans.

Triple Pot Distilled

Remarks by: Governor Phil Scott, US Congressman Peter Welch, and Lt. Mark Fountain

Prepared with Fresh Local Spring Water

Vermont’s 40th Army Band

Only Distillery to Malt Its Own Irish Grown Barley

2 pm | Twilight Theatre Free public concert

+ Exhibitor booths + Mobile Vet Center

for veterans and their immediate family members Sunday, March 11 Burke Mountain *Proof of service required

03.07.18-03.14.18

Employment, women in the military, homelessness, mental health, book groups and more.

+ Free lift tickets

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

+ Breakout sessions:

+ 5th Annual Ian Muller Rail Jam

SEVEN DAYS

2 p.m.–6 p.m. Burke Mountain

Learn more: LyndonState.edu/VeteransSummit

Produced, Distilled and Bottled in Ireland by West Cork Distillers, LLC. Imported by M.S. Walker, Inc., Boston, MA. 40% Alc/Vol. WESTCORKIRISH.COM

Thomas.Anderson@LyndonState.edu

PLEASE ENJOY RESPONSIBLY.

21

Untitled-37 1

3/6/18 12:38 PM

Untitled-74 1

2/27/18 10:38 AM


STATEof THEarts

Short Takes on Five Vermont Books

B Y MA R GO T HARRISON, PA MEL A P O LST ON, ELIZABET H M. SEY LER & SADIE WIL L IAMS

22 STATE OF THE ARTS

SEVEN DAYS

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

S

even Days writers can’t possibly read, much less review, all the books that arrive in a steady stream by post, email and, in one memorable case, a skulk of foxes. So this monthly feature is our way of introducing you to a handful of books by Vermont authors. To do that, we contextualize each book just a little and quote a single representative sentence from, yes, page 32 (or nearest to it). Inclusion here implies neither approval nor derision on our part, but simply: Here are a bunch of books, arranged alphabetically by authors’ names, that Seven Days readers might like to know about.  Contact: elizabeth@sevendaysvt.com, margot@sevendaysvt.com, pamela@sevendaysvt.com, sadie@sevendaysvt.com

“We Are All FastFood Workers Now”: The Global Uprising Against Poverty Wages

So Be It

Ralph Culver, WolfGang Press, 20 pages. $8.

Cutting carrots for soup, I’m distracted by the trees outside the window, their branches making sweeping gestures through pale air half an hour before sundown, officious yet somehow disinterested…

T

Ivory and Paper: Adventures in and Out of Time

Ray Hudson, University of Alaska Press, 236 pages. $16.95.

Annelise Orleck, Beacon Press, 298 pages. $18.

Since 2012, Walmart workers have struck on every Black Friday — in the US and around the world. In 2014, Chilean workers shut down every Walmart in that country.

hirteen poems from RALPH CULVER come with high praise from former Vermont poet laureate SYDNEY LEA, who calls him one of “New England’s truly distinguished voices.” Culver, who lives in South Burlington, has been published in numerous poetry journals and graduated with an MFA from Warren Wilson College. His verse is dense but sometimes deft in its manipulations. He draws in everything from cold spring air to solitary red-winged blackbirds to grimy chrome ashtrays to the smell of gasoline to create tense, introspective verses that ground the reader in a landscape. While that landscape is Vermont’s for the most part, there are no passive cows or sweet scents of hay to be found here. Culver opts instead for skidding tires on slippery March roads and “slanted sunlight over a stream in late autumn” that illuminates the blue veins visible beneath the skin of a hand. One or two pieces fall into the familiar poetic well of liquor and feel appropriately depressing. And that’s good. Comfort can be a curse, and the poems in So Be It are by no means comfortable or comforting in their subject matter or their tricky phrasing. In works that frequently take Vermont as their physical setting, this crisp and complex viewpoint is refreshing.

In Vermont, 13-year-old Booker acquires a bookmark that has the power to transport him anywhere in the space-time continuum where its companion book is being read. In the Aleutian Islands, 15-yearold Anna, a descendant of the indigenous Unangax people, finds a powerful artifact that has been looted by outsiders. With the aid of both these talismans, the two embark on an adventure that takes them deep into Unangan history and folklore, where they tangle with fantastical antagonists such as the Real Raven and Summer-FaceWoman. Middlebury author RAY HUDSON has lived in the Aleutians and authored several nonfiction books about the region; last year, the Alaska Historical Society gave him an award for his long-term contributions. In this, his first novel, he brings the verdant, treeless islands to life in evocative prose, whether describing a modern harbor or a ceremonial parka made of bird skin and seal fur.

Walmart employees, farmworkers, hotel housekeepers, garment workers, home health care aides, airport workers, adjunct professors and others around the globe are rebelling against the negative impacts of globalization. Among these, writes Dartmouth College history professor ANNELISE ORLECK, are “poverty wages, the disappearance of public services (education, health care, water), the transformation of workers into independent contractors … disrespect, sexual harassment and violence, mass evictions and disregard of people’s land rights.” Based on research she conducted in Bangladesh, Cambodia, Mexico, the Philippines, South Africa and the U.S., Orleck’s book describes the global “precariat” — the postindustrial working class of people whose employment and income are insecure — and efforts to build social movements. Peppered throughout are examples of struggles, successes and visions for a future that ensures living wages and dignified work. The author of five books on the history of American women, politics, immigration and activism will speak on her latest publication on Thursday, March 22, 6:30 p.m., at Phoenix Books Burlington.

S . W.

M .H .

E.M .S .

The scenes on the bookmark show places where the book that you’re holding is being read.


GOT AN ARTS TIP? ARTNEWS@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

The Most Hated Man in America: Jerry Sandusky and the Rush to Judgment Mark Pendergrast, Sunbury Press, 400 pages. $19.95.

Once the idea of possible molestation is planted, most people become obsessed with knowing whether it is true or not.

Comments: A porta-potty is available in the summer.

Untitled-29 1

3/5/18 5:10 PM

Untitled-26 1

3/5/18 4:09 PM

SEVEN DAYS STATE OF THE ARTS 23

In 1981, Vermont geographer and fly fisherman PETER SHEA published the first Atlas. Sales of three editions over the next dozen years testified to the book’s popularity with local and visiting anglers. The guides’ inventory and descriptions of the state’s 150 or so water bodies not only provided basic geographic information but helped trout seekers navigate some of Vermont’s can’tget-there-from-here back roads. Now comes a 21st-century version: “GPS-compatible” means that Shea has used Google Earth technology to update the previous books to the nth degree. Nowadays, travelers might choose to employ their own GPS or other navigation tool to reach a destination — or reference the six maps in Shea’s guide. Once they’ve arrived at their chosen site, fishermen and -women can make use of the book’s info on fish populations and stocking data, invasive species, boat access or rentals, hiking, perks such as restrooms, and more. The straightforward writing and standard formatting for each pond’s page encourage less reading, more fishing. Shea discusses his book on Thursday, March 19, 6:30 p.m., at Phoenix Books Burlington.

03.07.18-03.14.18

P.P.

Peter Shea, Wind Knot Publishing, 148 pages. $16.95.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

MARK PENDERGRAST’s fourth book on the topic of repressed memory may be his most controversial. Along with its subhead, his publicity statement indicates the direction of this exhaustively researched volume: “Everyone knows the story of Jerry Sandusky, the serial pedophile, the Monster. But what if the story is wrong?” In 2012, Sandusky, a retired Pennsylvania State University assistant football coach, was convicted of multiple counts of child molestation over many years. The scandal, or its cover-up, also brought down head coach Joe Paterno, the university president and two other administrators; Penn State has paid out millions of dollars to alleged victims of the abuse. The author fiercely discounts the validity of accusations based on repressed memories and therapists who have, in his view, invented them; and he tears into the evidence, or lack thereof, against Sandusky. Pendergrast’s charge of a “moral panic” is plausible — such phenomena surely did not end with the Salem witch trials. Though he eventually allows that “readers will of course make up their own minds,” Pendergrast does his best to persuade us that Sandusky is — or at least could be — the real victim.

The New Atlas of Vermont Trout Ponds: A GPS-Compatible Guidebook

P. P.


STATEof THEarts

Island Stage Presents Inaugural Play in South Hero

THEATER

G

rand Isle resident NONI STUART wants to dispel the notion that the commute from Burlington to the Lake Champlain Islands is long. “It’s a really short 30 minutes from anywhere in Burlington,” she says. “It’s an easy and beautiful drive, in fact.” Stuart is president of ISLAND STAGE, a new theater company based in the islands. When Island Stage opens its debut season this Friday, March 9, in South Hero, she hopes it will attract audiences from Burlington, as well as other cities in Vermont, New York and Canada. “Our mission is to provide quality performing arts opportunities in the Lake Champlain Islands and offer [a] year-round theater presence,” Stuart says. Stuart, who is in her mid-sixties, is originally from Montréal but has spent her entire adult life in Vermont. A retired massage therapist and psychotherapist, she has acted with several local theatrical groups, including LOST NATION THEATER in Montpelier, UNADILLA THEATRE in Marshfield, VALLEY PLAYERS THEATER in Waitsfield and the SHELBURNE PLAYERS. Island Stage has been several years in the making and recently received tax-exempt, nonprofit status. Six people, including Stuart, serve on the board of directors; all are volunteers. “We aren’t here to replace any other performing arts organization,” Stuart says. “We want to be very humble and inclusive and work with others.” The group aims to eventually build a wellequipped arts center that will serve as a hub for the performing NONI ST UART arts, she notes. In the interim, Island Stage will present shows in venues throughout Grand Isle County. “I’m thrilled that we have a new theater company to bring more people to the islands,” says KATYA WILCOX, president of ISLAND ARTS, which serves as the area’s arts

COURTESY OF PAULA BRADLEY

B Y K Y MELYA SA R I

Left to right: Vivian Jordan, Noni Stuart, Carli Harris, Justin Gardner, Bill Pelton and Mary Scripps

council. The islands are becoming an arts destination, she asserts. Island Stage launches its inaugural season with the 2013 Tony Award-winning play Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike by Christopher Durang. The comedy revolves around two middle-aged siblings who feel confused and resentful when their moviestar sister suddenly arrives with her new boy toy and threatens to sell the family house in which the siblings live. Stuart is producing the play and performing as Masha. JUSTIN GARDNER, CARLI HARRIS, VIVIAN JORDAN, BILL PELTON and MARY SCRIPPS make up the rest of the cast; BOB CARMODY directs. Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike will be staged at the FOLSOM EDUCATION & COMMUNITY CENTER in South Hero. Island Stage plans to produce three shows annually. In July, it will present The Great Kooshog Lake Hollis McCauley Fishing Derby by Canadian playwright Norm Foster; and, in November, Love Letters by A.R. Gurney. Anyone is welcome to audition, says Stuart.

WE WANT TO BE VERY HUMBLE AND INCLUSIVE

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

AND WORK WITH OTHERS.

She stresses that Island Stage is keen to work with businesses to revitalize and strengthen the local economy. And she’s making good on that pledge. Theatergoers who dine at Blue Paddle Bistro on Route 2 will get $5 off their tickets for the Friday and Saturday shows of Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike. Love Letters will be a dinner-theater experience at the North Hero House Inn & Restaurant. Given Vermont’s long winters, Stuart hopes that Island Stage will create opportunities for audiences from near and far to be entertained, have fun and be educated. She adds, “I think the importance of having a place where community can gather is so vital.” m Contact: kymelya@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike, Friday, March 9 and 16, and Saturday, March 10 and 17, 7 p.m.; and Sunday, March 11 and 18, 2 p.m., at Folsom Education & Community Center, Folsom Elementary School, in South Hero. $12-15. Not recommended for viewers under 12. islandstage.org

COME CHECK OUT OUR NEWEST GRANT RECIPIENTS EXHIBIT OPENING! Series Sponsors

24 STATE OF THE ARTS

SEVEN DAYS

Friday, March 2, 5-8PM Featuring work by Vermont artists Irene Lederer LaCroix, Dianne Shullenberger, Eve Jacobs-Carnahan, Jeremy Ayres, Holly Walker, Jon Black, and others.

107 Church Street, Burlington 864-7146 • opticalcentervt.com

Prescription Eyewear & Sunglasses 8H-opticalctr122717.indd 1

12/11/17 11:53 AM

85 Church St. | Burlington | 863-6458 | WWW.FROGHOLLOW.ORG 8H-froghollow022818.indd 1

2/21/18 4:27 PM


DRAWN+paneled

NOVEL GRAPHICS FROM THE CENTER FOR CARTOON STUDIES

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 03.07.18-03.14.18 SEVEN DAYS

SHASHWAT MISHRA is a Center for Cartoon Studies graduate currently

ART 25

living in Mumbai, India, but he doesn’t know where he’ll be in a month. He likes winters and loves a good steak. So invite him over for dinner someday.

DRAWN & PANELED IS A COLLABORATION BETWEEN SEVEN DAYS AND THE CENTER FOR CARTOON STUDIES IN WHITE RIVER JUNCTION, FEATURING WORKS BY PAST AND PRESENT STUDENTS. FOR MORE INFO, VISIT CCS ONLINE AT CARTOONSTUDIES.ORG.


THE STRAIGHT DOPE BY CECIL ADAMS

Dear Cecil,

Disappointed in your answer regarding infectious diseases. Ten million annual deaths by 2050 not! Bacteriophages to the rescue. Maybe you should answer the question: What are bacteriophages?

— Jerry Novoryta

outright. Phages are crucial in maintaining the world’s microbial equilibrium; every day, they kill off 40 percent of all bacterial cells in the ocean. What with their proven know-how at offing microbes, you can understand why we might want to try aiming them at the infectious ones. And, in fact, phages have been admired for their antibacterial potential since their discovery just over a century ago. After showing some initial promise, research on phage therapy to treat bacterial infection lost steam once antibiotics came along in the ’40s and took over the bug-fighting game, at least in the West. Behind the Iron Curtain, where doctors lacked broad access to our antibiotics buffet, phage therapy remained a subject of hotter scientific pursuit, notably at a facility in Tbilisi, Georgia. Phages are back on everyone’s radar now, though here in the U.S. we still aren’t at full speed on testing — not much thus far in the kind of doubleblind controlled clinical trials, for instance, that the Food

& Drug Administration likes to see before it green-lights a treatment for widespread use. What we have instead are largely case studies — anecdotal but certainly intriguing. Consider Tom Patterson, a 69-year-old psych professor at the University of California, San Diego, who picked up an antibiotic-resistant strain of Acinetobacter baumannii while on vacation in Egypt in 2015. When the infection spread from his pancreas and through his system at large, he went into septic shock and fell into a coma. Luckily for Patterson, his wife, Steffanie Strathdee, happens to be an infectious-disease epidemiologist who heard from a colleague about a patient who’d sought phage treatment in Tbilisi. With Patterson having basically reached the end of the line options-wise, Strathdee was able to persuade the UCSD medical team to acquire some phages and pump them into his bloodstream, to great effect: out of the coma within three days, bacteria all gone  within three months.

cocktails or using gene-editing technology to engineer new ones altogether. The regulatory apparatus in the U.S. and Europe, meanwhile, isn’t really set up to deal with phages, because there’s a virtually limitless variety of them and no established courses of treatment to which to give approval. One idea that’s been floated is to create preapproved national phage libraries, from which doctors could select to match whatever infection needed zapping. Backing up our beleaguered antibiotics would presumably be phages’ most important task, but that’s not the end of their promise: They’ve been seen to be effective on gangrene and foodborne illnesses like salmonella and E. coli, as well as in hand washes to prevent the spread of staph in hospitals. And unlike antibiotics, phages won’t disturb your body’s bacterial balance but in fact (boosters predict) can be targeted to improve the gut microbiome. If you think you hear people talking up probiotics all the time now, wait until they want to tell you about the new phage-smoothie bar down the street.

INFO

Is there something you need to get straight? Cecil Adams can deliver the Straight Dope on any topic. Send questions to Cecil via straightdope.com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.

SEVEN DAYS

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

T

hat’s an optimistic take, Jerry, and it may yet prove right. But optimism doesn’t typically get everyone off their asses and into problem-solving mode, which was the point of that UK governmental report I cited in the December column you’re referring to. Worldwide, we’re already losing 700,000 people a year to infections that won’t respond to antibiotics; in 30 years, the Brits concluded, that could be 10 million if we don’t buckle down now. The report didn’t mention bacteriophages, probably because research still hasn’t gotten to where we can really think of them as a silver bullet. In general, though, phages (as they’re known) tend to get less coverage than you’d figure they deserve, if only in that they outnumber all other organisms on Earth put together — there are 10 million trillion trillion of them out there. So what are they? They’re viruses that infect bacteria, sometimes modifying their activity, sometimes killing them

With stories like this turning up, and with the antibiotics situation looking ever bleaker, the West is coming around to the phage way of thinking. Right now, clinical trials in Europe are examining phages’ effectiveness on burn-related infection, and two small-scale trials are getting under way in the U.S. in 2018. Still, there are some roadblocks. As discussed here back in December, one obstacle to the development of better antibiotics is pharmaceutical companies and their eye for the bottom line; cynically but correctly, they see pouring a couple billion into developing a new antibiotic as a bad investment, since sooner or later bacteria will evolve to resist it, too. Antimicrobial phages pose similar problems and more: They’re not intended for chronic use (i.e., the lucrative kind), and since they exist in nature and the basic treatment premise was established decades ago, legally it might be tricky to patent them as intellectual property. A 2014 Nature article reported on ways biotech firms might get around this: combining multiple phages into patentable

600

PHARMACIES ARE WAITING.

26 STRAIGHT DOPE

TA K E T H E N E X T S T E P

ACPHS.EDU/VERMONT VERMONT CAMPUS Untitled-13 1

1/31/18 3:49 PM


HACKIE

A VERMONT CABBIE’S REAR VIEW BY JERNIGAN PONTIAC

Marvin and Waylon Come North

A

“Well, put it this way,” I replied, pausing to best land the joke. “It ain’t Texas.” “No, I suppose not,” Marvin said, chuckling. He was a gentle and round middle-aged man with fine, sandy-colored hair. “This is as far north as I’ve ever traveled,” he volunteered. “I rarely get out of Houston. Now that I think about it, this is the first time I’ve ever seen real snow.”

As if on cue, a meow emanated from the canvas carrying case at his feet. “Now, now, Waylon,” he cooed. “Be a good boy. We’re almost there.” “Don’t tell me,” I said. “Named for Waylon Jennings?” “The one and only,” he affirmed with a laugh. The ferry slowed to a crawl and joggled into its landing dock. Our turn came,

I WONDERED WHAT HAD DRAWN MARVIN OUT OF THE LAND OF ARMADILLOS AND INTO YANKEE COUNTRY. Our enclosed chamber felt cozy, with the drone of the boat’s engine and muffled ice-breaking creating an oddly comforting backdrop. I wondered what had drawn Marvin out of the land of armadillos and into Yankee country. So I asked him just that, substituting — for clarity — “Lone Star State” for “land of armadillos.” “Well, I’m here to visit Travis, a dear old friend of mine who lives in Plattsburgh and is quite ill. He lived in Houston for many years and, for most of that time, we were roommates. For, like, a minute we were a couple, but both quickly realized that didn’t make much sense. So we became close friends, which is in some ways just as deep.” “How long are you up here for?” I asked. “Well, that’s open-ended. Hence the cat.”

and we drove off onto dry New York land. Approaching the traffic light at Route 9, I pointed out Gus’ Red Hots, a restaurant and local landmark. “That’s so old-fashioned,” he said. “You know, calling hot dogs ‘red hots.’” “Yeah, I think you’ll find that’s true about a lot of things in New York’s North Country. You can see it in the signage and the stores and the architecture. Life seems to be frozen in, like, 1958. It’s kind of quaint and depressing at the same time.” We turned onto Interstate 87 south for a short stretch. Travis resided in an apartment house located north of the downtown area and populated by seniors and folks with disabilities. I was employing the GPS to find the place, even though I probably knew the way without satellite assistance. Despite fighting it

every step of the way, I have succumbed: I am officially a digital wuss. Travis’ building was huge, perhaps a dozen stories, rising like a monadnock from its flat surroundings. Indeed, it was nearly a twin to Decker Towers Apartments, a senior-living facility in Burlington and the tallest building in Vermont. Travis was waiting outside for us as we pulled up to the main entrance. He sat in a wheelchair with a breathing tube affixed to his nose. His legs and torso appeared withered; his skin was grayish. But his bright eyes glistened. Waylon the cat — who evidently had a feeling for big moments like this — began meowing again. Marvin got out and walked over to his friend, crouching to take him in a warm, extended embrace. Decoupling, they faced each other, hands touching hands. “Marvin, has it been seven years?” Travis asked. “More like 10, I think, but who’s counting?” Marvin said, chuckling. “All I know is, it’s good to see you again. Now we’re going to get you all better.” Travis smiled wistfully. I could almost hear his unspoken thought: OK, my old friend, that’s how we’ll play it. “In God’s will, Travis,” he said softly. “All better.” m All these stories are true, though names and locations may be altered to protect privacy.

INFO Hackie is a twice-monthly column that can also be read on sevendaysvt.com. To reach Jernigan, email hackie@sevendaysvt.com.

03.07.18-03.14.18

The Archive Center

— We store it. We file it. We deliver it!

46 Swift Street, South Burlington, Vermont n8h-EasySelfStorage0318.indd 1

www.easyselfstoragellc.com 2/22/18 1:30 PM

$8.00 OFF

17 pt. Super-Service Oil Change

1691 Shelburne Rd., S. Burlington 951-0290 | Susie Wilson Rd., Essex Junction 879-2707 Expires 03/18/18 7days 8H-oilngo030718.indd 1

3/5/18 1:43 PM

HACKIE 27

Call for a free consultation: 802-863-8300

Let us service you!

WE SE RVICE A COND IR ITIONIN G!

SEVEN DAYS

We are a full-service document storage center. We provide: • Climate-controlled document storage • Same-day delivery and pick-up to most locations in Chittenden County • Monthly-to-month contracts, no hidden fees • Destruction services

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ll of the other ferry passengers had the good sense to remain in their heated vehicles, but something drew me out. Informing Marvin, my customer, that I’d be right back, I pulled my woolen hat down over my ears and ventured forth. The night sky was moonless, and the wind cried Mary as I made my way to the bow, where three suspended horizontal chains marked the tenuous dividing line between dry safety and man overboard. A single spotlight illuminated the vessel’s way forward across Lake Champlain, revealing the source of a bone-rattling sound. The din was all encompassing, akin to standing six feet from a passing freight train. This winter had been marked by long stretches of subzero temperatures, freezing the big lake like we hadn’t seen in years. To counter Mother Nature (and stay in business), the Grand IslePlattsburgh ferry ran all day and night, breaking up the ice sufficiently to maintain a navigable channel — but only just. The water’s surface was a black, chunky stew of silvery floes and shards of white. The ambient roar was generated by the ferryboat’s flat steel bottom smashing through the vast, icy carpet. If this sounds dangerous, I took solace in the fact that Lake Champlain Ferries has been in continuous operation since 1826, with nary a Titanic-like incident. My mind blown and senses stimulated, I returned to the taxi. “What’s it like out there?” Marvin asked. He had been in a state of wonder over the weather from the moment we stepped out of the airport terminal in Burlington.


Greta Solsaa speaking at the March for Our Future in January

E

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 03.07.18-03.14.18 SEVEN DAYS 28 FEATURE

The young survivors of the Valentine’s Day slayings are making significant progress on restricting access to firearms — more so than any other group that’s tried since Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold gunned down their classmates at Colorado’s Columbine High School in 1999. Two hundred school shootings later, a movement is under way, and teens are driving the conversation. “The main message is that we’re young people, and we care about what’s happening at our school, and we want there to be some sort of action,” said Sophia Venturo, a 17-year-old senior at Bellows Free Academy in St. Albans. Venturo and a committee of students are planning their own version of the National School Walkout on March 14. They’ll exit the building for 17 minutes to honor the 17 school shooting victims in Florida, she said, but whether or not the demonstration is silent remains up for debate. The students also aren’t in agreement on what changes they’d like to see, according to Venturo. Some advocate for stricter gun laws, while others would rather see armed teachers or guards on campus, she said. Such activism is common among college kids, but this generation of Vermont high schoolers appears to be engaging earlier in responses to current events. Last year, student journalists at Burlington High School petitioned the Vermont legislature to better protect their free-speech rights, and their bill passed the Senate. In South Burlington, Isaiah Hines led the charge in getting the high school to drop its Rebels nickname, which many thought had racist connotations. Now a first-year student at Columbia University, he’s getting an award for his activism on March 15, the day after the national protest. At the same award ceremony, the Burlington-based Peace & Justice Center is also honoring a slam poetry quartet of local high schoolers known as Muslim Girls Making Change. The young women — Hawa Adam, Kiran Waqar, Lena Ginawi and Balkisa Abdikadir — “have used their words to challenge gender roles, fight racism and stand up for social justice,” Seven Days reported in 2017. The year before, they were on the Huffington Post’s list of “17 Muslim American Women Who Made America Great.” Adam was among the student activists who lobbied successfully to hoist the Black Lives Matter flag at BHS, just a few weeks after Montpelier became the first high school in the nation to do so. Waqar testified before the Vermont Senate Judiciary Committee on February 22, urging action on gun-control legislation. Like many Vermont youth, she was shaken not just by the Parkland massacre, but by events closer to home:

COURTESY OF GRETA SOLSAA

xactly one month after the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., Vermont students across the state plan to walk out of their classrooms to protest gun violence on March 14.

VERMONT TEENS ARE RAISING THEIR VOICES TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE STORY: SEVEN DAYS STAFF • ILLUSTRATIONS: AARON SHREWSBURY In January, police gunned down a robbery suspect on school grounds in Montpelier; more recently, a young man’s foiled plan to commit mass murder at Fair Haven Union High School “changed completely” Republican Gov. Phil Scott, who is now open to legislation designed to make Vermont safer. Waqar’s onstage experience served her well at the Statehouse. “When we leave an event, and a person tells us that they were inspired and want to make a change, it is the most amazing thing,” she told Seven Days in 2017 about the exhilaration she felt speaking to a room full of people. “If they take action, just imagine the ripple effect.” In Vermont, young people are doing just that. Future leaders are raising their voices for Abenaki, disabled, transgender and unborn people who lack representation. Here are seven who aim to turn ripples into waves.  For more information about March 14’s National School Walkout, visit 7dvt.co/school-walkout. For more information about March 24’s March for Our Lives, visit marchforourlives.com.


COURTESY OF MOLLY THOMPSON

There’s a lot of fear that comes from not understanding the issue. Greta Solsaa, 16, Rutland High School

D

espite being nervous, Greta Solsaa sounded confident when she stepped up to the podium on January 20 to address 4,000 activists on the Statehouse lawn in Montpelier.

Molly Thompson, 16, Woodstock Union High School

L

WE THE YOUNG PEOPLE

» P.30

FEATURE 29

KE N P I C ARD

SEVEN DAYS

ike many social activists, Molly Thompson didn’t choose her cause — it chose her. The 16-year-old Hartland native was born with Pfeiffer syndrome, a rare genetic disorder that causes the bones of the skull to fuse prematurely, resulting in various physical anomalies and health challenges. In her case, Thompson lives with a tracheotomy tube and uses hearing aids. When Thompson was a third grader at Hartland Elementary School, just before one of her many corrective surgeries — she’s had more than 30 — she gave a presentation to her classmates about her condition and invited her plastic surgeon to explain the procedure. Her teacher was so impressed with the presentation that she asked Thompson to repeat it for the entire school. “I remember feeling quite empowered,” Thompson said. “Maybe it was an innate talent for public speaking, or maybe it was just the natural confidence of a child. I wanted people to know my story, and it just somehow came naturally to me.” In middle school, Thompson was invited back to Hartland Elementary to give yet another talk to the students. There, she met Sam Drazin, a Norwichborn educator and founder of Changing Perspectives. The Vermont nonprofit creates school curricula for teaching students empathy for, and acceptance of, people with disabilities and other differences. Drazin, who also grew up with a rare genetic disorder, was so impressed with Thompson’s poise that he invited her to be a guest speaker in his program. Since 2016, Thompson has visited 10 schools and spoken to more than 1,000 students throughout Vermont. “I knew right from the beginning that Molly was someone who had a lot to share, who had an inspiring story, and who had the confidence and courage within herself to share it,” Drazin recalled. “Not everybody has it.” Though Pfeiffer syndrome is rare, affecting one in 100,000 people, Thompson said she’s never felt isolated by her disability but instead has made many friends through her activism. “When I speak to students, I want to spread awareness about my disability, but more importantly, I want them to know that I’m a normal girl who is just like them in many ways,” she explained. “These challenges don’t define me. Disabled or not, I’m still relatable.” Thompson said she is often asked about her future plans. Now a junior at Woodstock Union High School, she has yet to decide what career she’ll pursue. It will likely incorporate some form of activism. Among her favorite questions to answer, she added, is a thought-provoking one: If you had a choice to live without your disability, would you? “I always answer no, because I feel my disability and the challenges that came with it have made me who I am today,” she explained. “Without these experiences, I wouldn’t be the same person.”

03.07.18-03.14.18

K AT I E JI C K L I N G

Disabled or not, I’m still relatable.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Before the “mind-boggling” crowd, the 16-year-old encouraged her peers to speak up. “Though I know it can be difficult in a world that is trying to silence you, never forget your voice,” she said. “Never forget that we are the future, and we have something to say about it.” Solsaa’s speech was the culmination of nine months of planning for the March for Our Future, a youth-led rally to advocate for human rights and dignity on the first anniversary of the Women’s March. It wasn’t the young activist’s first organizing effort; in 2016, she helped start an Amnesty International chapter at Rutland High School, where she’s a junior. Local reactions to a plan to resettle Syrian refugees in the surrounding community helped spark her early interest in human rights. To help those resistant to the plan understand the crisis in that country, her group sponsored a movie screening and discussion about it. Despite their efforts, the federal government halted the refugee program after just

a few Syrian families had moved to the area. Solsaa, meanwhile, has become Amnesty International’s student activist coordinator for the entire state, serving as a liaison and spokesperson for Vermont’s three high school Amnesty groups. “Greta’s a quiet ember that just keeps burning,” said Marsha Cassel, a Rutland High School humanities teacher who serves as the Amnesty chapter’s adviser. “And she’s tenacious.” Cassel has witnessed Solsaa latch on to issues, including Amnesty’s efforts to lobby Vermont lawmakers for limits on solitary confinement for incarcerated youth. The young woman is currently helping to organize a March 24 protest in downtown Rutland, one of many to be held across the country that day in response to the Florida school shooting. She hopes to attract hundreds of southern Vermont students as part of “a continuation of youth seizing our power.” Solsaa has also begun a campaign to get her own school to fly a Black Lives Matter flag, after successful student efforts in Montpelier and Burlington. She sees her work as a way to bridge differences through education. “Oftentimes, I don’t think people are actively trying to be malicious or shut an event down — it’s just that they don’t understand,” Solsaa said. “There’s a lot of fear that comes from not understanding the issue.” The optimistic Vermont teen aspires to be a diplomat, or perhaps an advocate for a nonprofit such as Human Rights Watch. Politics is also a possibility, said Solsaa, who expresses herself through poetry and art. “There is so much to change,” she said, “but there is also so much to be hopeful about.”

Molly Thompson speaking at a local school


We the Young People « P.29

I write about being trans.

Nathan DeGroot, 16, Montpelier High School

B

efore Nathan DeGroot found himself at the Northeastern Family Institute Hospital Diversion Program, an inpatient facility for suicidal teens, he had used a girl’s name. But he checked in as a boy, and when he walked out of the hospital three days later, he kept that identity. Finally, something felt right. DeGroot said he lived for years “feeling super uncomfortable in my body.” He didn’t realize being a boy was an option until 2015, when he shadowed a student at Montpelier High School who had a trans friend. “I met him and was like, Oh no, this is it!” DeGroot recalled. Coming out after his 2016 hospitalization, and

working through that fear, likely saved DeGroot’s life. Now he’s trying to do the same for others. During his sophomore year, he got involved with an online forum called What’s the Story? The Vermont Young People Social Action Team, which encourages students to connect by exploring social issues. Through that platform, DeGroot joined a group called Breaking Binary, which aimed to promote awareness of trans identity and value in a classroom setting. The group created a 30-minute documentary to raise awareness for trans students, as well as shorter videos to help teachers make their classrooms more inclusive. As a trans teen, DeGroot is acutely aware of safety, too. The soon-to-be 17-year-old spoke on the steps of the Statehouse last month in support of three gun-control bills. DeGroot related, somewhat gleefully, that he addressed Gov. Phil Scott during a press

Nathan DeGroot at a Gun Sense Vermont rally in Montpelier

conference, saying that the governor’s stance on one of the bills “was not a definitive answer.” He may have been speaking out of turn, he noted, but at least he was speaking up. Now a junior, DeGroot is part of a school club planning a speaker series for next year on “social sustainability” issues and organizing a concert to benefit Spectrum Youth & Family Services and the Vermont Ibutwa Initiative, a nonprofit that provides aid to the Democratic Republic of Congo. He recently started writing poetry. “I write about

The one thing I’d like to do is give back to the people.

30 FEATURE

SEVEN DAYS

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Lauren Ryea, 17, Missisquoi Valley Union High School

I

t wasn’t too long ago that Abenakis in Vermont had to hide their identity to avoid being targeted by the state’s eugenics program. But today, Lauren Ryea, a senior at Missisquoi Valley Union High School in Swanton, proudly embraces her Native American heritage. “She’s the real deal,” said Jeff Benay, director of the federally funded Indian Education program for Franklin County. He’s known Ryea since she was a preschooler. “Lauren exemplifies the values and commitment the local Abenaki community takes pride in, and she is certainly one of the young people who will one day take her place as a community leader.” The unassuming teen has volunteered at Circle of Courage, an afterschool cultural program for Abenaki and non-Abenaki students, since she was in seventh grade. Today, 34 students are in the program, which teaches Abenaki dancing, drumming and artwork. Once a year, they perform for the third-grade class

at Malletts Bay School in Colchester, where Benay’s wife is the principal. Ryea has put in more than 2,000 hours volunteering at the center in the last six years, estimated program director Brenda Gagne. “She’s a part of the heartbeat of our community,” said Gagne, who’s also Ryea’s aunt and guardian. The 17-year-old is a “fancy shawl” dancer, which means she can participate in competitions at powwows, but she chooses not to. “I dance because I enjoy it and don’t believe in competing,” said Ryea. She first attended Circle of Courage as a young child. In 2012, when she was 12 and the Missisquoi tribe gained state recognition, the group performed in front of the Statehouse in Montpelier. Ryea was shy until her peers elected her to take over as drum leader at the end of sixth grade, Gagne

Lauren Ryea doing a “fancy shawl” dance at a powwow


Life is precious.

Celine Morris, 18, homeschooled in Barton

B JAY ERICSON

SADIE W IL L IAM S

FEATURE 31

» P.32

SEVEN DAYS

WE THE YOUNG PEOPLE

03.07.18-03.14.18

KYM ELYA SARI

DAN BO LLE S

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

COURTESY OF CIRCLE OF COURAGE

noted. Now, the Highgate teen is comfortable in front of large audiences. “It’s a good feeling,” she said. To be a Circle of Courage volunteer, Ryea has to maintain good grades; she’s a straight-A student. In addition, she had to take an oath of purity, promising not to use alcohol, drugs or tobacco. A student representative on the Abenaki Parent Advisory Committee, which oversees all educational and cultural support services for the tribe, Ryea recently pushed the issue of suicide prevention to the forefront after the death of a schoolmate last year. A difficult upbringing may explain her outsize empathy for others. The youngest of three girls, Ryea was in third grade when she and her sisters were taken out of their home to live with Gagne. Their biological parents, who struggled with substance and alcohol abuse, were deemed unfit to care for their children. Both of Ryea’s sisters are now in college. “To watch them push through, make something of themselves, is really just inspiring to me,” said Ryea, who wants to become a surgeon. “The one thing I’d like to do is give back to the people,” she said. “If I can try to save lives and give them another chance at it, it’d be worth” the hard work.

killing the next generation. Just think about who that life could have been: the next great president. A great doctor.” Like each of her 12 siblings, Morris was homeschooled by her mother — her father is a long-haul truck driver. She studies tae kwon do and is nearly a black belt. She also works as a certified emergency medical responder in Barton and is just a written exam away from her emergency medical technician certification. Recently, Morris won an oratorical contest held by her local American Legion on the topic of gun control — she’s against it. “I’m all for the Second Amendment,” she said. This fall, Morris will attend the Franciscan University of Steubenville in Ohio, where she plans to study political science with the long-term goal of becoming a defense attorney. “I want to stand up for people who can’t stand up for Celine Morris at themselves,” she the Statehouse said. Morris intends to get involved in the pro-life movement at the Catholic school. “They pray at the abortion clinics, and they raise a lot of awareness that there are other options available,” she said. “Life is precious.” Given that she’s devoted nearly a third of her life to raising awareness around pro-life issues, Morris should fit in just fine at Franciscan. Said Beerworth: “I just hope she comes back.” DAN BOLLES

being trans, and not only being trans but being a boy in a relationship with another boy,” DeGroot said. At a recent open mic at the Vermont College of Fine Arts, he “floored the audience of graduate students,” said Kerrin McCadden, his former English teacher. By making his voice heard, McCadden suggested, DeGroot creates space for others to join him. “His writing is one of the ways he stands up for people,” she said. “And I hope — I trust — that he will have many books on the shelves.”

eing a pro-life activist in Vermont is probably something like being a guncontrol advocate in Alabama. Or, we suppose, it could be akin to being a pro-choice activist in the Yellowhammer State. The point is: It ain’t easy. Mary Beerworth, executive director of the Vermont Right to Life Committee, estimates that 70 percent of state residents identify as pro-choice. Turning that tide — particularly in a state that legalized abortion in 1972, one year ahead of Roe v. Wade — is an uphill battle. Judging by past precedent, it’s also likely a long one, which makes the development of young activists such as Celine Morris paramount to groups like VRLC. “We’re always looking for youth,” said Beerworth. Though Morris has only interned for a few weeks with the Montpelier-based nonprofit, the Barton native has organized fundraisers for the lobby group since she was 13 through Vermont Teens for Life. Among other moneymaking initiatives, VTFL sells roses on Mother’s Day, runs “baby bottle drives” and hosts bingo at the Orleans County Fair each summer. In January, the group places small crosses on a snowy hill in Barton to represent “all the babies that were killed,” explained Morris. Morris, 18, said she came to the pro-life movement both by her Catholic conviction and familial example. She is the third youngest of 13 children, three of whom were adopted. “I’m very pro-life,” she said with a chuckle, adding that her family is generally politically conservative. “I love life, and I think that, from the moment of conception, it’s a soul,” Morris continued. “It’s just sad to think that we are


We the Young People « P.31

I’m faced with these problems every day. Joelyn Mensah, 18, Montpelier High School

T

32 FEATURE

SEVEN DAYS

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

wo years ago, Joelyn Mensah gathered with her fellow students to hear Major Jackson, the celebrated Burlingtonbased African American poet, in a Montpelier High School assembly. Mensah heard someone in the crowd use the N-word. “I was not shocked at all,” Mensah, now 18 and a senior, told Seven Days. But she was upset. Mensah sought out her school’s social worker, Mary Ellen Solon, who helped her connect with other students of color. The teen went on to found the school’s Racial Justice Alliance. Eight of its 25 members are black, at a school where only 18 of 350 students are African American. Mensah and other students of color chronicled specific incidents of racism they’d experienced in school, from inappropriate jokes to feeling they’d be

brushed aside or ignored if they raised their concerns to adults. With the help of MHS principal Mike McRaith, the group presented its findings at a faculty meeting. The teachers were surprised and appalled, according to Mensah. “School’s supposed to be a place where you’re safe and where you’re in an environment to thrive,” Mensah reflected. “The racism that was going on was distracting from my learning. I want students in the future to be able to go to school without that being as big of a hurdle as it was for me.” So on February 1, when Montpelier became the first high school in the country to fly the Black Lives Matter flag, it was a personal victory for Mensah. “Some students weren’t on board,” she said of the RJA’s crowning achievement; they didn’t believe the school

should be a place to express political opinions. National media attention brought backlash from beyond the local community, too. “I wasn’t really anticipating all the attention,” Mensah said, “so when it did come, it kind of shocked me.” In honor of Black History Month, the student group went on to orchestrate classroom screenings of 13th, a documentary on mass incarceration. It organized a school-wide “privilege walk” during which students took steps forward according to aspects of their identity and circumstances of their upbringing. “The work I do for the RJA is more

Joelyn Mensah raising the Black Lives Matter flag at Montpelier High School

than I do for any class right now,” Mensah admitted. Still, her transcript is a mixture of As and Bs, and she’s a self-identified “math geek” — both of her parents are accountants. Mensah is anxiously waiting to hear from her top two college choices: Smith College in Northampton, Mass., and Howard University, a historically black college in Washington, D.C. She hopes to study medicine and to

I’m tired of watching this happen. I’m tired of feeling powerless. Hannah Pandya, 18, St. Johnsbury Academy

B

lending in with the crowd was not a realistic option for an openly lesbian woman of color growing up in rural Vermont. Hannah Pandya stood out last month, too, in a packed Cedar Creek Room at the Vermont Statehouse, where she urged lawmakers to take decisive action to prevent gun violence. “The time has come over 500 times since the tragedy at Columbine,” the St. Johnsbury Academy senior told the crowd of reporters, students and legislators last month. “The names of these communities are now synonymous with the senseless violence and destruction

wrought by dangerous, unrestricted weapons, many of which are designed to slaughter large numbers of people in a short space of time.” Pandya got her start in activism by supporting LGBTQ efforts at school and in the Northeast Kingdom. The LGBTQ adults in that community inspired her by being “very out and proud and outspoken in an area that can be very harsh and unwelcoming,” Pandya said. One of those mentors is Elisa Lucozzi, pastor of United Community Church in St. Johnsbury, who met Pandya through a youth LGBTQ support group she facilitates. She said

Hannah Pandya speaking at the Statehouse about gun violence

Pandya’s drive as an activist comes from growing up as a minority lesbian in rural Vermont. “I think because she has those pieces

as part of who she is, that has made her … have to be an activist for herself, initially,” Lucozzi said, “and I think that’s motivated her to be an activist for


Better than summer camp. Send them on an expedition!

An Adventure They’ll Never Forget

Champlain Discovery Expedition Champlain Wind, Oar, Explore Shuttle stops in Burlington, Shelburne and Vergennes

FILE: JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

climate.” Staff and students gave her a standing ovation. Though tenaciously dedicated, Mensah admitted that she is not a fan of public speaking. “I only do it out of necessity,” she said. The same is true of her social activism. “For me, it’s not a passion,” she said. “It’s something I have to do because I’m faced with these problems every day.”

those who come behind her.” It was Lucozzi who connected 18-year-old Pandya, of East Montpelier, with the Youth Lobby, the organization that brought student advocates to the Statehouse on February 22. “I think on the gun issue it was just that one moment of, I’m tired of watching this happen, I’m tired of feeling powerless, and here is this opportunity to do this that hasn’t been presented before,” Pandya said. The teen has never handled a gun, but she said attending school in the

Northeast Kingdom has given her a clear sense of the cultural affinity for firearms in Vermont. She doesn’t take issue with the state’s gun culture, but she has problems with policies that make assault rifles easier to buy than scratch-off lottery tickets. A former legislative page, Pandya said her more recent trip to the Statehouse made a big impression. She said she’s now certain she wants to pursue a career in advocacy or nonprofit work, advancing issues that are important to her. Although she’s looking at colleges in the Boston area, Pandya plans to return to Vermont after graduation. Political gridlock, such as that in Washington, D.C., “would be a lot easier to overcome here at the local level,” she said. Meanwhile, she said she’d “continue to pass petitions around, write letters to the editor, take any opportunity that I’m given to speak to the legislators” — including at a rally scheduled for March 24 in Montpelier.

Untitled-30 1

2/26/18 10:11 AM

Untitled-27 1

3/5/18 4:10 PM

RAC HE L E L I ZA B E T H JO N E S

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

FILE: JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

become an ob-gyn focused on the reproductive health of women of color. “Joelyn is a great student and wonderful activist,” McRaith said. “She is as wise as she is brave.” At the 2017 end-of-year assembly, Mensah was given the Solon Award, which recognizes students who have “demonstrated exceptional leadership in helping to build a positive school

d 16 Learn more and apply! Financial aid available. -e 13o c s camps.lcmm.org/expeditions/ e Lake Champlain Maritime Museum - Vergennes, VT ag

03.07.18-03.14.18 SEVEN DAYS FEATURE 33

TAY L O R D O B B S


Ralston Rising

A gallery exhibit brings the “history” of Burlington’s fictional neighbor to life B Y RACHEL EL I ZAB E TH J ON E S PHOTOS: MATTHEW THORSEN

H

ow do you know a place exists? Because you can find it on a map or google it? You see its name emblazoned on a sweatshirt, or written on a souvenir in someone’s kitchen? Perhaps you hear it referenced in conversation, or maybe you’ve met someone who grew up there. Just how a community exists and how it produces artifacts are central questions for novelist and Champlain College associate professor of writing Erik Esckilsen. To explore that question, he created a fictional community. Recently opened at the Champlain College Art Gallery, an exhibition called “Quality of Life: The Ralston Historical Museum” uncannily conjures the life and times of a city close to Esckilsen’s heart: Burlington’s island neighbor, Ralston, which doesn’t exist. “I think of [the exhibition] as a spatial story,” Esckilsen said. Curated by Jane Adams, a Champlain MFA candidate in emergent media, and gallery director Dana Heffern, the show proffers a bevy of Ralston “artifacts.” They range from a lacquered Japanese tea set purportedly gifted by Momofuku Ando, the inventor of instant ramen, to stereoscopic historical images, to a Ralston-branded windshield scraper. Displayed on pedestals or in Plexiglas cases and accompanied by descriptive labels, these relics are presented precisely as they might be in a real museum. A pictorial timeline of Ralston’s history spans the gallery’s northern wall, beginning in 1837 with the logging Thibodeau brothers and ending in 2015 with the election of Zora Dardas, the city’s second female mayor. “[Ralston] is a city that’s constantly trying to outBurlington Burlington,” Esckilsen said. “[It] tries to be more liberal than Burlington.” A monitor plays a short documentary about the origins of the town’s brewery, and an interactive map invites visitors to tie their memories of Ralston to precise locations on the island. This transmedia approach will reward visitors who pay close attention; from the various forms of representation, narrative threads begin to emerge. For a chronicle of a fictional place, the Ralston Historical Museum is shockingly comprehensive. But what end does all this mimicry of real life and real history serve? In that respect, Ralston has dual lives: as the setting for a novel and as a teaching tool. The seeds of Ralston were planted during Esckilsen’s sabbatical in the fall of 2014. Influenced by the work of media scholar Henry Jenkins, Esckilsen began to dive into “storytelling as world-building,” he said. A former journalist (who has contributed to Seven Days) and author of three young-adult novels, Esckilsen knew he wanted to write about community issues and smalltown political culture. With that in mind, he decided

34 FEATURE

SEVEN DAYS

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

CULTURE

RALSTON IS A CITY THAT’S CONSTANTLY TRYING TO OUT-BURLINGTON BURLINGTON. E R IK E S C K IL S E N

Erik Esckilsen (center)


to “start to build the world first and see what kind of stories came out of that.” And so Ralston was born. Its name’s inspiration? Ralston Roast, Esckilsen said — “the Vermont Coffee Company blend that I hit pretty hard when I’m writing.” In November 2014, Esckilsen delivered a presentation on Ralston at a Shelburne Museum-hosted PechaKucha Night. In December 2015, he contributed his short story “The Ralston Snow-Blower Collective” to Seven Days’ Winter Reading Issue. Now, Esckilsen is seeking a publisher for the completed manuscript of his Ralston-based novel, Quality of Life. The book’s protagonist is a city council president, its inciting incident a school budget that doesn’t pass. Sound familiar?

that Ralston is not a utopian project — unlike Sir Thomas More’s Utopia, perhaps the most famous fictional locale in the Western tradition, whose name literally means “nowhere.” Though his students read More’s book, Esckilsen said, “Our tradition is to problematize [and] critique. We don’t sustain the notion of the utopia really for more than a second.” Instead, students are asked to work within limits and constructs that are based on Burlington and reality at large. “It’s not Second Life,” said Esckilsen, referring to the popular online virtual world. “It’s more a community based on real community. What happens in Burlington actually has an impact on what happens in Ralston.” He continued, “It’s really how we negotiate difference day by day that is

WE BUILD DREAMS!

D

reaming of a new deck? We can build your dream into a reality! Call us today for a FREE estimate on a deck, porch or small addition.

davidcone23@comcast.net • www.builtbydc.com Untitled-28 1

Contact us today if you are interested in buying, selling, or investing in real estate!

3/5/18 4:13 PM

THE BUR AK GROUP

VERMONT

Like our !acebook page in the month of March to be entered to win a $100 gift card to

Winner will be announced April 1st.

68 Randall Street | South Burlington 802-861-6431 | www.myhomevermont.com | homes@burakgroup.com

! MikeBurakRealtor $ TheBurakGroup ' Mike Burak ( TheBurakGroup 8h-burakgroupatKW030718.indd 1

3/1/18 2:49 PM

Champlain College Art Gallery

the real work of community.” As Ralston cocreators, students have not only navigated and augmented the city’s history but also helped Esckilsen construct supplemental materials. The city seal originates from a sketch by Champlain third-year Ryan Place, and Esckilsen worked with several students to create Ralston Brewing Company logos and other Ralston-related materials. “People are in the habit of migrating fictional narratives to digital space,” Esckilsen observed. “It doesn’t occur to anybody to re-create material artifacts.” To hear him talk about Ralston is a trip; one could easily be convinced of its authenticity. Of his experiment, Esckilsen said, “It’s more detailed than any other fictional setting I’ve ever created.” m

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 03.07.18-03.14.18 SEVEN DAYS

Contact: rachel@sevendaysvt.com

INFO “Quality of Life: The Ralston Historical Museum,” on view through March 23 at the Champlain College Art Gallery in Burlington. artgallery.champlain.edu.

FEATURE 35

The underlying theme of the story, Esckilsen said, is “the unwitting oppressiveness of a liberal regime. In the fictions, I’m trying to explore the dark side of liberal progressivism.” Ralston’s influence on Esckilsen (or vice versa), however, extends beyond the literary. For three years, he has been introducing Ralston to students in his Champlain College course “The Rhetoric of Community.” The class examines “how communities use rhetoric to negotiate shared geography,” explained Esckilsen. “Ralston becomes one text that we use.” He asks students to learn about Ralston “through inference,” using a host of fabricated materials. They then apply what they’ve gleaned to craft proposals for appropriate additions to Ralston’s community fabric, be those artifacts or landmarks. One year, a student proposed a scenic lighthouse. Perennial topics of contention for the fictitious city council are proposed public artworks and the legalization of marijuana. Weed or no weed, Esckilsen is clear

Untitled-35 1

3/6/18 10:54 AM


Ready, Set, Flow A regional yoga competition comes to South Burlington B Y PA M EL A POL STON

03.07.18-03.14.18 SEVEN DAYS 36 FEATURE

HEALTH

PHOTOS: JAMES BUCK

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

N

ica Thomas stands in front of a small audience and a long mirror and begins her routine. She stretches fluidly from side to side, forward and backward. Seemingly boneless, she bends and twists her spine, balances on her hands and pretzels one leg around her neck, the other around an arm. Nica is 8 years old. With the advantage of youth and gymnastics training, she makes flexibility look effortless. Today she’s rehearsing her Bikram moves, and it’s clear the Edmunds Elementary School third grader has the skills, poise and confidence to compete. Yes, that’s right: compete. Nica will be one of eight participants representing Vermont in the Northeast Super Regional Yoga Asana Championships this Saturday, March 10, in South Burlington. The other seven are women ranging in age from 28 to 53. All of them practice at Queen City Bikram Yoga. Marla Thomas — Nica’s mom — is the studio’s founder and owner, and she’s responsible for bringing the regional competition to Vermont for the first time. While previous regionals were New England-wide events, this “super” comp will also include competitors from New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Delaware. The competitions are produced by LA-based USA Yoga Federation, a national nonprofit launched by Rajashree Choudhury and “dedicated to developing and promoting Yoga Asana as a sport,” according to its website. USA Yoga is part of an international movement that began, like yoga itself, in India. Hearing the words “competitive yoga” for the first time, many people react the same way: “Isn’t that an oxymoron?” Thomas suggests that reflex implies a negative judgment — one that she dismisses. While USA Yoga has been producing regional and national competitions for just 15 years, its Indian roots go back centuries. But Thomas acknowledges

Nica Thomas

that the concept of yoga competition is still unfamiliar to many, including yogis who follow other traditions. “I think it’s been looked at as a Bikram thing,” she says. Janet Carscadden, owner of Evolution Physical Therapy & Yoga in Burlington, echoes

that thought. “It’s more in the Bikram world — they’ve taken yoga into the competitive world,” she says. “For a lot of people in yoga, it’s not about that; it’s a very spiritual practice.” Carscadden, who is also a physical therapist, has been practicing yoga since 1995

choices,” observes Sofi Dillof, cofounder of Laughing River Yoga in Burlington and an advanced certified Jivamukti yoga instructor. “For every person who feels triggered or turned off by the idea of a yoga competition, there will be another who is inspired.” For her part, Thomas believes “it’s our nature to be competitive.” She notes that many yogis — herself included — are or have been competitive athletes; the practice has helped them heal injuries and correct alignment. While practitioners are always “competing with themselves,” she says, this event allows participants to show what they have been able to accomplish. Thomas, now 45, began practicing yoga at age 28. She has participated in four U.S. yoga competitions and been an official timer for 12 years. Now she prefers the role of coach. “I want to be a good role model, to share what helps me,” Thomas says. “I feel like my place on the Earth is to help and inspire others.” Referring to the treatment of yoga as spectator sport, she adds, “People are interested in it — do you know how many

THE BEST PART OF THE COMPETITION IS THAT

THE WINNING IS REALLY IN THE PREPARATION.

AL E X S TU R G ES

and opened Evolution in 2006. Regarding this week’s competition in Vermont, she comments, “It’s nothing that I’ve ever been exposed to. But I think, like anything else, there are evolutions and branches [of yoga].” “Though, on an obvious level, the idea of a yoga competition seems counterintuitive, these participants have trained as hard as many professional athletes and don’t deserve to be shamed or criticized for their efforts and

people watch yoga videos on YouTube? It’s fun to watch.” A Bikram class typically uses 26 postures, each sustained for 10 seconds to a minute, and is conducted in a hot room — 105 degrees, with 40 percent humidity. But the competition, Thomas says, “is a different animal.” For starters, the South Burlington High School auditorium will not be excessively warm. Each competitor will present a routine consisting of four compulsory poses and two optionals in three minutes or less. There are age categories — 7 to 11, 12 to 17, 18 to 49 and 50-plus — and three levels of difficulty in the poses. The scoring system is similar


96.1 96.5 98.3 101.9 AM550

NEWS RADIO

Keeping an Eye On Vermont

while CBS Keeps an Eye On the World

3

Daily News Specials

World and National News on the Hour Headlines on the Half-Hour

Six-and-a-half hours DAILY of IN-DEPTH, LOCALLY-PRODUCED news, weather, sports and commentary:

5:00 – 9:00 AM Noon – 1:00 PM 4:00 – 5:30 PM

Morning News Service

NEWS PARTNERS

Noon News Hour Afternoon News Service

03.07.18-03.14.18

THE DAVE GRAM SHOW Longtime Vermont journalist and former Associated Press Montpelier 9:00 – 11:00 AM bureau chief Dave Gram brings over 30 years of experience to this locally-produced interview and talk show. Interviews with political and business leaders, authors, educators, and others in the news with call-ins from listeners.

SEVEN DAYS

Contact: pamela@sevendaysvt.com

Locally Owned and Operated Since 1931

INFO

FEATURE 37

Northeast Super Regional Yoga Asana Championships, Saturday, March 10, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (doors 9 a.m.), South Burlington High School. $10. usayoga.org, queencitybikramyoga.com

MORE LOCALLY PRODUCED NEWS EVERY DAY THAN ANY OTHER VERMONT RADIO STATION

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

to that of, say, Olympic gymnastics. Overall, the purpose of the competition is to demonstrate strength, balance and flexibility. Heather Leibenguth, 38, will be a first-time competitor this weekend. A hair stylist and aesthetician at O’Briens Salon, she took her first Bikram class in 2003 and has been practicing “solidly” for two and a half years. “I like the structure of the class,” Leibenguth says. “At the end, I feel great.” In addition to affecting her body, she adds, the practice “has helped a lot with my inner struggles, the ‘bad tapes.’ It’s a personal inner journey.” Karen Krieger, 47, is also competing for the first time. A Burlington rep for Colorado-based Coalition Snow, which makes skis and snowboards for women, she’s been doing yoga for 22 years and, she says, has “been a competitive athlete all my life.” But then, Krieger notes grimly, “I wrecked my back in a ski accident.” Practicing Bikram helped her to strengthen the muscles around a bulging disc and straighten her spine so that “I got it to pop back,” she says. Among the Vermonters competing this weekend, Alex Sturges is the most experienced; this will be her third time onstage. Now 28, she’s been practicing for eight years and teaching for nearly a year and a half at Queen City Bikram. As a “veteran,” she’s also playing a support role for her fellow participants. “The best part of the competition,” Sturges says, “is that the winning is really in the preparation. You work so hard, and you really deepen your practice. “The second part I love [about the competition] is all the people I meet,” she continues. “You’re meeting people from all over the country that you have so much in common with — they’ve really become my yoga tribe.” Thomas says her goal for this Saturday’s event is to see her competitors “do their routines in under three minutes and have a positive experience.” If the comp provides a supportive community for its participants, she suggests, it’s also an energy boost for the audience. “No one’s seen anything like this in Vermont,” Thomas enthuses. “I dare anyone not to be inspired.” m

STREAMING Untitled-12 1

3/5/18 10:59 AM


Checking IDs Theater review: Disgraced, Northern Stage B Y A L EX BROW N

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 03.07.18-03.14.18 SEVEN DAYS 38 FEATURE

THEATER

Amar Srivastava and Olivia Gilliatt

firm — attention that the partners consider unwelcome. Amir is intently focused on professional success. His Caucasian wife, Emily (Olivia Gilliatt), is steadily moving her painting career forward after receiving favorable reviews. Amir’s nephew (Kanwar Singh) changed his name to blend in but is tugged back to his Muslim heritage. Isaac (Sid Solomon), a curator at the Whitney, evaluates Emily’s work for inclusion in a forthcoming exhibition, potentially a major career milestone for her. Isaac’s wife, Jory (Dan’yelle Williamson), is Amir’s colleague at the firm, on the same partnership track despite the obstacles she faces as an African American woman. These aspirations are fertile ground for theater. Akhtar brings the two couples together for dinner, with enough alcohol to justify confrontations, speeches and insults. Isaac is critical of Israel’s military extremes; Amir denounces the Koran’s expression of gender inequality. This talk sounds enlightened, especially when Emily chimes in to defend Islamic culture and Jory appears to be living proof

THEY DISCOVER THAT A TASTE FOR FINE LIVING IS NOT A UNIFYING PRINCIPLE

BIGGER THAN THEIR CULTURAL DIFFERENCES.

that a black woman can make a run at a law firm’s glass ceiling. Then, as strong opinions become attacks, civility dissolves. The four share a sense of wealth and privilege but discover that a taste for fine living is not a unifying principle bigger than their cultural differences. Everyone bristles, but Amir is the prickliest of all, and a disturbing secret is revealed. The play’s potential to show the tension between competing aspects of identity is undermined by the superficial nature of the characters. They’re abstractions, not people struggling to solve central questions about their existence. Director Carol Dunne moves the action forward crisply in 75 minutes, and the play grips attention from start to finish. By emphasizing the plot’s bombshells, Dunne keeps the actors focused on the discomfort of meeting social expectations while burying atavistic impulses. In this production, director and actors rely on the lines and actions to tell the story without investigating character complexities that drive behavior. The show is sometimes closer to an earnest essay than a work of theater. One could argue that simply voicing Akhtar’s banter, rationalizations, jabs and counterattacks keeps attention on the words themselves and encourages us to see the very archetypes to which we reduce others. That approach may work for some viewers, but words without emotional

COURTESY OF ROB STRONG

T

here’s no such thing as an American whose ancestry can’t be shoved into a category. In Disgraced, playwright Ayad Akhtar gathers two Pakistani Americans, an African American, a Jewish American, and a WASP whose immigrant heritage no longer sticks out. The Northern Stage production maps the minefield of cultural assimilation with an emphasis on what’s polarizing about categories, both to the observer and the observed. Disgraced won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for drama and is currently one of the most frequently performed contemporary plays. Its subject couldn’t be more important, which is why the artistic emptiness of Disgraced is such a disappointment. Akhtar gets the structure for tension just right, setting conflicting forces at work on characters with distinct cultural identities. But he gives them little inner life and, in this production, the actors don’t supply it either. It’s a play that makes you think, but it doesn’t make you feel. On a topic like this, perhaps thinking is enough. Set in a luxurious Manhattan apartment a decade after 9/11, the story features people who’ve achieved significant worldly success. Do such accomplishments require them to renounce their cultural identities as capitalism homogenizes them? Amir Kapoor (Amar Srivastava) has edited his own narrative just short of dishonesty. He’s dropped his Pakistani family name for an Indian one and denounces the extremes of Islam. He seems to distance himself from his cultural roots as he seeks partnership in a top mergers-and-acquisitions law firm. When his nephew urges him to become involved in the defense of an imam accused of raising money for terrorism, Amir tries to straddle his divided allegiances. He appears at the trial unofficially but draws publicity to his law

depth don’t convey characters’ conflicts fully, even if they tell the story. And the fast pace, while energizing, comes at a cost. The sense of a passage of time, or even the effect of events on the characters, is lost. Speedy exchanges can leave out the moment when a thought registers or an emotion flares. Bill Clarke’s apartment set evokes the majesty of Manhattan wealth with restrained emptiness. A massive cornice crowns the creamy walls, and plaster filigree and arched windows above the doorways reflect the occupants’ wealth and taste. Lighting by Dan Kotlowitz keeps the time of day and season a subtle presence and carries some of the storytelling in a key scene. The program includes a director’s note from Dunne with the disclaimer that the play has been criticized by Muslim Americans for portraying a Muslim man’s negative side. But why should that be perilous for artists? By the logic of the complaint, characters in stories are no longer individuals but statements about vast groups. Akhtar’s play doesn’t achieve rich characterization, and it’s legitimate to note that his characters are clichés. They’re not, however, clichés designed to condemn, but failures of artistic imagination. The play falls short, at least in this production, in the outbursts of pride and anger. Thursday’s preview audience quietly, obediently gasped when a racial insult was spoken, when spit flew, when a blow was struck. All of us saw the signal that a character had gone too far. What we didn’t see was a character under such pressure that he had no choice. By portraying people reconciling competing claims on their identities, Disgraced has a dazzling premise. It’s not fully realized, but the questions raised are vital ones. m Contact: alex@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Disgraced by Ayad Akhtar, directed by Carol Dunne, produced by Northern Stage. Through March 18: Wednesday through Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Thursday and Saturday, 2 p.m.; and Sunday, 5 p.m., at Barrette Center for the Arts in White River Junction. $15-59. northernstage.org


FLOOR MODEL CLEARANCE! SAVE 50 TO 70% • Serta floor model mattresses • Kids & adult bedroom furniture • Sofas & sleepersofas • Recliners When they are gone, they’re gone! Come in today.

THROUGH MARCH! We also feature Vermont made furniture and Amish made furniture!

2800 Shelburne Rd., Shelburne burlingtonbedrooms.com 802-985-3049 Monday-Saturday 9-6 Closed Sunday 2H-burlbeds030718.indd 1

3/5/18 3:39 PM

Blackboard Jungle Symposium

March 22 & 23, 2018

REGISTER NOW

$25/UVM employees and $40/non-UVM employees uvm.edu/hrdma/blackboardjungle

Keynote Presentation: Thursday, March 22, 4:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m. Learning Day: Friday, March 23, 8:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m. University of Vermont Dudley H. Davis Center (4th floor)

Dr. OiYan Poon Assistant Professor of Higher Education Leadership in the School of Education at Colorado State University

Dr. Jelani Cobb Ira A. Lipman Professor of Journalism at Columbia University Staff Writer at The New Yorker

Laura M. Bohórquez García Undocumented Student Program Coordinator University of Maryland

Tatyana Fertelmeyster Founder and Principal of Connecting Differences, LLC

SEVEN DAYS

John Quiñones Emmy Award-winning anchor of ABC series What Would You Do?

Nevien Shaabneh Novelist and Educator Author of Secrets Under the Olive Tree

03.07.18-03.14.18

Dr. Jeffrey Milem Professor and Dean of the Gevirtz Graduate School of Education at UC Santa Barbara

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

The University: A Sanctuary or an Arena? Fostering Inclusive and Difficult Conversations

Organized by the Office of the Vice President for Human Resources, Diversity and Multicultural Affairs To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact University Event Services at 802-656-5665. 39

2h-uvmdeptofenagement030718.indd 1

3/5/18 11:47 AM


food+drink

In Good Spirits Longtime public health colleagues launch a craft distillery B Y M EL I SSA PASANEN

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 03.07.18-03.14.18 SEVEN DAYS 40 FOOD

FOOD LOVER?

GET YOUR FILL ONLINE...

BEAR CIERI

C

raig Stevens and Naomi Clemmons have worked for more than two decades in public health. While the field is rewarding, the longtime friends and colleagues say, it’s not known for its fun quotient. Their latest enterprise, Wild Hart Distillery, is a different animal. “Although we’re both very passionate about public health, we always dreamed of doing other things,” Clemmons said recently, sitting at a table with Stevens in their Shelburne distillery, which opened last fall. “Our work is stressful.” “It’s hard,” agreed Stevens. “In public health, change takes a long time.” He gestured around the light-filled, 2,650-square-foot distillery filled with shiny equipment. “Here,” Stevens said, “within a month’s time we can distill and package a spirit. I love making something, holding that first bottle.” That said, the craft beverage entrepreneurs admitted, the path to launching their new business has been hard, too: slower than expected and, despite careful business planning, costlier due to unanticipated bumps in the road. In fact, it took more than three years and about $500,000 from their first water-cooler chat about the idea to the November public opening of their tasting room and distillery. Wild Hart joins a growing number of distilleries in Vermont — now 19, according to the state Department of Liquor Control’s 2017 annual report. The company’s inaugural line consists of three spirits: a straight American dry gin; Burning Embers, a 45-proof liquor inspired by the Swedish spiced-wine punch called glogg, that blends house-distilled and flavored vodka with Shelburne Vineyard’s red wine; and Sugarfoot gin, made with limeleaf-infused maple syrup from Runamok Maple in Cambridge. At the Wild Hart tasting room, visitors can sample all three spirits and purchase Burning Embers

WE WANTED SOMETHING FUN, HANDS-ON, THAT WOULD TAKE OUR BRAINS IN A COMPLETELY DIFFERENT DIRECTION.

Craig Stevens and Naomi Clemmons

and Sugarfoot. Twenty Vermont liquor stores currently sell the three Wild Hart products. Restaurant distribution is in the works. Clemmons and Stevens first met in the early 1990s while each was earning a master’s degree in public health at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Both now live with their families in Burlington and juggle distillery responsibilities with full-time jobs at the local office of Boston-headquartered John Snow, Inc., a global public health consulting firm. Clemmons, 50, is the youngest of five children raised on her family’s 148-acre farm in Charlotte, where her parents, both medical health professionals, settled LISTEN IN ON LOCAL FOODIES...

N A O M I C L EM M O N S

in 1962. The Clemmons Family Farm is one of the largest African Americanowned historic farms in Vermont and a landmark site on the state’s African American Heritage Trail. Stevens, 49, grew up outside of Worcester, Mass., and moved to Vermont for his first public health job in 1995. The two have worked together for much of their careers and, over the years, had talked about doing a side project. “We would say to each other, ‘If you have a good idea, let me know and we’ll see if it holds water,’” Clemmons explained. “We wanted something different from what we do in public health. We wanted something fun, hands-on, that would take our brains in a completely

BROWSE READER REVIEWS OF 1,000+ RESTAURANTS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/FOOD. REGISTER TO JOIN OUR BITE CLUB. YOU’LL GET FOOD NEWS IN YOUR INBOX EACH TUESDAY.

different direction, but something where we could still bring our project management skills. “Craig always talked about wanting something that he could hold,” Clemmons continued, “and I always wanted something to do with community that would bring people together in a fun way.” Ideas came and went until, she recalled, “I was lying in bed one night trying to think about what assets I have in my life. I don’t have deep pockets, but I have a great community and know a lot of people and have such good friendships.” One of those friends, she said, is IN GOOD SPIRITS

» P.42

LOOK UP RESTAURANTS ON YOUR PHONE:

CONNECT TO M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM ON ANY WEB-ENABLED CELLPHONE AND FIND LOCAL RESTAURANTS BY LOCATION OR CUISINE. FIND NEARBY EVENTS, MOVIES AND MORE.


GET READY FOR SUMMER!

SIDEdishes

• Swim lessons for ages 6 months to adults

COURTESY OF HOOKER MOUNTAIN FARM DISTILLERY

SERVING UP FOOD NEWS

• New 7 week session starts this week! cordial and a bottle of white whiskey infused with bitter, aromatic hops grown from a rhizome of a feral vine found near the farm. Since Hooker Mountain makes all of its spirits with grains and botanicals grown on-site, the distillery’s offerings are always changing. “We have a very different business model than most distilleries,” Randolph said. “I have a lot of different spirits that I rotate through, and I’m always running out of things.” Pickup is available on the farm or at the MONTPELIER FARMERS MARKET.

www.gbymca.org

Hannah Palmer Egan

Community Booze

Curry and a sushi roll at Shinjuku Station Café

HOOKER MOUNTAIN FARM DISTILLERY LAUNCHES LIQUOR CSA

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Japanese Joint BURLINGTON’S SHINJUKU STATION BECOMES A SIT-DOWN CAFÉ

The Old North End has a new restaurant with the March 1 opening of SHINJUKU STATION CAFÉ at 260 North Street in Burlington. The wife-and-husband team of

SEVEN DAYS

license, which covers sales at the place of manufacture and at market, also covers the CSA. In the spring, a share might include a bottle of the farm’s maple whiskey, made with sap and oats and sweetened with a touch of maple syrup. Or it could mean flasks of berry

03.07.18-03.14.18

SALLY POLLAK

Some farms sell vegetables through community-supported agriculture programs. Other farms supply CSA customers with monthly drops of pastured pork, beef or poultry. In some areas, you can sign up for regular, prepaid bread or baked-goods shares. Now, if Washington County is convenient for you, skip the trip to the liquor store and get your hooch through a CSA subscription. Members of HOOKER MOUNTAIN FARM DISTILLERY’s new distilled-spirits CSA pay $89 to $340 in exchange for a share of the Cabot farm and distillery’s monthly output for three or six months, co-owner KEMPTON RANDOLPH said. Each share has a $35 value. The farm’s fourth-class liquor

MAO and PETER HARTWELL own • Register now! Call Jess to the Japanese eatery. determine level, 652-8143 Peter Hartwell ran the sushi concession at CITY MARKET, ONION RIVER CO-OP for 12 years; Mao joined him six years in, and they worked together until that venture Untitled-4 1 3/5/18 10:33 AM ended in the summer of 2016. After that, the couple operated Shinjuku Station as a takeout sushi shop in the North Street space for a year and a half. Now they’ve transformed CHANNEL 15 it into a sit-down restaurant serving “Japanese comfort CHINESE NEW YEAR OF food,” said Peter. The restauTHE DOG CELEBRATION rant seats about 35 people at FRIDAY > 7:30 P.M. eight tables. Strings of lights glimmer from the charcoalGET MORE INFO OR gray ceiling; a chalkboard WATCH ONLINE AT menu hangs above the VERMONTCAM.ORG counter where customers order. “Mao says, if you want 16t-vcam-weekly.indd 1 3/5/18 10:42 AM people to come to your place, you have to have beer,” he added. The restaurant has four Vermont beers on tap, as well as cans of Sapporo beer and bottles of sake. BOBBY GAY, who previously cooked at ZABBY & ELF’S STONE SOUP, runs the kitchen at Shinjuku Station. The restaurant serves traditional sushi rolls such as salmon, tuna and California rolls, as well as vegan rolls, seaweed salad, miso soup and curries. Specials include a small bowl of chicken or vegetable curry and a sushi roll for $8. Shinjuku Station is open Tuesday through Saturday, noon to 9 p.m. It joins a growing enclave of nearby eateries, including DRIFTER’S Traditional Irish Fare | Guinness on Draft and BARRIO BAKERY. “We want Plenty of Parking | Family Friendly to offer reasonably priced food for this neighborhood,” Peter said. “We’re sort of a little team here.”

Sally Pollak

1076 Williston Road, S. Burlington

862.6585 www.windjammerrestaurant.com

Follow us for the latest food gossip! On Twitter: Hannah Palmer Egan: @findthathannah; Sally Pollak: @vtpollak. On Instagram: Hannah and Suzanne Podhaizer: @7deatsvt. Untitled-5 1

FOOD 41

CONNECT

1/31/18 3:19 PM


03.07.18-03.14.18 SEVEN DAYS 42 FOOD

farmer Tom Kenyon of Aurora Farms in Charlotte, a neighbor of Clemmons Family Farm. He cultivates grain, including corn, and markets it under the brand Nitty Gritty Grain Company of Vermont. “I’d been reading about the craft distillery movement, and I love bourbon,” Clemmons said, referring to the barrel-aged American whiskey traditionally made from corn. “I thought, I know this guy who grows great organic grain. Even though I know nothing about distilling, why don’t I become a distiller? I think I romanticized the concept. My husband thought I was crazy.” Stevens, however, was intrigued and started doing research. “That’s one thing we know how to do,” he said. “In our work, you’re always researching.” The friends devoted a week of vacation time to take an introductory course in craft distilling at Vermont Technical College in Randolph. The teacher was the state’s micro-distilling pioneer, Duncan Holaday. Clemmons and Stevens then began working with Holaday to develop a product line. They were inspired by Vermont’s active distilling community and robust interest in handcrafted food and beverages with a local spin. The partners’ thorough business plan landed them a $150,000 loan from the Vermont Economic Development Authority. During the process, Clemmons was tickled to learn from her parents that her grandfather used to make peach brandy in Shreveport, La., in the early 1900s. “He put the bottles under the floorboards of the house to hide it,” she said with a grin. Even her husband began to warm to the idea. There was a lot to navigate along the way, but Clemmons and Stevens worked through it. They’ve known each other so long, Clemmons observed, “we’re like siblings.” “That doesn’t mean it always goes smoothly, but you keep your eye on the prize,” Stevens added. One key decision was hiring distiller Joe Buswell to join their team as a part-time employee, rather than just a consultant. “We were naïve with a capital N,” admitted Clemmons. “We thought, We can do this. We’re going to roll up our sleeves and do it. Then the still arrived, and it was like, holy shit.” The still and its installation costs accounted for about half of Wild Hart’s startup budget. Covering almost the

length of the distillery’s western wall, in front of tall windows overlooking Route 7, the squat, round still resembles a one-eyed, potbellied robot followed by three columns — for distilling whiskey, vodka and gin, respectively — and a condenser. The tallest column stretches nearly to the ceiling and features round portholelike windows. Stevens pointed to the 30 blue levers running up the side like flute keys. “It’s complicated,” he said with dry

Vermont with a winemaking background but then honed skills as a distiller while working for several industry frontrunners. They included Caledonia Spirits in Hardwick, whose Barr Hill Gin is the best-selling Vermont-made spirit in the state, according to the Department of Liquor Control. Buswell clarified that his role is to execute on the founders’ vision, to help steer and refine the best execution of what Clemmons and Stevens

Craig Stevens (left) talking with customers

PHOTOS: BEAR CIERI

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

In Good Spirits « P.40

understatement. “There really is an art and a science to the distilling.” “The art comes first,” Clemmons added. “When I see Joe interacting with the still, he’s touching things, he’s looking at things, he’s feeling the equipment itself for the heat, and that is truly artistic, [using it] more like an instrument.” The Wild Hart founders were introduced to Buswell through a fellow Vermont Technical College distilling course student. Buswell had arrived in

want to produce. “Most people who are successful,” he said, “aren’t successful because they’re doing what everyone else is doing.” The distiller said he appreciates the team at Wild Hart, which includes another part-time employee in sales and distribution. “None of our meetings are ever boring,” Buswell quipped. Wild Hart’s current focus is on wrapping up development of its first vodka made from locally grown corn. The initial product line was distilled from cane

sugar because “it’s easier to dial in the equipment with that,” Stevens explained. Once the vodka is finalized, they plan to move all distillation to a corn base. Huge white bags of Kenyon’s certified organic corn were stacked behind the meeting table. Clemmons pulled out her phone to show a photo of her elegant, nonagenarian mother and “lady friends” gathered around that same meeting table for dirty martinis featuring a test batch of Wild Hart vodka. Their smiles were eclipsed only by Clemmons’ own happy face. This kind of joyful gathering, centered on a product made with local ingredients, represents exactly why she embarked upon this crazy endeavor in the first place, said Clemmons. “For me, it’s about the community, making more partnerships with more different entities,” she said. “I want people to see Wild Hart as a destination for community gatherings, as a company that thinks outside the box, that welcomes new ideas.” Clemmons pointed out that a close friend who is originally from Sweden inspired Burning Embers and that the distillery’s very name emerged from community brainstorming. “In public health, we work in teams because that’s when innovation happens,” she said. “That’s our strength — that we will reach out to others, like we have so far to Shelburne Vineyard and to Runamok Maple, to come up with something unique that will take us far.” Clemmons traces her focus on community back to her parents. “It wasn’t easy growing up black in Vermont. It was complicated,” she said carefully. “But I think the values my parents had influenced me. They are very community oriented. I attribute it to my parents, who made good neighbors.” In turn, she said, “They would come home to a pie on the counter, or a freshly baked loaf of bread.” While the aged bourbon that originally inspired Clemmons is still a few years off, she promised, “We’ll get there.” And one day, perhaps, Wild Hart’s neighbors will come home to a bottle of locally crafted bourbon on their counter. m Contact: pasanen@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Wild Hart Distillery, 26 Sage Court, Shelburne. Winter tasting-room hours are Thursday through Saturday, noon to 5 p.m. wildhartdistillery.com


Untitled-13 1

3/5/18 11:04 AM


Humane

Society

housing »

of Chittenden County

Tuck AGE/SEX: 9-year-old neutered male COURTESY OF KELLY SCHULZE/MOUNTAIN DOG PHOTOGRAPHY

ARRIVAL DATE: January 30, 2018 REASON HERE: Tuck's owner could no longer care for him. SUMMARY: This handsome gentleman was described by his previous owner as being affectionate and mellow. Since coming to HSCC, he has fit that description to a tee! Tuck enjoys soft beds, cheek scratches and a good window seat. This beefy boy spends the majority of his afternoons going from cat bed to cat bed and drifting in and out of naps, most likely dreaming of treats. SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS: Tuck is overweight. We love him all the same, but he must lose weight to manage his health, happiness and longevity!

APARTMENTS, CONDOS & HOMES

DID YOU KNOW? Kongs are man’s other best friend. Use peanut butter, wet dog food, plain yogurt, pumpkin purée, treats or anything safe for dog consumption! Mix it, fill it and freeze it, then watch your buddy go to work!

Sponsored by:

CATS/DOGS: Tuck lived with another cat in his previous home and did well. He has no history with dogs.

Visit HSCC at 142 Kindness Court, South Burlington, Tuesday through Friday from 1 to 6 p.m., or Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 862-0135 for more info.

NEW STUFF ONLINE EVERY DAY! PLACE YOUR ADS 24-7 AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM.

on the road »

CARS, TRUCKS, MOTORCYCLES

pro services »

CHILDCARE, HEALTH/ WELLNESS, PAINTING

buy this stuff »

APPLIANCES, KID STUFF, ELECTRONICS, FURNITURE

music »

INSTRUCTION, CASTING, INSTRUMENTS FOR SALE

jobs »

NO SCAMS, ALL LOCAL, POSTINGS DAILY


CLASSIFIEDS on the road

CARS/TRUCKS 1992 2-DOOR HONDA ACCORD Runs great. $900. 802-495-1954. 2010 TOYOTA TACOMA 2x4, shell incl., comes w/ summer & winter studded tires, 200K miles, 5-speed manual. Asking $5,500. 802-393-5755. 2014 VW GOLF GTI WOLFSBURG Black, auto, 21,300 miles. 1 owner, clean CarFax. Excellent condition. Search Craigslist for 2014 Golf GTI for details & photos. Call or message 802-238-2998.

3-BR, W/D IN UNIT, PARKING $1,650/mo. 3-BR, balcony, off-street parking, storage, big shared backyard, 15-min trip to downtown, good neighbors. Avail. now. ellflynn@gmail.com.

housing ads: $25 (25 words) legals: 52¢/word buy this stuff: free online services: $12 (25 words)

We Pick Up & Pay For Junk Automobiles!

display service ads: $25/$45 homeworks: $45 (40 words, photos, logo) fsbos: $45 (2 weeks, 30 words, photo) jobs: michelle@sevendaysvt.com, 865-1020 x21

WINOOSKI ST. PETER ST. 1st floor 3-BR, 2-BA apt. W/D, off-street parking. $1,300/mo. incl. heat & electricity. 802-655-1032.

Route 15, Hardwick

SERVICES Valley Painting

C-2 CLASSIFIEDS

SEVEN DAYS

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

FOR RENT 3-BR WINOOSKI APT. FOR RENT Completely renovated 3-BR, 1-BA + den apt. avail. Apr. 1. $1,800/ mo. + $1,800 sec. dep. Tenant pays efficient natural gas heat & electric. Landlord pays trash/recycling, water, landscaping, snow plowing. Contact Christine: christine.e.golden@ gmail.com or 802-598-4782.

CLASSIFIEDS KEY

services

appt. appointment apt. apartment BA bathroom BR bedroom DR dining room DW dishwasher HDWD hardwood HW hot water LR living room NS no smoking OBO or best offer refs. references sec. dep. security deposit W/D washer & dryer

WINOOSKI: SENIOR HOUSING Interior/exterior Sunny, studio & 1-BR BURLINGTON 1-BR APT. 3842 Dorset Ln., Williston Painting apts. for seniors. Utils. $900/mo. Bright. 802-793-9133 incl. Off-street parking. Close to colleges, fully Sheetrocking 24-hour, on-call mainfurnished, lg. deck. New & Taping tenance. Residents pay North End neighborAIRLINE CAREERS 30% of adjusted income Cathedral Ceilings BEGIN HERE hood near bike path DOWNTOWN 7/20/15 sm-allmetals060811.indd 1 5:02 PM for rent. Application & lake, 3 miles from BURLINGTON Custom Carpentry Get started by training downtown. Electric incl. as an FAA-certified Across from park w/ lake preference for seniors. For info & application, Any Size Job No pets. Avail. now. aviation technician. views. Bright mornings, call 802-655-2360. EHO. Contact thomas Financial aid for Free Estimates majestic sunsets. businessagency@ qualified students. Job Lg. furnished 1-BR Fully Insured comcast.net for online placement assistance. apt. HDWD, off-street application. Paula, Call Aviation Institute of parking. NS/pets. Tub 864-0838. Maintenance, 800-725& shower. Lease req., HUNTINGTON 1563. (AAN CAN) temps welcome. Avail. BURLINGTON Rural women’s collecnow. $1,195/mo. + utils. Maple St. Close to lake tive seeking housemate PAID IN ADVANCE! Call 476-4071. & downtown. 1-BR, who reflects their Make $1,000/week 1st floor in historic values of environmental STARKSBORO ROOM mailing brochures KEEN’S CROSSING IS Victorian. Spacious, sustainability. $350/ lg-valleypainting112614.indd from NOW LEASING! 11/24/14 1 12:11 PM home! Genuine FOR RENT fresh paint, refinished mo. all incl. Space opportunity. Helping Spacious, open layouts; Avail. now. Historic HDWD floors, stainless for gardening/ home workers since plush carpets; ample Starksboro home. W/D, steel appliances, W/D, farming. Shared BA, 2001! Start immedicloset space. 2-BRs: lots of garden space, screened-in porch. Year kitchen. 863-5625, ately! incomecentral. $1,095. Income restricon bus route. No dogs. STELLAR ELDERCARE/ lease. Refs. & credit homesharevermont. net. (AAN CAN) tions apply. Call for $400/mo. + utils. ADVOCACY report req. Avail. now. org for application. details. 802-655-1810, 802-349-5640 after Are you finding it chal$1,500/mo. + utils. Interview, refs., keenscrossing.com. 6 p.m. lenging to find quality, 862-3719. background check req. educated, responsible EHO. LG. 1-BR APT. & compassionate BURLINGTON S. Burlington. Lg. 1-BR SAIGE’S CLEANING help for your parent CHARMING QUEEN ROOM FOR RENT, SOLUTIONS apt., 2nd floor, parking or loved one? Contact ANNE VICTORIAN AVAIL. NOW Saige’s Home for 1 car, on bus line. me today for a free 45 Howard St. 2-BR Monkton farmhouse on Cleaning Solutions is NS/pets. $875/mo. consultation: qualityfurnished house, 20 acres, all amenities professional, per+ utils. & deposit. OFFICE/RETAIL SPACE open concept. Corner incl., garden space, sonal & reliable. Weekly, eldercarevt@gmail.com 802-860-1642. AT MAIN ST. LANDING or 802-343-3281. lot. Parking. W/D. 13.5 miles to I-89. Start biweekly, monthly. on Burlington’s water$1,950/mo. + utils. $400/mo. 453-3457. WINOOSKI: Plenty of references front. Beautiful, healthy, Sec. dep., lease. Pets COURTYARD APTS. upon request. Call Saige affordable spaces for negotiable. Avail. now. S. BURLINGTON A 100-unit, affordable, at 802-458-5635. your business. Visit 802-591-0975. Share home w/ senior senior-housing facility mainstreetlanding.com DISH NETWORKwoman who enjoys is accepting applica& click on space avail. BURLINGTON CONDO SATELLITE TELEVISION cooking & sports on tions. These units are Melinda, 864-7999. LEDGEWOOD EAST SERVICES TV. Must be 50+ for income eligible, bright Highly desirable Now more than 190 apt. building. Seeking & freshly renovated, & location. 2-BR, 1 3/4-BA, channels for only female housemate to offer 24-hour, on-call W/D, gas heat, deck, $49.99/mo. HBO free for maintenance. Off-street cook 2 meals/week, SOMETHING SEW garage, pool, tennis, 1 year, free installation, parking, on-site laundry, provide occasional RIGHT bike path, fireplace. free streaming, free HD. heat & utils. incl. in rent. transportation & share Professional clothing $1,900/mo. incl. water. Add internet for $14.95/ some companionship. For info & application, alterations since 1986. Avail. Apr. 2. Year lease. mo. 1-800-373-6508. Private BA, shared call 802-655-2360. Creative, quality work NS/pets. 802-598-1891. (AAN CAN) kitchen. $200/mo. all EHO. from formal wear to incl. No pets. 863-5625, leather repairs. 248 BURLINGTON, 1869 homesharevermont. WESTFORD, 2-BR, Elm St., 2nd floor, VICTORIAN HOME $1,200/MO. org for application. Montpelier. 229-2400, 2nd-floor w/ 1,300 sq.ft. Restored Interview, refs., pmorse52@live.com. incredible views of 18th-century post-&background checks req. Lake Champlain. HDWD beam cape. Fenced-in EHO. floors, separate DR, backyard. Basement LR, kitchen. Private storage. W/D, DW in entrances, off-street unit. Call 802-735-4527. parking. Secure storage. NS/pets. $1,495/mo. + gas heat & electric. 802-476-4071 Saturday, March 10 @ 9AM

802-472-5100

BIZ OPPS

HOUSEMATES

Call TJ NOW!

355-0392

ELDER CARE

OFFICE/ COMMERCIAL

housing

print deadline: Mondays at 4:30 p.m. post ads online 24/7 at: sevendaysvt.com/classifieds questions? classifieds@sevendaysvt.com 865-1020 x37

ENTERTAINMENT

CLOTHING ALTERATIONS

m

300± Vehicles Expected!

Call for a free seller or buyer consultation.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 and similar Vermont statutes which make it illegal to advertise any preference, limitations, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, sexual orientation, age, marital status, handicap, presence of minor children in the family or receipt of public assistance, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or a discrimination. The newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate, which is in violation

CLEANING

of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Any home seeker who feels he or she has encountered discrimination should contact: HUD Office of Fair Housing 10 Causeway St., Boston, MA 02222-1092 (617) 565-5309 — OR — Vermont Human Rights Commission 14-16 Baldwin St. Montpelier, VT 05633-0633 1-800-416-2010 hrc@vermont.gov

PUBLIC AUTO AUCTION (Register to Bid for Free from 7:30AM)

298 J. Brown Dr., Williston, VT

2017 NVBR REALTOR OF THE YEAR

Bid to buy your next car the way the dealers do! It’s FAST, FUN and a GREAT way to buy a car! UPCoMing

Robbi Handy Holmes • 802-951-2128 robbihandyholmes@c21jack.com Find me on Making it happen for you! 16t-robbihandyholmes120617.indd 1

Wednesday, March 14 @ 5:30PM (Register from 3:30PM)

Saturday, March 24 @ 9AM (Register from 7:30AM)

THCAuction.com • 800-474-6132

12/4/17 Untitled-1 12:54 PM 1

LIVELINKS CHAT LINES Flirt, chat & date! Talk to sexy real singles in your area. Call now! 844-359-5773. (AAN CAN)

FINANCIAL/LEGAL DENIED CREDIT? Work to repair your credit report w/ the trusted leader in credit repair. Call Lexington Law for a free credit report summary & credit repair consultation. 855-620-9426. John C. Heath, Attorney at Law, PLLC, dba Lexington Law Firm. (AAN CAN)

HEALTH/ WELLNESS INTUITIVE COACHING & HANDS-ON HEALING Experience emotional freedom, balance & renewal. Coaching sessions blend energy work, EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques), intuitive awareness & expressive arts. Handson healing sessions in reiki & chakra balancing. Open to Joy! With Naomi Mitsuda, Reiki master & certified practitioner of EFT, energy medicine, intuitive awareness & expressive arts. 802-658-5815, naomimitsuda@gmail. com. MAKE THE CALL TO START GETTING CLEAN TODAY Free 24-7 help line for alcohol & drug addiction treatment. Get help! It is time to take your life back! Call now: 855-7324139. (AAN CAN)

3/2/18 11:28 AM


BROWSE THIS WEEK’S OPEN HOUSES: sevendaysvt.com/open-houses WINOOSKI STARTER

INVESTMENT PROPERTY

WINOOSKI | 81 RIVER STREET | #4667504

Completely refreshed with new maple floors & fresh paint! This 3 bedroom, 2 bath home offers an open floor plan, 1st-floor office, newer washer/dryer plus charming porch all nestled on a partially fenced lot just blocks from the hustle and bustle of a vibrant downtown. $214,000

PSYCHIC COUNSELING Psychic counseling, channeling w/ Bernice Kelman, Underhill. 30+ years’ experience. Also energy healing, chakra balancing, Reiki, rebirthing, other lives, classes, more. 802-899-3542, kelman.b@juno.com.

buy this stuff

MISCELLANEOUS

ANTIQUES Furniture, postcards, pottery, cameras, toys, medical tools, lab glass, photographs, slide rules, license plates & silver. Anything unusual or unique. Cash paid. Dave, 859-8966.

music

FOR SALE BASSES Kay upright bass S-8 Swingmaster #12899, built 1945. Realist pick-up, case, Ingles bass stand. Also G&L 5-string electric bass L5000 #8019375. sawmatt@hotmail.com

INSTRUCTION ANDY’S MOUNTAIN MUSIC Affordable, accessible instruction in banjo, guitar, mandolin & more. All ages/skill levels/interests welcome! Supportive, dedicated teacher offering references, results, convenience. Andy Greene, 802-658-2462, guitboy75@hotmail. com, andysmountainmusic.com.

GUITAR INSTRUCTION Berklee graduate w/ 30 years’ teaching experience offers lessons in guitar, music theory, music technology, ear training. Individualized, step-by-step approach. All ages, styles, levels. Rick Belford, 864-7195, rickb@rickbelford.com. GUITAR LESSONS W/ GREGG All levels/ages. Acoustic, electric, classical. Patient, supportive, experienced, highly qualified instructor. Relax, have fun & allow your musical potential to unfold. Gregg Jordan, gregg@ gjmusic.com, 318-0889.

ACT 250 NOTICE MINOR APPLICATION #4C0619-12 10 V.S.A. §§ 6001 - 6093 On February 20, 2018, the Town of Milton filed application #4C0619-12 for a project generally described as construction of a new dog park with an associated walkway. The project is located to the south of 43 Bombardier Road in Milton, Vermont. The District #4 Environmental Commission is reviewing this application under Act 250 Rule 51 - Minor Applications. A copy of the application and proposed permit are available for review at the office listed below. The application and a draft permit may also be viewed on the Natural Resources Board’s web site (http://nrb.vermont. gov) by clicking on “Act 250 Database” and entering the project number “4C0619-12”. No hearing will be held and a permit may be issued unless, on or before

518-546-7557 realty-results.com

OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered July 12, 2017, in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Jon M. Marcoux and Karen A. Marcoux to Centex Home Equity Company, LLC, dated August 12, 2005 and recorded in Book 726 Page 717 of the land records of the City of South Burlington, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of a corrective assignment of mortgage from Nationstar Mortgage LLC f/k/a Centex Home Equity Company, LLC to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for Citigroup Mortgage Loan Trust, Inc. 2006-HE1, Asset-Backed PassThrough Certificates, Series 2006-HE1 dated November 15, 2011 and recorded in Book 1121 Page 21 of the land records of the City of South Burlington for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 299 Juniper, Unit 17A, South Burlington, Vermont on April 2, 2018 at 12:00 PM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To wit: ALL A CONDOMINIUM UNIT AND UNDIVIDED PERCENTAGE INTEREST IN THE LAND AND IMPROVEMENTS CONSTITUTING THE COMMON ELEMENTS OF THE CONDOMINIUM, LOCATED IN THE CITY OF

SOUTH BURLINGTON, COUNTY CHITTENDEN 3/1/18 3:22 PM AND STATE OF VERMONT, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, VIZ: BEING CONDOMINIUM UNIT NO. 17A (THE “UNIT”) OF QUARRY RIDGE TOWNHOMES (THE “CONDOMINIUM”) AS DESCRIBED AND DEPICTED IN THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM FOR QUARRY RIDGE TOWNHOMES, AND ALL EXHIBITS THERERTO, DATED JUNE 30, 1999 AND RECORDED ON JUNE 30, 1999 IN VOLUME 457 AT PAGES 196-234 OF THE CITY OF SOUTH BURLINGTON LAND RECORDS, AS AMENDED BY FIRST AMENDMENT TO DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM DATED OCTOBER 21, 1999 AND RECORDED IN VOLUME 464 AT PAGES 583-589 OF THE CITY OF SOUTH BURLINGTON LAND RECORDS (THE “DECLARATION”), TOGETHER WITH THE UNIT’S ALLOCATED INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS OF THE CONDOMINIUM AS DEPICTED AND DESCRIBED IN EXHIBIT “D” OF SAID DECLARATION (THE UNIT AND ITS ALLOCATED INTEREST ARE COLLECTIVELY REFERRED TO HEREIN AS THE “PROPERTY”). THE POST OFFICE ADDRESS OF THE UNIT IS 299 JUNIDPER DRIVE, SOUTH BURLINGTON, VERMONT 05403. THE LOCATION OF THE UNIT, AND THE LAND COMPRISING THE COMMON ELEMENTS OF THE CONDOMINIUM ARE DEPICTED ON A PLAN ENTITLED: “CEDAR RIDGE TOWNHOMES, PATCHEN ROAD, SOUTH BURLINGTON, VERMONT, MASTER

LEGALS »

CLASSIFIEDS C-3

sevendaysvt.com

BASS, GUITAR, DRUMS, VOICE LESSONS & MORE! Learn bass, guitar, drums, voice, flute, sax, trumpet, production & beyond w/ some of Vermont’s best players & independent instructors in beautiful, spacious lesson studios at the Burlington Music Dojo on Pine St. All levels & styles are welcome, incl. absolute beginners! Gift certificates available. Come share in the music! burlingtonmusicdojo.com, info@ burlingtonmusicdojo. com, 540-0321.

tion, please notify us by March 21, 2018, a person March 21, 2018. notifies the Commission 3/5/18RR-Cook-072617.indd 1:52 PM 1 of an issue or issues reParties entitled to quiring the presentation participate are the Muof evidence at a hearing nicipality, the Municipal or the Commission sets Planning Commission, the matter for hearing the Regional Planning on its own motion. Any hearing request must be Commission, affected state agencies, and adin writing to the address joining property owners below, must state the and other persons to the criteria or subcriteria extent they have a parat issue, why a hearing ticularized interest that is required and what may be affected by the additional evidence proposed project under will be presented at the the 10 criteria. Non-party hearing. Any hearing participants may also be request by an adjoining allowed under 10 V.S.A. property owner or other Section 6085(c)(5). interested person must include a petition for Dated at Essex Junction, party status. Prior to Vermont this 26th day of submitting a request for a hearing, please contact February 2018. the district coordinator at the telephone number By: /s/ Rachel Lomonaco Rachel Lomonaco listed below for more District #4 Coordinator information. Prior to convening a hearing, the 111 West Street Commission must deter- Essex Junction, VT 05495 mine that substantive 802-879-5658 issues requiring a hearrachel.lomonaco@ ing have been raised. vermont.gov Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law will not be prepared unless STATE OF VERMONT the Commission holds a CHITTENDEN UNIT, public hearing. CIVIL DIVISION VERMONT SUPERIOR If you feel that any of COURT the District Commission DOCKET NO: 896-10members listed on the 16 CNCV attached Certificate of U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASService under “For Your SOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE Information” may have a FOR CITIGROUP MORTconflict of interest, or if there is any other reason GAGE LOAN TRUST, INC. a member should be dis- 2006-HE1, ASSETBACKED PASS-THROUGH qualified from sitting on CERTIFICATES, SERIES this case, please contact 2006-HE1 the district coordinator v. as soon as possible, no JON M. MARCOUX, later than prior to the KAREN A. MARCOUX, response date listed AND QUARRY RIDGE above. HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. Should a hearing be OCCUPANTS OF: 299 held on this project and Juniper, Unit 17A, South you have a disability Burlington VT for which you are going to need accommodaMORTGAGEE’S NOTICE

Sue Cook

SEVEN DAYS

Say you saw it in...

BASS LESSONS W/ HARMONICA LESSONS hw-C21-Burns-030718.indd ARAM W/ ARI 1 For all ages, levels Lessons in Montpelier & styles. Beginners & on Skype. 1st lesson welcome! Learn songs, just $20! All ages & theory, technique & skill levels welcome. more on Pine St. Years Avail. for workshops, of pro performing, too. pocketmusic. recording & teaching musicteachershelper. experience. 1st lesson com, 201-565-4793, ari. half off! 598-8861, erlbaum@gmail.com. arambedrosian.com, lessons@arambedrosian.com.

Burns Real Estate Team 44 Shelburne St., Burlington 802-864-9856/802-373-3506

A spacious, open floor plan enhances the features of this lovely home. 3BR, 2BA, formal DR, LR, family room, breakfast nook and 2 car garage with storage above. Owner has relocated, price is well below assessed value. Just 35 minutes from Vergennes/Middlebury. $69,900.

03.07.18-03.14.18

WANT TO BUY

846.9575 LipVT.com

Chuck and Cindi Burns

PORT HENRY, N.Y. | 3170 BROAD ST.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

HONEYBEE NUCLEUS COLONY Order your 2018 hygienic Veroa mite-resistant honeybee nucleus colonies before supplies run out. Avail. 1st or 2nd week of May. $175. theshamanstouch.com.

Steve Lipkin

PORT HENRY, NY

ESSEX JCT. | 161 MAIN STREET | #4676446

Car buff garage: Commercially zoned 4 bay garage rented at $850/mo. Cape Style Home: 3 bedroom, 2 bath. Currently rented for $1550/mo. + utils. New furnace in 2016 and cozy gas fireplace insert, lots of character. Large lot, convenient Essex Junction location. $279,000

REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS: List your properties here and online for only $45/week. Submit your listings by Mondays at noon to homeworks@sevendaysvt.com or 802-865-1020, x37.


The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale.

BOUNDARIES AND THE FLOOR PLANS OF THE UNIT ARE DESCRIBED AND DEPICTED IN EXHIBIT “C” OF THE DECLARATION, WHICH FLOOR PLANS ARE RECORDED IN MAP VOLUME 450 AT PAGE 34-36 OF THE CITY OF SOUTH BURLINGTON LAND RECORDS (THE “FLOOR PLANS”).

[CONTINUED]

Reference is hereby SITE PLAN,” PREPARED made to the above BY TRUDELL CONSULTinstruments and to the ING ENGINEERS, INC. records and references DATED MAY 9, 1996, contained therein in AND RECORDED AT MAP further aid of this deVOLUME 386 AT PAGE 45 scription. OF THE CITY OF SOUTH BURLINGTON LAND Terms of sale: Said RECORDS, AND REVISED premises will be sold PLAN ENTITLED: “QUARand conveyed subject to RY RIDGE TOWNHOMES, all liens, encumbrances, PATCHEN ROAD, SOUTH unpaid taxes, tax titles, BURLINGTON, MASTER municipal liens and asSITE PLAN,” PREPARED sessments, if any, which BY TRUDELL CONSULTtake precedence over ING ENGINEERS, INC., the said mortgage above DATED JUNE 23, 1999 described. ATTACHED AS EXHIBIT “B” TO THE DECLARATEN THOUSAND TION AND RECORDED IN ($10,000.00) Dollars of MAP VOLUME 430 AT the purchase price must PAGE 101 OF THE CITY be paid by a certified OF SOUTH BURLINGTON check, bank treasurer’s LAND RECORDS, AND or cashier’s check at the AS FURTHER REVISED time and place of the BY REVISION DATED sale by the purchaser. OCTOBER 20, 1999 AND The balance of the purRECORDED IN MAP chase price shall be paid VOLUME 450 AT PAGE 37 by a certified check, bank OF THE CITY OF SOUTH treasurer’s or cashier’s BURLINGTON LAND REcheck within sixty (60) CORDS (THE “PLAN”). days after the date of THE SPECIFIC LOCATION sale. OF THE UNIT WITHIN ITS BUILDING, ITS VERTICAL Using the enclosed math operations

Calcoku

DATED: February 15, 2018 By: /S/Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032 STATE OF VERMONT FRANKLIN UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT DOCKET NO: 133-4-15 FRCV U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, NOT IN ITS INDIVIDUAL CAPACITY BUT SOLELY AS TRUSTEE FOR RMAC TRUST, SERIES 2016-CTT v. MELINDA RAYMOND AND ROBERT GALLEY OCCUPANTS OF: 209 Tabor Hill Road, Fairfax VT MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and

as a guide, fill the grid using the numbers 1 - 6 only once in each row and column.

2-

2-

SEVEN DAYS C-4 CLASSIFIEDS

1-

6

4-

To wit: Being all the land and premises conveyed to Robert Galley and Melinda Raymond by Warranty Deed of Gregory J. Allard and Julieanne E. Allard, dated November 9, 2001, of record in Volume 131, Pages 457458 of the Land Records of the Town of Fairfax, being further described as follows:

30x

5-

2-

MENDON/KILLINGTON

Being a parcel of land, together with all improvements situated thereon, located on the southerly side of Tabor Hill Road, so-called (sometimes also referred to as Huntsville Road).

Sudoku

7

4x

9

4 5

7 3 2

14+

15+

6 4 8 2

CALCOKU

List your property here for 2 weeks for only $45! Contact Ashley, 864-5684, fsbo@sevendaysvt.com.

Said parcel has a frontage and southerly backline of 250 feet, more or less, and east and west sidelines of 100 feet, more or less. Said parcel is bounded substantially by George and Hughette George C. Drinkwine, Sr. as follows: on the north Drinkwine. by the aforesaid Tabor FSBO-JeannaBradley022818.indd 1 dated December 1, 1977 and recorded in Book 46, Hill Road; on the east Also included herewith Page 16 of said Fairfax by the Fairfax/Fletcher are certain water rights Land Records. town line; and on the as more fully described south and west by lands in the deed from George Also included herewith now or formerly owned C. Drinkwine, Jr. and are all of the rights with respect to the mainteComplete the following puzzle by Hughette usingDrinkwine the to nance and repair of a numbers 1-9 only once in each row, column leach field as more fully described in a Quitclaim and 3 x 3 box. Deed from John A. Russell and James K. Warner to Stephan C. Ziemba dated July 26, 1982 and recorded in Book 51 at Page 181 of the said Fairfax Land Records.

16x 12x

FOR SALE BY OWNER

Being the lands and premises commonly known as 209 Tabor Hill Road.

3

1-

fsb

PM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage,

6 2

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

15x

Decree of Foreclosure entered April 30, 2017, in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Melinda Raymond and Robert Galley to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Ohio Savings Bank, dated October 5, 2005 and recorded in Book 173 Page 411 of the land records of the Town of Fairfax, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of the following Assignments of Mortgage: (1) Assignment of Mortgage from Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Ohio Savings Bank to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. dated October 15, 2007 and recorded in Book 192 Page 136 and (2) Assignment of Mortgage from Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. to U.S. Bank National Association, not in its individual capacity but solely as trustee for RMAC Trust, Series 2016-CTT dated October 2, 2017 recorded in Book 255 Page 346 both of the land records of the Town of Fairfax for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 209 Tabor Hill Road, Fairfax, Vermont on March 20, 2018 at 1:00

Difficulty - Medium

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

1 5 2 9 1 6

No. 522

SUDOKU

5 4 8 1 7 Difficulty - Hard

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: ★★

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: ★★★

Fill the grid using the numbers 1-6, only once in each row and column. The numbers in each heavily outlined “cage” must combine to produce the target number in the top corner, using the mathematical operation indicated. A onebox cage should be filled in with the target number in the top corner. A number can be repeated within a cage as long as it is not the same row or column.

Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each 9-box square contains all of the numbers one to nine. The same numbers cannot be repeated in a row or column.

5

3

1

2

4

6

3

6

2

4

5

1

4

5

6

1

2

3

8 3 7 1 5 9 6 2 4

ANSWERS ON P. C-6 2 4★★5= CHALLENGING 6 7 8 ★★1★ =3HOO,9BOY! ★ = MODERATE

9 1 6 3 2 4 5 7 8 7 5 1 4 8 3 2 9 6

Reference is hereby made to the above instruments, the records thereof, the references therein made and their respective records and references in aid of this description. Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description. Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described. TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the

Pristine 4-5 BR, living room w/ fieldstone fireplace, full kitchen w/ granite, newly renovated 2-BA, 2 car garage, great schools, minutes from skiing and all outdoor fun. $199,500. jb47234@gmail.com. 802-775-3735

time and place of the sale by the purchaser. 2/26/18 1:13 PM The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale. The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale. DATED: February 14, 2018 By: /S/Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032 STATE OF VERMONT FRANKLIN UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT DOCKET NO: 254-7-16 FRCV WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. v. WILLIAM SAVARIA III AND KRISTIN M. SAVARIA OCCUPANTS OF: 279 Swamp Road, Fairfax VT MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and


SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Decree of Foreclosure entered May 30, 2017, in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by William Savaria III and Kristin M. Savaria to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Ark-La-Tex Financial Services, LLC dba Benchmark Mortgage, dated February 21, 2014 and recorded in Book 234 Page 123 of the land records of the Town of Fairfax, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of an Assignment of Mortgage from Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Ark-La-Tex Financial Services, LLC dba Benchmark Mortgage to Wells Fargo Bank, NA dated April 3, 2015 and recorded in Book 240 Page 371 of the land records of the Town of Fairfax for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 279 Swamp Road, Fairfax, Vermont on April 3, 2018 at 3:00 PM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To wit: Being all and the same

land and premises conveyed to Patricia A. McGovern by Warranty Deed of Deborah G. Allinger (f/k/a Deborah Porter), dated July 12, 1995 and recorded in Volume 93, Page 434 of the Town of Fairfax Land Records. A parcel of land, consisting of 36,770 square feet of land, more or less, together with the buildings thereon, situated on the easterly side of Town Highway #28, commonly referred to as the “Swamp Road, approximately 1.2 miles northerly of the intersection of Town Highway #28 with State Aid Highway #2, and commonly known as 279 Swamp Road. Said land and premises are more particularly described by metes and bounds as follows: commencing at the southwesterly corner of a parcel of land containing 18 acres, more or less, and having been conveyed to Arthur W. and Margaret C. Webb by warranty deed of Leno A. Wetherbee of record in Book 37, Page 232 of the Town of Fairfax Land Records, said corner being marked by a surveyor’s metal tee located at the intersection of the Town

Highway right-of-way (1.5 rods easterly of and normal to the center line of the travelled way) and the boundary fence between the property now or formerly owned by the said Webbs and property now or formerly owned by Jean Guy Rainville; thence bearing N 9°33’ E for a distance of 150.63 feet along the easterly right-of-way boundary of Town Highway #28 to the northwesterly corner of the parcel herein conveyed, said corner being marked by a surveyor’s metal tee stake; thence bearing S 73° 33’ E for a distance of 190.81 feet across lands now or formerly owned by the said Webbs to a northerly internal corner of the parcel herein conveyed, said corner being marked by a surveyor’s metal tee stake; thence bearing N 78° 50’ E for a distance of 91.93 feet across lands now or formerly owned by the said Webbs to the northeasterly corner of the parcel herein conveyed, said corner being marked by a surveyor’s metal tee stake; thence bearing S 18° 45’ E for a distance of 126.21 feet across lands now or formerly owned by the said Webbs and being also the interface between open meadow

crossword

Show and tell.

»

View and post up to 6 photos per ad online.

to the interior of these metes and bounds and wooded land to the exterior, arriving at the southeasterly corner of the parcel herein conveyed, said corner lying at the northerly boundary of the aforementioned Rainville property and being marked by a surveyor’s metal tee stake; thence bearing N 88°47’ W for a distance of 338.80 feet along the northerly boundary of the said. Rainville property, said boundary being marked by an existing stone wall and wire fence, to the point or place of beginning. The premises conveyed herein are subject to a right-of-way over and across a strip of land 150.63 feet in length and 1.5 rods in width between the center line and the easterly right-of-way line of Town Highway #28 along the westerly side of said premises. Reference is made to a Map entitled “Ronald Morrissette, Map of Property Survey” dated April 14, 1970, and prepared by Buck and Pierce, Civil Engineers and designated Project 70-4-18-11 and recorded in the Town of Fairfax

OH GEE! ANSWERS ON P. C-6

Open 24/7/365. Post & browse ads at your convenience.

Land Records in Map Slide 12813.

further aid of this description.

Being all and the same land and premises conveyed to James R. Boudah and Deborah Porter, now Deborah G. Ailinger, by warranty deed of Michael E. Grant and Elizabeth A. Grant dated August 21, 1985 and recorded in Book 56, Pages 474-475 of the Fairfax Land Records; title vested in Deborah Porter by virtue of a quit-claim deed from James R. Boudah dated December 13, 1990 and recorded in Book 74, Pages 287-288 of the Town of Fairfax Land Records.

Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described.

Reference is hereby made to the aforementioned instruments and their records and to the references therein contained in further aid of this description.

TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale.

Mark R. Ailinger joins in this deed to convey any interest he may have by virtue of his relationship as husband of the said Deborah G. Ailinger. Parcel ID # SP0279.

The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale.

Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in

DATED: February 12, 2018 By: /S/Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC

270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032 STATE OF VERMONT LAMOILLE UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT DOCKET NO: 167-8-15 LECV U.S BANK TRUST, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR LSF9 MASTER PARTICIPATION TRUST v. JAMES D. SHEPHERD, MARTHA W. SHEPHERD, STERLING WOODS COMMUNITY OWNERS ASSOCIATION AND DANIEL W. BURGESS OCCUPANTS OF: 117 Sterling Woods, Stowe, VT MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered July 12, 2017, in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by James D. Shepherd and Martha W. Shepherd to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for IndyMac Bank, F.S.B., dated December 22, 2006 and recorded in

Extra! Extra! There’s no limit to ad length online.

Book 670 Page 171 of the land records of the Town of Stowe, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of the following Assignments of Mortgage: (1) Assignment of Mortgage from Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for IndyMac Bank, F.S.B. to Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC dated June 30, 2014 and recorded in Book 891 Page 23 and (2) Assignment of Mortgage from Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC to U.S Bank Trust, N.A., As Trustee For LSF9 Master Participation Trust dated April 27, 2016 and recorded in Book 959 Page 318, both of the land records of the Town of Stowe for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 117 Sterling Woods, Stowe, Vermont on March 27, 2018 at 2:30 PM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To wit: All that certain parcel of land being situated in the Town of Stowe, County of Lamoille, State of Vermont, being known and designated as a part

LEGALS »

» SEVENDAYSVT.COM 03.07.18-03.14.18 SEVEN DAYS CLASSIFIEDS C-5


To the creditors of Jonas Robertson, Jr. late of Essex, VT. I have been appointed to administer this estate. All creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the first publication of this notice. The claim must be presented to me at the address listed below

4

6

5

4

6

3

3

5 8 2 19 5-7 4 6 1 5 3 15x

34- 7 4 5 1 6 516x 1 9 3 2 8 6 9 7 4 8 2 2-

5

3

6 2-

3

5

2 5 9 7 8 22 4 8 3 614+7 1 5 3 2 9 1 4 6

2

2

4

1 1 6 30x 3 4 2 12x 9 7 8 5

1

1

2

5 1

4

6

6 23÷ 4 1 3 9 4x 5 7 8 2 9 6 8 515+1 7 4 3 4 8 5 3Difficulty 6 - Medium 2 9 1 7 1-

6

Using the enclosed math operations as a guide, fill the grid using the numbers 1 - 6 only once in each row and column.

Calcoku

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

FROM P.C-4

3

03.07.18-03.14.18

STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT CHITTENDEN UNIT PROBATE DIVISION DOCKET NO. 132-1-18 CNPR In re estate of Jonas Robertson, Jr.

FROM P.C-5

6

SEVEN DAYS

By: /s/Grant C. Rees, Esq. Grant C. Rees Attorney, PLC 30 Kimball Ave., Ste. 307 South Burlington, VT 05403 Attorney for Plaintiff

4

C-6 CLASSIFIEDS

Nationstar Mortgage LLC,

2

PUZZLE ANSWERS

The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale.

Dated at South Burlington, Vermont this 19th day of February, 2018.

1

The mortgagor is

By virtue and in execution of the Power of Sale contained in a certain mortgage given by Allison Mullis and Janice Presutti to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Nominee for Countrywide Home Loans, Inc. dated February 16, 2007 and recorded in Volume 342, Page 209, which mortgage was assigned to Nationstar Mortgage LLC by an instrument

Terms of Sale: $10,000.00 to be paid in cash or cashier’s check by purchaser at the time of sale, with the balance due at closing. The sale is subject to taxes due and owing to the Town of Milton and any liens against the property.

4

TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale.

NOTICE OF SALE

6

Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described.

To Wit: Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to Allison Mullis and Janice Presutti by Warranty Deed of Michael R. Thorpe dated February 16, 2007 and recorded March 1, 2007 in Volume 342, Page 209 of the Land Records of the Town of Milton.

5

Excepting and reserving unto Grantor, his heirs, successors and assigns as a right appurtenant to Lot 12, at all points within a 100 foot radius of the pin marking the common corner of Lots 8 and 9 and which is in the sideline of Lot 12, the right to conduct all surface activities including, without limitation, the right to landscape, plant or remove vegetation and to alter the surface of the area excepted and reserved unto Grantor provided however, that the right to conduct sur-

Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description.

STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT CHITTENDEN UNIT CIVIL DIVISION DOCKET NO. 873-1016 CNCV Nationstar Mortgage LLC, Plaintiff v. Allison Mullis, Janice Presutti and Occupants residing at 35 Meadow Road, Milton, Vermont, Defendants

Other terms to be announced at the sale or inquire at Grant C. Rees Attorney, PLC, 30 Kimball Avenue, Ste. 307, South Burlington, VT 05403, (802) 6609000. This sale may be cancelled at any time prior to the scheduled sale date without prior notice.

3

Being Lot No. 8 as shown on a survey plan titled “Sterling Woods Community” by Paul C. Harrington dated September, 1983, as recorded in Map Book 4 at Pages 114-115 of the Town of Stowe Land Records.

Tax/Parcel ID: 19067-110

DATED: February 12, 2018 By: /S/Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032

dated July 22, 2013 and recorded on August 23, 2013 in Volume 439, Page 397 of the Land Records of the Town of Milton. Pursuant to the power of sale in the subject mortgage, of which Plaintiff is the present holder, for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purposes of foreclosing the same, the collateral property will be sold at Public Auction at 11:00 A.M. on March 21, 2018, at 35 Meadow Road, Milton, Vermont all and singular the premises described in said mortgage:

1

of all and the same land and premises conveyed to Nelson S. Riley, III, by Sterling Valley, a Limited Partnership, by its Warranty Deed dated August 7, 1981, and of record in Book 103 at Pages 137138 of the Town of Stowe Land Records.

entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale.

2

[CONTINUED]

face activities excepted and reserved shall not include the right to erect any building or structure on any part of the land and premises excepted and reserved. As to all points more than 100 feet but less than 175 feet from the above-referenced pin, no cutting of live trees or fencing activities shall occur except with the mutual consent of Grantor and Grantee and their heirs, successors and assigns.

with a copy sent to the court. The claim may be barred forever if it is not presented within the four (4) month period. Date: February 26, 2018 /s/ Naomi Wilson Signature of Fiduciary Naomi Wilson Executor/Administrator: c/o C. Dennis Hill Esq. 333 Dorset Street South Burlington, VT 05403 802-497-0079 Name of publication Seven Days Publication Dates: 3/7/2018 Name and Address of Court: Chittenden Superior Court Probate Division PO Box 511 Burlington, VT 054020511 STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT CHITTENDEN UNIT PROBATE DIVISION DOCKET NO. 1702-1217 CNPR In re estate of James R. Lynch. NOTICE TO CREDITORS To the creditors of James R. Lynch late of South Burlington, VT. I have been appointed to administer this estate. All creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the first publication of this notice. The claim must be presented to me at the address listed below with a copy sent to the court. The claim may be barred forever if it is not presented within the four (4) month period. Date: 2/22/18 /s/ Victoria Lynch Signature of Fiduciary Victoria Lynch Executor/Administrator: 105 Swift St. So. Burlington 802-862-3487 Name of publication Seven Days Publication Date: 3/7/2018 Name and Address of Court: Chittenden Superior Court Probate Division PO Box 511 Burlington, VT 05402

STATE OF VERMONT WASHINGTON UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT DOCKET NO: 370-6-15 WNCV NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC D/B/A CHAMPION MORTGAGE v. MARGUERITE MUNRO AND THE SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT OCCUPANTS OF 384 RIVER RIDGE ROAD, WAITSFIELD, VT MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered June 28, 2017, in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Marguerite Munro to MetLife Home Loans, a Division of Metlife Bank, N.A., dated July 20, 2009 and recorded in Book 135 Page 455 of the land records of the Town of Waitsfield, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of a Corrective Assignment of Mortgage from MetLife Home Loans, a Division of Metlife Bank, N.A to Nationstar Mortgage LLC d/b/a Champion Mortgage dated December 14, 2012 and recorded in Book 149 Page 380 of the land records of the Town of Waitsfield for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 384 River Ridge Road, Waitsfield, Vermont on March 20, 2018 at 2:00PM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To wit: ALL THAT PARCEL OF LAND IN TOWNSHIP OF WAITSFIELD, WASHINGTON COUNTY, STATE OF VERMONT, BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS METES AND BOUNDS PROPERTY. BEING ALL AND THE SAME LAND AND PREMISES CONVEYED TO MARGUERITE MUNRO BY QUITCLAIM DEED OF ALASDAIR T. MUNRO AND MARGUERITE MUNRO DATED OCTOBER 2, 1984 AND RECORDED IN BOOK 44, PAGE 15 OF THE WAITSFIELD LAND RECORDS. BEING ALL AND THE SAME LAND AND PREMISES CONVEYED TO ALASDAIR T. AND MARGUERITE MUN-

RO BY WARRANTY DEED OF A.N.B. VENTURES, LTD. DATED JANUARY 11, 1971 AND RECORDED IN BOOK 24, PAGE 295 OF THE WAITSFIELD LAND RECORDS. BEING A 5.00 ACRE PARCEL OF LAND, MORE OR LESS (WAITSFIELD GRAND LIST HAS THE PROPERTY SIZE AS BEING 6.60 ACRES) WITH DWELLING AND IMPROVEMENTS LOCATED THEREON AND MORE PARTICULARLY KNOWN AS 384 RIVER RIDGE ROAD IN THE TOWN OF WAITSFIELD, VERMONT. BEING THE SAME PROPERTY AS CONVEYED FROM ALASDAIR T. MUNRO AND MARGUERITE MUNRO TO MARGUERITE MUNRO, AS DESCRIBED IN DEED BOOK 44 PAGE 15 DATED 10/02/1984 AND RECORDED 10/02/1984, WASHINGTON COUNTY RECORDS, STATE OF VERMONT. Tax ID: 029026000.00 Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description. Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described. TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale. The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale. DATED: February 5, 2018 By: /S/Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032


C-7 03.07.18-03.14.18

ATTENTION RECRUITERS: POST YOUR JOBS AT: PRINT DEADLINE: FOR RATES & INFO:

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTMYJOB NOON ON MONDAYS (INCLUDING HOLIDAYS) MICHELLE BROWN, 802-865-1020 X21, MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

YOUR TRUSTED LOCAL SOURCE. SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS TEACHERS, COME JOIN THE TEAM AT KING STREET CENTER!

CA R I N G P E O P L E WA N T E D

Home Instead Senior Care, a provider of home helper services to seniors in their homes, is seeking friendly and dependable people. CAREGivers assist seniors with companionship, light housekeeping, meal preparation, personal care, errands, safety presence and more. Part-time, flexible scheduling, including: daytime, evening, weekend and overnight shifts currently available. Higher pay for weekend shifts. No heavy lifting.

Apply online at: www.homeinstead.com/483 or call us at 802.860.4663

2v-HomeInstead020817.indd 1

Ivy Computer has been named the fastest growing technology company by Vermont Business Magazine. We are in need of a software technical support person to join our existing team. This is a full-time position supporting software developed by Ivy. For more information, visit www.IvyComputer.com. If you are interested in joining our team, please send a cover letter and resume to Jobs@IvyComputer.com.

1 1/13/17 2v-IvyComputer030718.indd 12:37 PM

Busy BakeryCafé hiring: • Full-time breakfast/lunch cook. Four day work week. Paid Vacation.

For more information go to:

kingstreetcenter.org/about-kingstreet-center/employment.

2h-KingStreetYouthCenter030718.indd 1

3/5/18 11:01 AM

Send resumes to: mirabelles198@comcast.net.

3/5/182v-Mirabelles030718.indd 3:06 PM 1

3/2/18 2:11 PM

LNAs Needed

V E R M O NT P U BLIC U TIL IT Y COMMISSION G E NE R AL CO U NSEL VACANCY

keting: Director of Communications

The Vermont Public Utility Commission is seeking a highly qualified attorney with extensive experience in administrative law, utility law and regulation, and environmental law to serve as General Counsel. The Public Utility Commission is a quasi-judicial commission that regulates electric, energy efficiency, natural gas, telecommunications and water utilities in Vermont. Issues decided by the Commission include, among others: siting of utility facilities and non-utility renewable generation facilities; utility rates and other financial matters; and renewable energy, energy efficiency and telecommunications policies. This is a unique chance to participate in Vermont’s regulatory process that implements major policy decisions which often have statewide, regional, and national significance. See http://puc.vermont.gov.

nal sought to lead the Vermont Department of Tourism nd trade relations efforts. This mission-critical position e positive tourism-related coverage of Vermont in the nal marketplace. The Director of Communications is An applicant must have a J.D. from a recognized law school, admission (or eligible for admission) to the Vermont and Bar withimplementation at least 8 years’ professional experience relevant business proficiency at increasing levels elopment of ademonstrating proactive of complexity and responsibility, and must demonstrate the ability to assimilate and understand a large volume nt withof highly thetechnical goals and mission of the Department of information, including legal principles and accounting, financial and engineering data. The applicant also possess the ability to write clearly on complicated subjects, conduct himself/herself in a as well asshould maintaining consistent communications judicial manner, manage complex utility litigation in a quasi-judicial hearing process, supervise other attorneys, ools. This position is responsible for all tourism media provide legal advice to Commission officials on issues involving substantial public policy concerns or substantial financial impact, and develop, implement,development; and execute litigation strategies in state and federal forums on complex ut-of-state; press release pitching targeted regulatory matters. egional and national media; development of press Salary in accordance with the State of Vermont’s Attorney Pay Plan for General Counsel I. The pay plan can be d itineraries; management of media contact lists; and found at http://humanresources.vermont.gov/sites/humanresources/files/documents/Compensation/DHRAttorney_Pay_Plan_FY18.pdf . nternational public relations initiatives. The Director The State of Vermont offers an excellent total compensation package. To apply, submit resume, cover letter th the Agency of Commerce executive team in the and writing sample to Business Manager, Vermont Public Utility Commission, 112 State Street, 4th Floor, Montpelier, VT 05620-2701, or via email to puc.businessmanager@vermont.gov by March 14, 2018. ctive travel trade and business recruitment plan. This State of Vermont&is Marketing. an Equal Opportunity Employer. he Commissioner ofTheTourism

onstrate strong oral and written skills; have a BA in 7-VTPublicServiceBoard030718.indd 1

Seeking creative, compassionate and fun-loving teachers for our year-round Preschool and Castle Camp summer program.

At UVM Health Network - Central Vermont Medical Center, we value the crucial role our LNAs play in caring for our patients and our community. That’s why we’ve increased the starting base pay to $14.61 per hour. Earn excellent pay for the exceptional care you deliver. FT, PT, and per diem positions available at Woodridge Rehabilitation and Nursing.

WE OFFER:

$3,500 SIGN-ON BONUS*

PAID TIME OFF

EARN MORE

EXCELLENT BENEFITS

for working night shifts

Learn more and apply online today: UVMHealth.org/CVMC/Nursing or call our recruitment team at (802) 371-5910

*must start by April 1, 2018.

Equal Opportunity Employer

3/5/18 3:46 PM Untitled-20 1

2/19/18 10:36 AM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-8

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

03.07.18-03.14.18

ENTRY LEVEL HVAC TECH - PLANNED GROWTH POSITION Looking for a highly motivated and positive person to join our HVAC/ Electrical department in a position that will start at entry level, and over a 4 year period of on the job training and external classes/ training, evolve into a full HVAC Tech. As this person grows in ability, knowledge and responsibility, the financial compensation will also grow. Starting pay is $15/hr with Saint Michael’s College’s generous benefits. Benefits include health, dental, vision, life, disability, 401(k), generous paid time off, employee and dependent tuition benefits, and discounted gym membership. For full job description and to apply online go to:

smcvt.interviewexchange.com/.

4T-St.Michael'sCollege030718.indd 1

Part-time Sales Employee Seeking part-time retail sales employee for our shop. Successful candidate will have: Retail sales experience (preferably craft store), familiarity with Ravelry, accomplished knitter (or other fiber crafter), flexible scheduling required (weekend & weekday hours and some special events). Please send cover letter with resume to: hello@mustloveyarn.com.

3/2/182v-MustLoveYarn030718.indd 2:27 PM 1

OPEN POSITIONS At Vermont Creamery, we pride ourselves on producing the highest quality cheeses, butter and crème fraiche while supporting and developing family farms. We aim to exemplify sustainability by being profitable, engaging our staff in the business, and living our mission every day at the Creamery. Vermont Creamery is hiring for the following positions: • Human Resources Manager • Creamery Supervisor: Second Shift

The team at Resonance (formerly SSG Advisors) is growing and we’re looking for dynamic and entrepreneurial professionals to join our global development consulting team. We’re currently seeking a Human Resources (HR) Generalist, and Analysts to join our Inclusive Markets and Secure Communities practice areas. Learn more and see full job descriptions at resonanceglobal.com/careers.

MEDICAL LAB ASSISTANT 3 DAYS/WEEK FOR ALLERGY IMMUNOTHERAPY PROGRAM TO INCLUDE ADMINISTERING INJECTIONS AND MONITORING PATIENTS FOR POTENTIAL ALLERGIC REACTIONS. LAB/ MEDICAL EXPERIENCE PREFERRED. SEND RESUMES TO: tlallergy@tlaaa.com

GLOBAL PRODUCTION COORDINATOR

3/5/182v-SSGAdvisors030718.indd 4:00 PM 1

3/5/182V-TimberlaneAllergy022818.indd 2:08 PM 1

2/26/18 10:13 AM

Looking for a Super Turtle who can work effectively with vendors around the world on costing, quality, and product specifications; process, track and expedite purchase orders; work with our Logistics Turtle to coordinate overseas shipments; accurately process bills of material in our inventory management system; and stay current on US import requirements. This is just for starters! You will work collaboratively with our design team on sample tracking, our accounting team to process deposits and payments to our numerous overseas vendors, and customer service on key account activity. You must multi task, communicate clearly and effectively, process mountains of work accurately and think creatively to identify and solve inefficiencies. Experience with business computing software a huge plus. Speed and competency with Excel a requirement. Apply with cover letter and resume via email to bsnow@turtlefur.com. No phone calls, please. 146 Industrial Park Drive, Morrisville, VT 05661 | (802) 888-6400 WHERE YOU AND YOUR WORK MATTER...

5h-TurtleFur030718.indd 1

3/5/18 3:04 PM

WOODSIDE CLINICAL CHIEF – COLCHESTER

The Woodside Juvenile Rehabilitation Center has an exciting opportunity to join our team as our Chief of Clinical Services. This position for Chief of Clinical services will provide overview of best practices clinical services in a secure treatment facility for adjudicated youth ages 10-18. For more

information, contact Lisa Jennison at lisa.jennison@vermont.gov or 802-655-4990. Children’s and Families Services. Reference Job ID #622587. Status: Full Time. Application Deadline: Open until filled.

• Industrial Mechanic

P U B L I C H E A LT H S P E C I A L I S T – B U R L I N G T O N

To apply, please call 802-479-9371 or go to

www.vermontcreamery.com/our-team.

Are you interested in public health? The Immunization Public Health Specialist position is a great opportunity to get experience working for the Vermont Department of Health. You will conduct site visits (60-70 per year) to ensure that health care providers around the state manage vaccines according to the requirements of the federal Vaccines for Children (VFC) Program. This program enables health care providers to offer low cost or free vaccine to people who are unable to pay. Your job is to monitor vaccine management including storage and handling, train nurses and other office staff to follow regulations and create databases that track site visits. The successful candidate will have excellent organization and communication skills, and expertise with Microsoft Office is required. For more information, contact Ines Burazerovic at 802-865-7755 or email ines.burazerovic@vermont.gov. Department of Health. Reference Job ID # 622661. Location: Burlington. Status: Full Time. Application Deadline: March 18, 2018.

Learn more at: careers.vermont.gov Untitled-5 1 6t-VTCreamery022818.indd 1

2/23/18 12:22 PM

The State of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity Employer 3/5/18 10:36 AM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! The Vermont Center for Anxiety Care, a psychology private practice directed by Paul Foxman, Ph.D. on the Burlington waterfront, has an opening for licensed psychotherapist (M.A., MSW, Ph.D, LCMHC) or master’s degree intern. Collaborative group with holistic approach and multiple specialties. Child therapy desirable. Clinical supervision by Dr. Foxman towards licensure and business coaching provided as needed. Visit web site: vtcenterforanxietycare.com. Send cover letter and resume to Paul Foxman, Ph.D., 86 Lake Street, Burlington, VT 05401 or email: paulfoxman@aol.com.

Licensed Nursing Assistants Full-Time Evening Shift Wake Robin seeks a dedicated nursing assistant with a strong desire to work within a community of seniors. Wake Robin seeks LNAs licensed in Vermont to provide high quality care in a fast paced residential and long-term care environment, while maintaining a strong sense of “home.” We offer higher than average pay including shift differentials, great benefits, a pristine working environment, and an opportunity to build strong relationships with staff and residents in a dynamic community setting. Interested candidates please email hr@wakerobin.com or fax your resume with cover letter to: HR, (802) 264-5146 or complete an application online at www.wakerobin.com. Wake Robin is an EOE. 5h-WakeRobin030718.indd 1

3/5/18 4:24 PM 2V-VTCenterforAnxietyCare030718.indd 1

3/5/18

Providing Innovative Mental Health and Educational Services to Vermont’s Children & Families.

Clinical Case Manager $300 Sign On Bonus Community Based Services Looking for an exciting new opportunity? NFI has one for you!

We’re seeking RNs & LPNs to join our team! The UVM Health Network - Central Vermont Medical Center is an equal-opportunity employer offering competitive compensation along with a wide array of benefits. A sign-on bonus of $8,000 is now available for full-time positions throughout CVMC (bonus is pro-rated for parttime). Openings are available in our hospital, at Woodridge Rehabilitation & Nursing, and in our medical group practices. Interested in learning more about the CVMC community? Apply online at UVMHealth.org/CVMC/Nursing or call our Recruitment Team at (802) 371-4191

Equal Opportunity Employer

C-9

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

CBS is seeking a full time Clinical Case Manager to join our amazing team of mental health professionals and our positive and supportive work environment. Responsibilities include working with children, adolescents, and families with mental health challenges both in the community and in their homes. Ideal candidates work well both autonomously and collaboratively on treatment teams, have a Master’s degree in mental health or social work, have related work experience, have a valid driver’s license, and have reliable transportation. Come be a part of our positive culture which includes a generous benefits package, $300 sign on bonus, tuition reimbursement, paid time off, and more. Please send a cover letter and resume to Brandiecarlson@nafi.com.

Community Integration Specialists $300 Sign on Bonus

03.07.18-03.14.18

Seeking Administrative Assistant Thomas Hirchak Company is seeking an Administrative Assistant for our Morrisville office to support with office, digital and financial tasks. Position may include some out-ofoffice work. Auction experience is not essential.

Responsibilities include: • High Proficiency in Microsoft Word and Excel 3:48 PM• Effective organizational skills with attention to detail • Basic bookkeeping & cashiering skills • Valid driver’s license • Excellent communication skills Hours are 8-5, Monday through Friday. Competitive wages, benefits package including 401(k).

Please submit your resumé to HR1@THCAuction.com

Let’s get to.....

Untitled-21 1

3/5/18 2:02 PM

Community Based Services CBS is committed to empowering youth by providing family based treatment through innovative, diverse and community integrated methods. CBS is seeking full time community integration specialists to join our talented team of mental health professionals. Responsibilities include working individually with children and adolescents with mental health challenges both in the community and in their homes. The opportunity to bring personal interests/hobbies to share with youth is encouraged. Ideal candidates must have a bachelor’s degree, be able to work afternoon and evening hours, have a valid driver’s license, and reliable transportation. A Generous benefits package is provided, which includes tuition reimbursement, and a $300 sign on bonus. Please send a cover letter and resume to Brandiecarlson@nafi.com. EOE

jobs.sevendaysvt.com


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-10

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

03.07.18-03.14.18

LEGAL ASSISTANT Assistant Professor, Sport and Wellness (Academic)

LEGAL ASSISTANT

For position details and application process, visit jobs.plattsburgh.edu and select “View Current Openings.” Application Email: hrapply@plattsburgh.edu. Your Online Application: jobs.plattsburgh.edu/postings/9027.

Small law firm focusing on medical malpractice, personal injury, and federal criminal work is looking for a bright, hardworking legal assistant/paralegal who is computer savvy and personable. Beautiful office on the waterfront, one month paid vacation, competitive salary based on experience, new graduates welcome. Full/part time. Please send resumes to:

SUNY College at Plattsburgh is a fully compliant employer committed to Bergeron, Paradis & Tom@ThomasSherrer.com. excellence through diversity. Fitzpatrick seeks a full-time, experienced legal assistant for its Essex Junction office. 3/5/182h-ThomasSherrer030718.indd 3:39 PM 1 3/5/18 2:49 PM This position requires 2H-PlattsburghStateUniversity030718.indd 1 familiarity with real estate transactional work. The ideal candidate will have DAY SHIFT CUSTODIAN (SUNDAY - THURSDAY) real estate experience, SEEKING FOSTER PARENTS excellent communication Saint Michael’s College is seeking applications from Howard Center has ongoing foster parent or weekend buddy skills, and the ability to work dependable, efficient workers to fill a day shift custodial needs for children ranging in ages from 7 to 16. Some need caring independently with attention position. The shift is: Sunday through Thursday (Sunday: adults to support them over the weekend, others need a family for to detail. Please send 6:00am - 2:30pm; Monday - Thursday: 5:00am - 1:30pm). a school year and some are looking for adoptive families. There are resumes to: Successful candidates will join a team which cleans College over 1,300 children in the Vermont foster care system and over buildings including dormitories, restrooms, offices and 60 children in need of an adoptive family. You don’t have to be Robin Beane, classrooms. Training will be provided for the right candidate. married, rich or own a home. You will be supported every step of PO Box 174, the way! Benefits include health, dental, vision, life, disability, 401(k), Essex Jct., VT generous paid time off, employee and dependent tuition SEEKING SHARED LIVING PROVIDERS benefits, and discounted gym membership. 05453-0174 Howard Center’s Shared Living Program creates opportunities For full job description and to apply online go to: for individuals with developmental disabilities to live in the or email to smcvt.interviewexchange.com/. community. We are accepting expressions of interest from rbeane@bpflegal.com. experienced caregivers to provide a home, day-to-day assistance and support tailored to the needs of individuals seeking caregivers. This is a rewarding employment opportunity for individuals interested 1 3/5/18 3:51 PM 3V-BergeronParadis&Fitzpatrick030718.indd 1 3/2/184T-St.Michael'sCollege(3)030718.indd 2:23 PM in working from home while making a meaningful difference in someone’s life. We use a careful matching process to ensure that each placement is mutually compatible. A generous tax-free stipend, room and board, respite budget, training, and team support are provided. Potential opportunities below:

LNA TRAINING PROGRAM For Full Time Employment Beginning March 26, 2018

To Apply Send Resume to Amanda St.Cyr, RN DNS Birchwood Terrace Healthcare 43 Starr Farm Rd Burlington, Vt 05408 802-863-6384 Amanda.st.cyr@ kindred.com EOE

3v-BirchwoodTerrace022818.indd 1

Invest EAP Support Specialist Position

Innovative, statewide Employee Assistance Program, Invest EAP (www.investeap.org), in partnership with Vermont Association of Business, Industry and Rehabilitation (www.vabir.org), seeks organized and reliable professional to provide excellent customer service to members and colleagues. This role will support our clinical and business staff to ensure that all services are delivered with distinction and confidence. Duties would include resource research and referral, data entry, managing information in multiple databases and member outreach and support. Candidate must be highly proficient with current technology, have the ability to work independently, take directives and abide by the highest professional ethical standards and confidentiality. Position requires a bachelor’s degree at minimum, preferably in the human services field. This position is part-time, 18-22 hours a week. The ideal candidate would work 3-4 hours 5 days a week in our Cherry St. offices in downtown Burlington, though we have some ability to craft a flexible schedule. Must be able to work Thursday morning 8:00 to 12:00. This position requires highly effective communication style and the ability to be part of a team. The best match will be able to work in a dynamic environment with great staff supporting our diverse client base. To apply, please send resume and cover letter to Marc Adams at marca@investeap.org before 3/18/2018.

2/22/185v-VABIR030718.indd 11:26 AM 1

1. SLP to support a 30-year-old man who enjoys taking walks, playing music and helping others. He seeks a roommate to share a furnished, centrally located home in Essex Junction. 2. A young woman who utilizes a wheelchair is looking for an accessible home (or one willing to make alterations). This position is two weeks on, two weeks off. Must be willing to learn special care procedures and how to use a lift. 3. SLP with a background in mental health/human services who can create a safe and nurturing home for a 25-year-old male. He uses facilitated communication and enjoys alone time, walks, hikes and swimming. 4. Medically aware SLP comfortable with personal care and who can offer a clean, structured and calm home for a social and musicloving 59-year-old woman. Wheelchair/walker accessible home. 5. Experienced caregiver(s) to live with and support two delightful women in their seventies who reside in a three-bedroom home in Essex. Sense of humor helpful; patience necessary. To learn more about these opportunities, contact JRodrigues@howardcenter.org or call (802) 488-6372.

3/5/188t-HowardCenter030718.indd 3:10 PM 1

3/5/18 12:25 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

Customer Care Specialist Primary responsibilities include providing pro-active and comprehensive customer care to the domestic representatives, sales managers and customers, managing customer leads, quotes, bids and accurate order processing utilizing various software programs. Successful coordination with other departments with respect to delivery schedules, resolving accounting issues and meeting customer requirements is essential. Five years of previous customer service experience preferably in manufacturing setting, professional oral communication, excellent telephone presentation and demonstrated ability to handle difficult customer issues and work well with team members. Experience with data entry and word processing. Associate’s degree preferred. Inside Sales Representative Primary responsibilities include prospecting and qualifying customers using supplied leads and internet research; communicating those leads to the appropriate outside sales representatives throughout the country and attendance at trade shows. Develop and maintain a through working knowledge of product design, functionality, operations and typical product applications. BS in Life Sciences or equivalent, excellent communication skills as well as an outgoing personality with a desire to interact with customers. Strong PC literacy and ability and willingness to travel. Our dedicated employees are our greatest asset contributing to our success. We offer a casual yet professional and respectful work environment, competitive salary and an excellent benefits package which includes medical, dental, vision, 401K and a profit sharing plan. If you want to join a great team that appreciates collaboration, hard work and a whole lot of fun, we would love to hear from you! To learn more, please visit our website at www.biotek.com. Please apply by submitting resumes to hrresumes@biotek.com or mail them to: Human Resources BioTek Instruments, Inc. P.O. Box 998, Highland Park Winooski, VT 05404

Talent Search Outreach Counselor VSAC is seeking a VSAC Talent Search Outreach Counselor to provide career and college readiness services at middle and high schools in the Chittenden County area. This full-time position will have a start date in late August to correspond with the start of the next academic year.

VT’s first full-scale cricket farm is seeking someone with passion, creative energy and drive to assist the Head of Sales & Marketing. We’re health-focused, earth-loving, think-outside-the-box world changers looking for someone with energy to join our team. 25 hours per week, $20 per hour. Weekday hours; occasional weekends. Williston. Job description and application info here:

A Master’s degree in counseling, education or related field is preferred along with experience working with youth in educational settings. The ideal candidate will have experience working with youth; have an understanding of the socioeconomic and academic needs of firstgeneration, modest-income students and families; have excellent communication and organizational skills; have an ability to work independently; and possess a working knowledge of adolescent development, career development, post-secondary options and financial aid. The successful candidate will create a curriculum plan that includes the full spectrum of career and college planning services http://bit.ly/2DT6aed and will have skill working with students in groups and one-on-one. Presentation skills are essential, as is establishing a good rapport with middle and high school students, area schools, agencies and college 2v-FlourishFarm022818.indd 1 2/26/18 personnel. Familiarity with school systems is preferred. Must have Vermont Regenerative a valid driver’s license verified by a Motor Vehicle Record Report, a Medicine in Winooski seeks a willingness to travel up to 1,200 miles a month, a properly inspected, medical receptionist. registered, and insured motor vehicle for business use and must provide We are looking for a detail own workspace when working away from VSAC offices. Candidate oriented professional with must also successfully complete a criminal background check. exceptional communication This is a grant funded position that is contingent upon continued & interpersonal skills. grant funds. Computer and organizational skills also required. Operations and Help Desk Supervisor

MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST

We’re looking for an experienced person to join our Information Technology Team. You will oversee IBM iSeries operations and desktop/laptop help desk activities, direct a team, ensure costeffective operations, and help forecast equipment and software needs for VSAC. Our ideal candidate will be a strong team leader who is proficient in a variety of technical applications, tools, and operating systems (mostly windows), has great interpersonal and communication skills and wants to continue to learn and grow both themselves and those around them. If you have about five years of experience in a service oriented leadership position in a technical area, can help lead our back office operations and our front line help desk team as we all work together to serve Vermonters, we want to hear from you. (Experience with IBM iSeries administration, project management and a Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Science or related discipline would be preferred, but don’t let that hold you back if you’re the right person to join our team.) VSAC offers a dynamic, professional environment with competitive compensation and generous benefits package. Apply online only at www.vsac.org.

New, local, scam-free jobs posted every day!

3/5/188-VSAC030718.indd 3:33 PM 1

sevendaysvt.com/classifieds 4h_filler.indd 1

Sales, Marketing & Admin Assistant

VERMONT STUDENT ASSISTANCE CORPORATION PO Box 2000, Winooski, VT 05404 EOE/Minorities/Females/Vet/Disabled www.VSAC.org.

No phone calls please EOE/AA

8-BioTek030718.indd 1

03.07.18-03.14.18

We’re all about mission at Vermont Student Assistance Corporation (VSAC). Help us fulfill our mission of providing all Vermont students with information and financial resources to reach their educational goals. You’ll work in a relaxed yet challenging environment.

Are you looking to become part of a company with a unique culture? Our employees consider BioTek not just a workplace but a community built on respect and trust. At BioTek, a market leader in detection and imaging instrumentation for life science and drug discovery research, we are recognized globally for our innovative product line and excellent customer service. Our global customers include academic, government, and biotech/pharmaceutical companies. Because of our continual growth, we are currently seeking enthusiastic, energetic, customer focused individuals to join our Marketing and Sales team.

C-11

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

3/5/18 3:37 PM

2:12 PM

The responsibilities of this position include: • Checking patients in and out • Verifying insurance • Processing payments • Light bookkeeping • Scheduling appointments • Obtaining Prior Authorizations • Answering and returning calls • Ordering supplies • Communicating effectively with patients • Maintaining patients’ confidential and demographic data The small medical practice environment is lively and energetic, and we believe a successful candidate will need to have that same kind of personality. Part time position to start, 25-30 hours over 5 days per week. May become full-time. Salary commensurate with experience, minimum $16 per hour. Send resume and cover letter via email.

mortonkg@comcast.net 2/19/18 4:56 PM 4V-VermontRegenerativeMedicine030718.indd 3/2/18 1 2:35 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-12

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

03.07.18-03.14.18

Carpenters Wanted. Needed Immediately!

Director of Community Programs

Finish Carpenters, Carpenters and Carpenters Helpers. Good Pay, Full Time and Long Term! Chittenden County. Call Mike at 802-343-0089 or Morton at 802-862-7602.

CLEANING 1/15/18 POSITIONS

1t-MJSContracting011718.indd 1

FULL – TIME

South Burlington, VT 05403 Williston, VT 05495

1:48 PM

The Vermont Humanities Council, a statewide non-profit organization headquartered in Montpelier, seeks a Director of Community Programs to develop, implement, and supervise the Council’s public programs. Relevant experience in program management and bachelor’s degree required; advanced degree desirable. Candidates should demonstrate a broad background in the humanities, especially literature and history; strong organizational skills; experience implementing programs; and excellent writing, people, and computer skills. EOE. See full job description at vermonthumanities.org/jobs. Please send cover letter, resume, and three references ideally by 3/16/2018 to: Vermont Humanities Council, ATTN: Human Resources, 11 Loomis Street, Montpelier, VT 05602, or email lwinter@vermonthumanities.org.

Director of Admissions Full Time, Benefit Eligible

We seek an experienced Admissions professional to provide leadership of Goddard’s Admissions functions to support robust enrollment of a diverse and nontraditional student body. This position manages counseling and conversion, data management and analysis, enrollment partnerships, and recruitment strategy. Successful candidates must have a genuine personal commitment to social justice, inclusion, and equity and will understand and readily participate in efforts to address these issues at the College. To learn more, please visit:

www.goddard.edu/about-goddard/employment-opportunities/ Must have transportation and be able to pass a 4t-VtHumanities022118.indd 1 2/19/18 4t-GoddardCollege022118.indd 11:51 AM 1 2/16/18 background check. Office/Warehouse cleaning includes sweeping, mopping, PART-TIME INSTRUCTOR- MARKETING dusting, vacuuming, Saint Michael’s College invites applications for a part-time (1-2 restrooms and Busy South Burlington shop is seeking an experienced ‘A’ level tech. We courses) Instructor of Marketing in the Department of Business emptying trash. Administration and Accounting beginning Fall 2018. Specific pay well for your skills and efficiency. We are looking for someone who can $14.00/Hr.

2:55 PM

‘A’ level tech

Call 716-854-1409 to place your name on the Interview List or email resumes to cthrun@ heldsjanitorial.com. Morning shift, parttime and full-time.

3V-Held'sJanitorial030718.indd 1

teaching assignments may include introductory and/or upper level marketing courses. Electives are open to discussion; but our students have interests in social media marketing, sustainable marketing business practices, and data/analytics topics. Innovative approaches to teaching, including those employing technology, are welcomed. Consideration is given to candidates who are accomplished leaders in their academic/ professional community. For full job posting and to apply online please go to:

smcvt.interviewexchange.com/.

Caregivers Needed!

1 3/5/184T-St.Michael'sCollege(2)030718.indd 3:53 PM

3/2/184T-GirlingtonGarage030718.indd 2:27 PM 1

Administrative Assistant - Burlington, VT Vermont Physical Therapy is seeking an outgoing, detailoriented multitasker to join our team. As Administrative Assistant you will be responsible for answering phones, scheduling patient appointments, collecting patient payments, and ordering office and clinical supplies. The right candidate will be flexible and resourceful, have strong customer service and interpersonal skills, and act on one’s own initiative. Previous experience in a medical office is not required. This is a full time position with competitive salary, medical benefits, short & long term disability benefits, and 401k with company match up to 3%.

3/2/18 2:24 PM

Are you a compassionate person with a little extra time to spare? Help Others as a VNA Personal Care Attendant

Convenient FREE evening training session!

March 26-March 30 | 4-8 pm evenings March 12-March 16 | 8-4 pm days

$500 BONUS

Help adults remain independent in their homes. No experience necessary. We’ll train you! Days, evening, night & weekend shifts available.

For more information, contact Lisa Barron at 802 860 4449 or barron@vnacares.org.

www.vnacares.org

Please send resume with cover letter to vtptjobs@gmail.com, Attn: Dorie Pierce. Untitled-36 1 4t-VTPhysicalTherapy(VTPT)100417.indd 1

do advanced diagnosis as well as routine repairs. We are a super busy shop with a great reputation, and we can’t keep up with all our work! We have a great close-knit crew and we are looking for the right person to join us. If you want to make money and be proud of your work, we are the shop for you. Offering $1000.00 sign on bonus, matching pay, plus benefits to the right person. Please reply by email with experience and we will get back to you. We are an equal opportunity employer. Must be physically able to perform job, have a clean license, and own tools. GIRLINGTONGARAGE@GMAIL.COM 802.660.0055

10/2/17 1:37 PM

2/26/18 10:29 AM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

C-13

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

03.07.18-03.14.18

Security Officers

VERMONT ENVIRONMENTAL CAREERS & OPPORTUNITIES (ECO) AMERICORPS is accepting applications for the 2018-19

Senior Credit Analyst Berlin

Northfield Savings Bank is looking for a professional to join our team as a Senior Credit Analyst for our Berlin Operations Center located at 1021 Paine Turnpike North, Berlin, Vermont. The Senior Credit Analyst position also offers periodic flexibility to work out of Chittenden County. This position offers a strong opportunity to work for a growing premier Vermont mutual savings bank. The Senior Credit Analyst will be responsible for preparing financial analyses of current and prospective commercial loan customers. The selected candidate must possess knowledge and understanding of cash flow lending, personal and business financial statements and tax returns. The Senior Credit Analyst must display excellent communication and customer service skills to both internal and external customers. A Bachelor’s degree and several years of experience in a directly related field plus well developed analytical skill and proficiency in technology are requirements of this position. Commercial underwriting experience, working knowledge of Credit Quest or similar software and solid knowledge in accounting principles is preferred. The hours for this position are Monday – Friday, generally 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Careers@nsbvt.com (Preferred) Or mail: Northfield Savings Bank Human Resources P.O. Box 7180 Barre, VT 05641-7180 Equal Opportunity Employer/Member FDIC

9v-NorthfieldSavingsBank030718.indd 1

program year. We are seeking highly motivated individuals with a background in environmental conservation, natural or agricultural sciences, environmental studies, engineering, government/policy, communications or other related fields. Preference may be given to 3/5/18 applicants with a college degree. ECO AmeriCorps members serve at 1t-SSC030718.indd 1 host sites across Vermont with a focus on projects to improve water quality and reduce waste in Vermont. Full-time: 40 hours per week, September 2018-August 2019. Benefits include: an AmeriCorps living allowance of $16,500, paid in bi-weekly stipends; health insurance; child-care assistance; professional training and networking; studentloan forbearance; and a $5,920 AmeriCorps Education Award. Application deadline is March 30. Apply online, and learn more about ECO AmeriCorps at ecoamericorps.vermont.gov. The Green Mountain Club (GMC),

4t-VtDeptEnvironmentalConservation030718.indd 1

3/5/18

Adventure Ropes Assistant to the Vice Course Provost Looking for adventuresome educators

for Student Affairs Facilitator Workshops

April 7& 8: Low Elements/Facilitation (Offi ce/Program Support Senior) April 14 & 15: High Elements Dean of Students Offi ce session (www.uvm.edu/~saff airs) 9am-4pm (All required)

UVM ARC provides experiential learning opportunities to UVM Thisthe position will provide executive-level support,will coordination, and surrounding community. Participants learn how to and project management for program. the Vice Provost and facilitate a challenge course Open of to Student all levelsAffofairs facilitation Dean of Students. Th is position will welcome and triage all questions and ropes course experience. Per diem work opportunities available and requests received in the Offi ce of the Viceassessment, Provost andand Dean of upon successful completion of workshops, Students. Thchecks. e Assistant to the Vice Provost will interact with projects background

3:07 PM

a nonprofit organization, is the maintainer and protector of 4:06 PM Vermont’s Long Trail hiking system.

Full Time Position: GMC is seeking a friendly, dynamic individual for a full time opening this summer in our Visitor Center. The position will start at part time in mid-May until mid-June then transition to full-time from midJune until mid-October. Weekend and select holidays required as well as the occasional evening event. $11 to $13 per hour. Great working environment. EOE.

and communications that may be highly confidential and sensitive in Email letter explaining your interest in coming to the nature. Thiscover position will also organize and implement all Divisionworkshops, with toand Megan Meinen (ropes@uvm.edu). wide eventsalong for 250 staffresume, members planning meetings for Division Leadership. The Assistant to the Vice Provost will coordinate with other GMC also seeks a friendly, dynamic University community members and those relevant to the VPSA's individual to work 1-2 days a week SHELBURNE participation in a 1variety of activities.HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 4t-UVMRopesCourse030718.indd 3/5/18 1:50 PM

Part Time Position:

Northfield Savings Bank, founded in 1867, is the largest banking institution headquartered in Vermont. NSB offers a competitive compensation and benefits package including medical, dental, profit sharing, matching 401(K) retirement program, professional development opportunities, and a positive work environment supported by a team culture. If you are a match for this opening, please submit your resume and application in confidence to:

Full-time/Parttime positions. $14 per hour. Hiring areas: Milton, Barre, Montpelier, Georgia. Call (800) 638-0437, or visit smgcorporateservices.com.

Truck Driver/Laborer

For further information on this position (#0041263) and to apply with electronic application, resume, cover letter and reference contact This full-time position requires truck driving, information, visit our website at www.uvmjobs.com.

snow plowing, operating a loader and other and daily physical The University of Vermont isequipment, an Equal Opportunity/Affi rmative labor. Action Candidate must have CDL orand thepeople ability to obtain a CDL Employer. Applications froma women from diverse racial, withinand 6 months, and must be within one hour from ethnic, cultural backgrounds are located encouraged to apply. time called to work. Drug & alcohol testing and background check will be required.

from mid-May to mid-October. Weekend and select holidays required as well as the occasional evening event. $11 to $13 per hour. For more information, please visit http://bit.ly/2oQcuwA.

See full job description at 4v-GreenMountainClub030718.indd www.shelburnevt.org/237/Human-Resources. Excellent pay and benefits. The Town of Shelburne is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Submit resume or application to: Susan Cannizzaro, Town of Shelburne, P. O. Box 88, Shelburne, VT 05482 or scannizzaro@shelburnevt.org. Position open until filled. First review of applications will begin the week of March 19, 2018. 3/5/184T-TownofShelburne030718.indd 3:32 PM 1

3/2/18 2:28 PM

1

3/5/18 3:59 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-14

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

03.07.18-03.14.18

ROAD FOREMAN Bristol, Vermont

The Town of Bristol is seeking qualified candidates for the position of Road Foreman to manage a 5-person Highway Department. Bristol (pop. 3,894) is a steadily growing, vibrant community located in the Champlain Valley in Addison County, Vermont. This “working” Foreman position requires experience with personnel management, all aspects of highway and bridge construction and maintenance, employee and contractor oversight, equipment operation and maintenance, job safety, mechanical ability, record keeping and communication skills, assistance with budget development, and any other tasks assigned by the Selectboard. The position is full-time, requiring a flexible schedule which will include nights, weekends and holidays. A detailed job description is available at www.bristolvt.org. Salary: $55,000 to $65,000 commensurate with experience. Excellent benefits package. To apply, please e-mail a confidential cover letter, resume, and three references to townadmin@bristolvt.org with Bristol Road Foreman Search in the subject line or send to:

We have an immediate opening for a Marketing Director. The successful candidate should possess proven experience leading marketing and communication strategies. BS/BA degree in Business Administration, Marketing, Communication or equivalent experience preferred. Key responsibilities include business and market development, market research, competitive analysis, strategic direction for promotion and advertising; execution of projects in coordination with business development activities and leading the overall marketing vision to ensure alignment with the company’s strategic goals. Must be able to work in fast-paced environment with demonstrated ability to juggle multiple tasks and meet deadlines. If you would like to become part of our growing construction company, please fax, email or send your resume to the address below. A full job description is available on our website at www.dewcorp.com.

Bristol Road Foreman Search PO Box 249 Bristol, VT 05443 DEADLINE TO APPLY IS FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 2018. THE TOWN OF BRISTOL IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PROVIDER AND EMPLOYER.

5V-TownofBristol022818.indd 1

Marketing Director

We are an Equal Opportunity Employer. All qualified applications will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability or veteran status.

DEW Construction Corp. 277 Blair Park Road, Suite 130 Williston, VT 05495 Attn: Human Resources Department Email: careers@dewcorp.com Fax: 802-872-0707

2/26/18 2:10 PM

Donor Relations Manager Want to help save the planet? THE NATURE CONSERVANCY in Vermont seeks a dynamic professional to serve as its full-time Donor Relations Manager. This is an exceptional career opportunity for a highly motivated, capable individual interested in joining the world’s leading conservation organization. The Donor Relations Manager works as part of the philanthropy team to identify and qualify major gift prospects. He/she will coordinate and implement effective multi-year strategies and plans for gift prospects, including corporate, foundation, and individual donors. We are seeking an energetic and dedicated professional with experience in philanthropy who works best in a collaborative, fast-paced environment and enjoys being on the road and out with donors. Our ideal candidate will have a deep commitment to conservation and the ability to build and leverage strong community relationships in Vermont. We have a fantastic office environment located in Montpelier, VT, and offer a competitive salary with great benefits. Bachelor’s degree and 2 years’ related experience or equivalent combination required. For a complete position description and to apply, visit nature.org/careers and search for job #46228. The application deadline is 11:59 PM EST March 9, 2018.

9t-DewConstruction022818.indd 1

HUNGRY

TO FILL THAT POSITION? JOB RECRUITERS CAN: • Post jobs using a form that includes key info about your company and open positions (location, application deadlines, video, images, etc.).

5v-JobsFiller022217.indd 1 5v-NatureConservancy021418.indd 1

2/12/18 2:33 PM

2/23/18 8:51 AM

• Accept applications and manage the hiring process via our new applicant tracking tool. • Easily manage your open job listings from your recruiter dashboard.

Seven Days’ readers are locally sourced and ready to bring something new to the table. Reach them with Seven Days Jobs — our brand-new, mobile-friendly, recruitment website. Visit JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM to start posting!

2/16/17 4:05 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

Engaging minds that change the world Seeking a position with a quality employer? Consider The University of Vermont, a stimulating and diverse workplace. We offer a comprehensive benefit package including tuition remission for on-going, full-time positions. These openings and others are updated daily.

Building a community where everyone participates and everyone belongs.

Direct Support Professional CCS is an intimate, person centered developmental service provider with a strong emphasis on employee and consumer satisfaction. Provide inclusion supports to individuals with intellectual disabilities and autism. Help people realize dreams and reach goals. This is an excellent job for applicants entering human services or for those looking to continue work in this field. Starting wage is $14.35 per hour with mileage compensation and a comprehensive benefits package. Interested in joining our team? Send your application and cover letter to Karen Ciechanowicz at staff@ccs-vt.org. ccs-vt.org.

E.O.E.

5v-ChamplainCommServices030718.indd 1

C-15

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

Fleet Mechanic - Transportation and Parking Services - #S1456PO Perform complex repairs and maintenance on vehicles. Be responsible for the safety and roadworthiness of the Transportation and Parking Services fleet. The fleet of 20 vehicles includes alternative power sources (compressed natural gas, hybrid electric, and diesel). Responsibilities include prioritizing, diagnosing, determining correct resolution and repairing all vehicles. Reporting to the Mechanic Supervisor, this position requires active engagement in learning and practicing principles of social justice and inclusion, environmental sustainability and delivering a great customer experience.

03.07.18-03.14.18

Seven Days Issue: 3/7 Due: 3/5 by noon Size: 3.83 x 5.25 Cost: $476.85 (with 1 week o Red Hen Baking Co. is hiring

Café Staff! We are looking for help in our Middlesex café.

Researcher/Analyst (MS Biostatistician) - Medical Biostatistics #S1475PO - Provide advanced biostatistical and epidemiological study design and data analytic support for a range of internally and externally funded College of Medicine. Research projects range from the basic sciences, clinical studies, clinical-translational studies, evaluation-comparative effectiveness studies, clinical decision and quality improvement initiatives, and health care delivery studies using micro and macro system level data extracted and procured from EMR data systems, clinical and disease specific registries as well as Medicare and other large scale population databases with particular attention to data extraction, data quality and data harmonization using Standard Operating Procedures.

• Customer Service

Master’s degree in Biostatistics or related quantitative field with three to five years of experience in a biomedical/scientific research environment required. Demonstrated knowledge of statistical analysis software packages (SAS, SPSS, Stata, R and BMDP) and database systems is required (EMR, Medicare, RedCap, etc. Effective oral and written communication skills are required.

• Making sandwiches to order

For further information on these positions and others currently available, or to apply online, please visit our website at: www.uvmjobs.com; Job Hotline #802-656-2248; telephone #802-656-3150. Applicants must apply for position electronically. Paper resumes are not accepted. Job positions are updated daily. The University of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Applications, from women, veterans, individuals with disabilities and people from diverse racial, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds are encouraged.

3/5/18 Untitled-19 1:38 PM 1

Previous food service/cash handling experience necessary.

Job requirements include:

• Making espresso drinks

This position includes benefits.

Please contact Hannah@ 223-5200 x19 or buyer@redhenbaking.com.

3/5/183v-RedHenBaking030718.indd 1:46 PM 1

3/2/18 2:19 PM

100% Employee-Owned CALL CENTER

GARDEN CENTERS

Spring Job Fairs

Spring Job Fairs

Wednesdays, March 14, 21 & 28 3-5:30pm

Thursday, March 8 · 3-5:30pm Saturday, March 10 · 10am-2pm

CALL CENTER: 128 Intervale Road, Burlington, VT 05401

GARDEN CENTERS: 472 Marshall Ave, Williston, VT 05495

(802) 660-4610 ∙ www.gardeners.com Download our job application TODAY and bring the completed form to our job fair! SPR18_Size9H_7D_Mar7_CCC_GC2.indd Untitled-17 1 1

3/5/18 11:35 10:16 AM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-16

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

03.07.18-03.14.18

Admissions Manager

Building Cleaning Services Technician

The Vermont Studio Center, the largest international artists & writers residency program in the U.S., seeks a full-time Admissions Manager with proven leadership experience to oversee all aspects of the VSC Admissions process. This position requires a background in arts management, education, and/or teaching; familiarity with contemporary arts & literature; and good working knowledge of database/CRM programs, application management program, and standard office software applications. Benefits include free shift meals, paid holidays, and paid vacation and sick time.

Clinician(s) – ASSIST

Seeking individuals to provide support services to adults in psychiatric, emotional and/or substance crisis in a variety of settings, including crisis stabilization beds. We have Clinician positions (evening and overnight shifts) and a Supervisor position available. Monitor clients’ well-being and help clients in their process of stabilization and to achieve their highest level of functioning. Bachelor’s and master’s degree required.

Clinician – Medication Assisted Treatment

Provide services through Chittenden Clinic’s outpatient opioid treatment program to patients dependent/recovering from dependence on opioids. In addition to service delivery, assist in developing and implementing clinic policy and procedure. Master’s degree required. LADC or Clinical License preferred.

Community Health Social Worker Facilitate access to health care, provide case management and provide community resource referral for New American patients at Adult Primary Care – Burlington (UHC). Master’s degree required.

To apply, email resume, 3 professional references, & cover letter to HR Director Maxine Kelly:

Cook – Lakeview Community Care Home

Seeking a Cook for the Lakeview Community Care Home. Individual will plan and prepare nutritionally balanced meals for residents. Full-time, benefits-eligible position.

maxine@vermontstudiocenter.org

Complete job description at: vermontstudiocenter.org/board-directors-staff#jobs

Untitled-39 1

Full-time, 40-hour, benefits-eligible position available in Howard Center’s Facilities department. Must have valid driver’s license and transportation.

Home Health Services Coordinator Work with clients and community partners as part of a Howard Center team serving individuals receiving medication assisted treatment through the Chittenden Clinic/HUB. Consider this position if you have a master’s degree, are licensed/license-eligible, and have a valid driver’s license and clean driving record.

2/26/18 10:41 AM

Registered Nurse – Medication Assisted Treatment Program

Two full-time positions available. Our nurses are responsible for safely dispensing methadone and buprenorphine products and maintaining all Nursing Dispensary operations. Must have excellent attention to detail and organizational skills plus strong interpersonal and communication skills.

Residential Coordinator – Northern Lights

Maintain a DBT-informed transitional house for incarcerated women. Supervises the residential treatment program to ensure that state, federal, and agency regulations are adhered to, provide clinical supervision and training to staff, and assist in the creation of treatment plans, crisis plans, etc. Master’s degree and licensed/license-eligible.

Residential Programs Coordinator Seeking individual to supervise two licensed residential programs serving adults diagnosed with major mental illness and some co-occurring substance use issues to ensure that state, federal, HUD and agency regulations are adhered to. Master’s degree required. Five years of experience in mental health and substance abuse required.

Now Hiring: Placement Coordination Nurse BURLINGTON, VT

Description:

Traffic controller and logistics manager: optimizes information transfer, safe bed assignment and timely patient flow within the organization

SUB – Registered Nurse – Medication Assisted Treatment Program

Seeking subs to cover vacancies. Our nurses are responsible for safely dispensing methadone and buprenorphine products and maintaining all Nursing Dispensary operations. Must have excellent attention to detail and organizational skills plus strong interpersonal and communication skills.

Requirements:

State of Vermont Registered Nurse license 4+ years of direct patient care in an acute setting or 6+ years in progressively-responsible RN position Previous experience with coordination of care preferred

Apply Online: uvmmed.hn/PlacementCoordination

Howard Center offers an excellent benefits package including health, dental and life insurance, as well as generous paid time off for all regular positions scheduled 20-plus-hours per week. Please visit our website, www.howardcentercareers.org. Enter position title to view details and apply.

Howard Center is an equal opportunity employer. Applicants needing assistance or an accommodation in completing the online application should feel free to contact Human Resources at 488-6950 or HRHelpDesk@howardcenter.org. 12-HowardCenterFULLAGENCY030718.indd 1

Untitled-14 1

3/1/18 2:03 PM

3/5/18 1:29 PM


Dogs are always allowed when you own.

Bauer Monday, April 2 Gravel 6-8 p.m. at Farnham, LLP

Presented by:

Attorneys at Law

A free workshop for first-time home buyers. Talk with experts, ask questions and grab a drink! ATTORNEYS

REALTOR

Daniel N. Farnham, Esq. & Jonathan M. Stebbins, Esq.

Steve Lipkin

MORTGAGE SPECIALISTS

COLDWELL BANKER HICKOK & BOARDMAN REALTY

BAUER GRAVEL FARNHAM, LLP

RSVP TODAY! 1t-houseparty030718.indd 1

Annie Rogers Cindy Reichard NEW ENGLAND FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

Go to: sevendaysvt.com/houseparty. You’ll be entered to win swag from: 3/5/18 4:55 PM


food+drink

TASTY BITS FROM THE CALENDAR AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM COURTESY OF WHISTLEPIG WHISKEY

Y A D SUN L U OUNCH S BR E E YOU’R IL H W H I IS K INOOS FTER YOU FIN US! W IN Y T ,A TO AR COME PG FOR BRUNCYH BRUNCH R U O WAITIN H, OR BRING BRUNC

EVERY 2ND SUNDAY OF THE MONTH MARCH 11, APRIL 8, MAY 13 11:00 AM - 3:00 PM WINOOSKI, VT

4t-monkeyhouse030718.indd 3

3/2/18 1:34 PM

Whet Your Whistle SEVENDAYSVT.COM

However that saying goes about March weather’s lions and lambs, it’s still winter. Warm up with rye libations and plates of grilled heirloom carrot “tartare,” blue cheese bread pudding and heritage pork steamed buns gleaming with hoisin lacquer. For dessert? Chocolate and ginger — and a whiskey nightcap, of course. WHISTLEPIG WHISKEY DINNER Thursday, March 8, 6:30-9 p.m., Junction at the Essex Culinary Resort & Spa, Essex Junction. $75; preregister. Info, 764-1489, essexresort.com.

BOTANICAL GIN LAB WITH WILLIAM CODMAN Industry expert William “English Bill” Codman digs deep into the history and process of Britain’s favorite beverage, exploring how different botanicals influence the spirit’s flavor. Tuesday, March 13, 1-3 p.m., Hotel Vermont, Burlington. Free; preregistration required. Info, 651-0080, hotelvt.com.

SEVEN DAYS FOOD 43

‘THE OFFICE’ COCKTAIL DINNER The cast and crew of Mary’s Restaurant and Stonecutter Spirits team up for a four-course cocktail adventure inspired by the shenanigans of the Dunder Mifflin Paper Company, as told in the TV series “The Office.” Saturday, March 10, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Mary’s Restaurant at the Inn at Baldwin Creek, Bristol. $69; reservations required. Info, 453-2432, baldwincreek.net.

03.07.18-03.14.18

ABANAKI INDIGENOUS SEEDS WITH FREDERICK M. WISEMAN, PHD A daylong workshop gives a comprehensive introduction to the preservation, science and spirituality of Vermont’s indigenous crops, with tips on cultivation and seedsaving techniques. Saturday, March 10, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism, Montpelier. $36-45; preregister. Info, vtherbcenter.org.

Untitled-19 1

12/4/17 10:53 AM


Golden Guy

Plate’s Sean Patrick Morrison on cooking California — in Vermont B Y HA NNA H PAL M E R EGAN

03.07.18-03.14.18 SEVEN DAYS 44 FOOD

SEVEN DAYS: Where did you grow up, and how did your family eat back then? SEAN PATRICK MORRISON: I grew up outside of Boston, in Woburn, [Mass.] We were a typical blue-collar Boston family — my dad worked, my mom worked. Weekly dinners were planned out, so it was mac and cheese on Monday, fish sticks on Tuesday, roast chicken on Wednesday. But, at a very young age, I knew this was what I wanted to do. My dad was a big bookworm, and we’d go to Barnes & Noble on weekends. I’d just camp out in the cookbook section. I’d spend hours flipping through cookbooks, not really understanding anything, just looking

JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

M

uch of a chef ’s work lies in balancing competing demands: Order ample ingredients to satisfy your nightly cover counts while ensuring there’s little or nothing left over. Create menus that are approachable yet interesting. Keep costs in check, but don’t spend too little, or your guests will fail to see the value in their meal. And, of course, there’s the be-all and end-all: Make food that sells. That balancing act is familiar to chef Sean Patrick Morrison, who took the reins at Plate in Stowe last April, replacing chef Aaron Martin, who had led the kitchen since its opening in 2014. When Morrison took over, he had to build his menu around certain requests: Don’t mess with the veggie burger (he didn’t); leave the vegan hearts-of-palm “crab cakes” alone (he did). But he was also hired to put a fresh spin on the restaurant’s California-style cookery. “I try to touch on all the different cultures in California, while using as much of Vermont as I can,” Morrison told Seven Days last week. “Why can’t I do a [Vietnamese-style] pho that showcases radishes from [Wolcott’s] Sandiwood Farm and mustard greens from Naked Acre Farm [in Hyde Park] with a broth using mushrooms my forager brought me?” he went on. “It’s not so much about having avocado in everything.” Morrison talked with us about seasonality, hipster line cooks and the joy of eating Haribo Gold-Bears.

SD: How do you marry the roles of chef and father when feeding your boy? SPM: We’re really lucky with our son. He’ll try anything, and if he doesn’t like it, he’ll let us know. We’ll try it again a few days later, and if he doesn’t like it again, we’re like, OK, cool. My wife took him to Bluebird Barbecue the other day, and it was the first time he’d had slow-roasted pork. He just housed it. When it was time to leave, he cried because he wanted more pork. One of my most joyful moments as a parent was the first time he had bacon. Just the look on his face … He gets super giggly when I’ll pull out the home-cured bacon, like, Oh, yeah, that’s coming my way. SD: Tell me a bit about your menuplanning process. SPM: I’m a big believer in having my farmers and foragers dictating to me what I should have on the menu, as opposed to me telling them what I want to have ready at a certain time. Spring kind of starts with the sap running. Then we have late spring with ramps and fiddleheads and the first mushrooms. Then leafy greens, small fruits and vegetables in early summer. As you get toward the late summer, there’s this mix of summer and fall at the same time. So it’s figuring how to utilize delicata squash at the same time as a green zebra [tomato].

Sean Patrick Morrison POSITION: Chef at Plate LOCATION: Stowe AGE: 34 RESTAURANT AGE: Four years CUISINE TYPE: California cuisine, new

American EDUCATION: New England Culinary Institute, graduated 2004 PAST EXPERIENCE: Intern, No. 9 Park,

Boston; chef de cuisine, Lumière, Newton, Mass.; sous chef, Michael’s on the Hill, Waterbury Center; instructor, New England Culinary Institute WHAT’S ON THE MENU? Beef tartare,

torched octopus, handmade tagliatelle with vegetable Bolognese

at the pictures. It was like, You can eat rabbit? That’s cool. “Mom, can we eat rabbit?” SD: What did you have for breakfast today? SPM: My 1-year-old really likes Cheerios. So, when I’m feeding him breakfast, he’s feeding me Cheerios back. But, being a chef, breakfast is usually an afterthought. Sometimes I’ll go to Waterbury for an egg sandwich at Hender’s Bake Shop [& Café] — [owner] Jess [Wright]’s egg sandwiches are like crack.

SD: What are a few of your staple, year-round ingredients? SPM: Some form of a mushroom, whether it’s a plain button mushroom or something my forager brought in. I like to utilize mushrooms in a lot of different ways. I also like lemon and thyme — so, using lemon peel and thyme when basting a duck breast. If you get the caramelizing right, you get this thing that’s a little nutty, and it’s just so, so good. I sneak a lot of fish sauce into dishes. I like the way it can manipulate a flavor profile without anyone knowing you used it. SD: What’s on your agenda for spring? SPM: We’re kind of just starting to talk about spring changes right now. But I’m going to be putting on a great new steak tataki dish, that’s for certain. I am also really excited to be doing one or two dinners up at Sandiwood, and to do a


food+drink

New!

HydraFacial Treatments

©

Only HydraFacial© uses patented technology to cleanse, extract, and hydrate. HydraFacial© super serums are made with nourishing ingredients that create an instantly gratifying glow.

Rates with Spa access begin at:

couple pop-ups and outside dinners over the course of summer and into the fall. SD: Anything fun you’re experimenting with right now? SPM: I’m trying to explore different ways to make new flavors from root vegetables — so, whether it’s coal-roasting beets or ash-brining celery root or hot-smoking carrots to make a carrot gravlax kind of thing. It’s that time of year when that’s really all you have to play with. It’s one thing to do a beet salad, but if you can do it where some are pickled-roasted and some are shaved and some are roasted on embers with orange peel, then it’s more interesting.

1/8/18 2:17 PM

NORTHEAST SEAFOOD

THE BAR AT BLEU 4 P M D A I LY/ B L E U V T. C O M Untitled-18 1

6/5/17 1:41 PM

SD: It’s Sunday night, and you’re relaxing over a drink. Where and what are you drinking? SPM: I’m home. Depending on the week, it’s either two fingers of Lagavulin 16[-year-old Scotch] with an ice cube, or I’m splitting a bottle of [sour ale from] Backacre [Beermakers in Weston] with my wife. I like to consider myself a beer geek, and I get the love affair with Heady Topper, but I’m a bigger fan of sours.

Gin Khao Reu Yung ? ? (Have you eaten yet?)

SD: When you’re not working, any hobbies? SPM: Fly-fishing — or fishing in general. And my hammock and I are inseparable in the summer. SD: Any edible guilty pleasures? SPM: Gummy candy. I’m a sucker for Haribo gummy bears and Welch’s Fruit Snacks. It’s a sad, sad addiction.  Contact: hannah@sevendaysvt.com

Plate, 91 Main Street, Stowe, 253-2691, platestowe.com

24 Main Street, Downtown Winooski, 655-4888 • tinythairestaurant.net 6h-tinythai050714.indd 1

Say you saw it in...

mini2col-sawit-3Dcmyk.indd 1

5/5/14 3:58 PM

NOW IN sevendaysvt.com

3D!

1/12/10 9:51:52 AM

FOOD 45

INFO

SEVEN DAYS

SD: What’s on the kitchen radio? SPM: We call ourselves the Island of Misfit Cooks. So my morning prep guy,

8h-theessex(spa)011018.indd 1

03.07.18-03.14.18

SD: What are your best-loved cookbooks? SPM: The books that are going into the ground with me would be [The] Elements of Taste by Gray Kunz [and Peter Kaminsky] and Mastering the Art of French Cooking by Julia Child — [my copy] is signed by her, and it was my grandmother’s. So there’s all my grandmother’s weird little notes in the margins. Also, it’s not a cookbook, but [Leda] Meredith’s Northeast Foraging [120 Wild and Flavorful Edibles From Beach Plums to Wineberries]. It’s the most comprehensive, and it breaks it down practically county by county. And, of course, for pretty much every cook in my generation, the bible was and always will be The French Laundry Cookbook.

SD: Any kitchen pet peeves? SPM: I always tell my cooks to live by the seven Ps: Proper prior preparation prevents piss-poor performance. So you’re constantly thinking ahead. Also: organization and communication. It’s one thing to have backups for your backup’s backups, but I want labels with sublabels, and sublabels for the sublabels. We go through a lot of kitchen tape. Another big pet peeve of mine — and something I had a hard time with as a young cook — was asking for help before you need it. So, being able to recognize when you’re about to get into the shits. I’ve had cooks with really fancy handmade knife rolls and exquisite tattoos all over their forearms and the right haircut, but they were never organized or prepared. I hate hipster cooks.

Vermont’s Culinary Resort & Spa | 70 Essex Way | Essex Jct | EssexResortSpa.com | 802-764-1452

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

SD: Any ingredients that are just too played out? SPM: I’d like to see people move away from microgreens and mini this and toybox that. Use garnishes and ingredients that make sense. Why stop the growth of a squash because you want a [tiny] toybox squash? There’s a place for micro beets, but I ate a bowl of clam chowder the other day, and it had micro arugula on it. Why did you just waste money putting that into hot soup when it doesn’t play anything into the texture or flavor?

Andrew, will have anything from Bad Brains to Bad Religion. Then my sauté guy, Ryan, comes in, and it’s Black Star and Mos Def. And I have a grill guy who’s into the [Grateful] Dead and Phish. It’s really all over the place.

175

$


calendar WED.7 cannabis

GREENER DRINKS: Supporters of commonsense cannabis reform sip beverages and discuss the culture, industry and politics of the agricultural product. Zenbarn, Waterbury, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, info@vtcannabisbrands.com.

conferences

BEER MARKETING & TOURISM CONFERENCE: Hundreds of industry professionals converge for three days of education and networking. DoubleTree by Hilton, South Burlington, 8 a.m. $445. Info, info@ bmtcon.com.

crafts

FIBER RIOT!: Crafters get hooked on knitting, crocheting, spinning and more at an informal weekly gathering. Mad River Fiber Arts & Mill, Waitsfield, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 496-7746.

dance

46 CALENDAR

SEVEN DAYS

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

CONTACT IMPROV: Movers engage in weight-sharing, play and meditation when exploring this style influenced by aikido and other somatic practices. The Everything Space, Montpelier, 7-8:30 p.m. $5-10. Info, 232-3618. DROP-IN HIP-HOP DANCE: Beginners are welcome at a groove session inspired by infectious beats. Swan Dojo, Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m. $15. Info, 540-8300.

7 - 1 4 ,

HIP-HOP DANCE: A highenergy class mixes urban styles of dance. Women’s Room, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $16. Info, beth@prenatalmethod.com.

education

WALK-THROUGH WEDNESDAY: Attendees learn the ABCs of the independent educational institution through a campus tour and a Q&A. Orchard Valley Waldorf School, East Montpelier, grades school, 8:30-9:30 a.m.; mixed-age kindergarten and Farm & Forest classes, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 456-7400.

etc.

BURLINGTON INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY CELEBRATION: Robin Lloyd of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom is the guest speaker at a ceremony honoring community members for their work with women and girls. Burlington High School, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, geezlouise1010@ gmail.com. CHITTENDEN COUNTY STAMP CLUB MEETING: Firstclass collectibles provide a glimpse into the postal past at this monthly gathering. GE Healthcare Building, South Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 660-4817. DINNER & A MOVIE: A summertime-themed potluck meal paves the way for a viewing of A Green Mountain Journey. Milton Historical Society, 6 p.m. Free. Info, miltonhistorical@yahoo.com.

ALL SUBMISSIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY THURSDAY AT NOON FOR CONSIDERATION IN THE FOLLOWING WEDNESDAY’S NEWSPAPER. FIND OUR CONVENIENT SUBMISSION FORM AND GUIDELINES AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT. LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY KRISTEN RAVIN AND SADIE WILLIAMS. SEVEN DAYS EDITS FOR SPACE AND STYLE. DEPENDING ON COST AND OTHER FACTORS, CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS MAY BE LISTED IN EITHER THE CALENDAR OR THE CLASSES SECTION. WHEN APPROPRIATE, CLASS ORGANIZERS MAY BE ASKED TO PURCHASE A CLASS LISTING.

Sunday, March 11, 2 p.m., at Town Hall Theater in Middlebury. $12. Info, 382-9222, townhalltheater.org.

2 0 1 8

WORKING GLOBALLY, CONNECTING LOCALLY: A night of networking gives students access to employers who work around the world. Bring your résumé. Livak Room, Davis Center, University of Vermont, Burlington, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 861-2343.

fairs & festivals

BURLINGTON IRISH HERITAGE FESTIVAL: The best of Ireland comes to the Queen City and surrounding areas via music, dance, workshops and presentations. See burlingtonirishheritage.org for details. Various locations statewide. Prices vary. Info, admin@burlingtonirishheritage.org.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘DOLORES’: This 2017 documentary focuses on feminist and labor activist Dolores Huerta. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600. ‘DUNKIRK’: Christopher Nolan directs this historical drama about the evacuation of 330,000 Allied troops from French beaches in 1940. Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, 6 p.m. $5. Info, 533-9075.

In 1959, Pope John XXIII announced the formation of the Second Vatican Council, or Vatican II, an ecumenical council convened to address doctrinal issues. The council called for numerous changes to Catholic Church practices in response to cultural shifts of the time. The 2017 drama Novitiate, set during this period, follows teenage Cathleen, played by Margaret Qualley, as she trains to become a nun. As Cathleen considers her commitment to the church, the strict Reverend Mother, played by Melissa Leo, questions the institution’s new, more modern direction. Middlebury College professor Jay Parini introduces Sunday’s showing, presented as part of the Middlebury New Filmmakers Festival Winter Screening Series.

‘HOLBEIN: EYE OF THE TUDORS’: From his time as a religious painter to his work for Henry VIII, artist Hans Holbein’s career comes into focus in a 2015 TV documentary. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, 11 a.m. $8-13. Info, 382-9222.

WED.07

LIST YOUR UPCOMING EVENT HERE FOR FREE!

‘NOVITIATE’

Sign of the Times

COURTESY OF SKIPPER’S ALLEY

M A R C H

MAR.11 | FILM

» P.48

FIND MORE LOCAL EVENTS IN THIS ISSUE AND ONLINE: art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

music Find club dates at local venues in the music section and at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com.

MAR.10 | MUSIC

Old Meets New As St. Patrick’s Day approaches, what better way to tap into the spirit of the Emerald Isle than with SKIPPER’S ALLEY Saturday, March 10, 7:30 p.m., at a lively concert of modern Irish folk music? The Barre Opera House. $20-26. Info, Dublin-based band Skipper’s Alley entertains 476-8188, barreoperahouse.org. listeners with a balance of contemporary and old-school sounds, featured on its acclaimed 2014 self-titled debut album. Boasting ample skills on uilleann pipes, whistle, fiddle, bouzouki and flute, the ensemble inspired Folk Radio UK to declare, “Skipper’s Alley not only have the mastery of their instruments, but the talent to devise arrangements that intrigue and delight in equal measure.” High-octane dance tunes and selections from the Irish song tradition waft through the air at the Barre Opera House.


MAR.9 | DANCE Spotlight on Stories

URBAN BUSH WOMEN Friday, March 9, 8 p.m., at Flynn MainStage in Burlington. $15-46. Info, 863-5966, flynntix.org.

CALENDAR 47

Saturday, March 10, 3 p.m., in downtown Burlington. Free. Info, 658-2739, magichat.net.

SEVEN DAYS

MAGIC HAT MARDI GRAS PARADE

03.07.18-03.14.18

Though the Queen City could never be mistaken for the Big Easy, local residents wholeheartedly embrace the New Orleans party-time ethos during the Magic Hat Mardi Gras Parade. Now in its 23rd year, this wintertime staple draws thousands to downtown Burlington for an all-out bash benefiting the Vermont Foodbank. Festivities commence at 10 a.m. with Kegs & Eggs at the Magic Hat brewery, where early birds find breakfast sammies from Kountry Kart Deli and live music by the High & Mighty Brass Band. Later, beads fly as floats from local businesses meander down Main Street to please revelers of all ages. The fun continues with live music at various downtown venues.

MAR.10 | FAIRS & FESTIVALS SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Me U

MATTHEW THORSEN

Beadp

COURTESY OF HAYIM HERON

Founded by Jawole Willa Jo Zollar in 1984, the modern dance troupe Urban Bush Women “seeks to bring the untold and under-told histories and stories of disenfranchised people to light through dance,� according to its website. In Hair & Other Stories, the Brooklyn-based, women-centric company explores concepts of body image, race, gender identity and economic inequities while celebrating the narrative of the African diaspora. Choreography by Samantha Speis and Chanon Judson captivates audience members at the Flynn MainStage in Burlington. Local favorite DJ Craig Mitchell spins records before the show and during intermission.


calendar

‘SPACE: UNRAVELING THE COSMOS 3D’: An out-of-thisworld film brings audience members closer than ever to far-off planets and galaxies. Northfield Savings Bank Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 11 a.m., 1 & 3:30 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $11.50-14.50; admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848. ‘WONDERS OF THE ARCTIC 3D’: Pioneering scientists seek to answer questions about the impact of human activities on this fragile frontier. Northfield Savings Bank Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, noon & 2:30 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $11.50-14.50; admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848.

48 CALENDAR

SEVEN DAYS

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

food & drink

BREAD-MAKING 101: Home cooks discover the joy of baking with a sourdough starter culture. Community Teaching Kitchen, City Market, Onion River Co-op, Burlington South End, 5:30-7:30 p.m. $5-10. Info, 861-9700. COMMUNITY SUPPER: A scrumptious spread connects friends and neighbors. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 5-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 300. VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: Local products — veggies, breads, pastries, cheeses, wines, syrups, jewelry, crafts and beauty supplies — draw shoppers to a diversified bazaar. Vermont Farmers Food Center, Rutland, 3-6 p.m. Free. Info, 342-4727.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: Players have fun with the popular card game. Burlington Bridge Club, Williston, 9:15 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. $6. Info, 872-5722.

health & fitness

ALL-LEVELS HATHA YOGA: With a focus on connecting breath to movement, this class offers yoga for everybody. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 6-7 a.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com.

CHAIR TAI CHI: Age and ability level are no obstacles to learning this slow, easy exercise routine. Champlain Senior Center, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 316-1510.

RESTORATIVE YOGA: Props support the body, leaving participants free to truly relax into long-held poses. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 5:30-6:30 p.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com.

EATING FOR ENERGY: Fed up with food comas? Health coach Marie Frohlich presents tasty fare that increases vitality. Community Room, Hunger Mountain Co-op, Montpelier, 6-7 p.m. $5-7; preregister. Info, info@hungermountain.coop. EMPOWERED YOGA FLOW: A rejuvenating practice for all levels weaves movement, breath and mental focus. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 9-10 a.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com. GENTLE CHAIR YOGA: Individuals limber up with modified poses. Waterbury Public Library, 11 a.m.noon. Free; preregister. Info, 244-7036.

RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: Folks in recovery and their families enrich mind, body and spirit in an all-levels class. All props are provided; wear loose clothing. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 861-3150.

ER IM HE

GENTLE YOGA IN RICHMOND: A gong savasana closes out an all-levels class benefiting the Williston Community Food Shelf. Partial proceeds are donated. Balance Yoga, Richmond, 11 a.m.-noon. $10; preregister. Info, balanceyogavt@gmail.com. GENTLE YOGA IN WATERBURY: Practitioners with limitations and seasoned students alike hit the mat for an all-levels class. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 9-10 a.m. $12. Info, studio@ zenbarnvt.com. GINGER’S EXTREME BOOT CAMP: Triathletes, Spartan racers and other fitness fanatics challenge themselves to complete Navy Seal exercises during an intense workout. Come in good shape. Private residence, Middlebury, 7-8 a.m. $8-12; for ages 16 and up. Info, 343-7160. HERBAL WISDOM FOR PREGNANCY & LABOR FOR PARENTS & BIRTH WORKERS: Attendants and expectant parents learn how certain plants and foods can complement the experience of welcoming new life. Railyard Apothecary, Burlington, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $2025. Info, 540-0595. NIA WITH LINDA: Eclectic music and movements drawn from healing, martial and dance arts propel an animated barefoot workout. South End Studio, Burlington, 8:30-9:30 a.m. $14; free for first-timers. Info, 372-1721.

music

talks

AMY TRUBEK: The author of Making Modern Meals: How Americans Cook Today serves food for thought during a discussion of modern-day domestic meal preparation. Richmond Community Kitchen, 5-6:30 p.m. $10. Info, info@richmondcommunitykitchen.com.

Find club dates in the music section. FIRESIDE COLLECTIVE: The Asheville, N.C., band brings harmonious vocals and sizzling instrumentals to a boot-stomping bluegrass show. York Street Meeting House, Lyndon, 7-8:15 p.m. $12; free for kids under 13. Info, 748-2600. SONG CIRCLE: Singers and musicians congregate for an acoustic session of popular folk tunes. Godnick Adult Center, Rutland, 7:15-9:15 p.m. Donations. Info, 775-1182.

EVERY WOMAN HAS A STORY: Fierce females of Castleton University share 15-minute personal stories in honor of Women’s History Month. Alumni Room, Huden Dining Hall, Castleton University, noon. Free; $4 for lunch. Info, 800-639-8521.

seminars

BASIC MAINTENANCE & DIY FLAT FIX: Riders get their gears turning during a lesson on bicycle anatomy, vocabulary, functions and fixes. Pizza is provided. Generator, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 863-4475.

GLENN ANDRES: In “Building for a Guided Age,” the architecture professor explores how the United States positioned itself on the world stage for architecture at the turn of the 20th century. Goodrich Memorial Library, Newport, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 334-7902.

BETHEL UNIVERSITY: Fifty-five community pop-up classes covering everything from comic books to gardening during the month of March. See betheluniversityvt.org for details. Various Bethel locations. Free; preregister. Info, betheluniversityvt.org.

GRETCHEN VAN SLYKE: The professor considers the context for French artist Honoré Daumier’s satires in “The Dark Side of Daumier’s Comedy.” Fleming Museum of Art, University of Vermont, Burlington, noon. Regular admission, $3-10; free for members, faculty, staff, students and kids 6 and under. Info, 656-0750.

INTRO TO FLY TYING: The Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department has anglers in knots during a four-week course covering techniques and terminology. ANR Annex, Berlin, 6-8 p.m. $20; preregister. Info, 265-2279. VIGOROUS VINYASA FLOW: Students link breath with movement as they transition through a series of strengthening and lengthening poses. Sangha Studio — Pine, Burlington, 9-10 a.m. $10-15. Info, hannasatt@ gmail.com. WEDNESDAY GUIDED MEDITATION: Individuals learn to relax and let go. Burlington Friends Meeting House, 5:306:30 p.m. Free. Info, 318-8605.

language

sports

WOMEN’S PICKUP BASKETBALL: Players dribble up and down the court during an evening of friendly competition. Lyman C. Hunt Middle School, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $3; preregister at meetup.com. Info, 540-1089.

GERMAN CONVERSATION GROUP: Community members practice conversing auf Deutsch. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 863-3403.

FOMO?

INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: Pupils improve their speaking and grammar mastery. Private residence, Burlington, 6 p.m. $20. Info, 324-1757.

art

INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASS: Learners take communication to the next level. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211.

film

LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: SPANISH: ¡Hola! Language lovers perfect their fluency. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

ED MCMAHON: Sense of place is central to the former Scenic America president’s lecture “Where Am I? The Power of Uniqueness.” Unitarian Church of Montpelier, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

’ TE TA OS

ED ASNER: ‘A MAN DY | AN ME DH CO IS | PR .8 HU

‘THE OTHER SIDE OF NOVEMBER’: Two immigrant women in Canada find themselves drawn to the past in this 2016 drama shown as part of the Québec Film Festival. Room 101, Cheray Science Hall, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 654-2000.

BUTI YOGA: A fusion of vinyasa yoga, plyometrics and dance is set to upbeat music. Bring water and a towel. Women’s Room, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. $16. Info, beth@prenatalmethod.com.

PRENATAL YOGA: Moms-to-be prepare their bodies for labor and delivery. Women’s Room, Burlington, 12:15 p.m. $16. Info, beth@prenatalmethod.com.

MA RK OP PE N

‘NOSEY PARKER’: A 2003 film shows an unlikely friendship between an old Vermont farmer and his new neighbor. Director John O’Brien is on hand for a discussion. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

PILATES: Students are put through the paces in a strengthand mobility-boosting workout. Women’s Room, Burlington, 4:30 p.m. $16. Info, beth@prenatalmethod.com.

BONE BUILDERS EXERCISE CLASSES: Folks of all ages ward off osteoporosis in this exercise and prevention class. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 7:30-8:30, 9:15-10:15 & 10:40-11:40 a.m. Free. Info, 223-3322.

THU.8 | TALKS |

« P.46

Find even more local events in this newspaper and online: Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

music Find club dates at local venues in the music section and at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com.

T

WED.07

HEIDI GRASSWICK: The Middlebury College professor appraises the challenges of integrating the goals of democracy with the practices of science. Trinity Episcopal Church, Rutland, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 773-1860. JOHN STAUFFER: Two historical figures come into focus in “Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln.” St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 748-8291. LISA HOLMES: “Presidents Appointing Judges” examines the impact of the Commander in Chief selecting members of the judiciary. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 388-4095.

RICK WINSTON: Clips illustrate the talk “All the Film’s a Stage,” which gives cinephiles a peek behind the scenes at embarrassing auditions, grueling rehearsals and big personalities. Waterbury Public Library, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 244-7036. ROY TUSCANY: Injury prevention is the purpose of a talk by the High Fives Foundation director. Stearns Student Center, Johnson State College, 5 p.m. Free. Info, 635-1408. STAN SLOAN: The Middlebury College visiting scholar examines threads to Western values and interests in “Transatlantic Traumas: Endangering the West.” Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955.

tech

INTRODUCTION TO HTML5 & CSS3: Tech-savvy students in this four-part workshop learn the base language supporting all webpages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 865-7217. TECH HELP WITH CLIF: Electronics novices develop skill sets applicable to smartphones, tablets and other gadgets. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, noon & 1 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-6955.

theater

‘DISGRACED’: Escalating tensions at a dinner party drive this Pulitzer Prize-winning play about a successful Pakistani American lawyer and his white artist wife. Barrette Center for the Arts, White River Junction, 7:30 p.m. $15-59. Info, 296-7000. ‘SEX WITH STRANGERS’: Vermont Stage performs Laura Eason’s sexy play about a pair of mismatched writers, one a 40-year-old novelist and the other an online memoirist who exposes his flings to the world. FlynnSpace, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $29.70-38.50. Info, 863-5966.

words

BOOK SALE: Shoppers browse gently used CDs, DVDs, puzzles and page-turners. Rutland Free Library, 3-7 p.m. Free. Info, 773-1860. CHRIS BOHJALIAN: Lit lovers join the bestselling author for the launch of his new novel The Flight Attendant. Phoenix Books Burlington, 6:30 p.m. $3. Info, 448-3350. FICTION WORKSHOP: Readers focus on elements of the craft when responding to work by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104. WRITING CIRCLE: Words flow when participants explore creative expression in a lowpressure environment. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218.


THU.8

film

WOMEN’S INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE FOR PEACE & FREEDOM MEETING: Socially conscious ladies convene to discuss upcoming programs and communityrelated topics. Peace & Justice Center, Burlington, 5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 862-4929.

CASTLETON INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL: Movie lovers feast their eyes on a diverse lineup of foreign cinema. See castleton.edu for details. Castleton University, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 800-639-8521.

activism

comedy

ED ASNER: ‘A MAN AND HIS PROSTATE’: Written by Ed Weinberger, this one-man comedy about prostate cancer is both hilarious and informative. Woodstock Town Hall Theatre, 7:30-9 p.m. $45-50. Info, 457-3981.

conferences

INTERNATIONAL & INTERDISCIPLINARY CONFERENCE: Papers provide critical analysis of topics related to the theme “1968, Fifty Years of Struggle.” Robert A. Jones House, Middlebury College, 4:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 443-5795.

dance

BALLROOM DANCING: Members of the University of Vermont Ballroom Dance Team teach new steps each week. Champlain Senior Center, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 316-1510. DUBLIN IRISH DANCERS: SOLD OUT. Direct from the Emerald Isle, this spirited dance troupe brings Celtic culture to life in “Stepping Out.” Lyndon Institute, 7 p.m. $15-54. Info, 748-2600.

etc.

TROPICAL FISH CLUB MONTHLY MEETING: Speakers ranging from local hobbyists to nationally known aquarium aficionados share their expertise. Essex Junction VFW Post, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 372-8716.

BURLINGTON IRISH HERITAGE FESTIVAL: See WED.7.

CENTRAL VERMONT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE RAFFLE DINNER: Locals feast on a hearty spread and vie for cash prizes, including $4,000 to the top winner. Steak House Restaurant, Barre, 6-9 p.m. $100 includes dinner for two; preregister. Info, 229-5711. COMMUNITY LUNCH: Farmfresh fare makes for a delicious and nutritious midday meal. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 309. JUNCTION WHISKEY PAIRING DINNER: A four-course meal featuring WhistlePig Rye Whiskey warms diners from the inside out. The Essex Resort & Spa, 6:30-9 p.m. $75. Info, 448-5510. MAGNIFICENT MICROBES, HEALTHY GUTS: Ancestral food enthusiast Eric Garza recommends key foods for a gut-friendly diet. City Market, Onion River Co-op, downtown Burlington, 6-7 p.m. $5-10. Info, 861-9700. UVM MEDICAL CENTER FARMERS MARKET: Locally sourced meats, vegetables, bakery items, breads and maple syrup give hospital employees and visitors the option to eat healthfully. Davis Concourse, University of Vermont Medical Center, Burlington, 2:30-5 p.m. Free. Info, 847-5823.

games

GAME NIGHT: From Monopoly to Bananagrams, players participate in tabletop pastimes. Main Street Museum, White River Junction, 6 p.m. Donations. Info, 356-2776. POKÉMON LEAGUE: I choose you, Pikachu! Players of the trading-card game earn weekly and monthly prizes in a fun, friendly environment where newbies can be coached by league leaders. Brap’s Magic, Burlington, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0498.

health & fitness

BEGINNER/INTERMEDIATE SUNSTYLE TAI CHI, LONG-FORM: Improved mood, greater muscle strength and increased energy are a few of the benefits of this gentle exercise. Winooski Senior Center, 6:45-8 p.m. Free. Info, 735-5467.

Register by April 1 Participating teachers receive a $1,000 stipend and $1,000 in equipment funds for their school!

BUDDHIST BABES GENTLE YOGA: Lessons for peaceful living pave the way for a moderate flow-style practice set to music. Women’s Room, Burlington, 5 p.m. $16. Info, beth@prenatalmethod.com. CHAKRA EXPLORATION SERIES: Attendees embark on an indepth exploration of the body’s seven energy centers, focusing on a different one each week. The Marbleworks, Middlebury, 6-7:30 p.m. $20 per class. Info, 845-642-6403.

Participants receive free room and board during a summer training week at Saint Michael’s College.

For more information and to apply: www.uvm.edu/epscor/highschool

Funding provided by NSF OIA 1556770

Untitled-29 1

2/26/18 10:10 AM

COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS: A 20-minute guided practice with Andrea O’Connor alleviates stress and tension. Tea and a discussion follow. Winooski Senior Center, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 233-1161.

HERBAL SUPPORT FOR AUTISTISM: Nick Cavanaugh of the Burlington Herb Clinic outlines natural remedies for individuals seeking a healthier, more balanced life. Railyard Apothecary, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. $20-25. Info, 540-0595. KARMA KLASS: DONATIONBASED YOGA FOR A CAUSE: Active bodies hit the mat to support local nonprofits. The Wellness Collective, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. Donations. Info, 540-0186. MEDITATION IN EVERYDAY LIFE: A four-part course gives neophytes the tools needed to develop a regular mindfulness practice. St. Johnsbury Shambhala Meditation Center, 6-8 p.m. $25. Info, 748-4240. NAMASTE AT THE SPA: Two hours of bliss include chair massage, gentle yoga, facial treatments and aromatherapy. La Bella Derma, Winooski, 5-7 p.m. $30; preregister; limited space. Info, 735-3031. REIKI SHARE: Practitioners support themselves and others during an evening of meditation and energy work. JourneyWorks, Burlington, 6:30-9 p.m. Donations. Info, 860-6203.

THU.8

» P.50

Sat, March 10, 7:30 pm Barre Opera House “4 Stars. A gloriously three-dimensional debut” - The Irish Times “hints of absolute brilliance” - Irish Music Magazine

FORZA: THE SAMURAI SWORD WORKOUT: Students sculpt lean muscles and gain mental focus when using wooden replicas of the weapon. North End Studio A, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. $10. Info, 578-9243. GENTLE FLOW YOGA: Individuals with injuries or other challenges feel the benefits of a relaxing and nourishing practice. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 9-10 a.m. $12. Info, studio@ zenbarnvt.com.

traditional music from Ireland

presents

For tix, call 802-476-8188 or order online at barreoperahouse.org

AT BURLINGTON March WED 7 6:30PM

CHRIS BOHJALIAN: THE FLIGHT ATTENDANT

Untitled-67 1

Book launch celebration!

THU 15 6:30PM SAT 17 11AM THU 22 6:30PM

SANDI EARLE: MY 30-YEAR LOVE AFFAIR WITH FOOD IN VERMONT O’SULLIVAN STEW

Story time with City Market. Free.

ANNELISE ORLECK: WE ARE ALL FAST-FOOD WORKERS NOW

April TUE 3 7PM

PETER SHEA: THE NEW ATLAS OF VERMONT TROUT PONDS

THU 5 7PM

JAMES KOCHALKA: MECHABOYS

Book launch celebration!

Book launch celebration!

Phoenix Books Burlington events are ticketed unless otherwise indicated. Your $3 ticket comes with a coupon for $5 off the featured book. Proceeds go to Vermont Foodbank.

AT ESSEX March WED 14 ARNIE KOZAK: 6:30PM TIMELESS TRUTHS FOR MODERN MINDFULNESS

GET YOUR GOGGLES ON!

2/26/18 6:00 PM

• Swim lessons for ages 6 months to adults • New 7 week session starts this week! • Register now! Call Jess to determine level, 652-8143

www.gbymca.org obsessed? Find, fix and feather with Nest Notes — an e-newsletter filled with home design, Vermont real estate tips and DIY decorating inspirations.

Phoenix Books Essex events are free and open to all. 191 Bank Street, Downtown Burlington • 802.448.3350 2 Carmichael Street, Essex • 802.872.7111 www.phoenixbooks.biz

Sign up today at sevendaysvt.com/enews.

CALENDAR 49

fairs & festivals

food & drink

BEGINNERS TAI CHI CLASS: Students get a feel for the ancient Chinese practice. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 223-3322.

SEVEN DAYS

JULIAN BARNETT’S ‘FOOTNOTES’: Meant for mature audiences, a lecture-performance probes the philosophy of the body within the voice as it sings. Dance Theatre, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168.

‘WONDERS OF THE ARCTIC 3D’: See WED.7.

Skipper’s Alley

Vermont EPSCoR supports high school teams of a teacher and two students to conduct independent research on stream ecology, water quality and land use management.

03.07.18-03.14.18

JOB HUNT HELP: Community College of Vermont interns assist employment seekers with everything from résumé-writing to online applications. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 2:305:30 p.m. Free. Info, 745-1393.

‘SPACE: UNRAVELING THE COSMOS 3D’: See WED.7.

BEGINNERS TAI CHI CHUAN: Standing and moving exercises in this foundational class are suitable for all levels and ages. Sacred Mountain Studio, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. $15. Info, 373-8060.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

FOR REAL WOMEN SERIES WITH BELINDA: GIT UR FREAK ON: R&B and calypso-dancehall music is the soundtrack to an empowering sensual dance session aimed at confronting body shaming. Swan Dojo, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. $15. Info, bestirredfitness@gmail.com.

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section.

Research Experiences for High School Students and Teachers


calendar

JOHN CORT: “The Jina as King or the Jina as Renouncer: Seeing and Ornamenting Temple Images in Jainism” dissects the differences between the Digambar Jains and Shvetambar Jains. Room 125, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168.

TAI CHI CHUAN: Beginners and seasoned practitioners alike explore the style of moving meditation passed down through the Tung family lineage. Richmond Congregational Church, 10-11 a.m. $10. Info, taichivermont@ gmail.com. YOGA: A Sangha Studio instructor guides students who are in recovery toward achieving inner tranquility. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 5-6 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

MARK OPPENHEIMER: A contributing opinion writer for the Los Angeles Times, the speaker looks to the future in “Judaism in the Year 2118: Where Will We Be in 100 Years.” Dion Family Student Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 4:30-6 p.m. Free. Info, 654-2460.

YOGA CORE FOR BABES: An empowering practice focuses on the abs and the pelvic floor. Women’s Room, Burlington, 12:15 p.m. $16. Info, beth@prenatalmethod.com.

MARY LOU RECOR: In “From Lisbon to Oslo by Bike,” the cyclist recounts her 3,000mile trip taken in 2017. Green Mountain Club Headquarters, Waterbury Center, 7-8:15 p.m. $5-8. Info, 241-8327.

language

BEGINNER-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: Basic communication skills are on the agenda at a guided lesson. Private residence, Burlington, 6 p.m. $20. Info, 324-1757.

ROB BOSTON: Current court battles come into play in “Religious Freedom: What It Is and What It Is Not.” Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

music

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

DS | WRITERS FOR REC WOR OV ER Y

RUNA: Toes tap to Irish folk music with an Americana twist. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, 7 p.m. $20. Info, 382-9222.

seminars

BETHEL UNIVERSITY: See WED.7. CH-CH-CHANGES: Using The Four Agreements: A Practical Guide to Personal Freedom by Don Miguel Ruiz as a reference, folks learn to modify their habits and perceptions. Community Room, Hunger Mountain Co-op, Montpelier, 5:30-7 p.m. $8-10; preregister. Info, info@hungermountain.coop.

SEVEN DAYS

talks

50 CALENDAR

NG DI EA

ED MCGUIRE: The former Vermont Genealogy Library president captivates ancestry enthusiasts with “Do You Know Your History?” Stowe Free Library, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 253-6145. FIRST WEDNESDAYS ENCORE: A video screening treats attendees to professor Timothy Billings’ 2016 talk “Not for an Age: Shakespeare’s 400-year Career.” Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2-3 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955.

words

CHRIS BOHJALIAN: See WED.7, Unitarian Church of Rutland, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 855-8078. FICTION BOOK GROUP: Bibliophiles break down Fordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford’s Forgotten Jungle City by Greg Grandin. Fairfax Community Library, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 849-2420. SOUNDCHECK: Slam poet Rajnii Eddins leads teen wordsmiths in a writing workshop followed by an open mic. Pizza fuels the fun. BCA Center, Burlington, 6-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, rajnii@ youngwritersproject.org. VT DISTINGUISHED WRITERS’ SERIES: MARTIN PHILIP: The author of Baking Bread: A Baker’s Journey Home in 75 Recipes brings bread samples to a presentation complete with music and slides. New England Federal Credit Union, Williston, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 879-8790.

FRI.9

community

FEAST TOGETHER OR FEAST TO GO: Senior citizens and their guests catch up over a shared meal. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, noon-1 p.m. $7-9; preregister. Info, 262-6288.

| I.9 FR

BURLINGTON SONGWRITER SESSION: Area songsters make their music heard in an intimate show complete with wine and eats. Partial proceeds benefit the Society of Women Engineers. Shelburne Vineyard, 6-9 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 985-8222.

R

Find club dates in the music section.

‘SEX WITH STRANGERS’: See WED.7.

conferences THIRSTY THURSDAY SPEAKER’S SERIES: Listeners whet their whistles with craft brews and Norwegian-style glogg while a panel discusses the topic “Snowboarding Past, Present and Future.” Vermont Ski and Snowboard Museum, Stowe, 6:30 p.m. $10. Info, 253-9911. ‘WOMEN IN ACADEMIA’: Castleton University female professors sound off during a lively panel discussion. 1787 Room, Campus Center, Castleton University, 12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 800-639-8521.

tech

TECH SUPPORT: Need an email account? Want to enjoy ebooks? Bring your phone, tablet or laptop to a weekly help session. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 5-7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-8291, ext. 302.

theater

‘DISGRACED’: See WED.7, 2 & 7:30 p.m.

INTERNATIONAL & INTERDISCIPLINARY CONFERENCE: See THU.8, 12:156 p.m.

crafts

CRAFTY CRAP NIGHT: Participants bring supplies or ongoing projects and an adventurous attitude to share creative time with other people in recovery. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150.

dance

ADULT ’80S DANCE: Decked out in themed threads, partygoers boogie to throwback tunes. Hampton Inn, Colchester, 7-11 p.m. $25; cash bar. Info, liz. vesosky@comcast.net. ADVANCED CONTEMPORARY TECHNIQUE: Led by Hanna Satterlee, this class involves technical challenges and spatial experiments. North End Studio A, Burlington, 10:30-11:45 a.m. $16. Info, hannasatt@gmail.com. BALLROOM & LATIN DANCING: Learn new moves with Ballroom Nights, then join others in a dance social featuring the waltz,

tango and more. Singles, couples and beginners are welcome. Williston Jazzercise Fitness Center, lesson, 7-8 p.m.; dance social, 8-9:30 p.m. $10-14; $8 for dance only. Info, 862-2269. ECSTATIC DANCE VERMONT: Jubilant motions with the Green Mountain Druid Order inspire divine connections. Christ Episcopal Church, Montpelier, 7-9 p.m. $10. Info, 505-8011. FLASHBACK FRIDAY: Merrymakers cut a rug to the rhythms of the ’90s. Main Street Museum, White River Junction, 8 p.m.-midnight. $5-7; BYOB. Info, info@mainstreetmuseum.org.

SINGLE ADULTS’ VOLLEYBALL/ GAME/PIZZA NIGHT: Social butterflies serve, set, spike and snack at a fun-filled gathering. Essex Alliance Church, 6-8:30 p.m. $5; preregister. Info, 899-4160.

AN

SLOW FLOW YOGA: Tailored to meet students’ needs, this foundational class facilitates overall wellness. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 7:30-8:30 a.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com.

NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: ‘HAMLET’: Fans are treated to an encore of a 2015 broadcast production starring Benedict Cumberbatch. Palace 9 Cinemas, South Burlington, 7 p.m. $18. Info, 863-5966. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. $1625. Info, 748-2600.

D

E’ IK SP

YA AND SONIA AND ‘VAN MA SH A

HANS HAVERKAMP: Using data from his campus research, the associate professor examines how exercise can induce asthmatic symptoms. Stearns Cinema, Johnson State College, 4 p.m. Free. Info, amy.welch@ jsc.edu.

NIA WITH SUZY — MOVE. SWEAT. BREATHE.: Drawing from martial, dance and healing arts, sensory-based movements push participants to their full potential. North End Studio A, Burlington, 8:30-9:30 a.m. $15. Info, suzy@loveyourbodyvt.com. URBAN BUSH WOMEN: Hair and Other Stories explores self-image, race and gender inequality through the lens of African American women’s hair. See calendar spotlight. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, 8 p.m. $15-46. Info, 863-5966.

education

DAVID SOBEL & JEN KRAMER: Two experienced teachers tout the practice of taking students beyond classroom walls in the talk “Developing a Sense of Place Through Waldorf Education.” Orchard Valley Waldorf School, East Montpelier, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 456-7400.

etc.

BEYOND BLACK HISTORY MONTH: Childcare and refreshments are provided for an evening of conversation, education and reflection with students and staff. Burlington High School, 6-8 p.m. Free; preregister for childcare. Info, 864-8474.

FOMO? Find even more local events in this newspaper and online:

art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

music Find club dates at local venues in the music section and at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com.

health & fitness

ACUDETOX: Attendees in recovery undergo acupuncture to the ear to propel detoxification. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150. ADVANCED TAI CHI CLASS: Participants keep active with a sequence of slow, controlled movements. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3322. BONE BUILDERS EXERCISE CLASSES: See WED.7, 7:308:30 & 10:40-11:40 a.m. BUTI YOGA: See WED.7.

| ER AT HE |T

« P.49

FR I.9

THU.8

TAROT READINGS: A spiritual mentor consults her cards to offer guidance and clarity. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 5:30-8:30 p.m. $1 per minute; preregister. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com.

fairs & festivals

BURLINGTON IRISH HERITAGE FESTIVAL: See WED.7. VERMONT OPEN SNOWBOARD & MUSIC FESTIVAL: Riders of all ages compete in the same arena as current and past pros during a three-day celebration complete with concerts by Twiddle and others. See stratton.com for details. Stratton Mountain Resort, 9:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Prices vary. Info, 800-787-2886.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘SPACE: UNRAVELING THE COSMOS 3D’: See WED.7. WOMEN’S FILM FESTIVAL: More than 50 pictures shown over three weekends tell compelling stories about sports, art, activism and more. See womensfilmfestival.org for details. New England Youth Theatre, Brattleboro, 7-10 p.m. Prices vary. Info, 257-7364. ‘WONDERS OF THE ARCTIC 3D’: See WED.7.

food & drink

FRIDAY MORNINGS AT TANDEM: Foodies start the day with provisions from Brio Coffeeworks, V Smiley Preserves and Coop to Kitchen Bakery. Stay in or order to go. Tandem, Bristol, 7 a.m.noon. Cost of food and drink. Info, honeyjam@vsmileypreserves.com. LENTEN FISH FRY: Neighbors rub elbows over helpings of haddock, French fries, coleslaw, beverages and dessert. Bristol St. Ambrose Parish, 5-7 p.m. $612.50; $37 per immediate family of five. Info, 453-2488.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.7, 9:15 a.m.

FELDENKRAIS AWARENESS THROUGH MOVEMENT: Aches and pains, be gone! The physically challenged to the physically fit increase flexibility and body awareness with this form of somatic education. The Wellness Collective, Burlington, 12:30-1:30 p.m. $10. Info, 560-0186. FRIDAY NIGHT POWER YOGA: Practitioners get their sweat on during a full-body, flow-style mindful workout. Kismet Place, Williston, 5:30-6:15 p.m. $12. Info, 343-5084. PHYSICAL THERAPY DAY: Folks find out if they’re at risk for injury or wearing the proper footwear during a 15-minute session with a professional from Timberland Physical Therapy. Danform Shoes, Colchester, noon-6 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 863-2653. QI GONG: Gentle movements promote strength, balance and well-being. Waterbury Public Library, 11-11:30 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 244-7036. RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: See WED.7. REFUGE RECOVERY: A LOVE SUPREME: Buddhist philosophy is the foundation of this mindfulness-based addictionrecovery community. Turning Point Center, Burlington, noon. Free. Info, 861-3150. TAI CHI AT WATERBURY PUBLIC LIBRARY: Those with arthritis or mobility challenges are welcome to join in a mild lesson with optional seated movements. Waterbury Public Library, 11:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 244-7036. TAI CHI AT ZENBARN STUDIO: Beginners learn the fundamentals of Yang style slow set, tai chi gong and basic warm-ups. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 9-10 a.m. $12. Info, taichivermont@ gmail.com.

music

Find club dates in the music section. CALIDORE STRING QUARTET: Bows in hand, the rising classical music stars appear as part of the UVM Lane Series. University of Vermont Recital Hall, Burlington, preshow talk, 6:30 p.m.; show, 7:30 p.m. $5-30. Info, 656-4455. EAGLEMANIA: Eagles fans flock to a note-for-note tribute to the “Hotel California” hitmakers. Paramount Theatre, Rutland, 8 p.m. $29-39. Info, 775-0903.


HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS NEEDED comedy

HELIAND CONSORT: The woodwind ensemble delights listeners with the fresh program “Old World/New World Legends.” York Street Meeting House, Lyndon, 7:30 p.m. $8-15. Info, 748-2600.

FLASK IMPROV NIGHT: Up-andcoming Queen City performers showcase their improvisational comedy chops. Off Center for the Dramatic Arts, Burlington, 8:30-10 p.m. $7. Info, anthony@ revelrytheater.com.

RANI ARBO & GREG RYAN: Dynamic vocals and virtuosic fiddle find an eager audience. Dominique Dodge opens. Williston Old Brick Church, 7-9 p.m. $11-15. Info, 764-1141.

community

MONTPELIER MEMORY CAFÉ: Pianist Luke Rackers performs for individuals with dementia and their care partners. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 229-9630.

WINTER WINE DOWN MUSIC SERIES: Oenophiles let loose with live music by Bob Boyd, award-winning wine, and mouthwatering eats. Snow Farm Vineyard, South Hero, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 372-9463.

conferences

INTERNATIONAL & INTERDISCIPLINARY CONFERENCE: See THU.8, 9 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

seminars

BETHEL UNIVERSITY: See WED.7.

NORTHEAST KINGDOM VETERANS SUMMIT: Mark Fountain of Honor Flight New England keynotes a day of talks and breakout sessions dedicated to local vets and their families. Alexander Twilight Theatre, Lyndon State College, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 626-6346.

talks

EDUCATION & ENRICHMENT FOR EVERYONE: Frederick H. Tuttle Middle School assistant principle Paul Yoon grabs attention with “What’s Race Got to Do With It?” Faith United Methodist Church, South Burlington, 2-3 p.m. $5. Info, 846-5132.

dance

theater

CONTRA DANCE: Fern Bradley is the caller at a spirited social dance featuring live music by Red Dog Riley. Cornwall Town Hall, 7-9:30 p.m. $5-10. Info, 462-3722.

‘DISGRACED’: See WED.7. ‘HAIR’: Very Merry Theatre Teens bring 1960s counterculture to the stage with this acclaimed classic-rock musical. Very Merry Theatre, Burlington, 7-9 p.m. Donations. Info, 355-1461.

FAMILY CONTRA DANCE: Hoofers of all ages follow callers’ instructions and move to lively music by the Woodbury Strings Jam Band. The Schoolhouse, South Burlington, 3-5 p.m. $5-8; free for kids 12 and under. Info, 2238945.

‘SEX WITH STRANGERS’: See WED.7.

SAT.10

JU LI

for more info and to schedule a screening. Leave your name, number, and a good time to call back.

• Healthy adults, ages 18 to 50

Email UVMVTC@UVM.EDU or visit UVMVTC.ORG

• 7-month vaccine study

LEGAL CLINIC: Attorneys offer complimentary consultations on a first-come, first-served basis. 274 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 383-2118. LUNG FORCE BIKE & BREW: Fueled by Switchback Brewing suds, cyclists face off in friendly stationary bike races. Partial proceeds are donated. The Tap Room at Switchback Brewing, Burlington, 5-8 p.m. $20 for bike race. Info, 876-6866. MODEL RAILROAD SHOW: The Northwestern Vermont Model Railroad Association hosts the state’s largest exhibition of its kind, featuring more than 100 tables of displays and vendors. Collins Perley Sports and Fitness Center, St. Albans, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $1-5; $5 per family with active military ID; free for kids under 6. Info, 598-0905. ‘QYRQ QYZ (FORTY GIRLS)’: Projected images are the backdrop for seven Central Asian bards who sing, recite and play traditional instruments in an ancient tale of female empowerment. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe Mountain Resort, 7 p.m. $20-35. Info, 760-4634.

• Earn up to $1900 in compensation

6h-uvmvaccinetesting(cutemosquitoPurple)011718.indd 1

1/11/18 10:05 AM

COME GET

DOWN

WITH 104.3 KISS FM EVERY THURSDAY NIGHT at

VERMONT CARES ANNUAL GALA LIVE & SILENT AUCTION: Folks support HIV prevention and harm-reduction services by participating in a fun-filled bidding war. The Essex Resort & Spa, 7-11 p.m. Free. Info, 528-1139.

fairs & festivals

BURLINGTON IRISH HERITAGE FESTIVAL: See WED.7. SECOND SATURDAY SWING DANCE: Quick-footed participants get into the groove. Bring clean shoes with nonmarking soles. Champlain Club, Burlington, beginner lesson, 7:30 p.m.; dance, 8-10:30 p.m. $5. Info, 864-8382.

education

NORTHERN VERMONT UNIVERSITY — JOHNSON BADGER INFORMATION SESSION: Prospective pupils visit campus for lunch, a tour and the chance to chat with current students. Johnson State College, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 635-1219.

MAGIC HAT MARDI GRAS PARADE: Live music, brightly colored beads and elaborate floats entertain revelers at this Big Easy benefit for the Vermont Foodbank. See calendar spotlight and magichat.net for details. Downtown Burlington, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 658-2739. MASQUERADE JAZZ & FUNK WINTER MUSIC CARNIVAL: Costumed revelers get down to live music by the Funky Dawgz Brass Band and feast from a taco bar. Barnard Town Hall, 6-11 p.m. $10-20; free for kids 6 and under; BYOB. Info, 234-1645.

Dance to hot tracks laid down by DJ BODEL

and sip on drink specials including: $2 PBRs $4 Red Bull & Vodkas $5 Long Island Iced Teas

at the sickest party in Burlington!

CALENDAR 51

BURLINGTON SEED SWAP: Green thumbs stock up on garden starters. Workshops and lectures round out the agricultural affair. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 861-4769.

Call UVM VACCINE TESTING CENTER at 802-656-0013

SEVEN DAYS

WRITERS FOR RECOVERY READING: Individuals affected by the disease of addiction give voice to original works. Studio Place Arts, Barre, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, writersforrecovery@ icloud.com.

INDEPENDENT COMMUNITY MEETING PLACE: Brainstorming leads to forming activity groups for hobbies such as flying stunt kites and playing music. Presto Music Store, South Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 658-0030.

Participate in a Research Study and help develop a vaccine against Dengue Fever

03.07.18-03.14.18

FRIDAY MORNING WORKSHOP: Wordsmiths offer constructive criticism on works in progress by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104.

agriculture

K AR M

SAT.10 | MU SIC |

words

A

FREE VERMONT RADIO/ WFVR-LP ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION: The all-volunteer station marks its fifth lap around the sun with live music from Soulfix, tasty appetizers and Upper Pass Beer brews. Seven Stars Arts Center, Sharon, 6-10 p.m. $20. Info, 763-2700.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

‘VANYA AND SONIA AND MASHA AND SPIKE’: Island Stage launches its inaugural season with Christopher Durang’s gut-busting comedy centered on three middle-aged siblings. Folsom Education & Community Center, South Hero, 7-10 p.m. $12-15. Info, 777-4326.

etc.

RJ’s 159 Main Street, Burlington SAT.10

» P.52 3V-GreatEasternRadio120617.indd 1

12/5/17 4:29 PM


calendar health & fitness

BUTI FLOW: Yogis benefit from power yoga and deep abdominal toning. Women’s Room, Burlington, 9 a.m. $16. Info, beth@prenatalmethod.com.

SOUTHERN VERMONT WINGS & WINTER HOMEBREW FESTIVAL: Fans of all things fermented taste their way through beverages and bites, voting to crown the Best Home Brewery and Best Regional Wings. 190 North St., Bennington, 1-4 p.m. $30-50. Info, 447-3311.

CANDLELIT YIN: Yogis embrace the coziness of the season with a slow, restful practice. The Wellness Collective, Burlington, 5:30-6:45 p.m. $13; preregister; limited space. Info, 540-0186.

VERMONT OPEN SNOWBOARD & MUSIC FESTIVAL: See FRI.9, 7 a.m.-10 p.m.

CAPOEIRA: A blend of martial arts, music and dancing challenges adults and kids. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 1-2 p.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section.

COMMUNITY SUPPORTED HERBALISM: Kara Buchanan and Katherine Elmer of Spoonful Herbals introduce healthconscious individuals to their nonprofit organization. Railyard Apothecary, Burlington, 1-3 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0595.

‘I, DANIEL BLAKE’: Set in Northern England, this 2016 drama follows a carpenter who, after suffering a heart attack, must fight bureaucratic forces to receive benefits. Dana Auditorium, Sunderland Language Center, Middlebury College, 3 & 8 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168.

FITNESS BOOT CAMP: Ma’am, yes, ma’am! Exercise expert Ginger Lambert guides active bodies in an interval-style workout to build strength and cardiovascular fitness. Middlebury Recreation Facility, 8-9 a.m. $12. Info, 343-7160.

‘SPACE: UNRAVELING THE COSMOS 3D’: See WED.7. WOMEN’S FILM FESTIVAL: See FRI.9, noon-8 p.m. ‘WONDERS OF THE ARCTIC 3D’: See WED.7.

SEVEN DAYS

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

CORNED BEEF & CABBAGE: Diners fill up on a traditional feast featuring boiled potatoes, carrots, onions, rolls, dessert and beverages. Takeout is available. Vergennes United Methodist Church, 5-6:30 p.m. $5-9. Info, 877-3150. MIDDLEBURY WINTER FARMERS MARKET: Crafts, cheeses, breads, veggies and more vie for spots in shoppers’ totes. VFW Post 7823, Middlebury, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free. Info, mosefarm@gmail. com. NORWICH WINTER FARMERS MARKET: Farmers and artisans offer produce, meats and maple syrup alongside homemade baked goods and handcrafted items. Tracy Hall, Norwich, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 384-7447. VERGENNES FARMERS MARKET: Local food and crafts, live music, and hot eats spice up Saturday mornings. Kennedy Brothers Building, Vergennes, 9 a.m.noon. Free. Info, 233-9180. VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: See WED.7, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

52 CALENDAR

games

F.O.L.K. BINGO: Prizes reward players who fashion five in a row. Door prizes, food and a raffle top off this fundraiser for Lowell Graded School. St. Ignatius, Lowell, 6-8:30 p.m. Prices vary. Info, friendsoflowellkids@gmail. com.

M

SAT.10 | MUSIC

BURLINGTON WINTER FARMERS MARKET: A bustling indoor marketplace offers fresh and prepared foods alongside crafts, live music and lunch seating. Davis Center, University of Vermont, Burlington, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, burlingtonfarmersmarket.org@gmail.com.

| MU SIC FR O

food & drink

A IN CH

HERBAL MEDICINE SWAP: Hand-made remedies change hands amid the healing sounds of bamboo flutes and guitars. Railyard Apothecary, Burlington, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0595. NATURE RHYTHM MOVEMENT & FLOW: Set to live piano music, this somatic movement practice promotes relaxation, rejuvenation and deep healing. Champlain Club, Burlington, 10-11:30 a.m. $5-20. Info, emilyarwenmott@gmail.com. NEWBIE NOON INTRO TO HOT YOGA: First-timers in loosefitting clothing get their stretch on in a comfortably warm environment. Hot Yoga Burlington, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 999-9963. R.I.P.P.E.D.: Resistance, intervals, power, plyometrics, endurance and diet define this high-intensity physical-fitness program. North End Studio A, Burlington, 9-10 a.m. $10. Info, 578-9243. YIN YOGA: Students hold poses for several minutes to give connective tissues a good stretch. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 8-9:30 a.m. $12. Info, studio@ zenbarnvt.com.

holidays

EASTER CHOCOLATE TASTING: Friends and families hunt for the perfect flavor, from caramel to peanut butter to coconut cream. Lake Champlain Chocolates Factory Store & Café, Burlington, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 864-1807. SAINT PATRICK’S COMEDY GALA: Three Boston comics of Irish descent have audience members in stitches. Lebanon Opera House, N.H., 8 p.m. $3237. Info, 603-448-0400.

language

ARMENIAN CONVERSATION GROUP: Singing, dancing, drama and games promote proficiency. Community Room, Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 2-3 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211. DUTCH LANGUAGE CLASSES: Planning a trip to Amsterdam? Learn vocabulary and grammar basics from a native speaker. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, bheeks@ yahoo.com.

music

Find club dates in the music section. AN ACOUSTIC EVENING WITH LYLE LOVETT & SHAWN COLVIN: SOLD OUT. Two celebrated songsters share tunes and tales. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, 8 p.m. $42.25-74. Info, 863-5966. CATAMOUNT ARTS BLUEGRASS NIGHT: The Linder Brothers and Bob Amos & Catamount Crossing are the featured performers during an evening chock-full of traditional tunes. Masonic Hall, Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. Donations. Info, 748-2600. JULIA MARK: Music fans snap their fingers to jazz-inflected folk and pop songs. Brandon Music, 7:30 p.m. $20; $45 includes dinner; preregister; BYOB. Info, 247-4295. MUSIC FROM CHINA: Timetested and contemporary works ring out on traditional stringed instruments. Robison Hall, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 8 p.m. $622. Info, 443-6433. PORTER NICKERSON: The indie duo of Willy Porter and Carmen Nickerson doles out songs from 2017’s Bonfire to Ash. Valley Players Theater, Waitsfield, 7 p.m. $28. Info, 503-0001. SKIPPER’S ALLEY: Modern Irish folk musicians get toes tapping with high-octane numbers played on fiddle, flute and harp. See calendar spotlight. Barre Opera House, 7:30 p.m. $20-26. Info, 476-8188. STARLINE RHYTHM BOYS: The guys celebrate their 20th anniversary as a band by channeling the Texas honky-tonks of the 1940s and ’50s. Burnham Hall, Lincoln, 7:30 p.m. $10; free for kids and teens. Info, 388-6863.

VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS Crossbows. R & L Archery, Barre, GALA: A creative showcase noon-4 p.m. Free. Info, 479-9151. highlights singer-songwriter Jon HOWARD CENTER CURLING Gailmor, dancer Hanna Satterlee CHALLENGE: REGISTRATION and others. Proceeds support CLOSED. Teams hit the ice to the South Burlington Visual and raise money for recipients of the Performing Arts Scholarship. organization’s services. Cairns Trader Duke’s Hotel, South Arena, South Burlington, 8 a.m.Burlington, 6:30-9:30 p.m. $20; 6:30 p.m. $150 per player; W O H S AD cash bar. Info, 598-4246. free for spectators. ILRO

seminars

RA EL OD |M

Info, 488-6913.

BIKEPACKING 101 — WHAT WORKS?!: Adventurous spirits swap stories about recent trips. Light refreshments are provided. Bootlegger Bikes, Jefffersonville, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 644-8371.

IAN MULLER RAIL JAM: Skiers and riders show off their moves in a competition benefiting the Ian Muller Memorial Scholarship. Burke Mountain Resort, registration, 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; competition, 1:30 p.m. $10-15. Info, 626-6134.

CUT WITH CONFIDENCE WORKSHOPS: Landowners learn the ins and outs of a successful timber harvest in their woods. 600 Schuler Rd., Newport, 1-3 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 5867711, ext. 169.

NORTHEAST REGIONAL YOGA ASANA CHAMPIONSHIP: Spectators marvel at athletes who compete for the perfect posture. South Burlington High School, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $10. Info, 489-5649.

RESEARCHING YOUR FAMILY HISTORY: Librarian Christine Eldred helps family-tree fact-finders jump start their genealogy research. Colchester Historical Society, 10-11 a.m. Donations. Info, felinefostermama@gmail.com.

talks

BETHEL UNIVERSITY: See WED.7.

ET C.

« P.51

SAT .10 |

SAT.10

VCAM’S DIGITAL EDITING CERTIFICATION: Adobe Premiere users get familiar with the most recent version of the editing software. Prerequisite: VCAM Access Orientation or equivalent, or instructor’s permission. VCAM Studio, Burlington, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 651-9692.

sports

ARCHERY DEMO DAYS: Sportsmen and -women get their hands on equipment from Bear Archery and Karnage

FOMO? Find even more local events in this newspaper and online:

art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

music Find club dates at local venues in the music section and at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com.

JOANNE POLANSHEK: “The Genealogy of Jeffrey Brace: Slave & Revolutionary War Soldier” reveals how one woman’s curiosity helped unveil the story of an incredible man. Vermont Genealogy Library, Fort Ethan Allen, Colchester, 10:30 a.m.-noon. $10. Info, 310-9285.

theater

‘DISGRACED’: See WED.7, 2 & 7:30 p.m. ‘HAIR’: See FRI.9, 2-4 & 7-9 p.m. HAWAIIAN BEACH PARTY: Revelers shake off the winter blues at a festive fundraiser for the Chandler Center for the Arts. Mari-Castle, Randolph, 6-9 p.m. $30. Info, 728-6464. ‘MANIFESTING MRS. MARX’ & ‘SYNDROME’: Presented as part of the One and Only Series, a double bill of solo performances gives way to an artist talk-back. Grange Hall Cultural Center, Waterbury Center, 7:30 p.m. $15. Info, 244-4168. METROPOLITAN OPERA LIVE IN HD: ‘SEMIRAMIDE’: Angela Meade portrays the murderous Queen of Babylon in an onscreen performance of a Rossini opera. Loew Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 1 p.m. $26-29. Info, 603-646-2422. Paramount Theatre, Rutland, 12:55 p.m. $10-23. Info, 7750903. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 12:55 p.m. $16-25. Info, 748-2600. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, 1 p.m. $1024. Info, 382-9222. ‘SEX WITH STRANGERS’: See WED.7, 2 & 7:30 p.m. SHAKESPEARE SALON: Vermont Shakespeare Festival treats fans to a reading of Wittenberg by David Davalos. A discussion with the audience follows. Highland

Center for the Arts, Greensboro, 3 p.m. $10. Info, 533-9075. ‘VANYA AND SONIA AND MASHA AND SPIKE’: See FRI.9.

words

CHAPTERS IN HISTORY: EXPLORING SEVERAL AMERICAN PRESIDENCIES: Nonfiction fans sink their teeth into Doris Kearns Goodwin’s Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581. POETRY MASTER CLASS: Writer Karin Gottshall leads a deep dive into the realm of metaphor. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104.

SUN.11 activism

SEEING & DISRUPTING RACISM: A workshop geared toward white community members elucidates the concept of white fragility and prepares participants to challenge prejudice. Arrive at 2:30 p.m. for a PJC new volunteer orientation. Peace & Justice Center, Burlington, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 863-2345.

bazaars

ANTIQUES MARKET: The past comes alive with offerings of furniture, artwork, jewelry and more at this ephemera extravaganza. Canadian Club, Barre, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. $2-5. Info, 751-6138.

community

COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS PRACTICE WITH NEW LEAF SANGHA: Sessions in the tradition of Thich Nhat Hanh include sitting and walking meditation, a short reading, and open sharing. Evolution Physical Therapy & Yoga, Burlington, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, newleafsangha@ gmail.com. COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS WITH THE CENTER FOR MINDFUL LEARNING: Peaceful people gather for guided meditation and interactive discussions. Burlington Friends Meeting House, 5-7 p.m. $10. Info, assistant@centerformindfullearning.org.

dance

BALKAN FOLK DANCING: Louise Brill and friends organize participants into lines and circles set to complex rhythms. Ohavi Zedek Synagogue, Burlington, 3-6 p.m. $6; free for first-timers; bring snacks to share. Info, 540-1020. NIA WITH SUZY — MOVE. SWEAT. BREATHE.: See FRI.9.

etc.

AARP TAX AIDE PROGRAM: Low-to-moderate-income seniors get help filing their taxes. Community Room, Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 12:30, 2 &


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

3:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 865-7211.

fairs & festivals

BURLINGTON IRISH HERITAGE FESTIVAL: See WED.7. VERMONT OPEN SNOWBOARD & MUSIC FESTIVAL: See FRI.9, 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘EX LIBRIS: THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY’: Academy Award-winning director Frederick Wiseman’s 2017 documentary takes viewers inside the New York Public Library. Film House, Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, 2:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 660-2600. ‘LADY BIRD’: Laurie Metcalf and Saoirse Ronan star as a mother and daughter with a complicated and comic relationship. 1787 Room, Campus Center, Castleton University, 9 p.m. Free. Info, 800-639-8521.

and energy flow. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 3-5 p.m. $20. Info, 505-1688. KARMA YOGA: Attendees practice poses while supporting the Richmond Food Shelf. Balance Yoga, Richmond, 10:30-11:30 a.m. $10; $5 with a food donation. Info, balanceyogavt@gmail.com. TRADITIONAL YOGA FLOW: Breath accompanies each transition during a vinyasa flow focused on body awareness and self-acceptance. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 9-10:15 a.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com.

language

LGBTQ FIBER ARTS GROUP: A knitting, crocheting and weaving session welcomes all ages, gender identities, sexual orientations and skill levels. Pride Center of Vermont, Burlington, noon-2 p.m. Free. Info, 860-7812.

food & drink

CHOCOLATE TASTING IN MIDDLESEX: Candy fanatics get an education on a variety of sweets made on site. Nutty Steph’s Granola & Chocolate Factory, Middlesex, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Info, 229-2090.

games

POKÉMON LEAGUE: See THU.8, noon-5 p.m.

ANCIENT TECHNOLOGY FOR MODERN STRESS: Through the practice of Kundalini yoga, anxiety and depression melt away to reveal heightened awareness

SE

COUNTRY CHORUS: New members join instructor John Harrison for ten weeks of fun, learning and singing. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 3:30-5 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 223-6954.

O DU TE

JEFFREY LADEUR: The pianist tickles the ivories in works by Rameau, Stravinsky and Debussy. United Community Church South Building, St. Johnsbury, 3 p.m. $6-18. Info, 748-7135. JEH KULU DANCE & DRUM THEATER: Audience members feel the beat as the Burlingtonbased troupe serves up joyous West African rhythm and movement. Chandler Center for the Arts, Randolph, 4 p.m. $6-12. Info, 728-9878. JOTA SETE DUO: A toe-tapping concert introduces new UVMC faculty member and saxophonist Michael Zsoldos, playing alongside seven-string guitarist

‘SEX WITH STRANGERS’: See WED.7, 2 p.m. SHAKESPEARE SALON: See SAT.10, Vermont Coffee Company Playhouse, Middlebury, 3-5 p.m. $10. Info, ruth@vermontshakespeare.org. ‘VANYA AND SONIA AND MASHA AND SPIKE’: See FRI.9, 2-5 p.m. WEST RUTLAND VARIETY SHOW: Talented performers take the stage with music, comedy and dance numbers. Proceeds benefit the Dodge House. West Rutland Town Hall, 3 p.m. $5-8; $20 per family. Info, 438-2490.

words

BOOK SIGNING: Authors Bill McKibben and Sue Halpern discuss their respective pageturners, Radio Free Vermont and Summer Hours at the Robbers Library. Hinesburgh Public House, 2-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 482-5500. POETRY OPEN MIC: Penmen and -women deliver original verse at this celebration of the written word hosted by Bianca Amira Zanella. Phoenix Books Rutland, 2-4 p.m. Free. Info, 855-8078. A WRITE-IN: SECOND WINTER WRITING RETREAT: The Burlington Writers Workshop offers a distraction-free space for wordsmiths to dive deep into projects. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com. Info, 383-8104.

DIANE HULING & ARTHUR ZORN: “Beethoven, Friends and Admirers” features pieces for piano and voice. Plainfield Town Hall Opera House, 4-6 p.m. $5-15. Info, 498-3173. HELIAND CONSORT: See FRI.9, Brandon Music, 2:30 p.m. $20. Info, 247-4295.

PEKING ACROBATS: Live musicians accompany China’s top tumblers as they somersault and trick-cycle their way across the stage. Paramount Theatre, Rutland, 7 p.m. $25-40. Info, 775-0903.

seminars

BETHEL UNIVERSITY: See WED.7.

sports

WOMEN’S PICKUP SOCCER: Swift females shoot for the goal. Robert Miller Community & Recreation Center, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. $3; $50 for unlimited drop-in pass. Info, 864-0123.

talks

JOHN RAHILL: The local architect shares images and impressions from a two-month Italian fellowship in “Hill Towns of Lazio, Umbria and Tuscany.” Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 223-2518.

MON.12 business

FEMALE FOUNDERS SPEAKER SERIES: ‘MAKERS MATTER’: Vermont business women share their entrepreneurial experiences. A Q&A, networking, appetizers and a cash bar round out the evening. Hotel Vermont, Burlington, 5:30 p.m. $15; preregister; limited space. Info, 651-0080. VERMONT WOMENPRENEUR MEETING: Female proprietors meet monthly to forge connections and collaborations. Fletcher Room, Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 12:45-2:15 p.m. Free. Info, mieko@radiancestudiosllc.com.

SALSA MONDAYS: Dancers learn the techniques and patterns of salsa, merengue, bachata and cha-cha. North End Studio A, Burlington, fundamentals, 7 p.m.; intermediate, 8 p.m. $12. Info, 227-2572.

education

CAMPUS TOUR: Potential students ages 16 through 24 check out a facility offering free housing, meals, career technical training, high school diplomas, driver’s licenses and job placement. Northlands Job Corps Center, Vergennes, 9:45 a.m.-noon. Free; preregister. Info, 877-0121.

etc.

AMERICAN VETERANS VERMONT POST 1: Those who have served or are currently serving the country, including members of the National Guard and reservists, are welcome to join AMVETS for monthly meetings. American Legion, Post 91, Colchester, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 796-3098. BUFFALO DREAMING: Longtime dream practitioners help participants interpret their nighttime visions. ARTSight Studios & Galleries, Bristol, 6-8 p.m. $20. Info, 238-6607. JOB HUNT HELP: See THU.8, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

fairs & festivals

BURLINGTON IRISH HERITAGE FESTIVAL: See WED.7.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘GLORIA: IN HER OWN WORDS’: From her journalistic career to her feminist activism, Gloria Steinem’s accomplishments shine brightly in this HBO documentary. Room 207, Bentley Hall, Johnson State College, 5 p.m. Free. Info, 635-1408. PALESTINE & ISRAEL IN FILM: Documentaries and dramas lay the groundwork for respectful discussions with local activists Kathy Shapiro and Mark Hage. Call for titles. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 6:30-9 p.m. Free. Info, 223-2518. ‘SPACE: UNRAVELING THE COSMOS 3D’: See WED.7. WILD & SCENIC FILM FESTIVAL: Environmental and adventure films feature stunning scenery and diverse examples of stewardship. Clips and Reels Theater, Jay Peak Resort, 5:30-9 p.m. $15. Info, 393-0076. ‘WONDERS OF THE ARCTIC 3D’: See WED.7. ‘YU-GI-OH! THE MOVIE’: See SUN.11, 7 p.m.

MAGIC: THE GATHERING — MONDAY NIGHT MODERN: Tarmogoyf-slinging madness ensues when competitors battle for prizes in a weekly game. Brap’s Magic, Burlington, 6:30-10 p.m. $8. Info, 540-0498.

health & fitness

ADVANCED SUN-STYLE TAI CHI, LONG-FORM: Elements of qigong thread through the youngest version of the Chinese martial art. Winooski Senior Center, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 735-5467. ADVANCED TAI CHI CLASS: See FRI.9. ALL-LEVELS HATHA YOGA: See WED.7. BONE BUILDERS EXERCISE CLASSES: See WED.7. BUTI YOGA: See WED.7. CLEARING THE SUBCONSCIOUS: Students cast off negativity and fear in favor of renewal, love and clarity in this class complete with guided meditation and gong healing. Chai Space, Dobra Tea, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. $18. Info, 318-6050. COMMUNITY HEALTH TALKS: A wellness-centered lecture addresses the connection between music and memory, and available programs for those with dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease. Sterling View Community Center, Hyde Park, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 888-4651. GENTLE HONEY FLOW: A slowmoving yoga class awakens the body for the week ahead. Women’s Room, Burlington, 12:15 p.m. $16. Info, beth@prenatalmethod.com. HERBAL CONSULTATIONS: Clinical interns from the Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism evaluate individual constitutions and health conditions. City Market, Onion River Co-op, downtown Burlington, 4-8 p.m. $10-30 plus cost of herbs; preregister. Info, 861-9700. MEDITATION: A group practice including sitting, walking, reading and discussion promotes mindfulness. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com. POWER YOGA: Yogis move, sweat and rock out to fun music. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 6-7 p.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt. com. RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: See WED.7. SEATED TAI CHI: Movements are modified for those with arthritis and other chronic conditions. Winooski Senior Center, 11 a.m.noon. Free. Info, 735-5467. SEXUAL TRAUMA RECOVERY USING PLANT MEDICINE & TAROT: Individuals of all genders and sexual orientations learn to use tools such as herbs, flowers and ritual for healing and empowerment. Railyard Apothecary, Burlington, 7-9 p.m. $20-22. Info, 540-0595.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.7, 6:30 p.m.

MON.12

» P.54

CALENDAR 53

health & fitness

Find club dates in the music section.

THE METROPOLITAN OPERA LIVE IN HD: ‘SEMIRAMIDE’: See SAT.10, Spaulding Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 1 p.m. $26-29. Info, 603-646-2422.

CONTACT IMPROV: See WED.7, Aikido of Champlain Valley, Burlington, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $4. Info, 864-7306.

SEVEN DAYS

PANCAKE BREAKFAST: Families fill up on an all-you-can-eat meal of fluffy flapjacks, breakfast meats, scrambled eggs, home fries and plenty of maple syrup. Franklin Central School, 7 a.m.12:30 p.m. $4-10; free for kids 5 and under. Info, 285-2050.

music

‘HAIR’: See FRI.9, 6-8 p.m.

dance

03.07.18-03.14.18

KNIFE SHARPENING: Dull blades, be gone! Jim Cunningham of JRC Knife Sharpening whets cutting tools. Chef Contos Kitchen & Store, Shelburne, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. $4-5 per knife. Info, 497-3942.

VERMONT PHILHARMONIC & GREEN MOUNTAIN YOUTH SYMPHONY: “The Magic of Stories,” a family-oriented concert, includes selections from Frozen, Hamilton and more. Barre Opera House, 2 p.m. $5-20. Info, 476-8188.

‘DISGRACED’: See WED.7, 5 p.m.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

‘YU-GI-OH! THE MOVIE’: A popular Japanese animated adventure from 2004 hits the big screen, complete with English dubbing. Palace 9 Cinemas, South Burlington, 12:55 p.m. $12.50. Info, 660-9300.

lgbtq

JO TA

‘WONDERS OF THE ARCTIC 3D’: See WED.7.

UKULELE MÊLÉE: Fingers fly at a group lesson on the fourstringed Hawaiian instrument. BYO uke. Fletcher Room, Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 4-6 p.m. Free. Info, reference@burlingtonvt.gov.

SUN.11 | M USI C|

WOMEN’S FILM FESTIVAL: See FRI.9, noon-8 p.m.

‘MANIFESTING MRS. MARX’ & ‘SYNDROME’: See SAT.10, 1 p.m.

TIMOTHY CUMMINGS & GUESTS: Pete Sutherland, Dominique Dodge and others join the bagpiper in spirited tunes celebrating the traditions of Ireland and Cape Breton. McCullough Social Space, Middlebury College, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168.

EASTER CHOCOLATE TASTING: See SAT.10.

‘SPACE: UNRAVELING THE COSMOS 3D’: See WED.7.

PAUL ORGEL: The piano professor performs works by Bach, Mozart, Janáček, Schumann and Chopin. University of Vermont Recital Hall, Burlington, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 656-3040.

THETFORD CHAMBER SINGERS: Powerful literary texts meet complex choral arrangements in “Poetry and Song.” ArtisTree Community Arts Center & Gallery, South Pomfret, 4-6 p.m. $15. Info, 457-3500.

holidays

‘DIMANCHES’ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Parlez-vous français? Speakers practice the tongue at a casual drop-in chat. Local History Room, Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 4-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, stevenorman@ fastmail.fm.

theater

SPIDER ROULETTE: Carrie Cook, Mike Kirick, Stefani Capizzi and Keith Williams enliven the Westford Music Series with a repertoire that travels from bluegrass to jazz. United Church of Westford, 4 p.m. Donations. Info, mhamrell@comcast.net.

VINYASA FLOW 1/2: This dynamic yoga practice joins physical postures with the rhythm of the breath. Evolution Physical Therapy & Yoga, Burlington, 8:45-10 a.m. $15. Info, hannasatt@gmail.com.

‘NOVITIATE’: A teenage girl trains to be a nun as the Vatican II instigates radical changes in the church in this 2017 drama shown as part of the Middlebury New Filmmakers Festival Winter Screening Series. See calendar spotlight. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, 2 p.m. $12. Info, 382-9222.

Jason Ennis. Upper Valley Music Center, Lebanon, N.H., 3 p.m. $15; free for kids under 18. Info, info@ uvmusic.org.


calendar MON.12

« P.53

TIBETAN YOGA: A cleansing practice leads to greater clarity off the mat. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, noon-1:15 p.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com. VIGOROUS VINYASA FLOW: See WED.7, 4:30-5:30 p.m. YIN YOGA: See SAT.10, 12-1:15 p.m.

language

ADVANCED-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: Language learners perfect their pronunciation with guest speakers. Private residence, Burlington, 4:30-6 p.m. $20. Info, 324-1757. LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE: Bring a bag lunch to practice the system of communication using visual gestures. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338. SPANISH GROUP CLASSES: Speakers brush up on their language skills en español. New Moon Café, Burlington, 5-6:30 p.m. $25. Info, maigomez1@ hotmail.com.

seminars

BETHEL UNIVERSITY: See WED.7.

talks

SANDI TOKSVIG: In celebration of Women’s History Month, attendees watch and discuss a video of the TED Talk “A Political Party for Women’s Equality.” Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

tech

words

MUST-READ MONDAYS: Lit lovers cover Watership Down by Richard Adams. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955.

business

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR FRONTLINE PROFESSIONALS FORUM: Area professionals become familiar with incentives available for those considering expanding or relocating to the North Country. Angell College Center, SUNY Plattsburgh, N.Y., 9 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 518-564-3054. RUTLAND BUSINESS SHOW: Local professionals mingle with more than 90 exhibitors, who offer a wide range of products and services. Holiday Inn, Rutland, 4-7 p.m. $5. Info, 773-2747.

community

FEAST TOGETHER OR FEAST TO GO: See FRI.9. TUESDAY VOLUNTEER NIGHTS: Helping hands pitch in around the shop by organizing parts, moving bikes and tackling other projects. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. Bike Recycle Vermont, Burlington, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 264-9687.

crafts

COMMUNITY CRAFT NIGHT: Makers stitch, spin, knit and crochet their way through projects while enjoying each other’s company. Local History Room, Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 863-3403.

dance

BEGINNER WEST COAST SWING & FUSION DANCING: Pupils get schooled in the fundamentals of partner dance. North End Studio B, Burlington, 8-9 p.m. $11-16. Info, burlingtonwestie@gmail. com. BEGINNING LINDY HOP: In weekly sessions, hoofers learn the foundation of the swingdance style developed in the 1920s and ’30s. Champlain Club, Burlington, 6:30-7:30 p.m. $10. Info, contact@vermontswings. com.

INTERMEDIATE & ADVANCED WEST COAST SWING: Fun-loving folks learn the smooth, sexy stylings of modern swing dance. North End Studio A, Burlington, 7-9 p.m. $11-16. Info, burlingtonwestie@gmail.com. SWING DANCING: Quick-footed participants experiment with different forms, including the Lindy hop, Charleston and balboa. Beginners are welcome. Champlain Club, Burlington, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $5. Info, 448-2930.

education

VISITING MORNING: Class observations and faculty meet and greets give parents a taste of the learning community. Lake Champlain Waldorf School, Shelburne, 8:30-10 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 985-2827.

etc.

DANCE, PAINT, WRITE: DROP-IN: Creative people end their day with an energetic meditation, music, movement, intuitive painting, free writing and de-stressing. Expressive Arts Burlington, 7-9 p.m. $15. Info, 343-8172. DISCOVER ALBANIA: INFORMATION SESSION: Globetrotters hear the details of an upcoming trip with the Vermont Council on World Affairs. 60 Main St., Burlington, 5-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 861-2343. LA LECHE LEAGUE MEETING: Nursing mothers share breastfeeding tips and resources. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 720-272-8841.

fairs & festivals

BURLINGTON IRISH HERITAGE FESTIVAL: See WED.7.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. CASTLETON INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL: See THU.8. ‘LADY BIRD’: See SUN.11. ‘SPACE: UNRAVELING THE COSMOS 3D’: See WED.7.

WESTON 101 FILM SCREENING & TALK: The Weston Playhouse primes theatergoers for its summer production of A Doll’s House, Part 2 with a screening of the 1973 film version of A Doll’s House. Weston Playhouse at Walker Farm, 7-9 p.m. Donations. Info, 824-8167. ‘WONDERS OF THE ARCTIC 3D’: See WED.7.

food & drink

BENEFIT BAKE: Pizza lovers dine on slices to support the Vermont Community Garden Network. Partial proceeds from each flatbread sold are donated. American Flatbread Burlington Hearth, 11:30 a.m.-11:30 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 861-2999. SCALING BACK: COOKING FOR ONE OR TWO: Waste, be gone! Home cooks learn to prepare quick, easy meals for dining solo. Community Teaching Kitchen, City Market, Onion River Co-op, Burlington South End, 6-7:30 p.m. $5-10. Info, 861-9700.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.7, 7 p.m.

health & fitness

BEGINNER/INTERMEDIATE SUNSTYLE TAI CHI, LONG-FORM: See THU.8, South Burlington Recreation & Parks Department, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 735-5467. BEGINNERS TAI CHI CLASS: See THU.8. BRANDON FITNESS BOOT CAMP: Hop to it! Get fit with strength, endurance, agility and coordination exercises. Otter Valley North Campus Gym, Brandon, 5-6 p.m. $12. Info, 343-7160. DE-STRESS YOGA: A relaxing and challenging class lets healthy bodies unplug and unwind. Balance Yoga, Richmond, 5:45-7 p.m. $14. Info, 434-8401. FELDENKRAIS AWARENESS THROUGH MOVEMENT: See FRI.9, 5:30-6:30 p.m. and Sacred Mountain Studio, Burlington, 9:30-10:30 a.m. $15; free for first-timers. Info, 735-3770.

GENTLE FLOW YOGA: See THU.8. HATHA YOGA FLOW: This practice provides a great stretch and strengthens the body through a combination of sustained and flowing poses. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 5:30-6:45 p.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com. LOW-IMPACT FITNESS BOOT CAMP: Strength, agility, coordination and heart-healthy exercises are modified for folks of all ability levels. Charlotte Senior Center, 9:15-10 a.m. $10. Info, 343-7160. PEACEFUL WARRIOR KARATE: Martial-arts training promotes healthy living for those in recovery. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150. PILATES: See WED.7, Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 7:30-8:30 a.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt. com. REIKI CLINIC: Thirty-minute treatments promote physical, emotional and spiritual wellness. JourneyWorks, Burlington, 3-5:30 p.m. $10-30; preregister. Info, 860-6203. R.I.P.P.E.D.: See SAT.10, 6-7 p.m. VINYASA FLOW 1/2: See SUN.11, 5:45-7 p.m. YOGA AT THE WINOOSKI VFW: Certified instructors guide veterans and their families through a series of poses. Arrive five to 10 minutes early. Second floor, Winooski VFW Hall, 6-7 p.m. Donations. Info, 655-9832. YOGA CORE FOR BABES: See THU.8.

language

‘LA CAUSERIE’ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Native speakers and learners are welcome to pipe up at an unstructured conversational practice. El Gato Cantina, Burlington, 4:30-6 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0195. LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: ITALIAN: Speakers hone their skills in the Romance language over a bag lunch. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

PAUSE-CAFÉ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Frenchlanguage fanatics meet pour parler la belle langue. Meet in the back room. ¡Duino! (Duende), Burlington, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 430-4652. SOCIAL GATHERING: Those who are deaf or hard of hearing or want to learn American Sign Language get together to break down communication barriers. The North Branch Café, Montpelier, 4-6 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 595-4001.

music

Find club dates in the music section. OPEN JAM: Instrumentalists band together for a free-flowing musical hour. Borrow an instrument or bring your own. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 300. OPEN MIC: Singers, players, storytellers and poets entertain a live audience at a monthly showcase of local talent. Wallingford Town Hall, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, 446-2872.

seminars

BETHEL UNIVERSITY: See WED.7. HOW TO BE AN EFFECTIVE HEALTH CARE AGENT: End-of-life specialist Michelle Acciavatti demystifies the responsibilities of a health care proxy. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 223-2518. MEDICARE & YOU: AN INTRODUCTION TO MEDICARE: Members of the Central Vermont Council on Aging clear up confusion about the application process and plan options. Central Vermont Council on Aging, Barre, 3-5 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 479-0531.

talks

ED MCGUIRE: In “Researching Your Irish Ancestors,” a brief history of immigration from the Emerald Isle to North America paves the way for an overview of fact-finding resources. Vermont Genealogy Library, Fort Ethan Allen, Colchester, 10:30 a.m.noon. $10. Info, 310-9285.

54 CALENDAR

SEVEN DAYS

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

TECH HELP WITH CLIF: See WED.7.

TUE.13

Untitled-42 1

2/12/18 1:36 PM

Untitled-7 1

3/5/18 10:41 AM


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

GAUVIN ALEXANDER BAILEY: The speaker reconstructs the building of an extraordinary monument in “The Palace of Sans-Souci in Milot, Haiti: The Untold Story of the Potsdam of the Rainforest.” Room 125, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168. LUNCH WITH A CITY OFFICIAL: City clerk John Odum shares his expertise in election security. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Free; $7 for lunch. Info, 223-2518. MARC PAUL: Photos and stories offer a window into the wildlife videographer’s Ugandan safari. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, gmas@greenmountainaudubon. org. SCOTT HAMILTON: In a broadcast talk, the 1984 Olympic gold medalist and cancer survivor offers words of motivation. Room 207, Bentley Hall, Johnson State College, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 635-1247.

tech

INTRODUCTION TO MICROSOFT WORD: Toolbars, menus and icons, oh my! A computer whiz teaches techniques such as copying, pasting, and formatting text and pictures. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 865-7217.

theater

‘TWELFTH NIGHT’: The Royal Shakespeare Company shines in a broadcast production of the Bard’s comedy about love, assumed identities and the hilarious intersection of the two. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. $6-15. Info, 748-2600.

BURLINGTON POETRY GROUP: Writers of verse ages 18 through 30 field constructive feedback on original works. Pickering Room, Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, btvpoetry@ gmail.com.

TRANSFORMING TRAUMA: HOW SHARING STORIES CAN HELP US HEAL: A book launch celebration for Erin Moulton’s new anthology Things We Haven’t Said: Sexual Violence Survivors Speak Out includes an informative panel discussion. Bear Pond Books, Montpelier, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 229-0774. WINTER LITERATURE READING SERIES: Ambitious readers cover selected pages of George Eliot’s Middlemarch: A Study of Provincial Life. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104.

WED.14

agriculture

CREATING PLANT & POLLINATOR SANCTUARIES IN GARDENS & FARMS: Green thumbs learn to boost pollinator habitat and provide protection to Vermont’s endangered and threatened flora. Fletcher Room, Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. $1-10. Info, 495-1270.

business

LEVERAGING ONLINE MARKETING BASICS FOR YOUR BUSINESS: Proprietors prepare to give their enterprises a push through an effective online presence. New England Federal Credit Union, Williston, 5:30-7 p.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, 764-5899.

cannabis

GREENER DRINKS: See WED.7.

community

AARP VERMONT COFFEE HOUR: Friends and neighbors learn how to get into the driver’s seat by using CarShare Vermont. Maglianero, Burlington, 9-10 a.m. Free. Info, 866-227-7451.

crafts

FIBER RIOT!: See WED.7. GREEN MOUNTAIN CHAPTER OF THE EMBROIDERERS’ GUILD OF AMERICA: Needle-and-thread enthusiasts fine-tune their techniques. Living/Dining Room, Pines Senior Living Community, South Burlington, 9:30 a.m. Free for first-timers; bring a bag lunch. Info, 372-4255. MAKE A DROP SPINDLE: Fiber fanatics learn to craft the apparatus used to spin wool into yarn without the need for a full spinning wheel. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955.

dance

CONTACT IMPROV: See WED.7. DROP-IN HIP-HOP DANCE: See WED.7. ‘THE FLAMES OF PARIS’: Bolshoi Ballet dancers leap and twirl across the stage in a story of love and revolution, broadcast to the big screen. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. $618. Info, 748-2600.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘DOLORES’: See WED.7, KelloggHubbard Library, Montpelier, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338. ‘SPACE: UNRAVELING THE COSMOS 3D’: See WED.7. ‘WONDERS OF THE ARCTIC 3D’: See WED.7.

food & drink

COMMUNITY MEAL: Diners dig into a hot lunch. United Church of Johnson, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 635-1247. COMMUNITY SUPPER: See WED.7. A MOSAIC OF FLAVOR: CONGOLESE MUAMBA NSUSU & UGALI: A seasoned cook demonstrates how to prepare traditional dishes from the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Community Teaching Kitchen, City Market, Onion River Co-op, Burlington South End, 5:30-7:30 p.m. $5-10. Info, 861-9700.

GENTLE YOGA IN WATERBURY: See WED.7. GINGER’S EXTREME BOOT CAMP: See WED.7. NIA WITH LINDA: See WED.7. PILATES: See WED.7. PRENATAL YOGA: See WED.7. RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: See WED.7. RESTORATIVE YOGA: See WED.7. VIGOROUS VINYASA FLOW: See WED.7. WEDNESDAY GUIDED MEDITATION: See WED.7. WINTER SKIN EVENT: Complimentary eye treatments to help soothe, hydrate and depuff peepers. La Bella Derma, Winooski, 2-6 p.m. Free. Info, 735-3031.

language

INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: See WED.7. INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASS: See WED.7.

HIP-HOP DANCE: See WED.7.

VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: See WED.7.

LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: SPANISH: See WED.7.

education

games

music

VISITING MORNING: See TUE.13.

etc.

LEGEND OF THE BANSHEE BUS TOUR: Queen City Ghost Walk’s Thea Lewis leads an exploration of Burlington’s colorful Irish history and most intriguing haunts. Arrive 10 minutes early. Burton Flagship Store, Burlington, 7 p.m. $32.50. Info, 863-5966. OPEN MIC NIGHT: Feats of comedy, music, poetry and storytelling fill five-, 10- and 15-minute time slots. Main Street Museum, White River Junction, 7-9 p.m. Donations. Info, info@mainstreetmuseum.org. VERMONT SUPREME COURT SESSION: The state’s highest judges hear oral arguments on five cases. Room 109, Oakes Hall, Vermont Law School, South Royalton, 9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 831-1000.

fairs & festivals

health & fitness

ALL-LEVELS HATHA YOGA: See WED.7. BONE BUILDERS EXERCISE CLASSES: See WED.7. BUTI YOGA: See WED.7. CBD-SUPPORTED GUIDED MEDIATION: Free your mind rejuvenating journey with Marysa of Marysa Mind Body Spirit. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 7-8 p.m. $15. Info, 598-4323. CHAIR TAI CHI: See WED.7. EMPOWERED YOGA FLOW: See WED.7. FALLING AWAY: A mindful exploration of being moves beyond a Western view of self and psychotherapy. Community Room, Hunger Mountain Co-op, Montpelier, 6-7:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, info@hungermountain.coop. GENTLE YOGA IN RICHMOND: See WED.7.

WOMEN’S PICKUP BASKETBALL: See WED.7.

talks

COMMUNITY CONVERSATIONS SERIES: ‘THE HUMAN CONNECTION’: Fran Stoddard moderates a gathering aimed at engaging Vermonters in the lost art of conversation. All Souls Interfaith Gathering, Shelburne, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 985-3819. EVERY WOMAN HAS A STORY: See WED.7.

tech

DOWNLOAD & LISTEN TO PODCASTS: Folks bring a phone or a tablet to a lesson on accessing online audio programs. Waterbury Public Library, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, delia@ waterburypubliclibary.com. INTRODUCTION TO HTML5 & CSS3: See WED.7. TECH HELP WITH CLIF: See WED.7.

theater

‘DISGRACED’: See WED.7, 10 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.

Find club dates in the music section.

‘SEX WITH STRANGERS’: See WED.7.

VERMONT’S 40TH ARMY BAND: The Farmers Night Concert Series continues with an evening of patriotic tunes. House Chamber, Vermont Statehouse, Montpelier, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 828-2228.

words

seminars

BETHEL UNIVERSITY: See WED.7. GRANT SEEKER WORKSHOP: CULTURAL FACILITIES & HISTORIC PRESERVATION: Folks get the facts on seeking awards for nonprofit organizations and municipalities to enhance, create or rehabilitate historic and community buildings. Brandon Town Hall, 1-3 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 828-3292. INTRO TO FLY TYING: See WED.7. NATURAL MARSHFIELD: Wildlife experts uncover the wonders of the local environment. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

BOOK DISCUSSION GROUP: Fans of the written word delve into Manhattan Beach by Jennifer Egan. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211. PROSE MASTER CLASS: Prompts from instructor Baron Wormser inspire writers to broaden their approach to material. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104. WRITING CIRCLE: See WED.7. m

WEEKLY SPECIALS! TACO TUESDAY

$2 CHICKEN OR SHREDDED BEEF TACOS & $3 LONG TRAILS

@ 5p and 6p on

WEDNESDAY

WCAX!

$5 MARGARITAS

THURSDAY 1/2 PRICE NACHOS

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK FOR LUNCH AND DINNER

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN CUISINE

authentic mexican cuisine

802-540-3095 • 169 Church St. • Burlington • 802-662-4334 • 4 Park St. • Essex Junction (Lincoln Inn) www.ElGatoCantina.com • info@elgatocantina.com 12/5/17 4:09 PM

8h-elgato111517.indd 1

11/13/17 3:09 PM

CALENDAR 55

COM WCAX.COM WCAX.COM WCAX.COM WCAX.COM WCAX.COM WCAX.COM

Untitled-2 1

SEVEN DAYS

JOIN Darren & Kristin

ARNIE KOZAK: The psychotherapist offers a closer look at his new book, Timeless Truths for Modern Mindfulness: A Practical Guide to a More Focused and Quiet Mind. Phoenix Books Essex, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 872-7111.

03.07.18-03.14.18

BURLINGTON IRISH HERITAGE FESTIVAL: See WED.7.

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.7.

sports

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

words

THE MOTH: TESTS: Wordsmiths have five minutes to tell true tales inspired by a shared theme. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $10; preregister. Info, 540-0406.


classes THE FOLLOWING CLASS LISTINGS ARE PAID ADVERTISEMENTS. ANNOUNCE YOUR CLASS FOR AS LITTLE AS $16.75/WEEK (INCLUDES SIX PHOTOS AND UNLIMITED DESCRIPTION ONLINE). SUBMIT YOUR CLASS AD AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTCLASS.

agriculture BEEKEEPER APPRENTICESHIPS: You can learn how to be a successful beekeeper with a full season of essential skills. This apprenticeship program will cover foundation concepts, information and philosophies for a full warmweather season of beekeeping. It is my honor to help you explore the world of the sacred honeybee. May-Oct. Cost: $35/single day; $300/series 10 days before April 15; $350/series 10 days after April 15. Location: The Shaman’s Touch Apiary, Morrisville. Info: Anthony Pauly, 324-5769, theshamanstouch@yahoo.com, theshamanstouch.com.

art

56 CLASSES

SEVEN DAYS

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

BEAUTY IN PROCESS: This acrylic painting workshop will mine the depths of intuitive abstraction through process painting and manipulation of materials. Instructor: Galen Cheney. Sat., Mar. 10, 9:30 a.m.3:30 p.m. Cost: $135/person; $110/members. Location: Helen Day Art Center, 90 Pond St., Stowe. Info: 253-8358, education@helenday.com, helenday.com. BLACKSMITHING 1: Instructors: Michael Coffey and Mark Hemley. Using a forge, students will learn basic blacksmithing techniques such as building and maintaining a fire, hammer control and more. Students will create hooks, pokers and small leaves during this two-day workshop. Materials included. Please bring a sack lunch. Sat. & Sun., Jun. 2 & 3, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost: $235/ person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org. WATERCOLOR NOW: CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES W/ WATERCOLOR: A variety of papers, composition and non-composition, mark making, and other contemporary ideas will be explored in traditional, innovative and experimental ways. Instructor: Suzanne Siegel. Sat. & Sun., Mar. 24-25, 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost: $250/person; $225 for members. Location: Helen Day Art Center, 90 Pond St., Stowe. Info: 253-8358, education@helenday.com, helenday.com.

craft

theshelburnecraftschool.org

985-3648

ADULT: ALTERNATIVE FIRING: Instructor: Rik Rolla. Explore clay on the wheel in a creative, mixed-level, supportive environment. Examine properties of form, function, color and glazes. Fire finished pieces in the primitive pit, the Raku Kiln with the option to explore other firing techniques. Gas reduction kiln and electric kilns are also available. Mon., 6-8 p.m., Mar. 26-May 21; no class April 23. Cost: $335/ person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org. ADULT: ART 101: Instructor: Kristen Maniscalco. Visual art for beginners! This is a technique-based 2-D sampler series that offers a little bit of everything: drawing, watercolor, collage, painting and mixed media. Students will gain an overview of the history behind each technique while exploring and playing with each medium. Mon., 1-3 p.m., Apr. 2- Jun. 4; no class Apr. 23 or May 28. Cost: $248/person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org. ADULT: DRAWING FOUNDATIONS: Instructor: Neil Berger. Learn the fundamental skills of observational drawing. Explore the technical and conceptual foundation of drawing using a variety of drawing materials such as graphite, charcoal, pen and ink. Develop personal goals while examining creative concepts through demonstrations. Materials not included. Thu., 10 a.m.-noon, Mar. 22-May 17; no class Apr. 25. Cost: $248/ person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne

Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org. ADULT: INTRO TO METALS: Instructor: Brenda-Lee May Prescott. Explore the basics of metalsmithing in this six-week class. Learn how to saw, file and solder using a torch to make a small piece in copper or brass. Then, using sterling silver, make a ring or small pendant. Tue., 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Mar. 20-May 1; no class Apr. 17. Cost: $370/ person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd, Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org. ADULT: LIFE DRAWING: Instructor: Misoo Filan. Practice the traditional art of drawing the human figure in a supportive and respectful atmosphere. With a life-drawing model present at each class, students will be able to capture the human form in varying mediums and develop drawing skills by studying human anatomy. Bring your favorite medium (water based). Basic drawing experience recommended. Mon., 6-8 p.m., Mar. 12-Apr. 2. Cost: $142/person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org. ADULT: MIXED-LEVEL WHEEL: Instructor: Rik Rolla. Further develop the fundamentals of wheel-throwing. Explore techniques through demonstrations and hands-on assistance. You set the pace and gain experience through guided individualized practice. Gas reduction kiln and electric oxidation kiln are available for firing, including an option to explore other firing methods. Wed., 6-8 p.m., Mar. 28-May 23; no class Apr. 25. Cost: $335/person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

awkward and natural encounter with paint. Tue, 10 a.m.-noon, Mar. 20-May 15; no class April 24. Cost: $248/ person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org. ADULT: RAISING METAL: Instructor: Michael Coffey. Raising is used to create threedimensional forms out of sheet metal, often in the form of cups, bowls or other voluminous vessels. Learn proper tool usage, materials selection, annealing/stress relieving and more. Finish this four-weeklong class with at least one cup, bowl or other vessel. Tue., 6-9 p.m., May 1-22. Cost: $245/ person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org. ADULT: SHAKER HALL TABLE: Instructor: Ryan Cocina. Learn a comprehensive introduction to woodworking. This course explores basic principles of lumber selection, hand-tool and machinery usage, milling, joinery, and finishing. You will build a Shaker-style hall table, taking the project from blueprint through completion, while gaining familiarity with the woodshop environment. Mon., 6-9 p.m., Mar. 26-Jun. 11; no class Apr. 23 & May 28. Cost: $565/person; member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org. ART AND CRAFT CLASSES: Art and craft studios located in Shelburne Village. Since 1945, our historic campus has been a home to arts and crafts people looking to create in clay, woodworking, visual arts, metals and glass. With year-round classes for adults and kids, we offer a one-of-a-kind creative experience. Ongoing. Member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

culinary ADULT: PAINTING PRACTICE: Instructor: Neil Berger. Together we will explore painting as performance: a series of gestures more like a dance than a marathon. We will look at pictures as holistic arrangements of shapes and colors instead of “subject matter” and learn to trust the intimate,

\BRO:T\ CULINARY CLASSES: We are a unique artisan microbakery and culinary school located in the mountains of beautiful Vermont. Our classes are multidisciplinary in nature and include not only hands-on, personalized instruction but also narratives about the region of production, terroir, traditional ingredients, and unique cultures that surround each bread, pastry or dish we prepare. Come bake and cook with us this spring.

See website for classes info. Artisan Bread Baking for Beginners every first Sat. Cost: $55/class. Location: Brot Bakehouse School and Kitchen, 38 Meade Rd. , Fairfax. Info: Heike Meyer, 370-4077, info@brotbakery.com, brotbakery.com.

dance DANCE STUDIO SALSALINA: Salsa classes, nightclub-style, group and private, four levels. Beginner walk-in classes, Wed., 6 p.m. $15/person for one-hour class. No dance experience, partner or preregistration required, just the desire to have fun! Drop in anytime and prepare for an enjoyable workout. Location: 266 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Victoria, 598-1077, info@ salsalina.com. DSANTOS VT DANCE CLASSES: New classes, new location! Come join the fun. Weekly classes in salsa, bachata, kizomba, kuduro. No partner or experience needed. Beginner drop-in classes. Salsa, Mon., 7-8 p.m.; Kizomba, Wed., 8-9 p.m.; Bachata, Thu., 6-7 p.m. Cost: $15/1-hour class. Location: Dsantos VT Dance Studio, 294 N. Winooski Ave., Unit 112A, Burlington. Info: Jon Bacon, 2272572, dsantosvt.com.

Through dozens of examples and exercises, discover how to contact your inner guides and bolster your trust in the universe. Led by Sue Mehrtens. Mar. 21 & 28, Apr. 4 & 11, 7-9 p.m. Cost: $60/person. Location: Jungian Center for the Spiritual Sciences, 55 Clover Ln., Waterbury. Info: Sue Mehrtens, 244-7909.

gardening GARDENING AND ORNAMENTAL GRASSES: Learn about using ornamental grasses in home landscapes. Come learn about the presenter’s favorite varieties, why they work, how to use them successfully in combination with shrubs and perennials, and how to extend the season with fall color. Presenter: Silvia Jope. Sat., Mar. 24, 9:30-11 a.m. Cost: $15/person. Location: Gardener’s Supply, 128 Intervale Rd., Burlington. Info: 660-3505, gardenerssupplystore.com. MINOR FRUITS & BERRIES: Learn about some of the lesser-known fruits and berries that can be grown in Vermont. Presenter: Meghan Giroux. Sat., Mar. 17, 9:30-11 a.m. Cost: $15/ person. Location: Gardener’s Supply, 128 Intervale Rd., Burlington. Info: 660-3505, gardenerssupplystore.com.

Generator

design/build TINY HOUSE ‘GARDENEER’: In class: tool type and use, materials, parts of a house, lumber list, cut list. In field: We will frame a floor, deck it, get a rafter pattern and put up two walls, framed for window and door. Forestry walk: cruising timber, dropping, limbing, chunking, splitting, stacking cord wood. Garden tour: tools, layout and utilities. Creating a “destination CSA” for progressive share cropping. Mar. 17 & 18. Cost: $250/weekend; on-site camping avail.; pre-registration required. Location: Bakersfield, Vermont. Info: 933-6103, vermonttinyhouses.com.

drumming TAIKO AND DJEMBE CLASSES IN BURLINGTON!: New drumming sessions begin weeks of Mar. 3 and May 1. Taiko for Adults: Tue., 5:30-6:20 p.m.; Wed., 6:30-8:20 p.m. Djembe for Adults: Wed., 5:30-6:20 p.m. Taiko for Kids and Parents: Tue., 4:30-5:20 p.m. Djembe for Kids and Parents: Wed., 4:30-5:20 p.m. Drums provided. Conga classes, too! Online schedule, registration. Location: Taiko Space, 208 Flynn Ave., Suite 3G, Burlington. Info: 999-4255, burlingtontaiko.org.

empowerment ANGELS WORKSHOP: Learn how you can work more consciously with the inner energies that have been called “angels.”

BUILD A FIRE PISTON: The lathe is typically used to create cylindrical or tapered objects in plastic or metal. In this safety and basic use course, we will learn metal turning, selecting speeds and cutting tools right for the task. To help learn the application, we will build a functional fire piston. Learn more about classes at generatorvt.com/classes. Mon., Mar. 26 & Apr. 2, 6-8:30 p.m. Location: Generator, 40 Sears Ln., Burlington. Info: 540-0761. LASER CUT BOARD GAME DESIGN: One of the things we love about tabletop games is the look and feel of an awesome game. Now you can make your own game with components that are beautiful to look at and use. This is a project-based class that relies primarily on the laser machine. Learn more about classes at generatorvt. com/classes. Wed., Mar. 28, Apr. 4 & 11, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Location: Generator, 40 Sears Ln., Burlington. Info: 540-0761. WOOD COVER SKETCHBOOK WORKSHOP: Never buy another journal or sketchbook again. Learn the craft of bookbinding by making your own sketchbook in just two evenings. Students in this workshop will learn different methods of bookbinding and make sample mini books. Learn more about classes at generatorvt.com/classes. Tue.,


CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES

Mar. 20 & 27, 6-9 p.m. Location: Generator, 40 Sears Ln., Burlington. Info: 540-0761. WOOD LATHE WORKSHOP: The Rockwell Delta Wood Lathe is the perfect tool for carving a bowl, cylindrical box, furniture legs and more. Students will gain confidence in spindle gouge, roughing gouge and scraper with the skew chisel and bowl gouge. Learn more about classes at generatorvt.com/ classes. Tue., Mar. 20, 6-8 p.m. Location: Generator, 40 Sears Ln., Burlington. Info: 540-0761.

language ALLIANCE FRANÇAISE SPRING SESSION: CONTINUONS: Elevenweek and six-week French classes for adults starting on March 12. Morning, afternoon and evening classes available in Burlington and evening classes only in Colchester and Montpelier. We serve the entire range of students from the true beginners to those already comfortable conversing in French. Starts Mar. 12. Various locations. Info: Micheline Tremblay, michelineatremblay@ gmail.com, aflcr.org.

martial arts COMBAT FITNESS MARTIAL ARTS : Vermont’s premier mixed martial arts academy: Brazilian jiujitsu, boxing, Muay Thai kickboxing, judo, MMA and Filipino martial arts. Combine

SINCE 2011

VERMONT BRAZILIAN JIUJITSU: Brazilian jiujitsu is a martial arts combat style based entirely on leverage and technique. Brazilian jiujitsu self-defense curriculum is taught to Navy SEALs, CIA, FBI, military police and special forces. No training experience required. Easy-to-learn techniques that could save your life! Classes for men, women and children. Students will learn realistic bully-proofing and self-defense life skills to avoid them becoming victims and help them feel safe and secure. Our sole purpose is to help empower people by giving them realistic martial arts training practices they can carry with them throughout life. IBJJF & CBJJ certified black belt sixth-degree Instructor under Carlson Gracie Sr.: teaching in Vermont, born and raised in Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. A five-time Brazilian National Champion; International World Masters Champion and IBJJF World Masters Champion. Accept no Iimitations! Location: Vermont

A R T E M I S

meditation LEARN TO MEDITATE: Through the practice of sitting still and following your breath as it goes out and dissolves, you are connecting with your heart. By simply letting yourself be, as you are, you develop genuine sympathy toward yourself. The Burlington Shambhala Center offers meditation as a path to discovering gentleness and wisdom. Shambhala Café (meditation and discussions) meets the first Saturday of each month, 9 a.m.-noon. An open house (intro to the center, short dharma talk and socializing) is held on the third Sunday of each month, noon-2 p.m. Instruction: Sun. mornings, 9 a.m.-noon, or by appt. Sessions: Tue. & Thu., noon-1 p.m., & Mon.-Thu., 6-7 p.m. Location: Burlington Shambhala Center, 187 S. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 658-6795, burlingtonshambhalactr.org.

performing arts IMPROV COMEDY CLASS: Come join the veteran improvisers from Kamikaze Comedy as they lead an energetic series of workshops that reveal just

F I T N E S S

FOR ONLY

$99

• INDIVIDUALIZED CONSULTATION • 3 PERSONAL TRAINING SESSIONS • UNLIMITED GROUP TRAINING

7 FAYETTE DRIVE, SOUTH BURLINGTON, VT

802-448-3769 • WWW.ARTEMISFITNESSVT.COM Untitled-4 1

2/28/18 3:41 PM

ACTIVATE INNER PEACE: Change your life with Tai Chi, Qigong, and Taoist meditation and philosophy. Join our group with other friendly adults to learn quickly and well in a lighthearted, encouraging environment. We teach ancient arts in a modern manner. Our teachers are traditionally trained and authentically qualified to teach. Fri., 6-7 p.m. & 7-8 p.m.; Sat., 11 a.m.-noon & noon-1 p.m.; Tue., 6-7:30 p.m. Cost: $12/1hour class; $40/mo. (incl. all classes offered); first class free. Location: 303 Flynn Ave., Burlington. Info: Wu Xing Chinese Martial Arts, 355-1301, info@wxcma.com, wxcma.com. SNAKE-STYLE TAI CHI CHUAN: The Yang Snake Style is a dynamic tai chi method that mobilizes the spine while stretching and strengthening the core body muscles. Practicing this ancient martial art increases strength, flexibility, vitality, peace of mind and martial skill. Beginner classes Sat. mornings & Wed. evenings. Call to view a class. Location: Bao Tak Fai Tai Chi Institute, 100 Church St., Burlington. Info: 864-7902, ipfamilytaichi.org.

INTUITIVE AWARENESS, ENERGY WORK, E.F.T. & EXPRESSIVE ARTS CLASSES: Open to joy! Tune into your body, mind and spirit. Learn tools to clear and reset your energy; develop clarity, awareness and compassion; and live from a place of well-being, truth and joy. Taught by Naomi Mitsuda, Reiki master, certified practitioner of E.F.T., intuitive awareness, expressive arts, and energy medicine. Offered this winter/spring at Spirit Dancer, Sacred Mountain Studio, and other venues in Burlington, VT. Location: Various locations around, Burlington. Info: Naomi Mitsuda, 658-5815, naomimitsuda@gmail.com.

yoga EVOLUTION YOGA: Practice yoga in a down-to-earth atmosphere with some of the most experienced teachers and therapeutic professionals in Burlington. Daily drop-in classes, including $5 community classes, Yoga Wall and Yoga Therapeutics classes led by physical therapists. Join our Yoga for Life Program to dive deeper into your practice, or register for our Yoga Teacher Training for Health and Wellness Professionals. We offer specialty workshops, series and trainings, rooted in the art and science of yoga as a healing practice for body, mind and spirit. $5-$15/ class; $140/10-class card; $5-10/ community class. Location: Evolution Yoga, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington. Info: 864-9642, evolutionvt.com. HONEST YOGA: Honest yoga offers practices for all levels. We just expanded to have two practice spaces! Your children can practice in one room while you practice in the other. No need for childcare. Yoga and dance classes ages 3 and up. Brand-new beginners’ course: This includes two specialty classes per week for four weeks plus unlimited access to all classes. We have daily heated and alignment classes kids classes in yoga and dance.

SAFE AND CONFIDENT SWIMMERS • Swim lessons for ages 6 months to adults • New 7 week session starts this week! • Register now! Call Jess to determine level, 652-8143

www.gbymca.org

We hold yoga teacher trainings at the 200- and 500-hour levels, as well as children and dance teacher training courses. Check our our website for dance classes and yoga summer camps! Daily classes & workshops. $50/new student (1 month unlimited); $18/ class; $140/10-class card; $15/ class for student or senior; or $110/10-class punch card; $135/ mo. adult memberships; $99/ mo. kid memberships. Location: Honest Yoga Center, 150 Dorset St., Blue Mall, next to Hana, South Burlington. Info: 497-0136, honestyogastudio@gmail.com, honestyogacenter.com. NEK YOGA TEACHER TRAINING: Step into your purpose and path. This Yoga Teacher Training/ Life Enrichment program will weave the transformative benefits of yoga and leadership into all areas of your life. Shift your awareness to embody greater freedom, ease, joy, love and connection. Open to profound healing for yourself and all you come in contact with. Monthly, starting Apr. 5. Cost: $2,500/200-hour Registered Yoga Teacher Training. Location: Heart Space Yoga Center, 446 Railroad St., St. Johnsbury. Info: Andrea Thibadeau, 626-3398, heartspaceyoga@gmail.com, heartspaceyogacenter.com. SANGHA STUDIO | NONPROFIT, DONATION-BASED YOGA: Sangha Studio builds an empowered community through the shared practice of yoga. Free yoga service initiatives and outreach programs are offered at 17 local organizations working with all ages. Join Sangha in both downtown Burlington and the Old North End for one of their roughly 60 weekly classes and workshops. Become a Sustaining Member for $60/month and practice as often as you like! Daily. Location: Sangha Studio, 120 Pine St. and 237 North Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 448-4262, Info@ sanghastudio.org.

SHOP LOCAL

and say you saw it in...

CLASSES 57

We believe that we offer the most effective, safe and dynamic programs, but talk is cheap. Come meet our team, experience our amazing culture and let us prove it to you.

tai chi

well-being

SEVEN DAYS

EXPERIENCE OUR 30 DAY TRIAL

what makes the unscripted performance work. Through fun and engaging theater exercises, students will discover the rules improv in practical terms by getting on their feet and making some magic. By exploring the concepts of teamwork, active listening and mutual acceptance, we’ll learn how scenes are built and how supporting each other is the key to spontaneous storytelling. Sat., Mar. 10, 4-6 p.m. Cost: $215/person. Location: Zenbarn Studio, 179 Guptil Rd., Waterbury Center. Info: 454-8020, info@ vermonthub.com, vermonthub. com/kamikazeworkshop.html.

03.07.18-03.14.18

We’ve been changing lives

MARTIAL WAY : Colchester and Milton locations. Classes in selfdefense, karate, kung fu, jiu jitsu and tai chi. We have 14 different age and experience levels, so the training is always age- and skill-appropriate. Beginner or experienced, fit or not yet, young or not anymore, we have a class for you! Days and evenings; see website for schedule and fees. Location: Martial Way Self Defense Center, 73 Prim Rd., Colchester, Colchester. Info: David Quinlan, 893-8893, info@ martialwayvt.com, martialwayvt. com.

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, 55 Leroy Rd., Williston. Info: 598-2839, julio@ bjjusa.com, vermontbjj.com.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ANNOUNCING SPANISH CLASSES: Spanish classes start in March. Learn from a native speaker via small classes or personal instruction. You’ll always be participating and speaking. Lesson packages for travelers. Lessons for young children; they love it! English as second language instruction online. Our 12th year. See our website or contact us for details. Starting Mar. 26, 10 weeks. Cost: $225/10 weekly classes of 90+ min. each. Location: Spanish in Waterbury Center, Waterbury Center. Info: 276-1255, spanishparavos@gmail.com, spanishwaterburycenter.com.

fitness and skills-building to learn self-defense and confidence. Classes six days a week. Private lessons available. Located at 276 East Allen St. off Exit 15 in Winooski. Call 655-KICK (5425). combatfitnessmma. com. See website for schedule. Membership and drop-in rates. Location: Combat Fitness Mixed Martial Arts Academy, 276 E. Allen St., Winooski. Info: Vincent Guy, 655-5425, vteguy25@gmail. com, combatfitnessmma.com.


58 MUSIC

SEVEN DAYS

03.07.18-03.14.18

Totally Stoked

Checking out White River Junction’s Engine Room BY J O R D AN AD AMS JORDAN ADAMS

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

I

n recent years, White River Junction has enjoyed the fruits of ongoing revitalization. The former industrial hub in the Upper Valley has seen a spate of new businesses, restaurants and cultural enterprises put down roots, while long-existing entities have been reinvigorated. The unincorporated village is home to the Main Street Museum, the Center for Cartoon Studies, theater company Northern Stage and a smattering of boutiques and markets. But missing from the arts-centric community has been a modern concert venue — until recently. In a space that once housed the Tupelo Music Hall, a nightclub that closed its doors under confusing circumstances in 2012, a new, multifaceted events space called the Engine Room is just taking shape. Brandon Fox stands behind the Engine Room’s glossy, fully stocked bar, which was recently refurbished and extended by several feet. The venue is his family business’ most recent acquisition. Fox is a co-owner of the dynastic Maple Street Catering and Big Fatty’s BBQ, which were founded by his mother, Bethany Lewis, and stepfather, Clay Vagnini. Fox explains that the room was in fairly good shape when his company took it over but says, “It definitely needed some love.” Most recently, the space had been home to a short-lived sports bar and lounge called Club Diesel. A cluster of businesses neighbor the Engine Room, including new American restaurant Elixir, hydroponic emporium White River Growpro, maker space White River CoWorks, hot sauce company Angry Goat Pepper, River Roost Brewery and Big Fatty’s BBQ — the last of which also houses beer hub the Crowler Pit. The commercial and industrial park is also home to a salt grinder, salt-storage shed and rail yard, hence the new venture’s mechanically inspired name. In fact, trains and tankers roll into the compound on tracks that practically come flush up against the Freight House, the official name of the long warehouse that is home to both Elixir and the Engine Room. But, with advance notice of train schedules, the rumbling of incoming rail traffic shouldn’t interfere with events. As waning afternoon sunlight pours through the Engine Room’s wall-to-wall windows, Fox points out many of the

COURTESY OF THE ENGINE ROOM

music

high-ceilinged room’s most recent additions and restorations. The bespectacled 39-year-old notes a new, serpentine lighting fixture with a cobalt LED strip hanging above the counter that his mother and sister conceived. He also points out the corrugated metal paneling underneath it.

New professional concert lighting adds a decadent, rock-and-roll vibe to the expansive stage, which could easily support a large combo or even a smallscale theatrical production. In fact, music and theater, as well as comedy and club nights, are included on a laminated page that lists

the Engine Room’s initial schedule through May. Upcoming entertainment includes Windsor rockers the Pilgrims, Upper Valley party band the Tricksters, Lebanon, N.H., trio the Conniption Fits, and a multi-night run of JAG Productions’ presentation of the biographical Billie Holiday musical Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill. “There’s a lot you can do with it,” Fox says of the approximately 2,700-squarefoot room. “We’re trying to be that middle place from Burlington to Boston.” A projector hangs from the ceiling in the middle of the room, as does a 125inch pull-down screen just in front of the stage. Fox says family film screenings and date-night movies are a potential offering, though none is currently booked. In addition to its own happenings, the space is available for public, semipublic and private events, with slidingscale fees based on a function’s needs. A bare-bones or charitable event could cost as little as a few hundred dollars, while larger-scale shindigs could cost thousands, especially if they utilize Maple Street Catering, which will soon be on-site. The kitchen is currently under construction, with several large appliances strewn about. Seating at the club can be configured in a variety of ways depending on the event. For instance, chair stools and high-top tables make the most sense for standup comedy. But a black curtain next to the stage hides several folding banquet tables and folding chairs for large-scale functions or seated shows. To show off the brand-new, state-ofthe-art sound system, Fox plugs his phone into the sound mixer. Country group Zac Brown Band and R&B spitfire Foxy Brown sound equally full and rich blaring from the club’s speakers, with bass tones you can feel in the soles of your feet. Though the space seems primed to succeed, it’s not immune to challenges. “In this area, staffing is definitely a tough thing,” says Fox, noting the difficulty of retaining “good-quality staff that want to work and call it their home.” Another issue with the ever-growing business hub is parking. Some of the businesses offer a handful of spaces alongside their buildings. But, given the Engine Room’s nearly 200-head capacity, parking could get tricky. TOTALLY STOKED

» P.62


GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Reel Big Fish

SUN 3.11

Nightmares on Wax

COURTESY OF JONATHAN THORPE

Ryan Kick

S UNDbites

News and views on the local music scene B Y J O RDAN A D A MS

Coup de Gras

Dance Comp in the ’Noosk

WED 3.14

Dustbowl Revival

THU 3.15

Rockin’ For A Reason

FRI 3.16

Little Tybee, The Reign of Kindo

SAT 3.17

The Kids Are Alright

SAT 3.17

Fractured Fairytales

Seamus The Great

Twisted Pine

ft. Renegade Groove, King Me

ft. Julia Caesar, Swale, Madaila

MON 3.19

Soulfly as Nailbomb

WED 3.21

Boogie T & Squnto

WED 3.21

That 1 Guy

Today is the Day, Lody Kong, Uncured

Prophet

JUST ANNOUNCED: 4.15 viperHouse, Madaila, Steady Betty 5.11 Into The Mystic: A Tribute to Van Morrison 7.25 Femi Kuti & The Positive Force 8.11 A Beatles Tribute: Spencer & The Walrus 1214 Williston Road, South Burlington 802-652-0777 @higherground @highergroundmusic

4V-HG030718.indd 1

MUSIC 59

» P.61

Roots of Creation

SEVEN DAYS

SOUNDBITES

FRI 3.9

The Big Sip

03.07.18-03.14.18

One of Saturday’s unofficial Mardi Gras events of note is DJ JONATHAN TOUBIN’s Soul Clap and Dance-Off at the Monkey House in Winooski. Toubin, founder of NYC-based production company New York Night Train, regularly hosts ’60s-era soul parties at which he spins nothing but deep-cut 45s. The Village Voice named him best DJ in its 2015 “Best of NYC” issue, stating, “We might live in an EDM world, but Jonathan Toubin has no truck with today’s musical whims. [His] Soul Clap and Dance-Off has brought throwback pizzazz and retro cool to New York’s late-night underground … No fistbumps or atomic bass drops here.” Sounds pretty dope, right? But wait — there’s more! The party’s central event is a freaking midnight dance-off. With numbers pinned to their backs, contestants are divided into several heats. The winners of these enter a final round to show the world what their mamas gave them. The ultimate champion walks away with $100. One thing I need to mention: I’m serving as one of the competition’s judges, as are WRUV hip-hop DJ extraordinaire MELO GRANT and MICK JAGGER superfan DENNIS LEMOINE. Just sayin’: You know that dance move where you take a feather boa or scarf in both hands and rub it across your butt? That’s one of my all-time faves — though it’s probably more appropriate for an oldtimey burlesque show.

Dumpstaphunk

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

When March rolls around, I often think of KARL MARX’s famous statement, often paraphrased “Religion is the opiate of the masses.” That’s because two holidays with Christian origins — Mardi Gras and Saint Patrick’s Day — fall practically back-to-back, and both usually involve (require?) heavy drinking. The act of partying on these formerly holy days — not engaging in religious reflection — provides euphoric escape, yet the same distracting and cathartic effect to which Marx referred is achieved. Oh, the irony… With that in mind: Magic Hat Brewing’s annual Mardi Gras celebration unfolds in downtown Burlington this weekend, with much of the hullabaloo surrounding a big, fancy parade on Saturday, March 10. And, as per usual, the downtown club scene is jam-packed with concerts, dance parties and other wild wingdings sure to please music lovers and the I-can’tfeel-my-face crowd alike. Much of the action picks up after the parade ends, but eager revelers may also want to check out some dope happenings the night before — namely, REEL BIG FISH. I think it’s pretty wild that the popska legends are taking over the relatively small Club Metronome on Friday, March 9. Anyone who came of age in the ’90s can attest that the horn-heavy band was an inescapable part of the decade’s pop-culture landscape. And even if you weren’t a fan, you at least had a cousin who was. I’d be lying if I said I didn’t

have a special place in my heart for hits such as “Sell Out” and “She Has a Girlfriend Now.” Nectar’s and Club Metronome essentially operate as the grand Mardi Gras nexus. Preceding, following and coinciding with the parade, the clubs provide 12-plus hours of live music, culminating in wee-hours sets from local rock-fusion band SWIMMER and DJ LUKE THE KNIFE. Perhaps the most tantalizing act included in the marathon lineup is SHOTS FIRED, a new project from KARL DENSON’S TINY UNIVERSE guitarist DJ WILLIAMS. The sizzling rock supergroup features a cavalcade of folks who’ve played with acts such as SLIGHTLY STOOPID, LYRICS BORN, DAVE MATTHEWS BAND and PIMPS OF JOYTIME. Additionally, electronica jam band LOTUS take over Metronome directly after the raucous processional. The Philadelphia- and Denver-based group usually rocks the Higher Ground Ballroom when it plays in the area, so you’re getting a much more intimate performance by comparison. If you feel like fleeing the scene after the parade, head up the street to Radio Bean for a bonker-balls vinyl set from DJ LEE J — aka proprietor LEE ANDERSON. For late-night revels, Philly’s DJ PETE MOSS keeps the buzz going with insatiable disco and house beats at Half Lounge. And that’s barely scratching the surface. For a full list of official Magic Hat Mardi Gras offerings, visit magichat.net. And please, please, please: Be safe and respectful, and drink responsibly.

FRI 3.9

3/6/18 6:00 PM


music

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

WED.7

burlington

ARTSRIOT: Jonathan Richman with Tommy Larkins (rock, new wave), 9 p.m., $17/20. HALF LOUNGE: DJ Craig Mitchell (house), 10 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. JUNIPER: Ray Vega Latin Jazz Sextet, 8:30 p.m., free. LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Queen City Hot Club (gypsy jazz), 7 p.m., free.

Sharper Image On

HILLSBURN’s

first album, In the Battle Years, the Halifax, N. S., quintet presented

itself as a pop-folk outfit that leaned more provincial than cosmopolitan. But the arrival of the band’s 2018 sophomore effort, The Wilder Beyond, announced a fairly dramatic stylistic shift away from Americana. The new effort is full of chic, anthemic pop with strong electronic elements. Though the folksier sounds are still there, they’re adorned with synths and a slick, urban production aesthetic. To wit: You can take the band out of the country, but you can’t take the country out of the band. Check out Hillsburn on Thursday, March 8, at Zenbarn in Waterbury.

THU.8 // HILLSBURN [POP, FOLK]

chittenden county BACKSTAGE PUB & RESTAURANT: Karaoke with Jenny Red, 9 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: Ensemble V (jazz), 7 p.m., free. Charles Corley (folk, soul), 9 p.m., free. The Stash! Band (bluegrass), 9:30 p.m., $5. Coopertheband (indie rock), 10:30 p.m., free.

HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Dumpstaphunk, the Big Sip (funk, jazz), 8 p.m., $18/20. HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Roots of Creation, Seamus the Great (jam, reggae), 7:30 p.m., $15/18.

RED SQUARE: DJ KermiTT (eclectic), 7 p.m., free. DJ Cre8 (hip-hop), 11 p.m., free.

JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: The Starline Rhythm Boys (rockabilly), 7 p.m., free.

RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: Gypsy Reel (traditional Irish, folk), 7:30-10 p.m., free.

MONKEY HOUSE: Untapped: A Night of Burlesque and Drag, 9 p.m., $10.

SIDEBAR: Hotel Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 03.07.18-03.14.18 SEVEN DAYS

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. Open Mic Night, 9 p.m., free.

HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Brett Dennen, Dean Lewis (singer-songwriter), 8 p.m., $22/25.

champlain islands/northwest

barre/montpelier

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: John Lackard Blues Jam, 8 p.m., free. All Request Video, 9 p.m., free. SWEET MELISSA’S: D. Davis (acoustic), 5:30 p.m., donation. WHAMMY BAR: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

IDLETYME BREWING COMPANY: The Idletyme Band (blues, rock), 8 p.m., free. MOOGS PLACE: Abby Sherman (Americana), 8:30 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury

ZENBARN: Bob Wagner and D. Davis (roots, Americana), 8 p.m., free. 60 MUSIC

middlebury area

CITY SPORTS GRILLE: Trivia Night, 7:30 p.m., free.

STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Bluegrass Jam Session, 7:30 p.m., free.

RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: DJ Supersounds (hits), 10 p.m., free.

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Kurt Braunohler (standup), 7 & 9:30 p.m., $15-27.

NECTAR’S: Troy Millette (acoustic), 7 p.m., free. Miku Daza, Matt the Gnat and the Gators (ska, punk), 9 p.m., free/$5. 18+.

MONKEY HOUSE: Anemone, Common Holly (dream-pop), 8:30 p.m., $5/10. 18+.

RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ KermiTT (eclectic), 10 p.m., $5.

THE TAP ROOM AT SWITCHBACK BREWING: Mitch & Devon (rock), 6 p.m., free.

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Open Mic with Andy Lugo, 9 p.m., free.

chittenden county

RED SQUARE: Funky Dawgz Brass Band (funk, soul), 7 p.m., $5. DJ Craig Mitchell (open format), 11 p.m., $5.

SIDEBAR: Ryan Ober (folk), 7 p.m., free. CLU6TERF*CK (electronic), 9 p.m., free.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Irish Sessions (traditional), 7 p.m., free.

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Standup Open Mic, 7 p.m., free. March Madness (improv), 8:30 p.m., $5.

Fire (punk-jazz, fuzz-rock), 11:30 p.m., $5.

TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: A2VT (Video Release Party) (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. Nina’s Brew (blues, rock), 9:30 p.m., free. RADIO BEAN: Justin Sawyer (acoustic), 8:30 p.m., free. Scuba Party (psychedelic rock), 10 p.m., free. Fertile Soil (folk-rock, jam), 11:30 p.m., free. RED SQUARE: Strange Purple Jelly (jam), 7 p.m., free. D Jay Baron (mashup, hip-hop), 11 p.m., free.

PARKER PIE CO.: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ Cre8 (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

outside vermont

SEABA CENTER: Bay Faction, Father Figuer, Princess Nostalgia (indie), 7 p.m., $5.

MONOPOLE: Open Mic with Lucid, 10 p.m., free.

THU.8

burlington

ARTSRIOT: WRUV’s Exposure Fest featuring Calvin Coolidge, Full Walrus, Amaal, the Flat Five, Papas Porch (eclectic), 8 p.m., free. FINNIGAN’S PUB: DJ Craig Mitchell (open format), 10 p.m., free. FOAM BREWERS: Peter Krag (jazz), 7 p.m., free. HALF LOUNGE: SVPPLY (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: James Harvey Group (jazz), 8:30 p.m., $5-10. Aaron Lucci Quintet (jazz), 10:30 p.m., free.

SIDEBAR: Yo! BTV Raps (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): International Women’s Day Benefit featuring Helen Hummel, Reid SP and Stephanie Tonneson (singersongwriter), 7 p.m., donation. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Kurt Braunohler (standup), 7 p.m., $15-27. The Daily Grind: Megan O’Brien (improv), 9 p.m., $5.

chittenden county

BACKSTAGE PUB & RESTAURANT: Trivia, 9:30 p.m., free. MONKEY HOUSE: Selector Sets with App Gap Staff (vinyl DJs), 5 p.m., free. Ghastly Sound, Witchkiss, Undercliff, Sachem (metal), 9 p.m., $3/8. 18+.

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Mono Malo (rock), 7 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Open Mic with Allen Church, 8:30 p.m., free. SUSHI YOSHI (STOWE): Brooklyn Circle (jazz), 4:30 p.m., free. THE VILLAGE TAVERN: Cooie Sings (Americana), 7 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury

BLACKBACK PUB: John Lackard Blues, 7 p.m., free. LOCALFOLK SMOKEHOUSE: Open Mic with Alex Budney, 8:30 p.m., free. ZENBARN: Hillsburn (pop, folk), 8 p.m., $12/$15.

middlebury area

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: James Towle (rock), 8:30 p.m., free. TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: DJ Da.Root (hits), 10 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom HIGHLAND LODGE: Trivia Night, 6:30 p.m., free. PARKER PIE CO.: Can-Am Jazz Band, 7:30 p.m., free.

outside vermont

OLIVE RIDLEY’S: Karaoke with DJ Jon Berry & DJ Coco, 9 p.m., free.

FRI.9

burlington

ARTSRIOT: Dynamo & Bob Lanzetti (Snarky Puppy), smalltalker (jazz, funk), 8:30 p.m., $12/15. BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD: Peter Krag (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free. CLUB METRONOME: Reel Big Fish, Suburban Samurai (ska, punk), 9 p.m., $20. FOAM BREWERS: The High Breaks (surf), 8 p.m., free. HALF LOUNGE: Reid (folk), 8 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. JUNIPER: Brett Hughes (country), 9 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: NoMad Stories (tribal, jazz), 7 p.m., free. CAB (reggae, funk), 9 p.m., free. DJ Taka (eclectic vinyl), 11 p.m., $5. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Dakota (hip-hop, house), 10 p.m., free. MUDDY WATERS: Emily Yacina, Yohuna, Amelia Devoid, Ebn Ezra (indie), 8:30 p.m., $10. NECTAR’S: Seth Yacovone (solo acoustic blues), 7 p.m., free. The Grift with Horns, Balkun Brothers (rock), 9 p.m., $5. RADIO BEAN: Friday Morning Sing-Along with Linda Bassick & Friends (kids’ music), 11 a.m., free. O’hAnleigh (Celtic), 7 p.m., free. Remember Baker (bluegrass, old-time), 8:30 p.m., free. The Mountain Carol (electro-pop), 10 p.m., $5. Joy on

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Graziano, Slim and Schofield (rock), 5 p.m., free. incaHOOTS (rock), 9 p.m., free. STONE CORRAL BREWERY: AmeriKanaBlue (folk), 7:30 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Songs of Sustenance featuring Colin McCaffrey, Lizzy Mandell, Blue Fox, Ron Sweet (eclectic), 6 p.m., donation. CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Julia Kate Davis (indie folk), 6 p.m., free. Abby Jenne & Her Dark Advisors, Liz Beatty & the Alternates (rock), 9 p.m., free. GUSTO’S: Supernatural (rock covers), 9 p.m., $5. POSITIVE PIE (MONTPELIER): Emperors Dance Band featuring members of Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars (world, Baskeda), 10 p.m., $10. SWEET MELISSA’S: Honky Tonk Happy Hour with Mark LeGrand, 5:30 p.m., donation.

stowe/smuggs

EL TORO: Allen Church Project (bluegrass, Celtic), 7 p.m., free. MOOGS PLACE: Chris Lyon (solo acoustic), 6 p.m., free. Red Hot Juba (swing, Americana), 9 p.m., free. TRES AMIGOS & RUSTY NAIL STAGE: CopOuts, Mr. Doubtfire (punk, Celtic), 8:30 p.m., $5/8.

FRI.9

» P.62


COURTESY OF ALEXANDER THOMPSON

GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

DJ Jonathan Toubin

Ski & Ride for

HALF-PRICE

with The Point! OUR 27TH SEASON CONTINUES FRIDAY 3/9 AT BOLTON VALLEY AND 3/16 AT SUGARBUSH

S

s e t i b D N U C O N T IN U E

GE 59 D FR O M P A

BiteTorrent

THEN HANG FOR THE APRES SKI & RIDE PARTY WITH LOTS OF PRIZES!

Get all the info at pointfm.com

Listening In If I were a superhero, my superpower would be the ability to get songs stuck in other people’s heads. Here are five songs that have been stuck in my head this week. May they also get stuck in yours. Follow sevendaysvt on Spotify for weekly playlists with tunes by artists featured in the music section. THE VOIDZ, “All Wordz Are Made Up� THE BRINKS, “Limit of the Deadline� M.I.L.K., “Slow Emotions� GOAPELE, “Play�

104.7 & 93.3 BURLINGTON

BOBBYSOCKS, “Cross Over the Bridge’�

93.7 MIDDLEBURY 104.7 & 100.3 MONTPELIER 95.7 THE NORTHEAST KINGDOM

thrashing fury, head over to Club Metronome on Monday, March 12.

103.1 & 107.7 THE UPPER VALLEY

SEVEN DAYS

made possible by EW eN Th

CHEVY - BUICK *

We Make Mak Ma ak ke Deals ke De eals the the Other O Oth th her Guys her Guy ys WonÂ’t! WonÂ’ Won W We onÂ’t Â’t! Â’t!

   #!#       #!#    ¡ New and Used Cars and T Trucks rucks ¡ ¡ Parts and Service ¡ Full Collision Center ¡

Different on Purpose since 1977 .... The Point!     #  

FIND NEW ROADS RO OADS

2V-ThePoint030718.indd 1

Corner & 100, 100,Morrisville Morrisville Cornerof ofRoutes Routes 15 15 &

online at www.mcmahonchevrolet.com """! or

3/5/18 12:34 PM

MUSIC 61

WRUV 90.1 FM, the University of Vermont’s student-run radio station, hosts the March Radness Local Music Showcase on Thursday, March 8, at ArtsRiot in Burlington. Composed exclusively of UVM-bred bands, the eclectic roster includes bluegrass group PAPAS PORCH, jazz cats the FLAT FIVE, alt-pop group CALVIN COOLIDGE, singersongwriter AMAAL and indie outfit FULL WALRUS. 

03.07.18-03.14.18

On January 27, I previewed improvisational metal band ZENTAURI’s live score for the Cinema Casualties screening of JOHN CARPENTER’s The Thing. In a phone interview, Zentauri’s MATT HAGEN mentioned another film his band soon planned to soundtrack: Disney’s breakout nature documentary March of the Penguins. Yes, you read that right. I mean, think about it. Is there anything more metal than all of those papa penguins struggling to cross the frozen wasteland while carrying their unborn children? No. That’s the most metal thing there is. If you want to see the hardscrabble life of Antarctica’s most adorable inhabitants paired with Zentauri’s

HALF-PRICE LIFT TICKETS WITH YOUR BUTTON AND COUPON BOOK

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Big congrats to JULIA CAESAR and the MOUNTAIN CAROL for reaching their Kickstarter goals! Both bands recently achieved their all-or-nothing, crowdfunded campaigns to finance their upcoming releases: an EP called Heavy Flow and a currently untitled full-length, respectively. Currently, neither band has announced a release date for these recordings. But with their financing secured, I imagine we’ll be grooving to their sweet jams sooner rather than later.

GET


music FRI.9

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

« P.60

mad river valley/ waterbury

ZENBARN: Swale (indie rock), 9 p.m., $5.

middlebury area

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Toast (rock), 9:30 p.m., free.

rutland/killington FIRESIDE CAFÉ: Hailey Boyle (standup), 8 p.m., free.

PICKLE BARREL NIGHTCLUB: Hot Date (covers), 8 p.m., $10-20.

champlain islands/northwest TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: Shane Murley Band (folk), 7 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom HIGHLAND LODGE: Not Quite Dead (Grateful Dead tribute), 6:30 p.m., free.

HIGHLAND LODGE RESTAURANT: Carol Hausner, Jonathan Kaplan and Donovan Delabruere (roots), 6:30 p.m., free.

outside vermont

MONOPOLE: Night Protocol (synth-wave, ’80s covers), 10 p.m., free. MONOPOLE DOWNSTAIRS: Happy Hour Tunes & Trivia with Gary Peacock, 5 p.m., free. OLIVE RIDLEY’S: Jamie Lee Thurston, Taylor LaValley (country), 7 p.m., $15/20.

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Dave Richardson (Album Release) (folk), 8:30 p.m., $10.

SAT.10

burlington

ARTSRIOT: Titus Andronicus with Rick Maguire (from Pile) (punk, indie rock), 8:30 p.m., $15. BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD: Anthony Santor (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free. CLUB METRONOME: Lotus (jam, electronic), 5 p.m., $25. Luke the Knife (Lotus After-party) (funk, disco), 9 p.m., $10. Retronome

With DJ Fattie B (’80s dance party), 11 p.m., free/$5. FOAM BREWERS: The New Review (soul, pop), 4 p.m., $5. Pat Finn & the Bad Table (funk, electronic), 8 p.m., free.

SEVEN DAYS

TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: Stefani Capizzi (folk), 7 p.m., free.

upper valley

HALF LOUNGE: Fun House (house), 3 p.m., free. Half Lounge Cabaret (drag), 8 p.m., free. Pete Moss (house), 10 p.m., free.

THE ENGINE ROOM: The Conniption Fits (hits), 8 p.m., free.

JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom

JUNIPER: Zack DuPont and Matt Deluca (folk), 9 p.m., free.

PARKER PIE CO.: Open Mic, second Saturday of every month, 8 p.m., free.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Daniel Miller (Americana), 7:30 p.m., free. Eric George (country, folk), 9 p.m., free. DJ Taka (eclectic vinyl), 11 p.m., $5.

outside vermont

MONOPOLE: Plattsburgh Metal Conglomerate, 10 p.m., free.

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: People’s Blues of Richmond (psych-rock), 10 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Mardi Gras 2018 featuring Swimmer, DJ Williams’ Shots Fired, Nate Reit and Friends play Trombone Shorty, the Renegade Groove, High and Mighty Brass Band, the Fritz, the Wormdogs (eclectic), 11 a.m., free/$7. RADIO BEAN: Parade AfterParty with DJ Lee J (eclectic), 4 p.m., free. Steph Pappas Experience (country, rock), 7 p.m., free. Oobleck (Afro-funk), 9 p.m., free. RED SQUARE: Mango Jam (zydeco), 10 a.m., free. Mashtodon (hip-hop), 2 p.m., free. Josh Panda & the Hot Damned (rock, soul), 7 p.m., $5. Luis Calderin (open format), 10 p.m., $5. RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ Frank Grymes (EDM), noon, free. SVPPLY (hip-hop), 2 p.m., free. DJ KermiTT (eclectic), 4 p.m., free. DJ Reign One (EDM), 6 p.m., free. DJ Craig Mitchell (open format), 8 p.m., $5. DJ Atak (hip-hop), 11 p.m., $5. RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: DJ Dodg3r (EDM, hits), 10 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: SVPPLY (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Big Night (cajun, Western swing), 3 p.m., free. SMITTY’S PUB: Slim & Nobby (rock), 8 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Kurt Braunohler (standup), 7 & 9:30 p.m., $15-27.

Totally Stoked « P.58

62 MUSIC

champlain islands/northwest

SAT.10 // SLUT MAGIC [ROCK]

Fox says he’s working on it. He expects another 30 spots to open up in the coming months as improvements are made to the rail yard. The father of three is a true family man. You can tell how much he cares about his community when you see him in his element. After showing off his new business, he heads back to his restaurant across the parking lot. Fox buoyantly flits about the dining room, checking in with staff, friends

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Fu’Chunk (funk, soul), 8:30 p.m., free.

Occult Following Brooklyn’s

SLUT MAGIC pack a lot of charm into their

gothic, post-punk songs. Literary, historical, political, scientific and cultural references abound in the quartet’s witches’ brew. They pay tribute to H.P. Lovecraft throughout their work, not only in a song titled with his surname, but also with the tension and dread for which the horror author was known. But it’s not all doom and gloom. “Feel the Bern” is a surprisingly heartfelt and whimsical recap of the life and times of Sen. Bernie Sanders. Slut Magic support locals

TIN TALISMAN

on Saturday, March 10, at Charlie-O’s

World Famous in Montpelier.

chittenden county

HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Trevor Hall: A Night in the Village (SOLD OUT) (roots, folk), 8 p.m., $23/25. JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: The Brevity Thing (rock, folk), 7 p.m., free. MONKEY HOUSE: Soul Clap and Dance-Off with DJ Jonathan Toubin (soul), 9 p.m., $7.

barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Irish Session, 2 p.m., donation. Hillary and Andy Leicher (rock covers), 6 p.m., free. CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Tin Talisman, Slut Magic (rock), 9 p.m., free. ESPRESSO BUENO: Jazzyaoke (live jazz karaoke), 7:30 p.m., $5.

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Mitch & Devon (rock), 5 p.m., free.

GUSTO’S: DJ Amanda Rock (hits), 9 p.m., $3.

STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Southtown Bluegrass, 7:30 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: Von Hauer (disco, house), 9 p.m., free.

EL TORO: Cooie Sings (Americana), 7 p.m., free. MOOGS PLACE: Gold Tooth Gator (blues), 9 p.m., free. TRES AMIGOS & RUSTY NAIL STAGE: Jamie Lee Thurston (country), 8:30 p.m., $15/20.

and regulars as well as ribbing a newcomer attempting the Big Fatty’s Challenge. That’s a feat of consumption in which a diner must ingest — and, presumably, hold down — four pounds of food in 60 minutes or less. The prize is a T-shirt. “It’s a place where everybody knows your name,” says Fox, likening the convivial vibe to the bar from NBC’s long-running sitcom “Cheers.” He’s excited for the Engine Room to finally get into the swing of things, but not as excited as his almost-4-year-old daughter,

mad river valley/ waterbury

CORK WINE BAR & MARKET (WATERBURY): Django Soulo (singer-songwriter), 6 p.m., free. ZENBARN: The Mountain Says No, Sad Turtle (rock), 10 p.m., $5.

middlebury area

SUN.11

burlington

HALF LOUNGE: Sunday Scene (bass music), 10 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Game Night, 8 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Mi Yard Reggae Night with DJs Big Dog and Jahson, 9:30 p.m., free/$3. RADIO BEAN: Maple Street Six (jazz), 1 p.m., free. Old Sky and Friends (Americana), 6 p.m., free. Christopher Gregory (Americana), 8:30 p.m., free. Natural Velvet (post-punk), 10:30 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: SideBar Sundays (eclectic), 9 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: March Madness (improv), 7 p.m., $5.

chittenden county

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: DJ Earl (open format), 9:30 p.m., free.

HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Nightmares on Wax, DJ Ryan Kick (trip-hop), 8:30 p.m., $20/23.

ROUGH CUT: O’hAnleigh (Celtic), 7 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

rutland/killington

PICKLE BARREL NIGHTCLUB: Hot Date (covers), 8 p.m., $10-20. RICK & KAT’S HOWLIN’ MOUSE: Vivisepulture, Ice Giant (metal), 8 p.m., $5.

Evelyn. Fox is hosting her upcoming birthday party there. “She said, ‘Daddy, we doing my party at the Engine Room?’” he recalls. “I said, ‘Yeah. What do you know about the Engine Room?’ She’s like, ‘Mommy told me. It’s gonna be great.’” m Contact: jordan@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Visit facebook.com/engineroomvt for the latest updates.

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Southern Old Time Music Jam (traditional), 10 a.m., free. SWEET MELISSA’S: Live Band Karaoke, 8 p.m., donation.

SUN.11

» P.64

WE’RE TRYING TO BE THAT MIDDLE PLACE FROM

BURLINGTON TO BOSTON. BRANDON FOX


COMEDY

GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

REVIEW this Dwight & Nicole, Electric Lights

(SELF-RELEASED, CD, DIGITAL DOWNLOAD)

In case you don’t know the backstory behind bluesy rock band Dwight & Nicole, here’s a quick primer: In the early 2000s, guitarist Dwight Ritcher and bassist Nicole Nelson met and fell in love as working musicians in Boston. After bouncing around for a bit, the couple landed in Burlington in the early 2010s, despite success and attention in larger markets — including accolades from the Boston and New England Music Awards and Nelson’s breakout performance on the third season of NBC’s “The Voice.” Now, the project might as well be called Dwight & Nicole & Ezra. Drummer Ezra Oklan, known for his work in Kat Wright’s band, is solidly a member of the group. And like soul sister Wright’s 2016 album By My Side, Dwight & Nicole’s new EP, Electric Lights, combines enough analog

Northern Flyer, Northern Flyer (SHANDOR MUSIC, CD, DIGITAL DOWNLOAD)

A WEEK

runs around the turns. But solos belong to Mark Struhsacker’s lithe guitar and Sacher’s tumbling mandolin. It’s a classic group effort, tied together by airtight harmonies behind Sacher’s grinning lead and rock-solid work from bassist Kirk Lord. Sacher and Struhsacker split songwriting duties among the EP’s four original cuts — a fifth song, “May I Borrow Some Sugar From You,” is a plucky cover of the Chips Moman and Bobby Emmons tune popularized by Waylon Jennings. The two have complementary styles. Sacher writes and sings with a lighter, winsome touch befitting his easy tenor. Closer “Vermont Winters,” for instance, is a lilting, comic ode to the hardships of the cold season: “If you promise to end this cold snap, Lord, I promise to dress in layers.” Struhsacker, on the other hand, favors a darker tack that resonates in his warm, full baritone. Both “Forgive and Forget” and “The Punishment Don’t Fit the Crime” are classic heartbreak songs rooted in classic twangy tropes — cheatin’, stealin’ and drinkin’ — that still feel urgent. Some themes are just timeless, much like the sound Northern Flyer forge on their exceptional debut. Northern Flyer is available at CDBaby.

GET YOUR MUSIC REVIEWED:

THU 8 | FRI 9 | SAT 10

KURT

BRAUNOHLER NEXT WEEK THU 15 | FRI 16 | SAT 17

BEN

BAILEY REGISTER NOW: 2-DAY SKETCH WORKSHOP

W/ KEVIN McDONALD (KIDS IN THE HALL) APRIL 28 & 29

ORDER YOUR TICKETS TODAY! (802) 859-0100 | WWW.VTCOMEDY.COM 101 main street, BurlingtoN

JORDAN ADAMS

THIS WEEK AT

Untitled-9 1

DAN BOLLES

ARE YOU A VT ARTIST OR BAND? SEND US YOUR MUSIC! DIGITAL: MUSIC@SEVENDAYSVT.COM; SNAIL MAIL: MUSIC C/O SEVEN DAYS 255 S. CHAMPLAIN ST., SUITE 5, BURLINGTON, VT 05401

3/5/18 10:46 AM

#DESTROYAPATHY FRIDAY, 3.9

DYNAMO & BOB LANZETTI OF SNARKY PUPPY WITH SMALLTALKER

SATURDAY, 3.10

TITUS ANDRONICUS WITH RICK MAGUIRE OF PILE

3.8 ROCKETSHOP LIVE WITH CRICKET BLUE & FRANCESCA BLANCHARD

3.14 WRUV’S MARCH RADNESS LOCAL MUSIC SHOWCASE FEATURING CALVIN COOLIDGE, FULL WALRUS, AMAAL, FLAT FIVE, AND PAPA’S PORCH

f 400 PINE ST, BURLINGTON, VT c 802.540.0406 • ARTSRIOT.COM

8v-artsriot030718.indd 1

MUSIC 63

The new Burlington-based quartet features four of the state’s most experienced and well-regarded bluegrass players, all of whom have performed together in various combinations over the past 30 years. We’ll skip the family tree, but the band’s collective bona fides include local grass greats Breakaway, the Modern Grass Quintet and the Lonesome Mountain Boys, to name a few. Put another way, you could play Six Degrees of Bob Degree and connect the noted Bluegrass Storm founder to each Northern Flyer rather quickly. Northern Flyer are indeed a star-studded collection of musicians. But that’s not what makes their debut EP special. Rather, it’s the manner in which each member sublimates his ego to the larger whole. These are veteran players who place a premium on taste, tact and making savvy musical choices in service of their winning original material. In so doing, the Flyers build a foundation on which each member is able to star. Take the Andy Sacher-penned opener, “Northern Flyer,” for example. Andy Greene’s banjo is the featured melodic instrument, cascading through rippling

MUSIC REVIEWS

THIS WEEK

SEVEN DAYS

midway point, Ritcher delivers an unhinged blues guitar solo, revving up the intensity on the otherwise even-keeled song. Under gobs of reverb, gut-punch kick drum opens the dirge-like song “Wait.” Layers of phased synth bass and snarling electric bass provide a sturdy foundation for Nelson’s soulful belting. Like a scene from a tent revival, you can almost see glorious, late-afternoon sunlight limning the neck of her axe as the track erupts into a crushing showstopper. Country-tinged love songs “Feel the Same” and “Hearts” round out the EP. The former feels wistful, like watching the countryside stream past you through the window of a moving vehicle while your mind wanders to a long-lost lover. The latter is an uncomplicated, thigh-slapping ode to the ooey-gooiest of romantic feelings. Under the supervision of Grammynominated producer Joel Hamilton, Dwight & Nicole triumph in their first new material since 2014. As always, romance takes center stage. And particularly in these troubled times, love is an especially welcome message. Electric Lights is available on iTunes.

03.07.18-03.14.18

nostalgia with modern pop sensibilities (and commercial appeal) that it’s bound to attract a fairly diverse audience, including some newcomers. Though only a brief 18 minutes long, the five-song collection is sharp AF with no filler — only hits. In a near fake-out, the titular opening track starts up with rave-ready sliced synth. Are we headed to the club? But seconds later, Ritcher’s jangly guitar grounds the cut in familiar, rootsy territory. A stomping beat enters, cutting the time in half and providing Nelson a loose groove on which to lay her breathy, ghostly vocals. “If you can hear me now / Just lean in close to me / When all the lights go out / There’s still so much to see,” she sings. Acceptance, tenderness and optimism are ongoing themes throughout. “Hi Lo” oozes with retro charm. Instantly evoking Norman Greenbaum’s gospel-rock hit “Spirit in the Sky” with a gravelly guitar, Ritcher takes lead vocals atop hip-shaking tambourine. Nelson harmonizes on the chorus as the couple sings about rolling with the punches. At the

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Bluegrass bands in Vermont pass around members about as often as square dancers swap partners. Notable exceptions exist — Banjo Dan mostly led the same Mid-nite Plowboys for some 40 years, for example. Still, the small but robust community of acoustic pickers throughout the Green Mountains tends to do-si-do through various configurations, combos and bands. That’s not a bad thing. For starters, revolving roster overlap means that practically every new grass band is essentially a local supergroup, since lineups often feature several of the state’s ace players. More critically, the constant mixing and matching fosters a familiarity among players that is often lacking in all-star bands. While blazing chops are nice, comfort with fellow pickers is key to musicality, to balancing substance against all that flash. For proof, look no further than Northern Flyer and the quartet’s late 2017 self-titled debut EP.

5 NIGHTS

3/1/18 11:14 AM


music SUN.11

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

« P.62

middlebury area ROUGH CUT: Kelly Ravin (country), 5 p.m., free.

MON.12 burlington

CLUB METRONOME: Metal Monday featuring Zentauri: ‘March of the Penguins’ (live film score), 9 p.m., $3/5. 18+. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Lamp Shop Lit Club (open reading), 8 p.m., free. Joey Agresta (Last Live Show) (indie), 10 p.m., $5-10. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Karaoke, 9:30 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Strangecreek 2018 Battle of the Bands: Hilltop, the Giant Peach, Doctor Rick (rock), 9 p.m., free/$5. 18+.

SIDEBAR: Hotel Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

Record High In the late ’80s and early ’90s,

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Standup Open Mic, 7 p.m., free. March Madness (improv), 8:30 p.m., $5.

breakthrough electronica/downtempo acts such as Massive Attack, Tricky, Portishead and ON WAX

chittenden county

NIGHTMARES

were part of the chilled-out, genre-splicing

CITY SPORTS GRILLE: Trivia Night, 7:30 p.m., free.

golden age of UK trip-hop. Over the years, the latter’s albums, including 2018’s Shape the Future. Whether

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Dustbowl Revival, Twisted Pine (Americana, funk), 7:30 p.m., $12/14.

performing a solo DJ set or with a full band, the

JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: Bluegrass Session, 7 p.m., free.

artist’s nebulous sound has remained consistently

STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Open Mic Night, 7 p.m., free.

founder, George Evelyn, has released eight studio

heady with cinematic samples, noteworthy guest

barre/montpelier

vocalists and influences from nearly every popular genre. Catch Nightmares on Wax on Sunday, March 11, at the

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: All Request Video, 9 p.m., free.

Higher Ground Ballroom in South Burlington. Local DJ RYAN

SWEET MELISSA’S: D. Davis (acoustic), 5:30 p.m., donation.

KICK opens.

WHAMMY BAR: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: Art Herttua and Ray Caroll (jazz), 6:30 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free. Family Night (open jam), 9 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Comedy & Crêpes (standup), 8 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Trivia: Sex on the Second, 9 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Seth Yacovone (blues), 7 p.m., free.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Pullin’ Yo Chain Comedy Showcase, 7:30 p.m., free. Danza Del Fuego (gypsy-infused world music), 9:30 p.m., free. LINCOLNS: Laugh Shack (standup), 8:30 p.m., $5. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: AliT (singer-songwriter), 9:30 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Django Soulo (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free. Dead Set (Grateful Dead tribute), 9:30 p.m., $5. 18+.

burlington

ARTSRIOT: The Moth: Tests (storytelling), 7:30 p.m., $10.

RADIO BEAN: Stephen Callahan Trio (jazz), 6:30 p.m., free. Honky Tonk Tuesday with Ponyhustle, 10 p.m., $5.

FOAM BREWERS: Local Dork (eclectic vinyl), 6 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE: DJ A-RA$ (open format), 8 p.m., free.

THE GRYPHON: P’tit Trio (jazz), 8 p.m., free.

SIDEBAR: Sean Kehoe (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free. Ron Stoppable (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

HALF LOUNGE: DJ Taka (eclectic), 10 p.m., free. LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: George Petit Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free.

chittenden county MONKEY HOUSE: The Full Cleveland (yacht rock), 9 p.m., free.

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Trivia with Top Hat Entertainment, 7 p.m., free. WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Karaoke with DJ Vociferous, 9:30 p.m., free. SWEET MELISSA’S: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Christine Malcolm (folk), 7:30 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury ZENBARN: Jazz Jam, 6 p.m., free.

IDLETYME BREWING COMPANY: The Idletyme Band (blues, rock), 8 p.m., free.

middlebury area

HATCH 31: Erin Cassels-Brown (indie folk), 6 p.m., free. Kelly Ravin and Lowell Thompson (country), 7 p.m., free. TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: Karaoke with DJ Chauncey, 9 p.m., free.

outside vermont

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

WED.14 burlington

ARTSRIOT: Rocket Shop Live with Cricket Blue and Francesca Blanchard (indie folk), 7:30 p.m., free. HALF LOUNGE: AQUG (bass music), 10 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

JUNIPER: Ray Vega Latin Jazz Sextet, 8:30 p.m., free. LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Cody Sargent Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Irish Sessions (traditional), 7 p.m., free. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Open Mic with Andy Lugo, 9 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Troy Millette (acoustic), 7 p.m., free. JUPTR, Dr. Sammy Love (neo-soul), 9 p.m., $5/10. 18+.

MOOGS PLACE: Abby Sherman (Americana), 8:30 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury

ZENBARN: Bob Wagner and D. Davis (roots, Americana), 8 p.m., free.

middlebury area CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. Open Mic Night, 9 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: Sofia Donavan (pop, R&B), 9 p.m., free. The Stash! Band (bluegrass), 9:30 p.m., $5. Staygold & the Ponyboys (alt-country, pop), 10:30 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom

RED SQUARE: DJ KermiTT (eclectic), 7 p.m., free. DJ Cre8 (hip-hop), 11 p.m., free.

MONOPOLE: Open Mic with Lucid, 10 p.m., free. 

PARKER PIE CO.: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

outside vermont

RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: Gypsy Reel (traditional Irish, folk), 7:30-10 p.m., free.

64 MUSIC

SEVEN DAYS

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

TUE.13

stowe/smuggs

SUN.11 // NIGHTMARES ON WAX [TRIP-HOP]

Untitled-32 1

3/6/18 10:19 AM


WIN $600 IN WINGS! Presented by

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Sample FREE Wings during any of the next BUZZ 99 Minute Wing Stops:

03.07.18-03.14.18

March 9th 6-7:39pm

March 13th 5:30-7:09pm

March 14th 5:30-7:09pm

March 15th 6-7:39pm

Untitled-6 1

2/28/18 3:49 PM

65

999THEBUZZ.COM

SEVEN DAYS

Then vote for your favorite & qualify to win $600 in wings at:


TALKINGart

A VISUAL CONVERSATION

art

Taking the Lead

The new Vermont Arts Council head talks about art access, digital technologies and why she loves Vermont B Y S A D I E W I LLI A M S

03.07.18-03.14.18 SEVEN DAYS 66 ART

SEVEN DAYS: What prompted your transition to this job? KAREN MITTELMAN: I wasn’t on the job market when I found this job. I had spent 19 years in the [NEH], and I figured I was going to stay another year; after 20 years I would look for another gig. But I knew that when I left the NEH, I wanted to leave the federal, national level and go back to either the local or regional level. I feel like that’s where you can make a much more profound difference, especially when it comes to arts and humanities. And I knew I always wanted to end up in Vermont. SD: Why Vermont? KM: I’ve been skiing in Vermont since I was 5 or 6 years old. I would come here for writing retreats in the summer. I just love it. I had a moment when I was

JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

L

ast summer, the Vermont Arts Council announced that Karen Mittelman would replace Alex Aldrich as executive director. Most recently the director of the Division of Public Programs at the National Endowment for the Humanities, Mittelman brings to her new job nearly three decades of experience at federal institutions and other cultural posts. The New York native has lived in the Washington, D.C., area most of her life. But, in October of last year, the 59-year-old traded the nation’s capital for Vermont’s. Besides adjusting to a less urban milieu, she’s dealing with the weather. In an interview at her Montpelier office last week, Mittelman related that she had a bit of a scare recently: She found herself without GPS while driving home from Newport in a snowstorm. “It’s been a long time since I’ve been that disoriented,” she admitted. The incident spurred Mittelman to buy a blanket and emergency safety kit for her car, because she wasn’t about to hole up indoors. Getting oriented has been integral to her first few months at the VAC. Since she arrived, Mittelman has been traveling around, getting to know the state and its artists. Seven Days met with the new director to get to know her, and her vision for the arts council’s future. Karen Mittelman

11 or 12 on top of a mountain with my dad; I was looking at the mountains and remember saying to him, “I’m going to live in Vermont someday.” Once I got to my late fifties, I was like, It’s not going to happen, because no jobs had opened up, and it’s late in life to make a big change. So I thought, I’ll just vacation there. Until my friend sent me this announcement [about the VAC job]. Once I came, I was complete lured in by the incredible things the arts council does, and by the fact that they wanted the new director to come in and help the staff reenvision the organization. That’s

what I love to do. I think that’s one of my strengths. SD: So they wanted to look at the way things are operating and make changes? KM: After 19 to 20 years with one director, I think the board knew you’re going to bring someone new in, and it’s time to take stock of where the organization is and where it might go in the future. I hope my staff at NEH is doing that. That’s what you should do when leadership changes: Look at it with new eyes and say, “OK, where do we want to go?”

SD: And where do you want to go? KM: We’re in the midst of mapping out two new program priorities. One of them is about access to arts and cultural experiences. It’s at the heart of the strategic plan I inherited, that everyone in Vermont [should] have access to arts and creativity in their life, education and community. Which is kind of a tall order, so we’re trying to figure out what that really does mean. When I think of access and equity and inclusion in Vermont, it means a lot of different things. Who stands in the doorway of a museum or theater company or pottery studio and doesn’t go in because they think, That place is just not for me? What are the barriers? I can’t tell you what we’ll be doing six months from now, but the staff and the board have made an absolute commitment that access, equity and inclusion are a priority. The second priority is creative place making. There was for many years a grant called Animating Infrastructure, and we’re going to revive that and expand it. Creative place making is about connecting people in meaningful ways to the places they live and work through art. SD: How involved are you in the grant process? KM: We have a peer-review process, and we send everything to outside review panels. They make their recommendations, and the board and the staff ratify those. We trust the external review. I think it’s a good thing. I think the integrity of that process is what makes people trust that, when the arts council makes a grant, experts in the field have reviewed it, the review was thoughtful, [and] it’s fair. SD: Sometimes individual artists have felt left out by that process, though. KM: I know. One of the struggles is that we don’t have enough money to go around. I think we made 11 creation grants to individual artists [last year], and there are so many more artists that deserve funding from the arts council. So, one of my missions is to bring in


ART SHOWS

some private funding to expand the number of grants we can make.

NEW THIS WEEK

SD: At a panel discussion hosted by Champlain College’s master’s program for emergent media, you discussed your work with digital technologies at the NEH. Will you incorporate that into your mission here? KM: At the NEH, I launched the first digital public humanities grant program … We were focused on digital experiences that would benefit members of the public — digital tours, virtual field trips, digital audio tours. We funded some amazing games, like the Walden game that’s going to be distributed in classrooms across America pretty soon. I would love to see the arts council embrace digital arts as a part of our portfolio. This is a really interesting moment, because [Vermont Humanities Council director] Peter Gilbert has announced that he’s stepping down. Depending on who the new leadership is over there, I would hope to collaborate with them and see what the two councils can do together to encourage digital media.

f CLAY MOHRMAN: A collection of lighting pieces made from Vermont wood found in the woods and shores surrounding Lake Champlain. Reception: Thursday, March 8, 6-9 p.m. March 8-April 6. Info, 516-263-7335. Karma Bird House Gallery in Burlington.

barre/montpelier

f ‘ARTISTS TO WATCH, PART I’:

The Vermont Arts Council, Ric Kasini Kadour and six guest curators showcase Vermont artists on the verge. Reception: Friday, March 9, 5-7 p.m. March 9-April 29. Info, 828-3291. Spotlight Gallery in Montpelier.

f JANE ENGLISH: A retrospective featuring photographs and books, including images from a best-selling translation of the Tao Te Ching. Reception: Friday, March 9, 6 p.m.; reading, 7 p.m. March 9-31. Info, 426-3581. Jaquith Public Library in Marshfield.

The M A D N E S S of M A R C H

giveaway

Every day in March, we’re giving away prizes, tickets, gift cards and more to these local businesses!

KUMARI PATRICIA: Self-reflective, narrative acrylic paintings. March 10-May 31. Info, 595-4866. The Hive in Middlesex.

stowe/smuggs

f GALEN CHENEY: “Look Up,” new abstract mixed-media works by the Massachusetts artist. Reception: March 23, 5:30-7 p.m. March 10-May 4. Info, 760-6785. Edgewater Gallery in Stowe. f JOHN MILLER: “Dialogue With Resonance: Recent Collages From Italy,” a series of photo collages using grids and images made during the artist’s residencies at the American Academy in Rome. Reception: Thursday, March 15, 3-5 p.m. March 12-April 6. Info, 635-1469. Julian Scott Memorial Gallery, Northern Vermont University, in Johnson.

rutland/killington

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

f ‘FROM FARM AND FIELD’: Sculpture by Joe Lupiani and paintings by Hannah Sessions. Reception: Friday, March 23, 6 p.m. March 10-April 21. Info, oliver. schemm@castleton.edu. Castleton University Bank Gallery in Rutland.

northeast kingdom

f ALICE KITCHEL: “Four Seasons,” paintings by the Danville artist. Reception: Saturday, March 10, 5-7 p.m. March 9-April 20. Info, 7482600. Catamount Arts Center in St. Johnsbury.

Contact: sadie@sevendaysvt.com

ART EVENTS

Tune in to hear the daily unique code!

03.07.18-03.14.18

SD: In terms of past projects, do any make you think, This is what the arts council needs to be doing? KM: I hate to single out [one project]. I think that some of the community arts centers that are doing work with at-risk kids … this is a place where art can transform the life of an individual. Art can always be transformative, but when you’re talking about a kid that’s at risk, on the edge of being lost to drugs or violence or God knows what, and you see that art really changes that person’s life — every time I see that happening, I think, This is why I’m here. This is why I’m in the arts. m

burlington

» P.68

SEVEN DAYS

INFO Learn more at vermontartscouncil.org.

VISUAL ART IN SEVEN DAYS:

ART LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY RACHEL ELIZABETH JONES. LISTINGS ARE RESTRICTED TO ART SHOWS IN TRULY PUBLIC PLACES.

IF YOU’RE PROMOTING AN ART EXHIBIT, LET US KNOW BY POSTING INFO AND IMAGES BY THURSDAYS AT NOON ON OUR FORM AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT OR GALLERIES@SEVENDAYSVT.COM.

2v-greateasternradio030718.indd 1

Winners are announced on the KISS FM Facebook Page 3/5/18 1:03 PM

ART 67

GET YOUR ART SHOW LISTED HERE!

Text 844-4KISS-FM and win prizes all month long


art NEW THIS WEEK

« P.67

DUSTY BOYNTON: “From Within,” works that merge memory and personal experience for a childlike appearance that is nonetheless sophisticated in gesture and expression. EDWIN OWRE: “New Constructions,” an exhibition of works that reference the formative American art movements of the 1960s and ’70s while embracing contemporary expressions of mark-making. ELISE WHITTEMORE: “One by One,” works that explore the physicality of printmaking, as well as formal constructs inherent to the natural world. Through April 7. Info, 865-7166. BCA Center in Burlington.

ART EVENTS ARTIST ROUNDTABLE: Kate Barcellos of the Rutland Herald interviews several of the 35-plus artists whose works are currently on view. The 77 Gallery, Rutland, Thursday, March 8, 7 p.m. Info, the77gallery@gmail.com. BIG & MESSY ART SPACE: A weekly child-led, process-based open art space featuring mural painting, light and shadow play, and more. River Arts, Morrisville, Sunday, March 11, 10 a.m.-noon. $5 suggested donation. Info, 888-1261.

‘ENCOUNTER EMPTY’: Installations by Kevin Donegan, Samantha Eckert and Lydia Kern reflecting on the physical, psychic and spiritual architecture that holds emptiness. Through April 24. Info, joseph@newcitygalerie.org. New City Galerie in Burlington.

CLASS: UNIVERSAL DESIGN FOR LEARNING FOR TEACHING ARTISTS: VSA Vermont leads this training workshop about inclusive teaching methods. River Arts, Morrisville, Wednesday, March 7, 5:30-8 p.m. Info, 871-5002.

FRANK DEANGELIS: “Paint Mayhem Under the Influence of Loud Fast Music,” new paint experiments produced with spray paint, acrylics, oils and other substances by the Burlington artist. Through April 30. Info, 859-9222. The Gallery at Main Street Landing in Burlington.

COMMUNITY ARTS OPEN STUDIO: A weekly workshop where children with caregivers are invited to make their own self-directed art projects using a diverse assortment of art supplies. AVA Gallery and Art Center, Lebanon N.H., Saturday, March 10, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Info, 603-448-3117.

THE GOLD BROTHERS: Works in multiple media by siblings Robert, Steve and Dennis Gold. Through May 31. Info, 651-9692. VCAM Studio in Burlington.

DR. SKETCHY’S BURLINGTON: Burlesque performer Merrique Hysterique poses for this life-drawing class with a twist, open to all ages. Off Center for the Dramatic Arts, Burlington, Thursday, March 8, 6-9 p.m. $12; $10 for students. Info, drsketchysbtv@ gmail.com. DROP-IN PRINTMAKING: An open studio for aspiring and working printmakers, with some materials provided. River Arts, Morrisville, Sunday, March 11, 1-3 p.m. $5 suggested donation. Info, info@riverartsvt.org. FILM: ‘HOLBEIN: EYE OF THE TUDORS’: Waldemar Januszczak looks at the life and work of an artist who became famous for bringing the Tudor era to life. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, Wednesday, March 7, 11 a.m. $13; $8 for students. Info, 388-1436.

68 ART

SEVEN DAYS

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

FILM: ‘WORLDS IN A BOX’: Screening of the 1991 documentary about influential American artist Joseph Cornell. AVA Gallery and Art Center, Lebanon N.H., Thursday, March 8, 7 p.m. Info, 603-448-3117. JEN BERGER: ‘WHAT’S COOKING OUTSIDE THE KITCHEN’: The Burlington artist celebrates International Women’s Day by sharing her inprogress series of portraits of trailblazing women. The Hive, Middlesex, Thursday, March 8, 6-9 p.m. Info, jen@pathwaysvermont.org. JULIAN BARNETT’S FOOTNOTES: A lectureperformance about unfolding communication, language, subjectivity, practice, empathy, isolation and potential. Harnessing vocalization as an agent for choreography and the notion that “languages” exist everywhere, the lecture/performance probes a philosophical thread offered by Roland Barthes’ “grain” of the voice, or the body within the voice as it sings. Dance Theatre, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, Thursday, March 8, 6:30 p.m. Info, 443-5258. ‘LOST AND FOUND’: An “art treasure hunt” instigated by Vermont artist DJ Barry, in which he places stenciled woodcuts in various locations, free to those who find them in exchange for paying it forward. Find the artist on Facebook for clues. Various Vermont locations, Wednesdays, March 7 and 14. Info, djbarryart@gmail.com. MANDALA JOURNALS BY ART THERAPISTS: A yearlong collaborative project by 12 members of the Art Therapy Association of Vermont. Each journal traveled by U.S. post from person to person, each adding a new mandala. Art materials will be on hand for those inspired to make a mandala of their own. Waterbury Public Library, Saturday, March 10, noon-1:45 p.m. Info, atav@arttherapy-vt.org. OPEN ART STUDIO: Seasoned makers and first-timers alike convene to paint, knit and craft in a friendly environment. Bring a table covering for messy projects. Swanton Public Library, Tuesday, March 13, 4-8 p.m. Free. Info, swantonartscouncil@ gmail.com.

GORDON GLOVER: “Composite/Synthesis,” mixed-media works by the Champlain College professor of creative media. Through April 30. Info, blowthewhistle@me.com. New Moon Café in Burlington.

Rachel Laundon The Shape of Water now boasts an Oscars Best

Picture win for 2018, so perhaps it’s safe to say: Fish are in. This Waterbury artist

clearly thinks so — Laundon has been creating her whimsical painted fish sculptures for years. With “Wet, Wild and Wonderful” at the Northeast Kingdom Artisans Guild in St. Johnsbury, Laundon’s works add a splash of color to dreary March. Her series of helmets featuring wearable fish (and other water creatures) lets wearers indulge in aquatic fantasy. The series is named “Roly-Poly Fish Heads,” after Barnes & Barnes’ painfully catchy, charmingly disgusting “Fish Heads” song. Don’t know it? Please google it right now. A reception is Saturday, March 10, 4 to 6 p.m. Through April 17. Pictured: “Alol the Axolotl.” OPEN STUDIO: MARK BOEDGES: The Shelburne painter showcases his winter landscapes. Mark Boedges Fine Art Gallery, Shelburne, Thursday, March 8, 5-7 p.m. Info, 735-7317. TALK: ‘JAMES WHISTLER, WALTER GREAVES AND THE INVENTION OF THE NOCTURNE’: Professor Pieter Broucke discusses the invention of the nocturne as a visual genre, originated in the 1870s by James Whistler and his sometimes-rival Walter Greaves. Dance Theatre, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, Friday, March 9, 12:30 p.m. Info, 443-5258. TALK: ‘MEMOIRS OF AN ART DEALER’: James Maroney, former head of American paintings at Christie’s and Sotheby’s, shares stories of his experiences in the art world of the 1970s. Norwich Congregational Church, Wednesday, March 7, 7-8:30 p.m. Info, 649-1184. TALK: ‘THE DARK SIDE OF DAUMIER’S COMEDY’: Professor Gretchen Van Slyke discusses the social context of, and critical reactions to, the Bluestockings, whom Daumier’s illustrations parodied. Fleming Museum of Art, University of Vermont, Burlington, Wednesday, March 7, noon. Info, 656-0750. TALK: ‘THE JINA AS KING OR THE JINA AS RENOUNCER: SEEING AND ORNAMENTING TEMPLE IMAGES IN JAINISM’: John Cort, professor of Asian and comparative religions at Denison University, will talk about the sectarian differences between the Digambar Jains and Shvetambar Jains. Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, Thursday, March 8, 4:30 p.m. Info, 443-5258.

TALK: ‘THE PALACE OF SANS-SOUCI IN MILOT, HAITI: THE UNTOLD STORY OF THE POTSDAM OF THE RAINFOREST’: Using unpublished archival sources and a photographic survey undertaken in 2017, Gauvin Alexander Bailey reconstructs the circumstances, influences and builders of this extraordinary monument. Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, Tuesday, March 13, 4:30 p.m. Info, 443-5258.

ONGOING SHOWS burlington

‘BRENDA AND OTHER WORKS’: Works by artist and former UVM professor Edwin Owre. Through April 1. HONORÉ DAUMIER’S ‘BLUESTOCKINGS’: ‘Les Bas Bleus,’ a series of 40 lithographs by the French caricaturist, satirizing groups of upper-class women who sought intellectual stimulation in defiance of their narrowly proscribed roles in society. Through May 20. ‘SELF-CONFESSED! THE INAPPROPRIATELY INTIMATE COMICS OF ALISON BECHDEL’: Works by the renowned Bolton cartoonist and graphic memoirist that span her decades-long career. Through May 20. Info, 656-0750. Fleming Museum of Art, University of Vermont, in Burlington. ‘CONSTRUCTED GESTURES’: Collages, montages and digitally manipulated photography by Wendy James, Greg Merhar, Sandy Milens, Bruce Pendleton, Paul Reynolds and Derrick Senior. Through March 31. Info, 652-4500. Amy E. Tarrant Gallery in Burlington.

‘IN THE MOMENT’: Works of collage by Ashley Roark, Barbee Hauzinger and Christy Mitchell. Through March 31. The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery in Burlington.

f ‘LE CADAVRE EXQUIS BOIRA VIN NOUVEAU: DRAWINGS IN SITU’: In the surrealist tradition, William Ramage and nine other artists draw directly onto the gallery wall: Jessica Adams, John Brodowski, Renee Bouchard, Jason Clegg, Jason Drain, James Harmon, Dasha Kalisz, Robert Johnson and Whitney Ramage. Closing reception: Friday, April 27, 6-9 p.m. Through April 27. Info, asm. exhibitions@gmail.com. Flynndog in Burlington. LYNN CUMMINGS: “Shapes, Signs & Symbols: Legacy of the Ancients,” works inspired by the artist’s observations of evidence of the ancients, particularly in the southwestern U.S., as well as several cultures in the South Pacific, Peru and Colombia. Through March 31. Info, 859-9222. SEABA Center in Burlington. MARTIN BOCK: Photographs and paintings by the Vermont artist. Through March 31. Info, 863-3403. ‘WOMEN SPEAK: RESISTANCE ART’: Works created in response to the 2016 U.S. presidential election by Meta Strick, India Tresselt and Sarah Rosedahl. Through March 30. Info, srosedahl@yahoo.com. Fletcher Free Library in Burlington.

f MIKE CLOUD: New works by the Brooklyn painter. Reception and gallery talk: Wednesday, March 21, 6 p.m. Through March 30. Info, 656-2014. Francis Colburn Gallery, University of Vermont, in Burlington. ‘MY SKY’: An exhibition inviting children and adults to explore the sun, moon and stars together in an immersive, family-friendly environment. Through May 6. Info, 864-1848. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain in Burlington.

f OPEN PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT: The fifth annual open exhibition of works by Vermont photographers. Reception: Friday, March 9, 5-7 p.m. Through March 30. Info, 859-9222. Art’s Alive Gallery in Burlington. ‘QUALITY OF LIFE: THE RALSTON HISTORICAL MUSEUM’: Author Erik Esckilsen’s narrative works inspire this installation designed and curated by Dana Heffern and Jane Adams, in which material culture and digital artifacts evoke life in a fictional Vermont city. Through March 23. Info, erikee@ gmail.com. Champlain College Art Gallery in Burlington.

f ‘A SHOW OF HANDS’: The sixth annual exhibition featuring 100 artist-decorated wood cut-out hands to be auctioned in support of HANDS, a local


ART SHOWS

CALL TO ARTISTS BRANDON ARTISTS GUILD: The Brandon Artists Guild welcomes applications for exhibiting members. Artists and artisans working in media include oil painting, watercolor, ceramics, fiber arts, fine furniture, metalwork, jewelry and more are invited to apply. To submit, visit brandonartistsguild.org. Deadline: March 19. Brandon Artists Guild. $25. Info, 247-4956. BURLINGTON CITY ARTS COMMUNITY FUND: The Burlington City Arts Community Fund welcomes applications for one-year grants of up to $3,000 for Burlington-based practicing artists, creative professionals or small arts organizations to develop projects that engage and connect the community and address community needs, challenges and priorities through the arts. For details and to apply, visit burlingtoncityarts.org. Deadline: April 16. BCA Center, Burlington. Info, 865-7166. CALL FOR LARGE OUTDOOR SCULPTURE: The Shoreham sculpture park is accepting submissions for the 2018 season. Sculptures must be exterior and able to withstand Vermont weather. Accepted works will be installed for one to two years. Interested artists should submit résumé, artist statement and images to lemonfairsculpture@gmail.com. Deadline: April 1. Lemon Fair Sculpture Park, Shoreham. ‘CELEBRATING WOMEN’: PhotoPlace Gallery in Middlebury seeks images that will contribute to a mosaic of what it means to be female, for an upcoming exhibition to be juried by Joyce Tenneson. For details and to submit, visit photoplacegallery.com. Deadline: March 12. PhotoPlace Gallery, Middlebury. $35 for up to five photographs; $6 for each additional. Info, 388-4500. ‘COMMON GROUNDS’: In recognition of 100 years of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and its conservation consequences, the museum seeks bird-oriented artworks for an exhibit to open in May. Art of and about birds, exploring commonality, conservation, migration, habitat, protection, and/or coordination among peoples, species, places and/or time will be considered. To submit, email up to three JPEG images to museum@birdsofvermont.org. Deadline: March 27. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington. Info, 434-2167.

nonprofit that provides food for older adults. Silent auction: Thursday, March 29, 6-8 p.m. Through March 29. Penny Cluse Café in Burlington.

chittenden county

CAROL DULA: “Avoid the Crowd,” landscape photographs. Through May 31. Info, avoidthecrowd@ gmail.com. Charlotte Congregational Church.

‘OPEN’: An open juried photography exhibition. Through March 18. Info, 777-3686. Darkroom Gallery in Essex Junction.

SEEKING MURAL ARTIST: The Downtown Lyndonville Vermont Revitalization Committee seeks an artist to design and execute a large permanent outdoor mural. For consideration, email résumé, artist statement and images of previous work to Kim Crady-Smith at kcradysmith@hotmail.com. Deadline: March 31. SEXUAL VIOLENCE AWARENESS MONTH ART SHOW: Burlington’s Hive Collective seeks art from artists who identify as survivors of sexual violence for an April show sponsored by H.O.P.E. Works. For details and to submit, email Rachel at outreach@hopeworksvt.org. Deadline: March 25. The Hive Collective, Burlington. ‘TELL ME’: There are currently 6,909 living languages. What do the connected sounds and symbols of words suggest for the visual arts? Studio Place Arts is seeking diverse languages and letterforms (real or invented), new communication technologies, censorship, graffiti, collage and urgent messages to create a Tower of Babel in the center of the gallery. Proposals for this structure in whole or part are welcomed. Deadline: April 6. For info and submission guidelines, see studioplacearts.com. Studio Place Arts, Barre. Free for members; $10 for nonmembers. Info, 479-7069. THIRTY-ODD ARTISTS’ SHOP: New South End shop seeks artists to rent vendor spaces. Rental starts at $110 per month, and artists retain 100 percent of their sales. For details and to apply, visit 30oddartists.com. Deadline: April 30. Thirty-odd, Burlington. Info, recyclemoe@ gmail.com.

‘PUPPETS: WORLD ON A STRING’: An introductory survey to the art of puppets, presenting a range of historical to contemporary works in a variety of mediums and forms, from 19th-century marionettes to digital installations. Through June 3. Info, 985-3346. Shelburne Museum. ‘WHAT DID THE ROCK SAY? PART 1’: Works from a two-year collaboration of artists Dianne Shullenberger and John Snell. Through March 18. Info, 899-3211. Emile A. Gruppe Gallery in Jericho.

barre/montpelier

ALEXY J. LANZA: “From the Death of One Star/ Por La Muerte De Una Estrella,” a series of 20 large woodcut prints based on ancient Mayan glyphs, 580 BC to 964 AD. Through April 10. Info, 322-1604. Goddard Art Gallery, Pratt Center, Goddard College, in Plainfield. ‘THE ART OF GRANITE’: An exhibition exploring the use of Barre granite in sculpture, highlighting a continuity between classical techniques and the innovation and creativity of today’s artists. Through March 30. Info, 479-8500. Vermont History Center in Barre. BARRE/MONTPELIER SHOWS

THE SMOKE SHOP WITH THE HIPPIE FLAVOR E x cl u s i v e deal er of I l l umi nati , I l l ad el p h and S ov erei gnt y G l ass. 75 Main St., Burlington, VT 864.6555 • Mon-Thur 10-9 Fri-Sat 10-10 Sun 10-8 Must be 18 to purchase tobacco products, ID required

4t-northernlights022118.indd 1

@NorthernLightsVT

2/13/18 2:39 PM

In distress?  Need to talk?  Call us for  free, anonymous,  non-judgmental  support. 

(833) VT-TALKS ART 69

‘PAINTING FOR A CURE’: A collection of recent works by local artist/architect Ted Montgomery. Proceeds support the University of Vermont Cancer Center research team headed by Dr. David Krag. Through March 30. Info, 985-8222. Shelburne Vineyard.

LARGEST SELECTION OF SCIENTIFIC AND AMERICAN GLASS IN TOWN

SEVEN DAYS

‘THE HEART SHOW’: More than 80 artist-created hearts, available for purchase to benefit the Janet S. Munt Family Room. Through March 25. Info, 985-9511. Rustic Roots in Shelburne.

LARGEST SELECTION OF VAPORIZERS IN VT. LARGE SELECTION OF LOCAL AND FAMOUS GLASS ARTISTS.

03.07.18-03.14.18

TERESA CELEMIN: Drawings by the Burlington artist and illustrator. Through May 31. Info, 658-6016. Speeder & Earl’s Coffee in Burlington.

‘SCORCHED’: This 2018 group show involves work in which the effects of heat and fire can be easily seen and experienced, including encaustic media, singed paper and other ephemeral materials, charred wood, pit-fired vessels, and hammered-metal and blown-glass objects. Deadline: May 18. For more info and submission guidelines, see studioplacearts. com. Studio Place Arts, Barre. Free for members; $10 for nonmembers. Info, 479-7069.

JUST ADD WATER

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

EKPHRASTIC POETRY: The museum welcomes submissions of poetry written in response to a work or works in its collection. Selected writers will be invited to read at an April 18 event, and their poem will be featured in a printed booklet. For details and to submit, visit flemingmuseum. org or email fleming@uvm.edu. Deadline: March 16. Fleming Museum of Art, University of Vermont, Burlington.

‘LOCKS & KEYS’: The Glover museum-in-a-barn invites submissions from artists and community members consisting of or relating to all aspects of locks and keys, from padlocks, key cards and chastity belts to works that explore concepts of imprisonment. Contributions including finished artworks, installation ideas and theoretical writings are welcome. To submit a proposal, use the “Contact Us” form at museumofeverydaylife.org. Deadline: April 15. The Museum of Everyday Life, Glover. Info, claredol@sover.net.

» P.70 Untitled-33 1

3/6/18 10:20 AM


art BARRE/MONTPELIER SHOWS

« P.69

‘In the Moment’ At its heart, collage

CLAIRE VAN VLIET: “Sky and Earth,” pulp paintings using mineral pigments and handmade paper by the renowned Vermont artist between 1995 and 2011. Through March 30. Info, 828-0749. Vermont Supreme Court Gallery in Montpelier.

is fundamentally a surrealist technique, one that lets the artist time-travel, appropriating concepts and

‘EXPLORERS OF NORWICH’: An exhibition exploring the lives of Norwich University alumni who shaped and changed the U.S. during the mid-19th and early 20th centuries. Through June 30. Info, 485-2183. Sullivan Museum & History Center, Norwich University, in Northfield.

aesthetics at will. Moments are fleeting, but collage allows for new temporal frameworks. Recently opened at Burlington’s S.P.A.C.E. Gallery, this exhibition features the bricolage endeavors of Ashley

‘GOLDEN’: A group exhibit with work in multiple mediums exploring aspects of aging. ROSALIND DANIELS: “Shape Shifting,” photographs of abstracted shapes and light. ‘SHOCKWAVE’: Art and poetry by contributors to Shockwave Magazine, an arts collective organized through Washington County Mental Health Services. Through March 17. Info, 479-7069. Studio Place Arts in Barre.

Roark, Barbee Hauzinger and Christy Mitchell, showcasing their unique mashup styles. Roark works with personal ephemera, evoking delicacy and contemplation through careful consideration of texture and form. With her two series, “Where You’d

f GROUP SHOW: Students of Sylvia Walker’s

MSAC painting workshop exhibit the fruits of their labor. Reception: Friday, March 9, 4-6 p.m. Through April 1. Info, 477-3181. East State Salon in Montpelier.

of consumerism. Mitchell gleans imagery that

‘NOURISHMENT’ JURIED SHOW: Works by Vermont artists including Josh Axelrod, Stella Ehrlich, Linda Di Sante, Carole Naquin, Roger Weingarten and Frank Woods. Through April 27. Info, 262-6035. T.W. Wood Gallery in Montpelier.

scenes to “a still [from] an imagined movie.” Through

TIKI KELVIE: “Glitterati,” works on canvas exploring the properties of glitter. Through April 1. Info, tikiamber@ymail.com. Espresso Bueno in Barre. ‘WAKE UP TO (LIVING AND) DYING’ MULTI-MEDIA EXHIBIT: An interactive exhibit featuring audio stories and questions meant to provoke thinking about how to live well through a conscious awareness of death. Through March 28. Info, 223-2518. Montpelier Senior Activity Center.

f WORKS PROGRESS ADMINISTRATION EXHIBIT:

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

imagined utopias and critiques the false promises

LINDA MIRABILE: “Avian Inspired,” bird-inspired paintings by the Vermont artist. Through March 30. Info, 828-0749. Governor’s Gallery in Montpelier.

‘SHOW 24’: The latest works of the gallery’s Vermont-based member-artists, with guest artist Athena Petra Tasiopoulos. Through April 28. Info, 552-0877. The Front in Montpelier.

Works commissioned by the WPA on loan from the collection of Montpelier’s T.W. Wood Gallery. Reception: Thursday, March 15, 4:30 p.m. Through March 31. Info, 279-6403. Central Vermont Medical Center in Berlin.

originated in the 1940s through ’70s, comparing her March 31. Pictured: “Filed Away” by Roark.

stowe/smuggs

BURTON SNOWBOARDS RETROSPECTIVE: Vintage to modern snowboards, original outerwear, and images and stories from the Vermont company’s 41-year history. Through April 15. Info, 760-4634. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe Mountain Resort. ‘CURIOUS & COOL’: Unusual and seldom-seen artifacts of ski culture from the museum’s archives. Through October 31. Info, 253-9911. Vermont Ski and Snowboard Museum in Stowe. DENNIS SHEEHAN: “Late for the Sky,” winter landscapes in the style of the Barbizon School and the American tonalists. Through March 9. Info, 760-6785. Edgewater Gallery in Stowe. DIANNE SHULLENBERGER: “After the Frost: Moments in Nature,” mixed-media and fabric collage. MARCIA HILL: “The Spirited Landscapes,”

scenic works in pastel. Through April 29. Info, info@ riverartsvt.org. River Arts in Morrisville. JAMES PETERSON: “Dreamcatcher,” an immersive installation by the artist-in-residence from Los Angeles. Through September 30. Info, 253-8358. Spruce Peak at Stowe. JASON ECKENROTH: “Run Rabbit — Chase,” a multimedia yarn mural and video poem that explores contemporary anxieties through the character of a rabbit. Through March 9. Info, 635-1469. Julian Scott Memorial Gallery, Northern Vermont University, in Johnson. ‘LOVE LOST & FOUND’: A juried exhibition of 28 works by 23 artists, including oils, watercolor, mixed media, photography, collage and textile art. Through April 1. Info, 644-5100. Bryan Memorial Gallery in Jeffersonville.

Anne Lilly. PHILIP HERBISON: “The Infinite Shapes of Water,” large-scale digital photo prints. Through April 14. Info, 253-8358. Helen Day Art Center in Stowe. ‘TUESDAY NIGHTS’: A collection of poetry by River Arts Poetry Clinic participants. Through March 30. Info, 888-1261. Morrisville Post Office. ‘VERMONT LANDSCAPES’: An exhibition featuring 38 landscape paintings by 19 Vermont artists. Through June 30. Info, 644-5100. Lamoille County Courthouse in Hyde Park.

mad river valley/waterbury

JOSH AXELROD: “A Man and His Camera,” fine art photographs by the Roxbury artist. Through March 30. Info, 496-6682. Vermont Festival of the Arts Gallery in Waitsfield.

‘ORDINARY TIME’: Paintings by Maine artist Grace DeGennaro and kinetic sculpture by Boston artist

We may be known for our steaks... but we know seafood!

Mid-Week Movies:

Fly Away Home

Wed. March 14  6:00pm

gallery exhibition:

FISH • SCALLOPS • SALMON SHRIMP • LOBSTER

Muse

March 3 – May 28 Three Vermont artists reflect on spirit guides, journeying, introspecting, and winter’s quiet.

SEVEN DAYS

03.07.18-03.14.18

Want to Be” and “Age of Ads,” Hauzinger constructs

opening reception: friday, march 9, 4–6pm

vermont shakespeare salon:

Wittenberg

70 ART

Saturday, March 10  3 :00 pm Read by local actors and followed by an audience discussion.

Fire & Ice Vermont’s Iconic steakhouse

$10 suggested donation

26 Seymour Street | Middlebury | 802.388.7166 | fireandicerestaurant.com 6H-fire&ice052516.indd 1

5/24/16 11:35 AM

highlandartsvt.org  802.533.2000  2875 hardwick street, greensboro, vt Untitled-31 1

3/6/18 10:17 AM


ART SHOWS

middlebury area

‘10 YEARS: THE CAMERON PRINT PROJECT’: Works created by Cameron Visiting Artists, in collaboration with students of Hedya Klein’s silk-screen and intaglio classes, including Mark Dion, Derrick Adams, Tomas Vu, Kati Heck and Rona Yefman. Through April 29. Info, 443-5258. Middlebury College Museum of Art. ELINOR STEELE FRIML: Tapestries from the 40-year career of the Vermont designer and weaver, including abstract and impressionistic images, landscapes and geometric compositions. Through March 31. Info, 382-9222. Jackson Gallery, Town Hall Theater, in Middlebury. ‘NEVER FELT BETTER: FIBER TRANSFORMED’: Works created with the world’s oldest textile technique by member artists Deb Allen, Marsha Chase and Celia Oliver, and guest artists Kathy Giroux, Kim Goodling, Nancy Hayden, Muffy Kashkin-Grolier, Lynn Ocone, Susi Ryan, and Linda Veilleux. Through April 8. Info, 877-3850. Creative Space Gallery in Vergennes. ‘POWER & PIETY: SPANISH COLONIAL ART’: Drawn from the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Collection, this exhibition reveals the great wealth of the region from the late 17th century until the 1820s. Through April 22. Info, 443-5258. Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College. RICK SKOGSBERG: “Can’t Lose Shoes,” an installation featuring the irreverently handpainted shoes of the Rochester artist. Through March 30. Info, info@bigtowngallery.com. BigTown Gallery Vergennes. ‘UP HOME: HAND-COLORED PHOTOGRAPHS BY SUSANNE AND NEIL RAPPAPORT’: Images that document the late Minnie Griswold’s Pawlet home. Through March 31. Info, 388-4964. Vermont Folklife Center in Middlebury. ‘WHILE THE TREES RUN’: Works by gallery artists and two new additions, Californian artists Katie Ruiz and Heather Gordon. Through March 11. Info, 877-2173. Northern Daughters in Vergennes. ‘WINTER INTO SPRING’: A group exhibition featuring works by Klara Calitri, Linda Hampton-Smith, Molly Hawley, Patricia LeBon Herb and Yinglei Zhang. Through March 30. Info, 388-4095. Ilsley Public Library in Middlebury.

rutland/killington

JOAN CURTIS: “Living With the Earth,” three collections of paintings by the Brandon artist. Through March 31. Info, galleries@castleton.edu. Rutland City Hall. ‘THE LABORING SELF’: An exhibition by professors xtine burrough and Dr. Sabrina Starnaman that juxtaposes the tools of craft with the spirit of the maker space. Through March 30. Info, galleries@ castleton.edu. Christine Price Gallery, Castleton University.

upper valley

‘BODY LANGUAGE’: A collaboration of poems and prints by Don and V. Shalvah Herzberg. Through March 31. Info, 295-5901. Two Rivers Printmaking Studio in White River Junction. CECILY HERZIG: “Dark Botanicals and Swamp Nonsense,” new paintings. Through March 31. Info, cecily.herzig@gmail.com. Zollikofer Gallery at Hotel Coolidge in White River Junction. LAURA DI PIAZZA: “Vox Somnium,” mixed-media works exploring irregular spaces, complicated positions and meditative interactions. Through May 23. Info, 296-7000. Barrette Center for the Arts in White River Junction. ‘THE LIGHT AROUND US’: An interactive, educational exhibition exploring the physics of light and how we see it. Through May 2. Info, 649-2200. Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich. ‘WINTER MAGIC’: Watercolors and pastels by Donalyn Burch and Kate Reeves. Through March 14. Info, 295-3133. The Quechee Inn at Marshland Farm.

northeast kingdom

‘BELLS & WHISTLES’: An exhibition exploring the myriad forms and associations connected to these ordinary objects. Through May 1. Info, 626-4409. The Museum of Everyday Life in Glover. BEN BARNES: Paintings by the Northeast Kingdom artist. Through March 31. Info, 472-9933. 3rd Floor Gallery in Hardwick. GERRY TREVITS: New oil paintings of local landscapes. Through March 9. Info, 525-3366. Parker Pie Co. in West Glover.

featuring local waters as well as soil and water conservation practices. Through March 30. Info, skye@wonderartsvt.org. Brown Library, Sterling College, in Craftsbury Common.

f ‘MUSE’: Vermont artists Jess Polanshek, Kristin

Richland and Amanda Weisenfeld reflect on spirit guides, journeying, introspection and winter’s quiet. Reception: Friday, March 9, 4-6 p.m. Through May 28. Info, 533-2000. Highland Center for the Arts in Greensboro. ‘PEOPLE: PORTRAITS. POSES, GESTURES AND DREAMS’: Art from the collections of artists Marjorie Kramer and Sam Thurston. Through March 23. Info, 323-7759. The 99 Gallery and Center in Newport.

f RACHEL LAUNDON: “Wet, Wild and Wonderful,” vibrant handpainted folk-art fish and fish masks. Reception: Saturday, March 10, 4-6 p.m. Through April 17. Info, 748-0158. Northeast Kingdom Artisans Guild Backroom Gallery in St. Johnsbury. f ‘SEASONAL EXPRESSION’: Paintings by Prilla Smith Brackett, Elizabeth Nelson and Jane Sherrill that explore the expressive force of nature. Reception: Saturday, March 10, 5-7 p.m. Through April 14. Info, 748-2600. Catamount Arts Center in St. Johnsbury.

brattleboro/okemo valley

ANILA QUAYYUM AGHA: “Shimmering Mirage,” a sculptural light installation inspired by Islamic architecture. Through March 10. Info, 257-0124. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center. ‘WILDLANDS’: Works by 10 artists that celebrate public lands, national parks and wilderness. Through March 30. Info, 885-3061. The Great Hall in Springfield. ‘WINTER GROUP 2018’: New works by Jackie Abrams, Eric Boyer, Josh Bernbaum, Tiffany Heerema, Anne Johnstone, Gene Parulis, Torin Porter, Erika Radich, Donald Saaf and other gallery artists. Through March 18. Info, 251-8290. Mitchell Giddings Fine Arts in Brattleboro.

manchester/bennington

JULIA R. SEYFERTH: “Feathered,” works on paper in pen, ink and watercolor by the Bennington native. Through April 2. Info, 681-2889. Southern Vermont College Gallery in Bennington.

NANCY TAPLIN: A select retrospective of paintings by the Vermont artist. Through March 31. Info, 767-9670. BigTown Gallery in Rochester. TONI GILDONE: “Depth of Expression,” photographs of children. Through April 28. Info, 685-2188. Chelsea Public Library. ZYLA NUITE: “Bees of Central Vermont,” photographs of native and non native bees spotted on flowers in Brookfield and Randolph. Info, zylanuite@gmail.com. Hartness Gallery, Vermont Technical College, in Randolph Center.

outside vermont

‘BEST OF THE UPPER VALLEY’ HIGH SCHOOL EXHIBITION: Works by area high school students in a range of media. BRENDA PHILLIPS: The artist, who is a survivor of childhood abuse, uses painting as a therapeutic tool and draws inspiration from Christian theology and Greek mythology featuring strong female characters. Through March 9. Info, 603-448-3117. AVA Gallery and Art Center in Lebanon, N.H. JAN BALET: “What Was He Thinking?” lithographs and watercolors by the German-born artist. Through March 16. Info, 518-564-2474. Myers Fine Arts Building, SUNY Plattsburgh, N.Y. KADER ATTIA: “Reason’s Oxymorons,” a researchdriven video installation consisting of a range of interviews with philosophers, psychiatrists, anthropologists, traditional healers, historians, musicologists, patients and immigrants. The conversations are organized around the ways in which non-Western and Western cultures approach psychiatric conditions and emotional breakdowns. Through March 18. Info, 603-646-2426. Hood Downtown in Hanover, N.H. ‘LEONARD COHEN: A CRACK IN EVERYTHING’: A collection of brand-new works commissioned from and created by local and international artists who have been inspired by Leonard Cohen’s style and recurring themes, in honor of the late poet and musician. Through April 9. Info, 514-847-6226. Montréal Museum of Contemporary Art. ‘MNEMOSYNE’: An exhibition pairing ancient and modern European works with contemporary art by Canadian artists. Through May 20. NADIA MYRE: “Scattered Remains,” the first survey exhibition of the indigenous Québec artist. Through May 27. Info, 514-285-1600. Montréal Museum of Fine Arts. m

randolph/royalton

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

‘ART FROM FARM TO TABLE’: Pastel works by Middlebury artists Judy Albright and Cristine Kossow. Through April 2. Info, 247-4956. Brandon Artists Guild.

‘ART OF RUTLAND COUNTY’: Inaugural gallery show featuring works by 34 area artists, including Bonnie Baird, Joan Curtis, Kerry O. Furlani, Warren Kimble, Grace Mellow and Erika Lawlor Schmidt. Through March 30. Info, the77gallery@gmail.com. The 77 Gallery in Rutland.

JENNIFER PALKOWSKI JACQUES: “Before the Storm,” abstract landscapes. Through March 7. Info, 8899404. Tunbridge Public Library in Tunbridge Village.

MEMPHREMAGOG WATERSHED ASSOCIATION: Artworks created by the Plein Air NEK group

C ATA M O U N T A RT S G A L L E R I E S February 24-April 14, 2018

LOCAL FOOD

VERMONT SPIRITS

discoverstjohnsbury.com

Seasonal Expression: Elizabeth Nelson, Prilla Smith Brackett, Jane Sherrill RANKIN GALLERY

Four Seasons: Alice Kitchel ARTISTS RECEPTION

Saturday, March 10, 5-7 pm 115 Eastern Ave. St. Johnsbury

12v-catamountarts030718.indd 1

VERMONT’S NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM

397 RAILROAD STREET, ST. JOHNSBURY, VT

Open daily 9am-5pm 1302 Main Street, St. Johnsbury VT fairbanksmuseum.org

3/5/1812v-fairbanksmuseum020718.indd 1:23 PM 1

OPEN DAILY: Tue - Thu: 4pm - 10pm Fri - Sat: 12pm - 12am | Sun: 12pm - 8pm 802.424.1355

KINGDOMTAPROOM.COM

2/2/1812v-kingdomtaproom011117.indd 2:28 PM 1

ART 71

catamountarts.org 3h-StJohnsbury030718.indd 1

SEVEN DAYS

MAIN GALLERY

03.07.18-03.14.18

CRAFT BEER

Elizabeth Nelson, Black Beach, 2017, acrylic/panel

3/6/18 10:29 AM 5/29/17 1:39 PM


movies Red Sparrow ★

R

ed Sparrow is many things. Regrettably, a good movie isn’t one of them. It’s also not a timely movie, an innovative, genre-stretching movie, a zeitgeisty movie or a movie whose two-hour-and-20-minute running time can be considered anything but cruel and unusual. It is, paradoxically, a movie that does zero to advance the professional standing of Jennifer Lawrence while, at the same time, facilitating a profoundly vital psychological corrective for the Oscar winner. An artist’s private and public lives can affect each other in myriad ways. The symbiosis may have never played out in quite this fashion before. More on this shortly. Red Sparrow is also the only movie I’ve seen based on a book that was reviewed by the CIA: a 2013 spy thriller by retired CIA officer Jason Matthews, the first of a trilogy. The resulting film is set in the present, focuses on cat-and-mouse games played by U.S. and Russian intelligence services, and features a degree of graphic nudity all but unprecedented in a major studio’s wide release. That may explain the conclusion the agency reached in its review: “The movie ... will undoubtedly influence perceptions of

the CIA for a wide swath of Americans, including among them future applicants.” Translation: Lawrence stars as ballerina-turned-secret agent Dominika Egorova. She’s trained to use sex as a weapon at a facility loosely based on the Sparrow School the Soviets ran during the ’60s and ’70s. Joel Edgerton plays CIA operative Nate Nash, her target. She uses sex as a weapon against him. A lot. Langley’s reviewers evidently theorized that their steamy international relations could make serving one’s country look like way more fun than traditional recruitment methods ever suggested. What they didn’t foresee was writer Justin Haythe and director Francis Lawrence (the second through fourth The Hunger Games) gutting the source material of everything that distinguished it. Matthews’ portrait of the low-key, non-Bondian nature of real-life tradecraft is nowhere to be found. Everywhere, instead, are thinly written characters, bad Russian accents, gratuitous torture scenes and agents becoming double agents, then triple agents, without generating an iota of suspense or excitement. This is an espionage saga so implausible, listlessly dull and glacially paced that even supporting talent like Charlotte Rampling, Jeremy Irons and Ciarán Hinds can’t breathe

DOUBLE AGENT Yup, that’s as sophisticated as the filmmaking gets here. A better title might have been Mission Implausible.

life into it. Lawrence herself is so cluelessly utilized, her character so clumsily written, even she proves a Russian not worth investigation. Of greater significance is what’s going on here with Lawrence the human being. The actress was devastated by a 2014 phone hack that leaked private nude photos to the internet, calling it a “sexual violation.” “I can’t even describe … what it feels like to have my naked body shoot across the world ... for a profit,” she told Vanity Fair. As I watched Lawrence perform by far the most revealing scenes of her career, I wondered whether the hack and the decision to do this film were linked, whether the

images on the screen reflected a desire to undo the violation by offering now what was stolen then. The movie shoots her naked body across the world again, but this time on her terms. One feels less objectified, I expect, when the decision and the millions are one’s own. Driving home from the screening, I doubted I’d end up mentioning my hypothesis here. Readers might misunderstand and take offense. Then research revealed that Lawrence has commented on the subject and, guess what — I wasn’t far off. Finally, something about Red Sparrow that didn’t disappoint. RI C K KI S O N AK

72 MOVIES

SEVEN DAYS

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Death Wish ★

Y

ou know a movie has problems when the only scene that really holds your attention depicts someone being tortured with a scalpel and brake fluid. On the plus side, for those of us who care about such things, this remake of the 1974 vigilante thriller doesn’t have much of a gun fetish. While there are shootings aplenty, horror director Eli Roth (Cabin Fever, Hostel) seems more invested in baroque ways of dispatching people. On the minus side, the filmmaker doesn’t succeed in getting us invested in his hero’s crusade or really in anything on-screen. Death Wish is a plodding retread that can’t seem to figure out if it’s aiming for emotional resonance, political provocation or satire. So it settles for getting our attention the way the Saw movies do: with creative brutality. Set in Chicago, because Manhattan isn’t violent enough these days, the film opens like the dramatization of a Trump speech. As radio jockeys recite the city’s murder statistics, we rush to the hospital with a mortally injured cop. ER doctor Paul Kersey (Bruce Willis) growls his resistance to treating the “animal” who shot the officer, but he obeys his Hippocratic Oath. For now. Paul lives in a palatial suburban home with his wife (Elisabeth Shue) and collegebound daughter (Camila Morrone). Even by the standards of movie families who exist only to suffer horribly and inspire the protagonist to vengeance, they’re pretty boring.

TRY-HARD Willis dons the hoodie of vigilante justice for Roth’s nasty remake of the Charles Bronson thriller.

Soon enough, two burglars invade the home and leave Mom dead, Daughter comatose and Dad grieving. Paul tries talk therapy, but he soon learns there’s only one remedy for his pain: a Glock dropped by one of his gangbanger patients. After a thorough YouTube-video education in firearms, the doctor starts executing carjackers and drug dealers, putting the city’s

talking heads in a whirl. When he gets a tip on his wife’s killers, he sets off in search of more systematic revenge. There’s not much of a character arc here. After his first vigilante murder, Paul shows anguish and ambivalence; his next finds him delivering quips. A few body bags later, Willis practically smirks through the aforementioned torture scene, inviting viewers to

laugh and cheer (which, at my showing, they did). If the source material was ever a sober examination of how victims of violence become perpetrators, the intent is lost in this film. At times, Roth edges close to satire: When Paul goes to a gun store, a blond in a push-up bra blithely does her best to sell him an arsenal, pooh-poohing rules and regulations. It could be a scene dreamed up by a gun-control advocate, but that’s hardly the prevailing tone of the film. Equally purposeless is Vincent D’Onofrio as Paul’s shiftless younger brother; we keep waiting for his character to have a point. At least D’Onofrio conveys some real grief and unrest, while Willis is mainly … just there. Whatever talent Liam Neeson apparently has for making blank-faced brutality fun to watch, his fellow action star doesn’t share it. Speaking of action movies, Death Wish is hardly alone in glorifying the killing of suspected criminals without due process. Put the same scenario in a more realistic setting, and it tends to divide viewers along political lines, repelling some and thrilling others. Roth’s movie, though, lacks the courage of its unpleasant convictions. Rather than giving propulsive, angry energy to its urban-revenge scenario, it goes through the motions as if the death wish were its own. MARGO T HARRI S O N


MOVIE CLIPS

NEW IN THEATERS GRINGO: A law-abiding businessman in Mexico (David Oyelowo) suddenly finds himself fighting for his life and freedom in this dark action comedy from director Nash Edgerton. Joel Edgerton, Charlize Theron and Thandie Newton also star. (110 min, R. Essex, Palace) THE HURRICANE HEIST: What’s more exciting than stealing from the U.S. Treasury? Doing it during a Category 5 hurricane, or at least that’s what the producers of this hybrid action/disaster flick seem to be hoping. Toby Kebbell, Maggie Grace and Ryan Kwanten star. Rob Cohen (The Fast and the Furious) directed. (100 min, PG-13. Palace, Paramount)

CALL ME BY YOUR NAMEHHHHH A restless teenager (Timothée Chalamet) falls for his dad’s research assistant (Armie Hammer) in this atmospheric summer romance set in 1983 Italy, from director Luca Guadagnino (I Am Love). With Michael Stuhlbarg. (132 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 1/17)

JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLEHHH Four teens are trapped in a video game where they’re represented by human movie clichés (Dwayne Johnson, Karen Gillan, Kevin Hart and Jack Black) in this belated sequel to the 1995 action comedy. Jake Kasdan (Bad Teacher) directed. (119 min, PG-13)

DARKEST HOURHHHH1/2 Gary Oldman plays Winston Churchill in this historical drama about his crucial decisions in the early days of World War II from director Joe Wright (Atonement). With Lily James and Kristin Scott Thomas. (125 min, PG-13; reviewed by R.K. 2/7)

LADY BIRDHHHH Actor Greta Gerwig wrote and directed this acclaimed coming-of-age tale about a Sacramento teen (Saoirse Ronan) navigating her senior year. With Laurie Metcalf and Lucas Hedges. (93 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 11/29)

THE STRANGERS: PREY AT NIGHT: In this sequel to horror flick The Strangers, masked psychos disrupt a family’s attempt to vacation peacefully at a deserted mobile home park. With Christina Hendricks, Bailee Madison and Martin Henderson. Johannes Roberts (47 Meters Down) directed. (85 min, R. Essex, Majestic, Palace) THOROUGHBREDS: Two privileged teens (Anya Taylor-Joy and Olivia Cooke) team up on a devious plan in this indie thriller from writer-director Cory Finley. The late Anton Yelchin costarred. (92 min, R. Roxy, Savoy) A WRINKLE IN TIME: A young girl (Storm Reid) must travel the space-time continuum to find her missing scientist dad (Chris Pine) in this Disney adaptation of Madeleine L’Engle’s kids’ classic from director Ava DuVernay (Selma). With Oprah Winfrey and Reese Witherspoon. (109 min, PG. Big Picture, Bijou, Capitol, Essex, Majestic, Marquis, Palace, Roxy, Stowe, Welden)

NOW PLAYING THE 15:17 TO PARISHHHH Three American soldiers (Spencer Stone, Anthony Sadler and Alek Skarlatos) who foiled a 2015 terrorist attack on a European train play themselves in this drama based on the events, directed by Clint Eastwood. With Judy Greer and Jenna Fischer. (94 min, PG-13; reviewed by R.K. 2/14)

H = refund, please HH = could’ve been worse, but not a lot HHH = has its moments; so-so HHHH = smarter than the average bear HHHHH = as good as it gets

PETER RABBITHH1/2 Beatrix Potter’s classic kids’ tale of a clever rodent — with some of her other beloved barnyard personae — comes to the screen as a family animation, directed by Will Gluck (Annie). With the voices of James Corden, Domhnall Gleeson, Fayssal Bazzi and Sia. (93 min, PG)

FIFTY SHADES FREEDH1/2 The bondage-enthusiast billionaire and his beloved (Jamie Dornan and Dakota Johnson) finally wed in the third (and last?) film based on E.L. James’ best-selling erotic trilogy. With Marcia Gay Harden and Eric Johnson. James Foley (Perfect Stranger) directed. (105 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 2/14)

PHANTOM THREADHHHH1/2 In 1950s London, an elite dressmaker (Daniel Day-Lewis, in what he says will be his last role) becomes fixated on a younger woman (Vicky Krieps) in this drama from writerdirector Paul Thomas Anderson (The Master). (130 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 1/24)

GAME NIGHTHHHH1/2 Folks who meet regularly for friendly competition find themselves instead trying to solve a real-life murder in this action comedy. With Rachel McAdams, Jesse Plemons and Jason Bateman. John Francis Daley and Jonathan Goldstein (Vacation) directed. (100 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 2/28)

THE POSTHHH1/2 Steven Spielberg’s drama chronicles the days in 1971 in which the Washington Post’s leadership struggled with the dilemma of whether to publish the explosive Pentagon Papers. With Tom Hanks as Ben Bradlee and Meryl Streep as Katherine Graham. (115 min, PG-13; reviewed by R.K. 1/10)

THE GREATEST SHOWMANHH1/2 This original musical, “inspired by the imagination of” circus entrepreneur P.T. Barnum (Hugh Jackman), appears to be less about the gritty facts of his life than about celebrating show biz. With Zendaya, Rebecca Ferguson and Zac Efron. Michael Gracey makes his directorial debut. (105 min, PG)

RED SPARROWH1/2 A ballerina (Jennifer Lawrence) becomes a Russian spy assigned to seduce a CIA agent in this thriller from director Francis Lawrence (the last three Hunger Games movies). Joel Edgerton, Matthias Schoenaerts and Charlotte Rampling also star. (139 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 3/7)

THE INSULTHHH1/2 Set in Beirut, this Oscarnominated drama shows how a dispute between a Lebanese Christian and a Palestinian refugee becomes an explosive court case. Adel Karam and Kamel El Basha star. Ziad Doueiri (Lila Says) directed. (112 min, R)

THE SHAPE OF WATERHHHH1/2 A mute janitor (Sally Hawkins) at a government lab falls for a mysterious marine creature in this arty riff on classic monster flicks from cowriter-director Guillermo del Toro. With Michael Shannon, Richard Jenkins and Octavia Spencer. (123 min, R)

I, TONYAHHHHH This no-holds-barred biopic tells the story of former Olympic figure skater Tonya Harding (Margot Robbie), banned from her sport for her role in conspiring to injure a rival, as a dark comedy of errors. Allison Janney and Sebastian Stan also star. Craig Gillespie (The Finest Hours) directed. (120 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 1/17)

THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURIHHHHH In this drama from writerdirector Martin McDonagh (In Bruges, Seven Psychopaths), Frances McDormand plays a grieving mom who doesn’t take kindly to the local sheriff’s failure to arrest her daughter’s killer. With Woody Harrelson, Sam Rockwell and Caleb Landry Jones. (115 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 11/29)

Conquer your weekend NOW with Notes on the Weekend. This e-newsletter maps out the best weekend events every Thursday. Visit sevendaysvt.com/ enews to sign up.

sevendaysvt.com/enews

4t-Now011316.indd 1

MOVIES 73

RATINGS ASSIGNED TO MOVIES NOT REVIEWED BY RICK KISONAK OR MARGOT HARRISON ARE COURTESY OF METACRITIC.COM, WHICH AVERAGES SCORES GIVEN BY THE COUNTRY’S MOST WIDELY READ MOVIE REVIEWERS.

EVERY DAYHH1/2 Two teens’ budding romance is complicated by the fact that one of them literally transforms into a new person every twenty-four hours in this drama based on the YA novel by David Levithan. Angourie Rice, Justice Smith and Debby Ryan star. (95 min, PG-13)

WEEKEND WARRIOR?

SEVEN DAYS

ratings

NOSTALGIAHH1/2 People meditate on the value of beloved possessions in this ensemble drama composed of connected stories, directed by Mark Pellington (Arlington Road) and starring Jon Hamm, Ellen Burstyn, Bruce Dern, Catherine Keener and James Le Gros. (114 min, R)

03.07.18-03.14.18

BLACK PANTHERHHHH Endowed with superhuman powers, the young king (Chadwick Boseman) of African nation Wakanda grapples with the threat of civil war in this Marvel production, which takes place after Captain America: Civil War. With Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong’o and Danai Gurira. Ryan Coogler (Creed) directed. (134 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 2/21)

DEATH WISHH1/2 Horror director Eli Roth (Hostel) remade the 1974 action hit about a family man (Bruce Willis) who starts dealing vigilante justice after a brutal attack on his loved ones. With Vincent D’Onofrio and Elisabeth Shue. (107 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 3/7)

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ANNIHILATIONHHHH Jeff VanderMeer’s cerebral sci-fi trilogy comes to the screen, with Natalie Portman playing a biologist who embarks on an expedition into an environmentally distressed area that seems to defy natural laws. With Jennifer Jason Leigh and Tessa Thompson. Alex Garland (Ex Machina) cowrote and directed. (120 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 2/28)

ARE YOU A

Black Panther

1/12/16 5:05 PM


movies

LOCALtheaters (*) = NEW THIS WEEK IN VERMONT. FOR UP-TO-DATE TIMES VISIT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/MOVIES.

SPEED DATING

WITH A TECH TWIST For active people in their 30s and 40s

MONDAY, APRIL 2, 7-9PM NECTARS, Main St., Burlington Advance $20 • Week of $25

drfrankiespeeddating.com 12v-techdating030718.indd 1

BIG PICTURE THEATER

48 Carroll Rd. (off Rte. 100), Waitsfield, 4968994, bigpicturetheater.info

wednesday 7 — thursday 8 Black Panther Lady Bird Peter Rabbit friday 9 — tuesday 13 Black Panther (except Mon) *A Wrinkle in Time (except Mon)

BIJOU CINEPLEX 4

Rte. 100, Morrisville, 888-3293, bijou4.com

wednesday 7 — thursday 8

Black Panther Fifty Shades Freed 3/5/18 10:40 AMGame Night Peter Rabbit friday 9 — tuesday 13 Black Panther Game Night Peter Rabbit *A Wrinkle in Time

CAPITOL SHOWPLACE 93 State St., Montpelier, 229-0343, fgbtheaters.com

wednesday 7 — thursday 8 Annihilation Game Night Red Sparrow Three Billboards in Ebbing, Missouri friday 9 — thursday 15

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Annihilation Game Night Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (Sat & Sun only) Peter Rabbit (Sat & Sun only) Red Sparrow The Shape of Water Three Billboards in Ebbing, Missouri (Sat & Sun only) *A Wrinkle in Time (2D & 3D)

ESSEX CINEMAS & T-REX THEATER 21 Essex Way, Suite 300, Essex, 879-6543, essexcinemas.com

03.07.18-03.14.18

wednesday 7 — thursday 8

74 MOVIES

SEVEN DAYS

Breakfast Lunch Dinner Take Out

175 Church St, Burlington, VT

Untitled-26 1

Annihilation Black Panther (2D & 3D) Death Wish Every Day Fifty Shades Freed Game Night Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Peter Rabbit Red Sparrow *A Wrinkle in Time (Thu only; 2D & 3D) friday 9 — wednesday 14 Black Panther Death Wish Game Night *Gringo Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Peter Rabbit Red Sparrow The Shape of Water *The Strangers: Prey at Night *A Wrinkle in Time (2D & 3D)

7/31/17 1:48 PM

MAJESTIC 10

190 Boxwood St. (Maple Tree Place, Taft Corners), Williston, 878-2010, majestic10. com

wednesday 7 — thursday 8 The 15:17 to Paris Annihilation Black Panther (2D & 3D) Death Wish Fifty Shades Freed Game Night The Greatest Showman Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Peter Rabbit Red Sparrow The Shape of Water *A Wrinkle in Time (Thu only) friday 9 — wednesday 14 Annihilation Black Panther (2D & 3D) Death Wish Game Night Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Peter Rabbit Red Sparrow The Shape of Water *The Strangers: Prey at Night *A Wrinkle in Time (2D & 3D)

MARQUIS THEATRE Main St., Middlebury, 388-4841, middleburymarquis.com

wednesday 7 Black Panther Call Me by Your Name thursday 8 — thursday 15 Black Panther *A Wrinkle in Time

MERRILL’S ROXY CINEMAS

222 College St., Burlington, 864-3456, merrilltheatres.net

wednesday 7 — thursday 8 Black Panther Call Me by Your Name Lady Bird Nostalgia Phantom Thread Red Sparrow The Shape of Water Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri *A Wrinkle in Time (Thu only) friday 9 — thursday 15 Black Panther Call Me by Your Name Red Sparrow The Shape of Water *Thoroughbreds Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri *A Wrinkle in Time

PALACE 9 CINEMAS

10 Fayette Dr., South Burlington, 864-5610, palace9.com

wednesday 7 — thursday 8 Annihilation Black Panther Darkest Hour Death Wish Game Night

Lady Bird

**National Theatre Live: Hamlet (Thu only) Peter Rabbit The Post Red Sparrow Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri *A Wrinkle in Time (Thu only)

The Insult Lady Bird

friday 9 — thursday 15

STOWE CINEMA 3 PLEX

friday 9 — thursday 15 I, Tonya Lady Bird *Thoroughbreds

Annihilation Black Panther Darkest Hour Death Wish Game Night *Gringo *Hurricane Heist **Met Opera: Semiramide (Sat & Wed only) Red Sparrow *The Strangers: Prey at Night *A Wrinkle in Time **Yu-Gi-Oh! The Movie (Sun & Mon only)

Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-4678, stowecinema.com

PARAMOUNT TWIN CINEMA

155 Porters Point Rd., Colchester, 862-1800, sunsetdrivein.com

wednesday 7 — thursday 8

WELDEN THEATRE

241 North Main St., Barre, 479-9621, fgbtheaters.com

Black Panther (2D & 3D) Peter Rabbit friday 9 — thursday 15

wednesday 7 — thursday 8 Black Panther Game Night Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri friday 9 — thursday 15 Black Panther Game Night *A Wrinkle in Time (2D & 3D)

SUNSET DRIVE-IN Closed for the season.

104 No. Main St., St. Albans, 527-7888, weldentheatre.com

wednesday 7 — thursday 8

Black Panther (2D & 3D) *Hurricane Heist

The 15:17 to Paris Black Panther Game Night

THE SAVOY THEATER

friday 9 — thursday 15

26 Main St., Montpelier, 229-0598, savoytheater.com

wednesday 7 — thursday 8

Black Panther Game Night (except Wed) Peter Rabbit (Sat & Sun only) *A Wrinkle in Time

I, Tonya

LOOK UP SHOWTIMES ON YOUR PHONE!

GO TO SEVENDAYSVT.COM ON ANY SMARTPHONE FOR FREE, UP-TO-THE-MINUTE MOVIE SHOWTIMES, PLUS OTHER NEARBY RESTAURANTS, CLUB DATES, EVENTS AND MORE.


what’s happenin’? BUY TICKETS TO THE COOLEST EVENTS IN TOWN.

EVENTS ON SALE NOW MAKING MODERN MEALS:

How Americans Cook Today with Amy Trubek

WED., MAR. 7 RICHMOND COMMUNITY KITCHEN

Cop Outs & Mr. Doubtfire

Titus Andronicus SAT., MAR. 10 ARTSRIOT, BURLINGTON

FRI., MAR. 9 RUSTY NAIL STAGE, STOWE

MAKING MODERN MEALS.

w

LIVE! Jonathan Richman featuring Tommy Larkins

Jamie Lee Thurston

Swale

SAT., MAR. 10 RUSTY NAIL STAGE, STOWE

FRI., MAR. 9 ZENBARN, WATERBURY CENTER

FEMALE FOUNDER SPEAKERS SERIES EVENT #3:

Baking in French!

Makers Matter

SAT., MAR. 10 BROT BAKERY & SCHOOL, FAIRFAX

MON., MAR. 12 HOTEL VERMONT, BURLINGTON

THU., MAR. 8 ZENBARN, WATERBURY CENTER

INJERA 101

‘Manifesting Mrs. Marx’ Make Your Own Ethiopian Bread! & ‘Syndrome’ as part TUE., MAR. 13 of the One & Only RICHMOND COMMUNITY KITCHEN Solo Series

VSO Presents Jukebox Hillsburn

• No cost to you • Local support

• Built-in promotion • Custom options

SUN., MAR. 18 STARBUCKS, SOUTH BURLINGTON

VIEW MORE EVENTS ONLINE!

Call MADIE AHRENS 865-1020 ext. 10 tickets@sevendaysvt.com

SEVEN DAYS

WE CAN HELP! • Sports • Concerts

ONE-DAY FRENCH

Jamie Lee Thurston IMMERSION: SAT., MAR. 10 Discover Montréal RUSTY NAIL STAGE, From Sky to Earth! STOWE

03.07.18-03.14.18

SAT. & SUN., MAR. 10 & 11 GRANGE HALL CULTURAL CENTER WATERBURY CENTER

SELLING TICKETS? • Fundraisers • Festivals • Plays

SOLD OUT!

FRI., MAR. 16 ARTSRIOT, RUSTY NAIL STAGE, STOWE BURLINGTON

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

FRI., MAR. 9 ARTSRIOT, BURLINGTON

FRI., MAR. 16 ARTSRIOT, BURLINGTON

SAT., MAR. MAR. 817 THU., ARTSRIOT, BURLINGTON ZENBARN, WATERBURY CENTER

MOXIE PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS

Dynamo with Bob Lanzetti

How Americans Cook with BreadToday & Puppet Amy Trubek Presents: The Basic WED., MAR. 7 Show Bye-Bye RICHMOND COMMUNITY KITCHEN

Jonathan Richman featuring Tommy Josh Panda & Hot Larkins Damned WED., MAR. 7

WED., MAR. 7 ARTSRIOT, BURLINGTON

Hillsburn

NEXT WEEK

SEVENDAYSTICKETS.COM

75

1t-tickets030718.indd 1

3/6/18 3:13 PM


fun stuff

FRAN KRAUSE

Have a deep, dark fear of your own? Submit it to cartoonist Fran Krause at deep-dark-fears.tumblr.com, and you may see your neurosis illustrated in these pages.

76 FUN STUFF

SEVEN DAYS

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

EDIE EVERETTE


MORE FUN! STRAIGHT DOPE (P.26) CALCOKU & SUDOKU (P.C-4) CROSSWORD (P.C-5)

MAJORWISE

www.getmajorwise.com

Do you remember your First

Job?

Majorwise works with local High Schools to help students find local Internships, Volunteer Opportunities, and parttime Jobs.

Help students prepare for their future. Untitled-16 1

1/29/18 11:09 AM

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Parkinson’s Disease Support Group

Sponsored by

Frederick C. Binter for Parkinson’s Disease & Movement Disorders

Second Wednesday of every month | 1-2:30 pm

SEVEN DAYS

We welcome all who are suffering from the effects of Parkinson’s Disease. Patients, caregivers, friends and loved ones – this disease affects us all.

Please join us for support, education and camaraderie!

03.07.18-03.14.18

The American Parkinson’s Disease Association and the Frederick C. Binter Center from the University of Vermont Medical Center sponsor a monthly support group for the greater Burlington community.

Located in the East Building Theater Room

What if we told you that you could share your jokes with the world?

185 Pine Haven Shores Rd, Shelburne, VT 802-985-9847 www.residenceshelburnebay.com

TO SUBMIT, GO TO: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOKE.

Untitled-16 1

2/16/18 1:10 PM

FUN STUFF 77

Calling All Jokers!

Independent, Assisted & Memory Care Living


78 FUN STUFF

SEVEN DAYS 03.07.18-03.14.18 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

fun stuff

JEN SORENSEN

RACHEL LIVES HERE NOW HARRY BLISS


REAL FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY MARCH 8-14

PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20)

According to my assessment of the astrological omens, you’re in a favorable phase to gain more power over your fears. You can reduce your susceptibility to chronic anxieties. You can draw on the help and insight necessary to dissipate insidious doubts that are rooted in habit but not based on objective evidence. I don’t want to sound too melodramatic, my dear Pisces, but this is an amazing opportunity! You are potentially on the verge of an unprecedented breakthrough! In my opinion, nothing is more important for you to accomplish in the coming weeks than this inner conquest.

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): On April 23, 1516, the Germanic duchy of Bavaria issued a decree. From that day forward, all beer produced had to use just three ingredients: water, barley and hops. Ever since then, for the last 500-plus years, this edict has had an enduring influence on how German beer is manufactured. In accordance with astrological factors, I suggest that you proclaim three equally potent and systemic directives of your own. It’s an opportune time to be clear and forceful about how you want your story to unfold in the coming years.

anything that lives in two worlds or that has paradoxical qualities. I hope you’ll exult in the educational delights that come from your willingness to be teased and mystified.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The English word “velleity” refers to an empty wish that has no power behind it. If you feel a longing to make a pilgrimage to a holy site but can’t summon the motivation to actually do so, you are under the spell of velleity. Your fantasy of communicating with more flair and candor is a velleity if you never initiate the practical steps to accomplish that goal. Most of us suffer from this weakness at one time or another. But the good news, Virgo, is that you are primed to overcome your version of it during the next six weeks. Life will conspire to assist you if you resolve to turn your wishy-washy wishes into potent action plans — and then actually carry out those plans.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): What’s your most frustrating flaw? During the next seven weeks, you will have enhanced power to diminish its grip on you. It’s even possible you will partially correct it or outgrow it. To take maximum advantage of this opportunity, rise above any covert tendency you might have to cling to your familiar pain. Rebel against the attitude described by novelist Stephen King: “It’s hard to let go. Even when what you’re holding onto is full of thorns, it’s hard to let go. Maybe especially then.”

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In the 2002 film Spiderman, there’s a scene in which the character Mary Jane slips on a spilled drink as she carries a tray full of food through a cafeteria. Spiderman, disguised as his alter ego Peter Parker, makes a miraculous save. He jumps up from his chair and catches Mary Jane before she falls. Meanwhile, he grabs her tray and uses it to gracefully capture her apple, sandwich, carton of milk and bowl of Jell-o before they hit the floor. The filmmakers say they didn’t use CGI to render this scene. The lead actor, Tobey Maguire, allegedly accomplished it in real life — although it took 156 takes before he finally mastered it. I hope you have that level of patient determination in the coming weeks, Libra. You, too, can perform a small miracle if you do.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In his book Whistling in the Dark, author Frederick Buechner writes that the ancient Druids took “a special interest in in-between things like mistletoe, which is neither quite a plant nor quite a tree, and mist, which is neither quite rain nor quite air, and dreams, which are neither quite waking nor quite sleep.” According to my reading of the astrological omens, in-between phenomena will be your specialty in the coming weeks. You will also thrive in relationship to

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scorpio mathematician Benoît Mandelbrot was a connoisseur of “the art of roughness” and “the uncontrolled element in life.” He liked to locate and study the hidden order in seemingly chaotic and messy things. “My life seemed to be a series of events and accidents,” he said. “Yet when I look back, I see a pattern.” I bring his perspective to your attention, Scorpio, because you are entering a phase when the hidden order and secret meanings of your life will

emerge into view. Be alert for surprising hints of coherence.

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I suspect that in July and August you will be invited to commune with rousing opportunities and exciting escapades. But right now I’m advising you to channel your intelligence into well-contained opportunities and sensible adventures. In fact, my projections suggest that your ability to capitalize fully on the future’s rousing opportunities and exciting escapades will depend on how well you master the current crop of well-contained opportunities and sensible adventures. Making the most of today’s small pleasures will qualify you to harvest bigger pleasures later.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): If you saw the animated film The Lion King, you may have been impressed with the authenticity of the lions’ roars and snarls. Did the producers place microphones in the vicinity of actual lions? No. Voice actor Frank Welker produced the sounds by growling and yelling into a metal garbage can. I propose this as a useful metaphor for you in the coming days. First, I hope it inspires you to generate a compelling and creative illusion of your own — an illusion that serves a good purpose. Second, I hope it alerts you to the possibility that other people will be offering you compelling and creative illusions — illusions that you should engage with only if they serve a good purpose. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I do a lot of

self-editing before I publish what I write. My horoscopes go through at least three drafts before I unleash them on the world. While polishing the manuscript of my first novel, I threw away over a thousand pages of stuff that I had worked on very hard. In contrast to my approach, science fiction writer Harlan Ellison dashed off one of his award-winning stories in a single night and published it without making any changes to the first draft. As you work in your own chosen field, Aquarius, I suspect that for the next three weeks you will produce the best results by being more like me than Ellison. Beginning about three weeks from now, an Ellison-style strategy might be more warranted.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ARIES (March 21-April 19): The men who work on offshore oil rigs perform demanding, dangerous tasks on a regular basis. If they make mistakes, they may get injured or befoul the sea with petroleum. As you might guess, the culture on these rigs has traditionally been macho, stoic and hard-driving. But in recent years, that has changed at one company. Shell Oil’s workers in the U.S. were trained by Holocaust survivor Claire Nuer to talk about their feelings, be willing to admit errors and soften their attitudes. As a result, the company’s safety record has improved dramatically. If macho dudes toiling on oil rigs can become more vulnerable and open and tenderly expressive, so can you, Aries. And now would be a propitious time to do it.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): How will you celebrate your upcoming climax and culmination, Taurus? With a howl of triumph, a fist pump and three cartwheels? With a humble speech thanking everyone who helped you along the way? With a bottle of Champagne, a gourmet feast and spectacular sex? However you choose to mark this transition from one chapter of your life story to the next chapter, I suggest that you include an action that will help the next chapter get off to a rousing start. In your ritual of completion, plant seeds for the future.

CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES & DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES: REALASTROLOGY.COM OR 1-877-873-4888

sponsored by:

SEVEN DAYS FUN STUFF 79

...AND LOVIN’ IT!

18 March 8, 20 ing a lot ch at w er ft A ermont V in of Stuck nifer and videos, Jen and their Jesse Bliss hter left g au young d year to Florida last mont. Eva move to Ver ught up ca Sollberger cently to with them re ey like th find out how it here.

Watch at sevendaysvt.com

4H-Stuck030718.indd 1

03.07.18-03.14.18

Eva Sollberger’s

NEW VIDEO!

3/6/18 4:25 PM


For relationships, dates and flirts: dating.sevendaysvt.com

WOMEN Seeking MEN CALM, CHEERFUL, INTERESTED I am basically a happy person with a good family, some fine friends and music in my life. I love being outside. I am retired from teaching and from the ministry. My religion is very important to me. I am looking for a kind, calm, musical friend for talks, walks and, hopefully, snuggles and more. musicdance, 75, l

THOUGHTFUL, HAPPY, ALMOST RETIRED Well, hello. Nice of you to stop browsing and read this informative essay! I am a pleasant, fun, loving woman who prefers outside to in and warm to cold. I would like to meet a kind and caring man who has a sense of adventure. I love to kayak and camp, cook and eat, laugh and have fun. kathy41449, 68, l

80 PERSONALS

SEVEN DAYS

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

HOOSIER GIRL GREEN MOUNTAIN BOUND I am sarcastic, compassionate, driven and motivated. I am looking for friends first and then who knows from there. I travel a lot and want to meet new people, explore new areas and just learn from others. I would love to meet people and grow friendships and maybe even a long-term relationship someday. Molly3791, 44, l GYPSY, GARDENER, GOOD, PLAYFUL GAL Independent person seeking an honest, open, truthful friend to play with who adores live music; likes to dance; is interested in getting hands dirty and growing stuff; enjoys the quieter sports: snowshoeing, walking, biking, swimming and snorkeling; and loves to travel around the USA and overseas. Must be positive, have a sense of humor, smile and understand that, at this stage of life, there is more to life. Wonderinginwaterbury, 60 DOWN-2-EARTH GAL I am a farming enthusiast looking for a man to get my hands dirty with. I love mud. My style: lots of flannel. If I can’t get it muddy, I don’t wear it. Need a man who knows how to use a good tool but is also gentle enough to hold me while I weep. Serious inquiries only. dirtgirl, 22 LADY GARDENER I like literature, photography, local music and shows, growing my own food, cooking with ingredients most people have never even heard of, spending time with family and close friends, Stegner, the occasional gin and tonic on a hot summer evening, dancing in my kitchen (with the blinds closed), traveling, attempting to locate my Zen state, and my dog Oli. ladygardener, 64, l ACTIVE, INDEPENDENT, CURIOUS Fun, curious person seeking someone to share fun times and life experiences with. I’m always up for spontaneous outings and looking for someone who is honest and funny. watergirl5, 55, l

HONEY, TAKE ME DANCING Looking to meet an intelligent man with a happy disposition, an energetic, healthy lifestyle and endless curiosity who can think outside the box and engage in lively conversation. I love to dance (mostly Argentine tango), sing, practice Ashtanga, grow food, be active outdoors, the usual Vermont stuff. I’ve recently returned to Burlington; I’d like to make some single male friends. oceanchild, 62, l INTERESTING, CREATIVE PERSON I like reading, music, gardening, the outdoors and the theater. I’d like someone who shares my interests. mapletree, 38 FUN-LOVING, EASYGOING I enjoy going for drives and exploring new places and finding quaint places to eat. I love sitting at home with a good movie or book, but I also love going out and doing just about anything. I want to find a man who wants to live life and enjoy all it has to offer along with me. LLL78, 40, l CREATIVE ARTIST SEEKS ADVENTURE BUDDY I’m a longtime Burlingtonian. I work as an educator and do odd jobs to support my creative practices. I am pretty satisfied with my world but would love to have some adventures outside of my own daily grind. I love to cook and watch movies and would love to spend more time outdoors. You: independent, kind, socially aware, communicative. jb7, 46, l

CURIOUS? You read Seven Days, these people read Seven Days — you already have at least one thing in common!

All the action is online. Browse more than 2,000 local singles with profiles including photos, voice messages, habits, desires, views and more. It’s free to place your own profile online. Don't worry, you'll be in good company.

l

See photos of this person online.

HONEST, KIND, PASSIONATE, KINKY I enjoy the outdoors, staying active, spending quality time with family and friends, and helping others. I enjoy the simple things in life. 7980, 37 STILL LIVELY/LOVELY AFTER ALL Why lie about age? ’60s music, mores, attitudes persist. Love dancing, rock and roll. Politically, I veer left; culturally, travel and arts attract passion. I’m healthy, flexible, a yoga instructor. Rural. My huge gardens are flourishing — let’s share flowers and fruits, good dinners, lively conversations, deep kisses, more for dessert. My energy level is high; yours needs to match. I’m smart, sexy, fun. Are you? Steamwoman, 70, l EXPERIENCED MASO FOR EXPERIENCED SADIST I’m a local poly masochist. Been on the scene for over a decade. Looking for a local sadist who is looking for both companionship and play/sex with the same person! Emotional, psychological, physical, sexual slut. Looking for experienced sadist, preferably older than me. Looking for an open-minded sadist for this eclectic masochist. CallMeParker, 31, l FLATLANDER LOOKING FOR VERMONTER I enjoy kayaking, motorcycling, nature, crafting and other things. I’d love to meet someone to occupy some of my free time and show me what the locals like to do! I love the Patriots and would love to cuddle with someone to watch them in the playoffs and Super Bowl! If anything I’ve said interests you, please drop me a message! newtovt17, 47, l BLUES AFICIONADO Cheerful, smart, curious, funny and kind. Avid blues fan. I actually like many genres and can dance up a storm when I’m in the mood (which is often)! I’m well traveled, well read and well aware that this may not work out in my favor. All of this is to say that I’m an optimist and willing to take chances. neknative, 63, l SEEKING FELLOW ADVENTURER “I wandered all these years among a world of women, seeking you.” —Jack London, The Seawolf. Independent woman seeks loyal, honest, eclectic (or not) fellow adventurer for travel, bumping into one another in the kitchen, gardening, uplifting conversation and slow dancing. I’m kind, romantic, playful and fit, with good teeth and two left feet. HeyNan, 64, l COUNTRY CUDDLEBUG LOOKING FOR LOVE SWF, 63. I am a down-to-earth person with a kind, loving heart. Looking for the same. Desire an honest, loving gentleman with integrity. A family man with a willingness to open his heart to new adventures. I have many interests and am willing to share yours. Life is too short to not enjoy it. Would love to find a travel partner. Ireland, anyone? IrishRose, 63, l

NONJUDGMENTAL, FRIENDLY, RELAXED I’m friendly, down-to-earth and a bit quirky. I like living alone; don’t want to change that. I don’t want to be the love of anyone’s life — too much responsibility. I’d like to have someone to spend time with — going out or staying in or walking around the block. I’m easily amused and don’t need to be entertained. MToday, 67, l

MEN Seeking WOMEN

GOOD-LOOKING, HIGH-ENERGY GUY Great guy with everything to offer and so much to give. My best traits are my smile, good looks, sexy eyes, being caring and attentive, and the whole package. outdoornatureguy, 53, l HAPPY GUY Hi, and thanks for stopping by. I’m a friendly, smart, attractive man looking for these qualities in a wonderful woman. I’m an independent thinker and can look at both sides of an issue fearlessly. I’m a passionate man looking for a passionate woman. Mellow_Fellow, 63, l LOOKING FOR FUN Hi. I am single, young, 26, independent and sincerely looking for fun. Age is no matter to me. See where it goes. Being single is hard. Thanks for reading. funguyvermont109, 26 BACK IN VT SOON Every day is a most wonderful day. I love clouds, sunsets and waterfalls. I’m outgoing, at times, deep and mysterious at other times, sometimes I’m just me. I enjoy the odd twist life brings. Single a long time. Don’t need a woman to make me whole but would love to date again. Be back in Vermont by April Fools’ Day. Sunshineboy, 57, l LOOKING FOR A DOMINATRIX Start part time, but I would like more. Not much I won’t do. Cutting is off the table, but we’ll explore the rest. Basically looking for someone to “own” me. bookervt, 42 RURAL RECLUSE I’m a loner in search of another loner, someone who likes nature more than the big city. Be curious, self-aware, HWP and not totally averse to tech. BeardoVT, 66 A NEW DAY, NEW BEGINNING Love isn’t about sex, going on fancy dates or showing off. It’s about being with someone who makes you happy in a way that nobody else can. scorpionstiger, 43, l HONEST MAN SEEKING HONEST WOMAN It seems to be more and more difficult to find someone who knows what they want! I want a partner in crime, if you will. I’m looking for an honest, smart, kind woman with a great sense of humor. Someone who is as happy taking weekend trips to other states as just kicking back and enjoying a quiet afternoon. mojo_baby, 49, l COOKING ON ALL FOUR BURNERS Passionate man who loves to cook looking for a woman to sizzle with. I still like to rock and roll or jazz it up Saturday nights (though at a lower volume), with Mozart, omelettes and you for Sunday brunch. Fruit and yogurt on the side? I’m funny, smart, resilient and sometimes silly. Hopefully you are, too. May I take your order? BrunchMan, 58, l

ITALIAN LOOKING FOR HIS LADY Traveled, open-minded, sense of humor, attentive, good conversationalist, listener, romantic. Some interests: traveling, bicycling, walking, crosscountry skiing, snowshoeing, theater, cinema, dining in and out. Looking for someone with some similar interests who is open-minded. Denero, 78, l TRUSTWORTHY, FUNNY, LOYAL, SMART, INTERESTING Hello, my name is Paul! I like music, movies, singing, and visiting with friends and family. I don’t have a car, unfortunately. I like dogs and playing with my bass. And what I’m looking for is a girl who is compassionate, trusting, loyal. If you think we’re a good match, please reach out and contact me. Thanks so much. Ph123, 25, l CURIOUS INTRO/EXTROVERT SEEKING THOUGHTFUL OTHER About me: I truly love life with all its ups, downs and brief moments of clarity. :) Every morning I start my day going to the window, looking out with curiosity, awe, optimism and appreciation for another day. I try to harness for the day the clear optimism I feel in those brief morning moments. easygoing1, 61 SUBMISSIVE CUCKOLD PANTY SNIFFER Single, submissive male experienced in erotic massage and oral body cleaning. Seeking women to serve. singlecuckold, 52 LAID-BACK, HONEST, FUNNY I don’t take myself too seriously. I can see the good side of everyone I meet. Pretty positive most of the time. A little company would be great. I’d like to make someone else happy. Dghacket, 54, l ROMANCE AT ITS BEST Hello. I am a romantic guy. I have accomplished all my goals. Let’s see if we can work on your list of goals. I am down-to-earth, no drama, funny and get along with most everyone. Outside in the summer, cuddle in the winter. Travel once a year. Give me a try. 53, SWM, Colchester, average, blue eyes. oneonone, 53

WOMEN Seeking WOMEN COUPLE SEEKING TO EXPLORE Cute and curious hetero couple seeks clean, adventurous female for some playtime in bed. coookielove, 38 COUPLE SEEKING WOMAN FOR ONGOING RELATIONSHIP We are deeply in love with life. Never boring, always genuine. Seeking a woman with the potential for an ongoing relationship. We enjoy meeting new people, learning new things and music — lots of good, loud music! We seek deep conversations that end in pleasure. Interested in an attractive couple with genuinely kind souls? If so, reach out and introduce yourself. MoonGirl, 31 TRANS WOMAN SEEKS SOUL MATE I love being active outside, and love animals, music, dining out, being crafty. I am looking for a partner in crime with whom I share a lasting bond. Someone who will treat me like the lady I am and loves me for me. If you’re curious, let me know! 802Butterfly, 33, l


Internet-Free Dating!

SWM who voted for Shirley Chisholm for president would like to connect with Passumpsic River Watershed woman for drumming in support of each other’s shamanic journeying. #L1147 I’m a 60-y/o male seeking a female in the age group of 25 to 61. Enjoy country music and LTRs. Don’t drink or smoke. Live in the Northeast Kingdom. #L1146 SWM, 5’8, seeking serious relationship with SWF, 40 to 54. FWB/casual sex don’t work for me. Want sex mornings, nights and again the next day. One to three times weekly. Communication barrier. Will you learn? #L1145 I’m a fit 30-y/o blond female. I like to laugh, love music and do things. Looking for a good guy to grab a beer with, a burger, maybe catch a Lake Monsters game. Not looking for a player, nor do I want someone looking to put another notch on their belt. Again, looking for a good, honest guy 25 to 35. #L1151

SWF seeks SWM, 58 to 70, Burlington. Good-hearted, honest, clean-cut, career type, nonsmoker, no drugs. Politically right minded. Phone number, please. I like the forest, nature, oldies music, road trips, long walks, breakfast in diners. 5’7, average build, brown hair. #L1149

I’m a 62-y/o male seeking a 40to 70-y/o female. Trustworthy guy looking for a female companion who listens to VPR, gardens and is up for jumping into the world of sheep farming together. Perks: your own handy man and a spot in a motorcycle sidecar. #L1150

63-year-young, fit female who loves reading, the outdoors and pretty much all the things we love about Vermont. Like intelligent conversation, manners and dressing up. Sense of humor and don’t smoke? Friendship first and see where it goes? #L1148

HOW TO REPLY TO THESE MESSAGES:

MAIL TO: Seven Days Love Letters

P.O. Box 1164, Burlington, VT 05402 PAYMENT: $5/response. Include cash or check

I’m a single guy, 59, looking for love, respect and happiness. Age and race is open. Love the outdoors. Looking for a single female, 30+. Romantic. #L1140

I’m a 50-y/o SWM in Colchester seeking a 18- to 50-y/o males. Fairly good/young-looking, 5’9, 160 pounds, brown and blue, seeking guys of any race, 18 to 50, who can last a long time. Tall, thin guys a plus for me. Discreet, oral and a bottom. #L1136

Senior lady, widowed, looking to see mailbox full of letters instead of junk mail. Men in your late 60s into 70s, tell me about yourself. Let’s get acquainted. Who knows what the future will bring. God bless all. #L1138

I’m a GWM, 54 y/o, seeking interested folks 40 to 60 y/o for conversation, gettogethers and maybe more. I’m easygoing, intelligent and like a bit of spice in life. Central Vermont, south of Rutland. #L1135

SWF seeks SWM, 58 to 68, Burlington area. Clean-cut, tall, average build, intelligent with positive attitude. Nonsmoker, no drugs. Me: 5’8, average build, medium-length brown hair. Politically right. Friendship first. #L1137

32-y/o polyamorous F looking for something more than just a hookup. An old soul who likes crafting, constantly learning new things and being an experience junkie! If this sounds good, or you’re looking for an adventure partner, feel free to reach out! #L1134

32-y/o female! Free-spirited, fit. Love adventures, reading, real estate, wine and lots of laughs. #L1130

Describe yourself and who you’re looking for in 40 words below:

Required confidential info:

(OR, ATTACH A SEPARATE PIECE OF PAPER.)

__________________________________________

I’m a _________________________________________________ ______

NAME

AGE + GENDER (OPTIONAL)

seeking a____________________________________________ ___________ AGE + GENDER (OPTIONAL)

__________________________________________ ADDRESS

_______________________________________________________

__________________________________________

_______________________________________________________

__________________________________________

_______________________________________________________

ADDRESS (MORE)

CITY/STATE

03.07.18-03.14.18

(made out to “Seven Days”) in the outer envelope. To send unlimited replies for only $15/month, call Ashley at 802-865-1020, ext. 37 for a membership (credit accepted).

56-y/o woman wanting to meet the right man. Honest, loving, funny. Someone to cook with, hold hands with, cuddle with. Communication is key to a good relationship. Someone who loves to slow dance, even at home. You want someone to love? Take a chance. #L1141

I’m a SW BBW, 24, seeking SM, 21+. Shy at first, not one to make first move. Varied interests; music and book lover. Someday author. I want to explore life’s options. Friends first, maybe lovers, maybe more. Beards and tattoos VERY welcome. #L1139

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Seal your reply — including your preferred contact info — inside an envelope. Write your penpal’s box number on the outside of that envelope and place it inside another envelope with payment.

I’m a 65-y/o female seeking a 65+-y/o male. I’m a widow looking to share friendship and a wonderful family. #L1142

Reply to these messages with real, honest-to-goodness letters. DETAILS BELOW.

__________________________________________

1

Submit your FREE message at sevendaysvt.com/loveletters or use the handy form at right.

_______________________________________________________

2

We’ll publish as many messages as we can in the Love Letters section above.

3

Interested readers will send you letters in the mail. No internet required!

MAIL TO: SEVEN DAYS LOVE LETTERS • PO BOX 1164, BURLINGTON, VT 05402 OPTIONAL WEB FORM: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/LOVELETTERS HELP: 802-865-1020, EXT. 37, LOVELETTERS@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

ZIP

__________________________________________ PHONE

SEVEN DAYS

PUBLISH YOUR MESSAGE ON THIS PAGE!

_______________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________

and I-Spy sections must be submitted online at dating.sevendaysvt.com.

PERSONALS 81

THIS FORM IS FOR LOVE LETTERS ONLY. Messages for the Personals


i SPY

If you’ve been spied, go online to contact your admirer!

dating.sevendaysvt.com

WINTER BLUES We were both there to see Bob Wagner and Josh Panda. Several times you looked over at me and smiled. I looked at you; you were with someone, and I try to respect that. You are a very pretty young woman with medium-length blond hair. I should have tried harder. I hope it’s not too late! When: Thursday, March 1, 2018. Where: ArtsRiot. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914288 RED HEN BAKERY ON SATURDAY We were standing in line, and I was focused on the cinnamon buns — that is, until you caught my eye and we tried to pronounce the name of that baked good. If you want to meet back up to sample some of their other goodies (and practice pronouncing that name), please let me know. I enjoyed our short encounter! When: Saturday, March 3, 2018. Where: Red Hen. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914287

82 PERSONALS

SEVEN DAYS

03.07.18-03.14.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

HOT PSYCHOLOGIST IN VERGENNES You came into the bar. I made an ass out of myself but bought you a drink to apologize. You had to run out and do some shopping. That night in December still makes me chuckle. Maybe I’ll see you at the bar again sometime. Summer is coming! When: Thursday, December 21, 2017. Where: Church Street. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914286 LANTMAN’S, MONDAY 2/26 We exchanged several glances around 6:45. You have black hair and a black beard. I was wearing a black hat, a black jacket and have long curly hair. If you’re single, we should grab a coffee/drink sometime. Reply back to this I-Spy with the color of my hair. When: Monday, February 26, 2018. Where: Lantman’s, Hinesburg. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914285 THOUGHT YOU WERE FROM NZ OK, I was wrong about you being from NZ. (Doesn’t happen often, LOL). We have a North Ave. connection. Anyhow, would you two like to have dinner sometime soon? Can’t get in trouble that way. I know a good restaurant or two. When: Wednesday, February 28, 2018. Where: North Ave. pub. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914284 A COUPLE GLANCES AT HANNAFORD We shared a couple of glances the other day. (6 p.m.) Thought moments later that I should have asked you out for a drink. Then, on second thought, maybe she doesn’t drink? In those few moments, I was intrigued. Coffee, maybe? When: Monday, February 26, 2018. Where: Hannaford, North Ave.. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914283 LAURA I really didn’t have any reason to stop by. It was only to say hi to you. Enjoy the real sunshine. When: Tuesday, February 27, 2018. Where: S. Royalton. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914282

RADIO BEAN Corner booth: Damn. When: Saturday, February 24, 2018. Where: Radio Bean. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914281 WILL, I AM LOOKING FOR YOU! Will: Wait, what just happened? We first connected online, and you had me at “Once you meet me, you won’t need to meet anyone else.” We connected on Google hangouts, and there was a technical glitch and you cut me off! Just want to say I am the real deal. It’s the gypsy woman from Waterbury. When: Wednesday, February 14, 2018. Where: online. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914280 GOOD DANCER, EH? To the dark-haired, sharply dressed gent: Overheard a conversation about you being a really good dancer. Maybe a twirl around the dance floor sometime? Spoiler alert: I can’t dance, but I can be a good student! When: Thursday, February 15, 2018. Where: Mehuron’s Market. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914279 NORTH CAPTIVA You screamed my name like Brando. / So many flavorful memories: Kismet, Honey Road, Maglianero… / It is no coincidence that I met you. / My toes are painted Carolina blue. / I wanted to go to Bubba’s island with you. When: Saturday, February 10, 2018. Where: Juniper, Burlington. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914278 LOST PEN, FOUND CONNECTION? You played a super fun show with Big Night. You borrowed my pen, and I offered to let you keep it. I regret not attaching my number to it. Hopeful for a second opportunity. Any chance you’d want to grab a drink and help me perfect my two-step? When: Tuesday, February 20, 2018. Where: Radio Bean. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914277 POOKEY ARTICHOOKEY I’m doing it. Life is meant to be lived. My favorite moment is when you had me stop driving out of Camel’s Hump so you could pick flowers. I hope to see you soon, and perhaps this is a catalyst for you to finally see me the way I see you. When: Thursday, February 22, 2018. Where: Burlington. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914276 2,000 YEARS A strange but familiar feeling that we had secrets from another lifetime. The intense moment when my soul recognized yours before we were ever introduced. The most beautiful view my eyes have ever seen has been watching happiness fill every inch of your being. Kirby, cheers to our friendship, our passion and our future. When: Friday, September 1, 2017. Where: Positive Pie, Barre. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914274

CRUELTY, MANIPULATION, MEANINGLESSNESS “Nobody sits like this rock sits. You rock, rock. The rock just sits and is. You show us how to just sit here, and that’s what we need.” Let’s go out to dinner and see a movie. Happy birthday, CA. When: Sunday, January 28, 2018. Where: Jay Peak. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914273 MAGLIANERO MONDAY We were spending time at Maglianero on Presidents’ Day around 3 p.m. You: tall, Irish-looking gent with curly, dark brown locks. Another café-goer joined you at your round table, and you took a phone call. Me: smiling, blue-eyed lady with a turquoise sweater, working in the armchair. Words cannot espress ... o, what it was about you. When: Monday, February 19, 2018. Where: Maglianero. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914272 A ROSE FOR VALENTINE’S DAY I left you a gift in the form of a rose for Valentine’s Day, hoping you’d figure out it was me. I was too shy to give it to you face-to-face, so I left it on your car at work. Anyway, I hope it brought a smile to your face. When: Wednesday, February 14, 2018. Where: Mehuron’s Market. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914268 RICHMOND MARKET BABE ALERT Wow. You’re gorgeous! I couldn’t bring myself to approach you. You had shoulder-length beautiful blond hair. You smiled at me and made my day. I wish I could rewind time so that I could at least tell you how beautiful you are. You deserve to hear that at least once a day. When: Saturday, February 10, 2018. Where: Richmond Market. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914267 NICE FACE AT MONTPELIER CO-OP You caught me huffing beeswax candles around noon, then our eyes met (I think) several times across the store. You: around my age, tall, dark-haired man with a nice face. I wish we’d said hi. I hope your week is full of love. When: Sunday, February 11, 2018. Where: Hunger Mountain Co-op, Montpelier. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914266 I ‘RECALL’ YOU You worked with me via email to schedule a recall appointment on my vehicle. After the appointment was over, you told me about the area and a restaurant I must try, as I am new to the area. Your name is Ray. Had we met outside of your work, I would have asked if you wanted to go to that restaurant sometime. When: Wednesday, January 17, 2018. Where: Barre. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914265 THINGS I REGRET You don’t know who I am now. You have no right to dismiss me like this. I could give you a lot in the ways of love and life. I messed up, but this isn’t fair, CM. I do love you, and I do remember why. When: Sunday, September 10, 2017. Where: Montpelier. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914264 PARTING IS SUCH SWEET SORROW Dear smart__beautiful woman who helped me discover my truth: You are a precious part of my story. “Happiness is like a butterfly which, when pursued, is always beyond our grasp, but which, if you will sit down quietly, may alight upon you.” —Nathaniel Hawthorne. And so I sit until the day when you feel it is time to alight upon me. When: Friday, January 12, 2018. Where: Shelburne Bay. You: Woman. Me: Woman. #914263

LAST WORDS! After years of dispensing advice, Athena is moving on to other adventures. Meet our new columnist next week!

Your wise counselor in love, lust and life

ASK ATHENA Dear Athena,

My girlfriend wants me to go down on her, but I feel selfconscious about doing it. I know she wants me to, since I never have. What if the smell bothers me? And she goes down on me, so I feel bad. Am I a bad boyfriend? What should I do?

Signed,

Dear B F,

Bad BF

You’re not bad; you just need some guidance. I agree that returning the oral favor would be a good move, especially if she’s been asking you to take a trip to vag town. Here are some tips to help you feel confident and make this experience as enjoyable as possible — for both of you. If smell is a concern, why not start this adventure in the shower? Talking to her about your odor anxiety would make her self-conscious and be a big no-no. But soaping up together would get you both squeaky clean, turned on and ready to have fun. Enjoy a shower, then escort her to a cozy place where she can get comfortable. Comfort is key, and you might suggest she lie down with a pillow under her bottom so you have easy access. Make sure her legs are spread nice and wide. Invite her to relax so she knows you aren’t in a rush — she needs to feel that you’re excited to please her. Rushing someone to orgasm has never gotten anyone anywhere. Start by teasing her with your tongue. Kissing her thighs and stomach or taking a long lick of her clitoris are enticing ways to get started. Think of it like licking an ice cream cone; avoid stiff, jabbing motions. If you do something she’s into, she might drive her pelvis toward you, or her breathing might change. Connect with these nonverbal messages and give her more of what she’s enjoying. You might even ask her what she likes — maybe she prefers labia action; maybe clitoral stimulation is her thing. Encourage audience participation. At some point, you might need to take a little break. That’s fine! If you aren’t having fun, she’ll likely pick up on that. Keep things going by switching to your fingers for a bit. You might even use a vibrator — that could really shake things up. The important thing is that you proceed with love. Worry less about you and focus more on her. Think of your happy place, and then take her there with your tongue.

Yours,

Athena


BRENT HARREWYN

vermontrestaurantweek.com PRESENTED BY

TO BENEFIT

Hungry for spring? 107 PARTICIPATING RESTAURANTS (SO FAR)

* = NEW IN 2018

During Vermont Restaurant Week, the state’s best eateries offer inventive prix-fixe dinners for $20, $30 or $40 per person. Try lunch, brunch or breakfast specials, too! PREMIER SPONSORS

*

*

*

*

*

*

* *

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

SEVEN DAYS

*

Juniper Kismet The Kitchen Table Bistro La Casa Burrito Leunig’s Bistro & Café The Lobby The Mad Taco (Montpelier, Waitsfield) Magic Hat Artifactory Michael’s on the Hill The Mill at Simon Pearce Misery Loves Co. Morgan’s Tavern at the Middlebury Inn Mule Bar NECI on Main New Moon Café Notte Neapolitan Pizza Bar The Old Foundry at One Federal Restaurant and Lounge The Old Post Our House Bistro Park Squeeze The Parker House Inn & Bistro Pascolo Ristorante Pauline’s Café Picnic Social Pizzeria Veritá

03.07.18-03.14.18

*

Cork Wine Bar & Market of Stowe The Daily Planet Dedalus Wine Shop, Market & Wine Bar deMena’s Doc Ponds East West Café Edson Hill Dining Room & Tavern El Cortijo Taqueria y Cantina Esperanza Restaurante The Farmhouse Tap & Grill Fire & Ice Restaurant Grazers The Great Northern Green Goddess Café The Gryphon Guild Tavern Hen of the Wood (Burlington, Waterbury) Hired Hand Brewing Hyde Away Inn and Restaurant Idletyme Brewing Company J. Morgan’s Steakhouse Joyce’s Noodle House Junction at the Essex: Vermont’s Culinary Resort & Spa

*

*

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

¡Duino! Duende 3 Squares Café A Single Pebble Agave Taco and Tequila Casa Allium ArtsRiot August First Bakery & Café Bar Antidote Barkeaters Restaurant The Bearded Frog The Bench Bistro de Margot Black Krim Tavern Bleu Northeast Seafood Blue Cat Steak & Wine Bar Blue Paddle Bistro Bluebird Barbecue Butch + Babe’s Café Provence Charlie B’s Pub & Restaurant at Stoweflake Citizen Cider City Market, Onion River Co-op (both locations) Cook Academy at the Essex Resort Coriander

Positive Pie (Barre, Hardwick, Montpelier , Plainfield ) Prohibition Pig The Reservoir Restaurant & Tap Room Revolution Kitchen Rí Rá Irish Pub Roots the Restaurant Rough Cut Sarducci’s Restaurant & Bar Sherpa Kitchen Sotto Enoteca The Spot Starry Night Café Stone Corral Brewery Storm Café Stowe Bowl Sweetwaters Table 24 Restaurant Tavern at the Essex: Vermont’s Culinary Resort & Spa Three Brothers Pizza & Grill Three Penny Taproom Tourterelle Trattoria Delia Tres Amigos Vermont Pub & Brewery Waterworks Food + Drink Wicked Wings (Essex, Johnson) The Windjammer Restaurant Zenbarn

MEDIA SUPPORT

$3 provides 5 meals 1t-rw030718.indd 1

3/6/18 6:43 PM

83

to Vermonters in need.

In 2017, with your help, we raised more than $20,000 for Vermont Foodbank. Help us connect all Vermonters with local, healthy food.


MyChoice Mortgage Your loan. Your rate. Your choice. NEFCU puts you in control of the refinance process. With NEFCU’s MyChoice Mortgage, we don’t choose the terms of your loan – you do!

Pick your interest rate (fiixed (fi xed rates from as low as 2.125% APR*)

Pick your loan term (from 1-10 years)

· No appraisal needed (in most cases) · Minimal closing costs Ready to learn more? Call us at 866.80.LOANS, visit the NEFCU branch nearest you, or apply online. *APR=Annual Percentage Rate. The APR is the Credit Union’s “as low as” rate effective February 6 6, 2018 8. PAYMENT EXAMPLES: The monthly payment on a 10 year loan with a rate of 3.25% APR would be $9.77 77 per $1,000 borrowed. The monthly payment on a 1 year loan with a rate of 2.125% APR would be $84.30 per $1,000 borrowed. All Credit Union loan programs, rates, terms and conditions are subject to change at any time without notice. Rate listed is for a refinance mortgage on owner-occupied single family detached primary residences only. Other restrictions may apply. NMLS#446767

Local, affordable, and on your side™. 800-400-8790 · nefcu.com

NMLS #446767

Federally Insured by NCUA

866.80.LOANS · nefcu.com Untitled-16 1

3/1/18 3:41 PM


Seven Days, March 7, 2018  

Vermont Teens Raise Their Voices to Affect Change; White River Junction’s Engine Room on Right Track; Wild Hart Distillery Launches in Shelb...

Seven Days, March 7, 2018  

Vermont Teens Raise Their Voices to Affect Change; White River Junction’s Engine Room on Right Track; Wild Hart Distillery Launches in Shelb...

Advertisement