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VE R MO NT ’S INDE PEN DENT VO IC E JANUARY 17-24, 2018 VOL.23 NO.18 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

THE WELLNESS GAME

GOOD GANJA?

PAGE 30

Experts weigh in on pot safety

OIL CHANGE

PAGE 32

Shirodhara therapy explained

EATING PASTE

PAGE 42

The many marvels of miso


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THE LAST WEEK IN REVIEW JANUARY 10-17, 2018 COMPILED BY SASHA GOLDSTEIN, MATTHEW ROY & ANDREA SUOZZO PHOTOS: SASHA GOLDSTEIN

New structures at the Burlington Surf Club

ROUGH ROAD

A proposed Vermont Senate bill would require bicycle owners to register their wheels for a $28 fee. Share the road … costs?

GOP-ETERED OUT

WHAT’S COOKING AT

BLODGETT?

T

tweet of the week: @JaneLindholm Last night I tried to listen to a meditation podcast at 2X speed. I don’t think that’s how you’re supposed to do it. #fail FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSVT OUR TWEEPLE: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/TWITTER

A CHICKEN CROSSES A ROAD — OR TWO Jersey, relied on experience he had caring for the animals as a former member of the Alpha Gamma Rho fraternity, which kept a brood. He gave the hen some oats and a bowl of water. Lawrence brought home brunch leftovers, and they named the chicken Penny after the spot where they’d eaten: Penny Cluse Café. The hen “just spent most of the day hanging out in the bathroom, staying warm and eating fruit,” Bennett said. The couple posted a note about the found fowl on Black Market-U, a Facebook group with nearly 17,000 members. Bennett included a photo of the hen huddled behind a toilet. The comments streamed in. A woman on

Saturday had posted on Front Porch Forum that her chicken, Jane, had left her yard on Archibald Street. Bennett gave the woman a call, but that bird was white — not speckled. Among the jokes and notes of concern was a message from someone who knew Penny’s owner. By 4:30 p.m. Sunday, the bird was headed home. She’d been missing since Friday after wandering from the owner’s College Street property, according to Bennett. The owner was “super happy we found his chicken,” Bennett said. “He was like, ‘They’re resilient birds!’” Guess so.

LAST SEVEN 5

wo University of Vermont students helped save a black-and-white-speckled hen from freezing to death in Burlington over the weekend. Alex Bennett and his girlfriend, Meaghan Lawrence, found the chilled chicken sitting in a snowbank on South Willard Street around 9 a.m. Sunday after a subzero night. The quick-thinking couple brought the sturdy clucker to Lawrence’s nearby apartment. “She let her roommates know that there was a chicken in the bathroom,” Bennett said. “They were fine with it.” Bennett, a 20-year-old junior from New

SEVEN DAYS

COURTESY OF ALEX BENNETT

Severe flooding hit Swanton and other Vermont towns after temps rose and then fell sharply last week. And it’s still only January…

1. “Vermont Senate Sends Marijuana Legalization Bill to Governor” by Taylor Dobbs. In the first week of this year’s legislative session, the House and Senate both approved a marijuana legalization bill. 2. “Walters: Scott Says He’ll Sign Bill Legalizing Marijuana in Vermont” by John Walters. Though he vetoed a marijuanalegalization bill last year, Gov. Phil Scott says he’ll sign it this time around. 3. “Panera Bread Closing on Church Street” by Sally Pollak. Outdoor Gear Exchange will expand into the neighboring space. 4. “One Controversial Coyote Hunt Is Canceled, and Another Crops Up” by Molly Walsh. Animal rights groups are calling on state officials to ban coyote hunting, which is allowed year-round in Vermont. 5. “Media Note: Top Burlington Free Press Editor Fired After Controversial Tweets” by Taylor Dobbs. Gannett executives said Denis Finley was fired for violations of the company’s social media policy.

WHAT’S WEIRD IN VERMONT

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Scully has in mind other eventual uses for the 16-acre property and its 150,000 square feet of industrial and office space. The property is not zoned for residential or hotels, he said, so those options are out. But he’s talking to economic development officials about recruiting a tech company to relocate to Vermont. “One of my goals for those buildings is to use them, to create an opportunity to attract another big business that we couldn’t get to Vermont without a site like this,” he said. Meantime, he said, he hopes the surf club will spur interest in the welfare of the massive lake. “The more people we can get out on the water, the more people will care about the water quality and do their part,” he said. Scully is meeting with neighbors to discuss plans for the property at 5:30 p.m. on January 18 at the St. John’s Club, which offers water sports and scenic views right next door.

GONE TO POT

Residents opposed the location for a proposed medical marijuana dispensary in Bennington. So, in whose backyard?

That’s the percentage of children ages 5 and under in state custody who are there because of family opioid use, according to a new report from Vermont-based Building Bright Futures.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

he former Blodgett Oven property on Lake Champlain in Burlington could become a members-only club with access to water sports and scenic views. Russ Scully and his wife, Roxanne, purchased the tract last year for $14.3 million but said little at the time about their plans for it. On Monday, Russ Scully told Seven Days reporter Molly Walsh that the new Burlington Surf Club would be up and running on May 1. The club will offer paddleboard and windsurfing lessons, as well as small catamaran sailing. The Scullys plan to relocate rentals and lessons they have been offering elsewhere through their store, WND&WVS. Scully envisions yoga classes in an open-air pavilion. Membership rates have not been set, he said. Blodgett Oven is moving to Essex, but the company has a lease for the Burlington plant that will keep workers there through 2018.

The Burlington Republican Party postponed its caucus Saturday because not enough people showed up. They’re blaming it on bad weather.

50


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FEEDback READER REACTION TO RECENT ARTICLES

MISSING THE POINT

Can Seven Days amend [Off Message: “Walters: Ex-Freeps Editor Finds a Friend on Fox News,” January 11] to include an explanation of a journalist’s code of ethics? That is at the core of the Burlington Free Press editor’s dismissal. Journalists are required to remain neutral and report without bias. Regardless of the content of Finley’s tweets, to comment publicly like he did places a shadow over the fair and balanced reporting of his newsroom. In this era of fake news, that is not something that can be taken lightly, and the public could benefit from understanding this pillar of journalism. Emily McManamy

STARKSBORO

McManamy is a former Burlington Free Press photojournalist.

JOURNALISM 101

[Re Off Message: “Media Note: Top Burlington Free Press Editor Fired After Controversial Tweets,” January 8]: In 1970, when I was Free Press capitol bureau chief, I was married to a staffer for Phil Hoff’s Senate campaign. One day my editor, Gordon Mills, called me into the office to say he had received complaints that I was driving to events with a Hoff sticker on my car. But, I pointed out, it was my wife’s car, so of course she had a Hoff sticker on it, and if I were paid more, I could buy my own car

TIM NEWCOMB

without a sticker. Not surprisingly, I lost the argument. The Freeps, regardless of any other strengths or weaknesses, has always had a strict policy separating personal and editorial opinions, and I, for one, am glad to see it is still enforced, at least in this case! Steve Carlson

HINESBURG

ILLOGICAL IDLING LAW

I’m the Burlington-born trucker who was quoted in last week’s anti-idling-law story [802Much: “Warming Up,” January 10]. If I got it right, John King, who is Burlington’s parking enforcer, decided that he would look the other way at scofflaws of the local anti-idling law, due to the recent extended arctic-cold blast. Bless his heart. The logic — or illogic! — of King once again shows Burlington to be a big joke of a little city with ridiculous, silly-ass regulations. Logically, the prime time to enforce an anti-idling law would be when it’s bitter cold and engines are left idling. If, in other words, this antiidling law is to be effective, tickets would be written when drivers are most likely to be idling their engines: in cold weather. Furthermore, the fact that King’s staff has written only six idling tickets in 53 weeks demonstrates that this anti-idling law is just another way for King and Burlington to show that they write tickets totally arbitrarily and simply like pissing off motorists. Idling violations — at $12 —  cost less than the $15 assessed for meter violations,


WEEK IN REVIEW

which clearly demonstrates that idling is close to a zero problem in Burlington. Daniel G. Cohen

BURLINGTON

VEGGIE TALES

I was interested to read the article about the expression “had the radish” [WTF, December 20, 2017]. Let me tell you what the origin has always been for this Vermonter, an origin I’ve retold as if it were gospel. The next time you have a nice garden salad in a wooden bowl with an oil-based dressing, just before you’re finished eating it, look at the bottom of the bowl. What will you see? Only the thin slices of radish, which are more elusive to spear with a fork than onions, lettuce, tomatoes or other ingredients! Thus, when you have “had the radish,” you are truly done with the salad. And with that comes the meaning, “You’ve come to the end”; you are now finished with a task, simply exhausted or otherwise. Scott Sabol

NORTHFIELD

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Editor’s note: Walsh’s original story, “Surrender Dorothy?” [June 21, 2017], fully explains the controversy.

WINES OF THE WEEK

CORRECTION

Last week’s cover story, “Time Keepers,” misrepresented the closing of the Brandon Historical Society. Its assets were given to the newly formed nonprofit Stephen A. Douglas Birthplace and Brandon Museum in 2012.

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[Re Off Message: “Library Board Pushes to Rename Dorothy Canfield Fisher Award,” January 11]: Molly Walsh’s posting about the state library board’s recommendation to rename the Dorothy Canfield Fisher Book Award could only capture highlights of the board’s months-long tussle with Vermont’s surprisingly little-known eugenics and sterilization movement and the association with it, to varying degrees, of prominent Vermonters such as Fisher, then a popular author and passionate publicist for the state.

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We went to see Ethan Hubbard’s didactic collection of photographs of Vermont country folk and farmers of the early/mid last century because of a descriptive article in Seven Days [“Picturing Vermont,” December 6, 2017]. Thank you! It was one of the highlights of 2017 for us. Hubbard’s photos, black and white in large format, are exquisite, but equally astounding are his short texts, which accompany each photo. In fewer than 200 words, Hubbard captures the essence of what he found so arresting about the people of then-backcountry Vermont in each photograph. He is as much a master of words as he is of pictured life. We now look forward to March, when the Vermont Folklife Center will feature the works of another of these three photographic artists: Richard W. Brown.

While eugenics played a prominent role in this overall discussion, the board also received recommendations to rename the award to reflect a more contemporary association and to avoid confusion between Fisher’s initials — DCF — and today’s Vermont Department for Children and Families, also DCF. Ultimately, given the board’s primary objective of promoting reading among Vermont school-age children and children’s literature, it voted to urge State Librarian Scott Murphy to change the name and update the program. Simultaneously, members stated their appreciation for Fisher’s contributions over time. While I felt duty bound to recommend that the board call upon the State of Vermont and University of Vermont to investigate their sorry promotion of eugenics and sterilization in the 1920s and 1930s, my colleagues raised legitimate points that this was not within our jurisdiction. As an individual, though, I remain convinced that the state and university have an obligation to history to expose our eugenics past and honor the memories of those governor Stanley Wilson and the legislature chillingly labeled “idiots, imbeciles, feebleminded or insane persons.” Other states have done so; why not Vermont?


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contents

LOOKING FORWARD

fresh

JANUARY 17-24, 2018 VOL.23 NO.18

Admit it: The resolutions we made three weeks ago look a lot like those we made a year ago … if not five years ago. But, as this issue highlights every midJanuary, wellness is about more than eating better and exercising. (Keep that up, though, especially when in the care of CARDIAC REHAB SPECIALIST DR. PHILIP ADES.) Sometimes the best way to heal mind, body and soul is to slow down, as we learned at a new SOMATIC MOVEMENT STUDIO in Montpelier. Some therapies get a little messy, like the slick AYURVEDIC TREATMENT that soothed a writer in Stowe. Pot can be relaxing, too. Just be sure to PARTAKE SAFELY — once it’s legal. Meantime, you could MEDITATE WITH THC’s legal cousin, CBD. And when munchies strike, discover the healthful MAGIC OF MISO.

NEWS 14

Ward 3 Candidates Talk Transparency, the Mall and Momos

FEATURES 30

BY MOLLY WALSH

16

Is Gentrification Inevitable in Burlington’s Old North End? Vermont’s Addiction Expert, John Brooklyn, Is in Demand BY ALICIA FREESE

20

34

BY SEVEN DAYS STAFF

22

36

Champlain College Students Produce a Wellness Magazine New Year, New Works: Buffing Up on Local Theater

BY JACQUELINE LAWLER

38

Desert Dreams

Food: Eating Mauritanian food under a tent at La Khama in Montréal

BY JORDAN ADAMS

COLUMNS + REVIEWS 12 26 29 39 59 63 66 72 82

Fair Game POLITICS Drawn & Paneled ART WTF Side Dishes FOOD Soundbites MUSIC Album Reviews Talking Art Movie Reviews Ask Athena SEX

SECTIONS 11 21 44 54 58 66 72

The Magnificent 7 Life Lines Calendar Classes Music Art Movies

FUN STUFF

straight dope mr. brunelle explains it all deep dark fears this modern world edie everette iona fox red meat jen sorensen harry bliss rachel lives here now free will astrology personals

CLASSIFIEDS vehicles housing services homeworks buy this stuff music legals calcoku/sudoku crossword support groups puzzle answers jobs

C-2 C-2 C-2 C-3 C-3 C-3 C-3 C-4 C-5 C-8 C-9 C-10

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OIL CHANGE

PAGE 32

Shirodhara therapy explained

COVER DESIGN REV. DIANE SULLIVAN

PAGE 42

The many marvels of miso

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CONTENTS 9

COVER IMAGE ROB DONNELLY

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THE WELLNESS GAME

Experts weigh in on pot safety

Stuck in Vermont: Every Thursday after school, kids get some quiet reading time with Archie the therapy dog and his handler, Christine Packard, at the Brownell Library in Essex Junction.

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Underwritten by:

28 76 76 76 76 77 77 78 78 78 79 80

BY MOLLY ZAPP

V ERMO NT’ S INDEP ENDENT VO ICE JANUARY 17-24, 2018 VOL.23 NO.18 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

VIDEO SERIES

Wellness Issue: A UVM cardiologist shares the benefits of cardiac rehabilitation

File Under ‘Expat’

Music: Four more albums from formerly local artists

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Vermont Stage Is on a Roll With World Premiere of Doublewide

Heart Smart

BY KYMELYA SARI

BY SADIE WILLIAMS

24

Inner Activism

Wellness Issue: The Everything Space champions Vermont’s “embodiment revolution” BY DAN BOLLES

BY SALLY POLLAK

23

Stream of Consciousness

BY JULIA SHIPLEY

Excerpts From Off Message

ARTS NEWS

Wellness Issue: As pot is legalized, medical experts weigh in on safer consumption

Wellness Issue: The ancient practice of shirodhara soothes body and mind

BY KATIE JICKLING

18

Burning Questions

BY KEN PICARD

32

58

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LOOKING FORWARD

the

MAGNIFICENT MUST SEE, MUST DO THIS WEEK COMPI L E D BY K RI STEN RAVIN

FRIDAY 19

Sounding Off “If you know anything about the Haitian people,” says violinist Daniel Bernard Roumain in a promotional video, “you know that we have great stories, great mythology and a great way of telling them.” Roumain, like his creative partner, spoken-word artist Marc Bamuthi Joseph, is a son of Haitian immigrants. As DBR and Marc Bamuthi Joseph Joseph, the pair presents Blackbird, Fly, an exploration of family, politics and race through words and music. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 48

SATURDAY 20

Electric Youth On the anniversary of President Donald Trump’s inauguration, youth across the country make their voices heard. As part of the multistate March for Our Future, young people and their allies take a stand for human rights by parading from Montpelier City Hall to the Vermont Statehouse. On the capitol steps, marchers can listen to speakers ages 8 through 22 and performances by A2VT and Muslim Girls Making Change. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 48

ONGOING

Brush Strokes THURSDAY 18-SATURDAY 20

UNDRESS YOUR BEST

THURSDAY 18-SATURDAY 20

Twice Is Nice A prototypical midcentury suburban family and a woman driven to pieces — literally — by loneliness are among the characters to appear on the Paramount Theatre’s Brick Box stage, courtesy of the Vermont Actors’ Repertory Theatre. For three nights, the Rutland company treats theater lovers to Zig Zag Woman and Wasp, two short plays by comedy legend Steve Martin. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 47

FRIDAY 19

COURTESY OF RENÉ BLAIS PHOTOGRAPHY

SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 48

Snow Sports Snow in Vermont means one thing: sliding on it. More than 70 telemark ski racers from nearly a dozen countries hit the Suicide Six Ski Area slopes in South Pomfret for the 2018 FIS Telemark World Cup. Spectators enjoy free entry and great views of athletes as they speed through giant slalom gates, distance jumps and a skate section. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 49

MAGNIFICENT SEVEN 11

Film buffs: Catch a critically acclaimed flick while supporting a local nonprofit at Montpelier’s Savoy Theater. Two showings of the 2017 drama Call Me by Your Name follow a reception at which cinephiles rub elbows over hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar. Funds raised benefit the Vermont People With AIDS Coalition.

SATURDAY 20-MONDAY 22

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Movie Night

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SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 46

SEE TALKING ART ON PAGE 66 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Feathers and tassels and corsets, oh my! The Vermont Burlesque Festival heats up a winter’s weekend with evening performances in Burlington and Barre, featuring the titillating talents of Rogue Burlesque, April O’Peel, headliners the Screaming Chicken Theatrical Society and others. Visit vermontburlesquefestival.com for the full schedule, including a day of classes covering everything from costumes to comedy to twerking.

For some, the thought of watercolor paintings conjures renderings of pretty flowers, cute birds or sweeping landscapes. Works in watercolor by Burlington artist Jeffrey Robbins are a little — or a lot — farther outside the box, including psychedelic and rock-and-roll imagery. Rachel Elizabeth Jones talks shop with Robbins, whose paintings are on view at Speeder & Earl’s Coffee.


FAIR GAME

I

PIVOT or Spin?

t’s a notion that every governor finds irresistible: Reinvent state government, find efficiencies, trim the fat, tear down the silos — and watch the savings roll in. Somehow, the results never live up to the promise. Consider, for example, former governor JIM DOUGLAS’ Challenges for Change initiative. It would save millions upon millions, he promised, cutting costs while enhancing government www.essexoutlets.com services. facebook.com/pages/essexvt By the time Douglas left office, 21 Essex Way, Essex Junction, VT | 802.878.2851 politicians of all parties were distancing themselves from the program, and it was quietly dropped. Untitled-57 1 5/8/17 10:28 AM Well, it’s that time again. Gov. PHIL SCOTT has a management initiative of his own, and it goes by the acronym PIVOT. That’s short for Program to Improve Vermont Outcomes Together, and it was Participate in a Research Study one of the first initiatives he launched and help develop a vaccine after taking office last January. He’s consistently promoted it ever against Dengue Fever since. In his January 4 State of the State address, Scott boasted of “44 PIVOT projects under way.” They would, he said, produce a government “geared towards continuous improvement, better service, done more efficiently and producing more value.” That list of 44 comes from a progress report released last June, and the projects are a real mixed bag. Some are specific and measurable, such as “billing • Healthy adults, process improvement” in the Agency of ages 18 – 50 Administration and “multi-year licensing” in the Agency of Agriculture, Food • 7-month vaccine study & Markets. Some are grandiose: The Agency of Natural Resources is to “create • Earn up to $1900 a world-class Vermont outdoor recreation experience.” Some are impossibly vague, in compensation such as “culture shift” in the Department of Labor. So is PIVOT a transformative force in state government — or just another manCall UVM VACCINE TESTING CENTER agement fad that won’t outlive Scott’s tenure? SUE ZELLER, chief performance ofat 802-656-0013 ficer in the Agency of Administration and for more info and to schedule a screening. the point person for the effort, argues that PIVOT takes a long view. Leave your name, number, “We’re issuing the state’s strategic and a good time to call back. plan, not the Scott administration’s plan,” she said. “We’re trying to institutionalize it as … a vital document that Email UVMVTC@UVM.EDU lives forever.” or visit UVMVTC.ORG Some things to understand about PIVOT: It’s meant to combine a strategic vision from the top with ideas from the bottom — engaging state employees in the effort. It aims to coordinate shortterm budgeting with long-term strategic planning. Also, there’s an advisory 12 FAIR GAME

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group whose role is to ask questions and generate ideas. It’s called GMET — the Government Modernization and Efficiency Team, a 10-member group that includes people from the public and private sectors. So how’s the process going? Great, say the people involved. “This approach to budgeting is long overdue,” said JIM REARDON, former state finance commissioner and member of GMET. “I used to write budgets based on previous years.” Now, he said, budgets are being crafted with an eye on long-term objectives.

IF YOU WERE TO ASK ME TO CONNECT IT TO SOME PARTICULAR OUTCOME,

I CANNOT DO THAT. S E N . JAN E KI T C H E L

GMET member KEVIN PECOR, a computer support specialist in the Department for Children and Families, says PIVOT is having an impact on the front lines. “Staff are thinking about how they can do their jobs better,” he said. “There’s a different energy, a different mentality.” That may be true, but tangible results are hard to find. “If you were to ask me to connect it to some particular outcome, I cannot do that,” said Sen. JANE KITCHEL (D-Caledonia), chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee. PIVOTeers say that’s not the point. “This is evolving,” said Reardon. “From my perspective, it’s a little too early to start measuring results.” Indeed, the goal isn’t necessarily to save money. It’s to improve operations. “We will save in some areas, maybe spend more in others as we identify needs,” said ALLYSON LAACKMAN, executive director of the Burlington Housing Authority and GMET member. She served in the Obama administration and instituted a process similar to PIVOT in the White House. “Once you budget based on impact, you spend more efficiently,” she added. It sounds promising. But the whole process is essentially a black box. Zeller says that GMET, as an advisory group, is exempt from state open meetings laws. PIVOT is an administrative process with no official reporting requirements.

In the end, it’s too soon to tell if PIVOT will be a transformative force or a fizzle. There are a lot of talented, dedicated people devoting their energy to the project, but that doesn’t guarantee results. In her 35 years in state government, Kitchel has seen this movie before. “The question is, are you getting outcomes that are over and above what you would normally expect?” she said. “Once it’s over, do people revert to their old behavior?” The governor identifies PIVOT as a policy cornerstone. Will it pay off ? History says no. But if it does, it could be a lasting legacy of his administration.

Lift Rug, Sweep Briskly After Washington County State’s Attorney SCOTT WILLIAMS resigned from office last week for medical reasons, Attorney General T.J. DONOVAN wasted little time dropping his investigation into Williams’ official conduct. Williams had been on medical leave since November 14, and the Vermont Supreme Court has suspended his law license on the grounds of medical disability. During his last year in office, Williams had stockpiled checks worth some $75,000, most of which came from a nearly defunct charity meant to aid crime victims. He planned to form his own charity but never got around to doing so. Some of the money came from Washington County defendants who wrote checks to Williams and then saw their charges dismissed. “There was no case,” Donovan asserted in defense of his decision to drop the matter. “There is no allegation that Scott Williams was personally enriched.” Well, sure, he never cashed the checks. But isn’t there something iffy about dismissing criminal cases in exchange for payment? “There’s no allegation of embezzlement,” Donovan responded. “What is the quid pro quo? There’s no personal benefit.” That seems a narrow view of the situation. What about dereliction of duty? Interference with the administration of justice? There remains an ongoing investigation by the judicial branch’s Professional Responsibility Board, which could sanction Williams or even permanently revoke his license. But the hot potato is safely out of Donovan’s hands.


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Media Notes

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802-540-2097 FAIR GAME 13

After making a big deal about selling Vermont Life, the iconic state-owned magazine, the Scott administration last week reversed course — rejecting all nine bids for the publication and keeping it under state control. (Da Capo Publishing, which operates Seven Days, had considered bidding but decided against it, according to publisher and coeditor PAULA ROUTLY.) Vermont Life was put up for sale because it had failed to break even for years and had accumulated more than $3 million in debt. But now, according to Department of Tourism and Marketing Commissioner WENDY KNIGHT, the tide has turned. “For this fiscal year, we’re about $2,500 in the black,” she said. “For next year, we’re projecting a $50,000 profit.” Why the sudden uptick in fortune? Mainly because of cost-cutting and a structural shift. “The Vermont Life team is being increasingly integrated into the Agency [of Commerce and Community Development],” Knight explained. The staff’s time and expertise — and the magazine’s content — are being used for agency projects, such as the promotional ThinkVermont website. Does that mean that story ideas will be considered through a marketing lens? Not so, said Knight. “I see a distinction between Vermont Life, the magazine with editorial content, written independently from marketing efforts,” she said. Still, the staff will be cognizant of the need to provide content suitable for marketing. Speaking of financially struggling print media, several Vermont newspaper publishers descended on the Statehouse last Friday to fight for their precious monopoly on legal notices — paid advertisements placed by governments to notify the public of official meetings and actions. A bill before the Senate Government Operations Committee, S.97, would allow online publications to compete for the legal-notice business. The constant refrain of the hearing was “It’s not about the money.” Which means, of course, it’s about the money. “This is not about revenue, it’s about access,” said ADAM SILVERMAN of the Burlington Free Press, who spoke as president of the Vermont Press Association. He argued that despite plummeting circulation figures, newspapers remain the best option “to reach the widest audience.” KAREN HORN, public policy and advocacy director for the Vermont League of Cities & Towns, which supported the bill, also put her argument in a public-service

context. “In the 21st century, people use the internet,” she told the panel. “It’s timely, efficient and broadly available.” And then she added the money kicker. “We spend a lot of money on legals,” she said. “Print media have a monopoly. S.97 would provide for more competition.” In the end, the publishers found receptive ears around the committee table. “I worry about our little papers,” said Sen. CHRIS PEARSON (P/D-Chittenden). Three of his four colleagues expressed support for community papers, as well. In the end, the committee agreed to put the bill “back on the wall,” which almost certainly means it won’t be considered again this session. But propping up newspapers with a legal-notice monopoly is, at best, postponing the inevitable. “When will we recognize that Vermonters are increasingly getting their news from internet sources?” asked SHAWN CUNNINGHAM, co-owner of the web-only Chester Telegraph. “If we want people, especially younger people who are far less likely to pick up a cellulose-based newspaper, to be included in our civic life, an adjustment to our laws is necessary.” It won’t be happening this year. Lawmakers are more interested in paying tribute to the ways of the past. Finally, it didn’t take long for MORGAN TRUE to land on his feet. True resigned from the VTDigger.org reporting staff in December to pursue new opportunities. A few weeks later, he has not one but two new jobs. He’s working for Heady Vermont, the media company that provides cannabis-related news and content, and for the Kria Group, the strategic consulting firm created by BILL LOFY, a Democratic operative who served as chief of staff to former governor PETER SHUMLIN. At Heady Vermont, True will serve as editor for the firm’s news operation. “We were looking to expand our editorial staff,” said Heady cofounder ELI HARRINGTON. “Our readership is growing, and we expect that to accelerate when legalization takes effect.”  As for Kria, True said, “I will be working mostly on bringing in new clients and using my writing experience to help them craft their messages.” Apparently I can claim partial credit for the gigs, having first announced True’s departure from journalism in my November 15 column. “I had no preconceived notion of what I would do next,” True said. “It wasn’t until your column ran that these opportunities came to light.” Royalties accepted in cash or Green Stamps, deliverable in plain brown envelopes, c/o the Seven Days loading dock. m 

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LOCALmatters

Burlington Ward 3 Candidates Talk Transparency, the Mall and Momos

TOWN MEETING DAY

B Y M O LLY WA LSH

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Getting off campus, “I learned a lot about the Burlington community apart from UVM,” she said. Haskell also worked in the UVM athletic department and joined the women’s crew team, where she stepped up to be the coxswain, who steers the boat. Being a leader taught her to “work with very different people,” Haskell said. Fall and spring, the team met at 5:15 a.m. to drive to Milton to train on the Lamoille River. “I saw a lot of

14 LOCAL MATTERS

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‘An engaged citizen, that’s what I am.’ When it comes to Burlington, James Lockridge doesn’t differentiate between small and big issues. For example, he believes the downtown needs more public bulletin boards, and they don’t need to be the fancy, glass-covered kind that city officials have in mind, he said. Anything that can accommodate a concert flyer will do.

MATTHEW THORSEN

‘I’m a new voice in Burlington politics.’ Growing up on Cape Cod in Chatham, Mass., was no vacation for Lizzie Haskell, who was adopted from China when she was 6 months old. When other teens headed to the beach, Haskell focused on her studies, waitressed at a seafood shack and cleaned houses with her mother to earn money for her higher education. “Neither of my parents went to college, and they needed to work seven days a week to make ends meet,” Haskell said. Her father was in the landscaping business. When her mother wasn’t making money dusting and vacuuming, she worked as a “lunch lady” at a local high school. UVM appealed to Haskell because a number of her relatives attended the school — “We like to call it the official ‘Haskell University,’” she said — and some of them live in the Burlington area. In her first year, she joined the Political Science Club. She learned different ways to get involved locally, and served as Ward 8 chair for the Burlington Democrats.

said George, who has formally endorsed Haskell. On the council, Haskell said, she would focus on policy that prioritizes affordable housing and solutions to the opiate crisis. She’s also interested in the municipal Memorial Auditorium, which has been closed because of its deteriorating condition. Haskell wants to see the building preserved and repurposed to “become a usable space for the entire community.”

MATTHEW THORSEN

he three contenders for the Burlington City Council’s Ward 3 seat have more in common than their eagerness to represent the city’s western flank. Each moved to the Queen City from somewhere else to attend the University of Vermont — and decided to stick around after finishing college. There are plenty of differences between them, though. One candidate is a 21-year-old newbie Democrat who graduated eight months ago. Another is a former city councilor and veteran Progressive who worked for decades in Burlington City Hall. The third is an independent — politically and in spirit — who founded a nonprofit that is committed to “preserving and promoting Vermont-made music.” They’re competing to be the voice of a corner of Burlington that encompasses parts of the Old North End, downtown and the waterfront, from King Street to Manhattan Drive. Incumbent Sara Moore, a Progressive, is not seeking reelection on March 6. Seven Days spoke with the candidates about their motivations and goals.

Lizzie Haskell

great sunrises, and that’s not something many college students can say,” Haskell said. She earned her political science degree in just three years to save money — and decided to stay in Burlington because “I feel like there’s a good sense of community in this town.” She said she was eager to start pursuing her goals. One of those is to run for office. “I’m a new voice in Burlington politics, and I think I can bring a new perspective to the council,” Haskell said. Another aspiration: to attend Vermont Law School. Haskell is already a legal administrative assistant at the Burlington law firm Maley and Maley — a job she can walk to from her Pine Street apartment. Chittenden County State’s Attorney Sarah George has become a fan. “Lizzie’s fresh ideas, extremely hard work and seemingly endless energy are exactly what this community needs,”

James Lockridge

How would Haskell have weighed in on recent major council issues? She would have voted with a council majority to approve the zoning change that increased the building height limit to 14 stories downtown for the redevelopment of the Burlington Town Center, now called City Place Burlington. The mall property is located in Ward 3. Regarding the sale of Burlington Telecom, Haskell said she initially supported a lower bid from the co-op Keep BT Local but in the end concluded it was not the best offer. “I would have had to choose Ting,” Haskell said, citing a Canadian-based competitor. After a lengthy debate, the council opted for a last-minute proposal from Schurz Communications. “The vote was at two in the morning when residents were asleep,” Haskell noted by way of mentioning another of her many goals: making city council proceedings more open.

If elected, said Lockridge, 49, he’d devote his attention to such minor improvements as well as to broader goals, like “making our little democracy more fair and transparent.” “When you talk about an engaged citizen, that’s what I am,” said the independent candidate. “I’m not running against anybody. I’m running for an improved city.” He proved it when he invited his opponent Brian Pine to appear in a video that gave both men a chance to champion respectful civic participation. If she’d declared her candidacy in time, Haskell would have been in it, too. Lockridge grew up on Oahu, where his dad worked as a pilot for Hawaiian Airlines. His mom, who worked in real estate, had a Vermont connection: Her parents lived on a farm in Springfield. Lockridge and his mom visited almost every summer.


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When it was time for college, Lockridge was sufficiently intrigued to give up the Aloha State for the Green Mountain one. He started at Lyndon State College, but soon found himself driving to Burlington to attend concerts. He transferred to UVM in large part to be closer to the music and culture. After graduating in 1991 with a history degree, he found work as a graphic designer and living accommodations with members of the band Chin Ho! on South Union Street. Music is the “most complete mode of sharing the human experience,” said Lockridge, who does not sing or play any instruments himself. “I keep a harmonica by my bed that I hope to learn someday,” he quipped. In 1996, he founded Big Heavy World, a nonprofit that has included a record COURTESY OF BRIAN PINE

“I keep bumping into a culture of inherited, legacy modes of governance that, by their nature, are exclusive,” Lockridge said. Lockridge said he supported KBTL’s bid for Burlington Telecom but that the city did not provide leadership to make it viable. At the polls last November, he voted against the zoning change to allow taller buildings downtown. “It was because I was dissatisfied with the process,” Lockridge said. City voters approved the new height, but a majority of Ward 3 voters were opposed. Memorial Auditorium should be restored for new uses, Lockridge said. He blames the city for failing to properly manage the space, which was used as a concert hall, gym and for other purposes. “It’s never had staffing that understood how to generate revenue,” Lockridge said. He’s helping to make a documentary about 242 Main, the teen center and punk-music venue that was located there for decades. If elected, Lockridge said he would search for solutions but stay positive and avoid falling into “antagonistic camps,” adding: “I’m not prone to that.”

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LOCAL MATTERS 15

Brian Pine came to UVM for the hiking and alpine skiing. He stayed for the politics — specifically, the Progressive ideology of now-Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.). His first glimpse of the man was at the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, where Sanders introduced musician Arlo Guthrie. Pine was amazed to discover the straight-talking guy onstage was Burlington’s mayor. “He was just telling it like it is, telling the truth,” Pine recalled. During his senior year at UVM, Pine served on a recycling task force that Sanders created. “That was the beginning of my civic involvement,” Pine said. “It was an incredibly exciting time to be here.” In 1985, with a degree in environmental science, the New Paltz, N.Y., native put down roots in Burlington’s Old North End. He was a senior loan officer with the Vermont Community Loan Fund when he ran for a seat on the Burlington City Council in 1991. By then, Peter Clavelle had succeeded Sanders, who had moved to the U.S. House. Serving two terms — and campaigning door-to-door — was a crash course in community relations for Pine, the son WARD 3 CANDIDATES

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label, a public listening library, a tour van, musician summits, a low-power radio station known as the Radiator 105.9 FM, recording equipment, and various programs to help people make and share Vermont sounds. Lockridge’s labor of love doesn’t provide a paycheck. So, by day, he is executive director of the Youth Safety Council of Vermont, which works to reduce teen car crashes. He lives on King Street with his wife, Victoria St. John, who is director of operations at Vermont Public Radio. Their daughter attends the private Vermont Commons School in South Burlington. Lockridge’s interest in city issues started with Burlington City Arts. He’s been critical of the department for funding decisions and for failing to open up its advisory board to new appointees. Too many citizen commissions and boards in Burlington have a culture of “permanent” incumbency that keeps new voices out, Lockridge said.

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Ready or Not: Is Gentrification Inevitable in Burlington’s Old North End? B Y KATI E JI CK LI N G

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BURLINGTON

258 North Winooski Avenue in 2012

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W

hen Jessica Bunce purchased Panadero Bakery in 2010, she became one of a few restaurateurs making a go of it in the largely residential Old North End. “Are you sure you want to do it there?” she remembered her friends asking, out of concern that the neighborhood’s crime rate would hurt business. Instead, the bright yellow building on North Winooski Avenue, rebranded Barrio Bakery & Café, has become the epicenter of a transformed neighborhood just north of Burlington’s downtown. A few years later, the hip, casual eatery Butch + Babe’s started serving fusion fare. Then Drifter’s restaurant and bar, with its small plates and craft beer, replaced the pay-what-you-please Psychedelicatessen. Knead Bakery, which will serve vegan food, is scheduled to open this month. The development group Redstone knocked down a North Winooski landmark, QTee’s convenience store and ice cream shop, in 2014 to make way for a sleek apartment complex that houses a yoga studio on the first floor. Such establishments share the street with the Chittenden Emergency Food Shelf, Vermont Legal Aid and Good News Garage, nonprofits that serve the neighborhood’s working-class or poor residents. Are those people being forced out of the area? Views among residents differ. But according to a Seven Days analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data from 2010 to 2016, increasing housing costs, rising incomes and a better-educated populace — coupled with a decrease in poverty and crime — make the traditionally blue-collar enclave ripe for gentrification. Emily Harrington, 23, said she moved to the neighborhood last fall for its ethnic diversity and artsy vibe. She likes it enough to commute to her job at Middlebury College, Harrington explained on a snowy January morning at Barrio, where young adults sipped $4.20 chai lattes and typed away on their laptops. The white, college-educated Rhode Island native acknowledged that people like her might be changing the character of the place. Harrington connected with “different music and art collectives directly tied to the Old North End,” she said. “It’s community.” The census divides the Old North End into four tracts, two of which are fully

258 North Winooski Avenue in 2017

contained within its official boundaries. In the tract that covers the southwest corner — the area enclosed by North and North Winooski avenues, and Pearl and North streets — the number of people living in poverty decreased from 42 percent to 34 percent between 2010 and 2016. Poverty rose slightly in the city as a whole during that period. Median household incomes in the same tract also rose by 23 percent — a rate that was 4 percent higher than the citywide increase. The number of collegeeducated residents has also risen from 30 to 39 percent, according to census data. Some parts of the neighborhood have

seen a 40 percent decline in crime during the past five years, city-kept data show. Such trends likely reflect an influx of wealthier residents — meaning that some lower-income Old North Enders could be priced out. “A lot of people can’t access the things that are happening here,” said Jen Berger, who has lived on Decatur Street since 2006. Gentrification “happens when people who move out are replaced by households that look different demographically,” said Maura Collins, deputy director of the Vermont Housing Finance Agency, who has also conducted studies on the phenomenon.

That shift is controversial in a part of Burlington that is celebrated for its diversity and inclusion. Not surprisingly, gentrification has become a campaign issue in the lead-up to the city’s March mayoral election. “It was well under way when I came into office six years ago,” asserted Mayor Miro Weinberger. He blames the city’s overall housing shortage — of  both affordable and market-rate units — for the squeeze, citing a 2014 housing strategy report that found Burlingtonians spent 44 percent of their income on rent. But change is on the way, Weinberger promised: “As a result of our policy of prioritizing new housing for people of all income levels and ages and backgrounds, I think we’re finally making progress against our housing affordability and equity challenges.” The mayor’s opponents aren’t buying it. Infinite Culcleasure, a candidate running as an independent, said that even the city’s designated affordable units are out of reach for most low-income residents. “We need a more accurate picture of what it means to be affordable for Burlington residents,” he said. Mayoral candidate Carina Driscoll faulted Weinberger for building too many “luxury high-rise apartments” and vowed to focus on reducing inequality if elected. “We have to continue to … help people find a way out of this cycle of generational poverty,” she said. The Progressive Party-endorsed Driscoll grew up hearing about the need for affordable housing. Her stepfather, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), created the Burlington Community Land Trust, now the Champlain Housing Trust, in 1984 to fend off gentrification in the Old North End. In a video made by University of Vermont graduate students the following year, a narrator worried that the neighborhood was struggling to find “a balance between the traditions that made it strong and new forces which are beginning to change it.” Old North Enders felt threatened “by Burlington’s expanding downtown, by its need for more housing, by a proposed multimillion-dollar waterfront development.” Those same fears remain. Since 2014, seven apartment complexes have been built across the city, according to city assessor John Vickery.


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Four of those have been built in the Old North End, an area traditionally known for single-family homes and duplexes. Just one of those developments is affordable, a 40-unit housing co-op on Bright Street, where a two-bedroom apartment costs about $1,000 — less than 60 percent of what’s considered market rate for a new unit. The average cost of renting an apartment in Burlington has nearly doubled since 2005, according to Vickery. In the Old North End, a two-bedroom apartment that went for $800 per month a dozen years ago now costs closer to $1,275. Bill Bissonette, a landlord who grew up in a blue-collar family in the Old North End, said he once rented almost all of his apartments primarily to low-income renters. Starting in 2010, when the state cut the number of Section 8 vouchers

In fact, the number of nonwhite residents increased by nearly 150 percent between 2010 and 2016. A large portion of housing stock remains permanently affordable. The Champlain Housing Trust owns 500 units, while the Burlington Housing Authority operates another 500. Household incomes, though rising, remain low, and about a third of residents still live in poverty, census data show. City Council President Jane Knodell (P-Central District), a 30-year Old North End resident and a UVM professor of economics, doesn’t believe the neighborhood is at risk of losing its character. “There’s definitely affordability problems that people face in the Old North End and in Chittenden County generally,” Knodell said. But, she added, “We have a very healthy mix of people in the Old North End.”

DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGES IN OLD NORTH END’S TRACT 4 2010

2016

Median income

$25,822

$31,795

Population in poverty

42%

34%

Nonwhite population

10%

25%

College-educated population

30%

39%

SOURCE: U.S. CENSUS BUREAU’S AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY

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Andrea Suozzo contributed data reporting for this story. For more maps, data and details about our methodology, visit sevendaysvt.com.

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Last week, a steady stream of Nepalese immigrants, women in hijabs and white college kids shopped at Central Market: Taste of Asia on North Winooski Avenue. That’s typical, said co-owner Som Timsina, who opened the store in 2015. More unusual, according to Timsina: He’s noticed a growing number of white customers as new housing and businesses have sprung up along the street. “It’s improving the neighborhood,” said the local retailer. “The construction is good for me; people come for shopping.” Collins, of the Vermont Housing Finance Agency, agreed. “In any community, there are going to be benefits, of, dare I say, gentrification,” she said. Stronger schools, better stores, safer streets — “those are good things.” “But,” she added, “if that’s only enjoyed by rich white people, that’s a bad thing.” m

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available to renters, Bissonette renovated his apartments and advertised them as market-rate units. Now, he has more than 300 apartments in the Old North End, most of which are rented to students or young professionals. He has no trouble finding new tenants, even with a 40 percent turnover each year. “People want to live in the Old North End,” Bissonette said. Erik Hoekstra, a managing partner at Redstone and a 15-year resident of the Old North End, said they’re drawn to “a neighborhood that has street life and retail and vibrancy.” The slow but steady influx of higherincome residents poses one of the most pressing concerns for the area, said Tony Redington, who serves on the steering committee of the Old North End Neighborhood Planning Assembly. “I think that gentrification is sort of a silent process,” he said. “You really don’t know it’s there until it’s arrived.” To many, the neighborhood looks just as it always has. It remains the most diverse section of the city, with a population that’s more than a quarter nonwhite.

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LOCALmatters

Dr. Yes: Vermont’s Addiction Expert, John Brooklyn, Is in Demand S T O RY & PHO TO B Y ALICIA F REESE

18 LOCAL MATTERS

SEVEN DAYS

01.17.18-01.24.18

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D

r. John Brooklyn hadn’t yet arrived at the South Burlington opiate addiction treatment center when I showed up for a tour one afternoon in December. Walking briskly into the Chittenden Clinic’s drab waiting room 10 minutes late, he apologized, explaining that he’d had to make a quick run to the post office to mail a batch of urine samples to a specialized lab in Germany. The shipment was the latest experiment in addiction treatment by the energetic 60-year-old doctor. His name may be unfamiliar to the general public, but Brooklyn has arguably done more to combat Vermont’s opiate epidemic than anyone in the state. Brooklyn has been the medical director of Vermont’s first methadone clinic since it opened in 2002. He’s treated thousands of addicted patients, trained well over a hundred doctors to do the same, and played a major role in creating a treatment system so successful that several states are now trying to replicate it. “There’s almost nothing to do with medicationassisted treatment and addressing the opiate crisis that he hasn’t had a role in during the last 20 years,” said Tom Dalton, executive director of Vermonters for Criminal Justice Reform. “He’s really been a force of nature.” Medication-assisted treatment is now widely accepted as the most effective way to address opiate addiction, but it was viewed skeptically for years. Vermont was one of the last states to open a methadone clinic in part because then-governor Howard Dean worried that treating patients with the medication — which is itself an opiate but blocks heroin highs — would simply replace one addiction with another. That left addicted Vermonters with two options throughout the ’90s: Drive every day to a methadone clinic in New Hampshire or Massachusetts, or participate in a study of buprenorphine, a drug that had not yet been approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration. At the time, Brooklyn was in his thirties and had recently finished his residency at University of Vermont Medical Center, then known as Fletcher Allen Health Care. He joined the team of UVM researchers conducting the study. He was already something of an expert in the field. The Rhode Island native went to UVM for his undergraduate degree — “I like to ski, and Rhode Island is flat,” he explained — but returned home to attend medical school at Brown University, which emphasized addiction medicine. Instead of becoming a family doctor, as he had planned, Brooklyn took a job at UVM’s Substance Abuse Treatment Center. Vermont’s buprenorphine studies continued into the early 2000s. Around that time, one of the subjects became pregnant,

which made her ineligible to continue. “So now I have a pregnant woman who is a heroin user who I can no longer treat with buprenorphine,” Brooklyn remembered thinking. “What am I going to do?” He wrote a letter to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency asking for a waiver to prescribe methadone to the woman. The DEA granted it, and Brooklyn soon began working with the state Department of Health to find other pregnant women addicted to heroin. “Before you knew it, I had 20 women at one time that I was writing prescriptions for,” he said. “He was one of the first physicians I knew who really put his neck out there and said, ‘This is a viable medication,’” said Jackie Corbally, the City of Burlington’s opioid policy coordinator. That’s in contrast to other doctors who inadvertently helped fuel the opiate epidemic. For years, many of

Dr. John Brooklyn holding an electronic pill dispenser

them liberally prescribed opiates such as OxyContin for pain, sowing the seeds of addiction among their patients. Then, as the crisis worsened, some of those same physicians proved reluctant to take on opiate-addicted patients, citing the demands of handling such challenging cases. When Vermont finally opened its first methadone clinic, Brooklyn was an obvious choice for medical director. In 2005, a second clinic opened in Newport; it, too, relied on him to be the prescribing physician. Brooklyn clocked more miles as several other new clinics asked him to fill in until they found their own doctors. In some cases, that took a while — he made the four-hour round trip from Burlington to Newport once a week for 12 years. “He was always willing to step up and fill in the gaps, or perhaps better described as gaping holes, in our treatment infrastructure,” wrote former health commissioner Harry Chen in an email from Uganda, where he is serving in the Peace Corps. Brooklyn’s partner of six years, Cara Hart, recalled her first date with the doctor. As they walked along Lake Champlain, his phone rang “many, many times.” He answered every call, she said, calmly dispensing advice to medical providers around the state about what to do with their patients. Aside from his incessantly ringing cellphone, Brooklyn manages to maintain a healthy lifestyle, according to Hart. The father of three adult children meditates every morning for 20 minutes, commutes to work by bike year-round, does yoga in the evenings and makes sure he’s in bed by 10 p.m. He finds time to ski, sail, read, garden and brew his own beer. Colleagues said he never appears flustered or stressed, despite the fact that he makes countless potentially life-or-death decisions. He decides whether clinic patients are eligible for treatment, which medication and how much they need, and whether they take it at home or in the clinic. “He carries an enormous responsibility,” said Bob Bick, CEO of the Howard Center, which runs the Chittenden Clinic. That clinic alone treats 1,000 people. A staggering 1.3 percent of the Vermont population currently receives medically assisted treatment — more than any other state. Brooklyn has a notably tolerant approach, continuing to assist patients even when they repeatedly relapse. He may reduce a person’s dose, but he generally only terminates a prescription if continuing it would endanger the person’s health. The Burlington doctor compares ending a prescription for methadone or buprenorphine to “pushing people off a cliff without a parachute,” and he often points out that a doctor would never deprive a diabetic of insulin just because they slipped up and went to Al’s French Frys. Many physicians aren’t as magnanimous. “There have been patients where I know, if it had been almost any doctor, that person would probably not


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have survived,” said Dalton of Vermonters for Criminal Justice Reform. After the FDA approved buprenorphine as a treatment for opiate addiction in 2002 — in part due to the UVM study — Brooklyn became one of the first Vermont doctors to prescribe it. In 2011, he helped conceive Vermont’s current treatment system. Though no one else interviewed for this story could recall who actually came up with the idea, Brooklyn had a clear memory of it. “I went to the state health department with Bob Bick,” he recalled. “I sketched out this sort of rudimentary idea and called it the ‘hub and spoke.’”

DR. JOHN BROOKLYN HAS ARGUABLY DONE MORE TO COMBAT VERMONT’S OPIATE EPIDEMIC THAN ANYONE IN THE STATE.

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The concept is simple: Patients in need of intensive treatment go to the clinics, or “hubs,” to receive methadone or buprenorphine and counseling services. More stable patients can receive their medication through primary care practices, which act as the “spokes.” Roving teams consisting of a nurse and a social worker are available to help those doctors provide more support to patients. If a patient needs more care, his or her doctor can refer the person back to a hub. Transitioning patients to their primary care doctors frees up space in clinics and integrates addiction treatment into the normal medical routine. It took the state years to get the system fully up and running, during which time some addicts had to wait more than a year to get treatment. Today, Brooklyn noted with pride, those waiting lists have largely been eliminated. He estimates that he personally trained 150 of the nearly 300 Vermont doctors who are federally approved to prescribe buprenorphine. He’s still hands-on, too. For 20 years, Brooklyn has been a primary care doctor at the Community Health Centers of Burlington, where he spends two halfdays a week seeing his patients, 35 of whom take buprenorphine.

“First and foremost he’s a stellar family practice doctor,” according to his boss at the Community Health Centers, CEO Alison Calderara. She credits Brooklyn with teaching her, and some of his fellow doctors at the health centers, that addiction “really is a chronic disease.” “I think when you’re actually doing the work, it has a lot more credibility than if you’re just some egghead that thinks something is a good idea,” Brooklyn said. Plus, he added, “I like seeing people in recovery.” Even after decades on the job, Brooklyn is coming up with new ways to improve treatment. Those urine samples he was sending to Germany? He excitedly explained that he’s testing a new way to screen patients for drugs. Instead of peeing into a cup while a clinic employee watches, patients swallow a liquid with a unique molecular combination that will then show up in their urine. The process is quicker and less demeaning: Patients can pee in privacy but staff can still ensure they’re not substituting someone else’s urine. During the tour of the Chittenden Clinic, Brooklyn began rapidly opening and closing large filing cabinets, searching for a device. Triumphantly, he pulled out a piece of plastic. The electronic wheel he displayed can be programmed to dispense buprenorphine pills, allowing patients to take their medication at home instead of having to travel to the clinic every day. Opening an app on his phone, Brooklyn explained that patients use the program to video themselves swallowing the pills and then send it to the clinic as proof. “Oh, my God, they love it!” he gushed. “This is liberating to be able to not come in.” Brooklyn doesn’t have the same freedom. In fact, he’s in even greater demand now that state officials around the country are seeking to replicate Vermont’s hub-and-spoke model. California and Tennessee have hired him as a consultant; he recently hosted a group of doctors visiting from Wisconsin; and, in February, he’ll give a presentation in Colorado. National reporters have started calling. “I’m really feeling overwhelmed,” Brooklyn said. “It’s almost like you’ve discovered some new cure for a disease, and everyone wants it.” To the relief of those working alongside him, he has no plans to slow down. Corbally, Burlington’s opioid policy coordinator, said, “There’s a sense of peace knowing that John is still out there prescribing.” 


LOCALmatters Ward 3 Candidates « P.15 of a sociology professor and a special ed teacher. He knew Ward 3 intimately when he went to work for Clavelle as an assistant director in the Community & Economic Development Office, where Pine focused on housing and neighborhood revitalization from 1997 to 2015. A few years into the job, in 1999, Pine took charge of a $6 million reconstruction of North Street with new curbs, sidewalks, trees and underground power lines. He’s lived on Crowley Street for almost 23 years. His wife, Liz Curry, serves on the Burlington School Board. They have two sons. Now that the younger is a Burlington High School senior heading off to

college, Pine said he’s ready to get back into electoral politics. “I’m going for it,” Pine, 55, said at Vermont Energy Investment Corporation on Lakeside Avenue, where he has worked for three years as an energy financing consultant. He’s running because, he said, he is “almost pathologically in love with Burlington.” Ward 3 has changed since Pine represented it. But he knows a lot of the newcomers, too. He spent a college semester in Nepal and speaks the language well enough to order momos from the Nepali Dumpling House on North Street. It’s good to see new enterprises cropping up, Pine said, but he is

worried about gentrification — a concern that dates back to the Sanders era. If he were to serve on the council, Pine said he’d push anew to pressure UVM to house more students on campus. That could free up affordable housing on streets such as Hickok, Green and Buell, where the high turnover of student renters contributes to disrepair, he said. Pine said he would also work to ensure that any city financial incentives, such as the ones extended for the mall makeover, would lead to local jobs. Pine would have voted to boost the building height limits. “It doesn’t personally offend me in any way to have taller buildings in the core of the downtown,” he said. He would have

opted for KBTL’s Burlington Telecom proposal. Over time, the city could have figured out ways to make the local-ownership model work financially, Pine said. “I just felt that was a huge missed opportunity,” he said. Memorial Auditorium should be saved, Pine said. The successful renovation of St. Joseph’s School in the Old North End shows how a publicprivate partnership could revive the auditorium, Pine said. Pine is a staunch believer in the city’s capacity to solve its problems. He has no political ambition beyond the council, he added: “This is not a stepping stone.”  Contact: molly@sevendaysvt.com

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01.17.18-01.24.18 SEVEN DAYS 20 LOCAL MATTERS

Thibault said he has not spoken to Williams since being appointed but hopes to soon. In his resignation letter, Williams suggested that he was suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and specifically mentioned the 2015 murder of Department for Children and Families social worker Lara Sobel.

MARK DAVIS

Private Prison Company Lobbies Vermont Officials to Build Proposed Facility Private prison company CoreCivic, formerly known as Corrections Corporation of America, is already angling to build the 925-bed prison that Gov. Phil Scott’s administration proposed Monday. The company, which rebranded in 2016, is one of the country’s largest private prison operators. For a decade, it housed several hundred Vermont inmates in Kentucky and Arizona. Under the Scott administration’s proposal, Vermont would contract with a private company to construct a $140 million prison in Franklin County over a 10-year period, which the state would then operate. The vision is far from becoming a reality — lawmakers only started reviewing the concept Tuesday. In an apparent effort to position itself for that contract, CoreCivic lobbyists are making overtures to key state lawmakers. The company has four employees registered to lobby in the state and is also represented by the Vermont lobbying firm MMR. Its outreach isn’t going over well in some quarters of the Statehouse. Calling CoreCivic a “notorious company” that has done “plenty of damage,” Senate President Pro Tempore Tim Ashe (D/P-Chittenden) told reporters Tuesday that its potential involvement “will merit a lot of discussion.” Ashe said the lobbyists had not personally contacted him. CoreCivic donated $1,000 to Scott’s campaign ahead of his 2016 election. In an emailed statement to Seven Days, the company’s public affairs director,

Jonathan Burns, emphasized that “CoreCivic would not be operating any facility in Vermont. We welcome a discussion with Vermont policy makers on a privately financed real estate-only solution.” Disclosure: Tim Ashe is the domestic partner of Seven Days publisher and coeditor Paula Routly. Find our conflict-ofinterest policy here: sevendaysvt.com/disclosure.

ALICIA FREESE

UVM Administrators Decry ‘Racist’ Flyers Posted on Campus Flyers featuring men of color who were recently accused of committing local crimes appeared on the University of Vermont campus Monday, the same day as the federal holiday that honors civil rights hero Martin Luther King Jr. “Stop Importing Problems,” the flyers read, above pictures of each man and his alleged crime. One of the flyers UVM police are investigating the postings, as is the UVM Bias Response Team. UVM president Tom Sullivan and other top administrators issued a statement describing the “abhorrent views” as “an assault on our values as an institution.” “We condemn these flyers unequivocally and in the strongest possible terms,” the statement read. “Our university strives to maintain a welcoming environment for all members of our community.” The Vermont Cynic student newspaper first reported on the flyers. They were discovered as UVM prepared to kick off a series of events to honor King and explore civil rights topics during the coming week. The flyers show three men recently in local headlines: one who was charged with attempted murder in a machete attack in Shelburne, one who was charged with murdering his wife with a meat cleaver in Burlington, and another who was charged with a rape inside Vermont Superior Court — and who was later acquitted at trial.

MOLLY WALSH

COURTESY OF THE VERMONT CYNIC

Interim Washington County State’s Attorney Rory Thibault has rescinded plea offers in criminal cases that his predecessor, Scott Williams, made before his abrupt departure last November. Williams disappeared from public view to seek treatment Scott WIlliams at the Brattleboro Retreat and resigned on January 8. Earlier this month, Gov. Phil Scott appointed Thibault, who used to work for Williams as a deputy prosecutor, to the interim position. Thibault wrote in a letter that he had “concerns over the content, structure and basis” of some of Williams’ proposed plea agreements. Thibault added that he was also rescinding felony plea offers made by prosecutors who filled in for Williams while the office was understaffed. In the letter sent Tuesday to defense attorneys, Thibault said he would make exceptions for defendants whose lawyers had stopped preparing for trials and who had scheduled court appearances to enter their pleas, as well as those who began cooperating with police as part of an agreement. Thibault told Seven Days he was uncertain how many cases would be affected. After taking office, he said, he grew concerned about “inconsistent and not well-thoughtout offers” that had been made before he arrived. “The intent is not a huge shift in policy,” Thibault said. “I would hope people would see it as a recognition that we have work to do, and these cases require digging into.” Thibault, who worked as a prosecutor in the office from June 2016 to October 2017, said he would apply to become the permanent state’s attorney. He said he would soon hire a deputy prosecutor to fill the remaining vacancy in the office.

FILE: TERRI HALLENBECK

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New Prosecutor Rescinds Plea Offers Made by Scott Williams


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OBITUARIES, VOWS, CELEBRATIONS

OBITUARIES

John W. Hennessey Jr.

1925-2018, SHELBURNE   

proclaimed March 25, 2005, “John W. Hennessey Jr. Day.” In 2006, Hennessey married former governor Madeleine May Kunin, and he moved with her to Vermont. At the 2008 commencement at Vermont Law School, he and Madeleine were awarded honorary Doctor of Laws degrees, while she was the commencement speaker. Later, at the University of Vermont’s 2012 commencement, Hennessey was also awarded an honorary LLD degree. John Hennessey is survived by his wife, Gov. Madeleine May Kunin; his son, John W. Hennessey III, of Weston, Mass.; his daughter, Martha S. Hennessey, and her husband, Stephen D. Severson, of Hanover, N.H.; his three grandchildren, Kristina Hennessey Hill (Greg Hill), Tucker Severson (Sarah Persing) and Elizabeth Scott Hennessey (Tamara Iwanski); five great-granddaughters; four stepchildren, Julia Kunin, Peter Kunin (Elizabeth), Adam Kunin (Jane) and Daniel Kunin (Chantal Gauvin); as well as six step-grandchildren. A Circle of Remembrance, open to the public, will be held on Saturday, January 27, 2018, at 2 p.m., at Wake Robin in Shelburne. A service will also take place in Hanover, N.H., at a later date. In lieu of flowers,

donations may be made to Patient Choices Vermont, P.O. Box 671, Shelburne, VT 05482 or Common Cause, 805 15th St. NW, 8th Floor, Washington, D.C. 20005. Arrangements are being made by Boucher & Prithcard Funeral Home in Burlington.

IN THANKS

To the many friends of

Diane Gabriel

who have written, called, donated, or come to see and comfort me: Thank you so, so much. I wanted to write to each of you but simply cannot do so. Just know that I am grateful beyond words for your love and concern. She was very special. And so are all of you. – Mark

Want to memorialize a loved one in Seven Days? Post your remembrance online and in print at lifelines.sevendaysvt.com. Or contact us at lifelines@sevendaysvt.com or 865-1020, ext. 37.

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Century Professorship. He then cofounded the Dartmouth Ethics Institute and taught business ethics classes to undergraduates, Tuck students, Dartmouth alumni/ae and community members. Hennessey was a much beloved and respected college professor and administrator. He had a passion for teaching and was a mentor and adviser to many students, friends and faculty, who frequently describe how he changed their lives. In 1986, Hennessey was named provost at the University of Vermont by president Lattie Coor. In 1989, after Coor left UVM, Hennessey served as interim president until 1990. He also served on more than 30 nonprofit and corporate boards (often as chair), including the University of Vermont and Vermont Law School. Hennessey twice chaired the board of the Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital/DHMC. He was instrumental in the hospital’s move from Hanover to Lebanon, N.H., and oversaw the new hospital’s expansion. He was chair of the Educational Testing Service, Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance, Encyclopedia Britannica Educational Corporation, and Kendal at Hanover, among many others. More recently, he served on the board of Americans for Campaign Reform and Patient Choices at End of Life. In 1981, Hennessey received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree from the University of New Hampshire. On the occasion of Hennessey’s 80th birthday, New Hampshire governor John Lynch

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John W. Hennessey Jr., age 92, of Shelburne, Vt., and formerly of Hanover, N.H., died of natural causes on January 11, 2018, at the Wake Robin Continuing Care Retirement Community. Hennessey was a much beloved and respected academic. He had a great love of teaching and was a mentor and adviser to his students, colleagues and friends, many of whom have said, “He changed my life.” Hennessey was a scholar, a feminist, a progressive and an ethicist with an exceptional career. Despite his myriad commitments, he always made time for his family. He and his wife, Jean, took each of their three grandchildren on crosscountry trips, which covered all 50 states, and the two spent 10 weeks with them in the Cotswolds of England. His family called him “Super,” short for “Super Pal,” an apt

description of his special friendships with all children. More recently, he became the proud great-grandfather of five great-granddaughters, a new joy in his life. Hennessey was born on March 25, 1925, in Danville, Pa., to Martha Scott Braun and John W. Hennessey. He attended public schools in York, Pa., before entering Princeton University’s class of 1945 at the age of 16. His college education was interrupted in 1943 by World War II, when he enrolled in Officer Training School at the age of 18. By the age of 21, Hennessey achieved the rank of first lieutenant in the United States Army and managed more than 200 men in the Philippines Ordinance Department. He returned to Princeton in 1946, graduating Phi Beta Kappa in 1948 with a degree in economics and social institutions. The subject of his senior thesis at Princeton was universal health care. Just after their graduations, John married Jean Marie Lande (of Seattle, Wash.) at Vassar College. The couple moved to Cambridge, Mass., where John entered Harvard Business School, receiving his MBA in 1950. They then moved to Seattle, where Hennessey received his PhD in organizational behavior from the College of Business Administration at the University of Washington. While in Seattle, the couple had two children, John William Hennessey III (1952) and Martha Scott Hennessey (1954). Jean has been long

admired as a leading environmental and Democratic activist; she died in 2004. In 1957, Hennessey accepted a full professorship, teaching organizational behavior at Dartmouth College’s Amos Tuck School of Business Administration. In 1959, he accepted a short-term faculty position at IMEDE (later IMD), a graduate management program in Lausanne, Switzerland. Later, he was an adviser for similar programs in Turkey, the USSR and the People’s Republic of China. Soon after his return from Switzerland, Hennessey became associate dean of Tuck School, and, in 1968, he was invited by Dartmouth president John Sloan Dickey to become the sixth dean of Tuck. Hennessey accepted the deanship with the conditions that he continue to teach organizational behavior and that the trustees approve the admission of women to the business school. They agreed; the first women were admitted to Tuck in September 1968, and Dartmouth College made the decision to accept undergraduate women three years later. During his tenure as dean, among other accomplishments, Hennessey inaugurated the Tuck Executive Program, the Tuck Education Loan Program and the alumni/ae magazine, Tuck Today. He was also founding chair of the Council on Opportunity in Graduate Management Education (COGME) to increase the flow of minority students into the five most selective MBA programs. Upon retiring as dean in 1976, Hennessey was awarded Dartmouth’s Third


Champlain College Students Produce a Wellness Magazine B Y SA LLY PO LL A K

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 01.17.18-01.24.18 SEVEN DAYS

Kim MacQueeni

COURTESY OF THE WELL

22 STATE OF THE ARTS

its writing program, having honed her chops as a high school sophomore at Peoples Academy in Morrisville, where she produced a 50-page grammar guide as part of an independent study. “It kind of snowballed from there,” Safford said of her interest in editing. Maina Chen, a senior from Brooklyn, N.Y., led the editorial team and worked as editor on Safford’s article. She was impressed by the supportive and collaborative nature of the class, Chen said, and the students’ ability to create a product over the semester. “It was actually pretty fun,” she said. “I didn’t realize what was in store, because I’ve never taken a publishing class before, but I’m actually proud that we’ve come this far.” Senior Kiera Hufford of Trumansburg, N.Y., wrote about SAD. She knew a student who had experienced it and thought the subject would be timely. Through her job at the college’s Center for Publishing, where she is assistant managing editor, Hufford worked through winter break to finalize the magazine’s production. “I am very happy with it,” The Well staff she said. “I think all of the content is really well written, and I’m proud of the writers in there. All of the story ideas were really great and were executed really well.” MacQueen said the opportunity to develop the course was a “wonderful gift.” She plans to offer it again in the fall. As for the first class, she said, “I lucked out. These 11 wonderful young women showed up to take it, and they asked amazing questions. They worked with each other to learn and create this wonderful thing. It was an absolute joy to teach.” 

JAMES BUCK

L

ast fall, Champlain College offered a course in magazine publishing through its professional writing program. The 11 students in the class performed all the duties that writers and editors undertake: determining a tone for the publication, developing story ideas for short pieces and longer features, writing and editing articles, designing pages, and proofreading copy. But even in a hands-on class such as this one, the teacher gets to call some shots. KIM MACQUEEN, managing editor of the Champlain College Center for Publishing, developed and taught the course — and came up with the magazine’s theme: health and wellness. Thus, as an initial task, the students in the class — by chance, all female — had to consider what wellness meant to them and how to approach a topic that’s heavily covered in the media. “It was kind of funny,” recalled GRACE SAFFORD, a sophomore from Elmore. “Half the room was like, ‘Yeah, I’m ready to write about this.’ The other half was like, ‘Man, I hate yoga.’” After discussions and kicking around ideas, the full group was interested, Safford said. “When we came together and had a common definition and wiped away the stereotypes of wellness being kale and yoga, people were happy,” she said. “Eventually, everyone really loved the idea of writing about wellness.” That enthusiasm and interest is evident in the Well, the 48-page publication that the students produced under MacQueen’s direction. The stories in the magazine — subtitled “A lifestyle magazine for young adults” — are engaging and well written, addressing familiar issues such as seasonal affective disorder (SAD), as well as lesser-known topics such as healthy gaming apps. The Well offers some quick recipes to make during finals week and includes a list of health resources. The digital version of

WHEN WE ... WIPED AWAY THE STEREOTYPES OF WELLNESS BEING KALE AND YOGA, PEOPLE WERE HAPPY. GRAC E S AFFORD

the magazine is online now; a print version will be published next month. MacQueen said she wanted the class to “mimic an editorial hierarchy.” In developing the course, she said she was initially unsure whether to “dictate” the theme of the magazine “or to let the students have that agency. “I decided ultimately it would help us move faster and get a lot more done if students could focus, rather than divine everything from scratch,” MacQueen

continued. “They really took the opportunity to redefine [wellness] for themselves … [It] was a really organic process.” Each student pitched three ideas for a 500-word article and selected one to write. From these shorter pieces, a few were chosen for more in-depth coverage, giving students an opportunity to report, write and edit feature-length stories. Safford produced a piece about service dogs — an idea that came to her when a college friend arrived on campus with one. “I was very curious about the whole process, but I noticed that I didn’t know how to approach her and ask about service dogs,” Safford said. “What’s the etiquette about this? What do I say? What do I do?” She chose to atend Champlain for

Contact: sally@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Find the Well online at bit.ly/2moc4w3. A launch party for the print version is Tuesday, February 27, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Fireside Lounge, IDX Student Life Center, Champlain College, in Burlington.


COURTESY OF NORTHERN STAGE

unique pieces in gibeon meteorite, 100% recycled gold, diamonds, and other fine gemstones.

Northern Stage actors in rehearsal for last year’s New Works Now festival

Awe.

YOUR ANTIDOTE TO THE MODERN AGE

CENTER FOR STRONG MIND, STRONG BODY S TA R T Y O U R L I F E T O D AY

THEATER

Jacob Albee Goldsmith

NEW YEAR, NEW WORKS: BUFFING UP ON LOCAL THEATER

135 ALLEN BROOK LANE WILLISTON 05495

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FOREVER MY GIRL Join New York Times bestselling author HEIDI MCLAUGHLIN in celebration of the theatrical release of her novel, FOREVER MY GIRL, on opening weekend at the Essex Cinemas.

The festivities will kick off on Friday evening with a Q&A session following the 6:30 p.m. showing. Mini-movie posters will be available! On Saturday, pick up your copy of Forever My Girl and have it signed by Heidi, with a paid admission, before the 6:30 showing. Don't forget to grab your mini-movie poster! *BOOKS AND POSTERS ARE LIMITED TO QUANTITY ON HAND

Tickets available at ESSEXCINEMAS.COM

JANUARY 19

Followed by Q&A Grab a mini-movie poster!

JANUARY 20

Book signing before showing. Grab a mini-movie poster!

JANUARY 21

Book signing before showing. Movie poster giveaway!

SHOWTIME: 6:30 SHOWTIME: 6:30 SHOWTIME: 1:00

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON FOREVER MY GIRL, PLEASE VISIT HEIDIMCLAUGHLIN.COM

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LOCAL PREMIERE!

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NEW YEAR, NEW WORKS

jacobalbee.com . 802-540-0401 burlington, vt hours by appointment

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There must be something dramatic in that White River water: In March, Thetford-based director PERRY ALLISON will mount a production of 1776, the musical by Sherman Edwards that debuted on Broadway in 1969. The show, to be staged at BRIGGS OPERA HOUSE, portrays the founding fathers during the signing of the Declaration of Independence. Allison’s interest in 1776 extends beyond the stage. “I have always loved this play and feel that in our current political climate, it is more relevant than ever,” she writes in a release. “It asks us to consider what it means to live in a democracy. It asks us to consider how we can come together, even with disparate points of view, for the good of our country.” To encourage full family participation, the company will admit kids for free. Local politicians, activists and scholars will be invited to participate in discussions with the audience, though none is yet named on the website for what Allison calls the 1776 Project: Creating a Community Conversation. Like Northern Stage, the MIDDLEBURY ACTORS WORKSHOP will present staged readings this year; they’re part of its Cutting Edge series, which launched last year and focuses on newer works. Sex With Strangers by Laura Eason

W W W. B I K R A M Y O G AW I L L I S T O N . C O M

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’Tis the season for everyone to put away their Christmas lights and turn on the stage lights. Or something like that. With apologies to the Scrooges and Grinches, most thespians take a break during the holidays, if only to gear up for the new season that starts in January. We’ve rounded up a few full productions and staged readings that theatergoers can look forward to in coming months. Interested in the freshest of fresh takes? NORTHERN STAGE will present three recently developed plays as part of its New Works Now festival, which runs Friday through Sunday, January 19 through 21, at BARRETTE CENTER FOR THE ARTS in White River Junction. Now entering its fifth year, the fest features staged readings followed by a post-performance conversation with actors, playwrights and directors. The 2018 New Works Now includes a one-woman show about modern femme adolescence, a “lush rock fable” about disconnects in our political system, and a drama exploring the intergenerational relationships of three female family members. In a super-meta addition, the festival will be capped by a 10-minute play about performing a 10-minute play. Written by Jack Neary, it’s called The Dual.

BIKRAM YOGA PIYO M E D I TAT I O N MASSAGE THERAPY


COURTESY OF LINDSAY RAYMONDJACK

Vermont Stage Is on a Roll With World Premiere of Doublewide BY JA C Q U E L I N E L AW LER

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roducing the world premiere of a play is a coveted opportunity for theater makers: It’s a natural marketing sell and can leave a lasting impression on the play itself. For example, if a publisher picks up a play, the world-premiere theater and cast will be listed in the resulting book. Too often, though, a play’s life begins and ends with its premiere, and playwrights struggle to get their largely unknown work produced a second time. Enter the National New Play Network, which works to disrupt the paradigm by enlisting theaters and playwrights across the country to participate in its landmark initiative, the Rolling World Premiere. Here’s how the program works: Three or more theaters within the network agree to produce the same play over a single calendar year, giving the work longer life and greater exposure. In the case of Stephen Spotswood’s Doublewide, one of those NNPN theaters

is VERMONT STAGE, which will present the world-premiere production next week. Partnering theaters include Florida Repertory Theatre in Fort Myers, Florida Studio Theatre in Sarasota, and Williamston Theatre in Michigan. Being part of the NNPN can benefit both theaters and playwrights. Vermont Stage producing artistic director CRISTINA ALICEA said joining the network has expanded the scope of what her company can do. “Even though we have a small theater, the network gives us access to a huge collection of collaborators and literary managers,” Alicea said. “We can’t read all the plays we’d like to, so getting recommendations from professionals we respect is critical.” The NNPN is more than just a book club, however, and it doesn’t set up one-way relationships in which large theaters bestow plays on small towns. Rather, Alicea suggested, it connects

playwrights to theater professionals whom they might not otherwise have met and empowers producers to share the work of local writers.

THE [NATIONAL NEW PLAY NETWORK]

artistic directors around the country and see if they want to do a [rolling premiere] with us.” Vermont Stage has belonged to the NNPN for almost four years, the only Vermont member and one of just three in New England. But this is the first time the Burlington-based company is rolling with the network. “Last year was so busy with Fun Home, and the right play hadn’t come along,” said Alicea. “But Doublewide feels really urgent right now, considering everything that’s going on.” She was referring to a notion that has dominated political discourse since at least the 2016 presidential campaign: that America’s rural poor have been neglected or forgotten. The dramatic canon also tends to forget about that demographic, Alicea suggested: “There’s a ton of plays about upper-class or upper-middle-class

GIVES US ACCESS TO A HUGE COLLECTION OF COLLABORATORS AND LITERARY MANAGERS. C RI S T I N A AL I C E A

“Often a playwright [has] made a name for themselves in their hometown, but not yet nationally,” Alicea said. “If there’s a playwright I love and I’m going to produce, using the NNPN can increase the impact of that production. I can personally send the play to


New Year, New Works « P.23

EVEN WITH DISPARATE POINTS OF VIEW, FOR THE GOOD OF OUR COUNTRY. PERRY AL L I S ON

sweetheart to a Vietnamese outpost, where “the country and the war transform her.” Later installments include a dinosaur-centric performance, a play centered on the wife of philosopher Karl Marx, and a biographical show about film actress and inventor Hedy Lamarr, among others. In Vermont, it seems, all the state’s a stage. This is just a sampling of theater experiences to come. SADIE WILLIAMS

Contact: sadie@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Learn more at northernstage. org, middleburyactors.org and vermontshakespeare.org, and check the Seven Days calendar for other theater

working with the writer,” Alicea observed. “You can ask questions; he can explain further. Seeing a different company perform the play can inspire him to make some changes.” Spotswood will join the cast for a “talkback” on the first Thursday of the run, January 25. Asked whether she would produce a Rolling World Premiere again, Alicea was enthusiastic. “The [NNPN] makes the search for new plays easier,” she said. “In my dream scenario, we’d produce one world premiere a year.” m

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INFO

STATE OF THE ARTS 25

Americans, but not many about the situation plaguing the rural poor.” Doublewide portrays a family whose American dream consists of replacing their doublewide trailer with a conventional home. Alicea called the work “a very loving and respectful play, which represents that community well.” She became interested in the work two years ago, after getting to know Washington, D.C., playwright Spotswood at the NNPN conference in Florida. At the conclusion of the conference, he sent her his play. “At that point, of course I’m going to read it,” Alicea said. Spotswood has been present at and involved in each production of the Rolling World Premiere, visiting the theaters and making edits to the play. While Vermont Stage was rehearsing, he cut an entire scene. “That’s what’s exciting about

IT ASKS US TO CONSIDER HOW WE CAN COME TOGETHER,

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is the first — on February 25 — of four plays curated and directed by BECKY STRUM. Chronicling the discomfiting sexual relationship between a twentysomething male writer and the object of his affection, a fortysomething female novelist, the 2014 show sounds like a good way to heat things up on a winter evening. Other readings in the series will happen in June, September and November. The VERMONT SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL keeps things old-school but with a contemporary and sometimes boozy twist. On February 11, Vino and the Bard is the first event in VSF’s 2018 Salon Series, which presents plays written or inspired by Shakespeare. For Vino, thespians will present scenes from the Bard’s works on the ARTSRIOT stage, while the audience can sip wines from Shelburne Vineyard. Three other “inspired-by” salon events are spread throughout the year, while VSF’s centerpiece Shakespeare production this summer will be The Taming of the Shrew. MOXIE PRODUCTIONS’ One & Only Series returns for its second year to the GRANGE HALL CULTURAL CENTER in Waterbury. The 2018 run of solo performances opens on January 20 with ETHAN BOWEN of BALD MOUNTAIN THEATER performing an adaptation of Tim O’Brien’s Vietnam story “Sweetheart of the Song Tra Bong” (from his collection The Things They Carried). It’s about a young soldier who flies his high school

Doublewide by Stephen Spotswood, directed by Cristina Alicea, produced by Vermont Stage, January 24 through February 11: Wednesdays through Saturdays, 7:30 p.m.; Sundays, 2 p.m., at FlynnSpace in Burlington. $29.70-38.50. vermontstage.org Untitled-41 1

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NOVEL GRAPHICS FROM THE CENTER FOR CARTOON STUDIES

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DRAWN+paneled

LUKE HOWARD is an Ignatz Award-nominated cartoonist who lives in White

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River Junction and teaches at the Center for Cartoon Studies. Find his work at andsothen.com.

DRAWN & PANELED IS A COLLABORATION BETWEEN SEVEN DAYS AND THE CENTER FOR CARTOON STUDIES IN WHITE RIVER JUNCTION, FEATURING WORKS BY PAST AND PRESENT STUDENTS. FOR MORE INFO, VISIT CCS ONLINE AT CARTOONSTUDIES.ORG.


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THE STRAIGHT DOPE BY CECIL ADAMS

Dear Cecil,

Scientifically speaking, is music universal? If some advanced extraterrestrial came to Earth, would he recognize our music?

— Jim B., via the Straight Dope Message Board

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s music universal? Well, that’s a bet being made by the group Messaging Extraterrestrial Intelligence. Not content to simply scan the skies for signs of life, the METI folks want to go ahead and say howdy, which they’re attempting to do via a transmission station in Norway, beaming a binary-coded message at one potentially life-friendly exoplanet 12 light-years away. The content of their message? Melodies, created in collaboration with an artsy Barcelona music festival — lest you thought we’d subject our pen pals to, say, “Escape (The Pina Colada Song).” For the moment, let’s put the more, uh, universal sense of “universal” on hold and start a little closer to home. Leaving aside all the pop-sci baloney about music being a “universal language” — a phrase specially calibrated to drive both musicologists and linguists nuts — we can say, nonetheless, that music is universal here on Earth: Virtually all cultures produce it in some form. We’ve been at it a long time, creating

tunes for at least 50,000 years — possibly as long as 250,000, if you count our a cappella period. This long-term commitment has led some scientists to suggest that the tendency to make music must have had some role to play natural-selection-wise. But what? The list of theories is longer than Wagner’s Ring Cycle: Music could have been a “proto-language,” a mode of human communication before formal languages developed; music might facilitate social cohesion, like grooming does for other primates; music might soothe cognitive dissonance in our brains and help us perform complex tasks; and so on. Not exactly settled science, but let’s accept for the sake of discussion that our taste for music is an evolutionary adaptation. Is there any reason to think our friends from the exoplanet GJ 273b — the target audience for the METI transmission — would’ve evolved similarly? I’ll point you toward an intriguing recent paper in the International Journal of Astrobiology, where a few

scientists argue that if advanced extraterrestrials have also undergone a process of natural selection (and there’s no reason to think otherwise), they might resemble us in some fundamental biological ways, and, to a degree, that might surprise us. But can they boogie? I regret to inform you that this paper didn’t go so far as to venture a guess, Jim. It’s not too hard, though, to make the case that it shouldn’t matter either way. Besides the musical passages, the METI message contains a primer on Earth math and physics — from basic arithmetic and geometry up through trig, which gets you to the sine function and, ultimately, to the wave forms that convey audible sound, as well as a clock function meant to get across the idea of measuring time in seconds. The plan is to provide a conceptual toolkit for budding music lovers on other planets: everything they’d need, ideally, to look at the other data and have a shot at figuring out it’s supposed to represent notes at various

pitches over varying lengths of time. Even if the aliens can’t hear the music in the sense that we understand hearing, they’ll be able to perceive the patterns formed by its constituent data and, with any luck, grok it anyway. The mathematical orderliness of Johann Sebastian Bach’s Goldberg Variations, you’d think, might have a beauty that transcends mere audibility. And who knows? Maybe the receiving civilization will have some souped-up hi-fi equipment that transposes our sound waves into a spectrum more locally popular — light, say. Just the same, they may not see what the big deal is. In a 2001 paper, the musicologist David Huron asks us, in the service of explaining various evolutionary theories of music, to engage in a little thought experiment. Imagine you’re an alien scientist visiting Earth, Huron writes. A lot of what you see makes sense to you on a behavioral level: eating, sleeping, etc. But you’d also see us creating music, listening to it, incorporating it into our religious

ceremonies and mating rituals — and all this you might find baffling. “Even if Martian anthropologists had ears, I suspect they would be stumped by music,” Huron concludes. His point is that music as we understand it may be a uniquely human behavior — graspable by extraterrestrial listeners, sure, but they might find our devotion curious. To be fair, this wouldn’t put them too far behind Earth anthropologists; as discussed earlier, we’re still puzzling it out ourselves. From METI’s perspective, this isn’t a bug, but a feature: Any alien civilization we contact, the thinking goes, is likely to be much more advanced than we are, so bragging about our scientific achievements is probably pointless — they’re there already, whereas music and other Earthly arts might be sui generis enough to pique their interest. To me, though, this argues for sending the very best stuff we’ve got. No offense to the composers in Barcelona, but if we’re trying to turn extraterrestrial heads here, why screw around? Play ’em some Stevie Wonder already.

INFO

Is there something you need to get straight? Cecil Adams can deliver the Straight Dope on any topic. Send questions to Cecil via straightdope.com or write him c/o Chicago Reader, 350 N. Orleans, Chicago 60654.

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WHISKEY TANGO FOXTROT BY KEN PICARD

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What’s the Deal With CBD-Supported Meditation Classes? Because I’m nursing a rotator cuff injury, I dipped, dropped, scooped and massaged in as much CBD as time allowed, then made myself comfortable in one of the chairs arranged in a semicircle around Ancker. Raap then dimmed the lights, and Ancker began verbally transporting us to “somewhere that’s warm and sunny, where our chakras will become balanced and everything will follow the flow.” During the next hour, she talked us through a typical guided meditation session, complete with the requisite visualization techniques for calming the body and mind.

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Contact: ken@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Got a Vermont head-scratcher that’s been puzzling you? Ask us! wtf@sevendaysvt.com

WTF 29

Though the overall vibe of the class sounds a bit New Agey, the emerging science on CBD is increasingly evidence based and peer reviewed. In recent years, CBD has gone more mainstream as a small but expanding body of research suggests it has wideranging therapeutic uses — such as an anticonvulsant treatment for epilepsy and other intractable seizure disorders. According to the California-based nonprofit Project CBD, cannabidiol has shown promise in relieving certain types of pain and inflammation, as well as in treating depression, anxiety, arthritis, diabetes, alcoholism, multiple sclerosis, schizophrenia and post-traumatic stress disorder. In November, the World Health Organization released a report on the current state of CBD science. One big takeaway was the WHO’s recommendation that it no longer be listed as a controlled substance. Although CBD is widely produced and sold throughout the U.S., including in Vermont, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration still lists it as a Schedule I substance alongside other drugs such as heroin, mescaline and

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LSD, which are deemed to have “no currently accepted medical use” and “a high potential for abuse.” WHO researchers strongly disagreed. They found compelling evidence that, beyond its uses for seizures, CBD also may be beneficial in treating other medical conditions due to its antipsychotic, analgesic, antiasthmatic and antitumor properties. The report also noted that CBD might help in treating opioid, cocaine and tobacco addictions. Furthermore, the WHO report pointed out that CBD has a good safety profile, with low toxicity, no risk of abuse or dependency, and “no known negative side effects,” even at high doses. Perhaps it was no surprise that, at the Burlington CBD meditation class, participants reported only positive experiences. Brendan of Burlington, who asked that his last name not be published because he works in a lab that receives federal funding, said he’s used CBD to treat anxiety instead of using conventional pharmaceuticals. Brendan said he found the class “really relaxing [and] very eye-opening.” His friend, Dylan Steinberg, agreed. “I thought the meditation was really nice,” she said. “I had some experience with meditation in the past, but this was definitely a very full experience.” Steinberg, who works at Healthy Living Market & Café in South Burlington, noted that “tons” of customers come in asking for CBD products. Sometimes one will ask her a question, and another nearby customer will chime in about his or her own CBD use. “It’s insane,” Steinberg added. “We joke that we can stand at the Follow Follow stories likeon... this on... stories like this case [where CBD products are displayed] and just talk to customers all day.” vermontcannabeat.com As for me, when I headed into the Arctic cold, my injured shoulder still ached, though less than it did when I had arrived. Even after a hearty dose of the latest “wonder drug,” it would be unrealistic to expect a miracle.  KEN PICARD

arely a day goes by without a news story about the latest superfood, miracle drug or herbal remedy that promises to stave off or cure all that ails you, from cancer to diabetes to chronic ennui. Be it turmeric, biotin, glucosamine or chia seeds, the list of superfoods, spices and dietary aids keeps growing at a dizzying pace. In October, the Council for Responsible Nutrition released the results of its annual survey, which found that a record-high 76 percent of Americans now take dietary supplements. In the last year, Seven Days staffers have reported on an increasing number of Vermont-made foods, beverages and health care products containing cannabidiol, or CBD, one of dozens of naturally occurring compounds found in cannabis plants. While clinical research on the health benefits of CBD is accelerating worldwide, it’s still limited in the United States. As such, CBD, which is non-psychoactive, continues to straddle the line between conventional and alternative remedies in this country. So, when we spotted a series of classes billed as “CBD-supported guided meditation,” our first reaction was, WTF? By itself, CBD won’t get you high. But can it help you go deeper within your psyche? I decided to find out firsthand. As evening temperatures plummeted into the subzero zone in early January, I arrived at Make It a Mellow 2018 With a CBD Meditation at Green State Gardener. The company is an indoorgardening supply store in Burlington that caters largely to at-home medical cannabis and registered hemp growers. Marsya Ancker of Marsya Mind Body Spirit of Winooski led the $15 class. For more than two decades, she has been “studying healing traditions from around the world including yoga, Reiki, chakra balancing, gem therapy, healing touch and breath work,” according to her website. Nine students, including GSG general manager Kelsy Raap, participated in the hourlong session. Before Ancker began leading us on an introspective journey of relaxed and focused attention, Raap invited students to the front of the room to pre-dose themselves with various oral and topical products, virtually all of which are produced in Vermont. They included CBD-infused honeys, tinctures, aromatherapy roll-ons, an anti-aging facial serum — “Please don’t eat it,” Raap cautioned — and salves for site-specific joint and muscle pain.


Burning Questions As pot is legalized, medical experts weigh in on safer consumption B Y KEN PICAR D

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LUKE EASTMAN

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

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he legal has landed. Adult Vermonters will soon be allowed to smoke pot at home with as much impunity as they can crack a beer or sip a Chardonnay. This week, Gov. Phil Scott is expected to sign into law a bill allowing people 21 and older to possess up to an ounce of marijuana and to grow up to two mature and four immature pot plants. Vermont will become the ninth state, along with the District of Columbia, to legalize it and the first to do so through its legislature rather than by ballot initiative. So now what? As Vermont transitions from an unregulated to a regulated cannabis environment — the law, set to take effect July 1, includes no provision for its sale or distribution — public health experts must shift gears from opposing legalization to minimizing its negative consequences. Charged with leading the harmreduction effort is the Vermont Department of Health. In an interview last week, state Health Commissioner Dr. Mark Levine said that his department will continue to resist efforts to legalize retail sales of recreational weed and cannabis-infused products. As he put it, “We’re not just going to throw in the towel, by any means.” Still, Levine acknowledged that it would be naïve and pointless for his department to take an abstinence-only approach to cannabis education. The health department is already developing cannabis-prevention campaigns that target populations at greatest risk of harm: children, teens, young adults up to age 25, pregnant and nursing mothers, and people with a history of substance abuse and/or mental health issues. Other public messaging will focus on the dangers of stoned driving. For the thousands of Vermonters who choose to use recreationally, what will the equivalent of a “drink responsibly” campaign for cannabis look like? “Toke thoughtfully”? “Warning: Objects may appear more edible than they are”? In short, what are the safest ways to get high? “This is very challenging,” Levine admitted. Unlike tobacco and alcohol, he said, which have generated years of

Inhale or Ingest?

data on the causal links between chronic use and adverse health consequences, marijuana’s federal status as a Schedule I drug has restricted comparable research. “With cannabis,” Levine said, “we really don’t have much to go on.” The dearth of peer-reviewed science notwithstanding, Levine and other local physicians were asked to weigh in on the healthiest ways to consume. We wanted to know: Are cannabis-infused products, such as edibles, safer or more dangerous than inhaled weed? Is vaping pot healthier

than smoking it? Are products with high concentrations of tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC — the primary psychoactive compound in cannabis — safer because users consume less? Or do they increase users’ tolerance to the drug? While wading into the weeds, we also asked questions that stoners have long debated: Are pipes and bongs safer than rolling papers? Are matches healthier than lighters? And does holding a hit longer get you more baked — or just gunk up your lungs with harmful chemicals? Yes, we went there, too.

It’s no secret that smoking weed is by far the most common way to get high, at least in states where marijuana remains illegal. However, in regulated markets such as Colorado and Washington, many consumers prefer THC-infused edibles, oils and tinctures. What do health experts say about their relative risks and benefits? At the health department, Levine was highly critical of edibles due to the inherent danger of accidental ingestion by children. Since Colorado legalized, he noted, the state has seen a spike in emergency room visits by minors who accidentally ate cannabis products packaged as candies or baked goods, as well as more ER visits by adults who consumed more than they’d intended. As Levine also pointed out, many people don’t realize that, compared


High THC Content: Good or Bad? In coming months, Vermonters are likely to hear the refrain: “This isn’t your father’s reefer.” Depending on whom you ask, today’s cannabis is five to 20 times more potent than that of 30 years ago. The baby boomers’ Colombian Gold had nothing on the millennials’ Strawberry Cough. Now, cannabis strains are as varied as the offerings in a high-end wine shop and are marketed according to their genetic pedigrees, cannabinoid profiles and characteristic highs (e.g., energetic, euphoric, creative, munchies inducing). With the advent of more robust strains, medical and recreational dispensaries typically offer a wider range of products, including smokable waxes, oils and dabs, which contain more potent THC concentrations than the traditional cannabis flower. Unless or until Vermont legalizes retail dispensaries, such products are unlikely to find widespread use in the Green Mountain State. Still, public health professionals warn about high-THC products’ unintended health consequences, noting that they’re more likely to impair memory and trigger cannabis-induced psychoses and paranoia. According to Hughes, high-THC strains are also associated with increased incidence of cannabis-use disorder, especially in young people. In short, they’re not recommended for inexperienced or casual users.

Lighters or Matches? Pipes or Papers?

Contact: ken@sevendaysvt.com

INFO The University of Vermont offers a Professional Certificate in Cannabis Science and Medicine, continuing medical education for professionals working with cannabis, and free webinars for the public on current cannabis science and business. More information and access to the webinars are available at learn.uvm.edu/program/ cannabis-science-and-medicine.

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FEATURE 31

Local medical experts declined to weigh in on the relative merits of smoking out of a pipe, bong or joint — or whether it’s healthier to strike a match or flick a Bic. For such outside-the-mainstream queries, we turned to Connecticut author Mark Braunstein, a paraplegic who described his cannabis use as “medicinal for below the waist and recreational

above.” In his 2016 piece “10 Ways to Reduce the Health Risks of Smoking Pot,” Braunstein advised against using lighters, because burning butane is far more toxic than cannabis smoke. “Matches are potentially safer if you patiently wait for the flaming sulfur tip to burn out before you hold the match to your bud,” he wrote. “In practice, however, you inhale the burning sulfur when you strike the match. If you are smelling it, then you are breathing it.” His advice: Use a match or lighter to light not your pipe or joint but a candle, then ignite toothpicks as needed. Braunstein’s research also found that pipes are the healthier option over rolling papers, whose combustion only adds more toxins to the mix. However, contrary to conventional stoner wisdom, he noted, bongs and bubblers filter out more cannabinoids, including THC, than smoke particulates, resulting in users actually consuming more weed. Finally, are you waiting to exhale? One intriguingly titled study, “Breathhold Duration and Response to Marijuana Smoke,” from the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, found that holding the hit for extended periods only exposes the lungs to more tar, carbon monoxide and other toxic nastiness but doesn’t improve the users’ high. So, don’t hold your breath. 

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For the uninitiated, a vaporizer is an electrical device that activates the THC in cannabis by heating it to below its combustion temperature. The user then inhales the THC-infused vapor to get a hit.

“There’s no question that inhaling the smoke from the combustion of marijuana is much more dangerous than inhaling vapor from heated marijuana,” Siegel wrote. “People tend not to realize it, but there are several thousand chemicals in marijuana smoke and many of them are the same chemicals present in tobacco smoke.” Exactly how harmful is smoked weed? Most medical experts agree that pot smoke can increase the frequency and duration of chronic bronchitis and exacerbate other respiratory problems. But even health commissioner Levine conceded, “It probably won’t cause lung cancer, like tobacco does, or some of the other adverse effects of tobacco.” Siegel noted that causal links between pot smoke and cancer are foggy at best. As he put it, “The data are too limited at the present time to draw a definitive conclusion either way.” And, as Freeman pointed out, in a 20-year longitudinal study jointly funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health,

“Researchers were unable to find any adverse effects on pulmonary function, from even heavy use of smoked cannabis.”

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Smoking or Vaping?

How does vaping weed compare to smoking it? Michael Siegel, a physician and professor of community health sciences at the Boston University School of Public Health, worked for two years in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Office on Smoking and Health. He was also an expert witness for plaintiffs in major lawsuits against Big Tobacco. Despite his anti-tobacco credentials, Siegel is actually a proponent of e-cigarettes as a way to get smokers to quit or reduce the harm of their tobacco use. In an email, he said he sees a “clear parallel” between the advantages of using e-cigarettes and vaping cannabis.

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to inhaled pot, edibles have a delayed onset — from 30 minutes to several hours — and a longer duration. Both, he explained, increase the likelihood of accidental overconsumption, impaired driving and workplace accidents. John Hughes is a professor of psychiatry and psychology at the University of Vermont College of Medicine and associate director of the UVM Tobacco Center on Regulatory Science. He suggested that edibles are safer than inhaled cannabis because they don’t create lung problems. “Plus, they tend to have [lower] THC concentrations,” Hughes added. “Although it’s very hard to kill yourself with a THC overdose,” he said — indeed, no such cases have been documented — “intoxicated kids can fall, walk in front of moving cars, etc.” “Oral delivery” is the healthier method, according to Dr. Kalev Freeman, assistant professor and director of emergency medicine research at the UVM College of Medicine. Freeman — who also teaches pharmacology and serves as medical director of the Vermont Patients Alliance, Montpelier’s nonprofit medical marijuana dispensary — suggested that if and when Vermont legalizes the retail sale of recreational cannabis, he’d prefer to see ingested products sold as single-dose pills, capsules or lozenges rather than as foods, candies or beverages that may appeal to children. Such products are unlikely to become legal in Vermont this year. If and when they do, however, experts point to advice offered by health departments in Colorado and California as well as the Canadian Nurses Association: “Start low and go slow.” Begin with a 10-milligram dose and wait at least two hours before eating more.


Stream of Consciousness The ancient practice of shirodhara soothes body and mind B Y J U L I A SHIPL EY

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Then Cavanagh placed cotton pads soaked in rosewater over my eyes and laid a warm, sandfilled pack across my abdomen. Finally, she adjusted the oil pot behind my head. As the treatment commenced, Cavanagh warned that shirodhara’s oil might feel cool at first but would gradually become warmer. As the oil began to flow across my brow, I found the sensation similar to standing directly under a showerhead — but so much better. The warm oil felt both deeply calming and pleasurably tingly. Due to the back-sloping decline of the forehead, the slight downward tilt of the headrest and the diligent administration of the therapist, no oil ventured near my eyes. But it definitely got in my hair as it enveloped my scalp and cascaded down the back of my head. There it was caught in a pot and recycled, as Cavanagh poured it back into the vessel. For a little more than an hour, she presided over the constant stream of perhaps a quart of oil, which was

SUSAN NORTON

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n the whole, oil spills are horrible: a waste and expense, not to mention an environmental travesty. But in a treatment room at the Stoweflake Mountain Resort & Spa in Stowe, Surinda Cavanagh administers a kind of oil spill called shirodhara that functions as luxurious medicine. Shirodhara is a thousands-of-years-old Ayurvedic treatment that aims to soothe the nervous system by gently pouring liquid — usually oil — in a steady stream onto the forehead of a person lying supine. Imagine drizzling syrup in a slow, steady stream over pancakes; now imagine that the syrup is a warm, herb-infused sesame oil and that you are the topmost pancake. Doesn’t the oil go in your eyes? Is this a slower version of Chinese water torture? How is this therapeutic? I had all of those questions and more as I prepared to experience shirodhara. It began in a dimly lit room at Stoweflake, where the shirodhara vessel hung from a stand near the head of the treatment table. After I was situated, Cavanagh applied some herbal oil (via a small bottle) to my scalp and began a series of massages, first to the head and then to the extremities — the feet and hands. This process helps to nurture  “the end points of the nervous system,” she said, which in turn “prepares the mind and body to receive shirodhara.”

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depression disorder; balances the third eye and nervous system by releasing neurohormones, creating ecstatic feelings of relaxation and pleasure; increases intuition; and renews the sweetness of life.” Quizzed about those assertions, Cavanagh smiled and replied that the treatment can have any or all of those effects, but she resists making unconditional promises. “Shirodhara is not one size fits all,” she said. And while it might be beneficial to anyone, some individuals may not be ready to receive it. “A lot of people may have difficulty giving over control,” she suggested. Some could even experience headaches as a consequence of receiving shirodhara.

THE WHOLE POINT OF SHIRODHARA IS COMPLETE SURRENDER, CALM AND PEACE, ALLOWING THE NERVOUS SYSTEM TO HEAL ITSELF. S UR IND A C AVANAGH

And yet, according to Allison Morse, a doctor of Ayurvedic medicine and founder of the Ayurvedic Center of Vermont in Williston, people who are constantly in stressful situations and on the go are perhaps among those who could benefit the most. “True healing cannot happen in an overly busy, ‘do, do, do’ environment,” said Morse. “I wish people could understand that within the stillness of shirodhara, healing starts to happen.” At Morse’s clinic, established in 2006, shirodhara isn’t regarded as a decadent spa treatment but as profound medicine. “It’s a necessity, not a luxury,” insisted Morse. Some of her patients come from out of state to receive personalized Ayurvedic treatment regimens,

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including shirodhara, for chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease, or for migraines. For those who deal with chronic pain or dysfunction related to neurological conditions, the shirodhara treatment Cavanagh provides at Stoweflake can complement other conventional or alternative medicine. Greta Lowther of Calais claims it’s been a crucial component of healing from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Lowther described her first shirodhara experience, in 2011, in a personal journal: “It seems so hard to really relax in life,” she wrote. “Surinda pointed out that you can get into a pattern of tension when you’re in pain a lot, and I was kind of bracing for muscle spasms and leg discomfort. The shirodhara help[ed] to relax my body and … let it rest, let my mind rest, and let me rest.” Healing with Ayurvedic treatments is really different from taking medication, Lowther said. She believes the treatments could serve others “in a more preventative way, just in helping to nourish the frayed nerves we can get from our busy lives.” Joanie Bégin-Morin, co-owner of Blossom Ayurveda in Montpelier, agrees. Shirodhara shares some of the same objectives as meditation, she noted. “I’ve had clients exclaim after the treatment, ‘For the first time, I had no thoughts!’” she said. “Shirodhara can be the most relaxing, beautiful thing — for PTSD, jet lag, insomnia — anything that involves the brain and nervous system,” Bégin-Morin explained. “But it can also stir up a lot of things, leading to big emotional releases, strange dreams, even colorful visions.” According to Morse, shirodhara can even spread by association. “One by one, the good effect of the healing trickles from a recipient to their partner, their children, their colleagues — it keeps spreading; it just keeps going.” Perhaps that’s another reason to try this ancient remedy. For me, shirodhara was the best kind of oil spill imaginable. 

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infused with herbs including ashwagandha, shatavari and bhringaraj — herbs recognized for their capacity to support the nervous system and brain. As Cavanagh guided the oil stream in a lazy, back-and-forth motion between my temples, my normally noisy mind — as well as my ability to continue reporting — subsided. In fact, I was barely aware that Cavanagh periodically emptied the liquid back into the pot to maintain a continuous flow. “The whole point of shirodhara,” she said, “is complete surrender, calm and peace, allowing the nervous system to heal itself.” Ayurveda is a form of health care that originated in India — the name combines the Sanskrit words ayur, meaning “life,” and  veda,  for “science or knowledge.” It aims to find the root cause of an ailment, as well as solutions that will “help the ailing individual regain balance, which in turn enables the body to heal itself,” Cavanagh explained. She trained specifically for the shirodhara practice at the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health in Stockbridge, Mass., in 2007. Additionally, she studied in India and became certified by the National Ayurvedic Medical Association in 2007. Stoweflake had been offering shirodhara since 2003, but, when Cavanagh was hired in 2008, she updated some of the equipment and introduced diet and lifestyle counseling to the spa’s menu of Ayurvedic treatments. After serving as the spa director for seven years, Cavanagh recently stepped down from the position and scaled back her hours at Stoweflake in order to open a private Ayurvedic practice. She also teaches Ayurveda and wellness classes for Johnson State College (to become Northern Vermont University in July). In addition to quieting an overactive mind — and nourishing dry hair— the purported benefits of shirodhara include better sleep, improved concentration, and reduced anxiety and fear. The Journal of Ayurvedic and Integrative Medicine asserts that the procedure induces a “relaxed state of awareness that results in a dynamic psychosomatic balance.” According to Karyn Chabot, who instructs shirodhara therapy seminars at the Newport Massage School in Rhode Island, the practice “regulates mood and


Inner Activism The Everything Space champions Vermont’s “embodiment revolution” B Y D AN BOL L ES

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 01.17.18-01.24.18 SEVEN DAYS 34 FEATURE

JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

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he revolution may or may not be televised — or YouTubed or Facebook Lived or whatever. But if Amanda Franz and Abbi Jaffe have their way, said revolution will most definitely be slow. And probably kind of awkward and touchy-feely. It will also be deeply self-aware and in touch with its own proprioceptive senses. There may be archery. Franz and Jaffe are the cofounders of the Everything Space, which bills itself as the first studio in Vermont “specifically dedicated to the education of diverse somatic practices as an integral part of social and environmental justice work.” Or, to use phrases Jaffe coined, the multiuse Montpelier studio is the epicenter of “embodiment activism” and home to the “embodiment revolution.” To understand those terms, it’s first helpful to have a definition of “somatic education,” or “somatics.” Very simply, it’s a field of movement study and therapy based on inner perceptions of the body — in other words, on actively paying attention to all the stuff our bodies are always trying to tell us if we’d just take a moment to listen. Or, as the late philosopher and somatics pioneer Thomas Hanna put it, somatics is the study of “the human being as experienced by himself from the inside.” At the Everything Space on a recent Tuesday evening, students are experiencing themselves from the inside — or learning to, at least. This is the second session of the seven-week somatic movement class Discover Your Body Intelligence, led by Montpelier’s Amy LePage. On a gleaming hardwood floor, eight students — mostly middle-aged women — stand over heavy knit blankets and plush pillows. The open room is warm, clean and well lit, with oversize windows on two sides looking onto Main Street and frigid downtown Montpelier. At the front of the room, LePage stands beside a model skeleton. She uses it to highlight the parts of the body on which this week’s class will concentrate — shoulders and pelvis. Following a brief icebreaker session, LePage instructs her students to stand in place and roll their heads from side to side. She asks them to pay special attention to muscles in the neck and shoulders

A contact improv class at the Everything Space

that engage and release throughout the movement. “Notice if one side feels different,” she says. “Notice if you’re holding your breath differently.” LePage teaches therapeutic yoga and somatics throughout the Montpelier area, independently of the Everything Space, under the banner of Emerge Yoga. Somatics has many variants, but LePage follows Hanna’s teachings in her focus on recognizing the habitual and often subconscious ways our bodies store tension — slanted posture, hunched shoulders — so we can release that tension through conscious movement. “Our habits and patterns eventually become normal, so our baseline changes,” LePage explains later. “So this is an opportunity to recalibrate, find our baseline and notice the nuances.” The way to do that, she continues, “is to slow way, way down.” During the hourlong class, LePage guides her students through a series of

gentle but deliberate movements, most of which happen (very slowly) at floor level. In each case, she reminds her students to take note of the subtle changes in their bodies and how their bodies interact with their surroundings. “We’re usually all over the place, thinking and doing, which means that we’re never actually sensing and noticing internally,” says LePage. “We are

relating human beings; we relate with our environment and other people. So, by having the opportunity to dive inward and pay attention to ourselves, it also impacts how we then experience outwardly.” An increase in internal awareness, she explains, can promote positive

external actions. That, in essence, is the foundation of the so-called “embodiment revolution,” as well as a founding principle of the Everything Space. When Franz and Jaffe opened the collaboratively run studio two years ago, it was the culmination of five years of teaching together — often at Dharma Door (now Reciprocity Vermont Embodiment Center) in Underhill, an embodiment retreat center owned by Jaffe. Though Dharma Door was a formative experience for the duo, Franz says it was just one piece of “the larger embodiment puzzle.” “We wanted to open a space that focused on the integration of somatic education and how that is connected to social and environmental justice,” says Franz. Such a space would need to be more accessible than a remote retreat — both physically and financially. “That’s why we called it the Everything Space,” says Jaffe, who has a background in yoga and Thai massage


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somatics in the U.S. and Canada for more than 12 years. The embodiment revolution, she continues, is “about how to get people in their bodies and feeling more connected and alive through that process.” As LePage’s students file out of the Everything Space at the conclusion of her class, it’s hard to say whether they’re ready to smash the patriarchy, battle the alt-right or save the planet. But most look relaxed and contented. “The slowing-down thing is really unusual for JAFFE me,” says Berlin’s Kathi Graves, who explains that the class is helping her deal with chronic nerve pain. “I’m noticing things in my body because it’s kind of meditative — and I’m not a meditative person.” Clara Bruns is dealing with a “frozen shoulder.” The Calais resident credits the “small, gentle movements” practiced in somatics with helping her regain some mobility. “I have this problem because of habitual tension holding,” says Bruns. Somatic movement “helps me relax.” You may or may not see Graves or Bruns on the front lines at the next Statehouse protest. But, according to Jaffe’s theory of embodiment activism, the mere act of slowing down and listening to their bodies could have a broader effect on the community. As LePage puts it: “The more we learn about ourselves, the more it impacts the world and culture around us.” m SPA

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FEATURE 35

and has been teaching embodiment classes throughout New England Amanda Franz (left) for more than a and Abbi Jaffe decade. “We could have called it the Somatic Studio or something. But we wanted anyone to walk in and feel like it could apply to them.” The Everything Space charges for its classes on a sliding scale. They range from LePage’s class to weekly contact improvisation jams to the family-oriented CoMotion Dance class to a new session called Robin Hood’s Arrow: Piercing the Illusion of Capitalist Culture. That last one is an archery class taught by wilderness guide and hunter safety instructor ABB I Murphy Robinson. Franz and Jaffe are both certified somatic body practitioners working toward somatic educator/therapist certification from the International Somatic Movement Education and Therapy Association. They curate the Everything Space’s offerings to align with the concepts of embodiment activism. For example, besides learning to shoot a bow and arrow, Robinson’s students will ponder “six concepts of anti-capitalist theory,” according to the course description. Not all classes are so overtly political. Most, in fact, aim arrows at capitalism and patriarchy in subtler ways. “We’re saying that the body is important, and let’s listen to the signals it’s giving us,” explains Jaffe. “And in our culture, that’s a radical act. “So the activism is in creating a culture where it’s safe to feel our bodies,” she continues. “Because when we are connected to ourselves, our bodies and nature, we’re going to respond differently when we show up to be an activist or gas station attendant or whatever it is we do.” “How we relate to the world is related to how we hear ourselves,” says Franz, who has studied and practiced


Heart Smart

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hen Linda Wellings first visited the University of Vermont Medical Center cardiac rehabilitation clinic in mid-2015, she was scared. Wellings, then 67, had just had a heart attack. “It’s a slap in the face of your mortality,” she recalled. But after 12 weeks of cardiac rehabilitation, during which she had a supervised exercise regime, Wellings said, she felt more confident in her health. “I always did the treadmill,” she said. “My kryptonite, the thing I hated the worst, was the elliptical.” Two and a half years later, Wellings continues to work out in the gym at the clinic on South Burlington’s Tilley Drive. Her friends have wondered why she doesn’t use the athletic club nearest to her residence in Shelburne. The clinic staff are the reason, Wellings tells them: “They know my situation. I feel supported, cared for and safe.” Where life-saving tactics such as surgery and medical devices leave off, cardiac rehabilitation begins. UVM’s clinic offers a program designed to improve the physical and emotional well-being of people with heart conditions through exercise, behavioral changes and education on heart-healthy living. Research has shown that participation in such rehab programs can reduce hospital readmissions by up to 30 percent and overall cardiac mortality by up to 28 percent. Yet only about 20 to 30 percent of patients nationwide participate in

cardiac rehab, according to an article the clinic’s gym is filled with exercise published by the Million Hearts Cardiac equipment. A mounted television screen Rehabilitation Collaborative. plays a slide show of inspirational quotes, Dr. Philip Ades, longtime director of interspersed with a heart-health quiz. UVM’s cardiac rehab, wants to change “The only way to keep your health is that. He was a contributor to the col- to eat what you don’t want, drink what laborative, which aims to increase the you don’t like and do what you’d rather percentage of rehab participants to 70 by not,” said one slide, quoting Mark Twain. 2022. “A goal without a Ades’ clinic sees plan is just a wish,” 350 to 400 new read a quote patients each from Antoine de year. Last fall, it Saint-Exupéry. announced that When Seven it was recognized Days visited the for its advanced clinic last week, practices when the Ades was in a conD R . P H IL IP AD E S American Association ference room speakof Cardiovascular and ing to a group of recently Pulmonary Rehabilitation recerdiagnosed patients who had tified its program. signed up for cardiac rehabilitation. “These really are the glory days of “You can outlive your heart disease,” cardiac rehabilitation,” said the clinic’s he told them. associate director and senior exercise Of the patients who attend cardiac physiologist, Patrick Savage, who has rehab, some have had a heart attack; been working with Ades for more than others deal with chronic conditions 20 years. Before the early ’80s, the pro- such as coronary artery disease. They gram tended to treat primarily men up may have undergone procedures such to age 65. When Ades started working in as bypass surgery, valve replacement or Vermont in 1984, he began working with stenting. older individuals, too. Today the clinic Participants must first take a stress treats all genders and ages, including test, the results of which are used to people with diagnoses that weren’t cov- design an individualized exercise proered before. gram. “People ask me if cardiac rehabili“The diversity of people coming into tation is safe,” Ades told his audience. “I our program is far greater than it was tell them, ‘Not doing cardiac rehabilitawhen I was getting into [it],” Savage said. tion is what’s not safe.’” Situated in a bright room with huge Most participants work out three windows that overlook the mountains, times a week for 12 weeks in what is

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known as phase two of cardiac rehab. (Phase one takes place in the hospital.) They also learn about heart-healthy dietary habits and stress-management techniques, because it’s “very, very common” for patients to experience a period of mental depression, Ades explained. The group discussed the efficacy of fitness tracking devices. Ades shared that he carries his iPhone everywhere he goes so he can use an app to count the number of steps he takes each day. “My wife thinks I’m crazy,” the cardiologist admitted. “I like to count my steps.” Before he ended the orientation, Ades reminded the group that he’s always available to answer questions. “I live here,” he told them. Heart disease, Ades said in an interview afterward, is “very preventable.” Having a family history of such disease is not a death sentence, he noted, but a call to arms. Ades himself is on the front line. His father died of a heart attack at age 50, and his brother was diagnosed with heart disease at age 47. “I’ve not had a heart disease, and I’m 66,” Ades said. “It’s pretty obvious why — I’ve tried to be healthy.” An important component of cardiac rehab is diet. Until the New York native moved to Vermont in 1984, Ades had had no contact with dairy farmers. When he advised one of his first patients, a dairy farmer, to opt for skim milk and avoid cheese, “he looked at me like I was from the moon,” the cardiologist recalled. “A

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Besides doing clinical work, Ades is committed to researching ways of getting more patients involved in cardiac rehabilitation. Between 2013 and 2015, for instance, he and his colleagues carried out a study to find out whether financial incentives would entice more patients of lower socioeconomic status to participate. They’ll publish their findings in the coming months. Ades’ dedication to his patients doesn’t go unnoticed. Wellings said the cardiologist expressed gratitude when she recently gave him a brochure from a cardiac rehabilitation clinic in Florida that her brother had attended. “He’s not set in his ways, but open to …

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for Joyful, Heart-Smart Eating, published in 2008. He worked with a dietician on recipe makeovers, being sure to include not only traditional American favorites such as oven-fried chicken, but also international dishes including Lebanese fattoush salad with grilled chicken. The book was nominated for a James Beard Award in the Healthy Cookbook category in 2009, and Ades attended the award ceremony at New York City’s Lincoln Center with his wife. “Nora Ephron was there,” he recalled, referring to the celebrated late screenwriter and humorist. “I was chatting with her about eating octopus.”

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lot of [farmers] look at skim milk like this stuff they’d like to throw away.” A change of diet is “painful” for some patients, agreed Joan Shaw, a registered nurse at the clinic. People from the older generation often aren’t used to the idea of exercising, she continued. Behavioral changes don’t always stick: 10 to 20 percent of those who complete the clinic’s program will eventually need to participate again. In line with his goal of promoting long-term heart-healthy living, Ades teamed up with the editors of Shelburne’s EatingWell magazine to produce The EatingWell for a Healthy Heart Cookbook: 150 Delicious Recipes

continually [improving] this program,” she noted. Likewise, for Savage and Shaw, it’s all about improving the program’s success rates. That might involve increasing overall motivation, helping women engage in higher-intensity training or encouraging participants to keep up with their exercise regimen after they’ve completed the program. Savage estimates that a third of such former participants, such as Wellings, continue to use the clinic’s gym facility as part of a long-term maintenance exercise program, also known as phase three of cardiac rehab. These days, the cardiac patients share their space with oncology and pulmonary rehabilitation patients. “They inspire me,” Wellings said of a group of female cancer survivors who were working out alongside her. Some participants form friendships and meet for breakfast or coffee after exercising. “The support that they get from one another is a really beneficial thing about cardiac rehabilitation,” said Savage. “This is much more social than any health club you would go to,” added Shaw. Sharing the space with other programs allows the gym to be open more hours, said Ades. And that suits him: “I like [it] to be busy.” m

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Desert Dreams Eating Mauritanian food under a tent at La Khaïma in Montréal B Y M OL LY ZAPP

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hen asked to describe the food of his native Mauritania, Atigh Ould, owner and chef of La Khaïma restaurant in Montréal, excused himself briefly, then returned to the table with a 15-pound block of salt. It was light tan and opaque. Ould explained that he had recently dug the salt from desert sand in northern Mauritania and brought it back to season the restaurant’s food. He chipped off a small piece for this reporter to try. It tasted of minerals and earth, with a flavor that deepened as it dissolved: the terroir of the Sahara. Ould, 44, grew up in a Berber tribe in the northwest African country; his relatives there are still nomads. “When you’re in the nomadic bedouin lifestyle, the key to food is simplicity,” he said. “Sometimes, you can only find certain things to eat.” In the desert, where travelers can carry only so much with them, an eating bowl and flavor-giving salt are essential. Ould brings this spirit of delicious simplicity and Mauritanian hospitality to La Khaïma, which he established in the Mile End of Montréal in 2004. He calls it the only Mauritanian restaurant in the world. Bedouin nomads have a strong tradition of welcoming guests to their tent homes and sharing meals with them, he explained, but don’t serve their food in restaurants. While Ould’s claim may be impossible to verify, he seems to have convinced Charles Bibilos, author of the popular blog United Nations of Food. Devoted to “eat[ing] food from every country,” the blogger made a trip from New York just to visit La Khaïma, which he touted as “the world’s only Mauritanian restaurant outside of Mauritania” and called one of his “favorite finds ever.” Singular or not, La Khaïma offers food and atmosphere that are unquestionably unique. There is no paper menu; all meals are prix fixe. On the chilly November

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Friday when my friend and I visited, La Khaïma was buzzing with customers, many seated in large groups. Instead of taking our order, our server told us how the night would unfold. First would come the soup, then a platter of couscous with three stews — one vegetarian and one each of chicken and beef. After that, we would have tea. We could have asked for gluten-free couscous or the vegetarian tagine only, but, otherwise, there were no choices to make. Relaxing and waiting to eat what the chef had decided for us was oddly liberating. We had barely settled in when our server brought us hummus, pita and steaming bowls of lentil m’berberli soup. Having spent my broke twenties eating lentils at least twice a week, I had steadfastly avoided the legume ever since. But personal preferences don’t matter when eating prix fixe, and I was cold, so I dug into the dal-like soup. Richly seasoned with ginger, cumin and pepper, and topped with a swirl of olive oil, the m’berberli satisfied me despite my prejudice. The simple hummus was thick but not pasty, light on the garlic and tahini. Our server did ask us one question: Would we like him to open our wine bottle? La Khaïma is licensed as a bringyour-own-alcohol restaurant, and we’d brought a Bourgueil: Avis de Vin Fort Clairet from Catherine & Pierre Breton. Made from cabernet franc grapes, it’s a light and

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funky biodynamic red wine from the Loire Valley that cost about $23 Canadian at the government-run Société des Alcools du Québec. Other juicy, light-to-mediumbodied reds that are lower in tannins, such as Beaujolais and Morgon, are a safe bet when you don’t know in advance what you’ll eat. La Khaïma always offers one vegetarian dish and often one dish each of chicken and beef, sometimes replaced by lamb or fish. The restaurant’s meat is halal, which excludes pork. Ould said he sources some of his vegetables and meats from local and organic producers and uses spices from Mauritania, Mali and other northwest African countries. We sipped our wine and took in the ambience as we DESERT DREAMS

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COURTESY OF MR. SHAWARMA

Shawarma by the Expo NEW MIDDLE EASTERN RESTAURANT IN ESSEX JUNCTION

When AYMEN AREF was a boy growing up in Baghdad, Iraq, his family owned a restaurant that served shawarmas, roasted-meat sandwiches similar to gyros. Eight years ago, his family moved to Essex Junction, where Aref recently debuted his own restaurant, MR. SHAWARMA. “It’s always been my dream to open a restaurant,” said Aref, now 22, whose business is located at 137 Pearl Street, beside the Champlain Valley Exposition. “So, when the opportunity came, I took it.” The eatery, which opened on December 29, serves chicken and beef shawarma. The meat is marinated for 14 hours, then cooked on a

shawarmas from traveling, so they are excited to try it out here.” The restaurant is Aref’s second Essex business. A graduate of the automotive program at Center for Technology, Essex, he also owns Clean & Clear Auto Detail at 18 Lincoln Street.

Caleb Lara

Lara said of the borscht. “[Escoffier’s recipes] are so thorough and super timeconsuming, and the end result is so rewarding.” Lara, who is half Mexican, is also excited about making mole Poblano. The complex sauce, which features dried chiles, spices, seeds and nuts, will be served over venison

Mr. Shawarma opens daily at 11 a.m.; it closes at midnight Sunday through Thursday, and at 4 a.m. on Friday and Saturday. The restaurant offers online ordering and delivery within a 10-mile radius. Sally Pollak

shank. He also plans seafood dishes inspired by his time in Chatham, Mass., and new vegan offerings. At the Essex, Lara suggested, he’ll strive to balance crowd-pleasing fare with menu items that push the envelope a bit, while learning more about the folks who grow and raise food in his new home state. “Creating a sense of community is important to me,” he said. “There are so many cool purveyors out there, and I haven’t scratched the surface yet.” As he does, Lara plans to make sure the menus stay seasonal and exciting. “I want things to be crafted, to be local,” he said. “I want to keep it fresh.”

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What can diners expect to find there? Borscht, for one thing. For years, Lara has been cooking a brisket-andduck borscht from a recipe by Auguste Escoffier (18461935), the famed French chef who, like Lara, worked in hotel kitchens. “It’s one of those dishes that gives me the warm-and-fuzzies,”

THURSDAY JAN 25 4-7PM

Left: chicken kebab with baba ghanoush and hummus; above: chicken and beef shawarma with hummus and stuffed grape leaves

01.17.18-01.24.18

Last fall, the ESSEX CULINARY RESORT & SPA announced the name of its new executive chef: CALEB LARA. Lara, who moved to Vermont for the job, grew up in San Diego, attended the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y., and has worked at fine restaurants along New England’s Atlantic coast. In his new role at the Essex, he gets to “oversee the whole culinary program,” he said. That includes creating menus for the resort’s restaurants: the TAVERN, which is casual, and JUNCTION, which is upscale. Lara’s first new menu for the latter will hit tables in early February.

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rotisserie. Offered in a pita or shrak flatbread wrap, the sandwich comes with lettuce, tomatoes, onions, pickles and garlic mayonnaise. “It’s a very popular food in Iraq,” Aref said. Mr. Shawarma also offers a range of other Middle Eastern fare, such as hummus, tabbouleh, falafel, baba ghanoush and stuffed grape leaves. Shawarma platters include meat and a choice of sides. Business has been very good since the restaurant’s opening, according to Aref. “It’s amazing,” he said. “It seems like people know

AMAZING BURGUNDY PRODUCERS PT 1

1/15/18 10:33 AM


waited for the main course. La khaïma is the term for the tall cloth tents in which nomadic Mauritanians make their traveling homes, and the restaurant’s décor is designed to emulate such an environment. Quilted tapestries in vibrantly eclectic patterns hang from the ceiling; most of the tables are low to the ground with cushioned benches for cozy, communal and shoeless seating. We observed many guests lounging for two or more hours over their meals. After the initial soup and hummus, the rest of the food came at a leisurely pace. It took a bit of maneuvering for the server to fit the 18-inch floral-designed platter on the table. Three stews lay on a bed of fluffy couscous in a pleasing visual presentation that we destroyed the second we dug in. The vegetarian magoji, with a base of puréed pumpkin and sweet potato, was loaded with thick, buttery, fresh-tasting carrots. The marjen featured beef and dates, the latter ingredient typical of food from the north of Mauritania. Sprinkled with a few kidney beans, the thick beef stew offered some sweetness and flavors of

cinnamon and star anise. Tiny seeds from cooked figs added a surprising crunch. As solid and interesting as both the magoji and marjen were, the poulet tenadi stole the show. The tender chicken pieces tasted hauntingly smoky, as if they had been first grilled, a note that contrasted brilliantly with the tang of the lemon confit and green olives. Perfectly juicy orange bell peppers came stewed along with onions, garlic and lots of black pepper in this complex and memorable tagine. We finished our meal with a pot of slightly sweetened fresh mint tea and two petite pieces of gingerbread. Chewy and crunchy, the dessert was an unremarkable but sweet end to a hearty dinner. The entire meal cost $25 Canadian per person, and we walked away with at least a pound of leftovers. It’s not uncommon for prix fixe meals to consist of small portions, or larger ones bulked up with inexpensive starches and proteins. The main courses at La Khaïma were neither and came with an ample but proportional helping of couscous, so the meal felt like an excellent deal. Toward the end of the evening, I noticed that our neighbors were enjoying a magoji containing a heap of blackeyed peas, unlike our version of the stew.

COURTESY OF JOSEPH POLIFRONI/LA KHAÏMA

Desert Dreams « P.38

La Khaïma

Later, I discovered that the difference was due to a chef ’s choice rather than an ingredient substitution. Ould said he sometimes adapts his dishes to the tastes of his customers, reflecting their origins or their travel experiences. If a dish on the menu resembles a dish from Senegal, for example, diners acquainted with Senegalese food might get it with spices, herbs or other touches designed to evoke that style.

The goal, Ould says, is to serve his guests food that recalls fond memories of other places and meals. For those not yet familiar with the tastes of the Sahara, La Khaïma offers the possibility of making new memories — perhaps the only ones of their kind in this part of the world. m

INFO La Khaïma, 142 Avenue Fairmount Ouest, Montréal, 514-948-9993, lakhaima.ca

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Dark Night of the Stew

Na Ghin Jung!

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The Green Mountain Beer Institute and the Woods Lodge — both based in Northfield — have teamed up to present an evening of food and drink centered on dark brews and rich, longsimmered winter fare. The night begins with a 30-minute beer education segment and continues with a glass of Long Trail Brewing or Guinness and a bowl of beef (or beefless) stew, plus fresh bread, salad and apple strudel. It’s part of a series they call the Friday Night Beer Thing, or #fnbt on Facebook.

1/15/18 2:52 PM

(It looks so good!)

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IN THE DARK: A NIGHT OF STOUTS (AND STEWS) Friday, January 19, 6 p.m., the Woods Lodge, Northfield. $28-35; preregister. Info, 778-0205, thewoodslodgerestaurant.com.

AGRICOLA FARM DINNER CLUB An Italian dinner at Agricola Farm isn’t just a meal. Attendees are inducted into the farm’s dinner club, which means they’re treated to a farm tour and, on the day of the event, get a 10 percent discount on meat products to take home. Expect communal tables, handmade pastas and courses made with meat from heritage breed animals. Saturday, January 20, 5:30 p.m., Agricola Farm, Panton. $75; preregister. Info, 475-3409, agricolavermont.com.

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SIMON PEARCE BEER DINNER Folks from Zero Gravity Craft Brewery will be on hand to talk about their products, while patrons eat and drink. Don’t miss the opportunity to visit the Simon Pearce shop and check out the made-in-Vermont glassware and pottery. Friday, January 19, 5:308:30 p.m., Simon Pearce Restaurant, Quechee. Cost of food and drink; preregister. Info, 2953655, joanne.reichle@ simonpearce.com, simonpearce.com.

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FOOD 41

AN INTRODUCTION TO INTUITIVE EATING Some diet gurus say to cut out carbs; others caution eaters to avoid fat. Fad diets — complete with loads of contradictory advice — abound. What’s a hungry person to do? According to Kerri-Ann Jennings, a registered dietician, the answer is to look inward. She’ll teach participants about the “10 principles of intuitive eating,” including “respect your fullness” and “discover the satisfaction factor.” The aim is to encourage dietary decisions that are good for both body and mind. Thursday, January 18, 5:30-6:30 p.m., City Market, Onion River Co-op (downtown Burlington). $5-10. Info, 861-9700, citymarket. coop.


Miraculous Miso Rich in flavor, the Japanese paste is a nutritional powerhouse B Y SUZ A NNE M. PO DHAIZE R

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 01.17.18-01.24.18 SEVEN DAYS

IT’S AN ANTIDOTE

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competition from other microbes, the koji fungus, with which the paste is inoculated, can take hold and multiply. Come summer, the ferment is strong, and problematic organisms — which are more plentiful in the season’s warmth and humidity — are less likely to gain traction. By fall, the miso is ready, but it can be aged even longer for more intense flavor. Rhapsody offers both white and red miso, and the Welterses cook with it every single day. “You can put it in bread instead of salt,” Sjon Welters said. “You can take miso and put cut-up onions, cucumbers or carrots into it and make the best probiotic pickles you can think of.” The family also uses miso in salad dressings, as a sauce for tofu and as a marinade for zucchini before grilling. And, of course, they stir it into soup.

“When you make soup,” Welters said, “you usually put salt into it, but if you use miso instead, it makes it so much richer. You get the probiotics, the medicinal qualities, and, suddenly, your soup becomes a multidimensional dish.” Welters believes that all Americans would benefit from including more miso in their diets. “Food nowadays is too devitalized and too industrialized, but miso is an ancient food, still made the same way it was made a thousand years ago,” he said. “It’s an antidote to a polluted world.” m

PREPARATION:

needs to be heated through. When these are done, turn off heat, remove pan from burner and let sit while you complete the assembly. 3. Assemble: Place precooked starches in serving bowls. Ladle a cup of broth from the pot into a separate bowl and stir in miso paste to make a slurry. Stir slurry back into the broth. Taste. Add more miso, vinegar or mirin as needed. Then ladle it into bowls over the starches and garnish with sesame oil and sliced scallion.

Contact: podhaizer@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Rhapsody Natural Foods, 752 Danville Hill Road, Cabot, 563-2172, rhapsodynaturalfoods.com

NONTRADITIONAL, MIX-AND-MATCH MISO SOUP I love restaurant miso soup, but at home I like to make my miso a meal by mixing in vegetables, mushrooms and other ingredients. INGREDIENTS

42 FOOD

that miso also protects against strokes and various kinds of tumors. Plenty of less-dramatic claims can be made about the benefits of miso, too. Like many fermented foods, it’s thought to contribute positively to the gut microbiome. It’s an excellent source of protein — versions made from soybeans provide all of the essential amino acids that humans need but must get from dietary sources. Miso is also a rich source of other nutrients, including phosphorus, manganese, calcium and vitamin K, as well as fiber. Vermont has just one commercial miso producer: Rhapsody Natural Foods in Cabot. There, Sjon and Elysha Welters, with help from their children and grandchildren, produce tempeh, amazake, natto, egg rolls, rice bran, koji and two kinds of miso (see glossary at right). In 1997, the Welterses, who came from the Netherlands, opened a vegetarian restaurant in Montpelier next to the Savoy Theater. In 2011, they sold the spot to the owners of Bagitos Bagel and Burrito Café and began to focus on commercial production. Their miso came along in 2012. “We wanted to make our amazake organic, but we couldn’t get organic koji, so we decided to make our own. The moment you start making koji, you might as well make miso, too,” Sjon Welters explained. Plus, because miso is a living food, it “takes on the characteristics of the environment,” he said. “Every region in the country should have its own artisan miso maker.” Traditionally, miso is produced in winter when fewer yeasts and bacteria are floating around. Sans too much

© OKSANABRATANOVA | DREAMSTIME.COM

A

t most Japanese restaurants, any entrée or selection of sushi comes with a complimentary cup of miso soup. It’s usually delicate in taste and garnished with bits of scallion, cubes of silken tofu and floaty bits of seaweed. The dish is made with a broth called dashi. The classic version is flavored with bonito flakes and kombu seaweed, both of which impart salty and savory qualities. (Vegetarian dashi omits the flakes, which are made of fish.) To that, a dollop of miso paste is added, and the soup, now with floating clouds of sediment, is finished with garnishes and delivered to diners. Miso is much more than a Japanese variation on the bouillon cube. The paste, which is made by fermenting grains or legumes with salt and koji — another name for the fungus Aspergillus oryzae — can be mixed into condiments, thinned into a marinade or used as a pickling agent for vegetables. Miso’s health benefits are the stuff of legend. After the atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, on August 9, 1945, Dr. Tatsuichiro Akizuki noticed that none of his tuberculosis patients developed acute radiation poisoning, despite having been a mere 1.4 kilometers from the bomb’s epicenter. He attributed this marvel to their daily consumption of miso soup. Thus, after the nuclear power plant meltdown at Chernobyl, Ukraine, in 1986, residents in the vicinity were encouraged to consume miso soup as an antidote to radiation exposure. And a 2013 study by Hiromitsu Watanabe, published in the Journal of Toxicologic Pathology, shows

For the broth: • Flavoring agents: onion, garlic, ginger, mushroom stems • Liquid: chicken, veggie, meat or fish stock or water • Condiments: soy sauce, mirin, rice wine vinegar, other vinegar

For the soup: • Greens: cabbage, kale, bok choy or other leafy vegetables • Carrots or sweet potatoes • Tofu To assemble: • Precooked starches: rice, rice noodles, soba or udon noodles • Miso paste: about 1 tablespoon per cup of broth, give or take • Sesame oil • Scallion, sliced into thin rounds

1. Make broth: Cut flavoring agents into small pieces and simmer in liquid, with condiments, for 15 minutes. Meantime, cut soup ingredients into bite-size pieces. Strain soup base, discarding solid bits, and return liquid to heat. 2. Add soup ingredients: When broth has come to a simmer, add ingredients that will take the longest to cook, and then gradually add the others. For instance, cabbage or sweet potato will need to cook a few minutes, while tofu merely


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EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 and similar Vermont statutes which make it illegal to advertise any preference, limitations, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, sexual orientation, age, marital status, handicap, presence of minor children in the family or receipt of public assistance, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or a discrimination. The newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate, which is in violation

SDIreland-Sm.ClassyDisplay081716.indd 8/22/16 1:51 PM1 of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Any home seeker who feels he or she has encountered discrimination should contact:

OFFICE/ COMMERCIAL

HUD Office of Fair Housing 10 Causeway St., Boston, MA 02222-1092 (617) 565-5309 — OR — Vermont Human Rights Commission 14-16 Baldwin St. Montpelier, VT 05633-0633 1-800-416-2010 hrc@vermont.gov

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APARTMENTS

20 WEST CANAL STREET • WINOOSKI 1, 2 AND 2+ BEDROOMS 700-1700 SQ. FT. CALL TODAY 655-1186, OR VISIT US AT WOOLEN-MILL.COM

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ENTERTAINMENT FINANCIAL/LEGAL

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ACT 250 NOTICE APPLICATION #4C1309 AND HEARING 10 V.S.A. §§ 6001 - 6093 On December 22, 2017, Giles Wagoner, Brian Libby, Nathaniel Hayward, Jamie Faas, and the Kim

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CLASSIFIEDS C-3

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01.17.18-01.24.18

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the existing house at 138 East Allen Street. Parking is available across East Allen Street.

of the organization, its purposes, and the nature of its membership (T.10, § 6085(c)(2)(B)); 2) documentation that prior to the date of the hearing, you were duly authorized to speak for the organization; and 3) that the organization has articulated a position with respect to the Project’s impacts under specific Act 250 Criteria.

The following persons or organizations may participate in the hearing for this project:

[CONTINUED] Haley and Gregory Chioffi Revocable Trust filed application #4C1309 for a project described as redevelopment of four building lots into one lot, demolition or relocation of four existing homes to construct a new fourstory mixed use building with 66-residential units and 2,300 square feet of commercial space. The project is located at 138, 144, 152 and 160 East Allen Street in Winooski, Vermont. This project will be evaluated by the District #4 Environmental Commission in accordance with the 10 environmental criteria of 10 V.S.A., § 6086(a).

1. Statutory parties: The municipality, the municipal planning commission, the regional planning commission, any adjacent municipality, municipal planning commission or regional planning commission if the project lands are located on a town boundary, and affected state agencies are entitled to party status.

If you wish further information regarding participation in this hearing, please contact the district coordinator at the address below before the date of the hearing date. If you have a disability for which you are going to need accommodation, please notify this office at least seven days prior to the above hearing date.

2. Adjoining property owners and others: May participate as parties to the extent they have a particularized interest that may be affected by the proposed project under the ten criteria.

If you feel that any of the District Commission members listed on the 3. Non-party parattached Certificate of ticipants: The district Service under “For Your commission, on its own Information” may have a A public hearing is motion or by petition, conflict of interest, or if scheduled for February may allow others to parthere is any other reason 5, 2018 at 9:00 AM at the ticipate in the hearing a member should be disEssex Junction District without being accorded qualified from sitting on Office of the Agency of party status. this case, please contact Natural Resources, 111 the district coordinator West Street, Essex Junc- If you plan on participatas soon as possible, no tion, Vermont. A site visit ing in the hearing on later than prior to the will be held before the behalf of a group or orga- date of the first hearing hearing at 8:30 AM at nization, please bring: or prehearing conferthe site. We will enclosed meet at Using the as a guide, fill 1)math a writtenoperations description ence.

Calcoku

the grid using the numbers 1 - 6 only once in each row and column.

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01.17.18-01.24.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

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By: /s/ Rachel Lomonaco Rachel Lomonaco District #4 Coordinator 111 West Street Essex Junction, VT 05495 802-879-5658 rachel.lomonaco@ vermont.gov ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Hadley Road Area Infrastructure Improvements City of South Burlington, Vermont 104 Landfill Road South Burlington, VT 05403 Separate sealed BIDS for the construction of Hadley Road Area Infrastructure Improvements, including Work Scope A – Hadley Road

Area Sanitary Sewer Improvements, Work Scope B – Champlain Water District Transmission Main, and Work Scope C – Farrell Street Road Improvements, will be received by the City of South Burlington at the office of 104 Landfill Road, South Burlington, VT 05403 until March 6, 2018, at 1:00 PM E.S.T., and then at said office publicly opened and read aloud. Each BID must be accompanied by a certified check payable to the OWNER for five percent (5%) of the total amount of the BID. A BID bond may be used in lieu of a certified check. Bidders are reminded that “Disadvantaged Business Enterprise” (DBE) program requirements apply to this WORK. The CONTRACT DOCUMENTS may be examined at the following locations: Department of Public Works, 104 Landfill Road, South Burlington, VT 05403 Hoyle, Tanner & Associates, 125 College Street, 4th Floor, Burlington, VT 05401 Works in Progress, 20

Sudoku

36x

4 1 7 2 5

5

6 6 4

4-

1

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

Copies of the CONTRACT DOCUMENTS may be obtained at: Blueprints, Etc. located at 20 Farrell Street, South Burlington, VT 05401 (802-8654503) upon payment of $160.00 for each set. Electronic Copy may be obtained for $120.00 each. Payments are nonrefundable. Any CONTRACT or CONTRACTS awarded under this Invitation for BIDS are expected to be funded in part by a grant from the United States Environmental Protection Agency. Neither the United States nor any of its departments, agencies or employees are or will be a part to the Invitation for BIDS or any resulting contract. This contract is subject to all applicable and/ or relevant Federal procurement guidelines pertaining to Grants and Cooperative Agreements with State and Local Governments. A Performance BOND and a Payment BOND each in an amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the contract price will be required.

“AIS (American Iron and provisions by Steel)” using the of P.L.

9 1

Difficulty - Hard

Farrell Street, South Burlington, VT 05403

Complete the following puzzle numbers 1-9 only once in each row, column and 3 x 3 box.

8

4-

CALCOKU

A copy of the application and plans for this project is available for inspection by members of the public during regular working hours at the District #4 Environmental Office. The application can also be viewed at the Natural Resources Board web site (http:// nrb.vermont.gov) by clicking on “Act 250 Database” and entering the project number above. Dated at Essex Junction, Vermont this 3rd day of January 2018.

9 8 2 5

7

No. 515

SUDOKU

3 3 6 7 2 6 9 Difficulty: Hard

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: ★★★

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: ★★★

Fill the grid using the numbers 1-6, only once in each row and column. The numbers in each heavily outlined “cage” must combine to produce the target number in the top corner, using the mathematical operation indicated. A onebox cage should be filled in with the target number in the top corner. A number can be repeated within a cage as long as it is not the same row or column.

Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each 9-box square contains all of the numbers one to nine. The same numbers cannot be repeated in a row or column.

5

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8 9 4 3 5 7 2 1 6 ANSWERS ON P. C-9 1 7 2 4 6 9 8 5 ★ =3 MODERATE ★ ★ = CHALLENGING ★ ★ ★ = HOO, BOY! 6 5 2 8 9 1 4 3 7 7 8 9 5 1 2 3 6 4

113-76, Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014, and all subsequent revisions and/or amendments including but not limited to the Water Resources Reform and Development Act (Clean Water Act §608), P.L. 113-25, Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act 2015, and P.L. 114-113, Consolidated Appropriations Act 2016 APPLY to this Contract. Bidders should refer to the Information for Bidders and the Supplemental General Conditions for these specific requirements. Federal Wage Rates as determined under the Davis-Bacon Act (29 CFR Part 1) APPLY to this contract. Bidders should refer to the Information for Bidders and the Supplemental General Conditions for these specific requirements. CONTRACTOR will be required to provide full time Superintendence at all times WORK is being performed on-site (G-C 12). Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBE) requirements of 40 CFR Park 33 and the six-step good faith effort apply to this contract. Bidders should refer to the Information for Bidders and the Supplemental General Conditions for these specific requirements. Current DBE Fair Share Objective/Goal The US Environmental Protection Agency goal for use of Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBE) is 8%. The Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation sub-goals for this project are: Women Owned Businesses: Construction Supplies, Services, Equipment: 3.5% Minority Owned Businesses: Construction Supplies, Services, Equipment: 1.85% Bidders must demonstrate an Affirmative Procurement Procedure for obtaining DBE participation. A pre-bid conference for prospective bidders will be held at the City of South Burlington, Department of Public Works, 104 Landfill Road, South Burlington, VT 05403 on January 18, 2018 at 11:00AM. Representatives of the City of Burlington, the Champlain Water District, Hoyle, Tanner, and Associates, and State of Vermont will be present to answer questions

from bidders and discuss DBE participation requirements. Date: 1/8/18 /s/ Justin Rabidoux Authorized Representative BURLINGTON DEVELOPMENT REVIEW BOARD TUESDAY FEBRUARY 6TH, 2018, 5:00 PM PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE The Burlington Development Review Board will hold a meeting on Tuesday February 6th, 2018 at 5:00pm in Contois Auditorium, City Hall. 1. 18-0323DT; 59-61 University Terrace (RL, Ward 8E) Citytrust of Bridgeport Connecticut / Priscilla Toomey Appeal adverse administrative decision regarding determination of pre-existing, non-conforming use of 5-person occupancy (unrelated tenants) of each of the two duplex units. 2. 18-0455CA/CU; 44 Hoover St (RL, Ward 6S) Alberto and Jessica Guiterrez Demolish 2 car garage replace with 2 car garage with ADU above. Plans may be viewed in the Planning and Zoning Office, (City Hall, 149 Church Street, Burlington), between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Participation in the DRB proceeding is a prerequisite to the right to take any subsequent appeal. Please note that ANYTHING submitted to the Planning and Zoning office is considered public and cannot be kept confidential. This may not be the final order in which items will be heard. Please view final Agenda, at www.burlingtonvt.gov/ pz/drb/agendas or the office notice board, one week before the hearing for the order in which items will be heard. NOTICE OF LEGAL SALE View Date: 1/24/2018 Sale Date: 1/25/2018 Heather Dion Unit #329 Robert Villa Unit #437 Easy Self Storage 46 Swift Street South Burlington, VT 05403 (802)863-8300


SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS NOTICE OF SELF STORAGE LIEN SALE BURLINGTON SELF STORAGE 1825 SHELBURNE RD SOUTH BURLINGTON, VT 05403 Notice is hereby given that the contents of the self storage unit listed below will be sold at public auction by sealed bid. Tenant Name/Storage Unit: Robenstein Unit# 85 Auction will take place on Friday, January 26, 2018 beginning at 11:00am at Burlington Self Storage, 1825 Shelburne Road, South Burlington, VT 05403. Unit will be opened for viewing immediately prior to auction. Sale shall be by sealed bid to the highest bidder. Contents of entire storage unit will be sold as one lot. The winning bid must remove all contents from the facility at no cost to BSS. BSS reserves the right to reject any bid lower that the amount owed by the occupant.

STATE OF VERMONT CALEDONIA UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT DOCKET NO: 135-6-16 CACV U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION v. BRANDON ALLING A/K/A BRANDON J. ALLING AND ALICIA ALLING OCCUPANTS OF: 841 Concord Avenue, St. Johnsbury VT MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered April 17, 2017, in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Brandon Alling and Alicia Alling to Union Bank, dated November 8, 2013 and recorded in Book 377 Page 271 of the land records of the Town of St. Johnsbury, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of an Assignment of Mortgage from union bank to U.S. Bank National Association dated November 8, 2013 and recorded in Book 377 Page 346 of

the land records of the Town of St. Johnsbury for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 841 Concord Avenue, St. Johnsbury, Vermont on January 29, 2018 at 12:00PM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To wit: Being a parcel of land, together with dwelling and other improvements thereon, located at 841 Concord Avenue in St. Johnsbury, Vermont; and being all and the same land and premises conveyed to Brandon J. Ailing and Alicia Ailing by Warranty Deed of Raoul P. Houde and Marcelle E. Houde, dated of even or near date and recorded prior to or simultaneously herewith in the St. Johnsbury Land Records. Further being all and the same land and premises conveyed to Raoul P. Houde and Marcelle E. Houde by Warranty Deed of Jeffrey J. Stewart and Betty S. Stewart, dated October 12, 2001, and recorded in Book 262 at Pages 442-443 in the St. Johnsbury Land Records; and being all

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and the same land and premises conveyed to Jeffrey J. Stewart and Betty S. Stewart by Warranty Deed of Mae L. Silsby, dated August 24, 2000, and recorded in Book 255 at Page 537 of the St. Johnsbury Land Records. Reference is also made to a Warranty Deed from Mae L. Silsby to Janet S. Dunham and Carolyn M. Silsby, dated January 14, 2000, and recorded in Book 252 at Page 569 of the St. Johnsbury Land Records and to a Warranty Deed from Janet S. Dunham and Carolyn M. Silsby to Mae L. Silsby, dated August 24, 2000, and recorded in Book 255 at Page 536 of the St. Johnsbury Land Records. Further being all and the same land and premises conveyed to John T. Silsby (deceased prior) and Mae L. Silsby, as husband and wife, by Warranty Deed of Gilbert J. Moyles and Mary J. Moyles, dated May 27, 1941, and recorded in Book 80 at Page 180 of the St. Johnsbury Land Records. Reference may be had to the aforementioned deeds and the records thereof and to all prior

9 B.C. ANSWERS ON P. C-9

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deeds and their records for a further and more complete description of the land and premises hereby conveyed.

under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale.

Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description.

DATED: December 20, 2017 By: /S/Rachel K. Jones, Esq. Rachel K. Jones, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032

Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described. TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale. The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due

STATE OF VERMONT FRANKLIN UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT DOCKET NO: 428-1015 FRCV U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION v. KRISTINA M. MORLEY OCCUPANTS OF: 17 Fletcher Road, Fairfax VT MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered May 15, 2017, in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Kristina M. Morley to Union Bank, dated July 12, 2012 and recorded

in Book 221 Page 11 of the land records of the Town of Fairfax, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of an Assignment of Mortgage from Union Bank to U.S. Bank National Association dated July 12, 2012 and recorded in Book 230 Page 267 of the land records of the Town of Fairfax for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 17 Fletcher Road, Fairfax, Vermont on January 31, 2018 at 11:00 AM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To wit: Being all and the same land and premises conveyed to Kristina M. Morley by Warranty Deed of Steven W. Hubbard and Kathy J. Hubbard dated_____, of record in Volume______ at Page_____ of the Town of Fairfax Land Records. Being all the same land and premises as conveyed to Steven W. Hubbard and Kathy J. Hubbard by Warranty Deed of Russell W. Gagnon and Sharon A. Gagnon dated April 29, 1994 and recorded May

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4, 1994 in Volume 67 at Page 442 of the Land Records of the Town of Fairfax and being more particularly described as follows: Being a parcel of land together with buildings thereon located on the easterly side of Town Highway No. 3 leading from Fairfax to Fletcher. Said parcel being more particularly described as follows: Commencing to a point in the centerline of said highway, said point marking the southwest corner (incorrectly referred to as the southeast corner in the hereinafter warranty deed) of the within premises and the northwest corner of other lands now or formerly of Ovitt, and proceeding in a general easterly line along the north line of other lands now or formerly of Ovitt, 100 feet, more or less, to a point; thence turning to the left and proceeding in a general northerly direction 138 feet, more or less, to a point of the property line of lands now or formerly owned by the Methodist Parsonage; thence turning to the left and proceeding in a general

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» SEVENDAYSVT.COM 01.17.18-01.24.18 SEVEN DAYS CLASSIFIEDS C-5


An Ordinance in Relation to COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT ORDINANCE – Rezone St. Joseph’s School ZA #18-02

e nu Av e le er va Int

NMU

North Street

Portion of site to rezone from RM to NMU

Murray Street

Elmwood Avenue

In the Year Two Thousand Seventeen

Rose Street

ORDINANCE 5.03 Sponsor: Planning Department, Planning Commission; Ordinance Committee Public Hearing Date: 01/08/18___________ _____________________________ First reading: 10/30/17 Referred to: Ordinance Committee Rules suspended and placed in all stages of passage: ______________ Second reading: 01/08/18 Action: adopted Date: 01/08/18 Signed by Mayor: 01/10/18 Published: 01/17/18 Effective: 02/07/18

La Fountain Street

CITY OF BURLINGTON

It is hereby Ordained by the City Council of the City of Burlington as follows: That Appendix A, Comprehensive Development Ordinance, of the Code of Ordinances of the City of Burlington be and hereby is amended to change the zoning district for a portion of the former St. Joseph’s

Allen Street

school site (southern end fronting on Allen Street) from Residential Medium to Neighborhood Mixed Use (consistent with the rest of the parcel) by amending Map 4.3.1-1 Base Zoning Districts, Map 4.4.2-1 Neighborhood Mixed Use Zoning Districts, Map 4.4.5-1 Residential Zoning Districts and Map 8.1.3-1

RM

Parking Districts to read as follows: Proposed ZA-18-02 Rezone Portion of Former St. Joseph's School site

**See attached map excerpt identified as Proposed ZA-18-02, Rezone Portion of Former St. Joseph’s School site for parcel changed from Residential Medium Density (RM) to Neighborhood Mixed Use (NMU), Map 4.3.1-1 Base Zoning Districts, Map 4.4.2-1 Neighborhood Mixed Use Zoning Districts, Map 4.4.5-1 Residential Zoning Districts and Map 8.1.3-1 Parking Districts, changes as indicated in each corresponding legend, consistent with the map excerpt.

Zoning Districts

L

RCO-RG

ABBREV

RH

NMU

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Peru Street

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Derway Amendment ZA-18-02 Island Rezone St. Joseph's School to NMU

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

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To the creditors of Gerald Robert Ragis late of Shelburne, VT.

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DATED: November 17, 2017 SU

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By: /S/Rachel K. Jones, Esq. Rachel K. Jones, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032 STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT CHITTENDEN UNIT PROBATE DIVISION DOCKET NO. 1664-12-17 CNPR In re estate of Gerald Robert Ragis.

1/11/18 2:24 PM

Name of publication Seven Days Publication Dates: 1/17/2018 Name and Address of Court: Chittenden Probate Court PO Box 511 Burlington, VT 05402 STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT CHITTENDEN FAMILY DIVISION DOCKET NO. 344-10-16 CNJV In re: K.S. NOTICE OF HEARING TO: Nathan Shaffer, father of K.S. The State of Vermont has filed a petition to terminate your residual parental rights to J.P. You are hereby notified that the hearing to consider the termination of all residual parental rights to K.S. will be held on March 1, 2018 at 8:30 a.m. at the Vermont Superior Court, Chittenden Family Division, at 32 Cherry St., Burlington, Vermont. You are notified to appear in connection with this case. Failure to appear at this hearing may result in the termination of all of your parental rights to K.S. The State is represented by the Attorney General’s Office, HC 2 North, 280 State Drive, Waterbury, VT 05671-2080. /s/ Arms Superior Court Judge Date: Jan. 3, 2018

1. YOU ARE BEING SUED. The Plaintiff has started a lawsuit against you. A copy of the Plaintiff’s Complaint against you is on file and may be obtained at the office of the clerk of this court, Lamoille Unit, Civil Division, Vermont Superior Court, 154 Main Street, Hyde Park, VT 05655. Do not throw this paper away. It is an official paper that affects your rights. 2. PLAINTIFF’S CLAIM. Plaintiff’s claim is a Complaint in Foreclosure which alleges that you have breached the terms of a Promissory Note and Mortgage Deed dated November 16, 2001. Plaintiff’s action may effect your interest in the property described in the Land Records of the Town of Cambridge at Volume 231, Page 346. The Complaint also seeks relief on the Promissory Note executed by you. A copy of the Complaint is on file and may be obtained at the Office of the Clerk of the Superior Court for the County of Lamoille, State of Vermont. 3. YOU MUST REPLY WITHIN 41 DAYS TO PROTECT YOUR RIGHTS. You must give or mail the Plaintiff a written response called an Answer within 41 days after the date on which this Summons was first published, which is January 17, 2018. You must send a copy of your answer to the Plaintiff or the Plaintiff’s attorney, LORAINE L. HITE, Esq. of Bendett and McHugh, PC, located at 270 Farmington Avenue, Ste. 151, Farmington, CT 06032. You must also give or mail your Answer to the Court located at Lamoille Unit, Civil Division, Vermont Superior Court, 154 Main Street, Hyde Park, VT 05655. 4. YOU MUST RESPOND TO EACH CLAIM. The Answer is your written response to the Plaintiff’s Complaint. In your Answer you must state whether you agree or disagree with each paragraph of the Complaint. If you believe the Plaintiff

6. YOU MUST MAKE ANY CLAIMS AGAINST THE PLAINTIFF IN YOUR REPLY. Your Answer must state any related legal claims you have against the Plaintiff. Your claims against the Plaintiff are called Counterclaims. If you do not make your Counterclaims in writing in your answer you may not be able to bring them up at all. Even if you have insurance and the insurance company will defend you, you must still file any Counterclaims you may have. 7. LEGAL ASSISTANCE. You may wish to get legal help from a lawyer. If you cannot afford a lawyer, you should ask the court clerk for information about places where you can get free legal help. Even if you cannot get legal help, you must still give the court a written Answer to protect your rights or you may lose the case. ORDER The Affidavit duly filed in this action shows that service cannot be made with due diligence by any of the method provided in Rules 4(d)-(f), (k), or (l) of the Vermont Rules of Civil Procedure. Accordingly, it is ORDERED that service of the Summons set forth above shall be made upon the defendant, Frank M. Lobacz, by publication as provided in Rule[s] [4(d)(l) and] 4 (g) of those Rules. This order shall be published once a week for 3 weeks beginning January 17, 2018 in Seven Days a newspaper of the general circulation in Lamoille County and in the community including Boynton Beach, FLA, and a copy of this summons and order as published shall be mailed to the defendant Frank M. Lobacz, at 4807 Gateway Gardens Drive, Boynton Beach, FL 33436-1421, defendant’s last known mailing address. Dated at Hyde Park, Vermont this 8th day of January, 2018.

LEGALS »

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Stephen F. Stowell Executor/Administrator: 9 Appletree Lane Jericho, VT 05465 802-899-1168

THIS SUMMONS IS DIRECTED TO: Frank M. Lobacz

5. YOU WILL LOSE YOUR CASE IF YOU DO NOT GIVE YOUR WRITTEN ANSWER TO THE COURT. If you do not Answer within 41 days after the date on which this Summons was first published and file it with the Court, you will lose this case. You will not get to tell your side of the story, and the Court may decide against you and award the Plaintiff everything asked for in the complaint.

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The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale.

Date: 1/14/2018 /s/ Stephen F. Stowell Signature of Fiduciary

SUMMONS & ORDER FOR PUBLICATION

should not be given everything asked for in the Complaint, you must say so in your Answer.

01.17.18-01.24.18

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Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description.

TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale.

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Reference is hereby made to the aforementioned instruments, the records thereof and the references therein contained, all in further aid of this description.

I have been appointed to administer this estate. All creditors having claims against the decedent or the estate must present their claims in writing within four (4) months of the first publication of this notice. The claim must be presented to me at the address listed below with a copy sent to the court. The claim may be barred forever if it is not presented within the four (4) month period.

STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT LAMOILLE UNIT CIVIL DIVISION DOCKET #165-9-17 LECV CITIBANK N.A. Plaintiff v. FRANK M. LOBACZ, GLADYS CECILIA LOBACZ AND UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE OCCUPANTS OF: 215 Burnor Road, Cambridge VT Defendants

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westerly direction in and along the Parsonage south line 114 feet, more or less, to a point in the centerline of Town Highway No. 3 marking the northwest corner of the within parcel; thence turning to the left and proceeding in a general southerly direction in and along the centerline of said highway to the point or place of beginning.

Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described.

Red Rocks Park

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»


[CONTINUED] Hon. Thomas Carle Presiding Judge Lamoille Unit, Civil Division STATE OF VERMONT WINDSOR UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT DOCKET NO: 383-8-16 WRCV BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC v. TODD C. STANLEY AND JERRY O. STANLEY OCCUPANTS OF: 826 Old River Road, White River Junction, Town of Hartford VT

C-8 CLASSIFIEDS

SEVEN DAYS

01.17.18-01.24.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered March 6, 2017, in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Todd C. Stanley and Jerry O. Stanley to CitiFinancial, Inc., dated May 30, 2008 and recorded in Book 430 Page 205 of the land records of the Town of Hartford, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of the following Assignments of Mortgage: (1) Assignment of Mortgage from CFNA Receivables (MD), Inc. f/k/a CitiFinancial, Inc. to CitiFinancial Servicing LLC dated October 20, 2015 and recorded in Book 516 Page 740 and (2) Assignment of Mortgage from CitiFinancial Servicing LLC to Bayview Loan Servicing, LLC dated July 13, 2017 and recorded in Book 539 Page 31, both of the land records of the Town of Hartford for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 826 Old River Road, White River Junction, Town of Hartford, Vermont on February 6, 2018 at 12:30PM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To wit: ALL THOSE CERTAIN PARCELS OF LAND IN

TOWN OF HARTFORD, WINDSOR COUNTY, STATE OF VT, AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN BOOK 427 PAGE 591 ID# 8-190, BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS A METES AND BOUNDS PROPERTY . BEING ALL AND THE SAME LANDS AND PREMISES CONVEYED TO THE GRANTORS HEREIN BY WARRANTY DEED FROM ROBERT DAUBENSPECK DATED AUGUST 19, 2005 AND RECORDED AUGUST 23, 2005 IN BOOK 392 AT PAGE 694 OF THE TOWN OF HARTFORD LAND RECORDS. BEING THE SAME FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY CONVEYED BY DEED FROM TODD C. STANLEY and JERRY O. STANLEY TO TODD C. STANLEY , DATED 08/08/2007 RECORDED ON 03/25/2008 IN BOOK 427, PAGE 591 IN WINDSOR COUNTY RECORDS, STATE OF VT. Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description. Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described. TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale. The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale. DATED: December 28, 2017 By: /S/Rachel K. Jones, Esq. Rachel K. Jones, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032

support groups VISIT SEVENDAYSVT. COM TO VIEW A FULL LIST OF SUPPORT GROUPS AHOY BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS Join our floating support group where the focus is on living, not on the disease. We are a team of dragon boaters. Learn all about this paddle sport & its health-giving, life-affirming qualities. Any age. No athletic experience needed. Call Penni or Linda at 999-5478, info@ dragonheartvermont. org, dragonheartvermont.org. AL-ANON For families & friends of alcoholics. For meeting info, go to vermontalanonalateen.org or call 866-972-5266. ALATEEN GROUP New Alateen group in Burlington on Sundays from 5-6 p.m. at the UU building at the top of Church St. For more information please call Carol, 324-4457. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Daily meetings in various locations. Free. Info, 864-1212. Want to overcome a drinking problem? Take the first step of 12 & join a group in your area. ALL CANCER SURVIVORS Join the wellness classes at Survivorship NOW, created by cancer survivors for survivors of all cancers. Benefi ts from lively programs designed to engage and empower cancer survivors in our community. Email: info@ survivorshipnowvt.org. Call Chantal, 777-1126, survivorshipnowvt.org. ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION SUPPORT GROUP This caregivers support group meets on the 3rd Wed. of every mo. from 5-6:30 p.m. at the Alzheimer’s Association Main Office, 300 Cornerstone Dr., Suite 128, Williston. Support groups meet to provide assistance and information on Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. They emphasize shared experiences, emotional

support, and coping techniques in care for a person living with Alzheimer’s or a related dementia. Meetings are free and open to the public. Families, caregivers, and friends may attend. Please call in advance to confirm date and time. For questions or additional support group listings, call 800-272-3900. ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION TELEPHONE SUPPORT GROUP 1st Monday monthly, 3-4:30 p.m. Pre-registration is required (to receive dial-in codes for toll-free call). Please dial the Alzheimer’s Association’s 24/7 Helpline 800-272-3900 for more information. ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE & DEMENTIA SUPPORT GROUP Held the last Tue. of every mo., 5:30-7:30 p.m., at Birchwood Terr., Burlington. Info, Kim, 863-6384. ARE YOU HAVING PROBLEMS W/ DEBT? Do you spend more than you earn? Get help at Debtor’s Anonymous plus Business Debtor’s Anonymous. Sat., 10-11:30 a.m., Methodist Church at Buell & S. Winooski, Burlington. Contact Brenda, 338-1170. BABY BUMPS SUPPORT GROUP FOR MOTHERS AND PREGNANT WOMEN Pregnancy can be a wonderful time of your life. But, it can also be a time of stress that is often compounded by hormonal swings. If you are a pregnant woman, or have recently given birth and feel you need some help with managing emotional bumps in the road that can come with motherhood, please come to this free support group lead by an experienced pediatric Registered Nurse. Held on the 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of the month, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at the Birthing Center, Northwestern Medical Center, St. Albans. Info: Rhonda Desrochers, Franklin County Home Health Agency, 527-7531. BEREAVEMENT/GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP Meets every other Mon. night, 6-7:30 p.m., & every other Wed., 10-11:30 a.m., in the Conference Center at Central Vermont Home Health & Hospice in Berlin. The group is open to anyone who has experienced the death

of a loved one. There is no fee. Info, Ginny Fry or Jean Semprebon, 223-1878. BRAIN INJURY SUPPORT GROUP IN ST. JOHNSBURY Monthly meetings will be held on the 3rd Wed. of every mo., 1-2:30 p.m., at the Grace United Methodist Church, 36 Central St., St. Johnsbury. The support group will offer valuable resources & info about brain injury. It will be a place to share experiences in a safe, secure & confidential environment. Info, Tom Younkman, tyounkman@vcil.org, 800-639-1522.

BRAIN INJURY ASSOCIATION OF VERMONT Montpelier daytime support group meets the 3rd Thu. of the mo. at the Unitarian Church ramp entrance, 1:302:30 p.m. St. Johnsbury support group meets the 3rd Wed. montly at the Grace United Methodist Church, 36 Central St., 1:00-2:30 p.m.  Colchester  Evening support group meets the 1st Wed. monthly at the Fanny Allen Hospital in the Board Room Conference Room, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Brattleboro meets at Brooks Memorial Library on the 1st Thu. monthly from 1:15-3:15 p.m. and the 3rd Mon.

montly from 4:15-6:15 p.m. White River Jct. meets the 2nd Fri. montly at Bugbee Sr. Ctr. from 3-4:30 p.m. Call our helpline at 877-856-1772. BURLINGTON AREA PARKINSON’S DISEASE OUTREACH GROUP People with Parkinson’s disease & their caregivers gather together to gain support & learn about living with Parkinson’s disease. Group meets 2nd Wed. of every mo., 1-2 p.m., continuing through Nov. 18, 2015. Shelburne Bay Senior Living Community, 185 Pine Haven Shores Rd., Shelburne. Info: 888-763-3366,

CITY OF BURLINGTON

In the Year Two Thousand Seventeen

An Ordinance in Relation to COMPREHENSIVE DEVELOPMENT ORDINANCE – Article 8 Amendment for Food & Beverage Processing ZA #18-03

parkinsoninfo@ uvmhealth.org, parkinsonsvt.org. CELEBRATE RECOVERY Overcome any hurt, habit or hangup in your life with this confidential 12-Step, Christ-centered recovery program. We offer multiple support groups for both men and women, such as chemical dependency, codependency, sexual addiction and pornography, food issues, and overcoming abuse. All 18+ are welcome; sorry, no childcare. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.; we begin at 7 p.m. Essex Alliance Church, 37 Old Stage Rd., Essex Junction.

ORDINANCE 5.04 Sponsor: Planning Department, Planning Commission; Ordinance Committee Public Hearing Date: 01/08/18 First reading: 10/30/17 Referred to: Ordinance Committee Rules suspended and placed in all stages of passage: ______________ Second reading: 01/08/18 Action: adopted Date: 01/08/18 Signed by Mayor: 01/10/18 Published: 01/17/18 Effective: 02/07/18

It is hereby Ordained by the City Council of the City of Burlington as follows: That Appendix A, Comprehensive Development Ordinance, of the Code of Ordinances of the City of Burlington be and hereby is amended by amending Table 8.1.8-1 Minimum Off-Street Parking Requirements thereof to read as follows:

Sec. 8.1.8 Minimum Off-Street Parking Requirements

Parking for all uses and structures shall be provided in accordance with Table 8.1.8-1. (a) Where no requirement is designated and the use is not comparable to any of the listed uses, parking requirements shall be determined by the DRB upon recommendation by the administrative officer based upon the capacity of the facility and its associated uses. (b) When the calculation yields a fractional number of required spaces, the number of spaces shall be rounded Table Minimum to the 8.1.8-1 nearest whole number.Off-Street Parking Requirements Neighborhood Shared Use Downtown Districts Districts Districts

Table 8.1.8-1 Minimum Off-Street Parking Requirements Per Dwelling Unit RESIDENTIAL USES

*** RESIDENTIAL USES RESIDENTIAL USES - SPECIAL *** *** RESIDENTIAL USES - SPECIAL NON-RESIDENTIAL USES *** *** NON-RESIDENTIAL USES Bakery - Retail

Bakery - Wholesale *** Bakery - Retail

***

Bakery - Wholesale *** Food & Beverage Processing Food & Beverage Processing ***

Micro-Brewery/Winery *** *** Micro-Brewery/Winery ***

** *** ** ***

Material stricken out deleted. Material underlined added. Material stricken out deleted. Material underlined added.

3V-CityOfBurlington011718.indd 1

Neighborhood except Shared Use as noted Districts Districts

Downtown Districts

***Unit Per Dwelling except as noted Per Dwelling Unit except as noted *** *** Per Dwelling Unit Per 1,000 square feet of except as noted gross floor area (gfa) except as noted *** *** *** *** 2.5 Per 1,000 square 2.5 feet of 1 gross floor area (gfa) except as noted ***2 ***2 ***1 *** 2.5

*** 2.5

2 3 per 1.3, plus 1,000 gfa *** devoted to 1.3,patron plus 3 use per 1,000 gfa *** devoted to patron3use

2 2 per 1, plus 1,000 gfa *** devoted to 1, plus 2 per patron use 1,000 gfa *** devoted to patron 2use

*** ***

*** ***

1*** 1 ***1 1***

1 *** ***

3

2

1

***

***

***

1/11/18 1:39 PM


FCA FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP Families coping with addiction (FCA) is an open community peer support group for adults 18 & over struggling with the drug or alcohol addiction of a loved one. FCA is not 12-step based but provides a forum for those living this experience to develop

personal coping skills & draw strength from one another. Weekly on Wed., 5:30-6:30 p.m. Turning Point Center, corner of Bank St., Burlington. (Across from parking garage, above bookstore). thdaub1@gmail.com. G.R.A.S.P. (GRIEF RECOVERY AFTER A SUBSTANCE PASSING) Are you a family member who has lost a loved one to addiction? Find support, peer-led support group. Meets once a month on Mondays in Burlington. Please call for date and location. RSVP graspvt@gmail.com or call 310-3301 (message says Optimum Health, but this is a private number). G.Y.S.T. (GET YOUR STUFF TOGETHER) GYST creates a safe & empowering community for young men & youth in transition to come together with one commonality: learning to live life on life’s terms. Every Tue. & Thu., 4 p.m. G.Y.S.T. PYNK (for young women) meets weekly on Wed., 4 p.m. Location: North Central Vermont Recovery Center, 275 Brooklyn St., Morrisville. Info: Lisa, 851-8120. GRIEF & RECOVERY SUPPORT GROUP 1st & 3rd Wed. of every mo., 7-8 p.m., Franklin County Home Health Agency (FCHHA), 3 Home Health Cir., St. Albans. 527-7531.

FROM P.C-4

Post & browse ads at your convenience. HEARING VOICES GROUP This Hearing Voices Group seeks to find understanding of voice hearing experiences as real lived experiences which may happen to anyone at anytime. We choose to share experiences, support, and empathy.  We validate anyone’s experience and stories about their experience as their own, as being an honest and accurate representation of their experience, and as being acceptable exactly as they are. Weekly on Tuesday, 2-3 p.m. Pathways Vermont Community Center, 279 North Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 802-777-8602, abby@ pathwaysvermont.org. HEARTBEAT VERMONT Have you lost a friend, colleague or loved one by suicide? Some who call have experienced a recent loss and some are still struggling w/ a loss from long ago. Call us at 446-3577 to meet with our clinician, Jonathan Gilmore, at Maple Leaf Clinic, 167 North Main St. All are welcome. HELLENBACH CANCER SUPPORT Call to verify meeting place. Info, 388-6107. People living with cancer & their caretakers convene for support. INTERSTITIAL CYSTITIS/PAINFUL BLADDER SUPPORT GROUP Interstitial cystitis (IC) and painful bladder syndrome can result in recurring pelvic pain, pressure or discomfort in the bladder/pelvic region & urinary frequency/ urgency. These are often misdiagnosed & mistreated as a chronic bladder infection. If you have been diagnosed or have these symptoms, you are not alone. For Vermont-based support group, email bladderpainvt@gmail.com or call 899-4151 for more information.

LGBTQ SURVIVORS OF VIOLENCE SafeSpace offers peerled support groups for survivors of relationship, dating, emotional &/ or hate violence. These groups give survivors a safe & supportive environment to tell their stories, share information, & offer & receive support. Support groups also provide survivors an opportunity to gain information on how to better cope with feelings & experiences that surface because of the trauma they have experienced. Please call SafeSpace 863-0003 if you are interested in joining. MALE SURVIVOR OF VIOLENCE GROUP A monthly, closed group for male identified survivors of violence including relationship, sexual assault, and discrimination. Open to all sexual orientations. Contact 863-0003 for more information or safespace@pridecentervt.org. MARIJUANA ANONYMOUS Do you have a problem with marijuana? MA is a free 12-step program where addicts help other addicts to get & stay clean. Ongoing Tue. at 6:30 p.m. and Sat. at 2 p.m. at Turning Point Center, 191 Bank St., suite 200, Burlington. 861-3150. THE MEMORY CAFÉ The Memory Café is where people with memory loss disorders and their care partners can come together to connect and support one another. Second Saturday of each month, 10-11:30 a.m. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 58 Barre St., Montpelier. Info: 223-2518.

Tuesday of the month, 5-6 p.m. at the New Hope Lodge on East Avenue in Burlington. Info: Kay Cromie, 655-9136, kgcromey@ aol.com. NAMI CONNECTION PEER SUPPORT GROUP MEETINGS Bennington, every Tue., 1-2:30 p.m., CRT Center, United Counseling Service, 316 Dewey St.; Burlington, every Thu., 3-4:30 p.m., St. Paul’s Cathedral, 2 Cherry St. (enter from parking lot); Berlin, second Thu. of the month, 4-5:30 p.m., CVMC Board Room, 130 Fisher Rd.; Rutland, every Sun., 4:30-6 p.m., Rutland Mental Health Wellness Center, 78 S. Main St.; St. Johnsbury, every Thu., 6:30-8 p.m., Unitarian Universalist Church, 47 Cherry St. If you have questions about a group in your area, please contact the National Alliance on Mental Illness of Vermont, program@ namivt.org or 800639-6480. Connection groups are peer recovery support group programs for adults living with mental health challenges. NAMI FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP Brattleboro, 1st Wed. of every mo., 6:30 p.m., 1st Congregational Church, 880 Western Ave., West Brattleboro; Burlington, 3rd Wed. of every mo., 6 p.m., Community Health Center, Riverside Ave., Mansfield Conference Room; Burlington, 2nd & 4th Tue. of every mo., 7 p.m., HowardCenter, corner of Pine & Flynn Ave.; Berlin, 4th Mon. of every mo., 7 p.m. Central Vermont Medical Center, Room 3; Georgia, 1st Tue. of every mo., 6 p.m., Georgia Public Library, 1697 Ethan Allen Highway (Exit 18, I-89); Manchester, 4th Wed. of every mo., 6:30 p.m., Equinox Village, 2nd floor; Rutland, 3rd Mon. of every mo., 6 p.m., Rutland Regional Medical Center, Leahy Conference Ctr., room D; Springfield, 3rd Wed. of every mo., 6:30 p.m., HCRS (café on right far side), 390 River St.; St. Johnsbury, 4th Wed. of every mo., 5:30 p.m., Northeastern Vermont Regional Hospital Library, 1315 Hospital Dr. If you have questions about a group in your area, please contact the National Alliance on Mental Illness of Vermont, info@namivt. org or 800-639-6480. Family Support Group meetings are for family & friends of individuals living mental illness.

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MYELOMA SUPPORT GROUP Area Myeloma Survivors, Families and Caregivers have come together to form a Multiple Myeloma Support Group. We provide emotional support, resources about treatment options, coping strategies and a support network by participating in the group experience with people that have been though similar situations. Third

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SEVEN DAYS

KINDRED CONNECTIONS PROGRAM OFFERED FOR CHITTENDEN COUNTY CANCER SURVIVORS The Kindred Connections program provides peer support for all those touched by cancer. Cancer patients as well as caregivers are provided with a mentor who has been through the cancer experience & knows what it’s like to go through it. In addition to sensitive listening, Kindred

Connections provides practical help such as rides to doctors’ offices & meal deliveries. The program has people who have experienced a wide variety of cancers. For further info, please contact info@vcsn.net.

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PUZZLE ANSWERS

FAMILIES, PARTNERS, FRIENDS AND ALLIES OF TRANSGENDER ADULTS We are people with adult loved ones who are transgender or gender-nonconforming. We meet to support each other and to learn more about issues and concerns. Our sessions are supportive, informal, and confidential. Meetings are held at 5:30 PM, the second Thursday of

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PROSTATE CANCER SUPPORT GROUP Held every 2nd Tue. of the mo., 6-8 p.m. at the Hope Lodge, 237 East Ave., Burlington. Newly

DISCOVER THE POWER OF CHOICE! SMART Recovery welcomes anyone, including family and friends, affected by any kind of substance or activity addiction. It is a science-based program that encourages abstinence. Specially trained volunteer facilitators provide leadership. Sundays at 5 p.m. at the 1st Unitarian Universalist

FAMILY AND FRIENDS OF THOSE EXPERIENCING MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS This support group is a dedicated meeting for family, friends and community members who are supporting a loved one through a mental health crisis. Mental health crisis might include extreme states, psychosis, depression, anxiety and other types of distress. The group is a confidential space where family and friends can discuss shared experiences and receive support in an environment free of judgment and stigma with a trained facilitator. Weekly on Wednesdays, 7-8:30 p.m. Downtown Burlington. Info: Jess Horner, LICSW, 866-218-8586.

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CEREBRAL PALSY GUIDANCE Cerebral Palsy Guidance is a very comprehensive informational website broadly covering the topic of cerebral palsy and associated medical conditions. It’s mission it to provide the best possible information to parents of children living with the complex condition of cerebral palsy. cerebralpalsyguidance.com/ cerebral-palsy/

DECLUTTERERS’ SUPPORT GROUP Are you ready to make improvements but find it overwhelming? Maybe two or three of us can get together to help each other simplify. 989-3234, 425-3612.

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SUPPORT Steps to End Domestic Violence offers a weekly drop-in support group for female identified survivors of intimate partner violence, including individuals who are experiencing or have been affected by domestic violence. The support group offers a safe, confidential place for survivors to connect with others, to heal, and to recover. In support group, participants talk through their experiences and hear stories from others who have experienced abuse in their relationships. Support group is also a resource for those who are unsure of their next step, even if it involves remaining in their current relationship. Tuesdays, 6:30-8 p.m. Childcare is provided. Info: 658-1996.

each month at Pride Center of VT, 255 South Champlain St., Suite 12, in Burlington. Not sure if you’re ready for a meeting? We also offer one-on-one support. For more information, email rex@ pridecentervt.org or call 802-238-3801.

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CELIAC & GLUTENFREE GROUP Last Wed. of every month, 4:30-6 p.m., at Tulsi Tea Room, 34 Elm St., Montpelier. Free & open to the public! To learn more, contact Lisa at 598-9206 or lisamase@gmail.com.

CODEPENDENTS ANONYMOUS CoDA is a 12-step fellowship for people whose common purpose is to develop healthy & fulfilling relationships. By actively working the program of Codependents Anonymous, we can realize a new joy, acceptance & serenity in our lives. Meets Sunday at noon at the Turning Point Center, 191 Bank Street, Burlington. Tom, 238-3587, coda.org.

Society, 152 Pearl St., Burlington. Volunteer facilitator: Bert, 399-8754. You can learn more at smartrecovery. org.

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CELEBRATE RECOVERY Celebrate Recovery meetings are for anyone with struggles with hurt, habits and hang ups, which includes everyone in some way. We welcome everyone at Cornerstone Church in Milton which meets every Friday night at 7-9 p.m. We’d love to have you join us and discover how your life can start to change. Info: 893-0530, Julie@ mccartycreations.com.

diagnosed? Prostate cancer reoccurrence? General discussion and sharing among survivors and those beginning or rejoining the battle. Info, Mary L. Guyette RN, MS, ACNS-BC, 274-4990, vmary@aol.com.

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Info: recovery@essexalliance.org, 878-8213.

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ATTENTION RECRUITERS: POST YOUR JOBS AT: PRINT DEADLINE: FOR RATES & INFO:

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTMYJOB NOON ON MONDAYS (INCLUDING HOLIDAYS) MICHELLE BROWN, 802-865-1020 X21, MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

YOUR TRUSTED LOCAL SOURCE. SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS

Medical Assistant

Director of Development Join a mission-driven, high energy team committed to improving the lives of people with intellectual disabilities and building more inclusive communities through sports.

• Driver

Call Kathy and Company Flowers: 863-7053; ask for Kathy.

Seeking Medical Assistant, one or two positions available. Can be two position 2-3 days/week each, or one position 4 days. Will divide duties according to desire and experience.

Special Olympics Vermont seeks a Director of Development to create and implement a fundraising strategy to grow our revenue base through individual giving, corporate sponsorships, and special events. This full-time position reports to the President and CEO and works closely with our Board of Directors. The successful candidate will have 5+ years of experience in Development/nonprofit management, and demonstrated success with donor cultivation. If you have a passion for our mission and a strong background in non-profit development, we encourage you to apply. Visit specialolympicsvermont.org/about-us/careers for the full job description.

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TEMPORARY VALENTINE’S HELP

Duties include:

KATHY & COMPANY FLOWERS

863 - 7053 • Communications: Respond to patient and professional phone calls. Includes accurately relaying information with the physicians. Obtaining authorization for medications, scans 1t-Kathy&Company011718.indd 1 School Chef 1/12/18 / from insurance payers. Schedule appointments with other Manager specialists for radiology and laboratory studies. • Lab assistant for immunotherapy injections. Administer Lamoille North SU seeks a injections and monitor patients for potential allergic motivated individual to join reactions. our School Nutrition Team. • Assist physicians with histories, spirometry and skin tests.

Send resumes to: tlallergy@tlaaa.com

Database Manager

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Director of Information Technology and Project Management We’re looking for an experienced leader to join our IT team. The ideal candidate is a strong leader who is proficient in leading technology planning and visioning, has outstanding skills in understanding and uncovering business needs and an ability to drive effective technical strategies and solutions to serve those needs. Please connect with us if you have experience in successful technology team leadership encompassing software development, project management, infrastructure, and support; have a proven track record of helping team members grow; and want to work for a great organization that helps Vermonters pursue their education goals. We’ve got a great team and a range of technologies in use so if your experience includes augmenting and supporting legacy systems and building new systems with modern tools, including cloud offerings, we want to hear from you. VSAC offers a dynamic, professional environment with competitive compensation and generous benefits package. Apply ONLY online at www.vsac.org no later than January 22, 2018.

VERMONT STUDENT ASSISTANCE CORPORATION PO Box 2000, Winooski, VT 05404 EOE/Minorities/Females/Vet/Disabled www.VSAC.org.

1/15/18

The Harwood Unified Union School District in Waitsfield, Vermont, is an educational organization responsible for the management and operations of seven school sites. We are seeking a Database Manager to work in our Central Office location. The data manager maintains data integrity of information within district data systems, inclusive of, but not limited to, the Student Information System, Food and Nutrition Database, Assessment Data Portals, and content management systems. The position oversees all data systems, applications, and required data collections. Candidate must have knowledge of Query Languages including SQL, HTML, object reports, and coding and have experience creating user documentation. Candidate must have Bachelor’s Degree in Data Management or related field and three or more years of direct experience with data management. This is a full-time, year round salaried position with a competitive wage commensurate with experience, and includes benefits in accordance with the HUUSD policies. The position is expected to begin immediately.

Our Chef Manager will manage and supervise daily operations of the school nutrition program for its secondary campus serving 500+ meals 1:56 PM per day. •

5 years or more experience in: institutional or commercial food service operations, nutrition/culinary education, food service management. • Culinary degree or Child Nutrition Certification preferred. • Full time/school year position, mid-August through late June • 37.5 hours/week, excellent benefits

For full job description or to submit a resume please apply at: vermont.schoolspring.com or contact:

Please submit a cover letter, resume, copy of transcripts, and 3 letters of reference to Laura Titus, Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent, at ltitus@wwsu.org.

Karyl Kent, Director of Nutritional Services

Position open until filled. For more information on HUUSD please visit our website at www.wwsu.org.

Lamoille North SU

EOE

5:09 PM

kkent@luhs18.org 736 VT Route 15w Hyde Park, VT 05655 EOE

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NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

Bergeron Paradis & Fitzpatrick seeks a

United States

FULL OR PART-TIME EXPERIENCED LEGAL ASSISTANT

Probation Officer

BUSINESS INTAKE/CONFLICTS COORDINATOR

for its Essex Junction office. This position requires familiarity with real estate transactional work. The ideal candidate will have real estate experience, excellent communication skills, and the ability to work independently with attention to detail. Please send resumes to Robin Beane, PO Box 174, Essex Jct., VT 05453-0174, or email to rbeane@bpflegal.com.

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(CL-27/28) $48,170 to $93,831

U.S. Probation Officers work for the federal court, conduct bail and pre-sentence investigations, and supervise federal defendants released to community supervision. The minimum requirement is a bachelor’s degree in an approved major with two years of specialized experience. The position is hazardous duty law enforcement with a maximum age of 37 at appointment. Prior to appointment, applicants considered for this position will undergo a full background investigation, as well as undergo a medical examination and drug screening. Starting salary range is from $48,170 to $93,831 (CL 27 to CL 28), depending on qualifications. For further information and application instructions visit www.vtp.uscourts.gov/career-opportunities. Deadline for complete applications is the close of business January 31, 2018. EOE

Primmer Piper Eggleston & Cramer PC, a full service law firm with offices in Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, and Washington, D.C., seeks a Business Intake/Conflicts Coordinator to join the Finance team in our Burlington, Vermont office. This position supports the Firm’s intake process and involves many aspects of new business intake, including quality control of incoming client/ matter data, screening and analysis of new matters for conflicts in cooperation with attorneys, daily operation of client and matter creation and updates in the Firm’s law practice management system, collaboration with team members to support effective matter management and other special projects as assigned. Ideal candidates will be highly proficient users of MS Office products, particularly Word and Excel, and possess at least two years of progressive administrative experience in a law firm or other professional services company. Strong communication skills, well-developed organizational abilities and attention to detail are also essential.

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We offer a competitive salary and comprehensive benefits. Qualified candidates may submit letter of interest and resume by e-mail to careers@primmer.com.

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Technical Solutions Specialist PCC, an award-winning provider of software for pediatric practices, is growing! Our 70+ employee company is located in the Champlain Mill in Winooski, VT. We offer a friendly, casual, and professional work environment. Our Technical Solutions Team provides a range of technical services for our clients nationwide, including telephone technical support and remote systems administration, and occasionally travels to client sites to install servers, networks and perform upgrades. Candidates will have two or more years of professional, clientfacing IT experience including Linux system administration, networking (firewalls, routers, wireless, VPN, DHCP, DNS), good security practices, and comfort with hardware configuration and installation. This position requires a blend of technical expertise and exceptional customer service and communication skills. As a Benefit Corporation, we place high value on client, employee and community relationships. PCC offers competitive benefits as well as some uncommon perks. To learn more about PCC, this position, and how to apply, please visit our website at www.pcc.com/careers. The deadline for submitting your application is January 28, 2018. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

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Town of Hartland, VT is seeking qualified applicants for the position of Finance Administrator. The Administrator provides management and leadership guidance in directing the operations of the Finance Department and reports directly to the Town Manager. The principle function of the Administrator is to perform financial oversight, planning and administrative duties, with responsibility over the Town’s budget, accounting, auditing and related financial operations. The administrator also acts as the Town’s Tax Collector. A two-year Associate Degree is required, and a BA/BS is preferred in relevant area of study. Municipal government finance experience is a plus as is knowledge of the NEMRC municipal and accounting software as well as Excel and Microsoft Office. Some night time meetings may be necessary. This is a managerial, full time position with an excellent benefits package. Pay will be based on qualifications and experience. A full job description is available at the Hartland Town Manager’s Office, located at 1 Quechee Road, Hartland, VT 05048 or online at www.hartlandgovoffice.com. To apply, email a cover letter and resume to David Ormiston, Town Manager at dormiston@hartlandvt.org or mail to: David Ormiston, Town Manager Town of Hartland P.O. Box 349 Hartland, VT 05048 This position is open until filled, with priority to applications received by Friday, February 2nd, 2018. The Town of Hartland is an equal opportunity employer.

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ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

01.17.18-01.24.18

Education & Events Manager

LOCAL FIRST VERMONT

PROGRAM MANAGER

Help advance business solutions to issues affecting planet, people and profit!

Afterschool Teacher The Schoolhouse Afterschool program is looking for a teacher who loves children, nature, and playing with students in grades K-8! The Afterschool Teaching team works together to engage students in art projects, games, homework help, and to create an inclusive environment for fun and learning. Important qualities in an Afterschool teacher are patience, curiosity, reliability, sense of humor, intelligence, and joy. Interested candidates please contact sfletcher@theschoolhousevt.org

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VBSR seeks a full-time Education and Events Manager to provide leadership and execution for VBSR’s educational and events programming. Qualified candidates will be highly organized and detailoriented, with excellent planning and communication skills, and 2-5 years’ experience in event planning and project management. Commitment to VBSR’s mission is a must. We offer a fun and engaging work environment, competitive compensation package and dedication to work-life balance. Join us! Complete job description at www.vbsr.org. To apply, send cover letter, resume and three references to Jane Campbell, Executive Director, at search@vbsr.org by 1/29/18.

Full Time Attorney

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The RegulatoryAssistance Assistance Project (RAP)® helpsnon-profit energy and The Regulatory Project (RAP) is a global, teamairof experts providing and policy assistance on a broad range sector of energy regulators andtechnical NGOs navigate the complexities of power issues. and Are you an experienced andEurope, detail-oriented individual that policy regulation in China, India, and the U.S. Doenjoys you designing and implementing a multi-faceted/strategic communications have the organizational insight of a COO and the financial foresight program? If so, our U.S. team just might be looking for you. of a CFO? Can you serve as the key advisor to RAP’s president and CEO and team engage on and multiple aspects of the president’s Our ideal member willsupport demonstrate that they: vision, programmatic and organizational strategy, and strategic  Can communicate complex ideas clearly and effectively allocation of RAP’s capital resources? If so, we just might be looking  Have excellent organizational, communication, and creative skills for you.  Have experience in energy and/or environmental policy and regu

Can take initiative and responsibility

• CanHave manage budgets andto financial as an extension of the can do attitude develop matters new communication avenues planning and organizational growth.

As our Communications Associate for the U.S. Program, not only will you • aAre ablerole to lead manage but change in processes play critical in ourand organization also your day will beand filledsystems, with rewarding interaction. and seek continuous improvement in operations to improve

the effectiveness, efficiency, and impact of the organization. to support and enhance RAP’s creative and collaborative

Send resumes to: mirabelles198@comcast.net.

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WHERE YOU AND 1/15/18 YOUR WORK MATTER...

11:12 AM

When you work for the State of Vermont, you and your work matter. A career with the State puts you on a rich and rewarding professional path. You’ll find jobs in dozens of fields – not to mention an outstanding total compensation package.

MANAGER OF PLANNING AND COMMUNIT Y SERVICES – BURLINGTON

The Department of Health’s Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program is looking for a highly organized individual to strengthen its workforce. You will coordinate trainings and conferences, develop and administer grants. Should have strong project management, planning and writing skills, working knowledge of adult education and public administration. For more information, contact Marcia LaPlante at marcia. laplante@vermont.gov. Reference job posting #622559. Status: Full Time. Application Deadline: 01/22/2018.

Our ideallation chief operating officer will demonstrate that they:

RAP offers a highly competitive salary/benefits combination that is com• Can manage all administrative and operational activities mensurate with experience.

• Full-time breakfast/lunch cook. Four day work week.

Complete job description at www.vbsr.org. To apply, send cover letter Attn: Jane Campbell and resume to search@vbsr.org. Deadline of February 8th.

NO PHONE CALLS, PLEASE.

Communications Associate CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER

1/15/18 1:52 PM

Busy BakeryCafé hiring:

Vermont Businesses for Social Responsibility (VBSR) seeks a part-time (20 hrs/ wk) Program Manager to lead VBSR’s Local First Vermont (LFVT) Program: manage the production, sales, marketing and distribution of the Buy Local Resource Guide and Coupon Book and mobile app; educate the public on the advantages of supporting a local economy; and hire and supervise employees for LFVT products, programs and services. Qualified candidates will have excellent communication and organizational skills plus experience with sales and digital marketing. VBSR offers a fun and engaging work environment and competitive compensation package. Join us!

No phone calls, please.

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Full time attorney needed. Northeast Kingdom Law, PLLC located in St. Johnsbury, VT seeks full-time attorney to handle public defense caseload. The position is demanding and fast paced. Two years of experience in criminal law and/or public defense work is preferred. Please send resume, references, salary requirements and a writing sample to: jadams@neklaw.com or: 58 2nd St., Newport, VT 05855. No phone calls please.

Encourage Vermonters to shop local and support our communities!

If youorganizational want to know more about the position, please visit our website at culture. http://www.raponline.org

RAP is dedicated to accelerating the transition to a clean, reliable, and cient energy future. theIf chief Doeseffi it all sound interesting to As you? so, weoperating would loveoffi to cer, havenot youonly come in for a chat with us. will you play a crucial role in our organization, but your day will also be filled with rewarding interaction on a global basis. Please send in you cover letter and resume by July 24th, 2015 to

Position is based in Montpelier, VT. RAP offers a highly competitive hr@raponline.org salary/benefits combination that is commensurate with experience. The Regulatory Assistance Project is an equal opportunity employer

Does this sound interesting? If so, we would love to hear from you. Visit our website at www.raponline.org for more details. Please send in your cover letter and resume to hr@raponline.org, attention Christine Salembier, chief operating officer, and refer to COO in the subject line.

IT SYSTEMS DEVELOPER II – MONTPELIER

Are you a people person? Do you have software development or application skills? Would you be interested in a career in the transportation sector? If you answered yes to all three questions, you might be the team member we are looking for. The ideal person will have a solid understanding in more than one programming language & programming fundamentals. Must have excellent verbal & written communication skills, & able to work with peers, users, mgmt. & staff in a reasonable & professional manner. Familiarity with one of the Microsoft visual basic variants is a plus, but not required. For more information, contact Betsy Ross at Betsy. Ross-Mobbs@vermont.gov. Agency of Transportation. Reference Job ID #622650. Status: Full Time. Application Deadline: 01/25/2018.

R E G I S T E R E D N U R S E I I , C L I N I C A L S P E C I A LT Y – COLCHESTER

Woodside Juvenile Rehabilitation Center is seeking a Psychiatric Nurse II to join our team. This position allows applicants to join a team providing best practices, both psychiatric and medical, to a population of adjudicated youth. Care/treatment may involve individuals with a variety of physical, emotional, mental and/or psychiatric disabilities. This position allows independent decision making within the scope of RN practice and work closely with the treating pediatrician and psychiatrists. For more information, contact Andrea Allen at andrea.allen@vermont.gov. Department of Children and Families. Reference Job ID #622586. Status: Full Time. Application Deadline: Open until filled.

Vermont is a place you can call home. We enjoy the slow paced healthier and natural lifestyle!

THE REGULATORY ASSISTANCE PROJECT IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.

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Learn more at :

careers.vermont.gov

The State of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity Employer

1/12/18 2:24 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

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SECURITY PERSONNEL (Job Code 18004)

The Vermont Judiciary is looking for a temporary part time (20 hours per week) position with primary responsibility for the security of court house. The position performs security, safety, and general assistance to court operations. Located in Burlington, VT. High School graduate and two years in a responsible position required. Starting pay $16.66 per hour. Open until filled.

Join Our Public Works Team! Equipment Operator II - Facilities Full-Time - $18.49/hour

Candidates shall submit a complete and up-to-date Judicial Branch Application and resume. An electronic version of the Application may be found at:

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1/12/18 2:44 PM

REGIONAL MANAGER

The EO II Facilities provides essential services associated with maintaining City facilities including the O’Brien Community Center, Winooski Senior Center, Dog Parks and occasionally other facilities. The individual in this role performs routine building maintenance, maintains the common areas of City buildings and coordinates or executes the maintenance and repair of the City’s physical assets. High school diploma or equivalent level of education required with two years of experience and one of the following certifications: Journeyman’s license in plumbing or electric, Carpentry union card or licensure, or similar licensure. Valid driver’s license is also required. A Commercial Driver’s License is preferred but not required. In addition to a competitive pay and benefits package, we offer a work culture of development and growth and we are looking for enthusiastic individuals to help our City grow!

Vermont State Parks, Southwest Region

Full-time, Classified position with full State of Vermont benefits

Interested in joining our team? For additional information, including complete position posting and job requirements, please visit our website at

www.winooskivt.org.

$60,944/year salary Job Location: Rutland, VT Closing Date: February 4, 2017

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1/15/18 1:40 PM

The Department of Forests, Parks, and Recreation is seeking a Parks Regional Manager for southwestern Vermont. This is a highly professional managerial position that oversees operations of eleven southwestern Vermont state parks, including some of the state’s most popular parks: Mt. Philo, Bomoseen, Branbury and Button Bay. This a rare career opportunity for the right person – these positions don’t often become available. Join a passionate team dedicated to providing recreational opportunities for Vermonters and visitors while being responsible stewards of Vermont’s natural resources for future generations.

Our new, mobile-friendly job board is buzzing with excitement.

Champlain Community Services

Community Inclusion Facilitator

Primary duties include: • Recruiting, training and supervising staff; • Managing staffing and capital budgets; • Administering regional contracts; • Managing license and special use permit requests in the region; • Participating in a variety of park planning activities including conducting public meetings and drafting and reviewing long range park management plans; • Participating with a statewide management team on technical assignments

CCS is an intimate, person centered developmental service provider with a strong emphasis on employee and consumer satisfaction. We would love to have you as part of the team. Provide inclusion supports to individuals with intellectual disabilities and autism. Help people realize dreams and reach goals. Starting wage is $14.35 per hour with mileage compensation and includes a comprehensive benefits package. This is an excellent job for applicants entering human services or for those looking to continue work in this field.

To view the full job description for this position please visit DHR Job Specifications page and search for job code 622630.

Send your application and cover letter to Karen Ciechanowicz at staff@ccs-vt.org.

To Apply, use the State of Vermont application portal (job opening ID# = 622630) at this link:

EOE

ccs-vt.org

humanresources.vermont.gov/careers/search-and-apply-jobs For information, contact Ellen McCarron at ellen.mccarron@vermont.gov, (802)272-5991

Looking for a Sweet Job?

Building a community where everyone participates and everyone belongs.

Start applying at jobs.sevendaysvt.com


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

01.17.18-01.24.18

Managing Director Responsible for Scrag Mountain Music’s operations, organizational growth and mission execution. For full job description go to:

Are you interested in keeping people who are homeless safe and warm?

Winter Warming Shelter Evening/Overnight Staff Needed

www.scragmountainmusic.org/employment Send resumes to: evanpremo@gmail.com

LNA TRAINING CLASS

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CHCB is seeking to fill shelter positions that provide direct service and resource connection to individuals experiencing homelessness. Learn more and apply at

chcb.org/careers.

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1/15/18 12:33 PM

Accounts Payable/Payroll Specialist Do you want to work for an Agency that positively impacts the lives of over 20,000 individuals? The Champlain Valley Office of Economic Opportunity (CVOEO) Finance department has a new opportunity for an Accounts Payable/ Payroll Specialist. Under direct supervision of the Fiscal Director, the Accounts Payable/Payroll Specialist will assist the Finance Department by processing incoming invoices; disbursing payments and performing payroll and accounting tasks.

1/15/18 4:46 PM

For full time positions at Birchwood Terrace Healthcare

Vermont’s Destination for Casual Contemporary Furniture is Growing!

Work in a job and make a difference in someone’s life!

WE HAVE THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS OPEN

Classes begin February 6, 2018.

• Operations Manager

For more information contact Sue Fortin RN, DNs: Birchwood Terrace Healthcare 43 Starr Farm Rd. Burlington, VT. 05408 802-863-6384 Sue.Fortin@kindred.com EOE

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• Sales Manager • Marketing Manager • Design/Sales Associates

For full descriptions go to jobs.sevendaysvt.com.

Product Development Assistant

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1/15/18 10:24 AM

Turtle Fur is seeking an energetic, passionate individual to join our Creative Team. The Product Development Assistant will work with our Designers to bring our products to life from design intent to manufactured product, while ensuring that quality and company standards are met and maintained. Ability to communicate clearly about product details and maintaining accurate records on products is essential.

Responsibilities:

Successful applicants will have an Associate’s degree in Accounting or two - three years’ related work experience or training in accounting/bookkeeping, or a combination of education and experience from which comparable knowledge and skills are acquired; experience with accounting programs and payroll software; and proficient in the use of Microsoft Office. This is a 40 hours/week position.

• Translate designs to Specification Sheets under guidance of Designers

We offer an excellent benefit package including medical, dental and vision insurance, paid holidays, generous vacation and sick leave, a retirement plan and discounted gym membership. To apply, please submit a cover letter and resume by e-mail to: acctspayable2018@cvoeo.org. The review of applications begins immediately and will continue until suitable candidates are found. CVOEO is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Applications from women, veterans and people from diverse racial, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

• Prepare product and related materials for Trade Shows

To learn more about this position, please visit www.cvoeo.org. Application deadline - January 11, 2018.

BAKER WANTED The Cupboard Deli. Friendly environment. Great, loyal customers. Full-time. Early morning. Weekdays and weekends. Responsible, reliable. Experience preferred, but will gladly train the right person. Please APPLY IN PERSON. 4837 VT Route 15, Jeffersonville, or call 644-2069 and ask for Dean, or email cupboarddeli@gmail.com.

• Maintain data and spreadsheets related to product development • Communicate with marketing and production • Track prototypes from design to catalog • Coordinate product for photography • Work with domestic and overseas manufacturers to communicate quality, cost and product specifications • Assist Designers with day-to-day creative process • Help keep product area organized and in order

Qualifications: • Excellent written and verbal communication skills • Positive attitude and ambitious, with the ability to work with others/independently • Organized and detail oriented with the ability to multitask • High level of self-motivation and creative problem-solving ability • Strong computer skills with fluency in Microsoft Office Suite, particularly Excel

This is a full-time benefited position at the Turtles’ Nest in Morrisville. Please email your letter of interest and resume to bsnow@turtlefur.com. No phone calls please. 7t-TurtleFur011718.indd 1

1/15/18 2:38 PM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

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TOW N O F S TOW E

ZONING DIRECTOR STOWE, VERMONT

A division of the Alamo Group

EQUIPMENT INSTALLER HP Fairfield has an opening for an equipment installer at our Morrisville, VT location. Candidate MUST be experienced in one of the three key areas: welding, electrical or hydraulic. We offer a competitive benefit package. If you are looking for a solid, growth-oriented company with a commitment to its customers and employees, we welcome you to apply today. Visit www.hpfairfield.com/about-us/careers. EEO/M/W/PV/D

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1/12/18

Stowe is a premier four season resort community with renowned alpine and Nordic skiing. It is a quintessential New England community known for its quality of life. The community has a proud history of land use planning based on its respect for its natural environment and a desire to maintain a vibrant economy. Stowe has a Zoning Director and a Planning Director that work collaboratively on land use planning and regulation. The Zoning Director provides professional support to the Development Review Board and Stowe Historic Preservation Commission. The Zoning Director is also responsible for the regulatory review process and enforcement of all Zoning and Subdivision regulations; and serves as Stowe’s Health Officer and E911 Coordinator. A bachelor’s degree in planning, community development, public administration or a related field; supplemented by three years of progressively responsible experience in zoning, planning and/or community development; or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Must have a valid driver’s license. The ideal candidate will have a demonstrated history of being even handed in administering regulations, have excellent computer skills, and be willing to work in a team environment. The position is appointed by the Town Manager and is responsible to him/her for the professional administration of the department. It is a full-time position with excellent benefits. The 1:33 PM starting salary range is $1,191 to $1,428 per week depending on qualifications. A job description and employment application can be obtained on our website: www.townofstowevt.org. Send employment application, letter of interest, resume and salary requirements to: Town of Stowe, C/o Charles Safford, PO Box 730, Stowe, VT 05672 or email recruit@townofstowevermont.org. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled. Scheduling for interviews is anticipated to begin towards the middle of February.

Stewardship Coordinator VHCB seeks a highly capable, self-motivated individual with strong communication skills, attention to detail, and ability to work as part of a team to join our conservation staff. Primary responsibilities include managing VHCB’s conservation stewardship program, GIS mapping, digital document and database management. The Stewardship Coordinator will also support project underwriting, measuring and conveying program impact, public outreach and policy development. Prior experience and training in agriculture, natural resources, and/or land conservation, and a commitment to the mission of VHCB required. A working knowledge of stewardship on conserved lands and proficiency with GPS and GIS is a must. Experience with Word, Excel and ArcGIS is required. Experience and proficiency with program tracking and database and document management systems is strongly preferred. This position requires some travel and field monitoring so a valid driver’s license and ability to work outdoors is necessary. Full time position with comprehensive benefits. EOE. See the job description at www.vhcb.org/employment.html.Please send resume and cover letter by January 26 by email to laurie@vhcb.org

Legal Assistant Innovative funding agency supporting land conservation and the development of affordableViability housing is seeking a highly capable, self-motivated individual Program Assistant with attention to detail to work as a part-time Legal Assistant with the General Counsel. Responsibilities include preparation of legal documents, maintenance of legal files, and managing administrative systems for tracking legal documents and payments. Prior experience and training in real estate legal closings required. Experience with electronic document management systems is a plus. The applicant will have an associate’s degree in business, legal studies, or a similar discipline, along with one to three years of relevant real estate experience, including at least two years of legal assistant or paralegal training/experience or equivalent education and experience. This is a part-time (20 hours per week) position with prorated, comprehensive benefits. EOE. See the job description at www.vhcb.org/employment.html. Please send resume and cover letter by February 5 by email to: laurie@vhcb. Celebrating 30 years supporting affordable housing and the conservation of agricultural and recreational land, forestland, natural areas and historic properties.

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We have a dynamic career opportunity for an experienced Email Marketing professional. Working in close collaboration with the Direct Marketing Manager, you will be responsible for the overall email marketing program – including developing the strategy, writing copy, creating and launching campaigns, and analyzing performance. In this role, you will also help maintain the consumer website, including inventory, content, merchandising, and promotions, as well as other program initiatives designed to acquire and retain direct consumers.

...

EDUCATION & EXPERIENCE • Bachelor’s Degree • 3+ years of Email Marketing experience in consumer goods industry • Proven experience in maximizing online sales and achieving revenue goals • Experience with e-commerce technology and identifying market trends KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS & ATTRIBUTES • Thorough working knowledge of email marketing and web analytics • Excellent writing, mathematical, analytical, and project management skills • Exhibit a growth mindset and can-do attitude • Chocolate enthusiast! • Honest with a high degree of integrity • Strong attention to detail • Proociency with MS Office, Web, HTML, Photoshop, and Google Analytics

Please visit our website for additional job details: https://www.lakechamplainchocolates.com/about-us/employment Lake Champlain Chocolates is an equal opportunity employer. Untitled-23 1

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ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

01.17.18-01.24.18

VERMONT CENTER FOR CRIME VICTIM SERVICES

Grants Specialist

Stowe Land Trust – a local, land conservation organization in Stowe, Vermont - is seeking a Stewardship & Outreach Assistant. This AmeriCorps position offers an exciting opportunity to gain valuable on-the-job work experience with a solid land conservation organization and successful team. Visit VHCB AmeriCorp’s website for a complete position description, compensation, and information on how to apply.

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Seeking detail-oriented individual with grant development, management and evaluation experience to coordinate, implement, monitor and evaluate activities of state and federal grant recipients. Position requires relevant grant management 1 1/12/18 2:14 PM experience. Full-time position, competitive salary and benefits Providing innovative mental health and educational package. E.O.E. services to Vermont’s children and families.

“Make a difference in the life of a child!”- NFI Vermont, a leader in specialized trauma and adolescent development, is looking to expand our team of innovators. Full time and part time positions available. Competitive wages, training opportunities, flexible work schedules and family oriented culture. Excellent benefits with tuition reimbursement offered for 30 or more hour employees. Visit our career page at www. nfivermont.org to learn more!

YOU WILL FIND

SUCCESS CRACK OPEN YOUR FUTURE... with our new, mobile-friendly job board.

HR DIRECTOR AT: HIRING@

Job seekers can: • Browse hundreds of current, local positions from Vermont companies. • Search for jobs by keyword, location, category and job type. • Set up job alerts. • Apply for jobs directly through the site.

CCVS.VERMONT.GOV

START APPLYING AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

EMAIL RESUME AND COVER LETTER BY 1/29/18 TO ATTN:

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Community Based Services Clinical Case Manager Looking for an exciting new opportunity? NFI has one for you! CBS is seeking a full time Clinical Case Manager to join our amazing team of mental health professionals and our positive and supportive work environment. Responsibilities include working with children, adolescents, and families with mental health challenges, both in the community and in their homes. Ideal candidates will work well both autonomously and collaboratively on treatment teams, have related work experience, a valid driver’s license, and reliable transportation. A Master’s degree in mental health or social work preferred, or a Bachelor’s degree with equivalent work experience. Come be a part of our positive culture which includes a generous benefits package, tuition reimbursement, paid time off, and more. Please send cover letter and resume to BrandieCarlson@nafi.com.

NFI St. Albans Programs Family Engagement Specialist Family Engagement Specialists work directly with children and families involved with DCF, who experience multi-system issues, including substance abuse, domestic violence, and mental health challenges. Responsibilities include coordinating and facilitating large meetings, teaming with community service providers, creating treatment plans through collaboration with DCF, and parent education. We are looking for candidates with strong communication and documentation skills, who work well in a team setting. Experience with Family Time Coaching, Family Safety Planning and Family Group Conferencing preferred. This full time position with benefits and a $500 sign on bonus requires a Bachelor’s degree and/or two years’ experience in related field. Please submit cover letter and resume to resume NatalieLemery@nafi.com

NOT JUST ANOTHER JOB...

...but an opportunity to work for one of the best insurance companies in the country and reap the rewards that go along with that level of success. We’re a 190 year old company that works hard not to act our age; as a result, we have been recognized as one of the “Best Places to Work in Vermont”. An open and collaborative environment, coupled with exceptional compensation and benefits help to make us one of the most attractive employment opportunities in the country. Thanks to our continued success, we are looking for qualified candidates to join our high-performing team in the following areas: Commercial Lines Underwriting Supervisor To support our growing Underwriting Department, we are seeking a Commercial Lines Underwriting Supervisor to lead an exceptional team of Underwriters. The successful candidate will have a broad base of knowledge and skills related to underwriting commercial lines of insurance, agency relations and operations, as well as excellent supervisory, analytical, problem-solving, and communication skills. Sales Support Specialist We are seeking an energetic professional to join a department that has produced record sales for the past six years. In this role you will support our Field Marketing Representatives and Independent Agency Partners. There is never a dull moment in this exciting and dynamic position. Coordinate training and off-site events, host webinars, and interact with all areas of our company. The ideal candidate will possess technical abilities associated with the property and casualty insurance industry, as well as excellent analytical, planning, presentation and interpersonal skills. Commercial Lines Underwriter We are looking for experienced Underwriters to join our growing team. Our Underwriters focus on writing new business and maintaining positive relationships with our Independent Agents; in doing so, we have contributed to some of the best results in our industry. These positions offer a dynamic environment for insurance professionals who enjoy creative problem-solving and working with others. If you have the qualifications outlined above or other experience and qualifications that you feel would allow you to contribute to the continued success of Vermont Mutual, we’d love to hear from you. To apply for these positions and others, please visit VermontMutual.com/Careers

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1/15/18 2:23 PM

1/12/18 11:59 AM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR CHECK POSTINGS ON YOUR PHONE AT M.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS Seven Days Issue: 1/17 Due: 1/15 by noon Engaging minds that change the world Seeking a position with a quality employer? Consider The University of Vermont, Size: 3.83 x 3.46 a stimulating and diverse workplace. We offer a comprehensive benefit package Cost: $308.55 (with 1 week online) including tuition remission for on-going, full-time positions. This opening and others are updated daily. Services Support Clerk - UVM Bookstore - #S1382PO - The UVM Bookstore is hiring a Services Support Clerk to assist in the smooth operation of the Cat Pause Convenience Store, as well as in the main UVM Bookstore and Henderson’s Café, all located in UVM’s Davis Center. This 30 hour per week position requires stocking of merchandise, operating a cash register, maintaining displays, cleaning, making coffee and specialty drinks and providing exceptional customer service and product delivery in a very fast-paced environment. The successful candidate will also be an individual who actively engages in learning and practicing principles of social justice and inclusion, environmental sustainability and delivering outstanding customer service. Minimum Qualifications*: High School diploma and familiarity with retail sales and convenience store/café operations. Knowledge of computer operations and data entry. *Further details in job posting. For further information on this position and others currently available, or to apply online, please visit our website at: www.uvmjobs.com; Job Hotline #802-656-2248; telephone #802-656-3150. Applicants must apply for position electronically. Paper resumes are not accepted. Job positions are updated daily.

SUMMER KITCHEN COORDINATOR

Common Ground Center is seeking an experienced food service manager for our residential summer camp programs. The ideal candidate will have experience with procurement, vegetarian menu planning and execution, a passion for local food and experience managing a food service team. Current ServsafeUntitled-24 certification and driver’s license is a must. 7 week commitment with room and board included. Send resumes to

connor@cgcvt.org

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1/15/18

CHCB is seeking a social worker position for our new Medical Respite Program. This is an innovative position that will lead a new community partnership and health reform effort focused on people struggling with chronic homelessness. Learn more and apply at

chcb.org/careers.

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EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

1/15/18 12:28 PM

DR Power Equipment is seeking an innovative HR professional to join our Vergennes team!

BARRE, VT

Reporting to a Board of Directors, the Executive Director is responsible for the day-to-day management of the organization and supporting the Board’s leadership on policy and long-term planning. Please submit resume and cover letter via email to communitycapitalvt@gmail.com. Position remains open until filled. EOE

This full-time position is primarily responsible for implementing Vermont 4t-CommunityCapitalofVT111517.indd 1 Foodbank programs and initiatives related to fresh food, including the Gleaning, Lawson’s Finest is looking for highly Pick for Your Neighbor and qualified people to join our team! VT Fresh programs. Residents We’re currently hiring for a of Rutland County who • Brewery Operations Director are familiar with the local agricultural community are • Finance & Administration Director encouraged to apply.

WE’RE HIRING!

A complete job description is available upon request. Please submit application on-line at: www.vtfoodbank. org/employment; be sure to include a cover letter & resume. Attention: Human Resources Department, Francine Chittenden.

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Medical Respite Social Worker Needed

Community Capital of Vermont seeks a dynamic, effective Executive Director with a strong commitment to our mission. CCVT is a statewide small business and microenterprise lender serving low and moderate income entrepreneurs. CCVT specializes in providing loans to business owners who lack the collateral or credit history to qualify for traditional bank loans. 10:15 AM

GLEANING AND COMMUNITY OUTREACH COORDINATOR – RUTLAND COUNTY

The Vermont Foodbank is an EEO.

Housing is health care – be a part of this amazing work!

The University of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Applications, from women, veterans, individuals with disabilities and people from diverse racial, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds are encouraged.

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Manufacturing Floater Positions

• Sales & Distribution Manager

If you are honest, hard working and extremely skilled – we want to hear from you! All positions are based in Waitsfield, Vermont, and will be instrumental in expanding our leadership team and helping us kick off our next chapter of the new Lawson’s Finest Brewery, Taproom, and Retail Store.

Full-time positions available at the Middlebury plant as floaters. Shifts will vary, but primarily will be on 2nd and 3rd shift. Work flexibility is a must. Maintain a sanitary work environment, ensure accurate records, and understand specific SOP’s and product specifications. High School Diploma or equivalent is required. Must be able to lift 40 lbs. Apply in person, by email to ajacobs@agrimark.net or send your resume with cover letter to:

The Lawson’s Finest job portal allows you to browse current and future openings. To apply visit: lawsonsfinestliquidsllc.appone.com.

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1/8/18 4:35 PM

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Agri-Mark Attn: Ashley Jacobs 869 Exchange Street Middlebury, VT 05753 EOE M/F/D/V

1/15/18 1:55 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

01.17.18-01.24.18

GRANTS MANAGER FULL TIME, EXEMPT Join a dynamic and innovative team and put your excellent writing skills to work as the Vermont Foodbank grants manager. The grants manager works closely with Foodbank program, operations, and finance staff to write compelling and accurate funding proposals, craft concise program budgets, and manage post-award communication and reporting. The grants manager is responsible for maintaining an annual grants calendar, including submission and reporting schedules; identifying and researching funding opportunities; and stewarding potential and existing relationships with private and corporate foundation and government agency representatives, meeting with funders when necessary. The grants manager collaborates with program and operations staff to stay abreast of their departmental and programmatic outcomes and funding needs and to clarify expected deliverables. A complete job description is available upon request. Please submit application on-line at www.vtfoodbank.org/employment; be sure to include a cover letter & resume. Attention: Human Resources Department, Francine Chittenden. The Vermont Foodbank is an EEO.

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1/15/18 1:44 PM

TRUST ADMINISTRATOR Union Bank, a full service community bank headquartered in Morrisville, VT, is dedicated to providing superior financial advisory and trust services. As a local Vermont business, we offer challenging and rewarding career RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE opportunities.

ASSISTANT We are seeking an individualLOAN to serve in the role of Trust Administrator, a We are seeking a full time Residential Mortgage full time position in our growing Asset Management Group. Loan This individual Assistant for our growing South Burlington Loan Office. and is will be joining an existing team, at a location to be determined, individual will be responsible for performing a va- and support responsible forThis providing a variety of operational, administrative of administrative to provide loan originaservices to theriety Financial Advisors ofduties the Asset Management Group. Specific tion and documentation support for our Mortgage Loan duties include daily inputting and settlement of account activity, providing Offi cers. Other responsibilities include overseeing the excellent client support, balancing department accounts, providing monthly completion and accuracy of loan documents, processreporting, preparing internal and external correspondence, answering and ing loans and ensuring proper loan documentation indirecting phone calls, and preparing and maintaining client records. This cluding input of information and preparing all related individual will also assist clients in the absence of a Financial Advisor. loan documents, follow up on verifications and credit

Knowledge of reports, trust and investment products and services as is required. preparation of loans for underwriting, well Excellent customer service skills, math aptitude, computer proficiency and as commitment letters, notes, and other loan documentation and set up, with advances clerical skills are necessary. The assisting ability tocustomers work independently and solve on home construction lines and providing all other loan problems, and a general understanding of retail bank products and services support needed.degree Requirements include excellent(or writis beneficial. An Associate’s in finance or business equivalent ten and oral communication, and a minimum 2 years financial experience) is desirable and two years of trustofdepartment of prior residential experience a familiarity of experience is required. Essentialloan traits include with being detail oriented, secondary market mortgage loan products is preferable analytical, organized, deadline oriented and efficient. Excellent verbal and but not required. Attention to detail, strong organizawritten communication skills are critical for success. tional skills, and the ability to multi-task are essential.

Wages will be commensurate with experience.

Licensed Nursing Assistants Full-Time Day Shift

Union Bank offers a comprehensive benefits program for full time employees, including medical and dental insurance, life and disability coverage, a robust 401(k) plan with company matching, and paid leave. Union competitive To be considered forBank thisoffers position, please wages, submitaacomprehensive cover letter, resume, ts package, training for professional developreferences andbenefi salary requirements to: ment, strong advancement potential, stable hours and Resources a supportive workHuman environment. Qualified applications Union may apply with a cover letter,Bank resume, professional refP.O. Box 667to: erences and salary requirements

What you do is important; at least, we think so, and our residents agree. Come to work for Vermont’s premier CCRC, and be a part of the community you hoped for. Wake Robin seeks a dedicated nursing assistant with a strong desire to work within a community of seniors. Wake Robin seeks LNAs licensed in Vermont to provide high quality care in a fast paced residential and long-term care environment, while maintaining a strong sense of “home”. We offer higher than average pay including shift differentials, great benefits, a pristine working environment, and an opportunity to build strong relationships with staff and residents in a dynamic community setting.

Morrisville, Vermont 05661 – 0667 PO Box 667

careers@unionbankvt.com Human Morrisville, VT 05661-0667 ~ Member FDIC ResourcesEOE careers@unionbankvt.com Member FDIC

Equal Housing Lender

Equal Opportunity Employer

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Residential Mortgage Loan Assistant - LPO Seven Days, 3.83 x 7 8.13.13

1/15/18 2:53 PM

ATTENTION RECRUITERS: POST YOUR JOBS AT: PRINT DEADLINE: FOR RATES & INFO:

Interested candidates please email hr@wakerobin.com or complete an application online at www.wakerobin.com. Wake Robin is an EOE. 3h-ContactInfo.indd 1

SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTMYJOB NOON ON MONDAYS (INCLUDING HOLIDAYS) MICHELLE BROWN, 802-865-1020 X21, MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

6/29/15 5:11 PM


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PAY IT IT PAY FORWARD PAY IT FORWARD PAY ITthe teacher FORWARD Become Become the teacher who inspired you. FORWARD Become the teacher who inspired you. Transition teaching Transition to in Become the teacher who inspired you.in Transition to teaching in only 8 months! Our fastonly fastwho inspired you. Transition to teaching in track8to a teacher’s license only months! Our fast-

track to a teacher’s license only 8tomonths! Our& fastis designed designed for new track a teacher’s license is new & Transition tofor teaching in mid-career professionals track a teacher’s license is designed for new & mid-career professionals only 8to months! Our fastwanting toteacher’s teach grades is designed for new & wanting teach grades track to ato license mid-career professionals 5 through 12. mid-career professionals 5 through is designed for new & wanting to12. teach grades wanting to12. teach grades professionals 5mid-career through ATTEND OUR INFO SESSION ATTEND OUR INFO SESSION 5Monday, through 12. wanting to teach grades January 29 6-7 Monday, January 29 IISESSION 6-7 p.m. p.m. ATTEND OUR 5Champlain through 12.INFO College Miller Center

ING ARNERS ING ARNERS

NG RNERS NG ARNERS NG ARNERS

Champlain College Miller Center ATTENDJanuary OUR INFO Monday, 29 ISESSION 6-7 p.m. 175 Lakeside Ave., Burlington 175 Lakeside Ave., Burlington ATTEND INFO SESSION Monday, OUR January 29 I 6-7 p.m. Champlain College Miller Center REGISTER: Monday, January 29Burlington I 6-7Center p.m. Champlain College Miller REGISTER: 175 Lakeside Ave., champlain.edu/tap Champlain College Center champlain.edu/tap 175 Lakeside Ave.,Miller Burlington 802.651.6488 REGISTER: 802.651.6488 175 Lakeside Ave., Burlington REGISTER: champlain.edu/tap REGISTER: champlain.edu/tap 802.651.6488 TAPvt.org 802.651.6488 802.651.5844

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1/15/18 2:27 PM

SUMMER CAMP EDUCATORS & FARMYARD EDUCATORS Shelburne Farms is a nonprofit organization and a 1,400-acre working farm, forest, and National Historic Landmark in Shelburne. We are seeking seasonal Summer Camp Educators, especially those with a lifeguard certification, to teach 10 weeks of onsite day camp for ages 4-17. Additionally, we’re recruiting educators with an interest in farm-based education and agriculture systems to teach in the Children’s Farmyard from May – October. To learn more about these positions, visit shelburnefarms.org/ about/join-our-team.

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

C-19 01.17.18-01.24.18

Come BUILD with us! • BUILD your skills with stimulating projects, • BUILD your career with opportunity for growth, • BUILD your security with competitive salary and benefits, • BUILD your job satisfaction by joining our professional but fun team! ReArch Company is a growing construction management firm in South Burlington, Vermont dedicated to creating buildings and spaces of distinction and significance while generating value for our clients. We are entering into our 15th year of strong growth and continue to be one of the leading construction management companies in the area. ReArch values employees and places a strong emphasis on providing a safe and fun work environment with the opportunity to develop skills and engage in stimulating and challenging projects. We offer the opportunity for growth as well as a competitive salary, annual bonus, 401k plan, generous vacation package, health and dental insurance along with life insurance, short and long term disability.

We are currently hiring for the following roles for projects in Vermont and New Hampshire.

Construction Superintendents – Sign on Bonus Available • Construction Superintendent needed to manage the entire construction site to ensure projects are completed on schedule and safely. • Candidates must have 10+ years’ experience supervising mid to large scale projects and possess a college and/or professional degree, preferably in an engineering or related field, or have an exceptional level of experience. A proven track record of delivering projects on time, within budget and safely is a requirement for this position.

Assistant Construction Superintendents • Assistant Construction Superintendents needed to assist with the management of mid to large commercial construction projects. • Candidates must have 5+ years’ experience in assistant supervisory role and possess a college and/or professional degree, preferably in an engineering or related field, or have an exceptional level of experience. The proper candidate must have the ability to lead when necessary and successfully engage on a daily basis with subcontractors, engineers, architects and clients. The applicant must be able to read plan sets, delegate tasks, think strategically and solve problems in a constructive manner while maintaining a safe and organized project.

Construction Foremen • Construction Foremen needed to assist with subcontractor supervision and other construction functions on mid to large commercial construction projects. • Candidates must have 2+ years’ construction experience in a trade/craft on mid to large scale commercial projects and possess a college and/or professional degree, preferably in an engineering or related field, or have an exceptional level of experience. Applicants must be able to read plan sets, have the ability to plan daily activities, give guidance to field subcontractors, plan material deliveries, keep the site clean, organized and safe, as well as assist with work activities as needed.

Qualifications for all Candidates. In addition to extensive construction knowledge and a strong resume of successfully managed projects, applicants should also have the ability to collaborate in a positive and respectful manner with subcontractors and agencies, and above all exhibit a proactive approach to providing outstanding customer service. Candidates should also possess the ability to delegate tasks, think strategically and solve problems in a constructive manner.

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

Please submit resume and cover letter including salary requirements in confidence to Careers@rearchcompany.com or via mail to ReArch Company, Inc., Human Resources, 55 Community Drive, Suite 402, South Burlington, VT 05403. No phone calls please. 14t-ReArch011718.indd 1

1/15/18 3:35 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-20

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

01.17.18-01.24.18

Carpenters Wanted. Needed Immediately!

Now hiring:

Maintenance Person

Visit our website for job descriptions and to apply online.

Full-Time

Wake Robin seeks a Maintenance person to join our Staff. Our maintenance team utilizes a variety of technical skills to repair and maintain Wake Robin facilities, resident homes, and grounds. S/he will provide a wide array of repair services involving, but not limited to, plumbing, electrical, carpentry, HVAC, adaptive equipment, and grounds. Monitor and maintain computer-based operation systems to include fire alarm, motion sensors, and card access locking system. Qualified candidates will have at least 5 years’ general maintenance experience in a residential or industrial setting, demonstrated skills in at least two areas mentioned above, as well as a strong aptitude for computer-based operational systems.

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FIND YOUR NEXT GREAT JOB! 1/15/18

Spherion Manpower Westaff Adecco Labor Ready

Home Depot Lowe’s Trapp Family Lodge TLC Nursing Sheraton Hannaford’s Fletcher Allen Home Instead University of Vermont Sodexo

1/15/18 1:48 PM

SEEKING SHARED LIVING PROVIDERS

2:19 PM

Come meet businesses from across the region who are looking for workers like you. Representatives from a variety of industries will be on hand to meet candidates: Staffing Services:

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Howard Center has an ongoing need for foster parents or weekend buddies for children in our program. These children range in age from 7-16. Some need caring adults to support them over the weekend, others need a family for a school year, and some are looking for adoptive families. On any given day, there are over 1,300 children in the Vermont foster care system and over 60 children in need of an adoptive family. You don’t have to be married, rich or own a home. You will be supported every step of the way!

If you have high standards of service and a strong desire to learn, please email hr@wakerobin.com your resume with cover letter to: HR, (802) 264-5105.

Support Specialist Position

Call Mike at 802-343-0089 or Morton at 802-862-7602.

SEEKING FOSTER PARENTS

Wake Robin provides an extensive benefit package and a team centered atmosphere where customer service and resident interaction combine to create a unique and rewarding work environment.

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Finish Carpenters, Carpenters and Carpenters Helpers. Good Pay, Full Time and Long Term! Chittenden County.

Maple Sugaring Assistants

Mountain Transit Howard Center Loso’s Janitorial Knowledgewave Securitas Security Walmart Price Chopper Sleep Number ReSource CCV

The Howard Center’s Shared Living Program creates opportunities for individuals with developmental disabilities to live in the community. The Shared Living Program is currently accepting expressions of interest from experienced caregivers to provide a home, day-today assistance, and support tailored to the needs of individuals seeking caregivers. This is a rewarding employment opportunity for individuals who are interested in working from home while making a meaningful difference in someone’s life. We use a careful matching process to ensure that each placement is mutually compatible. A generous tax-free stipend, room and board, respite budget, training, and team support are provided. Potential opportunities below: 1. Young SLP to support a 22-year-old woman who enjoys music, dancing and theater, and who can create a safe environment where she can thrive, join in lively conversations about equity and be herself.

Innovative, statewide Employee Assistance Hilton Burlington Program inHotel partnership with Vermont CVS Association of Business, Industry and VT Department of Labor Northlands Job Corps Rehabilitation seeks organized and reliable Janitech professional to provide excellent customer service to April 22, 2014 9am-4pm Exclusive Media Partner: members and colleagues. Tasks range from daily data entry, Hilton Burlington telephonic and web customer support, Presented resource by: Openbased to all candidates! research, mailings, and work in Office 365. Potential other duties may include updating Microsoft Excel files, crafting letters, using online technology to embed links and graphics, and using data to create simple graphs.

2. Experienced, attentive and confident SLP to support a fun-loving 24-year-old man. Our client’s wish is to have the support of a strong male role model that exhibits clear boundaries, energy and enthusiasm.

Candidates must have reliable transportation, Bachelor’s Degree, preferably in the Human Services Field, be proficient with current technology, have the ability to work independently, take directives and abide by the highest professional ethical standards and confidentiality.

5. An individual or couple with a background in mental health/human services who can create a safe and nurturing home for a 25-year-old male. He is a user of facilitated communication who enjoys his alone time, walks and hikes, and swimming.

Hours are flexible and range from 2-5 hours per day, during business hours in our Cherry St. offices in downtown Burlington. Must be able to work Thursday morning 8:00 to 12:00. Ideal candidate will be available 4-5 days per week and able to work in a dynamic work environment adept at managing long term assignments with short term daily assignments added. To apply, please send resume and cover letter to Marc Adams at marca@investeap.org before 1/24/2018.

3. Seeking a live-in SLP to support a 30-year-old man who enjoys taking walks, playing music, helping others and participating in hands-on activities. This individual is seeking a roommate to share a furnished, centrally located home in Essex Junction. 4. Happy young woman who utilizes a wheelchair is looking for a home. This is a twoweek-on, two-week-off position. Must be willing to learn special care procedures and how to use a lift. The ideal home will be wheelchair accessible or be willing to make the necessary alterations.

6. A home provider who offers a clean, safe, structured, and comforting home environment for a very social, humorous and music-loving 59-year-old woman. This provider should be medically aware, comfortable with personal care and experienced with dual-diagnosis. The home must also be wheelchair and walker accessible. 7. Home provider(s) to support an independent man in his forties who is a dedicated full-time worker. He would love the opportunity to do more cooking and spend casual time together at home. To learn more about these rewarding opportunities, contact JRodrigues@howardcenter.org or call (802) 488-6372. 10v-HowardCenterSLP011718.indd 1

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1/5/18 11:52 AM

1/12/18 3:16 PM


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NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

C-21 01.17.18-01.24.18

Care & Service Coordination Supervisor, RN About the Position:

Town of Charlotte

Age Well seeks a Care & Service Coordination Supervisor and Registered Nurse with creative instincts, strong interpersonal and leadership attributes excited by the prospect of helping to create a new template for aging services in an evolving healthcare environment. This position will lead our highly-skilled team of Care & Service Coordinators in Franklin County and help to conceptualize and implement Age Well’s region-wide practice model, with a focus on client-centric risk detection, wellness and improved clinical outcomes and quality of life for those we serve. Central to this work will be a keen understanding of the social determinants of health and the leading role that community-based organizations like Age Well should play in interfacing with the healthcare system to prevent & mitigate chronic disease, rather than chasing it.

Zoning Administrator/Sewage Control Officer/ Health Officer/E911 Coordinator The Town of Charlotte is accepting applications for a Zoning Administrator/Sewage Control Officer/ Health Officer/E-911 Coordinator. The primary responsibility of this position is to administer land use permitting. The position is also responsible for enforcement of the Charlotte Land Use Regulations, wastewater system permitting (with the assistance of a Licensed Designer), performance of the statutory duties of the Health Officer, and issuing E911 addresses.

We are seeking candidates dedicated to providing outstanding support to our staff, the seniors & families we serve. Age Well is committed to providing a culture that embraces change, where our staff are energized and feel proud to work, and where they’re reminded frequently that their work makes a profound difference in people’s lives. This is an opportunity for a candidate at mid-career excited by the prospect of developing strong leadership skills and participating in strategic planning and program implementation in a mission-driven, high-performing organization that emphasizes work-life balance and places a premium on creating a healthy, high-morale culture.

The position is a permanent position approved for 35 hours, paid hourly. Compensation is in accordance with the Town of Charlotte Salary Administration Policy. The starting wage rate is between $18.06 and $20.43, based on qualifications and experience. Generous health benefits are offered. A job description can be viewed at www.charlottevt.org; see right-hand sidebar. To apply, please send a resumé and cover letter to dean@townofcharlotte.com. The deadline for submitting an application is January 26th.

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1/15/18

Our Purpose

Applicants must be licensed in Vermont or eligible for licensure by reciprocity and have demonstrated experience working with at-risk patients in home-based or primary care settings. The Care & Service Coordination Supervisor will develop a deep understanding of the Franklin County community and represent Age Well as a key member of OneCare Vermont’s Franklin County Core Team, and serve as a member / participant of other 1:14 PM community collaborations. The CSC Supervisor’s time will be split between Age Well’s Central Office in Essex Junction and providing “boots on the ground” support to our team in the St. Alban’s field office.

SunCommon is a Benefit Corporation that is fueled by the belief that everyone has the right to a healthy environment and safer world. So we’re tearing down the barriers that have made renewable energy inaccessible with the goal of re-powering our communities one home, school, and business at a time. To this end, we make going solar easy and affordable so that all Vermonters together can take part in creating a healthier environment.

Now Hiring: •

Lead Ground Mount Operator- Waterbury

Warehouse Manager- Waterbury

Email and Content Manager- Waterbury

Master or Journeyman Electric Solar Installer- Waterbury

If you are interested in joining Age Well and learning more about this position, send a cover letter, along with your resume to hr@agewellvt.org, or fax to (802) 865-0363.  Age Well is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

About the Organization: Age Well is the largest elder services organization in Vermont, providing Care & Service Coordination, Meals on Wheels, the Senior Helpline and a network of services and support to seniors and their families in Chittenden, Addison, Franklin & Grand Isle counties. A growing nonprofit with a staff of 63 and an annual budget of $6 million, Age Well works with nearly 1000 volunteers and 10,000 clients each year, to provide the support and guidance that inspires our community to embrace aging with confidence. Visit agewellvt.org/about/careers to learn more and apply. Since 1974, we have provided Northwestern Vermonters with essential services to help them age well. Meals on Wheels | Care Coordination | Helpline: 1-800-642-5119 Age Well is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and an Equal Opportunity Employer. 10v-AgeWell121317.indd 1

12/11/17 4:45 PM

YOU

Warehouse Support- Waterbury

SU

For a full job description and application instructions, visit

suncommon.com/work-at-suncommon.

D

FIN

S S E CC L WIL

CRACK OPEN YOUR FUTURE...

with our new, mobile-friendly job board. START APPLYING AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

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1/15/18 2:06 PM

2/27/17 4:18 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-22

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

01.17.18-01.24.18

Spring Lake Ranch is a long term residential program for adults with mental health and addiction issues. Residents find strength and hope through shared work and community. We are searching for:

Clinical Team Leader Responsible for assessment, general recovery support, treatment planning, crisis intervention, progress documentation, on-call rotation, and med administration within a beautiful and uniquely relational therapeutic farm setting. Master’s degree required and clinical licensure strongly preferred. Experience in mental health and/or substance abuse recovery support is required. Must be willing to participate in and foster the therapeutic community milieu. Full time position with benefits; flexible schedule.

Psychiatric Prescriber Responsible for psychiatric care and assessments of residents and clients; prescribing medications; completing medical records, reports and providing referrals to medical services; providing coverage for psychiatric emergencies. Ideal candidate must be licensed psychiatrist or psychiatric nurse practitioner; demonstrate ability to collaborate effectively in a team setting; have addiction treatment experience, including MAT certification. Part-time position with flexible schedule. To apply for either position, send cover letter indicating your interest in Spring Lake Ranch and resume to: marym@springlakeranch.org, or fax to (802) 492-3331, or mail to SLR, 1169 Spring Lake Road, Cuttingsville, VT 05738.

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1/5/18

Business Office Director The Residence at Shelburne Bay is a luxury senior living community located in Shelburne, Vermont. We are looking for an exceptional Business Office Director to join our management team. The Business Office Director will be responsible for overseeing human resource functions, accounts payable and receivable, payroll, and overseeing our front desk team. We are looking for someone who is compassionate, detail oriented, and reliable. This person will have excellent customer service skills as well as computer skills and will be interested in joining a team that is much like a family in a community where our residents always come first. Please send resumes to: Allyson Sweeney, Executive Director asweeney@residenceshelburnebay.com or apply online, www.residenceshelburnebay.com

185 Pine Haven Shores Road – Shelburne, VT

Clinician – First Call for Chittenden County

Provide life-changing support in a compassionate environment focused on professional development. Howard Center is hiring skilled Crisis Assessment and Triage Clinicians for its integrated crisis program. First Call for Chittenden County is the 24/7/365 mobile crisis service for anyone of any age in Chittenden County, Vermont. One team. One number. Master’s Degree req. Visit www.howardcentercareers.org and enter “First Call” to learn more.

Community Health Social Worker New Position: Facilitate access to health care, provide case management and provide community resource referral for New American patients at Adult Primary Care – Burlington (UHC). Master’s Degree req.

LPN – Medication Assisted Treatment Program

Seeking a dedicated full-time LPN who will be responsible for safely dispensing methadone and buprenorphine products and maintaining all Nursing Dispensary operations. Minimum 1-2 years experience in nursing and education based on that required by State of VT for licensure (LPN). We are looking for someone with excellent attention to detail and organizational skills plus strong interpersonal and communication skills. Must be reliable, polite, motivated, and able to work early mornings.

Medical Home Early Childhood Clinician Provide home/community based consultative services to children and families, as identified by UVMMC - Medical Home Team. Services include assessment of child/family needs, targeted therapeutic interventions, on-going collaboration with medical team and case management to support linkages to external services. Master’s Degree req.

Outpatient Clinician/Substance Abuse Clinical Care We have an exciting opportunity for a licensed clinician to provide care coordination and psychotherapy to a diverse set of clients. Approximately 50% of the position will be providing care 3:25 PM coordination to clients receiving buprenorphine treatment through Howard Center’s new “Spoke” program. The remaining portion of the job will be to provide individual and/or group psychotherapy to adults, children, families and/or clients with intellectual disabilities. This is an ideal position for an applicant that wishes to work within a team of outpatient clinicians providing an array of different services to a diverse population. FT. Master’s degree and LCMHC or LICSW or LADC required.

Residential Counselor - Awake Overnight

Establish and maintain a therapeutic, clean, and stable environment in a residential program serving adults with severe mental illness and/or substance use issues. Must have the ability to exercise sound judgement and be compassionate and respectful. Bachelor’s degree required.

Registered Nurse – Medication Assisted Treatment Program

1 PT and 1 FT position available. Our nurses are responsible for safely dispensing methadone and buprenorphine products and maintaining all Nursing Dispensary operations. Must have excellent attention to detail and organizational skills plus strong interpersonal and communication skills.

SUB - Registered Nurse – Medication Assisted Treatment Program

Seeking subs to cover vacancies. Our nurses are responsible for safely dispensing methadone and buprenorphine products and maintaining all Nursing Dispensary operations. Must have excellent attention to detail and organizational skills plus strong interpersonal and communication skills.

Howard Center offers an excellent benefits package including health, dental, and life insurance, as well as generous paid time off for all regular positions scheduled 20+hrs/week. Please visit our website www.howardcentercareers.org. Enter position title to view details and apply.

Howard Center is an Equal-Opportunity Employer. Applicants needing assistance or an accommodation in completing the on-line application should feel free to contact Human Resources at 488-6950 or HRHelpDesk@howardcenter.org. 12-HowardCenter011718.indd 1

1/15/18 10:09 AM


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Part-time Test Administrator So. Burlington, VT

• Check in examinees, verify ID • Explain exam process • Monitor while testing computerized exams for certifications/licensing • 6-20 hrs/week • Various shifts between 7:30am-8:00pm • Monday-Saturday; MUST be available to work all shifts. Flexibility/availability are key. • Professional position; quiet office; enforce policies. • Good customer service. • Beginner-intermediate Internet/Email/ PC skills. • $12/hr.

jobs.pearson.com Search by state PEARSON VUE EOE - M/F/D/V

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NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

C-23 01.17.18-01.24.18

America’s premier innovator, designer and manufacturer of high performance wire and cable with a 60-year history of providing solutions to the toughest problems in the world’s most extreme environments. We excel at developing customized products, utilizing our cross-linked irradiation technology, that meet power, signal and data transmission needs—no matter how demanding the challenge—while exceeding standards for quality, durability and safety.

SUPPLY CHAIN INVENTORY CONTROL ANALYST We are looking for an Inventory Control Analyst/Buyer who will be responsible for inventory control company-wide serving multiple manufacturing facilities. Some responsibilities are performing cycle counts and reporting results monthly, analyzing inventory data and cycle counts, requesting quotes and placing POs, resolving inventory discrepancies, and training others on inventory practices and procedures; also responsible for the procurement of non-production and production items. Requirements: • Minimum of 3 to 5 years of experience in inventory control and operational procedures in a manufacturing environment. • Business Administration or related major with a minimum of an Associate’s Degree, a Bachelor’s Degree being a plus. • Proficient in Excel. Able to collate physical cycle counts, inventory data, analyze that data and make recommendations as to corrective action should data indicate an inventory control issue. • Problem-solving and time management are critical. • Learn Champlain Cable’s ERP system, AXIOM, and be able to communicate effectively using the terms unique to AXIOM and Champlain Cable. • Procurement experience a plus. Responsibilities: • Provide operations management with recommendations to improve inventory accuracy. To include review of cycle counts and usage ensuring that our bill of materials accurately reflect the actual material usage. • Be customer centric, always looking at how we impact our customers. • Ensuring shipments reflect the customer requirements, specifically footage. • Work with Quality Assurance when a customer reports a quantity discrepancy, analyzing the reason(s) and assisting with submitting an 8D (corrective action) to the customer. • Cross-shift coverage required to get a full understanding of the product flow, inventory issues, meeting with shift supervisors and group-leaders and conducting training on cycle counting. • Some travel required to other Champlain Cable facilities in El Paso, TX and Benton Harbor, MI. • Other duties as may be assigned by Manager.

DEVELOPMENT ENGINEER FOR R&D

1/15/18

This position will be responsible for the development of our wires and cables at our Colchester, VT facility. The primary responsibility is to design and formulate polymer/elastomer compounds to develop new products and or improve current products. You will work in our R&D department from 8am to 5pm in collaboration with other engineers and technicians. There will be occasional travel to 1:50 PM customers, vendors, and professional conferences. This position reports to our R&D Senior Technologist & Scientist. Specific responsibilities: • Design and formulate polymer/elastomer compound specific to wire and cable industry. • Work collaboratively to develop products from R&D to Production scale.

New, local, scamfree jobs posted every day! sevendaysvt. com/classifieds

• Challenge status quo and drive the product development to production scale in a timely fashion. • Keep abreast of latest developments in the polymer/elastomer technology and recommend to the company. • Use DOE and preferably 6 sigma tools to trouble shoot and developing new compounds. • Work closely with R&D head to streamline day to day trouble shooting and new developments. • Pursue high standards to keep company’s commitment to customers in an accountable way. • Knowledge in polymer/elastomer processing equipment and know how in tying additives with properties required like fire retardants and antioxidants. • Knowledge in using processing aids facilitating processing. • Knowledge in characterization tools with Standards such as ISO, SAE, UL, CSA preferred. • Unwavering commitment to safety. • Keep meticulous documentation. Qualifications: • BS or MS in polymer science or materials engineering. • 1-5 year’s experience in polymers. • Excellent interpersonal and communications skills both verbal and written. • Ability to present ideas effectively to diverse constituencies, internal and external. • Strong understanding of Polymer processing. • Strong decision making skills with emphasis on analytical thinking. • Team oriented working with peers and direct labor in transferring the product to production. • Self-motivated with high energy. • Six sigma and 5S methodology preferred as well as knowledge of polymer/elastomer suppliers. We are ISO & TS-16949 certified, offer excellent benefits and competitive wages based on experience and education. Apply here or you can email your resume and/or cover letter to hr@champcable.com. If you prefer, you can mail your resume and cover letter to Champlain Cable Corp. Attn: HR Dept., 175 Hercules Drive, Colchester, VT 05446. No phone calls please. 14-ChamplainCable011018.indd 1

1/8/18 3:37 PM


01.17.18-01.24.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Dogs are always allowed when you own.

h use

Tuesday, February 6, 6-8 p.m.

party!

Bauer Gravel Farnham, LLP

Presented by:

Experts include:

Attorneys at Law REALTOR

SEVEN DAYS

ATTORNEYS

Daniel N. Farnham, Esq. & Jonathan M. Stebbins, Esq.

BAUER GRAVEL FARNHAM, LLP

Nate Malley

THE NATE MALLEY TEAM, KW VERMONT

MORTGAGE SPECIALIST

Emily Malinowski

NORTH COUNTRY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

at sevendaysvt.com/houseparty and you’ll be entered to win swag from:

C-24

RSVP

A free workshop for first-time home buyers. Talk with experts, ask questions and grab a cocktail!

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1/15/18 6:54 PM


food+drink

MISO & CO. Many kinds of miso exist, made from different grains and legumes and aged for varying lengths of time. Here are some of them, along with related products.

If you don’t want to make the mayonnaise from scratch, simply stir miso paste, a little sesame oil and some scallion into the store-bought stuff. INGREDIENTS:

• • • • • • • •

2 egg yolks 1 teaspoon mustard 1 teaspoon lemon juice 1/3 cup toasted sesame oil 1 cup neutral oil (such as grapeseed) 1 tablespoon miso, plus more to taste 1 scallion, sliced into thin rounds Black pepper to taste

DIRECTIONS:

HealthSource education programs and healthy lifestyle classes are offered by Community Health Improvement at The University of Vermont Medical Center. This program is FREE.

Mastering Stocks and Broths

Stocks and broths are the foundation of good cooking, yet information on their use is often relegated to the introductions or appendices of cookbooks. Join Rachael Mamane, a self-taught cook and owner of small-scale broth company Brooklyn Bouillon, as she takes us on a culinary journey into the science behind fundamental stocks and the truth about well-crafted bone broths. Book sale and signing to follow the presentation. WHEN

Tuesday, January 23, 6 – 7:30 pm

WHERE

UVM Medical Center, Main Campus, Davis Auditorium

A Precautionary Tale

Join Philip Ackerman-Leist as he discusses his most recent book: A Precautionary Tale, which shares the inspiring story of a group of citizens in Mals, Italy who fought Big Ag and won and, in doing so, became the first place on Earth to ban pesticides by a referendum vote. With more than two decades of field experience, Philip’s work is focused on examining and reshaping local and regional food systems from the ground up. Book sale and signing to follow the presentation. WHEN

Tuesday, February 6, 6 – 7:30pm

WHERE

UVM Medical Center, Main Campus, Davis Auditorium

CHECK ONLINE FOR MORE UPCOMING CLASSES! 01.17.18-01.24.18

You may want to watch a tutorial on the web before you begin. Making mayo isn’t particularly tricky, but it is possible to “break” the mayo by adding the oil too quickly or by adding too much. Separate the eggs, placing the egg yolks in a large mixing bowl. Add mustard and lemon juice, and whisk until the yolks have lightened to a lemon yellow. Very slowly, a trickle at a time, whisk in the sesame oil. (It’s great to have a helper to pour in the oil for you. If you don’t, fold a kitchen towel into a ring that the bowl can sit on. You want the bowl to stay still as you pour oil with one hand and whisk with the other). When the sesame oil has been incorporated, begin with the neutral oil, whisking constantly. Eventually, the stuff will start to look like mayonnaise. When it does, stop adding oil. Stir in the miso, scallions and black pepper. Taste. If you want it to be saltier, add more miso or a sprinkle of sea salt. For more tang, add more lemon juice or mustard. This mayo is great in slaw, smeared on veggie fritters or in sandwiches.

FREE CLASSES — WINTER REGISTRATION NOW OPEN

MISO-RUBBED KALE • 3 tablespoons red miso • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil • 1 bunch kale, cleaned and stripped from its stems PREPARATION:

UVMHealth.org/MedCenterHealthsource pieces and place in a mixing bowl. Using your fingers, massage the miso mixture onto all surfaces of the kale. Bake for 10 minutes, stir, and return to the oven until the pieces are crisp but not browned, between 5 and 10 minutes. Best eaten immediately, as the snappy texture doesn’t last.

PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED BY CALLING (802) 847-7222 Untitled-26 1

1/15/18 1:16 PM

FOOD 43

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Blend the miso and sesame oil, stirring until combined. Pull the kale into bite-size

SEVEN DAYS

This is about as close as you can get to a Vermonty version of seaweed. INGREDIENTS:

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Amazake: A rice drink made with koji, the same fungus that is used to make miso. In Japan, it’s considered a cure for hangovers. Barley (mugi) miso: It has a grainy aroma but a milder flavor than bean-based misos. It can be smooth or chunky. Brown rice (genmai) miso: A bit sweeter than most misos, the rice variation needs less time to age because its starches break down quickly. Koji: Aspergillus oryzae, the fungus used to make miso, amazake, sake and an alcoholic beverage called shochu. Natto: Soybeans fermented with Bacillus subtilis. Pungent and slimy, it has many health benefits. In Japan, it’s generally mixed with mustard and soy sauce and eaten for breakfast. Red (aka) miso: Salty and strong, it is excellent in dishes with meat or mushrooms and as an ingredient in marinades. Soybean (hatcho) miso: Named for the Chinese city in which it originated, it is typically aged for two to three years. White (shiro) miso: This mild miso isn’t fermented as long as other variations. With a less-funky flavor, it can be added to a wide variety of recipes without overwhelming the other ingredients. Tempeh: A cake of fermented soybeans, originating in Indonesia. It’s often used as a meat substitute in recipes. Yellow (shinshu) miso: The oolong of miso, fermented for longer than white miso but not as long as red. Its flavor falls between the two.

MISO MAYO


calendar J A N U A R Y

WED.17 art

Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section.

business

KELLEY MARKETING GROUP BREAKFAST MEETING: Professionals in marketing, advertising, communications and social media brainstorm ideas for nonprofit organizations. Room 217, Ireland Building, Champlain College, Burlington, 7:45-9 a.m. Free. Info, 864-4067.

cannabis

GREENER DRINKS: Supporters of commonsense cannabis reform sip beverages and discuss the culture, industry and politics of the agricultural product. Zenbarn, Waterbury, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, info@ vtcannabisbrands.com.

crafts

FIBER RIOT!: Crafters get hooked on knitting, crocheting, spinning and more at an informal weekly gathering. Mad River Fiber Arts & Mill, Waitsfield, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 496-7746.

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dance

CONTACT IMPROV: Movers engage in weight-sharing, play and meditation when exploring this style influenced by aikido and other somatic practices. The Everything Space, Montpelier, 7-8:30 p.m. $5-10. Info, 232-3618. DROP-IN HIP-HOP DANCE: Beginners are welcome at a groove session inspired by infectious beats. Swan Dojo, Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m. $15. Info, 540-8300.

education

VISITING MORNING: Class observations and faculty meet and greets give parents a

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THE ILLUSIONISTS: Five magicians dazzle audience members of all ages with acts of levitation, mind reading and more. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, 7 p.m. $25-70. Info, 863-5966.

‘WONDER OF THE ARCTIC 3D’: Pioneering scientists seek to answer questions about the impact of human activities on this fragile frontier. Northfield Savings Bank Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 11 a.m., 1 & 3:30 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $11.50-14.50; admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848.

film

food & drink

taste of the learning community. Lake Champlain Waldorf School, Shelburne, 8:30-10 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 985-2827.

etc.

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘EXTREME WEATHER 3D’: A National Geographic film takes viewers to the front lines of powerful storms, widespread fires and rising waters. Northfield Savings Bank Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, noon & 2:30 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $11.50-14.50; admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848. ‘THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL’: An unexpected death leads to adventure for a concierge and his trusty lobby boy in this Wes Anderson comedy. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600. MOUNTAINTOP FILM FESTIVAL: A week of films centered on human and civil rights honors the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. See mountaintopfilmfestival.com for details. Big Picture Theater and Café, Waitsfield. $10-100. Info, 496-8994. MOVIE NIGHT FOR ADULTS: Film buffs keep their eyes glued to the screen during a popular picture. Call for title. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

COMMUNITY DINNER: The Winooski Partnership for Prevention hosts a neighborhood feast. O’Brien Community Center, Winooski, 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 655-4565.

SEVEN DAYS

In addition to writing fiction, essays and journalism, author Lauren Markham works at a high school for immigrant youth in California’s Bay Area. These literary and cultural passions meet in her 2017 book, The Far Away Brothers: Two Young Migrants and the Making of an American Life. In it, Markham tells the true story of teenage twin brothers who, fleeing gang violence, make the harrowing journey from their native El Salvador to the Golden State, where they encounter a new set of challenges. The author and Vermont College of Fine Arts alum appears at Phoenix Books Burlington to discuss her hard-hitting page-turner, which the New York Times describes as “impeccably timed, intimately reported and beautifully expressed.”

LAUREN MARKHAM Thursday, January 18, 6:30 p.m., at Phoenix Books Burlington. $3. Info, 4483350, phoenixbooks.biz.

COMMUNITY SUPPER: A scrumptious spread connects friends and neighbors. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 5-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 300.

JAN.18 | WORDS

VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: Local products — veggies, breads, pastries, cheeses, wines, syrups, jewelry, crafts and beauty supplies — draw shoppers to a diversified bazaar. Vermont Farmers Food Center, Rutland, 3-6 p.m. Free. Info, 342-4727.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: Players have fun with the popular card game. Burlington Bridge Club, Williston, 9:15 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. $6. Info, 872-5722. CHESS CLUB: Strategy comes into play as competitors try to capture opposing game pieces. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

JAN.19-21 | FAIRS & FESTIVALS

health & fitness

ATHLETES PRIMAL FLOW: Yoga meets primal movement, animal flow, plyometrics and isometrics. Zenbarn Studio, WED.17

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List your upcoming event here for free! SUBMISSION DEADLINES: ALL SUBMISSIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY THURSDAY AT NOON FOR CONSIDERATION IN THE FOLLOWING WEDNESDAY’S NEWSPAPER. FIND OUR CONVENIENT FORM AND GUIDELINES AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT. YOU CAN ALSO EMAIL US AT CALENDAR@SEVENDAYSVT.COM. TO BE LISTED, YOU MUST INCLUDE THE NAME OF EVENT, A BRIEF DESCRIPTION, SPECIFIC LOCATION, DATE, TIME, COST AND CONTACT PHONE NUMBER.

CALENDAR EVENTS IN SEVEN DAYS: LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY KRISTEN RAVIN. SEVEN DAYS EDITS FOR SPACE AND STYLE. DEPENDING ON COST AND OTHER FACTORS, CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS MAY BE LISTED IN EITHER THE CALENDAR OR THE CLASSES SECTION. WHEN APPROPRIATE, CLASS ORGANIZERS MAY BE ASKED TO PURCHASE A CLASS LISTING.

Good Sports For many Vermonters, immersion in the great outdoors can be an exhilarating experience. Before trekking into field or stream, though, it’s smart to stock up on the appropriate gear. With nearly 200 exhibitors, the Yankee Sportsman’s Classic provides a one-stop shop for outdoor enthusiasts of every stripe. Whether fans of hunting, fishing, archery, ATVs, or wildlife-inspired arts and crafts, browsers find plenty of vendors to get their motors running. Seminars covering topics such as trophy fishing, beekeeping and tracking help attendees sharpen their skills, while a petting farm, dog demonstrations and a trout pond keep kiddos occupied. Partial proceeds from this info and equipment emporium YANKEE SPORTSMAN’S CLASSIC benefit Camp Ta-Kum-Ta.

Friday, January 19, noon-7 p.m.; Saturday, January 20, 9 a.m.7 p.m.; and Sunday, January 21, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., at Robert E. Miller Expo Centre, Champlain Valley Expo, in Essex Junction. $5-11; free for kids under 3. Info, 877-0033, yankeeclassic.net.


All That Jazz

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nswering Cragislist classified ads can yield mixed results. One may find that a secondhand couch is not in the “like-new” condition described — or wind up with the perfect roommate. For musicians Evan Palazzo and Elizabeth Bougerol, the popular website led to a sizzling musical partnership. The two met after answering an ad about a jam session in 2007 and are now bandleader and lead singer, respectively, of the New York-based jazz band Hot Sardines. Influenced by genre trailblazers such as Fats Waller, Dinah Washington and Louis Armstrong, the ensemble serves up stirring renditions of classic jazz numbers for today’s listeners.

JAN.19 | MUSIC

HOT SARDINES Friday, January 19, 7 p.m., at Fuller Hall, St. Johnsbury Academy. $15-53. Info, 748-2600, catamountarts.org.

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COURTESY OF PETE CHECCHIA & ALLEN COHEN

SEVEN DAYS

Cross-generational collaboration can be a rich endeavor, particularly in the arts. Every summer, exceptional young, mid-career and veteran classical musicians reap sonorous rewards at the Marlboro Music School and Festival. Rehearsing and performing in chamber ensembles, participants flourish in the bucolic setting of southern Vermont’s Marlboro College. After seven weeks, standout ensembles tour the nation as part of four Musicians From Marlboro series. Renowned cellist Marcy Rosen and New York Philharmonic principal clarinetist Anthony McGill (pictured) lead one such ensemble. With violist Daniel MUSICIANS FROM MARLBORO Kim and violinists Emilie-Ann Gendron and David Wednesday, January 24, 7 p.m., at Spaulding McCarroll, they showcase consort chemistry and Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, in Hanover, N.H. $17-30. Info, 603-646-2422, technique in pieces by Ludwig van Beethoven, Johannes hop.dartmouth.edu. Brahms and Krzysztof Penderecki.

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calendar Waterbury, 5:30-6:30 p.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com.

KIDS’ MOVIES: Youngsters and their grown-ups feast their eyes on a 30-minute film before digging into a community supper. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

BUTI YOGA: A fusion of vinyasa yoga, plyometrics and dance is set to upbeat music. Bring water and a towel. Women’s Room, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. $10. Info, 829-0211.

READ TO DAISY: Budding bookworms join a friendly canine for ear-catching narratives. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-6956.

A COURSE IN MIRACLES: A monthly workshop based on Helen Schucman’s 1975 text delves into the wisdom found at the core of the world’s major religions. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Plattsburgh, N.Y., 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 518-561-6920.

CHAIR TAI CHI: Age and ability level are no obstacles to learning this slow, easy exercise routine. Champlain Senior Center, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 316-1510.

SCIENCE & STORIES: TRACKS IN THE SNOW: Footprints offer insight into animals’ secret winter lives. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Regular admission, $11.50-14.50; free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 877-324-6386.

YOURS, MINE & OURS — MONEY WITH YOUR HONEY: Partners get on the same page regarding personal finances in a four-week class covering everything from bills and spending to savings and debt. Capstone Community Action, Barre, 6-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 477-5215.

STORY TIME: Children are introduced to the wonderful world of reading. Richmond Free Library, 10-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 434-3036.

sports

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GENTLE YOGA IN WATERBURY: Practitioners with limitations and seasoned students alike hit the mat for an all-levels class. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 9-10 a.m. $12. Info, studio@ zenbarnvt.com.

STORY TIME FOR PRESCHOOLERS: Picture books, songs, rhymes and early math tasks work youngsters’ mental muscles. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

GINGER’S EXTREME BOOT CAMP: Triathletes, Spartan racers and other fitness fanatics challenge themselves to complete Navy Seal exercises during an intense workout. Come in good shape. Private residence, Middlebury, 7-8 a.m. $8-12; for ages 16 and up. Info, 343-7160.

WEDNESDAY STORY TIME: From timeless tales to new adventures, books transport tots to another world. Phoenix Books Essex, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 872-7111.

NIA WITH LINDA: Eclectic music and movements drawn from healing, martial and dance arts propel an animated barefoot workout. South End Studio, Burlington, 8:30-9:30 a.m. $14; free for first-timers. Info, 372-1721. PRIMAL CORE FLOW: A varied vinyasa class promotes balance, body control, coordination, strength and flexibility. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 7:30-8:30 a.m. $12. Info, studio@ zenbarnvt.com. RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: Folks in recovery and their families enrich mind, body and spirit in an all-levels class. All props are provided; wear loose clothing. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 861-3150. RESILIENCE FLOW: Individuals affected by a traumatic brain injury engage in a gentle yoga practice. Sangha Studio — Pine, Burlington, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262. WEDNESDAY GUIDED MEDITATION: Individuals learn to relax and let go. Burlington Friends Meeting House, 5:306:30 p.m. Free. Info, 318-8605. ZUMBA EXPRESS: A shortened version of this guided, beatdriven workout gives students a much-needed midday surge of energy. Marketplace Fitness, Burlington, 11:30 a.m.-noon. $12;

YOGA FOR KIDS: Yogis ages 2 through 5 strike a pose to explore breathing exercises and relaxation techniques. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216.

language

BEGINNER ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASS: Students build a foundation in reading, speaking and writing. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211. FRENCH WEDNESDAY: SOCIAL EVENT: Francophones fine-tune their French-language conversation skills over cocktails. Bar, Bleu Northeast Seafood, Burlington, 5-7 p.m. Free. Info, info@aflcr.org. INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: Pupils improve their speaking and grammar mastery. Private residence, Burlington, 6 p.m. $20. Info, 324-1757. INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASS: Learners take communication to the next level. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211. LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: SPANISH: ¡Hola! Language lovers perfect their fluency. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

music

Find club dates in the music section.

seminars

WOMEN’S PICKUP BASKETBALL: Players dribble up and down the court during an evening of friendly competition. Lyman C. Hunt Middle School, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $3; preregister at meetup.com. Info, ET 540-1089. | I.19 FR

SEVEN DAYS

kids

SONG CIRCLE: Singers and musicians congregate for an acoustic session of popular folk tunes. Godnick Adult Center, Rutland, 7:15-9:15 p.m. Donations. Info, 775-1182.

BONE BUILDER EXERCISE & OSTEOPOROSIS CLASSES: Folks of all ages ward off osteoporosis in this exercise and prevention class. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 10:40-11:40 a.m. Free. Info, 223-3322.

GENTLE YOGA IN RICHMOND: A gong savasana closes out an all-levels class benefiting the Williston Community Food Shelf. Partial proceeds are donated. Balance Yoga, Richmond, 11 a.m.-noon. $10; preregister. Info, balanceyogavt@gmail.com.

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free for members and first-timers. Info, 651-8773.

talks

RACHEL ZINMAN: No prior yoga experience is required to enjoy a reading, signing and Q&A by the author of Yoga For Diabetes: How to Manage your Health with Yoga and Ayurveda. Phoenix Books Essex, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 872-7111. WRITING CIRCLE: Words flow when participants explore creative expression in a lowpressure environment. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218.

THU.18 activism

MOTHER UP! MONTHLY MEETUP: Families discuss the realities of climate change and what that means on a local level. A vegetarian meal and childcare are provided. First Unitarian Universalist Society, Burlington, 5:307:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, heather@350vt. org.

art

Find visual art JO exhibits and C. I H | DB events in the art UT R&M ARC BA M section.

CURRENT EVENTS CONVERSATION: Newsworthy subjects take the spotlight in this informal discussion. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 878-4918. LAZ SCANGAS: “The Life and Cruel Death of Penn Station” lays out the history, construction, glory days and demise of an iconic New York City train station. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 6:30-7:45 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. TEDX BROWNELL LIBRARY: Lifelong learners watch TED Talk videos centered on the theme of “Our Future.” Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955.

tech

TECH HELP WITH CLIF: Electronics novices develop skill sets applicable to smartphones, tablets and other gadgets. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, noon & 1 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-6955.

theater

VERMONT SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL 2018 SEASON GENERAL AUDITIONS: Trained actors vie for roles in well-known works by the Bard. North End Studios, Burlington, 5-9 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, jena@ vermontshakespeare.org.

words

his latest title, Lila & Theron. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 482-2878.

BILL SCHUBART: The awardwinning wordsmith discusses

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business

BIZCONVT: Attendees forge new business connections during a day of coffee and conversation, seminars, and an exhibitor showcase. Hotel Burlington & Conference Center, South Burlington, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Prices vary. Info, marianne@ eventmoguls.com. FRANKLIN COUNTY REGIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE MIXER: Friends and colleagues catch up in a relaxed environment. People’s Trust Company, St. Albans, 5:30-7:30 p.m. $5-8; preregister. Info, 524-2444. GROW YOUR BUSINESS WITH DIGITAL MARKETING: DIY tools such as blogging, emailing, video and social media are the focus of a workshop with Kim Dixon of Insights Marketing Solutions. River Bend Career and Technical Center, Bradford, 3-4 p.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, 882-8191.

community

VILLAGE FARM COMMUNITY FORUM: Area residents share their ideas for a unique property in the town of Pittsford. Light refreshments and childcare are available. Lothrop Elementary School, Pittsford, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 989-0480.

crafts

MANDALA ROCK PAINTING: Folks ages 13 and up recover from the holiday bustle by embellishing river stones with intricate circular designs. Calming

herbal tea warms hands and hearts. Norwich Public Library, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 649-1184. MOUNT MANSFIELD SCALE MODELERS: Hobbyists break out the superglue and sweat the small stuff at a miniature construction skill swap. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:308:30 p.m. Free. Info, 879-0765.

dance

ADVANCED CONTEMPORARY TECHNIQUE: Movers infuse technique with improvisation, composition and play. North End Studios, Burlington, 10-11:15 a.m. $15. Info, hannasatt@gmail.com. BALLROOM DANCING: Members of the University of Vermont Ballroom Dance Team teach new steps each week. Champlain Senior Center, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 316-1510. CONTEMPORARY DANCE: Hoofers explore movement from a decolonial perspective. Swan Dojo, Burlington, 7:30-9 p.m. $10; free for first class. Info, 210-577-1441. FOR REAL WOMEN SERIES WITH BELINDA: Git Ur Freak On: R&B and calypso-dancehall music is the soundtrack to an empowering sensual dance session aimed at confronting body shaming. Swan Dojo, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. $15. Info, bestirredfitness@ gmail.com.

environment

RICHMOND TOWN FOREST WORKSHOP: Locals offer their two cents on how the town can best utilize and care for 428 wooded acres. Camel’s Hump Middle School, Richmond, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, guyr@gmavt.net. VERMONT SOLAR OPTIONS: Ecoconscious community members learn about state and federal incentives and different methods for harnessing the power of the sun. Community Room, Hunger Mountain Co-op, Montpelier, 6-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, info@ hungermountain.coop.

etc.

JOB HUNT HELP: Community College of Vermont interns assist employment seekers with everything from résumé writing to online applications. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 2:30-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 745-1393.

fairs & festivals

VERMONT BURLESQUE FESTIVAL: Dozens of titillating performers bring a mix of class and sass to the Green Mountain State. See vermontburlesquefestival.com for details. Various Barre and Burlington locations, 5:30 p.m. $20-85. Info, cory@ vtburlesquefest.com.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘8 BORDERS, 8 DAYS’: A 2017 documentary puts a human face on the Syrian refugee crisis. Woodstock Town Hall Theatre, 7:30-9 p.m. Free. Info, 457-3981.

‘EXTREME WEATHER 3D’: See WED.17. MOUNTAINTOP FILM FESTIVAL: See WED.17. ‘WONDER OF THE ARCTIC 3D’: See WED.17.

food & drink

COMMUNITY LUNCH: Farm-fresh fare makes for a delicious and nutritious midday meal. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 309. AN INTRODUCTION TO INTUITIVE EATING: Ten principles promote a healthy relationship between the body, the mind, food and exercise. City Market, Onion River Co-op, Downtown Burlington, 5:30-6:30 p.m. $5-10. Info, 861-9700. UVM MEDICAL CENTER FARMERS MARKET: Locally sourced meats, vegetables, bakery items, breads and maple syrup give hospital employees and visitors the option to eat healthfully. Davis Concourse, University of Vermont Medical Center, Burlington, 2:30-5 p.m. Free. Info, 847-5823.

games

POKÉMON LEAGUE: I choose you, Pikachu! Players of the trading-card game earn weekly and monthly prizes in a fun, friendly environment where newbies can be coached by league leaders. Brap’s Magic, Burlington, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0498.

health & fitness

BEGINNER/INTERMEDIATE SUNSTYLE TAI CHI, LONG-FORM: Improved mood, greater muscle strength and increased energy are a few of the benefits of this gentle exercise. Winooski Senior Center, 6:45-8 p.m. Free. Info, 735-5467. BEGINNERS TAI CHI CLASS: Students get a feel for the ancient Chinese practice. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 223-3322. CHAIR YOGA: Students with limited mobility limber up with modified poses. Sangha Studio — North, Burlington, 2-3:15 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262. COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS: A 20-minute guided practice with Andrea O’Connor alleviates stress and tension. Tea and a discussion follow. Winooski Senior Center, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 233-1161. FORZA: THE SAMURAI SWORD WORKOUT: Students sculpt lean muscles and gain mental focus when using wooden replicas of the weapon. North End Studio A, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. $10. Info, 578-9243. GENTLE FLOW YOGA: Individuals with injuries or other challenges feel the benefits of a relaxing and nourishing practice. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 9-10 a.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com. HEALING THROUGH YOGA: Participants with a history of cancer boost their energy,


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

strength and flexibility. Sangha Studio — North, Burlington, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262. SLOW FLOW YOGA: Tailored to meet students’ needs, this foundational class facilitates overall wellness. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 7:30-8:30 a.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com. VINYASA FLOW: A well-balanced flow pairs movement with breath to create a stronger mind-body connection. Kismet Place, Williston, noon-1 p.m. $12. Info, 343-5084. Y12SR YOGA: Modeled on the structure of 12-step meetings, this class includes a group sharing circle and an intentional, themed practice. Sangha Studio — Pine, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 448-4262. YOGA: A Sangha Studio instructor guides students who are in recovery toward achieving inner tranquility. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 5-6 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

kids

BABY TIME: Books, rhymes and songs entertain tiny tots. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:15-10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. CHESS CLUB: Checkmate! Registered players face off in friendly bouts. Fairfax Community Library, 3:15 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 849-2420. READ TO ARCHIE: Budding bookworms join a friendly therapy dog for entertaining tails — er, tales. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:15-4:15 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

language

FRENCH CONVERSATION: Speakers improve their linguistic dexterity in the Romantic tongue. Bradford Public Library, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 222-4536.

IGLOOFEST: Electronic music from top DJs draws thousands of revelers to this popular outdoor festival. Jacques-Cartier Pier, Montréal. $20-1,000. Info, 514-904-1247.

music

JUST JAMMIN’: Music lovers dance, listen or join in with a group of local instrumentalists. Light supper items are

ARE YOU READY?: Attendees get schooled on aspects of disaster preparedness including staff training, insurance coverage and estate planning. Joseph C. Burke Education and Research Center. Joseph C. Burke Education and Research Center, Miner Institute, Chazy, N.Y., 1-3:30 p.m. Free. Info, 518846-7121, ext. 115.

talks

ARMCHAIR TRAVELS: No passport is required for this virtual tour of the Dominican Republic. Fairfax Community Library, 6:307:30 p.m. Free. Info, 849-2420. DAWN ANDREWS: The granddaughter of craftsman Stanley Lyndes considers family storytelling and humor in early 20th-century Vermont. BYO lunch. Vermont History Museum, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 479-8500. FINDING TRACTION: VERMONT TRAIL RUNNING PANEL: Local ultrarunners Aliza LaPierre, Kasie Enman and Lindsay Simpson share their thoughts following a showing of Finding Traction, a documentary about runner Nikki Kimball. Green Mountain Club Headquarters, Waterbury Center, 7-8:30 p.m. $5-8; free for kids under 12. Info, 244-7037. LUNCH & LEARN: Gladwyn Leiman discusses her journey to numerous Holocaust sites and recalls the events that took place at each of the locations. Ohavi Zedek Synagogue, Burlington, noon. $6. Info, 863-4214.

tech

TECH SUPPORT: Need an email account? Want to enjoy ebooks? Bring your phone, tablet or laptop to a weekly help session. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 5-7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-8291, ext. 302.

theater

‘ZIG ZAG WOMAN’ & ‘WASP’: Vermont Actors’ Repertory Theatre performers put on two short play by Steve Martin. Brick Box, Paramount Theatre, Rutland, 7:30 p.m. $20. Info, 775-0903.

words

KATHERINE ARDEN: Faced with the options of marriage or life in

FRI.19

for more info and to schedule a screening. Leave your name, number, and a good time to call back.

Email UVMVTC@UVM.EDU or visit UVMVTC.ORG

agriculture

PRECISION AGRICULTURE FORUM: Local and regional experts cultivate understanding of technologies, data, funding and other topics as they relate to farming. American Legion, St. Albans, 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. $10 includes lunch; preregister. Info, farmerswatershedalliancenw@ gmail.com.

• Healthy adults, ages 18 – 50 • 7-month vaccine study • Earn up to $1900 in compensation

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art

Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section.

comedy

BOB MARLEY: New England’s “King of Comedy” delivers big laughs. Paramount Theatre, Rutland, 8 p.m. $25-40. Info, 775-0903. STEVE TAUBMAN: Hypnosis and comedy meet in a family-friendly show with opportunities for audience participation. Colchester High School, 8-10 p.m. $10-15. Info, 343-8829.

community

FEAST TOGETHER OR FEAST TO GO: Senior citizens and their guests catch up over a shared meal. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, noon-1 p.m. $7-9; preregister. Info, 262-6288.

crafts

CRAFTY CRAP NIGHT: Participants bring supplies or ongoing projects and an adventurous attitude to share creative time with other people in recovery. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150. KNIT NIGHT: Fiber fanatics make progress on projects while chatting in front of a fireplace. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955.

dance

ADVANCED CONTEMPORARY TECHNIQUE: See THU.18, 10:3011:45 a.m. BALLROOM & LATIN DANCING: Learn new moves with Ballroom Nights, then join others in a dance social featuring the waltz, tango and more. Singles, couples and beginners are welcome. Williston Jazzercise Fitness Center, lesson, 7-8 p.m.; dance social, 8-9:30 p.m. $10-14; $8 for dance only. Info, 862-2269. FRI.19

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MONTH

CERTIFICATE

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CALENDAR 47

Find club dates in the music section.

ADULT DAY – WHAT, WHY, WHEN & HOW: Shelly Ehrman of Project Independence offers creative strategies for transitioning to a nonresidential support program for adults. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 223-2518.

Call UVM VACCINE TESTING CENTER at 802-656-0013

SEVEN DAYS

montréal

seminars

LAUREN MARKHAM: Nonfiction fans flock to a talk on the writer’s new work, The Far Away Brothers: Two Young Migrants and the Making of an American Life. See calendar spotlight. Phoenix Books Burlington, 6:30 p.m. $3. Info, 448-3350.

Participate in a Research Study and help develop a vaccine against Dengue Fever

01.17.18-01.24.18

BEGINNER-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: Basic communication skills are on the agenda at a guided lesson. Private residence, Burlington, 6 p.m. $20. Info, 324-1757.

NORTHERN VERMONT SONGWRITERS: Melody makers meet to share ideas and maximize their creativity. Call for details. Catamount Outback Artspace, St. Johnsbury, 6:45 p.m. Free. Info, 467-9859.

a convent, Vasya flees her home in the new novel The Girl in the Tower, discussed by the author. Phoenix Books Rutland, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 855-8078.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

TRICKY TRACKS: Explorers ages 3 through 5 and their adult companions learn about the comings and goings of furry and feathered friends. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 9-10:30 a.m. $8-10 per adult-child pair; $4 per additional child; preregister. Info, 434-3068.

available for purchase. VFW Post 309, Peru N.Y., 6 p.m. Free. Info, 518-643-2309.

HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS NEEDED


calendar FRI.19

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ECSTATIC DANCE VERMONT: Jubilant motions with the Green Mountain Druid Order inspire divine connections. Christ Episcopal Church, Montpelier, 7-9 p.m. $10. Info, 505-8011. QUEEN CITY TANGO MILONGA: Participants put their best feet forward in a lively social dance. Champlain Club, Burlington, Argentine tango lesson, 7-7:45 p.m.; milonga, 7:45-10:30 p.m. $5-10; free for tango lesson. Info, qct@queencitytango.org.

etc.

DBR & MARC BAMUTHI JOSEPH: Strings, movement and spokenword meet in Blackbird, Fly. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, 8 p.m. $15-36. Info, 863-5966.

fairs & festivals

VERMONT BURLESQUE FESTIVAL: See THU.18, 8 p.m. YANKEE SPORTSMAN’S CLASSIC: Hunting and fishing enthusiasts browse the wares of nearly 200 exhibitors during a long weekend of seminars, demos, kids’ activities and more. Robert E. Miller Expo Centre, Champlain Valley Expo, Essex Junction, noon-7 p.m. $5-11; free for kids under 3. Info, 877-0033.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section.

48 CALENDAR

SEVEN DAYS

01.17.18-01.24.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

‘CALL ME BY YOUR NAME’: A reception replete with hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar paves the way for two screenings of this 2017 drama about a relationship between a young man and his father’s research assistant. The Savoy Theater, Montpelier, reception, 4:30 p.m.; film, 5:30 & 8 p.m. $7.50-9.75; preregister; limited space. Info, 229-0598.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.17, 9:15 a.m.

health & fitness

ACUDETOX: Attendees in recovery undergo acupuncture to the ear to propel detoxification. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150. ADVANCED TAI CHI CLASS: Participants keep active with a sequence of slow, controlled movements. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3322. BONE BUILDER EXERCISE & OSTEOPOROSIS CLASSES: See WED.17. BUTI YOGA: See WED.17, 10-10:45 a.m. & 6-7 p.m. FELDENKRAIS AWARENESS THROUGH MOVEMENT: Aches and pains, be gone! The physically challenged to the physically fit increase flexibility and body awareness with this form of somatic education. The Wellness Collective, Burlington, 12:30-1:30 p.m. $10. Info, 560-0186. FRIDAY NIGHT POWER YOGA: Practitioners get their sweat on during a full-body, flow-style mindful workout. Kismet Place, Williston, 5:15-6:15 p.m. $12. Info, 343-5084. IT WAS ALL A DREAM: AN OLD SCHOOL HIP HOP BLACK LIGHT EXPERIENCE: Body paint and glow sticks illuminate an upbeat flow yoga class. Wear neon or bright clothing. Sangha Studio — Pine, Burlington, 7-8:15 p.m. $5-10. Info, 448-4262. LIVING RECOVERY YOGA: An all-levels class targets those in addiction recovery or affected by the addictive behavior of others. Sangha Studio — Pine, Burlington, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

‘EXTREME WEATHER 3D’: See WED.17.

RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: See WED.17.

‘PAUL ROBESON: THE TALLEST TREE IN OUR FOREST’: Cinephiles screen this 1977 documentary about the 20thcentury singer, actor and activist in honor of the 50th year since Martin Luther King Jr.’s death. Newman Center, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 7 p.m. Donations. Info, serious_61@yahoo.com.

REFUGE RECOVERY: A LOVE SUPREME: Buddhist philosophy is the foundation of this mindfulness-based addictionrecovery community. Turning Point Center, Burlington, noon. Free. Info, 861-3150.

‘WONDER OF THE ARCTIC 3D’: See WED.17.

food & drink

IN THE DARK: A NIGHT OF STOUTS (AND STEWS): A seminar presented by the Green Mountain Beer Institute serves as an appetizer to a hearty dinner buffet of stews, bread and desert. The Woods Lodge, Northfield, 6 p.m. $28-35; preregister. Info, 778-0205. SIMON PEARCE BEER DINNER: Zero Gravity craft brews complement palate-pleasing eats. Simon Pearce Restaurant, Quechee, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Cost of food and drink; preregister; limited space. Info, 295-3655.

TAI CHI FOR ALL LEVELS: Instructor Shaina shares the fundamentals of Yang style, including standing and moving postures. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 9-10 a.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com.

kids

ACORN CLUB STORY TIME: Little ones up to age 4 gather for read-aloud tales. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 748-8291. EARLY-BIRD MATH: Books, songs and games put a creative twist on mathematics for tots ages 2 through 5. Richmond Free Library, 11-11:45 a.m. Free. Info, 434-3036. FAMILY MOVIE: Parents and tots take their seats for an all-ages flick. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

GROOVAROO: Parents and caregivers bond with their babies through soulful movement with a certified babywearing dance teacher. Visit littleartsyfaces.com for a list of approved carriers. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10-10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216.

talks

LEXI & LINNAEA SHEAR: Two Montpelier Green Mountain Club members share a slideshow from their mother-daughter hike on the Long Trail. T.W. Wood Gallery, Montpelier, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 262-6035.

LEGO FUN: Kiddos build creatively with colorful blocks. Tots under 8 require a caregiver. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

STORY TIME: Babies, toddlers and preschoolers drop in for books, rhymes, songs and activities. Winooski Memorial Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 655-6424.

lgbtq

QTPOC GAME NIGHT: Queer and trans people of color gather to play favorite board and card games. Pride Center of Vermont, Burlington, 6-9 p.m. Free. Info, sunshine@pridecentervt.org.

montréal

IGLOOFEST: See THU.18.

music

Find club dates in the music section. FRIDAY NIGHT WINE DOWN: Locals welcome the weekend with the musical stylings of Erin Cassels-Brown. Elfs Farm Winery & Cider House, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 6-9 p.m. Free. Info, 518-563-2750. HOT SARDINES: Old sounds feel new when the New York-based ensemble serves up a jazzy repertoire spanning the decades. See calendar spotlight. Fuller Hall, St. Johnsbury Academy, 7 p.m. $15-53. Info, 748-2600. MYRA FLYNN ALBUM RELEASE CONCERT: Musicians Paul Boffa and Dave Grippo join the soulful songstress on numbers from her latest offering, Never Mind the Mourning. Shelburne Vineyard, 6-10 p.m. $10. Info, 985-8222. RIYAAZ QAWWALI: Dating back more than 700 years, the Sufi music tradition reaches new ears, courtesy of this Texasbased ensemble. Spaulding Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 8 p.m. $17-30. Info, 603-646-2422. WINTER WINE DOWN MUSIC SERIES: Oenophiles let loose with live music by Carol Ann Jones, award-winning wine and mouthwatering eats. Snow Farm Vineyard, South Hero, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 372-9463.

art

Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section.

cannabis

CBD 101: HEMP FOR WINTER SPORTS ATHLETES & WEEKEND WARRIORS: Experts elucidate the painrelieving attributes of cannabidiol. Burke Mountain, East Burke, 12:30-1 p.m. Free. Info, 424-7642.


MUSIC WITH ROBERT: Sing-alongs with Robert Resnik hit all the right notes. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. STORY TIME: Picture books, songs, rhymes and puppets make for a memorable morning. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Neighbors stay engaged with current issues by connecting with social justice groups amid music, poetry and activities. Plainfield Town Hall Opera House, 10 a.m.noon. Free. Info, theplainfieldresistancefair@gmail.com.

community FR LI I.19 WA | MU SIC | RIYAAZ QAW

tech

TECH TUTOR: Techies answer questions about computers and devices during one-on-one help sessions. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 4-6 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-4918.

theater

NEW WORKS NOW 5.0: A showcase of plays-in-progress features readings of scripts by Stephanie Everett, Rebekah Greer Melocik and Victor Lesniewski, and Jane Burgoyne. Barrette Center for the Arts, White River Junction, 7:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 296-7000. THIRSTY THEATER: Emmy Award winner Gordon Clapp and Susan Haefner perform The Duel, a 10-minute play by Jack Neary. The Filling Station, White River Junction, 9 p.m. Free. Info, 296-7000. ‘ZIG ZAG WOMAN’ & ‘WASP’: See THU.18.

words

FRIDAY MORNING WORKSHOP: Wordsmiths offer constructive criticism on works in progress by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104.

QUEEN CITY MEMORY CAFÉ: People with memory loss accompany their caregivers for coffee, conversation and entertainment. Thayer House, Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 656-4220.

crafts

MAKE EARRINGS & DRINK MEAD: A LAID BACK AFFAIR: Four mead samples fuel creative individuals who construct eye-catching baubles. Arrive 15 minutes early to buy tickets on-site. Colchester’s Mead Hall, 5-6 p.m. $25; limited space. Info, bmeeartdesign@gmail.com.

dance

CONTRA DANCE: Luke Donforth calls the steps at a spirited social dance with music by Turning Stile. Capital City Grange, Berlin, instruction session, 7:35 p.m.; dance, 8-11 p.m. $5-15. Info, 249-7454. ERB DANCE COMPANY AUDITIONS: Movers vie for full company, junior company and understudy spots in this Plattsburgh, N.Y.-based modern dance troupe. 15 McKinely Ave., Plattsburgh, N.Y., 1:30-3:30 p.m. Free. Info, 617-515-4242.

etc.

SAT.20

GROWN-UPS PLAYDATE: Adults unleash their inner child for an evening of golf contests, shuffleboard, beverages and raffles to benefit Wonderfeet Kids’ Museum. Stonehenge Indoor Golf, Rutland, 7-11 p.m. $40; preregister; for ages 21 and up. Info, 282-2678.

CHAMPLAIN VALLEY AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL MEETING: Area members and interested individuals gather with the goal of tackling human-rights issues. Essex Police Department, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 238-7634.

INDEPENDENT COMMUNITY MEETING PLACE: Brainstorming leads to forming activity groups for hobbies such as flying stunt kites and playing music. Presto Music Store, South Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 658-0030.

activism

MARCH FOR OUR FUTURE: Youth and their allies make strides for human rights by proceeding to the Vermont statehouse lawn for speakers and performers. Montpelier City Hall, 1-3 p.m. Free. Info, march4ourfuture@gmail.com. PLAINFIELD RESISTANCE FAIR: JANUARY 20, ONE YEAR LATER:

LEGAL CLINIC: Attorneys offer complimentary consultations on a first-come, first-served basis. 274 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 383-2118. SKI TO DINE: A four-course dinner rewards cold-weather warriors who complete a guided 10-kilometer ski. Rikert Nordic

Center, Middlebury, 2-9 p.m. $60; preregister. Info, 247-6735.

fairs & festivals

VERMONT BURLESQUE FESTIVAL: See THU.18, 7:50 a.m. YANKEE SPORTSMAN’S CLASSIC SHOW: See FRI.19, 9 a.m.-7 p.m.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘CHASING CORAL’: A 2017 documentary offers a deep dive into the disappearance of underwater reefs. Dana Auditorium, Sunderland Language Center, Middlebury College, 3 & 8 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168. ‘EXTREME WEATHER 3D’: See WED.17. ‘THE MAN’: James Earl Jones stars in the 1972 critically acclaimed account of the first African American president, shown on 16mm film. Newman Center, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 7 p.m. Donations. Info, serious_61@ yahoo.com. MOVIE: Snacks are provided at a showing of a popular flick. Call for details. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. ‘MURDER, MY SWEET’: Dick Powell stars as a hard-boiled detective in this quintessential film noir. Norwich Public Library, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 649-1184. ‘WONDER OF THE ARCTIC 3D’: See WED.17.

food & drink

AGRICOLA FARM DINNER CLUB: Authentic Italian cuisine comes alive in a rustic 1850s Victorian farm house. Agricola Farm, Panton, 5:30 p.m. $75 includes membership; BYOB; preregister. Info, alerellini@gmail.com. CALEDONIA WINTER FARMERS MARKET: Fresh baked goods, veggies, beef and maple syrup encourage foodies to shop locally. St. Johnsbury Welcome Center, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, cfmamanager@gmail.com. CAPITAL CITY WINTER FARMERS MARKET: Root veggies, honey, maple syrup and more change hands at an off-season celebration of locally grown food. City Center, Montpelier, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 793-8347. CHOCOLATE TASTING: With the help of a tasting guide, chocoholics of all ages discover the flavor profiles of four different confections. Lake Champlain Chocolates Factory Store & Café, Burlington, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 864-1807. FUNDRAISING DINNER: Foodies taste main courses, soups and desserts by the scoop. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, 4-7 p.m. $10. Info, 223-3322. VERGENNES FARMERS MARKET: Local food and crafts, live music, and hot eats spice up Saturday mornings. Kennedy Brothers Building, Vergennes, 9 a.m.noon. Free. Info, 233-9180. VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: See WED.17, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

ZODIAC-THEMED TASTING MENU: Guided by the stars, Suzanne Podhaizer of Every Table VT and Tessa Holmes of Blossom Whole Food Kitchen and Catering serve up seven collaborative courses. Blossom Whole Food Kitchen and Catering, Winooski, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $75; limited space; BYOB. Info, 338-1202.

health & fitness

FITNESS BOOT CAMP: Ma’am, yes, ma’am! Exercise expert Ginger Lambert guides active bodies in an interval-style workout to build strength and cardiovascular fitness. Middlebury Recreation Facility, 8-9 a.m. $12. Info, 343-7160. INTRO CROSSFIT CLASS: Folks looking to get fit bring a water bottle and sneakers and prepare to get their sweat on. Mountain Trail CrossFit, Colchester, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, erin@ mountaintrailcrossfit.com. NEWBIE NOON INTRO TO HOT YOGA: First-timers in loosefitting clothing get their stretch on in a comfortably warm environment. Hot Yoga Burlington, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 999-9963. OPEN STUDIO: Both Sangha Studio locations open their doors to the community for a full schedule of classes, teacher meet and greets, photo ops, snacks and more. Sangha Studio — Pine, Burlington, 7:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Info, 4484262. Sangha Studio — North, Burlington, 7:30 a.m.-5:15 p.m. Info, 448-4262. Free; preregister for classes. R.I.P.P.E.D.: Resistance, intervals, power, plyometrics, endurance and diet define this high-intensity physical-fitness program. North End Studio A, Burlington, 9-10 a.m. $10. Info, 578-9243.

kids

STORY TIME: See FRI.19, 10:30-11 a.m. STUFFED ANIMAL SLEEPOVER: Youngsters’ favorite toys spend

lgbtq

REASONING & INVESTIGATION AS TOOLS IN SPIRITUAL PRACTICE: Buddhist Tenzin Gache shares his knowledge during an educational program complete with a break for tea and discussion. Milarepa Center, Barnet, 1-5 p.m. Donations. Info, 633-4136.

DUTCH LANGUAGE CLASSES: Planning a trip to Amsterdam? Learn vocabulary and grammar basics from a native speaker. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, bheeks@ yahoo.com.

PRIDE YOGA: LGBTQ individuals and allies hit the mat for a stretching session suited to all levels. Sangha Studio — Pine, Burlington, 5-6:15 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

montréal

IGLOOFEST: See THU.18.

music

Find club dates in the music section. BARIKA: The horn-driven, Burlington-based band brings West African grooves to a lively performance. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe Mountain Resort, 7:30 p.m. $20. Info, 760-4634. BURLINGTON CHAMBER ORCHESTRA: Instrumentalists show their mettle in works by Mozart, Shostakovich and others. University of Vermont Recital Hall, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $10-40. Info, 863-5966. CATAMOUNT ARTS BLUEGRASS NIGHT: Jim Rooney and Bob Amos & Catamount Crossing are the featured performers during an evening chock-full of traditional tunes. Masonic Hall, Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. Donations. Info, 748-2600. NEWARK BOYS CHORUS: Members of this celebrated choir lift their voices as part of the college’s Martin Luther King Convocation Week. Praise dancer ShahKylah Morris also performs. McCarthy Arts Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 5 p.m. Free. Info, 654-2000. SWING NOIRE: An intimate show performed in the spirit of Django Reinhardt channels the early days of American hot jazz. Brandon Music, 7:30 p.m. $20; $45 includes dinner; BYOB; preregister. Info, 247-4295.

outdoors

BUTLER LODGE VIA NEBRASKA NOTCH HIKE: Ramblers on snowshoes keep a moderate-tostrong pace on a 6.2-mile trek. Contact trip leader for details. Free; preregister. Info, 899-9982.

VCAM ORIENTATION: Videoproduction hounds master basic concepts and nomenclature at an overview of VCAM facilities, policies and procedures. VCAM Studio, Burlington, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 651-9692.

sports

FIS TELEMARK WORLD CUP: More than 70 athletes from 11 countries are expected to compete in giant slalom, distance jumps and more over several days. Suicide Six Ski Area, South Pomfret, 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 457-6661.

talks

SUSAN KOCH: “Images and Impressions From the Polar Frontier” brings the arctic circle to the Green Mountain Stage. A vegetarian meal from Farmhouse Catering comes first. Unitarian Church of Montpelier, dinner, 6 p.m.; talk, 7:30 p.m. Free; $20 for dinner; preregister; limited space. Info, saddleshoes2@gmail.com.

theater

NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: ‘SAINT JOAN’: A young girl is called to drive the English from France in George Bernard Shaw’s classic play, shown on the silver screen. Paramount Theatre, Rutland, 2 p.m. $20. Info, 775-0903.

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NEW WORKS NOW 5.0: See FRI.19. THIRSTY THEATER: See FRI.19, Thyme, White River Junction, 6:30 p.m. ‘ZIG ZAG WOMAN’ & ‘WASP’: See THU.18.

words

JULIA ALVAREZ: A book signing and conversation conclude a reading by the Vermont author of How the García Girls Lost Their Accents and other works. Morristown Centennial Library, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 262-1356. POETRY EXPERIENCE: Rajnii Eddins facilitates a poetry and spoken-word workshop aimed at SAT.20

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CALENDAR 49

SATURDAY STORY TIME: Timeless tales and new adventures spark imaginations. Phoenix Books Burlington. Info, 448-3350. Phoenix Books Essex. Info, 872-7111. 11 a.m. Free.

language

NAMI VERMONT MENTAL ILLNESS & RECOVERY: Vermonters at this National Alliance on Mental Illness seminar brush up on coping strategies, available services and more. Clara Martin Center, Bradford Main Site, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 800-639-6480.

SEVEN DAYS

FRANKENSTEIN FEST: Families celebrate the 200th anniversary of Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein with a variety of STEM-based activities. See echovermont. org for the schedule of events. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Regular admission, $11.5014.50; free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848.

MINDFUL PARENTING: Moms and dads gain tools for practicing action over reaction. Kismet Place, Williston, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. $5-20. Info, 318-0564.

01.17.18-01.24.18

FAMILY ART SATURDAY: Creative projects inspired by a current exhibition ignite the imaginations of kids and caregivers. BCA Center, Burlington, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7166.

WEBBY’S ART STUDIO: Temporary and permanent exhibitions inspire specialized art activities for all ages. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Regular admission, $5-10; free for active military and kids under 5. Info, 985-3346.

seminars

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

YIN YOGA: Students hold poses for several minutes to give connective tissues a good stretch. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 8-9:30 a.m. $12. Info, studio@ zenbarnvt.com.

a night amid the stacks, then are reunited with their owners for a noontime slideshow the next day. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 5 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7216.


calendar « P.49

building confidence and developing a love of writing. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 1-3 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211. WRITING WORKSHOP: Aspiring wordsmiths hone their craft with help from Joni B. Cole, author of Good Naked: Reflections on How to Write More, Write Better and Be Happier. Waterbury Public Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 244-7036.

SEVEN DAYS

01.17.18-01.24.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

etc.

RUTLAND WINTER BRIDAL SHOW: Brides-to-be browse the latest fashions, vie for raffle prizes and mingle with industry professionals. Holiday Inn, Rutland, 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m. $6-7. Info, 459-2897. SOCIAL SUNDAY SERIES: Singersongwriter Jim Brtalik provides the tunes while parents and kids enjoy refreshments and a free beading workshop. Milton Art Center & Gallery, 1-3 p.m. Free. Info, 355-6583.

fairs & festivals

YANKEE SPORTSMAN’S CLASSIC SHOW: See FRI.19, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘EXTREME WEATHER 3D’: See WED.17. ‘FED UP’: University of Vermont’s Jennifer Laurent is on hand for a screening and discussion of this 2014 documentary examining connections between the food industry and America’s obesity epidemic. Shelburne Museum, 2 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 985-3346. ‘THE GREATEST THING THAT ALMOST HAPPENED’: Shown

FIS TELEMARK WORLD CUP: See SAT.20. WOMEN’S PICKUP SOCCER: Swift females shoot for the goal. Robert Miller Community & Recreation Center, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. $3; $50 for unlimited drop-in pass. Info, 864-0123.

talks

LISE ERICKSON: Curious about Iceland and the Faroe Islands? The speaker shows photos of her summer travels to these far northern regions. Craftsbury Public Library, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 586-9683.

MARK GREENBERG: Folk singer Woody Guthrie is the SI C HO subject of a lively presentahealth & fitness |S EP WI tion. Jewish Community of OL NG N BUTI YOGA: See WED.17, Zenbarn A NOI IM C Greater Stowe, 2 p.m. Free. Info, RE | CO Studio, Waterbury, 7-8 p.m. $12. URTESY OF J 253-1800. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com. ROBERT GRANDCHAMP: KARMA YOGA: Attendees pracCAPITAL CITY CONCERTS: Flutist “The Role of the Militia in the tice poses while supporting the Karen Kevra and pianist Jeffrey Revolutionary War” enthralls Richmond Food Shelf. Balance Chappell hit all the right notes history buffs. Ethan Allen Yoga, Richmond, 10:30-11:30 a.m. in “The French Connection.” Homestead Museum, Burlington, $10; $5 with a food donation. Unitarian Church of Montpelier, 2-3 p.m. Free. Info, 865-4556. Info, balanceyogavt@gmail.com. 3 p.m. $16-26. Info, info@ WILLIAM TORTOLANO: A capitalcityconcerts.org. RESTORATIVE YOGA WITH PowerPoint presentation GONG: Bathed in an ocean of COUNTRY CHORUS: New compete with music and comsound, participants engage in a members join instructor John mentary covers Italy’s Jewish gentle practice aimed at calming Harrison for ten weeks of fun, community. Temple Sinai, South the nervous system. Balance learning and singing. Twin Valley Burlington, 2-4 p.m. Free. Info, Yoga, Richmond, 6-7:30 p.m. Senior Center, East Montpelier, 862-5125. $20-25. Info, balanceyogavt@ 3:30-5 p.m. Free; preregister. gmail.com. Info, 223-6954. theater STRETCH & SIP YOGA: Yogis OLIVIER STANKIEWICZ: A French INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S at all levels do the downwardoboist showcases his technique VOICES DAY: Vermont facing dog before quenching and artistry. Paramount Theatre, Playwrights Edition: Female their thirst with a pint or flight Rutland, 3 p.m. $12-22. Info, voices take center stage in a of Switchback suds. The Tap 775-0903. showcase of unproduced plays Room at Switchback Brewing, SUNDAY OPEN MIC BRUNCH: and a potluck feast. Off Center Burlington, 9:45 a.m. $20; Listeners whet their whistles for the Dramatic Arts, Burlington, preregister; limited space. Info, from a build-your-own-Bloody 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 651-4114. Mary bar while aspiring theoffcenter@gmail.com. TRADITIONAL YOGA FLOW: musicians test their talents NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: Breath accompanies each onstage. Elfs Farm Winery & ‘YOUNG MARX’: Broadcast from transition during a vinyasa flow Cider House, Plattsburgh, N.Y., London, this new comedy spotfocused on body awareness and 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Free. Info, lights the early life of revolutionself-acceptance. Zenbarn Studio, 518-563-2750. ary socialist Karl Marx. Loew Waterbury, 9-10:15 a.m. $12. Info, Auditorium, Hopkins Center for studio@zenbarnvt.com. outdoors the Arts, Dartmouth College, TREES ON SKIS: WINTER TREE Hanover, N.H., 4 p.m. $10-23. kids ID: Nature lovers take to cross Info, 603-646-2422. FAMILY DROP-IN ART FUN: country skis to seek out local NEW WORKS NOW 5.0: See Creative projects for all age twig-and-bud varieties. Intervale FRI.19, 2 p.m. groups banish the winter blues. Center, Burlington, 1-3 p.m. Milton Art Center & Gallery, 1-3 $10-15; $15 for ski/boot rental; words p.m. Free. Info, 355-6583. preregister. Info, 434-3068. WRITING AS A SPIRITUAL FRANKENSTEIN FEST: See JOURNEY: Wordsmiths of all politics SAT.20. genres and experience levels DR. DAN FOR CONGRESS PEER-LED MINDFULNESS sharpen their storytelling skills CAMPAIGN LAUNCH: Supporters MEET-UP FOR TEENS: South with the help of creative join Daniel Freilich as he Burlington High School junior exercises. Fletcher Free Library, embarks on his quest for a seat Mika Holtz guides adolescents Burlington, 2-4 p.m. Free. Info, in the United States congress. toward increased awareness writelife1@hotmail.com. TRAIL BREAK taps + tacos, White through music, movement and River Junction, 2:30-4:30 p.m. other techniques. Stillpoint Free; preregister. Info, mik@ Center, Burlington, 9-10:30 a.m. drdanforcongress.com. Donations. Info, 720-427-9340. U M

BOLSHOI BALLET: ‘ROMEO AND JULIET’: The bitter rivalry between the Capulets and the Montagues plays out through dance in this on-screen production. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 12:55 p.m. $6-18. Info, 748-2600.

Find club dates in the music section.

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BALKAN FOLK DANCING: Louise Brill and friends organize participants into lines and circles set to complex rhythms. Ohavi Zedek Synagogue, Burlington, 3-6 p.m. $6; free for first-timers; bring snacks to share. Info, 540-1020.

sports

games

POKÉMON LEAGUE: See THU.18, noon-5 p.m.

dance

montréal

CHOCOLATE TASTING: See SAT.20.

community

COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS WITH THE CENTER FOR MINDFUL LEARNING: Peaceful people gather for guided meditation and interactive discussions. Burlington Friends Meeting House, 5-7 p.m. $10. Info, assistant@ centerformindfullearning.org.

Free; preregister. Info, info@ norwichhistory.org.

music

food & drink

Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section.

art

p.m. Free. Info, stevenorman@ fastmail.fm.

IGLOOFEST: See THU.18.

‘WONDER OF THE ARCTIC 3D’: See WED.17.

GAMES PARLOUR: Strategic thinkers bring favorite tabletop competitions to play with others. Champlain Club, Burlington, 2-8 p.m. $5. Info, orsonbradford@ gmail.com.

SUN.21

50 CALENDAR

on 16mm film, this 1977 TV movie follows a teenage athlete with leukemia. Newman Center, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 7 p.m. Donations. Info, serious_61@ yahoo.com.

TO GR AP HY

SAT.20

language

FRENCH CONVERSATION GROUP: Parlez-vous français? Native speakers and students alike practice the tongue at a casual drop-in chat. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 4-5:30

seminars

WINTER WORKSHOP: Energy Retrofits for Old Houses: Homeowners pick up tips for buttoning up their abodes. Norwich Historical Society and Community Center, 1:30 p.m.

MON.22 art

Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section.

business

FEMALE FOUNDERS SPEAKER SERIES: ‘Sustainability & Personal Care’: Vermont

business women share their entrepreneurial experiences. A Q&A, networking, appetizers and a cash bar round out the evening. Hotel Vermont, Burlington, 5:30 p.m. $15; preregister; limited space. Info, 651-0080.

dance

CONTACT IMPROV: Movers engage in weight sharing, play and meditation when exploring this style influenced by aikido and other somatic practices. Aikido of Champlain Valley, Burlington, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $4. Info, 864-7306. SALSA MONDAYS: Dancers learn the techniques and patterns of salsa, merengue, bachata and cha-cha. North End Studio A, Burlington, fundamentals, 7 p.m.; intermediate, 8 p.m. $12. Info, 227-2572.

education

CAMPUS TOUR: Potential students ages 16 through 24 check out a facility offering free housing, meals, career technical training, high school diplomas, driver’s licenses and job placement. Northlands Job Corps Center, Vergennes, 9:45 a.m.-noon. Free; preregister. Info, 877-0121.

environment

LET’S TALK TRASH: WHAT IT MEANS TO BE ZERO WASTE: Environmentally friendly folks hear about changes they can make to reduce their waste footprints. Jericho Town Library, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 829-8168.

etc.

JOB HUNT HELP: See THU.18, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. VERMONT FRESH NETWORK ANNUAL MEETING & LUNCHEON: Locavores looked ahead to initiatives planned for 2018. King Arthur Flour Bakery & Café, School and Store, Norwich, 10:15 a.m.-3:30 p.m. $15-25; preregister. Info, 434-2000.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘EXTREME WEATHER 3D’: See WED.17. ‘WONDER OF THE ARCTIC 3D’: See WED.17.

food & drink

FORGET-ME-NOTS BROWN BAG LUNCH: Women ages 65 and up meet for a midday meal. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Plattsburgh, N.Y., noon. Free. Info, 518-561-6920. LCRCC LEGISLATIVE BREAKFAST: Members of the business community connect with lawmakers at this morning meal hosted by the Lake Champlain Regional Chamber of Commerce. Trader Duke’s Restaurant & Lounge, South Burlington, 7:30-9 a.m. $27-31. Info, 877-686-5253. LEGISLATIVE BREAKFAST: Locals join the Rutland County Legislative Delegation and

Castleton University president Karen Scolforo for the first meal of the day. Franklin Conference Center, Rutland, 7:30 a.m. $15; preregister. Info, penny@ rutlandvermont.com.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.17, 6:30 p.m. MAGIC: THE GATHERING — MONDAY NIGHT MODERN: Tarmogoyf-slinging madness ensues when competitors battle for prizes in a weekly game. Brap’s Magic, Burlington, 6:30-10 p.m. $8. Info, 540-0498.

health & fitness

ADVANCED SUN-STYLE TAI CHI, LONG-FORM: Elements of qigong thread through the youngest version of the Chinese martial art. Winooski Senior Center, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 735-5467. ADVANCED TAI CHI CLASS: See FRI.19. BONE BUILDER EXERCISE & OSTEOPOROSIS CLASSES: See WED.17. BUTI YOGA: See WED.17. CAPOEIRA: A blend of martial arts, music and dancing challenges adults and kids. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 4:30-5:30 p.m. $12. Info, studio@ zenbarnvt.com. HERBAL REMEDIES FOR WINTER VITALITY: Mind and body benefit from traditional home concoctions, including apple cider vinegar infusions and teas. Bring a mug and a lidded glass jar. Railyard Apothecary, Burlington, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 495-2074. MEDITATION: A group practice including sitting, walking, reading and discussion promotes mindfulness. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com. RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: See WED.17. SEATED TAI CHI: Movements are modified for those with arthritis and other chronic conditions. Winooski Senior Center, 11 a.m.noon. Free. Info, 735-5467. YIN YOGA: See SAT.20, noon-1:15 p.m.

holidays

MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. CONVOCATION: Robert Lee IV, a direct descendant of Civil War general Robert E. Lee, delivers “The Cost of Silence: Asserting Our Responsibility in the Face of Injustice and Oppression. Chapel of Saint Michael the Archangel, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 654-2000.

kids

CHESS CLUB: Checkmate! Players make strategic moves and vie for the opposing king. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. CRAFTERNOON: Storytelling Rocks: A themed activity motivates children ages 6 and up to create. Fairfax Community


6h-summitschool011718.pdf

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1/15/18

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LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

Library, 3-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 849-2420. GO CLUB: Strategy comes into play during a 4,000-year-old game suitable for players in grades 1 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 5:306:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. KIDS’ YOGA: Young yogis strike a pose. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 3:30-4:15 p.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com. ROBIN’S NEST NATURE PLAYGROUP: Outdoor pursuits through fields and forests captivate little ones up to age 5 and their parents. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 10 a.m.-noon. Donations. Info, 229-6206. STORIES WITH MEGAN: Lit lovers ages 2 through 5 open their ears for exciting tales. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216.

language

ADVANCED-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: Language learners perfect their pronunciation with guest speakers. Private residence, Burlington, 4:30-6 p.m. $20. Info, 324-1757.

Marshfield, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

TUE.23 art

Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section.

business

RUTLAND YOUNG PROFESSIONALS JANUARY MIX: Clad in comfy clothes, area business people mingle while experiencing a salt cave, an aromatherapy station and more. Appetizers and non-alcoholic drinks are catered by Harvest Moon Café and Bakehouse. Pyramid Holistic Wellness Center, Rutland, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 775-4321.

community

FEAST TOGETHER OR FEAST TO GO: See FRI.19. TUESDAY VOLUNTEER NIGHTS: Helping hands pitch in around the shop by organizing parts, moving bikes and tackling other projects. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. Bike Recycle Vermont, Burlington, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 264-9687.

music

Find club dates in the music section.

FIS TELEMARK WORLD CUP: See SAT.20.

tech

TECH HELP WITH CLIF: See WED.17.

‘COME BLOW YOUR HORN’: Community members take on randomly selected roles for a reading of Neil Simon’s comedy. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, saddleshoes2@gmail.com.

words

HISTORICAL LAND USE CHANGE & THE WILDLIFE OF VERMONT: Biologist Kim Royar outlines how human influence has altered Vermont’s flora and fauna. United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Forest Supervisor’s Office, Rutland, 6-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 747-7900.

Green Mountain Playboys

The Rear Defrosters

Brian Slattery • Chaque Fots! Tim Jennings & Leanne Ponder Kick ‘Em Jenny • Big Night

ECUMENICAL FORUM: Expert scholar John Armstrong shows the film This Changed Everything as part of a gathering commemorating the 500th anniversary of the Reformation. Pomerleau Alumni Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 654-2000.

Dana & Susan Robinson

January 25-28

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section.

Granite Junction

Montpelier Gospel Choir & more!

all ‘round montpelier

‘EXTREME WEATHER 3D’: See WED.17.

tickets now on sale: summit-school.org

‘TELL THEM WE ARE RISING: The Story of Black Colleges and Universities’: This 2017 documentary schools viewers on historically black institutions of post-secondary education. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600. ‘WONDER OF THE ARCTIC 3D’: See WED.17.

food & drink

DROP-IN: Healthy After-School Snacks for Kids: Home cooks drop in for demos and leave with recipes, skills and a full belly. Community Teaching Kitchen, City Market, Onion River Co-op, Burlington South End, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 861-9700.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.17, 7 p.m.

health & fitness

50/50 POWER/YIN YOGA: Physical therapist Kyle McGregor designed this class to address the needs of cyclists and those with a sedentary lifestyle through a strengthening warm-up and restorative poses. Kismet Place, Williston, 4-5 p.m. $12. Info, 343-5084. AWARENESS THROUGH MOVEMENT LESSON: From reducing pain to improving mobility, this physical practice reveals new ways to live with the body. Come with comfy clothes and an open mind. The Wellness Collective, Burlington, 5:30-6:30 p.m. $10. Info, 504-0846. BEGINNER/INTERMEDIATE SUN-STYLE TAI CHI, LONGFORM: Improved mood, greater muscle strength and increased energy are a few of the benefits of this gentle exercise. South Burlington Recreation & Parks Department, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 735-5467.

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CALENDAR 51

MONTHLY BOOK GROUP FOR ADULTS: Behold the Dreamers by Imbolo Mbue sparks conversation. Jaquith Public Library,

environment

modern times theater

SEVEN DAYS

theater

SWING DANCING: Quick-footed participants experiment with different forms, including the Lindy hop, Charleston and balboa. Beginners are welcome. Champlain Club, Burlington, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $5. Info, 448-2930.

Young Traditions Touring Group

01.17.18-01.24.18

sports

INTERMEDIATE & ADVANCED WEST COAST SWING: Fun-loving folks learn the smooth, sexy stylings of modern swing dance. North End Studio A, Burlington, 7-9 p.m. $11-16. Info, burlingtonwestie@gmail.com.

Scott Ainslie

DANCE, PAINT, WRITE: DROP-IN: Creative people end their day with an energetic meditation, music, movement, intuitive painting, free writing and de-stressing. Expressive Arts Burlington, 7-9 p.m. $15. Info, 343-8172.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: American Sign Language: Bring a bag crafts lunch to COMMUNITY practice the CRAFT NIGHT: system of comMakers stitch, spin, SA munication using H T.2 knit and crochet their OC 0|T visual gestures. ALKS | SUSAN K way through projects Kellogg-Hubbard Library, while enjoying each other’s Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. company. Fletcher Free Library, Info, 223-3338. Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, SPANISH GROUP CLASSES: 863-3403. Speakers brush up on their language skills en español. New dance Moon Café, Burlington, 5-6:30 BEGINNER WEST COAST SWING p.m. $25. Info, maigomez1@ & FUSION DANCING: Pupils get hotmail.com. schooled in the fundamentals of partner dance. North End montréal Studio B, Burlington, 8-9 p.m. IGLOOFEST: See THU.18. $11-16. Info, burlingtonwestie@ gmail.com.

David Greely & blake miller

etc.


calendar BRANDON FITNESS BOOT CAMP: Hop to it! Get fit with strength, endurance, agility and coordination exercises. Otter Valley North Campus Gym, Brandon, 5-6 p.m. $12. Info, 343-7160. DE-STRESS YOGA: A relaxing and challenging class lets healthy bodies unplug and unwind. Balance Yoga, Richmond, 5:45-7 p.m. $14. Info, 434-8401. GENTLE FLOW YOGA: See THU.18.

LOW-IMPACT FITNESS BOOT CAMP: Strength, agility, coordination and heart-healthy exercises are modified for folks of all ability levels. Charlotte Senior Center, 9:15-10 a.m. $10. Info, 343-7160. PEACEFUL WARRIOR KARATE: Martial-arts training promotes healthy living for those in recovery. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 861-3150. PILATES: Active bodies utilize core strength, build body awareness, improve posture and alleviate pain with this innovative system of exercise. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 7:30-8:30 a.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com.

52 CALENDAR

SEVEN DAYS

01.17.18-01.24.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

PRENATAL YOGA: Moms-to-be prepare their bodies for labor and delivery. Women’s Room, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. $15. Info, 829-0211. REIKI CLINIC: Thirty-minute treatments promote physical, emotional and spiritual wellness. JourneyWorks, Burlington, 3-5:30 p.m. $10-30; preregister. Info, 860-6203. R.I.P.P.E.D.: See SAT.20, 6-7 p.m. VINYASA FLOW: See THU.18. YOGA AT THE WINOOSKI VFW: Certified instructors guide veterans and their families through a series of poses. Arrive five to 10 minutes early. Second floor, Winooski VFW Hall, 6-7 p.m. Donations. Info, 655-9832.

kids

CREATIVE TUESDAYS: Artists exercise their imaginations with a variety of craft materials. Kids under age 8 must be accompanied by an adult. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 3:15-4:45 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. PRESCHOOL STORY HOUR: MUSIC WITH CAITLIN: Imaginations blossom when kids up to age 6 engage in themed tales and activities. Fairfax Community Library, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 849-2420. SPANISH MUSICAL KIDS: Amigos ages 1 through 5 learn Latin American songs and games with Constancia Gómez, a native Argentinean. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:45 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216.

BROWN BAG BOOK CLUB: Readers voice opinions about The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

STORY TIME FOR BABIES & TODDLERS: Picture books, songs, rhymes and puppets arrest the attention of children and their caregivers. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9:10-9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. STORY TIME FOR PRESCHOOLERS: Picture books, songs, rhymes and early math tasks work youngsters’ mental muscles. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

language

BUTI YOGA: See WED.17.

TRAPP FAMILY LODGE CROSS COUNTRY SKI CENTER’S 50TH ANNIVERSARY: A cash bar and complimentary appetizers fuel revelers for a short film and a Q&A with Johannes Von Trapp and his son, Sam. Vermont Ski and Snowboard Museum, Stowe, 5-8 p.m. $10. Info, 253-9911.

GENTLE YOGA IN RICHMOND: See WED.17.

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section.

‘LA CAUSERIE’ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Native speakers and learners are welcome to pipe up at an unstructured conversational practice. El Gato Cantina, Burlington, 4:30-6 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0195. LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: ITALIAN: Speakers hone their skills in the Romance language over a bag lunch. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338. PAUSE-CAFÉ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Frenchlanguage fanatics meet pour parler la belle langue. Meet in the back room. ¡Duino! (Duende), Burlington, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 430-4652. SOCIAL GATHERING: Those who are deaf or hard of hearing or want to learn American Sign Language get together to break down communication barriers. The North Branch Café, Montpelier, 4-6 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 595-4001.

montréal

IGLOOFEST: See THU.18.

music

Find club dates in the music section. OPEN JAM: Instrumentalists band together for a free-flowing musical hour. Borrow an instrument or bring your own. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 300.

seminars

MEDICARE & YOU: AN INTRODUCTION TO MEDICARE: Members of the Central Vermont Council on Aging clear up confusion about the application process and plan options. Central Vermont Council on Aging, Barre, 3-5 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 479-0531.

words

Valley, Burlington, 9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 985-8228.

film

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HATHA YOGA FLOW: This practice provides a great stretch and strengthens the body through a combination of sustained and flowing poses. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 5:30-6:45 p.m. $12. Info, studio@zenbarnvt.com.

STEAM TUESDAYS: Creative activities are based in science, technology, engineering, art and math. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:15-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

BOOK LAUNCH: Terry Mosher honors his late brother, the writer Howard Frank Mosher, with a reading from his short story collection Points North. Hazen Union School, Hardwick, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 472-5533.

M

‘13TH’: Director Ava DuVernay’s 2016 documentary takes a hard look at the role of race in the United States justice system. Mt. Mansfield Union High School, Jericho, 6-8 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, david.alofsin@ cesuvt.org.

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CREATIVE NONFICTION WORKSHOP: Folks give feedback on essays, poetry and journalism written by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104. SEARCH FOR MEANING DISCUSSION GROUP: Readers reflect on A New Earth: Awakening to Your Life’s Purpose by Eckhart Tolle. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Plattsburgh, N.Y., 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 518-561-6920. WINTER LITERATURE READING SERIES: Ambitious readers cover selected pages of George Eliot’s Middlemarch: A Study of Provincial Life. 110 Main St., Suite 3C, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104.

‘EXTREME WEATHER 3D’: See WED.17. ‘GET LOW’: Bill Murray and Robert Duvall star in a drama about a 1930s hermit who throws his own funeral party during his lifetime. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600. ‘I, CLAUDE MONET’: Drawing on more than 2,500 letters, this film, shown as part of the Architecture + Design Film Series, paints a portrait of the influential impressionist artist. Burlington City Hall Auditorium, 6 p.m. Free. Info, adfilmseries@ gmail.com. ‘WONDER OF THE ARCTIC 3D’: See WED.17.

food & drink

art

THE ART AND SCIENCE OF KOMBUCHA: Nutritionist Suzanna Bliss provides stepby-step instruction for making the beneficial fermented tea. Participants take home a starter culture. City Market, Onion River Co-op, Downtown Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. $5-10. Info, 861-9700.

cannabis

COMMUNITY MEAL: Diners dig into a hot lunch. United Church of Johnson, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 635-1247.

WED.24 Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section.

GREENER DRINKS: See WED.17.

crafts

COMMUNITY SUPPER: See WED.17.

CONTACT IMPROV: See WED.17.

MEAL IN A MUG: Home cooks learn to prepare scrumptious microwave dishes. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955.

DROP-IN HIP-HOP DANCE: See WED.17.

VERMONT FARMERS MARKET: See WED.17.

etc.

games

FIBER RIOT!: See WED.17.

dance

DEATH CAFÉ: Folks meet for a thought-provoking and respectful conversation about death, aimed at accessing a fuller life. Pyramid Holistic Wellness Center, Rutland, 7-9 p.m. Free; donations accepted. Info, 353-6991. NURSING BEYOND A YEAR MEET-UP: Breastfeeding parents connect over toddler topics such as weaning and healthy eating habits. Aikido of Champlain

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.17. MAH JONGG: Players of all levels enjoy friendly bouts of this tile-based game. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 1-3:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

health & fitness

ATHLETES PRIMAL FLOW: See WED.17. BONE BUILDER EXERCISE & OSTEOPOROSIS CLASSES: See WED.17.

CHAIR TAI CHI: See WED.17.

GENTLE YOGA IN WATERBURY: See WED.17. GINGER’S EXTREME BOOT CAMP: See WED.17. KICK THE SUGAR HABIT: Clinical herbalist Barb Alpert helps sweets addicts balance their cravings with new, healthy patterns. Community Room, Hunger Mountain Co-op, Montpelier, 6-7:30 p.m. $3-5; preregister. Info, info@hungermountain.coop. NIA WITH LINDA: See WED.17. PRIMAL CORE FLOW: See WED.17. RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: See WED.17. RESILIENCE FLOW: See WED.17. Wednesday Guided Meditation: See WED.17.

including selections from her recent album If All I Was Was Black. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $15-52. Info, 863-5966. MUSICIANS FROM MARLBORO: Skilled renditions of works by Beethoven, Penderecki and Brahms charm classical connoisseurs. A discussion with the artists follows. See calendar spotlight. Spaulding Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 7 p.m. $17-30. Info, 603-646-2422.

seminars

A NIGHT OF HYGGE: Participants prepare to survive the rest of the long winter through the Danish art of comfort. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955.

ZUMBA EXPRESS: See WED.17.

YOURS, MINE & OURS — MONEY WITH YOUR HONEY: See WED.17.

kids

sports

READ TO A DOG: Book hounds ages 5 through 10 curl up with a good story and a furry friend. Fairfax Community Library, 3:154:15 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 849-2420. READ TO DAISY: Budding bookworms join a friendly canine for ear-catching narratives. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-6956. SCIENCE & STORIES: BELUGAS IN THE BASIN: Tots have a whale of a time exploring the question of large aquatic mammals in the Lake Champlain Basin. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Regular admission, $11.5014.50; free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 877-324-6386. STORY TIME: See WED.17. STORY TIME FOR PRESCHOOLERS: See TUE.23. WEDNESDAY STORY TIME: See WED.17. YOGA FOR KIDS: See WED.17. YOUTH IN ARTS PERFORMANCE: ‘NUGGET & FANG’: Produced by ArtsPower, this underwater tale follows the unlikely friendship between a shark and a minnow. Woodstock Town Hall Theatre, 10-11 a.m. $6. Info, 457-3981.

language

BEGINNER ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASS: See WED.17. INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL SPANISH CLASS: See WED.17. INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASS: See WED.17. LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: SPANISH: See WED.17.

montréal

IGLOOFEST: See THU.18.

music

Find club dates in the music section. MAVIS STAPLES: The dynamic diva lends her powerful pipes to an expansive repertoire,

WOMEN’S PICKUP BASKETBALL: See WED.17.

talks

FAITH EXAMINED: A faithbased discussion of the essay collection Christian Voices in Unitarian Universalism focuses on life’s big ideas. Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Plattsburgh, N.Y., 10:15 a.m. Free. Info, faithexamuufp@ gmail.com. MAEVE KIM: The experienced birder imparts her ornithological knowledge in “Vermont’s Birds and Our Agricultural Heritage.” Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, gmas@greenmountainaudubon. org. MICHAEL LANGE: A talk on the professor’s pageturner Meanings of Maple: An Ethnography of Sugaring taps into Vermont’s liquid gold. Steele Community Room, Waterbury Municipal Building, 7 p.m. Free. Info, waterburyhistoricalsociety@gmail.com. ‘REFLECTIONS ON COMMUNITY’: Panelists ponder questions such as the implications of remaining silent in the face of injustice. Dion Family Student Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 654-2000.

tech

TECH HELP WITH CLIF: See WED.17.

theater

‘DOUBLEWIDE’: Vermont Stage presents Stephen Spotswood’s play about a family whose American Dream is challenged by forces beyond its control. FlynnSpace, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $29.70-38.50. Info, 863-5966.

words

WRITING CIRCLE: See WED.17. m


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classes THE FOLLOWING CLASS LISTINGS ARE PAID ADVERTISEMENTS. ANNOUNCE YOUR CLASS FOR AS LITTLE AS $13.75/WEEK (INCLUDES SIX PHOTOS AND UNLIMITED DESCRIPTION ONLINE). SUBMIT YOUR CLASS AD AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTCLASS.

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COMPUTER CLASSES: 200 OFFERINGS AT CVUHS IN HINESBURG: Excel 1 and 2; Word 1, 2 and 3; File Management; Data Analysis; Adobe Photoshop; and Web Design. Full descriptions at access.cvuhs.org, or google access cvuhs. Senior discount. 10 minutes from exit 12. Location: CVU High School, 369 CVU Rd., Hinesburg. Info: 482-7194. CRAFT CLASSES: 200 OFFERINGS AT CVUHS IN HINESBURG: Pottery (10 choices), Bowl Turning, Metals Workshop, Woodworking, Welding, Carving a Spoon, Rug Hooking, Bracelet Making, Three Bag Sewing, Clothing, Basket Making, Needle Felting, Quilting, Cake Decorating, Knitting. Full descriptions at access.cvuhs.org, or google access cvuhs. Senior discount. 10 minutes from exit 12. Location: CVU High School, 369 CVU Rd., Hinesburg. Info: 482-7194. LANGUAGE CLASSES: 200 OFFERINGS AT CVUHS IN HINESBURG: French (three levels), Spanish (six choices), French or Spanish for Kids, Italian for Travelers, Beginning Mandarin (two levels), German (three levels)! Low cost, handson, excellent instructors, limited class size, guaranteed. Materials included with few exceptions. Full descriptions at access. cvuhs.org, or google access cvuhs. Senior discount. 10 minutes from exit 12. Location: CVU High School, 369 CVU Rd., Hinesburg. Info: 482-7194. NATURE CLASSES: 200 OFFERINGS AT CVUHS IN HINESBURG: 200 offerings for all ages. Beekeeping, Birding With Maeve Kim (four choices), Tree ID, Woodlot

Management, Growing Blueberries, Edible/Medicinal Plants, Odonates, Growing Mushrooms, Flower Arranging, Terrarium Making, Hoof Health, Animal Communication, Tree ID, Backyard Astronomy, Cat Behavior, Herbals (three choices), Soapmaking, Homesteading. Guaranteed. Full descriptions at access.cvuhs.org, or google access cvuhs. Senior discount. 10 minutes from exit 12. Location: CVU High School, 369 CVU Rd., Hinesburg. Info: 482-7194. BODY AND MIND CLASSES: 200 OFFERINGS AT CVUHS IN HINESBURG: Core Strength (Tue. and Thu.), Weight Training for Women, Cycling Conditioning, Strength Training, Yoga (six choices), Swing or Ballroom with Terry Bouricius, Hip Hop for Kids, Hip Hop for Adults, Jazzercise Dance Mixx, Tai Chi, Chi Kung, Voice-Overs, Guitar (two levels), Mandolin, Banjo, Ukelele, Mindful Meditation, Self-Hypnosis, Emotions/Health, Juggling. Low cost, excellent instructors, guaranteed. Materials included. Full descriptions at access.cvuhs.org, or google access cvuhs. Senior discount. 10 minutes from exit 12. Location: CVU High School, 369 CVU Rd., Hinesburg. Info: 482-7194. ART CLASSES: 200 OFFERINGS AT CVUHS IN HINESBURG: Watercolor with Ginny Joyner, Drawing 1 and 2, Zentangle, Pop-Up Cards, Acrylic Landscape, Oil Painting, Journal Sketching, and Calligraphy. Culinary Arts: one-night, hands-on classes where you eat well! Chinese Feast/Chef Jim McCarthy, Italian Cuisine/Chef Jim, German/Chef Jim, Vegetarian/Chef Jim, Middle Eastern, Persian, Chocolate, Argentinian, Paella, Vegetarian, Quiche, Fermented Foods, Ethiopian/Eritrean, Injera, Cake Decorating. Yum! Full descriptions at access.cvuhs.org, or google access cvuhs. Senior discount. 10 minutes from exit 12. Location: CVU High School, 369 CVU Rd., Hinesburg. Info: 482-7194. EMPOWERMENT CLASSES: 200 OFFERINGS AT CVUHS IN HINESBURG: Beekeeping, Birding (three choices), SAT Boot Camp, Memoir Writing, Songwriting, Mindfulness for Activists, Guided Imagery, Feldenkrais, Massage Therapy, Talks on: Politics, Mt. Philo, Donner Party. Also, Solar Energy 101, Bridge (two levels), Mah Jongg, Behavior, Reiki, Herbals

(three choices), Luscious Lotions, Juggling, VMAP Motorcycle Awareness, Hunter Education 101. Guaranteed. Full descriptions at access.cvuhs.org, or google access cvuhs. Senior discount. 10 minutes from exit 12. Location: CVU High School, 369 CVU Rd., Hinesburg. Info: 482-7194,

art FAMILY-FRIENDLY PAINT AND SIP: Join us for creative familyfriendly paint and sip! Led by instructors from the ONE Arts Center, each parent-child pair will receive two canvases for their paintings, as well as a warm cup of hot chocolate. Workshop themes will vary each month. We welcome ages 7 and up. Starts Jan. 27, last Sat. of every mo., 3-5 p.m. Cost: $60/2-hour class for parent & child (cost includes both). Location: Community Sailing Center, 505 Lake St., Burlington. Info: Amanda Phillips, 864-2499, amanda@ communitysailingcenter.org, sailingcenter.e-beans.net/adult_ programs/pntsip.html. ONE-DAY ART PLAYSHOP: Wingspan Studio invites you to bring your vision for the New Year to life! Creativity exercises, loosen-up drawing, paint exploration and guidance to start your “Vision for 2018” masterpiece. Open to all. No experience required. Give yourself and/or a friend an afternoon to settle, create and manifest what the future holds for you! Sat., Jan. 27, 11:15 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost: $160/ person. incl. all materials and a stretched canvas. Location: Wingspan Studio, 4A Howard St., Burlington. Info: 233-7676, maggiestandley@gmail.com, wingspanstudiovt.com.

Burlington City Arts

Call 865-7166 for info or register online at burlingtoncityarts.org. Teacher bios are also available online. ABSTRACT PAINTING: Explore the many exciting possibilities of abstract painting through a variety of fun demonstrations and exercises designed to help you open up and work intuitively. Experiment with paint of your choice (water-soluble oils, acrylics or watercolor) and a variety of other mixed media. Learn from fellow students and discuss techniques and ideas in a supportive setting. Beginners are welcome. Thu., Jan. 25-Mar. 1, 6-8:30 p.m. Cost: $225/person; $202.50/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166.

ADOBE LIGHTROOM: Learn how to easily upload, organize, edit and print your digital photographs using Adobe Lightroom. RAW file management, exposure/white balance corrections and printing high-quality archival inkjet prints on our Epson printers will be covered. Students will leave with the skills and confidence to join the digital lab as a member. Bring a Mac-compatible portable drive with your images to the first class. No experience necessary. Mon., Mar. 19-Apr. 23, 6-9 p.m. Cost: $275/person; $247.50/ members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. ADULT WHEEL DROP-IN: Curious about the pottery wheel? Spend a Friday night with our pottery instructors learning the basics of wheel throwing with clay. This is a great introduction to our studio for those who don’t have time for an eight-week class or who just want to have fun with other beginner potters. There is a $5 additional fee per clay piece to be kept, fired and glazed. No registration necessary, but space is limited. First come, first served. Groups larger than six people are encouraged to set up a private workshop. Fri., Jan. 26-May 18 (no class Mar. 6), 7:30-9 p.m. Cost: $10/person; $9/members. Purchase a drop-in card and get the 6th visit free! Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7157. BANGLES: Come check out the jewelry and fine metals studio by making your silver, copper or brass bangle. Open to all skill levels. All materials included. Thu., Feb. 15, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Cost: $37/person; $33.30/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. COLOR FILM PROJECTS: Learn how to scan, edit and print your color film and receive feedback on your work in this introduction to working with color film in a digital workflow. Film scanning basics, editing techniques and printing on our large format Epson archival color printers will be covered. This class will also explore ideas in contemporary photography through special readings, and we will discuss the technical, aesthetic and conceptual aspects of your work in supportive critique sessions. Thu., Mar. 29-May 17, 6-9 p.m. Cost: $360/person; $324/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. CONTEMPORARY FIGURE PAINTING: Intermediate and advanced painters, revitalize your painting practices with a contemporary approach to the figure. Use fresh color and dynamic composition to strengthen your personal expression. Work from live models each week, explore a variety of contemporary techniques with non-toxic water soluble oils and get supportive feedback in a small group environment. Figure

drawing experience is recommended. Wed., Mar. 21-May 2, (no class Apr. 25), 1:30-4:30 p.m. Cost: $270/person; $243/BCA members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405, Burlington. Info: 865-7166.

DIY DESIGN: MINI SUCCULENT GARDEN: Whether you are a master gardener or think you have a black thumb, you can design and grow your succulent garden. Using easy-to-care-for succulent plants and a variety of fun containers, you will come away with a fully planted mini garden of your own and plant care instructions. All materials provided. Registration required. Mon., Feb. 12, 6-8 p.m. Cost: $30/ person; $27/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. DIY DESIGN: SCREENPRINTED TOTE BAGS: Learn to pull a print from an existing silk screen and decorate your tote bag! We’ll discuss the process of creating silk screening from start to finish, and, using one of four designs, you will use fabric ink to create your washable tote bag that will be ready to take home and use at the end of the workshop. All materials provided. Registration required. Mon., Mar. 12, 6-8 p.m. Cost: $30/person; $27/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. DIY DESIGN: SUNPRINTS: Create unique prints using photo-sensitive paper and everyday objects. Local artist Laura Hale will lead you through this simple way to create beautiful artwork and will show you how to frame the results. All participants will leave with one framed sun print. All materials provided. Registration required. Mon., Apr. 30, 6-8 p.m. Cost: $30/person; $27/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. DIY DESIGN: TERRARIUMS: Join artist Laura Hale and create your custom-designed terrarium. You’ll learn how to choose the right plants and create the right soil conditions for them to thrive. You’ll leave with your custom creation and care instructions for keeping it healthy and

vibrant. All materials provided. Registration is required. Mon., May 14, 6-8 p.m. Cost: $30/ person; $27/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. DARKROOM CRASH COURSE: Explore the traditional, analog black-and-white darkroom! Learn how to properly expose black-and-white film, process film into negatives, and make silver gelatin prints. Students will leave with the skills and confidence to join the darkroom as a member. All film, paper and darkroom supplies included. Bring your manual 35mm or medium format film camera to the first class. No experience necessary. Mon., Mar. 19-Apr. 9, 6-9 p.m. Cost: $180/ person; $162.50/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. DARKROOM PHOTOGRAPHY PROJECTS: Refine your blackand-white darkroom skills and receive feedback on your work in this supportive, project-based class open to all levels of experience. Guided sessions to help you improve your printing and film processing techniques and discussion of the technical, aesthetic and conceptual aspects of your work will be included. Bring a selection of recent darkroom prints to the first class. Thu., Jan. 25-Mar. 15, 6-9 p.m. Cost: $360/person; $324/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. DIGITAL PRINTING CRASH COURSE: Are you comfortable with organizing, editing and sizing your digital photographs in Photoshop or Lightroom but have never printed your work? Are you curious about testing paper surfaces or printing large? This intensive workshop will go through all of the basics of printing to the large format, archival inkjet Epson printers at the BCA Photo Labs. Bring a selection of digital files prepped and ready to print on a Mac-compatible external hard drive. Option 1: Wed., Jan. 31, 6-9 p.m.; Option 2: Fri., Mar. 30, 10-1 p.m. Cost: $45/person; $40.50/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. DIGITAL SLR CAMERA: Explore the basic workings of the digital SLR camera and learn how to take the photographs you envision. Demystify f-stops, shutter speeds, sensitivity ratings and exposure, and analyze the basics of composition. Bring your camera and owner’s manual to the first class. Pair with Adobe Lightroom to learn how to edit and print your images. Option 1: Mon., Jan. 22-Mar. 5, 6:30-8:30 p.m. (no class Feb. 19); Option 2: Thu., Feb. 8-Mar. 15, 3:30-5:30 p.m.; Option 3: Tue., Apr. 3-May 15, 10-noon (no class Apr. 24). Cost: $180/person; $162/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166.


CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES

DOCUMENTARY STORYTELLING: Learn how to tell a compelling story with your photographs! This six-week class will introduce participants to the process of documentary storytelling and include discussions of subject matter, composition, editing and story structure. Group discussion and critiques as well as shooting assignments, readings and writing exercises will give participants the opportunity to begin a new photographic project or refine works in progress. Film or digital photography acceptable. Thu., Feb. 8-Mar. 15, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Cost: $180/person; $162/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. DRAWING: Learn a variety of drawing techniques including basic perspective, compositional layout and use of dramatic light and shadow. Students will work mostly from observation and will be encouraged to work with a variety of media including pencil, pen and ink, ink wash, and charcoal in this small group setting. All levels of experience, including beginners, are welcome. Wed., Jan. 24-Mar. 7 (no class on Feb. 14), 6-8:30 p.m. Cost: $255/ person; $229.50/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166.

EXPERIMENTAL DRAWING: Expand on your drawing skills, while discovering the possibilities of abstract drawing styles and compositions. A variety of drawing mediums, sizes and techniques will be explored, with plenty of flexibility to incorporate individual visions. Benefit from constructive feedback and gentle coaching in this supportive environment. Class price includes basic drawing materials. Prerequisite: Some drawing experience is recommended. Thu., Jan. 25-Feb. 15, 9:30-12:30 p.m. Cost: $180/person; $162/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. FAMILY ART SATURDAY AT BCA CENTER: Get creative and make art together! Families are invited to drop in to the BCA Center and enjoy an art activity inspired by our current exhibitions. On each scheduled Saturday, BCA will offer a different art-making project that will ignite the imaginations of kids and adults. Admission is free. Third Sat. of the month, 11-1 p.m. Location: BCA Center, 135 Church St., Burlington. Info: 8657166, burlingtoncityarts.org. FAMILY WHEEL DROP-IN: Explore BCA’s clay studio while hanging out with the family. Try the pottery wheel or create fantastic clay sculptures while our staff gives demonstrations.

There is a $5 additional fee per clay piece to be kept, fired and glazed. No registration necessary, but access to wheels is limited. Groups larger than six people are encouraged to set up a private workshop. All ages. Fri., Jan. 26-May 18, 5-7 p.m. Cost: $10/person; $9/members. Purchase a drop-in card and get the 6th visit free! Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7157.

will also review the work of a variety of cartoonists as inspiration for student work. Some basic drawing experience is encouraged; students should be comfortable with and enjoy doodling. BCA will provide all basic materials. Wed., Mar. 21-Apr. 25, 6-8:30 p.m. Cost: $255/person; $229.50/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166.

GLAZE CHEMISTRY: For ceramics artists, glazing can be a daunting and mysterious process: part alchemy, part magic and part pure luck. During this two-hour lecture, we will pull back the curtain to reveal the science behind this mysterious process. We will cover families or types of glazes, the breakdown of components in a glaze, common and less-common raw materials, and the basics of what you can do to start making and troubleshooting your glazes. Mon., Apr. 9, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Cost: $25/person; $22.50/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. GRAPHIC NOVEL: Learn the art of visual storytelling through this immersive class in the comics discipline. Students will learn a broad range of techniques for communicating with both words and pictures, with an emphasis on using pen and ink. The class

photo shoots, process and print digital photos and zines in our digital lab, experiment with film photography in our darkroom, and participate in supportive discussions and critiques. All supplies and cameras provided. Scholarships are available. Ages 14-18. No experience required. Fri., Feb. 2-Mar. 16 (no class Mar. 2), 4:30-6:30 p.m. Cost: $150/person; $135/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. JEWELRY: Learn the basics of creating metal jewelry. Techniques covered will include sawing, piercing, filing, annealing, soldering, texturing, cold connections, basic hollow construction, ring sizing and more, so that students can create at least two completed pieces. The class includes copper and brass and use of all basic tools, as well as studio access during the weeks of your class. Tue., Jan. 23-Feb. 27, 5:30-8 p.m. Cost: $255/person; $229.50/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166.

HIGH SCHOOL PHOTOGRAPHY: Tell your story with photographs in this six-week session for high school students! You will explore your ideas, go on group

LIFE DRAWING DROP-IN: Spend the evening with other local artists drawing from one of our experienced models. Please bring your drawing materials and paper. No preregistration is necessary. Ages 18 and up. Fri., Jan.

26-May 18, 7:30-9 p.m. Cost: $10/ person; $9/members. Purchase a drop-in card and get the 6th visit free! Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. MIXED-LEVEL JEWELRY: This is a less-structured fine metals jewelry class for students who would like to work on a specific project, brush up on their techniques or learn some new techniques with the aid of an instructor there to coach them. Open to all skill levels, but some experience is helpful for this open-style class. Tue., Mar. 13Apr. 17, 5:30-8 p.m. Cost: $255/ person; $229.50/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. MIXED-LEVEL WHEEL THROWING: Mixed-Level Wheel supports students across a range of skill and experience levels who have thrown on the wheel. This eight-week course is rooted in fundamentals and encourages individual projects. Demonstrations and instruction will cover centering, throwing, trimming and glazing, as well as forms and techniques determined by students. Prerequisite: wheel-throwing experience required. Option 1: Wed., Jan. 24-Mar. 21 (no class Feb. 14), BURLINGTON CITY ARTS

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1:30-4 p.m.; Option 2: Wed., Mar. 28-May 16, 9:30-noon; Option 3: Wed., Apr. 4-May 23, 1:30-4 p.m.; Option 4: Thu., Mar. 29-May 17, 6-8:30 p.m. Cost: $340/person; $306/members. Class includes first bag of clay; additional bags can be purchased separately. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. OIL PAINTING: Learn how to paint with non-toxic, watersoluble oils. With an emphasis on studio work, this class will begin with fun exercises. Using direct observational skills, we’ll work on still life and referencing photographs, and we’ll explore the landscape. Discover a variety of painting techniques and learn how to apply composition, linear aspects, form and color theory to your work. Beginners are welcome. Tue., Jan. 23-Mar. 20, 6-8:30 p.m. Cost: $340/person; $306/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166.

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PAINTING SEMINAR: COLOR HARMONY: Immerse yourself in the vibrant world of color in this one-day, hands-on seminar. Focus on the vital role of color harmony and how to achieve it. Guided exercises will stimulate awareness of color changes and temperatures and will show how to mix colors simply and accurately. Also, learn how various application techniques affect the appearance of color. Sat., May 5, 9:30-4 p.m. Cost: $100/ person; $90/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. PHOTOGRAPHING PAINTINGS & PRINTS: Learn how to take professional-quality digital images of your paintings or prints in this hands-on workshop in our lighting studio. Whether you’re applying to art school, submitting work for an exhibition or putting together a website, you’ll leave this workshop with techniques that improve your images and enhance your presentations. Bring up to five 2-D pieces no larger than 40 x 60 inches. Wed., Apr. 11, 6-9 p.m. Cost: $45/person; $40.50/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. PHOTOGRAPHING POTTERY & CERAMIC ART: Learn how to take professional-quality digital images of your ceramic work in this hands-on workshop in our lighting studio. Whether you’re applying to art school, submitting work for an exhibition or putting together a website, you’ll leave this workshop with techniques that will improve your images and enhance your presentations. Bring a selection of pieces. Wed., Apr. 18, 6-9 p.m. Cost: $45/person; $40.50/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. PHOTOSHOP CRASH COURSE: Learn the basics of photo editing and printing using Adobe

Photoshop in this three-evening intensive workshop. You’ll learn to upload and save images for print and the web, navigate the workspace and adjustment layers, and use basic editing tools. Bring images on a Maccompatible portable drive to class. No experience necessary. Mon., May 7-21, 6-9 p.m. Cost: $135/person; $121.50/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. PRINTMAKING: This introductory class will show you a whole range of printing techniques that can be used on their own or in combination to create unique artwork. Over six weeks, you’ll be introduced to the studio’s equipment and materials and learn techniques such as block printing with linoleum, collograph (a low-relief intaglio technique) and monoprinting. Thu., Jan. 25-Mar. 1, 6-8:30 p.m. Cost: $255/person; $229.50/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. RINGS: Come check out the jewelry and fine metals studio by making your silver ring. Open to all skill levels. All materials are included. Thu., May 3, 5:308:30 p.m. Cost: $37/person; $33.30/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. SEE.THINK.DO!: See.Think.Do! invites youth and adults to the BCA Center for an interactive arts experience. Visits begin in the gallery with inquiry-based exploration, lively discussion and active multidisciplinary learning. Programs conclude in the studio classroom where students explore artists’ processes and materials and create works of art inspired by exhibition themes. Groups may schedule a one- or two-part program, with tours lasting approximately one hour, and full programs lasting 1.5 to two hours. Weekly on Mon., Tue. & Fri., 9:30-11:30 a.m. Custom scheduled days and times are based on availability. Cost: $5/ per student; individuals and groups are invited to apply for a partial or full scholarship. Location: Burlington City Arts, 135 Church St., Burlington. Info: Melinda Johns, 865-7551, mjohns@burlingtoncityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org. SILKSCREENING: Expert screen printer Aaron David will introduce you to silkscreening and show you how to design and print t-shirts, posters, fine art and more! Students will learn a variety of techniques for transferring and printing images using hand-drawn, photographic or borrowed imagery. Students will learn how to apply photo emulsion, how to use a silkscreen exposure unit and how to print on a variety of surfaces. No experience necessary. Option 1: Wed., Jan. 24-Mar. 21, (no class Feb. 14), 6-8:30 p.m.; Option 2: Thu., Mar. 29-May 17, 6-8:30 p.m. Cost: $340/person; $306/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166.

WATERCOLOR: Learn how to paint with watercolor. This class will focus on observational painting from still life, figure, landscape and photos. Students will paint on watercolor paper and gain experience with composition, color theory, layering, light and shade. The class may move outdoors to paint en plein air on nice days! No experience necessary. Thu., Mar. 29-May 3, 6-8:30 p.m. Cost: $225/person; $202.50/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. WHEEL THROWING: This class is an introduction to clay, pottery and the ceramics studio. Students will work primarily on the potter’s wheel, learning basic throwing and forming techniques, while creating functional pieces such as mugs, cups and bowls. Students will also be guided through the various finishing techniques using the studio’s house slips and glazes. No previous experience needed. Option 1: Wed., Jan. 24-Mar. 14, 9:30-noon; Option 2: Wed., Jan. 24-Mar. 21 (no class Feb. 14), 6-8:30 p.m.; Option 3: Thu., Jan. 25-Mar. 15, 6-8:30 p.m.; Option 4: Wed., Apr. 4-May 23, 6-8:30 p.m. Cost: $340/person; $306/members. Class includes first bag of clay; additional bags can be purchased separately Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. WOODCUT: Discover the unique process of woodblock printing with local artist Ashley Stagner. Students will focus on fundamental relief printing techniques and will be able to transform their designs into unique prints. The class will then progress to more sophisticated processes, including multi-color printing and 2-3 color reduction block printing. Wed., Apr. 4-May 9, 6-8:30 p.m. Cost: $225/person; $202.50/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166.

Burlington City Arts Youth School Break Workshops

Choose from 1 to 5 days of art workshops for your child during Spring School Break. All basic supplies are included. Students must bring their bag lunch, and snacks will be provided. CRAZY CREATURES: Create awe-inspiring creatures out of the pages of your favorite book, from your favorite movie or your imagination. Will your creature have two or four heads? Will it be an animal or vegetable? You get to decide in this fun

one-day camp that lets you get creative, through drawing, painting and craft. Ages 6-8. Wed., Apr. 25, 8-3 p.m. Cost: $70/ person; $63/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. MINI WORLDS: Shrink down with us and create small beautiful worlds. Campers will be encouraged to explore a variety of craft media to develop tiny, intricate terrariums, doll houses or fairy worlds. Ages 6-11. Thu., Apr. 26, 8-3 p.m. Cost: $70/ person; $63/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166.

climbing FRIDAY NIGHT KIDS CLUB: Parents, enjoy an evening out while your children burn energy, develop coordination, build selfconfidence and practice group problem-solving under Petra Cliffs’ supervision. Kids will have the opportunity to experience the high ropes course, climb, play games, learn climbing knots and much, much more! Includes pizza. Ages 6+. Pre-registration required. Every Fri. night. Cost: $30/child includes climbing gear rentals and pizza. Location: Petra Cliffs Climbing Center, 105 Briggs St., Burlington. Info: Andrea Charest, 657-3872, andrea@petracliffs.com, petracliffs.com.

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PAINTING: This oneday camp is designed for the young painter who wants to go beyond the typical tempera. Join us at BCA’s painting studio to experiment with watercolors and acrylic on paper or canvas, large or small. Have fun while learning new techniques that will help you make even better paintings. Ages 6-11. Tue., Apr. 24, 8-3 p.m. Cost: $70/person; $63/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166.

DESIGNING AND PROTOTYPING YOUR NEXT APP WITH ADOBE XD: Adobe XD is an app for doing it all: wireframing, visual design, interaction design, prototyping, previewing and sharing. We will show you how to design and prototype a complete experience using the new Adobe XD. Learn tips and tricks to be more productive and create a great user experience. Thu., Jan. 25, 1-4 p.m. $20-30. Location: Black Box Theater, Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, 60 Lake St., Burlington. Info: 333-0312, programming@nhvt.aiga.org, aigavt-adobexdworkshop. eventbrite.com.

POTTERY WHEEL: This day is all about learning the basics of the ever-popular pottery wheel. Students will have all day to get their hands-on clay, spinning it into small bowls or cups to be fired and glazed by the studio. All items will be dishwasher safe and lead-free. Ages 6-11. Mon., Apr. 23, 8-3 p.m. Cost: $70/ person; $63/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166.

BOOKBINDING: Students will learn to make an Accordion book, a Pamphlet Stitch book and 7 different folded books. Supplies provided. Instructor: Chiyomi McKibbin. Jan. 27-28 (Sun. optional). Sat., 9:30 a.m.3:30 p.m.; Sun., 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat. only: $100 (member), $125 (non-member). Both days: $190 (member), $215 (non-member). Location: Helen Day Art Center, 90 Pond St., Stowe. Info: 2538358, programs@helenday.com, helenday.com.

dance DANCE STUDIO SALSALINA: Salsa classes, nightclub-style, group and private, four levels. Beginner walk-in classes, Wed., 6 p.m. $15/person for one-hour class. No dance experience, partner or preregistration required, just the desire to have fun! Drop in any time and prepare for an enjoyable workout. Location: 266 Pine St., Burlington, Info: Victoria, 598-1077, info@ salsalina.com. DSANTOS VT SALSA: Experience the fun and excitement of Burlington’s eclectic dance community by learning salsa. Trained by world famous dancer Manuel Dos Santos, we teach you how to dance to the music and how to have a great time on the dance floor! There is no better time to start than now. Mon. evenings: beginner class, 7-8 p.m.; intermediate, 8:159:15 p.m. Cost: $12/1-hour class. Location: North End Studios, 294 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: Jon Bacon, 3551818, crandalltyler@hotmail.com, dsantosvt.com.

PHOTOGRAPHY: Explore photography in our black-andwhite darkroom and digital lab! Campers will go on guided photo shoots and will create prints in this fun, hands-on day. Ages 9-11. Wed., Apr. 25, 8-3 p.m. Cost: $70/ person; $63/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166. POTTERY WHEEL: This day is all about learning the basics of the ever-popular pottery wheel. Students will have all day to get their hands into clay, spinning it into small bowls or cups to be fired and glazed by the studio. All items will be dishwasher safe and lead-free. Ages 6-11. Fri., Apr. 27, 8-3 p.m. Cost: $70/ person; $63/members. Location: Burlington City Arts, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: 865-7166.

to our tools and equipment, you have the opportunity to make something exciting and memorable. Intro level classes and workshops. All skill levels welcome. Schedule varies. Cost: $165/varies depending on usage. Location: The Shelburne Craft School , 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: The Shelburne Craft School , 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org.

craft CLASSES IN CLAY FOR ADULTS: Think Spring! Our sun-filled clay studio is the perfect place for you to find respite and make beautiful objects. Join one of our many clay classes and develop the skills to center, trim and glaze. We offer a fun and supportive environment for all skill levels. 8-week classes start Mar 26, Mon.-Fri. Cost: $335/ person, member discount avail. Location: The Shelburne Craft School, 64 Harbor Rd., Shelburne. Info: 985-3648, info@ theshelburnecraftschool.org, theshelburnecraftschool.org. WOODWORKING FOR ADULTS: Spend Spring 2018 in our 3,000sq.ft., light-filled wood shop! As a renter or student with access

LEARN TO DANCE W/ A PARTNER!: Come alone or come with friends, but come out and learn to dance! Beginning classes repeat each month, but intermediate classes vary from month to month. As with all of our programs, everyone is encouraged to attend, and no partner is necessary. Private lessons also available. Cost: $50/4week class. Location: Champlain Club, 20 Crowley St., Burlington. Info: First Step Dance, 598-6757, kevin@firststepdance.com, firststepdance.com.

drumming DJEMBE & TAIKO: Classes in Burlington, Hyde Park and Montpelier. Drums provided. Classes for adults (also for kids with parents) Mon., Tue. & Wed. in Burlington. Wed. a.m. or Friday a.m. in Hyde Park. Thu. in Montpelier. Most classes are


CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES

in the evenings or after school. Conga classes, too! Visit our schedule and register online. Location: Taiko Space, 208 Flynn Ave., Suite 3G, Burlington; Capital City Grange, 6612 Rte. 12, Berlin; Moonlight Studios, 1670 Cleveland Corners Rd., Hyde Park. Info: 999-4255, burlingtontaiko.org.

gardening GROWING MICRO GREENS: Learn to grow nutrient-dense, flavorful greens year-round. Microgreens are rapidly increasing in popularity as people recognize the benefits of adding them to their meals. Presenter: Ethan Thompson. Sat., Jan. 27, 9:30-11 a.m. Cost: $15/person. Location: Gardener’s Supply, 128 Intervale Rd., Burlington. Info: 660-3505, gardenerssupplystore.com.

French the fun way. Immersion FRArt program for youth: French and art. Schedule: Adults: Wed., Jan. 17-Feb. 28, 7 weeks, $210. Beginner French: 5-6:30 p.m., Adv Beg/Interm French: 6:30-8 p.m. Kid FRArt Class: Weekly on Fri., Jan. 12-Feb. 23, 3:30-5 p.m., $230/7 weeks. Ages 5-12. School Closure Art & French Day Camps: Jan. 15, 16, 17 or 18, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. $70/day includes materials. Aftercare avail. until 5:30 if needed. Ages 5-12 and teens 1316 years. Teeny Ones FRArt: Sat., Jan. 20-Feb 24, $110/6 weeks. Ages 0-4 with an adult. Location: Wingspan Studio, 4A Howard St., Burlington. Info: Madame Maggie Standley, 233-7676, maggiestandley@gmail.com, wingspanstudiovt.com.

SOIL 101: Healthy and vibrant plants start with healthy soil. This one is a must for all gardeners, from beginners to the more experienced growers. Presenter: Mike Ather. Sat., Feb. 3, 9:30-11 a.m. Cost: $15/person. Location: Gardener’s Supply, 128 Intervale Rd., Burlington. Info: 660-3505, gardenerssupplystore.com.

jewelry

COMBAT FITNESS MARTIAL ARTS: Vermont’s premier mixed martial arts academy: Brazilian jiujitsu, boxing, Muay Thai kickboxing, judo, MMA and Filipino martial arts. Combine fitness and skills-building to learn selfdefense and confidence. Classes six days a week. Private lessons available. Located at 276 East Allen St. off Exit 15 in Winooski.

massage ASIAN BODYWORK THERAPY PROGRAM: This program teaches two forms of massage: amma and shiatsu. We will explore oriental medicine theory and diagnosis as well as the body’s meridian system, acupressure points, yin yang and fiveelement theory. Additionally, 100 hours of Western anatomy and physiology are taught. VSAC non-degree grants are available. NCBTMB-assigned school. Starts Sep. 2018. Cost: $5,000/600hour program. Location: Elements of Healing, 21 Essex Way, Suite 109, Essex Jct.. Info: Scott Moylan, 288-8160, scott@ elementsofhealing.net, elementsofhealing.net.

meditation EARTH MEDITATION/ CLOUD HANDS: In this workshop, participants will learn the Cloud

INTRO TO COLD WEATHER TREKKING: In this workshop, you will learn what to wear, what to bring and what gear you need for a safe and successful winter trek. We will discuss food, baseversus mid-layers, shells, socks, snowshoes, sweat, hats, handwarmers, hydration, boots, traction and more! Preregistration required at greenmountainclub. org. Wed., Jan. 24, 6-8 p.m. Cost: $35/workshop; 20% discount for GMC members. Location: Green Mountain Club Headquarters, 4711 Waterbury-Stowe Rd., Waterbury Center. Info: Green Mountain Club, Rob Rives, 241-8329, rrives@greenmountainclub.org, greenmountainclub.org.

photography PHOTOGRAPHER’S WORKROOM: Instructor: Marcie Scudder. This class on project and portfolio development emphasizes process and practice to develop a body of work with a set intention or story. Tue., Jan. 23-Mar. 27, 10 a.m.-noon. Cost: $265/person; $240/members. Location: Helen Day Art Center, 90 Pond St., Stowe. Info: 253-8358, education@helenday.com, helenday.com.

tai chi SNAKE-STYLE TAI CHI CHUAN: The Yang Snake Style is a dynamic tai chi method that mobilizes the spine while stretching and strengthening the core body muscles. Practicing this

INTUITIVE AWARENESS, ENERGY WORK, E.F.T. & EXPRESSIVE ARTS CLASSES: Open to joy! Tune into your body, mind and spirit. Learn tools to clear and reset your energy; develop clarity, awareness and compassion; and live from a place of well-being, truth and joy. Taught by Naomi Mitsuda, Reiki Master, certified practitioner of E.F.T., Intuitive Awareness, Expressive Arts, and Energy Medicine. Offered this winter/spring at Spirit Dancer, Sacred Mountain Studio, and other venues in Burlington, VT. Various locations around, Burlington. Info: Naomi Mitsuda, 658-5815, naomimitsuda@gmail. com. MINDFUL EATING: Learn the basics of Mindful Eating: How to: tune into signals of hunger and fullness; slow down, savor and enjoy your food; recognize and take care of feelings instead of stuffing them; respond to cravings with mindfulness; bring loving-kindness and compassion to your body; and be more grateful for food. Three Thu., starting Jan. 18. Cost: $90/three 1.5-hour workshops. Location: online, online, online. Info: Eating with Grace, Anya Raven Hunter, 233-6116, ahunter@sover.net, eatingwithgrace.com. YOGA & RECOVERY GROUP FOR FOLKS LIVING W/ LYME DISEASE: Join as we practice gentle restorative poses suitable for all levels. Afterward, join the discussion as we share and support one another on the often confusing and isolating journey to wellness while living with lyme disease. Wear comfortable clothing. Sign up or find more information at laughingriveryoga.com. Dec. 17, Jan. 14, Feb. 11, Mar. 18, Apr. 8, 2-3:30 p.m. By donation. Location: Laughing River Yoga, The Chase Mill, 1 Mill St., Burlington.

yoga BALANCE YOGA CLASSES/ WORKSHOPS: Offering a variety of yoga classes and wellness workshops to meet individual needs, from beginners to experienced yogis seeking to deepen their practices. Our welcoming community offers support to experience and explore yoga, meditation, sound therapy and bodywork. First class free for Vermonters! Schedule private and group sessions at balanceyogavt.com. See website for daily class schedule. Cost: $15/ drop-in class; $130/10-class card; $70/5-class card; $120/ monthly unlimited. Workshop cost will vary. Location: Balance Yoga, 840 W. Main St., Richmond.

EVOLUTION YOGA: Practice yoga in a down-to-earth atmosphere with some of the most experienced teachers and therapeutic professionals in Burlington. Daily drop-in classes including $5 community classes, Yoga Wall and Yoga Therapeutics classes led by physical therapists. Join our Yoga for Life Program to dive deeper into your practice or register for our Yoga Teacher Training for Healthcare Providers. We offer specialty workshops, series and trainings, rooted in the art and science of yoga as a healing practice for body, mind and spirit. Cost: $15/ class; $140/10-class card; $5-10/ community classes. Location: Evolution Yoga, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington. Info: 864-9642, evolutionvt.com. HONEST YOGA: Honest yoga offers practices for all levels. We just expanded to have two practice spaces! Your children can practice in one room while you practice in the other. No need for childcare. Yoga and dance classes ages 3 and up. Brand-new beginners’ course: This includes two specialty classes per week for four weeks plus unlimited access to all classes. We have daily heated and alignment classes kids classes in yoga and dance. We hold yoga teacher trainings at the 200- and 500-hour levels, as well as children and dance teacher training courses. Check our our website for dance classes and yoga summer camps! Daily classes & workshops. $50/new student (1 month unlimited); $18/class; $140/10-class card; $15/class for student or senior; or $110/10-class punch card; $135/ mo. adult memberships; $99/ mo. kid memberships. Location: Honest Yoga Center, 150 Dorset St., Blue Mall, next to Hana, South Burlington. Info: 497-0136, honestyogastudio@gmail.com, honestyogacenter.com. SANGHA STUDIO | NONPROFIT, DONATION-BASED YOGA: Sangha Studio builds an empowered community through the shared practice of yoga. Free yoga service initiatives and outreach programs are offered at 17 local organizations working with all ages. Join Sangha in both downtown Burlington and the Old North End for one of their roughly 60 weekly classes and workshops. Become a Sustaining Member for $60/month and practice as often as you like! Daily. Location: Sangha Studio, 120 Pine St. and 237 North Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 448-4262, Info@sanghastudio.org.

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ABSOLUMENT FABULEUX FRENCH: Oh la la! Winter French classes for all ages: tots, kids, teens, adults. Check that New Year’s resolution off. Interactive, fun, structured, supportive. Experienced instructor: lived in West Africa and Paris. Held in cozy, working art studio. Learn

ACHIEVE YOUR POTENTIAL: Change your life at Wu Xing Chinese Martial Arts. Join other thoughtful, friendly adults to learn traditional arts taught in a contemporary manner. We teach tai chi, kung fu, meditation, dynamic physical exercises and effective self-defense techniques to maximize your mental tranquility and clarity, physical health and fitness, and selfconfidence. Fri., 6-7 p.m. & 7-8 p.m.; Sat., 11 a.m.-noon & noon-1 p.m. Cost: $12/1-hour class; $40/ mo. (incl. all classes offered); $5/ trial class. Location: 303 Flynn Ave., Burlington. Info: 355-1301, info@wxcma.com, wxcma.com.

outdoors

well-being

Info: Lynn Clauer, 922-0516, balanceyogavt@gmail.com, balanceyogavt.com.

SEVEN DAYS

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martial arts

VERMONT BRAZILIAN JIUJITSU: Brazilian jiujitsu is a martial arts combat style based entirely on leverage and technique. Brazilian jiujitsu self-defense curriculum is taught to Navy SEALs, CIA, FBI, military police and special forces. No training experience required. Easy-to-learn techniques that could save your life! Classes for men, women and children. Students will learn realistic bully-proofing and self-defense life skills to avoid them becoming victims and help them feel safe and secure. Our sole purpose is to help empower people by giving them realistic martial arts training practices they can carry with them throughout life. IBJJF & CBJJ certified black belt sixth-degree Instructor under Carlson Gracie Sr.: teaching in Vermont, born and raised in Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. A five-time Brazilian National Champion; International World Masters Champion and IBJJF World Masters Champion. Accept no Iimitations! Location: Vermont Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, 55 Leroy Rd., Williston. Info: 598-2839, julio@ bjjusa.com, vermontbjj.com.

LEARN TO MEDITATE: Through the practice of sitting still and following your breath as it goes out and dissolves, you are connecting with your heart. By simply letting yourself be, as you are, you develop genuine sympathy toward yourself. The Burlington Shambhala Center offers meditation as a path to discovering gentleness and wisdom. Shambhala Cafe (meditation and discussions) meets the first Saturday of each month, 9 a.m.-noon. An open house (intro to the center, short dharma talk and socializing) is held on the third Sunday of each month, noon-2 p.m. Instruction: Sun. mornings, 9 a.m.-noon, or by appt. Sessions: Tue. & Thu., noon-1 p.m., & Mon.-Thu., 6-7 p.m. Location: Burlington Shambhala Center, 187 S. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 658-6795, burlingtonshambhalactr.org.

ancient martial art increases strength, flexibility, vitality, peace of mind and martial skill. Beginner classes Sat. mornings & Wed. evenings. Call to view a class. Location: Bao Tak Fai Tai Chi Institute, 100 Church St., Burlington. Info: 864-7902, ipfamilytaichi.org.

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JEWELRY CLASSES: Learn how to make your own jewelry in a fully equipped studio with a German-trained goldsmith in a private and bright atmosphere. Besides creating my own collections and custom designs, I also teach all skill levels, “make your own wedding bands,” summer camps for teenagers, private lessons, etc. For existing students: drop-in hours are Mon. & Thu., 1-4 p.m. Mon. and Thu., 9:30noon (ongoing). Cost: $160/10hour classe + cost of silver ($3/ gram). Location: 26 Spring St., Burlington. Info: Jane Frank Jewellery Design, Jane Frank, 999-3242, info@janefrank.de, janefrank.net.

SPANISH CLASSES STARTING NOW: You can still sign up! Our 12th year. Learn from a native speaker in lively small classes or individual instruction. You’ll always be participating and speaking. Lesson packages for travelers. Also lessons for children; online ESL instruction. See our website or contact us for details. Start week of Jan. 15; 10 weeks. Cost: $225/10 weekly 90-minute classes. Location: Spanish in Waterbury Center, Waterbury Center. Info: 585-1025, spanishparavos@gmail.com, spanishwaterburycenter.com.

MARTIAL WAY: Colchester and Milton locations. Classes in self-defense, Karate, Kung Fu, Jiu Jitsu and Tai Chi. We have 14 different age and experience levels, so the training is always age- and skill-appropriate. Beginner or experienced, fit or not yet, young or not anymore, we have a class for you! Days and evenings; see website for schedule and fees. Location: Martial Way Self Defense Center, 73 Prim Rd., Colchester, Colchester. Info: David Quinlan, 893-8893, info@martialwayvt.com, martialwayvt.com.

Hands short set and Earth Meditation. These foundational practices from the Tao Ahn Pai system of internal Qigong help to improve health, increase vitality and set the foundation for further Qigong practice. The workshop will be led by Scott Moylan L.Ac. Jan. 27 & 28, 9 a.m.-noon. Cost: $75/workshop. Location: Elements of Healing, 21 Essex Way, Essex Junction. Info: Carrie Abair, 999-9717, abairacupuncture@gmail.com, abairacupuncture.com.

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STONE WALL WORKSHOPS: Our introductory stone wall building workshops for homeowners and tradespeople promote the beauty and integrity of stone. The one-day workshop covers basic techniques for creating dry-laid walls using stone native to Vermont. Workshops are held in warm greenhouses in Hinesburg. Space is limited; gift certificates available. Sat., Jan. 20, Feb. 10, & Mar. 3 & 17, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Cost: $100/oneday class. Location: Red Wagon Plants, 2408 Shelburne Falls Rd., Hinesburg. Info: Queen City Soil & Stone, Charley MacMartin, 318-2411, macmartin@igc.org, queencitysoilandstone.com.

Call 655-KICK (5425). combatfitnessmma.com. See website for schedule. Membership and drop-in rates. Location: Combat Fitness Mixed Martial Arts Academy, 276 E. Allen St., Winooski. Info: Vincent Guy, 655-5425, vteguy25@gmail.com, combatfitnessmma.com.


File Under ‘Expat’ S Four more albums from formerly local artists

58 MUSIC

SEVEN DAYS

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B Y JOR D AN A D AMS

music

even Days receives more album submissions than we know what to do with, which speaks to the boundless creativity and tenacity of our local music scene. In addition to many submissions from Vermont-based artists, we get a fair number of albums from formerly local music makers, as well. Even though they’ve moved on to new frontiers, it’s fun to revisit and check in with some of our favorite expat musicians. 

CHRIS ALLEY ALL STAR BAND Hippo Nose

HANA ZARA Where Amanda Is King

JOE DAVIDIAN TRIO Live at the Jazz Cave, Vol. 2

SIMÓN! Deviant Optimism

(Self-released, CD)

(Self-released, CD, digital download)

(Sonic Mirage Media, CD, digital download)

(Self-released, CD, digital download)

The Wards are generally regarded as Burlington’s first punk-rock band. While no longer active, they’d surely be among the first inductees to the Queen City’s rock-and-roll hall of fame — if such a thing existed. Chris Alley, guitarist for the Wards, recently came back to Vermont to pack up his life and sell his house after spending time living at Entropy Beach House, a private music and spiritual center in San Diego. The 60-year-old rocker plans to return to southern California, this time to an off-the-grid location in Joshua Tree. Alley and a few West Coast buddies — including Doubletime Recording Studio’s Jeff Forrest, known for his engineering work on Blink-182’s debut, Cheshire Cat — formed a new project, Chris Alley All Star Band. The front man describes it as a union of Butthole Surfers and Tom Waits. Translation: quirky, hard-edged rock with a grizzled troubadour mystique, as heard on the group’s debut, Hippo Nose. The title track is a bluesy jaunt with bizarre spoken lyrics. Though shrouded in ambiguity, a few choice lines out of context might inform overall expectations for Alley’s brand of weird: “Ridin’ on a hippo nose / He was sittin’ there on the damn thing / On its nose / Amblin’ downtown in front of the mudslide / Snortin’ and wigglin’ its little fuckin’ ears / And farting / A jolly hippo.” Um, OK. “Terribly Attractive” is a much more downthe-line rock song, predicated largely on a two-chord guitar pattern. In it, Alley belts out an ode to his lady love: “When she’s not bald / She has hair / Her muffins won a blue ribbon at the fair / You know she’s brave enough to care / And she’s terribly attractive.” As a rousing conclusion — presumably with fists raised to the sky — the group shouts, “Hey!” between head-banging riffs. Hippo Nose will soon be available on Amazon. In the meantime, swing by the Monkey House in Winooski to pick up a free copy.

Former Burlingtonian Hana Zara traded the Green Mountains for the Great Plains a few years ago — Lincoln, Neb., to be exact. The outsider folk singer-songwriter has released a jaw-dropping new effort, Where Amanda Is King. Preceded by stripped-down acoustic albums The North, Tatterhood and Little Doll, Zara’s latest is a huge leap. It’s a fully formed, highly produced masterpiece endowed with atmospheric synths, twinkling electronic beats and staggering choral harmonies. If the album were paired with visuals, a looped video of the aurora borealis over an icy landscape would be perfect. The updated production aesthetic fits snugly with Zara’s gorgeous poetry. Her writing has a classical quality and, as evidenced by the artsy lyric booklet accompanying the CD, could easily exist solely in written form. Mechanical percussive sounds tinker behind placid acoustic guitar on “The Toy.” Zara’s voice splits into multipart harmony as slaphappy accordion and a watery field recording seep into the mix. “House of Mirrors” materializes with round synth tones and electro hand claps. The song peaks with glittery arpeggios. “Snow,” one of the most outstanding cuts, feels like a bittersweet, irresolute goodbye: “And remember me well / But remember me right / Still raging like a river / Raging through the night.” Its bossa nova beat glimmers in a sea of synth tones and widespread vocal harmonies. Where Amanda Is King is available at hanazaramusic.bandcamp.com. Zara returns to Vermont to celebrate the album’s release on Sunday, February 11, at Radio Bean in Burlington.

The Joe Davidian Trio celebrated their 15th year in 2017. The New York City-based jazz combo — which includes Davidian on piano, bassist Jamie Ousley and drummer Austin McMahon — first came together at the University of Miami. Its members have since steadily built a repertoire of originals, as well as unique arrangements of a number of jazz standards and other recognizable pop tunes. Live at the Jazz Cave, Vol. 2, a follow-up to 2013’s Live at the Jazz Cave, Vol. One, contains more selections captured in the early 2010s at the legendary Nashville Jazz Workshop’s live performance space, the Jazz Cave. Soft murmurs and appreciative applause break through the hepcats’ grooves, reminders that, despite the crispness of the recordings, everything was captured live in a single take. The trio offers a sweet treat with a whimsical take on “Pure Imagination.” Gene Wilder famously sang the original as the titular character in the 1971 film Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. Ousley introduces the melody before handing it off to Davidian. About four minutes in, the pianist lets his fingers wander into the dizzying heights of the upper octaves. The trio’s modern take on Tony Bennett’s “A Time for Love” feels carefully orchestrated — a contrast to the looser feel of other cuts that include improvised solos. Davidian’s keyboard acrobatics are as dazzling as ever as he traverses the expanse of his instrument. Live at the Jazz Cave, Vol. 2 is available at cdbaby.com.

When last we heard from Swanton native Camille Collins Lovell, she had relocated to Honduras. While living abroad, the singersongwriter and bandleader formed an eclectic group called Simón! Around the time Lovell left Central America in 2017 for her new home in Massachusetts, she released that band’s sophomore effort, Deviant Optimism. Lovell genre-hops throughout the new album, making more stops in the realm of dusty Americana than others. But she carves out plenty of space for rock with ska, Latin and alt-punk feels. The unifying thread among these 11 tracks is the front woman’s wry and often self-deprecating lyrics. (Also, can we talk about that amazing album cover? It’s literally raining cheerleaders over a stretch of desert highway. Hooray for the open road?) The opening track, “Cougar’s Lament,” is a prurient requiem about desiring a younger suitor. Lovell’s unbridled yearning reveals her insecurities: “I bought heels I can’t walk in / And waxed everywhere / Ridiculous diets / And died my gray hair.” The unhurried ballad also notes the hypocrisy of the age-inappropriate May-December romance: “If I were a man / And you were the girl / Your friends would say to give it a whirl.” Other standouts are the mariachi-infused “Fuego,” the gently swung lamentation “Marsh Mellow” and the chunky bar-chord banger, “Screw Youth.” Overall, the record feels content and defiant, despite hints that it may be a breakup album. Deviant Optimism is available at simonmusic.net.

Contact: jordan@sevendaysvt.com


GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

S UNDbites

News and views on the local music scene

Teenage Dream

COURTESY OF BIG HEAVY WORLD

B Y J ORDAN ADAM S

Resident Adviser

SOUNDBITES

» P.61

THU 1.18

Andrea Gibson

WED 1.24

Collie Buddz

WED 1.24

Octave Cat ft. Members of Lotus & Dopapod

FRI 1.26

Keys N Krates

FRI 1.26

The Ghost of Paul Revere

Chastity Brown

Jo Mersa Marley, The Holdup

Nudist Co

Falcons, Jubilee, Fabrikate

Troy Millette

104.7 The Point welcomes

SAT 1.27

A Beatles Tribute: Spencer Albee & His Friends Are The Walrus

SUN 1.28

BoomBox

SUN 1.28

Flint Eastwood

TUE 1.30

Emancipator

THU 2.1

Whiskey Myers

Bad Smell

Nydge

Blockhead

Scooter Brown Band

JUST ANNOUNCED: 2.11 3.23 4.14 4.23

Joe Hertler & The Rainbow Seekers Too Many Zooz The Mallett Brothers Band feat. Jon Fishman Matt & Kim

1214 Williston Road, South Burlington 802-652-0777 @higherground @highergroundmusic

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MUSIC 59

If you haven’t made it out to folk singer-songwriter ZACK DUPONT’s Wednesday night MODA residency at the Light Club Lamp Shop in Burlington, you still have two more

Overcoats

SEVEN DAYS

Meanwhile, a newish, all-ages St. Albans venue called the Burrow is working toward a similar goal as the BHW series. We’ll have more info on that burgeoning hot spot soon.

Tennis

01.17.18-01.24.18

Big Heavy World concert artists, top to bottom, left to right: The Dead Shakers, the Mountain Carol, Sleeping In, Wren Kitz, ouzkxqlzn, Gestalt, Oldsoul and Bonzo

SAT 1.20

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

When Burlington’s Memorial Auditorium was condemned in 2016, its tenants were forced to vacate — including the all-ages rock club, 242 Main. Local promoters and other arts organizations have stepped in to fill the void left by the legendary venue’s closure with like-minded programming. Queen City nonprofit Big Heavy World is one such proponent. The local music resource center and archive just launched a new concert series that it hopes will keep 242’s inclusive, DIY spirit alive. BHW presents each show in conjunction with one of two local DIY promoters — namely Friends + Family and Jim’s Basement. The all-ages and substance-free concerts are held in the South End Arts and Business Association’s gallery space on Pine Street in Burlington. (Fun fact: According to a press release from BHW, the series is “made possible in part with generous support from AARP.” All ages, indeed.) The series premiered last Thursday, January 12, with New York’s ELEPHANT JAKE, Pennsylvania’s SLEEPY FREAK, and locals DAYS ON END and GREASE FACE. The series continues this week as Jim’s Basement copresent Lowell, Mass., rockers DAISYBONES and OLDSOUL on Saturday, January 20, with local support TBA. Next up, Friends + Family copresent local analog experimentalist WREN KITZ, soundscape looper OUZKXQLZN and ambient artist WRY ONE on Monday, January 22. On Friday, January 26, local indie rockers GESTALT team up with heavy shoegazers SLEEPING IN and Michiganbased post-rockers BONZO. The series concludes with three more local acts on Thursday, February 8: psychedelic ensemble the DEAD SHAKERS; Plattsburgh, N.Y.’s enigmatic electro-pop outfit the MOUNTAIN CAROL and drone composer ECHOER.

chances to do so: January 17 (aka the street date of this column) and 24. What the hell is MODA, you ask? Good question! For starters, it’s a limitedtime-only supergroup, and the name is an acronym composed of the first letter of the last name of each of the group’s members. Joining DuPont are bassist ROB MORSE (VORCZA, SOUND OF MIND) drummer EZRA OKLAN (DWIGHT & NICOLE, KAT WRIGHT) and keyboardist/trumpeter WILL ANDREWS (JAPHY RYDER, WILLVERINE). The guitarist/bandleader explained to Seven Days that the residency features new arrangements of existing material from his bands the DUPONT BROTHERS and SOUNDBROTHER, as well as some recognizable covers and plenty of improvisation. (Fun fact No. 2: While originally billed as the evolution of his existing fraternal folk duo with brother SAM DUPONT, Zack informs us that SoundBrother shall henceforth be regarded as an entity unto itself, and that the DuPont Brothers, as a band, are still intact.) In addition to moody folkrock, DuPont likely will regale us with more “behind-themusic” stories like the one he told last week about getting locked out of his house moments after starting up the bathtub. (Fun fact No. 3: A similar situation once happened to me while housesitting for some friends. I locked myself out after putting a frozen pizza in the oven. At least now I know I can kick down a door!) And speaking of residencies, powerfunk band the MEDALLIONS are in the midst of a monthlong takeover of Club Metronome in Burlington. The timetraveling spiritual cousins of psychpop band MADAILA — but who are, like, definitely not the same band — throw down the retro party jams every Friday

1/15/18 12:13 PM


music

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

WED.17 burlington

CITIZEN CIDER: Brett Hughes (country), 6 p.m., free.

ZENBARN: Zach Nugent’s Acoustic Dead Duos (Grateful Dead tribute), 7 p.m., free.

THE DAILY PLANET: Seth Yacovone (blues), 8 p.m., free.

middlebury area

FOAM BREWERS: Brews & Bros (standup), 7 p.m., free. HALF LOUNGE: BTV Unplugged (acoustic), 9 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. JUNIPER: Audrey Berstein (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free. LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Queen City Hot Club (gypsy jazz), 7 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Irish Sessions (traditional), 7 p.m., free. MODA (folk, jazz), 9:30 p.m., free. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Open Mic with Andy Lugo, 9 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Dead Winter Carpenters’ Jennie and Jessie Dunn (Americana), 7 p.m., free. Ween Wednesday with Knights of the Round Table featuring members of Swimmer, Tar Iguana, Grundlefunk (Ween tribute), 9 p.m., $3/5. 18+. RADIO BEAN: DJ Two Sev (eclectic vinyl), 4 p.m., free. REDadmiral (rock), 7 p.m., free. Sean Kehoe (singer-songwriter), 8:30 p.m., free. Justin Panigutti Band (rock), 10:30 p.m., free. RED SQUARE: DJ KermiTT (eclectic), 7 p.m., free. DJ Cre8 (hip-hop), 11 p.m., free. RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: The County Down (Americana, reggae), 7 p.m., free. Gypsy Reel (traditional Irish, folk), 7:30-10 p.m., free.

SEVEN DAYS

01.17.18-01.24.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

SIDEBAR: Hotel Karaoke, 9 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Standup Open Mic and Improv Jam, 7 p.m., free. Songs in the Key of Slink (improv), 8:30 p.m., $5.

chittenden county HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Charles Phoenix (comedy), 8 p.m., $20/23/50.

MONKEY HOUSE: Blanka, Appalled Eagles, DJ Disco Phantom (electronic, post-punk), 8:30 p.m., $5/10. 18+.

barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Jason Dick (reggae, soul), 6 p.m., free. CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: All Request Video, 9 p.m., free. SWEET MELISSA’S: D. Davis (acoustic), 5:30 p.m., donation. WHAMMY BAR: Myra Flynn and Paul Boffa (neo-soul), 7 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

IDLETYME BREWING COMPANY: The Idletyme Band (blues, rock), 8 p.m., free. 60 MUSIC

mad river valley/ waterbury

MOOGS PLACE: Abby Sherman (Americana), 8:30 p.m., free.

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. Open Mic Night, 9 p.m., free.

champlain islands/northwest THE BURROW: Plastique Mammals, Miami Summer Culture, Mingo Maquera (postrock, synth-pop), 7 p.m., free.

chittenden county

BACKSTAGE PUB & RESTAURANT: Trivia, 9:30 p.m., free. HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Andrea Gibson, Chastity Brown (poetry and music), 8 p.m., $20/23. JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: Irish Jam Session, 7 p.m., free. MONKEY HOUSE: Anthill Collective presents 3rd Thursdays featuring Network, Princess Nostalgia, Fresh Patterns (hip-hop), 9 p.m., $3/8. 18+. ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Duncan MacLeod Blues Band, 7 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom

barre/montpelier

outside vermont

stowe/smuggs

PARKER PIE CO.: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

MONOPOLE: Open Mic with Lucid, 10 p.m., free.

THU.18

burlington

ARTSRIOT: Vermont Burlesque Festival Opening Night Sneak Peak (burlesque), 5:30 p.m., $10-25. THE DAILY PLANET: Chris Page and Collin Cope (blues, soul), 8 p.m., free. FINNIGAN’S PUB: DJ Craig Mitchell (open format), 10 p.m., free. FOAM BREWERS: Ben Bevins and Friends (jazz, funk), 7 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Shane Hardiman Trio (jazz), 8:30 p.m., $5-10. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Kat Kennedy (folk-rock), 10 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. Jiggawaltz, Lush Honey featuring Deven Massarone (funk, live electronica), 9 p.m., free/$5. 18+. RADIO BEAN: DJ Chia (house), 4 p.m., free. Adam Wolf (alt-country), 7 p.m., free. Reid SP (Americana), 8:30 p.m., free. Corporate Punk (jam-pop), 10 p.m., free. Avery Cooper Group (jazz), 10:30 p.m., free. Beware the Dangers of a Ghost Scorpion! (horror-surf), 11:30 p.m., free. RED SQUARE: Dr. No (funk, rock), 7 p.m., free. D Jay Baron (mashup, hip-hop), 11 p.m., free. RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ Cre8 (hip-hop), 11 p.m., free.

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Italian Session (traditional), 6 p.m., free.

MOOGS PLACE: Open Mic with Allen Church, 8:30 p.m., free. Stelvis Carbo (rock), 9 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury LOCALFOLK SMOKEHOUSE: Open Mic with Alex Budney, 8:30 p.m., free. ZENBARN: Myra Flynn (neosoul), 8 p.m., $5.

middlebury area

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Mike Brinkman’s Open Mic Series, 8:30 p.m., free. TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: DJ Da.Root (hits), 10 p.m., free.

rutland/killington PICKLE BARREL NIGHTCLUB: The Machine performs Pink Floyd, 8 p.m., free.

outside vermont

OLIVE RIDLEY’S: Karaoke with DJ Jon Berry & DJ Coco, 9 p.m., free.

FRI.19

burlington

ARTSRIOT: VSO Presents: Jukebox (chamber music), 7:30 p.m., $5-125. BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD: Andrew Moroz (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free. CLUB METRONOME: The Medallions Metronome 2: With a Vengeance (disco and funk covers), 9 p.m., $10. FOAM BREWERS: DJ Disco Phantom (eclectic dance), 8 p.m., free.

SIDEBAR: Ugly Sun, the Onlys, the Mangroves (indie), 9:30 p.m., free.

HALF LOUNGE: Fun House (house), 10 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Grant Gordy and Ross Martin (acoustic), 8 p.m., $5.

JUNIPER: Eric George (country, folk), 9 p.m., free.

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Bob Marley (standup), 7 & 9 p.m., $25.

THU.18 // ANDREA GIBSON [POETRY AND MUSIC]

JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Sophie (singer-songwriter), 7:30 p.m., free. Northern Spy (soul, jazz), 9 p.m., free. DJ Taka (eclectic vinyl), 11 p.m., $5.

Grand Slam Prior to writing her profoundly political 2018 spoken-word album Hey Galaxy, poet and activist ANDREA GIBSON was working on a project solely about

love. But the 2016 U.S. presidential election compelled the queer wordsmith to focus on timely topics. Among others, these included the Pulse nightclub massacre (“Orlando”), harassment of women (“To the Men Catcalling My Girlfriend While I’m Walking Beside Her”) and the Black Lives Matter movement (“Letter to White Queers”). The Boulderbased poet delivers verses with intense fervor while her folksy backing band underscores her words. Gibson performs on Thursday, January 18, at the Higher Ground Ballroom in South Burlington. Americana singer-songwriter CHASTITY BROWN opens. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Scuba Party (rock), 10 p.m., free.

$5. DJ Craig Mitchell (open format), 11 p.m., $5.

NECTAR’S: Seth Yacovone (solo acoustic blues), 7 p.m., free. The Atlantic Effect (Album Release), Zuch Ummer, Copilot (rock, soul), 9 p.m., $5.

RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ KermiTT (eclectic), 10 p.m., $5.

RADIO BEAN: Friday Morning Sing-Along with Linda Bassick & Friends (kids’ music), 11 a.m., free. DJ Ryan Kick (eclectic), 4 p.m., free. Warm Water (soul, jazz), 7 p.m., free. Matt Savage Groove Experiment (jazz fusion), 10 p.m., $5. Sabrehound (metal), 11:30 p.m., $5.

SIDEBAR: The Green Mountain Boys (bluegrass), 7 p.m., free. Haitian (open format), 10 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE: Andriana Chobot (singer-songwriter), 4 p.m., free. Swimmer (rock fusion), 7 p.m.,

RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: DJ Supersounds (hits), 10 p.m., free.

THE TAP ROOM AT SWITCHBACK BREWING: Stone City (folk-rock), 6 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Jay Pharoah (standup), 7 & 9:30 p.m., $25/35.

chittenden county BACKSTAGE PUB & RESTAURANT: Karaoke with Jenny Red, 9 p.m., free.

JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: The Jeff Salisbury Band (blues), 7 p.m., free. MONKEY HOUSE: Dark Star Project (Grateful Dead tribute), 5 p.m., free. The Brazen Youth, PhiloSofie, Gestalt (indie, Americana), 8 p.m., $5-10. ON TAP BAR & GRILL: The Duel (rock), 5 p.m., free. Photo Bomb (rock), 9 p.m., free.

FRI.19

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GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

COMEDY

South End venue queried its followers as to what acts they’d like to see in 2018 — which I think is a pretty cool thing to ask. However, I was surprised to see responders shouting out many of the same acts the club brought us in 2017. Don’t get me wrong — there are tons of bands I’d see again and again. But, if asked an open-ended question such as the one posed, I’d surely request something fresh. Like, maybe ELECTRIC GUEST? Pretty, pretty please?

Tennis

5 NIGHTS

A WEEK THU 18

BOB

MARLEY FRI 19 | SAT 20 | SUN 21

Superman Returns NEXT WEEK

S

UNDbites

CO NT I NU E D F RO M PAG E 5 9

in January. You still have two more chances to “get down on it,” as it were: January 19 and 24. Madaila’s ERIC MAIER tells us that the Medallions plan to rage some TALKING HEADS and MICHAEL freaking JACKSON at this week’s throwdown — at least he thinks so. He’s not actually in that band, so he can’t say for sure — and plans can change.

Mixed Doubles

Repeat Offenders

While we’re on the subject of nationally touring acts returning within a year of their last performance, I saw some puzzling comments on a recent Facebook post from ArtsRiot. The

Hot Dish

JAY

PHAROAH FRI 25 | SAT 26 | SUN 27

OWEN

BENJAMIN ORDER YOUR TICKETS TODAY! (802) 859-0100 | WWW.VTCOMEDY.COM 101 main street, BurlingtoN

…Monday, January 22, marks the twoyear anniversary of Motown Mondays at the Monkey House in Winooski. Untitled-21 1 1/15/18 DJs FATTIE B and CRAIG MITCHELL host These are the best snow tubing the twice-monthly event and spin a conditions since opening in 2009! scorching blend of classic soul, R&B and Check out our video online funk tunes. Aside from rump-shaking at sharppark.com! jams, the free event always features a home-cooked crockpot meal from Mitchell, who dips into his own pocket to cover the cost of feeding anyone in need. 

DON’T MISS IT!

SHARP PARK

10:51 AM

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

204 Cobble Hill Road, Milton (802) 879-3507

Listening In

POST MALONE, “I Fall Apart” 6LACK, “PRBLMS” GABRIEL GARZÓN-MONTANO, “Sour

Mango” DINNER, “Cool as Ice” Overcoats

1/4/18 10:50 AM

CHANNEL 15

VCAM BY THE SLICE SUNDAYS > 3:30 P.M. GET MORE INFO OR WATCH ONLINE AT VERMONTCAM.ORG

MUSIC 61

TROYE SIVAN, “My My My!”

16t-sharppark011018.indd 1

SEVEN DAYS

If I were a superhero, my superpower would be the ability to get songs stuck in other people’s heads. Here are five songs that have been stuck in my head this week. May they also get stuck in yours. Follow sevendaysvt on Spotify for weekly playlists with tunes by artists featured in the music section.

01.17.18-01.24.18

I love it when two of my favorite artists wind up on a bill together — especially when they’re groups I recently interviewed. Denver-based indie-pop duo TENNIS, composed of married couple ALAINA MOORE and PATRICK RILEY, along with BFFs JJ MITCHELL and HANA ELION’s New York City-based folktronica duo OVERCOATS, distinguished themselves as artists to give a shit about in separate local performances in 2017. They join forces on Saturday, January 20, at the Higher Ground Ballroom in South Burlington. If you recall, Tennis rocked the Burlington waterfront in July in support of elder statesmen the SHINS, while Overcoats blew our minds with an April gig at Higher Ground as well as a midday set at the Otis Mountain Get Down in September.

If you missed any of these shows last year, now’s your chance to make it right. For the inside scoop on each project, revisit my interviews with Moore and Mitchell/Elion at sevendaysvt.com.

The Burlington music scene bid adieu to one of its most unsung heroes in the fall of 2016: NICK MAVADONES of Higher Ground and Waking Windows Presents. The behind-the-scenes workhorse traded B-town for Motown nearly a year and a half ago, taking on managerial duties at Detroit live-music venue El Club. But, as of New Year’s Eve, Mavadones is back in town and on board full time with WW. Welcome back, dude! And speaking of Motown…


music FRI.19

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

« P.60

STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Shane Murley (singersongwriter), 7 p.m., free. WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: DJ Louis Calderin (hip-hop, hits), 9 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Dave Loughran (acoustic), 6 p.m., free. CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Dallas Higgins (indie), 6 p.m., free. Megan Jean & the KFB (gypsy folk), 9 p.m., free. DEMENA’S: Dave Keller Band (blues), 8 p.m., $10. GUSTO’S: Scott Graves and Chris Martin (acoustic), 5 p.m., free. Native Tongue (rock), 9 p.m., $5. SWEET MELISSA’S: Honky Tonk Happy Hour with Mark LeGrand, 5:30 p.m., donation. WHAMMY BAR: The Brevity Thing (Americana), 7 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

EL TORO: Rebecca Padula (folk), 7 p.m., free. MOOGS PLACE: Chris Lyon (solo acoustic), 6 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury

ZENBARN: Old Sky (Americana), 9 p.m., $5.

middlebury area

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 01.17.18-01.24.18

JUNIPER: Dr. Sammy Love (soul, jazz), 9 p.m., free.

Farm League Nicholas Lussier and Charles Dahlke, founders of the Connecticut-based indie trio the

BRAZEN YOUTH,

are childhood friends

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Chesty Rollins (alternative), 7:30 p.m., free. The Green Mountain Boys (bluegrass), 9 p.m., free. DJ Taka (eclectic vinyl), 11 p.m., $5.

who once performed together in a Red Hot Chili Peppers cover band. But their

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Fertile Soil (folk), 10 p.m., free.

Bristlecone Man, is a sprawling, orchestral opus. Tight harmonies and brassy

NECTAR’S: AliT (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free. Gnomedad, Adventure Dog (psych-fusion), 9 p.m., $5.

layered sound that the band cultivated on an old farm called Ashlawn. Catch

RADIO BEAN: Steph Pappas Experience (Americana, rock), 7 p.m., free. The Fantastic Partnerz (rock, R&B), 10 p.m., $5.

current project hardly sounds like the sunny SoCal funk-rockers. Overcast and full of ennui, the group’s low-blood-pressure debut, The Ever Dying embellishments suffuse a foundation of familiar acoustic folk, creating a richly the Brazen Youth on Friday, January 19, at the Monkey House in Winooski. PHILOSOFIE and locals GESTALT add support.

ZENBARN: VSO Presents: Jukebox (chamber music), 4 p.m., $5-100.

MON.22 burlington

HALF LOUNGE: Four-D (house), 9 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Lamp Shop Lit Club (open reading), 8 p.m., free. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Karaoke, 9:30 p.m., free. RADIO BEAN: Axiomatic (folk, Americana), 7 p.m., free. Addition Not Division (indie), 9 p.m., free. Good Trees River Band (psychedelic fusion), 10:30 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE: Left Eye Jump (blues), 3 p.m., free. The Tricksters (rock), 7 p.m., free. Mashtodon (hip-hop), 11 p.m., $5.

SIDEBAR: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free. Family Night (open jam), 9 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ Raul (salsa, reggaeton), 6 p.m., free. DJ Reign One (EDM), 11 p.m., $5.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Comedy & Crêpes (standup), 8 p.m., free.

RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: DJ Dodg3r (EDM, hits), 10 p.m., free.

chittenden county

SIDEBAR: Seamus the Great (rock), 7 p.m., free. SVPPLY (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

MONKEY HOUSE: Motown Mondays’ Two Year Anniversary (Motown DJs), 8 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Oath of Action 2018 with Big Night (Cajun), 8 p.m., donation.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Seth Yacovone (blues), 7 p.m., free.

SMITTY’S PUB: The Hubcats (rock), 8 p.m., free. SOCIAL CLUB & LOUNGE: Totally Inappropriate X with Carl Sonnefeld (standup), 7:30 p.m., free.

TUE.23

VILLAGE CAFE AND TAVERN: Cooie & Skip (Americana), 7 p.m., free.

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Jay Pharoah (standup), 7 & 9:30 p.m., $25/35.

FOAM BREWERS: Local Dork (eclectic vinyl), 6 p.m., free.

rutland/killington

chittenden county

champlain islands/northwest TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: Tim Brick (country), 7 p.m., free.

outside vermont

MONOPOLE: Fertile Soil (folk), 10 p.m., free.

SEVEN DAYS

JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: DJ Amanda Rock (hits), 9:30 p.m., free.

PICKLE BARREL NIGHTCLUB: Hot Date (hits), 8 p.m., free.

MONOPOLE DOWNSTAIRS: Happy Hour Tunes & Trivia with Gary Peacock, 5 p.m., free. OLIVE RIDLEY’S: Dom Flemons, Roy Hurd (folk), 7:30 p.m., $18/20. All Request Night with DJ Skippy (hits), 10 p.m., free.

SAT.20

burlington

BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD: Anthony Santor (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free. CLUB METRONOME: Retronome With DJ Fattie B (’80s dance party), 9 p.m., free/$5.

62 MUSIC

Cabaret (drag), 8 p.m., free. SVPPLY (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

FOAM BREWERS: Japhy Ryder (funk-hop, jazz), 8 p.m., free. HALF LOUNGE: Half Lounge

HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Tennis, Overcoats (indie pop), 8:30 p.m., $16/18.

burlington

THE GRYPHON: P’tit Trio (jazz), 8 p.m., free. HALF LOUNGE: David Chief (hip-hop), 9 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Rachel and Vilray (of Lake Street Dive) (jazz, soul), 8:30 p.m., $20.

FRI.19 // THE BRAZEN YOUTH [INDIE, AMERICANA]

JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: Old Tone String Band (bluegrass), 7 p.m., free. MONKEY HOUSE: Winter Wonder-Glam: Burning Monk, People Person, Sad Turtle (Rage Against the Machine tribute), 9 p.m., $5/10. 18+. ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Graziano, Slim and Schofield (rock), 5 p.m., free. B-Town (rock), 9 p.m., free. STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Cooper=Childs Duo (jazz), 7 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Irish Session, 2 p.m., donation.

stowe/smuggs

rutland/killington

EL TORO: John Smyth (Americana), 7 p.m., free.

PICKLE BARREL NIGHTCLUB: Hot Date (hits), 8 p.m., free.

HALF LOUNGE: Comedy Open Mic and Showcase (standup), 8 p.m., free. STRYTLLR (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

MOOGS PLACE: Gold Tooth Gator (blues, rock), 9 p.m., free.

champlain islands/northwest

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Game Night, 8 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury

CORK WINE BAR & MARKET (WATERBURY): Helen Hummel (folk), 6 p.m., free. LOCALFOLK SMOKEHOUSE: Seth Yacovone Band (blues, rock), 9:30 p.m., free.

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Barbacoa, the Tsunamibots, Beware the Dangers of the Ghost Scorpian! (surf), 9 p.m., free.

THE RESERVOIR RESTAURANT & TAP ROOM: Robin Gottfried Band (rock), 10 p.m., free.

GUSTO’S: DJ LaFountaine (hits), 9:30 p.m., $3.

middlebury area

WHAMMY BAR: Kelly Ravin and Halle Toulis (country), 7 p.m., free.

ZENBARN: Perkins, Ross & DeWees (old-time), 9 p.m., $5

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: DJ Earl (open format), 9:30 p.m., free.

NORTH HERO HOUSE INN & RESTAURANT: Ed Schenk (piano), 5:30 p.m., free. TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: Buck Hollers (bluegrass), 7 p.m., free.

outside vermont

MONOPOLE: Ausable Branch (folk), 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): The Wheelers (rock covers), 9 p.m., free.

SUN.21

burlington

RADIO BEAN: Pete Sutherland and Tim Stickle’s Old Time Session (traditional), 1 p.m., free. Fenn Macon, Tough Guy (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free. Henry Finch: Near Capacity (singer-songwriter), 9 p.m., free. Pocket Vinyl (piano rock and live stage art), 10:30 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Jay Pharoah (standup), 7 p.m., $25/35.

barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Bleecker & MacDougal (folk), 11 a.m., free. SWEET MELISSA’S: Live Band Karaoke, 8 p.m., donation.

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Hannah Fair (singer-songwriter), 9:30 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Adult Sex Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. Dead Set (Grateful Dead tribute), 9:30 p.m., $5. 18+. RADIO BEAN: DJ Lee J (eclectic), 4 p.m., free. Honky Tonk Tuesday with Ponyhustle, 10 p.m., $5. RED SQUARE: DJ A-RA$ (open format), 8 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Seth Yacovone (blues), 7 p.m., free. Blackout Barbie and SVPPLY (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

chittenden county HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: The Devil Makes Three, the Huntress and Holder of Hands (bluegrass, folk), 8:30 p.m., $27.50/30. ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Trivia with Top Hat Entertainment, 7 p.m., free.

FOAM BREWERS: Sugarsnap Trio (folk), noon, free. TUE.23

» P.64


GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Easing into

REVIEW this Clothcutter, Landfall EP

(ONSET AUDIO, DIGITAL DOWNLOAD)

Clothcutter is a talented EDM producer who is old enough to insist on calling it “bass music.” This is fitting, since he draws from a much deeper well than those on the summer festival circuit. The man behind the bottomheavy breaks is Forest Bond, a Burlington-based programmer, business owner and longtime jungle/drum-and-bass DJ. Bond only recently started releasing music as Clothcutter but has already built a solid catalog. 2017 was a big year for Clothcutter, shaped by two very different releases. His No Good EP, released on BTV imprint Party Guy Records, was a blitzkrieg of uptempo styles. Bond carved a lane between jungle and DJ Rashad-style footwork that was sparse and compelling. It was also downright brutal and perhaps not the most accessible introduction to his work.

Dan Zura, Leo’s Lament (STATE AND MAIN RECORDS, DIGITAL DOWNLOAD, VINYL)

Join us as we take you through the ABCs and 123s of retirement and how it can affect you.

His Reverberations Remixes project skewed closer to the melodic, R&B aspects of drum-and-bass music — think Roni Size or Massive Attack. It also showcased Bond’s educated ear for production. In particular, his remixes shine. Not only is his mixing crisp and deep, he has an innate sense of song structure. Which brings us to Landfall EP, Clothcutter’s latest, released in December on Seattle label Onset Audio. True to form, the producer has mutated once again, and the result is his best work to date. This is a short, high-voltage instrumental set. The gorgeous piano wash that opens the lead track, “Song for Éa,” sets the tone for a serious, polished project. It’s the work of an experienced architect. The main themes emerge slowly, the melodies are more classical than club music, and it sounds transcendent at high volumes. “Free Range,” an earnest scorcher, kicks the EP into dance-floor gear. Bond never relies on repetition, always pushing his songs in new directions that

never wander. Squint past the booming arpeggiators and filter sweeps, and you WHEN: Tuesday, January 23rd can see a real songwriter at work here TIME: 5:30 p.m.-7 p.m. amid the chaos. WHERE: Jo Ann Thibault & Associates, “You’ll Know Me” is a nod to his No 457 Mill Pond Road, Colchester Good EP work, pitting spastic drums over RSVP: JoAnnThibault.com or 802.662.4923 a lurching half-time feel. It’s the most stripped-down track here, which makes it easy to appreciate Clothcutter’s inventive tailoring. Landfall closes with the cinematic “Lying in Wait.” A vast soundscape of ominous drones, it is by far the most Jo Ann Thibault is a Registered Representative and Investment Adviser Representative of textural piece on the EP, ready for a movie Equity Services, Inc., Securities and investment advisory services are offered solely by Equity Services, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC, Jo Ann Thibault & Associates is independent trailer or luxury car ad. of Equity Services, Inc. 354 Mountain View Drive, Suite 200, Colchester, VT 05446. Tel: (802)864-6819. Mailing address: 483 Mill Pond Rd, Colchester, VT05446 TC98923(0118)1 As a teaser, Landfall is a grand slam. Each of its four tracks is single-worthy in its respective subgenre. And despite 1 compositional differences, all the songs 12v-joannthibault011718.indd Hopkins Center for the 1/10/18 Arts10:28 AM fit together nicely. While it’s hard to see At DArtmouth the EP as anything but the prelude to a killer album, old-school LPs don’t drive the EDM scene — singles do. Which means Clothcutter was born at the right time. He’s a producer with serious chops and big vision. Wherever 2018 takes him, expect more fireworks. Landfall is available at onsetaudio. bandcamp.com.

The title track is brief but stunning. The song has the feel of a late ’70’s Fleetwood Mac soft jam, with sunny pedal steel atop Zura’s delicately plucked acoustic guitar. “I’m so bound to the ground / I’m so bound / I could not get much further down / I’m just so bound to the ground,” he sings, every word dripping with beautiful melancholia. “I Get to Talking” and “Let You Worry” both fall decidedly in the realm of modern classiccountry torchbearers Sturgill Simpson and Jason Isbell — though Zura’s myopic snark keeps his songs distinctive. Some of Zura’s earlier releases had a sameness of tone, like a man lingering in a nice field for a little too long. Perhaps it’s the time he spent crafting Leo’s Lament, or just the natural progression of his writing, but Zura keeps things moving at all times. If the album were a novel, it’d be a page-turner. It doesn’t hurt that he honed his songs with a subtle, evocative band. Pedal steel ace Asa Brosius splashes color around Zura’s melodies. Drummer Ben Roy and bassist Eric Clifford — who also

engineered and produced the record — slide effortlessly between laid-back country and, as on the fuzzed-out “Slip and Score,” angular indie rock. Zura claims Leo’s Lament was inspired by “distance, Texas, Vermont, whiskey, waists, plains, mood disorders, addiction, pottery and zazen.” Maybe meditation afforded him the peace of mind to weave together such invisible themes and to make what feels like a rambling, 33-minute confession captivating. Or maybe it was the whiskey. Either way, Zura’s vocal delivery has only gotten better over time, exuding confidence and character throughout. He can go with an almost new-wave, brooding menace — as on “Your Beam” — or soar with barely controlled vigor, as on “Atlantic Avenue.” Leo’s Lament is Zura’s finest work and another solid release for State and Main Records, the Montpelier-based, artist-run label. It’s safe to say the music scene in the capital city remains vibrant and diverse. Long may that continue. Zura and his band play a release show for Leo’s Lament on Saturday, January 27, at DeMena’s in Montpelier. The album is available at danzura.bandcamp.com.

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Dan Zura hasn’t released a full-length album since his 2006 breakout debut, What Moves You Kid. The Montpelierbased singer-songwriter arrived as an almost fully formed product, setting forth with what can be best described as lonesome alt-country — a rich vein to tap, if one has the skill to navigate its traps. In the intervening 12 years, Zura has issued several notable EPs. But his new full-length record, Leo’s Lament, is the most complete document of the songwriter’s talents to date. It doesn’t start on the strongest foot, though. “Arc Rider” is an awkward opener, with a shuffled beat and resigned sort of aggression. The mid-tempo rocker pushes toward college rock. Further listening reveals a melodically complex song that grows in stature — though it might have been better placed later on the album.

RETIREMENT

Indie folk singer-songwriter (“Heartbeats”) offers hushed, intimate songs that “ask big questions”

Untitled-39 1

hop.dartmouth.edu • 603.646.2422

MUSIC 63

YOU A VT ARTIST OR BAND? SEND US YOUR MUSIC! DIGITAL: MUSIC@SEVENDAYSVT.COM; GET YOUR MUSIC REVIEWED: ARE SNAIL MAIL: MUSIC C/O SEVEN DAYS 255 S. CHAMPLAIN ST., SUITE 5, BURLINGTON, VT 05401

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WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

SWEET MELISSA’S: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free.

NECTAR’S: Django Soulo (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free. Kudu Stooge (psych-rock, jazz-funk), 9 p.m., free/$5. 18+.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Ricky Golden (acoustic), 7:30 p.m., free.

middlebury area

HATCH 31: Erin Cassels-Brown (indie folk), 6 p.m., free. Kelly Ravin and Lowell Thompson (country), 7 p.m., free. TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: Karaoke with DJ Chauncey, 9 p.m., free.

SEVEN DAYS

WED.24 burlington

CITIZEN CIDER: Brett Hughes (country), 6 p.m., free.

64 MUSIC

THE DAILY PLANET: Lowell Thompson (alt-country), 8 p.m., free. ARTIST INFO

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THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

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LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Cody Sargent Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free.

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Karaoke with DJ Vociferous, 9:30 p.m., free.

outside vermont

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Sierra Hull Trio, bluegrass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 2 A Capella Festival . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 3

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JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. JUNIPER: The Marty Fogel Quartet (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: DJ Two Sev (eclectic vinyl), 4 p.m., free. Stephanie Tonneson (indie pop), 8:30 p.m., free. Justin Panigutti Band (rock), 10:30 p.m., free. RED SQUARE: DJ KermiTT (eclectic), 7 p.m., free. DJ Cre8 (hip-hop), 11 p.m., free. RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: The County Down (Americana, reggae), 7 p.m., free. Gypsy Reel (traditional Irish, folk), 7:30-10 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Hotel Karaoke, 9 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Standup Open Mic and Improv Jam, 7 p.m., free. Songs in the Key of Slink (improv), 8:30 p.m., $5.

chittenden county

HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Collie Budz, Jo Mersa Marley, the Holdup (reggae), 8 p.m., $25. HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Octave Cat featuring Jesse Miller (Lotus), Eli Winderman (Dopapod), Charlie Patierno, Nudist Co (electronic), 8 p.m., $12/15.

JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: Bluegrass Jam Session, 7 p.m., free. STONE CORRAL BREWERY: Bluegrass Session, 7 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Jason Dick (reggae, soul), 6 p.m., free. CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: All Request Video, 9 p.m., free. SWEET MELISSA’S: D. Davis (acoustic), 5:30 p.m., donation. WHAMMY BAR: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

IDLETYME BREWING COMPANY: The Idletyme Band (blues, rock), 8 p.m., free. MOOGS PLACE: Abby Sherman (Americana), 8:30 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury

ZENBARN: Zach Nugent’s Acoustic Dead Duos (Grateful Dead tribute), 7 p.m., free.

middlebury area CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

TWO BROTHERS TAVERN: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. Open Mic Night, 9 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom PARKER PIE CO.: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

outside vermont MONOPOLE: Open Mic with Lucid, 10 p.m., free. m


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Pop Painter

From web to watercolor, Jeffrey Robbins’ career takes a turn ROBIN KATRICK

TALKING ART

66 ART

SEVEN DAYS

01.17.18-01.24.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Jeffrey Robbins in his studio

J

effrey Robbins is not a starving artist. With his mind on how to support himself, he dropped out of New York’s Pratt Institute in 2000 and opted instead to pursue a career in web development and e-commerce during the internet boom. After spending his earlier adult life in New York City, Robbins, 38, relocated to Burlington with his wife in the summer of 2015. Since then, he’s found the time to rededicate himself to art making. Robbins has established a routine that’s allowed him to experiment with ideas that were brewing for more than a decade. The results have been fruitful. For his first public showing in about 15 years, Robbins was accepted into the juried show of Burlington’s South End Art Hop last fall, exhibiting two of his drippy, trippy watercolors. The juror, New York gallerist Asya Geisberg, awarded Robbins first place for his painting “Cellar Dwellers.”

“I wanted to reward a vision executed with such ferocity that little did it matter my own personal stake in the artist’s choices,” Geisberg wrote. She continued, “[Robbins’] commitment to making every form as sinewy and spaghetti-like as possible and colors from a Pop-y ’70s quilt made me want to indulge in every last wanton limb and dirty crumb.” Through February, Burlingtonians can see Robbins’ work at Speeder & Earl’s Coffee. Seven Days met up with Robbins to talk about youthful rebellion, schlocky horror flicks and working outside a major commercial art scene. SEVEN DAYS: What drove you to go to art school, and to leave? JEFFREY ROBBINS: I’d always been artistic when I was young. I ended up going to Pratt in 1998 for painting, and while I was spending all of this money to be there, I was thinking, How am I going to make a living when I get out of this? I come from Buffalo; it’s a very blue-collar

art BY RAC H E L E L I Z ABE TH JO NE S

town. I didn’t grow up wealthy or anything like that, so I had to figure out how I was going to make a living. This was at the height of the internet boom, and it was like, if you know HTML, you’re golden! So I decided to transfer some of my art skills into the digital realm by doing graphic design and [Adobe] Illustrator. I started doing some of that digital art, and I hated it. I felt like it was a diluted version of what I wanted to do with art. So I said, “I might as well go full bore and learn programming and take that route.” And I have. SD: Your work has a gooey, irreverent quality, but it’s actually precisely executed. Can you talk about your visual influences? JR: When I was young, I was very into horror movies. I still am, and it’s a big influence. I was 9 years old, maybe 8, when I started watching horror movies. I remember when my family got a VHS player for the first time. I went to the video shop on the way home from getting our Sharp VHS player, and all of these movie covers [were] just jumping out, like Chopping Mall and Ghoulies. [The horror movies] are so hokey, and none of them actually hold up as good movies at all. I think of Phantasm as this great aesthetic masterpiece, and, in the fog of my memory, it is. And then I watch it and am like, Man, this movie is horrible. We had a clubhouse, and I would draw werewolves and vampires and hang them up all over it. I would look

at skateboard graphics from the time, which I still think are super cool. They were very colorful, very neon, loud and in-your-face. I feel like they spoke to rebellion when you were a 9-year-old. A lot of that aesthetic still sticks with me: the skateboard deck, the VHS cover of a horror movie, a Tales From the Crypt comic book, thrash metal album art; all of those things are still so strongly embedded in my visual memory. SD: Have you been making work steadily since you left art school? JR: Once I dropped out of Pratt, I would make art on and off. That was a cycle I had for many years, and for most of that time I was living in New York City. New York is the cultural capital of the world, arguably, and trying to make art in that environment when you’re not 100

“Cellar Dwellers”


ART SHOWS

I WOULD LOOK AT SKATEBOARD GRAPHICS FROM THE TIME, WHICH I STILL THINK ARE SUPER COOL. JEF F REY ROBBINS

percent sure what you are doing is very intimidating. Not until I moved to Vermont a few years ago did I really say, “OK, this is what I’m going to focus on now.” I’m free from a lot of the pressures that you have in a big commercial art market like New York. Burlington is a very

Friday, January 26 St. Albans City Hall Two tastings: 4:30-6:30 pm OR 7-9 pm Admission: $12 in advance online $18 at the door

Under 16 free. All others must register. ID required for alcohol samples. Information and registration at www.ingoodtasteVT.com Sponsors: Peoples Trust Company, Northwestern Medical Center, VT Federal Credit Union, St. Albans Cooperative Creamery, Yankee Farm Credit. Media Sponsor: Seven Days

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Jeffrey Robbins has work on view through February 28 at Speeder & Earl’s Coffee in Burlington. jeffreyrobbins.net

‘BARN ART’: Seeking submissions of artworks related to barns for an upcoming juried exhibition. For guidelines and to submit, visit cmacvt.org. Deadline: February 23. Compass Music and Arts Center, Brandon. Info, info@cmacvt.org.

‘PLEASED TO MEET YOU!’: This 2018 show will bring to life fantastical, imaginative creatures and beings of the nonhuman variety, whether based on folklore, ancient myths, wild imagination or a memorable dream. Any medium welcome. Deadline: February 2. For more info and submission guidelines, see studioplacearts.com. Studio Place Arts, Barre. Free for members; $10 for nonmembers. Info, 479-7069.

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ART 67

NEW THIS WEEK

LIVE WELL.

SEVEN DAYS

‘SCORCHED’: This 2018 group show involves work in which the effects of heat and fire can be easily seen and experienced, including encaustic media, singed paper and other ephemeral materials, charred wood, pit-fired vessels, and hammered metal and blown-glass objects. Deadline: May 18. For more info and submission guidelines, see studioplacearts.com. Studio Place Arts, Barre. Free for members; $10 for nonmembers. Info, 479-7069.

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commonality, conservation, migration, habitat, protection, and/or coordination among peoples, species, places and/or time will be considered. To submit, email up to three JPEG images to museum@birdsofvermont. org. Deadline: March 27. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington. Info, 434-2167.

BE WELL.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

EAT WELL.

ART AT THE DAILY PLANET: The restaurant in downtown Burlington seeks fine and/ or scenic artists to showcase work. Shows last two months; all proceeds go to artist. For immediate consideration, email gm@ dailyplanetvt.com. Deadline: January 31. The Daily Planet, Burlington. Info, 862-9647.

‘COMMON GROUNDS’: In recognition of 100 years of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and its conservation consequences, the museum seeks bird-oriented artworks for an exhibit to open in May. Art of and about birds, exploring

Come sip, sample and chat with the farmers, growers and producers responsible for the food on local tables at...

INFO

CALL TO ARTISTS

‘TELL ME’: There are currently 6,909 living languages. What do the connected sounds and symbols of words suggest for the visual arts? Studio Place Arts is seeking diverse languages and letterforms (real or invented), new communication technologies, censorship, graffiti, collage and urgent messages to create a Tower of Babel in the center of the gallery. Proposals for this structure in whole or part are welcomed. Deadline: April 6. For info and submission guidelines, see studioplacearts.com. Studio Place Arts, Barre. Free for members; $10 for nonmembers. Info, 479-7069.

r like you’ve neve ! tasted it before

supportive city for the arts, and there are a lot of opportunities to get a little bit of recognition. You don’t really have to give a shit whether you’re going to sell anything — you’re not going to sell anything. Maybe it finds an audience, maybe it doesn’t, but you can do whatever you want. When I finally did decide that art was something I wanted to do seriously again, it wasn’t because I felt like I had to do it; it was because I felt compelled to do it. I feel like I’ve hit a midlife creative spurt — more than I’ve ever had in my life. In art school, you’re still doing it on somebody else’s terms, at somebody else’s direction. Here, I have no direction; I just do it because I want to. I do it seven nights a week, and I love it. m Contact: rachel@sevendaysvt.com

“Interdimensional Discovery”

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art CALL TO ARTISTS

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chittenden county

‘PAINTING FOR A CURE’: A collection of recent works by local artist/architect Ted Montgomery. Proceeds support the University of Vermont Cancer Center research team headed by Dr. David Krag. Through March 30. Info, 985-8222. Shelburne Vineyard.

NEW THIS WEEK burlington

f AUDUBON PHOTOGRAPHY AWARDS EXHIBIT: Winning bird photographs selected from more than 5,500 entries. Reception: Friday, February 2, 5:307:30 p.m. January 22-February 6. Info, 540-3018. The Gallery at Main Street Landing in Burlington. f DUSTY BOYNTON: “From Within,” works that merge memory and personal experience for a childlike appearance that is nonetheless sophisticated in gesture and expression. f EDWIN OWRE: “New Constructions,” an exhibition of works that reference the formative American art movements of the 1960s and ’70s while embracing contemporary expressions of mark-making. f ELISE WHITTEMORE: “One by One,” works that explore the physicality of printmaking, as well as formal constructs inherent to the natural world. Reception: Friday, January 19, 6-8 p.m. January 19-April 7. Info, 865-7166. BCA Center in Burlington. f JOHN R. KILLACKY: “Embodied Voice: Video Narratives,” works by the artist, performer and Flynn Center executive director including AIDSrelated videos from the 1990s, disability-themed pieces from the 2000s, and recent collaborations with Vermont artists Todd R. Lockwood and Art Bell. Reception: Friday, January 26, 5 p.m. January 19-February 16. Info, 865-6432. Champlain College Art Gallery in Burlington.

barre/montpelier

NITYA BRIGHENTI: “Light and Shadow,” recent watercolor and oil paintings featuring notable streetscapes and historical portraits. January 17-March 2. Info, 808-358-8185. Kellogg-Hubbard Library in Montpelier.

stowe/smuggs

f BURTON SNOWBOARDS RETROSPECTIVE:

Vintage to modern snowboards, original outerwear, and images and stories from the Vermont company’s 41-year history. Reception: Saturday, January 20, 6-7 p.m. January 20-April 15. Info, 760-4634. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe Mountain Resort.

SEVEN DAYS

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

f HAL MAYFORTH: “Avenues,” works by the

award-winning cartoonist and painter. Reception: Thursday, January 25, 3-5 p.m. January 22-February 9. Info, 635-1469. Julian Scott Memorial Gallery, Johnson State College.

f ‘ORDINARY TIME’: Paintings by Maine artist Grace DeGennaro and kinetic sculpture by Boston artist Anne Lilly. f PHILIP HERBISON: “The Infinite Shapes of Water,” large-scale digital photo prints. Reception: Friday, January 19, 5-7 p.m. January 19-April 14. Info, 253-8358. Helen Day Art Center in Stowe.

randolph/royalton

‘A CLOSER LOOK’: Paintings and photographs by the three “People’s Choice” award winners of 2017 Area Artists Show: Valerie Auffray Daniel, Judy Laliberte and Jo Lavasseur. January 20-March 3. Info, 728-9878. Chandler Gallery in Randolph.

f JENNIFER PALKOWSKI JACQUES: “Before the Storm,” abstract landscapes. Reception: Sunday, February 11, 2-4 p.m. January 24-March 7. Info, 889-9404. Tunbridge Public Library.

ART EVENTS

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60+ ART GROUP: A free meet-up for folks 60 or older who’d like to be creative and make art in a social environment. River Arts, Morrisville, Thursday, January 18, 10 a.m.-noon. Info, 888-1261.

VISUAL ART IN SEVEN DAYS:

PHILIP HERBISON: Assemblages of wood created intuitively by the Stowe artist. Through January 28. Info, 985-9511. Rustic Roots in Shelburne. ‘SWEET TOOTH: THE ART OF DESSERT’: An exploration of the American appetite for sweets and its impact on modern visual culture. Through February 18. Info, 985-3346. Shelburne Museum.

Claire Van Vliet

The “book arts” sit squarely at the intersection

of content and form, and the Northeast Kingdom’s Van Vliet is widely recognized as one of the discipline’s early innovative champions. She founded the celebrated Janus Press in San Diego in 1955 and received the first-ever MacArthur Foundation grant for bookmaking in 1989. Now on view in Montpelier in the Vermont Supreme Court Gallery, “Sky and Earth” brings together a series of the artist’s dreamy, subdued pulp paintings, mottled landscapes rendered in the muted tones of plant fibers. Through March 30. Pictured: “Fieldwork.” AUDUBON PHOTOGRAPHY AWARDS POP-UP EXHIBIT: A celebration of the winning bird photographs selected from more than 5,500 entries. T.W. Wood Gallery, Montpelier, Thursday, January 18, 5:30-8 p.m. Info, 434-3068. CLASS: ‘UNUSUAL LANDSCAPES FROM AROUND THE WORLD’: Instructor Jan Danziger leads this educational visual art series. Call to register. Twin Valley Senior Center, East Montpelier, Friday, January 19, 3-5 p.m. Info, 223-6954.

ONGOING SHOWS burlington

‘CONSTRUCTED GESTURES’: Collages, montages and digitally manipulated photography by Wendy James, Greg Merhar, Sandy Milens, Bruce Pendleton, Paul Reynolds and Derrick Senior. Through March 31. Info, 652-4500. Amy E. Tarrant Gallery in Burlington.

FAIRY AND DEMON DRAWING WORKSHOP: Emily Anderson demonstrates how to tame your demons and unleash your personal powers of positivity in this drawing workshop. No experience necessary, ages 13 and up. Bluebird Fairies, Burlington, Saturday, January 20, 1-3 p.m. $20. Info, emily@ bluebirdfairies.com.

JEFFREY ROBBINS: Works in watercolor by the Burlington artist and the 25th South End Art Hop jury winner. Through February 28. Info, 658-6016. Speeder & Earl’s Coffee in Burlington.

FAMILY ART SATURDAY: Families are invited to drop in and enjoy an art activity inspired by current exhibitions. Burlington City Arts, Saturday, January 20, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 865-7166.

LAURA HALE: “A Bug’s Eye View: Macro Photography of the Natural World,” images of insects, amphibians and flowers that show the hidden life of tiny things in Vermont. Through January 31. Info, 238-7994. Nunyuns Bakery & Café in Burlington.

‘HOW TO CREATE AN ARTIST BIO & STATEMENT’: Wildlife artist Corinna Thurston leads this workshop advising artists and creative entrepreneurs. SEABA Center, Burlington, Wednesday, January 17, 12-1:15 p.m. Info, 859-9222. ‘LOST AND FOUND’: An “art treasure hunt” instigated by Vermont artist DJ Barry, in which he places stenciled woodcuts in various locations, free to those who find them in exchange for paying it forward. Find the artist on Facebook for clues. Various Vermont locations, Wednesdays, January 17 and 24. Info, djbarryart@gmail.com. PHOTO CO-OP: Lens lovers gather to share their experience and knowledge of their craft. Gallery at River Arts, Morrisville, Thursday, January 18, 6-8 p.m. $5. Info, 888-1261. SOCIAL SUNDAYS: A weekly community event featuring music, refreshments and art workshops. Milton Art Center & Gallery, Sunday, January 21, noon-3 p.m. Info, 355-6583. TALK: ‘FAYUM PORTRAIT FROM ROMAN EGYPT’: Caroline Knapp, ’18, a joint major in history of art and architecture and classics, presents her senior work in progress on the museum’s recently acquired portrait. Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, Friday, January 19, 12:30 p.m. Info, 443-3168.

ART LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY RACHEL ELIZABETH JONES. LISTINGS ARE RESTRICTED TO ART SHOWS IN TRULY PUBLIC PLACES.

JOHN GONTER: Landscapes of spring, summer and fall by the Burlington painter. Through February 3. Info, 2kdeep@gmail.com. Half Lounge in Burlington.

LYNN CUMMINGS: “Shapes, Signs & Symbols: Legacy of the Ancients,” works inspired by the artist’s observations of evidence of the ancients, particularly in the southwestern U.S., as well as several cultures in the South Pacific, Peru and Colombia. Through March 31. Info, 859-9222. SEABA Center in Burlington. MARTIN BOCK: Photographs and paintings by the Vermont artist. Through March 31. SHARON RADTKE: Photographs and paintings of Vermont’s landscape and wildlife by the Milton artist. Through January 31. Info, 863-3403. Fletcher Free Library in Burlington.

f MARY LACY: “Pollination,” new works by the Vermont painter, inspired by pollinators and their counterparts, flowers. Reception: Thursday, January 18, 6-9 p.m. Through March 2. Info, marylacy4@gmail.com. Karma Bird House in Burlington. ‘SMALL WORKS’: An annual seasonal exhibition featuring works measuring not more than 12 inches by local artists. Through January 20. The S.P.A.C.E. Gallery in Burlington.

GET YOUR ART SHOW LISTED HERE!

IF YOU’RE PROMOTING AN ART EXHIBIT, LET US KNOW BY POSTING INFO AND IMAGES BY THURSDAYS AT NOON ON OUR FORM AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT OR GALLERIES@SEVENDAYSVT.COM.

‘WATER’: Water-themed works by 13 Burlingtonarea photographers. Through February 27. Info, 434-5503. Healthy Living Market & Café in South Burlington. ‘WILD THINGS’: Works by Susan Raber Bray, Wendy Copp, Cindy Cowles, John Hodgson, Max Hodgson, Juliet McVicker, Bethany Myrick and John Rivers. Through January 31. Info, 985-3819. All Souls Interfaith Gathering in Shelburne.

barre/montpelier

‘THE ART OF GRANITE’: An exhibition exploring the use of Barre granite in sculpture, highlighting a continuity between classical techniques and the innovation and creativity of today’s artists. Through March 30. Info, 479-8500. Vermont History Center in Barre. CLAIRE VAN VLIET: “Sky and Earth,” pulp paintings using mineral pigments and handmade paper by the renowned Vermont artist between 1995 and 2011. Through March 30. Info, 828-0749. Vermont Supreme Court Gallery in Montpelier. ‘EXPLORERS OF NORWICH’: An exhibition exploring the lives of Norwich University alumni who shaped and changed the U.S. during the mid-19th and early 20th centuries. Through June 30. Info, 485-2183. Sullivan Museum & History Center, Norwich University, in Northfield. ‘FAMILY TRAITS: ART, HUMOR & EVERYDAY LIFE’: An exhibition originating from the Vermont Folklife Center that tells the story of Stanley Lyndes, a Calais-born teacher, craftsman, storyteller, artist, hunter and grandfather. Through January 26. Info, 479-8519. Vermont History Museum in Montpelier. JAQUITH INVITATIONAL GROUP ART SHOW: Works by Terry Allen, Lorilla Banbury, Jennifer Barlow, Chuck Bohn, Juliana Fletcher, Diane Fitch, Tracey Hambleton, Viiu Nuiiler, Marge Pulaski, Helen Rabin, Frederick Rudi, Michael Schumacher and David Smith. Reception: Friday, January 26, 6-8 p.m. Through February 28. Info, 426-3581. Jaquith Public Library in Marshfield. LINDA MIRABILE: “Avian Inspired,” bird-inspired paintings by the Vermont artist. Through March 30. Info, 828-0749. Governor’s Gallery in Montpelier. LINDA S. FINKELSTEIN: Eco-art creations made with eucalyptus, indigo and rust, as well as “transformations” combining photography, collage and drawing. Through February 7. Info, 479-0896. Espresso Bueno in Barre. MARGARET SPARROW: “Still Time,” fine paintings by the northern Vermont artist. Through January 31. Info, 279-6403. Central Vermont Medical Center in Berlin. MATTHEW MONK: “Painting as Language,” 50 recent works by the artist and academic dean of the Vermont College of Fine Arts. Through January 20. Info, 828-8556. College Hall Gallery, Vermont College of Fine Arts, in Montpelier. MERRY SCHMIDT: Watercolor paintings by the local artist. Through February 12. Info, 223-2518. Montpelier Senior Activity Center. NITYA BRIGHENTI: “Street Scapes of Vermont,” paintings in watercolor by the Vermont artist. Through January 30. Info, 223-3338. KelloggHubbard Library in Montpelier. RYAN GEARY: “America Falling,” one year of collages processing postelection anxiety syndrome. Through March 1. Info, 595-4866. The Hive in Middlesex.


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‘Sweet Music Never Heard Until Diversity Plays Catch-Up: Contemporary African American Thought’ Curator cultural

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color] are often [not] co-opted

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TS MENT PRESEN

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“usually at the end of an arc (death bed), when major museums realize that there is a gap in their collection.” This exhibition advances its correctional ethos through the work of six artists: Sadikisha Saundra Collier, Dr. Myrah Brown Green, Al Johnson, Otto Neals, Eric Pryor and Theda Sandiford. Styles vary, but the juxtaposed materials and textures convey exuberance, ease and even musicality. Through January 26. Pictured: “Baby of Wisdom” by Johnson. ‘SEVEN WAYS OF SEEING’: Works by members of the f7 photography group. SUSAN ABBOT AND AXEL STOHLBERG: New paintings by the Vermont artists. Through February 23. Info, 262-6035. T.W. Wood Gallery in Montpelier.

f SHOW 23: A showcase of the latest works by gallery members plus paintings by guest artist Jeanne Thurston. Reception: Friday, February 2, 4-8 p.m. Info, 552-0877. The Front in Montpelier. ‘CURIOUS & COOL’: Unusual and seldom-seen artifacts of ski culture from the museum’s archives. Through October 31. Info, 253-9911. Vermont Ski and Snowboard Museum in Stowe. JAMES PETERSON: “Dreamcatcher,” an immersive installation by the artist-in-residence from Los Angeles. Through September 30. Info, 253-8358. Spruce Peak at Stowe.

JOAN BRACE O’NEAL: “The White Slip Drawings,” an ongoing series of figurative works in graphite. Through February 25. Info, 888-1261. Gallery at River Arts in Morrisville.

‘THE RIVER WORKS PROJECT’: The final designs and sketches for the partnership of River Arts and Johnson State College, designed to increase awareness about the Lamoille River and its social, economic and environmental impact. Through January 18. Info, 888-1261. Morrisville Post Office.

‘10 YEARS: THE CAMERON PRINT PROJECT’: Works created by Cameron Visiting Artists, in collaboration with students of Hedya Klein’s silk-screen and intaglio classes, including Mark Dion, Derrick Adams, Tomas Vu, Kati Heck and Rona Yefman. Through April 29. Info, 443-5258. Middlebury College Museum of Art. ‘AN INSTALLATION OF FOLK, ETHNIC, VINTAGE & CONTEMPORARY ART INSPIRED BY ANDRÉ BRETON’S STUDIO AT THE CENTRE POMPIDOU’: An installation featuring African and European objects, as well as works by gallery artists. Through January 31. Info, 349-0979. BigTown Gallery Vergennes. MARK BENTON: “Rural Industry: An Embellishment or Blemish on the Landscape?,” a series of paintings exploring the rustic aesthetics of the energy and agricultural industries in the rural landscape. Through January 31. Info, 453-7011. WalkOver Gallery and Concert Room in Bristol. ‘MORE LIGHT’: Small works by Molly Bosley, Anne Cady, Edward Holland, Julia Jensen, Pamela Smith and Sobelman Cortapega. Through January 28. Info, 877-2173. Northern Daughters in Vergennes.

&

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f ‘UP HOME: HAND-COLORED PHOTOGRAPHS BY SUSANNE AND NEIL RAPPAPORT’: Images that document the late Minnie Griswold’s Pawlet home. Reception: Thursday, February 1, 5-7 p.m. Through March 31. Info, 388-4964. Vermont Folklife Center in Middlebury. RUTLAND/KILLINGTON SHOWS

BY

14 Margaret Street $10 21+ Plattsburgh, NY

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ART 69

RORY JACKSON: “Coming in From the Cold,” a new collection of Vermont landscape paintings. Through February 20. Info, 760-6785. Edgewater Gallery in Stowe.

middlebury area

SPONSORED

SEVEN DAYS

JUSTIN KENNEY: “The Parley of the Curve,” works made with shellac, paper, inks and graphite, representing the architecture of society in opposition with nature. Through February 25. Info, 888-1261. River Arts in Morrisville.

MATT LARSON: “Abstracting Nature,” a collection of mixed-media works by the Waterbury Center artist, who finds inspiration from natural systems and ecological processes. Through March 2. Info, 244-6636. White Meeting House in Waterbury.

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JIM WESTPHALEN: The Vermont photographer uses an adapted vintage camera to capture dynamic winter landscapes, blurring the line between photography and painting. Through January 31. Info, 253-8943. West Branch Gallery & Sculpture Park in Stowe.

KATHY STARK: “Mostly White,” a series of mixed-media paintings made through building and manipulating layers of paint and other materials. Through February 17. Info, 244-7801. Axel’s Gallery & Frame Shop in Waterbury.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

stowe/smuggs

mad river valley/waterbury


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ART SHOWS

art MIDDLEBURY AREA SHOWS

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rutland/killington

‘WINTER IN VERMONT’: A festive holiday show featuring works by more than 40 artists and artisans, including painting, photography, ceramics, jewelry and more. Through January 29. Info, 247-4956. Brandon Artists Guild. ‘ART OF RUTLAND COUNTY’: Inaugural gallery show featuring works by 34 area artists, including Bonnie Baird, Joan Curtis, Kerry O. Furlani, Warren Kimble, Grace Mellow and Erika Lawlor Schmidt. Through March 30. Info, the77gallery@gmail.com. The 77 Gallery in Rutland. JESSICA ADAMS: “A piece of string or a sunset, each acts,” a solo exhibition of mixed-media works by the Brooklyn artist. Through March 3. Info, vtalleygallery@gmail.com. The Alley Gallery in Rutland.

To subscribe, visit sevendaysvt.com/enews

JOAN CURTIS: “Living With the Earth,” three collections of paintings by the Brandon artist. Through March 31. Info, galleries@castleton.edu. Rutland City Hall.

f NICK NEDDO: “The Wildcrafted World of Nick

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Neddo: Merging Craft and Art,” nature scenes created from materials foraged and handcrafted by the sixth-generation Vermonter. Reception: Friday, January 19, 5-7 p.m. Through February 13. Info, 287-8398. Feick Arts Center, Green Mountain College, in Poultney.

upper valley

HELEN SHULMAN: “Art of Place,” an exhibition of abstract oil and cold wax paintings. Through February 1. Info, scavenger.gallery@gmail.com. Scavenger Gallery in White River Junction. HOLIDAY SHOW: Annual exhibition featuring small, gift-size matted prints. Through January 31. Info, 295-5901. Two Rivers Printmaking Studio in White River Junction.

Finance Administrator

SEVEN DAYS

01.17.18-01.24.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

The Town of Hartland, VT is seeking qualified applicants for the position of Finance Administrator. The Administrator provides management and leadership guidance in directing the operations of the Finance Department and reports directly to the Town Manager. The principle function of the Administrator is to perform financial oversight, planning and administrative duties, with responsibility over the Town’s budget, accounting, auditing and related financial operations. The administrator also acts as the Town’s Tax Collector. A two-year Associate Degree is required, and a BA/BS is preferred in relevant area of study. Municipal government finance experience is a plus as is knowledge of the NEMRC municipal and accounting software as well as Excel and Microsoft Office. Some night time meetings may be necessary. This is a managerial, full time position with an excellent benefits package. Pay will be based on qualifications and experience. A full job description is available at the Hartland Town Manager’s Office, located at 1 Quechee Road, Hartland, VT 05048 or online at www.hartland.govoffice.com To apply, email a cover letter and resume to David Ormiston, Town Manager at dormiston@hartlandvt.org or mail to: David Ormiston, Town Manager Town of Hartland P.O. Box 349 Hartland, VT 05048

70 ART

This position is open until filled, with priority to applications received by Friday, February 2nd, 2018. The Town of Hartland is an equal opportunity employer.

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‘IT’S COLD OUTSIDE’: New paintings by members of the Odanaksis ArtGroup. Through February 14. Info, 436-2473. Hartland Public Library. ‘THE LIGHT AROUND US’: An interactive, educational exhibition exploring the physics of light and how we see it. Through May 2. Free with museum admission. Info, 649-2200. Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich.

northeast kingdom

‘ARTS CONNECT AT CATAMOUNT ARTS’: An exhibition juried by Hood Museum of Art director John R. Stomberg, featuring outstanding work submitted by emerging and established artists from across the country. Through February 16. Info, 748-2600. Catamount Arts Center in St. Johnsbury. ‘BELLS & WHISTLES’: An exhibition exploring the myriad forms and associations connected to these ordinary objects. Through May 1. Info, 626-4409. The Museum of Everyday Life in Glover. BEN BARNES: Paintings by the Northeast Kingdom artist. Through March 31. Info, 472-9933. 3rd Floor Gallery in Hardwick. CHARLES TROTSKY & BEN BARNES: A new series of enamel and mixed-media prints that blend printmaking and graffiti, accompanied by furniture by local designer Barnes. Through February 28. Info, 748-0158. Northeast Kingdom Artisans Guild Backroom Gallery in St. Johnsbury. CHIP TROIANO: Travel photography by the Vermont artist. Through February 4. Info, 533-9370. Brown Library, Sterling College, in Craftsbury Common. GAYLE GIBSON: “South and North,” watercolor and oil paintings of Key West and West Glover by the Vermont artist. Through January 23. Info, 525-3366. Parker Pie Co. in West Glover.

brattleboro/okemo valley

‘TOUCHSTONES, TOTEMS, TALISMANS: ANIMALS IN CONTEMPORARY ART’: An exhibition exploring the deep connections humans have with animals, both domestic and wild, with works by Walton Ford, Bharti Kher, Colleen Kiely, Stephen Petegorsky,

Shelley Reed, Jane Rosen, Michal Rovner, Rick Shaefer and Andy Warhol. Through February 11. ‘YOUR SPACE: FLIGHTS OF FANCY’: Images of iconic artworks inspired by birds, from Leonardo’s sketches of flying machines to Ai Wei Wei’s design for the Olympic stadium in Beijing, assembled by education curator Linda Whelihan. Through February 11. ANILA QUAYYUM AGHA: “Shimmering Mirage,” a sculptural light installation inspired by Islamic architecture. Through March 10. Info, 257-0124. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center.

f BRIAN COHEN: Works on paper by the founding member of Two Rivers Printmaking Studio. Reception: Thursday, January 18, 5:30-7 p.m. Through February 23. Info, 869-2960. Main Street Arts in Saxtons River. DENISE BEAUDET: “Roots to Resistance,” a public art installation of 12 eight-foot portraits of women activists from across the globe, intended to make a connection for the viewer to the pathways of social change. Through January 31. Info, galleryinthewood@yahoo.com. Gallery in the Woods in Brattleboro. ‘WILDLANDS’: Works by 10 artists that celebrate public lands, national parks and wilderness. Through March 30. Info, 885-3061. The Great Hall in Springfield. ‘WINTER GROUP 2018’: New works by Jackie Abrams, Eric Boyer, Josh Bernbaum, Tiffany Heerema, Anne Johnstone, Gene Parulis, Torin Porter, Erika Radich, Donald Saaf and other gallery artists. Through March 18. Info, 251-8290. Mitchell Giddings Fine Arts in Brattleboro.

randolph/royalton

NANCY TAPLIN: A select retrospective of paintings by the Vermont artist. Through March 31. Info, 767-9670. BigTown Gallery in Rochester.

f PETER SCHUMANN: Postapocalyptic woodcuts by the Bread and Puppet Theater founder. Reception: Saturday, February 3, 3-5 p.m. Through March 2. Info, freealexis@hotmail.com. White River Gallery @ BALE in South Royalton. ROSS SHEEHAN: “Cuprum Papyrus,” more than 25 artworks including copper sculptures and works on paper, all sharing common archaeological themes from skeletal blueprints to studies in identification. Through February 20. Info, 800-431-0025. Hartness Library in Randolph Center.

outside vermont

KADER ATTIA: “Reason’s Oxymorons,” a researchdriven video installation consisting of a range of interviews with philosophers, psychiatrists, anthropologists, traditional healers, historians, musicologists, patients and immigrants. The conversations are organized around the ways in which non-Western and Western cultures approach psychiatric conditions and emotional breakdowns. Through March 18. Info, 603-6462426. Hood Downtown in Hanover, N.H. ‘LEONARD COHEN: A CRACK IN EVERYTHING’: A collection of brand-new works commissioned from and created by local and international artists who have been inspired by Leonard Cohen’s style and recurring themes, in honor of the late poet and musician. Through April 9. Info, 514-847-6226. Montréal Museum of Contemporary Art. ‘MNEMOSYNE’: An exhibition pairing ancient and modern European works with contemporary art by Canadian artists. Through May 20. ‘ONCE UPON A TIME ... THE WESTERN ‘: A multidisciplinary exhibition offers a new interpretation of the Western film genre by examining its links to the visual arts from the mid-19th century to today. Through February 4. NADIA MYRE: “Scattered Remains,” the first survey exhibition of the indigenous Québec artist. Through May 27. Info, 514-285-1600. Montréal Museum of Fine Arts. ‘SWEET MUSIC NEVER HEARD UNTIL DIVERSITY PLAYS CATCH-UP: CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN AMERICAN THOUGHT’: Works by Sadikisha Saundra Collier, Dr. Myrah Brown Green, Al Johnson, Otto Neals and Eric Pryor. Through January 26. Info, 518-563-1604. Strand Center for the Arts in Plattsburgh, N.Y. m


3 1 st A nnual Hotel Burlington & Conference Center The former location of the Sheraton

Sunday, January 21 Noon – 3 p.m. FASHION SHOW by Fiori Bridal Boutique and Ecco

PRIZE DRAWINGS throughout the day and 2 Grand Prize Honeymoon Getaways Courtesy of Milne Travel American Express

Mansfield Barn

Hotel Burlington & Conference Center

Vermont Party Starters

Bed, Bath & Beyond

Mary Kay Cosmetics

Perrywinkle’s Fine Jewelry

Waterworks Food & Drink

Supersounds Entertainment Co

Vermont Laser Services

Hampton Inn Burlington

Champlain College Event Center

Snow Farm Winery

Dickey’s Barbeque Pit

David’s Bridal

Sugartree Vermont

Men’s Wearhouse

Just In Cakes

Oasis Day Spa

Vermont Bride Magazine

Affordable Transportation

Premier Entertainment & Events

Homeport Spirit of Ethan Allen O’Briens Salons Jon Adams Photography

Central Market Florist at Price Chopper

Interested in exhibiting? Email paulg@95triplex.com for more details.

Pre-register at 95triplex.com or vermontbridemagazine.com

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Ecco-Clothes for Women & Men

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01.17.18-01.24.18

Milne Travel American Express

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VENDORS

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1/16/18 11:11 AM


movies Call Me by Your Name ★★★★★

H

ow fitting that this gorgeous, sensual and perceptive film, in which a young man and a somewhat older young man share a summer of discovery and love, is a collaboration of two auteurs — neither exactly young, but one somewhat older. If you ever wondered how a movie would look and sound as directed by Luca Guadagnino (A Bigger Splash) and scripted by James Ivory (A Room With a View), the answer is this: precisely like nothing else. Based on André Aciman’s 2007 novel, Call Me by Your Name portrays a season in the life of perhaps the most perfect movie family ever. Michael Stuhlbarg plays Professor Perlman, an authority on classical archaeology. Or Greco-Roman culture. Philology, maybe. The character, modeled on the author’s father, exhibits expertise in all these fields and more. All I know for sure is that people don’t watch TV a whole lot or make small talk ever in the Perlman home. Which reminds me, I should probably say something about the home itself, a 17th-century villa in northern Italy. It is perhaps — you guessed it — the most perfect movie villa ever. Fruit or-

REVIEWS

chards, gardens, every room with a view you wouldn’t believe. The sprawling yet somehow cozy château was inherited, we learn, not long before the start of the story by Annella Perlman (Amira Casar), the scholar’s cultured, stunning Italian wife. Along with their 17-year-old son, Elio, the couple spends summers catching Riviera rays, working (she’s a translator), playing music, reading and generally getting even smarter. The family also hosts a special guest for six weeks, a lucky doctoral candidate who’s earned the chance to intern with the professor. Elio is played by Timothée Chalamet, one of 2017’s ubiquitous breakouts. Like Stuhlbarg, he can also be seen in a rival Oscar front-runner (Chalamet in Lady Bird, Stuhlbarg in The Shape of Water). Armie Hammer gives a beautifully calibrated performance as the visitor, 24-year-old Oliver. Hammer will always be the Winklevoss twins in The Social Network to me, but I forgot all about them as he acclimated to this garden of earthly and cerebral delights. He wastes precious time, we see in retrospect, as he dazzles the village’s young ladies, plays volleyball and bicycles into town with his new friend, keeping his distance, even though he and the increasingly flirtatious Elio occupy adjoining bedrooms.

EDUCATED GUEST Hammer plays a doctoral candidate who takes a degree of interest in the precocious son of his host.

Did I mention Oliver’s dancing? A whole internet thing has been spawned by a scene in which he loses himself grooving to the Psychedelic Furs’ “Love My Way.” (Did I mention the movie is set in 1983?) Apparently you can substitute almost any other pop song, and Oliver grooves exactly as rapturously. It’s hardly a spoiler to report that the two eventually yield to their yearning. So exquisitely refined are their performances that Chalamet and Hammer actually look and sound like new men the next morning — which doesn’t go unnoticed, in a villa filled with super-perceptive brainiacs. We all

know what normally happens in stories like this. But it doesn’t. The Perlmans, remember, are the most perfect movie family ever. Were the gods to author a parenting guide, I doubt the chapter on helping a child come to terms with human sexuality could add much to what Elio’s father tells him in a lovely late scene. The film’s last-minute twist is strictly spoiler territory, so all I’ll say is that Call Me by Your Name is that rare achievement: a great film that only gets greater as it unfolds. Run, don’t walk. It’s a peach. RI C K KI S O N AK

72 MOVIES

SEVEN DAYS

01.17.18-01.24.18

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I, Tonya ★★★★★

I

n one of the mock interviews that open I, Tonya, Tonya Harding’s former coach (Julianne Nicholson) tells the audience that people love or hate the disgraced figure skater the way they love or hate America: “Tonya was totally American.” This is the movie’s thesis, too. It’s not a compliment but a challenge. It was a story the media loved without taking it seriously: When Harding faced off in her 1994 Olympic battle with Nancy Kerrigan, she was already under investigation for alleged involvement in a plot to maim her rival with a collapsible baton. Just months after the events, the makers of the TV movie “Nancy & Tonya: The Inside Story” were already presenting the saga as a jokey meta-tale of the birth of the 24-hour news cycle. So what makes the deconstructed biopic I, Tonya so original is not that director Craig Gillespie (Fright Night) and writer Steven Rogers take an ironic tack. It’s the extent to which they take Harding seriously. Without excusing her off-ice behavior, they remind us that, before her name became synonymous with tabloid fodder, Harding was a formidable athlete who beat the odds in a sport eager to reject her. Therein lies her tragedy — or was it a farce? After all, a story’s tone depends on its teller. The film makes that clear by alternating between fake present-day interview segments (based on genuine interviews, we’re

STICKING THE LANDING Robbie re-creates Harding’s most triumphant moment in Gillespie’s brilliantly off-the-wall biopic.

told) and dramatic reenactments, both using the same actors. Harding (Margot Robbie) and her ex-husband, Jeff Gillooly (Sebastian Stan), rarely agree, so what we see often contradicts what we’re told, and vice versa. Sometimes a reenactment even pauses for a character to face the audience and critique it, evoking the vertiginous era of “fake news.” Yet, from this chaos, a story does emerge. It’s the story of a working-class girl who excelled at a sport that was historically the

domain of “rich, prissy a-holes,” in the nevertactful words of LaVona, Harding’s largerthan-life mother. Allison Janney makes the character’s rage, sarcasm and occasional insight indelible. Even after Tonya transfers her loyalties from her abusive mom to an abusive husband, LaVona haunts her like a seething fury, doling out love and hate in equal measures. Gillespie gives the reenactments Martin Scorsese-esque cinematic flourishes: sweeping tracking shots, a vintage soundtrack. The

dark humor broadens in the depiction of the plot against Kerrigan, which is as clownishly inept as anything in a Coen brothers film. But I, Tonya really only works because of the sure, merciless strokes in which it sketches its main characters. Some have seen the film as an attempt to exonerate Harding, but the mock interviews do a lot more than present her point of view. With satirical acumen, Robbie captures the plaintive, untrustworthy quality of a kid insisting she’s only flunking because the teachers hate her — the very quality that bleeds off Harding in real interview footage. This is no reliable narrator. Yet Harding wasn’t alone in complaining about skating judges, and it’s impossible not to sympathize with her when she recalls her 1991 U.S. Championships win and says simply, “I was loved.” In Tonya’s narrative of herself, she’s a scrappy, self-made survivor fiercely trying to beat the elites. That’s often America’s narrative of itself, too. I, Tonya depicts Harding as a talent, a hard worker, and someone who rejoices endearingly in her wins and blames others for her losses. To call her “totally American” is, again, not to pay much of a compliment to her or to us, but right now it rings true. MARGO T HARRI S O N


MOVIE CLIPS

NEW IN THEATERS 12 STRONG: Warfare on horseback is the centerpiece of this action drama about the first Special Forces team deployed to Afghanistan after 9/11, based on Doug Stanton’s book Horse Soldiers. Chris Hemsworth, Michael Shannon and William Fichtner star. Nicolai Fuglsig directed. (130 min, R. Essex, Majestic, Paramount) CALL ME BY YOUR NAMEHHHHH A restless teenager (Timothée Chalamet) falls for his dad’s research assistant (Armie Hammer) in this atmospheric summer romance set in 1983 Italy, from director Luca Guadagnino (I Am Love). With Michael Stuhlbarg. (132 min, R. Roxy, Savoy; reviewed by R.K. 1/17) FOREVER MY GIRL: In this romantic drama based on the novel by Vermonter Heidi McLaughlin, a bad-boy rock star (Alex Roe) returns home to reconnect with his high school sweetheart (Jessica Rothe). Bethany Ashton Wolf directed. (104 min, PG. Essex) PHANTOM THREAD: In 1950s London, an elite dressmaker (Daniel Day Lewis, in what he says will be his last role) becomes fixated on a younger woman (Vicky Krieps) in this drama from writerdirector Paul Thomas Anderson (The Master). (130 min, R. Capitol, Roxy)

I, TONYAHHHHH This no-holds-barred biopic tells the story of former Olympic figure skater Tonya Harding (Margot Robbie), banned from her sport for her role in conspiring to injure a rival, as a dark comedy of errors. Allison Janney and Sebastian Stan also star. Craig Gillespie (The Finest Hours) directed. (120 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 1/17) JANEHHHHH This documentary from Brett Morgen (Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck) chronicles anthropologist Jane Goodall’s early fieldwork with apes. (90 min, NR. Savoy; reviewed by R.K. 11/15) JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLEHHH Four teens are trapped in a video game where they’re represented by human movie clichés (Dwayne Johnson, Karen Gillan, Kevin Hart and Jack Black) in this belated sequel to the 1995 action comedy. Jake Kasdan (Bad Teacher) directed. (119 min, PG-13) LADY BIRDHHHH Actor Greta Gerwig wrote and directed this acclaimed coming-of-age tale about a Sacramento teen (Saoirse Ronan) navigating her senior year. With Laurie Metcalf and Lucas Hedges. (93 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 11/29) MOLLY’S GAMEHH1/2 Writer Aaron Sorkin makes his directorial debut with this fact-based story of a young woman (Jessica Chastain) who made and lost her fortune running a high-stakes poker game. With Idris Elba and Kevin Costner. (140 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 1/10)

NOW PLAYING THE COMMUTERHHH Yes, Liam Neeson is punching things again, and this time he’s doing it on a commuter train that’s fallen prey to a criminal conspiracy. Jaume Collet-Serra (Non-Stop) directed the action thriller, also starring Vera Farmiga and Patrick Wilson. (104 min, PG-13) DARKEST HOURHHHH Gary Oldman plays Winston Churchill in this historical drama about his crucial decisions in the early days of World War II from director Joe Wright (Atonement). With Lily James and Kristin Scott Thomas. (125 min, PG-13) THE DISASTER ARTISTHHH1/2 James Franco directed and plays would-be auteur Tommy Wiseau in this comedy-drama about the making of The Room, celebrated by many as one of the most brilliantly bad films ever produced. Dave Franco and Ari Graynor costar. (104 min, R; reviewed by M.H. 12/20)

INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEYHH1/2 Lin Shaye returns as the ghost-whispering psychologist who (sort of) ties together this supernatural horror series. With Kirk Acevedo and Javier Botet. Adam Robitel (The Taking of Deborah Logan) directed. (103 min, PG-13)

H = refund, please HH = could’ve been worse, but not a lot HHH = has its moments; so-so HHHH = smarter than the average bear HHHHH = as good as it gets

TUESDAY, JANUARY 23 • 4:00-5:30 PM UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT IRA ALLEN CHAPEL THIS IS A TICKETED EVENT. TICKETS ARE FREE. Tickets are limited and available to the general public beginning Friday, January 19 at the following locations during business hours:

DUDLEY H. DAVIS CENTER - Miller Information Desk (3rd floor) WATERMAN BUILDING - Registrar’s Office Student Service Center Kiosk (3rd floor) PADDINGTON 2HHHH1/2 The marmalade-loving bear embarks on a search for the thief of a coveted pop-up book in this sequel to the family adventure hit, again directed by Paul King. With Ben Whishaw, Hugh Grant and Sally Hawkins. (103 min, PG) PITCH PERFECT 3HH Aca-why? The a capella Bellas face the temptation of adding instruments to their act as they compete at an overseas USO tour. Trish Sie (Step Up All In) directed the latest entry in the comedy series, starring Anna Kendrick, Ruby Rose and Rebel Wilson. (93 min, PG-13)

To request a disability-related accommodation, please contact Student Accessibility Services at 802-656-7753. Sponsored by President Tom Sullivan, Department of Student Life, and the Office of the Vice President for Human Resources, Diversity and Multicultural Affairs • uvm.edu/hrdma/mlk 4t-UVMengagement011718.indd 1

1/10/18 11:22 AM

THE EDGE Total Health Network is pleased to introduce

THE POSTHHH1/2 Steven Spielberg’s drama chronicles the days in 1971 when the Washington Post’s leadership struggled with the dilemma of whether to publish the explosive Pentagon Papers. With Tom Hanks as Ben Bradlee and Meryl Streep as Katherine Graham. (115 min, PG-13; reviewed by R.K. 1/10)

Powered by THE EDGE Total Health Network

PROUD MARYHH A professional hitwoman (Taraji P. Henson) finds herself questioning her career path in this action thriller from director Babak Najafi (London Has Fallen). With Neal McDonough and Danny Glover. (89 min, R) THE SHAPE OF WATERHHHH1/2 A mute janitor (Sally Hawkins) at a government lab falls for a mysterious marine creature in this arty riff on classic monster flicks from cowriter-director Guillermo del Toro. With Michael Shannon, Richard Jenkins and Octavia Spencer. (123 min, R) STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDIHHHH1/2 Rian Johnson (Looper) helmed Episode VIII in the science fiction series, in which Rey (Daisy Ridley) teams up with Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) on her journey of apprenticeship in the Force. With John Boyega, Oscar Isaac and Adam Driver. (152 min, PG-13) THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURIHHHHH In this drama from writerdirector Martin McDonagh (In Bruges, Seven Psychopaths), Frances McDormand plays a grieving mom who doesn’t take kindly to the local sheriff’s failure to arrest her daughter’s killer. With Woody Harrelson, Sam Rockwell and Caleb Landry Jones. (115 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 11/29) WONDER WHEEL 1/2H In Woody Allen’s latest, set in 1950s Coney Island, Kate Winslet plays a washed-up actress whose life is complicated by the arrival of her husband’s estranged daughter (Juno Temple). With Jim Belushi and Justin Timberlake. (101 min, PG-13; reviewed by R.K. 12/13)

The EDGE Preventative Care is an evidenced based practice designed to improve the lives of our community. As Vermont’s exclusive provider of Genavix and HealthyCARE services, this uniquely structured practice has already impacted hundreds of lives in Chittenden County with a focus on fitness, nutrition, stress management, and behavior modification. Our participants have been successful in taking control of their health through sustained weight loss, lowered cholesterol, and blood pressure. Our practice allows you to migrate into a healthier lifestyle at a pace you are comfortable with, creating long lasting and effective habits. Our preventative care approach will leave you empowered to improve your overall quality of life. Contact us TODAY to utilize your INSURANCE BENEFITS and for Program Start Dates! Genavix@edgevt.com • www.edgevt.com/genavix | www.genavix.com • 951-2320 4t-edge)preventive)011718.indd 1

1/15/18 2:05 PM

MOVIES 73

RATINGS ASSIGNED TO MOVIES NOT REVIEWED BY RICK KISONAK OR MARGOT HARRISON ARE COURTESY OF METACRITIC.COM, WHICH AVERAGES SCORES GIVEN BY THE COUNTRY’S MOST WIDELY READ MOVIE REVIEWERS.

HOST OF BET NEWS AND A POLITICAL CONTRIBUTOR FOR CNN

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AUTHOR OF THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER NOBODY: CASUALTIES OF AMERICA’S WAR ON THE VULNERABLE, FROM FERGUSON TO FLINT AND BEYOND

01.17.18-01.24.18

THE GREATEST SHOWMANHH1/2 This original musical, “inspired by the imagination of” circus entrepreneur P.T. Barnum (Hugh Jackman), appears to be less about the gritty facts of his life than about celebrating show biz. With Zendaya, Rebecca Ferguson and Zac Efron. Michael Gracey makes his directorial debut. (105 min, PG)

DR. MARC LAMONT HILL

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

FERDINANDHHH Munro Leaf’s simply eloquent picture book about a bull who doesn’t choose to fight has become an animated film about a bull on a very busy adventure, from the makers of the Ice Age series. With the voices of Kate McKinnon, David Tennant and Bobby Cannavale. Carlos Saldanha (Rio) directed. (106 min, PG)

REV. DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT CELEBRATION


movies

LOCALtheaters

MARQUIS THEATRE

(*) = NEW THIS WEEK IN VERMONT. FOR UP-TO-DATE TIMES VISIT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/MOVIES.

BIG PICTURE THEATER

48 Carroll Rd. (off Rte. 100), Waitsfield, 496-8994, bigpicturetheater.info

wednesday 17 — thursday 18 **MountainTop Film Festival friday 19 — thursday 25 Schedule not available at press time.

BIJOU CINEPLEX 4 Rte. 100, Morrisville, 888-3293, bijou4.com

wednesday 17 — thursday 18 Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Paddington 2 Pitch Perfect 3 Star Wars: The Last Jedi friday 19 — tuesday 23 Schedule not available at press time.

CAPITOL SHOWPLACE 93 State St., Montpelier, 229-0343, fgbtheaters.com

ESSEX CINEMAS & T-REX THEATER 21 Essex Way, Suite 300, Essex, 879-6543, essexcinemas.com

wednesday 17 — thursday 18 *12 Strong (Thu only) The Commuter Darkest Hour The Greatest Showman Insidious: The Last Key Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Molly’s Game Paddington 2 Pitch Perfect 3 The Post Star Wars: The Last Jedi friday 19 — wednesday 24 *12 Strong The Commuter *Forever My Girl The Greatest Showman Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Paddington 2 (with sensoryfriendly showing on Sat) The Post The Shape of Water Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

MAJESTIC 10

190 Boxwood St. (Maple Tree Place, Taft Corners), Williston, 878-2010, majestic10.com

wednesday 17 — thursday 18 The Commuter Ferdinand The Greatest Showman Insidious: The Last Key Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Molly’s Game Paddington 2 Pitch Perfect 3 The Post Star Wars: The Last Jedi friday 19 — thursday 25 *12 Strong The Commuter Ferdinand The Greatest Showman Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Paddington 2 Pitch Perfect 3 The Post The Shape of Water Star Wars: The Last Jedi

wednesday 17 — thursday 18 Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle The Post friday 19 — thursday 25 Ferdinand (Sat & Sun only) Lady Bird **Night School (Wed only) The Post

MERRILL’S ROXY CINEMAS

222 College St., Burlington, 864-3456, merrilltheatres.net

wednesday 17 — thursday 18 Darkest Hour The Disaster Artist I, Tonya Lady Bird The Shape of Water Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri friday 19 — thursday 25 *Call Me by Your Name I, Tonya Lady Bird *Phantom Thread The Shape of Water Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

LOOK UP SHOWTIMES ON YOUR PHONE!

GO TO SEVENDAYSVT.COM ON ANY SMARTPHONE FOR FREE, UP-TO-THE-MINUTE MOVIE SHOWTIMES, PLUS OTHER NEARBY RESTAURANTS, CLUB DATES, EVENTS AND MORE.

PALACE 9 CINEMAS 10 Fayette Dr., South Burlington, 864-5610, palace9.com

wednesday 17 — thursday 18 The Commuter Insidious: The Last Key Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle **Mary and the Witch’s Flower (dubbed and subtitled; Thu only) Molly’s Game **The Opera House (Wed only) Paddington 2 The Post Proud Mary Star Wars: The Last Jedi friday 19 — thursday 25 Schedule not available at press time.

PARAMOUNT TWIN CINEMA

The Shape of Water Wonder Wheel friday 19 — thursday 25 *Call Me by Your Name The Shape of Water

STOWE CINEMA 3 PLEX

Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-4678, stowecinema.com

wednesday 17 — thursday 18 Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (Wed only) Molly’s Game Paddington 2 friday 19 — thursday 25 Schedule not available at press time.

SUNSET DRIVE-IN

155 Porters Point Rd., Colchester, 862-1800, sunsetdrivein.com

241 North Main St., Barre, 479-9621, fgbtheaters.com

Closed for the season.

wednesday 17 — thursday 18 Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Paddington 2

WELDEN THEATRE

friday 19 — thursday 25 *12 Strong Paddington 2

wednesday 17 — thursday 18 Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Lady Bird (Thu only) Paddington 2

THE SAVOY THEATER

friday 19 — thursday 25 Insidious: The Last Key Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle Lady Bird (Fri-Sun only) Paddington 2 (except Wed)

26 Main St., Montpelier, 229-0598, savoytheater.com

wednesday 17 — thursday 18 Jane

104 No. Main St., St. Albans, 527-7888, weldentheatre.com

01.17.18-01.24.18

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

wednesday 17 — thursday 18 Darkest Hour The Greatest Showman Molly’s Game Pitch Perfect 3 Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2D & 3D)

friday 19 — thursday 25 The Greatest Showman Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle *Phantom Thread The Post Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2D & 3D)

Main St., Middlebury, 388-4841, middleburymarquis.com

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WND&WVS PROUDLY PRESENTS THE BURLINGTON SURF CLUB OPENING SUMMER 2018 • NOW TAKING MEMBERSHIPS

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fun stuff

FRAN KRAUSE

Have a deep, dark fear of your own? Submit it to cartoonist Fran Krause at deep-dark-fears.tumblr.com, and you may see your neurosis illustrated in these pages.

76 FUN STUFF

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FUN STUFF 77

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RACHEL LIVES HERE NOW HARRY BLISS


REAL FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY JANUARY 18-24

ple than you know. Be a good boy or good girl.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In the coming

Capricorn (DEC. 22-JAN. 19)

Bubble gum is more elastic and less sticky than regular chewing gum. That’s why you can blow bubbles with it. A Capricorn accountant named Walter Diemer invented it in 1928 while working for the Fleer Chewing Gum Company. When he had finally perfected the recipe, the only food dye on hand was pink. His early batches were all that color, and a tradition was born. That’s why even today, most bubble gum is pink. I suspect a similar theme may unfold soon in your life. The conditions present at the beginning of a new project may deeply imprint the future evolution of the project. So try to make sure those are conditions you like!

ARIES

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Looks like the

Season of 1,001 Emotions hasn’t drained and frazzled you. Yes, there may be a pool of tears next to your bed. Your altar might be filled with heaps of ashes, marking your burnt offerings. But you have somehow managed to extract a host of useful lessons from your tests and trials. You have surprised yourself with the resilience and resourcefulness you’ve been able to summon. And so the energy you’ve gained through these gritty triumphs is well worth the price you’ve had to pay.

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): Every relationship is unique. The way you connect with another person — whether it’s through friendship, romance, family or collaborative projects — should be free to find the distinctive identity that best suits its special chemistry. Therefore, it’s a mistake to compare any of your alliances to some supposedly perfect ideal. Luckily, you’re in an astrological period when you have extra savvy about cultivating unique models of togetherness. So I recommend that you devote the coming weeks to deepening and refining your most important bonds.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): During recent weeks, your main tasks have centered around themes often associated with strain and struggle: repair, workaround, reassessment, jury-rigging, adjustment, compromise. Amazingly, Leo, you have kept your suffering to a minimum as you have smartly done your hard work. In some cases you have even thrived. Congratulations on being so industrious and

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Norwegian artist

Edvard Munch (1863-1944) created four versions of his iconic artwork “The Scream.” Each depicts a person who seems terribly upset, holding his head in his hands and opening his mouth wide as if unleashing a loud shriek. In 2012, one of these images of despair was sold for almost $120 million. The money went to the son of a man who had been Munch’s friend and patron. Can you think of a way that you and yours might also be able to extract value or get benefits from a negative emotion or a difficult experience? The coming weeks will be a favorable time to do just that.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “I think I like my brain best in a bar fight with my heart,” says poet Clementine von Radics. While I appreciate that perspective, I advise you to do the opposite in the coming weeks. This will be a phase of your astrological cycle when you should definitely support your heart over your brain in bar fights, wrestling matches, shadow boxing contests, tugs of war, battles of wits and messy arguments. Here’s one of the most important reasons why I say this: Your brain would be inclined to keep the conflict going until one party or the other suffers ignominious defeat, whereas your heart is much more likely to work toward a win-win conclusion. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): When he was 24 years old, Scorpio-born Zhu Yuanzhang (1328-1398) was a novice monk with little money who had just learned to read and write. He had spent years as a wandering beggar. By the time he was 40 years old, he was the emperor of China and founder of the Ming Dynasty, which ruled for 276 years. What happened in between? That’s a long story. Zhu’s adventurousness was a key asset and so was his ability as an audacious and crafty tactician. His masterful devotion to detailed practical matters was also indispensable. If you are ever in your life going to begin an ascent even remotely comparable to Zhu’s, Scorpio, it will be in the coming 10 months. Being

brave and enterprising won’t be enough. You must be disciplined and dogged, as well.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In 1892,

the influential Atlantic Monthly magazine criticized Sagittarian poet Emily Dickinson, saying she “possessed an extremely unconventional and grotesque fancy.” It dismissed her poetry as incoherent and declared that an “eccentric, dreamy, half-educated recluse” like her “cannot with impunity set at defiance the laws of gravitation and grammar.” This dire dis turned out to be laughably wrong. Dickinson is now regarded as one of the most original American poets. I offer this story up as a pep talk for you, Sagittarius. In the coming months, I suspect you’ll be reinventing yourself. You’ll be researching new approaches to living your life. In the course of these experiments, others may see you as being in the grip of unconventional or grotesque fantasy. They may consider you dreamy and eccentric. I hope you won’t allow their misunderstandings to interfere with your playful yet serious work.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “When one

door closes, another opens,” said inventor Alexander Graham Bell. “But we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened.” Heed his advice, Aquarius. Take the time you need to mourn the lost opportunity. But don’t take more than the time you need. The replacement or alternative to what’s gone will show up sooner than you think.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Gilbert Stuart painted the most famous portrait of America’s first president, George Washington. It’s the image on the U.S. $1 bill. And yet Stuart never finished the masterpiece. Begun in 1796, it was still a work in progress when Stuart died in 1828. Leonardo da Vinci had a similar type of success. His incomplete painting “The Virgin and Child With St. Anne” hangs in the Louvre in Paris, and his unfinished “The Adoration of the Magi” has been in Florence’s Uffizi Gallery since 1671. I propose that Stuart and da Vinci serve as your role models in the coming weeks. Maybe it’s not merely OK if a certain project of yours remains unfinished; maybe that’s actually the preferred outcome.

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(March 21-April 19): Many American women did not have the right to vote until August 18, 1920. On that day, the Tennessee General Assembly became the 36th state legislature to approve the 19th Amendment, thus sealing the legal requirements to change the U.S. Constitution and ensure women’s suffrage. The ballot in Tennessee was close. At the last minute, 24-year-old legislator Harry T. Burns changed his mind from no to yes, thanks to a letter from his mother, who asked him to “be a good boy” and vote in favor. I suspect that in the coming weeks, Aries, you will be in a pivotal position not unlike Burns’. Your decision could affect more peo-

weeks, destiny will be calling you and calling you and calling you, inviting you to answer its summons. If you do indeed answer, it will provide you with clear instructions about what you will need to do to expedite your ass in the direction of the future. If, on the other hand, you refuse to listen to destiny’s call or hear it and refuse to respond, then destiny will take a different tack. It won’t provide any instructions but will simply yank your ass in the direction of the future.

steadfast! Beginning soon, you will glide into a smoother stage of your cycle. Be alert for the inviting signs. Don’t assume you’ve got to keep grunting and grinding.

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SEEKING FELLOW ADVENTURER “I wandered all these years among a world of women, seeking you.” —Jack London, The Seawolf. Independent woman seeks loyal, honest, eclectic (or not) fellow adventurer for travel, bumping into one another in the kitchen, gardening, uplifting conversation and slow dancing. I’m kind, romantic, playful and fit, with good teeth and two left feet. HeyNan, 63 WILDERNESS LOVES ADVENTURE Simple gal seeking a friend. You are open-minded, like being outside, going for a ride or a walk, love music, independence, self-sufficiency, paddling, learning to cook, sharing good times and listening to what you don’t know. simplegal, 58, l

BLUES AFICIONADO Cheerful, smart, curious, funny and kind. Avid blues fan. I actually like many genres and can dance up a storm when I’m in the mood (which is often)! I’m well traveled, well read and well aware that this may not work out in my favor. All of this is to say that I’m an optimist and willing to take chances. neknative, 63, l CARING, HELPFUL, GIVING More into taking rides into the mountains, stopping by a stream and having a picnic lunch than social gatherings. Love the ocean and fishing. Hate shopping. SEASONS, 63

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FLATLANDER LOOKING FOR VERMONTER I enjoy kayaking, motorcycling, nature, crafting and other things. I’d love to meet someone to occupy some of my free time and show me what the locals like to do! I love the Patriots and would love to cuddle with someone to watch them in the playoffs and Super Bowl! If anything I’ve said interests you, please drop me a message! newtovt17, 47, l

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INTERESTING, MOTIVATED, HEALTHY, HAPPY, LOVING Happily separated 1.5 years; in process of divorce. I have three financially/ physically independent, wonderful daughters. I’m a nurse and attaining a higher nursing degree. Love the outdoors; walking, running and biking along the lake; hiking in the woods and mountains (or by the ocean when possible). I enjoy family, humor, interesting company, intimacy, delicious food, music, exercising, relaxing, traveling, cooking, reading. Looking for companion/soul mate to share interests and enjoy life together. Newlifeahead, 54, l HONESTLY GENUINE AND SWEETLY UNIQUE I moved from across the state in June and am looking for friends and more. If you can cook — oh, man — I love that! I’m up for adventures to offset my work and home life. Smart, sexy and sometimes sarcastic. Not interested in your education; more into your ideas and inspirations. Please bring me some interesting conversations! curlyone68, 49, l CARING, FUN, HARD WORKER I am ready to have some fun! Laughter is very important to me. I like to cook, volunteer my time, dance, listen to music, enjoy romantic meals, be outdoors, hike, camp, hang at the beach, meet with friends and have good conversation. I am in pretty good shape but striving to be better. I am looking for someone to enjoy life with! Lovethebeach, 59, l COUNTRY CUDDLEBUG LOOKING FOR LOVE SWF, 63. I am a down-to-earth person with a kind, loving heart. Looking for the same. Desire an honest, loving gentleman with integrity. A family man with a willingness to open his heart to new adventures. I have many interests and am willing to share yours. Life is too short to not enjoy it. Would love to find a travel partner. Ireland, anyone? IrishRose, 63, l

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SECRET DOWN-TO-EARTH DREAMER Well, this is intimidating! Boasting about myself at work is easy, but in a personal setting, I am usually rather quiet. I like very small groups so I can connect, and big groups are fun to people-watch, but somehow I find myself just by myself. Hopefully this is going to grab the attention of someone traditional but with an unusual twist. makemysevendays, 50 NEVER WATCHED ‘GAME OF THRONES’ Vermonter who likes to spend time outdoors, watching sports, and laughing with family and friends. Currently working hard on the family farm and saving up for a cabin in the woods. Looking to get to know new people. tcs1987, 30, l HELLO, I’M LOOKING FOR HONESTY Hello, my name is Reynald. I’m 27 y/o and am a hard worker. I love being outside and just about every outdoor activity there is: camping, hunting, fishing, hiking, biking and sports. I work as an auto mechanic and as a tattoo artist. I play guitar and sing as well. My ideal partner is smart, funny and pretty. Find me. InTheBoonies, 27, l SUBMISSIVE CUCKOLD PANTY SNIFFER Single, submissive male experienced in erotic massage and oral body cleaning. Seeking women to serve. singlecuckold, 51 LIFE’S TOO SHORT. HAVE FUN. I’m looking for a FWB only. Married, single, lesbian — it doesn’t bother me. I just want that one preferred friend to Snapchat and say, “Hey, you want to go fill each other’s voids and have some nice mind-blowing sex or even a lunchtime quickie?” with a smile. Hit me up for fun. Everlast1969, 48 LAID-BACK, HONEST, FUNNY I don’t take myself too seriously. I can see the good parts in everyone I meet. Pretty happy all the time. A little lonely lately. I’d like to make someone else happy. Dghacket, 54, l ROMANCE AT ITS BEST Hello. I am a romantic guy. I have accomplished all my goals. Let’s see if we can work on your list of goals. I am down-to-earth, no drama, funny and get along with most everyone. Outside in the summer, cuddle in the winter. Travel once a year. Give me a try. 53, SWM, Colchester, average, blue eyes. oneonone, 53

AFFECTIONATE AND CARING Hardworking person who is widowed looking for companionship. Lonely. builder, 74, l PERCEPTIVE, PASSIONATE, AFFECTIONATE Honestly, I am a shy and quiet introvert who likes to be with people. Yep, a bit of a paradox. Great at listening. Love hiking and being outdoors. Much enjoyment comes from podcasts nowadays. I’m looking for friends, chatting/sexting, a FWB, and to have some NSA fun inside, outside, anywhere. Love giving oral as much as receiving. granitelove, 42, l HEALTHY, FIT, LOW-KEY AND SENSITIVE I look for humor in everything. I believe I am thoughtful and caring. I enjoy quiet conversation, not shouting at one another over the music. I enjoy walking, cross-country skiing and cycling. Dinner, wine and a movie at home is great entertainment for me. Sharing these activities with the right person is special. Breakfast? Even better. mtnps, 66, l SOLID, KIND, GOOD-LOOKING VERMONT MAN Quiet. Gardening. The natural world. Walking my two beautiful girl dogs. Shaking a leg whenever possible. Nice environments. Artwork, sensual, making and building stuff, reading, skating. Craftsman/artist type, UVM hockey supporter. Have tools and skills. Know how to take care of a woman and treat her right. You’re smart, trim and similar. Not too perfect, realist about life and have affinity for a man. 14thstate, 62, l

WOMEN Seeking WOMEN INTELLIGENT, FREE-THINKING BEAUTY I am a bisexual lady in a long-term relationship with a great man. Just looking for a like-minded hot woman to hang with, share thoughts and possibly get physical if our energies align. Been waiting for this to happen organically, but it’s not! 420-friendly and fit, please. Beautiful_smart, 38, l

TRANS WOMAN SEEKS SOUL MATE I love being active outside, and love animals, music, dining out, being crafty. I am looking for a partner in crime with whom I share a lasting bond. Someone who will treat me like the lady I am and loves me for me. If you’re curious, let me know! 802Butterfly, 33, l

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GWM, 61, SW Vermont, seeking a grounded GM, 50 to 70, for dating and possible LTR. Nonsmoker. Enjoy hiking, gardening and reading. Silverhaired, blue eyes. Seeking someone with intelligence, integrity, positive attitude and sense of humor. #L1126 I’m a free-spirited woman, 80, of many interests seeking an open-minded gentleman for conversation, ambulation and maybe even actualization. I like movies, reading, theater, music of all kinds and quiet. Enjoy bird-watching, volunteering and Athena. Carpe diem. #L1125

79-y/o independent grandmother, two-dog owner, looking for a male companion on the same wavelength. I enjoy new adventures, movies, reading, road tripping, lunches. Healthy and happy is good. Please respond if you are interested, able and willing. #L1131

39, male. Tall, fit, straight, single. New to Burlington. Relocated from New York and multiple states. Likes reading, writing, wine, healthy food, standup comedy, real estate, cryptocurrency and more. Available evenings and weekends. Seeking single female in Burlington. #L1128

Bighearted, fair-haired bloke — into old bicycles, new beaches and arresting books — in search of spontaneous connections over lively cups of conversation. Be well, embrace today and write soon! Scully (62). #L1129

49-y/o SWM looking for a woman to have fun with. If you enjoy reading and spending time outdoors, that could be a plus. Pretty easygoing guy but don’t spend too much time in the shallow end. Betterlooking than most deep-sea fishes. #L1127

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32-y/o female! Free-spirited, fit. Love adventures, reading, real estate, wine and lots of laughs. #L1130

Lonely, widowed, retired. Seeking a SWF for friendship, possible long-term relationship. Don’t drink, smoke or use drugs. I am a young 80y/o gentleman who is honest and caring. Homeowner, dog owner. #L1121 SWM, 5’8, seeking serious relationship with SWF, 40 to 54. Women always attract me with good looks. FWB/casual sex don’t work for me. Want sex mornings, nights and again the next day — one to three times weekly. Communication barrier. Will you learn? #L1119

SWM, 53, of Colchester looking for SWF, 40 to 53. Looking for friend with similar interests who wants to sleep together, first for cuddling without sex on weekends or napping on any weekdays, then sex — from dating to serious relationship. #L1118 Dirty old man seeking dirty old lady. I need a frisky woman who still enjoys making passionate love. Be my steady girlfriend, and I’ll be your man. I’m a SWM looking for a long-term relationship. I give soothing foot massages. How about breakfast in bed? Keep my warm this winter. Brrrrr! #L1117 I’m a single male, 68, seeking a single younger female. Am well traveled, interesting, openminded, attentive, and have a sense of humor and career in aviation. Lived and worked abroad; trilingual. Mutual good times and travel waiting for us. #L1116

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I’m a 60-y/o male seeking a female in the age group of 25 to 61. Enjoy country music and LTRs. Don’t drink or smoke. Live in the Northeast Kingdom. #L1123

I’m a 60-y/o male seeking a 45- to 75-y/o female. 5’9, 150 pounds, long-distance runner. Love literature, books, nature, forest, poetry, drawing, writing. I’m artistic, respectful, caring, kind, male with values, politically left. Seek wonderful, kind, caring woman for friendship first and knowing the joy of a romantic discovery. Nonsmoker. #L1122

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I’m a 58-y/o male seeking a 45- to 75-y/o male. Artistic, athletic, free spirit, 5’10, 147 pounds. Love writing, nature, poetry, ideas, books, running, hiking, drawing. Seek good, caring, romantic soul who loves warm conversation and smiles. Nonsmoker. I’m politically left. Open-minded. Let’s meet. #L1124

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SHERIFF DUCKY I’ve seen you over the last few years protecting the city of Barre’s people and all who pass through with great empathy, collaboration and dedication. You’ve got great style, too — a handlebar mustache, sometimes a yellow rubber-ducky tie and a warm smile. You raise hell in the right way. Thanks for that! When: Monday, January 8, 2018. Where: Helping the community.. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914238 SATURDAY NIGHT COFFEE SHOP Saw you with your two friends. You had beautiful eyes and brown hair and were sitting at a round table. I caught your eye but didn’t catch an opportunity to say hi. When: Saturday, January 6, 2018. Where: Muddy Waters. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914237 DIAMOND IN MY EYE At Seth Yacovone, across the room — and a plate of fried chicken — I spied you. A dazzling dark-haired waitress with brushed-back bangs and a sparkle on her cheek. I hope you read this and know someone sees you are uniquely beautiful, despite this redhead not saying so in person. When: Friday, January 5, 2018. Where: Nectar’s. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914236

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PF ESSEX I asked to help you push your truck on a snowy incline in Essex. You asked if your truck blocked my car. I laughed and said yes, but it’s OK; I was leaving. I was walking away; you drove away on the back of the truck, talking to me. You had a hat with dark hair. I had a hat with blond hair. When: Friday, January 5, 2018. Where: Essex. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914235 JUST LIKE A HURRICANE I heard you on VPR (19:00 EST) while my family drove back from a vacation overseas. I don’t know what it is about your voice, but something tells me we should meet. If you want a free cup of café au lait, I’m here. You can find me four comments down on your latest Instagram post about María. When: Wednesday, January 3, 2018. Where: Vermont Public Radio. You: Woman. Me: Woman. #914234 ALECIA IN WILLISTON We met briefly at the party. You didn’t appear to be having a very good time. I’d like to get together with you sometime (and please bring your handcuffs). When: Tuesday, January 2, 2018. Where: Whitcomb Barn Halloween party. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914233

RED BEARD, COLD CIGARETTES You: outside. We started talking about beards and then EMF and nerdy electrical things. Me: feather earrings and goatskin boots. I’d love to continue the discussion with you sometime if you want. :) When: Sunday, December 31, 2017. Where: Nectar’s. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914230 AMAZING BLUE EYES, CBD OIL The week prior to Thanksgiving, you checked out in front of me. You: CBD oil purchase, $99. Me: two bottles of wine for Thanksgiving dinner, $24. When: Friday, November 23, 2018. Where: Healthy Living Market & Café. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914229 HEINEKEN, RED SQUARE, NEW YEAR’S You went out of your way to buy a Heineken and deliver it and just say “Happy New Year.” Are you really that kind or anything more? We locked eyes among many others’ eyes targeted at you. I was just in awe of how good-looking you were. You were blond and beautiful and a really good dancer. Are you seeing this? When: Monday, January 1, 2018. Where: Red Square. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914228 DARNED GOOD PIZZA You were seated at the bar eating chicken wings, reading Seven Days and skillfully deflecting drunken advances from the guys next to you. My buddy and I were sitting across from you, and I think you liked my answer about wearing socks. Join me for wings and wine? When: Saturday, November 4, 2017. Where: Positive Pie, Montpelier. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914227 LOVE YOUR DARK HAIR! Nobody does that adorable style anymore, and that caught my eye as you tended bar — even before the smile you gave me that absolutely lit up your pretty face! I hope you are there January 13 for Vorcza! I will be, and I want to talk to you! Hope you want to talk to me, too! When: Saturday, December 16, 2017. Where: Nectar’s. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914226 HONEY, I’D SPLIT YOUR KINDLING You were on the other coast, and I was in Vermont imagining you were home so I could split your kindling and make you feel warm and cozy throughout. When: Tuesday, April 8, 2014. Where: G&T’s. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914225

DREADLOCKED GIRL WITH TATTOOS We got drunk and banged in Winooski. I said “Yeah, boys” after, and you replied “Aye, Papi.” Are you out there? I want to put a big ole kiss on your lips. You know how to get ahold of me. When: Tuesday, October 3, 2017. Where: Winooski. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914232

SUPERMAN SIGHTING IN RUTLAND It was evening late January/early February 2017. I was short on funds for a deposit near a downtown bank across from a church parking lot. You handed me a $20 bill. Handsome and probably married — if you’re taken, she’s a lucky woman. Nobody knows you have an S on your chest underneath those civvies. Thank you. When: Saturday, January 28, 2017. Where: Rutland. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914224

A SOLDIER WITH POMEGRANATE SEEDS You: wanting to grow your beard longer, visiting from Cali and a plastic bag of pomegranate seeds. I would have liked to have gotten your contact. :) You may be on your way home now, but maybe your friends will see this message and pass it on. Me: feather earrings, tattoos and goatskin boots. When: Sunday, December 31, 2017. Where: Nectar’s. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914231

SERENDIPITOUS HAT MOMENT Met at a crosswalk outside of the Roxy. It was freezing, and you offered me your hat. Your energy was immediately infectious. You seem like a super nice lady — I can totally see us being friends! I wish I asked to get a coffee with you sometime. Xo. When: Sunday, December 17, 2017. Where: between the Roxy and City Market. You: Woman. Me: Woman. #914223

Your wise counselor in love, lust and life

ASK ATHENA It’s another doubleheader Ask Athena! Two people are on a search, but for very different kinds of treasure.

Dear Athena,

I want to meet as many hot chicks as possible and have as much sex as possible. Not to be weird, but I only lost my virginity when I was in my midtwenties, and I feel like I want to make up for lost time. Is that bad behavior? I want to have a lot of sex, because now that I have done it, it’s all I want. How can I make this happen?

Signed,

Dear Horny,

Horny Dude

Take a deep breath, Dude. So you want to get busy — I dig it. There’s nothing wrong with some no-strings-attached action. To each his or her own, right? What does constitute as “bad behavior,” or just straight-up prick protocol, is leading someone on. Don’t sleep with a woman and then act all surprised if she wants to cuddle or go steady the next day — like you didn’t know that was a possibility. Sex doesn’t have to lead to a relationship, or even be terribly meaningful, but you don’t have to be inconsiderate about it. When you get close to a new potential sex partner, share your intentions pronto. Be clear and kind about what you’re looking for, and you should still get plenty of booty. Have fun, and don’t forget to practice safe sex!

Yours,

Dear Athena,

Athena

I want to know if there is a place or places in Burlington where a man who would like to meet pre-op male-to-female transsexuals might accomplish that. I am an admirer (and somewhat confused about myself) and am looking for nonsexual encounters. Thank you.

Signed,

Dear Looking,

Looking

One place to start is the Pride Center of Vermont on South Champlain Street. The center offers loads of resources and support groups for transsexual and gender-nonconforming people — as well as those who are confused. And since it sounds like you’re looking for more personal, very specific interactions, another good bet would be to put out a personal ad. How about one in this very paper? Maybe your M2F transsexual is reading this right now! Be creative, honest and clear in your ad. If you need help describing yourself, ask someone who knows you well for input. Offer a few more details about what you’re looking for in a new friend and how you’d like to meet. Pretty soon, you could be forging new connections. Good luck!

Yours,

Athena

Need advice?

You can send your own question to her at askathena@sevendaysvt.com.


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