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The Sailing Magazine September 2016

Celebrating our 35th Anniversary!


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40' J/120 '94....................$129,000

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65' MacGregor '84.............$99,000

September 2016

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30' Farr 30 '96...................$51,000 Recently Sold Boats

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September 2016

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Sailing Magazine

Incredible young sailors grace the waters of Lake Washington. The Leiter Cup, which is the US Youth Women’s Singlehanded Championship, was won by Kirkland, WA, native Talia Toland (page 63). Photo courtesy of Jan Anderson

This month’s cover, “Wooden Boat Festival 2014” is by local artist, Luke Tornatzky. To see more of his work, www.Lukejtornatzky.com September 2016 www.48North.com

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September 2016 The First Days Away

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PNW Youth Sailing Update

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How does it feel when those first days begin a huge adventure? By Becca Guillote WIND Clinic and Leiter Cup are extraordinary opportunities. By Andrew Nelson

Two Hands, a Bent Boat, and Half a Shoestring 34 A couple PNW sailor dudes tackle a refit and race to Hawaii. By Rhys Balmer

Getting and Keeping Rides on OPBs

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How-to: Late Summer Exterior Varnish

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Artist’s View - Secrets of the Salish Sea

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Galley Essentials with Amanda

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Lessons Learned While Cruising

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Offshore Cruising Sail Inventory

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Love is in the Stars

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The Cohen Family Crushes WIRW

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48° North Race Report

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Bring skills or a good attitude to get invited and stay invited. By Andy Schwenk Make the most of the consistently dry weather. By Jack and Alex Wilken 687 Sea Otters. Seriously! By Larry Eifert

Scotland exploration with Mum and Dad. By Amanda Swan Neal Shoulder season: different mindset, great experience. By Jamie and Behan Gifford The latest installment of the Sailmaker Sessions. By Jim Kitchen Sailing together may have side effects...like marriage. By Michelle DeCouteau After 29 years at WIRW, two generations take class wins! By Stephanie Schwenk CGOD, Leiter Cup, Down the Sound, Shaw Island, and more!

DEPARTMENTS

Editorial 6 Letters 8 Calendar 14 Lowtide 17 In the Biz 25 Trivia 26

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September 2016

Books 27 Crossword 28 Product News 29 Classified Ads 66 Brokerage/Listings 75 Index to Advertisers 85

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35 Years of 48° North History and sailing - it’s a daunting pairing. According to Robert Carter’s Antiquity Volumes, the first depiction of sailing goes back beyond 5,000 BCE. Considering this, any sail-related history exists in an unthinkably distant context - nearly two millennia before humans began to utilize the wheel. What is historical about anything compared to those first sailors? Nonetheless, the simple act of sailing connects us with those courageous pioneers. To be sure, we know a lot more about crossing oceans now, but it is still hard (page 34). As the years pass and the purposes evolve, sailing continues to be useful and fulfilling. September often has a historical feel for sailors in the Pacific Northwest, as tens of thousands of us make the pilgrimage to the Wooden Boat Festival in Port Townsend to honor traditional wooden vessels, as well as their dedicated stewards and the purveyors and preachers of the skilled trades necessary to keep these important boats afloat. Building, refitting, or even just sailing a wooden boat puts you in the company of all sailors over the eons, until the advent of the plastic fantastic, fiberglass, in the 1960s. For us here at the good ship 48° North, this month is historically important for another reason, as we celebrate our 35th Anniversary. Though an awfully small fraction in the broad history of sailing (half of one percent, if you’re curious), these have been 35 years of significance for the sailing community in our region. It’s difficult for me to wrap my mind around these 35 years of 48° North. I’m 32 years old. By the time I was entering the world, 25 quality and free-as-the-wind sailing magazines were on the streets benefiting the readers with entertainment and information, and giving advertisers a chance to share their products and services with an audience that actually sails. The story goes that the inception of 48° North took place on barstools at the Sloop Tavern. Three men - one who could write, one who could sell, and one who had money - envisioned a magazine that would serve the local sailing community. Their beer-fueled experiment worked, and it still does, thankfully! Within these 35 years, 48° North has given voice to hundreds of wonderful story tellers with a sea tale to share. We hope it has inspired new sailors and made them feel that the skills and the community of sailing are accessible to them. And, we continue to be flattered that a local 48° North activity, Tropical Night at Duck Dodge (page 22), draws well over 100 boats and is still every bit as fun after all these years. Our individual histories in sailing ebb and flow like the tides. But, like the waters of the Salish Sea, movement and variation and change actually provide a basis for the consistent. Young sailors continue to fall in love with our sport, when given the opportunity. Old sailors reluctantly reduce their sailing ranges and eventually sell their last boat - hopefully to a first-time boat owner. Between those extremes, sailors progress, explore, challenge themselves, and make enough friends and happy memories along the way to last ten lifetimes. I can tell you no more about the mindsets of those three men who sat in the Sloop Tavern and imagined a magazine than I can represent those first sailors capturing the mysterious power of the wind for the first time more than 7,000 years ago. But, when we cast off our docklines, leave the harbor, and hoist the sails, I’d say we’re a little closer to understanding them. I’ll see you on the water, Joe Cline Editor, 48° North

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September 2016

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Volume XXXVI, Number 2, September 2016 6327 Seaview Ave. NW Seattle, WA 98107 (206) 789-7350, fax (206) 789-6392 Website: http://www.48north.com Publishers Michael Collins & Richard Hazelton Editor Joe Cline email: joe@48north.com Associate Editor/Race/Current Events: Karen Higginson email: karen@48north.com Advertising Director Michael Collins email: michael@48north.com Classifieds/Display Advertising Savannah McKenzie email: classads48@48north.com Bookkeeper bookkeeper@48north.com Contributing Editors Culinary Cruiser: Amanda Swan Neal Photographer: Jan Anderson Published monthly by Boundless Enterprises, Inc, 6327 Seaview Ave. NW, Seattle, WA 98107, (206) 789-7350/ Fax (206) 789-6392. Printed in Seattle, WA USA. Dealers paying UPS charges for delivery may charge a nominal reimbursement fee. 48° North encourages letters, photographs, manuscripts, burgees, and bribes. Manuscripts should be related to boating issues, instruction, or experiences. Emailed manuscripts and high quality digital images are best, but submissions via mail or delivered in person are still most welcome! We are not responsible for unsolicited materials. Articles express the author’s thoughts and may not reflect the opinions of the magazine. Allow eight to ten weeks for response. Reprinting in whole or part is expressly forbidden except by permission from the editor. Subscription Rates: U.S. one year - $25 - 3rd Class (3rd Class is not automatically forwarded) 1st Class in U.S. - $35 U.S Funds Canada Printed Matter - $35 U.S. Funds Over-Seas Foreign Air Mail - $65 U.S. Funds


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38' Shannon ketch '81  $86,000

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34' X-Yacht X-342 '89  $44,700

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50' Valiant '02....................... 499,550 47' Gulfstar Sailmaster '81.......SOLD 45' Harden sloop '81................ CALL 44' Irwin CC '97.................... 129,900 42' Catalina MkII '07................SOLD 42' Bavaria CC '99............... 135,000 42' Spencer '66........................SOLD 41' CT PH ketch '76................ 34,900 41' Sweden Sloop '85.......... 114,950 40' Island Packet '99............ 199,900 38' Shannon ketch '81........... 86,000 38' Panda '86...........................SOLD 38' Baltic 38 DP '85............... 109,500 38' Catalina 380 '00............. 119,000 37' Bavaria sloop '00...............SOLD 37' Hunter '89............................SOLD 37' Pacific Seacraft '81...........SOLD 36' Union Cutter '81.................SOLD 35' Wauquiez Pretorian '85.....SOLD 34' Tartan T34C '78................. 34,900 34' X-Yacht X-342 '89............. 44,700 33' Saturna PH '81....................SOLD 31' Pacific Seacraft '81...........SOLD 30' Fisher PH '75...................... 74,900 30' Hunter '79.......................... 23,450 27' Catalina 270 ‘94.............. 24,900 TRAWLERS 48' Offshore Sedan '87........ 289,900 43' Fathom Element '16........... CALL 43' Fathom Element '11....... 399,000 42' Grand Banks '89.................SOLD 37' Nordic Tug '02...... Sale Pending 37' Fountaine Pajot '05........ 239,500

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September 2016

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Letters All the Power You Need

o -T Convert from

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Diesel to Electric Part 1: Installation

Figure 1: The motor beds are an aluminum box that was cut and drilled to use the original engine mount bolt holes “A” (under the new mount), “B”, & “C”. The height of the box at “D” brings the electric motor up so it is aligned with the propeller shaft. The box is cut down to the level of “E” to make securing easier.

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insulation can be nasty stuff) as well as eye and ear protection if you are grinding or banging on things. Our house batteries were in the same space as the engine, so we moved them in order to keep all of the electric propulsion in the same space for reasons that we will go into later. The old engine weighed just under 300 lbs. We were able to lift it out through the hatch using the spinnaker pole supported by a halyard with the help of a 4-to-1 purchase of the boom vang secured to the spinnaker pole at the place that was supported by the halyard. The first step in the EP part of this project was deciding on the size of electric motor to install. This should have been easy, but, as it turns out, is

a little confusing. We started from the size of the diesel engine we were taking out. Before going further we are going to define some terms. In general it is common to speak about horsepower (hp) when we speak about engines. Hp is a measurement of power reflecting the rate at which work is done. This can also be expressed in kilowatts (kw) or

Figure 2: The engine space is now home to the electric propulsion. “A” = electric motor controller. “B” = electric motor. “C” = shore power battery charger. “1 - 8” are the batteries. OctOber 2015

www.48NOrth.cOm

In the October and November 2015 issues of 48° North, our how-to columnists, Jack and Alex Wilken, wrote a thorough two-part column on converting a sailboat from diesel to electric auxiliary power. As a part of this article series, we also made a couple of videos for the 48° North youtube page. These videos have proven very popular, with views numbering over 25,000 between the two. In the comments section of these videos are a number of follow-up questions. Jack was generous enough to answer some of those for us here, in case you’ve been wondering some of the same things. Concern: hydrogen goes boom. All these batteries should maybe be vented after charging, during charging, and definitely prior to motor use. We don’t see much original venting in diesel powered boats, unlike gas power inboards where venting is a must have. Jack’s response: The batteries we used produce little or no gas if they are be cycled between 20% and 80% of their amp hour capacity. Gassing off in AGM batteries, which is less than flood batteries, takes place in the last 10% to 15% of their capacity. This boat is well ventilated and this should be the case for all battery spaces. How much did it cost ? Jack’s Response: The bank of batteries totaling 200 amps cost $3600. The 7kw Electric Drive from Clean e-Marine cost $7690. The battery charger cost $880. What about waterproofness? If the engine compartment is somehow flooded will the motor still work when dried out or is the whole system gonna get fried? Jack’s Response: The motor will run underwater. If it is saltwater, you will need to wash it down with fresh water. The control box should be mounted where it can be high and dry.

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We recently removed the diesel engine from our 1978 Yamaha 33 sailboat and installed an electric motor. This month, we want to share some of that process. Our interest in a nonfossil-fuel means of propulsion goes back a long ways. But until now, we have not put it into practice beyond running our diesel engine on biofuel. There are questions that we asked and that people asked us; we will try to answer some of them. The first one is, “How fast or far will it go?” Then, “How big of an electric motor do I need?” “What kind and how many batteries do I need?” These and other questions give the general impression that electric propulsion (EP) is something new and not really well understood. The reality is that electricpowered boats are not something new. If we look at history, the evolution of electric boats bears a striking similarity to that of the electric car, and both are tied to battery technology and the price of petroleum. The golden age of the electric boat can be considered from 1880 to 1920 when the gasoline outboard began its reign of terror with both air and sound pollution. With present day technological advances in electric motors, pulse controllers, and batteries, we may be set to begin the next “Golden Age.” The beginning of this project started with the removal of the internal combustion engine. We were careful to keep every nut and bolt and to label everything as much as possible. In the end, this meant we had no problem selling the old diesel. One issue in the removal is the disposal of the cooling system liquid and old fuel. This requires that you have containers available and know where to take them. Household Hazardous Waste will take most, if not all, of what you will need to dispose of. Be sure to wear protective gear such as gloves and a respirator (old sound

September 2016

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ST OC K IN

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Letters What kind of solar and wind turbine system would you need to charge this? Along with everything else being converted to electric i.e. all electric galley, watermaker, all electronics, air conditioner, water heater and pumps. And the dozens of other things? Jack’s Response: It is all about watts (power). You will need to buy charging systems that are rated to keep up with the loads. As we discussed in the second video, the regeneration of the Max-Prop will deliver something back, too, but it would be rare, especially in the Pacific Northwest, for you to get enough regeneration to forego signficant back-up sources, whether solar, wind, generator, or shore power. Is this a brushless motor? It sounds so loud in the video? Jack’s Response: It is a brush motor, it is more efficient than brushless motors of the same weight and output. The actual sound is inaudible underway from the cockpit. Based on our experience, the video sound is not representative of the actual sound level. Are there any issues with magnetic fields and compasses? Jack’s Response: The normal safe distance for a compass is three feet. We have an autopilot compass that is mounted about two feet from cables that carry as much as 140 amps at 48 volts and there is no effect.

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Hi Joe, I thought your articles on R2AK were insightful and entertaining. Until I read the line, “I felt like the will to push and the will to win were more evident from the Jungle Kitty team.” Huh? On MAD Dog, three guys raced harder than I ever could for four days, without sleeping, eating perhaps tuna fish straight from the can. On Jungle Kitty, 8 guys/gals raced harder than I ever could for 4.5 days. But I’m guessing some of them actually slept, and ate hot (OK, maybe warm) meals,

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September 2016

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Letters since their boat was a bit more than a maxi beach cat and seems to have featured something like a cabin. Regardless of boat comfort, Jungle Kitty had more than double (if you do the math) the crew of MAD Dog. Sure, the Jungle Kitty crew wanted to win, but I’m thinking the MAD Dog crew wanted to win a bit more. I think you probably didn’t intend it to sound this way, but I think you’re doing a disservice to the crew of MAD Dog by claiming that the 2nd place boat had more “will to win.” In a race that long, in those conditions, the boat doesn’t win the race. The crew wins the race. Regards, Bill Quigley Seattle, WA

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Thanks for the note and your opinion, Bill! I completely agree with you, the conditions on “MAD Dog” were vastly more austere than those on “Jungle Kitty.” I was not trying to take anything away from the “MAD Dog” team. Those guys were positively incredible. What they did was insanely hard and they wanted it for sure! I think I was trying to communicate something (my perspective) regarding the competitive affect of the teams who knew they would never catch the Marstrom 32. You’re absolutely right that in the wrong hands, even the fastest boat can’t win a race. However, to see the speed differential that the M32 was capable of, they were kind of in another league of speed potential when they sailed correctly, which they did pretty much the whole race. I can see how my thinking wasn’t communicated clearly, and I’m glad to have your feedback to that end. “MAD Dog” never took their foot off the gas, but they were really racing against themselves and racing the clock for the record, especially after they made the gate at Seymour Narrows. But once they built their lead, I would say my impression from them was more about the “will to continue for the win” than it was a will to thwart their competition. “Jungle Kitty’s” set of steak knives, on the other hand, was never safe, they had to push their limits to fend off three extremely experienced and fast boats on their heels. In speaking with them, I was aware of the fact that they seemed to be in competition mode and pushing themselves to the competitive max (against the other teams) while engaging in a game of boat race with the boats behind them. My opinion is that they seemed even more this way than the “MAD” trio, who were pushing to their personal max. It was a slight but, to me, noteworthy difference. One thing that was interesting to note was that the “Jungle Kitty” team seemed to be pushing their boat enough that they were actively concerned about breakage, and taking action to avoid it. Conversely and surprisingly, the “MAD Dog” team seemed to have the utmost confidence that their platform would hold up. But, you’re also correct that the experience of life on board would have been wildly different, and the differences between the states of the two teams upon arrival in Ketchikan seemed to paint that picture in full color, which “MAD Dog” reaching near delirium and “Jungle Kitty” a bit more ready for the party! Thanks again for sharing your thoughts! www.48North.com

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September 2016

Hobie Cat Division 4 of the Pacific Northwest lost a dearly beloved friend on Saturday, August 6, 2016, when Jerry Valeske passed away unexpectedly of natural causes. He was 66 years old. He died doing the thing he loved best – sailing – at the venue he loved the most – Lake Quinault. Jerry was leading the race at the weather mark of the 2nd race of the Pacific NW Area Championships at the time of his passing. He is survived by his wife, Laura Sullivan, son Jason, brother Ray, and mother June. An incredible outpouring of love and support has helped Laura and the family to endure these difficult times. There are not enough “thank yous” to express the gratitude Laura and the family feels. Jerry will be remembered for many things. His smile and gracious giving were two of his biggest assets. But Jerry was also giving with the many talents God graced him with, including fiberglassing, woodworking, artistic t-shirt design, trophy design, PROing, and much, much more. He was a man of many talents, that is for sure. The Pacific Northwest sailing community has lost a dear and beloved man. Many people have expressed a desire to send flowers or help out in other ways. So we have set up a Jerry Valeske Memorial Fund. The idea behind this campaign is to raise money that can help support any one of a number of passions Jerry enjoyed, including contributions to youth sailing and other charities Laura feels best match the spirit of her beloved husband. If you’re interested in contributing to the Memorial Fund, please contact me via email, peter@fullservicepm.com www.48North.com


Letters Jerry touched so many people, and friends and family are invited to join in a Celebration of Life at Lake Quinault on Saturday, September 17. Please join us as we remember Jerry’s life, experiences, and stories. From all of us who knew Jerry and were close to him, words cannot express the gratitude we have for your love and support through all of this. It has been truly overwhelming. God bless.

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What Makes for Olympic Success? Hey Joe, I’ve got a question about the sailing in the Olympics. Knowing that the boats are strict one design, what separates first place and last place in the regatta? Is it boat handling? Is it sail/rig tune? Is it 6th sense? Is it luck? Chris Brown Seattle, WA Good question, Chris. While I’m no expert in Olympic-level racing, I’d offer up some of these opinions: I suppose my answer is a non-answer, because it’s really all of those things, plus good tactics. Even among the Olympians, you can see the difference between the boat handling experts and those who are only very, very good. It’s not so much about getting the kite up and down, as it can be for many of us racing locally. You can see who has a touch of extra speed or gets their bow out off the start line. There are slight speed differences with the turn radii around the mark. Coming out of maneuvers like tacks and jibes well might get you a partial boat length of separation over your competition. The racing is certainly close, but it’s often the same boats that get an edge at the start. Boat trim (fore and aft), angle of heel, and mode (foot/point/hot/soak) are all the other skills related to boat speed and effectiveness that can pay big dividends. The more high-performance the boat is, the greater the speed differences can be between those that are doing it most effectively and those that aren’t. A sailor or team’s ability to sail in a powered, but efficient, mode can be credited to crew weight, sail trim, helm skill, sail design, or rig tune. These sailors are world-class athletes too, and their level of fitness can come into play. The mark roundings in many of these boats can push even these top athletes into max heart rate zones. Being fit enough to push hard all the time is paramount. So, all of that stuff matters, but they’re still playing the course too - which side has more pressure or current, how to react to shifts - these still rule the day, but I’d guess that the expectation is that more of the competition will be interpreting the course accurately in Olympic fleets. Additionally, with such close racing, the boat-toboat tactics are really important. Retaining starboard advantage or inside rights matters a ton, so position on the course is a huge deal. I think it’s fair to say that luck is involved in all of this, but is probably most apparent in being on the right side of a shift. www.48North.com

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Lowtide September 2-4 3-4 4 5 5-7 6 9-11 10 10 10-11 11 12 14-18 16 17 17 17 17-19 19 20 21 24 24 24-25 26 30-1

Calendar

Victoria Classic Boat Festival, www.classicboatfestival.ca Bellingham YC PITCH Regatta, www.byc.org Corinthian YC Edmonds Halloween Series begins, www.cycedmonds.org Karen Appreciation Day! Wooden Boat Rendezvous, Deer Harbor Marina, (360) 376-5881 Duck Dodge, www.duckdodge.org 40th Annual Wooden Boat Festival, www.woodenboat.org Pink Boat Regatta in Seattle, www.pinkboatregatta.org Milltown Sailing Association Fall Regatta, www.milltownsailing.org San Juan 21 Fleet 1 Lake Chelan Regatta, www.sj21fleet1.org Sloop Tavern YC Jack & Jill, www.styc.org Flagship Maritime Captain's License Training Class begins, Vancouver, WA, www.flagshipmaritimellc.com NYBA Boats Afloat Show, www.boatsafloatshow.com Puget Sound Cruising Club meeting, N. Seattle Comm. Coll., www.pugetsoundcruisingclub.org 48° North/Fisheries Supply Swap Meet, Mariner Square Parking Lot, 7:00am - 1:00pm, call (206) 632-3555 Corinthian YC Tacoma Robinson Point Race, www.cyct.com Shilshole Bay TransPuget Benefit Race, www.shilshole-bayyc.org Dale Jepsen One Design Regatta, www.byc.org America’s Boating Course begins at the Everett Community College, www.usps.org/Everett Boating Safety Class begins at Chuck Olsen Chevrolet, (425) 530-9003 Happy Birthday Joe! San Juan 21 Fleet 1 Fall #1 Picnic, West Seattle, www.sj21fleet1.org Seattle Singles YC NW Harvest Benefit Regatta, www.Seattlesinglesyc.com Sail Sand Point/CYC Oktoberfest, www.sailsandpoint.org Flagship Maritime Captain's License Training Class begins, Tacoma, www.flagshipmaritimellc.com Bellingham Seafeast, www.BellinghamSeaFest.com

1 1 3 6 8 8-9 15 15 15-16 15-24 17 22 22 22-23 23 23 24 28-30 29 31

October

Corinthian YC Tacoma Point Defiance, www.cyct.com Corinthian YC Edmonds Foulweather Bluff Race, (425) 280-5572 Flagship Maritime Captain's License Training Class begins, Everett, www.flagshipmaritimellc.com Portland YC presents Laura Dekker, (503) 285-1922 San Juan 21 Fleet 1 Fall #2, Lake Union, www.sj21fleet1.org Corinthian YC PSSC Small Boat, www.cycseattle.org Happy Birthday Michael! Corinthian YC Tacoma Neill Point Race, www.cyct.com Corinthian YC PSSC Large Boat, www.cycseattle.org American Marine Training Centers, Captain's License Courses in Sequim, WA: www.americanmarinetc.com, 855-344-2682 Flagship Maritime Captain's License Training Class begins, Tacoma, www.flagshipmaritimellc.com USMA 10Day License Renewal Class at The Center for Wooden Boats, Seattle, www.usmaritime.us San Juan 21 Fleet 1 Fall #3, American Lake, Tacoma, www.sj21fleet1.org Marine Weather Endorsement, ASA 119, www.seattlesailing.com Sloop Tavern YC Fall Regatta, www.styc.org Sloop Tavern YC Race Your House, www.styc.org Flagship Maritime Captain’s License Training Class begins, Tacoma, www.flagshipmaritimellc.com Seattle YC Grand Prix Regatta, www.seattleyachtclub.org Corinthian YC Tacoma Browns Point Race, www.cyct.com Flagship Maritime Captain's License Training Class, Eastern Washington, www.flagshipmaritimellc.com

November 5-6 5 7

Orcas Island YC Round the County Race, https://oiyc.org San Juan 21 Fleet 1 Fall #4, Coulon Park, Renton, www.sj21fleet1.org Flagship Maritime Captain’s License Training Class begins, Bellingham, www.flagshipmaritimellc.com

FALL 2O16 WINTERIZING SPECIALS S E P TE M B E R TH RO U G H N OVE M B E R Including Additional Weekly Specials on Heaters, Moisture Control, Mold and Mildew Prevention, Bilge Pumps, Fuel & Oil Protection, Engine Maintenance, Boat Covers & Shrink Wrap, Trailer Accessories & More!

For the complete details go to fisheriessupply.com/winterizing

Call us 800.426.6930

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fisheriessupply.com

September 2016

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come visit us at the boat show at the creek in north vancouver september 8 – 11 anD seattle boats afloat show september 14 – 18

a reputation built on results. thousanDs of relationships built on trust. new or pre-owneD, power or sail, we are your boating specialists.

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Find out why boaters just like you keep coming back to Specialty Yachts. tel: 604-689-7491 • 1-877-822-0359 email: info@specialty-yachts.com web: www.specialtyyachts.com

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marlow pilot 37 September 2016

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54 - Master Suite

JEANNEAU 51  ǀ  JEANNEAU 54  ǀ  JEANNEAU 58  ǀ  JEANNEAU 64 NEW

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Discover the exceptional JEANNEAU 54. Designed to fit the way you live. Seattle Boats Afloat Show September 14-18, 2016 United States Sailboat Show October 6-10, 2016

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See these 5 Jeanneaus, Largest SINGLE Brand Display AT THE SEATTLE SHOW! SO 349

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Jeanneau Yachts • Jeanneau Sun Odyssey • Jeanneau Deck Salon • Jeanneau Sun Fast (206) 323-2405 Seattle • (360) 293-9521 Anacortes www.marinesc.com • info@marinesc.com 16

September 2016

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www.Jeanneau.com


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Six Washington Lighthouses Receive Grants Funded By Lighthouse License Plates Lighthouse Environmental Programs (LEP) announces that $21,600 in grants were awarded to six Washington state lighthouses for restoration projects. The grants are funded by the sales of Washington Lighthouse License Plates, which have provided more than $220,000 in grant funding since 2009. The Washington lighthouses receiving grants this year are: Mukilteo, $4,800 to replace windows; Patos Island in the San Juan Islands, $4,000 for an educational exhibit; Swiftsure Lightship in Seattle, $3,300 for a cook’s galley restoration; Burrows Island near Anacortes, $3,000 for a duplex restoration; Turn Point on Stuart Island in the San Juan Islands, $2,900 for floors and counters in the lighthouse keepers unit; and Point No Point on the Kitsap Peninsula, $3,600 for a workroom exterior door. For each license plate sold and renewed, LEP, which manages the license plate funds, receives $28, an amount that is tax-deductible for the driver. Restoration projects also benefit from the time, services and products donated by local businesses and performed by teams of dedicated volunteers, whom devote hundreds of hours every year to help keep lighthouses shining. The 12 nonprofit lighthouses and one lightship eligible for grants attract thousands of maritime enthusiasts and cultural visitors every year. Visit www.washingtonlighthouses.org

Boater’s Swap Meet It’s time again to get that box of stuff out of the garage, empty the lazarette and head to the 48° North Boater’s Swap Meet. Hundreds, even thousands, of your fellow boaters will be there selling those items that you’ve been yearning for but couldn’t find, and buying those items you’ve stored forever. It’s a bargain hunter’s paradise. And it’s FREE!

Fisheries Supply Saturday, September 17, 2016 Mariner’s Square Parking Lot

(across from, but not in, Gasworks Park)

1900 N. Northlake Way, Seattle WA 98103 7:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. • (206) 632-3555 www.48North.com

September 2016

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Lowtide Set Sail for the 40th Annual Wooden Boat Festival September 9-11 handmade carousel, kid’s boatbuilding, paddleboard test

Pirate ships, drives, a fleet of wooden boats, dancing and music, in its 40th year the annual Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival, is a weekend of fun for all ages. North America’s largest wooden boat festival, the celebration runs from 9:00am to midnight on Friday and Saturday and from 9:00am to 5:00pm Sunday. Live music, kids’ activities, spectacular vessels and captivating speakers fill the weekend, with the awe-inspiring “Sail-By” on Sunday. Hundreds of wooden vessels of all sizes and shapes will pour out of the harbor and past the waterfront in full sail celebration. The 40th Annual Festival features more than 250 wooden vessels, dozens of indoor and outdoor presentations and demonstrations ranging from how to sharpen a chisel to running rivers in a wooden drift boat. This year festival goers can visit with racers from the engineless Race to Alaska (R2AK) and even purchase

tickets to join in the fun at the “Blazer Party,” a reunion and awards party where racers are issued thrift store blazers in mock formality. Highlights include: • Tall Ships Lady Washington and Adventuress will be available for touring and charter. Visit the beautiful and historic Virginia V, the last steamship of the famed Mosquito Fleet. • Vanishing Sail, a heartwarming movie about boatbuilding on the tiny island of Carriocou. • Gregg Hatten tells his epic adventure drift boating all the National Parks. • Legends Lin Pardey and Nigel Calder will be presenting all weekend. • Teams competing in the Edensaw Boatbuilding challenge will be building the best boats they can during the festivals 72 hours. Teams are competing for a $1,000 prize. The Wooden Boat Festival is fun for the whole family. Kid’s Cove features a

and crafts. There are plays daily on the North Star Stage and Marine Science Center activities daily, and a Pirate Treasure Hunt on Sunday. There are several opportunities to get out on the water: try a paddleboard, row a kayak or historic longboat, and go for a boat tour on a classic motor boat. Regattas and races fill the weekend. Enjoy rowing races and model boat races. The NW Schooner Cup, held on Saturday, is majesty on the water as the region’s largest sailing vessels race for glory around Port Townsend Bay. When you’re ready for a break from viewing beautiful boats, the Balcony Wine Bar has a stunning view of the harbor and the Wee Nip Merchant Saloon out on the point is the best secret spot to watch the races and catch a cool breeze. The food court has a wide variety of delicious choices. Over 50 vendors will share their wares. For more information go to www.woodenboat.org

Have Plans to Go Cruising? Discover what West Coast Sailors have long known… Outfit your bluewater adventure at Downwind Marine! We provide extensive experience and great value! Use our Online Catalog for all the gear you need Save with every click! We specialize in Special Orders too! ★ Use our Online Cruising Guide to assist in planning your gear and itinerary.

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VISIT US IN SAN DIEGO … OR VISIT OUR WEBSITE!

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THE CRUISER’S CHANDLERY

We are a great family of marine stores with even more products, services and resources to meet all your boating needs.

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Lowtide Seattle’s Lake Union Boats Afloat Show September 14-18 Seattle’s 38th annual Lake Union Boats Afloat Show brings you all the best of boating in one place on beautiful South Lake Union, in sunny September. More boats, more styles, more fun. At the show you’ll find there’s a boat for every budget, activity and lifestyle. From sport boats to sailboats, trawlers to mega yachts and everything in between, the West Coast’s largest floating boat show has it all. More than 50 distinct brands of yachts and 50 brokers and dealers will display new and used boats. Some 50 shore side exhibitors will also exhibit at the show. A sneak peak of exhibitors and boats of note includes: • New for 2016, Marine Servicenter presents the Jeanneau Yacht 54. • Making its US debut is the new Hanse 588, exhibited by JK3 Yachts. • S i g n a t u r e Ya c h t s p r e s e n t s Beneteau’s new Oceanis 41.1. • Ruby Kiss, a 2014 60’ Shannon custom motorsailor is being shown by Swiftsure Yachts.

Victoria Classic Boat Festival September 2-4 The Pacific Northwest on both sides of the border is blessed with an enormous number of traditional boats of all descriptions. The wonderful craft, both yachts and workboats, are cared for by their owners and a supportive community of boatyards, trades people, and admirers. We are also fortunate to have some amazing maritime nonprofit organizations throughout the region. These dedicated organizations provide opportunities for education, training, skills development and economic growth in our communities. The boat owners and those that support them are why we are still celebrating our maritime heritage after 39 years. Proudly presented by Canoe Cove Marina and Boatyard. Check: www.classicboatfestival.ca

Free Family Boat Rides – Presented by 48° North and Seattle Sailing Club Don’t just look at the boats…. ride on one. Get involved handling the lines on 26’-35’ boats from Seattle Sailing Club - the kind of boats you could own yourself or learn to sail on. During the weekend, cruise on the classic 65’ Schooner Lavengro, a 1926 wooden gaff-rigged schooner, facilitated by Lake Union Charters & Adventures, or get out on a 19’ powerboat courtesy of Seattle Boat Share. Rides are about 45 minutes on Lake Union. Enjoy the sights of Seattle, learn new boating skills and see the Boat Show from a whole different angle, on the water. Fun for all ages. Check in at the Discover Sailing Booth to sign up. Sailboat rides available every day at the show, schooner and powerboat rides available Saturday and Sunday. The show is open from 11:00am6:00pm weekdays and 10:00am-6:00pm weekends. Tickets: $12 for adults/ $5 for kids 12-17 (kids under 11 are free). $18 for a multi-day pass. Check: www.boatsafloatshow.com

Wooden Boat Rendezvous September 5- 7 The Wooden Boat Society of the San Juan Islands is holding the 15th Annual Wooden Boat Rendezvous at Deer Harbor Marina. Most of the activities and BBQ are on the 6th. All wooden boats are welcome: oar, sail, and power. Wooden boats of all sizes attend the rendezvous, from row boats, to motor launches, day sailors to historic tall ships. Most of the boats moor at the Deer Harbor Marina, and are available for public viewing. The rendezvous is a low-key celebration of wooden boats, held in one of the most scenic harbors in the Pacific Northwest. Activities include a potluck, salmon BBQ, sailing and rowing races. For more information contact Mike Douglas (360) 376-5881 or emailwbs.sji@gmail.com www.48North.com

September 2016

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BRB

BIG RIVER BISTRO

GRAND OPENING 305 STRAND ST. ST. HELENS, OR 97051

WED-SUN: 7-4 (503)410-5680

Leave Your Disability at the Dock! Footloose introduces the recreation and sport of sailing to people of all ages with various disabilities. Based out of Leschi Marina, WA. It’s good, clean, safe family fun! Come join us! “Leave Your Disability at the Dock.” www.FootlooseDisabledSailing.org

Darwin says: Expect a miracle! Soiled sails are not SPIFFY SAILS The professionals at Clean Sails will rid you of that pesky, fabric destroying dirt and make your sails sunrise fresh once more.

We also remove green algae and rust! SAIL & CANVAS CLEANING

206-842-4445 DROP-OFF POINTS

Seattle - Schattauer Sails & North Sails Anacortes - Ullman Sails Bellingham - Skookum Sails PORTLAND - Banks Sails

www.cleansails.com

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Lowtide Bellingham Seafeast 2016 September 30-October 1

Puget Sound Cruising Club Events

Eat. Play. Explore. Eat some more.... The inaugural SeaFeast, in Bellingham, WA, provides you a setting of endless fun and the food fare of the surrounding bay and straits. A gathering for family and friends. Admission free. Friday: at Boundary Bay & Honey Moon Mead & Cider Bar. Stroll through downtown Bellingham and listen to local poets read poems and stories, and sing-along to sea shanties in the first Annual FisherPoets-on-Bellingham Bay. Saturday: Salmon BBQ Grilling Contest and Family Fun at Zuanich Point Park. Let the fun begin as you dive into the hands-on activities designed for play but also to learn the essential connections between our healthy waters, its healthy seafood, and a healthy you. Visit: www.BellinghamSeaFeast.com

PSCC meetings are held at North Seattle Community College NSCC Lower Library Building Auditorium, 7:30 pm. A donation of $5 per adult is requested to cover expenses. Check: www.pugetsoundcruisingclub.org September 16: Rob Sicade presents a two hour show of underwater photos from the Caribbean, Red Sea, Pacific and Indian Oceans. A brief summary of equipment, and tips for taking better pictures while diving and snorkeling. Come to the meeting to find out more about the fun cruiser race and raft-up on September 24th.

48 North's Swap Meet September 17th At Fisheries Supply

Right for you.

Spectra Mk II Watermakers

Portland Yacht Club Presents Laura Dekker October 6 The youngest ever to solo circumnavigate the world will stop in Portland on her way to her new home in New Zealand. All are invited. Laura is now 20 years old, but started her trip at age 14 and completed the circle at 16. Serious planning started when she was 11. She had the support of her father, Dick, but he did not have the financial means and told her she would have to acquire sponsorship. A year later Laura told him that she had written letters and now had sponsors. That is just the beginning of her story. An award winning and Oscar nominated documentary film, called “Maidentrip,” was made by Jullian Schlesinger of her exploit. Laura has also written a book entitled One Girl One Dream. Make reservations by phoning PYC at (503) 285-1922 or emailing events@portlandyc.com

Sloop Tavern Yacht Club & Washington Liveaboard Association bring you the Sixth Annual

RACE YOUR HOUSE! Saturday October 22nd Sponsored by:

No Entry Fees Entries Due by October 14th

Newport 700/1000

Must be a Full-Time Liveaboard Vessel Special Cruiser Ratings Provided

With the introduction of its Mk II watermakers, Spectra has pushed the technology to fast forward in all the important areas. Compact • Quiet • Efficient At Elliott Bay Marina. Working from Canal Boatyard.

206-285-3632 info@emharbor.com www.emharbor.com

Pre-Race Party & Skipper’s Meeting Friday Night 10/21 at Ballard VFW, Free Beer & Music by The Bill Derry Band Awards & Raffle at The Sloop on 10/22 – Must be Present to Win! Other Proud Sponsors Include:

Ballard Sails Bulldog Dive Service CSR Marine Dockside Solutions Fisheries Supply Kam Gear Luhn Law North Sails

Sail Northwest Schattauer Sails Seadog Line Seattle Sailing Club Seaview Boatyard Smart Plug West Marine

Details & Entry Forms at www.STYC.org 20

September 2016

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www.48North.com

September 2016

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Tropical Night at the Duck Dodge 2016

I

t was another epic DuckDodge as the elusive tropical island reappeared in the middle of Lake Union, complete with a grass hut, palm trees, tiki torches, friendly natives and wonderful local brew. Yes, it was Tropical Night again, and a good time was had by all those colorfully, and some skimpily, clad sailors that passed within arms reach

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of the island for a taste of the delicious elixir. 48° North, Marine Servicenter and Ullman Sails were again joined by Fremont Brewing, who really upped their game with the new and improved pouring system. This made it so much easier to refill those empty cups that were recycled back to us (okay, next year

September 2016

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we’ll bring more cups!) Although the weather looked a little threatening and presented a southerly breeze, the temperature was comfortably warm. Yet because of the wind direction, racers had to round inside the island to keep


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from catching our anchor line - most everyone figured it out. The perennial mix of tropically attired islanders, along with some new friends, were again there to enrich the lives of those parched sailors as they sailed by within inches of our island... or at least tried to. We even had a couple of guest ducks and one stowaway racer come onboard the island to enjoy the evening!

Attending the party, with plenty of guests onboard, were some of the usual suspects, such as Ballistic, Absolutely and Scat, but also loaded to max limit was Renegade, Oxomoxo, Supernaut, Ocelot, Free Spirit, Distance, Sea Duced, Twisted Journey, and Tipsy Gypsy. And are we seriously being decor challenged by Deception Island? A huge thank you to the Duck Dodge Committee and all the racers

for allowing us to be part of the fun. And thank you to all of our friends for your help on the island! There is still more Duck Dodge fun left: August 30th is Pink Boat Regatta Night, September 6th is Committee Re-appreciation/Dead Presidents Night and November 12th will be the Rum Run off Shilshole Bay. Check: www.duckdodge.org for details. photos by Karen Higginson & Jeff Carson Fremont Man!

www.48North.com

September 2016

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Lowtide America’s Boating Course September 19-October 31 The Everett Sail and Power Squadron will be offering to the public a 7-week America’s Boating Course on the fundamentals of safe boating. Class will be held on Mondays at the Adult and Continuing Education Center of Everett Community College, 2333 Seaway Blvd, Everett. Register online at usps.org/Everett, or contact James West at (425) 778-0283 or by email phnx789@msn.com

Boating Safety Classes September 20 This U.S.C.G. Auxiliary class covers all aspects of boating, and is good for novied and expericneced boaters. Classes go for 12 weeks and will be taught at Chuck Olsen Chevrolet Auxiliary Classroom. Email: boatclasses@hotmail.com or call (425) 530-9003.

Small Spills, Big Problems, Sound Solutions As the largest contributor to oil contamination in the Puget Sound, we must stop small vessel oil spills at the source. To paraphrase an old saying, “There’s no use crying over spilled oil.” Yet many are concerned with oil pollution in Puget Sound. What people don’t realize is that the biggest source of spills so far in the Sound has not been tankers and freighters, but small recreational and commercial vessels. Small spills, such as oily bilge discharge, account for 75 percent of the oil dumped into local waters over the last 10 years. In the future, however, there may be a lot less to cry about, thanks to a simple remedy called the Small Oil Spills Prevention Kit consisting of a small absorbent pillow that is placed alongside bilge pumps to prevent oily discharge from entering the water. Washington boaters will be seeing and using a lot more of the kits in the coming months.

The Clean Marina Program, a partnership of the Puget Soundkeeper Alliance, the Northwest Marine Trade Association and Washington Sea Grant, has worked for 20 years to minimize small vessel spills. Washington Sea Grant, the Washington Department of Ecology and Washington’s District 13 Coast Guard Auxiliary have launched the Small Spills Prevention Program to provide boaters with the knowledge and tools they need to stop oil pollution at the source. Last year, in a trial run, Washington Sea Grant Boating Program Specialist Aaron Barnett succeeded in distributing 1,000 spill prevention kits. Getting Your Own Kit This summer, the program hopes to hand out another 1,000 kits. Kits may be obtained during U.S. Coast Guard boat inspections or at marinas throughout the Puget Sound. If you or your organization would like to have kits sent directly to you, contact WSG’s Aaron Barnett at aaronb5@uw.edu

Our Mainsail:

What makes it such a good buy? You’ll find features in a LEE SAIL that are specifically included to extend its life: reinforced batten pockets; leech line; tack and clew with leather chafe guards; sail numbers; tell tales; leather encased, hand-sewn aluminum headboard and triple stitched with 6-point zigzag seams when required; stainless steel, heavy duty pressed cringles; reinforced stress points.

With a Bristol Channel Cutter

email: chandcw@comcast.net 10997 NW Supreme Ct., Portland OR 97229 Phone: 503-641-7170 • www.leesails.com

Bristol Channel Cutter was designed by the late Lyle Hess. The vessel is attractive to blue water sailors because of her seaworthiness and outstanding performance. Cape George Marine Works builds the Bristol Channel Cutter and the Falmouth Cutter, along with their other range of vessels. In January 2011, Cape George rolled out their first completed hull using the original Sam L. Morse BCC mold.

Cape GeorGe Marine Works, inC. 1924 Cape George Rd. Port Townsend, WA 98368 360.385.3412 www.capegeorgecutters.com 24

September 2016

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In Lowtide The Biz

Ballard Sails announces the addition of Ray Hines to our rigging and sail service team. Ray has worked in the local marine industry for the past 12 years. Some of you might remember him selling you a Laser, climbing your rig, or installing your electronics. Ray will join Colin Dunphy as Ballard Sails Rigging Team providing a complete running, standing and hardware installation and replacement services. Say “Hello” if you see us on the docks or at the shop and ask about our Fall rigging inspection special. Ballard Sails, 6303 Seaview Ave NW, Seattle, (206) 706-5500, website: www.ballardsails.com

Jeanneau America is pleased to announce that Marine Servicenter is the 2016 North American Sailboat Dealer of the Year! Only one award was given to the North American Dealer network of 22 professional dealers on an international stage. Marine Servicenter was recognized as the Dealer of the Year for not only L-R: Jean-Paul Chapeleau (President, Jeanneau), Catherine their high sales volume Guiader (Sales Mgr, Jeanneau), Dan Krier (Marine Servicenter) in the 2016 model year, and Erik Stromberg (Sailboat Product Dir, Jeanneau). but also for impeccable after-sales and warranty service along been for several years running,” said with excellent customer satisfaction. Catherine Guiader of Jeanneau America. The company was also acknowledged “Not only did this dealer perform in for their continued support and growth sales, they checked all the boxes and of the PNW Jeanneau owners group continue to succeed year after year and family-like camaraderie developed on many aspects that makes them an through the many events Marine outstanding dealer. We are very proud to have Marine Servicenter on our team Servicenter sponsors. “The 16th annual PNW Jeanneau and partner since 1988.” Marine Servicenter is located in Rendezvous with over 37 boats and 120 attendees was the largest owners Seattle (206) 323-2405 and Anacortes event in North America and has (360) 293-9521, www.marinesc.com

Bellhaven Yacht Sales and Charters has moved their office space in Squalicum Harbor, Bellingham, Washington from a cramped 1,000 square feet to over 2,000 square feet. Space includes a wide open broker area, a full conference room and a bay at the back complete with work bench. They were also selected as an Affiliate for Dream Yacht Charter Sales team selling a new line of affordable, redesigned catamarans, power and sail, for CATANA Group – BALI Line. Visit Bellhaven Yacht Sales and Charters, 700 Coho Way, Bellingham, WA, 98225 or call (360) 733-6636.

NW Boater Training Learn to boat on a boat from local experts with the the United States Power Squadron. Classes are offered at a location near you, go to www.nwboatertraining.com www.48North.com

September 2016

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Lowtide Near Port Campbell, Australia, is one of the country’s best-known geological landmarks: a group of large sea stacks formed through the erosion of 20 million-year-old limestone cliffs. Even though there were originally only nine of them, they’re called the Twelve Apostles. In 2005, one collapsed, leaving eight stacks. Singapore Harbor in Southeast Asia, before human intervention, was a mangrove-lined estuary.

Maritime Trivia by B ryan H enry

The Gironde Estuary in western France, about 50 miles long and seven miles wide, is the largest estuary in Europe. More than 90 percent of the world’s oceans are more than two miles deep.

Of the 10 deepest spots in the oceans, eight of them are located in the Pacific Ocean. If you stacked 24 Empire State Buildings, it still would not equal the total depth of the Pacific Ocean’s deepest point. The Indian Ocean’s Kerguelen Plateau, an underwater volcanic landmass, is three times the size of Japan. The Java Trench off Indonesia, at 1,600 miles long and 50 miles wide, is the world’s longest trench. Borneo is the world’s only island divided between three countries: Brunei, Indonesia and Malaysia. Africa’s Mediterranean coast lies only 8 miles south of Spain across the Strait of Gibraltar. The Galapagos Islands were the first designated World Heritage Site, in 1978. The Bahamas contain more blue holes than any other country and also boast the world’s deepest submarine sinkhole, Dean’s Blue Hole. Archipelago refers to any large body of water studded with islands, but originally it meant “chief sea,” specifically the Greek Aegean Sea. More than 200 million acres of wetlands existed in the lower 48 states 200 years ago. Today, less than half remain. Airports serving New Orleans, Boston and New York City cover former wetlands. A third of U.S. threatened and endangered species depend on wetlands. The Mississippi River system drains more than 40 percent of the contiguous U.S. and parts of southern Canada. The chalk from which the White Cliffs of Dover in southeastern England are composed was formed 70 to 100 million years ago. The cliffs rise to 330 feet at their highest.

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September 2016

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Books On an island in Denmark where the oldest oak tree in Europe grows, a lone builder nicknamed “the perfectionist” crafted a boat with his hands. In 1936, the boat was finished and her journey began. Seventy years later in Port Townsend, Washington— just minutes after a near catastrophe was averted in

When Elsie Hulsizer was little, she lived on the shores of Puget Sound in Washington where she spent the summers sailing in a small open sailboat with her parents. Her parents would always start out by sailing to windward, so they would have an easy ride home with the wind pushing them from behind. When Elsie grew up and married, she and her husband Steve spent their summers sailing out of Puget Sound and up the Strait of Juan de Fuca, always to windward. This challenging course

the marina outside her office window—Kaci Cronkhite opened an email. A Danish spidsgatter named Pax was for sale in Victoria, British Columbia. The journey that brought the two together became a quest that connected families in three countries with history that had been lost.

What Kaci didn’t know—what no one knew—was where and how far Pax had journeyed, how she survived those seven decades and what those who loved her would always remember. FINDING PAX: The Unexpected Journey of a Little Wooden Boat, by Kaci Cronkhite, $18. 95, published by Wind Spur Books, available at www.findingpax.com or at the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival.

took them up the west coast of Vancouver Island where they were rewarded with a cruising area of spectacular scenery and quiet anchorages that were almost all their own. They spent the next twentyodd years exploring the sounds, inlets and countless islands, bays, coves and stretches of unprotected coast between Barkley Sound and Brooks Peninsula. They survived many encounters with wild weather, met interesting people

and discovered the intriguing history of a coast undergoing phenomenal changes. Beautifully illustrated with her own excellent photographs, Voyages to Windward is Elsie’s updated account of their quartercentury of discovery, an absorbing, exquisitely crafted story that will delight all sailors. Voyages to Windward by Elsie Hulsizer, $44.95 published by Harbour Publishing.

Come See Us! At the Seattle Boats Afloat Show in September

Sailing Lessons

Great discounts on all classes at the show!

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September 2016

Suite #130 at Shilshole

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Lowtide Across 1 Passageway on a ship 5 Where cargo is carried below decks 8 Excellent 9 Study of the way wind across the sails drives the boat 11 French word for sea 12 Fore part of a ship 13 Seaman who performs routine tasks 17 Average 18 Way of doing something 19 Reflection of a radar signal showing a target on the screen 20 Tire 21 Line rigged to the end of a yard 23 Center of storm 24 Life prefix 26 “Old man ____” 27 60 minutes, for short 28 Vessel 29 Line regulating the angle of the sail to the wind

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Nautical Crossword 1

9 11 12

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Restricted area of a waterway between two headlands 8 3 Walk in the water 10 4 Over there 5 Noise of an engine 6 French for lake 13 14 15 16 7 Things you are supposed 17 to do 10 Ever to a poet 19 13 Boulder is one 20 14 They manage lighthouses 15 Sky-blue 22 23 24 25 16 Lightweight anchor with 26 27 large flukes 29 30 17 Supporting post for a binnacle or steering wheel 31 19 Piece of sunshine 32 20 Manatee, 2 words 21 Rear 31 Large tree 22 Toward the stern 32 “_____ ____ run deep” (expression) 25 Game with pawns and castles 30 Listening device Down 1 Small whale Solution on page 75 2

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Antal Marine Hardware Roller Cleats is a folding cleat with rotating horns: with a simple gesture of your hand, you can open or close roller even with the line on, just by turning one of the horns. Roller is open: you can easily tie or remove the mooring line. Roller is closed: this position minimizes the size and, more important, Finding a bag you can use for outdoors that is also built to protect your tech gear can be hard. Most technical bags offer little in the way of extra padding, waterresistance and thoughtful design for devices like laptops, smartphones and tablets. The STM Haven Backpack blends Air Channel Comfort padding and a chest strap on the exterior with CableReady

Galleys, nav stations, fly bridges, engine compartments and other onboard areas are often poorly lit. Hella Marine’s new Surface Mount Strip LED Lamps are designed with an extremely low profile; they fit just about anywhere to provide bright, accurate light. New models feature a built-in waterproof switch and increased LEDs provide greater illumination. Each dimmable strip now has 12 high-performance LEDs producing an exceptional output of 250 lumens (white), yet draws less than 3W, making it an ideal replacement for a fluorescent The American Boat and Yacht Council recommends using ground fault protected receptacles where there's potential for water exposure, such as heads, galleys, machinery spaces or a weather deck. Fully compliant with the newest UL 943 Standards, the Hubbell Marine GFCI duplex receptacle automatically monitors ground fault circuit

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Lowtide prevents other lines from getting caught. The horns can be shut down or turned up even under load. Roller is the only folding cleat you can close with the line on. Roller has perfectly rounded shapes in order not to damage the mooring lines. Available in 3 sizes and 2 finishes: silver or black anodized . Check: www.antal.it/eng or locally at www.fisheriessupply.com

Organization, SlingTech Protection and fleece lined pockets on the inside of the bag for the perfect balance between performance and design. SlingTech keeps tech gadgets safely suspended inside the bag so even if you drop it, your gear won’t hit the ground, while CableReady Organization lets you wind cords from power banks inside the bag through interior pockets where your devices are stashed for easy, tangle-free charging on the go.

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interrupting functionality every three hours or less. If an event occurs, it interrupts the power supply and limits the duration of any electrical current flow. After tripping, the receptacle is reset by pushing a button on its face. A test button allows the user to verify the GFCI is in working order, along with visual indication of outlet status—green when powered,

solid red when tripped and flashing red to warn of device end-of-life. The Hubbell GFRST52MW GFCI duplex receptacle can be mounted on any standard 2.5" deep electrical box, with no special wiring needed. A feedthrough feature also provides protection at any other receptacle downstream on the same electrical circuit. The unit’s standard size and interface allow for easy retrofits. Check:www.hubbell-marine.com

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September 2016

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By Becca Guillote Whether for a weekend, a week, or even a month, the first few days of any trip involves something of a mental/emotional reset. What does it feel like when it is the first few days of something much, much bigger? Becca and John Guillote have cut the lines and are gone for a multi-year adventure on their Valiant 40, “Halcyon.” Here she shares her experience of their first few days away. They’re headed north around Vancouver Island at the moment, and will start making miles southward within the month.

Day 1: I keep waiting for the emotions to kick in. Everyone asks “Are

you excited?” “Aren’t you scared?” “What are you most anxious about?” But when I think about leaving, instead of emotions, my head fills with tasks. Call the bank, clean out the car, don’t forget to buy toilet paper. It’s not that I’m devoid of emotion necessarily; it’s that I just don’t seem to get it. I can’t wrap my mind around what it will feel like when we’re gone. That’s how I prepare for an event or a vacation: I picture myself there, going through the day, even the mundane tasks like brushing my teeth. And I get excited because I can imagine the view I will have, the people I will meet, the time I will have to read or relax. But I can’t picture this one. I don’t know what my daily life will look like. So when I talk about it, it feels fake, like I am talking about someone else’s journey.

Day 2:

We are motoring up Puget Sound under sunny skies with 2-4 knots of breeze on the nose. Our good friends on Kotuku have joined us for the first leg and we are, as usual, watching their stern get smaller. I make lunch and start a new book. John tinkers with fishing gear and splices an old charging cable. I sit and take stock of my own emotions. This feels like any other weekend trip to Port Townsend, and I try to convince myself it’s not. This time is different; this time we won’t turn back to Seattle in a few days. That evening we say goodbye to Kotuku. I would have kept it together if they had. But the tears flow. Ah ha! Sadness over what we leave behind is certainly the first step towards excitement over what is to come. 30

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Day 3: We wake up still purposely undecided where we will

be that night. Stay in Port Townsend? Head for Lopez or Orcas? Or cross into Canada and visit friends in Victoria? We discuss thoughtfully as the fog thickens to inhibit our view of the breakwater 100 feet away. We aren’t going anywhere until that clears. This morning, I can’t knock the nagging anxiety that we must keep moving because soon we will have to turn back. No need to rush, we have no timeline; we can do whatever we want to do today. I repeat this mantra to help it sink in.

Day 4: I am sitting in the cockpit with my notebook and a

cup of tea while we swing gently at anchor in Cadboro Bay. It is still and quiet but for the seagulls squawking at the low tide line and a seal pup splashing around beside us. We have deliberately set no agenda for the morning. Out of habit, I grab my phone to check messages but there’s no cell reception here. There’s nothing on there I need to see anyway. I take a deep breath and feel the muscles in my back relax, melting away the first bit of city stress. I think about the days and weeks to come, and picture myself sitting right here, doing just this, in uninhabited coves and pristine bays, and I get just a little bit excited.

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September 2016

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Optis work on bearing away at the WIND Clinic.

PNW Youth Sailing Update By Andrew Nelson

and confidence in heavy air. Close proximity to shore and the warm water temperatures make the Columbia River Gorge an ideal place to make mistakes. Sailing the Gorge gives you that “full on” experience, without the fog, cold water, and boat traffic of San Francisco Bay. As a coach, it was really fun to see the progress that these sailors made during the four day clinic. About onethird of the sailors had never sailed the Gorge before. The Gorge firsttimers were wide eyed and feeling a bit nervous day one. Head coach Brendan Casey had to pause at one point during his welcome speech as boats were getting blown off dollies and onto the beach below. Half the group seemed more fixated on the churning river behind him than on listening to a former Olympian’s sage advice. However, as the clinic went on, sailors all got more comfortable in the heavy stuff. By day two, sailors Head Coach Brendan Casey talks with the WIND participants. began to brag about

We’re in the waning days of summer now, but oh what a summer it’s been for young sailors in our area. Since school let out they’ve been busy logging hours on the water training, competing, instructing, and just having fun. The season kicked off with a bang when The Sailing Foundation and Columbia Gorge Racing Association partnered to put on the annual WIND Clinic. This concept started over ten years ago as an opportunity for local sailors (many of them starved for wind!) to improve their skills

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how many times they had capsized. I heard at least a couple sailors with counts in the mid-teens. Capsizes were like badges of honor, and there was definitely some one-upmanship going on. Jibe a Laser in 20 knots? Sure thing coach! SPLASH Clinic might be the more appropriate name the event. The early WIND Clinics started as 2-3 coaches and about 20 Laser sailors. This year we added Optis to the equation and recruited more coaches. In total, we ended up with 48 Lasers and 14 Optis, including several sailors from California, Florida, and Colorado. The all-star cast of coaches was equally diverse, but included several local coaches. Together, the eight coaches helped keep the chaos to a minimum. Getting 62 boats on and off the beach twice a day wasn’t always smooth, but it was sure fun to watch it happen. Most of the sailors opted to camp on site. After a hard day of drills and spills, it amazed me that sailors still had the energy to play a sunset game of ultimate frisbee. Kids of all ages from different yacht clubs and sailing programs chased frisbees between tents and trees supporting clotheslines full of wet sailing gear. This is all a part of the Gorge experience, and one of the big reasons sailors come back year after year. For a lot of dinghy sailors, sailing the Gorge is the galvanizing moment when they fall in love with sailing and never look back. The Laser sailors have had a summer of great events. About a dozen of our local youth sailors chose to head back to the Gorge later in July for Laser North American Championships. 150 adults and juniors from around the country converged on Cascade Locks for four days of intense racing. A couple of our local girls then high tailed it back to Seattle for the US Sailing Youth Women’s Singlehanded Championships (whew), which is also known as the Leiter Cup. It’s not often our area gets two big championship regattas in one summer, and we were very lucky that Sail Sand Point’s bid to host the regatta was accepted. Bringing Leiter Cup to the Northwest gave a dozen local young women the chance to line up against some of the top female sailors in the county, which is an opportunity they rarely get unless they travel to California or Florida.


Letier Cup is more than just a championship, it’s an empowering experience for young women. US Sailing brought in several coaches to put on a two-day clinic prior to racing. The girls worked in small groups, sometimes just 3-4 boats, with a new coach each day. Common meals, housing arrangements (where several competitors often room together), and fun outings, like going to the top of the Space Needle, meant that plenty of lasting friendships were formed at Leiter Cup. None of this is by accident. US Sailing and event organizers work hard to ensure that competitors will remember the event as more than just a regatta. Sportsmanship and camaraderie were on full display each and every day. This was reflected by the fact that after ten races, not a single protest was filed. Talia Toland, of Kirkland, WA, won the regatta on her home turf after a strong performance throughout the event. It’s a big deal to win the Leiter Cup, but even sweeter to do it at home! Our other local sailor did great too, and for most this was their first national caliber event. Abbie Carlson

Talia Toland gets inside rights on the competition on her way to a win in the Leiter Cup! Photo courtesy of Jan Anderson. (Bellevue) placed third and Maggie Toombs (Orcas Island) placed sixth, meaning they both earned spots at the 2017 US Sailing Youth Championships. These young women are following in the steps of some of our area’s other top women’s sailors, including another Kirkland native, Helena Scutt, who just

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September 2016

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8/17/16 11:30 AM


Two Hands, A Bent Boat, and Half a Shoestring By Rhys Balmer

T

his is the story of two PNW sailor dudes who raced to Hawaii double-handed on a 24’ boat. Oh yeah, and we were on what would have to be considered half of a shoestring budget. Fast forward to the middle of the Pacific Ocean. We have broken our spinnaker pole, boom vang, spinnaker halyard and sheave, topping lift bridle,

backstay block, and one of the two only winches onboard just blew up. All the while, the crazy little yacht screams on. White water hisses by my ear as I try to sleep, wedged between the water bladders and the life raft, in wet underwear, on a wet sleeping bag, being dripped on by one of the million leaks that weren’t there before.

Surfing on “Evermoore” became our Modus Operandi. 34

September 2016

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It’s not really racing anymore when, if given the opportunity, you would spend your precious PHRF points for some dry skivvies, a combo plate of Zippies, or just for your shipmate to stop talking about all the animals he is seeing in the clouds. With all that breakage, it’s hard to believe we spent innumerable hours refitting the boat! It makes a person wonder what might have happened if we hadn’t done all that work. It was with a healthy disregard for our lives and bodily comfort, and the irresponsible opportunities made possible with a credit card, we began the refit of my 1982 Moore 24 Evermoore. We had one of the hairiest schemes: racing to Hawaii in this year’s Pacific Cup. We went about haggling with chandleries, scrounging unlocked boatyards (just kidding), marina dumpsters (not kidding), and coercing our downsizing fellow boaters into opening their dock boxes and sharing their hidden wealth - scraps of G-10 for backing plates,


old blocks, the self-tailing winches off Martin’s dad’s boat, an old solar panel, a water bladder, and the list goes on. We were the underdog contingent, the Jamaican bobsled team, the Spud Webbs, the Erin Brokaviches, the Oliver Twists, Cinderellas, Davids up against the Goliaths of this wonderful world of offshore “yacht” racing. And, we knew it. Our competitors dinghies are worth more than our boat. They probably have real jobs and other “hobbies” and girlfriends and... I digress. We wouldn’t have had it any other way. We’ve committed our lives to teaching sailing and fixing boats. It may not be lucrative, but we thrive on our roles sharing sailing with others. We Evermoore boys make up for the lack of full shoestrings with our experience working on boats, or at least we try. I come from a little backwater area of Portland, was “home” schooled on a sailboat, and have worked on boats professionally since that Hollywood Video manager didn’t give me the first job I applied for because my hair was too long. I met my shipmate, Martin Gibson, at the Willamette Sailing Club, where I was working at the time

Martin is the ginning-est, barefoot-est, hardest-to-please cup of gung-ho jibe turkey I know. (though I’d just been demoted from instructor to cook for taking time off to go sailing). He’d been around boats since he was a barnacle as well, and has taught US Sailing dinghy programs and worked in fiberglass repair shops, and everything in between. Martin is also the grinning-est, barefoot-est,

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One part of my shoestring approach involved building my own sails. I worked in a local loft and learned from more experienced sailmakers. bravest lemming, weren’t enough to get us riding the waves next to the big boys. The sailing communities we come from perpetually inspire us, filling our sails and fueling our wake. From those that lent a rivet gun when our gooseneck fell off, to those who just give a dock walking high-five or spare beer - you all represent the same helpful spirit that binds the sailing communities of this world. Our trip to Hawaii had three distinct parts in my mind. First was the push for distance, tempered by the exhaustion that comes with trying to get into the watch schedule of fouron and four-off. Of course, you never really get four hours of sleep, thanks to the persistent drips and the abdominal workout retching from seasickness provides. As the trip wore on, the second chunk of my experience was defined by the realization that, despite going faster for longer than we had ever gone, we were still nowhere near our goal. This feeling was compounded with the knowledge that the more things broke, the longer it is going to take. When we heard our friends on the well appointed Express 27, Alternate Reality, lost their mast, it really drove home this sobering reality. This brings me to the main concern of the last third of the adventure: how much longer do we have to eat dehydrated beef stroganoff? You know the food is bad when the emergency rations of cup o noodles start looking better than the primary dehydrated 36

Tollycraft and a stand-up paddleboard will throw water and you realize that you are suddenly going twice as fast as you’re supposed to be able to go on that little waterline. It’s enough to hook anybody. It sure hooked me. I sold all my worldly possessions to get back on that plane, and signed up to do it day-in and day-out across the Pacific. I didn’t even care if I had enough left over for the ticket back on the other kind of plane (I’m not still in Hawaii, if you’re wondering, I got a delivery gig back). As awesome as the Moore 24 is, readying any boat, especially a small one, for an ocean crossing is hardly as simple as bopping the pelagic field mice on the head. Doing it on the cheap meant doing the work ourselves, whether it was the endless grinding of fiberglass or figuring out how to acquire thousands of dollars of safety equipment. I even got a job at a sail loft and moved to Seattle to learn how to make my own sails. Martin quit his job so he could get back to work on the bulkhead! Back in the ocean... When you are sailing to Hawaii, it feels like you are going somewhere no one has ever been before, like you’re on some great watery frontier. It is closer to a rite of passage. Racing ‘round the clock always feels like another world. But the range of emotions on this trip was remarkable. Sometimes, we felt so confident and sublime. We posted along the way,

diet. We both love (LOVE!) sailing, but for the last third of the trip, we were so ready to be off the boat that we were willing to push the boat harder and risk more just to get off sooner. Let me put this simply: Yes we broke some stuff, but my boat is incredible (it’s probably to be expected with a 34 year old boat). The Moore 24 was one of George Olson’s early designs...sort of. The story goes that the original design didn’t perform how Georgie wanted so he went back to the drawing board to come up with the Olson 30. The 24’ mold was saved from extinction by another sailing, surfing, full-time acetone-huffing, grass smoking architect of wet and wild mayhem, Ron Moore. He widened Olson’s mold with a fateful twoby-four, and somewhere in this scientific process (that ended up with one side being wider than the other) the mighty Moore 24 was born. Despite being symmetrically challenged, it was FAST! Moore sailors are a different breed. Where some go though a 24’ boat phase before growing up and into larger boats, Moore sailors are addicted for life. It’s not hard to see why. From the first puff or wave you catch, Marin and I enjoying a Mai Tai after completing the the bow that looks like trip to Hawaii in 11 days! a cross between a 1970s September 2016

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“The night is long and full of terrors... well, not last night. We’ve had some of the absolute best sailing in the world under the full moon!” At other times, things were hardly as pleasant. A little later on, I logged, “Imagine waking up in a wet sleeping bag to the sound of the stern wave hissing through the 1/8” thick hull as the boat comes off a wave at over 15 knots. Your shipmate “taps out” on the drum of the cockpit overhead. You leave the comfort of your wet sleeping bag for your wet foulweather gear and go on deck to take the helm. You’re not quite awake, but you’re already far away from the mermaid you left in your dream. You stare bleary eyed at the tiny over-bright compass as phosphorescent bow waves stream past you as you begin another four hours alone on deck. It hardly seems humane, but tell that to the flying fish bouncing off our bow like bugs on a windshield.” After what was a rarely lucid, seemingly psychedelic trip, I got to call “land ho” from my own boat, and we made landfall in Kaneohe Bay in just over 11 days. It is a real-life tropical paradise. Our moms were there and we were alive…maybe. Our land legs grew back slowly in between naps and Mai Tais. I took pictures of every meal and thanked Neptune that all that freeze dried beef Stroganoff was behind me. I blink my eyes and 15 days later I step off of a delivery sailing back to the mainland on a boat that, unlike mine, is too big to go into a shipping container. I write this as I wait for Evermoore to finish her sail back on the big ship. With a bit of hindsight, would I recommend it? Hell yes! Rock what you got and do it. I did it on the cheapest, fastest boat I could find and can say it was truly life changing. I’m sure one could find cheaper, better, wetter ways to humble, inspire, and degrade yourself, but I haven’t found it. Nothing can prepare you for the amount of work involved. You may not decide to make your own sails, or do it on an old boat never meant to leave sight of land, or do it double-handed like Martin and me. Regardless, be prepared for it to totally eclipse your life for a year at least. I would also recommend that if you have friends, take them with you and make them help. With that much

concentrated time together, Martin and I were happy to “split tacks” for a while once we got ashore. One thing is for sure though; whether your crew is big or little, you will need a lot of help. Having that help come from someone you genuinely enjoy and can depend on is indispensable. Whether your next goal is your first overnight sail or sailing around the world, I encourage you to do it. Clip in, don your waterwings, and help each other out. As I try to get back to normal, I’m thankful. I’m thankful to Evermoore for the imperfect but safe passage, to

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Martin for being my other hand, and to what I’m sure is the best village of helpers any boat or captain could ask for. Pac Cup is a race, too! Big ups to the boys on Mas! - the other Moore 24 in the race and the overall winners on corrected time. We are as happy as could be with a second behind those guys! Captain Rhys Balmer is a sailing instructor, sailmaker, and delivery captain. He’s based in Seattle... or Portland... or wherever else the wind blows. Check out the Evermoore Racing Development page on Facebook for some video of the trip!

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Getting and Keeping Rides Other People’s Boats

on

By Andy Schwenk

I

started boating as a child in the early 70s and never actually owned my own real life “in-the-water” boat until my parents blessed me with a 26’ Thunderbird as a wedding gift/ liability in 1996. Oh, I owned a couple Lasers and I-14s but never a “real” boat for over 20 years. Nevertheless I was able travel well over 100,000 miles near coastal and offshore racing and

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cruising and you can too, sometimes without spending a cent. There are a lot of ways to get out on the water. Each of these ways has its joys and pitfalls, but generally it’s all good. And if it isn’t, I just promptly forgot about it, with a few lessons excepted. But, whether you’re just getting into the sport or you have a lot of experience and find yourself September 2016

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boatless or simply balancing some new priorities - jobs, kids, etc. - getting out on the water on someone else’s boat can be a great option. One easy way to get on the water for cheap is to crew on a racing boat. There are regattas out of Shilshole, Leschi, and Lake Union almost every night throughout the summer and weekend regattas on the Sound all


year ‘round. Most local marinas and yacht clubs will have at least one night of beer can racing to offer. The Seattle Area Racing Calendar (SARC) is maintained by the sweet and popular Catherine Picha, and is printed in the January issue of this fine publication. The process to wrangle your way on board is simple. Find a race in your area. Scout the docks beforehand, try to look the part. If it’s raining, as it probably will be, go to a local thrift store and purchase a set of beat up foul weather gear so you don’t look like a noob. If you are an attractive young lass you will surely find a skipper willing to offer you a crew spot come race day, even if he has to leave his own kid on the dock. For the rest of us, a six pack of beer in hand always makes you look more attractive. One pal of mine wears a pork chop around his neck, not sure why. Among other things, I recommend wearing shoes with lightcolored non-marking soles. Even if you can’t pull your weight on board right away, you won’t piss off your skip by scuffing up the decks. You can also sort of stowaway on board if it’s a larger boat. Play it cool and just say you are a friend of [insert the name of a prominent sailing family in your area here]. Busy yourself helping to haul out sails or offer to make coffee since it’s raining and you likely will not be chased off right away. My two governing principles that never fail for good times on the water are to sail with your friends, sail with people that are better sailors than you, or preferably both. It is unlikely you will start out in on someone else’s boat in the latter category, and you might as well be in the former, so be helpful and kind. Many skippers are looking for crew because either their boat isn’t all that, or they aren’t all that. So, if you are not super happy with your first ride, hang in there! You are on your way. Keep track of the names of the yachts in the regatta that look promising and try to spot them in the marina. Stash an introductory note aboard after the race along with a Starbucks card and pray they call. If they don’t, keep developing your skills. When one of your crewmates lands a sweet ride on a nicer vessel and they come up one short, hopefully she will call you to fill in. Listen carefully for clues about

upcoming boat projects, like the boat is being hauled out or sails need to be delivered for repair. Offer to help out with the delivery or take the sail to the loft. Anything you can do to be helpful will surely be noted by the skipper. Helping with deliveries on race boats is only one kind of delivery. You may also find yourself able to go sailing on someone else’s boat by being available to help with cruising deliveries, or just plain cruising! Between the back of some sailing publications and the wonders of the information super highway, you will find skippers looking for crew and crew looking for skippers. This can range from you sharing expenses to you being paid for your services. If you are still reading this article, there’s a good chance you fall into the former category, unless you are terrific in the galley or have fantastic mechanical skills. Many wealthy people have lovely yachts and need trustworthy people to crew them. There are also trustworthy people with lovely yachts that can’t afford all the expense and are happy to help burn up your discretionary funds. Anytime you pay to play or someone is paying you, make sure the expectations are clear and you have enough greenbacks stashed in your Sou’wester for a plane ticket home in the case the plan goes awry. Again the first boat you step aboard may not be the finest kind but it does get you in the mix. Make sure you always have your own safety equipment and it fits and you know how to use it. Quickly familiarize yourself with the safety plans aboard any vessel, like how to operate the Man Overboard function on the GPS and where thru-hulls and fire extinguishers are located. Be upfront about your experience level. If you “oversell” yourself, it is not fair to your skipper. Their trust in you may end up putting their life and your own in danger. Boat schedules are notoriously changing as they are fairly dependent on weather and owners change plans frequently due to family and economic issues. This usually means if you are in a hurry, forget about making it back and enjoy the ride. It’s good to volunteer to help out, but you may need to bring some flexibility to match your enthusiasm. www.48North.com

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Joining race crews or helping with deliveries involves going sailing on someone else’s boat with that someone. However, if you formerly owned a boat or have the killa skillz, but just don’t have a boat, consider chartering. You may not always think of it that way, but chartering is basically going sailing on a privately owned boat. It can be expensive, but if you’re not going frequently, it’s cheaper than ownership! On top of that, some of the courtesy that makes a sailor good crew can also make them a good charter skipper. The world of charter ranges from 100 boat fleets in the San Juans to

local VRBO (vacation rental by owner) located throughout our area. Generally, you will have to lay down a hefty cash deductible and get through some kind of check out procedure. There is no special license or paperwork required, though you may find it helpful to be certified. If, in the opinion of the check out skipper, you need a little more instruction on that particular boat, it is likely they have a bullpen of willing skippers to guide you for a small fee, at least until you get your sea legs back under you. There are also sailing clubs and groups to join to get you on the saltchuck. These range from health club

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type programs with a fee for a certain amount of boat usage to social groups that enjoy potlucks and little else. Whether or not a school, chartering program, or private skipper requires training or certification, building your skills to be safe, competent, and confident on the water will always make you more desixsrable whether you’re crewing or skippering another person’s boat. For formal training, there are reputable schools endorsed by American Sailing Association or US Sailing. Most will start you out on 22’-25’ tiller and outboard keelboats and work you into diesel powered auxiliaries with a wheel after several weeks. Look for programs with a strong on-the-water presence. Check out the fleet, facility and staff before signing any paperwork or giving up your credit card info. Most have an introductory special to dip your toe in the water before going all in for hundreds if not thousands of dollars. Of course, the sure fire way to spend the maximum amount of dinero is to purchase a boat of your own. It’s as easy to buy a boat as it is to buy a car, except if you plan to keep it in the water you will likely want to figure that situation first. Even if you plan to purchase a trailerable boat, it is a good idea to figure out where it will live and if your jalopy is up to the task of hauling it around. In my experience, shop for a good trailer then see what kind of boat is currently occupying it. Saltwater is highly corrosive and if you have always wanted to work on wheel bearings, here is your chance! I encourage you to explore the options and get out there. Stay within your budget so you can enjoy the wind in your hair, while all those other wannabe captains are workin’ nights, waiting for the minimum wage to rise again, or hoping that RV out in front of their house moves on to the next neighborhood. After all, if you’re not ready to own, there are a lot of ways to get out there on other people’s boats. Just follow some of this advice and bring a good attitude! You’ll be invited back for sure. Andy Schwenk is a USCG 100 Ton licensed Master and the owner of Northwest Rigging. He has 42 Pacific transits to his credit and at least one win in every major local regatta.


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o End of Summer T -

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H

Varnishing By Jack and Alex Wilken

Late summer is a great time to be out on the water, but there are also some non-sailing things that are done best in dry weather. One of those is varnishing. Interior varnish can be applied at any time of the year as you can create the environment; exterior is weather dependent, and we do live in the Pacific Northwest. The reason we varnish is not just because it looks beautiful. It also protects the wood while at the same time allowing you to see the condition of what lies below. If you have spent much time around wooden boats, you will have had the experience of pushing into a painted surface only to find something underneath that is soft and mushy. There are other ways than varnish to protect wood and still see it. There are various oils and some hybrids of oil and varnish. We are going to focus on varnish. The word ‘varnish’ itself represents a fairly wide range of different compounds. Without spending too much time, let us say that varnish has a long history. Its use is said to date back

at least to the ancient Egyptians. You’ll want to start by checking the weather. When applying varnish, we look for something between 50° to 80°F, with 55° to 65°F being preferred. The relative humidity should be hovering around 50%. Having said all this, different products, especially modern ones, may have very specific requirements, so read the manufacturer’s instructions. The important thing is that the varnish has time to flow out and self-level, but we’ll get to more on that when we talk about thinning. If the wind is blowing, it is probably better to go sailing as dust will not give you a flawless finish. Varnishing in direct sunlight is another no-no, so if you do not have one of our historically overcast days, you will want to create some shade. The direct sun can make it difficult to maintain a wet edge that you can brush into, and it may cause the varnish to dry unevenly. On top of all that, you want to start your coat so that it will be dry before the rain or dew settle on it. The choice of which varnish to use

Figure 1: Preparing to remove the old varnish, we taped, “A”, the tarp in place and then laid it over the lifelines, “B”, to create a trough, “C”, that will keep everything out of the water. We are doing this one section at a time. 42

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often comes from habit or emotional attachment. If you are adventurous, there are newer products on the market. Several years back we were introduced to one that, at the time, was getting rave reviews and was said to last for 5 years. After some reluctance we used it on one of our boats and then on some other jobs we had. At some point we noticed that there was a change in how it sanded between coats. Namely, the first boats we did were really tough to sand and then the latter ones were easy. As we soon found out, the change coincided with the company producing the second batch of the product. To our dismay the new batch did not act the same, and, instead of lasting 5 years, it began breaking down in 6 months. That company is now history, but it does make a good case for using products or companies with long track records. Not all new products start out in the US. Some will have proven themselves by the time they are released here. We are going to break varnish down into three categories: traditional, polyurethane, and modern or high tech. They all will provide some UV protection though how much will vary, and some get reformulated (we hope for the better) now and again to improve this characteristic. You can read the company’s hype or, if you have one, use a good source who keeps up to date. At the risk of this sounding like a commercial plug, we have gotten a lot of good advice from the maintenance department at Fisheries Supply. That’s just to say that good help is out there. In general, traditional varnish is more flexible - remember that wood was a living organism that will continue to move - but softer than polyurethane. The latter, in most cases, is more UV resistant. It should be noted that polyurethane comes in oil or water-based. The advantage of the water-based product is that it dries quickly and gives off very little VOCs (volatile organic compounds). The down side is in performance, and that it will not give you the deep gloss of a traditional varnish. These are generalities. You have to look at each product carefully. There are also those who use one product to build up coats and then finish with something else for looks or UV protection. The possibilities are endless. The best thing


is to find one you like and stick with it, remembering that traditional varnishes may need to be re-coated every six months. Polyurethanes might not be too far behind, expect to re-coat at least every year if they are not covered. What is important is not to allow them to breach or crack. As far as high tech, we are trying another one right now that is supposed to last 5 years. Wish us luck! The final look of the job will depend most on the preparation. If you are starting with old, breached varnish, then it will need to be all stripped off. This means sanding and dry scraping, or the use of a chemical remover and then scraping or removal by some abrasive, a Scotch-Brite pad or bronze wool are very common ones. A heat gun can also be used with a putty knife to remove everything. No matter which method you use, it is necessary to contain all the old varnish as nothing can go into the water (Figure 1, page 42).

not to use silicone sealant as it does not hold coatings. Read the manufacturer’s re c o m m e n d a t i o n s to make sure that what you are using is paintable. The wood has to be thoroughly sanded. We often start with 40 grit and work our way up to 120 grit in 40 grit steps. The finish sanding is done with 120 grit along the grain for most products. Check the manufacturer’s Figure 3: “A” is the first piece of tape put down that is lifted guidelines. Now, wipe and then resealed to allow the last piece, labeled “D”, to be down everything under it. “B” is second and then “C”. Each is on top of the with a low lint rag preceding one so that when you pull up the tape the next one is that has the thinner lifted by the one before it. “E” shows the tape doubled back on itself so you can easily pull it with gloved fingers. or reducer for the product you are using. If you use a tack applied without pulling the tape, and cloth, go over the surface the third coat should still be wet when very lightly so that you do you pull it. When you are planning not deposit any chemicals the job, you will want to varnish first on the wood. With a new if there is any painting to be done. It is product we are trying, much easier to paint over varnish than the manufacturer has you the other way around. Use “delicate wipe down with acetone surface tape” on new varnish. when preparing to prime There are various possibilities in teak. Read the label! brushes. Badger hair or now the oftenYou will want to used China Bristle and Ox Ear Hair mask or tape off the edge Blend brushes are a joy to use, but of your work to protect their cost means they are not one-use the paint, gelcoat, or bare wood that is adjacent to Figure 2: Masking tape comes in many grades. This chart it. There are many grades shows how long you can leave the tape in place and have of masking tape plus we it still come off cleanly. Leaving the tape on longer risks often use vinyl tape or that it will leave adhesive or come apart on the surface. electrical tape, and each has its own personality Have a plastic or cloth catchment (Figure 2). Some are waterproof, and system set up before you start. Care they have different expected lifespans. and patience in the removal process The ¾” vinyl tape is not wide enough will mean less gouging and scratching to protect the surroundings, but it that will need to be sanded out latter. seals well and will go around curves. Once all the old coating is Then, you can use something wider removed, it is time to sand or repair the to complete the job. It will be easier Figure 4: Instead of cleaning a brush, underlying structure. Moisture getting when it is time to remove the masking “A”, completely between coats, it can under the varnish can cause failure of tape if you start at one end of your job be suspended in a container, “B”, with the greatest varnish job. This means and lay any tape joints on in order so thinner, and, then, by squeezing the excess that any place where the wood is in when you start to pull, you always lift thinner out, it is ready to go. The lid, “C”, contact with another material, like a the next one. The first one should have has an opening cut in it, and the brush toe rail where it meets the deck, it must the tape doubled back on itself so your handle is drilled at “D”. In this case a long sealed and varnish needs to come down gloved hands can grab it easily (Figure screw holds it in place. A taller, slenderer and cover the sealant. This is a reason 3). Not more than three coats should be container will use less thinner. www.48North.com September 2016 43


brushes. Cleaning the brushes involves the use of chemicals which later need to be dealt with. You can hang them in a cup and keep them ready for the next coat (Figure 4, page 43). For brushes that are single use, you can try foam, especially for rolling and tipping. That is when one uses a roller to spread the varnish on and then smooths or flattens it out by pulling the tipping brush lightly, in this case a foam brush, across the varnish. Do not shake the can or stir it except to add thinner as that can cause bubbles. Badger brushes really matter only on the final two coats. The first coat should be penetrating

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epoxy, wood sealer, or a 50% thinned coat of the varnish you are using. The best is the penetrating epoxy, but if you need to remove it latter, you will have more work to do. Some systems have a wood sealer that is part of it. The last choice is the old standby, and, while it is not as good as the other two, it is an acceptable alternative. If you overcoat some varnishes within a certain window of time, there is a chemical bond and therefore no need to sand. Sanding will, however, give you a clear idea of where you have applied the new coat and help avoid “holidays,” or spots you missed. Holidays can be

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seen most easily by looking across the surface being worked on, not directly at it. Sanding can be accomplished by using a medium to fine grade Scotch-Brite pad which will rough up the surface without taking off a lot of material. The idea is to build up thickness, so putting on a coat and then sanding most of it off does not make any sense. Dip the brush into the dedicated varnish pot, not the can. This pot should be filled by the use of a varnish strainer, a paper cone with fine mesh. When you are done, unused varnish should be disposed of, not returned to the original can. So, try to pour what you will use. Dip less than half the bristles into the varnish and give them a few seconds to soak up the material. Foam brushes will not soak up much varnish, but, as we said, they are good for tipping. The trick is spreading the varnish out evenly with no drips, sags, runs, or holidays. You may want to load the varnish onto the surface with a roller or larger brush. Try going across the grain and then tip going with the grain. Do not work with so much area that you cannot maintain a wet edge to brush into. It may require thinning for this to happen. If the brush starts to stick, you probably need thinner. Read the label. The finish coat is the one you are going to see, so sand the previous coat with fine wet/dry sandpaper. Use a little water in the process. This may mean allowing the second to last coat to dry longer to be able to sand it. In total 7 or 8 coats on bare wood will give you a good base to go forward with periodic maintenance. If you do not like the last coat, just put another as it is tough to have too many coats. The sun is the great destroyer when it comes to varnish, so as you travel south from here, the interval for re-coating gets shorter. If you shield varnish from the sun, it will last for years. If covers are going to be successful, they will need to be UV proof. Enjoy a beautiful boat, but mostly, enjoy sailing! Jack and Alex Wilken are experienced boat builders and have cruised extensively. They hold USCG Captain’s Licenses and are the owners of Seattle Boat Works LLC in Seattle.


The Artist’s View – Secrets of the Salish Sea Sketches and story by Larry Eifert

“687 sea otters rafted up together off Hoh Head!” Now THAT caught my attention! I realize no one in their right mind would pilot their boat into that pretty little cove north of the Hoh Estuary and spend the night, but this seemed like a story just waiting to be told. Sea otters are currently endangered and are our largest otter, two to three times the size of river otters. Some males can be upwards of 100 lbs. You’ll rarely see them in the Salish Sea east of Pillar Point because they need kelp beds for shelter and the associated marine life to consume – urchins, clams, crabs and fish. Urchins and clams, you wonder? Sea otters have learned to use small rocks as tools. Floating on their backs in the kelp and using a flat stomach into a table, they bang away with the rock until dinner appears. 687 sea otters is a big deal because they were once

on the brink of extinction and completely gone from our area. Thanks to fur that has around one million hairs per square inch (the densest on Earth), it seems everyone just had to have a sea otter hat at the time. So, we did a number on hundreds of thousands of Pacific Northwest sea otters. The last one in Washington state was killed in 1911. Then in 1969, 59 otters were transplanted from Alaska and the slow process of reintroduction began. I’ve seen them in many places along the outer coast, but never more than one or two at one time. They tend to eat at first light, then gang up in the kelp to hang out together, even holding each other’s paws to keep together as they snooze. So, 687! That’s a big deal in the face of Global Climate Change, shifting food sources, declining salmon runs, and all the rest of the problems facing wildlife today.

Looking to see a sea otter up close? The Seattle Aquarium has an entire family. Larry Eifert paints and writes about wild places. His work is in many national parks across America – and at larryeifert.com. www.48North.com

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Galley Essentials with Amanda Ready to enjoy tea and cake at the Minginish Artisans fair. As Scotland is one of my most favorite countries (John’s too!), we purposely planned a long turnaround in Oban, located on Scotland’s west coast. Years ago writer/cruiser Beth Leonard wrote about anchoring off Dunvegan Castle on the Isle of Skye and enjoying a classical music concert on the castle lawn. That stuck with John, and after friends mentioned great hiking on Skye, he researched Dunvegan Castle and discovered that the estate rents historic cottages on the grounds by the week. He chose the Laundry Cottage, situated on the loch right in front of the castle, and for six months we’d been excited to visit, with plans for using the cottage as a base for daily hikes. On the morning our crew departed, we’d gathered our kit and were checking email when we received a surprise message from my parents, Robert and Lesley, saying, ”We’ve just flown in from Auckland and are in Oban - let’s get together.” Needless to say we canceled our rental car and joined mum and dad in their rental car. With the boys in the front seats driving and navigating, that left mum and I in the back seat to visit. But wait, we also needed something to do, so our first stop was Fort William, where we decided upon knitting. It wasn’t an easy mission, but after stumbling across a teddy bear maker who had Highland spun and dyed wool plus a sock pattern, all we then had to do was scour the second hand shops for sock knitting needles. 46

Swanning About on Skye by Amanda Swan Neal Luckily,uponarrivingatDunvegan’s quaint Laundry Cottage, we discovered there was plenty of room and that we were also offered free rein of the castle grounds and several tours of the themed gardens and the castle. Although the UK was suffering a wicked summer, we were experiencing a heat wave with no midges, perfect for picnics. With the arrival of mum and dad, John and I The ladies of Minginish Walnut Cake

downsized our hiking plans and studied a pocket book of 40 Skye walks. We’d also picked up Skye’s Gallery and Studio Trails booklet ( w w w. a r t - s k y e . c o . u k ) and formulated a new plan to alternate hiking with studio visits. Mum and I soon realized Skye’s art scene is very impressive. With our knitting interest, we chose to limit our studio visits to those containing wool; including tartans and tweeds. Skye’s numerous peninsulas allowed for intriguing exploration and we did our best to hit the highlights. For example, the first day took us to the central region with the aim of hiking the Fairy Pools, but a recent article in The Times had now made the pathway a thoroughfare, so we continued on down the road and had a wonderful scramble to get close up views of the Cuillin Ridge. When the afternoon weather socked in, we dashed to Talisker Distillery for a tour, but again crowds forced us to retreat. Nevermind, we discovered the lovely ladies of Minginish hold an artisans fair on Wednesday at the community hall complete with homemade soup and scrumptious cakes. Walnut Cake 8½oz - walnuts 3¾oz whole wheat flour 4 eggs - separated 8oz caster sugar zest of 1 lemon confectioner’s sugar Pre-heat oven to 375°F. Grease a round cake pan and line it with parchment paper. Grind walnuts in a food processor until you have a coarse meal. Beat egg yolks with sugar until

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pale and creamy. Stir in zest, walnut meal and flour. In a small bowl whisk egg whites until stiff peaks form, add to mix. Bake 30 minutes. Dust with confectioner’s sugar. Although Dunvegan was remote, we happened on a live concert in the Red Roof Cafe, a tiny isolated coffee house/art gallery in the nearby village of Glenvale. The captivating singer, Robyn Stapleton, had recently won Scotland’s Young Singer of the Year contest and was accompanied by an equally talented young guitarist. A highlight of touring Dunvegan Castle was the discovery of an old photo of Finlay McQueen who lived on St. Kilda; an isolated island formerly owned by the same family that owns Dunvegan. As my family clan is McQueen, perhaps Finlay is a relative. I’m now looking forward to our St. Kilda visit. Our five days of swanning about the countryside and delighting in Dunvegan soon ended. Thanks to my mum’s great cooking skills and the abundance of tasty local produce, we’d also enjoyed many fantastic meals. Here are some of mum’s recipes as a window into what Skye has to offer. Chicken Liver Pate 4 strips of bacon 1½ cups leeks - diced 3 cloves garlic - crushed 1 lb chicken livers 1 tablespoon olive oil ½ cup red wine 1 teaspoon dried thyme ½ teaspoon dried parsley ½ teaspoon ground sage 1 bay leaf 1 tablespoon fresh parsley - chopped 1 tablespoon fresh rosemary - chopped ¼ teaspoon salt In a large, non-reactive frying pan, brown bacon. Remove bacon from pan. Add leeks and garlic; sauté 2 minutes. Move leeks to the side and add chicken livers. Drizzle with olive oil. Cook 4 minutes then turn livers over, add wine & herbs. Cover pan and simmer 15 minutes. Remove lid and cook 3 minutes more. Add liver mix to a large food processer along with bacon, herbs & salt. Puree until smooth. Portion into five 4oz mason jars and chill.

Cullen Skink with Mussels 3 garlic cloves ½ cup chopped parsley juice from ½ lemon ½ teaspoon Dijon mustard ½ teaspoon red wine vinegar 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons water pepper 2 tablespoons butter 1 onion - chopped 1 leek - sliced 1 lb potatoes diced 2 bay leaves 1 lb smoked haddock fillets 3 cups milk water 1 lb fresh mussels In a blender, puree garlic and parsley. Add lemon juice, mustard, vinegar, olive oil, water and pepper; blend until smooth. Cook onion, leek, potatoes and bay leaves in butter, 5 minutes. Add haddock, half the milk and water to cover; simmer 10 minutes. Remove fish and flake. Add remaining milk and pepper to pan; simmer 10 minutes. Add haddock and mussels,

cover and cook 4 minutes until mussels open. Serve drizzled with vinaigrette. Chicken & Mushroom Pesto Pasta 16oz pasta 3 tablespoons olive oil 3 cloves garlic - crushed 1 chicken breast - thinly sliced 8oz sliced mushrooms 1 cup pesto salt & pepper Parmesan cheese - grated Cook pasta according to packet instructions. Meanwhile in a large frying pan heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil and saute garlic 1 minute, add mushrooms and cook 5 minutes. Remove mushrooms, heat remaining oil and saute chicken 5 minutes. Drain pasta, reserving a small amount of cooking water. Add pasta, pesto and mushrooms to chicken. Season to taste. Add a little cooking water if pasta seems dry. Serve with grated Parmesan cheese. Serves 4. Amanda is currently cruising Norway to Sweden. To view here latest adventures and more recipes sail to www.mahina.com

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LESSONS LEARNED WHILE CRUISING Jamie & Behan Gifford

Shoulder Season Cruising There was an extra edge of magic to cruising along the coast of Namibia earlier this year. The fast-flowing waters of the Benguela current are nutrient rich, allowing a tremendous amount of marine life to flourish in an ecosystem that spans from phytoplankton to whales. These Antarctic-chilled waters run along the 1,200 mile coast of the Namib desert, where the clash in temperatures means our encounters included a stand of flamingoes in one anchorage and a flock of penguins in the next, with pods of fur seals in the hundred-count between. Among all the factors that made this a surreal environment to cruise, it was the novelty of cool weather that had a surprising impact on our crew. After years of warm-weather cruising, they reveled in the rare experience of bundling up to ward off a chill. We snuggled below in our heater-less cabin, warmed by tea and stews. Fog frequently blankets the coastline where hot desert air hits cold water, and the wonder of feeling lost (and yet, not lost) gave our travels a mystical quality. It was that nip in the air that brought back some of our best memories of sailing in Puget Sound: the shoulder

seasons. Beginning in September, the summer crowds fade but the weather can still be stunning. It’s an ideal time to plan a getaway afloat. Pressing deeper into the season when a cool edge seeps in, our boat migrated from a warm-weather platform for play to a cozy, cold season retreat. It was more than a fresh twist on familiar places: we found new experiences altogether. Foggy early mornings tucked into a peaceful harbor, and glassy water unbroken by boat traffic, sharing the cockpit for quiet conversation. It is these memories that stand out above cruising during those glory days of August, when the little secret gets out for a while that the Pacific Northwest isn’t such a gray, rainy region after all. And while there may not be penguins, on fall afternoons it seemed that wildlife more frequently tantalized us with sights and sounds. Fewer distractions? Less traffic? Maybe. But, it could also be that September is still one of the best months of the year to sight pods of orcas in Puget Sound. And if the bay you’re in is quiet, it’s simply that much easier to hear seals slapping their catch on the water’s surface or spot an eagle carrying off a fish.

Foggy days in Seattle peak in September and October. Don’t let it scare you away, but be ready! 48

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Popular harbors in the San Juans that are bedlam in the summer start to tone down the action in September. It can still be busy, especially if there’s a weekend with a glorious weather forecast, but it’s still appealing in contrast to the jammed peak season. The later you can wait into fall, sailing north when the crowds fade helps open the islands up further: without the noise and distractions, they’re easier to appreciate. That wee tiny anchorage that only holds a couple of boats - you know the one - is waiting, with room. Certainly, it is more pleasant to walk in and get a seat than wait in line with the crowds at a choice pub or restaurant. When we could take time to provision, cool weather brought out the galley god/goddess inside. On hot summer days, the last thing I want to do is heat up the main cabin by using the oven (WHY are most boat ovens uninsulated?!). Cool weather changes that dramatically, with the double benefit of warming the cabin and creating delicious meals. In Namibia, I was so happy to bake again after giving it up in the sweaty tropics. You know the phrase about a well fed crew being a happy crew? There’s not much like the yeasty aroma of warm bread to make the crew smile! No more interested in heating up the cabin in the Salish Sea summers than I was in the South Pacific, setting dough to rise in a warm engine compartment to bake bread was an off-season pleasure. We treat ourselves with more slow cooked meals for the benefit of heat and ambiance: Jamie makes his crowd pleasing “one pot wonder,” roasting a chicken on top of chopped root veggies tossed with olive oil, herbs, and seasoning keep the good smells coming. Shoulder season cruising doesn’t have to mean tackling big miles. Some of our favorite weekend getaways were those closest to our home port of Eagle Harbor, since shorter days play well with shorter transits. Tucked into Blakely Harbor, less than an hour from our slip, the glow of city lights provides a beautiful view and often we’d be the only boat there. Quartermaster Harbor


and Port Madison offer similar respites within easy reach. Anchored just off the channel in Port Madison on a foggy morning, listening to the cry of eagles hidden in the soupy mist, we might as well have been in a far more distant port instead of one that only took us a few short hours to reach. If we didn’t have time for provisioning to feed our crew, but weren’t willing to give up a weekend the getaway, Poulsbo was another easy choice. Sluy’s for breakfast (my mouth waters thinking about the pastries!), Market for lunch, and choosing from among waterfront restaurants for dinner. When the weather isn’t right to go out, or even if it is, another favorite way we enjoyed the shoulder seasons was to turn a weekend into a boat staycation. Many of these were an obligatory part of getting Totem ready for long distance cruising, but often it was just for fun. Simply departing from the normal routine at home changed our outlook, a step of disconnecting to reconnect with ourselves and as a family. So break out a few books or games, warm up some cider, splash in a little rum, and see if you can find out just how much

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SALES

September 2016

INSTALLATION

SERVICE 49


T he S ailmaker S essions Offshore Cruising Sails By Jim Kitchen, of Puget Sound Sails/Doyle Sails

The Sailmaker Sessions is a recurring series in 48° North which features a different local sailmaker in two formats: an informational article in print written by the featured sailmaker, and interview focusing on their background and current interests in sailing published on the new www.48north.com. I’d like to discuss some of the considerations one might go through in setting up an offshore sail supply. Like so many situations in sailing, one size does not fit all. Budgets, boat designs, and destinations vary widely. With so many options out there, I’m going to focus on a mid-size bluewater cruiser in the 30 to 40 foot range, and for the sake of a specific example let’s give it a cutter rig. Storage space is at a premium on any cruising boat, especially on smaller boats. You want to be able to go for long periods of time without having to stop to re-supply for food, fuel, and water. Cruisers get very creative in utilizing the small spaces within their boat to pack in as much as possible. With that in mind, imagine our cutter-rigged cruiser, which will have headsail, staysail, mainsail, and the usual extras such an asymmetrical spinnaker, storm sails, and potentially a drifter for the ultra-light upwind days. Some of these sails require storage space in the boat when they’re not being used, and this can help determine which sails you choose for your journey. You might throw the spinnaker on deck to clear some space during the medium wind days, but if it’s blowing, it will need to go below. The goal here is to outfit your boat in a way that you can maintain a safe and steady pace to the next destination. It probably won’t surprise you that sails designed for offshore tend to be heavier than all-purpose or coastal cruising sails, typically using cloth that is about one ounce heavier. One of the major factors is UV protection. Offshore sails should utilize a product that coats 50

the seams to protect the thread from UV, as it is typically more susceptible to the effects of the sun than the cloth itself. Even with perfect care and maintenance, sails used offshore will have a shorter life than sails used for inshore or coastal sailing. The intensity of the wind and sun, combined with day-in-day-out usage mean you’ll be doing well to get six to seven years out of an offshore sail, whereas a sail used for more coastal cruising may have a life of up to 15 years. Mainsails The mainsail is the engine that makes the boat move. They come in different shapes and sizes, morphing a lot as boat design has changed over the last 40 years. One boat may have a tall mast and short boom, which is called “high aspect” and another may have a long boom and short mast, or “low aspect.” Both can be effective, but they each have strengths and weaknesses. A cutter in this size range tends to have a fairly squatty rig with a low aspect main, but high aspect headsails. An offshore mainsail should typically be made in a stably woven Dacron or laminate with some type of taffeta on the outside. The mainsail will be up for long periods of time and Dacron cloth with a stable weave will help keep the stretch to a minimum. Newer Dacron cloths have some UV protection as well. Laminate cruising cloths made today are very nice in that they cut the weight of sail by a least a third while keeping optimum shape over very long periods of time. Many companies are now offering load path computer-generated sails, just be sure September 2016

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you have a taffeta membrane on both sides. Using the taffeta as the outer membrane gives the sail extended chafe and UV protection that a Mylarfilmed laminate cannot. The layout of the mainsail for an offshore trip should include battens and reefs. Some sailboats with in-mast furling will have vertical battens to create a little more area, but can be a hassle rolling in and out. For boats that will raise and lower their mainsails in traditional fashion, a full-battened main will offer optimum shape and durability (by reducing chafe), compared to standard battens. The number of reef points on the main should be enough to handle a wide range of velocity changes in the wind, keeping the boat safe and controlled. Reefing a sail changes the percentage of available sail area, and I consider it like shifting gears. For an offshore main, it’s possible that we might have more distance between the reef points so that the change in gear accounts for a great percentage reduction. Putting three reefs in a main can be a good option if the controls for putting the reefs in remain simple. Many offshore cruisers will use that third reef and never need to up a trysail. The reef points themselves should be nearly identical to the tack and clew, and able to handle the same loads. Offshore sailors are always concerned about chafe. With experience, they become specific about the rope, webbing, or apparatus used to control the extra sail below the reef point. The gentler the option, the better. Threestrand has a traditional look, but it’s hard on the sails. Canvas “sail basket” solutions tend to be the easiest and most gentle option on your sail. Headsails Headsails on a cutter rigged boat can be tricky. Having a furler on your headsail and staysail will make life on the cruise much easier. You want to have a good amount of sail area up to keep moving. On the other hand, having a staysail to interfere with tacking may push you toward a smaller sail that could get around the staysail without


having to furl or pull the sail through. Some people prefer a high clewed Yankee, while others prefer a lower clewed headsail to give them more drive down low. I often recommend headsails with lower clews for an offshore cutter, for several reasons. The closer you get to the equator, the lighter the breeze gets, and I think there’s an advantage to having some extra drive in that situation. Additionally, cruisers will spend most of their time on a reach or a run. The power on these points of sail is less noticeable when pointing. Finally, on a cutter rig, when the wind comes up, you’re going to furl or stow your big headsail anyway, so you might as well make it a bit more powerful. Whatever the size or shape, a balanced Dacron or taffeta covered laminate works very well for the headsail. Make sure your UV protection is of a quality material since replacement may be difficult when you’re on a remote island somewhere. A luff flattener on the headsail is another good option to consider. It will help take draft out of the sail when reducing the sail area with the furler. Staysails The staysail on a cutter can be on a roller furling unit or hanked on, and it may be either club footed or You Read! loose footed. The We sail Scancan be used in combination with the headsail on a reach, or by itself in a heavy weather situation. I have set them up to sheet to carsWe on the cabin top or single line Receive self-tending back to the cockpit. The Your Mail, You Go! staysail will typically beWherever a low-clewed OLUTIONS sail. It must be that way Swith a club DOCKSIDE foot. www.dockside-solutions.com 206.434.8241 The cloth will be similar to the headsail, but the weight is usually one

step heavier because of its use in heavy air conditions. A luff flattener normally isn’t needed because the sail shouldn’t have a lot of shape built into it to begin with. Sails work in conjunction with the boat design to keep the center of effort balanced between the sails. One of the advantageous aspects of a cutter rig is that as sail is being reduced (reefing the main, going from headsail to staysail), the center of effort is moving in toward the keel. This balance can reduce the pressure on the helm compared to a sloop rig where a partially furled headsail is still far forward on the boat. The reduced pressure on the helm can keep your autopilot or windvane functioning happily! Asymmetrical or Drifter In light air situations, the use of an Asymmetrical spinnaker or drifter comes in handy. An asymmetrical spinnaker needs no spinnaker pole support or projection and is easier to fly short-handed, as most offshore cruisers are. A drifter is useful in very light air for the upwind mode. In each case, storage will dictate that you probably only carry one of each of these sails offshore, meaning they must be fairly Old Version all-purpose (reach/run capability with the spinnaker, and point/reach capability with the drifter). The type of cloth used for these sails varies depending on the size of boat. Spinnakers will usually be between .75oz. and 1.5oz nylon cloth. The drifter would be a light Dacron (3.8oz. to 5.4oz.) or a heavy nylon and would likely exceed the size of the headsail in an overlapping manner. It will have a super strong Amsteel luff line that can make the loose luff rigid

when pulled tight. An offshore drifter may likely have a two-part layout with lighter cloth in the luff, and heavier cloth further back. This will be more durable over its years of use, combating chafe and leech flutter. Storm sails The reason you would use a storm sail is simply that - you’re in a storm. The conditions have become such that it’s not safe to be on the deck of the boat. These sails need to withstand a large amount of load and should be built accordingly. The weight of the sail should be Dacron in the 9oz. - 11oz. range for the 30’ to 40’ boat. Where to position these sails is up for some debate. You want the center of effort on the boat to be low, but you don’t want the sail cut so low that it catches waves coming over the bow. A high clew on the storm headsails works well, though on a cutter, it’s likely that you would have a way to reef or partially furl your staysail, negating the need for a storm headsail. The storm trysail should deliver just enough power to keep the boat moving but not knocked over. It is flown above the lashed-down boom. The offshore environment is tough on boats and people, but it’s also a gateway to extraordinary adventure. Having a suit of sails built to handle it and powerful enough to get you there is essential. With all the variation in boats and sailors, it’s always good to talk to a professional about your specific boat, and where you plan to go. Jim Kitchen is the owner and operator of Puget Sound Sails, the Northwest’s Doyle Sails loft.

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Love is in the Stars By Michelle DeCouteau They had only been dating for a couple months and it was almost her birthday. Unsure of what to get, and wanting a gift that would truly be

appreciated, he decided to ask what she would like. With little hesitation she answered, “I would like a sailing lesson.” Really, he thought, this is

The happy couple tied the actual and proverbial knot on the “Lady Washington!” 52

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too good to be true! Sailing was the passion of his life, and that was what she wanted for her birthday. Things were going well. Derek started sailing Star Boats in 1977 and has been hooked ever since. With a glance at the calendar, Derek noticed the Jack and Jill race was close to Michelle’s birthday. Being a practical person, and needing crew, he thought that would be a good day for the sailing lesson. However, not wanting to cause pre-race anxiety for his student (crew), Derek decided not to mention to Michelle that her birthday sailing lesson would be during a race. The day was perfect, Derek thought, 75 degrees, 7-9 knots of breeze and a girl who wanted to go racing! Actually, it was a girl who wanted a sailing lesson and was clueless about the race. Minor detail! At the marina, Derek went to work getting the boat ready while Michelle intently observed. She had only


“Derek was able to pull off a win in spite of the challenge of having inexperienced crew. And even better, Michelle enjoyed sailing in the star and wanted to go out again... Deciding it would be good to have crew for the rest of his life, Derek proposed to Michelle!” admired pictures and videos of the Star Boat and now, with excitement, she was ready to go sailing. Derek started his tutorial, more like a crash course, as they left the dock. Once out of the marina, other Star Boats could be seen, and that was when Derek shared that they were about to participate in a race. “What?!” Michelle said with panic, “I’ve never been in a Star Boat. I can’t race!” As they sailed to the course, Derek assured Michelle that he would give instructions and the race would be fun! Although not completely convinced, she decided to be a good sport and go with it. After all, Derek was

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experienced, confident, and, Michelle thought, very cute! Derek was able to pull off a win in spite of the challenge of having inexperienced crew. And even better, Michelle enjoyed sailing in the Star and wanted to go out again. This was the beginning of a summer of racing together. Deciding it would be good to have crew for the rest of his life, Derek proposed to Michelle, and they tied the knot on July 4, 2016, aboard the Lady Washington. Derek and Michelle DeCouteau are now happily married Star Boat owners. It was in the stars that these two were meant to be!

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D’Alene Idaho to Oak Harbor 29 times. It’s a heck of a long way, but hey... Don’t mess with something that ain’t broke! The Hobie 33 made the trip until a couple from Long Island, NY, followed them to the boat ramp on Couer d’Alene and “made an offer that we couldn’t refuse.” Ironically, that boat reappeared at Whidbey Island Race Week many years later with new owners; it was renamed by the midnight Whidbey boat elves as “The Real Slow Eye Eye.” Funny AND clean re-name! Well done, funsters! Sons David and Coby helped buy and sell the boats they sailed at WIRW. After the Hobie 33, their boys became excited by the Martin 243. Being good parents, David and Vernice were up for the change. They sailed in regattas in Canada, WIRW, and several lake regattas. It proved to be very exciting to sail when the breeze was on, but it he was sticky on the lake. Time to move on! Their next Eye Eye was a J/80. There is a theme here! Sporty boats with a consistent boat name! Keeping the same boat name, they didn’t have to re-embroider their team polos, by Stephanie Schwenk rugby shirts, and fleece jackets… just 2016 was the 29th consecutive the early years, but it didn’t take long guessing on the fashion but it does year David and Vernice Cohen joined for them to join the crew. match the era. They hoped the J/80 They have brought their different would be part of a one-design class, in the part rodeo/part circus Adult Summer Camp that is the annual Eye Eyes from beautiful Lake Coer but that didn’t happen until after they Whidbey Island Race Week, sold her in 2005. Since then, aboard four different boats The first “Eye Eye,” a Hobie 33. “old” David helped convince named Eye Eye. David Cohen Photo courtesy of Cohen Family. Bill McKinnon to buy the first Sr. is an Ophthalmologist and J/80 ever built, and Bill invited Sailor Man, hence the double David to drive Skye Rocket entendre. in two Whidbey Island Race Their first Whidbey Island Week Regattas and in several Race Week was in 1987 when NOOD Regattas. That boat they were first learning to race name was a fun canvas for the on a Hobie 33. Nothing like Whidbey elves, with a name jumping in with both feet! If that won’t go to print but still memory serves me well, those cracks me up every time. were the fine days of Keith As time went on, young Lorence “owning” that fleet, David was searching for a but man, it was fun! David boat that would be easy for Senior planned to race, but his “not as young as they used Vernice had not. When she to be” parents to sail, with the pointed out the tangled mess potential to light it up in the of lines on board, she was lighter winds of the lakes of immediately recruited just to Idaho and Montana. He found keep everything straight. Since a well-loved, but needing a then she has been a regular lot more love, J/90 in Lake member of the crew. Their two Pontchartrain, Louisiana, a sons David V.H. and Coby, were survivor of Hurricane Katrina too young to race at WIRW in with a history of racing the Photo courtesy of Cohen Family

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Cohen Family

29 Years “Behind the Mast” …and Counting!

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Singlehanded TransPac, and sailing back. David drove a truck to New Orleans, negotiated the sale, and towed her back to Spokane. Paul Bieker designed a deck-stepped mast rig with a 100% jib, so they could step the mast (with help!) and Tim Ryan at CSR Marine Services rebuilt the mast and made the current “new” Eye Eye look pretty and functional. In the Cohen family, there was a historic subtle rivalry for the job of helmsman. In most sailing families, the rivalry is not so subtle, so they must be gentlemen as well as sailors. Young David always wanted the job, but Dad was never ready to relinquish it. I think we all know that story! Last year David Jr., Lance Rummel, and Bill McKinnon bought an older J/105, fixed it up, named it Inconceivable and started racing her on Puget Sound.

“Eye Eye” wins their class at WIRW 2016. Photo by Jan Anderson.

year, David and Vernice had an extra challenge because the hoist at Oak Harbor was broken. They hauled in

The “Eye Eye” crew. Photo courtesy of Cohen Family.

and out at lovely La Conner and had a three-hour tour back and forth to Oak Harbor. Kudos to the city of Oak Harbor who paid for the extra costs. Here’s where the story takes a dramatic turn! Pay Attention Now! For the first time in 29 years of just showing up and having fun, Eye Eye won her eight-boat class for the week! Combined with Inconceivable’s win in the 13-boat J/105 fleet, this has to be the first time a father and son have ever won the WIRW overall 1st place trophies in their divisions in the same year. Certainly, it is the only time two David Cohens were the winning skippers in two separate classes! Eye(Eye) think it’s Inconceivable!! With any luck, they’ll both be back next year! 30 years of Cohen Race Week, 2017. Go Team! “Inconceibable” also wins their class at WIRW 2016. Photo by Jan Anderson.

Don’t mess with David Jr’s dad (“you killed my father, prepare to die…!”). They brought Inconceivable to Whidbey for the second year this July, and won! J/105’s are a competitive fleet with rockstars in the mix! It is no small feat to win that division at Race Week. It’s almost Inconceivable! Getting Eye Eye to Whidbey was often filled with road adventures, challenges, and a wealth of stories, if you have enough rum to get it out of them. I know that I’ve heard the stories, but not from the direct source! Buy the Cohens a drink and you might hear some funny stories. This www.48North.com

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Columbia Gorge One-Design Regatta

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s Mario Andretti says, “If after all. You may end up in it. everything is under control, In addition to Moore 24’s, there you are going too slow…” And were Melges 24’s, Flying Dutchman, not unlike the Olympic Games, Fireballs, Tasars and Lasers. the Columbia Gorge One Design In the Moore 24 fleet, not only (CGOD) Regatta was a test of athletics, did we share the race course in some strength, knowledge, preparation, challenging conditions, many shared and the sheer will to survive. Also, the campground, the dinner table, there was a coincidental warning the local establishments, and two not to swim in the marina, but that’s showers for the entire campground. a story for another article. Speed, We persevered through three nights of swimming, and smiles made the trains passing on both sides, survived CGOD Regatta the exceptional event a new on-site brewery, and had a we will all remember! fantastic time doing it. Headlining the weekend was the 2016 “Snafu,” a Moore 24, Moore 24 National smashing through the waves. Championship, with the only fleet to race all three days in what some claim to be the windiest regatta they’ve seen at that venue. If you know Moores, they aren’t much for electronics, so we weren’t exactly sure what it was blowing, other than the tops off the waves. Dinghies were upside down, spinnakers and gear were thrown into the river, sometimes with an unsuspecting sailor attached and there was a lot of swimming on the race course. But as I always say, sailing is a water sport September 2016 www.48North.com 56

On Friday morning, the Moore, Fireball, and Flying Dutchman fleets raced and some Melges 24 sailors came out to practice. In building #3 conditions, all three fleets raced with no option to reef or reduce sails. The wind built all afternoon until we were looking at fairly consistent 30 knot puffs rolling through the course. All weekend the Washington side of the river had the greatest pressure and the most river current running up the course, but it also had the most chop. Getting away from the shenanigans of other boats and finding your own patch of wind and water was usually the best bet, if you were able to find it. The Fireball and Flying Dutchman sailors started to swim a lot, and called it early. The Moore 24s got in four solid races and pushed hard to sail back in, fix broken gear, dry out, and go out together in town. Upon returning from a long evening of fun, the wind was still nuking. Typically, the thermal gets put to bed for the night after dinner. However, on Friday night it rocked the campground all night and well into the next morning.


The chatter in the local breakfast joints was that it was gonna be a blowout. Maybe they’d keep us at the dock? What’s the wind threshold? Overheard at the next table, the PRO asked the Flying Dutchman rep what was their top end… 22. Well, he replied, it’s already above that. All the while, the Moore 24 fleet president was tapping busily on his laptop, perhaps checking the weather models. When the horn blew, calling all sailors to the Competitor Briefing, many were wondering what was planned for the day. The Moores were scheduled for a distance race down to a windier section of the river, aptly named Wind Mountain, and it seemed like a questionable choice, at best. The

“Rest assured, it’s going to get windier here in the afternoon today.”

Winning the Tasar division was “WAFI”, then “Honey Badger”, followed by “Fast & Thorough & Sharp as a Tack.”

PRO broke the ice by saying, “well, you’ve heard that it gets windier in the afternoons here. Rest assured, it’s going to get windier here in the afternoon today.” Will there be a wind delay? NO. Will there be a distance race down the river? Maybe. “Don’t hit the RC boat, and don’t park in their spot in the marina. If you get hit in the head, find someone wearing a uniform. If a barge comes down the river, go the other way. Keep your radio turned on. Go have fun!” Okay, we got this. It was SO WINDY! Mind altering windy. Hold on cowgirl, it’s gonna be rodeo windy. The breeze kept up all day, unlike the boats that went down like dominoes and skidded

out all over the course. Despite some broken gear and swimmers, the rigs all stayed up and everyone made it back to the dock. Serious speed sailing and big grins happened all day long. Experienced big wind sailors put on a show. Most of the sailors who went out had many miles under their keels, but most of us took awhile to get our Gorge legs under us and we put on a whole different kind of show. The wind quieted down for a fantastic dinner on the lawn and more socializing back at the campground. Ibuprofen and coffee were the breakfast of champions on Sunday morning. The clouds rolled in and the wind dropped to the typical morning breeze. Hooray! Maybe we will try out that new #1 after all! The “Tangeroo” won in the Fireball fleet , followed by “Infallible” then “Eeyore.”

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“morning people” got to marina early to tune rigs, tinker with gear, and fix the broken pieces. The The Firebal was the trickiest “other people” rolled in just in boat to keep upright. time to un-raft and go race! By the time we untied, we were back to #3 conditions and building. Three more races and a snapped spinnaker pole later, we were dodging the kite boards and windsurfers competing in the Gorge Blowout Regatta at Stevenson, sailing back to the dock to pack up. Many stories will be retold, and many bruises will linger, the riggers and sailmakers will be busy, but rest assured we all got our money’s worth at the CGOD Regatta and Moore 24 Nationals. Congratulations to the Gruntled crew from Richmond, California, winning their third consecutive Moore 24 Nationals with the same crew. Simon Winer reports: “Gruntled took three days to get Stamford Yacht Club with matching to the heaven of the Gorge, from neon green lifejackets. Third went to Yosemite Valley with the boat in tow, the crew of Matt McGregor ’s greenthen the Black Rock Desert, then a kite speedster Good Enough, racing out relaxed trip in Eastern Nevada and of Seattle Yacht Club by way of Port Oregon. Whitecaps, swaying green Madison. Gennie Livingston shared trees and singing halyards meant we (there was) “a lot of flailing on the had arrived. A few growlers from the runs and roundings. The Gorge has a local brewery and Gruntled was all set. way of testing your strengths. Bigger Eleven races, ten tired fingers, and breeze forces a team to work faster an infinity of smiles. Many new faces and beautifully prepped boats. The Moore fleet is strong, In the Melges 24 fleet, the people are wonderful, and there were epic speeds the venue is pinch-me beautiful. and some epic wipeouts. Thanks to everyone who made this happen.” Second and third places went to San Francisco sailors as well, Andy Hamilton with White Trash and Matt Noble with Further. In the Melges 24 fleet, there were epic speeds and some epic wipeouts. Jibe and reach angles were critical, given the speeds and how hard you put on the brakes while jibing. Kevin Welch’s Mikey came out on top as predicted, but had to fight for it on several occasions. “We broke more this weekend than we have at any regatta… jib halyards are a one-regatta item for conditions like we had this weekend,” said Ian Sloan. Second for the weekend went to SlingSHOT, straight out of 58

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and more efficiently. Couldn’t have asked for better.” The Flying Dutchman fleet had their hands full trying to keep their boats right side up, and inevitably return them back to right side up. Racing Friday and Sunday, they put those vintage dinghies through the paces. Winning the fleet was Paul Scoffin with Copacabana, then Lin Robson in the Sojourner, and spar-guy Buzz Ballenger all the way from Santa Cruz, California in third. The Fireball was the trickiest boat to keep upright. Small hulls and plenty of sail area, they spent a lot of time washing off their sails in the river but were spectacular on the run for as long as they could hold it. Going out in those boats in those conditions was a feat in and of itself. The top three places all went to Canadians from Victoria, BC. James Cox won the weekend with the Tangelo, followed by Robert Thompson in the Infallible and Mark Cummings sailing Eeyore. Congratulations to all the vintage boat rockstars of CGOD. In the dinghy fleets of Tasars and Lasers, just a handful of hardy souls stuck it out for all of the races on both days. Winning the Tasar division was Canadian Thilo Giese with the WAFI, then Michael Karas and Molly Jackson with the Honey Badger, followed by the Renehans Fast & Thorough & Sharp as a Tack. The Laser fleet all hailed from just down the river, Willamette Sailing Club. Finishing on top were Bill Symes, Doug Seeman, and Rod Honson. Columbia Gorge Racing Association put on a fantastic event. They are a volunteer organization, operating on borrowed real estate, funded largely by private donations. And yet, they run the place like true professionals. They would be happy to tell you more about what they do and what they’re about, and would be grateful for support from the sailing community. Well done, CGRA! And thank you. by Stephanie Schwenk results: www.regattanetwork.com


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he Sloop Tavern Yacht Club Down the Sound race was held August 6th and 7th with 40 boats participating. This race is the second leg of the double handed Triple Sound series. This race goes from Seattle to Gig Harbor and back through Colvos Passage. A new finish and start line on the Gig Harbor end debuted this year. It was moved to a shallow spot in the middle of south end of Colvos Passage. From all reports it improved the finish and start on that end of the race. Tactically this race is really tough as you are going up and down Colvos Passage. It is a huge challenge and, I think, one of the best races around. Along with the great racing, one of the favorite aspects of double handed racing like this is getting to know your competitors at the party on Saturday night. Thanks go out to Anna Elz for running this race as well as our volunteer race committees on both ends. Copacetic handled race committee duties on the Seattle end and Rock Lobster took care of the duties in Gig Harbor. Saturday’s leg started in a 6 to 8 knot southerly and an ebb tide. The fleet split at West Point with about half heading west and half going into Elliott Bay. The southerly switched to a northerly after Alki for the boats on the east side and Restoration Point for the boats on the west side. The northerly held about three quarters of the way down Colvos Passage and then switched to a decent southerly. The transition zones between the breezes were tough as always. In general the boats that went west at the beginning of the leg made out the best. Terremoto was the only boat that made the east side work winning the first leg by a big margin. The start on Sunday was delayed by half an hour which gave the slower rated boats a southerly breeze with a nice ebb for the whole leg. The faster rated boats started in very light breeze and struggled up Colvos Passage, not getting breeze until they were to Blake Island, making this leg heavily favored for the small boats. Once out of Colvos Passage the fast lane was to the west. Several boats got sucked up to the east into Elliott Bay and paid a big price. Dennis

Sloop Tavern Yacht Club

Down the Sound Race Clark and his J/27 won the leg on Sunday. First place overall went to Ben, Jen, and Macintosh Braden in their first attempt at this race. Eight bells to Macintosh (the dog) Braden, who passed away that Sunday night at the age of 11. Way to go out in style Mac - winning overall on your last

race! You brought great joy to all of us dog lovers and will be missed out on the race course. Sunday, September 11th, is the J&J race which is the last leg of the double handed Triple Sound series. Try to make this race, it is great sailing. by Kirk Utter results: www.styc.org

Luke J. Tornatzky

Luke’s work is represented locally at Roby King Gallery on Bainbridge Island, and Earthenworks Gallery in Port Townsend. More can be seen at Lukejtornatzky.com www.48North.com

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San Juan Island Yacht Club

Shaw Island Classic

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riday Harbor is a great spot to visit for a summer sailing cruise. It's the happening place in San Juan County. Restaurants, bars, whale watching tours, fishing guides, ferries, supplies, a big marina, and the San Juan Island Yacht Club (SJIYC). It’s just the right venue for the start of the 46th Annual casual sailboat race around Shaw Island! The SJIYC race committee goes out of their way to make it easy for any boat that can move under sail to participate. Don’t have a PHRF rating, they'll improvise. No spinnaker, no problem! There are similarly configured cruising families with grills on the back and dodgers on deck in the cruising classes. The race starts and finishes about 100 yards from the SJIYC visitors dock. That makes it easy to have an early lunch in town, then walk down to the docks, push off, and be all set for the 12:00 start of the 12 mile sail around Shaw Island. This year, the 46th annual Shaw Island Classic was special because there was plenty of wind to get nearly all of the 48 boats that entered around the island in time for an early finish.

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The race is unique because you get to pick the direction you circle the lone mark of the course (Shaw Island). After the start, you sail out of the Harbor and then turn left or right, depending on the conditions. The favored route depends on the timing of the tides and the wind

direction and is not the same every year. Deciding what time to hit the notorious Wasp Passage, between Shaw Island and Orcas Island, is primary in the thinking of the “naviguessers.” The winds are frustratingly fickle in those narrows, so having the tidal current with you is paramount. This year, slack tide was at 2:00pm which meant that if you get there before that time you should be headed

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east (clockwise around Shaw) arrived after that time and you should going west (counterclockwise). A falling ebb tide and robust 12 to 14 knot south/southeast winds at the start of the race split the fleet with about half sailing off in each direction. Brightly colored spinnakers filled with that southeast wind for those boats making the clockwise run up San Juan Channel. “This was my seventh Shaw Island Classic and I think, with the south/ southeast breeze, it was the most enjoyable yet,” said Nigel Oswald, skipper of the F-25C trimaran, Makiki. “Although there were some compelling reasons to choose either direction around Shaw this year, clockwise paid off for us, the deciding factor being a known favorable ebb through Wasp Passage.” Wasp Passage proved once again to be a notorious challenge with light wind and shifty current around Bell Island. It turned out that the clockwise route was slightly favored for the full course with that group featured more prominently in the winners circle including the first three overall winners. “The whole fleet was moving pretty good,” Oswald added. “After a good race with overall winner, Crazy I, we sailed the final leg with a nice fetch at 14 knots of wind to finish on a high note.” Oswald, in Makiki, finished in 2.49 hours; the fastest elapsed time. Crazy I, a Martin 242 skippered by Chris White, finished in first place on corrected time. “Many boats crossed the finish line within seconds of each other. It was a great race and exciting finish,” said SJIYC Fleet Captain, Bill Robinson. Of the


48 sailboats that started the race, 43 crossed the finish line. Wally Lum, who skippered Marquita in the very first Shaw and has competed in every one of the 45 races since, was awarded an honorary T-shirt. Carol Smith reminisced about that first Shaw race, organized in 1970 by her late husband, Ed Kennell. Only one boat managed to coast across the finish line before the time limit, beating it by a mere three minutes. That boat was Peniel, skippered by Captain Kennell himself. “It was great fun,” Smith added. “We had a pot luck on Brown Island and they threw Ed and his crew into the pond!” After this 46th running, we all piled back onto the docks in Friday Harbor and walked up to the wonderful SJIYC club house for drinks, stories, awards, and had a hearty lasagna dinner prepared by the SJIYC. Many thanks for a great event. by Bob Brunius and Peg Gerlock photos by Marc Forlenza results at www.sjiyc.com

KarMART PITCH Regatta September 3-4 The course will be posted on the committee boat. For information, check: www.duckdodge.org Start 1: Fast Boats, 7:00 pm Start 2: Half Fast Boats, 7:05 pm Start 3: Cruising/Slower Boats, 7:10 pm Start 4: Dinghy Class, 7:15 pm September 6: Dead Presidents Night/ Committee Re-appreciation October 29: Rum Run

This will be the 42nd annual running of the Ton’s and Kelly O’Neil Cup. Open to all TON and non-TON boats with a PHRF-NW certificate and/or recognized One Design fleets. BYC will crank up the barbie and the tunes and hold a REGATTA of a party, Labor Day Weekend. Come for the race and stay for the party! Check: www.byc.org

Pink Boat Regatta September 10: Seattle

San Juan 21 Fleet 1 Schedule Sept 10-11: Lake Chelan Regatta Sept 24: Fall #1 and Fleet picnic- Don Armeni Park, West Seattle (Alki) Oct 8: Fall #2 - Lake Union Oct 22: Fall #3 - American Lk, Tacoma Nov 5: Fall #4 - Coulon Park, Renton Check www.sj21fleet1.org

The 5th Annual Pink Boat Regatta will be taking place in Seattle. Sign up to race, or get your ticket to watch the race from one of Lake Union Charters and Adventures boats. Find all the details and learn how to get involved at www.pinkboatregatta.org or email info@pinkboatregatta.org

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September 2016

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TransPuget Benefit Race September 17 S h i l s h o l e B a y Ya c h t C l u b invites you and your crew to race in this late summer classic. Proceeds support sailing programs at Footloose Sailing Association, the Northwest’s premiere sailing program for people of all disabilities. Check: www.shilshole-bayyc.org

Dale Jepsen One Design Regatta September 17-18 The Dale Jepsen One Design Regatta will be held on Bellingham Bay. Check: www.byc.org

CYC Tacoma Point Series

For 50 years, Northwest Harvest has helped feed the hungry and for almost half that time, the Seattle Singles Yacht Club has raised money for this local food bank. The 24th Annual Northwest Harvest Benefit Race will be held on Shilshole Bay. Race plans include three sailboat classes and one “Half Fast” class for power boats. After the race, skippers and crew are invited to join SSYC at the Ballard Elks Lodge for the awards ceremony, auction, dinner, and dancing to the Tropics. The money raised and food collected helps Northwest Harvest serve about 142,000 people each month. SSYC is proud to have raised money that purchased more than one million meals over the past 24 years. Join us in fighting local hunger! For details and to register: www.seattlesinglesyc.com

CYCE Foulweather Bluff October 1 Corinthia Yacht Club Edmonds invites you to its 36th annual Foulweather Bluff Race. Yachts with a PHRF rating of 180 and faster compete in the 26 mile feature course rounding both Scatchet Head and Foulweather Bluff buoys. Yachts with a PHRF of 181 or slower and all boats entering the NFS division will sail the 18 mile course to the Scatchet Head buoy and a temporary buoy off Pilot Point. The first division will start at 10:00 am, reverse starting sequence, with Multi-hulls in the last start. Overnight moorage is available at the Port of Edmonds Marina for boats arriving the day before the race and/ or staying overnight the day of the race. Registration forms are available: www.cycedmonds.org. Please print the entry form, complete, and mail form to: Reinhard Freywald 9509 234th St SW Edmonds, WA 98020. For more information call (425) 280-5572 or email reinhardhf@comcast.net

Rum Run PSSC Large LeMans her Bluff

September 17: Robinson Point October 1: Point Defiance October 15: Neill Point October 29: Browns Point Check: www.cyct.com

Seattle Singles Yacht Club Northwest Harvest Race September 24

Pink Boat Round Island PSSC Small Snowbird Race Your House Grand Prix Round the County Foul Weat

“Football, sailing,   food,  sleep,  repeat!   Oh,  a  squirrel!!”  

CAPTAIN’S LICENSE  TRAINING  

www.flagshipmaritimellc.com 62

September 2016

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U.S. Junior Women’s Singlehanded Championship

photos by Jan Anderson

O

n Sunday, July 28th, the fleet of 28 Laser Radials competing at the U.S. Junior Women’s Singlehanded Championship, hosted by Sail Sand Point, put the finishing touches on a fun and exciting three day regatta on Lake Washington. In the end, it was Washington native, Talia Toland, of Kirkland, WA, who ran away with the title in her home state. Toland enjoyed a three point lead over Kiera O’Reardon (Houston, Texas) through eight races entering Sunday’s final two races. With the

Nancy Leiter Clagett Memorial Trophy on the line and two 50-minute races to go, Toland won her third race of the Championship in Race 9 and gained two more points on O’Reardon, who placed third. In the 10th and final race, Toland ensured O’Reardon did not catch her in the standings by finishing three places ahead of her (14th to 17th) to win the Leiter Trophy. “This is my third year sailing at the Leiter Trophy and it’s great to finally put it all together in my home venue,” said Toland. “It was kind of cool that we had different wind direction every day of the regatta. I stayed in the pressure and stayed pointing towards the mark and kept a cool head in the shifty conditions, which helped a lot when you had patience. “I had a work with all the coaches, which is really great. It’s cool to see

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September 2016

how I’ve developed from year to year at this event. “Thank you to US Sailing, Sail Sand Point, the Clagett family and everyone who helped host this regatta. It was a great venue with great coaches and a lot of fun,” added Toland. The top six boats qualified for early acceptance to the 2017 U.S. Youth Sailing Championships – a qualifier for the 2017 ISAF Youth World Championships in Israel. courtesy of Jake Fish results: www.ussailing.org/jws16-final

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W

e’re a sailing family. My first date with my wife Lori was sailing, and my kids started out in Optis when they were very young. We all like short-handed “ a d v e n t u re ” r a c i n g i n particular. Lori has done Race to the Straits and Down the Sound with me, and we all race Foulweather Bluff together. Our boat, Kyrie, is a CS 36M. By far, our favorite race is the Northern Century. We like the challenge of a long, difficult race where patience, strategy, and endurance are necessary along with sailing skills. Our first attempt was in 2012, with my then 17 yearold daughter, Hope, (now a recent WWU graduate.) We were fortunate to finish in the back of the pack. We received an award for being the first Father-Daughter team to complete the full race, and found the folks at AYC to be friendly and interesting. We’ve raced every year since, with my kids taking turns joining me. This year, the Friday evening start was the typical drifter, with boats stuck in various places between Saddlebag and Jack Island. A few minor stereo wars broke out. (Kyrie plays funk, Wild Rumpus favors R&B) It was a lovely evening with howls rising from the fleet as a giant, nearly full moon rose. My son Mark, a UW sophomore, was in charge of strategy this year and made good use of our current atlas. We chose to go alone to the east of Vendovi island, and popped out in front of most of the fleet. We traded tacks with Monkeybones up the west coast of Lummi, and she left us in the dust. We were later joined by La Toonces, Keet, and others as we all broke free up the coast. Dawn brought lighter winds and a struggle to get to Point Roberts. The back of the fleet moved up to join us and we rounded mostly together. We headed south in a nicely rising breeze.

Anacortes Yacht Club

Mark made the call for us to stay on the Canadian side of Haro Strait and it paid off big. Most of the fleet chose the center, and were punished with a nasty tide rip and adverse currents. Hugging the coast of Saturna, we followed Off Constantly well east to hide from the current and wait for the ebb to start. After Mark cooked us a nice spaghetti dinner, we joined Off Constantly, Eos and Havoc in a slow drift around Turn Point and found breeze in Haro Strait. The wind in Haro lightened until we left the south entrance and seas and wind began to build. Winds were howling at Hein Bank, with steep, breaking seas. After gybing around the mark, we headed back to Anacortes, surfing down the waves under main alone. Steering was challenging. Early morning found us finishing about 10 minutes behind EOS. Havoc was well ahead. Alii Kai took line honors and was the overall winner. The natural beauty of where we sail is just amazing. For us, this race is a chance for our family to find out what we are made of and how well we handle success and disappointments. It’s also about knowing when it’s time to quit or time to push on. I’ve never been prouder of my family than when they race Northern Century with me. They are unfailingly positive and supportive. As we were struggling in the rough waters around Hein Bank, Mark said: “Who gets to do stuff like this?” Fortunately, we do, and many of you could too. Thanks to the volunteers who work so hard to make this the great event we enjoy every year. Well done, Chuck and Amie Tidrington who stayed up all night keeping track of us out there! Thank you to Walt Meagher, of Sunshine Girl, who stayed up two nights in a row, and then tended bar for all of us on Sunday afternoon by David Odendahl results: www.anacortesyachtclub.org

Northern Century

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“Epic scenery, good times, adventure and challenge.” .......... “You’d think that someone who has sailed as much as I have in this area would avoid the inside corner by Huckleberry Island, but you’d be wrong! Suckered in and stuck for hours...” .......... “Getting close to Patos was awesome! Getting all the way to Patos was almost a nonevent! Holy mother of all tide rips! Surfing on big waves with the kite up, big speeds on the knotmeter, but actually going nowhere over the ground. Tide Rip Two Step! A little forward, a little back, a little to the side, and eventually crossing the halfway finish before being flung back into the Straits.” - Stephanie Schwenk “Wild Rumpus” Santa Cruz 27 September 2016

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T

he Double Damned Race is known for a crazy downwind, 40 mile run from Cascade Locks to The Dalles, Oregon. This year, August 6th, was no exception. The fleet was very mixed in ratings. The usual few Moore 24s and Express 27s made the run, but the real extremes were Gay Morris’ Shark 24 Fayaway rating 227 all the way up to SlingSHOT, a Melges 24 all the way from Stamford, CT, rating in at 84. With a cool air on the coast, and 100 degree temps forecast for The Dalles, the wind machine in the gorge was setting up nicely. The start was off of the CGRA race deck. No spinnakers are allowed up until the start signal goes off. As the start horn sounds, a colorful mix of old chicken chutes, and brand new runners hits the tops of the rigs. Half of the fleet, including the Extreme 40 helmsman, Morgan Larson, on his Moore 24, Bruzer, worked the Oregon side of the start, and weny for current relief. The other half, including the Melges 24, head for the Washington side which had quite a bit more breeze. SlingSHOT did just that, and shot off quickly to the front of the pack, never to look back. For the rest of the mortal boats, it was a game of puffs and lulls, when to jibe, and when to hold on. As the fleet reached Wind Mountain, the puffs started to grow into the mid 20’s and low 30’s. The rust was quickly blown off as the 1st few breeze-on jibes were completed (or not). Once through the first gate, the wind moderated slightly through Viento Park. This gave a slight sense of false security.

Hood River Yacht Club

D ouble D amned R ace

The wind and waves got massive as the fleet reached “The Hatchery” just west of the Hood River event site. This one of the famous wind surfing spots in the Gorge where the current and wind concentrate, making big, standing waves. It did not disappoint! On the Soling I was sailing, we were blasting along with the chicken chute, standing in the boat looking straight up out of the troughs up to the peaks of the waves, 8 to 10 feet over head! The next section of the race after the Hood River bridge, the wind went south and moderated slightly from full 30 knots to around 15-20. This suckered us into putting up the big spinnaker and like always, the wind came right back on. After Mosier, the river starts to narrow and there are many twists and turns, and you must avoid huge barges while you are carefully planning your jibes around massive puffs , rocks, sandbars, and commercial traffic.

As if this was not exciting enough, we had the last part of the gauntlet…Doug’s Beach to The Dalles. Doug’s is another famous wind surfing venue where, again the waves and wind stack up. This was the site for quite few round ups and round downs, many boats went to headsails for this portion. The Narrows entering the Dalles got quite light and shifty, allowing passing lanes. Some boats could carry their kites, while others had to douse and go to headsails. All but three boats finished the 2016 barn burner. The elapsed time winner was be the well sailed Melges 24, shattering the record by over 35 minutes. Once again, the overall handicap winner was Gay Morris and his little Shark 24. It all ended with a well deserved Mexican feast and lots of story telling over the keg of local Full Sail beer. Don’t miss the 10th anniversary next year! by Alex Simanis results: www.hoodriveryachtclub.org photos by Ted Lohr

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Classifieds ad! Plan Ahe2016 October e is deadlin er Septemb 13th.

Get the exposure you need. Get the results you want.

1987 CAPE MUST SEE! 6327GEORGE Seaview36Ave NW There were only approximately 30 CG 36s that were Seattle, WA 98107 completely built by the craftsmen at CG Marine Works. This is one of the finest remaining examples. A twoowner boat with refits in 2007 and 2014. Meticulously Phone (206) 789-7350 maintained, in Bristol condition. This is a true bluewater world cruiser,Fax or will(206) cruise 789-6392 the PAC NW keeping you happy and savannah@48north.com safe. Compliments wherever she is Email moored. All custom built magnificent teak interior. Too many extras to list here. Lying Vancouver, BC. For complete description and more photos please email wse541@gmail.com or call (575) 770-1872. End of season price reduction! $189,000. Now $179,000.

BABA/PANDA 40 Fully equipped for long term cruising. Call for details. (206) 459-2540. 6053

The fabulous hagar RON HOLLAND 3/4 TONNER COLD MOLDED Cold molded western red cedar. Clear coated hull, Awlgrip decks. Fractional rig, rod rigging, new headstay and Harken foil. New engine, 3 cylinder Beta Marine, V drive, 16” Max-prop. new head, no stove. Newer sails, GPL carbon main, #1 AP and Light #3, .5 x 2, .75, 1.5 plus a bunch of older sails. $18,000. Contact Joe at tfhagar@yahoo.com 6069

5793

TAYANA 1977

Beautiful 37’ cutter designed by Robert Perry, built to top quality standards; you’ll find these fine yachts all over the world. Interior woodwork in fine condition. Quarter berth, pull-out stbd. settee double berth, convertible salon table, full sized V-berth forward. Sigmar diesel furnace, too. Perkins 4 cyl. diesel with 650 hours. Roller furling. New paint, varnish last summer, nonskid reapplied to decks and all mech. systems check out just fine. If you’ve admired these distinctive cutters when you’ve been on the docks in Seattle, you’ll be thrilled to own one … at last. David at 206.225.3360. See photos and specs at: pacificmarine.org

66 3.75 x $40/inch= $150

plus $20/ inch of color= $170

1967 SPENCER 42 Perfect liveaboard / bluewater cruiser. Price reduced. Full keel/cut away forefoot, solid fiberglass hull, deck and hard dodger. No blisters. Mahogany interior with 6.4´ headroom, nice upholstery and lots of storage. Expensive upgrades are done: Propane system (2011), AC wiring/panel (2011), Composting marine head (2011), New standing and running rigging (2012), Mast rewire/lights (2012), Xantrex 2000 inverter (2013), Perkins engine overhaul (2013). GPS, radar, anchor windlass, diesel heater, 3 anchors, full chain and nylon rodes, much more. Sleeps 6. 10´ RIS dinghy. Priced to sell at $39,900. (360) 293-8699 or (360) 202-8014. Email: buyspencer42@gmail.com for info or photos.

KAYAK 36´ BILL GARDEN MOTOR SAILER 1952 50 hp Perkins, radar, 100 gallons fuel, 75 gallons water. Dickinson stove/heater. Sails by Carol Hasse. A rare beauty with Alaska pedigree. Contact Doug at (360) 269-4878. $39,500. 6037

5839

PACIFIC SEACRAFT FLICKA 1986 SLOOP Comes with trailer. $18,000. Inboard Yanmar deisel 9 hp. Call Vince for more information (206) 459-6420 6072

September 2016

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RAIDER SPORT 16´ SAILBOAT Original owner Raider Sport 16´ sailboat. Fully equipped, trailer, outboard motor, many extras, excellent condition, ready to sail. Check online for videos of Raider Sport 16’. Price: $5,600. Please contact by phone, I don’t get texts. Rick, (360) 352-1834. 6024


Fax (206) 789-6392 Email savannah@48north.com

Boats For Sale

Hodgdon Bros Schooner- $89,500

Mahogany over Oak frame. Lovingly maintained, and ready for cruising. Sleeps 5, full galley, fridge/freezer, alcohol stove, large head with shower. 37HP Westerbeke, newer Garmin electronics, sails in good condition. Recent survey and hull paint.

Boats For Sale

1971 WILLIAM GARDEN 46´ KETCH Beautiful “Porpoise” design, all teak cruising vessel. Perkins, solar and wind turbine. Very well maintained. Website info: www.dreamscomethru.org Email: manuoku51@yahoo.com Call: (360) 927-7441. Newport, Oregon $79,900. 5709

(310)600-2851• Byron@DenisonYachtSales.com

44´ CHEOY LEE CUTTER 1979 $80,000 Priced to sell, with substantial upgrades to bluewater cruising sailboat and great liveaboard. New Yanmar 50 hp engine, exhaust system, batteries, bow pulpit & lifelines. Upgraded plumbing, mechanical, electrical systems. Refinished interior, etc. Fully equipped with extensive boat gear and supply inventories as part of sale. Begin cruise in Sitka, Alaska. See boat at www.svvega.com (907) 227-6588.

Phone (206) 789-7350 Fax (206) 789-6392 Email savannah@48north.com

1978 FAST PASSAGE 39 Cutter rigged, bluewater vet, well maintained, outfitted and rewired 2003, Perkins 4-108, 3 Blade Max- Prop, Spectra Watermaker, below deck autopilot, Leather interior, Avon RIB, 8 hp OB. New dodger and canvas 2011. Survey 2013. Asking $112,000. Contact jogginssail@yahoo.com or Bob at (206) 714-8272. 4423

Boats For Sale

Pristine 2002 Hunter 410

2 cabin/2 head. Rigging tune, new bottom paint and wax (2016). Lewmar electric winch, mast furling, Dual 16K BTU reverse cycle heat pump/ AC, electric windlass, generator, inverter, full canvas dodger+bimini and Raymarine suite including ST7000 Autopilot, ST60 wind/speed/ depth, two RC530 chart plotters and radar. Contact Rob at rob@wrightyachtsales.com or (206) 356-8698. $125,000.

1997 BENETEAU 461 (46´) ANACORTES,WA Lovingly used and cared for. Three cabin, three head layout. Set up for NW cruising and/ or liveaboard. Radar, chart plotter, autopilot, heater and much more. Epoxy barrier, coated 2009, ten years of mechanical records. $115,000. Contact j46ladue@gmail.com for full specs and photos. 6055

5586

37´ RHODES DOG STAR 30 DOUBLE-ENDER Cutter rig, medium displacement (15,000 lbs.), 30´ LOD, 37´6” LOA. Old-growth fir over oak, teak decks, Honduran mahogany cabin, chart table, silicon bronze fasteners, all bronze fittings, exquisite workmanship throughout. Westerbeke 21 hp diesel. Light use since built. New 2011: Garmin HD radar, Horizon VHF with AIS, 8” Garmin chartplotter, GPS, SS standing rigging and lifelines. Hi Seas diesel heater. Designed 1930, built 1984. Maintained to a high standard. Located Port Angeles. $32,000. Much more info at (360) 452-3717, danacordrey6@gmail.com 5844

HALLBERG-RASSY RASMUS 35 1976 build no. 475. Needs some work. In storage in Sooke, Vancouver Island. Email for images and details. Phone John to view. (250) 658-5358.

1983 J/30 - $16,000 Good condition. 7 sails with head sail furler, asymmetrical spinnaker and regular, 2 poles and boom kicker. Updated electronics. 3 gel batteries and charger. 4 new self-tailing Harken winches windward sheeting. Stereo 4 speakers + sub, TV. Electric head. Inboard Yanmar diesel. Folding prop. On the water in Hood River. Call Trevor at (804) 335-7713

1974 CORONADO 41 30 hp Perkins diesel, center cockpit, Bimini, GPS, windvane steering, Queen size aft cabin, Roller furling. Needs TLC, very seaworthy. $25,000 firm. Lying Warrenton, Or. Contact (360) 263-7505 or (360) 241- 6523. 6057

6064

Submit your personal classified by September 13th to be featured in our October issue! (206) 789-7350 savannah@48north.com

1989 PACIFIC SEACRAFT CREALOCK 34 CUTTER US Documented, ready for offshore. Rigging replaced 2000-06. Sails: cruising asymmetrical, 150% furled genoa, main & staysail (1999-2013) & dinghy. Radar, GPS, VHF & SSB radios & EPIRB. Monitor selfsteering vane, wind generator, Yanmar diesel 35 hp, 100 amp alternator, inverter. Very little use. For stat sheet email: ps4salenow@gmail.com or text (206) 321-2032. $88,500 (negotiable). 5997

6051 www.48North.com

September 2016

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Boats For Sale

1981 Saturna 33’ Pilothouse Sloop

Cockpit Wheel steering plus inside helm, Yanmar 22HP Diesel, Espar Diesel Heat, plus Sig Diesel bulkhead diesel heater, Propane Stove/Oven, Garmin Echomap GPS and Plotter, Furuno radar, Autopilot, Elec. Windlass, new Refer/freezer, Spacious forward berth, quarter berth, and convertible dinette. New Upholstery. Full batten mainsail, furling genoa, inflatable dinghy. Surveyed - Priced below survey value $39,500.

Boats For Sale

Boats For Sale

1987 FREEDOM- PRICED TO SELL GREAT FOR CRUISING SAN JUANS Freedoms are of the highest quality and design. Freestanding carbon fiber mast, self tacking jib, very easy for new sailors, sleeps 4, autopilot, GPS chart plotter, new Yanmar 30 hp, additional galley work table. REDUCED $27,000. Call for more information on this unique vessel. Terry (206) 940-1380. Only 4 for sale in the US at this time.

PROVEN BLUEWATER CRUISER 43’ Nereia Ketch, 1983, looking for her next captain to continue her adventuring life. Comfortable liveaboard, equipped for cruising. Refrigeration/freezer, watermaker, solar/wind generation, ample storage. Fiberglass hull, full keel/rudder, Yanmar 20 hp engine. Sleeps 2-3, open plan. Moored Poulsbo, WA. $35,000. Info/photos/email at www.nereiaketch.weebly.com or call (206) 992-1450.

6067

5884

‘84 NAUTICAT 33 90 hp Lehman diesel. Well maintained, many upgrades. Recent topside/bottom paint. Full electronics. New inverter/charger & house batts. Ready for comfortable long distance cruising. Located in WA. $89,500. Email tom.racette@gmail.com or call (307) 752-3065.

CLASSIC BURMESE TEAK SLOOP Built in Ah King Boat Yard, Hong Kong 1938. Designer unknown but likely Phil Rhodes. Heavy standing rig, ocean veteran. Ported in San Francisco Bay in 1950’s. LOA 35.6´. New deck, mast rebuilt 2010. Yanmar 2GM20 rebuilt 2012. Laminated teak frames on 6” centers, fastened with copper rivets & roves. Blue Sea breaker panel. Solid fuel stove, kerosene range. VHF, depth sounder, radar, autopilot, lifesling, SL555 windlass, 200’ 5/16” chain, Avon inflatable. Recent survey. Sweet sailer. $35,000. Located Bellingham, WA. Contact pwilling64(at)gmail(dot)com

San Juan Sailing - Bellingham Wa. 800-677-7245

6065

28’ SAN JUAN Excellent cruiser/racer, easy single handling. Sleeps 4. 6´2” Standing room. New Yanmar diesel. Racor fuel filter. 34´ dual axle boat trailer with dolly mast. (Available with or without trailer.) Inverter 2000w and microwave. Harken roller furler. Outboard motor mount. Battery charger. Autohelm. Garmin 182C GPS w/ charts. Digital Depth and Speed. New: 120% jib, West Marine radio, and new electrical throughout. $13,500 OBO (with or without trailer). (360) 681-7300. 6015

5563

33´ CHEOY LEE CLIPPER $49,500 Many upgrades including engine, transmission, rigging, 3000 watt inverter, full covers, AC/DC Panel. Go to www.henfrigate.com for more details. Call Jim (208) 699-2633, jim@jmglenn.com 6054

36´ CLASSIC ROBB LION Built to Lloyd’s A-1 specifications by Cheoy Lee Shipyards in 1962 with Burmese teak hull, decks and cabin. Lovingly maintained by the same owner for the past 19 years. Includes: custom cover, 6 sails, self-tailing winches, 3 anchors, windlass, radar, GPS, Dickinson stove, “Sunkist” dinghy, etc. All electrical and plumbing redone; all systems first rate and in excellent condition. Located on Orcas Island. Asking $39,000. For complete inventory and photos contact peterolesen@msn.com or (360) 317-5206. 5758

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BRUCE ROBERTS 27´ SAILBOAT Comes with trailer. Hull is C-Flex fiberglass. 6´ 2” headroom, fireplace, and 2 bunks. New main and 8´ sailing dinghy. One experienced owner. Asking $7,000 OBO. Call Dennis (206) 781-7649. 5827

2006 23´ TACOMA-BUILT DORY PRICE REDUCED: $19,950 OBO Built by a master boat builder at Bates College. Combines old-time beauty and craftsmanship with modern materials. 2005 Suzuki 4-stroke (ultra-low emission 50 hp engine with electronic fuel injection). Tops out at 23 mph, cruises at 17 mph. Includes companionway cover, fishfinder, GPS, VHF, rail mounted barbecue, five day icebox, boarding ladder, 8´ West Marine inflatable and a stem to stern Trailerite boat cover. Amenities include: porta-potti, 2-person V berth and galley for cooking. Comes on 2014 custom-built EZ Loader dual axle trailer with a 12 volt trailer winch. Contact Diane at aubergine66ep@comcast.net or (360) 491-6176. Must sell. Any reasonable offer will be considered. 6027

September 2016

www.48North.com


Boats For Sale

Boats For Sale

Boats For Sale

ERICSON 38 1981 - GREAT CRUISING BOAT Sails well. Good headroom. Recent North main. Roller reefing. Universal diesel. Garmin chart plotter, autopilot and AIS. 3 burner stove, oven. BBQ. 92 gal. water. 54 gal. fuel. 8 foot Achilles with 2 hp Honda. $42,500. dave@tubafour.com (206) 473-1598.

CAL 330 - $9,900 Retiring- moving to the Phillipines. I love this boat, but can’t take it with me. Even though the boat has seen better days, it’s still an excellent sailboat. Everything works well from engine to chartplotter. Four burner stove, cabin heater, refrigerator, Achilles inflatable dinghy. Wireless Autohelm, and much more. Includes moorage in Falls Creek. (604) 669-7520 mjuert@telus.net

1973 NEWPORT 30 Yanmar 30 hp diesel. New aluminum fuel tank (150 gal.). 2 new stainless steel water tanks (115 gal.). New rig by Seatek, new bronze thru hulls, 2 new Lewmar 40 winches, Lofrans manual windlass, 200’ 5/8” chain and 150’ rode. $60K invested, asking $18,000. Boat in San Diego. rdeblegiers@gmail.com

5971

6022

6058

MASON 44 Bristol Mason 44 hull #166 of #168 built. No teak decks. Cruise equipped and ready to go anywhere. Low engine hours, new canvas, new LPU, etc,etc. Many upgrades. Survey and haul out 4/16. $239,000. Lying Puerto Vallarta. More information at rossmayya@gmail.com 6063

ATKINS ERIC JR. LOA 30´, LOD 25´ 2”, LWL 21´ 6”, beam 7´7”, fractional sloop 378 sq. ft. (main 262 sq. ft., jib 116 sq. ft., plus 130% genoa). Displacement 7,000 lb., ballast cast iron 3,500 lb., full keel. Yanmar 9 hp, model 1GM10. Built in 50s, Port Orford cedar over white oak frames. Completely restored 2002-2006. $13,500 OBO. Call or text Bill, (206) 200-8194.

56´ JOHN ALDEN PILOTHOUSE CUTTER Built by Camper & Nicholson to Lloyd’s Specs, Solid GRP Hull. 2011 completed 18 year circumnavigation. Includes air compressor, bow thruster and lots more. Moored at USSC Marina, Bowen Island. Email: westbynorth@gmail.com 5952

5877

1992 W.I.B. CREALOCK (CREALA 40) Located Guatemala (Caribbean side). Sell or trade for Puget Sound boat. Cutter rig, aft cockpit, fin keel, 44 hp Yanmar. Cruising equipped and ready to go, very good condition throughout. Maintained and cruised by one owner. $110,000. tillsonds@yahoo.com 4505

1987 CUSTOM 43´ KETCH PROVEN MEXICO VETERAN Aires core F/B. Flush teak deck, mahogany & birch interior, sleeps eight in three staterooms. Cold plate refrigerator, Espar heat, autopilot, A/B RIB, Harken furler, solar panels. Reduced to $119,000. More info at www.tourgl.webs.com or email luengenllc@gmail.com 5232

1977 DOWNEASTER 45 CUTTER $88,500 LA CONNER, WA Great liveaboard, 3 staterooms, 2 heads with showers. Midship cockpit. Generator, diesel furnace, refrigeration, radar, anchor windlass. Perkins 4-236 85 hp diesel. Proven oceangoing vessel. Contact (360) 794-4080 or jcoylear@gmail.com

1999 CATALINA 30 MARK 3, TALL RIG, WELL MAINTAINED. 30 ft, very spacious & clean, 3´10” draft, walk thru transom, roller furling, propane furnace, autopilot, Navpod, 800 engine hours. New running rigging / 135% genoa / AGM batteries. Sleeps 6. Freshwater boat. $43,500 (about $300 / month). Portland, OR. (360) 281-0965 or aussieflyer98@hotmail.com 6062

Place your personal/individual ad online at 48North.com! It’s quick and easy. If you are a business, please contact us at classads48@48north.com or (206) 789-7350.

6021 www.48North.com

September 2016

69


Boats For Sale

Boats For Sale

Boats wanted

1979 CATALINA 27 Newer 4 stroke outboard. Roller-furling. On board waste system. Fully furnished with many extras and ready for cruising. $5,000. (425) 967-3190 or fetkat@comcast.net

DONATE YOUR BOAT

5970

Save on taxes while helping support local youth organizations.

PACIFIC MARINE FOUNDATION www.pacificmarine.org (206) 225-3360 info@pacificmarine.org

1982 SAN JUAN 34 RACER / CRUISER Spinnaker setup, 3GM, Adler Barbour refrigerator, Wabasto heater. Bottom barrier coated years ago. In dry storage for 4 years in Anacortes. New seacocks. $30,000. Contact albert_coburn@yahoo.com for details.

Contact us for more information about boat donations and maximum legal deductions.

5939

36´ STEEL BLUEWATER SAILBOAT 36´ steel cutter, solid bluewater boat, big sister to Moitessier’s Tamata, new bottom, equipped and ready for the South Pacific. Lying Port Townsend. For more information visit www.svbluewater.com 5902

1976 BAYLINER SLOOP Care about quality. One of the best designed and built 21’ trailerable sailboats. ALL REBUILT - Best deal - Learning - Safe - Functional - Simple, yet prepared for cruising and someone experienced. Comes with everything! See it to believe it. (360) 417-1544. $7,995. 5704

Wanted for purchase

6327 Seaview Ave NW 40-45 ft trawler or tug in good condition Seattle, WA Price 98107 in PNW. range: $30,000 - $60,000.

located CUSTOM 8.5 TRIMARAN Photos Custom built NZ 09’, redesigned amas by Morrelli and appreciated. Please contact Seth at (509) 985-8847 or Melvin, new racing bottom, running rigging, 2x new srt1688@yahoo.com sails, new B&G plotter, R2AK vet. and ready for 2017. Phone (206) 789-7350 Unbelievable boat, one of a kind. Asking $88,000 obo. Fax (206) 789-6392 fasttackmarine@gmail.com, (206) 218-9201 BOSTON WHALER FOR SALE 1990 Boston Whaler 13.5. Excellent condition. Newer 40 hp 4 stroke. Galvanized trailer. $6,500.September In Montana. May Deliver. (406) 465-2366. 5983

PACIFIC MARINE FOUNDATION

CAPE GEORGE 36 HULL & GEAR Cape George 36 hull in good condition. Built in water/ fuel tanks, ballast (10,500 lbs. lead), Volvo md3b with top end rebuild, standing rigging (Stayloc), deck and halyard winches. Wood mast and boom, sails, misc. Needs new deck and house (rotten) $5,000 (salvage price of lead). As is, where is in Bellingham, WA. dougbeer@hotmail.com and (360) 671-1279. 5894

1979 30 C&C 2004 Yanmar Diesel, 215 hrs. All self tailing winches. Lying Seattle. $19,000. Contact James at (206) 527-6610. 6066

1979 J/24 $20,000 Classic J/24 with original sails, re-coated hull, near mint condition, new outboard, collectible, comes with trailer. Contact Corey (208) 596-9015 or cjpatak@gmail.com 6052

CAPE GEORGE 38 Cape George 38 full keeled cruising sailboat for sale. Uncompleted project boat. All previously purchased material and equipment included in sale. As is, where is, on Vancouver island, BC. $18,000. Serious inquiries only please. Contact (250) 754-9289 or jadawoje@telus.net 6060

70

Partnerships

Email savannah@48north.com

6073

SAIL 60’ Dutch built Motorsailor, Corten steel, Iveco diesel, ‘round-the-world boat. 48’ Robert Perry sloop ‘80, custom design and build, Perkins diesel, come see! 37’ Tayana ‘77, beautiful, solid, offshore cruiser, ready to inspect right now. 28’ Herreshoff Cat-ketch ‘86, full ext/interior restoration this past summer. POWER 110’ x 34’ USN Barge, two-story, 10,000 sq. ft enclosed, convert for crew/shop/lodge. 56’ Monk McQueen ’71, beautiful, boathouse kept. Call for details on this classic. 54’ Wm. Garden Trawler ‘68, see NEW restoration photos, Twin Cummins, 12kw gen. 42’ Uniflite ’77, with twin GM 6-71s immaculately maintained, spacious family cruiser. 36’ Stockland troller ‘67, complete refit for conversion to yacht style, new diesel. 25’ Bertram ‘68, new canvas, twin Merc 470’s. Email for boat donation info

(206) 225-3360 • info@pacificmarine.org

www.pacificmarine.org

September 2016

www.48North.com

2016 Boat Show Issue

RANGER 29 PARTNER Seeking a half-interest partner in a Ranger 29 at Seattle’s Shilshole Marina. The Ranger is a sturdy and efficient small-family cruiser or casual racer. Ours has newer sails including a nice main and furling jib, plus a fullSave spinnaker. The while M3-B Westerbeke diesel local on taxes helping support engine has been well youth maintained, including recent organizations. servicing from a local marine mechanic. Your share: $6,500 plus half of recurring costs. Write to Art at tunescout@gmail.com or call/text (206) 920-0539.

DONATE YOUR BOAT

6032

PACIFIC MARINE FOUNDATION www.pacificmarine.org (206) 225-3360 info@pacificmarine.org

Advertising

Contact us for more information about boat donations and maximum legal deductions.

If you want to reach the Pacific Northwest sailing and boating community, 48° North is the place to advertise.

TAYANA 1977 Beautiful 37’ cutter designed by Robert For business classified Perry, to top standards; ads,built contact usquality at you’ll find these fine yachts all over classads48@48north.com, the world. Interior woodwork in fine condition. Quarter berth, pull-out (206) 789-7350 stbd. settee double berth, convertible

table, full sized vee Forsalon personal/individual ads,berth try forward. Sigmar diesel furnace, too. Perkins our new online submission form at 4 cyl.

diesel with 650 hours. Roller furling. www.48north.com New paint, varnish last summer, nonskid reapplied to decks and all mech. systems check out just fine. If you’ve admired these distinctive cutters when you’ve been on the docks in Seattle, you’ll be


MOORAGE

Charter

6327 Seaview Ave NW Seattle, WA 98107

Instruction

liberty bay Marina Phone 789-7350 40’ - 48’ (206) - 60’ open slips. FaxGreat (206) 789-6392 location. EmailRestrooms, savannah@48north.com Showers. Poulsbo, WA

360-779-7762 or 360-509-0178

Business Classified, 1” BW, $40/Month ANACORTES MARINA Julyavailable issue now: Annual2016 moorage

32’ to 80’ Open and 32’ to 60’ Covered slips. In town rental slips w/security gates, mini storage, full service boat yard, fuel dock & pump out on site. Anacortesmarina.com or (360) 293-4543

Reserve Now!

• Basic through Advanced Sailing Lessons • Week-long Cruise & Learn lessons • Spinnaker, Intro and Advance Racing Classes Gill foulweather gear & Dubarry footwear

206-782-5100 www.seattlesailing.com info@seattlesailing.com 7001 Seaview Ave NW Suite 130 (Shilshole Bay Marina in Port of Seattle Building)

6327 Seaview Ave NW Seattle, WA 98107 Phone (206) 789-7350 Fax (206) 789-6392 email jen@48north.com

Live Music! weekends

253.884.3350 • Gig Harbor, WA

6327 Seaview Ave NW Tethys Seattle, WA 98107

Offshore Sailing for Women

Nancy (206) Erley, 789-7350 Instructor Phone 206.789.5118

Fax (206)www.tethysoffshore.com 789-6392 nancy@tethysoffshore.com Email savannah@48north.com

San Juan Sailboat Charters

Best Priced Bareboat Sail Charters in the NW

• Catalina 30’ • Catalina 34’ • Hunter 38’ • Jeanneau DS 40’ Gets You Sailing Located in Bellingham & Anacortes, WA

1-800-599-0489 - sanjuansailboatcharters.com

Cat Curious??? Gato Verde Adventure Sailing Come have fun learning basic to advanced sailing and seamanship skills combined with environmental education aboard our comfortable & efficient catamaran. Also available for carefree skippered charters. More information at www.gatoverde.com or 360-220-3215

SAIL ALASKA WITH THE EXPERTS Glacier Bay, Sitka, Petersburg, Juneau Now Booking for 2017 & 2018 S/V BOB

7-10 day trips, 4 staterooms w/ private heads and showers. Licensed Captain and crew. Fully permitted and insured. Capt.blain@soundsailing.com (907) 887-9446 www.soundsailing.com SAIL

HIKE

FISH

WHALES

BEARS

Help Wanted Seeking Yacht Broker

Seattle Yachts is seeking an experienced, professional yacht broker with extensive knowledge of sailboats! We are an exclusive dealer for two major sailboat lines and three major power boat lines. Over two million dollars of new yacht inventory and considerable selection of brokerage boats on hand at our 500+ feet of exclusive sales dock located at Seattle’s largest marina. Please send resumes to Peter@seattleyachts.com

Boating Safety Classes

Boating Skills & Seamanship: Starts Tuesday September 20th. 12-week course, 7:00 to 9:00 pm, Tuesday evenings. This class covers all aspects of boating, and is good for novice and experienced boaters. Class fee is $55 or $75 for two sharing a book. Will be taught at Chuck Olson Chevrolet Auxiliary Classroom. Email: boatclasses@hotmail.com Ph: Dan Watson (425) 530-9003 About Boating Safely: This is the seminar version of the BSS class above is taught from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm with sessions available on the first Saturday of each month from March to October except July (2nd Saturday) at the Rosehill Community Center in Mukilteo. Class fee is $25. Email: rifangela@msn.com Phone: Angela Rifner (425) 359-5971

Both the BSS and ABS classes meet the educational requirements for the WA State Boaters Card.

For more information, other classes and dates, please visit http://tiny.cc/CGAux

RIGGER WANTED Tired of the rain and snow? Come work in sunny Sausalito, California. Friendly, highly regarded shop with 20 plus years experience. Experience and splicing skills a plus. Free parking, waterfront location. Compensation based on experience. For details contact Tom at (415) 331-3400 or email southbeachriggers@gmail.com www.48North.com

September 2016

3.25” = $130/month Business Classified ad Instruction category August and September 2016 issue71


Instruction

Clubs 1945

• BEGINNER TO ADVANCED SAILING COURSES • FIVE DAY TO SIX WEEK DURATIONS • ALL YEAR FROM NANAIMO AND ST. LUCIA If you don’t see what you want on our website, we can arrange something specifically for your group.

Dinghies 2016

The Best Racing in the Northwest • On the Lake or Sound • Active Cruising • Reciprocal Rights Corinthian Yacht Club of Seattle 7755 Seaview Ave. NW, Seattle, WA 98117 Phone (206) 789-1919 for information www.cycseattle.org

TENDER ROW OR SAIL One of a kind! 10.5 ft. tender or stand alone dinghy. Teak trim and bronze fittings. Stayless mast, rudder and dagger board. Oars. Trailer. $2,500 OBO. Call or text Mike at (206) 235-6029.

Call or email for more details:

NYCSailingschool.com sailtraining@nanaimoyc.ca (250) 754-7071 or (250) 218-1549

6044

Salish Yacht Services

Professional Instruction • Consultation Delivery • Fleet Management

Marine Equipment

• Sail on Puget Sound out of Shilshole Bay Marina • Full Service Sailing Club/Pro Shop/Brokerage • All the advantages of ownership without the hassles

www.seattlesailing.com info@seattlesailing.com 7001 Seaview Ave NW Suite 130 (Shilshole Bay Marina in Port of Seattle Building)

Dinghies

Sailing club since 1992. • Club memberships starting at $49 per month • Specializing in late model cruising and power boats • Two convenient locations: Shilshole and Anacortes

eck Prisms, Pulls to D From Bell ners. o for boat w everything

Volume Discounts: • NOAA Charts • Bronze Hardware • Knot Tying Board • Unbreakable Galleyware • Shipmate Stoves • Traditional Rope • Custom Wood Blocks • Nautical Books & Gifts Port Townsend, WA (360) 385-3628 x101 www.woodenboatchandlery.com

Wooden Boat Chandlery

206-782-5100

Purveyors of Quality Shipwright Products

nzie USCG Licensed Master • ASA Certified Instructor • Insured Advertising 30+ Years Experience • Concierge Level Service 50 www.SalishYachtServices.com h.com (206) 718-6361 • jjking40@gmail.com

FREE unlimited day sailing on the club boats.

• US Sailing and US Powerboat lesson certifications

(206) 784-9386 6327 Seaview Ave NW www.windworkssailing.com Seattle, WA 98107

STAR CLASS SAILS FOR SALE - 3 Star Class Mainsails / 2 Quantum and 1 North (various ages and usage)- 4 Star Class Jibs / 4 Quantum (various ages and usage). Additional equipment and gear, please contact Dave at (206) 245-4774 to set up a day and time to see the sails.

See us at the docks at Shilshole Bay!

2 1/4” Business Classifi ed Color Phone: (206) 789-7350 Email: savannah@48north.com

Clubs

$40/ column inch X 2 1/4”= $90 $20/ inch of color X 2 2/4”= $45 Seattle Total= $135Singles Yacht Club Join our lively club of single boaters.

• RAFT UPS • RACES • Dances

6046

2442 NW Market St. #94, Seattle, WA 98107 “Established in Ballard since 1976” $75 Annual Dues - Reciprocal Moorages With prepayment discount High quality sailing at the lowest cost Info (206) 473-1905 Ashley

club5%since 1992. 3 Sailing month= discount (You pay 171 total, 57/month) • Club memberships starting at $49 per month

72

DIESEL MOTOR FOR SALE Never used. 25 Horsepower Beta Diesel with Sail drive. Upgrade on alternator and panel. $10,500. In Montana. May deliver. (406) 465-2366. 5983

Minto Classic 9’ Sailing Dinghy Replacement Parts

Reciprocal moorages. Reasonable dues.

3 month:www.seattlesinglesyc.com 5% discount 6 month: 7% discount 12 month: 10% discount club $40/inch X 1”Sloop + $20tavern color=Yacht $60/Insertion

5858

New Contruction Restoration

(360) 357-4999 Richpassage.com minto@richpassage.com September 2016

www.48North.com

Stay dry and get a breeze RAIN or SHINE Also makes engine panel shields

Rain shields for opening ports

Prepayment discounts available: • Happy hours • Volleyball

8’ SAILING DINGHY 8’ cedar sailing dinghy. Light as a feather, beautifully built, glassed over w/ epoxy. Oars, rudder, centerboard. No mast or sail. Bronze hardware. Easily carried single-handedly. More pics upon request. $1,000. (360) 749-6717.


Seattle, WA 98107 Phone: (206) 789-7350 Email: savannah@48north.com

Marine Equipment

Marine Equipment SAILS FOR SALE

Marine Equipment Odor-free Dishcloths

ATN GENOA SLEEVE - 40 ft. long, NEW . . . . $175

Self-cleaning

Washcloths

JIB – 49.75 x 46.0’ x 14.5’, UV cover, vertical leech battens, #6 HF tape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$350 JIB TOP - 57.2’ x 44.4’ x 31.0’, CL-90P cruise laminate, #8 HF, white WeatherMax UV cover, Multi-Track foam luff pad, U & amp; O leech line, NEW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4,500 SYMMETRICAL SPINNAKER – 29.5’ x 17.1’, 0.6 oz. nylon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$100 ASYMMETRICAL SPINNAKER – 60.0’ x 47.33’ x 36.0’, 0.75 oz. nylon, NEW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$500

Call Scott at (206) 719-8436 MARINE PUMPOUT STATION $40/inch X FR-40 2.75”= $110/Insertion Edson Model 286 w/pump, hoses, controls, etc. 110VAC/ 220VAC. Lightly used for 4 years - replaced by new docks w/ central pumpout. Asking $5,000. OR Quartermaster Yacht Club. Dennis: (206) 406-2625. We off er prepayment discounts Bob: (206) 409-0114.

Probiotic Tank Treatment

5853

3 month= 5% discount (You pay 313.5 total, 104.5/month) 6 month= 7% discount (You pay 613.80 total, 102.3/month) Shower, mist & stream settings. Hydrate, cool off & clean. �am�ing, �icnics, �each & water �ghts.

12 month= 10% discount (You pay 1,188 total,SELLING 99/month) RETIRED BOAT BUILDER MOLDS

FOR ROWING/SAILING DINGHIES Three lapstrake style - 8´9”, 10´, and 12´3”. One El Toro mold. Excellent shape. Always kept indoors. $8,000 for these four molds. Have molds for rudders and daggerboards for each as well as front & rear seat molds. Also have mold for 19´ racing rowboat (reverse transom) former cross-sound rowing race winner. $3,000 for the Shearwater 19 mold. Pictures available for the boats that came out of the molds. Contact Jim Llewellyn. North Pacific Marine. Bainbridge Island. jim.llewellyn47@gmail.com or (206) 842-4552.

www.hydrovane.com

eliminate h ead odor ™

FEEL THE FREEDOM Of sailing with a Hydrovane

Independent Self-Steering Windvane AND ‘Ready to Go’ Emergency Rudder...

• • • •

No problem to install off center No lines running through the cockpit No worries in case of steering failure Your best crew member - will steer 24/7 and won’t eat, sleep or talk back!

www.ForgetAboutItForBoats.com

Available at LFS Marine & Outdoor

Professional Services VESSEL MOVING

No ocean too big, no trip too small, no ship too large, no mast too tall, sail or power, we move them all! When you are ready, give us a call. Professional service since 1967. CappyTom@aol.com, (206) 390-1596.

Salish Yacht Services

Professional Instruction • Consultation Delivery • Fleet Management

6039

USCG Licensed Master • ASA Certified Instructor • Insured 30+ Years Experience • Concierge Level Service

www.SalishYachtServices.com (206) 718-6361 • jjking40@gmail.com

Serving the Boating Community Since 1955 Toll Free 1-800-494-7200

STEERING THE DREAM Fuel Cell Battery Charger

www.48North.com

Hydrogenerator

September 2016

• Yachts - Pleasure or Charter • Marine Related Business • World Wide Coverage Available 12106 20th St. NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258 Fax 425-334-2950 425-334-7200

73


Fax (206) Seattle, WA789-6392 98107 Email jen@48north.com Phone (206) 789-7350 Fax (206) 789-6392 email jen@48north.com

Professional Services

Professional Services

Business Classified, 1” BW, $40/Month 2016 April issue

Nancy Anderson - Seattle 206/669-0329 • sureritesigns@gmail.com www.sureritesigns.com

Real Estate

6327 Seaview Ave NW Seattle, WA 98107 • 25+ years of experience • Phone (206) 789-7350 Fax (206) 789-6392 Email savannah@48north.com

www.taylorsails.com erictaylorsails@gmail.com

Anacortes, La Conner, Oak Harbor, North Sound

1.5 inch =$60/month MOBILE MARINE SERVICES

Business Classifi ed ad Systems, Electronics & Electrical Woodworking & Varnishing, 2016 March issue PROOF Outboard Engines, and more! (360) 320-2325

www.knrmarineservice.com

Business Classified, 1” BW, $40/Month HOME AND MOORING BUSINESS FOR SALE 2016 September issue Taboga Island, Panama $395,000 Beautiful 3 bedroom, 4 bath home and thriving mooring business. 2400 sq. ft. Spectacular ocean views. Eight years in business 011 (507) 6459-4576 or (507) 6442-5712 www.tabogahome.canbyours.com

Specializing in Marine Heating, Air Conditioning & Refrigeration

5881

Cliff Valentine

ANACORTES SKYLINE MARINA

ANACORTES SKYLINE MARINA

cliff@nwmarineair.com 40´ Dock Slip For Sale

40´ Dock Slip For Sale

(206) 548-1306

40´ boat slip (4´ overhang, width 19´) Gated security. Full services. Flounder Bay Yacht Club. Owner $119,000. CheckParking. Us Out at

40´ boat slip (4´ overhang, width 19´) Gated security. Full services. Flounder Bay Yacht Club. Owner Parking. $119,000.

www.nwmarineair.com MLS # 962841 Ruth Dorsey. John L Scott Real Estate We202-3361 specialize marine heat pumps, (360) orinruth@ruthdorsey.com

• Rotary Swaging • Roller Furlings • Life Lines • Mast Repair • Standing Rigging

(360) 293-1154 www.northwestrigging.com

MLS # 962841 Ruth Dorsey. John L Scott Real Estate (360) 202-3361 or ruth@ruthdorsey.com

A/C systems, refrigeration, and watermakers. We also carry an assortment of portable freezers and wine coolers for your entertainment needs on the go!

See us for a Better way to Heat Your Boat

Adler Barbour CONDOMINIUM WITH 62’ SLIP ON BAINBRIDGE ISLAND Magnificent views of Eagle Harbor from this stand-alone condo on quiet Bainbridge Island. Includes a 62´, deep water moorage slip in the private marina by the home. Call (206) 842-1607. eagleharborview@gmail.com. More info at www.eagleharborview.com 6056

Selling your home or boat slip, but don’t know where to start?

Espar by Parts • Sales • Service (206) 548-1306 Eberspächer www.nwmarineair.com 74

Contact Savannah at 48° North to find out how.

(206) 789-7350 • savannah@48north.com

September 2016

www.48North.com


Charts

Crossword Solution 1

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2016 GUIDES FOR THE CRUISING MARINER

G R A

A 10

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21

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14

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8

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24

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29

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15

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20 23

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26

5

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4

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13

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32

Y

17

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22

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D E

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A

28

SalishSeaPilot.com

G W A

R

12

● San Juan Islands ● Puget Sound ● Gulf Islands ● Sunshine Coast ● Desolation Sound

3

N

E

11

● Constantly updated ● Free sample ● Special package price!

2

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R 25

N F O

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31

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Sailboat & Trawler Listings

Cape George Cape George Marine Works ElliottBYS Elliott Bay Yacht Sales JK3 Yachts JK3 Yachts Mar Servic Marine Servicenter NWYachtnet NW Yachtnet.com Passion Yachts Passion Yachts Sail NW Sail Northwest San Juan San Juan Sailing

Seacraft Yacht Sales Seattle Yachts Signature Yacht Sales Specialty Yachts Swiftsure Yachts Waterline Boats West Yachts Windworks Sailing

Yacht Finders YachtFinders/WindSeakers Yct Sale Wst Yacht Sales West Key N = No Auxillary Power G = Inboard Gas 0 = Outboard D = Inboard Diesel E = Electric

Brokerage Sail Listings

Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

36 Cape George

79 D

59,900

Bellhaven Yacht Sales

www.bellhaven.net

18’ Custom Devlin

12 O

19,500

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

18’ i550 w/trlr

14 O

14,999

Passion Yachts

18’ Capri w/trlr

O2 O

8,650

19’ W Wight Potter trlr O6 O

9,500

20’ Laser SB3

Broker

Seacraft Seattle Yachts Signature Specialty Yachts Swiftsure Waterline West Yachts Windworks

Contact

Page

Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

Broker

Contact

Page

84

24’ Dana

89 D

57,500

Seacraft Yacht Sales

(206) 547-2755

78

83

24’ J24 w/trlr

86 O

17,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

www.passion-yachts.com

83

24’ Martin 241 w/trlr 80 O

10,500

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

24’ Pacific Seacraft

89 D

57,500

Bellhaven Yacht Sales

www.bellhaven.net

84

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

24’ Pacific Seacraft

89 D

59,900

West Yachts

www.west-yachts.com

79

www.marinesc.com

81

25’ Beneteau First 25S 15 D

89,900

Signature

www.signature-yachts.com

88

www.windworkssailing.com

84

08

24,500

Mar Servic

21’ Hunter 216 w/Trlr O3 O

18,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

25’ Catalina

83 O

21’ Hunter 216 w/trlr O7 O

19,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

25’ Dibley

97 G

25,000

Sail Northwest

www.sailnorthwest.com

22’ Beneteau First

16 OB

35,900

Signature

www.signature-yachts.com

88

25’ Harbor 25

09 D

62,000

Sail Northwest

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

22’ Catalina 22 w/trlr 86 O

4,900

www.passion-yachts.com

83

25’ Beneteau First 25 15 D

~

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

www.capegeorgecutters.com

18

25’ Catalina 250 w/trlr O4 D

24,499

Passion Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

25’ Harbor

09 D

49,500

Signature

25’ Hunter

86 O

6,400

26’ Albin 7.9 w/Trlr

76 D

16,000

Passion Yachts

22’ Falmouth Cutter

80 D

49,500

Cape George

22’ J/70

14 ~

50,000

JK3 Yachts

22’ J/70

16 G

~

Sail Northwest

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

22’ Beneteau First Trlr 16 O

~

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

www.48North.com

September 2016

8,950 Windworks

2

www.passion-yachts.com

83

www.signature-yachts.com

88

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

75


WaterLine

krogen express

|

bracewell yachts

boats

helmsman trawlers ®

|

helmsman trawlers®

At Our Seattle Docks!

WaterLine boats brokerage

powered by boatshed

trawlers Steel Bushey 100’ Tug $179,000 Converted Tug 78 $184,000 Nordlund 52 Pilothouse *$114,000 Meridian 48 Pilothouse *$79,500 DeFever 47 Trawler *$109,000 Tollycraft 44 *$115,000 Lien Hwa 42 Sundeck *$94,900 Californian 42 Aft Cabin *$74,000 Custom 41 Trawler $124,000 Mariner 38 Seville DC $269,000 Barry Farrell 38 Trawler $125,000 Trojan Sea Voyager *$49,500

Cheoy Lee 41 Offshore Ketch *$89,500 Rhodes Bounty II 41 Sloop *$25,000 Ingrid 38 Cutter $39,500 Alajuela 38 *$59,000 Union 36 Cutter *$54,500 Solaris Sunrise 36 Sport *$99,500 sailboats J-35 Sloop Racer *$28,900 Herreshoff Marco Polo 56 $215,000 Legendary Yachts 33 Ketch $180,000 Vagabond 47 Ketch *$134,950 Bruce Roberts Offshore 44 *$69,000 *reduced Schucker 430 Motorsailer $62,500 Hallberg Rassy 42 Ketch $119,500 entire inventory at Hunter 41 Deck Salon $159,000 waterlineboats.com Nordlund 38 Sedan *$45,000 Grand Banks 32 *$47,500 Nordic Tugs 32 *$79,000 Camano 31 Trawler Troll $114,900 Helmsman 31 Trawler $295,000

waterlineboats.com ~ 206.282.0110 ~ 2400 westlake avenue north ~ seattle

Brokerage Sail Listings

Boat Type 26’ Devlin Sharpie

Yr Aux Price 99 ~ 49,500

Broker Seacraft Yacht Sales

26’ MacGregor

04 O 19,000 Yachtfinders/Wind

Contact Page (206) 547-2755 78

Boat Type 30’ C&C 30 MK1

Yr Aux Price 76 D 19,900

Broker Sail Northwest

Contact Page www.sailnorthwest.com 2

85

30’ Cape Dory MK II 87 D

49,900

Bellhaven Yacht Sales

www.signature-yachts.com

88

30’ Catalina

84 D

18,500

West Yachts

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

30’ Catalina

89 D 32,950 Windworks

19,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

30’ Catalina 30

80 D

22,500

Mar Servic

26’ Macgregor w/trlr 98 G

15,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

30’ Catalina Mkiii

03 D

53,900

Sail Northwest

26’ Macgregor w/trlr 97 G

14,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

30’ Catalina Tall Rig

84 D

34,500

West Yachts

26’ Niagara 26

81 O

14,000

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

30’ Columbia Sport

05 D

49,500

Sail Northwest

27’ C&C MkIII

76 D C17,500

Specialty Yachts

www.specialtyyachts.com

15

30’ Etchells 22

71 ~

5,950

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

30’ Farr 30

96 ~

58,000

85

30’ Fisher

79 D 30,000 Yachtfinders/Wind

26’ Seaward 26 RK/trlr 16 D

99,900

Signature

26’ Macgregor w/trlr O4 G

21,900

26’ Macgregor w/trlr O8 G

27’ Cascade 27 Hull#1 78 D

15,000

27’ Catalina

83 ~ 13,500 Yachtfinders/Wind

27’ Catalina 270

93 D

24,900

NW Yachtnet

27’ Hunter 27

06 D

42,900

Signature

27’ Orion

~

D

52,000

Seacraft Yacht Sales

28’ Alerion

96 D

72,500

JK3 Yachts

28’ Alerion 28

16 D

~

28’ Bristol Channel Ctr 81 D

60,000

28’ Catalina MkII

07 D

28’ Hunter 280

99 D

28’ Hunter 280

www.yachtfinders.biz

www.yachtfinders.biz

7

30’ Fisher PH Sloop

75 D

74,900

NW Yachtnet

88

30’ Henderson

97 G

42,000

Sail Northwest

(206) 547-2755

78

30’ Hunter

79 D

23,450

NW Yachtnet

www.jk3yachts.com

3

30’ J/30

82 D

17,000

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

30’ J/95

16 D

~

Cape George

www.capegeorgecutters.com

18

30’ Newport

79 D

7,500

57,950

Windworks

www.windworkssailing.com

84

30’ Nimble

94 D

14,900

Passion Yachts

39,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

30’ Nonsuch Ultra

84 D

49,900

Signature

96 D

19,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

30’ Yankee

72 D

32,900

28’ Lancer w/trlr

79 O

9,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

30’ Bystedt

74 D

29’ C&C 29

77 D

14,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

30’ Catalina

29’ Cal Jenson

76 ~

14,900

Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

85

30’ Hunter

30’ Admiralty

06

35,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

30’ Alerion Sport 30 16 D

~

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

(206) 547-2755

78

31’ Beneteau Platinum 16 D 139,900

Signature

www.yachtfinders.biz

85

31’ Cape George

Cape George

Sail Northwest

Sail Northwest

30’ Baba

83 D

46,000

Seacraft Yacht Sales

30’ Brewer Nimble

07 D

44,500

Yachtfinders/Wind

76

September 2016

79

www.marinesc.com

JK3 Yachts

www.nwyachtnet.com

84

www.windworkssailing.com

Bellhaven Yacht Sales

www.signature-yachts.com

www.bellhaven.net www.west-yachts.com

84 81

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

www.west-yachts.com

79

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

www.bellhaven.net

84

www.jk3yachts.com

3

www.yachtfinders.biz

85

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

Sail Northwest

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

Sail Northwest

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

www.marinesc.com

81

Mar Servic

www.passion-yachts.com

83

www.signature-yachts.com

88

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

19,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

78 D

14,000

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

89 D

26,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

30’ S2/Becker CC w/trlr 77/08 D

39,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

30’ Santana 30/30

12,000

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

www.signature-yachts.com

88

www.capegeorgecutters.com

18

www.48North.com

82 D 12 D

97,500


E l l i o t t B ay y a c h t S a l E S

68’ Nelson Marek “Drumbeat”

51’ Herreshoff Ketch “Irene”

54’ Sparkman & Stephens “Rosebud”

48’ Custom Schooner “Grail”

Sail liStingS 68’ Nelson Marek ’84..........$267,000 54’ Roberts ’82 ...................$223,500 54’ Sparkman & Stephens ’73..$195,000

54’ Roberts “Impossible”

52’ Nauticat ’82 ..................$113,500 48’ Custom Schooner ’86 .....$125,000 47’ Beneteau ’05 .................$210,000 41’ Passport ‘90 ..................$159,900 40’ Catalina 400 MK II ’05 ..$179,000 52’ Nauticat “Big Finn”

47’ Beneteau “First Light”

40’ Hinckley B-40 ’70 ..........$169,500 40’ S & S Loki Yawl ’53 ..........$59,000 36’ Catalina MKII ’97 ............$73,000 34’ Taylor/Rhodes ’59 ...........$29,500

41’ Passport “Volare”

40’ Hinckley B-40 “Freya”

Elliott Bay Marina 2601 West Marina Place, Suite D Seattle, Washington 98199

40’ Catalina “Legacy”

Phone: Fax: Email: Web:

40’ S&S Loki “Irolita” www.48North.com

September 2016

206.285.9563 206.676.3704 info@elliottbayyachtsales.com www.elliottbayyachtsales.com

77


Y A C

H

T

S

A L E

S

Representing Buyers and Sellers Since 1985

seacraft.com Broker

206.547.2755

Brokerage Sail Listings

Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

31’ Cape George

91 D 140,000

31’ Herreshoff

83 ~ 25,000 Yachtfinders/Wind

31’ Marlow Hunter

15 D

~

Specialty Yachts

31’ Northsea 31

81 D C35,000

Specialty Yachts

Cape George

Contact

Page

Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

18

34’ Jeanneau 349

16 D 159,489

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

85

34’ Jeanneau 349

16 D 175,427

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

www.specialtyyachts.com

15

34’ Pacific seacraft

90 D

74,000

Seacraft Yacht Sales

(206) 547-2755

78

www.specialtyyachts.com

15

34’ Sabre 24 MkI

84 D

42,000

JK3 Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

www.marinesc.com

81

34’ Tartan

(604) 488-1202

9 7

www.capegeorgecutters.com

Mar Servic

www.yachtfinders.biz

2007 D C229,900

Broker

Contact

Yacht Sales West

Page

31’ Beneteau Oceanis 10 D

94,500

31’ Beneteau Oceanis 16 D

~

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

34’ TartanT34-C

78 D

34,900

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com www.nwyachtnet.com

7

(206) 285-9563

77

31’ Hunter

84 D

16,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

34’ X-Yachts X-342

89 D

47,500

NW Yachtnet

32’ Beneteau 323

05 D

69,500

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

34’ Taylor-Rhodes

54 D

29,500

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

32’ Bob Perry Custom 02 D

35,000

Sail Northwest

32’ Bristol

77 D

21,000

Seacraft Yacht Sales

32’ Catalina

94 D

59,000

West Yachts

32’ Catalina 320

08 D

96,950

Windworks

32’ Ericson

85 ~ 37,000 Yachtfinders/Wind

32’ Ericson

85 D

35,000

Sail Northwest

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

35’ Baba by Ta Shing 84 D 100,000

West Yachts

www.west-yachts.com

79

(206) 547-2755

78

35’ Beneteau 351

59,900

Signature

www.signature-yachts.com

88

www.west-yachts.com

79

35’ Beneteau Oceanis 16 D 184,000

Signature

www.signature-yachts.com

88

www.windworkssailing.com

84

35’ Carroll 1D35

98 D

62,950

JK3 Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

85

35’ Carroll 1D35

99 D

59,900

JK3 Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

35’ Catalina 355

New D 247,900

Seattle Yachts

www.seattleyachts.com

82

Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

85

www.windworkssailing.com

84

www.yachtfinders.biz

95 D

32’ Gulf Pilothouse

83 D

55,000

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

35’ Cooper 353

81 D

32’ Island 32

78 D

24,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

35’ Dufour 350GL

16 D 189,950

44,900

33’ Cal 2-33

86 D

52,500

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

35’ Endurance

33’ J/100

05 D

77,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

35’ Hallberg Rassy

89 D

33’ J/100

16 D

~

1984 D C52,900

Windworks Yacht Sales West

(604) 488-1202

9

99,900

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

35’ Hinterhoeller

81 D

58,500

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

33’ Legendary Yachts 00 D 180,000

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

76

35’ Island Packet

01 D 157,500

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

33’ Marlow Hunter

15 D

Specialty Yachts

www.specialtyyachts.com

15

35’ J?35

84 D

28,900

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

76

33’ Nauticat

85 D 59,500 Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

85

35’ J/105

98 D

66,500

JK3 Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

33’ Nauticat 33 MS

83 D

79,500

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

35’ Salona 35

16 D

~

33’ Nauticat 33 MS

84 D

65,000

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

35’ Beneteau First 35 11 D 169,900

Signature

35’ Beneteau Oceanis 16 D

~ 19,900

33’ Roughwater

~

Sail Northwest

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

www.signature-yachts.com

88

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

Yacht Sales West

(604) 488-1202

9

33’ Saturna PH

81 D

39,500

San Juan Sailing

www.sanjuansailing.com

83

35’ Ericson 35-2

71 G

33’ Yamaha

78 D

23,500

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

36’ Beneteau 361

01 D 114,750

JK3 Yachts

33’ Hunter

O6 D

84,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

36’ Cascade

88 D

30,000

Passion Yachts

34’ C&C 34

79 D

24,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

36’ Catalina

84 D

30,000

NW Yachtnet

34’ Cal

76 D

29,000

West Yachts

www.west-yachts.com

79

36’ Catalina

97 D 74,900 Yachtfinders/Wind

34’ Cal III

79 ~

34,500

Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

85

36’ Catalina MkII

04 D 104,950

Windworks

www.windworkssailing.com

84

34’ Cal MkIII

76 D

32,995

West Yachts

www.west-yachts.com

79

36’ Catalina MkII

07 D

~

Windworks

www.windworkssailing.com

84

34’ Cal/Jenson MkII

75 ~

14,900

West Yachts

www.west-yachts.com

79

36’ Colvin Pinky

93 D

99,500

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

34’ Catalina

93 ~

59,900

West Yachts

www.west-yachts.com

79

36’ CS

(604) 488-1202

9

34’ Hans Christian

76 D

77,990

Seattle Yachts

www.seattleyachts.com

82

36’ Freedom 36

55,000

JK3 Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

34’ Hunter

86 D 29,900 Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

85

36’ Island Packet 360 14 D 274,852

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

34’ Hunter

86 ~ 27,000 Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

85

36’ Sabre 36 Spirit

07 D 219,900

JK3 Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

34’ Hunter 340

99 D

64,500

Bellhaven Yacht Sales

www.bellhaven.net

84

36’ Sabre 362

96 D 138,500

JK3 Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

34’ Irwin Citation

78 D

22,900

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

36’ Solaris Sunrise

93 2D

99,500

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

76

34’ Islander 34-2

85 D

39,900

JK3 Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

36’ Union 36 Cutter

81 D

54,500

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

76

34’ Jeanneau 34.2

00 D

86,000

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

78

1982 C C42,900

Sail Northwest

September 2016

www.48North.com

1982 D C58,900 88 D

Yacht Sales West

www.jk3yachts.com

3

www.passion-yachts.com

83

www.nwyachtnet.com www.yachtfinders.biz

7 85


info@west-yachts.com 1019 Q Ave. Suite D Anacortes, WA

360-299-2526

www.west-yachts.com

at t

Se

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34' CAL '76................................ $29,000

34' CAL Jensen MkII '75............ $14,900

35' Baba by Ta Shing '84.......... $100,000

36’ Union Cutter '79.................. $79,900

40' Panda by Ta Shing '85......... $159,000

44' Nauticat Ketch '83............. $167,000

49' Meridian 490 PH '05.......... $295,000

46' Nielson trawler '81............ $299,000

32' Nordic Tug '90................... $120,000

31' Camano Troll '92.................. $96,000

at t

le

34' Catalina '93.......................... $59,900 Se

at t

le

34’ CAL MkIII “Spark” '76....... $32,995 Se

42’ Colvin Gazelle '10 .............. $39,990

44’ DeFever Motor Yacht '83.. $139,900

28' Cutwater '15...................... $179,000

Se

at tl e

42' Grand Banks Classic '87.........Inquire

32' Catalina 320 '94................... $59,000

le

30' Catalina Tall Rig '84............. $34,500

le

30' Catalina '84 Tall Rig..............$12,000 Se

Se

at t

le

24' Pacific Seacraft Dana '89..... $59,900

Se

Se

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le

le

35' Baba by Ta Shing 1984

25' Devlin Surf Scoter '00........ $125,000

Russ Meixner Fred West Lee Youngblood 360-951-3000 360-466-8753 425-444-9109

24' Sea Sport 2400XL '99........... $49,000

(360) 299-2526 • www.west-yachts.com www.48North.com

September 2016

79


swiftsure yachts The logbook for September 2016 See the stunning

RUBY KISS

Swiftsure Yachts will show the unique pilothouse motorsailer Ruby Kiss at Boats Afloat. Ruby Kiss would be at home at anchor at a remote atoll, cruising the Inside Passage or navigating the Northwest Passage. From the salon and lower helm station, the view is 270 degrees. For maneuverability and power underway, she is a twin screw vessel. For economy, she can run on one engine with a 3,000-mile range. Her roller furling ketch rig is easy to handle. Ruby Kiss is stunning.

at Boats Afloat

2014 Shannon Custom HPS 60 Motorsailer • $1,495,000

q ua l i t y ya c h t s f r o m s w i f t s u r e ya c h t s . d e ta i l s o n l i n e at s w i f t s u r e ya c h t s . c o m price reduced

Swan 46 • 1984 • $255,000

Hallberg-Rassy 46 • 2000 • $348,000 price reduced

32 Beneteau 323 • 2005 • $69,500

Lavranos 50 • 1990 • $194,500

Caliber 40LRC • 1996 • $179,500

Custom Perry 46 • 1989 • $180,000

Garcia Passoa 46 • 1993 • $298,000

Fantasi PH 44 • 2004 • $429,000

Hallberg-Rassy 43 • 2005 • $385,000

Hallberg-Rassy 42 • 1986 • $225,000

Outremer 49 • 2010 • $615,000

price reduced

Perry 43 • 1977/2001 • $219,500

NEW SAILING YACHTS

for world cruising from Swiftsure Yachts 73 Manuel Campos 60 Farr 60PH 53 Hallberg Rassy 53 Spencer PH 50 Dubbel & Jesse 48 Fife 8 Metre 48 Tayana 48 Swan 48 C&C 47 Valiant 46 Amazon CC 44 Nordic

80

1941 $500,000 1997 $675,000 2003 $575,000 1978 $150,000 1989 $269,000 1929 $250,000 1993 $249,000 1972 $80,000 1973 $248,000 1984 $239,000 1992 $199,950 1983 $139,000

44 Beneteau 44CC 42 Roberts PH 41 Hanse 411 40 Norseman 400 40 Jonmeri 39 Hallberg Rassy 38 C&C 115 35 Hallberg Rassy 352 35 Nexus 34 Red Wing 33 J/100 30 Admiralty

1999 $139,000 1994 $123,000 2004 $135,000 1987 $149,500 1986 $129,000 2000 $249,000 2006 $161,500 1989 $99,900 2003 $299,000 2008 $145,000 2005 $77,000 2006 $35,000

September 2016

two offices to serve northwest yachtsmen

2500 Westlake Ave. N. on Lake Union The Chandlery, 133 Parfitt Way SW on Bainbridge Island

www.48North.com

SwiftsureYachts

206.378.1110 | info@swiftsureyachts.com www.swiftsureyachts.com www.facebook.com/swiftsureyachts


See & Follow Us

 Lake Union - Sales

(206) 323-2405 (360) 293-9521

CPYB Dan Krier

CPYB Tim Jorgeson

CPYB Jeff Carson

Kirk Peterson

Jim Rard

CPYB Patrick Harrigan

Anacortes

 2442 Westlake Ave. N.

Anacortes - Sales, Dry Storage & Yard 700 28th St & 2417 “T” Ave.

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www.marinesc.com • Serving Northwest Sailors Since 1977  •  info@marinesc.com

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39' Jeanneau 39i '07... $169,000

arr w/ an ty

37' Jeanneau SO '02...... $99,500 W

36' Colvin Pinky '93......$99,500

36' Island Packet 360 '14.. $274,852

d

Tacks & Gybes 50' Farr 50 '85.........................SOLD 49' Jeanneau 49p '07........ $349,500 45' Nauticat 40+5 '85....... $235,000 44' Bruce Roberts PH '93.... $49,500 40' Jeanneau 409 / 419......23 SOLD 38' Sunbeam CC '85.....Sale Pending 33' Nauticat MS '84...... $65,000 38' Nauticat MS '82/'01.......2 SOLD 37' Jeanneau SO '02......Sale Pending 34' Jeanneau 349 '16...........6 SOLD 32' Nauticat 321 '02............2 SOLD 32' Hunter 326 '02 .................SOLD 30' Cape Dory '83...................SOLD 30' Newport '79...Reduced $7,500 30' Catalina '80............. $19,800 20' Laser SB3 '08................. $24,500 ce

u

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d

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d

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35' Niagara '81............. $58,500

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w

37' Cooper CC '81........ $49,000 L i Ne

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Re

35' Island Packet 350 '01.. $157,500

d

34' Jeanneau 34.2 '00....$86,000

37' Beneteau First '85.... $59,500

d

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w

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37' Tartan 37 '78........... $57,500

u

37' Tartan 3700 '07..... $239,500

43' Jeanneau DS '03.... $198,500

ce

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Re

38’ Coronet-Elvstrom PH '76.$59,500

w

38' Nauticat MS '85.....$139,000

Re

ce

d

38' Nauticat MS '83.... $134,500

40' Lagoon 400 '10..... $398,500 40' CS Yacht '89............ $79,500

g

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st

in

L i Ne

41' Cheoy Lee '78..........$49,000

47' Beneteau 473 '06.. $229,000

42' Beneteau First '82.... $79,950 42' Valiant 42 '93........ $187,000 42' Jeanneau DS '07.... $219,500

in

L i Ne

w

42' Cheoy Lee Goldenwave... $107,000

g

42' Nauticat PH '04..... $439,500

43' Jeanneau DS '05.... $214,500

g

43' Tartan 4300 '10..... $219,500

st

Re

43' Hans Christian '79.$114,900

e

45' Lagoon 450 '12...... $519,000

ar

LLC 50 Sh %

45' Jeanneau DS '10..... $294,500

51' Alden Skye '80...... $198,500 47' Southerly 145 '86...$199,000 w in g

55' Christensen PH '02.. $299,000 d u ce d

64' Roberts PH '88...... $298,000

33' Nauticat MS '83...... $69,500

33' Cal 2-33 '86............ $52,500

31' Beneteau Oceanis '10.$89,500

Huge Selection of New & Used Boats at Our Westlake Sales Basin & Anacortes, “Boats for Sale,” Dry Storage. A Boat Show Every Day! • Quality Listings Wanted - We Get Results! - See your boat shown here in Full Color! www.48North.com

September 2016

81


s!

Come find u

Our Business is "Fun"

(844) 692-2487

Shilshole Bay Marina • Anacortes Marina

4-18

September 1

www.SeattleYachts.com DEFEVER

Motor Yachts

Do On ck O NO ur W

Everywhere you look on the 355, you'll find features that make sailing for the day or for extended periods a pure pleasure! Specifications LOA

35' 5"

Draft Beam

6' 8" 12'

The 355 is fast and comfortable with qualities proven in its pedigree that are sure to win you over!

2016 Catalina 355

Spacious salon with ample seating!

See her for yourself at the Seattle Boats Afloat Show! Featured "Represents a refined approach to the questions of getting a well-executed interior and a solid, proven hull form."

"A yacht that combines long haul passage-making with crew comfort and luxury for extensive cruising"

2013 Tayana Pilot House 46'

2012 Tayana Deck Saloon 48'

1976 Hans Christian 34' $77,990

O

Lis Ne tin w g!

Liv G ea rea bo t ar d

NO RD W ER !

Brokerage Offerings

1993 Catalina/Morgan 38' $84,900

1984 Mason 43' $99,500

BRAND NEW Catalina 385

Visit us online, stop by one of our offices, or give us a call! Anacortes Office Seattle Office 2415 T Ave. Suite 112, Anacortes, WA 98221 7001 Seaview Ave. NW, Suite 150, Seattle, WA 98117 Phone: 844.692.2487 Dial 1 for Seattle & Dial 2 for Anacortes Email: info@seattleyachts.com 82

September 2016

www.48North.com


SALES + S A I L I N G L E S S O N S

Catalina 400 1995 $129,900

31' Camano - 2004 Very clean, 200 hp Volvo, Webasto diesel FA heat, bowthruster, radar, AIS, plotter, AP, dinghy w/ 8 hp, Sea Wise davit system............. $124,500

i550 2014 $14,999

Portland, OR - 503.289.6306 - PASSION-YACHTS.COM

Po r t l a n d

Go sailing with SailTime Portland. Our unique, flat rate, membership programs offer an affordable way to get on the water without the hassle of boat ownership. Fleet boats Hunter 33 & Beneteau 35.

Saturna 33’ Pilothouse Sloop - 1981 Wheel steering w/ inside helm, Yanmar, Espar heat, propane galley, radar, AP, Garmin GPS/Plotter, elec. windlass, dinghy, surveyed........... $39,500

San Juan Sailing

• Sailing School • Sailing Club 1-800-677-7245 • Charters 2615 South Harbor Loop Dr. #1 • Sales Bellingham, WA 98225

Membership available as low as $395 a month!

Ph: (360) 671-4300 • Fax: (360) 671-4301 www.sanjuansailing.com email: brokerage@sanjuansailing.com

260 NE Tomahawk Island Drive Portland Oregon - (503) 289-6306 Portland@sailtime.com - https://sailtime.com/portland/

Brokerage Sail Listings

Boat Type 36’ Union Cutter

Yr Aux Price 79 D 79,900

Broker West Yachts

36’ Union Cutter

80 D

Passion Yachts

37’ Beneteau 373

06 D 125,000

Signature

37’ Cooper

81 D

49,000

37’ Cooper Pilothouse 82 D

84,900

34,900

Contact Page www.west-yachts.com 79

Boat Type 38’ Downeaster

Yr Aux Price Broker 77 D 47,000 Signature

Contact Page www.signature-yachts.com 88

www.passion-yachts.com

83

38’ Hanse 385

13 D 279,000

www.signature-yachts.com

88

38’ Hunter

06 D 129,900 Signature

JK3 Yachts

www.signature-yachts.com

www.jk3yachts.com

88

3

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

38’ Moody CC

01 D 139,900

Signature

www.signature-yachts.com

88

Bellhaven Yacht Sales

www.bellhaven.net

84

38’ Nauticat MS

85 D 139,000

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

(206) 547-2755

78

38’ Nauticat MS

83 D 134,500

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

38’ Sabre 386

06 D 223,000

JK3 Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

38’ Sabre 386

04 D 233,000

JK3 Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

37’ Crealock

78 D 109,000

Seacraft Yacht Sales

37’ Endeavour

78 D

27,900

NW Yachtnet

37’ Hunter

96 D

49,900

Sail Northwest

37’ Irwin CC

76 D

49,500

Bellhaven Yacht Sales

www.bellhaven.net

84

38’ Shannon Ketch

81 D

86,000

NW Yachtnet

37’ Jeanneau SO 37

02 D

99,500

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

38’ Wauquize Hoo

86 D

59,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

37’ Marlow Hunter

15 D

~

www.specialtyyachts.com

15

38’ Hans Christian

78 D

74,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

37’ Pacific Seacraft

93 D 149,000

Seacraft Yacht Sales

(206) 547-2755

78

39’ Andrews

07 D 324,900 Yachtfinders/Wind

37’ Pacific Seacraft

78 D

99,500

Seacraft Yacht Sales

(206) 547-2755

78

39’ Farr 39 C/R

96 D 149,000

Sail Northwest

37’ Pacific Seacraft

81 D

95,000

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

39’ Hallberg Rassy

00 D 249,000

Specialty Yachts

www.yachtfinders.biz

85

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

37’ Tartan 37

78 D

57,500

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

39’ Hunter 39

12 D C253,000

Specialty Yachts

www.specialtyyachts.com

15

37’ Tartan 3700

07 D 239,000

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

39’ Beneteau 393

O2 D 149,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

37’ Tartan S&S

82 D

68,950

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

39’ Corbin pilothouse 80 D

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

38’ Alajuela 38

77 D

59,000

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

76

39’ Jeanneau 39i

www.marinesc.com

81

www.passion-yachts.com

83

69,500

07 D 169,000

38’ Alerion Express 38 06 D 279,000

JK3 Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

39’ Landfall pilothouse 78 D

38’ Baltic 38 DP

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

40’ J/120

98 D 159,000

JK3 Yachts

www.signature-yachts.com

88

40’ Bali 4.0

15 D 277,000

Bellhaven Yacht Sales

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

40’ Beneteau Oceanis 11 D 174,500

Signature

www.capegeorgecutters.com

18

40’ C&C 121

00 D C189,000

Yacht Sales West

(604) 488-1202

9

84

40’ Catalina

05 D 179,000

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

(206) 285-9563

77

www.seattleyachts.com

82

www.marinesc.com

81

(206) 285-9563

77

85 D 109,500

38’ Beneteau Oceanis 16 D 224,900

Signature

38’ C&C 115

06 D 161,500

Swiftsure Yachts

38’ Cape George

91 D 157,500

Cape George

38’ Catalina

01 D 129,500

Bellhaven Yacht Sales

38’ Catalina

00 D 125,000

www.bellhaven.net

39,900

Mar Servic Passion Yachts

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

40’ Catalina 400

99 D 129,000

Seattle Yachts

38’ Catalina/Morgan 93 D

84,900

Seattle Yachts

www.seattleyachts.com

82

40’ CS Yacht

88 D

Mar Servic

38’ Coronet Elvstrom 79 D

65,000

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

40’ Hinckley

70 D 169,500

www.48North.com

September 2016

79,500

www.jk3yachts.com

3

www.bellhaven.net

84

www.signature-yachts.com

88

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

83


Charters, Classes, Clubs, and Sales since 1992! New 2016- DuFour 350 Grand Large

www.bellhaven.net (360) 733-6636

Toll Free (877) 310-9471 714 Coho Way, Bellingham, Wa 98225

2001 Catalina 380 Asking $149,500

3 cabin/1 head layout. Fully loaded with off shore upgraded sails, upgraded Volvo engine, diesel heat, upgraded Oak interior & cushions, code zero sail WOW. MSRP $221,00. Special pricing- ONLY $185,000.

Cooper Yachts Seabird Pilothouse

36’ 4” Catalina MKII 2004 - Wilson

Asking $89,900

1987 30’ CAPE DORY MK II Asking $49,900

Deep fin keel, 155% Genoa, radar, engine just serviced. New heat exchanger, injectors, head, and bottom paint. Waxed and buffed. Recently installed deisel heater. A steal at $99,950!

1979 36’ CAPE GEORGE Asking $59,900

(206) 784-9386 www.windworkssailing.com admin@windworkssailing.com

Meeting your boating needs in the Pacific Northwest

Brokerage Sail Listings Contact

Page

Visit us at Shilshole Bay Marina 7001 Seaview Ave NW # 110 Seattle, WA 98117

Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

Broker

Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

40’ Island Packet

99 D 199,000

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

41’ Freedom 40/40

96 D 137,900

JK3 Yachts

Broker

40’ J/120

02 D 171,900

JK3 Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

41’ Hanse 411

04 D 142,000

Swiftsure Yachts

40’ J/40 J Boat

86 D

Sail Northwest

40’ Jonmeri

86 D 129,000

Swiftsure Yachts

40’ Lagoon 400

10 D 398,500

Mar Servic

40’ Leopard

Contact

Page

www.jk3yachts.com

3

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

41’ Hunter 41 DS

05 D 159,000

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

76

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

41’ Hunter 41 DS

08 D C247,000

Specialty Yachts

www.specialtyyachts.com

15

www.marinesc.com

81

41’ J/122e

16 D

Sail Northwest

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

09 D 399,000 Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

85

41’ J/124

06 D 229,500

JK3 Yachts

40’ Nauticat

85 D 107,500 Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

85

41’ Kettenburg K41

67 D

Yachtfinders/Wind

40’ Norseman 400

87 d 149,500

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

41’ Passport

90 D 175,000

www.west-yachts.com

79

41’ Rhodes Bounty II 59 D

www.jk3yachts.com

3

(206) 285-9563

77

99,000

Swiftsure Yachts

40’ Panda by Ta Shing 85 D 159,000

West Yachts

40’ Passport 40

83 D 126,000

JK3 Yachts

40’ S&S Loki

53 D

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

40’ Sabre 402

99 D 120,000

JK3 Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

40’ Sabre 402

99 D 224,900

JK3 Yachts

40’ Valiant

77 D

Passion Yachts

59,000

54,900

~ 49,500 25,000 ~

www.jk3yachts.com

3

www.yachtfinders.biz

85

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

(206) 285-9563

77

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

76

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

41’ Salona 41

16 D

41’ Sweden

85 D 114,950

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

3

41’ Tartan 4100

04 D 259,000

JK3 Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

www.jk3yachts.com

3

41’ Tripp Carrol Marine 91 D

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

www.passion-yachts.com

83

41’ Bavaria Cruiser

16 D

CALL

www.signature-yachts.com

88

41’ Beneteau O 41.1 16 D

~

39,900

Sail Northwest

Sail Northwest Yacht Sales West

(604) 488-1202

9

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

40’ Beneteau Oceanis 11 D 189,500

Signature

40’ J/120

94 D 129,000

Sail Northwest

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

41’ Catalina 400

95 D 129,000

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

41’ Beneteau 411

99 D 109,500

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

41’ Formosa Ketch

76 D

59,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

41’ Beneteau 411

01 D 125,000

Signature

www.signature-yachts.com

88

41’ Freeport

78 D

57,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

41’ Beneteau O 41

98 D 124,900

Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

85

41’ Newport

83 D

47,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

www.jk3yachts.com

3

42’ Bavaria CC

99 D 135,000

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

Yacht Sales West

41’ Beneteau Oceanis 00 D 136,500

JK3 Yachts

41’ Beneteau Oceanis 12 D 219,900

Signature

www.signature-yachts.com

88

42’ Bavaria Vision

16 D

41’ Beneteau O 41.1

16 D 269,900

Signature

www.signature-yachts.com

88

42’ Beneteau 423

O5 D 165,000

Passion Yachts

41’ C-T PH Ketch

76 D

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

42’ Beneteau 423

03 D 149,000

Signature

41’ C&C

86 D C99,900

(604) 488-1202

9

42’ Beneteau First 42 83 D

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

www.marinesc.com (206) 282-0110

39,900

Yacht Sales West

41’ C&C Redline Demo 15 D 279,900

Sail Northwest

41’ Cheoy Lee

78 D

49,000

Mar Servic

41’ Cheoy Lee

77 D

89,500

Waterline Boats

84

CALL

(604) 488-1202

9

www.passion-yachts.com

83

www.signature-yachts.com

88

79,950

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

42’ Cheoy Lee

82 D 107,000

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

81

42’ Colvin Gazelle

10 D

39,990

West Yachts

www.west-yachts.com

79

76

42’ Endeavour

90 D

99,000

JK3 Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

September 2016

www.48North.com


Professionally staffed! Open EVERY day!

(619) 224-2349 • Fax (619) 224-4692 • 2330 Shelter Island Dr. #207 San Diego, CA 92106 www.yachtfinders.biz • Toll-Free (866) 341-6189 • info@yachtfinders.biz

A Leader in Brokerage Sales on the West Coast

26’ MACGREGOR 26M ’04..........$19,000 MACGREGOR PLEASURE Waterski in the AM. Sail in the PM she allows you to do both. Unique design allows comfortable sailing.

27’ CATALINA 27 ’83 $13,500 REDUCED ! VENTO SOTTO has wheel steering, roller furling and a new Yanmar, just a few good reasons she is the perfect starter boat for you!

30’ FISHER 30 ’79...................$30,000 Featured at a very attractive price, GALE offers a great opportunity to own a pilothouse ketch well within the bounds of affordability.

30’ CAPE DORY 30 Cutter ’80 $39,500 SWIFT RANGER Knowledgeable and skilled owners have renewed all the systems on this classic cruising boat.

33’ NAUTICAT ’85....................$59,500 CHATON DE FOI is a motorsailer that really sails. A sturdy platform for cruising or liveaboard. Re-powered & a new mizzen mast. w Ne ting s i L

34’ HUNTER 34 ’86..................$27,000 RICH’S 2 RAGS is a roomy, comfortable boat that is perfect for Southern California cruising. Take trips to Catalina and beyond.

36’ CATALINA 36 MKII ’97..........$74,900 MARATHON WINDS The Catalina 36 was the best-selling sail boat of all time. Catalina made improvements to make the 36 MkII.

41’ BENETEAU Oceanis 411 ’98 $124,900 SEA FROG is exceptionally well kept and maintained. Very little is needed to enjoy coastal or longer distance cruising. w Ne ting s i L

42’ HUNTER 420 Passage ’03.... $142,500 PARACLETE provides perhaps the largest volume and most storage capacity of any sailboat of its size. Owner is very motivated!

42’ WESTSAIL Cutter ’74...........$79,900 HALIA Built of stout and sturdy materials that can take you anywhere. Sisterships have appeared on every ocean.

44’ DAVIDSON 44 ’81...............$44,000 I’O has been drysailed for the last 10 years & is ready to go cruising again. New Yanmar installed in 2010! Come check her out.

62’ DEERFOOT 62 ’82............. $375,000 EMMA is a show stopper. Built to go around the world with ease and comfort. Beautiful lines and a super user friendly layout.

Please Support the Advertisers Who Bring You 48° North 48° North Swap Meet........................... 17 Artist Ad - Luke Tornatzky.................. 59 Ballard Sails......................................... 61 Bellhaven Yacht Sales and Charters.... 84 Beta Marine Engines.............................. 8 Big River Bistro.................................... 19 Blaine Harbor....................................... 35 Boat US................................................ 33 Cape George Marine............................ 24 Captains Nautical Supplies.................. 25 Clean Sails........................................... 19 Columbia Marine Exchange................ 35 CSR Marine......................................... 53 Discovery Yachts.................................. 31 Dockside Solutions.............................. 51 Downwind Marine............................... 18 Dr. LED................................................ 13 Drivelines Northwest........................... 47 Elliott Bay Yacht Sales......................... 77 Emerald Harbor.................................... 20 Fisheries Supply................................... 14

Flagship Maritime................................ 62 Iverson’s Design Dodgers..................... 24 Jeanneau Yachts................................... 16 Jerry James............................................ 40 JK3 Yachts.............................................. 3 Lee Sails............................................... 24 LFS Marine & Outdoor....................... 39 Mahina Offshore Expeditions.............. 49 Marine Servicenter........................ 81, 90 Master Craft Boat Covering................ 12 NW Yachtnet.com................................. 7 Passion Yachts...................................... 83 Peoples Bank........................................ 41 Pink Boat Regatta................................ 61 Port of Friday Harbor........................... 12 Port Townsend Rigging........................ 10 Pt Townsend Wooden Boat Festival.... 21 Rosario Resort...................................... 28 Sail Northwest....................................... 2 Sail Sand Point.................................... 62 San Juan Sailing................................... 83 www.48North.com

September 2016

Scan Marine......................................... 53 Schooner Creek Boat Works............... 44 Seacraft Yacht Sales............................. 78 Seattle Boats Afloat Show................... 26 Seattle Boatworks................................ 49 Seattle Sailing Club............................. 27 Seattle Yachts....................................... 82 Seaview Boatyard................................. 37 Seventh Wave Marine......................... 51 Signature Yachts............................ 88. 89 Specialty Yachts................................... 15 STYC - Race Your House.................... 20 Swiftsure Yachts................................... 80 Ullman Sails........................................ 13 Waterline Boats................................... 76 West Yachts.......................................... 79 Wichard............................................... 11 Windworks Sailing & Powerboating... 84 Yacht Sales West.................................... 9 Yachtfinders/Windseakers.................... 85 Yager Sails & Canvas........................... 10 85


Brokerage Sail Listings

Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

Broker

42’ Hallberg Rassy

82 D 119,500

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

76

46’ Tayana Pilothouse 13 D

42’ Hunter 42 Passage 90 D C147,900

Specialty Yachts

www.specialtyyachts.com

15

46’ Bavaria Vision

15 D C489,000

Yacht Sales West

(604) 488-1202

9

42’ Hunter 420 CC

01 D 140,000

Signature

www.signature-yachts.com

88

47’ Beneteau 47.7

05 D 210,000

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

(206) 285-9563

77

42’ Hunter Passage

04 D C217,000

Specialty Yachts

www.specialtyyachts.com

15

47’ Beneteau 473

06 D 229,000

Mar Servic

42’ Hunter Passage

94 D

99,000

JK3 Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

47’ Beneteau O 473

05 D 219,900

Signature

42’ Jeanneau 42 DS

07 D 219,500

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

47’ Custom PH

04 D 425,000

42’ Maple Leaf

76 D

Seacraft Yacht Sales

(206) 547-2755

78

42’ Nauticat PH

04 D 439,500

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

42’ Roberts PH

94 D 123,000

Swiftsure Yachts

42’ Sabre

87 D C154,900

Yacht Sales West

42’ Sabre

87 D C154,900

Yacht Sales West

42’ Valiant 42

93 D 187,000

Mar Servic

42’ Westsail

74 D 79,900 Yachtfinders/Wind

43’ Atkins Cutter

02 D 180,000

Seacraft Yacht Sales

43’ Bali 4.3

15 D 357,000

Bellhaven Yacht Sales

43’ Catana 431

00 ~ 349,000

Yachtfinders/Wind

43’ Custom Perry

77 D 230,000

43’ Hallberg Rassy

05 D 385,000

43’ Hans Christian

78 D

Yachtfinders/Wind

43’ Jeanneau 43 DS

05 D 214,500

Mar Servic

43’ Mason

84 D

99,500

Seattle Yachts

43’ Schucker 430 PH 79 D

62,500

Waterline Boats

69,000

84,900

Contact

Page

Boat Type

Yr Aux Price ~

Broker

Contact

Seattle Yachts

www.marinesc.com

81 88

Seattle Yachts

www.seattleyachts.com

82

47’ Gulfstar Sailmaster 81 D 129,000

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

81

47’ Southerly 145

78 D 199,000

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

47’ Vagabond Ketch

79 D 134,950

Waterline Boats

(604) 488-1202

9

48’ Beneteau Oceanis 16 D 499,000

Signature

(604) 488-1202

9

48’ C&C

73 D 248,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.marinesc.com

81

48’ Cust. Schooner

86 D 125,000

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

www.yachtfinders.biz

85

48’ Fife 8 Metre

29

Swiftsure Yachts

(206) 547-2755

78

48’ J/145

01 D 559,000

JK3 Yachts

www.bellhaven.net

84

48’ J/145

02 D 399,000

Sail Northwest

www.yachtfinders.biz

85

48’ Swan

72 D

80,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

48’ Tayana

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

48’ Tayana DS

www.yachtfinders.biz

85

www.marinesc.com

250,000

(206) 282-0110

76

www.signature-yachts.com

88

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

2

93 D 249,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

12 D

~

Seattle Yachts

www.seattleyachts.com

82

49’ Beneteau

07 D 249,999

Seattle Yachts

www.seattleyachts.com

82

81

49’ Hunter

08 D C397,000

Specialty Yachts

www.specialtyyachts.com

15

www.seattleyachts.com

82

49’ Jeanneau SO 49P 07 D 349,500

www.marinesc.com

81

(206) 282-0110

76

50’ Calkins

64 ~ 99,000 Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

85

www.marinesc.com

81

50’ Custom Steel

94 D

www.bellhaven.net

84

(604) 488-1202

9

50’ Dubbel

89 D 269,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

09 D C435,000

Specialty Yachts

www.specialtyyachts.com

15

Specialty Yachts

www.specialtyyachts.com

15

www.bellhaven.net

84

www.yachtfinders.biz

85

(604) 488-1202

9

89,000

Mar Servic Bellhaven Yacht Sales

43’ Hunter 430

92 D

99,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

50’ Hunter 50 CC

43’ Polaris Cutter

78 D

84,500

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

50’ Marlow Hunter AC 15 D

44’ Beneteau CC

99 D 139,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

50’ Offshore FD12

78 D 109,000

Bellhaven Yacht Sales

44’ Bombay

79 D

49,900

Seacraft Yacht Sales

(206) 547-2755

78

50’ Santa Cruz

81 D

Yachtfinders/Wind

44’ Bruce Rbts Offshr 81 D

69,000

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

76

50’ Simpson

1999 D C399,000

85

50’ Valiant 50

02 D 499,500

www.yachtfinders.biz

~ 99,500

Yacht Sales West NW Yachtnet

44’ Davidson

81 D 44,000 Yachtfinders/Wind

44’ Fantasi PH

04 D 429,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

51’ Alden Skye Ketch 80 D 198,500

Mar Servic

44’ Hunter 44 DS

05 D C235,000

Specialty Yachts

www.specialtyyachts.com

15

51’ Bakewell-white

95 D 398,000

JK3 Yachts

44’ Irwin CC

87 D 129,900

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

51’ Ben Seaborn RS

56 D

Signature

Mar Servic

85 D C149,000

Specialty Yachts

44’ Nauticat

83 D 167,000

West Yachts

44’ Nauticat

80 D 199,000 Yachtfinders/Wind

44’ Salona

16 D

45’ Bali 4.5

15 D 412,000

Bellhaven Yacht Sales

45’ Bavaria

10 D C319,000

Yacht Sales West

79,900

www.jk3yachts.com

3

www.signature-yachts.com

88

www.passion-yachts.com

83

www.seattleyachts.com

82 80

51’ Formosa CC Ketch 81 D 149,900

Passion Yachts

15

52’ Tayana

90 D 265,500

Seattle Yachts

www.west-yachts.com

79

53’ Hallberg Rassy

03 D 575,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

85

53’ Pearson

1981 D C188,900

Yacht Sales West

(604) 488-1202

9

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

53’ Spencer PH

78 D 150,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.bellhaven.net

84

54’ Jeanneau 54

16 D 652,789

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

(604) 488-1202

9

54’ Roberts

82 D 249,500

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

(206) 285-9563

77

www.signature-yachts.com

88

54’ S&S Sloop

73 D 145,000

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

(206) 285-9563

77

(206) 547-2755

78

55’ Christensen PH

02 D 299,000

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

56’ Herreshoff Schner 56 D 215,000

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

76

60’ Colvin Schooner 86 D

79,000

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

76

45’ Besteaver 45ST

11 D 625,000

Seacraft Yacht Sales

45’ Brewer ketch

78 D

Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

85

45’ Harden Cutter

81 D 129,500

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

45’ Herreshoff

82 D 239,500 Yachtfinders/Wind

45’ Hunter CC

06 D 214,000

85

60’ Farr 60PH

97 D 675,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

www.signature-yachts.com

88

60’ Shannon

14 D 1,495,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

www.passion-yachts.com

83

62’ Deerfoot

82 D 37,500 Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

www.yachtfinders.biz

45’ Hunter Deck Salon O8 D 209,900

Passion Yachts

45’ Jeanneau 45 DS

10 D 294,500

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

62’ Dynamique

92 D 249,900

Yacht Sales West

45’ Lagoon 450

12 D 519,000

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

64’ Roberts PH 64

88 D 298,000

Mar Servic

45’ Nauticat 40+5

85 D 235,000

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

65’ MacGreagor/Wylie 84 D

46’ Amazon CC

92

D 199,950

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

66’ Gorbon

97 D 875,000 Yachtfinders/Wind

46’ Custom Norseman 89 D 180,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

68’ Nelson Marek

84 D 267,000

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

46’ Garden Porpoise 71 D

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

76

73’ Manuel Campos

41 D 500,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

78’ Cheoy Lee

88 D 449,000

Seacraft Yacht Sales

www.yachtfinders.biz

85

46’ Hylas 46

00 D 325,000

JK3 Yachts

46’ Kanter Atlantic

88 D

Yachtfinders/Wind

46’ Nordic RS

92 D 229,000

Signature

www.signature-yachts.com

88

46’ Spindrift CC

84 D 149,900

Passion Yachts

www.passion-yachts.com

83

46’ Swan

84 D 255,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

86

81

81

Signature

99,900

7

www.marinesc.com

www.marinesc.com

45’ Beneteau Oceanis 17 D 349,900

79,900

www.nwyachtnet.com

www.specialtyyachts.com www.yachtfinders.biz

Sail Northwest

Signature

3 80

Yacht Sales West

17 D 339,483

80

www.jk3yachts.com www.swiftsureyachts.com

10 D C224,900

44’ Jeanneau 44DS

77

www.swiftsureyachts.com

Swiftsure Yachts

43’ Beneteau

44’ Nauticat

(206) 285-9563

www.sailnorthwest.com

Mar Servic

79,000

82

www.signature-yachts.com

43’ Tartan 4300 50% 10 D 219,500

~

Page

www.seattleyachts.com

September 2016

www.48North.com

99,000

Sail Northwest

85

(604) 488-1202

9

www.marinesc.com

81

www.sailnorthwest.com www.yachtfinders.biz

2 85

(206) 285-9563

77

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

(206) 547-2755

78


Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

21’ NorthRip New

16 G

~

24’ Osprey 24

01 D

53,500

Brokerage Trawler Listings

Broker

Sail Northwest Waterline Boats

25’ Devlin Surf Scoter 01 D 125,000

West Yachts

26’ Aquasport Explorer 04 G

JK3 Yachts

50,000

26’ Maxum TG 28,000 Signature 27’ Rinker Fiesta Vee 04 ~

34,500 5,400

Yachtfinders/Wind

28’ Bayliner 2855

87 G

28’ Boston Whaler

14 D 220,000

Yacht Sales West

28’ Chris Craft 28

04 G

JK3 Yachts

29’ Maxum

02 D C42,900

Yacht Sales West

69,000

Mar Servic

29’ Ranger Tug

10 D 129,000

West Yachts

29’ Sea Ray 290

93

C32,700

Specialty Yachts

30’ NorthRip New

16 G

~

Sail Northwest

31’ Camano

04 D 119,500

San Juan Sailing

31’ Camano Troll

01 D 114,900

Waterline Boats

31’ Camano Troll

92 D

West Yachts

96,000

Contact

Page

Boat Type

Yr Aux Price

2

38’ Mariner 38 Seville 09 D 269,000

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

76

38’ Nimbus 365 Coupe 16 D 495,000

Seattle Yachts

www.west-yachts.com

79

38’ Nordlund Trawler 66 D

45,000

www.jk3yachts.com

3

38’ Trojan Sea Voyager 68 G

49,500

www.signature-yachts.com

Contact

Page

(206) 282-0110

76

www.seattleyachts.com

82

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

76

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

76

88

38’ True North

16 D

~

Sail Northwest

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

www.yachtfinders.biz

85

40’ Bayliner 4087

01 D 129,000

Seattle Yachts

www.seattleyachts.com

82

www.marinesc.com

81

40’ Greenline Hybrid 14 D C589,000

Yacht Sales West

(604) 488-1202

9

(604) 488-1202

9

40’ Hiptimco

77 D C99,900

Yacht Sales West

(604) 488-1202

9

www.jk3yachts.com

3

41’ Back Cove

15 D 685,000

JK3 Yachts

(604) 488-1202

9

41’ Back Cove

14 D 664,900

Seattle Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

www.seattleyachts.com

82 76

www.west-yachts.com

79

41’ Cust Alum Trawler 90 2D 124,000

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

www.specialtyyachts.com

15

42’ Californian

Yacht Sales West

(604) 488-1202

9

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

76

www.sanjuansailing.com

83

42’ Devlin Sockeye

00 D 420,000

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

(206) 282-0110

76

42’ Grand Banks

70 D

84,900

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

www.west-yachts.com

79

42’ Grand Banks

87 D

~

West Yachts

www.west-yachts.com

79

83 D 169,000

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

(206) 282-0110

76 7

83 D C99,900

42’ Californian Trawler 77 2D

31’ Helmsman Trawlers 15 D 295,000

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

76

42’ Grand Banks

31’ Marlow Mainship 15 D

Specialty Yachts

www.specialtyyachts.com

15

42’ Lien Hwa Sundeck 86 2D

~

Broker

www.sailnorthwest.com

74,000

94,900

Waterline Boats

31’ Tiara Coronet 3100 14 ~ 324,900

JK3 Yachts

www.jk3yachts.com

3

43’ Fathom Element

11 D 399,900

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com

32’ Bayliner 3218

87 D

38,000

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

43’ Fathom Element

16 D

CALL

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

32’ Bayliner 3218

88 D

42,000

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

43’ Ocean Alexander 83 TD

99,000

(206) 285-9563

77 79

32’ Glacier Bay 3080 08 G 159,000

Seattle Yachts

32’ Grand Banks 32

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

www.seattleyachts.com

82

44’ DeFever

West Yachts

www.west-yachts.com

74 D

47,500

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

76

44’ Ocean Alexander 82 D

69,900

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

32’ Marlow Mainship 15 TD

~

Specialty Yachts

www.specialtyyachts.com

15

44’ Ocean Alexander 89 D

99,500

Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

85

www.west-yachts.com

79

44’ Tollycraft CPMY

44 2D 115,000

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

76

(206) 282-0110

76

45’ Northwest

08 D 495,000

Seattle Yachts

www.seattleyachts.com

82

www.seattleyachts.com

82

45’ Northwest

07 D 490,000

Seattle Yachts

www.seattleyachts.com

82

81 D 299,000

West Yachts

www.west-yachts.com

79

(206) 282-0110

76

www.seattleyachts.com

82

32’ Nordic Tug

90 D 120,000

West Yachts

32’ Nordic Tugs 32

88 D

79,000

Waterline Boats

32’ Sport Fisher

77 D

38,000

Seattle Yachts

83 D 139,900

32’ Coastal Craft 320 02 D 198,500

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

46’ Nielson Trawler

33’ Chris Craft 33

48 D

67,500

Mar Servic

www.marinesc.com

81

47’ DeFever 47 Trawler 60 D 109,000

Waterline Boats

33’ Puget Trawler

77 D

47,900

Seattle Yachts

www.seattleyachts.com

82

47’ Diesel Duck

06 D 599,000

Seattle Yachts

34’ CHB Trawler

89 D

29,995

Yachtfinders/Wind

www.yachtfinders.biz

85

48’ Meridian 48 PH

73 2D

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

76

www.marinesc.com

81

48’ TriStar Trawler

80 D 299,000

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

(206) 285-9563

77

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

49’ DeFever PH

04 D 519,000

Seattle Yachts

www.seattleyachts.com

82

www.yachtfinders.biz

85

49’ Elling E4

08 D 449,000

Seattle Yachts

www.seattleyachts.com

82

www.marinesc.com

81

49’ Integrity 466

04 D 469,900

Seattle Yachts

www.seattleyachts.com

82

www.sailnorthwest.com

2

49’ Meridian 490 PH 05 D 295,000

West Yachts

www.west-yachts.com

79

www.bellhaven.net

84

34’ Glacier Bay 3470 05 D 175,000

Mar Servic

34’ Red Wing

08 D 145,000

Swiftsure Yachts

34’ Sea Ray 340

86 ~

34,900

Yachtfinders/Wind

34’ Tollycraft

72 D

19,900

Mar Servic

34’ True North

16 D

~

Sail Northwest

79,500

34’ Beneteau Trawler 15 D C524,900

Yacht Sales West

(604) 488-1202

9

50’ CTF Trawler

13 D 669,500

Bellhaven

35’ Nexus

03 D 319,000

Swiftsure Yachts

www.swiftsureyachts.com

80

50’ True North

14 D

~

Sail Northwest

36’ Grady-White

12 G 380,000

Seattle Yachts

www.seattleyachts.com

82

50’ Willard

97 D

28,000

36’ Grand Banks

73 D

49,000

Bellhaven

www.bellhaven.net

84

51’ Wm.Garden

64 D 109,000

Seacraft Yacht Sales

36’ Island Gypsy

86 D

69,500

Bellhaven

www.bellhaven.net

84

52’ DeFever Euro

16 D SPECIAL

Seattle Yachts

36’ Monk Bridge Deck 41 D

49,900

Seattle Yachts

www.seattleyachts.com

82

52’ Integrity PH

05 D 595,000

Seattle Yachts

www.seattleyachts.com

82

36’ Nova Trawler

87 D

86,000

Seacraft Yacht Sales

(206) 547-2755

78

52’ Nordlund 52 PH

70 D 114,000

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

76

36’ Willard

63 D

88,950

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

54’ Bracewell

00 D 549,000

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

(206) 285-9563

77

36’ Willard 36

63 D

88,950

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

59’ Compass 55 PH

01 D 450,000

JK3 Yachts

37’ Cobalt 373

09 TG 275,000

Signature

www.signature-yachts.com

88

59’ Selene

08 D 1,415,000

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales

37’ Fountaine Pajot

05 D 239,500

NW Yachtnet

37’ Fountaine Pajot

16 TD 497,500

Signature

37’ Marlow Mainship 15 D

Mar Servic

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

60’ Sather Brothers

78 D 395,000

Bellhaven

www.signature-yachts.com

88

60’ Seaquest

91 D C250,000

Yacht Sales West

65’ Realships

98 D 699,000

66’ Cheoy Lee LRC

91 D 299,000

Seattle Yachts

9

78’ Converted Tug

1890 D 184,000

Waterline Boats

37’ Nordic Tug

02 D 299,900

NW Yachtnet

www.nwyachtnet.com

7

85’ Azimut 85

37’ Nordic Tug

08 D 387,500

West Yachts

www.west-yachts.com

79 81 76

38’ Boden Power Cat 08 D 142,000

Waterline Boats

(206) 282-0110

76

www.48North.com

September 2016

www.bellhaven.net

84

76

9

(604) 488-1202

(206) 282-0110

77

82

(604) 488-1202

Yacht Sales West

www.marinesc.com

3

(206) 285-9563

(206) 282-0110

Yacht Sales West

04 D 325,000

Waterline Boats

www.jk3yachts.com

www.seattleyachts.com

07 D 365,000

37’ Nordic Tug

Mar Servic

82

9

37’ Nordic Tug

74 D 125,000

78

82

15

38’ Berry Farrell

(206) 547-2755 www.seattleyachts.com

www.seattleyachts.com

www.specialtyyachts.com

37’ Sea Ray Sundancer 12 D 269,000

81

Seattle Yachts

Specialty Yachts

100’ Steel Coastal Tug 44 D 179,000

2

www.marinesc.com

(604) 488-1202

~

02 D 1,399,000

www.sailnorthwest.com

JK3 Yachts Waterline Boats

www.jk3yachts.com

3

(206) 282-0110

76

87


Select Brokerage er

Platinum Service Dealer

Se

aF

ev

SEATTLE (206) 284-9004

www.signature-yachts.com

Nordic 46 Raised Salon

51' Ben Seaborn '56................ $79,900

Re

du ced

1992 - Robert Perry Design

Do

ck

45' Hunter Center Ckpt '06..... $214,000

Ou r

Our Westlake Docks $229,000

BENETEAU OCEANIS 40

42' Hunter Center Ckpt '01..... $140,000

Ou

rD

oc

k

2011 - Loaded & Like New

40' Beneteau Oceanis '11....... $174,500

Re

du

ce

d

Our Westlake Docks $189,950

BENETEAU OCEANIS 411 2001 - Ready to Cruise

By

Ap

pt

.

38' Moody Center Ckpt '01.... $139,900

38' Downeaster '77.................. $47,000

Our Westlake Docks oc k Ou rD

Ar

riv

Ou rD

in

g

oc k

By

Ap

pt

.

$125,000

35' Beneteau First '11............ $169,900 What's Happening

39' Cal '78...................................SOLD

riv

in

g

k

27' Hunter '06 $42,500

Ar

38' Hunter '06................. Sale Pending

34' Beneteau 343/352 '08 $89,900

Do c

37' Beneteau 373 '06...... Sale Pending

35' Beneteau Oceanis 351 '95.. $59,900

Ou r

34' Beneteau 343 '06..................SOLD

D Sa emo le

30' Nonsuch '84 ............. Sale Pending

42' Beneteau 423 '03...... Sale Pending 45' Beneteau Oceanis' 14............SOLD 47' Beneteau 473 '05...... Sale Pending 54' Mason CC '90.......................SOLD

26' Seaward RK '16................. $99,900 25' Harbor '09.......................... $49,500

25' Beneteau First '15.............. $79,900

Showcase Marina Open Mon. - Sat. 10-5, Sun. by Appt. • 2476 Westlake Ave N. #101, Seattle, WA 98109 88

September 2016

www.48North.com


See These Boats At

Platinum Service Dealer

SEATTLE (206) 284-9004

www.signature-yachts.com Trailer, Demo Clearance

B Afl oat oa s t

B Afl oat oa s t

Seaward 26RK

New Retractable Keel Easy Launching, Shallow Access!

First 25 Sport B Afl oat oa s t

B Afl oat oa s t

Fountaine Pajot MY-37 Power Cat

Fast, Fun, On Sale!

First 22

OCEANIS 41.1

New Model Just Arrived

B Afl oat oa s t

Oceanis 31

B Afl oat oa s t

B Afl oat oa s t

Year end clearance on this Loaded Pocket Cruiser

Light Oak or Mahogany And 2 or 3 Staterooms!

B Afl oat oa s t

B Afl oat oa s t

Oceanis 35

OCEANIS 48

Spectacular Sailing Boat

Ar riv i

ng

Oceanis 38

Three Stateroom In Stock. Amazing Forward Master! Fountaine Pajot 40

Showcase Marina Open Mon. - Sat. 10-5, Sun. by Appt. • 2476 Westlake Ave N. #101, Seattle, WA 98109 www.48North.com

September 2016

89


AT THE SHOW! In Stock & Sale Priced!! Best Savings of the Year @ This Show! Come See!

CLOSE OUT!

Call for VIP Passes!

VIP NIGHT SEPT 13

2016 Jeanneau 349 #72208: $159,489 - SAVE $23,936

Superb Safety & Sea Keeping in this “full foil” keel rock-solid cruiser. Unique open salon concept & 2 nicely appointed cabins. New boat at a used boat price = exceptional value!

NEW - 2014 Island Packet 360 #18: $274,852 - SAVE $135,100

2017 Jeanneau 419 #72680: $279,323 - SAVE $14,957

2017 Jeanneau 44DS #72379: $339,483 - SAVE $23,960

2017 Jeanneau 479 #72673: $429,864 - SAVE $24,729

Stunning Andrew Winch designed light oak interior with “home-like” appliances & comfort - upright SS Fridge/ Freezer, Miele Dishwasher & Washer / Dryer. 30%+ weight savings with resin infusion & injection molding!

2016 Jeanneau 54 #72332: $648,789 - Save $61,746

Dealers For:

Since 1977

1-877-215-0560 (Toll Free) | www.marinesc.com | info@marinesc.com Seattle - Sales: 2442 Westlake Ave. (206) 323-2405 | Anacortes - Sales, Dry Storage & Yard (360) 293-9521 Huge selection of New & Used Boats at Our Lake Union Sales Dock & Anacortes Dry Sales Lot. See our brokerage ad on page 81.

90

September 2016

www.48North.com

September 2016 48 North  
September 2016 48 North