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34 THE MILEAGE MYTH CRUISING SKILLS BEFORE YOU LEAVE 36 LEARNING TO FLY LOCAL SAILORS LEARN TO FOIL

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40 EVOLUTIONS IN YOUTH SAILING


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FEATURES 36 Learning to Fly

Sailors of varied backgrounds share stories of learning to foil.

CONTENTS

By Kurt Hoehne

40 Evolution in Youth Sailing

Positive shifts promise increased engagement and enjoyment. By Andrew Nelson

44 Joy Ride’s Sidney Hobart Adventure, Part II Big conditions and big fun across Bass Strait. By Alex Fox

COLUMNS 23 Artist’s View – Secrets of the Salish Sea

Pacific Loon: Elegant winter visitors are deep water divers. By Larry Eifert

24 Local Cruisers Abroad

Matt Steverson and Janneke Petersen report in from Tahiti. By Kurt Hoehne

28 Halcyon Wandering

Even full-time world cruisers continue to learn every day. By Becca Guillote

30 Galley Essentials with Amanda

Sailing adventures and pineapple treats in Mo’orea. By Amanda Swan Neal

32 How-To: Run a Messenger Line

Tips for ease and efficacy, whether re-running lines or wires. By Alex and Jack Wilken

34 Lessons Learned Cruising

“The Mileage Myth” – Cruising skills don’t require ocean miles. By Jamie and Behan Gifford

49 48° North Race Report

Blakely Rock (including a statement from the sailor who went overboard), Scatchet Head, Islands Race and more.

ON THE COVER, Dan Tedrow’s Cal 34, Resolute, sends it downwind under spinnaker on their way to a shared class win in the Blakely Rock Race (report on page 50). Photo courtesy of Jan Anderson. THIS PAGE, Photo courtesy of Alex Fox

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Editor MANY PATHS TO THE MOUNTAINTOP

For more than a decade now, I have struggled to come up with concise and effective answer to the question, “How do I get into sailing?” Sure, you can name your favorite programs, tell the inquirer about how you built your skills and knowledge, or give blanket recommendations like the proverbial, “A six-pack, a PFD, and some Sperrys ought to get you a ride on a race boat...” To me, they all fall short. Half of the trouble is that there are too many good answers to the question. The other half is that the person posing the question seldom has enough context to differentiate between the options or suggestions. A person who has never really sailed won’t understand the difference between racing and cruising, how different the experience of sailing a 15-foot boat is from sailing on a 50-foot boat, or the idea that you can arrive at a level of safe proficiency within a matter weeks even though learning to sail is a lifelong pursuit. Asking follow-ups like “Are you thinking big boats or small boats? Do you want to buy a boat?” or, “Are you more interested in racing or cruising?” should yield a response, “Uhh, I don’t know yet.” I find it better to ask: “Do you prefer exhilaration over comfort? Is working on your house or your car something you find fun and fulfilling?” or, “Do you like to play team sports?” The key is that there’s no wrong way to get into it. Can you get into sailing by buying a boat and learning on that boat? You betcha. Can you become a truly great sailor without ever owning a boat? Without a doubt. Can you learn on small boats? Of course. Big boats? Yes. Can you do it with little money? Definitely. Can you spend exorbitantly? Sure. Do you need to race? Absolutely not. Can getting involved in racing speed up your learning curve and connect you with a community of other sailors? Yup. 48° North has traditionally published a Learn To Sail Issue in an effort illuminate these many versions of entry into our worthy pastime. This year, we decided to take a different approach, recognizing that most of you reading this are already involved. This issue is still filled with articles that display a spirit of lifelong learning – from the ways that international cruisers continue to learn every day (page 28) to world cruising skills you can hone in local waters (page 34), from practical instruction about how to run a messenger line (page 32) to learning to foil (page 36). However, some components that were formerly in this issue, such as updated listings of PNW sailing schools, will now be found in our new annual stand-alone publication called, Setting Sail: A Guide for the Sail-Curious. It hits the streets next month and will hopefully be a resource for anyone asking (or trying to answer) the question, “How do I get into sailing?” The best thing sailors like us can offer new sailors, of course, is an invitation. The transfer of knowledge and enthusiasm usually begins a connection like this, and continues with a fun experience under sail. I’ll see you on the water, Joe Cline Editor, 48° North

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Volume XXXVIII, Number 9, April 2019 6327 Seaview Ave. NW Seattle, WA 98107 (206) 789-7350, fax (206) 789-6392 www.48north.com

Publisher Northwest Maritime Center Managing Editor Joe Cline joe@48north.com Guest Editor Kurt Hoehne Art Director Karen Johnson Advertising Sales Kachele Yelaca kachele@48north.com Advertising & Design Benjamin Harter benjamin@48north.com Contributing Editor Amanda Swan Neal Photographer Jan Anderson 48° North is published as a project of the Northwest Maritime Center in Port Townsend, WA – a 501(c)3 non-profit organization whose mission is to engage and educate people of all generations in traditional and contemporary maritime life, in a spirit of adventure and discovery. Northwest Maritime Center: 431 Water St, Port Townsend, WA 98368 (360) 385-3628 48° North encourages letters, photographs, manuscripts, burgees, and bribes. Emailed manuscripts and high quality digital images are best, but submissions via mail or delivered in person are still most welcome! We are not responsible for unsolicited materials. Articles express the author’s thoughts and may not reflect the opinions of the magazine. Reprinting in whole or part is expressly forbidden except by permission from the editor.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES One year $25 | Two years $40 (US 3rd Class, not automatically forwarded)

1st Class in US $35 USD Canada Printed Matter $35 USD Over-Seas Foreign Air Mail $65 USD Proud members:

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Wauquiez PS Yachts Linssen Steel Yachts Fairway Yachts 48º NORTH


08 All the Power You Need

Letters

Response to “Freesailing” Editorial in February 2019

Hi Joe, I’m a lifelong passionate dinghy sailor and racer based in the UK, racing in a class called the RS800. My home club is Hayling Island Sailing Club. I basically just wanted to say that I believe you’ve absolutely hit the nail on the head with your excellent and perceptive article and have articulated something I’ve felt for a long time. Whilst I still enjoy competing, I sincerely hope that the sport somehow takes a turn in this direction while I’m still just about young enough to be part of it. As dinghy sailors, we are indoctrinated to believe that racing is the be all and end all and whilst this may have been relevant in the 70s, 80s and 90s I think that approach is outdated and has damaged our sport and led to a decline in participation. I could go on, because I feel so strongly about this, but you have put it perfectly in your article. Incidentally, you can add the RS800 to your list of boats (Moth, 49er etc.) that are simply spectacularly good fun to sail just for kicks – which this picture of me sailing one on Lake Garda illustrates!

Model Shown Beta 38

Engineered to be Serviced Easily!

Yours in sailing, Chris Feibusch

Beta Marine West (Distributor) 400 Harbor Dr, Sausalito, CA 94965 415-332-3507

Pacific Northwest Dealer Network Access Marine Seattle, WA 206-819-2439 info@betamarineengines.com www.betamarineengines.com Sea Marine Port Townsend, WA 360-385-4000 info@betamarinepnw.com www.betamarinepnw.com Deer Harbor Boatworks Deer Harbor, WA 888-792-2382 customersupport@betamarinenw.com www.betamarinenw.com

Hi Joe and 48° North crew,

Emerald Marine Anacortes, WA 360-293-4161 www.emeraldmarine.com

In print and online you’ve spelled boat #15 of the top 25 “Elixer” instead of the correct spelling of “Elixir.” It’s sort of funny because the accompanying photo shows the transom of Elixir with the correct spelling.

Oregon Marine Industries Portland, OR 503-702-0123 omi@integra.net 48º NORTH

Correction to the Top 25

Thanks, Jarred Swalwell Team Elixir 8

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HALF * PRICE for YARD STORAGE

10

Letters Boat Type in Race Results?

Hi there, I’ve been a reader for a long time and I love the magazine. I was wondering if, in your race results, you could put in the type of boat in the race results. It helps people who are reading to better understand them. Just a thought. Take it easy and sail on, Chuck Kinney Thanks for the feedback, Chuck! Anytime a yacht club includes that information in the results (and there's space on the page), so will we.

(*Almost: It ’s 42 percent off normal monthly rate)

48° North Community

Hi Joe, My name is Cailey, and I was looking to join the 2019 Cascadia Cruising Rally . I’ve been racing sailboats for three years now from J-24 sailboats to trimarans. However, I live in Idaho, and I’m not a part of the sailing scene over there. I wanted to ask you if you knew of anyone that was in need of crew for the upcoming rally? Thanks for your time, Cailey Rankin

Storage in the Port of Port townSend’S yard iS on Sale through March to the end of aPril. 35¢/foot/day instead of 60¢!

Joe, Last year’s Cascadia Cruising Rally looked fantastic. My wife and I were talking about how great it looked, but were also concerned that perhaps there wouldn’t be any kids on the rally. So, this year we are going to try to informally pull something similar together for sailors with young families – a tall order! We are planning a 2-3 week Desolation Sound trip from Bellingham this August and I’m interested in best ways to track down other families that might be interested in an informal meet-up. Any suggestions?

(Pre-pay the first month. For vessels 75 tons or less and maximum beam 18 feet.)

the n orthweSt’S

beSt Marine

tradeS are here to helP !

Thanks! Jake Hartsoch Bellingham, WA Thanks Cailey and Jake – since it seems like there’s an increasing need to help connect 48°N readers (and sailors) with one another, we’ve created a 48° North Community Facebook Group. Whether you’re looking for crew or looking to crew, headed off on a sweet trip that others can join, or just have a question, post it in the group: www.facebook.com/groups/417203165724363/

(360) 3856211 6211 •• Portof (360) 385 Por tofPT.com PT.com 48º NORTH

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Calendar

April 2019 5

T Sailing Fast and Voyaging Far in Traditional Proas in the South Pacific, presented by Dr. Mimi George from vaka.org, held at the Puget Sound YC (206) 795-2111 www.nwmultihull.org

6

E 48° North & Fisheries Supplies Swap Meet, 1900 N Northlake Way, Seattle, (206) 632-3555

6

R Carol Pearl Blakely Rock Benefit Regatta hosted by Sloop Tavern Yacht Club, to benefit the Multihull Youth SAIL Foundation (MY SAIL) www.styc.org

6

C About Boating Safely (Bainbridge) Taught by USCG Auxiliary. Get WA State Boaters card. Eagle Harbor Congregational Church. Contact Loretta, (360) 779-1657

R = Race

20

R Pursuit Race presented by Three Tree Point YC, www.ttpyc.org

20

R Rich Passage Ramble #3 contact West Sound Corinthian YC www.scyc.net

20

R COB Challenge presented by Small Yacht Sailing Club of Oregon www.syscosailing.org

20-21 R The Wood Open One Design Race Open to wood sailboats large and small, presented by The Center for Wooden Boats, www.cwb.org

R Poulsbo Invitational Race #4 presented by Port Orchard YC www.poyc.org

6

R Spring Single/Double Handed Race www.cyct.com

6

R Spring Race Series begins, South Sound Sailing Society www.ssssclub.com

6-7

R Portland YC Opening Day Regatta www.portlandyc.com

27-28 E Race & Raft-up At Lemolo, Liberty Bay A meet-up of the Puget Sound Cruising Club, and a tradition with almost 30 years of fun history. The winner is the boat that comes second! www.pugetsoundcruisingclub.org

6-7

R Blackline Patos Island Race (VIRS 1) www.snsyc.ca

27-28 R Kitten Cup Presented by Royal Vancouver YC www.royalvan.com

13

R Vendovi Island Race presented by Bellingham YC www.byc.org

27-28 R East Sound Spring Regatta presented by Orcas Island YC www.oiyc.org

13-14 R Tulip Cup Race Anacortes Yacht Club www.anacortesyachtclub.org

27-28 R Protection Island, Tri Island #1 first in the three-part series www.seattleyachtclub.org

13-14 R Puget Sound Spring Regatta (Small Boats) CYC Seattle www.cycseattle.org

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19-21 R Southern Straits Race (VARC) West Vancouver YC www.wvyc.ca 13-22 C Captain’s License Course in Sequim American Marine Training www.americanmarinetc.com 16

C Gusts and Lulls: Helm and Trim Response Class, at NW Maritime www.nwmaritime.org

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T Sail Like a Girl - R2AK Winners Puget Sound Cruising Club hosts these lively presenters. 7:30 at North Seattle Community College. www.pugetsoundcruisingclub.org

20 E Marine Thift Swap Meet Spring cleaning and bargain hunting at Port Townsend’s Boat Haven. It’s free to sell. www.nwmaritime.org/swap-meet 20

R Spring Regatta presented by Milltown Sailing Association www.milltownsailing.org

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11-12 R Thetis Island Regatta (VIRS 3) Presented by Maple Bay Yacht Club www.mbyc.bc.ca 11-20 C Captain’s License Course in Sequim American Marine Training www.americanmarinetc.com 13-24 C Captain’s License Class, Tacoma Contact Flagship Maritime, www.flagshipmaritimellc.com

19

27

C America’s Boating Course Begins from 6:30-8:30pm each Monday for seven weeks, covering the fundamentals of safe boating. At Everett Community College, but taught by the Everett Sail and Power Squadron, www.everettCC.edu/CCED

11-12 R Vashon Island, Tri Island #2 second in the three-part series www.seattleyachtclub.org

22-3 C Captain’s License Class, Tacoma Contact Flagship Maritime, www.flagshipmaritimellc.com E Royal Victoria YC Opening Day www.rvyc.bc.ca

15

E = Event

18-19 R Round Whidbey Island Race Presented by Oak Harbor Yacht Club www.ohyc.org

27

13-14 R THRASH (VIRS 2) www.rvyc.bc.ca

t = Talks

20-21 R Puget Sound Spring Regatta (Large Boats) presented by CYC Seattle www.cycseattle.org

E 13th Annual Swap Meet and Jamboree By The Sea sponsored by Deception Pass Sail & Power Squadron Swap Meet , call Mark (360) 240-1546; for Jamboree: tedmihok@yahoo.com

6

C = Class

C Weather for Cruisers Class, at NW Maritime, www.nwmaritime.org

25-26 R Swiftsure International Yacht Race presented by Royal Victoria Yacht Club www.rvyc.bc.ca 31-2 R Classic Mariners’ Regatta presented by Port Townsend Sailing Association and NW Maritime Center www.nwmaritime.org 31-2 R Seventy48 Human Powered race from Tacoma to Port Townsend, NW Maritime Center www.nwmaritime.org

June 2019 1

R Blake Island, Tri Island #3 Third in the three-part series www.seattleyachtclub.org

1

R Summer Vashon presented by Tacoma Yacht Club www.tacomayachtclub.org

1-15 R VanIsle360 A 14 day race around Vancouver Island www.vanisle360.com

May 2019 4

E Seattle YC Opening Day www.seattleyachtclub.org

4-5

R Race to the Straits presented by Sloop Tavern Yacht Club www.styc.org

4-5

R Hobie Fleet Race, Cultus Lake, BC www.hobie.org

5

R Mark Meyer Race (free) presented by Seattle Yacht Club www.seattleyachtclub.org

7-28 C Rookie Rally Learn to Race CYC Seattle gives you a fun and educational intro into the world of sailboat racing, www.cycseatte.org 9-12 R Oregon Offshore presented by CYC Portland www.cycportland.org 11

E Seattle YC Foundation Annual Fundraiser Open to the public (with minimum donation). Support an organization committed to ensuring the next generation loves being on the water. 4pm at SYC Elliott Bay Outstation. www.seattleyachtclub.org

R Round Lummi Island Race Presented by Bellhingham Yacht Club www.byc.org

11-12 R Mallory Cup (High School DoubleHanded National Championship) hosted by Sail Sand Point www.sailsandpoint.org

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3

R Race to Alaska Begins Tracker junkies unite for the phenomenon that is this non-motorized race from Port Townsend to Ketchikan, NW Maritime Center www.r2ak.com

3-14 C Captain’s License Class, Tacoma Contact Flagship Maritime, www.flagshipmaritimellc.com 4

E Round Mercer Island Fun Sail a Hobie-affiliated event open to all multihulls www.hobiediv4.org

8

R Leukemia Cup Regatta Hosted by Elliott Bay Marina, this popular event benefits the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. It’s a great sailing event for a fabulous cause. www.leukemiacup.org/wa

15-24 C Captain’s License Course in Sequim American Marine Training www.americanmarinetc.com

August 2019

3-10 E 48° North/Ullman Sails Cascadia Cruising Rally, beginning and ending in Anacortes, headed to the Gulf Islands. www.48north.com/rally APRIL 2019


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low tides >> News and Events

Events It’s Swap Meet Season! The spring sunshine makes any sailor’s stoke meter go through the roof! Yet as the days get longer, how many of us take to the basement, garage, or storage unit and remember that we didn’t make good on our intention to organize and off-load that pile of old boat gear over the winter? Conversely, spring maintenance often sends boat owners into the “if only I had” mindset, trying to figure out how their budget and their gear needs are ever supposed to intersect. What better way to address both problems than with a marine swap meet? Luckily for sailors around the Puget Sound, April affords numerous options. Of course, the grandaddy of ‘em all – 30 years of history and still wearing the belt as the largest on the west coast – is the 48° North / Fisheries Supply Boater’s Swap Meet on Saturday, April 6, 2019, at Fisheries Supply. The stories from this swap meet are kind of legendary. In the early days, the swap meet was scheduled to start at 9am. People started showing up so early that if someone hoping to display their gear showed up at 9am, there was no room. One year, people were setting up in the pre-dawn dark, some were actually shopping with flashlights! When Fisheries Supply owner, Carl Sutter, arrived at his store and discovered the scene, he went inside the store and brought out flood lights from his inventory saying, “If you’re going to be here this early, you might as well be able to see what you’re buying!” It’s still a bargain hunter’s paradise and attendees actually fly in from elsewhere in the country for that rare find. It’s a godsend for anyone looking to make a little dough when they clear out their lazarette, too. Before the days of ubiquitous electronic charts, someone came with an impressive nautical chart collection and left with over $5,000!

48° NORTH/FISHERIES SUPPLY BOATER’S SWAP MEET Saturday April 6, 2019 7:00am - 1:00pm 1900 North Northlake Way, Seattle (206) 632-3555

48º NORTH

The 48° North / Fisheries Supply Swap Meet is far from your only option, however! Taking place on the same day, as a part of their Jamboree by the Sea event in Catalina Park at Oak Harbor Marina, The Deception Pass Sail & Power Squadron hosts a Marine Swap Meet across the street from the Jamboree. Finally, the annual Marine Thrift Swap Meet organized by Marine Thrift and the Northwest Maritime Center will take place on April 20, 2019, in Port Townsend’s Boat Haven. Bring your cash and stock up on used and useful tools, hardware, supplies, and more. Want to sell at the Marine Thrift Swap Meet? Clean out your shop, empty your garage and turn your old stuff into cash. It’s free to sell. Note that at the end of the day, you can donate your unsold items to Marine Thrift and get a taxdeductible receipt! Whether buying or selling, we hope you keep boats sailing and sailors happy by attending one of these great events.

JAMOBOREE BY THE SEA SWAP MEET

MARINE THRIFT SWAP MEET

Saturday April 6, 2019 8:00am - 4:00pm Across the street from Catalina Park (1401 SE Catalina Dr.) in Oak Harbor. (360) 240-1546

Saturday April 20, 2019 8:00am - 2:00pm At Boat Haven in Port Townsend. Visit nwmaritime.org/swap-meet for more information and to register to sell.

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low tides >> News and Events

Events “SAILING FAST AND FAR IN ANCIENT POLYNESIAN PROAS” with Dr. Mimi George from vaka.org NW Multihull Association April 2, 7:30pm

Puget Sound where racers and cruisers can sail together, all for a good cause. This year, the beneficiary is the Multihull Youth SAIL Foundation (MY SAIL), a new organization dedicated to offering a conduit for kids wanting to sail, race, and experience multihull sailing. www.styc.org / www.mysail.org

In the Biz

All Fleet Rendezvous in Poulsbo! Come and join us for a funfilled weekend in Poulsbo. Cocktails and appetizers Friday on the docks. Demonstrations and education events Saturday morning and sailing in the afternoon. And of course, Signature’s famous blueberry pancakes Sunday morning! To register or for more details, (206) 284-9004.

OFFSHORE-FOCUSED SAILING SCHOOL GETS ASA ACCREDITATION Griffin Bay Adventures in Friday Harbor was founded in 2018. It began with when Pacific Northwest native, Captain Rhys Balmer, wished to expand offshore sailing education offerings in the Puget Sound region. Originally from Portland, Balmer was raised afloat and cruised with his family through Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean on their 60’ wooden ketch. Prior to starting Griffon Bay, Balmer honed his craft with two decades of professional experience in sailing education, teaching on the Columbia River for 16 years before working for several ASA schools on the Salish Sea. In recent years, big water called to him, and Balmer began captaining ocean deliveries and even raced to Hawaii on his Moore 24. These experiences led him to recognize the need for offshore training, and fueled a desire to facilitate ocean experiences for other sailors. While this is Griffin Bay’s focus, the new development of ASA accreditation makes internationally recognized certifications available at the school for the first time, to go along with more customized private instruction and paid positions on other ocean adventures like deliveries. www.griffinbayadventures.com

GO SAILING TO GROW YOUTH MULTIHULL SAILING

SAIL IT FORWARD

Dr. George will show video, diagrams, and slides of construction and sailing of the TePuke and TeAlo designs of outrigger voyaging canoes, as well as explanations and demonstrations of the builders and sailors of these vessels. These designs are the ancient heritage of the Polynesian community of Taumako, in the SE Solomon Islands. They are the only Pacific islanders still building, sailing, and navigating using only ancient designs, materials, methods, and tools. The vessels do not require money or high tech equipment to build or maintain, and they out-perform modern vessels in many ways. Dr. George will show the jobs of crew members and the method of shunting (end-to-end tacking). She will also discuss the aerodynamic and hydrodynamic advantages and whether this design can be built using modern materials. Plan on a lively question-and-answer session, too! The presentation will be at Puget Sound Yacht Club on Lake Union, 2321 N. Northlake Way, Seattle. Non-members always welcome. Potluck at 6:30pm, presentation at 7:30. www.pugetsoundcruisingclub.org

SIGNATURE YACHTS ALL FLEET RENDEZVOUS May 31-June 2

Sloop Tavern Yacht Club's Carol Pearly Blakely Rock Benefit Race to benefit MY SAIL April 6 One of the oldest (38+ years) and largest (130 boats, 700 sailors) in the Pacific Northwest is one of the few events on 48º NORTH

The Artful Sailor Whole Earth Nautical Supply in Port Townsend has started a Sail Exchange Program. Used sails received, sold, and traded by donation will benefit educational programs at Northwest Maritime Center. (360) 344-8120 or theartfulsailor@gmail.com 16

APRIL 2019


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Sea to Sky Spotlight

A Different Kind of Sailing School Call it learning to sail and race Pacific Northwest style, with an international nod of approval. Sea to Sky Sailing, located in West Vancouver at the mouth of Howe Sound in British Columbia, has come up with a different kind of sailing school that puts new and experienced sailors in the middle of the action, whether on the race course or exploring a hidden anchorage. Katy Campbell grew up in Vancouver, BC, but she traveled far afield before settling back in the area and starting Sea to Sky Sailing to teach both racing and cruising for beginners through to advanced levels. She may be the epitome of the hands-on sailor, wiping the sealant off her hands to pick up the phone, and having recently finished re-powering her boat herself. Fittingly, for both racing and cruising, she believes immersing

students in the experience is the best way to teach. Several different levels of instruction are offered, but only the beginner levels don’t involve some overnights on the boat. “Plenty of sailing schools teach safety, navigation and all those other vital parts of sailing, which is great. But I realized no curriculum teaches real sail trim for racing.” Her vision was to take students on real races against tough competition and teach in that environment. She takes students as crew on her X372 Paragon for a full range of Northwest events, such as Swiftsure, Southern Straits, and the Van Isle 360. Last year, along with students, she raced the Hotfoot 27 Pau Hana, her “misbehaving little sister” to Paragon, in the R2AK, finishing eighth. Campbell, like many others, sees a major challenge for sailing to retain youth sailors, bridging the gap between dinghy sailors and big-boat sailors. She offers “the biggest possible discounts I can” to youth sailors plus an apprenticeship program. The curriculum also focuses on encouraging small-boat sailors to become big-boat sailors. The Caribbean racing circuit is even on the agenda. She chartered a J/120 for the recent Heineken Regatta, and had a couple of novice students on the crew in addition to experienced racers. Next winter she’ll be offering spots on board for Grenada Sailing Week, Caribbean 600, St. Maarten Heineken Regatta and Les Voiles de St. Barth’s, along with some cruising in between. But the biggest news for Sea to Sky Sailing was announced in mid-March. Sea to Sky is now a Royal Yachting Association (UK) recognized training center. This “gold standard” of international certification helps graduates of the advanced Yachtmaster program qualify for jobs in the sailing industry in the Caribbean and elsewhere. “We’re now the only RYA Center on the west coast of North America and I’m really excited to open the door for others to set sail internationally from right here at home,” Campbell explains. In an age where the emphasis seems to be on pushing as many sailors as possible through a basic program for a few hours each week, Sea To Sky seems intent on appealing to a different kind of emerging sailor, the kind who likes to immerse themselves in the sport and come out a full-fledged sailor.

This “gold standard” of international certification will help graduates of the advanced Yachtmaster program qualify for jobs in the sailing industry in the Caribbean and elsewhere. 48º NORTH

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Book Reviews

BLUE WATER WOMEN

SPYHOP

By Gina De Vere, $16.99

By Ayla Joy Love, $9.99

“We are not ‘super women’, not particularly strong or especially brave women, simply all types of women, and we rise to the occasion.” With little sailing experience and in her late 50s, Gina de Vere left her comfortable home with her second husband, a passionate sailor. Needless to say, her life turned upside down. She experiences medical emergencies, foreboding weather, and a new relationship that’s thrown into the spotlight in the most crammed conditions, but the joys of sailing and the freedom of life at sea far outweigh these struggles. Fifteen years on, she’s still a full-time cruiser. On her adventures, she has met countless other inspirational and courageous Blue Water Women, 40 of whom she has interviewed for this book. Practical sailing tips and trustworthy advice are interwoven with the inspirational real-life stories of these sailor women from around the globe, from novices to professionals. Through their shared experiences and De Vere’s frank advice, this book provides an entertaining yet pragmatic look at how to live your best life on the open water.

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Did you know Southern Resident Killer Whales are the only unique species of orca on the Endangered Species list? Find out more about what makes these whales that live only in the Pacific Northwest so special. For children and the young-at-heart, Spyhop contains whimsical illustrations that bring to life the educational aspects of a very simple storyline. The words have rhythm and rhyme which makes it very fun and easy to read. You will learn what makes the orcas just like you and me and how you can tell who is who based on observing certain details of each whale in the wild. “Orcas love their family, just like you and me... They’re not all the same, they each have a name.” The book explains how the saddle patch located below the dorsal fin is used for identification with a corresponding picture that illustrates it in a kid-friendly way. There is also a short glossary at the back that defines in adult terms the key words used in the book. It’s a great read for everyone who loves colorful art, short educational stories, and the Pacific Northwest.

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New Products

LEARN TO SAIL BY THE TIPS OF YOUR FINGERS

A

bout four months ago the American Sailing Association released its Sailing Challenge app. This app is supposed to be a tool for helping students with their “ASA 101 Certification,” but is applicable to anybody learning sailing.

The points of sail resource in Sailing Challenge. The app covers the basics with points of sail, apparent wind, trimming, tacking and jibing, right of way, docking, and just plain sailing – and can even take you on a fun digital cruise in the British Virgin Islands. The cost is $4. As with any app, half the battle is getting accustomed to the digital controls. Much like a radio-controlled boat, there are basically two “channels” – the user controls the helm and trim (for both sails simultaneously). Once that touch is mastered, then one can focus on learning things like tacking and docking. Be prepared for some humbling moments as you get used to the app. There are other learn-to-sail apps. The $5 Top Sailor app adds the element of tilting the phone to steer. There’s a motoring 48º NORTH

The gameplay view of the Sailaway app.

course, raising sails function, and sail trim. One of the panels in the program explains how sails work. One of the courses Top Sailor includes places a centerboard boat into the Roaring 40s. It’s not clear why you’re sailing an open boat out there, but it’s complete with scared crew sound effects. Luckily you’re not allowed to capsize. Sailaway is another app, available as a desktop program for PC or Mac for around $40. Sailaway places you on a boat type of your choice (ranging from cruising catamaran to Mini Transat) into the ocean of your choice. Utilizing real time weather data and a “persistent online world,” you can spend weeks crossing oceans. You can check in any time or get email updates. You can also plan shorter voyages! As a game, you can compete against your friends. Perhaps the best digital sailing adventure comes along with the round-the-world races on your desktop machine. The Volvo Ocean Race (Now The Ocean Race), the Vendee Globe, and Clipper Round the World Race have implemented games akin to Sailaway. You choose the sails, course, and trim and monitor all as closely as you want to. It may be the most engaging video game for racers. Up to 144,000 players were playing the online game for a single leg. Some people set alarms to wake them up several times at night to check sail trim. For learning to sail, or learning how to handle the Roaring 40s, the cheapest and easiest means can be right on your phone or laptop. It may not compare to real-life sailing, but these days digital instruction (or just gaming) is certainly an option when no water’s available. 20

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Crossword and Trivia 2

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Sea horses, like flounder, octopus and squid, can change colors to match their surroundings.

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Sea mice are not rodents but are segmented marine worms. They’re called mice because they resemble them when washed ashore.

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Some sea hares can emit a cloud of dark purple ink when disturbed.

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DID YOU KNOW? by Bryan Henry

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Schools of migrating mullet form chains that stretch for more than 60 miles.

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About half of all fish species spend part of their lives schooling, and a quarter school throughout life.

The man-of-war fish, which is a juvenile jack, lives among the deadly tentacles of the Portuguese man-of-war.

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Among ancient sealife was the sabertoothed herring (Enchodus petrosus).

ACROSS

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Long, breaking ocean wave

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Emergency cry at sea, 2 words

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“___ Wiedersehen”

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Cry for help

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The elder

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Green sea color sometimes

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Spike of corn

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Blew violently, like some winds

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“___ girl!”

Instrument showing the direction of the ship

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Crew tool

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Master-at-arms, for short

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Document listing all passengers and cargo aboard the ship

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Icy sea danger

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Short cord for operating a whistle or a bell

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Ancient oared warship

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Sail supports

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Main horizontal timber in the rigging of square rigged ships

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Warships that act as escorts

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Able bodied seamen, for short

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Vast deep

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Arrival times, abbr.

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A sea cucumber resembles a cucumber but is a sea animal related to sea urchins and starfish. The Chinese eat it dried and call it trepang, and like so many other of their delicacies, they consider it an aphrodisiac, which is a myth. Sea anemones are used in stews in France.

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Naval rank, for short

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Cashew, e.g.

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Nautical spars

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Brit, sailor, in slang

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German for the

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Noise of heavy waves on the shore

Sardines aren’t a species of fish. They become sardines only after they are smoked, dried, or canned. Small fry of pilchards, herrings, and sprats are the most common fishes fated to become sardines. The Atlantic salmon is actually a member of the genus Salmo, or trout clan, not a salmon, which belongs to the genus Oncorhynchus.

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More than 50 percent of all fishery products consumed in the United States come from the Bering Sea.

Towards the stern

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What @ means

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Fall back

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Thanks, for short

Fish and seafood account for about 16 percent of the animal protein consumed by the world’s population. 22

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Artist View

“How can I miss you if you don’t go away?” – or so the song goes. And for the Pacific loons in the Salish Sea, this is the time of year they actually do go away, far away to the Arctic to nest and make families. In the summer, Pacific loons are anything but pacific, staying on deep lakes in the tundra and forests far away from the ocean. Once their young are raised and self-reliant, these birds head for the Pacific coast to spend the winter. We are part of the Pacific Coast and get our share of them here; and throughout the cold months, you can see these birds diving for a meal in deep water bays. You can easily spot them as they have the habit of dipping their head underwater repeatedly checking for the flash of a fish, before diving quickly to chase it. Winter plumage for Pacific loons (also known as Pacific divers) is drab brownish gray, but before migration north in

Sketches and story by Larry Eifert

early spring, these birds take on a very elegant set of feathers. I couldn’t help myself, I just wanted to paint them that way instead of what we’ve seen for the past few months. If you know what the larger common loon looks like, you can see a family similarity. In my mind, these birds are very definition of elegance and sophistication, but smaller sleeker versions of the common loon. Pacific loons may mate for life, and you’ll often see them in pairs, like long-distance travelers sharing their lives together. Look for these birds as you sail across current rips and eddies where they spend much of their time looking to catch disoriented forage fish. Notice their head shape. Their colors may be changing at this time of year, but the profile of a Pacific loon is unmistakable.

Larry Eifert paints and writes about the Pacific Northwest from Port Townsend. His large-scale murals can be seen in many national parks across America, and at larryeifert.com. APRIL

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PNW Cruisers Abroad

Matt Steverson and Janni Petersen Report in from Tahiti 48° North: What kind of sailing backgrounds did each of you have before the trip? I’ve been sailing since college, going on 15 years now. I did a ton of racing in the Puget Sound and managed to get myself on board a few boats going down the west coast as well as across the Pacific, so I had more than 10,000 ocean miles going into our cruise. Janni (pronounced Yanni) got into sailing when she started hanging out with me about five years ago, mostly sailing my little i550 Honey. We bought our boat together about a year before we left and lived on it full time, so she was very comfortable with the boat going into the cruise.

by Kurt Hoehne

only needed one, so we hustled hard for a year to get her ready, save money, then we left. How’d you choose/come by the boat? What is it? It’s a long story. We bought Louise from Lou and Al Hughes, who built her in their backyard in Magnolia 40 years ago. We LOVE her. I would not say that we chose Louise, she just fell into our lap, kind of like a stray cat will find you to take care of her. She is a 40’ sloop, with a 3/4 length keel, a doghouse, a tiller, and a ton of character. She’s fast, sturdy, easy to sail, and has an elegant and clean interior. It was so early in the planning stages that we didn’t have a lot of criteria, but when we stepped on board, we both knew it was the boat for us.

How long were you busy planning this trip? When we decided to do the trip, we made a five-year plan to find a boat, fix it up, make some money, and leave. Luckily, we quickly found a great deal on a really wonderful boat. One evening over happy hour in Seattle, Janni said, “Why don’t we leave in a year?” The boat needed a lot of updates, but we realized that we didn’t need the extra four years to be ready. We 48º NORTH

What has the trip been like so far (timing, landfalls, etc.) Where are you now? We turned left out of the Strait in early September 2017. We sailed straight to the Bay Area with our good friend Somerset Fetter as crew. We got married at San Francisco City Hall on September 21. From there, we took our time exploring central 24

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and southern California including the Channel Islands. In midNovember, we entered Mexico and took nearly a month cruising the west coast of Baja. By mid-December, we were in La Paz and spent the rest of the winter exploring the Sea of Cortez, getting as far north as Mulege. We stayed on the west side of the Sea and made our way back to La Paz by mid-March. The next few weeks were spent preparing the boat for the long haul to French Polynesia. My mom joined us in April for the crossing and I believe we left for Nuku Hiva in the Marquesas on April 12. We crossed in 19 days, which was fast, but not an easy or fun crossing. We just got unlucky with the conditions I think. Then we spent a month in the Marquesas, a month in the Tuamotus, and the next five months in the Societies – mostly the Leeward Islands. We decided to leave our boat anchored in Pt. Phaeton in Tahiti and fly home for three months to work and reconnect with family and friends. And now we’ve just arrived back to Tahiti. What have been you biggest challenges? One challenge for me is that I have always been a worrier. I’m constantly worried about something that could go wrong with the boat. No matter how much time I’ve spent tinkering with systems and hardware, I’ll always be nagged that something I’m not thinking of could go wrong. I would say that it is a good kind of stress, but it is a stress nonetheless. I do my best to get over it, but it has been a challenge. We are both introverted homebodies, but we love to travel, so this lifestyle is the best of both worlds. We left wonderful friends and family back on the West Coast and we were optimistic that we would make lifelong friendships during this journey. We'd read that it was impossible not to make many friends! Yet, what we’ve found is that, yes we make friends here

and there, but they’re fleeting. Our schedule is different than most cruisers so we don’t have a lot of opportunities to really get to know people. We’ve come to understand the cruising culture is changing; boats are more self-sufficient than ever, which means folks aren’t relying on the anchorage as much for help. Neither Janni nor I are much into following the crowd, but I guess we hoped for more sense of community. I need to say that this is mostly our own experience, we don’t know how every cruiser out there feels about this. Biggest surprises? We knew that quitting our jobs and gallivanting for a couple of years in the South Pacific was a risk to our careers. This trip has shown us that our future is our own. We can continue this lifestyle, and mold our careers to fit the lifestyle. This cruise is just the first of many that we plan on doing, and we do not feel like we are putting our careers on hold to do it. Also, in La Paz, we found a flame point Siamese kitten who we aptly named.....La Pawz. She’s become quite the able bodied sea kitten. Are you working as you go? Got jobs to come back to? Janni has been working for the past ten months as an earth science curriculum writer. I worked for myself doing boat maintenance and deliveries before we left, and I’ve continued to pick up gigs here and there. I’ll jump back into the boat world when I return. Janni will probably work for herself as well. We think it is the best way to continue this lifestyle. Where are you going next? Long term? Next we’ll head northeast through the Tuamotus and maybe back to the Marquesas. In May, we’ll sail to Hawaii and spend a

Louise anchored in Gabriella Bay, Isla Espiritu Santo, Sea of Cortez, Mexico. Photo by Wesley Daughenbaugh.

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PNW Cruisers Abroad

Continued

month or two. We’d like to be in BC by August, and then spend the next few months making our way back to Washington. But who really knows, our plans may change.

Follow Matt and Janni's adventures on instagram at peversens_putz_around_pacific and at their blog peversonsputzaroundpacific.wordpress.com

Come across any other PNWers out there? Tons. It’s a well represented area. Right now in fact we’re anchored with a couple salty cruisers: Dan and Kathy from Portland, on their 60-something foot ferro-cement ship Lungta (built in Everett). They are in their eighth year of cruising. Also nearby are Pajo and Ava from Seattle of Sailing Cinderella fame. Pajo and Ava actually left from Seattle the same day that we did back in 2017, but they’ve done the entire trip with no engine! Also, I’m really excited to see Halcyon (John and Becca Guillote) soon, as they are just now leaving Panama to make their way here. And Dogbark! (the Esarey family) is leaving Hawaii heading for the Marquesas. Dogbark! was Al Hughes’ Open 60 that he singlehanded to Hawaii a few times. I’ve sailed a ton with Graeme Esarey, John, and Becca aboard Graeme’s previous boat Kotuku, so it will be quite the reunion for us sailors. It also seems fitting that two boats that formerly belonged to Al Hughes, who has been an offshore sailing mentor to us all, will meet-up on the far side of the Pacific.

The placid tropical anchorage of Fare, Huahine, Leeward Islands of Society Islands, French Polynesia.

& oll rega k&r tt c o Friday, June 28th

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Halcyon Wandering

LEARNING EVERY DAY

by Becca Guillote

48° North readers know Becca and John Guillote as young international cruisers who sailed away from Seattle on their Valiant 40, “Halcyon,” in August of 2016. You might think that sailors immersed in a full-time cruising lifestyle have learned all there is to know about sailing; but this month, Becca reminds us that a sailor’s education is never finished. I am asked that question on a regular basis, often by people intrigued by our lifestyle but with no sailing experience of their own. The truthful answer is, “every day.” I am still learning to sail every day. But that is a somewhat unsatisfying answer, so instead I tell them the story of that time I volunteered to race on a Moore 24 in the Puget Sound, with a few dozen days on a Caribbean charter boat as previous sailing experience. Racing is a wonderful introduction to sailing. In contrast to local weekend cruises, the race fleet puts the sails up in

“When did you learn to sail?”

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almost any weather condition, from barely perceptible wisps of breeze to cold and wet gales. The goal, no matter the weather condition, is speed (and safety of course) but not comfort. Racing demonstrates where the edges are and what happens when they are ignored. How far into a beam reach can we carry this spinnaker? How hard does the wind need to blow before a smaller jib is a faster sail? How much patience can we muster to drift down to West Point in 3 knots of northerly before it’s time to head to the bar? Racing teaches a lot about the act of sailing, but very little about anchoring, installing inverters, choosing weather windows or fixing the head. For these invaluable life skills, we enrolled in the school of boat ownership (it’s amazing they 28

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“When we host other cruisers on “Halcyon,” sometimes I teasingly ban “boat talk” for the evening, and compel the group to find other foundations of connection. But those boat talk nights are immensely valuable for our continued learning.” let us in, really). It was completely overwhelming. We were confident in our ability to sail the boat, but all the rest of it – the maintenance, the decisions, the costs, the troubleshooting – was like a whole new language. So, we started at the beginning. We took everything out of every cabinet and painted the insides white. This eased us into boat work and gave us a glimpse of the boat’s innards, how the wires were run, how the stanchions were mounted and where the leaks were. Soon, we were upgrading our battery bank, modifying the salon table, and re-bedding portlights. After several years in the Pacific Northwest learning how the boat works, we left to cruise south, which introduced a whole new curriculum. We had to learn how to say “can you rebuild my injectors without breaking them?” in Spanish, where to source zincs in coastal Nicaraguan towns, and how to balance the frustration of boat work in foreign countries with the enjoyment of exploring new places and the slower pace of life. It is definitely an ongoing education. Our teachers come in all kinds of shapes and sizes – from Nigel Calder’s esteemed written words and hundreds of hours spent in the depths of the Cruiser’s Forum (www.cruisersforum.com), to simply taking it apart and screwing it up once or twice. The most valuable teacher, the one that is most experienced, provided you’ve got the patience to soak up the knowledge, is the hive mind of the cruising community. Every cruiser we meet has different experiences, skills, and information tucked away somewhere. With a bit of time, the right questions, and generally a few libations, we could learn just about anything from fellow cruisers. In the marina recently, on a dock full of boats preparing to cross the Pacific, questions about digital charts, weather downloads, and tracking software swirled around. It seemed to be on everyone’s mind, so we formalized the knowledge gathering. One afternoon, seven boats’ worth of cruisers assembled on the back deck of the catamaran with notebooks and iPads to hash out the pros and cons of different weather and charting apps (PredictWind, iNavX, iSailor, openCPN, qtVLM, Navionics, Weather4D…). Adding personal experience to all those acronyms was infinitely more valuable and efficient than the rabbit hole of internet research we’d been down. A few days ago, I was walking to town with Josh, a fellow cruiser, to augment our dwindling vegetable supply at the island’s one small store, and our conversation turned to propane use. I’ve been struggling to find the correct propane adapters to replace the aging hose that connects our tanks to our regulator. We recently added a local Panamanian propane tank to the system, which requires a different style fitting, of course. Without the ability to walk into a marine store with the APRIL

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hose in hand, it had become frustratingly difficult to determine what style and size I needed to buy. Josh recently purchased some new adapters from the states and offered to lend them to me for comparison. I took him up on the offer. They weren’t exactly right, but they were still in packaging with – and this is the most useful detail – labels. For the first time, I learned the names of the fittings I needed. Our old tanks wanted ACME adapters while our new Panamanian tank required POL. That little bit of new information launched me on the Great Internet Search of Tuesday. Soon, I understood that the numbers associated with brass propane fittings are completely irrelevant to the size of the actual fittings (a ¼” male NPT fitting actually measures close to ½” in outside diameter, of course). Once I figured out what they were called and which size I was actually looking for, it was simply a matter of finding the right bits on Amazon. A months-long search had come to an end! While I was knee-deep in male inverted flare fitting sizes, John was once again attempting to wrap his mind around our bonding system, trying to understand why we seem to lose zincs faster than the boats around us. That night, we enjoyed sundowners with a handful of cruiser friends, one of whom was a metallurgist before he was a cruiser. John mentioned his struggle with whether we should bond everything metal on Halcyon or keep it all isolated. He brought those struggles to the right person. Neil had our full and complete attention as he launched into the theory of bonding and how electrolysis works. Two hours and a few beers later, he had laid out a clear and logical case for keeping all metal isolated and unbonded (except those connected to a battery). We know better than to take Neil’s opinion and knowledge as the only truth; but his description made sense and his experience in the industry added authority to his explanation. That entire evening was dominated by talk of galvanic corrosion and electrical charges and the potential of metals. It is tiresome at times to talk of nothing but boat problems and projects on the list. When we host other cruisers on Halcyon, sometimes I teasingly ban “boat talk” for the evening, and compel the group to find other foundations of connection. But those boat talk nights are immensely valuable for our continued learning. It is during those afternoon gatherings full of acronyms and midday strolls discussing propane fittings and sipping beer while bonding over the bonding system that we learn the most. When did you learn to sail? I learn every day. Becca and John Guillote are somewhere in the middle of their Pacific crossing – check the tracker at www.halcyonwandering.com to see exactly where! Send “Halcyon” and her crew good vibes for safe passage. 29

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April Galley Essentials

A refreshing salad with grilled pineapples from Mo'orea.

by Amanda Swan Neal

Pineapple Delights and Island Highlights

W

hen our new expedition crew arrived at the marina in Tahiti, it was all-hands-on-deck to help with fueling before we set sail to the island of Mo’orea. Set sail... yes! Anticipating strong trade winds upon exiting Taapuana Pass, we hoisted the main and stationed lookouts for surfers paddling out to the impressive surf break. Sadly, only a light wind graced our sails for the 25-mile crossing, but the crew still got to find their sea legs as they stowed their kit. We chose the idyllic outer reef anchorage of Cooks Bay and with only one foot of crystal water below the keel, we had a magical swim with the hovering stingrays who agitated the sand in search of food. The next morning after completing the safety orientation, we re-anchored at the head of the bay to drop off our crew and load up with provisions. Mo’orea is shaped like a “W” with the iconic Mt. Rotui separating Cook and Opunohu Bays. We’d given our crew the challenge of hiking up the steep valley to Belvedere lookout for a spectacular overlook that was the setting for the 48º NORTH

film The Bounty. En route, they wound their way up through lush tropical plantations and stopped to visit Titiroa Marae – a sacred temple and village site dating back to the 13th century. Ahu O Mahine’s, the great chief of Mo’orea is honored with a stone platform and standing stones which were built in the 18th century. When Captain Cook was in Tahiti on his second voyage, he documented more than 200 double war canoes preparing "Mahina Tiare's" pineapple-loving expedition crew in Opunoho Bay.

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“Pineapples gradually became a symbol of wealth, demand for this exotic fruit was so great that they could be rented from confectioners!” to attack Mo’orea. In 1777, during his third voyage, he visited Opunohu Bay where, upon meeting the great chief warrior Mahine, it was evident that the chief had defended his island. On their descent to Opunohu Bay where Mahina Tiare was now anchored, our crew stopped for refreshments at the nearby hillside agricultural high school, Lycee Aricole, and came away loaded with fresh pineapple jam. Meanwhile, John and I had sailed Mahina Tiare around Mt. Rotui and her surrounding reef to our crew rendezvous after purchasing fresh baguettes and three bundles of pineapples. To aid my pineapple stowage and avoid an ant infestation, I remove their crowns with a sharp knife. Once they’re picked, they’ll not ripen further so to tell if a pineapple is ripe, I sniff the base looking for a sweet smell. As pineapples are not grown on any other island we would visit until we got to Fiji, these pineapples would become daily treats. In order to take advantage of a favorable weather forecast, we decided to depart Mo’orea for Huahine at sunset; this would allow for a prudent daylight arrival. For some of our crew, it was their first overnight passage, so we were thankful for light-tomoderate winds, a bright moon, and piña colada pancakes at landfall. Navigating Huahine’s Passe Avapehi with whale songs reverberating through the hull added a sense of awe for all of us! Their songs could still be heard as we anchored in the spectacular Baie d’Avea ready for sunset coolers, grilled shrimp, and grilled pineapple salad. Now, how should we utilize our remaining pineapples….perhaps a chili? I’m rather sentimental about pineapples. When I raced across the Atlantic in the Route of Discovery, I learned that in 1493, Christopher Columbus’s crew encountered harvested pineapples at a deserted Guadeloupe Carib village. He named them Piña de Indes. After bringing some to Spain, pineapples gradually became a symbol of wealth. Aristocrats in Europe would go to great lengths to cultivate them in hot houses and a hostess was the talk of the town if a pineapple was her centerpiece at dinner. The demand for this exotic fruit was so great that they could be rented from confectioners! On returning home from the Caribbean, sea captains would announce an open house by placing a pineapple on the gate post. EASY PINEAPPLE JAM 1 medium pineapple – diced 1 tablespoon pectin or tapioca starch 1 tablespoon chia seeds ¼ teaspoon pure stevia extract powder – optional

In a blender puree pineapple with pectin. Place mix in a saucepan and cook over medium heat, stirring continuously, 10 minutes, to let water evaporate. Add chia seeds. Place in glass jars and store in the refrigerator up to 10 days. PINA COLADA PANCAKES 2½ cups skim milk 1½ cups pureed fresh pineapple ½ cup coconut milk 4 eggs 1/3 cup sugar 1½ teaspoons salt 4 teaspoons baking powder 1½ teaspoons baking soda 4 cups wheat flour 1¾ cups oat flour In a large bowl combine first 8 ingredients. Add flour, one cup at a time, until batter is smooth. Makes 25 pancakes. GRILLLED PINEAPPLE SALAD 2 bunches of spinach or watercress 1 pineapple – sliced 1 tablespoon sugar 3 garlic cloves – finely chopped ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice or cider vinegar 1/8 teaspoon ground cumin 1 teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 2 medium avocados – sliced 1 cup pomegranate arils 1 red onion – sliced Place pineapple slices on a baking pan and sprinkle with sugar. Broil each side 7 minutes, until golden brown. Cool, then cut into small triangles. In a small bowl whisk together garlic, oil, vinegar or juice, cumin, salt, and pepper. Toss salad greens with dressing and garnish with remaining ingredients. PINEAPPLE PORK CHILI 1 lb ground pork, beef or turkey *for vegetarian chili substitute 1 cup of corn 2 cups pineapple salsa 1 15oz can red kidney beans 1 14oz can fire roasted tomatoes 1 8oz can tomato sauce 1 tablespoon chili powder pineapple chunks fresh cilantro *tortilla chips or corn bread In 3-quart saucepan brown meat. Stir in salsa, beans, tomatoes, sauce, and chili. Bring to a boil then simmer 10 minutes. Serve garnished with pineapple and cilantro with chips on the side. Serves 4.

This month, Amanda co-presents Mahina’s Offshore Cruising Seminar at the Pacific Boat Show in Richmond, CA, on April 6th along with five free one-hour seminars. Details on www.mahina.com. APRIL

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RUN A MESSENGER LINE by Alex and Jack Wilken

hen running wires, hoses, halyards, or anything else that needs to be pulled through a mast or hard-toreach area, having a messenger line to help pull it through can make all the difference. Beyond remembering to run one, there are several considerations for running and utilizing messenger lines that can save you time and frustration on a variety of projects. First and foremost, the messenger line needs to be both strong enough not to break under tension and small enough to be pulled through narrow areas, ports, or over sheaves. It also should be at least twice as long as the space it runs through so you can pull though something without losing the messenger. Most of the time we use 1/8 inch line, or even ¼ inch if the space allows. In particularly tight spaces, whipping twine can be used. Sometimes there is no room to leave a messenger line in place (such as a particularly tight wire chaseway) or it would interfere with other systems if left (like with a halyard). In these cases, the old wire or halyard must become the messenger and the challenge becomes how to connect the old and the new in a strong, space efficient manner. Running a messenger where there is not already a line or wire in place is the most challenging, but often it is the only option. To run one, you need to be able to feed it through and reach each end after it is run. This is easier said than done, and can be aided in some cases by running a snake, by pushing with something stiff, or using a hook to snag a dangling line – a messenger’s messenger if you will. In certain

For the DIY Sailor DON’T SHOOT THE MESSENGER, RUN IT! 48º NORTH

cases, you have to disassemble parts of the boat or even cut accesses into an inaccessible area that is proving impassible. What you use to run the messenger is important and what will work best will depend on where it is being run. If you are running a messenger in a mast while it is up, which is ever so much fun, the only way to have a chance of doing so is to put it in from the top and let gravity carry it down. This could be done with the actual messenger line with a small weight attached to the end (Figure 1). Since space is at a premium, a series of small nuts tied in a sequence rather than in a bundle may be a good option. If the mast is down (Figure 2), you are no longer hanging atop the mast and the bottom of the mast is now accessible, but gravity is no longer helping you. So, you will need something stiffer, like a steel fish (Figure 2). This may be too flexible in some situations, in which case you may need to resort to a rod or dowel of some kind. Pushing or feeding a messenger through can be tricky, since there is a tendency to get caught on things. The nature of the messenger’s messenger can be used to help get around barriers. A steel fish will tend to have a bend to it so that, by keeping the bend in the right direction, you can direct the tip away from something or towards an opening. When setting up the messenger’s messenger, keep in mind how you are going to grab it at the other end and that it will fit through the opening. When dropping a messenger through, such as from atop a

FIGURE 1: (A) You don’t need much weight to get a messenger line (B) to fall into a space. Smaller is better, and having a hole in a nut or washer makes it easier to tie onto and hook at the other end to retrieve it. FIGURE 2: (A) Steel fish is stiff enough to go up the mast irrespective of gravity. (B) Messenger line tied to a reeving eye on existing halyard. (C) Access is better with the mast down.

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mast, you may need to direct it to one side or the other – twisted halyards inside the mast create tons of friction, not to mention chafe on the lines themselves. If you are working through a small opening, you can try to deflect the line to one side with something long and thin like a screwdriver. You can also make a tool to better hold the line so it is able slide deflecting to one side. If you can tilt what you are dropping it through, like leaning the boat to one side so the messenger swings down a particular side of the mast, that can help direct the messenger to the desired side. The goal is to get hold of the messenger at the other end. That can present its own challenge, particularly if all you have to work through is a small opening like a halyard exit. A brass rod with a hook bent into the end can make grabbing it much easier. Occasionally, needle nose pliers come in handy too. It is far easier to use a wire, halyard, or hose that’s already in place than it is to try messenger’s messenger. Attaching it securely in such a way that you can safely pull the messenger through is essential. We have had the connection break while pulling it through, and we can tell you – you don’t want that. Depending on what you are connecting, there are various ways that balance a secure connection with one that is lowprofile for the pass-through. Similar techniques can work for the messenger’s messenger, connecting an existing halyard or wire with its replacement, or affixing an actual messenger to something that’s already in place. If the messenger’s messenger is a wire, you can crimp an eye onto it and tie the messenger line through it. When you need to pull the new wire with the old wire, crimp the two wires together with butt-connectors (Figure 3). When using the old halyard to run the new halyard, butt the two halyard ends against each other and secure them together with seizing wire (make sure it is seizing wire and not solder as it will break – as we can attest to!). Then, wrap with vinyl tape to keep the ends in line and keep the wire from catching (Figure 4). You could also stitch the lines together with whipping twine. Double it back several times to make sure it is strong enough. Whatever your connecting material, pull the two parts apart hard to test the strength of the connection.

If you want to pull down the halyard temporarily, such as over the winter or to measure it, you can tie a messenger line to a reeving eye with a bowline (Figure 2) and leave the messenger in its place for a period of time. Reeving eyes are a good way to finish the end on a halyard. Check online for instructions on how to splice it on. For a quick, easy pull, you can overlap the two pieces and wrap them with vinyl tape. This method should only be used when there is plenty of room and you do not have to pull very hard. Once you have the two ends secured, you can start pulling them through carefully. This is almost always at least a twoperson job, as one needs to feed in as the other pulls from the opposite end. Good communication is essential; and, as both people will have their hands full, hands-free Bluetooth sets can be invaluable. Every corner in a run adds friction, so for long, complicated runs it may be better to do it in stages between short points. For very tight fits you can even resort to lubricant (synthetic grease is best, but soap may suffice if you have nothing else). Lubricants will only reduce friction. If the fit is too tight, you may need to change your attachment method. Also, keep the part you are pulling on and your hands clean so you don’t lose your grip. Once the messenger is run, you want to secure it at the two ends with the extra line. It should be able to be pulled back and forth and neatly tied away. You should also label the messenger in case you need a reminder of what it is; or, in case you are not the next person to need to pull something through that space. Thinking ahead can make your life easier. There is a tendency to think that this is the last time you or someone else will have to do this. But the lives of boats are long, and especially with ever-improving electronics, the need to run more and more wires can be greatly facilitated by a good messenger line.

Alex and Jack Wilken are professional shipwrights, lifelong cruisers, USCG licensed captains, and are the owners of Seattle Boat Works.

FIGURE 3: (A) Butt-connectors to attach the old wire to the new wire to pull it through. (B) New wire being pulled through. (C) Old wire to pull the new wire. (D) Old wire acting as a messenger’s messenger to pull the messenger, using only one ring connector in this case to keep it from getting stuck. (E) Messenger line tied onto the ring connector with a bowline. For both methods you can use vinyl and/or rescue tape to keep it together and/or prevent it from getting caught. APRIL

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FIGURE 4: (A) New halyard to be pulled up the mast. (B) Old halyard being used as a messenger. (C) Seizing wire pushed through both old and new halyards to keep them together while you pull them through. The same technique can be used for hoses or other things. (D) Vinyl tape to keep everything together as you pull it through. (E) Needle to stitch whipping twine through instead of sizing wire. (D) Whipping twine takes up less room then the seizing wire and is more flexible, just make sure you double it back and forth several times to make it strong enough. Test all connections by pulling on them before trying to pull them through the mast or any other space.

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Lessons Learned Cruising

THE MILEAGE MYTH

by Jamie and Behan Gifford

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common benchmark of cruising expertise is the number of miles a sailor has traveled at sea. Online forums are rife with answers to newbie questions, qualifying their response with, “I’ve done 100,000 miles, so blah blah.” Big mileage implies expertise. Who dares challenge the big dog? Perhaps only someone boasting, “I’ve got 200,000 miles” making the 100k-big-dog look like a Chihuahua! But it’s a myth: The Mileage Myth. Distance sailed is a measure of enjoyment or fortitude, not a certification of expertise in the myriad skills that make up cruising. It doesn’t take big miles to build strong cruising skills. Below are some skills and ways to build them before you’ve gone the distance, and for some, before you even have the boat. But first, two important methods to consider in your approach to learning. Technique before gear: It’s bad enough that sailors argue over the best anchor and joke when technique never enters the debate. If you were a guest on a boat anchored during a squally night, would you sleep better knowing the owners were new to boating but had the ‘best”’ anchor; or that the owner’s old anchor kept them secure hundreds of times without fail? Gear are tools, limited by the skills with which we use them. Debrief often: Racing sailors get judged on their skill with the posting of race results. Crews then relive the mark rounding

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or gybe or tactical mistakes that cost them. Self-evaluation is a very effective method to improve skills. Cruising sailors don’t experience comparative judgment, such as race results. We’re self-graded on a pass/fail basis – “Yay, we made it again so we must be great sailors!” Whether an experience goes perfectly or not, talk through it after the fact to learn from mistakes and credit yourself when it goes well. Now, on to skills building in 1,000 miles or less. SAILING Sailing skills are fundamental when cruising, and surprisingly, not easily developed when cruising unless they’re strong when you start. So, how do you build sailing skills before cruising? There is no better way than by racing sailboats. You may view cruising as a leisurely endeavor, not a sporty one, but you’ll probably tack more in one race than many cruisers do in one year! Interested to try but don’t have experience? No problem. In casual racing, there is always a call for reliable crewmembers. If you’ve tried racing and found too much intensity, find a different boat. Some crews are out to win, others to have fun – match your interests. The goals are: • Learn onboard mechanics of sailing: setting sails, tacking, gybing, sail trim, steering, etc. • Learn awareness of what’s happening off the boat and how 34

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it affects you: wind, waves, other boaters, navigational hazards, etc. • Have fun! You may never be a skilled racer, but you will be a better sailor. Start with the Seattle Area Racing Calendar (SARC) or 48° North race calendar for a list of races and host organizations. Reach out for help finding a boat to crew on. By the end of a season, you’ll know all about why a gybe-set is best left to racing, and how understanding VMG can make cruising passages shorter and more comfortable. MARINE WEATHER Of all cruising skills, this one is the least appreciated until leaving the anchorage on a day best observed from the sidelines. La Cruz, Mexico – where we are moored with Totem at the moment – typically has dry, stable weather this time of year. When a large, low, and dark cloud mass formed over the bay, we said, “See ya later!” to the group we were in town with and fast walked to our dinghy. On the way, we passed new cruisers and said, “Maybe rain?” They replied, “Our weather app says 7% chance,” as if weather took direction from the forecast. Weather is dynamic. It forms and changes with imperfect predictability. There are three steps to building marine weather smarts. First, learn weather theory and fundamentals, like – what

“It doesn’t take miles to build strong cruising skills.” makes wind? For this, crack the books. Chris Parker’s Coastal and Offshore: The Essential Handbook is one of several terrific resources. Second, learn and understand weather forecast tools, such as GMDSS text forecasts, GRIB forecasts, etc. Each has specific contributions to your ability to forecast weather accurately. Third, apply the first two while sailing, even locally. This will enable a richer understanding of what it’ll be like if you choose to leave familiar waters. The forecast may only show four-foot waves, but remember when a similar forecast was very uncomfortable because the waves were steep sided and confused? PASSAGE-MAKING How to gain the experience of a multi-day passage? Go on passage as crew with experienced passage-makers. Common ways to crew are: • Many boats doing rallies, such as the Coho HoHo or Baja HaHa, look for crew and facilitate crew matching • On a delivery or active cruising boat • Paid eduational opportunity, such as with John and Amanda Neal aboard Mahina Tiare among other options • Pay a captain to accompany you on a passage on your own boat APRIL

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There are pros and cons to each of these. For example, rally boat crews often have minimal passage-making experience. Do your homework with any crew you join for an offshore experience. You don’t want to get out there and find that your skipper is the second coming of Captain Bligh. The right crew will prepare you with safety, weather, and watch responsibility discussions. After a few groggy watches, you’ll be able to step into the cockpit at 0200 hrs, clip in, open a snack bar, and say, “What’d I miss?” MEDICAL TRAINING Commonly, sailors preparing to go cruising have nightmares imagining the worst what-if medical scenarios. Rather than giving into the stress of what could happen, seek courses in medical training, Safety at Sea, and Crisis and Emergency Management. There are excellent classes and books on the subject. Become empowered with knowledge and understand the things you control, rather than living in fear. You come away with a basic comprehension of first aid and other medical issues. More importantly, you are building skills to manage how you respond to medical and emergency situations. Dr. Curtis Edwards, who trained us in wilderness first aid and crewed with us on our first delivery on Totem years ago, taught us: first, stop and take your own pulse. This snippet, and more like it from medical training we had before we left, is frequently repeated on our boat. It’s the framework for a procedural response. Reasoned rather than hasty responses force you to slow down enough to say, “Yes, I will clip-in before going to the aft deck to fix the towed dinghy.” The alternative could bring a real nightmare. MECHANICAL APTITUDE Because you might need to diagnose or repair rigging, sails, diesel engine, electric motors, steering system, electrical issues, the head and plumbing, and that precious ice machine – it’s probably a good idea to have at least basic knowledge of some of those systems, even if you’re all thumbs. When we first began cruising, my knowledge of diesel engines was very thin. We made sure our diesel was very reliable when we sailed away. Classes at the marine technical schools may get you started in the right direction, but so will your dockmates or some of the very good resources for the DIY-minded sailor. Your learning doesn’t stop when you leave, but it’s important to prepare well. As you begin to rack up miles (for enjoyment or from persistence) the opportunities to develop skills when cruising will be endless – unless you’re a big dog barking at Chihuahuas. Jamie and Behan Gifford have been jetsetters, giving presentations in four countries in the last month. They’re back aboard “Totem” in Mexico now. Follow their adventures at www.sailingtotem.com. 35

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LEARNING TO FLY

Stories of Going from Sailor to Foiler by Kurt Hoehne

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Once you’re up on a foil, it really doesn’t matter what kind of hull you’re dragging around with you. It’s just drag.

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or many of us, sailing is about constant learning. We learn trim, navigation, systems, storm tactics, provisioning, and, above all, seamanship. These bits of knowledge are a little like well-worn paths, known and not terribly exciting but a very satisfying devotion to our sport. Then, once in a while there, comes a sea change where a completely new aspect of sailing comes to the fore, and we get to learn something completely different and sometimes lifechanging. Foiling is one of these sea changes. It’s definitely different, exciting, and for many, life-changing. The foiling sailboat concept isn’t new, or even close to it. Back in the 1950s on Lake Mendota, Wisconsin, the U.S. Navy was curious about foiling and sponsored the development of the Monitor sailboat. Its foil racks lifted the boat out of the water and helped it to speeds of 30-40 knots. For some reason, foiling sort of slipped sailors’ minds for a while. Then came Eric Taberly and the Paul Ricard in 1980, a semi-foiling trimaran that got the whole world talking when it set a new transatlantic record.

One of the U.S. Navy's experimental boats utilizing hydrofoils in the 1950s.

Leave it to a development class for developments. The first foiling Moth turned up in 1972, but it wasn’t until the 2000s that foiling Moths really took over. With the proliferation of carbon fiber, bigger and bigger boats were soon able to fly. There are now 100-foot flying multihulls, and even a production Beneteau monohull with semi-lifting foils. Sailing a foiling, or even semi-foiling, big boat is no doubt a skill in and of itself. But to learn to foil, there’s nothing quite like approaching it with just you, the foil, a sail and some sort of hull, hulls, or boards to hold it together. After all, once you’re up on a foil, it really doesn’t matter what kind of hull you’re dragging around with you. It’s just drag. APRIL

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RETIRED, BUT FLYING HIGH Al Johnson’s first boat in the 1970s, an old E Scow, wasn’t a foiler, but it certainly was “out there” on the performance scale when he bought it used for $800 from the very first commodore of the Washington Yacht Club. Keelboats later became his passion and he’s sailed up and down Puget Sound and elsewhere countless times. But with retirement came more time, time he wanted to spend sailing and learning something new. Intrigued by the Moth, he saw a new one at Sail Sand Point and connected with the owner Allan Tencer. The two tackled learning to foil it with gusto. It kicked their butts for some time, but when they eventually got a wand that determines the lift angle of the hydrofoil figured out, they found themselves scurrying around Lake Washington frequently. Johnson eventually bought a used Bladerider for $7,500, and sails it to this day. “It’s fabulous fun,” Johnson says. He gets downright giddy when talking about how everything goes silent when the carbon fiber hull lifts out of the water and all that’s left is the quiet hiss of the thin foils going through the water. The learning curve has been a steep one. “Trial and a lot of errors,” he quips. A salesman once told him, “If you can sail a Laser on a windward-leeward course in 15 knots of breeze you can probably foil a Moth.” So Johnson boned up on his Laser for a bit before tackling the Moth. The wand – aka “ride height adjustor” – automatically adjusts the foil trailing edge that provides lift. The wand skips along the water and as the boat lifts, the angle lessens, allowing the boat too level out. As the hull dips down, the angle increases, lifting the boat. Johnson and Tencer found it’s critical to get those push-rod settings correct – being a quarter of an inch off either way changes the experience from “can’t lift off the water” to “leaps out of the water and immediately crashes.” When Johnson first got going, it was easy to capsize to weather. There’s an “unstable equilibrium” between weight, flying height and mainsheet tension that needs to be figured out, and felt. The skipper is making both macro and micro mainsheet adjustments as much to keep the boat upright as it is to propel it forward. Johnson, who still races his Quest 30 Charlotte, is completely sold on foiling. “Once you’ve tried three dimensions, two dimensions just doesn’t cut it anymore.” Some of the things Johnson has learned along the way – • You don’t right the capsized Moth, crawl in and sail away. It’s too unstable, plus when you are standing on the centerboard, you can’t kick your leg high enough to get over the edge of the wingbar. You have to water-start it much like a kiteboard or small windsurfer. 37

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• When the Moth nosedives, you get bruises from your body shooting forward and hitting the shrouds when the boat stops. Johnson has pool noodles on the shrouds to make for a softer landing on the shrouds. Getting the ride height adjusted correctly means he doesn’t do that nearly as often. • As a beginner, you need a second person around. First off, launching is a lot easier with another person helping. Then, there’s the real possibility of getting stranded on the water for one reason or another. • The amount of water that can enter orifices (noses, of course) when you crash at 15 knots is “impressive.” ADVANCED MOTH SAILING Dalton Bergan, who was one of the top college small boat sailors in the country and has been in the top five at Moth World

the boat. Also, while it’s certainly a goal to stay up on the foil through the tacks and gybes, it’s not absolutely necessary in the case of tacks. “Sometime it’s actually faster not to foil through a tack,” he says. These days, when he’s not sailing his RS Aero, Bergan is challenged by yet another kind of foiling; kite foiling. Kite sailing in itself is quite a challenge, but kite foiling is yet another notch above. Unlike the Moth’s wand that controls the foil attack angle, the only thing controlling the foil attack angle on a kite is weight. Lean back too much and the board shoots out of the water. Too much pressure forward and the board nose-dives. It took Bergan about six times out before he could kite foil and 10 times before he felt any good at it. An intriguing relatively new foiling sport, sans sails, is niggling at Bergan – foilboarding. Basically, it’s surfing with a foil. It can be done with surprisingly small waves, so Bergan expects to see

Local Sailor Al Johnson flying his Moth at Sail Sand Point on Lake Washington.

Championships, not surprisingly didn’t really have too steep of a learning curve. He caught the Moth bug early. “I was invited down to San Diego by Charlie McKee and a few others. After going out with them for an hour or two, I was racing.” The gentle breezes and flat waters of San Diego Bay were helpful. While Bergan’s learning curve may be a bit different than a lot of sailors’, he has some tips that the rest of us can bear in mind. For one, it’s vitally important to get the setup correct on 48º NORTH

some appearing around our region. By the way, apparently it does have a “mast,” which is what the vertical part of the foiling apparatus is called. As challenging as other kinds of foiling are, Bergan misses the high level of competition in the Moth. “It’s just tough to have good racing at the local level,” he says. And then there’s the cost aspect. He estimates that a top Moth costs “north of $30K.” That’s enough for a few RS Aeros. 38

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The UFO offers another out-of-the-box option for beginning foiling sailors.

FOUR-POINT FOILING The secret to popularizing foiling is really in the hulls. The Moth’s foot or so of beam and wide racks aren’t exactly user friendly to a novice with less perseverance than Johnson. Standing on boards, even without foils, is a challenge for a lot of us. That leaves the choice to multihulls, and it’s a good one. Just ask the veterans of the last two America’s Cups. For the rest of us that aren’t going 50mph, they may be a solution as well. Small catamarans have great initial stability, and the foiling can be accomplished with multiple foils spread far apart, instead of inline like a Moth. Helena Scutt of Kirkland knows foiling all the way down to her toes, literally. Until recently, she was deeply into an Olympic campaign as crew for Bora Gulari on a foiling Nacra 17. She’s now living in San Francisco, furthering her career in mechanical engineering and coaching. Scutt explains, “The crew can adjust the foils’ attack angle on a Nacra, but there’s no time to do that on the fly.” There are plenty of foils, one on each rudder and centerboard. The crew would have to lean in from the trapeze and adjust a line connected to wormgear. The quicker and more effective adjustment is body weight. Lean or step back and the foil will provide more lift. Put more pressure forward and the bows go down. When it comes to learning this skill, Scutt says simply “there’s decisive feedback if you do it wrong.” Nacra crews even have a word from some of that feedback: “splat.” When the boat gets too much lift, comes out of the water and then comes down, it’s a splat. To avoid splats and other feedback, Scutt uses most of her senses. There’s the feel of the boat through her feet, looking ahead for waves and behind for puffs and even her ears: the pitch of the vibration-caused noise from the rudders is a good indicator of how things are going. APRIL

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PRODUCTION FOILING The UFO may be the solution for the singlehanded learning or beginning foiler. It is a 70-pound catamaran on in-line foils, developed by the team that built Vanguard boats many years ago. The sit-on-top boat reportedly has speed comparable to a Moth, yet can be easily launched and sailed in shallow waters. On a somewhat larger scale is the Beneteau Figaro 3, built for the Figaro singlehanded racing series in France. It has also raced in last year’s Pacific Cup with an experimental rating. A Fond Le Girafon ran away from her class on the water and was, in fact, the first boat into Hawaii. The Figaro is not a full foiling boat, but a foiling assisted boat. The inward-facing foils lift the boat somewhat, combat leeway and provide righting moment. All of this makes the boat faster with more user-friendly foils than are used on the IMOCA boats and record-setting multihulls. FOILING FUTURE While the Beneteau and UFO boats are exciting and innovative, the jury is still out on what role foils will play in production boats and the future of sailing. They’re certainly here to stay. They’ll also become easier to use as builders and designers search for ways to bring products to market. Foiling is already old hat to a lot of the world’s best sailors. For the rest of us, it’s high time we at least give it a try.

Kurt Hoehne grew up sailing in the Midwest, has written about sailing since the 1980s, and currently manages the sailish.com website. He shares a C&C 36 with two other families. 39

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CHANGING TIMES AND WIND DIRECTION Evolution in Youth Sailing

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by Andrew Nelson

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pathways of engagement. The central theme is that kids can continue to participate and develop new skills, even if they don’t want to be racers. Sailing programs that are successful in implementing this approach will develop more “complete sailors,” which hopefully translates into developing more lifelong sailors. This will take time for organizations to implement, but the good news is that we’re having this conversation not only at the national level, but also locally.

e’re in a pivotal time for youth sports in America. There have been a lot of changes in the ways kids play, and an unsettling trend that many of them aren’t playing. I like to think that sailing is different, but we face many of the same problems as traditional sports like baseball, soccer, and football, among many others. Most of these sports have relied on a pyramid model – a sequence in which “all play, some play, only the best play.” The first major drop off in participation happens once we start keeping score (in sailing, racing is how we keep score), and the pyramid continues to sharpen as the level of competition increases. Over the last couple of decades, youth sports have become more and more professionalized. Coaches are asking more and more of their athletes at an earlier age, families are asked to invest enormous amounts of time and money in their child’s potential, and as a result young athletes feel an intense pressure to perform rather than playing a game because they enjoy it. Our society seems to be coming to grips with some of these uncomfortable truths. Organizations like the Aspen Institute and the Positive Coaching Alliance have been important advocates for changing youth sports culture, and people are listening.

“The central theme is that kids can continue to participate and develop new skills, even if they don’t want to be racers. Sailing programs that are successful in implementing this approach will develop more complete sailors, which hopefully translates into developing more life-long sailors.” The professionalization of youth sports, and the expense associated with it, is the main reason we’re having this conversation. The Northwest youth sailing scene has remained somewhat isolated from all of this. Our area didn’t rapidly professionalize youth sailing 20 years ago when it was happening in other regions and other sports. In fact, we’ve only just begun this transformation. Today, there are at least twice as many people making careers as coaches or program directors here as there were just four years ago. To support these positions, organizations have expanded their classes and added programming in the shoulder seasons. My biggest concern isn’t that youth sailing in the Northwest will be poisoned by money. Instead, my concern is the resulting disparity between smaller seasonal programs and larger year-round programs with paid staff. Ultimately, this transformation is a positive development because it puts more kids on the water, but we may be in for some growing pains. High school sailing in particular has been a big catalyst for this transformation, and it has also undergone some significant changes as a result. Ten years ago, there were about a dozen high school teams in the Northwest, and all of the coaches were volunteers. In 2017 we reached a high water mark of 56 registered teams, which were still coached mostly by volunteers. This year, we’re probably looking at around 40 teams, and it’s a more even mix of volunteers and paid coaches. We’ve lost a few of the smaller teams, however more sailors are participating, which means there are deeper rosters and more robust teams. Several hubs have emerged as major powerhouses. These hubs support multiple schools, employ paid coaches, and offer summer race teams. The sailors at these hubs sail at least eight months a year and might also work as instructors during summer. These are what we refer to as full circle programs because they keep their sailors engaged throughout the year. They also have established pipelines to prepare sailors for the next stage, allowing them to retain more sailors over time. Another reason high school sailing is important to highlight is because it bucks the attrition trend that I mentioned earlier. In

The US Sailing Development Model In 2014, the US Olympic Committee (USOC) released its “American Development Model” (ADM) which focuses on fun, inclusivity, and engagement at all levels. Most National Governing Bodies (or NGBs, which are typically independent, self-appointed organizations that govern their sports through common consent) have followed suit and revamped their own development models to mirror the USOC’s ADM. Some, like USA Hockey, are a couple of years into their new development model and show promising results as they try to “square the pyramid.” US Sailing’s recently published Youth Development Model identifies High Performance Racing, Smallboat Racing, Keelboats, and Smallboat Recreational Sailing as several APRIL

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fact, many new sailors come to love sailing as walk-ons through their high school team. It’s fun, it’s social, it’s affordable, and it’s growing in the Northwest! Even as the USOC’s ethos is shifting the ways that programs engage their participants, racing pathways are still an important part US Sailing’s development model. If any sailing program is looking to add racing to their offerings, then, without question, I would start with high school sailing. I mentioned that it’s a key component to supporting the addition of a year-round director/coach, but high school sailing also pays quick returns by creating a pipeline of future instructors. A coach/director usually knows who they want as instructors from their freshmen and sophomore classes. The coach can then spend the next year or two mentoring and preparing that sailor to be a great instructor. The result is a dramatic improvement in the quality of learn-to-sail instruction for all ages, and it started with high school sailing. Learn-to-sail and high school sailing pair very nicely; and for the most successful programs in our area, they are the bread and butter. However, there are still potential sailors that we’re not “capturing,” and this is where successful organizations

Olympia Yacht Club's full circle program uses this robust flow chart for their sailors. expand horizontally, not just vertically. This might mean adding a couple of keelboats to an organization’s fleet and then integrating adventure sailing or boat rentals. Maybe it looks like STEM education that is integrated with sailing camps. Space, staffing, and money are very real constraints, but in general, this horizontal expansion is a much better business proposition than supporting an elite traveling race team. Organizations with a full-time director are naturally more poised to expand into new niches because they have the time to devote to developing new programming. It’s easy to see how the hill is getting steeper for seasonal/ volunteer run organizations. Most programs in the Northwest 48º NORTH

still fit into this category, and they’re crucial to the fabric of our sailing community. In many cases, they serve small or isolated communities and are the only place local children can learn to sail. On the Olympic Peninsula, there are a remarkable number of sailing programs and at least eight high school teams despite a population density that is a small fraction compared to what you find along the I-5 corridor. These programs add real value to their communities and the lives of their participants. In spite of this intrinsic value, it’s getting increasingly difficult for one these teams to crack the top-five in the high school standings; but any coach that’s been at this awhile knows that’s not the only way to measure success. Putting butts in boats and smiles on faces is an intangible reward, and it’s the reason why so many volunteers continue to keep giving back to the sport. I’m optimistic about the future and excited by the change that’s happening. The Northwest youth sailing community is very closely knit, and that’s its greatest strength. There’s a strong spirit of cooperation, because we’re all in this together and when more kids are sailing we all win. There have been numerous examples of large and small programs sharing instructors/coaches, borrowing boats, and co-hosting events. Most of all, everyone is very eager to share information. We’re not a community that keeps secrets, especially when that information can help others. I believe that the personal relationships between program directors, coaches, volunteers, and community members will remain strong for the benefit of youth sailing as a whole. There are a lot of good people out there who care about youth sailing, and I know some of these questions keep them up at night too. Sailing, like so many youth sports, faces challenges to participation and success on both the local and national levels. However, the trend of offering multiple pathways of engagement through the support of paid leadership at an increasing number of programs promises better experiences for new sailors, and is an exciting launch ramp for future growth.

Andrew Nelson is the Youth Sailing Director for The Sailing Foundation and acts as a facilitator and ambassador for all youth sailing programs in the Pacific Northwest. He lives in Tacoma, WA, and enjoys cruising his Olson 30 with his wife and daughter. 42

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The code zero sail, flying here, offered the right blend of power and control in the big breeze during the Sydney Hobart.

JOY RIDE DOWNUNDER Part 2: A PNW J/122E Does Sydney Hobart

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hen we left off last issue, Team Joy Ride had just exited the Sydney Heads, A-3 and spinnaker staysail up and drawing nicely. Not quite a serial cliff hanger, but stage one of our Sydney Hobart, getting out of Dodge clean and clear, was now complete. We’d been in places like this before, but I expected that what might lie ahead would somehow be different. The forecast for the day was unfolding true to script, a building nor’easter – a perfect send-off for the fleet. As we settled in for the leg down the coast, it was time for evaluation and acclimation. We seemed in pretty good nick at this early

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by Alex Fox

stage, as the wind continued to build into the high teens. Nice! About four hours into the race, John surrendered the helm to Robin. Our watch set-up was going to be pretty simple, two pairs of helmsmen, John and Robin, Byron and myself, spelling off in three hour shifts. The goal was to keep a fresh set of hands on the wheel throughout the race. The rest of the team were paired up to mirror each other on opposite watches; Maaike and Erik, Bron and Quill. We’d become pretty accustomed to this set-up during the Vic Maui, so it was pretty seamless getting back into the rhythm of a system. For smaller boats, Sydney 44

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Hobart seems neither a sprint nor a marathon, but somewhere in between. Our goal was simple, to sail as close to maximum efficiency possible, while keeping the crew somewhat rested. As the sun began to set on day one, an overcast, muted grey sky and ocean replaced the bright blue seascape from earlier in the day. I’d taken over the helm about 15 minutes earlier, when “Bang!” The tack line lead ring blew off the pole end, followed by the spinnaker rotating out to leeward and, arrrghhh, a slowmotion round-up. Not a very auspicious start to my helming shift. We got things back under control, spinnaker down, repacked and re-hoisted, while continuing to sail under staysail and main. This seemed like the right thing, as the A-3 was the sail we wanted up at night. Darkness fully enveloped us with no moon and no stars...only a few ominous displays of sheet lightning in the distance ahead! The breeze and waves continued building over the next couple of hours, and it took all of our concentration and coordinated efforts to keep Joy Ride on her feet. The rhythm became: trim in as the apparent wind went forward while riding down a wave, followed by a big ease as we slowed in the trough. Then we’d head up slightly again and ease the mainsheet and vang. The

rig. Additionally, a J-133 and a Farr 40 lost battles with sun fish, shearing off rudders. We were feeling pretty good about not pushing the extremes. Before the race we talked quite a bit about pushing hard at night, but we were also cognizant of what the Vic Maui had taught us: when things got close to the edge, shifting down to the code zero proved very effective. In breeze with the apparent wind between 100 and 130 degrees, this sail was much more forgiving, mitigating the dangers associated with collapsing and refilling a spinnaker in the dark. Our top speeds would perhaps suffer a bit, but the average speeds were maintained pretty well. Every boat-rattling, high-stress wipe out, is a potentially raceending event. Finding a balance and finishing this race safely was our first priority, a challenge we all took seriously. Every sailor who competes in the Sydney Hobart is aware of the tragic 1998 race that took the lives of six sailors. There is a weight of responsibility shared amongst the fleet and by organizers alike. I felt it. This weight is not a burden, but more a promise, a commitment to compete as safely as possible. One of those safety requirements, in addition to the regular, scheduled radio roll calls, is a mandatory call by the skipper of each boat

“The boat would launch through the top of the bigger waves, airborne back to the keel a few times, landing with a thunderous bang, as the whole boat shuddered! It crossed my mind for a split second that this was the Sydney Hobart we’d been expecting.” next few hours were very focused, flying by in what seemed like a few minutes. Around the time the relief shift was coming up on deck, we got a series of big puffs and I was really fighting the helm. We were getting a little too close to the edge, so I called for the douse of the A-3. Our wind instruments had been underreading, but I would guess we were pushing 30 knots of true wind by this point. The code zero was our next choice and it was quickly hoisted and moved us nicely along. Bron, the navigator, called for gybe back towards the coast, and it was so much easier with the zero up! I know what you’re saying, “Come on, mid 20s, BIG chute up and let her rip!” I also had second thoughts about throttling back. As luck would have it, when I came back up from my offwatch, there was a bright moon shining through the cloud cover, the sea state had flattened quite a bit, and it was time for the A-2+! Day two dawned clear, bright, and sunny; but where did all the boats go? Difficult to believe that the fleet could be so spread out this early in the race, with only a couple of other boats visible to the eye. Our downwind slide continued, and Joy Ride was hanging in pretty well based on AIS positions. News also trickled in of a few casualties from the first day of racing. The main halyard sheave had pulled out of a TP52 mast, a sprit broke on one of the super maxis, and there was word that second TP52 lost its APRIL

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at Green Cape, some 200 miles into the race. This is a moment when each skipper is asked to assess the condition of his or her boat and crew. That ask is a very poignant one, and the answer is yes or no on whether to continue racing across Bass Strait. Our skipper’s answer, “Onward to Hobart!” As kind as the day two champagne running conditions were to Joy Ride (we were up in the top five overall for a while), the second night was equally brutal. We had positioned ourselves slightly to the west of our immediate competition. It was where we wanted to be. Weather systems move fast, and things change quickly in this part of the world. We got caught in the wrong place, plain and simple. During the night, we got severely headed, ending up hard on the wind for several hours, before losing the breeze all together and finding ourselves becalmed by morning, a condition that extended for several hours. Some others, who were just ahead and, more painfully, behind and more to the east, sailed away from us. Our eventual class winner, Grace O’Malley, a Cookson 12m, sailed this middle section brilliantly, as they put more than 50 miles on us! The wonders of a race like this extend beyond just the sailing, like the school of dolphins that kept us company on night three. There must have been 20 or more of these amazing creatures darting alongside and underneath Joy Ride. Back and forth, leaping clear of the waves, their phosphorescent trails putting on a most entertaining light show. They stayed with 45

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A tour of the harbor before departure included the Sydney Opera House for the "Joy Ride" crew, including crew member Bryon Meseroll.

The fleet, like Thoroughbreds in the starting gate, ready to run and battle the infamous Bass Strait.

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us for some time, mesmerizing us with their effortless speed through the water! Equally stunning was coming up to the coast of Tasmania. This craggy, rocky coastline pushes up out of the ocean in all manner of rock formations. Both desolate and beautiful, the landscape unexpectedly transforms into areas of lush timber, then dry desert-like rolling hills. The contrasts are as surprising as they are unique. What a welcome sight Tasmania is. The tip of Tasman Island represents the beginning of the final leg (60 miles or so) into Hobart. This is where many races have been won and lost, there is no free pass from here to the finish line. A fast reach down the coast was followed by one more inexplicable hole that lasted for a few hours before the expected southerly shift occurred and filled and we finally got the upwind conditions that Joy Ride loves. As we beat towards the southern tip of Tasman Island, now in the company of three or four boats, the breeze was building and so were the size of the waves. It was my turn on the helm again as the sun was beginning to set. We were several miles out from the shore – it was a shame to miss seeing the famous organ pipes! Byron and Maaike were on deck trimming with Bron navigating down below. Our crew gear had morphed from shorts and tees to full foulies, gloves, and hats. Wind was now in the high 20s, maybe low 30s. The waves really starting to stack up and were very skewed relative to the wind direction. Sailing on starboard tack, the waves hit us almost on the beam, and every so often we’d launch through the top of a big one as it broke over the boat. Head down, gripping the helm with one hand, mainsheet winch handle with the other, was my position of choice (tethered of course). The force of some waves was enough to wash me off my seat, hanging and holding on, awaiting the next big one. Bron came up from down below to let us know it was time to tack. Port tack was pretty interesting, more or less straight into the large seas. It was the same drill on this tack except the boat would launch through the top of the bigger waves, airborne back to the keel a few times, landing with a thunderous bang, as the whole boat shuddered! APRIL 2019

It crossed my mind for a split second that this was the Sydney Hobart we’d been expecting, along with the happy, reassuring thought that we’d checked, double-checked and taped every pin and shackle before the race. We were now on a direct course towards Hobart! What a pleasure and privilege it was to race down under with some great friends. We’ve seen a lot of sea miles together. Crossing that finish line just after 0600, and seeing Hobart in the morning light (there you go, Bron) was a highlight of

my sailing life. I hope to do it again one day and look forward to my next great adventure with Team Joy Ride.

Alex Fox manages the sailing shop at Trotac Marine in Victoria, BC. As a crew, he’s won Swiftsure, Whidbey Island Race Week, and Vic Maui, as well as T-bird Regionals and the Canadian Match Racing Championship. His monthly column, “The Favored Tack” appears in Pacific Yachting Magazine.

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The Santa Cruz 50 "Chasch Mer" and the Soverel 33 "Flim Flam" make for Colvos Passage.

ISLANDS RACE ends SOUTH SOUND SERIES on a SUNNY NOTE G ig Harbor Yacht Club’s Islands Race capped off the Southern Sound Series with a warm breeze, bright sunshine and a shortened course on March 16. The cruising classes, both flying and non-flying sails, started in drifting conditions. A few minutes later, the northerly rolled down Colvos Passage, allowing the PHRF classes to start in good breeze and enjoy the positive current and 10-knot breeze all the way to Blake Island. With her tall rig, Crossfire found some wind up high and managed a corrected time win in PHRF 2. “We were about halfway down Colvos when Crossfire passed us with everyone on the rail,” Dave Knowlton of the Pearson 36, Koosah, said. “It was like magic.” It was a familiar name atop PHRF 4, a class of mostly-72raters, with The Boss winning. The J/35, a Seattle fixture for many years, is now raced by Chad Stenwick. Other class winners included String Theory, Dash, Sidewinder, Slick and Nimbus. 48º NORTH

In the flying sails Commodore Class, the J/120 Felicita ended the series with a victory, while among the non-flying-sails Cruising Class it was Dave Knowlton’s Koosah finishing up the series with a fourth straight win. The race was shortened at the turn at Blake Island, but some boats were seen sailing back south under spinnaker just for fun. Given the forecast, the race committee decided to play it safe and finish the race there. All the races in the Sound Sound Series this year were shortened. “A while ago we decided to standardize the south sound races,” Knowlton explained. “The cruisers start at 9:30 and the racers at 10. There’s a 13-hour time limit on all the races. People seem to be enjoying it more.” by Kurt Hoehne photo by Jeffrey Hogan results on page 54

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Kwandwo Copeland's Thunderbird, “Selchie”, not only chalked up a class win, but were the capable crew that recovered the sailor in the water.

Breezy, Bright

BLAKELY ROCK with a Successful MOB Recovery

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ou know it’s a good day for sailing when it’s bright sunshine and enough breeze to make setting the weather mark a challenge. Such was the start for Corinthian Yacht Club of Seattle’s Blakely Rock Race, the first race of the Center Sound Series, on March 1. Winds were around 20 knots much of the time, allowing most boats to be fully powered up with number 3 headsails, but controllable downwind on the spinnaker run. After getting six classes underway, PRO Charley Rathkopf decided to restart the race because the weather mark was headed for Spring Beach due to wind, tide, and waves. The fleet adjusted to the change (though those off to a great start were disappointed!), and a new starting sequence was made, and the fleet went charging off for a great day of racing in consistent, excellent breeze. The biggest event of the race wasn’t the winner’s circle, it was the rescue of Anarchy crew member Lindsey Lind. 48º NORTH

About a mile from Blakely Rock on the long downwind leg, Lind fell overboard from the Flying Tiger 10, Anarchy. There were some chaotic radio transmissions from Anarchy to the Coast Guard, and several boats in the fleet responded quickly. Marek Olium, the skipper of a the new-to-town TP 52 Sonic, saw Lind in the water about 500 yards ahead but wasn’t sure it was a person until they were 100-150 yards from her. By then, the Sonic crew was already preparing the M.O.M. (Man Overboad Module) and deployed it close enough that Lind was able to grab it. In the meantime, Charlie Macaulay on Absolutely also saw what was going on. Absolutely dropped their chute and motored toward the victim in time to see the Thunderbird, Selchie, recover Lind. Macaulay recalled, “We were still about 10 boat lengths away when Selchie executed a perfect kite douse and circled the MOB, turning up to leeward of her. They quickly pulled her onboard as we approached.” Absolutely’s crew timed their participation in the rescue at six minutes, but ended further down the track, and so the race committee awarded them four minutes of redress. “That put us in 2nd for the race, which I think was pretty fair. I would hate to bump the top boat out of that position from redress,” Macaulay said. Sonic doused their spinnaker and motored back to retrieve their M.O.M. unit. It was quite a coming out race for Omilian’s TP 52. While this is Omilian’s first boat, he comes with vast offshore experience having sailed the complete Clipper Around the World Race. The Clipper race emphasizes safety training, and with a total of five “Clippers” on Sonic, they were ready to help. THE RACING Brad Butler’s very well-sailed Sierra 26, Dos, planed to another victory, correcting easily on her class and by over a 50

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The biggest event of the race wasn’t the winner’s circle, it was the rescue of “Anarchy” crew member Lindsey Lind. minute overall. The six-second ding to her rating, pronounced in the January PHRF meeting, wasn’t nearly enough for Saturday’s conditions. When the Sierra gets on a plane, the boat is pretty much a gun in a knife fight. Second overall was Bill Buchan’s Sachem demonstrating how it’s done in a heavy keelboat. The Peterson 43 charged along in the heavy upwind conditions and held her own downwind, correcting by nearly eight minutes ahead of the rest of her class and only a 1:24 behind Dos. The 9-boat J/105 class was won by Racers Formally Known as Here & Now. Some of the J/29 Boat of the Year crew have seamlessly transitioned into the one-design class. The level 72 (PHRF rating) class has made a reappearance, and it was won by the C&C 115 Elusive with the J/35 Tahlequah second and the Schock 35 Darkside third. Elusive had a very strong downwind leg. It will be interesting to see if this class can stay together as a group and, hopefully, build participation. Perhaps the most competitive of the classes was Class 8. Burzicki/Shorett’s Farr 395 Ace corrected to first, with Absolutely second, and Andy Mack’s J/122 Grace third. The three finished within 11 seconds on corrected time and finished fourth, fifth and sixth overall. In the proverbial race-within-a-race, the J/122 Grace and the Farr 395 Ace, had a few close crosses before Ace

When It’s Not a Near Miss A statement from Anarchy crew Lindsey Lind We have all had those moments of near misses, when the boat shifts and your balance forces you to adjust. You connect with a lifeline, part of the rigging, or maybe even an outstretched hand that keeps you from falling off the boat. You are grateful, but move on quickly without giving it too much thought. The difference between those near misses and my tenminute MOB experience in the 45-degree Puget Sound is a much smaller margin that any of us would like to admit to ourselves. I was crewing on Anarchy, a Flying Tiger, and we were sailing downwind at approximately 13 knots with winds around 20-22 knots. As we approached Blakely Rocks, just south of the Tyee Shoal Light outside of Eagle Harbor, the boat broached and went full over. I was on the windward side of the boat helping to grind on the spin sheet. My left hand went down to the winch handle to hold on for stability, and my right hand reached for the closest port lifeline. APRIL

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ultimately finished overlapped ahead. Mike Johnson, crew aboard Ace, recounted: “We had a good day sparring with Grace, a boat with many good sailors and friends. They had a great start and first beat to begin the run with a 100-yd lead. We were able to reel them in after a few big puffs filled in from the north and rounded Blakely Rock just ahead. Upwind, we stayed on port while they took a tack toward Wing Point and then held a higher port tack lane across the Sound. There was a slight left shift, but not enough for them to pass. From the tack at Discovery Park we were always close and ended up overlapped at the finish. One advantage of having another equally rated and well-sailed boat is the opportunity to learn new things, which is what keeps us coming back.” In the ORC fleet it couldn’t have been much closer between John Buchan’s Glory and Jonathan McKee’s Dark Star, as they finished only two seconds apart on corrected time. Steve Travis’ Smoke was back only another 15 seconds. The entire class, even Sonic after their rescue efforts with no redress, finished within seven minutes on corrected time. by Kurt Hoehne photo by Jan Anderson result on page 54

Anarchy’s winch handles are the easy-release design and as I grabbed the handle it released from the winch, disengaging my closest anchor point to the boat. My right hand never made it to the lifeline, and I was ejected out of the boat. I flew forward over the cockpit, hitting the starboard side winch with my left inner-thigh before falling through the lifelines into the water head-first. This story has a happy ending. My PFD inflated and no serious injury resulted from going overboard. The fleet of the 2019 Blakely Rocks Race should feel an overwhelming sense of pride for their quick response and aid given that allows me to be writing these words to you today. A huge thanks to Sonic for deploying the M.O.M. device. And of course, thank you to my rescuers – the amazing crew of the TBird, Selchie. This experienced crew knew just how to execute the recovery and keep me warm until we reached the dock. There’s much more to my story and many takeaways to share at a future time. I hope my experience can be a learning opportunity for all racers and make each of us better in this sport that we love. I know this experience will make me a better sailor both on my own boat and when I crew on others. I plan to continue racing and sailing, as the season has only just begun. Hope to see you out there! – Lindsey 51

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The competitive J/105 class fights to make the starting pin. Several new owners to the fleet, including Bucky Rezabek on USA 212, are mixing it up with the top boats.

Sunny SCATCHET HEAD S catchet Head Saturday has thrown pretty much everything at Puget Sound sailors over the years. In 2019, it dawned with crisp sunshine and a gently building northerly that represented an eleventh-hour positive detour from most predictions. There must be some seriously good karma going on at Corinthian Yacht Club of Seattle. At the risk of talking about a no-hitter, CYC’s Center Sound Series, of which Scatchet Head is the second race, now has had six consecutive March race days (dating back to 2017) with unseasonable sun and sailable breeze. Yes, it was a pleasant day on the water – 48º NORTH

mellow compared to the blustery Blakely Rock race the week before. Unlike Blakely, this was a day for the crew work to find its footing again after a long winter, and to get back to the dock with both the time and the energy to make repairs... except the gear that was going to bust already did so last week. So, post-race beers in the sunshine would have to do. As 75 boats circled the starting area and the committee got the chase starts (slower boats first) underway, the breeze took a healthy left-hand turn from north to almost due west. Boats struggled to get across the line on starboard. A few nailed the triumphant port-tack-start; 52

while others came close, only to be turned away at the last second by a possibly-noteven-making-the-pin starboard tacker. Several boats were nailed on individual recalls, perhaps because of the ebbing current carrying them across the line. The tides couldn’t have been more helpful to us – ebbing most of the way north to Whidbey, flooding most of the way home. Once the challenge of actually crossing the start line was thwarted, there were two schools of thought: head west into the headed new breeze immediately or get north a few ladder rungs and then look for a lane to tack west. In earlier APRIL 2019


classes, the west-side boats seemed to look fast. Among the later starters, those that went hard left found the breeze dwindle, while the get-north crowd came out better. Eventually, nearly the entire fleet was trading tacks off of Appletree Cove, duly avoiding ferries and commercial traffic. The few boats that took an unfortunate flyer over on the east side of the Sound may have been some of the last to the Dark ‘n’ Stormy table in the clubhouse at the end of the day. North of Kingston, the breeze backed off a bit and again, the westerly shift was strong. In fact, through that lightish transition zone, the further west you were, the better. At least for a while... The thing about that westerly was that those west-most boats wound up overstanding the green gong buoy at the south end of Whidbey. On the TP52, Glory, we were about 100 yards east of our nearest competitors, another TP52, Smoke. Smoke had made big gains in the transition by staying west, but when the solid breeze returned, we were cracked off and jib reaching to the mark. Being further west, Smoke had no choice but to do the same and fall in line behind. Others in our class like Crossfire and Sonic were east of us, waylaid in some lighter breeze. As we approached the turning mark, you could smell the sea lions even before you could see them. The regal and rank pinnipeds left their perch for the safety of the water as our #2 kite went up around the mark. What followed was a spinnaker run with a surprising amount of reaching, unexpectedly on both jibes. Just around the mark, there was a big hole to the east and the westerly shift was still on. Strap the kite, hike it flat, and sail it hot (and wonder if we’d made the wrong spinnaker choice) was the only option to avoid the hole just underneath. Eventually, the breeze freed up a bit to the anticipated northerly and some gains were again to be found on the west side, this time because of the flood current that builds over there. But that last jibe back toward Kingston in search of positive water left us pretty nervous as we watched the breeze all-of-a-sudden trend east of north. In the span of a few minutes and APRIL 2019

a few miles, the true wind reading went from 300° at the start of the run to 030° toward the end. So, we were back to the mode where we’d started – strapped kite, hiking rail meat, and tight reaching to get back to the committee boat. Working up in the light spots, we managed to get across, and even had to throw in a couple jibes near the finish... you don’t want the grinders to get cold, afterall. The breeze never topped 12, but eventually the chill burned off and WOW was that a lot of needed Vitamin D! It

53

was all smiles back at the clubhouse afterwards for a review of the fantastic day of spring sailing and a great party. Congrats to those who picked the right routes in the shifting breeze, and who sailed it hard and high during that reachy run! And thanks to CYC and all the sailors for making this a terrific series. by Joe Cline photos by Jan Anderson results on page 54

48º NORTH


54

RACE RESULTS

JIM DEPUE MEMORIAL RACE Place Boat Name Boat Type Division 3 1 Castaway Catalina 30 Division 2 1 Swan T-bird 2 Falcon Cal 9.2 3 Skye Hinckley Pilot 4 Anicca Catalina 30 Division 1 1 Ace Farr 395 2 The Boss J/35 3 Great White J/35 4 Tigger FT10 5 Darkside Schock 35 6 Intuition C&C 37+ 7 Corsair Hanse 411 8 Chupacabra Wilderness 30 9 Perplexity Express 37 10 Tantalus Express 37-2 11 Vigilant Navy 44 12 Sea Bear Jeanneau 36

BLAKELY ROCK RACE

Skipper Kelly Foust Gary David Bryanb Massey Bill Walker Richard Kerby Shorett/Burzycki Chad Stenwick Dan Wierman Cody Pinion Nicholas Leede David Lynch Gary Seibert Ty Abrams John Wilderson Hovland Riley Turk John Richardson

Place Boat Name Boat Type Skipper ORC Class 1 Glory TP 52 John Buchan 2 Dark Star Bieker 44 Jonathan McKee 3 Smoke TP 52 Steve Travis 4 JAM J/160 Fox/McPhail 5 Crossfire R/P 55 Lou Bianco 6 Sonic TP 52 Marek Omilian Class 1 1 (RDG) Selchie Thunderbird Kwadwo Copeland 1 Resolute Cal 34 Mk II Dan Tedrow 3 Midnight Escape Mirage Kirby 25 Borge Ellingsen Class 2 1 Rush J/80 Phillip Dean 2 Taj Mahal J/80 David Schutte 3 Reckless J/80 John Sezer 4 Outlaw J/30 Derek Storm / Cindy Gossett 5 Elixir Aphrodite 101 Megan Kogut 6 Cherokee Cal 33 Peter Stewart 7 Tastes Like Chicken J/80 Richard Demmler 8 Underdog J/80 Lek Dimarucot 9 Mata Hari Catalina 36 Mk II Jeff Blyth 10 Wind Dancer Tartan 3800 Chris McMuldroch 11 Madrugador Cal 40 Mike Irish Class 3 1 Gaucho Ross 930 John Cahill 2 Kiwi Express Farr 1020-2 Reinhard Freywald 3 Madame Pele Davidson 29 Tom Andrewes Class 4 1 Racers formally known as Here&Now J/105 Bucky Rezabek 2 More Jubilee J/105 Erik Kristen 3 Jaded J/105 Chris Phoenix 4 Creative J/105 Allen Huges / Shauna Walgren 5 Corvo 105 J/105 Tom Kerr 6 Liftoff J/105 Jeffrey Pace 7 Puff J/105 Steve Summers 8 Avalanche J/105 Jeremy Boynes 9 Paladin J/105 Daryl Schlick / Mason Killebrew Class 5 1 Dos Sierra 26 Brad Butler 2 Different Drummer Wauquiez Cen.40s Charles Hill 3 Dash J33 Stephanie Arnold & Chuck Queen 4 Gratitude Hanse 415 David Barnes 5 Kinetics Nordic 44 Brad Greene 6 Overtime Ross930T Julie Renick 7 Semper Quaerens J/40 Michael Murphy 8 Charlotte Quest 30 Al Johnson 9 Helios Beneteau 36.7 David James

48ยบ NORTH

BLAKELY ROCK RACE, CONTINUED

Place Boat Name Boat Type Skipper 10 Gusto Swan 441 Holm Albrecht 11 Millennial Falcon Melges 24 Team Educated Guess Class 6 1 Elusive C&C 115 Jeff Whitney 2 Tahlequah J/35 Don Leighton 3 Darkside Schock35 Nicholas J Leede 4 Fortuna C&C 115 David De Lanoy 5 re-Quest Express 37 Kerry Billingham 6 Solution J/35 Tyson Varosyan Class 7 1 Sachem Peterson 44 Bill Buchan 2 Eclipse J/109 Kirk Fraser 3 Luna Hanse 455 Gordon SToll 4 Lodos J/109 Tolga Cezik 5 B.O.O.H. Farr 30 Lance Staughton 6 Gray Wolf Custom 40 Evgeniy Goussev 7 Izakaya FT 10 Iain Christenson 8 Windsprint Dehler38C Thomas Raschko Class 8 1 Ace Farr 395 Burzycki/Shorett 2 Absolutely Farr 39ML Charlie Macaulay 3 Grace J 122 Andy Mack 4 Madrona Custom 40 Carl Buchan 5 Hamachi J/125 Dougherty/Andrews 6 Freja Aerodyne 43 Jonathan Cruse 7 Tachyon Farr 39 C/R Jack Yinger Class 9 1 Freda Mae Corsair 31R Vincent Depillis

SCATCHET HEAD RACE

Place Boat Name Boat Type Rating Skipper Name ORC Class 1 Glory TP 52 1.3797 John Buchan 2 Smoke TP 52 1.3725 Steve Travis 3 Crossfire R/P 55 1.4074 Lou Bianco 4 Sonic TP 52 1.3395 Marek Omilian 5 JAM J/160 1.1544 Fox/McPhail Class 1 1 Midnight Escape Mirage Kirby 25 186 Borge Ellingsen 2 Selchie Thunderbird 198 Kwadwo Copeland Class 2 1 Rush J/80 129 Phillip Dean 2 Reckless J/80 129 John Sezer 3 Tastes Like Chicken J/80 129 Richard Demmler 4 Elixir Aphrodite 101 153 Megan Kogut 5 Madrugador Cal 40 129 Mike Irish 6 Wind Dancer Tartan 3800 138 Chris McMuldroch Class 3 1 Kiwi Express Farr 1020-2 117 Reinhard Freywald 2 Gaucho Ross 930 114 John Cahill Class 4 1 Jaded J/105 93 Chris Phoenix 2 More Jubilee J/105 93 Erik Kristen 3 Racers formally known as Here&Now J/105 93 Bucky Rezabek 4 Corvo 105 J/105 93 Tom Kerr 5 Liftoff J/105 93 Jeffrey Pace 6 Creative J/105 93 Allen Huges / Shauna Walgren 7 Puff J/105 93 Steve Summers 8 Avalanche J/105 93 Jeremy Boynes 9 Paladin J/105 93 Daryl Schlick / Mason Killebrew Class 5 1 Dos Sierra 26 81 Brad Butler 2 Different Drummer Wauquiez Cen.40s 81 Charles Hill 3 Charlotte Quest 30 96 Al Johnson 4 Kinetics Nordic 44 96 Brad Greene 5 Overtime Ross930T 81 Julie Renick 6 Gusto Swan 441 93 Holm Albrecht 7 Dash J33 93 Stephanie Arnold & Chuck Queen 8 Gratitude Hanse 415 96 David Barnes Class 6 1 Elusive C&C 115 72 Jeff Whitney 2 Tahlequah J/35 72 Don Leighton 3 Fortuna C&C 115 72 David De Lanoy 4 Darkside Schock35 72 Nicholas J Leede 5 Solution J/35 72 Tyson Varosyan Class 7 1 Anarchy FT 10 57 Tom Ward 2 Izakaya FT 10 57 Iain Christenson

54

APRIL 2019


SCATCHET HEAD RACE, CONTINUED

Place Boat Name Boat Type Rating Skipper Name 3 Sachem Peterson 44 60 Bill Buchan 4 Gray Wolf Custom 40 57 Evgeniy Goussev 5 With Grace J120 57 Chris Johnson 6 Lodos J/109 69 Tolga Cezik 7 B.O.O.H. Farr 30 54 Lance Staughton 8 Luna Hanse 455 66 Gordon SToll 9 Bravo Zulu Beneteau 40.7 51 Clifton Teschke Class 8 1 Ace Farr 395 39 Burzycki/Shorett 2 Absolutely Farr 39ML 18 Charlie Macaulay 3 Freja Aerodyne 43 18 Jonathan Cruse 4 Madrona Custom 40 18 Carl Buchan 5 Hamachi J/125 -3 Dougherty/ Andrews 6 Grace J 122 39 Andy Mack 7 Tachyon Farr 39 C/R 18 Jack Yinger Class 9 1 Freda Mae Corsair 31R -6 Vincent Depillis

ISLANDS RACE

Place Boat Name Rating PHRF-2 1 Crossfire   -102   2 Constellation   24   3 Kahuna   48   4 Hamachi   -3   5 JAM   -0   6 Chasch Mer   -0   PHRF-3 1 String Theory   57   2 Anarchy   57   3 Korina Korina   66   4 McSwoosh   66   5 Equus   63   PHRF-4 1 The Boss   72   2 Grace E   72   3 Great White   72  

Skipper Lou Bianco   Ronald Holbrook   J Leitzinger   Shawn Dougherty   Bill Fox   Scott Newman   Robert King   Tom Ward   Jon Knudson   Clark McPherson   Dean Conti   Chad Stenwick   Brian White   Dan Wierman  

ISLANDS RACE, CONTINUED

Place Boat Name Rating Skipper 4 Lodos   69   Tolga Cezik   5 Altair   72   Jason Vannice   6 DarkSide   72   Nicholas Leede   7 Rock Paper Scissors   69   Hans Seegers   8 Intrepid   72   Patrick Robinson   PHRF-5 1 Dash   93   Stephanie Arnold   2 Dos   81   Brad Butler   3 Redline   90   Reese Cassal   PHRF-6 1 Sidewinder   99   Mike/Brad Jones   2 Flim Flam   96   Fred Creitz   PHRF-7 1 Slick   120   Christine Nelson   2 Tonic   132   Mark Brink   3 Bodacious   129   J Rosenbach   4 Les Chevaux Blancs   132   Gordon Kells-Murphy   5 Asylum   126   Jeremy Bush   6 Folie à Deux 132   Jeff Johnson   PHRF-8 1 Nimbus   177   Mark Harang   2 Fandango   195   Jaime Storkman   3 Solitaire   159   Chris Caudill   4 Cherokee   156   Pat Stewart   5 Snowbird   195   Ed Josberger   6 Djinn   153   John Martehs   7 Encore   159   Wendell Crim   8 Suddenly   192   Tom Davis   Cruising-NFS 1 Koosah   177   Dave Knowlton   2 Sheet Music   123   Brad Slayton   3 Jolly Rumbalow   135   Richard Bigley   4 Emma Lee   225   Calvin Brodie   5 Earth's Edge   225   Denis Vannier   Commodore-Flying Sails 1 Felicita   45   Ralph Vendeland   2 White Squall   132   Roger Deitz   3 Blue Max   141   Charles Hendrick   4 Steamy Windows   141   Laura Sullivan 

Classifieds

36.5’ STEEL SLOOP Beautiful, strong and proven Franz Maas Dutch built sloop. Excellent condition after complete re-build from ‘03 - ‘05. 3cyl Yanmar, Monitor windvane, SSB/Pactor/radar, plotter, AIS, watermaker, 5 solar panels, refer, windlass, EZ Stack on main, Harken on jib. Aluminum inflatable w/ 6 HP Mercury & much more. Lots of well thought out storage. Puerto Vallarta/La Cruz Marina. Photos/specs: begonephotos.shutterfly. com Awaiting your inspection in Paradise (the fun side of the wall). teridonm@hotmail.com Call for more info: 011 322 274 2421 (Mexico). 6495

APRIL

2019

SCEPTRE 41 1986 W/ STAYSAIL “Built like a TANK, Sails like a DREAM!” Made in Canada with German engineering, Betelgeuse is a sleek, comfortable and fast sailing bluewater wonder. New Raymarine chart plotter with HD Color Radar (gimbaled). New Eberspächer forced air cabin heat, MAGNUM 2000W INVERTER, new SS lifelines, gennaker, drifter, boom furling, quick release staysail, pressured hot water, Yanmar 50 HP turbocharged diesel, feathering prop and new Hydrovane autopilot system that will take you to Tahiti, and beyond. $149K. More info at (206)-459-6316 or jason2hawks@gmail.com

6518

55

PASSPORT 40 - 1983 World capable cutter-rigged Passport 40. Sea-friendly, head-forward layout. Large sail inventory, VHF, GPS, Aries Windvane, Dickinson heater, Forespar boom. Oversized rigging and 2 extra cockpit winches (large). 2000-03, new Yanmar 40 HP, 3 burner stove/oven, refrig/freezer, Spectra watermaker, Autohelm autopilot, Icom HF. 2010, new Furuno radar. 2018, power train refurbished at $20K cost; new heat exchanger, transmission, cutlass bearing, engine mounts and shaft. $136,000 US. svlandsend@yahoo.com or call (360) 632-8896 for more information.

6412

48º NORTH


BOATS FOR SALE

BOATS FOR SALE

BOATS FOR SALE

READY TO CROSS AN OCEAN! 36’ bluewater steel cutter, Moitessier/Hutton designed, built by Tern Marine/Hawaii. Diesel engine and heater, windvane, solar, gennaker, new transmission, great bottom, very comfortable and incredibly well cared for. Lying Port Townsend. For details, links and photos visit svbluewater.com

2005 HYLAS 54 RAISED SALOON Single owner. Meticulously maintained. Offshore cruising ready, skip 3-week passage across Pacific, hop to Fiji. Center-cockpit, 3 cabin, 2 head layout, mattress in master. Bow thruster! New within 2 years: Northern Lights generator, rigging, overhaul of 125 HP Yanmar engine, AGM battery bank, dodger, folding prop, solar panels, wind generator, A/C. All LED lights. Webasto heater. Fully loaded electronics. Includes AB tender, Honda 15 HP outboard, Winslow liferaft, ditch bag, extensive spare parts inventory. Sails in excellent condition, beautiful spinnaker. No broker, make offer. For more information please phone us at (425) 591-7111 or via email at davebrennan@gmail.com For more photos or specs go to http://sailinganila.org/forsale

2002 MALO 41/43 “The Other Swedish Yacht” offered by original owner. Aft cockpit, two staterooms, large salon, mahogany interior, great storage, two large lazarettes, Icom 805, fresh Icom VHF, Yanmar turbo diesel, ample power alternator, large tankage, sail inventory including Hasse cruising sails, cored hull with bulb keel on a stub. Fresh bottom paint. Make inquires at KI6KNI@gmail.com. $325,000.

6527

1975 SAN JUAN 24 W/ TRAILER $6725. Call for specifics. (360) 640-0046. Also, “Backwater Boats” dinghy wanted. 6517

6499

6494

SALSA - MILLIMETER MARINE HULL #208 Complete boat with spars, main and jib sails, spinnaker, ballast and trailer. READY TO RACE. $2,500 cash. This boat will be at the Seattle Fisheries Supply Swap Meet April 6th. Additional spars, sails and other sailing stuff will also be available for sale. For additional information, please call or text to (971) 409-3765 or (503) 313-0007. SEE YOU AT THE SWAP MEET!!! 6524

NIMBLE ARCTIC 25 PH YAWL 1990 Brewer designed, quality built, pilothouse yawl with custom trailer. Steering inside or out. Marine head with holding tank, Y valve, Dickinson heat, galley w/ sink and portable cook top. Yamaha 9.9 HP in well. Portland, OR. $18,500 for boat and trailer. Email whitneymarine@comcast.net with questions or for more information. 6471

Moresby 3 - $29,900 Retired seiner with a long heritage, now converted to liveaboard and cruiser. Maintains workboat character with added comforts of home. Extensive work done and she remains well found. Looking for people who will be her next stewards.

nwmaritime.org/boats/for-sale Contact Kris at 360-379-5807 kris@nwmaritime.org 48º NORTH

‘84 KIRIE ELITE 32 TALL RIG R AC E R E A DY, CO M F O RTA B L E C R U I S E R . Blaine, WA. Hull Peeled and epoxied below waterline, bottom faired and keel faired to CompuKeel template, Vivid bottom paint, Volvo (18hp) raw water-cooled diesel, Kiwi 3-blade feathering prop, Raymarine i70 sail instrument package, Raymarine e78 chartplotter, Bose speakers in salon, cd/am/fm player, Sailtech hydraulic backstay adjuster, Oversize 40” destroyer wheel, 25 kg claw anchor with 30ft chain and 100ft rode. UK racing #1, 2016 UK racing main with 2 reef points and cunningham cringle, North Dacron main with 2 reef points, FX Sails racing #2 – rigged for furler with UV cover, Dacron furling headsail, North #3 Kevlar, storm jib, UK drifter – 2016 North Symmetrical .75oz Spinnaker, 1.5oz spinnaker. MORE. Asking $38,900. Phone us at (360) 510-1005 or via email at ross@americannettings.com

2001 STEEL TED BREWER 36.5’ Boat is in Anacortes. 6’1” fin keel, skeghung rudder. Double headed sloop with 1.5’ bowsprit. 74 gallons diesel, 105 gallons water. Lots of storage under all settees. Fantastic galley. Large V-Berth. $75,000. More info at (425) 772-9580

6516

6497

THISTLE 17 FT FIBERGLASS Greatlylovedclassracer.4mains,2jibs,2spinnakers. Aluminum mast, Minnkota electric motor and boat trailer $2500. More info at (253) 345-0017.

6522

65’ CENTER COCKPIT KETCH Classic Sparkman & Stephens aluminum motor sailer. Built by Derecktor in 1968, refitted 2017. Awlgrip paint job. Under 650 hours on 200 Hp 6061 John Deere with Twin Disk marine gear and hydraulic shaft brake. Cruising at 8 kts. Northern Lights 8 Kw generator under 250 hours. Large sail and parts inventory. Located in dry storage in Anacortes. $385,000. Call (206) 550 0895. 6503

56

APRIL 2019


BOATS FOR SALE

BOATS FOR SALE

BOATS FOR SALE

1988 CUTTER RIGGED CALIBER 38 Excellent bluewater boat, great for PNW. Yanmar 4J with two Racor filters, autopilot/chartplotter upgraded two years ago, jib, spinnaker, staysail, mainsail, and trysail on own track. Call for more details: (360) 917-5168.

1990 TAYANA VANCOUVER 42 Original owner, all records, cruised Mexico for 25 years, aft cockpit, Hull #172. New dodger/bimini, new mainsail, new 3 burner Eno stove/oven, new Adler-Barbour refrigerator, new water heater, Trace 2010 inverter, Furuno 24 mile radar, ICOM SSB, Robertson autopilot, Xantrex 40 amp battery charger, Max-Prop, 12v watermaker, Lewmar electric halyard winch, Maxwell 2200 Horizontal windlass, Yanmar engine with 2450 hrs and 100 amp alternator, 2x 70 watt solar panels (mounted), Forespar boom vang, Depth/ windspeed/direction, Profurl-jib, 3 anchors w/ rode/chain, oversize main winches (Lewmar 55), lazy jacks, six man Avon raft w/ hardcase, Sta-loc rigging, 5 step custom welded stainless steel dive ladder, 7 batteries (golf), 1 start, located in Tiburon, CA. Too much to list...$125,000. Contact nixonkeoke@gmail.com or (707) 674-7028.

CLASSIC NORTH SEA DESIGN What I love about this boat: The full cockpit enclosure that keeps me dry; the Divinycell insulation, double fiberglass hull and Dickinson heater that keep me warm; the stable, full keel; the Danish interior woodwork; and the new Yanmar engine that starts quickly on cold, Alaska mornings. C’est La Vie is a Laurin 32 built in Malmo, Sweden. She is well suited and equipped for cruising the BC Coast and southeast Alaska. Systems include: wind generator, solar panel, Furuno radar, marine, ham and SSB radios. $27,000. Contact Ed at eohaleus3@yahoo.com or phone (360) 378.9797. For more information visit https://fennyjo.net/

6492

10’ NUTSHELL PRAM New, never launched nutshell pram. Built using the best materials I could find. A new pair of spruce oars is included with the pram. Call for details: (206) 954-0066.

6503

6526

6501

1981 FREEDOM 33 CAT-KETCH New Volvo Engine (2011), four sails, two heaters, two anchors. Located in Seward, AK. $35,000. For more info, please email topsail@alaska.net 6500

CAL 34 1977 EXCELLENT CONDITION Bill Lapworth design, Westerbeke 30 diesel, six sails, auto-helm, all original except newer upholstery. Lovingly maintained for 12 Years, just bought new boat so must sell. $18,500. Everett Marina. For more info contact (206) 650-5896.

1982 40’ PUGET TRAWLER Built by C&L Marine and designed by Edwin Monk Sr. Only 9 of these yachts were built. 90 HP Ford Lehman is very efficient. 6 knots at 1400 rpm.... less than a gallon per hour or sail for free. In LaPaz, Mexico. Will consider delivery to Northwest. $75,000. Call (855) 225-2729 or email Tom at lapazyachts@aol.com

6527

6514

34 GEMINI 105 MC – 2006

PEARSON 40 1980 Classic flush-deck centerboard sloop ready for cruising! Hot & cold pressure water. Head w/ sink, shower & Electra San treatment. 6 cu/ft refrigeration[Sea Frost], forced air propane heat, 3 burner stove w/oven GPS, 2 DS, VHF, knotmeter. Hood full-batten, double reef main. Full hoist 120% furling genoa w/Stearns rod furler,150 genoa, 8 Lewmar winches + power windlass. Info at (971) 533-3599. $49,500. 6513

APRIL 2019

1966 CAL-36 Diesel, 2-8D house batteries, 1000 W inverter/ charger, H&C water, LPG stove w/oven & BBQ, LPG sniffer, Profurl W/140 genoa, main W/ 2 reefs, rigid vang, EZ jacks, 35# Bruce w/150’ chain & 200’ rode, windlass, autopilot, radar, diesel cabin heater, holding tank, microwave, upgraded interior, VHF w/ DSC & GPS. $26,000. More info at bcuster070@gmail.com

6521

57

A wonderfully nimble, stable catamaran with three staterooms, single head, central salon table, screecher sail / rig and fully enclosed cockpit. Extras include a secondary anchor, handheld VHF and spare starter/alternator. Professionally maintained. Recently surveyed and major findings addressed by the Owner. - $108,000

San Juan Sailing - Bellingham, WA brokerage@sanjuansailing.com 360-671-0829 48º NORTH


BOATS FOR SALE

BOATS FOR SALE

BOATS FOR SALE

CLASSIC BEAUTY The well known and loved 38 M2 Klasse Spidsgatter, Pia, is looking for a new caretaker. I have owned and maintained Pia, a Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival regular, for 26 years. At 71 I hope to find someone to carry on. Finding the right person, an aesthetic individual with skills and a passion for wooden boats who will continue to maintain and love Pia is very important to me. For more information and photos email me at copesetic65@gmail.com

1972 ERICSON 27’ - IN VICTORIA, BC 9.9 Yamaha Long Shaft, High Thrust. New genoa 2018, roller furling, Micron CSC bottom paint 2018, tiller. All upholstery new in 2005. Marine head and holding tank, VHF, Furuno LS-4100 depth sounder 2016, 2003 MicroLogic GPS, 2017 Raymarine Dragonfly 5 GPS, radar reflector, masthead. VHF antenna, windvane & anchor light, M.O.B. pole, throwing collar with line, Lge Propane BBQ, kerosene stove and cabin heater (Force Ten), stereo-CD, USB, many charts. $12,000. Mike - (250) 818-6913 or ve7mdg@gmail.com

1977 ERICSON 27 Stardust. Ericson 27 in great condition. Clean interior with varnished mahogany. Working jib, genoa (160), storm sail. Tohatsu OB (2014). Currently in Anacortes. Local (PNW) sales only. Info at obiwanrazzy@gmail.com

6443

6509

G IN D N

6512

PE R E

F OF

FLYING TIGER 10M Perry design Hiptrader 33’ high-performance racer! Hull #16. Located in Kingston. $22,000. Photos and more info: flyingtiger016@gmail.com 6520

1989 PACIFIC SEACRAFT CREALOCK 37 In Portland, Oregon. $115,000. Newer AGM batteries, 2 kw inverter/charger, wind generator, solar panels, watermaker, liferaft, knot, depth, wind instruments; autopilot; Garmin radar, AIS, chart plotter, VHF, ICOM M802 SSB, computer, monitor, EPIRB, Yanmar 4-cylinder diesel engine. 40 gallons fuel, 80 gallons water. Max-Prop, 8 sails. Standing rigging replaced in 2013. More info at sv.annamarie@gmail.com

2002 BENETEAU 393 This well equipped sailboat is setup for cruising to Alaska and beyond. It features the spacious, very well designed two cabin, two head layout. A full enclosure and Dickinson heater extends your cruising season, keeping you comfortable in all weather. Call (778) 269-1012 or email sv.splendid.mane@gmail.com $110,000.

6519

CHESAPEAKE 32 - $17,500 Peregrina, a beautiful Rhodes design sloop, proven cruiser. Hasse & Company sails. Yanmar 3GM engine. Monitor windvane and Autohelm ST4000. Dickinson propane fireplace. Ranger sailing dinghy. (206) 714-2074

6523

6459

Kettenburg PC32 $15,900

Launched: 1948, Orion #68. Major restoration in 2006. Mahogany planks--some new, over steamed oak frames--all sistered. Updated rigging with Schaefer/Harken. Lots of bronze and varnish. Very minimal systems. Tons of class.

nwmaritime.org/boats/for-sale/ Contact Kris at 360-379-5807 kris@nwmaritime.org

48º NORTH

ISLANDER FREEPORT Illness forces sale. Owner built sailboat with excellent carpentry. Interior is in fantastic condition. Includes 4-person dinghy 10HP OB. Great liveaboard and ready to cruise. Roller furling with complete set of sail covers. Canvas covers for all external woodwork. Full cockpit enclosure. Engine is Nissan MN633. Farymann diesel generator. Maxwell electric windlass. Full set of tools included. Boat has not had any rough sailing. Radar R10X raster scan. Hot water heater and dryer. Sleeps 6. Anchored in Lake Union. $79,000. For more info contact or (206) 579-0187. Alternatively via email at rexcnanw@msn.com 6469

58

COLUMBIA 21 KEELBOAT Fabulous fun comfortable sailing w/ cuddy, main, jib, spinnaker and gear. Includes outboard motor. Great on lake or Sound. Owners say enjoy more than any other boat owned. $1,500 OBO. For more info, contact (206) 285-1111. 6525

WANTED EQUIPMENT WANTED CATALINA 34 OR 36 Catalina 34 or 36 WANTED! 1990 or newer. (Walk through transom) Contact saildabob@gmail.com 6511

APRIL 2019


EQUIPMENT CAPE HORN STEERING VANE Cape Horn integrated self steering system. “Joshua” outboard version (boats 35-40+) with light and heavy air windvanes. System used for two hours on a 44ft sailboat. $2,995 OBO. For more info, call (206) 245-8080. 6496

CARBON MAST Made by Offshore Spars, built for Tartan 3700. Suitable for 35-40 foot boat, up to 16,000 lb. displacement, 2 sets swept back spreaders, No rigging, email for details. $10,000. jackanaka@gmail.com or (206) 399-7040.

6498

EMPLOYMENT

Great Opportunity to own premium slips in Skyline Marina Division 22, easy access to the San Juan Islands. Slip TDO90 Division 22, 48’LOA (44’+ 4’x18’) $150,000. TDN38 and TDN39 are 44’LOA (40’+4’x18’) $140,000 each. Full service marina w/ secure gate. Amenities include bathroom/shower, laundry, parking, power and water!

Caroline Baumann - (360) 202-7327 caroline@windermere.com Windermere Real Estate - Anacortes Properties

FABULOUS LAKE UNION MOORAGE Outside slip. Unobstructed view. West side of lake. SAILBOATS ONLY (low profile preferred). NO LIVEABOARD. 48’ max. length. $758./mo includes power/water. Contact Bill at (206) 200-8636. 6507

San Juan Sailing, the premier charter company and sailing school in the Northwest, with over 35 years of experience is seeking USCG instructors to teach any of the following courses: ASA 101-106, 118, 114 and RPBA 1101, 1102. Competitive pay, flexible scheduling, and ongoing education and training.

48 FEET MOORAGE - $400.00 Shelter Bay is a gated, private community with direct access via the Swinomish Channel to the San Juan islands and beyond. The private moorage will accommodate a boat up to 48’, you’ll have your private parking spot as you enter through the gate on the side of my house. For more information, please contact (425) 210-5050. 6508

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6476

APRIL 2019

Poulsbo, WA

ANACORTES MARINA

Annual moorage available now: 32’ to 80’ Open and 32’ to 60’ Covered slips. In town rental slips w/security gates, mini storage, full service boat yard, fuel dock & pump out on site. Anacortesmarina.com or (360) 293-4543

1945

6506

CANAL BOAT IN FRANCE – 1/3 OWNERSHIP 1995 fiberglass Rialto 1140FB (11.4 meters) outfitted for cruising and located in the Burgundy region of France for 2019. Two cabins, each w/ head & shower, galley, salon w/inside steering & table for four, forward cockpit ideal for romantic dinners for two, plus flying bridge/sun deck with table for four or more. Each partner gets approximately a two month time period per year. Ideal boat for one or two couples. €15,000 – other two partners live in Seattle. Contact Michael with questions – jmcollins86@hotmail.com

LIBERTY BAY MARINA 40’ - 48’ - 60’ open slips. Great location. Restrooms, Showers.

CLUBS

Contact (360) 671-8339 or jermaine@sanjuansailing.com

INTEREST IN SAILBOAT PARTNERSHIP Experienced sailor would like to buy into 1/3 to 1/5 interest in 35 to 43 foot premium quality sailboat. Would also consider limited use lease arrangement. Email: SkiPilot99@msn.com

34’ - 50’ slips for lease/purchase Phone &(206) 789-7350 Free Wifi, Pumpouts Showers, Fuel, Store /Café Fax (206) 789-6392 • semiahmoomarina.com (360) 371-0440 Email calla@48north.com

360-779-7762 or 360-509-0178

SEEKING USCG INSTRUCTORS

PARTNERSHIPS

6327 Seaview Ave NW Gateway to the San Juans Seattle, WA 98107

MOORAGE/ANACORTES, WA

6113

CASSENS & PLATH ULTRA SEXTANT Beautiful C&S Ultra Sextant. Original wood case and additional waterproof travel case. Approx 2002. $800. Anacortes. Come to inspect. For more info, please email barton.waring@gmail.com

MARINAS

MOORAGE

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FREE unlimited day sailing on the club boats.

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• Sail on Puget Sound out of Shilshole Bay Marina • Full Service Sailing Club/Pro Shop/Brokerage • All the advantages of ownership w/out the hassles

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2442 NW Market St. #94, Seattle, WA 98107 “Established in Ballard since 1976” $90 Annual Dues - Reciprocal Moorages High quality sailing at the lowest cost For more info call Mike at (206) 265-9459

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SLOOP TAVERN YACHT CLUB

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The Best Racing in the Northwest • On the Lake or Sound • Active Cruising • Reciprocal Rights Corinthian Yacht Club of Seattle 7755 Seaview Ave. NW, Seattle, WA 98117 Phone (206) 789-1919 for information www.cycseattle.org

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206-782-5100 www.seattlesailing.com info@seattlesailing.com 7001 Seaview Ave NW Suite 130 (Shilshole Bay Marina in Port of Seattle Building)

48º NORTH


PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

CHARTER

INSTRUCTION

See us for a Better way to Heat Your Boat

• Basic through Advanced Sailing Lessons • Week-long Cruise & Learn lessons • Spinnaker, Intro and Advance Racing Classes Gill foulweather gear & Dubarry footwear

SAIL ALASKA WITH THE EXPERTS

206-782-5100

Glacier Bay, Sitka, Petersburg, Juneau

www.seattlesailing.com info@seattlesailing.com 7001 Seaview Ave NW Suite 130 (Shilshole Bay Marina in Port of Seattle Building)

Now Booking for 2019!!! S/V BOB 7-10 day trips, 4 staterooms w/ private heads and showers. Licensed Captain and crew. Fully permitted and insured. (907) 887-9446 Capt.blain@soundsailing.com www.soundsailing.com

(800) 494-7200

SAIL • HIKE • FISH • WHALES • BEARS

SAIL ALASKA WITH THE EXPERTS

Espar by Parts • Sales • Service (206) 548-1306 Eberspächer www.nwmarineair.com

Glacier Bay, Sitka, Petersburg, Juneau Now Booking 2016, 2017 S/V BOB 7-10 day trips, 4 staterooms w/ private heads and showers. Licensed Captain and crew. Fully permitted and insured. (907) 887-9446 Capt.blain@soundsailing.com www.soundsailing.com SAIL

HIKE

FISH

WHALES

BEARS

Tethys

Offshore Sailing for Women Nancy Erley, Instructor 206.789.5118

nancy@tethysoffshore.com www.tethysoffshore.com

• Up to 50% off US Sailing leSSonS on Brand new 2018 Capri 22’S • “BaSiC to BareBoat” Sailing leSSonS

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES WINTER YACHT SITTING Professional woman looking to yacht sit over the winter on a boat moored at Harbour Marina in Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. Keep your yacht warm and dry. References available! candisekrummel@gmail.com

6515

VESSEL MOVING

No ocean too big, no trip too small, no ship too large, no mast too tall, sail or power, we move them all!!! When you are ready, give us a call. Professional service since 1967.

* US Sailing Certification * Learn to Sail in 5 Days!

• loweSt inStrUCtor to StUdent ratio in Seattle • HigHeSt qUality fleet in tHe paCifiC nortHweSt

CappyTom@aol.com (206) 390-1596

At Shilshole Bay Marina www.windworkssailing.com 206.784.9386 48º NORTH

(800) 494-7200

60

APRIL 2019


PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

MARINE EQUIPMENT

Seaview Ave NW • Rotary6327 Swaging • Roller Furlings • Life Lines • Mast Repair • WA Standing Rigging Seattle, 98107

(360) 293-1154 www.northwestrigging.com Phone (206) 789-7350 Fax (206) 789-6392 email jen@48north.com

SAILING DONATIONS

Community Boating Center Nancy Anderson - Seattle 206/669-0329 • sureritesigns@gmail.com www.sureritesigns.com

1.5 inch =$60/month Business Classified ad 2016 March issue PROOF

Full service rig shop serving the Puget Sound

Cliff Hennen ‑ (206) 718‑5582

Donate your Boat toDay! All donated vessels and equipment help raise funds that support CBC youth programs. Donated vessels and equipment are eligible for itemized charitable tax deductions.

• 30+ years of experience •

www.taylorsails.com erictaylorsails@gmail.com

for more info, or to donate (360) 714-8891 or info@boatingcenter.org

www.evergreenrigging.com ‑ (360) 207‑5016

MARINE EQUIPMENT

Specializing in Marine Heating, Air Conditioning & Refrigeration

Cliff Valentine

cliff@nwmarineair.com

(206) 548-1306 Check Us Out at

www.nwmarineair.com

We specialize in marine heat pumps, A/C systems, refrigeration, and watermakers. We also carry an assortment of portable freezers and wine coolers for your entertainment needs on the go!

Mac’s CUSTOM CANVAS & MARINE UPHOLSTERY

Boat Cushions & Canvas CLEANING & REPAIR

Resew • Zippers • Clear Plastic Foam • Water Proofing • New Free Estimates • Fast Quality Work

Adler Barbour APRIL 2019

5015 15th Ave. NW, Seattle, WA 98107

(206) 783-1696 - www.MacTops.com

61

48º NORTH


Listings Legend ElliottBYS Elliott Bay Yacht Sales Mar Servic Marine Servicenter NWYachtnet NWYachtnet.com Passion Passion Yachts Rubicon Rubicon Yachts Sail NW Sail Northwest San Juan San Juan Sailing Seattle Yachts Seattle Yachts Signature Signature Yacht Sales Swiftsure Swiftsure Yachts Waterline Waterline Boats West Yachts West Yachts Wright Yachts Wright Yachts Yachtfinders YachtFinders/WindSeakers

ELECTRIC PROPULSION SYSTEMS

SPIRIT 1.0

REPLACES UPTO A 6 HP GASOLINE MOTOR CAN PUSH 3000 LB BOAT

OW BOAT SH ER L L E S P TO

NAVY 6

REPLACES UPTO A 25 HP GASOLINE MOTOR CAN PUSH 6000 LB BOAT

Key

NAVY 3 TILLER

N = No Auxillary Power G = Inboard Gas 0 = Outboard D = Inboard Diesel E = Electric

REPLACES UPTO A 12 HP GASOLINE MOTOR CAN PUSH 4500 LB BOAT

(206) 849-4259 • www.seattleboatworks.com

Brokerage Sailboat Listings Boat Type

Yr Aux

20' Corsair Pulse 600

18 O $44,900

Price Broker

Wright Yachts

Page

20' Laser SB3

08

19,500

Mar Servic

20' Pacific Seacraft

83 D

32,500

West Yachts

Boat Type

Yr Aux

30' C&C MKII

88 D

29,500

Mar Servic

72

33' Legendary 33 Kch. 00 D 180,000

Waterline

72

30' Catalina 30

81 D

14,500

Mar Servic

72

33' Nauticat PH

87 D

99,900

Mar Servic

72

70

30' Catalina Sloop

79 D

19,500

NW Yachtnet

7

33' Nauticat PH

85 D

99,000

Mar Servic

72

11

Price Broker

Page

Boat Type

Yr Aux

Price Broker

Page

30' Catalina Tall Rig

80 D

17,999

NW Yachtnet

7

33' Soverel

85 D

17,500

21' Com-Pac Eclipse

18 O

49,900

Passion Yachts 66

30' Dufour Arpege

72 D

12,500

NW Yachtnet

7

33' Wauquiez

83 D

49,000

West Yachts

22' Hunter 216 w/Tr

O8 O

11,900

Passion Yachts 66

30' Fisher

79 D

34,500 Yachtfinders

68

33' C&C 99

02 D

73,500

Seattle Yachts 65

22' Hunter 216 w/Tr

O3 O

7,900

Passion Yachts 66

30' Henderson

97 G

23,000

Sail NW

2

33' Hunter

11

D

99,900

Passion Yachts 66

22' J/70

12

G

34,900

Sail NW

2

30' J/95 New

19

~

Sail NW

2

34' C&C 34

80 D

29,900

ElliottBYS

22' J/70 New

19

G

~

Sail NW

2

30' Olson

84 G

15,000 Yachtfinders

68

34' Catalina

87 D 42,000 Yachtfinders

22' Beneteau Fir. w/Tr

18 O

~ Passion Yachts 66

30' Sabre 30 mkIII

88 D

39,500 Swiftsure

69

34' Catalina 34

84 D

35900

24' Corsair

18 O

~

30' Catalina mkI

86 D

14,900

Passion Yachts 66

34' Columbia 34

72 D

30,000

24' Hunter w/Trlr

93 G

9,900

Passion Yachts 66

31' Cal Sloop

79 D

24,500

NW Yachtnet

34' Dash

82 D

19,900

24' Martin 241

80 O

7,900

Passion Yachts 66

31' Cape George

81 D

38,000

West Yachts

34' Gemini

05 D 115,000 ElliottBYS

67

24' Nimble w/Trlr

95 O

14,900

Passion Yachts 66

32' Corsair 970 Sport

18 O 244,900

Wright Yachts

64

25' Fisher Potter Kch.

77 D

29,500

Signature

32' Evelyn

85 D

17,500

Mar Servic

26' Hake

12 D 64,000 Yachtfinders

32' Irwin Sloop

87 D

24,500

NW Yachtnet

26' MacGregor w/Trlr

89 G

8,900

Passion Yachts 66

32' Islander

77 D

29,000

NW Yachtnet

26' Ranger w/Trlr

79 D

12,900

Passion Yachts 66

32' Islander

78 D

19,500

27' Cascade 27

78 D

15,000

Passion Yachts 66

32' J/97e New

19

D

27' Island Packet 27

89 D

32,500

Mar Servic

20' Benetau First w/Tr 18 O

27' Pac SeaCraft Orion 79 D

~ Passion Yachts 66

Wright Yachts

35,000 Swiftsure

11

71 68

D

Mar Servic

~

Sail NW Sail NW

72

32' J/99 New

19

D

~

69

32' Westsail 32

79 D

22,500

Mar Servic

7 70

Sail NW

66

Wright Yachts Mar Servic Sail NW

11

34' Gemini 105 MC

06 D 108,000

San Juan

72

34' Gemini 105 MC

08 D

Wright Yachts

7

34' Hallberg Rassy

00 D

7

34' Hunter 340

00 D

54,900

San Juan

34' J/105 Shoal Daft

99 D

49,000

Sail NW

34' Jeanneau 349

19

189,942

Mar Servic

72 2

D

114900

155,000 Swiftsure

2 70

67 68 11 72 2

11 69 64 2 72

2

34' O'Day

82 D

23,900

Passion Yachts 66

72

34' J/105

O3 D

85,000

Passion Yachts 66

278,655

Seattle Yachts 65

84 D

14,900

Passion Yachts 66

32' Cascade Cutter

71

D

29,900

Passion Yachts 66

34' Tartan 345

19

27' Cheoylee Offshore 65 D

14,900

Passion Yachts 66

32' Hunter 326

O3 D

56,000

Passion Yachts 66

35' Alberg

64 D

19,000 Yachtfinders

68

28' Herreshoff

95 D

39,500 Yachtfinders

32' PDQ Catamaran

OO D 109,000

Passion Yachts 66

35' Beneteau

89 D 45,000 Yachtfinders

68

15,900

35' CAL

83 D

34,000

West Yachts

70

35' Cheoy Lee

80 D

41,500

NW Yachtnet

27' Catalina

Passion Yachts 66

33' Beneteau First 10R 07 D

89,500

Signature

Sail NW

33' eSailing Yacht

07 D

64,900

Sail NW

Passion Yachts 66

33' Gambling 34

74 D

29,000

Mar Servic

72

35' Hunter Leg. 35.5

90 D

44,900

NW Yachtnet

Passion Yachts 66

33' Hunter

05 D

67950

Wright Yachts

11

35' J-35 Sloop Racer

84 D

28,900

Waterline

66

33' J/100

07 D

69

35' Jason Brewer 35

76 D

44,900

Mar Servic

72

28' O'Day

82 D

29' J/88 New

19

D

~

29' Carrera 290

93 G

14,900

29' Cascade Cutter

84 D

19,900

30' Baba

84 D

54,900 Yachtfinders

48º NORTH

68 2

68

62

76,500 Swiftsure

71

D

2

7 7

APRIL 2019


Brokerage Sailboat Listings Boat Type

Yr Aux

35' Nauticat 35

00 D

194,500

Price Broker

35' Wauquiez

82 D

59,900

NW Yachtnet

35' Beneteau 350

88 D

39,900

35' Young Sun Cutter

79 D

36' Bruce Roberts Spr. 01 D

Page

Boat Type

Yr Aux

Page

Boat Type

Yr Aux

37' Pacific Seacraft

99 D

164,900

Passion Yachts 66

40' Hunter

98 D

93,500 Yachtfinders

68

37' Pacific Seacraft Cre. 82 D

60,000

Seattle Yachts 65

40' Islander Peterson

81 D

49,000

Yachtfinders

68

Passion Yachts 66

38' Alajuela 38

72 D

46,900

Waterline

66

40' J 40

90 D

99,500

Mar Servic

72

34,900

Passion Yachts 66

38' Alerion

6 D 199,500 Yachtfinders

68

40' J/120

99 D

159,000

Sail NW

2

55,500

Waterline

66

38' Beneteau

15

D

40' J/121 New

19

~

Sail NW

2

D

Mar Servic

72 7

Price Broker

189,900

36' C&C 110

04 D

110,000

ElliottBYS

67

38' Beneteau Oceanis

19

36' Colvin Pinky Sch.

93 D

79,000

Mar Servic

72

38' Block Island

60 D 150,000

Signature

71

40' J/122e New

19

D

~

68

40' Lagoon 40 #39

19

D

529,854

Mar Servic

~ Passion Yachts 66 Yachtfinders

D

Price Broker

Page

Sail NW

2 72

36' Hallberg Rassy

02 D 184,000 Swiftsure

69

38' Catalina

80 D

68

40' Malo Sloop

10 D

367,500

NW Yachtnet

36' Hunter

04 D

98,900

Signature

71

38' Seawind

19

Wright Yachts

11

40' Nauticat 40

85 D

149,900

Mar Servic

36' Islander Sloop

78

29,000

West Yachts

68

40' Panda

81 D

115,000 Swiftsure

69

36' J/111 New

19

D

40' Perry Bella

94 D 120,000 Swiftsure

69

36' J/112e New

19

72

36' Tanton 36

~

Sail NW

D

~

Sail NW

81 D

27,000

Mar Servic

59,000

Mar Servic

29,900 Yachtfinders

D 310,000

38' X-Yachts

94 D 39,000 Yachtfinders

2

38' Yankee

72 D

2

38' Catalina S&S 39' C&C

70

72

7

7 72

39,900

NW Yachtnet

83 D

29,900

Passion Yachts 66

40' Schucker 436 PH

72 D

86 D

64,900 Yachtfinders

68

40' Beneteau Oc.

O8 D 169,000

Passion Yachts 66

69,000

Mar Servic

36' Union Cutter

82 D

72

39' Cal 39

71

44,000 Swiftsure

69

40' Mariner Ketch

78 D

74,900

Passion Yachts 66

36' Valiant

85 D 99,000 Yachtfinders

68

39' Cal 39

78 D

35,900

Waterline

66

40' J/120

94 D

99,500

Sail NW

36' Vancouver

81 D

69

39' Jeanneau 39i

08 D

159,500

Mar Servic

72

41' Beneteau 411

00 D

119,900

Signature

71

139,500

Mar Servic

Signature

71

59,999 Swiftsure

D

36' Cascade

71

D

25,000

Passion Yachts 66

39' Jeanneau 39i

07 D

36' Catalina Sloop

91

D

55,000

Seattle Yachts 65

39' Nauticat

03 D 265,000 Swiftsure

36' Freedom

86 D

62,000

Seattle Yachts 65

39' Seawind

20 D 385,000

36,900

Passion Yachts 66

Wright Yachts

2

72

41' Beneteau Oc. 41.1

19

D

315,000

69

41' Buchanan Classic

63 D

49,750

11

41' Ericson

70 D 39,500 Yachtfinders 68

NW Yachtnet

7

36' Islander

82 D

39' Seawind 1160

05 D 335,000

Wright Yachts

11

41' Ericson Sloop

68 D

37,500

West Yachts

37' Corsair

19 O 300,000

Wright Yachts

11

39' Seawind 1160

19

D

~

Wright Yachts

11

41' Freeport Islander

78 D

66000

Wright Yachts

70

37' Endeavour

80 D 39,000 Yachtfinders

68

39' Beneteau 393

O2 D

129,900

Passion Yachts 66

41' Hunter 41 DS

08 D

154,000

San Juan

64 69

11

37' Island Packet 370

08 D 230,000

Mar Servic

72

39' Freedem Cat Kch.

83 D

65,000

Passion Yachts 66

41' Hunter 410

00 D 109,000 Swiftsure

37' Nautor Swan

80 D

West Yachts

70

39' Pearson 39-2

87 D

49,000

Passion Yachts 66

41' Hunter 410

98 D 104,900

Mar Servic

72

37' Rustler

15

40' Beneteau

94 D

85,000 ElliottBYS

67

41' Island Packet SP

07 D

319,000

Mar Servic

72

72

41' Island Trader

68

84,750

D 365,000

Sail NW

2

37' Southerly 115

87 D

89,900

Passion Yachts 66

40' Beneteau 400

95 D

72,500

Mar Servic

37' Tartan Blackwater

65 D

15,000

Yachtfinders

68

40' Beneteau Oc.

95 D

89,700

NW Yachtnet

37' Truant 37

80 D

45,000

Mar Servic

72

40' Fount. Paj Lucia

18 D

553,148

Signature

37' Bavaria

02 D

84,500

ElliottBYS

67

40' Hinckley

70 D 129,500 ElliottBYS

APRIL 2019

63

77 D

69,000

Yachtfinders

41' Morgan Classic CC 87 D

79,900

NW Yachtnet

71

41' Morgan Giles Cl.

87 D

86,500

NW Yachtnet

67

41' Passport 41

89 D 169,000

7

Mar Servic

7 7 72

48º NORTH


San Juan Sailing

• Sailing School • Guided Flotillas • Charters • Sales

2615 South Harbor Loop Dr. #1 Bellingham, WA 98225 Ph: (360) 671-4300

www.sanjuansailing.com • brokerage@sanjuansailing.com

Ready FoR

32' nordic TuG 2010 - $262,000 Currently in the charter fleet with bookings already for 2019. Cummins 270 HP diesel, bow & stern thrusters, Espar diesel heat, dinghy w/ davits, radar, electronics. Recent survey.

a

BRokeR you Can TRusT?

Whether you’re listing your boat, looking for your dream yacht, or both – Jack is ready to put his 40 years of experience in the marine industry to work for you. He’s as passionate about helping his clients as he is about sailing.

34' mainship - $ 83,500 Great PNW cruiser. Single Yanmar diesel 370 HP with 1425 hours. Bow thruster, full enclosure, 5 KW GenSet with Cruisair A/C and heat, dinghy with 6 HP OB on Weaver davits. Generous forward cabin and dinette converts to double bed.

34' Gemini - $108,000 A nimble, stable catamaran with three staterooms, single head, central salon table, screecher sail/rig and fully enclosed cockpit. Professionally maintained. Recently surveyed and major findings addressed by the owner.

JaCk spRiggs

Let us sell your boat for you!

(206) 399-7040 ◊ jack@seattleyachts.com

Over Three Decades in Business - Contact Us Today!

Brokerage Sailboat Listings Boat Type

Yr Aux

41' Tartan 4100

96 D 189,900

41' Beneteau Oc.

19

41' Finngulf

03 D 249,500

41' Sceptre PH

89 D

D

Price Broker

Page

Boat Type

Yr Aux

44' Morris

95 D 375,000 Swiftsure

69

49' Transpac 49 OS

86 D 185,000

44' Nauticat 44

80 D 185,000

72

49' Transpacific Marine 80 D

Seattle Yachts 65

44' Nordic

83 D

115,000 Swiftsure

69

49' TransPacific Marine 80 D 109,000

Seattle Yachts 65

44' Spencer 44

73 D

40,000

Mar Servic

72

50' Baltic

Wright Yachts

11

~ Passion Yachts 66 115,000

Boat Type

Yr Aux

Price

Broker

Page

Mar Servic

Price Broker 129,000

Page

Waterline

66

ElliottBYS

67

Sail NW

2

99 D 499,000 Swiftsure

69

42' Beneteau 423

07 D 169,000

71

44' WorldCruiser

79 D 218,000 ElliottBYS

67

50' Beneteau

88 D 145,000 Yachtfinders

68

42' Catalina

89 D

69,900 Yachtfinders

68

45' Beneteau Oc.

18 D 388,000

Signature

71

50' Farr PH

03 D 475,000 Swiftsure

69

42' Catalina

93 D 115,000 Yachtfinders

68

45' Bestevaer 45st

11

Sail NW

50' Jeanneau 50DS

11

42' Catalina 42

92 D

72

45' Brewer

78 D 69,000 Yachtfinders

68

50' Lavranos

90 D

169,900 Swiftsure

69

42' Catalina 42 MK1

94 D

66

51' Able Apogee

00 D 499,000 Swiftsure

69

68

51' Alden Skye Kch

80 D

139,500

Mar Servic

72

51' German Frers

87 D

49,900

Mar Servic

72

Signature

110,000

Mar Servic

114,500

Mar Servic

D 550,000

72

45' Bruce Roberts OS

83 D

154,000 Swiftsure

69

45' Morgan

94 D 139,000 Yachtfinders

42' Hinckley Sou'wester 84 D 230,000 Swiftsure

69

45' Beneteau Oc. 45

18 D

42' Island Packet 420 00 D 259,000 Swiftsure

69

42' Hallberg Rassy 42E 83 D

69,000

Waterline

~ Passion Yachts 66

99 D 395,000

Yachtfinders

68

19

Wright Yachts

11

01 D 329,000 Swiftsure

69

53' J/160

03 D 575,000

46' Jeanneau 45.2

00 D

179,500

Mar Servic

72

53' Jeanneau

11

D 375,000 Swiftsure

69

46' Kanter Atlantic

68

53' Oyster

99 D 410,000 Swiftsure

69

53' Spencer 53 PH

78 D

Waterline

66

56' Custom Morgan

81 D 195,000 Swiftsure

69 66

489,859

Signature

11

46' CAL 2-46

73 D

89,900

West Yachts

42' Seawind

19

Wright Yachts

11

46' Hallberg Rassy

42' Catalina 42 mkII

O2 D 169,000

Passion Yachts 66 Passion Yachts 66

71

42' Mermaid Ketch

78 D

88 D

99,900

Yachtfinders

43' Beneteau

05 D 119,500 ElliottBYS

67

46' West Indies Heritage 77 D

84,999

Signature

43' Gulfstar

77 D 65,000 Yachtfinders

68

46' Spindrift CC

84 D 138,000

Passion Yachts 66

71

D 859000

149,500

43' Hans Christian (Chr.) 86 D

99,000 Swiftsure

69

47' Beneteau 47.7

05 D 189,000

ElliottBYS

67

56' Herreshof 56f MP

56 D

43' Hans Christian (Trad.l) 78 D

115,000 Swiftsure

69

47' Catana 472

01 D 449,000 Swiftsure

69

58' Tayana CC

02 D 429,000

43' Hunter 430

99,400

47' Chris White Atl.

13

69

59' Outremer 5X

21

43' Luengen 43 OS

87 D

89,500

43' Slocum

87 D

139,900

NW Yachtnet

7

72

52' Seawind

D

Wright Yachts

96 D

Mar Servic

52' Santa Cruz

19

07 D 375,000

54,900

D 339,000

70

46' Beneteau Oc. 46.1

42' Lagoon

D 410,000

2

D 799,000 Swiftsure

215,000

Sail NW

Waterline NW Yachtnet

D € 1,190,000 Swiftsure

2

7 69

Waterline

66

47' Garcia Passoa

05 D 375,000 Swiftsure

69

59' Schooner Pinky

90 D 150,000

NW Yachtnet

7

West Yachts

70

47' Vagabond

84 D 82,000 Yachtfinders

68

60' Mariner

78 D 550,000 Yachtfinders

68

43' Waquiez Amphitite 82 D 119,000

Wright Yachts

47' Vagabond Ketch

83 D 249,900

72

61' C&C

72 D

Mar Servic

72

43' Polaris Cutter

78 D

74,900

Passion Yachts 66

48' Chris White Atl.

10 D 625,000 Swiftsure

69

65' Bruce Roberts NY

97 2D 329,000

Waterline

66

44' Bruce Roberts

90 D

37,500

West Yachts

70

48' Waterline

97 D 395,000 Swiftsure

69

75' Custom Schooner

87 D 299,500

NW Yachtnet

44' Bruce Roberts OS

93 D

49,500

Mar Servic

72

49' Hunter 49

O9 D 299,900

72

11

44' Jeanneau 440

19

D

399,982

Mar Servic

44' Jeanneau 44i

10 D

189,900

Passion Yachts 66

48º NORTH

D

Mar Servic

Passion Yachts 66

49' Jeanneau 490

19

519,796

Mar Servic

72

49' Jeanneau SO 49P

07 D 349,500

Mar Servic

72

64

179,000

83' Custom St. Schoon. 34 D 250,000

Waterline

7 66

APRIL 2019


SEATTLE YACHT AD???

APRIL 2019

65

48ยบ NORTH


SALES + S A I L I N G L E S S O N S

MacGregor 26 2012 $28,900

Freedom 39 1983 $65,000 Po r t l a n d

PASSION-YACHTS.COM 503.289.6306

Brokerage Trawler Listings Boat Type 21' 22' 25' 25' 25' 27' 27' 27' 27' 27' 28' 28' 29' 29' 31' 31' 31' 31' 31' 32' 32' 32' 32' 32' 32' 33' 33' 34' 34'

Yr Aux

Ranger Tug R21-EC 14 D Surf Scoter 92 G Devlin Surf Runner 04 D Four Winns Vista 19 G Shearwater 05 D Devlin Black Crown 93 D Four Winns Vista 18 G Ranger Tug 15 D Ranger Tug R-27 16 D Ranger Tugs R-27 17 D Pelican Bay 90 Bertram Moppie 88 G Four Winns Horizon 19 G Ranger Tug R-29 CB 17 D Camano 31 Troll 95 D Camano 31 Troll 92 D Helmsman 31 Sedan 18 D Ranger Tugs R-31CB 15 D Ranger Tugs R-31S 17 D Back Cove 32 18 D BC 32 Tri-Cabin 86 D Grand Banks 72 D Grand Banks 32 72 D Nordic Tug 8 D Nordic Tug 10 D Back Cove 08 D SEARAY 330 08 D Mainship 0 D Red Wing 08 D

48º NORTH

Price Broker $44,900 49,900 99,900 139,564 76,000 90,000 169,862 150,000 164,000 174,000 39,900 65,000 225,572 236,800 94,500 78,500 289,000 264,000 269,000 379,500 69,000 37,500 49,000 229,000 26,200 259,000 155,000 83,500 115,000

Page

Seattle Yachts 65 West Yachts 70 West Yachts 70 Mar Servic 72 West Yachts 70 West Yachts 70 Mar Servic 72 Elliott Bay YS 67 Seattle Yachts 65 Waterline 66 West Yachts 70 Wright Yachts 11 Mar Servic 72 Seattle Yachts 65 Waterline 66 Waterline 66 Waterline 66 Waterline 66 Waterline 66 Mar Servic 72 Waterline 66 Elliott Bay YS 67 Waterline 66 NW Yachtnet 7 San Juan Sailing 64 Swiftsure 69 West Yachts 70 San Juan Sailing 64 Swiftsure 69

Boat Type 34' Tollycraft 35' Carver Supersport 35' Four Winns Vista 35' MJM 35z New 36' Albin 36 Tri-cabin 36' Egg Harbor 36' Grand Banks 36' Grand Banks 36' Monk 37' Fairway 370 38' Helmsman 38 38' Helmsman 38E 38' Ocean Alexander 39' Azimut 39' Bayliner 3988 39' Carver 39' Mainship 40' Carver 390 40' Davis Trawler 40' MJM 40z New 40' Pacific 40 40' Willard LRC 41' Bracewell 41 FB 41' Cheer Men 41 PT 42' Californian 42 42' Grand Banks 42' Grand Banks Cl. 43' MJM 43z New 43' Sabreline Aft Cbin

Yr Aux 89 D 06 G 18 D 19 G 79 2D 78 D 69 D 77 D 88 D 16 D 16 D 17 D 87 D 00 D 98 G 93 G 99 D 95 G 87 D 19 D 00 D 83 D 19 D 82 2D 77 2D 89 D 77 D 19 G 95 2D

Price Broker

69,500 95000 369,807 – 49,500 44,950 59,000 99,000 109,000 389,500 449,000 469,000 150,000 215,000 139,900 64,900 139,500 59000 79,900 – 219,000 169,000 499,000 69,000 59,000 205,000 116,000 – 299,000

66

Page

Elliott Bay YS Wright Yachts Mar Servic Sail NW Waterline Elliott Bay YS NW Yachtnet Seattle Yachts West Yachts NW Yachtnet Waterline Waterline West Yachts West Yachts West Yachts West Yachts Yachtfinders Wright Yachts NW Yachtnet Sail NW Waterline NW Yachtnet Waterline Waterline Waterline Elliott Bay YS Mar Servic Sail NW Waterline

67 11 72 2 66 67 7 65 70 7 66 66 70 70 70 70 68 11 7 2 66 7 66 66 66 67 72 2 66

Boat Type 43' Tollycraft 45' Grand Mariner 45 45' Navigator PH 46' Nielson Trawler 46' Grand Banks CL 48' Tollycraft 49' Grand Banks 49' Meridian 490 PH 50' Cruisers Sedan 50' Grand Banks 50' Grand Banks 50 50' MJM 50z New 51' Symbol PH 52' Emerald PH 53' Aluminum LRC 53' Pacemaker 54' Kady Krogen PH 55' Lien Hwa 57' Alden 57 57' Bayliner 5788 60' Custom PH 60' DeFever/Angel 60 65' Malahide 65 PH 70' Monte Fino 72' McQueen CPMY 76' Conv. Wallace Tug 78' Converted Tug 100' Steel Bushey Tug 150' Custom Ferry

Yr Aux

Price Broker

81 D 189,000 81 2D 115,000 11 D 499,500 81 D 249,000 88 D 245,000 77 D 109,000 85 D 269,500 06 D 285,000 99 D 219,000 70 D 149,000 72 2D 179,000 19 D – 97 D 299,000 96 D 199,000 74 2D 199,000 68 D 49000 91 D 359,000 84 D ~ 64 2D 79,500 00 D 459,000 89 D 499,000 84 D 435,000 72 D 795,000 96 D 1,250,000 77 D 525,000 1906 D 160,000 1890 D 97,500 44 D 179,000 36 D 1,699,000

Page

Seattle Yachts Waterline NW Yachtnet West Yachts West Yachts Seattle Yachts NW Yachtnet Elliott Bay YS NW Yachtnet NW Yachtnet Waterline Sail NW NW Yachtnet Elliott Bay YS Waterline Wright Yachts Waterline Wright Yachts Waterline West Yachts NW Yachtnet Waterline Waterline NW Yachtnet West Yachts Waterline Waterline Waterline NW Yachtnet

65 66 7 70 70 65 7 67 7 7 66 2 7 67 66 11 66 11 66 70 7 66 66 7 70 66 66 66 7

APRIL 2019


APRIL

2019

67

48ยบ NORTH


Professionally staffed! Open 6 days, Sun by appt.

(619) 224-2349 • Fax (619) 224-4692 • 2330 Shelter Island Dr. #207 San Diego, CA 92106 www.yachtfinders.biz • Toll-Free (866) 341-6189 • info@yachtfinders.biz

A Leader in Brokerage Sales on the West Coast w g Ne stin Li

47’BLUEWATERVAGABOND47’84...$82,000

“BOLD VENTURE” A great boat in need of TLC from a new owner who will appreciate a sturdy, well built, CC cruising sailboat.

46’KANTERCUSTOMATLANTIC’88....$99,900 “SEAFARER” This sturdy offshore PH vessel is a top candidate if you want a comfortable, manageable boat to go almost anywhere.

43’ GULFSTAR G43 ’77....$65,000 “SEA CARLA” A comfortable layout below with functional working deck layout. Deep cockpit protected with a dodger.

42’ CATALINA 42 MK I ’89.......$69,900

39’ C &C LANDFALL ’86........$64,900 “GAIA J” A unique and capable vessel that has cruised extensively. Hard dodger and canvas enclosure added for comfort and safety.

38’ ALERION AE ’06.........$199,500 “ROCINANTE” This boat is one of the most attractive vessels on the water to date. Enjoy sailing in a pure and simple form.

“CALYPSO” Great blend of comfort and function. Capable of crossing oceans. Easy for two to handle. Upgraded electronics.

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41’ ISLAND TRADER ’77.............$69,000 “MS SC” A classic full keel cutter in excellent condition with many recent upgrades including all new standing rigging and sails.

40’ HUNTER LEGEND 40.5 ’98...$93,500 “HIGH ENERGY” Very well-kept and cared for. Rigging replaced in 2017. Wonderful boat for cruising, daysailing, and liveaboard.

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37’ TARTAN BLACKWATCH ’65...$15,000 “FAIAOAHE” This boat has a modified full keel, is easily driven, and is a delight to single-hand. West coast veteran.

35’ PEARSON ALBERG 35 ’64....$19,000 “SPRIG” Extremely solid and excellent sailing classic. New electrical panel. Fresh sails and rig are yearning to go on adventures.

30’ TA SHING BABA 30 ’84.........$54,900 Uncommonly safe and comfortable cruiser in almost any sea conditions. A big boat in a small body. Easily handled by two.

28’HERRESHOFF ROZINANTE’95...$39,500

“EDITH” Ideal for daysailing, club racing and/or simple compact cruising. Call for an appointment to inspect this beautiful vessel.

Please Support the Advertisers Who Bring You 48° North Anacortes Boat & Yacht Show. . . . . . . . 15

Ground Tackle Marine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Scan Marine / Wallas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

Ballard Sails & Yachts Services . . . . . . 49

Iverson’s Design Dodgers . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

Seattle Boat Works. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

Ballard Yacht Rigging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Lee Sails. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

Seattle Sailing Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Beta Marine Engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Mahina Offshore Expeditions. . . . . . . . 43

Seattle Yachts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

Boat U.S. Towing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Marine Servicenter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72

Seaview Boat Yard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Brion Toss Yacht Riggers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

NWYachtnet.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Seventh Wave Marine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Cape George Marine Works . . . . . . . . . . 21

Oceanmax / PropSpeed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Signature Yachts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71

Clean Sails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Passion Yachts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

Swiftsure Race. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

CSR Marine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

Port Ludlow Resort. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Swiftsure Yachts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

Doyle Sails Seattle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Port of Friday Harbor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Ullman Sails. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Drivelines Northwest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Port of Port Townsend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Waterline Boats. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

Elliott Bay Yacht Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67

Port Townsend Rigging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

West Yachts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

EP Carry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Rubicon Yachts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63

Wright Yachts / Corsair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Fisheries Supply. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Sail Northwest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Yachtfinders/Windseakers . . . . . . . . . . . 68

Flagship Maritime. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

Sail Sand Point. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

Yager Sails & Canvas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Gallery Marine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

San Juan Sailing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 & 64

GEICO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Scanmar Int. / Pelagic Autopilots. . . . 49

48º NORTH

68

APRIL 2019


APRIL

2019

69

48ยบ NORTH


46' CAL 2-46 1973

info@west-yachts.com 1019 Q Ave. Suite D, Anacortes, WA

At West Yachts you pay only 8.7% sales tax. Why pay more?

43' Slocum 43 1987

41' Ericson 1968

37' Nautor Swan 1980

36’ Islander Sloop 1978

35' CAL 1983

33' Wauquiez Gladiator 1983

31' Cape George Cutter 1981

20' Pacific Seacraft Flicka 1983

72' Monk McQueen 1977

46' Nielson Trawler 1981

46' Grand banks Classic 1988

39' Bayliner 3988 1998

39' Carver Cockpit Motoryacht 1993

38' Ocean Alexander Double Cabin 1987

36' Monk 1988

28' Pelican Bay 1990

27' Devlin Black Crown 1993

Bu

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46' CAL 2-46 1973

34' PDQ Power Catamaran 2003

33' Devlin Kingfisher

MAY 16TH - 19TH 25' Shearwater Cabin Cruiser 2005

25' Devlin Surf Runner 2004

22' Devlin Surf Scoter 1992

(360) 299-2526 • www.west-yachts.com


APRIL

2019

71

48ยบ NORTH


MARINE SERVICENTER e

In

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2020 Island Packet 349 - Order Yours! Cruising World - 2019 Boat of the Year Au g.

1 Sold!

2019 Lagoon 40 #39: $529,854 West Coast Debut! SAVE $27,448

L-40

Ar riv es

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Single level living & master hull suite! Aft mast w/ big self tacking jib, Code 0 & more! d

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2020 Jeanneau 410 #73972: $326,638 Scow Bow Hull, Walk-Around Deck!

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50' Jeanneau 50DS ‘11.....$339,500

50' German Frers ‘81 .....$49,900

47' Vagabond Ketch ‘83.. $249,900

46' Jeanneau 45.2 ‘00...$179,500

44' Spencer 44 ‘73 ....... $40,000

42' Catalina MkI ‘92 ... $110,000

42' Catalina MkI ‘94.....$114,500

41' IP SP Cruiser ‘07 ... $319,000 Tacks and Gybes

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40' Nauticat PH ‘85.....$149,900 u d

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40' Jeanneau 409 ‘13.......$239,500

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40' J/40 ‘90....................$99,500

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41' Passport 41 ‘89 ..... $169,000

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44' Nauticat MS ‘80 ... $185,000

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61' C&C ‘72 ................... $164,000

34 Sold!

2019 Jeanneau 419 #74316: $274,870 Final 419 built, own a legend! SAVE $26,200

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2019 Jeanneau 490 #73996: $519,796 Scow Bow, Walk-Around Deck. SAVE $19,265 u

2020 Jeanneau 349 #74440: $189,965 Square-top main, twin wheel. SAVE $12,350 N ow !

1 Sold!

1 Sold!

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2019 Jeanneau 440 #73995: $399,985 Scow Bow, Walk-Around Deck. SAVE $18,775 Ju st Ar riv ed !

10 Sold!

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Ju st Ar riv ed !

2 Sold!

St oc kSA LE !

Serving Northwest Boaters since 1977

39' Jeanneau 39i ‘07....$139,500

37' Truant 37 ‘80 .......... $45,000

37' Island Packet 370 ‘08....$230,000

35' Nauticat PH ‘00....$194,500

35' Jason Brewer ‘76.......$44,900

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39' Jeanneau 39i ‘08......$159,500

36' Union Cutter ‘82......$59,000

34' Columbia 34 ‘72......$30,000

33' Nauticat 33 ‘85...........$99,000

27' Island Packet ‘27 ’89...$32,500

Full Service Boatyard 2417 "T" Ave. Anacortes, WA 98221 360.293.8200

info@marinesc.com | www.marinesc.com

Dan Krier

Tim Jorgeson Jeff Carson

LesleyAnne Moore Jim Rard

Anacortes

Anacortes Sales Office & Explore Store 700 28th Street Anacortes, WA 98221 360.293.9521

20' Laser SB3 ‘08..................$19,500

Anacortes

Seattle Sales Office 2442 Westlake Ave N. Seattle, WA 98109 206.323.2405

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36' Pinky Schooner ‘93 ........$79,000

62' Lagoon 620 ‘20........Sale Pending 51' Jeanneau Yacht 51 ‘18 .... 4 SOLD 51' Alden Skye ‘80 .............$139,500 49' Jeanneau 49p ‘07 .........$349,500 49' Jeanneau 490 ‘19 .............. SOLD 46' Lagoon 46 ‘20.......Arriving SOLD 44' Bruce Roberts PH ‘93 .....$49,500 44' Jeanneau 440 ‘19 ........... 2 SOLD 41' Hunter 410 ‘98 ........Sale Pending 41' Jeanneau 410 ‘20..Arriving SOLD 40' Beneteau 400 ‘95 ....Sale Pending 40' Jeanneau 419 ‘11-’19....34 SOLD 40' Schucker 436 ‘72.....Sale Pending 38' Island Packet 349..Arriving SOLD 36' Tanton 36 ‘81 .................$27,000 34' Jeanneau 349 ‘19.....Sale Pending 34' Pacific Seacraft 34‘88...Sale Pending 34' KMV Grambling 34 ‘74...$29,000 33' Nauticat MS 33 ‘87.............SOLD 32' Jeanneau SF 3200...Arriving SOLD 32' Westsail 32 ‘79 ........Sale Pending 32' Evelyn ‘85 ......................$17,500 32' Islander 32 ‘78 ...............$19,500 30' Catalina 30 ‘81 ...............$14,500 30' C&C 30 MkII ‘88................SOLD

Patrick Harrigan

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April 2019 48° North  

April 2019 48° North  

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