Page 1

Romford

Upminster

Rainham

Hornchurch

Spring 2019

Moving forward Building for the borough

FUTURE PROOFING

Romford’s masterplan to set a new vision

IN DESIGN Issue 2 — Spring 2019

Green, open spaces, and natural light are key

Harold-Hill

Elm-Park

Collier-Row

Open for growth, business and opportunities


Breyer Advert v5.pdf

2

20/10/2017

15:27

Havering

Breyer Group

Working in partnership with

Romford’s favourite retail and leisure destination Proud sponsors of Havering magazine

With over 60 years’ experience specialising in roofing, construction, responsive repairs and maintenance, Breyer Group are one of the industry’s leading principal contractors, operating from our headquarters in Romford, Essex and our network of locally based offices. Breyer Group is a family owned business and it is currently managed by Tim Breyer.

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

Construction Our Construction division provides high quality internal and external refurbishment within Housing, Education, Healthcare and Commercial Sectors through a range of long-term framework agreements and short term contracts.

Roofing With nearly 60 years’ history and experience, we are one of the UK’s largest specialist roofing contractors and a prominent member of the National Federation of Roofing Contractors (NFRC).

B-Line At Breyer Group we put our residents first. With our B-Line service you can be assured of an immediate response to your repair call and feel safe in the knowledge that any work will be carried out to the highest standard with minimal disruption.

Find out more: breyergroup.co.uk

Caring for your home and community


DELIVERING AN EXCITING NEW DEVELOPMENT IN THE LONDON BOROUGH OF

Havering

North Street, Hornchurch 44 high specification, one and two bedroom apartments, for private rental Completion Autumn 2019

Award-winning, family owned, residential property developer and contractor, providing high-quality homes throughout London and the South East.

www.bugler.co.uk


CONTENTS

5

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF: JAMES RENOUX-WOOD EDITOR: NOELLA PIO KIVLEHAN ART DIRECTION: KATE MONUMENT

21

PRODUCTION MANAGER: CHRISTOPHER HAZELDINE BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR: PAUL GUSSAR SENIOR BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER: SHELLEY COOK PROJECT MANAGER: SUE MAPARA SUBSCRIPTIONS MANAGER: SIMON MAXWELL MANAGING DIRECTOR: TOBY FOX

11

COVER IMAGE: Napier House and New Plymouth House part of Havering’s 12 housing sites

IMAGES: Havering Council, REX / Shutterstock, SEGRO, PetStockBoys / Alamy, Countryside, Notting Hill Genesis, Rodger Tamblyn / Alamy, ©TfL, jax10289 / Shutterstock, Tong_stocker / Shutterstock, Chronicle / Alamy, Google Art Project, British Library’s collections, Gary Jude / judephotography.co.uk, Rafe Abrook, Mark Sepple, David Burrows/ Shutterstock

haveringmagazine.com

42

47 06 N E WS

Launch of the Romford BID, the town’s masterplan, and £40 million for road improvements are in the spotlight.

2 1 DESI GN

Importance of good design is highlighted throughout the multibillion pound regeneration schemes.

42 HER ITAG E

Sensitivities surrounding historic sites are taken into consideration for all planning in the borough.

1 1 M AST E R M INDED

2 8 PROJ EC TS

47 SHOW TIME

1 8 L E A D E R’S V ISI ON

3 6 FI RM FAVOUR ITE

54 IN THE MAR K ET

Romford’s future is being designed with input from residents on the masterplan.

Cllr Damian White shares his views on the borough, and the legacy he hopes to leave.

What is planned, where are the key schemes located and how much progress has been made?

Havering is attracting more businesses to prime locations, with improved infrastructure.

Retail and leisure are being ramped-up and revamped for more savvy shoppers and users.

As the heart of the town, Romford market is set for major transformation.

PUBLISHED BY: 3FOX INTERNATIONAL IN PARTNERSHIP WITH: THE LONDON BOROUGH OF HAVERING

PRINTED IN THE UK BY: PARK COMMUNICATIONS The views expressed in this ­magazine are not ­necessarily those of 3Fox International Limited. © 2019 3Fox International Limited. All material is strictly copyright and all rights are reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without the written permission of 3Fox International Ltd is strictly forbidden. The greatest care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of information in this magazine at time of going to press, but we accept no responsibility for omissions or errors.

FSC

H AV E R I N G


6

NEWS

ROMFORD BID OFFICIALLY LAUNCHED

A

new body aimed at boosting trade for Romford town centre was launched in February. The Romford BID (Business Improvement District) has over 500 town centre businesses in an area covering Central Library, Como Street car park, as well as properties opposite North Street and within the boundaries of the ring road. The BID hopes to bring in £2.75 million for projects and developments to boost customer spend and footfall in the town centre, as well as looking after the public realm, for the next five years.

H AV E R I N G

In July 2018, Romford’s businesses and organisations voted in favour of taking more control of their future by voting for the BID. This followed plans made by Romford Town Management Partnership to form the BID to help revitalise the town’s economy, which were approved by Havering Council leading to the balloting of business owners. Tom Stobbart, chair of the Romford BID, said its aim was to drive the growth in new tech business, while ensuring traditional, long-established enterprises also adopted the digital

and tech economy. Its first projects will involve developing town hosts - an approachable informed presence in the BID area - and marketing Romford. Havering’s other BID is London Riverside, with 350 businesses, covering eight industrial estates. Havering Council already has numerous initiatives in place to support local businesses. These include Havering Works, developed by the council, and partfunded by the European Social Fund that offers access to jobs, training and employment support services.


NEWS

MASTERPLAN CONSULTATION UNDERWAY Consultation on how the future of Romford will look over the next few decades got under way in January. The council-appointed firms GVA (now part of Avison Young), Maccreanor Lavington Architects along with architect and design company make:good will seek the opinions to help shape the Romford masterplan. Set to complete by December, the masterplan will set out how the regeneration of the town will take place. This will include designs on public realm, new homes, offices, retail, leisure, schools and community facilities. A key feature will be bringing the River Rom back into prominence.

BOOST FOR ROAD IMPROVEMENTS Over £40 million will be spent on the borough’s roads and pavements over the next four years. The money will be used to see the backlog of repairs cleared and the delivery of an enhanced road network. Council leader Damian White said: “People across Havering have said that road improvements are a priority. I am

pleased to take on this challenge.” Last year, £3.2 million was to be spent on improvements, while £895,000 was awarded by the Department of Transport in last year’s budget for pothole repairs. There is also an investment of £8 million from the Greater London Authority to fund the Romford ring road and the A1306 in Rainham.

TV’S DANCING ON ICE STARS IN ROMFORD Stars of the current 2019 ITV show Dancing on Ice have been using Romford’s flagship Sapphire Ice and Leisure centre as a practice ice rink. Among those to use its facilities for the present run of the programme that started in January, include reality TV star Gemma Collins, of The Only Way Is Essex fame, and Brian McFadden, former member of Irish boy band group Westlife. Since opening in February 2018, the £28 million centre, built to replace the 1980s ice rink that closed in April 2013, has attracted over 500,000 visitors. Home to the Romford Raiders ice hockey team, it has become a symbol of the town’s leisure and retail regeneration plans. The centre includes the full- sized ice rink, which is open to the public, a state-of-the-art 100-station gym, two swimming pools, dance studios and two fully licensed cafes. The Dancing on Ice final aired on ITV in March at the time of going to press.

7


8

NEWS

ELIZABETH LINE DELAYS IMPACT MINOR, SAYS COUNCIL

NEW TENANTS FOR SEGRO PARK RAINHAM’S ENTERPRISE QUARTER Four new firms have signed up for space at at SEGRO Park Rainham Enterprise Quarter. The quartet, who signed last month, are: the Date Company London, which imports and packages dates for luxury retailers; Noor Chand Electrical Solutions, an electrical installation contractor; KK Inspiration, shipping storage and courier company, and C-Tec London, a startup company specialising in the supply and distribution of building products. Fifteen companies have now signed up to the Enterprise Quarter, less than six months after its launch. The quarter, which forms part of the £180 million East Plus regeneration programme has 42 units, is a pioneering hub which provides dedicated workspace for startups and smaller sized businesses. H AV E R I N G

Alan Holland, SEGRO’s business unit director, Greater London, said: “The new tenants represent the perfect example of companies we are attracting to SEGRO Park Rainham and reflect the diversity of businesses from the area. From retro fashion t-shirts and building products, to organic dates and electrical contractors, the quality of well-located, modern space at the Enterprise Quarter clearly has broad appeal to those business people wanting to expand and grow their enterprises.”         SEGRO Park Rainham is spearheading the East Plus partnership, one of the most significant regeneration and employment space creation projects in London.  Since its inception in 2015, SEGRO has transformed 13.3ha of once redundant land into high quality work space, securing a wide range of customers at SEGRO Park Rainham and the nearby SEGRO Park Newham. 

The ongoing delays to the £15 billion Elizabeth line will have just a minor impact on Havering’s regeneration schemes, according to the council. While council leader Damian White called the hold-ups, “unfortunate”, and that “it will invariably have an impact on land prices,” he added: “I am confident our regeneration proposals will not be [badly] affected because of the ambition we have [for the borough], and the developers coming to our communities can see where we are going, rather than where we have been. “The expectation of where we are going is driving regeneration. The new properties will not start coming on-stream until the Elizabeth line is fully opened anyway – the first will not be sold for two-to-three years’ time, so it will not adversely impact our development proposals.” Originally planned to open at the end of 2018, the line that will connect major landmarks from east to west London from Shenfield to Reading, taking in Heathrow airport and Canary Wharf, will be delayed until at least the end of 2019. In August it was announced the route was to open nine months after the original December 2018 launch date to allow more time for testing. In December, a £1.4 billion bailout was announced that would be used to plug a predicted £2 billion hole in the Elizabeth line’s finances. Part of the eastern branches between Liverpool Street and Shenfield, transferred to a precursor service called TfL [Transport for London] Rail.

C

C

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

w


M

Anderson_racecard_advert_V2.pdf

1

01/03/2019

12:05

CREATING NEW

COMMUNITIES REQUIRES VISION, CRAFTSMANSHIP

AND CREATIVITY

Y

Y

Y

Anderson Group is an industry-leading construction and development company that specialises in finding possibilities where others see only problems. Wherever the site, whatever the challenge, we take abandoned and neglected land and create a bright new future through well-informed place-making.

www.andersongroup.co.uk

land@andersongroup.co.uk

01245 399 999


Galliard_StEd_Havering_FPC_Jan19.qxp 14/12/2018 15:01 Page 1

GALLIARD HOMES PRESENT

ST. EDWARDS COURT LO NDO N ROAD ROMFORD RM 7 9QD

NEW LUXURY APARTMENTS MINUTES 0 1 N O I S R E V CON AINLINE M , E A LANDMARK R T N E C D TOWN R O F M O R M ICES O V R E S L I A WALK FR R S G CROS N I M O C H T R O AND F M PRICES FRO

0 0 0 , 9 9 1 £

E Y AVAILABL

TO BU WITH HELP

CALLING ALL FIRST TIME BUYERS • HOME MOVERS • INVESTORS SALES & MARKETING SUITE Appointed Agent

020 7620 1500

galliardhomes.com

Price correct at time of going to print. All journey times stated are approximate, source: tfl.gov.uk and google.co.uk

Official letting and managing agent


al and ging

ROMFORD MASTERPLAN

11

Redesigning, and transforming Romford is at the heart of Havering’s £3 billion regeneration plans. Kevin Logan, the man overseeing the town’s masterplan, shares his vision and approach to the job. Noella Pio Kivlehan reports H AV E R I N G


12

ROMFORD MASTERPLAN

T

he ‘countable noun’ for a masterplan, according to the Collins English Dictionary, is: “A clever plan intended to help someone succeed in a very difficult or important task.” This precisely sums up the challenge ahead for Kevin Logan and his team at Maccreanor Lavington, in producing the masterplan for Romford. Appointed in November, Havering Council put its faith in the firm to design, with its full input, the borough’s civic and capital centre – the business and retail heart of Havering with over 1,000 H AV E R I N G

years of history. Along with Londonbased Maccreanor others involved are Lavington Architects, architect and design company make:good, which will be carrying out the public consultation, and consultants GVA , which became part of Avison Young, who took over the company in November. By starting its major tranche of regeneration now, Havering is realising its ambitions to match other London boroughs that have seen years of rebuilding. And Havering is determined to make an entrance on the regeneration stage

Consultation has now started with the resident’s and worker’s in Romford on the masterplan set to be complete in December.


ROMFORD MASTERPLAN

13

with £3 billion alone associated with the three joint venture (JV) partners, which will ultimately be more when the redevelopment of private companies are taken into account.

J E W E L IN T H E C ROWN The three JVs carrying out the work across the borough with the council, appointed between November 2017 and March 2018, are: Notting Hill Genesis for Rainham and Beam Park; First Base, and Savills Investment Management on Bridge Close, Romford; and Wates Residential for the 12 estates - the transformation of a dozen council estates throughout Havering. But, the jewel in the crown will undoubtedly be Romford’s revival. And the beginnings of that revival is the masterplan, with the aim that it is delivered by December 2019. “To me, the masterplan is a starting point, a vision, a picture of Romford in the future, that inspires people, but is grounded in commercial reality, attracting investment and the support of council members and the public,” says David Covill, the council’s regeneration and development consultant. For Neil Stubbings, Havering’s director of regeneration, integrating the two JVs - the 12 estates, and Bridge Close - that are active fully or partly in the Romford masterplan area, is crucial to what is being planned. “Those two JVs came before we started work on the masterplan. But, because the council is working with each of them, we have made sure each of the developers and architect practices involved were completely aware of the masterplanning, so they will complement each other,” says Stubbings. Leading the Romford masterplan for Maccreanor Lavington – a company

The masterplan is a starting point, a vision, a picture of Romford in the future that will inspire people

with a noted history having been involved with schemes such as likes of Southwark’s Canada Water is its associate director Kevin Logan. Logan says what attracted his company to tender was Romford’s strategic position. “Romford has an awful lot going for it. It is in an interesting strategic position: it’s in London, but it’s on the edge of London, but equally it’s on the edge of the county of Essex. And then [the Elizabeth line] goes through it and beyond into Essex – so it has this amazing relationship to two hinterlands – one being the capital, the other being the county.” As a major town centre, Logan says there is an opportunity in Romford “to do something transformational.” And while Mccreanor Lavington, with Allies and Morrison, are designers on Bridge Close with masterplanner Fletcher Priest, Logan says there is no conflict. “We’re not masterplaning our own masterplan.” With Romford not being far from neighbouring Stratford and its forest of new shiny high-rise developments H AV E R I N G


14

ROMFORD MASTERPLAN

and the Westfield shopping and entertainment emporium, Logan is adamant the town will be looked at on its own merits. “I don’t think you can have a ‘Stratford’ and for Romford, I don’t think you should want it,” he says. “If you look at the way retail is going and the structural changes in the retail market, that big branded high street convenience-based retail is completely catered for in places like Lakeside on one side of Romford, and Westfield in Stratford. Added to that is infrastructure: Lakeside is car born, with a huge car park – which has even more than Romford.

D IST IN C T IV E N ESS Logan says Stratford is a major transport node, with Transport for London and regional rail lines, so it has huge connectivity. Lakeside and Stratford “are very mature, and working well,” he adds. “Layer on to that internet shopping and evolution away from every day high street shopping,” he says “and the notion you could build Romford up to compete with any of those would be folly in my mind, and we would be mis-selling the opportunity and misleading the council.” Logan wants to bring out Romford’s ‘distinctiveness’. “We are interested in the rediscovery of the River Rom, the creation of a townscape which is walkable and mixed, and the nature of moving away from big internalised shopping malls to more, networks of streets and small spaces,” he says. Adding things that are missing from the town is a key aim. “It’s not saying ‘well, we don’t have a John Lewis, so we’ll add another department store’,” says Logan. “In our mind, there’s a real opportunity to increase the amount of employment in H AV E R I N G

the town centre, building a mix of spaces from offices, to SME-business type spaces. It’s providing a diverse array of space to support the local economy.” And what Logan hopes to do is “diversify Romford beyond the car”. In the 1960s with the car’s reign as king starting, Romford built a ring road around the town centre, now described as a collar strangling it’s growth and development. But, rather than doing away with the ‘collar’, Logan believes the ring road is an “amazing opportunity”.

Landscape, public spaces, culture and heritage, and environment and sustainability, are all being considered by Romford’s residents and workers.


ROMFORD MASTERPLAN

15

THE RIGHT BID Time and again Kevin Logan, associate director with Maccreanor Lavington, the firm drawing up the Romford masterplan, reiterates that his company’s work on the town’s future is all about collaboration. And it is not only with the people in Romford, but businesses in the rest of Havering.

“It takes a long time to build cities and you accumulate things for which other generations might say, ‘I wouldn’t do that now, but we’ve got it,’ and the act of eradicating it is quite consuming in terms of effort and resources. Also, it is not sustainable as you are throwing away things. . [We should] recycle and rework. Ok, some things need to be taken out. But, the starting point should always be ‘can we rework it? Can we reuse it?’” What the Romford ring road gives the town centre, says Logan, is definition. “The character around the edges, and further out is quite historically intact. And quite pleasant. “The town centre , however, has been reconfigured extensively over the subsequent years. “So, while physical change will be concentrated within the ring road, the ring road then safeguards the heritage around the outside.” Given the degree of work that will be done in Romford through the regeneration and redevelopment, ensuring everyone’s opinion is heard as to what should be in the masterplan, is

Rainham, the industrial heart of Havering is home to many large companies, including the new industry and tech hubs of the Centre of Engineering and Manufacturing Excellence (CEME) and SEGRO’s new developments. For Ilker Dervish, managing partner, Comfort Zone Technology, and chairman of the London Riverside BID, that covers the industrial area, the Romford masterplan will impact the rest of the borough on two key issues: transport, and the supply chain. He says: “We must make sure enough pubic transport capacity is put in to service both north and south of the borough: that’s a particular problem for us here in Rainham, in the BID area. We are one of main employment areas, but we don’t have a direct bus route. “There is talk of a north-south tram route if the funding can be found, but accommodation and space needs to be made for that as part of the masterplans.”

The councillors are the town’s custodians and representatives of this populace - they are the knowledge crucial to Logan – and something make : good is also undertaking (see page 16). “We are the masterplanners, and we are – saying it modestly – experts at that,” say Logan, “but, ultimately, the councillors are the custodians of this town centre, and representatives of this populace – they are the knowledge. And we will work with [what they know]. “We are not going to come in here and say it should be Stratford, or it should be this or that. The starting point is with the custodians of Romford, and the public.” He adds: “We also understand concerns around heritage and intensification, and this needs to be carefully balanced. It’s about creating a diversity of opportunities that can be operated reasonably at a local level.” With the public announcement to go out to consult on the principals for the masterplan started in January, Stubbings says the council’s main message with the masterplan is that Romford is a place of key opportunity. “It’s about wanting to talk to developers and investors who want to come and talk to us and bring forward H AV E R I N G


16

ROMFORD MASTERPLAN

MAKE:GOOD Set up by architect Catherine Greig in 2009, make:good is an architect and design studio that specialises in involving people in shaping neighbourhood change. And it will be doing all the public engagement and consultation work for the Romford masterplan. Having started the consultation in January, which is due to last until the summer, make:good will be garnering the public’s opinions through pop-up stands in the town centre, to workshops with the masterplan’s architects and designers, and through exhibitions.

sites and opportunities that fit in with the overall masterplan for the benefit of everybody, rather than going off and doing a piecemeal development on its own,” says Stubbings. As a result, hitting December’s deadline for delivery of the plan is crucial due to planning applications already being made in the town. “We want [all the development] to come forward in conformity,” says Stubbings. He adds: “But if it’s going to take too long then [developers are] going to have to go at their own pace. It’s about using the individual applications to inform the masterplan.” The Collins English Dictionary describes ‘success’ “the achievement of something you have been trying to do.” While the final achievement for transforming Romford is still at least some 10-15 years away, all those involved in the masterplan are pushing to ensure they draw-up a policy document for not just current Romford residents, but for future generations to come.

WH AT THE DEV ELO P ER S THINK For the council’s two joint venture partners working in the Romford masterplan area, there is an opportunity to build on their own proposals to the council. Kate Ives, development director, Wates Residential South, says: “The Romford masterplan proposals should be grounded in good design, placemaking and place keeping. And with sustainable development, which means creating vitality now and in the future.” Elliott Lipton, managing diretor, First Base, says: “Our plans for Bridge Close provide a unique opportunity to truly transform the town centre, bringing new homes, modern workspace, a new bridge... we are looking forward to taking the JV into delivery.”

“It’s our role to encourage people who who live, work, travel through and enjoy Romford town centre, to get involved and have their say about what their priorities are for change, and to allow them to have as much scope to influence the masterplan as possible,” says Greig. To do this, make:good has identified a series of themes from initial engagement that covers: • • • • •

Landscape & public spaces Culture & leisure Heritage & character Health & wellbeing Transport & connectivity

Greig’s philosophy is that: “In a world where you can feel absolutely no autonomy over what is going on, and what change is happening in public realm and town centres, this consultation is an opportunity for people to be a part of that process – to shape it and influence it.”

H AV E R I N G

3013


WITH A STRONG REGIONAL FOOTHOLD AND NATIONAL CAPABILITIES, WE’RE READY WHEN, AND WHEREVER, YOU ARE. Benefiting from Glenny’s in-depth and unrivalled knowledge of the East London and Essex property markets, our clients operating in Havering can expect an exceptional service, whatever their requirements are. Our full range of services are accessible through our central support hub in Stratford and strategicallylocated regional offices.

DISCOVER MORE ABOUT US AT WWW.GLENNY.CO.UK ESSEX | EAST LONDON | NORTH LONDON & HERTFORDSHIRE | SOUTH EAST LONDON & KENT

OUR TEAM:WORKING

WELL PLACED PROPERTY ADVISORS

30133_Glenny_Regional_HaveringAdvert_AW.indd 1

28/09/2017 16:23


18

LEADER’S Q&A

T

he former deputy leader under Ramsey outlines his, and the council’s hopes and ambitions for Havering as it embarks on one of the UK’s biggest multibillionpound regeneration schemes: over the next 15 years, three joint venture (JV) partnerships are set to deliver thousands of homes, new infrastructure, and jobs.

When Cllr Damian White became Havering Council leader last May, replacing stalwart Cllr Roger Ramsey, who had been in the top job on and off for over 20 years, he became determined to leave his own legacy for the borough. White speaks to Noella Pio Kivlehan H AV E R I N G

Embarking on a £3 billion regeneration plan with JV partners – Notting Hill Genesis; First Base and Savills Investment Management; and Wates Residential - why was now the right time was for change? Since I was elected to the council in 2000, we have seen property prices rise, and the nearly completed Elizabeth line (the borough will have three stations). As a result, opportunities have come forward that had not existed previously. There is a willingness to accept that change is coming, but now it’s how we manage that change. In years gone by, in terms of regeneration, where our land values were so much lower and depressed, regeneration development was piecemeal and not holistic. But with increasing land values, we see more wholesome and comprehensive development and it’s starting to change people’s views and impressions and also their aspirations for our towns. Which other London areas are you inspired by when it comes to regeneration? People can now see that Romford potentially could become the new Kings Cross, in terms of quality development, rather than just seeing new flats being put up all the time. At Kings Cross (which has undergone its own multimillion pound regeneration over the last decade) they have been able to mix new and old together.


LEADER’S Q&A

I want Havering, and Romford in particular, to be somewhere people want to go, to experience. and be a destination.. I would like to achieve a similar type of quality design and external environmental aspects. But, we don’t need to impose another community’s ideas, values or developments on Havering, rather create a Havering focus, a Havering-particular answer to regeneration. Romford is getting its own masterplan, and as the heart of Havering’s civic, commercial community, could Havering become too Romford-centric? We have numerous communities across Havering, with Romford clearly being the largest urban expansion. However, as a council, we are committed to all of our communities, with the two growth areas identified in our local plan being Romford, and South Hornchurch and Beam Park (Rainham). We should not overlook the importance of the smaller communities and outlying retail destinations in our borough, because they add vibrancy, such colour to our authority. Regeneration across Havering – particularly in Beam Park and South

Smaller communities and outlying retail destinations in our borough... add vibrancy and such colour

Council leader Damian White says Havering has a huge amount of enthusiasm for the future - “more so than any time in the last 50 years”.

Hornchurch – could be a real gamechanger in tackling any deprivation. Some of our communities within the borough have already benefitted from major regeneration or major investment. But, those that have not, like Romford, South Hornchurch and Upminster, are the ones we need to focus on. How important is it to upgrade infrastructure and connectivity, with London, and within the borough? To get from Romford to Rainham by public transport, or even by driving in rush hour, can take up to an hour. This is why it is so important we reduce those distances by championing better north-to-south connections, and public transportation. We are regularly lobbying the mayor of London, and Transport for London, to provide additional investment. With improved transportation; the Elizabeth line; the Lower Thames Crossing; the upgrade to the M25, [and even river transport] more companies see us in a new light. And they also see us as a destination for development, regeneration and housing. This which would never have been possible 10 years ago.

19

A London borough, and part of the county of Essex, does Havering struggle with its identity? In terms of local government, we are a local authority, but we have the Essex tradition, we share the same cultural identity but we also embrace our London heritage and roots. People live here who have moved out from inner London, so we are uniquely placed to trade on both platforms and heritages, which is a great strength for us. The Elizabeth line, which is opening connectivity up, has brought us closer into London than ever before. That is very important for direct investment into our communities. But, what is vital, is people know we are the gateway to the east. We are the gateway to Essex. What legacy do you want to leave? I want to look back on the quality of regeneration undertaken with these JVs. More importantly than anything to me is the delivery of a huge increase in social housing: we have one of the largest council house building programmes as a percentage of our stock, in the country. And in next five years we are planning on building hundreds of new council properties to ease our waiting list. The legacy I’m keen to deliver is establishing an environment that continues to improve our public services, delivers more affordable accommodation for our residents and supports the correct evolution of our towns, resulting in a more coherent and cohesive society. Havering has a huge amount of enthusiasm for the future – more so than any time in the last 50 years for our towns. We have such optimism about what the future will bring because of the benefits of regeneration. It’s such an exciting time to live and work in this borough and to be part of this great legacy we are going to deliver. H AV E R I N G


MERRIELANDS, DAGENHAM

BRINGING LAND TO LIFE

INLAND HOMES LOOK EAST Inland Homes look forward to growing an exciting new partnership with the London Borough of Havering as we bring forward future development opportunities within the borough. We are an established land regeneration specialist devoted to providing high quality residential and mixed-use developments, creating vibrant communities in which people want to live and work. CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS (EASTERN REGION): COLCHESTER, BASILDON & IPSWICH FORTHCOMING DEVELOPMENTS (EASTERN REGION): CRESSING, BRAINTREE, DAGENHAM & BILLERICAY

For further details please call 01494 762450 or email info@inlandplc.com

inlandhomesplc.com Computer generated illustration indicative only

Working in partnership with


HAM

FEATURE DESIGN TYPE

21

FOR LIFE Today, regeneration is not just about building homes and infrastructure, but a holistic approach to people’s overall lifestyle and living. And Havering is ensuring these qualities are built into its schemes. Hannah Gal reports

W

hen a major London borough sets itself the task of embarking on one of the UK’s most ambitious regeneration programs, the need to get everything right is imperative. And as Havering – the capital’s third largest borough - starts on its milestone £3 billion facelift in collaboration with three joint venture (JV) partners, at its heart will be the shared appreciation of innovative, placemaking-led design. “Local authorities have come to recognise the impact design has on other services the council offers” explains Rachel Hearn, Havering’s principal urban design officer. “Today’s design is more

people-led, more holistic and much more long-term. We know well-designed places improve residents’ wellbeing and by helping people to move around, you help them enjoy a healthier lifestyle.” Set to last up to 15 years, the project will see first JV partner Wates Residential, regenerate 12 council estates, while second JV partner Notting Hill Genesis will deliver 700 new homes within the Rainham and Beam Park housing zone. Separately at Beam Park, Countryside is working in a JV with L&Q New Homes on 3,000 new homes. Third JV partner, First Base, and Savills Investment Management, is assigned with the transformation of Bridge Close,

situated within the ring-road in Romford town centre, building 1,070 new homes, a new school, a health centre and a bridge linking the site to the Elizabeth line at Romford station. And with the JVs working with council, all will have an eye on the importance of design. “Today’s people-led design is about looking at people’s daily experiences and how you can improve their quality of life,” says Hearn. “There are, for example, communal spaces to enjoy, as well as green areas that ‘work hard’ to provide a quiet space for the elderly, under-fives and teens. The emphasis is on getting people H AV E R I N G


22

DESIGN

to be more active through better connectivity and improving movement around town centres. This approach marks a break from past car-dominated models that were about, as Hearn puts it: “people driving somewhere and then driving out again”. For its JV partners, Hearn’s vision sits perfectly for what they want to achieve in the borough. “We want to set the benchmark for design in Havering,” says Wates Residential development director, Kate Ives. She adds: “[We want to] create houses and environments that future generations will want to conserve.”

We want to set the benchmark for design in Havering... to create houses...future generations will want to conserve

GOING GREEN Havering is one of the capital’s greenest boroughs with over half lying in London’s Green Belt, and 14 of its parks now recognised by the Green Flag Award Scheme. The council is keen for this ‘greenness’ to be reflected in new schemes. “It is important to think long-term and design good places that sustain character and quality in years to come, places that can be well-maintained,” says Hearn. She adds: “As a council, we understand the spaces between the buildings are more important than the buildings themselves, and [our JV partners] share our appreciation of design as a key factor within placemaking.” This is evident in Notting Hill Genesis’ proposals, where designs are set to capitalise on the rich context of Rainham village, the marshes and Beam Valley Country park. “Harnessing the qualities of these existing places,” explains Notting Hill Housing’s spokesperson, “will ensure new homes have a unique and attractive character, welcoming to residents, visitors and the wider community.” An important consideration at Bridge H AV E R I N G

Close for First Base, and the council is opening up the River Rom to create an urban promenade on which people can jog, walk the dog, or simply enjoy a coffee by the water. Meanwhile, Wates Residential’s proposals call for trees, play areas, biodiversity and open space, something which has always been cherished by residents of the local area. Walking and cycling will also be designed in to each scheme, with plenty of bicycle parking for residents and pedestrian routes to help people live more active and healthy lives. Wates Residential will also provide car club spaces and electric charging points to help the borough increase the use of green cars and further support improvements in air quality.”

Rainham school pupils help with the Romford masterplan (over right). Cycling is encouraged (above), the River Rom to be opened up (below), and cllr Damian White views design proposals (top right).


DESIGN

23

Notting Hill Genesis’ scheme will see the creation of the new linear park to prioritise a green and leafy environment with safe and highquality walking and cycling routes, accessible to all. Describing this as “a fundamental part of the vision for the Beam Park Housing Zone,” Notting Hill Genesis’s spokesperson notes that: “The emerging designs give access to these routes, with considered placement, size and accessibility of entrances and routes through and between the buildings. A green environment will be prioritised with high quality landscaping and people friendly ‘home-zone’ style streets, which support social activities and play space.”

LOCAL OPINION The council has actively engaged residents with plans for the area, welcoming feedback through special events, consultations, group meetings, newsletters and one-to-one sessions. Residents’ input has also been taken to heart by the three JV partners who have appealed to every sector of the community to join in. Even children were invited to share their personal take through opportunities such as Wates’s Minecraft event, where Rainham Village Primary School children worked on a redesign of Napier House and New Plymouth House through the game, showing what they like most about the site and how they would improve it. The council’s endeavour to encourage a healthier lifestyle is evident throughout the Rainham schemes, with more open spaces and the ability to move around places with ease. “We are talking about a design that enables enjoyment of daylight, provision of communal green spaces and parks”, explains Hearn, “an area with a higher density than expected in suburbia. This

can be a challenge at times as you try to mix old with new while maintaining the character of the area.” The challenge is to create a scheme unique to the story of the place itself but still feels like Havering and its people. “The sites are different in nature,” explains Hearn, who adds that Rainham is with a housing association, while Wates acts more like a contractor responsible for demolishing several tired, not-fit-for-purpose structures, which currently exist. “The homes being replaced come with a range of challenges including crime and antisocial behaviour,” says Ives. She adds: “There are individuals feeling isolated due to poor connections, lack of efficient and therefore affordable heating and buildings that are simply not in keeping with the local area.

“Our job is to open up the sites to new opportunities. This means housing design that is outward looking, engaging with the wider neighbourhood and stitching into the existing local fabric.”

IDENTITY Daniel May, First Base’s head of design, stresses the need to “respect local character and celebrate local heritage, where possible.” Describing placemaking as ‘the core focus of proposals for Bridge Close”, he argues that: “As a concept, placemaking is important to give a location an identity and to give people a reason to visit, to live, work and play. Places are about people, that’s why making a successful place for people long into the future is so important.” H AV E R I N G


24

DESIGN

Countryside and L&Q have made design central with their Beam Park scheme (left). The Beam Parklands crossing focusing on green space (below).

We all agree on topquality being a must... with schemes developed so that quality is embedded in the [throughout] the process

First Base is working with the design team to ensure that “the architecture respects the local area’s character and context and that the development delivers a step-change in quality for the whole borough.

QUALITY VERSUS AFFORDABILITY Equalling design quality with affordability is a formidable challenge for all the projects. “There are constraints H AV E R I N G

on every site to balance with the commercial objectives as well as the council’s social objectives” says Hearn. “We realise our partners have their own aspirations and there might be slight differences at times, but we all agree on top quality being a must, schemes are developed so that quality is embedded in the process.” An assertion seconded by First Base who selected Maccreanor Lavington and Allies and Morrison, to design the buildings and spaces for the first phase of Bridge Close in Romford. The new neighbourhood, by Romford town centre and the new Elizabeth line, will have new homes, school and workspaces, with a new riverside path and a bridge to the Elizabeth line station. “The benefits of Bridge Close will reach beyond the boundary of the site, improving connectivity to the town centre for those that live to the southwest of train station. May adds: “It is thinking about how an area can be successful in the long term.”

ARCHITECTURE The architecture across the schemes is clearly driven by the council’s vision and the overriding wish to respect the character of the area. Wates Residential’s programme, will include “lower rise housing in the outer parts of the borough, with housing designed specifically for the active elderly who want more modern accommodation, as well as housing for Havering’s first-time buyers.” First Base’s architecture takes its cues from both the historic context of Rainham village, and the emerging context of the Beam Park Housing Zone to ensure the proposals will sit comfortably with both the new and existing settings.


somewhere to feel at home


26

FACT FILE

£3

BILLION THE AMOUNT BEING SPENT BETWEEN THE BOROUGH’S THREE JVS ON REGENERATION

With history dating back hundreds of years to huge plans for the future, Havering is making all the numbers add up

SIZE OF HAVERING’S POPULATION

WHERE HAVERING SITS IN RELATION TO SIZE OF OTHER LONDON BOROUGHS

FACT FILE H AV E R I N G


DECEMBER

FACT FILE

500,000 NUMBER OF VISITORS TO THE SAPPHIRE ICE RINK IN ITS FIRST YEAR

27

PARKS IN THE BOROUGH THAT HAVE BEEN AWARDED ‘GREEN FLAG’ STATUS - THE NATIONAL STANDARD FOR OPEN SPACES

31,000sq m Amount of modern industrial space SEGRO is delivering at its Rainham site

MONTH WHEN THE ROMFORD MASTERPLAN WILL BE DELIVERED

3

THE YEAR ROMFORD MARKET WAS GRANTED A ROYAL CHARTER UNDER KING HENRY III

NUMBER OF ELIZABETH LINE STATIONS IN HAVERING (AT ROMFORD, GIDEA PARK, AND HAROLD WOOD)

HAVERING HAS THE HIGHEST AMOUNT OF GREEN SPACE IN GREATER LONDON (source: Urban Studies and Planning Department, University of Sheffield, 2017)

H AV E R I N G


28

PROJECTS

Between January 2017 and March 2018, Havering Council announced three major joint ventures worth over £3 billion that are set to transform, regenerate, and rejuvenate large areas of Havering.

CHIGWELL

PROJECTS

EASTERN AVENUE

A12 RT H CIR CU LAR RO AD

4. 5. 6.

Rainham and Beam Park Bridge Close, Romford Mercury Land Holdings (a. North Street and b. Cathedral Court) London Riverside Beam Reach Harold Hill

NO

1. 2. 3.

ILFORD

THE 12 ESTATES 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

12.

H AV E R I N G

Romford - Delderfield House Romford - Queen Street Romford - Waterloo Gardens Romford - Oldchurch Romford - Maygreen Crescent Gidea Park - Royal Jubilee Court Gidea Park - Delta Court Harold Hill additional homes Hornchurch - Serena, Solar and Sunrise Court Hornchurch - Dell Court Rainham - Napier House and New Plymouth House Cranham Brunswick Court

A13

LONDON CITY AIRPORT

WOOLWICH


PROJECTS

NOAK HILL

29

BRENTWOOD 2

A1

8

6 1 6

ROMFORD

VENUE

3

2

7

3a

4

3b

A127

2

5

HORNCHURCH 9

12

10 LO NDON O RBITAL M OT

UPMINSTER

ORWAY

1

11

RAINHAM

4

5

LONDON BOROUGH OF HAVERING

RIVER THAMES H AV E R I N G


We’re Building Lives Less Ordinary At Willmott Dixon Construction we believe it is our responsibility to take the ordinary and make it extraordinary. That’s why every project we take on has to deliver a positive and memorable impact. 18 year old Havering resident Jordan Fox is a Technician Apprentice at Willmott Dixon under the Evolve Apprenticeship Scheme. After leaving school Jordan studied bricklaying at Havering College. Although Jordan enjoyed bricklaying, it wasn’t something he wanted to do for the rest of his life. Jordan first came across Willmott Dixon while attending an interview skills workshop where he met Community Engagement Manager Stephanie Hensman. Steph saw real potential in him and advised him on work experience and future qualifications.

Wilmott Dixon is, truly, a company that is genuinely interested in its position as an integral part of the community.

When the opportunity arose for Willmott Dixon to provide a Technician Apprenticeship, Jordan excelled in his interview with CITB. Jordan has now been with Willmott Dixon since September 2015 working on our site at Jenny Hammond School in East London. This role is very hands on, and also gives him an insight into all the job roles within construction.

Norma Green, Chair of the Yes Partnership

Jordan is now working towards his future, studying a BTEC Diploma in Construction and the Built Environment (QCF) and NVQ Level 3 in Construction Contracting Operations.

Pictured above l-r: Tom Turner, Tony Shevlane, Jordan Fox, Luke Aspland

£2.1m

£2.1 million community investment last year.

55,000

55,000 hours of staff time invested in the community.

4,586

Made a difference to the life chances of 4,586 young people last year.

In Havering... training 783 Short courses workshop 202 School places 62 Apprentice weeks 99%

Waste diverted from landfill

Willmott Dixon @WillmottDixon

www.willmottdixon.co.uk

Pictured right: Sapphire Ice and Leisure Centre Romford


PROJECTS

31

THE 12 ESTATES

THE 12 ESTATES

Announced at leading global property show MIPIM in March 2018, the council’s joint venture (JV) with Wates Residential to regenerate 12 estates, made it the borough’s largest scheme, at a cost of £1 billion. The council estates will be transformed, with more than 3,000 homes to be built. Broken down into numbers, the scheme will see the current stock of 856 homes replaced to create 3,112 homes. The number of general needs rented homes will increase from 414 to 694, going up by almost 70%. Affordable homes will rise from 595 to 1,186: this includes 383 low-cost home ownership properties. With an ever increasing ambition, the council and Wates want to increase the affordable housing by adding further opportunities and other sites. At its cabinet meeting in February, the council approved the funding to increase the

number of homes to just below 4,000. The plan now is to treble the number of affordable homes compared to the numbers on the sites now. The value of development expected from the JV now amounts to £1.3 billion. The first phase of the development is due to start in spring 2019 at Napier and New Plymouth and Solar, Serena and Sunrise and towards the end of 2019 on the Waterloo Estate. The regeneration plans include a comprehensive programme of community initiatives and commitments to the whole of the Havering borough. Targeted areas include: apprenticeships, skills and experience; school’s curriculum support; targeting hard-to-reach groups; economic development and the use of social enterprises; and investment in local communities and facilities. The whole project is expected to be delivered over the next 12-15 years.

ROMFORD Delderfield House Queen Street Waterloo Gardens Oldchurch Maygreen Crescent GIDEA PARK Royal Jubilee Court: to be developed as an older persons’ village Delta Court HAROLD HILL Additional homes HORNCHURCH Serena, Solar and Sunrise Court: to be sheltered and supported housing Dell Court RAINHAM Napier House and New Plymouth House as part of the Rainham Housing Zone and delivery of the new Beam Park community CRANHAM Brunswick Court to provide housing for older people H AV E R I N G


32

PROJECTS

1. RAINHAM AND BEAM PARK Notting Hill Genesis (formerly Notting Hill Housing) was awarded the contract in June 2017 to build hundreds of residences in a joint venture (JV) with Havering Council. Working with Bell Philips Architects, over 700 new homes across nine sites within the borough’s Rainham and Beam Park Housing Zone will provide a mixture of affordable housing, including homes for affordable rent, shared ownership, market sale and private rent. In a further example of the council’s growing ambitions to provide affordable homes for local people, the February cabinet approved funding to increase the number of homes built through this JV from the current 700 to just over 1,000.

H AV E R I N G

The sites, along the A1306, are close to a proposed new c2c rail station, school, nursery and medical centre, which would provide vital facilities to residents moving into the area. Along with the new housing, Transport for London (TfL) is supporting the regeneration with a plan to reduce traffic and create a new linear parkway for existing and new residents. A current planning application proposes a new school, nursery, medical centre, community centre and commercial units with up to 2,900 homes. The new Beam Park railway station, built with funding from the council, GLA and TfL, will take passengers into central London within 20 minutes when it opens in 2020.

2. BRIDGE CLOSE, ROMFORD In January 2017, First Base and Savills Investment Management, entered a joint venture (JV) with the council to transform Romford town centre with new homes and workspace. The JV will see around 1,070 homes delivered alongside a school, a health centre and a mix of workspace and community amenities.  In addition, a new bridge will link the site to the Elizabeth line at Romford station. A major part of this regeneration plan is to “rediscover” the River Rom. Increasing the biodiversity and ecology is an important part of the future plans to encourage wildlife and provide leisure facilities for local people. In March 2016, the centre of Romford was designated a housing zone by the mayor of London and has an allocation of £15.4 million from the Greater London Authority, invested in unlocking sites, paving the way for mixed-tenure homes and new job opportunities and fitting in with the wider vision for a changing Romford. Working with architects, Fletcher Priest, Allies and Morrison, and Maccreanor Lavington. The JV will be a mix of residential and commercial workspaces, to activate the River Rom and to bring activity that will complement the vibrant Romford town centre.


PROJECTS

3. MERCURY LAND HOLDINGS DEVELOPMENTS Mercury Land Holdings (MLH) is a private company, wholly owned by the London Borough Of Havering. Registered in November 2015, and with investment of over £135 million, the company aims to create a portfolio of PRS properties that will generate a return to the council. Its current portfolio includes 65 high quality properties close to Romford town centre, which has a variety of leisure facilities including the new Sapphire swimming pool and ice rink and transport links including the Elizabeth line – formerly known as Crossrail which is scheduled to open later in 2019. The scheme was completed in 2017 and was opened in February 2019. The MLH portfolio is set to expand to over 400 properties in the next five years through acquisitions from the market (including the council’s JVs) and direct delivery.

33

DEVELOPMENTS

The next scheme due to come online for MLH, which will complete in the autumn of 2019, is the development of 44 PRS units in North Street, in the centre of Hornchurch (pictured: below left). Being delivered directly by MLH, with partner Bugler, and designed by PCKO, an AHR company, the project is on the site of the former Nalgo Club, located next to the Queens Theatre near the town centre. Andy Bugler, chief executive of the Bugler Group, said; “We are delighted to partner with Mercury Land Holdings to deliver this prestigious development of 44 high specification, private rental apartments with a mix of one and two bedrooms.  “This partnership is the first we have secured in the London Borough of Havering and we look forward to supporting the growth ambitions of Mercury Land in creating much-needed new homes in the borough.” Recently completed, and now fully let is the 65-bed Cathedral Court in Romford. The new one-bedroom apartments have an open plan living room and fully fitted kitchen, a double bedroom with fitted wardrobes, tiled bathroom and storage space. Each apartment has its own designated parking space and its own private balcony. All MLH properties include hyperfast internet as part of the rent - with speeds up to 1GB, which is the fastest available in the UK, and subsidised health centre packages as standard.

These are all advertised through MLH’s website www.placetocallhome.co.uk H AV E R I N G


34

PROJECTS

GENERAL PROJECTS 4. LONDON RIVERSIDE Extending from east London to Rainham in the south is London Riverside, taking in the Havering Riverside, and part of the Thames Gateway redevelopment zone. It is currently undergoing major regeneration, in part through the Rainham Compass programme. It is expected that by 2025, the development will have created 25,000 jobs and up to 5,000 new homes within Havering. The next few years are likely to see an increase in visitors, thanks to the redevelopment of Rainham Hall into a full-time National Trust attraction and the expansion of the Rainham Marshes nature reserve. Specifically, Havering Riverside stretches from Barking Reach to Wennington Marshes and incorporates Rainham Village, the business areas around the A1036, Ferry Lane and Coldharbour Lane, and the former industrial areas once owned by the Ford Motor Company. A proposed railway station at Beam Park will link the area to London Fenchurch Street and the south Essex coast, as well as serving the emerging major developments.

5. BEAM REACH Beam Reach is identified by the mayor of London as the most favourable location to attract investment by manufacturing companies. H AV E R I N G

Businesses are offered the prospect of taking advantage of a revitalised gateway into east London within a development that will make best use of the available land to accommodate businesses, support services and sustainable housing. The area already has a skilled labour force and existing high quality homes. Freshly built leisure and community facilities designed around new and existing public transport services will integrate with existing communities. The new railway station is set to provide links directly into central London and the coast.

6. HAROLD HILL Harold Hill Industrial Estate, at almost 31 hectares in size, is one of Havering’s strategic industrial locations. It is just off the A12, which has direct access to the M25, making it a very convenient and attractive location for businesses. The estate has numerous detached warehouse and industrial units, many of which include high quality office facilities. There is also a mixture of new and established properties currently used for business purposes, including offices, factories and retail outlets. Much of the area’s commercial real estate is well located with sufficient distance away from residential developments. Harold Hill is now set to become a new regeneration area as part of the Havering Wates joint venture.

Beam Reach is identified by the mayor of London as the most favourable location to attract manufacturing firms


The Chigwell Group have become a major brand within the Housing Association, Local Authority & Private Sectors. Chigwell Group is a company where the Directors are on hand 24 hours a day.

rs upporte Proud s g in r e v a of the H y it r a h C Mayoral l a e p Ap

Our core businesses are: Planned Maintenance, Decent Homes, Kitchens and Bathrooms programmes, Voids Refurbishments, One-off Large Refurbishment Projects, External improvement Works, Responsive Repairs including a 24/7 Emergency Call-out Service and New Builds Projects.

Chigwell Window Centre manufactures and fits aluminium bi-fold doors, sliding doors and windows, Upvc windows and doors as well as roofing products and front and rear composite doors. We have showrooms in Collier Row, Romford and Billericay in Essex.

Chigwell Heating employs a team of plumbers and heating engineers in order to provide a consistently high level of service and workmanship. All of our engineers hold the necessary qualifications so we can carry out any required work to gas, LPG, oil and renewable appliances.

Part of the Chigwell Group

music

GET IN TOUCH | 020 8500 4100 | CHIGWELLGROUP.CO.UK


36

BUSINESS

With a major push towards growth in the borough, Havering is ramping up its drive to attract more businesses with its prime locations, improved infrastructure and affordable rents. Shailja Morris reports   H AV E R I N G


BUSINESS

I

t is already feted as the tech start-up capital of London with a mainstay in the construction, retail, engineering and manufacturing sectors. Now, Havering’s growing network of business centres, improving infrastructure, its bid for a Heathrow Logistics Hub and a new partnership with London City Airport are all pointing to stellar business growth for London’s third largest borough, and increasingly a rising star of the east. Havering is already home to over 8,300 businesses, employs 108,200 people of working age and sees approximately 1,000 new enterprises launched every year. Nearly half the residents commute within the borough, helping sustain the local economy and employment rates. Its key commercial towns of Romford and Rainham have a distinct appeal, attracting diverse business sectors from all areas.

37

Romford, in the north of the borough, has traditionally been Havering’s hotspot for the retail and office sector, given its strategic location at the heart of the Thames Gateway. And, of course having the largest conurbation, with a population of just under 100,000. And this will be further boosted by the new Elizabeth line services (see below). Office space, for example in Romford’s office quarter, is high quality and offers more affordable rates than Canary Wharf. In some parts of Havering, the average rateable value of commercial space falls below £80 per sq m, compared to the average £192 per sq m in other parts of London and Cambridge. Traditional sectors like waste disposal, engineering and manufacturing still flourish in the south. The landscape is changing, however. Regeneration charity CEME (Centre for Engineering and Manufacturing Excellence), with its 8.55-ha site in Beam Reach continues to see a proliferation of digital startups. It also has plans to introduce a mixeduse residential model in partnership with First Base to create 400 housing units, co-located with a skills and business park. The diversification continues at pace at SEGRO Park Rainham. The first phase of East Plus, where the Enterprise Quarter, an area designed to provide dedicated workspace for startups and SMEs, has secured a range of new customers to add to its growing roster of occupiers.

CO NNECTIVITY On the face of it, Havering’s transport infrastructure is enviable. Its road network boasts four arterial routes leading directly to London, Essex and Kent. Good public transport links are set H AV E R I N G


38

BUSINESS

The river is an under-utilised resource and could be used for transporting freight from north to south of the borough

to become stronger with the arrival of the Elizabeth line with three stations in the north of the borough at Romford, Harold Hill and Gidea Park. Elizabeth line services between Shenfield and Liverpool Street are already up and running. The trains for the service are gradually being introduced, with the full service between Shenfield and Reading expected to operate at the earliest of December 2019. However, traffic congestion and a lack of public transport from north to south Havering is stymieing growth. Congestion is hampering logistics operations and road haulage companies and causing problems with staff retention. A feasibility study carried out by Havering Council with the Greater London Authority (GLA) and Transport for London (TfL) is exploring ways of linking Rainham, Romford, Collier Row and Harold Hill, particularly given the new residential developments at Beam Park and Romford. Options include a tram or light rail link. A redesign of Gallows Corner, a five-armed junction linking the A12 and A127 is also proposed to improve links, reduce pollution and ease congestion. A new station at Beam Park, operated by C2C Beam Park, will support the new homes as well as employment sites at Beam Reach, including the Tesco Distribution Centre. Havering is also scoping plans to use the river as a method of transport, as proposed in the Mayor of London’s transport strategy. Daniel Douglas, transport planning leader at the council, says: “It is unutilised and could be used for transporting freight from the south of the borough. There’s a real opportunity for getting HGVs off our trunk roads and on to the river.” Journey time by river from Rainham to Canary Wharf is 23 minutes. H AV E R I N G

Geographically, Havering’s nearest airport is London City Airport. “London City is keen to tap into opportunities for business in the south of the borough,” says Douglas. He adds: “It’s a relatively straightforward journey from Rainham along the A13. The airport wants to expand its workforce catchment area to Havering so we are discussing how we can encourage young people to become involved in aviation careers. “There is also scope for freight operations to move towards us.”

The Centre for Engineering and Manufacturing Excellence has a reputation for business acceleration and a strong leaning towards the tech sector (right).

Havering’s transport and connectivity to London is being improved by the Elizabeth line. Internal borough connections, from north to south, are being proposed (above).


BUSINESS

39

CASE STUDY B R EYER G R O UP

C EM E The subtle shift in Centre for Engineering and Manufacturing Excellence’s (CEME) clients and services over the last 15 years offers a glimpse into Havering’s economic landscape. Set up in 2003, with £40 million in funding from Ford and the GLA. CEME started as a centre for engineering and manufacturing success, providing skills and training to startups and educational institutions. Today, it is recognised as a centre for business acceleration, with a strong leaning towards the tech sector. Chief executive Bill Williams explains: “We are still a provider of high quality business skills, but our focus has definitely shifted in creating faster growing companies within the tech sector. “We’re attracting growth from the wider business community from sectors unrelated to engineering or manufacturing. And they are coming from further afield.” The proliferation of software-based startups in Havering led CEME to set up its Launchpad Centre in 2017, partnered with Havering Council and the GLA. The Launchpad Centre is located in CEME’s purpose-built 8.55-ha campus in Rainham. Tech savvy entrepreneurs have access to an incubation manager as well as hot and fixed-desk work spaces designed for small tech startups. Despite having delivered projects like the High Speed Sustainable Manufacturing Institute (HSSMI)

Harold Hill based Breyer Group has an annual turnover of more than £100 million and employs over 500 people Starting off as an asphalt and felt roofing business in Leytonstone in 1956, Breyer and now provides services for social housing organisations, with a construction division that carries out refurbishments. It is the largest business of its kind in the south-east. The move to Harold Hill came in 2003 when larger premises were needed. Managing director Tim Breyer says: “Since [the move] we have bought two neighbouring sites and invested more than £5 million in the area. Breyer says the help and support from Havering Council with departments in helping with the move “very linked up and supportive”. He adds: “I found that mentioning something to one contact would usually lead to the right person ringing me to answer my query in 24 hours. “That is service you can’t fault. The transport links are very good thanks to the A12 and M25 and the rail link from Harold Wood to London. It should be even better when [the Elizabeth line] services begin linking directly through to central London and Heathrow.” H AV E R I N G


40

BUSINESS

CASE ST UDY C O M FORT Z ON E Comfort Zone is an SME that designs, supplies and delivers public area CCTV surveillance systems. In 1998, the company moved from Hornchurch to larger premises in Suttons Business Park in New Road, Rainham. Managing director Ilker Dervish says: “Rainham was ideal due to its transport links and availability of larger premises that gave us the ability to expand. We have 10 vehicles and when there are no traffic issues we can get in and out of Rainham and out to east London and the home counties easily. But when there’s an incident, there’s gridlock.” Dervish says this causes real issues for his staff and the logistics schedule. He adds: “At the moment we are not looking to expand, and industrial space is scarce due to land being used for residential development. “There are conversations about colocation and mixed-use of space and it is vital that this is implemented. The new residents will need employment opportunities and improved transport links and mixed-use developments would be a step in the right direction.” H AV E R I N G

SEGRO’s has permission to development at its SEGRO Park Rainham site, with the potential to create 4,000 jobs

in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in Stratford, with sites in Birmingham and Glasgow, CEME stays true to its Rainham roots. As Williams says: “We are always finding a way to take learning and skills and make it happen elsewhere in a sustainable way. We have no building empires to own and operate – we pass them on to their community as a not-for-profit business. Today we have one site which CEME owns in Rainham and we created thousands of jobs out of it.” CEME’s partnerships with the education sector has also grown in scale. It has partnered with University College London to set up Elutech, a University Technical College in Dagenham. And it has big plans for the future. “We will have more CEMEs in London in five years. We are in discussion about two sites outside the M25 in south Essex and further potential sites from Heathrow to north Essex. “We are also developing a mixed-use residential model in partnership with First Base to create a hub with 400 housing units, which will be co-located with a skills and business park. It’s a new model of huge interest to local authorities which are under pressure to deliver housing but aware they need to create sustainable, high quality employment plus housing.”


BUSINESS

41

RO M FO RD A N D LO N D O N RIV ERS ID E BID S Havering now boasts two Business Improvement Districts (BIDs), reflecting its strong business community and its commitment to improving the borough’s economic potential

F SEGRO SEGRO Park Rainham is testament to the company’s growing presence in London Riverside, The Enterprise Quarter, delivered in 2016 as part of East Plus - a partnership with the mayor of London to redevelop vacant industrial land across east London, it has the potential to create around 4,000 direct jobs. Permission has also been received to develop an adjacent site and SEGRO is scoping an investment opportunity in nearby Ferry Lane to offer muchneeded commercial space in Riverside. The company’s biggest potential project in Riverside is the Heathrow Logistics Hub to feed the construction of the new runway, SEGRO partnership development director, Neil Impiazzi, says: “There is a strong case for Rainham. There is good collaboration between SEGRO and Havering Council and stakeholders to make this happen. Impiazzi points to the sites land availability and the good supply chain in Riverside in terms of logistics and construction. He adds: “The facility could continue to be used as a logistics hub, reaching out to Kent and east London, long after the new runway is built.”

ollowing the success of London Riverside BID, Romford BID assembled its board for its launch in February 2019. Unlike its London Riverside counterpart which is largely drawn from the Rainham industrial areas, Romford BID members will be around 500 town centre businesses in an area covering Central Library, Como Street car park, properties opposite North Street and within the boundaries of the ring road. Jonathan Birkett, interim director of Romford BID, outlines its vision: “We represent the whole town centre with a full mix of businesses across leisure and the cultural and nighttime economy as well as retailers and professional services. “We’re in a cultural shift as town centres change their reliance on retail due to the growth in online retail. Tech-based creative businesses are also more prominent in the town. Our first projects will involve developing town hosts (an approachable informed presence in the BID area), marketing Romford and exploring opportunities for footfall.”

By contrast, the London Riverside BID’s main areas of focus are safety and security and improving the area’s physical environment. The BID has around 450 members, largely within industrial zones as well as the new industry and tech hubs of CEME and SEGRO’s substantial new developments. BID chairman Ilker Dervish explains: “The industrial zones are largely populated by waste handling and processing operators, service companies, construction and logistics. These areas are a target for vehicle crime and anti-social behaviour, so to counter that we fund a mobile patrol service and CCTV, ANPR systems and coordinate security and security training.” The BID is working with Havering Council, the Greater London Authority and SEGRO to develop an innovation hub for businesses. They will learn about investing in new technologies to improve their processes and productivity, trialing new software and processes, and will get help with skills, training and support with digital technologies.​ H AV E R I N G

 


42

HERITAGE

Redeveloping historic sites or listed buildings is always highly sensitive, and for Havering, which is embarking on major regeneration plans, great care is needed with all planning applications to ensure the borough’s history and heritage remains intact. Noella Pio Kivlehan reports

H AV E R I N G


HERITAGE

43

Royalty, like Henry VIII (right), who reigned from 1509 1547, owned Pygro Palace at Haveringatte-Bower, while Romford Market, originated in 1247, and given a Royal Charter by King Henry III (left).

W

ith over a thousand years of history, and home to numerous Kings and Queens such as Henry VIII, it is not surprising redevelopment in Havering’s towns and open spaces inevitably triggers the debate of how new fits with old. On a weekly basis, the council’s planning services department deals with applications potentially affecting heritage assets, including 11 conservation areas. Regardless of size, all need to be considered for their impact, and whether they are locally, or nationally-listed. And given that the borough is embarking on its £3 billion regeneration plans, council leader, Damian White is adamant that in pushing ahead with new development there is an overriding need “to preserve the historical elements of our towns”. The huge regeneration plans, launched in 2017, cover three major joint ventures in partnership with the council: Notting Hill Genesis; Wates Residential, and First Base with Savills Investment Management. These JVs will see thousands of new homes built, and jobs created in Havering, along with new transport and infrastructure. Central to the regeneration is a major facelift for Romford, the heart of Havering. It, like other places in the borough such as Rainham and Havering-atteBower, has history dating back over a thousand years. “In the 1960s many historic buildings were knocked down and lost through development. “What we want to do going forward is not only preserve that history, but embrace the future by championing quality developments and focus on what could be the new [buildings and garden] suburbs for the next century,” says White. He adds: “Whatever is built today, my ambition

is that in 50 - 100 years someone will stop, look at them and say they are of quality, they are a product of the time. They are something unique that adds to the built environment of the town, the community.” Simon Thelwell is projects and regulations manager in the council’s planning service that deals with major planning applications, planning enforcement and building control. This includes applications where the heritage aspects need to be considered, protecting landmarks and listed buildings, and protecting the greenery already there. These can be nationally-listed such as Grade I, II, or locally-listed within the borough (see panel). Given Romford town centre’s conservation area is a cluster of listed buildings around the Market Place, which in turn dates back to 1247 during the reign of King Henry III, Thelwell says there is need for special care in relation to new development on that space. “We would want to ensure those [historic buildings] were protected as much as possible and new buildings close to those are sympathetic in terms of their scale,” says Thelwell, adding, “we wouldn’t be looking for new development to follow H AV E R I N G


44

HERITAGE

Pygro Palace (left) at Havering-atteBower, which also houses the historic Round House (right), was the home of many significant figures, including Henry VIII, before being demolished in 1841.

the design necessarily, because they were of their time. But there may, for example, be issues where the tallest elements of certain buildings might be sited.” While Market Place is a historic site, Thelwell admits the buildings around them: “aren’t necessarily the best, so there are opportunities to improve the setting of that [historic] space. Whoever the developer might be they would have to design buildings that sit well within [their historical context] so they need a design team that can do this. Design quality is crucial.” Thelwell says the council is especially keen to examine the old layout of the town and what was lost through previous developments to see if it is worth reintroducing. Referencing the masterplan, which is now under way for Romford, Thelwell H AV E R I N G

LISTED BUILDING CRITERIA A building is normally over 30 years old Grade I: of exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important - only 2.5% of listed buildings are Grade I Grade II*: particularly important buildings of more than special interest - 5.5% of listed buildings are Grade II* Grade II: nationally important and of special interest - 92 % of all listed buildings are in this class and it is the most likely grade of listing for a homeowner

says: “One of the issues is around the River Rom, which you can’t see, although it’s there. There’s several planned developments along it, and we would want them to create a route by the river, improving its environmental quality, while reintroducing something that historically has been lost.” (Romford masterplan feature page 11). Rainham is another major development area where Notting Hill Genses is planning over 700 new homes that will be delivered within the Rainham and Beam Park Housing Zone. The town was recorded as early as 1068 when it was mentioned in the Domesday Book, and Thelwell admits: “As you get closer to Rainham village there will be issues around heritage.” In considering proposals for the demolition, preservation, or


HERITAGE

The degree you give to the significance of an asset can vary...as can the degree of the impact depending on what is being proposed refurbishment of heritage assets, there are key criteria to be considered. And the council department takes advice from Place Services, part of Essex County Council, on historic matters, and from Historic England for major developments involving significant listed buildings of Grade II*. “We would look at the heritage assets, anything from a listed building, conservation area, historic landscape, and ask what the significance of it is. What does the development propose? What impact does it have upon that heritage asset? The degree you give to the significance of the asset can vary, and the degree of impact can vary, depending on what is being proposed,” says Thelwell. A building set to be demolished which did cause a public reaction was the MECCA bingo hall – an Art Deco former cinema - in High Street, Hornchurch. It was pulled down in 2017 following a year-long local campaign to save it after the site was bought by budget supermarket chain Lidl. “[In that case], we asked Historic England to consider whether they would list [the bingo hall], and they said it wasn’t special enough to require it to be kept, so on that basis we didn’t feel we

45

RINGING IN THE CHANGES Havering-atte-Bower – Grade I listed manor house, Bower House. The village has been had numerous palaces and large houses, including Bower House, The Round House, Havering Palace, built before 1066 until abandoned in 1668, and Pyrgo Place – bought by King Henry VIII. Bower House, the Grade I Palladian mansion built in 1729 by architect Henry Flitcroft, was used by FordMotor Company as a training facility. During the mid-20th century the company had built, what Thelwell calls ‘unsympathetic buildings’. The new owners of the site wanted to replace those. We worked closely with the architects to get an overall improvement” Harold Wood hospital – listed building, The Grange. A former private home built in 1884 was a hospital administrative block until the hospital closed in 2006. As part of the redevelopment, the listed building was retained, while improving the setting and refurbishment the building in a sympathetic manor. St George’s hospital in Hornchurch: group of locallylisted buildings. Thelwell says: “The NHS sold the site in 2018 to housebuilders Bellway. The developers said the [front] buildings couldn’t be economically re-used. They then proposed was something good architecturally as has been there. We accepted their arguments.”

could run an argument,” says Thelwell. On the other hand, developers, which get no financial help for schemes with heritage status, have been known to walk away from sites because of that said status – albeit rarely. Thelwell says: “The council balances the need to protect historic assets with encouraging development and investment in the borough. Where developers fail to take account of [the heritage aspect of the building or site] and go ahead in submitting a planning application, that causes issues with the council over whether what they are proposing is acceptable.” There will be, says Thelwell: “Occasions where developers will have submitted applications and where they haven’t appreciated the significance of a site, or what is adjacent to it.” Thelwell offers advice for would-be developers in Havering, with its centuries of history, is, says Thelwell: “We would encourage where historic buildings are concerned that developers contact us at pre-application stage.” He adds: “Before developers go to the expense of getting their applications submitted, they get our advice. It helps save the developer money, and it streamlines the process.” H AV E R I N G


Havering Open for Growth, Business and Opportunities

The completion of the Crossrail project and opening of the new Elizabeth line will provide high-speed access to central London from three of the borough’s stations. With excellent travel connections, award-winning green spaces and a great riverside location, Havering is on track to becoming a perfect place to live and work in Greater London.

council.indd 1

04/03/2019 17:01


9 17:01

RETAIL AND LEISURE

47

Havering’s ‘me time’ choices are seeing a shift towards more adventurous leisure activities and desire for inventive shopping. By Liv Maxwell

H AV E R I N G


48

RETAIL AND LEISURE

With modern town centres, social and community integration needs leisure being the driver, not retail, as it is now

S

andwiched between the red brick buildings on Romford’s Grimshaw Way stands an unusual new construction. Composed of blue panels, all different shades, it is immensely tall. This is a building that feels modern, forward thinking, a symbol of the new bright prospects for Romford, and the borough of Havering in general. It is the Sapphire Ice and Leisure Centre. Opened last year, the facility has become one of Havering’s most impressive leisure offerings, and marks a notable new interest for the council in improving the leisure offerings available across the borough. Comprised of a gym, pool and, of course, ice rink, which has attracted ITV’s Dancing on Ice stars to practice on, has massively added to the already varied business in Romford and the surrounding town centres.

P OW E RH O U S E The £28 million investment was built to replace an old ice-skating rink that closed down in 2013 and it has attracted 500,000 visitors since opening. In many ways this building with the Sapphire Ice Rink, epitomises what the future for retail and leisure across the borough really needs, and that is investment – especially in leisure. Despite its size, Romford doesn’t have an extensive after work ‘twilight economy,’ as it lacks a big employment footprint from offices. But, with regards to retail, Romford, is the borough’s powerhouse with three main shopping centres housing chain shops such as Primark, Debenhams, H&M and Topshop. H AV E R I N G


RETAIL AND LEISURE

49

Pictured: Sapphire Ice and Leisure Centre (above and left), the Liberty shopping centre in Romford (below left) and The Brewery shopping centre (right).

There is the 51-year-old Liberty Shopping Centre, that last year was sold by Hammerson to Dublinbased Cosgrave Property Group for £281 million. Also prominent is the Mercury Mall, managed by Ellandi, and The Brewery owned by Prudential Property Investment Managers, while giving a more traditional retail offer is the historic Market Place. The importance of retail in Romford cannot be understated. But, times have changed massively for the shopping scene as a whole in the last decade, and as a result, Romford is viewed as being too retail-led, with a need to push leisure. This is something that will be looked at in the Romford masterplan currently being drawn-up by architects Maccreanor Lavington and set for publication in December 2019. “Many London town centres have been heavily built and reconfigured around retail”, says Kevin Logan, associate director with Maccreanor Lavington. “We were interested in this challenge of ‘can we deal with that structural change in retail to evolve town centres to be more diverse and mixed?’.

“In Romford’s case there are two major poles on either side of it: you have Stratford with Westfield, which is this huge new beast of a retail epicentre. Then in Essex, you have Lakeside, which is not very far if you drive, only about 15 - 20 minutes.” The result is the need to up the leisure ante. To do this, the masterplan will look at bringing in more, and different types of town centre employment through creating more offices. This in turn would encourage a stronger twilight economy. Tom Stobbart, chair of the Romford interim BID (Business Improvement District), says: “We would like to see the masterplan being a visionary document that future proofs the town centre, ensuring that it has the right level of infrastructure to support the influx of the population. “It needs to make sure it’s digitally up-to-speed as that’s where the future of the high street lies. Concerns come in when existing businesses, particularly small independent businesses, are ignored or for large scale development that will only meet the need for national stores.” H AV E R I N G


50

RETAIL AND LEISURE

Stobbart says what the new Romford BID, launched in February, wants is a redeveloped town centre fit for purpose, and for consideration to be made about potential tenants that will be in new developments. “Whether those will be in Bridge Close, South Street, or Market Place, new developments should look at what modern town centres need, taking in social and community integration, with leisure being a driver, not retail, as it is now,” says Stobbart. Speaking about its future retail prospects, and the Romford masterplan, council leader Damian White, says: “What we do not want in Havering is a carbon copy of a town centre that could exist anywhere across the country. We are keen to foster an environment that allows residents to set up businesses to take advantage of this exciting regeneration proposal.” Given how shoppers habits have changed with the internet increasingly becoming king, the council has launched initiatives, such as discretionary rates, to improve and promote businesses and give discounts, but, even so, small businesses are shutting down at a rapid rate. Susan Williamson, deputy centre and marketing manager of the Liberty, has addressed the way in which it is adapting to Havering residents’ changing attitudes to how they spend their money. She believes shopping centres must now cater to all kinds of needs, like “gyms, crèches, kids activities, a pamper zone”. The Liberty, in response, is now also “a meeting place for lunch, dinner or convenient grab and go food, a place to meet for drinks”.

We do not want a carbon copy of town centres that could exist anywhere across the country H AV E R I N G

Elsewhere in the borough, opportunities of an altogether different nature can be seen. Smaller centres like Hornchurch and Rainham offer a greater variety of independent retailers, with a highlight in Rainham being Fellas, the Turkish barbers. In Upminster, along with quaint pubs and independent shops, there is a Grade II- listed windmill that offers locals and tourists educational and historic days out. Hornchurch is considered by many residents to be Havering’s main artistic hub, boasting the Queen’s Theatre and the Fairkytes Arts Centre, both of which provide an alternative leisure option for those wishing to develop their creative skills. Fairkytes Arts Centre has prided itself on the new Fry’s Gallery, which opened its doors in February

Starbucks and Office (above) are major retailers in the Liberty shopping centre (above); Abigail’s Party, and Priscilla, Queen of the Desert were shown at Queen’s Theatre, Hornchurch (top and bottom right).


RETAIL AND LEISURE

51

2018, as part of an initiative by the council to showcase local artistic talent. It will also provide meeting and practice space for theatre-makers and artists alike. Within the borough’s smaller centre there are more community-based opportunities for both residents and tourists. In Rainham, for instance, is the local community centre that, according to deputy mayor, Councillor Michael Deon Burton, epitomises the community values of the area, as does the local church St John’s. Proposals for increased investment into transport in the future promises to boost the local economy with more visitors, as some residents are concerned that a lack of transport has affected the opportunities in the more rural areas of the borough. Havering also has a large number of H AV E R I N G


52

RETAIL AND LEISURE

Stubbers Adventure Centre in Upminster provides numerous outdoor activities (right and below), Havering County Park (middle) and Fairkytes Arts Centre (bottom).

historic sites, most notably Havering Country Park. In addition to the woodlands and various footpaths – with the hope of spotting the resident deer population – its cafe is also a popular destination. For the more adventurous, the 20-year-old Stubbers Adventure Centre in Upminster, allows thrillseekers of all ages, to engage with a range of activities. These include rock climbing, rifle shooting, high ropes aerial walking and archery, as well as the Havering Sailing Club. A pride of the area, the sailing club not only allows young and old the chance to practise a unique sport, it also hosts a range of community activities such as barn dances and quiz nights. While the early 1990s and 2000s saw developments in Romford and the wider Havering area heavily focused on nightlife, today there is a clear movement towards Havering becoming a lively cultural borough; one where health and socialising can exist hand-in-hand. The investments into leisure centres in the area and increased tourism to historic and artistic sites has provided an increased variety of activities in the area for people to enjoy. And, with the increased incentives for local business, the future is looking bright for Havering’s local communities. H AV E R I N G


HAVERING COLLEGE Training the Construction & Engineering Professionals of the Future Apprenticeships Professional Development Work Experience New Technologies Routes to Higher Education Engineering Career College PART OF HAVERING COLLEGE

Construction Career College PART OF HAVERING COLLEGE

For more information visit: www.havering-college.ac.uk

Engineering Career College PART OF HAVERING COLLEGE

Construction Career College PART OF HAVERING COLLEGE


54

ROMFORD MARKET

DAYS Established as a sheep market in 1247, Romford Market is the heart of the town, and home to over 250 stalls run by around 150 regular traders on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturdays. Last March, Katerina Sharpe took over as project lead on the transformation of Romford Market

What are your hopes and plans for Market Place? Our long-term ambition is to develop and increase the awareness of Romford Market Square as a destination for fantastic shopping and social activities; bringing greater footfall to Romford Market and town centre. The next 12 months will include an exciting market events programme aimed at attracting a wide range of visitors and a mix of new, and different traders. H AV E R I N G

What influences and experiences do you bring to your role?  I worked at Borough Market for five years project managing the physical changes. This involved working with architects and the development market team to bring in tenants and traders that were supportive of the core values, helping reorganise the market and ensuring it integrates with the surrounding retail area.  I was dealing direct with traders and tenants new and existing.

What would you like to see for Romford Market?  As part of the wider masterplan for Romford Town Centre and the surrounding area, the council is committed to making sure that future change for Romford, including the market, delivers positive local growth and benefits for all.   I want to use my previous experience and energy to make sure Romford Market continues to appeal to visitors and traders, and celebrates the uniqueness and what makes Romford town special.  We are constantly looking for ways to collaborate, often working with local theatres, colleges and enterprises, on special events that showcases our borough’s talent. I am always looking for new opportunities from new partners and new and existing traders.   What of kind of retailers do you have there at the moment? As a general market, we host a wide range of every day items from fish, fruit, vegetables, through to clothing and household goods. We also have several specialist traders offering a wide range of goods and services as well as some fantastic catering experiences: Caron Webb babies and children’s fashion; Tony Luscombe, selling bedding; Dave Crosbie, who runs Fish Fish, and Steve Wickenden, the butchers. Romford Market is always looking for traders from within the borough as well as the surrounding areas. We currently have traders travelling in from Hounslow, Brighton and Kent as well as attracting casual traders from as far as Yorkshire.  We want to encourage our customers to shop local, support your traders, local businesses and new talent.  Our borough holds a huge amount of talent and opportunities, with hard working businesses wishing to grow.  We can help them on that journey.


Breyer Advert v5.pdf

2

20/10/2017

15:27

Havering

Breyer Group

Working in partnership with

Romford’s favourite retail and leisure destination Proud sponsors of Havering magazine

With over 60 years’ experience specialising in roofing, construction, responsive repairs and maintenance, Breyer Group are one of the industry’s leading principal contractors, operating from our headquarters in Romford, Essex and our network of locally based offices. Breyer Group is a family owned business and it is currently managed by Tim Breyer.

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

Construction Our Construction division provides high quality internal and external refurbishment within Housing, Education, Healthcare and Commercial Sectors through a range of long-term framework agreements and short term contracts.

Roofing With nearly 60 years’ history and experience, we are one of the UK’s largest specialist roofing contractors and a prominent member of the National Federation of Roofing Contractors (NFRC).

B-Line At Breyer Group we put our residents first. With our B-Line service you can be assured of an immediate response to your repair call and feel safe in the knowledge that any work will be carried out to the highest standard with minimal disruption.

Find out more: breyergroup.co.uk

Caring for your home and community


Romford

Upminster

Rainham

Hornchurch

Spring 2019

Moving forward Building for the borough

FUTURE PROOFING

Romford’s masterplan to set a new vision

IN DESIGN Issue 2 — Spring 2019

Green, open spaces, and natural light are key

Harold-Hill

Elm-Park

Collier-Row

Open for growth, business and opportunities

Profile for 3Fox International Ltd

Havering #2  

Plans for £3 billion worth of development in Havering are emerging, with an emphasis on quality housing design, boosts for local businesses...

Havering #2  

Plans for £3 billion worth of development in Havering are emerging, with an emphasis on quality housing design, boosts for local businesses...