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OPPORTUNITY ENFIELD / The regeneration of Enfield

WE ARE A PARTNERSHIP HOMEBUILDER BRINGING SUSTAINABLE PROSPERITY TO COMMUNITIES

The regeneration of Enfield

- delivering 993 units, including 40% affordable.

Spring 2018 Issue Nine

Spring 2018 Issue Nine

countrysideproperties.com ountrysidep dep

- delivering 408 units, including 34% affordable.

Going homegrown / bumper crop for artisan producers / Crafty construction / a trade to triumph / Training kick / funding facilities and sporting success


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Greater Anglia jonathan.denby@greateranglia.co.uk 020 7904 4200 Lee Valley Estates info@lee-valley-estates.co.uk 2 020 8808 4070

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Sitematch London josie@3foxinternational.com 020 7978 6840

WE ARE LOOKING FOR LAND...

Thames Water customer.feedback@thameswater.co.uk 0800 980 8800

...IN LONDON AND THE SOUTH EAST 4

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A SELECTION OF OUR 2016 ACQUISITIONS 1 | PARK ROYAL - NW10

2 | HICKMAN AVENUE - HIGHAMS PARK

3 | VICTORIA WAY - CHARLTON

Formerly part of the Guiness factory 5.5 acre (2.22 hectares)

A cleared site used as temporary car park 0.9 acre (0.36 hectares)

Large warehouse and associated offices 4.82 acre (1.95 hectares)

4 | HAMPDEN ROAD - HORNSEY

5 | OVAL ROAD - CAMDEN

6 | HOPE WHARF - GREENWICH

Former steel stockholders yard 1.4 acre (0.56 hectares)

Six light industrial units 0.8 acre (0.32 hectares)

Former Booker ‘cash & carry’ wholesale store 1.1 acre (0.44 hectares)

7 | GAYTON ROAD - HARROW

8 | CRICKLEWOOD - NW2

Redundant car park • Cleared site Delapidated residential block of flats 3.16 acre (1.28 hectares)

Disused warehouse • Derelict offices MOT station and garage • Islamic centre 1.6 acre, (0.64 hectares)

9 | YEOMAN STREET - SURREY QUAYS Former building contractors storage yard 0.7 acre (0.28 hectares)

Based in Enfield for over 50 years, we have been successfully using our expertise and specialist skills to ensure land owners realise maximum value from their sites. We continue to seek new land opportunities in London and the South East.

For more information about these companies, visit opportunityenfield.com/partners 50 Lancaster Road, Enfield, Middlesex

• All sites considered, with or without planning • Substantial funds immediately available • Purchasing decisions are made quickly • Introductory fees paid

For further information please email Nicholas Dulcken at nick.dulcken@fairview.co.uk or Richard Paterson at richard.paterson@fairview.co.uk. Alternatively call 020 8366 1271.

EN2 0BY. DX: 90635 ENFIELD

www.fairviewnewhomes.co.uk

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Enefeld info@enfieldbrewery.co.uk 020 8807 1533

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Opportunity Enfield partners group Joining together to support Enfield


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A SELECTION OF OUR ACQUISITIONS 1 | PARK ROYAL - NW10

2 | HICKMAN AVENUE - HIGHAMS PARK

3 | VICTORIA WAY - CHARLTON

Formerly part of the Guiness factory 5.5 acre (2.22 hectares)

A cleared site used as temporary car park 0.9 acre (0.36 hectares)

Large warehouse and associated offices 4.82 acre (1.95 hectares)

4 | HAMPDEN ROAD - HORNSEY

5 | OVAL ROAD - CAMDEN

6 | HOPE WHARF - GREENWICH

Former steel stockholders yard 1.4 acre (0.56 hectares)

Six light industrial units 0.8 acre (0.32 hectares)

Former Booker ‘cash & carry’ wholesale store 1.1 acre (0.44 hectares)

7 | GAYTON ROAD - HARROW

8 | CRICKLEWOOD - NW2

Redundant car park • Cleared site Delapidated residential block of flats 3.16 acre (1.28 hectares)

Disused warehouse • Derelict offices MOT station and garage • Islamic centre 1.6 acre, (0.64 hectares)

9 | YEOMAN STREET - SURREY QUAYS Former building contractors storage yard 0.7 acre (0.28 hectares)

Based in Enfield for over 50 years, we have been successfully using our expertise and specialist skills to ensure land owners realise maximum value from their sites. We continue to seek new land opportunities in London and the South East. • All sites considered, with or without planning • Substantial funds immediately available • Purchasing decisions are made quickly • Introductory fees paid For further information please email Nicholas Dulcken at nick.dulcken@fairview.co.uk or Richard Paterson at richard.paterson@fairview.co.uk. Alternatively call 020 8366 1271.

50 Lancaster Road, Enfield, Middlesex EN2 0BY. DX: 90635 ENFIELD www.fairviewnewhomes.co.uk


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For more information please visit: www.newlon.org.uk

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We are currently working on new Shared Ownership homes as part of the regeneration of the Alma Estate and have a number of other schemes in the pipeline, including new homes for supported housing.

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Newlon Housing Trust has an extensive history of working in partnership with the London Borough of Enfield. We have recently provided high specification new affordable homes at Watermill Lane and in the heart of Angel Edmonton, as well as a state of the art scheme providing self-contained flats for older people with learning disabilities.

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Newlon Housing Trust proud to be working in partnership with Enfield

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7 News A new station at Meridian Water and all the latest development updates. 12 Enabling Enfield How can Enfield Council meet the needs and understand the priorities of its private sector development partners? 14 Food and drink Visiting the borough’s top artisan producers, from gin and beer to bread and a range of produce at Forty Hall Farm. 20 Build Enfield Construction careers are being encouraged in Enfield through the council’s innovative campaign.

25 Ardmore The Ardmore construction centre has provided local jobs for 40 years and is now involved with the supply chain for some of London’s newest high-end hotels. 33 Sports and leisure A training ground for a top Premier League football team and abundant opportunities for sports participation. 38 Map and projects Highlighting the major regeneration opportunities in Enfield, including small housing sites across the borough.

Sunley House, Bedford Park, Croydon CR0 2AP 020 7978 6840 3foxinternational.com

Enfield Council Civic Centre, Silver Street, Enfield EN1 3XA enfield.gov.uk improvingenfield.com Subscriptions opportunityenfield.com © 3Fox International Limited 2018. All material is strictly copyright and all rights are reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without the written permission of 3Fox International Limited is strictly forbidden. The greatest care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of information in this magazine at time of going to press, but we accept no responsibility for omissions or errors. The views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of 3Fox International Limited.

46 Sitematch The Grid is primed for development.

5 Contents Issue 9 Spring 2018

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Cover illustration Simon O’Connor/ Enfield Council Images Sharron Wallace, Grant Smith, Trent Park Equestrian Centre, Karakusevic Carson Architects, Simon O’Connor, Jennifer Balcombe Photography, Luke Dyson, Forty Hall Farm, Ray Gumbley, Ardmore, Gareth Gardner / KSS Architects, Phil Davison, Lee Valley White Water Centre, High Level Photography Ltd

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Editor-in-chief James Renoux-Wood News and digital editor Natalie Vincent Designer Smallfury Designs Production assistants Tilly Shenstone Mia Wicks Production manager Christopher Hazeldine Business development director Paul Gussar Senior business development manager Shelley Cook Project manager Sue Mapara Subscriptions manager Simon Maxwell Managing director Toby Fox

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As part of one of the UK’s most dynamic and fast-growing Facilities Management services providers, Enfield Norse deliver first-class services that our many customers value and trust. Our award winning learning and development programmes ensure our staff are highly trained and motivated, and our deployment of the latest technology in service delivery sets performance standards that lead the industry. A few key facts about us:

Our business retention – 98% against an industry average of 65% Our staff turnover – 6.25% against an industry average of 35% Educational cleaning is worth around £2.5 million a year to Enfield Norse. Enfield Norse has added over £1/4 m new business in the last financial year For more information on any of our services, or to discuss working with us, contact us using the details below:

t 0208 884 5857 w www.enfieldnorse.co.uk e enfieldnorse@ncsgrp.co.uk

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7 News Issue 9 Spring 2018

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across the Upper Lee Valley over the next two years, as part of our Railway Upgrade Plan. “With passenger demand growing, this investment will bring better rail services and support economic growth, jobs and housing opportunities in this area.” The proposed 85-ha development will comprise 10,000 new homes and is expected to open up thousands of new jobs. Doug Taylor, leader of Enfield Council said: “The council is continuing to take direct control of Meridian Water, working with partners at Network Rail as well as our local communities. “I am immensely proud of the very real progress we have made and with construction activity already underway it is starting to become a reality. “We will continue work with partners from the private sector.”

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Work has started on building a train station at Enfield Council’s flagship regeneration project. Meridian Water station will replace the current station at Angel Road and is expected to accommodate four million passengers over the next 20 years. Forming part of Network Rail’s £170 million improvement scheme to build a better railway network across the Upper Lee Valley, the new station will open in 2019, taking passengers directly south to Stratford London and London Liverpool Street, and north to Stansted and Cambridge. Train connections from Meridian Water will be 17 minutes direct to Stratford and 24 minutes to London Liverpool Street. Meliha Duymaz, Network Rail’s route managing director for Anglia, said: “The new station is an integral part of a project to deliver £170 million of improvements

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Enfield launches culture bid

NEWS

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8 News Opportunity Enfield

Enfield Council launched its bid to become the first London Borough of Culture at an art exhibition on 7 November 2017. London mayor Sadiq Khan announced the London Borough of Culture competition in June, as part of plans to support arts in the city. Inspired by the UK City and European Capital of Culture awards, two winners will be chosen for 2019 and 2020 respectively in February 2018. It took place at the Dugdale Centre, where acclaimed artist Patrick Samuel was displaying his work (above). Enfield Council’s cabinet member for community, arts and culture, Yasemin Brett, spoke confidently about the bid: “Enfield is blessed with a vast array of theatre, music venues and cultural assets, which are much loved and popular, both within the borough and further afield. “The borough itself is a vibrant melting pot of different cultures, races and religions and this contributes towards giving Enfield a vibrant, colourful and generous spirit of togetherness and community.”

“ I am motivated by the scale of transformation under way to make Enfield a better place”

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All change to regeneration leadership Enfield Council has appointed a real estate expert to lead its regeneration and environment department from this spring, following the appointment of former executive director Ian Davis to the role of council chief executive in summer 2017. Sarah Cary, the former head of sustainable places at developer British Land, will join the regeneration and environment team in March 2018. Davis praised Cary’s appointment: “Sarah has been appointed following a rigorous appointment process with an impressive calibre of applicants. “We were looking for a director to provide strong and long-term strategic leadership, to develop core strategies and to uphold the council’s priorities. “I believe we have found that in Sarah and I look forward to working closely with her and her team.” Serving at British Land for nine years, Cary has substantial experience with major development projects across the UK and will have strategic responsibilities for a diverse department, including waste, public realm, highways, regeneration, planning and sustainability. Cary said: “I understand the strategic and highprofile nature of this role and I am motivated by the scale of transformation under way to make Enfield a better place to live and work in, delivering fairness for all, growth and sustainability and strong communities.” Doug Taylor, leader of the council, reacted to Davis’ appointment as chief executive: “Ian’s appointment will enable him to continue to drive the regeneration of our borough, boost its economy, help to improve the lives of residents and support the most vulnerable.”

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Ponders End traffic improvements pay off Enfield Council has said that improvements made to a busy junction on Ponders End High Street have resulted in encouraging safer driving. The works were completed in September 2017, before the start of the new school year, with a blockpaved junction with crossing points installed at the junction of South Street, Lincoln Road and Derby Road. Existing traffic lights were replaced with two circular traffic schemes called roundels. Enfield Council’s cabinet member for environment, Daniel Anderson, said: “As a result of this pioneering scheme, traffic flow is now far smoother, with a safer, more harmonious relationship between pedestrians, cyclists and motor vehicles.” Works completed further north on the high street include new block-paved footways and parking bays and additional crossing facilities near the park. New cycle lane markings will be added shortly to complete the improvements to the High Street.

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Safety measures Work to install sprinkler systems at 54 high-rise residential blocks in Enfield began in January 2018, following recommendations made in the wake of the Grenfell tower fire tragedy in Kensington, which claimed 71 lives in June last year. The project, expected to cost £8 million (approximately £3,000 per property), will be funded by Enfield Council. However, it is currently lobbying government to pay for the upgrades. Enfield Council’s cabinet member for housing and housing regeneration, Ahmet Oykener, praised the move: “We take the safety of all of our residents extremely seriously and although our high-rise blocks are extremely safe, we think it is sensible and proportionate to install sprinkler systems in them to further reduce the likelihood of a serious fire breaking out. “We have already reviewed fire safety in every single one of our high-rise blocks and even though they are fully compliant with existing fire regulations, we feel it is right and proper to install sprinkler systems to enable more effective firefighting in these blocks and to reassure residents that we take their safety extremely seriously.”

New green space wins landscape prize A recently renovated public space in Edmonton has won a National Landscape Award. Monmouth Road Green was developed in partnership with Enfield Council and Glendale, and opened to the public in June 2017. The project won the Community and Schools Development award and was honoured in a ceremony on 1 December 2017 in central London. The new green comprises a footpath engraved with words by novelist Daniel Defoe (who wrote about Edmonton in Letter VII), with a retaining wall and a line of trees.

Pupils from nearby St. Edmund’s Catholic Primary School helped to plant flower beds, which will be watered sustainably thanks to a new guttering system. Enfield Council’s cabinet member for economic regeneration and business, Alan Sitkin, said: “We are honoured to be recognised in this way and we are extremely thankful to all who made the project come to life. It is a truly breathtaking urban project and I hope all local residents will enjoy the area for years to come.” The scheme was designed by the council’s in-house team, working in partnership with Glendale, the company which submitted the award application.

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PLANNING PERMISSION FOR EDMONTON HOMES Developer St. Modwen has been granted planning permission to build 77 flats at Edmonton Green Shopping Centre. The proposed development site is north of the shopping centre and will occupy an underused section of the North Car Park, comprising a mix of one and twobedroom apartments. Gary Morris, senior development manager at St. Modwen, said: “The decision gives the opportunity to provide much-needed privately rented housing in the area, and helps fulfil the long-term aspiration for Edmonton Green to become one of the most successful and diverse centres in north London”. The flats are part of the developer’s ongoing Edmonton Green regeneration, which includes a new public square at the northern gateway to the shopping centre, the improvements to pedestrian areas in the surrounding area, and new shops and leisure facilities. St. Modwen originally acquired the 150-year leasehold for the shopping centre in 1999, agreeing to work in partnership with Enfield Council on redeveloping the site.

9 News Issue 9 Spring 2018


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10 News Opportunity Enfield

A state-of-the-art artificial football pitch opened in Enfield on 20 November 2017. The £522,000 joint project between Enfield Council and the Football Foundation charity transformed the existing Enfield Playing Fields into a new 7,420sq m pitch, featuring third-generation (3G) artificial grass and new floodlights. There will be easy access to the changing rooms and cafe at the neighbouring QEII stadium from the facility. It was opened by the mayor of Enfield, Christine Hamilton, and Enfield Council's cabinet member for environment, Daniel Anderson. Anderson said: "The mayor of Enfield and I are thrilled to officially open the new 3G pitch at Enfield Playing Fields with the help of the Premier League and The FA Facilities Fund. "We would like to foster grass-roots football in the borough, improve skills levels across the board and help the local community benefit from this outstanding new pitch. I look forward to kick-off." Home to the UK's first supporter-owned football club, Enfield Town FC (see page 35), the grounds will also be used by Ignatians Rugby Football Club. The renovated pitch is expected to increase sports participation by local youth, women and disability teams.

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Edmonton Green Library reopened in October 2017 after a £4.2 million refurbishment. The updated library now features a digital access centre, with dozens of upgraded computers, free wifi, spruced-up study space and new self-service kiosks. There is also now a dedicated local history and museum space to celebrate the borough’s heritage. Enfield Council’s cabinet member for education, children’s services and protection, Ayfer Orhan, praised the new-look library: “We value it greatly, as do our residents, and I am delighted we have upgraded and transformed this marvellous facility as part of our wider plans to promote growth and sustainability in Enfield.” The upgrade forms part of the council’s library development strategy that was agreed in 2015, in order to ensure a sustainable future for the borough’s libraries; leading to the most significant investment for more than 15 years.

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The enablers Enfield Council has embarked on a new initiative called “Enabling Enfield” to find out how it could improve stakeholders’ experience with the planning process and decision-making for development and regeneration. Natalie Vincent reports

Pictured Delegates at an Opportunity Enfield event were given the chance to leave feedback and make suggestions on how to stimulate progressive development in the north London borough.

12 Enabling Enfield Opportunity Enfield


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In summer 2017, Enfield Council sought detailed feedback from developers and partners on how efficiently the local authority processes planning applications, promotes available development opportunities and advises on improving business relationships. The council is working with place branding consultant Tim Lewis and Opportunity Enfield publisher 3Fox International on the project. Lewis says: “More than any borough, Enfield believes in working with the private sector to create the right environment for success. Enabling Enfield is a way of thinking and acting that embodies this attitude. “3Fox became involved with the project as a natural extension to its publishing and promotional work with the borough. It had become apparent that a clear positioning concept and a concise business pitch would add value to these existing work streams.” On a rainy 17 July 2017 at the Opportunity Enfield magazine launch at the Grange St Paul’s Hotel, the usual networking sessions were combined with workshop groups, at which delegates were able to contribute suggestions and ideas about how the planning process could be improved. Four ‘stations’ were set up at the venue, with stakeholders given five minutes at each to write answers to questions on post-it notes about their expectations of the council, the challenges facing businesses and opportunities for the council to seize on. In addition, they were asked to contribute their previous experiences in promoting business in Enfield; the barriers faced by firms wanting to invest and develop in the borough, and how they perceive the ‘personality’ of the council. The feedback immediately spawned a new business enquiry form on investinenfield.co.uk, inviting businesses to tell the council how much space is required, and for what purpose. The council now plans to implement this feedback to work into the Local Plan, with developers better informed on what local schemes to bring forward. The council’s approach to decision making was further examined at a workshop held in November 2017, with 11 senior council stakeholders representing commercial and mixed-use development, property agency, business advisory, local business and public

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“We want to build good links with the private sector to improve the lives of our residents”

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relations, discussing Enfield’s strengths and weaknesses in the planning process. Decision makers at the council were not present for the meeting, in order to preserve the anonymous findings. The feedback relating to the council’s planning department praised its organisation, creative thinking and willingness to cooperate with the private sector. Its ambition for larger regeneration schemes and its role as a connection for business were also given positive feedback. Enfield Council’s assistant director for regeneration and planning, Peter George, says: “We want to build good links with the private sector to improve the lives of our residents and also build a strong and vibrant economy which benefits everyone in the longer term. “The creation of Enabling Enfield and the partnership with 3Fox are important parts of this strategy and play an important role in helping us deliver our aspirations for the future.” Suggestions for improvements were also made; the group identified duplication, repetition and lack of consistency within the planning process, leading to a long lead time on approving applications, especially with smaller extensions on existing properties. Ideas to combat this included creating dedicated project teams at the council dealing with specific applications, with planning officers assigned to projects which showcased their expertise. To tackle transparency issues within the planning department, the stakeholders suggested making contact details for planning officers and project team members clear and accessible for stakeholders, and encouraging the council to share potential project barriers with them, acting together as one team to find solutions. Lewis believes Enabling Enfield will be useful in the future: “This is more than a marketing idea; Enabling Enfield will create its own events and be featured in a wide range of communication channels. “However, its real value lies in embedding the value of collaboration and the actions that continue to create a business enabling environment in to the culture of the council and the borough.”

13 Enabling Enfield Issue 9 Spring 2018

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Pictured New Enfield premises have opened for Camden Town Brewery (main); Wright’s Bakery (right, top) has been producing bread for 150 years; Enefeld brewery (right) set up in the borough in 2015.

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With numerous artisan food and drink companies setting up in Enfield, Jane Thynne finds a borough building on its historic industry ties and creating a food and drink hub fit for the 21st century

When it comes to manufacturing firsts, Enfield has certainly made its mark. From dishwashers to rifles, the north London borough has consistently led the way. But before technology took centre stage, the area was hailed as the ‘bread basket of London’ with a history of food production that can be traced back as far as the Domesday Book. Today, Enfield is home to a thriving food sector that sees global conglomerates rub shoulders with a growing army of artisan bakers, distillers and brewers, all choosing to make their base here. One of the oldest and most successful is Wright’s Baking. For more than 150 years, the family owned company – now the only flour mill in London – has been growing and grinding wheat on the banks of the River Lea. A spokesperson for the firm, Deb Gaffney, known affectionately as ‘Deb the Bread’, says the Wharf Road location certainly contributed to its success. “Originally the river played a huge part, not only in transportation but powering the water wheels. The location is just as important today thanks to the easy access to London, the M25 and the wider road network.” The company, which has recently opened a second plant in nearby Brimsdown, acknowledges that the changing nature of the country’s population and eating habits have meant the miller has had to adapt its offer. “People now want all kinds of breads,” says Gaffney. “One of our bestselling flours is for pizza dough and we do a fine, fine flour for chapattis. We also make focaccia and rosemary [bread] and ciabatta breadmaking kits for home use too.” Another producer keen to build on already established links with the borough is Rahul Mulchandani, owner of Enefeld Brewery. The company – home to a SIBA award-winning pale ale – even pays homage to the area’s past by using the town’s original spelling. And if it’s a local brew you are looking for, then you can’t get more local than Enefeld’s products which are made from water sourced from a borehole on its Eley Road industrial site. “My family has had a business here for more than 30 years,” says Mulchandani. “With its fantastic position,

it was the obvious choice. We are a small but dedicated team and are passionate about creating a local brew we hope will be enjoyed by Enfield’s drinkers. It’s hard as many pubs here are owned by big brewers. But there are now two independent pubs in the area stocking our beers and we have been very successful in getting our brews into central London.” Meanwhile, just a few miles away, Camden Town Brewery, already part of the capital’s craft beer

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16 Food and drink Opportunity Enfield

“Enfield was the perfect place to dramatically increase production”

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cognoscenti, has responded to the current thirst for artisan beers by building an additional state-of-the-art 4645sq m brewery at Navigation Park. Although the company is now owned by global beer giant Anheuser-Busch InBev, founder Jasper Cuppaidge is committed to introducing the spirit of craft beer to the people of north London. The new brewhouse, which opened in 2017, currently offers party packages and a ‘Bottomless Beer Brunch’, as well as hosting tours and art workshops for children. You can even sign-up to guided cycle rides from Camden to Enfield via the canal. “Just a short journey from our original brewery in Camden, Enfield was the perfect place to dramatically increase production and build a site to our specifications,” explains Cuppaidge. “The brewery is also next to the River Lea, which is how the London breweries used to transport malt from Ware to London hundreds of years ago, so there’s a great historical link too.” Enfield is certainly at the forefront of the burgeoning beverage industry, with market leading products in both the wine and spirit markets. Old Bakery Gin is the brainchild of Ian Puddick, who came across the Pymmes Road buildings while looking for premises for his leak detection agency in 2012. During his research into the building’s history, Puddick discovered the original bakers had once made illicit gin there, which gave him an idea. After finding an old recipe, he bought a still from eBay and began experimenting. Old Bakery Gin began officially trading in

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part – with the proximity of London, producers have one of the best markets in the world right on their doorstep – but Enfield has a great deal to offer in terms of affordable industrial land, a skilled workforce, loyal consumers and a council very focused on creating a positive professional environment for companies doing business here.” Sitkin firmly believes that it is the council’s duty not only to champion the companies but also to support them. “We are consistently pro-active in all our business dealings,” he says. “To attract companies to Enfield and retain those who are already operating here, we are always looking for ways to help with practicalities ranging from to planning land and staff searches.” Yet even as food manufacturing has started to flourish in Enfield, Sitkin is aware of the need for further change if the borough’s town centres are to keep pace with the sector’s loyal dynamic . “Consumers’ purchasing habits have changed incredibly in recent years,” he says. “They no longer flock to town centres to buy day-to-day provisions and it is hard to imagine that happening again. “We need to re-shape our town centres so that they offer what modern consumers want – a leisure and culture experience. Study after study show what makes people come out are busy cafes, a good choice of restaurants and a vibrant night-time economy. “The council cannot dictate these outcomes but we can do and are doing everything we can to facilitate it, by changing the planning environment and by engaging in place marketing with large chains and small independents alike”.

Far left, top Customers at Enfield’s new Camden Town Brewery venue. Far left, middle, Forty Hall Vineyard produces sparkling wine. Left Seasonal vegetables are harvested at Forty Hall Farm.

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January 2017 and can now be found gracing the shelves of Harvey Nichols and being sipped by members of the royal household. The brand will also have a presence at the first ever Enfield Gin festival. To be held on the weekend of 30 June and 1 July 2018, it is expected to attract 1,000 people. “One of the best reasons for being here is its a fantastic entrepreneurial community,” Puddick says. “We actually talk to other artisan producers regularly and the council has been with us every step of the way. We are planning for the gin festival, which will of course be held in Enfield.” And while Old Bakery Gin makes its mark on the glamorous stores of Knightsbridge, social enterprise vineyard Forty Hall Farm has also hit the headlines with its 2015 Brut featuring on BBC1’s Saturday Kitchen recently and a 2017 BOOM (Best of Organic Marketing) award for Best Organic Wine. The 4.05-ha farm is home to the first London vineyard since the Middle Ages and produces both still and sparkling wines. Farm project manager Sarah Vaughan-Roberts says its success is a huge testament to the work of the local people. “It really is a community project with so many volunteers coming together to produce something wonderful,” she says. With Enfield at the heart of this artisan revolution, no one is more proud of the area’s achievements than Alan Sitkin, cabinet member for economic regeneration and business at Enfield Council. “There are so many reasons for our borough’s success in food manufacturing,” he says. “Of course, location plays a

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And Enfield’s cafe society does seem to be thriving, providing a great mix of venues to suit different tastes and preferred pastimes. Brian Lewis is the owner of My Time in Palmers Green, which sells only ethically obtained tea and coffee sourced through a local importer, and food from nearby bakeries. The cafe acts as a ‘shop window’ for other independent traders selling art, cards and crafts. My Time has also now extended its offer into the evening, thus benefitting the area’s night-time economy too. “Enfield is doing so much for the craft market,” Lewis enthuses. “We open in the evenings and serve fantastic local alcohol from Enefeld Brewery, Boham Brewey and Old Bakery Gin, which is around the corner. We see the cafe as a social hub where we can support local people and businesses. “To succeed, we need to work with the council, residents and landlords to keep the Enfield economy growing. When it comes to independent shops and so on, it’s a case of use it or lose it.” And while the area is alive with artisanal industry, Enfield remains a premier spot for large companies such as Greggs, Coca Cola and Warburtons, which opened its Enfield site on Millmarsh Lane in 2003. Warburtons, which has an annual turnover of £500 million, started off with the production of just four loaves in a grocer’s shop in Bolton, 1841. So what brought it to Enfield? Spokesperson Tearmh Taylor says: “Enfield is the perfect location and we now employ over 400 people here. Its excellent transport links ensure we can deliver our products fresh each day to customers in London and across the south. Yet while the major companies have no problem getting their goods to market, accessing local and national client bases can be harder for smaller businesses. Enter the food festivals. These relatively new concepts that bring artisan producers together under

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one roof are becoming increasingly popular and are an essential part of the artisan producer’s publicity arsenal. Launched in 2015, the Forty Hall Food Festival has proved to be an excellent arena for the area’s artisan food and drinks makers. Farm manager Kate McGeevor says: “Food is a burgeoning industry here and many of those involved are young and enthusiastic not only about their goods but to see what other like-minded entrepreneurs are doing. “We see the food festival as very much an event for the producers who can network and for consumers who can see and taste the great work local people are creating here.” The festival also reflects the borough’s rich ethnic mix, showcasing lots of flavours from around the world. Again, as well as a myriad of Turkish, Italian and Greek cafes and restaurants, Enfield is also home to international food companies such as Tazaki Foods which specialises in Japanese ingredients. Marketing manager Gabriella Vathcova believes Enfield’s “position and skilled local workforce” is what keeps the company, which celebrates its 40th anniversary in 2018, based in the borough. “We are very proud to be here,” she says. “Our base here means we can deliver twice a day to London, which is crucial for the restaurant trade.” From entrepreneurial small businesses to global giants, Enfield is the home of a thriving food and drink community. Here’s to the next 150 years.

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Left Conservation work at Forty Hall Farm. Below Ian Puddick launched The Old Bakery Gin company in 2016, which operates from a former bakery with a history of selling illicit gin 100 years ago.


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WITH A STRONG REGIONAL FOOTHOLD AND NATIONAL CAPABILITIES, WE’RE READY WHEN, AND WHEREVER, YOU ARE. Benefiting from Glenny’s in-depth and unrivalled knowledge of the North East London and Hertfordshire property markets, our clients operating in Enfield can expect an exceptional service, whatever their requirements are. Our full range of services are accessible through our central support hub in Stratford and strategicallylocated regional offices.

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OUR TEAM:WORKING

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In Enfield, the local council and large development and construction companies are working towards a similar goal: to grow and develop a young workforce in the industry for future prosperity. Karen Jensen-Jones reports

21 Build Enfield Issue 9 Spring 2018

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It may take some convincing to prove that a career in the construction industry is an exciting and rewarding prospect, but that’s exactly what Enfield Council has set out to do. The Build Enfield programme recently launched with the aim of creating a strong and sustainable local workforce in an industry badly in need of a rebrand. Its ambitious plan to create a generation of workers capable of regenerating and sustaining the borough is making considerable progress. Councillor Alan Sitkin, lead member for business and economic development at Enfield Council, explains: “Offering good careers to local people is obviously a really positive step for the residents in our borough. “The construction industry is booming right now and it’s destined to remain active in the residential market and industrial sector. As a borough, we’re very involved in regeneration in both those areas so a lot of the demand is local to Enfield.” Dismissing outdated views that the construction industry is a male-dominated environment and a hazardous place to work, the aim is to encourage people from all walks of life to learn about what the industry really has to offer. It is estimated that around 179,000 construction sector workers will be required in the UK in the next five years. And as construction is surprisingly one of the most high-tech, pioneering sectors around, it requires top-quality students for roles from accountancy to virtual reality design. “There’s quite a gap between companies looking for recruits and secondary schools offering information on careers in construction,” explains Sitkin. “We’ve worked hard to form closer relationships and bridge the gap by putting them together through local events such as Construct With Us. “These networking events enable students to discuss work opportunities face-to-face with contractors in the industry.” The crossover between students and employers has played a vital role in the success of the scheme, with

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two local further education colleges based in the borough at the forefront. The College of Haringey, Enfield and North East London (CONEL) and Barnet and Southgate College both offer a number of well-established construction courses and traineeships. Lystra Greaves is 17 and from Enfield. She is studying for a carpentry and joinery Diploma Level 1 at CONEL and is challenging stereotypes that only males are interested in the sector. “Although my course is male dominated, it doesn’t bother me as we’re all there for the same reason,” she says. “When I was at school I was the only girl in my class doing woodwork. When I spoke to other girls there about working in the industry, they would say they can’t do it or they weren’t strong enough. “I think it’s really important that we get rid of the negative image of construction and destroy gender stereotypes. It’s about reassuring girls that they can do as much, if not more than the boys. If I can be a role model for other girls to choose construction as a career, that would be great.” As one of London’s top further education colleges, CONEL offers opportunities to learn skills from bricklaying and joinery to electrics and building services all with first class teaching. At Barnet and Southgate College, apprenticeships in the construction industry enable students to enter the world of work, earn a wage and learn new skills, as well as working towards a nationally recognised qualification. Barnet and Southgate College principal, David Byrne, says: “Apprenticeships are at the heart of everything we do as a college, which is working closely with employers in the community and across the region. “They are a great way for young people to shape their future careers; earning a wage while they train on

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the job and at the same time gaining a nationally recognised qualification.” Meet The Buyer is another forum for Enfield Council to bring together individuals and businesses who may benefit from working with one another. Local Enfield construction businesses, sole traders and building services providers are given an unparalleled opportunity to meet some of the biggest construction firms in the country. Enfield Council’s chief executive, Ian Davis, says: “We want to offer the chance for people to reach their full potential in an industry that has so many prospects beyond bricks and mortar. “These events will help people realise what skills they possess to enable them to forge a career that can flourish and grow.” Davis adds: “Whether you are male or female, interested in computing or carpentry, whether you have a degree or are just dogged determined.” Understanding the importance and advantages of attracting a high caliber workforce, construction company Mulalley is a large employer supporting the Build Enfield scheme and local students who are looking for employment. With more than 40 years experience in the industry, Mulalley’s mantra is that regeneration should be about more than just bricks and mortar, but also about individuals and communities. With its strong commitment to supporting local businesses and local training and employment initiatives, the comapny is well placed to inspire and encourage the positive change that is taking place in the industry. Alpha Nyaka is 21 and completed a level 3 Electrical Programme course at Lewisham Southwark College and had been trying to work out his next step.


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Shared objectives: The council and local Enfield employers are holding workshops and working together on a variety of initiatives to encourage more young people to pursue careers in construction.

At a Construct With Us event, he met representatives from Mulalley who were looking for someone to join the team on the Lytchet Estate, Enfield Lock regeneration. Nyaka says of his work as a labourer on the estate: “Everyone was friendly and I felt part of the team. It also made me feel very responsible – the team depends on you and you can’t let them down.” Mulalley was impressed by Nyaka’s work ethic, deciding to keep him on for new projects. Countryside is another contractor making a difference to the industry, with plans moving ahead to build nearly 1,000 homes and regenerate the post-war Alma estate in Enfield.

Gareth Dominique, senior development manager for east London at Countryside presented a Meet The Buyer event in November and explains how the company benefits from supporting Build Enfield. “Regenerating the Alma estate is a joint venture with Enfield Council and part of our planning obligation is to employ a certain number of local apprentices,” Dominique says. “However, we feel it’s more than just an obligation as it really benefits us if the local community are on board. “It was great to see students and local businesses at the event, all keen to know more about the industry and really engaging in what the opportunities are. Regeneration is for everybody and the uplift it will create is very positive.” Sitkin is encouraged with progress so far but says there is still a way to go. “Some of the young people won’t be working for prime contractors but may be working with smaller local companies to whom the big developer will have sub-contracted. “The small local company won’t have the resources to fund the young person to train, so they will need assurance of a long-term contract secured from the big developer.” “We try to get those big developers to commit to who they are working with to enable those subcontractors to feel more confident that they have work. It’s a big investment for everybody concerned but one that is worth it for the long-term prosperity and future of our fantastic community and borough.”

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www.ardmoregroup.co.uk

Pictured: The Ned at Poultry, winner of Best Spa, Best Event Space, Best Restaurant and European Hotel of the Year at the 2017 AHEAD awards. Alongside acting as the main contractor for the refurbishment, Ardmore also manufactured thousands of bespoke pieces of stone and joinery for the hotel

Ardmore is one of the UK’s largest privately owned construction companies. We’ve delivered London’s most important residential projects and built some of the world’s best hotels: from the sumptuous Four Seasons, Ten Trinity Square through to the trendy Ned at Poultry - the capital’s coolest new haunt. Whether it’s large - scale estate regeneration, luxury residential or magnificent hotels, our operations are underpinned by our production facilities in Enfield. In the past few years, Enfield has provided the talented carpenters and stone craftsmen that have produced tens of thousands of made-to-measure pieces from hand crafted doors to skilfully cut marble flooring. For more information contact Head Office 28 Wharf Road, London, N1 7GR t: 0208 344 0300

Recruitment Anthony Child e: achild@ardmoregroup.co.uk

New Business Martyn Horne e: mhorne@ardmoregroup.co.uk

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Above Ardmore’s Enfield centre allows all preconstruction projects, including steel works, to be completed in one place.

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control over any pre-construction work on any project. The amalgamation of these skills – previously housed at different sites – took place over five years and was completed in 2017. Ardmore now employs 110 people at Millmarsh Lane, with thousands more on different sites. “This means the company has the ability to turn its hand to anything within the materials [restoration area],” says Adrian White, general manager of Paddington Construction, a subsidiary of Ardmore.

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“We’re the only ones that do this.” Cormac Byrne’s mantra about the work undertaken at his Enfield factory – the Ardmore construction centre in Brimsdown – is one he often repeats. It is not misplaced pride from an owner of a successful 40-year old Enfield businesses. As Byrne demonstrates the facilities on a tour of the site, he says the factory is unique in bringing stone, joinery and steel works under one roof. This, he explains, allows for total

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Steel, stone and joinery works under one roof give Enfield firm Ardmore an edge in the construction industry, marking it out as a sought-after company for high-quality renovation and restoration work. Ardmore is people-led with a history steeped in promoting diversity, women, and apprentices. Noella Pio Kivlehan reports

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As Enfield Council’s recently appointed chief executive, Ian Davis, is shown around Ardmore, he underlines how it is not only a crucial local employer, but an important investor in young people’s futures. He says: “This is a great example of a business and a local authority working together to put in place the conditions needed to encourage businesses to expand. “A key part of that is finding ways to ensure local people have access to the skills and training they need to take up jobs that come about as an inevitable result of businesses successfully growing their operations.” Throughout its history, family owned Ardmore has made a name for itself in regeneration, renovation, heritage and refurbishment, taking on projects as diverse as luxury hotels, social housing and retail outlets. Recent stand-out renovation schemes it has carried out include The Ned, the former Grade I-listed Midlands Bank building in The City and at Ten Trinity

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“We have had some young apprentices who have gone on to be here for 25 years”

Pictured Materials produced at the Ardmore facility (above left, below and above right), led by founder Cormac Byrne (left), were used at the new Four Seasons hotel at Ten Trinity Square (above).

Ardmore apprenticeships • 60 apprentices are taken in each year: - 50% go on to be offered jobs at Ardmore • 100% of construction-related trades are offered as apprenticeships • Diversity provider: apprentices include ethnic minorities, females and older people • Local focus: many apprentices are from the area, in line with council objectives • 40 years: Ardmore has been running apprenticeship schemes for four decades • Waged jobs: Unlike other providers, apprentices are paid: £7.20 per hour and £82.00 for travel • NVQ – a requirement for all apprentices

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Women of the future The figures say it all: only around 11% of women make up the entire construction workforce in the UK, with around 99% workers on-site being men. Sexism has been cited as a main reason for this by many females who believe they get treated worse than their male counterparts. Times are changing however, and Ardmore is making strides to not only improve the statistics, but the overall perception of females in the construction industry. Established on the London 2012 Olympic Park, independent, not-for-profit organisation Women into Construction started working with Ardmore when the company was part of the 2010 build team on the Athletes Village in Stratford. Through the relationship, Ardmore supported six female construction management and engineering graduates into getting employment on the site. When the Olympic Park and Athletes Village were completed in 2011/12, the Women into Construction (WIC) model was rolled out to all areas of London. Ardmore’s vision was to develop what WIC calls “the positive relationships we already had with contractors from the Olympic Park, and found Ardmore to be particularly supportive and pro-active.” Taking the reins for Ardmore was Eillish Kwai, who oversaw site visits for groups of women, and helped place them into construction roles on Ardmore sites throughout the capital. So far, 30 women have been put into paid employment. This includes 11 apprenticeships, and 36 work-placements that took in all areas of construction, providing opportunities for painters, plumbers and carpenters, through to graduates and undergraduates in engineering, quantity surveying and site management. Today, Ardmore is working closely with the WIC programme to further these initiatives.

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Square, home to the grade II*-listed, five-star Four Seasons hotel, which opened in May 2017. But it was rebuilding the five-star Corinthia hotel at Charing Cross from a shell which initially secured Ardmore’s reputation for restoration – and the Enfield factory was at the centre of the work. “Ardmore cut its teeth on the Corinthian, and the renovation arm of Ardmore is now a prominent part of the business,” says Chris Shellard, a consultant at the company. The hotel, which just prior to re-opening in 2011 had 1,000 people working on it, won a 9/10 rating for style and character from the Telegraph’s travel expert Nigel Tisdall. Materials are sourced internationally from India, Turkey and Italy, and are meticulously matched to any existing grade-listed project as part of the company’s renovation schemes. Cormac Byrne’s story is a classic one of ragsto-riches. Having arrived in England from his home in the Irish county of Donegal in 1973, with only £50 in his pocket, today Ardmore has a turnover of £303 million and employs over 7,500 people. Today, the company’s focus is primarily London and the south-east of England, and will remain so for the foreseeable future. This is in part to do with the amount of work there is in the capital, but also ties in with the company wanting to have projects close at hand, so Byrne and his team – which includes his two sons Bernard and James, both directors – can be physically on-site. “They like absolute control,” says Shellard, “and London is a big enough market. It is a global city. Ardmore has its offices here, its manufacturing here – and they can be on-site quickly. They will visit all the sites and inspect the work first hand. “Also, there is the personal touch of the company’s owners. It’s not people working for a board or shareholders – people work for the actual owners of the company,” Shellard adds. And it is in those people, whether they are from other countries, young, old, or women that Ardmore invests so much of its time and resources.

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Pictured The five-star Four Seasons hotel at Ten Trinity Square (far left); Ardmore encourages women into construction (middle left) and Benjamin Ohene at work (left).

May the force be with you When Ardmore set up its first apprenticeship scheme in 1977, the very first Star Wars film, A New Hope, was released. Forty years on and the latest Star Wars flick – The Last Jedi – was smashing box office records in December 2017. Just as Luke Skywalker was apprentice to Jedi master Obi-Wan Kenobi, Ardmore takes on 60 of its own ‘padawan’ each year. And more than 50% are offered jobs within the company. Adrian White, general manager of Paddington Construction – a brand name and part of the Ardmore family – has worked for the company since 2011. He says: “We train people not only here, but also on-site and in addition, they go to college one day a week. “We have a lot of young people we invest time and effort in to. Eight out of 10 make it. “We’re the type of business where if someone wants to get on in life we support them.” Ardmore managing director, and founder, Cormac Byrne, adds: “We do retain the apprentices, who make up the wide variety of diversity, that’s the reality. “We have had some young apprentices who have gone on to be here for 25 years.” Opportunity Enfield spoke to apprentices currently working on the Ten Trinity site about why they joined Ardmore, and what it means to work there.

Benjamin Ohene, 23, from Shoreditch (above) Plumbing apprentice working for NVQ level 3 I chose Ardmore because there was a preapprenticeship programme in plumbing I was really interested in. I had heard about it through my aunt’s estate manager. The reason I chose plumbing was because I always wanted to see how the water systems worked. Yes, there are some parts I found difficult with the apprenticeship, but I managed to get through it and get the job done. I’m now doing my Level 3 NVQ, and go to Oaklands College, Hertfordshire, one day a week for practical and for theory . I did half of it in Ten Trinity and half in Pembury Circus, Hackney [where Ardmore was involved with the Bellway/Peabody Trust residential development]. After there I went to Bank for the refurbishment of The Ned at Poultry [the Grade I former Midlands Bank in The City]. The best thing about working on-site is that it feels good to know that I have completed something. When I walk around , I think “yes, I was a part of that”. It boosts my ego up a little bit. I finish my apprenticeship at the end of next year and I would definitely recommend the option to others who might be considering doing this.

29 Ardmore Issue 9 Spring 2018


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Ian Davis, chief executive of Enfield Council, concludes: “Now is a fantastic time for young people in Enfield to make the most of the growing number of apprenticeship opportunities available in the construction sector in our borough. “Our Build Enfield website is a fantastic resource, which provides information about how young people can get involved and highlights a wide range of schemes which will be seeking construction workers – including at the £6 billion Meridian Water development, which will provide 10,000 homes and 6,000 jobs in a beautiful waterfront setting.”

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30 Ardmore Opportunity Enfield

Govind Singh, 24, Stoke Newington (above) Carpentry apprentice completing NVQ level 2 I found out from a friend who was already doing an Ardmore apprenticeship. I started with the company in 2013 after sending an email and [in reply] they invited me to an opening day. Through that I got to meet Eillish [Kwai], who is in charge of apprentices and getting them into jobs. She helped us progress forward. I have got family members who have been in the building industry, but I thought I’d do my own thing – which is carpentry. Being an apprentice, you meet different people, and everyone is willing to help you. If you’re doing something wrong, they’ll point that out. You learn from your mistakes. The sense of achievement happens when a big project all comes together; it’s teamwork. When you work together, anything can happen. One man can’t come overnight and create a building. Maybe one day I’ll set-up my own business when I have more experience and build up all my own contacts. Why not?

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Calvin Joseph, 27, Hackney (above) Trained electrical apprenticeship and full-time employee at Ardmore sub-contractors, Trinity I got into Ardmore as there was a job local to us in Pembury Circus, and I heard about it through my friends’ mum. Being an electrician was something I had looked at about three years before, but never really followed-up on. But once it presented itself again, I thought ‘I can’t miss it twice’. Being an apprentice – I started with Ardmore in 2013 – is a mixed experience. Getting up in the morning to be on site for 7am can be tough. Then there are other little aspects you could always gripe about, but what does it all mean? To be honest, if you bend your routine anyway, you can accommodate anything. The best thing so far has been opening up my own company. In May, I registered Shock and Aura, which is going to be about lighting mood. Even with registering my own company, I’m going to stay with Ardmore as I’m still learning a lot. But, obviously the dream is to run my own ship. I’d recommend doing an apprenticeship to others, particularly if you’re just leaving school, because you don’t know where life is going to take you. You can do one aspect then move on to the next. Eventually I want to design and going through this route opens doors. You do feel proud about the work you do. It makes all the early mornings, cold mornings, all of that stuff, worth it. When you’re looking in here, at Ten Trinity, you think ‘you know what, I was part of this’. When I walk past with my wife, or mum I can say to them “I put up the lights outside”. You can see what you have done, and it’ll be there for a while, because sometimes people work and it’s fleeting and if you put something that has longevity behind it, then you can say to yourself “I’m here to stay”.

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• Unrivalled opportunities for technology, retail, food and drink, manufacturing and green industries within easy reach of the M25, A406, A10, London Stansted Airport and central London • Join over 12,300 businesses including Coca Cola, Kelvin Hughes, Warburtons, Ardmore Construction, Ikea, John Lewis, Tesco, Building BloQs and Biffa employing nearly 132,000 people • Enfield offers support to businesses considering locating in Enfield with advice on available sites and premises, support with recruitment and introductions to local stakeholders and support with sourcing local suppliers.

For more information on opportunities in Enfield please email invest@enfield.gov.uk or visit www.investinenfield.co.uk

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A family owned, award winning company with a reputation as a dynamic organisation committed to exceeding clients expectations. Delivering high quality regeneration projects throughout London and the South East of England for over 40 years.

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Above The Tottenham Hotspur Training Centre in Enfield features 15 grass pitches, four of which are for the Spurs first team.

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With a wide range of indoor and outdoor activities, world-leading facilities, its own football club, and a Premier League giant’s state-ofthe-art training centre, Sue Hill finds the London Borough of Enfield has emerged as one of the best places to live for sporting enthusiasts

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While many London boroughs don’t have the vast acres of open green space needed for outdoor pursuits such as rambling, hiking, golf, horse riding and fishing, those living in the leafy north London borough of Enfield are spoilt for choice. The River Lea offers fishing and boating and for cyclists, there’s an interesting route along its banks, where centuries of invention and production can be explored. Over the border, nestled between the picturesque Essex and Hertfordshire countryside, the Lee Valley White Water Centre was built to host the canoe slalom events at the London 2012 Olympic Games. It has been open to the public since 2010 and provides families with a thrilling day out where they can enjoy activities such as white water rafting, canoeing and kayaking on an Olympic standard course. Enfield is also home to the largest indoor and outdoor athletics facility in London and the south-east. The Lee Valley Athletics Centre, located in Edmonton, was used by gold medallists Greg Rutherford and Jonnie Peacock as they trained for the London 2012 Olympics. It features the only indoor 200m six-lane track in the south of England, 60m and 130m sprint straights, full jumps and throws facilities, as well as permanent seating for 500 spectators both inside and out – and provides cutting-edge sports science and physiotherapy suites. Outdoors, there is a full eight-lane 400m track with field events facilities, seating and an outdoor terrace. The centre also co-hosted the inaugural Invictus Games in 2014 created by Prince Harry, in which wounded, injured or sick armed services personnel and their associated veterans took part in an international multi-sport event. But you don’t have to be an elite athlete to take advantage of the facilities on offer. Whether you are already into athletics or just learning something new for fun, everyone is welcome. Council initiatives such as

34 Sport Opportunity Enfield

“We want all residents to become more physically active”

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Active Enfield organise a range of sport, dance and health activities all year round for young people “That’s the great thing about Enfield, we have such a wide range of sports and leisure activities on offer here,” explains Enfield cabinet member for community safety and public health, Krystle Fonyonga. “We want all residents to become more physically active and generally move more, as part of a healthier lifestyle. Our leisure centres are very popular and offer something for all age groups, with tailored activities for the over 50s. “They can take part in activities such as swimming, gym classes and even weightlifting,” Fonyonga adds. “We’ve also got basketball clubs, alongside our fantastic yoga and pilates classes.” Enfield cabinet member for economic regeneration and business development, Alan Sitkin, says the borough’s location on the edge of London means it can offer a lot of things that other places can’t. Sitkin adds: “We have the great advantage in Enfield of being in London, so we have all the cultural offerings of the capital but the advantage of a lot of open green spaces. We’ve seen the emergence of a number of rambling and hiking clubs, especially up by Trent Park, where there are some fantastic walks. “And then there’s the Trent Park Equestrian Centre for those who want to ride horses. We also have a lot of golf courses including a pitch and putt at Grovelands Park which is perfect for beginners. I really enjoy going there and would advise anyone thinking of taking up golf to give it a go. Football is a particular passion of Sitkin’s, a sport which he says has “always been a big thing in the borough”. “Tottenham Hotspur has its training facility in Enfield,” he points out.

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Pictured Enfield is home to the Lee Valley Athletics Centre (far left), Trent Park Equestrian Centre (left), the River Lea (above) and Enfield Town FC (below).

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“This season our first team got to the fourth qualifying round of the FA Cup, and took Maidstone to a replay, who are two divisions higher. We only lost in extra time, but it was the furthest we’d ever progressed in the competition. “It’s always exciting to have a cup run like that and the fans really got behind us. But Enfield Town FC isn’t all about the first team, it’s about the whole community. We’ve got over 20 teams of various age groups, mens, youth, ladies and the learning difficulties team. We’re trying to grow the club. A lot of what we do is about community development and making sure that whatever we do is sustainable.

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“I was up there recently and was surprised by how many youth teams they have. It’s not just about the big, professional, famous first team, there’s this whole educational structure for young footballers which is a really good thing. But it’s my Enfield Town FC scarf that I wear whenever I head into London. And I always take great pride in telling whoever asks that it’s my local team.” Enfield Town FC was the first supporter-owned club in the country when it was formed in 2001. The first team are currently in the Isthmian League Premier Division and play at the Queen Elizabeth Stadium, where Lord Sebastian Coe once trained. With the club owned and run by the fans, it’s at the heart of the local football community and has over 20 men’s and women’s teams of all ages and abilities. Its vision of being an inclusive club for all and a football and social centre for the community, has included setting up a learning difficulties squad. Initially launched as a collaboration between Enfield Town FC and the Tottenham Hotspur Foundation, the team has helped many local disabled players of all ages get into football. The squad is made up of people with a range of conditions from Asperger’s to autism, as well as physical disabilities. Speaking about the club’s position within the local community, Enfield Town spokesman Ken Brazier, says:

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“We have to look at every pound that comes in and make sure that it’s spent wisely. The attendances have grown slightly each year and I think people like being involved because they feel that it’s their club. It’s something they can be proud of.” While Enfield Town FC is continuing to grow, Premier League giants Tottenham Hotspur recently announced plans to build a new education and environmental facility on a site adjacent to its training centre. Located on Hotspur Way, Enfield, the training centre was built on 31.16ha and was opened at the end of 2012. Home to the club’s first team and academy, it is recognised as one of the best in Europe. The facility includes a covered artificial pitch, player preparation areas, pool and hydrotherapy complex, altitude room, large-scale gymnasium and specialist sports rehabilitation suites, has helped attract, develop and retain the highest quality talent. Following the success of the training centre, the purpose-built education facility (below) will include a

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top-level multi-use sports pitch and a nature reserve with boardwalks, wildflower walks and a meadow. The club also announced in January 2018 that it will open a ‘player lodge’ near the facility this summer, which would provide a place for top European clubs visiting to train and sleep. The plan is to create an environment where nature conservation, recreation and sport can be brought together to provide a high-quality, hands-on learning experience for Enfield children, alongside a world-class sports field for schools and club use, which will be used for different purposes. Speaking about the facility, Daniel Levy, club chairman, says: “The location of the centre has provided an unrivalled and unique opportunity to deliver something truly outstanding for the young people of Enfield. “Our training centre has already been able to play an important role locally through the hosting of sport and educational projects alongside a comprehensive programme of outreach work. Levy adds: “This facility represents a sustainable long-term investment into the next generation and will provide facilities for children to learn in a fun, high quality and natural environment that can remain part of the borough for years to come.”

Above The Tottenham Hotspur training ground is regarded by football coaches as one of the best in Europe. Left The Lee Valley White Water Centre hosted canoe slalom events at the London 2012 Games.

36 Sport Opportunity Enfield

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100,000 bikes means one big bike shed. Brompton is a British success story, exporting their iconic folding bikes all over the world. Booming businesses have complex problems that need solving. However, in just one meeting, we were able to put a line through the property ones. Four separate parts of Brompton’s business moved into one of our industrial properties, a property that not only allowed for expansion but also provided a viewing platform enabling Brompton customers to watch their personally specified bikes being built. When brilliant businesses find outstanding spaces, extraordinary things happen.

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01 Meridian Water Work on Meridian Water station is progressing, with the first trains set to arrive at the pioneering development site in 2019.

03 Alma Estate Mixed-tenure homes will soon be available as part of one of the council’s flagship estate renewal projects.

05 Montmorency Park Replacing the 1970s Ladderswood Way estate with a highquality, mixed-tenure residential scheme.

02 The Electric Quarter The first phase of the Electric Quarter project in Ponders End is scheduled for completion in May 2018.

04 Dujardin Mews Dujardin Mews, named after a successsful Enfield Olympian, has won a RIBA for its highquality architecture.

06 New Avenue Building work began in autumn 2017 on a project to deliver more than 400 new homes near the North Circular road.

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01 Small Housing Sites Phase 1 a. Parsonage Lane b. St George’s Rd c. Forty Hill d. Lavender Hill e. Jasper Close f. Holtwhites Hill g. Tudor Crescent

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02 Small Housing Sites Phase 2 a. Perrymead Padstow and Hedge Hill b. Gatward Green c. Newstead d. Ordnance Road

01 Joyce and Snells 02 Upton and Raynham 03 Small Sites 3 a. Rosenheath Walk

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Piccadilly Line Proposed route of Crossrail 2 38 Map Opportunity Enfield

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40 Projects Opportunity Enfield

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01 Meridian Water In 2019, the first trains will stop at the new Meridian Water station, which will be on the line from London Liverpool Street and Stratford to Stansted Airport and Hertfordshire, with convenient connections to London Underground at Tottenham Hale. Meridian Water is one of London’s largest regeneration projects and will make use of waterfront settings and the adjacent Lee Valley Regional Park, to create a new community with 10,000 homes and thousands of jobs on a site of around 85ha and in a development worth £6 billion. The station will be only 17 minutes from Stratford and 24 from Liverpool Street. Network Rail has started construction of the station, which will replace the inconveniently sited one at Angel Road, and expects up to four million people to use it each year. It forms part of Network Rail’s £170 million programme of improvements to services across the Upper Lee Valley. The station has been designed by Arup, Atkins and architect KCA and will include three platforms and a new footbridge with access by lifts and stairs. Provision has also been made for a fourth platform, and this will accommodate the proposed Crossrail 2 north-south line across London.

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Enfield has recently acquired the 12.9-ha Stonehill and Hastingwood sites, which have the potential to deliver 2,200 homes – taking the council a step closer to gaining full control of all developable land for the significant regeneration project. In March 2017, Enfield also bought for redevelopment the VOSA site south of Stonehill once used for vehicle testing. Meridian Water will be a place to work as well as a place to live, offering a change of emphasis for the area away from industrial warehousing and logistics – fields where jobs are relatively plentiful in the locality – to those offering higher-skilled, higher-paid employment opportunities. The project will transform the eastern part of the borough in what has been a largely former industrial landscape and make the most of Meridian Water’s proximity to the waterways and parklands of the Lea Valley as a new waterfront eco-quarter. It will be designed as a well-integrated urban extension of the busy Edmonton area. Other plans include primary schools, an all-through school, a local centre offering new health and library facilities and local shops. The council owns two-thirds of the developable site and has housing zone funding


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secured for part of the area secured from the Greater London Authority. In October 2017, Enfield ended its discussions with housebuilder Barratt on entering into a development agreement for Meridian Water and the company withdrew from its position as preferred development partner. The reserve development partner is Hong Kong’s PCPD, which the council is in talks with. Ian Davis, chief executive at Enfield Council, says: “Meridian Water remains one of the most exciting development opportunities anywhere in London but we were simply not prepared to sign up to what we considered to be a poor deal for the residents and businesses of Enfield. “Enfield Council therefore informed Barratt that its proposed terms were unacceptable, which has led to discussions with them ending. “We are immensely proud of the progress we have made at Meridian Water over the last 18 months as the council has taken direct control to ensure successful delivery.” Progress is being made with the first housing developments and planning consent is in place for the first 725 homes at Willoughby Lane and for Meridian Works, Europe’s largest open workshop for makers, creators and artists, which is due to open in 2018.

02 The Electric Quarter Enfield Council is working with developer Lovell Partnerships to deliver the £50 million Electric Quarter project in Ponders End. The area has a long association with industrial innovation and technology and the Electric Quarter celebrates this, being named in honour of electric light bulb inventor Joseph Swan, who lived on Ponders End High Street. It is a two-hectare development on the high street that will see 167 homes built and more than 1,300sq m of commercial and community space created. Almost all the necessary land assembly is completed for both phases. Energy will be supplied by Energetik. The first phase, due for completion in March 2018, will deliver 40 townhouses for private sale and 21 homes for rent, while phase two will include 106 homes, a nursery, a rooftop play area, library and commercial units. Eight of the townhouses were already complete and occupied as Opportunity Enfield went to press. Lovell is in the process of appointing a registered housing provider to manage all the affordable units. Ponders End High Street’s highway improvements and the Electric Quarter developments have been planned closely together to minimise impact on existing residents and businesses. On the delivery of each scheme, additional car parking will be provided. A public realm improvements scheme to upgrade the appearance of the street and enhance the community legacy is under consideration by the council and will be delivered in collaboration with the Ponders End Community Development Trust.

41 Projects Issue 9 Spring 2018


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Work is in progress on the first phase, with construction of the first 228 homes due in 2020. Enfield Council is meanwhile working with developer Countryside on detailed plans for phase two.

Below Work is well under way at the Alma Estate, one of the council’s flagship regeneration schemes.

The street takes its name from Enfield’s equestrian Olympic double gold medallist, Charlotte Dujardin, and is the first housing scheme developed and managed by the council since the 1980s. Dujardin Mews is a modern interpretation of a traditional London residential street with town houses, flats and maisonettes built to Lifetime Homes standards and larger than the Greater London Authority’s requirements for minimum floor areas and meet either Code for Sustainable Homes Level 4 or 5 criteria. Half the homes are allocated for affordable rent and half for shared equity sale and they have been offered to tenants and leaseholders from the Alma Estate, which is being demolished and regenerated.

05 Montmorency Park The former Ladderswood Way estate has been renamed Montmorency Park to mark its redevelopment. It was built in the 1970s on land adjoining New Southgate industrial estate and had 161 homes. Plans were approved three years ago for 517 homes – ranging from one bedroom flats to four bedroom houses – new commercial space, a community centre and an 80-bedroom hotel, and the handover of the first 23 affordable homes and 17 homes for private sale took place in September 2017. Montmorency Park is one of the first projects to be delivered through the New Southgate Masterplan and it has been led by the New Ladderswood partnership, which comprises social landlord One Housing Group, housebuilder Sherrygreen Homes and building contractor Mulalley. Works on phases two and three of the development have been under way since 2016. All utility diversion works and excavation to form the basement car park have been completed. Mulalley has also finished the  construction of the concrete structure for buildings on the site. Energy for the scheme will be provided by Energetik.

42 Projects Opportunity Enfield

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Enfield Council also won a RIBA award for the scheme in the Best Client category. It is the first council-led social housing scheme the local authority has embarked on in 40 years.

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There will be a mix of homes for private sale, shared ownership and those rented from the council for the remaining secure tenants. Construction work will carry a minimum requirement for local labour during the development.

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04 Dujardin Mews, Ponders End Dujardin Mews is a development of 38 homes for local people built for the council by Durkan. It was the recipient of a RIBA London Award in 2017 for architects Karakusevic Carson with Maccreanor Lavington.

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03 Alma estate Developer Countryside’s plans for the Alma estate at Ponders End estate involve the demolition of 746 properties and in their place, construction of 993 homes, shops, a gym, medical centre and community facilities.

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06 New Avenue Construction work has started on Cockfosters’ New Avenue estate regeneration programme, which will see the existing blocks comprising 171 homes demolished and redeveloped along with the Hood Avenue open space and nearby garages. In their place will come more than 400 homes, a multipurpose nursery/community centre, community amenity space and parking. Construction work started in autumn 2017 with the first homes due to be completed by late 2019. Residents will have the first opportunity to purchase the homes, and tenants will keep their secure tenancies if they choose to remain.

Small Housing Sites Phase 1 The council is seeking to make use of small parcels of land it owns which, while not suitable for large-scale housebuilding, can still provide more homes in small packages.

shared ownership, one for shared equity and 16 for social rent.

There are seven such sites across the borough in the first phase of this exercise, which will provide 94 homes.

Tudor Crescent (Kier): A terrace of four three-bedroom houses and two four-bedroom houses for social rent, as well as a block of nine two-bedroom flats for private sale.

Of these, 37 will be for social rent, 15 for shared equity, two for shared ownership and 40 for private sale. Kier is the council’s development partner for the first phase of the project comprising three sites and a contractor named AMCM for the second phase comprising four sites. The project is part funded by a grant from the Greater London Authority but it is mostly financed by loan funding secured against the sales receipts of the private homes.

St George’s Road (Kier): Three four-bedroom family townhouses, all allocated as affordable to rent.

Forty Hill (AMCM): Nine homes for private sale with a mix of three and four bedroom properties. Lavender Hill (AMCM): A detached corner building with 12 single or two bedroom flats, eight for private sale and four for shared equity.

The sites (with contractor named in brackets) are:

Jasper Close (AMCM): A development of 18 new homes within three buildings, with 10 for shared equity and eight for social rent.

Parsonage Lane (Kier): Four terraces with three-storey buildings to provide 10 homes for private sale, two for

Holtwhites Hill (AMCM): A mews of eight new homes, half for private sale and half for social rent.

43 Projects Issue 9 Spring 2018


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Newstead: Planning approval was granted in August 2017 for the redevelopment of Newstead House and the car park located on Maldon Road. Newstead House and in its place there will be 12 family homes built, 11 of them with three bedrooms and one with two bedrooms. There will also be a block of 11 single bedroom flats for people aged over 50. Work is due to start in summer 2018 and scheduled for completion the following year. Ordnance Road: The Neilcott Construction development will provide 15 homes allocated as affordable rent on the former Kettering Hall and pub site on Ordnance Road. It will feature 11 three-bedroom houses and four single-bedroom detached bungalows. All 11 houses were partially handed over in December 2017 and are now tenanted. Handover of the four bungalows on Sparkbrook Way will take place in early February 2018.

Small Housing Sites Phase 3 These are a further phase of redevelopments of small sites, in this case to make use of redundant garages owned by the council, to give nine residential units at High Road, five at Southbury Avenue and five at Roseneath Walk.

In Brief Joyce Avenue and Snells Park The council is consulting on opportunities for the Joyce Avenue and Snells Park estates in Edmonton and has appointed HTA Design to develop proposals with residents and stakeholders. Upton and Raynham The council is reviewing the financial viability of this estate regeneration scheme, which could provide homes for those who move out of the adjacent estates at Joyce Avenue and Snells Park while they are regenerated.

44 Projects Opportunity EnďŹ eld

Above Small housing schemes are planned at Gatward Green (above top), Hedge Hill (below top) and Ordnance Road (left).

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Work is expected to start in summer 2018 for completion a year later.

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Gatward Green: Planning approval has been given for seven affordable homes and five for private sale on the site of three redundant garages, which will be demolished. There will also be associated landscaping, cycle parking, refuse storage and off-street parking.

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Perrymead, Padstow & Hedge Hill: Neilcott Construction is building 13 homes for private sale across five disused garage sites owned by Enfield Council in Gordon Hill, due for completion in spring 2018.

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Phase two This follows the idea of the first phase in making good use of vacant parcels of land.

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Small Housing Sites

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020 7978 6840

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Hemini Mistry – events assistant

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Natasha Pullan – head of events natasha@3foxinternational.com

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WORKSHOPS ● LAUNCHES ● TOURS ● RECEPTIONS CONFERENCES ● MEETINGS ● ROUND-TABLES

Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AG

EVENTS

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No gridlock Huub Nieuwstadt reports on how an industrial site on the Brimsdown estate is primed for development

Enfield Council is currently seeking parties interested in The Grid, one of the latest industrial developments in London. When completed, The Grid is set to offer nine units covering nearly 7,900sq m of warehouse and office space, suitable for light industrial, general industrial and distribution uses. The key features of the development include fitted offices on the first floor, full height electronic loading doors and security gates. Furthermore, environmentally friendly technologies like photovoltaic panels, high performance insulated cladding and air source heat pumps will reduce costs for future end users. These green features provide the development with an “excellent” BREEAM rating. The site is located in the heart of the Brimsdown estate, the second largest industrial/warehouse estate in London. Brimsdown railway station is a short walk away, offering a regular 22-minute train service to Liverpool Street station. Road connections are equally efficient. The complex is just off Mollison Avenue, providing easy access to the M25 in the north, and Tottenham Hale to the south. There is also very easy access to the A10 and North Circular Road. The area’s industrial history dates back to 1907, when the coal-fired Brimsdown power station was opened. It closed in the 1970s, but was responsible for 46 Sitematch Opportunity Enfield

attracting a number of manufacturers, including Enfield Cables, Johnson Matthey and Imperial Lampworks. The area is now home to over 10,000 industrial and logistics businesses and employs almost 90,000 people. A few miles south of the Brimsdown estate is Meridian Water, a £6 billion regeneration programme delivering 10,000 homes and thousands of jobs. Work has already commenced on a new railway station by Network Rail, which is set to be completed in 2019. If you want to learn more about the opportunities The Grid can offer, contact: Ivan Scott/Peter Ley – Glenny 0208 367 2334 Nick Hardie/Will Merritt – BNP Paribas 020 7629 7282 Jack Booth/Richard Sullivan – Savills 020 7499 8644

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Greater Anglia jonathan.denby@greateranglia.co.uk 020 7904 4200 Lee Valley Estates info@lee-valley-estates.co.uk 2 020 8808 4070

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Sitematch London josie@3foxinternational.com 020 7978 6840

WE ARE LOOKING FOR LAND...

Thames Water customer.feedback@thameswater.co.uk 0800 980 8800

...IN LONDON AND THE SOUTH EAST 4

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A SELECTION OF OUR 2016 ACQUISITIONS 1 | PARK ROYAL - NW10

2 | HICKMAN AVENUE - HIGHAMS PARK

3 | VICTORIA WAY - CHARLTON

Formerly part of the Guiness factory 5.5 acre (2.22 hectares)

A cleared site used as temporary car park 0.9 acre (0.36 hectares)

Large warehouse and associated offices 4.82 acre (1.95 hectares)

4 | HAMPDEN ROAD - HORNSEY

5 | OVAL ROAD - CAMDEN

6 | HOPE WHARF - GREENWICH

Former steel stockholders yard 1.4 acre (0.56 hectares)

Six light industrial units 0.8 acre (0.32 hectares)

Former Booker ‘cash & carry’ wholesale store 1.1 acre (0.44 hectares)

7 | GAYTON ROAD - HARROW

8 | CRICKLEWOOD - NW2

Redundant car park • Cleared site Delapidated residential block of flats 3.16 acre (1.28 hectares)

Disused warehouse • Derelict offices MOT station and garage • Islamic centre 1.6 acre, (0.64 hectares)

9 | YEOMAN STREET - SURREY QUAYS Former building contractors storage yard 0.7 acre (0.28 hectares)

Based in Enfield for over 50 years, we have been successfully using our expertise and specialist skills to ensure land owners realise maximum value from their sites. We continue to seek new land opportunities in London and the South East.

For more information about these companies, visit opportunityenfield.com/partners 50 Lancaster Road, Enfield, Middlesex

• All sites considered, with or without planning • Substantial funds immediately available • Purchasing decisions are made quickly • Introductory fees paid

For further information please email Nicholas Dulcken at nick.dulcken@fairview.co.uk or Richard Paterson at richard.paterson@fairview.co.uk. Alternatively call 020 8366 1271.

EN2 0BY. DX: 90635 ENFIELD

www.fairviewnewhomes.co.uk

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Enefeld info@enfieldbrewery.co.uk 020 8807 1533

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Opportunity Enfield partners group Joining together to support Enfield


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OPPORTUNITY ENFIELD / The regeneration of Enfield

WE ARE A PARTNERSHIP HOMEBUILDER BRINGING SUSTAINABLE PROSPERITY TO COMMUNITIES

The regeneration of Enfield

- delivering 993 units, including 40% affordable.

Spring 2018 Issue Nine

Spring 2018 Issue Nine

countrysideproperties.com ountrysidep dep

- delivering 408 units, including 34% affordable.

Going homegrown / bumper crop for artisan producers / Crafty construction / a trade to triumph / Training kick / funding facilities and sporting success

Opportunity Enfield #9  

This edition of Opportunity Enfield features artisan producers, construction, skills, multimillion pound sporting facilities and all the lat...

Opportunity Enfield #9  

This edition of Opportunity Enfield features artisan producers, construction, skills, multimillion pound sporting facilities and all the lat...