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CONTENTS

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20 Map What’s happening and where – development schemes delivered, under way and planned.

22 Project by project A round-up of the major regeneration opportunities in Enfield.

31 Art and culture From creative businesses to investment in its cultural and heritage facilities, the local arts scene is thriving.

35 Waterways Enfield aleady exploits its liquid assets for leisure pursuits – with opportunities for regeneration opening up along the waterside.

40 Neighbourhoods The east of the borough is where Enfield’s major regeneration challenges lie – and radical change is under way.

44 Markets Fact file – statistics about local markets, people, history and environment.

47 Employment Enfield’s manufacturers find skilled recruits, with training provision in local colleges responding to employer’s needs.

04 News An update on what’s happening in regeneration around Enfield.

08 New directions As budgetary pressures

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on local authorities grow, Enfield Council looks at innovative approaches with the Centre for Research on Socio-Cultural Change (CRESC).

16 Economy Enfield attracts businesses in the logistics, food manufacturing and green sectors.

opportunity

Enfield For contacts and feedback visit: opportunityenfield.com Published on behalf of:

Published by: 375 Kennington Lane, London SE11 5QY 3foxinternational.com T: 020 7978 6840 F: 020 7681 3468

Enfield Council, Civic Centre, Silver Street, Enfield EN1 3XY enfield.gov.uk T: 020 8379 1000 Director of regeneration, leisure and culture: Neil Rousell neil.rousell@enfield.gov.uk

Executive editor: Siobhán Crozier Contributing editors: Sarah Herbert, Lucy Purdy Designers: Katrin Smejkal, Smallfury Design Head of design: Rachael Schofield head of business development: Paul Gussar Business development manager: Sophie Gosling Production assistants: Emily Corrigan Doyle, Jeri Dumont Office manager: Sue Mapara Subscriptions manager: Simon Maxwell Managing director: Toby Fox Printed by: Printech

Images: Enfield Council, David Tothill, Mike Swartz, The College of Haringey, Enfield and North East London, Tooley & Foster Partnership, ISG, Burns + Nice, Countryside Properties, Hawkins\Brown, Fairview New Homes, Mulalley and Company, Forty Hall, Rapleys © 3Fox International Limited 2012. All material is s ­ trictly copyright and all rights are reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without the written ­permission of 3Fox International Limited is strictly ­forbidden. The greatest care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of information in this magazine at time of going to press, but we accept no ­responsibility for omissions or errors. The views expressed in this ­magazine are not ­necessarily those of 3Fox International Limited or Enfield Council.

03


NEWS

NEWS

04

Edmonton Youth Hub

Meridian Water takes centre stage Two high profile events have showcased Enfield’s 82-ha Meridian Water regeneration development to a central London investment audience. The first, a reception at the House of Commons in October 2011, showed investors, politicians and industry experts the many opportunities in the proposed £1.3 billion development, which will include 5,000 homes, 3,000 jobs, schools, parks and other community facilities. Enfield Council’s cabinet member for business and regeneration, Councillor

Del Goddard, told the audience: “Meridian Water will be an outstanding place to live and work. Providing a vibrant mix of aspirational and affordable homes, this community in the making will embrace best practice in ecodevelopment and ecologically responsible living. Developers and investors are taking notice of this great opportunity.” The ambitious waterside project, which will be one of the largest green developments in the UK, was also the focus for a wellattended event at New London Architecture in central London in November.

Office to homes A former office building, Wenlock House in Enfield Town, was acquired by Fairview New Homes in January 2012. Fairview submitted a planning application in June 2012 for the refurbishment and conversion of the building to provide 36 high quality new residential apartments including a mix of one, two and three-bedroom units. Planning director Steven Gough said: “Fairview’s investment in the development of Wenlock House will deliver new homes and a visual enhancement to the town centre, which it is hoped will have a catalytic influence on further inward investment and regeneration. It is anticipated that construction will begin in early 2013, with apartments available in early 2014.”

A state-of-the-art youth centre has been created in the heart of Enfield, as part of a £3 million Edmonton Youth Hub project, led by the council. The centre – which includes hitech facilities such as music recording studios, radio and TV broadcasting facilities and a driving simulator – will be open seven days a week, and give young people the opportunity to take part in a range of sport, and arts projects and practical workshops. It will also provide a range of support services such as advice on alternative education, substance misuse, healthy eating and young parenting.


Partners fund MIPIM delegates

Dramatic improvements to rail and road infrastructure in north London are vital in order to attract billions of pounds in investment – so said Enfield Council’s chief executive Rob Leak at a House of Commons reception to lobby for support for local transport projects. Leak said: “Growth needs the right road and rail networks to support it, which is why we are pushing for major upgrades to be carried out to our transport network. The addition of a third track would help reduce congestion, improve service for travellers and support growth in the area.” The proposals promoted by Enfield include a third rail line between Stratford and Brimsdown and construction of the Northern Gateway Access Road to link Brimsdown with the Upper Lee Valley. Enfield Council also wants to look at ways of providing easier access to the M25, as well as improving public transport, walking and cycling routes to create a better environment for residents and businesses in the area. For more on Enfield’s rail proposals, see page 22 (projects).

Action for North Circular A planning framework for the development of the A406 North Circular Road is now being prepared to improve the living and working environment. The framework will also enable investors to identify new opportunities for housing, employment and community facilities. The North Circular area action plan is due for public consultation in autumn 2012. It will be refined and submitted for independent examination and adopted by autumn 2013. This will guide the purchase of blighted land from Transport for London by Notting Hill Housing Trust and estate renewal taking shape at Ladderswood. It will also help further steer the council’s adopted core strategy, the New Southgate Masterplan and a planning brief which outlines future opportunities for Southgate Town Hall.

(pictured bottom). These opportunity sites will see a number of different regeneration schemes that will include housing, retail, schools, parks, recreation and communityled facilities. “Enfield is a great opportunity for any investor looking for good infrastructure, green spaces, attractive suburban housing, low crime levels, excellent schools – and it forms part of the second largest employment corridor in London,” said Goddard. MIPIM was attended by 19,402 delegates and 4,130 property investors. The conference offers a platform for local authorities to promote the sites they plan to develop and to attract inward investment.

05 NEWS

Enfield on the right track

Enfield Council sent its first delegation to MIPIM, the international property and investment conference, held annually in Cannes, in early March Councillor Del Goddard, cabinet member for business and regeneration, was accompanied by director of regeneration, Neil Rousell. The delegation, fully funded by Enfield’s private sector partners, joined other London boroughs in meeting potential developers to promote sites. Investors listened with interest as Goddard and Rousell highlighted opportunities at the £1.3 billion Meridian Water project, as well as sites in Ponders End, Edmonton Green, New Southgate, Ladderswood (pictured below) and Highmead


Meridian Water royal visit

06 NEWS

£2 million boost for north-east Enfield Enfield has scooped £1.9 million from the GLA to regenerate and improve north-east Enfield. The money, which comes from the Outer London Fund, will be used to regenerate Ponders End High Street. It will also contribute to improving Enfield Business Centre, which provides support and space for local businesses, and improve the public realm in high street shopping areas from Ponders End to Enfield Lock. The funding will also help to bring together the Ponders End Business Forum and provide a website for companies to share good practice. The Outer London Fund is awarded to benefit areas not profiting from the Olympics or Crossrail. It will also go towards the London Outdoor Arts Festival to hold a series of events in Enfield Lock, Ponders End and Enfield Highway during the Olympic year to celebrate the diversity of the area.

The Duke of York has formally opened the first project to be completed as part of the £1.3 billion Meridian Water development in Edmonton. St John’s Church, closed in 2000 due to falling attendance and structural problems, has been redeveloped with Enfield Council’s help and converted into a centre comprising a church, community centre and primary school. Prince Andrew opened the Hanlon Community

Centre and St Matthew’s CE Primary School, Edmonton Annex, on 16 July. Enfield Council leader, Cllr Doug Taylor, said: “This is a fantastic project which has helped save the church from closure, provided first rate community facilities and helped provide muchneeded primary school places in Enfield.” The project, which is being delivered by Enfield Council, will be one of the country’s largest green developments.

Enfield Business Accord Companies across the borough have signed up to the Enfield Business Accord, a set of principles designed to involve companies in decision-making processes, and improve business consultation with community leaders. Produced by the Federation of Small Businesses, the proposals have been sent to every council in England, encouraging them to adopt a similar approach. Other principles of the Enfield Business Accord include the nomination of business engagement champions and setting out a minimum notice period for inviting small businesses to consultation meetings and commenting on policy documents.

WLTM developers at Sitematch London Enfield Council regeneration chiefs attended the first Sitematch London event at City Hall on 1 March. The event worked in a “speed dating” format, with 27 London authorities meeting investors to discuss key development sites. Councillor Del Goddard, cabinet lead member for regeneration, attended with senior regeneration officer Sharon Strutt who ran the Enfield desk, meeting with developers interested in working in the borough. Sitematch London is run by Opportunity Enfield publisher, 3Fox International, in partnership with Ealing Council, and is supported by the Mayor of London. The next Sitematch London is on 6 November.


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08

NEW DIRECTIONS


In partnership with the Centre for Research on Socio-Cultural Change (CRESC), Enfield Council is developing a new approach to regeneration. A series of conferences, involving local authorities, private companies, academia and the third sector, have explored innovative ways to deliver regeneration in a challenging financial environment. Elizabeth Pears went along to hear their ideas

NEW DIRECTIONS

Meeting of minds

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council’s sustainability scrutiny panel. Paul Sanderson, deputy head of knowledge exchange at the Economic Social Research Council (ESRC), says: “We want research which has impact. And research that is not simply confined to academic circles, but will, hopefully, influence public policy or business policy. We think academics will gain because they will understand the priorities and issues faced by practitioners – whether they are in central government, local authorities or the business sector – and users such as local authorities, as in this case, will gain because they get access to new thinking and expertise.” Karel Williams, CRESC director, added: “The existing paradigm, the existing personnel, are very ill-adapted for the problems we now face. How do you change the mix of activities in the UK, run an industrial policy and regional policy, when the civil service lacks expertise, and Westminster politicians are likely to resist serious changes? “Westminster and Whitehall don’t do renewal. And they don’t do it for two jolly good reasons. First of all, political base and calculation. The parties are now Westminster cliques connected with the electorate via their focus groups, and allied to London finance.

“Oxford Economics states that we have the ability to add more than two billion pounds of GVA in Enfield” fell by 12%, while publicly supported jobs increased by 32%. At present, the council remains the borough’s biggest employer, but unemployment in Enfield is above the London average with some 17.4% of the population without a job. A lack of disposable income also has an adverse effect on the local economy. “Enfield has not been dragging its feet and just looking at the stats. We have a very significant regeneration programme,” says chief executive Rob Leak, pointing to the council’s efforts in supporting business needs, attracting inward investment, improving railway infrastructure, decentralised energy networks and market gardening. “Oxford Economics state that we have the ability to add more than two billion pounds of GVA in Enfield, and the Lee Valley can add something like five to ten billion over the next ten to twenty years. But in addition to all the work that is ongoing, we need fresh ideas to further reduce unemployment and boost growth,” Leak adds. This fresh thinking has taken the form of a unique partnership with the Centre for Research on Socio-Cultural Change (CRESC) – the research facility for the University of Manchester and Open University funded by the Economic Social Research Council. The idea of cashing in on such academic expertise was the brainchild of council leader Doug Taylor, Councillor Del Goddard (cabinet member for business and regeneration), Councillor Achilleas Georgiou (deputy leader), Councillor Andrew Stafford (cabinet member for finance and property) and Councillor Alan Sitkin, chair of the

“The second point is the absence of technical resource and expertise. It’s really good to have regional studies and town and country planning represented at the conference, because renewal needs focus on this activity.” The council, too, hopes a new collaborative approach focusing on developing the local and regional economy will help create perfect conditions for prosperity. “We have looked at what we believed would be a role for local authorities and our concept is that of the ‘co-ordinating council’,” explains Doug Taylor of the leadership position he believes his team can take, as services are fragmented and the state becomes more splintered. He adds: “We believe ourselves to be the most legitimate player in the local state, given our ability to say that we have been elected by people. “We can bring together public service bodies and private sector bodies to try and get the best for the local citizen.” The partnership is hosting three New Directions conferences over 18 months exploring 18 ideas centred around three themes: big business and corporate social responsibility; purchasing and collaboration; and financial strategies. The first conference took place in February 2012 and kick-started the debate on the medium-term scope for a national re-industrialisation policy and immediate possibility of changes to local policy initiatives. Guests included academics from the University of Oxford and the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), as well as thinktanks such as Demos, Civitas, New Policy Institute and Localis. Overleaf we look at some of the big questions discussed.

11 NEW DIRECTIONS

or local authorities delivering regeneration, reliance on government funding has run its course. There is no money to be had. And it’s not going to get any better. The national picture is bleak, with the UK economy predicted to grow just 0.4% in 2012, with companies carefully hoarding their cash rather than investing it in business. “We cannot rely on some of the old and sometimes discredited ways of working”, says Neil Rousell, director of regeneration at Enfield Council. “To ensure Enfield’s 300,000 residents enjoy a decent standard of living despite limited resources, independent of economic trends, the council is laying the groundwork for a new kind of intervention that gets local, regional and central government working together.” And these communities need it. Enfield never fully recovered from the decline of its industrial sector during the 1980s. Those who relied on the factories for employment now depend on the state for help, either for work or benefits. There is a pool of untapped talent within the borough, so Enfield Council is working with local training providers and employers to train up and skill those affected by this industrial decline. Between 1998 and 2008, private sector employment in Enfield


The big questions: what the experts think Q. Is it a good idea for local authorities to take the lead on delivering services? Michael Moran, professor of government and business at University of Manchester Business School

12 NEW DIRECTIONS

“The market garden suggestion has already gained significant traction and Enfield Council has amassed funding of £600,000 to drive this idea forward”

“There’s no reason to think that central government is more efficient at delivering services than local government. Indeed, there’s a very good reason to think that central government is a good deal less efficient at delivering services than local government. Most of the great policy catastrophes in Britain since 1945 were the fault of central – not local – government. The UK has just about the most centralised system of local government in western Europe. There’s a connection between that over-centralisation in Britain and low voter turnout. It’s a perfectly rational response to the historically constricted powers of local government. There’s a serious crisis of engagement.” Q. Will central government support this new way of thinking towards growth and regeneration? Dr Ben Jackson, lecturer in modern British history, University of Oxford “It is very apparent that politicians of all hues are now talking about changing the character of British capitalism. Ed Miliband has spoken a lot about this, but David Cameron is also interested in the same political train of thought. As part of that conversation, this idea of an industrial policy has emerged as an important buzz phrase. I guess the question to ask is, why is there such an interest across the political class? And what are the political opportunities that this represents? I think there is certainly a suggestion that Enfield should be able to count on the support of a wide variety of political perspectives for the agenda that it is pursuing.”


Q. What are the new ways Enfield can raise investment?

Q. German Sparkasses: A model for Enfield?

Sukhdev Johal, Royal Holloway School of Management, University of London

David Green, director of thinktank Civitas

Q. How could corporate social responsibility (CSR) investment be used in Enfield? Councillor Alan Sitkin, chair of sustainability scrutiny panel, Enfield Council “There’s a justification for companies to take some of the post-tax profits they’re achieving in Enfield to reinvest specifically into further education programmes. For example, Southgate College has been working on a large programme of environmental construction techniques. The college would be interested in expanding provision in that area. The problem is the lack of British workers capable of installing things like solar panels. Southgate College could help address that. Our argument to companies is that it would be in their interests to spend more on corporate responsibility. By contributing to education and skills they will get a more productive workforce.”

“I recently came across a company in the Midlands that made parts for a Japanese car company. This firm went to a bank and asked for some working capital to develop the capacity to supply the factory in Japan, but the bank wouldn’t do it. If it had been in Germany, it could have gone to the local bank, the Sparkasse, and a loan would have been far more likely. Local banks give local people the power to do something about the problems in their neighbourhood. They tend to lend more than commercial banks as they have a third more banking assets. Germany’s economy suffered more than Britain’s in 2008, but its local banks increase their lending during a downturn. In 2011, lending had increased by 17% compared with 2006 – commercial banks cut that by nearly 10%. In July 2008, just before the Lehman Brothers crash, they were lending €294 billion and €322 billion in 2011. For commercial banks, it dropped from €199 billion to only €177 billion. Sparkasses have supervisory boards and executive boards. Two thirds of the board members are nominated by the local council, and the other third are employees. They are legally required to operate on commercial lines, to protect against undue party political influence, and loans can only be made within the local authority area. Enfield is twinned with Gladbeck, a city of about 77,000 people, which has a Sparkasse. Why not invite someone over to tell Enfield how to run its own Sparkasse?”

Q. Is market gardening one answer? Q. How can Enfield stimulate local supply and spend? Neil Rousell, director of regeneration, leisure and culture, Enfield Council “CRESC advised the council to look at its market gardening history as a way of creating a new sustainable business sector. The market garden suggestion has already gained significant traction and Enfield Council has amassed funding of £600,000 to drive this idea forward. This initiative will put Enfield at the forefront of food security for London, and showcase how environmentally sensitive food production in London can provide employment, education and revenue for the council, a revenue that could be directed back into social benefit.”

Neil Rousell “Not only is the council a major commissioner of capital projects and ordinary spend but so are the developers of major schemes. Enfield Council wants others to follow its economic initiatives, including the use of local labour and the sourcing of goods and services from local suppliers. The council is working with North London Chamber of Commerce, which has produced a directory of all local businesses to support local purchasing.” n

13 NEW DIRECTIONS

“Enfield is going to have to use creativity to come up with local policies which generate jobs and ensure there is a greater trajectory where money is being used for productive purposes, rather than inflating the price of houses. I think that the creativity is here in local authorities, and it’s really pleasing that Enfield is in the market for new ideas. But what would these new ideas look like? Follow the money – why not put pressure on the utilities, banks and supermarkets?”


Where do regeneration finance professionals go for information and advice? WWW.SOCINVEST.CO.UK SocInvest.co.uk provides an enhanced news and information service to regeneration funding and finance professionals. The site is accompanied by a weekly email news service sent to 16,000 subscribers FREE every Thursday. The site provides news and analysis of all the latest issues affecting: / Private and affordable housing finance / Council property joint ventures / Enterprise zones / Institutional investment in infrastructure / Sources of European funding / Government policy and regeneration initiatives The site also contains an intelligence section linking to all the latest publications affecting the sector, plus special reports on in-depth topics from SocInvest Thought Leaders.

Sign up to FREE SocInvest news service at

WWW.SOCINVEST.CO.UK

Demonstrate your expertise on socinvest.co.uk If you would like to become an expert Thought Leader like GVA Financial Consulting, who are currently publishing their report on how the public sector can intervene to enable property finance, contact Paul Gussar on 0207 978 6840 or paul@3foxinternational.com


opportunity

Enfield

Opportunity Enfield partners group Joining together to support Enfield Derrick Wade Waters Mark Joslin mj@dww.co.uk Greater Anglia Jonathan Denby jonathan.denby@greateranglia.co.uk Ingleton Wood Andrew Shepherd andrew.shepherd@ingletonwood.co.uk Macmillan macmillan.org.uk The National Autistic Society autism.org.uk North London Business northlondonbusiness.com

For more information about these companies, visit opportunityenfield.com/links


16 ECONOMY

BELOW: When Biffa’s plant moved to the borough, Enfield Jobsnet helped to recruit its workforce. OPPOSITE: The fully automated distribution centre in north Enfield, rebuilt by ISG under six months.

Industrial strength


17 ECONOMY

Eastern Enfield’s transport links and its position within the London Anglia Growth Corridor make it a location of choice for green sector, food manufacturing, construction and logistics firms. Paul Coleman reports

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eciding to be in Enfield was a no-brainer for Biffa, according to Steve Oulds, the company’s national municipal manager for recycling, on its decision to establish a state-of-the-art materials recycling facility (MRF). “Edmonton is a perfect location for Biffa and Enfield Council actively helped with planning and licensing,” says Oulds. He points out that Enfield Jobsnet, the borough’s specialist recruitment agency, quickly delivered 200 local jobseekers to Biffa. “That solved a big problem for us. Those staff helped us start up the facility.” Biffa is one of the UK’s leading waste recycling firms, and its £12 million MRF, built on a 3.6-ha site in Enfield’s industrial eastern corridor, licensed to process up to 350,000 tonnes per year of London’s waste paper, cardboard, plastic, metal containers and glass.

Green Enfield The MRF’s links to ports – via the M25 and M11 motorways, and the A406 North Circular and A10 Great Cambridge roads – allow Biffa to easily dispatch bulk tonnages of recycled waste product to processing plants in China, India and Indonesia. Andrew Campling, interim chair of North London Business, says this is just one example of eastern Enfield’s growing international reputation as a thriving cluster of environmental firms engaged in waste handling and processing, plastics recycling, biodiesel production, energy from waste and aggregates.

He says that the area’s industrial character suits companies with 24/7 shift patterns and large early morning lorry movements. “There isn’t the worry of disturbing residents,” says Campling. “Eastern Enfield’s industrial designation means businesses don’t worry about residential creep and rising land prices and rents.” Enfield Council is actively encouraging start ups by green tech and carbon reduction companies using environmentally friendly systems and energy saving production processes – many making green products, such as food packaging, from recycled and decontaminated plastics . In May, government officials were surprised to learn of an Enfield cluster of 28 green sector businesses at the North London EcoPark . “Once there was a pub on every corner,” says Campling. “In eastern Enfield there’s now almost a green company on every corner.” One such company is Greentech, which uses techniques known as ‘washing line’ – plastic technologies and products (PTP) processes – to transform compressed bales of recycled plastic into thoroughly decontaminated flakes and pellets that can be used to make more food grade containers. Enfield officers introduced Greentech to both suppliers and buyers of their processed PTPs. “They’ve helped us to develop our network,” explains Javed Mawji, chief executive of Greentech. “Enfield Council understands our business and technology. I’ve been recommending Enfield as a location.”

From past to present The borough has an enviable industrial track record. After the Second World War it hosted electrical goods manufacturers, with many Enfieldians working for Standard Telephone and Cables, Belling & Lee and Thorn Lighting, before these firms faded from Enfield’s industrial landscape. The 2011 Local Economic Assessment (LEA) shows that Enfield attracts major modern companies. Johnson Matthey operates a catalyst, chemicals and refining business at Brimsdown, while Ardmore Construction’s Brimsdown location offers easy access to its London projects, including the Olympic Games’ Athletes Village. Ardmore’s partnership with the College of Haringey, Enfield and North East London ensures a steady supply of apprentices for the company and opportunities for local young people to gain a trade. >


Fields of Enfield

18 ECONOMY

Under consideration is the establishment of a viable market gardening social enterprise on council-owned land that could supply local schools, hospitals and other customers with fresh, locally grown vegetables. The project aims to reduce food miles and promote horticulture as a career, with local people, students and pupils being trained in market gardening. Enfield’s Local Economic Assessment emphasises that food production could offer real career opportunities.

ABOVE: One of Enfield’s many food distribution depots.

Fields and greenhouses for salad crops once dominated the northern part of the borough. The glasshouse industry flourished along the Lee Valley in the 1900s, supplying Covent Garden Market. Enfield is home to Capel Manor College, specialising in arboriculture, horticulture and woodland management, and to Crews Hill, Europe’s largest concentration of garden centres, nurseries and aquatic warehouses. The food sector contributes to Enfield’s economy, with a range of smallscale producers, wholesalers and large companies providing many jobs.

Food and drink accounts for one in three Enfield manufacturing jobs. Coca Cola’s bottling plant on the Eley Trading Estate produces up to 142,000 litres of soft drink per hour, while eastern Enfield is home to one of Iceland Foods’ four regional distribution centres and to large online shopping delivery hubs for John Lewis, Tesco and Asda. Arla Foods, JJ Foods, DHL and Wincanton also run major logistical operations in the area. Food production includes bakers Warburtons and Greggs. Warburtons’ £30 million bakery in Millmarsh Lane opened in 2003 to supply supermarkets and retailers. Chairman Jonathan Warburton described the Enfield bakery as the company’s “foothold in the south of England”. Warburtons also benefits from a local workforce, accustomed over generations to triple shift work patterns in plants and factories in eastern Enfield. Brimsdown and Innova Park host specialist manufacturers of pharmaceuticals, lubricants, cleaning solvents, high performance paints and surgical gloves. Logistics is a resilient sector, as shown by Sony DADC’s fantastic recovery from the fire that destroyed 25 million CDs and DVDs – and its distribution centre in north Enfield

during last August’s riots. A disaster recovery plan ensured Sony could remanufacture and supply products at temporary locations. Permanent Enfield staff have remained, and better still, Enfield Council has actively encouraged Sony DADC to build a new, fully automated distribution centre that will be up and running this summer. From its Picketts Lock depot, Burdens supplies civil engineering projects with bulk deliveries of large construction and environmental products. Fedex, TNT, DHL and Clipper are some of Enfield’s other major logistics operators, many of which have bases in Brimsdown’s vibrant industrial area, with its 15 business centres, trading estates and business parks. The LEA calculates that jobs in this sector are likely to increase. Currently, about half of these firms’ workforces consist of local people. “Public transport is an issue in Brimsdown,” says Campling. “For people coming off an early morning shift, getting home can be a problem.” But Brimsdown firms, with Enfield Council and Transport for London, are working closely through the Brimsdown Freight Quality Partnership to improve bus services in the area. The partnership has also completed small-scale yet vital transport improvements to ease congestion, improve loading and unloading and provide informative electronic road signage for drivers. Huw Jones, chief executive of the North London Chamber of Commerce (NLCC), feels confident Enfield can retain businesses and entice future inward investment. “Survival in a recession is just slow death,” says Jones. “Enfield Council grasps the need for growth and its business-led approach actively encourages more investment into the borough.” To that end, NLCC and the council are developing a business directory to encourage procurement from local firms. A business ambassadors group of the borough’s 20 leading firms has been set up to champion Enfield, while the NLCC is researching these firms’ local employment needs. It is actively working with Coca Cola, Enfield Council and the Eley Trading Estate management company to both retain Coca Cola and entice further investment and jobs. Jones says more work needs to be done in eastern Enfield. Improving bus and train services, upgrading roads, matching vacancies with local jobseekers and upskilling Enfield people so they can compete for those local jobs are just some of the tasks on his NLCC agenda. “Enfield has the ingredients businesses need to locate and – importantly – to grow,” says Jones. “Regeneration projects like Ladderswood, Meridian Water and Ponders End all represent business and employment opportunities.” Jones also says land prices, rents and labour costs are competitive, unit vacancy rates are not as high as elsewhere in London, and there’s plenty of land with development potential. The NLCC is working with land agents to help Enfield Council spatially plan future industrial growth. “We’re laying the foundations in Enfield for the future,” says Jones. “The UK economy has to make and sell things to generate real wealth. Everyone in Enfield is taking the right steps to attract the right kind of businesses that will make life better for Enfield’s people.” n


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3 OASIS ACADEMY HADLEY Opening this year, a £28 million academy for more than 1,900 pupils, from primary to sixth form.

5 HIGHMEAD £25 million of high-quality housing, plus 1,092sq m of retail and commercial space. 6 central leeside A strategic growth area offering a number of development opportunities.

8 new avenue estate The existing estate is the focus of plans for major transformation with opportunities for new development. 9 NEW SOUTHGATE The Ladderswood Estate is to be regenerated, the New Southgate Industrial Estate redeveloped and shopping facilities enhanced. 10 NORTH CIRCULAR ROAD Large scale regeneration on London’s orbital route, with a variety of opportunities for housing, employment and community facilities.

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■ ■ ■Hall ■ ■restoration ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 19 Forty ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ in■ ■ ■ The■£4.5million project, ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ partnership ■ ■ ■ with ■ ■ the ■ Heritage ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Lottery ■ ■ Fund, ■ ■reopened ■ ■ ■ in ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ June ■ 2012. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

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MAP: Key ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ regeneration ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ sites ■ ■ around ■ ■ ■ ■ the ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ borough. ■ ■ ■ Details ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ are■ ■ ■ of ■ several ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ on the following ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ pages. For further ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ information ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ the ■ ■ contact ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Discover ■ ■ ■Enfield ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■team: ■ ■discover@ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ enfield.gov.uk, ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 020 4514 ■ ■ ■8379 ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

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■ stadium ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 20 QE2 ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ stadium ■ ■ ■with ■ athletics ■ ■ ■ Refurbished ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ in ■ 2012. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ track,■ completed ■

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■ valley ■ ■ ■ heat ■ ■ network ■ ■ ■ ■ 18 lee ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Residents ■ ■ could ■ ■ see ■ local ■ ■ waste ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ processed ■ ■ into ■ ■energy ■ ■ to■heat ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Enfield homes. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

17 Picketts ■ ■ ■ ■ Lock ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ A 58-ha ■ ■ site ■ containing ■ ■ ■ ■ a mix ■ ■of ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ sport ■ and ■ ■recreation ■ ■ ■ uses, ■ ■with ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ opportunities as a■resource for ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ athletes and the■local community. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

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16 Cat ■ Hill ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Formerly ■ ■ a campus ■ ■ ■ of ■ the ■ Middlesex ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ University, by ■ ■ recently ■ ■ ■ purchased ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ L&Q■ Developments with a ■view to■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ providing mixed housing. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

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Centre 15 Joint Service ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Planned Road ■ ■ for ■ Ordnance ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ in ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Enfield Lock, Enfield, north-east ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ GP■and dental combining a library, ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ and ■ community ■ ■ ■ ■ space. ■ ■ ■ practices ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

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■ ■ ■ park ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 12 lumina ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ A major commercial ■ ■ mixed-use ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ development ■ ■ ■ ■featuring ■ ■ ■a hotel. ■ ■ ■

7 Rays Road A new public park is planned for a run down site on the edge of the proposed Meridan Water scheme.

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4 Ponders end Strong community spirit is shaping a transformed gateway to the Lee Valley Park, with new homes, school, public realm and leisure facilities.

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way 11 burleigh ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Mixed-use development ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■of ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ residential and retail in■ the heart ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Town. of Enfield ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

2 EDMONTON GREEN A revitalised town centre with 1,065 new homes, youth and community centres and an improved station.

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1 Meridian water A major new neighbourhood, featuring an eco-village, with waterfront homes and businesses.

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From youth and community centres to promote neighbourhood regeneration, to the decades-spanning £1.3 billion Meridian Water scheme, Enfield’s transformation is gathering pace ■

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RIGHT: Meridian Water will comprise a mix of high quality residential and new retail opportunities with community facilities and well designed public realm.

22 PROJECT BY PROJECT

Meridian Water

BELOW: High street multiples occupy the new retail park which borders the Meridian Water opportunity site.

One of the key regeneration and investment opportunities in north London, the £1.3 billion redevelopment of this area of underused land will create Meridian Water, a new neighbourhood of up to 5,000 homes and businesses, and create up to 3,000 new jobs by 2026. Enfield Council’s masterplan for regeneration of the 82-ha site beside Lee Valley Regional Park proposes energy-efficient housing, revitalised commercial areas, waterside living,

leisure opportunities, new schools, community spaces, local shops and high quality public realm. The site, which links Edmonton to the Lee Valley, is just south of the North Circular Road, near Angel Road station – with connections to Liverpool Street in the City, as well as Stansted Airport and Cambridge. The site is dominated by the Lee Navigation canal, which acts as a sustainable route for pedestrians, cyclists, freight and boat passengers, from Hertfordshire to the Olympic Park. It is connected to the River Lee, and Salmons and Pymmes Brooks, with development sites surrounding the banks of Banbury Reservoir looking out across the waterways and parklands to Canary Wharf and the City. The masterplan will regenerate disconnected pockets of underused and vacant land, linking the east and west of the area with a new community spine, a pedestrian friendly route that joins Harbet Road to Glover Drive, connecting the area with Edmonton,

Northumberland Park and Highams Hill. A new neighbourhood developed around this link will become an extension of Edmonton. To realise this level of growth, Enfield Council has drawn together the Meridian Water Delivery Board, including the Greater London Authority, Transport for London, the Environment Agency and the Homes and Communities Agency. This allows the partners to co-ordinate their funding streams and other resources, and speeds up decision-making to allow joint delivery of this major scheme. Councillor Del Goddard, the council’s cabinet member for business and regeneration, said: “Meridian Water is the most significant contribution to the transformation of Edmonton and will help to drive the expansion of north London for decades. The masterplan will be finalised at the end of the year and makes one of the largest legacy contributions of the Olympics.” For proposals, see enfield.gov.uk/ meridianwater


Joint service centre

LEFT: Significant improvements are under way at St Modwen’s Edmonton Green shopping centre.

A new joint service centre is planned for Ordnance Road, Enfield Lock, in north-east Enfield, bringing together facilities in one fully accessible building. It would combine a library, GP surgery, dental practice and community space at the site of the current Ordnance Road Library. The development is being proposed by Enfield Council in partnership with NHS North Central London. Plans respond to the need for extra GP and NHS dental services in Enfield Lock, and include a new library with community space. Enfield Council and the NHS are committed to full public consultation. To this end, summer 2012 was spent in extensive consultation including local groups and at an area forum, to ensure all affected had a chance to learn about the plans and comment on them. A decision on planning permission is expected in November 2012 and, if granted, work is expected to start on site in early 2013. The joint service centre could be open by 2014.

23 PROJECT BY PROJECT

New Avenue Estate New Avenue estate, in west Enfield, is poised for transformation. Its two panel-system tower blocks, Shepcot House and Coverack Close are in poor condition, are set to become increasingly expensive to repair and need significant investment. Consultation shows that residents like the estate’s location and its strong sense of community would need to be preserved in any new development. Work could rid it of poorly designed housing, unpleasant communal stairways and a lack of surveillance combined with antisocial behaviour. One option is to replace the existing properties with a mixture of private and affordable houses, with improved open spaces. The 163 properties currently on the estate would be added to and private sales would finance its regeneration. Once the council and residents agree a preferred scheme, the council will decide whether to market the site.

New Southgate On the south-western edge of Enfield, bordering Haringey and Barnet, New Southgate is an area of social housing estates and former industrial land amid otherwise leafy suburbs. A masterplan sets out the aim to create a gateway for the borough on the busy North Circular Road. The first stage is under way, with the redevelopment of Ladderswood estate. In May 2011 Enfield Council selected construction firm Mulalley and One Housing Group as partners to undertake the £100 million project to regenerate the estate, delivering 491 new homes, a community centre and more than 4,000sq m of commercial space. Work is due to begin in 2013 with the first homes to be completed in 2014. The Red Brick estate has seen a £150,000 investment to reduce crime and antisocial behaviour by reducing high walls and closing alleyways to make the area more permeable and visible, improving lighting and planting new shrubs. The first public realm project, a calming green link along New Southgate High Road, will improve both the High Road and nearby open spaces to benefit residents, cyclists and walkers. There will also be a community centre, park and more than 4,000sq m of commercial space, including a hotel at Arnos Grove station.

Edmonton Green Transforming Edmonton spearheads Enfield Council’s regeneration policy, with improvements planned over the next 15 years. A draft masterplan focuses on redeveloping Fore Street and Church Street and making the A1010 attractive for shopping. The proposals underwent consultation between April and June, for adoption in 2013. Edmonton Green is a continued focus for regeneration, and has already seen improvements to the shopping centre, opportunities for new housing and increased access to education, skills and employment. A £1.5 million refurbishment of the South Mall of Edmonton Green shopping centre was completed in late 2011, including new flooring, a replacement roof, better lighting and seating and signage, along with improved access to the library and Enfield Homes office. The mall is topped by a 73-bed Travelodge hotel. The work was carried out by St Modwen, which bought the 10-ha centre from Enfield Council in 1999, and has since invested £100 million. Footfall has increased to around 200,000 people per week, including a rise from 10% to 15% in the past two years, and has created 100 local jobs. The much-improved environment has attracted retailers including Sports Direct, Dreams, Argos and Costa Coffee. Meanwhile, in the centre’s North Square, household retailer Wilkinson has signed a 15-year lease, giving the green light to a planned £3 million revamp of this area, including improvements to shop fronts, flooring and street furniture – as well as combining smaller units to make the 2,000sq ft Wilkinson store. Improvements to Edmonton Green also include a stateof-the-art youth club and refurbishment of the 1970s-built Green Towers Community Centre, a landmark community facility. The £1 million project by Apex Contractors, due to complete in autumn 2012, involves adding a new extension with community rooms on the ground floor.


Building great success

Travelodge and Jemca Toyota now open. Big Yellow Storage coming soon.

FOR SALE OR TO LET

luminapark.co.uk

• Trade counter/light industrial units • Individual plot sales also available • Ground floor bar/restaurant available now


Lee Valley Heat network

◆ Provide affordable zero to low carbon energy to 10,000 homes and 150 businesses at approximately 10% below current energy costs ◆ Cut carbon emissions by 41,000 tonnes each year, the equivalent of the CO2 production of around 10,000 homes ◆ Improve resource efficiency through a system recovering heat that would otherwise be lost into the atmosphere ◆ Secure at least 1,700 additional new jobs by 2026 ◆ Reduce reliance on fossil fuels and their price volatility ◆ Reduce fuel poverty ◆ Support the continued growth of a green industries cluster

Ponders End High Street is set to be transformed through a £23 million regeneration scheme, which will stimulate the local economy and provide up to 550 new homes. The Ponders End plan is the start of a vision for the complete regeneration of eastern Enfield over the next 20 to 30 years. Work could begin by March 2014 to replace around 30 buildings with a mixed-use development of shops and houses. The council is now negotiating land assembly and seeking a developer. The first stage of regeneration finished in March 2012, when Ponders End Park reopened after refurbishment. A block of shops has been in poor condition for decades and the council will assemble the site for a residential development with local retail units. This will unlock a large site to its rear, which was previously part of Middlesex University. Most of the site can be demolished for residential use but there is also a listed, midrise tower suitable for conversion. The site could provide some 550 homes. Across the High Street is the Alma estate on South Street, where four tower blocks will be demolished to make way for 700 new homes. In pressing ahead with the scheme, Enfield Council will become one of the first local authorities for decades to build new social housing. Throughout Ponders End there are small scale opportunities for builders and developers and wider opportunities for investors.

RIGHT: The new Oasis Academy Hadley will have 1,900 pupils.

Oasis academy hadley The brand new Oasis Academy Hadley will open this year on a former gas holder site near Ponders End station. The £28 million academy, built by Balfour Beatty, will be a threestorey building accommodating more than 1,900 pupils.

Facilities will include a sports hall, an amphitheatre and a community garden. The main entrance, from South Street, will feature a pedestrian plaza and trees will be planted to create a natural shield to the street noise. The academy was created in 2009,

replacing Albany School, and accepted primary pupils for the first time in September 2010. In the new building, primary school pupils will start in September 2012, with secondary and sixth-form pupils joining in January 2013.

25 PROJECT BY PROJECT

Enfield could have its own decentralised energy network (DEN), the Lee Valley Heat Network, with the council set to undertake a feasibility study into the idea. An initial study demonstrated that local waste could become a viable and sustainable source of lowcost, low-carbon heat for the Upper Lee Valley (ULV). This study considered potential sources of fuel (waste) and heat, specifically from the incinerator at Edmonton EcoPark, the Kedco gasifier and Enfield power station. It concluded that utilising these sources would put the Upper Lee Valley at the forefront of energy production in London and give it a clear competitive advantage over other areas. The study, by consultant Parsons Brinckerhoff for North London Strategic Alliance, concluded that a DEN could:

ponders end


RIGHT: The Fore Street area will gain 120 new homes and retail space.

26 PROJECT BY PROJECT

HighmeaD Redevelopment of the Highmead estate in Angel Edmonton is part of plans to kickstart regeneration, by creating a beacon development that both acts as a catalyst for change and attracts enough people to buy into the area to strengthen the local retail offer. Planning permission was granted in

2011 for 120 mixed-tenure homes, over 1,000sq m of retail on Fore Street and a community building on Alpha Road. The Hawkins\Brown scheme featured in the 2012 Housing Design Awards. Initial site clearance works are complete, and demolition of Highmead tower started in March 2012.

Housebuilder Countryside Properties has been selected to rebuild the site, and will work with Newlon Housing Trust, which will own and manage the new affordable properties. Construction is due to start this year, with the first new homes being completed in 2014.

Central Leeside Central Leeside, in the south-east of Enfield, is one of the borough’s strategic growth areas and one of its most significant regeneration opportunities. It is located within an economic subregion stretching from Tech City in the south to Stansted Airport in the north, with a number of opportunity sites identified for housing, employment and mixed-use. Central Leeside occupies a strategic position in the London and wider Stansted corridor, and is at the core of both the London Anglia Growth Partnership sub-region and the mayor’s Upper Lee Valley Opportunity Area –

one of the UK’s largest – stretching from the fringes of the Olympic Park to beyond the M25. The Upper Lee Valley has space for 15,900 new homes and new employment space to support around 15,000 new jobs. The council is bringing forward the Central Leeside area action plan (AAP), which will set out a comprehensive planning framework for the area to stimulate growth and investment. The AAP covers a wide area including the existing industrial estates, Picketts Lock, Deephams Sewage Treatment Works, the Edmonton EcoPark and

the council’s flagship regeneration area, Meridian Water, which will create a whole new neighbourhood. The plan will set out the council’s vision for the area and policies that will help bring about fundamental change and meet regeneration objectives. A north London decentralised energy network will help to provide low cost and low carbon energy to residents and businesses, and help secure at least 1,700 jobs in Central Leeside. The potential for a third track along the West Anglia Main Line will help to open up the redevelopment potential of the area.


Rays Road

LEFT: Rays Road, on the edge of the Meridian Water scheme, is to become a new public park.

A new public park is set to transform a derelict site between Montagu Industrial Estate and a residential section of north Edmonton, on the edge of the Meridian Water regeneration area. The 1.4-ha site was contaminated and has now been prepared for clearance. Plans include a new 330-metre stretch of pathway to provide pedestrian and cyclist access to Angel Road Station from Montagu Road along the old railway line. The transformed open space will feature the creation of a new natural habitat with enriched biodiversity through planting. Planned facilities include an activity area for young people – a BMX track, outdoor gym and play area. The concept design is under consultation, with delivery planned in phases over two years. The project has been designed by Enfield Council’s in-house landscape architecture team.

27 PROJECT BY PROJECT

E

SOUTHGATE Town Hall Enfield Council is considering potential development opportunities at its Southgate Town Hall site in Green Lanes, on which the former town hall is located, along with Palmers Green library. The scheme will involve the refurbishment of the library and redevelopment of the rest of the site, preserving the existing character buildings, some of which look on to the New River. An attractive view to the south of

the site – to Alexandra Palace – will be maintained and could be enhanced from the development. The three-storey, 4,350sq m town hall was built in the late 19th century and the library annexe in 1940. The buildings are not listed and neither are they in a conservation area. The 0.52-ha site also features landscaping and car parking space, which offers further potential for development such as housing. Palmers Green station is within a

five-minute walk of the town centre and local bus routes offer good access to Piccadilly line stations at Arnos Grove and Bounds Green. Any scheme is likely to include a mix of uses, including high quality housing, community facilities and the library. A developer will be selected to deliver the project, preserving the character of the heritage buildings, in a comprehensive approach to the scheme and library refurbishment.


North Circular Road

29

Burleigh Way Christian Action Housing Association has completed a development of 42 apartments at Burleigh Way, providing new homes, shops, creating a new route through this part of town. The six retail units range from 40.4sq m to 84.4sq m. The scheme, by architect the Tooley & Foster Partnership, transformed a derelict site, which included a former bingo hall, adjacent to the Market Square in Enfield Town. The units, including one cafe/restaurant, are currently being marketed by Bower Bryce.

Upper Lee Valley Rail Services Key to the Upper Lee Valley’s regeneration is a reliable, enhanced rail service, around which development and regeneration can take place. Partners have outlined a case for a four-trains per hour service to link Stratford, Tottenham Hale and Angel Road – to be known as STAR – securing a reliable, robust and viable scheme, including Stansted Express and commuter services. Partners – the Lee Valley authorities, Transport for London, Greater Anglia and the Mayor of London – have collaborated on the scheme, which is projected to cost about £81 million. Their comprehensive document outlines the case for the project with strong support for a third rail track, allowing for more frequent trains, and will be used in preparation for discussions with transport minister Theresa Villiers MP and other Department of Transport representatives. The partners hope it will be referenced in the Department for Transport’s forthcoming High Level Output Specification and ultimately “unlock the potential of this area and transform the passenger experience.”

Employment opportunities at Lumina Park and the new hotel opened in July.

LUMINA PARK A major mixed-use commercial development, Lumina Park, is being developed on the A10 Great Cambridge Road. Among the early operators are a 130-bed Travelodge, which opened in July, a Jemca Toyota dealership and Big Yellow Self Storage. The site has excellent links to the A406 North Circular Road, the M25 and M11. The scheme is being developed by Frontier Key Fund and marketed by Rapleys, GVA and CBRE. It includes warehousing, trade counter and business units. There will be a retail/ leisure unit on the ground floor of the Travelodge.

PROJECT BY PROJECT

Regeneration around the North Circular Road, in the southwest of the borough, is a priority for Enfield Council. With the completion of improvements to reduce congestion – and removal of uncertainty over the plans – progress has been made toward major improvements. In addition to road improvement works, Notting Hill Housing Trust and contractor Durkan have refurbished 275 properties along the A406 – removing squatters and reducing the blight that has affected the area for more than 30 years. The council’s North Circular area action plan (NCAAP) will set out its vision to improve the living and working environment along the A406 and to identify new opportunities for housing, employment and community facilities. The area is one of the council’s priority regeneration and strategic growth areas, due to the investment and regeneration needed. Transport for London’s road improvement plans for the North Circular have delayed progress. Plans for different road improvement schemes have been, over many years, promoted and abandoned due to lack of funding. The land and property required for such schemes has been left dormant, with decay and social problems resulting from this chronic lack of investment. The NCAAP will cover a wider area than the North Circular Road, transforming it from one disconnected by an unforgiving road corridor, dominated by derelict housing, into strong communities and sustainable neighbourhoods with high quality housing, attractive spaces and vibrant retail and community clusters at New Southgate/Arnos Grove, Bowes Road and Green Lanes. New and improved pedestrian and cycle routes will link to these clusters and create an accessible network of green spaces to help unite communities currently divided by the North Circular Road. It is hoped that these neighbourhoods will become desirable places to live and provide existing and new communities with high quality housing, supported by local services and jobs, improved transport and access to enhanced green space and community facilities.

Stylish new development of 42 homes on a former bingo hall site in Enfield Town.


Savills Planning Savills is pleased to announce that following the recent acquisition of LPP we have expanded our dedicated team of planners to 170, advising the public and private sectors from London and 15 ofďŹ ces across the UK.

Roger Hepher Head of Planning and Regeneration +44 (0) 845 1550 138 rhepher@savills.com

savills.co.uk


Creative buzz

31 Art and culture

A thriving arts scene contributes to a healthy society. So, via support to local artists and creative businesses, and funding to enhance its collection of arts venues, Enfield Council is making the most of the borough’s creative energy. Ben Willis reports

T

here is a strong will from the council to place culture at the centre of regeneration in Enfield, says Simon Gardner, leisure and cultural services manager at Enfield Council. “Artists, creative industry people, heritage enthusiasts and experts all have a unique part to play in getting things moving,” he adds. One of the most concrete signs of the authority’s support for the local arts scene is its ongoing programme to refurbish and improve its arts venues. Gardner explains that the health

of these flagship institutions is vital in ensuring a continued focal point for Enfield’s cultural scene. “The role of arts centres in regeneration is unique and sustainable, and they are often at the heart of regeneration schemes,” he says. In the heart of Enfield Town is the Dugdale Centre, a studio theatre and commercial venue. As Opportunity Enfield went to press, the council was due to start work on enhancing the centre’s meeting rooms to maximise their commercial potential for conferences.

ABOVE: Edmonton dance group Cerebro gained national recognition, performing in Sky TV’s Got to Dance.


The venue retains an active community focus. “We have a strong programme for families, including small-scale theatre and story telling during the school holidays,” says Gardner. Meanwhile, to the south of the borough in Edmonton, Millfield Arts Centre incorporates a purpose-built theatre and a Georgian mansion house, both of which have recently been refurbished under a £2.5 million council-funded programme. Lorraine Cox, the council’s cultural services manager, says that, by being in the heart of Edmonton, with all the challenges of a changing population, Millfield functions as an important focal point for the community, bringing people together as well as serving as a flagship arts venue for the rest of the borough. “Edmonton includes some of the poorest wards in the country. At Millfield we provide jobs and training for local people, which are essential to the health of the local community,” she says. “We also provide a space and opportunity for the community to enjoy and learn together.” The council’s ‘jewel in the crown’ is Forty Hall, which has been completely refurbished and made fully accessible in partnership with the Heritage Lottery Fund. The four-year, £4.5 million project has seen this fine 17th century country house in the north of the borough, transformed from the shabby to the magnificent. The venue reopened in June 2012, and was voted by residents as one of 33 iconic buildings for London in its Olympic year. The hall now provides a great free day out in London. Enfield residents and visitors to the borough can enjoy the beautiful parkland, an exhibition on the history of the hall, as well as a wide range of family events and activities, workshops, living history tours and learning activities for schools and colleges but also, open to all. Forty Hall offers training, apprenticeships, volunteering, and work experience opportunities, in partnership with JobcentrePlus, the College of Haringey, Enfield and North East London, Middlesex University and schools.

32 Art and culture ABOVE: Power of Dreams introduces Enfield’s emerging talent, each year at Millfield Theatre. RIGHT: Strong communities – Enfield hosts several festivals during the summer months.

Inclusive performance Cox says: “Arts, heritage and cultural venues are catalysts for positive change, having the potential to move people emotionally and economically.” This thinking is reflected in the work of Chickenshed Theatre, famous internationally and locally for inclusive peformance. The company brings together people with a variety of abilities and disabilities to devise and perform theatre, music and dance. Enfield Council is very proud of the work of Chickenshed and its sustained vision to work inclusively with young people in the arts, and works in partnership with the company. Chickenshed’s Susan Jamson says its work is based on the principle that the medium of theatre should be as inclusive as possible, a philosophy the theatre demonstrates through the huge range of local people it involves. “We’ve got a company of 850, taken mostly from the Enfield community,” she says. “We put on large-scale shows using our professional cast, and

“We give people hope that there is a life beyond just working, slogging away and making a living” people from all walks of life, from all ages and all abilities. We embrace everybody.” Jamson says Chickenshed’s aims of engaging local people and giving audiences an entertaining spectacle are important when many people are struggling. “Life isn’t easy – finding work is difficult, continuing to be employed is difficult. But with the arts it’s something that’s beautiful, that can be enjoyed,” she says. “And we actively help in the regeneration of the area because we give people hope that there is a life beyond just working, slogging away and making a living.” Enfield’s cultural scene is not confined solely to its arts venues. The borough is also home to numerous creative people and small businesses, and the council is working with many of these to find new ways of raising their profiles. Councillor Del Goddard, cabinet member for regeneration, says: “The need to create environments that encourage artists to establish themselves is well recognised and will be a feature of major developments in Meridian Water and Ponders End.”


33 art and culture LEFT: Refurbished and reopened in June, Forty Hall is almost 400 years old. BELOW: The Dugdale Centre in Enfield Town.

Cox says the council is particularly proud of the work of Skewbald Theatre, Artstart, and Face Front Inclusive Theatre whose work also reaches local people at grassroots level. Cox adds that the council regards 2012 as a great opportunity to publicise Enfield’s arts and cultural scene. Enfield Festival is the primary vehicle for this, running from May to September and bringing together a wide range of arts and cultural events. Last year it showcased 103 events, and looked set to repeat this success in 2012. Local artist, Debbie Dean, from Artstart, is working on a community project that she hopes will contribute to the regeneration of a section of the A1010 high street running through Enfield. The project is supported by a grant from the Outer London Fund, made available by the Mayor of London. Based in a vacant shop on the A1010, Dean’s work uses stained glass to create artworks that tell the area’s story. While some of the work is created by Dean and her colleagues, the main aim of the project is to involve local people in creating their own pieces of glasswork, each somehow representing an aspect of the area’s history. “The idea is to create a kind of visual map that depicts

certain elements of the local area and its history, but linked to the present day,” she explains. By involving residents in this process, Dean hopes to both better connect people with their area and its past, and help build a sense of community today. “The arts can be one of best tools for engaging and informing people about what’s going on,” she says. “When people come into the shop, they’ll be able to find out about lots of other things going on to improve their neighbourhoods.” Local designer Dan Maier, whose company Extraordinary Designs undertakes bespoke commissions for such clients as Harvey Nichols, John Lewis and the Old Vic Theatre, is involved in the Enfield Festival. In July, Maier opened her Southgate studio to the public in Enfield’s first ‘open studio’ weekend. Maier believes that any initiatives to give local artists and creative businesses a helping hand are beneficial to Enfield, as a vibrant arts scene can only help lift the area. “It’s always hard to justify the arts, as their benefits can be seen as intangible,” Maier says. “But they bring so many knock-on benefits you can’t measure, such as motivating and inspiring people. People doing creative work can transform an area by the life and the buzz they bring.” n


LondonWaste EcoPark Supporting an evolving Enfield The LondonWaste EcoPark in Edmonton N18 plays a vital role in Enfield; LondonWaste Ltd has a major contract with the North London Waste Authority (NLWA) to provide waste disposal and treatment services for its seven constituent boroughs (Enfield, Barnet, Camden, Hackney, Haringey, Islington, and Waltham Forest). The company also operates a transport contract, collecting material from Household Waste Recycling Centres. As a major employer and service provider in the area, the company remains committed and expert in delivering a cost effective and valuable service to the community and businesses in Enfield. The company largely employs local people through involvement with job centres, agencies and, via long term links with Schools and Further Education, helps to prepare young people and adults for employment. The EcoPark will remain an important site of industrial land within Enfield, of around 15 hectares in size, housing a number of waste management centres, primarily composting, recycling and energy recovery. Its long term use for waste management is protected by Mayoral policies which recognise the strategic importance of resource management to the capital. The site will be further developed over forthcoming years continuing to help London achieve its sustainability goals. Rest assured that in the meantime waste and recyclables collected from the seven constituent boroughs will continue to be delivered to LondonWaste for treatment, separation, recycling and composting.

To find out more about the services we provide and plans for the future visit our website www.londonwaste.co.uk

Tel: 020 8803 1322 www.londonwaste.co.uk Advent Way, London N18 3AG

The Energy Centre exports eighty-five percent of the electricity it generates to the National Grid, which is enough to power 72,000 homes as well as all the other centres in the EcoPark. The Compost Centre produces a high quality compost which can then be reused in agriculture, local allotments, parks and gardens. Up to 45,000 tonnes of organic waste a year is saved from going to landfill sites. Around 5½ million tonnes of waste was diverted from landfill from 2000 – 2011. Improvement plans have introduced London’s newest semi automated system for recycling bulky items.

London Borough of

Enfield


35 SUSTAINABILITY

Down by the water

With more waterways than any other London borough, Enfield is beginning to exploit this natural resource for the benefit of businesses and residents. Lucy Purdy explores


S

36 waterways

naking through the borough like a web of blue ribbons, Enfield’s waterways carry not just water along their well-worn paths, but also heaps of potential for development and regeneration. There are over 100kms of waterways in Enfield – more than any other London borough – and these streams, canals and reservoirs are one of the area’s greatest unsung assets. From the stunning, leafy open spaces of the Lee Valley to the engineering feat that helped bring fresh water to thirsty Londoners via the New River, these waterways punctuate the local landscape, creating oases of open space. Not only are they crucial to leisure, recreation, health and wellbeing but they also form precious habitats for wildlife, tempting spots for visiting boaters, anglers, walkers and cyclists and important sites for heritage. Now Enfield’s waterways are poised to become even more thriving corridors, for wildlife, residents and businesses too, as Enfield Council works on exciting plans to maximise these valuable resources. The fast-flowing waters of the River Lee have attracted people to settle in the area for thousands of years. Ancient remains, including prehistoric axes, Roman coffins and medieval roads, have been discovered in the valley. Viking longships are known to have used the river 1,000 years ago, sweeping through Enfield on their way up and down the country. During the reign of Alfred the Great, the waterway formed the border between Saxon England and the vast swathes of northern and eastern England which fell under “Danelaw”

and Viking-control. Many local place names are derived from Saxon words. Even the name Enfield is itself thought to come from an Anglo-Saxon name, meaning Eana’s open land. The Lee was plunged into the spotlight again in the first half of the twentieth century when it became a centre of industry in London. Workers throughout the Lee Valley churned out thousands of products including buses, guns, gunpowder and chemicals, before trade began to decline when the UK’s road and rail infrastructure improved in the 1960s. Today, the River Lee runs through Lee Valley Regional Park – one of London’s most thriving green lungs – and forms a retreat on the doorsteps of thousands of Enfield residents. It morphs from a rural canal lined with mature trees, with stunning towpath views over the surrounding marshland in the north, to a wide, urban river as it nears its confluence with the Thames. Water taken from the Lee in Hertfordshire also forms the basis of the New River, a waterway which was constructed to bring clean drinking water to London in the 17th century. Back then, Londoners relied on water carriers who walked the streets selling water collected from ponds or streams. But as the capital’s population expanded and pollution levels rose, there emerged an acute shortage of safe drinking water. It was decided that a new canal should be built to transport fresh water from springs near Ware in Hertfordshire to the city – and the New River was established. The project was expensive and challenging but Sir Hugh Myddelton managed to successfully craft a course which

“We have locations that provide the added value of a riverside setting for a development”


37

TOP: The Crown & Horseshoes offers a riverside setting and a beer garden. LEFT AND BELOW: The River Lee is popular with walkers and cyclists. OPPOSITE: Preserving industrial heritage, creating an entirely new community at Enfield Island Village.

waterways SUSTAINABILITY

diligently followed the land’s natural contours and the river was ready in 1613. And changes are still happening. A section of the River Lee towpath was reopened to the public in January after Enfield Council, Transport for London and British Waterways teamed up to undertake massive improvements, creating a new cycle lane and footpath to complete a safe and secure route through the Lee Valley. Hailed by environment cabinet member, Councillor Chris Bond, as a golden opportunity to encourage more people to enjoy walking in the borough, it formed the final link for walking and cycling between the main London 2012 Olympic site and the Olympic canoeing venue in Broxbourne through the peaceful Lee Valley. The reopened section also forms part of the National Cycle Network. It is now possible to walk all the way from Waltham Abbey to the Thames, along peaceful towpaths that were once busy with horses hauling barges, through centuries of history from the monks of Waltham Abbey changing the course of the river, through the Industrial Revolution, to post-war industrialisation and London 2012’s regeneration. This summer’s Games brought 1.2 million people and 15,000 athletes to the capital – it was a rare chance to reinvest in the River Lee and return it to the hive of activity it once was. The lower Lee saw a huge increase in freight traffic during construction of the Olympic Park, with its emphasis on sustainability, and the London Plan has prioritised increasing freight on the Lee. Canny investors are seizing the opportunity to be part of this unique wave of development with freight, canoe and cycle-hire businesses, but also riding the wave of a boom in riverside housing. And though the spotlight has been on Stratford, the heart of the Olympic Park, there are opportunities being created all the way up the Lee. The huge Meridian Water development project is set to transform large swathes of Edmonton, using £1.3 billion to turn underused land into a thriving new neighbourhood by 2026, creating up to 5,000 new homes and businesses and delivering up to 3,000 new jobs in the process. The natural landscaping and charm of Enfield’s waterways will prove a central attraction of the scheme, creating massive opportunities for waterside living, canal moorings and new uses along the waterways of Edmonton. “People love to walk the footpaths alongside Enfield’s many rivers, but waterways also offer excellent opportunities for regeneration and renewal,” says Enfield Council’s assistant director for regeneration, leisure and culture, Paul Walker. “We have locations that provide the added value of a riverside setting for a development and the bonus of footfall from people using the waterways and footpaths,” he says. Completed in 2001, the Enfield Island Village development made the most of its riverside setting. The housing estate sits a stone’s throw from the banks of the River Lee and was built on land previously occupied by the Royal Small Arms Factory, a government-owned rifle factory, which produced military rifles since the 1850s. A residential mix, ranging from one-bedroom flats to five-


38 waterways

“Waterways offer excellent opportunities for regeneration and renewal” bedroom family homes, is arranged around a central parkland area and a village centre with a local shopping area and its own GP centre, fitness centre, community hall, youth club, library and small business units. Residents recently held a French market in the village centre and have also expressed an interest in opening a shop to sell local produce – evidence of a sense of community which has grown on the estate. The development’s history is recognised with plaques marking landmarks such as the bayonet department. The Grade-II listed original machine shop was converted into the village centre, via a very successful regeneration project by a not-for-profit company, RSA Island Village Ltd, which was set up by four directors of the Enfield Enterprise Agency. The surpluses generated by RSA Island Village are transferred to a charity, The RSA Trust, which has already distributed more than £2 million to worthwhile local causes, including youth projects and business start-ups. Director of RSA Island Village and RSA trustee, Michael Polledri MBE of Lee Valley Estates, says: “Enfield Island Village is a piece of industrial history, which was sadly left to decline. It’s now an example of regeneration preserving our heritage in an innovative and imaginative way.” Further south, the King George V Reservoir is home to the King George Sailing Club and is also of major importance for wildlife. The reservoir is London’s largest, covering a hefty 170 hectares, and is a Site of Special Scientific Interest and a

major wintering ground for wildfowl and wetland birds. This means the reservoir is particularly attractive to bird watchers who come to spot the 85 wetland species that have been recorded here in recent years. The planned growth around Enfield’s waterways clearly represents a major and exciting prospect for change. It is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to devise better access for residents and visitors to green spaces such as the verdant Lee Valley, as well as individual developments and projects which will lift the character of the borough. Investors have already been hooked by Enfield’s enviable location within easy reach of the capital’s centre yet surrounded by beautiful countryside, and by the chance to use the borough’s flowing, natural infrastructure as a catalyst for change and development. Through careful planning and astute investment, it is clear that waterways can play a huge role in the creation of jobs, the protection of the natural environment, leisure, transport and in bringing about the regeneration of both rural and urban areas, including heritage sites. From the vast expanses of the King George V Reservoir to the nostalgic charms of Enfield’s many canals and locks, these watery assets have a major influence on the borough’s character and sense of place today. And Enfield’s decision-makers are seizing with both hands the opportunity to reclaim Enfield’s waterfront. n

ABOVE: The Meridian Water development will create new opportunities for riverside living.


Supporting Enfield’s long-term development As the water and sewerage provider for London and the Thames Valley, we have a key role to play in supporting regeneration in Enfield. At Deephams Sewage Works in Edmonton, we are just completing a project to improve the area where sewage first enters the works. This work will improve the quality of the treated wastewater that flows into the Salmon’s Brook, increase the amount of oxygen in the river and reduce odour produced by the site. These improvements will benefit local residents, wildlife and the environment. Deephams Sewage Works Upgrade We are also proposing a major upgrade to Deephams Sewage Works to significantly improve the quality of the treated wastewater that flows into the Salmon’s Brook, a tributary of the River Lee. The Environment Agency has set us a new quality standard for treated wastewater, which means that we need to develop an improved sewage treatment process for the works. The current sewage works, which was largely built in the 1950s and 1960s, treats about the same amount of sewage that would be produced by 885,000 people.

The number of homes and businesses served by the works is increasing. To cope with this, the proposed upgrade will be designed to treat the sewage from about 941,000 people, as well as treating it to a higher standard. The upgrade will also improve treatment facilities that are becoming old and worn out and will be designed to cope with the heavier winter rainfall and warmer summer temperatures that are predicted due to climate change. Our preferred option for the upgrade is to redevelop the works within the boundaries of the current Deephams Sewage Works site. The upgrade is likely to take up to seven years to complete and, subject to planning permission, the main construction work is expected to start in 2015. Having your say Our first phase of consultation runs for 16 weeks from 4 July to 24 October 2012. We want to know what you think about the need for the project, our choice of preferred site and potential treatment technologies for the sewage works upgrade, as well as the other options we have considered. We also want your feedback on how we propose to build the upgrade on our preferred site. Visit our consultation website - www.deephamsconsultation.co.uk to find out more and complete our online feedback form. You can also email your comments to customer.feedback@thameswater.co.uk or call us on 0845 366 2957 (Textphone: 0845 7200 899) to request a paper feedback form. Our lines are open from 9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday.


40 neighbourhoods

building Neighbourhoods Enfield is a borough of vast contrasts, from its comfortable, leafy suburbs, to its more urban, inner-city neighbourhoods with economic and social challenges. Mark Smulian looks at regeneration planned for the neighbourhoods


E

41 neighbourhoods

ABOVE: Significant improvements will be made in Ponders End, including the park. LEFT: On the waterfront – the future for Ponders End.

nfield Council has learned lessons from previous large-scale developments. Regeneration is not just about building houses, it is about creating homes and neighbourhoods. For a neighbourhood to thrive, it needs to be balanced and sustainable with good schools, health provision, shops and transport infrastructure. Enfield Council is therefore committed to creating areas with mixed-tenure housing and a community with the wealth to support local shops, neighbourhoods and restaurants. Creating places in this way not only makes areas more attractive to live in but, by creating good health facilities and schools, promotes strong and thriving communities at the same time. The borough will soon seek developers and social landlords to help it turn around its most disadvantaged neighbourhoods, with fresh ideas, ambition and the will to deliver benefits to the communities that live here – social and economic, as well as physical regeneration. At Ponders End and other neighbourhoods earmarked for regeneration, including Meridian Water and Edmonton Green, the council will be seeking partners. But these areas do not just present opportunities to build homes for sale alongside affordable housing – the council is equally interested in projects that will create jobs. As Sharon Strutt, head of neighbourhood regeneration, says: “We have a great opportunity to create new jobs and homes and a better environment, as it is part of the council’s policy to help people into work. “The regeneration and development areas are to the east and south of the borough where we have the highest levels of deprivation; these are very poor areas with a lack of jobs, and where there are health inequalities. It is not just about housing, the major issues for local people are also job opportunities and well-being.” Strutt says the council’s approach is to de-risk sites as far as possible, for example, by working with residents, landowners and stakeholders throughout the process, and by carrying out land assembly where appropriate to ensure comprehensive regeneration schemes come forward. The council is seeking to achieve a more equal mix of tenures to ensure a balanced community within its social housing estates. Says Strutt: “It needs affordable housing and other options for shared ownership, given the state of the mortgage market. We are looking for innovation rather than a magic solution. “But we are not looking to gentrify areas nor displace existing communities,” she adds. “Real change is needed with a balance of private and affordable family housing including shared ownership, so that not all the social housing is in one stigmatised block.” Daisy Johnson, senior planning and regeneration officer for Ponders End, explains that developers there will be able to explore opportunities in three adjacent areas. The first is a block of shops in the High Street which has been in poor condition for decades. Here the council will assemble the site for a new retail and residential development with the retail intended to be of local – rather than out-of-town – scale. That in turn will unlock, to its rear, a large site that used to be part of Middlesex University. Most of the site can be demolished for residential use but there is also a listed


42 neighbourhoods TOP: An image of a brighter future for the Ladderswood estate in New Southgate where a major regeneration project is under way. ABOVE: The new concourse at Edmonton Green.

mid-rise tower building suitable for conversion. The site is expected to provide around 550 homes. Across the High Street lies the Alma estate on South Street, where four tower blocks will be demolished for some 700 new homes. Consultation with residents is in hand, and they will be involved in shaping the future of their area. The £28 million Oasis Academy Hadley is being built on a former gasworks site in South Street, and is due to open in January 2013 for its first term. Johnson explains: “In Ponders End we have a really strong community and voluntary sector and there is real involvement by residents.” South Street and its school are intended to become a gateway to the Lee Valley Park, which runs along the nearby river and is currently somewhat hidden. Naturebased leisure will be encouraged there as part of the regeneration strategy. The council’s role in land assembly and site de-risking is particularly important in Ponders End, where, Johnson says: “Land values are so low that developers have been reluctant to build, so it needs council support. There are currently high levels of churn, with not enough family homes in the area, and we want the population to become more stable.” The council will want its development partner, as far as possible, to work with a local supply chain and offer construction training and apprenticeships. The latter has been achieved at the redevelopment of the Ladderswood estate in New Southgate, where development partner Mulalley is running a construction training programme. Both Mulalley and the council’s other regeneration partner at Ladderswood, social landlord One Housing Group, were appointed after a competitive dialogue process. Suzanne Johnson, also a senior planning and regeneration officer, says the council requires its development partners to employ local people where possible and tries to encourage end users to do the same. Ladderswood is part of wider regeneration, she explains:

“The masterplan is for a mix of residential and commercial areas, which have affluence around them but are marked with deprivation and unemployment, and we need to improve the social environment.” This approach has already borne fruit on the area’s Red Brick estate. The council has delivered a package of safety improvements, closing alleyways and knocking down high walls to make it more permeable and visible, so that residents feel safer. The police have recorded a significant reduction in crime and antisocial behaviour. There is a major commercial development site opposite Ladderswood and the two together are intended to form the borough’s gateway on the North Circular Road. “We will create a mix of housing and commercial uses to provide jobs for local people,” Johnson says. “It will have both private and affordable housing and we will avoid a mono-tenure estate.” The existing Ladderswood estate is to be demolished, alongside an adjacent industrial area and will be replaced with 500 homes that will range in size from one-bedroom flats to four-bedroom houses. In all, there will be a total of 81 family-sized homes. The new estate will also include a new community centre, park and more than 4,000sq m of commercial space. This will include a hotel at Arnos Grove, where a London Underground station gives access to central London in less than half an hour on the Piccadilly line. Enfield Council is clear that, as well as creating better housing, its planners are also creating more cohesive communities, ones in which local residents have job opportunities on their doorsteps. Cohesion also thrives among a mix of housing types and tenures, better able to support a local economy than could the large estates of solely social housing. Developers and social landlords who share this vision will find ample opportunities to work with the council for profitable regeneration of sites. Investors will find a range of schemes, which will provide rare development opportunities, at relatively low cost, within London’s growing economy. n


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44 MARKETS

Enfield factfile

45 minutes from ...

10,000

homes could draw low to zero carbon energy from Enfield’s proposed decentralised energy network

Charles Reginald Belling began making his innovative electric fires in a small shed in Enfield Joseph Swan is said to have invented the electric light bulb in the basement of a house in Ponders End

13 million

visitors every year Thriving green sector: Johnson Matthey North London Waste Authority Biffa


Stansted

Heathrow

Airports City

MARKETS

189,000 people are of working age – the 9th largest workforce in London

45

2,000 hectares of open space, with 123 parks, spaces and playgrounds

34%

of manufacturing is in food and drink, with big names including Coca-Cola, Greggs and Warburtons

More than 10,000 businesses employ nearly 100,000 people Will create up to 11,000 new homes by 2025

60%

5,000 homes to be built at the ÂŁ1.3 billion, 82-ha Meridian Water scheme

e Enf i

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m as

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ter a w

w ay s t h

of jobs are filled by residents

an

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The London Borough of Enfield offers unrivalled opportunities for residential, retail, manufacturing and green industries within easy reach of the M25, A406 and London City itself.

Join over 10,000 businesses including Coca Cola, Warbutons, Ikea, John Lewis, Tesco and Biffa employing nearly 100,000 people.

To find out more about our exciting regeneration programme, contact the Discover Enfield Team. Email: discover@enfield.gov.uk or Tel: 020 8379 4514 www.discoverenfield.co.uk

Enfield


47 employment

Employment exchange Enfield’s manufacturing past is marked by a long series of innovations. Its economy is changing but even through the recession, different sectors are expanding as new businesses forge a re-industrialised economy. Estates Gazette’s senior business writer, Nick Whitten, reports

>


48 employment

RIGHT: Expert bakers Greggs’ Enfield factory bakes bread and cakes for distribution to some of the company’s 1,400 UK outlets.

E

nfield has an ace up its sleeve when it comes to employment opportunities. The borough is home to London’s largest opportunity area, which lies slap bang in the middle of one of the capital’s “super corridors”. The 3,000-ha Upper Lee Valley in the London-Anglia growth corridor boasts excellent infrastructure, solid energy generation and a concentration of industry in several major clusters. This area has always boasted a very strong manufacturing base, with many notable industrial innovations stemming from this borough’s manufacturing workforce. Enfield has experienced numerous changes to its economy and business-base over the past 40 years, shifting from being dominated by large businesses and with 53% of the workforce employed in the manufacturing sector. Today the borough has a diverse, sophisticated and broad servicebased economy, dominated by small and micro businesses. “We have a number of sectors that we want to support – there is still a significant amount of advanced manufacturing, and we are linked in with the Manufacturers Alliance,” says Councillor Del Goddard, cabinet member for regeneration. “There are concentrations of the food and drink industry in the Upper Lee Valley, with strong supply chains – Greggs and Warburtons supply bread and GR Wright supplies the flour,” he says. “There’s Coca Cola and London Cake and Bread company. But there are lots of smaller ones too: chilled foods and ethnic foods are significant in Enfield and these companies settle, not only for production but also for distribution – it’s easy to distribute their products from here.” Goddard thinks that for companies investing in the borough, it’s important to be clear about planning policy: “They might think, ‘If I build an industrial unit here, will the council then decide to turn it into housing?’ But no, our local development framework is absolutely clear, it’s in place and absolutely solid.” Fairview New Homes has been based in Enfield for more than 50 years and employs around 200 people in the borough and 100 more on its construction sites around London and

the south-east. Fairview’s planning director, Steven Gough, thinks the company’s 50-year history says it all: “We’re committed to Enfield, it works well for us,” he says. “We are successful in recruiting people with the range of skills we need, whether in construction, administration or technical and professional roles.” The council’s 2011 Local Economic Assessment shows that 5,568 jobs have been created in Enfield since 2005. The greatest job growth has come in the construction sector, where 1,819 roles have been created, followed by 1,619 in business support services and 1,354 in health and education. By contrast the manufacturing sector has seen year-onyear job losses – with 1,246 shed since 2005. However, employment among food and drink producers has grown over the past 15 years and now represents one in three manufacturing jobs.

“We are successful in recruiting people with the range of skills we need” The closure of many of Enfield’s manufacturing businesses, particularly in the 1990s, has created huge opportunities, encouraging land-hungry storage, logistics, wholesale and transport businesses to locate in the borough. About half of Europe’s logistics sector, which is worth £670 to £753 billion per annum, is concentrated in the UK, Germany and France. And given London’s size and global importance, as the capital’s northern-most borough, Enfield has become one of Europe’s strategic logistics locations. It boasts great accessibility to the London markets via the North Circular Road in the south of the borough, as well as to regional, UK and international markets via the M25. In 2009 Enfield had 6,176 employees in the transport,


RIGHT: Coca Cola’s plant on Meridian Way, close to the North Circular Road.

49 employment

distribution and communication sectors, estimated to rise by a further 3,000 in the coming years. Driving jobs form one of the highest categories of vacancies advertised with Jobcentre Plus in 2010 – Enfield-based distribution businesses created more than 600 new jobs that year. Enfield’s changing employment character presents challenges for the council and training providers in ensuring the workforce has the right skills. A key factor affecting employability has been the skill levels of people who are unemployed. But the challenge has been met and despite a gap still existing at some levels, overall employability levels have improved. With only one in 12 jobs advertised by Jobcentre Plus each year requiring low or no skills, it is clear employers increasingly require higher levels of competence and job related qualifications. Enfield Council’s head of sustainable communities, Judy Flight, says: “Although skills levels have risen, there remains a mismatch; some businesses have difficulty recruiting locally, especially for engineering skills, construction and lorry drivers. But the colleges have been working closely with major firms to set up apprenticeship training schemes.” “Enfield Council also runs a very successful and nationally-recognised apprenticeship scheme with more than 100 apprentices recruited to date,” adds John Haslem, the council’s head of economic development. “The core of Enfield’s economic growth strategy is to ensure that there is an increase in jobs that can be filled by local people with the required level of training or skills,” says Goddard. “As a co-ordinating council, Enfield is committed to bringing key partners together to deliver improved local employment. To this end, we’ve established a job brokerage board and a youth employment board to increase the chances for local people in the jobs market.” The 2009 merger between The College of North East London and Enfield College created one of the UK’s largest further education institutions. The College of Haringey, Enfield and North East London is a training provider big enough to make a marked difference to the borough’s skill

levels. The college’s chief executive Paul Head says: “Our local community has high levels of deprivation, low employment rates and a high proportion of the working age population claiming means-tested benefits. This is likely to deteriorate as the downturn hits our communities and public expenditure cuts are implemented in the coming years.” But he adds: “Our role is to help to meet London’s skills and funding priorities by working in the Upper Lee Valley, developing new education and training opportunities, extending choice, improving quality and contributing to economic regeneration by increasing educational achievement and improving skills, within a climate of declining resources. “To achieve this we work in partnership with key >

Jobsnet Established in 2006, Jobsnet has a main office in Edmonton Green shopping centre, as well as several outreach sites. Jobsnet runs two job fairs each year, which are attended by employers and support unemployed residents in returning to work. This can involve helping them with CVs and application forms as well as searching for jobs. Jobsnet offers a free recruitment

service and screens and matches clients with employers to ensure compatibility. The team of seven also carries out visa and right-to-work checks and has office space available for any employers who need to use it, for example, to carry out interviews. Jobsnet has worked with major clients including Asda, Tesco, Biffa, Ardmore and Chitter Chatter. Its latest programme achieved around 170 jobstarts, bringing its total to just over 740.


50 employment TOP: Investment of £12 million at the College of Haringey, Enfield and North East London includes a new construction training centre at its Enfield campus. ABOVE: Greggs – food production is a major sector in Enfield.

stakeholders and we’re responsive to local policies and strategies as well as regional and national developments.” The construction sector across London experiences recruitment difficulties and the recession has resulted in job losses. But construction is Enfield’s fastest growing sector, with opportunities to improve prospects for the younger generation. The college started delivering construction skills training in 2009 and by 2010 had 50 trainees. It provides more than 30 apprenticeship frameworks. In 2011, almost 1,200 learners enrolled on an apprenticeship programme in sectors such as construction and engineering, care and early years, business administration and IT, as well as hairdressing, beauty and leisure services. Many apprentices work for small companies in construction, horticulture, hairdressing and ICT. Others work for Enfield’s major employers, such as construction group Ardmore, on sites throughout London. Some are employed in local government, care services or early years education.  In 2011, over 80% completing apprenticeships were young people, aged between 16-24, who entered employment through this route.

“We plan to offer even more apprenticeships to meet the needs of local people and employers” By July 2012, the college was meeting its target of offering 1,800 apprenticeships. “These are in an expanding range of jobs and by 2013, we plan to offer even more apprenticeships to meet the needs of local people and employers,” Head says. “There is increasing demand from employers for accountancy qualifications and a specialist Accountancy Academy has been established to provide the full range of qualifications from intermediate to higher level.” Committed to investing in Enfield and aligning provision with business needs, the college is building a £2.2 million Construction Training Centre at its Enfield campus, opening in September 2012, part of the site’s £12 million redevelopment. Barnet and Southgate College also runs training courses

in construction, with more than 70 full-time students enrolled. Principal and chief executive David Byrne says: “Strong links have already been forged between training providers and local businesses to tailor skills to demand. Enfield has a proud tradition of motor vehicle engineering and this has been reflected in the college’s excellent industrial links, particularly with the Morelli Group and vehicle manufacturers, with whom we set up our £2.5 million specialist automotive paint and body centre in Enfield.” The college has a national reputation for vocational training with more than 2,000 apprentices across the UK including STEM, mechatronics and leisure and retail companies. “It’s vital that we align our training provision with the needs of our local employers and also nurture enterprise and entrepreneurial activity to stimulate business opportunity,” adds Byrne. Enfield’s future looks bright, with attempts to build on the strength of the Upper Lee Valley. Ten zones of change have been identified, which will form the regeneration backbone for the area. And this will fuel the construction sector, maintaining jobs for years to come. n

Businesses hook up with Further education A campaign has been launched to improve apprenticeship opportunities in Enfield. Since early in 2011 students and advanced technicians have been able to train at Barnet and Southgate College’s body and paint centre, set up in conjunction with the automotive supplier Morelli Group and supported by manufacturers such as GM, Volvo and Ford. The specialist £2.5 million SC Body and Paint Centre, off the A10, is reputed to be one of the best in the country, providing specialist automotive ATA accreditation, welding and airbrushing training plus body and paint repairs for motor sport teams. The centre offers a range of high quality facilities, including two dedicated spray booths, a specialist cosmetic repair booth, alloy wheel repair, welding and bonding plus conference space for up to 140 people. The centre can train up to 300 students at a time. Chemicals specialist and FTSE 100 company, Johnson Matthey, has a refining and chemicals plant on Enfield’s Brimsdown industrial estate. Over the past year, the multinational has worked with Hertford Regional College to develop a new apprenticeship programme which covers mechanical and electrical engineering, controls and project management. These two college-business tie-ups are among the first projects to contribute to a council target to encourage 50 Enfield based firms, both large and small, to provide apprenticeship opportunities. Councillor Del Goddard, Enfield Council’s cabinet member for business and regeneration, says: “The importance of apprenticeships and the business benefits they bring cannot be underestimated.”


Opportunity Enfield #2  

Opportunity Enfield is a business publication publicising the work of regeneration organisations in the borough.

Opportunity Enfield #2  

Opportunity Enfield is a business publication publicising the work of regeneration organisations in the borough.