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BRISTOL CONNECTING

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One Bristol: where no-one and no place is left behind

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Flying success: growing ambitions


Mayor Q&A | Bristol

Q&A: MAYOR OF BRISTOL MARVIN REES How would you sum up Bristol for those who are new to the city? Bristol has a reputation for its high quality of life and is rightly celebrated as a place to live, work or visit (one of the ‘coolest’ cities in the world – National Geographic; one of the top 52 places to visit in the world – New York Times; best British city to live in – Sunday Times). Bristol is a young, vibrant and growing city with strong cultural assets and excellent heritage architecture. We often do things differently here, we challenge the status quo and we bring together diverse cultures. Perhaps above all else, Bristol is a place that knows how to enjoy itself. We have a hospitable climate, heritage and history, leaving us with some stunning architecture, high quality open spaces and a wide range of cultural, gastronomic and leisure attractions. Where are the key opportunities for development? There are a number of key sites in the city for commercial

and residential development, notably Temple Quarter and Western Harbour. Temple Quarter is centred on the historic Temple Meads station and an imminent new campus for the University of Bristol. Western Harbour is currently dominated by an outdated, inefficient road and bridge system. It’s ready for large-scale commercial and residential development within sight of the world-famous Clifton Suspension Bridge. We are also putting together a programme of investment opportunities in low-carbon technologies across the city, as we move towards being a carbon neutral city by 2050. Why should investors be attracted by Bristol? Bristol has made great strides in improving civic leadership in recent years. With my One City Plan for Bristol, I’m aiming to bring the whole city together, behind a shared set of objectives and a focus on delivery and bold ambition. Bristol has reaped the benefits of a strong, creative culture, leading to an innovative and

productive local economy, driven by a highly skilled workforce and a tradition of enterprise. There are many opportunities for development in the city, building upon a successful city economy. There is a clear commitment to inclusive and sustainable economic growth, with exciting plans for new infrastructure, homes, offices and high quality public realm. What are the main challenges for the city over the next 10 years? Housing, transport, inclusion, sustainability and trade. Like many large and growing urban areas, Bristol needs more homes, and better mass transit, to include all of its citizens in economic activity and prosperity, to ensure resilience in the face of climate change and to pay its way in a changing world. Unlike many other cities, Bristol is well placed to turn these challenges into opportunities for its citizens and investors. The challenges stem from success not decline; meeting them together will bring further prosperity.

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Bristol | Introducing Bristol

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BRISTOL SUCCESS CONNECTING

GO WEST

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Bristol’s reputation as a brilliant place to live is established, but it is also marking itself as a great place to work. Sarah Herbert introduces a city that is Sed ut perspiciatis unde omnis iste natus error sit voluptatem accusantium doloremque laudantium, growing and innovating totamevolving, rem aperiam, eaque ipsa quae ab illo inventore veritatis et quasi architecto beatae vitae dicta sunt explicabo. Nemo enim ipsam voluptatem quia voluptas sit aspernatur aut odit aut fugit, sed quia consequuntur magni dolores eos qui ratione voluptatem sequi nesciunt. Neque porro quisquam est, qui dolorem ipsum quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci velit, sed quia non numquam eius modi tempora incidunt ut labore et dolore magnam aliquam quaerat voluptatem. Ut enim ad minima veniam, quis nostrum

So, you probably know about its Clifton suspension bridge and Brunel’s SS Great Britain. But did you know that according to The Sunday Times last year, Bristol is the UK’s most ‘liveable city’?

Bristol is the fastest-growing city in the UK. It’s a young city, with 35% of its population under 24, and one of the most diverse in the UK. With 187 different countries of origin, 92 languages are spoken.

You might be aware that this now buzzing, multicultural city of over 400,000 – famous for its hi-tech and creative industries and seafaring trade – is the world’s biggest manufacturer of hot air balloons, pioneer of triphop, and home to famous subversive street artist Banksy. But perhaps you did not know that Ribena and chocolate bars were invented here, that it has four Michelin-starred restaurants, or that it was the birthplace of Archibald Leach – you might know him better as Cary Grant. Or that, ever pioneering, the city has its very own currency: the Bristol Pound, launched in 2012 and still going strong.

It is home to two universities, the University of Bristol – linked to 13 Nobel Laureates – and the University of the West of England, and its 80,000-strong student population adds to the vibrancy and buzz. But academia does not exist in a bubble: the universities partner with city institutions to develop innovative research structures with commercial imperatives, such as the Digital Cultures Research Centre, the REACT Hub and Bristol Robotics Lab. This explains why the city’s digital tech cluster employs 36,000 people, with a turnover of £8.1 billion, making it the second largest such cluster in the country after London.

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Bristol | Introducing Bristol

Another huge boon for the city is the creative sector. It’s not just street art, trip hop and theatre: it’s big business, employing 16,000 people, including the UK’s third largest media hub after London and Manchester. It has no fewer than 130 TV production companies, with famous alumni including Aardman Productions, of Wallace and Gromit fame, and Watershed, the UK’s first dedicated media centre. But it’s not resting on its laurels. Community outreach projects – such as Creative Youth Network,

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the Knowle West Media Centre in the south of the city and Ujima Radio in St Paul’s – are helping those from marginalised communities into the fiercely competitive media sector. It’s also a city of digital technology. Building on work in semiconductors and R&D by HP Labs and Toshiba, digital tech skills in the city have attracted investment from the likes of Cray and Huawei, and led to Oracle establishing its Global Cloud Accelerator. Such companies collaborate with start-


up incubators such as Engine Shed, or university tech accelerator SETsquared. It’s not just employment drawing in tech workers, and everyone else. In a 2017 report by industry bible Tech Nation, 92% of Bristol start-ups cited quality of life as a big plus. For shopping, it has one of the UK’s top 10 markets, and Gloucester Road has one of the highest concentrations of independent shops in the country. Foodies are licking their lips: Bristol has ‘arguably the best foodie scene in the UK’, according to The Financial Times, with the latest openings tickling the tastebuds including The General, a converted hospital where you can have a pizza or tapas in a former morgue, or Cargo, a collection of tiny but perfectly formed restaurants in shipping containers on Wapping Wharf. Small plates, foraging, casual dining and a souk-full of Middle Eastern spicing – they’re all here. But one of the city’s biggest selling points is its ‘green-ness’. Over 90% of Bristolians live within 300m of parks and waterways, and have four city farms, eight nature

reserves and more than 400 parks to choose from. On Sundays, many streets are closed to vehicles and opened to people. More people cycle than in any other major UK city, and Bristol has the lowest CO2 emissions of any UK city. Hardly surprising then that Bristol was the first city to be awarded European Green Capital in 2015. This was no PR puff: the city’s low-carbon economy employs around 9,000 people. The £12.6 million raised for the year created sustainable farming initiatives, a national schools programme and a festival of environmental ideas and arts. While a lot of Bristolians have short commuting times, they’d be the first to admit that its public transport system leaves a little to be desired. However, according to Arcadia’s report ‘UK Sustainable Cities Mobility Index 2017’, improvements are on the way, such as new rolling stock on the railway to London and MetroBus coming on stream shortly. The ingredients are quite a concoction and Bristol’s evolution continues to develop and grow. |

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Bristol | Temple Quarter

BRISTOL CONNECTIVITY CONNECTING

ACTION STATION

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The area around Temple Meads, once only thought of as a transport hub, is becoming a new hotspot for burgeoning voluptatem quia voluptas sit aspernatur aut odit work residential communities. Debbie aut fugit, sed quiaand consequuntur magni dolores eos qui ratione voluptatem sequi nesciunt. Neque porro quisquam est, qui dolorem ipsum quia dolor Ashford reports sit amet, consectetur, adipisci velit, sed quia non Sed ut perspiciatis unde omnis iste natus error sit voluptatem accusantium doloremque laudantium, totam rem aperiam, eaque ipsa quae ab illo inventore veritatis et quasi architecto beatae vitae dicta sunt explicabo. Nemo enim ipsam

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The famed entrepreneurial spirit that has contributed to Bristol’s unique character is in evidence once again in the city’s Temple Quarter, where one of the largest urban regeneration projects in the UK is under way.

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Around 40.4ha of former industrial land in the centre of the city is transforming into a pulsating new district, with historic Temple Meads station at its core. Led by enterprise and innovation, the ambition is to deliver 22,000 jobs, 4,000 new homes and 300,000sq m of commercial space over 25 years, creating a new destination with superb connections within the city, to London and the rest of the UK. Established as an ‘enterprise zone’ in 2012, Temple Quarter has already attracted more than 3,200 jobs from over 150 employers, including names such as Coutts bank, PwC and IBM. An early hit was the Engine Shed, housed in Brunel’s original station, which was converted through collaboration between Bristol City Council, the University of Bristol and the West of England Local Enterprise Partnership. It is now a hub where entrepreneurs, business leaders, academics and students collaborate on projects and nurture new

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businesses. On the top floor, Bristol SETsquared centre, which was set up by the University of Bristol in 2013, was named the best university incubator for start-up businesses in the world in 2015 and for 2017/2018 and is home to more than 80 innovative ventures. Media agency The Specialist Works recently moved into the area. Matthew Pover, chief commercial officer, says: “We can go from desk to platform at Temple Meads in five minutes. We’ve already noticed a marked difference in the quality of applicants for roles as the travel radius is so much larger than our last rural location. We’re growing quickly, so attracting the brightest minds is crucial.” Now there are plans to develop Engine Shed 2 in heritage buildings nearby to offer further space to grow Bristol’s hi-tech sector. In a further boost

to the region’s tech and creative industry, the University of Bristol is building a new £300 million campus, transforming a derelict sorting office site next to Temple Meads into a green, open space and a 1,500-room student village. More than 80,000sq m in size, the development will include a new business school and a hub for digital innovation, and put the university at the forefront of digital and business research. New homes are also an essential part of the mix. Temple Quarter will provide a significant share of the 7,400 homes proposed for central Bristol by 2026. Among them will be one of the city’s first build-to-rent schemes of 168 homes, backed by Legal & General Investment Management, which is expected to complete in autumn 2018. The cultural and food offer is growing too, with Temple Quay market now a weekly fixture and

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Bristol | Temple Quarter

independent producers and retailers moving in. Major investment in transport will support all this expansion. Built in 1841, Grade-I listed Temple Meads station, one of the oldest surviving railway terminus buildings in the world, is already the city’s mainline railway station connecting to London and Wales, as well as to the north and south of England. With 22 million passengers a year expected by 2030, investment from the council, Network Rail, Homes England and central government will see it become a modern hub, with better access from the east of the city; more retail and leisure uses in and around the station; and upgraded public and ticketed areas. Significant investment by Network Rail to upgrade the line will result in faster and more frequent services between Bristol and London, with four trains an hour by 2019. Also, £300 million is being spent on improving commuter routes in the city region from Temple Meads. Alongside this, a £21 million council programme is already under way to improve access to and through the area, creating a better first impression of the city, with improved roads, pedestrian and cycle routes, new public spaces and bridging across the city’s Floating Harbour. With the city’s prosperous maritime history, focus may again turn to the water. Temple Quarter’s location at the eastern gateway of Bristol’s historic harbour and almost 1km of waterways within the district offer significant potential to develop another waterfront attraction. |

For further information visit www.bristoltemplequarter.com or contact Richard Marsh, Temple Quarter programme director, Bristol City Council, richard.marsh@bristol.gov.uk

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AT A GLANCE 100 hectare site in central Bristol

£21 million on access improvements

£11 million investment in low carbon heat networks

More than 27, 870sq m of commercial floorspace being refurbished or developed

£100 million on new train routes and services

£300 million new University of Bristol campus 11


Bristol | Western Harbour

BRISTOL READY CONNECTING

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Bristol’s waterside has played a part in the city’s economic Sed ut perspiciatis unde omnis iste natus error sit voluptatem accusantium laudantium, growth for centuries and doloremque now the council is presenting a totam rem aperiam, eaque ipsa quae ab illo inventore veritatis et quasi architecto beatae vitae significant opportunity at Western Harbour dicta sunt explicabo. Nemo enim ipsam voluptatem quia voluptas sit aspernatur aut odit aut fugit, sed quia consequuntur magni dolores eos qui ratione voluptatem sequi nesciunt. Neque porro quisquam est, qui dolorem ipsum quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci velit, sed quia non numquam eius modi tempora incidunt ut labore et dolore magnam aliquam quaerat voluptatem. Ut enim ad minima veniam, quis nostrum

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With Bristol’s important historic role as a port city and strong links with its waterways, the city’s waterfront has already been key in revitalising the city’s economy, proving an attraction for leisure, business and residence.

15-20ha of prime land. The area has the potential to provide 3,500 homes, with a gross development value estimated at over £1 billion, as well as commercial and leisure space.

Another area of huge potential is the Western Harbour development located close to the city centre and forming an extension of the established and fashionable Harbourside.

With views of Brunel’s world famous suspension bridge, the Avon Gorge, Bristol Harbour, and the open, green expanses of Ashton Court, the Western Harbour could be one of the most desirable development locations in the UK.

Bristol’s mayor, Marvin Rees, has announced his intention to realise this potential by replacing the dominant road system on the Cumberland Basin – which limits current development – with lowerimpact options, releasing

Rees says: “We are putting together a proposal that will tear down the old, ugly road network across the western end of the harbour, build a new bridge across the river at a lower point and develop the available land on both

sides of the Avon, bringing more affordable housing to the city centre, extending the harbour as a residential area to the west.” The area is within 25 minutes’ walk of the city centre or a seven-minute cycle ride on dedicated lanes, and the launch of a new Metrobus Rapid Transit route to the city centre and Temple Meads will make access even easier. The opportunity also exists to combine better access to the historic harbour running through the city, while also providing essential flood defences that are resilient to climate change. The council owns 75% of the land with the intention of buying the remainder required. |

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Bristol | Low carbon

BRISTOL GREEN CONNECTING

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A city that prides itself on its environmental credentials, ut perspiciatis unde omnis iste natus error sit Bristol hasSed set out bigdoloremque ambitions for a green future voluptatem accusantium laudantium, totam rem aperiam, eaque ipsa quae ab illo inventore veritatis et quasi architecto beatae vitae dicta sunt explicabo. Nemo enim ipsam voluptatem quia voluptas sit aspernatur aut odit aut fugit, sed quia consequuntur magni dolores eos qui ratione voluptatem sequi nesciunt. Neque porro quisquam est, qui dolorem ipsum quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci velit, sed quia non numquam eius modi tempora incidunt ut labore et dolore magnam aliquam quaerat voluptatem. Ut enim ad minima veniam, quis nostrum exercitationem ullam corporis suscipit laboriosam, nisi ut aliquid ex ea commodi consequatur? Quis autem vel eum iure reprehenderit qui in ea voluptate velit esse quam nihil molestiae consequatur, vel illum qui dolorem eum fugiat quo voluptas nulla pariatur?

Bristol was the UK’s first city to win European Green Capital in 2015. The council has been delivering renewable energy and energy efficiency projects since 2005 and exceeded its target to reduce corporate carbon emissions by 50% in 2017, three years early. In the longer-term, Bristol has a target of becoming carbon neutral by 2050. To meet this objective, the local authority is now looking to invest up to £1 billion in low-carbon energy schemes in Bristol through partnership, joint ventures and investment over the next 10 years. Later this year, a prospectus will set out energyrelated projects to benefit the city and begin the conversation around investment and delivery. Rates of return are expected to be consistent with longterm infrastructure and pension fund investment. |

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ENERGY INVESTMENTS Bristol Heat Network Development of a city-wide heat network: £300 million up to 2027.

Smart grid and demand -side management Work with local distribution and national transmission companies and aggregators, and to increase the take-up of smart appliances in homes: £125 million up to 2027.

Domestic energy efficiency Provision of low-cost loans to private households to carry out energy efficiency retrofits: £300 million up to 2027.

Commercial energy efficiency Provision of low-cost loans to SMEs to install energy efficiency measures: £100 million up to 2027.

Renewable electricity generation Development of renewable energy projects: £40 million up to 2027.

Electric vehicle Development of charging infrastructure across the city: investment to be confirmed.

Marine energy Collaboration with the South West Marine Accelerator Programme and development of pilot array projects and technology performance: investment to be confirmed.

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LOREM | IPSUM DOLOR SIT AMET Bristol Skills and training

BRISTOL TRAINING CONNECTING

LOREM POWER OF YOUTH IPSUM Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur Few places in the country have the scale of skills and training adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore dolore magna aliqua. Herbert reports opportunities as inetBristol. Sarah Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi u

With 35% of its population with education, Sed utStarting perspiciatis unde omnis higher iste natus error sit voluptatem accusantium doloremque laudantium, under the age of 24, young example of town totam one rem aperiam, eaque ipsa quae ab illo inventore veritatis et quasi architecto beatae vitae people in Bristol are looking for dicta sunt collaboration is the SETsquared explicabo. Nemo enim ipsam opportunities – and companies voluptatem Partnership, a collaboration quia voluptas sit aspernatur aut odit fugit, sed quia consequuntur magni dolores researchare in turn looking for skilled, aut between five leading eos qui ratione voluptatem sequi nesciunt. Neque quisquam est, qui dolorem ipsum quia dolor innovative employees. This is porro intensive universities – Bath, sit amet, consectetur, adipisci velit, sed quia non eius modiExeter, tempora incidunt ut labore et a mutually beneficial situation. numquam Bristol, Southampton dolore magnam aliquam quaerat voluptatem. Ut enim ad minimaSurrey veniam, quis– nostrum With two universities, strong and which focuses digital, aerospace and creative exercitationem on enterprise activity and new ullam corporis suscipit laboriosam, nisi ut aliquid ex ea commodi consequatur? industries, and an ever-growing Quis autem business vel eum iurecreation. reprehenderit qui in voluptate velit esse quam nihil molestiae clutch of incubators and trainingea consequatur, vel illum qui dolorem eum fugiat quo voluptas nulla pariatur? providers, opportunities abound Its enterprise events give for both worker and employer. students valuable hands-on

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business experience and access to expertise to get their own ventures off the ground. They also focus on research commercialisation, which has resulted in such developments including Apitope, a drug to combat multiple sclerosis, in collaboration with the University of Bristol, and Ultrahaptics, a company working with augmented reality technology and 4D slot machines.


SETSquared’s Bristol campus is now in the Engine Shed, part of the Temple Quarter Enterprise Zone (TQEZ). The zone will also feature Bristol University’s new £300 million campus, focused on digital innovation. The city’s ‘other’ university, University of the West of England (UWE), is doing its part too. The Digital Cultures Research Centre (in the Watershed) was created with the UWE’s faculty of arts and the digital and media sector, both massive in Bristol, to allow researchers to share knowledge with real-world media technology firms. Meanwhile, back at the University of Bristol, its student enterprise team, Basecamp, supports students to develop enterprising, entrepreneurial and intrapreneurial skills via workshops, networking events, and start-up support. But it’s not just about higher education. The City of Bristol College – one of the largest further and higher education colleges in the UK – offers more than 1,000 courses, from A-levels in everything from physics to psychology, to entry-level English to level 5 courses in aeronautical engineering. Based in four main centres across Bristol, it provides education and training to more than 20,000 learners of all ages and backgrounds each year. It also partners local firms to offer apprenticeships. At the current count it has 1,000 apprentices working with some 600 employers, a figure which will no doubt rise with the completion of its new £4 million, 1,200sq m extension to its Advanced Engineering Centre, which will provide industry facilities including workshops, laboratories, computer aided simulation rigs and testing/diagnostic equipment, to give students and apprentices the skills they need for employment. Another apprenticeships success story is On Site, set up in 1996 to help local people to get jobs and training in construction, and take advantage of the widespread redevelopment of the city. Part of Bristol City Council, On

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Bristol | Skills and training

Site acts as a broker for students and employers, taking care of training, funding and general support. For adult learners, who may have missed out on education the first time round, Bristol Council’s adult learning service offers courses in the arts, bridge, conservation and even philosophy, from beginners to level 3. Many courses are free. And talking of free, the council’s community learning team last year offered over 400 courses in 150 different venues to 2,000 residents, with over 60% of learners progressing to further learning, volunteering and work. The courses are run all over the city, at centres convenient to the learners. It’s also worth remembering that skills gaps can be filled from across the population, including talent developed outside formal education. Engaging and inspiring schoolage children in imaginative programming and use of technology is key to this, whether at the DigiTech Studio School or the Bath Studio School or supporting specialists such as Bristol Music Trust and community-based sector connectors such as Knowle West Media Centre. Away from the public sector, numerous private sector training providers are doing their bit. Little Kitchen is a specialist cookery school providing workshops for adults and children, while the rather larger Lifetime Training, supported with European funding, runs courses on fitness, beauty, hospitality, health and social care and retail, in partnership with names such as David Lloyd, PizzaExpress and Hilton, as well as the NHS. |

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BRISTOL CONNECTING

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Images: Chris Bahn / Bristol City Council, @JonCraig_Photos, Aardman Animations, Jimmy Image

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BRISTOL CONNECTING Published by 3Fox International Editor-in-chief James Renoux-Wood Production manager Christopher Hazeldine

For more information about Bristol please contact: Mayor’s office mayor@bristol.gov.uk +44 (0)117 922 2420 Postal address: Mayor’s Office (CH), Bristol City Council, PO Box 3176, Bristol, BS3 9FS

Production assistants Tilly Shenstone Mia Wicks Managing director Toby Fox Consultant Tim Lewis Printed by Bishops Printers Designer NWMN Designs


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Bristol Is Connecting  
Bristol Is Connecting