337 MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2020

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SEPTEMBER ISSUE

From Lafayette Chic to Fashion Week Acadiana Fashion

The Little Bar at Indulge PARC LAFAYETTE'S NEW LITTLE BAR WITH BIG OLE CHARM

Week's Morgan Pete

THE BIG RETURN Local Professional

Pet Nutritionist on Natural Flea Remedies

Organizer's Advice for Tidy Homework or Virtual Learning Spaces

COPING THROUGH THE CHAOS

Looking at Mental Health During Trying Times



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CONTENTS

OWNERS/PUBLISHERS 337 Media Editor / Creative Director: Abby Meaux Conques Graphic Designer: Abby Meaux Conques Ad Design: Abby Meaux Conques, Heidi Roy Digital Media: Abby Meaux Conques, Heidi Roy

337 CORRESPONDENTS Abby Meaux Conques, Angel Jones, Renee Ory, Vicky Roe

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS / ARTISTS Abby Meaux Conques Mike D Photography

COVER PHOTO Mike D Photography

HOME + STYLE 6 The Big Return

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FOOD + DRINK 8 The Little Bar at Indulge

PET CARE 10 Getting to be Flea-Free Naturally

COMMUNITY 12 From Lafayette Chic to Fashion Week

WELLBEING 14 Coping Through the Chaos

CONTACT US 337magazine.com Editorial: editor@337magazine.com Advertising: advertise@337magazine.com

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14 All pages within 337 magazine are the property of 337 magazine. No portion of the materials on the pages may be reprinted or republished in any form without the express written permission of 337 magazine ©2020. The content of 337 magazine has been checked for accuracy, but the publishers cannot be held liable for any update or change made by advertisers and/or contributors to the magazine. 337 Media, LLC is not responsible for injuries sustained by the reader while pursuing activities described or illustrated herein, nor failure of equipment depicted or illustrated herein. No liability is, or will be, assumed by 337 magazine, 337 Media or any of its owners, administration, writers or photographers for the magazine or for any of the information contained within the magazine. All rights reserved.

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The Big Return By Renee Ory

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ongratulations Parents, you have survived Summer 2020. It was the longest summer, because for most, it began in March: when schools were closed as part of the COVID-19 pandemic response. This extended period of time with children out of school (and potentially at home) means that your home may look like more of a disaster zone than welcoming oasis. More time at home means more clutter from toys, books, and craft supplies.

Develop a plan for creatively storing all those things that make childhood sweet. Envision new spaces for Legos, stuffed animals, art supplies, board games, gaming systems, puzzles, and dolls.

New work-from-home needs that children may require in the event of additional virtual learning due to COVID-19 may need attention.

which current items in the home can be moved or repurposed for this design, or find / restructure new items to better function in this new capacity.

New storage needs may include space for iPads, Chromebooks, laptops, or other digital learning tools sent from school, charging stations for all devices, headphones, school supplies such as pencils, crayons, markers, scissors, glue, tape, notebooks, and schoolbooks. Options could include forming one central learning hub for the home, or individualizing plans contained in bedrooms to better fit the learning needs of each child.

Returning to school often involves increased reading, and with the potential for an increase in at-home learning, finding quiet spaces to read for learning purposes will be a necessity. Create beautiful spaces conducive to reading with minimal distractions from toys and television.

These spaces need to be functional to facilitate learning, while providing minimal distractions. Identify 6

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Many parents are purchasing new school uniforms in the hopes of their children attending in-person classes in August. Finding space for these new purchases can be difficult, especially in closets that may already be overflowing.

Re-organize closets to edit out clothes that have become too small or will likely be outgrown over the upcoming year. After clearing out clothing clutter, effectively integrate new uniforms and potentially uncover new spaces for storage of summer toys and/or school items.

In anticipation of a return to schools outside of the home, develop a solution for the “after-school clutter” that best fits your family’s needs. Spaces for backpack storage, homework organization, school jackets and shoes are all the most-identified necessities among clients. Create storage solutions in children’s rooms or one centralized area where parents and children can easily access information from school.

TIP OF THE MONTH Get the kids involved in decluttering their rooms, and teach them a valuable lesson at the same time - giving to those less fortunate. Tell each child they get to choose 3-5 toys they no longer play with and donate/gift these items to kids who would enjoy playing with them! Your excitement for the endeavor can help them to be excited as well. Knowing the toys will be a gift to those in need can make parting with them easier. And, your kids learn to empathize with others!

We understand this can all seem overwhelming, and sometimes you just really need some guidance from a professional point of view. We can help ease the transition from summer fun to school structure by decluttering and organizing rooms throughout your home. Think of Amazing Spaces as your fairy godmother – organizational style. We can take items off your never-ending to-do list and help get your family ready for school! Remember, all of our services include that pesky last step: removal of discarded items. For the safety of our clients and team members, we adhere to the Covid-19 safety guidelines.

AMAZING SPACES is an Acadiana-based Professional Organizing Company transforming homes and offices since 2003. Offering a full line of closet and storage systems. Call Renée Ory (337) 296-5506 for appointments and visit the website at AmazingSpaces.org V O L U M E 6 ISS U E 4

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The

Little Bar at indulge By Abby Meaux Conques

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eet Lafayette's new Little Bar at indulge with big ole charm.

Recently, we sat with the General Manager of the adorably quaint Little Bar at Indulge, Kendra DeVille.

The Little Bar at Indulge has its own little entrance in Indulge located in the Parc Lafayette shopping center off of Kaliste Saloom road, and it’s like walking into a tiny portal perfect to end a date night or to have a social distancing girls’ night.

DeVille and James Lawrence, Jr. (Director of Operations) were sought out to refresh the popular local dessert eatery, Indulge. The restaurant consulting team moved in to get it to run more efficiently, upscale the look and add the bonus bar to the treatery.

“We definitely saw promise in the space, and knew we could turn it into its own amazing little thing,” DeVille explained. The Little Bar is situated in the portion of the dessert spot previously sold candy treats. Logistical use of large furnishings, draperies, French antiques, original art, and a bar area 8

makes the space feel like an entirely different room. The Little Bar at Indulge is a fully functioning bar with artisan cocktails and an inviting atmosphere that entices you to hang out amongst the plush blue velvet seating. DeVille exclaimed, “I like to say, ‘Sip and Stay a while.’”

The Little Bar is open from 4pm til, Thursday through Saturday and offers tenderly crafted drinks such as the popular Queen Bee deemed “Champagne with a Sting”, the Laissez Les Bon temps Roulez (their handcrafted old fashioned), the Walk in the Parc (the proclaimed taste of summer), the Hemingway Daiquiri and the Blue Velvet. You can order anything available in the Indulge portion of the building to be paired with your cocktail. DeVille says, “Those are what I like to call Nibbles and Noshes.”

The Little Bar practices all safe guidelines outlined for restaurants. Each table is spaced 6’ apart, tables and chairs are cleaned regularly, and the entire staff wear masks.

Add the sweet spot to your next social distancing night away from quarantine, you won’t be disappointed. 337M A GA ZIN E.C OM

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Getting to be Flea-Free Naturally By Angel Jones, Thriving K-9 Co

Fleas are the most common external parasite to plague companion animals. They are wingless insects that feed on blood, can jump up to two feet high and are persistent in the environment.

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It’s true that a healthy animal is a less desirable host for fleas, but it’snot a guarantee that your healthy animal won’t get them, especially if you live in highly infested regions. Southern Louisiana is considered a highly infested region. Did you know that an animal that isn’t allergic to flea saliva may not show signs of having fleas? This can make it difficult for the PAW-rent to realize there is an issue until it is an infestation. Fleas can cause a slew of problems for your fur kid and some can be fatal. Bartonellosis, flea dermatitis, anemia and tapeworms are just a few problems you definitely want to try avoiding at all costs. All but flea dermatitis can be fatal.

Here are some natural remedies and some repellants you can try at home:

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Give you fur baby a quality probiotic

Try food grade Diatomaceous earth (CAUTION: DE can irritate the lungs so wear a mask and make sure your dogs and other pets aren’t breathing the dust. After the dust has settled, DE is safe)

Try an apple cider vinegar wash: 1 part vinegar to 10 parts water

Use nematodes to minimize flea populations in your yard

Keep pots of lemon balm, sage, rosemary, catnip, lemongrass, basil and mint outside. Place some by your main doors and throughout your yard. Essential oils are a wonderful choice for natural repellants but be sure to use quality essential oils and to dilute them properly. These oils should be diluted at a 2% ratio (1 ounce of carrier oil to 12 drops of essential oil). Lavender, palmarosa, cedar (atlantica), eucalyptus (radiata) and clary sage are good ones to begin with. You can clean with them or add them to laundry treatments and home fragrance spray.

If you're looking for something to treat fleas naturally and effectively that's already mixed up for you, we have you covered at thriving K-9 Co with our formulated skincare line. You can purchase online or directly from me. FB @PUPcakesADogBakery/thriving K-9 Co (337) 936-4664 Call or Text Angel Jones is the owner of Thriving K-9 Co/PUPcakes A Dog Bakery. 7 years ago, she drove a good distance to meet a litter of puppies. That day we brought a itty bitty brindle colored puppy home with her. Little did she know, this would the beginning of her spiritual journey and finding a true mission in life; to support the animal-human relationship and offer others education to ensure their furkids live a long healthy life through free education. After working in rescue, she learned that every animal is different in their needs and the bond they form with kind compassionate humans is the purest love you will ever find. PUPcakes A Dog Bakery began after moving to Louisiana Kata (the itty bitty brindled colored puppy) started developing skin issues, ear issues and yeast issues. She researched after everything multiple Veterinarians sold me only made her skin worse. Being a professional in the human heath & fitness world she knew the healing powers of fresh food and began learning about animal nutrition and natural healing with herbs and began fresh food feedings. She formulated a skincare line for ALL skin types that would not only heal dog’s skin but would be affordable and chemical free. This is where Thriving K-9 Co was born. Angel's Certifications through DNM University: Certified Advanced Canine Nutritionist / Certified Raw Dog Food Nutritionist / Certified Pet Food Nutritionist / Certified Canine Essential Oil Specialist / Certified Acute Canine Herbalist / Certified Acute Canine Homeopathy Specialist V O L U M E 6 ISS U E 4

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From Lafayette Chic to Fashion Week By Vicky Roe

MIKE D PHOTOGRAPHY

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ew York. Los Angeles. Even Atlanta. All cities that may come to mind when you think of Fashion capitals- but one Louisiana native is creating a lane for Lafayette to join the ranks. Hailing from Breaux Bridge, Morgan Pete believes in one simple rule “If we don’t have it, create it.” Following this simple principle, Pete has created several opportunities in Lafayette that otherwise, wouldn’t exist- Acadiana Fashion Week and the Fashion Institute of Louisiana. But how did a quiet and shy young girl, who tried to avoid public speaking at all costs, become the woman running one of the premiere events in Lafayette? Well that’s a question that even Pete is still coming up with the answer to. “All of this is so surprising. I just wanted to play volleyball and become a scientist. That was always my goal. I never thought I’d actually own a business,” said Pete One of Pete’s successful businesses is Acadiana Fashion Week, (AFW) a three day experience where people come to Lafayette and enjoy fashion shows from a number of designers. The concept of Acadiana Fashion Week was born around 2014, but it wasn’t until two years later that Pete took that leap of faith and went for it. “I traveled a lot and went to a few different fashion weeks; some huge (New York Fashion Week) and a few smaller ones. I no-

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ticed how much talent our area had but with so little opportunities. I wanted to create a platform where everyone could come together and showcase their work, help out backstage or just be a guest in the audience. I wanted AFW to be big but also wanted it to be looked at as a family atmosphere, where people felt comfortable, could network and actually build a career.” Even with the best intentions, the road to success is almost never a glamorous one, but Pete was determined to turn her trials to triumphs. “I was told ‘no’ a lot, especially since I became interested in modeling. A lot of agencies wanted models who were one size and that’s just not realistic; consumers want to see people they can relate to. Unfortunately, my hips were always too wide, my butt was too big, I wasn’t tall enough and at some points, I did get discouraged and felt like I wasn’t good enough. One agency told me they already had someone who looked like me. This industry forces you to have tough skin. But I was able to use everything I went through and create a platform here in Louisiana that doesn’t cater to the ‘one size fits all’ industry standard. We’re all different, the consumers are different and when I do my shows, I want little kids and adults to see someone who looks like them,” Pete explained. 337M A GA ZIN E.C OM

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With her idea and the help of her team, she was able to do exactly what she set out to do. Her co-founders and leadership team consists of Michael Smith and Johnetta George. Pete stresses the importance of having a solid foundation for a successful business. “Things definitely get hard, and trying to do everything alone gets exhausting. Plus, it’s always good to have people around who will keep you going! At times, I can’t make it to our photo shoots for Fashion Week but I trust that the team will still be able to execute our vision. We all have similar goals and want what’s best for Louisiana. Our families are here and we’re going to raise kids here one day too. Louisiana is our home,” she explained. Although Pete’s biggest fear about the first Acadiana Fashion Week was not getting support, it turns out she had nothing to worry about. “The seats were filled and we actually ended up having to turn guests away because it was too full. We underestimated ourselves and received a lot more support than anyone expected.” From the first Acadiana Fashion Week in 2016, to the annual ones that followed, Pete has plenty to be thankful for. “I’m most proud of our growth, which means we’re doing something right. When models and designers return with their designer and model friends, it shows that it’s working. We went from 40 models at our first casting, to over 300 the next; that’s growth! People are showing up and talking about it.” After getting so much support from one venture, it was only natural for Pete to gamble on herself a second time. Thus, the Fashion Institute of Louisiana was born. “The Fashion Institute of Louisiana (FIL) is a college for business, fashion and design. We are committed to excellence. We believe in challenging the status quo and changing the world through art and fashion. We are dedicated to growth and enhancing the gifts each of our students possesses.” While both the Fashion Institute of Louisiana and Acadiana Fashion Week have bright futures, the current pandemic has rearranged some things for all of us, Pete being no exception. “Canceling this year’s AFW was heartbreaking. I went back and forth so many times with the decision but I knew that it was best for the safety and health of our community and everyone involved in Fashion Week. I tried to look at things in a more positive light. It gives us more time to make AFW 4 even better. People can look forward to a bigger venue, more vendors, more models, new faces, and more designers from across the United States. They can also look forward to more male (fashion) lines, our Art Show and Business Seminar that’ll consist of great artists and panelists.” The new dates for AFW are January 7th10th, 2021 at the Ballroom of Broussard. With no end in sight for this ever-growing entrepreneur, Pete plans on keeping the importance of community at the forefront. “So many people have told me to move, do it somewhere else, that it could be bigger somewhere else. My answer has always been the same, ‘no!’ I want to keep people here, bring people here and build my area up. I think it’s important to not forget about the kids in the area and give them those opportunities we never had.”

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MIKE D PHOTOGRAPHY

MICHELLE WILLIAMS PHOTOGRAPHY

For more information on Acadiana Fashion Week: Website: www.acadianafashionweek.com Instagram: @acadianafashionweek Twitter/Snapchat: @acadianaFW For more information on the Fashion Institute of Louisiana: Instagram: @fashioninstitutela Twitter: @FILouisiana 13


Coping Through the Chaos A Look at Mental Health During the Pandemic By Vicky Roe

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ho knew something as simple as going outside would turn into a constant reminder of grabbing your mask? Who knew that for some, sending your kids to school would be turned into setting up a Zoom meeting at the kitchen table? And who knew a trip to the grocery store could turn into the fear of not being able to find what you need. The global pandemic has taken a toll on so many things and people. Hospitals filled to capacity, lives lost, jobs terminated...the list could go on. While we’re seeing a lot of the physical issues caused by the pandemic, it’s important to take note of the very real unseen issues caused by it as well. Natalie Bunner, Licensed Clinical Social Worker and Child and Youth Care Practitioner Professional, has seen firsthand how the pandemic has impacted mental health. Remember, you are not alone in this and you can calm your mind through the chaos!

NATALIE BUNNER With Vicky Roe, you’re getting the best of both worlds - born and raised in New York City but growing up in Charlotte, North Carolina gives her the Concrete Jungle hustle with a solid serving of Southern Hospitality! After numerous opportunities, including working for “American Idol” during their stint in Charlotte, to interning for the “Rachael Ray Show”, to becoming a Television News Reporter in Alabama, she ultimately made her way back to Charlotte where she worked as the Executive Producer for a Morning Radio Show. The experience both behind the scenes and on the mic, set her up to be the next powerhouse on Q95.5 in Lafayette, Louisiana, and now contributing writer for 337 Magazine. 14

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HAVE YOU SEEN/NOTICED AN INCREASE IN PEOPLE STATING THEY ARE DEALING WITH MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES SINCE THE PANDEMIC BEGAN? BUNNER: Absolutely! I believe that before the pandemic, we were

all “too busy” to deal with mental health concerns. It was pushed behind our work obligations, social events, extracurricular activities, etc.. However, when we were forced to slow down due to the Shelter in Place order, we suddenly had the space, time and opportunity to (at least) acknowledge mental health issues that challenged our connection with ourselves and others. That realization can be jarring, especially when the go-to distractions are no longer available. I think many of us could no longer deny that the things we had been ‘sweeping under the rug’ were now causing us to trip up.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE MAIN ISSUES SURROUNDING MENTAL HEALTH THAT HAVE BEEN ARISING SINCE QUARANTINE STARTED? BUNNER: I would say that the issues were already present prior to

the quarantine; however, sheltering in place may have exacerbated the symptoms. Some of those symptoms include anxiety, particularly related to the fear of the unknown. As there was minimal information about the virus in the first few months, our understanding was that anyone could catch it and die. This heightened symptoms of anxiety and depression. Additionally, the isolation seemed to exacerbate depressive symptoms for many. With the children I work with, their symptoms were more significant as they realized that the consistency (and in some cases, safety and reliability) that school attendance provided, would not be an option for the rest of the school year. Educators were struggling with a sudden loss of purpose, anxiety about some of their school kids and how the pandemic would impact their employment. I believe that grief was a significant issue experienced by so many. Whether it was “traditional” grief due to the loss of a loved one due to Covid, senior students grieving the incomplete experience of their last year of high school, or the dissolution of an already fragile marriage, grief and loss is certainly felt by significant portions of our communities.

ARE THERE CERTAIN SIGNS FAMILY MEMBERS/FRIENDS/INDIVIDUALS SHOULD LOOK FOR THAT COULD IDENTIFY POSSIBLE MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES BROUGHT ON BY THE PANDEMIC? BUNNER: It is important to note that our communities are not

monolithic thus people may experience the stress of the pandemic in a variety of ways. Some may experience significant changes in mood and disruption in behavior- they may express irritability and/or exhibit lower tolerance to stress. Others may experience a decrease in motivation, exhibit increase in isolative behaviors, overt decrease or increase in appetite or insomnia. Still, others may begin to experience a decrease in motivation to maintain their sobriety and may experience relapse in addictive behaviors (drugs, alcohol, pornography, gambling). Children may also exhibit some of the aforementioned symptoms as well as an obvious increase in hyperactive behavior, struggles to regulate their own feelings, “clingy” behaviors with caregivers and vicarious anxiety relative to the stress level in the home.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE THINGS PEOPLE CAN DO TO HELP COMBAT SOME OF THEIR MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES WHILE AT HOME? BUNNER: I have learned that there are so many ways to promote

mental health during a pandemic. It does not have to be grand gestures towards health; one step at a time is the best way to address those challenges and make positive changes in life. For example, before getting out of bed in the morning, I express five things I am thankful for. It helps set my mind in the right direcV O L U M E 6 ISS U E 4

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tion for the day. Self-care is paramount during this time; this may include spending time reading your favorite author, taking a bike ride around the neighborhood or getting that coveted afternoon nap. To combat isolation, Zoom and Google Meet calls with friends and families can help people maintain connections with their loved ones. One of the things I learned to appreciate during the pandemic was early morning air. Whether we were relaxing in one space or taking a walk around the neighborhood, being outside was a great opportunity to reset our emotional selves. Lastly, eating well (not to be confused with overeating) and sleeping well are foundational tools that promote mental health.

IN ADDITION TO THE PANDEMIC, THE WORLD HAS TAKEN NOTICE OF THE INJUSTICES THAT HAVE BEEN GOING ON, PARTICULARLY AS IT RELATES TO LAW ENFORCEMENT AND THE AFRICAN AMERICAN COMMUNITY. HAS THAT PLAYED A PART IN ARISING MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES DURING THE PANDEMIC? BUNNER: I believe that the scaffolding of crises can certainly have

a significant impact on one's mental health for two reasons. One, the relationship between the black and brown community and a helping profession is incredibly fragile. When we consider how conflict impairs our personal relationships, we can then imagine the mental health impact of chronic tension between two long-standing communities. Two, the challenges faced in the relationship between law enforcement and the African American community were occurring well before the pandemic. Thus, the Covid-19 experience added life and death concerns that certainly could have increased mental and emotional crises in the community.

OF COURSE IT’S NOT GOING TO BE A ONE SIZE FITS ALL STATEMENT BUT IS THERE ADVICE YOU CAN GIVE TO THE AFRICAN AMERICAN COMMUNITY AND THEIR ALLIES WHO ARE FRUSTRATED, HURT AND OVERWHELMED BY CONTINUOUSLY SEEING THESE DEADLY ENCOUNTERS? BUNNER: First, acknowledge that being exposed to these lethal

encounters are traumatic. The community is experiencing direct and vicarious trauma and acknowledging that reality is a good place to start. Secondly, know that there are members of the community that are willing to help bring peace, hope and unity. Whether it is a community leader, spiritual advisor, wise community elder or licensed mental health professional, we are in the community with the desire to help you find solace, both personally and globally. Lastly, remember your worth. Surround yourself with people and entities that bring compassion, support and allyship. Identify and gather your resources around you. Understand that you are not alone; we are here and we are walking this journey with you.

ADDITIONAL ADVICE FOR THOSE STRUGGLING AT THIS TIME? BUNNER: I have a friend who told me, “If I hear another person say

that these are ‘unprecedented times’ ONE. MORE. TIME..!” But, the reality is, it is! We have never experienced anything like this before. So, it is important that we give ourselves some grace as we navigate through this experience. Just because one experiences mental health challenges during this season doesn’t mean that they have a diagnosable mental illness. It simply means that their ability to emotionally regulate is hampered by the additional acute stressors in their lives. Acknowledging this challenge early and seeking help allows a person to acquire skills to cope with the extra stress in an effective way.

If you or your loved ones are experiencing intrusive suicidal thoughts, please call the 24/7 National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255 15


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