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CAJUN NATION

Spotlight on Henderson

DAY IN DOWNTOWN The wonders of Franklin

KIDS CAMPS

Highlights of summer fun

VOL. 5 ISSUE 2

INDOOR DÉCOR

Clash matching, pillow talk and more!

SOUTH LOUISIANA EATS Destination dining and international eats

THE HAPPENING

Cinco De Mayo, horse racing and festivals


PROBLEM SOLVING AT THE ORCHARD Southwest Louisiana’s only Apple Authorized Service Provider can help We’ve all been there: your phone slips out of your hand, and you see your entire life falling with it. Cracked screen, distorted pictures, and crashing apps. Your iPhone, iPad, or Mac is way more than what meets the eye. Your life happens on that screen; your business operates from that connectivity. That’s where The Orchard comes in. For over a decade The Orchard has provided Southwest Louisiana with Apple products and services. We are recognized by Apple as a Premium Service Provider and provide same day service on most Apple products. This ensures you can get back to your life—quickly. The Orchard uses only Apple Genuine Parts supplied directly from Apple and is an extension of Apple’s sales and service network. We use those genuine Apple parts so you can know for sure that your iPhone, iPad, or Mac will be returned with the quality that Apple intended. We work with Apple to service your devices so your standard warranty, AppleCare, AppleCare+, and any Apple issued recall programs are valid here!

Need a little extra care or not getting the full experience with your Mac? Running a business or even a family requires a little technical know how these days. We will sit down with you at your home or business and walk through everything. Our technicians serve as your IT professionals, will set up of all your devices, and can consult you on what comes next. As Southwest Louisiana's ONLY Apple Authorized Service Provider, The Orchard is the best way to get fast, reliable, and quality service on all of your Apple Products. We are here for you!

Find informational videos that will help you get the most from your devices on The Orchard’s Facebook and Instagram pages

The Orchard 4415 Ambassador Caffery Pkwy Lafayette, LA 70508 337-981-2589 www.theorchardstores.com Packing meals for those in need at The Orchard

“Your life happens on that screen; your business operates from that connectivity. That’s where The Orchard comes in.” V OL U M E 5 IS S U E 2

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ON OUR COVER Currently owned by Drew and Kathryn Hoffpauir, this stunning lake-front home was originally built by George Law in 1920 and is one of the oldest homes in Lake Charles. Follow 337 Magazine online for a peek at the elegant interior!

We can’t get enough of the custom designed furniture by Room Service! Check out their FB or IG. You’ll thank us later.

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Our cover model is the incredibly beautiful and equally as witty Michel Hirsch, real estate agent with Century 21 Bessette Realty. Her hair and makeup were done by The Parlor House, and the gorgeous threads were provided by Mimosa Boutique.

A very special thank you to Lance Thomas, the creative director behind our cover, as well as Kathryn Hoffpauir for letting us play in her vintage Chanel collection. Dreams do come true.

This is Hef. He’s awesome and has earned his place as an official 337 Ambassador.

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CONTENTS PUBLISHER 337 Media LLC Editor-in-Chief: Sevie Zeller Copy Editor: Cheryl Robichaux Graphic Designers: Abby Meaux Conques, April Guillote Account Executive: Noah Callen, Nicole DeHart Ad Design: Abby Meaux Conques, April Guillote Intern: Chazmyne Jackson

337 CORRESPONDENTS Brandon Alleman, Adam Chauvin, Cheré Coen, Brandi Comeaux, Brandon Comeaux, Hannah Comeaux, Jared Conques, Curt Guillory, Lisa Hanchey, Chazmyne Jackson, Ginger Louviere, Chad Matrana, Jude Romero, Theresa Russell, Lance Thomas, Annette Vidrine, Liz Waguespack, Molly Waltman

LOCALISM 4 Cajun Nation: Henderson 6 Regional Ribbon Cuttings 8 A Day in Downtown: Franklin

HOME + STYLE 12 Pillow Talk 15 Clash Matching 16 Spring Fashion Trends

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FOOD + DRINK

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21 Dining Destination: Steamboat Warehouse 24 Global Grubs 26 Welcome to Vegetopia

HEALTH + FITNESS 28 Oxygen Therapy 30 Retinols: Avoiding the Side Effects

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS/ ARTISTS

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31 Discovering Neural Manipulation

DATING + MARRIAGE

Adam Chauvin, Cheré Coen, Abby Meaux Conques, Jared Conques, Danielle Nester Faulk, Ginger Louviere, Chad Matrana, Lance Thomas, Annette Vidrine

32 Creative Date Night for Bust Couples

CONTACT US

33 10 Signs of Anxiety in Your Child

337 Magazine 340 Kaliste Saloom Road, Suite E Lafayette, LA 70508 www.337magazine.com sales@337magazine.com editor@337magazine.com

34 Finding A Summer Camp

KIDS + PETS 36 Novel Robotics Club 37 Heartworm Protection for Your Pet

SPORTS + ADVENTURE 39 McNeese State University 40 University of Louisiana at Lafayette 41 Louisiana State University 42 The Long Drive

LEISURE + EVENTS 43 Cowboys, Canyons and Cadillacs 44 Festival International de Louisiane

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45 Louisiana Staycations 46 The Happening: Cinco de Mayo & Horse Racing 49 Featured Artist: Danielle Nester Faulk

All pages within 337 magazine are the property of 337 magazine. No portion of the materials on the pages may be reprinted or republished in any form without the express written permission of 337 magazine ©2019. The content of 337 magazine has been checked for accuracy, but the publishers cannot be held liable for any update or change made by advertisers and/or contributors to the magazine. 337 Media, LLC is not responsible for injuries sustained by the reader while pursuing activities described or illustrated herein, nor failure of equipment depicted or illustrated herein. No liability is, or will be, assumed by 337 magazine, 337 Media or any of its owners, administration, writers or photographers for the magazine or for any of the information contained within the magazine. All rights reserved.

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L O C A L I S M

CAJUN NATION

HENDERSON By Cheryl Robichaux

Mayor Sherbin Collette

“Gateway to the Atchafalaya Basin”

(has a hobby of making miniature hoop nets by hand)

Gotta Taste It

Must-have Cajun cuisine includes crawfish dinners at Pat’s Fisherman’s Wharf Restaurant, a bayou institution since 1948. Pat Huval was a premier restaurateur and his place was one of the first Cajun restaurants to receive recognition internationally. As the first mayor of Henderson, Huval orchestrated the incorporation of his beloved town. After dinner, have a cocktail and hit the dance floor at the Atchafalaya Club.

1,771 P O P U L AT I O N In 2017, according to the U.S. Census

DON’T MISS

Hold onto your hat as you fly through the swamp on an Airboat Tour! Better yet, skip the hat entirely. Atchafalaya Basin Landing Airboat Swamp Tours take you deeper into nature than regular boats will allow. For nature lovers, groups and thrill seekers! Native Cajun tour guides with McGee’s Louisiana Swamp Tours & Adventures explain from personal experience what it’s like to live on a houseboat or survive off the swamp. McGee’s also offers guided photography tours and canoe rentals. “Come pass a good time and Bayou some Louisiana stuff!” Louisiana Marketshops at the 115 provide retail therapy, representing over 300 Louisiana artists and makers of Louisiana products. Find unique collectibles and antiques, gifts, souvenirs, Cajun and Zydeco music, local books and DVDs, even Louisiana Sinker Cypress slabs! Bring the kiddos to Prehistoric Park located near Cajun Palms RV Resort and get your roar on! With 12 acres to explore, you’ll step waaaay back in time to see a variety of realistic-looking steel and fiberglass dinosaur replicas. There’s a concession stand, gift shop and a sandbox with buried bones, perfect for budding paleontologists.

Claim to Fame

Many of Henderson’s forefathers once lived in the Village of Atchafalaya. An AmericanIndian word, Atchafalaya (ah-CHA-fa-LIE-ah) means long river. Located in St. Martin Parish, Henderson, La. appeared on the radar in the 1930s, after the government ordered the construction of larger levees in the Atchafalaya Basin. The Basin is world famous for its mysterious beauty, volume, diversity of wildlife, plants and history. 4

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Bank of Sunset & Trust Co. Dependability and service since 1906

Sunset Branch 337-662-5222 Grand Coteau Branch 337-662-3855 Lafayette Branch 337-234-5220 Home Mortgage Office 337-703-3144 Broussard Branch 337-837-5220

Todd Metrejean, NMLS# 505479, Mary Trahan, NMLS# 505478, Jennifer Aguillard, Jason Hurling, NMLS# 626313

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odd Metrejean came to Bank of Sunset & Trust Company 25 years ago to start what is now known as The Bank of Sunset & Trust Company’s mortgage department/products. A year later, his lifelong friend, SPECIALIZING IN Mary Trahan, came to work alongside him. Construction The dynamic duo wasted no time in implementing high ethical standards in their work and showing Home Purchases total commitment to the financial needs of the local families and business that walked through the door. and Refinances As the bank continued to grow and evolve, new locations were built and additional professionals joined the Home Renovations highly accredited staff. Jennifer Aguillard topped that list and joined the bank 5 years ago, followed by Jason Hurling, who hangs his hat on over 15 years of mortgage lender experience. Residential Lot Financing This powerhouse team recently opened the doors to The Bank of Sunset & Trust Co.’s gorgeous new home mortgage office, located at 105 North Beadle Road in Lafayette. They are more equipped than ever to assist in personal or commercial financial needs. Those interested can visit www.bankofsunset.com for further The number of years that details on products and services, The Bank of Sunset has been as well as find out how to get rising up to meet the pre-qualified for a loan and access mortgage applications. communities’ needs.

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L O C A L I S M

RIBBON CUTTINGS

Acadiana Total Security Bella Grace Paper Acadiana Center for Natural Health

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Central Pizza Parklet

Comeaux High School Performaing Arts Academy

CPL Michael Middlebrook Elementary

EE Kitchen & Bath

Express Oil Change

Girl Scout Cookie Drive

Home Builders Association

Lafayette General Trauma Center

Lawn Doctor

Magnolia Estates at Camelot

MTS Physical Therapy and Wellness

Pemberton Mortgage

Vermilion Lofts

Waxing the City

Wine and Design

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A MESSAGING JOURNEY True design and branding capabilities take local clubs and businesses further

SHIRTS WITH SPIRIT

Acadiana teams, schools and businesses have an amazing team behind them at Grafx Plus. Are you a Shark, Lion or Eagle? Boost your school pride with custom designed shirts that will impress in class and around town. Not just school colors or a few pops of school pride, Grafx Plus offers true design and branding capabilities that let people know who you are and what you represent. STELLAR SIGNAGE, VEHICLE WRAPS + MORE

Need to get the word out about your brand? Get your business booming with stellar digital LED signs or special custom wrap designs for vehicles. Our full array of services covers everything from small, large and grand format digital printing and promotional specialties to direct mail services and FanZone team branding. THE ENTIRE MESSAGING JOURNEY

That “plus” in Grafx Plus name means that we specialize in taking you from concept to message placement -- the entire messaging journey.

We’re all about the people. We love what we do, and to put it simply, we love to connect people to products and services. AN EXCEPTIONAL EXPERIENCE

Our team comes with 30 years of industry experience. That translates to exceptional quality and full service. You will not find a company that will work harder to earn your business, make you feel more comfortable during the ordering process, and provide absolute service after the sale. From concept to creation, the pros at Grafx Plus provide an unmatched customer experience.

DRY NEEDLING

A technique used by specially trained Physical Therapists for treatment of pain and movement impairments that are the direct result of myofascial, muscle tissue and connective tissue impairments. Dry needling involves a thin filiform needle that penetrates the skin and stimulates underlying myofascial trigger points and other soft tissues that are not manually palpable.

Lafayette, Louisiana realestatedela.com (337) 989-7005 V OL U M E 5 IS S U E 2

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Dr. Kevin Landreneau DPT, MTC

508 Lafayette St, Ste 2 Youngsville, LA 70592 337-450-8181 landreneauphysio.com 7


L O C A L I S M

DAY IN DOWNTOWN Quaint, Historical Franklin Brought to you by Franklin Foundation Hospital

By Nicole DeHart

First, Conversation and Coffee Lamp Lighter is a locally owned and operated antiques and collectibles shop located on historic Main Street in Franklin, Louisiana specializing in antiques, vintage, classical, collectible items, local art and gifts. The shop owners are always ready to greet you with a warm smile and a cup of coffee, morning or afternoon! Locals know this is the place to pop in to see what's happening in Franklin.

Go Window Shopping Shop, create, and escape into Downtown Franklin at the French Door located at 608 Main St. in one of its historic buildings. Peruse unique gifts, art, jewelry, children’s clothing, photography, custom chalk painting and classes, vintage finds, Merle Norman cosmetics, gourmet items and calligraphy. They also provide a venue for local artists to showcase their work and host a different artist each month. They also have a wonderful, colorful collection of pieces by famed female African American artist, Clementine Hunter. 8

Support Local Artists Inside the Lamp Lighter you will find a nice array of local artists' wares. The shop owners are happy to showcase the artistic expressions of Franklin artists that lend to the town's rich culture.

Relax Under the Oaks Southern hospitality and beautiful surroundings make the Fairfax House the perfect place to unwind or simply explore the rich culture of the City of Franklin. Tour the facility and feel the rich history stemming from 1852.

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Check Out a Classic Film The 800-seat Moderne style movie house was unveiled in 1940, noted as the most luxurious theater in South Louisiana at that time. After a restoration project in 2003, the Teche Theatre for the Performing Arts began its “Silver Screen Classics” series, with monthly showings of classic films on the large screen.

Break for Lunch Mona’s Southern Soul Food & Snack Shop is no stranger to hungry locals and tourists alike. They are serving up the finest Southern style soul food with love and a passion for cooking. Comfort food and a smile go a long way here.

Take a Tour The Battle of Irish Bend took place near Oaklawn Manor during the Civil War, but this grand old home emerged unscathed. Built in 1827 it is currently owned by the family of Governor Mike Foster. V OL U M E 5 IS S U E 2

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Visit Mrs. Mary Edwards. 38 years of service as a tour guide at Oaklawn Manor. She enjoys her job because she says she meets the most beautiful people from all over the world. She also decorates Oaklawn Manor for every holiday.

Marvel at the Historic Lamp Posts Franklin boasts a beautiful Main Street Boulevard, which includes their trademark Lamp Posts. The eastern section of the Boulevard is lined on both sides by large Oaks, creating a majestic Oak Alley. Built in 1915, the cast iron street lamps have been fixtures in Franklin for over 100 years. You can see the words "Do Not Hitch" which reminded our ancestors not to hitch their horses to them. These words stil appear on the original lamp posts, which have been carefully restored.

End at the City's Hub Franklin is a city without a civic center, and The Lamp Post Reception Facility is a site that serves that function; it has become an integral part of Franklin’s civic life. It serves as the info and social anchor for many of the city’s Main Street events—the Art Stroll, health fairs, Festivals, breakfasts, festival kick-off parties and various events.. 9


Quality Health Care for the Whole Community Franklin Foundation Hospital has served the health care needs of not only the city of Franklin, but the surrounding areas of the parish for more than half a century. They have been at their current state of the art location since August of 2007, where they operate a 24hour Emergency room, inpatient and outpatient surgery, intensive care, OB/GYN services, inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation, laboratory, radiology, skilled nursing, cardiology, orthopedics, nutritional services and respiratory care and have also expanded with a host of physician services. The hospital is constantly improving all of its services to keep the latest medical care available to all of their patients. They have created a hospital environment that focuses on the delivery of "caring and healing" in a confidential and professional manner. Every employee is dedicated to providing you with quality care, making you feel like family.

They are a huge supporter of our local Chez Hope, Inc. and other community events. Every year they operate the Teddy Bear Repair Clinic at our local Black Bear Festival. In addition to quality medical care the hospital has just about the busiest lunch room you could ever see. Members of the community frequent the lunchroom daily for wonderful dishes cooked here. They always provide tasty local dishes as well as options for health conscious members of the community. • Surgery Department • Maternity and Newborn Services • Wound Healing Center • Advanced Radiology Services

• Cardiology • Orthopedics • ICU • Swing Bed

Franklin Foundation plays an active role in the community, taking part in many events held throughout Western St. Mary Parish.

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Affordable luxury for your windows

15% Off Plantation Shutters, Blinds and Shades

15% Off PLUS additional rebates on select blinds and shades by

• No interest financing available* • FREE in-home design consultation • Professional installation in as few as 3 weeks! 47633-louver-2019 337 Magazine-7.625x4.9142.indd 1

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www.louvershop.com 337-210-3088 Not all offers available in all areas and on all product combinations. Hunter Douglas rebates require qualified product purchases and registrations. *Consult your Louver Shop expert for details. Offer expires 4/30/2019

3/11/19 9:16 AM

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Endless looks can be achieved by simply updating pillows and accent alone. Visit Nest Home Interiors to browse their delightful collection of pillows and more!

Pillow Talk Cost effective seasonal home décor By Annette Vidrine, Owner of Nest Home Interiors

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s it because of our climate here in South Louisiana that we love seasonal decorating? With every season change, our door wreaths change welcoming both upcoming holidays and our friends and family. For most of us, our front doors, mantles and dining tables are adorned with splendid displays denoting the time of year. This is typically where it stops. Every other surface in our home remains the same. We have the same tabletop accessories, candles, pillows, throw blankets, etc. year-round. Of course, suggesting we completely transform our homes with every seasonal change would be impractical, costly and time consuming. However, there are subtle changes we can make to our homes that are rejuvenating, cost effective and take little time to achieve. We’re talking PILLOWS! Typically, during your soft furnishing selections, both the body and the pillow fabrics are selected at the time of purchase. They should reflect both your personal style and the interior surroundings of your home. Years later, the same pillows adorn your lovely upholstered pieces. They still look fine but seem to make you feel a little tired. 

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In the interior design arena, we like to equate this with wearing the same outfit over and over again. You just begin to feel bored with it when Mother Nature changes the weather, and we retire that outfit for something new and different. Just as your wardrobe change makes you feel refreshed, changing your decorative pillows with the seasons will make you feel excited and rejuvenated in your cozy surroundings again.   Summertime is a great time to pull some brighter colors into your home. The children are home for the summer, home activity is revved up, and the sun is bright; your home should reflect the happiness summer inevitably brings in. Vibrant hues are certain to celebrate summer. Adorn your softlanding places with a few throw pillows of varying colors, patterns and sizes this season. Enjoy bringing the warmth of summer indoors without feeling the heat!  Everyone’s color palettes are different: some are light, others are dark, some are casual, others are formal. Regardless, simple seasonal changes to refresh your interior surroundings can be easily achieved rejuvenating both you and your beautiful home!

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Crawfish Leg Table

WOODEN WONDERS Cypress furniture handcrafted by local family has unexpected finishes By Sevie Zeller

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Antique Barn Red, ftentimes when Coffee, Driftwood people think and Antique Patina. of the southern The extensive Louisiana landscape, rustic cypress table a vision of lazy selection may just waterways shaded be what All Wood by moss-covered Furniture is most cypress trees comes recognized for. to mind. These Special attention is strong, unyielding paid to individualized trees have stood leg and top style, the test of time and Duhon signature crawfish giving unlimited effectively bared the options in the elements -- possibly design process, and the brothers the very reasons that made are always on the lookout for cypress a desired building material new trends and inspiration throughout our cultural history. to keep their work fresh. Brothers David and Doug The detail we couldn’t get Duhon started All Wood Furniture enough of was the crawfish drawn 1993 with $500 and a table saw. freehanded on the underside of They’ve overcome fires and floods, every table. The signature touch never giving up on their dream from Doug’s daughter, Rebecca, and never letting their standards adds the perfect artistic element drop despite hurtles in their path. to make each piece truly unique. To this day, each piece of furniture Past the tables, customers will is handmade by local craftsmen find the same fine craftsmanship and craftswomen in Carencro on hutches, outdoor furniture, using the finest Louisiana cypress. bars, TV entertainment Cypress has always been highly centers, desks, beds, pergolas valued for multiple traits including and more. Peruse one of their fine grain and resistance to rot and beautiful showrooms or visit insect damage. It can be stained www.allwoodcompany.com various colors to highlight the to find your dream piece of grain and knots in the wood or left furniture or have it custom unfinished. A few of the finishes built to last for generations. that are customer favorites include V OL U M E 5 IS S U E 2

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H O M E

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2E VIE

Bringing awareness of Lafayette’s environmental wellbeing to the forefront through creativity By Brandi Comeaux

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rom the outside Deuxiéme Vie (2e Vie) Creative looks a bit like a thrift store or possibly an art supply store, but really, it’s the best of both worlds. Recently celebrating their one-year anniversary, 2e Vie is a not-for-profit creative reuse center on an environmental mission to teach sustainability using art. Donations of items that would be destined for the landfills are accepted, sorted, priced and displayed in the store. It gives them a second life where they can spark creativity. 2e Vie holds regular workshops to encourage resourcefulness though craft projects, displays art made of at least 75 percent repurposed materials, and is the meeting spot for No Waste Lafayette’s meetings and Fix It Cafés.

Franklin Main Street has much to offer including speciality shops, eateries, and lovely white lamp posts to line the center of downtown. Come visit Franklin for a small town experience and witness the richness and traditions of days gone by. Bayou to Main Market

2nd Annual Art Stroll

April 6, May 4 and June 1st 8 am to 2 pm

May 4, 2019 2 pm to 6 pm

Bayou Teche Black Bear Fest and Wooden Boat Show

Biker’s on the Bayou

April 12-14, 2019

July 13, 2019

Teche Theatre To Kill A Mockingbird April 11-14, 2019

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cajuncoast.com

Rethinking Our Consumer Choices Reports say plastic contamination on Earth is reaching catastrophic levels. China has stopped buying our plastic up to be recycled. Videos of marine wildlife entangled in trash are all over social media. We have found ourselves rethinking our consumer choices. These days it’s not uncommon to see people refusing straws at restaurants, carrying reusable cups into the coffee shop, and looking for small ways to reduce their individual impacts. It’s becoming cool to care about the environment and preserving the planet for future generations. Entering the Post-Consumer Arena While buying in bulk and decreasing your plastic consumer choices are great ways to do your part, 2e Vie is entering the arena on the post-consumer end. 2e Vie provides a way to find that one item needed to start or finish a project or an avenue for your unused project materials to be repurposed in another person’s project. 2e Vie has brought awareness of Lafayette’s environmental wellbeing to the forefront through creativity and a sense of community. We invite you to walk through the store at the next Downtown Artwalk, sign up for a workshop, or just stop by and get inspired. The future of 2e Vie is bright, and you’re a part of it! Website: www.2eviecreative.org Facebook + Instagram: @2eVieCreative 337M A GA ZIN E.CO M

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Clash Matching A bold, unapologetic Spring style trend By Lance Thomas

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ouisiana spring has officially sprung-ish. The tulips are smiling to the warming sun.  The everything-gray trend has overstayed its welcome and thankfully melted away with the winter snow. Feeling inspired, a quick afternoon trip to the local furniture store is in order. Sounds easy, right? Cut to Aisle 10.  Lost. Overwhelmed (and over it).

Balance, scale, and repetition are the three main components to achieving this personality-driven technique. Balance the types of patterns you use. Blend geometrics with organics. Blend cultures (English toile, ikat, tribal, etc.). Blend design periods (antique, contemporary, traditional, etc.). Scale those patterns. This allows your larger patterns to take .main stage and the smaller ones to highlight them. Repeat one or two of the previous decisions above somewhere else in the space. It states, “I clearly meant to do .this because I did it more than once.” . This can most easily be done by taking the pillow that .often comes with a piece of furniture and tossing it on a different piece in the room (or sometimes casually resting it by the fireplace). Or, repeat another stripe, for example, just in a different scale. Trust your intuition (that’s your personality talking) and add an animal print just for good measure. After all, animal prints are the neutrals of the pattern world.

“Do these patterns go together?” "Will this toss pillow be too busy with this rug?”  “Haven’t I already been down this aisle?” This spring, a new technique for pattern pairing has blossomed. It is called clash matching, and it answers all your troubling design dilemmas. Think of it as pattern mixing’s unapologetic, crazy (yet stylish) aunt.  The theory behind clash matching is as follows: Any patterns can be paired together as long as they (1) reflect your personality and (2) show purpose.  Simply put, make the patterns you love look like you meant to pair them, especially if they appear as though they too should clash. Think oversized floral patterns mixed with black and white stripes and animal prints Lance Thomas and Drew Hoffpauir, the design team behind Room Service, a boutique furniture store and interior design business in Lake Charles, reveal their secrets to a sophisticated clash match.

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Swoon 1700 Kaliste Saloom Rd., Suite 100A Lafayette, LA 70508 337-534-8117 Be sure to follow @swoonlafayette on Instagram & Facebook to stay updated on the newest arrivals!

High school friends and New Iberia natives Natalie Guillory and Alyssa Mansfield opened Swoon Lafayette together on March 30, 2019. The store originated in New Orleans, three years ago, and a return home for one of its owners resulted in their second location! The duo is excited to bring the cutest clothing, shoes, and accessories to a variety of age groups at a moderate price point. Swoon’s favorite trend for Spring is bright and white! White denim and white shoes paired with a bright pop of color, like a blazer or printed top! The girls love to top their Spring outfits off with a great pair of statement earrings and a fun bag.

Photos by Carlie Lormand with Magnolia Film Company

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Brother's on the Boulevard 101 Arnould Blvd. Lafayette, LA 70506 337-984-7749 Stand out this Mother’s Day with our Michael Stars Linen Blazer and short set. Dress it up by pairing it with our Seychelles Exotic Chunky Heel or dress it down by slipping on our Matisse Lana Mule! Pair your Johnnie-O Prep-formance Polo and Prep-formance Shorts with our Sperry flip flops for the Perfect Father’s day look! Top it off with a spritz of cologne from our Southern Tide gift set.

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Motiér 340 Kaliste Saloom Rd Suite G1 Lafayette, LA 70508 www.motierlafayette.com The Motiér Amour Collection is part of the Motiér Spring 2019 line. Specifically, this design was developed to share our viewpoint on love during Valentine’s Day and equally represents our love for spring. The Motiér Amour collection is available in cropped crewneck sweaters and our flowy crop-tops. Now available in store and online

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Sweet Caroline Boutique 2722 Kaliste Saloom Rd. Lafayette, LA 70508 337-408-8702 Spring in the South is the perfect time to break out those bold colors and unique pieces. From summer parties to festivals, we have those statement pieces that will get all the "oohs and ahhs".

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F O O D

D R I N K

KARY’S KITCHEN

Discover the secret to perfectly seasoned smothered porkchops By Sevie Zeller

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outh Louisiana brims with tradition, especially when it comes to food. When the occasion calls for a soul-nourishing and heartwarming meal, smothered pork chops are always a good choice. Ross Lafleur, owner of Kary’s Roux, shared his family’s recipe with the readers of 337 Magazine. We love that it’s a concise, easy-to-execute recipe that is satisfyingly full of flavor. A video version of this recipe is available on Kary’s Roux & Pig Stand Bar-B-Q Sauce’s YouTube channel, and you can find more great recipes like this at karysroux.com.

Smothered Pork Chops 2-2 ½ pounds bone-in pork chops 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 2 cups chopped onions 1 cup chopped bell pepper 2 cloves garlic chopped 2 tablespoons Kary’s “No Fat” Dry Roux Queen Bee Seasoning to taste 5 cups water

In a medium pot, add oil and bring to a medium heat. Season pork chops on both sides with Queen Bee Seasoning. Add pork chops to pot and brown on both sides. Remove pork chops and add onions and bell pepper. Cook until tender and begin to turn brown. Add garlic and cook for approximately 1 minute. Add Kary’s Dry Roux, stir, and let cook for just under a minute. Add water and stir. Add pork chops, bring to a light boil, cover most of the pot with lid, and cook for approximately 1 hour or until tender. Serve over rice. *An additional cup or two of water may be needed depending on how long it takes for the pork chops to get tender and to end up with enough gravy. Editorial Note: For those who love to play in the kitchen, Kary’s Dry Roux has a ton of great uses beyond just roux! After this shoot, my jars of Kary’s and Queen Bee came in handy for Instapot recipes that needed a little doctoring, dry rub on the fly and even impromptu side dish seasoning. They’ve quickly become staples in my kitchen!

Nothing says BAR-B-Q better than Pig Stand BAR-B-Q 20

Ross Lafleur , Kary’s Roux, and Sevie Zeller, 337 Magazine, smothering pork chops

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Chef/owner Jason Huguet

F O O D

D R I N K

DINING DESTINATION Steamboat Warehouse Restaurant in Washington By Executive Chef Chad Matrana

S Catfish Courtableau

Crème Brûlée

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Escargo

ituated on the banks of the Old Opelousas River sits a rustic warehouse hardly touched by time. In its earlier life it served as a steamboat port where travelers boarded and cargo was loaded for destinations around the world.   Construction of the railroad had made the bustling warehouse all but obsolete. Many years of disrepair left the building in a shadow of its former glory days; however, in 1977 it was completely restored with a new life as the Steamboat Warehouse Restaurant.  Current chef/owner Jason Huguet believes fate stepped in and that this restaurant chose him as much as he chose it. It is an extraordinary partnership between the two.  He pays homage to the legacy preceding him with dishes such as a grilled ribeye topped with crawfish étouffée and perfectly fried seafood from the Gulf.  Huguet is also looking to continue with a legacy of his own by focusing on locally sourced ingredients incorporated into the off-menu specials. Take the Catfish Courtableau, a crispy fried filet of catfish topped with a jumbo lump crabmeat herb cream sauce, for example.   Another dish worth ordering is the Softshell Cypremort. This dish celebrates Louisiana seafood at its finest. It starts with a Cypremort Point softshell crab which is stuffed with Gulf shrimp and blue point crabmeat, fried golden and finished with a creamy herb sauce.  Whether you go to enjoy the ambiance from yesteryears or fine Louisiana cuisine, sitting waterfront at the Steamboat Warehouse Restaurant will certainly not disappoint.

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We provide quality compassionate care. ADULT SERVICES

Aftercare services Crisis Intervention Drug Screens Evaluation and treatment for compulsive gambling HIV/STD/TB Services Individual, group, and family therapy Intensive outpatient treatment for substance abuse Medication management Peer support services Prevention Psychiatric evaluations Referrals for detoxification Referrals to inpatient programs Referrals to resident care Tobacco cessation therapy

CHILD/ADOLESCENT SERVICES

Aftercare services CART (crisis services) Case Management Community Referrals Crisis assessments and interventions Flexible family fund Individual and family therapy Medication management Prevention Psychaictric evaluations Psychosocial evaluations

We are located across Acadiana. ACADIANA AREA DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES 302 Dulles Drive Lafayette, LA 70506 Phone: 337-262-5610 Fax: 337-262-5233

NEW IBERIA BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CLINIC 611 West Admiral Doyle Drive New Iberia, LA 70560 Phone: 337-373-0002 Fax: 337-373-0129

OPELOUSAS BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CLINIC

TYLER BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CLINIC

220 South Market Street Opelousas, LA 70570 Phone: 337-948-0226 Fax: 337-948-0399

302 Dulles Drive Lafayette, LA 70506 Phone: 337-262-4100 Fax: 337-262-1146

VILLE PLATTE BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CLINIC

CROWLEY BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CLINIC 1822 West 2nd Street Crowley, LA 70526 Phone: 337-788-7511 Fax: 337-788-7588

312 Court Street Ville Platte, LA 70586 Phone: 337-363-5525 Fax: 337-363-1567 22

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F O O D

D R I N K

KITCHEN ON KLINTON WINGS & THINGS Grab your wings and things at the new location in Franklin By Tre’Jan Vinson

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t is often people ask us “How did you all start?” Then, we go on to explain that we met as fraternity brothers and notice we all wanted to work for ourselves in the long run. It would be easier to work together in the direction of a common goal However, in the grand scheme of things it did not start at our 1st meeting in September of 2016, or even when we all met as frat brothers. It all started made the choice to immerse ourselves in the college experience at UL. Tre’ Jan Vinson Avery Bell, Corey McCoy & Jared Johnson we are all UL alumni who started our very own business while attending UL in the year 2016. When we started the company it had humble begins in the backyard of our home on Clinton street we would host events at the residence to get people to try the food and spread the word. We were only open 2 days a week for 4 hours serving 30- 60 people a week for the 1st 6 months of the company. The Pictured from left to right Jared four of us all had Johnson, Avery Bell, Corey Mccoy, jobs & were in school Tre’Jan Vinson but soon we realized in the spring semester if we wanted the company to truly grow we would have to sacrifice everything had to have everything we want we had to quit our jobs and dedicate ourselves completely to the company.

That decision put us all in a financial bind that would only make us work harder to get from under the burden of only eating our own chicken for 3 years not being able to afford anything else to eat and often not being able to afford to pay our bills. The Mardi Gras of 2016 showed us the true potential of our company. We used the money we made from Mardi Gras to invest into a food truck that would carry our brand across the state to multiple fairs, churches, schools, & events. Now we have grown to a restaurant open 7 days a week serving thousands .Now this year we will embark on a the expansion of our company. KOK wings & things will be expanding to its 2nd location this spring/early summer in Franklin Louisiana. The home of owner Avery Bell where we have brought the food truck every Mardi Gras & summer and they have supported us completely and full heartedly.

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Global

GRUBS Must try international delights! By Chazmyne Jackson

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outh Louisiana is known for its Cajun food, but it’s

a good gumbo of international cooking as well. From Japanese ramen to Cuban grilled meats, experience the world right here in South Louisiana. Step away from the usual southern style food and stand out from the pack with these must try international delights!

FRIED RICE AT JANE’S SEAFOOD & CHINESE RESTAURANT

BUN BO HUE AT BLU BASIL WINE & GRILL This popular Vietnamese dish is a spicy beef noodle soup served with beef broth flavored with lemon grass and chilies served with pork patties, sliced beef brisket and pork hamhock. The warm flavor profiles complement each other in a way that is satisfying on so many levels. 5451 Johnston Street, Lafayette, @blubasilwineandgrill

PABELLON CRIOLLO AT PATACON LATIN CUISINE This tasty Venezuelan dish is made with rice, shredded beef in stew, stewed black beans and fried sweet plantain. Other local favorites include hallacas (traditional Venezuelan tamales), patacones (fried green plantains), empanadas (meat pies) and arepas (white corn meal patties stuffed with your choice of deliciousness). 308 Bertrand Drive, Lafayette, @PataconLLC 24

When the best of traditional Chinese dishes has a love baby with some of the best regional seafood, her name is Jane. The fusion eatery’s menu is laiden with delicious fare, but sometime the test of a place is a straightforward dish most people have tried before. Congratulations Jane’s, you passed the test with flying colors! Your fried rice is too legit to quit. 1201 Jane Street, New Iberia, @JanesSeafood 337M A GA ZIN E.C O M

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SPICY MISO RAMEN AT KATSU RAMEN BAR The spicy miso ramen at Katsu is so good you’ll do a little dance in your seat. This Japanese dish made of spicy miso with pork broth, pork chashu, boiled egg, bean sprouts, bamboo shoots, green onions and sesame seeds. 3809 Amb. Caff. Pkwy., Lafayette, @katsulafayette

CHICKEN SHAWARMA PLATE AT ZEUS CAFÉ

CASSOULET AT LA TRUFFE SAUVAGE Boasting a multicultural menu with heavy French influence, an extensive wine selection and live jazz on Tuesday evenings, La Truffe Sauvage is the complete fine dining experience. Go for one of the chef specials, such as this cassoulet made with duck confit, merguez, lamb shank and white beans. 815 W. Bayou Pines Drive, Lake Charles, @la.t.sauvage

Enjoy a healthy Mediterranean dish of marinated chicken breast, rice, and feta salad served with hummus. Zeus Café is Louisiana owned and consistently good. Give the Lebanese tea a try! Lafayette, Youngsville, Carencro, Breaux Bridge, Crowley and Eunice locations

FISH AND CHIPS AT MACFARLANE’S CELTIC PUB Fish and chips, corned beef and cabbage, and scotch eggs might come to mind when you think of Celtic cuisine, and you’d be right. Find these and other delicacies perfectly executed at MacFarlane’s. Now for a dram of scotch… 417 Ann Street, Lake Charles, @macfarlanespub

SALMON NARUTO AT YAMATO STEAKHOUSE OF JAPAN Where perfect execution and presentation meet, you’ll find the salmon naruto roll. It’s made with fresh salmon, crabmeat, avocado and tobiko wrapped in cucumber. Do you like to go big with your sushi? Grab some friends and order the boat. You won’t regret it. 1434 Heather Drive, Opelousas, @xzosaka V OL U M E 5 IS S U E 2

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F O O D

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WELCOME TO VEGETOPIA

Where plant-based alternatives help shift to more conscious eating habits By Sarah Owens and Lindsey Foreman

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afayette is known for having a plethora of food options, but what about for those of us foodies looking for meatless dishes? Look no further than Vegetopia, a small business run by two Lafayette natives, Sarah Owens and Lindsey Foreman. They host pop-up dinners, cater, vend at local festivals and events, and provide in-home chef services. Vegetopia strives to provide plant-based alternatives to the community, and wants to inspire our culture to shift to more conscious eating habits. Lindsey and Sarah are two vegans that saw a void in the health food market here and aim to fill it with fresh, vibrant, and healthy meals that are still heavy in flavor and creativity. Sarah trained with Plant Lab, a vegan culinary institute, last summer in Barcelona. She and Lindsey create the menus and recipes by pulling inspiration from their travels around the world. They both also love providing Lafayette with vegan versions of traditional Cajun dishes and believe that it's important work to show that flavor need not be sacrificed in exchange for healthy choices. Sarah and Lindsey's project began as a series of backyard dinners throughout the summer of 2018, aiming to create a unique experience unlike any other in Lafayette. They use community tables to encourage strangers to bond over the 5-course meal and have had guests travel from out of town just to experience a Vegetopian Dinner. This past Valentine's Day was their biggest and best dinner event yet, where they hosted over 60 guests along the Vermillion River. In addition to the multi-course vegan and gluten-free dinner, the guests were treated

to a mini-photoshoot curated by a local photographer and were able to have the photos as a memento from the evening. Vegetopia's dinner events not only are designed to support our community, but have transformed into opportunities for local musicians and artists to perform and display their work. Past dinners have provided a stage for local musicians from both Lafayette and New Orleans surrounding areas. Now, in addition to their dinners, Sarah and Lindsey have expanded to catering and festival pop-ups in Lafayette, Baton Rouge, and New Orleans. Most recently they were at the Acadiana Poboy Festival as the only vegetarian/vegan option selling their Cajun Fried Cauliflower Poboy. To keep up with where they'll be popping up next, as well as when their next dinner event will be, follow them on Facebook and Instagram: @vegetopianfood

Sarah Owens and Lindsey Foreman

Founded in 1999 with just 11 employees and 133 accounts, Community First Bank has grown to 112 employees, over 12,000 accounts and 8 locations. Our commitment to providing face-to-face personal service and competitive products is stronger than ever. We’re proud of our involvement in the communities we serve. Thank you for helping us grow. Stop by any branch today and celebrate with us.

www.cfirstbank.com | Breaux Bridge (337) 442-6320 / 1805 Rees St. | Broussard (337) 735-3400 / 801 Albertson Pkwy. | Loreauville (337) 229-8000 / 302 N. Main St. New Iberia (337) 365-6677 / 1101 E. Admiral Doyle Dr. / 403 Emile Verret Rd. / 2919 W. Old Spanish Trail | St. Martinville (337) 394-4049 / 2300 N. Main St. | Youngsville (337) 856-7866 / 2821 E. Milton Ave. 26

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Fried Shrimp on Bun

Shrimp Po-Boy

CHICK’S BURGER SEAFOOD AND PLATE LUNCHES By Adam Chauvin, @adamceats on Instagram Follow Adam on Instagram @adamceats

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risha Mora Mestayer, the second generation restauranteur at Chick’s Burger on Main Street in Baldwin, Louisiana is continuing her family’s tradition. The Fried Shrimp on Bun and Shrimp Po-Boy pictured here are just a couple of them. Serving the Fried Shrimp on Bun with a fork comes from experience and with knowing that the diner may end up with a tasty little snack at the end. Crispy and golden, the medium sized fried shrimp nearly fall out of the bun until the very last bite. For about a couple of dollars more, the Shrimp Po-Boy is fit for a larger appetite. Catfish, crab and oysters also make it onto the sandwich and po-boy buns at Chick’s. A different plate lunch each day of the work week; Shrimp Stew, Roast Beef or Spaghetti and Meatballs are just some of the options made available. Burgers; single, double, cheese, bacon, Hot dogs; plain, chili, cheese and a selection of sides, ice cream, shakes and malts round out the rest of the menu offering an option for anyone, anytime. Dine-in or take it to go in this busy little town less than an hour southeast of Lafayette, Louisiana. Just three minutes off US Highway 90 makes for a quick stop to and from the Big Easy, or anywhere in between.

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H E A LT H

F I T N E S S

OXYGEN THERAPY Alternative therapies and local support for traumatic brain injury sufferers By Lisa Hanchey

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hile living in Washington, D.C., Paul Bosworth found himself choking on chicken fried rice. He passed out, hitting his head multiple times. When he came to, he realized that his speech was garbled and he could not see out of his right eye. He had sustained a TBI – traumatic brain injury. It was September 11, 2007. After being treated and released, Bosworth found that he was not the same. “I was a hot mess,” he reveals. “It hurt to talk, I had debilitating headaches, I couldn’t see straight and I was walking into walls.” Bosworth went being from a top corporate computer sales rep to “a ball of wax.” “I realized my function was gone,” he shares. His doctors offered no solutions. He tried self-guided therapy, but nothing was working Five years after his TBI, Bosworth found himself in New Orleans at a presentation by Dr. Paul Harch, founder of HBOT -- hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Dr. Harch’s website describes HBOT as “a specialized oxygen treatment that enhances the body’s natural healing process.” Afterwards, Bosworth began his search for a hyperbaric oxygen chamber. He found one oxygen chamber at a local hospital, and another HBOT at a dive master’s place in Texas. After doing 60 treatments, called “dives,” Bosworth started improving. “It brought my stamina back, my focus back -- it brought my life back,” Bosworth gushes. “I was able to function more efficiently.” Since 2010, Bosworth has been on a mission to share his knowledge about alternative therapies for brain injury victims. In 2011, he moved back to his hometown of Lafayette, and

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formed a support group called AMAZE. On September 14, AMAZE is hosting a Better Brain Expo at Riverside Church of Christ, located at 200 Southcity Parkway in Lafayette. Among the exhibitors are Dr. Chris Cormier, D.C. and Dr. Angelique Miller, D.C. of Nerve Health Institute; Holistic Health Practitioners; Mythos Apothecary; National Alliance on Mental Illness, and other alternative therapists including CBD manufacturers, massage therapists, music therapists and sleep specialists. Bosworth’s purpose with the expo is to “let people know that this and dozens of other natural therapies are out there,” he explains. “This AMAZE group tells you about how to save yourself. There are resources to enable a better brain.” For more information on AMAZE, visit AMAZE Brain Injury Group on Facebook.

Paul Bosworth AMAZE Brain Injury Group

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H E A LT H

F I T N E S S

RETINOLS

How to avoid common side effects By Ginger Louviere, Medical Aesthetician, Spa Mizan

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etinols used as part of an anti-aging regime is one of the best ingredients found in professional skin care treatments as well as for home use. Not only does it refine the skin, but it increases the production of collagen, helps to fade and even out hyperpigmentation and is very effective in treating acne. Despite all the wonderful benefits that using Retinols can provide, if not used properly and under the strict supervision of a doctor and/or licensed medical aesthetician, Retinols can be very irritating, turning your face red, dry, irritated, flaky and itchy. When this happens, users assume they are allergic to Retinols and can never use them. This could not be further from the truth. The problem is usually using too much too soon.

WAYS TO PREVENT RETINOL ASSOCIATED SIDE EFFECTS: Cleanse Appropriately Cleanse your face thoroughly with a gentle cleanser and lukewarm water. Let your skin dry completely before applying Retinol. Do not use harsh soaps that can further dry out your skin and avoid using mechanical devices and/or scrubs to exfoliate the skin. Start Gradually Slowly allow your skin to acclimate and adjust to Retinol by beginning with a very small amount with a lower percentage of Retinol. Use 2 – 3 times (at night) the first week, gradually working up to every night, if possible. This should take 3 – 4 weeks or more. Don’t rush. Be patient. Once you have completed your product, the goal is to work up to a higher percentage, if possible. Beginning the slow introduction process all over again. If you can never work up to higher percentages of Retinol every night, work with what works for you. The key is to be consistent. Lower percentages used 2-3 times each week consistently can still be very effective. However, using Retinol products once in a while will never accomplish your anti-aging goal. Eye Area The skin around your eye area is much thinner and more sensitive. Only a very small amount of Retinol is necessary, being careful not to get too close to the eye. I do not recommend using Retinols on the eyelids.

SOME COMMON SIDE EFFECTS OF USING RETINOLS ARE: Dry/Tight Skin Retinols can initially cause the skin to feel very dry and tight. Because Retinols accelerate cell turn over which leads to rapid shedding of the top layer of dead skin cells, the skin can feel dry, flaky and tight. This is normal and exactually what you want to encourage. Unless this issue is severe, don’t stop. This is a temporary response before the new surface skin begins to feel soft, supple and smooth. Redness Increased redness is a common experience for some clients when first using Retinols. Because Retinols increase shedding of the top layer of dead skin causing a slight break down of the skin barrier, this can trigger underlying inflammation in the skin. This is temporary. Unless this issue is severe, don’t stop. Itchy Skin Increased shedding of dead skin cells at the outer layer of the skin can led to inflammation and dryness which can cause the skin to feel itchy. This is temporary. Unless this issue is severe, don’t stop. This information should give you a brief overview of the use, benefits and effects of Retinols on the skin. For a professional evaluation of your skin be sure to consult with a medical aesthetician and/or physician who can instruct you on the best use of Retinols on your skin.

Moisturizer Because Retinols can cause the skin to feel dry and flaky, a noncomedigenic (pore clogging) moisturizer will help to replenish the necessary level of hydration. Sunscreen Since Retinols can increase sun sensitivity, the use of a daily sunscreen is more important than ever.

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Ginger Louviere, Medical Aesthetician, Spa Mizan

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DISCOVERING

NEURAL MANIPULATION By Brandon J. Alleman, OMP, CEK, HHP, D.PSc

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he human body is made up of many interrelated components – bones, muscles, internal organs, fascia (thin connective tissue), and nerves. The body’s Nervous System is made up of the brain, spinal cord, and a network of peripheral nerves. It serves as a communication and information system throughout the body and between all tissues. As with other tissues and systems of the body, when the Nervous System becomes dysfunctional in any way it will cause the body to compensate to protect that area. Neural dysfunction hinders the Nervous System’s responsiveness to dysfunction in all other tissues, diminishing the body’s ability to utilize its own, innate self-corrective capabilities. This makes the body’s quest for equilibrium much more difficult. Neural Manipulation, based on the work of Jean-Pierre Barral, D.O. (UK) and Alain Croibier, D.O., is a very soft, hands-on manual therapy used to improve communication within the body thereby alleviating pain related to dysfunction. Underneath all pain or diagnosis is a compensatory pattern created in the body with the initial source of the dysfunction often being far away from where symptoms (pain) is experienced. A Neural Manipulation correction is comprised of a very precise, gentle engagement, mobilization, and elongation of the soft tissue, and more specifically, the nerves. As the source of the problem is released, symptoms will start to release as the body’s innate healing capabilities are freed up. In essence, Neural Manipulation improves communication within the body, thereby alleviating pain related to dysfunction.

Commercial and Residential Architectual Design 337.298 .8 098 parisharchitecture.com

Some conditions potentially benefiting from Neural Manipulation include: Traumatic Brain Injuries / Concussions Whiplash Injuries Headaches and Migraines Lower back pain and Sciatica Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Birth Injuries Neuralgia and Neuritis Tendonitis Sprains and Traumatic Lesions Joint Pain Every person’s situation is different. Therefore, the number of sessions to resolve the source of dysfunction varies with each case. Many individuals experience significant improvement within three to six corrective sessions. The individual and the Practitioner work together to develop the best plan based on the individual’s needs and how the body responds to Neural Manipulation.

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D AT I N G

M A R R I A G E

Creative Date Nights for Busy Couples Keep that special time a priority By Hannah Comeaux, M.A, LPC, LMFT

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t’s easy to lose focus on your relationship when there are so many important things demanding our attention. Dating is an integral part of a successful marriage. Here are a few creative, inexpensive ideas to keep that special time a priority.

View dating like any other appointment that can’t be missed. Get together on the best time and set a reminder. Like anything else on your schedule, it should become a habit.

picking up take-out, then watching a movie at home. If you have kids, trade out nights with other couples taking turns watching each other’s children.

Keep it simple. Tailor your dates to fit your unique relationship. Dates can be planned for any time of day and be as simple as meeting for breakfast, coffee, or a picnic in the park.

Set healthy boundaries. Don’t let daily conversation spill over into date night. Make sure it doesn’t become a time for problem-solving and discussing to-do lists. Focus on the fun of being together. Keep the conversation light - laugh, recall fond memories and make some new ones!

Dating is like any other household expense. Being “wined and dined” is nice occasionally. Plan for it! But the budget doesn’t always allow for an expensive meal. Create budget friendly ways to get that alone time, such as cooking a meal together or

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Hannah Comeaux is a Licensed Professional Counselor and Marriage and Family Therapist. Her passion is working with couples and families to restore and cultivate more meaningful relationships.

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K I D S

P E T S

10 Signs of Anxiety in Your Child Tips to help them cope By Hannah Comeaux, M.A, LPC, LMFT

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hildren often have trouble verbalizing their emotions, and more often tell us what they are feeling through non-verbal behaviors and other symptoms. Neither the parent or child may be aware of the presence of anxiety. Here are a few common signs to help you and your child recognize and deal with it. Avoiding social events, places or activities. Clinging to or not wanting to be separated from parent or caregiver. Constantly worrying or asking a lot of anxious questions. Always tired, trouble sleeping or often waking up with night terrors. Over-obsessing about small things. Easily angered or frustrated, or constantly apologizing. Getting into trouble often or having difficulties at school. Struggles with self-image and what others think of them.

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Frequent complaints of feeling sick, such as stomach pain or headache. Anxiety can often cause physical symptoms or illnesses. Trouble breathing, panic attacks or emotional meltdowns such as crying for no apparent reason. Seeing your child struggle is difficult. Here are a few tips to help them learn to recognize and cope with feelings of anxiety. Take notice of behaviors that are triggered by anxious thoughts instead of immediately jumping into disciplinary mode. Ask questions that will help you identify hidden fears or insecurities. Respond with empathy, a listening ear, reassurance and a hug. Teach simple coping skills like taking a moment to relax, changing negative feelings to positive ones with happy thoughts or memories, journaling, drawing, deep breathing techniques, or moving to a change of scenery. These can all be helpful but take time to find what works best for your child. Anxiety is common in our complicated world. There is no shame in asking for professional help. If you don’t know where to start, reach out to your child’s Primary Care Physician for a referral to a Licensed Therapist or Counselor. Hannah Comeaux is a Licensed Professional Counselor and Marriage and Family Therapist. Her passion is working with couples and families to restore and cultivate more meaningful relationships.

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K I D S

P E T S

By Chazmyne Jackson

Sky Zone Lafayette Kids will have an epic time as they leap through the air at Sky Camp Lafayette! Their summer will be filled with exciting activities like Ultimate Dodgeball, arts and crafts, and movies. Lunch and snacks are provided each day.

Mix It Up (May 27- July 18, 2019) Kids will have a delicious summer at Mix It Up summer camp. Campers will learn basic cooking skills, friendly recipes, kitchen safety and more. Kids will learn to make multicourse lunches each day and enjoy them right after.

Camp hours: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Ages: 6–12 Cost: $180/week or $40/day Location: 3814 Ambassador Caffery, Lafayette, La.

Camp hours: 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Ages: 5–12 Cost: $185 Location: 127 Arnould Boulevard, Lafayette, La., 70506

Kidcam Summer Camps (May 28- August 2, 2019) Celebrate 45 years of Kidcam summers with fun weekly themes and engaging activities. Kidcam promotes friendship, fitness, and creativity with classic camp activities. Each week campers will celebrate retro themes and enjoy field trips, swimming, and sports.

Skate Camp at Fun Nation (May 27- August 9, 2019) Roller skating and lessons for beginners, age appropriate movies/cartoons, craft stations, awesome games, huge indoor playground...and more! A morning snack, lunch and an afternoon snack are provided and campers can bring extra dollars for food and video games. Visit funnationla.com for more information.

Camp hours: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Ages: 4–13 Cost: $130/ week & $50 application fee. Full summer session: $1016 per camper for 10 weeks. Location: First United Methodist Church, 703 Lee Ave. Downtown Lafayette, La., 70501 or Broussard: Elevation Station 240 St Nazaire Rd, Broussard

Camp hours: Monday – Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Ages: 5 and up Cost: $125/week or $100/week if you register for 3 or more weeks, $20 registration fee Location: 4518 W Congress St, Lafayette, LA 70506

The Little Gym of Lafayette (June 3- August 8, 2019) Beat the heat and stay cool at The Little Gym. Kids can avoid bug bites and poison ivy and have a wonderful summer camp experience.

ESA Summer Camp (June 11- July-27, 2019) Campers will enjoy a range of adventures including art, athletics, cooking, science and theater. ESA teachers and special guests will lead campers in exciting games and activities. Campers can explore and try new things.

Camp hours: Monday & Wednesdays 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Tuesdays & Thursdays 11:30 a.m.- 2:30 p.m. Ages: 3–12 Cost: Camps start at $30/day Location: 4422F Ambassador Caffery Parkway Lafayette, La.

Ages: Pre-K to 12th grade Cost: Camp starts at $100 Location: 721 E. Kaliste Saloom Rd. Lafayette, La. 70508

Hangtime TNT (June 3- July 26, 2019) Let your kids release their energy on recreational trampolines and exciting tumbling classes. Campers can play games, make crafts and enjoy movies. Snacks are provided for all campers. Camp hours: Full and half days available Ages: 3–12 Cost: $125/full day week or $75/half day week Location: 115 Lions Club Road, Scott, La. 70583

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Crawfish Aquatics Hop in the waters at Crawfish Aquatics! Use the summer to help your kids learn to swim. With a proven curriculum and fun instructors, they’ll be swimming like fish. Swim lesson ages: 6 months & up Costs: $130-$140 two-week rate Location: 107 Susan Street Lafayette, La. 70506

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Blue Ribbon Camp (June 3- July 26, 2019) Build confidence and enjoy a positive week of exciting activities. Blue Ribbon Camp is dedicated to the development of children and making sure each camper leaves with memories that will stay for life. Camp hours: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Ages: Pre-K4 through Eighth grade Costs: $195 per child/week sibling discount available Location: 1821 Academy Road Grand Coteau, La. 70541

Wonderland Performing Arts (June 10 -July 18, 2019) A summer filled with wonderful camps. Artistic fun filled activities and friendships await. Camp hours: vary Ages: 3-12 Cost: $100-$225 Location: 227A Bendel Road, Lafayette, La. 70503

Camp Chorale (June 10- June 28, 2019) Music is in the air this summer. Visit Camp Chorale for an adventure full of singing, playing, and friendship.

Painting With a Twist (April 22- June) Have a paint filled summer! Professional artists guide campers in creating a finished work of art every day. Painting supplies and clean-up is provided.

Camp hours: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Ages: 5-12 Costs: Early registration $150 after April 30th $180 Location: 260 La Rue France, Suite 205 Lafayette, La. 70508

Camp hours: 9 a.m.- 12 p.m. Ages: check local studio for age restric tions Cost: vary Location: Shreveport, La. or Mandeville, La.

Nutty Scientists of Acadiana Have fun and learn at once! Nutty Scientists of Acadiana has a theme for each day and campers will be engaged with education and entertainment.

Jungle Book and Annie Kids (hosted by Music Academy of Acadiana) (June 10th-22, July 8- 20, 2019) Campers will learn dancing & choreography, vocals & music, acting & scene work, and have fun more fun with arts & crafts! Cast shirts and paint shoes based on the show are provided. These camps will train your kids for the big stage!

Camp hours: 7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Ages: 5-11 Cost: $175/week no lunch or $200/week with lunch Location: 1042 Camellia Blvd Suite 17, Lafayette, La. 70508  Acadiana Karate (July 15- July 26, 2019) Action packed martial arts camp with field trips, drills, games and fun activities. Campers learn safety, teamwork, respect, confidence and more. Bully self-defense and stranger danger included. Camp hours: 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Ages: 6-12 Cost: $209/week (before May 1) $269/week regularly Location: 2464 West Congress Street Lafayette, La. 70506 Hello Dancer (June 3- Aug 2, 2019) Dance with mermaids, fly with fairies and wander through wonderful lands. Hello Dancer presents multiple camps this summer and they are all filled with magical fun.

Camp hours: 8 a.m.- 12 p.m. Ages: 5- 15 Cost: $200/one camp or $300/ both camps Location: 100 William O Stutes Blvd. Suite D., Lafayette, LA 70506 Zoosiana’s Jungle Camp (May 27-July 22, 2019) Campers will have daily zoo tours, Safari Express train rides, Feed-the-Parakeets interactions and more! An adventure awaits at Zoosiana’s Jungle Camp. Camp hours: 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Ages: 5-12 Cost: $135/child per week $25 deposit Location: 5601 Hwy 90 E, Broussard, La. 70518

Ages: 3-12 Cost: vary from $90- $200 Location: 114 Rena Drive, Lafayette, La. 70503 Music Garden of Lafayette (June 3- Aug 9, 2019) Enjoy camps filled with music and movement, singing and musical games! Campers learn the basics of music and explore multiple instruments. Have fun with live performances by guest musicians. Camp hours: 9 a.m.- 3p.m. Ages: 4-9 Cost: $190 week long or $125 3 day camp or $50/day or $30/half day Location: 1424 Saint John Lafayette, La. 70506

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K I D S

P E T S

Kabuki Dancers Artists with a message By Jude Romero

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iscovering that you have a talent is an amazing feeling. Especially when you can use that talent for change. If you would have told me 20 years ago that I would be using dance to capture the attention of thousands of kids to deliver positive messages ranging from never giving up to anti-bullying, I would have said, “Sorry, but you got the wrong guy…” I mean, the thought of getting up in front of one person, much less a crowd of people to speak AND dance would have been enough nightmare fuel for weeks!

Students presenting a robotic solution

The Double Take

Novel robotics club teaches perseverance and team work By Sevie Zeller

M My name is Jude Romero, original member of Kabuki Kru and performer for Kabuki Dancers. I began b-boying (breakdancing) in 1998. Back then, all I wanted was to make a few new friends, learn some cool moves, and just MAYBE impress someone along the way. Some of us excel at sports, school, or business, but I always had an interest for unconventional things. The kind of things your parents would tell you to stop wasting your time on. And they did. Luckily, I was able to find some other “time wasters” that shared my love of unconventional interests and a bond was formed. Kabuki has had many members over the years. Early on, the focus was purely on getting the next big move or competing with others to prove who’s the best. That focus would last for the majority of my dance career. It wasn’t until fairly recently, when I started performing alongside some great people in the public library and school systems, that focus would change. Currently I work with Terrance Morgan, Torrez Hypolite, and Collin Galyean to create and perform our programs for kids of all ages through the state. Together we use dance, drums and spoken word to uniquely entertain and spread positivity to our audience. I am amazed at the impact we have been able to deliver and the response has been overwhelmingly positive.

Torrez Hypolite, Jude Romero, Terrance Morgan & Collin Galyean

I would like to thank everyone on behalf of Kabuki that has supported us. You allow us to do what we do, and we are exploring ways to reach even more with our work. kabukidancers@gmail.com or @kabukidancers on all social networks.

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organ Mercado and Taylor Wallace are two south Louisiana teachers who are used to garnering attention. They are identical twins, after all, who both teach at the same school and run the fun social media handle @doubledutyteachers. Lately, however, the attention hasn’t been on which twin is which. It’s been on the forward thinking, innovative work the duo has done in launching Woodvale Elementary School’s Robotics Club (with a huge helping hand from Jorey Krupa of Barnes and Noble). The gist of novel engineering is that the students will read a story and then use coding, engineering design and robotics to solve problems for the characters they read about. The work over the course of six weeks culminates in a presentation about their “client” and the solution to their problem. It’s quite impressive. The two core values Mercado and Wallace instill in robotics club are perseverance and teamwork. “At the end of the day, no matter what career path our students choose, we want them to know how to encounter a problem and overcome it without giving up. And we want them to be able to work graciously with people.”

The sisters continued, “A bonus is that through coding, we’re able to introduce them to a career option they may have never considered before. Coding sounds hard to the average kid, but when we break it down, give them the resources, and let them explore - they really surprise themselves. Coding is a “language” that’s becoming more and more common. Exposing our students to these ideas now gives them an advantage in the future.” One can’t help but feel hopeful when talking to top-notch educators such as Mercado and Wallace. They truly see a future that starts with the amazing kids in their classrooms. “We want them to be able to take risks and “fail” safely. That way we can encourage them to try again. And they will try again because someone believed in them and said they could do it. It’s never too early for that to happen, and if we can help make it happen in 4th grade, we’ve done our job.”  Robotics clubs are an empowering experience that is catching a lot of attention. Area schools have kits and Dash robots available and can contact Jorey Krupa at crm2730@bn.com for more information.

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Heartworm Prevention

Mosquitos are a year-round threat in South Louisiana By Dr. Liz Waguespack and Dr. Molly Waltman

meal (i.e. a bite) and then go through a molt stage in the mosquito. Heartworms must travel through a mosquito to mature. After their molt, when the mosquito feeds on another animal, the heartworm is deposited and infects the new animal. Once in the new animal, the microfilaria go through more molt stages before becoming an adult. During these molts, the heartworm is migrating through the tissues of the animal until it ends up in the lungs. This period from mosquito bite to full adult takes around six months. Current heartworm tests are used to detect pregnant female worms. These tests cannot detect if a dog has been infected until the adult heartworms begin producing babies. This is why it is possible for a dog to test negative and six months later test positive while being on preventatives. PREVENTATIVES

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ost people have heard of heartworms in dogs. Some people know how they are transmitted and how to prevent them. This article aims to cover this disease a little more in depth. Heartworms are a parasite that live more in the lungs than the heart of an infected animal. The body sees these worms as foreign invaders and produces an inflammatory response in the small airways of the lungs.

TRANSMISSION

Heartworms are spread by mosquitoes, and in South Louisiana, there are a lot of those. Adult heartworms live in infected dogs, coyotes and foxes and produce lots of baby heartworms called microfilaria. Microfilaria are sucked up by a mosquito during a blood

There are many safe, effective heartworm preventatives available. Most are monthly pills or a topical that will stop the microfilaria during the early molt stages close to when it is deposited by the mosquito. There is also a shot which lasts for six months. Your veterinarian can go over which product is best for your pet and your situation. Preventatives are much cheaper (and safer) than treatment. The damage done in the lungs from heartworms can improve but is never fully reversible. This means once a dog is infected by heartworms there will always be some damage. It only takes one mosquito for your dog to become infected. All dogs, even indoor-only dogs, should be on heartworm prevention year-round in South Louisiana.

SPACE AVAILABLE NEXT TO MARCELLO’S CALL NOW TO INQUIRE • CENTER PARK

James L. Plumley, Jr. L I C E N S E D R E A L E S TAT E B R O K E R

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S P O R T S

A D V E N T U R E

McNeese Cowboys COWBOYS BASEBALL & COWGIRLS SOFTBALL By Brandon Comeaux Photos courtesy of Pam LaFosse & mcneesesports.com

Giving Back To The Community The McNeese athletic program takes pride in volunteering for community service projects.

SOFTBALL The McNeese Cowgirls season may have not gotten off to the start many fans expected, but these big road wins may help the team get back to the NCAA postseason if they can get on a roll in Southland Conference play.

Special Olympics

McNeese football, soccer, women’s basketball, and Track and Field athletes volunteered by helping out with the event.

A two-hour trip out west paid off big for McNeese as they came back from an early 3-0 deficit to pound the University of Houston 13-5. It took an RBI double in the top of the 9th inning for the Cowboys to send the game into extra innings. Once the bats came alive, there was no stopping the McNeese hitting attack as they scored 10 runs in the 14th inning to earn the victory over a Houston team that would go on to win a series against a nationally-ranked Arizona team days later.

Avenging a loss in extra innings just two days earlier, McNeese scored 3 runs in the 1st inning and never looked back in defeating nationally-ranked Texas A&M by the score of 3-1.

Cowgirls Snap 10Game Losing Streak To Cajuns

Rowdy’s Readers

Promotes literacy by creating a reading program with students in the Southwest Louisiana region. (In partnership with Cheniere Energy) Contact Information: Email: msload@mcneese.edu Call: 337-562-4299

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The McNeese Cowboys has had some huge wins on the road this season as they look to improve upon last season’s losing record and try to make some noise in the Southland Conference Tournament.

February 20 Cowboys Comeback To Slay Cougars In 14 Innings

February 17 Cowgirls Jump Out To Quick Lead As They Wrangle The Aggies

In a back-and-forth contest that was not decided until the 11th inning, McNeese was victorious over highly-ranked Louisiana by a score of 5-4. The Cowgirls’ victory also gave the Cajuns their first home loss of the season.

BASEBALL

March 26 McNeese Mauls LSU In Shutout The Cowboys continued some recent success in Baton Rouge by shutting out the Tigers 2-0. In its 3rd win in the last 4 years over LSU, McNeese became the first non-conference opponent to shut them out since they did it to LSU in 2016. 39


S P O R T S

A D V E N T U R E

Ragin Cajuns The Louisiana Ragin’ Cajuns baseball team and its fans have had some incredible moments this season at the “Tigue.”

MAGIC AT “TIGUE” MOORE By Brandon Comeaux • Photos courtesy of ragincajuns.com

February 17 Cajuns Notch HardFought Victory Against Texas Playing host to one of the most legendary programs in college baseball, the Cajuns earned their first victory of the season by holding on against the Longhorns. Despite building an 8-1 lead, Louisiana had to fight until the end. With the bases loaded for Texas, Austin Bradford struck out two batters to end the contest and preserve the win.

March 2 Cajuns Capitalize On Mistakes In Sweep Over Maryland In Game One of a doubleheader, Daniel Lahare took advantage of a fielding error by the Terrapins to

break a 3-3 tie in the 14th inning as the Cajuns clinched the victory. In Game Two of a 1-1 ballgame, Sebastian Toro’s hit with the bases loaded helped bring in Teurlings Catholic product Hayden Cantrelle as an errant throw allowed Cantrelle to easily score the winning run in the bottom of the 9th inning.

March 26 Cajuns Beat Tulane With Walk-Off Home Run Freshman Colton Frank gets his first collegiate hit in a big way. In front of the home crowd at Russo Park, the LaGrange product broke a 6-6 tie in the bottom of the 9th inning with a blast over the left field wall to give the Cajuns a thrilling win over the Green Wave.

“Tigue” Moore Field

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YVETTE THE ARCHITECT In a Friday night home matchup against the Troy Trojans, the Louisiana Ragin’ Cajuns athletic program decided to honor its own legend by naming the field in her honor – Yvette Girouard Field at Lamson Park. Each year, the softball program competes with the best of the best, and this year is no exception. But, it was the vision of Girouard that laid the groundwork and set a winning standard for the school. As the 1980s began, college softball was not the incredible sporting event Former Lady Cajuns head softball coach it is now. It was a game Yvette Girouard and current Ragin’ Cajuns without much fanfare and head softball coach Gerry Glasco. without much support. But Girouard loved the sport and wanted to bring it to then-USL, her alma mater and hometown university. She built the program from the ground up, taking a program without much resources and facilities, and turned them into a national power. Over 20 seasons with the Cajuns, Girouard led the program to three Women’s College World Series appearances. She later went on to lead the LSU Tigers softball program to two Women’s College World Series appearances in 11 seasons. In doing so, she became one of only three coaches to take two teams to the Women’s College World Series. During her 31-year college coaching career, Girouard amassed 1,285 victories and was named Louisiana Coach of the Year thirteen times. She was also inducted into the Louisiana Sports Hall of Fame in 2015. It was only fitting that the Architect was honored in the park of the program she built.

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S P O R T S

A D V E N T U R E

Tiger Happenings By Curt Guillory

LSU Well Represented in AllLouisiana Basketball Team

Finnegan

Reid

SHE’S Gymtastic

And the Women….

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Photo by: lsusports.net

Not to be outdone by the boys, the LSU Lady Tigers Basketball team’s Ayana Mitchell and Khayla Pointer have been named to the 2019 Louisiana Sports Writers Association’s AllLouisiana Basketball Team. Redshirt junior Mitchell posted a smoking 56.3% field goal percentage which lead the team. With 16 double doubles, 4 offensive rebounds per game, 6.5 defensive rebounds per game, 11 steals, and 13.5 points, it is little doubt why she was an All-SEC First Team selection. To her credit, Pointer was an All-Louisiana third team selection. Her very impressive season included, 12.5 points per game, 4.5 assists, and 1.7 steals. Hardcourt excellence!

Photo by: lsusports.net

Photo by: lsusports.net

Two LSU Campuses produced members of the Louisiana Sports Writers Association’s All-Louisiana Basketball Team. Tremont Waters was named as the association’s 2019 Men’s College Basketball Player of the Year; Naz Reid brought home the Freshman of the Year honors; and coach Larry Cordaro (LSU Alexandria) was named as the Coach of the Year. Waters averaged 15.1 points, 5.9 assists, 3.0 steals, and 2.9 rebounds per game and led his Tigers to an SEC regular season championship, and NCAA sweet 16 birth. Coach Cordaro led his team to a 30-4 season, and 17-1 in Red River Athletic Conference play with a NAIA Tournament appearance for the fifth consecutive time finishing in the quarterfinals. Reid was named to the All-SEC Freshman team after averaging 13.7 points and 7.2 rebounds per game. The young phenom posted double digit scores in 21 games, and had a season high 29 points in two games this season. Tigers, tigers everywhere!

The Women’s Collegiate Gymnastics Association has announced their Central Region Gymnast of the Year, and LSU’s senior Sarah Finnegan gets the honor for the second time. Setting the school record for all-around wins Finnegan recorded 6 perfect 10’s in route to being named for the honor. Sarah also holds the career record for balance beam titles with 25. Great tumbling Tigers!

LSU Athletics and Toyota have partnered to provide one lucky fan a once in a lifetime experience with the Toyota Big Catch Sweepstakes. The winner of the Toyota Big Catch Sweepstakes will receive a weekend fishing trip for two (2) with LSU Baseball Head Coach Paul Mainieri, a VIP Experience for the LSU vs. Texas A&M Football game on Saturday, Nov. 30, 2019, and two (2) season tickets for the 2020 LSU Baseball season. The VIP Experience for the LSU Football vs. Texas A&M game will include two (2) game tickets, two (2) pregame sideline passes, two (2) pregame VIP hospitality passes for the LSU Sports Properties' hospitality tent in Tiger One Village and one-night hotel accommodations for two people. Entry to the sweepstakes will begin on April 5, 2019, and remain open until Nov. 24, 2019. Enter for your chance to win at: https://www.buyatoyota.com/gst/landing/Sponsorships/LSU.page 41


LONG DRIVE STM Golfer Matthew Weber

S P O R T S

A D V E N T U R E

Young local amateur sets sights on big gold dreams By Jared Conques

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mateurs practice until they get it right, professionals practice until they can’t get it wrong. If there is any truth to this adage, then big things are in store for Matthew Weber, the golf signee for the Louisiana Ragin Cajuns golf team. While Weber has been swinging a club ever since he could walk, he didn’t actually start playing until he was 7 years old. It was this early start in the sport he loves that has seen him accomplish amazing feats in his young career. Some of his accolades include placing second in the Louisiana amateur tournament and placing third in the prestigious Future Masters tournament, an event that sees some of the best young talent from around the nation. Weber is currently preparing for the LHSAA State Tournament with his teammates at STM, practicing and playing as often as possible to hopefully bring home a championship to cap off his high school career. When asked about his dream round of golf, he says he wishes he could play a round with his dad, Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy. If Weber keeps up his pace, he just may find himself in the final round of a PGA tournament, playing with two out of three golfers mentioned!

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Cowboys, Canyons and Cadillacs Saddle up and head to Amarillo By Theresa Russell

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he desolate Texas Panhandle conjures memories of the Wild West and Amarillo focuses on its cowboy heritage, both as a hardworking lifestyle and with some quirky elements sprinkled in just for a smile. One of those more fun elements is in the form of art. The Cadillac Ranch, with its partially buried Cadillacs in the middle of a field is an interactive art exhibit. Visitors bring spray paint to leave their personal graffiti mark on this popular attraction. Mimicking Cadillac Ranch, a field of planted combines called Combine City gives passersby just a view as barbed wire fence surrounds the site.What a curious, but clever way to dispose of old farm equipment. Outside Amarillo, Palo Duro State Park showcases part of the second largest canyon in the US.Stretching for 120 miles with a depth of 800 feet, much of the canyon is on private property; however,within the state park, significant geologic features, campgrounds and adventures await the visitor. Mosticonic, the giant hoodoo known as The Lighthouse can be viewed from the visitor center or via a hike. During the summer, Texas The Outdoor musical, plays in the amphitheater. Relaying the story of the settlement of the Texas Panhandle, the musical plays against the natural backdrop of the cliffs of the canyon. High atop the amphitheater, a lone horseman carrying a Texas flag appears, marking the beginning of the family-friendly show. Fireworks light the sky at the finale of the production that features performers, mostly college students from around the continent.

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Everything in Texas is big and that includes the gigantic 72-ounce steak served at the Big Texanrestaurant. Guests lured by the offer of getting this dinner for free if they eat not only the steak, but also a baked potato and salad, dine on a raised staged with giant clocks counting down the hour allowed to complete this gargantuan task. Surprisingly, more women than men get their meal for free; the unsuccessful pay the $72 charge, but take home a doggie bag as a reminder of their attempt. Amarillo remembers its roots with several museums. The Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum, the largest history museum in Texas, shares a story of life on the prairie from past to contemporary times of life in the Texas Panhandle. Exhibits feature a variety of topics, including a pioneer town, Texas art, geology, paleontology, petroleum history, windmills, the American Indian and more. The Headdress of Comanche chief, Quanah Parker, is a prized artifact on display. Horse lovers will enjoy the American Quarter Horse Museum And Hall of Fame Which Focuses On the lineage of the quarter horse. Bringing the cowboy lifestyle to those unfamiliar are ranch rodeos, longhorn drives, and boot and saddle makers. Road trip fans drive along the short stretch of Route 66 that passes through Amarillo, which is just a short distance away from the midpoint of this romanticized route. The friendly locals welcome you whether you want to view the art-deco architecture, watch a rodeo, explore Route 66 or immerse yourself in nature. Saddle up and head to Amarillo.

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L E I S U R E

2019 F E STIVAL I NTE R NATI O NAL D E LO U I S I A N E Celebrate culture through music, art and food

E V E N T S

MUST-SEE P E R FO R MAN C E S Alsarah & The Nubatones

By Sevie Zeller

Dobet Gnahoré April 25 at 10:30 p.m. at Scene LUS International April 26 at 8:30 p.m. at Scene Laborde Earles Law Firm – Fais Do Do

Clear your calendar April 24-28 for the largest international music and arts festival in the United States. This community-loved and community-supported Festival International de Louisiane touts music, arts and crafts, street animation, performances and more that celebrate everything French, Cajun, and Creole heritage. GET THE APP Everything you need for Festival International is in one app! Find details of your favorite artist. Pull up the schedule between food vendor pit stops. Easily navigate to your destination with the site map. You can even top off your RFID wristband so that you don’t have to reach for your wallet. Yes, it’s that convenient!

Les Hotesses D’Hilaire April 26 at 6:30 p.m. at Scene Laborde Earles Law Firm – Fais Do Do April 27 at 3:30 p.m. at Pavillion Du Nouveau Brunswick April 27 at 7 p.m. at Scene TV5Monde – Lafayette April 28 at 2:45 p.m. at Pavillion Du Nouveau Brunswick Dobet Gnahoré Mdou Moctar

STREET ANIMATION YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS Bagad Plougastell Homebase: France – Bretagne Genre: Breton traditional music (Pipe Band) Performance: April 25-28 at 1 p.m. Lemon Bucket Orkestra Homebase: Ontario Genre: Folk Performance: April 28 at 1 p.m.

Alsarah & The Nubatones April 25 at 5:45 p.m. at Scene LUS International April 26 at 5:30 p.m. at Scene TV5Monde – Lafayette

Boukman Eksperyans

Boukman Eksperyans April 27 at 8:45 p.m. at Scene LUS International Mdou Moctar April 26 at 5 p.m. at Scene Laborde Earles Law Firm – Fais Do Do April 27 at 1:30 p.m. at Scene LUS International Moonlight Benjamin April 26 at 8:45 p.m. at Scene LUS International April 27 at 4:30 p.m. at Scene Laborde Earles Law Firm – Fais Do Do

Les Hotesses D’Hilaire

COURIR DU FESTIVAL 5K Winding through the streets of downtown Lafayette, participation in the Courir Du Festival is a great way to keep FIL a ticketless, community-driven music and art festival. One of the best parts is crossing the finish line right into international music, delicious food and cold drinks. Register for the April 27th race at festivalinternational.org/5k. 44

Moonlight Benjamin

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LOCAL PLAYGROUNDS Louisiana staycations By Cheré Coen Lt. Gov. Billy Nungesser travels the world promoting Louisiana but this year he’s also touting the Bayou State at home. Nungesser hopes that Louisiana residents will spend some of their 2019 vacation days traveling the unique state in a Louisiana “staycation,” suggesting visiting everything from beaches and state parks to the charming historic Natchitoches. “I promise you won’t be disappointed,” he said at a recent gathering. “We’re working hard to promote all of Louisiana, not just the big cities.” Here are some ideas to consider as the weather warms and the great outdoors beckons.

Louisiana Beaches Several state parks front the Gulf of Mexico or lie close to the water and make for easy trips to the beach. Grand Isle remains the most popular with Gulf access in addition to top fishing and a great migratory bird watching. Holly Beach in the southwest offers 30 miles of Gulf views and camping is allowed on the beach. In addition, there’s Cypremort Point on Vermilion Bay.

Holly Beach

400 Festivals Photo Credit: Louisiana Office of Tourism

Near the border with Alabama lies the sleepy town of Pascagoula, but it’s the quiet that makes this weekend getaway so special. Add the historic Grand Magnolia to the mix and you may choose to open a bottle of wine and never leave the veranda. Don’t miss the LaPointe Krebs Museum, one of the oldest buildings in the Mississippi Valley, built in 1757, and pause for dinner at Scranton’s, another local landmark.

Cypremort Point

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Toledo Bend Yes, Toledo Bend is known for its outstanding bass fishing, but there are two state parks bookending the South’s largest manmade lake and both offer hiking, cabins and water access. We enjoyed a cabin at South Toledo Bend State Park north of Lake Charles with a full kitchen, two bedrooms sleeping six (couch can add another person or two) and stunning lake views. Hiking South Toledo Bend trails and a nature center were close by, a perfect weekend escape for families, with day visits only a modest fee.

NOMA

No visit to the New Orleans Museum of Art is complete without a stop at the Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden with its 64 exquisite sculptures — many of which children will delight to see — in five acres beneath towering ancient trees in City Park. But the Sculpture Garden is about to get better. A six-acre addition with 26 new works will open on May 15 with two new works commissioned for the The Sculpture Garden site: a 60-foot-long mosaic wall by artist Teresita Fernández and a glass bridge by Elyn Zimmerman. For information, visit https://noma.org/sculpture-garden/background/.

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L E I S U R E

E V E N T S

THE FUN EVENTS IN THE 337! By Chazmyne Jackson & Cheryl Robichaux

Latino Pulse CINCO DE MAYO Celebrate Mexican culture with food, music, friends and family. Embrace the diversity of Lafayette and find new friends during the celebration. Don’t miss out on the chance to make good memories so mark your calendars for these 337 happenings. ACLA presents Latino Pulse at Rock’n’Bowl de Lafayette A Cinco de Mayo Celebration! A night to celebrate the Latin American culture and more. Music by Latino Pulse, Salsa Dance Lesson by Lou from Dance Around the World Academy, DJ Victor from Club 337, culture exhibits and more. Brought to you by the ACLA Latin Music Festival. Date: May 4, 2019 Time: 6 p.m. Location: Rock ‘n’Bowl de Lafayette, 905 Jefferson St., Lafayette, LA 70501 Cinco de Mayo at Agave Youngsville Join them Amigeauxs where the Border meets the Bayou! Mingle over margaritas, music and delicious Mexican cuisine.

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Date: May 4, 2019 Time: 9 p.m. – midnight Location: 2810 E. Milton Ave. #101, Lafayette St, Youngsville, LA Cinco de Mayo- Chris Trahan Band Visit La Carreta on May 5 to celebrate Cinco de Mayo with the Chris Trahan Band! Food, drinks, and live music will guarantee a good time. Date: May 5, 2019 Time: 6 p.m. – 9 p.m. Location: 400 Jefferson St. Lafayette, LA 70501 Cinco de Mayo at Agave Downtown Enjoy live music, specials, and giveaways all day at Agave Downtown. See Rory Suire, Vintage Band, and Chubby Carrier and the Bayou Swamp Band perform! Date: May 5, 2019 Time: 11 a.m. – 11 p.m. Location: 200 E. Vermilion St., Lafayette, LA, 70501

Ray Boudreaux Cinco de Mayo at Agave Parc Lafayette Check out the soulful, swamp pop sound of Ray Boudreaux, a singer/songwriter from South Louisiana who finished in the top 7 on season 5 of NBC’s The Voice. Date: May 5, 2019 Time: 7 p.m. Location: 1919 Kaliste Saloom Rd. #301, Lafayette, LA 70508

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HORSE RACING Evangeline Downs

It’s Thoroughbred Season at Evangeline Downs! Don’t miss out on tense, action-packed live horse racing. Place your bets and enjoy 84 days of heart pounding showdowns. Can’t be there in person? No worries! Visit Evangeline Downs website where a live feed is broadcasted, and replays are available. Evangeline Downs Racetrack & Casino offers free club house admission with a purchase of food and drink, free valet and general admission. Ils sont partis!

RACING DATES: April 3-April 6 April 10-13 April 17-20 April 24-27 May 1-4 May 8-11 May 15-18 May 22-25 May 29- June 1 June 5-8 June 12-15

June 19-22 June 26-29 July 3-6 July 10-13 July 17-20 July 24-27 July 31- August 3 August 7-10 August 14-17 August 21-24

www.evdracing.com 2235 Creswell Lane Extension Opelousas, LA 70570 FESTIVALS Breaux Bridge Crawfish Festival Crawfish, music and competition will leave you with a full belly and good memories. Don’t miss this three-day celebration! Date: May 3 - May 5, 2019 Time: 9 a.m. – 11 p.m. Location: Parc Hardy 1290 Rees St. Breaux Bridge, LA, 70517

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Louisiana Pirate Festival Party like a pirate in Lake Charles! This seafaring pirate festival has events on land and sea. Live performances and carnival rides await! Date: May 2 - May 5, 2019 Time: 12 p.m. – 11 p.m. Location: 900 Lakeshore Drive Lake Charles, LA, 70602

Spring Swing Zydeco and R&B Festival Swingout to Zydeco music in downtown Lafayette Parc International. Fill your day with great food and drinks during this Mother’s day weekend. Date: May 11, 2019 Time: 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. Location: 200 Garfield Street Lafayette, LA, 70501 47 47


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Danielle Nester Faulk: Fine Art & Gifts www.daniellenesterfaulk.com

by Danielle Nester Faulk

Steel Magnolias


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MERCHANDISE

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LIVE AT L’AUBERGE AT THE EVENT CENTER

DENNIS DEYOUNG

THE MUSIC OF STYX

SATURDAY, MAY 18 Doors open at 7pm Show starts at 8pm Reserved Seating

LITTLE RIVER BAND

URBAN COWBOY REUNION

SATURDAY, JUNE 8 Doors open at 7pm Show starts at 8pm Reserved Seating Tickets start at $40

Tickets start at $35

MICKEY GILLEY & JOHNNY LEE

SATURDAY, JUNE 22 Doors open at 7pm Show starts at 8pm Reserved Seating Tickets start at $30

/LAubergeBatonRouge

@LAubergeBR

@LAubergeBR

Must be 21 years of age or older to enter Casino and Event Center. Tickets may be purchased at all Ticketmaster outlets, ticketmaster.com, Sundries, mylauberge.com, or by calling Ticketmaster. Subject to availability. See mychoice ® Center for details. Management reserves the right to cancel, modify or refuse this off er without notice at any time. Prices are subject to change and based on availability.Offer not valid for self-exclusion program enrollees in jurisdictions which Penn National Gaming, Inc operates or who have been otherwise excluded from the participating property. ©2019 Penn National Gaming, Inc. All rights reserved.

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 800.522.4700.

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337 Magazine Vol. 5. Issue 2  

337 Magazine presents Cajun Nation: Spotlight on Henderson, Day in Downtown: The wonders of Franklin, KidsCamps: Highlights of summer fun. A...

337 Magazine Vol. 5. Issue 2  

337 Magazine presents Cajun Nation: Spotlight on Henderson, Day in Downtown: The wonders of Franklin, KidsCamps: Highlights of summer fun. A...

Profile for 337media
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