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March 2016 | TheSevenSpot.com ISSUE

#9

Local Food

Celebration and Contemplation

Caroline Smith

On music, touring & strength

Mississippi Steamroll Woodcutting Goes Big


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SEVEN | Issue #9 | March, 2016

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SEVEN | thesevenspot.com |


Inside

PUB INFO

6 Urbanist 7 (Almost) Famous Locals

About SEVEN explores the dynamic community, culture and arts world of the Seven Rivers Region. Contact

8 The Arts

Phone: 608-780-3853 Email: contact@thesevenspot.com

14 Entertainment

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Web: TheSevenSpot.com

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18 Sip n’ Taste

24 Business

Twitter: @thesevenspot

Support Advertising sustains the celebration of musicians, festivals, thespians, artists, and the vibrant community that calls the Seven Rivers Region home. Phone: 608-780-3853 Email: michelle@thesevenspot.com

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26 Health & Fitness 27 Listings 29 Volunteer Listings

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Facebook: TheSevenSpot NEW! Instagram: thesevenspot

21 Limelight

A note

Mail: PO Box 762, Onalaska, WI 54650

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30 Writer’s Block

from the publisher March 2016 marks the month that SEVEN evolves into the world of online media. The pages of SEVEN have held many stories that came alive for readers… building community, piquing interest in regional happenings and creating excitement for our cultural lore. In print, we will continue to grow, but now our readers can enjoy even more beautiful imagery in online galleries; share our articles with friends and family; and access up-to-date event listings on our online calendar. In addition, readers will find: restaurant and bar listings with reviews and ratings; giveaways, contests and deals; and discussion forums and community information. We’re excited to invite you to our revitalized site at www.TheSevenSpot.com! This month, in addition to our columns, we’re discussing food – systems, growers, purveyors, epicureans. Personally, I grow what food I allow time for and appreciate every person in the cycle of food creation. But there’s more to this dialogue. There’s your story. We invite you to visit our website to add to the conversation as we release our articles online throughout the month.

This publication is printed monthly by Humble Mountain Press, LLC and distributed throughout the Seven Rivers Region. Readers are encouraged to verify event information with organizations and businesses directly. Humble Mountain Press, LLC does not necessarily endorse the claims or contents of advertising or editorial materials. Though SEVEN is free, please take just one copy. Anyone removing papers in bulk from our distribution points will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law. Copyright 2016 by Humble Mountain Press, LLC. All rights reserved. All material, including artwork, advertisements, and editorial, may not be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher.

TheSevenSpot.com

As always, I want to thank every single person who has worked alongside me to make SEVEN possible. Every one of you rocks! p.s. Extra thanks to my mom, fiancé and kids for knocking it out of the park! Love you guys! Michelle L. Jerome

On the Cover Cover Photo: Dahli Durley This month’s cover displays a handcrafted meal from the DAMN TASTY of La Crosse, Wis. The business creates food for delivery, catering and events. This photograph by Dahli Durley was chosen because it hints at the simple beauty of a well-made bowl of soup and the comfort that homemade bread provides. These pages of SEVEN discuss aspects in the world of food…and this image entices us to learn more.


Deborah Nerud Associate Editor & Writer

Joseph O’Brien Writer

Briana Rupel Writer

Austin Sargent Intern & Writer

Michael Scott Writer

Theresa Smerud Photographer

Jess Witkins Writer

Todd Wohlert Writer & Calendar Editor

Haakon Nelson Writer

A.J. Moore Writer

Samantha Loomis Writer

Andrew Londre Writer

Jason Keeney Crew Chief & Graphic Designer

Michelle L. Jerome Crew Captain

Bob Good Photographer

Parker Forsell Writer

Dahli Durley Photographer

Joerg Droll Writer

Leah Call Copy Editor & Writer

Chad Berger Photographer

The CREW

The local talent dedicated to bringing you a fresh look at our region.


URBANIST

PERSONAL INJURY:

DENSIFICATION AS A SOLUTION

COMPENSATION FOR YOUR LOSSES

A personal injury involves any physical or psychological harm caused by the wrongdoing of another person, company, or entity. Common causes resulting in injury, catastrophic injury such as brain injury, spinal cord injury, or amputation, and death include the following examples:

Improving the livability of older neighborhoods

• Slips and Falls

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Eliminating dilapidated properties

• Animal Attacks

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Addressing the conflicting transportation visions of the City and the WisDOT

• Workplace Accidents • Construction, warehouse, factory accidents • Nursing home abuse – Poor treatment by nursing home staff • Defective products • Prescription errors If you have suffered personal injuries from any of the above described incidents, you could be entitled to monetary compensation for your losses. To ensure that you receive the compensation you seek, you need to work with a competent personal injury attorney. Contact our team of personal injury attorneys at Moen Sheehan Meyer, Ltd. today to schedule your initial legal consultation with us.

SEVEN | Issue #9 | March, 2016

ESTATE PLANNING

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f I had to list the top-five challenges facing the City of La Crosse over the next few years— which consequently affect the entire region—I would say they are (in no particular order): 1. Reducing the city’s municipal tax rate 2.

• Vehicular accidents

By: Andrew Londre

CIVIL LITIGATION BUSINESS FAMILY LAW

(608) 784-8310

Then there is issue number five. I left it off the list intentionally, because it’s the only issue I can think of that is a common thread between all four issues listed above, which are discussed and dealt with almost constantly. Yet, ironically, issue number five is the only issue that is rarely, if ever, discussed. 5. La Crosse desperately needs to get on board with housing density, and fast. By housing density I mean, housing units per square acre. La Crosse is a city that is predominantly made up of low-density housing—single family homes. La Crosse is also a city that has been slow, if not openly hostile, to the development of high-density living options, such as apartment buildings, or even medium-density options like townhomes. This is a big problem. Assuming the average single-family home is worth $150,000 and you can fit six per acre, that’s roughly $900,000 in total taxable value. If that same acre fit 20 townhomes (considered medium-density) each valued at $120,000, you’d be looking at $2.4 million in taxable value. But if you had an apartment building (high-density) with 50 units on that same acre, each unit valued at $100,000, that’s a $5,000,000 taxable property. But because La Crosse has so few high-quality, high-density living options, it is a city that is not nearly as value-dense as it could be which leads to a tax-rate that is far higher than it has to be. Housing density also has everything to do with neighborhood livability. People who live in high-density housing generally walk, bike and use public transportation more often and have more disposable income to spend locally. Don’t believe me? Just walk around downtown La Crosse, one of the few places in the area where you’ll find dense housing. There are few places as vibrant right now as downtown La Crosse. Sure, you can also go over to the neighborhoods around UW-La Crosse and Western, where there is a lot of dense housing and a lot of problems, but much of that has to do with design—or a historic lack thereof. There was a time in La Crosse’s history when it was going through a period of densification. Sadly, it was also a period that put virtually zero value on quality design, which led to a lot of problems still being dealt with. La Crosse has, thankfully, woken up to the sad state of housing conditions in the city and has rightly correlated low-valued housing with high taxes (which, by the way, means higher rent rates, too). Unfortunately, while La Crosse has made great progress on eliminating low-valued dilapidated homes, those homes are rarely replaced with something that maximizes value through greater density. Housing density also has everything to do with the debate over building more roads to the suburbs which has a lot to do with population growth. The WisDOT makes a fair point that the population of the region will continue to grow over time but shows no signs of growing within the City of La Crosse, largely because densifying housing and growing La Crosse’s population is not—at this point—a top priority. People gotta’ live somewhere, but La Crosse is basically saying, “not here!” Thankfully we have a choice. But to some it may be a bitter pill to swallow, no doubt. Nevertheless, we should be comforted by the fact that it is not too late to address our city’s major challenges, and we know what a big part of the answer is. We do not have to accept high taxes or dilapidated housing or depressed neighborhoods or devastating new roads, if and only if, we are ready to accept and embrace high-quality, highdensity housing. Is densification a silver bullet to all that ails the city and the region? No. But it’s the closest thing to it, and it’s time to pull the trigger.

ELDER LAW

201 Main Street, Suite 700 PO Box 786 La Crosse, WI 54602-0786

Andrew Londre wears many hats-currently serving on eight local, regional and national boards, with a focus on neighborhoods and urban revitalization. Andrew started a number of new organizations and initiatives-most recently La Crosse SOUP-and has worked in many sectors: government, nonprofit, cooperatives and small businesses. In 2014, he was honored as a NextCity Vanguard.

PERSONAL INJURY

www.msm-law.com

Have feedback? Share your thoughts on the Urbanist with the SEVEN Facebook page: www.Facebook.com/TheSevenSpot.


FAMOUS LOCALS She began her self-titled “food journey” when she realized that local schools were not utilizing resources that were readily available to them. With the fresh garden produce and herbs that a school garden could provide, the nutritional value of school lunches could be transformed. This revelation then led to the development of Luangpraseuth’s personal cooking philosophy, one that should make us all feel a little better. “Anybody can cook,” Luangpraseuth says. “It just takes a little bit of planning. Once you learn how to put [ingredients] together, the rest falls into place.”

THIPPI LUANGPRASEUTH

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s a volunteer for Grow La Crosse, an instructor for an array of locally held food courses, and ambassador for the Jamie Oliver Food Revolution, Thippi Luangpraseuth, it is safe to say, has a lot on her plate.

And that is just what she does in her free time! Luangpraseuth also works as a chef at the Shrine of Guadalupe, hoping to slowly transition current menu items toward more locally grown cuisine with additional healthy options. And for her, that’s what food is all about.

This is where her experience as a food ambassador for the Jamie Oliver Food Revolution comes into play. As an ambassador Luangpraseuth always “gravitates towards wanting to learn more,” she says, noting that learning (about food especially) is invigorating and adds meaning to her life. Continuing on her mission to share culinary knowledge in the community, Luangpraseuth will participate in this year’s upcoming Earth Day celebration. The theme of this year’s Earth Day will be a tad different than usual. Luangpraseuth plans to give away herb seedlings to promote organic

Article By: Samantha Loomis Photos: Dahli Durley

gardening and to remind people that caring for a personal herb garden is a realistic goal. Of all of her adventures, Luangpraseuth’s favorite has yet to be mentioned. She and her children often experiment with recipes in their home kitchen. “Meatless Mondays” has become a tradition over the past few months, and it is something the whole family enjoys. Luangpraseuth hopes this tradition will not only provide her children with valued cooking skills, but that it will also inspire them to do more, to be more, and to create more. But she doesn’t want that mindset to stop with her children. She encourages everyone in the community to “take it a notch up, because anybody can cook!” To get Luangpraseuth’s recipe for easy, fun and healthy Energy Bites, visit www.thesevenspot.com.

Samantha Loomis is an English major at UW-La Crosse who loves to pass time figuring out crossword puzzles and is almost always accompanied by her dog, Lady.

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700 West Ave. S., La Crosse, WI 54601 • For a consultation, call 608-392-9876 mayoclinichealthsystem.org/lacrosse

SEVEN | thesevenspot.com |

(Almost)

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THE ARTS THE 10 LETTERS PROJECT Article: Jess Witkins

STACY SCHLAF BRUEMMER

SEVEN | Issue #9 | March, 2016

By: Michael Scott

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A twelve-year old girl used to entertain an audience of stuffed animals and dolls in her basement at her Colorado home. A neighbor girl auditioning at the local playhouse asked this little girl’s mother, “Would Stacy like to come along to the audition?” At that moment Stacy Schalf Bruemmer emerged from the basement and was thrust upon the bright lights of the stage—a place she would return to for years to come. That first role was portraying Charlotte Sowerberry in Lionel Bart’s, “Oliver!” The character was rude, flirtatious and funny. “I remember the laughter. The laughs rose up from the audience, and that was it for me,” recalls Schalf Bruemmer. “I could think of nothing else I’d rather do.” In high school Schalf Bruemmer was a theatrical standout, earning leading or large supporting roles in every production. Her favorite roles from that time include Lenny from Beth Henley’s “Crimes of the Heart” and multiple characters in a production of Terrance McNally’s “Where Has Tommy Flowers Gone?” After high school the budding actress continued performing at Metropolitan State University of Denver. Then fate brought her to our region. She was cast in a brand new acting company that was forming in the quaint Minnesota town of Lanesboro. For five years Schalf Bruemmer was a professional member of the Commonweal Theatre Company. The company’s first season was eleven weeks long with employed nine other actors. Schalf Bruemmer portrayed Chic in, once again, “Crimes of the Heart” and Hermia in Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” Then life and family interrupted for a time. And in 1996, she returned to the boards in the La Crosse Community Theatre’s production of Ray Cooney’s “Funny Money.” She played Jean Perkins in this British farce about an insignificant middle-aged accountant that accidently picks up a briefcase full of money. Since then, Schalf Bruemmer has graced the stage at the La Crosse Community Theatre many times; notably, as Penelope Sycamore in “You Can’t Take it With You” by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart. She also portrayed multiple characters in John Cariani’s “Almost, Maine.” In a few weeks, Schalf Bruemmer will play Berthe, a grumpy but reliable maid, in the classic French farce, “BoeingBoeing” by Marc Camoletti. Does she prefer comedy over tragedy? “Not really,” she says. “But it’s always nice to hear the laughter.” Schalf Bruemmer has passed on her love of the theatre to her children. Her son MacKinley, who nearly stole the show from a cast of standouts as Chef Louis in “The Little Mermaid” earlier this year, will head to South Dakota this summer as a member of a professional theatre company. Her daughter Julianna is about to open “Mulan Jr” at Logan Middle School. “There is a place for everyone in the theatre,” says Schalf Bruemmer. “The play doesn’t happen only on stage. No matter what you like to do, there is something there for you.” Michael Scott is a freelance writer and advertising copywriter. He is the creator and voice talent for Rose Jewelers “Rose Files” radio campaign and the host of The Old School Variety Show.

The 10 Letters Project is a correspondence between makers. Based on the emails between two friends, Jen Lee and Tim Manley, they chronicled the process of creative work and what it means to be in the thick of it. Lee was touring with her documentary, Indie Kindred. Manley had just released his debut book, Alice in Tumblr-land. Across cities and sometimes states, despite loaded schedules and obligations, they wrote to one another. What transpired, was an archive of inspiration and intimacy. Two makers, inviting one another into their worlds. Here in the Seven Rivers Region, writers and makers Deborah Nerud and Jess Witkins recreate the project. One new letter printed over the course of each month for 10 months. Neither of them seeing it before you do. Watch what unfolds. To learn more about the project, visit www.10lettersproject.com.

February 21, 2016 Dear Deborah,

er

Lett

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One of my favorite book quotes of all time is from “The Holy Man” by Susan Trott. The quote is, “If you look upon everyone you meet as a holy person, you will be truly happy.” The book is about a series of people who go on a pilgrimage to meet with the holy man. Most learn more from their long journey of getting there than they do when they enter his house. I have always been a fan of stories. My mother, an avid reader, read aloud to us as kids, and as soon as I could talk, I started telling my own tales and was aptly nicknamed “Chatterbox” by my dad. And of course as a writer, I love diving into the structure of a story and its plot line. Because that’s the thing isn’t it? A story isn’t a great story if it’s all matter-of-fact and just point A to point B. As readers, learners and listeners, we want to know what happened in the middle. Well, I’m very much in the middle. The past year has been a soulsearching one for me with lots of changes. I found myself letting go of past hurts, and yet troubled by new disappointments. Basically, I was depressed. Thankfully the universe, and a series of holy persons disguised as friends and allies, showed me I had much to give and the power of positive thinking persuaded me to say yes to several new endeavors. So now, I’ve been performing improv theater since August, and have three shows under my belt. I entered my first piece for a writing competition in a long, long time. I took on the overwhelming and uplifting challenge of directing and producing a show. And most recently, started an adult storytelling class on Thursday nights. What have these things taught me? To be honest, the list is too long to fit in this letter. But I’ll sum it up in that they have taught me the power of pilgrimage. By embarking on my own journey to feel better and to learn, and to practice self-care for the creative, I have met some amazing people and made new friends. My world has opened up again, and I am happy to be traveling this path. How are you doing, friend? Shall I save you a seat beside me as we travel on? You are always welcome. Love and pilgrimages, Jess

Jess Witkins is a writer, blogger, and sometimes funny. Her mission: making pathetic look cool since 1985. She can be found in the coulee region’s many coffee shops and wordmongering at http://jesswitkins.wordpress.com.


friends. We’re on tour together, and she’s come to be my right-hand woman. She signed on one and a half years ago. Mina’s a brilliant musician and comedy writer and performer. It’s nice to have someone whose taste I trust and I can bounce ideas off of. Q: Independent creatives are always working on something; what’s got you busy these days? A: I’m working my ass off on something new. I’m taking my time with it, and I want it to be really good. I don’t want to be rushed at all. You can’t force good art, and I don’t feel pressured to release something that may be mediocre. It’s getting really close to being finished— it’s been in my brain-space for years, and I’m excited to release it. Mostly I’m excited to get back onto the road and perform. I feel like I write a lot of songs just so I can perform them on stage. That’s my favorite part. These days I’ve been writing a lot of pop music. It’s everything I grew up listening to at middle school dances. What I’m singing about, or what I’m feeling, really comes out naturally in the style.

An Interview

Article: Deborah Nerud Photo: Contributed

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aroline Smith is bicoastal, if you consider Minnesota’s border with the Mississippi River. The singer, songwriter and guitar player from Minneapolis is back from Los Angeles, California, for a visit during her spring tour around the Midwest. This is Smith’s fourth trip to the Seven Rivers Region (she’s

a Mid West Music Fest alum), and she will perform at The Cavalier Theatre on April 7 at 9:00 p.m. Q: Folks are familiar with your Midwestern roots, and this spring tour connects with that fan base. You’re on the West Coast now—how’s it going? A: I do split my time between

Q: Was the move difficult? A: It was a very natural move. I met a publishing company and a management company, and I started flying out to meet with those groups a lot. When it got to be too much flying, I realized I needed to spend some time in L.A. My plan is to stay here for a couple years and then see what’s next. I don’t want to be in L.A. forever, and I try not to get too wrapped up in the city. I love my Minneapolis crew. I miss my girlfriends and my family. When I’m home, I get to stay at my mom’s house, and I get to sleep with my mom in her bed. I love it. Q: Will Arlen Peiffer, Jesse Schuster and Eric Mayson be joining you on this tour? A: They’ll definitely be with me. I feel really lucky—these are the most confident, secure, inspiring men I’ve ever been around in my life. Every day I hang out with them, I feel so fortunate to have them in my life. I also recently introduced backup singers, including Mina Moore. She’s one of my best

Deborah Nerud is a ukulele-playing mama-of-two/writer/gardener/pie baker/cyclist/runner/performer with work published in Coulee Region Women and Coulee Parenting Connection. A firm believer in the emotional power of pen and paper, she still loves sending (and receiving) letters via USPS and will happily send you a note in the mail.

GO: Caroline Smith Where: The Cavalier Theatre When: April 7 at 9 p.m. Information: www.facebook.com/ events/868405386610475 www.carolinesmithcarolinesmith.com/

SEVEN | thesevenspot.com |

CAROLINE SMITH

Minneapolis and L.A., but my community really is in Minneapolis. I knew that I’d miss home a lot, but I’m learning that everyone out here is really trying to make it work. I’m really excited to be greeted by that challenge.

Q: Your lyrics read a lot like a journal, and you’re very articulate about femininity and feminism. A: I’m a writer at heart. Deep down, I feel my music is a vehicle for my writing and there’s a push-and-pull I try to explore in my lyrics. People may have one idea of what a strong, independent woman looks like—and I think it’s really limiting. An independent strong woman can come in any shape and any form. I grew up with a single mom who worked and was adamant about me being an educated feminist. And to have the bravery and the gumption to be yourself as a woman in this society, you deserve every kind of notable mention.

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THE ARTS

Behind A Series

the Scenes

Behind the Scenes features multi-issue chronicles from the people involved in what’s happening in the Seven Rivers Region. In our first series, Parker Forsell keeps you on the beat of April’s Mid West Music Fest as it’s in the making.

Series 1, Part 3: Mid West Music Fest (MWMF) with Parker Forsell, MWMF Managing Director

4 on the floor

I

SEVEN | Issue #9 | March, 2016

was in Kansas City last week at Folk Alliance International, where booking agents, record labels, festival organizers and talent buyers of all shapes and sizes hole up in a huge hotel for five days with musicians from all over the world. Talks and workshops happen during the day; concerts take place in the ballrooms in the evening; and then from 10:30 p.m. to 4:00 a.m.  each night, three floors of the hotel are taken over by representatives from festivals, labels and agencies who host mini-shows in their hotel room by the amazing variety of musicians. The Midwest was well represented.

A showcase hosted by the Winona/ La Crosse business Ocooch Mountain Music included a collaboration between Mid West Music Fest (MWMF), Boats and Bluegrass Festival, Driftless Music Gardens (People Fest & Bonfire Fest) and Eddie Danger Music out of 10 Viroqua. An impressive array of artists

that will come to the upper Mississippi River Valley over the next months and years played our room into the wee hours of the morning. These are all original songwriters. Gatherings like Folk Alliance help MWMF and our partners stay on the cutting edge of new and upcoming talent. Acts that will be playing the festival in La Crosse and Winona next month were Olympia, Wash., by way of Minnesota banjo duo The Lowest Pair; rising punk Americana-grass locals Them Coulee Boys; one-man band extraordinaire Possessed by Paul James; and no-holdsbarred rock n’ roll band 4onthefloor.

Possessed by Paul Since the beginning, the festival has shared the tag line, “where music and community meet.” That sentiment is something that has created a real fervor up the river in Winona, where people get more and more excited each year to see new discoveries for the first time and brush elbows with the future stars of the Midwest music scene. Advice from past attendees includes: do your homework through the program (which will be available midMarch); go see acts and genres of music that you might not normally sample; introduce yourself to a stranger—they just might be a rising-star musician; and help the non-locals navigate your town—community is what keeps people coming back to our cool little river cities. Tickets and more information at midwestmusicfest.org.

Them Coulee Boys The MWMF team looks forward to La Crosse getting a taste of the thriving musical circus atmosphere that comes from taking the leap into discovering new bands for the first time through venue hopping familiar locations. The festival is also a celebration of all things local—music, food and friendship.

GO: Mid West Music Fest Pre-Party Events

March 18

Live Show: Cedar Cultural Center, Minneapolis, MN Featuring Erik Koskinen, Farewell Milwaukee, Mike Munson After-party: Nomad World Pub, Minneapolis, MN Featuring People Brothers Band, The Heavy Set, General B and the Wiz

April 9

Live Show: Cavalier Theater & Lounge, La Crosse, WI Featuring People Brothers Band, The Weathered Heads, Civil Engineers

Parker Forsell is the Managing Director of the four-day, 11-stage, 400+ musician Mid West Music Fest and founder of Ocooch Mountain Music. Since 1992, Forsell has been organizing events, music performances and grassroots community networks of consumers, farmers and musicians. He has been a publisher and editor (Dandelion Whine, Stinging Nettle, Biodynamic Journal), farm hand, non-profit organizer (Angelic Organics Learning Center, Land Stewardship Project), booking agent, band manager and record producer. He is a UW-La Crosse alum living in Winona, Minn.  


Mississippi Steamroll event coordinator Ben Alberti

WOODBLOCK ART GOES BIG

Woodcut Workshops Learn how to create a woodcut using MDF and simple carving tools. Instruction and materials provided as needed; tools available for additional fee. In addition, you can participate in the Mississippi Steamroll on April 30, 2016. Sign up online or call the Pump House at 608-785-1434.

Article: Haakon Nelson Photo: Bob Good

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simplicity and affordability. Traditionally, though, woodblock art is listed as being “designed” by artists, as once the artist creates the art, it was then given to a craftsperson to carve the block itself. This is done in several ways with art either traced or glued onto the block and then carved out. Once it has been carved, either paper or fabric are placed over the block and “brayers” (small, hand rolling tools) spread the ink over it. The annual Mississippi Steamroll event was created because of the historic importance of woodblock art and the appeal of the communal art creation. The event takes place at the Pump House Regional Arts Center, hosted jointly by the Pump House and UW-La Crosse. During this event, local artists and students from the community are invited to make large-scale woodcuts, which are then gently run over with a specially purposed asphalt spreader (hence the name Steamroll). On the first day of this two-day event, participating local students will

make woodblock art to be displayed at La Crosse’s downtown art festival, Artspire (June 10-11), as part of the Perseverance Project. Any students— elementary through high school—are invited to participate. On the second day, University and college students, as well as local artists, are encouraged to bring their woodblock art down to be printed. The ink and brayers will be provided, but artists will need their own fabric or paper. Non-participants are encouraged to come down and witness art created by steamroller. Prior to the event on March 19, 2016, SEVEN will sponsor a workshop on woodblock art, hosted by The Pump House Regional Arts Center. The first 15 people to sign up and mention SEVEN will get 50 percent off the registration fee and a SEVEN T-shirt plus stickers. If creating unique art in a conceptual and literal large-scale format appeals to you, get ready for the Mississippi Steamroll!

March 19: 1-2 p.m. *March 19 class sponsored by SEVEN! First 15 receive 50% off class fee, SEVEN T-shirt, and stickers March 23: 6-7 p.m. March 30: 6-7 p.m. April 2: 1-2 p.m. Cost: $25 per student $65 with cutting tools Mississippi Steamroll Event April 29-30, 9 a.m.– 4 p.m. The Pump House Regional Arts Center 119 King St., La Crosse, WI www.thepumphouse.org

Haakon Nelson, a local experimental musician, was born in La Crosse, raised in Winona and returned to La Crosse four years ago. His writing has appeared in Virus! magazine and TheQuietus.com. He is a father of a 13-year-old son and a drinker of much coffee.

SEVEN | thesevenspot.com |

Mississippi Steamroll

oodblock art has existed in various forms throughout the world for almost 2000 years. The earliest examples in China date back to 200 A.D., and from there, the practice was transferred to and flourished in Europe, starting in the 1400s. A great deal of art was reproduced using woodblock art as it was sometimes easier and cheaper than producing prints with movable type. Artists such as Albrecht Durer refined woodblock art to the upper standards of high art, and his works are still shown in museums and art books as masterpieces of the era. In Japan, the art is known as “moku hanga” and diversified and evolved in style right into the 20th Century. It was through 19th Century Europe’s obsession with all things Japanese that this art came to be known to artists such as Gaughin and Van Gogh, informing their own work in post-Impressionism. Later artists in the “Modernist” school appreciated its

GO:

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THE ARTS

IMAGINATION SPECTRUM THEATRE Arts for All

SEVEN | Issue #9 | March, 2016

Article: Austin Sargent Photos: Theresa Smerud

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a Crosse Community Theatre (LCT) is changing the way autistic students in the community engage in the arts. New to the community theatre this year is the Imagination Spectrum program, an eight-week course that offers classes specifically for kids on the autism spectrum. This program is the effort of LCT’s new Education Director Sara Pillatzki-Warzeha. Warzeha comes to La Crosse after years of work in the arts in the Twin

Cities. As a performer and director, Warzeha’s experience is vast and varied. But Warzeha’s connection to autistic youth is a personal one. “My journey started because I have a nephew on the spectrum,” she says. “My sister and I got the idea to write a show about autism for children.” The brainchild of this idea was “BUZZ,” a children’s musical that seeks to educate and highlight some of the challenges that individuals on the spectrum face. Warzeha attributes

her love for teaching autistic youth to the success of that show. According to a 2014 report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in 68 children have been diagnosed as being on the Autism Spectrum. That statistic highlights the importance of the Imagination Spectrum classes now more than ever, notes Warzeha. “If theatre, at its best, is truly a reflection of the society in which it is created, then we have to be ready

to reflect, support and encourage all people in that society,” she says. “Anecdotally, I believe that the theatre has not always been a place where people with Autism Spectrum Disorder or Sensory Processing Disorder have either felt like they were welcome or like their needs were being addressed, thereby excluding them from theatre activities. We have to be passionate about making our theatres a welcoming and inclusive place for all people.”


recognition of emotions in ourselves and others, social and emotional reciprocity, body awareness and focus,” adds Warzeha. Inclusion classes are only a small portion of the new diversity and accessibility trend at LCT. They have also added sensory-friendly performances for some of their Theatre for Young Audience shows; the first of these shows was “Stuart

students important life skills. Warzeha highlights some of the outcomes: “Things like speaking confidently to a group, connecting to another person or having great social skills. And as always, to have a great time while doing it.” The next session of classes at LCT begins in April. LCT is always looking for volunteers for ushering, set construction and more. Students and families interested in getting more involved should visit www. lacrossecommunitytheatre.org. Austin Sargent has joined SEVEN as an Intern. Austin is an artist, advocate, and soon-to-be graduate from Viterbo University with a major in Musical Theatre and a minor in Arts Administration. Usually, you can find Austin in a coffee shop, at a show or at the bar, and if he’s not there he’s probably napping.

GO: Imagination Spectrum Class Where: La Crosse Community Theatre 428 Front St. S., La Crosse, WI 608-784-9292 When: Offered periodically throughout the year Info: www.lacrossecommunitytheatre.org

SEVEN | thesevenspot.com |

Warzeha understands the importance of flexibility. “Our classes are designed to ebb and flow with the needs of each group of students individually, so no two classes look exactly the same.” Specifically, the Imagination Spectrum classes focus more on social skills through theatre practice. “The skills we work on in an autismspecific class might include things like

Little” this past fall and the next will be “Bridge to Terabithia” on June 18 at 2:00 p.m. These performances look and feel different than a traditional night at the theatre. “Our sensory-friendly performances have been a great addition to our programming,” Warzeha says. “Some of the things parents can expect are a social story guide found on our website to prepare their youth for what might be coming, a softening of extreme light cues, sound cues or action to avoid any abrupt changes and a quiet space if someone might need a break. We also provide sensory items such as weighted lap blankets, fidgets and noise cancelling headphones.” Whether autism-specific or not, all the classes offered at LCT teach

13


ENTERTAINMENT

2016 MOSES CONFERENCE Article: Deborah Nerud Photos: Dahli Durley

“Land, then, is not merely soil; it is a fountain of energy flowing through a circuit of soils, plants, and animals.” --Aldo Leopold,

La Crosse County Convention and Tourism Bureau, last year’s conference brought $2,160,000 to the region, and the number of attendees increases each year. MOSES Executive Director Faye Jones was emphatic about the vitality and continued interest in the event, noting, “This may be the only farming conference where the attendees get younger every year.” The 2016 MOSES Farmer of the Year award went to Steve Pincus and Beth Kazmar (and their children, Sophie and Ari) of Tipi Produce, a 76-acre certified organic vegetable farm and CSA in

SEVEN | Issue #9 | March, 2016

“A Sand County Almanac”

L

et it be known henceforth that the MOSES (Midwest Organic & Sustainability Education Service) conference is ground zero for the future of sustainable farming in Midwestern America. MOSES is a non-profit that provides education, resources and practical advice to help farmers grow using sustainable, organic practices. The 27th annual conference, held in La Crosse for 10 years, brought more than 3,600 attendees from all over the world to the Seven Rivers Region. The event is big and getting bigger. According to Jeremiah Burish of the

14

2016 MOSES Farmers of the Year: Steve Pincus and Beth Kazmar of Tipi Produce

Evansville, Wis., that provides produce to the Madison and Milwaukee areas. The annual award recognizes a farm’s ability to educate, thrive, empower, innovate and sustain the business, as well as the farm’s commitment to MOSES’ mission to “contribute to organic education and community.” Tipi Produce was honored not just for their soil-building and research efforts in connection with UW-Madison, but also for their commitment to their employees and outreach efforts with young and future farmers. “One good year on the farm can have a really positive


Meet the Deutsch Family Regional Organic Hog Farmers Article: Deborah Nerud With ten years of experience raising hogs and chickens on a 160-acre Osseo, Wis., farm, Jim and Alison Deutsch consider themselves relatively new to the farming field. “The best part of being a farmer means you get to do all the things you love every day,” notes Alison. Jim adds, “The toughest part always concerns cash flow. As newer farmers, you have to realize you’re always going to be a bit behind.” released. Writer’s note: This was my first year at the conference, and as a long-time urban gardener with future small-farm aspirations, I hope it’s not my last. After dropping in on two Organic University courses (‘Silvopasture’ and ‘Understanding Soil’), visiting with some of the 170 vendors in the exhibit hall, and browsing through the pop-up bookstore, I found that the more I spoke with different attendees, the more enjoyable my experience became. Meals are served communally, with strangers and friends seated elbow-to-elbow enjoying the plentiful organic breakfasts and lunches. Over organic pasta primavera and butternut squash soup, La Crosse’s Kane Street Community Garden employee Todd Huffman, who has collected the excess cases of food from MOSES for the Hunger Task Force, stated, “You never know who you’re gonna meet here, but you’ll always find someone to talk to.”

GO IN 2017: Info about MOSES and the 2017 conference at www.mosesorganic.org.

Deutsch Family Farm raises 300-500 100 percent certified organic Duroc/Berkshire/Hampshire mixed-breed hogs per year—both in pasture and in deep-bedded outdoor pens. The couple credits a lot of their success to the Farm Beginnings Program from the Land Stewardship Project. “They were essential in helping us find and afford our land,” Jim recalls. Alison praises the program for offering advice and assistance when no one else would. “In fact, when we decided to leave our careers to start farming, the only advice we received from other farmers was, ‘Don’t do it,’” she recalls. After a decade of producing a successful product and a 2013 feature on the Wisconsin Public Television-produced “Around the Farm Table,” the Deutsches are now the ones sought out for advice. “We get referred to a lot,” Alison states. “We try to stress the importance of persistence. We want folks to believe you can do it differently—and that you have to add value to your product.” As MOSES conference attendees, the Deutsch family, which includes Lily (7) and Lou (8), benefitted from the all-day Organic Dairy class at MOSES’ Organic University. They also had a chance to meet other farmers. “The MOSES conference is energizing,” Alison states. “It gives us a bit of a break, but it also gives us the opportunity to talk with like-minded people and make some new connections.” You can find Deutsch Family Farm pork at a number of La Crosse establishments, including The Mint, the La Crosse Country Club and People’s Food Co-op.

LEARN MORE:

www.deutschfamilyfarm.com www.landstewardshipproject.org/morefarmers

SHOP ONLINE:

www.farmmatch.com/foodie/deutschfamilyfarm-osseo-wi/storefront/shop

SEVEN | thesevenspot.com |

effect on a young person,” says Kazmar. “At MOSES, I look around and see that there are young folks here that can take the reins. This event is all about gathering people, brain power and energy. I’m very optimistic about the future.” While the first day of the conference is relatively low-key—featuring 10 allday Organic University courses on a variety of topics—proceedings reach a fever pitch on day two, with back-toback classes, research presentations, movies, speeches and demonstrations. Organic systems specialist Jim Riddle of Winona, Minn., emphasized the value of the conference among researchers and producers. “This is the place to share info and network—it’s a reality check from farmers to the research community,” says Riddle, director of Organic Independents, LLP, co-owner of Blue Fruits Farm, and organic research program coordinator for The Ceres Trust. Farmers, researchers, interns, students, mothers, fathers and children were among the diverse crowd of humans that gathered at the conference. There were activities for teens, for Hmoob farmers (the Farley Center and the WI Dept. of Ag, Trade, and Consumer Protection provided interpretation), for beginning farmers, women farmers, mid-life farmers, and aspiring farmers. LGBTQ farmers enjoyed a “Queers in the Field” social, and the paperback book “Soil Sisters: A Toolkit for Women Farmers” by Lisa Kivirist was

15


ENTERTAINMENT

Clockwise from top left: Mark Schimpf, Mayor Tim Kabat, Pam Hartwell, Barb Janssen

MAYOR’S CONFERENCE FEATURES URBAN FOOD ISSUES

SEVEN | Issue #9 | March, 2016

Not-so-fun fact: La Crosse has two food deserts.

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Article: Joseph O’Brien

W

hat a According to the United States Department of Agriculture’s online “Food Access Research Atlas,” food deserts are low-income and low-access urban locales with no healthy food sources within a mile radius of a census tract. La Crosse’s food deserts exist in the city’s southwestern

and east-central neighborhoods. That such deserts exist in a city surrounded by a rich, quilted expanse of farmland is an irony organizers of the Third Annual La Crosse Mayor’s Neighborhood Conference hope participants will take as food for thought. Hosted by Mayor Tim Kabat at the La Crosse Center’s South Hall on April 9, this year’s

conference, which is free and open to the entire public, features “Food in the City.”

and give them fun reasons to love good food and choose health over unhealthy food.”

Gardens create community Organized with the help of Hillview Urban Agricultural Center’s executive director Pam Hartwell, this year’s conference brings together experts on how to grow, source and cook healthy foods in sustainable urban food systems. “Food brings neighbors together,” says Hartwell. “Whenever you grow a garden, for instance, you always have an excess of something and a lack of something–and maybe your neighbor’s garden had an excess of something else and a lack of something else. So you get together to share, talk and sit at table together. Gardens create community.” This is the third La Crosse Mayor’s Conference. As chair of the Neighborhood Revitalization Commission during her time as a La Crosse city council member (20112015), Sara McFall Sullivan persuaded Mayor Kabat to organize the annual conference in 2014 after she attended the 2013 Madison Mayor’s Neighborhood Conference. Previous conference themes included Safe Communities (2014) and Transportation (2015). The conference’s goals, Sullivan says, are “to highlight the importance of healthy neighborhoods for the overall well-being of the city of La Crosse, and to facilitate the communitybuilding among residents of La Crosse neighborhoods.” This year’s event accomplishes these goals as the main panel discussion will address how food plays a part in strengthening neighborhoods. Leading the panel, Hartwell says she will speak about “the real local benefits of urban food systems and the non-profit resources that exist in the community.” Also on the panel, La Crosse restaurateur Dane Gonzalez will speak about his successful farm-to-table eateries: The Root Note and The Mint. The panel also includes La Crosse urban farmer Casey Peterson, who rented and transformed his neighbors’ underutilized backyards into abiding gardens of plenty. “La Crosse is ready for this model. The city will support it and people already love it,” states Hartwell. “People in the city don’t think there are farms in the city, but Casey’s proven that a backyard can be a very productive space.”

To attend the conference and learn more: www.facebook.com/ La-Crosse-Mayors-NeighborhoodConference-Food-in-the-City

Getting youth involved The conference will feature a variety of events. Teaching kids about agriculture, Ana Skemp, Grow La Crosse program director and panel member, will share how she brings kids to the farm and farming to kids in the schools. Inspired by the “Iron Chef” TV show, organizers scheduled a Future Iron Chefs Demonstration cook-off between the La Crosse Boy’s and Girl’s Club and the Ho-Chunk Nation Youth. Each cooking team will create a recipe from a list of ingredients announced at the beginning of the event, and Mayor Kabat has been invited to be one of the judges of the teams’ creations. “If kids get excited and inspired about something, they get really excited and inspired,” says Hartwell. “We wanted to target middle and high school age kids

To learn more about food deserts: www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/ food-access-research-atlas

Joseph O’Brien lives with his wife Cecilia and their nine children on their Soldiers Grove farmstead. He is staff writer and poetry editor of the San Diego Reader and was a regular contributor to the late great Kickapoo Free Press. 

2016 La Crosse Mayor’s Conference Schedule of Events 8:30 a.m. – Vendors open 8:30–9:30 a.m. – Registration 9–noon – Activities provided for 5-12 year olds 9:30 a.m. – Welcome by Mayor Kabat 9:45 a.m.-10:45 a.m. – Group Session/Panel Discussion 10:45–11 a.m. – Break 11 a.m.–Noon –  Breakout sessions led by panel members Noon – 1 p.m. – Lunch (provided by local restaurants/vendors) 1 p.m. – Neighborhood Collaboration Panel 1–2 p.m. – Future Iron Chef Kitchen Demonstration 2:30 p.m. – Neighborhood Award Presentations


TAILGATE PARTY Article: Joseph O’Brien Photos: Shana Meshbesher

A

s everyone in Wisconsin knows, the tailgate party never ends—it simply puts fresh charcoal on the hibachi and moves on to the next parking lot.

On March 26 that lot is the Viroqua Food Coop (VFC) parking lot, site of the Fourth Annual P6 Tailgate Party. This annual event features a dozen local producers showing off their bumper

Bjorn Bergman

crops in a heated tent for customers to visit and sample. If the free samples don’t do it for them, customers can also buy lunch at the VFC deli’s grill-out or take advantage of the ten-percent sale on products sold at VFC by tailgate vendors. According to VFC’s outreach coordinator and event organizer Bjorn Bergman, the “fender fair” started in-store as a way to get Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) buyers and sellers together. Once the event reached critical mass, he says, the venue was moved to asphalt and thereby embraced the hallowed Wisconsin tailgating tradition in name and deed. “I know nationally a lot of people ask, ‘A tailgate party?’” Bergman says with a laugh. “I say, ‘Hey, this is what we do in Wisconsin!’” At the same time, Bergman says, the party became a showcase for the store’s P6 producers. “P6” refers to the sixth of seven principles established by the Principle Six national cooperative trade movement. P6, which was founded by Seward Co-op in Minneapolis, states that cooperatives ought to cooperate with one another, Bergman says. So far, about eleven co-ops around the country participate in the movement. “P6 really is trying to tell the story of the foods that match our mission as a co-op the most,” Bergman says. “The three P6 criteria match the products— it’s local, cooperative and small. If a product meets two of those criteria it gets the P6 label. When you come into our store you can see how that manifests itself, and a lot of the signs in our store are for P6 producers and really tell the story of P6 producers.” In more than one way, P6 has put its stamp on stores and producers. “In

our last fiscal year, we have had 185 P6 producers, and 33.5 percent of our total sales ($2.3 million) in the last fiscal year were of P6 products,” explains Bergman. “So that’s super powerful to know that VFC is contributing to the local co-op and small food economy which we want to see in the future.” The P6 program is also building on its success, Bergman says, through the VFC microloan program, which benefits P6 producers such as Viroqua’s own Wisco Pop with an annual no-interest $3,500 loan. “We recognized that a lot of small and beginning farmers didn’t have access to smaller loans to help their farming operations or local food business operations expand,” he says. “Essentially we want to fill holes in our local food system.” Funded by VFC and a handful of donations, the microloan program takes applications each year between mid-December and January. For more information on the microloan program, visit: www.viroquafood.coop/you-ownit/microlending-initiative.

GO: Principle Six Tailgate Party Where: Viroqua Food Co-op, 609 Main St., Viroqua, WI When: March 26, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

SEVEN | thesevenspot.com |

Celebrates Food Suppliers

17


SIP N' TASTE

FOOD Review

North Bend Lions Club Annual Smelt Fry By: Lee Neves

When you’re from the Seven Rivers Region, you know a good fish fry. Typically, we reserve our fish dinners for Fridays, but a smelt fry is a whole ‘nother occasion. The best smelt comes to our area in late winter/early spring, usually from the Great Lakes. This little fish (3-7 inches) is often caught in small, handheld nets. The head and entrails are removed and the fish is fried with skin on. Each cook adds his own touch of magic seasoning to the batter recipe when pan-fried at the fishing site or in large kitchen fryers. In my opinion, the North Bend Lions Club annual fish fry fundraiser, featuring smelt and catfish, is one of the best around. This year’s fry on February 28 was exceptional! The scenery on the way to the Lions Club Hall is Americana at its finest: a mix of modern and old-world farmsteads, endless wooded bluffland and valleys, and acres of crop fields. The Club sets up their kitchen counter top to accommodate hundreds (yes, hundreds), who are served lunch-line style by friendly volunteers. From there, guests fill rows of tables to enjoy camaraderie with locals and visitors. Smelt has a buttery, mildly sweet flavor with a touch of saltiness when fried just right. And the North Bend Lions Club nailed it—barely an essence of a fishy taste with plenty of meat inside the breading. The Club also offered a helping of catfish as an option. The sides included bread, coleslaw, potato salad, baked beans and tartar sauce. The bread and beans

WINE

by Wohlert

SEVEN | Issue #9 | March, 2016

WINE 18

Review

By: Todd Wohlert

CARMÉNÈRE: It’s a what from a where?

Everyone loves a comeback kid—someone, who through overwhelming odds, manages to come back from the brink and succeed, like Frodo, or Westley from the “Princess Bride.” “As… you… wish…” Carménère is that comeback kid. It is considered one of the original six red grapes of Bordeaux, along with Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec, Cabernet Franc, and Petit Verdot. After a time, Carménère fell out of favor. A lot of plants were torn up and something else was replanted. To make matters worse, the Phylloxera bug epidemic in 1867, which almost destroyed all the vineyards of Europe, wreaked total havoc on the remaining Carménère plants. By the time someone decided to make wines with Carménère again, it was pretty much gone. There were

were store-bought, but everything else tasted freshly made. The best part came at the end—a choice of every kind of homemade pie you could think of for a mere $2 contribution. I grabbed the chocolate mousse with graham cracker crust. If you don’t already have a favorite fish fry in your community, I highly recommend the North Bend Lions Club Annual Smelt Fry—even if you have to wait another year to check it out! Meanwhile, keep an eye open for a fish fry in your area. You might discover your own favorite.

GO:

North Bend Lions Club Melrose, WI

For more information on the North Bend Lions Club, visit: www.facebook.com/NorthBendWiLionsClub.

a couple of small pockets here and there, but the varietal was basically given up as lost and as hard to find as a six-fingered man. Fast forward almost a century and hopscotch halfway around the world to Chile, where some Merlot wine makers were having problems with their wines—they didn’t taste ripe enough. Throw in some scientists and DNA testing, and in 1994 someone from the local school of Oenology figured out that their poor-performing Merlot was actually the long-lost Carménère of Bordeaux. Merlot ripens much earlier than Carménère does, which is why the Merlot tasted off. Once the two varietals were separated, everything was copasetic again. The two grapes were often confused, and when the Europeans brought all their grapes to the New World 200 years ago, the Carménère was unknowingly planted with the Merlot. INCONCEIVABLE! (I know, I know, that one was cheap.) What is happening with Carménère today? A lot! In the old country, some Bordeaux makers are starting to dabble with the grape again. Much like the Malbec grape, which didn’t get much love in France but became a world power in Argentina, Carménère is becoming the signature varietal of Chile. Wine makers are producing higher end and higher quality Reserva and Gran Reserva wines that rack up high points with critics and consumers. This month we look at the immensely enjoyable and ridiculously affordable Root:1 Carménère from Chile. What is it like? Intense violet in color with ripe aromas of blackberries and warm spice. Full-bodied and fruit-forward with plum, cherry and a hint of smoke. Smooth tannins and good structure create perfect balance and a powerful finish with notes of vanilla. Try Root:1 Carménère with hearty chili, pork stew or barbeque ribs. Serve with roasted eggplant parmesan or vegetarian lasagna, or pair it with rich cheeses like Camembert or Brie. This is wine you will love and wuv, tru wuv, will fowow you foweva... Todd Wohlert works for Purple Feet Wines, a member of the Winebow Group. He is not an expert in wines but he unfortunately knows more that 98% of the people in the state. He is the most requested wine advisor in the Seven Rivers Region, making weekly appearances and spreading the gospel of good wine.


Style: Double Oatmeal Stout Brewer: Tyranena Brewing Company, Lake Mills, Wis. Price Point: $10.99 / Four Pack of 12 oz. bottles; $2.99 singles at La Crescent Wine & Spirits

BEER

Carnal Knowledge By: A.J. Moore

Appearance: Dark ruby brown color of molasses with only faint traces

of copper on the edges and nearly entirely opaque in a ball-top pint glass. Nary a candlepower of light slips its way through this dark heavybodied beer. It pours with an almost oily appearance that accurately foreshadows the substantial and luxurious body. The head is dark tan, creamy and thick but brief lived, and the beer leaves a leggy spotted lacing as the surface gradually descends.   Aroma: The predominant aromas of this beer come from a rich concentration of roasted and black malt that conjures up familiar notes of blackstrap molasses, darkly toasted bread and New Orleans-style chicory coffee. Additionally there are some slightly buttery yeast notes and a distinct booziness that is warming and inviting, rather than alarming. Hop aroma, if any, is minimal and lost behind the rich top of roastiness.    Taste: The palate opens up with dark toffee and iced Thai coffee and then gently transitions to a nutty, rich round note of grainy cereal and oatmeal into pleasantly bitter, fruity and slightly boozy flavors of dark chocolate liqueur. It’s like sweet coffee and chocolate chip oatmeal cookies distilled into a sensual elixir worthy of its suggestive name.

Review

Alcohol by Volume: 8.5%

Presence: Big and creamy, with a silkiness to the mouthfeel that can only be achieved with the artful application of copious quantities of oatmeal in the mash. Despite the relatively heavy body, there is just enough residual alcohol warmth and hop bitterness to provide a perfectly clean finish that is both satisfying and paradoxically refreshing. X-Factors and Overall: As any proper double stout should do, this beer takes all of the dials of your usual stout and cranks them to the top. There is roast and chocolate to spare; there’s body that goes on for days; the malt is sweet and substantial, yet somehow the subtlety of the oatmeal still manages to come through from beginning to end. It’s luscious and sensual, yet down-home and comforting. Pour yourself a snifter or a pint and pull up a plate of macaroons, shortbread or oatmeal cookies, find your comfy chair and dive headlong into this one. Winter’s almost over, and you’ve earned it.

Until then, Cheers! A.J. Moore is a renaissance man. In addition to writing, tabletop gaming, smelting, blacksmithing, woodworking and restoring antique hand tools, A.J. is a homebrewer, occasional beer judge and member of the La Crosse LAGERS homebrewer club.

WEEK OF

ST. PATRICK’S

DAY CELEBRATION!

SATURDAY, MARCH 12TH

Irish breakfast buffet before the parade from 8-11 am

THURSDAY, MARCH 17

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ST. PATRICK’S DAY! PARTY WITH US FOR OUR

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APRIL 1ST! YEAR ANNIVERSARY

The ONLY dedicated off-site Pearl Street Brewery growler fill station!

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Wednesdays only.

Gourmet Burgers • Roast Beef Sandwiches Mac ‘n’ Cheese Dishes • Fusion Shakes

(608) 781-4212

Valley View Mall, La Crosse, WI burgerfusioncompany.com

FREE COMBO with purchase of burger! One coupon per customer, per day. Coupon must be presented before ordering. Offer expires 3/31/16. No cash value. Excludes applicable taxes & gratuity.

SEVEN | thesevenspot.com |

THURSDAY, Irish whiskey tasting MARCH 10TH from 7-9 pm

Thank you for making us

19


SIP N’ TASTE ABC DINNER SERIES An Exploration in Fine Dining: Accessibility, Beauty, Community

Article: Deborah Nerud

T

he first ABC Dinner Series event on January 3 at the Driftless Café in Viroqua, Wis., featured five courses, six different Wisconsin Brewing Company (WBC) beers and a lot of bonhomie. ABC, which stands for Accessibility, Beauty, Community, was not only borne out of the Café’s continued desire to serve delicious, local, sustainable food, but also as a way to create awareness about the land, the farmers and the food that inspired the event. The reservation-only function was hosted by Driftless Café co-owners Luke and Ruthie Zahm, Café server/ executive assistant/event coordinator Havvah Spicer, and WBC’s brewmaster Kirby Nelson. Guests were greeted with a 6 ounce

pour of ‘Old Reliable’ (a Munich-style lager) and opening statements by Nelson and Zahm: “We are so honored to have you here—we’re building a community through our food, for you and for our farmers.” The meal included a soul foodinspired first course: pork belly, house pickled beets and buttermilk biscuits served with a honey hot sauce (paired with the Yankee Buzzard IPA); fried smelt (with Golden Amber lager pairing); chicken mousse (with Orelia, a Belgian triple ale); beef cheek and polenta (with a Dark Something, a 9.0% porterdopplebock combo); and a vanilla panna cotta with hazelnut brittle and ganache (with Porter Joe, a Barriques-roasted coffee porter). The entire meal—the

open 7 days 7 am–10 pm grocery • produce • in-house bakery • full-service meat & seafood • made-from-scratch deli • soups and sandwiches • coffee bar • wine & beer • body care • vitamins •

SEVEN | Issue #9 | March, 2016

local food & favorites

20

Good. Honest. Local.

315 5th Avenue South La Crosse, WI 608-784-5798 www.pfc.coop

majority of which was local, sustainable and organic—was liberally seasoned with informative, insightful commentary on the need for continued, dynamic sustainability and local food availability. Zahm recalls, “When we started game-planning our vision for the restaurant, our main aspiration centered around winning the James Beard Award. At the end of the day, as the Café developed its identity, we realized that a clear intention to build a stronger community through our food and our farmers was bigger and more important than any award.” To date, the Café has been involved in fundraising for multiple local organizations and continues to do outreach to local schools. After funding for Viroqua’s Farm2School program was slashed, Zahm began cooking meals once a month for Viroqua Sr. High as a volunteer. “My identity as a chef is changing—in the beginning, I had my hands on every single plate going through this kitchen,” says Zahm. Through the thoughtfully prepared dishes and locally crafted beer served at the ABC Dinner Series event, both the Driftless Café and WBC emphasized the importance for balanced symbiosis from farm to fork. As a result, the Zahms and their team are passionately weaving a healthy, mindful product as a teaching tool for their vision. Zahm states, “As the restaurant has grown, I’m trying to effectively get involved on a bigger scale to increase awareness about how the food we serve here is connected to the community at large on both a local and global scale.” To learn more about Wisconsin Brewing Company, visit www. wisconsinbrewingcompany.com. To learn more about Driftless Café, visit www.driftlesscafe.com.

Luke Zahm, Photo: Chad Berger

GO: ABC Dinner Series March 6 Hosted by Kickapoo Café, 232 E. Erie St., Milwaukee, WI Brewery selection by Lakefront Brewery March 20 Hosted by The Mint, 1810 State St, La Crosse, WI Brewery selection by Toppling and Goliath Brewery April 10 Hosted by the Driftless Café, 118 W Court St, Viroqua, WI Brewery selection by Driftless Brewing Company May 1 Hosted by The Charmant Hotel, 101 State St, La Crosse, WI Brewery selection by Turtle Stack Brewing Company Schedule subject to change. Contact Driftless Café to confirm at 608-637-7778


LIMELIGHT attendees ran the gamut from youth interested in breaking into the industry to elderly farmers wanting to transition after a lifetime of farming non-organically. Kastel was able to address all their mutual and exclusive concerns. I met up with Kastel afterword to discuss the Cornucopia Institute and the issues facing the organic industry. Q: Is the role of the Cornucopia Institute more of an advocacy group for organic farmers, or more of a watchdog group against deceptive labeling and practices by corporate interests? A: We act as an organic industry watchdog monitoring both corporations and the government. The USDA is charged with protecting organic consumers from fraud and farmers from unfair competition, but they are friendly with industry lobbyists and woefully failing their charge.

MARK KASTEL An interview with the co-founder of Cornucopia Institute Article By: Haakon Nelson Photo: Dahli Durley

If organic foods are important to you, you should know about MOSA Certified Organic. The Midwest Organic Services Association, or MOSA, in Viroqua, Wisconsin, is the largest USDA accredited organic certification agency for organic farms and food processors in the Midwest, and the second largest organic certifier in the entire country. Founded in 1999, MOSA has over 1800 clients in 20 states, but its base is right here in the heart of the Midwest. MOSA enforces the National Organic Standards, created by the USDA in 2002. They verify that farmers and food processors are following these rules by reviewing the necessary paperwork and by doing annual onsite inspections. Organicconscious shoppers should look for labels with the USDA Organic Seal and “Certified Organic by MOSA,” or another accredited agency. Products with the USDA Organic Seal are held to very high standards of production and handling, all verified by organizations such as MOSA. Farmers or business owners interested in attaining organic certification, should start with a call to MOSA. “The organic market is growing rapidly, but there’s so much to consider before filling out the paperwork,” says Erik Gundersen, one of MOSA’s certification specialists. “Like what kinds of fertilizers and livestock healthcare products you’re using. Those things have to be approved first. Only natural products are allowed. Our job is to help people understand the process.” Gundersen’s role at MOSA involves

Institute co-founder Mark Kastel. A former farm equipment salesman whose interest in organics came about after being exposed to life-threatening levels of pesticide, Kastel speaks to the interests of organic farmers, while possessing an understanding of the conventional farming industry. Conference

Q: Are there any issues/legislation which are of major concern in the near future? A: Yes, the USDA has violated a number of tenants of the Organic Foods Production Act, passed by Congress in 1990. They’re handing power to corporate lobbyists and taking it away from the National Organic Standards

Q: The Institute posts an impressive amount of scientific data, is this mostly from government or independent sources? A: It’s a combination of studies that we produce ourselves and an analysis of peerreviewed, published research by other scientific authorities. Q: Do events like the MOSES Conference, where youth were quite visibly represented, show positive steps in the future of organic food? A: Yes! Both organic and conventional farmers in this country are graying rapidly. We need to replace them and hand down the knowledge base we have developed over the last few decades. It’s wonderful to see so many young couples with their children attending the conference. Q: With people just becoming interested in organic food/living, what are some good resources they can consult? A: If they are interested in learning more about becoming organic farmers, then MOSES is an excellent resource. If they want access to great food and to learn more about the options available, we would highly encourage them to visit one of the memberowned cooperative grocers in our region. For more information consult either www.cornucopia.org, or visit the Cornucopia Institute Facebook page.

Local Organic Certifiers Article: Jess Witkins Photo: Contributed

both reviewing certification forms and performing on-site inspections. “We are really dedicated to customer service,” he says. “We are able to answer any questions the community has about organic labels or products. A lot of us have backgrounds working with small farms. I think that gives us a lot of credibility with farmers and consumers.” MOSA dedicates a lot of resources towards organic education. They participate in many farming conferences, including the Organic Farming Conference

in La Crosse, and also hold several hands-on learning opportunities called Field Days, where farmers are invited to gather at different locations to continue their education on the certification process and best organic farming practices. For more information about MOSA, field days, organic certification and how to get started, visit mosaorganic.org.

SEVEN | thesevenspot.com |

The popularity of organic food and the resulting economics and advocacy issues presented to this growing industry were the main topics at the recent MOSES Organic Farming Conference, at the La Crosse Center in downtown La Crosse. One of the presenters was Cornucopia

Q: What sort of staff does the Institute have? How much work/information that the Institute posts is done by outside allies? A: We have a core-staff of about 12, which includes scientists with Ph.D.s and related fields and farm policy experts with agricultural economics backgrounds. We do collaborate with other organizations that share our values.

Board, a 15-member, multi-stakeholder body that was designed to act as a buffer between lobbyists and the organic community.

Erik Gundersen

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LIMELIGHT

SEVEN | Issue #9 | March, 2016

L

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ove and syrup flow through the entire B&E’s Trees story, and as a #1 fan of B&E’s Trees Certified Organic Bourbon Barrel Aged Maple Syrup, it was an absolute delight to sit down with business partners Bree Breckel and Eric Weninger to talk about turning sap into syrup, phenology (the study of cyclic and seasonal natural phenomena, especially in relation to climate, plant and animal life), really old tractors and the future of small farms. Breckel “The Sap-wrangler” and Weninger, a combustion engineer who works in research and development at Harley Davidson in Milwaukee, joined the conversation via speakerphone in Breckel’s La Crosse home. According to Weninger, the nebulous idea of starting a farm came to him in 2008. A business plan formulated between the partners two years later, and in 2011, B&E’s Trees became a reality with help from a farm ownership loan from the Farm Service Agency (FSA) of Monroe County. “The FSA was the first group to see our potential and viability,” states Weninger. The duo purchased 40 acres in October 2011 and an additional 24 acres in 2012. After the initial purchase, the woods were assessed by an equipment company, which

B&E’S TREES Article: Deborah Nerud Photos: Dahli Durley

advised new, efficient methods for the tubing and collection system. Then in 2012, the very first season for B&E’s Trees arrived early. Weninger recalls, “Historically, it was the worst syrup season ever recorded, since records have been kept.” Aware of the enormous investment made by both partners, Breckel states, “We had committed everything into this venture—you have to put so much in right away, but you don’t see the return until later.”

B meets E Sandwiched between an idea and a business plan, before sap became syrup, Breckel and Weninger met on Earth Day 2010. Breckel recalls, “I tackled this tall gentleman who kept elbowing me. I figured I’d either get a buddy or a restraining order.” The two united as a couple, and the decision to purchase land and work a farm intertwined with their courtship. The formation of B&E’s Trees ran

concurrent to full-time jobs. Breckel explains, “We had a lot of schedule coordination happening—not just for ourselves, but with the amazing team of humans that just wanted to help us. Folks would show up and just say, ‘Hi, what can I do to help? I brought beer.’” Weninger concurs, “There’s so much motivation to get to your goal. The heroic efforts by family and friends to help us make this dream a reality was unbelievable.” Syrup meets beer The cold nights and warm mornings of the 2013 season ushered in a bumper crop and a new partnership for B&E’s Trees. A chance meeting with Paul Graham of Central Waters Brewery at the MREA conference grew into an opportunity for product diversification. “We knew we didn’t just want to sell bulk syrup—we really wanted to add value and a brand around our story by creating something unique,” says Breckel. Central Waters Brewery in Amherst, Wis., is committed to sustainability with a majority of ingredients sourced locally and a solar array that heats the facility’s water and powers over 20 percent of its electricity. The connection between B&E’s Trees and Central Waters Brewery marries beer and syrup into what Graham calls “a really


A sweet future The future for B&E’s is exciting. As their unique product slowly flows into co-ops, grocery stores, fairs and trade shows, the success is almost overwhelming. “We are focusing on the small scale right now,” Breckel states. “We want to continue to build relationships with businesses and our customers.” Breckel and Weninger are grateful for the local response and support they receive. That includes business marketing and retailing classes from Coulee Co.Starters of La Crosse and assistance from Sue Noble of the Food Enterprise Center of Viroqua, which provides a certified kitchen for bottling and aging the syrup. B&E’s isn’t just syrup or a farm, it’s a way of life. Weninger notes, “We’re improving these woods to improve the eco-system and the business. There’s viability of seeing these woods healthy and sustained—being active in the woods, managing this space—I can’t think of anything I’d rather be doing.” Breckel has an equally deep connection with the land. “Doing syrup successfully allows you an intimate knowledge of the woods,” she says. “I know when certain flowers are

going to bloom. I can find and forage the ramps as they poke through the snow…Out here, there are so many opportunities to stop and acknowledge the power of nature and how life cycles through the seasons. Setting up, tapping, watching the forest come alive—I feel like I’ve been invited to watch the awakening of spring. It really is a full, immersive experience.” For the curious, the syrup-lover or those who just like to play in the woods, B&E’s Trees is open for business and open for visitors. If you’re interested in checking out the magic of the woods or just want to see what a massive sap boiler system looks like, plan to attend B&E’s open house on March 19. Directions to the farm, recipes, stories, videos and beautiful photography can be found on B&E’s website at www.bandestrees.com.

B&E’s Trees Fun Facts! It takes 40-50 gallons of sap to produce one gallon of syrup; this is highly variable based on tree health, size and air temperature. ••• On average, one tree makes approximately 40 gallons of sap/season. ••• B&E’s Trees utilizes 2,3002,400 taps in their 64-acre woods; while most trees are single tap, some of their larger trees host two taps.

GO: B & E’s Trees Open House Where: Oarlock Ave., Cashton, WI 608-799-9380 When: March 19, 2 p.m. Info: www.bandestrees.com

SEVEN | thesevenspot.com |

fun relationship.” “I wanted to try something new, and I really liked what B&E’s was doing,” adds Graham. The pilot program for a new B&E’s Bourbon Barrel Aged Maple Syrup beer started with just two oak barrels. The syrup ages for nearly a year in the bourbon-soaked barrels (provided by Central Waters). It is then removed, processed and sold by B&E’s. The barrels are then filled with a stout that requires a 9-12 month aging process. After tweaking the stout recipe to reflect a stronger maple flavor, the original two barrels turned into 18. A 1,000-gallon batch of stout imbued with B&E’s Trees Bourbon Barrel Aged Maple Syrup will be ready for a fall 2016 release. With Central Waters’ barrels, Breckel and Weninger created a unique, value-added product. In return the maple syrup-soaked barrels enabled Central Waters to create a new product steeped in flavor and sustainability. “Without a doubt,” Graham states, “I see this symbiotic relationship continuing—I give them the barrels for free. I get them back. We make beer. It’s a great working relationship. It makes their product more marketable, and the only cost is time.”

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BUSINESS

GARLIC GALORE Two young men from Trempealeau set out to conquer the world of garlic

Article: Joerg Droll Photos: Contributed

“I SEVEN | Issue #9 | March, 2016

haven’t seen a vampire here in two years,” notes Jason Hovell, half of the duo behind Trempealeau County’s up-and-coming garlic producer Tamarack Garlic Farm. Hovell’s business partner and lifelong

24

Dan Lilla

friend Dan Lilla puts it in less mystical terms: “We both grew up on and around farms and wanted to create something earthbound and of value for our kids.” Hovell concurs, “Yeah, something to keep them off the couch and away from the video games.” Their quest to become the top garlic producers in the Midwest began two and one-half years ago. Lilla’s father-inlaw planted the seed—or rather clove— with a slightly cryptic text message: “Look into garlic farming.” Lilla was intrigued and started doing some research. It turns out the planting, growing and harvesting season of garlic falls almost completely in the summer. And for Hovell and Lilla, both teachers with time off in the summer months, that was perfect timing. “We read up on the topic, talked to garlic farmers around the country and found a plot of land on my family’s farm that would suit our purpose,” says Lilla.

Garlic demystified “Since we bought garlic from a number of producers, we ended up with 11 varieties of garlic, each with a different taste, bulb and clove size, and storage time,” explains Hovell. There are only 12 to 14 strains of garlic that can actually be differentiated genetically. Many of the 400 or so garlic names describe the same bulbs in varying regions and cultures. “Our garlic ranges from mild sweetness in the Great Northern White—that can easily be enjoyed raw— to the strong and hot flavor of the Asian Tempest, that’s best when it’s roasted,” says Hovell. In October 2015 the team planted the field for their second season in the garlic biz. They expect the 28,000 bulbs on 1.5 acres to begin sprouting in early March. “Then we harvest the scapes in May and start picking the actual garlic, depending on the variety, in June and July,” says Lilla.

After harvest the garlic cures for three to four weeks before it hits the market. “We sell our product at the local farmers’ markets, through Schwertel’s roadside produce stand and a couple of food coops in the area but mainly through our website (www.TamarackGarlicFarm.com)


ONLY AT THE Y

There’s a unique combination at the Y. It’s a place where the community comes together to connect, play, and discover new things. The Y offers comprehensive healthy living and learning experiences for adults and kids, from fitness equipment and team sports, to creativity classes exploring music and art.

and Facebook,” says Hovell. Pre-sale of the next crop through their website starts in early April; the actual product will begin shipping in midAugust. Growing success Hovell and Lilla are pretty happy with the first season of Tamarack Garlic Farm. “Equipment, seed and running costs were paid for, and we even had some money left to pay ourselves a fair wage,” says Lilla. Hovell adds, “We now produce our own seed material. That’s a big win.” The farms ongoing efforts include

obtaining organic certification. “Right now we produce on a conventional farm, but use strictly organic processes—no pesticides, no herbicides, no chemical fertilizer,” explains Lilla. “That’s part of our mission statement and pledge to our customers.”

The best way to experience the unique combination at the Y is to see it for yourself. Present coupon below for a free visit*. Visit www.laxymca.org for more information LA CROSSE AREA FAMiLY YMCA YMCA-LA CROSSE BRANCH 1140 Main Street, La Crosse

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400 Mason Street, Onalaska

Joerg Droll is a freelance writer from Germany. Prior to moving to the United States, he spent 20 years at various men’s lifestyle publications working his way up from intern to managing editor at the German editions of magazines like Playboy, Men’s Health, GQ and MAXIM.

608 782 9622 www.LAxYMCA.ORg

Home Roots (n):

1. Where you dig your hands into the dirt. 2. Where you dine. 3. A place to rest your head. 4. Where you grow.

Roasted Garlic Aioli By Executive Chef Gavin Keeling Trempealeau Hotel

Together, let’s explore what this looks like for you.

“ Kassidy was amazing to work with...It was truly a fun and exciting home buying experience.” - Ryan S., La Crosse

“This easy-to-make mayonnaise is an elegant dip for crudités and a wonderful condiment for most fish dishes and all manners of grilled vegetables. Use Siberian garlic if you like some spice, Chesnok Red if you prefer a subtle garlic taste with sweet notes.” Ingredients • 1 head of garlic • 1/2 cup plus 2 tsp. extra-virgin olive oil • 1 tsp. Dijon mustard • 1 egg yolk • 1/2 cup vegetable oil • 2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice • Kosher salt Instructions • Heat the oven to 375°degrees, rack in the middle.

Kassidy Taggart

Buyer Specialist kassidytaggart@remax.net

608-797-3332

• Stop processor, add lemon juice, season with salt, and pulse until mixed, scraping down the sides with rubber spatula. • Let aioli sit for 30 minutes before using.

First Choice

Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

The Linda Nelson Team

Free Tailgate Party!

Saturday, March 26, 10AM-2PM JOIN US IN OUR PARKING LOT!

• Peel loose outer skins from garlic, keeping head in one piece. Cut off the top quarter to expose cloves. Place head cut-side up on piece of foil, drizzle with 2 tsp. olive oil, wrap tightly to form a foil packet. Place on baking sheet and bake until package is very soft when squeezed, about 60-75 minutes. Open packet and squeeze roasted cloves from skins into food processor with a blade attachment. • Add mustard, egg yolk, process until evenly combined, about 10 seconds. With the motor running, slowly add remaining 1/2 cup olive oil, then vegetable oil in thin streams until completely combined, about 2 minutes.

FREE YMCA DAY PASS

*Present this pass to the Member Services Desk at time of visit. Anyone 18+ must present photo I.D. at time of use. Children under age 8 must be accompanied by an adult at all times. One coupon per visit, per household, per a month. Expires 03/31/16 CODE: COUPON

Free Samples from P6 Producers

OPEN DAILY 7AM-9PM 609 N Main Street 608.637.7511 viroquafood.coop

• Artisan Deli Foods • Black Garlic North America • • B&E’s Trees • Driftless Organics • The Flower Basket • • Kickapoo Honey • Hansen’s Country Bakery • • St. Brigid’s Meadows • Driftless Organics • • TerraForm Botanicals • Underground Meats •

Enter Drawing to WIN BASKET FULL OF P6 GOODIES!

Saturday, March 26th, 10am-2pm

SEVEN | thesevenspot.com |

Jason (left) and Dan planting

25


COLLEGE CORNER By Austin Sargent

Photo: Dahli Durley

When it Seems Easier to...

SEVEN | Issue #9 | March, 2016

It’s starting to feel a bit like crunch time isn’t it? Midterms are inching closer and the amount of responsibilities outside of class keep piling on. For me, it’s a time when it’s a lot easier to do anything but schoolwork. So this month’s article is all about those times. When it seems easier to stay in bed instead of go to class: Alright, I am guilty of this way too often. The alarm goes off and I check my attendance grade in my classes for that day. I do the calculations in my head: “How many more can I miss?” But then I remember that the work I miss today will just have to be made up later. So why not just throw on a pair of sweatpants and SHOW UP? It’s a lot easier to ask professors for extensions and help, if you show you are committed to the class. When it seems easier to just quit: Sadly, I think we’ve all been here. Our commitments, which once seemed small, have now snowballed into a seemingly unmanageable amount. So what to do? In times of overwhelming stress, it always helps me to break things into smaller bits. Start week by week, and then even day by day. Set goals for yourself that are actually achievable. (What a radical thought!) Be proactive about getting an earlier start on those assignments and commitments that will require the most energy and attention. When it seems easier to just drop out: Let me just say this, college really isn’t for everybody. I know it’s something we have all heard, but now I get it. Four years is a huge commitment! It’s like a boyfriend or girlfriend, really. It’s exciting at the start, then you hit challenges and hurdles and suddenly it isn’t always so fun. By the time you get to graduation and your life is about to change again, it can be downright scary. In times like this, I meditate about what I really want. Am I just having a really tough week, or is the problem more deeply rooted? Dropping out or transferring shouldn’t be considered a bad thing. Some people need more time to find exactly how their piece of the puzzle fits. When it seems easier to go to the bar: Okay, I get it. But you have to earn it. Don’t push off responsibilities for a few hours of fun. One of my professors recently made us calculate how much we spent on alcohol at bars, and let’s just say I’ve found plenty of other things to spend my time on. It’s also easy to forget about all the things you’ve already committed to when you’re only focused on your happy hour drink specials. If you manage your time wisely, you should still be able to build in some “recreational time.” If you are in a rough patch as you read this, my best suggestion to you is breathe. Really. Take a minute to check in with yourself and center your mind on what is most important to you. If that doesn’t work, talk it out with someone. Find an accountability buddy, who will take away your Netflix password or help you through the really dry homework. In the blink of an eye, it will be over, and 26 you will come out on the other side a stronger person. Just keep pushing!

HEALTH & FITNESS IMPROVE RELATIONSHIPS with the Enneagram Article By: Jess Witkins Photos: Contributed If there was a class you could take to learn how to better communicate with and understand others, would you take it? That’s exactly what the Franciscan Spirituality Center (FSC) is offering this April with its Enneagram course. What exactly is Enneagram? FSC staff member and course instructor, Audrey Lucier explains, “When people talk about the Enneagram, they’re referring to a way to understand and explain human personality differences. We know that even people who grow up in the same family have very different ways of seeing things. They differ in what is important to them, what motivates them and how they cope with the challenges of life. There are nine different personality styles in the Enneagram, which is how it gets its name; ‘ennea’ means nine.” The Enneagram is depicted as a circle rather than nine separate boxes, because all nine styles represent who we really are and can be found within each of us. “We’ve just learned to rely on and use some parts of our personality more than others,” says Lucier. The program, which takes place April 8-9, is for anyone looking to grow in selfawareness. It highlights individual personality strengths and how to build less-developed areas for balance. Attendees can expect to attain more effective communication skills, which can be applied both professionally and personally. Lucier first became intrigued by the Enneagram process when she joined FSC, and combined it with her own background in the Myers-Briggs theory of personality. “It really explained a lot of what I was seeing in my own family! So it was very practical in finding ways to get along better with others,” explains Lucier. “The Myers-Briggs theory and the Enneagram complement each other, and I still use both.” FSC holds the class annually, so people can learn about personality and the nine different ways of viewing the world according the Enneagram system. This spring, Lucier returns to the class with fellow FSC staff member, Steve Spilde. Lucier recalls a couple she and Spilde met in a past Enneagram workshop. “The husband was a big, burly guy with a career in law enforcement, and his wife was a petite woman who worked in a helping

profession,” notes Lucier. “Their personality styles were not what you’d guess from this description, and their styles were quite different. The wife was more actionoriented and the husband was more heart-centered. So when their son died, they found themselves grieving quite differently. They told us that they believe the Enneagram saved their marriage, because it helped them understand why they might grieve differently.” People describe the Enneagram as a way to grow in compassion, not only for others who see the world differently, but also for ourselves. Lucier adds, “So often we are intensely aware of all the ways we think we are less than perfect, but no personality style is better than another.”

Steve Spilde

Audrey Lucier

GO: Increase Your Emotional Intelligence with the Enneagram Where: Franciscan Spirituality Center When: April 8, 7-9 p.m. and April 9, 9 a.m. - 7 p.m. Presenters: Audrey Lucier and Steve Spilde Cost: $95.00 Registration: www.fscenter.org


YOUR GUIDE TO SEVEN RIVERS REGION EVENTS, FARMERS MARKETS, BLOOD DRIVES, VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES AND SO MUCH MORE. Have something you would like to list in an upcoming issue?

All listings are free, visit our website at TheSevenSpot.com or email contact@thesevenspot.com.

Friday, Mar. 4 International Festival of Owls Immerse yourself in owls at the only full-weekend, all-owl event in North America. Seven species of live owls, nest box building, pellet dissection, owl experts from Finland, Then Netherlands, Canada, and North Carolina, kids crafts, hooting contest, bus trips, banquet, owl-themed food, vendors, and more. 6-10pm. $8 adults; $5 ages 4-17, all, Houston High School, 306 W Elm St, Houston festivalofowls.com (507) 896-6957. Social Repose Live with It Lives It Breathes and Steven Joseph 6:30-10pm. $10 adv/$12 day of, All

Ages, Warehouse, 328 Pearl Street, La Crosse warehouserocks. com.

Singin’ in the Rain The UW-La Crosse Department

of Theatre Arts presents Singin’ in the Rain, the delightfully entertaining musical with a downpour of unforgettable songs including Good Morning, Make ‘em Laugh, and of course, Singin’ in the Rain. 7:30-9:45pm. $5 - $18, all ages, Toland Theatre, UWL Campus, 16th and Vine St., La Crosse uwlax.edu (608) 785-8522.

Saturday, Mar. 5

owl experts from Finland, Then Netherlands, Canada, and North Carolina, kids crafts, hooting contest, bus trips, banquet, owl-themed food, vendors, and more. 9am-3pm. $8 adults; $5 ages 4-17, all, Houston High School, 306 W Elm St, Houston festivalofowls.com (507) 896-6957.

Centering Prayer Centering Prayer, experience the

SOAR With the Eagles Bring the whole family and

Wednesday, Mar. 9

visit the National Eagle Center in Wabasha weekends in March for SOAR With the Eagles! Each weekend we offer special programs sure to thrill people of all ages, including flying birds shows, live animal programs, wild eagle viewing and MORE! 10am-5pm. $8 Adults, $7 Adults 62+, $6 Kids 4-17, Kids Under 3 - FREE, All Ages, National Eagle Center, 50 Pembroke Avenue, Wabasha nationaleaglecenter.org (651) 565-4989.

stillness of community prayer at Franciscan Spirituality Center. 5:30pm-6:15am. Free, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

Book Chats at Java Vino Like to talk books? Share your favorite titles, least favorites or just chat about the wonderful world of books. Sure to relieve your cabin fever. There will also be a drawing for a $10 gift certificate from Java Vino at each Book Chats session. 10:30-11:30am. Free, Adult, Java Vino, 2311 State Rd, La Crosse lacrosselibrary.org.

Teddy Bear Clinic Sponsored by Gundersen Health

Hatha Yoga Hatha Yoga, with instructor Michelle Hundt. Open the many channels of the body through postures or asana to create balance, flexibility, and coordination. 5:30-6:30pm. $10, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

Music on a Sunday Afternoon The La Crosse Public Library’s free live music series. Please check the event calendar on our website for performer information. 1:30-2:30pm. Free, All Ages, La Crosse Public Library, 800 Main Street, La Crosse lacrosselibrary.org.

Food as medicine Food as Medicine explores the benefits

System, learn about health care for kids. Free teddy bears while supplies last. Regular admission resumes 2-5 pm. 11am-2pm. FREE, All ages, Children’s Museum of La Crosse, 207 5th Ave S., La Crosse.

Behind [art]ifact Talks Please join us for the Behind

Creative Communities Art Experience Saturday, March 5, 2016 - Creative Communities Art Experience - 9:00 am-4:00 pm. Join us for a day of art exploration. Attendees will meet four local artists, work with them and their mediums for 90 minutes each, and take home art projects. Everyone is welcome; no experience required. 9am-4pm. $60/Person; $54/KVR Friend, 15+, Kickapoo Valley Reserve, La Farge kvr.state.wi.us.

[art]ifact talks! Behing [art]ifact is a series of talks hosted throughout the [art]ifact exhibit. This is where objects and original artwork will be delved into further by the artist and historian who worked with each object. The talks are open and free to the public. 2-3pm. Free, All Ages, Pump House Regional Arts Center, 119 King St., La Crosse thepumphouse.org.

Monroe County Historical Arts & Craft Show

of Theatre Arts presents Singin’ in the Rain, the delightfully entertaining musical with a downpour of unforgettable songs including Good Morning, Make ‘em Laugh, and of course, Singin’ in the Rain. 2-4:15pm. $5 - $18, all ages, Toland Theatre, UWL Campus, 16th and Vine St., La Crosse uwlax.edu (608) 785-8522.

Monroe County Historical Society Presents Their Annual Spring Arts & Crafts Show. 300+ booths. 9am-4pm. free, 0+, Sparta High School, 506 N Black River St, Sparta business.bikesparta. org (608) 269-3233.

All listings are subject to change. It’s always a good idea to review event directly ahead of time.

Singin’ in the Rain The UW-La Crosse Department

Thursday, Mar. 10

Sacred Places in Word and Art Sacred Places in Word and Art, with Jan Wellik and Deborah Hansen, explores the sacred in nature and within us through creative expression; theme is “Sky View” (oil pastels at Grandad Bluff), fee includes all supplies (yours to keep). 9am-noon. $25, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

Golden Yoga Golden Yoga, with instructor Amber Moesch. Traditional poses are modified using a chair. 11:15 a.m.-noon. $8 drop-in. [Optional: One-hour class from 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. offers additional 15 minutes of floor exercises; $10 dropin.] Please bring a mat. 11:15am-noon. $8, $10, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

Drumming Circle Drumming Circle, bring your favorite

SOAR With the Eagles Bring the whole family and

Monday Mornings @ Main Lifelong learning for Ages

Computer Classes @ the Library Max. 12 Please call the Reference Desk at 608.789.7122 to reserve your seat. Topics change each month. Please check our website for more information: www.lacrosselibrary.org 5:30-7:30pm. Free, Adult, La Crosse Public Library, 800 Main Street, La Crosse lacrosselibrary.org.

March MACness Delicious Mac varieties will be served by The Old Crow, Dublin Square Irish Pub & Eatery, Fayze’s Restaurant & Bakery, Burger Fusion Company, Big Boar Smokers & JavaVino. A donation of $5 serves as your entry fee with all proceeds supplying bicycling gear to local children. 11am-12:30pm. $5, All Ages, The Old Crow, 100 3rd St So., La Crosse (608) 397-5078. Wild Clover Green Lifestyle Consulting at the Climate Action Festival Climate Action Festival: acting locally for climate sustainability. Vendors, music, food, network, voters registration, assess your carbon footprint, make an action plan, and more! Wild Clover: Green Lifestyle Consulting, and author of A Green Lifestyle Recipe Book. 2-5pm. FREE, All Ages, First Congregational Church, 2503 Main St., La Crosse .

Rockin’ Out Hunger Rock Out Hunger with The Re-

mainders and The Executives! Join us for a night of great music, food, a silent auction, raffle, and dessert auction, all to benefit The Hunger Task Force! Tickets are available at Best Western & The Hunger Task Force. 6:30pm. $10 in advance/$15 at the door, 21+, Best Western Riverfront Hotel, 1835 Rose Street, La Crosse.

Singin’ in the Rain The UW-La Crosse Department

of Theatre Arts presents Singin’ in the Rain, the delightfully entertaining musical with a downpour of unforgettable songs including Good Morning, Make ‘em Laugh, and of course, Singin’ in the Rain. 7:30-9:45pm. $5 - $18, all ages, Toland Theatre, UWL Campus, 16th and Vine St., La Crosse uwlax.edu (608) 785-8522.

Sunday, Mar. 6 International Festival of Owls Immerse yourself in owls at the only full-weekend, all-owl event in North America. Seven species of live owls, nest box building, pellet dissection,

50 and better. Refreshments will be served. Please check the event calendar on our website for program information. 9:3011am. Free, 50+, La Crosse Public Library, 800 Main Street, La Crosse lacrosselibrary.org.

Monday Night @ the Movies Join us every Monday

night for a showing of some of your favorite movies! Free popcorn provided! Please check the event calendar on our website for title information. 6-8pm. Free, Adult, La Crosse Public Library, 800 Main Street, La Crosse.

Tuesday, Mar. 8 Computer Classes @ the Library Max. 12 Please

call the Reference Desk at 608.789.7122 to reserve your seat. Topics change each month. Please check our website for more information: www.lacrosselibrary.org 10am-noon. Free, Adult, La Crosse Public Library, 800 Main Street, La Crosse lacrosselibrary.org.

Golden Yoga Golden Yoga, with instructor Amber Moesch. Traditional poses are modified using a chair. 11:15 a.m.-noon. $8 drop-in. [Optional: One-hour class from 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. offers additional 15 minutes of floor exercises; $10 dropin.] Please bring a mat. 11:15am-noon. $8, $10, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

International Women’s Day at PFC Join friends

and meet new ones on Tuesday, March 8, International Women’s Day, to celebrate women. We will discuss how far we’ve come, and our current and upcoming needs, with a focus on environmental issues. UW-L professor Dr. Adam Driscoll will lead a conversation over lunch on EcoFeminism. All participants are invited to share thoughts, stories, and concerns related to women’s roles. 1-2:30pm. Free, RSVP requested, All Ages, People’s Food Co-Op, 315 Fifth Avenue South, La Crosse pfc. coop (608) 784-5798.

The Sound of Bowls The Sound of Bowls, with Tom Roberts. Traditional historic Tibetan singing bowls produce sounds that invoke deep states of relaxation, naturally assisting one in entering expanded states of consciousness and meditation. 5:30-6:30pm. Freewill offering, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

LCT: Boeing Boeing Bernard, a swinging bachelor in 1960s Paris, is engaged to three different women, all stewardesses for different airlines. His carefully scheduled routine flies out the window, however, when all three are grounded in Paris on the same night! Bernard enlists the help of his housekeeper and a hapless friend to maintain the charade as he strives to keep each woman happy...and in the dark. 7:30-9:30pm. $10 military, $15 students, $23 matinees, $27 evenings, Weber Center for the Performing Arts, 428 Front St S, La Crosse lacrossecommunitytheatre.org (608) 784-9292.

Saturday, Mar. 12

Vinyasa Yoga Vinyasa Yoga, with instructor Cheryl Neubauer. Flowing sequence of postures are coordinated with a comfortable breathing rhythm. $10, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

visit the National Eagle Center in Wabasha weekends in March for SOAR With the Eagles! Each weekend we offer special programs sure to thrill people of all ages, including flying birds shows, live animal programs, wild eagle viewing and MORE! 10am-5pm. $8 Adults, $7 Adults 62+, $6 Kids 4-17, Kids Under 3 - FREE, All Ages, National Eagle Center, 50 Pembroke Avenue, Wabasha nationaleaglecenter.org (651) 565-4989.

tation of the live community variety show with host Damon Prestemon and a cast full of local talent featuring music, jokes, skits, poems, sponsor interviews, audience participation, spontaneous humor, sing along songs and more. Musical guest: Amanda Grace. Pre-show music: Helen Johnson. 7:30-9:30pm. $8, all ages, St. Mane Theatre, 206 Parkway Ave N, Lanesboro lanesboroarts.org (507) 467-2446.

of simple ingredients that help you maintain your body’s health and vitality. We will focus on a few key ingredients, sample ‘medicinal’ dishes, and provide information on preparation with recipes to take home. Join Crystal Reynolds, chef and holistic health advocate, as we explore ancient and modern food wisdom. 6-7:29pm. $15 members; $25 nonmembers, 18+, People’s Food Co-Op, 315 Fifth Avenue South, La Crosse pfc.coop (608) 784-5798.

International Festival of Owls Immerse yourself in owls at the only full-weekend, all-owl event in North America. Seven species of live owls, nest box building, pellet dissection, owl experts from Finland, Then Netherlands, Canada, and North Carolina, kids crafts, hooting contest, bus trips, banquet, owl-themed food, vendors, and more. 9am-10pm. $8 adults; $5 ages 4-17, all, Houston High School, 306 W Elm St, Houston festivalofowls.com (507) 896-6957.

Monday, Mar. 7

“Over the Back Fence” Community Variety Show ‘The Letter M’ is the theme for this month’s presen-

Lenten Gospels Lenten Gospels series with John McHugh 5:30-6:30pm. $10, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

drum. 5:30-6:30pm. Freewill offering, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 7915295.

Needle Felting Class ~Eggs -n-Chicks! Needle

Felting is a simple, fun, and forgiving art form. We will use special needles to “poke” at wool to create any shape we want, in this case an Egg -n- Chick! No Skills Needed. Registration is required as space is limited. 6-8pm. $16, 5/6+, Inspired, 1516 Market St., La Crosse InspiredLaCrosse.com (608) 317-2046.

3rd Annual Forks and Corks The 3rd Annual Forks & Corks Fundraiser event will be held Thursday, March 10, 2016 in the Grand Ballroom at the La Crosse Center. Join us as we sample delicious wine and gourmet food pairings from Pogreba Restaurant! Proceeds from this event support the Gemütlichkeit Foundation, which offers scholarships to local students. 6-9pm. $35, 21+, La Crosse Center, 300 Harborview Plaza, La Crosse. Guilty Kilts live music Join Dublin Square for weeklong specials and events celebrating St. Patrick’s Week...it’s more than just a day around here! 7pm. Varied, 21+, Dublin Square Irish Pub and Eatery, 103 North 3rd Street, La Crosse DublinSquarePub.com (608) 519-2509. Irish whiskey tasting and Andreas Transo Live Music Join Dublin Square for week-long specials and events

celebrating St. Patrick’s Week...it’s more than just a day around here! 7pm. Varied, 21+, Dublin Square Irish Pub and Eatery, 103 North 3rd Street, La Crosse DublinSquarePub.com (608) 519-2509.

Friday, Mar. 11 Girl Scout “Painting Picassos” Overnight For

Daisies and Brownies.Learn the magic of various painting/drawing mediums to create your own masterpieces. Brownies earn the Painting Badge. Includes Brownie badge, program materials, evening snack, continental breakfast, take-home project and admission to the Museum/Climbing Wall. Event ends at noon, Mar. 12th. Pre-registration and pre-payment required. 5pm. $30/ scout, $1/chaperone, Daisies & Brownies + adults, Children’s Museum of La Crosse, 207 5th Ave S., La Crosse.

St. Patrick’s Celebration with Dublin Square

Join Dublin Square for week-long specials and events celebrating St. Patrick’s Week...it’s more than just a day around here! 8-11am. Varied, 21+, Dublin Square Irish Pub and Eatery, 103 North 3rd Street, La Crosse DublinSquarePub.com (608) 519-2509.

Get Growing Gardening Series: Soils & Seeding Hands-on demo of seeding, sets, and transplants. Door

prizes included! Offered by Gretchen Vaughn longtime CSA and Master gardener. 10% same day greenhouse purchases. 10am-noon. $20, All Ages, The Flower Basket Greenhouse and Floral, 520 E. Terhune St., Viroqua prwsflowerbasket.org (608) 637-8200.

SOAR With the Eagles Bring the whole family and

visit the National Eagle Center in Wabasha weekends in March for SOAR With the Eagles! Each weekend we offer special programs sure to thrill people of all ages, including flying birds shows, live animal programs, wild eagle viewing and MORE! 10am-5pm. $8 Adults, $7 Adults 62+, $6 Kids 4-17, Kids Under 3 - FREE, All Ages, National Eagle Center, 50 Pembroke Avenue, Wabasha nationaleaglecenter.org (651) 565-4989.

Victory over Violence New Horizons shelter and outreach centers is hosting their Victory Over Violence Gala and auction. Enjoy a festive event and help New Horizons become victorious over violence. Call 791.2610 ext. 1305 to reserve your place or go to www.nhagainstabuse.org. 5:30-9:30pm. 75.00, 21+, Cargill Room, 332 Front Street, La Crosse. Knife Skills Cooking Class / Saturday, March 12th, 6:30pm @ savorycreations.org *full meal provided Knowing how to use knives skillfully is the foun-

dation of all cooking, and doesn’t have to be scary or frustrating. Many home and even professional cooks don’t always wield a knife correctly, however, which increases food preparation time and makes the process harder---and less safe---than it should be. This class is sure to assist in helping you get comfortable with your kitchen knives 6:30-8:30pm. $50, 18+, Savory Creations Cooking School, 1230 Caledonia St, LaCrosse savorycreations. org (608) 519-3542.

LCT: Boeing Boeing Bernard, a swinging bachelor in 1960s Paris, is engaged to three different women, all stewardesses for different airlines. His carefully scheduled routine flies out the window, however, when all three are grounded in Paris on the same night! Bernard enlists the help of his housekeeper and a hapless friend to maintain the charade as he strives to keep each woman happy...and in the dark. 7:30-9:30pm. $10 military, $15 students, $23 matinees, $27 evenings, Weber Center for the Performing Arts, 428 Front St S, La Crosse lacrossecommunitytheatre.org (608) 784-9292. Pigtown Fling LIVE at Steinhaus Pigtown Fling

can’t get enough of the beer, brats, and bluegrass down at La Crosse’s best German bar! We’ll be taking the main stage inside to pick a few of our favorite Irish tunes and then some to help you prepare for St. Paddy’s day. Slainte! 8-11pm. FREE, 21+.

Sunday, Mar. 13 SOAR With the Eagles Bring the whole family and

visit the National Eagle Center in Wabasha weekends in March

SEVEN | thesevenspot.com |

LISTINGS

March 2016

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LISTINGS March 2016 for SOAR With the Eagles! Each weekend we offer special programs sure to thrill people of all ages, including flying birds shows, live animal programs, wild eagle viewing and MORE! 10am-5pm. $8 Adults, $7 Adults 62+, $6 Kids 4-17, Kids Under 3 - FREE, All Ages, National Eagle Center, 50 Pembroke Avenue, Wabasha nationaleaglecenter.org (651) 565-4989.

Music on a Sunday Afternoon The La Crosse Public Library’s free live music series. Please check the event calendar on our website for performer information. 1:30-2:30pm. Free, All Ages, La Crosse Public Library, 800 Main Street, La Crosse lacrosselibrary.org. LCT: Boeing Boeing Bernard, a swinging bachelor in 1960s Paris, is engaged to three different women, all stewardesses for different airlines. His carefully scheduled routine flies out the window, however, when all three are grounded in Paris on the same night! Bernard enlists the help of his housekeeper and a hapless friend to maintain the charade as he strives to keep each woman happy...and in the dark. 2-4pm. $10 military, $15 students, $23 matinees, $27 evenings, Weber Center for the Performing Arts, 428 Front St S, La Crosse lacrossecommunitytheatre.org (608) 784-9292.

Monday, Mar. 14 Vinyasa Yoga Vinyasa Yoga, with instructor Cheryl Neubauer. Flowing sequence of postures are coordinated with a comfortable breathing rhythm. $10, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295. Monday Mornings @ Main Lifelong learning for Ages

50 and better. Refreshments will be served. Please check the event calendar on our website for program information. 9:3011am. Free, 50+, La Crosse Public Library, 800 Main Street, La Crosse lacrosselibrary.org.

Rohr Discussion Group Open, informal group exam-

ining the ideas of Franciscan priest, author and speaker Richard Rohr, OFM. Facilitated by Greg Lovell. 5:30-6:30pm. Freewill offering, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

Monday Night @ the Movies Join us every Monday

night for a showing of some of your favorite movies! Free popcorn provided! Please check the event calendar on our website for title information. 6-8pm. Free, Adult, La Crosse Public Library, 800 Main Street, La Crosse.

Tuesday, Mar. 15 Golden Yoga Golden Yoga, with instructor Amber Moesch. Traditional poses are modified using a chair. 11:15 a.m.-noon. $8 drop-in. [Optional: One-hour class from 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. offers additional 15 minutes of floor exercises; $10 dropin.] Please bring a mat. 11:15am-noon. $8, $10, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

Mindfulness Practices for Stress Reduction

Mindfulness Practices for Stress Reduction, with Greg Lovell. Theme is letting go of thoughts through meditation. 5:306:30pm. $10, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

Lefse making Lefse making with Inez Blank, Carol Mills, and Irene Wood. Inez, Carol, and Irene have been making lefse together since childhood, and their first class at PFC received rave reviews! Learn their recipe and process, their techniques and tips and go “hands on” in the PFC kitchen: rolling, baking, and tasting fresh lefse! Register in person at the store, or by phone. 5:30-7:30pm. $15 members; $25 nonmembers, 18+, People’s Food Co-Op, 315 Fifth Avenue South, La Crosse pfc. coop (608) 784-5798.

Adult Craft - No Sew Glove Bunnies Come and

create an adorable bunny that doesn’t require any sewing skills. All supplies are provided. However, if you prefer your own scissors or tools, please bring them with you. Please call Kathy at 608.789.8092 to register by March 10. 1-3pm. Free, Adult, La Crosse Public Library, 800 Main Street, La Crosse lacrosselibrary.org.

Lenten Gospels Lenten Gospels series with John McHugh 5:30-6:30pm. $10, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

Divorce Recovery Divorce Recovery, offering support,

friendship, and healing for the wounds of divorce and separation. 5:30-7pm. Freewill offering, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

Computer Classes @ the Library Max. 12 Please

call the Reference Desk at 608.789.7122 to reserve your seat. Topics change each month. Please check our website for more information: www.lacrosselibrary.org 5:30-7:30pm. Free, Adult, La Crosse Public Library, 800 Main Street, La Crosse lacrosselibrary.org.

St. Paddy’s at the Charmant with Pigtown Fling Irish or not, the Charmant is the place to be to get your

fill of Irish music with Pigtown Fling String Band & friends, and perhaps some pints of the black stuff. From rousing fiddle tunes, to Irish folk and its influences in Americana, and to pub rock and everything in between, some great craic is sure to be had by all! 7-10pm. FREE, All Ages.

LCT: Boeing Boeing Bernard, a swinging bachelor in 1960s Paris, is engaged to three different women, all stewardesses for different airlines. His carefully scheduled routine flies out the window, however, when all three are grounded in Paris on the same night! Bernard enlists the help of his housekeeper and a hapless friend to maintain the charade as he strives to keep each woman happy...and in the dark. 7:30-9:30pm. $10 military, $15 students, $23 matinees, $27 evenings, Weber Center for the Performing Arts, 428 Front St S, La Crosse lacrossecommunitytheatre.org (608) 784-9292.

Friday, Mar. 18 Ultimate Epicurean Event / Wine Pairing Dinner The adventure begins with a tour of the DNA Vintners winery & tasting room while enjoying artisan wine tastings & hors d’oeuvres. We then will commence the evening with a six course gourmet wine-paired dinner hosted by Executive Chef Shawn McManus & his private chef’s table at Savory Creations, located adjacent to the winery. Tickets: savorycreationsllc@ gmail.com 5pm. $80, 21+.

Serenity Retreat: Forgiveness & Healing Se-

renity Retreat: Forgiveness & Healing, closed retreat for those recovering from alcoholism or chemical dependency. 7pm. $135 for full retreat, $95 for commuters, scholarships available., Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

LCT: Boeing Boeing Bernard, a swinging bachelor in

3 - FREE, All Ages, National Eagle Center, 50 Pembroke Avenue, Wabasha nationaleaglecenter.org (651) 565-4989.

comfortable breathing rhythm. $10, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

Easter Egg Hunt Free Easter Egg Hunt! Easter Story,

Monday Mornings @ Main Lifelong learning for Ages

craft, games, and hunt- rain or shine (indoors)! Bring a friend. 10:30-11:30am. FREE, Kids through 5th grade & parents, Shepherd of the Hills, 1215 Redwood St, Onalaska (608) 783-0330.

Ukrainian Egg Decorating Learn how to create

Ukrainian Eggs in this fun class. Registration is required. No Skills Needed. noon-2pm. $20, 7+, Inspired, 1516 Market St., La Crosse InspiredLaCrosse.com (608) 317-2046.

Woodcut Workshop Learn how to create a woodcut us-

ing MDF and simple carving tools. Instruction and materials provided as needed; tools available for additional fee. In addition, you can participate in the Mississippi Steamroll on April 30, 2016. Sign up online or call the Pump House at 608-785-1434. **March 19th class sponsored by SEVEN! First 15 receive 50% off class fee, SEVEN t-shirt, and stickers! 1-2pm. $25 per student, $65 includes cutting tools, Pump House Regional Arts Center, 119 King St., La Crosse thepumphouse.org.

Erik Koskinen & Barbara Jean Erik and Barbara

LCT: Boeing Boeing Bernard, a swinging bachelor in 1960s Paris, is engaged to three different women, all stewardesses for different airlines. His carefully scheduled routine flies out the window, however, when all three are grounded in Paris on the same night! Bernard enlists the help of his housekeeper and a hapless friend to maintain the charade as he strives to keep each woman happy...and in the dark. 7:30-9:30pm. $10 military, $15 students, $23 matinees, $27 evenings, Weber Center for the Performing Arts, 428 Front St S, La Crosse lacrossecommunitytheatre.org (608) 784-9292. Old School Variety Show New show added to the 2015-16 season. A great mix of local performing artists including music, comedy, theatre and storytelling. Special musical guest: Eddie Allen 7:30-10pm. 18.00, 18+, Pump House Regional Arts Center, 119 King St., La Crosse thepumphouse.org.

Sunday, Mar. 20 SOAR With the Eagles Bring the whole family and

visit the National Eagle Center in Wabasha weekends in March for SOAR With the Eagles! Each weekend we offer special programs sure to thrill people of all ages, including flying birds shows, live animal programs, wild eagle viewing and MORE! 10am-5pm. $8 Adults, $7 Adults 62+, $6 Kids 4-17, Kids Under 3 - FREE, All Ages, National Eagle Center, 50 Pembroke Avenue, Wabasha nationaleaglecenter.org (651) 565-4989.

Music on a Sunday Afternoon The La Crosse Public Library’s free live music series. Please check the event calendar on our website for performer information. 1:30-2:30pm. Free, All Ages, La Crosse Public Library, 800 Main Street, La Crosse lacrosselibrary.org.

Start garden seeds indoors Start garden seeds indoors with Jamie O’Neill. We will look at whether or not to soak seeds, what to plant them in, heating mats, grow lights, natural lighting, and more. Everyone will take home a tray of seeds! Jamie is a program director for Grow La Crosse. This class is primarily intended for adults. Register in person at the store, or by phone. 5:30-7pm. $15 members; $25 nonmembers, 18+, People’s Food Co-Op, 315 Fifth Avenue South, La Crosse pfc.coop (608) 784-5798.

Thursday, Mar. 17 St. Patrick’s Day with Dublin Square Join Dublin

Square for week-long specials and events celebrating St. Patrick’s Week...it’s more than just a day around here! Varied, 21+, Dublin Square Irish Pub and Eatery, 103 North 3rd Street, La Crosse DublinSquarePub.com (608) 519-2509.

Egg dyeing with veggie and fruit colors Egg dyeing with veggie and fruit colorswith Linda Riddle. Let’s learn about veggies and fruits that make great dyes, then make some dyes and color boiled eggs to take home! We will decorate baskets and enjoy healthy snacks while the eggs soak up the colors! This class is intended to be interactive for adults and children. Register in person at the store or by phone. 9:30-11am. $10 member family; $20 nonmember family, All Ages, People’s Food Co-Op, 315 Fifth Avenue South, La Crosse pfc.coop (608) 784-5798. SOAR With the Eagles Bring the whole family and

visit the National Eagle Center in Wabasha weekends in March for SOAR With the Eagles! Each weekend we offer special programs sure to thrill people of all ages, including flying birds shows, live animal programs, wild eagle viewing and MORE! 10am-5pm. $8 Adults, $7 Adults 62+, $6 Kids 4-17, Kids Under

Monday Night @ the Movies Join us every Monday

night for a showing of some of your favorite movies! Free popcorn provided! Please check the event calendar on our website for title information. 6-8pm. Free, Adult, La Crosse Public Library, 800 Main Street, La Crosse.

Tuesday, Mar. 22

stillness of community prayer at Franciscan Spirituality Center. 5:30pm-6:15am. Free, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

tarist and folklorist from Memphis, TN with a Master’s Degree in Anthropology, Cohen is a former student of legendary blues and gospel musician Rev. Gary Davis. He performs blues music rooted in Mississippi, the Piedmont, Memphis, and Chicago, as well as some ragtime, gospel & original tunes. 7:30-9:30pm. $15 regular price / $12 members price, all ages, St. Mane Theatre, 206 Parkway Ave N, Lanesboro lanesboroarts.org (507) 467-2446.

Saturday, Mar. 19 ty Retreat: Forgiveness & Healing, closed retreat for those recovering from alcoholism or chemical dependency. midnight-4pm. $135 for full retreat, $95 for commuters, scholarships available., Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

watercolors to explore the connection between artistic expression and your spirit. Registration required; limited to 20 participants. 6-7:30pm. $15, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

Concert: Andy Cohen A finger-style country-blues gui-

Wednesday, Mar. 16 Open the many channels of the body through postures or asana to create balance, flexibility, and coordination. 5:30-6:30pm. $10, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

Art as Prayer Art as Prayer, with Mary Thompson. Use

Golden Yoga Golden Yoga, with instructor Amber Moesch.

stillness of community prayer at Franciscan Spirituality Center. 5:30pm-6:15am. Free, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

Serenity Retreat: Forgiveness & Healing Sereni-

50 and better. Refreshments will be served. Please check the event calendar on our website for program information. 9:3011am. Free, 50+, La Crosse Public Library, 800 Main Street, La Crosse lacrosselibrary.org.

return the Bluff View with a co-billing. We’ll get to hear more of Erik’s unique rockabily story songs, Per Erik “I always want to write about real stuff, real emotions, and I think it comes from living in a place like Northern Michigan.”. Add in the Barbara smooth songs and we’ll have promises to be another fantastic concert. Oh and I’m sure Erik will bring 3 different guitars. 7:29-10pm. $15, all Ages, Bluff View House Concerts, N7916 Bluff View Ct, Holmen facebook.com/BluffView (608) 526-9051.

Girl Scout Sunday “Animals Around Us” For

Hatha Yoga Hatha Yoga, with instructor Michelle Hundt.

SEVEN | Issue #9 | March, 2016

Traditional poses are modified using a chair. 11:15 a.m.-noon. $8 drop-in. [Optional: One-hour class from 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. offers additional 15 minutes of floor exercises; $10 dropin.] Please bring a mat. 11:15am-noon. $8, $10, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

1960s Paris, is engaged to three different women, all stewardesses for different airlines. His carefully scheduled routine flies out the window, however, when all three are grounded in Paris on the same night! Bernard enlists the help of his housekeeper and a hapless friend to maintain the charade as he strives to keep each woman happy...and in the dark. 7:30-9:30pm. $10 military, $15 students, $23 matinees, $27 evenings, Weber Center for the Performing Arts, 428 Front St S, La Crosse lacrossecommunitytheatre.org (608) 784-9292.

Centering Prayer Centering Prayer, experience the

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Golden Yoga Golden Yoga, with instructor Amber Moesch.

Brownies, Juniors & Cadettes. Join Capable Canines of Wisconsin as we learn how animals and humans are connected. Brownies earn Pets, Juniors earn Animal Habitats, and Cadettes earn Animal Helpers. Includes the individual badge, take-home project, snack, and admission to the Museum/Climbing Wall. Pre-registration and pre-payment required. 1-4pm. $15/scout, $1/adult, Brownies, Juniors, Cadettes, Children’s Museum of La Crosse, 207 5th Ave S., La Crosse.

LCT: Boeing Boeing Bernard, a swinging bachelor in 1960s Paris, is engaged to three different women, all stewardesses for different airlines. His carefully scheduled routine flies out the window, however, when all three are grounded in Paris on the same night! Bernard enlists the help of his housekeeper and a hapless friend to maintain the charade as he strives to keep each woman happy...and in the dark. 2-4pm. $10 military, $15 students, $23 matinees, $27 evenings, Weber Center for the Performing Arts, 428 Front St S, La Crosse lacrossecommunitytheatre.org (608) 784-9292. ABC Dinner Series, #2 Accessibility. Beauty. Community. A Dinner Series, #2. Five Course Dinner with beer pairings provided by Toppling Goliath Brewery. Confirm time with The Mint or Driftless Cafe (collaborator). www.driftlesscafe.com 6pm. The Mint, 1810 State St., La Crosse.

Monday, Mar. 21 Vinyasa Yoga Vinyasa Yoga, with instructor Cheryl Neubauer. Flowing sequence of postures are coordinated with a

Traditional poses are modified using a chair. 11:15 a.m.-noon. $8 drop-in. [Optional: One-hour class from 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. offers additional 15 minutes of floor exercises; $10 dropin.] Please bring a mat. 11:15am-noon. $8, $10, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

Centering Prayer Centering Prayer, experience the

Gluten-free cooking and baking Gluten-free cooking and baking with Lisa Wetterlin. Here is your opportunity to learn about gluten-free methods by making an all gluten-free comfort meal and dessert! Lisa will lead us through techniques, recipes, and her own baking mix, finishing with fried chicken tenders with homemade bread crumbs and Cranberry Nut Cookies! Register in person at the store, or by phone. 6-8pm. $15 members; $25 nonmembers, 18+, People’s Food Co-Op, 315 Fifth Avenue South, La Crosse pfc.coop (608) 784-5798.

Wednesday, Mar. 23 Hatha Yoga Hatha Yoga, with instructor Michelle Hundt. Open the many channels of the body through postures or asana to create balance, flexibility, and coordination. 5:30-6:30pm. $10, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295. Woodcut Workshop Learn how to create a woodcut us-

ing MDF and simple carving tools. Instruction and materials provided as needed; tools available for additional fee. In addition, you can participate in the Mississippi Steamroll on April 30, 2016. Sign up online or call the Pump House at 608-785-1434. **March 19th class sponsored by SEVEN! First 15 receive 50% off class fee, SEVEN t-shirt, and stickers! 6-7pm. $25 per student, $65 includes cutting tools, Pump House Regional Arts Center, 119 King St., La Crosse thepumphouse.org.

Thursday, Mar. 24 Golden Yoga Golden Yoga, with instructor Amber Moesch. Traditional poses are modified using a chair. 11:15 a.m.-noon. $8 drop-in. [Optional: One-hour class from 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. offers additional 15 minutes of floor exercises; $10 dropin.] Please bring a mat. 11:15am-noon. $8, $10, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

Tabletop Gaming Night LPL and River City Hobbies

will be joining forces for game night! There will be games for all ages, including board games, card games and more. Come and learn something new, or bring a favorite game to play with friends. 4-7pm. Free, All Ages, La Crosse Public Library, 800 Main Street, La Crosse lacrosselibrary.org.

Healthy Indian cooking Healthy Indian cooking with Puja Mehta. Whether you are a longtime vegetarian or just want to add some more vegetarian options to your diet, having tasty, exciting menu choices is always a plus. Puja is pleased to teach the preparation of authentic Indian dishes that are made in most Indian households. Register in person at the store, or by phone. 5:30-7pm. $15 members; $25 nonmembers, 18+, People’s Food Co-Op, 315 Fifth Avenue South, La Crosse pfc.coop (608) 784-5798. Easter EGG-Stravaganza For ages 2-7 with adult. Join the Easter Bunny in a egg hunt, games, craft and more. Earn bunny money to purchase prizes. Pre-registration and pre-payment required. $5 per child Members/$12 per child Non-Members and $1/adult. Register on-line at funmuseum. org or call at (608) 784-2652. 5:30-7pm. $5/member child, $12/ non-member child, $1/adult, 2-7 + adults, Children’s Museum of La Crosse, 207 5th Ave S., La Crosse. Easter EGG-Stravaganza For ages 2-7 with adult. Join the Easter Bunny in a egg hunt, games, craft and more. Earn bunny money to purchase prizes. Pre-registration and pre-payment required. Register on-line at funmuseum.org or call at (608) 784-2652. 5:30-7pm. $5/member child, $12/non-member child, $1/adult, 2-7 + adults, Children’s Museum of La Crosse, 207 5th Ave S., La Crosse.


Unplugged featuring Gregg “Cheech” Hall and Billy Hembd. Door open at 6. Dinner at 7:00 and show to follow. Tickets are $50 and our available online at http://deecedinner.bpt.me/ and at Deaf Ear Records, Tree Hugger’s Coop, PSB, Old Towne Strings, and IRL 6-11pm. $50, all ages, The Court Above Main, 420 Main St., LaCrosse gregghallmusic.com (608) 397-4636.

Dollar Chips for Scholarships “Dollar Chips for

The Brothers Burn Mountain Based out of Duluth,

Scholarships” is a casino based theme with exciting games for everyone. Attendees will have the opportunity to bid on fabulous gift baskets or purchase raffle tickets for a large cash prize drawing...and, of course, there will be scrumptious food catered by Pogreba Restaurant! 5:30-8pm. Advanced tickets $30, All, The Grand Hotel Ballroom, 207 Pearl Street, La Crosse facebook. com/crpwomen/ (608) 790-3608.

Chemical Free Living with Therapeutic Essential Oils Learn how to incorporate essential oil products into

your life! Each therapeutic oil has many uses and health benefits; learn how easy and inexpensive it is to make your own cleaning products, personal care items and even cook with essential oils. Make n’take a new DIY item every month and find out what supplements your body needs with a Zyto Compass Assessment. Cash n’ carry items available. 6:30-8pm. $5, All Ages, Springbrook Assisted Living, Activities Room, 861 Critter Court, Onalaska yldist.com/livingscents (608) 780-7181.

Living Downstream Documentary Screening

This poetic film follows scientist Sandra Steingraber’s work to break the silence about cancer and its link to chemicals in our environment. We see how these chemicals enter our bodies and how, once inside, scientists believe they may be working to cause cancer. The film is a powerful reminder of the intimate connection between the health of our bodies and the health of our air, land, and water. 6:30-8:30pm. FREE, All Ages, The Ark, 401 E Jefferson St, Viroqua thearkviroqua.org (608) 637-7824.

MN, The Brothers Burn Mountain are a soulful, energetic, eclectic duo of real-life brothers, Ryan and Jesse Dermody. They’ve been playing music together for more than 16 years, have released 8 albums of original music,and played more than 1,300 live shows. Though difficult to try and put their sound into words, some have called it avant-garde blues rock, though basically it is really just good-ol’ rock n’ roll with a very personal and bluesy twist. 8pm. Pass the hat, Trempealeau Hotel, 11332 Main St., Trempealeau trempealeauhotel.com.

Monday, Mar. 28 Vinyasa Yoga Vinyasa Yoga, with instructor Cheryl

Neubauer. Flowing sequence of postures are coordinated with a comfortable breathing rhythm. $10, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

Monday Mornings @ Main Lifelong learning for Ages

Traditional poses are modified using a chair. 11:15 a.m.-noon. $8 drop-in. [Optional: One-hour class from 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. offers additional 15 minutes of floor exercises; $10 dropin.] Please bring a mat. 11:15am-noon. $8, $10, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

this workshop participants will learn the basics of suitable tree identification, log preparation, log pounding (to peel off the basket staves), stave preparation (including splitting, shaving, sorting, and dying); but the focus of the day’s class will be weaving your own basket. Instructors: Henning and Kjetil Garvin 9am-5pm. $80/person; $72/KVR Friend + $30 Materials Fee, 18+, Kickapoo Valley Reserve, La Farge kvr.state.wi.us.

Viroqua Food Co-op P6 Tailgate Party Join the Viroqua Food Co-op for our 4th Annual P6 Tailgate Party! This event features FREE samples from 10-12 P6 producers (local, co-op and small) and a grill out on our patio. Family friendly fun for all! 10am-2pm. FREE, All Ages, Viroqua Food Co-op, 609 N Main St., Viroqua viroquafood.coop (608) 637-7511. SOAR With the Eagles Bring the whole family and

visit the National Eagle Center in Wabasha weekends in March for SOAR With the Eagles! Each weekend we offer special programs sure to thrill people of all ages, including flying birds shows, live animal programs, wild eagle viewing and MORE! 10am-5pm. $8 Adults, $7 Adults 62+, $6 Kids 4-17, Kids Under 3 - FREE, All Ages, National Eagle Center, 50 Pembroke Avenue, Wabasha nationaleaglecenter.org (651) 565-4989.

DP and Damn Tasty Present: Dinner and a Show! feat. Neil Young Tribute This show will

feature a 4 course seated and served meal provided by Damn Tasty. The dinner will be followed by a tribute to Neil Young

608-784-6565; amanda@crossfire4u.com; crossfire4u.com.

La Crosse Area Family YMCA:

Couleecap, Inc.:

La Crosse County Historical Society:

Great Rivers United Way:

Lakeview Health Center:

contactus@couleecap.org; www.couleecap.org.

608-782-9622; www.laxymca.org.

Call 608-782-5936 or 608-782-1980 if interested.

Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalu pe:

Justice and Peace Stations of the Cross Justice

Ho-Chunk Black Ash Basketry Workshop During

507-895-2066; www.lacrescentanimalrescue.blogspot.com

Habitat for Humanity/ReStore:

night for a showing of some of your favorite movies! Free popcorn provided! Please check the event calendar on our website for title information. 6-8pm. Free, Adult, La Crosse Public Library, 800 Main Street, La Crosse .

is an early art experience for ages 1-3yrs. We will explore one color a day in this 6-week series through a variety of mediums. Our day will include play time, an art project, and a story! Registration is Required as space is limited to 8. 9:30-10:30am. $65, 1-3 yrs., Inspired, 1516 Market St., La Crosse InspiredLaCrosse.com (608) 317-2046.

Join the Easter Bunny in a egg hunt, games, craft and more. Earn bunny money to purchase prizes. Pre-registration and pre-payment required. $5 per child Members/$12 per child Non-Members and $1/adult. Register on-line at funmuseum.org or call at (608) 784-2652. 8:30-10am. $5/member child, $12/ non-member child, $1/adult, 2-7 + adults, Children’s Museum of La Crosse, 207 5th Ave S., La Crosse.

Crossfire Youth Center:

La Crescent Animal Rescue:

Monday Night @ the Movies Join us every Monday

Join the Easter Bunny in a egg hunt, games, craft and more. Earn bunny money to purchase prizes. Pre-registration and pre-payment required. $5 per child Members/$12 per child Non-Members and $1/adult. Register on-line at funmuseum.org or call at (608) 784-2652. 8:30-10am. $5/member child, $12/ non-member child, $1/adult, 2-7 + adults, Children’s Museum of La Crosse, 207 5th Ave S., La Crosse.

Easter EGG-Stravaganza For ages 2-7 with adult.

Children’s Museum of La Crosse:

608-784-2652, ext. 226; christina@funmuseum.org; www.funmuseum.org.

608-687-3332; inquiry@kinstonecircle.com with VOLUNTEER in the subject; www.KinstoneCircle. com.

Outdoor Recreation Alliance (ORA):

Tiny Hands ~An Early Art Experience Tiny Hands

cle registered, for free. The Beer By Bike Brigade and DRBC are teaming up to help you license your bike with the LCPD. Registration takes less time than it takes to eat a delicious scone or drink a Bean Juice coffee. You just need to bring your bicycle. *If your bike is stolen and the LCPD finds it, they’ll have your info on file and you’ll get your bike back faster. 8-10am. FREE, All Ages, Bean Juice Coffee Roasters, 1014 19th St South, La Crosse (608) 397-5078.

(608) 782-2227; info@7riversbbbs.org; www.7riversbbbs.org.

Kinstone Academy of Applied Permaculture:

Grow La Crosse:

Easter EGG-Stravaganza For ages 2-7 with adult.

Bicycle Registration Drive - March Get your bicy-

Big Brothers Big Sisters:

www.ugetconnected.org.

Tuesday, Mar. 29

Saturday, Mar. 26

volunteerwestern.wi@redcross.org; 877-618-6628, ext. 5822; www.redcross.org/wi/la-crosse.

Kids and Mentors Outdoors (KAMO):

Contact Michael Brown at brownmtjc@gmail.com or (608) 799-5037 for details.

50 and better. Refreshments will be served. Please check the event calendar on our website for program information. 9:3011am. Free, 50+, La Crosse Public Library, 800 Main Street, La Crosse lacrosselibrary.org.

Friday, Mar. 25

and Peace Stations of the Cross - two-mile walk from St. Rose Convent to Mississippi River to stop and pray at places that represent suffering in our community. Free and open to the public, no registration necessary. 10am. Free, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

American Red Cross - Scenic Bluffs Chapter:

Golden Yoga Golden Yoga, with instructor Amber Moesch.

Identity Theft 101 Identity theft is the fastest growing

crime in the United States. Learn how to protect yourself, your information, and know what to do if you become a victim. Presented by Consumer Credit Counseling Service (CCCS) of La Crosse. 5:30-6:30pm. Free, Adult, La Crosse Public Library, 800 Main Street, La Crosse lacrosselibrary.org.

Centering Prayer Centering Prayer, experience the

stillness of community prayer at Franciscan Spirituality Center. 5:30pm-6:15am. Free, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295.

Wednesday, Mar. 30 Spring Labyrinth Walk: Inviting New Life Spring Labyrinth Walk: Inviting New Life - indoor labyrinth walk to give your soul a spring cleaning. 4:30-6:30pm. Freewill offering, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295. Hatha Yoga Hatha Yoga, with instructor Michelle Hundt. Open the many channels of the body through postures or asana to create balance, flexibility, and coordination. 5:30-6:30pm. $10, Franciscan Spirituality Center, 920 Market Street, La Crosse FSCenter.org (608) 791-5295. Woodcut Workshop Learn how to create a woodcut us-

ing MDF and simple carving tools. Instruction and materials provided as needed; tools available for additional fee. In addition, you can participate in the Mississippi Steamroll on April 30, 2016. Sign up online or call the Pump House at 608-785-1434. **March 19th class sponsored by SEVEN! First 15 receive 50% off class fee, SEVEN t-shirt, and stickers! 6-7pm. $25 per student, $65 includes cutting tools, Pump House Regional Arts Center, 119 King St., La Crosse thepumphouse.org.

Home gardening: Composting, container gardens, and raised beds! Come learn the basics of

composting, raised garden beds, and container growing with Judson Steinback and Jarad Barkeim of Coulee Region Ecoscapes, LLC. Participants will learn about construction techniques, site and plant selection, and tips on how best to add function and beauty to your garden using these three simple techniques. Register in person at the store, or by phone. 6-8pm. $15 members; $25 nonmembers, 18+, People’s Food Co-Op, 315 Fifth Avenue South, La Crosse pfc.coop (608) 784-5798.

www.growlacrosse.org/get-involved. volunteer@habitatlacrosse.org; 608-785-2375, ext. 7003.

Hillview Urban Agriculture Center:

608-786-0338; vicki@vsm5.com; www.hillviewuac. org.

The Hunger Task Force of La Crosse:

608-386-3319; kanestreetgarden@gmail.com; www.lacrossehtf.org.

(608) 786-1400 x 40195; lrose@lacrossecounty.

www.naturesplacetoplay.com.

www.guadalupeshrine.org/volunteer.

WAFER Food Pantry:

608-782-6003; waferfoodpantry@centurytel.net; waferlacrosse.org.

WisCorps:

608-782-2494; staff@wiscorps.org; www.wiscorps.org.

YWCA La Crosse: info@ywcalax.org.

To add your free volunteer listing, email contact@thesevenspot.com.

or f y d a Re e SEVEN? mor

CALENDAR ARTICLES PHOTOS COMMUNITY Restaurant & Bar Listings . . . s Plu and Giveaways & Contests!

MORE

call the Reference Desk at 608.789.7122 to reserve your seat. Topics change each month. Please check our website for more information: www.lacrosselibrary.org 5:30-7:30pm. Free, Adult, La Crosse Public Library, 800 Main Street, La Crosse lacrosselibrary.org.

Find full details of volunteer opportunities at thesevenspot.com

THESEVENSPOT

SEVEN | thesevenspot.com |

Computer Classes @ the Library Max. 12 Please

29


WRITER’S BLOCK

W

The Comfort of Cabbage hen your version of decadence is defined by spoon-feeding yourself Velveeta Shells and Cheese straight from the hot pot you filled 15 minutes earlier with bathroom tap water, you know it’s time to step up your game.

I was no novice to cooking; my mom and I often cozied up under blankets and clipped recipes out of magazines. My dad and I honed our skills by watching “The Frugal Gourmet” and Jacques Pépin. But anyone who’s ever lived in a college dorm room knows that no matter how savvy you are in the kitchen, your roommate’s desk is never enough space to make any kind of meal for yourself unless it involves bringing something to boil with the touch of a button. So as I entered my last semester of dorm life, pots and pans already clanged together with noisy anticipation inside of my head. I made a silent vow to myself: Once I got my own kitchen, I was going to perfect Grandma’s Cabbage and Dumplings. Growing up, there was only one thing more sacred to my brother and I than a snow day in winter: A Cabbage and Dumplings Day. The long-awaited season of our favorite dish would typically kick off on a day when bare branches shivered under the first true chill of winter; where their leaves had all turned crispy and brown on the ground, and the sky sulked with gray. When the phone rang, we’d instinctively know that Grandma’s already had the kettle simmering for hours, and we’d all be heading over for the ultimate comfort food.

Pasture Raised

PORK, CHICKEN & EGG (20forlb)

}

bundle $100!

SEVEN | Issue #9 | March, 2016

Liz 608-738-2940 / flyinlynch@hotmail.com / Facebook: Lynch Farms

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By: Briana Rupel

Spring Fling!

It’s been 13 years since my grandma gave me my lesson over a winter break in college. Recently, I declared a dreary Tuesday a Cabbage and Dumplings Day and invited my boyfriend over for dinner. I used all my grandma’s essential tips: to sauté the onions in bacon fat and thicken with flour before adding them to the pot; to use stale bread instead of fresh. I neglected the measuring cups and worked my biceps and shoulders stirring the tough batter until it just felt right. Still I was nervous. It’s one thing to cook for people you care about. But this wasn’t just food. I was sharing a part of my heritage; a part of my personal history. This is the meal we all requested before leaving for college. This is the meal that feeds hordes of hunters before they wander off into the woods year after year. This is a big deal. I pulled a little test bite out of the kettle. The pork nearly disintegrated at the touch of a spoon, but the true test was in the dumpling. The surface was moist and sweet from being nestled in the cabbage. As I bit in, I hit that perfect amount of chew—not mushy, not dry—followed by the sweetness of real cream butter with a hint of salt and nutty caraway. A huge grin spread across my face and I jumped up and down on alternating legs clutching the spoon in my hand. “Ahhh,” I cried out loud, giggling. “It’s perfect!” I called Grandma the next day to fill her in on my victory. I told her it was the first time I had made the dish for Eric. “Oh,” she acknowledged, with a semi-serious tone. “And... did he like it?” I recalled sneaking a peek at him while he took his first bite so I could gauge his natural reaction. I could feel myself biting my lip in anticipation. Then his eyes got wide as he nodded his head and raised his hand to offer up a high-five. “Yeah,” I smiled, “he loved it!” “Oh, good,” she exasperated, only half-jokingly, “tell him Grandma’s proud!”

Briana Rupel is a born and bred Wisconsinite. She is continually inspired by the Seven Rivers Region’s natural beauty, the talent of its local musicians and the stories of everyday people.

Open House

Friday, April 8th - from 4 to 8 pm

Stores are open late to kick off new spring trends, products, fashions, food and special events!

Downtown Trend Showcase Thursday, April 21st - from 5 to 9 pm

Experience a new three stop progressive format! L AC RO S S E D OW N TOW N . CO M DOWNTOWN MAINSTREET

If there’s any badge of my Bohemian heritage besides my prominent facial features, it is this dish—perfect in its simplicity—of slow-simmered pork, sweet cabbage and buttery bread dumplings the size of mini Nerf Footballs. My grandma remembers first cooking this when she married my grandpa 59 years ago. She got it from her grandma, who was taught the recipe by her mother-in-law. This isn’t the stuff of Pinterest. This is oral tradition at its finest, originating half a world away. I needed to carry on this tradition. I also needed dumplings in my belly at any time I wanted.

608-784-0440


Giveaways of your favorite entertainment, dining, merchandise & more!

SHENANIGANS

WIN A $100 PLAY PASS Enjoy paintball, laser tag, rock climbing wall, high ropes course, human hamster ball, inflatables, tons of new arcade games, prizes and more!

PEARL STREET BREWERY

WIN A PRIVATE BREWERY TOUR FOR 10 Each of your guests receives a private brewery tour, a custom PSB pint glass, one free fill (choose from 9 draft beers!), one coupon for a beer at a local La Crosse account & a whole lot of valuable beer knowledge!

DEECE PRODUCTIONS

WIN A DINNER & A SHOW Enjoy a 4-course meal provided by Damn Tasty followed by a live tribute performance to Neil Young Unplugged featuring Gregg “Cheech” Hall and Billy Hembd at The Court Above Main on March 26th, 2016!

SEVEN

WIN A CUSTOM STREET KING BIKE See yourself on this sweet ride…the official SEVEN bike – Street King by Wyatt Bicycle! Customized paint, rims, seat, and decals will have you stylin’!

Sign up for these offers and more at:

www.thesevenspot/promotions

Trempealeau Hotel presents

Trempealeau Hotel presents

St. Pats Thursday March 17 ONLY

The Brothers Burn Mountain

$10 Pre-sale Reggae Fest Tickets (save $12)

DJ Trichrome spins

Experimental Folk/Rock

Saturday March 26

No cover, pass the hat

Kitchen serving bangers & mash, jerk chicken, corned beef & cabbage, Guinness stew

cash sales, this day only, limit 5 tickets/person, open at 3, DJ starts at 6 REGGAE FEST IS HELD MAY 14, 2016 Trempealeau, WI 54661

LIVE MUSIC most Thursdays and Saturdays FOOD • DRINK • SHELTER • MUSIC Trempealeau, WI 54661

SEVEN | thesevenspot.com |

wicked reggae vintage vinyl

31


A Day for You & Your Staff 9 a.m.-3 p.m Thursday, April 7

>Fun and affordable staff development day. >$30 per person, includes lunch. >Discounts for groups of 5 or more. >Ideal for small businesses and nonprofits.

Fra nci s c an Spirituality Center 920 Market Street, La Crosse www.FSCenter.org 608-791-5295

READ THIS

PAGE

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SEVEN March 2016  

SEVEN March 2016  

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