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SEPTEMBER 2017

VOLUME 2

ISSUE 4

IRON CITY

INK PLAYING TO WIN Return of UAB’s football program comes full circle this month. 19

INSIDE

HAPPENINGS

Finding Hope Ex-felons create Offender Alumni Association as support system for re-entry into society. 16

FACES

B’HAM BIZARRE

DISCOVER

Bagpiping in ’Bama Jim MacRae travels the world playing the pipes and brings his favorite sounds to downtown. 20


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IRON CITY INK

IRONCITY.INK

ABOUT

BUSINESS

SIPS & BITES

HAPPENINGS

SIGHTS

SEPTEMBER 2017

FACES

B’HAM BIZARRE

NECK OF THE WOODS

DISCOVER

18 EXPOSING THE ELEMENTS: Glen Iris musician, band member creates web series for city’s music scene.

BUSINESS

HAPPENINGS

FACES HOPE INSTEAD OF HURT: E felons create ffender lumni ssociation as community support system for re entry into society. 16

‘BALLET DAD’ FOLLOWS HEART HOME: Alabama native who danced with American Ballet Theatre now heads Alabama School of Fine Arts dance department. 11

YOUNG AT HEART: Birmingham native fle es creative muscle at production company Akioboy. 6 REAL ESTATE: Transactions and developments slated for the metro’s real estate market. 10

IRON CITY

INK

A LIFE OF STORIES: For Birmingham’s Dolores Hydock, storytelling is not only a ay of life, ut also her full time profession. 12 TIME TO GET OUT: Runs and al s enefiting multiple organizations, plus several different food festivals fill up September weekends. 14

Publisher: Managing Editor: Contributing Editor: Design Editor: Director of Photography: Digital Editor: Copy Editor:

Dan Starnes Sydney Cromwell Jesse Chambers Kristin Williams Sarah Finnegan Alyx Chandler Louisa Jeffries

PLAYING TO WIN: Return of UAB’s football program comes full circle this month. 19

DISCOVER SEPTEMBER’S BEST BETS: Your quick guide to metro Birmingham music and events scheduled this month. 33

Community Reporters: Kyle Parmley Sam Chandler Emily Featherston Lexi Coon Contributing Writers: Rachel Hellwig Intern: Lauren Roland

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Legals: Iron City Ink is published monthly. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content without prior permission is prohibited. Information in Iron City Ink is gathered from sources considered reliable, but the accuracy cannot be guaranteed. All articles/photos submitted become the property of Iron City Ink. We reserve the right to edit articles/photos as deemed necessary and are under no obligation to publish or return photos submitted. Inaccuracies or errors should be brought to the attention of the publisher at (205) 313-1780 or by email.

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SEPTEMBER 2017

IRON CITY INK

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IRONCITY.INK

ABOUT

EDITOR’S NOTE

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e’re getting close to a day that, at least for a while, many in Birmingham thought we wouldn’t see again: the opening game for the Blazers football team. UAB football will play its first game this month since being shut down in December 2014 and reinstated in June 2015. Check out our cover story for how the Blazers’ season will shape up. Our other features this month include a new Avondale guitar store, a local “one-woman show” legend and the fact that Birmingham is home to not one, but two bagpiping bands. One story that was particularly significant to me as the ffender Alumni Association, a group of exconvicts providing resources to others

before and after being released from prison. Their help includes mentorship, job and housing leads and community outreach efforts, as the Alumni Association members have been in the exact same situation themselves and know what they needed to succeed. Finally, the City Council, mayoral and school board elections had not taken place as I was writing this note, but likely will be by the time you’re reading. Visit ironcity.ink for updated election results, and look for more in our October issue.

COMMUNITY PARTNERS Advent Episcopal School (29) Alabama Power (13) Alabama School of Fine Arts Foundation (35) ARC Realty (36) Avondale Common House & Distillery (14) Bedzzz Express (9) Bird’s Bar & Pizza (13) Birmingham Botanical Gardens (22) Birmingham Museum of Art (8)

Campaign to Re-elect Valerie Abbott (2) Case Remodeling (14) Children’s of Alabama (15) Creative Montessori School (32) Cynthia Vines Butler, LLC (35) Enroll Alabama (22) Hutchinson Automotive (17) Iron City Realty (23) Jefferson Christian Academy (31) Pies and Pints (5) RealtySouth (3)

Savoie Catering (7) Seasick Records (7) Shades Valley Dermatology (6) Skin Wellness Center of Alabama (28) Southern Veterinary Partners (25) Ten Awards (32) The Altamont School (31) The Highlands School (30) The Maids (1, 17) UAB Health System (27) Vulcan Pain Management (6)

FIND US Pick up the latest issue of Iron City Ink at the following locations or scan the QR code for a complete list of our rack locations: Birmingham Public Library Central Branch Five Points Market Ted’s Restaurant Starbucks at 20 Midtown

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Want to join this list or get Iron City Ink mailed to your home? Contact Matthew Allen at matthew@starnespublishing. com.


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BUSINESS Ronnie Moore Jr. works on one of his characters while at Railroad Park. Moore, an artist and founder of Akioboy, creates multimedia pieces and animation for his company. Photos by Sarah Finnegan.

IRONCITY.INK

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HAPPENINGS

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SIGHTS

FACES

SEPTEMBER 2017

B’HAM BIZARRE

NECK OF THE WOODS

Young

DISCOVER

AT HEART brand for other nerds and geeks who are in the video game and cosplay culture,” Moore said. He said their mission is “ to promote the idea that everyone’s the main character of their life story,” and that the business “ represents staying young at heart and creating yourself like character customization in a video game,” which is represented in the logo. Moore’s interest in anime, video game and cosplay piq ued when he found popular animated TV show “ Dragon Ball Z ” after school as a kid. “ F rom there, I just kind of got into it,” he said. He found his creative side when he was younger, too, and after drawing and doodling characters for many years, a friend noticed and jokingly called him “ man-child” — later giving way to his company’s name,

Birmingham native fle es creative muscle at io oy

A B y L E X I C O O N

kioboy ( pronounced ah-key-oh-boy) is a combination of two words: akio, which is Japanese for “ bright; shining man,” and boy, which is used to contradict the latter half of the word. I t’s like saying “ man-child.” I t’s also the name of Birmingham native Ronnie Moore Jr.’s company. An entertainment company based in Birmingham, Akioboy began in 2014 as a fashion and lifestyle brand, but has since expanded. “ At its core, it’s like a lifestyle


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BUSINESS

Moore said he was an artistic child but took up vector art and graphic design in about 2006. “Vector art, that’s kind of therapeutic to me.”

but infusin the anime in uence to include the apanese ord a io. as al a s an artist ro in up he said. ut the actual computer side for raphic desi n on merchandise came from m ob here ve been since . A si n ma er at nstant i n enter in russville oore s boss ave him a boo earl into his career to learn more about raphic desi n. ead throu h this and

learn oore recalled his boss sa in . fell in love ith it. ector art that s ind of therapeutic to me. As the brand of his compan re oore needed e perience and e uipment to ta e photos of people earin his merchandise. o he invested financiall and mentall in camera ear. rom there reali ed had a love for directin and filmin and such he said.

o decided to run ith that as ell. As of mid-Au ust his outube channel found under A iobo has over cospla and indie videos all anchored in anime and ran in from three minutes to nearl minutes in len th. m tr in to brin somethin different in terms of li e thin li e a live action anime but it s ot more emotion into it he said. t s ver different and that s ind of ho ant A iobo to be al a s havin this sense of bein himsical. oore said he doesn t t picall or ith clients on a personal basis althou h he has collaborated ith outube celebrit aleb les but has or ed ith different conventions for both merchandise and video content. ost recentl he desi ned shirts that ere sold at irmin ham s a ic it on. A lot of hat he does comes b ord of mouth. he productions e do the re ind of our productions he said. Aside from usin music from local artists or artists he s found online for the cospla videos ever thin is done in-house even the score to man of his lon er indie films. t s different he said of A iobo s productions. ind of ant it to be that thin here ou re confused hen ou see it but then ou o do n the rabbit hole. ventuall he ould li e his brand to stand out so that hen a vie er sees an A iobo video the can tell he created it ust from the st le.

ith the man different facets of his business oore said his compan s or aniation is loosel based on hat isne has done. creatin one overarchin umbrella of a compan A iobo is a con lomerate that can or on raphic desi n video production music production and more in the future all ithout a storefront. ou don t actuall al a s have to have a storefront oore said. ith ever one havin access to the internet these da s he said those ho are interested can contact him or purchase merchandise from their online store a iobo .com. hat s not to sa he ouldn t li e to have a storefront or home base in the future. hat s m dream to al do n the halla and see people or in on different characters he said and ithin the ne t five ears or so he s hopin to ro A iobo to here it s his full-time ob. After ro in the compan from its roots in irmin ham oore said others have told him that hat he s doin is uni ue to the cit and he plans to eep movin for ard ith it all. ven if tomorro ever one said h e don t care about A iobo ould still eep doin it he said. ecause that s hat love. earn more about A iobo at a iobo . com or the brand s aceboo pa e at faceboo .com a iobo brand.


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BUSINESS

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HAPPENINGS

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SEPTEMBER 2017

FACES

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NECK OF THE WOODS

DISCOVER

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Children’s of Alabama will construct a par ing dec and office uilding on the 1600 block of Fourth Avenue South. The 12-story parking deck will provide 1,500 parking spaces and will be located between 16th and th treets on the Children s campus. Brasfield Gorrie was chosen as construction manager and Williams Blackstock Architects as architect for the project, which is estimated to cost $54 million for construction.

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to UAB Media Relations. The projected completion time is August 2018. The contractor is M. J. Harris Construction Services. Construction continues on a major expansion and renovation of the Ronald McDonald House at 1700 Fourth Ave. S., with completion expected by mid-December, according to Stephanie Langford of the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Alabama. The interior renovation of the current building will be complete by the end of September. On the new portion, windows have een installed and the roof is finished. The interior drywall is largely complete, and the exterior brick should e finished y the end of eptem er.

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Openings/Closures 9

Tortuga’s, a restaurant that has been a Hoover favorite for 20 years, has opened a

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location in downtown Birmingham, at 1304 Second Ave. S., near Regions Field and Good People Brewery. Vineyard Brands, a wine importer previ10 ously located at 2000 Resource Drive in the Meadowbrook area, has relocated to downtown Birmingham at 2 20th St. N. The Football Operations Center at UAB is now in use. The Blazers begin their summer practice at the new facility on July 31. A ribbon-cutting was scheduled for Aug. 18, according to a UAB Athletics spokesperson.

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The Shu Shop, an Asian-themed restaurant, opened in late uly on the first floor of the recently renovated Graves Building at 1818 Third Ave. N. Appleseed Workshop restored the historic building, formerly the home of Lichter’s Furniture.

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UAB is planning to build a new ROTC 4 facility at 828 Eighth Court S., according to UAB Media Relations. The old Center of Nuclear Imaging Research will be demolished to make way for the new building.

Work on a $32 million renovation and expansion of the UAB School of Nursing continues. Work was about 35 percent complete at Iron City Ink’s press time, according

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A small commercial building at 400 41st St. S. in Avondale will soon be converted for use y up to four retail or office tenants. The renovated structure, which once served as a gas station, will measure about 4,000 square feet, according to developer Adam Thrower of 400 41st St. LLC. The project has passed all of its design reviews, Thrower said. The building is expected to open in 2018.

Construction continues on the new $37.5 million UAB Collat School of Business on University Boulevard between 12th and 13th streets South. Construction is about 45 percent complete, according to UAB Media Relations. The foundations and floor sla s are finished, the structural steel is nearing completion and exterior wall framing is in progress. The projected time of completion is ay . Brasfield orrie are the contractors.

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Barnes & Associates Realtors has pur1 chased a building in Avondale for use as its new headquarters, according to owner Abra Barnes. The 5,000 square-foot facility is located at 4322 Third Ave. S. The company’s previous home was only 1,800 square feet.

Construction Update

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Real Estate and the developers of 5 LAH 20 Midtown will demolish an existing structure in the 400 block of 20th Street outh and uild a five story, 4 , s uare foot building that will house a restaurant and about 60 apartments, according to AL.com. Developers hope to start construction in about six months. Several businesses in the current building, including the popular Syndicate Lounge, will have to move.

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Coming Soon The build-out continued at our press time for Ikko Ramen & Sushi, an Asian fusion restaurant in Five Points South. The restaurant is located in the old location of Spring Aire Cleaners next door to health food store Golden Temple. Ikko may open by mid- to late September, according to a spokesman at Watts Realty.

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The Hilton Garden Inn and Home2Suites on Second Avenue South between 17th and 18th streets in Parkside will open Sept. 12, according to AL.com, which cited a news release from developers. The custom hotel, with about 200 rooms, will feature two brands: the Garden Inn, catering to families and business travelers, and the extended stay Home2Suites. LBA Hospitality will manage the facility.

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SEPTEMBER 2017

BUSINESS

SIPS & BITES

HAPPENINGS

IRON CITY INK

SIGHTS

FACES

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NECK OF THE WOODS

‘BALLET DAD’ FOLLOWS HIS HEART BACK HOME

DISCOVER Wes Chapman, teaching here in Palm Beach, Florida, now heads the Alabama School of Fine Arts’ dance department. Photo courtesy of Neil Cohen.

Alabama native who danced with American Ballet Theatre now heads Alabama School of Fine Arts dance department

B y R AC H E L H E L L W I G

W C ou r tesy ar tsB H AM

hen the Alabama School of F ine Arts had an opening for chair of their dance department last year, Wes Chapman knew he wanted to pursue to it, returning to the place he began learning his craft after years of performing and teaching ballet at the highest level. “ These jobs don’t open up often,” he said. “ I jumped at the chance to be back at ASF A, as it’s always been my home and in my heart.” Born and raised in U nion Springs, Alabama, Chapman graduated from the dance program at ASF A in 198 3. He then danced with Alabama Ballet for a season before heading to New Y ork City to join American Ballet Theatre ( ABT) , one of the most prominent dance companies in the country. Over the years, he was promoted to soloist and then principal dancer. Chapman was also a principal at Bavarian National Ballet and guested with numerous other companies. Like many dancers, Chapman realized his path early in life. too m first ballet class at the a e of 9 in an arm cast from falling off a pony,” he said. “ I remember walking into the studio at Montgomery School of Ballet and thinking, ‘ This is it; this is where I belong.’” Chapman said his mother and grandmother supported his ambitions. “ My dad, on the other hand, was the football coach at the local high school,” he said. “ Y ou can imagine how that went. But when ABT’s artistic director, Mikhail Baryshnikov, hired me in 198 4, my dad was my biggest fan — and still is.” Chapman took on a different side of the dance world in 1996 when he became artistic director of Alabama Ballet and founded the company’s school. I n 2007, he returned to ABT for four years to direct the organization’s studio company, a performing troupe for dancers ages 16-20 who are transitioning

Chapman teaching for Florida Dance Association at Santa Fe College in Gainesville, Florida. Photo courtesy of Suzanna Mars.

from student to professional. I n 2015, Chapman came back to the Magic City to pursue freelancing. “ I am not exactly sure what the draw is, but Birmingham has always seemed like home to me,” he said. “ I love to be in U nion Springs, but Birmingham is where my heart brings me.” What was it like for him to return to the school he graduated from? “ The school offers so much more than my time there,” he said. “ I ’ve learned a lot of how the dayto-day works and all of the administrative duties that come along with that.” He credits fellow dance faculty members Martha F aesi and Teri Weksler for their guidance, support, and mentorship. “ They are my personal heroes and there’s

no way for me thank them enough in my first ear as dance chairman. Of course, administrative duties are just part of the job at ASF A. Dance classes run from 2-5:30 p.m. “ Some evenings we have rehearsals until 7:15 p.m. if we are in need of extra time,” Chapman said. “ Often, students will come in on Saturdays for some additional rehearsal time.” Chapman was proud with the results of all those classes and rehearsals, which culminated in an end-of-the-year showcase. “ The dance department looked like a school that enjoyed dancing together and they put on a wonderful show,” he said. e ectin on the past ear hapman said ASF A got to know him and the way he views the dance world. He said that

sometimes his students now call him “ ballet dad” and he calls them his “ ninjas.” What are his goals for the future of ASF A’s dance program? He would like to increase enrollment a bit, but not too much, saying that the school currently has the “ luxury of smaller class sizes.” He also hopes “ to see the students to continue to grow and have more performance experiences” in the coming years.

Editor’s note: This article was produced in partnership with artsBHAM. To learn more about them, visit artsbham.com.


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IRON CITY INK

SEPTEMBER 2017

A life OF STORIES

BUSINESS

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NECK OF THE WOODS

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B y R AC H E L H E L L W I G

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torytelling is a part of Southern culture. F or Birmingham’s Dolores Hydock, it’s not just a way of life, but her full-time profession. Originally from Reading, Pennsylvania, she made Alabama her home after college and found her way back to performing after pursuing other careers. Hydock’s experience with stories goes back to her early youth. “ The stories I heard and the stories I read were the traditional European folktales that came through Ellis I sland with the families who settled Northeastern cities in the early 1900s,” she said. At age 5, she won a storytelling contest at a local playground’s summer program for telling the traditional European tale “ Clever G retel.” At the time, storytelling didn t especiall capture her attention. first stor tellin effort came about simply because I did everything at the playground, and that meant being in all the contests I could enter,” she recalled. “ The fact that I was the only one competing in my age group helped.” Hydock describes her immediate family members as avid readers rather than storytellers. She remembers that getting her first librar card as thrillin and she traces the enesis of her current storytelling art to a “ love of words and love of good writing.” Reading scripts aloud with her sister likewise sparked her interest in acting. She went on to attend G eorge Washington U niversity and later Y ale. Hydock initially studied drama, but opted for an American studies degree instead. Her love for acting hadn’t faded, but she concluded the profession was a “ very hazardous” way to earn a living. Her decision to pursue American studies was, in fact, hat first led her to Alabama hose fol lore as the subject of her senior paper. “ I chose the folklore in the American South, an area rich with tradition, full of stories and storytellers,” she said. “ I further narrowed my focus to folklore in Alabama simply because there was already a lot of academic work being done on the folk traditions of G eorgia, Tennessee, ississippi but there asn t a lot alread ritten about Alabama.” Once in Alabama, Hydock said she q uickly discovered the state’s folklore encompassed many different strains from Appalachian- avored traditions of and ountain to the ld rench in uence in obile. n order to complete the assignment within the allotted four months, she decided to concentrate on the community of Chandler Mountain in St. Clair County. “ I was, by good fortune, introduced to Warren Musgrove, who owned Horse Pens 40 on Chandler Mountain at the time and sponsored traditional music and craft festivals there every spring and fall,” she said. “ Mr. Musgrove loved everything about Alabama’s folk history and was a wonderful source of information and encouragement for me. He also introduced me to the generous people of Chandler Mountain, who very kindly allowed me – a naï ve Y ankee colle e student to come spend time ith them and learn

Dolores Hydock at the Sounds of the Mountain festival held at Camp Bethel, Virginia. Hydock’s decision to pursue American studies was, in fact, what first e her to Alabama — whose folklore was the subject of her senior paper in college. Photo courtesy of David Miller.

about their lives.” Alabama ultimately beckoned Hydock back. U pon graduation, she settled in Birmingham. She held different jobs over the years but her desire to perform endured. Eventually, it became too strong to ignore. She began volunteering to tell stories at a retirement community, then her audience members began inviting her to perform at local garden and literary clubs. Over time, she was able to make her hobby her full-time job. Hydock’s craft also brought her back to acting. Though she didn’t set out to perform one-woman shows, they’ve become one of her signatures. “ Once I did a few of them, more opportunities to keep on doing them appeared. By then, my storytelling had become my full-time profession, and one-woman shows, including my original one-woman shows, became a way to combine my love of both theater and storytelling,” she said. doc s first ori inal one- oman sho n er n F ashion,” grew out of a series of interviews she conducted ith inette riffith ho served as the fashion coordinator for Loveman’s department store in Birmingham during the 1950s and 1960s. he stories ere so fascinatin and such an honest intriguing, irreverent look into mid-20th century life in the outh that anted more people to be able to hear them. So I compiled some of her stories into a performance piece where I alternate between being Ninette telling her stories and myself, the Y ankee interviewer, hearing those stories,” Hydock said. Hydock went on to write “ Take a Ride on the Reading” and “ Tony Curtis Speaks I talian and All I Can Say I s ‘ I Love Y ou.’” “ All of my shows began as stories,” she said. “ I started with individual ‘ nuggets’ of stories then pieced those stories

with other stories, almost like making a q uilt, into scripts that encompassed the stories I wanted to share about that particular theme or experience.” Whether she is acting or performing as a storyteller, Hydock said that connecting with the audience is key. She said Southerners make good audience members because they not only have a gift for telling stories, but also for listening. A stor can t happen ithout someone to hear it the listener has an active, essential role to play in the process,” she said. “ With a live performance, the physical presence and attention of other people helps shape the performance, so having people who really know how to listen to stories is a crucial part of the experience.” Hydock will perform “ The Lady with All the Answers,” a one-woman show about the advice columnist known as Ann Landers, at the Red Mountain Theatre Company Cabaret Theatre, Sept. 8 -10. “ The play takes place on the night when Ann is struggling to write what will become her most famous newspaper column doc said. As she tries to find the ri ht ords for this important column, she procrastinates by telling us stories about her life and career and sharin some of the funniest, most unusual, and most poignant letters that came her way as a ground-breaking advice columnist for more than 40 years.” F or more information or to purchase tickets, visit www. redmountaintheatre.org. Editor’s note: This article was produced in partnership with artsBHAM. To learn more about them, visit artsbham.com.


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SEPTEMBER 2017

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DISCOVER

Get on your feet: Walks, runs abound this month

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B y E M I L Y F E AT H E R S T O N

to register, visit act.alz.org.

hether it’s an afternoon stroll through Railroad Park or an early-morning run through the streets of downtown, there is no shortage of options for those looking to get involved while getting active this month.

MAGIC CITY AIDS WALK & 5K RUN

Wh

NOOJIN & WHITE RACE TO THE COURTHOUSE

en: Saturday, Sept. 9, 8 a.m. hW ere: Y MCA of G reater Birmingham, Downtown Branch, 2101 F ourth Ave. N. Beginning and ending at the downtown branch of Y MCA of G reater Birmingham, this year’s Race to the Courthouse 5K and one-mile fun run will support the Y MCA’s financial assistance pro ram that prevents anyone from being turned away from the organization’s offerings because of the inability to pay. There will also be a “ sleep in” option for supporters to donate and participate in the event without losing a Saturday morning snooze. Registration ranges from $ 20-$ 45 depending on the event chosen and whether or not registration is made before Sept. 8 . F or more information or to register, visit runsignup.com/Race/AL/Birmingham/ TheNoojinWhiteRacetotheCourthouse5K

MONKEY C MONKEY RUN 5K Wh

en: Saturday, Sept. 16, 8 a.m. Wh ere: Smile-A-Mile Place, 1600 Second Ave. S. The annual Monkey C Monkey Run 5K has moved from Homewood Central Park to downtown Birmingham. I t will start and finish at mile-A- ile lace on econd

This year’s Monkey C Monkey Run 5K will be Sept. 16 starting at Smile-A-Mile Place on Second Avenue South. Photo courtesy of Camp Smile-A-Mile.

Avenue South. The event, which also includes a 1-mile fun run at a.m. benefits the mile-AMile pediatric cancer support organization. According to its description, the group’s mission is to “ provide hope, healing of the spirit and love for the whole family during the childhood cancer journey.” Registration is $ 30 for the 5K and $ 20 for the fun run. There also is a $ 30 sleep-in option for those who wish to support the organization without physically participating. Pre-registration ends Sept. 14, while race day registration begins at 6:30 a.m. F or more information or to register, visit runsignup.com/Race/AL/Birmingham/ MonkeyCMonkeyRun5k.

ST. JUDE WALK/RUN TO END CHILDHOOD CANCER

W h en: Saturday, Sept. 23 W h ere: Railroad Park Along with cities across the country, Birmingham will be running and walking to raise funds for St. Jude Children’s Research

Hospital, so that the hospital can continue its practice of never turning away a family due to the inability to pay for medical care. The event will include a 5K and a walk, and all ages are welcome. Registration is $ 20 for the 5K and $ 10 for the walk, while children 5 years old and under are free. The Birmingham event has a fundraising goal of $ 125,000. F or more details about the event or to register, visit fundraising.stjude. org.

WALK TO END ALZHEIMER’S

W h en: Sunday, Sept. 24, 3 p.m. W h ere: Railroad Park The two-mile Walk to End Alzheimer’s supports the efforts of the Alabama chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association with its mission of care, support and research. While there is no fee to participate in the walk, registrants are encouraged to make a personal donation in support of the association, and to fundraise. Registrants who raise $ 100 or more receive a T-shirt that can be picked up the day of the event.F or more information or

W h en: Sunday, Sept. 24, 4 p.m. W h ere: Railroad Park Hosted by Birmingham AI DS Outreach, the th annual al and run ill benefit the group’s efforts to raise funds and awareness for the fi ht a ainst and A in the greater Birmingham area. The family-friendly event will honor those who have been lost and celebrate those still fi htin throu h a one-mile fun walk and 5K run through Railroad Park, as well as with a business fair, free health screenings, a kids’ activity area and live entertainment. Registration for the 5K is $ 25 per runner, which includes a T-shirt, and all participants are encouraged to start a fundraising page. F or more information and to register, visit birminghamaidsoutreach.org/ aids-walk-5k-run.

SISTAH STRUT

W h en: Saturday, Sept. 30, 7 a.m. W h ere: Legion F ield Brenda’s Brown Bosom Buddies are getting together again this year to strut their stuff and commune with kindred spirits while also raising support for the communit fi htin breast cancer. The 5K at Legion F ield can be completed by running, walking, strolling or, of course, strutting by anyone who decides to come. Registration is $ 30 in advance or $ 45 the da of and re istrants ill receive a fish and grits meal. However, all are encouraged to attend, even if affording the entrance fee is an issue. F or more information and to register, visit brendasbrownbosombuddies.org. – Sam C handler contr ibu ted to this ar ticle.


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HAPPENINGS Members of the St. George Melkite Greek Catholic Church prep food for the 2017 Middle Eastern Food Festival. Photo by Sarah Finnegan.

September comes alive with Greek, Middle Eastern, local food festivals B y J E S S E C H AM B E R S September promises to be a great month for Birmingham foodies. They can enjoy two events that celebrate ethnic cuisine: the Birmingham G reek F estival and the St. G eorge Middle Eastern F ood F estival. And Breakin’ Bread, a festival with more than 30 local food providers in one location at one price, is back for its 15th year.

FAITH AND FOOD

Holy Trinity-Holy Cross G reek Orthodox Cathedral will host the 45th annual Birmingham G reek F estival, Thursday, Sept. 21, through Saturday, Sept. 23, 10:30 a.m to 10 p.m. The event is “ an act of love” by the members of the G reek community and allows them to share their “ faith, tradition, food and culture” said Elaine Lyda, event spokesperson. The festival offers dance, music, traditional costumes and plenty of food, including such favorites as gyros, lamb skewers, pita bread, stuffed grape leaves and fried doughnuts. Attendees can also tour the cathedral and view its Byzantine architecture The festival, which drew more than 25,000 people from at least 10 states in 2016, has helped numerous local charities, including Magic Moments, The Bell Center and F irehouse Shelter, Lyda said. F or details, call 716-308 0 or go to birminghamgreekfestival.net.

CELEBRATING MIDDLE EASTERN CULTURE

St. G eorge Melkite G reek Catholic Church, at 425 16th Ave. S., will host the annual St. G eorge Middle Eastern F ood

F estival, Thursday, Sept. 14, through Saturday, Sept. 16, 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. The festival, now in its 36th year, features dance, music and such popular foods as kibbee, mamoul, spinach pies, stuffed grape leaves and Middle Eastern pastries. There are vendors selling books, religious relics, hand-carved olive wood and Middle Eastern groceries. Attendees can also take tours of the church. St. G eorge helps support such local charities as the Pathways shelter and the Three Hots and a Cot veterans group. F or more information, call 492-9621 or go to saintgeorgeonline.org/food-festival.

BUYING LOCAL

Birmingham Originals, a group of local restaurateurs who seek to raise awareness of the city’s great food, will present the 15th annual Breakin’ Bread festival at Sloss F urnaces, Sunday, Sept. 24, 1-5 p.m. Breakin’ Bread features a “ very diverse” group of vendors, according to chef Chris Hastings, owner of Hot & Hot F ish Club. “ I t represents the gamut of restaurants that are locally owned, not just white-tablecloth or high-end places,” he said. The event also shows that the city’s food scene “ is becoming more diverse ethnically,” Hastings said. he event hich ill benefit the oodlawn High School U rban F arm, includes cooking demonstrations, live music and kids’ activities. G eneral admission tickets are $ 35 and include unlimited food samplings and two drink tickets for wine and beer. VI P passes are $ 99 and provide unlimited food samplings, wine and beer, access to a lounge, gift bags and an early entrance at 12:30 p.m. Children 12 and under are admitted free. F or details, go to breakinbreadbham.com or birminghamoriginals.org.


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Ex-felons create Offender Alumni Association as support system for re-entry into society t ents in the en er mni ss ci ti n s ne th reer e iness r r m ic tr sh in it s i e n h e een in e in the ss ci ti n in s me since it e n in e r h nie s s i r n re re

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series of bad choices, including dropping out of school and a crack cocaine addiction, “ set the road map” for Deborah Daniels’ life. But after being released early from her third sentence in Julia Tutwiler Prison for Women, she found a support network that helped her realize that road map didn’t have to be her future, too. I t’s that background that gives Daniels credibility when she tells other Alabama prisoners that they can create a new road map, too. “ To have us go back into prison — and especially for men or women who we did time with — there Daniels is such great hope for them,” Daniels said. “ Nobody knows how it feels to be on your bunk and be faced with all the decisions and the harm and stuff that you caused and not be able to do anything,

except somebody who has been on that bunk and cried those tears.” Daniels is one of the creators of the Offender Alumni Association, which has a ministry in four state prisons — St. Clair, Limestone, Bibb County and Staton correctional facilities — and support resources for recently released prisoners who are trying to reintegrate into society. She began volunteering with Prison F ellowship after her last release from prison in 1997 and is now the Southeast Area director, but she felt that ex-offenders like herself had something uniq ue to offer. “ I realized that one of the resources that we were not utilizing to its full capacity was eq uipping those of us who had actually been there, and engaging us in being part of the solution, and getting us involved in every angle of this process,” Daniels said. “ We were just like them. We were the ones who dropped out of school. We were the ones who made all the bad choices. And so I felt like if we could mobilize and empower us to be part of that vehicle, part of that effort to bring about a change, that we could really make a difference.” According to a 2016 annual report from the Alabama Department of Corrections ( ADOC) , an average of 32 percent of inmates released in 2013, or 3,603 people, were within the prison system again within

ne the first the r r m hi e c e h n re r cti e in s r r ms Photos by Sydney Cromwell.

three years. A successful re-entry into everyday life for newly released prisoners — including jobs, social connections and a mental shift toward making new, better choices — make it less likely for them to re-offend. Re-entry programs have been shown to reduce rates of recidivism, or returns to prison, after being released. The ADOC 2016 annual report showed the recidivism rate of inmates who participated in their Supervised Re-entry Program ( SRP) prior to release in 2013 was only 17.6 percent. There were 13,274 inmates released from Alabama prisons in 2016, of which 2,794 participated in the SRP. I n 2016, the ADOC funded almost $ 1.8 million for SRP, which totals about 0.41 percent of its annual budget. However, last year the department began downsizing its re-entry program and moving community supervision responsibilities to the Alabama Board of Pardons and Paroles, according to ADOC budget documents and annual reports. Dena Dickerson, who helps with the OAA program in Limestone and a community engagement program in Titusville, sees the OAA as a way to pick up where staterun programs leave off. “ We are the extended arms of re-entry,” said Dickerson, who is now a case manager at I mpact F amily Counseling.

irmin h m re e

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The OAA holds support group meetings on Monday evenings at I mpact F amily Counseling, 1000 24th St. S. in Southtown, and Daniels said they’re working on expanding Dickerson these groups to other areas such as East Lake, Ensley and Collegeville. There are also meetings for the families of inmates before and after release. As Daniels knows from her own experience, families can be as much a hindrance as a help in the re-entry process. “ When you’ve been incarcerated, even though your family is there, you really haven’t been in their lives. And they really don’t know how to embrace you. Y ou know, a lot of times they can enable you and cripple you, and it’s all in love. And it’s not because they mean to do any harm,” Daniels said. Along with their regular programs at four facilities, Daniels said members of OAA will sometimes travel to do forums at other correctional facilities and answer inmates’ q uestions. I n June 2016 they created a community engagement program in Titusville,


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FACES where members of OAA do yard work, trash removal and other chores for residents as a way to build relationships and good will. “ I t gives us a place in the community to give back to the parts of our society that we were once part of tearing it up,” Dickerson said. This summer, they expanded that to include a youth career readiness program for students identified as at-ris . “ Our goal is to provide that role model, that support that they need in their lives to actually start making some wise decisions,” Daniels said. As the mother of four children, Daniels said she knows how her own choices could have led her children on a similar path had they not had people to support and mentor them while she was incarcerated. “ They got the brunt of the choices that I made. Because a lot of times we think it’s just about us, and we’re only harming ourselves. But in reality, it’s not just about us. I t’s all of those people that are part of our nucleus, part of our family, that are impacted by our choices,” Daniels said. hile a couple hundred irmin ham-area e -offenders have been involved in OAA in some way since it began in 2014, Daniels said around 25 are regularly active in the group’s programs.

Once they’re released from prison, former inmates have a number of needs that can stand between them and successfully rebuilding their lives. Dickerson, who was released in 2012 after serving 10 years of a - ear sentence for conspirac recalled she was “ a new person coming into a world that was so foreign yet familiar to me, and not no in hether fit because had been incarcerated before.” Some of those needs are immediate, such as a place to live and a new job. Daniels said the AA can be a built-in career net or for the e -offenders ho come to them because of the communit connections they’ve made. She also would like to see hi her- ualit housin options for men and women after they’ve been released, as aniels said the ualit can have an effect on e -offenders sense of self- orth as ell as their likelihood to commit a crime again. “ When you take these men out and ou put them in this dru - crime-infested neighborhood, and you tell them, ‘ I want you to do this, I want you to stay clean,’ … probably 90 percent of them fail,” she said. But in the long term, the barriers that eep man e -offenders from reinte ratin into society are often in their own heads. As Dickerson said she often tells the men she works with at Limestone, “ they don’t know

that their thinking is broke.” Carmone Owens, who relocated to Birmingham after his release from prison about a year and a half ago, said the people he counOwens sels before and after their release often struggle with PTSD, mental illnesses, substance abuse and ingrained habits that have led them to some of the bad choices they have made. As program director for OAA, his job is to help them see the source of those problems so they can begin rooting them out. “ Behind the fence, my nickname was ‘ Big Bro,’ and I have a lot of rapport and relationship ith some ver difficult-toor - ith people. ut m able to penetrate the hardness and reach them and help them change their thinking and their attitude. And they trust me,” Owens said. “ Nothing’s hidden in prison, nothing’s diluted in prison and the issues are far more severe.” Through OAA and other prison ministries he has worked with, Owens said he has been

able to atch e -offenders dramaticall alter their lives with “ the encouragement that yes, I can do it and I don’t have to be a hostage to my past, and my past is not preventing me from becoming who I can become.” ic erson said one of the valuable lessons she had to learn was accountability and reco ni in most of the thin s that happened in my life, I was a major contributor to it,” but without being too overwhelmed b uilt to move for ard and ta e advantage of the opportunities in front of her. Owens said having a mentor who has walked through the prison gates themselves helps e -offenders in a a their famil and friends often can’t. “ Y ou need a relationship with someone who understands the issues and is willing to literally take you by the hand. Rules without relationship leads to rebellion. When people come out of prison, there’s an inherent, unspoken fear of the unknown and there’s a mistrust,” Owens said. “ I need help, but I don’t want to ask for help. I need somebody, but I don’t know who to trust. The people I ’m familiar with are not healthy for me, but the people that are healthy for me, I ’m not comfortable around. So who do I turn to? ” To learn more about the Offender Alumni Association s pro rams visit offenderalumniassociation.org.


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Above: A band performs as part of the Monotonia web series. Right: Daniel Hargett is the creator of Monotonia, a web series about local music. Below: Greg Henderson is part of the Monotonia team and serves as head of staging and lighting as well as camera operator. Photos courtesy of Daniel Hargett.

EXPOSING THE ELEMENTS O Glen Iris musician, band member creates web series for city’s music scene

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ne of the hardest parts of being in a local band is getting that all-important name recognition. As guitarist for the Secret Midnight Band, G len I ris resident Daniel Hargett has experienced that for himself. “ I know what it’s like to be a musician and how hard it is to have the media to get your name out there. I t’s not very easy, like a job in itself. I wanted to create something to help people do that,” Hargett said. About a year ago, Hargett and his band’s keyboardist, G reg Henderson, came up with the idea of a web video series showcasing local and traveling acts. Hargett said music in Birmingham has transformed from being dominated by rock ’n’ roll or heavy metal to more jazz, hip hop, progressive rock and abstract artists. “ I ’ve been playing music in Birmingham for 13 years, and the Birmingham music scene has really transformed into something completely different from what it was 15 years ago,” Hargett said. “ Through the years, there’ve been all these different elements come from all over the place that have created this really awesome music scene.” That idea became Monotonia, which published its first episode in arch. onotonia no has a cre of si

people, including Hargett, Henderson, Daniel Rhodes, David Maclay, David Allen and Beau Latham. The show is recorded out of Hargett’s basement. “ I t’s kind of like ‘ Wayne’s World,’” he said. Each episode begins with a song by the featured artist, then a three-to-four minute interview and closing with a second song. Hargett said he’d like to eventually make the videos longer, but right now he wants to keep them short enough to hold viewers’ attentions. “ We try to keep it short. We haven’t done a good job of keeping it short so far, though,” Hargett said.

he first season of onotonia episodes in total wrapped up in late May. Many of the bands featured in the first season ere friends ar ett had made hile performing or attending shows, or they became friends by the time the video wrapped. A few of those acts included Alabama Rose, Steel City Jug Slammers, Nerves Baddington and Creature Camp — H argett said he intentionally picked acts across several genres. “ I have a lot of friends now that I didn’t have before,” Hargett said. Right now, Monotonia is on a break, and Hargett plans to play with the format of the web series before starting its second season. Though he’d like to eventually pick up sponsors, that’s not really what the project is about. “ This means the world to me,” Hargett said. “ I ’m doing this because I really care about Birmingham; I really care about my friends.” He’s hopeful that as Monotonia picks up steam, it will not only give exposure to the artists but also create bonds within Birmingham’s music community. “ A certain sense of community has been built up because of it. I f that’s what’s happening, I feel like I did a good job,” Hargett said. he full first season of onotonia is at elcometo monotonia.com.


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COVER STORY: Return of UAB’s football program comes full circle this month.

Playing TO WIN UAB 2017 SCHEDULE Home games at Legion Field

Sept. 2: Alabama A&M Sept. 9: @ Ball State Sept. 16: Coastal Carolina Sept. 23: @ North Texas Oct. 7: Louisiana Tech Oct. 14: Middle Tennessee Oct. 21: @ Charlotte Oct. 28: @ Southern Miss Nov. 4: Rice Nov. 11: @ UTSA Nov. 18: @ Florida Nov. 25: UTEP 2017 UAB season tickets start at $99. Single game tickets are on sale for $30 premium seating (sections 10-11, 35-36) and $20 for all other sections. Group rate tickets are available for purchases of 20 or more tickets. For more information, visit uabsports.com.

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he U AB football program could have announced its return with a press release as simple as the one Michael Jordan used to return to the NBA in 1995, and no further explanation would have been req uired to set off the celebration. “ We’re back.” After being left for dead on Dec. 2, 2014, when the football program was given the ax after a 6-6 season — head coach Bill Clark’s debut season due to a lac of financial and fan support, each of those factors took a 18 0-degree turn almost immediately. Voices were raised. Money was also raised. Even as the players in the program split off to find ne homes the or to bring the program back was already in progress. And Clark stayed. The announcement on June 1, 2015, that the pro ram ould return on the field in 2017 was met with many a happy tear. A great deal happened in that six-month span while the program was dormant, but arguably the biggest news came about a year later. The U AB F ootball Operations Center and adjacent Legacy Pavilion was announced June 17, 2016, ground was broken Aug. 29, and the team moved into the facility in late

July of this year, right ahead of the opening of the Blazers’ first preseason camp in three years. The facility includes the necessary amenities for a major college football program, unlike the previous facility that was often compared to a dentist’s office. ha ones a senior Clark linebacker who has been at U AB since 2011 — called the facility a “ wonderful maze.” I t currently features two full-length turf practice fields includin one covered b the pavilion. Being able to escape the elements is one of the many blessings Clark counts daily. After the first da of preseason practice on July 31, Clark said, “ To be able to go from the outside heat to under the pavilion and have t o fields practicin at once there’s a lot of things that maybe we took for granted that really made for a great day.” Last fall, the Blazers conducted a pair of scrimmages to satisfy the appetites of Birmingham fans, annually the top viewing market for college football on television. A season with U AB football has arrived once again, and now the Blazers are aiming to make every contribution worthwhile, hether emotional or financial. ver

FACES

UAB opened a preseason camp this year for the first time since 2014. Photo and cover photo by Sarah Finnegan.

season tickets were sold, an all-time high for a program that has been in existence since the early 1990s. “ We want to show our respect to Birmingham,” Jones said. “ They put their hardearned money into this project, so we are going to give our blood, sweat and tears and do the best we can.” A handful of guys, like Jones, stayed with the program throu hout. ome came bac after a ear at another school. But most in the program now will be new faces to fans of the G reen and G old. here are important on-field decisions to be made. Will it be A.J. Erdely or Tyler Johnston who gets the majority of the reps at q uarterback? How big of an impact will linebackers and senior leaders Tevin Crews and Jones make on the defense? How good can this team really be? The return has come full circle, and the Blazers are more than ready to answer those q uestions, especially the last one. They’re aiming to be more than a neat story with a happ endin . he hope on-field success follows suit, beginning with the 2:30 p.m. home and season opener ept. a ainst Alabama A& M. “ We’re playing to win,” Clark said.


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THE PIPES OF SOUTHSIDE

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ou can add the phrase “ punk bagpiper” to the list of words I never thought would be paired together. This city’s a long way from Scotland, yet there’s not one, but two different bagpipe and drum bands practicing in Southside. One preserves the traditional heritage of the pipes; the second looks for a more modern edge. Though the two groups have different styles, they can definitel a ree on one thin people underappreciate the pipes. “ People either like them or hate them,” said Jim MacRae, the pipe major of Alabama Pipes and Drums. MacRae began piping in college in 1961 in Pittsburgh, and continued to play for many years across several northern states. He has even played at the Scottish World F estival in Canada and competed in the orld hampionships in cotland five different times. Hearing hundreds of pipers and drummers performing together is something he’ll Know about never forget. something in “ The sound Birmingham you that day absoconsider bizarre, lutely just gave eclectic or utterly you chills. I t original? Let gave you a us know! Email tingling feeling information to when you’re sydney@starnesplaying. I t’s hard publishing.com. to explain just exactly what it was, like there was electricity in the air,” MacRae recalled of one of his visits to Scotland. But bagpiping doesn’t hold q uite as much popularity here. Alabama Pipes and Drums is trying to build its membership back up to begin competing, and its Monday practices at Seq uel Electric in Southside are often small. The I an Sturrock Memorial Pipe Band, which has its own practice space on 11th Avenue South, is also trying to build its numbers back up to compete again. While you’ll see the band’s pipe major, Ryan Morrison, sporting a kilt when he plays, it’s paired with a bright blue head of hair. “ I am the Bizarro world bagpiper,” Morrison said. “ I wanted us to be cool.”

What’s going on?

Daniel Akin and Jim MacRae play at Sequel Electric in Southside, where Alabama Pipes and Drums holds weekly practices. Photo by Sydney Cromwell.

Morrison said while the band does play and practice more traditional bagpipe pieces, they’ve also adopted more modern ways of playing and new compositions that brin a different air. e have tried to be cheeky,” Morrison said. That’s how I found myself at Buck Mulligan’s on a F riday night, listening to Morrison play with Jasper Coal, a local band that plays Scottish and I rish jigs and reels “ but we punk it up a little bit.” I t was a performance that had very little in common with the traditional rendition of “ Amazing G race.” “ The pipes tend to get looked at as a cultural artifact and not as a living, breathing instrument,” Morrison said. The I an Sturrock band also takes a step outside the norm with the F lam F atales, their all-female drum corps. Morrison said he’s yet to hear of another all-female drum corps within the piping world. His wife, Sherry Morrison, leads the F lam F atales, which started in 2013 with some players who had never held a drumstick before.

“ We learned the box, which is the tradition, then we learned to step outside the box respectfully,” Sherry Morrison said. Morrison said one of the highlights of his career so far was playing at I ron City Bar and G rill for St. Patrick’s Day 2017. “ I t really was the best performing night of my life so far,” Morrison said. “ I t was a dream night for me.” Even with the edge that the I an Sturrock band brings to the music, the roots of bagpiping are still important to its players. The band gets its name from I an Sturrock, born in 1921 in Kilmarnock, Scotland, who immigrated to Birmingham and taught others about piping when he arrived. MacRae’s grandfather played the pipes and Morrison’s grandfather brought stories back from his visit to Scotland during World War I I . Daniel Akin, MacRae’s “ second in command” at Alabama Pipes and Drums, grew up in a town with heavy Scottish in uence and started earin ilts and going to Highland games and [ it was] just

the inevitable conclusion at that point.” The bagpiping “ scene,” as Morrison puts it, is smaller by far than your average guitarist or other musician, so the bonds they form tend to be tighter. Akin, after 13 years of piping, still regularly performs with one of the earliest roups he met almetto Pipes and Drums in South Carolina. “ I am still talking to the same pipers that I ’ve been dealing with since I started,” Akin said. And a corps of pipers playing indoors, as I found out, isn’t always easy on the ears if you aren’t used to it. Bagpipes can top out over 110 decibels, louder than a jackhammer or a jet take-off. “ To get those things out every day and every time you want to practice, [ you’ll] drive the rest of the house crazy,” MacRae said. ut those ho find somethin to love in the harmonies and history of the instrument tend to stick with it for life. A in uoted a common ba piper motto “ Piping is life. The rest doesn’t matter.”


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USL expands soccer league to B’ham; debut set for 2019

Lakeview Green will include apartments, condominiums, retail, restaurants and a public green space. Rendering courtesy of Cohen Carnaggio Reynold.

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Lakeview Green hoped to ‘bridge’ between Pepper Place, 7th Avenue S S E C H AM B E R S

A large retail and residential project planned for Lakeview is expected to create a vital pedestrian link between Pepper Place and the neighborhood’s entertainment strip on Seventh Avenue South, according to the developers, a group called 1904 on 4th LLC. Lakeview G reen – to be built by on F ourth Avenue South near 29th Street on the site of the old Davis School – will have 30 condos, 73 apartments, 38,00 0 squa re feet of retail and restaurant space and a large public green space. Construction on the project, which was announced in July, is expected to begin this fall and be completed by fall 2018 , according to Jennifer Ansley, vice president of Engel Realty, which will manage the property. Ansley told I ron City I nk the development is “ a bridge” between Pepper Place and the

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rest of a evie and fills a ap here there is currently nothing interesting and walkable for residents.” The location was attractive because Lakeview is near downtown but has “ a neighborhood atmosphere,” Ansley said. The green space will include a koi pond, river and waterfalls, and the development will offer such amenities as a bocce ball court and outdoor grills. a evie reen the first condo pro ect in the Lakeview area in this decade, according to developers – is “ unique ” and “ is meant to be a catalyst for increased community atmosphere,” Ansley said. Retail spaces are still being planned, but Ansley said the developer hopes to attract local vendors. Cohen Carnaggio Reynolds is the architect. ARC Realty is the condominium broker.

C H AN D L E R

G olden goals are destined for the Magic City. On Aug. 8 at G ood People Brewing Company, Mayor William Bell announced that Birmingham will soon boast its own professional soccer franchise. I n 2019, the club is slated to make its debut as a member of the U nited Soccer League, which is one tier below Major League Soccer in the U nited States’ footballing pyramid. “ Soccer has grown and grown in excitement, and we oftentimes watch on the TV as other cities and other countries have the experience of live soccer right here in their cities,” said Bell, standing behind a podium outfitted ith a Birmingham sign. “ Well today, the time has come. The time has come.” The hope for team vice president Morgan Copes and investors Jeff Logan, Lee Styslinger I I I and James Outland is that the city will embrace the sport. Atop their current to-do list: select a team name and home playing venue. e re definitel e cited about etting that brand out here,” Copes said at the announcement, “ but today was about the franchise and about the launch.” Copes helped build the Birmingham ammers the area s a ship semipro soccer team, from the ground up with the help of his friend, John Killian. Their desire originally triggered the city’s push to gain professional

From left: USL President Jake Edwards; USL Birmingham investor Lee Styslinger III; USL Birmingham investor James Outland; USL Birmingham investor Jeff Logan; Birmingham Mayor William Bell; and USL Birmingham Vice President Morgan Copes during the August announcement event. Photo by Sam Chandler.

soccer. “ Their passion and their vision, hopefully coupled with some of our resources and business experience, will bring the best team to the league for Birmingham,” Outland said. The immediate fate of the Hammers, Copes said, remains to be seen. F or the past three years, the team has played a roughly two-month season during the summers, with home matches hosted at Sicard Hollow Athletic Complex in Vestavia Hills. The two entities will most likely integrate. Copes added that the new club will likely take the pitch for the first time ne t ear as a member of the Premier Development League. The experience will serve as a stepping stone in preparation for its 2019 U SL debut. U SL President Jake Edwards, who attended the unveiling, cited the Birmingham metro area’s growing population, healthy economy and passionate sports culture as factors that drew the U SL’s attention. F or more information on the soccer organization, visit uslbirmingham.com.

Merchant to convert shop into studios

S S E C H AM B E R S

Vince Amaro, a merchant and property owner in East Lake’s commercial district, said the historic neighborhood, “ deep down inside, is an art district.” That’s why Amaro, at I ron City I nk’s press time, was planning to close Estate Liq uidators — his retail shop in the 7600 block of F irst Avenue North — on Aug. 19 and convert the facility into artist studios. Amaro expected the facility to reopen by about Oct. 1 with about 15 studio spaces. He had already decided to close Estate

i uidators hich didn t seem to fit in East Lake. “ I t was a good business ... but it wasn’t producing what I though it could be,” he said. He then learned from Robert Emerick of REV Birmingham that numerous artists in the city were looking for space. About 20 artists attended a meeting at the space in August, according to Emerick. Amaro will be the landlord, and the facility will be run by the artists. Lindsey Christina, director of Birmingham Art Crawl, is spearheading the creation of the artists’ collective that will manage the

space. Christina said she’s working on the project with artist Celeste Amparo Pfau and that they hope to provide affordable space to “ a diverse group of emerging and established artists.” Several previous art events in East Lake have generated a positive response, according to Amaro. “ Everything we’ve ever done art-wise has attracted a lot of attention and seems to work well,” he said. Artists interested in the studios should contact Christina at contact@ birmingham artcrawl.com.

Vince Amaro, plans to convert a facility along First Avenue North into artist studios. Photo by Jesse Chambers.


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SIPS & BITES

CRESTWOOD

HAPPENINGS

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SEPTEMBER 2017

B’HAM BIZARRE

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DISCOVER

With nod to history, ElementsBhm looks toward future

B y AL Y X C H AN D L E R I t’s hard for anyone passing through to miss Crestwood’s newest retail tenant, ElementsBhm. Since co-owners Johnnie Shaneyfelt and Mallory Barnett recently opened their apparel and accessory store on June 25, they said they’ve had a steady stream of curious locals drop in to check it out. “ We’ve been toying with the idea [ of opening a shop] for a long time,” Barnett said. Before the store, they had a booth set up in U rban Suburban and freq uented Crestline Coffee Shop. When a space opened up just a few stores down, they couldn’t think of a better location. Barnett described their retail store as selling “ basics that you need, that we all want to wear every day, but with an eclectic air. Previously, Barnett and Shaneyfelt had both worked at several retail stores. After working in a dermatology and skin care office arnett decided it as time she went back to retail and do something that

they both really wanted to do. Plus, they felt there wasn’t a lot of men’s shopping around town, so they wanted to add to that. Shaneyfelt and Barnett are both life partners as well as business partners. “ We do a lot of things together,” Shaneyfelt laughed. “ But we did this because we do work well together. Mallory is decisive and fast, and I ’m thorough and want to research everything. We balance each other out professionally and personally.” Barnett and Shaneyfelt said they did extensive research and searching through a lot of internet rabbit holes to find the clothes that would occupy their store. They chose the kind of cool brands that they’ve seen past retail bosses pass up on, as well as some comfortable favorites they’ve remembered from over the years or that people would recognize. But they also wanted to bring in some new items they hadn’t seen around Birmingham. “ [ The name] Elements is a nod to the Magic City, our iron history. Also it is about the elements that make up your style, what you throw into your jeans and shirt that make a difference,” Barnett said.

“ I t’s about some weird socks or wild shirt, about how you make yourself stand out, but to still appreciate and embrace the casualness.” ElementsBhm also sells from local vendors including TJ Wood Works, Champion Limited, the 18 71 project, Counterfeit Rabbit, Katherine Cooper, Small Woods Studio, City Bee Co. and Lindsey Brook. “ That was another big drive in opening the store in general — we could have a place where all these talented and local people we know could sell their goods,” Barnett said. They hope to continue to talk to more local vendors and get them on board for selling at ElementsBhm. Barnett and Shaneyfelt said they also have some new items coming in for this fall. “ We are excited to carry some new lines, new recognizable lines, and continue building our inventory, both men’s and women’s, bringing in some classic brands, some of our most req uested lines,” Shaneyfelt said. The store is located at 5502B Crestwood Blvd. To learn more, search @ Elements Bhm on F acebook.

Johnnie Shaneyfelt and Mallory Barnett opened ElementsBhm in the Shoppes at Crestwood in June. Photo by Alyx Chandler.


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SOUTHSIDE

Brooks Taylor is the owner of Birmingham Breadworks on Seventh Avenue South, which makes most of its breads and pastries fresh daily. Photo by Alyx Chandler.

Strengthening the local community, a croissant at a time B y AL Y X C H AN D L E R ater salt and our. hat s all it ta es for ualit bread said roo s a lor o ner and ba er at irmin ham read or s. a lor said he s been e perimentin ith ba in variations of hi h- ualit bread at his home for over ears. hen his ids ot older and ere leavin home for colle e he and his ife started tal in more seriousl about openin a ba er . reviousl an electrical en ineer he said he as loo in for a chan e. or about a ear and a half a lor ould spend all ni ht in a itchen ba in bread and pastries ith local ba er ore in el ho at the time as sellin bread for epper

lace ar et. n the bou ht a buildin in the heart of outhside and officiall called it irmin ham read or s nine months later. e ve had to educate people on hat ood bread is supposed to taste li e a lor said. he have to o out of their a to come et bread the can t o to the rocer store for it.

a lor said that since the ver be innin he s had three oals for the ba er to ma e the best product possible to have a reat place for people to or hile pa in them decentl and to create a local communit . inus a fe breads that eep ell for multiple da s he said the ma e most of their bread and pastries are made fresh each da . irmin ham read or s currentl

holesales its bread to elt aramount cean he i hlands and he on on. he also have a lunch menu. a lor said the have several local customers that come b each da for bread and their best-sellin products are the cinnamon rolls and rench breads. o learn more about irmin ham reador s o to birmin hambread or s.com.

WOODLAWN

Entrepreneur finds his spot in city’s ‘little Brooklyn’ B y L AU R E N R O L AN D Armand ar e a is a difficult man to trac do n. et een runnin several business in oodla n oodla n cle af ublic ffice and pen hop and others in olorado ar ie a is constantl movin around. pen hop opened a fe ears a o sellin unise clothin and apparel. he shop is bri ht and minimalistic painted a clean hite ith items linin the shelves li e an art displa . ublic ffice ust up the street sells s incare candles campin mu s and maintains the same bri ht atmosphere. oodla n cle af offers a food-oriented space in a modern hite bric buildin . And each has seen communit support. he public s reaction has been fantastic and supportive ar e a said about pen

Open Shop, one of Armand Margieka’s businesses in Woodlawn, utilizes natural light and minimalism, a theme that is consistent with all of this stores. Photo courtesy of Armand Margieka.

hop. e ve increased revenue b over percent since e opened in . espite runnin multiple stores each ith a different theme ar e a said all of his businesses are run under the same mindset. i h ualit products a simple but reat approach special and uni ue items made and crafted ith care and attention and ivin the customer a reat e perience he said. t s li e a little roo l n aitlin latter ne mana er of the oodla n cle afe hich operates ri ht across the street from pen hop said in reference to the oodla n area. ou ve ot e or and ou ve ot roo l n and this is our roo l n.


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FIVE POINTS

HAPPENINGS

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DISCOVER

Victorian mansion-turned-B&B thrives in safe hands

B y AL Y X C H AN D L E R I f you’ve ever wandered by Highland Avenue in the historic F ive Points South area, you might have noticed a certain carousel-looking centaur — not the horse many people confuse it for — staring back at you from the width of a large, Victorian-styled window. etired architect heila haffin no the third o ner of the house and first inn eeper of the Hassinger Daniels Mansion Bed and Breakfast, said this mythological creature, which her husband, I ra, sculpted several years ago, tends to be a favorite among guests and spectators. I t also happened to be a favorite of the second mansion co-owner, Venoa Daniels, who owned the mansion since 1946 with her husband. aniels met heila and ra haffin after noticing some of the sculptures in the indo of their first bed and brea fast hich is also in ive oints outh. ra haffin eventually offered Daniels a tour of the mansion. hen the haffins moved to irmin ham in 1998 , they both noticed her mansion in the Historic F ive Points South area, but it wasn’t until a last-minute outreach in 2010 that they got the chance to tour it, or even dream about

The Hassinger Daniels Mansion Bed and Breakfast, a 1898 National Historic Registry Victorian mansion, offers 10 different rooms for guests to stay at in the Five Points district. Photo by Alyx Chandler.

putting in an offer for it. After Daniels moved to a nursing home and got wind that there was a chance another family would put a bid in for the house to eventually tear it down and rebuild, she made sure her choice of buyers — Sheila and I ra — didn’t have the same plan. heila haffin still recalls e actl hat the second owner of the Victorian home whispered to her, right before they signed the hefty stack of papers to buy the house. “ ‘ Y ou’re an angel,’ she said, and when I asked her why, she asked me to take care of

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Pharmacy with ‘neighborhood feel’ opens shop

17-story apartment complex to replace pool hall, retail sites

B y L E X I C O O N

B Y L AU R E N R O L AN D he rea ool all in ive oints is the latest business in downtown Birmingham to be listed for redevelopment, following projects such as the million ubli apartment development at 20 Midtown, the $ 16.5 million aites mi ed-use development and the $ 66 million Pizitz building renovation. he spot here the current pool hall rests will be demolished and rebuilt as a $ 40 million apartment comple ith roundbrea ing sometime in the upcoming year followed by 18 months of construction. he ne buildin ill be stories tall and will feature 196 apartment units, varying from studio apartments to efficienc apartments to four bedroom apartments, accommodating a total of 518 beds, according to the Birmingham Design Review. he apartments ill feature a m as

the house heila haffin said. hen she told me, ‘ Ms. Hassinger [ the original owner] said to me, I ’m asking you to take care of my house for as long as you can.’” Located at 2028 Highland Ave S., right behind the hic -fil-A heila haffin soon after opened the Hassinger Daniels Mansion as her second bed and brea fast the first being Cobb Lane Bed and Breakfast on 19th Avenue — in late 2015. I t took Sheila Chaffin and her husband more than four ears to restore the mansion, add some modern amenities and carefully harmonize it with the

architectural and stylistic effects of its original time period: 18 98 . Now the bed and breakfast offers 10 different rooms and houses locals, newlyweds and visitors from all over the . . heila haffin said she loved using her architectural background during restoration. She decorated the house herself, adding fancy Victorian elements, iconic columns, gargoyles and angelic statues, dollhouses, old-fashioned bathtubs and even an aged staircase that a local Birmingham friend interested in architecture saved in his garage for 45 years. heila haffin is currentl in the process of making a website for the Hassinger Daniels Mansion Bed and Breakfast. She hopes more people in Birmingham, as well as travelers passing through, will try staying a night or two. U ntil then, she plans to keep honoring Daniels req uest for safekeeping. his is the mansion that ill o n until die, and before I die, I ’ll make sure to arrange for the new owner, for safekeeping,” she said. he rooms at the bed and brea fast ran e from $ 99-$ 159 a night, depending on the size and number of beds. he haffins also offers tours. Call 918 -9090 or go to cobblanebandb. com to check availability.

The exterior of The Break Pool Hall. Photo by Erica Techo.

well as an amenities deck, along with more than 3,8 00 sq uare feet of retail space on the round oor. he apartment comple ill most li el attract students attending the U niversity of Alabama at Birmingham and other young professionals who work in the downtown area. he rea currentl holds a total of tables, including pool tables and air hockey tables, in addition to arcade games and a bar. he pool hall as ori inall built in Lakeview and moved to F ive Points in the late 1990s.

I n recent weeks, the Crestwood Pharmacy and Soda F ountain opened its doors in the Shoppes at Crestwood. ned b a lor rammel and ler hadi hadi said it s oin to be a retail pharmacy that also offers compounding services for clients. And, they’ve installed an old-time soda fountain. nce a lor ot into pharmac he wanted to open up his own pharmacy and have the soda fountain hadi said. rammel will be working as the head pharmacist and hadi as the mana er of the store. Shopping center co-owner Payne Baker said hen hadi and rammel approached him with the idea, he was drawn to it. “ I think this [ the pharmacy] is a fantastic idea,” he said. He believes it meshes well with the popular hyper-localized, neighborhood-oriented movement. here s been a ro in need for the old

The Crestwood Pharmacy and Soda Fountain. Photo by Lexi Coon.

traditional compounding pharmacies,” he said. And patients are findin that ou re [ a] one stop shop.” Baker said thinks the pharmacy will be a great addition to the community, too. “ I t’s gonna be like a throwback to a traditional neighborhood pharmacy,” Baker said. hadi described the vision as openin a pharmacy with a “ hang-out vibe” and nei hborhood feel hich rammel as looking forward to for the pharmacy. “ He’s always wanted to have that sort of vibe and run a pharmac hadi said. he pharmac is open onda throu h F riday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. o learn more about rest ood harmac and oda ountaion visit bhamr .com find them on nsta ram bhamr or ive them a call at 564-0429.


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MEDICAL SERVICES DIRECTORY SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

AVONDALE ANIMAL HOSPITAL 3624 Fifth Ave. S.

322-8566

Q: How are you different from other veterinary practices in the area? A: Avondale Animal Hospital opened in June 2017 in a brand new, spacious and modern facility. Our facility houses three examination rooms, a surgical suite, hospitalization and isolation areas, separate cat holding area and everything pets need to receive top quality veterinary care. Plus, we are adjacent to a luxury boarding and grooming facility, The Pawms Pet Resort, which allows pet owners to easily board or groom their pets and receive medical services at one location. Although our facility is brand new, our team has been caring for Birmingham pets for over 35 years. We operated as Southside Animal Hospital until this year in a smaller building and realized the need to serve the growing Avondale and Southside communities. Q: How do you improve the lives of pets in your care?

avondaleanimal.com

A: By recommending preventative care services such as annual examinations, parasite screenings and laboratory tests, we are able to manage and treat any health issues before they can become a problem. As much as we improve the lives of pets, helping the people is just as important. Educating clients about proper pet care and ways to help them live longer, healthier, happier lives is vital. We realize the bond pet owners and pets have and understand their concerns and worries.


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MEDICAL SERVICES DIRECTORY • SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

UAB WOMEN’S HEART HEALTH CLINIC The Kirklin Clinic of UAB Hospital For two years, Joy O’Neal complained to her doctor of fatigue, weight gain and difficulty breathing. Testing didn’t point to an obvious cause, so her symptoms were blamed on stress, allergies and menopause. “I just kept pushing through, thinking, ‘This is what normal menopause is like; just quit your whining and move on,’” recalled O’Neal, who operates The Red Barn in Leeds, a therapeutic horseback riding center for children and adults with disabilities. “I very easily could have been dead within a matter of months.” A routine physical for a life insurance policy revealed an abnormal EKG reading, which led to her diagnosis of congestive heart failure. Further testing revealed that no blockage was present, so her doctors didn’t know what to do. “But I knew what to do, and that was to get to UAB as soon as I could,” said O’Neal, whose condition has improved greatly since receiving care at UAB Medicine’s Women’s Heart Health Clinic. Women have unique risk factors and symptoms and may benefit from cardiac care designed to address their particular needs, says Salpy Pamboukian, M.D., director of the Women’s Heart Health Clinic. The clinic is staffed by an experienced team of renowned UAB Medicine cardiac experts, including hypertension specialist Suzanne Oparil, M.D., interventional cardiologist Brigitta Brott, M.D., and heart failure specialist Indranee Rajapreyar, M.D. The clinic enjoys full access to UAB Cardiology’s wide range of diagnostic and therapeutic services. Heart disease is the No. 1 cause of death among women in the United States. Dr. Pamboukian says keeping close tabs on heart health is particularly important for women in midlife, because

800-UAB-8816 / 800-822-8816

uabmedicine.org/womensheart

JOY O’NEAL

SALPY PAMBOUKIAN, M.D.

their risks of heart disease and heart attack jump dramatically upon reaching menopause. One in eight women between the ages of 45 and 64 has some form of heart disease, and this increases to one in four women over the age of 65. “Despite the fact that there is plenty of public information about heart disease, many women are not receiving the message that heart disease

is still the top cause of death in the United States,” Dr. Pamboukian says. “A lot of women put off getting the kind of medical care they need. I also believe that there is still a lack of understanding in the medical community of how heart disease can affect women. Whatever the reason, delays in diagnosis give the disease time to advance.” The good news is that 80 percent of heart disease and

stroke may be prevented through lifestyle changes, education, and proper medical care. So in the interest of spreading the word about women’s heart health, Dr. Pamboukian answered a few key questions on the subject: Q: What are the biggest risk factors for heart disease? A: The biggest risk factors are abnormal cholesterol levels — especially high LDL cholesterol — and smoking,

along with other medical conditions and lifestyle choices such as diabetes, obesity, poor diet, physical inactivity, excessive alcohol use and a family history of cardiovascular disease. Q: What are some of the symptoms of heart failure in women? A: Women typically experience different symptoms than men do during heart attacks. Common symptoms include sweating, pressure, lightheadedness, nausea, indigestion and pain in the jaw, neck or upper back. These symptoms may be brushed off as the flu, stress or menopause, but when it comes to heart disease, there is no reason to be passive. Q: What can I do to reduce my risk for heart disease? A: Women can significantly reduce their risk by eating a heart-healthy diet that is low in saturated fat, sugar and salt; not smoking; achieving and maintaining a healthy weight; staying physically active; and limiting your alcohol consumption. It’s also important to note that psychological stress can contribute to a higher risk for heart disease, so it’s important to seek help for any mental health issues you may have. Q: If I have a family history of heart disease, what age should I begin getting screened? A: There are no clear-cut guidelines for screening a person based strictly on family history. However, you should have an ongoing dialogue with your doctor about reducing your risk and screening for symptoms and risk factors — especially if your family members developed heart disease at a young age (age 55 or earlier for men, and age 65 or earlier for women). The UAB Women’s Heart Health Clinic accepts referrals from the Birmingham metro area and from outside Birmingham if services are not available in your area.


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MEDICAL SERVICES DIRECTORY • SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

SKIN WELLNESS CENTER 1920 Huntington Road, Homewood Q: Could you tell us about your new “Breeze in for Botox” service? A: We listened to our cosmetic patients and wanted to make it as easy as possible for them to come in for Botox and Dysport. Most of our patients are busy and do not have time to remember to make an appointment and then rearrange the rest of their schedule to accommodate that appointment. We just decided to make ourselves available whenever they needed us. So every Tuesday and Thursday, we are available from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. for patients to just breeze in and walk out without wrinkles. Q: Skin Care Wellness carries a great selection of skin care products. Do you need a prescription to purchase these? A: Everything you see on skinwellness.com/shop/ can be purchased without a prescription. We pride ourselves on the selection of our online store. It’s definitely an

205-871-7332

skinwellness.com

DEBORAH YOUHN, MD; RAYNA DYCK, MD; BRITTANY RIGSBY, CRNP advantage to our patients to be able to order online when they don’t have a chance to come by the office. We get orders all the time from patients who are overseas, on vacation or away at school that can’t live without their favorite Skin Wellness products. We also get a ton of orders

from people that aren’t even patients and we’re happy to fill those as well and ship them wherever needed. Q: You’ve recently added the Excel V Laser Skin Treatment to your practice. What are the benefits of this new treatment? A: Excel V is a workhorse laser with

many applications from melasma to sun spots, but it really shines as a laser to combat skin problems that are vascular in nature like spider veins, facial telangiectasias (veins), rosacea redness and chronic sun damage. Q: What is the best advice you could give someone who is looking to reverse the effects of aging on their skin and keep their skin youthful looking? A: Always wear sun protection (sunscreen, hats, sunglasses) when outside, avoid the sun during the peak hours of 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and invest in a retinol that should be used every night. This one cream has many benefits from pigment correction to pre-cancer prevention. Q: What are some of the biggest misconceptions people have about skin care? A: The biggest misconception about skin care is that it must be expensive and a lot of work. Wrong! Simplicity and compliance are the keys to success.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

SEPTEMBER 2017

2017

IRON CITY INK

INSIDE ADVENT EPISCOPAL SCHOOL ............................ 29 HIGHLANDS SCHOOL ......... 30 THE ALTAMONT SCHOOL ... 31 JEfferson Christian Academy ......................... 31

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

creative montessori school ............................ 32

Advent EpIscopal school Since its establishment in 1950, Advent Episcopal School has built a national reputation for academic excellence. Offering pre-kindergarten through eighth grade, Advent is a diverse community of bright children who excel in an environment that is safe, stable and enriching. The school provides students with varied opportunities to develop and demonstrate their talents and abilities both inside and outside the classroom and ultimately prepares them for lives of purpose and service. F or the second year in a row, Advent has received the President’s Award for the top K-8 school in the state from the Alabama Independent School Association. As the only PK-8 school in downtown Birmingham, Advent is able to take advantage of the rich and extraordinary educational and cultural opportunities at our doorstep. eanin ful e posure to fine art music, foreign language and critical thinking spurs intellectual curiosity amongst our students. Advent is small by design, even though our students come from 44 different zip codes. Every Advent student is known by name. They are challenged, celebrated,

KEY FACTS • GRADES: PK-8 • WHERE: 2019 6th Ave. N. Birmingham, AL 35203 • CALL: 252-2535 • WEB: adventepiscopal school.org

filled ith onder as Advent instills earl on a desire to be lifelong learners. I f you start here, you can go anywhere!

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SEPTEMBER 2017

HIGHLANDS SCHOOL F ounded in 1958 by educator, civic leader and philanthropist, Evalina Brown Spencer, Highlands School is an educationally progressive independent 4k-8 th grade school and 6 weeks-3-year F amily Center. Distinguished by its research-based, contemporary approach to education, Highlands’ faculty and staff partner with students and families throughout their educational trajectory to maximize student learning and wholechild development. U pon graduation from Highlands, students are prepared to thrive academically, professionally and socially in a constantly changing, global world. Highlands’ approach to learning systematically builds one success/challenge upon another. As students move through our Primary, Elementary, and Middle grades, they are joined on their journey by a partnership of teachers, parents, and administrators working to develop increasing degrees of initiative inte rit and self-confidence. hrou h q uality time with teachers, open and meaningful dialogue with each student’s parents, robust learning opportunities which include arts appreciation, physical education, character and leadership development, combined with rigorous academic programming creates a special learning environment at a most critical span in a student’s life. We deliver a curriculum from early

KEY FACTS • • • •

GRADES: 4K-8 WHERE: 4901 Old Leeds Road CALL: 956-9731 WEB: highlandsschool.org

are in charge of their own educational journey and have developed the leadership skills to excel in high school and beyond. childhood through the eighth grade that challenges every student to reach his or her potential and prepares them for lifelong success. Our culture emphasizes academic excellence in a supportive environment. o this end e see the importance and value of embedding social-emotional learning throughout our school day. Research has been clear that academic learning is impacted by social and emotional competence. Ever mindful of these priorities, our strategic roadmap includes differentiated learning strategies, appropriate and seamless integration of technology, as well as robust global education experiences. Highlands’ faculty and staff are constantly exploring the most effective approaches to education for students.

hrou hout these endeavors e believe that the most effective learning occurs when it is relevant and students are focused and engaged. Woven throughout our teaching and learning is a project-based learning approach — one in which students develop skills for living in a knowledge-based, highly technolo ical societ . he activel e plore real-world problems and authentically engage in content. As project work is cross-curricular, students learn to apply skills, knowledge, and strategies from a variety of content areas and curriculum standards are addressed while developing critical thinking, problem-solving ability, collaboration, communication, and creativity. Our graduating 8 th graders leave ith confidence are not afraid to ta e ris s

WHY HIGHLANDS

an ed on he est chools list of the op rivate lementar chools in the U nited States. ur rd- th raders are in the top percent of all independent school students in ERB mathematics test scores and in the top 15 percent of all independent school students in ERB reading comprehension test scores. School-wide curriculum concentrated on. chool- ide curriculum concentrated on 21st century skill include creativity, collaboration, communication, critical thinking and cooperation. o tudent- eacher ratios allo in for personalized attention guaranteeing individual success for students.


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THE ALTAMONT SCHOOL The mission of The Altamont School is to improve the fabric of society by graduating compassionate, well-educated individuals capable of independent thinking and innovative ideas. To this end, the school attracts, nurtures and challenges students whose commitment to truth, knowledge and honor will prepare them not only for the most rigorous college programs, but also for productive lives. Altamont is a small family of approximately 370 students in grades 5-12 with socio-economic, ethnic and religious diversity. Altamont is a good choice for students who excel in their present school but want greater breadth and challenge in all areas of school life. We combine an intensive, college preparatory academic program with a personalized college search program. At Altamont, there are many opportunities for students to develop multiple talents by participating in arts, foreign language, community service, clubs, class projects, science competitions and athletics. Students also benefit from unparalleled service leadership opportunities through Altamont’s C. Kyser Miree Ethical Leadership Center.

KEY FACTS • GRADES: 5-12 • WHERE: 4801 Altamont Road S. Birmingham, AL 35222 • CALL: 879-2006 • WEB: altamontschool.org Altamont is located five minutes from downtown Birmingham on the crest of Red Mountain in a secluded residential neighborhood. The campus features the CabanissKaul Center for the Arts, the Pharo Art Studio, the Lacey-Day Photography Studio, newly renovated athletics spaces, two science wings, a study garden, a 14,000-volume library and much more. Experience all that Altamont offers for yourself by attending an Open House or scheduling a campus tour.

Jefferson Christian Academy THE TECHNOLOGY LEADER IN CHRISTIAN EDUCATION

JCA is a private Christian school serving students from eight weeks through the 12th grade. We offer a full school experience in a positive environment where self-esteem and confidence can thrive. At JCA, we encourage the development of the entire child: academically, socially, physically and spiritually. We are fully accredited by SACS/ AdvancED and the National Christian School Association. Our students score an average of almost two grade levels above the current grade on standardized tests, and our average ACT scores are higher than the state and national averages. Our growing 21st century teaching and learning program promotes creativity,

KEY FACTS • GRADES: 8 weeks-12th grade • WHERE: 1500 Heritage Place Drive Birmingham, AL 35210 • CALL: 956-9111 • WEB: jcaweb.net

critical thinking, communication and collaboration. Our iPad initiative infuses technology into education and prepares our students for a future career in a global society. Visit our website at jcaweb.net or call 956-9111 to schedule a visit and let us tell you more!


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CREATIVE MONTESSORI school Creative Montessori School ( CMS) is dedicated to providing an authentic Montessori environment for our students. We value each child’s uniq ue potential and nurture our students’ inherent ability to meet challenges with divergent thinking s ills self-confidence adaptabilit and resilience. Children at CMS learn all the same things that children in a traditional school will learn — plus practical knowledge such as con ict resolution social responsibilit and environmental stewardship. I t is how they learn and how they feel about learning that is q uite different and truly valuable. Montessori classrooms are designed to foster intellectual curiosity by facilitating individualized, independent, purposeful work within a warm and peaceful setting. The result is children who fall in love with learning. Students are allowed to learn at their own pace under the caring and thoughtful guidance of a professionally trained Montessori teacher. F ounded in 1968 , CMS is Birmingham’s first ontessori school the first local private school to be racially integrated from

KEY FACTS • GRADES: 18 months-6th grade • WHERE: 2800 Montessori Way, Homewood, AL 35209 • CALL: 879-3278 • WEB: cmskids.org

inception and the first to offer science world geography and foreign language to preschoolers. Today, CMS enrolls 225 students from 21 zip codes and is located on a two-acre campus in the heart of Homewood. Our affordable tuition makes exceptional education accessible to families with diverse socioeconomic backgrounds.


SEPTEMBER 2017

BUSINESS

SIPS & BITES

HAPPENINGS

SIGHTS

PUT THESE IN SEPTEMBER’S BEST BETS

BIRMINGHAM ARTWALK

Sept. 8-9; Friday, 5-10 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Loft District, various locations

This annual festival transforms the Loft District into an arts district with more than 100 visual artists, live music, street performers, food and drink vendors and children’s activities. Friday night has been compared to a huge gallery opening with a street festival atmosphere, while Saturday afternoon caters more to the family crowd with special children’s activities. Free admission. For more information, visit birminghamartwalk.org.

IRON CITY INK

FACES

B’HAM BIZARRE

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BIRMINGHAM GREEK FESTIVAL

Sept. 21-23; Thursday-Saturday, 10;30 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Holy Trinity-Holy Cross Greek Orthodox Cathedral, 307 19th St. S.

Begun in 1972 by the Ladies Philoptochos Society, this yearly event has blossomed into one of the premier cultural events in the Southeast. Besides trying delicious Greek cuisine, you’ll enjoy live music and dancing and a warm, spirited family atmosphere. Free admission, Food and drinks priced separately. For more information, call 716-3080 or visit birminghamgreekfestival.net.

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TRUCKS BY THE TRACKS

Sept. 17; 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Railroad Park, 1600 First Ave. S.

Birmingham’s best food trucks will serve everything from po’ boys, grilled cheese and specialty burgers to popsicles and ice cream sandwiches. The event will also feature lawn games and other activities, as well as live bands. All proceeds support Railroad Park. General admission is $8 at the gate, $5 in advance and children younger than 12 are free. VIP tickets also available. For information, call 521-9933 or go to railroadpark.org.

DISCOVER

ICI

MUST SEE

See this? It means we think you ought to go!

HEART OF ALABAMA WALK TO END ALZHEIMER’S Sept. 24; 1:30-4:30 p.m., Railroad Park, 1600 First Ave. S.

The Alzheimer’s Association’s Walk to End Alzheimer’s is the world’s largest event to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer’s care, support and research. This year’s route length will be 2 miles, and the walk will take place rain or shine. Admission is free. For more information, call 379-8065 or visit http://act.alz.org/heartofalabama.

OFFICIAL BIRMINGHAM CITY COUNCIL Sept. 5: Birmingham City Council. 9:30 a.m. City Hall, third floor. Sept. 11: Birmingham City Council Economic Development, Budget and Finance Committee. 4 p.m. Birmingham City Hall, third floor, Conference Rooms D and E. Sept. 11: Birmingham City Council Governmental Affairs Committee. 2 p.m. Birmingham City Hall, third floor, Conference Rooms D and E. Sept. 12: Birmingham City Council Public

Improvements and Beautification Committee. 2 p.m. Birmingham City Hall, Conference Room A. Sept. 12: Birmingham City Council. 9:30 a.m. City Hall, third floor. Sept. 18: Birmingham City Council Public Safety, Transportation Committee. 4:30 p.m. Birmingham City Hall, third floor, council chambers. Sept. 18: Birmingham City Council Planning and Zoning Committee. 4:30 p.m. Birmingham City Hall, Conference Room A.

Sept. 18: Citizen Advisory Board. 7 p.m. City Council Chambers, Birmingham City Hall, third floor. The Citizen Participation Program is designed to achieve improved communication, understanding, and cooperation between Birmingham citizens and city officials through increased personal contact between City Hall and neighborhoods and communities throughout the city. The public is welcome to attend.

Birmingham City Hall, third floor, Conference Rooms D and E.

Sept. 19: Birmingham City Council. 9:30 a.m. City Hall, third floor.

Sept. 26: Birmingham City Council Utilities Committee. 4 p.m. Birmingham City Hall, third floor, Conference Rooms D and E.

Sept. 22: Birmingham City Council Administration/Technology Committee. 1 p.m.

Sept. 26: Birmingham City Council. 9:30 a.m. City Hall, third floor. Sept. 26: Birmingham City Council Education Committee. 2 p.m. Birmingham City Hall, third floor, Conference Rooms D and E.

Sept. 27: Birmingham City Council Committee


34 BUSINESS

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of the Whole. 4 p.m. Birmingham City Hall, third floor, Conference Rooms D and E.

COMMUNITY

NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION MEETINGS

Sept. 2, 9, 16, 23 and 30: The ar et at Pepper Place. Pepper Place, econd ve. . The mar et rings the est la ama gro ers, food producers and artisans to Birmingham every aturday, rain or shine. ree. a.m. to noon. . pepperplacemar et.com.

Sept. 11: orest Par outh vondale eigh orhood ssociation meeting. p.m. vondale i rary, 4 th t. . isit forestpar southavondale.com for more information. Sept. 11: Woodlawn Neighborhood ssociation meeting. st ve . Call President Brenda Petta ay at 44 for more information. Sept. 12: Highland Par eigh orhood ssociation meeting. p.m. pstairs meeting room of the Highland Par olf Course clu house. eeting notices are sent out to recipients of the Highland Par email list. If you ish to e included on this list, email President lison lascoc at alisonglascoc gmail.com. Sept. 14: Roe uc prings eigh orhood ssociation meeting. p.m. outh Roe uc Baptist Community Church. Call President ran Ham y at for more information. Sept. 19: Central City Neighborhood ssociation meeting p.m. inn Henley i rary, Richard rrington, r. uditorium. eigh orhood social to follo at Tavern on st, st ve. . Sept. 25: Crest ood outh eigh orhood ssociation meeting. p.m. th t. . Sept. 25: Crest ood orth eigh orhood ssociation meeting. p.m. irls Inc. of la ama. Sept. 25: Huffman eigh orhood ssociation meeting. p.m. Cornerstone chool, Huffman Road. Sept. 25: ive Points outh eigh orhood ssociation meeting. p.m. outhside i rary, 4 th ve. . isit fivepoints ham. com for more information.

Did we miss something? If you ould li e to have your neigh orhood association meeting mentioned in ne t months calendar, email the meeting info to illiams starnespu lishing.com.

Sept. 11: B Bingo. Birmingham ID utreach, nd t. . B hosts its ingo fundraiser on the first onday of each month. p.m. Cash prizes. 4 e t. . irminghamaidsoutreach.org. Sept. 14: tray Cat trut. The est, 4 st t. ., uite . Help stray and feral cats hile en oying silent auctions and free food. lcohol ill e served. ll proceeds to go to ittle e s Cat anctuary. Tic ets at the door advance. p.m. 4 . littleme scats.com. Sept. 14: iddle Eastern ood estival. aint eorge el ite ree Catholic Church, 4 th ve . En oy the est of ree culture, including dance, music, church tours, art and culture vendors and food at this annual event. ood items include chic en, i ee, falafel, grape leaves, spinach pie, a lava and many more. or details, call or go to saintgeorgeonline.org food festival. Sept. 17: R E Birmingham, presented y the la ama ustaina le griculture MUST et or . p.m. at vondale SEE Bre ing Co., 4 st t. . Eighteen farmer chef pairs ill create food tastings ith the freshest farm products to delight in this picnic style event. Tic ets egin at . or more information, visit asanonline.org graze.

ICI

Sept 17: ational College air. B CC. ree and open to the pu lic event allo s students to meed admissions reps from numerous schools. Pre registration is recommended. Sept 23: irl couts Iron ids. ulcan Par . Through the Iron ids patch, participants learn the story of health and fitness in Birmingham, loo ing at ho people left farms to or in factories, changing the ay they ate and e pended energy in the process. e ma e ulcan s Iron ids patch an e hilarating e perience, com ing history ith lots of physical activity. or more information contact indsay Elliott at 4 , e tension . Sept. 23: to erfest Birmingham. p.m. Cald ell Par , th treet outh and Highland venue. Put

SEPTEMBER 2017

B’HAM BIZARRE

NECK OF THE WOODS

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on your lederhosen and oin us for Birminghams iggest erman themed party. Early ird general admission IP 4 . eneral admission includes a souvenir oz. eer stein and one complimentary eer. IP includes a souvenir oz. eer stein, four complimentary eers, one meal voucher and a commemorative Birmingham to erfest T shirt. or more information, visit irminghamo to erfest.com.

t. . The Indie fol singer song riter duo is from ustin, Te as. p.m. . 4 . or play.com

Sept. 24: agic City ID al Run. Railroad Par , irst ve. . The th annual ID al raises money for Birmingham IDs utreach. The event ill include a guest emcee as ell as live music and choirs. The endor air ill e open 4 pm. ree admission. 4 p.m. 4 . Birminghamaidsoutreach.org.

Sept. 10: uture Islands. Iron City, nd t. . The popular synth pop and from Baltimore is touring in support of their ne al um, The ar ield. p.m. . . 4 . ironcity ham.com

Sept. 24: Brea in Bread. loss urnaces, nd t. orth. la amas premiere food, ine and eer festival ill offer an afternoon of unlimited signature dishes from popular restaurants. There ill e ine, eer and non alcoholic everages, as ell as live music and coo ing demonstrations. Birmingham riginals ill again donate proceeds to ones alley Teaching arm and its oodla n High chool r an arm pro ect. p.m. dmission Info IP general admission children ages and under are admitted free. 4 . irminghamoriginals.org. Sept. 30: istah trut. egion ield, 4 raymont ve. est. This event features a run and al . It s presented y Brenda Bro n s Bosom Buddies, a local non profit dedicated to the support, education and early detection of reast cancer for minority, lo income and under served omen and men. a.m. Registration fee is advance . or more information, go to or to ace oo rendas ro n osom uddies.

MUSIC Sept. 3: Cheru s. aturn, 4 st t. . eteran ustin, Te as, pun and ill appear ith a e Tyrants, Holiday unfire and Bulging. p.m. 4. 4 . saturn irmingham.com. Sept. 6: i e Bama. The ic , 4 th ve. . Rap, hip hop, house and Dirty outh from an la ama performer. p.m. . . thenic roc s.com. Sept. 7: Cherry lazerr. yndicate ounge, 4 th t. . roc and from os ngeles. p.m. . . syndicatelounge. reinventrecords.com. Sept. 7: Penny

parro . or Play,

rd

Sept. 8: ulture hale. The ic , 4 th ve. . The legendary Birmingham alt roc and hosts its th anniversary party. lso appearing are Bohannon and River Bend. p.m. . . thenic roc s.com

Sept. 14: The Infamous tringdusters. Iron City, nd t. . popular modern luegrass and. p.m. . 4 . ironcity ham. com Sept. 15: Tedeschi Truc s Band. la ama Theatre, Third ve. . Doors open at p.m. sho egins at p.m. This piece ensem le, led y the hus and and ife team of guitarist Dere Truc s and guitarist singer usan Tedeschi, is a true roc n roll collective. Tic ets start at . or more information, visit ala amatheatre.com. Sept. 15: heila E. lys tephens Center, th ve. . orld class drummer and percussionist heila E has performed ith such stars as Ringo tarr, arvin aye, Prince and Beyonc , p.m. Tic ets are , 4 and . . alysstephens.org Sept. 16: lo Tri e. or Play, rd t. . High energy e rleans and that com ines Cu an Cari ean rhythms ith R B, soul, roc , and hip hop. p.m. . 4 . or play. com Sept. 17: T ice is ice n Evening ith Deer Tic . aturn, 4 st t. . popular alternative roc and from Providence, R.I. p.m. . . 4 . saturn irmingham. com Sept. 20: The Cactus Blossoms. yndicate ounge, 4 th t. . popular t o man alt country and from inneapolis, inn. p.m. . . syndicatelounge. reinventrecords.com Sept. 21: oogma. ydeco, th ve. . n electronic and ased in ashville, oogma lends genres into an original e perience still steeped in dance music. p.m. . . zydeco irmingham.com Sept. 22: Blac ac et ymphony. B CC Concert Hall. The group ill offer a live performance of


SEPTEMBER 2017

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DISCOVER The Beatles’ classic 1967 album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band to celebrate its 50th anniversary. 8 p.m. $29 - $80. 800-745-3000. bjcc.org. Sept. 22: Mitchell Tenpenny. Zydeco, 2001 15th Ave. S. A country singer-songwriter from Nashville. 9:30 p.m. $8. 933-1032. zydecobirmingham.com Sept. 26: Young the Giant. BJCC Concert Hall. The rock band from Irvine, Calif., is touring to support its record, Home of the Strange. Also appearing are Cold War Kids and Joywave. $37. 800-745-3000. bjcc.org. Sept. 28: Joey Alexander Trio. Alys Stephens Center, 1200 10th Ave. S. Alexander, a talented 14-year-old pianist, will star in the final installment of The Essentials, the C s innovative series devoted to the history of jazz. 7 p.m. $40. 975-2787. alysstephens.org

ARTS Through Oct. 22: Alabama and Beyond: African merican Educators and Their rt. Birmingham Civil Rights Institute, 520 16th St. N. The exhibit includes 30 works from the Carnetta & Norm Davis Collection. Admission free after regular BCRI admission. 328-9696. bcri.org Sept. 7-23: Trevor. Theatre Downtown. 2410 Fifth Ave. S. A Nick Jones play about the relationship between a chimpanzee who used to act in commercials and his owner Sandra. Thursday-Saturday, 8 p.m. General admission: adults $18, students $12. 565-8838 theatredowntown.org Sept. 15-30: Chapeau!! Naked Art Gallery, 3831 Clairmont Ave. An extravagant hat show by various local artists. Opening reception is Friday, Sept. 15, 5-8 p.m., part of the monthly Third Friday celebration in Forest Park.

Admission free. For details, call 595-3553 or go to nakedartusa.com Sept. 16-17: Burningham. Artchovia Art Park, 225 47th St. N. A smaller, kid-friendly version of the epic Burning Man festival held each September in the Nevada desert. Attendees are invited to do or create anything they would do at Burning Man — except the nudity. Presented by The Magic City of Art Campaign. Admission free. Saturday, 9 a.m., until Sunday, 11:59 p.m. For information, call 305-0505. Sept. 22: Ballet Hispánico. Alys Stephens Center, 1200 10th Ave. S. Led by award-winning artistic director Eduardo ilaro, the company celebrates Latino culture and has performed for more than 3 million people on three continents. 8 p.m. Tickets $25, $35 and $45. 975-2787. alysstephens.org Sept. 23: Contra Dance. YWCA Birmingham, 309 23rd St. N. Presented by FOOTMAD, Birmingham Friends of Old-Time Music and Dance, these regular events primarily feature contra dancing, square dancing and waltzes. 7-10:30 p.m. Adults (over 18) $10; college students $8; children ages 13-18 $4; children 12 and under admitted free. 979-3237. footmadbirmingham.org Sept. 29: Soul Sessions @ Seeds. Seeds Coffee Co. 4 moor Road. En oy coffee, poetry and music at this event, featuring Atlanta’s ady ee Da Poet and hosted y B.Royalty. Admission free. 7-9:30 p.m. 225-2512 or kingdomink2014@gmail.com.

SPORTS UAB FOOTBALL ( HOME GAMES AT LEGION FIELD) Sept. 2: Alabama A&M, 2 p.m. Sept. 16: Coastal Carolina, time TBA.

Let us help spread the news! Email sydney@starnespublishing.com to submit your announcement.


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