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IRON CITY

JUNE 2018

VOLUME 3

ISSUE 1

INK 10 YEARS OF BEERS X

Good People Brewing Co. marks decade of growth, in uence in Magic City. 22 INSIDE

BUSINESS

Bigger, better opportunity Bayles Catering estaurant moves to larger location in oodlawn, e pands hours and Southern-style menu. 10

SIPS & BITES

HAPPENINGS

FACES

Room to grow John Boone and Hunter Renfroe of Orchestra Partners are betting big on the future of downtown, Five oints South. 18


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ABOUT

IRON CITY INK

IRONCITY.INK

BUSINESS

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JUNE 2018

B’HAM BIZARRE

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DISCOVER

22 10 EA S F BEE S: ood eople Brewing Co. marks decade of growth, in uence in agic City.

BUSINESS

HAPPENINGS

SAVVY STARTUP BIRMINGHAM: Local entrepreneur art arasco creates podcast to boost city s startup sector. 6

FINDING WAYS TO STAND OUT: Singer-actor Amy Johnson approaches 15th show with ed ountain Theatre Company s production of Disney s Beauty and the Beast.” 12

ARCHIVING THE PAST: Director is on a mission to create web archive of Birmingham-connected black radio. 20

NECK OF THE WOODS

REAL ESTATE: Transactions and developments slated for the metro’s real estate market. 8

COMMUNITY EVENTS: hether you re looking to run a 5 or eat to your heart s content for a good cause, plenty of events abound throughout June. 14

FOREST PARK: Author Alina Stefanescu wins award to publish first short story collection. 24

SIPS & BITES

FACES

DISCOVER

BIGGER, BETTER OPPORTUNITY: Bayles Catering estaurant moves to larger location in oodlawn. 10

ROOM TO GROW: John Boone and Hunter enfroe are betting big on the future of downtown, Five oints. 18

JUNE’S BEST BETS: our uick guide to metro Birmingham music and events scheduled this month. 28

IRON CITY

INK Contact Information: Iron City Ink PO Box 530341 Birmingham, AL 35253 (205) 313-1780 dan@ starnespublishing.com

Please submit all articles, information and photos to: sydney@ starnespublishing.com P.O. Box 530341 Birmingham, AL 35253

Publisher: Managing Editor: Contributing Editor: Design Editor:

Dan Starnes Sydney Cromwell Jesse Chambers Kristin Williams

Director of Photography: Sarah Finnegan Digital Editor: Alyx Chandler Community Editor: Erica Techo

Published by: Starnes Publishing LLC Legals: Iron City Ink is published monthly. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content without prior permission is prohibited. Information in Iron City Ink is gathered from sources considered reliable, but the accuracy cannot be guaranteed. All articles/photos submitted become the property of Iron City Ink. We reserve the right to edit articles/photos as deemed necessary and are under no obligation to publish or return photos submitted. Inaccuracies or errors should be brought to the attention of the publisher at (205) 313-1780 or by email.

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Advertising Manager: Matthew Allen Account Manager: Layton Dudley Sales and Distribution: Warren Caldwell Eric Clements Don Harris Michelle Salem Haynes James Plunkett Rhonda Smith Vicky Hager Heather Anthony Ethan Currier Advertising inquiries: matthew@starnes publishing.com


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ABOUT

EDITOR’S NOTE

I

n my head, my dad and motorcycles have always been two sides of the same coin. He raced dirt bikes when he was young and is known to make a second loop around the parking lot to get another look at a nice motorcycle anywhere he goes. So, as a young child, of course I had a motorcycle, too. You could find me on my little pink amaha dirt bike, head bobbling in a slightly oversized helmet as I cruised through our backyard or nearby fields. y favorite was going over “whoop-de-doos” – in reality, they were probably just little dirt mounds, but Dad always treated them like jumps on my own personal track. Usually when I would ride, Dad kept training wheels on my bike and a long rope attached to the tail so he could prevent anything catastrophic from happening. When I was roughly 6 or 7, he stopped me in the backyard to “look at something” on the back of my bike. I wasn’t paying attention to what he was doing, focused impatiently on returning to zipping around in a circle.

When he stepped away, I carried on riding like normal, not even noticing until later that he had taken off both the training wheels and the rope. Without realizing it, I was riding all on my own. Had he told me the training wheels were gone, I probably would have gotten nervous and crashed almost immediately. Instead, he knew I was ready and quietly took away the supports so that when I realized they were gone, I was already succeeding on my own. Not all of the things Dad taught me have stuck over the years – sorry Dad, I still can’t change my own oil – but that’s one of the memories I remember fondly, of my father guiding me, but letting me teach myself to be strong and brave. Happy Father’s Day.

COMMUNITY PARTNERS Alabama Power (31) Alys Stephens Performing Arts Center (29) American arketing Association (27) ARC Realty (32) Avondale Animal Hospital (7) Bedzzz Express (9) Birmingham Festival Theatre (16) Birmingham useum of Art (17, 21) Birmingham Speech and Hearing Associates (10) Campaign To Elect Bill Veitch (11)

Case Remodeling (25) Children’s of Alabama (13) City Church idtown 13 Committee to Elect Jac ueline ray iller 5 Dish’n It Out (7) Enroll Alabama (14) Gaynell Hendricks Tax Assessor (14) Groome Transportation (23) Heath Boackle for Sheriff 2018 Campaign (16) Hutchinson Automotive (15) James S. Snow & Associates CPAs (10) Lamb’s Ears Ltd. (25) agic City Dentistry 2

Nothing Bundt Cakes The Summit (5) Pies and Pints (6) itts Associates ental Health Professionals (14) RealtySouth (3) Riders Harley Davidson (27) The aids 1 Total Skin and Beauty Dermatology (24) UAB Lung Health Center (16) Valora at Homewood Apartments (19) Vulcan Termite & Pest Control (15) Watts Realty (11)

FIND US ant to get ron City nk mailed to your home Contact atthew Allen at matthew@starnespublishing.com. Or, scan the QR code for a complete list of our rack locations:


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Entrepreneur creates podcast to boost city’s startup sector

E Mart Marasco, left, speaks with Robert Ferrara of Anchorspace during his podcast “Savvy Startups.” Marasco started the podcast as a way to interview upcoming tech businesses in the Birmingham area. Photo by Sarah Finnegan.

By JESSE CHAMBERS ntrepreneur Mart Marasc o gav e up a f ull-time b usiness dev elopment j ob in h is h ometow n of Altoona, Pennsy lv ania, to mov e to B irmingh am w ith h is f amily in F eb ruary 2 0 1 7 and h elp start a new c ompany . And Marasc o q uic k ly disc ov ered th e Magic C ity ’ s v ib rant tec h and startup b usiness c ommunity . “ Th ere’ s a lot of c ool ac tiv ity ,” h e said. “ Th ere’ s a good f oundation b eing b uilt.”


JUNE 2018

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BUSINESS If you want to achieve something, you have to get through the pain to get there.

MART MARASCO

Th is ac tiv ity deserv ed to get more loc al attention, Marasc o f elt. “ Th ere’ s a lot of stuf f going on, b ut a lot of people don' t k now ab out it,” h e said. To h elp c h ange th at, Marasc o started a new podc ast c alled “ Sav v y Startup B irmingha m” in N ov emb er 2 0 1 7 th at c onsists of 3 0 to 60 -minute interv iew s w ith th e ow ners of loc al startups and f ormer startups th at h av e be c ome suc c ess stories. Marasc o also talk s to representativ es of local for-profit and nonprofit entities, inc luding univ ersities and b usiness inc ub ators — th at of f er inf ormation and resourc es to entrepreneurs. Th e response to th e podc ast among b usiness people h as b een positiv e, Marasc o said. “ Th ey th ink th e w ord needs to spread ab out th e startup c ommunity in

B irmingh am,” h e said. Marasc o graduated f rom Penn State in 2 0 0 5 w ith a degree in supply c h ain and inf ormation sy stems. H e w ork ed in operations and supply -c h ain management f or 1 2 y ears and h ad what he described as a si -figure salary. ut Marasc o said h e “ alw ay s h ad th e entrepreneurial itch and finally chose to scratch it b y mov ing to B irmingh am to serv e as C O O f or a tec h -b ased medic al startup. H ow ev er, th at c ompany dissolv ed in summer 2 0 1 7 , and during th e transition, Marasc o dec ided to do h is ow n podc ast as a potentially f ruitf ul side proj ec t. “ It’ s a c h anc e to introduc e my self and also prov ide th e opportunity to h elp oth er people get introduc ed to th e startup c ommunity in B irmingh am,” Marasc o said. H e h as done nine episodes so f ar, w ith interv iew sub j ec ts suc h as Dev on L aney , C E O of tec h h otb ed Innov ation Depot; K imb erly B roc k , ow ner of B itty ’ s L iv ing K itc h en; and Tony Summerv ille, f ounder and C E O of F leetio. Th ere’ s b een no prob lem f or Marasc o in finding willing interview sub ects. “ Th ere’ s lots of people w h o’ v e b een th ere, done th at and are eager to support entrepreneurs and also b uild someth ing to h elp th e c ommunity ,” h e said.

Th e podc ast giv es entrepreneurs a c h anc e to promote th emselv es. “ Th ey w ant people to h ear ab out th eir c ompany , th eir startup,” Marasc o said. B ut it also seems th at tak ing part in th e podc ast c an b e “ k ind of th erapeutic ” f or entrepreneurs, ac c ording to Marasc o. Th e interv iew ees get a c h anc e to step b ac k and rev iew th e f ac tors th at led th em to mak e th e “ h uge lif e dec ision” to start a c ompany , h e said “ It giv es th em a f resh perspec tiv e on w h at th ey ’ re doing and energiz es th em mov ing f orw ard,” Marasc o said. he podcast certainly benefits its creator, ac c ording to Marasc o. “ It h as h elped me f oc us on th e ex pertise I b ring to th e tab le and h ow I c an h elp support someone' s else b usiness or th eir needs,” h e said. Marasc o is in th e midst of h is ow n new entrepreneurial v enture, launc h ed in 2 0 1 7 . H e is a managing partner at B F C ( B etter F aster C h eaper) G lob al Serv ic es L L C , b ased at Innov ation Depot. Marasc o desc rib es B F C G lob al Serv ic es as “ a glob al sourc ing c ompany th at h as b oots on th e ground in most low -c ost c ountries, lik e C h ina, to manage q uality and sourc ing of any c ompany ' s produc ts or c omponents.”

Th e podc ast h elped Marasc o realiz e th at h e’ s c oping w ith th e same “ pains and struggles” as any one else try ing to start and grow a b usiness. “ And I am c ontinuing to grow a netw ork of f olk s w h o h av e sk ills sets I don’ t h av e, th at I c an rely on in th e f uture,” h e said. Marasc o and h is w if e, C ameron, liv e in Inv erness w ith th eir th ree c h ildren: girls Marli and Alaina, ages 4 and 2 , respec tiv ely , and new b orn b oy Mic ah . H is goal now is to grow th e listening b ase f or “ Sav v y Startup,” and h e w ants th e podc ast to h elp entrepreneurs reac h out and c onnec t w ith eac h oth ers. Marasc o said h e also h opes h is podc ast w ill sh ow th at entrepreneursh ip is not at all glamorous. “ If y ou w ant to ac h iev e someth ing, y ou h av e to get th rough th e pain to get th ere,” h e said. Anoth er goal is to allow b usiness people learn ab out some of th e f ree or low -c ost resourc es av ailab le in B irmingh am. “ A lot of startups don' t realiz e all th e programs and serv ic es th at are out th ere,” h e said. o find Savvy Startup irmingham, go to sav v y startupc ity .c om. F or more ab out Marasc o’ s startup, go to b f c glob alserv ic es. c om.


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BUSINESS

IRON CITY INK

IRONCITY.INK

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HAPPENINGS

SIGHTS

JUNE 2018

FACES

B’HAM BIZARRE

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DISCOVER

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Sidewalk Film Festival will soon began construction of its own downtown facility — the Sidewalk Film Center and Cinema at The i it with two 100-seat screening rooms that will allow the nonprofit to operate a year-round arthouse theater. At press time, the Sidewalk expected to break

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Strategic Solutions is moving 3 Forensic its headquarters to the Wells Fargo Tower at 420 20th St. N. , according to a news release from real estate firm J.H. Berry ilbert nc. The company’s old headquarters was at 2001 Park lace. The financial investigation firm has offices in Atlanta, Charlotte and Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

Birmingham City Council also voted 5 The May 1 to assist 1904 on 4th LLC, the developers of Lakeview Green, a large retail and residential project to be built on Fourth Avenue South near 29th Street. The city will give the developer a $1.5-million business development loan for a 24-month term at an annual interest rate of 4.17 percent. The council also voted to approve a tax incentive. The developers will receive up to $1,090,000 payable from future sales tax revenue generated by the project, in five annual installments.

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The Pizitz, 1821 Second Ave N., has been 2 awarded LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design certification by the U.S. Green Building Council, according to a news release from Bayer Properties. It scored high in sustainable site development, water savings, energy efficiency, materials selection and indoor environmental quality.

The Birmingham City Council voted May 4 1 to approve a development agreement between the city and Birm Premiere Realty LLC under which Birm will turn the old Carmike Cinema/Grace Church property at 500 Commons Drive near Lakeshore Parkway into a movie theater. In return, the city will make about $400,000 in street improvements at the site. The theater will offer recliner seating and, potentially, amenities such as a large-format auditorium and arcade, as well as wine, li uor, craft beer and oven-fired pi a.

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Berman Enterprises in Maryland is seeking 1 to turn the former Trinity Medical Center campus on Montclair Road in Crestwood into a mixed-use development, according to media reports. The developer has a contract on the site, which includes almost 80 acres and the old hospital buildings. The project, called Trinity Heights, would include retail and office space, condominiums, a hotel and a senior-living facility, according to a brochure from the developer.

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ground on the facility in May. Demolition will be the first step in an estimated 230-day construction schedule, according to Executive Director Chloe Cook. The 11,000-square-foot facility will also include lounges, a bar and concession stand, Sidewalk offices and space for meetings and classes. Red Mountain Theatre Company recently announced it will build a new arts campus in Lakeview. The facility will cover a half-block on Fifth Avenue South between 27th and 28th Streets South, on the site of the old ABSCO Fireplace atio warehouse. At press time, there were no details available regarding the construction timetable. LIVE Design Group are the architects, Brasfield orrie the general contractor and Harbert Realty Services the project manager, according to the RMTC website.

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Construction Update 8

Construction continues on the new Fairfield Inn business-class hotel at First

S.

Location not on map

e S. Avenue North and 20th Street North. The the neighborhood on a daily basis.” venu Ahotel, 16th located in a former Alagasco facility, is being devel-Vulcan ark oped by Ascent Hospitality of Buford, Georgia, which also created the Elyton Hotel nearby. The Fairfield should be open by the end of this year, according to Potter and art teacher Lana B. Hobbs 10 opened Thrive Clay Studio at Pepper Place Ascent owner John Tampa. in Lakeview on May 1. The Hoover resident Work continues on The Thomas — was previously located at Artists on the Bluff and 9 Nequette Architecture and Design’s reno- has been a vendor at Pepper Place Market for three vation of the Harold’s Furniture storefronts years. She offers clay workshops and classes, and in the 2200 block of Second Avenue orth for office also makes and sells plates and vases. and residential use. Louis Nequette told Iron City Ink that interior construction would be complete May 18 and the exterior would be complete by the end of May. Nequette’s company has moved into its Organic Harvest Grocery, based in Hoover, 11 plans to open a new market this summer in offices on a newly added fourth oor. e love our space and our view of this fabulous city,” he said. the old Parisian department store building Both office spaces and four of the nine aparton Second Avenue North at 20th Street North ments are occupied. Nequette is having conversadowntown, according to media reports. In addition to tions with possible tenants for the two ground- oor groceries, the store will stock wine and beer and fearetail spaces. The perfect fit would be a restaurant, ture a cafe. According to the store’s website, the cafe bar, art gallery, retail store, sundry or market,” at the Hoover location accommodates gluten-free, e uette said. e want something that can benefit dairy-free, paleo, vegetarian and vegan diets.

Openings/Closures

Coming Soon


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Bayles Catering expands menu, moves to bigger Woodlawn site By AL Y X CHAN D L ER v en th ough C h ef Tony B ay les simply mov ed h is W oodlaw n c atering c ompany dow n th e road, h e said th e numb er of c ustomers c oming b y h as tripled. “ W h en th e opportunity c ame f or me to ha v e a b igger loc ation th an I already h ad, I dec ided to mov e righ t aw ay ,” h e said. “ Th e same c ustomers h av e b een c oming b y , too.” B ay les, w h o is th e ow ner of B ay les C atering & R estaurant, said th e inc rease of c ustomers is prob ab ly largely due to th e f ac t th at h is f ood c ompany is now open f or br eak f ast and lunc h six h ours eac h day , f rom 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., w ith 1 0 tab les and a b ar seating area along th e w all. E v en w ith th e c h ange, th ey ’ re still doing c atering, B ay les said. F ormerly k now n as B ay les C atering, th e

c ompany h as serv ed f ood to w ell-k now n organiz ations and b usinesses inc luding th e B irmingh am Museum of Art, Th e B otanic al G ardens, th e Alab ama Th eatre and sev eral oth ers, in addition to smaller v enues all ov er th e c ity . B ay les said it c an b e f rom 1 0 people minimum to a c ouple th ousand people. “ W e serv e a lot of South ern c uisines w ith a tw ist,” B ay les said. “ Some of our most popular items are our b uf f alo c h ic k en melt and our b urgers. H onestly , w e pretty muc h h av e one of th e b est b urgers in tow n.” B ay les, w h o h as b een serv ing th e B irmingh am area f or ov er 1 0 y ears, said h is love for food was in uenced by his family s lov e f or c ook ing, and also w ork ing parttime at h is unc le’ s c atering b usiness. Af ter th at, h e said h e spent 1 0 y ears w ork ing f or Merc edes until h e dec ided to leav e and f ollow w h at h e w as passionate ab out: mak ing f ood.

Chef Tony Bayles, owner of Bayles Catering & Restaurant, stands inside his new storefront in Woodlawn. Bayles Catering & Restaurant, which recently relocated to 5831 First Ave. N., is now open six hours a day and provides guests with the opportunity to eat in-store from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Photo by Alyx Chandler..

“ [ My f ood] is c ook ed to order, and it’ s f resh ,” h e said. “ Th e taste is aw esome.” At th e new loc ation, B ay les said h e h as b een updating th e menu and of f ering

a larger v ariety of f ood. L unc h c h oic es c an range f rom c lassic s lik e one of h is six burgers to chicken and waf es, all the way to items w ith a tw ist lik e h is pulled pork


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“ Deep-fried grits and shrimp, left, and an order of the Cuban Cigars, which is made with slow roasted pork, ham, Swiss cheese and pickles, and served with yellow mustard.

sliders, w h ic h c ome w ith green c h ili slaw , or hi s sh rimp and deep-f ried grits. H e also serv es items lik e h is spec ialty pimiento grilled c h eese and h is b ac on, lettuc e and c uc umb er sandw ic h . E arly -morning c h oic es are inc lude a v ariety of b reak f ast sandw ic h es, w ith th e option of b ac on, sausage, b ologna, h am, grilled pork c h op, c h ic k en and turk ey , and sev eral b reak f ast plates or omelets to c h oose f rom.

H e said th at Sunday h as b een dub b ed “ Soul F ood Sunday .” Th e menu f or Sunday inc ludes f ried or b ak ed c h ic k en, b eef tips, smoth ered pork c h ops, ox tails and grilled tilapia, w ith side options of ric e, c onf etti c orn, mac and c h eese, grilled v eggies, b roc c oli and c h eese c asserole, pinto b eans, y ams, b lac k -ey ed peas, c ollard greens, f ried green tomatoes and f ried ok ra. Peac h c ob b ler and pound c ak e are serv ed f or dessert.

B ay les C atering & R estaurant “ is a f amily -f riendly plac e f or any one and ev ery one, w ith reasonab le pric es,” B ay les said, loc ated at 58 3 1 F irst Av e. N . H e added th at th ey also of f er an assortment of v egetarian and v egan options. Th e most ex pensiv e item on th e restaurant menu is $ 8 . A c ustomer f av orite is C ub an C igars, B ay les said, w h ic h h e mak es w ith slow roasted pork , h am, Sw iss c h eese and pic k les and serv es w ith y ellow mustard.

SIPS & BITES When the opportunity came for me to have a bigger location than I already had, I decided to move right away.

TONY BAYLES

In th e nex t f ew month s, B ay les is b uilding an outdoor seating area w h ere people c an also enj oy th eir f ood. H e plans to ev entually of f er daily spec ials, and serv e b eer and w ine onc e h e gets h is alc oh ol lic ense req uest approv ed. Tak e-out serv ic e is Monday th rough F riday f rom 6 : 3 0 a.m. to 3 p.m., and B ay les enc ourages people to c ontac t h im f or c atering serv ic es any day of th e w eek . H is w eb site, b ay lesc atering.c om, is c urrently in th e proc ess of b eing updated. C all 7 0 6 -2 47 0 or c h ec k out th eir F ac eb ook page at “ B ay les C atering & R estaurant.”


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Local singer-actor approaches 15th show with RMTC

DISCOVER Amy Johnson will play Madame de la Grande Bouche in the Red Mountain Theatre Company’s summer production of “Disney’s Beauty and the Beast,” her 15th performance with RMTC. Photo courtesy of Elle Kay Images.

By ART SBHAM ST AF F ed Mountain Th eatre C ompany onc e again mounts tw o f ull produc tions f or its summer season. “ Disney ’ s B eauty and th e B east” and “ Mamma Mia! ” w ill b oth sh ow at th e Doroth y J emison Day Th eater. O ne c ast memb er of “ B eauty and th e B east” w ill b e f amiliar to B irmingh am audienc es. Amy J oh nson w as b orn in B irmingh am and grew up in R andolph and Montev allo, w h ere sh e ev entually attended th e Univ ersity of Montev allo and in 2 0 0 6 earned h er b ac h elor’ s of arts in th eatre. actually ust finished a stint this spring as a guest artist perf ormer w ith th e th eatre department in th eir produc tion of ‘ Urinetow n,’ ” sh e said. “ It’ s b een amaz ing to c onnec t w ith th e students, rec onnec t w ith th e c ampus and perf orm a dream role of mine, Penny Penny w ise. Suc h an inc redib le exp erienc e.” ArtsB H AM rec ently spok e w ith h er ab out h er role in “ B eauty and th e B east” and h er ex perienc es w ith R MTC . Q: How long have you lived in the Birmingham area? ‘Disney’s A: I moved to Birmingham shortly after I graduated Beauty and college and have lived in the the Beast’ Homewood/Southside area ever since. I love Birmingham and • WHAT: Based on have really enjoyed watching it the 1991 animated grow and change over the last eat re l several years. • WHEN: June W en did fir l es perform with Red Mountain days-Saturdays at Theatre Company? e es A: y first e perience with days, Saturdays and RMTC was “The Sound of Music” Sundays at 2 p.m. back in 2010. So, including the • WHERE: Dorothy 2014-16 Holiday Spectacular e is a heater, shows, this is show No. 15. 800 19th St. N. Fifteen? Holy cow. I’ve been • WEB: redmountain incredibly fortunate to stay theatre.org/beautybusy in the Birmingham theatre and-the-beast world, and TC has definitely been a pivotal part of that. W a er ae you done in the area? A: erforming in the agic City with companies like TC, Virginia Samford Theatre, The Dane and others has offered me the opportunity to cross some dream roles off the list like Ursula (“Little Mermaid”), Sister ary atrick Sister Act , Lady of the Lake Spamalot , and work on epic old and new shows like Les iserables, Fiddler on the oof, Falsettos, Hairspray and others. hen look at the list over the years, I’m a little overwhelmed at how lucky I am. Q: RMTC Executive Director Keith Cromwell will be directing Bea and e Bea ’ an i e a e een in e’ directed?

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A: Of the 15 RMTC shows I’ve done, eight of them have been directed by Keith, including “Beauty & the Beast.” W a i r in i i li e A: Every director is different and definitely has a uni ue style of their own, and it can be tough as an actor to match your style with someone else’s. The thing I’ve learned with Keith is to make sure I have my multi-task switch turned on as soon as I walk in the door. The way he approaches work with actors re uires you to perform and listen at the same time, which is much easier than it sounds. You could be mid-song thinking you’re nailing it and he’s known to redirect you and e pect you to make new choices right away ... while you never stop singing. love that challenge. And it creates an environment where you can’t be afraid to really play and make off-the-cuff choices. Another thing love about working with eith is his passion about telling the story in a way that is relevant for our audiences and making sure we understand why we’re here, why what were doing is important, why this story is one that should be told. W a d in ll rin e r le Mada e de la Grande Bouche? A: n a role like this one, while The ardrobe isn t a central

character, her moments on stage are important and you have to find a way to make them stand out without taking away from the focus of the show — for some reason, Madame de la Grande Bouche & the Beast wasn’t a big hit on Broadway. I try to think early on about the things that make her different – things like voice, posture, accent, movement and layer that in during rehearsal on top of what we know and don t know about her story. Every character, no matter the size, has a story. If it’s not written, you build one, and that’s where the fun really is. For this role, m really e ploring her si e and power, while still keeping her feminine and in the realm of the world. Shes an e ception to the rest of the enchanted house objects because she’s not an employee, but an opera singer in real life who was caught in the wrong place at the wrong time and wound up under a spell. So that gives her a whole different layer of history to play with. m really looking forward to it! Editor’s note: This article was produced in partnership with artsBHAM. To learn more about them, visit artsbham.com.


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Art on the Rocks kicks off 2018 series with soul band, LED show By ART SBHAM irmingh am Museum of Art’ s annual summer series Art on th e R oc k s returns th is summer f or th ree month s of liv e music , artist c ollab orations, f ood and drink s. Th e series k ic k s of f J une 8 , 7 -1 1 p.m., w ith liv e music b y Th e Suf f ers, an eigh t-memb er soul b and originating f rom the G ulf C oast. Also f eatured are loc al ac ts The Audiov ore, w h ic h w ill prov ide a DJ set, and L uminarts E ntertainment. L uminarts E ntertainment w as f ounded b y C h elsea resident R ob b ie L ew is and Paige Marmolej o, w h o graduated f rom th e Univ ersity of Alab ama w ith a b ac h elor’ s of arts in danc e. Sh e said sh e reac h ed out to L ew is w h en sh e mov ed to th e B irmingh am area in 2 0 1 5. was a performer in a fire D circus perf ormanc e troupe in E l Paso, Tex as, f or a f ew y ears and w as really missing b eing invo lv ed w ith it and perf orming af ter mov ing to B irmingh am,” Marmolej o said. Sh e and L ew is w ere interested in

Art on the Rocks at Birmingham Museum of Art features music, performers and food and drink. Photo courtesy of ArtsBHAM.

bringing hooping and ow arts to the community ,” and L ew is already h ad ex perienc e starting a company oop for itness ow arts. “ Th is area did not h av e any th ing lik e L uminarts already — th e c losest similar groups w ere in Atlanta and N ash v ille — so I dec ided to start my ow n group,” Marmolej o said. “ I f elt lik e B irmingh am w as a b ig enough c ity w ith enough going on th at it c ould use a perf ormanc e group lik e L uminarts. Sinc e starting th e group I h av e h ad sev eral people mention th at th ey h ad

no idea th ere w as someth ing lik e th is in B irmingh am and th at b ef ore th ey h ad to b ring in out of state perf ormers f or th is sort of entertainment. W e are c ontinuing to grow and are w ork ing on adding stilt w alk ers to our of f erings later th is y ear.” At Art on th e R oc k s, Marmolej o, Molly Mc Q uitty and C arly B ell w ill present a b lac k ligh t sh ow w ith b lac k ligh t h ula h oops and c ostuming. Th ey w ill also perf orm an L E D sh ow using h ula h oops, poi and Isis ( v eil) w ings th at inc lude L E D ligh ts.

R eturning to Art on th e R oc k s is solo DJ and B irmingh am resident L ee Sh ook , w h o perf orms as Th e Audiov ore. H e w as last seen at AO TR in 2 0 1 6 . H e’ ll b e perf orming one nigh tlong set w ith no b reak s, h e said. always want the music to ebb and ow w ith th e nigh t and audienc e as needed.” H e desc rib ed h is w ork as “ an ec lec tic mix of rare groov e, w orld music , old sc h ool f unk , indie danc e music , h ip h op and w h atev er else I c an mix in.” Th e J uly 2 7 ev ent’ s music w ill b e prov ided b y Sh rev eport, L ouisiana’ s Seratones, and Aug. 1 7 ’ s ev ent f eatures Tank and th e B angas, a N ew O rleans b and w ith roots in soul and R & B th at w on th e 2 0 1 7 N PR Tiny Desk C onc ert c ompetition. Tic k ets are $ 1 5 f or museum memb ers or $ 2 5 f or nonmemb ers.

Editor’s note: This article was produced in partnership with artsBHAM. To learn more about them, visit artsbham.com.


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he avors, sights and sounds of the aribbean will be coming to inn ark this month for the seventh annual agic ity aribbean ood and usic estival. his year s festival will be held on une from a.m. to p.m., and organi ers said growing attendance over the past several years made it necessary to hire an event planner for the first time in 2 . he day will include music, dancing, food, family-friendly activities and a aribbean parade at noon, with costumed participants representing various countries. here will be demonstrations of hula hooping, salsa, umba and line dancing. lato s charisma and ability to engage

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Girls Inc. to host summer camps

Caribbean Fest returns to Linn Park By SY D N EY CRO MW EL L

FACES

JUNE 2018

By AL Y X CHAN D L ER

Dancers perform at the 2016 Caribbean Festival. Photo by Patty Bradley.

the crowd has made him a staple over the years and a huge hit with the audience, said auline ord of the entral Alabama aribbean American rgani ation A A . ord said a delegation from ingston, amaica, which is irmingham s Sister ity, will attend the festival, including the mayor of ingston. usical performers will include the ansonics Steel and and the evolution eggae Soca band. evolution will close the show with a performance of ob arley s ne ove. he festival is free and open to the public. isit cacaoonline.org caribbean-festival for more information.

articipants at the irls nc. annual summer camps not only have a great time, Development Director aren riner said, but they also get to e perience hands-on learning that inspires them to set goals for their future. he irls nc. of entral Alabama restwood Summer amp, which lasts eight weeks, will be at the restwood ommunity enter from une through Aug. , e cept the week of uly . e believe irls nc. s summer camps are important because girls face so many obstacles to success, riner said. or e ample, we know that one in si girls will not finish high school. ithout continual learning throughout the summer, riner said, girls risk falling behind in all sub ects, which could make it difficult for them to stay on track for graduation. According to their website, the irls nc. camp e perience consists of programming, people and an environment that empowers

Photo courtesy of Girls Inc. of Central Alabama.

girls to succeed. irls who attend engage in daily learning in sub ect areas including science, math, nglish, health and wellness, arts and culture and economic literacy, riner said. hey participate in classroom-style learning and get to e perience hands-on lessons led by trained instructors. ampers also go swimming and on several field trips throughout the summer, riner said, in addition to practicing dance and performance arts, which they show off during an end-of-summer production. or more information, go to girlsinc central-al.org.


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Birmingham Burger Fest to benefit ALS patients

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By JESSE CHAMBERS

ome of B irmingh am’ s b est restaurant c h ef s and b ac k y ard c ook s w ill grill b urgers f or a good c ause at th e sec ond annual B irmingh am B urger F est f rom 1 1 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Av ondale B rew ing C o. on J une 2 . Th e ev ent raises money f or th e AL S Assoc iation Alab ama C h apter. R estaurants c ompete f or th e B irmingha m' s B est B urger aw ard, w ith th e w inner be c oming eligib le f or th e W orld F ood C h ampionsh ips, ac c ording to Ash ley H orton, direc tor of dev elopment f or th e Alab ama C h apter. R estaurants and groups of amateur c ook s w ill c ompete f or th e People’ s C h oic e aw ard. he event also features craft beer, pri e raf es, games and liv e music f rom Th e Tuc k ah oe Trav elers and h eadliner C B DB . “ Av ondale' s env ironment of f ers spac e to sit and listen to music or play c ornh ole or j ust soak up th e sun w h ile h av ing some yum my b urgers,” H orton said. Th e $ 1 5 admission giv es eac h attendee f our b urger samples. To get more samples,

LOCAL 2018 to celebrate Alabama music, food, crafts

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By JESSE CHAMBERS

Photo courtesy of the ALS Association Alabama Chapter.

people c an purc h ase tw o additional tic k ets f or $ 5, ac c ording to H orton. All proceeds benefit care services programs th at enab le AL S patients to remain independent as long as possib le. Th ose serv ic es are prov ided at no c ost to patients. F or ev ent details, c all 8 0 0 -6 6 4-1 2 42 , go to w eb al.alsa.org or c h ec k out F ac eb ook @ AL SAlab ama.

h e Aly s Steph ens C enter at UAB w ill present L O C AL 2 0 1 8 , an outdoor, f amily -f riendly ev ent b illed as “ a c eleb ration of ev ery th ing Alab ama,” at 5 p.m. J une 1 6 . he free event, in its fifth year, will be h eld on E ngel Plaz a. L oc al music ians w ill prov ide entertainment, an ec lec tic mix of Alab ama artists and v endors w ill peddle th eir w ares and loc al f ood truc k s w ill b e on site. Th e music al h eadliner w ill b e L ov e Moor, a soul and R & B singer f rom E nsley w h o rec ently perf ormed at th e SX SW f estiv al in Austin, Tex as, ac c ording to UAB Media R elations. ther musical acts confirmed at press time w ere C h elsey W h ild, K ate and th e H ow lers and B anditos, as w ell as emc ee

Photo courtesy of UAB.

Sh aun J udah and DJ R y N ea Soul. At least 2 vendors were confirmed at press time. V endors of f ering f ood, snac k s or b ev erages inc lude Tarez K itc h en, B B ’ s B read, Siah ’ s L emonade Stand and N augh ty B ut N ic e K ettle C orn. F ood truc k s w ill inc lude B ig Spoon C reamery , C ity owls and ed ountain rawfish. Th ere w ill also b e v endors selling art, dec or, c loth ing and oth er items, inc luding Anth ony Tav is F olk Art, E astab oga B ee C o., B h am Artsy C h ic k s, E arth C reations and L indsay B rook Designs. F or details, go to aly ssteph ens.org/ ev ents/ loc al-2 0 1 8 .


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Magic City Market Place series kicks off this summer By AL Y X CHAN D L ER n th e th ird Saturday of J une and J uly , Magic C ity T Sh irt and Urb an V intage C loth ing is partnering w ith G ood People B rew ing C ompany to b ring a f ree, loc al artist mark et to th e b rew ery . Th e mark et w ill inc lude 2 0 B irmingha m-b ased artists and v endors, Magic C ity T Sh irt Direc tor Perc y J ones said, f rom 3 -9 p.m., w h ic h giv es it “ a b it of nigh t mark et f eel,” J ones said. Th e mark ets w ill also b e on B aron B aseb all game day s. Magic C ity T Sh irt is a c ommunity -b ased not-for-profit organi ation, ones said, that rec ently opened a pop-up store w ith Urb an V intage C loth ing in R ailroad Park . O riginally an online store, Magic C ity T Sh irt sells Magic C ity -th emed paraph ernalia

HAPPENINGS

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JUNE 2018

B’HAM BIZARRE

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DISCOVER

Here2Beer races from Good People to Avondale Magic City T Shirt creator Percy Jones, left, and Urban Vintage creator Ty Jones at their May 12 grand opening at Railroad Park. Photo by Alyx Chandler.

suc h as T-sh irts, sw eatsh irts, tank tops, c of f ee c ups, b eer glasses and oth er trink ets lik e k ey c h ains and magnets. Proc eeds f rom the company benefit free basketball camps at loc al middle sc h ools suc h as C enter Street and Daniel Pay ne sc h ools. J ones said th eir w eb site, magic c ity tsh irts .c om, in addition to th e ev ents lik e th e upc oming mark etplac e, are w ay s to get th e word out about how their organi ation is h elping students in th e c ommunity . “ [ Th e mark ets] are f or a good c ause, it supports th e c ommunity -b ased ef f orts w e are doing,” J ones said. “ It is also an opportunity to sh ow c ase th e talents th at are loc al in B irmingh am.” V isit magic c ity tsh irts.c om or urb anv intage c loth ing.c om f or more inf ormation.

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By AL Y X CHAN D L ER ew 5K s b egin and end w ith a b eer, w h ic h is one of th e reasons th e H ere2 B eer 5K R ac e Series is b ec oming a popular running ev ent in B irmingh am, C adenc e1 8 0 C onsulting R ac e Direc tor Allison Stone said. H ere2 B eer, a month ly w eek nigh t 5K ev ent put on b y C adenc e1 8 0 C onsulting, w ill of f er its 5K th is month on W ednesday , J une 2 7 , and tak e its usual route f rom G ood People B rew ing C ompany to Av ondale B rew ing C ompany . H ere2 B eer c onsists of th ree w eek nigh t ev ents th rough out th e spring and summer, Stone said, and starts out w ith partic ipants drinking an o . beer at ood eople B rew ing C ompany and ends w ith drink ing anoth er b eer in Av ondale. Partic ipants must b e 2 1 y ears old or older. Stone said th ere is only 56 f eet of total elevation gain, so most of the run is at and f ast. Th e c ourse tak es partic ipants th rough dow ntow n and along th e R otary Trail. R unners w h o don’ t drink b eer c an drink root b eer and partic ipate in th e C ompetitiv e

Photo courtesy of Suman Silwal.

Div ision. If some runners pref er to instead tak e on th e 5K and c eleb rate w ith f riends separately af terw ards, th at is also an av ailab le option. C ompetitors w h o partic ipate in eith er of th ese options w ill b e c h ip-timed, and th e top th ree male and f emale runners in b oth div isions w ill b e giv en aw ards. Pac k et pic k up is 3 p.m. at G ood People B rew ing, and th e 5K starts at 6 p.m., w ith th e aw ards c eremony and post-rac e party at Av ondale B rew ing starting at 7 p.m. Th e last H ere2 B eer ev ent of th e series w ill b e Aug. 2 3 . Disc ounts also apply if partic ipants register f or more th an one ev ent. G o to runsignup.c om/ R ac e/ AL / B irmingh am/ H ere2 B eer5K to sign up.

UAB Lung Health Center COPD Research CRITERIA:

EMPHYSEMA

COPD CHRONIC BRONCHITIS

40-85 years of age Current or Former Smoker COPD Diagnosis

This study will look at COPD and muscle loss over a six-month period. Compensation provided.

Contact Stephanie Ford 205-934-5555


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DISCOVER Renderings of The Woolworth, left, at the former site of Bailey Brothers Music space on 20th Street in Five Points South, and Founders Station, at First Avenue North and Morris Avenue. Renderings courtesy of Orchestra Partners.

ROOM TO GROW

John Boone, Hunter Renfroe are betting big on the future of downtown, Five Points South

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By JESSE CHAMBERS

t’ s no sec ret th at B irmingh am’ s C ity C enter is seeing a c onstruc tion b oom, b oth new b uilds and renov ations. And th e dev elopers j umping in range f rom one-person operations to large c ompanies. ut among that crowded playing field are tw o y oung dev elopers — J oh n B oone and H unter R enf roe of O rc h estra Partners — w h o seem to b e on th e v erge of dramatic ally raising their profile in the city. F ounders Station, th e c ompany ’ s mix edused dev elopment in th e 2 0 0 0 b loc k of F irst Av enue N orth , w as nearing c ompletion at Iron C ity Ink ’ s press time. Th e W oolw orth , the ir new soc ial h ouse c onc ept in F iv e Points South , sh ould open th is summer. B oone and R enf roe b ough t a b ig c h unk of Av ondale’ s c ommerc ial distric t in 2 0 1 7 . And th ey h av e an innov ativ e plan f or th e long-gutted “ Y ou are B eautif ul” b uilding in Park side. Th e men are w ork ing h ard to c h ange th e c ommon perc eption th at real estate dev elopers are mostly rapac ious c apitalists w h o chase ta incentives and short-term profits and b uild c ook ie-c utter proj ec ts th at add noth ing aesth etic ally to c ommunities. Instead, B oone said, h e and R enf roe seek to engage c ommunity stak eh olders and av oid b eing seen as th e “ b ig, b ad dev eloper th at j ust c omes in and look s at th e b ottom-line return” instead of w h at an area needs. And th eir inv estments h av e a c ommon thr ead: a prof essed desire to h elp c reate and sustain w alk ab le urb an c ommunities and c ity lif e. R enf roe h as long h ad a passion f or real estate and c onstruc tion. “ I lov e real estate be c ause it’ s an opportunity to c reate a real impac t,” h e said. H e earned b ac h elor’ s degrees in b usiness and ph y sic s at B irmingh am-South ern C ollege in 2 0 0 7 and 2 0 0 8 , respec tiv ely ; a master’ s in c iv il engineering at UAB in 2 0 1 0 ; and an M.B .A. at B oston Univ ersity in 2 0 1 5. A B irmingh am nativ e, B oone earned a b ac h elor’ s in h istory at B irmingh am-South ern

John Boone, left, and Hunter Renfroe, the principals of Birmingham development company Orchestra Partners, stand along Morris Avenue at the site of their Founders Station mixedused redevelopment April 17. Photo by Jesse Chambers.

in 2 0 0 6 and a master’ s in h istory at UAB in 2 0 1 0 b ef ore entering b usiness. Th e men, w h o b ec ame f riends w h ile attending B irmingh am-South ern, started O rc h estra Partners in 2 0 1 5. R enf roe’ s primary role w ith th e c ompany is handling the finances, while oone f oc uses on b usiness dev elopment and c ommunity outreac h . F ounders Station, a 44,50 0 -sq uare-f oot redev elopment of some h istoric c ommerc ial b uildings, w ill inc lude c ondominiums, retail and office spaces and eateries, including Th e E ssential, opening th is summer. Th e proj ec t f eatures a plaz a th at w ill prov ide a new c onnec tion b etw een F irst Av enue N orth and h istoric Morris Av enue. “ People tak e pic tures on Morris Av enue, b ut th ey don' t see it as a plac e to eat and drink and h ang out,” R enf roe said. “ W e w ant to c h ange th at.”

R enf roe said Morris Av enue h as long b een “ perc eiv ed as a gem” b ut h as b een an underused asset. O rc h estra Partners plans to c omplete c onstruc tion on Th e W oolw orth , loc ated in th e old B ailey B roth ers Music spac e on 2 0 th Street in F iv e Points South , b y J uly . A team f rom E l B arrio and Paramount B irmingh am h elped O rc h estra Partners c reate th e f ac ility , w h ic h w ill of f er f ood, b ev erage and games, inc luding duc k pin b ow ling. B oone and R enf roe w ere inspired b y Pinew ood Soc ial in N ash v ille and similar f ac ilities in oth er c ities. O rc h estra is also redev eloping th e f ormer B ase C amp spac e at 1 0 2 4 2 0 th Street South f or use as a b ar or restaurant and plans to c reate a large c ourty ard th at B oone said w ill b e reminisc ent of Th e G arage. Th e men are inv esting h eav ily in th e f uture of F iv e Points South , w h ic h enj oy s c lose

prox imity to UAB , V ulc an and th e c ity ’ s oldest neigh b orh oods, as w ell as H omew ood. “ Th e F iv e Points b rand is h istoric ” and th e distric t h as “ tons of c h arac ter,” R enf roe said. “ It’ s w alk ab le and h as residential density ,” B oone added. H ow ev er, F iv e Points South — lik e Morris Av enue — h as b een “ sq uandered” in th eir opinion, and R enf roe b lames property ow ners w h o didn’ t reinv est in th eir b uildings or w h o c h ose tenants stric tly due to c onv enienc e. G reedy or ab sentee landlords “ are tw o of th e w orst th ings plaguing th is c ity ,” said B oone, w h o liv es in F iv e Points and is a memb er of F iv e Points Allianc e. “ W e c ome up w ith a game plan w ith w h at w e th ink th e c ommunity w ants and needs, and w e ex ec ute ov er a long period of time,” R enf roe said. Th e men made a splash in O c tob er 2 0 1 7 w h en th ey purc h ased sev eral properties on 41 st Street South in Av ondale, inc luding Av ondale B rew ing C o., f rom b rew ery c o-f ounder C ob y L ak e and h is partners. Th ey sold th e b rew ery to G ood People B rew ing to k eep th e asset loc ally ow ned. Th ey now ow n th e land under popular Av ondale spots suc h as Saw ’ s Soul K itc h en and W asab i J uan’ s, and th ose estab lish ments c ontinue to operate. B oone and R enf roe h av e some additional plans f or th e area b ut w ere not y et ready to disc uss th em. O rc h estra Partners purc h ased th e tw ostory c ommerc ial struc ture at 2 0 1 1 8 th St. South , c alled th e “ Y ou are B eautif ul” b uilding because of its iconic graffiti, in 2 . Th ey ’ ll dev elop th e struc ture as sh ells th at c an b e sold and b uilt out b y h omeb uy ers as c ustom h ouses, ac c ording to R enf roe. B oone and R enf roe are b ullish on B irmingh am. “ Th ere’ s a ton of momentum.” R enf roe said. “ I th ink B irmingh am is j ust seeing th e b eginning of th e re-urb aniz ation of th e c ity .” “ Th ere’ s still room to grow ,” ac c ording to B oone, w h o said B irmingh am h asn’ t b ec ome ov erc row ded, inac c essib le or “ irritatingly b usy ,” lik e N ash v ille and Atlanta.


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Archiving THE PAST

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BBRM director on a mission to create web archive of Birmingham-connected black radio By AL Y X CHAN D L ER

v en th ough B irmingh am’ s C arv er Th eatre of Perf orming Arts is c urrently in th e midst of renov ation, it doesn’ t mean arc h iv e ef f orts f or th e B irmingh am B lac k R adio Museum ( B B R M) , w h ic h is h oused th ere, h av e c ome to a h alt. W ith th e h elp of loc al and nationw ide student v olunteers in lib rary sc ienc es and h istory ov er th e last sev eral y ears, f ormer W J L D radio h ost and B B R M Direc tor B ob F riedman c ontinues h is mission to transc rib e and c reate a c ommunity -b ased w eb arc h iv e f or th e oral h istory of B irmingha m-c onnec ted b lac k radio. B B R M c atalogs interv iew s f rom th e 1 9 3 0 s th rough th e 1 9 8 0 s c onduc ted b y h im and othe r radio sh ow h osts. “ I realiz ed th ere w as th is f antastic h istory of b lac k radio in B irmingh am, espec ially sinc e I didn' t grow up h ere,” h e said. “ I f ound th ese people, did pretty ex tensiv e c onv ersations w ith th em, … so w h at w e are talk ing ab out h ere is th e dev elopment of a v ery uniq ue k ind of arc h iv e.” F riedman, w h o is th e f ounder of B B R M, w as interested in c reating th e arc h iv e af ter h e mov ed f rom C h ic ago to B irmingh am in 1 9 8 7 and spent 2 5 y ears on th e air. Th e greater portion of h is time w as spent at th e B irmingh am-b ased W J L D, h e said, w h ic h is th e oldest radio station targeted tow ard b lac k listeners in Alab ama and play ed on 1 40 0 AM and 9 4.1 F M. In 1 9 9 2 , h e ran a talk sh ow on W J L D c alled Sound O f f , in addition to a 1 9 50 s rh y th m and b lues segment, w h ic h he f ueled th rough h is lov e f or th e music , ex tensiv e rec ord c ollec tion and y ears trav eling as a singer in v oc al groups. F or th e 50 th anniv ersary of W J L D radio, h e w anted to do someth ing to c ommemorate its h istory . “ I w as f ortunate enough to h av e a mic roph one,” h e said. “ A numb er of people c ame f orw ard w ith th eir memorab ilia, w ith th e early day s of W J L D, and th en f urth er along, th ings f rom th e 1 9 6 0 s. And th at gav e me th e impetus to try and interv iew more people. My enth usiasm and ex c itement f or the sub j ec t matter made it muc h easier f or people to open up and tell me ab out it.” H e b egan to w rite dow n names, look in ph one b ook s and c ollec t as many interv iew s as h e c ould. Th e intervi ew s inc luded B irmingh am-c onnec ted people w h o w ere accomplished in their fields, authors, entertainers and radio announc ers. “ Th e early interv iew s w e did at th e station illuminated tha t th ere w ere oth er stations th at h ad c ome and gone th at w ere b lac k -f ormatted,” F riedman said. B y allow ing univ ersity students spec ializ ing in arc h iv al w ork or h istory to transc rib e th e interv iew s and put th em in a w eb -b ased f ormat f or th e w eb sites, F riedman said it allow s th e arc h iv e to ac t as a c ommunity -b ased educ ation sys tem. It also prov ides rare v alue and insigh t f or students to immerse th emselv es in intimate c onv ersations f rom an ext remely dif f erent time. L indsey R ey nolds, an intern f or F riedman in 2 0 1 1 and

Bob Friedman, creator and director of the Birmingham Black Radio Museum, poses with some of his radio equipment, museum memorabilia and record collection from his years hosting radio shows and conducting interviews. Photo by Alyx Chandler.

UAB history students Hannah Moore, left, and Carlena McClain work with the community-based Birmingham Black Radio Museum. Photo courtesy of Bob Friedman.

now a lib rarian f or th e Univ ersity of G eorgia in Ath ens, said th at b eing ab le to transc rib e th e interv iew s w as a galv aniz ing ex perienc e in h er c areer. he richness of the oral histories and of ob s firsthand c onnec tion to th e people w h o spok e th em taugh t me h ow rew arding c ommunity inv olv ement is,” R ey nolds said. “ Th e v oic es th at th e B B R M h igh ligh ts are important and of ten unh eard. I b eliev e th ey h av e a lot to teac h us as w e organiz e and seek to stand f or our c ommunity righ ts.”

F riedman launc h ed B B R M’ s w eb -b ased arc h iv e in 2 0 1 6 as a f ree and av ailab le resourc e to researc h ers and th e general pub lic . E ac h indiv idual interv iew inc ludes a pic ture or tw o of th e sub j ec t, th e transc ription and a sh ort c lip of th e audio. As of May 2 0 1 8 , th e B B R M is only h alf w ay done putting th e oral h istory onto its w eb site, th eb b rm.org. Sinc e th e indiv idual piec es also h av e to b e digitiz ed, c ategoriz ed and entered w ith th e most ac c urate data, F riedman said h e ex pec ts th e remaining w ork on th e oral interv iew s to last at least anoth er y ear. Th is w ill b e a prime opportunity f or more students to intern w ith h im at th e B B R M, h e said. Af ter th e oral h istory is done, F riedman said h e w ill go on to ph ase tw o and th ree of B B R M, w h ic h inc ludes uploading a v ariety of oth er materials, in addition to adding new inf ormation to a 2 0 1 3 v ideo retrospec tiv e h e made f or th e c ity of B irmingh am c alled “ A R adio H ero” of th e h istory of th e early lif e of Paul “ Tall Paul” W h ite, one of th e most significant irmingham lack radio announcers of the time during th e C h ildren’ s C rusade. Students w h o are interested in interning c an email F riedman at inf o@ th eb b rm.org. Th e C arv er Th eatre is slated to reopen in th e spring of 2 0 1 9 and until th en, F riedman said th e B B R M c ollec tion w ill b e stored at th e B irmingh am C iv il R igh ts Institute dow ntow n.


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: ood eople Brewing Co. marks decade of growth, in uence in agic City

10 YEARS OF BEERS

Brewer Patrick Taylor pours hops into a brew kettle of Good People IPA on April 26. Good People Brewing Company will celebrate its 10th anniversary this year. The brewery now has eight yearround beers ranging from 4.2 to 10 percent ABV and several seasonal beers, some of which would have been illegal prior to 2009. Photos and cover photo by Sarah Finnegan.

I

By ERI CA T ECHO

ts c ans may say “ b rew ed legally sinc e 2 0 0 8 ,” b ut th e story of G ood People B rew ing C ompany started f ar earlier th an th at. C o-f ounders Mic h ael Sellers and J ason Malone met at Aub urn Univ ersity in th e 1 9 9 0 s and spent sev eral ye ars drink ing b eer b ef ore dec iding to start br ew ing togeth er. Sellers trav eled internationally f or 1 2 y ears selling sof tw are, w h ile at th e same time learning more ab out th e va riety of b eers outside th e spec trum of w h at w as of f ered in th e South . H e started h omeb rew ing w ith Malone, and in 2 0 0 6 , af ter b uilding a reputation f or good b eer w ith f riends and f amily , th ey made it official and incorporated — but it w ould b e anoth er tw o y ears b ef ore selling their first beer. F irst, th ere w ere a f ew ob stac les to ove rc ome. At th e time, th ere w as only one b rew ery in Alabama — lde owne rewing ompany, which suffered a fire in 2 , rebu ilt in 2 0 0 8 b ut w ould c lose f or good in 2 — and selling beers above 6 percent alc oh ol b y v olume or b rew ing at h ome w ere illegal. Plus, b rew pub s, or plac es th at br ew b eer and sell f ood, c ould only open in hi storic sites and in c ounties w h ere b eer w as c ommerc ially b rew ed b ef ore Proh ib ition. F ree th e H ops, a grassroots lob b y ing organiz ation th at f ormed in 2 0 0 4, w as w ork ing to c h ange th ose law s. In 2 0 0 6 , G ood eople oined the fight. hat legislative session was when first started h earing ab out th em [ G ood People] , and th ey w ere supporting us and going to the L egislature and speak ing on th eir ow n be h alf , b ut also supporting us,” said Stuart C arter, a F ree th e H ops b oard memb er. hey are some very smart, sharp business people. hey knew back then how important

Without having Good People there as the trailblazers, the flag bearers, the ones who dealt with the entrenched bureaucracy … without Good People, Birmingham brewing would not be anything like it is now.

STUART CARTER

our legislation w ould b e to th eir b usiness, and th at w as w h y , I th ink , th ey c ame on b oard as suc h staunc h supporters and allies f rom th e get-go.” H elping lob b y f or c h anges in legislation w as an inv estment in th e b rew ery ’ s f uture, C arter said, and it paid of f . “ Y ou look at w h ere th ey are in Alab ama b eer today , and I don’ t need to say any th ing to prov e th e point th at th ey w ere righ t,” h e

said. “ B iggest b rew ery in Alab ama, one of th e larger regional b rew eries in th e South east. L ook at th eir reputation on th e b eer rating sites — people love Snake andler. n 2 , ood eople opened its first loc ation in F iv e Points, and th e nex t y ear, on uly , 2 , it sold its first beer — a keg of G ood People B row n Ale to a b ar in F iv e Points. It w ould b e anoth er sev eral y ears b ef ore G ood People c ould sell direc tly to c onsumers f rom its taproom. “ I f eel lik e G ood People k ind of h elped pav e th e w ay f or c raf t b eer,” said L auren Mc C urdy , mark eting direc tor f or th e b rew ery . “ I th ink it really sh ow ed th at c raf t b eer w as possib le in th e state, ev en w ith pretty restric tiv e law s at th e time.” C arla J ean W h itley , th e auth or of “ B irmingh am B eer: A H eady H istory of B rew ing in th e Magic C ity ,” w as ab le to witness the growth of craft beer firsthand. hose early days of ood eople, she said, have had a lasting in uence on irmingham c ulture. “ E arly on, it didn’ t f eel totally lac k ing [ to not h av e b rew eries] b ec ause it w as still so new to us,” W h itley said, “ b ut as G ood eople first started, and then they ust really ex ploded so q uic k ly , th at really sh aped our idea of w h at th at sc ene is lik e. B rew eries

now are suc h a part of our c ulture, ev en if y ou don’ t lik e b eer.” he first beer fit under the state restriction of 6 perc ent AB V b ut, af ter lob b y ing ef f orts b y F ree th e H ops and b rew eries, a law c h ange in 2 0 0 9 opened up th e c h anc e to ex pand b rew s as w ell. en years later, ood eople now has eight y ear-round b eers ranging f rom 4.2 to 1 0 perc ent AB V and sev eral seasonal b eers, some of w h ic h w ould h av e b een illegal prior to 2 0 0 9 . H av ing a b rew ery already estab lish ed in B irmingh am, W h itley said, h elped put a f ac e on th e c raf t b eer mov ement and in turn h elped push along legislation th at allow ed b rew eries to ex pand. hat was a really e citing time locally in th e b eer mov ement b ec ause it w as so new and f resh , and it taugh t us th at th ere is more out there, and there are economic ramifications to th is as w ell,” W h itley said. W h ile it w ould b e possib le to understate th e impac t G ood People h ad on B irmingh am b rew ing, C arter said it’ s not possib le to overstate that in uence. “ W ith out h av ing G ood People th ere as the trailbla ers, the ag bearers, the ones w h o dealt w ith th e entrenc h ed b ureauc rac y … w ith out G ood People, B irmingh am b rew ing w ould not b e any th ing lik e it is


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FACES In 2007, Good People opened its rst location in Five Points, and the ne t year, on uly , 2008, it sold its rst beer a keg of Good People Brown Ale to a bar in Five Points. t would be another several years before ood People could sell directly to consumers from its taproom.

now ,” C arter said. In th e F iv e Points neigh b orh ood, Mc C urdy said G ood People q uic k ly f ound a f ollow ing. Its presenc e and th e potential it sy mb oliz ed h elped rev italiz e a sense of pride in th e c ity and led to more people planning to stic k around, sh e said. “ B ac k th en [ in 2 0 0 8 ] , a lot of people w ere mov ing to Atlanta or N ash v ille, or ev en C hi c ago or N ew Y ork ,” sh e said. “ I th ink , in

my opinion, G ood People w as k ind of one of those first brands that really made people reth ink mov ing aw ay and [ instead] w anting to b uild a c ommunity w h ere th ey grew up.” Th e b rew ery q uic k ly needed more spac e, Mc C urdy said, and mov ed in 2 0 1 0 f rom F iv e Points to its c urrent loc ation on 1 4th Street South ac ross f rom R egions F ield — a mov e th at grew G ood People’ s f ootprint nearly 1 0 -f old. In addition to ex panding its sq uare

f ootage, th e b rew ery started c anning b eer and opened a taproom in 2 0 1 1 , f ollow ing th e passage of th e B rew ery Moderniz ation Ac t. N ear its new loc ation, G ood People saw th e c ommunity grow ing as w ell. “ E spec ially in th e part of tow n w e’ re in now , 1 0 y ears ago y ou nev er w ould h av e th ough t th at it w ould b e w h at it is now , w ith R ailroad Park and th e B arons and all of th at,” Mc C urdy said.

Th e b rew ery is in a peak plac e f or entertainment, W h itley said. “ Y ou h av e an ex perienc e. Y ou get to look out into y our c ity w h ile y ou’ re enj oy ing someth ing made righ t w h ere y ou’ re sitting, y ou h av e th e ic onic b all team righ t ac ross th e street,” sh e said. “ It b ec omes a v ery B irmingh am-b ooster k ind of moment. Th at h as such great ramifications for tourism, that has economic development ramifications, and th at h elps attrac t oth er b usinesses, too.” As f or th e trend in 2 0 0 8 , w h en people w ould mov e aw ay af ter graduating c ollege, c urdy said that script has ipped in a sense. As G ood People h as ex panded its distrib ution to neigh b oring mark ets in G eorgia, F lorida and Tennessee, sh e said th ey h av e seen more v isitors to B irmingh am. “ It almost is lik e a little b it of street c red in my opinion, w h ere so many people 1 0 y ears ago w ere leav ing to go to N ash v ille and Atlanta b ec ause th ey w ere th e ex c iting [ c ities] ,” sh e said, “ b ut now , it’ s almost lik e a role rev ersal, w h ere people f rom Atlanta are c oming to B irmingh am f or th e w eek end.” G ood People plans to c eleb rate a dec ade of b eer b y b ringing b ac k past “ f an f av orites,” Mc C urdy said, as w ell as merc h andise and ev ents in late J une and early J uly . F or more details, go to goodpeople b rew ing.c om.


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Author wins award to publish 1st short story collection

By AL Y X CHAN D L ER As a c h ild, Alina Stef anesc u said h er mom alw ay s th ough t sh e w as a pow erf ul w riter and w ould pay h er and h er b roth er money to memoriz e poems and rec ite th em aloud. H er moth er, a ph y sic ian, h ad a b ig spac e in h er he art f or th e arts, Stef anesc u said. It w asn’ t until Stef anesc u w as a moth er h erself th at sh e started f oc using on w riting more. “ I j ust really enj oy ed b eing a moth er,” Stef anesc u said. “ I also started look ing at th e w orld dif f erently , w h eth er it w as a sense of w onder w h ere th ey saw th e w orld, or a sense of c onc ern of all th e th ings people don' t w ant to talk ab out [ w ith b eing a moth er] .” “ E v ery Mask I Tried on,” Stef anesc u’ s priz e-w inning c ollec tion of sh ort stories pub lish ed th rough B righ th orse B ook s, w as released in b ook stores th rough out th e U.S. on May 1 . Many of th e stories — desc rib ed as realistic fiction that also incorporates fabulism and magic al realism — h av e b een pub lish ed in va rious literary j ournals, Stef anesc u said, b ut

Alina Stefanescu at her Forest Park home. Photo courtesy of Patrick Coryell.

w ere c h osen to b e part of th e c ollec tion af ter sh e w on th e 2 0 1 6 B righ th orse B ook s Priz e. O nly one c ollec tion a y ear is c h osen to b e pub lish ed, ac c ording to B righ th orse B ook s, and th e auth or is also giv en priz e money and 50 perc ent of th e proc eeds, w h ic h Stef anesc u said is unusual and generous f or a pub lish ing c ompany .

“ Th at’ s w h at th ey w anted to do f or emerging w riters, and it meant a lot f or th em to pic k me,” sh e said. Stef anesc u, w h o h as only liv ed in F orest Park f or ab out 6 month s, said sh e mov ed to B irmingh am b ec ause sh e lov ed th e c ity and th e energy surrounding w riters and poets. Sh e plans to do readings of h er b ook s in loc al b ook stores. “ Parts of it are really f unny , [ espec ially ] if y ou lik e auth ors th at mak e f un of all th e f unny th ings w e do as moth ers. Th ere’ s also lov e stories in th is,” sh e said. In th e end, Stef anesc u said it is a sw eet b ook , th ough it c an b e dark . Many of th e stories in th e b ook are interw ov en, sh e said, w ith some of th e same c h arac ters c oming b ac k . As an immigrant, Stef anesc u said sh e play s w ith immigration as a c onstant th eme b ec ause sh e f elt lik e it w as a sub j ec t sh e k now s w ell. B eing b orn in R omania, w h ere h er parents c h ose to def ec t, sh e and h er b roth er stay ed f or a w h ile in th e c ountry w ith oth er f amily memb ers b ef ore h er parents b rough t h er to Americ a to apply f or c itiz ensh ip w ith th em.

“ L iv ing b etw een tw o plac es and not really b elonging in eith er giv es y ou insigh t to b elonging in b oth . Sometimes y ou c an see th ings th at some people c an’ t,” sh e said. “ It’ s h ard f or me to not desc rib e a land th at isn’ t h aunted b y its past, muc h lik e R omania.” Anoth er th eme th rough out th e c ollec tion is moth ers. H er moth er, w h o th e b ook is dedic ated to, died b ef ore it w as pub lish ed. Th ere’ s a story in th e b ook c alled “ Moth ers W h o Died,” Stef anesc u said, th at enc apsulates th e impac t h er moth er and h er death h ad on h er. “ Sh e w as my b est f riend, sh e w as someone w h o k new th e w orst in me b ut ref used to b eliev e it. I th ink w h en someone is suc h a h uge presenc e in y our lif e, y ou f eel nak ed in so many w ay s w h en th ey ’ re gone,” sh e said. Stef anesc u h as th ree c h apb ook s pub lish ed, as w ell as anoth er b ook c alled, “ Stories to R ead Aloud to Y our F etus.” Stef anesc u is also th e poetry editor of Pidgeonh oles, th e president of th e Alab ama State Poetry Soc iety and a b oard memb er of th e Alab ama W riter’ s C onc lav e. F or more inf ormation on h er, go to alinastef anesc u.c om.


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Bakery owner gets boost with loan from city of Birmingham By JESSE CHAMBERS O rganic ally Y ours, a b ak ery sh op, is set to open soon in th e E ast L ak e c ommerc ial distric t. F ounded b y Antionette N eeley , th e sh op w ill c reate suc h organic treats as b read, rolls, c ook ies and trail mix . “ Th e c ommunity is in need of h ealth y produc ts and organic produc ts,” N eeley said. And th e entrepreneur got a b oost at a C ity H all c eremony May 1 w h en sh e b ec ame th e first recipient of a , loan from the c ity of B irmingh am’ s new Small B usiness R ev olv ing L oan F und. N igel R ob erts, th e c ity ’ s direc tor of c ommunity dev elopment, said th is w ould allow N eeley to b uy th e eq uipment sh e needs to open. H er estab lish ment c an h elp rev italiz e long-dormant

United Way offers classes to help people take control of their money From left, Birmingham City Councilman Hunter Williams; a city staffer; Nigel oberts, director of the f ce of Community Development for the city; and Antionette Neely, owner of Organically Yours LLC. Photo by Jesse Chambers.

E ast L ak e retail, ac c ording to R ob erts. B irmingh am C ity C ounc ilman H unter W illiams praised N eeley ’ s inv estment in E ast L ak e. “ W h at y ou’ re doing is going to prov ide j ob s,” h e said. N eeley said sh e h oped to open in J une and would have five full- and part-time employees initially . In addition to retail, O rganic ally Y ours w ill serv e as a w h olesale distrib ution site to send N eeley ’ s produc ts to groc ery stores, inc luding Piggly W iggly .

By JESSE CHAMBERS Part of th e United W ay of C entral Alab ama’ s w ork in th e c ommunity is of f ering financial stability programs for families and indiv iduals. Th ese programs inc lude f ree w ork sh ops on topic s suc h as money management, deb t reduc tion and goals-setting. “ Until y ou tak e c ontrol of y our money , y ou c an nev er b e in c ontrol of y our lif e,” said udy oods, A financial stability spec ialist Tw o w ork sh ops are sc h eduled f or J une. Th e UW C A w ill h ost a “ L unc h & L earn” session, “ K now Y our R igh ts W h en R enting, B uy ing or Sec uring F inanc ing f or H ousing,” from a.m to 2 p.m. on une . Th e session w ill c ov er f air h ousing law s

Workshop leaders from Wells Fargo and attendees at one of the free nancial stability classes. Photo courtesy of United Way of Central Alabama.

and c onsumer righ ts. A h ome b uy er w ork shop will be from a.m. to noon une 2 to h elp partic ipants learn w h at th ey c an af f ord, how to get their finances in order and how to improv e th eir c redit sc ore. C lasses are h eld at th e UW C A, loc ated at 6 ighth Ave. S. he workshops are interac tiv e and c onduc ted b y industry ex perts w h o sh are prof essional k now ledge and personal stories, ac c ording to W oods. Th e c lasses h elp attendees “ c reate th e confidence needed to better understand and manage money in th eir dif f erent situations,” W oods said. F or details on c lasses, go to uw c a.org/ ev ents.


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Panels from the AIDS Memorial Quilt on display in June 2017 at Woodlawn United Methodist Church in Birmingham. Photo courtesy of Woodlawn UMC.

With AIDS quilt display, Woodlawn UMC offers space to celebrate lives By JESSE CHAMBERS W oodlaw n United Meth odist C h urc h w ill display sec tions of th e f amed AIDS Memorial Q uilt f or th e sec ond c onsec utiv e y ear, in c onj unc tion w ith C entral Alab ama Pride W eek . E igh t q uilt panels — eac h c ontaining eigh t names — w ill b e on display Sunday , J une 3 , thr ough Saturday , J une 9 , ac c ording to R ev . mily reeman enfield, the church s pastor. And th e c h urc h c ounc il rec ently named th e eve nt Th e Mic h ael C onw ay Annual Display of th e AIDS Memorial Q uilt, to h onor th e son of an onway, the church s administrative assistant. Mic h ael C onw ay died of AIDS in 1 9 8 8 . can t e press how touched am, an C onw ay said.

Th is is th e sec ond y ear th e c h urc h h as h osted sec tions of th e q uilt, w h ic h w as b egun in 1 9 8 7 to h onor people lost to AIDS/ H IV and is managed b y Th e N AME S Proj ec t. ach person s panel is made as a witness or testimony to who that person was, enfield said. t s a memorial but one that helps tell the story of that person s life. t s part tombstone, part scrapbook, part celebration. Af ter Mic h ael C onw ay died, J an C onw ay and h er daugh ters made an AIDS Q uilt b loc k f or h im th at w as display ed at th e c h urc h in 2 0 1 7 . an onway said the uilt is a comfort to th e lov ed ones of people w h o died of AIDS b ec ause th ose people w ere of ten stigmatiz ed – espec ially w h en h er son died in th e 1 9 8 0 s. t s our way of commemorating our loved

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ones when no one else did, she said. Th e c h urc h is an appropriate plac e f or th is display, according to enfield. “ To prov ide a spac e f or people to ob serv e, remember, grieve, celebrate that s a big portion of what our church is about, she said. About one third of the church s congregation is part of th e L G B TQ c ommunity , according to enfield. here s an affinity to reach out to people w h o h av e b een f riends and f amily of th ose in

our c ongregation and to rememb er th e liv es of those who died from A DS, she said. Th e display w ill b e open Sunday , 3 -8 : 3 0 p.m.; Monday th rough F riday , 5-8 : 3 0 p.m.; and Saturday , 1 0 a.m.-3 p.m. Admission is f ree, b ut donations w ill b e ac c epted f or B irmingh am AIDS O utreac h and AIDS Alab ama. Th ere w ill b e also some oth er ac tiv ities, inc luding H IV / AIDS testing. F or details, c all 59 5-3 7 7 6 or go to w oodlaw nb h am.c om.

CRESTWOOD

Lucy’s Coffee & Tea celebrates 25 years

Saint Junia UMC welcomes all to participatory, casual house church

By AL Y X CHAN D L ER

By JESSE CHAMBERS

L oc ated at th e edge of th e UAB c ampus, ucy s offee ea has been serving students and prov iding a “ c oz y , c ommunity-friendly place in downtown irmingham f or 2 5 y ears, ow ner L uc y B onds said. It is the only loc ally -ow ned c of f ee sh op in F iv e Points. riginally, ucy s offee and ea began in 19 9 3 as a c of f ee c art in f ront of Sitar, f ormerly known as racy s afeteria, on 2 th Street and Univ ersity B oulev ard af ter B onds spent some time in Seattle and saw th at th e c of f ee b usiness w as b ooming. As popularity f or th e c art grew , B onds dec ided in 1 9 9 5 to mov e to h er c urrent b ric k -and-mortar loc ation at 2 0 0 7 Univ ersity B oulev ard. picked the A area because there s people f rom all ov er th e w orld going to A , onds said. have a wonderful customer base. onds said when it first opened, she dev eloped a solid c of f ee c ustomer b ase, some of w h ic h are still w ith h er today . A f ew y ears into th e b usiness, sh e started selling lunc h . m really proud of our lunch, make all

Most modern w orsh ip h appens in c h urc h b uildings, b ut h istorians say many early C h ristian c ongregations met in priv ate h omes. Saint J unia United Meth odist C h urc h , f ounded in ab out 2 0 1 4, f ollow s th at model today . Saint J unia h osts ab out f our serv ic es per w eek at h ouse c h urc h es in C restw ood N orth , Trussv ille and V estav ia H ills. Th e C restw ood meeting tak es plac e at th e h ome of c h urc h minister Dav e B arnh art, w h o said G od liv es in th e c ommunity , not a b uilding. his thing we call the church is really ab out relationsh ips w ith eac h oth er and w ith G od, and th ose relationsh ips c an b e nurtured and grow anywhere, he said. All the ashy things churches do to draw members are stripped away, said rin eorgia, a c h urc h memb er w h o h osts a Sunday service in russville. e re meeting literally where people live. Saint unia s website calls the church a div erse c ommunity of sinners, saints and skeptics. he services are casual, laid-back gath erings w h ere attendees b ring f ood. And

Lucy’s Coffee & Tea, located on 2007 University Boulevard, celebrated 25 years of business this year. It is open from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, and serves lunch from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Photo by Alyx Chandler.

of our soups from scratch, she said, adding th at th e soups are alw ay s v egetarian and h ealth y , and th e b read is made f resh . B onds still opens th e sh op almost ev ery day , sh e said. “ I h av e great people w ork ing th ere, and everybody loves them, she said. t s a homey place. t s where people go to hang out. ucy s offee ea uses locally roasted H C V alentine C of f ee and serv es self -serv e drip c of f ee, a f ull espresso menu and f ruit or c of f ee smooth ies. C restline B agels and Y oY o Donuts are also menu options.

Minister Dave Barnhart leads a worship service April 8 at his residence in North Crestwood, where he holds one of the weekly meetings of the Saint Junia house church. Photo by Jesse Chambers.

all people are w elc ome, regardless of age, race, class or se ual orientation, according to B arnh art. Th e C restw ood serv ic e is h eld Sunday s at 9 : 3 0 a.m. at 544 55th St. S. F or details regarding serv ic es, go to saintj unia.org or F ac eb ook @ SaintJ unia.


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Sidewalk Film Festival set to break ground on new downtown home By JESSE CHAMBERS Sidew alk F ilm F estiv al w ill soon b egin c onstruc tion of its ow n dow ntow n f ac ility — th e Sidew alk F ilm C enter and C inema — w ith tw o 1 0 0 -seat sc reening rooms th at w ill allow the nonprofit to operate a year-round art-h ouse th eater. Th e organiz ation announc ed April 1 9 it h ad raised $ 3 .1 million of th e $ 5 million needed to b uild th e long-aw aited f ac ility in The Piz itz . Th e goal is to raise th e remaining $ 1 .9 million by Aug. 26 — the final day of the 20t h annual Sidew alk f estiv al — ac c ording to C h loe C ook , Sidew alk ex ec utiv e direc tor. At press time, Sidew alk ex pec ted to b reak ground on th e f ac ility in May . Demolition will be the first step in an

LAKEVIEW

A rendering of the interior floor plan of the new $5 million Sidewalk Film Center and Cinema facility at The Pizitz. Rendering courtesy of Davis Architects.

estimated 2 3 0 -day c onstruc tion sc h edule, ac c ording to C ook . Th e 1 1 ,0 0 0 -sq uare-f oot f ac ility , designed b y Dav is Arc h itec ts, w ill also inc lude lounges, a b ar and c onc ession stand, Sidewalk offices and space for meetings and c lasses. C ook said sh e’ s “ th rilled” the festival will have finally a permanent h ome in th e th eatre distric t w h ere th e ev ent’ s alw ay s b een h eld. “ Th e idea f or th is proj ec t is as old as th e f estiv al itself ,” C ook said. And th e sc reening rooms w ill f ill “ a long-standing c ultural v oid,” sh e said. F or more inf ormation on th e c ampaign, go to sidew alk f est.c om/ mak e-mov ie-magic .

Artist opens Pepper Place studio to be part of ‘thriving’ Birmingham By JESSE CHAMBERS Potter and art teac h er L ana B . H ob b s opened Th riv e C lay Studio at Pepper Plac e in L ak ev iew on May 1 . Th e H oov er resident, prev iously loc ated at Artists on th e B luf f , said th e B irmingh am mov e made sense. “ I' v e b een a v endor at Pepper Plac e Mark et f or th ree y ears, and most of my students are f rom h ere,” sh e said. Th e Atlanta nativ e, w h o earned a master’ s degree in art educ ation at th e Univ ersity of Montev allo in 2 0 1 4, w as also attrac ted b y B irmingh am’ s energy . “ B irmingh am is w h at my [ studio] name is righ t now — it’ s th riv ing, grow ing and c h anging,” sh e said. “ I w anted to b e part of th at.”

Potter and art teacher Lana B. Hobbs, right, works with a student Megan Trolard at Thrive Clay Studio at Pepper Place on May 7. Photo by Jesse Chambers.

Th riv e is a “ c ommunal plac e w h ere people c an c ome togeth er and mak e th ings w ith th eir h ands,” H ob b s said. H ob b s of f ers tw o-h our c lay w ork sh ops during w h ic h partic ipants c omplete one of sev eral ob j ec ts, suc h as a mug, b ow l or pitc h er, and six -w eek c lasses in pottery w h eel and h and-b uilding. Th ere are sessions listed online, and people c an sc h edule priv ate lessons. H ob b s also sells h er plates and v ases online, at H omew ood’ s L iz L ane G allery and month ly at Pepper Plac e Mark et. F or inf ormation, c all 2 59 -8 52 4 or go to th riv ec lay .c om.


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SIPS & BITES

HAPPENINGS

SIGHTS

PUT THESE IN JUNE’S BEST BETS

ALABAMA THEATRE SUMMER FILM SERIES

FACES

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MAGIC CITY CARIBBEAN FOOD AND MUSIC FESTIVAL

Beginning June 8; 1817 Third Ave. N.

11 a.m. to 8 p.m., June 9; Linn Park, 710 20th St. N.

The Showplace of the South hosts its annual film series, which continues through Aug. 12, with these screenings: June 8, “Superman: The Movie,” 7 p.m.; June 10, “Funny Girl,” 2 p.m.; June 15: “Dazed and Confused,” 7 p.m.; June 17: “Father of the Bride” (1950), 2 p.m.; June 22: “The Wiz,” 7 p.m.; June 24: “The Wizard of Oz,” 2 p.m.; June 29: “The Sandlot,” 7 p.m. Tickets are $9; children ages 2 and younger admitted free. 800-745-3000. alabamatheatre.com.

This annual family-friendly event showcases the music, food and culture of the Caribbean and will again feature a parade of costumes. Musical performers will include the Pansonics Steel Band and the Revolution Reggae/Soca band, which has performed for the past two years. Revolution will close the show with a performance of Bob Marley’s “One Love.” Free admission. 383-1726. cacaoonline.org.

LOCAL 2018

5 p.m., June 16, Engel Plaza, 1200 10th Ave. S.

The Alys Stephens Center is proud to present the fifth annual L CAL a celebration of everything Alabama. Shop some of Alabama’s favorite eclectic artists and vendors while enjoying live performances by local musicians. All your favorite local food trucks will be on-site when it’s time for a bite to eat. Kick off your summer at our outdoor, family-friendly event. Free admission. 975-2787. alysstephens.org/ events/local-2018.

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ICI

MUST SEE

See this? It means we think you ought to go!

SLICEFEST

1-11:55 p.m., June 16; Slice Pizza and Brew, 725 29th St. S.

Billed as the city’s largest block party, this seventh annual event in Lakeview offers food and live music. Slice Pizza & Brewhouse hosts the event to celebrate the restaurant’s anniversary and thank the Birmingham community for their continuous support. As with previous years, SliceFest is expected to welcome a sold out crowd. Tickets $35; advance $30. Children 12 and younger are admitted free. Information at slicefest.com.

OFFICIAL BIRMINGHAM CITY COUNCIL

third oor, Conference ooms D and E.

Hall, Conference Room A.

June 4: Birmingham City Council Public Safety, Transportation Committee. 4:30 p.m. Birmingham City Hall, third oor, council chambers.

June 12: Birmingham City Council. 9:30 a.m. City Hall, third oor.

June 18: Citizen Advisory Board. 7 p.m. City Council Chambers, Birmingham City Hall, third oor. The Citi en articipation rogram is designed to achieve improved communication, understanding, and cooperation between Birmingham citi ens and city officials through increased personal contact between City Hall and neighborhoods and communities throughout the city. The public is welcome to attend.

June 5: Birmingham City Council. 9:30 a.m. City Hall, third oor. June 11: Birmingham City Council Economic Development, Budget and Finance Committee. 4 p.m. Birmingham City Hall, third oor, Conference Rooms D and E. June 11: Birmingham City Council Governmental Affairs Committee. 2 p.m. Birmingham City Hall,

June 12: Birmingham City Council Public Improvements and Beautification Committee. 2 p.m. Birmingham City Hall, Conference Room A. June 18: Birmingham City Council Public Safety, Transportation Committee. 4:30 p.m. Birmingham City Hall, third oor, council chambers. June 18: Birmingham City Council Planning and Zoning Committee. 4:30 p.m. Birmingham City

Administration/Technology Committee. 1 p.m. Birmingham City Hall, third oor, Conference Rooms D and E. June 26: Birmingham City Council. 9:30 a.m. City Hall, third oor. June 26: Birmingham City Council Education Committee. 2 p.m. Birmingham City Hall, third oor, Conference ooms D and E.

June 19: Birmingham City Council. 9:30 a.m. City Hall, third oor.

June 26: Birmingham City Council Utilities Committee. 4 p.m. Birmingham City Hall, third oor, Conference ooms D and E.

June 22: Birmingham City Council

June 27: Birmingham City Council Committee


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of the Whole. 4 p.m. Birmingham City Hall, third oor, Conference ooms D and E.

NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION MEETINGS June 5: Forest ark South Avondale eighborhood Association meeting. 6:30 p.m. Avondale Library, 50 40th St. S. Visit forestparksouthavondale.com for more information. June 11: oodlawn eighborhood Association meeting. 570 1st Ave . Call resident Brenda ettaway at 5 3-4487 for more information. June 12: Highland ark eighborhood Association meeting. 7 p.m. Upstairs meeting room of the Highland ark olf Course clubhouse. eeting notices are sent out to recipients of the Highland ark email list. f you wish to be included on this list, email resident Alison lascock at alisonglascock gmail.com. June 14: oebuck Springs eighborhood Association meeting. 7 p.m. South oebuck Baptist Community Church. Call resident Frank Hamby at 222-231 for more information. June 19: Central City eighborhood Association meeting: 6-7 p.m. Linn-Henley Library, ichard Arrington, Jr. Auditorium. eighborhood social to follow at Tavern on 1st, 2320 1st Ave. . June 25: Crestwood South eighborhood Association meeting. 6:30 p.m. A C of Alabama. Contact association Vice resident Virginia Volker at 5 2-7 66 for more information. June 25: Crestwood orth eighborhood Association meeting. 6:30 p.m. irls nc. of Alabama. June 25: Huffman eighborhood Association meeting. 7 p.m. Cornerstone School, 5 Huffman oad. June 25: Five oints South eighborhood Association meeting. 6-7:15 p.m. Southside Library, 1814 11th Ave. S. Visit fivepointsbham. com for more information. June 26: Bush Hills eighborhood Association meeting. 6:30 p.m. Bush Hills Academy School, 01 16th St. S. . Call resident alladean Streeter at 602-4237 for more information.

Did we miss something? f you would like to have your neighborhood association meeting mentioned in ne t months calendar, email the meeting info to kwilliams starnespublishing.com.

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COMMUNITY June 3: et Healthy on the ailroad Cooking Class. 3:30-4:30 p.m. ailroad ark, 1600 First Ave. S. Head to ailroad ark for a fun, informative, free cooking class for all. Join us for cooking demonstrations, healthy eating tips, free recipes and food tastings. egistration will open 30 minutes prior to class. The first 100 registered participants receive a free bag of produce from iggly iggly Clairmont Avenue. June 9: oodlawn Street arket. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 55th lace South. This urban street market in historic oodlawn, features local vendors selling produce, prepared food and a variety of other products. Free admission. 482-2650. Facebook woodlawnstreetmarket. June 9: Southeastern utings Attendance at the Alabama Symphony rchestras Concert in ailroad ark. 8 p.m. Free admission. 631-4680. alabamasymphony.org. June 16: Funky Food Truck Festival. 1-6 p.m. Cahaba Brewing Company, 4500 Fifth Ave. S. Join us for a funky good time e ll have tasty food from these top Birmingham food trucks: Eugenes Hot Chicken, La y Boy BB , Taco orro Loco and LA ce. e ll even have treats from Fetch A Treat Truck for Dogs for your four-legged friend s , and the reater Birmingham Humane Society will be there with adoptable dogs. Enjoy the fun while sipping on refreshing Cahaba brews. Donations benefit A DS Alabamas programs and the suggested donation is just 5. 18-8182. aidsalabama. org events Funky 20Food 20Truck 20 Festival-10025.htm June 23: Fourth annual Birmingham Black odeo. 7:30 p.m. Legacy Arena at the BJCC. The Southeastern odeo Association showcases professional cowboys in events such as bronc riding, steer wrestling, calf roping, ladies barrel racing, ladies steer undecorating, team roping, bull riding and junior barrel racing for kids. V tickets: 35.25 regular tickets: 1 .25. Ages 2 and older must have a ticket. 800-745-3000. bjcc.org events-and-tickets.php. June 23-24: Family Camp- ut ight. ailroad ark, 1600 First Ave. S. Each year, a section of ailroad ark is turned into an interactive family campground. The event features e pert lessons in such subjects as astronomy, bird watching and camp cooking. Saturday, 3 p.m., until Sunday, 8 a.m. For ticket prices and more information, call 521- 33 or go to railroadpark.org June 30-July 1: reat Southern un

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Show, BJCC E hibition Halls. The event features hundreds of tables of new and old guns, knives, ammo, gun parts, reloading supplies, holsters and other products. Saturday, a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Admission ages 12 and up, ages 6-11, 2. 865-671-4757. greatsoutherngunshow.com

MUSIC June 1: Caddle. 10 p.m. The ick, 2514 10th Ave. S. Caddle is a high-powered rock and altcountry band from Birmingham. Also appearing will be Chris Simmons Band, The Edmonds Butler Band and reenleaf Hustle. 10. 2523831. thenickrocks.com June 1-2: ussian asterpieces. Alys Stephens erforming Arts Center, 1200 Tenth Ave. S. The Alabama Symphony rchestra will present The Firebird, Stravinsky and Tchaikovsky s transcendent si th symphony. Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m. Tickets start at 24, with student prices available. 75-2787. alysstephens.org or alabamasymphony.org June 3: Fit And The Tantrums. 8 p.m. ron City, 513 22nd St. S. This indie pop and neo-soul band from Los Angeles was formed in 2008. 32.50- 35. 202-5483. ironcitybham.com June 6: Big Boi. 8 p.m. Saturn, 200 41st St. S. The legendary, rammy-winning rap artist will appear in support of his third studio album, Boomiverse. Also appearing will be The reat. 25- 28. 703- 545. saturnbirmingham. com June 7: Ale uthrie. 8 p.m. ork lay, 500 23rd St. S. uthrie is a singer-songwriter from Atlanta who blends such genres as soul, folk and rock. a uel Lily, a singer-songwriter from Birmingham, will open. 8. 380-4082. workplay. com June 8: The osies. p.m. Saturn, 200 41st St. S. The veteran Seattle rock band, led by Jon Auer and en Stringfellow, are touring to support their eighth album, Solid States. 20- 22. 703- 545. saturnbirmingham.com June 16: The Fab Four. 8 p.m. Alabama Theatre, 1817 Third Ave. . This Beatles tribute act promises note-for-note live renditions of the legendary groups classic tunes. For tickets, call 800-745-3000 or go to alabamatheatre.com. June 16: LD. 8 p.m. ork lay, 500 23rd St. S. LD, pronounced marigold, is a Birmingham rock band with two lead singers that promises strong guitar riffs, driving rhythms and infectious melodies. Also

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appearing will be Jesse ayne and Future Elevators. 8. 380-4082. workplay.com June 20: oung idows. p.m. The ick, 2514 10th Ave. S. oung idows is a popular indieand noise-rock band from Louisville, y. ull, described as gloom and doom rockers from Birmingham, will open. 8- 10. 252-3831. thenickrocks.com June 27: Days Da e and oddamn allows. 8:30 p.m. ydeco, 2001 15th Ave. S. Days Da e is a folk-punk band from Houston. oddamn allows are an Americana-punk band. Also appearing will be Virginia band allows Bound. 12. 33-1032. ydecobirmingham.com

ARTS June 6: Flicks Among the Flowers. 8 p.m. Birmingham Botanical ardens, 2612 Lane ark oad. Attendee are encouraged to bring blankets and sit on the lawn and watch the ill Smith film, Hitch. Admission free, but suggested donation of 5. 414-3 00. bbgardens.org June 7: Chip higna. ojo, 2 21 Highland Ave. S. The popular eatery will host a reception for the Birmingham painter, whose work will be on display, at 6 p.m. Admission free. 328-4733. rojobirmingham.com June 7-24: Fragmented ecall. round Floor Contemporary, 111 ichard Arrington Jr. Blvd. S. Artists Sara arden Armstrong and Barbara Hirschowit will present new work based on recollected imagery using chance, change and encounter. Armstrong will present drawings and paintings, and Hirschowit will show paintings and works on paper. The opening reception is Thursday, June 7, 5-7:30 p.m. For information, go to ground oorcontemporary.com. June 7-30: Shirley Valentine. Terrific ew Theatre, 2821 Second Ave. S. Dolores Hydock will star in illy ussell s play about a Liverpool housewife who finds her est for life on a vacation in reece. Directed by Carl Stewart. Thursday, Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m. Sunday, June 10, and Sunday, June 24, 2:30 p.m. For tickets and other information, call 3280868 or go to terrificnewtheatre.com. June 8-July 1: Beauty and the Beast. Dorothy Jemison Day Theater, Alabama School of Fine Arts, 1800 everend Abraham oods Jr. Blvd. Disney s Beauty and the Beast is the classic story of Belle, a young woman in a provincial town, and the Beast, who is really a young prince trapped in a spell. resented by ed ountain Theatre Company. Tickets start at


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DISCOVER $25. For tickets and show times, call 324-2424 or go to redmountaintheatre.org. June 11-15: Girls Rock Birmingham Camp. Red Mountain Community School, 4022 Fourth Ave. S. The camp offers girls ages 9-16 instrument instruction, workshops, songwriting, band practice, live performances by visiting artists and a showcase concert. No previous musical experience is required. $250 (assistance available). 920-1785. girlsrockbham.org June 14-30: “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead.” Theatre Downtown, 2410 Fifth Ave. S. This is a production of the classic comedy by Tom Stoppard about two minor characters in Shakespeare’s “Hamlet.” Thursday-Saturday, 8 p.m. Adults $20; students $12. For details, including some special discounts, call 5658838 or go to theatredowntown.org. June 15-24: “Sand Mountain Saturday Nite.” Virginia Samford Theatre, 1116 26th St. S. Written and directed by Norton Dill, this play is set at a music party on Sand Mountain. The cast of six actor/musicians play 24 different characters and many instruments, including

guitar, banjo, mandolin, fiddle, bass and piano. Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, 2:30 p.m. Tickets $25 and $30; students $15. 251-1206. virginiasamfordtheatre.org June 15-July 21: Double Feature: Corey Webb and Jamie Adams. Naked Art Gallery, 3831 Clairmont Ave. The two visual artists will show their work. Webb’s show is called “Places & Faces: And so on and so Forth,” and Adams will show “A New Beastiary.” There will be opening receptions on Friday, June 15, from 5-8 p.m., and Saturday, June 16, 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Admission free. For details and gallery hours, call 5953553 or go to nakedartusa.com. Through June 17: Magic City Realism: Richard Coe’s Birmingham. Birmingham Museum of Art, 2000 Rev. Abraham Woods Jr. Blvd. In the 1930s, artist and Alabama native Coe documented the city’s rapidly changing urban fabric in his prints and paintings. Free admission. For information, including BMA hours, call 254-2565 or go to artsbma.org. June 17: Sanspointe Dance Company. Railroad Park, 1600 First Ave. S. The Birmingham troupe

will offer a free performance on the West Green as part of its “Have Dance, Will Travel” summer tour. 2 & 4 p.m. 256-348-6438. sanspointe.org June 19: Screentalk: “Filmworker.” 7 p.m. Carrigan’s Public House, 2430 Morris Ave. This documentary film tells the story of Leon Vitali, who gave up a promising acting career to work for director Stanley Kubrick for two decades. The screening, followed by a panel discussion, is presented by Sidewalk Film Festival. $10 ($8 advance); students $5. 324-0888. sidewalkfest. com June 26: David Lee: The Ultimate Elvis. 7:30 p.m. BJCC Theatre. Lee will recreate Elvis Presley’s last concert, backed by the Steel City Sound. $15-$35. 800-745-3000. bjcc.org

SPORTS BIRMINGHAM BARONS (HOME GAMES AT REGIONS FIELD) May 29: Chattanooga Lookouts, 7:05 p.m.

May 30: Chattanooga Lookouts, 12:30 p.m. May 31: Chattanooga Lookouts, 7:05 p.m. June 1: Chattanooga Lookouts, 7:05 p.m. June 2: Chattanooga Lookouts, 6:30 p.m. June 3: Jacksonville Jumbo Shrimp, 6 p.m. June 4: Jacksonville Jumbo Shrimp, 7:05 p.m. June 5: Jacksonville Jumbo Shrimp, 7:05 p.m. June 6: Jacksonville Jumbo Shrimp, 11:30 a.m. June 7: Jacksonville Jumbo Shrimp, 7:05 p.m. June 13: Chattanooga Lookouts, 7:05 p.m. June 14: Chattanooga Lookouts, 7:05 p.m. June 15: Chattanooga Lookouts, 7:05 p.m. June 16: Chattanooga Lookouts, 6:30 p.m. June 17: Chattanooga Lookouts, 7:05 p.m. June 28: Jackson Generals, 7:05 p.m. June 29: Jackson Generals, 7:05 p.m. June 30: Jackson Generals, 6:30 p.m. July 1: Jackson Generals, 3 p.m. July 2: Jackson Generals, 7:05 p.m. July 3: Jackson Generals, 7:05 p.m. June 19: 46th annual Southern League All-Star Game. 7:05 p.m. Regions Field. The Barons will host an All-Star Game gala, the Southern League All-Star Luncheon and the 2018 Southern League Hall of Fame induction. Details TBA.


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