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from the editor

MICHELLE BLAISDELL

W

e welcome spring with our May issue. The same week as we go to press heralding the change of the seasons, a winter that has overstayed its welcome is giving way to balmy temperatures and blue skies. With that, we bring you a joyful cover story about two of Flint's most beloved radio personalities – Mike and Stephanie in the Morning on 105.5 CK. Truly a dynamic duo, they mug stylishly for the camera and tell us how it's been to work as a team for 12 memorable years.

Dancing With The Local Stars Grand Blanc Chamber of Commerce Kim Gray, Nichole Gardner, Michelle Blaisdell, Shannon Boyd

With the water crisis coming close to its two-year mark, we've decided to highlight proactive and positive community members helping to mitigate damage to our infrastructure and to our health. In this issue, you'll learn about the success of the new KWA pipeline construction to bring Lake Huron's water to Flint, in a story by professor Paul Rozycki. Also Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha's long-term plan to help kids in Flint who have been affected by the water crisis will lift your spirits. In this issue, you'll learn about how the YWCA, the Crim Foundation, and the Greater Flint Arts Council are dynamically serving the community with changes and events, and celebrate Applewood's hundredth year of making a difference in the lives of local citizens. Several organizations – The State Bank, Adopt-a-Pet, and the YMCA – held glamorous celebrations and fundraisers. onthetown loves to showcase, in every issue, interesting people doing interesting things in our community. The May issue has a profile of FIM's Jeff Walker, former organist and director of music at First Presbyterian Church, and teacher at Flint Institute of Music who plays keyboard for Flint Symphony and tunes harpsichords, pianos, and organs. Also in the May issue, we introduce you to the Rita Langworthy Foundation, established in the name of former Flint school principal Rita Langworthy, and intended to help organizations serving at-risk children.

Hurley Medical Center's 35th Annual Benefit Ball Marc Lund, Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, Michelle Blaisdell

Food and fashion are on many people's minds this spring season, and in their regular features, Chef Sean Gartland of the Flint Farmer's Market and Lisa Szukhent advise how to spring forward with your menu and wardrobe. A little spring spice is just what's needed! Our community is full of people whose careers bring good things to others' lives. onthetown spotlights agent Dave Lucas of Peabody Insurance, who helps business owners make the best decisions and save money, and Dan Crannie, owner and operator of Crannie Signs, loyally serving the area for 30 years. Need a vascular surgeon? Find out about the life-saving innovations pioneered by researchers at Flint's own Michigan Vascular Center!

Adopt-A-Pet’s “Wags & Whiskers” Annual Fundraiser Dawnell Binder, Kim Gray, Michelle Blaisdell, Denise McDowell

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Last but not least, onthetown is celebrating our 42nd year in business as Flint's premier publication. Why celebrate 42 years? Well, as author Douglas Adams famously said, the number 42 is “the answer to the ultimate question of life, the universe, and everything!” On that note, we raise our proverbial glasses to another 42 years of the privilege of serving our community by showcasing the best it has to offer. So enjoy our May issue in this lovely spring weather, and be seen, be heard, be onthetown!


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from the publisher

O

KIMBERLY GRAY

nthetown is now in our 42nd year of providing an oasis of optimism in a world in which the dry and negative is often given priority. This spring, we present several of Flint and Genesee County's communityminded organizations and businesses that are helping the needy, keeping people healthy, and offering quality services to help businesses thrive. We’re celebrating many milestones in 2016 with regard to Flint's history, like the 100th anniversary of Flint's Rotary Club, along with Charles S. Mott's renowned Applewood Estate's summer-long centennial celebration. In upcoming issues, onthetown will feature other community stalwarts who have survived the trials of time in the spirit of preserving Flint's storied legacy. You know what they say about April showers—well, things are certainly starting to bloom around here! More than just budding leaves and blossoms, there’s a new, hopeful feeling. Though the water crisis continues, lights on the way to the end of the tunnel (or pipeline, if you prefer) are glimmering. Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, without minimizing the seriousness of the issue, offers reassurances that Flint can heal from this disaster. Also, the Karegnondi Pipeline, which will bring Lake Huron water to the city, is being completed on time and with thorough safety testing. The centerpiece of this issue is a bit more playful and carefree—an inside view of local DJs Mike and Stephanie in the Morning. You've probably heard them on your way to work, playing the latest hits and bantering with one another. Find out what it’s like behind the speakers, and enjoy their candid “rock star” photos. There is much more in our May/June pages, and we hope to work in tandem with the sunny weather to put a smile on the faces of our readers and advertisers. So enjoy, and hope to see you at one of the many summer events in the upcoming months!

Copyright © 2016. onthetown Magazine /onthetownlimited.com. No part of this publication may be produced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission in writing from the publisher. The views expressed in this publication are those of the respective contributors and are not necessarily shared by the publication or its staff. SUBSCRIPTIONS Mail check or money order for $12.00 to Global Network Publishers P.O. Box 121 | Grand Blanc, MI 48480

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W W W. O N T H E T O W N L I M I T E D . C O M

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF & CREATIVE DIRECTOR Michelle Blaisdell MANAGING EDITOR Meredith McGhan CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Michael G. Thodoroff Martha Hamp LEAD DESIGN Archetype Design Studio DESIGN & LAYOUT Chelsea Mills, Macie Keller- Behind Your Design Julie Erdman- jedesign ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Debby Molina Allison Joslin Jason Hill Lanie Nix CONTRIBUTORS Kristen Aguirre, Wendy Byard, Dennis Ferrara, Sean Gartland, Jamie Hamp, Ilse Hayes, Joel Hart, Louis J. Lobsinger Jr., Kellie McCarty, Meredith McGhan, Chelsea Mills, Tara Moreno, Debby Molina, Gary Paavola, Lynn Penning, Rich Reed, Paul Rozycki, Theresa Roach, Lisa Szukhent, Rynelle Walker Photography THANKS TO M-Live Media Group, Rotary Club of Flint Michigan, Ruth Mott Foundation Archives, Flint Michigan, Ashley Norman PUBLISHER Kimberly Gray Global Network Publishers, producers of onthetown Magazine P.O. BOX 121 GRAND BLANC, MI 48480 CONTACT ADVERTISING MANAGER Michelle Blaisdell director@onthetownlimited.com 810.584.7006 onthetown Magazine 8469 S. Saginaw Street, Suite 3 Grand Blanc, MI 48439 CORRECTION In our last issue, we listed rates for The Sugarbush Houses and facilities as being $2800 per week. Rates for the senior living homes actually start at $2800 per month.


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Contents

VOLUME 6 ISSUE 2

Be Seen 10 FLINT YMCA ANNUAL GALA 28 ADOPT-A-PET WAGS & WHISKERS 32 35TH HURLEY BENEFIT BALL 38 STATE BANK 10-YEAR ANNIVESARY 44 AMERICAN ADVERTISING AWARDS 62 FLINT FIREBIRDS CHAMBER NIGHT PUCKS FOR PAWS

Progress 08 THE KAREGNONDI PIPELINE: ON TIME AND UNDER BUDGET

Entertainment 12 THE DYNAMIC DUO: MIKE AND STEPHANIE IN THE MORNING

Food & Drink 18 MAY/JUNE: PUSHING A MENU FORWARD

Business 20 A SIGN OF THE TIMES: DAN CRANNIE'S SIGN COMPANY IS HERE TO STAY 22 THIS GOLF COURSE HAS IT “COVERED!” 26 THE MUSICIAN WHO WEARS SEVERAL HATS 36 FROM EXCAVATORS TO INDUSTRIAL WAREHOUSES 48 MORE THAN A GOLF COURSE: A PILLAR IN OUR COMMUNITY FOR 60 YEARS!

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Fashion 24 SUMMER BREEZE: 5 TIPS FOR AN EASY, BREEZY, SUMMER

Community 30 LETS CRIM FOR FLINT!

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50 COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF GREATER FLINT RESPONDS TO THE FLINT WATER CRISIS 52 FLINT’S YWCA: A PHOENIX RISING UP FROM THE ASH 54 COOL CITY ART AUCTION HELPS FLINT’S DOWNTOWN CULTURE THRIVE 56 RITA LANGWORTHY'S LEGACY OF COMPASSION 58 THE ROTARY CLUB OF FLINT TURNS 100

46 40

64 APPLEWOOD ESTATE: A CELEBRATION OF 100 YEARS IN THE MAKING!

Medical 34 MVC RESEARCH... SEEKING TREATMENTS FOR

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YOUR BETTER VASCULAR HEALTH 40 HURLEY PEDIATRICIAN'S MESSAGE OF HOPE

Car Culture 46 SOMETIMES IT’S MORE FUN TO DROP YOUR TOP

Anniversary 68

onthetown MAGAZINE CELEBRATES 42 YEARS


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PROGRESS

The Karegnondi Pipeline On Time and Under Budget

// BY PAUL ROZYCKI

CAN YOU IMAGINE A HUGE GOVERNMENT PUBLIC WORKS PROJECT BEING COMPLETED ON TIME AND FOR LESS THAN ITS INITIAL PROJECTED COST?

Neither can I.

B

ut right here in Genesee County that’s just what’s happening with the construction of the Karegnondi Pipeline, named for the Wyandot word for “big lake.” The 70-mile long waterway begins in Lake Huron, runs through Sanilac, Lapeer and Genesee counties, and will supply clean, affordable water to those counties. Right now the pipeline is 10 miles from completion. If weather permits it, the pipeline should be done by June or July of this year, as initially projected. (Extra water testing, as a result of the Flint water crisis, might delay the full usage of the water for six months or so.) The pipeline will be finished on time, and unlike many government projects, it will come in under its projected budget. According to Jeff Wright, Genesee County

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Drain Commissioner, the final cost will be $285 million -- $15 million less than expected. Several factors played a role in making the move from using piped-in Detroit water to constructing a new pipeline. One was the reliability of the Detroit water source. Following a 2003 power outage, Genesee County lacked water for three days. Being at the end of Detroit’s service line meant we were first to have water turned off and last to have it turned on. The second problem was the cost of Detroit water. Detroit charged Genesee County for the ‘distance and elevation’ from their system, so our water rate was the highest of the nation’s 500 largest water systems. Rates increased by at least 10% each year. In 2001, the total bill for the county was $8 million. By 2014 it was $26 million and by 2016 it quadrupled to $32 million.

After several years of complex negotiations with Detroit, and considering other options, the decision was made to leave the Detroit system and the Karegnondi project began in 2013. Wright calls the Karegnondi a “true public works project, with local suppliers” because 13 Flint-area firms designed, inspected, and signed off on the project. By most measures it qualifies as the second-largest public works project in Michigan. After a competitive bidding process, Genesee County and several southeastern Michigan companies won the construction contract. These companies employ more than 1300 people, 950 of them local, providing an $80 million payroll for the area. The Karegnondi project also brought the American Cast Iron Pipe Company to Genesee County, to the old Buick City site. Wright hopes the success of American Cast Iron will encourage


other manufacturers to consider Buick City a viable place to set up operations.

accountability and control for all who use it.

In addition to expanding local jobs, the KWA (Karegnondi Water Authority) will offer other benefits to Genesee County. First, it will provide a dependable water supply at a lower cost. Wright says, “There will be no more double-digit increases, and our children and grandchildren will have some of the lowest water rates in Michigan.” He also feels that a dependable, affordable water supply will be a “backbone of the growth of agribusiness and food production along the I-69 corridor.” A large amount of the food grown in the area is processed outof-state. The Karegnondi could provide a way for some of that business to stay in Michigan. Similarly, the water line could provide growth for green agriculture such as hydroponics. The pipeline will also serve industry in the I-69 corridor. In the end he feels that the KWA will provide

As is true of any large project, the KWA hasn’t avoided its share of controversy, and social media has spread misunderstandings about the project. Commissioner Wright is quick to respond to several of the myths about the pipeline. First, the pipeline is not an attempt to introduce fracking into the area. That is not the purpose of it and there are no plans for it. Second, the KWA is not the cause of the Flint water crisis. Flint’s decision to separate from Detroit’s water system, draw water from the Flint River and treat it incorrectly involved decision-makers at local, state and national levels, outside of the KWA. However, the crisis will have one important effect on the start-up of the Karegnondi pipeline. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Michigan Department of Environmental

Quality (DEQ) have required additional testing to assure the quality of the water from the KWA. Wright feels that even though the additional tests will delay use of the water by about six months, it is worth it to reassure the public and build trust. Wright spent his career engineering and providing quality water. A lifelong resident of Genesee County, he graduated from Ferris State, and began his career as an engineer and inspector with the Genesee County Drain Commission. Later he served as deputy drain commissioner before being elected to the top position in 2001. Seeing the KWA project develop and approach completion has been one of the most challenging and rewarding of his career. But even then, he doesn’t take all the credit for himself. As he says, “I couldn’t have done it without the great staff and support at the Drain Commission.”

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be seen Flint YMCA Annual Gala C AM P CO PNE CO NI C F E N TO N | FE BR UARY 27

YMCA Camp Copneconic hosted its Annual Fundraising Dinner and Auction. This year’s theme was “Rockin’ Gala! Let’s Rock for our Community!” All proceeds from this event provide financial assistance to families in our community so that they may experience the YMCA. An evening of food, fun, and friends, all for a great cause! For more information visit flintymca.com.

Left to right: Christie Siegel, Don Delabbio | Bryan & Lisa McGill | Ethan Weinberger, Lori Anthony, Jasen Anthony | Karen Vobach, Diana Snider | Heather Skinner, Mathew Harton | Amanda Snider, Dustin Doren | Brian & Linda Nelson | Shelly Hilton, Mike Thodoroff | Ron Bienkowski, Carrie Graff, Jim & Patty Peabody, Lauren & Brandon Peabody

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ENTERTAINMENT


Dynamic Duo The

[

MIKE AND STEPHANIE IN THE MORNING BY ILSE HAYES

]

The radio duo whose show is known by the moniker “Mike and Stephanie in the Morning” has been exciting audiences over the airwaves at Cumulus Radio CK 105.5 for over a decade. It was with these two that I met at Panera Bread in Grand Blanc one recent afternoon. Mike MacDonald was scrolling through sites on his phone as I approached him, having just finished lunching with his wife before I arrived. And Stephanie Confer, who was running a few minutes late, immediately greeted me with a hug when she showed up shortly afterward. Once we were all settled and prepared to talk, it wasn’t long before the back-and-forth banter with which listeners are so familiar on weekday mornings began –on cue and live – right in front of me. I thought this a very hopeful sign, for I was going to experience them as they really were…and so, amidst all that typical, potent, and high-powered repartee for which they are well-known, I jumped right in to interview the two of them.

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ENTERTAINMENT

"Mike is very caring and understanding! He doesn't get mad that I am NOT a morning person by nature and get there late at times."

B

ecause this year marks the 12th anniversary of their working side by side, I wondered how each would characterize the successful dynamic of their partnership that works so effectively on the air. Stephanie was first to respond, saying, “It’s like any brother-sister relationship. You learn what [the other’s] personality [is]. You know when to leave [each other] alone and when to get on his [case]. And Mike added to that depiction by pointing out that “We also know when to apologize and that’s important. Even if we leave the radio station and we’re just scowling at each other, one of us will call the other from the car and say, ‘Hey, sorry – it was a rough ride today.’” From his perspective I thought I could detect something almost diplomatic in Mike’s statement – and probably that “something” goes a long way to making the relationship between the “dynamic duo” work – and work very well. But Stephanie, true to her slightly edgy form, had her own take on this remark; she says, “I’ll be honest – he’s usually better about that, [smoothing things over], than I am only because he has to do so more often!” We all chuckled at her claim – including Mike’s wife who had been sitting quietly and

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listening intently during the interview. It’s not difficult to see that, even off the airwaves, Mike and Stephanie continue to be – well – Mike and Stephanie. At this point, I turned to ask about the nature of the program itself, questioning whether or not the upbeat element to all the shows was a deliberate device. Mike, again, responded first by stating, “You can’t take your problems to the airwaves. People have their own lives going on and when they turn on the radio, they want us to bring joy into their lives.” This made perfect sense to me, although so did Stephanie’s next remark as she clarified

her partner’s perspective by saying, “On the other hand, I think when we share personal things, it makes us [seem] more compassionate.” I thought that they were both on to something at this point – a real expression of the “yin and yang” that works so well for them both in their medium. Stephanie Confer, who was born in Ohio, moved to Michigan with her family when she was 10. At an early age, she gravitated toward drama and the theater, but it wasn’t until, as an adult and going through a divorce, that she seriously tried pursuing a career in acting…so that nearly 20 years ago, she even considered relocating to California after auditioning and receiving a callback for a role in a soap opera. At the time, Stephanie’s kids were 16 and 19, and she remembers her younger child saying, “Mom could make it, but I don’t want her to leave.” It was then that she decided to stay in Michigan and take a radio job instead…where her efforts have gone beyond merely her “disc jockey duties.” She recently won a Silver Medal at the American Advertising Federation for Contribution to the Community. Her partner Mike says about her and her award that “I think she should toot her own horn more about that. She does so much in [and for] the community.”


Mornings for Mike MacDonald are very much governed by routine. In fact, anyone can discern the importance of habit for him when he explains, “My prayers and meditation are very important to me. I won’t leave the house until I’ve had time for myself. I love the serenity of getting up at 2:30 in the morning. There’s not a soul moving.” And Stephanie’s opposite inclination shows just how different in some ways, and yet how complementary to each other they actually are when she reveals, “And I hit the snooze button until I have to leave. I feel like, if God wanted you to get up early, He would have turned the lights on.” Again, I encountered their professional “yin and yang” that seems to make their partnership work, both on the air and off. Radio life for Chicago native Mike MacDonald wraps up at the station around 10:30 a.m., at which point, he immediately jumps into his real estate mode for the business he has run with his wife for the past decade – Tremaine Real Living of Grand Blanc. But no matter what hat he’s wearing, he says he’s always thinking of his listeners. Mike says, “If I’m in the checkout line at Kroger

with my wife, I’m actually listening to what women are talking about while I’m waiting. I’m listening to hear what the current buzz is.” So it seems that other people are essential in determining the content of his radio show. And he definitely has a passion for his work – whatever it might be at a given time. He says, “When we go and talk to kids, we tell them all of the time, find that one thing you love to do, no matter what it is. Find that one thing, no matter what it pays.” He knows a bit about dedication, and he is living as the embodiment of his philosophy.

As the interview I was conducting was wrapping up, I thought it might be fun and revealing to give readers a final glimpse of Mike and Stephanie behind the scenes – or in this case, behind the voices -- by asking them about some of their “memorable moments in broadcasting” that are all in a day’s work. I began by inquiring about what each would say constituted his or her most embarrassing moment on the air. Mike said quickly, “I accidently swore once without knowing it,” while Stephanie recounted that “Just recently I was endorsing Johnsonville Breakfast Sausage, and I accidently said, ‘I love my Johnson.’ Gotta love the broadcast, huh?” And on a more serious note, when asked what they love best about working together, Mike answered, “Stephanie is not only a natural talent; she’s also very quick-witted and spontaneous.” His partner returned the compliment by

"Stephanie is not only a natural talent, she's also very quickwitted and spontaneous."

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ENTERTAINMENT

saying, “Mike is very caring and understanding! He doesn’t get mad that I am NOT a morning person by nature and get there late sometimes. I bring goodies to make up for it, though.” And then they both supplied answers as to what one song could be considered a favorite, with Mike explaining philosophically that his was “Clocks” by Coldplay “…because it reminds me of how quickly time passes, and why we should cherish every moment. It’s a great song to listen to late at night while you’re driving in your car.” Stephanie, on the other hand, shows her practical and edgy side in her choice of Donna Summer’s “She Works Hard for the Money,” saying, “I think people assume we just sit around and listen to music, but there is a lot going on off the air.” Finally, when asked to tell the weirdest thing that ever happened to either one of them as a morning show host, Mike stated that he “… wrestled a grizzly bear and almost got knocked out.” That was a stunning revelation that never brought forth from him any further explanation, but Stephanie’s example was more explicit and poignant. She said, “I was on the air during the 9-11 attacks, and I will never forget it. Stayed on the air all day with updates and then went out to collect for the families, and the community was amazing in their generosity and concern.” Many of us seem to remember where we were that day, but she was able to perform a service from her position. And, as most people know about that song that sticks inexplicably in their heads, I asked as a parting question if either one of the “dynamic duo” had one currently taking up residence in his or her mind. Never at a loss, Mike immediately said, “Margaritaville” by Jimmy Buffett, while Stephanie, true to form, told me, “Baby, I’m Worth It” by Fifth Harmony. It seems I learned a great deal about the duo, for they were very open and forthcoming for me as we talked…just as they are open and forthcoming on their morning show on the airwaves…proving that there’s a very good reason that they entertain such a great number of fans each and every day.

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FOOD & DRINK

MAY/JUNE >>>PUSHING A MENU FORWARD

BY SEAN GARTLAND // CULINARY DIRECTOR FLINT FARMER’S MARKET // FEAST COOKING SCHOOL

O

ur long wait for a break in the weather seems infused with a spirit of renewal and hope. Long nights and grey days turn into sunny afternoons and wistful musings on how to enjoy the fresh fruits and vegetables that are just around the bend. One can’t help but get excited at the thought of fresh asparagus and sweet hoop house greens that are plentiful this time of year. The abundant rhubarb is sure to fill pies and tarts for weeks to come, and tender English peas are appearing in every imaginable variation, from smooth soups to lightly sautéed with fresh mint. It's easy to get caught up in the emotion of a new season if you’re a foodie. You’ve spent the last few months sustaining yourself with root vegetables, braised meats, and possibly a hearty helping of

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pasta. Now it’s time to push your menu forward! Clean out the pantry and replace winter fare with light, flavorful ingredients. Soon, strawberries will be abundant and the season’s first green beans will arrive. Prepare your kitchen to make the most of the season’s offerings. Replace butter with seed and nut oils. Grapeseed oil is a great staple -- neutral in flavor and cholesterol-free with a high smoke point. You can cook with high heat for fast preparation of fresh vegetables and seafood. Rehab your spice cabinet. This is the perfect time of year to sort out old herbs and spices. These ingredients start losing flavor when they’re exposed to air. Most herbs and spices are only useful for a year. Think about turning to fresh herbs when you can and grinding spices as needed. Lighten up your cooking and focus on

lighter recipes like marinated and grilled meats. It’s the perfect opportunity to experiment with a variety of vinegars and assorted fruit juices to add flavor. Shop locally, cook globally. You haven’t lived until you’ve experienced a spicy curry, the perfect complement to the young potatoes that begin showing up in late spring. Ingredients like pomegranate molasses, fresh ginger, and Thai red curry are all available locally and can give your meal an exotic taste. Spring sets the stage for the vast variety of local fruits and vegetables that are available throughout the summer and fall in Michigan. You can look at it as a warmup to get you ready for a full summer season of cooking. Take advantage of the chance to move your menu forward and explore new flavors and ingredients to accompany the season’s fresh produce.


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BUSINESS

A Sign OF THE

Times:

DAN CRANNIE'S SIGN COMPANY IS HERE TO STAY

A

well-designed sign is more than just a label for the outside of your building, and does more than just let customers know your location. The right sign is part of your business' branding, and if done well, it reflects your community spirit and presents you as a success. Crannie Signs, Flint's most prominent sign company, does all that, and they've been doing it for 30 years and have no intention of stopping. When the company expanded to Florida back in 2008, some people thought they were leaving the Flint area, founder and president Dan Crannie explains. But the expansion was a result of him seeing there was a need for his services elsewhere too. “I would take my daughters down to Fort Myers for spring break, and talking to business owners down there, I realized there was a need,” he says. “So I started a small branch there, and moved some of my people down from Michigan, while keeping the main operations here.” Dan Crannie wants the community to know that, despite its national reach, Signs By Crannie is firmly planted here. “People don't realize we're still local,” he says. “Our roots are in Genesee County, and we do signs for many local tradespeople.” Crannie goes on to list DM Burr, Terry Allen Plumbing & Heating, Zellar & Sons Excavating, and other wellknown area business clients. “Some people have a perception that we don't deal with small customers,” he adds. “That's not the 20

case. We still cherish our relationships with our local customer base regardless of the size of their organization.” Crannie Signs are not limited to just Michigan and Florida. They make signs for businesses all over the U.S. and Canada, including a large shopping center in Virginia. Their website lists the comprehensive services they provide to all sizes and kinds of businesses, and it's pretty much every kind of sign imaginable—digital, LED, channel letters, pylon signs, high-rise signs, vehicle wraps, monument signs, archway signs, scoreboards, plaques, flagpoles, neon signs, community clocks, city maps, and custom signs. And they are involved in every step of the process, whether it's design, getting a permit, or construction. Furthermore, they serve a wide variety of industries—retail establishments, restaurants, churches, parks, medical offices, malls, schools, and more. Crannie Signs has done signs for Kettering University, Flushing Schools, Whaley Children's Center, UM-Flint, Halo Burger, McLaren Flint, Hurley Medical Center, Genesee Valley Center, Troy Cleaners, and AJ Johnson Construction, among others. Some clients are national chains, others local, but either way, they are treated with equal respect and professionalism. Dan Crannie's passion and devotion to his craft are evident in all areas of his life. He belongs to four mid-Michigan chambers of commerce, and is a member

// BY MEREDITH MCGHAN

of five professional associations. He was recently elected vice-president of the Midwest Sign Association, a trade association for the sign industry that encompasses Michigan, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, western Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. In keeping with his enthusiasm for bringing good things to the local community, he actively participates in charitable activities around Genesee County. In April he attended the open house for the new Ellie's Place at Holy Redeemer Catholic Church in Burton. Ellie's Place is a counseling service to help bereaved children cope with the loss of a loved one. Crannie is also involved with Whaley Children's Center and several other local charities. The company also supports the arts and culture scene around downtown Flint. Last year they volunteered to assist Detroit-based artist Paige Barnett, who used to live in Flint, with the Inside Out Project. This largescale photo installation consisted of photo portraits of 28 locally influential citizens whose faces graced the silo at Second Avenue downtown as part of the Flint Public Art Project's 2015 Free City Festival. As you can see, Signs By Crannie is still very much a part of the Genesee County community, and involved in supporting local businesses and the revitalization of Flint. They're located at 4145 Market Place off of West Bristol Road. Visit them online at www.signsbycrannie.com or call them at 810-487-0000. Their toll-free number is 800-973-0200.


SE R V I N G T H E COMMUN I T Y F OR MORE TH A N 30 Y E A RS


BUSINESS

This Golf Course has it “Covered!” BY MICHAEL G. THODOROFF

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endorsed Sto-Cote Products, Inc's GreenJacket® Cover System. With a patented process, and now successfully protecting over 22,000,000 square feet of turf worldwide, it made for a sound decision.

inter enthusiasts aside, snow, ice and cold temperatures pose many challenges to the area’s golf courses. In fact, three Michigan winters past saw the most severe conditions on record. Damages like Genesee County had never seen before hurt many area golf courses, particularly the greens. Phil Owen, Golf Course Superintendent at Warwick Hills Golf & Country Club for the past 25 years, and a Flint native, recalls the winter of 2013-4. “Our greens have 200,000 square feet of surface. Over half of that was damaged,” he remembers. Because of this, the play of golf was not up to Warwick Hills' impeccable standards, while a significant loss of revenue also occurred. The course has a mix of Poa Annua and Bentgrass on their greens. Poa Annua is more susceptible to winter damage than Bentgrass, and often sustains more damage from severe winters. The membership and board of directors decided to address the possibility of unrecoverable future damage. Phil said several options in several price ranges are available, but after much discussion, they decided on the most cost-effective approach-physically removing the snow. “We knew there was a risk, but we could not predict the outcome,” he says. “Unfortunately, the snow removal machines caused some damage.” Moving forward, there are two more options; to completely replace the grass or cover the entire greens’ surface. Since replacing

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The custom covers were ordered in August of last year and installed the first week in December. “It takes eight people over five days to complete the installation,” Phil says. With much anticipation, the covers were removed in early March and the initial reaction was extremely favorable. According to Owen, it was obvious the grass area was much greener under the covers, but he also recognizes the “help” of mild winter conditions.

“We are committed, and I can say with confidence, even in a severe winter, these covers will definitely reduce damage to the greens.”

the grass has a more than tenfold total price tag over covering all the greens, the active six-member Greens Committee recommended pursuing the green covers. Owen consulted with fellow golf course superintendents throughout the state and Canada. They primarily

“I am real excited to see the health of greens so early,” he says. “Now it looks like we have a jumpstart on the growing season.” He concedes it will take a couple more years to form a conclusion, but it looks positive. The covers are re-useable for a number of years, as handling is important. Of course, the severity of winter will effect results. “We are committed,” Phil affirms, “and I can say with confidence, even in a severe winter, these covers will definitely reduce damage to the greens.” Covering a golf course’s green during the winter season is not a new “tool,” but Phil Owen is constantly on the lookout for new golf course turf technology. “Currently, I don’t see any new groundbreaking winter damage prevention technology, but we are always on the lookout for anything that enhances the playability of our greens.”


FASHION

Summer Breeze 5 TIPS for an

EASY, BREEZY SUMMER

Finally.....yes, finally....the lazy, hazy days of summer are upon us. This is the time of year when we’re all ready for some warmer temperatures and longer days. We’re definitely over the snow and frigid weather, and ready to shed some layers and trade in our cozy knits for tank tops and our hot cocoa for iced coffee. Although the days of rolled-down car windows and late-night boat rides should have us embracing all that’s relaxed and chill, we could always use a few quick tips to make the upcoming season a breeze.

INVEST IN WHITE

TOP IT OFF

A quick tip to easy dressing this summer is as simple

Easy. That is the key word of summer. Keep it easy. When

as one pair of denim....white denim. Easy for casual

it comes to the heat of summer it always seems to invoke

dressing with sandals and flip flops to dressing up for

a love-hate relationship with our hair. So keep it simple.

wedges and flirty tops, white denim will take you where

One of the trendiest and easiest looks is the Top Knot. The

you need to go. Great styles to flatter any silhouette

style is easy, quick, and has a fashion forward look. Simply

await at Mainstream Boutique in Grand Blanc.

pull strands into a high ponytail, tie, and twist and secure

MAC and ME White Denim : Mainstream Boutique

hairpins into the coiled locks. Instant chic and instant cool!    Easy Top Knot: photo by Marie Claire

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LASH OUT We all know the scenario. Hot day, refreshing pool, quick dip and instant raccoon eyes. Although waterproof mascara does ward off the gothic look poolside, it isn’t always a win.  Before you spend another day in the sweltering heat channeling your inner Alice Cooper, why not make a permanent fix to the problem? Lash extensions are by far the best beauty breeze to come along in a very long time. Of course, one of the best in advanced beauty applications around, Pure Bliss Salon & Spa is offering the treatment just in time for summer. Applied to your natural lashes one by one, the initial procedure takes about 2 to 3 hours and the results are simply drool worthy! Call today for details and be foolproof in no time!

Lash Extensions by Sam at Pure Bliss Salon and Spa

“TOTE”ALLY AT EASE Summer dressing is all about the ease, so why carry the structured handbags of the stuffy cooler months? Consider going totally....or “tote”ally simple. A great tote bag with some style is just the bag you need to take you from beach to dinner. I’ve developed a love affair with the whimsical and functional looks from Draper James. A company started by Reese Witherspoon in honor of her southern roots, they carry fun and stylish totes and a great seasonal handbag replacement. Check out the entire line at www.draperjames.com. Draper James Peabody Straw Printed Tote

TIP TO TOE EASE Summer is all about color! The easiest way to be fun and bold is with nail color. Keep your manicure and pedicure fun and fresh throughout the season with a great use of color. Corals, blues, and purples always look great against tan, sun-kissed skin. Looking for a neutral with just a hint of shade? Stick to the soft pastels in pinks and taupes for that subtle softness.  Whatever you choose, be sure to take advantage of open toes and warm temps while they are here! Butter London Nail Color

Nothing quite compares to a Michigan summer! Long days and great nights await. Why spend a minute sweating the small stuff? A few easy tips can have you breezing through a fantastic and stylish summer!

Lisa Szukhent With a passion for fashion, Lisa created StyleEYE Midwest in 2011 to focus on the classic looks, styles and trends of the Midwest and beyond. Since then she has collaborated with retailers such as Tanger Outlets and Macy's for their local fashion events and shows throughout Michigan. She can also be seen as a guest fashion contributor on the NBC25 Morning Show, talking red carpet awards and seasonal style. 25


BUSINESS

School of Performing Arts. Besides all of these creative projects, he performs as a recitalist on both the harpsichord and organ. “I became interested in harpsichord and organ tuning and maintenance while I was at Oberlin College and I was looking for a student job,” he says. “Of course, there were the standard jobs working in the school’s cafeteria, but I was looking for something more interesting and found it in the Music Department. The department was looking for an organ and harpsichord student assistant and I was hired. I learned much about tuning and building instruments as well as learning about historical temperaments.”

The

Musician Several Hats

Who Wears

A

BY DENNIS E. FERRARA

s the old adage states, “Variety is the spice of life” and this statement certainly applies to Jeffrey Walker. As a creative and artistic individual, he is an organist-choirmaster and recitalist – as well as a piano, harpsichord, and organ technician. Walker holds degrees in Organ Performance form Oberlin College Conservatoire and Eastman School of Music. He is a past winner of the 26

prestigious American Guild of Organists National Competition. Currently, Walker is organist/choirmaster at St. Paul Episcopal Church in Lansing, after serving for ten years at Christ Church, Detroit, and eighteen years at First Presbyterian Church, Flint. He has played in the Flint Symphony Orchestra for 20 years and has also performed in the Ann Arbor, Saginaw Bay, Lansing, and Detroit Symphony Orchestras. He also accompanies the Opera Workshop Program at the Flint

The harpsichord was extremely popular throughout the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries. Various countries produced master builders of the instrument including Germany, France, Italy and Belgium. The harpsichord's strings are plucked by quills as opposed to the piano, where the strings are struck by small hammers. “I have built and rebuilt several harpsichords as well as performing on them,” Walker says. “The music of the baroque fits these instruments to a letter and creates fine textures in baroque music. I enjoy the inner workings of these wonderfully crafted keyboard instruments. They range from one keyboard to even three-keyboard instruments. A few models have been built with a pedalboard of 32 notes. These keyboards may range from 49 to 63 notes in the treble; however, the standard compass is 61 notes.” The pipe organ is one of the oldest instruments, tracing to the time of Roman


Emperor Nero who played on a crude prototype instrument with wind pressure and pipes. Throughout the centuries, the instrument has been installed in churches, concert halls, schools, colleges, funeral homes, mausoleums, cemeteries, theatres, and residences of the rich and famous. Older pipe organs had elaborate mechanisms which not only played the instruments by paper rolls but also selected stops and expression of the respective instrument.

“Being a concert organist and enjoying mechanical things, I became hooked on the inner workings of the organ..." The organ technician learns much about the art of piano and organ construction, history, and regulation of each instrument. Special tools are required and include hammers, cones, felt, and other instruments of the trade. “I became interested in organ maintenance through a then-local organist, Joy Schroeder, who had asked me to tune some reed pipes at Court Street United Methodist Church,” Walker says. “Being a concert organist and enjoying mechanical things, I became hooked on the inner workings of the organ including the action, pipe construction, wind pressures, pipe chests, and other complicated construction. I decided to read, study with hands-on experience, and become an organ technician.”

The piano has evolved from an early instrument of the late 18th century to a modern musical instrument marvel, which is still one of the most popular instruments in the recital and concert halls throughout the world. Recordings and performances with symphony orchestras attest to its popularity with audiences and with the record-buying public in general. “As an accompanist, I also wanted to learn more about the inner workings of the piano and so I took several classes and attended several workshops and became a piano technician. I still attend conferences and workshops as well as buying special tools of the trade. I enjoy working on the instrument. Some of the major piano builders include Steinway,

Mason and Hamlin, Yamaha, and Bosendorfer. In fact, this company builds special models with 92 and even 97 note keyboard compasses.” “In total, I enjoy not only performing on these instruments, but also enjoy the challenge in making each instrument, whether it’s a harpsichord, organ or piano, by helping it through maintenance, rebuilding, or tuning, to become once again a fine musical instrument for the enjoyment of the performer as well as for their respective audiences.”

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be seen Adopt-A-Pet Wags & Whiskers C AM P CO PNE CO NI C F E N TO N | FE BR UARY 20 Adopt-A-Pet of Fenton Hosted its annual event “Wags & Whiskers� at Camp Copneconic. Adopt-A-Pet is committed to helping people and animals in need. One which looks out for the physical AND mental well-being of animals. And their mission is to provide a means to place unwanted, adoptable animals into appropriate, loving homes. They are committed to reduce the amount of animals killed daily in overcrowded shelters by providing programs to help. All animals are fixed, vaccinated, tested and micro chipped prior to adoption. All potential adopters are screened to ensure an appropriate match is made. For more information and upcoming events please visit adoptapetfenton.com Left to right: Joe Consiglio, Sandy Leone-Consiglio | Richard & Wendy Savage | John & Dina Cunningham | Romeo & Kathy Trobaugh | Justin Brown, Delmer Childs | Frank Salvati, Dan Bullard | Ron & Christina Lemming | Kim Grey, Stephanie K, Denise McDowell | Barbara Kincaid | Sheila Bullard, Chris Vachon, Jane Bullard

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COMMUNITY

Let's Crim For

Flint

Crim Offers Scholarships to Flint Residents in Need for the First Time BY THERESA ROACH

T

his has been a year unlike any other. The water crisis has brought health and wellness to the forefront of conversation, making it the largest priority in the City of Flint. At the Crim Fitness Foundation, the health and vitality of Flint has always been in the forefront, and now it’s more important than ever. This year, for the first time ever, the HealthPlus Crim Festival of Races is taking the $40,000 prize purse normally

reserved for elite runners and creating scholarships for Flint residents who can’t afford the registration fees. “This year’s Crim is our city’s chance to rally and show the world that we’re stronger than this crisis. In the face of all the challenges that Flint has been dealing with, we know that the Crim Festival of Races will be Michigan’s greatest race and Flint’s finest hour,” said Race Director Andy Younger. “We envision a record number of Flint residents participating, sending the message to the world that Flint is full of vibrant people who aren’t afraid to take their health into their own hands. With that in mind, we don’t want cost to be a barrier for anyone.” The I Crim for Flint! scholarship program will offer free registration to the HealthPlus Crim Festival of Races for at least 2,000 Flint residents. All race registrants, including scholarship recipients, will have an opportunity to “Pay It Forward” by donating any dollar amount in addition to their race entry fee. All donations will go towards future scholarships and the Crim’s yearround efforts to create a healthier Flint and Genesee County through nutrition, physical activity and mindfulness programs and advocacy efforts.

30


This scholarship program will give people an opportunity to not just celebrate the Crim, but to feel good about being a Flint resident. It will also show the many racers who come from out of town just what a welcoming and resilient community Flint is. While the Crim is just one day out of the year, the event serves as a celebration and demonstration of how individuals can take control of their own health and wellbeing. At the Crim Fitness Foundation, creating a healthier community means working together to combat the issues that families face each day through nutrition, physical activity and mindfulness

programs, events and advocacy efforts. This year’s Festival of Races will be an opportunity to shine a bright light on the unwavering determination of residents, activists and organizations working to create a healthier Flint and on the goodwill of individuals who are stepping up to help Flint residents affected by the water crisis, said Younger. “This is our way of letting everyone know that we are all in when it comes to the health of the Flint community today and for years to come. It’s an investment in helping people in Flint have fun, feel strong and have the opportunity to celebrate our health and vitality.”

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be seen 35th Hurley Benefit Ball RIVERFRONT BANQUET CENTER DOWNTOWN FLINT | MARCH 5 Hurley Medical Center's 35th Annual Benefit Ball on March 5th celebrated its Emerald Anniversary with a Wizard of Oz theme complete with a poppy field, angry apple orchard and even the Emerald City! The program included amazing clinical ambassador stories from clinicians who received their vital medical education and expertise at Hurley. Proceeds from the event benefit a new Hurley Medical Education Center. The 6,800-square-foot will integrate medical education for Hurley doctors, residents, nurses and staff, as well as allied health occupations and providers in the community who rely on Hurley for training and experience. It will feature upgraded technology to meet the demands of the 21st Centrury and will be wi-fi compatible, offering the most modern audio-visual and other technical equipment. A nice mix of doctors, hospital staff, business and community leaders attended. Guests followed the Yellow Brick Road through the land of Oz, where they dined and danced in the Emerald City. The Youth Theatre performed songs from Wizard of Oz. The attendance this year was outstanding!

Left to right: Andrew & Melany Gavulic | Drs. Apparao Mukkamala, Nita Kulkarni, Bobby Mukkamala | Richard & Corinne Warmbold | Chris & Keisha Gates | Janelle & John Stewart | Steffany & Paul Hillis | Laura & Tucker Jasso | Michelle Blaisdell, Mark Williams, Aaron Hamp | Mrs. Jacquinne & Dr. Lawrence Reynolds | Joseph Jacobson, Dr. Mona HannaAttisha, Elliott Attisha

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EXPERTS IN GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY

#THISishurley

Hurley Medical Center is proud to offer more Gynecological Oncology diagnostic options, new advanced surgeries and management options, all with compassion and care.

Nabila Rasool, MD Board Certified Surgeon, affiliated with Henry Ford Health System

Gynecologic Oncology For an appointment, call 810.262.9751


MEDICAL

Maureen Blewett, CCRC, Barbara Lewis, BS, CRCC, Linda Reynolds Research Assistant

MVC Research… SEEKING TREATMENTS FOR YOUR BETTER VASCULAR HEALTH

W

hen we think of problems facing society, in particular health care issues, there is a tendency to think… “Certainly someone out there is working on a solution or a cure.” While that is not always the case, the good news is that right here in Flint, a group of vascular surgeons and their research team are working to resolve a number of vascular issues. They are working alongside other researchers across the country, the FDA, and other major universities to advance scientific knowledge. From medical devices, to medications, to non-embryonic stem cell work and beyond, advancement requires a dedicated and concerted effort. Since 1999, Michigan Vascular Center (MVC) has been involved in over 65 clinical trials, including eight that are currently underway.

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It’s been said, “You never know what a vascular surgeon really does, until you need one.” Vascular surgeons are experts in diagnosing, managing and treating all forms of vascular disease. This includes medical management, minimally invasive endovascular interventions and, when needed, surgical repair. No other specialty offers a fully comprehensive approach to vascular care and MVC has provided a dedicated vascular care team for over fifty years. An additional goal of MVC is to bring the latest advancements in vascular care to the community, opportunities that are not available except from vascular centers of excellence. To further achieve this goal, MVC has a very engaged research center which offers patients investigational procedures and use of investigational devices not available elsewhere. Here are a few of MVC’s current research efforts:

CREST-2 MVC is participating in the NIHsponsored CREST-2 trial.  This study compares three different methods of stroke prevention to find the safest and most effective treatment.  The options are:  1) intensive medical management alone, 2) intensive medical management in combination with carotid endarterectomy, and 3) intensive medical management in combination with carotid stenting.  All participants will receive intensive medical management to help control their risk factors for stroke. ROADSTER 2 MVC surgeons have adopted a new procedure called TransCarotid Artery Revascularization (or TCAR) to treat patients with carotid artery disease in a less invasive, more patient-friendly approach than traditional open surgery. On March 7, 2016 they performed the


first TCAR procedure in Michigan as part of the Roadster 2 trial, and are the only group of physicians in the state of Michigan to offer this innovative, less invasive procedure as part of the trial. “Like carotid endarterectomy, the TCAR procedure involves direct access to the common carotid artery, but through a much smaller incision above the collarbone creating just enough room to place a sheath into the artery and deliver a stent,” states Dr. Robert Molnar, vascular surgeon. This novel transcarotid access path is designed to allow for use of local anesthesia, minimize the rate and severity of nerve injury, minimize scarring of the skin, avoid potential stroke complications seen from the femoral arterial approach, and speed the recovery process for an overall more patient-friendly procedure. The MVC surgeons can now provide the best approach for treating patients with carotid disease based on their individual anatomy and extent of disease. LUTONIX-AV This is an investigational study that evaluates the treatment of dialysis access vessel stenosis, or blockage, comparing a standard angioplasty balloon to an investigational drug-coated angioplasty balloon. When vessels become narrowed, one treatment option is to pass a standard angioplasty balloon to the narrowed space, inflating the balloon which opens the passageway to increase blood flow. This method works, but the ballooned area frequently re-narrows due to scar tissue formation (neo-intimal hyperplasia) again over time. The investigational Lutonix AV drug-coated balloon, when inflated, transfers drug from the balloon surface to the vessel wall. The drug (paclitaxel) has been shown in previous trials for other indications to decrease the rate of re-stenosis, decreasing the number of re-interventions. MIMICS-2 This is a study to evaluate an investigational stent used to treat blockages in the femoral artery in the leg. The stent features a unique 3D geometric curvature that closely mimics the natural helical geometry of the human vascular system. The stent is designed to promote swirling blood flow through the stented segment, which preclinical data have shown to significantly reduce re-blockage in the artery. The nationally recognized surgeons at Michigan Vascular Center are always seeking treatments for your better vascular health. Once again, Michigan Vascular Center shines a positive light on Flint.

Local Knowledge Take advantage of guidance from a financial services leader, right here in Flint. • One-on-one guidance focused on your goals, not ours • Investment strategies and ideas to help you realize your personal vision • Access to retirement expertise through investment professionals and top-rated planning tools

Come in or give us a call today. Flint Investor Center 2425 South Linden Road Suites B & E 800.222.5765 Keep in mind that investing involves risk. The value of your investment will fluctuate over time, and you may gain or lose money. Guidance provided is educational. Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC, Member NYSE, SIPC. © 2016 FMR LLC. All rights reserved. 724050.3.0

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2/2/16 10:42 AM

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BUSINESS

From Excavators to Industrial Warehouses Agent Spotlight: Dave Lucas from Peabody Insurance Agency BY CHELSEA MILLS

MEET DAVE LUCAS

P

eabody Insurance Agency has a pretty awesome group of agents and team members. They wanted to take the time to spotlight one of their workers compensation specialists who has saved his clients thousands of dollars each year. He’s done this by correcting errors found in workers compensation audits, experience modification factors and premium calculations in every type of business, ranging from excavators to industrial warehouses. Did you know approximately 25-50% of business owners who carry a workers compensation policy are now or have been in the past overcharged by an insurance company? Most business insurance clients have no idea that there are errors in their premium calculations. Lucas will review your current and past policies, looking for the errors that will return premium to your business. You can count on him to discover these errors and deliver refund premium due to overcharges back to your bottom line. “Helping customers is the most fulfilling component of what I do. After the initial visit, where I discover what they have, what their concerns are, and what they are trying to accomplish, we

36

can come in. One of the biggest benefits we have is knowing the risks they may be facing and what solutions are available. This will allow them to make the best business decisions for them and their employees,” Lucas says.

OSHA Outreach Certification. He began his insurance career with the SmithPeabody-Stiles Agency in 1995 and later served as Vice President of Brown & Brown of Michigan for three years before opening Lucas Insurance.

After spending five years with the elite US Navy Seabees, Lucas learned how important meticulous planning and clear expectations are-- not just for the Navy, but also for business owners.

Peabody Insurance Agency recognizes that the world of insurance is ever changing and complex. That is why they provide their clients with ways to simplify the insurance process in order to continuously meet their clients’ needs and interests.

“Customers should scrutinize the qualifications and experience of the agent and agency,” Lucas says. “I believe experience is extremely important, and that is what sets Peabody Insurance apart from other agencies. It’s not only my goal to find the best price and coverage for my customers, but to help them understand what they're purchasing and why it’s important.” Dave Lucas is a local workers compensation specialist. His services include consulting, insurance and risk management. You can count on him to discover the errors in your current policies and help provide your business the tools necessary to make an informed buying decision. “To me, insurance is a personal commitment to help others. My job is to spend time looking for ways to reduce or return premium to your business.” Dave is a Certified Workers Compensation Advisor, Certified Insurance Counselor and has earned his

“We are a full-service agency and our value proposition is to assist our customers in lowering their total cost of risk. We look at our clients and prospective client’s unique needs and goals and put together a comprehensive insurance program tailored specifically for you.” states Jim Peabody, owner of Peabody Insurance Agency. “We are proud to have Dave on our team, with his expertise, to help reduce the risk and the overall cost of insurance to our customers.” “Contact us today for a review of your policy, you might be surprised at what we can do for your bottom line!” - Dave Lucas

PEABODY INSURANCE AGENCY 265 North Alloy, Suite #100 Fenton, Michigan www.peabodyinc.com | (810) 629-1504


FIRST... and FOREMOST

Carlo A. Dall’Olmo, M.D.

Allan L. Ippolito, M.D.

Wayne K. Kinning, M.D.

Gregory J. Fortin, M.D.

Scott A. Garner, M.D.

Robert G. Molnar, M.D.

Nitin G. Malhotra, M.D.

Learn Why So Many Doctors Trust Us for Their Patients’ Vascular Care

50

th

Anniversary

Cherie R. Phillips, M.D.

Mark A. Mattos, M.D.

Christopher J. Goltz, M.D.

1963-2013

Patricia A. Perrine, N.P.

Joseph M. Jacot, P.A.

Sara Belopavlovich, N.P.

Jeff Eschenburg, C.P.

Karen Driskill, N.P.

Saginaw Campus

2013

Lapeer Campus

2015

MichiganVascular.com of Bristol & Linden - Flint 810-732-1620 Corner


be seen The State Bank 10-Year Anniversary GR AND BLANC | M AR CH 3 The State Bank, a locally-owned community bank headquartered in Fenton, MI, celebrated its 10-year anniversary of the Hill Road office in Grand Blanc. “Since 1898, The State Bank has remained strong throughout the many changes in the economic climate,” said Ron Justice, President and CEO of The State Bank. “I attribute our success in Grand Blanc to those residents and business owners who see value in a locally-owned financial institution and to our staff who remain committed to serving the area with outstanding products and service.” www.thestatebank.com

Left to right: Ron Justice, Richard Hinterman | Douglas Fairbanks, Stacey Webb | Jet Kilmer, Lisa Wood, Kae Eidson | Brooke Jansen | Kristy Schaffer, John DiGaetano | Lynette Bradley, Jill White | Randy Hicks | Craig Johnson, Kristy Cantleberry | Steve Krause, David Scott | Jodie Burton, Shelby Sanborn, Alison Tessner

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40

MEDICAL


Hurley Pediatrician's Message of

Hope

// BY MEREDITH MCGHAN Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha continues her advocacy for Flint's children with local public health initiative

D

r. Mona HannaAttisha has become a beloved and familiar name and face in Flint. The director of the Pediatric Residency Program at Hurley Children’s Hospital, and assistant professor of pediatrics at Michigan State University’s (MSU) College of Human Medicine, Dr. Mona was galvanized into action last Fall when she heard through the grapevine that Flint’s water system had no corrosion control in place to stop lead from leaching out of the pipes. Alarmed, the doctor compared the number of children with lead in their blood after the switch to Flint River water to the number from before the switch. Hurley routinely tests the blood of babies, so the data was already there. It just had to be examined.

and has testified at a recent Congressional Hearing on the Flint Water Crisis. On Thursday, March 3, Hanna-Attisha spoke about the crisis and the positive steps being taken to mitigate damage to a group of about 35 people at the Sloan*Longway Planetarium.

Hanna-Attisha was first to sound the alarm bells about lead in Flint’s water. Now, six months later, she has the status of a local hero. As of this writing, she is in the running to be one of Time Magazine's 100 most influential people,

A September press conference featuring Hanna-Attisha’s blood analysis was the catalyst for switching back to Detroit’s water from the more corrosive Flint River water in October. Partnering with Michigan State University,

In “Lead Impacts Families: A Community Conversation,” HannaAttisha gave an overview of the timeline of the water crisis, talked about the effects of lead on the human body, and presented research findings to back up the steps that are being taken to restore hope to the community. The doctor’s love for Flint is obvious. “We put the world on wheels, and we’re the birthplace of unions and the middle class,” she told the audience. “Our children are facing a lot of obstacles, but we’re going to change that.”

Hurley has created the Pediatric Public Health Initiative, which HannaAttisha is leading. The team is made up of pediatricians, child development specialists, psychologists, epidemiologists, nutrition specialists, educators, and more. The Genesee County Health Department, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, and Michigan State’s extension program are part of the initiative. Hanna-Attisha said the plan is to reinvest in the community, continue research, keep testing newborns, and follow the progress of lead-affected children for 20 years. “We can’t just sit back and do research,” she says. “We have to be proactive in intervening.” The initiative is taking a multifaceted approach. Hanna-Attisha said they would be providing mentally stimulating activities for the children, supporting the parents to help them help their kids, and establishing a Head Start program to give them access to early education. The Flint Community Schools have hired nine more school nurses, too, because at the time the crisis broke there was only one. 41


MEDICAL

“Today it was in the news that the federal government expanded Medicaid up through age 21 for Flint,” Hanna-Attisha said. This will enable children affected today to be cared for through early adulthood. Also, Genesee County is implementing CHAP, the Children’s Healthcare Access Program, to help children covered by Medicaid. Pediatricians refer families to the

program, which seeks to improve health outcomes for low-income children. Other resources include the Empower Flint App, which can be downloaded to show people where to pick up water, and the Flint Child Health and Development Fund, of which Hanna-Attisha was the founding donor. Though damage to the pipes remains and residents are still drinking filtered

and bottled water, Hanna-Attisha says the crisis “provides a unique opportunity to be proactive and build a model public health program to buffer the impact.” She says she believes Flint can emerge from this crisis stronger than before, and become a leader to other communities struggling with public health crises. She embodies the spirit of hope that enables healing and moving forward after disaster, and that is what Flint needs most right now.

Q&A

DR. MONA HANNA-ATTISHA

onthetown was fortunate to speak with Dr. Hanna-Attisha after her speech for a brief Q & A. The doctor's heart for Flint was evident in our conversation.

Q: You mentioned during the talk that you were born in Sheffield, UK. What brought you to Flint? A: I was in Flint about 20 years ago as an MSU medical student for clinical training. After that, I was in Detroit for residency and taught at Wayne State for nine years, and I returned to Flint in 2011. Q: What is your favorite thing about this community? A: Flint is a small 'big city.” Everyone who cares about Flint is proactive and makes things happen. It's harder to move forward in a really big city like Detroit because it gets chaotic. Flint is more organized, as well as creative and hopeful. I also love Hurley, because it is one of the few public hospitals left. Only two percent of the nation's hospitals are public, and it's a nonprofit. I teach the Michigan State students and direct the MSU pediatric residency at Hurley, and I love it.

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Q: If all goes as planned with the Pediatric Public Health Initiative, what kind of outcomes do you expect to see in 20 years? Can kids affected by lead make a full recovery? A: Yes. Our goal is to not see any consequences of lead poisoning. To see the kids receive a great education, and not see an increase in crime, which can be a consequence of cognitive impairment from lead poisoning. We want to convey a message of hope because parents have heard such scary stories about brain damage. Q: What kind of outcomes might there be on the children born of parents exposed to lead, or the future children of the kids exposed, since lead can change DNA? A: We hope to be vigilant. We will track development and kids will have doctor visits so we can identify issues early.

Though it's hard to predict, we're trying to limit the consequences. Q: Of all the solutions, what is the most effective thing so far? A: Switching back to Detroit water was the most important thing to do damage control, and drinking bottled and purified water. Q: So our readership knows how to help, what solutions have yet to be implemented because you are still seeking funding? A: We need better nutrition programs, a universal preschool, literacy programs, behavioral health, and more. We started http://www.flintkids.org through the Community Foundation of Greater Flint so people can donate to the Flint Child Health and Development Fund. Our goal is $100 million. We now have four percent of that – which is awesome. But we do have a long way to go.


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be seen American Advertising Awards Evening of Excellence NO R TH BANK CE NTE R DO WNT OW N FLI NT | FE BR UARY 19 The American Advertising Federation of Greater Flint (AAF) presented the American Advertising Awards (formally known as the ADDYs) recognizing advertising excellence in midMichigan. This year the AAF of Greater Flint inducted Hank Graff and the Skaff family into their Hall of Fame. The “Evening of Excellence” was held at the Northbank Center Grand Ballroom in Downtown Flint. The mission of AAF of Greater Flint is “to promote professional interaction and growth, integrity, and creativity, while supporting a vital advertising and marketing community in/around Genesee County, Michigan.” Left to right: Julietta Chevalier, Stephanie K., Debbe Campbell | Patricia Uhde, Paul & Steffany Hillis | Tom Reynolds, David & Suzanne Smith | Dick Skaff, Hank Graff | Pat & AJ Cars 108 | Suzanne Fabick, Brian Bohnett | Karl Olmsted, Zoe Burdine-Fly | Karin & Mike Burnett, Laura Jasso | Chris McDonald, Ellen Peter | Jen & Doug Pike, Rebecca Jensen

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CAR CULTURE

Sometimes It’s More Fun to Drop Your Top BY L.J. LOBSINGER, JR.

W

ho doesn’t love a long summer ride in a drop-dead gorgeous convertible? Well, turns out many women find the whole “messy hair” thing to be quite a challenge. Those damaging wind gusts can cause your hair to tangle, dry out, and break off. Our advice--bun it, pony up, or embrace your inner Elizabeth Taylor and go for the Burberry checkerprint silk scarf. Either way, Buick has just released their new Cascada; a stylish and sporty convertible Buick hopes will bring new buyers to the brand. And you’re going to want one as you head north for your summer weekends. The Cascada is powered by an efficient

46

1.6-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine putting out 200 horsepower and 221 lbsft of torque. The power runs through a smooth six-speed transmission and gets to 60 mph in 8.4 seconds. This new Buick features a sport-lowered chassis, StabiliTrak technology, 20-inch wheels and a fabric soft top that can retract in just 17 seconds at speeds of up to 31 mph. The Buick engineers did a commendable job of tuning the Cascada’s HiPer Strut suspension, as the car still feels sporty yet rides comfortably. A critical distinction given Buick customers’ preferences. But is the Cascada really designed for the typical Buick buyer? In short, no. The Cascada is more of a rare type of marketing campaign: The car AS marketing. You’ll undoubtedly see television and print ads for the Cascada, but the car itself is an advertisement for Buick. An inordinate number of Buick’s 223,055 U.S. sales last year were right here in the Midwest. Get too far outside of that comfort zone and sales slow to a trickle. It won’t surprise you to know that none of the largest convertible markets in the U.S. are in the Midwest. So, as much as the Cascada exists to bolster Buick’s sales numbers, the brand’s marketers

don’t expect all of the additional sales to be Cascadas. They remain excited about the number of new buyers they hope will come into the showroom to see the convertible and then drive home in a new Regal or Enclave. Buick will offer two choices of the new Cascada: Base and Premium. Starting at $33,990, the base model comes with a ton of goodies such as heated power front seats, heated steering wheel, navigation, dual-zone climate control, HID headlights, and LED taillights. The $36,990 Premium adds forward-collision alert, lane-departure warning, automatic wipers, and several new wheel choices. We like to think of the base model as a new pair of Jimmy Choos at the Michael Kors price point. Mid-Michigan has a strong affinity for the Buick brand and although it’s unlikely you’ll see a lot of Cascadas cruising through Grand Blanc, Fenton, and Davison, when you do see one, you’ll give it a second and third look, just like you did 25 years ago with Buick’s last convertible, the iconic Buick Reatta. So as you head north in your new Buick Cascada, just remember, “messy hair, don’t care,” might not be so good for you, and yes, we think Buick should team up with Burberry on a line of scarves. One last tip from Wall Street Journal fashion reporter Teri Agins: “You can always turn your new Burberry square scarf into a “babushka” by folding it into a triangle and crossing or tying the ends under your chin. But be careful, if it hangs too low, the look will be borderline hausfrau.”

Lou Lobsinger is the OEM/Aftermarket Accessories & Lifestyle Manager for the Al Serra Auto Plaza. He is a graduate of Bondurant Racing & Driving School in Phoenix and the is a regular automotive correspondent for NBC25 Today. Lou's work has also appeared in Car & Driver, GQ, Performance Business, and Restyling magazines.


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BUSINESS

More Than a Golf Course A PILLAR IN OUR COMMUNITY FOR 60 YEARS! BY MICHAEL G. THODOROFF

W

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hile Warwick Hills Golf & Country Club is synonymous with professional golf via past Buick Open tournaments, they are still a prominent pillar in our community – and proud of it! The public may not be aware that the Buick Open golf tournament raised millions of dollars for local charities, not to mention the benefits to the local economy. Doug Brody, Head Golf Professional, says the club has always been an integral part of the community and will continue to be.

so let’s take a look at some of the more popular dockets.

“While the Buick Open is a part of our legacy here, being a part of the community is very important too,” he affirms. While he is optimistic for the club to again host a future professional golf tournament, he remains focused on the operation of the course and pro shop while maintaining Warwick’s heritage of community involvement. To list all of the events and programs at Warwick Hills would likely fill pages of this magazine,

Since its inception in 1939, the Flint Junior Golf Association  has provided an opportunity for young golfers ages 8-18 from Genesee County to learn, play and enjoy a game of golf while setting high standards to preserve the integrity and traditions of the game. Brody mentions it is common to see 130 youngsters participate in this program. The PGA Junior League Golf is a fun, social and inclusive opportunity for

Warwick Hills is the longtime home golf course for the boys’ and girls’ Grand Blanc High School golf teams, hosting many high-school team competitions while accumulating several individual and team championships. With the help of his golf professional assistants Joel Hoffman, Chris Caslmon and Tim Child, Brody continues to involve the golf course in many youth-oriented programs, such as the Flint Junior Golf Association, the PGA Junior League and the First Tee program.

boys and girls 13 and under to learn and enjoy golf from PGA and LPGA professionals, where the participants wear numbered jerseys and play on teams. Chris Caslmon is a certified instructor for Mid-Michigan’s First Tee program which places focus on bringing golf to primarily inner-city children in elementary through high school, conducting year-round afterschool programs reinforcing values like integrity, respect and perseverance through the game of golf. Since 1997, this very successful national program has seen 10.5 million youngsters enjoy and play the game of golf who may not otherwise have had an opportunity to do so. The club will host many charitable public golf outings throughout the season, benefiting venerable local organizations such as Genesys Health System, McLaren Hospital and the Whaley Children’s Center, along with events like the King Par Classic and Smiles For Sophie outing


where proceeds go to the Flint Junior Golf Association and to those families burdened by pediatric brain tumors respectively. Brody consistently encourages getting the members’ families involved in the club, and mentions ladies’ golf is big part of that movement. They conduct a “Get Golf Ready” class with a focus on bringing the game to newcomers but not limited to ladies. It is a five-week clinic series beginning in late April and is taught by Brody’s spouse Jenn. She is a staff teaching professional, former professional golfer and four-time winner on the ladies’ Futures Tour. She has also competed one year in the LPGA tour! In addition to their club’s golf-related responsibilities, they both oversee the operations of Warwick Hills’ Pro Shop, and with Jenn as lead merchandiser, won the state of Michigan’s 2014 “Merchandiser of the Year” award. “We continue to push ourselves,” Brody emphasizes, “to provide opportunities to the men, women, children and couples through member activities. And just as instruction is of importance to us, we hold our caddie program in high regard too.” Brody points out Warwick Hills has developed a strong caddie program with a core of about 80 young people. Eight of their former caddies earned full-

ride college scholarships thanks to the nationally recognized Evans Scholarship for caddies. Just as the golf is synonymous with Warwick Hills, their membership options cannot be defined by just one description, as it is an opportunity to build lifelong relationships. A warm and welcoming atmosphere awaits you, with casual and fine dining facilities, featuring the gourmet tastes of Executive Chef Shawn Sprecksell. The clubhouse, private dining rooms, and ballroom are well suited for all types of functions, both formal and more relaxed. With an emphasis on family activities, their once-a-week Family Night features themed nights with dinner specials catered to the whole family. Membership choices embrace access to all of the club’s dining facilities and amenities including all social events and activities. A six-lane heated pool, complete with a three-foot shallow end and a 10-foot diving area, highlight their newly renovated cabana facilities which provide a covered area for poolside/patio dining. Warwick Hills’ four Hydro-Clay championship caliber tennis courts offer members the ultimate tennis playing experience on the best courts in Genesee County. Nick Logan, a certified USPTA professional, has served as their Director of Tennis since 1977.

Warwick Hills Golf & Country Club is much more than world-class golf - its membership opportunities provide a variety of features to "Experience the Tradition" that is Warwick Hills. For more information about Warwick Hills Golf & Country Club and membership benefits, visit http:// www.warwickhills.org/ or call Jeanna Paulsen at 810-694-4103; via email at jeannapaulsen@warwickhills.org

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COMMUNITY

Community Foundation of Greater Flint: Our Response to the Flint Water Crisis

I

BY ANN MARIE VAN DUYNE // VICE PRESIDENT PHILANTHROPIC SERVICES COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF GREATER FLINT

nherent in the work of the Community Foundation of Greater Flint is community leadership – using our knowledge, expertise, relationships, reputation and dollars to affect positive community change. The Flint Water Crisis has called us to action. In January, a group of leaders gathered to activate a philanthropic response focused on the longterm issues Flint children will face for decades. Within a few days, the Flint Child Health & Development Fund was established with the intent of raising significant resources to ensure a positive and hopeful narrative for the future of Flint’s children. Since then we’ve worked with several donors to establish funds in response to the water crisis. Here’s a snapshot.

FLINT CHILD HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT FUND

The Flint Child Health and Development Fund was established by Mona Hanna-Attisha, M.D., FAAP, of Hurley Medical Center and Michigan State University. Over 14,000 donors have contributed over $6 million to the fund that serves the long term health and development needs of Flint children exposed to lead. An advisory committee has been appointed and is responsible for the grantmaking decisions of the fund. Lawrence A. Reynolds, M.D., FAAP, President and CEO of Mott Children’s Health Center, serves as chair. Other members include Dr. Hanna-Attisha, Kenyetta Dotson, James W. “Jamie” Gaskin, Wanda Harden, Diana Kelly, Kirk D. Smith, and George Wilkinson. To apply for a grant, visit www.cfgf.org. FLINT WATERWORKS FUND

On March 5, this fund was established

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to support Mayor Weaver’s Flint WaterWorks Initiative. The purpose of the initiative is to provide jobs and career pathway training for Flint youth while ensuring delivery of clean and safe water, healthy food, and installation of safe water infrastructure, or other safe water and health interventions for households in Flint experiencing barriers to access. SAFE WATER SAFE HOMES FUND

Genesee County native Brandon Carr, cornerback for the Dallas Cowboys, established the Safe Water Safe Homes Fund. This Fund provides emergency relief for households with damaged plumbing and service lines as a result of the water crisis. Grants from this fund align with the homeowner selection process in phase one of the City of Flint's Fast Start Lead Line Replacement Program. CARR CARES FUND FOR FLINT

Brandon Carr also established this donor-advised fund to support efforts to mitigate lead exposure to Flint children and families. He is encouraging his fellow NFL players to contribute to the Fund. THE LINKS, INC. FLINT AREA (MI) CHAPTER FLINT KIDS MATTER FUND

Members of the Links, Inc. Flint Area (MI) Chapter established a donor-advised fund to support critical public health, medical, and community-based services for Flint’s children exposed to lead. Local members are encouraging gifts to this fund from their national membership. MOVING FLINT FORWARD FUND

The Moving Flint Forward Fund was established to support the Genesee Chamber Foundation, the charitable supporting organization of the Flint & Genesee Chamber of Commerce. The purpose of this fund is to address immediate and longterm community and economic development needs arising out of, or amplified by, the Flint Water Crisis. To apply for a grant, contact the Genesee Chamber Foundation.            We are grateful for the generosity that has poured out in support for Flint. We have been uplifted, inspired and touched by thousands of people we will never meet or adequately be able to thank. They have become part of our “for good, forever” in Flint. We welcome gifts to any of these funds at www.fundsforflint.org.


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COMMUNITY

Flint’s YWCA:

A Phoenix rising up from the ash

T

BY TARA MORENO

he YWCA Safehouse for sexually and domestically abused women and children is moving to downtown Flint’s Phoenix Building on South Saginaw Street. When conveying to CEO Heidi McAra that the story would center around the idea of a phoenix rising from the ashes, she said they had been thinking the same thing ever since they had confirmation seven months ago that they would be moving into the building. McAra says the move was not an easy decision, but it was needed. A lot of difficult but necessary choices were made to keep the YWCA operating, and the move was part of a sustainability effort. “Our former home was great and served us for a great many years, but this is an effort for us to align our resources more closely with our mission,” McAra says. “This building is smaller but it is a rightsizing effort with room to grow.” McAra took over as CEO last year, after the YWCA went through a shaky period when the former CEO resigned. After talk about the YWCA possibly closing its doors, McAra, a lawyer and successful entrepreneur, has taken the YWCA to new heights.

YWCA board member Marissa Pierce and Ann Kita, Counseling and Services Coordinator

to do the renovations. The focus was to make an effort to reuse and repurpose all the gifts the YWCA has been given in the past, says McAra.

White says she and McAra toured many buildings across the county, and settled on the Phoenix Building as the new location for the YWCA because the space is extremely "A WHOLE NEW STAGE OF LIFE functional, allowing staff to be FOR THE ORGANIZATION." divided by departments and the Safehouse to be divided into sleeping rooms and communal rooms that The Phoenix Building has been are more functional and comfortable for transformed into a more efficient space the clients. The transformed 3,000-squarethan the former location. She calls the foot fourth floor has nine rooms for 32 move “a whole new stage of life for the women and children, with separate spaces organization.” Once the building was for women who don’t have children. The secured, McAra and her team hired local areas include a communal kitchen, dining architect Shannon White of FUNarchiture 52

space, teen hideaway, family gathering space, women’s lounge, group sharing space, and two private sharing spaces. In one of the hallways a chandelier made of the old YWCA's locker keys hangs from the ceiling, along with a sign the says “Namaste,” which was repurposed from old signage letters. On March 19, supporters gathered at the Phoenix Building for the “Constructing Hope: Tomorrow’s YWCA” event, which introduced the space to the public with food, desserts and music, and an opportunity to donate and sponsor a room or one of the communal spaces. The event welcomed well over 100 people. The final move for the YWCA is scheduled for July 2016. To donate or volunteer, visit www.ywcaflint.org or call 810-238-SAFE.


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CULTURE

Cool City Art Auction

Helps Flint’s Downtown Culture Thrive BY LYNN PENNING

T

his year’s Cool City Art Auction took place March 18, and successfully generated proceeds to help maintain the area’s arts culture in the year to come. Cool City, an annual fundraising event that supports the arts in Flint, is in its 13th year. Three venues-the Greater Flint Arts Council, Buckham Gallery, and the Lunch Studio--attracted art enthusiasts and buyers from Flint, Genesee County, and beyond. Filled with art donated by local artists and collectors, each venue offered a

wide assortment of interesting and appealing work. With an extensive variety showcasing multiple types and styles of artwork, ranging in size from very small items to works large in scale, the auction offered something for everyone’s taste, preferences, and budget. Many happy buyers left with more than one piece of art. “This is always our biggest fundraiser,” says Meghan Kelly, manager and director of Buckham Gallery. Besides great art, a spread of hors d’oeuvres and drinks at all three venues helped draw a large and enthusiastic crowd. As attendees

moved throughout the venues viewing and bidding on art, music played at each location, adding to the ambiance and success of the event. Silent auctions with designated bidding times at each venue kept the gathering moving, with many people choosing to visit each venue more than once. During the final minutes of the auction, bidding escalated with folks vying for their favorite pieces. Bids started at approximately half the value of the artwork, and patrons had the option of making an immediate purchase with a “buy it now” price or participating in the competitive bidding process. All in all, the community seemed to appreciate the opportunity to buy original art at affordable prices. Contributing to Cool City’s success, the generous donations of area artists made the event possible. According to Buckham’s Meghan Kelly, “The talent and generosity of the artist members who donated art work is really what made the auction a success for Buckham. People were able to purchase one-of-a-kind artwork for great prices.” She adds, “With Buckham being a small nonprofit in Flint, all of it

54


helps our organization stay alive, and we can keep showcasing amazing artists and building a positive atmosphere for Flint.” Many area artists view the auction not only as an opportunity to share their work, but also as a way to lend support to Flint’s arts culture, a vital part of the community that enhances the city and the surrounding area. Two of this year’s contributing artists at Buckham Gallery were Ken and Karen Milito, together making a donation totaling five pieces of art. Ken’s paintings, Finding the Hawk Totem and Dance Studio, were two of the larger pieces in this year’s auction. His work has an understated narrative style and engages the viewer with interesting subject matter. “This is a big planet with lots of people sharing everything,” Ken says. “Art gallery space is for artistic self-expression and community celebration.” Karen’s painting, Enchanted Forest, one of her three pieces on display at Buckham during the auction, is striking for its vivid colors. Supportive and involved in the local art scene, Karen adds, “Many nonprofit galleries like Buckham and GFAC, or even downtown businesses, who display artists’ works, depend on donations, fundraisers, art commissions and volunteers to make ends meet. Ken and I donated five of our paintings to the Cool City Art Auction in hopes of helping Buckham Gallery raise the needed funds to allow local artists a venue to share their work in this creative Flint community.” At the Greater Flint Arts Council, artist Lanie Nix also made a generous contribution to this year’s Cool City Art Auction. Her photography pieces beckoned the viewer to take a second look, drawing them in with her unique ability to make ordinary things intriguing. Photography was also a significant part of the evening’s offerings at Buckham Gallery. Shelley Spivack’s series of twelve photographs shared the culture of faraway lands. Photographed on her travels to Cambodia, Thailand, and Vietnam, Shelly brings to us a world most of us will never see, transporting her viewers to foreign locations rich and varied. Her works, small in scale, invite us to step closer, creating an intimate interaction between the viewer and the photograph. If you missed this year’s Cool City Art Auction, mark your calendar for next year and make plans to be one of the many supporters that look forward to this annual fundraising event. And, in the meantime, Flint’s monthly Artwalk, held the second Friday of each month, is always an opportunity to get out and enjoy the arts in the downtown area. As Karen Milito states, “It’s important for everyone to keep coming to 2nd Friday Artwalks so the arts can continue to thrive here.” Ken Milito adds, “On Artwalk night our unique selves and interconnectedness is on full display!” To that I’ll agre--for Flint’s arts culture is vibrant and engaging! Be part of it. It’s yours to enjoy.

55


COMMUNITY

Rita Langworthy's L egacy of Compassion In the dark aftermath of a senseless murder, a bright light still shines. BY MEREDITH MCGHAN

R

ita Langworthy was a committed Flint educator and activist on behalf of needy children and their families, and a second mom or grandmother to many of the community’s children. Though Rita was tragically killed by gun crossfire at age 70 in August 2015, the foundation her daughter Lin Randolph established in her memory lives on. As their mission statement says, “the Rita Langworthy Foundation provides funds to local and national nonprofit organizations that directly help at-risk children by providing food, clothing, shelter, medical assistance and educational opportunities; with the additional long-term goals of offering mini grants to educators who serve at-risk students and scholarships to poverty level/low-income students ranging in age from kindergarten through college.” The foundation continues Rita’s work and will do so for years to come. Rita’s Christian faith was at the root of

56

her dedication to helping others. She was an active member of First Presbyterian Church in downtown Flint, and believed that God had called her to this mission. Angie Field, Director of Children’s

Ministry at First Presbyterian Church, said the eldest child Rita was caring for at the time of her death called Rita her “other mother.”

“Rita always made her feel special, made sure holidays and birthdays were recognized, always protected [the children] and took them to new places. [The girl] talks about church and how Rita never missed it. About how church became like home to them, and they were always happy to help Rita if it meant they could go to church.”  She recalls how Rita homeschooled the children, taught them to love reading, and ultimately paid for each of them to go to a private school, because she knew a great education was the most valuable thing she could give them. “Rita made sure they had clothes, coats, clean uniforms” Angie Field says. “She would make sure they were out of the way when people weren’t getting along. My image of Rita is as a duck with her little ducklings. She always had a string of seven, eight, nine, ten, or even fourteen kids crammed in a van or waddling behind her. She taught them manners and they


"She was a person of few words, but huge action." respected her. Their trajectory will forever be changed due to her presence in their lives. They have the world against them, but a firm foundation.” On the foundation’s website, a quote by Rita exemplifies her faith and humility.  “Make no mistake…this is not about me! I am not a hero. I am not a Mother Theresa. This is His story and these are His children. I am but a servant who has been given a ‘talent’ – a unique gift – for which I am responsible.” Reading works by Rita on the foundation’s website, you get a sense of what a vibrant, kind, and humorous person she was. She relates the story of helping her daughter move, with her obstreperous dog, and it’s like she is there in person, telling the anecdote over a cup of coffee. And God is a palpable presence throughout her writings. Even when she accidentally tears the lights off a bank’s drive-through with a U-haul trailer, she both prays and jokes about it. Rita clearly saw laughter – with God – as a saving grace. She is so alive on paper, one can only imagine the force she was while here on earth. Lin calls her “a quiet and understated tidal wave who made a huge difference in people’s lives.”

of The Rita Langworthy Foundation, someone said I had 'lofty goals.' They did not know me well, but have quickly come to witness that just as Rita was, I am a woman of action. Rita laid the foundation of this organization simply by living every day of her life as a selfless example of love and true generosity. It is our job to nurture and grow the seeds she planted. Every child, no matter the circumstances into which they are born, deserves a chance to not just survive, but to flourish. Rita’s bright smile and joyful laugh will live on in every child we are able to help. Her indelible spirit and soul cannot ever be stolen from the world.” Lin says that those who knew her mother experienced “the Rita effect” when they saw her acts of service to others. “She was never one to tell people how to do things,” Lin says. “She was a

person of few words, but huge action. She would empty out her pocketbook into the hands of someone who needed it. She set an example by living her life the way she did. As people learn about her life, there is a ripple effect in which they start giving more to others." The foundation’s purpose is to increase that ripple effect, as well as to give grants to organizations that are working to improve outcomes for at-risk children. Lin says the foundation’s 15-year plan is to first award grants to direct service providers for at-risk children over the next five years. A focus on mini-grants for educators of vulnerable kids will come next, and the last five years will see scholarships awarded for private school and higher education students. Lin encourages organizations to apply now. “Approval can take several months to a year,” she says. “Since we’re just starting out, it’s a great time to apply.” For more information, visit www.ritalangworthyfoundation.org.

Stories of how Rita affected the people she knew bear witness to the love and compassion she exuded, providing an example to others that she always credited to God, rather than herself. Reminiscences by her sister Cathren Paxton give a sense of a loving childhood, where many sets of grandparents were present – perhaps what inspired Rita to forge a grandmotherly relationship with so many children.  Lin says that “during the inception

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COMMUNITY J. Laurence Gillie, Billy Mills, and Robert E. Pratt at the 50th anniversary celebration held at Flint Golf Club. 5/7/1966 M-Live Media Group

The

Rotary Club of Flint Turns

100

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T

he Rotary Club of Flint is celebrating 100 years of serving Flint, Genesee County and the world through its service projects and support of community initiatives, ranging from the Flint Rotary Crippled Children’s Clinic (a precursor to the Mott Children’s Health Center), to local urban gardens and water, as well as sanitation projects in India. As part of its centennial celebration on April 7, 2016, the Rotary Club of Flint unveiled an artifact to be included in the permanent exhibit at Sloan Museum of the history of Flint. The museum is also hosting a temporary exhibit of the club's first 100 years in the VanBolt Gallery from March 7 through the end of June.


Photo by Ashley Norman

Amy Krug

When 23 Flint businessmen chartered the club on April 7, 1916, they committed themselves to the Rotary motto of “Service Above Self,” and so began 100 years of community-building by many of Flint’s early leaders and influencers; people such as Charles Stewart Mott, A. N. Cody, J. Dallas Dort, Charles Foss, Matthew Davison, Eldon E. Baker, Reinhard Kleinpell, David M. Averill and Albert W. Dodds, all of whom were members in the club’s inaugural year.

Current President Rotary Club of Flint

Walter E. Dunkin, owner of the Model Baking Company, of Flint, was elected first president of the Rotary Club of Flint. Within two years of its founding, members began serving the community with a downtown beautification project. The club’s first large community project was Rotary Lodge, a large log structure used as a weekend camp by the Flint Boy Scouts for many years. The Rotary Club of Flint Crippled Children’s project began in 1924, providing local children with weekly transportation to Ann Arbor for orthopedic treatment, and transportation to and from a special school in Flint. Around 1939, Hurley Hospital was approved for the care of orthopedic patients. Orthopedic clinics were conducted there until the separate establishment of the Mott Children's Health Center. The club continued its commitment to improving the lives of children in the Flint area through support of the Flint Rotary Orthopedic Center at Mott Children’s Health Center, where the club employed a full-time orthopedic nurse and a secretary for many years, entirely funded by members. The Rotary Club of Flint has always made the welfare of children one of its top priorities, a commitment that continues to this day. In 1985, they established Rotary House at Whaley Children’s Center, one of the largest projects the club has undertaken. Over the years they have also supported Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Big Brothers/Big Sisters, Durant Tuuri-Mott School, the Model United Nations program, Junior Achievement, Boys & Girls Club of Flint, REACH and the Children’s Wish Fund. The Club also helps develop future leaders through participation in the Rotary District 6330 Seminar for Tomorrow’s Leaders, a weekend seminar for high school-aged students. Additionally, the club has an established scholarship program that awards tuition support to local students for post-secondary education. Scholarships are given annually to students at Mott Community College, the University of Michigan-Flint and Baker College. The club’s commitment to community is not limited to children. Over the years it has supported a wide variety of initiatives to improve the lives of many people in Flint and Genesee County, such as the Rotary Dyslexia Center, Literacy Network, United Way, Rotary Park at the Flint Cultural Center, Foodbank of Eastern Michigan Hunger Solution Center, Rotary Club of Flint Michigan 59


COMMUNITY

medical and dental facilities at Carriage Town Ministries, Rotary Hemobile for the Red Cross, For-Mar Nature Preserve, Easter Seals Society, UM-Flint’s Urban Alternatives House, Flint Institute of Arts, Back to the Bricks Auto Pioneers project, Catholic Charities Life Skills Center, and Rotary Plaza in downtown Flint.

Top: (1963) Linda Holt, patient from Rotary Orthopedic Clinic, boards a bus to attend Camp Grace Bentley. Also pictured with her, Dagney Bishop, R.N. and Ivan A. MacArthur, chairman of the Rotary Club's Crippled Children Program. | M-Live Media Group. Bottom: (1975) Dr. Branch, Rotary Club doctor with child patient | M-Live Media Group.

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Located in Rotary International District 6330, the Rotary Club of Flint is part of one of the few international Rotary districts worldwide. District 6330 includes clubs in Ontario, Canada and Michigan. The Rotary Club of Flint’s influence has reached far beyond Flint and Rotary District 6330 to help people globally through education, health and nutrition; water and sanitation projects in Honduras, Dominican Republic, India and Haiti; the Rotary Avoidable Blindness project in Mexico; the Rotary International Polio Plus program; an orphanage in Abakaliki, Nigeria; and to

provide scholarships to Camp America for Youth in Togliati, Russia. Nurturing the values and expanding the influence of Rotary at home and around the world, the Rotary Club of Flint has sponsored new Rotary clubs in Genesee County and abroad, including Rotary Club of Burton, Rotary Club of Greater Flint-Sunrise, Rotary Club of Owosso, Rotary Club of Clio, Rotary Club of Lapeer, Rotary Club of Durand, Rotary Club of Davison, Rotary Club of Grand Blanc, Rotary Club of Swartz Creek, Genesee Valley Rotary Club, Rotary Club of Fenton, Rotary Club of Flushing and co-sponsorship of the Rotary Club of Togliati, Russia. As it moves into its next 100 years, the Rotary Club of Flint continues its commitment to “Service Above Self” and improving the lives of children and families in Flint and around the world.


100 YEARS OF SERVICE

The Rotary Club of Flint has met at noon on Fridays for 100 years. Their first luncheon meetings were held at the Model Tea Room, located over the Model Bakery on South Saginaw Street. As it grew, the club moved to the basement of the First Baptist Church and then to the Dresden Hotel. When the Durant Hotel opened in 1921, the Rotary Club met there until the hotel closed in 1973, then made its home at the Sarvis Food Center until it closed in January 2014. After two years at the Flint Golf Club, the Rotary Club of Flint now meets at the Foodbank of Eastern Michigan Hunger Solutions Center.

Sarvis Food Center | Rotary Club of Flint Michigan

Hotel Durant 1942 | Rotary Club of Flint Michigan

RICHARD CORDELL Richard Cordell provided outstanding leadership and service to the Rotary Club of Flint, Michigan for 47 years (1963 to 2010); as its president from 1974-1976, club secretary/treasurer from 1980 to 2008, and club secretary/treasurer emeritus from 2008 to August 27, 2010. He served with distinction as the District Governor of Rotary International District 6330 in 1984-1985 and represented the Rotary Club of Flint and Rotary District 6330 as an ambassador at numerous Rotary International conventions. Richard truly lived the credo of Rotary’s ‘Four-Way Test’ and Rotary’s motto ‘Service Above Self.’

A LIFETIME OF DEDICATED SERVICE TO THE ROTARY CLUB OF FLINT, ROTARY INTERNATIONAL, FLINT & GENESEE COUNTY AND THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

On April 7, the Alfred P. Sloan Jr. Museum installed a Rotary Bell in the permanent History of Flint exhibit to commemorate the 100th Anniversary of the Rotary Club of Flint. The club dedicated the bell in memory of Richard Cordell.

Richard’s service extended beyond Rotary to include service to the greater Flint community as president of the Greater Flint YMCA, a leader in the First Presbyterian Church of Flint, and as an ambassador to the City of Flint’s sister city Togliatti, Russia. He also served his country in WWII as a Lieutenant Colonel in the U.S. Army AirCorp. Richard was a B-26 pilot, flying 62 missions during the War, including two missions on D-Day. A family man, he and his beloved wife Ruth have a son Richard, daughter-in-law Anita, and granddaughters Chelsea and Katie, and his extended Rotary family, that cherish his memory. Pictured: Richard & Ruth Cordell | Rotary Club of Flint Michigan 61


be seen Flint Firebirds Chamber Night Pucks for Paws DO R T F E DE R A L CR E D I T UNI O N E V E NT CE NTE R B UR TO N | FE BR UARY 18 The Firebirds hosted the Erie Otters on Pucks for Paws Night. Fans donated a pet care item, cleaning supplies, dog/cat food, or dog/cat toy to benefit The Humane Society of Genesee County (HSGC). Their mission is to provide shelter and adoption of companion animals, reduce overpopulation, extend humane education, prevent cruelty, and provide those services that promote their goals and policies. The HSGC’s focus remains on the companion animals of Genesee County, treating them and one another with dignity and respect, providing them with the best possible humane treatment until we are able to locate their forever homes. Left to right: Tami, Garrett, & Gabby O'Neill | Brad McFaul, Tom Cheek | Danielle Arnold, Trevor L'Hommedieu | Steve Walker, Sherrie Eastman, Jim Ott | Lisa Allen, John Ranville | Mike Chapman, Dave Prochazka | Dr. Bobby & Deven Mukkamala | Alexandrea Giguere, Brandi Lucke, Danny Arnold | Lorry Goldman, Ray Rust | Steve Basinski, Susana Wright, Dominic Gutierrez

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COMMUNITY

Applewood Estate

A Celebration of 100 Years in the Making!

I

BY MICHAEL G. THODOROFF

n this, a year of election, one issue all Flint community citizens can agree upon is that Charles Stewart Mott is synonymous with Flint. Ever since he and his family landed in Flint at the turn of the century at the request of William C. (Billy) Durant, Mott’s industrial and business prowess is well documented. But he was also deeply

64

committed to the service and development of his community. C.S. Mott was a threeterm mayor of Flint, served as a major in the Army Quartermaster Corps during World War I, and helped form local service organizations that were critical to the social and economic growth of the city. After initially settling in their Kearsley Street home, Mott eventually purchased

65 acres of farmland at the edge of the city for a family home and gentleman’s farm. He envisioned a place to help balance the stresses of work—a place where family and friends could find beauty, have fun, and stay healthy by eating fresh food and staying active with sports and games. He hired Herbert Davis as the architect and landscape architect William Pitkin Jr. to design a beautiful and practical estate,


including a gracious home, recreational opportunities, flower and vegetable gardens, and a farming operation. Pitkin’s landscape design incorporated an old apple orchard already on the property, and oriented the house to face the beautiful but gnarled-looking trees. When the time came to name the estate, “Applewood” was a natural choice, not only because of the orchard, but because apples are an important part of the Mott family heritage. The core of the 21-room estate was built in 1916, and while additions were made for several years—especially as the landscaping developed—it soon began to operate as the Motts had envisioned.  However, in 1973 after C. S. Mott’s passing, his spouse Ruth reexamined Applewood and realized it was overgrown and underused. She began to plan for Applewood’s future, a future in which the estate would be open to the public as a memorial to Charles Stewart Mott and his ideals. To that end, she established an advisory board and began to renovate the once-beautiful grounds. The Ruth Mott Foundation was established in 1999 according to her plan, focusing its grant making on meeting needs in Flint and Genesee County while operating

according to the values she personally embodied including respect, kindness, and humor. Ruth Mott loved sharing the bounty of Applewood. For many years, Applewood Estate’s 34 acres of renovated and reinvigorated grounds have demonstrated ways to grow healthy food, beautify Flint, and protect the environment, while the house hosted meetings for foundation grantees. Since 2000, the grounds have been open to the public several times a year for major events based around healthy food, gardening, and the arts. But starting in May of this year the gates will be

Left Page: The Motts' gracious mansion today. | R. H. Hensleigh Top Right: A group of boys enjoying Applewood’s pool on a summer day, about 1918–20. | Ruth Mott Foundation Bottom Right: During construction at Applewood, Aimeé and Elsa Mott pose with a friend in the soon-to-be swimming pool, 1915. | Ruth Mott Foundation

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COMMUNITY wide open for a 100-year commemorative celebration. The public is welcome to come and enjoy the fun with new home tours, exhibits and other captivating activities. And best of all – admission is FREE! From May 5th through October 30th, Thursday through Sunday from 10:00am to 6:00pm, Applewood will be open for visitors to experience new programs, exhibits, events, a refreshed garden tour and for the first time, tours of the Mott’s period-preserved beautiful home. Applewood also offers special experiences for larger groups and field trips.

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Not only will this celebration be shared and enjoyed by all who visit these “hallowed grounds,” Applewood’s staff will too, treasure this once-in-a-lifetime celebration experience. Deborah Elliott, director of estate operations, has been a part of Applewood ever since she was hired as a full-time horticulturist in 1980. She had the privilege of working alongside Ruth Mott, who unfortunately passed in 1999, and still has a deep respect and great fondness for her. Over the years, Elliott has played a key role in Applewood’s transformation from a

family home to a public resource. "I knew Applewood was a special place from the start. To be able to share its beauty and story with visitors is a wonderful way to honor Mrs. Mott’s wishes for the estate,” Elliott says. “From a gentleman’s farm and family home to a community resource that brings people together – it has been 100 amazing years! I am so fortunate and proud to be part of the journey." Handy Lindsey, Current President of the Ruth Mott Foundation, adds, “We have so much to celebrate this year as the 100th anniversary marks a new future not only


Top: Applewood's living room today. | R. H. Hensleigh Bottom Left: Ruth and C.S. Mott in the gardens at Applewood with their dogs, Peanuts and Toby, 1972. Photo by Don Owens. | Ruth Mott Foundation Bottom Right: Ruth Mott with her dog Toby in Applewood’s orchard, 1974. | Ruth Mott Foundation

for Applewood Estate, but also for the Ruth Mott Foundation. It is so important to the foundation to be able to share this beautiful and historic resource with everyone, but particularly with Flint residents as we embark on our new strategic plan. We hope the community enjoys Applewood as much as we do, and moving forward, we plan to carry our new programs outside the gates of Applewood and into the community.” Lindsey additionally points out that Applewood’s centennial coincides with another significant development at the Ruth Mott Foundation: the implementation of the foundation’s new strategic plan. After an extensive series of community engagement forums with Flint residents, the foundation has developed a comprehensive plan to focus its grant-making activities in north Flint, an area with significant challenges that could benefit from concentrated resources. Part of that plan includes increasing the Flint community’s access to Applewood Estate with more public programming than ever before.

WE WOULD LIKE TO EXTEND OUR WARMEST

Congratulations To ... Ruth Mott Foundation

APPLEWOOD THE CHARLES STEWART MOTT ESTATE

On 100 Years A Rich Legacy & Philanthropic Support OF PROVIDING

TO OUR COMMUNITY

410 E Sec ond Street | F l i nt | Mi c hi gan 810-235-0617 | www. b b b s fl i nt. org

Even after this notable celebration of the centennial passes, the events and activities at Applewood Estate will continue in the years to come. Applewood will forever remain a classic artifact for all people of all ages to enjoy as it is a Michigan Historic Landmark along with a listing in the National Register of Historic Sites. The Ruth Mott Foundation published a book in honor of Applewood Estate’s 100th anniversary. Applewood: The Charles Stewart Mott Estate: One Hundred Years of Stories, 1916-2016 can be purchased on site at Applewood or at www.msupress.org. For more information regarding Applewood’s 100th Anniversary celebration events see the full calendar at RuthMottFoundation.org. For more information regarding “Applewood: The Charles Stewart Mott Estate,” contact Andrea Bergstrom at 810-396-3401 or abergstrom@ruthmott.org.

Events

June 18

& June 19

On the Grounds of the Flint Institute of Arts

May 5–8 Grand Opening Weekend June 23 Applewood’s Birthday Party July 21–24 Four Days of Family Fun September 24 Fall Harvest Festival

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ANNIVERSARY

E

ven though Flint’s “heyday” has long passed, there is still an abundance of dedicated people who deserve recognition for work ethics, philanthropy and community involvement along with fledgling entrepreneurs, area businesses and non-profit organizations all doing their part through the years in the revitalization of our community. And just as it has for the last 42-plus years, onthetown magazine will be at the forefront of this social and eventful acknowledgement. Thanks to the foundation of its founder Harry C. McVey, onthetown’s vision is intact – and will remain true to the mission established by McVey - through the staff and administration of locally-based Global Network Publishers. Most importantly, the magazine’s marquee is as alive as ever. It all started with Harry McVey who came to Flint in the 1950s as a manufacturer's sales rep, when the city was in the early boom stages due to the rapid expansion of General Motors and related supplier businesses. Harry realized all the businesspeople coming to Flint for commerce were not aware of places to stay, eateries to frequent and things to do. With encouragement from many local businesspeople, he set out to publish a magazine specializing in the places, events, restaurants and of course, the dedicated citizens of the area. Harry decided on the title when he and his spouse Joyice, who were big fans of Frank Sinatra, watched one of his movies titled “On the Town.” After the movie, they both concluded the film’s title was the ideal branding for the new magazine. Starting out with a small format of 5 ½ inches by 8 ½ inches, the new magazine was hand-stapled and hand-assembled in the living room of his own house with the help of Joyice and their five children! In the summer of 1974, onthetown magazine officially “hit the streets” of the Greater Flint area with George Thomas gracing the first cover. In the true spirit of Harry’s vision for the magazine, he made this selection as a way to commemorate the new City of Burton which coincidentally was granted its charter when George Thomas was the first mayor. The magazine was an instant success as it filled a much-needed and desired community service – just as it does today! Furthermore, many have entered this dynamic print market in recent years but can never replicate the quality and the legacy onthetown has staunchly established – and the years substantiate it. We have consistently set the bar as the standard for a local publication supporting its community and oft referred to as the city guide--"to be seen, be heard and be onthetown!”

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TM

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onthetown Magazine May/June