Page 1

xp

id EE G u FR e r s

E

south coaster lor

SUMMER 2017-18

e

Sharing local knowledge

thesouthcoaster.com.au

To dive for

Discover Salt Water Wonderland Swim, surf and snorkel!

Images by awardwinning ocean wildlife photographer Matt Smith


SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

e Insids thi issue MER SUM / 18 2017

Explore Salt Water Wonderland Surf beaches, rock pools & dive sites

Hello, summer! ‘Tis the season to hit the beach, so we’ve rounded up several ways to enjoy the coast, from sheltered swims in rock pools to great waves for beginner surfers. We’re also excited to share incredible images of life below the surface, thanks to Stanwell Park’s Matt Smith, whose meteoric rise to world-class ocean wildlife photographer began with images of the humble blue bottle at Shellharbour’s Bass Point Reserve. We love to share local knowledge – also in this issue, South Coast authors reveal some of their favourite places and a scuba expert picks her top dive sites. Visit us online at thesouthcoaster.com.au. Happy reading!

south coaster

Genevieve and Marcus, the Editors

DESIGN: youngwise design

Read all about it 04 Markets Galore! The best fresh produce, as well as artisan everything 06-12 Thirroul, Stanwell Park, Austinmer, Helensburgh Cafes, beaches, walks, parks, art and entertainment 16 Cover feature The amazing ocean wildlife photography of Matt Smith 22 Where the waves are The region’s best surf spots 24 Map Top 21 places to visit when you do the Loop 26 Animal attraction Hand-feed ‘roos at Symbio Wildlife Park 28 Inspiration in a cup A writer’s favourite cafes 30 Rock Pools Super spots for a swim 34 Adventure Authors pick their favourite places 41 Dive sites A scuba expert shares her top 3 underwater adventures 44 Events Where to find NYE fireworks and art in Stanwell Park

Cover: Lion’s Mane jellyfish with an entourage of juvenile bait fish, by Matt Smith, www.mattysmithphoto.com.

Meet Our Contributors

2

ROB BRANDER – aka ‘Dr Rip’ – is a coastal geomorphologist and Associate Professor at the University of New South Wales. An expert on rip currents, he runs a beach safety education program called The Science of the Surf. See page 40. LARA McCABE is a freelance photographer who lives in Coledale with her three children and husband. Inspired by the natural beauty of the Illawarra, Lara loves to shoot rock pools (see page 30) and is also the creator of the South Coaster’s new maps. RACHAEL FALLON is general manager of Sydney’s Abyss Scuba Diving (www. abyss.com.au). Rachael has been involved in the dive industry for 25 years and loves diving on the South Coast and checking out the amazing marine life. See page 41. Advertise in the Autumn issue of the South Coaster! Book online by February 20 at thesouthcoaster.com.au

SUMMER 17/ 18

EDITORS: Genevieve Swart, Marcus Craft CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER: Anthony Warry ADVERTISING: Karen McDougall, 0403 789 617. Email editor@thesouthcoaster. com.au for a rate card. Terms and conditions apply. CONTACT: editor@ thesouthcoaster.com.au; phone 0411 025 910; PO Box 248, Helensburgh, 2508. DEADLINE: February 20 for Autumn 2018 edition. DISTRIBUTION: The South Coaster is available at tourist hot spots, art galleries, cafes, libraries, B&Bs and information centres. Want copies? Contact us via thesouthcoaster.com.au. PUBLISHER: The Word Bureau Pty Ltd (ABN 31 692 723 477) is the Illawarra’s local independent publisher of The South Coaster, 2508 District News and 2515 Coast News. DISCLAIMER: All content and images remain South Coaster property unless otherwise supplied. No part of this mag may be reproduced without the publisher’s written permission. Views expressed in submissions and advertisements do not reflect those of the publishers. PRINTED BY: Spotpress on Forest Stewardship Council-certified paper from sustainable forests. PROUDLY A MEMBER OF: The Northern Illawarra Chamber of Commerce


ARTIST JOHN VANDER OF STANWELL PARK www.johnvander.com.au

John Vander and two of his popular works. Secrets of the Coast 12 Coalcliff (top right) and The Blue Cottage Dalton.

Articles

Fine Art Gallery

111 Lawrence Hargrave Drive (on the way to the Sea Cliff Bridge) Stanwell Park 2508 P: 02 4294 2491 E: articlesgallery@optusnet.com.au

Possibly one of the most popular artists in NSW today, his work has been reproduced extensively in prints for many years and has attracted a large following among art collectors. Over the past 40 years, John has become a household name throughout Australia. Don’t miss the chance to view and buy one of his original paintings. Over the past 36 years, countless visitors to his gallery – Articles Fine Art Gallery – have had the great experience of meeting the artist himself.

The FINEST Gallery in the South OPEN 10am-5pm Friday, Saturday and Sunday and Public Holidays Situated on the lovely beach of Stanwell Park, the Gallery is a pleasant 30-minute drive from Wollongong and 60 minutes from Sydney. Artist John Vander and his wife Frances own “Articles”. The gallery features the works of well established and emerging artists as well as ceramics and sculptures, glass and homewares.

Details of works by: (left) Peter Fennell, (below) Rachel Carmichael.

Details of works by: (left) Max Mannix, (below) John Bradley.


4

Market Directory SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

Top Shop

Marke vibe t


Check markets’ social media pages for festive season updates. To advertise your market, email editor@thesouthcoaster.com.au

Relaxing IS

EASY WHEN YOU SELL WITH BELLE

SUMMER 17/18

Coledale Markets  4th Sunday of the month. Christmas Twilight market on Wednesday, December 20, 2-8pm. At Coledale Public School, 699 Lawrence Hargrave Drive, Coledale. Foragers Market Bulli  Sundays 9am-2pm. Bulli Showground. Note: Foragers will be closed on 24 Dec, 31 Dec, 7 Jan and 21 Jan (closed for Illawarra Folk Festival). Eat St Market  Thursdays from 5pm. Crown Street Mall, Wollongong. Warrawong Markets  Saturdays, by the Lake, Northcliff Drive, Warrawong. Shellharbour Village Harbourside Markets  4th Sunday of the month, Little Park, Addison Street, Shellharbour Village. The Farms Market  1st Sunday of the month 10am-3pm, Note: Christmas Twilight market Saturday 16th December 3-8pm, Killalea Drive, Killalea State Park, Shell Cove. Jamberoo Village Markets  Last Sunday of the month, Note: Christmas market 10 Dec from 9am, Reid Park, Cnr Allowrie and Churchill Streets, Jamberoo. Kangaroo Valley Farmers Markets   2nd Sunday of the month, 165 Moss Vale Road, Kangaroo Valley. Kiama Farmers’ Market  Every Wednesday in summer 3pm-6pm (winter 2-5pm) Coronation Park Surf Beach, 72 Manning Street, Kiama. Gerringong Village Markets  3rd Saturday of the month, Gerringong Town Hall, Fern Street, Gerringong. Berry Produce Market  2nd Saturday and 4th Sunday of the month, Andrew Place Park, Berry. Shoalhaven Heads Seafood and Fresh Produce Fair  Every Saturday, The Heads Hotel, River Road, Shoalhaven Heads. Pyree Village Art & Handmade Market  4th Sunday of the month, Note: December only will be the 3rd Sunday, 888 Greenwell Point Road, Pyree. Jervis Bay Maritime Museum Markets  1st Saturday of the month, 3-7pm, Woollamia Road, Huskisson. Huskisson Market  2nd Sunday of the month, Huskisson Sports Ground Cnr Huskisson Road and Kiola Street, Huskisson.

south coaster

Find a market

Let your area specialist help you get the best price for your home and make the transition to your new home nice and easy.

WENDY LEPRE 0431 322 192

Enjoy your holiday time here

Best Thai/Oz on the South Coast Kids playground Barefoot bowls

new Thai street food

BISTRO OPEN Wednesday dinner Thursday to Sunday 12 noon till late

(02) 4267 2139

Xmas Eve band Crims n’ Le on from 3.30 pm

Scarborough-Wombarra Bowling Club, 578 Lawrence Hargrave Dr, Wombarra

5


SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

Top Spot

Thirroul

Coffee Coast

Map Key 1 Beach Pavilion 2 Pool 3 Playground 4 Naturopath 5 Crust Pizza

6

6 IGA 7 Horizon Credit Union 8 Nest 9 Post Office

10 Anita’s Theatre 11 DP boards 12 See Side Optical

13 Op shop 14 Coles 15 Ibah spa 16 Egg & Dart 17 Belle Property

18 Byrne Surf 19 Newsagency 20 Cocoon 21 Food co-op 22 Library


SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

Thirroul Discover unique boutiques, surf stores and great coffee. There’s a buzz about Thirroul. Possibly because this popular seaside village runs on caffeine. Thirroul’s coffee obsession has resulted in about a dozen flourishing cafes in a town home to only about 5600 people. Other reasons to stop here include eclectic boutiques and homewares stores such as Cocoon and Nest. For vintage treasure hunters, there are a four options along Lawrence Hargrave Drive: Thirroul Antique Centre, Now and Then Collectables, the Mission Australia op shop and Retro Wombat. Surfers will want to check out Finbox, Byrne

See SeeSide Side See Side

Surf and the DP Boardroom – the latter two run by legendary local surfboard shapers, Parrish Byrne and Dylan Perese. The historic town takes its name from the Thurrural Aboriginal people who lived here. Translated, it means “the place or valley of the cabbage tree palms” (not many now remain). Thirroul’s iconic building is the old Kings Theatre, now Anita’s Theatre. Built in 1912 it was once an open-air theatre with a canvas roof and still hosts gigs and film nights. Young children will love Thirroul’s big beachside playground (especially the climbing ropes, scooter track and flying fox). There is also a free saltwater pool on Bath Street, beside the beach, open daily 6am-7pm. Thirroul Beach is a long, stunning stretch of sand. It’s heaps of fun for swimmers, surfers and bodyboarders. And, of course, you can enjoy a fine coffee! Kick back at Thirroul Beach Pavilion, where tables overlook the ocean.

EyeExaminations Examinations Eye Eye Examinations Eye Examinations ptical 6 6Days ptical a Week Days a Week ptical 6 Days a Week

Anita's Theatre Anita's Theatre Anita's Shop 10, King Theatre Street Shop 10, King StreetThirroul Thirroul Shop 10, King Street Thirroul Call for an appointment today on

Call todayonon Callfor foran anappointment appointment today

Ph: 4268 3933

Ph: 3933 Ph: 4268 4268 3933

Latest Medicare technology Bulk in eyeBilled examination Medicare Bulk Billed equipment arriving this month Medicare Bulk Billed

Diabetic, Glaucoma & Macular Diabetic, Glaucoma & Macular Diabetic, Glaucoma & Macular Diabetic, Glaucoma & Macular Degeneration Screenings Degeneration Screenings Degeneration Screenings Degeneration Screenings Vision VisionScreening Screening && Vision Screening Vision Screening & & Digital Photography DigitalRetinal Retinal Photography Digital Retinal Photography Digital Retinal Photography

$129 SV $129 SV SV $129 $189 BIFOCAL $189 BIFOCAL $189 BIFOCAL $289 MULTIFOCAL

$289 MULTIFOCAL

MOST HEALTH FUNDS $289 MULTIFOCAL MOST HEALTH FUNDS MOST HEALTH NO GAP NO GAPFUNDS MOST HEALTH FUNDS

NO GAP

G7039730AL-140115

NO GAP

G7039730AL-140115

7

G7039730AL-140115


Stanwell Park

SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

Map Key 1 Bald Hill 2 Off-leash area 3 CWA Hall, home of Stanwell Park

8

Arts Theatre 4 Beach Reserve 5 Live Life Health, next to The Stanny cafe

6 16 Feet Cafe 7 Uluwatu Blue 8 Surf Club 9 Hargrave Cafe 10 Articles Fine

Art Gallery 11 Boho Chic & Boho Emporium 12 Palms Cafe 13 Train station

14 Wodi Wodi Walking Track, a steep and slippery 6.5km challenge.


Stanwell Park is the first seaside village on the NSW South Coast. It is famous as the home of 19th-century aviation pioneer Lawrence Hargrave, whose experiments with box kites on Stanwell Park Beach were instrumental in the development of human flight. It’s still a popular recreational flight spot – paragliders and hang gliders take off from Bald Hill to enjoy panoramic views along the coast before swooping down to land at the beach. In the colonial era, Stanwell Park was the abode of a gang of bush rangers, led by arch

SUMMER 17/18

Go surfing, shopping or cafe hopping.

south coaster

Stanwell Park

villain ‘Wolloo Jack’. Today the village is a more peaceful spot, home to a creative community including artists, filmmakers and authors. It gets busy on weekends when families, surfers, dog walkers and fishermen come out to play. Stanwell Park has no supermarket, petrol station or pharmacy. It does, however, have enough cafes to give keep visitors entertained daily. Try the gelato at Uluwatu Blue, chips from the Stanny, coffee on Hargrave Cafe’s balcony and Friday night dinners at 16 Feet. In a sunny courtyard with escarpment views, the Palms Cafe is a superb spot for a leisurely brunch or lunch. Afterwards, enjoy a browse at Articles Fine Art Gallery, owned by local painter John Vander and his wife, Frances. The Beachside Reserve has a children’s playground, with climbing frames, scooter track and sea views. There are barbecue areas and vast lawns for picnicking or impromptu soccer. Stanwell Park Beach is popular with surfers; swimmers should take care as the beach is also infamous for rips and drop-offs. Stanwell Park Surf Club holds regular Friday night drinks through summer and is also home to the world’s most scenic yoga classes, with fresh ocean breezes for extra relaxing effect (call Karen, 0403 789 617).

BOHO CHIC BOUTIQUE & EMPORIUM Beautiful and unique clothing and gifts are in store now. Women’s, Men’s and Children’s clothing and accessories. Exclusive stockists of fair trade, natural fibre clothing for everyone. Avoid the mall madness and shop locally this Christmas. And we’re open right up until Christmas Eve!

Shop 1 & 2/111 Lawrence Hargrave Dr, Stanwell Park (next door to Palms Cafe) Ph: 4294 3111 Open Thur to Mon from 9.30 am.

9


Austinmer

SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

Map Key 1 Playground 2 Tennis court 3 Headlands 4 Little Austi 5 Glastonbury Gardens

10

6 Bells Point 7 Playground 8 Surf Club 9 Amenities 10 Rock pools 11 Sublime Point

Track starts 12 Ibah Spa 13 Train station 14 Vet 15 Mala Beads 16 Mimi’s Place

17 Chiropractor 18 Shell’s Diner 19 Austi Beach Cafe 20 Newsagency & post office

21 Scout Hall 22 Moore St General 23 Haveli Living 24 Fireworks 25 Yoga studio


“Austinmer...I’m glad I’m here. there’s nowhere else I’d rather be” sing local band, the Glamma Rays . It’s a breezy, gorgeous tune which truly gets this charming beachside village between the escarpment and the sea. Here are some suggestions to make the most of your visit: Start with a morning bushwalk up to Sublime Point. It is a steep climb up the stairs and ladders but the view from the top is worth it. The track from the bottom starts near Foothills Road and Buttenshaw Drive (1.4 kilometres return). If you need relaxation and a foot scrub after your walk, try Ibah Spa Austinmer or, if this is

SUMMER 17/18

The charming seaside village is famous for its twin rock pools.

south coaster

Austinmer

booked out, nearby sister spa, Ibah Spa Thirroul. After walking and unwinding, you can stretch out an Iyengar yoga class the Moore Street Yoga Room with Johnny Batchelor. Johnny usually offers classes over the summer holidays too. Wander down Moore Street and grab a coffee from Austinmer favourite, Fireworks. You’ll find delightful shops nearby including jewellery store, Mala Beads, Haveli Living and Mimi’s Place. Then on to the star attraction, Austinmer beach with twin ocean pools and a big rock pool which is perfect for young kids and their parents to loll around in and explore. Take a moment to turn your back on the water and take in the breathtaking escarpment views too. The outside of the old dressing sheds are updated on weekdays with the water temperature and a trivia question. If the kids need a change of scene, there’s a recently renewed gated playground there too. After all that virtuous walking and swimming, tuck into some takeaway fish and chips from 50’s themed Shell’s Diner or try Austi Beach Cafe with views of the waves. If you’ve forgotten anything, Austinmer Beach newsagent sells lots of useful bits and pieces. Drink in a perfect Austinmer day with a cocktail at the new Headlands Hotel.

11


Helensburgh

SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

Map Key 1 Train station 2 Historic tunnel 3 Tradies club 4 Pool 5 H'burgh Hotel

12

6 Post Office 7 Pharmacy 8 Surefire Boards 9 Essential Surf

10 Alcara cafe & Raya Thai 11 Coal Coast Emporium 12 La Belle

Boutique 13 Coles 14 Massage 15 Library 16 Burgh gym

17 Sunrise Nursery 18 Symbio zoo 19 Hindu temple 20 Kellys Falls


Photo this page: Anthony Warry Photography

Helensburgh is a town on the verge of transformation, moving away from its coal mining roots to become a commuter town and tourist attraction. Two popular attractions are the award-winning, family-run zoo, Symbio Wildlife Park (see feature on page 26), and the Sri Venkateswara Temple (SVT), one of the most famous and popular Hindu temples in the southern hemisphere.

SUMMER 17/18

An hour south of Sydney, this historic coal-mining town is the gateway to the Grand Pacific Drive.

south coaster

Helensburgh

Building started in 1978 at this site, chosen according to Vedic principles (Agama Sastras) with five requirements: the site should be a virgin land, a forest, ideally on an island, with fresh water, and on a coastline. Today it is one of the region’s most popular attractions, attracting thousands of people a year. The temple's canteen serves delicious vegetarian food, open 10am-4pm (Sat/Sun and public holidays). Contact: 1300 626 663, www.svtsydney.org. The ‘Burgh is also home to several historic tunnels. The best known is the Metropolitan rail tunnel, with resident glow worms. This tunnel was lost for years, but in 1995 members of Helensburgh Landcare and Helensburgh and District Historical Society drove excavations to uncover the entrance and original platform. Railway line has since been laid and the old Helensburgh station sign (dating from 1889) restored. After heavy rain, the area floods and locals paddle canoes in. The tunnel has been used as a location for weddings, photo shoots and ghost tours (despite a lack of any recorded deaths). It’s at the corner of Vera Street and Tunnel Road, near Helensburgh Station. Please take care at this site – don't litter or do anything to harm the glow worms (i.e., no fireworks, fire juggling, smoking or mosquito repellent).

get wild at symbio wildlife park

If you’re looking to get up close and personal with all your favourite Australiana and exotic animals, head on out to Symbio Wildlife Park. Feed kangaroos, cuddle up next to a koala, come face-to-face with tigers and cheetahs, or fall in love with our adorable red pandas, ring-tailed lemurs, monkeys and more.

WWW.SYMBIOZOO.COM.AU • 7-11 LAWRENCE HARGRAVE DRIVE, HELENSBURGH NSW 2508

13


14

SUMMER 17/18

south coaster


1

4

2

5

EARTH WALKER & CO 749 Lawrence Hargrave Drive, Coledale Pick up the Found at Sea coffee table book by local surf photographer Ray Collins. With a range of delicious produce (tea blends, chocolate), the Earth Walker team is making great gift hampers. NEST EMPORIUM 287 Lawrence Hargrave Drive, Thirroul Covering two levels, this decor store has everything from greeting cards and limited edition photography by The Studio Coledale and paintings from Nicole Grimm-Hewitt.

3

COCOON TRADING 2/357 Lawrence Hargrave Drive, Thirroul Purchase gorgeous candles handmade in Thirroul by Bella and Toby, Lobster pot lights made in Wombarra by The Lobster Shack, plus local handmade greeting cards.

SUMMER 17/18

Lara McCabe presents a shopper’s guide to unique boutiques.

south coaster

Support small makers SKETCH COFFEE ART corner Towradgi Rd & Carters Lane Featured local makers include proprietor and painter Jaqueline Burgess. Brews are served in amazing ceramics by Rhiannon Gill. THREE FLYING DUCKS 19 Allowrie Street, Jamberoo Find handmade soaps by Raw Lather and recycled silver jewellery by Magdalena Pillai.

6

BEACHSIDE EMPORIUM 106 Terralong Street, Kiama With colourful paintings by Kerry Bruce, beachy oils on canvas by Di Crisp plus handmade ceramics from Brigita Hammell.

7

THIS OLD HOUSE STUDIO 81 Queen Street, Berry Bespoke products include macrame wall art, shibori throws, screen-printed totes and more!

For authentic primitive pieces, original artwork, furniture, rugs, lighting, gifts, games and more

02 4267 1335

www.cocoontrading.com.au

Christmas elements designed by Freepik

Shop 2, 357 Lawrence Hargrave Drive, Thirroul 2515 Monday to Friday 9.30 – 5.30 Saturday 9.30 – 4.30 Sunday 9.30 – 3.30

15


SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

Lion's Mane jellyfish at Bass Point; (inset) Glaucus atlanticus, a small blue species of sea slug, photographed at Port Kembla.

To dive for Discover the beauty below the South Coast’s surface – thanks to award-winning ocean wildlife photographer Matt Smith. In just three years, Stanwell Park’s Matt Smith has stormed the charts of ocean wildlife photography. His images are extraordinary, capturing a sense of wonder at the beauty, bright colours and otherworldly strangeness of life below the surface. Matt has had several no.1s, including winning the BBC Wildlife Photographer of the Year award in 2014; Nikon have used his photos on billboards and his imagery features in Blue Planet II, BBC Earth’s stunning sequel, again narrated by Sir David Attenborough. And it all kicked off on the NSW South Coast, with over/under images of blue bottles that Matt – an engineer – took off the coast of Shellharbour using underwater housing he designed himself. “Ah yes, my signature bluebottle images, they were a real door-opener for me and it’s been a hectic roller coaster ride since!” Matt said. Pictured above at right is A Shock Of Blue. “Despite their potentially dangerous sting, the bluebottle cnidaria is an amazingly beautiful creature. I wanted to demonstrate this with careful lighting and composition. The blue of the zooid colonies underneath these animals ignites with glorious translucent blue in my

16

underwater camera flashes, I thought this would look magnificent in front of a glowing orange sky. After many early mornings I eventually got my shot.” Over the past three years Matt – who shoots with Nikon cameras, using Aquatica Digital water housings – has gone to many places: Cuba to photograph saltwater crocs; Costa Rica’s Isla del Coco (“known as the sharkiest place on Earth”) and Papua New Guinea to document hawksbill turtle hatchlings. One of his favourite spots remains Bass Point at Shellharbour. “It’s relatively close to home and easy to dive with bags of marine life,” Matt says. “It’s also where I’ve taken most of my awardwinning shots; it’s like my practice ground for honing my skills because of its convenience.” In this feature, Matt kindly shares some incredible images of local marine life. On the cover is a Lion’s Mane jellyfish with an entourage of juvenile bait fish. “This was a lucky find as I was ascending from a dive at Bass Point.” Find more photos, order prints or sign up for a photography tutorial expedition at www. mattysmithphoto.com. Follow Matt’s work on Facebook or Instagram @mattysmithphoto


SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

A SHOCK OF BLUE: “The bluebottle cnidaria is an amazingly beautiful creature.” CELESTRIAL TERRESTRIAL: “The alien-like southern calamari squid is native to Australian and New Zealand coastlines. It’s dotpainting-like skin patterns are reminiscent of ancient native Australian paintings. It took me several weeks of night dives and patience to achieve this unique portrait, when I shot this frame I was elated!” @mattysmithphoto

Continued on page 21

17


SUMMER 17/18

south coaster BEAM ME UP: Giant cuttlefish at the Gravel Loader dive site south of Shellharbour. PORPITA: A blue button hydroid (Porpita porpita) washes into shore at sunrise at Bushrangers Bay. @mattysmithphoto

18


SUMMER 17/18

south coaster CRIMSON DAWN: “Crimson red Waratah Anemones in a tide pool at Port Kembla. I think of these crimson red Waratah Anemones as the roses of the sea bed. They can be found in intertidal zones around south-east Australia.” WEEDY SEA DRAGON WITH EGGS: “I am always blown away when I find a weedy seadragon. The colours on these animals are awesome and the iridescent colours really pop under my dive lights! Endemic to Australia’s southern coastline, the weedy seadragon is found nowhere else in the world.” @mattysmithphoto

19


SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

Seasons in the orchard Glenbernie Orchard’s Jo Fahey walks us through a year in life on the farm.

Having a farm reveals challenges and wonders. We thought we’d share a few of these with you and give a little insight into farm life in our modern world! There is always something going on. Our farm traditionally has grown fruit for the Sydney market system, supplying major supermarkets. In recent years we have shifted toward making award-winning products and selling direct to consumers. We have been opening up the farm for experiences like fruitpicking tours. Visitors get to see what we do and how we do it up close and personal. It’s not far to get to work, the daily commute is only seconds, meaning you have more time to PRODUCE

get work done. These days we don’t walk to work – we use quad bikes and other vehicles. There’s always something to do, jobs are very hands-on and much of our work will never be replaced by computers, however, modern technology is assisting in many facets of farm life. We use computers to assist in monitoring soil moisture and keeping records of everything. In the future, we will be able to turn our watering systems on and off from home rather than having to jump on a bike in the middle of the night to turn a pump on or off. More sleep! We are the only commercial orchard in this area, so we need to travel quite long distances to see other farms first-hand. We really enjoy meeting up with other farmers and cider SEASONAL AVAILABILITY

SUMMER JAN

FEB

AUTUMN MAR

APR

WINTER MAY

JUN

JUL

SEP

PEACHES NECTARINES RASPBERRIES APPLES PICKING GALA PICKING DELICIOUS PICKING FUJI PICKING JULIE PICKING GRANNY SMITH PICKING PINK LADY PICKING PERSIMMONS APPLE CIDER/CIDER VINEGAR APPLE JUICE, HONEY, JAMS PICKING TOURS FLOWERING

20

SUMMER

SPRING AUG

Apples available for sale from storage

OCT

NOV

DEC


SUMMER 17/18

SUMMER Summer heralds picking of fruit. By mid November we are in full swing picking nectarines and raspberries, followed by peaches. Apples kick in later in January. We usually think of apples beginning after Australia Day. Tours of the orchard including fruit picking are a feature of this time and happen mostly on weekends with weekday opportunities offered during the summer NSW school holidays. It’s a great time for celebrations and feasting on superb fruit and mixing it up with the apple ciders!

south coaster

makers to share knowledge and a yarn! We then bring what we’ve learnt back to the farm. Each year we hope to do better than the last!

AUTUMN Autumn is apple picking time and stone fruit trees will begin to lose their leaves. Late autumn can be a really lovely time for photography sessions and wedding shoots. We begin to plan and prepare the ground for new tree plantings. The apples lose their leaves after harvest is complete during May to June. We start practising recipes for mulled cider and apple cider vinegar tonic to ward off winter colds. WINTER In winter the trees sleep. The orchard can look a bit spooky but there is plenty happening across the farm. While the trees sleep the farmer gives them a much-needed haircut! This is called pruning and it allows us to train the tree and select the best shape for fruit production. We can let in maximum light and grow the fruit in better positions so they develop more flavour, sweetness and even better colour. In the background we are busy making cider, mead and vinegar. This is the perfect time for mulled cider and making apple pie. Our annual Apple Pie competition day is around the end of July. A mead around the fire goes down well. SPRING The trees begin to wake up across the farm in a kind of mosaic. Flowers pop out firstly on the stone fruit, variety by variety. This means different spots across the farm become ablaze with colour in a sequential pattern. The bees wake up from their hibernation and in the warmth of day you can hear them working busily among the fruit trees. The apple trees are the last to flower as spring is in full swing and heading quickly toward summer. Apple flowers are white and the leaves begin to grow at the same time. This is a great time for photos, and close ups on the working bees!

21


SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

Salt Water Wonderland 2 A local expert gives us his favourite surfing spots on the South Coast.

3

JIM'S TOP 3 SURF SPOTS ON THE SOUTH COAST

Sandon Point: Only 15 minutes north of Wollongong at Bulli is Sandon Point, one of the South Coast’s most well-known breaks. A long, often fast point break that holds swells up to 8-10ft. A good right for intermediate to experienced surfers that can produce really long rides if you chance it on the right day. This is a really wave-rich area as well, with great beach breaks and reefs all the way along the coast north to the Royal National Park.

1

JIM'S TOP 3 LEARN-TO-SURF SPOTS ON THE SOUTH COAST

Jim Hughes Thirroul resident Jim Hughes is Surfing Australia's Sport Development Manager. He has been developing, planning and implementing surf programs, courses and events around the world for more than 10 years.

Black Rock: One of the main reasons to hang around Jervis Bay and Booderee National Park as a surfer is to surf the all-time classic South Coast reef break – Black Rock (aka Aussie Pipe, Wreck Bay or Summercloud Bay). It is one of the hollowest and most photogenic lefts in Australia, breaking intensely over a shallow cunjevoi- and urchin-infested bottom.

22

Green Island: A long walk and a long paddle (over the Shark Pit) to the SW tip of Green Island when a moderate to big NE to S swell hits is often rewarded with long; sectioney, bending, walled-up lefts, great for long-boarders and short-boarders. These super fun slow-peelers are also one of the rare offshore options during those summer NE winds … but this often means a crowd!

1

Bulli Beach: Probably one of the best learn-to-surf options on the South Coast of NSW. Bulli Beach offers the perfect options for beginners almost 365 days a year. From the sheltered rolling waves of the south-end, perfect for youngsters and the more cautious beginner,


Photos courtesy of Surfing Australia / SurfGroms / www.learntosurf.com

Bendalong Beach: All levels of surfers will find something at Bendalong, where sometimes busy, but highly consistent peaks can offer anything from barrels on NE to SE swells to perfectly gentle learning waves through all tides. There are great shories and a bunch of other spots around this area too for all abilities, from Washerwoman’s to Manyana.

SUMMER 17/18

2

south coaster

to the bigger breakers on the north end for the more intrepid beginner … this beach offers the full package to newly enthusiastic!

3

Broulee Beach: North Broulee is the closest beach to Canberra, and considered one of the best learn-to-surf breaks on the South Coast due to its sheltered position and flat sand bottom. Most days of the year Broulee offers safe waves, perfect for the beginner surfer. Around the corner at South Broulee there is a more challenging beach break suited to intermediate to advanced level surfers. This is a stunning playground well worth a visit! For more, visit www.learntosurf.com and www.surfingaustralia.com

Fun For All the Family, Join Us At the Bowlo!

AW3332363

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT LIVE ENTERTAINMENT SATURDAY NIGHTS, ON SATURDAY NIGHTS BISTRO OPEN FOR LUNCH AND DINNER DAILY, BAREFOOT BOWLS AND MORE 2b Station Street, Thirroul (02) 4267 1148 thirroulbowlingclub.com.au

2B Station St,Thirroul,

Bistro 1148 open for lunch and dinner daily Ph: (02) 4267 thirroulbowlingclub.com.au Barefoot Bowls and more

Fun for all the family Visit our website for all Christmas and New Year’s events

23


SYDNEY

WOLLONGONG

ULLADULLA

JERVIS BAY

KIAMA

ots

p Hot s

21

Top

HELENSBURGH

south coaster

SUMMER 17/ 18

11. ScarboroughWombarra Bowlo.

10. Wombarra Sculpture Garden (open by appointment).

9. Sea Cliff Bridge.

8. Coalcliff.

7. Stanwell Park village, beach and cafes.

6. Bald Hill – lookout and hang-gliding launch pad.

5. Road to Royal National Park.

4. Kelly’s Falls picnic area.

3. Tradies Helensburgh.

2. Sri Venkateswara Hindu Temple.

1. Symbio Wildlife Park.

Follow the Illawarra’s beautiful route from bush to beach – discover the famous Sea Cliff Bridge and other highlights of the Grand Pacific Drive

Do the loop


www.tradies.com.au • 02 4294 1122

EDEN

NAROOMA

BATEMANS BAY

ULLADULLA

xmas gift vouchers. the best gift eva!

0417 939 200

21. Maddens Falls, Dharawal National Park.

20. AppleShack store at Glenbernie Orchard.

19. Boomerang Public Golf Course.

18. Turn-off to Sublime Point Lookout.

17. Southern Gateway Centre, Bulli Tops.

16. Thirroul village.

15. Sublime Point walking track starts.

14. Austinmer Beach, with twin rock pools.

13. Sharkeys Beach, a dog off-leash area.

12. Coledale, with beach camping, cafes and homewares store.

11. ScarboroughWombarra Bowlo.

Garden (open by appointment).


SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

Animal attractions

Photos: Kevin Fallon / Symbio Wildlife Park

There's so much to love at Helensburgh's award-winning zoo.

26

One of Symbio Wildlife Park's newer attractions, the Farmyard, is one of the largest precincts of its kind in Australasia. It includes two barns covering 700 square metres, a chicken coop the size of a three-car garage, and expansive grounds where visitors may feed the animals. General manager Matt Radnidge reckons what sets Symbio apart from other zoos is that it offers visitors an immersive experience. “We get consistent feedback about the interactive side of Symbio; how close you feel and how close you can get to a lot of the animals – really close, intimate encounters,” he said. Matt – pictured above, with his nieces Isabelle and Lara Aldred – had a chat with The South Coaster. Who designed and built the farmyard? The Symbio team. We have been talking about

doing a farmyard project for over five years and have collaborated on what that may look like. What animals call it home? All of the farmyard favourites are in there, including baby lambs and kid goats, chickens, rabbits, guinea pigs, ducklings etc. It's a multi-purpose facility that allows us to house a few other animals as required – such as baby emus and joey kangaroos that we are hand raising. What activities are there for children? Interaction is our key focus within the farmyard, with lots of feeding and petting opportunities. We aim to have additional experiences such as milking demonstrations, billy tea and damper, and Happy Snap photo memories.


SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

Where will baby animals go when they grow up? We aim to set up some reciprocal advantage relationships with farmers where we can return the animals as they grow, and replace with new babies. We may also offer some animals to the public as pets, such as laying chickens for homes to provide their own eggs, or rabbits and guinea pigs as companion animals. We are very conscious of ensuring a suitable home is provided, so all animals will go with relevant care sheets. What veggies are you growing? We started with some really simple things, like assorted greens, celery, tomatoes, corn etc, which are fed to the animals, and some of it makes it onto staff dinner Tables. We aim to host workshops that will allow visitors to gain an insight into growing produce, how to compost,

worm farm etc. We will definitely get our Junior Keeper Camp program involved in some of the planting and harvesting activities. Tell us about your sustainability initiatives. The vision was to create one of the most dynamic and integrated sustainability projects out there, something that was powered by solar power, was totally self-sufficient with rainwater, and gave the public many examples of how they can live a more sustainable life, even in a very small way, which most of the time is a great family activity, and saves you money! Symbio is open daily, 9.30am-5pm. Junior Keeper Camps, for ages 7 to 12, are on in school holidays, call (02) 4294 1244. Symbio Wildlife Park.

27


SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

Inspiration in a cup Stanwell Park poet Ali Whitelock likes to set up her laptop at a local cafe. Here are three of her favourite places.

Ali Whitelock

READ THE BOOK! Ali’s memoir is an enchanted Scottish tale and a raucous romp through a dysfunctional Scottish family. ‘The result is remarkably life affirming.’ – The Sydney Morning Herald. Visit www.aliwhitelock. com

Photos supplied

Poking seaweed with a stick and running away from the smell is my first book. A tragicomical memoir where I dream of shooting my da’ with a sawn-off shotgun, my brother plans to use the longest knife in the cutlery drawer and my mother tries to poison him with out-of-date tranquillisers. My next book, and my heart crumples like a coke can, is a collection of irreverent poetry and is due for release in the next few months.

1

THE PALMS CAFE The Palms' attraction was never only about the delicious coffee and the scent of fresh scones just out of the oven. I felt comfortable here. Welcomed. When we moved to Stanwell Park, The Palms became my go-to place to write. I’d take my dog with me. He’d lay at my feet, one eye on me, one eye on the cafe door, hoping a sausage might miraculously find its way to him. 111 Lawrence Hargrave Drive, Stanwell Park, (02) 4294 3371, www.thepalmscafe.com.au

28

2

16 FEET ESPRESSO This gorgeous little cafe is a bustling hub for locals and bursting with excellent coffee, groovy food and stunning home-made cakes and provides another writing sanctuary for me. Somehow being out in the world, particularly among locals, is important for my writing. It brings a dimension to my work that I wouldn’t get if I were to only work from home. 91A Lawrence Hargrave Drive, Stanwell Park, (02) 4294 1425, @16feetespresso

3

STOKES LANE CAFE Despite living in this South Coast paradise, there are times when I need my city fix. If I don’t want to drive an hour north to Sydney, I drive 15 minutes south to Bulli, to this uber-cool cafe with a couple of outside tables and the most incredible coffee I’ve ever had. Another place where I regularly rock up with my laptop under my arm and join the queue … which is often out the door. 238 Princes Highway, Bulli, www.stokeslanecafe.com. au


SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

True Romance

Want to get married in the great outdoors? Award-winning photographer Anna Blackman picks three beautiful wedding locations.

1

The Beach Anna says: Tuckerman Reserve at Little Austinmer is a lovely place to get married. The grass is right next to the beach. You can go down to the rock platform, it’s fantastic for photos, even at high tide you can still get to it and it’s safe. The details: Call Wollongong City Council (02 4227 7111) to book Tuckerman Park.

2

The Garden Anna says: The Rhododendron Gardens are a little Wollongong secret. It’s up Mt Ousley, hidden away. It’s got a duck pond with a little pergola, Japanese style, it’s like a mini Botanic Gardens. Just beautiful. The details: Illawarra Rhododendron Gardens (Parrish Avenue, Mt Pleasant) are open weekends and public holidays, 9am to 6pm in summer, 5pm in winter. It is $200 to book a ceremony spot, $100 to reserve the shelter shed and $50 for photos only. Phone Vi Worth on (02) 4284 8041.

111 Lawrence Hargrave Dr, Stanwell Park NSW 2508 02 4294 3371 • info@thepalmscafe.com.au • thepalmscafe.com.au Open Breakfast & Lunch | Thursday - Monday 9am - 4pm

Sydney’s largest range of Australian native plants 9 Veno Street, Heathcote 2233 PHONE (02) 9548 2818 OPEN 7 DAYS 9am to 5pm www.sydneywildflowernursery.com.au

3

The Park Anna says: Austinmer’s Glastonbury Gardens is really pretty. There is a giant, old fig tree you can get married under. I’ve seen people hang all different messages from the tree, hearts and lanterns, streamers, you can really dress it up and make it look great. The details: Call Wollongong City Council on (02) 4227 7111 to book a park spot. Wollongong Botanic Garden is another popular venue.

29


SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

Joy of Rock Pools There are 14 stunning tidal rock pools along the Grand Pacific Drive between Coalcliff and Gerringong. Nine of these ocean baths are in the Illawarra, one in Shellharbour and another four around Kiama, including the magnificent Blowhole Point Rock Pool. Historians struggle to put an exact date on the creation of the pools; some are said to have been cut from the rock shelf by communityminded coal miners armed with explosives and pick axes. At best guess, for example, Austinmer’s famous twin pools were built in the 1920s and late 1930s or early 1940s. For many locals, early-morning lap swims in their local pool are a daily ritual. Pools are also a safer option for young children, a refuge from rough surf. Just be careful you don’t get swept over the wall at high tide! The South Coast’s ocean baths are not only important for fitness and fun. They play a pivotal role in coastal society, providing a meeting place

30

for everyone from retirees to mums’ groups. Children love to paddle about exploring the pools, enchanted by little fish, crabs and the occasional octopus. Swim club members carry a sense of camaraderie through a lifetime. The men’s only Austinmer Otters Winter Swimming Club, for example, has been going since 1963, its results book peppered with colourful nicknames: Seagull, Rambo, Son of Rambo, D Day. The Otters is a very social club (members head from the pool to the pub after their weekly swim) and has famously raised thousands for local charities. The South Coast rock pools are very beautiful. Refreshed daily by the tides, with rolling ocean on one side and the grandeur of the escarpment on the other, the pools have inspired countless artists and photographers over the past century. And – like many good things in life – they’re free!


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14

Photos: Lara McCabe; Anthony Warry

The South Coast rock pools are beautiful. Refreshed daily by the tides, with rolling ocean on one side and the grandeur of the escarpment on the other ...

SUMMER 17/18

1

FROM NORTH TO SOUTH

Coalcliff Rock Pool: Walk south along Coalcliff Beach, or park on Paterson Rd, off Lawrence Hargrave Drive, and take the path down through a playground. Wombarra Rock Pool: Long pool and children’s paddling pool, Reef Road. Coledale Rock Pool: Park on Northcote Street or Coledale Avenue, off Lawrence Hargrave Drive. Austinmer Twin Pools: At Austinmer Beach, on Lawrence Hargrave Drive. Bulli Rock Pool: Farrell Road, parking at the Surf Club. Woonona Rock Pool: Collins Point, Kurraba Road. Bellambi Rock Pool: Morgan Place, Bellambi. Towradgi Rock Pool: Towradgi Point, Towradgi Road North Wollongong Rock Pool: (aka the Men’s Baths) on Cliff Road, accessed via a track to the north of the saltwater Continental Baths. Shellharbour Ocean Pool: Addison Street, Shellharbour Kiama’s Continental Pool: At the north end of Black Beach Reserve, with parking in Shoalhaven Street. Blowhole Point Rock Pool: On the north side of Blowhole Point, with access from the harbour road, Kiama. Ourie Pool: At the south end of Werri Beach with access via Pacific Avenue or Geering Street. Boat Harbour Pool: Around the headland north of Gerringong’s Boat Harbour, access via a 50m walkway starting at the Boat Harbour Reserve.

south coaster

14 Grand Pacific Ocean Baths

31


SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

Wild angles Thirroul photographer Ray Collins will launch his new book, Water & Light, on Friday, December 15 at Anita’s Theatre. Here Ray tells about his extraordinary transformation from coal miner to award-winning ocean photographer.

Please introduce yourself. I am an ocean photographer from Thirroul. I went to Bulli High School and I worked as a coal miner in the Illawarra coalfields for a dozen years. That ended over two years ago when photography commanded too much of my time and I could no longer juggle between working underground and shooting, travelling and running a business. So I removed the safety net and here I am. It’s been just 10 years since you bought your first camera, now you’re winning awards all over. Please fill us in on some of the decade’s highlights and how your life has changed. The last 10 years have been so life-changing that it’s hard to actually remember the day to day stuff from a decade ago. I originally set off with the goal of having one published photo within a 12-month time frame. That was realised within six weeks, and I’d had my first cover shot by the fourth month. From there I focussed on winning awards, I used to find personal reward and worth in getting cover shots of magazines or winning awards, but now I realise it’s not a healthy way to view success. I’ve worked with National Geographic, have had works in the Smithsonian Museum, California Academy of Sciences. Won the Australian Surf Photo of the Year twice and

32

heaps of other stuff that I can’t think of off the top of my head. It all means nothing though. It’s just the opinions of others. I shoot to push myself creatively, I want to capture things that have never been seen before, and more importantly, I want to use my voice to bring attention to causes like the protection of our oceans – to be a better person than I was yesterday. In the last decade too, I’ve stopped drinking alcohol and transitioned to a plant-based diet. They’ve both been huge steps in my personal well-being which then feeds into more productivity, which feeds into more well-being and the cycle continues. You are launching a new book, Water & Light, on December 15 at Anita’s Theatre – where did you go and what did you do to capture the images for this book? To make this book I hung harnessed out of a door-less helicopter in Hawaii, swam amongst the below-freezing North Atlantic seas of Iceland, sailed through the remote and uninhabited island chains of the Indonesian archipelago, documented a once-in-a-decade Tahitian mega swell, and drove for days on end to the desolate reefs and bomboras of Australia’s raw southern and eastern coastlines. I also got some of the best stuff swimming out the front of


SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

my house at McCauley’s Beach too! What camera did you use? Mainly D5, D4 and D810 from Nikon Australia. For every water shot, of which there are lots, I used Aquatech Water housings which are a Thirroul-born and -bred company; they’re the best in the world and fortunately for me they’re up the road. I’m so lucky! Where was the book’s cover image taken? The cover image was taken somewhere in the Great Australian Bight, hours away from anywhere or anything. I chose it because it is just so different to any image I had taken, or seen for that matter. It takes a while to process what is even happening. The darkness and moodiness really stood out to me. Who is the publisher and how did you fund the 'making of' the book? I’m self-publishing again, I learned a lot from my first book, Found At Sea, it’s good having complete creative control over the project. Aquatech are the main sponsor for the book, so they helped financially with the cost of production.

When’s the book launch and who’s invited? The launch is on Friday 15th of December at Anita’s Theatre; it’s free and there will be nibblies and drinks on the night. We will also be screening Patagonia’s new film Fishpeople (6.30pm and 8pm) which is about six different people’s relationship with the ocean. I’m one of the people in it and any ocean-loving person will enjoy it. Tickets are $10 for that and can be purchased at Anita’s or at TicketMaster. All profits from the night will go towards the South Coast chapter of The Surfrider Foundation. Where can readers buy a copy of your book? Online at RayCollinsPhoto.com or EarthWalker, Nest, Byrne and a few other places locally. Visit www.raycollinsphoto.com.

3 FAVOURITE SOUTH COAST SPOTS

1 2 3

Stanwell Park to Bellambi. This is my favourite area in the world and the place I connect to the most – it’s ‘home’. Kiama area; the geography changes a lot from the coal coast, only 40 minutes away, the waves change too. Ulladulla/Bawley and beyond; so untouched and pristine.

33


SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

Top

3

Favourite places

Writers' retreats We asked local authors of bestselling books for their favourite spots on the South Coast.

Chris Allen Thriller writer Chris Allen left an action-packed career in the Australian military – he was a paratrooper – to tackle a life-long dream to write action-packed fiction for a living. With five topselling books published and another on the way, he's carving a spy niche all of his own in the global market. “Recently my wife and I made the decision to relocate our lives down here [Gerringong] on the south coast and we feel so lucky that we pinch ourselves almost everyday for having made the move,” Chris Allen tells The South Coaster. “What we’ve found is that the South Coast is much more than just a lifestyle choice, it’s the feeling of community we’ve discovered here that has really put the icing on the cake. “Our two boys are just starting out in their school years and so the simple things in life are what’s making all the difference for our family. We’re blessed with the best neighbours you could ever hope for, so a great deal of our time – when it’s warm – is spent outside chatting, sharing a beer or a glass of wine with our new friends over a barbecue that’s been dragged out into a driveway, while all the kids play on their bikes and scooters or kick around a footy. “We’re walking distance to the beach and we have an unrestricted view of the escarpment. The mooing of cows from a nearby farm sets the scene. It’s absolute paradise. Community is everything here. “My days of jumping out of a C-130 Hercules or abseiling from a helicopter are well behind me now, so our adventure pursuits are much more configured towards things that are suitable for our boys. Need to start them off early!”

34

1

KANGAROO VALLEY: Canoeing in Kangaroo Valley – Glenmack Park: Who wouldn’t enjoy a canoeing adventure in Kangaroo Valley? There is some absolutely incredible scenery along the way – rainforest, wildlife, Tallowa Dam, Shoalhaven Gorge, Hampden Bridge, riding the rapids with the bush towering above you on both sides, clambering over rocks along the banks. Great family fun and a never-to-be forgotten experience. www.kangaroovalleyadventurecompany.com.au


2

www.southcoastluxurycamping.com

3

ILLAWARRA FLY TREE TOP ADVENTURES: This is a great day out for everyone. The kids get a real buzz out of the bushwalks, reading all the wildlife information along the way. Once you reach the treetop walk you enjoy the most spectacular views of the surrounding countryside – basically for as far as the eye can see. And don’t forget the Zipline tours! www.illawarrafly.com

READ THE BOOKS!

“In my Alex Morgan – INTREPID series, I aim to put the reader deep within the action. “My protagonist, Alex Morgan is a former paratrooper and now an agent of INTREPID – the Intelligence, Recovery, Protection and Infiltration Division of Interpol. “INTREPID is a top secret taskforce operating in the shadows to protect the world's

most vulnerable people from the worst among us. “There are currently five books in the series – DEFENDER, HUNTER, AVENGER, HELLDIVER and RANGER – and I’m currently working on number six which I’m calling SHAPESHIFTER.  “I’ve recently made a few changes to my publishing arrangements, so at the movement all of the books are

Author photos: supplied. Other photos: Kangaroo Valley Glenmack Park/South Coast Luxury Camping/Illawarra Fly Tree Top Adventures

SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

SOUTH COAST LUXURY CAMPING: One of the opportunities that’s also available down here is South Coast Luxury Camping. The services they offer are a far cry (massive understatement) from my experience of ‘camping’ in the military! The tents are set up for you before you arrive along with all the modcons – bedding, linen, toiletries, towels, crockery and cutlery – and wine! And, there are a heap of locations to choose from, too.

currently being prepared for re-release. “The full series will be available again from the end of June 2017. “You can keep up to date on everything happening in the world of Alex Morgan via my website: www.chrisallenauthor. com and on Facebook www. facebook.com/IntrepidAllen/” – Chris Allen

35


SUMMER 17/18

south coaster Photos: Shoalhaven City Council/Andy Hutchinson/Katie Rivers/Eurobodalla Shire Council

Pamela Cook

36

Pamela Cook is a city girl with a country lifestyle and too many horses. "My rural fiction novels feature complex women, tangled family relationships and a healthy dose of romance," she told the South Coaster. Her first novel, Blackwattle Lake, was published in 2012 after being selected for the Queensland Writer’s Centre/Hachette Manuscript Development Program. Her following novels were Essie’s Way (2013) and Close To Home (2015) and her fourth book, The Crossroads, was released in December 2016. An eclectic reader, Pamela also enjoys writing poetry, memoir pieces and literary fiction and is proud to be a Writer Ambassador for Room To Read, a not-for-profit organisation that promotes literacy and gender equality in developing countries. When she’s not writing she wastes as much time as possible riding her handsome quarter horses, Morocco and Rio. "The South Coast is my favourite getaway destination. There are a heap of things to do if you feel like getting out and about or plenty of places to sit and relax, take in the view or enjoy the amazing variety of great food venues on offer. "There are so many more places I could recommend but then I’d be giving away secrets! The Crossroads, my most recent novel, is set in outback Queensland but my first three books – Blackwattle Lake, Essie’s Way and Close To Home – are all based on different parts of the South Coast. The area has been a very important part of my life since I was a child and every time I’m there it feels like coming home.

1

NARRAWALLEE INLET: One of my top spots is Narrawallee lake. It’s perfect for families with great swimming options – lake on one side and beach on the other – but also ideal if you want some solitude, especially in winter. I love to take a notepad and pen and sit by the shore watching the tide rise and fall, and listening to the sigh of the ocean breeze through the mangroves. For more, visit www.shoalhaven.com.au

2

MILTON: Browsing – and often buying – in the gorgeous shops in Milton is one of my favourite pastimes . Unique pieces of jewellery, head-turning clothes and designer homewares make sticking to a budget way too hard! And you can’t go past Pilgrims for coffee, lunch or the best milkshakes on the South Coast (or possibly in the universe!) For more, visit www.shoalhaven.com.au

3

SHALLOW CROSSING: Driving through the beautiful state forests and national parks is the perfect way to escape. My number one destination is Shallow Crossing on the Clyde This page: Narrawallee Inlet


SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

Shallow Crossing

The Studio Coledale limited edition local photography available at Nest Emporium Thirroul.

River. Pack a picnic and sit by the riverbank taking in the tranquil beauty of the bush or cool off in summer with a refreshing swim. We love to stop in at the local Berry Farm on the way, fill a few buckets with berries and devour the delectable homemade ice cream. For more, visit www.eurobodalla.com.au

READ THE BOOKS!

Pamela's novels – Blackwattle Lake, Essie’s Way, Close To Home and The Crossroads – are available through her website or in all good bookshops. Pamela also teaches writing courses and workshops through her business, Justwrite (www.justwrite.net.au). She loves to connect with readers in person and online. You will often find her lurking in one of these places: www.pamelacook.com.au www.facebook.com/PamelaCookAuthor @PamelaCookAU

0422 865 648 robyn@beachframing.com 13 George St Thirroul NSW 2515

Thursday and Friday 9:30am - 5:30pm Saturday 9am - 12pm

37


SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

Currarong

Caroline Baum "Only is my memoir of being the only child of parents with turbulent European pasts," the Wombarra-based author says. "It's a story of privilege, conflict, secrets, love and loss. I'm currently working on my second book, based on the life of a Frenchwoman who witnessed epic rifts and convulsions at the heart of French society from the Belle Epoque to World War II." Currarong

2

ILLAWARRA ROCKSHELVES The rockshelves between Wombarra and Thirroul are a beautiful canvas of geology and intertidal ecology. Their textures are intriguingly diverse and display stunning colours due to the presence of minerals; snails create a fine tracery of squiggles as they fossick for food. I find these patterns hypnotic and very soothing after a day writing. I take endless Insta snaps of them and then return with a good camera to make limited edition prints of the best ones.

1

CURRARONG The lagoon at Currarong is the perfect place to paddle board and play water frisbee, and watch how far the tide goes out; it's a safe gentle spot and easy to cross to the broad flat beach – perfect for morning walks. A favourite spot in summer after school holidays when the water stays warm for months. For more, go to www.shoalhaven.com.au

READ THE BOOK!

Caroline’s memoir, Only, recounts her colourful life as an only child, and is "a painfully honest and entertaining story of an unconventional childhood", according to Booktopia. Visit www. carolinebaum.com.au

38

3

COASTAL WALK The coastal walk from Kiama to Gerringong is a good work-out with sweeping views , which means you feel you've earned your fish 'n' chips at Werri Beach. I'm always amazed that you can have so much beauty to yourself, there's often no one on the path out of season or midweek. For more, go to www.visitkiama.com.au.

Photos: Shoalhaven City Council/Caroline Baum/Kiama Municipal Council

Follow Caroline on Instagram @ lacarolinebaum


SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

Jeff Apter Renowned biographer Jeff Apter had a chat with The South Coaster and gave us his three favourite places on the NSW South Coast.

1

WHITE RABBIT CAFE, KEIRAVILLE — Remember in the TV show Cheers when Norm would walk into the bar and be greeted by drinkers, as one, calling out his name? I get a slightly understated version of that at my favourite lunch spot, the White Rabbit, where everybody knows your name (or at least mine). Anything with eggs is gold.

@Whiterabbitkeiraville

You’ve produced such an enormous volume of work about the music industry. How did your career begin? Ever since I can remember, I wanted to write. At the same time I had a decidedly geeky interest in music – I grew up on Bob Dylan, Lou Reed, David Bowie and the Beatles, the classics. In my teens I read a book called No One Here Gets Out Alive, a biography of the Doors’ Jim Morrison. It was then that I realised you could write about music and musicians in a thrilling way, without pandering to the subject. That book was the perfect melding of my two key interests: music and writing. It was the starting point for me, although it wasn’t until the early 2000s that I wrote my first book. The appeal for me is the same as it is for so many music fans: who are these people that make music? What is it that inspires them? What hardships have they endured to get to where they are? What are they like?

2

Your new book, High Voltage, is out now. What’s it about? It’s a biography of Angus Young, the oldest man to ever wear a schoolboy’s uniform, a guy who’s the sound, the face and sometimes the bared spotty backside of AC/DC. It’s the first biography totally focusing on Angus and his journey — he’s now the last original member of the band left. For more details or to buy one of Jeff's books visit jeffapter.com.au.

3

BELMORE BASIN, WOLLONGONG A very family-friendly, something-foreveryone community promenade, with some of the best fish-and-chips in the 2500 postcode. And did you know that Bob Dylan once swam in the Continental Baths? True story. visitwollongong.com.au

JAMBEROO, ILLAWARRA If you walk around the township, especially in winter, it’s like rewinding time 100 years or so. I’m not much for living in the past, but this is an exception. It’s green and lush and picturesque and just a little bit spooky — and it has its own croquet club. Who else can say that? visitwollongong.com.au

Photos: supplied / Dee Kramer Photography (Belmore Basin image)

Jeff, tell us a bit about yourself. I’m a former Sydney-sider, the father of two school-age kids, and I’ve been living in the Illawarra for the past 10 years. I’ve been a professional writer for some 30 years and have written more than 20 books, many of them dealing with music and musicians. I also write for Rolling Stone (I was on staff there for four years), the Guardian and the Sydney Morning Herald. I’m a regular on Nick Rheinberger’s ABC Illawarra morning show; I’ve also spoken at various writers festivals and libraries in and around the Illawarra and beyond.

39


SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

Dr Rip’s Science of the Surf Dr Rob Brander has five summer surf safety tips that you simply must read.

Summer is here so it’s time for my obligatory ‘surf safety tips’ and while many experienced beachgoers may be thinking ‘yep, already know this stuff!’, it’s always risky to be over-confident and complacent and a myth to think only international visitors get into trouble. Most drownings on Australian beaches are Australians who live near the coast. Here are my top 5 things to think about when you swim at a beach: 1. Always swim between the red and yellow flags. We hear this so much it’s almost boring, but it’s so important, particularly if you have kids, are not a confident ocean swimmer, and don’t understand much about waves and rip currents. Drownings rarely, if ever, occur between the red and yellow flags. Lifeguards and lifesavers do an amazing job of keeping you safe. If they can’t see you, they can’t save you. 2. Spend 5 minutes looking at conditions before going in. If there are no red and yellow flags on the beach (or even if there are), you absolutely

40

have to spend a few minutes thinking about whether the conditions look safe or not to enter the water. Are the waves too big? Is the water moving along the beach? Are there rips? Is there a nasty shore dump? Are there flags further down the beach? You don’t cross the road without looking both ways and you should never go for a swim without spending some time thinking about whether it’s safe or not. Those few minutes may save your life. 3. Know your rip currents. All surf beaches have rips. These strong, narrow seaward flowing currents often occupy semi-permanent deeper channels against headlands and along the beach, and can suddenly appear out of nowhere when large waves break. Along our coast they occur about every 150m along the beach and there are about 17,000 rips on Australian beaches at any given time. Do you know how to spot rips? If not, look at my Rip of the Month feature at www.scienceofthesurf.com. There are seven years of rip pictures! Also keep an eye out for a documentary called Rip Current Heroes that will premiere on the National Geographic Channel this December 20 at 9pm. It’s an amazingly powerful and educational doco and I’m in it! The picture, at left, is a screen grab. 4. Don’t just run in to save someone. Tragically, many people drown trying to save others. If you do see someone in trouble, even if it’s a family member, it’s important to not rush in, but take 10 seconds thinking about what you should do. Get someone to go get a lifeguard or call for help. Look for something on the beach that floats, that you and the person you are trying to save can hold onto. 5. Keep your eyes open. Never turn your back on breaking waves when you are coming out of the ocean, especially dumping waves. Look for jellyfish washed up on the beach. If they’re on the beach, they are probably in the water! Just being an extra bit observant can end up saving you a lot of pain. n If you want more information you can always read Dr Rip’s Essential Beach Book (UNSW Press) while relaxing on the beach (this is my annual shameless Christmas gift plug!). Visit www.scienceofthesurf.com. Have a question for Dr Rip about the Science of the Surf? Email rbrander@unsw.edu.au


SUMMER 17/18

3

south coaster

Top Dive sites

Top 3 dive sites Rachael Fallon, general manager at Abyss Scuba Diving in Sydney, picks her favourite South Coast destinations.

1Martin Island Seal Dive

Swimming with seals must be one of the best things to do in the ocean. They are so cute, just like puppy dogs of the ocean. There is a secret location that the locals know about that is an amazing dive with seals. They are sure to get up close and personal with scuba diver and snorkellers and it will be an experience you will remember forever. Just south of Wollongong at Port Kembla, the boat does a short trip out to Martin Island, where the seals swim from down south for a holiday from June to October. As soon as the boat pulls up, the seals jump in the water and come right up to the boat to check it out. They are super-friendly and inquisitive – both snorkellers and divers can get close enough to just about touch them before they dart off. Make sure you have your camera for this one. The seals are so cute. This is an easy dive and snorkel for anyone to join in.

Photos: Kristine O'Keeffe

2Wreck Of The Bombo

Everyone loves a wreck dive. Be it the history of the wreck, the excitement of descending to explore a big structure or even simply the sheer numbers of fish attracted to the artificial reef, a wreck makes for an amazing dive. The south coast of Sydney, off Wollongong, is lucky enough to have a great wreck that divers love to explore. In 1949, the collier freighter SS Bombo, carrying 650 tonnes of 'blue metal' (basalt aggregate), disappeared off the coast of

Wollongong. A combination of the blue metal shifting in her no. 1 hold and rough seas caused her to capsize and sink without a trace for more than 30 years. There were only two survivors. The Bombo now lays upside down and broken in half at a depth of 30 metres just outside Wollongong Harbour. She is a perfect artificial reef, home to thousands of fish with several swim-throughs of interest. It is always an adventure, with different marine life every time you descend. Divers can always expect to see wobbegong sharks, cuttlefish, lots of school fish and sometimes there is even a grey nurse shark around!

3The Gravel Loader

Heading a little further south to Shellharbour, there is a great little shore dive called the Gravel Loader. Once again an excellent dive with lots to see. The Gravel Loader is, just as the name suggests, a very large pier that extends out into Shellharbour Bay for about 500 metres. So basically the diver can just swim between the pylons, making it an easy dive to naturally navigate. As I am sure you know, fish like a structure. So the structure of the pylons has become home to loads of marine creatures, big and small. Expect to swim though a heaps of yellowtail and at the end you will find a big school of old wives (pictured above), a spectacular sight.

41


1233 1.52 0.32 0.23 0.11 1823 0.42 0.34 1.72 0.07 32 FRDECEMBER MO 1800 TUNOVEMBER TH 1301 SA 1343 1.65 TU 1718 TH 1736 MO 1658 WE 1745 0.43 1.21 0.24 1.34 0.27 38 Time 2038 m Time 1959 m 2349 me m 2301 1.43 Time m 2316 1.22 Time 1929 m 2334

0120 0255 0.44 0120 0209 0.35 0524 30 0005 0.28 0448 0031 0136 0.300459 0035 0022 0.330443 1.13 0.55 1.39 0.33 1.18 0.54 1.23 0.41 40 16 1.63 16 1.62 1 25 1 25 10 10 0740 10 0830 22 22 7 1113 7 1150 0756 1.61 0744 1.55 42 0559 1.35 0657 0655 1.601128 0650 0552 1.401114 0.68 0.38 0.58 0.57 60 1.85 1.89

1.28 0.60 1430 0.40 1.52 1402 0.40 32 0.45 1316 0.37 1248 0.471759 1.45 1.68 1.50 1.63 34 SA 0.35 TH 0.37 WE 0.14 FR 0.12 SA 1319 TU 1223 WE 1223 FR 1404 SU 1445 WE FR 1815 TU 1754 TH 1842 1.24 0.33 1957 2105 1.38 0.29 1913 2021 45 1900 1.58 0.28 1854 1911 1.44 0.46 2017 2134 1.502359 0.47 1.18 31

SU 1247 1.52 1939 0.39

25 0152 0719

1.20 0.66 MO 1334 1.45 2027 0.41

0157 0.45 1.30 0156 0320 0.36 0049 15 0105 0.26 0000 0116 0233 0.270016 0115 0111 0.270521 1.13 1.19 1.29 1.35 1.13 December 1.22 1.30 0246 46 2017 17 0.59 17 0.59 2 26 2 26 11 11 0852 11 0358 23 23 8 0539 8–0622 0831 1.65 0.63 26 0821 0821 1.61 27 0651 1.44 0742 0753 1.730541 0730 0636 1.521151 0943 0.61 0.71 0.47 0.64 1.57 58 0.41 PORT KEMBLA NEW 0.48 SOUTH WALES SUMMER 17/18

S

south coaster

1.23 0.67 1510 0.36 1.41 TU 1429 1.39 1445 0.36 25 1319 0.38 1409 0.251206 1336 0.36 1513 1.55 1414 1.40 1.63 1.44 1.58 38 1245 1.78 SUChart FR 0.40 SA TH 1.80 SU WE TH 1308 MO 1548 SA TH 1842 WE 1205 LAT 34°FR 29ʼ LONG 150° 55ʼSA Port Kembla Tidal 2058 2228 1.24 0.38 Local Time 2038and2209 1.35 34 2008 1.58 1854 2006 2116 1.451856 1941 2005 1.54 0.50 Times 0.32 2116 0.41 0.46 0.37 0.33 0.18 24 Heights1940 of High 0.19 and Low Waters JANUARY

2017

2017

FEBRUARY

MARCH

APRIL

56 0213 0.25 0101 0201 0335 0.250102 0153 0208 0.230045 0230Time 0.39 0151 0231 0456 0.47 1.36 1.09 1.20 1.27 0429 1.26 1.28 1.17 1.19 0344 1.15 52 Local 3 3127 18 18 12 12 12 27 24 24 9 0636 9 08 0753 1.51 0829 0902 1.840627 0811 0730 1.640604 0856 1.64 0906 1.68 0.61 27 0931 0.69 1055 0.54 1007 0.61 0.72 0.50 0724 0.55 0.64 0.62 55 16 1 16 16 1 16 1 Time

m

Time

m

Time

m

Time

m

Time

m

Time

m

Time

m

BER 13 0.34 1502 0.14 1424 0.26 1525 0.33 1546 0.33 1.33 1.39 1.58 1.49 1.37 1233 42 SU 1.65 FR 1.72 SA 1.52 MO 1.52 FR 1401 TU 1653 TH 1423 SU 1622 MO 1515 FRDECEMBER SU 1247 TH 1301 SA 1343 19 Time 1.55 1959 2100 1.451939 2028 1.551929 2118 Time 1.32 2137 2317 1.24 2107 0.52 2121 0.35 2307 0.33 0.43 0.24 2038 0.27 0.39 Time M Time M 2210 Time M 0.41 m m Time m 0.43 0.47 1.72 0.27 1.26

0536 0.44 1156 1.70 MO 1834 0.26

0514 0.50

0044 1.32

0049 1.41

TU 1221 1.62 1906 0.30

WE 1320 1.43 1955 0.42

FR 1345 1.43 2011 0.37

0430 1059 SU 1742 2342

0002 0549 WE 1205 1837

1.39 0.42 1.64 0.26

0043 0642 TH 1245 1900

1.38 0.54 1.39 0.46

0450 1105 WE 1727 2337

0.30 1.70 0.21 1.56

0533 1137 TH 1740 2359

0.45 1.43 0.45 1.49

0001 0631 SA 1236 1830

1.75 0.29 1.43 0.43

1.29 0.66 WE 1532 1.34 2209 0.40 Time M Time

0536 1135 SU 1707 2337

m

0.50 1.24 0.64 1.54

0124 1.36

0541 0.32

0615 0.50

0054 1.71

0625 0.54

SA 1416 1.18 2023 0.58

FR 1242 1.49 1853 0.35

SA 1257 1.25 1846 0.58

MO 1348 1.24 1928 0.61

TU 1321 1.15 1844 0.76

33 0120 0.27 0330 18 46 0744 1.56 0905 58 57 0.31 1534 50 FR1402 FR TH 00 1957 1.51 2233 47

17 0136 2 0642 0233 0.21 0301 0.42 1.17 21.23 0528 0315 1.09 0625 0.521.13 1139 1.68 0.46 0209 0120 0.35 0031 0.30 1822 0.28 TU 1238 1.57 TH 1252 1.55 0852 1.740655 0930 1.66 0.59MO0.57 1117 0837 0.72 0740 0756 1.55 0657 1.60 1915 0.350.68 1921 0.31 1514 0.18 1602 0.32 1.55 1726 1505 1.36 1404 1430 0.40 1316 0.37 SA 1.63 SU MO0141 SA SA 1319 SU SA FR1.27 0130 1.301.45 0028 1.43 18 2021 3 0741 0715 0.590.46 0600 0.52 0.50 2116 1.54 2157 1.29 0.34 30.29 2357 2209 0.50 2105 2017 1.38 1913 1.44

17 20.26 0249 0306 0.482 0634 0548 1.420.34 17 1224 1.33 0433 1.24 0440 0730 1.28 0.60 1.19 1151 0152 1.61 171.20 1215 1.34 0255 0.44 FR 1327 1.28 MO 1750 0.70 TH 1808 0.27 FR 1811 0.51 0941 1202 1.70SU 1238 0917 1.930719 0.571.32 0.57 1014 0.68 0.66 1045 0830 1.61 1938 0.60 0.52 1824 0.53 1622 0.31 0053 1556 0.08 1.281.66 TH0023 1.46 1.36 1641 1445 0.40 MO WE1.471752 TU 1620 MO 0211 1.52 1.35 1.49 0024 1334 1.57TU 1.45 0036 18 31.42 0700 0.55 0829 0.33 0.65 0.57 0635 2027 0.36 180.41 2215 1.233 0745 0.39 18 0720 2156 0.33 2300 0.39 2301 2134 1.24

1.38 0.60 1.31 0.37

07 0156 0.30 0446 13 23 0821 1.59 1021 64 39 0.31 1646 44 SA1445 SA FR 41 2038 1.45 2336 50

03340238 0.46 0315 0.220233 1.20 1.22 0423 1.12 0618 0320 0.36 0157 0116 0.27 1.13 0218 1.29 0116 1.28 1.45 19 0753 4 0850 0653 0.56 0810 0.650.71 0.53 1003 1.67 0937 1.82 0.58 40.61 0951 0.71 1220 0852 0742 1.73 1.61 0831 WE 1308 1.55 TH 1406 1.31 SA 1449 1.32 1641 0.32 1604 0.13 1.55 1613 1.36 1822 1513 1409 0.25 0.36 1510 MO SU 1.55 SU TU2107 SU 1414 MO 1953 2037 0.481.40 0.42 SU SA0.32 22360341 1.25 2208 1.492116 0.31 0.32 2305 0.46 2209 2006 1.45 1.35 2058 0211 1.31 0310 1.300.46 1.49

0343 0.50 0159 0338 0525 0.29 0001 0.431.61 1.41 1.34 1.23 0534 0358 1.30 0246 0.45 0118 1.44 0304 1.34 0115 1.57 0118 1.45 41.96 19 0736 0821 0.42 190.67 0753 0.59 0938 0.63 0.67 0.58 1015 1.694 0858 1007 0635 1.490.42 19 0822 0.51 1120 0.60 1155 0943 1.65 SU 1520 1.11 SA 1339 1.36 SU 1346 1.18 WE 1429 1.15 1659 0.31TU 1507 1649 0.05 0.521.22 1.43 1.38 1748 1548 0.36 WE 1.39 TU TH0.641300 WE 1722 TU 1944 1429 0.44 1930 2120 1.41 0.62 2042 0.65 FR1952 0.78 2255 1.22 0311 2252 1.39 1846 1.261.58 2346 0.34 2354 2228 0.41 1.24 0208 1.40 0406 0.38 1.35 0213 2116 1.55 0222 1.43

1.50 0.50 1.32 0.35

39 0230 0.34 0549 09 59 0856 1.60 1131 69 19 0.32 1750 39 SU1525 SU SA 19 2118 1.38 52

1402 1.47 FR 1500 1.21 1.24 SU 1604 0407 0.50 0400 0.260335 1.27TH1.26 0042 0521 1.19 0429 0201 0.25 0.39 0231 2044 0.34 0.45 2125 0.531.17 2211 1038 1.65 1024 1.85 0.52 0.61 0703 1059 0.66 1007 0902 0.72 0829 1.84 1.64 0906 0447 1.55 0309 1.36 0405 1.33 21 1515 6 1129 0903 1025 0.691.37 0.46 1718 0.34 1658 0.11 1.56 1315 1714 1.39 1622 1502 0.14 0.33 1546 TU MO61.49 WE MO TU MO SU0.59 MO 1505 1.38 SA 1605 1.14 MO 1724 1.21 2316 1.22 2301 1.432210 1912 2353 0.39 2307FR0.33 2100 1.45 1.32 2137 2139 0.36 2216 0.550.43 2315 0.45

1636 1.08 1.19 1445 1.25 MO 1447 1.12 MO SU WE 1620 TH 1537 0420 0.52 0430 0.34 0043 0.441.25 0.34 0612 1.46 0627 0456 1.29 0.47 2027 0.70 2224 1.36 0.64 2156 0.64 2106 0.76 1.64 2044 0344 0.51 1051 1.67 1058 1.95 0717 1.55 1.48 1220 0.49 1259 0.37 1055 0.61 0931 0.66 1.68 0509 1.39 0420 1.58 0329 1.44 0318 1.55 0309 1.38 21 6WE 211.34 1005 1532 0.47TH 1006 1200 1.33 0.59 0.50 1.34 1736 0.326 1107 1745 0.07 0.460.39 21 0.45 1.41 1852 1653 0.33 WE FR0.621348 TH 1818 SA1020 TU 1749 1.10 TH 1721 1.32 FR 1635 1.27 MO 1604 1.19 TU 1601 1.10 2334 1.21 2303 2349 1.34 1933 1.240.59 1.41 2317 0.40 1.24 2153 2209 0.56 2136 0.72 2326 0.41 0.62 2214 0.70

13 10 4 281 25 19 16 13 10 4 28 25 19 13 16

14 11 5 29 26 20 14 14 11 5 292 26 20 17 17 5 0753

0.58

20 0914

0.69

0410 1020 SA 1617 2237

1.44 0.55 1.33 0.36

0502 1137 SU 1715 2311

1.37 0.65 1.12 0.56

MO 1819 1.13

0.65

5 0846

0.46

20 0856

0.62

0553 1.64 1240 0.37 TU 1835 1.24

0606 1.45 1255 0.51 WE 1846 1.15

0430 1122 TU 1725 2305

1.56 0.43 1.19 0.55

0416 1114 WE 1715 2247

1.39 0.58 1.13 0.70

WE 1340 0.27 1936 1.29

0.58 1.53 TH 1340 0.43 1933 1.21

0538 1.61 1230 0.37 WE 1832 1.25

5 1009

0.52

20 1052

15 12 6 30 27 21 15 15 12 6 303 27 21 18 18

22 0433 7 0306 22 0448 0609 0.33 0443 0.54 0.48 0524 70.410440221.38 0459 11 0301 0.40 0.42 1.29 0528 71.33 0548 1.42 09 0249 0.26 1.24 22 0.68 22 0.60 13 1.66 13 1.70 28 19 4 19 1113 1.851014 1114 1.62 1150 28 1.891045 1128 32 0930 1.60 1157 0.57 11177 31 0.57 12027 0.57 72 0917 1.93 0941 1754 1806 0.141620 1759 0.37 1752 1.28 1842 0.121641 1.31 1815 59 0.34 1726 1.46 1.44 1.36 36

1556 0.08 1622 WE TH TU 1.54 MO 0.32TU 0510 WE TU 0556 SU 1602 MO 1.43 TU 0017 0.43 0.31 8 0652 23 0020 23 2300 1136 0.47 1239 0.580.39 1.72 1.23 0655 2359 1.18 59 2157 1.31 1.29 2357 80.33 50 2156 1.42 2215 SU 1730 1.30 2334 0.36

TH

8

05210115 0.59 42 0334 0.46 0.46 0000 1.350525 0049 0001 0.43 12 0618 1.41 0343 0.50 0338 0.29 1.34 0609 1.65 0001 0.54 0.39 0108 0.52 of 2015, of1.50Meteorology 90.51 24 1120 9 0746 24 07Australia 1.58 1.67 0539 0.41 0622 1151 1.57 0635 71 1220 0.60 1245 Bureau 0.36 1.80 1.69 0738 1.49 1.61 0645 1003 1015 1007 1.96 1839 1.31 TU 1329 0.49 0.20 FR 1418 0.35 MO1.43 TH 1431 40Astronomical 0.38 1205 1.801722 1245 1842 0.40 1300 36 1822 1641 1659 0.05 TH WE FR TH TU 0.32 WE MO WE TU 1649 2029 1.34 0.31 2014 0.52 1.28 1913 1.161.38 st Tide 39 2236 1.24 1.25 1854 0.182346 1940 1846 1.26 46 0.34 0208 2255 2252 1.39 0030 0.34 0048 0.52 0.35 1.22 0151 0.46

FR 0520 1211 2301230.37

29

5 1007

21 15 9 6 30 24 21 15 9

30 24

20 0925

0.55

0430 1108 SA 1724 2312

1.49 0.43 1.37 0.61

30

22 0045 31 0718

0.52 0612 1.60 SA 1242 0.35 1853 1.47

8

0016 1.19 0050 1.30 0534 1.50 0011 0.51 0615 1.50 90.48 0541 0.599 0658 1258 0.43 0639 1155 1.67 240.50 1325 0.30 FR 1901 1.28 TH 1.78 1206 1.58SU 1320 FR 1932 1928 1748 1.32SA 1.32 0.19 1856 0.37 0134 2354 0.35 0109 0.45 0042 0.56

29 23

0.41

0520 1.59 0.36 1.40

0.557 1158 1.63FR 1810 0.35 0000 1.43

0.51 TH 1815 1.19 2349 0.65

20 14 8 5 29 23 20 14 8 ALES

2017

28

0.47 1.60 0.34 1.53

0.32 1.77 1357 0.24 SU0522 1.56 23 1152 0.36 1.36 1951 SU 1807 1.49

24 0005 0612

0.49 1.62 MO 1234 0.30 1849 1.62

0056 0.38 10 0836 1.84 25 (UTC 10 0740 0.43 10 0705 or 25 0727 1.57savings 10 0732 1.71when 25 0702in1.58effect me (UTC +10:00) time 1.77 daylight 0818 1.68 +11:00) 1.57 25 0700 1.65 1347 0.251.27 1411 0.421.46 1412 0627 0.26 SA1.64 1338 0.35 0.16 0043 0.28 WE 0612 FR 1518 SA 1455 0.44 FR MO 1355 0.36 TU 1316 0.26 0045 1.15 0102 1.19 0101 0151 1.28 15 0407 0.52 0.50 0042TU0.34 19 0430 0.34 0420 0.52 Local Time 1942 1.33 1958 1.20 Quarter 2015Moon 1.39 1943 1.38 2115 1.38 2052 1.35 2008 1.58 1932 1.74 New Moon First Last Quarter 0636 0.501220 0724 Full 0.55 44 1038 1.55 06040258 0.64 0627 0.62 0215 0.41 0717 1.55 0703 1.48 1259 0.37 66 1.65 1058 1.95 0.49 1051 1.67 0125 0.32 0131 0.49 0234 0.39 0200 0.40 0130 0.47 0.33 0146 0.29 OVEMBER DECEMBER 11 26 26 11 26 11 11 26 1301 1.72 1343 1.65 23 0.42 1233 1.52 1247 1.52 1348 0.46 1315 0.45 1818 1.41 1852 1.34 39 0759 1.86 0807 1.64 0858 1.73 0820 1.73 0746 1.65 0923 1.85 0819 1.53 0751 1.66 1718 0.34 1745 0.07 1736 0.32 FR TH SU TH WE TH SA FR SA TU WE

1443 0.16 TH 1449 0.35 1454 0.15 SU 1531 0.22 SA 1601 1959 0.242039 2038 0.43 1933 1912 39 2349 1.34 2334 TimeWE1.41 m 1.35 Time m SA0.27 m 2316 1.22 Time m 2038 1.24 1929 2130 1.24 1.42 2057 2200 1.41 1.21

0.24 1.44

1939 0.39TU 1427 2043

SU 1416 0.28 2022 1.48

0120120.35 0120 0.44 0031 0136 0.30 0.33 1.13 0.55 0152 0209 0524 1.23 22 0443 1.18 0.54 0255121.280045270.32 29 27 0.41 12 0459 27 16 1.63 16 1.62 1 1.89 25 25 10 10 22 7 22 0744 1.55 0756 1.61 0657 1.601128 1.40 0655 0.68 0719 0740 0.57 52 1114 0.58 0830 31 0.600718 1.77 57 1150 0.37 1.45 1430 0.40 0.47 1334 1404 1.63 1316 1319 23 1.50 1402 0.40 1445 1.521357 0.24 44 0218 0849 TH 1534 2130

0.31 1.92 0.10 1.37

0212 0845 FR 1526 2117

0.46 1.70 0.29 1.28

0345 1007 SU 1641 2243

0.34 1.81 0.18 1.41

0317 0938 MO 1608 2211

0247 0904 SU 1531 2136

0.34 1.76 0.19 1.48

0.37 1.72 0.25 1.48

0215 0830 MO 1455 2102

0.38 1.71 0.22 1.58

0255 0857 WE 1457 2115

SA 1601 0.24 2156 1.31

MO 1718 0.24 2324 1.41

0400 1026 SA 1708 2310

0333 1000 SU 1638 2236

0514 0.41 1129 1.62 TU 1753 0.31

TU 1646 0.18 2252 1.53

MO 1606 0.28 2214 1.50

TU 1534 0.20 2144 1.66

0413 1023 TU 1639 2249

0.37 1.61 0.33 1.51

0350 1000 WE 1615 2227

0.25 1.71 0.21 1.73

15 1100

1.52

30 1049

1.64

0157 0.45 0156 0.36 0116 0233 0.270016 0.27 1.13 1.19 11 0521 1.13 0.59 0358 1.30 0320 0049 1.22 1.30 0246 17 0.59 17 1.57 26 11 11 23 8 23 0831 1.65 0821 0742 1.73 1.52 of 0753 0.71 36Meteorology 0.64 0943140.63 26 0852 0.61 14 0541 141.61 292 0.48 290821 1151 0622 0.25 1.40 1510 0.36 0.36 08 1.44 1445 0.36 1548 1.41 1513 1.55 1409 1414 1429

0.41 1.43 TH 1527 0.47 2147 1.62

28 0331 0936

0.43 1.37 0.52 1.61

29 0427 1032

1.23 0.67 14 0413 1013 FR 1558 1.39 1842 0.40 1245 1.78 1206 1.58 SU FR SA SU MO SA TU TH FR SA 2221 2058 1.24 2006 1.450003 1.54 2116 0.46 05 0.50 2038 1.35 2228 0.38 2209 0.320415 2116 0.41 0453 1940 0.19 1856 0.37 0448 0.38 1.40 0.39 0453 0.41 0440 0.23 0.34 1.90 0.12 1.36

0.40 1.76 0.21 1.34

ht savings time +11:00) when in effect 15 1112(UTC 1.82 30 0557 0.47 1040 1.76 15

1752 0.18 1.51 0.21 0335 WE 1206 MO 1715 0201 0.25 0.23 0230SU0.39 08 0045 1.09 1.15 0429 1.26 1.17 0102 0151 1.28 2357 1.34 1827 0.38 2317 1.37 irst Quarter Moon 0829 1.840627 1.64 0856 1.64 30 0604 0.69 0.64 1007 0724 0.61Full 0902 0.72 0.55 0500 0.40 1502 0.14 0.26 1525 01 1233 1.39 1622 1.49 1.37 31 1.65 SU1121 SA 1.52 MO 1.72 1515 SU 0.33 MO FR SU 1247 SA 1343 0.22 1.45 TU 1755 2100 1.55 2118 1.32 07 1929 0.52 0.43 2307 2038 0.33 2210 1939 0.43 0.27

0231 1.19 0906 0.62 1546 1.52 TU 2137 0.39

24 18 12 9 3 27 24 18 12

0.21 0301 0.42 0249 0433 0.260152 0306 0.48 0528 0255 1.33 1.28 0548 15 0136 1.09 1.13 1.24 1.20 19 0.68 4 0.60 19 0.66 13 13 28 25 25 10 1.74 0930 1.66 0917 1.930719 0941 1.70 1117 0.57 1202 37 0655 0.72 1014 0.68 0830 0.18 0.08 1.36 1622 0.31 1726 1.46 1556 1620 1752 05 1.36 1602 0.32

SU SA 1319 1.54 09 2021 0.50

15 1052

1710 0.38 TH0344 1657 0.26 0.47 0456 WE1.36 1.29SA 1630 2258 2324 1.51 2313 1.76 Last Quarter 1.68 1055 0.61 0931 0.66 0533 0.25 0.33 1653 1.33 WE 1.34 311532 1141 1.55 1742 0.34 FR2209 1.24 0.40 2317 0.41

27

WE 1359 0.25 2017 1.84

27 0238 0843

1.20 12 0.66 1842 1815 SA 0.35 TH 0.37FR 0310 FR 0.12 SA MO 0301 0.311.45 0333 SU SU WE 1759 TH0.32 0402 0.31 0.42 FR 0430 0.36 0330 0.36 28 0252 13 10480.46 13 0934 1957131.38 2017 1913 1.44 1.50 2027 0.41 2105 11 2359 0.47 1.18 2134 0.33 0939 1.940.29 1.73 28 1020 1.24 1.75 13 0923 1.74 2021 0945 1951 1.67 281.36 0915 1.73 FR 1622 0.09 2221 1.37

0.39 1.61

0.41 1.48 0.43 1.62

1.42 0440 1.38  Copyright Commonwealth of Australia 2015, Bureau of Meteorology 0.57 1045 0.60 Datum of Predictions is Lowest Astronomical Tide are1445 in local +10:00) or daylight savings time (UTC 1.28 1641 when 1.31in effect 1.45 1334 1.45 1.52 MOstandard TU MOTimesSU WE TH +11:00) TU time MO(UTC Phase Symbols New 2027 Moon First Quarter Full Moon 2157 Moon 1.29 2156 2300 1.42 2215 1.23 2357 0.33 2301 0.37 0.39 0.41 0.46 2134 0.33

0.22 1.63 TH 1444 0.28 2103 1.90 0.18 1.57 FR 1530 0.33 2152 1.92

0.19 1.48 SA 1618 0.42 2243 1.90

Times and 0.46 0526 0.23 1.30Heights 1132 of 1.40high 0.58 SU 1711 0.51 1.58and low 2336 waters 1.83

30

lat 340 29’ long 1500 55’

28

Last Quarter

The Bureau of Meteorology gives no warranty of any kind whether express, implied, statutory or otherwise in respect to the availability, accuracy, currency, completeness, quality or reliability of the information or that the information will be fit for any particular purpose or will not infringe any third party Intellectual Property rights. The Bureau’s liability for any loss, damage, cost or expense resulting from use of, or reliance on, the information is entirely excluded.

0334 0.46 0343 0.50 0.22 0338 0525 0.290246 0001 0618 0358 1.41 1.30 1.34 1.23 23 0233 1.12 1.13 20 0.71 20 0.67 5 0.63 14 14 29 26 11 26 1003 1.67 1015 1.69 1.82 1007 1.960821 0635 1220 0.51 1120 0.60 51 0753 0.71 0943 1641 1659 0.13 1649 0.05 1300 1822 1.43 1.38 13 1414 1.36 MO 1.40 WE 1.39 TU 1.41 TH 0.31 TU 0.32 WE 1722 SU MO 1548 TU 1429 2236 1.25 2228 0.38 2255 1.22 1.49 2252 2346 1.392116 1846 0.34 0.41 05 2116 0.46 0.46 42 0407 0.50 0420 0.52 0.26 0430 0612 0.340344 0043 0042 0456 0.34 1.36 1.46 1.29 21 0335 1.19 1.17 21 0.72 21 0.66 6 0.61 15 15 30 27 12 27 1038 1.65 1051 1.67 1.85 1058 1.950931 0717 0703 1.48 1220 0.49 59 0902 0.66 1055 0.11 0.07 1.41 1736 0.32 1348 1315 0.45 1745 1818 14 1.39 1718 0.34

0.43 1.49 0.52 1.26

29 0534 1155

0.44 1.55 0.46 TU 1.37 TH 1.34FR WE 1.33 WE TU 1653 TH WE 1532 MO 1515 2334 1.21 1.43 1933 1.24 1912 1.41 2349 1.34 53 0.39 2316 1.22

30 0627 1259

1.50 0.50 FR 1748 1.32 2354 0.35

1.64 0.37 SA 1852 1.34


1357 1.38 1.44 1.33 1.39 WEFEBRUARY TU 1509 FR 1641 SA 1226 1.78 JANUARY SU 1822 0.32 WE 1247 TU 1 TU 1338 0.41 Time 0.44 Time 1912 Time 0.19 0.39 2231 0.44 2030 Time 2141 m 2000 m 1 m 1905 m

0.49 0228 0.44 0 0.28 0129 1.36 0312 1.36 0308 1.34 0.30 0029 0209 1.28 0414 1.44 0520 1.37 0259 16 0845 1 0138 1 25 16 0934 10 1209 10 1024 22 7 0122 7 0838 70 1.66 1.69 0810 1.89 0606 0939 1.98 0738 0.64 0.61 0703 0.50 22 0.52 0.61 0901 0.54

0.33 0.28 0.04 1.22 1.30 1.63 0.13 1.34 1.25 1.55 TU 1528 MO 1452 TH 1621 FR 1608 SA 1752 WE 1613 TH 1459 SU 1317 MO 1222 TH 1339 WE 1 WE 1430 1.23 2045 1.34 1 1.43 1952 0.49 2221 0.43 2205 0.52 2124 2001 2049 0.28 1.38 1900 2117 0.35 2230 0.45 2329

January 2018 11 8 8 2 23 17

SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

0.42 0 0.48 0322 0.28 0224 1.40 0404 1.43 0345 0218 0230 1.33 0.29 0114 0246 1.29 0510 1.36 0400 1.46 0615

2 26 23 17 11 8

1.69 0 1.97 0655 0921 1.69 0947 1.94 0846 0.57 1009 0.62 1029 0.57 1136 0.57 0.65 1019 0.54 1304 PORT KEMBLA –0804 NEW 0901 SOUTH WALES 1602 0.27 1545 0.05 1306 0.30 0.07 1.24 1.16 1.47 1412 1.47 1.14 1.24 SA 1641 TU WEChart FR 1708 SU 1850 TH 1717 FR 1612 MO TH 1 TH 1530 FR 1444 LAT 34° 29ʼ LONG 150° 55ʼTU Port Kembla Tidal

PORT KEMBLA – NEW SOUTH 2017WALES

1.24 2135 2310 1.44 2049 2318 0.51 2224 0.44 2241 0.57 0.51 1.37 Local Time LAT 34° 29ʼ 2154 LONG 150° 55ʼ DECEMBER 0323 0.29 0324 0.47 and 0.41 0.31 0327 0601 1.46m 0456 0501 1.53 0426 0203 1.32 0316 1.33 and 0421 1.38Waters 1.49 0022 Times Heights of High Time m Time m Time m Time m Time m Time Low Time m Time m 0953 1.70 0031 1.66 1.85 1239 0.570.30 1116 1136 0.48 1045 0753 0956 0.60 0912 0.63 2.01 1100 0.640120 1006 0.52 0701 0.44 0030 0.28 0120 0.35 0459 1.23 0436 1.10 0601 1.16 0035 0.33 161636 16 1 1011 0.62 16 JANUARY 1 1137 TU 10.02 1 0657 MARCH FEBRUARY 0744 1.55 1.60 1753 0756 1.61 1601 0642 1638 1.35 1038 0.48 0.61 16 0650 1.40TH 0.29 1714 0.28 0.14 1818 1.14 1730 1.23 1348 1357 1.38 1509 1.33 1641 1.09 1.18 WE SU SA FR SA MO WE FR SA FR 1316 0.37 SA 1430 0.40 1801 1.44 MO 1232 0.45 1248 0.47 TH 1402 0.40 FR 1651 1.45 SA 1706 1.65 1.39 2231 1.25 1.40 1.43 2326 0.42 1938 2231 0.60 0.53 Time 0.41 2141 0.44 1957 1.38 2017 1.24 2158 1.58 2340Time 0.49 1854 2030 1.50 M0.26 SU TimeTime M WE M FR 1913 Time M m 1845 2239 Time m 1.44 2359 Time m 2318 Time mTime Time 2352m 2145 1.39

SEPTEMBER

1943 0.38 Times and Heights2051 of High 0.37 and Low Waters NOVEMBER OCTOBER

24 18 12 9 3 27 24 18 12 9 00

9 3

0532 1.15 1106 0.57 SA 1740 1.51

0556 1.30

SU 1153 0.52 1823 1.58

MO 1232 0.35 1853 1.74

0043 0.40

0115 0.26

TU 1314 0.45 1930 1.57

WE 1413 0.34 2019 1.55

17 1138 17 2 0647 0209 0138 0.30 0727 0416 1.44 1.24 0.49 0.41 0414 1.36 0.54 TU 1325 0.38 1.71 SU 1802 MO 1229 0845 0810 1.89 1024 0.64 1934 1044 1.58 1848 1.51 1.66 1528 0.33TH 1452 0042 0.13 1730 TH MO0.42 0156 1.22 0.25 0024 0.20 TU 0122 WE 0.33 1613 18 3 0618 1.21 18 0645 3 0727 0808 2333 1.51 1.38 1.33 1.23 2117 2049 1.38 2230 0.49 2

1

2 0230 19 0901

0.35 1.27 MO 1236 0.46 1902 1.64

5

0734 1.33 TU 1317 0.40 1940 1.68

0126 0730 TU 1322 1939

20 0812

1.49

0115 0.27

0156 0.36

0116 0.27

0157 0.45

FR 1424 0.26 2028 1.55

SA 1525 0.33 2118 1.32

SU 1502 0.14 2100 1.45

MO 1546 0.33 2137 1.24

0233 0.21 0852 1.74

0301 0.42 0930 1.66

0249 0.26 0917 1.93

0306 0.48 0941 1.70

17 0831 20.32 0308 0312 0.28170402 0210 0.32 0.37 0.472 0.44 0005 0.521.73 0547 0602 1.64 0821 1.61 0742 0730 0259 1.52 1.65 0436 0520 1.41 1.36 1445 0.36 1409 0.25 SU 1510 0.36 TH 1336 0.36 0934 0939 1.98FR1031 0833 1.88 1.70SA 1.69 1.99 1.71 0648 1.521.45 1204 1246 0.36 1209 0.602058 0.61 2038 1.35 2006 1941 0901 1.54 1.24 1126 1608 1621 0.04 1711 1513 0.11 0.29 0.04 1836 0.23 1330 0.50 1840 1.26 1752 TH0231 FR MO SU SA0.39 SU SA 0.28 SU TH 0201 0.25 1.09 0153 1459 0.23FR 1.30 0230 0.47 1724 31.37 18 09062114 0829 0811 2124 1.64 0856 1.64 1.68 2308 2205 2221 1.43182309 1.47 1.263 1.34 1912 1.151.84 0.60 2329 0.43

0246 0848 TH 1441 2058

5 0841

1.51

20 0923

1.59

SA 1514 0.18 SU 1602 0.32 MO 1556 0.08 TU 1622 0.31 1641 0.27 1557 0.11 1708 0.07 0.34 0.10 0.30 1.55 1414 0.44 1502 1346 0.23 1850 1.12 1.25 1.24 SA FR2215 SA TU 1825 SA 1746 MO SU1.29 WE1532 MO SU MO FR SU 01 2157 1.23 1835 2116 1612 1.54 2156 1.42 1250 2241 2200 1.52 2136 2310 1.44 2347 1.27 1.37 0.34 1958 1.180.29 19180343 2055 12 1943 0.44 0315 2224 0.22 0334 0.46 0338 0.50 1.31

5 0937

1.82

20 1003

1.67

5 1007

1.96

20 1015

1.69

0.21 1.45 0.32 1.69

0320 0930 FR 1537 2145

22 4 0416 1044

0.26

1.43 00 0230 0.46 0330 18 12 6 3 27 21 18 18 150945 15 12 6 303 27 21 0041 12 11 0642 0.48 0859 1.74 0348 0.19

0411 0.40

0.32 0402 7 1001 22 0005 0.52 1.52 1.66 0.47 1032 0122 1.60 0.33 0.20 SU 1659 0.34 SA 1614 1.99 1031 0648 1.52 1.51 2222 1.58 1.70 2259 0703 1.31 1730 0353 0.04 1711 0.29 1317 1330 0.50 TH0.20 SU SU 0.33 FR 0429 SA 0.23 0442 0.46 8 0322 23 8 23 0929 1.50 1008 1.51 1045 1.70 1107 1.58 2333 1.37 2309 1.26 1912 2001 1.15

7

FR 1526 0.31 2140 1.65

SA 1620 0.38 2224 1.41

5

0.22 1.53 0.32 1.57

10 1056

1.55 SU 1706 0.35 2314 1.47

25 1123

1.46

0448 0.33 1113 1.85 TU 1754 0.14

0443 1114 WE 1759 2359

0.54 1.62 0.37 1.18

0524 0.41 1150 1.89 TH 1842 0.12

0459 0.55 1128 1.63 FR 1815 0.35

WE 1205 1.80 1854 0.18

TH 1842 0.40

FR 1245 1.78 1940 0.19

SA 1206 1.58 1856 0.37

1247 1.44 1535 0.24 SU TH1605 MO 01 1905 0.39 12 2130 1.33 2212

0441 0.30 0129 0.37220029 71.34 0602 22 0217 1.44 00 1.287 0.42 1.37 0115 0.30 0109 0228 0.54 0.39 0411 1.64 0507 19 13 7 4 0547 19 1123 4 0848 19 1023 22 0606 22 0738 7 31 13 1.61 28 13 11 28 1056 1.73 1204 1.71 0.52 0.50 1246 0.54 0838 0.61 0742 1.96 0744 1.58 1.83 0.36 SU 1705 0.20 2312 1.50

MO 1740 0.38 2339 1.24

0511 0425 0.36 0441 0.48 0218 0049 0.51 0.40 0.29 0515 0.52 9 24 1045 9 0512 24 1135 1.91 1107 0730 1.57 1.49 1132 1.70 1.67 1144 0804 1.55 1703 0.43 1800 0.23 TU 1823 0.42 SU MO 0.10 1414 0.44 FR 1821 2303 MO MO 1412 SU 0.30 1.30 SA 1746 2347 1.27 2051 1958 1.18 0441 0.27 0458 0.48 0005 1.39 0022 1.18

0400 1011 SA 1614 2224

1748 0.30 1427 1.19 FR TU1500 SA 01 2358 1.42 12 2018 0.51 2101

0301 0.28 0552 0.28 0441 0.45 00 0.36 0400 0.48 0.42 1.41 0545 0049 0.51 0047 0151 0.39 0615 1.46 0025 1.64 0250 1.43 0345 17 17 11 5 2 0404 17 20 1203 20191107 5 29 141009 140907 114 1.69 26 26 11 11 192 0700 41.91 1019 0923 1.88 1029 1.94 1.54 1.67 0641 0.45 1235 0730 1.57 0822 1.77 1304 0.53 0.34 0.57

0.29 FR 1539 0.31 1604 0.13 MO 1641 0.32 1649 0.05 WE 1659 0.31 0.29 WE 1409 TH 1441 SU 0426 0323 0.29 0324 0.472141 0028 0456 0.31 0522 0352 0.27 1.35 0.50TU 0.41 1.39 0130 0.501.39 0136 0123 0.34 1.46 0022 0.582255 1.53 2052 1.64 0601 2208 0501 1.49 2236 1.25 2252 1.22 0015 2023 1.69 1.45 1045 1.66 0953 2.01 0956 1.70 1116 1.85 1010 1.83 0606 0.42 1144 1.62 0.54 0809 1.62 0736 0756 1.88 1239 0.57 0701 1.520420 0645 1136 0.48 0400 0.26 0407 0.50 0430 0.34 0.52 0212 0.24 0245 0.21 0310 0.19 0339 0.34 6 0811 21 0852 6 0920 21 61.78 211822 21 1714 1638 0.02 1636 0.14 1638 0.15 1.52 TH 1.59 0.29 0959 1226 1.60 1024 1730 1.85 1038 1058 1.95 1338 1.67 1333 0.32 1.39 1452 0.38 1442 0.13 1818 1.14 1348 0.46 1.23 SU WE1.39 SA 1753 SA1051 SA SU WE TU MO1.65 TU FR MO6 0.28 TU SA MO 1658 0.11 TU 1718 0.34 WE 1745 0.07 TH 1736 0.32 WE 1358 0.36 TH 1454 0.30 FR 1527 0.23 SA 1619 0.32 2318 2239 2104 1.39 2231 2244 1.54 2359 1.43 0.42 0.19 0.44 2039 1.40 1.211.34 2000 2038 1.36 1938 1.172334 2018 1.70 1.61 2136 1.63 1.25 2219 1912 1.38 2301 2326 1.43 2316 1.22 2349 1.21 1934

3

1 2

0.42 00 0109 1.55 0211 16 10 4 1 25 19 16 16 13 10 4 281 25 19 0507 130830 10 11 1123 1.61 0744 0.45

0.29 0246 0.48 0511 0510 1.40 0233 0.27 0.17 0.27 19 4 0158 1.97 0921 0803 1.42 1.69 0846 1135 1.56 1.44 1136 0.62 0.30 WE 1358 0.37 TH 1457 0.31 1602 1717 1.16 TU 1545 0.05 FR FR TH 1.62 0.30 2100 1821 1.51 1.73 WE 2011 2145 0207 1.39 2154 1.240307 0.51 0137 0.29 0.18 0233 0.22 2318 0.30

4 0101 0658

1

1748 1717 0.23 1836 0.23 1.34 1.63 1.55 1.25 0.06 14271.30 1430 0.39 1425 0.16 1840 1.26 MO 0.59 SU 1532 MO 1639 TH 1339 MO 1222 WE TU 0.30 WE TU 01 SU 0521 1.19 0000 1.35 0049WE 80.28 23 0016 0541 0.59 2026 1151 1.57 0539 0.41 231900 0622 2358 2327 1.54 1952 0.45 1 0.358 1.42 0.52 2130 1.41 20180.48 2045 1.22 1.41 2249

0552 0530 0.35 0224 0455 0047 1.41 0114 1.33 1.29 0.45 1.36 1.46 00 0151 0322 0.500102 0025 0.39 0045 1.15 1.19 0101 1.27 0151 1.28 0.64 Copyright of Australi 24 06271140 90.57 1203 1104 0641 0.45240655 0947 0.65 0.54 10 0.579 1.54 08220.55Commonwealth 1.63 1.77 0604 0.62 1.60 0846 0636 0700 0.50 0724 1301 1.72 FR 1233 1.52 1343 1.65 SU 1247 1.52 TH SA 0.34 1825 1755 1715 1250 1.55 1.14 1.24 1.47 1.47 1502 0.34 0.23 TU MO1939 TUAstrono TU 1306 TH FR 1444 WE MO WE 01 1929 0.43 0.39is 0.32 1959 1346 0.24 2038 0.27 1530 Datum of Predictions Lowest 1918 0.34 1943 2135 0.57 2049 2330 0.51 11 0.37 2055 1.26 1943 1.31 0152 1.20 0209 1.23 34°0136 1.28 LAT 29ʼ1.130.38 0255 LONG 150° 55ʼ

20 14 PORT 8 5 29 23 20 14 8 5 23 20 14 KEMBLA – NEW SOUTH WALES 10 0559

0.38

25 0552

0.58

10 0740

0.57

25 0655Times 25 0719standard are time (UTC + 0830 in 0.60local 0.68 10 0.66

1.68 0.50 1.50 1445 1319 1.45 1.45 1.51 0327 0543 0.49 1404 0123 1.63 MO 1334 MO 1750 TU 1223 WE 1223 0316 FR 0041 1.43 0028 1.35 0522 0136 1.39SA 0010 0203 1.32SU High 1.33 1.38 1.49 00 0130 0.50 0.34 02301.52 0421 0.47 Heights Low 1900 0.28 1911 0.47 Times 2134 0.33and 2021 0.46 ofPhase 2027 0.41Waters New Moo 2347 1.21 2105 and 0.29 Moon Symbols 0642 0.48 0606 0.42 1144 1.62 0736 0.54 0618 0.42 1006 1149 1100 0.64 0.52 10 0753 0.60 0912 0.63 0809 1.62 0756 1.88 0859 1.67 0524 0.34 0534 0.55 0105 1.29 0111 1.13 0233 1.13 0358 1.30 0320 1.22 0246 1.23 MARCH 26FEBRUARY 11 1145 26 1205 11 0651 26 11 1.44 26 1247 1226 1.78 1822 1338 1.39 1223 1754 1.09 1.18 1357 1.38 1.33 1452 0.38 0.13 1535 0.30 1.42 JANUARY 0753 0.47 0.32 0636 1509 0.64 0943 0.63 1641 0852 1442 0.61 0.67 1.45 WE 0.71 SA1.55 SU TU 11 TU0821 WE WE TU FR SA 1601 MO TU TH TH 01 0.54 1319 1.63 TH 1308 1.44 1548 1.41 TU 1429 1.39 1513 1.55 SU 1414 1.40 MO 1804 0.39 TU 1844 SA 1905 1912 0.19 0.44 1830 0.60 0.41MO 0.39 0.44 1.21 1.36 21300.38 2231 1.30 2 Time m 2116 Time 2158 m 0.53 T Time m 2000 Time 2030 m 0.46 Time WE m 2008 0.33 2039 2116 2005 2141 0.50 2228 2209 2038 0.32 0.41 0.42

6

21 15 9 6 30 24 21 15 9 6

24 21 15

0308 0520 0.44 0209 0414 0.49 12 0138 0.30 0312 0.280129 0210 0436 0.320014 1.37 1.41 1.48 1.55 10 1.36 0217 1.36 0.30 27 1.34 27 12 0029 1.28 270259 27 0052 16 0.54 1 0.51 16 00 10848 1612 1.44 7 0122 22 7 0709 7 0228 22 10 1209 25 10 1024 25 31 0934 1.69 0845 1.66 0810 22 1.890606 0939 0901 1.980738 0833 1126 1.880635 07031 0.50 0.52 0838 0.61 0.60 0.45 0.64 0.61 1.96

12 0008 0612

1.35 0.41 TU 1240 1.53 1912 0.43

0037 0617 WE 1255 1945

1.13 0.61 1.38 0.57

0213 0753 TH 1423 2121

1.20 0.54 1.58 0.35

0208 0730 FR 1401 2107

1.09 0.69 1.39 0.52

0429 1007 SU 1622 2307

1.26 0.61 1.49 0.33

0335 0902 MO 1515 2210

1.17 0.72 1.37 0.43

0456 1055 TU 1653 2317

1.36 0.61 1.33 0.41

0344 0931 WE 1532 2209

1.29 0.66 1.34 0.40

16081.42 1752 0.28 1528 0.33 1452 0.130330 1621 1459 0.04 1513 0.11 1222 1.55 1.25 1.09 1.19 1613 1.22 1.30 0.06 TU TH 1.31 FR 11 MO 1.63 TH1532 FR 1.34 SU 1317 TH 1339 WE 1307 MO WE 1430 TH 1239 SU 1724 WE WE 1.17 0528 1.33TH 0433 1.24 0548SA 1.38 1.08 0315 1.09 28 0138 13 0905 28 282124 13 0.45 28 0440 22050.57 2329 1.34 2117 1.23 2049 2221 1.430.68 2114 2308 1.471836 2001 0.28 1952 1907 1900 2045 0.52 0.60 0.51 02 0.49 0.43 1.41 0.59 0.35 1117 2130 0.57 1014 1202 1045 0.60 0.52 0715 0.67 1.38 0837 2230 0.72 13

13 0112 0709

1.24 0.49 WE 1343 1.53 2028 0.44

TH 1354 1.35 2055 0.57

FR 1534 1.55 2233 0.34

SA 1505 1.36 2209 0.50

MO 1726 1.46 2357 0.33

TU 1620 1.36 2300 0.39

WE 1752 1.28

TH 1641 1.31 2301 0.37

0345 0615 0.42 0136 0.290114 1.29 0246 0510 0.48 0322 0404 0400 0.280224 0301 0545 0.280102 1.46 1.44 1.64 10 1.40 1.36 1.43 1.46 0001 0.43 1.20 0423 1.12 0618 1.41 0525 1.34 0534 1.50 10091.49 1304 1.69 1.97 0921 1.69 1029 1.940.60 0923 1235 1.88  Copyright Commonwealth of14 Australia of Meteor 0655 0.57 0804 0.58 0734 0947 0.65 0846 0.54 0.53 0.34 00 0.62 0.57 292016, 14 0446 29 291019 0635 1021 0.58 0951 1136 0.71 14 1220 0.51 1120 1155 0.50Bureau 1300 0.52 1646 1.55 1613 1.36 1822 1.43 1722 1.38 1748 1.32 TH 1.24 SA 1306 SU TU WE1612 FR 16411.26 1850 0.27 0.05 1602 0.30 1708 0.07 1557 0.11 1.47 1355 1444 1.12 1.25 1717 1.16 1.24 SA FR 1.14 FR 1.19 SA 11 TU TH2354 FR 1335 TH 1530 FR 0.34 MO 1835 TH FRis 1846SU 2336 WE 0.31 2305 0.46 2346 0.35 Datum of Predictions Lowest Astronomical Tide 2241 1.37 1.390549 2154 1.24 2135 2310 2224 1.442049 2200 1.521926 02 1943 0.38 1947 0.57 2318 0.51 0.44 0.51 Times and 0.60 1.27 0042 0.34 0612 1.46 0043 0.44 0627 1.64 0521 1.19

0230 0218 1.33 1.18 1.06 0901 0804 0.57 14 0228 29 0251 0817 0.53 0824 0.69 1452 1.54 1501 1.35 TH FR 1.47 1545 1412 TU MO 2145 0.40 2201 0.53 2145 2051 0.37 0348 1.17 0404 1.09

23 17 11 8 2 26 23 17 11 8 2 26 23 17

9 3

24 18 12 9 3 27 24 18 12 9 3 27 24 18

8 2

15 0930

0.53 FR 1602 1.59 2255 0.33

30 0935

0.67

1.38 SA 1606 0323 0316 1.33 2257 0.47 0953 0912 0.63 1638 WE 1.33 TU 1509 2239 2141 0.44

Times local time +10:00) daylight saving 15(UTC 15 1131 0.52 30 1059are 30 1259 of0.37or 0703 standard 1.48 30 1220 0.49 0717 1.55Heights 0.66in15 high

1.56 1.32 1315 0.45 1818 1348 1.34 1.41 1.39 SU 1750 WE SA 1852 MO 1714 0601 0.29 0324 0.47 04260.46 0.41 0352 0015 0.270159 0456TH0501 0.311.41 0203 0421 1.38 0327 0226 1.46 0022 0.58 0.46 10 1.53FR 1.49 1912 1.41 1933 1.24and low waters 2353 0.39 New0.52 Moon First Quart Moon Symbols 0 2.010753 0956Phase 1.70 1100 1045 1.66 1010 0645 1.830844 1116 1136 1.851006 0.60 00 0908 1239 0.57 0.64 0701 1.52 1.74 0.48 29’ 0.62 lat0045 34 0609 1.29 0.32 0 0.02 1636 0.29 1714 0.28 1638 0.15 1753 0.14 1357 1.38 1445 1641 1.09 1601 1.18 1453 1.11 0.46 31 55’ TU 1333 long 150 TH 31 FR SU MO 1348 SA SU 11 SA SA 1730 1157 1818 0.57 1.77 WE SA 0.24 FR 1.14 SA 1.23 FR0718 1.44 0.24 0.66 TU 1806 1.25 SU 1357 2231 1.392030 0.41 2318 1938 1.40 2244 1934 1.542029 2359 2326 1.432158 2231 0.60 2038 0.42 0.53 1.17 1.33 02 1951 1.36

0507 0109 0.42 0323 0416 0.32 0402 0.47 0547 0602 0.370436 0414 1.36 02592015, 1.36 0520 0005 0.52 1.41 0.54 1.64 1.55  Copyright Commonwealth of Australia Bureau of Meteorology 1123 0744 1.61 1017 1044 1.99 1031 1.70 1209 1204 1246 1.711126 1024 0.64 0901 0.61 1.52 0.60 1.58 0.36 0.45 Datum of Predictions is Lowest Astronomical Tide 0648 Times are1613 in local +10:00) or daylight time1.09 (UTC +11:00) when in 1.19 effect 1748 0.30 1730 time 0.04 1711 0.29 1836 0.23 1.22 1459 1752 1330 0.50 0.39 1.26 MO THstandard FR 1.30 SU SU WE TH(UTC SAsavings SU 1724 SA 1605 SA TU 1427 SU 1840 Moon Phase Symbols New2124 Moon 0.43 First Quarter Quarter 2358 Last 1.42 2333 1.37 2309 1912 1.26 2230 0.49 2329 2308 0.51 2143 1.15 0.60 Full Moon 2018 1.22

10 4

0441 0115 0.300304 0.39 10 19 01 25 19 13 10 4 28 25 19 13 10 4 1.38 25 28 1056 0742 1.731000 0.63 1.83 1717 0.23 1

1.07 0.16 MO 1 SU 1605 WE 1425 2327 2026 1.542144 0.70 1.41 02

The Bureau of Meteorology gives no warranty of any kind whether express, implied, statutory or otherwise in respect to the availability, accuracy, currency, completeness, quality or reliability of the information or that the information will be fit for any particular purpose or will not infringe any third party Intellectual Property rights. The Bureau’s liability for any loss, damage, cost or expense resulting from use of, or reliance on, the information is entirely excluded.

0552 0151 0.45 0428 0511 0.360400 1.43 0441 0049 0.48 0615 0047 0025 1.410545 0530 0.350417 10 1.40 0.50 1.39 0.51 1.46 0.39 1.64 20 0.34 20 0.57 5 0.53 5 0.60 20 01 11 1304 26 11 0510 11 1127 14 14 29 1203 1.54 1135 26 1.911019 1107 1.67 0641 0700 0.451235 1140 26 1.601115 11365 0.62 0822 1.63 0730 1.57 1.77 1825 0.34 1821 0.10 1746 0.30 1250 1.551835 1755 MO 0.321724 0.34 0.44 0.23 TU 1.25 FR 1.16 SA 1.24 MO 1.12 MO 1.09 TU 11 SU 1850 MO TH 1717 FR 1612 SU 1723 WE 1502 SU 1414 MO 1346 2347 1958 1.27 1.18 1918 1943 0.34 1.31 2318 0.51 2224 0.44 2300 02 2055 2252 1.26 0.70 43 0028 1.350501 1.53 0522 0130 0.50 0022 0041 0230 1.43 0531 0010 1.510528 10 0136 0123 1.390015 1.46 0.50 0.58 0.34 0.46 0.47 1.42 6 21 21 6 21 01 6 12 27 12 0601 27 12 15 30 15 0606 0.421136 0.48 1144 0809 1.62 0701 0642 0859 0.48 1226 0618 27 0.421218 0736 0756 0.540645 1239 0.57 1.62 1.52 1.88 1.74 1.67 0.54

1226 1.78 1822 0.32 1247 1.44 1223 1.45 1338 1.39 0.38 0.13 0.30 SA 1.14 SU 1.23 WE 0.24 TU 1.14 WE 11 TU 0.46 MO 1348 TU 1333 FR 1818 SA 1730 MO 1825 TU 1829 MO 1452 TU 1442 TH 1535 1912 0.192326 0.42 2039 1938 1905 2130 0.39 2354 1830 0.42 2000 2038 0.441934 1.21 1.17 1.36 1.33 1.30 0.66


SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

Summer Calendar Jan 18-21

Dec 27

Illawarra Folk Festival The annual four-day folk fest at Bulli Showground will feature 144 acts from all over Australia and the world, including The Beez from Germany, the Small Glories from Canada and the Illawarra’s very own Darren Coggan (pictured). Organised by the Illawarra Folk Club, it’ll include a range of music, including folk, world, roots, Celtic, gypsy, bluegrass and spoken word, plus buskers, poets, parades and dancing!

Sunset Cinema Bring a picnic blanket, kick back and enjoy outdoor movies at Wollongong Botanic Garden. The season kicks off with a classic Agatha Christie whodunnit, Murder on the Orient Express, on Wed, Dec 27. Also coming up are Bad Moms II on Dec 30 and Justice League on Jan 6. Full schedule available online. Gates open 7pm, movies start on dark (about 8.30pm).

www.illawarrafolkfestival. com.au

www.sunsetcinema.com. au/wollongong

KIDS DAY OUT!

KIDS DAY OUT!

10am-2.00pm Thursday 18 January 2018 Dapto Ribbonwood Centre

10am-2.00pm Thursday 18 January 2018 Dapto Ribbonwood Centre

Jan 18

Summer

NEW YEAR’S EVE FIREWORKS l Wollongong Welcome

in 2018 at Wollongong Harbour. This is a familyfriendly, alcohol-free event with live music, roving performers, face painting, amusement rides and food stalls in the lead-up to a fireworks spectacular at the kid-friendly hour of 9pm.

www.wollongong.nsw. gov.au l Kiama: Head

to Black Beach at Kiama Harbour from 5pm on NYE for The Kiama New Year’s Eve Sky Show, billed as “the biggest coastal show outside of Sydney”, with fireworks and laser lights, plus live music and food stalls.

kiama.com.au

l Huskisson: Holidaying

FREE event for kids 3-13 years Author & Illustrator Workshops

KidsStorytelling Day Out • Book Signings & Sales With author and illustrator workshops, book signings, sales and storytelling, this is a free festival for all bookworms aged three to 13 at Dapto Ribbonwood Centre on Jan 18, 10am2pm. Run by the IllawarraSouth Coast branch of the Children’s Book Council.

Registration: On the day only from 9.15am Sponsors: Friends of Wollongong City Library Dapto District Community Centre & Library Bluescope WIN Community Partners Visit: nsw.cbca.org.au/pages/illawarrasouthcoast Email: isccbca@gmail.com Telephone: Margaret Wolfe 4268 2498 Note: Children must be accompanied by an adult Café onsite or BYO lunch

nsw.cbca.org.au/pages/ illawarrasouthcoast

44

FREE event for kids 3-13 years Author & Illustrator Workshops Storytelling • Book Signings & Sales

Pick Your Own Fruit! Teach children where peaches, nectarines and apples come from, taste fruit fresh from the tree and experience life on a working farm. Apple picking season starts from late January.

Registration: On the day only from 9.15am Sponsors: Friends of Wollongong City Library Dapto District Community Centre & Library Bluescope WIN Community Partners Visit: nsw.cbca.org.au/pages/illawarrasouthcoast Email: isccbca@gmail.com Telephone: Margaret Wolfe 4268 2498 Note: Children must be accompanied by an adult Café onsite or BYO lunch

Glenbernie Orchard, 259 Darkes Forest Rd, Darkes Forest. Book a picking tour at www. darkes.com.au.

in the Jervis Bay region? Join the free New Year’s Eve celebrations from 7pm at Voyager Memorial Park in Huskisson. Fireworks at 9pm.

www.shoalhaven.com l Ulladulla:

From December 29 to January 3, the NYE Ulladulla Harbourside Festival includes a nightly carnival, food market and NYE fireworks at 9pm.

www.nyeulladulla.com

Party time


SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

Show of the season

Stanwell Park’s Articles Fine Art Gallery is holding its ‘23 Days To Christmas’ exhibition from December 2. Meet owner and painter John Vander.

In his paintings, John distils the character, history and beauty of a place to capture its essence on canvas. “Before I paint a town I paint every, or nearly every, house, every shop, individually,” he tells the South Coaster. “Also I try to meet the people in the town: who lives there, who used to live there, what is the history of the place? Then I do an overall painting, a larger painting of the whole town. By that stage I will know every nook and cranny. “You should see my library of research – when you travel in those villages, they’ve got a local historical society, right? And they released a book which only six people bought – well, I am one of the six.” John is fascinated by the relatively brief history of settled Australia, compared with his native Belgium. “It’s a short history; where I come from, at the back of my grandmother’s place, there is a Roman highway … here in Australia, the [colonial] history is about 200 years old. “You travel the bush and discover all these places where a gold rush took place; 40,000 people lived in a small town and now there’s only 180 people there. I walk in these places, I can relive the past, I can see these people and I try to capture that in my paintings.” John was born in Belgium, the son of a World War II resistance fighter. He did his national service in the special forces of the Belgian Air Force. Later John became a pilot and worked in the taxation office. Then in 1969, aged 24, he travelled to Australia in search of adventure. "I wanted to become a crop-dusting pilot," he says. But after two friends died on the job, John left to work at Citicorp First National in Sydney. And he started to paint. “At one stage I used to decorate all the offices at Citicorp. I decorated all the associated businesses with my paintings.” In 1976, he quit his role as Bankstown branch manager and became a full-time painter. For the past 36 years, John and his wife Frances have

run Articles Fine Art Gallery – now an icon on the Grand Pacific Drive. “The first Christmas people were queueing like 20m out the door. And we said: ‘Whoa, what have we done here? It looks like it's going to be successful’ …” It was. The couple would travel for a month, then John would paint for a month. In the 1980s, fine art print distributors Art Nouveau picked up his work. “It went berserk and now we’ve sold about three million prints. I’ve had exhibitions all around Australia … travelled all around Australia.” Locally, John is known for his community service, including as a founding member of the business chamber. Nationally, he's won many awards, including a fellowship from the Australian Institute of History and Arts, and is in Kevin Hill's prestigious Top 10 Australian Artists list. His advice for young artists: “Work every day.” And his greatest achievement? “Living my dream, that is all.” Articles is at 111 Lawrence Hargrave Drive, Stanwell Park; ‘23 Days To Christmas’ starts on December 2. www.johnvander.com.au As well as new artwork, visitors can also buy prints of John’s paintings, such as the magnificent view from Bald Hill.

45


SUMMER 17/18

south coaster

Top

4

Golf Courses

Go green A fore!-course special for golfers. You deserve a golfing break. John Towns, of Tradies Helensburgh Social Golf Club, picks four top-quality courses – listed here in no particular order of preference – that are just waiting for you to play them.

For most golfers the game is not about a swing like Adam Scott or a putting game like Rory McIlroy. However, when the mind does wander back to the time when that six iron shot on a tough par three landed inches from the hole, even if it was back in ’86, you feel like a ‘pro’ and it proves the memory is still working OK. It’s about the camaraderie and the mates you have developed over many years of hacking your way out of that impossible bunker, or the shot out of the trees where the ball always ends up behind the biggest pine tree. Unlike some other sports for which you need to be built like a Greek god or be able to run the 100m in 9.76 seconds, this is a sport you can learn in school, develop throughout your life and well into retirement. Your style will evolve from that of a hard-hitting young player to that of a mature sportsman with finesse and cunning, allowing you to enjoy the sport and lifelong friendships born of the greatest game on earth. As a golfer you develop a liking for a range of golf courses for many different reasons. My favourite courses include:

1 Photo courtesy Russell Vale Golf Course

Boomerang Golf Course

46

The home course for our Tradies Sports and Social Golf Club where we battle it out for the chance to collect the bragging rights for the month. With a slope rating of a respectable 112, and a lightly undulating course, this is perfect for mature exponents of the ancient art. The outof-bounds areas are usually well protected by the resident black snake and it always pays to donate a ball to the golfing gods usually residing in the dam on the short par3 on the 7th.

2

Russell Vale Golf Course

A course I play on a weekly basis in their regular championships. A shorter course with a slope rating of 93 and treacherous greens which allows you to putt on and off the greens with very little control over the result. However all is not lost, while waiting for your turn to tee-off the view over the northern

suburbs and out to sea will allow your nerves to settle before the next shot. An amazing team of social members guarantees that a piece of homemade cake or slice is available to the players on the 19th. This is one of the best-run clubs I have had the pleasure to be a member of.

3

Calderwood Golf Course

I play here several times a year with Vets and Probus groups. A public course with a relaxed atmosphere and open fairways that allow the average golfer with a natural slice to be able to recover without too much damage to the score. The breathtaking surrounds feature the rugged Illawarra escarpment as a backdrop. The soft, easy flowing greens allow the players to attack the pin and keep the score under control.

4

Kangaroo Valley

An excellent course for our yearly weekend away excursion. Originally designed by Jack Newton, the course is challenging with its diverse terrain and water hazards. The overnight accommodation with spectacular views of the course is excellent with dinner and breakfast included in the package if required, or dinner at the local pub is always a great night. With a slope rating of 135, carts are essential for a two-day event. This also allows players the extra glass of port to clear the system on the second day. Please note: There are many other golf courses I would love to play, from Stonecutters Ridge, the venue for the Australian open, the sand belt in Victoria to those public courses in small country towns, each one with their own challenges and unique beauty. I’m always looking forward to the tee shot that lands next to the hole, or that long putt that seems destined to drop into the cup and the feeling that keeps bringing you back to that next game.


• Scarborough to Gerroa

AFTER HOURS HOME DR VISITS

radiodoctor.com.au

ILLAWARRA CALL CENTRE

• Bulk Billed (Medicare) • Weeknights/Weekends All Year Round

SUMMER 17/18

Illawarra

Shop local

CALL CENTRE (02) 4228 5522

south coaster

Radio Doctor

Service directory

Bulk Billed

SURF ACADEMY (Medicare) (02) 4228ILLAWARRA 5522 with professional Surfer Nic Squiers

AVAILABLE:

PEST MANAGEMENT Lic# 7001

WEEKNIGHTS Monday - Friday 7pm to 6am- Weet-Bix SurfGroms WEEKENDS Saturday 12pm Midday to Monday 6am Lessons - Private - Holiday Programs PUBLIC HOLIDAYS 24hrs - After-School Surfing ACCEPTING CALLS 1 HOUR PRIOR - Birthday Parties - Schools groups Scarborough to Gerroa Visits in the comfort of your own home Thirroul | Corrimal | Warilla Available at student, holiday or retirement accommodation All ages | All levels Experienced doctors and drivers

TERMITE & PEST SPECIALIST

Termite Treatments & Inspections General Pest Treatments • Cockroaches • Spiders Ants • All Pests • Fully Licenced and Insured

Call: 0420 480 036 pestfix.com.au

Call STEVE on

‘Radio Doctor Illawarra’

CMYK: 54 0 100 0 EXP 28/2/18

‘Yoga with a View’

Above All Locksmiths

@ Stanwell Park Surf Club

Above All Locksmiths Contact Karen

BRING A FRIEND FOR FREE

0402 277 928

0403 789 617

Email: info@abovealllocksmiths.com.au

Pantone 802 C Website: www.abovealllocksmiths.com.au PO Box 969, SUTHERLAND Mention this ad to receiveNSW 10%2232 off

www.facebook.com/ yogastanwellpark

Master Licence Number: 000102854 | ABN: 44690806859

Above All Above All Locksmiths Pick up a copy at Glenbernie Orchard, Symbio Wildlife Park, Articles Locksmiths Fine Art Gallery, Tradies Helensburgh PLUS all good cafes, B&Bs and South Coast attractions. Visit www.thesouthcoaster.com.au

s o u th so ut h s o u t ht e r c o a s te rco as te r s coa FR

O

RE

GU

ID

knowledge

Farm

cafes Hot art, cool pools and ocean

om.au

thesouthcoaster.c

The stand-up surfing and g! paddlin

Your paddock to plate guide

Explore Glenbernie Orchard

Home of awardwinning apple cider

e

To dive for

fresh

er Salt Watan derl for d Wonbest beaches

x p FR lo r E er E sG u id

Sharing local knowledge

Sharing local knowledge

The e Pacific Driv

ter.com.au

SUMMER 2017-18

E

over DiscGra nd

thesouthcoas

E

SPRING 2017

EE

R’S

EE

Sharing local

PL

FR

The next South ill Coaster w be out in Autumn 2018!

2016-17

thesouthcoaster.com.au

EX

SUMMER

Discover Salt Water Wonderland Swim, surf and snorkel!

Images by awardwinning ocean wildlife photographer Matt Smith

47


South_Coaster_December_Adv2.indd 1

1/12/2017 3:38 PM

SUMMER 2017/18 SOUTH COASTER  
SUMMER 2017/18 SOUTH COASTER  

Free explorer's guide to the NSW South Coast! Seasonal supplement to local mags 2508 District News & 2515 Coast News.

Advertisement