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SPRING 2017

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Sharing local knowledge

Farm fresh

thesouthcoaster.com.au

Your paddock to plate guide

Explore Glenbernie Orchard

Home of awardwinning apple cider


south coaster THE SPRING

e Insids thi issue NG SPRI 2017

Explore Glenbernie Orchard

Home of awardwinning apple cider

Welcome blossoms! Welcome to the Spring 2017 issue of The South Coaster. To celebrate the season of rebirth, we’ve compiled a series of articles on South Coast farms, from small urban gardens to big country estates. Read our cover story for an insight into a year in the life at Glenbernie, the Illawarra’s last remaining orchard. We love to share local knowledge – also in this issue, South Coast authors reveal some of their favourite places. Visit us online at thesouthcoaster.com.au. Happy reading!

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Genevieve and Marcus, the Editors

EDITORS: Genevieve Swart, Marcus Craft

Read all about it

DESIGN: youngwise design

04 Calendar Festivals of wood, writing and song 06 Where the waves are Six top surf spots 08 The Whale Trail Get off the beaten track 15 Inspiration in a cup A writer’s favourite cafes 16 Animal attraction Discover Symbio Wildlife Park 18 Cover feature A year in the life of Glenbernie Orchard 22 Festival of wood Meet a fine furniture cabinetmaker and teacher 24 Map Top 21 places to visit when you do the Loop 28 Fresh from the farm Where good things grow 33 Markets The top three markets for fresh produce 34 Wine Three of the best vineyards to visit 36 Adventure Authors pick their favourite places 42 Grand Pacific Drive Three top pitstops

Cover: Spring blossoms at Glenbernie Orchard in Darkes Forest, by Anthony Warry Photography.

Meet Our Contributors

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ROB BRANDER – aka ‘Dr Rip’ – is a coastal geomorphologist and Associate Professor at the University of New South Wales. An expert on rip currents, he runs a beach safety education program called The Science of the Surf. See page 26. KERRY BOYD-SKINNER has been a journalist for more than 40 years with stints at many newspapers, including Fairfax’s Wollongong Advertiser, where he was the founding editor. For 15 years Kerry served as the Illawarra Mercury’s wine writer, tasting and reviewing thousands of wines. See page 34. JO FAHEY is the author of this month’s cover story, ‘Seasons in the Orchard’; see page 18. Jo and her husband, Glenn, run a fourth-generation family fruit farm in Darkes Forest, home of the award-winning Darkes Cider. Advertise in the Summer issue of the South Coaster! Book online by November 15 at thesouthcoaster.com.au

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CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER: Anthony Warry ADVERTISING: Karen McDougall, 0403 789 617. Email editor@thesouthcoaster. com.au for a rate card. Terms and conditions apply. CONTACT: editor@ thesouthcoaster.com.au; phone 0411 025 910; PO Box 248, Helensburgh, 2508. DEADLINE: November 15 for Summer 2017/18 edition. DISTRIBUTION: The South Coaster is available at tourist hot spots, art galleries, cafes, libraries, B&Bs and information centres. Want copies? Contact us via thesouthcoaster.com.au. PUBLISHER: The Word Bureau Pty Ltd (ABN 31 692 723 477) is the Illawarra’s local independent publisher of The South Coaster, 2508 District News and 2515 Coast News. DISCLAIMER: All content and images remain South Coaster property unless otherwise supplied. No part of this mag may be reproduced without the publisher’s written permission. Views expressed in submissions and advertisements do not reflect those of the publishers. PRINTED BY: Spotpress on Forest Stewardship Council-certified paper from sustainable forests. PROUDLY A MEMBER OF: The Northern Illawarra Chamber of Commerce


ARTIST JOHN VANDER OF STANWELL PARK www.johnvander.com.au

John Vander and two of his popular works. Secrets of the Coast 12 Coalcliff (top right) and The Blue Cottage Dalton.

Articles

Fine Art Gallery

111 Lawrence Hargrave Drive (on the way to the Sea Cliff Bridge) Stanwell Park 2508 P: 02 4294 2491 E: articlesgallery@optusnet.com.au

Possibly one of the most popular artists in NSW today, his work has been reproduced extensively in prints for many years and has attracted a large following among art collectors. Over the past 40 years, John has become a household name throughout Australia. Don’t miss the chance to view and buy one of his original paintings. Over the past 36 years, countless visitors to his gallery – Articles Fine Art Gallery – have had the great experience of meeting the artist himself.

The FINEST Gallery in the South OPEN 10am-5pm Friday, Saturday and Sunday and Public Holidays Situated on the lovely beach of Stanwell Park, the Gallery is a pleasant 30-minute drive from Wollongong and 60 minutes from Sydney. Artist John Vander and his wife Frances own “Articles”. The gallery features the works of well established and emerging artists as well as ceramics and sculptures, glass and homewares.

Details of works by: (left) Peter Fennell, (below) Rachel Carmichael.

Details of works by: (left) Max Mannix, (below) John Bradley.


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Spring Calendar Nov 3-5

Eden Whale Festival The annual celebration of the southern migration of the humpback and other whales will include a street parade, markets, artisan stalls, family fun, marine displays, live music, seafood and local produce. Eden’s beautiful Twofold Bay is a great place to see whales from a boat or the shore. For more South Coast whale-watching spots, turn to page 8 www.edenwhalefestival. com.au; visitor information centre (02) 6496 1953

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Nov 24-26

Wollongong Writers Festival The 2017 theme is ‘Can Words Change the World?’ Expect a mix of panels, workshops, pop-up performances, music, literary trivia and spoken word. The fantastic line-up of writers and thinkers includes several South Coast authors, such as Pamela Cook and Caroline Baum (pictured), featured in this issue on pages 38 and 40. www.wollongong writersfestival.com

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Oct 27-29

Illawarra Festival of Wood Look out for everything from chainsaw sculpture to spoon carving at this showcase of wood artisans, wood-related crafts and forest industries. 10am-5pm, Bulli Showgrounds, Turn to page 22 for our feature on fine furniture maker Stuart Montague (pictured). illawarrafestivalof wood.com

Harley Days A festival of all things Harley-Davidson – bikes and riding, custom culture and community. Head to Wollongong’s Stuart Park for motorcycle displays, stunts, entertainment and food. Explore further: take Harley trike tour of Sea Cliff Bridge with Just Cruisin’ (see ad, page 47). australianharleydays.com.au

MUSIC FESTIVALS l Yours & Owls: From

September 30 to October 1, at Stuart Park in Wollongong. The stellar line-up of bands includes Illawarra rock ‘n’ roll outfit The Pinheads (pictured), famous for their wild live performances. yoursandowlsfestival. com.au l Folk By The Sea: From 22-24 September, Kiama will host the fifth Folk by the Sea Festival. Enjoy folk, world, roots, Celtic, bluegrass and gypsy sounds as more than 100 artists gather for concerts, dances and sessions. www.folkbythesea.com. au, 1300 887 034. l Kangaroo Valley Folk Festival: From October 2022, take part in a three-day celebration of music, poetry, dancing, arts and crafts. Plus, enjoy fine food and craft beer. This is a familyfriendly festival, with a kids’ stage and a program of fun. www.kangaroovalley folkfestival.com.au l Jazz at Moruya: From September 29 to October 1, enjoy live music at Moruya Golf Club. www.moruyagolfclub. com.au

Party time


“CELEBRATING 15 YEARS"

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Coledale Markets, 9am-3pm, fourth Sunday of each month, Coledale Public School, 699 Lawrence Hargrave Dr, Coledale. Coledale residents Jenny Briscoe-Hough and Lara Seresin founded this lively, colourful community market 15 years ago. There is so much to love. You can browse a wide selection of arts, crafts, bric-a-brac and vintage goods, kick back on the lawn, listen to music by local bands and DJ Nautilus Sound, plus feast on delicious food. Look out for Berry sourdough bread, locally made jams, tasty tacos, gluten-free bagels, wood-fired pizza, gozlemes, Malay and Thai curries, fresh juices served in grass canisters and gelato by Kiama micro-dairy The Pines (see page 28). Lenka’s Bohemian Delights (such as fermented pickles, kombucha) and Balinese Spice Magic may also pop up. Coming soon is a stall by Green Connect social enterprise, selling ‘fair food’, fresh greens and veggies, from its urban farm in Warrawong. Next markets: Sept 24, Oct 22, Nov 26.

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Market magic ! Spring into the Bowlo Best Thai/Oz on the South Coast Kids playground Barefoot bowls

new Thai street food

BISTRO OPEN Wednesday to Sunday 12 noon till late

(02) 4267 2139 Scarborough-Wombarra Bowling Club, 578 Lawrence Hargrave Dr, Wombarra

Sydney’s largest range of Australian native plants 9 Veno Street, Heathcote 2233 PHONE (02) 9548 2818 OPEN 7 DAYS 9am to 5pm www.sydneywildflowernursery.com.au

EVERY FOURTH SUNDAY

9AM-3PM

ARTISAN II VINTAGE II FASHION II BOOKS II ARTISTS | FOODS II LOCAL ENTERTAINMENT COLEDALE PUBLIC SCHOOL, LAWRENCE HARGRAVE DR, COLEDALE

ENQUIRIES: ADMINWOLLONGONGMARKETS.COM OR PH: 0422781920

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Salt Water 2 Wonderland A local expert gives us his favourite surfing spots on the South Coast.

Jim Hughes Thirroul resident Jim Hughes is Surfing Australia's Sport Development Manager. He has been developing, planning and implementing surf programs, courses and events around the world for more than 10 years. JIM'S TOP 3 SURF SPOTS ON THE SOUTH COAST

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Black Rock: One of the main reasons to hang around Jervis Bay and Booderee National Park as a surfer is to surf the all-time classic South Coast reef break – Black Rock (aka Aussie Pipe, Wreck Bay or Summercloud Bay). It is one of the hollowest and most photogenic lefts in Australia, breaking intensely over a shallow cunjevoi- and urchin-infested bottom.

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Green Island: A long walk and a long paddle (over the Shark Pit) to the SW tip of Green Island when a moderate to big NE to S swell hits is often rewarded with long; sectioney, bending, walled-up lefts, great for long-boarders and short-boarders. These super fun slow-peelers are also one of the rare offshore options during those summer NE winds … but this often means a crowd!

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Sandon Point: Only 15 minutes north of Wollongong at Bulli is Sandon Point, one of the South Coast’s most well-known breaks. A long, often fast point break that holds swells up to 8-10ft. A good right for intermediate to experienced surfers that can produce really long rides if you chance it on the right day. This is a really wave-rich area as well, with great beach breaks and reefs all the way along the coast north to the Royal National Park. JIM'S TOP 3 LEARN-TO-SURF SPOTS ON THE SOUTH COAST

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Bulli Beach: Probably one of the best learn-to-surf options on the South Coast of NSW. Bulli Beach offers the perfect options for beginners almost 365 days a year. From the sheltered rolling waves of the south-end, perfect for youngsters and the more cautious beginner, to the bigger breakers on the north end for the

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Photos courtesy of Surfing Australia / SurfGroms / www.learntosurf.com

Bendalong Beach: All levels of surfers will find something at Bendalong, where sometimes busy, but highly consistent peaks can offer anything from barrels on NE to SE swells to perfectly gentle learning waves through all tides. There are great shories and a bunch of other spots around this area too for all abilities, from Washerwoman’s to Manyana.

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Broulee Beach: North Broulee is the closest beach to Canberra, and considered one of the best learn-to-surf breaks on the South Coast due to its sheltered position and flat sand bottom. Most days of the year Broulee offers safe waves, perfect for the beginner surfer. Around the corner at South Broulee there is a more challenging beach break suited to intermediate to advanced level surfers. This is a stunning playground well worth a visit!

For more, visit www.learntosurf.com and www.surfingaustralia.com

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more intrepid beginner … this beach offers the full package to newly enthusiastic!

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Phone number – 0409111665

Illawarra’s Premier Learn to Surf &

Surf Coaching Academy

Private Lessons Weet-Bix SurfGroms School Holiday Programs After-School Surfing Surf Coaching for all ages Birthday Parties Uni-Student Specials Gift Vouchers Equipment Hire Locally owned and operated | Surf education specialists | Safe and secure online bookings


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Whale Trail

NSW National Parks’ experts share six of the best spots to catch a glimpse of humpbacks and other whales on their annual migration.

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Montague Island Lighthouse, Montague Island Nature Reserve Montague Island walking track reveals the lighthouse against a dramatic island backdrop. The walk leads past penguin breeding boxes, and whales, dolphins, seals and migratory birds are all regular visitors – Montague Island Nature Reserve is a wildlife lover’s paradise. Make a weekend of it and stay at the incredible Montague Island Lighthouse Cottages. “During the humpback whale migration, Montague Island Nature Reserve offers vantage points where you can experience a 360-degree view of whale activity. There are very few locations in Australia that can rival that experience!” – Ian Kerr, NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) Area Operations Coordinator, South Coast

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Green Cape Lightstation, Ben Boyd National Park No wrap-up of whale watching is complete without Eden. On the far south coast of NSW, it is home to the Davidson Whaling Historic Site. The Green Cape Lightstation at nearby Ben Boyd National Park is a historic site built in 1883 and perched on the edge of the peninsula. Take a tour to explore the lightstation and see passing whales. For a unique experience, wake up with the whales and stay at the Green Cape Lightstation Keeper's Cottages. “Most amazing sight off Green Cape was the day we had a pod of humpback whales (three to four) animals turning tight circles just off the rocks on the point of Green Cape. They were feeding at the time so there was a lot of activity very close to shore. “There were also dolphins getting in on the action and they were leaping over the whales

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and swimming amongst them feeding off the same thing, probably a school of bait fish. “In addition to all this excitement, there were a mob of seals in amongst the action, sea eagles collecting fish and gannets diving into the melee as well. This went on for a good half an hour before the frenzy broke up.” – Craig Dickmann, NPWS Ranger (Neighbour Relations), South Coast

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Murramarang National Park With 44km of dramatic coastline near Batemans Bay, this is a great spot to explore the cliffs, headlands and pristine beaches of the South Coast. Head to Mystery Bay or Snapper Point lookout to spot migrating whales, and enjoy a weekend getaway by staying at Depot Beach or Pretty Beach cabins. “Snapper Point and North Head in Murramarang NP are great for whale watching! As is Meroo Head Lookout. I remember sitting with a bunch of people at one of the lookouts... “We were waiting, waiting, waiting for any sign of whales. We were scanning the horizon, searching for a blow or a tail slap. After about two hours of no signs, a car pulled up and two elderly people got out and said, ‘Hi, we have never seen a whale in the wild, what time do they come out?’ We all just laughed and looked at each other and thought “Rookies” until someone shouted, ‘Whale!’ “Just then a large humpback whale travelling north split the surface and breached four times right in front of us. The elderly couple said ‘Oh, that’s great’, jumped back in their car and drove off. “If only whale watching from the coast was always that easy! Often you have to wait some time to see anything. But that is all part of what makes it so exiting when you do!” – Michael Jarman, NPWS Project Officer, South Coast

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Meroo National Park Located between Ulladulla and Batemans


Eurobodalla National Park South of Narooma, this park offers plenty of lookouts and headlands for whale viewing. Visitors keen to explore the area on foot can set out on the Bingi Dreaming Track, a 14km walk along the coast south from Congo to Tuross Head. “Eurobodalla National Park is full of excellent vantage points for viewing whales! I have seen Southern Right and Humpback whales feeding 50m to 200m from the shore in several locations. I have also seen killer whales from Montague Island – quite the experience.” – Helen Hayward, Team Leader, South Coast Branch, NPWS

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Mimosa Rocks National Park For a view you’ll never forget, head to Bunga Head in Mimosa Rocks National Park for sunrise, then take a short walk to Wajurda Point and relax on the rocks as you look out for whales. The lookout at North Tura, just south in Bournda National Park, is also a great vantage point to spot the majestic animals on their journey.

“Make sure you can see the whales!”

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WHERE TO STAY Want fabulous ocean views? Try the heritagelisted Montague Island Lighthouse Keeper's Cottages or the Green Cape Lightstation Keeper’s Cottages. Looking for something family friendly and affordable? Check out Pretty Beach campground and cabins; Depot Beach campground and cabins; and Pebbly Beach shacks in the secluded coastal rainforest of Murramarang National Park. Pebbly Beach is also famous for its ‘surfing’ kangaroos.

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Bay, this national park has great vantage points for whale watching – don’t miss the panoramic coastal views from Meroo Head lookout, or follow the walking track to Nuggan Point.

Thank you to NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service staff for providing information and photography in this article. Visit www. wildaboutwhales.com.au or download the free Wild About Whales mobile app.

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Top Spot e Villag e b vi

Stanwell Park Stanwell Park is the first seaside village on the NSW South Coast. It is famous as the home of 19th-century aviation pioneer Lawrence Hargrave, whose experiments with box kites on Stanwell Park Beach were instrumental in the development of human flight. It’s still a popular recreational flight spot – paragliders and hang gliders take off from Bald Hill to enjoy panoramic views along the coast before swooping down to land at the beach. In the colonial era, Stanwell Park was the abode of a gang of bush rangers, led by arch villain ‘Wolloo Jack’. Today the village is a more peaceful spot, home to a creative community including artists, filmmakers and authors. It gets busy on weekends when families, surfers, dog walkers and fishermen come out to play. Stanwell Park has no supermarket, petrol station or pharmacy. It does, however, have enough cafes to give keep visitors entertained daily. Try the gelato at Uluwatu Blue, chips from the Stanny, coffee on Hargraves Cafe balcony and Friday night dinners at 16 Feet. In a sunny courtyard with escarpment views, the Palms Cafe is a superb spot for a leisurely brunch or lunch. Afterwards, enjoy a browse at Articles Fine Art Gallery, owned by local painter John Vander and his wife, Frances. The Beachside Reserve has a marvellous children’s playground, with climbing frames, scooter track and sea views. There are barbecue areas and vast lawns for picnicking or impromptu soccer. Stanwell Park Beach is very beautiful, but swimmers should take care as it is also infamous for shore dumps, drop-offs and rips.

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TO ROYAL NATIONAL PARK

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Bald Hill

Stanwell Park Station

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1. Fly: Take off at Bald Hill, land on Stanwell Park Beach. 2. Shop: Visit Articles Fine Art Gallery, Boho Chic and the Palms Cafe. 3. Picnic: Enjoy the playground, barbecues and lawn at Stanwell Park Beach Reserve 4. Beach: Go fishing, surfing or walk the dog. Swim between the flags. 5. Bush walk: The challenging, steep, sometimes slippery, 6.5km Wodi Wodi Track starts at the station.

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LAWRENCE HARGRAVE DRIVE

STANWELL PARK MUST-DOS

Beach Reserve

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LAWRENCE HARGRAVE DRIVE

Stanwell Park Beach

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Surf Club

Wodi Wodi Walking Track TO SEA CLIFF BRIDGE

FEEL RIGHT AT HOME WITH WENDY If you are looking for a positive selling or buying experience, contact Wendy today. WENDY LEPRE 0431 322 192

111 Lawrence Hargrave Dr, Stanwell Park NSW 2508 02 4294 3371 • info@thepalmscafe.com.au • thepalmscafe.com.au Open Breakfast & Lunch | Thursday - Monday 9am - 4pm

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Top Spot Coffee Coast

Thirroul There’s a buzz about Thirroul. Possibly because this popular seaside village runs on caffeine. Thirroul’s coffee obsession has resulted in about a dozen flourishing cafes in a town home to only about 5600 people. Other reasons to stop here include eclectic boutiques and homewares stores. For vintage treasure hunters, there are a four options along Lawrence Hargrave Drive: Thirroul Antique Centre, Now and Then Collectables, the Mission Australia op shop and Retro Wombat. The historic town takes its name from the Thurrural Aboriginal people who lived here. Translated, it means “the place or valley of the cabbage tree palms” (not many now remain).

Thirroul’s iconic building is the old Kings Theatre, now Anita’s Theatre. Built in 1912 it was once an open-air theatre with a canvas roof and still hosts gigs and film nights. Young children will love Thirroul’s big beachside playground (especially the climbing ropes, scooter track and flying fox). There is also a free saltwater pool on Bath Street, beside the beach, open daily 6am-7pm. Thirroul Beach is a long, stunning stretch of sand. It’s heaps of fun for swimmers, surfers and bodyboarders. And, of course, you can enjoy a fine coffee! Kick back at Thirroul Beach Pavilion, where tables overlook the ocean.

Thirroul Post Office

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Thirroul Beach and Playground

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Thirroul Station

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OUT & ABOUT IN THIRROUL 1. Horizon Credit Union 2. See Side Optical 3. Anita’s Theatre 4. Cocoon 5. Egg & Dart Art Gallery 6. Crust Pizza 7. Flame Tree Co-op 8. Thirroul Pool 9. Ibah Thirroul 10. IGA Supermarket


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For authentic primitive pieces, original artwork, furniture, rugs, lighting, gifts, games and more

Shop 2, 357 Lawrence Hargrave Drive, Thirroul 2515 Monday to Friday 9.30 – 5.30 Saturday 9.30 – 4.30 Sunday 9.30 – 3.30

02 4267 1335

www.cocoontrading.com.au

CRUST PIZZA MAKES EVERYDAY MOMENTS MORE DELIGHTFUL, WE COOK ALL OUR CHICKEN AND LAMB FRESH ONSITE AND ALSO HAVE VEGETARIAN, VEGAN AND GLUTEN FREE PIZZAS OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK FROM 5PM WEEKDAYS AND FROM 12PM FOR LUNCH ON WEEKENDS. SHOP 3, 271 LAWRENCE HARGRAVE DRIVE THIRROUL PH: 4267 1700 (NEXT TO IGA)

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south coaster Photos this page: Anthony Warry Photography/Anna Blackman

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Best of Burgh The historic coalmining town of Helensburgh is home to a Hindu temple, a magical ‘glow worm’ tunnel and a world-famous zoo. An hour south of Sydney, Helensburgh is the historic gateway to the Illawarra and the Grand Pacific Drive. Its Sri Venkateswara Temple (SVT) is one of the most famous and popular Hindu temples in the southern hemisphere. Building work started in 1978 at this site, chosen according to Vedic principles (Agama Sastras) with five requirements: the site should be a virgin land, a forest, ideally on an island, with fresh water, and on a coastline. Today it is one of the region’s most popular attractions. Serving delicious vegetarian food, the canteen is open 10am-4pm (Sat/Sun and public holidays). 1300 626 663, www.svtsydney.org. MAGIC OF GLOW WORMS The ‘Burgh is home to several historic tunnels, including two abandoned when the railway line was duplicated in 1915. The best known is the Metropolitan rail tunnel, home to a stunning

colony of glow worms that light up the roof like the Milky Way. This tunnel was lost for years, but in 1995 members of Helensburgh Landcare and Helensburgh and District Historical Society drove excavations to uncover the entrance and original platform. Railway line has since been laid and the old Helensburgh station sign (dating from 1889) restored. After heavy rains, the area floods and locals paddle canoes in. The tunnel has been used as a location for weddings, professional photo shoots and ghost tours (despite a lack of any recorded deaths). It’s at the corner of Vera Street and Tunnel Road, near Helensburgh Station. www.historichelensburgh.org.au n Turn to page 16 for a feature on Helensburgh’s award-winning zoo, Symbio Wildlife Park.

PRINCES MOTORWAY PRINCES HWY

Helensburgh Station

Helensburgh Pool

Old Metropolitan train tunnel

Charles Harper Park

PARKES ST

Helensburgh Tradies

SRI VENKATESWARA TEMPLE Most famous and popular Hindu temple in the southern hemisphere.

PARKES ST

Coal Coast Emporium, supermarket and cafes

WALKER ST

Symbio Wildlife Park

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OTFORD RD Sri Venkateswara Temple

TUNNEL VISION “The combination of a historical subject and natural beauty makes for some wonderful photos. People try to capture the magic of the glow worms’ lights of a night,” says the Helensburgh Historical Society’s Merilyn House.


Ali Whitelock

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Stanwell Park poet Ali Whitelock likes to set up her laptop at a local cafe. Here are three of her favourite places.

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Inspiration in a cup READ THE BOOK! Ali’s memoir is an enchanted Scottish tale and a raucous romp through a dysfunctional Scottish family. ‘The result is remarkably life affirming.’ – The Sydney Morning Herald. Visit www.aliwhitelock. com

Photos supplied

Poking seaweed with a stick and running away from the smell is my first book. A tragicomical memoir where I dream of shooting my da’ with a sawn-off shotgun, my brother plans to use the longest knife in the cutlery drawer and my mother tries to poison my him with out-of-date tranquillisers. My next book, and my heart crumples like a coke can, is a collection of irreverent poetry and is due for release in the next few months.

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THE PALMS CAFE The Palms' attraction was never only about the delicious coffee and the scent of fresh scones just out of the oven. I felt comfortable here. Welcomed. When we moved to Stanwell Park, The Palms became my go-to place to write. I’d take my dog with me. He’d lay at my feet, one eye on me, one eye on the cafe door, hoping a sausage might miraculously find its way to him.

111 Lawrence Hargrave Drive, Stanwell Park, (02) 4294 3371, www.thepalmscafe.com.au

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16 FEET ESPRESSO This gorgeous little cafe is a bustling hub for locals and bursting with excellent coffee, groovy food and stunning home-made cakes and provides another writing sanctuary for me. Somehow being out in the world, particularly among locals, is important for my writing. It brings a dimension to my work that I wouldn’t get if I were to only work from home.

91A Lawrence Hargrave Drive, Stanwell Park, (02) 4294 1425, @16feetespresso

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STOKES LANE CAFE Despite living in this South Coast paradise, there are times when I need my city fix. If I don’t want to drive an hour north to Sydney, I drive 15 minutes south to Bulli, to this uber-cool cafe with a couple of outside tables and the most incredible coffee I’ve ever had. Another place where I regularly rock up with my laptop under my arm and join the queue … which is often out the door.

238 Princes Highway, Bulli, www.stokeslanecafe.com.au

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Animal attractions

Photos: Kevin Fallon / Symbio Wildlife Park

There's so much to love at Helensburgh's award-winning zoo.

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One of Symbio Wildlife Park's newest attractions, the Farmyard, is one of the largest precincts of its kind in Australasia. It includes two large barns covering 700 square metres, a chicken coop the size of a three-car garage, and expansive grounds where visitors may feed the animals. General manager Matt Radnidge reckons what sets Symbio apart from other zoos is that it offers visitors an immersive experience. “We get consistent feedback about the interactive side of Symbio; how close you feel and how close you can get to a lot of the animals – really close, intimate encounters,” he said. Matt – pictured above, with his nieces Isabelle and Lara Aldred – had a chat with The South Coaster.

Who designed and built the farmyard? The Symbio team. We have been talking about doing a farmyard project for over five years and have collaborated on what that may look like. What animals call it home? All of the farmyard favourites are in there, including baby lambs and kid goats, chickens, rabbits, guinea pigs, ducklings etc. It's a multi-purpose facility that allows us to house a few other animals as required – such as baby emus and joey kangaroos that we are hand raising. What activities are there for children? Interaction is our key focus within the farmyard,


What veggies are you growing? We started with some really simple things, like assorted greens, celery, tomatoes, corn etc, which are fed to the animals, and some of it makes it onto staff dinner tables.We aim to host workshops that will allow visitors to gain an insight into growing produce, how to compost, worm farm etc. We will definitely get our Junior Keeper Camp program involved in some of the planting and harvesting activities.

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Where will baby animals go when they grow up? We aim to set up some reciprocal advantage relationships with farmers where we can return the animals as they grow, and replace with new babies. We may also offer some animals to the public as pets, such as laying chickens for homes to provide their own eggs, or rabbits and guinea pigs as companion animals. We are very conscious of ensuring a suitable home is provided, so all animals will go with relevant care sheets.

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with lots of feeding and petting opportunities. We aim to have additional experiences such as milking demonstrations, billy tea and damper, and Happy Snap photo memories.

Tell us about your sustainability initiatives. The vision was to create one of the most dynamic and integrated sustainability projects out there, something that was powered by solar power, was totally self-sufficient with rainwater, and gave the public many examples of how they can live a more sustainable life, even in a very small way, which most of the time is a great family activity, and saves you money!

Symbio is open daily, 9.30am-5pm. Junior Keeper Camps, for ages 7 to 12, are on in school holidays, call (02) 4294 1244. Symbio Wildlife Park.

get wild at symbio wildlife park

If you’re looking to get up close and personal with all your favourite Australiana and exotic animals, head on out to Symbio Wildlife Park. Feed kangaroos, cuddle up next to a koala, come face-to-face with tigers and cheetahs, or fall in love with our adorable red pandas, ring-tailed lemurs, monkeys and more.

WWW.SYMBIOZOO.COM.AU • 7-11 LAWRENCE HARGRAVE DRIVE, HELENSBURGH NSW 2508

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south coaster THE SPRING

Seasons in the orchard Glenbernie Orchard’s Jo Fahey walks us through a year in life on the farm. Having a farm reveals both challenges and wonders. We thought we’d share a few of these with you and give a little insight into farm life in our modern world! There is always something

going on. In times long past, winter was a time for rest and regeneration, not just for the fruit trees but also the farmer! However these days, winter has become as busy as summer, with so many extra jobs to get done before harvest time begins. Our farm traditionally has grown fruit for the Sydney market system, supplying major supermarkets. In recent years we have shifted toward making award-winning products and selling direct to consumers. We have been opening up the farm for experiences like fruitpicking tours. Visitors get to see what we do and how we do it up close and personal. We have listened to feedback from visitors and are continually adding to our program of activities through the year. Photographers are doing

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engagement, wedding and branding shoots. It’s not far to get to work, the daily commute is only seconds, meaning you have more time to get work done. These days we don’t walk to work – we use quad bikes and other vehicles. There’s always something to do around the farm, jobs are very hands-on and much of the work here will never be replaced by computers, however, modern technology is assisting in many facets of farm life. We use computers to assist in monitoring soil moisture and keeping records of everything. In the future we will be able to turn our watering systems on and off from home rather than having to jump on a bike in the middle of the night to turn a pump on or off. More sleep! Cheers to that! Communication with other farms and specialists around the world and information sharing has become easier. Year round we attend farmers meetings, industry forums and farm talks in NSW and other parts of Australia. We are the only commercial orchard in this area, so for us to learn about what others


PRODUCE

SEASONAL AVAILABILITY

FEB

MAR

APR

WINTER MAY

JUN

JUL

SUMMER

SPRING AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

PEACHES NECTARINES RASPBERRIES APPLES

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JAN

AUTUMN

south coaster

SUMMER

Apples available for sale from storage

PICKING GALA PICKING DELICIOUS PICKING FUJI PICKING JULIE PICKING GRANNY SMITH PICKING PINK LADY PICKING PERSIMMONS APPLE CIDER/CIDER VINEGAR APPLE JUICE, HONEY, JAMS PICKING TOURS FLOWERING

are doing we need to travel quite long distances to see other farms first hand. We really enjoy meeting up with other farmers and cider makers to share knowledge and a yarn! We then bring what we’ve learnt back, improve on what we are doing and share that with our customers. Each year we hope to do better than the last! SPRING In Spring the trees begin to wake up across the farm in a kind of mosaic. Flowers pop out firstly on the stone fruit, variety by variety. This means different spots across the farm become ablaze with colour in a sequential pattern. The bees wake up from their winter hibernation and in the warmth of day you can hear them working busily among the fruit trees. The apple trees are the last to flower as spring is in full swing and heading quickly toward summer. Apple flowers are white and the leaves begin to grow at the same time. This is a great time for photos, and close ups on the working bees! The bees begin production of honey but this really doesn’t get into full swing until summer begins. Honey is robbed from hives late spring, summer and early autumn. The farm can be busy catching up on lastminute infrastructure projects (building stuff!) and repairs to fences and netting, making sure the irrigation lines are working in preparation for summer. Flower thinning often is done, removing flowers by hand to reduce the

number of fruit on the tree. This assists us to achieve good-sized fruit and less stress on the trees. It’s also a busy time making cider! SUMMER Summer heralds picking of fruit. By mid November we are in full swing picking nectarines and raspberries, followed by peaches. Apples kick in later in January. We usually think of apples beginning after Australia Day. Tours of the orchard including fruit picking are a feature of this time and happen mostly on weekends with weekday opportunities offered during the summer NSW school holidays. It’s a great time for celebrations and feasting on superb fruit and mixing it up with the apple ciders! AUTUMN Autumn is apple picking time and stone fruit will begin to lose their leaves. The stone fruit trees can look particularly pretty when losing their leaves. Late autumn can be a really lovely time for photography sessions and wedding shoots. We are busy fertilising the stone fruit trees at this time so that they form strong buds for the next seasons harvest. We begin to plan and prepare the ground for new tree plantings. Stone fruit pruning begins as it gets closer to winter. The apples lose their leaves after harvest is complete during May to June. We begin to practise our recipes for mulled cider and apple cider vinegar tonic to ward off the winter colds and flu. WINTER In winter the trees sleep, gathering themselves Continued on page 21

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south coaster THE SPRING

Baked goodness Have apples, want to make pie? Jo Fahey shares a recipe. INGREDIENTS Pastry 250g plain flour, plus a bit extra for dusting 75g self-raising flour 185g butter, chilled, cut into small pieces 75g caster sugar 1 egg 1 tablespoon chilled water Glaze 1 egg 1 tablespoon milk Demerara sugar or caster sugar, to sprinkle Filling 2kg Granny Smith apples (or other apple of choice) METHOD Make apple filling. Peel and core the apples, slice or cut into pieces. (A slinky peeler is good for this.) Place apple in microwave safe container with lid. Do not add water. Cook for 20 mins on high. You can cook the apple in a pot on the stove top but you will need to add a few spoons of water to the bottom to stop it sticking and you will need to occasionally stir. Set aside to cool. (I cook the apple the day before and use cold from the fridge when building the pie.) Make pastry and build the pie. Sift flours with a pinch of salt into a large mixing bowl. Rub butter into flour with your fingertips. Lift mixture high above the bowl as you rub, to incorporate air into the pastry and make it lighter. Continue until mixture

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resembles fine breadcrumbs. Stir in sugar. Lightly beat 1 egg with 1 tablespoon chilled water, then drizzle over flour mixture. Use a blunt butter knife to mix/ cut together. When mixed form into a smooth ball with your hands, adding a little more water if needed. Divide dough ball into two, one slightly larger than the other. Wrap in plastic wrap, and chill for 30 minutes. Roll out the larger pastry ball on a floured workbench to a 30cm circle (about 2mm thick). Roll pastry around rolling pin, then unroll over a 22cm pie dish. Gently press into corners and allow excess to overhang. Use a big spoon to place cold apple filling into the base. Roll the small pastry piece to a 25cm circle to become the lid of the pie. Beat an egg with a little milk to make a glaze, then brush some on rim of the base. Roll the pastry lid around rolling pin as you did for the base and unroll over the pie. Cut excess pastry from edges with a sharp knife. Crimp edges of pastry together with a fork or end of a spoon. Cut some air vents in the centre of the pie. Brush top of pie with some of the egg glaze, sprinkle with a little demerara or caster sugar Preheat oven to 180°C, Bake for 45 minutes or until golden brown. Serve warm or cold with whipped cream, custard or ice-cream.


Continued from page 19 THE SPRING

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before they have to wake up in spring and work hard to produce fruits. The orchard can look a bit spooky but there is plenty happening across the farm. While the trees sleep the farmer gives them a much-needed haircut! This is called pruning and it allows us to train the tree and select the best shape for fruit production. We can let in maximum light and grow the fruit in better positions so they develop more flavour, sweetness and even better colour. In the background we are busy making cider, mead and vinegar. These products are fermented year round and some of our new ciders are sitting in oak barrels, developing some interesting flavour and new characteristics. Competitions and festivals are held around the world and across Australia keeping us busy and sometimes side-tracked! This is the perfect time for mulled cider and making apple pie. Our annual Apple Pie competition day is usually around the end of July so get practising! A mead around the fire goes down well at this time and it’s worth spicing/mulling the honey mead at home – delicious for Christmas in July. Pulling out old trees and planting new ones, tagging them (so we know what they are if we have lots of new varieties) keeps us busy, along with building trellis and replacing fences. Hazard reduction for the bushfire season happens now too and that means making sure our fence lines are clear and that the property is fully accessible for fire trucks. Any excessive undergrowth in bush areas is also managed in consultation with the Rural Fire Service.

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south coaster Photos: Anthony Warry Photography

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Festival of Wood Meet Stuart Montague, one of the people behind the Inaugural Illawarra Festival of Wood this October. Look out for everything spoon carving to chainsaw sculpture when the first Festival of Wood comes to Bulli Showgrounds in October. Created by Stuart and Suzanne Montague of the Illawarra Woodwork School and Christian and Tomiko Timbs of Japanese Tools, the festival “will showcase local and regional wood artisans as well as celebrating a variety of wood-related crafts and forest industries”, the organisers say. “Each stall will have a wood artisan demonstrating their craft. The public will be able to learn, reconnect, discover and discuss woodwork with these skilled makers.” “The festival is returning woodworking back to its grassroots where people can enjoy hands-on experience and learn about the tools, the skills and the craft of wood artisans.” A variety of workshops will also be held. Stuart, a Coledale resident, third-generation fine furniture cabinetmaker and teacher at the Illawarra Woodwork School, kindly took the time to answer questions from The South Coaster.

What's the appeal of working with wood? I just love working with timber and I love making objects. It is such a joy to see what you have created at the end of the day. Having spent nearly 40 years working with timber I am still amazed by what I don’t know about my craft, timber is such a unique material. Each species of tree has its own special characteristics some timber you can bury in the ground for 30 years and it won’t rot. While some timbers will rot before the weekend comes. Timber can be so light it can float through the sky, other timber is more like steel. It is just an absolutely beautiful material it has touch, smell and visual appeal. What is most rewarding about your teaching role? I think I have the best job in the world, teaching people woodwork, the school has a strong emphasis on using hand tools and it is a great delight when new students say too me I really love using a hand plane. Most people do not live


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in a three-dimensional world it is easy for me too forgot that most people don’t make objects. That is a really important part of teaching woodwork allowing people to make furniture and objects. Why should people attend the Festival of Wood? The festival is really about sharing this great world with the community. There are so many people around in the Illawarra and South Coast making such amazing things. The world of wood has been very good to me, my family has been working in wood for 100 years and it is continuing on with one of my sons. So it is really about sharing this wonderful world and hopefully inspiring people to start making things. Come along and meet Adam from Scarborough he makes beautiful timber spear guns; Graham from Bulli who makes North American native flutes; Brett from Coledale, you can turn your bowl and work out how to build yourself a tree house; Sarah from Tahra who combines wood and silver to create jewellery. The festival has workshops so people can carve a spoon, make a stool or learn to use power tools. In this age of mass production, tell us about the joy of crafting a single piece of furniture. “Whatever I’m working on, I get excited. It does not matter whether I have done the same piece many times. I still can’t wait to get out to the shop in the morning.” I think this quote by Sam Maloof, the famous American woodworker, sums up for me the joy of making a hand-crafted piece of furniture. Timber is a beautiful material to work with. An intimate relationship is built between the woodworker, tools and timber. It is a unique experience to be able to use your hands, head and heart to create a piece of furniture.

The 2017 Illawarra Festival of Wood will be held from 10am to 5pm on Friday, October 6 and Saturday, October 7, at Bulli Showgrounds, Princes Highway. Entry fee is $15 (adult), $12 (concession) and under 18 years free.

For more details, visit illawarrafestivalofwood.com.

WARRA ILLA 6

th

&

7 th O C T

1 2 0

7

“ Every tree has a story ”

Friday 6th & Saturday 7th

October 2017 10am - 5pm Bulli Showgrounds #Spoon carving #Knife makers #Traditional tool makers #Floristry #Jewellery #Chainsaw Sculpture #Timber milling #Timber surfboard maker

Workshops available for adults & children Book online www.illawarrafestivalofwood.com

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ULLADULLA

JERVIS BAY

KIAMA

WOLLONGONG

HELENSBURGH

SYDNEY

19 DARKES FOREST

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2

4

9

5

3

TO SYDNEY

COALCLIFF

Take flight!

STANWELL PARK

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Rainforest retreat

OTFORD

CLIFTON

10

Stunning ocean pool

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6

Historic coal-mining town

HELENSBURGH

1

11. ScarboroughWombarra Bowlo.

10. Sea Cliff Bridge.

9. Coalcliff Beach, pool and rock shelves.

8. Articles Fine Art Gallery, Boho Chic and the Palms Cafe.

7. Bald Hill lookout.

6. Kelly’s Falls picnic area.

5. Sri Venkateswara Hindu Temple.

4. Symbio Wildlife Park.

3. Royal National Park, and Coast Track.

2. Tradies Helensburgh.

1. Historic ‘Glow Worm’ Rail Tunnel.

The Illawarra’s beautiful drive from bush to beach. More destination info at thesouthcoaster.com.au

Do the loop

Home of Glenbernie Orchard

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pots s t o H

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Top


Scenic viewpoint

BULLI TOPS

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www.tradies.com.au • 02 4294 1122

EDEN

NAROOMA

BATEMANS BAY

ULLADULLA 18

16

WOMBARRA

Playground, rock pools

AUSTINMER

fourth Sunday

Markets every

COLEDALE

TO WOLLONGONG

Enjoy coffee the sea

Illawarra

Radio Doctor

(Medicare)

• Weeknights/Weekends All Year Round

Bulk Billed WEEKNIGHTS Monday - Friday 7pm to 6am

AVAILABLE:

(02) 4228 5522

ILLAWARRA CALL CENTRE

radiodoctor.com.au

• Scarborough to Gerroa

• Bulk Billed (Medicare)

CALL CENTRE (02) 4228 5522

21. Boomerang Public Golf Course.

20. Maddens Falls, Dharawal National Park.

19. AppleShack store at Glenbernie Orchard.

18. Turn-off to Sublime Point Lookout.

17. Southern Gateway Tourist Information Centre.

16. Cafe-happy Thirroul.

15. Sublime Point walking track starts.

14. Austinmer Beach, with its iconic twin rock pools.

13. Sharkeys Beach, a dog off-leash area.

12. Wombarra Sculpture Garden.

11. ScarboroughWombarra Bowlo.

10. Sea Cliff Bridge.

AFTER HOURS HOME DR VISITS

Bowls and bistro with a view

Explore Sculpture Garden

THIRROUL

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14

13

12

11

SCARBOROUGH

Walk to iconic Sea Cliff Bridge

CLIFTON

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Stunning ocean pool


south coaster THE SPRING

Dr Rip’s Science of the Surf Your annual rip current survival guide, by Dr Rob Brander. It’s Spring and time for my annual Rip Current Survival Guide. Rips are the biggest hazard on Australian beaches causing more fatalities each year on average than bushfires, cyclones, floods and sharks combined and this year won’t be any different. There will be far too many unnecessary rip current drownings and tens of thousands of people getting rescued in them. There are 17,000 rips on Australian beaches at any given time and there are many unpatrolled beaches. Do you know how to spot a rip? If the answer is ‘No’ and you swim outside of the flags, then you must read this article. What are rips? Rips are rivers of the sea that carry water brought towards the beach by breaking waves back offshore. They start close to the shoreline and flow at different angles offshore, often in deeper channels between sand bars. Most rips are about 5-20 metres wide and occur every 100-200 metres along the beach. Rips flow at speeds faster than most people can swim and can suddenly pulse (after wave sets break) for 30 seconds or so at Olympic swimmer speeds. They always flow faster a few hours before and after low tide. Rips will flow offshore to the limit of breaking waves where they may either re-circulate back towards the beach, or head offshore another 20-50 metres. Their flow behaviour is very unpredictable. What do rips look like? Most beach rips are fixed in place by channels

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and bars and can stay in the same spot for days or weeks. As they are in deeper water, the water looks darker with less waves breaking. Always spend five minutes looking for dark gaps, almost like paths, heading offshore between areas of whitewater. When it comes to rips, “white is nice, green is mean”. Also look along the beach for large bowls, or embayments, carved into the sandy shoreline by rips. There are almost always persistent rips against reefs and headlands. The water surface in rips also looks a bit bumpy, rippled and disturbed and there’s often clouds of sand heading offshore of the breakers. What should you do if you get caught in one? Don’t panic – rips won’t pull you under, take you to New Zealand or into shark-infested waters; they just take you for a ride. Stay afloat, relax and signal for help from the lifeguards or surfers. If you are a good swimmer, swim towards lots of whitewater where it’s shallower, you may be able to stand up and the breaking waves will help bring you back to the beach. Whatever you do, keep reassessing the situation, conserve energy if you feel tired and don’t swim directly back to the beach against the rip. For YouTube videos and pictures of rips, please explore www. scienceofthesurf.com Have a question for Dr Rip? Email rbrander@unsw.edu.au or head to www.scienceofthesurf.com to buy Dr Rip’s Essential Beach Book.


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Q

Top

Can you spot the rips in these three photos? All taken by Dr Rip at Stanwell Park Beach.

Dog Walks

Look for dark gaps, like paths

Walkies! With Bark Busters Illawarra dog trainer Philip Comans.

1Sea Cliff Bridge

Take a walk from Coalcliff to Clifton across this iconic man-made structure for some of the best views anywhere in the world. Keep going to Scarborough Pub where the beer garden offers dogs and humans refreshing beverages and ocean views. Total distance from Coalcliff to Scarborough is 3km each way.

The surface may look bumpy

2Sandon Point, Bulli

Combining a Leash-Free Dog Beach with a paved walking track, this sun-filled outing takes you from Hamilton Road, Bulli south across a lagoon, then either along the sands of McCauleys Beach or the path past Sandon Point’s millionaire’s row. Hard to decide whether to gaze at the views or the houses! 1.5km each way.

3Warrawong to Berkeley

Start at King Street and Northcliffe Drive, Warrawong, follow the cycleway past the Illawarra Yacht Club towards Berkeley hugging the northern shore of Lake Illawarra. Continue as far as Hooka Point if you like. 6km each way.

Estate south to 4Puckey’s Wollongong Harbour White is nice, green is mean

Starting at Elliots Road, Fairy Meadow near the surf club, walk south along the beach (some is off-leash) towards Wollongong. You’ll eventually reach Stuart Park and lots of cafes and restaurants, some with outdoor seating for us to enjoy with our dogs. 2.4km each way.

5Coledale Beach to Thirroul Beach

Winding past lovely beaches and lots of interesting homes, this easy walk is perfect for pooches. Finish up in Thirroul with a coffee and puppycino at Honest Don’s. 4km each way.

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south coaster THE SPRING

Fresh from the farm The South Coast is fertile ground for everything from urban gardens to dairy farms, vineyards, olive groves and the Illawarra’s last remaining orchard. DAIRY The Pines, Kiama The Pines is a micro-dairy located in the rolling hills above Kiama. As sixth-generation dairy farmers they believe the quality of their produce starts with the natural pasture-based diet that their cows eat. Their 28 cows are raised using sustainable, biodynamic practices with a huge emphasis on animal welfare. They do everything on the farm using minimal processing – slow-speed pumps, low-temp pasteurisation and hand packaging. This means their milk is one of the best available in Australia – the Pines has been a state winner in the delicious. Produce Awards for the past two years. They also have a range of artisan dairy produce – including natural yoghurt and gelato – and are now venturing into the world of cheese making, where they want to celebrate the seasonal variations of their milk, allowing the different complexities of the pasture to be highlighted in the cheeses produced. Says the Pines’ Mahlah Grey: “People can find us at Kiama Farmers’ Market every Wednesday

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2-5pm (summer trading hours of 3-6pm start back after daylight saving starts in October) and also Carriageworks Farmers Market in Sydney every Saturday from 8am-1pm. “Our seasonal picks are new season sheep’s curd from Pecora Dairy, fresh greens like beans, asparagus, fennel and zucchini. Then passionfruit towards the end of October should be amazing.” Gelato from The Pines is a taste of heaven. It comes in all the traditional flavours, plus lemon and ginger; cinnamon with rhubarb and ginger jam; and caramel shortbread with crushed pistachios. The Pines gelato is sold at Coledale Markets (held every fourth Sunday of the month), at the The Dish & the Spoon in Nowra, Il Locale Gelato on the main street in Berry and Gerringong’s Blue Espresso Bar and Fern St Espresso and Gelato. The Pines milk and cheese is sold at Coledale’s Earth Walker General Store and more stockists may be found online. The Pines has a new website in the works and no longer does farm stays, only selected bookings over Christmas and Easter. 0449 914 063, www.thepineskiama.com.au


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Opposite page: Kel and Mahlah Grey at The Pines. Above: On the farm at Schottlander’s Wagyu. Below: a platter at the Schoolhouse; Maria Baden at the Kiama Farmers’ Market.

Country Valley, Picton Famed for its fresh, 100 percent pure (permeatefree) milk, yoghurt and cream, the awardwinning Country Valley dairy farm is set back from the coast, in the rolling hills of Picton. The Fairley family farm is home to about 145 head of cattle on 121 hectares. It’s not open to the general public, but the good news is that you can buy Country Valley milk in lots of places: at supermarkets in Figtree, Corrimal and Wollongong, at Camden farmers markets (fortnightly on Saturdays) and at cafes, including Earth Walker in Coledale, Coco’s Cafe in Wollongong and at Manic Organic in Woonona. Find suppliers at www.countryvalley.com.au

beef. You can buy meat on Wednesdays at the Kiama Farmers Market or direct from the farm gate – call first to make an appointment. Visitors can also enjoy a farm stay in the historic farm house (four bedrooms, sleeps eight) with wooden floors, high-pressed ceilings and original cast-iron fireplace and mantle-piece, all surrounded by green paddocks and contented cows. Children will enjoy searching for nesting boxes and collecting eggs for breakfast, while adults are invited to read, daydream or meditate “till the cows come home!” Schottlanders Wagyu, 96 Rose Valley Road, Gerringong, 0408 245 212, www.schottlanderwagyu.com.au

BEEF Schottlanders Wagyu, Gerringong In 2005, Gerhard and Maria Baden founded Schottlanders Wagyu farm in the lush, green Rose Valley of Gerringong. The cattle farm – which gets its name from a dairy farm in northern Germany where Gerhard grew up – covers 93 hectares of grazing land that has been proudly chemical-free for four decades. The farm is known for its high-quality Wagyu

CHEESE The Schoolhouse, Gerringong Get your cheese fix from the Schoolhouse, which makes cheese in an artisan workshop on the historic premises. The old primary school building, built by Alexander Berry in 1862, has been moved twice and has stood on its current site since 1995. The blackboard and verandah (complete with schoolbag hooks) are relics of the past; inside the classroom today you’ll find a

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restaurant, cheesemaking and tasting room. “At the Schoolhouse we make a range of fresh and matured cheeses, from both cow and goat milk,” says Kirsten McHugh. “Our cows’ milk comes from a family-run dairy farm in Rose Valley, and our goat milk comes from a family-run dairy in Falls Creek (just south of Nowra). In both cases, the milk is of exceptional quality and comes from well-cared-for herds. We sell our cheeses at the weekly Kiama Farmers’ Market, the monthly Gerringong Village markets, the monthly Pyrmont Growers Market the monthly Bundeena Saltwater market, and by appointment at the Schoolhouse.” 2 Victoria Street Gerringong, bookings (02) 4234 0050, www.theschoolhouse.com.au The ABC Cheese Factory, Central Tilba Here you can watch cheese makers at work or enjoy a South Coast Cheese tasting of handmade specialty cheeses such as cream blue, camembert, havarti and romano. You can also taste South Coast honey, enjoy a fresh milkshake and buy various jams and condiments. Founded in 1891, the Cheese Factory was the first cheese co-operative in New South Wales. It was closed for decades but

The olives groves and products of Kangaroo Valley Olives.

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Nic and Erica Dibden, owners of the Tilba Real Dairy farm, successfully revived the cheesemaking tradition in 2012, with a focus on quality products made from fresh milk. You can also buy Tilba Real Dairy products at Moruya Sage Farmers Markets (Tuesdays, 3-5.30pm) and the Bermagui Farmers Markets (Thursdays, 3-6pm) The ABC Cheese Factory, 37 Bate Street, Central Tilba, (02) 4473 7387 www.tilba.com.au OLIVES Kangaroo Valley Olives, Kangaroo Valley “We are a boutique operator located in Kangaroo Valley groves, processing facility with our own (albeit small) olive oil press, commercial kitchen,” says Brenda Sambrook, of Kangaroo Valley Olives. “We currently have three labels: two new secondary ones which launched in August.” The labels are Kangaroo Valley Olives, Essence of Kangaroo Valley and Kangaroo Valley Kindred Spirits. The Kangaroo Valley Olives label includes table olives, tapenades (sweet and savoury), extra virgin olive oils (EVOO), caramelised balsamic vinegars, standard vinegars (chardonnay balsamic, merlot balsamic, sherry). Says Brenda, “Each of our table olives are and hand-picked one at a time from the tree, debittered naturally (we do not use caustic soda or any other agent), without breaking the skin over a period of nine to 15 months before they are ready to be jarred – this preserves the terroir of Kangaroo Valley.” Essence of Kangaroo Valley products have all or their main ingredients grown in Kangaroo Valley. Kangaroo Valley Kindred Spirits products may include ingredients sourced from outside of Kangaroo Valley. Where to find KVO: Kangaroo Valley General Store (& Newsagency) has a large selection. “We have also just started to supply our EVOO in a stainless-steel tank so that customers can bring them own bottle and fill up,” Brenda says. Kangaroo Valley Fudge House & Ice Creamery has a large selection of products, as does The World’s Best Pies, at the Old Barrengarry Store (Moss Vale Road, Barrengarry) and the Shoalhaven Visitor Information Centre in Nowra. You can also find KVO products at South Coast wineries such as Coolangatta Estate and Silos Estate, “which use our olives in the cheese platter available on site”, Brenda says. “We supply our extra-virgin olive oil to fine dining restaurants”. Examples are South on Albany in Berry and Caveau in Wollongong. “We supply our whole olives (used in their


Popes Produce, Woonona Permaculturalist Sarah Anderson founded Popes Produce market garden in 2016 in Woonona, a suburb on Wollongong's northern beaches. The family-run garden supports seasonal eating and chemical-free food production. You can

south coaster

FRUIT & VEG Glenbernie Orchard, Darkes Forest This fourth-generation family fruit farm covers about 65 hectares in Darkes Forest, just 10 minutes’ drive south of Helensburgh. Faheys have farmed this land for four generations, since Edward Charles Fahey (Ted Snr), grandson of an Irish free settler, began the farm in 1939. Originally, they grew potatoes, raised chickens and sold firewood. The first commercial apple crop was planted in 1952. Today Glenn Fahey runs the farm with his wife, Jo. Their children, Brandon and Casey, came up with the brilliant idea of expanding to make apple cider. The result is Darkes Cider, a range made from 100 percent fresh crushed apples that includes Howler (alcoholic) and Little Blue (non-alcoholic). Billed as sweet, but with “a bit of a bite”, both drinks are named in honour of the farm’s dogs (Australian stumpy tail cattle dogs, pictured on the label). For the Faheys, survival in this challenging time for Australian farmers means diversifying. “So we are making apple juice,” Jo says. “Now apple cider. The apple cider project has led to apple cider vinegar. And that has also led to us looking at our fresh honey production and utilising our own honeys to make honey wine, in particular honey mead.” This year, Darkes Cider won a gold medal at London’s World Cider Awards! Try it yourself – enjoy a cider tasting and buy cider – plus apples, honey, apple cider vinegar, honey mead and more! – at Glenbernie’s farm shop, The Apple Shack. Tradies Helensburgh stocks Darkes Cider, as do all good local bottle stores. AppleShack, open daily, 10am-4.30pm, Glenbernie Orchard, 259 Darkes Forest Road, Darkes Forest, www.appleshack.com.au.

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appetizers/nibbles as stand-alone dishes) to: * Dave Campbell’s Wharf Rd (North Nowra) * Bistro One46 (Moss Vale Road, Kangaroo Valley), owned and operated by chef Gerald Poelzl and his wife Nicole. “We do not operate a cellar door, however, we do pre-booked private tour groups.” Kangaroo Valley Olives, 0447 491 245, kangaroovalleyolives.com.au Above: Glenbernie’s Glenn and Jo Fahey. Below: Sarah Anderson at Popes Produce.

subscribe to receive Weekly Greens (orders are packed on Tuesdays and Thursdays, pick up only), buy herbs and greens at the Flame Tree Community Food Co-op in Thirroul or visit Coledale's Earth Walker cafe, which uses Popes Produce greens in their salad dishes. Sarah also runs workshops, such as From Seed to Salad Bowl, Fast Bread, Flat Out and Get Growing. On October 14, you can visit the market garden for a tour and morning tea. 0432 960 284, www.popesproduce.com Green Connect's Urban Grown farm, Warrawong Green Connect is an innovative social enterprise that recovers waste and grows ‘fair food’. Its 4.8-hectare urban permaculture farm, called Urban Grown, is on land behind Warrawong High School. Last year Green Connect kept 1990 tonnes out of landfill and grew and distributed 13,754kg of chemicalfree food. It also provided employment for 114 refugees and young people. Each Thursday farm workers harvest and pack veggie boxes. You can buy boxes via subscription, pick up from the farm or via outlets such as the Thirroul’s Flame Tree Community Food Co-op – go to 1/374 Lawrence Hargrave Drive,Thirroul, (02) 4267 5792. (02) 4243 1537, www.green-connect.com.au

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Left: Fiona and Adam, with their children Henry, Ivy and Tilly.

Q&A with Fiona Weir Walmsley, of Buena Vista Farm in Gerringong Please tell us about the farm, its history and who runs it today? Buena Vista is an old family farm, it’s been in my family since the mid-1800s, and it’s where I grew up. It’s been a dairy farm almost that whole time. After living away for a long time, in big beautiful cities mainly, and after Adam and I had acquired three small children of our own, we were given the opportunity to come back and it was an offer too good to turn down. A small farm by the sea, with amazing soil and good rainfall, proximity to Sydney and within a pretty good local food system? We would have been mad not to, and we haven’t regretted the decision for a second.

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can’t host drop-in visitors. It’s something we’re working on for the future. The farm is open every Saturday however, for cooking classes, that people book quite some time in advance. We’re booked out for the rest of this year but the first 2018 classes are available for bookings on our website.

What produce should we look out for at the Kiama markets this Oct/Nov? We’ve got lots of gorgeous organically-grown greens: the end of the kale, and crisp mixed salad bags, proper carrots! As well as our probiotic kefir drink and handmade traditional sauerkraut.

Please tell us about your workshops. We get really excited about traditional foods and teaching people how to make sourdough, and bone broth, and cheese and sauerkraut; all the foods that used to be made in ordinary homes, all the time. We run a class called From Scratch, which is our most popular, and you learn bread baking and yoghurt, butter, bikkies and crackers, lots of simple foods that we often buy but which are fun to make yourself. We teach cheese making and fermenting as well as other things. Classes are usually a whole day, on Saturdays, and include a proper farmhouse morning tea, a farm walk, and a good break for a paddock-toplate long table lunch.

Does the farm welcome visitors? I’m afraid we don’t have a farm shop and we

Buena Vista Farm, 250 Fern Street, Gerringong 0414 703 958, buenavistafarm.com.au


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To market!

Thirroul wellness coach Stephanie Meades picks her top three fresh food markets.

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Kiama Farmers’ Market Wednesdays, 2-5pm in winter; 3-6pm in summer at Surf Beach, Kiama The markets are at Coronation Park at Surf Beach (on Manning Street), and provide a wonderful selection of produce sold directly to you by the farmer or maker. Along with in-season fruit and veggies, you may also shop for seafood, beef, raw honey, eggs, milk, gelato, flowers, cider, wine, sourdough bread, spices, coffee, plants, olives and olive oil, street food – and lots more! My favourite is Buena Vista’s seasonal produce stall. I also love the dairy from The Pines.

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Friday Forage, Wollongong, Fridays, 9am-2pm, Crown St Mall, Wollongong Lining the lower end of Crown Street Mall are fresh produce stalls where you can pick up seasonal delights. My favourite is the fresh herbs and seedlings stall. I also love the 74 Albert St Bakery stall, which sells freshly baked sourdough. Peppercreek Farm’s stall stocks raw treats and the best green matcha energy drink.

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Foragers Market, Sundays 9am-2pm, Bulli Showground Foragers has a huge variety of stalls run by locals who source produce from farmers in NSW and ACT. My staples always include fruit and vegetables from Margin’s Mushrooms, a kombucha tea or two from Mr Kombucha; raw treats from Raw Vibes or Raw Obsessions; and a sherbet lemonade from Juicing By Colours.

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Cheers to the Shoalhaven

Photos: Cupitt’s, Silos Estate, Coolangatta Estate

Wine writer Kerry Boyd-Skinner picks three of the best vineyards to visit.

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When Alexander Berry planted a small vineyard on Mount Coolangatta way back in the 1800s little did he know it would herald the birth of one of the most popular wine regions in the country. But it would be more than 150 years before the Shoalhaven Coast was recognised as Australia’s 95th designated wine region in 2002. Today the Shoalhaven is dotted with vineyards and wineries from Gerringong out to Kangaroo Valley and down to Bawley Point, south of Ulladulla. If you’re planning a visit to the South Coast here are three must-visit wineries.

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Coolangatta Estate, Bolong Road, Shoalhaven Heads This historic five-star winery, once the first European settlement on the South Coast, should be your first port of call. With more than 2000 trophies and awards, its wines are meticulously crafted and seriously good, with world-class semillon, classic chardonnay, tempranillo and the bold-as-brass French variety tannat, to name but a few. Visit www.coolangattaestate.com.au


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south coaster Wine garden, Coolangatta Estate.

Sophie and Raj of Silos Estate.

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Silos Estate, Princes Highway, Berry Raj and Sophie Ray purchased Silos in 2007 and have turned it into an environmentally sustainable showpiece. Breathtakingly beautiful, the one-time dairy farm now features sprawling vineyards, guest accommodation, a state-of-theart cellar-door complex, restaurant, a working alpaca farm and even a charging station if you happen to rock up in an electric car. Oh, and there’s also a portfolio of handy wines from semillon to chardonnay, shiraz, cabernet and stickies (dessert wines). Visit www.silosestate.com

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Cupitt’s Winery, Brewery and Kitchen, Washburton Road, Milton/Ulladulla What do you get when you combine a passion for quality estate-grown wines, craft beers from its own micro brewery, a fromagerie and a topnotch restaurant with magnificent views to the Budawang Ranges and Burrill Lake? The answer is Cupitt’s Winery, one of the Shoalhaven’s real gems. Enjoy a guided tour through the vineyards, barrel room and brewery before a tasting and then lunch. Visit www.cupitt.com.au

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Favourite places

Writers' retreats We asked local authors of bestselling books for their favourite spots on the South Coast.

Chris Allen Thriller writer Chris Allen left an action-packed career in the Australian military – he was a paratrooper – to tackle a life-long dream to write action-packed fiction for a living. With five topselling books published and another on the way, he's carving a spy niche all of his own in the global market. “Recently my wife and I made the decision to relocate our lives down here [Gerringong] on the south coast and we feel so lucky that we pinch ourselves almost everyday for having made the move,” Chris Allen tells The South Coaster. “What we’ve found is that the South Coast is much more than just a lifestyle choice, it’s the feeling of community we’ve discovered here that has really put the icing on the cake. “Our two boys are just starting out in their school years and so the simple things in life are what’s making all the difference for our family. We’re blessed with the best neighbours you could ever hope for, so a great deal of our time – when it’s warm – is spent outside chatting, sharing a beer or a glass of wine with our new friends over a barbecue that’s been dragged out into a driveway, while all the kids play on their bikes and scooters or kick around a footy. “We’re walking distance to the beach and we have an unrestricted view of the escarpment. The mooing of cows from a nearby farm sets the scene. It’s absolute paradise. Community is everything here. “My days of jumping out of a C-130 Hercules or abseiling from a helicopter are well behind me now, so our adventure pursuits are much more configured towards things that are suitable for our boys. Need to start them off early!”

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1

KANGAROO VALLEY: Canoeing in Kangaroo Valley – Glenmack Park: Who wouldn’t enjoy a canoeing adventure in Kangaroo Valley? There is some absolutely incredible scenery along the way – rainforest, wildlife, Tallowa Dam, Shoalhaven Gorge, Hampden Bridge, riding the rapids with the bush towering above you on both sides, clambering over rocks along the banks. Great family fun and a never-to-be forgotten experience.

www.kangaroovalleyadventurecompany.com.au


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www.southcoastluxurycamping.com

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ILLAWARRA FLY TREE TOP ADVENTURES: This is a great day out for everyone. The kids get a real buzz out of the bushwalks, reading all the wildlife information along the way. Once you reach the treetop walk you enjoy the most spectacular views of the surrounding countryside – basically for as far as the eye can see. And don’t forget the Zipline tours!

www.illawarrafly.com

READ THE BOOKS!

“In my Alex Morgan – INTREPID series, I aim to put the reader deep within the action. “My protagonist, Alex Morgan is a former paratrooper and now an agent of INTREPID – the Intelligence, Recovery, Protection and Infiltration Division of Interpol. “INTREPID is a top secret taskforce operating in the shadows to protect the world's

most vulnerable people from the worst among us. “There are currently five books in the series – DEFENDER, HUNTER, AVENGER, HELLDIVER and RANGER – and I’m currently working on number six which I’m calling SHAPESHIFTER.  “I’ve recently made a few changes to my publishing arrangements, so at the movement all of the books are

Author photos: supplied. Other photos: Kangaroo Valley Glenmack Park/South Coast Luxury Camping/Illawarra Fly Tree Top Adventures

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SOUTH COAST LUXURY CAMPING: One of the opportunities that’s also available down here is South Coast Luxury Camping. The services they offer are a far cry (massive understatement) from my experience of ‘camping’ in the military! The tents are set up for you before you arrive along with all the modcons – bedding, linen, toiletries, towels, crockery and cutlery – and wine! And, there are a heap of locations to choose from, too.

currently being prepared for re-release. “The full series will be available again from the end of June 2017. “You can keep up to date on everything happening in the world of Alex Morgan via my website: www.chrisallenauthor. com and on Facebook www. facebook.com/IntrepidAllen/” – Chris Allen

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This page: Narrawallee Inlet

Photos: Shoalhaven City Council/Andy Hutchinson/Katie Rivers/Eurobodalla Shire Council

Pamela Cook

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Pamela Cook is a city girl with a country lifestyle and too many horses. "My rural fiction novels feature complex women, tangled family relationships and a healthy dose of romance," she told the South Coaster. Her first novel, Blackwattle Lake, was published in 2012 after being selected for the Queensland Writer’s Centre/Hachette Manuscript Development Program. Her following novels were Essie’s Way (2013) and Close To Home (2015) and her fourth book, The Crossroads, was released in December 2016. An eclectic reader, Pamela also enjoys writing poetry, memoir pieces and literary fiction and is proud to be a Writer Ambassador for Room To Read, a not-for-profit organisation that promotes literacy and gender equality in developing countries. When she’s not writing she wastes as much time as possible riding her handsome quarter horses, Morocco and Rio. "The South Coast is my favourite getaway destination. There are a heap of things to do if you feel like getting out and about or plenty of places to sit and relax, take in the view or enjoy the amazing variety of great food venues on offer. "There are so many more places I could recommend but then I’d be giving away secrets! The Crossroads, my most recent novel, is set in outback Queensland but my first three books – Blackwattle Lake, Essie’s Way and Close To Home – are all based on different parts of the South Coast. The area has been a very important part of my life since I was a child and every time I’m there it feels like coming home.

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NARRAWALLEE INLET: One of my top spots is Narrawallee lake. It’s perfect for families with great swimming options – lake on one side and beach on the other – but also ideal if you want some solitude, especially in winter. I love to take a notepad and pen and sit by the shore watching the tide rise and fall, and listening to the sigh of the ocean breeze through the mangroves.

For more, visit www.shoalhaven.com.au


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Shallow Crossing

Shallow Crossing is about 20km upriver from Nelligen Bridge (pictured here).

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MILTON: Browsing – and often buying – in the gorgeous shops in Milton is one of my favourite pastimes . Unique pieces of jewellery, head-turning clothes and designer homewares make sticking to a budget way too hard! And you can’t go past Pilgrims for coffee, lunch or the best milkshakes on the South Coast (or possibly in the universe!)

For more, visit www.shoalhaven.com.au

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SHALLOW CROSSING: Driving through the beautiful state forests and national parks is the perfect way to escape. My number one destination is Shallow Crossing on the Clyde River. Pack a picnic and sit by the riverbank taking in the tranquil beauty of the bush or cool off in summer with a refreshing swim. We love to stop in at the local Berry Farm on the way, fill a few buckets with berries and devour the delectable homemade ice cream.

For more, visit www.eurobodalla.com.au

READ THE BOOKS!

Pamela's novels – Blackwattle Lake, Essie’s Way, Close To Home and The Crossroads – are available through her website or in all good

bookshops. Pamela also teaches writing courses and workshops through her business, Justwrite (www.justwrite.net.au). She loves to connect with readers in person and online. You will

often find her lurking in one of these places: www.pamelacook. com.au www.facebook.com/ PamelaCookAuthor @PamelaCookAU

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Currarong

Caroline Baum "Only is my memoir of being the only child of parents with turbulent European pasts," the Wombarra-based author says. "It's a story of privilege, conflict, secrets, love and loss. I'm currently working on my second book, based on the life of a Frenchwoman who witnessed epic rifts and convulsions at the heart of French society from the Belle Epoque to World War II." Currarong

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ILLAWARRA ROCKSHELVES The rockshelves between Wombarra and Thirroul are a beautiful canvas of geology and intertidal ecology. Their textures are intriguingly diverse and display stunning colours due to the presence of minerals; snails create a fine tracery of squiggles as they fossick for food. I find these patterns hypnotic and very soothing after a day writing. I take endless Insta snaps of them and then return with a good camera to make limited edition prints of the best ones.

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CURRARONG The lagoon at Currarong is the perfect place to paddle board and play water frisbee, and watch how far the tide goes out; it's a safe gentle spot and easy to cross to the broad flat beach – perfect for morning walks. A favourite spot in summer after school holidays when the water stays warm for months.

For more, go to www.shoalhaven.com.au

READ THE BOOK!

Caroline’s memoir, Only, recounts her colourful life as an only child, and is "a painfully honest and entertaining story of an unconventional childhood", according to Booktopia. Visit www. carolinebaum.com.au

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COASTAL WALK The coastal walk from Kiama to Gerringong is a good work-out with sweeping views , which means you feel you've earned your fish 'n' chips at Werri Beach. I'm always amazed that you can have so much beauty to yourself, there's often no one on the path out of season or midweek.

For more, go to www.visitkiama.com.au.

Photos: Shoalhaven City Council/Caroline Baum/Kiama Municipal Council

Follow Caroline on Instagram @ lacarolinebaum


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Jeff Apter Renowned biographer Jeff Apter had a chat with The South Coaster and gave us his three favourite places on the NSW South Coast.

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WHITE RABBIT CAFE, KEIRAVILLE — Remember in the TV show Cheers when Norm would walk into the bar and be greeted by drinkers, as one, calling out his name? I get a slightly understated version of that at my favourite lunch spot, the White Rabbit, where everybody knows your name (or at least mine). Anything with eggs is gold.

@Whiterabbitkeiraville

You’ve produced such an enormous volume of work about the music industry. How did your career begin? Ever since I can remember, I wanted to write. At the same time I had a decidedly geeky interest in music – I grew up on Bob Dylan, Lou Reed, David Bowie and the Beatles, the classics. In my teens I read a book called No One Here Gets Out Alive, a biography of the Doors’ Jim Morrison. It was then that I realised you could write about music and musicians in a thrilling way, without pandering to the subject. That book was the perfect melding of my two key interests: music and writing. It was the starting point for me, although it wasn’t until the early 2000s that I wrote my first book. The appeal for me is the same as it is for so many music fans: who are these people that make music? What is it that inspires them? What hardships have they endured to get to where they are? What are they like?

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Your new book, High Voltage, is out now. What’s it about? It’s a biography of Angus Young, the oldest man to ever wear a schoolboy’s uniform, a guy who’s the sound, the face and sometimes the bared spotty backside of AC/DC. It’s the first biography totally focusing on Angus and his journey — he’s now the last original member of the band left. For more details or to buy one of Jeff's books visit jeffapter.com.au.

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BELMORE BASIN, WOLLONGONG A very family-friendly, something-foreveryone community promenade, with some of the best fish-and-chips in the 2500 postcode. And did you know that Bob Dylan once swam in the Continental Baths? True story.

visitwollongong.com.au

JAMBEROO, ILLAWARRA If you walk around the township, especially in winter, it’s like rewinding time 100 years or so. I’m not much for living in the past, but this is an exception. It’s green and lush and picturesque and just a little bit spooky — and it has its own croquet club. Who else can say that?

visitwollongong.com.au

Photos: supplied / Dee Kramer Photography (Belmore Basin image)

Jeff, tell us a bit about yourself. I’m a former Sydney-sider, the father of two school-age kids, and I’ve been living in the Illawarra for the past 10 years. I’ve been a professional writer for some 30 years and have written more than 20 books, many of them dealing with music and musicians. I also write for Rolling Stone (I was on staff there for four years), the Guardian and the Sydney Morning Herald. I’m a regular on Nick Rheinberger’s ABC Illawarra morning show; I’ve also spoken at various writers festivals and libraries in and around the Illawarra and beyond.

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acific Grand P Marvels

Photos: NSW National Parks, Anthony Warry, clifftocoast.com.au

Touring the Grand Pacific Drive? Here are three highlights.

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Bald Hill For the best views of the South Coast and the iconic Sea Cliff Bridge, go to Bald Hill. The tree-free – aka ‘bald’ – hill south of the Royal National Park is a great look-out point. Motorists, bikers and cyclists all like to pull in for photos and ice-cream. The grassy hillside is a launch pad for paragliders and hanggliders. Q&A WITH CHRIS BOYCE, OF SYDNEY HANG GLIDING CENTRE What’s the appeal of hang gliding? The word that comes to mind is freedom – plus what a great way to see the world from a completely different perspective. Yep, it’s literally a bird’s eye view. We fly from world-famous Bald Hill at Stanwell Park. We are airborne for 25 to 30 minutes, soaring along the spectacular Illawarra escarpment and land on the beach at Stanwell

Park. As you are flying with an experienced instructor, this is ideal for someone who has not been hang gliding before. The minimum age is 14 years and maximum weight restriction is 95kg. Fitness is not important unless you are learning to fly. Seen any whales lately? Yes, a double treat – whale watching AND hang gliding at the same time. 0400 258 258, www.hanggliding.com.au


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Sea Cliff Bridge The iconic Sea Cliff Bridge is an engineering marvel, one of the Grand Pacific Drive’s true highlights. This towering, 665-metre-long structure opened in December 2005 and gives visitors the opportunity to take plenty of photos of the amazing scenery and to walk, ride or drive the bridge. It also makes a fantastic viewing platform for whale watchers during the migration season from May to November. Park at either end, at Coalcliff or Clifton. Buses also travel the route. Or book a Harley tour at JustCruisinTours.com.au. More info: www.grandpacificdrive. com.au

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Blowhole Point, Kiama This rugged headland is a super spot to sit and scan the sea for whale spouts. But the big ‘blow’ you’re most likely to see comes courtesy of a geological phenomenon. With sea water exploding up through a sea cave, Kiama’s famous Blowhole can shoot water 20m or more into the air, putting any passing humpbacks in the shade. The resulting sea spray and rainbows are will keep photographers happy. Another attraction is Blowhole Point’s active lighthouse, established in 1887. Want to escape the hordes? Take a stroll north or south along the Coast Walk. Blowhole Point is roughly midway on the Kiama Coast Walk, a 22km track that begins at the Minnamurra River mouth and ends at Werri Beach in Gerringong. More info: go to kiama.com.au to download a Coast Walk map.

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0556 1138 MO SU 1802

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17 17 1224 171.18 20.27 0158 0233 0.21 0233 0.27 03302 0.35 1.17 1.24 0138 1.08 0315 1.09 0730 1.39 0.60 0634 0.341.23 1.19 0136 11510022 1.61 1215 1.34 0209 0005 0120 0.28 0031 0.30 0035 0.33 FR 1327 1.28 SU 1238 1.32 MO 1750 0.70 TH 1808 0.27 FR 1811 0.51 0846 0744 1.56 0803 1.420552 0852 0837 1.740655 0905 0.59 0.49 0715 0.67 0.72 0740 0559 1.35 1.55 0657 1.60 0650 1.40 0.58 1938 0.38 0.52 1824 0.530.57 1457 0.31 1358 0.37 1514 0.18 1534 1.55 1.53 1.35 1505 1.36 1404 1223 0.45 1402 1316 0.37 1248 0.47 TH 1.50 WE SU FR1.47 TH 1354 SA SA FR 0.40 WE TH WE FR0023 0211 1.68 1.35 0053SA 1.661.63 1.49 1319 00241223 1.57 0036 18 18 0720 31.62 180.47 0745 0.390.29 0700 0.55 0829 0.28 0.65 0.57 2021 06351911 0.36 2100 1.51 2011 2116 1.54 22333 1.38 0.34 0.44 2055 0.57 2209 0.50 2105 1900 1.58 1957 1913 1.44 1854 1.50 1348 1.24 1257 1.25 1416 1.18 1321 1.15 1242 1.49

0.52 20 1052

5 0846

0.46 20 0856

5 1007

0.65 MO 1636 1.08 2224 0.64

SU 1445 1.25 2044 0.51

0.62 MO 1447 1.12 2027 0.70

0.41 WE 1620 1.25 2156 0.64

0509 1.39

0318 1.55

0309 1.38

0420 1.58

20 0925

0.55 TH 1537 1.19 2106 0.76

TU1510 MO 0 SU 2236 2058 1.25 1 0.46 2

0407 0231 0.50 0310 0404 0.190208 0339 0230 0.34 0400 0521 0.260335 0549 0.39 1.27 1.26 0042 0 1.17 1.20 1.09 1.19 0429 0213 0201 0.25 1.17 0153 0.23 1.09 21 6 21 6 15 15 15 12 0.25 30 30 27 12 12 1 27 8 12 6 3 27 21 18 3 3 18 18 1038 1.65 0920 1.590730 0959 1.60 1024 1.850902 1131 0.52 0703 0.53 0935 0.67 1059 0.66 0.69 1007 0.61 0753 0.54 0.72 1.51 0829 1.84 0811 1.64 0856 1.64 0906 21 60.231401 21 1714 1718 0.34 1527 1606 1619 0.32 1658 0.111515 17506 1622 1.56 1.49 1315 1 1.59 1.58 1.38211.39 1.39 1.37 1423

0042 0645 TU MO 1232 1853

1402 1.47 FR 1500 1.21 1.24 SU 1604 0212 0.240037 0245 0.21 0348 0008 TH1.35 0156 0.20 0122 0.33 2044 0.34 0.45 2125 0.531.13 2211 0811 1.39 0852 1.52 0930 0612 0.41 0617 0.61 0808 1.38 0727 1.33 0447 1.55 0309 1.36 0405 1.33 21 1255 6 1129 0903 1025 0.691.38 0.46 1358 0.36 1454 0.30 1602 1240 1413 0.35 1314 0.45 WE61.53 TH FR WE TH WE TU0.59 1505 1.38 SA 1605 1.14 MO 1724 1.21 2018 1.701945 2104 1.61 2255 1912 FR0.43 2019 1.74 1930 1.57 2139 0.36 2216 0.550.57 2315 0.45 0410 1020 SA 1617 2237

1.44 0.55 1.33 0.36

1.37 0.65 1.12 0.56

0553 1.64 1240 0.37 TU 1835 1.24

0606 1.45 1255 0.51 WE 1846 1.15

0430 1122 TU 1725 2305

MO 1819 1.13

WE 1340 0.27 1936 1.29

TH 1340 0.43 1933 1.21

WE 1832 1.25

0502 1137 SU 1715 2311

0329 1.44

1005 0.47 1200 0.59 1107MO 0.39 MO 0.50 0.14 0.34 1502 1424 0.26 1525 TU MO FR SA 1006 SU0.62 WE1546 SA FR SU 0.33 TU 0 MO SU1020 FR MO SA 1604 1.19 TU 1601 1.10 1721 1.32 FR 1635 1.27 TU 1749 1.10 2316 2137 1.22 2136 1.63 2219 1.38TH 1.32 23012214 1.43 1912 1 0.33 2257 0.47 2353 0.39 2307 2 2121 1.55 2100 1.45 0.43 2028 1.55 0.52 2118 21532107 0.56 2136 0.72 2326 0.35 0.62 2303 0.590.33 0.70 2210 1.56 0.43 1.19 0.55

1.39 0.58 1.13 0.70

0520 1.59 1158 0.36 FR 1810 1.40

0430 1108 SA 1724 2312

TH 1815 1.19 2349 0.65

SA 1242 0.35 1853 1.47

SU 1807 1.49

0416 1114 WE 1715 2247

1.49 0.43 1.37 0.61

22 0138 7 0233 22 1.17 70.190315 22 0609 0448 0.330433 0443 0306 0.54 0 0246 0158 0.21 0320 0.26 0.27 0348 0233 0411 0301 0.407 0.42 1.29 0528 1.33 0112 71.24 0330 0.27 1.08 0.21 0249 0.26 1.24 7 0.57 22 0.68 7 0.49 22 0.67 7 0.59 22221.09 31 13 1.66 13 1 13 0.17 28 13 1.56 28 28 19 9 0126 4 4 19 4 19 1113 1.851014 1114 1.62 0848 1.450715 0930 1.52 1001 1.660837 1032 1.60 1157 0.57 1117 0709 0905 0.72 0846 0730 1.44 0803 1.42 0852 1.74 0930 0917 1.93 0941 1754 1806 0.141620 1759 0.37 1 1441 0.321354 1.35 1537 0.33 1534 1.55 1614 0.201505 1.36 1659 0.34 1726 1.46 1.44 1.36 1343 1.53

1457 0.31 1358 0.37 0.18 1602 WE TU 1622 TH 0510 FR SA 0.58 SU 0520 TU 1556 MO 0.32 WE 0 WE 0.30 TH 0556 SA TU TU 1322 WE1.54 SA 1514 SU 1.43 1.43 TH 0017 FR 0.43 0538 1.61 0000TU 0.52 MO 1.56 0.08 8 0652 23 0020 23 0522 23 2055 81.58 230.50 1136 0.47 1239 0.580.57 12302209 0.37 1211 0.51 1152 0.36 2300 1.72 1.51 0655 0.34 1.53 0612 1.600.33 2359 2215 1.18 1 2058 1.69 2145 1.51 2222 2259 1.318 1.29 2357 2028 80.44 2233 2100 1939 1.73 2011 1.62 2116 1.54 2157 2156 1.42 0.39

0207 0812 TH WE 1409 2023

SU 1730 1.30 2334 0.36

0521 0343 0.59 0 0322 0.200251 0353 0115 0.33 0429 0.23 0442 0.46 0.46 00000005 1.35 0228 1.18 0446 1.20 0423 0618 1.41 0525 0233 0.22 1.06 0334 0.18 0307 0.30 0315 0.22 1.12 0338 0.29 1.34 0609 1.65 0001 0.54 0.39 0.52 0011 0.51 0615 1.50 0050 0.47 0.49 Copyright of Australia Bureau of Meteorology 24 0824 90746 24 0108 91.70 240.71 24 0612 0929 1.50 1008 1.51 1045 1107 1.589 1.67 0539 0.41 1151 1015 1.57 1 0 0817 90.53 1021 0.58 1220 0.60 1245 0.36 1.80 1.59 0738 Commonwealth 1.61 1258 0.43 0658 2015, 1.600.51 1.62 1120 0645 1.500.69 06390951 1.67 0841 1.51 1003 1.49 0923 0937 1.82 1007 1.96 1839 1.31 TU 1329 0.49 0.20 FR 1418 0.35 1320 0.34 MO 1234 0.30 1325 0.30 FR 1901 1.28 MO1.54 TH 1431 TH SU 1822 1526 0.31 1620 0.38 1705 0.20 1740 0.38 1205 1.80 1842 0.40 1 1452 1646 1613 0.29 1641 0.32 0.29 1539 0.31 0.13 1649 0.05 TH 1.38 FR SA SU MO 1.36 TH 0 FR 1501 SA SU TU WE TH 1441 MOAstronomical WE 1659 FR SU 1604 TU 2029 1.34 of 2014 1.55 1.28 1932WE 1.531.43 1849 1.62 1722 1913 1.161.35 1928 1.32 Datum Predictions is Lowest Tide 2140 1.65 2224 1.41 2312 1.50 2339 1.24 1.25 18540056 0.18 2145 0.40 2201 0.53 2336 0.31 2346 0.34 2255 1 2052 1.64 2236 1.69 2141 2208 1.49 0.46 2252 0030 0.34 0048 0.52 0.35 1.45 0151 0.46 0109 0.45 0042 0.56 0134 0.43 0.38 1.39 LAT 34° 29ʼ0208 LONG 150° 55ʼ2305

8 5 29 23 20 14 8 5 29 23 20 14 8 5 29 23 20 14 0 14 PORT KEMBLA – NEW SOUTH WALES 10 0705

1.77 TU 1347 0.25 1942 1.33

25 0727

1.57 WE 1411 0.42 1958 1.20

201

10Times 25 0818 10 0740 in local standard (UTC +10:00) or daylight savings tim 0732 1.71 25time 0702 1.58 0836 1.84are 1.68 10 1.57 25 0700 1.65

0045 1.15Tim 0101 0430 1.270612 0400 0.220404 0425 0339 0.40 0512Low 0.29Waters 0515 0407 0.52 0.50 0549 and 1.27 0042 0.34 0348 1.17 1.09 0521 0400 0.26 1.19 0.34 0420 0 0245 0.21 0310 0.19 Heights 0.34 Times and ofPhase High Local New Moon First1.46 Quarter Moon Symbols 24 9 24 9 24 9 15 15 15 30 15 30 30 21 21 1 6 21 6 6 0636 0.501220 1011 1.530935 1045 1.49 1132 1.701059 1144 1.55 0604 0.64 0 1131 0.52 0703 1.48 0.49 0930 0.53 0.67 0.66 1024 1.85 1038 1.65 1058 1.95 1051 1 0852 1.52 0920 1.59 0959 1.60 PTEMBER NOVEMBER 26 1606 OCTOBER 26 1.56 11 0.43 1750 11 1315 0.45 26 1.721818 DECEMBER 1301 1614 0.32 1703 1800110.23171426 1823 0.42 1233 1.52 1 1.41 1602111.59 1.38 1.39 0125 0.32

0131 0.49

FR 1518 0.16 2115 1.38

SA 1455 0.28 2052 1.35

FR 1412 0.26 2015 1.39

SA 1338 0.35 1943 1.38

MO 1355 0.36 2008 1.58

TU 1316 0.26 1932 1.74

0258 0.33

0234 0.39

0200 0.40

0130 0.47

0215 0.41

0146 0.29

1.64 SA 0923 0858 1.73 0820 1.73 1.85 0.32 0819TH 1.53 WE 0751 1.66 0.07 0.11 1718 1745 1527 0.23 1619 FR TH 1736 SA 0759 SU MO TU 0746 FR 0 SU WE 0.34 TH FR 0.30 SA 0807 MO MO 1658 TU 1.65 TH 1454 FR1.86 1443 0.16 TH 1449 0.35 0.15 SU 1531 0.22 1427 0.39 WE 1359 0.25 SA 1454 0.24 SU 1416 0.28 SA 1601 1959 0.24 2224 1.572257 2303 1.30 0.43 1 1912 2255 1.43 2316TU 1.22 2349 2136 1.63 2219 T Time m 2017 TimeWE0.33 m 1.35 Time m 2301 Time 0.39 m 1.48 Time 1929 m 2334 m 2104 1.61 Time m 2038 2039 1.240.47 2130 1.42 20572353 1.44 2022 2200 1.41 1.38 2043 1.611.41 1.84 1.34

0120 0.35 0459121.23 0030 0031 0136 0.300459 0601 0458 1.16 0035 0.330443 1.13 0 0441 0348 0.27 0.48 0.40 0209 1.23 0.41 000512 1.390609 0022 1.18 27 0.19 271.29 12 0411 27 0.28 27 0524 0448 0.33 16 10 1612 0.54 1 1.66 16 1.60 11157 1 1.89 25 10 25 10 25 10 31 7 22 7 22 2 16 0.26 7 22 0744 1.55 1038 0.48 0642 1.35 0657 1.601128 1137 0.611032 0650 1.401114 0655 0.68 1056 1.55 1123 1.46 0740 0.57 0559 0.38 0552 0.58 0.57 1113 1.85 1.62 1150 1.52 1001 1706 1.65 0.37 1.45 1 1.44 0.49 1232 0.45 1248 1.44 0.47 1.50 1402 0.40 1706 0.35 1801 1750 1404 1.63 1316 1319 1223 1.681806 1223

.100320 .620930 .451537 SA FR .492145

0218 0849 TH 1534 2130

0.31 1.92 0.10 1.37

0212 0845 FR 1526 2117

0.46 1.70 0.29 1.28

0345 1007 SU 1641 2243

0.34 1.81 0.18 1.41

0317 0938 MO 1608 2211

0.34 1.76 0.19 1.48

0247 0904 SU 1531 2136

0.37 1.72 0.25 1.48

0215 0830 MO 1455 2102

0.38 1.71 0.22 1.58

0255 0857 WE 1457 2115

0.41 1.48 0.43 1.62

0238 0843 TH 1444 2103

0.22 1.63 0.28 1.90

1759 0.33 1614 1659 SA 0 TH 0.37 SU 0.20 MO 0.34 WE 0.14 FR 0.12 SA FR 1815 SU 0310 MO TU 0.31 WE 0301 TU TU 1754 WE 0.31 TH 1842 SA0.32 0333FR 0.41 0.18 0.42 SU 0430 0.36 0330 0.36 28 0252 13 1048 28 0402 281911 13 1.18 28 0331 1957 2352130.26 1845 1.44 0.46 2 1854 1.501.73 2314 1.47 1.21 2105 1900 0.28 0.47 0939 1.94 1.73 1.31 1020 1.58 1.75 13 0934 1.431.38 09360.29 1.57 1913 2021 0923 1.742347 0945 1.67 0915 2359 1.51 2222 1.58 2259 FR 1622 0.09 2221 1.37

SA 1601 0.24 2156 1.31

MO 1718 0.24 2324 1.41

TU 1646 0.18 2252 1.53

MO 1606 0.28 2214 1.50

TU 1534 0.20 2144 1.66

TH 1527 0.47 2147 1.62

FR 1530 0.33 2152 1.92

3 17 11 8 2 26 23 17 11 8 2 26 23 17 11 8 2 26 23 17 1001

0115 0.26 0156 0.36 0116 0233 0.270016 0556 1.30 .150353 0.33 0043 0534 0.400442 0115 0111 0.270521 1.13 0524 0429 0.34 0.23 0.55 0.46 0105 0000 1.29 1.35 1.13 0.59 0320 0049 1.22 1.30 0400 0.34 0.40 0413 0.37 0350 0.25 0413 0.43 0.19 0727 1.44 0821 0742 0753 1.730541 1138140.41 .571008 0647 1.24 0730 1.52  Copyright Commonwealth of0.41 Australia 2015, Bureau of Meteorology 0.71 1145 1.55 1.42 0651 0.47 0.64 0852 0.61 14 0514 14 1.57 29 0427 29 0333 14 290636 1151 0539 0.41 0622 1.51 1045 1.70 1107 1.58 1026 1.90 1000 1.761205 1129 1.62 1023 1.61 1000 1.71 1013 1.371.61 1032 1.48 0.48 1708 0.12 1638 0.21 1753 0.31 1639 0.33 1615 0.21 1558 0.52 1618 0.42 SU 0.20 TU 1740 TU FR 0.40 SA 1325 1445 0.36 1409 0.25 1802 .511620 1229 0.54 1336 0.36 1.40 1804 0.39 1844 0.54 1319 1.63 1.44 1513 1.55 1842 1.80 1245 0.38 1705 0.38 SU TU FR SA 1.78 SU MO TH 1.51 SU 1414 MOSA WE 0.38 THWE1308 TH 1.73 WE 1205 FR2243 SA 1206 SA SU1.36 MO 2310 2236TU 1.34 2249 2227 2221SA 1.61 1.90 Datum of1.71 Predictions is Lowest Astronomical Tide 1934 1.58 1.35 2006 2116 1.451856 1848 1.510003 1941 2005 1.54 0.50 2038 0.46 2008 1854 0.33 2209 0.32 0.18 1940 2224 1.41 0448 0.38 2312 0415 1.50 2339 1.24 Times and 0.19 1.40 0453 0.46 0526 0.23 0.39 0453 0.41 0440 0.23

1 2 0

Times 15 are in1.82 local standard time daylight savings +11:00) when in e 30 1040 15 1100or1.52 30 1049 1.64 15 1052time 30(UTC 1112 0.47(UTC +10:00) 1.30Heights 1132 of 1.40 1.76 15 0557 high

1752 0.18 1.51 0.52 1630 0.580.39 0.51 1.28 0.210037 1710 0.38 1657 WE 1206 SU 1711 MO 1715 0156 0.25 0201 0335 0.250102 0042 SU0.20 .420425 0.40 0122 0.33 0153TH0208 0.230.26 0230 0008 1.35 1.13 1.09SA 1.15 0429 1.26 0213 WE 1.20 1.17 0045 0512 0.29 0515 0101 1.27 0151 2357 1.34 1827 New 0.38 2258 1.58and low 2336 waters 1.83 Full Moon 2317 1.37 2324 1.51 2313 1.76 Moon First Quarter Moon Symbols 0 0808 1.51 0829 0902 1.840627 0645Phase 1.38 .211045 0727 0617 1.331144 0811 0730 1.640604 0856 1.64 0612 1132 0.41 1.70 0.61 1.55 0.69 0.64 1007 0.61 0753 0636 0.54 0.50 0.72 1.49 0724 29’ 0.55 lat 34 0500 0.40 0533 0.25 0 1413 1502 0.14 1232 .521703 1314 0.45 1424 0.26 1525 1240 1.53 1.38 1.39 1622 1.49 1423 1.58 1.37 31 311401 55’1.65 long 150 1233 1247 0.23 1823 1301 1343 WE 0.42 SU MO 0.43 TU1121 FR 1.72 SA 1.52 MO 1.721255 1141 1.55 TU 0.35 WE FR SU 0.33 TH 0.34 MO 1515 FR SU SU MO 1800 TU TH SA 0.22 1.57 1742 TU 1755 2100 2210 1.451939 1853 1.74 .582303 1.30 1930 2028FR2107 1.550.34 2118 1.32 0.52 0.43 1912 0.43 1945 0.57 2019 1.55 2307 2038 0.33 0.27 2121 1959 0.35 0.24 0.43 1929

4 18 12 9 3 27 24 18 12 9 3 27 24 18 12 9 3 27 24 18 1001

1 2 0

0126 0.17 0233 0.27 0158 0138 0.270022 0233 0315 0.210136 0301 0.42 0249 0433 0.260152 0528 0255 1.33 1.28 0112 0005 1.24 1.39 1.08 1.18 0330 0209 1.17 1.23 1.09 1.13 1.24 1 19 0.58 4 0.38 4 0.57 19 0.68 4 0.60 19 00 13 13 28 13 28 28 25 25 5 19 0.48 10 25 10 10 0730 1.44 0846 1.56 0803 1.420552 0852 1.740655 0930 1.66 0917 1.930719 1117 0.57 0709 0.49 0715 0.67 0905 0.59 0837 0.72 1014 0.68 1.46 0559 0740 0830 1322 0.30 0.37 1.35 1457 0.31 0.18 1.36 1602 0.32 0.08 1.36 1 1726 1.46 1556 1620 1343 1.53 1358 1354 1534 1.55 1514 1505

.350458 .271123 .461750 TU MO .642347

.290534 .331205 .401844 WE TU .68

 Copyright Commonwealth of Australia 2015, Bureau of Meteorology Datum of Predictions is Lowest Astronomical Tide are1223 in local +10:00) or daylight time1.63 (UTC when 1.45 0.49 1.68 1223 1.50 1404 TH WE standard SA SUin effect MO MO SU 1445 WETimesTU TH time FR SA +11:00) SA 1319 WE(UTC FRsavings Phase Symbols New 1911 Moon First Quarter Full Moon Quarter 1939 Moon 1.73 2100 1.51 2011 2055 1.62 2116 2209 1.54 2157 Last 1.29 2357 0.33 2028 0.44 0.57 0.47 2233 0.34 0.29 0.50 0.46 2021 1.21 1900 0.28 2105 2134

1.52 TU 1 TU MO 1334 2156 2300 1.422027 2 0.39 0 0.33

The Bureau of Meteorology gives no warranty of any kind whether express, implied, statutory or otherwise in respect to the availability, accuracy, currency, completeness, quality or reliability of the information or that the information will be fit for any particular purpose or will not infringe any third party Intellectual Property rights. The Bureau’s liability for any loss, damage, cost or expense resulting from use of, or reliance on, the information is entirely excluded.

0233 0251 0.220111 0334 0.46 0315 0423 0.220233 0338 0525 0.290246 0207 0.18 0307 0.30 0446 0320 1.20 1.22 0618 0358 1.41 1.30 1.34 1 0228 0105 1.18 1.29 1.06 1.13 1.12 1.13 5 0.47 20 0.71 20 001 5 0.61 5 0.63 20 0.64 14 29 14 29 14 29 26 6 20 0.55 11 26 11 11 26 0841 1.510636 1003 1.67 0937 1.820753 1007 1.960821 0812 1.49 0923 1.59 1021 0.58 1220 0.51 1120 0.60 0817 0.53 0824 0.69 0951 0.71 1.42 0651 0943 0852 1441 0.29 1641 1604 0.13 1649 0.05 1409 1539 1646 1.55 1822 1.43 1.38 1452 1.54 1.35 1.36 0.54 TH 1.63 MO 1.40 WE 1 SU 1.55 TU 1.41 FR 1.44 SA 0.31 TU 0.32 WE 1722 TH 0.29 FR 1501 SU 1613 SU 1414 WE 1319 TH 1308 MO 1548 SA 1513 TU 1429 2052 2201 1.642005 2236 1.25 2228 0.38 2 2208 2305 1.492116 2252 2346 1.392116 2023 1.69 2141 1.45 2336 2209 0.31 0.32 0.34 0 2145 2008 0.40 0.33 0.53 0.50 0.46 0.46 44 0407 0.50 .240037 1.13 0245 0.21 0310 0404 0.190208 0339 0.34 0400 0521 0.260335 0430 0612 0.340344 0549 0429 1.27 1.26 0042 0456 0.34 1.36 1.46 1 0348 0213 1.17 1.20 1.09 1.09 1.19 1.17 21 0.72 21 001 21 0.61 6 0.54 21 0.69 6 0.61 6 0.61 15 15 30 15 30 30 7.360617 27 12 12 27 12 27 1038 1.65 .39 0852 1.52 0920 1.590730 0959 1.60 1024 1.850902 1058 1.950931 1131 0.52 0703 1.48 1220 0.49 0930 0.53 0935 0.67 1059 0.66 1007 1055 0753 1454 0.30 0.23 1.38 1619 0.32 0.11 1.39 1718 0.34 0.07 1.41 1 1750 1.56 1658 1714 1315 0.45 1745 1818 1602 1.59 1527 1606

TU 1.37 TH 1 TH 1.38 FR 1.58 SA 1.39 MO 1.49 WE 1.33 SU SU 1622 WE TU 1653 TH WE 1532 FR TH 1423 SA FR 1401 MO MO 1515 WE 1255 2 .70 2104 1.61 1.63 0.47 2219 1.38 2301 2353 1.43 0.39 2316 1.22 1912 1.41 2349 1.34 2255 0.33 2136 2257


R30SA 1614 1233 1.52 0.32 0.32 0.23 1703 0.43 0.32 0.23 0.11 1823 0.42 0.34 1.72 0.07 FRDECEMBER SU OCTOBER MO 1800 TUNOVEMBER TH 1301 SA 1343 TU 1718 TH 1736 FR 1527 SA 1619 MO 1658 WE 1745

1.57 1.63 1.30 1.38 61 2224 me m 2136 Time Time 2303 m 2219

m

2301 1.43 Time

0.43 1.21 0.24 1.34 Time 2038 m Time 1959 m 2349 m 2316 1.22 Time 1929 m 2334

0120 0255 0.44 0120 0209 0.35 0524 0031 0136 0.30 0459 1.13 0.55 1.23 0.41 16 1.63 1 25 10 7 1 25 22 16 10 7 1 25 22 16 0.54 10 0740 10 0830 22 7 1150 0756 1.61 0744 1.55 0657 0655 1.60 1128 0.68 0.57 1.62 1.89

59 26 38 52 06 33 SU 52 51

1.23 0441 0.48 1056 1.65 1706 SA 0.26 2314

0.27 0348 1.55 1001 0.35 1614 SU 1.47 2222

0601 0458 1.16 0411 0.48 0.19 1137 1123 0.61 1032 1.46 1.66 1801 1.44 0.49 0.20 MO MO 1750 SU 1659 1.21 1.58 2347 2259

0030 0.40 0642 1.60 1232 0.34 TU 1845 1.31

0.28 0005 1.35 0559 0.45 1223 TU 1.58 1900

1.39 0448 0.38 1113 1.68 1754 WE 0.28

0035 0022 0.33 0443 1.18 0.33 0650 0552 1.40 1114 0.58 1.85 1248 0.47 1759 1.50 0.14 TH WE 1223 WE 1854 1911 1.50 2359 0.47

1430 0.40 1402 0.40 1316 0.37 1.45 1.63 0.37 SA 0.35 FR 0.12 SA 1319 FR 1404 SU 1445 FR 1815 TH 1842 1.24 1957 2105 1.38 0.29 1913 2021 1.44 0.46 2017 2134 1.18

south coaster

2017

THE SPRING

0157 0358 0.45 0156 0.36 0049 56 0524 1.30 0429 0115 0105 0.26 0000 0116 0233 0.27 0016 0043 0534 0.40 0442 0115 0111 0.27 0521 1.13 1.19 0.34 0.23 0.55 November 1.29 1.35 1.13 0.59 0320 1.22 1.30 33 0.46 2017 17 17 17 2 2 2 26 11 26 11 26 11 11 23 23 8 23 8 8 0831 1.65 0821 1.61 38 1145 0.41 0727 1.44 0742 0753 1.73 0541 0647 1205 1.24 1107 0730 0636 1.52 1151 0943 0852 0.61 0.71 1.55 1.42 0651 0.47 0.64 1.57 0.59 51 1045 1.70 1.58 0539 0.41 0622 0.48 PORT KEMBLA – NEW SOUTH WALES NEW SOUTH WALES

2017

1510 0.36 1445 0.36 02 1804 1.71 1325 0.38 1409 0.25 1229 0.54 1740 1336 0.36 1842 1.55 1.40 0.39 0.54 1319 1.63 1308 1.44 0.40 38 1205 1.80 SU 1.58 FRChart TU 0.38 SA 1.78 MO 0.20 TH SU 1414 MO TU 1844 WE TH MO 1548 SA 1513 SA 1206 SU 1705 MO FR 1245 LAT 34°WE 29ʼ LONG 150° 55ʼTH Port Kembla Tidal 2058 2228 1.24 1.35 1940 1934and2008 1.58 2006 1.45 1856 1848 1.51 2339 Times 1941 1.54 0.50 2038 2209 0.32 Local 2116 0.46 0.37 0.33 2005 0.18 0.19 41 LONG 2312 1.24 Heights1854 of High and Low Waters Time 150°1.50 55ʼ SEPTEMBER

OCTOBER

NOVEMBER

DECEMBER

0156 0213 0.25 0101 0201 0335 0.25 0102 42 High 0.20 and 0122 0.33 0515 0153 0208 0.23 0045 0230Time 0.39 0151 0231 0456 0.47 0008 1.35Low 0037 1.13 0.52 1.09 1.20 1.27 0429 1.26 1.28 1.17 1.19 1.15 40 0512 0.29 of Waters Local 18 3 3 3 18 18 12 27 27 12 12 12 27 24 24 9 9 9 24 0808 1.51 0829 0902 1.84 0627 45 0612 1.38 0727 0617 1.33 1144 0811 0730 1.64 0604 0856 1.64 0906 1.68 0.41 0.61 0.69 1055 0753 0.54 1007 0.61 0.72 0636 0.50 0724 0.55 0.64 0.62 49 1132 1.70 1.55 16 16 1 16NOVEMBER 1 16 1 DECEMBER 1 BER Time

m

Time

Time

m

Time

0030 0642 MO 1232 1845

m

0.28 1.35 0.45 1.58

Time

m

Time

0120 0744 TH 1402 1957

m

0.35 1.55 0.40 1.38

Time

m

Time

0120 0756 SA 1430 2017

m

0.44 1.61 0.40 1.24

1.23 0.48 1.65 0.26

0601 1.16 1137 0.61 SU 1801 1.44

0532 1.15

0556 1.30

0043 0.40

0115 0.26 1.44 0.38 1.58

0115 0.27

0156 0.36

0116 0.27

0157 0.45

SU 1153 0.52 1823 1.58

MO 1232 0.35 1853 1.74

TU 1314 0.45 1930 1.57

WE 1413 0.34 2019 1.55

FR 1424 0.26 2028 1.55

SA 1525 0.33 2118 1.32

SU 1502 0.14 2100 1.45

MO 1546 0.33 2137 1.24

0101 0.35 0658 1.27

0126 0.17 0730 1.44

0158 0.27 0803 1.42

0233 0.27 0846 1.56

0233 0.21 0852 1.74

0301 0.42 0930 1.66

0249 0.26 0917 1.93

0306 0.48 0941 1.70

0436 1011 FR 1651 2340

1.10 0.62 1.45 0.49

0459 1038 SA 1706 2352

m

0035 0650 WE 1248 1854

0.33 1.40 0.47 1.50

0031 0657 FR 1316 1913

0.30 1.60 0.37 1.44

1413 0.34 1502 0.14 32 0.35 1314 0.45 1424 0.26 1525 0.33 1546 0.33 1.53 1.38 1.39 1.58 1.49 1.37 43 WE 0.42 SU 1.65 TU 0.23 FR 1.72 SA 1.52 MO 1.52 TU 1240 WE 1255 FR 1401 TU 1653 TH 1423 SU 1622 MO 1515 FR 1233 SU 1247 TH 1301 SA 1343 MO 1800 TU 1823 1.55 2100 1.45 1939 53 Time 1.74 0.43 1930 1.57 0.57 2028 1.55 1929 2118 Time 1.32 2137 2317 1.24 1912 1945 0.52 2121 0.35 2307 0.33 2210 0.43 1959 0.24 0.27 30 0.43 Time M Time M 2107 M 2038 Time M 0.39 m m m Time m 2019 Time Time mTime

17 1138 17 2 0647 0120 0035 0.33 26 0030 0.17 0.28 0233 0.27 0158 0.27 0330 1.17 0112 1.24 2 1.39 0138 1.08 0727 1106 0.57 1.24 0.35 0.41 1.18 48 0005 0022 0209 1740 1.51 SU 1802 1.71 0.54 TU 1325 MO 1229 0744 0650 1.40 0.58 0846 1.56 30 0642 1.44 1.35 0803 1.42 0552 0905 0.59 0709 0.49SA 0.38 0715 0.67 46 0559 0740 1934 1848 1.51 1.55 1402 0.40 1248 0.47 1457 0.31 22 1232 0.30 1358 0.370042 1534 1.55 1343 1.53 1354 1.35 49 1223 1223 TH MO WE TH WE 1.68 SA FR0122 WE TH0.42 FR TU 0.45 WE 0156 0024 0.20 1.50 0.33 1404 18 18 0645 3 0727 0808 1.38 0.47 0618 1.21 1.33 1.38 1957 1854 1.50 2100 1.51 39 1845 1.73 1.58 2011 1.62 2233 0.34 2028 0.44 3 0.28 2055 0.57 21 1900 1911 2105

171.13 17 0831 20.21 0120 0031 0.30 0233 0315 0249 0.26 0301 0.422 0.44 0528 1.33 1.09 0433 1.24 0821 1.61 0742 1.73 1.28 0730 0136 1.52 1.65 0152 0255 1.23 1445 0.36 1409 0.25 SU 1510 0.36 TH 1336 0.36 0756 0657 1.60FR0.68 0930 1.66SA 1.61 0852 0837 1.74 09172058 1.93 1117 0.57 1014 0.68 0.72 0.57 0830 2038 1.35 2006 1.45 0.60 1941 0655 1.54 1.24 0719 1430 1316 0.37 1602 0.32 1514 0.18 1556 0.08 1726 1.46 1620 1.36 1.36 1.63 1445 SA FR 1505 MO TU MO0.39 TU0231 SA SA MO SU 0.40 0.25 0201 0.25 1.52 0153 1319 0.23SU 1.45 0230 0.47 1334 31.54 180.46 18 0906 1.51 0829 1.84 0.33 0811 2021 1.64 0856 1.64 1.68 2027 2017 1913 1.44 2157 1.293 1.24 2116 2156 1.42 2357 0.33 2300 0.39 2209 0.50 0.29 2134

0306 0548 0.48 16 13 10 4 281 25 19 16 13 10 4 28 25 19 1.20 13 1202 13 10 4 281 25 19 16 0941 1.70 0.66 1622 0.31 1.45 WE 1752 2215 1.23 0.41

0116 0.27 1.13 0115 0.27 1.13 0233 0251 0.22 0111 0334 0157 0.46 0.45 0343 0001 0.50 0315 0423 0.22 0233 0338 0525 0.29 0246 07 0115 0.18 0.26 0307 0156 0.30 0.36 0228 1.18 1.29 1.06 0446 1.20 1.22 1.12 0618 1.41 1.30 1.34 1.23 55 0105 0358 0320 17 17 17 2 0951 2 0824 5429 20190.71 20 0.67 5 29 5 29 20 0.64 14 0635 140831 14 14 26 11 1.44 26 114 1.65 11 1.61 26 19 0636 19 4 0821 19 1120 41.820753 0742 1.73 0730 1.52 0841 1.51 1003 1.67 1015 1.69 0937 1007 1.96 0821 12 0727 1.49 0923 1.59 0817 0.53 0.69 1021 0.58 0.71 1220 0.51 0.60 42 0651 0.47 0943 0.63 0852 0.61

MO 1236 0.46 TU 1322 0.30 WE 1358 0.37 TH 1457 0.31 SA 1514 0.18 SU 1602 0.32 MO 1556 0.08 TU 1622 0.31 1409 0.25 1510 0.36 1445 1336 0.36 1441 0.29 1641 0.32 1659 0.31 1604 0.13 1649 0.05 09 0.29 1539 0.31 1452 1.54 1501 1.35 1646 1.55 1.36 1822 1.43 1722 1.38 54 1319 1.63 1308 1548 1513 SU FR TU SA 1613 TH1.64 TH MO 1.40 WE 1.39 SU TU FR TH 1300 TH1325 FR SA2011 SU TU1.29 WE2215 SU WE 0.38 TH 1939 MO SA TU 1902 1.62 0.36 2157 1.23 1429 2100 1.55 1.51 1.73 1.44 2116 1414 1.54 2156 1.42 1.41 2006 1.45 0.46 2058 2038 1.35 1941 1.54 2052 1.640207 2236 1.25 1.24 2255 1846 1.22 2208 1.49 22520343 1.39 23 1934 1.69 1.58 21410233 1.45 2145 0.40 0.33 2201 0.53 2336 0.31 2305 0.46 2346 0.34 0.41 2008 2005 22280.29 0.38 0137 0.29 0.18 0.50 0.22 2209 0307 0.32 0.30 0315 2116 0.22 0334 0.46 0338 0.50 2116

5 0734

1.33

20 0812

1.49

5 0841

1.51

20 0923

1317 0.40 WE 1409 0.29 0.29 FR 1539 TH 1441 0153 0.23 0230 0.39 45 0156 0.21 0.25 0310 0.192023 0339 0.34 0549 1.27 0348 1.17TU 1.20 0404 1.09 13 0208 0213 1940 1.68 1.64 0429 1.69 1.09 2052 2141 0811 1.64 0856 1.64 52 0808 1.52 1.51 0920 1.59 0959 1.60 1131 0.52 0930 0.53 0.54 0935 0.67 61 0730 0.69 1007 0753 0212 0.24 0245 0.21 0310 0.19 0339 21 0852 6 0920 21 1424 0.26 1525 0811 1.52 1.39 1.59 0.33 0959 54 0.30 1527 0.23 1619 0.32 1750 1.56 1602 1.59 1606 1.38 38 1401 1622 1423 WE FR1.39 SA FR6 1.58 SA MO SU FR1413 SA FR SU TH 0.34 1358 0.36 TH 1454 0.30 FR 1527 0.23 SA 1619 2028 1.55 2118 04 2019 1.61 1.55 2136 1.632104 2219 1.38 2255 0.33WE 0.35 2257 0.47 57 2107 2307 2121 2018 1.70 1.61 0.52 2136 1.63 1.32 2219

1.59

5 0937

1.82

20 1003

1.67

5 1007

1.96

20 1015

1.69

1604 0.13 MO 1641 0.32 1649 0.05 WE 1659 0.31 0.31 SU 0201 0.25 1.17 0231 0407 0.50TU 0.47 0400 0.26 0430 0612 0.34 0042 0.34 1.46 0521 1.19 1.26 0456 2208 0335 1.49 2236 1.25 2252 1.39 1.362255 1.22 0344 1.45 0829 1.84 0906 1.68 1038 1.65 1024 1.85 10580420 1.95 0703 1.48 0.61 1220 0.49 1059 0.66 0.61 1055 0931 0902 0.72 0400 0.26 0407 0.50 0430 0.34 0.52 0.34 6MO 211.37 6 0.33 21 1502 0.14 1546 1.60 1024 1515 1.85 1038 1058 1.95 1.33 1.67 1532 1718 0.34 1658 0.11 1745 0.07 1315 0.45 1818 1.41 1.39 1.49 1653 SU 1714 MO TU TH WE WE1.65 TH1051 MO TU WE 0.32 MO 1658 0.11 TU 1718 0.34 WE 1745 0.07 TH 1736 0.32 2100 1.45 0.43 2137 2316 1.22 1.24 2301 1.43 234923341.34 1912 1.41 2353 0.39 0.33 2317 1.38 2301 2210 1.43 2316 1.22 2349 1.34 0.41 1.21 2209

0420 0043 0.52 18 15 12 6 30 27 21 1.29 15 0717 15 12 6 303 27 21 18 15 12 6 303 27 21 18 1051 1.67 0.66 0246 0848 TH 1441 2058

0.21 1.45 0.32 1.69

0320 0930 FR 1537 2145

0.26 1.52 0.33 1.51

0348 1001 SA 1614 2222

0.19 1.66 0.20 1.58

0.40 1.60 0.34 1.31

0448 0.33 1113 1.85 TU 1754 0.14

0443 1114 WE 1759 2359

0.54 1.62 0.37 1.18

0524 0.41 1150 1.89 TH 1842 0.12

0459 0.55 1128 1.63 FR 1815 0.35

MO 1740 0.38 2339 1.24

WE 1205 1.80 1854 0.18

TH 1842 0.40

FR 1245 1.78 1940 0.19

SA 1206 1.58 1856 0.37

0411 1032 SU 1659 2259

1736 0.32 1.34 FR 1348 2334 1933 1.21 0.40

0.21 1.09 0249 0.26 22 0315 22 70.330433 22 0.41 0440 1.38 0448 0609 0443 0306 0.547 0.48 0524 0459 20 0233 0.26 0.27 0348 0233 0.19 0411 0.40 0.42 1.29 0528 1.33 0548 1.42 08 0330 7 1.17 19 197 0301 19 0941 4 0852 4 1157 7 31 22221.24 7 0.57 22 0.60 7 0.59 22 0.72 13 1.66 13 1.70 13 1.56 28 28 1.74 0930 0917 1.93 1113 1.85 1014 1114 1.62 1150 28 1.89 1045 1128 30 0846 1.52 1001 1.66 0837 1032 1.60 0.57 1117 0.57 1202 67 0905 0.68

0.55 1.63 1514 0.18 0.32 1556 0.08 1622 1754 0.14 1759 0.37 184200160.12 1815 0.35 37 1457 0.33 1614 0.20 1659 1602 0.34 1.44 1726 1.46 17521.30 1.28 1641 35 1534 1505 1.36 1620 TH SA0.20 MO TU 0.59 TU WE 1.36 FR 1.31 SA 1.55 SU TU 1806 WE 0.31 TH FR 0.31 SA 0353 TU 0521 1.19 0322 0.33 SU 0429 MO 0.23 0442 0.46 0000 1.35 0049 TH 8 0539 2300 230.39 23 1008 8 1045 23 0929 1.50 1.51 0.50 1.70 1.29 1107 0.33 1.58 1151 1.57 0.41 0622 0.48 23 0541 0.59 2301 0.37 2116 1.54 2157 2156 1.42 2215 2359 1.188 1.23 45 2100 1.51 1.51 2222 1.58 2259 1.31 2357 57 2233 8 0.34 2209 FR 1526 0.31 2140 1.65

SA 1620 0.38 2224 1.41

SU 1705 0.20 2312 1.50

0315 0.22 0334 0.46 0.29 1.34 0343 0521 0.59 0.50 53 0307 0.33 0.30 0429 0.230425 04420512 0.46 0000 0338 1.35 004901021.30 0001 0.43 06 0446 1.20 0423 1.12 0618 1.41 0525 0534 0045 1.15 1.19 0400 0.22 0.40 0.29 0515 0.52 0101 1.27 0151 1.28  0923 Copyright of9Australia 2015, of24Meteorology 24 06270.48 24 1045 24 90.41 0937 1.82 1003 1007 1.96 1015 08 1.51 1.59 1045 1.70 1107 1.58 0539 0622 1151 1.579 1.69 06350.55 1.49 69 1021 9Commonwealth 0.58 0951 1220 0.51 0.60 0604 0.64 0.62 1155 1011 1.53 1.49 0.71 1132 1.70 1.67 1144 1.55 Bureau 0636 1120 0.50 0724 1614 0.32 SU 1703 0.43 1800 0.23 TU 1823 0.42 1301 1.72 FR 1233 1.52 1343 1.65 SU 1247 1.52 SA MO TH SA 1604 0.13 1641 1649 0.05 1659 1539 0.31 20 0.38 1705 0.20 1740 0.38 1205 1.80 124519391.78 1842 0.40 1300 35 1646 1613 1822 SU1.57 MOAstronomical TU WE 0.43 FR TH 1.38 SA SU 1.55 MO WE 1.43 FR TH 0.31 SA of SUis2303 TU 0.32 WE FR 1929 0.39 1748 2224 1.30 1.36 1959 1722 0.24 2038 0.27 0.52 Datum Predictions Lowest Tide 2208 1.49 2236 1.250022 1854 2252 1.39 0.34 2255 1.22 24 2141 1.41 1.45 2312 1.500458 23390005 1.24 0.18 194001520.19 1846 1.26 53 2336 2305 0.46 2346 2354 0136 1.13 1.20 0441 0.27 55ʼ 0.48 1.39 1.18 0209 1.23 0255 1.28 29ʼ LONG0.31 150°

20 14 8 5 29 23 20 14 8 5 29 23 20 14 8 A – NEW SOUTH WALES

2017

0016 29 23 1.50 0541 0.50

1.19 0.59 1206 1.58 1.32 1856 0.37 0.35

10daylight 10local 25 1123 1.46time 10 0559 Times are in standard (UTC +10:00) savings time when in effect 0.38 25 0552 0.58 or 0830 (UTC 0.60 25 +11:00) 0655 0.68 10 0719 0.66 1056 1.55 0740 0.57 25 1.68 0.50 1.50 1445 1319 1.45 1.45 0627 1.64 1706 0.35 0.49 1.19 1404 0612 1.63 MO 13341.28 MO 1750 TU 1223 WE 1223 0.34 FR 0407 0420 0.52 0.34 0400 0.26 0430 0.34SA1.46 0045 1.15SUTime 0102 1.19 0101 1.27 0151 25 0339 0.40 0512 0.29 0515 0.52 00431.52 0.44 0549SUand 1.27 0042 09 0521 ights ofPhase High Low Waters Local 1900 Moon 0.28 1911 0.47 2134 0.33 2021 0.46 2027 0.41Moon 2314 1.47 2347 1.21 2105 0.29 New First Quarter Moon Symbols Full 1038 1.65 1051 1024 1.85 1.95 0.49 0636 1058 0.50 072402460.55 45 0959 1.49 1.60 1132 1.700534 11440105 1.55 0604 0.64 1.67 0627 0.62 0717 1.55 1131 0.52 0703 1.48 1220 1259 0.37 67 1059 0.66 0524 0.34 0.55 1.29 0111 1.13 0233 1.13 0358 1.30 0320 1.22 1.23 CTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER 26 11 1.56 26 1205 11 26 11 0.32 26 08211.65 1718 1736 1658 0.11 1745 0.07 1301 1.72 1343 03 1619 0.43 1800 0.23 1823 0.42 1233 1.52 1247 1.52 1348 1750 1315 1.41 38 1714 1.39 1145 1.42 0753 0.47 0.34 0636 0.45 0.64 0943 0.63 0.46 0852 1818 0.61 0.67 1852 TU 0651 TH 0.71 SA MO1.55 WE11 FR SU 1.34 TH SA MO TU FR SU 0.32 WE TH SA MO

21 15 9 6 30 24 21 15 9 6 30 24 21 15 9

30 24

0.54 1.63 TH 1308 1.44 1548 1.41 TU 1429 1.39 1513 1.55 SU 1414 1.40 TU 1844 WE 1319 MO 1.21 SA 2316 2334 2301 1.43 1.34 1959 0.24 2038 0.43 1912 19330.38 1.24 2353 Time m 21160.27 Time 0.39 m 2008 Time m 2349 Time 1929 m 0.46 2116 0.33 1.22 2005 1.41 0.50 2228 2209 0.32 0.41

1804 03 1.30 1.38 47 TimeMO m m 2219

0.39

0008 0612 TU 1240 1912

1.35 0.41 1.53 0.43

1939 0.39

0120 0.44 0030120.28 0120 0.35 0031 0.300459 1.16 0035 1.29 0.33 0.33 1.13 0152 58 0411 0.48 0.40 020912 1.23 0.41 0005 0448 1.39 0022 1.18 0.54 0255 27 0609 27 12 0443 270136 27 1.28 0045 0.32 1612 0.55 16 1.62 16 1.60 11157 1 1.89 22 22 22 7 1113 7 0524 25 25 10 25 10 10 31 0756 1.61 0642 1.35 0744 1.55 0657 1.601128 0.61 0650 1.401114 1.63 1.85 1150 0655 0.68 0719 23 1032 1.46 0740 0.57 0559 0.38 0552 0.58 0830 31 0.60 0718 1.77 0.57 1430 0.40 1232 0.45 1402 0.40 1316 0.37 1.44 1248 0.47 0037 0617 WE 1255 1945

1.13 0.61 1.38 0.57

0213 0753 TH 1423 2121

1.20 0.54 1.58 0.35

0208 0730 FR 1401 2107

1.09 0.69 1.39 0.52

0429 1007 SU 1622 2307

1.26 0.61 1.49 0.33

0335 0902 MO 1515 2210

1.17 0.72 1.37 0.43

0456 1055 TU 1653 2317

1.36 0.61 1.33 0.41

0344 0931 WE 1532 2209

1.29 0.66 1.34 0.40

1.20 0.66 1759 0.37FR 0.14 1.45 1334 1.45 50 1659 0.49 1404 1.63 1.68 1223 1.50 144504401.52 1357 1.44 SA 0.35 TH MO 0.34TU 1223 WE1806 FR 0.12 1319 WE 0330 FR 1815 SU TU 1754 TH 1842 MO 0.24 SU 1.17 0528 1.33SA 0433 1.24 0548SU 1.42 1.38 0112 1.24 TU 0138WE 1.08 0315 1.09 28 0715 13 0905 28 282021 13 2017 28 10450.33 1845131.58 1957 1913 1.440.680.46 1854 1.50 2359 2027 0.41 47 2259 1.21 1.31 2105 0.29 1900 0.47 2134 0.59 1.18 1117 0.57 1014 1202 0.57 1.24 0.60 1951 1.36 0709 0.490.28 0.67 1911 0837 1.38 0.72 13 WE 1343 1.53 2028 0.44

TH 1354 1.35 2055 0.57

FR 1534 1.55 2233 0.34

SA 1505 1.36 2209 0.50

MO 1726 1.46 2357 0.33

TU 1620 1.36 2300 0.39

WE 1752 1.28

TH 1641 1.31 2301 0.37

0157 0.45 0115 0.26 0156 0.36 0116 0233 0.270016 0.40 0115 0111 0.270521 1.13 1.19 34 0442 0.55 0.46 0105 0000 1.29 1.35 1.13 0.59 0358 1.30 0320 0049 1.22 1.30 0246 0001 0.43 0228 1.18 0251 1.06 1.20 0423 1.12 0618 1.41 0525 1.34 1.50 0831 0727141.44 0821 0742 1.730.60 1.24 0730 1.52 alth of Australia 2015, of 0446 Meteorology 1151 0541 1.58 0539 0.41 0622 0.48 0.71 05 1107 1.42 0651 0.47 0.64 0943 0852 0.61 0821 14 0.59 29 0534 29Bureau 14 29 290753 0635 1.49 1.65 0817 0.53 0824 0.69 0636 1021 0.58 1.57 0951 1.61 0.71 14 1220 0.51 1120 11550.63 0.50 1300 0.52 1452 1.54 1501 1.35 1646 1.55 1613 1.36 1822 1.43 1722 1.38 1748 1.32 TH 1.58 FR 1.80 SA 1842 SU TU FR 1510 0.36 1325 1445 0.36 1409 0.25 0.54 1336 0.36 0.40 1206 1740 0.38 1205 1.40 44 0.54 1319 1.63 1308 1.44 1548 1.41 TU 1429 1513 1.55 SU TU SA 1.78 TH SA 0.34 MO WE0.40 FR 1245 SUWE1414 WETH0.38 SA 1846MO 1.26 2145 2201 TH 0.53 TH 2336 FR 0.31 2305 0.46 2346 2354 0.35 owest Astronomical Tide 2058 1.24 1934 1.58 2038 1.35 2006 2116 1.451856 1.512339 1.24 1941 1.5405490.50 1854 0.18 0.19 0.46 0.37 2008 0.330404 2005 2228 0.38 2209 1940 0.32 2116 Times and 1.27 0042 0.34 0612 1.46 0043 0.44 0627 1.64 0348 1.17 1.09 0521 1.19

23 17 11 8 2 26 23 17 11 8 2 26 23 17 11

26

rd time (UTC or0935daylight savings (UTC when 15 effect 15+10:00) 15 0703+11:00) 30 1259 of0.37high 0.52 30 time 1.48 30 1220 0.49 in 0717 1.55Heights 0930 0.53 30 0.67 15 1131 1059 0.66

1.56 1.15 1315 0.45 1818 1348 0.46 0.47 18521.36 1.34 1602 1.59 1.38 0208 1.39 SU 1750 WE SA low SA 1606 MO 1714 0.39 0156FR0.25 0201TH0335 0.251.41 0.33 0153 0.23 0230 0231 0101 1.27 0045 0151 1.28 0102 37 0515 1.13 0.52 1.09 0429 1.26 0456 0213 1.20 1.17FR 1.19 waters 1912 1.41 Moon 1933 1.24and Last 2255 0.33 2257 0.47 First Quarter2353 0.39 New1.55 Moon Quarter0344 0 0808 1.51 0829 0902 1.840627 1.33 0811 0730 1.640604 0856 1.64 0906 1.68 0.55 17 1144 0.61 0.69 0.64 1007 0724 0.61Full 1055 0931 0753 0636 0.54 0.50 0.72 0.62 29’ lat0045 340.61 0609 1.29 0.32 0 1413 1502 0.14 0.45 1424 0.26 1525 1546 55 1823 1.38 1.39 1622 1.49 1653 1.33 1423 1.58 1.37 31 31 long 150 WE 0.42 SU 1.65 FR 1.72 SA 1.52 MO 1.52 1157 0.33 0.57 0718 1.7755’ WE 1532 TH 1301 FR 1233 SA 1343 SU 1247 TU FR 1401 SU TU 0.33 TH 0.34 MO 1515 1.44 0.24 TU 1806 1.32 SU 13570.41 2118 2100 2210 1.451939 1.57 2028 2107 1.551929 2137 1.24 2038 0.43 0.39 45 0.57 2019 1.55 0.52 0.43 2307 0.33 0.27 2317 2209 2121 1959 0.35 0.24 1951 1.36

24 18 12 9 3 27 24 18 12 9 3 27 24 18 12

27

0233 0.27 0.27 0233 0315 0.210136 0301 0.42 0249 0433 0.260152 0306 0.48 0528 0255 1.33 1.28 0548 38 0022 1.08 1.18 0330 0209 1.17 1.23 1.09 1.13 1.24 1.20 19 0.58 4 0.57 19 0.68 4 0.60 19 0.66 25 25 10 0740 25 10 0830 13 13 13 28 28 0846 1.56 1.42 0852 1.740655 0930 1.66 0917 1.930719 0941 1.70 1117 0.57 1202 15 0552 0.67 0905 0.59 0837 0.72 1014 0.68 1457 0.31 0.37 1514 0.18 1602 0.32 1556 0.08 1622 0.31

28 0440 1045

54 1223 1.35 TH WE 1.62 55 1911 0.57

1.42  Copyright Commonwealth of Australia 2015, Bureau of Meteorology 0.57 Datum of Predictions is Lowest Astronomical Tide are1404 in1.55 local time +10:00) or daylight savings time1.52 (UTC when in effect 1319 1.45 1.45 1.63 1.50FRTimes 1445 1726 1.46 1534 1.36 1620 1.36 SAstandard SU MO TU SA(UTC MO 1334 FR SU MO WE 1752 1.28 SA 1505 TU +11:00) Phase Symbols New 2021 Moon First Quarter Full Moon Quarter 2100 Moon 1.51 2116 2209 1.54 2157 1.29 2156 2300 1.42 2215 Last 1.23 2027 2105 0.29 0.47 2134 2357 0.33 0.33 2233 0.34 0.50 0.46 0.39 0.41

1.23 0.67 1.39 0.41 1.29 0.66 1.34 0.40

1.38 0.60 TH 1641 1.31 2301 0.37

The Bureau of Meteorology gives no warranty of any kind whether express, implied, statutory or otherwise in respect to the availability, accuracy, currency, completeness, quality or reliability of the information or that the information will be fit for any particular purpose or will not infringe any third party Intellectual Property rights. The Bureau’s liability for any loss, damage, cost or expense resulting from use of, or reliance on, the information is entirely excluded.

0.22 0334 0.46 0343 0.50 0315 0423 0.220233 0338 0525 0.290246 0307 0.30 0001 0446 0320 1.20 1.22 0618 0358 1.41 1.30 1.34 1.23 51 0111 1.06 1.13 1.12 1.13 20 0.71 20 0.67 5 0.61 5 0.63 20 0.64 26 26 11 0943 11 0852 26 14 1.69 14 1.59 29 0951 14 1.67 29 1120 1.51 1003 1015 0937 1.820753 1007 1.960821 0923 0635 1021 0.58 1220 0.51 0.60 24 0636 0.69 0.71

0.43 1.49 0.29 1641 1659 1604 0.13 1649 0.05 1539 1300 0.52 1646 1.55 1822 1.43 1.38 01 1308 1.35 1.36 MO 1.40 WE 1.39 SU 1.55 TU 1.41 FR 1.44 SU 1414 TH MO 1548 SA 1513 TU 1429 TH 0.31 SA 0.31 TU 0.32 WE 1722 SU 1613 1.64 2236 1.25 2228 0.38 2255 1.22 2208 2305 1.492116 2252 2346 1.392116 2141 1.45 1846 1.26 2336 2209 0.31 0.32 0.34 0.41 01 2005 0.53 0.50 0.46 0.46

0407 0.50 0420 0.52 0.19 0339 0.34 0400 0521 0.260335 0430 0612 0.340344 0043 0549 0429 1.27 1.26 0042 0456 0.34 1.36 1.46 1.29 04 0208 1.09 1.09 1.19 1.17 21 0.72 21 0.66 21 0.69 6 0.61 6 0.61 27 12 1007 12 1055 27 27 15 15 15 30 30 1038 1.65 1051 1.67 1.59 0959 1.60 1024 1.850902 1058 1.950931 0717 1131 0.52 0703 1.48 1220 0.49 35 0730 0.67 1059 0.66 1718 0.34 1736 0.32 0.23 1619 0.32 1658 0.11 1745 0.07

0.44 1.55 1.56 0.45 1.41 06 1401 1.38 1.39 TU 1.37 TH 1.34FR 1348 0.46 SA 1.39 MO 1.49 WE 1.33 FR SU 1622 TU 1653 WE 1532 MO 1515 SU 1750 WE 1315 TH 1818 MO 1714 2316 1.22 2334 1.21 1.63 2219 1.38 2307 0.33 2301 2353 1.432210 2349 1.342209 0.40 1933 1.24 1912 2317 1.41 0.41 57 2107 0.47 0.52 0.39 0.43

1.50 29 0534 1155 0.50 FR 1748 1.32 2354 0.35 45 0627 1.64 30 1259 0.37 SA 1852 1.34


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Golf Courses

Go green A fore!-course special for golfers. You deserve a golfing break. John Towns, of Tradies Helensburgh Social Golf Club, picks four top-quality courses – listed here in no particular order of preference – that are just waiting for you to play them.

For most golfers the game is not about a swing like Adam Scott or a putting game like Rory McIlroy. However, when the mind does wander back to the time when that six iron shot on a tough par three landed inches from the hole, even if it was back in ’86, you feel like a ‘pro’ and it proves the memory is still working OK. It’s about the camaraderie and the mates you have developed over many years of hacking your way out of that impossible bunker, or the shot out of the trees where the ball always ends up behind the biggest pine tree. Unlike some other sports for which you need to be built like a Greek god or be able to run the 100m in 9.76 seconds, this is a sport you can learn in school, develop throughout your life and well into retirement. Your style will evolve from that of a hard-hitting young player to that of a mature sportsman with finesse and cunning, allowing you to enjoy the sport and lifelong friendships born of the greatest game on earth. As a golfer you develop a liking for a range of golf courses for many different reasons. My favourite courses include:

1 Photo courtesy Russell Vale Golf Course

Boomerang Golf Course

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The home course for our Tradies Sports and Social Golf Club where we battle it out for the chance to collect the bragging rights for the month. With a slope rating of a respectable 112, and a lightly undulating course, this is perfect for mature exponents of the ancient art. The outof-bounds areas are usually well protected by the resident black snake and it always pays to donate a ball to the golfing gods usually residing in the dam on the short par3 on the 7th.

2

Russell Vale Golf Course

A course I play on a weekly basis in their regular championships. A shorter course with a slope rating of 93 and treacherous greens which allows you to putt on and off the greens with very little control over the result. However all is not lost, while waiting for your turn to tee-off the view over the northern

suburbs and out to sea will allow your nerves to settle before the next shot. An amazing team of social members guarantees that a piece of homemade cake or slice is available to the players on the 19th. This is one of the best-run clubs I have had the pleasure to be a member of.

3

Calderwood Golf Course

I play here several times a year with Vets and Probus groups. A public course with a relaxed atmosphere and open fairways that allow the average golfer with a natural slice to be able to recover without too much damage to the score. The breathtaking surrounds feature the rugged Illawarra escarpment as a backdrop. The soft, easy flowing greens allow the players to attack the pin and keep the score under control.

4

Kangaroo Valley

An excellent course for our yearly weekend away excursion. Originally designed by Jack Newton, the course is challenging with its diverse terrain and water hazards. The overnight accommodation with spectacular views of the course is excellent with dinner and breakfast included in the package if required, or dinner at the local pub is always a great night. With a slope rating of 135, carts are essential for a two-day event. This also allows players the extra glass of port to clear the system on the second day. Please note: There are many other golf courses I would love to play, from Stonecutters Ridge, the venue for the Australian open, the sand belt in Victoria to those public courses in small country towns, each one with their own challenges and unique beauty. I’m always looking forward to the tee shot that lands next to the hole, or that long putt that seems destined to drop into the cup and the feeling that keeps bringing you back to that next game.


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Spring 2017 South Coaster  

Your ultimate guide to holidaying on the NSW South Coast

Spring 2017 South Coaster  

Your ultimate guide to holidaying on the NSW South Coast

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