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FEBRUARY 2020

www.2508mag.com.au

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DISTRICT NEWS

WILDLIFE CRISIS HOW LOCALS ARE HELPING THE FIRE ZONE SURVIVORS

Waterfall | Helensburgh | Otford | Darkes Forest | Stanwell Tops | Stanwell Park | Coalcliff


MEET OUR CONTRIBUTORS

RODNEY ARMISTEAD is a zoologist with 20 years’ experience in environmental education, research and science. He spends most of his time working on Australia’s threatened bats, marsupials and the platypus. Now a resident of Helensburgh, he has lived and worked across Australia. He finds great pleasure in travelling to remote locations in the hope of catching sight of a particular bird, mammal or reptile. DR DANIEL DALY is a Research Fellow at UOW’s Sustainable Building Research Centre. He was a core member of the UOW Solar Decathlon China 2013 competition winning team, which demonstrated how to retrofit a typical Australian home to be a net-zero energy home. TERRI AYLIFFE is an artist, writer and the owner of Lifeology, life and business coaching. Terri has undergrad and post grad degrees in Psychology and has run a business with her husband, Matt, for the past 20 years.

DISTRICT NEWS EDITORS Genevieve Swart, Marcus Craft CONTACT PO Box 248, Helensburgh, 2508; editor@2508mag. com.au  www.2508mag.com.au  There is a drop box at Helensburgh Newsagency (please notify us if you use it). ADVERTISING Karen McDougall, 0403 789 617. Or book via www.2508mag.com.au. Terms and conditions apply. ON THE COVER: Mel Whiteside’s pic of a kangaroo in care – see Wildlife Crisis special feature p26-31. 2508 is hand delivered in the first week of each month and produced by The Word Bureau. ABN 31 692 723 477 Disclaimer: All content and images remain the property of 2508 District News unless otherwise supplied. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. Views expressed do not reflect those of the editors. Articles of a general nature only; seek specific advice on an individual basis.

THANK YOU!

To all our fireys for a huge summer of service

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Left: Melissa Mullin with a Lions collection due to be sent south on the Australia Day weekend. Below: thanks to Andy Offord (left) for the storage space at Helensburgh Business Park and Greg O’Driscoll of Gline Taxi Cabs.

BUSHFIRE CRISIS

LIONS FUNDRAISE FOR FIREYS The Helensburgh Lions Club has been actively involved in supporting our local RFS stations as well as delivering food, clothing and other essentials to fire-affected communities within our Lions district, from Eden to Helensburgh. We have donated $1000 to the Australian Lions Foundation, the part of our organisation that responds directly to communities in need. Thanks to Andy Offord at Helensburgh Business Park, we have a storage facility where we can collect and hold supplies for the RFS, as well as items to be distributed through a network of volunteers. We intend to maintain this facility throughout the fire season. The need for support will not dissipate any time soon. Members have already assisted with the delivery of goods with local mum (and soon-to-be Lion) Melissa Mullin travelling to Bargo. We were outside Coles each weekend in January, and appreciated those of you who took the time to stop for a chat or to pat Ollie the dog. Your generosity after just that first weekend raised enough money to purchase the first iPad requested by our RFS stations. After servicing the needs of our local RFS crews, we will continue to supply goods to communities in need. You’ll see our collection buckets at the Sri Venkateswara Temple, Symbio, Sunrise Nursery, Stanwell Park cafes and Flying High Cafe at Bald Hill. Please take the opportunity to offload coins. We have other activities planned, so check out the Helensburgh Lions Facebook page to see what’s coming up. Message us if you can help in any way. We would like to sincerely acknowledge and thank our wonderful fire fighters, police and SES personnel for their continued bravery and dedicated service across Australia. We are also awed by the many individuals who have selflessly collected and delivered donations. It is inspiring to see leadership emerging within our communities, with people taking decisive and generous action, often for complete strangers. 2508

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Photos: supplied

By Fran Peppernell, Helensburgh Lions Club publicity officer

THANKS EVERYONE

The 2508 community has been incredibly generous. Gina Krohn shares some of many local initiatives. Kerrie Blackwell organised a massive donation of goods that was sent south; Luke Maloney, Natalie Rajnsz, Sue Pratt, Josh Noakes, David & Raye Taylor helped with transport. Melissa Mullin has been a powerhouse of energy and enthusiasm. Belinda Taylor donated money from the sale of cakes in her online business. Amber Sweet and her sister hosted a drop-off point for clothes, toys, non-perishables and cleaning products and took them to Lake Conjola. Alivia (Liv) from Grassroots Holistic Grooming made up comfort packs for the fire stations. Greg and Mandy Mullane (owners) and Nat and Jason (managers) at Silvergum Stables held a mammoth garage sale in their barn and raised $6000, which was donated to the local RFS stations. The CWA held a successful cake stall, with money used to buy items for RFS crews. 2508

NORMAN NEEDS A HOME!

This six-month-old puppy is looking for his forever home. He is smart, affectionate and ready to learn life’s lessons and manners which will make him the perfect family pet. Norman is a mix of a mix of a mix breed – and he is a sweet boy! EMAIL Julie-ann on ccarpetrehoming@tpg.com.au or Helensburgh’s Country Companion Animal Rescue.


MORE THAN COFFEE AT 2508 SALVOS By Lauren Martin

WHAT’S ON

Deirdre Healey (left) and Alison Hawley.

Every Wednesday, Salvation Army community worker for the 2508 area, Deirdre Healey, turns on the coffee machine at Helensburgh Salvos Store. Her “Coffee and Chat” mornings have been running for nearly a year and are a chance for people to slow down and connect. “I’ve met some amazing people in this store over the past year,” she says. “Some from out of town but many locals who pop in regularly on a Wednesday.” Deirdre, a 2508 resident, is a qualified chaplain. Her role with the local Salvation Army ‘2508 Salvos’ involves connecting with people and providing both material and emotional support. “The 2508 community is so fantastic,” she says. “Their support for us during our Red Shield Appeal in 2018 and 2019 has enabled us to give back to people in need through emergency relief and other assistance.” Deirdre and 2508 Salvos Mission Leader, Lauren Martin, have been able to help people through

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• Wednesday Coffee & Chat – 11am-1pm @ Helensburgh Salvos Store • Monday Walking Group with Al – meet 11:30am @ Helensburgh Salvos Store • For The Salvation Army’s Positive Lifestyle Program, community worker support or a confidential chat, call Deirdre Healey: 0413 839 530 or email: deidre.healey@salvationarmy.org.au • Find us on Facebook @2508Salvos. referrals to mental health services, Salvation Army Recovery Services to assist with addiction issues, and providing information and referrals for domestic violence support. Deirdre has also been able to offer household goods and food assistance for families doing it tough. The team also journeys with people one-on-one through the Salvation Army’s Positive Lifestyle Program, an eight-week well-being course tackling issues such as loss, loneliness and goal-setting. “The Positive Lifestyle Program is really powerful,” says Lauren Martin. “I did it for myself a few years ago and loved it so much I became a facilitator. It’s amazing how setting aside an hour a week to look at different aspects of your life can really help to put in place new, healthy habits and ways of thinking.” 2508 Salvos has several amazing volunteers, including fitness instructor Alison Hawley, who runs a free walking group on Mondays. 2508

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FEBRUARY / 2508 / 7


GO TEAM HELCAR!

John Hine (‘Hiney’, proprietor of Helensburgh Car Services) and I (Peter Zifovich, ‘Zifo’, longsuffering team-mate) are really stoked to announce that we are taking part in Shitbox Rally Autumn 2020. This event is part of the Box Rallies series and will see all the teams driving their ‘shitboxes’ from Alice Springs to the Gold Coast via the Gulf of Carpentaria, nearly 4000km in seven days. A ‘shitbox’ is defined as a car worth less than $1000 and we have an old VZ Commodore station wagon, once owned by a house painter, as our means of transport for this epic journey. Our team name is HELCAR because our primary sponsor is Helensburgh Car Services, but we’re excited to announce that we now have a number of generous major sponsors on-board to help out. These sponsors are: Southern Storage, Helensburgh Premium Liquor, Helensburgh Tyres, Babister Legal, Darkes Cider, Helensburgh Golf Driving Range & Putt Putt and Apex Decals. John says that it didn’t take a lot of arm-twisting to get these local companies on board. Once he explained the purpose of the rally, they were all eager to be involved. He emphasised how grateful he was for their support as the primary objective of the event was to raise money for Cancer Council. The funds raised go directly to the Cancer Council and we are extremely proud to be doing our part to support such a worthy charity. A close friend of Team Helcar has recently been diagnosed with the disease. I lost my father and a close friend to the disease and John recently lost

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Child Restraints Fitted John Hine (Proprietor) 187 Parkes St Helensburgh 2508 8­ / 2508­/ FEBRUARY

Photo supplied

Two local mechanics have teamed up to enter the Shitbox Rally Autumn 2020 and raise funds for the Cancer Council. Peter Zifovich (Zifo) reports.

his brother-in-law and a close friend to it as well – hence our desire to do something about it. Because we’re motor mechanics and car enthusiasts, the ‘shitbox’ rally seemed a logical way to do it. Shitbox Rally is the largest community-led fundraiser for the Cancer Council in Australia and is now in its 11th year. To qualify for the event, all teams have to raise a minimum of $5000 but most teams raise well above this amount, the 2020 Autumn rally target is set at more than $2 million. Team Helcar has already received a pleasing number of donations from individuals and small companies, but more donations are required if we are to reach our team target of $15,000. To help us raise the entry fee we have organised a raffle and some Bunnings Sausage Sizzles to augment the donations received so far. The raffle prizes have been generously donated by Just Cruisin’ – Harley Davidson Motorcycle Tours, Sydney Hang Gliding Centre, and Rally School. Binners Farm – Farmers Market generously donated the onions for the inaugural Bunnings Sausage Sizzles at Kirrawee. Raffle tickets are available from us, Helensburgh Car Services or at our Bunnings Sausage Sizzles. John said the first step was to raise the entry fee and as much as we could for Cancer Council. Then prepare the car and try to get the old crate to Alice Springs for the start. The fundraising is the hard part, so any donation you can give is greatly appreciated. We reckon the really difficult part is going to be spending the best part of 10 days together in a confined space. Who drives? Who navigates? Who changes flat tyres? Who picks the music? Air conditioning or windows down? Bathroom breaks? It’ll be a real test of our friendship. Please support our sponsors and prize donors and make sure to follow our progress of Team Helcar via https://autumn2020.shitboxrally.com. au/helcar 2508


SYMBIO’S BUSHFIRE PLAN

Did you read about Mogo Zoo’s incredible escape from the New Year’s Eve bushfires and wonder: ‘What would Symbio do?’ Here, the zoo’s Jess Harris shares their plans. We have been extremely lucky that we have not been impacted directly by the bushfires. At Symbio, we have been making sure that we are as prepared as we can be, while always looking to improve our current facilities. We understand the incredible responsibility we have to the animals in our care at Symbio. As such, we have invested a substantial amount of time and money in being prepared for bushfire emergencies. Our aim is to be as self-sufficient as possible in the worst-case scenario – if we cannot get RFS assistance in time. Our plan includes three stages of alert –Yellow, Amber and Red. All have escalating actions associated to safely move animals and people to safe areas and allow for emergency access. Symbio has invested in 20 large rainwater tanks that have a storage capacity of 556,000 litres. This water may be used for irrigation, to flush toilets and to clean enclosures. During the dangerous bushfire season we ensure we have a minimum of 150,000 litres in our water tanks to ensure we are able to run our sprinklers for as long as we can. The majority of these rainwater tanks also have Storz fittings installed, which will allow fire trucks to fill up from our tanks if needed. Petrol pumps and fire-suppression sprinklers

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have been installed on a number of major buildings and we recently completed 450 metres of sprinklers along our highest risk Southern boundary. These systems would begin to be prepared in the Yellow stage, and physically started in the Amber stage to eliminate ember attack and spot fires. We feel we are well prepared for an emergency, but we know you can never get complacent, we still have further plans to increase our fire suppression capability this coming year. We would welcome anyone who would like to know more about setting up these systems –please get in touch with our team. 2508


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ACROSS THE STATE, THOUSANDS OF FLYINGFOX PUPS ARE DYING Helensburgh zoologist Rodney Armistead reports.

Undoubtably, you would have noticed the Grey-headed Flying-foxes that are flying over and feeding in the trees around Helensburgh, Otford and along the Illawarra coast. Whatever you think of them – whether you see them as a scourge or you admire them for their grace and beauty – they do have an important role in maintaining the WILDLIFE health, genetic diversity and biodiversity of IN CRISIS NSW forests. Grey-headed Flying-foxes are highly mobile, and at times they will fly long distances to search for and find food. Grey-headed Flying-foxes mostly feed on nectar, pollen, and the fruits that grow on A shortage of food has meant mothers have been forced to native plants. When times are tough, they will also abandon their young. Photo: Rodney Armistead feed on fruits that grow on domestic plants too. This is the reason why they’re here: they are Across NSW, thousands of dead and dying feeding on the nectar and pollen being produced abandoned pups are dropping out of the trees. by our local Blackbutt (Eucalyptus pilularis) and This is happening because there is a shortage of Smooth Barked Apple (Angophora costata) trees. food across NSW, meaning that the mothers cannot produce enough milk to sustain their pups. VITAL IN LONG-DISTANCE POLLINATION For the adults to survive themselves, and in the Their ecological importance is similar to that of hope that conditions will get better, the mothers bees, except on a much grander scale. have been forced to abandon their young. Grey-headed Flying-foxes visit flowers, collect Some of the young have been rescued and taken pollen in their fur, then fly away to flowers on other into care by the amazing people at WIRES, Sydney trees, (that are often some distance away) Wildlife Rescue and other experienced carers. pollinating as they go. A similar process happens These people are doing some amazing things and when they eat fruit (as their name implies). After they need our ongoing support. eating the fruit, they fly away carrying the seeds in their mouths or stomachs, only to be dropped DON’T TOUCH – CALL FOR HELP some distance away, hopefully away from the Flying-foxes and the small insect-eating microbats parent plant. This is called long-distance do have the potential to carry viruses that can pose pollination or seed dispersal, and it is an extremely human health risks – this includes the Australian important ecosystem function. Bat Lyssavirus, Hendra and Menangle virus. Fact sheets for these diseases, produced by NSW Health, MOTHERS CAN’T MAKE ENOUGH MILK TO SUSTAIN PUPS show that the occurrence among bat populations Grey-headed Flying-foxes spend their days and the risk of transmission of these diseases in hanging upside down in day roosts, camps or Australia is very rare. colonies. These camps can contain up to tens of Transmission of diseases can be avoided by not thousands of Grey-headed Flying-foxes. Camps touching or approaching injured or dead bats. are important places for them for reproduction, If you encounter an injured or dead bat, or any care of their young, social interaction and other native animal, call WIRES Wildlife Rescue to avoid predators. (1300 094 737 or www.wires.org.au), Sydney They breed once a year and only have one pup. Wildlife Rescue (02 9413 43 00 or www. They are slow breeders and survival among the sydneywildlife.org.au), any local Animal Welfare pups, even in productive years, can be low. Shelters or a veterinarian. However, the sustained drought, extreme heat and You can read more on NSW Health’s website at recent fires that have been raging across the state http://www.health.nsw.gov.au/environment/ have further impacted on their survival. factsheets/Pages/flying-foxes.aspx. 2508

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THE BOMBIE PLANS BUSHFIRE BENEFIT GIG Coalcliff SLSC and the Bombie Crew, along with Stanwell Park Arts Theatre, are organising a bushfire benefit concert for 29 February at the Stanwell Park CWA Hall. “The Leap into Fire Recovery Music Benefit” will start with a free outdoor concert, with bands playing in the CWA Hall grounds from 1-5pm. Please bring cash for donations. This will be followed by a ticketed indoor gig, from 8-11pm, featuring The Hot Potato Band supported by The Groove. Headlining the night are the Hot Potato Band, a 10-piece band from Sydney who started out as street performers and whose all-acoustic line-up is a tribute to their roving roots. The band says their unique sound is built “on the backs of three drummers and a sousaphone, along with an array of horns covering catchy chorus lines and providing a layered harmonic cloud for Ben (vocalist) to float above”. Expect catchy lyrics, infectious dance moves and audience interaction! Support act the Groove – featuring are Sako Dermenjian, Damion Stirling and Drewe Peard – are billed as “a new fusion of old sounds emerging

from the Illawarra/Shoalhaven. An amorphous shifting blend of Spanish/classical acoustic guitar vibes with driving Afro percussive rhythms.” Tickets may be purchased through South Coast Tickets, the booking fee goes to Humantix who is donating the funds to Red Cross. The recipient charity was yet to be announced at press time– keep an eye on the Bombie’s Facebook page for more information. 2508

Top: Hot Potato Band. Below: The Groove. Photo: Chris Frape.

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FEBRUARY / 2508 / 13


EMPOWERED BY TECHNOLOGY

2508 meets Kimberlee Brooker, 23 years old, visually impaired and a lawyer at Helensburgh’s Babister Legal.

Graduate lawyer Kimberlee Brooker with her guide dog, Toffee. Photo: Unicorn Studios

Technology has enabled 23-year-old Kimberlee Brooker to fulfil her dream of a career in law in a way that would have been impossible just a few decades ago. Using the old, heavy Braille machines, which required individual pages to be fed in by hand, would have been hard, she says. “I can’t imagine studying law like that, it would’ve been extremely difficult All my law books were just electronic and on my computer.” Kimberlee has used a laptop since she was in

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year two, touch typing since age eight. It’s an ordinary laptop loaded with a modern marvel, screen-reading software called Job Access With Speech (JAWS). While her laptop is Kimberlee’s first choice (“because I’ve been using it a long time, I know all the shortcuts”), she also uses three other ingenious devices at work. There’s the Braille Note (“I can read anything that’s text in Braille, and it also talks as well. I read emails on that”). A ReadEasy Move scanner instantly reads pages aloud, whizzing through a complex Law Society Journal item Kimberlee uses to demonstrate. The Orcam, which clips onto a pair of glasses, is her newest gadget. “It can read text and it can also do facial recognition and it can read barcodes.” Kimberlee has also recently bought a Braille embosser to print pages in Braille for quick, easy access to documents in court. Acquiring this technology to enable her work at Babister Legal has cost up to $100,000, she says, with the Australian Government’s JobAccess department providing funding. Kimberlee has wanted to be a lawyer since she was in year 10 at Oak Flats High. “I guess it was those crime shows and that on TV that made me want to study law.” She graduated from the University of Wollongong with a distinction and started at Babister Legal in October 2019. “I like general practice, doing a bit of everything. I particularly like wills and estates and family law.” Lynda Babister, owner of Babister Legal, said: “A few times, I’ve had people tell me how good I am for putting Kimberlee on. Well, it’s not charity. She’s here to work. She’s doing the work, bringing in work. She’s an excellent lawyer.” Kimberlee was five years old when she woke up one morning unable to see. “I have rod-cone dystrophy. They’ve never been able to explain why it happened… a freak accident. I virtually have no sight. The politically correct term is vision impaired, but blind gets the message across a bit better. So it doesn’t bother me.” Kimberlee moved to Helensburgh almost two years ago. “I love the small town feel,” she says. Outside work, Kimberlee enjoys horseriding (she keeps two horses at Otford Valley Agistment Farm) and also acts as a public speaker for Guide Dogs NSW/ACT a few times a year. Technology has advanced hugely in her lifetime. Kimberlee remembers the advent of the iPhone as a milestone – all come with built-in screen readers, allowing easy access to news, emails and her favourite social media platform, Facebook. But all the devices in the world could not replace her guide dog and companion, Toffee. “I got Toffee when I was 18. She provides great company. And she makes me feel secure and safe. “I reckon I would be able to live without technology, but not without my guide dog.” 2508


WELL DONE TO OUR LOVE POEM WINNER! Thirroul local Nancie Clisby has won this year’s Valentine’s Day Love Poem Competition. Karen Lane reports.

The winner of the 2508 District News and 2515 Coast News Valentine’s Day Love Poem Competition is Thirroul local Nancie Clisby, with her poem, My Gift. Nancie has been writing poetry since her teenage years and her love of words now extends to helping others. “Since April 2019, I’ve taken on the running of the Thirroul Poetry Club. We meet on the third Tuesday of the month, 4pm to 5pm, in the Thirroul Library. “At the moment we have a core group of six writers, with a ‘drop in’ or two, each month.” When asked what inspired her to write My Gift Nancie replied, “I wrote this poem for my husband Greg, just prior to us getting married. It was a second marriage for both of us. “And for me, after a few ‘frogs’, Greg was definitely My Gift.” 2508

MY GIFT, by Nancie Clisby I lived reluctant to be open Reluctant to believe That somewhere out there He was waiting The man able to love The woman I’d come to be A woman, who on the outside To most was so carefree Yet truly on the inside Disillusioned that love could be Found when least expecting Found in full complacency Your heart, I didn’t see it coming With grace, took hold of me Your smile beamed the message Your eyes a mirror To reflect the star I kept hidden Waiting to shine and to be free My smile now deeper than the surface My eyes send the feeling deep within My gift of love has found a haven As the woman I’ve come to be

For some it’s business, for us it’s family. Mattias Samuelsson

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FEBRUARY / 2508 / 15


DESIGN FOR LIFE

Q&A with Michelle Viret, a Stanwell Park mum who has started her own business, Michelle Viret Design. One of her first local projects was at Stanwell Park Surf Club.

What was it like growing up in Stanwell Park in the 1980s? It was every child’s dream! Shoes were always optional, everyone always said ‘hello’ and Friday nights were spent at the Kiosk eating dinner and playing cricket. Growing up here has given me a deep appreciation for our natural environment and a passion to protect it. You’ve won an award for environmental innovation in a commercial project – please tell us more. One of my workplace designs for WT Partnership was awarded the ‘International Green Interior Award’ and achieved a 5-Star rating from the GBCA. The design challenged what an everyday office should be by crafting a ‘rainforest inspired’ landscape that increased social interaction and knowledge sharing, as well as helping to increase the company’s female recruitment exponentially. How were you involved in the Stanwell Park surf club reno? The H-SP Surf Club engaged me to design a full refurbishment of their existing function hall. The space was lovingly restored to make way for a beautifully crafted acoustic and lighting solution, layered with a beach-style finishes palette. Custom storage also simplifies the interior environment to ensure the focus is on the community within and the coastal views beyond. Why start your own business? My mission is to show that living in a sustainably built environment is a beautiful and achievable lifestyle for everyone. I’d love to share the knowledge I’ve gained over the last 15 years with the South Coast community so that the benefits can be enjoyed by everyone.

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Photos: supplied

Please tell us a bit about yourself. As an interior designer, I’ve always had a passion for understanding how our surroundings influence how we feel, as well as the impact the built environment has on our planet. This led me to specialising in environmental design with the Green Building Council of Australia (GBCA). The last 15 years have seen me travelling the globe designing projects for companies such as Estee Lauder, Macquarie Private Wealth and Hitachi. With the growth of my family in Stanwell Park, I’ve launched my own interior design business to share this knowledge with the local community.

What services do you offer? I provide full interior design services for both family-friendly homes and commercial environments. My designs have an emphasis on biophilic principles, clever planning, beauty, comfort, connection to daylight/views and sustainable product sourcing. What does biophilic mean? Biophilia is our innate biological connection with nature. It helps explain why crackling fires and crashing waves captivate us. By strengthening this connection, our client’s interior environments help to reduce stress, decrease blood pressure levels and heart rates, enhance creativity and clarity of thought, improve well-being and expedite restorative healing. How is our health linked to the design/building process? Statistically we spend 90 per cent of our time indoors. The World Health Organisation says that this is leading to a decrease in physical and mental health due to the current quality of our buildings, construction materials used, and the equipment installed. By being mindful of the decisions we make during the design process, we have an opportunity to build healthier, safer and more eco-friendly buildings to support us well into the future. n Contact Michelle on 0422 760 837, michelle@ michelleviret.com.au or michelleviret.com.au 2508


MEN’S SHED 2020 By Paul Blanksby

The recent and ongoing bushfires in our beautiful country have been a sobering reminder of ‘her beauty and her terror’, visited upon people, homes, stock and wildlife. The response across Australia helping all those affected has been so wonderful. With our native animals in crisis the Shed has possum, bird and microbat nesting boxes available to anyone interested in helping out in this way. We have been hard at work installing a dust-extraction machine and ducting into the timber workshop to make your Shed as safe as possible, with generous assistance from Chris Parks of the Burgh and a grant from the Stronger Communities Program. And although the Shed can’t at the moment be ‘net zero’ in our emissions, we have always and still do practice the Six ‘R’s of sustainability: Recycle, Repurpose, Reuse, Restore, Reimagine, Repair… awesome. Scrap timber becomes kids’ toys or kindling, our sawdust is used by gardeners for compost and by animal lovers for bedding, we rescue old machines, tools and furniture from landfill, turn weed-beds into veggie gardens, use keep cups for our Morning Brew (or use the paper cups for seedlings, paint etc), rescue local historical items to

In the Shed: Wayne helping to make the new Helensburgh Tunnel Station sign.

preserve and enhance our history, make the most of just about anything; the list is endless. We would love to meet you at the Shed, hear your ideas and help with your project. All men aged 18 and above are welcome. n Helensburgh Men’s Shed, 199A Parkes Street Open Mondays and Tuesdays 9am-3pm. And more days to come. Contact Michael Croft (0413 401 522) or Ron Balderston (0410 564 752).Visit our website at helensburghmensshed.org.au 2508

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CLUB REPORTS

Dora Rae at Helensburgh Big Dam, circa 1930s

LOOKING BACK ON A BOXING DAY TRAGEDY Helensburgh & District Historical Society presents a story from the archives.

The Big Dam in Helensburgh has always been a popular swimming hole for local children. A swing rope and homemade canoes were popular. In the early part of the 20th century, the Big Dam was used for storing water for the Metropolitan Coal Company for many years. The mine ceased to use the dam after 1952 when town water was laid on. But they did pump some water into an old railway tunnel for the washery until recyclable storage tanks were constructed on site. During a dry period in the 70s contractors were employed by the mine to clean out the dam from a build-up of sands. The contractor used a bulldozer, disturbed the clay bottom of the dam and it eventually emptied. For many years the dam would occasionally fill in high rainfall periods, only to empty again before the dam naturally sealed again. On the 15 October 1902, Colin Charles Edgar Edmondson, age 6 years and 1 month accidentally drowned at Helensburgh, as reported in the Sydney Morning Herald on 15 October 1904. The newspaper article did not specify where he drowned, which could have been in any of the creeks and lagoons in the district. Colin Charles Edgar was the son of Charles Grey and Elizabeth Gertrude Devine of McMillan Street, Helensburgh. On the 26 December 1935 a family picnic at the Helensburgh Big Dam turned to a disaster when a family got into difficulties in the dam. The Sydney

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Morning Herald reported on the 17 January 1936 the Coroner’s finding on the drowning tragedy at the Helensburgh Metropolitan Colliery Dam. “CORONER PRAISES RESCUERS BULLI, THURSDAY”. After an inquest to-day, the district coroner (Mr. Keegan) found that Mrs Florence Ang-win (sic), her son, Francis, 8, and her daughter, Lola, 6, of Leichhardt, were accidentally drowned in the Metropolitan colliery dam at Helensburgh on Boxing Day. The coroner added that the dam was securely fenced, and people trespassed at their own risk. Mrs Muriel Angwin, of Scarborough, said that the party was picnicking. Her son Billy, 12, first fell into the dam, and she and Florence Angwin jumped into the water in an attempt at rescue. Francis and Lola jumped in after their mother. The water was nine feet deep. Witness stated that at one stage she had resigned herself to her fate, and, gripping her sister-in-law, Florence, by the arm, said “We will go down together”. Witness’s other son, Edgar, 10, with remarkable presence of mind, got a stick and held it out to those who were in the water. Alexander and Hugh Blair heard calls for help, and rushed to the dam. Hugh Blair rescued witness first, then Francis and Lola Angwin, diving to the bed of the dam to get the bodies. Alexander Blair rescued Florence Angwin, but resuscitation methods used for two hours failed to revive her. The coroner praised the Blair brothers’ gallantry, and agreed that their efforts were worthy of recognition. (Sydney Morning Herald, 17 January 1936). 2508

HELENSBURGH VIEW CLUB By Barbara Kitson, publicity officer

Hello 2020 – happy new year to all. We had a great year productively and socially in 2019 and we are hoping for an even better year in 2020. This year VIEW marks its 60th anniversary of service to the less fortunate and we at the Burgh club celebrate 29 years of service. VIEW supports the Smith Family charity, mostly helping by sponsoring students who are struggling with their school life. We meet on the third Tuesday of the month at Tradies Helensburgh at 10:45 for 11:15 start. Our next guest speaker is Karen Lane, of the Writers’ Boot Camp (Otford). This year Chris has some great theatre events for us to attend. If you like theatre, then this is the way to go – the bus picks us up at the pool at 12 noon and drops us back at about 6pm. Everyone has a great day. Our February meeting is on Tuesday the 18th and it is our AGM. 2508


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Once you know where you are using energy, think about reducing energy consumption using this energy-management hierarchy: PRIORITY 1 Be lean: minimise demand for energy. For instance, ensuring all equipment and lighting is turned off when not in use. PRIORITY 2 Be clean: meet remaining demand with energy-efficient systems. For instance, ensure lighting is LED, and equipment is high star rated. PRIORITY 3 Be green: use renewable sources to supply energy needs. For instance, adding rooftop solar, or purchasing green power. Heating and cooling, refrigeration and lighting are major sources of energy consumption. Potential energy-saving opportunities for these uses are:

GO NET ZERO

For a business to go net zero involves first reducing emissions as much a possible, then using carbon credits to compensate for any remaining emissions. The result is ‘net-zero emissions’, aka ‘carbon neutrality’. To help with step 1, Dr Daniel Daly, of the University of Wollongong Sustainable Buildings Research Centre (SBRC), shares his expert advice on lowering emissions. Lowering carbon emissions from your small business can save you money on your energy bill and be cost-effective, while contributing to climate change mitigation and often improving the quality of the indoor environment. There are many options for reducing your energy usage, and what’s best will depend on your business and your building. The first step to reducing energy use is identifying the main sources of energy consumption in your operation. The best way to do this is with an energy audit. Energy audits can be completed by a third party or as a self-assessment. For small businesses, a self-assessment is a good starting point, and there are many useful guides online (for instance, Energy basics for business at energy.gov.au). The federal government also offers the Business Energy Advice Program, which includes free consultations with energy experts for eligible businesses (see https:// businessenergyadvice.com.au/). For more complex sites needing a detailed audit, the Energy Efficiency Council has a list of service providers on its website (https://www.eec.org.au/ for-energy-users/find-a-provider#/find-aprovider), and the NSW Government website (https://energysaver.nsw.gov.au/business/ evaluate-your-usage/find-energy-expert) also lists energy efficiency experts.

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HEATING AND COOLING: 1. Adjust your thermostat, and minimise your hours of usage. For every 1°C you change your thermostat (warmer in summer, cooler in winter) you can reduce energy consumption by 5 to 10%. 2. Consider installing ceiling fans to minimise the need for AC in summer, or to allow you to set your thermostat higher. 3. Upgrade your air-conditioning system with higher efficiency models (see energyrating.gov.au to compare models) 4. Seal any obvious gaps, e.g. around doors and windows, to prevent conditioned air escaping. REFRIGERATION 1. Rethink your second (or third or fourth) fridge, particularly if it is an older model. 2. Consider upgrading fridge(s) with higher efficiency models. Fridges made prior to 2005 were substantially less efficient than modern fridges. 3. Don’t forget your display fridges and cabinets. The NSW government is offering a rebate of up to $1490 for these fridges for eligible businesses (https://energysaver.nsw.gov.au/business/ discounts-and-incentives/commercial-refrigeratorrebates). LIGHTING 1. Ensure unnecessary lights are switched off, and consider ‘delamping’ twin tube fluorescents – that is removing one of the two tubes. 2. Replace existing lighting with LED globes, particularly lights that are used for long hours. Once these simple actions have been completed, it may be time to think about renewable energy – and you may find you need a lot fewer solar panels to meet your reduced energy demand. Follow SBRC on Instagram for more tips on how to reduce your energy usage. 2508


Real estate update BY IAN PEPPER

ON BOARD WITH SURFRIDER

By Susie Crick, chair of Surfrider Foundation Australia Our love affair with plastic is slowly changing as we become more aware and educated about the dangers plastics pose, not only to our marine and natural environments, but also to our own health. Surfrider Ocean Friendly cafes, school canteens and markets are popping up all over Australia and we invite you to get your local favourite cafe or school canteen involved. By making simple changes businesses can reduce their plastic footprint and, in turn, do a great thing for the environment, our health and our children’s future. In order for a business to receive Surfrider Ocean Friendly accreditation, establishments must implement the first six mandatory criteria, with the option to adopt all of the criteria. The mandatory criteria are as follows: no styrofoam or polystyrene packaging; reusable tableware/cutlery for dine in, and non-plastic utensils for take away; no plastic bags offered; businesses must not offer single-use plastic straws; no water sold in plastic bottles; proper recycling practices are followed. The remaining optional criteria are: 30 cents discount offered for reusable cup, mug; vegetarian and/or sustainable seafood options on the menu; energy efficient LED lighting and energy star appliances; water conservation efforts in use. Australians produce almost three million tonnes of plastic each year, and less than 9 percent is recycled, I hope as we move into 2020 that we become are more mindful of waste. CLEAN UP AT COLEDALE Please come and join us for our Clean Up Australia beach clean on Friday, 28 February at 11am at Coledale Beach. 2508 Become a member and get involved! For more info: www.surfrider.org.au

REVIEW OF MEDIAN HOUSE PRICES 2019 VS 2018 Helensburgh Stanwell Pk Wombarra Coledale Thirroul

2018 2019 $870k $820k $1.36m $1.34m $1.76m $1.25m $1.48m $1.42m $1.2m $1.1m

% dec 5.7% 1.5% 29.0% 4.1% 8.3%

Source: Property Data Solutions Pty Ltd 2020 (21/01/2020)

Overall 2019 was a tough year for median house prices in our area with reductions across all areas. The Federal Election and cautious lending are mostly to blame with volumes of houses sold also down from 205 in 2018 to 160 in 2019. What can we expect for 2020? Another rate cut is on the cards and higher volumes are expected in all areas. The end of 2019 saw median house prices returning to positive growth and this is expected to continue in 2020.

Now selling Real Estate with Ray White For experienced and educated advice, call Ian today!

Ian Pepper 0403 570 041

ian.pepper@raywhite.com raywhitehelensburgh.com.au

FEBRUARY / 2508 / 21


WHO’S A CLEVER COCKIE? Researchers are excited about our cockatoos’ ability to open bins and are calling out for footage. 2508 reports.

The sulphur-crested cockatoo is our very own bin chicken. But where he differs from Sydney’s more notorious rascal, the ibis, is in ability. “Ibis don’t open bins, they basically just scavenge from open bins,” said terrestrial ecologist Dr John Martin, of the Taronga Conservation Society. “These cockatoos are really quite special. “Bin opening is a novel behavior. This doesn’t occur all across the Sydney region. It doesn’t occur all across eastern Australia. It’s akin to the uniqueness of finding an animal is using a tool.” John is part of a small team working on the Clever Cockie Project. His colleague, Dr Barbara Klump, of the Max Planck Institute in Germany, spent three months working here last year and is due to return in 2020. “She had previously done research on tool use by New Caledonian crows. That’s one of those really interesting examples because that species was the first bird that was shown to use tools. Prior to that, it was only thought that primates use tools.” Last year researchers painted a few hundred sulphur-crested cockatoos with unique colour markings (which they’re now having to touch up ahead of the February/March moulting season). “We’re trying to learn more about where the bin-opening behavior is occurring, how it’s originated and the actual mechanics of the behaviour,” John said. The team want to discover which particular individuals are opening bins, and whether the birds are learning from one other. The Clever Cockie Project has evolved from Sydney’s Wingtag Project (which looked at ecology,

BOHMER’S BLOG

where the birds went, what they ate). “The Clever Cockie Project goes beyond that by looking at individuals, and looking at the different behaviours, and their relationships with each other,” John said. “So the connectedness of birds in the population.” HOW TO GET INVOLVED 1. Take the survey at https://tinyurl.com/y8a5xpl6 2. Got video proof? Name videos by street and suburb, then upload to https://www.dropbox.com/ request/D7680ZDoNfTA1qy1itza 3. Send reports of transmitter birds via Messenger to the Cockatoo Wingtag Facebook page: two birds are being GPS tracked to learn about movements between urban and natural habitats. 2508

where possible. Head over to Bohmer’s Blog on our website to listen to an excellent interview on the With five million hectares of NSW ABC with Dr Owen Price from UOW’s School of Environment & Life Sciences. Dr Price shares his forest having been wiped out in the recent bushfires, which is over expert knowledge to give you the facts on how the bushfires have impacted our area’s environment half the entire forest, the scale of and the possibilities for tree regeneration. the impact on our environment is huge. The Australian bush is extremely resilient, with As we come to grips with that loss, our team is some already spouting fresh leaves. helping more people to minimise bushfire risks at Isn’t Mother Nature mind-blowing? Let’s all work their own homes, as much as possible. We are also together to protect her for the future. on hand for organisations who need expert assistance with clear-up and replanting, when and n Visit www.bohmerstreecare.com.au/blog/ 2508

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HIMALAYAN CHARITY TREKS – MARCH/APRIL 2020

HELENSBURGH PROBUS By publicity officer Helen Durham

One of our recent guest speakers was Don Eyb, a retired superintendent of the NSW Mounted Police. He spoke of his time helping choreograph and train 140 horses for the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games. The riders were all volunteers from all walks of life and the horses were all bush horses of similar colour and size. Don was very interesting. We watched a short segment of the opening and this brought back lots of memories for our members. Shannon Crofton of NSW Fire and Rescue was another one of our speakers. He is a volunteer with SES and told the meeting about the issues facing emergency services personnel in rescuing people and animals caught in floods. He showed footage of examples overseas and in Australia, emphasising the power of floodwater. Melbourne Cup day was held at Engadine Tavern with a delicious lunch. A fashion parade was held before the great race started. Some of us were winners, some losers but a very enjoyable day was had by everyone. Another very enjoyable day was celebrating Christmas at our annual party with our members and friends. Tables were set with a Christmas theme to get us in the mood. After our meal we were entertained by Kristy Lee, a singer and impersonator. She sang well-known songs and had regular changes of costumes to go with each group of songs. Before long many of our members were dancing along to her music. Mrs Claus and her elf helper made an appearance, which helped with the spirit of things. Thank you to the organisers. A small group of our members had a very enjoyable holiday to Cambodia and Vietnam. Lots of sightseeing from modern cities to ancient ruins before cruising down the Mekong River. Tuk tuk and ox cart rides were lots of fun. We visited small villages, with lush-looking crops growing, local schools, vegetable markets. We all learnt to manage to dodge the thousands of bikes while crossing the road in the major cities. Want to know more about our club? Phone Brent Percy on 0419 604 576. 2508

HIMALAYAN CHARITY TREKS Join us for an amazing 2020 experience with us in Nepal, APRIL 2020

while at the same time as helping others less fortunate. Ø We are a registered Australian charity (and 2508 locals)

Join us for 2020 experience Ø an We amazing have 20 + years experience in Nepal. Please contact us for more information andsame advice: with us in Nepal, while at the Ph: 0418 (Bernard)others Email: info@dontgogently.com.au time269as901 helping less fortunate. We are a registered Australian charity (and 2508 locals) and have over twenty years experience in Nepal.

Please contact us for more information and advice: ph: 0418 269 901 (Bernard) e: info@dontgogently.com.au

FEBRUARY / 2508 / 23


OUT & About

CLUBS & MEETINGS Helensburgh & District Probus Club meets every second Thursday of the month at Tradies Helensburgh. Visitors welcome, please first contact Brent Percy on 0419 604 576 for further information. Helensburgh Historical Society Call Jan Lee 0418 681 Send your listings to editor@2508mag.com.au. 384 or visit historichelensburgh.org.au Helensburgh Lions Club Meets 7.30pm 2nd Monday of CLEAN UP AUSTRALIA DAY: SUNDAY, 1 MARCH Step up to clean up. For over 20 years, Helensburgh month at Tradies. www.helensburghlions.org.au Helensburgh Men’s Shed Mondays and Tuesdays & District Landcare Group has given residents a 9am-3pm at 199A Parkes Street Helensburgh. chance to help Clean Up Australia. This year is no Call Mike 0413 401 522, Ron 0410 564 752. different. Come along to the Registration Point, The Old Mine Surgery, 78 Parkes St, Helensburgh, Helensburgh Scout Group Open to new members. between 10am and 1pm, on Sunday, 1 March. Pick Meetings during school term: Joeys (ages 6-8) Tues 4.30-6pm. Cubs (ages 8-11) Thurs 6.30-8pm. up a bag, then clean up an area of your choice – maybe your local street or along the footpath where Contact groupleader@helensburghscouts.org.au you regularly walk. Anywhere you’ve seen rubbish. Neighbourhood Forum 1 7pm, second Wednesday of Wear a hat and sturdy shoes, and bring gloves and the month, Helensburgh Community Centre. water. Contact merilyn@helensburghlandcare.org. Northern Illawarra Chamber of Commerce Networking nights for business people, visit www.nicc.net.au. au or 0414 819 742. Northern Illawarra U3A Stanwell Park Mondays (in school FREE ART WORKSHOPS FOR SENIORS terms) 9.30am-noon at Hillcrest House, Stanwell At Clifton School of Arts. Limited places, bookings Park. Jenny Lee-Robins, 0406 350 025 / 4294 3475. essential, call Vicki on 9056 8429. Stanwell Park CWA Meets 1st Tuesday each month, Feb 18 Feb 10am-3.30pm drawing/ watercolour 10am at CWA Hall. Call Lynette Loo, 0413 166 244. with Christine Hill Toastmasters meets at Tradies Helensburgh every Feb 20 Feb 10am-3.30pm drawing/pastels with 2nd and 4th Monday, at 7pm. 0408 961 392. Mark Svensson. View Club Meets 3rd Tuesday of the month, 10.45 for 11am start at Tradies Helensburgh. STANWELL PARK U3A PROGRAM FOR 2020 Monday morning talks 9.30-10.30am followed by CHURCHES Morning Tea then Music Appreciation from • Bushland Chapel (Uniting Church) 94 Parkes St 11am-noon. Call Jenny Lee-Robins, 0406 350 025. Helensburgh. Faith, community. Yoga, drama. Feb 3 Suffragette (DVD). Maria Holbert Spaces available. bushlandchapel.net, 0425 257984. Feb 10 History of English language. Tom Mylne. • H’burgh & Stanwell Park Anglican Church Feb 17 Norway and Ireland. Kerrie Christian. Regular Sunday services, 8.15am, 54 Stanwell Ave, Feb 24 Historic Sights of Bergen, Norway. Stanwell Park; 10am and 6pm, 75 Parkes St, David Christian. Helensburgh. Call 4294 1024. Mar 2 Crop Circles – Hidden Mysteries(YouTube). • Helensburgh Baptist Church Sundays, 10am at Jenny Lee-Robins. the Bushland Chapel, 94 Parkes St, 0411 192 508. Mar 9 Return of the Divine Feminine. • Holy Cross Catholic Church Weekend Mass at Jenny Lee-Robins. Helensburgh:  Sunday 8.30am. Reconciliation:  Mar 16 Five Mysteries of the Ocean. Judy Bull Sunday 8am. Visitors welcome. Mar 23 Spain and Gaudi Highlights. Marion Sinclair. • Hope Church 2508 Sunday services, 9.30am, 3/23 Cemetery Road, Helensburgh. 0404 803 055. HELENSBURGH LIBRARY, 57 Walker Street, 4294 2185 • Hillcrest Christian Fellowship Sundays, 6pm, Tue 4 Steam Punks, 3.30, ages 5+, free STEM fun. Hillcrest House, Stanwell Park. Call 4294 3153. Fri 7 11am-1pm. Knit, Stitch, Yarn. Free, drop-in Wed 12 Grandparents Storytime, 10.30am, free. PLAYGROUPS Wed 19 “Firsts at Helensburgh” History talk. • Mondays 9.30am-noon, Stanwell Park Children’s A talk by Jim Powell of the Helensburgh Historical Centre. Call Eleanor: 04 3443 4481. Society. Bookings essential. • Tuesdays 9.30-11.30am, Helensburgh Anglican Wed 26 Preschool Storytime, 10.30am, Free. Church, 75 Parkes St. Call 4294 1024. • Fridays 10.30am-12.30pm, NEW DAY & TIME! HALLS FOR HIRE Starting on February 14, Helensburgh Community Otford Community Hall 121 Otford Rd (holds up to 30 Playgroup will meet at the Walker St Community people) book online at www.otford.org.au. Centre on Fridays during school term, $4 per Helensburgh-Stanwell Park Surf Club Reasonable rates, session; first two sessions free. Tons of fun things licenced. www.hallhirestanwellparksurfclub.com planned! helensburgh.playgroup@gmail.com 2508

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ONE ADMIT ADMIT ONE


Sift flour, bicarb, spices & brown sugar into a large bowl. Stir in the cooked apples, then the milk and butter, until just combined. Spoon the mixture into muffin pan holes. • Peel, core and halve the small apple then slice each half thinly. Place apple slices on top of each muffin then brush with extra butter and sprinkle with cinnamon sugar. • Bake the muffins for about 25 minutes. Leave the muffins in the pan for 5 minutes before turning top-side up onto a wire rack. Serve warm or cooled.

TREE TO TABLE!

ORCHARD FAQs This past year has been quite challenging for anyone in agriculture. Here’s a couple of answers to common questions we are fielding at the moment.

Pick your own apples, then turn them into delicious muffins. Jo Fahey reports from Darkes Glenbernie Orchard.

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Is drought affecting the fruit? Our fruit has been incredibly tasty, juicy and big in We are beginning to pick apples! Gala varieties are size because of our growing strategies. Glenn (our being picked right now and by mid February we fabulous farmer) has been working on water-saving will start Delicious and Fuji. technologies and pruning and thinning programs Pick your own experiences are running on a that have really made the difference. In an orchard, number of weekends when fruit is at its best. dry and sunny weather is a good thing but you still Bookings are essential at www.darkes.com.au. need water. We are extremely thankful for the generosity of our neighbours, the Laws family. To celebrate apple season, here’s an easy apple muffin They loaned us water from their dams at a critical recipe by Dennis Limbert, The Caravan Cook. point in time that has helped us get through to the recent rain. APPLE SPICE MUFFINS At the moment we are really busy putting up Ingredients additional nets to stop birds and bats. We also have • 2 cups self-raising flour lots of areas of net to repair from wind and storms • ½tsp bicarbonate of soda and the occasional fallen tree. • ½ tsp ground cinnamon • 1 tsp ground ginger Are the bushfires affecting you? • ¼ tsp ground nutmeg As we all know, thankfully the fires have not been • 1 pinch ground cloves in this area, however, there seems to be a lack of • ¼ cup brown sugar understanding from the general public that this • 200g cooked apples area in the Northern Illawarra is unaffected and • 1 egg, lightly beaten can still be visited with safety. • ¾ cup milk Visitor numbers for January are down on past • 60g butter melted years and we are fielding a lot of telephone • 1 small apple inquiries from people asking if we are okay and • 20g butter, extra melted ‘How close is the fire?’ • 2 tbsp cinnamon sugar We have been stocking blueberries from Clyde River Berry Farm whose visitor numbers are well Instructions down. We love Clyde River blueberries. They are the • Pre-heat your oven to 200°C. best you can buy and much tastier than from other Grease a six-hole Texas muffin pan (makes large locations. Buying them from us helps that farm. 2508 size muffins).

FEBRUARY / 2508 / 25


Photos: Lauren Newman

WILDLIFE IN CRISIS

SAVING THE SURVIVORS There’s still a long road ahead for the native wildlife that made it through the catastrophic summer of fires. 2508 spoke to local vet Dr Matt O’Donnell.

In the aftershock of the South Coast bushfires, our community rallied round to help injured wildlife. People sewed joey pouches, bat wraps and koala mittens. Others built nesting boxes, held fundraisers outside supermarkets, at surf clubs and on social media. Two veterinary nurses even drove south with a ute-load of supplies, including bandages, burn creams and antibiotics, donated by local vets at Bulli, Helensburgh and Austinmer. But there are huge hurdles ahead. Many native animals and birds in the fire zones are still suffering from burns and smoke inhalation. It will be months before their bushland habitat grows back. So, deprived of food and shelter, they face starvation or, with nowhere to hide, death by feral foxes and cats. In early January, Northern Illawarra Veterinary Hospital (NIVH) owner Dr Matt O’Donnell ran a collection for wildlife impacted by the bushfires, with the surgery matching all donations up to $500. The total raised was $3768. The money was used to buy bandaging, burn creams, antibiotics and IV fluids for wildlife rescuers on the South Coast. NIVH’s Lauren Newman drove down to Milton with a vet nurse friend from Austinmer Vet, Kate Shoobert-Brown, to deliver supplies, plus water stations made by a plumber friend. “I’ve been a vet nurse for over 20

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Vet nurse Lauren Newman took medical supplies south to help wildlife including kangaroos and (above) this baby wombat.

years and I’ve never seen anything like it. It’s totally obliterated down there,” Lauren said. Now Matt wants to “keep the money flowing” as wildlife carers face months of hard work before some of their charges have a chance of returning to the wild. “They’re going to struggle… It’s going to be a long time – like months,” he said . “For instance, you’ve got to find suitable habitat and ideally be going back to where they came from – you can’t just throw them in non-burnt areas because then you’re just crowding out what’s there, and competing, and you might be introducing new problems or new diseases. “So ideally, get them back where they came from. But there needs to be food there for them, food and water – that could be months away.” In the meantime, water and feeding stations are being set up in burnt areas. “Some local people are putting together nest boxes and possum boxes too. Because a lot of the mature trees are burn out and the hollows are gone. “There’s just no refuge for the wildlife.” ‘IT’S GOING TO TAKE A LOT OF HELP’ “The thing that’s devastated us the most is just the


extensive nature of the fires,” Matt said. “A lot of this wildlife has evolved with fire but not at this scale. And there’s little refuge for escape or recolonisation. So it’s a real worry longer term, the devastation and the loss, and how that’s going to recover. “I feel it’s one of those times when really, it’s going to take a lot of help just to try and maintain those ones that have survived. So they can be the founder populations that can repopulate these areas once they’ve recovered, whatever that recovery might look like. “There’s a general rule for burnt eucalypt forests – it takes three to four months for there to be sufficient food for browsers like koalas and some of the gliders and possums. Assuming it hasn’t been burned to the extent that the trees haven’t survived. “I guess it depends on the severity of the burn in an area. “Time will tell.” TRAUMATIC TIME FOR WILDLIFE CARERS Going into burnt bushland can be traumatic for wildlife carers as they’re likely to find charred corpses, or animals so badly hurt they have to euthanase them. “You’ve really got to triage, because you find that there’s a high percentage of ones that you have to euthanase because you know they’re not going to survive,” Matt said. “That’s very hard when you’re trying to save animals and that’s the main thing you’re doing. “If it’s more than even about 15% of their body, it’s often not viable. So you really have to sort of make hard decisions early on. “Then, even some weeks down the track, you might find they are not coping. You can still lose them along the way. That’s the sad part. It’s a bit of an emotional roller-coaster for the carers.” WHERE TO SEND MONEY Locally, Matt recommends donating to Wildlife Rescue South Coast Inc. “That’s a genuine organisation, the largest one on the South Coast. “We’ve sent medical supplies and also donated directly through their website.” While cash donations are often the best way to help, many people – driven by the enormity of the tragedy – want to act too. Matt said there are some fantastic community initiatives springing up, including a joey pouch sewing bee at Club Thirroul, organised by Cassandra Cahill, and a habitat box-making session in Coledale, organised by Lisette Tatnell. “The big challenge will be in the weeks and months to come,” he said, “when the focus goes off, but there’ll still be a lot of work to do.” 2508

With the help of some friends, 11-year-old Helensburgh girl Willow Mahler set up a stall selling hand-made bracelets. The children raised $453 for Wildlife Rescue South Coast, money that went to the kangaroo sanctuary in Wandandian.

TO THE RESCUE

WILDLIFE RESCUE SOUTH COAST INC: ‘Wildlife are suffering badly from the bushfires in our area and your donations are being used to acquire medication, bandages, specialist wildlife food, supply expert veterinary care and to repair or replace cages, aviaries and other equipment lost in the fires.’ Follow on Facebook, donate at www.wildlife-rescue.org.au WIRES (NSW Wildlife Information, Rescue and Education Service Inc.) “In WIRES history we have never seen a concurrent series of emergency events like those that began in November … It is impossible to know how many animals have perished and it will be many months before the impact on wild populations can be better understood but ecologists at Sydney University have estimated over 800 million animals have been affected in NSW and over 1 billion animals in Australia since September. – www.wires.org.au SCIENCE FOR WILDLIFE: “Blue Mountains Turning Black – We’re losing koalas to fire in the Blue Mountains World Heritage Area. Please donate to our Emergency Bushfire Appeal.” – http://scienceforwildlife.org NSW NATIONAL PARKS: “You can help native wildlife by giving them a safe supply of water.” – for more info, go to www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au and search for “Help injured wildlife”. NSW RSPCA: “The estimated billion animals who have perished as a result of these fires is a tragedy. RSPCA NSW is providing relief and recovery assistance to animals impacted by Australia’s bushfire crisis.” – www.rspcansw.org.au 2508

FEBRUARY / 2508 / 27


‘IT WAS HEARTBREAKINGLY, DEVASTATINGLY EYE-OPENING ANGUISH’

WILDLIFE IN CRISIS

Mel Whiteside, owner of Crawchys Swim School in Helensburgh, reports on her time rescuing wildlife on the South Coast last month. I have been a volunteer with Wildlife Rescue South Coast (WRSC) for 12 months. We foster orphaned joeys from pinkies until they’re about 5-6kg, then they go to a kangaroo sanctuary at Wandandian. We have a house at Berrara, near Sussex Inlet. The area and the sanctuary were hit very hard. We were on the ground doing ‘black walks’, answering calls to the WRSC hotline, cleaning, bandaging and being an ambulance to native wildlife, from south Nowra to Little Forest, including Sussex Inlet, Bendalong, Manyana and Lake Conjola. It was heartbreakingly, devastatingly eyeopening anguish, JUST NO WORDS really. Not many animals survived. We euthanised many more than we saved. As an animal lover, this broke my heart. Every day. Over and over. We had help from volunteers from New Zealand, South Africa, Canada, Ireland and all over Australia. We met some unbelievably amazing gracious souls. We learnt lots and cried more. Many people from the Burgh contacted me and donated cash, feed stations, Bunnings vouchers and more. The situation is still heartbreaking and will be for months/years. Donate money. Head south, go on a holiday, leave with your empty esky, pay $10 for a coffee or a beer. Talk to people and hug someone. 2508

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Mel Whiteside (above) is a volunteer at Wildlife Rescue South Coast.


AFTER THE FIRES By Helensburgh entomologist Dr Chris Reid

Well, here in the Illawarra we’ve dodged the bullet, but I know many of you will have been caught up in the fires further south. I hope unscathed. The good news is that the long range forecast for us is back to normal rainfall for the next three months. We can all breathe until next summer. I was up around Mount Wilson in the Blue Mountains on Sunday, 19 January, a month since the fire (16 December). In the sandstone woodland on the plateau there are already a few new shoots, but recovery is slow. The eucalypts look dead but at least some are able to almost randomly send out shoots from anywhere on their ‘bodies’ (imagine being able to grow fingers like that!). It’s called epicormic growth, from emergency buds that are deep under bark and only develop if the tree is severely stressed. The grass trees and hardheads are also producing new growth, and they are also fire adapted. The plateau is silent – there are no birds or cicadas. However, this area, although it looks bleak, will probably recover after a few years. Mount Wilson is an isolated ridge of basalt, which produces the rich soils capable of supporting rainforest. But the edge of the rainforest has burnt, retreating it several hundred metres. Burnt rainforest basically dies, and requires many years of no fire and no drought to recover. The Mount Wilson rainforest is an isolated narrow fragment of a much wetter ancient landscape, with some unique plants and animals and its loss would be major. What has this got to do with insects? I was quoted in the national press saying there were 240 billion insects in the eight million hectares of fires... That was a mistake. I was using the old UK billion, which is now 240 trillion, and the paper misquoted me – I said arthropods, not

Burnt rainforest edge, Mount Wilson, 19 January 2020. Inset: epicormic shoots on eucalypt trunk, Mount Wilson, 19 January 2020. insects. Why arthropods? Arthropods equal insects PLUS millipedes, centipedes, spiders, mites, slaters etc, and the reason for using that term is that soil is often absolutely chockers with individuals of mites, which are related to spiders, not insects. 240 trillion is my guesstimate of the number of arthropods in eight million hectares, not the number burnt. But the significant thing is not really the numbers of individuals, it’s the species. The reason is that only one out of 1000 larvae might survive to adulthood and only adults are functional for the species. In 2016 it was estimated there are 250,000 insect species in Australia. The fire zones have consumed a swathe of habitat. Let’s say 15% of all Australian terrestrial insect species occur in the burnt areas. So about 37,000 species of insects have been impacted in the fires. That’s the equivalent of about 20 times all of the terrestrial vertebrate species in Australia. Many of these species are known to be restricted to small areas which rarely or ‘never’ burn (eg isolated rainforest patches such as Mount Wilson), some of which have now been burnt. Will they recover? We don’t know, but if large-scale fires are increasing in frequency, combined with further prolonged droughts and the added effects of weeds invading newly opened up (burnt) areas, it seems unlikely. For those who want a happy ending, I did see a colony of ants in the middle of the blackness. Share your stories or ask Chris a question. Email editor@2508mag.com.au. 2508

FEBRUARY / 2508 / 29


Photos: Chrystie Longworth & Lisette Tatnell

WILDLIFE IN CRISIS

‘WE HAD TO CONSTRUCT 200 BOXES QUICKLY ’

Q&A with Lisette Tatnell, who along with the tight-knit Coledale community, organised a habitat box-making day and started the Wollongong Network Helping South Coast Wildlife group on Facebook. Tell us a bit about yourself. I live in the Northern Suburbs of Wollongong. I am a registered nurse and I also work in a native plant nursery. I have always been a nature and plant lover, concerned about habitat destruction. Recently, I have been getting more involved with activities aligned with my passion for protecting the environment. When and why did you get involved? When the fires occurred on the South Coast I literally paced the house out of frustration that I could do nothing to help. Then, like many, I felt deep sadness at the catastrophic loss of habitat and wildlife. To deal with these feelings I swung into action. I spoke with the president of Wildlife Rescue South Coast, who connected me with a wildlife carer. She had just filled her entire home with bats that had been evacuated from the bat clinic. I helped for a day washing and making up tiny baby bat bottles. A 20-hour-a-day job. Seeing what these carers do made me realise they are going to need a lot of support in the months ahead. What have you been doing to help? Through email, the president of WRSC mentioned a need for habitat boxes. Immediately, friends Jane Fullerton Smith, Matt Park, Patrick Maloney and Nigel Puckeridge were on board. The wealth of knowledge, expertise, passion and contacts between them all saw the habitat box project off to a flying start. Other things I have been involved in recently are delivery of medical supplies to a vet clinic in Jervis

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Bay and organising several deliveries of wildlife food and water stations to Eden. The logistics needed to make this happen made me realise that a network of people could be more effective in getting things done. So now I am doing a lot of behind-the-scenes work connecting people on the community Facebook group called Wollongong Network Helping South Coast Wildlife. Tell us about the habitat box event you organised. The community habitat box making day was created for two reasons. We had to construct 200 boxes quickly and needed manpower to achieve this. However, more important was the process of getting our community together and encouraging them all to get involved. People constructed boxes at the working bee but also took home simple instruction sheets (that Pat created) enabling them to make boxes in their own time. I also invited Woody, the ex-president of Wildlife Rescue South Coast, to come and speak to everyone. What can ordinary people do to help? Be patient and flexible. In emergency situations people don’t always call back, they are very busy, plans change constantly and miscommunication is common. Stay connected. This will be a long battle for wildlife carers and others. Things are evolving. In the past few weeks, northern suburbs residents have set up a supermarket food collection group, made habitat boxes and water stations, and sewed joey pouches. But needs change daily – the only certain thing that charities will need tomorrow is money. You can donate to WRSC at https://www.wildlife-rescue.org.au I also recommend donating to Wildlife Water Stations Shoalhaven and Wildlife Water Station Bega Valley – find details of how to send money on their Facebook pages. n Note: at press time, Wildlife Rescue South Coast did not require any more habitat boxes. 2508


& Lisette Tatnell

THOUSANDS OF HIVES LOST IN NSW

Darkes Glenbernie Orchard’s Jo Fahey reports.

CUPCAKE AID: Pictured outside Helensburgh Coles are

Jamie Brewer and Leila Barilla, both 11 years old and about to enter high school. Local Lions member Gina Krohn reports that the girls each spent $20 of their own money on cupcake ingredients. “They thoroughly researched the organisations and chose the Australian Koala Foundation because it also supports the koalas’ habitat not just the koalas. They were thrilled with people’s response as some people gave $20 donations and didn’t take cakes.” They raised $251. 2508

THE FIRES THAT CHANGED US By Terri Ayliffe

Our organic honey beekeeper lost 130 hives in the Batemans Bay area fires but he managed to save 170 hives, his house and his extraction shed. His dad’s house burnt down, however. He had spent a month preparing and removing his bees from the bush to put them in a defendable area. He was well prepared. We know other larger companies that have lost as many as 2500 hives, who did not have time to take their hives out of the bush. Unfortunately across NSW bee foraging areas have been badly burnt and we are concerned about honey production going forward. It will take years for the bush to recover and, for some trees, decades. We have honey stock that will last us, as long as there isn’t panic buying. In this climate we will have to be vigilant in regard to cheap imported products and imitation honey coming into Australia in the future. 2508

animals, our sense of safety and predictability. The fires changed the face of our country, we have all suffered trauma, some more than others but it is trauma none the less. We have been very supportive of each other during the fires. We ensured no one had to go without for too long. Now the practicalities have been taken care of, I have concern for the mental well-being of the people caught in the fires. It would not be surprising if their heightened anxiety remains for some time and, for some, it may manifest in PTSD. Our work as a supportive community now extends to give others the opportunity to talk about their experience. If you are concerned for someone, suggest they take advantage of the mental health programs being run in the fire zones. And as for us, the luckier ones, if your anxiety is not settling, please talk to someone. I’m here if anyone needs help.

It has been a rough few months. If you’ve had the misfortune to be in the face of the fires, then it has been very tough indeed. We on this magnificent strip of coast have the great fortune to live amongst nature and, as we have seen, that comes with its risk. Our homes and families are safe, but that doesn’t mean we have not felt anxious and stressed. I have been in a heightened state of awareness, an overload of adrenaline, the fight and flight hormone, preparing my body and mind for survival. When the threat passed, I felt myself slip into exhaustion – falling levels of adrenaline leave me tired. Does that sound familiar? Along with stress and anxiety, we may feel grief. n Read Terri’s blog at https://lifeology.blog or get in touch via A sadness for all we have lost, homes, the bushland, Terriayliffe@gmail.com or 0431 488 914. 2508

FEBRUARY / 2508 / 31


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Local BMX stars Saya and Kai Sakakibara are racing World Cup rounds – in Australia! Saya reports.

CLASSIFIEDS BAZZA’S CARPENTRY & HANDYMAN SERVICES: All handyman repairs. Decks, pergolas, tiling, fencing, plastering and all other timber work. Local, reliable, quick and fully insured. Free quotes. Ph. Barry [Bazz] 0414 492 509 or 4294 8164. CAT CARE: Wish your CAT could stay at home while you’re away? I love cats & can come & feed & cuddle yours at home with a daily photo. Margaret 0401 460 491. YOGA - PILATES - STRETCH CLASS: * increase flexibility, balance & general wellbeing * strengthen & tone the whole body *calms the mind, improves memory & concentration * Suitable for all levels of fitness & flexibility @ Stanwell Park Surf Club. All classes 1 hour: Sat 8am / Sun 4.30pm / Tues 9am & 7pm / Thurs 7pm. Contact Karen 0403 789 617.‘Yoga with a view’. yogastanwellpark 2508

Happy New Year! Well, January has been and gone already! By the time you read this, we will be racing the opening rounds of the World Cup of 2020. What is so special is that they are being held in Australia for the first time in 11 years: in Shepparton, Victoria and in Bathurst, NSW. We are so excited! It is a great opportunity for our friends and family, for BMX fans, and for new spectators to really experience the energy and high level of BMX that Kai and I compete at! During the summer, Kai and I have been preparing well for these events. I spent a lot of time in the gym, with an emphasis on building upper body strength and size, which helps with my starts. We’ve also travelled to Shepparton and Bathurst to familiarise ourselves with the tracks! These events are important in terms of Olympic qualification as a nation and as individual athletes. For the women, Australia is looking good in the nations ranking and, if we carry on this momentum, we are gearing towards two spots. The men are right on the borderline and points are close for one or two spots. So it is so important we utilise the home-country advantage to get good results, to secure as many country spots, as well as qualifying individually too! 2508

FEBRUARY / 2508 / 41


THISTLES KICK OFF BIG 125TH BIRTHDAY YEAR Helensburgh Thistle Soccer Club is celebrating 125 years! Junior President Gillian Lehn and Senior President Jason Bell report.

What an exciting year ahead for the Helensburgh Thistle Soccer Club and the community, celebrating 125 years of this iconic sporting organisation. We have an incredible year planned, with some fantastic events to celebrate this milestone. But first things first, registration for the 2020 season is well and truly open and we can’t wait to see our current and new players back on the pitch in April. Registration can be done online via our website www.helensburghsoccer.org for all of our players. Don’t forget the Active Kids Rebate can be used for our Junior players, making our registration very affordable for a whole season of sport. The early bird prices for our Junior Players are: U6 - $135 (less Active Kids Rebate) U7 to U18 - $160 (less Active Kids Rebate). We also have our super-popular Mini Thistles Program returning for 2020. Registration is also online this year through our club website. It is open to all residents in the 2508 area only, from ages 3 to 5 years and is specially designed to prepare U5’s for competition soccer. The children will have a fantastic time, learning a variety of soccer skills

BOARDRIDERS ELECT 2020 TEAM By Ian Pepper

The Scarborough Boardriders AGM was held on Tuesday, January 21 at Beaches Hotel, Thirroul. It was good to see a few new faces at the meeting to see how the club is run and provide their input as well. The 2020 Committee was reelected with no changes to the prior year: • President Christian DeClouett • Vice President Drew Rendall • Treasurer Tristen Hargreaves • Contest Directors Ian Pepper, Col McDougall • Junior Contest Directors Fin McLaren, Josh Pepper • Secretary Pete Coleman Membership fees are slightly increasing on last year to cover the costs of some new coaching programs to be announced in following weeks. • Single member $70 • Family with two members $110 • Family with three or more members $140

42­ / 2508­/ FEBRUARY

while expressing their own ideas in a fun, relaxed, non-competitive environment. Sessions will be held at Rex Jackson Oval at 9am every Saturday morning and the cost for the season is only $50 – players will receive a Mini Thistles shirt, socks and drink bottle. DATES TO REMEMBER… Saturday, 1 February Club Information and Registration Day. 9am – 1pm, Rex Jackson Oval Saturday, 14 March 125 Year Season Launch - Family Fun Day. Rex Jackson Oval Saturday 4 and Sunday 5 April Season Commences Saturday 30 May 125 Year Celebration Ball. Novotel Wollongong Northbeach We would also like to thank all of our sponsors, both past and present – without the support of numerous sponsors over the past 125 years, our club certainly wouldn’t have the strength it does now. Thank you also to the Helensburgh community and we look forward to our biggest season and biggest year yet! 2508 Membership is now open on www.liveheats.com/ scarborough. Membership is likely to be capped again this year so the Committee recommends you join now to avoid disappointment. The first Pointscore will be on Sunday 2nd February. The rest of the year’s dates have been published on the club’s Facebook page and liveheats. 2020 will also see the club trial the priority system where each surfer gets an equal chance to surf the best waves in the heat. The trial will begin with the A Grade final at the first pointscore. The club also agreed to adopt a Plastic Free policy suggestion from one of our younger committee members, Fin McLaren. From the first pointscore the club will no longer sell or provide plastic bottles and members will be requested to bring their own. 2508 Boardriders member Nic Squiers placed 5th in the 2020 Corona Open, China. Nic now ranks 5th in the world on the WSL Qualifying Series 2020 rankings!


Australian salmon and (inset) the dolphins who prey on them. Photos by Duncan Leadbitter

HELLO FISH With Duncan Leadbitter This month we visit my home port of Stanwell Park where I have spent many years snorkelling and spearfishing at both the northern and southern ends. This article focuses on the northern end. Park your car in the northern car park at Stanwell Park Beach. The entry area is at the northern end of the beach and involves getting through the surf,so make sure it’s a relatively calm day. Two things to watch for are the boulders at the northern end (so make sure you get in and out only where there is sand) and the channel that runs towards the headland. Depending on the size of the waves and the state of the tide this channel can have quite a strong current. The first part of the snorkel is in a shallow (1m deep) boulder field where you may see small bream, black drummer and luderick. Growing on the rocks is the lime green seaweed, Caulerpa. To the north, around the small islet the water gets deeper (3-4m) and you will see rock cale, sweep, mado and maybe the occasional blue groper.

The northern headland is called ‘The Pinnacles’ and is defined by a rock wall. About 20m or so away (south) from the wall are a couple of reefs that rise up to about 5m from the surface and are worth a look. On some of the boulders and reef you can see cunjevoi and in some areas the beautiful red jewel anemones. In early summer as the water warms up schools of small sandy sprats and yellowtail can be found in the shallows. They are preyed upon Australian salmon, which migrate along the coast in large schools on their annual spawning run. In turn, these are preyed upon by dolphins and, at times, seals. The whole food chain comes alive over the summer and I’ve been visited by seals while snorkelling (see the video) but not yet by dolphins. n Watch Duncan’s film of this adventure, including footage of a large school of Australian salmon – and their predators. Visit https://youtu.be/ UD3fjHoMCH8 2508

FEBRUARY / 2508 / 43


‘A GREAT FEELING OF COMMUNITY’ January’s Friday Night Drinks fundraiser brought everyone together, writes Steven McDonald, president of Helensburgh-Stanwell Park Surf Life Saving Club.

FRIDAY NIGHT DRINKS BUSHFIRE FUNDRAISER This great event – which raised more than $5300 for the Red Cross Disaster Relief and Recovery Appeal – included representatives from all 2508 RFS Brigades (Stanwell Park, Otford, Darkes Forest and Helensburgh), Fire & Rescue 325 Helensburgh. It was also nice to have two big red special guests: Fire Trucks Stanwell Park 1 and Helensburgh 1B. The club was packed with surf club members, 2508 residents and RFS & Fire & Rescue members. A big thanks to all the club members who generally kept the night going. Thanks to our donors: Tradies Helensburgh, Renzetti’s Italian Pizza, Potter’s Bus, High On Tea, Dalton Strata Services, Jasmin Bonador, Peter & Sandra McDonald, Endota Spa Gymea, Burgh Healthy Hub, Helensburgh Golf Driving Range & Putt Putt, Helensburgh Premium Liquor, Stanwell Park Cellars, Uluwatu Blue, Symbio Wildlife Park, DJ Chris, Georgia Anger, Raeleen’s Fancy Faces, Leafy Sea Cottage and Boho Chic. All donated goods for the raffle, food on the night and Tradies donated a keg of “Community Lager”. We are now looking forward to presenting a big cheque to the Red Cross in the near future.

agency response with Illawarra Police Rescue and State Emergency Services involved in returning the dog to Stanwell Park Beach. In an operation that involved a vet, a special raft and two IRBs (Rubber Ducks), the dog was transferred from the rocks in the raft and then loaded into the IRB for the trip to Stanwell Park. This all happened around 2pm on a Friday. The club received messages of thanks from the people rescued on Christmas Day. The four swimmers were in the surf well away from the Red and Yellow Flags when they were caught in a rip. “Quite quickly two of my friends were swept into a rip and they began to panic. I swam to assist one of them and raised my arm to signal the beach. I could see the JetSki was already in the water and there were lifesavers running down with rescue boards. Within 1 minute the friend furthest from me was picked up by the JetSki which quickly returned and got the friend I was helping to shore. On the beach your members made sure both my friends were fine and had oxygen available. They didn’t berate any of us and just educated us on the dangers and how to spot a rip. Without any doubt your members saved two lives on Christmas Day.”

1800 HOURS, 300 PREVENTATIVE ACTIONS, 5 RESCUES Up to 20/01/2020, volunteer life savers have patrolled for more than 1800 hours since the 2019/2020 Season started in September 2019. They have performed more than 300 preventative actions, as well as five rescues, four of which were on Christmas Day using the RWC (jetski), and the retrieval of an injured dog. Prior to Christmas, the club’s Emergency Callout Team sprung into action to assist in the retrieval of a Labrador that had been injured on rocks between Stanwell Park and Bulgo Beach. It was a multi-

EMERGENCY CALL-OUT TEAM SENT TO SOUTH COAST Three members of the Emergency Callout Team were tasked to the South Coast to assist in evacuating areas around Sussex Inlet. They spent three days between Sussex Inlet and the beaches south of Sussex Inlet, checking on the welfare of campers and residents, as well as running reconnaissance missions to ensure they could identify locations should they be called upon to assist with evacuations. They took two IRBs – “The 2508” and “The Tanya Potter” – and were part of a team with clubs from Sydney, Illawarra and the

44­ / 2508­/ FEBRUARY


South Coast. Fortunately, they didn’t need to assist anyone, but their presence was greatly appreciated. Well done to the patrols on Christmas Day for preventing an almost certain tragedy, and thank you to all members who patrolled over Christmas, New Year and the Australia Day weekend. Patrols will continue until the end of April 2020. Please help life savers help you: “Swim Between the Red & Yellow Flags”. If you are interested in joining the surf club and becoming a life saver, please contact the club for more information www.stanwellparksurfclub.com.

house: the Sea Eels. Congratulations to the winners, and all nippers who took part. It was our first time running an event like this, and it was a great success. Thanks to everyone who stayed for Santa, lunch, drinks and live music in the Surf Club. Special mention to the friendly seal who paid us a surprise visit during the swim events. Our senior nippers in the Under 13 & 14 age groups attended our inaugural leadership camp in late January. The overnight camp provided nippers with the opportunity to refine their water and board skills in preparation for transitioning to patrols. Attendees learned the importance of teamwork and the essential qualities of leadership and friendship. Thank you to the volunteers who made this camp possible. Congratulations to all of our nippers who attended – we look forward to seeing you develop into our future club leaders. It has been a long time since there was a Surf Carnival on Stanwell Park Beach, but it returns on Saturday, 1 February. The SLS Illawarra Junior Development Carnival is a fun and friendly carnival designed to help Nippers gain valuable carnival experience. Again, a huge thank you to all of our families and volunteers – we would not function like we do without your support.

NIPPERS ENJOY FIRST CARL WILLIAMS CUP In December, our junior members competed in the inaugural ‘Carl Williams Cup’ intra-club carnival. This carnival was held at Stanwell Park Beach and divided Nippers into three teams or ‘houses’ with each named after a branch of our club: Sea Wolves, Boaties and Sea Eels. Every junior competed in swim, board, wade, flags and sprint events. Individual results were collated and contributed to a final point-score that designated a winning

EQUILIBRIUM HEALTHCARE STANWELL PARK OCEAN SWIM After the surf conditions got the better of us for the 2019 Equilibrium Healthcare Stanwell Park Ocean Swim we are on the countdown to the 2020 swim. The next swim is on 15 March 2020. Swimmers registered for the cancelled 17 March 2019 and 8 December 2019 swims will have their entries rolled over to the 15 March 2020 swim. Enter at https://oceanswims.com. Enquiries, email oceanswim@stanwellparksurfclub.com. 2508

Big red special guests – Fire Trucks Stanwell Park 1 and Helensburgh 1B. Photos: Steven McDonald

The Emergency Callout Team were sent to help out at Sussex Inlet. Photo: Anthony Ashley.

FEBRUARY / 2508 / 45


1.36 0053 1.51 0034 1.58 00 1.28 0202 1.39 0148 0.44 0205 0.48 0257 0.32 0114 0.46 0224 0.48 0202 0.50 0256 0.51 0325 0.55 0314 1.51 1.18 0038 0130 0.53 0357 1 25 1 25 16 0714 1 0123 16 0926 16 0917 10 10 10 22 22 7 01 7 0629 7 7 0.49 0.52 0.49 0644 0.66 0719 0756 0.68 0832 0726 0.61 0807 0952 1.96 1.65 0838 1.81 1.77 0933 0730 1.72 0930 1.69 1.60 1307 0.53 22 1.70 0704 1.73 1018 1328 1.64 1518 1.23 1512 1.16 1304 1.48 1355 1.28 1322 1.25

0.08 0.33 0.24 0.27 SA 0.30 SU 0.27 TH 0.35 WE 1.19 WE 1410 SU 0.32 MO 0.38 FR 1524 SA 1615 MO 1633 TU 1647 TU 1605 FR 1418 SA 1515 SU 1440 TU 10 TU 1850 SA 1351 0.27 2012 0.52 1952 0.65 11 1958 0.44 1959 2009 0.52 2108 0.57 2042 1.27 2024 1.25 2120 1.43 1926 1.36 2046 1.20 2117 1.25 2208 1.29 2233 1.37 2210 1.33 2248

1.52 0129 1.54 00 1.39 0144 1.31 0243 1.39 0228 0.30 0201 0.47 0330 0.42 0258 0.48 0400 0.48 0416 0.51 0406 0.48 0248 0.44 0336 0.49 1.19 0128 0229 0.43 0433 17 1047 17 1035 2 0212 17 0819 2 26 2 26 11 11 11 23 23 8 8 0034 8 8 01 0.53 0.51 0737 0.71 0807 0.54 0902 0.70 0910 0827 0.65 0844 0922 1.88 1.75 1023 1041 1.94 1.60 1.74 1.69 1.60 0817 1.83 1008 0712 1.61 23 0755 1.84 1051 1637 1.14 1634 1.11 1349 1.39 1427 1.49 1451 1.19 1416 1.16

2020 PORT KEMBLA TIDAL CHART 2020

0.17 0.28 0.08 0.36 PORT NEW WALES 0.30 1546 1504 0.43 TH 1457 MO 0.31 TU 0.37 TH KEMBLA FR– SU 0.19 MO 0.17 TU 1717 WE 1716 SA 1609 SU 1651 WE 1648 SU MO 1510 SA SOUTH WE 1355 SU 1437 WE 10

0.58 2038 0.71 21 0.34 2100 0.56 2143 0.63 2114 1.47 2014 1.38 2157 1.30 2113 1.26 2222 1.22 2204 1.32 2321 1.42 2257 1.32 2245 1942 2042 1.21 0.47 2046 2101 1.43 2321

9 3

ARY TH Time

LAT 34° 29ʼ S KEMBLA LONG 150°SOUTH 55ʼ E WALES PORT – NEW

1.54 0221 0440 1.52 1.43 0354 1.34 0305 1.22Heights 1.39 0304 0415 0.49 0507 0.30 0257 0.49 0500 0336 0.40 0214 0329 0.48 0117 0.46 and 0.34 0511 0234 0.37 0.47 0509 0.48 Time LAT 34° 29ʼ Sand LONG 150° 55ʼ E 0320 Times of High Low Waters Local 0.49 0845 0.50 0934 0.56 0.69 0940 0.65 0918 1.87 Local 1125 1.53 1146 1044 1.71 1205 1.92 Heights0904 of High 1019 and Low Waters 1.77 and1008 0755 0841 1.72 0.73 0850 Times 1.91Time 1.92 0945 1.68 1130 1.59 1114 1.12 1750 1.13 1.36 1.12 1.30 1527 1.09 MARCH APRIL 0.13 0.40 0.31 0.13 FEBRUARY MARCH 1538 0.27 1440 0.33JANUARY 0.10 0.11 0.31 0.37 TU 1756 WE SA 1532 MO 1601 FR 1443 TUAPRIL MO 1725 WE 1802 TH 1745 TH 1731 SU 1655 FRFEBRUARY MO 1521 SU 1548 MO 1617 TU 1539 TH Time m 2156 Time m 2144 Time 1.38 m Time m0.60 2124 Time Time2215 m Time m 0.49 2129 Time m 2115 0.71 0.40m 2146 0.58 2130 0.67 1.26 2356 1.39 2345 2254 1.32 1.34 1.47 Time 2030 1.24 m Time m 0257 2208 Time 0213 m 1.481.520304 Time m 2326 Time Time TIME 0130m M1.361.24 0205 M 2322 TIME TIME Mm 2309 1.50 1.51 0224 1.58 M 0123 1.18 1.28 TIME 0114 1.39 1 0756 11.41 10.44 1 0314 0913 0.59 16 1012 0.51 0644 0.66 16 0714 0.49 0.68 16 0926 0.52 0726 0.61 16 0917 0.49 1.53 1.49 0452 1.26 1.43 1.58WE 0.51 0011 1.491.110401 0557 0426 0.40 0551 0.52 0202 0.48 0.46 0.26 0.46 0304 1.36 WE0400 0257 1.51 0224 1.58 0213 1.48 0546 0205 1.28 0114 1.39MO0610 1328 1.640430 1.19 0340 1.23 0452 1512 1.16 1511 1304 1.48 1.28 0325 13220357 1.25 SU TH 0256 SA 1355 TH 1627 SU 1518 0.32 0.271054 0.79 0951 2120 1135 0.52 1118 2046 0.65 2037 1958 0.440.74 0930 0.52 0952 19261018 0.57 0.47 0.44 0933 0.55 0.63 0.60 1.65 0604 0.340.741059 1205 1200 1.44 1055 1.92 0838 1.81 1.96 1.77 2024 1.65 1.932144 1.56 1012 0926 0.52 0917 0.49 0.49 0953 0756 2009 0.68 0913 0.59 1244 0726 0.61 1308 1.48 1607 0229 1.391645 0258 1.31 1633 0400 1717 1.52 0330 0319 1.491651 0212 1.19 02011647 1.39 1.19 1.15 1.26 1.10 1.23 1.09 0.34 1219 1.73 1815 1815 0.45 1742 0.13 1524 0.24 0.08 1615 0.27 0.33 0.09 0.38 1518 1.23 1512 1.16 1.64 1355 1.28 1511 1.11 1322 1.25 WE 1900 TH 1847 SU TU SA21545 WE TU TH1.54 FR FR 1627 MO FR SA MO TU TU2 1605 WE SU1758 SA0.71 TH MO WE0410 17 2 2 1103 0.50 0737 0827 0.65 17 1035 0819 0.54 SU 0902 0.70 17 1047 0.53 0.51 1027 0.55 17 0.45 0.58 0.51 0.66 1.26 1848TH 2210 0.221.132226 2344 1.33 2117 1.27 1.43 1.25 1.60 1.25 2215 1349 1.39 14162248 1.16 1427 1.492251 1.19 2233 1637 2305 1.14 2359 1634 1.11 1633 2120 0.52 2046 0.65 0.27 TH2218 2024 0.52 2037 0.74 1.50 2144 1926 0.57TU1.36 FR 1718 FR 2208 SU 1451 MO MO

18 12 9 3 27 24 18 12 9 0001 27 24 2020 24 18 12 9 3FEBRUARY

10 21

13 10 4 281 25 19 16 13 10 00101 13 10 4 281 25 19 16 10 4 1 25 19 16 16 0130 0714 10

FR TH 1328 2009

2042 0.47

2101 0.34

2113 0.56

0953 0.74 SA 1545 1.23 2218 0.51

1054 0.55 SU 1645 1.26 2251 0.45

1135 0.63 TU 1717 1.10 2305 0.58

0454 1.33 1106 0.70

0530 1.56 1211 0.49

0548 1.49 1238 0.53

0544 1.42

0628 1.63

0000 0.55

2222 0.58

2014 0.63

2157 0.71

2157 0.73

2250 0.74

0.67 011 0034 0.45 0410 14 11 5 292 26 20 0013 14 14 11 5 292 26 20 17 11 100 17 17 11 5 2 26 20 17 0642 1.55 0657 1.52 1103 1330 0.43 11 0.42 1300

0229 0819 SA FR 1427 2101

0329 1.430530 1.34 0305 1.22 1.33 0336 1.56 0518 0248 0.42 0.483 0354 1.39 30454 0258 1.31 0400 1019 0.69 0841 0.73 18 0934 0.56 0.70 0.49 1144 0922 1.88 1.75 0.54 FR1106 0902 0.70 1047 1532 1.361211 1.12 1443 1.30 SA 1008 MO 1601 0.401758 0.58 2130 0.491.19 1651 1.20 1830 1609 0.17 0.28 1.49 1.19 1637 SU 1651 MO TU2208 TU SU 2156 SU 1451 MO 0430 1.49 0452 1.41 0400 1.26 0.51 0.47 2204 1.30 2113 1.264 2222 0.34 42305 0.56 2345 19 2245

0507 0548 1.54 0531 0440 1.52 0432 1.49 0416 02570433 1.39 0.58 0406 1.50 0102 1.501.540508 0033 1.40 0.41 0.55 0416 0.30 0.47 0.230506 1.52 0330 0319 1.49 0201 1.39 0025 18 31.49 3 1.54 1205 0.49 1133 0.46 18 1145 0.48 0940 0.65 18 1146 0.50 1.63FR 1023 0.53 0.51 0704 0.401.211207 0635 0.57 1.87 1.57 1041 1.94 1.60 1.88 0.53 1035 0.51 1027 0.55 0827 0.65WE0704 1.12 1153 1750 1.13 1745 1.33 1026 15271051 1.09 TU 1756 1238 SA 1800 TU 2326 1825 0.60 1830 2309 0.71 2312 0.661805 0.67 1634 21151716 0.67 0.38 1.13 1.14 1313 1.56 1238 1.34 0.15 0.38 1717 0.08 0.36 0.12 1.14 1.11 1633 1.13 1.16 TH 1357 FR WE TH FR 1634 SA WE WE TH WE 1648 TU TH2344 MO 1416 1.58 0546 1.53 0539 1.50 2246 1.43 1.204 2257 0.62 1934 0.321.632333 1848 0.51 2321 1.47 2321 1.38 1.650553 0.58 2157 0.71 2157 0.73 2014 0.63 1950 19 0610 4 0401 1059 0.60 19 1244 0.47 1308 0.44 1229 0.36 19 1223 0.46

1 20

WE 1900 1.15

WE 1651 1.09 2226 0.66

TH 1847 1.19

SA 1840 1.32

SU 1836 1.40

0025 0.58 0704 1.63

0508 1.50 1207 0.51

0013 0.67 0642 1.55

0016 0.56 0537 1.73

0029 0.61 0634 1.51

0117 0.55

0609 1.61

0105 0.61

0014 0.44

0108 0.55

SA 1718 SA 1 FR 1931 1.25 200 1900 1.53 2250

1.63 0509 0.55 0511 0.55 0500 0.61 011 1.42 0415 1.61 0455 0036 1.34 0000 1.26 0158 1.51 0609 0127 0.49 0507 0.30 0037 0.49 0440 0.23 0432 0.46 0506 0.40 0354 1.54 1.52 1.54 0105 1.43 0544 1.34 0628 0257 1.39 0117 21 6 21 21 6 30 15 15 15 27 12 27 12 27 12 100 18 18 3 18 18 12 0336 3 3 1316 0.42 0641 1.60 1125 0751 1.66 0728 1.58 0.62 1044 1302 0.39 1100 0614 0.45 0614 0.59 0810 0.47 0803 1.71 1130 1.87 1.53 1114 1.77 1.45 1008 1.92 1205 0.49 1146 0.50 1133 0.46 1145 0.56651212 1019 0.69 0940 0.65 20 5 1.19 1802 20 50.41 1745 200.40 1411 5 1.39 1903 20 0.34 1731 0.40 11 1.77 1331 1.48 1438 0.31 1234 0.13 1229 0.20 1.23 1703 1406 0.46 1400 1655 1754 0.13 1.18 1725 1902

0329 0934 SU SA 1532 2156

1756 1750 1745 1.36 1601 1.12 1.09 TU FRFR 1330 SA SA MOSU 1651 1357 0.38 1218FR 0.26 MO 0.44 1.21 1805 1.14 1.20 1.13 1.12 WE TH SA0.43 SU 1800 MO WE TH FR SU 1 TU WE FR1256 MO1.19 TU 1527 MO 1758 WE 1825 TH TH SU 1.13 THTH 1950 1922 1.20 1904 1931 1.25 1828 1.47 2319 2008 2305 0.510.50 2322 23332356 0.62 0.471.26 1.19 1.24 2345 1.32 200 1919 0.60 0.20 0.43 2025 0.431.451.671909 1948 1.39 2254 1.32 2326 2309 0.71 2312 0.66 1.55 2344 0.40 2351 2208 2345 0.58 2115 0.67 2031

21 0751 0053 6 0557 60.50 1.66 0630 1.80 21 0712 1.51 1302 0.39 21 0728 1.58 0.51MO 0.53 0119 1.27 0011 1.49 0551 0.52 0.27 1.58 0546 1.53 0539 1.63 0401 1.43SA0202 1406 0.40 1304 0.190034 0.43 0534 FR 1438 0.34 TU 1326 FR 1903 1.23 1.24 0700 2008 1.32 1914 1.570704 1.54 1137 1.69 1205 1.72 1200 1.73 0.63 0604 0.34 1.44 1.621940 0.442031 0730 1244 0.47 1229 0.36 1059 0.60 0832 0202 1418 0.51 0148 0.55 0109SA 0.331351 0.50 1732 00341815 0.53 0.32 0.30 0.27 1.38 1219 1.73 0.45 0.31 1.15 1.19 1840 1.32 1651 1.09 SA 1515 SU FR FR FR FR7 1815 SA TH 1847 SA0146 WE1309 22 7 0832 1.69 0722 1.84 22 0747 1.50 0704 1.73 22 0807 1.60 1.29TU 1348 0.151952 1.25 1848 0.22 2226 0.66SU2108 0.44 2355 0.32 1942 1440 0.38 1351 0.47 0.27 SA 1515 2012 WE 13551.33 SA

0430 1054 MO SU 1645 2251

6 0641 60.40 1.60 1212 0.62 21 1316 0.42 0.48 1.51 0452 0.51 0426 0610 1.49 MO0629 0452 1.41 1.190038 0.41 1754 1.18 TU 1902 TH 1331 1.19 2351 0.50 1.70 0.53 1118 1.65 1922 1055 1.92 1308 0.55 1307 1135 0.63 0719 0629 1.51 0038 0.481410 0053 0.50 0.35 1.19 0.34 1742 0.13 1900 1.26 1.10 WE TU71850 TU 1758 TH WE TU 1717 7 1307 0.53 22 0719 1.70 0730 1.72 1.20 1.26 2344 0.45 TU1.33 2305 0.58 1850 1.19 1410 0.351959 0.30 WE 2359 FR 1418

0530 1211 TU MO 1758 2345

0.48 0034 0.51 0 0.48 0.49 0531 0.43 0.48 0228 0.51 0034 0.49 0128 0.480128 0.44 0102 01290033 0.43 0202 0.250129 0.47 0617 1.50 1.40 0.52 0029 0.55 0144 1.670223 0518 0.41 1.56 80034 0548 1.49 0025 0.580243 0144 0013 0.67 0016 0.56 0228 0508 1.50 0243 8 0817 80.44 8 0657 0712 1.61 23 0807 1.74 0755 1.84 23 0844 1.60 1.83 23 0910 1.69 0814 1.82 23 0824 1.47  Copyright Commonwealth of Australia Bureau of Meteorology 1.69WE 0844 1.60 01 1.74 0817 1.83 1.61 1.84 0.57 1.29 0634 1.57 0.35 1144 1.87 0.49 WE0712 1238 0.53 0704 1.63 0642 1.55 0537 1.73 1207 0.51MO0910 0.31 1510 0.37 1355 0.43 1457 0.300807 14370635 0.17 0.19 0704 1431 2019, 0.170755 0.46 1217 SU 1546 0.40 TH 1153 SA 1504 SU TH 1424 2143 1504 1.32 2114 1.42 1942 1.21 2046 1.221457 20381238 1.43 2100 1.32 1313 2045SU 1.771437 1.64 1804 0.31 0.37 0.30 0.19 0.43 0.17 1.56 1.34 0.58 0.38 1.44 1830 0.15 1.20 1.13 1357 0.38 1330 0.43 1218 0.26 1.14 SU 1546 MO 1510 TH SA WE 1355 FR SA SU TU 10 WE 1830 SA 1300 MO 1256 WE 1825 TH FRAstronomical SU2042 TH 1805 Datum of Predictions is Lowest Tide 0117 0.461.21 0214 0.482046 0234 02211848 0.37 1934 0320 2100 0.47 0304 0.48 0256 0.212038 0300 0.45 1.45 2114 1909 1.329 1900 1.42 1 1.22 1.43 0.32 0.51 0.43 0.47 91942 1950 1.20 1931 1.25 1828 2333 0.62 The Equilibrium 24 085034° 91.32 9S 242020 LONG 150° 55ʼ0.34 E 242143 0755 1.72 LAT 0845 1.91 0905 1.74 0900 1.43 1.77 29ʼ 0904 1.92 24 0945 1.68 0918 1.59

0.55 01 0.48 0553 13 10 19 19 13 7 4 28 22 19 13 7 314 28 22 19 13 7 4 28 22 0148 0807 1.60 1.38 1223 1440 0.51 0.38 1 1959 1.20

2012 1.25

2108 1.29

2042 1.37

1952 1.33

1959 1.69

2011 1.59

SWIM OF 8 BIG 29 23 5 THE SOUTH!

23 20 14 8 5 29 23 20 14 8 5 29 20 14 PORT KEMBLA – NEW SOUTH WALES

MO 1 SU 1836 2042 1.54 1.37

20 14

202

Times are in local MO standard time (UTC +10:00) or daylight savings time 1521 0.10 TU 1539 0.37 MO 1617 0.31 TH 1515 0.23 FR 1453 0.49 Stanwell 2124Waters 1.52 2130 1.83Healthcare 1.67 0033 1.34 Low 2144 1.47 0.46 0037 0214 0.48 0221 0.34 0234 0.37 0.47 0127 0.48 Tim 1.26 0117 0158 1.51 1.632115 1.53Local 1.34Times 0 0.552215and 0105 0.61 0014 0.44 0304 0108 0628 0036 1.63 0117 0000 0.55Heights 0609 1.61 0320 and ofPhase High New Moon First Quarter Moon Symbols Swim is 1.72 0614 1.77 0845 1.91 1.92 0945 1.68 0803 0918 1.59 01 0202 0.44 0.32 0810 0357 0904 0.46 0340 0.46 0351 0.21Park 0340 0.44 0256 0.480850 0314 0.26 0.59 0325 0.47 0.42Ocean 0706 0.55 0712 0.45 0751 1.66 0728 1.58 0630 1.80 1316 0614 0.42100755 0641 1.60 1302 0.39 25 10 25 10 25 10 25 0952 1.96 1018 1.65 0951 1.56 0958 1.62 0939 1.37 0930 1.77 0933 1.93 0838 1.81 FEBRUARY MARCH ANUARY APRIL 0.33 0.27 0.10 0.11 1.23 0.31 0.37 1.48 1.39 1.28 1303 1.21 1.77 1438 0.34 1406 0.40 1304 0.19 1326 1.19 1331 0.41 THFR1440 FR MO MOWE1617 TU 1539 onMO 151523 March 2020. TH SA SU MO WE 1234 WE 10 0.08 1411 1647 1548 0.33 1607 1558 0.321521 0.54 1615 0.271538 1524 FR SA 0.38 TU TU 1902 TH0.24 FR 1903 MO 1633 TUSU FR 1400 SA SA 1229 TU 1605 0.09 TH 1440 0.33 2030 1.24

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1.43 0234 1.34 0320 1.54 0221 1.52WATERS 1.54 0300 .22 0214 0329 1.39 0304 0509 0.30 0257 0.49 0440 0455 0.46 0336 0.40 0354 0.49 0507 0.23 0432 0.48Phase 0.34 0511 0256 0.21Moon 0.37 0415 0.47 0.48 0500 New Moon First Quarter Moon Symbols Full 0934 0.56 1019 0.690158 0.49 0845 1146 0.50 0.46 0900 .73 0850 0940 0.651.53 1.87 1.53 1.45 1.92 0037 1.71 1.77 0045 0036 1.34 1.261044 1.51 1205 0127 1.63 0033 0155 1.561114 01.59 1133 1.77 1008 1.91 1125 0905 1.74 1100 0904 1.92 0945 1.68 1130 0918 1.59 LAT 34 29’ 15 0810 30 0706 30 151655 0753 0.51 1745 1.21 0614 0.45 30 0614 0.59 1.12 0.47 1756 1.12 15 0803 0.42 0.55 15 1750 0909 0.501.13 1.36 1601 .30 1538 1527 1.09 0.13 0.40 0.46 0.13 1725 0.31 1731 0.20 0.27 1521 0.10 1515 0.23 1453 1548 0.11 1617 1539 SA SA 1532 MO TU WE FR TU 1.28 WE 1802 THMO1745 FR 1703 SU MO FR MO SU TH FR SU1.77 TU 1.21 1401 1.17 1.48 MO 1.39 0.31 1400 1303 1519TH 1.14 TH 0 WE 1234 TH 1229 SA 1411 WE 0.37 LONG 150 55’ 2312 1917 0.78 1919 0.20 0.432322 0.43 2326 1948 0.56 1843 2029 0.802345 0.40 2208 0.582025 0.71 0.66 2115 .49 2129 2156 2115 0.670.64 1.39 2309 1.55 1.32 1904 1.26 1.67 1.24 2254 1.52 2356 2130 1.83 2319 2146 1.38 2215 1.34 0.60 2124 2144 1.47

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SA 0.32 SU 0 SA SA 1523 FR 1558 1.54 1 2217 1.84 2355 2147

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0.36 0.42 1641 MO 0 MO 0.28 WE 0.08 SU 0.44 THor0.12 WEno warranty FR SA in TH SA SU SU 1556 TUThe Bureau Meteorology gives any TH kind whether express,WE implied,1648 statutory otherwise respect1634 to theFR availability, accuracy, SA currency, completeness, TUof1717 WE of1716 SU 1651 0.47 1.20 1931 1.25 .51 2245 2345 2333 0.62 1934 0.32 1848 0.51 1900 0.43 1828 or reliability of the information information1950 will be fit for any particular purpose or will not infringe2246 any third party Intellectual Property2306 rights. 2321 1.47 or that the2321 1.38 1.53 1.80 1.45 2224 1 1.26 quality 2257 1.65 The Bureau’s liability for any loss, damage, cost or expense resulting from use of, or reliance on, the information is entirely excluded.

1.63 0509 0.55 0511 0.55 0500 0.61 0548 0.44 0504 1.26 0117 1.51 0609 1.63 0014 1.53 0 1.34 0000 0.32 0033 0415 0628 0.49 0036 0.30 0037 0.49 0158 0.23 1.61 0455 0105 0.46 0127 21 01 21 1316 6 30 21 0751 21 0728 6 30 6 1302 15 0810 15 0803 1546­0614 12 27 27.42 12 27 12 0.42 0641 1.60 1125 1.66 1.58 0630 1.80 1104 .62 1044 0.39 1100 0.59 0.47 0.42 0.55 / 25081130 /0.45 FEBRUARY 1149 1.34 0706 1.71 1.87 0614 1.53 1114 1.77 27 1.45 1902 1234 1.19 1.77 1331 1229 0.41 1.48 1438 1411 0.34 1.39 1903 1.23 1406 1400 0.40 1.28 1304 1303 0.19 1.21 1 .18

TU 0.31 TH 0.13 FR 0.40 FR 0.20 TH TH 1745 SA TH 1731 WE WE 1802 MO 1725 1.19 2356 1.24 2345 .50 2322 1.26 1919 0.20 1922 1904 0.43 2031 0.43 1.67 1.39 2025

TU 0 SA 0.46 MO 0.56 SU SU 1726 MO MO 1632 FR 1703 1.32 2357 1.57 2304 0.56 1914 0.64 1 1.73 1843 2319 2008 1.55 1948

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Golf NEWS

TRADIES SOCIAL GOLF

Barry Thompson Towns reports. Only 11 intrepid members braved the fog and rain to contest the opening tourney of 2020 and, despite the welcome downpour, the conditions allowed an enjoyable round. The way Terry savaged the course suggests to me that he has been on a diet of raw meat during the break. He scored a 39 to win the day, two nearest the pins and the A grade longest drive. Started the season the way you mean to finish, Terry? Dave carded a 37 for second on a countback with Paul. Scores then tumbled until they hit my 20 Bradman effort. Ian took the first nine and Jammu the back paddock. Sparrow won the prized Helensburgh Driving Range voucher, expect big things from him next month. Lunch improved with the return of Mark and all enjoyed the debrief at Tradies. Thanks again for the continuing support of Helensburgh Butchery and Gallardo’s Pizzeria. We left plenty of holes in one so join us in chasing them at our next outing on February 15th. Tee off is 7.30am and we welcome players of all standards. 2508

HELENSBURGH SUNDAY SOCIAL GOLF CLUB

Robert ‘Indy’ Jones reports. HSSGC 2020 had a somewhat disrupted start. Rain forced us to postpone our opening January 19th game – do I dare mention climate change? Don’t be dismayed, the 13 events scheduled for 2020 will remain, your 234 holes of sheer delight is still to be had as a booking has been made for October 18th with an 8.30 tee off. Those who did turn up strolled the lightly damp fairways and greens, appreciating the opportunity, and avoided a drenching. No prizes for Scotty who, after much encouragement (harassment more likely, as birdies and pars surrounded him), missed the eagle on 17; Tim, who looked to burn up the course without the watchful eye of the handicapper; Indy, who took comfort from one par; father and son, Bruce and Daniel, who took to removing the covers off balls with explosive drives; and the effervescent Mark, who would have played in a cyclone to achieve his stated goal of “A” grade in 2020. It all continues again on February 2nd at 8.15am and then March 1st. Call Tony on 0418 863 100 or just arrive at 7.30 for 8am to enjoy the golf, a chat and a BBQ finish at Boomerang Public Golf Course. 2508

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PHONE: 02 4288 0833 FEBRUARY / 2508 / 47


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2508 FEBRUARY 2020  

Free monthly local news mag, hand delivered to homes in the Helensburgh district, NSW

2508 FEBRUARY 2020  

Free monthly local news mag, hand delivered to homes in the Helensburgh district, NSW

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