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NOVEMBER 2020

www.2508mag.com.au

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DISTRICT NEWS

LITTLE ATHLETICS THE CLUB WHERE KIDS LOVE TO RUN, JUMP & RING THE PB BELL!

Waterfall | Helensburgh | Otford | Darkes Forest | Stanwell Tops | Stanwell Park | Coalcliff


COMING SOON

www.2508mag. com.au

AUTUMN 2018

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Sharing local knowledge

Grand walks

For all board riders

Discover

Salt Water Wonderland

Playgrounds full of fun

Swim, surf and snorkel!

6 of the best for active kids

SUMMER 2016-17

Hot art, cool cafes and ocean pools

3 of the best wineries Cheers to the Shoalhaven!

Glenbernie Orchard

Home of awardwinning apple cider

thesouthcoaster.com.au

Your ultimate guide to the annual migration

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The Grand Pacific Drive

Salt Water Wonderland

Your paddock to plate guide

Explore

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Discover

fresh

Discover

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Sharing local knowledge

Farm Whale trail

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Sharing local knowledge

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Sharing local knowledge

From Sea Cliff Bridge to Sublime Point

Images by awardwinning ocean wildlife photographer Matt Smith

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south coaster WINTER 2017

Discover

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The best surf beaches

thesouthcoaster.com.au

Discover

thesouthcoaster.com.au

To dive for

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thesouthcoaster.com.au

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Sharing local knowledge

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horticulturist, and she is passionate about enjoying and protecting of our local bushland. She moved to Helensburgh in 1973. In 1993, Merilyn, along with her husband Allan, started the Helensburgh & District Landcare Group, as they were concerned with the increasing presence of environmental weeds in our neighbouring bushland. Merilyn believes everyone has a responsibility to become aware of exactly what they have growing in their gardens, and to remove any problem plants.

bushwalks for everyone!

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MERILYN HOUSE is a bush regenerator and

Magic afoot The ultimate

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and natural resource consulting company, Fish Matter, which advises industry, government and NGOs on the sustainable use of fish. Most of Duncan’s work is in based in Asia where he is involved in fisheries projects in Indonesia, Vietnam, Thailand, Philippines and India. He is a Visiting Fellow at the Australian Centre for Ocean Resources and Security at the University of Wollongong. A keen scuba diver, snorkeller, spearfisherman and photographer, Duncan has lived in Stanwell Park for 20 years.

Meet the locals – from wombats to whales!

Sharing local knowledge

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DUNCAN LEADBITTER is a director of fisheries

Gourmet guide

Wine, whisky, cider and chocolate!

Animal magic

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HEATHER EISZELE is a veteran journalist of 35 years experience and was the Editor of this magazine’s precursor, Helensburgh & District News. She currently works from home, offering proofreading and editing services.

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ROB BRANDER – aka ‘Dr Rip’ – is a coastal geomorphologist and professor at the University of New South Wales in Sydney. A resident of Coalcliff, he’s been studying beaches for more than 30 years, starting in Canada where water temperatures convinced him to come to Australia to do his PhD. He is an international expert on rip currents and runs a beach safety education program called The Science of the Surf (www.scienceofthesurf.com).

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MEET OUR CONTRIBUTORS

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Disclaimer: All content and images remain the property of 2508 Coast News unless otherwise supplied. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without written permission. Views expressed do not reflect those of the publisher.

The South Coaster Book! E

EDITORS Genevieve Swart, Marcus Craft CONTACT editor@2508mag.com.au. Ph: 0432 612 168 2508mag. PO Box 248, Helensburgh, 2508. ADVERTISING 0432 612 168. www.2508mag.com.au. T&Cs apply. NEXT DEADLINE November 18 COVER Little Athletics relay stars, from left to right: Jayden Borg, Blake Noble, Ruby McGarity, Lyla Innes. Photo: Anthony Warry 2508 is published by The Word Bureau, ABN 31 692 723 477.

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DISTRICT NEWS

BOOK YOUR PRINT AD ONLINE! Next cut-off is Nov 18.

The best beaches for surfing and stand-up paddling!

Our tourist magazine is becoming a book! The ultimate guide to exploring the bush and the beach Holidaying at home? Three reasons it’s a Christmas must-have: 1. Packed with local knowledge 2. Illustrated by local artists 3. Available at local shops! RRP $19.99, PRE-ORDER TODAY Email editor@2508mag.com.au The South Coaster book is brought to you by the publishers of 2508 District News & 2515 Coast News. Any profits from this book will go into the production of community news, ensuring the future of the local mags you love!


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GRANTS HELP FUND A NEW BUS FOR NINA Helensburgh-based NINA has won a couple of government grants and bought a new Mercedes-Benz Sprinter to add to its small fleet of community transport vehicles. On October 12, NINA celebrated with a bus unveiling ceremony attended by the region’s federal and state representatives, Sharon Bird MP and Lee Evans MP. NINA manager Sharon Gissane reports,

Special guests attending the bus unveiling event on October 12 included Sharon Bird MP – pictured below cutting the ribbon, with Lee Evans MP and NINA manager Sharon Gissane. The ceremony included a performance on the didgeridoo by Peter Button, a representative from the Wollongong Aboriginal Land Council. Photos: Anthony Warry

In 2019 Northern Illawarra Neighbour Aid Inc (NINA) was successful in obtaining two separate grants that allowed us to purchase a new vehicle to assist in the transport of clients throughout the Northern Illawarra. The new Mercedes-Benz Sprinter was purchased in September 2020 using funds granted by the Federal government Stronger Communities Program and our successful state government Community Building Partnership grant. NINA was able to provide some funds that we had saved over the years and now we have a brand-new vehicle. This vehicle will allow us to increase our group transport options for people, increasing activities throughout the region. Currently our activities include shopping trips weekly, group outings including day trips and

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lunch ventures from the Southern Highlands to various coastal destinations. The Sprinter will enable a greater level of passenger comfort and care to all aboard. Our drivers love it and clients all exit with a smile on their face. The Sprinter has room for 10 passengers, however, Covid restrictions limit the occupants to five passengers plus driver and client escort. The Sprinter can also be hired out to community groups for a small fee, either with or without a driver. I would like to thank the Honourable Sharon Bird and Mr Lee Evans for their contribution of funds. NINA is confident that this vehicle will provide a great deal of opportunity for the next 10 years. 2508


To sell what you love, talk to someone who loves where you live Julie York

0405 128 070

julie.york@helensburgh.rh.com.au


All up, about 8000 beachgoers visited Stanwell Park on the October long weekend’s Sunday and Monday. Photo: Steven McDonald

SUMMER BEACH-SAFETY STORM BREWING Our beaches are attracting unprecedented visitor numbers. How will the district cope? 2508 reports.

On the 2020 October long weekend, record numbers of beachgoers flocked to Stanwell Park, with Helensburgh-Stanwell Park Surf Life Saving Club recording 8000 beach visitors on the Sunday and Monday. That’s more than seven times last year’s total – in 2019, 1100 people visited on those two days. It’s “a massive increase”, said Steven McDonald, president of Helensburgh-Stanwell Park SLSC. In the summer of Covid-19, if those record numbers continue, it will put immense pressure on our volunteer life savers, who patrol the region’s beaches on Sundays and public holidays. Can they cope? “We need more volunteers to ease the load, that is true,” Steven said. “We are looking for previous members to come back and patrol during the busy periods, and have started a recruitment campaign on social media and through direct contact with previous members to do that. “SLSNSW has given the club some additional funding as Covid support to its members – the club reduced membership fees for Nippers and Active Patrolling Members using this funding. “No additional funding has been made available by local government or state government that is additional at this stage.” Steven shared the following information from Steven Pearce, CEO at Surf Life Saving NSW: “SLSNSW was expecting a significant visitation to all NSW beaches over the long weekend … “Across NSW we saw a significant increase in visitation with, at many locations, over a 300% increase in people swimming between the red and yellow flags. Concerningly we saw approximately an 800% increase in people swimming outside the red and yellow flags in unpatrolled locations.

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“This summer will be a huge summer for beach visitations, and it is so important, in fact, life saving important, that people swim at patrolled locations where our lifesavers or lifeguards are on duty.” Wollongong City Council has more than 80 professional lifeguards patrolling beaches this season. “Our Lifeguards will monitor crowd numbers regularly and where necessary will encourage social distancing through signage and public announcements,” a spokesperson said. “We have plans in place to support our beach operations and will work closely with NSW Police across the summer, including if a beach was to exceed crowd capacity or if beachgoers we not following COVID-safe practices. “Each of Council’s 17 patrolled beaches has a different crowd capacity guide estimated on allowing 4 square metres per person across a typical patrolling area. “It’s going to be a busy summer… “Remember that No Flag means No Swim.” In October’s 2508 District News, UNSW’s Professor Rob Brander, head of a beach-safety education program called The Science of the Surf, wrote about challenges ahead, including huge crowds; restriction-weary people swimming at unpatrolled beaches; the dangers of bystander rescues; and the risks for infrequent beachgoers unaware of common hazards, such as rips. “Covid-19 has created a perfect storm that could make beaches more popular than ever and raise the risk of drowning,” he wrote. “Are we going to love our beaches to death? I truly hope not, but I think it will be more important than ever this summer to think about beach safety … ” Want to volunteer as a life saver this season? Turn to page 44 to find out more. 2508


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SCULPTOR CALLS FOR COMMUNITY INPUT NSW sculptor Col Henry is working on a public art project for the Grand Pacific Walk, and he’d love your help.

Wollongong Council has commissioned artist Col Henry to create a public sculpture for the Grand Pacific Walk – but the exact location is still uncertain. In an October 14 media release, council said the artist’s work would be installed on either side of the viewing platform on stage 1 of the walk, between Stanwell Park and Coalcliff. But following residents’ objections, including a rash of comments on social media, Council has backtracked. “Wollongong City Council is investigating the suitability and appropriateness of a proposed site,” a council spokesperson told 2508 at press time. “At present, no final decisions about the location for the sculpture have been made.” 2508 understands the sculpture is now tipped to be installed at Moronga Park in Clifton. A well-known sculptor, Col

A mini version of the planned sculpture alongside a GI Joe toy to show actual scale.

Henry mostly works with marine-grade stainless-steel – one of his famed creations is Turtle Dream, a giant steel turtle installed 8m underwater in the Whitsundays. For the Grand Pacific Walk, Col envisions two hand-formed towers, with reflective elements at the top that will respond to the environment and weather conditions. The works will have space for some form of inscription or simple image to “Tell The Story”, to reveal the “Vibe of the Place”. This is where you come in. Col would love community input: he envisions aspirational words or short phrases, sketches, or petroglyphs to mark the time, and the human connection.

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Call Col Henry on 0448 512 788, colhenryart@gmail.com or visit www.colhenryart.net 2508

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Helensburgh Town Centre Plan and Streetscape Masterplan NF1 emailed councillors prior to the council meeting on 26 October with support for the Helensburgh Town Centre Plan 2020, but not supporting the Streetscape Masterplan. This was for reasons including that the new Helensburgh Community Centre (HCC) and Library site is now in question; loss of parking in Parkes and Walker streets; rearrangement of the parking area at Charles Harper Park/ Post Office area; Lilyvale/Walker streets’ roundabout unable to be addressed due to the future HCC and Library site being undecided; traffic counting in the CBD was carried out during the closure of Lawrence Hargrave Drive Bald Hill reflecting a 30% decrease in local business and the missing understanding of “how Helensburgh works”. At the October 26 council meeting, WCC councillors resolved unanimously the following: 1 The Helensburgh Town Centre Plan 2020-2045 be adopted; 2 The Helensburgh Streetscape Masterplan be adopted; 3 The Helensburgh Town Centre Implementation Plan be noted. The community can now look forward to the delivery of the plan over the next few years. Remember that Council has received a State grant for a large part of the work – Council has to match this dollar for dollar. 2508

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Photo: Unicorn Studios

NF1 REPORT By Neighbourhood Forum 1 convenor Warwick Erwin.

COVID TESTS PASS 5000 2508 reports.

Helensburgh Respiratory Clinic had tested a total of 5379 people, Dr Cindy Htet, owner of Parkes Street General Practice, told 2508 on October 25. “It has been over five months now that the clinic has been up and running. We are still opening from Monday to Saturday,” said Dr Htet. Located behind Parkes St Practice, Helensburgh Respiratory Clinic is GP-led and Commonwealthfunded. Testing is free and bookings are required.

Visit www.psgp.com.au or call 4294 1400. 2508

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Parkes Street General Practice is excited to welcome 3 new faces to the practice!

Dr Michael Petinga has interests in Men’s Health, Preventative Health and Chronic Disease Management.

New service: 24-hour blood pressure monitor and Holter monitor

Dr Louise Turner is a Clinical Psychologist who has worked collaboratively with adults and older adolescents.

Immunisation: for children and adults by friendly and experienced nurse

RN Alison Fawcett, our registered nurse, is both a nurse immuniser and cervical screening provider. She loves the diversity nursing has to offer.

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www.psgp.com.au or phone 4294 1400 129 Parkes St, Helensburgh

NEW PATIENT S WELCO ME

Helensburgh Respiratory Centre is open 6 days a week for Covid testing • Dr Cindy Htet

(Mon, Tues, Wed, Friday)

• Dr Martin Gellatley (Mon, Tues, Friday)

• Dr Meng Chen (Thursday) • Dr Michael Petinga (Tues, Wed, Friday)

• Dr Sandra Sherwood (Thursday)

• Dr Louise Turner (Monday)

SERVICES INCLUDE: • Onsite Pathology (Mon-Fri 8-12pm) • Mobile Bulkbilling Ultrasound Imaging (Thursday) • 24hr Holter Monitor & 24hr BP Monitor • Laser Hair Removal (Thursday) • Cosmetic Procedures • Full Skin Check & skin cancer treatment • Covid-19 Assessment Clinic


Kirsi Benson (at left) and Kylie Saleh.

BENSONS WELCOMES NEW CONVEYANCER By Heather Eiszele

When a client from a decade prior rang Kylie Saleh to check if she was still working in property conveyancing, she had a million-dollar moment. “That’s what makes it worthwhile, when you know you have provided such good customer service that someone rings you after 10 years and they want you to work for them again. “That’s my million dollars.” Kylie has bought into Helensburgh-based Bensons Conveyancing Service, which recently marked 20 years in business. Proprietor Kirsi

Benson will continue to be involved for the next six to 12 months and will service her existing clients as Kylie takes on new business. Kirsi said it was important she felt confident with a like-minded person who was going to take over her business and, crucially, her name. “It will continue to operate as Bensons Conveyancing Service,” she said. Kylie found a love for property through her uncle, a developer. She studied law and has “half a degree” but was drawn back to real estate and has worked in conveyancing – the legal transfer of property from one name to another – for 20 years. She previously had a business based at Warrawong and also worked on the North Shore where she learnt the value of discretion when dealing with the rich and famous. “I often get told that my skill is my ability to smooth things over,” Kylie said. “Negotiating with real estate agents, purchasers, solicitors – I can step in and make things flow nicely.” Customer service is the hallmark of Bensons and ‘Kylie The Conveyancer’ intends to continue this. “I’m not interested in the commercial (conveyancing) factories where people are just a number … When you call me, you get me.” Kylie is available to meet clients in their own homes and can be contacted on 0423 577 767 or email benson@bensonsconvey.com.au 2508

DISORDERED EATING AND EATING DISORDERS By Lucinda Cheke, The Whole Health Dietitian

I recently caught up with a friend and was surprised to hear that her 15-year-old daughter – who I’d always known as bright, outgoing and active – was starting to demonstrate signs of disordered eating. With Covid-19 lockdown and home-schooling, my friend was suddenly more aware of her daughter’s eating habits – her unusual preoccupation with cutting food into tiny pieces, a newfound interest in the kitchen, and preparing her own calorie-controlled meals. While these things might seem insignificant on their own, restrictive and control strategies around food may manifest into an eating disorder. Other symptoms include an intense sense of guilt after eating, reluctance to eat in front of others, or a desire to purge after eating. It’s essential to keep lines of communication open and seek qualified help as early as possible. There’s a lot of confusion out there about eating disorders and disordered eating. Many assume they’re driven by a desire to be thin, but research

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shows the psychology behind them is much more complex – a need for control, to conquer or alleviate stress, or a way of coping with change. Eating disorders can affect people across various age groups and demographics, and both men and women can suffer. Eating disorders generally include restriction of food or restriction/binging and purging. They can lead to major health complications, including gum disease, cardiovascular disease, hormonal imbalances, bone density concerns leading to osteoporosis, oesophageal malfunctions and fertility challenges. An holistic approach is the best way to treat eating disorders, and to resolve early signs of disordered eating. Often a multidisciplinary team is best – yo ur GP, a dietitian, a psychologist and occupational therapist can all help. If you, or someone close to you, has feelings of guilt around food and is restricting their food, please seek help – the earlier the better. If you’re not sure where to start, speak to your GP, or contact me for a consultation to get back on the path to a healthy relationship with food. 2508


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4294 1955 eqhc.com.au 61-63 Walker Street Helensburgh Open Monday to Saturday equilibriumhelensburgh


Below: a stick with cicada eggs in it. Right: Verity’s daughter Vivian holding some Christmas beetles. Inset: a Christmas beetle on the lawn (“These are actually from the curl grubs many gardeners spray every year - the reason we don’t see many anymore,” Verity says); and a cicada.

BRING BACK BUGS!

By landscape designer Verity Snaith, of Sydney Wildflower Nursery DOWN IN THE DIRT Dirt – it’s not the first (or the most glamorous!) thing you think about when you’re creating your garden. But in one handful of soil there are more living organisms than there are people living on Earth. From bacteria to protozoa, all the way to earthworms, ants, insects and burrowing animals – the dirt in your garden is of vital ecological importance, yet it is so often overlooked when we come to creating habitats. KNOCK, KNOCK WHO’S THERE? If you put a spade into your garden, what do you see? You might notice some earthworms, maybe an earwig or slater, a slug or perhaps some ants. Some of these have been branded garden pests but it’s much better to look at them as part of a whole ecosystem that can work harmoniously for the benefit of your garden. Slaters and earwigs are great garden recyclers and pest managers, providing their populations don’t get out of control. And it’s not just bees that pollinate your vegetable patch – ants play an important role as garden pollinators, soil aerators and composters. Healthy soil that is part of a healthy ecosystem is the best and most cost-effective way to creating a great garden.

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BRINGING BACK THE BUGS Unfortunately, many gardeners have been taught to fear bugs in the garden. But by cultivating wild spaces – giving over an area to the various composters, pollinators and pest managers that live in our soil – we can all benefit from their hard work. In your home garden you can do this by limiting digging, chopping up garden prunings and using them as mulch, or creating a space for a compost bay and insect hotel to help encourage more bugs into your backyard. Worm farms and bug catchers are also a great way to engage children in learning about healthy soil habitats and the benefits and miraculous array of insects and organisms that can be found in their very own backyard. BALANCING THE SYSTEM All the organisms – big and small – that live in your soil play a role in balancing the eco-system of your garden. When you neglect your soil health, your plants will ultimately fail to thrive, which means less birds, bees and other wondrous creatures visiting your garden. So take the time to see what’s going on in your soil and leave space for those underground critters who can – if we let them – do a lot of the hard work for us in our gardens. 2508


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YEAR 6 LEADERS PRESENT NEWS REPORT By Annaye Blakey, Kindergarten Teacher at Helensburgh Public School

HELENSBURGH LEADERS NEWS TEAM Our dedicated year 6 school leaders have started a weekly news report to ‘deliver news differently’ to our community on our school Facebook page. To stay up to date with what is happening in our school and classrooms, follow our school Facebook page @HelensburghPS HELENSBURGH READATHON Helensburgh Public School has introduced an exciting reading initiative called the ‘Reading Project’. After the success of our recent home reading competition, the Reading Project team have launched a Readathon. This was an opportunity to continue to build positive reading habits as well as raise funds to purchase more books and reading resources for our students. The Readathon launched on Monday, 26 October with a Book Parade and engaging classroom reading activities. Each week the children learnt a fun activity to use at home with

LIBRARY’S TINY BITES FOR TINY ONES

Wollongong City Libraries presents, for your viewing pleasure, Tiny Bites: Snack-sized stories and songs. This online story telling program is designed for you and your little ones to enjoy while taking some time out. Grab a snack and get ready for some fun stories and songs with your favourite librarians. Just go to www.wollongong.nsw.gov.au/library/whats-on/ online-programs/tiny-bites and enjoy! Pictured: Librarian Tracey talks about insects. 2508

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their families, such as having dinner talks about favourite books, playing dice games about a text, asking questions and having structured discussions about books read. Helensburgh Public School thanks in advance all students, teachers, parents, family, and members of the local community for their support of the Readathon. LOCAL COMMUNITY SUPPORT PLANNING THE 2021 READING PROJECT In planning the Reading Project for 2021, we are asking for local community groups, sporting groups and businesses for your support. Please email at helensburg-p.school@det.nsw. edu.au or call the school on 4294 1332 to speak with the school principal, Mr Ewen Neild, and we will share our ideas in how you can help. We would love to hear your suggestions as well. Together, we can do something very special for Helensburgh students who are the future of our local community. 2508


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Stanwell Tops artist Jennifer Jackson. Photo: Serge Linnik

SUBLIME SHOW

This month, the new 55 Parrots store at Bulli is exhibiting work by Illawarra artists, including works by Jennifer Jackson, of Stanwell Tops. Jennifer will exhibit alongside four others: pleinaire landscape artist Kate Broadfoot, Bulli painter Renee Kamaretsos, Wombarra’s Vyvian Wilson and mixed media artist Alison Winchester. The exhibition is titled Sublime and has been curated by well-known local artist Tanya Stubbles.

MEN’S SHED REPORT By Paul Blanksby

Jennifer has worked in the visual arts since 1979, including teaching visual arts and design for more than 25 years. Her art works relate to the local landscape and encompass notions of weathering, cycles and journeys and “are usually mixed media abstracted images that focus on the land, journeys and memories of experiences”, she says. “I make works that focus on where I have lived for over 40 years,which is the northern Illawarra and Stanwell Tops. “I walk and travel this area extensively with my mind constantly on future art projects . “A strong component of my work relates to history, the history of the region, place and land. I respond to weathering, rocks, mapping imagery and atmospheres that surround and captivate me. Time passing and time lines recur in my work. “I enjoy using found objects, often pieces that I have discovered locally, such as a chunk of charcoaled wood left over from a fire on Scarborough beach that I use to draw with. “I prefer to work a series where I build a story, or insight, into a place experienced. For example, working with the Nan Tien Temple on Buddha’s Birthday exhibition and workshops was a memorable experience for me and generated a narrative series of artworks. “Currently I am exploring notions of history, relics and the land. “My works are often tiny 15cm images but they range through to large 2 x 1.5m pieces.” Visit 55 Parrots, 237 Princes Hwy, Bulli, open daily 10am-4pm. The Sublime exhibition runs from 4 November to 1 December. 2508

And why am I puffing? There weren’t that many stairs. (I’m talking to myself as well, everybody.) Do I really need sugar in my tea? And then there’s our drivetrain (our When did we have our last tune-up? reproductive and digestive bits). PSA doesn’t stand The primary aim of any Men’s Shed is to improve for Pie Sounds Awesome – it’s Prostate-Specific and maintain local men’s health in a safe, friendly Antigen. Get a prostate check! Eat your veggies and and inclusive venue, a place of purpose, drink more water! Yes, water! achievement and social interaction. So, my Speaking about food (the fuel and oil you need), question is: are we OK or just battling through? did you hear about a famous retired footballer’s Our bodies are finely tuned wonders and need diet? ‘Eat less, exercise more.’ Pretty simple. Move it regular maintenance and the occasional repair. and lose it. And keeping our relationships healthy But even our ‘old models’ can still perform well; is great too. Turn the TV off, put that phone down, just visit any Classic Car show and you can see how take a walk with someone around this lovely town even the old fellas still look great. So, what’s first? of ours and have a chat. Perhaps the computer (my head). When was my Your Helensburgh Men’s Shed, more than just last dental check? Maybe I should rethink that next timber and metal, we care about each other’s schooner or glass of wine, or do we need help health. Come on in and have a look. keeping away from the pokies? Or am I too sad to 199A Parkes Street Helensburgh, 9am-3pm, care and just need a friendly shoulder? Monday and Tuesday and more days to come. Maybe we should look at that body of ours; helensburghmensshed.org.au or info@ just like the panels of a car, it’s what we see in the helensburghmensshed.org.au; call Michael Croft mirror. What’s that skin spot I’ve been ignoring? 0413 401 522; Ron Balderston 0410 564 752. 2508

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ALL SET TO GO FOGO

Wollongong City Council is launching its Food Organics Garden Organics (FOGO) collections across the city. From November, households with a greenlidded bin will receive a kitchen caddy and compostable bags to collect their food scraps. This includes fruits and vegetables, meat, seafood, tea bags and coffee grounds, as well as those unidentifiable things you’ve got sitting in the back of the fridge. If it was ever edible, it’s good to FOGO. Once a caddy is full, empty it into the green lidded-bin. Green bins will be collected each week along with the red-lidded bin. Recycling will remain fortnightly. About 40% of waste in Wollongong LGA is food waste – averaging about 150kg of food per household per year. When it’s taken to landfill the food breaks down and generates methane, a greenhouse gas 25 times more potent than carbon dioxide. By composting food with the garden waste, we can reduce the amount going to landfill. Visit www.wollongongwaste.com.au 2508

PET RESCUE

DOLLY NEEDS A HOME

Meet Dolly, a four-year-old greyhound who loves company and is a great companion. Dolly is a real lounge lizard and would love a spot on your lounge. To help animals like Dolly, deposit cans at the return & earn machine at the Helensburgh Golf Driving Range... every can helps! EMAIL Julie-ann on ccarpetrehoming@tpg.com.au or Helensburgh’s Country Companion Animal Rescue.

For local, experienced and educated real estate advice, call Ian today! Ian Pepper 0403 570 041

ian.pepper@raywhite.com raywhitehelensburgh.com.au

Real estate & finance update Local real estate continues to be a sellers’ market as limited stock is quickly snapped up by buyers leaving the city. Houses have been the main beneficiary, particularly those with plenty of internal and external areas for the occupants to work from home and seek space. Some great prices are being achieved for the most desired properties and, as data comes in, we should see median prices in the area are on the rise. Meanwhile, on finance, the federal government has announced that responsible lending laws implemented in 2009 will be axed by March 2021. The proposed changes shift from a “lender beware” model to a “borrower responsibility” model, allowing lenders to rely on the information provided by borrowers. NOVEMBER / 2508 / 17


NEW MEMORIAL FOR 40 MINERS

By Merilyn House, of Helensburgh & District Historical Society. A large sandstone rock with a plaque on it was recently installed outside the Helensburgh & District Historical Society’s Old Mine Surgery. This story started when the historic Band Hall, which was located on this site, burnt down in July 2000. The Band Hall Trust tried to find a replacement hall that could be transported to the site. After no success in this regard, the Band Hall Trust was wound up and its remaining funds were given to Wollongong Council to use on the site. The focus for the use was to be the heritage of the site. In 2007 the Helensburgh Lions Club had started on the Helensburgh Beautification Project. Part of this project involved the commissioning of the Miner Statue outside the Post Office. Initially there was to be a sign remembering all the miners who had been killed or died from injuries in the mine. However, at the time, the Historical Society was not confident that we had done enough research. About 10 years ago, the Historical Society started discussions with Wollongong Council on the best

PURPLE POPPIES HONOUR ANIMALS LOST IN WAR By Fay Prideaux

Calling all knitters, crocheters and felt makers. I’m a local resident and teacher librarian launching a Purple Poppy Project for 24 February 2021, the National Day for War Animals. Few are aware of the purple poppy as the symbol for remembrance of animals or the day itself – I’m hopeful this project will go some way to changing that. Humble beginnings: during a unit of study with my students on Animals in War we created a purple poppy mural out of cardboard poppies. A friend – who makes cards decorated with knitted poppies – knitted me a purple poppy to wear while

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The Miners’ Memorial, on a sandstone rock at the Old Mine Surgery. Photo: Helensburgh & District Historical Society

use of the money. We envisaged a Memorial and a garden with information signs about the heritage of the area where the Band Hall had once stood. We are thankful that finally we have achieved the construction of this Miners’ Memorial, remembering the deaths of 40 miners. We thank Wollongong Council officers and Heritage Memorials for their involvement. Over the next few months we hope to complete this project. 2508 I taught my library lessons. It was a hit with the kids, which made me think of ramping up the idea to knit a poppy for each student and staff member for the 2021 National Day for War Animals, and possibly a larger public display of purple poppies. Current communications for a public venue are with the Australian War Memorial, Canberra. The Explosive Detection Dogs memorial is a perfect fit as two local veterans who worked with sniffer dogs in Afghanistan and East Timor shared their photographs and experiences with my students. Under consideration for Anzac Day 2021, depending on border restrictions, is a plan to use the same display to surround the statue of Horrie the War Dog, unveiled in 2016 in Corryong, Victoria. Mascot Horrie, was an Egyptian terrier found in the desert in World War II. Adopted by the army camp, he became an accidental hero by saving soldiers’ lives as his acute hearing and subsequent barking alerted soldiers to incoming bombers before they were sighted. If you would like to contribute to the project, I’d love to receive your poppies – any colour purple, any design, any size, any amount. All gratefully received. Closing date, 30th December. Please email for pickup/drop off location. fay.prideaux1@gmail.com 2508


LIONS BACK AT THE BARBIE! By Fran Peppernell, Helensburgh Lions Publicity Officer

Last month our Lions put on the first BBQ since lockdown at Bunnings Bellambi. We are looking forward to more fundraising, including: 1. Helping Helensburgh Off Road Cycling Club buy a gazebo. We will hold a BBQ and raffle. 2. Working with Council to upgrade Stanwell Tops Memorial Park with a memorial wall. 3. Supporting and fundraising for our Lions Foundations, which aid communities impacted by natural disasters such as bushfires and floods. HELENSBURGH LION OF THE MONTH Meet Gina Krohn. Gina has been a Lions member for 11 years. When Gina joined the Lions she was involved in establishing the initial Family Fun Day and the upgrade to the playground in Charles Harper Park. Gina’s children were only small at the time, so this was an important project for her. Gina loves being a Lion “because I feel passionately about offering a helping hand to others”. As we would all agree, this builds a strong and caring community. Gina is also involved in national and international projects like the Cheti School in Tanzania. Gina is always looking to improve the educational opportunities for the children and does this with the support of our club, powered by the Lions motto of “we serve”. 2508

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NOVEMBER / 2508 / 19


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EGGS: FIGHTING FIRES SINCE 1975 By Iris Huizinga, Community Engagement Officer, Helensburgh Brigade.

Normally you don’t fight a fire with eggs, but in Helensburgh we do. Graham Williams, aka Eggs, is the oldest active member of the Helensburgh Volunteer Rural Fire Brigade. At 74, he has been on call for 45 years.

coming at you. The fires didn’t hit into our area until later, completely circled Helensburgh. It was just bedlam in town. Our tanks emptied, the power went out and there was no water. We ended up putting big pumps into the swimming pool. I was on duty for 23 days. On the 19th day we WHY EGGS? got a bit of rain. That slowed the fire down. My brother gave me that nickname. I liked to eat a It was one of the worst days to have a fire, on lot of eggs for breakfast when I was young. It was Christmas Day at lunchtime. Most people were Egbert originally, after a comic book character. having a Christmas lunch and a beer. They were all happy as Larry and some were even past happy as HOW MANY FIRES? Larry. Some went to bed that night in town and I have lost count there. didn’t even know there was a fire. I was here up on The fire in the Royal National Park in 1994 was a the station, early on Boxing Day and people walked big one. We could not stop it at Wattamolla. down the street wondering: “What’s all this? What’s It started to come into Otford and Helensburgh. all the smoke for?” I asked where they had been. Last season I fought the Green Wattle Creek Fire. “We went to bed early,” they answered, having I helped in Nowra as well. But only for 24 hours. missed the whole thing. I didn’t go up north. I’m just a little bit too old for The worst overrun was at Albert’s Point, during that. I was on standby in Helensburgh on total fire the Menai fires in 1997. It just hit us so quick. I had ban days, ready to go. a hydrant and a hose. Our truck was down the road. That was the last thing I remember: seeing OVERRUN one of our members hosing the truck down in a big On Christmas Day [2001] in Darkes Forest, I didn’t ball of flames. Then I collapsed. think I was coming out. When I came to, he was still there. The heat had Our crews were protecting a greyhounddamaged the truck with melting and warping. I breeding farm when the fire came roaring through. was soaking wet, still holding the hose. It had gone It just went over. It sounds like a steam train over the top of me. The house in front of me was on

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fire. So I just got up and started to put that out. I couldn’t save it. FIRES THEN AND NOW The fires seem to be going longer, but otherwise they are not different. In 1975 we didn’t lose a house, but we did get some damage. There were a lot less people here back then, lot less houses too. There was a lot more bush and a lot more bush got burnt out. HUMPTY DOO The Northern Territory flag on the wall at the station was presented to us in the 2001 fires from the Northern Territory people. They were from Humpty Doo, a small town south of Darwin. We had a going-away party at the station. All the firefighters that fought in the Helensburgh area during the Christmas Day fires were invited. We had over 400 people up here. The town put it on for us. There were people from Alice Springs, Howard Springs, Humpty Doo, all over the place. They put crews together to come and help us. We had a marvellous party, a lot of good memories. OTHER MEMORABILIA ON THE WALL IN THE STATION We have our old helmets at the top. All the different types of helmets we have had. Up top hangs the old flame thrower. In the past it was used for lighting up fires to put in a backburn or a hazard reduction, to really get it to going. You put a mixture of drip-torch fuel in it, light the little nozzle at the end and pump out a flame. The flame was maybe about 10 feet. It would really roar. Back in 1965 one of our members was using that and he was killed. He fell over a log and he got covered in liquid. It hasn’t been used since. EGGS’ TIP FOR LOCALS The main thing is to not panic. You have to have a fire plan. Leave early. Listen to what’s going on. Don’t panic. There was enough of that on Christmas 2001. EGG’S FIREPLAN I’ll be up at the fire station. Watch the video of this interview on Facebook @NSWRFSHelensburgh 2508

The Helensburgh Volunteer Rural Fire Brigade would like to sincerely thank all who donated during the 2019/20 fires, including a generous contribution by the Sri Venkateswara Temple. This money is so important, as is knowing the community supports our volunteers. Now we have some down time, we can tell you what we have purchased. You have helped us buy important equipment such as new thermal imaging cameras. These help fire fighters to locate hot spots invisible to the naked eye. The ground or a tree may look burnt out, but below the surface it can be extremely hot, burn for days, and even start a new fire. Thanks to you we can better store our Personal Protective Equipment. We purchased new lockers which are more durable and easily accessible. This saves vital seconds when responding to a call-out. In our workshop we now have shelving, an air compressor and a 24v jump pack starter. To help firefighters stay in contact on the fireground, we installed portable radio chargers in our trucks, and they are equipped with eskies and driving lights. Thank you for supporting us to help save lives. 2508 Pictured at top, L to R: Tony Keep,Rebecca Rusten, Daniel Peterson, Hamish Meredith, Karen Elward, Annette Gribbin. Opposite page: Graham Williams, aka Eggs. In the old photo from 1999, Eggs is on the far left, in the red helmet.

NOVEMBER / 2508 / 21


CLUB ENJOYS CATCHING UP AT THE BOWLO

By Helen Durham, Publicity Officer for the Combined Probus Club of Helensburgh & District Although we still haven’t been able to have our Highlands. Peter, our driver, took us on many back regular meetings our hard-working committee are tourist roads and was able to tell us so many doing their best to keep in touch with all our interesting facts along the way. Morning tea was at members. the misty and rainy Mt Keira Lookout. An Last month 35 members enjoyed lunch at enjoyable lunch was had at the Burrawang hotel. Engadine Bowling Club. It was so good to see so Our golfers had their regular monthly game in many members enjoying catching up with friends good weather conditions at Cabramatta Golf Club. they haven’t seen for awhile. Our bowlers also enjoyed their monthly game at This month instead of our meeting some Scarborough Wombarra Bowling Club (pictured). members had morning tea at Woonona Bulli RSL The morning session was played in windy and hot Club, then a few stayed to enjoy lunch. Also on the conditions but the afternoon was more pleasant. same day Probus were able to hire the community Any membership enquiries, please phone bus for a pleasant day’s drive through the Southern Brent Percy on 0419 604 576. 2508

GUIDES DISCOVER SUPER POWERS By Publicity Officer Sophie Miller

The Helensburgh Girls Guides kicked off term 4 by exercising their creativity. The girls are working towards their arts badge they started in term 3. This term the girls have left the dramatic arts behind, sharpening their pencils to explore the finer side of art. Ex Guide Charlotte Kelly returned to share her talents in fine art. She opened our eyes to the range of emotion and detail that can be captured with a pencil through the manipulation of line. For a still-life exercise, the girls drew inspiration from the abundant collection of shells, feathers and flowers created by the Helensburgh Girl Guide unit over the years. After the girls had mastered the art of sketching, they stretched their imaginations with some character-building. Inspired by some powerful women in history such as Edith Cowan, Rosa Parks and Jessica Watson, the girls created their own superhero women. At first it was a bit tricky, but encouraged to look into their own strengths, the girls all found something in themselves that was superhero worthy. Whether it was their humour,

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their intellectual ability, physical strength or just the sheer power of their imaginations they each found something uniquely powerful. Charlotte taught them how to use colour theory to show their personality through their characters, for example, using darker colours to express mystery. In the coming weeks the girls are looking forward to getting outdoors and getting crafty, ready for the holiday season! CHRISTMAS TREE SALE AHEAD: On Friday 4th and Saturday 5th December, Helensburgh Girl Guides will be continuing with our Christmas tree sales, although there will be a few changes to assist social distancing measures. Further details to follow! 2508


PICK YOUR OWN STONE FRUIT

Nectarine and peach picking starts mid-November. Plus Jo Fahey shares some great Christmas gift ideas! If you haven’t come to our farm to pick fruit before, then this is the year to give it a go! Stone-fruit picking will begin mid-November and will continue each weekend in the lead-up to Christmas. We will run our Pick Your Own tours under a Covid Safe plan, including smaller groups, physical distancing and hand sanitiser. Those who wish to wear a mask are encouraged to do so! It’s perfect for young and old and something to do together. Old-fashioned farm stuff – love it!

Photos: Sasha Faint Photography

TIPS TO GET THE MOST OUT OF A ‘PICK YOUR OWN’ VISIT Get orders for fruit from friends. That way you can have fun picking more! Make a list of all the people you still need to sort for Christmas cheer! Pick some fruit to include in a hamper tied up with a bow or just present your freshly picked fruit straight from the paddock in your picking bag or box. I can’t think of a nicer way to give joy than to turn up at a friend’s place with local fresh fruit – and the best bit is that it was hand-picked from the tree by you! Bring your Santa hats and take a family photo around the tractor. Could be a nice touch to print this and other picking shots and include these with your fruit gift for friends and family. Make some jam, chutney or other preserves from your picked fruit to give as a gift. Homemade is always a wonderful thing! Peach or nectarine jam is great used as a ham glaze or served with ham. Add a bottle of Apple Cider, Perry or juice to your basket for your Christmas celebrations. Enjoy a cider tasting on the lawn with the family. Check in will be required, along with Covid Safe rules so get here about 15 minutes before your picking group start time.

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NOVEMBER / 2508 / 23


Photo: Denis Ivaneza – Inner Visions Photography

HELENSBURGH TIGERLILLIES 2020 ILLAW

TIGERLILLIES 2020 ILLAWARRA W


2

08

DISTRICT NEWS

LLAWARRA WOMEN’S LEAGUE PREMIERS!

RA WOMEN’S LEAGUE PREMIERS!


Helensburgh Tigerlillies’ skipper Rachael Pearson and her teammates celebrate their 2020 grand final victory over Corrimal. Photo: Dorian ‘Dodge’ Cobb

TIGERLILLIES’ PREMIERSHIP ENDS BIG YEAR

The Tigerlillies’ 2020 premiership brought this year’s disrupted season to a close in the most fitting way possible. The Helensburgh Tigerlillies showed all the grit and determination they’re renowned for in taking out the Illawarra Women’s League premiership with a decisive 40-24 victory over the reigning premiers Corrimal Cougars at Sid Parrish Park on Saturday, September 26. Candice Woodward was named Player of the Match after her two-try performance. It was a great effort all-round by the whole team – and their hard-working supporters – and it was a fitting end to a very disrupted footy season. Congratulations to all Helensburgh Tigers and Tigerlillies for making the most of 2020. Helensburgh was one of only two clubs to field five teams this season. Congratulations to all of our award-winners for 2020. (See full details, at right.)

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TIGERLILLIES BEST AND FAIREST: Jessica Sergis PLAYERS PLAYER: Samantha Bremner BEST BACK: Jessica Sergis BEST FORWARD: Zoe Smith COACHES AWARD: Candice Woodward THIRD GRADE (SECOND DIVISION) BEST AND FAIREST: Braiden Garrick PLAYERS PLAYER: Braiden Garrick BEST BACK: Jack Mott BEST FORWARD: Lewis Brokman COACHES AWARD: Nicholas Plunkett, Troy Beaver REGGIES (OPEN GRADE) BEST AND FAIREST: Mitchell Baillie PLAYERS PLAYER: Liam O’Toole BEST BACK: Jacob Masters BEST FORWARD: Mitchell Baillie COACHES AWARD: Wilson Cobb LEAGUETAG WOMEN BEST AND FAIREST: Maya Christensen PLAYERS PLAYER: Jade Wagstaff COACHES AWARD: Nikeah Locke MOST IMPROVED: Amanda Greig 1ST GRADE (SYDNEY SHIELD) BEST AND FAIREST: Lachlan Peachey COACHES AWARD: Pierce Thompson 2020 PERPETUAL AWARDS ROOKIE OF THE YEAR Nicholas Plunkett ROOKIE OF THE YEAR – FEMALE Kellie Mutch GRANT MCGRAW MOST DEDICATED PLAYER TROPHY Tasmin Gilmour, Jesse Cobb RONDA COLLINS MOST DEDICATED WOMAN PLAYER TROPHY April Boughton GEORGE JARDINE HIGHEST WORK RATE TROPHY Vincent Stowers SEAN SULLIVAN BACK OF THE YEAR Zeik Foster NEIL PICCINELLI FORWARD OF THE YEAR TROPHY Vincent Stowers JOHN DUFF TACKLING TROPHY Kurt Atkinson COL DORAN CLUB SERVICE AWARD Dodge Cobb David Bell SAM BREMNER FEMALE PLAYER OF THE YEAR Jessica Sergis STEVE (TOWER) MCCALLUM PLAYER OF THE YEAR Vincent Stowers. 2508


This month’s mystery object: Gum Scales. Photo: Chris Reid

BEETLING ABOUT With Helensburgh entomologist Dr Chris Reid. This month: mysterious blobs on a twig.

Any idea what these blobs – pictured above – might be? Here’s a clue – this is a story about insects. These packed waxy blobs, each with a little access hole, are adult female scale insects. The actual animal is under the protective waxy shell. It’s there for life and a real blob – no differentiated head, tiny legs and just a simple syringe for a mouth that is stabbed into individual cells in the twig. The hole is to allow sex with the winged males, which emerge from smaller, narrower blobs and are ephemeral, lacking mouths and living for only a day or two. It’s also where the babies crawl out. Australia is often called the ant centre of the world – ants are everywhere and incredibly diverse. But it could also be called the scale insect centre of the world – scales are also abundant and diverse here, but we usually don’t notice them. There’s a link actually, as ants feed off the sticky honeydew secretions of the scales, and in return protect them from predators. This particular scale, the gum scale (Eriococcus coriaceus), is unusual because it occurs in these large clusters, girdling saplings and branches. The clusters provide easy eating for those few predators that are able to chew their way through wax. The most common predator is a small dark ladybird with small dark larvae – you can see in the photo the chewed stumps where scales have

been eaten off. Another is one of the very few predatory moth caterpillars in the world – the larva of a tiny fringe-winged moth. Each mat of scales is a little ecosystem. You can see that many of the scales are an attractive orange-brown colour and if you crush these, your fingers are stained brown. Scales have traditionally been major producers of dyes for the clothing industry – mostly reds. These scales (dare I say produced on an industrial scale?) have included lac, kermes, carmine scale and cochineal. The British redcoat uniform was dyed with cochineal, a scale that occurred only in the Americas, where it fed on prickly pear. So Captain Arthur Phillip bought some prickly pears infested with cochineal in Brazil on his way to Sydney and planted them when he got here in 1788. The scales died, but our farmers can tell you all about what happened to the prickly pears. No one seems to have used our native scales for dyeing, yet this gum scale occurs in such huge numbers it’s easy to harvest. So I had the brilliant idea (with flashing dollar signs) of getting a friend’s daughter, a high school student, to do her science project on this. We mashed up a lot of scales (sorry scales) and tried various additives and mordants but only ever managed to achieve dull brown. Oh, well. Maybe you could do better? There’s an excellent article on the early development of dyes in Sydney here: https://garlandmag.com/article/local-colour/ For general insect enquiries, email the Australian Museum’s Search And Discover team at sand@austmus.gov.au. Have a question specifically for Dr Chris? Email editor@2508mag.com.au 2508

NOVEMBER / 2508 / 27


COVER FEATURE

From left to right: Jayden Borg, Blake Noble, Joji Allred, Rosalee Floyd-Kerr, Lyla Innes, Ruby McGarity.

FRIDAY NIGHT FUN

Photos: Anthony Warry Photography

Discover Little Athletics – the Helensburgh club where kids love to run, jump and ring the PB bell. 2508 reports.

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Did you drop the ball on summer sport registration? Parents, that’s totally understandable. Thanks to Covid-19 and the knock-on effects of lockdown, 2020’s winter sports season stretched into the school holidays, and even term 4. So if you were still focussed on ferrying the kids to soccer/ footy/netball when summer sport registrations began, do not worry – it is never too late to sign up for Little Athletics! “Registrations are open all season so you can register at any time,” says Helensburgh and Districts Little Athletics president Sue Downie. Helensburgh and Districts Little Athletics Club has been a part of this community for 35 years, attracting children and teenagers from the Northern Illawarra and the Sutherland Shire. “People can come and try it out, just see on the night if they enjoy it,” Sue says. “They don’t have to join up to do that, they can try it out for free.” Little Athletics takes place on Friday evenings at Rex Jackson Oval in Helensburgh. “It runs from 6pm until technically eight o’clock would be the latest, but it generally wraps up around 7.30,” Sue says. “It’s a very relaxed atmosphere.” HIGH ACHIEVERS Last season the club’s athletes attended several competitions including: l 50 kids at Zone; l 40 kids who progressed to the Region; l 16 kids at the State Championships; l and six athletes were selected for NSW to compete at the Australian Junior championships.

Little Athletics helps kids develop a range of athletics skills. The goal is to provide a fun and nurturing environment that encourages athletes of all abilities to try their hardest. The club proudly promotes athletics for kids with special needs and modifies events for inclusion. Rewards include fitness and friendship, Sue says. “It’s for every level, it’s for every ability and for everybody. “It’s all based on their PBs (Personal Bests) – so every week’s about beating your PB. It’s not about competing against the people in your age group, it’s about bettering yourself.” Ages in the club range from about three in the Tiny Tots through to the U17s. “Then they transition to a senior club, our sister club for the seniors is Illawong,” Sue says. Some Little As alumni have gone on to great things. Former club members include: Sarah Walsh (Australian Paralympian – Long Jump); Lexi Gilmour (Australian Cross Country representative); Sam Bremner (Australian Jillaroo – Rugby League) and Aaron Calver (Western United A-League player). ATHLETICS IN A TIME OF COVID This summer, holding Friday meetings will require first-class organisational skills. But the club is Covid-ready, and taking all the necessary steps to ensure the safety of members and their families. Sue says they will split up events to minimise the amount of time when people are present and there’ll be one parent permitted per child/children.

Continued on page 23

NOVEMBER / 2508 / 29


Q&A

With the athletes What do you love most about Little Athletics? Lyla (9): I love that I can challenge myself against other people and I can work hard to improve myself. Caylee (7): I love doing races against other people. Rosie: Seeing my friends and making new friends. Also learning new skills. Harlem: Having fun and getting a sausage at the end. Natalie (U13): You get to do lots of fun things like Javelin and make new friends while you are being fit, healthy and active. Ben (U11): High jump. Blake Noble (9): Long jump, hurdles and sprinting. Ruby McGarity (9): The 70m and 100m and some of the field events. I like getting challenged every week and I can make new friends. It’s really fun and it’s good exercise for the other sports I do. And the canteen is really good too, it feels like a reward after my events.

RELAY MEDAL WINNERS ON THE COVER!

Last season Helensburgh and Districts Little Athletics won two medals at the State Relay: • 4 x 100 U9 Mixed – Gold. In the team: Jayden Borg, Ruby McGarity, Blake Noble and Lyla Innes. (This is the team featured on 2508’s cover this month.) • 4 x 100 U8-U11 Mixed – Silver. In the team: Hope Taylor, Dominic Rogers, Harlan Taylor and Joji Allred.

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What’s the most challenging? Lyla (9): When I have to go against other girls that can beat me, but I will try my best. Caylee (7): Discus. Rosie: Trying to beat your PB. Harlem: Running the 3km. Natalie (U13): Shotput. Ben (U11): 1500m. Blake Noble (9): Long distance running as it is tiring. Ruby McGarity (9): The long-distance races, I like the short distance the best. I also find discus a challenge. How do you feel when you achieve a Personal Best (PB)? Lyla (9): I feel happy that I’ve achieved to the best of my ability and that means I’m getting more fit and I’m achieving better every year. Caylee (7): I feel grateful and happy. Rosie: I feel excited and like I’ve been challenged. Harlem: Happy! Natalie (U13): Amazing, and I feel like I could achieve many more things after it. Ben (U11): Happy and proud. Blake Noble (9): Excited but it also makes me want to try harder to get a new PB. Ruby McGarity (9): I feel proud and excited, also happy that I ran faster than other times. Getting a PB also makes me run faster next time to try and beat it. 2508


Continued from page 21

“We will have a QR code for signing in. And we’re also having hand sanitiser, we’re adhering to social distancing at all times, except for when the athletes are on the track.” Traditional carnivals have been cancelled, but the club is looking at ways to increase competition internally and will be ready to support the kids once region/state carnivals are scheduled. WHAT TO EXPECT Friday nights include running races of various lengths, hurdles, discus, shotput and javelin, plus a separate section for the club’s Tiny Tots (U5s). “Typically age groups take turns to arrive around 5pm to help set up,” Sue says. “It takes a good hour to set up. Then all the events start at six o’clock. “We sort out people into their age groups and then rotate around. They have a number of events that they have to do in a certain order.” Last year Little As had a 199 registrations. In 2020, figures are down by about 20 percent, John Argall, the club’s treasurer, told 2508. “We have sponsorship from Tradies for a trolley and marquee and sponsorship from Coles for a trolley and some electronic equipment to manage the club meets under Covid,” John said. “We have strong community partnerships and support local schools with equipment and access to our track for school carnivals. “We’re a little club that loves to see the kids develop and enjoy the sport for what it is (and get a chance to ring the PB bell).” 2508

Q&A

Meet Sue Downie, president of Helensburgh and Districts Little Athletics. Please tell us a bit about yourself. I live in Helensburgh and I love the sense of community and the wonderful natural surroundings. I teach at the University of Wollongong, and both kids are members of Little As. When did your family join Little As and what do you love about it? The kids joined up three years ago and I became involved in the committee last year. Being involved in Little As has built up the kids’ self-confidence, introduced them to new friends and it’s lovely to see their smiles when they or their friends achieve a PB. As club president, what are your goals for the 20/21 season? Our first goal was to be able to have a season, and with the massive help of the dedicated committee members, to have Friday nights run smoothly in a COVID-safe way so the kids can just focus on enjoying themselves in their events. We are also hoping to have an opportunity for kids during the season to compete with athletes from other clubs. 2508

Helensburgh and Districts Little Athletics club meets on Friday evenings at Rex Jackson Oval. You can sign up at any time or try it for free. More info at helensburgh-lac.com/home/ or phone 0419 464 472 or email hblac@live.com.au

NOVEMBER / 2508 / 31


Arum lilies in Helensburgh, pictured in the area where the old Chinese market gardens were once located. Photo: Merilyn House

LANDCARE NEEDS YOU!

Helensburgh & District Landcare is calling for volunteers, Merilyn House reports.

BE WEED WISE With horticulturalist Merilyn House.

WEED IT OUT: Arum lily (Zantedeschia aethiopica) Arum lily (also commonly named funeral lily or death lily because it was once popular as a funeral flower) is a garden escapee that is now considered an environmental weed. Arum lily is a long-lived plant that is 1-1.5m tall. It is known for its large, white flowers and recognisable leaves. Arum lily prefers wet, sunny areas but can also grow in full shade. It is hardy and can tolerate waterlogging, fire, occasional frost and salt. It can grow in tropical and cold areas. In Helensburgh, it is common in swampy areas and along drainage lines and creeks, and has now spread into the Royal National Park and Garrawarra State Conservation Area. Removing large clumps of Arum lily is time consuming and requires many years of follow-up. If you have Arum lily on your property or nearby, please do all you can to remove this invasive weed. GROW ME INSTEAD Swamp lily - Crinum pedunculatum: This Australian native plant has rosettes of broad leaves and clusters of white, highly fragrant flowers on 1m stems. Suits any soil, full sun or dappled shade and is mildly frost tolerant. It also grows well near ponds. Grass flag - Libertia paniculata: Australian native which forms a grass-like clump with masses of white flowers in spring, for moist, semi-shaded positions. Madonna lily - Lilium candidum: Unlike most liliums, this species keeps its green leaves through the winter. It grows, on average, to one metre with white flowers. Do not confuse this with the weedy Formosan lily, which is invading roadsides and bushland locally. 2508

32­ / 2508­/ NOVEMBER

Like many other organisations during Covid-19 restrictions, Landcare has had minimal activities. A few members have been working on Thursdays at various locations around Helensburgh. We have our Bushcare site at Helensburgh Creek where we work two Thursdays each month, and the other Thursdays see us at various sites, including the top of the Porcupine Track (at the station end of The Ridge). We have also just started our monthly Sunday afternoon activity at Station Reserve (including the Glowworm Tunnel). Unfortunately because of Covid-19, we look on and see the invasive weeds taking over our loved bushland. We need an influx of new members. If you love our local native bushland, love working outdoors and love digging out weeds, please consider helping us out. We are also available to give advice on invasive weeds in your gardens. Some of the problematic local weeds are asparagus fern, bridal creeper, Madeira vine, arum lilies, morning glory, privet, ochna… and the list goes on. To learn about our local weed problem, or to check out our next work days, visit www.helensburghlandcare.org. au or ring Merilyn on 0414 819 742. 2508

LEARN MENTAL HEALTH FIRST AID

By Stanwell Park CWA president Carol Pugh

Metropolitan Mine owner Peabody Energy has generously offered to pay the costs of delivering Mental Health First Aid training in Helensburgh. Stanwell Park CWA has facilitated two of these courses, but this will be the first time it is run in Helensburgh. Mental Health First Aid aims to give the average person the knowledge and skills to be able to support someone who has mental health issues until professional help can be arranged. The course will be delivered by an accredited trainer over two Saturdays. It is a 12-hour course with a certificate of completion available – so participants must commit to both days. Light refreshments will be provided by Stanwell Park CWA, as well as a complimentary manual. We hope to run the course in late November, but the exact date and venue are yet to be finalised. For more, contact Ron on 0490 062 466 or Carol on 0432 385 524 as places are limited. This course is for over-18s only. This will be a Covid-19 safe event. 2508


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Follow Fishhead6103 on YouTube.

HELLO FISH

With Duncan Leadbitter. This month: a scuba dive at Coalcliff. It must be 30 years since I last carried my scuba gear down to Coalcliff for a dive. It was with my brother and all I recall about the dive was going into a gully to be confronted by a large wobbegong and not being able to get out because my brother was right behind me. We all survived. This time my son and I did the walk. I know a lot of the shallower geography because I have snorkelled there many times. We walked to the main gutter to the south of the pool, jumped in the water and took a compass bearing due east. Down to the sand in the gutter is about 9 metres (deeper than I thought). There are some nice swim-throughs in the gutter area along with some small caves and overhangs. We found two small wobbegongs hanging out on the bottom and a small school of bulls-eyes under one of the ledges. There were lots of mado swimming around, a few yellowtail, the occasional red morwong, as well as a small red rock cod. We continued on over some relatively dull, flat terrain until we reached the sand again in about 12m of water before turning around to find a wall with all sorts of things including a small lobster

located in an overhang. On the wall itself were sea tulips and jewel anemones and a small gorgonian fan. For me the two highlights of the dive were a patch of the colonial ascidian called Botrylloides magnicoecum (the magnificent ascidian) and another colonial critter, Zoanthus robusta, which looks like a carpet of purple cocktail franks. At night time they put out yellow tentacles to feed on floating organic matter drifting by in the plankton. If you look at the video you can also see two nudibranchs called blue devils. We will definitely go back to explore other parts. Care is needed though as there is abandoned fishing line all over the place, which is an entanglement hazard for divers. WATCH DUNCAN’S FILM: https://youtu.be/kFJBPiXl1FU. 2508

COOMADITCHIE: KEEPING CULTURE ALIVE

2020’s Naidoc Week is on from November 8-15 – celebrate by taking in this Wollongong Art Gallery exhibition.

Detail of Ocean Deep, Allison Day, 2019, acrylic on canvas

42­ / 2508­/ NOVEMBER

Curated by Lorraine Brown, Narelle Thomas and Kristy Thomas, the Coomaditchie: Keeping Culture Alive exhibition brings together three generations of artists. At its heart are two sisters: premier artists Lorraine Brown and Narelle Thomas, renowned for using art to tell stories, share knowledge and promote an understanding of Aboriginal culture. Over the past three decades, their public art has featured on schools, buildings and meeting places in Port Kembla, and at the Hub at Kemblawarra Community Hall, the sisters pass on knowledge and painting skills. The Coomaditchie exhibition also features works by two of Lorraine’s sons – Shane and Derecke Brown, and Derecke’s partner, painter Allison Day, also a skilled weaver and potter – as well as her eldest grandson, Tynan Lenihan, and two granddaughters, Jessica Mook-Brown and Meahala Langlo-Brown. Events include Yarn Up on Wednesday, 4 November, 1-2pm, a chance to engage with the artists and learn more about their stories and art practices. Bookings essential via Eventbrite. Visit www.wollongongartgallery.com 2508


Shifting sands: Classic transverse bar-rip sandbars at Stanwell Park. Photo: Rob Brander

DR RIP’S SCIENCE OF THE SURF

By Prof Rob Brander. This month – Sand Bars: You Can Bank on Them. It seems to me there’s less sand on our beaches this response to changing wave directions, wave heights and periods, the behaviour of rips and the spring compared to previous years, which raises changing tide cycles. Some beaches with a low sand some questions about how sand on our beaches supply may not have any bars, while others with a fluctuates and where it goes. lot of sand can have double bar systems (think The general rule is that large storm waves strip Northern NSW with all those rivers). sand off the beach and dump it offshore. Beaches We know that bars go through a sequence of can normally recover quite quickly after an changes after a big erosional storm event. First, erosional event, in maybe three to six months, but when you get a cluster of storms close together large storm waves stir up the beach sand and dump it offshore into a longshore bar, separated from the like we had this winter, it makes the recovery beach by a deep trough/gutter. process much longer. Smaller swell then causes the bar to migrate We’re also supposedly heading into a La Nina onshore and it becomes rhythmic in shape, phase, which generally results in more storms, so the sand might not come back in large amounts eventually welding to the beach as transverse bars, separated by rip channels. anytime soon. If the swell remains small or gets smaller, the There’s a strong link between how much sand is sand fully welds to the beach as a wide and shallow on the beach berm and how much is offshore in low tide terrace. sandbars (banks). A berm is the distinct ridge This is great for kids and families, but surfers running along the beach at the high tide mark. hate it as all those lefts and rights formed by the Every wave that breaks on the beach carries sand rhythmic and transverse bars quickly turn into and water with it when it rushes up the beach. close-outs. This cycle can take weeks, or months, or The water soaks into the dry beach and deposits the bars may get stuck for a while, or another storm the sand, creating the berm. If you have an comes along and it all starts again. extended period of small to moderate swell, How long it takes is anyone’s guess because it all the berm gradually shifts seaward and your beach depends on the waves, which depend on the becomes wider. But that sand has to come from weather, which as we know is totally screwed up! somewhere – the sandbars. Sandbars are fascinating features. They are Have a question for Dr Rip? accumulations of sand (almost like underwater dunes) that constantly adjust their position in Email rbrander@unsw.edu.au 2508

NOVEMBER / 2508 / 43


The club is well into the season now, we had a couple of bumper weekends to start, especially over the long weekend with more than 8000 visitors to Stanwell Park Beach on the Sunday and Monday. The beach will be patrolled until the end of April 2021, with seven club patrols rostered over every weekend and public holiday. The club has just under 100 active patrolling members, aged from 13 to 70+, but we are always looking for more. Bronze Medallion and Surf Rescue Certificate Training has started, but it is not too late to join, if you’d like to do your Bronze Medallion, Surf Rescue Certificate or any other surf life saving award, email education@stanwellparksurfclub.com

on how to get involved, or drop into the surf club before Nippers starts on a Sunday morning and a committee member will help you out. Membership fees have been reduced to $30 for nippers this season with the support of a grant from Surf Life Saving NSW. The Nippers Committee have a full program planned for the season going all the way through until the end of March 2021. There is a Board Training squad running on Tuesday mornings, Thursday afternoons and Sunday mornings to help improve board-paddling skills. Also during the season there are two intra-club carnivals planned to allow our nippers to compete in a full carnival-like atmosphere within the club.

SEARCH AND RESCUE TEST RUN The club’s Emergency Callout Team ran a simulated Search and Rescue Event on 17 October to test the club’s response to an incident in the waters off Stanwell Park Beach. The first incident involved three people in the water as a result of a boat being overturned, and the second involved two missing people in the water. The club utilised all of its rescue capabilities including four Inflatable Rescue Boats, UAV (Drone), ATVs, Defibrillators and First Equipment to locate, rescue and treat the patients. Twenty members were involved in the three-hour event. Lots was learned. There are more events being planned with other Northern Illawarra clubs that will be viewable from the Sea Cliff Bridge.

STANNY ROWERS CALL FOR MEMBERS “The Stanny Rowers” are looking to re-build the surf crews at Helensburgh-Stanwell Park, if you are interested in getting involved in surf boat rowing get in touch with the Surf Boat Captain through the surf club Facebook Page or email boats@stanwellparksurfclub.com

JOIN THE NIPPERS Nippers started on 1 November 2020, it is not too late to join. Visit the club website for information

44­ / 2508­/ NOVEMBER

FRIDAY DRINKS WILL BE BACK Friday Night Drinks will return soon, dates are being finalised and will be published shortly. A reminder for members that they need to renew their membership NOW, visit http:// members.sls.com.au to complete the Membership Renewals and pay their fees. If you want to know what else is going on at the club, visit our Facebook Pages @hspslsc and @hspslsc_nippers, or our Instagram account @hspslsc 2508

Photo: Christine McDonald

PATROLLING MEMBERS NEEDED

Helensburgh-Stanwell Park Surf Life Saving Club president Steven McDonald reports.


LOCAL BMX STAR COACHES IN NT

Helensburgh’s Saya Sakakibara is sharing her BMX knowledge and experience with younger enthusiasts. In October, I visited Alice Springs and Darwin. I spent five days coaching and taking part in Come and Try BMX events (pictured, bottom of this page). These included Females Only sessions and it was great to help introduce girls to this sport. The Come and Try BMX events were all really successful. My time in Alice Springs and Darwin was quite rewarding. Holding more than 20 hours of coaching and meeting more than 200 enthusiastic, new and experienced BMX riders was such a pleasure. It was also awesome to ride at tracks I’ve never been to, including two undercover facilities in Darwin – undercover tracks are quite rare in BMX! It was fantastic to meet friendly faces and, for me, if the riders walked away having learnt one thing, I was very satisfied. n I was away for about two months training on the Gold Coast, so when I arrived home I was blown away by the huge gains my brother Kai (pictured, at right) had made. Kai has been working intensively on his walking, and has been walking around Helensburgh when he is home on weekends. He still has more work to do on his technique, but this has been a great achievement as it allows him to be more independent. Kai’s speech has improved, as well as his use of his right arm but he still has such a long way to go. I am looking forward to supporting him along the way. 2508

Lenny Golding on his way to 14s win. Photo Nick McLaren

JUNIORS RIP THROUGH HEATS IN PENULTIMATE POINTSCORE

Ian Pepper reports. Bit of an epic boardriders, second last one for the year. With Covid restrictions partially lifted it was back to quarters and semis for some, making it a much longer day. But the waves were pumping, till the southerly hit, the weather was warm, until the rain arrived, and most of us were enjoying the distraction. So here we go, a few highlights. The juniors were ripping their way through multiple heats. Huge performances by Tommie and Mitch in the 12s, Tom taking the win meaning the leaderboard is virtually equal for these surfers with only one pointscore to go. Lenny and Mannix were stand-outs in the 14s, with Lenny taking the win. And the junior girls were on fire with some incredible high performance surfing on display by sister rivals Zahlia and Shyla, with Zahlia taking the win this time. And check out the score totals, 16.36 & 12.17 in the final. Also most improved surfer Macey Jolley getting a screamer in her heat but not able to back it up to progress to the final. Other memorable moments, A-Grade Heat 1 which saw Nic, Darcy, Fin and Dylan all trying to take out the rocks sticking out on the shore with their fins. Dylan won when he got pumped on the sand and came up smiling. Congrats to big Nic for putting on the best pre-final distraction declaring he was done, exhausted, couldn’t be bothered, only to go out and hunt waves like an African lion who hasn’t eaten for two months. Never write him off. Good job to Fin in second, Josh dangerous as always in third, and Angus I’ll just wait for the bomb set that never arrived, in 4th. Next pointscore is the last one for the year on 1 November and looks like presentation will be on 14 November. New venue and format due to Covid restrictions to be announced. 2508

NOVEMBER / 2508 / 45


0.18 0002 0.12 0130 0.26 0211 0.41 0.48 0324 0.31 0124 0.39 0318 1.14 0312 1.21 0300 1.32 0334 1.11 0150 1.09 0218 1.05 0305 1.16 0600 1.23 0306 1.20 0255 1.09 0502 1.14 0450 1.21 0510 16 0830 1 25 16 0938 1 25 16 1009 10 1020 10 1108 08523 0106 10 0816 7 0730 22 7 0545 7 0645 22 22 1.38 1.62 1.91 1.95 0931 1.71 0855 0755 1.41 0651 0926 1.60 0832 0.70 0.65 0.65 0.65 0656 0.631 25 0.71 0.58 0.69 1022 0.73 0.73 0.67 1157 0.54 0829

1 0 0.34 0.20 0.10 0.12 1 0.33 0.41 0.36 1.45 1.51 1.53 1.32 1.38 1.41 46 1339 1.65 1.51 1.46 1.34 1.55 1.49 TH 1349 FR 1434 SU 1548 MO 1615 TU 1613 WE 1701 SU 1648 TU 1638 WE 1754 TH 1710 TH FR 1510 SA 1457 MO 1353 WE 1215 TH 1325 SA 1319 SU 1456 TU 1500 8 2029 1.84 1851 1.75 2027 1.43 2056 1.28 0 1.55 2032 1.35 2201 0.41 2215 0.31 2207 0.42 2044 0.63 2001 0.52 2145 0.36 1.23 2149 2259 0.34 2208 0.46 2343 0.43 2325 0.48 2334 0.50 2218

0.34 0314 0.51 0417 0.46 0.11 0048 0.32 0236 0.11 0235 0.43 0420 1.21 0357 1.33 0334 0.44 0423 1.05 0219 1.11 0300 1.06 0334 73 0216 1.15 0424 1.18 0544 1.25 0602 1.12 0415 1.08 0557 1.21 0014 17 2 17 17 2 26 11 26 11 1 11 8 23 23 23 8 8 1.48 0826 1.45 0752 0915 1.73 0958 1.63 0945 1026 1.93 1007 1.72 1005 1058 1.90 0.65 1129 0.55 1217 0.65 1.40 0.672 26 0934 0.71 06 0757 0624 0.61 0943 0.73 0.74 0.67 0748 0.72 1130 0839 0.67 0640 NEW SOUTH WALES

1 0 0.25 0.39 0.14 0.35 0.11 0.32 0.17 1 1.44 1.56 1.53 0.59 1.39 1.44 05 1443 1.46 1.38 1.26 1.56 1.48 1.51 TU 1711 WE 1652 TH 1752 FR 1426 SA 1528 MO 1626 MO 1747 WE 1740 TH 1249 FR 1814 FR SA 1620 SU 1608 TH 1259 MO 1600 WE 1600 FR 1429 SU 1420 TU 1456 1.87 1947 1.51 2143 2135 1.69 –2131 1.20 2234 1.30WALES 0.39 1.31 2351 0.59 2313 0.44 05 2145 0.54 2251 2312 0.45 1.34 2151 2248 0.49 1.24 0.39 0.44 0.34 1842 PORT KEMBLA NEW2224 SOUTH LONG 150°2035 55ʼ2318 E

2020CHART PORT KEMBLA TIDAL 2020

0444 0.43 0414 0412 0.54 0508 0.52 0.08 and 0247 0.34 0354 0.16 0346 0404 0.47 0514 0049 0.43 0513 0339 1.05 Low 0523 1.17 0344 0523 1.14NOVEMBER 0027 0.40 0014 0.24 Local 0145 1.08Waters 1.24Time 1.32 0023 1.11 1.12 1.29Time 55 High of Local 2020 Times and Heights of High and Low Waters 1.89 0955 1045 1.72 1116 1.81 1.56 0712 1.49 0906 1.80 1.64 1054 0.67 0857 0.64 1030 1.28 1115 1.47 1.48 1145 1049 0.61 1000 0.67 0.71 0632 0.70 0653 0.71 1048 0904 0.71 0640 0.63 0716 00 0908 OCTOBER SEPTEMBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER ER DECEMBER 1808 0.16 0.42 0.33 0.24 0.20 0.39NOVEMBER 0.12 1705 0.36 1.45 1715 1.52 0.59 0.52 1.55 1.42 1.34 1.21 1.49 1.48 57 1549 WE THm1734 FR 1842 SA 1502 SUm1622 TU FR 1335 SA SU MO Time TU TH 1230 SA 1320 FR 1352 TU MO Time Time1.48 m 1227 Time m WE 1603 TimeTH m 1701 m 1530 Time Time 1719 m SA 1539 Time1700 m LAT 34° 29ʼ S

LONG 150° 55ʼ E

0 1 0 1.18 1.84 2055 2109 1.46 1.590.31 2231 1.24 2251 0.50 1836 1.44 1837 1.60 1.30 0.55 33 Time 0.50 1915 1 2248 0.41 0150 0.38 2244 0.32 1925 m Time m 02182304 Time m 0.482332 Time m 0.45 Time mM0.182228 0112 0.12 0312 0.26 0334 0.412318 0300 0153 0.28 03052335 0.39 TIME TIME M TIME M TIME M 1 16 1 16 1 16 1 16

2 9 3 27 24 18 12 9 3 27 24 18 12 9 3 27 24 18 12 0748 1.30

0713 1.38

0755 1.41

0830 1.62

0926 1.60

0938 1.91

0931 1.71

1009 1.95

0259 0.29

0235 0.08

0247 0.34

0344 0.16

0404 0.47

0444 0.43

0412 0.54

0513 0.52

FR 1520 0.44 2136 1.57

SA 1530 0.19 2143 1.74

SU 1640 0.40 2245 1.39

MO 1718 0.14 2323 1.45

WE 1747 0.39 2346 1.18

TH 1206 1.80 1907 0.24

FR 1818 0.34

SA 1231 1.69 1930 0.32

0.09 0449 97 0218 1.63 1015 56 0830 0 1434 0.19 1649 3R SU SA 1.74 2344 23 2044

0.20 1613 0.33 WE 1701 0.12 1325 0.45 WE 1256 0.34 1548 0.36 MO 1615 0.10 FR 14340437 SU 0.12 0312 0334 0300 0.48 0305 0.391.840427 0010 1.25 TU0.41 0452 0.57 0.37 0502 0.240.41 0.52 0.43 1.10 TU0415 0.36 0006 0.34 0.38 0059 0.20 1.32 1.14TH 1349 0450 0510 1.41 0123 0255 1.05 1918 20441.21 1.75 0104 2215 1.43 2259 1.280555 2207 1.23 1951 0006 1.70 2001 1.55 0.26 21450600 1.35 1.62 0938 1.91 1009 1.95 0931 1.71 0926 1.60 0533 0.52 1126 0423 1.69 1029 1.51 1047 1.82 1106 1.62 1.55 0.62 0609 1.24 0616 1.24 0717 1.36 0718 1.61 0816 0.71 0.65 1022 1108 0357 0.34 0334 0.510.55 0750 0.461219 0227 0.27 0153 0.110.70 0219 0.32 1020 03000.65 0.11 03341157 0.43 171206 20.12 17 1416 21640 171648 2 0826 17WE 2 09581754 1026 1.93 1007 1.72 1058 1.901800 0824 1.33 0756 1.48 1.45 0.10 09151747 1.73 1.63 0.20 1615 1701 1613 0.33 1548 0.36 1.80 1818 0.34 0.40 1718 0.14 0.39 0.45 1.54 1145 0.55 1151 0.54 1314 0.53 1329 0.30 1457 1.41 1.32 1.45 1638 1.51 1710 1.46 SU MO TU WE TH FR SA SUWE MO SA MO TU WE FR WE FR SU TU TH 1652 0.32 TH 1752 0.17 1404 0.43 TH 1345 0.25 1426 0.39 SA 1528 0.14 MO 1626 0.35 TU 1711 0.11 1.75 2215 2259 2207 1.23 2145 1.351.872323 1907 0.24WE1.28 1.39 2343 1.451.51 1.43 1.18 0.39 2245 1.57 1812 1.6221352346 1931 1.60 2208 0.52 0.41FR 2035 2325 0.31 2334 2312 1.34 2248 1.200.29 2006 2351 1.241.29 2028 1807 1.68 2005 1.69 1918 22241.44 1.30

0.16 0544 10 0300 1.67 1113 53 0915 0.21 1743 36 1528 SA MO SU 1.60 94 2135

18 0155 180557 18 10000513 3 10300014 0357 0334 0.51 0423 0.11 0334 0.431.560511 0110 1.18 30.46 0020 1.15 0.42 0.351.49 0.34 0.58 1115 1.89 1045 1.72 1145 1.810000 0858 0045 1.36 0840 1.80 0137 1.64 18 0.37 0143 0.19 0.44 1.18 30443 0.33 0053 0.24 1.213 0857 0544 1.33 0.44 0602 1.55 0415 1.06 1734 0.33 FR 1842 0.24 1442 0.43 FR 1437 0.20 0.36 WE 1808 0.16 SU 1622 0.12 TU 1705 1.72 0958 1.631.841137 1026 1007 1.73 0627 0.61 TH1.90 0537 0.61 0638 1.52 1130 1.810.39 1.59 1.43 0804 1.75 1.62 0.54 TH1101 1.30 0702 1.37 0.65SA 1502 1129 0.55 1.40 1058 1217 0.44 0824 0934 0.71 2332 1.18 2102 0647 1.64 2053 2109 1.46 1.93 22281145 1.59 0751 23040640 1.24 1626 0.35 1711 0.11 1652 0.32 1752 0.14 1.69 1.65 0.42 0.20 1833 0.42 0.47 1425 0.20 0.39 1.65 0.49 1248 0.42 1.44 0.59 1814 1.44 1608 1.44 TU 0415 WE1355 TH MO1230 FR 1259 SA0.571210 SU MO 1720 TU0.091818 TH TH SA 1.25 SU 1456 TU WE MO 1747 WE TH FR 0.17 0010 0452 0044SA 1.201313 0330 0.31 0317 0.37 1740 04271.56 0.24 04371249 0.52 19 2046 191.58 19 1047 1.82 1957 4 11061842 0533 0.52 1126 1.69 0602 0.591854 0931 1849 1.37 0926 1.51 1.34 1.62 19 2224 1.301.63 4 1029 2312 2248 1.20 2351 1.69 1.31 2007 0.32 41.24 1907 0.36 1.43 2026 1.57 1.28 1904 1.70 1.31 2313 42322 0.44

0 1 0.56 MO 1515 0 2017 0.39 1 1.18 2110

0.26 0029 73 0344 1.68 0630 12 1000 6 1622 0.27 1205 5U TU MO 0 2228 1.44 1830

0444 0412 0.54 0513 0.16 0404 0.47 0021 0214 1.14 0.52 0113 1.14 0040 0.48 0027 1.320.42 0.43 1.13 0208 0.36 0.28 0513 0119 0.31 0136 0.1605110034 0227 0.21 0.45 0.40 0443 0014 0.24 0049 0.43 0023 0.29 0227 0523 1.14 0110 1.18 0020 1.15 0136 1.18 0359 0.35 0400 0.16 0.35 0.58 20 0858 200640 20 11370554 5 0513 1115 1045 1.72 1145 1.80 1030 1.641.670559 0627 0.61 0537 0.61 0655 0.650717 1005 0722 1.39 1013 1.81 0823 11450716 1.59 20 0726 0.68 51.81 0630 0.64 1.52 0.461.52 1.89 0.64 1.50 1.28 51137 1.36 0746 1.50 0850 1.85 1.67 1.285 1101 0632 1.47 1.48 0653 1.69 1048 0.64 1559 0.46 SU 1626 0.21 0.42 TU 1818 0.20 0.42 FR 1259 1.69 SA 1210 1.65 SU 1318 1.56 MO 1720 TH 1833 0.33 1808 1734 1842 0.12 1705 0.36 1.57 1.60 0.46 1.74 1.55 0.42 0.44 0.44 1341 0.30 1520 0.13 0.35 0.59 1230 0.42 0.52 1320 0.33 1715 1.52 WE TH1433 FR TU1312 SA 1355 SU0.361258 MO TUSA1803 WE1.601229 FR 1229 FR WE TH 2322 SU 0.32 MO 1534 TU 1227 TH FR 1335 SA 0.24 SU 2007 1907 2017 0.391359 2210 1.49 2234 1.31 0.16 2332 1.18 1.59 2304 1836 1.24 1923 2106 0.39 1915 2000 0.37 0.270.48 1837 0.45 1.42 1.76 1.57 1954 1.7500211927 2120 1.51 1.26 1.44 0513 1.60 1.30 1.42 2126 0214 1.14 0113 1.14 0230 1.181943 0428 1927 0.39 0443 0.26 1.32 2033 00341925 1.13

0 1 0.48 TU 1609 0 2104 0.44 1 1.19 2205

1639 0.50 1726 1.74 1.55 SA 1355 MO0104 WE 12290130 FR 12290123 0010 0452 0.57 0.24 0437 0.520.270124 1.23 1.200.46 1.25 1.09 0318 0.43 0.38TU 1803 0059 0006 SU0002 0.34 2106 2245 1.40 2330 1.44 19230.20 0.27 0236 19270.37 0.45 0533 0.52 1126 1.69 1.82 1106 1.62 0.54 0651 0.58 0645 0.69 0832 0855 1.55 0750 1.55 0717 1.36 0718 1.61 0616 0545 1.24 0458 0.44 0529 0.38 0002 1.23 0124 1.20 0130 1.09 0318 221314 7 0545 22SA 7SA 1206 1818 0.34 0.14 1747 0.39 1116 1155 0.54 1.80 06511319 0.58 06451416 0.69 0832 1.49 1.65 1.51 1456 0.39 0.45 0.53 1329 0.30 1151 0.54 TH FR1511 SA WE 1.40 WE 71215 TH1.651325 SU22 SA WE FR 1723 0.54 TU 1831 0.34 WE 1215 1.49 TH 1325 1.65 SA 1319 1.51 SU 1456 1907 1.45 2346 1.18 2032 0.50 1918 0.340.50 0.24 0.46 2201 1.39 1.29 1.44 193120322027 1.60 1812 MO1851 1.62 2325 1.30 1851 0.34 2109 20272006 0.46 2201

1.21 0.73 0.41 1.34 2149 1.20 0.48

1.20 1.40 0111 63 10 4 281 25 19 16 13 10 4 28 25 19 0044 13 0743 13 10 4 281 25 19 16 0602 0.59 0.64 1231 1.69

0 1 1.19 SU 1419 0 1930 2013 0.32 1

1.18 0.50 0159 74 11 5 292 26 20 17 14 11 5 29 26 20 0136 14 0831 14 11 5 292 26 20 17 0655 0.65 1.48 1318 1.56

1.18 0.50 0246 85 12 6 303 27 21 18 15 12 6 303 27 21 18 15 12 6 30 27 21 0230 15 0920 0751 0.70 1.56 1407 1.44

69 45 1 5O 7

0427 0.38 1047 1.65 1718 0.34 TU 2323

6 1040

1.40

21 1102

1.68

6 1137

1.52

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6 0554

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21 0726

0.68 1.57 0.39

6 0630

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9 13 7 4 28 22 19 13 7 314 28 22 19 13 7 0530 0.50 1158 1.40

0031 1.27 0618 0.50

0048 1.15 0624 0.61

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0235 1.08 0748 0.72

21 0751

0.70

1258 1.60 MO 1407 1.44 0044 0211 1.16 1.14 SU1.20 0111 0.29 2104 2000 0.37 0.440118 0602 0.59 0730 0.67 0.73 0756 0743 1.81 0324 0211 1.16 1.14 1.21 71.69 22 08551.55 1231 0730 0.73 0.731440 1353 1.46 1419 0.22 MO0.67 TU MO SU 1353 1.55 1.46 1500 1.34 TU 1930 2056 0.36 0.43MO0.32 2013 1.39 2056 0.36 0.43 2149 0.482027

0420 1.18 0945 0.73

0314 1.21 0839 0.67

0.50 28 22 0324 0855 1.63 1500

0417 1.25 1005 0.74

1.1523 0.58 0236 230137 23 0235 8 0155 23 1.21 0156 0417 1.27 0.35 1.15 0420 1.08 0.44 0136 0.24 0513 0.378 0110 0143 0159 0314 20 1.12 20 1.18 031 0511 5 29 23 8 0.195 0020 23 8 0.32 29 29 23 0.50 14 1.18 1481.18 14 00538 80048

1.25

1815 0.58 WE 1252 1.60 1259 1.46 FR 1429 1.56 1420 1.48 MO 1600 1.38 1456 1.51 WE 1600 1.26 TU SU © of TH Australia 2019, Bureau of Meteorology 0627 0537 0.61 0655 1137 1145 1.59 0752 0.670.54 0.61 0.72 0839 0.67 0.50 1.81 0624 0.61 0751 0945 0.73 TU0.65 1.62 1.70 0.74 08 Copyright 0702 Commonwealth 1.37 1.43 0804 1.75 0831 1.90 2234 1945 0.40 1947 21430748 0.39 21310824 0.44 2251 0.45 2151 0.34 0.490833 1005 1259 1.69 1210 1.65 1318 1.56 1818 0.20 1833 0.42 1429 1.56 1420 1.48 1.51 2 1.60 1259 1.46 1600 1.38 1456 0.39 1519 1600 0.35 1.26 9 1248 0.42 1355 0.47 1425 0.20 1515 0.15 0508 FR SA SU U TH TH MO FR SU TU1.291456 SU TU WE TH SA MO 0010 1.20 is 0143 0145 1.08 0354 1.11 0346 1.12 0514 1.24 0414 1.32 WE 1.15 Datum of Predictions Lowest Astronomical Tide A – NEW SOUTH WALES 24 11160.34 241957 24 09062131 9 09042046 0609 0.57 0.71 0.71 24 1054 0.71 0955 0.63 0.702109 2234 0717 0.60 2007 1907 0.36 2017 2143 0.390.67 0.32 0.44 2151 0.54 2251 0.45 90.39 1.28 1.20 0.49 85 0.40 1904 91947 1.70 1.439 0712 2026 1.57 2110 1.36 1245 1.38 TH 1358 1.55 1352 1.42 SA 1539 1.49 1530 1.48 TU 1700 1.34 1603 1.48 TH 1701 1.21 WE FR MO WE Times are in local standard time (UTC (UTC +11:00) 1915 0.62 2055 0.55 +10:00) 2248 0.41or daylight 2231 0.38 savings 2335 0.45 time 2244 0.32 2318 0.50 when in effect 2105 0.43 9ʼ S LONG 150° 55ʼ E 0214 0113 1.14 0230 0034 1.13 0354 1.08 0208 0514 1.24 1.18 1.15 1.32 1.111.05 1.14 1.12 0414 1.29 0.36 0255 13 0021 0136 0145 0.16 022705020346 0.21 0227 0.45 0246 0.36 0555 0234 0508 0.50 1.32 1.14 0450 First 1.21 0600 1.32 0510 1.41 1.40 0106 1.11 0306 1.09 New Moon Symbols Moon Moon Quarter 25 10220904 25 Full 25Waters 10 0816 0726 0630 0.64 0751 0.70 0.46 0554 0.640.650906 0712 0.67 1054 0.7110 7 0559 0.60 0.71 0.71 0955 0.63 0.70 10 10200858 0.65 25 1157 0.65 1108 0.55 1219 0.640911 1116 0656 Low 0.63 0829 0.71 0.68 0823 1.50 6ghts 074610 1.50 0850 1.85 1.67 0920 1.95 1.75 0.70 ofPhase High and Local Time

2020

1 15 9 6 30 24 21 15 9 6 30 24 21 15 9

30 24

2 16 10 7 311 25 22 16 10 7 1 25 22 16 10

31 25

1.40 0.64 1.19

3 17 11 8 2 26 23 17 11 8 2 26 23 17 11

26

0.50 1.48 0.56 1.18

4 18 12 9 3 27 24 18 12 9 3 27 24 18 12

27

0.50 1.56 0.48 1.19

5 19 13 10 4 28 25 19 13 10 4 28 25 19 13

28

0.50 1.63 0.41 1.20

6 20 14 11 5 29 26 20 14 11 5 29 26 20 14

29

0.50 1.70 0.35 1.20

7 21 15 12 6 30 27 21 15 12 6 30 27 21 15

30

0.50 1.75 0.30 1.21

1.51 WE 1754 1.32 1710 1.46 FR 1800 1.19 1339 1.38 FR 1510 1.53 1.41 SU 1648 1.45 TU 1638 1.60 SA 1457 1355 1229 1.55 1.42 1.34 1.55 1.49 1.48 0.42 48 1229 1341 0.30 1520 0.13 0.35 1609 0.11 1.48 0.30 SA SU 1258 MO 1407 WE FR 0.63 FRTH1352 TU 1700 TH 1701 SA0.421539 MO WE0.291603 FR 1433 TH 1.74 SU MO TUTH1.44 WE 1558 23431530 0.41 23251534 0.31 2334 2029 2218 2208 0.52 1.57 CTOBER DECEMBER 2000 0.37 2104 1927 0.45NOVEMBER 2335 0.45 0.44 2318 0.55 2033 0.43 0.27 2248 2106 0.41 0.3905572231 0.38 2244 0.32 75 1923 1954 2055 1.75 1.51 1.26 2205 1.21 05442126 1.33 0014 0.44 0602 1.551.32 0000 0.502149 1.21 0216 1.05 0424 1.111.42 0415 1.06 2120 26 1130 0.65 26 0638 1.48 0.55 26 0640 1217 0.44 m 0.65 11 Time11 0757 m 0.67 26 0943 m Time m 11 1129 Time m 1.40 11Time Time m 0934 0.71 1.44 1740 1.16 1.56 TH 1249 0.59 1814 1.44 0.56 1443 1.39 1620 MO 17470450 WE SA 1313 SA0236 0211 0130 1.091.530502 0318 0324 0600 1.32 FR1.21 1.141.44 1.14 1.21 0510 1.41 6 0124 1.09 1.20 FR0255 1.05 0.37SU 1608 0314 0555 0.50 2318 0.39 1842 1.31 1854 1.18 2145 0.59 2313 0.44 0218 0816 0.12 0645 0334 1108 0.41 0.55 0949 1219 03001157 0.480855 0312 1020 0.26 0730 31 03051022 0.390832 0.67 0.69 0.73 0.73 0.65 0.70 0.65 9 0651 0.65 0.58 0.71 0855 1.55 1.78 0049 0.43 0040 0.50 0339 1.05 0523 1.17 0523 1.14 0027 0.40 0014 0.24 0023 0.29 0830 1.62 1009 1.95 0931 1.71 0938 1.91 41 0926 1.60 27 07171.46 271511 12 1048 27TU 1353 1319 1.51 1456 1500 1754 1.32121.34 1.450.64 1.46 1.51 0 1325 1.53 1.65 1.41 0716 1.561637 0908 1049 06401638 1.28 0632 1.55 1.47 0653 0.39 0.27 MO 12 H SA 0.67 SU TU 1.48 WE27 FR 1800 SU0.611648 TH1.691710 SA121457 SA TH 1335 0.52 1359 0.48 1549 1.45 1719 1.55 1715 1.52 1227 0.59 1230 0.42 1320 0.33 FR SU SA SU MO TU TH SA 1434 2208 0.20 1701 0.12 1943 1613 0.33 1615 0.10 41 15482343 0.362201 2056 2027 0.46 2149 FR 0.34 MO 0.43 TU 0.36 WE 0.48 SU2109 0.41 0.31 2334 0.29 8 2032 0.42 0.52 1.39 1925 1.30 1.192231 1.22 2251 0.50 18362325 1.44 1837 1.60 1915 1.42 2044 1.75 2259 1.28 2207 1.23 2215 1.43 55 2145 1.35 0449 1.10 0.38 0059 0.20 0123 0.43 0111 0.29 0.50 0235 1.080.36 0420 0314 0417 0557 1.210.34 1.33 0014 0.44131.25 0602 1.55 0000 4 0236 1.11 1.12 130415 1.06 28 0006 13 0006 28 0104 28 0118 1015 0.62 0609 1.24 0616 1.24 1.18 07170544 1.36 13 0718 1.21 1.61 28 0750 1.55 0743 1.81 0756 1.63 1649 1.54 1145 0.55 1151 0.54 0.73 0.53 0.30 SA 1416 0.45 1419 0.22 0.41 MO TUMeteorology WE 13141129 FR 1329 0.67 SU0.74 MO 1440 0357 0.34 0334 0.51 0423 0.46 32 0300 SU0934 0.11 0334 0.43 0.67 0748 0.72 0945 0839 1005 alth of Australia 2019, Bureau of 1130 0.65 0.55 0640 1.40 1217 0.44 0638 3 0752 0.65 0.71 2344 0.39 1807 1.57 1812 1.62 1918 1.44 1931 1.60 2006 1.29 2013 1.39 2027 1.20 1026 1.93 1007 1.721600 1058 1.90 1.44 SA 1313 45 0915 1.73 0958 1.631600 1.56 1.48 1.51 1.44 1.38 1740 1.56 0.59 1.26 0 1429 1.53Astronomical 1.44 0045 R SU 1420 MO TU 1456 WE MO0.331747 WE TH 1249 FR0.321814 SU 1608 0137 0.37 0143 0.19 0155 0.44 0159 0156 0.50 0544 1.18 Tide 0053 0.24 owest 1711 1652 0.32 1752 39 1528142313 0.14 1626 29 07510.11 140.49 29 0833 1.70 29 0647 14 0702 2131 0.44 2251 2151 2234 TU WE TH SA 0.39 MO 1842 1.31 1854 8 2143 0.39 0.44 1.43 14 0804 0.34 1.75 29 0824 1.62 0831 1.900.17 1113 0.54 1.30 0.35 1.37 0.45 13551.34 0.47 0.20 SU 1.20 1456 0.39 1515 0.151.24 1743 1.65 TU 1230 0.49 1.30 1248 0.42 2312 THtime SA 1425 TU 1519 0.35 WE savings 2248 2351 51 2135 MO+10:00) 1.69 2224 d time (UTC or1849 daylight (UTC +11:00) when inMOeffect 1957 1.43 2026 1.57 2046 1.28 2110 1.36 2109 1.20 1.58 1904 1.70 0354 1.11 0346 1.12 0514 1.24 0414 1.29 0508 1.32 0027 0.40 0014 0.24 0049 0.43 0023 0.29 0040 3 1.17 0523 1.14 0029 0.28 0.31First0136 0.16 0.36 0227Full 0.21 Moon 0227 0.45 0246 0.36 0234 0.50 New0.71 Moon Quarter Quarter 0444 0.43 0412 0.54 0513 0.52 34 0344 0.16 0404 0.47 TIMES AND HEIGHTS 0904 0.71 1054 0955 1116 0640 1.28 1.47 0716 1.48150.70 0653 1.69 0717 9 0906 0.61 0.64 151048 30 0119 15 0746 30 0208 30Last 0630 1.28 0722 1.36 1.50 0.71 08230632 1.50 15 0850 0.63 1.85 30 0858 1.67 0920 1.95 0911 1.75 1205 0.44 1312 0.44 1341 0.30 1433 0.42 1520 0.13 1534 0.35 1609 0.11 1558 0.30 TU WE TH FR SU MO TU WE 1115 1.89 1045 1.72 1145 1.81 49 1000 1.80 1030 1.64 1530 1.48 1700 1.48 1701 0.591.75 1.34 1230 0.42 0.52 1.21 0.33 9 1539 1.55 1.49 1.52 1927 SA MO 1.76 TU 1954 WE 1603 TH 1.26 TU1.571227 TH FR 1335 SA1.321320 MO 1715 OF HIGH AND LOW SU 1359 1830 2033 1.42 2120 1.51 2126 2205 2149 1.21 1808 1837 0.16 2244 17341925 0.332318 1842 1915 0.24 1.42 392248 1622 0.12 2231 17051836 0.362335 WE 0.45 TH 0.32 FR 0.50 SU 0.41 TU 0.38 1.44 1.60 1.30 1943 0.37 0314 0.50 2332 1.18 46 2228 1.59 2304 1.24 31 0236 31WATERS 0855 1.55 09490 1.78 0.39 0.27 LAT1637 340.29 29’ SA 15110059 TH 0510 0.43 1.40 0111 0118 6 0502 0.36 1.14 0006 0450 0.34 1.21 0104 0600 0.38 1.32 0.20 1.41 0123 0555 2109 1.39 2231 1.22 0 0010 1.25 1108 04520750 0.571219 0044 0743 1.20 37 0427 0616 0.24 1020 04370717 0.521157 1.55 0.64 0756 9 1022 1.24 0.70 1.24 0.65 1.36 0.65 0718 1.61 0.55 1.81 LONG 150 55’ 0533 0.52 1126 1.69 0602 0.59 0.22 MO 1440 51 1047 1.82 1106 1.62 1754 1.32 1.51 1710 0.45 1.19 5 1648 0.55 1.45 0.54 0.53 2019, 1329 0.30 1.46 Copyright Commonwealth of Australia Bureau of Meteorology WE FR 1800 U TU 1638 TH SA 1416 TU ©1151 WE 1314 FR SU 1419 1.80 2334 18182006 0.34 1.29 1.69 1.39 40 1718 Datum 0.14of 2325 1747 0.39 Predictions is Lowest Astronomical Tide 1931 TH 1206 FR 0.29 SA 1231 2013 MO 0.41 WE 0.31 2027 7 2343 1.57 1812 1.62 1918 1.44 1.60 or daylight effect 0.32 1907 0.24 savings time (UTC +11:00) when in 1930 39 2323 Times 1.45are in local standard 2346 time 1.18(UTC +10:00) Moon Phase Symbols New Moon First Quarter Full Moon Last Quarter 0.37 0.44 0143 0602 0.19 1.55 0155 0000 0.44 0.50 0159 0.32 0156 5 0557 0.33 1.21 0053 0544 0.24 1.33 0137 0014 0110 0804 1.18 1217 0020 1.150638 0136 0831 1.18 1.90 42 0511 0702 0.35 1129 0.55 0513 0.580640 1.40 1.48 0.44 1.62 7 1130 1.30 0.65 The Bureau of 1.37 Meteorology gives no0751 warranty of1.43 any kind whether express, implied, 1.75 statutory or otherwise0824 in respect to the availability, accuracy, currency, completeness, 0833 0627 0.61 0537 0655 0.65 52 1137 1.81 1145 1.59 1249 0.59 0.56 1740 1814 1.44 0.47 0.20 0.39 0.15 TU 1519 0 1747 0.49 1.44 1248 0.42of the1.56 SA 1313 O WE FR TH 1355 SU MO 1515 WE quality or reliability information orTH that the information willSA be fit 1425 for any particular purpose or will 1456 not 0.61 infringe any third party Intellectual Property rights. 1259 1.69 1.65 1318 2110 1.56 1.36 42 0.20 18331957 0.42 1854 1.18 FR 1.31 SAon,1210 SU TU 1818 The TH 1.43 2026 2046 1.28 2109 9 1.58 1904 1.70 Bureau’s liability for any loss, damage, cost1842 or expense resulting from use of, or1.57 reliance the information is entirely excluded. 2007 0.32 1907 0.36 2017 0.39 31 0.24 0208 0049 9 0027 0.31 0.40 46­ 0.36 0.43 0227 0023 0136 0.16 0.21 0.29 0227 0040 0.45 0.50 0246 0.36 0234 / 25080014 / NOVEMBER 0214 0850 1.14 0653 01130858 1.140717 0230 0920 1.18 1.95 48 0021 0746 1.32 0632 00340823 1.130716 2 0640 1.36 1.28 1.50 1.48 1.50 1.47 1.85 1.69 1.67 1.56 0911 0726 0.68 0630 0.64 0751 0.70 0.11 WE 1558 52 0559 0.46 0554 0.64 2 1227 0.44 0.59 0.42 0.52 0.30 0.42 0.13 0.33 0.35 0.48 FR 1335 SU 1359 U TH 1230 SA 1320 FR 1433 TH 1341 SU 1520 MO 1534 TU 1609 1355 2120 1.57 1915 12582126 1.601943 1407 2205 1.44 1.32 46 1229 1954 1.74 1837 12292033 1.551925 SA 1.30 SU 1.42 MO 1.19 WE 1.44 FR 1.60 7 1836 1.57 1.42 1.75 1.51 1.26 2149 2106 0.39 2000 0.37 2104 0.44 1923 0.27 1927 0.45 0104 0.38 0059 0.20 0236 0123 0111 0.29 0118 0.50 0.37 0.43 0314

1.21 0.50

0.50


Golf NEWS TRADIES SOCIAL GOLF

John Towns reports. Maintenance on a golf course is essential. Coring and sanding the greens is an essential activity in the summer, however, it plays havoc with your putting, especially when the finals of the match play is on. The advantage of the warm dry weather suited some of our members. Barry’s comment was he usually putts so badly the cored greens never affected him. It goes to show there is a great game in all of us on the right day. Some golfers revel in adverse conditions and Barry Thompson won the match play 5 and 4 and the day with 41 Stableford points, Sparrow (38 points) and Iain (37 points), all collecting the prizes from our sponsors, Helensburgh Butchers and Gallardo’s Pizza, the rest of us trudged around with the cored greens giving a great excuse for our scores. The Helensburgh Driving Range prize went to Brian, who is hoping it will move him up into the winner’s circle. Two games in November – the 7th and 28th – at 7.30am and 7am tee off respectively, the first game is the final round of the championships, so bring your best game, and remember to arrive early to allow Paul time to prepare the various cards. Full results are available on our Facebook page at Tradies Helensburgh Sports and Social Golf Club where I can be contacted for more details. 2508

HELENSBURGH POST OFFICE

HELENSBURGH SUNDAY SOCIAL GOLF CLUB

Robert ‘Indy’ Jones reports. Hello to all our playing members, friends and local businesses who have supported Helensburgh Sunday Social Golf Club – I trust you are all safe and well. It gives me no pleasure to say farewell to our local Boomerang Golf Course after 40 years of loyal support. We were somewhat surprised to be advised in late September that our remaining bookings for 2020 and 2021 had been cancelled. The Boomerang management team is implementing a new business model, which means the HSSGC has to find another golf course in order to continue – not an easy task given the game’s popularity. However, HSSGC is delighted to report that we have been welcomed with open arms into the Kareela Golf Club fraternity, which appreciates the value of a club our size that will deliver on the first Sunday of every month. HSSGC is a friendly group of amateurs, who like nothing more than a round of golf, a round of drinks and good company, working alongside our new partners at Kareela. Keep an eye on our reports here in 2508 and via emails to members for the good things happening at our new home at Kareela. New players are always welcomed – please contact Tony on 0418 863 100 for membership information. We hope everyone remains safe and healthy and remember to support our sponsors Christian’s Premium Meats and the Helensburgh Golf Driving Range and other local businesses who do enjoy supporting the local community. Indy signing off …“Don’t worry, you had a bad lie” was heard from the gallery…. after shanking my drive on the first tee. 2508

Helensburgh Car Services

4294 2930 Tune & Service • E Safety Checks All Makes & Models LPG Rego Checks • Blue Slips Licence no. MVRL 17877

INK AND TONER SUPPLIES IN-STORE OR BY ORDER

Child Restraints Fitted

4294 1008

John Hine (Proprietor) 187 Parkes St Helensburgh 2508 NOVEMBER / 2508 / 47


RENOVATION CENTRE

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