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FEBRUARY 2020

www.2515mag.com.au

5 1 COAST NEWS

HAPPY 100TH

TO THIRROUL RAILWAY INSTITUTE!

Clifton | Scarborough | Wombarra | Coledale | Austinmer | Thirroul


MEET OUR CONTRIBUTORS

DR DANIEL DALY is a Research Fellow at the Sustainable Building Research Centre at UOW. He has experience in assessing energy performance and optimal upgrade strategies for buildings. His PhD research explored the best methods to improve the energy efficiency of lower-quality office buildings. Daniel was a core member of the UOW Solar Decathlon China 2013 competition winning team, which demonstrated how to retrofit a typical Australian home to be a net-zero energy home. TERRI AYLIFFE is an artist, writer and the owner of Lifeology, life and business coaching. Terri has undergrad and post grad degrees in psychology and has run a successful business with her husband, Matt over the past 20 years. Terri has been writing her column for the magazine for the past two years, in addition to her blog, lifeologyblog.com. Terri is available for private counselling and coaching sessions. Contact Terriayliffe@gmail. com or call 0431 488 914.

AMANDA DE GEORGE is a naturalist, writer and photographer based in the Northern Illawarra. Her passion lies in discovering interesting critters in urban environments and bringing them to the followers of her Facebook and Instagram page Backyard Zoology. Oh, and adventures and naps and wine; she’s passionate about those things too! BEN WOLLEN is the director of Wollen Architecture, an architecture studio with a focus on sustainable design. “Only build what you need to” is one of his driving mantras. He feels deeply his accountability, as an architect and environmental scientist, to work towards a sustainable future. When he’s not working, Ben’s enjoying the natural wonders of the Illawarra escarpment with his wife & kids.

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EDITORS Gen Swart, Marcus Craft CONTACT editor@2515mag.com.au 2515mag Ph: 0432 612 168 PO Box 248, Helensburgh, 2508. ADVERTISING Karen, 0403 789 617. www.2515mag.com.au. T&Cs apply. DEADLINE 18th of month prior. COVER John Tuckerman and Barbara Overington at Thirroul Railway Institute. Pic by Anthony Warry. 2515 is published by The Word Bureau, ABN 31 692 723 477.

Disclaimer: All content and images remain the property of 2515 Coast News unless otherwise supplied. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without written permission. Views expressed do not reflect those of the publisher.

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COAST NEWS

Let's enjoy the summer together Afternoon Melodies


‘It’s been a tough few years for the Grey-Headed Flying Fox.’ Photos by Amanda De George

BACKYARD ZOOLOGY

With Amanda De George

If you have been out and about around Thirroul this summer, any time after say 6pm, you would have witnessed the sky explode with bats. This year has been particularly spectacular with hundreds, if not thousands of bats taking to the sky, some swooping in big, fat circles looking for blossoming and fruiting trees nearby while others head in huge trailing conga lines up and into the escarpment. They can travel up to 50 kilometres if needed during a night in search of food, and this season it has been very much needed. It’s been a tough few years for the Grey-Headed Flying Fox and this has seen the local camp in Thirroul, which sets up usually in late Spring with maybe a hundred or so individuals, multiply into a much larger colony consisting of hungry bats from habitats ravaged by drought and fire. They’re currently listed as vulnerable in New South Wales, which means they face a high risk of extinction in the medium-term future which is particularly worrying as these animals are very important for both pollination and long distance dispersal of seeds. Basically we need them to keep our forests healthy. So how can we help bats? Due to the loss of habitat after the fires and the lack of blossoming trees during the drought, bats are hungry and LOVE backyard fruit trees. If you have trees and

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don’t want to share the spoils, use wildlife friendly netting; netting that you can’t poke your finger through. If you’re lucky enough to live near a camp, stay out of it during really hot days as this can lead to serious stress. If you see a bat in trouble, on low branches or on the ground call WIRES on 1300 094 737 and, most importantly, don’t touch. Bats in Australia can carry Lyssavirus which can be fatal to humans. Importantly, it’s estimated that less than 1% of the bat population actually carry this and it can only be transmitted by a scratch or bite from an infected bat or through exposure to an infected animal’s saliva via your eyes, nose, mouth or an open wound. So no touch, no risk! Stand back and let the vaccinated experts do the actual rescuing. And possibly the best thing you can do is just look skyward at dusk, enjoy the spectacle and okay, let yourself fall a little bit in love with these special, cape-wearing teddy bears. Follow Amanda’s Facebook blog @BackyardZoology 2515


FROM WEST TO EAST With Wombarra filmmaker David Roach

Imagine a wine that is considered so perfect that it becomes too valuable to drink. This is exactly what happened to the 2009 vintage from what many call the greatest wine-making region in the world, Bordeaux, France. Famous Bordeaux labels like Chateau Margaux and Chateau Lefite have become synonymous with prestige and status. So when top wine critics began calling the 2009 vintage, “the vintage of the century”, investment banks and hedge fund managers began buying it up. Not to serve to their top clients but to be sealed in crates and stored in vast climate-controlled warehouses to be traded like bullion. For an investor, these wines became more valuable than gold. The irony of course is that the moment you pull the cork, your investment becomes worthless. When my co-director, Warwick Ross and I learned about what was happening in Bordeaux it reminded us of the “tulip mania” that engulfed Holland in the 1600s. In that case speculators were paying the equivalent of house prices for a single bulb. Of course the tulip market collapsed spectacularly and investors lost fortunes. Would the 2009 Bordeaux prove to be another speculative bubble? And why had the new billionaire class from China, not a traditional market for red wine, become so obsessed with buying these prestigious labels? These are some of the questions we intended to find answers to when we set off to France to make Red Obsession. But documentaries have a way of taking filmmakers to unexpected places. The film you thought you were making rarely ends up being the

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one on the screen. We set out on this journey to make a film about the great wines of France. Along the way we took detours to the major wine-trading centres of London and Hong Kong. Eventually the story took us to China. It had become about two disparate and powerful cultures struggling to find common ground over their love of rare wine. What we were witnessing was the shift in economic power from the West to the East. 2515 Above: Filming Red Obsession took David from Chateau Margaux in Bordeaux to (inset) Shanghai.

WATCH RED OBSESSION

On Friday and Saturday, 14 and 15 February, Clifton School of Arts presents special Valentine’s Day screenings of the acclaimed feature documentary Red Obsession. Set against the stunning landscapes of Bordeaux and China, narrated by Russell Crowe, Red Obsession is the story of two disparate and powerful cultures struggling to find common ground over their love of a rare and precious wine. Introduction and Q&A with filmmaker David Roach. Fine wine tasting courtesy of Coledale Fine Wines. Doors open 6pm. Film starts 7pm. Members $25, non-members $30. A fundraiser for the Clifton School of Arts, 338 Lawrence Hargrave Drive, Clifton. Book online: www.trybooking.com/592603. For more information call Alison: 0410 139 140 2515


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bowl. Stir in the cooked apples, then the milk and butter, until just combined. Spoon the mixture into muffin pan holes. • Peel, core and halve the small apple then slice each half thinly. Place apple slices on top of each muffin then brush with extra butter and sprinkle with cinnamon sugar. • Bake the muffins for about 25 minutes. Leave the muffins in the pan for 5 minutes before turning top-side up onto a wire rack. Serve warm or cooled. ORCHARD FAQs This past year has been quite challenging for anyone in agriculture. Here’s a couple of answers to common questions we are fielding at the moment.

TREE TO TABLE!

Pick your own apples, then turn them into delicious muffins. Jo Fahey reports from Darkes Glenbernie Orchard.

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Is drought affecting the fruit? Our fruit has been incredibly tasty, juicy and big in size because of our growing strategies. Glenn (our We are beginning to pick apples! fabulous farmer) has been working on water-saving Gala varieties are being picked right now and by technologies and pruning and thinning programs mid February we will start Delicious and Fuji. Pick that have really made the difference. In an orchard, your own experiences are running on a number of dry and sunny weather is a good thing but you still weekends when fruit is at its best. Bookings are need water. We are extremely thankful for the essential at www.darkes.com.au. generosity of our neighbours, the Laws family. They loaned us water from their dams at a critical To celebrate apple season, here’s an easy apple muffin point in time that has helped us get through to the recipe by Dennis Limbert, The Caravan Cook. recent rain. At the moment we are really busy putting up APPLE SPICE MUFFINS additional nets to stop birds and bats. We also have Ingredients lots of areas of net to repair from wind and storms • 2 cups self-raising flour and the occasional fallen tree. • ½tsp bicarbonate of soda • ½ tsp ground cinnamon Are the bushfires affecting you? • 1 tsp ground ginger As we all know, thankfully the fires have not been • ¼ tsp ground nutmeg in this area, however, there seems to be a lack of • 1 pinch ground cloves understanding from the general public that this • ¼ cup brown sugar area in the Northern Illawarra is unaffected and • 200g cooked apples can still be visited with safety. • 1 egg, lightly beaten Visitor numbers for January are down on past • ¾ cup milk years and we are fielding a lot of telephone • 60g butter melted inquiries from people asking if we are okay and • 1 small apple ‘How close is the fire?’ • 20g butter, extra melted We have been stocking blueberries from Clyde • 2 tbsp cinnamon sugar River Berry Farm whose visitor numbers are well down. We love Clyde River blueberries. Instructions They are the best you can buy and much tastier • Preheat your oven to 200°C. Grease a six-hole than from other locations. Buying them from us Texas muffin pan (makes large size muffins). helps that farm. 2515 Sift flour, bicarb, spices & brown sugar into a large


WELL DONE, LOVE POEM WINNER!

The winner of the 2508 & 2515 magazines’ Valentine’s Day Love Poem Competition is Thirroul local Nancie Clisby. Karen Lane reports.

The winner of the 2508 District News and 2515 Coast News Valentine’s Day Love Poem Competition is Thirroul local Nancie Clisby, with her poem entitled My Gift. Nancie has been writing poetry since her teenage years and her love of words now extends to helping others. “Since April 2019, I’ve taken on the running of the Thirroul Poetry Club. We meet on the third Tuesday of the month, 4pm to 5pm, in the Thirroul Library. At the moment we have a core group of six writers, with a drop-in or two, each month.” When asked what inspired her to write My Gift, Nancie said: “I wrote this poem for my husband Greg, just prior to us getting married. It was a second marriage for both of us. And for me, after a few ‘frogs’, Greg was definitely My Gift.” 2515

MY GIFT

by Nancie Clisby I lived reluctant to be open Reluctant to believe That somewhere out there He was waiting The man able to love The woman I’d come to be A woman, who on the outside To most was so carefree Yet truly on the inside Disillusioned that love could be Found when least expecting Found in full complacency Your heart, I didn’t see it coming With grace, took hold of me Your smile beamed the message Your eyes a mirror To reflect the star I kept hidden Waiting to shine and to be free My smile now deeper than the surface My eyes send the feeling deep within My gift of love has found a haven As the woman I’ve come to be

VOLUNTEER PIANIST REQUIRED The Silvertowns would also like to invite more people to join their choir. Margaret Wolfe reports.

The Silvertowns is a group of older women who entertain at aged care facilities. It has been operating for 20 years and, as the title suggests, we are an older group of volunteers and so dynamics change for various reasons. Our age range is from 60 to 92. We are in need of a volunteer pianist who is willing to give two hours each Friday for rehearsals and one hour for performances as they occur. We already have over a dozen booked in for 2020 and this number will rise. We would also like some new members to join the choir. Everyone can sing. No auditions held. No experience necessary, just a love of sharing with others and bringing joy to those care-bound in these establishments. If you’re able to help, please contact Margaret Wolfe on 0407 496 979 or email margaretwolfe75@ gmail.com for further information. 2515

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The Silvertowns, from left to right: Yvonne Kusi-Appauh, Margaret Wolfe, Roma Bates, Margaret Chadwick and Elizabeth Kennedy.


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We have a zero-waste blog on our webpage with great tips on how to reduce your impact, including info on the current water restrictions. This year, we also want to encourage people to eat more veggies and a lot of customers ask for help getting their kids to eat more. Personally, I’ve just discovered it’s super easy to hide greens in my kid’s smoothies. Experiment with adding avocado, cucumber, zucchini and spinach into your fruit and berry smoothies. Beetroot and strawberries also make a surprisingly tasty combination. Try making homemade ice lollies and hide a couple of goodies in the mix. Here is one that went down a treat this week.

WATERMELON, CARROT AND ORANGE ICE LOLLIES

INGREDIENTS 1 cup watermelon (include the white rind, which is full of vitamins C, B6 & A, potassium and zinc) 1 orange (peeled) plus zest of ½ orange 1 nectarine 1 lime, peeled 2 small carrots, grated ¼ avocado

’TIS THE SEASON

METHOD In a large blender, mix together all ingredients. I just peel the lime and orange and chuck it in whole. Pour into ice lolly moulds and freeze for a couple of hours until solid. 2515

With Green Connect Fair Food Coordinator Kristin Watson This summer, like no other, weather and climate are front and centre of the public consciousness. The farm’s been struggling with dry weather conditions, heat, smoke and dusty winds. A lot of our October crop hasn’t made it. But, our cherry tomatoes and carrots are bountiful and we’re loving it! So, we’re making sundried tomatoes, carrot top pestos, and fritters for the whole family. With holidays behind us, we’re back to our routine and it’s time to take a good look at what meaningful changes we can make. What habits can you change this year? Are you recycling, RED cycling, composting, FOGO? Got your hands on a keep cup, boomerang bag, reusable straw and take-away cutlery set? As a consumer, you can make a change. Support local, ethical and sustainable businesses (have you visited our op shop in Bellambi yet?). Think about how much packaging is on the things you buy. Think about how far it’s travelled and how much energy produced it.

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Green Connect is a social enterprise that employs young people and former refugees to grow fair food and reduce waste. Our 10-acre chemicalfree permaculture farm spreads out behind Warrawong high schools and is home to not just a large range of vegetables and fruit but also pigs, sheep, bees and chickens. Our weekly veg boxes are available for pick up at Flame Tree Co-op in Thirroul. To order, visit our website, www.green-connect-vegbox.com.au

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ART OF NATURE “The scribbly bark gum designs are fascinating the closer you look at them,” writes Chris Duczynski. “To me, the patterns resemble Aboriginal Art and are a very quintessential element in our Australian landscape. The trees are found on high ridgelines predominantly in NSW and the scribbles are formed by larvae burrowing out from under the bark.” Bulli local Chris Duczynski is an award-winning photographer and filmmaker who has been in the business for over 40 years. Chris is currently working on a new series looking at human shapes and Aboriginal designs in the scribbly barks, visit www.malibumedia.com.au or email chris@malibumedia.com.au 2515

BOHMER’S BLOG With five million hectares of NSW forest having been wiped out in the recent bushfires, which is over half the entire forest, the scale of the impact on our local environment, flora and fauna is huge. As we come to grips with the loss of life and livelihood across our coastal communities and beyond, our team is helping more people to minimise bushfire risks at their own homes, as much as possible. Plus, we are on-hand for organisations who need expert assistance with clear-up and replanting, when and where possible in the near future. Head over to Bohmer’s Blog on our website to

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listen to an excellent interview on the ABC with Dr Owen Price from UOW’s School of Environment & Life Sciences. Dr Price shares his expert knowledge to give you the facts on how the bushfires have impacted our area’s environment and the possibilities for tree regeneration. It’s not all doom and gloom, as the Australian bush is extremely resilient, with some trees in bushfire zones already spouting fresh leaves. Isn’t Mother Nature mind-blowing? Let’s all work together to protect her for the future. n Read more of Bohmer’s Blogs at www.bohmerstreecare.com.au/blog. Here you can also read about how every time we must remove a tree – usually due to ill-health, safety or Council requirements – we donate money towards a tree to be replanted in its place via the excellent Australian organisation, the Carbon Neutral Charitable Fund. 2515


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COVER FEATURE

HAPPY 100TH!

Centenary celebrations at Thirroul Railway Institute will include a bridge tournament, heritage walks and train rides. 2515 reports. Thirroul Railway Institute opened in December 1920 on Railway Parade, on the western side of Thirroul Station. For almost 100 years, it’s been a hub for the community. If only the tallowwood floors could talk. Would they boast of political forums or union meetings? Lessons in engine maintenance or typewriting? Or of dance classes, life drawing and blues gigs? “The beautiful tallowwood floor is secretly nailed, which means you can’t see the nails,” says John Tuckerman, president of Thirroul Railway Institute Preservation Society (TRIPS). “The idea was, not only were there educational activities for the railway people, but it was used as a social venue as well. So plenty of wedding anniversaries, 21st birthday parties and wakes. “And no stilettos caught on nails as a result.” It’s a good hall for dances: “Oh yeah, if you get the right musicians, you can go all night.” “We’ll be dancing tomorrow,” says Barbara Overington, director at Illawarra Bridge Association Northern Division (IBAND). “It’s the rain dance nationwide. At one o’clock, we’re all going to jump out, even Violet at 93 – I told her if she didn’t dance, she couldn’t play bridge.” “A major threat!” John says, laughing.

John Tuckerman, president of TRIPS, and Barbara Overington, director at IBAND. Photos: Anthony Warry Photography

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1ST PARTY OF THE CENTENARY IBAND are the hall’s main users, meeting three times a week. They will kick off centenary celebrations with an all-day bridge tournament on February 21. “We’ll have 10 tables, so that’s 40 people. It’ll be jam packed. If only we could get rid of that piano…” Barbara says. “Get rid of?” John replies, in mock horror, “As a musician, that sounds horrendous.” (“That piano” is a Bechstein from Berlin, imported to Melbourne in 1901 for a big piano exhibition; it’s said to have been donated to Bulli Workers Club in World War II when German brands fell out of favour, stored in “dire circumstances”, then resurrected and passed on to the institute in the 1970s.)


Other historic items include benches used to accommodate typing students (we use one as a photo prop) and photographs of Labor luminaries (from the 1970s until 1991 when TRIPS was formed, the building was restored and managed by the local branch of the Labor party). Still ticking away after maybe 100 years, is a clock from when the depot was in Thirroul. “When it closed down, we were gifted with that by the Railway Preservation Society,” John says. “That’s an original Seth Thomas clock from Connecticut in the USA. All railway offices had a Seth Thomas clock. It’s a 28-day clock, spring loaded. It keeps good time, now and again you have to give it a wind.” HAPPY 14TH TO IBAND February’s IBAND tournament will be a double party. “We’ll have a lunch here with a birthday cake because it’s actually our [bridge club’s] birthday too – 14 years old we’ll be,” Barbara says. Barbara played bridge, off and on, for 24 years. “I learned in 1987 in Indonesia. I was part of the Australian New Zealand Women’s Group there.” She also played bridge while living in Thailand. “Most of the bridge that I played in Thailand was against very wealthy Thais. There’d be 25 to 30 tables and there’d be very few expats.” Barbara joined IBAND after a friend spotted a notice at Austinmer about a new club starting up. “I love the company. I’ve met some amazing people. I love bridge – it’s challenging – but it is the people. This group is quite exceptional. We have about 60 members. As the years have gone on, the standards are getting higher and higher. So we’ve stopped being a supervised club.” (Beginners will be directed to the Figtree branch.)

FEBRUARY / 2515 / 17


HISTORY OF THE HALL By John Tuckerman, president of Thirroul

Railway Institute Preservation Society (TRIPS) n It was opened in December 1920. n Its centenary will be celebrated throughout

2020 with a series of events and functions. n It was originally constructed by the NSW Railways for the education of employees and was also used for teaching a diverse range of skills from theory of train driving, accounting, technical and maintenance of railway wagons, carriages and locomotives, short-hand and type-writing (some students and a tutor still live in Thirroul). The benches they sat on have been restored and are still used. n Also used for social functions such as wedding receptions, milestone birthday celebrations, political party and union meetings; n And since TRIPS took on management: bridge playing, Thirroul Dance Academy classes, Life Drawing, The Thirroul Pick - a blues musical group, Illawarra Recorder Assoc players, functions for the Alliance Francaise d’Illawarra and last November as a venue for the Thirroul Music Festival. n It fell derelict when the railway abandoned the building in late 1970s. n Local branch of the Australian Labor Party, led by Paul Tuckerman, John Deland, Don Gray, Keith Woodward and Jim Hagan, saved the building from demolition for use as a carpark. n In 1991 the management of the institute was handed over to the then newly formed Thirroul Railway Institute Preservation Society (TRIPS), an incorporated entity. n Since 1991 TRIPS has been managed, maintained and operated by volunteers. n The building is heritage listed by NSW Government and Railway. This means it is to be preserved with regard to its heritage condition. It does not mean that the railway will preserve it regardless. n Thirroul Station is heritage listed under the same auspices as the institute. n TRIPS’ members promote the use of the institute as a unique, well-loved community venue with many memories. n The first event on the TRIPS centenary calendar will be a Bridge Tournament; run by the Illawarra Bridge Association in February. 2515 18­ / 2515­/ FEBRUARY

“The biggest group that we have is on a Friday and we have 11 tables, 44 people. It’s a wonderful turn-out. It’s very social. We stop for afternoon tea and we always have a drink afterwards. “We’ve got a 93-year-old playing on a Friday afternoon, probably the youngest would be about 55, 60. And the rest of us are in between.” As director, part of Barbara’s role is to ensure fair play. “I used to be a hockey ref, I have got a whistle. But that’s only to keep them quiet on a Friday afternoon.” WHAT’S IN A HERITAGE LISTING In the 1970s Thirroul Railway Institute narrowly escaped becoming a carpark. The local Labor branch saved it, John says. “Eventually they did get a lease from the railway, which has transferred over now to TRIPS, which is an incorporated body, and it says that we have to maintain it and we have to pay a rental – not peppercorn, it’s around a thousand bucks a year just for the privilege of maintaining it.” It is heritage listed. “But that only means that you have to maintain it in that style. It doesn’t mean it has to be preserved at all costs. “A good example is platform two and three over there [at the station]. They said, ‘Oh, we’re going knock it down, it’s full of white ants, we’re going to put a bus type shelter over there.’ “People jumped up and down – this was only a year or two ago – and said, ‘You can’t do that, it’s heritage listed.’ But they said ‘No, heritage listing means if you do anything to it, it has to be in that style, but if it’s unsafe or it can’t be repaired, it can be taken down.’ “People who are regular hirers give us the income that we need. White ants are our life


members here… There’s always things going on with an old building. “We maintain it as best we can with the funds we get from people like Barb’s bridge people and the Thirroul Dance Academy and the bluegrass people, the Thirroul Pick. They have concerts here with international guests, often a sell-out. They have people standing around the walls.” Says Barbara: “I was told that at one of the concerts people had to stand outside and they opened the windows.” John laughs.“That’s true.” JOIN THE PRESERVATION SOCIETY Illawarra locals have used the much-loved old building at 14 Railway Parade for a century. And TRIPS wants to keep it that way. “We welcome membership,” says John. Currently TRIPS has about 70 members. “Without people being members and involved and interested it won’t exist,” John said. “It’s not just a museum, not just a dust collector. We want people to be running it as volunteers, managing the maintenance of the place so that people can come here and enjoy it, it’s no use having it locked up.” “It’s not a big task to be a member. It’s basically just stating that you’re interested, and being on the books as a registered member and paying $10.”

Members will be kept informed about the venue and what’s on there – good to know in centenary year, when fabulous functions are planned. ON THE CENTENARY CALENDAR The character and charm of the much-loved venue will be on show at several events in 2020. Thirroul Dance Academy are planning a performance; the Labor party is organising a public forum and TRIPS will lead heritage walks. “We’re going to do one in Thirroul and one in Austinmer, in May and probably July,” John says. “Mark Ballesi, the man in charge of Thirroul Pick, wants to organise a concert in August. “We’re trying to organise a train in September to do some shuttles between here in Port Kembla. It’d be a heritage train, not a steam loco. It’ll be designed for families as cheap as we can possibly do it, just to cover the cost. “The last one will be in November – we’ve got Professor Joe Davis, a local historian who is going to be our guest speaker at the Centenary Dinner. Joe is a retired professor of history from Wollongong Uni. He’s very entertaining.” FOR MORE INFORMATION TRIPS: 0429 614 392, john@insightstours.com.au IBAND: www.illawarra.bridgeaustralia.org, (02) 4227 2799. See page 37 for times. 2515

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FEBRUARY / 2515 / 19


Researchers at a house in Strathewen that survived the 2009 Black Saturday bushfires. Photo: CSIRO, Nick Pitsas, February 25, 2009

BUSHFIRE-RESILIENT HOUSE DESIGN By local architect Ben Wollen

In recent years there has been a lot of research and product development into bushfireresilient house design. In light of the most recent and ongoing bushfire catastrophe, the topic will most likely get a lot more attention. Whilst there are many varied views on what constitutes best practice bushfire resilient design, there are some basic and fairly straightforward passive design parameters that, if implemented in the early stages of building design, can make a big impact on the bushfire resilience of a house. It is imperative that we take these parameters into consideration when the re-building effort begins. Fortunately, a lot of these design elements can also make a house more environmentally sustainable. Below is by no means an exhaustive list. These suggestions don’t include any of the active type systems like roller shutters or sprinkler systems but they are easily implemented and don’t cost anything extra beyond the construction! 1. BUILDING LOCATION Fire burns faster uphill and so it stands to reason that building on the top of a ridgeline is not the best place to position a house. This can contradict the desire to take advantage of district views. One has to weigh up the advantages against the disadvantages of building lower down the slope than the top, but in terms of bushfire, it’s a no-brainer to keep away from the top of ridges (especially in wooded areas). Proximity to fuel sources also needs to be considered but these can be managed through effective landscaping.

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2. BUILDING FORM To design against ember attack you almost need to think of it as a hail storm in reverse. Instead of freezing blocks of ice raining down on the building, it’s fiery hot embers and, depending on the intensity and proximity of the fire, these can be also as big as golf balls! Most of us would have noticed how during a hail storm that internal corners or courtyards of a house will collect more hail than elsewhere – embers will do the same. That’s why a simple building form without corners or courtyards will be more resilient to ember attack than more complicated forms. A long rectangular pavilion will work best, or even a round house if you’re into curved living, but stay away from complicated roof forms and if you have the space, keep to single storey instead of two. 3. MATERIALS While there are many products out there claiming resistance to bushfire, there are some materials that are inherently fire resistant. Any earth-based material is a good choice, but for sustainability reasons, it’s hard to beat rammed earth. Quite often this can come directly from the site. If the site is on a slope, the house can be dug into the slope and the soil dug up from the site provides the material for the walls – win-win! This has the benefit of using the natural thermal mass of the earth by both digging into the earth and using it for the walls. Other options are brick, strawbale with mud render, concrete or concrete block. While there are ways to use timber to provide bushfire resilience, it is not inherently fireproof like earth-based materials and the treatments that provide the fireproofing (blankets or retardants) haven’t been tested for their longevity. 2515


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Barefoot bowls (02) 4267 2139 FEBRUARY / 2515 / 21


ON BOARD WITH SURFRIDER

By Coledale’s Susie Crick, chair of Surfrider Foundation Australia.

Our love affair with plastic is slowly changing as we become more aware and educated about the dangers that plastics pose, not only to our marine and natural environments, but also to our own health. It’s great to see so little rubbish on our local beaches as our community is increasingly getting active in clean up efforts While this is a great thing, it is reactive. So we aren’t forever picking plastics and microplastics off our beaches, our energies could be better put to use if we were to eliminate the offending items altogether by stopping them at the source. Easier said than done, for sure! Saying no to single-use plastic is tricky in the supermarket, but there are ways that we can have power over the amount of plastic that we use (and buy) in our lives. Surfrider Ocean Friendly cafes, school canteens and markets are popping up all over Australia and we invite you to get your local favourite cafe or school canteen involved. By making simple changes, businesses can reduce their plastic footprint and, in turn, do a great thing for the environment, our health and the future of our children. In order for a business to receive Surfrider Ocean Friendly accreditation, establishments must implement the first six mandatory criteria, with the option to adopt all of the criteria. The mandatory criteria are as follows: no styrofoam or polystyrene packaging; reusable tableware / cutlery for dine in, and non-plastic utensils for take away; no plastic bags offered; businesses must not offer single-use plastic straws; no water sold in plastic bottles; proper recycling practices are followed. The remaining optional criteria are: 30 cents discount offered for reusable cup, mug; vegetarian and/or sustainable seafood options on the menu; energy efficient LED lighting and energy star appliances; water conservation efforts in use. Australians produce almost 3 million tonnes of plastic each year, and less than 9% is recycled, I hope as we move into 2020 that we become more mindful of waste and put more thought into the disposal of recyclable items. 17 billion bottles and cans are used in Australia every year, with 15,000 of these discarded every minute. NSW has a great container deposit scheme where the bottles and

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cans are eligible for a refund, which results in correct recycling. Slowly, we are realising that we can’t keep consuming stuff and that all of our personal accumulated rubbish has to go somewhere. We can start by being responsible for the things that we can control. Start with baby steps and do easy things such as composting fruit and vegetable scraps; taking your own bags to the shops; carrying your own drink bottle and cutlery in your bag; and finally saving all of your ‘soft’ plastics and taking them to the supermarket for ‘soft plastic’ recycling. Once you start reducing the amount of plastic in your life, by composting, recycling and ‘soft’ plastic recycling, you will be amazed at how small your weekly waste collection will be. CLEAN UP AT COLEDALE For those of you who love a good beach clean, please come and join us for our Clean Up Australia beach clean on Friday, 28 February at 11am at Coledale Beach. If you would like to volunteer with us, please reach out to me at southcoastnsw@ surfrider.org.au 2515 Become a member and get involved! For more info: www.surfrider.org.au


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SAVE DATE FOR GREAT DEBATE

February 19 is U3A Open Day and will feature ‘The Great Debate’ between students of Bulli High School and members of the U3A. Janice Creenaune reports on all this local club has to offer. “Anyone who stops learning is old, whether at twenty or eighty. Anyone who keeps learning stays young.” – Henry Ford. Helping its 250-plus members stay young, the Northern Illawarra University of the 3rd Age (NIU3A) has served our region for 15 years. U3A brings aged communities together to learn and form friendships. It opens up worlds of differing interests and allows experience, knowledge and skills to be shared and enjoyed together. MAIN MEETING DAY Wednesdays are the main meeting day, with two talks, from 9.30-10.30am and 11am-1noon at Thirroul Community Centre. Speakers generally come from within the group. Term 1 opened on 29 January with a talk on Forensic Science. Some talks focus on music, others on history, or interests and skills developed over a lifetime. All talks are listed in newsletters that can be found on the NIU3A website. All are welcome to attend.

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SPECIAL INTEREST GROUPS NIU3A has three long-standing book clubs, with a fourth to begin in 2020. Shared reading and discussion builds close friendships and camaraderie – the groups are indeed about more than the books themselves. Balance ‘n’ Bones is a weekly exercise group at the Thirroul Community Centre – always full and energetic. Watercolour Painting starts on 3 February 2020, a Current Affairs group meets the on 1st and 3rd Mondays, with Australian Affairs on the alternate 2nd and 4th Mondays. Other groups include a Philosophy Forum, Brain Games, an Arts Hub, Drawing and Painting, Reading Aloud, Italian Conversation, the Sandpipers Walking group and Scrabble. The NIU3A Film society meets in the Excelsior Hall each Wednesday at 12.30pm. A brief but often enlightening discussion follows. Films range from the silent to the contemporary. Picnic at Hanging Rock (Australia, 1975) kicks off the 2020 season. Films are free for members. Table tennis battles take place in the Senior Citizens Hall at Bulli and the U3A Illawarra Choir gathers harmoniously at the Conservatorium of Music. On Mondays, you can enjoy a wellresearched ‘splinter’ group of talks at Hillcrest House in Stanwell Park. NIU3A also organises excursions. Merrigong Theatre sessions are well attended. Museum events and garden openings, harbour trips and fish and chips at Watson’s Bay are all encouraged. THE GREAT DEBATE Wednesday, 19 February is U3A Open Day and will feature The Great Debate between students of Bulli High School and members of U3A. It is a much anticipated event on the U3A calendar. Starts 9.30am in the Excelsior Hall at Thirroul Community Centre. The topic will be “It’s a Great Thing to Live in the Digital Age” and Lord Mayor Gordon Bradbery will adjudicate. NIU3A FEES Fees for NIU3A remain at $50 a year – that includes all films, courses and talks. Excursions and other optional activities remain at participant’s cost. Further information can be found on the web page https://northernillawarra.u3anet.org.au/ Final thought: “The capacity to learn is a gift, the ability to learn is a skill, the willingness to learn is a choice.” – Brian Herbert (US writer) n Janice Creenaune writes on behalf on NIU3A, but continues her work as a volunteer for the PKD (Polycystic Kidney Disease) Foundation Australia. Email janicecreenaune@gmail.com 2515


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JESSE TRAILL BOOK LAUNCH AT COLLINS THIRROUL

At 5.30pm on February 28, Collins Booksellers Thirroul will host the launch of a new book by Austinmer’s Jo Oliver: Jessie Traill: A biography. Featuring diary extracts, descriptions of world travels and personal letters, the book tells the story of Jesse Traill, the artist, traveller, humanitarian and independent spirit who became one of Australia’s most outstanding etchers, working in a field uncommon for women of her time. Jo Oliver is a printmaker who has illustrated her own four children’s books and it was a love of the printmaking process that led her to study the work of Jessie Traill. Jo received a Creative Fellowship from the State Library Victoria to research and write about the famous etcher, using her extensive papers held in the collection. Jo travelled within Australia and to France and the United Kingdom to find out more about Jessie Traill’s life. The biography is published by Australian Scholarly Publishing. 2515

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BLUE FUTURE IS HIGH TECH UOW’s Blue Economy project leader Dr Michelle Voyer reports on early opportunities in marine technologies.

can play in monitoring and evaluating change in our marine environments. Read more at http:// digitallivinglab.uow.edu.au/sensors/  

MEET THE iOYSTER The UOW iOyster project (funded by Global Challenges) is one example of a project that is exploring how technology can assist maritime industries to monitor and improve their economic and environmental performance. Led by Dr Johan RISE OF BLUE TECH HUBS Barthelemy and Dr Hugh Forehead, this project Around the world ‘blue tech’ hubs, such as the San will explore how sensor-based technologies can be Diego-based ‘TMA Blue Tech’ maritime cluster, are used to provide real-time information to oyster popping up with a focus on creating jobs and new farmers on key water-quality indicators to assist in business opportunities from technical innovations precision farming techniques. in underwater robotics, drones, IT and monitoring The project is still in its very early stages, Johan and surveillance technologies. As a region we are says. Examples of environmental indicators that also beginning to develop our capacity in this space will be monitored include: salinity, turbidity, water but the opportunities are so far largely untapped. temperature and pH. The project’s iOyster will also The University of Wollongong is a leader in monitor its location and its rocking due to tidal smart technologies based predominantly around movement. environmental sensors and Internet of Things (IOT) developments, through the SMART TRY THE EDEN TRAIL APP Infrastructure Facility. The SMART IoT hub While UOW are undoubtedly at the forefront of provides a platform and work space for the blue tech innovations in our region, there are other community to utilise the Internet of Things local companies who are beginning to experiment LoRaWAN networks, deployed by the UOW and in the marine and coastal space. For example, 2pi SMART Infrastructure Facility. This hub has software is a Bega-based software engineering developed sensors and prototypes for a variety of team. The company has recently launched its ‘Eden initiatives and is increasingly exploring the role it Trail app’ for iPhones and iPads. The trail utilises Many of the stories of the ‘Blue Economy’ told in many parts of the world focus on an amazing array of innovations that are occurring in marine and ocean technologies.

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Real estate update BY IAN PEPPER

REVIEW OF MEDIAN HOUSE PRICES 2019 VS 2018 Helensburgh Stanwell Pk Wombarra Coledale Thirroul

2018 2019 $870k $820k $1.36m $1.34m $1.76m $1.25m $1.48m $1.42m $1.2m $1.1m

% dec 5.7% 1.5% 29.0% 4.1% 8.3%

Source: Property Data Solutions Pty Ltd 2020 (21/01/2020)

Meet the iOyster, an ingenious device that will explore how sensor-based technologies can be used to monitor water quality indicators and help oyster farmers in precision farming techniques. Photos: Professor Marc in het Panhuis

its ‘Phonic Path’ technology, creating a customisable mobile phone app that provides audio narrative as you pass key sites along a trail of locations (designated by GPS coordinates). The ‘Eden Tail’ experience details the story of the whales of Eden, and their impact on the Far South Coast of NSW. ‘BLUEBOTTLE’ PROTOTYPE TESTED OFF ULLADULLA Sydney-based OCIUS is another company working with local businesses to develop blue tech solutions in their “Satellites of the Sea” project. The Bluebottle is Ocius’ prototype – an Unmanned Surface Vessel (USV), a new generation of ocean drones able to power large payloads, roam widely and stay at sea for months at a time under solar power. Visit https://ocius.com.au/about/ The Bluebottle is being tested in the waters off Ulladulla. The company worked with a small family business in Ulladulla to provide the innovative machine and fibreglass production and mechanical engineering services required to develop the prototype. Ulladulla Engineering and Fibreglass also provide equipment for Solar Sailor ferries, as well as other scale models and prototypes. While blue tech remains in its infancy in the Illawarra and South Coast region the stories of success in other parts of the world illustrate the potential opportunities that could be explored in this area, as we move towards a Blue Future. 2515

Overall 2019 was a tough year for median house prices in our area with reductions across all areas. The Federal Election and cautious lending are mostly to blame with volumes of houses sold also down from 205 in 2018 to 160 in 2019. What can we expect for 2020? Another rate cut is on the cards and higher volumes are expected in all areas. The end of 2019 saw median house prices returning to positive growth and this is expected to continue in 2020.

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FEBRUARY / 2515 / 27


Photos: Lauren Newman

WILDLIFE IN CRISIS

SAVING THE SURVIVORS There’s still a long road ahead for the native wildlife that made it through the catastrophic summer of fires. 2515 spoke to local vet Dr Matt O’Donnell.

In the aftershock of the South Coast bushfires, our community rallied round to help injured wildlife. People sewed joey pouches, bat wraps and koala mittens. Others built nesting boxes, held fundraisers outside supermarkets, at surf clubs and on social media. Two veterinary nurses even drove south with a ute-load of supplies, including bandages, burn creams and antibiotics, donated by local vets at Bulli, Helensburgh and Austinmer. But there are huge hurdles ahead. Many native animals and birds in the fire zones are still suffering from burns and smoke inhalation. It will be months before their bushland habitat grows back. So, deprived of food and shelter, they face starvation or, with nowhere to hide, death by feral foxes and cats. In early January, Northern Illawarra Veterinary Hospital (NIVH) owner Dr Matt O’Donnell ran a collection for wildlife impacted by the bushfires, with the surgery matching all donations up to $500. The total raised was $3768. The money was used to buy bandaging, burn creams, antibiotics and IV fluids for wildlife rescuers on the South Coast. NIVH’s Lauren Newman drove down to Milton with a vet nurse friend from Austinmer Vet, Kate Shoobert-Brown, to deliver supplies, plus water stations made by a plumber friend. “I’ve been a vet nurse for over 20

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Vet nurse Lauren Newman took medical supplies south to help wildlife including kangaroos and (above) this baby wombat.

years and I’ve never seen anything like it. It’s totally obliterated down there,” Lauren said. Now Matt wants to “keep the money flowing” as wildlife carers face months of hard work before some of their charges have a chance of returning to the wild. “They’re going to struggle… It’s going to be a long time – like months,” he said . “For instance, you’ve got to find suitable habitat and ideally be going back to where they came from – you can’t just throw them in non-burnt areas because then you’re just crowding out what’s there, and competing, and you might be introducing new problems or new diseases. “So ideally, get them back where they came from. But there needs to be food there for them, food and water – that could be months away.” In the meantime, water and feeding stations are being set up in burnt areas. “Some local people are putting together nest boxes and possum boxes too. Because a lot of the mature trees are burn out and the hollows are gone. “There’s just no refuge for the wildlife.” ‘IT’S GOING TO TAKE A LOT OF HELP’ “The thing that’s devastated us the most is just the


extensive nature of the fires,” Matt said. “A lot of this wildlife has evolved with fire but not at this scale. And there’s little refuge for escape or recolonisation. So it’s a real worry longer term, the devastation and the loss, and how that’s going to recover. “I feel it’s one of those times when really, it’s going to take a lot of help just to try and maintain those ones that have survived. So they can be the founder populations that can repopulate these areas once they’ve recovered, whatever that recovery might look like. “There’s a general rule for burnt eucalypt forests – it takes three to four months for there to be sufficient food for browsers like koalas and some of the gliders and possums. Assuming it hasn’t been burned to the extent that the trees haven’t survived. “I guess it depends on the severity of the burn in an area. “Time will tell.” TRAUMATIC TIME FOR WILDLIFE CARERS Going into burnt bushland can be traumatic for wildlife carers as they’re likely to find charred corpses, or animals so badly hurt they have to euthanase them. “You’ve really got to triage, because you find that there’s a high percentage of ones that you have to euthanase because you know they’re not going to survive,” Matt said. “That’s very hard when you’re trying to save animals and that’s the main thing you’re doing. “If it’s more than even about 15% of their body, it’s often not viable. So you really have to sort of make hard decisions early on. “Then, even some weeks down the track, you might find they are not coping. You can still lose them along the way. That’s the sad part. It’s a bit of an emotional roller-coaster for the carers.” WHERE TO SEND MONEY Locally, Matt recommends donating to Wildlife Rescue South Coast Inc. “That’s a genuine organisation, the largest one on the South Coast. “We’ve sent medical supplies and also donated directly through their website.” While cash donations are often the best way to help, many people – driven by the enormity of the tragedy – want to act too. Matt said there are some fantastic community initiatives springing up, including a joey pouch sewing bee at Club Thirroul, organised by Cassandra Cahill, and a habitat box-making session in Coledale, organised by Lisette Tatnell. “The big challenge will be in the weeks and months to come,” he said, “when the focus goes off, but there’ll still be a lot of work to do.” 2515

With the help of some friends, 11-year-old Helensburgh girl Willow Mahler set up a stall selling hand-made bracelets. The children raised $453 for Wildlife Rescue South Coast, money that went to the kangaroo sanctuary in Wandandian.

TO THE RESCUE

WILDLIFE RESCUE SOUTH COAST INC: ‘Wildlife are suffering badly from the bushfires in our area and your donations are being used to acquire medication, bandages, specialist wildlife food, supply expert veterinary care and to repair or replace cages, aviaries and other equipment lost in the fires.’ Follow on Facebook, donate at www.wildlife-rescue.org.au WIRES (NSW Wildlife Information, Rescue and Education Service Inc.) “In WIRES history we have never seen a concurrent series of emergency events like those that began in November … It is impossible to know how many animals have perished and it will be many months before the impact on wild populations can be better understood but ecologists at Sydney University have estimated over 800 million animals have been affected in NSW and over 1 billion animals in Australia since September. – www.wires.org.au SCIENCE FOR WILDLIFE: “Blue Mountains Turning Black – We’re losing koalas to fire in the Blue Mountains World Heritage Area. Please donate to our Emergency Bushfire Appeal.” – http://scienceforwildlife.org NSW NATIONAL PARKS: “You can help native wildlife by giving them a safe supply of water.” – for more info, go to www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au and search for “Help injured wildlife”. NSW RSPCA: “The estimated billion animals who have perished as a result of these fires is a tragedy. RSPCA NSW is providing relief and recovery assistance to animals impacted by Australia’s bushfire crisis.” – www.rspcansw.org.au 2515

FEBRUARY / 2515 / 29


‘IT WAS HEARTBREAKINGLY, DEVASTATINGLY EYE-OPENING ANGUISH’

WILDLIFE IN CRISIS

Mel Whiteside, owner of Crawchys Swim School in Helensburgh, reports on her time rescuing wildlife on the South Coast last month. I have been a volunteer with Wildlife Rescue South Coast (WRSC) for 12 months. We foster orphaned joeys from pinkies until they’re about 5-6kg, then they go to a kangaroo sanctuary at Wandandian. We have a house at Berrara, near Sussex Inlet. The area and the sanctuary were hit very hard. We were on the ground doing ‘black walks’, answering calls to the WRSC hotline, cleaning, bandaging and being an ambulance to native wildlife, from south Nowra to Little Forest, including Sussex Inlet, Bendalong, Manyana and Lake Conjola. It was heartbreakingly, devastatingly eyeopening anguish, JUST NO WORDS really. Not many animals survived. We euthanised many more than we saved. As an animal lover, this broke my heart. Every day. Over and over. We had help from volunteers from New Zealand, South Africa, Canada, Ireland and all over Australia. We met some unbelievably amazing gracious souls. We learnt lots and cried more. Many people from the Burgh contacted me and donated cash, feed stations, Bunnings vouchers and more. The situation is still heartbreaking and will be for months/years. Donate money. Head south, go on a holiday, leave with your empty esky, pay $10 for a coffee or a beer. Talk to people and hug someone. 2515

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Mel Whiteside (above) is a volunteer at Wildlife Rescue South Coast.


AFTER THE FIRES By Helensburgh entomologist Dr Chris Reid

Well, here in the Illawarra we’ve dodged the bullet, but I know many of you will have been caught up in the fires further south. I hope unscathed. The good news is that the long range forecast for us is back to normal rainfall for the next three months. We can all breathe until next summer. I was up around Mount Wilson in the Blue Mountains on Sunday, 19 January, a month since the fire (16 December). In the sandstone woodland on the plateau there are already a few new shoots, but recovery is slow. The eucalypts look dead but at least some are able to almost randomly send out shoots from anywhere on their ‘bodies’ (imagine being able to grow fingers like that!). It’s called epicormic growth, from emergency buds that are deep under bark and only develop if the tree is severely stressed. The grass trees and hardheads are also producing new growth, and they are also fire adapted. The plateau is silent – there are no birds or cicadas. However, this area, although it looks bleak, will probably recover after a few years. Mount Wilson is an isolated ridge of basalt, which produces the rich soils capable of supporting rainforest. But the edge of the rainforest has burnt, retreating it several hundred metres. Burnt rainforest basically dies, and requires many years of no fire and no drought to recover. The Mount Wilson rainforest is an isolated narrow fragment of a much wetter ancient landscape, with some unique plants and animals and its loss would be major. What has this got to do with insects? I was quoted in the national press saying there were 240 billion insects in the eight million hectares of fires... That was a mistake. I was using the old UK billion, which is now 240 trillion, and the paper misquoted me – I said arthropods, not

Burnt rainforest edge, Mount Wilson, 19 January 2020. Inset: epicormic shoots on eucalypt trunk, Mount Wilson, 19 January 2020. insects. Why arthropods? Arthropods equal insects PLUS millipedes, centipedes, spiders, mites, slaters etc, and the reason for using that term is that soil is often absolutely chockers with individuals of mites, which are related to spiders, not insects. 240 trillion is my guesstimate of the number of arthropods in eight million hectares, not the number burnt. But the significant thing is not really the numbers of individuals, it’s the species. The reason is that only one out of 1000 larvae might survive to adulthood and only adults are functional for the species. In 2016 it was estimated there are 250,000 insect species in Australia. The fire zones have consumed a swathe of habitat. Let’s say 15% of all Australian terrestrial insect species occur in the burnt areas. So about 37,000 species of insects have been impacted in the fires. That’s the equivalent of about 20 times all of the terrestrial vertebrate species in Australia. Many of these species are known to be restricted to small areas which rarely or ‘never’ burn (eg isolated rainforest patches such as Mount Wilson), some of which have now been burnt. Will they recover? We don’t know, but if large-scale fires are increasing in frequency, combined with further prolonged droughts and the added effects of weeds invading newly opened up (burnt) areas, it seems unlikely. For those who want a happy ending, I did see a colony of ants in the middle of the blackness. Share your stories or ask Chris a question. Email editor@2515mag.com.au. 2515

FEBRUARY / 2515 / 31


Photos: Chrystie Longworth & Lisette Tatnell

WILDLIFE IN CRISIS

‘WE HAD TO CONSTRUCT 200 BOXES QUICKLY ’

Q&A with Lisette Tatnell, who along with the tight-knit Coledale community, organised a habitat box-making day and started the Wollongong Network Helping South Coast Wildlife group on Facebook. Tell us a bit about yourself. I live in the Northern Suburbs of Wollongong. I am a registered nurse and I also work in a native plant nursery. I have always been a nature and plant lover, concerned about habitat destruction. Recently, I have been getting more involved with activities aligned with my passion for protecting the environment. When and why did you get involved? When the fires occurred on the South Coast I literally paced the house out of frustration that I could do nothing to help. Then, like many, I felt deep sadness at the catastrophic loss of habitat and wildlife. To deal with these feelings I swung into action. I spoke with the president of Wildlife Rescue South Coast, who connected me with a wildlife carer. She had just filled her entire home with bats that had been evacuated from the bat clinic. I helped for a day washing and making up tiny baby bat bottles. A 20-hour-a-day job. Seeing what these carers do made me realise they are going to need a lot of support in the months ahead. What have you been doing to help? Through email, the president of WRSC mentioned a need for habitat boxes. Immediately, friends Jane Fullerton Smith, Matt Park, Patrick Maloney and Nigel Puckeridge were on board. The wealth of knowledge, expertise, passion and contacts between them all saw the habitat box project off to a flying start. Other things I have been involved in recently are delivery of medical supplies to a vet clinic in Jervis

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Bay and organising several deliveries of wildlife food and water stations to Eden. The logistics needed to make this happen made me realise that a network of people could be more effective in getting things done. So now I am doing a lot of behind-the-scenes work connecting people on the community Facebook group called Wollongong Network Helping South Coast Wildlife. Tell us about the habitat box event you organised. The community habitat box making day was created for two reasons. We had to construct 200 boxes quickly and needed manpower to achieve this. However, more important was the process of getting our community together and encouraging them all to get involved. People constructed boxes at the working bee but also took home simple instruction sheets (that Pat created) enabling them to make boxes in their own time. I also invited Woody, the ex-president of Wildlife Rescue South Coast, to come and speak to everyone. What can ordinary people do to help? Be patient and flexible. In emergency situations people don’t always call back, they are very busy, plans change constantly and miscommunication is common. Stay connected. This will be a long battle for wildlife carers and others. Things are evolving. In the past few weeks, northern suburbs residents have set up a supermarket food collection group, made habitat boxes and water stations, and sewed joey pouches. But needs change daily – the only certain thing that charities will need tomorrow is money. You can donate to WRSC at https://www.wildlife-rescue.org.au I also recommend donating to Wildlife Water Stations Shoalhaven and Wildlife Water Station Bega Valley – find details of how to send money on their Facebook pages. n Note: at press time, Wildlife Rescue South Coast did not require any more habitat boxes. 2515


& Lisette Tatnell

THOUSANDS OF HIVES LOST IN NSW

Darkes Glenbernie Orchard’s Jo Fahey reports.

CUPCAKE AID: Pictured outside Helensburgh Coles are

Jamie Brewer and Leila Barilla, both 11 years old and about to enter high school. Local Lions member Gina Krohn reports that the girls each spent $20 of their own money on cupcake ingredients. “They thoroughly researched the organisations and chose the Australian Koala Foundation because it also supports the koalas’ habitat not just the koalas. They were thrilled with people’s response as some people gave $20 donations and didn’t take cakes.” They raised $251. 2515

THE FIRES THAT CHANGED US By Terri Ayliffe

Our organic honey beekeeper lost 130 hives in the Batemans Bay area fires but he managed to save 170 hives, his house and his extraction shed. His dad’s house burnt down, however. He had spent a month preparing and removing his bees from the bush to put them in a defendable area. He was well prepared. We know other larger companies that have lost as many as 2500 hives, who did not have time to take their hives out of the bush. Unfortunately across NSW bee foraging areas have been badly burnt and we are concerned about honey production going forward. It will take years for the bush to recover and, for some trees, decades. We have honey stock that will last us, as long as there isn’t panic buying. In this climate we will have to be vigilant in regard to cheap imported products and imitation honey coming into Australia in the future. 2515

animals, our sense of safety and predictability. The fires changed the face of our country, we have all suffered trauma, some more than others but it is trauma none the less. We have been very supportive of each other during the fires. We ensured no one had to go without for too long. Now the practicalities have been taken care of, I have concern for the mental well-being of the people caught in the fires. It would not be surprising if their heightened anxiety remains for some time and, for some, it may manifest in PTSD. Our work as a supportive community now extends to give others the opportunity to talk about their experience. If you are concerned for someone, suggest they take advantage of the mental health programs being run in the fire zones. And as for us, the luckier ones, if your anxiety is not settling, please talk to someone. I’m here if anyone needs help.

It has been a rough few months. If you’ve had the misfortune to be in the face of the fires, then it has been very tough indeed. We on this magnificent strip of coast have the great fortune to live amongst nature and, as we have seen, that comes with its risk. Our homes and families are safe, but that doesn’t mean we have not felt anxious and stressed. I have been in a heightened state of awareness, an overload of adrenaline, the fight and flight hormone, preparing my body and mind for survival. When the threat passed, I felt myself slip into exhaustion – falling levels of adrenaline leave me tired. Does that sound familiar? Along with stress and anxiety, we may feel grief. n Read Terri’s blog at https://lifeology.blog or get in touch via A sadness for all we have lost, homes, the bushland, Terriayliffe@gmail.com or 0431 488 914. 2515

FEBRUARY / 2515 / 33


ILLUSTRATE

Janice Creenaune meets Thirroul resident Helen McCosker, an illustrator of children’s books, magazines and other books, fine art works and assemblages. Photos supplied. Helen McCosker moved to Thirroul a few years ago and now divides her time between illustrating children’s books and magazines, and creating her own fine art. This inspirational artist also finds time for woodwork, pastel drawings inspired by our coastline, and playtime with her grandchildren. Helen was inspired by her grandmother’s old and beautiful leadlight-door bookcase. It opened to reveal another world of illusion – the world of fairytales and old illustrations. “The world of picture books from the late 19th and 20th century, of Arthur Rackham, Edmund Dulac and Anne Anderson inspired me and opened my world,” Helen says. “Through the years I have continued to be inspired by many others, including Australian illustrators such as Shaun Tan and Freya Blackwood. I always felt very special diving into these treasures.” Helen trained at the National Art School and later Alexander Mackie Teachers College. “But I really wanted to be an illustrator. I was fortunate to land a job with Dolly magazine and many other publications at Fairfax, Australian Consolidated Press and Reader’s Digest. I also illustrated many gardening books. “I was fortunate to be commissioned by a compilation publication, The Joy of Travel, edited by Susan Kurosawa. It was a treat to illustrate these tales of unusual and exotic places and people. “I still like to plaster my studio walls to let images and ideas filter through. I then use rough

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drawings on tracing paper and compose the wanted image. It can then be transferred to hot-pressed watercolour paper with the aid of a light box. “The main shapes are blocked in with washes of watercolour and the surfaces built up using coloured pencil, masking film, direct transfer prints and occasionally collage. “It is a solitary experience to be an illustrator but I do appreciate making connections and exchanging ideas with other writers and illustrators.” Australian House and Garden offered Helen opportunities for many years and books such as Mary Moody’s The Gardener’s Companion required multiple illustrations. A mini-exhibition showed illustrations from Helen’s first children’s picture book, The Nightfish (2006). The story, featuring a series of oil paintings, was inspired by the South Coast and years of family holidays there. “Creating illustrations for children recreates that sparky feeling of madness, magic and wonder that I felt as a child.” Helen also studies woodwork at Illawarra Woodwork School. “I like to make crazy assemblages from junk.” n Writer Janice Creenaune is a volunteer for the PKD (Polycystic Kidney Disease) Foundation Australia, helping to raise awareness. For more info, email janicecreenaune@gmail.com 2515


NEW PROBUS CLUB FOR THIRROUL By Lynne Harris

A new PROBUS club has been established in Thirroul. The initial meeting was held in November 2019 to explore the level of interest in the community for a new PROBUS club. There was a strong initial interest with in excess of 70 people attending this meeting, along with team members representing the Board of Probus South Pacific Limited (PSPL) and a representative of Corrimal Rotary. Corrimal Rotary were responsible for the proposed establishment of the new PROBUS club at Thirroul. Rotary plays a key role in not only the formation of new Probus Clubs, but also in providing assistance to existing Probus Clubs. The elected Management Committee consists of: President –Mike Brennan; Secretary – Yvonne Whitesmith; Treasurer – John Harris; Membership Officer – Margaret Tobin. Other officers were also elected to assist in organisation of social activities, communication and dissemination of information. Meetings are held on the second Monday of each month, 10.30am at Club Thirroul (Thirroul Bowling, Leagues and Recreation Club) with guest speakers on topics of interest, morning tea and the opportunity to socialise with other members. Activities organised in the initial months have included social drinks and Barefoot Bowls at Club Thirroul, with further activities in the process of being organised. We would encourage any retired or semi-retired people to come along and join us and we welcome anyone interested to become a member as there are still membership places available. For further information, please contact Yvonne Whitesmith at thirroulprobus@gmail.com.

Probus committee, from left to right: Margaret Tobin (Membership Officer), John Harris (Treasurer), Mike Brennan (President), Yvonne Whitesmith (Secretary) and Margaret Wolfe (Welfare Officer).

effective delivery of a wide range of services including administration, insurance, member benefits and support to Probus Clubs and Probus Club members in the South Pacific region. PSPL is dedicated to promoting the development of friendship, fellowship and fun and the advancement of intellectual interests for retirees in the South Pacific region. For more than 40 years, Probus Clubs have continued to provide social activities and fellowship to those members of our community who are either semi- or fully retired. 2515

PROBUS THROUGH THE YEARS Probus clubs had their origin in the United Kingdom in the 1960s. They were formed to meet the need for companionship of their peers and mental stimulation for retired business and professional men. (PRO – professional and BUS – business). The first Probus Clubs in the South Pacific region were the Probus Club of Kapiti Coast in New Zealand in 1974 and the Probus Club of Hunters Hill in Australia in 1976. By 1981, there were 44 clubs in Australia and New Zealand. Under the guidance of the PSPL Board, the PSPL Team is responsible for ensuring the efficient and

FEBRUARY / 2515 / 35


Photos: Billie Acosta

BEACH VIGIL AT AUSTINMER

A peaceful, family-friendly fundraiser, organised by Extinction Rebellion Northern Illawarra (XRNI), brought in $4000 for the RFS and Wildlife Rescue South Coast. Amy Luschwitz reports.

On Saturday, January 12, residents of the northern suburbs came together to hold a vigil and fundraiser to support bushfire-affected communities and to raise funds for the RFS. The event was organised by Extinction Rebellion Northern Illawarra, and attracted not only its core membership of 200, but an additional hundred or more community members, who together raised more than $4000 for the RFS and Wildlife Rescue South Coast. Funds were raised from the sale of baked goods provided by community members, and from dinner provided by local cafe Moore Street General. A Welcome to Country was performed by local Elder Uncle Richard Davis, and speakers included Professor Paul Chandler, Richard Woodman from Wildlife Rescue South Coast, Associate Professor Owen Price from the Centre for Environmental Risk Management of Bushfires, and Wollongong Councillor Mithra Cox. Local musicians Holly Throsby and Elana Stone played originals and covers that commented directly on the current environmental crisis. Elana and Yael Stone wrote the song I’ve Got You specifically for the event, performed on the night with Holly Throsby and Earth, Wind and Choir, telling the story of people fleeing from the bushfires and subsequent community responses of support.

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Local non-profit organisation Rumpus provided a letter-writing station where community members of all ages could express their feelings in letters to politicians or people affected by the bushfires. The message at the vigil was clear: the time has come for urgent climate action. We need to start caring for this planet, for our children and future generations. Even if people are not willing to accept the science of climate change, then surely we can all agree that moving away from polluters and fossil fuels to clean energy is a logical thing to do. 2515

WHAT IS XRNI?

XRNI (Extinction Rebellion Northern Illawarra) began in November 2019 after a meeting of 160 concerned community members. It has since attracted over 200 members. XRNI is a family-friendly, non-violent, organisation with three demands: 1. TELL THE TRUTH: Government must tell the truth by declaring a climate and ecological emergency, working with other institutions to communicate the urgency for change. 2. ACT NOW: Government must act now to halt biodiversity loss and reduce greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2025. 3. BEYOND POLITICS: Government must create and be led by the decisions of a Citizens’ Assembly on climate and ecological justice.


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WELL DONE TO 2020 AWARD WINNERS Congratulations to two of our recent cover stars, whose groups were among those honoured at Wollongong’s 2020 Australia Day Awards. The Australia Day Awards Dinner, which is sponsored by Bendigo Bank, was held at Villa Doro on Wednesday, 22 January 2020. Veteran newsreader Geoff Phillips was named Wollongong’s Citizen of the Year for 2020. Senior Citizen of the Year 2020 went to dementia advocate Val Fell and Young Citizen of the Year to musician Ian Steven Muhayimana. Fourteen awards were presented at the night. The Make-Do Library of Things, a volunteer-run, not-for-profit organisation founded by the Austinmer Beekeeper Andrea Persico, won the Outstanding Innovation Award. The Lord Mayor’s Award 2020 went to the Scouting Movement of Wollongong. “Congratulations to all of those who were nominated, and awarded,’’ Lord Mayor Gordon Bradbery said. “It was an impressive list and highlights the wonderful, compassionate and hardworking community members that call Wollongong home.’’ 2515

MUSIC IN THE LIBRARY Sat 1 Feb 11am-noon, with Wollongong Conservatorium musicians. • RAGE Thurs 6 & 20 Feb 3.30pm. Informal get together to share books, games, music, movies, magazines, audio books, apps, craft and food! • CODE CLUB Mon 3 Feb, 3.30pm – bookings required via Eventbrite. • LEGO CLUB Wed 12 & 26 Feb at 4pm. Drop in to create. For 5 -12 years. • STORYTIME & CRAFT. Every Friday 10am, stories and craft. No bookings required. • BORN TO READ Every Friday 11am. Drop-in, No bookings required. • COLOUR, COFFEE, CALMER. Wed 5 & 19 Feb 9.30-12 noon. No bookings required. • KNIT, STITCH, YARN. Wed 5 & 19 February 9.30am-noon. Drop In. • TECH HELP Please call library staff on (02) 4227 8191 to arrange a time. • THIRROUL POETRY CLUB 3rd Tuesday of the month at 4pm. Poets share work and receive feedback in a friendly space. No expertise required, just a passion for poetry. • SENIORS WEEK, 12-23 FEB 2020. Special events: Tue 18 Master your Mind 1.30-2.30: Is stress affecting your day to day life? Create a toolbox of techniques to manage stress. • Wed 19 – Colour coffee calmer 9.30-noon. No bookings required. • Special Grandparents Storytime Fri 21, 10am. No bookings required. 2020 SENIORS FESTIVAL: THE GREAT DEBATE. Bulli High School Debating Team V Northern Illawarra U3A Debating Team. Topic - “It’s a Great Thing to Live in the Digital Age.” The Lord Mayor, Cr Gordon Bradbery will adjudicate. Wednesday. 19 February, 9.30am in the Excelsior Hall, Thirroul Community Centre. ILLAWARRA BRIDGE ASSOC NORTHERN DIV (IBAND) Monday nights (except the 1st Monday of the month): 6.45 for a 7.00pm start. Partner needed. Finishing time approx. 10.30pm. • Wednesday nights: 6.45 for a 7.00pm start. Partner needed. Finishing time approx. 10.30pm. • Friday afternoons: 12.45pm for a 1.00pm start. No partner needed. Finishing time approx. 4.30pm. • The cost: $5.00 per session; tea, coffee and biscuits supplied. All sessions are duplicate bridge and are held at the TRIPS hall, western side of Thirroul Railway Station. www.illawarra.bridgeaustralia.org THE LEAP INTO FIRE RECOVERY MUSIC BENEFIT 29 February at Stanwell Park CWA Hall. Starts with a free outdoor concert in the hall grounds, 1-5pm. Followed by a ticketed indoor gig, from 8-11pm, featuring The Hot Potato Band supported by The Groove! See the Bombie’s Facebook page for details. 2515

FEBRUARY / 2515 / 37


3 STEPS TOWARDS NET ZERO Be lean Be clean Be green

GO NET ZERO

Do you run a small business and is your goal to achieve net zero by 2030/50? Dr Daniel Daly, from the University of Wollongong Sustainable Buildings Research Centre (SBRC), shares his expert advice on lowering carbon emissions in your business. Lowering carbon emissions from your small business can save you money on your energy bill and be cost-effective, while contributing to climate change mitigation and often improving the quality of the indoor environment. There are a myriad of options for reducing your energy usage, and what’s best will depend on your business and your building. The first step to reducing energy use is identifying the main sources of energy consumption in your operation. The best way to do this is with an energy audit. Energy audits can be completed by a third party or as a self-assessment. For small businesses, a self-assessment is a good starting point, and there are many useful guides online (for instance, Energy basics for business at energy.gov.au). The federal government also offers the Business Energy Advice Program, which includes free consultations with energy experts for eligible businesses (see https:// businessenergyadvice.com.au/).

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For more complex sites needing a detailed audit, the Energy Efficiency Council has a list of service providers on its website (https://www.eec.org.au/ for-energy-users/find-a-provider#/find-aprovider), and the NSW Government website (https://energysaver.nsw.gov.au/business/ evaluate-your-usage/find-energy-expert) also lists energy-efficiency experts. Once you know where you are using energy, a simple way to think about your options for reducing energy consumption is the energymanagement hierarchy, which provides a simple prioritisation of methods: PRIORITY 1 Be lean: minimise demand for energy. For instance, ensuring all equipment and lighting is turned off when not in use. PRIORITY 2 Be clean: meet remaining demand with energyefficient systems. For instance, ensuring all lighting is LED, and all equipment is high star rated. PRIORITY 3 Be green: use renewable sources to supply energy needs. For instance, adding rooftop solar, or purchasing green power. For many businesses, heating and cooling, refrigeration and lighting are major sources of energy consumption.


Some potential energy-saving opportunities for these uses are: HEATING AND COOLING: 1. Adjust your thermostat, and minimise your hours of usage. For every 1°C you change your thermostat (warmer in summer, cooler in winter) you can reduce energy consumption by 5 to 10%. 2. Consider installing ceiling fans to minimise the need for AC in summer, or to allow you to set your thermostat higher. 3. Upgrade your air-conditioning system with higher efficiency models (see energyrating.gov.au to compare models) 4. Seal any obvious gaps, e.g. around doors and windows, to prevent conditioned air escaping. REFRIGERATION 1. Rethink your second (or third or fourth) fridge, particularly if it is an older model. 2. Consider upgrading fridge(s) with higher efficiency models. Fridges manufactured prior to 2005 were substantially less efficient than modern fridges. 3. Don’t forget your display fridges and cabinets. The NSW government is currently offering a rebate of up to $1490 for these fridges for eligible businesses (https://energysaver.nsw.gov.au/ business/discounts-and-incentives/commercialrefrigerator-rebates).

SHARE YOUR STORY Welcome to the first in our new series, Go Net Zero.

In these monthly columns, 2515 will be featuring expert local advice for businesses eager to take climate action by reducing their carbon emissions to ‘net zero’. It’s officially a hot topic, with research published in January in Global Change Biology (by biologists including UOW’s Prof Sharon Robinson) finding activism has driven interest in climate change science. Web searches including the keywords “climate action” and “climate emergency” increased 20-fold in 2019. 2515 will also be featuring local case studies. Because one of the advantages of running a small business (aside from being your own boss and enjoying the flexibility to attend unlimited school talent quests) is the ability to heed the science, ignore the squabbling pollies and get on with climate action. Is your business on board? Change is seldom easy – but the silver lining here is that great difficulty makes for great stories. Tell us yours! Email editor@2515mag.com.au 2515

LIGHTING 1. Ensure unnecessary lights are switched off, and consider ‘delamping’ twin tube fluorescents – that is removing one of the two tubes if lighting levels permit. 2. Replace existing lighting with LED globes, particularly lights that are used for long hours. Once these simple actions have been completed, it may be time to think about renewable energy – and you may find you need a lot fewer solar panels to meet your reduced energy demand.

Photos: UOW

n Follow SBRC on Instagram for more tips on how to reduce your energy usage. 2515

WHAT IS NET ZERO?

“Carbon neutrality is achieved when greenhouse gas emissions (emissions) from a particular activity, process or for an entire organisation have been reduced to zero. For business this can be done by reducing emissions as much a possible through improvements in energy efficiency, changes to operations and procurement strategies, and then using carbon credits to compensate for any remaining emissions. This process results in net-zero emissions or carbon neutrality.” – Source: The Carbon Market Institute, the independent industry body helping business manage risks and capitalise on opportunities in the transition to a net-zero emissions economy. Visit http://carbonmarketinstitute.org 2515

FEBRUARY / 2515 / 39


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FEBRUARY / 2515 / 43

SPORT & FITNESS

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Australian salmon and (inset) the dolphins who prey on them. Photos by Duncan Leadbitter

HELLO FISH With Duncan Leadbitter This month we visit my home port of Stanwell Park where I have spent many years snorkelling and spearfishing at both the northern and southern ends. This article focuses on the northern end. Park your car in the northern car park at Stanwell Park Beach. The entry area is at the northern end of the beach and involves getting through the surf,so make sure it’s a relatively calm day. Two things to watch for are the boulders at the northern end (so make sure you get in and out only where there is sand) and the channel that runs towards the headland. Depending on the size of the waves and the state of the tide this channel can have quite a strong current. The first part of the snorkel is in a shallow (1m deep) boulder field where you may see small bream, black drummer and luderick. Growing on the rocks is the lime green seaweed, Caulerpa. To the north, around the small islet the water gets deeper (3-4m) and you will see rock cale, sweep, mado and maybe the occasional blue groper.

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The northern headland is called ‘The Pinnacles’ and is defined by a rock wall. About 20m or so away (south) from the wall are a couple of reefs that rise up to about 5m from the surface and are worth a look. On some of the boulders and reef you can see cunjevoi and in some areas the beautiful red jewel anemones. In early summer as the water warms up schools of small sandy sprats and yellowtail can be found in the shallows. They are preyed upon Australian salmon, which migrate along the coast in large schools on their annual spawning run. In turn, these are preyed upon by dolphins and, at times, seals. The whole food chain comes alive over the summer and I’ve been visited by seals while snorkelling (see the video) but not yet by dolphins. n Watch Duncan’s film of this adventure, including footage of a large school of Australian salmon – and their predators. Visit https://youtu.be/ UD3fjHoMCH8 2515


BOARDRIDERS ELECT 2020 TEAM By Ian Pepper

The Scarborough Boardriders AGM was held on Tuesday, January 21 at Beaches Hotel, Thirroul. It was good to see a few new faces at the meeting to see how the club is run and provide their input as well. The 2020 Committee was reelected with no changes to the prior year: • President Christian DeClouett • Vice President Drew Rendall • Treasurer Tristen Hargreaves • Contest Directors Ian Pepper, Col McDougall • Junior Contest Directors Fin McLaren, Josh Pepper • Secretary Pete Coleman Membership fees are slightly increasing on last year to cover the costs of some new coaching programs to be announced in following weeks. • Single member $70 • Family with two members $110 • Family with three or more members $140 Membership is now open on www.liveheats.com/ scarborough. Membership is likely to be capped again this year so the Committee recommends you join now to avoid disappointment.

The first Pointscore will be on Sunday 2nd February. The rest of the year’s dates are on the club’s Facebook page and liveheats. 2020 will also see the club trial the priority system where each surfer gets an equal chance to surf the best waves in the heat. The trial will begin with the A Grade final at the first pointscore. The club also agreed to adopt a Plastic Free policy suggestion from one of our younger committee members, Fin McLaren. From the first pointscore the club will no longer sell or provide plastic bottles and members will be requested to bring their own. 2515 Boardriders member Nic Squiers is pictured here last month being interviewed in China after placing 5th in the 2020 Corona Open China. Nic now ranks 5th in the world on the WSL Qualifying Series 2020 rankings!

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS

Be quick! Applications close February 4. By Cristina Sacco at SCARF Refugee Support Make 2020 the year you give back to the community! SCARF Refugee Support is looking for volunteers to help deliver its programs to refugees settled in the Illawarra. SCARF is an independent, community-focused and volunteer-powered not-for profit that supports humanitarian refugee entrants to rebuild their lives in Wollongong and the Illawarra. By creating connections and generating opportunities, SCARF helps individuals and families to establish a sense of belonging, experience social and economic independence and empower individuals and families to lead independent lives.

We are looking for volunteers to assist with a range of SCARF programs and activities, as well as office administration and specialist support roles, including driver mentoring, befriending, tutoring support primary, high school and tertiary students, Story Time, employment support, interpretation support, and more. People with professional skills in areas such as program evaluation, fundraising, corporate engagement, media engagement, communications, marketing, law or other disciplines are also being encouraged to make a contribution. For more information or to apply, visit www.scarfsupport.org.au/volunteer. Applications close 4 February 2020. 2515

FEBRUARY / 2515 / 45


1.36 0053 1.51 0034 1.58 00 1.28 0202 1.39 0148 0.44 0205 0.48 0257 0.32 0114 0.46 0224 0.48 0202 0.50 0256 0.51 0325 0.55 0314 1.51 1.18 0038 0130 0.53 0357 1 25 1 25 16 0714 1 0123 16 0926 16 0917 10 10 10 22 22 7 01 7 0629 7 7 0.49 0.52 0.49 0644 0.66 0719 0756 0.68 0832 0726 0.61 0807 0952 1.96 1.65 0838 1.81 1.77 0933 0730 1.72 0930 1.69 1.60 1307 0.53 22 1.70 0704 1.73 1018 1328 1.64 1518 1.23 1512 1.16 1304 1.48 1355 1.28 1322 1.25

0.08 0.33 0.24 0.27 SA 0.30 SU 0.27 TH 0.35 WE 1.19 WE 1410 SU 0.32 MO 0.38 FR 1524 SA 1615 MO 1633 TU 1647 TU 1605 FR 1418 SA 1515 SU 1440 TU 10 TU 1850 SA 1351 0.27 2012 0.52 1952 0.65 11 1958 0.44 1959 2009 0.52 2108 0.57 2042 1.27 2024 1.25 2120 1.43 1926 1.36 2046 1.20 2117 1.25 2208 1.29 2233 1.37 2210 1.33 2248

1.52 0129 1.54 00 1.39 0144 1.31 0243 1.39 0228 0.30 0201 0.47 0330 0.42 0258 0.48 0400 0.48 0416 0.51 0406 0.48 0248 0.44 0336 0.49 1.19 0128 0229 0.43 0433 17 1047 17 1035 2 0212 17 0819 2 26 2 26 11 11 11 23 23 8 8 0034 8 8 01 0.53 0.51 0737 0.71 0807 0.54 0902 0.70 0910 0827 0.65 0844 0922 1.88 1.75 1023 1041 1.94 1.60 1.74 1.69 1.60 0817 1.83 1008 0712 1.61 23 0755 1.84 1051 1637 1.14 1634 1.11 1349 1.39 1427 1.49 1451 1.19 1416 1.16

2020 PORT KEMBLA TIDAL CHART 2020

0.17 0.28 0.08 0.36 PORT NEW WALES 0.30 1546 1504 0.43 TH 1457 MO 0.31 TU 0.37 TH KEMBLA FR– SU 0.19 MO 0.17 TU 1717 WE 1716 SA 1609 SU 1651 WE 1648 SU MO 1510 SA SOUTH WE 1355 SU 1437 WE 10

0.58 2038 0.71 21 0.34 2100 0.56 2143 0.63 2114 1.47 2014 1.38 2157 1.30 2113 1.26 2222 1.22 2204 1.32 2321 1.42 2257 1.32 2245 1942 2042 1.21 0.47 2046 2101 1.43 2321

9 3

ARY TH Time

LAT 34° 29ʼ S KEMBLA LONG 150°SOUTH 55ʼ E WALES PORT – NEW

1.54 0221 0440 1.52 1.43 0354 1.34 0305 1.22Heights 1.39 0304 0415 0.49 0507 0.30 0257 0.49 0500 0336 0.40 0214 0329 0.48 0117 0.46 and 0.34 0511 0234 0.37 0.47 0509 0.48 Time LAT 34° 29ʼ Sand LONG 150° 55ʼ E 0320 Times of High Low Waters Local 0.49 0845 0.50 0934 0.56 0.69 0940 0.65 0918 1.87 Local 1125 1.53 1146 1044 1.71 1205 1.92 Heights0904 of High 1019 and Low Waters 1.77 and1008 0755 0841 1.72 0.73 0850 Times 1.91Time 1.92 0945 1.68 1130 1.59 1114 1.12 1750 1.13 1.36 1.12 1.30 1527 1.09 MARCH APRIL 0.13 0.40 0.31 0.13 FEBRUARY MARCH 1538 0.27 1440 0.33JANUARY 0.10 0.11 0.31 0.37 TU 1756 WE SA 1532 MO 1601 FR 1443 TUAPRIL MO 1725 WE 1802 TH 1745 TH 1731 SU 1655 FRFEBRUARY MO 1521 SU 1548 MO 1617 TU 1539 TH Time m 2156 Time m 2144 Time 1.38 m Time m0.60 2124 Time Time2215 m Time m 0.49 2129 Time m 2115 0.71 0.40m 2146 0.58 2130 0.67 1.26 2356 1.39 2345 2254 1.32 1.34 1.47 Time 2030 1.24 m Time m 0257 2208 Time 0213 m 1.481.520304 Time m 2326 Time Time TIME 0130m M1.361.24 0205 M 2322 TIME TIME Mm 2309 1.50 1.51 0224 1.58 M 0123 1.18 1.28 TIME 0114 1.39 1 0756 11.41 10.44 1 0314 0913 0.59 16 1012 0.51 0644 0.66 16 0714 0.49 0.68 16 0926 0.52 0726 0.61 16 0917 0.49 1.53 1.49 0452 1.26 1.43 1.58WE 0.51 0011 1.491.110401 0557 0426 0.40 0551 0.52 0202 0.48 0.46 0.26 0.46 0304 1.36 WE0400 0257 1.51 0224 1.58 0213 1.48 0546 0205 1.28 0114 1.39MO0610 1328 1.640430 1.19 0340 1.23 0452 1512 1.16 1511 1304 1.48 1.28 0325 13220357 1.25 SU TH 0256 SA 1355 TH 1627 SU 1518 0.32 0.271054 0.79 0951 2120 1135 0.52 1118 2046 0.65 2037 1958 0.440.74 0930 0.52 0952 19261018 0.57 0.47 0.44 0933 0.55 0.63 0.60 1.65 0604 0.340.741059 1205 1200 1.44 1055 1.92 0838 1.81 1.96 1.77 2024 1.65 1.932144 1.56 1012 0926 0.52 0917 0.49 0.49 0953 0756 2009 0.68 0913 0.59 1244 0726 0.61 1308 1.48 1607 0229 1.391645 0258 1.31 1633 0400 1717 1.52 0330 0319 1.491651 0212 1.19 02011647 1.39 1.19 1.15 1.26 1.10 1.23 1.09 0.34 1219 1.73 1815 1815 0.45 1742 0.13 1524 0.24 0.08 1615 0.27 0.33 0.09 0.38 1518 1.23 1512 1.16 1.64 1355 1.28 1511 1.11 1322 1.25 WE 1900 TH 1847 SU TU SA21545 WE TU TH1.54 FR FR 1627 MO FR SA MO TU TU2 1605 WE SU1758 SA0.71 TH MO WE0410 17 2 2 1103 0.50 0737 0827 0.65 17 1035 0819 0.54 SU 0902 0.70 17 1047 0.53 0.51 1027 0.55 17 0.45 0.58 0.51 0.66 1.26 1848TH 2210 0.221.132226 2344 1.33 2117 1.27 1.43 1.25 1.60 1.25 2215 1349 1.39 14162248 1.16 1427 1.492251 1.19 2233 1637 2305 1.14 2359 1634 1.11 1633 2120 0.52 2046 0.65 0.27 TH2218 2024 0.52 2037 0.74 1.50 2144 1926 0.57TU1.36 FR 1718 FR 2208 SU 1451 MO MO

18 12 9 3 27 24 18 12 9 0001 27 24 2020 24 18 12 9 3FEBRUARY

10 21

13 10 4 281 25 19 16 13 10 00101 13 10 4 281 25 19 16 10 4 1 25 19 16 16 0130 0714 10

FR TH 1328 2009

2042 0.47

2101 0.34

2113 0.56

0953 0.74 SA 1545 1.23 2218 0.51

1054 0.55 SU 1645 1.26 2251 0.45

1135 0.63 TU 1717 1.10 2305 0.58

0454 1.33 1106 0.70

0530 1.56 1211 0.49

0548 1.49 1238 0.53

0544 1.42

0628 1.63

0000 0.55

2222 0.58

2014 0.63

2157 0.71

2157 0.73

2250 0.74

0.67 011 0034 0.45 0410 14 11 5 292 26 20 0013 14 14 11 5 292 26 20 17 11 100 17 17 11 5 2 26 20 17 0642 1.55 0657 1.52 1103 1330 0.43 11 0.42 1300

0229 0819 SA FR 1427 2101

0329 1.430530 1.34 0305 1.22 1.33 0336 1.56 0518 0248 0.42 0.483 0354 1.39 30454 0258 1.31 0400 1019 0.69 0841 0.73 18 0934 0.56 0.70 0.49 1144 0922 1.88 1.75 0.54 FR1106 0902 0.70 1047 1532 1.361211 1.12 1443 1.30 SA 1008 MO 1601 0.401758 0.58 2130 0.491.19 1651 1.20 1830 1609 0.17 0.28 1.49 1.19 1637 SU 1651 MO TU2208 TU SU 2156 SU 1451 MO 0430 1.49 0452 1.41 0400 1.26 0.51 0.47 2204 1.30 2113 1.264 2222 0.34 42305 0.56 2345 19 2245

0507 0548 1.54 0531 0440 1.52 0432 1.49 0416 02570433 1.39 0.58 0406 1.50 0102 1.501.540508 0033 1.40 0.41 0.55 0416 0.30 0.47 0.230506 1.52 0330 0319 1.49 0201 1.39 0025 18 31.49 3 1.54 1205 0.49 1133 0.46 18 1145 0.48 0940 0.65 18 1146 0.50 1.63FR 1023 0.53 0.51 0704 0.401.211207 0635 0.57 1.87 1.57 1041 1.94 1.60 1.88 0.53 1035 0.51 1027 0.55 0827 0.65WE0704 1.12 1153 1750 1.13 1745 1.33 1026 15271051 1.09 TU 1756 1238 SA 1800 TU 2326 1825 0.60 1830 2309 0.71 2312 0.661805 0.67 1634 21151716 0.67 0.38 1.13 1.14 1313 1.56 1238 1.34 0.15 0.38 1717 0.08 0.36 0.12 1.14 1.11 1633 1.13 1.16 TH 1357 FR WE TH FR 1634 SA WE WE TH WE 1648 TU TH2344 MO 1416 1.58 0546 1.53 0539 1.50 2246 1.43 1.204 2257 0.62 1934 0.321.632333 1848 0.51 2321 1.47 2321 1.38 1.650553 0.58 2157 0.71 2157 0.73 2014 0.63 1950 19 0610 4 0401 1059 0.60 19 1244 0.47 1308 0.44 1229 0.36 19 1223 0.46

1 20

WE 1900 1.15

WE 1651 1.09 2226 0.66

TH 1847 1.19

SA 1840 1.32

SU 1836 1.40

0025 0.58 0704 1.63

0508 1.50 1207 0.51

0013 0.67 0642 1.55

0016 0.56 0537 1.73

0029 0.61 0634 1.51

0117 0.55

0609 1.61

0105 0.61

0014 0.44

0108 0.55

SA 1718 SA 1 FR 1931 1.25 200 1900 1.53 2250

1.63 0509 0.55 0511 0.55 0500 0.61 011 1.42 0415 1.61 0455 0036 1.34 0000 1.26 0158 1.51 0609 0127 0.49 0507 0.30 0037 0.49 0440 0.23 0432 0.46 0506 0.40 0354 1.54 1.52 1.54 0105 1.43 0544 1.34 0628 0257 1.39 0117 21 6 21 21 6 30 15 15 15 27 12 27 12 27 12 100 18 18 3 18 18 12 0336 3 3 1316 0.42 0641 1.60 1125 0751 1.66 0728 1.58 0.62 1044 1302 0.39 1100 0614 0.45 0614 0.59 0810 0.47 0803 1.71 1130 1.87 1.53 1114 1.77 1.45 1008 1.92 1205 0.49 1146 0.50 1133 0.46 1145 0.56651212 1019 0.69 0940 0.65 20 5 1.19 1802 20 50.41 1745 200.40 1411 5 1.39 1903 20 0.34 1731 0.40 11 1.77 1331 1.48 1438 0.31 1234 0.13 1229 0.20 1.23 1703 1406 0.46 1400 1655 1754 0.13 1.18 1725 1902

0329 0934 SU SA 1532 2156

1756 1750 1745 1.36 1601 1.12 1.09 TU FRFR 1330 SA SA MOSU 1651 1357 0.38 1218FR 0.26 MO 0.44 1.21 1805 1.14 1.20 1.13 1.12 WE TH SA0.43 SU 1800 MO WE TH FR SU 1 TU WE FR1256 MO1.19 TU 1527 MO 1758 WE 1825 TH TH SU 1.13 THTH 1950 1922 1.20 1904 1931 1.25 1828 1.47 2319 2008 2305 0.510.50 2322 23332356 0.62 0.471.26 1.19 1.24 2345 1.32 200 1919 0.60 0.20 0.43 2025 0.431.451.671909 1948 1.39 2254 1.32 2326 2309 0.71 2312 0.66 1.55 2344 0.40 2351 2208 2345 0.58 2115 0.67 2031

21 0751 0053 6 0557 60.50 1.66 0630 1.80 21 0712 1.51 1302 0.39 21 0728 1.58 0.51MO 0.53 0119 1.27 0011 1.49 0551 0.52 0.27 1.58 0546 1.53 0539 1.63 0401 1.43SA0202 1406 0.40 1304 0.190034 0.43 0534 FR 1438 0.34 TU 1326 FR 1903 1.23 1.24 0700 2008 1.32 1914 1.570704 1.54 1137 1.69 1205 1.72 1200 1.73 0.63 0604 0.34 1.44 1.621940 0.442031 0730 1244 0.47 1229 0.36 1059 0.60 0832 0202 1418 0.51 0148 0.55 0109SA 0.331351 0.50 1732 00341815 0.53 0.32 0.30 0.27 1.38 1219 1.73 0.45 0.31 1.15 1.19 1840 1.32 1651 1.09 SA 1515 SU FR FR FR FR7 1815 SA TH 1847 SA0146 WE1309 22 7 0832 1.69 0722 1.84 22 0747 1.50 0704 1.73 22 0807 1.60 1.29TU 1348 0.151952 1.25 1848 0.22 2226 0.66SU2108 0.44 2355 0.32 1942 1440 0.38 1351 0.47 0.27 SA 1515 2012 WE 13551.33 SA

0430 1054 MO SU 1645 2251

6 0641 60.40 1.60 1212 0.62 21 1316 0.42 0.48 1.51 0452 0.51 0426 0610 1.49 MO0629 0452 1.41 1.190038 0.41 1754 1.18 TU 1902 TH 1331 1.19 2351 0.50 1.70 0.53 1118 1.65 1922 1055 1.92 1308 0.55 1307 1135 0.63 0719 0629 1.51 0038 0.481410 0053 0.50 0.35 1.19 0.34 1742 0.13 1900 1.26 1.10 WE TU71850 TU 1758 TH WE TU 1717 7 1307 0.53 22 0719 1.70 0730 1.72 1.20 1.26 2344 0.45 TU1.33 2305 0.58 1850 1.19 1410 0.351959 0.30 WE 2359 FR 1418

0530 1211 TU MO 1758 2345

0.48 0034 0.51 0 0.48 0.49 0531 0.43 0.48 0228 0.51 0034 0.49 0128 0.480128 0.44 0102 01290033 0.43 0202 0.250129 0.47 0617 1.50 1.40 0.52 0029 0.55 0144 1.670223 0518 0.41 1.56 80034 0548 1.49 0025 0.580243 0144 0013 0.67 0016 0.56 0228 0508 1.50 0243 8 0817 80.44 8 0657 0712 1.61 23 0807 1.74 0755 1.84 23 0844 1.60 1.83 23 0910 1.69 0814 1.82 23 0824 1.47  Copyright Commonwealth of Australia Bureau of Meteorology 1.69WE 0844 1.60 01 1.74 0817 1.83 1.61 1.84 0.57 1.29 0634 1.57 0.35 1144 1.87 0.49 WE0712 1238 0.53 0704 1.63 0642 1.55 0537 1.73 1207 0.51MO0910 0.31 1510 0.37 1355 0.43 1457 0.300807 14370635 0.17 0.19 0704 1431 2019, 0.170755 0.46 1217 SU 1546 0.40 TH 1153 SA 1504 SU TH 1424 2143 1504 1.32 2114 1.42 1942 1.21 2046 1.221457 20381238 1.43 2100 1.32 1313 2045SU 1.771437 1.64 1804 0.31 0.37 0.30 0.19 0.43 0.17 1.56 1.34 0.58 0.38 1.44 1830 0.15 1.20 1.13 1357 0.38 1330 0.43 1218 0.26 1.14 SU 1546 MO 1510 TH SA WE 1355 FR SA SU TU 10 WE 1830 SA 1300 MO 1256 WE 1825 TH FRAstronomical SU2042 TH 1805 Datum of Predictions is Lowest Tide 0117 0.461.21 0214 0.482046 0234 02211848 0.37 1934 0320 2100 0.47 0304 0.48 0256 0.212038 0300 0.45 1.45 2114 1909 1.329 1900 1.42 1 1.22 1.43 0.32 0.51 0.43 0.47 91942 1950 1.20 1931 1.25 1828 2333 0.62 The Equilibrium 24 085034° 91.32 9S 242020 LONG 150° 55ʼ0.34 E 242143 0755 1.72 LAT 0845 1.91 0905 1.74 0900 1.43 1.77 29ʼ 0904 1.92 24 0945 1.68 0918 1.59

0.55 01 0.48 0553 13 10 19 19 13 7 4 28 22 19 13 7 314 28 22 19 13 7 4 28 22 0148 0807 1.60 1.38 1223 1440 0.51 0.38 1 1959 1.20

2012 1.25

2108 1.29

2042 1.37

1952 1.33

1959 1.69

2011 1.59

SWIM OF 8 BIG 29 23 5 THE SOUTH!

23 20 14 8 5 29 23 20 14 8 5 29 20 14 PORT KEMBLA – NEW SOUTH WALES

MO 1 SU 1836 2042 1.54 1.37

20 14

202

Times are in local MO standard time (UTC +10:00) or daylight savings time 1521 0.10 TU 1539 0.37 MO 1617 0.31 TH 1515 0.23 FR 1453 0.49 Stanwell 2124Waters 1.52 2130 1.83Healthcare 1.67 0033 1.34 Low 2144 1.47 0.46 0037 0214 0.48 0221 0.34 0234 0.37 0.47 0127 0.48 Tim 1.26 0117 0158 1.51 1.632115 1.53Local 1.34Times 0 0.552215and 0105 0.61 0014 0.44 0304 0108 0628 0036 1.63 0117 0000 0.55Heights 0609 1.61 0320 and ofPhase High New Moon First Quarter Moon Symbols Swim is 1.72 0614 1.77 0845 1.91 1.92 0945 1.68 0803 0918 1.59 01 0202 0.44 0.32 0810 0357 0904 0.46 0340 0.46 0351 0.21Park 0340 0.44 0256 0.480850 0314 0.26 0.59 0325 0.47 0.42Ocean 0706 0.55 0712 0.45 0751 1.66 0728 1.58 0630 1.80 1316 0614 0.42100755 0641 1.60 1302 0.39 25 10 25 10 25 10 25 0952 1.96 1018 1.65 0951 1.56 0958 1.62 0939 1.37 0930 1.77 0933 1.93 0838 1.81 FEBRUARY MARCH ANUARY APRIL 0.33 0.27 0.10 0.11 1.23 0.31 0.37 1.48 1.39 1.28 1303 1.21 1.77 1438 0.34 1406 0.40 1304 0.19 1326 1.19 1331 0.41 THFR1440 FR MO MOWE1617 TU 1539 onMO 151523 March 2020. TH SA SU MO WE 1234 WE 10 0.08 1411 1647 1548 0.33 1607 1558 0.321521 0.54 1615 0.271538 1524 FR SA 0.38 TU TU 1902 TH0.24 FR 1903 MO 1633 TUSU FR 1400 SA SA 1229 TU 1605 0.09 TH 1440 0.33 2030 1.24

FR 1538 0.27 2129 1.24

SU 1548 0.11 2146 1.38

21 15 9 6 30 24 21 15 9 6

m

24 21 15 9 6 30 24 21 15

1.43 2025 1.36 2215 1.50 2217 1.842124 1.69 1843 2208 1.252129 2210 1.60 2117 1.27 1.24 1904 1.24 1.52 1.38 1.34 1948 1.47 2 0.43 0.43 0.56 0.64 1919 0.20 2031 1.242248 2146 1.32 1914 1.57 2144 1 1.19 Time 2030 m 1922 T Time m 2147 Time 2215 m 2008 Time m 2233 Time m Time m 1940 0248 0.42

0336 0.48

0416 0.30

26 0119 11 1041 1.94 0922 1.880.44 1008 1.750256 0130 1.36 0205 1.28 0202 0.48 1.27 0202 0.4811 0053 0.50 TU 1717 0.08 SA 1609 0.17 SU 1651 0.28 1.47 2204 1.30 2245 1.26 0714 0.49 0756 0.68 0838 1.81 0930 1.77 0832 1.70 0730 0700 1.72 0.63 2321 1328 1.64 1355 1.28 1524 0.24 0.27 0509 0.30 0336 0.40 0415 0.491615 1309 1.38 1515 0.35 1418 0.30 SA SU FR SA FR SA FR 120.27 1008 1.92 27 1044 1.71 12 1130 1.87 2009 2024 0.52 1.27 1.25 0.47 2108 1.20 SU2117 2012 1.25 1725 0.312208 0.13 1655 0.13 WE 1802 MO 1942

0433 0.47

0416 0.45

0406 0.23

0448 0.25

0420 0.45 ENTER AT

26 1051 0325 260357 11 0224 26 10200109 1.60 11 1026 1052 1.480314 1.32 0213 0340 1023 1.88 1.58 0257 1.51 1.48 0146 0114 1.391.52 0.32 0.46 0.26 0.46 0117 0.51 0148 0.55 0.33 1.50 0034 0.53 WE 1716 0.36 SA 1641 0.44 oceanswims.com. SU 1556 0.59 WE 1648 0.12 TH 1634 0.42 2321 1.38 2246 1.53 2306 1.80 2224 1.68 0804 2257 1.65 0917 0.49 0926 0.52 0913 0.59 0747 0726 0.61 0952 1.96 1018 1.65 0933 1.93 1.56 0.59 1.69 0807 1.60 0722 1.84 0951 0704 1.73 1512 1.16 1518 1.23 1511 1.11 1322 1.25 0.08 1647 0.33 0.09 1607 0.38 0511 1633 0.49 0455 0.46 0548TU 0.321605 0504 0.47 0500 0.23 1400 1.15 1355 0.32 1440 0.38 1348 0.15 1351 0.27 SU TH MO WE MO TU WE TU WE SU TU SA EMAIL oceanswim@ 27 1125 2233 1.53 12 1114 1.77 27 1100 1.45 12 1149 1.34 27 1104 1.26 0.65 2120 0.52 2037 0.74 2011 0.570.46 1.43 1926 1.36SU 2046 1.60 1.50 0.70 1.29 2042 1.37 1959 1.69 2215 1952 1.33FR2248 1703 1726 0.562210 0.64 1930 TH 1745 0.40 MO 1632 TH 1731 0.20 stanwellparksurf

22 16 10 7 311 25 22 16 10 7 1 25 22 16 10 7 311 25 22 16 011

.18 0038 .66 0719 .48 1410 TH WE .44 1959

2254 1.32

2322 1.26

2356 1.39

2345 1.67

2319 1.55

2357 1.73

2304 1.66

0258 1.310011 1.52 1.54club.com 1.49 0223 .19 0128 0229 0201 1.390.48 0.48 0.30 0.47 0330 0.23 0.45 0.42 0452 0652 0.400406 0.50 0319 0426 0.40 0.510336 1.49 0400 0.52 0557 0.27 0144 0.44 0243 0.480551 0416 0228 0.51 0.48 0248 0129 0.43 0433 0202 0.25 0416 13 1035 28 0554 131.39 28 1118 13 0604 28 1200 1041 13 28 0534 1252 1.221023 11541.88 1.21 1027 1026 1055 1.92 1.651008 1.44 1205 1.62 1137 1.38 0819 0.54 0902 0.70 1047 0.53 0.51 0.55 0824 .71 0807 0827 0.65 1.75 1.94 1.60 1.52 1.88  Copyright Commonwealth of0.34 Australia 2019, Bureau of Meteorology 0817 1.83 0910 0844 1.74 MO0922 0755 1.84SA1051 0814 1816 0.67 TU 1715 0.70 1.82 1742 0.13 0.34 1.73 1.69 1732 0.51 MO 1.60 TU 1758 TH 1219 FR 1815 0.45 FR 1815 0.31 1.62 2344 1.33 1.261651 0.22 1637 2355 1427 1.49 1451 1.19 1.14 1.11 1.13 .39 1457 1.16 0.28 0.08 0.36 1648 0.12 0.42 0.17 0.19 1546 0.31 1510 0.37 0.30 0.17 1431 0.17 FR FR SU2359 MO TU 1634 TH 1633 MO 1416 SU TU 1717 WE 1716 WE TIMES TH 1634 SAof1609 SA 1504 SU1848 MO 1.54 TH SU 1437 WE2350 TH 1424 Datum Predictions is Lowest Astronomical Tide AND HEIGHTS 0.34 0.560102 0.58 0.710650 0.73 2042 .47 2046 2101 2014 0.630.52 1.26 1.47 1.38 2157 1.65 1.53 1.30 0531 1.50 2222 1.40 0034 1.67 0617 0052 1.652257 0.52 2157 0518 0.41 0.552245 2100 1.32 1.32 2114 1.22142204 2038 1.43 1.77 2246 14 1.42 29 2113 14 2143 29 0033 2321 14 292321 29 2045

0 2 1

23 17 11 8 2 26 23 17 11 8 2 26 23 17 11 8 2 26 23 17 011

0 2 1

HIGH AND+11:00) LOW Times are in local standard time (UTC +10:00) or daylight savings timeOF(UTC when in e 1144 1.87 TU 1830 0.15

1153 1.57 WE 1830 0.38

0704 0.40 FR 1313 1.56 1934 0.32

0635 0.57 SA 1238 1.34 1848 0.51

0657 0.35 SA 1300 1.44 1900 0.43

1217 1.29 SU 1804 0.58

0800 0.46 TU 1402 1.15 1916 0.76

1252 1.17 WE 1809 0.75

24 18 12 9 3 27 24 18 12 9 3 27 24 18 12 9 3 27 24 18 011

1.43 0234 1.34 0320 1.54 0221 1.52WATERS 1.54 0300 .22 0214 0329 1.39 0304 0509 0.30 0257 0.49 0440 0455 0.46 0336 0.40 0354 0.49 0507 0.23 0432 0.48Phase 0.34 0511 0256 0.21Moon 0.37 0415 0.47 0.48 0500 New Moon First Quarter Moon Symbols Full 0934 0.56 1019 0.690158 0.49 0845 1146 0.50 0.46 0900 .73 0850 0940 0.651.53 1.87 1.53 1.45 1.92 0037 1.71 1.77 0045 0036 1.34 1.261044 1.51 1205 0127 1.63 0033 0155 1.561114 01.59 1133 1.77 1008 1.91 1125 0905 1.74 1100 0904 1.92 0945 1.68 1130 0918 1.59 LAT 34 29’ 15 0810 30 0706 30 151655 0753 0.51 1745 1.21 0614 0.45 30 0614 0.59 1.12 0.47 1756 1.12 15 0803 0.42 0.55 15 1750 0909 0.501.13 1.36 1601 .30 1538 1527 1.09 0.13 0.40 0.46 0.13 1725 0.31 1731 0.20 0.27 1521 0.10 1515 0.23 1453 1548 0.11 1617 1539 SA SA 1532 MO TU WE FR TU 1.28 WE 1802 THMO1745 FR 1703 SU MO FR MO SU TH FR SU1.77 TU 1.21 1401 1.17 1.48 MO 1.39 0.31 1400 1303 1519TH 1.14 TH 0 WE 1234 TH 1229 SA 1411 WE 0.37 LONG 150 55’ 2312 1917 0.78 1919 0.20 0.432322 0.43 2326 1948 0.56 1843 2029 0.802345 0.40 2208 0.582025 0.71 0.66 2115 .49 2129 2156 2115 0.670.64 1.39 2309 1.55 1.32 1904 1.26 1.67 1.24 2254 1.52 2356 2130 1.83 2319 2146 1.38 2215 1.34 0.60 2124 2144 1.47

31 0119 0700

1.27 0.63 FR 1309 1.38 1942 0.47

31 0117 0804

1.50 0.59 TU 1400 1.15 1930 0.70

0 2 1

1.58 0314 1.53 0351 1.63 0340 1.49 0325 1.41 0357 1.43 0340 1.49 0401 0.52 0546 0.48 0 0.40 0452 0.51 0610 0.27 0539 0.21 0534 0.48 0426 0.32 0452 0.46 0011 0.26 0551 0.46 0557 19 1308 19 1244 4 28 19 1 4 28 4 28 13 0604 13 1205 13 1055 10 25 25 19 0430 10 25 10 25 0.44 0.47 1229 0.36 0939 1054 0.55 1135 0.63 1018 1059 0.60 0951 0.34 1.44 1.38 1.92 1.65 1.62 0958 1.62 1137 1.77 0952 1.96 1118 1.65 0933 1.93 1200 1.56 1.15 1.73 1651 1815 1.19 0.31 1840 1732 1.32 0.51 1 1645 1742 1.26 0.13 1717 1758 1.10 0.34 1900 1219 1.09 0.45 1847 1815

.26 0256 .74 0930 .23 1615 SU SA .51 2208

0.27 WE 0.33 TH 0.38 TU 0.08 WE 0.09 TH TU 1605 FR WE 1607 MO MO 1633 TU TU 1647 FR Copyright1.33 Commonwealth of Australia Bureau of Meteorology 2251 0.45 2305 0.58 1848 0.22 2226 2344 1.262019, 1.25  2233 1.43 2359 2248 1.36 2210 1.60 0.66 2215 1.50 Datum of Predictions is Lowest Astronomical Tide Times are in local standard time (UTC +10:00) or daylight savings time (UTC +11:00) when in effect Moon Phase Symbols New Moon First Quarter Full Moon

SA 0.32 SU 0 SA SA 1523 FR 1558 1.54 1 2217 1.84 2355 2147

1.56 0416 1.49 0433 0.58 0406 0.67 0448 0.56 0420 1.50 0416 0.55 0025 1.50 0508 1.40 0013 1.67 0016 0.52 0 0.41 0548 0.30 0531 0.47 0102 0.45 0034 0.25 0617 0336 0530 0.48 0518 0.23 0033 20 01 20 1211 5 29 20 0704 20 0642 5 29 5 29 14 1144 14 0704 14 0657 11 26 26 11 26 26.33 11 0.49 1238 0.53 1051 1.63 1.55 0537 1.73 1020 .70 1008 1207 0.51 1026 1.57 0.40 0.57 0.35 1.29 1.87 1041 1.94 1153 1.60 1.52 1052 1.48 1217 1.75 1023 1.88 0635 1758 1830 1.20 0.15 1825 1830 1.13 0.38 1357 1313 0.38 1.56 1805 1238 0.43 1.44 1218 1804 0.26 0.58 1 .19 1.14 1.34 1330 1300 Last Quarter

0.36 0.42 1641 MO 0 MO 0.28 WE 0.08 SU 0.44 THor0.12 WEno warranty FR SA in TH SA SU SU 1556 TUThe Bureau Meteorology gives any TH kind whether express,WE implied,1648 statutory otherwise respect1634 to theFR availability, accuracy, SA currency, completeness, TUof1717 WE of1716 SU 1651 0.47 1.20 1931 1.25 .51 2245 2345 2333 0.62 1934 0.32 1848 0.51 1900 0.43 1828 or reliability of the information information1950 will be fit for any particular purpose or will not infringe2246 any third party Intellectual Property2306 rights. 2321 1.47 or that the2321 1.38 1.53 1.80 1.45 2224 1 1.26 quality 2257 1.65 The Bureau’s liability for any loss, damage, cost or expense resulting from use of, or reliance on, the information is entirely excluded.

1.63 0509 0.55 0511 0.55 0500 0.61 0548 0.44 0504 1.26 0117 1.51 0609 1.63 0014 1.53 0 1.34 0000 0.32 0033 0415 0628 0.49 0036 0.30 0037 0.49 0158 0.23 1.61 0455 0105 0.46 0127 21 01 21 1316 6 30 21 0751 21 0728 6 30 6 1302 15 0810 15 0803 1546­0614 12 27 27.42 12 27 12 0.42 0641 1.60 1125 1.66 1.58 0630 1.80 1104 .62 1044 0.39 1100 0.59 0.47 0.42 0.55 / 2515­1130 /0.45 FEBRUARY 1149 1.34 0706 1.71 1.87 0614 1.53 1114 1.77 27 1.45 1902 1234 1.19 1.77 1331 1229 0.41 1.48 1438 1411 0.34 1.39 1903 1.23 1406 1400 0.40 1.28 1304 1303 0.19 1.21 1 .18

TU 0.31 TH 0.13 FR 0.40 FR 0.20 TH TH 1745 SA TH 1731 WE WE 1802 MO 1725 1.19 2356 1.24 2345 .50 2322 1.26 1919 0.20 1922 1904 0.43 2031 0.43 1.67 1.39 2025

TU 0 SA 0.46 MO 0.56 SU SU 1726 MO MO 1632 FR 1703 1.32 2357 1.57 2304 0.56 1914 0.64 1 1.73 1843 2319 2008 1.55 1948

0.33 0554 0.50 0551 1.27 0202 1.50 0 0.40 0117 0452 0038 0.51 0.48 0011 0053 1.49 0119 0.52 0.51 0557 0034 0.27 0.53 0534 0148 0.48 0.55 0652 0109 22 0832 22 0 13 7 31 28 28.51 13 7 31 28 13 7 0704 28 1.69 0722 0804 1.84 0.59 .53 22 0719 1.70 0730 0700 1.72 0.63 1.73 22 0807 1.60


CLIFTON SCHOOL OF ARTS presents A Special Seniors’ Week Event

Free Art Workshops for Seniors • Tuesday 18 Feb 10am - 3 pm •

Drawing/watercolour with Christine Hill • Thursday 20 Feb 10am - 3 pm •

Drawing/pastels with Mark Svensson Lots of practical demonstrations!

All materials supplied • Bring your own lunch.

338 Lawrence Hargrave Drive Clifton

Public transport: No 2 Bus to the door.

- Please note: limited disability access to the premises Places limited to 12 each workshop, booking essential. Please contact Vicki: Ph 9056 8429 www.artsclifton.org

INTEGRATIVE GENERAL PRACTITIONER

SERVICES INCLUDE: Health Checks Clinical Hypnotherapy Ashati Practitioner / Reiki Practitioner Naturopathic Nutritionist Kinesiology Salt Therapy 12/345 LAWRENCE HARGRAVE DRIVE, THIRROUL

www.thirroulholistic.com

PHONE: 02 4288 0833 Licence No. 95628C / ARC Licence No. AU09136 ABN 62 078 105 978

SPLIT SYSTEM DISGUISED

(02) 4222 9988 • www.tcair.com.au

AW3681790

ASK ABOUT OUR DESIGNER AIR.

FEBRUARY / 2515 / 47


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2515 FEBRUARY 2020  

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2515 FEBRUARY 2020  

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