2515 AUGUST 2020

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5 1 COAST NEWS

‘ROCKER’ BOB

LOCAL LEGEND RETIRES AS BUTCHERS’ GROUND ANNOUNCER

Clifton | Scarborough | Wombarra | Coledale | Austinmer | Thirroul


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EDITORS Gen Swart, Marcus Craft CONTACT editor@2515mag.com.au. Ph: 0432 612 168 2515mag. PO Box 248, Helensburgh, 2508. ADVERTISING 0432 612 168. www.2515mag.com.au. T&Cs apply. DEADLINE August 19 COVER ’Rocker’ Bob Sheeley. Photo: Anthony Warry 2515 is published by The Word Bureau, ABN 31 692 723 477. Disclaimer: All content and images remain the property of 2515 Coast News unless otherwise supplied. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without written permission. Views expressed do not reflect those of the publishers.

MEET OUR CONTRIBUTORS MITHRA COX is a Greens Councillor for Wollongong City Council, representing Ward 1 (Wollongong’s northern suburbs). She is a musician and environmental educator with 15 years’ experience managing sustainability projects and working in public administration, including in local government and the NSW Parliament. She attended Bomaderry High School and Wollongong University. Mithra now lives with her family in Corrimal and is a mum of two young kids. She also plays the banjo with The Lurkers. Mithra is passionate about making Wollongong a vibrant, creative, green city. STEPHEN LE BAS grew up in Mt Keira and went

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to Wollongong High. He left for Melbourne after finishing high school. After moving between Melbourne and Sydney, he settled in Thirroul. Stephen, a software professional by day, is a keen advocate for protecting the community from inappropriate development. He is a member, and moderator, of the Thirroul Community for a Sustainable Town Centre Facebook group.

GRAHAME GOULD is a clinical psychologist in

private practice living in the northern Illawarra with his wife and kids. Grahame became interested in sleep psychology after finding he was not sleeping well. He also focuses on trauma and generalised anxiety in his psychology practice. Previously, Grahame was the CEO of Lifeline South Coast. He enjoys drinking coffee in the mornings, running and walking next to the coast and in the Royal National Park.

EDITOR’S NOTE

We’re short on space this month – so straight to the important stuff. Apologies for incorrectly attributing a photo – the image of cellist Rita Woolhouse on page 10 in July’s magazine was taken by Anna Hewgill. Stay safe. The editors, Gen & Marcus 2515

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Photo: Stephen Le Bas

‘SAVE THIRROUL VILLAGE’

Development at all costs ruins village character, writes Stephen Le Bas, a moderator for the Thirroul Community for a Sustainable Town Centre Facebook group. Thirroul has unique charm and character stemming from its lineage as a working-class coastal coal town. Blessed with beautiful beaches, Thirroul is now a vibrant contemporary coastal village. It has reinvented itself as a town full of thriving new businesses – shops, cafes, restaurants, and a small bar culture complements the traditional pub culture. We must strive to avoid rampant encroachment of high-density building that has seen suburbs in our capital cities lost to inappropriate development. Planning controls have been stripped from our council; it has been ‘neutered’. Local councillors are no longer the final arbiters in major Development Applications. Power that should belong to the community has been “seized” by a NSW government regional planning panel aimed at eliminating local input into significant developments. How can it happen that beautiful old houses are demolished? If a developer does not like a council decision, there are mechanisms to help the developer get what they want. Planning panel reforms that come into effect on 1 August 2020 show that the state government has a policy of “develop at all costs”, with scant consideration for the well-being of local communities. Thirroul village must be protected from the impacts of the proposed Thirroul Plaza redevelopment. The proposed Thirroul Plaza development is not our Thirroul. The proposed development would create a mega-structure of unprecedented height and overbearing scale, and set a precedent for future development. It would

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rob locals and visitors of escarpment views and afternoon sun. The infill development besetting Thirroul in recent years has already contributed inordinately to traffic congestion; this would be seriously compounded if the 82 units and expanded retail space proposed for Thirroul Plaza are realised. Thirroul has incredibly low shop vacancy rates. We have already lost businesses in Thirroul Plaza due to DA 2020/363. Will our beloved independent businesses survive a massive shopping centre and apartment development in our town centre? Business activity and the village “feel” would be destroyed by this development, which would result in significant loss of street parking. It would also cause loss of the atmosphere that draws visitors to the businesses and other attractions of the area. The council has done its bit, describing the vast array of problems with the Thirroul Plaza DA in a letter to the developers’ architects. Transport for NSW have raised a number of serious concerns about the proposed development with the developers’ architects. We must lobby state members, government and opposition to rethink planning for communities such as ours. Help us Save Thirroul Village; savethirroulvillage.com is your landing point to support the preservation of our village. Please join us. For more information, visit the new website at savethirroulvillage.com; Instagram @savethirroulvillage or find Thirroul Community for a Sustainable Town Centre on Facebook. 2515


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Cr Mithra Cox on the path near Sandon Point. Photo: Unicorn Studios

HAVE YOUR SAY ON NEW CYCLEWAYS By Greens councillor Mithra Cox, representing Ward 1, the northern suburbs in the City of Wollongong.

“It’s too hilly, it’s too far.” “I have kids, I need to carry shopping.” “Our summers are too hot.” “Cycling just isn’t part of our culture.” How many times have I heard these tired old excuses for why we don’t invest in cycling infrastructure in Wollongong. In 2009, I travelled to Copenhagen, in the middle of a cold snowy winter. The coldest day was -15°C. This trip blew all these lame excuses out of the water. Our climate in Wollongong is infinitely more pleasant than in Copenhagen, and yet here were mothers calmly transporting three kids and a dog by bike in weather so cold that your eyelashes stuck together with ice. TV camera crews travelled by bike. Even the Queen travels by bike. Not because the Danes are particularly culturally different from us – simply because it is safe, convenient and easy to do so. Actually, much of Wollongong is on a relatively flat coastal plain. The majority of trips to shops, school and friends are less than the magic 6km, which is considered an easy and convenient distance to cycle. And for those who live on hills or have kids and shopping to transport, the Danes have a simple solution: cargo bikes and electric bikes. What we lack is safe bike lanes, that are physically separated from both cars and pedestrians, that connect us to the places that we want to go – beach, train, shops and school.

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The thing that I most noticed when I was riding in Copenhagen is that there were no heart palpitations from either fear or exertion. And when I compare that to riding in Wollongong, I am sad to say that I often have moments of panic riding with my kids to school. Because we are on the road, with cars weighing a tonne whistling past my kids’ fragile little bodies. The solution is blindingly obvious. When we are building roads, we need to provide safe, separated bike lanes. Make it safe, and people are able to ride. Cities around the world have been rapidly doing this during the pandemic, as cycling rates increase by up to 300% as people look to bikes as a safer form of local transport and exercise. Here in Wollongong, there has been a massive increase in cycling and bike shops have been overwhelmed with customers. I’m so proud that Wollongong Council will be rolling out 15 new separated cycleways in the next 12 months, and a very ambitious program of new cycleways in the next four years. It is the perfect time for this transformational change in Wollongong. You can see the four-year plan online, and drop pins on the interactive map if you have suggestions about where you think new bike paths are needed the most. Comments are open until August 17. Visit https://our.wollongong.nsw.gov.au/ wollongong-cycling-strategy-2030 2515



Woodwork studentturned-maker Liz Argaet.

CUTTING-EDGE CREATIONS 2515 meets Bulli’s Liz Argaet.

Liz Argaet was a student at the Illawarra Woodwork School. Now this Bulli local is forging ahead on her own, selling a range of bread knives via Thirroul’s Flame Tree Co-op, restoring preloved finds and completing the odd commission. “I just do it for the love, really,” Liz said. “Doing the woodwork classes does give you more skills, and more confidence, to go at and make things yourself. “I love making things to give things away. It’s one of my favourite things. There’s a connection with you in the piece. It’s relaxing and definitely rewarding. and enjoyable. To take something home and say you made it, and it’s not from Ikea or somewhere, it’s very pleasurable.” Liz’s woodworking experience dates to her childhood. She was raised on orchards around Shepparton – growing up on a farm meant never being short of an axe or a hammer. Liz later did a women’s trade and technical course. She’s lived in Bulli for the past 10 years, running her own business, Growth Cycle Gardening Care. Woodwork is her creative outlet. A beautiful solid buffet that she made takes pride of place in the dining room of her Bulli home. And a bread knife Liz made of blackbutt gets a daily workout – it is just the right tool for cutting loaves of sourdough. Liz got the idea after buying a similar knife at a market in Tasmania. She drew a template, sourced some blades and now sells her own works for $50, “just for the time to cut out, sand, stain”. Liz’s first lessons in the Illawarra were under the

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tuition of Illawarra Woodwork School founder Robert Chapman. She works at home, in her garden shed, popping out to use the bandsaw and other tools at the school in Woonona, now run by teacher and master craftsman Stuart Montague. Modern power tools mean there’s no need for great strength, and these days woodworking is no longer a Dad’s domain. “Stuey’s classes are fantastic. I’ve seen more women sometimes than I do men there, and I see all ages. So, I think Stuey’s got a personality that encourages all walks of life, all different nationalities – there is no discrimination. “Women can do beautiful work,” Liz said, adding female carpenters are proving increasingly popular in Sydney – not least because they know how to tidy up afterwards. “In a man’s world, I’ve got to say, I’ve never had trouble.” TRY A WORKSHOP 2020’s Illawarra Festival of Wood is off, but the ‘We Love Wood’ weekend workshops, presented by the Illawarra Woodwork School, are still on. 1. Carving a Whale Netsuke (Japanese small object). With master carver Hape Kiddle. October 16-18, Clifton School of Arts, $780. 2. Greenwood Stool Workshop. With Stuart Montague and Ed Oliver, Oct 24-25, Denbigh Heritage Farm, Cobbitty, Camden, $450. 3. Spoon Carving With Carol Russell, Nov 28-29 at Clifton School of Arts, $650. Book online: https://woodworkschool.com 2515


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COVER FEATURE

‘ROCKER’ BOB

Local legend ‘Rocker’ Bob Sheeley was homeground announcer for the Thirroul Butchers for 25 seasons – but he’s now handed over duties to a new bloke. 2515 reports. Every local sports club has its own legendary character – and the Thirroul Butchers rugby league club is no different. It’s a club with a rich history, having celebrated its centenary in 2013, and more than 5000 people have donned the Butchers jersey over the years. So, it’s fair to say that it has a few legends of its own. But one local bloke – “Rocker” Bob Sheeley – has been loyal to the club for ages and has also served the club as timekeeper, scorer and ground announcer at the club’s homeground, Thomas Gibson Park. Bob attracted the nickname “Rocker” because of his appearance back in the ’60s. Heis a long-time Illawarra resident, having moved down from Cessnock in 1961, looking for work in the mines as a fitter. Bob spent 44 years in the mining industry as his day job, so this is a bloke who knows all about hard work and has never been afraid of doing more than his fair share. But “The Voice of Gibson Park”, who did the ground announcer gig for 626 games over 25 seasons, decided in 2019 that it would be his final season in that role. Bob, 80, has handed MC duties over to another local, Josh “Dougie” Millington, whose family has a long-time connection with the Butchers and who

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played a pivotal role as halfback in the 1999 U18’s Grand Final victory. In a hand-written note Bob gave to us as reference material for this yarn he wished Josh all the best in his new vocation, and he also thanked “everyone in league circles from all clubs for their friendliness, hospitality and co-operation throughout the years”. When 2515 caught up with Bob, the Butchers had just recorded a 22-16 win over Wests in round one of this year’s Presidents Cup. He kindly took time to have a chat with 2515. Have you always been a rugby league fan? Did you play when you were a young bloke? No, now here’s a bit of trivia for you: I played soccer as a young bloke, up there at Cessnock, and we won an under-12 competition in 1952, that was, and we all got a little gold medal. What position did you play in soccer? Centre half, I don’t know what they call it now. But I always liked rugby league. Dad used to take us to the league when we were young. Did you play league when you moved here? I had a few games in the lower grade down here but I thought: “This is too bloody hard, this stuff, so I’ll

Photos: Anthony Warry Photography

New homeground announcer Josh Millington (left) and the legendary ‘Rocker’ Bob Sheeley.


give that away.” [laughs] Then I got into water-skiing. A couple of my mates had boats, this was in the mid-60s, and yeah I did that for about 10 years. We had a lot of fun. We had plenty of falls and spills and everything.

Your throat’d be sore at the end of a day’s announcing, wouldn’t it? Nah, in all that time once I had a little bit of a sore throat and I got some Strepsils and I was bloody right. That was the only time.

When did you start calling the league? Well, halfway through or partway through the ’95 season. I went over to the footy and the bloke who was doing the job – it was a bit of a breezy day – and he’s got papers blowing everywhere and he’s trying to write things down and call over the mic – and I thought: This bloke needs a bloody hand, so I sat down with him. Arthur Osborne was his name. I said: Can I help you out? And he said: Yes, mate, yes. So I got my hands on the mic and they haven’t taken the mic off me since. [laughs] Arthur retired at the end of that season, I took over. But the poor bugger died about 12 months after that. He was only in his 50s and he was a fantastic bloke too. No one challenged me for the job. It was a sh*t job [laughs]: braving the elements, no protection from the sideline officials [the crowd] over there.

Have you missed doing the announcing this year? No, not really. Not really.

Everyone’s an expert in the crowd, aren’t they? Oh yeah. You get plenty of advice, plenty of advice, you dare not make a mistake or pronounce a name wrong, or get the wrong number [on a player’s jersey], and say: “Number eight scored” ... [because someone in the crowd would yell back] “It’s not bloody number eight!” No, it’s a lot of fun and it’s a good mob of people I’ve met over the years.

Are you still going to watch the games though? Oh yeah. Out of 626 games you called, what were some of your favourites? When Thirroul beat the top teams like Western Suburbs and Collegians, because they were the money clubs, they bought players before salary cap and all that stuff, still are. And winning the grand final, of course, which they [the Butchers] won four or five times in my era, yeah, so they’ve done well. You enjoy the camaraderie and friendships in rugby league? Yeah. You could talk to anyone from any club and 99.9 percent of them are good blokes and just like talking football, talk a bit of rubbish. Really good, all of them. 2515

THIRROUL BUTCHERS – THANKS TO SPONSORS

The Thirroul Butchers would like to thank their major sponsors – Ryan’s Hotel, ARA Electrical and K&R Fabrications – and associate sponsors: Sureplumb, Club Thirroul, Fitzmoore Group, UGM, Thirroul Physio, Butchers Juniors, Woonona Dentist, CS Concrete Polishing, and Better Floors & Blinds. 2515

AUGUST / 2515 / 11


Male glossy black cockatoos have a stunning red-panelled tail. Photos: Amanda De George

BACKYARD ZOOLOGY With Amanda De George

Get excited because this month I’m going rogue! I usually feature a species I’ve photographed locally here, but I had such a special encounter recently with a bird that I have wanted to see in the flesh since forever that I just had to share it with you. You know those spur-of-the-moment adventures? They really are the best. There’s no time to agonise over the finer points, you just make your decision and go. And so, one day in late June, I decided over my morning coffee that I had a date with Ulladulla and hopefully some Glossy Black Cockatoos. This was a last-minute thing and I was yelling my plans for the day back to my confusedlooking husband as I was trying to grab the camera and spare battery and find my boots. Incidentally, why are my boots always hidden away in random places? Anyway. Once I got in the car and set up my playlist it dawned on me I was facing a two-and-a-half-hour drive. One of those finer points it’s best not to dwell on until it’s too late! But the drive down the coast is a breeze and it was a delicious sunny day. When I finally took one of only two or three turns on the entire trip, left towards the lighthouse, I knew I’d made the perfect decision. The lighthouse had a smattering of people watching for humpbacks on their annual migration and there was splashing and breaching and all of those amazing whale behaviours that normally capture my attention entirely. But on this occasion it was all about the Glossies. As soon as I hit the path I heard them. It’s hard

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to describe their call. Harsh, perhaps, definitely not the drawn-out eerie cry of the Yellow-Tailed Black Cockatoos that frequent the Northern Illawarra. And then I saw them, some sitting high in dead trees, others hidden among the casuarinas feasting on their seeds. And, oh my, these birds were absolutely worth the drive. Smaller than other species of black cockatoos, the adult females have patchy yellow feathers on their faces, giving them an almost unfinished appearance. The males though, I can barely describe my excitement when I first caught a glimpse of their stunning red-panelled tail. I stood and took photos and they paid me no mind whatsoever. I was just something looking at them while they were completely surrounded by their preferred food. Insignificant. And so I was able to stand quietly, so close that I could hear their strong, bulbous beaks crunching away on the seed pods. I’ve heard there were several of these birds in Helensburgh earlier this year and if you do get a chance to see them, I highly recommend it. They are listed as vulnerable in NSW, joining a growing number of other species. But that’s not what makes them a must see. Instead it is their incredible colouring, the sun playing off the black brown feathers on their bodies and the unique details that make sex identification easy. There is something so magical and mesmerising about our native cockatoos. I hope you get to see them in the wild. Follow Amanda’s Facebook blog @BackyardZoology 2515


TRIBUTE TO A TREE

Peter Cunningham (left) and Bob Woodhill. Photos: Imogen Ross

By Austinmer artist Imogen Ross. As part of the Creative Corners project – spearheaded by myself and Louise Manner after receiving a Connecting Neighbourhoods grant from Wollongong Council – over 25 local families got involved in painting the Oak Leaf mural on the fence opposite the Austinmer Railway underpass on Wigram Rd on a sunny weekend in July. The weather was picture-perfect and new friendships were forged as local stories were exchanged and laughter was heard around the neighbourhood. The big oak tree on the corner behind the fence was planted in 1945 by a young boy called Bob from an acorn seedling his aunty had brought from Tamworth. Bob Woodhill (who was that five-yearold boy!) and his cousin Peter Cunningham came along to paint several big leaves and shared many local stories with the new generations of Austinmer families gathered along the fence. This is the first of several Creative Corner activations that Louise and I have planned around the Austinmer underpass bridge. If you and your family are interested in being a part of it, please email imogenross@yahoo.com.au with your contact details. 2515

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DEATH OF A LYREBIRD 2515 reports.

Kylie Madden and her children, Arlo (left) and Millie. Photos: Unicorn Studios

On July 3, Coledale local Kylie Madden published a tribute to Frank the superb lyrebrid, killed by a 4WD in a ‘hit and run’ on Buttenshaw Drive. In her Facebook post, Kylie included a picture of the bird lying dead on the road, feathers torn from his tail. It was a powerful post. Kylie’s words have since been liked by almost 4000 people, shared over 1100 times and republished in the Illawarra Mercury. Locals have left flowers at a roadside memorial, expressed anger and grief on social media and started work on a petition. On July 20, Kylie organised a meeting in her driveway so residents could talk to Greens councillor Mithra Cox, share road-safety concerns and call for change. “The death of this much-loved lyrebird has really galvanised the community,” Kylie said. “Not just me. I have been overwhelmed by the amount of support for change. From people on this road, in this community and from further afield, people are just over the destruction of nature. “It’s more than just one lyrebird. It is symbolic of something else much broader that I think almost everyone is sick of – that loss of beauty – he was a beautiful bird – that loss of nature.” Frank was a Coledale character. “Everyone in the neighborhood knew him – he would often be in this stretch, just on the road. He was so bolshie that he wouldn’t move for anyone.” Kylie nicknamed him Frank “because he was an old man”.

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“He was a bit cantankerous and it just seemed to suit. What I find hilarious is that other people in the neighborhood had names for him as well. And they were all old man names.” Frank was also known as ‘Norman’ and ‘Larry’. “He obviously exuded that kind of air. He would rarely cross the road to get out of your way. He’d be like, you get out of my way. Which is why he got hit, I guess, after all these years.” Kylie is a wildlife biologist, with 30 years’ experience in the field. She has worked on many conservation projects, including saving koalas. But Frank’s death hit her hard. This time it’s different, this time it’s personal. A mum of two primary school children, Kylie has spent much of 2020 at home, locked in a difficult battle with breast cancer. Frank was her companion. “A passion for wildlife is what brings you to work in wildlife biology,” Kylie said. “But this is very different from those study animals, where you’re putting a tag on an animal. Even though you might get attached, you don’t really get to know them. But with Frank? I got to know Frank, Frank and I had a close relationship. So yeah, it was different. “It was very personal. And because I was at home for 10 months straight, aside from when I was in hospital, I was here on this property with Frank, it was particularly heartbreaking.


FAREWELL, FRANK

Frank and I have known each other a long time. It’s been more than eight years. Longer than my son has been alive. Frank owned this block on Buttenshaw more than I did. In his mind, he also owns all our neighbours land. It was he and his family's domain alone – and he defended it fiercely. He is the King of this place. His song repertoire is impressive – kookaburras, gerygones, king parrots, yellow-tailed black cockatoos. He even sings the ghost songs of birds that are now gone from this stretch of bush (victims of the recent drought and the local cat): Logrunners and Yellow-throated Scrub Wren. He hasn’t forgotten them. We have had a rocky relationship, Frank and I. His feet are huge and destructive. I have sworn at him and thrown things at him. His boldness knew no bounds and he had zero conscience about ripping up my newly planted vegetables or tossing a row of freshly planted natives onto the mulch. But now he’s gone. Hit by a car on this exponentially busy road. He’s been “In the weeks since he’s been gone, to just not have him there, that constant presence, has been very, very sad.” Lyrebirds are famous for their mimicry, and the older they are, the more calls they accumulate. “Frank had scores,” Kylie said. “He could mimic absolutely everything. I estimate he was maybe 20, 30 years old. “I’ve always taken a particular interest in lyrebirds because they’re just so showy and surprisingly poorly known, given that they’re just emblematic. To be living in a lyrebird territory as we were here was just such a privilege. And having that wildlife biologist background, I just couldn’t help be a part of his life. “I’m continuing to follow all the local lyrebirds now Frank’s gone and I’m watching – well, listening – to the males in the surrounding territories suss out what’s going on, like ‘Where’s Frank?’ “There’s one from up the hill over here; there’s another one from down south who actually, I think, has stepped into Frank’s territory. He was on our property yesterday, which is very brave of him because Frank would have made short work of him if he’d done that while Frank was alive. “He was a very dominant lyrebird, he was very old and his territory took in all our property, plus about half of the property in front. It was probably about four hectares.”

crossing this road for years, but he’s currently moulting and probably not as quick as he normally is. And as all the locals know, most cars are driving too fast up here. Farewell Frank. You were one of the most accomplished lyrebirds I have known – your mimicry was incredible. I wonder how old you were? Twenty years? Thirty? I’ve no doubt you were an old man, but today when I picked you off the road you were plump and healthy looking. Your eye still shone bright and your strong feet still dirty, undoubtedly from mucking around in my veggies, you evil bastard. I’ll miss your beautiful songs that have been a constant of the last ten months at home through cancer treatment. Always watching me with those big bright eyes, yelling at me if I got too close. It’s your place, after all. Nothing will bring you back, but I’ve already phoned Council about trying to get some traffic calming up here...and I'm feeling feisty as all hell about it. – Kylie Madden, July 3, on Facebook Frank’s talents were many and varied. “Everyone up on the back roads here is on septic pump-out and there’s this big truck that comes and connects up the hose to the septic tanks. It makes this very distinctive noise – it goes chshh, chshh, chshh. That runs for about 15 minutes as it pumps out the tanks and Frank could actually mimic that sound and he would mix it in amongst the other calls he did. Kookaburras was one of his favorites. He was very good at that and whip birds and king parrots and yellow-throated scrub wrens. They were all in his repertoire, and then he’d slip in the pump-out truck noise – hilarious.” Frank’s death has prompted calls for traffic calming measures on the backroads beneath the escarpment. At press time, council had not made any changes, other than asking NSW Police to increase patrols on Buttenshaw Drive and Morrison Avenue “where their resources permit”. Kylie remains determined. “It hasn’t changed – yet,” she said. “I think it needs both the community and council to come together. “I’m not giving up and I don’t think the other residents of this street are going to give up.” Next month: Coledale residents speak out – how more traffic, speeding and a lack of footpaths are increasingly big problems in our coastal villages. 2515

AUGUST / 2515 / 15


Choreographer Frances Rings. Photo supplied

CLIFTON CONVERSATIONS

By David Roach One of the most satisfying aspects of the Clifton Conversations is the way they are building up their own momentum, a continuous chain of connection and talent. A few weeks ago we talked with Bulli painter John Bokor about why he is drawn to domestic interiors and still lives of cluttered table tops. Bokor works fast and spontaneously, often using a startling palette of colours. His interiors and still lives are anything but still, they pulsate with a juicy vibrancy. John explained how reimagining and rearranging remembered spaces allows him to create paintings within paintings. The European flavour of his works comes from his love of artists like Bonnard, Dufy and Marquet and memories of his grandmother’s Hungarian cooking. Chatting about the local creative community, John mentioned fellow artist Chris Zanko. Zanko is also fascinated by the domestic. He is best known for his images of the old houses that are fast disappearing from our suburbs: the miners’ cottages, the weatherboard and fibro beach shacks, the rare art deco bungalows. Zanko explained how he started out as a graffiti artist and became influenced by Japanese woodblock prints with their flat areas of colour, their elimination of excessive detail. He combines meditative techniques of wood-carving, lino-cutting and painting to make bold, graphic works that celebrate the everyday. Clifton School of Arts committee member Prue Watson mentioned that First Nations Bangarra dancer turned award-winning choreographer Frances Rings and her family had once lived with

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her in Wombarra. When Frances joined us in conversation, she explained that she is a descendant of the Kokatha Tribe from South Australia. Her country incorporates the Nullarbor: “We had big whale dreaming. Moving to Wombarra I couldn’t believe I could just look out of me window and see whales. It was my connection back to my country.” She married a saltwater man and finds similarities between swimming and dancing. “When I danced I used to think that the space around me was water and I could make it ripple or make it still or make it into a storm.” She expressed the pride she felt when the Coledale School flew the Aboriginal flag for the first time. A small, symbolic gesture that signals the willingness to begin a conversation which may take time but which Frances was keen to encourage us to pursue. In coming weeks, our conversations will follow new threads of introduction. Our first author interview is with award-winning writer Helena Fox, who writes heart-crackingly perceptive young adult fiction. A fortnight later, we pivot to frontline photography, talking to acclaimed photojournalist Stephen Dupont. In between exhibitions and international assignments covering humanitarian crises, war and climate change, he returns to the sanctuary of his home in Scarborough to recharge. Who knows where that dialogue will lead us to? n Clifton Conversations are live (and lively!) and online every second Thursday at 5pm. To receive an invitation simply join the Clifton School of Arts. Email Vivienne: vyvwilson@gmail.com. To see highlights go to www.artsclifton.org or visit our Facebook page. 2515

THIRROUL LIBRARY SERVICES

THIRROUL LIBRARY IS OPEN! It opened on 2 June in accordance with NSW government restrictions to reduce the spread of Covid-19. Make an appointment by calling 4227 8191 to come in for a 50-minute session. YOU CAN …. Browse the shelves, use self-checkout stations, use public computers and laptops, use printer, copiers & scanner, get assistance from Library staff. SORRY, AT THIS TIME WE ARE UNABLE TO…. Offer toys, games, puzzles, craft supplies, newspapers, children’s or adult programs, or provide close assistance.

CLIFTON PATH: HAVE YOUR SAY

Council is developing a project to construct a shared path in conjunction with the Clifton Hotel refurbishment. Details will be shared on its community engagement pages. Visit https://our.wollongong.nsw.gov.au/ Feedback deadline is Monday, 17 August. 2515


SLEEP, GLORIOUS SLEEP

Grahame Gould has some tips for a better night’s rest. Sleep Awareness Week (3-9 August) highlights the importance of sleep, alongside diet and exercise, as part of a healthy lifestyle. A good night’s sleep is wonderful. A bad night’s sleep can be hard work. If you are having sleep problems, start by talking to your GP to eliminate any medical causes. A common medical cause is Obstructive Sleep Apnoea with associated interrupted sleep patterns leading to day-time sleepiness and increased risk of anxiety and depression. My experience is that many people who struggle with sleeping are very alert at night. Sometimes they’re not even aware of this as they’ve developed the habit of being alert and it becomes normalised. Thinking about your day or planning for tomorrow as you try to fall asleep is a sign that your mind is alert. Revisiting past traumatic events and stressful situations can also make you more alert at night. Ironically, being worried about not falling asleep can also make it hard to get to sleep. Often the answer is not straight-forward but some useful things to consider are: • Getting out of bed at the same time each morning and out into the light to reset your melatonin-influenced biological clock; • Having a wind-down period an hour before bed where you are off screen and not thinking about day-to-day problems (ideally you can have big discussions about life at a different time); • Becoming comfortable with wakeful periods through the night (as this is quite common) and knowing that even if you do miss sleep you will find a way to get through the next day; • Practising ‘Worry Delay’ methods to decrease anxiety in the night (I found the book No Worries by Sarah Edelman extremely helpful for this). About the author: Grahame Gould is a clinical psychologist in private practice living in the northern Illawarra. “At Gould Sleep Psychology (located within Bulli Medical Practice) I help clients with insomnia, including difficulty getting to sleep, staying asleep or having non-restorative sleep.” For more information, visit http://gouldpsychology.com.au/ 2515

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Ocean Vs Beach: sandbags hold the line at Coalcliff; and (bottom left) absolute oceanfront on the NSW mid-north coast and (bottom right) the Outer Banks in North Carolina. Photos: Rob Brander

DR RIP’S SCIENCE OF THE SURF A cautionary tale of coastal erosion, by Prof Rob Brander.

Many of you would have seen the dramatic news footage of the coastal erosion at Wamberal Beach on the Central Coast during the July school holidays. Several days of large storm waves left a stretch of beachfront houses perched precariously on top of a badly eroded sand dune. As I write this, another potential east coast low system is looming. If so, it’s possible that some of those houses will collapse onto the beach, just as they did in the same location in 1978. Could this happen along the Northern Illawarra? Thanks to sensible planning decisions made in the past, and our coastal topography, probably not, but there are some valuable lessons to learn from Wamberal. Wamberal Beach is one of 16 coastal erosion ‘hotspots’ along the NSW coast, where a hotspot is defined as a location where “5 or more houses or a public road” are at immediate risk of coastal erosion. Other locations include Narrabeen/ Collaroy in Sydney’s Northern Beaches, Belongil in Byron Bay, Stockton in Newcastle, and Jimmys Beach in Port Stephens. One thing that all of these locations have in common is that houses were built in completely inappropriate locations – either too close to the shoreline (often on top of a sand dune) or on a dynamic landform, such as a sand spit, or sometimes both.

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Existing beachfront houses present a complex legacy problem with no easy solution when it comes to mitigating future storm damage or ‘who should pay’ when damage occurs. At the core of most debates is whether seawalls should be built to protect the properties. Seawalls are any structure, ranging from concrete walls to piles of rocks, built along the back of the beach in order to stabilise the shoreline location and protect property behind it. They do a very good job of this. Unfortunately, seawalls don’t do the beach in front of them any favours as they can enhance wave reflection, turbulence, longshore and rip currents, all of which lead to increased rates of erosion. They also deflect wave energy to their sides causing greater erosion to adjacent unprotected locations. You can see evidence of this in the Wamberal footage. So while homeowners tend to call for seawalls as a solution, or blame Councils for not installing seawalls earlier, Councils are trying to maintain the beach. Ultimately, seawalls protect the interests of a very few while potentially ruining an amenity used by many. While there are no erosion hotspots along our coast, our beaches and dunes are not immune from significant erosion after big storms. However, the message should be clear – when it comes to buying beachfront property, do your research and be careful what you wish for! 2515


VET AT WORK

Northern Illawarra Veterinary Hospital’s Dr Sarah Anderson shares a ‘tail of no poop’. Narla is a young energetic, playful and happy Australian cattle dog. So her owners knew something was wrong when she stopped being her usual bouncy self and appeared to be having trouble taking her regular number twos. Narla had begun vomiting the morning she presented to the hospital and was not her usual fun-loving self. She was really uncomfortable in the tummy. It turned out that for the past few days Narla had been enjoying an additional bone daily,, which had now turned from tasty treat to a serious impaction in her intestine. Radiographs confirmed her diagnosis and showed the extent of the obstruction throughout her bowel. Just like the pipes in our houses, at times there is nothing left to do but unblock the problem. To do this, Narla was placed under a general anaesthetic and had a warm water and lubricant enema performed until her pipes were free-flowing again! A messy business but on recovery the relief was visible and she was no longer bloated and uncomfortable around the belly. Narla went home that afternoon and made a full recovery. Bones of all kinds can carry many unfortunate

Dr Anderson’s x-ray of the blockage.

risks. Obstruction of the bowel and constipation are commonly seen when our doggie friends cannot digest the bone adequately or have too much of a good thing. Bones can be responsible for broken teeth, airway obstructions, lacerations of the oesophagus and intestinal tract, choking hazard and can sometimes cause a bacterial gastroenteritis. All of these problems can result in an unfortunate and expensive trip to the vet. For many owners and vets, the benefits of a raw bone are outweighed by the risks and there are many tasty chew treats – treat balls or chew toys (filled with food), or a pig’s ears, or dental treats – that can be used as safer alternatives. n Northern Illawarra Veterinary Hospital is at 332 Princes Highway, Bulli. Phone 4238 8575. 2515

For local, experienced and educated real estate advice, call Ian today! Ian Pepper 0403 570 041

ian.pepper@raywhite.com raywhitehelensburgh.com.au

Covid-19 update

JOBKEEPER 2.0 The property and share markets both received some needed positive news from the government on Tuesday 21st July. A modified version of the current JobKeeper scheme was extended for another six months from 1 October 2020 to 31 March 2021. The revised scheme scales back the fortnightly payment from $1,500 to $1,200 and also reduces payments for those casuals and part timers who were being paid more than they were previously under the existing scheme. The share market reacted quickly on the day of the announcement closing at its highest level since March 6. The local real estate market is also expected to benefit from the announcement. AUGUST / 2515 / 19


An example of a good local dual occupancy. Construction: Greenstone Homes. Architecture: mcdesign architects. Photography: Shaw Photography.

PROS AND CONS OF NEW HOUSING CODE By local architect Ben Wollen

While Covid-19 dominates the headlines, there are newsworthy stories not making the front page that probably would be if we weren’t in the midst of a pandemic. One of these is the NSW Government’s introduction of the Low Rise Medium Density Housing Code. You might recall a recent article of mine on Exempt and Complying Development? Once that was limited to single dwellings, alterations and additions and, of course, the chookpen out the back. This new addition takes the same principles and allows developers to bypass council and build new housing such as dual occupancies, terrace housing and manor houses (small flat buildings) of up to two storeys on many residentially zoned lots. That’s a lot of chooks! What does that mean for you and me? Well, if your property lies within any of residential zones R1, R2, R3 or RU5, your neighbour can apply to a private certifier for approval (within 20 days) to build two or more dwellings and bypass the usual advertising and assessment period a development application would require at Council. Furthermore, the first you might find out about what’s being built at old Edith’s place next door is when the demolition crew turn up. Scary stuff, I know! Especially in light of recent disasters with developers penny-pinching on apartment constructions – think Opal tower. Could this be the second wave of dodgy buildings requiring expensive remediation at the cost of new owners and with no recourse to the original developer? Maybe – I don’t have a crystal ball, but there are some in the development sector with a ‘profit over people’ culture. Fortunately, they’re not all like that but, good and bad alike, they’re all looking at ways to bypass Council, for reasons of time and money.

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You might ask why the government would bother, when there is already a method to get this type of development through? Simply put, it’s about supply and demand. Due to our enthusiasm to expand outward and not upward, quarter-acre blocks have taken up most of the available space and in so doing increased the cost of land around metropolitan and regional centres. By providing this ‘fast track’ method of approval for higher density, they’re hoping to alleviate the shortage in housing generally, and especially affordable housing. The scheme has many critics and some councils have deferred the code, however, from 1 July 2020, the code is now active across NSW. Time will tell whether it makes or breaks our suburbs, but let’s look to the positive side of the code. We all know that when the Genners (my new term for Gen Y and younger) see house prices soar in the area that they grew up in they sigh a big smashed avocado sigh. This code provides a chance for Mum and Dad (depending on the size of their land) to help out their progeny by carving up the family home into a dual occ. or a row of terraces or even a small block of flats. Of course, this was available to them before, but this time old Edith next door doesn’t get much of a say. I realise I’m being unfair to old Edith, but it could also help her too. Say she’s getting on and needs a bit of support at home but can’t afford carers. Well, she might opt for intergenerational living and subdivide her place so that her family can live next door and provide that care she needs. The news is only as good as you paint it. There is a summary of the code at the NSW Planning website, https://www.planning.nsw.gov.au/ Policy-and-Legislation/Housing/Low-RiseHousing-Diversity-Code. 2515


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Blossom walks in the orchard begin in August. Photo: Sasha Faint Photography

SPRING IS HEADED OUR WAY! Jo Fahey reports from Darkes Glenbernie Orchard. As we move from winter toward spring the farm begins to ‘wake up’. It’s a beautiful time of year and the atmosphere begins to feel fresh and exciting. Different blocks of trees flower in a mosaic pattern across our Darkes Forest farm from early August till early October. Stone fruit with pink flowers are first, followed by apples which are predominantly white. The flowers take a period of time to pop open. Not all flowers on a tree open exactly at the same time. Full bloom is considered to be when 90% of the flowers are open and this is brief, between one and three days. The shortness of full bloom makes it incredibly difficult to predict the prettiest or best time to view a block of trees, or for special photography. Rain can be a major interrupter, and wind can blow petals off, shortening the length of time the flowers are looking their best. An area of trees can flower over 10 days or so, but are only at their best for one day. This doesn’t mean you will only get good photos that day – it’s just the technically best day! The sun, clouds, time

of day can also impact on the way the flowers present themselves. I love photographing the flowers and every year I don’t tire of it! We are hoping to run blossom walks in the orchard beginning in August. During these walks we take a small group, with social distancing in place, to the very best flowering and have opportunities for photographs. We take you on an adventure to see and experience what is happening with the trees at this time of the year. We will show you baby fruitlets (the earliest stages of fruit formation) to see exactly how the fruit begins its life. Return and pick the fruit later in the year and see the difference in the fruit. It is a perfect chance to show children how fruit grows in sequence. You can also compare the photographs you take. Bookings for blossom walks are essential and can be made from www.darkes.com.au. Private photography sessions can be booked with Helensburgh’s Sasha Faint Photography. ! Visit www.darkes.com.au 2515

AUGUST / 2515 / 21


ON BOARD WITH SURFRIDER

By Coledale’s Susie Crick, head of the Plastic Research program at Surfrider Australia It’s August and by now I had hoped that we would have taken control of the virus that has taken control of everything. By now, I was hoping to get back to inviting you to community beach cleans, hosting GromFest Junior Surf competitions and generally rallying the community into action for the conservation of our beautiful beaches and the marine environment. Regrettably, Covid-19 has taken everything off the table and is the main subject of our news, our conversations and is starting to govern the way we live our lives. If we can remain healthy mentally and physically, and keep ourselves, our families, our loved ones and community healthy, we will get through this windy winter and come out the other side able to move around our country freely. But what about the environment? We have now prioritised our health and survival, yet we don’t give a second thought to the planet’s health and the impact we are having on the land that we stand on, the oceans that give us life and the oxygen we breathe. Let’s compare our reaction to the health

SONIA SAYS… “come and visit our new dog training centre”.

Sonia Gregson from Sonia Says Sit has expanded her successful local business and established a new, dedicated dog training centre at the rear of Sunrise Nursery in Helensburgh. You and your dogs are invited to attend and experience this great new facility at an open day on Sunday August 23, between 11am and 2pm. Sonia Says Sit offers Puppy Preschool, Puppy Playgroup, Adolescent & Adult dog training, as well as in-home training. FOR ENQUIRIES AND TO BOOK VISIT SONIASAYSSIT.COM.AU

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Photo: Weston Fuller

crisis to our reaction to the environmental crisis. Last summer we learned of a virus in China, but we largely ignored it, because it was ‘not in my backyard’. It was news, but not our news and so we put our heads in the sand. When will we wake up to realise the health of the planet also affects us? As a community we can see climate change changing our world, and acknowledge there is a problem but, just like at the beginning of the Covid pandemic, we are not prepared to do anything. It won’t be until the world puts on their collective ‘face-masks’, and join as ONE to tackle the environmental problem that we are ALL creating, that we will start the regeneration of our planet. We can no longer ignore what we are doing to the earth and our oceans. We still naively think that we can get away with doing nothing about it – but we simply can’t. The problem isn’t too big; each and every one of us can fix this by taking small actions every day in the choices we make, especially when we shop. Use your voice and let your favourite business know that you don’t want food packaged or sold in plastic, and only buy what you absolutely need. Plastic never melts or goes away and is choking the planet. We are eating and breathing it, and it is seeping into every aspect of our existence. Just say ‘NO’ to plastic in order to regenerate our planet and improve our health. 2515 Become a member and get involved! For more info: www.surfrider.org.au


OCEAN VIEW DECK COMING SOON By Warrick Try, secretary/manager of Coledale RSL Club Look what we have been up to at The Coledale RSL! Things are really starting to take shape at the venue with the servery installed, wooden flooring and carpet laid and the bar really coming to life. The biggest change to the Club will be the addition of a large deck with retractable roof that

boasts ocean views and a grassy dog-friendly area. Other exciting additions will include new furniture, a coffee corner, upgraded kitchen and dining facilities. The coffee corner will operate seven days a week from 8am and will serve barista-made coffee with on-the-go breakfast options. In the kitchen, chef Carlos is returning for lunch and dinner from Wednesday till Sunday with his new international menu. The menu will have club favourites, chef selections and family-friendly meal options to enjoy. The Coledale RSL will be reopening its doors very soon. Keep an eye on Facebook @ColedaleRSLclub for our launch date. 2515

COLEDALE RSL CLUB OPENING SOON Same friendly club, same great chef - brand new look! NEW deck with ocean views & barista coffee from 8am International Menu at My Little Brasserie Open Wednesday-Sunday for Lunch and Dinner @coledalerslclub and 4267 1873 AUGUST / 2515 / 23


PHOTOGRAPH SURFERS

Janice Creenaune meets Ray Smith, a graphic designer, sign writer, silk-screen printer and a photographer celebrating the art of surfing. Photos supplied. Ray Smith started surfing at a young age. He also started photography early, so it’s an easy fit to combine his passion for both, to follow the surf, the surfers and the competitive sport to create stunning images. A moment in time of fast-paced action captured for all to enjoy. Trial and error, experience and artistic ability allowed this self-taught photographer to look for different perspectives. “I was always looking for a different angle, always looking for something distinctive. It is the competitive surfing events (CT, Competitive Tour) and especially the Qualifying Series (QS) in Australia which I really enjoy. Every year, in March and April, Clarrie Bouma and I head north to the Snapper Rocks Quicksilver Pro (just south of Brisbane) and photograph our mates. “I photograph many things, bushfires, nature and the Port Kembla stack fall. That was a really amazing experience. It had instant shock-waves and gases squirted out the vents like you may imagine on a space ship. It is hard to describe, but there was a real adrenaline rush. Certainly a very unusual three seconds. The stack wobbled back and forth, and then developed a slow fall. It was an awesome experience to witness.” He remains dedicated to surf photography. “I still enjoy my own surfing, but my photography is land-based primarily. I do feel I have an edge because I can anticipate the wave, what is going to happen and when. It is important to both read the wave and the surfer’s mind to capture what is about to happen. It is amazing to witness that next level on the pro circuit. When I do get that ‘hot shot’ and a feeling that I have ‘nailed it,’ it can be an amazing feeling.”

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Ray may spend many hours at the beach, taking many images. “And all the time I wish I was out there. I do sacrifice my own love of the sport to capture the efforts of others. But there is a joy in seeing the genuine delight others get in seeing themselves on a wave, and I often get many thanks from family members as well. “I do minimal photo-shopping, just often to sharpen images or crop. I then just pick the best image and place it on my website … I find that if I ‘play with it’ I lose the essence of the shot.” Ray’s website, Waxheads.com, is a showcase of his work. “I had 7000 hits from our last Coledale event, and counting. I like to promote the sport, publicity gives it greater credence and after the global financial crisis, money for the sport has not been so forthcoming. “The new teams events are making quite a ‘splash’ though. It adds a new dimension and allows for mixed events, greater camaraderie and a loss of the pressure on individual competitors. It also promotes good mental well-being … and it is really exciting to be a part of.” Ray often completes media work for Scarborough Boardriders of which he is proudly a life-time member. Ray’s skillful use of the camera, his expertise in surfing and his genuine love and appreciation for surfers and the sport help him to capture the perfect moment. What next? Videos, Instagram? Whatever, Ray is never finished. For more of Ray’s images, visit Waxheads.com. n Writer Janice Creenaune is a volunteer for the PKD (Polycystic Kidney Disease) Foundation. For more information please contact Janice on janicecreenaune@gmail.com or ph 42674880. 2515


’TIS THE SEASON With Green Connect ambassador Kristin Watson

I recently left my role as Fair Food Coordinator to focus on my studies, but will still be sharing recipes (here and on Instagram @theproduceconnection) plus getting my hands dirty as often as I can on the farm. I’ve been enjoying the white cabbage and making sauerkraut, cabbage salads and this cabbage lasagne. I call it that although in Swedish it’s called cabbage pudding, but that just hasn’t got the same ring to it in English. This is a very old traditional dish, using the whole cabbage. Vegetarian? Use beluga lentils instead of mince. CABBAGE LASAGNE 1kg white cabbage (whole) 300g free-range pork mince 300ml pork broth 1 onion 50g butter 1 bay leaf

1 egg 1 medium sized potato, boiled 1tsp English mustard 1½ tbsp. golden syrup 50g breadcrumbs

Lettering : pantone cool gray 11 Leave : pantone 5555 and shade 60%

SAUCE: 700ml pork broth 2 bay leaves 15g butter cabbage hearts

1 onion ½ tsp whole white pepper 1 tsp mustard seeds

Quarter cabbage and cut out its heart (save for sauce). Shred cabbage, put half aside for later. Sauté half cabbage with butter on low to medium heat until caramelised. Salt cabbage. Once a nice golden brown, add the syrup, bay leaf and broth. Simmer until liquid has evaporated, and put aside. Then sauté the rest of the cabbage with one onion until soft, but not caramelised. Add half of this mixture to a food processor and mix with eggs, potato, mustard and breadcrumbs. Stir in mince (or cooked lentils) and the rest of the cabbage/ onion mixture by hand. Grease a 32x25cm oven dish. Layer caramelised cabbage, then a layer of the meat mixture, then top with caramelised cabbage. Bake at 150°C for 20 min then cover with foil and cook for another 20 min. Cut up cabbage heart. Fry with onion in butter, then add 700 ml broth, and spices. Simmer for 30 min then strain and season to taste. I serve it with green peas and lingon berries, or cranberry sauce. To order veg boxes, visit green-connect.com.au. 2515

AUGUST / 2515 / 25


BEETLING ABOUT With Helensburgh entomologist Dr Chris Reid

One of my duties is handling enquiries from members of the public – ie, you. However, most insect-related enquiries are about relatively common things that our team at the museum can handle. Infestations of spider beetles, hawk moths, european wasps… that sort of thing. Yes, spider beetles, even my mother has them in her house – probably breeding in sparrow nests in the roof. Beyond that filter, the odder beetle enquiries get sent on to me. So I got sent a picture of small, bright-pink beetles feeding on a lichen. There are three things odd about that. One: very few beetles are bright pink, in fact, very few insects generally. Why I have no idea, but maybe pinkness is difficult to create structurally – colours in insects are generally a result of light being reflected off different layers in the insect skin. The bog-standard colour for an insect is brown, the colour of the main chemical compound (chitin). Being bright pink doesn’t mean these are like lollies – just the opposite, they are probably saying “Look at me, I’m poisonous”. The other odd thing is that very few insects feed on lichen. And they certainly fed on it – the stump was cleaned up a few weeks later. Lichen is plentiful, so why don’t insects feed on it? Lichens are odd things – compound organisms made up of fungi (which are related to animals) and algae (which are simple plants). The algae

LIFEOLOGY With Terri Ayliffe.

Why can’t I make a decision? Indecisiveness can make moving forward difficult. If we are not prepared to take risks, even with the possibility of making a wrong choice, we are effectively stuck. Often a fear of failure keeps us in one place, but we may also fear success. After all, both have the potential to change our lives and quite often it is the change we find intimidating. In some cultures, failure is seen as a necessary stepping stone to success. In our culture that is rarely the case. We tend to view failure as the end of something, not part of the journey to getting it. To succeed, we must be prepared to fail, though

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produce energy and the enclosing fungi shelter the algae. The result might be chemically potent, like a mix of deathcaps and blue-green algae, not something you want to try eating unless desperate. However, not much is known of the chemistry of Australian lichens, although at least some produce phenols, which are pretty nasty. My guess is the beetles are able to ingest the chemicals from the lichen and use them for their own defence. The third and most important part of this story is that the biology of this type of beetle, called Lemodes, was previously completely unknown. And this illustrates a fourth and even more important thing. The discovery was serendipitous – due to the curiosity of a member of the public who was interested in nature, was out in the bush, found this, photographed it and wanted to know more. Please keep asking questions! Email editor@2515mag.com.au 2515

Lemodes beetles feeding on lichen. Photo: Arthur White, Bellingen.

with good planning it is unlikely to happen. If we are prepared to take risks, we give ourselves permission for either outcome and we will have adopted an approach that allows us to try again. If we make decisions with a need for perfection, then failure is unacceptable. If this is our approach to achieving our goals, then doing nothing is less risk then doing something. We tend to over-think things. Often the best method of making decisions is to quieten our thoughts and listen to our instincts. There is something within us that knows the right thing to do. If you have a decision to make, take time to sit quietly, try to ignore your noisy thoughts and tune into your instincts. You may find decision-making much easier and in the process gain an understanding that nothing is perfect and reevaluate failure as a stepping stone, not a wall. n Read more at https://lifeology.blog or get in touch with Terri: Terriayliffe@gmail.com or 0431 488 914. 2515


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20 5 36 9 10 6 WE 30 6

1.32 0402 1.19 0443 0.45 0.36 0432 1.41 0331 0.39 0428 0.31 0436 0.43 0042 0.24 0015 0.35 0548 0.14 0625 0.27 0525 0.22 0605 1 25 1 25 16 1029 16 0605 10 1250 0 0604 10 1212 7 0959 22 7 1045 22 0.54 0.57 1.17 0630 1.23 1041 1034 0.42 0930 1207 1.23 1.29 1.25 1.40 1.30 1200 1.51 1.28 1130 1.33

0.50 1.33 1.49 1.54 0.54 0.68 0.51 1.70 1719 0.73 0.62 0.70 0.51 0.55 0.33 0.57 0.46 SA 1200 WE 1710 TH 1710 SU 1133 MO 1846 TH 1654 FR 1736 SA 1742 FR 1621 SA 1634 TU 1521 WE 1500 0.68 2154 0.59 2241 1.79 2249 0.46 2130 2347 1.68 2344 1.79 2353 1.54 1840 1.69 1810 1.58 2357 1.74 1.68 1.83 2320 1.91 2354

0.30 0516 0.34 1.30 0445 1.19 0515 1.37 0415 0652 0.45 0532 0.33 0533 0.48 0131 0.29 0100 0.40 0636 0.21 0043 0.32 0615 0.20 0645 2 17 17 2 1 26 11 26 11 8 23 8 23 1125 0.43 1017 0722 1.25 1130 0652 1.23 0.54 1114 0.57 1300 1.22 1.30 1259 1.26 1.43 0706 1124 1.31 1254 1.53 1044 1.27 1225 1.35 S

14 2 15 9 50 8 TH 7

1.57 1812 0.78 TH WE 1605 2234

25 0040 0651

1.41 0.41 TU 1321 1.54 1951 0.48

1.27 0146 1.26 0.54 0745 0.50 1802 1.80 0.49 0.48 1.34 WE 1425 1.55 1.63 0.64 0.74 0.55 0.60 0.38 0.61 0.46 SU 1249 MO 1222 FR 1754 TU 1340 FR 1751 SA 1828 SU 1845 SA 1704 SU 1733 TH 1551 1.82WALES 1.78 0.70 2113 0.49 1.48 2342 1856 1.58 1952 1.75 2216 PORT1.88 KEMBLA –2316 NEW1927 SOUTH LAT 34° 29’ S LONG 150° 55’ E 0.27 0602 0.25 1.18 Local Time 0041 0.50 0045 0.37 0501 1.72Local 0038 1.44 0215 1.55 0142 0304 1.16 0549 0.45 0053 0.31 0140 0.37 0013 0.21 and Times Time Heights of High and Low Waters 1.28 1224 0737 1.30 0.59AUGUST0848 0.56 1.21JUNE 0633 1.34 0.34 0625 0.51 0808 0.36 1205 1.31 0726 1.54 0754 1.26 0707 1107 1.38 0725 MAY JULY AUGUST 1336 0.48 0.41 1.37 0.55 1214 0.46 1.34 1532m 1.57 1347 1.29 1.48 0.44 0.65 0.48 MO TU 1310 SAm1157 SA SU Time MO WE 1435 SU MO Time Time 0.64 m 1351 Time m m 1751 Time m TH Time Time 1322 m FR 1645 Time1837 m 1.83 1941 1.87 1.711.59 2357 1852 1.87 0.66 1928 0.77 2231 2108 1.38 1.65 1.80 0343 Time m 04202010 Time 0320m 0015 1.32 0436 1.19 0042 0.36 0150 1855 1.57 04280.57 1.41 TIME 2305 M1.441836 TIME M 1957 TIME M 0.69 TIME0.45 0.46 M

26

2020 PORT KEMBLA TIDAL CHART 2020

0.60 0526 1.57 18 12 3 27 24 18 12 9 3AUGUST 2 0035 27 242020 9 1.30 0740 0.50 1128 0.54

20 1 02 8 Y 52 9 FR 28 4

1353 1.23 FR TH 1649 1.65 2314 1911 0.81 Time m

04 1 48 9 30 2 TH SA 05 9

0436 0.53 0126 1029 1.29 0826 1710 0.54 1446 FR 2353 1.72 2017

1.49 1200 0.51 SU 1133 0.54 1515 1.22 SA 1633 1.30 1710 1.70 TH 1710 1.54 MO 1643 TU 17100257 WE 1.19 FR0140 0015 0.45 0042 0.36 0124 0.411.54 0.30 0548 0.26 0224 0.17 SA 1.12 1.41 0249 04251.68 1.13 1.47 1.63 0128 1.35 0605 0.43 0.24 1.41 2330 0.50 0.68 0156 2353 0.59 1840 1.79 2213 0.79 1810 2036 0110 0.76 2245 0.57 0625 23440040 0.46 0630 1.23 0.57 0605 1.17 0713 1.24 0730 1.33 0850 1.29 0821 1.36 0818 0.42 0848 0.62 09550.34 0.58 0.53 0800 0.36 0809 0.54 1212 1.25 1200 0.41 0418 1.421.40 0445 1.58 1250 0514 1.33 1.30 0533 1.19 0131 0.30 0100 0301 1.59 05320651 1.37 171742 17 0652 21302 2 1106 17TU 2TU 171359 1052 0.52 11151419 0.54 1451 1114 0.57 0722 1.25 FR 1000 0.41 0.34 1846 11251321 0.43 1200 0.51 1.54 1133 0.54 1241 0.53 0.48 0.48 0.35 2 1.42 1.53 1533 16381.23 1.60 1.27 1421 1.40 1439 1.33 0.68 1736 0.70 0.51 1.54 SA SU SU SASA WE TU TH SU MO MO SA 1249 0.49 MO 1222 0.48 1618 1.32 SU 1716 1.38 1733 1.67 WE 1750 1.57 TH 1802 1.80 FR 1754 1.63 0.59 1941 1810 1.68 20512115 1840 1.79 1918 1.790.47 0.77 1.92 2357 1.80 1951 1.91 SU 0.64 0.56 2026 23381.78 0.40 0.83 0.66 2037 2354 1.54 1.69TU 2349 0.48 2222 2312 0.73 1927 1.82 1856 2152 2006 0.68

45 3 33 0 06 4 FR SU 43

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27 2 17 4 45 4 SA MO 21 6

0041 0.40 0323 0625 1.29 0955 1157 0.55 1626 SU 1836 1.83 2232

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08 3 02 6 28 0 SU 02 6

0124 0.35 0713 1.29 1241 0.56 MO 1918 1.86

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SU 1241 0.53 1918 1.79

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17 11 5 29 26 20 14 47 11 5 292 26 20 14

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0 14 8 5 29 23 20 14 8

LES

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2020

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29

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0.45 SU 1451 0.58 0.67 WE 1601 0.59 SU 1751 0.64 MO 1837 0.44 SA 1525or TU 1630 time TH 1649 0.65 FR 1645 e (UTC +10:00) daylight savings (UTC when in 0.48 effect 2357 1.38 2153 1.94 2122 1.79 2302 1.79 2231 1.84+11:00) 2314 1.65 2305 1.80 0409 0.31 0348 0.11 0.26 0526 0549 0.45 0602 0.31 37 0.31 0332 0.37 0501 0.21 0421 1.24 0511 1.12 0030 0.34 7 0248 1.21 0604 0.39 0525 0.31 Full0605 0.43 0548 0.24 0625 0.50 0040 1.41 0438 0.25 0407 0.40Quarter Moon New Moon First Quarter 251010 10Local 25 11301205 1008 1.30 0952 1.47 1.30101128 1.31 1224 1.5410 1250 Last 38 1.28 0943 1.26 1107 1.381.23Time 1207 1.29 10 12120625 1.25 25 1200 1.40 1.33 25 0651 0.41 1040 1.37 1005 1.28 0.50 1042 0.59 1.20 0 0843 0.57

1 15 9 6 30 24 21 15 9

30 24

2 16 10 7 311 25 22 16 10

31 25

3 17 11 8 2 26 23 17 11

26

4 18 12 9 3 27 24 18 12

27

5 19 13 10 4 28 25 19 13

28

6 20 14 11 5 29 26 20 14

29

7 21 15 12 6 30 27 21 15

30

0.73 TH 1654 0.62 1736 0.70 SA 1742 0.51 1.54 1610 0.55 MO 1530 0.62 WE 1719 FR 1541 0.52 1540 0.31 0.47 0.64 0.44MO 1846 0.68 TU 1321 01 0.59 0.65 0.48 1.67 1.58 0.53 9 1412 1.46 TH1.88 FR TU SU MO 1837 THSU1649 FR1.791645 TH 1652 SA SU WE 1622 2347 1.68 1722 23201751 1.79 23541153 1.54 2357 1.69 1951 0.48 2241 2202 AUGUST 2205 1.67 2305 2200 2045 1.90 2314 1.38 31 1.84 2257 1.65 2343 1.80 1.8506152357 1.69 5JULY 0.68 0043 1.27 0535 0.31 0452 0.410.43 0652 0.45 0.33 06451827 0.48 0636 0.29 0146 1.26 26 1225 1.30 1.26 11 1.26 26 1254 1.43 11 0706 0.54 26 0745 0.50 Time11 1137 m 1.28 26 1053 Time m 1300 1.22 Time m 11 1259 m 1.34 WE 1425 1.55 1657 0.65 1613 0.66 0.64 1828 0.74 SU 1845 0.55 TU0530 FR 17510625 SA 0443 0.35 0432 0.50 1.41 TU 1340 25 0331 0.31 0.22 MO0605 0.43 0548 0.240.78 0.14 0115 0040 0.30 1.22TH 1812 1952 0.70 2329 1.79 2245 1.76 2113 0.49 1.19 1045 0042 0.36 1041 0015 0.45 1.33 0709 0651 .41 0930 1.33 1212 1.30 1.51 1250 0.41 30 1.29 0436 1.25 1200 1.40 1.25 1106 0.51 0633 0.39 0542 0.42 0035 1.57 0013 1.72 0038 1.44 0053 1.55 0140 1.18 0304 1.16 1029 0.57 0630 1.23 0605 1.17 .42 12 27MO 271748 1621 0.55 1634 0.68 1321 1.5412 0754 0.59 27 0848 0.56 54 1500 0.62 0.46 0.70 0.510.50 0.33 1236 1145 07071846 0.34 12 07251242 0.51 0726 0.36 0.48 1.74 WE FR1.22 SA 0740 TU27 FR121736 SA1.231742 MO FR 1747 0.74 WE 1702 0.70 0.51 1.23 1133 1.34 1351 1.48 FR 1353 SA 1322 0.54 SU 1347 1.29 MO WE 1435 1.37 TH 1532 1.57 1.54 1200 .70 2130 1.91 TU2354 2241 1.58 2249 1.74 SA2333 SU TH 1710 1951 0.48 20 1.79 1.54 2357 1.69 1912 1.71 1.72 1911 0.81 1855 0.66 1928 0.77 1957 0.57 2108 0.69 2231 0.46 2353 0.59 1840 1.79 1810 1.68 .46 0020 1.68 0.43 1.63 0128 1.35 0156 1.41 1.12 0425 1.13 0515 0.40 0516 1.27 15 0415 0.33 0.20130645 0.48 0636 0.291.47 0146 1.2613 0249 28 0635 13 0126 28 0110 0732 0.46 1243 1.23 0826 0.53 0.21 08000043 0.36 13 0809 0.54 28 0818 0.42 0848 0.62 28 0955 0.58 1339 1.19 0.73 1.27 0100 1.40 1439 1.33 TU 1451 1.53 TH 1800 SA 1446 SU 14210706 MO TH 1533 1.42 FR 1638 1.60 0131 0.30 0.34 1.19 .37Meteorology 1124 1.31 1130 1.53 1017 1.35 WE1259 of 0.54 25 1.30 0533 1.26 1254 1.43 0745 0.50 1845 0.80 2017 0.83 2006 0.66 2037 0.77 2115 0.56 2222 0.64 2338 0.40 0722 1.25 1.23 1.34 WE 1425 1.55 0.57 .43 1551 0.60 1733 0.38 0.46 1340 51 0.64 1114 0.74 0028 0.551.40 0652 SA 1704 SU 0223 TH TU SA 1828 SU1.681845 TIMES AND 0116 1.57 0307 1.30 0404 1.10 0532 HEIGHTS 1.15 0214 1.55 0227 1.27 1249 0.49 1222 0.48 1754 1.63 .80 2216 14 29 29 14 29 14 29 14 2316 1.48 2342 1.58 1.88 FR 0.70 2113 0.49 0946 0.62 0830 0.51 SU0732 0.43 0914 0.47 1058 0.57 0911MO 0.54 08521952 0.38 0855 0.56 OF HIGH AND LOW 1444 1.20 FR 1346 1.25 1.82 1630 1.49 1737 1.65 1538 1.33 1856 1519 1.78 1.49 1532 1.39 WE 1552 1.60 TH FR SA SU MO TU 1927 ht savings time1953 (UTC +11:00) when in effect 0.84 1906 0.75 2233 0.51 2324 0.55 2127 0.81 2121 0.62 2150 0.74 WATERS 13 0501 1.72 0.21 0038 0549 1.44 0.45 0053 0602 1.55 0.31 0140 1.18 0304 1.16 0217 1.49 0129 1.63 1.35 1.47 Last0332 1.21 0421 1.24 0511 1.12 0030 0.34 Moon rst 1107 Quarter Quarter 0215 0.27 0.25 0041 0.50 .37 1.38150725 1205 1.31 1224 1.54 07 0.34 0.51 0726 0.360.54 0142 0.59 0848 0.5615 1042 0.59 30 30Full 15 0323 30 0321 0923 0.53 0830 0.41 0955 09440754 0.40 15 0943 0.57 30 1010 0.50 1.20 LAT0625 340 29’ 1543 1.24 1.32 1.40 0737 1.59 1622 1.46 TH 1652 1.67 SA 1449 MO 1626 TU 16151435 WE SA 1722 1.58 SU 1153 00.53 0808 1.28 1.30 1.21 .34 1645 0.48 1751 0.64 1837 0.44 22 1.34 0625 1.29 1351 1.48 1.37 1532 1.57 FR SU MO SUFR1347 MO WE TH 2105 0.83 2020 0.73 2232 0.75 2235 0.55 2257 0.68 2343 0.43 1827 1.69 LONG 150 55’ 1336 0.48 0.57 0.41 0.69 0.55 2357 .46 2305 1.80 1928 1.38 MO0236 TU 1310 2108 SA 1157 55 0.66 0.77 1957 2231 1.22 0.46 1.61 0.30 2010 1941 1.87 1836 1.71 .87 31 0926 31 0530 31 0115 0.38 1.83 1106 0.51 0709 1.25 1.42 1748 1.74 SU 1548 FR MO 1242 0.48 0.50 0156 0040 1.41 1.41 0249 1.12 0425 1.13 10 0548 1.63 0.24 0128 0625 1.35 2134 0.67 1912 1.71 0.41 1250 .30 1200 0.26 0651 0.17 0.62 1.40 0809 1.33 0818 0.41 0848 0.42 0224 0955 0.58 00 0.36 0124 0.54 0257 0713 1.24 .33 0850 1.29 0821 1.36 1742 0.51 1846 0.68 1321 1.54 1451 1.53 1533 1.42 1638 1.60 21 1.40 1439 1.33 of Australia 2019,TH Bureau of Meteorology FR SA MO Commonwealth TU TU MO Copyright 0.53of Predictions .48 2357 0.48 0.35 0.64 is Lowest Astronomical Tide 2222 1.69 Datum 1951 0.48 SU 1241 TU 1419 WE 1359 2115 0.56 2338 0.40 06 0.66 2037 0.77 or daylight 1918 Times 1.79are in local standard .92 2051 time 1.80(UTC +10:00) 2026 1.91savings time (UTC +11:00) when in effect Moon Phase Symbols New Moon First Quarter Full Moon Last Quarter 1.30 1.26 0404 1.10 0532 1.15 14 0636 1.55 0.29 0227 0043 1.27 1.27 0307 0146 0.33 0706 .26 1254 0334 0.28 0745 0306 0.12 0.62 1.43 The 0.54 0.50 0914 0.47 0946 1058 0.57 52 0.38 0206 0855 0.56 Bureau of Meteorology gives no warranty of any kind whether express, implied, statutory or otherwise in respect to the availability, accuracy, currency, completeness, 1.27 .31 1845 1.30 1.42 0.55 1340 1.34 1.55 1.60 1630 1.49 1.65 19 1.49 0758 1532 1.39of the0930 SU TU WE 1552 TU quality or reliability information orWE that the1425 information0906 willFR be fit for any particular purpose SA or will 1737 not infringe any third party Intellectual Property rights. 0.50 .50 0.62 1500 0.50 0.32 1952 0.70 0.49 MO 1325 The WE TH 1448 2233 0.51 2324 21 2150 0.74 Bureau’s liability for any loss, damage, cost2113 or expense resulting from use of, or0.55 reliance on, the information is entirely excluded. 2001 1.86 .92 2129 1.75 2112 1.91 0030 0.34 21 0053 1.47 1.55 30­ 0332 1.21 1.24 1.16 0511 1.12 / 2515­0140 / AUGUST1.18 0421 0304 .25 0726 0.26 0754 0.31 0848 0.11 0.59 0.56 1042 0.36 0943 0.59 1010 0625 1.20 44 0.40 0248 0.57 0409 0.50 0348 .30 1351 1.30 1.30 1.47 1.58 SU 1153 0.53 1.57 1.48 1.37 15 1.59 0843 1.46 1008 1.67 0952 TH 1532 MO WE 1435 WE 1622 TH 1652 SA 1722 .53 1957 0.47 2108 0.52 2231 0.46 0.31 0.57 2257 0.69 2343 TU 1412 TH 1541 FR 1540 1827 1.69 35 0.55 0.68 0.43 .89 2045 1.90 2205 1.67 2200 1.85 0156 1.41 0249 1.12 0530 0425 1.22 1.13 0115 0.30


Kit Irving-Dent, winner of the under-18s final at the June 28 pointscore. Photo: Scarborough Boardriders

BOARDRIDERS FIT IN A POINTSCORE By Scarborough Boardrider Ian Pepper

The Scarborough Boardriders were stoked to hold the club’s first pointscore since 8 March on Sunday, 28 June. The swell, wind and weather all cooperated for an epic day of surfing for all ages, from micros to the over-55s. Our home beach had been firing in the lead-up to the day and did not disappoint with perfect three-foot clean peaky waves all day. Due to the COVID restrictions imposed upon us we were unable to hold finals for any division, but every member registered got to surf a heat in the top conditions on offer.

SALUTE TO SQUIERS Finally, on a proud note we acknowledge the retirement of Nic Squiers from the World Surf League Qualifying Series (QS). Over the 10 years Nic competed on the world stage he racked up an impressive list of achievements. Most notable among these were QS wins at Burleigh and Maroubra, a couple of Aussie titles, and a gold medal for Australia at the ISA China Cup in 2014. 2515

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