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MAY 2020

www.2515mag.com.au

5 1 COAST NEWS

A NEW CHAPTER LIFE & LOCAL BUSINESS IN THE AGE OF COVID-19

Clifton | Scarborough | Wombarra | Coledale | Austinmer | Thirroul


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BOOK YOUR PRINT AD ONLINE! Next cut-off is May 20.

EDITORS’ LETTER

Well, this is a surprise. Here we are – in the middle of a global pandemic and economic meltown, COAST NEWS www.2515mag. publishing an independent print magazine entirely com.au funded by advertisements for local businesses. EDITORS Gen Swart, Marcus Craft When coronavirus restrictions kicked off, venues closed and ad revenue plummeted, it seemed all CONTACT editor@2515mag.com.au. Ph: 0432 612 168 local media was doomed. Last month big players 2515mag. PO Box 248, Helensburgh, 2508. like News Corp and Australian Community Media ADVERTISING 0432 612 168. www.2515mag.com.au. T&Cs apply. stopped printing many of their regional DEADLINE 18th of month prior. newspapers. Around the world, community COVER At Collins Booksellers Thirroul. Photo: Unicorn Studios publications have been folding fast. Incredibly, 2515 Coast News and sister mag 2515 is published by The Word Bureau, ABN 31 692 723 477. 2508 District News are still standing, but the world Disclaimer: All content and images remain the property of 2515 Coast is changing daily so who knows whether this will News unless otherwise supplied. No part of this magazine may be be the case next month. reproduced without written permission. Views expressed do not reflect Established in late 2013, our small family those of the publisher. business, The Word Bureau, is a publishing company run by two journalists who’ve spent a lifetime in the media. Our mags go where Google MEET OUR CONTRIBUTORS and Facebook can’t – directly into the hands of DAVID ROACH is a visual artist and awardlocal residents, via household letterboxes. As the winning screenwriter and director. His films only print publication producing original, local have been released internationally, including content specifically for this community, we provide the documentary Red Obsession (narrated by part-time casual work for other locals – from Russell Crowe), Beneath Hill 60 (starring Brendan Cowell) and The Surgeon and the Soldier about surgeon, photographers and sales reps to our unique Dr Munjed Al Muderis. David lives on the Illawarra coast with his distribution team. This fit and fabulous group of wife, author and broadcaster, Caroline Baum. David is part of a walkers tackles the hills of the escarpment each team caring for and revitalising the lovely Clifton School of Arts. month to hand-deliver more than 9000 mags to homes and workplaces from Waterfall to Bulli. DR CHRIS REID lives in Helensburgh and Our goal is simple: to celebrate our community. works in the Australian Museum in Sydney as Our motto is ‘Everyone has a story’ and over the a research scientist specialising in beetles. His job is a combination of research, teaching past seven years we’ve put more than 100 local people on the cover of our mags, published or supervising students, and dealing with public enquiries. A NSW government beetle expert, Chris thousands of local stories, reporting on everyone describes his identifying beetles as “a bit like detective work”. from sports players to coastal creatives, from “Working on insects means I get to indulge in two favourite talented teens to award-winning seniors. pastimes: travel and bushwalking.” Last month, readers and advertisers took the time to tell us how much they love our mags. From DR LORRAINE JONES came to NSW after an local tradies to our local bank, the feedback has internship in the Royal Brisbane Hospital. She been overwhelmingly supportive. worked at the Prince Henry Hospital before going into general practice in Regents Park in The volunteers at Clifton School of Arts even Sydney. After moving to Stanwell Park in 1970 surprised us by booking a quarter-page ad. she worked part-time in Helensburgh until she went into A few years ago, we ran a big feature on how specialist practice in rehabilitation. After she retired, Dr Jones funding cuts to Northern Illawarra Neighbour Aid joined the Helensburgh and District Historical Society and has at the time threatened this crucial local service’s published a booklet on the 1919 influenza epidemic. existence – this month, the non-profit booked a full page of advertising with us. DR JULIE BLAZE is a general practitioner in the Northern A heartfelt thank you to all of our readers and Illawarra. She studied medicine in Newcastle, advertisers for keeping local news alive! graduating in 1986. She worked as a doctor in The editors, Gen & Marcus Sydney until she took over Bulli Medical PS: Turn to page 10 to read how other local Practice in 1999. Julie has a special interest, and considerable businesses are adapting to life and work in the age expertise, in travel medicine, chronic disease management, of COVID-19. 2515 women’s health, weight management and aged care. She supervises medical students from the University of Wollongong and General Practice Registrars from GP Synergy. In her spare time, Julie enjoys family life, cooking, yoga, reading, exercising, walking her dog and travelling. 2515

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LIVE STREAMED, FROM LOCAL STUDIO TO WORLD Organiser Karen Lundin reports on the Coal Coast Film Festival – last year at Anita’s Theatre, this year live streamed from Helensburgh’s LundinStudio on April 11.

We are thrilled to announce the award-winners for 2020’s Coal Coast Film Festival. Game Night, directed by Penelope Berkemeier, won Best Short Film (Australia) 2020. Berkemeier worked for a decade in television as an assistant director on shows like Home and Away. In this nine-minute comedy set in a bomb shelter, the hosts are determined to have a fun games night, but barbs are traded and relationships tested as the night descends into farce. Roxy Love Child, by writer/director/producer duo Jennifer Sabal and Benjamin Kramme of Germany, won Best Short Film (International) 2020. Sabel and Kramme, an actor couple based in Berlin and Schwerin, made an 11-minute short, a comedic take on gender stereotypes. All finalist short films were judged by a panel of film industry professionals. Our live audience event was cancelled due to the coronavirus outbreak, so we adapted our delivery to a live stream run by Dennis at LundinStudio in Helensburgh. We had a generator on standby for blackouts, a high-speed 4GX dongle for internet failure, two live stream back-up copies on separate computers in case the live stream went down on servers in different parts of the world and, finally, the main live stream was running on a laptop which would switch to battery in a blackout until the generator system was activated. Fortunately, none of the back-up systems were needed. Live stream consulting is one of the services offered by LundinStudio.

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Coal Coast Film Festival organisers Karen and Dennis Lundin. Photo: Unicorn Studios

Our 2021 festival will include a live audience studio screening (if restrictions have been eased), and a live stream. Thanks to our locals who joined the live stream – it was great to hear your feedback! LundinStudio founded the Coal Coast Film Festival to encourage up-and-coming filmmakers. We are in our third season and run five submission rounds from which an Australian and International finalist is selected for screening at the end of the season. The next event will be in March 2021. Total prize value is more than $13,000 for the 12 finalists and two award-winners. Awardwinners receive a custom film laurel, trophy, a suite of production software, a two-hour workshop with writer/director/producer Corey Pearson of Rhythmic Films and a shoot day at LundinStudio in the Helensburgh Business Park. Thanks to our trophy sponsor Gala Trophies, who went above and beyond to provide trophies for our award winners. Thank you to 2508 District News and 2515 Coast News for being our Media Sponsor and helping to get the word out to filmmakers and film lovers alike. Submissions are now open, and earlybird deadline is May 7. Final submissions for the first round close on May 28. Visit www.CoalCoastFilmFestival. com or join the LundinStudio public Facebook group Coal Coast Film Festival. 2515


ARE YOU ISOLATED AND NEED SOME ASSISTANCE? Call the staff at NINA and we can arrange assistance for you.

Need some shopping done and can’t go outside

Need to go to a Doctor or specialist appointment?

Lonely and need someone to talk to on the phone?

Prefer to have meals on wheels delivered to you

Monday–Friday (9am-5pm) | telephone 02 4294 1900 18 Walker Street, Helensburgh

ARE YOU ABLE TO ASSIST SOMEONE WHO IS ISOLATED OR LONELY?

Call the NINA staff and you can join our team of volunteers assisting others in the community.

Willing to drive them to a doctor or Specialist appointment?

Have some time to have a chat to an isolated person who might be lonely?

Can help by doing someone’s shopping and delivering it to them

Monday–Friday (9am-5pm) | telephone 02 4294 1900 18 Walker Street, Helensburgh MAY / 2515 / 5


Photos: Unicorn Studios (main image) and Wendy McDougall (inset)

Collins Booksellers Thirroul (L to R): Kate Adams, owners Deb Thompson & Amanda Isler, and Angus Woodiwiss.

THE SHOP THAT CHANGED THIRROUL By Caroline Baum

By law, every village in France has to have a bakery. I’d like to see the same sort of rules apply to bookshops. A community without a bookshop lacks a soul. It’s not just a commercial space, it’s a cultural hub, a place where people can share ideas and enthusiasms and can connect through a diversity of voices, genres and stories. When I first moved to Thirroul there was no bookshop here. Every time I went to places like Bowral or Berry or Moruya, I experienced a twinge of envy and wondered why we didn’t have one. There’ve been a couple of valiant attempts that petered out thanks to the GFC. Long-term gentrification pushes up house prices but it also creates a stronger customer base for new ventures. The arrival of the IGA cheese counter generated wild excitement when it opened, with its stunning selection from around Australia, France, Italy and beyond. Suddenly a slab of tasty didn’t cut it anymore. You had to try the Lemon Myrtle Chevre, the King Island Blue, the Leyden with caraway. Many wedges were cut to order to suit all budgets. Since 2018 we’ve had a bookshop that is as welcome as the cheese counter. Its presence has changed the character of Thirroul so that it is more than a place where you go to buy your necessities. Round the corner from the retail strip, it’s a place to browse when you’ve done your chores. You can sink into one of the comfy leather armchairs and spend time leafing through volumes, undisturbed. You’ll run into people you’ve been meaning to call

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for a catch-up or make a new friend who shares your enthusiasm for cooking or birdwatching or crime fiction. When Collins Booksellers first opened early in the morning, I thought the opening hours were crazy, but sure enough, commuters popped in on their way to the station. The owners, sisters, and both local, with prior retail experience selling homewares, knew their market. Recognising the large number of young families in the area, they devoted generous space to their kids section. Their calendar of events supports local writers. Now they’ve set up their website for easy online ordering with free home delivery during the coronavirus pandemic. Initially, there were encouraging signs with increased sales, but figures for book sales have now slumped by as much as seven per cent. Small independent bookshops are struggling as household incomes drop. The indies can’t discount like the big players. For some, books are a luxury, beyond their spending reach. Maybe we could organise a pay-it-forward scheme like some cafes are doing, and put money into the bookshop till for those who can’t afford to buy? While our libraries are temporarily closed, we need to support our local bookshop more than ever if we want it to be there when this is over. n Caroline Baum is the author of Only: a Singular memoir. You can see her personal selection of book recommendations on Instagram at @lacarolinebaum #carocororeads 2515


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HOW TO DESIGN A DREAM GARDEN By Sydney Wildflower Nursery’s Verity Snaith

Clockwise from top left: Choose plants for interesting foliage. Flowering eucalyptus (Corymbia ficifolia) add a pop of colour. Native daisies provide year round colour. Photos: Verity Snaith

With many families spending more time at home, urban gardening is having a renaissance. So if you’ve got a neglected corner, or even a whole block to makeover, these top tips from the landscape designers at Sydney Wildflower Nursery will get you off to a solid start.

PLANT IN LAYERS Check plant labels to learn about how big your plants will grow. Plant in layers with taller plants at the back, then shrubs and ground-covers to provide your garden with depth and interest.

MAKE A PLAN Determining the orientation of your site is the best place to start when designing a garden. Areas of your garden will receive varying levels of sunlight at different times of year, so knowing this in advance will help you select plants that will thrive.

PLANT FOR THE FUTURE Many Australian natives have short but spectacular flowering periods. Choosing plants that flower at different times of year is a great start, but choosing plants for their foliage is equally important to create a textural tapestry.

PLANT IN MASSES Choosing a few plants and repeating them throughout your garden will provide a sense of cohesiveness. Planting in odd numbers also helps balance the design.

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Don’t forget – if you need assistance planning your garden the qualified staff at Sydney Wildflower Nursery are always more than happy to help! Pop in with a photo or two to discuss your needs. 2515


awesome stock recipe. Here is a simple version that will make enough to stock the freezer for many meals ahead.

DIY CHICKEN STOCK

Ingredients 1 whole chicken – free range, organic if possible 2-4 chicken feet or chicken necks, optional (for added gelatine) 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar 2 onions 1 bulb garlic (sliced in half) 2 carrots 4 celery stalks Bunch of herbs (whatever you have in the garden tied together using cooking twine) 1-2 tsp Celtic sea salt

Stephanie Meades presents a tasty meat stock guaranteed to turbo-charge your stews and soups.

Instructions Rinse chicken, feet and necks in purified water and place in One way to boost our immunity is a large pot. Add vegetables and vinegar. Fill the pot with to improve the health of our enough water to cover the contents. Allow the pot and its digestive system. Consuming contents to stand for 30 minutes, giving the raw apple cider meat stock or broth on a regular vinegar time to draw minerals out of the bones, then bring to basis may help to improve gut a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 1½ to health. The cooler months 2 hours. Add herbs and salt during the last 10 minutes of lend themselves to us eating more stocks and cooking. Remove the chicken and other large parts. broths as they form the base of delicious winter Debone and reserve the meat for eating. It will be delicious. meals like slow-cooked stews and hearty soups, so Strain the stock through a sieve and store in glass jars in the now is the perfect time to find yourself a super freezer until ready to use. 2515

FOR THE LARGEST RANGE OF AUSTRALIAN NATIVE PLANTS

9 Veno Street, Heathcote 2233 Phone: (02) 9548 2818 Open 7 days 9am to 5pm www.sydneywildflowernursery.com.au Lettering : pantone cool gray 11 Leave : pantone 5555 and shade 60%

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COVER E R FEATU

The See Side Optical team before social distancing became our new normal.

COAST SHOWS SPIRIT Around the world, lives and livelihoods are at stake. Yet local businesses are staying strong and carrying on, 2515 reports.

The threat of coronavirus has affected every part of our community. Parents are homeschooling, and finding it harder than their own work. Team sports are off; the great outdoors is for exercise only. The Anzacs are honoured in suburban driveways; a trip to the supermarket requires military precision. Petrol prices are down; no one’s going anywhere. Even fire fighting is different – last month Austinmer RFS fielded modified crews to comply with social distancing rules at a Stanwell Tops hazard reduction. Around the world, lives and livelihoods are at stake. The region’s businesses are a resilient bunch, adapting swiftly to survive, but they can’t do it without their core local customer base. Never before has it been as important to shop local. Need someone to mow your lawn, paint your house or fix a leaking tap? Turn straight to 2515’s Business Directory. Amazingly, the Illawarra has thrown its support behind 2515 mag, which remains fully funded by advertising and still in print – while many other community newspapers are not. Huge thanks to all our advertisers for keeping local news alive! SHOPS SHIFT ONLINE With as many plug-ins as paint swatches, building a website can be as complicated as constructing a bricks and mortar store. But several local businesses have taken on the challenge and launched online

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shops in record time. You can now buy farm produce from Glenbernie Orchard’s virtual AppleShack (visit www.darkes.com.au) or ethical essentials plus fair food from the Flame Tree Co-op’s new website at flametree.coop. Hungry for a good book? Visit www.collinsbooksthirroul.com.au. Not only do Collins Booksellers Thirroul stock great reads for the whole family, they’ll deliver them to your home for free. Symbio Wildlife Park is closed, but offering creative ways to engage with animals online. Said Symbio’s Kevin Fallon: “This includes an increase in educational Facebook live videos with our animals, educational packs which include Facemasks, Find-a-words, Jigsaw Puzzles, a Quiz and more, along with a ‘Letters of Happiness’ App. This allows children to write to their favourite animal and get a personalised and instant response via email to help light up their day.” DON’T NEGLECT YOUR HEALTH Don’t delay regular health checks. Other diseases don’t stop for a pandemic and GPs have taken precautions to ensure the safety of both patients and staff. Read how our local Bulli practice has done this on page 18. And don’t neglect your sight either. See Side Optical co-owner Sonya Broadhead says if you have any eye concerns, it’s vital to schedule a


Harry Wilcock, of Wilcock Air Conditioning and Electrical

Horizon Thirroul staff: (L-R) branch manager Anne-Maree Hicks, Sharon Hubble & Mira Cenagdzija

check-up. “Your vision is important,” she said. “PLEASE contact us – ophthalmologists have asked us to remain open, so we can prevent any emergency eyecare case resulting in the loss of vision.” See Side has made necessary changes. “We are restricted to three patients in-store only, longer appointment times, sanitation of each area after each patient. When trying on frames we have baskets set aside so each frame can be sanitised,” Sonya said. “We can also triage over the phone. “We have three optometrists and a separate team working with each optometrist, so we are prepared for a worse case scenario. I set a team chat group, so we can continue to communicate with each other – including sending the odd joke.” Want to get your eyes checked? Step 1: Call to make appointment, 4268 3933. Step 2: Make sure you’re feeling well on the day. Step 3: Expect a maximum of two people in the examination area. Step 4: Be prepared for longer appointment times. (This allows for social distancing and for strict hygiene procedures between patients.) OPEN, WITH PRECAUTIONS IN PLACE Thirroul’s Horizon Bank is open as usual, Monday to Friday 9am-5pm. The customer-owned bank is taking the time to make phone calls to check in with

Karen Bestel of Karen’s Pet Care.

Helensburgh Business Park’s self-storage facility is open.

their customers. “We’ve been calling our regulars to check in and see how they’re going and to assist with any remote banking questions,” said Thirroul Branch Manager Anne-Maree Hicks. “It’s great to be able to provide reassurance with everything going on.” Horizon has a range of online and digital facilities customers can use to manage their money and are available to help over the phone (4224 7730) or at the branch, 277a Lawrence Hargrave Drive. Visit horizonbank.com.au For employers who hold the livelihood of others in their hands, staying open is key. TC Air & Electric manager Ann Harrison told us their head office and showroom in Fairy Meadow (phone 4222 9988) is still open. “We are open and trading on reduced staff hours to try and retain our loyal staff,” Ann said. “All staff have also completed COVID-19 training.” For those seizing the time to declutter and make their home a more spacious place to isolate, it’s good to know Helensburgh Business Park’s self-storage facility remains open, offering secure spaces for individuals and businesses. “We are open as usual and helping people that need storage in this time of crisis, as well as usual businesses and people that need general storage,” said HBP Storage’s Christie Peters. Call HBP Storage on 4294 1076. John Hine, proprietor of Helensburgh Car Services, would like to give heartfelt thanks to

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customers for their support. “To adapt to our current situation we have made some changes to the way we do things to help keep you safe and well. John, Pete and Cassie are sanitising all touch points after working on your vehicle and are happy to pick and deliver your vehicle in the local area. We can organise non-contact payment and regularly sanitise the office area and equipment.” Call 4294 2930. Home comfort is still on offer: “We at Wilcock Air Conditioning and Electrical are open and operating,” Coalcliff ’s Harry Wilcock said. “It’s ironic but we have always kept sanitiser in all the work trucks and practised good hygiene. I was taught it by my parents (scientists) and have always taught it to my boys, who now work with me. Also, as a firefighter with FRNSW, same goes 24/7.” Call 0418 660 835. “Meld Constructions is still open and available for business,” said Helensburgh business owner Matthew Leach, who combines building and carpentry skills with his maths and physics teacher qualifications. Visit www.meldconstructions.com. Mahler Building is also still open. “As we are a small team we are able to keep our social distancing on site and ensure that we uphold all regulations,” Sammy Mahler said. “It is nice that we are able to continue to build people’s homes amongst this time of uncertainty.” After celebrating 20 years in business last November, Essential Surf School isn’t about to stop having fun in the waves. For those wanting to learn something new: Stanwell Park’s Fiona Hunt is still running her popular surf lessons – now one-on-one or two siblings at a time, at Coledale or McCauley’s Beach, depending on conditions. Call 4294 2778 or visit essentialsurfandskate.com.au.

WORKING ON THE BUSINESS Some are seizing the moment to work on their business rather than always in their business. Steve McCallum of SRM Plumbing & Gasfitting has a website and a new logo – check it out! Visit www.srmplumbing.com Tradies Helensburgh, which remains closed until further notice, due to the government mandated COVID-19 shutdown, has taken the opportunity to go greener – the club has installed an extra 76kW system of solar panels on the roof. MANY DOING IT TOUGH Karen Bestel, of Karen’s Pet Care, said business is “very quiet”. While she did pick up a dog-walking job for a couple in quarantine (after a trip aboard the Ruby Princess), her business now relies on a few regular pet owners who work in essential services. Need help? Karen can walk your dog, feed your cat or care for any other pet, including chooks, birds, rabbits and guinea pigs. Call 0419 432 482. Stanwell Park’s Justin Poore, of Poorey’s Plumbing, said: “Business is not very good. I have had many jobs pull out due to concerns over the virus. It’s tough as I have a family to support.” Call 0459 260 104, email justinpoore@bigpond.com. Painter Tom Lynch also reports “very testing times”. Sick of staring at those peeling walls? Call the Otford local on 0406 807 856 for a free quote. Even those in the online world are facing challenges. “We are open for business (remotely),” said Otford’s Rhys Cornock, of Sprout Scientific. “We have been battling with the inability to build connections with clients and generate new sales, but have our team working remotely, implementing some new software to do so, and are focusing on

Collins Booksellers Thirroul’s Kate Adams and Angus Woodiwiss.

Above: Raeleen and Maeve Rickard. Below: Rhys Cornock, of Sprout Scientific

From left: Murray Morrison, Shaun Crocker, Tracey Morrison and Nicole Crocker

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Essential Surf marked its 20th business birthday at McCauleys Beach last November: pictured are owner Fiona Hunt (centre), with surfing instructors Sid Masters, of Coledale, and Zoe Gelder, of Thirroul.

Above: Kerrie and Dan Belter, of Belter Electrical. Below: Free kids activity packs at symbiozoo.com.au

software and website builds, book-keeping, and assisting businesses with drafting their government grants to keep the wheels turning. We are determined to keep all of our ‘ineligible’ (less than 12 month) casuals on.” Visit www.sproutscientific.com Others have chosen to hibernate, such as Helensburgh’s Dan Belter, of Belter Electrical (0407 767 654). “We service customers throughout the Illawarra, and a large number of those are older residents,” Dan said. “So we thought it best to put some jobs on hold and only do those considered urgent. Thankfully, those customers we had booked in have agreed to wait for us to complete the work at a safer time. Given the slowed rate of infection we hope to be back on the tools locally in the coming weeks. In the meantime, I have been keeping busy giving the house an overdue paint job.” Coalcliff ’s Raeleen Rickard, of Raeleen’s Fancy Faces, has put face-painting into hibernation and switched to balloon/plaster/slime deliveries. “Locals are ordering balloons to be delivered to grandchildren, kids, parents and friends for birthdays or to cheer them up,” Raeleen said. Call 0413 291 843 or raeleensfancyfaces@gmail.com

Business and family are tightly knit strands for many locals. Cathy and Geoff Hammonds, of plumber, drainer and gasfitter GK & CM Hammonds, said: “We’re all well but missing our grandchildren, like all grandparents.” HOME OWNERS GET INTO DIY One business is bustling. Helensburgh local Tracey Morrison, of Crockers Paint & Wallpaper, said: “Thank you to all of our customers for supporting our small family business. Feedback in appreciation for us continuing to trade has been phenomenal! We are also very fortunate that we are in the home improvement industry and have been extremely busy since all of our customers are at home.” Crockers is open, with physical distancing in place, and offering home delivery, or order ahead and pick up with minimal wait times. Tracey said Crockers was updating its YouTube Channel with DIY ideas for people at home. “For example, what you can do to Add Value To Your Home while you are forced to stay home.” Visit 1/206 Box Road Miranda, phone 9525 7489, www.crockerspaint.com. 2515

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BACKYARD ZOOLOGY

change colour fairly rapidly, ranging from a pale white through to a dark brown, all speckled with these amazing emerald-green flecks. They also have a cross-shaped pupil, making them relatively easy to identify. However, when one leaps off the roof and lands in the camellias with a heavy thwack directly in With Amanda De George front of you, identifying it is the last thing on your I have a new saying: the old rules no longer apply. I mind! In our case, the frog took a leap of faith after mean, there are still lots of rules and plenty of new being chased by a brushtail possum, the little face ones, but the old ones? They don’t matter anymore. of which peered down at me over the gutter Cereal for dinner? The old rules no longer apply. wondering what on earth had just happened. Pyjamas all day? The old rules no longer apply. Me too, possum, me too. Still, gave me a good Wine midweek? You know what to do. opportunity to have a decent look at what is quite So like everyone, I’ve been spending a lot more a pretty frog. time pottering around the yard. I’m used to taking The most recent time I spotted one was around myself off on adventures, mini and otherwise, so midnight last night. They’re pretty silent right now, this staying-at-home thing has taken a bit of getting not starting their cackling call until around used to, but what a home we have here in the September when breeding season kicks in, so I was northern Illawarra. With all this extra time around surprised to turn around and see one silently the house I’ve been able to spot the resident clinging to the wall near our bedroom. I only Peron’s Tree Frog. Or frogs, as it turns out. Who stopped and had a quick look though, as I was knew we had so many? hotly pursuing a gorgeous Sugar Glider as it These frogs are often found at night in local bounced through our tress, yapping as it went. gardens clinging onto trees or sitting on the side of But that’s a story for another time. the house waiting for whatever insect happens to amble by. They’re really variable in colour, and not Follow Amanda’s Facebook blog @BackyardZoology 2515 just from frog to frog but as individuals they can

Peron’s Tree Frogs are often found at night in local gardens. Photos: Amanda De George

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Farm update: Retail staff like Cameron (at left) are picking up new skills, and farm produce – with gorgeous new labels – can be delivered to your home!

FARM SHOP OPENS ONLINE

Jo Fahey reports from Darkes Glenbernie Orchard. What’s happening on the farm right now? We are picking Pink Lady apples and Granny Smith apples and it’s also Persimmon time. These are absolutely beautiful and available direct from our farm shop, the AppleShack. You can now order online too, from www.darkes.com.au They will keep really well in your fridge. They are tasty, crunchy and naturally full of nutrients! Have you any jobs right now for people who are looking for work during the COVID-19 crisis? We just don’t have any extra positions at this point. We have had a lot of inquiries from people with a variety of job backgrounds, including an airline pilot and a skydive instructor. It was heartbreaking to field calls from cafe owners looking for work for their entire team when the first restrictions started. Hardworking and valued staff. Unfortunately, we couldn’t help, we didn’t have work for all of our own team either. We moved many of our retail staff into doing farm work. On a positive note, they have all enjoyed the change in their work roles and

have really stepped up! We are really proud of their ‘can do’ attitude. We heard you have a new website with online ordering? Yes, we have been working on a new-look website. We were delayed with its launch but now it’s up and you can order products online for delivery. This is a big thing, of course, if you are in isolation. We will gradually add to the online offerings and put up special hampers and packs for special occasions. We notice you have some new labels! Craig, our local graphic designer, has hand-drawn some beautiful artwork that we have incorporated into our new juice and honey labels. We use local people in the design and making of our packaging. Our printers take pride in being a multigenerational family business too. We take pride in the fact that we genuinely support local businesses and local manufacture. Anything else on the horizon? We are planning for the future in the background. Planning for when we are able to get together with others. We will be ready to run fun, family-friendly events at the orchard and get right back into Cider Sundays and things of that nature! So keep watching this space. Visit www.darkes.com.au 2515

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FOLLOW THE SUNLIGHT By local architect Ben Wollen

As we spend more time in our homes during the current stay-at-home measures, it provides a perfect time to undertake some of those DIY projects that have consistently never made it to the top of the to-do list. Re-coating the deck, painting the ceiling, building a chicken coop or even a bathroom renovation. A lot of people have already cleaned the house twice, dusted those out-of-reach shelves and gone through the unsorted boxes from the last house-move. Some of us might even be planning out how to make an extension to the house by adding a bedroom or new living wing. It really is a great opportunity to think about the place we call ‘home’. The word ‘home’ comes from the ProtoGermanic ‘khaim’, which meant a residence as opposed to simply a shelter or ‘hus’, which developed into the modern word house. Most of us would recognise the difference between what a house or home offers and we can see this in the development of the origin of the words. In architecture, the terms house and home have had many evolutions through various architectural movements. The house as a “machine for living” is one of the more famous ones, which was the brainchild of the well-known mid-century architect Le Corbusier. He designed a house called the Villa Savoye near Paris, which captured his ideals of a machine for living. His ideals have come under much scrutiny since, as being too cold and minimal and undervaluing other characteristics that make a house more like a home than machine. One of my favourite architecture books, Thermal Delight in Architecture, by Lisa Heschong, proposes

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a contrasting notion to Le Corbusier’s machine for living. Heschong describes our close relationship with architecture in a more connected and habitual way. She draws on the cultural history of the hearth fire, the sauna, traditional bath houses and Islamic courtyard gardens to explain the cultural connections we have to the architecture of these spaces. She then connects this to our homes, suggesting contemporary connections to our domestic spaces. In particular, she focuses on how we have rituals in our homes throughout the seasons that respond to our direct thermal experiences. In summer, the deck becomes a living space where we might setup a hammock, cook a BBQ or entertain friends. In winter, there might be a particular window seat that collects the low winter sun that we are drawn to as we read a book and sip a cup of tea. So, as we all are spending the extra time at home, I would encourage you to observe these moments in the house. If you can, spend a whole day watching as the sun moves across the sky and the direction of the sea breezes – look for opportunities that maybe your current house is missing out on. For example, find where that early morning sun comes from to light the inside of the house. Is it working on the best space or is it being blocked by the garage? If you are considering some renovations, how could you reconfigure your home to take advantage of these moments and improve its thermal delight. Even on the most ill-considered house design, there will be some thermal delight to be found and all that will be required to create a new ritual might be a rearrangement of furniture or to add a window to a wall. Stay safe, stay home and embrace this period of pause and reflection. 2515


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Practice Nurse Alex Pritchard (left) and Dr Julie Blaze in full PPE.

ON THE FRONTLINE 2515 asked Dr Julie Blaze, director of Bulli Medical Practice, for an update on how local GPs are managing during the COVID-19 pandemic.

How are your staff coping with the crisis? The last two months have brought unprecedented change and our staff have adapted in an incredible and admirable way. Some of our doctors, with their own health issues, or with caring responsibilities, chose to self-isolate but are treating patients via telehealth consultations. The rest of us have continued seeing patients face-to-face or via telehealth. Our nurses have been instrumental in triaging patients, establishing clinics, and ensuring all the personal protective equipment protocols are met. And our reception and administration team have enabled the new technologies and processes as well as managing the increased volume of calls, communicating changes with patients, and keeping everyone calm. We are so proud of our team and how they have stepped up during this crisis. How are you managing patients with suspected COVID-19 symptoms? Very early in the piece, we established a respiratory clinic for patients with symptoms of cough, fever and/or breathing difficulties. We conduct this clinic separate to the rest of the practice, with restricted entry via the rear door. It was vital, right from the start, that people with COVID-19 symptoms didn’t pose an inadvertent contact risk to other patients or staff, but we were still able to care for them. The respiratory clinic has evolved with capacity for an outdoor clinic on fine days to further reduce the risk of potential transmission. Doctors and nurses overseeing the

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clinic wear full personal protective equipment (PPE), with thorough sanitising between every patient. For suspected COVID-19 cases, we are swabbing patients and/or referring them to hospital-based clinics. What about your other patients? Where possible, and especially for older and potentially more vulnerable patients, we encourage telehealth consultations. We are still providing face-to-face consultations but have restricted access to the building. Patients use an intercom system to alert reception staff on arrival, and reception confirm their appointment prior to entry. This method ensures we have very few, if any, patients in our waiting room. All staff are wearing masks and we encourage all patients to wear a mask to their appointment if they have one. How are you managing flu vaccinations? We’ve established a separate nurse-led clinic for flu vaccinations via a side-entry accessible room in the practice. Our initial supply of government vaccines was quite limited, so we undertook triaging of the neediest patients, including elderly patients and patients in nursing homes. We will continue to run this clinic over the coming months. Do you think these changes will have a lasting effect on how your practice will run? The availability of appointments via telehealth will hopefully continue. Telehealth is ideal for consultations where a physical examination is not necessary, such as mental health, reviewing results and care planning. New technology is also enabling more efficient processes, such as sending prescriptions directly to pharmacies and referrals directly to specialists and imaging providers. 2515


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Real estate update HOW COVID-19 IS AFFECTING LOCAL DEMAND & FINANCE Despite the real estate industry being forced to operate under new guidelines in order to minimise the spread of COVID-19, it is clear Australians remain passionate for property. Real estate websites are experiencing record hits on properties and our area continues to receive a high level of enquiry from buyers. This month (as at 22 April) there have been 5 properties sold in postcode 2508 and 2 in postcode 2515, all for reasonable prices. Finance is getting more stringent again as lenders ask for additional information about the sectors that borrowers are earning incomes and some employment types (eg casual & contractor) have more scrutiny. However, loans are still being approved and properties selling so it’s not all doom and gloom out there.

MAY / 2515 / 19


CLIFTON CONVERSATIONS ONLINE The School of Arts is launching a new fortnightly online event for members, David Roach reports. With a heavy heart we have temporarily closed the doors of the Clifton School of Arts until the coronavirus crisis is over. For an institution that has been at the centre of community life for 109 years this was a difficult but very necessary decision. We trust all of our members and our arts community are safe and well and looking out for each other. Because we are a community-owned and -run organisation we always try to make the CSA available for anyone who would like to use the space. Just prior to the current crisis we had a full program. There were history open days and sold-out film screenings. Our galleries were buzzing with workshops and exhibitions, our “Meet the Maker” series was up and running and we had future bookings for everything from woodworking workshops to classical concerts and family birthdays. Now our doors will be closed for a while. But behind those closed doors there will be a lot going on. We have decided to take this opportunity to undertake some much-needed improvements. We are installing a new kitchen and storage areas, we are upgrading our toilet facilities and stairways

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to make them more accessible. The CSA History Group is working on a permanent display for the downstairs gallery. And we will have some very exciting news to announce in the months ahead. So stay tuned for that! Because we are all self-isolating it’s more important than ever to stay connected. So we are working hard to bring you something new from the School of Arts. We’re calling it Clifton Conversations, a fortnightly online event. Members will be able to log in from home. We will be talking to local artists, writers, musicians, historians and filmmakers and we’ll also keep you up to date with developments at the CSA. More information on that coming soon. And if you’re not a member, join now and get involved. Check our website for details – www.artsclifton.org. The Clifton School of Arts has been here since 1911. We’ve endured two World Wars, Depressions, floods, fires and landslides. This is our second pandemic. We’re not going anywhere. And we look forward to the day when we can reopen our doors and welcome you back inside. Stay safe, everyone. 2515


Simon Dikkenberg is an award-winning filmmaker who lives in and loves Stanwell Park. 2515

POET’S CORNER Compiled by Karen Lane — NOTHING — Been looking for something To occupy my mind Something that takes away the sense that I’m wasting all my time Something that gives a little, to parts of me that I’ve denied Something that when I face myself Makes me feel satisfied. Been looking for something That fills me from above That fleshes out my life like chubby fingers in a glove Something to strike me in the heart, knock me fair square off my feet Something to preface peace Answer questions Make complete. Whilst looking for something Something occurs to me Perhaps if I stand still... Something will search for me And so I sit and wait... I... w a i t… S i l e n t l y And when I shut my eyes Quite a something I do see When I look at that which is Without a question or a need I catch it in this moment When nothing to it I bring.

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LIFEOLOGY

With Terri Ayliffe. This month: fear. Let fear be a tailwind, not a head wind. I like that saying; it allows us to see fear in two ways. As a detractor or motivator. I don’t think I would be remiss in saying fear is an element in all of our lives at the moment. We can see its presence either way. COVID-19 will pass into memory before too long and life will resemble what it once was. It is unlikely to be the same, which I am sure worries some of us, yet others, like myself, feel excited about the prospect of what that means. Change can be uncomfortable, some of us avoid it at all costs. Others see it as a catalyst and embrace it. How we see fear determines our outlook on change. This terrible virus has stopped our lives and isolated us from our loved ones, however, it is also presenting us with the opportunities. It is fair to say that we lost track of what was important. The pandemic has forced us to stop, rethink, redesign, reinvent, reevaluate – what a gift. We have been presented with an opportunity to engage more sincerely, to breathe clean air, to watch the sun rise and set. Having nothing to do gives us time to do the things we value. Things will be different on the other side of this, because of the opportunity we have to stop. I am excited for what might be, even though at the moment I feel an amount of fear. Fear is my tailwind, a motivator and instigator for me to bring about change. I hope it doesn’t hold you in comfortable but unproductive ground. We have the opportunity after this to live life as we choose. n Read more at https://lifeology.blog or get in touch with Terri: Terriayliffe@gmail.com or 0431 488 914 2515

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the first time was Charles Darwin, wandering around the new settlement of Albany, bored and anxious to get home. There are similar viral diseases in maize and wheat, also transmitted by beetles. Some of these we don’t have in Australia, so keeping the beetle carrier out of this country is an important function of our quarantine strategy. Viruses are well-known in humans, for example, cold, flu, polio, measles, mumps, AIDS, Covid-19, ebola, dengue, ross river, smallpox, rabies. Most of these diseases don’t kill immediately because they have been in the human population for a long time and we have adapted to each other. We tolerate them, they don’t kill many of us, but in the past they may have been much more dangerous. Viruses are therefore important in evolution. A classic example is myxomatosis, brought into Australia from rabbit-like animals in South America, to control rabbits. Rabbits were a new host for the virus, like Covid-19 in humans, but in myxomatosis transmission and mortality were much higher – with a 99.8% fatality rate. This might explain the fears of epidemiologists With entomologist Dr Chris Reid. This month: Viruses. regarding ‘wet markets’. What happened with such a high mortality rate? This month it seems pertinent to talk about viruses. Well, there are still heaps of rabbits around. The They are very strange things. 0.2% survivors were resistant to myxomatosis, and Viruses are rogue cell fragments – small chunks they, um, bred like rabbits. And the myxomatosis of genetic material surrounded by protective layers virus also evolved to become less damaging, so of protein and often an oil. These outer layers allow now the two co-exist. This is a classic example of the fragment to pierce cells of other organisms, evolution in action. where the genetic material in the virus interferes Stay safe and well, everyone. with normal cell duties. I wrote ‘rogue cells fragments’ because one Share your stories or ask Chris a question. theory of origin is that they derive from Email editor@2515mag.com.au. 2515 fragmentation of genetic material during cellular reproduction in bacteria or other simple organisms. But viruses, since they are agglomerations of different molecules, may have diverse origins. And viruses only really maintain existence by reproducing in host cells, so they are parasites. Some regard them as living organisms, but they lack cell structure. It’s maybe semantic, but if they are living organisms should we have a conservation plan for them? And how to do that, given that they change so quickly? Viruses are so small that they cannot be seen with normal microscopy. Viruses occur in all living organisms. Plants have viruses, many of which are transmitted by insects. For example, mosaic viruses in brassicas (cabbage, turnip etc) are due to a plant virus that is spread by a tiny hopping beetle, in its mouthparts. Cabbages are not native to Australia, Top left: A flea beetle carrier of plant mosaic viruses in so we shouldn’t have the disease, but the beetle was Australia. (Photo: Phyllotreta undulata, Wikimedia Commons) brought into the country before 1836 with Above: Before myxomatosis, by unknown author. cabbages carried on ships for the first colonists. (Photo: National Archives of Australia; Wikimedia Commons) The man who collected this beetle in Australia for

BEETLING ABOUT

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ON BOARD WITH SURFRIDER

Photo: Stella Crick

By Coledale’s Susie Crick, chair of Surfrider Foundation Australia.

Hey, fellow C19 survivors! Self-isolation has been an interesting time of reflection and has taught us a lesson about patience, calm and learning what we value. When your life is stripped to the bare necessities of health and family, it really shines a light on what is, and what is not important in our day-to-day existence. Once we get off the ‘crush’ of Highway C-19, and when we are finally allowed to get back into the freedoms of living – we will be able to do so with a sharper focus on the things that we hold dear. One of the things that I hold dear is the ocean that we have the privilege of having on our doorstep. My story this month is about washing and what goes down the drain with each load. Our oceans are being trashed by microfibres that break off from our clothes. Did you know that up to 700,000 fibres can come off our clothes in a typical laundry cycle? (Napper & Thompson 2016). Many are blaming fast fashion, however, if I dig into my granny’s closet, even way back then, many clothes were made from nylons, polyesters, acrylics and other nasty fabrics. Approximately 342 million barrels of oil are used each year to make plasticbased fibres for textiles. We have unwittingly been wreaking havoc on the marine environment for years! 35% of all microfibres found the oceans

come from our washing machines; synthetic fibres are a major source of microplastic pollution. Here’s the drill; it goes down the drain, into the wastewater and straight to the ocean and into the mouths of the very fish that we eat. Yet if we move to natural fibres, they also come at a high cost to the environment. So, what can we do to give our oceans (and ourselves) a chance? Buy second-hand, buy less and take better care of what is already in our wardrobe. Washing less will also reduce the impact on the marine environment and using a washing machine filter will help too. Before the world was turned on its head, my plan for April was to be sailing from Tahiti to the Cook Islands, doing ocean microplastic research as a part of the crew of ‘eXXpedition’. This article was going to be reporting to you about all of the microplastics, microfibres and nanoparticles that I would discover in the waters of the South Pacific that would eventually swirl and float to our shores. Obviously, that didn’t happen as the borders were closed and my big sail and exciting journey has been put on hold for a year. Stay tuned! 2515 Become a member and get involved! For more info: www.surfrider.org.au

MAY / 2515 / 23


process and then sealed with a varnish matt finish and then a UV protectant. The alcohol is very ink sensitive and the UV protectant is essential for the longevity of the colours.” Beautifully painted vases and tea light candles are also completed similarly. Sharlene can only devote about 12 hours a week to her new work. “But it does take my mind off everything. I do really get lost within myself.” She sells her work at Forager’s Markets in Bulli Janice Creenaune meets Sharlene Banks, who, after and Coledale Markets. “It really lifts my spirits to many years as a sales representative for a have wonderful comments offered by many I don’t pharmaceutical company, has realised that her new even know. And it certainly gives me a little lift vocation lies in painting with alcohol ink. Photos supplied. each and every time somebody buys something. I’ve always been a bit crafty but I have made a At 58, Sharlene, a long-time transition into being arty. You just have to let it go. Thirroul resident, was at a The whole process simply makes me feel happy.” crossroad. As her work options Sharlene does hope to eventually eke out ‘a changed, living’ from her works. “I am always learning and she needed to be proactive. A new pursuing different styles and I have made career in painting opened this path friendships within the “Fluid Art Tribe’ on for her. She delved into her favoured medium, Facebook from all over the world. We encourage alcohol ink painting. each other and the group is very supportive. It has become her passion and also an additional “There is a community camaraderie that is way to earn income. “It is the vibrant colours that I wonderful to be a part of.” really enjoy and the ability to easily move things Sharlene has found a new direction in her life around, where every piece is totally unique. that offers her new insights, friendships and “My time disappears and I lose myself for many beginnings. That in itself offers inspiration. hours once I start.” For more details, email sharleneb0811@gmail. Sharlene begins with a non-porous surface. com and Instagram @purple.artbysharlene “It could be non-porous Yupo paper, tiles, glass etc. My items are various in shape and utility. I initially n Writer Janice Creenaune is a volunteer for the work with the alcohol ink to create my pattern. It PKD (Polycystic Kidney Disease) Foundation has a very different base to normal printing inks. Australia, helping to raise awareness. For more “I paint with it, I blow it and often dab for special details, email janicecreenaune@gmail.com. 2515 effects. I can utilise a compressor air-brush, for example, to make petals of flowers but sometimes I blow with a gentle breath or spray bottle with a fine-tip needle. It is all about the effect I want. “Mixing of colours is extremely important for the unique qualities I am trying to create and there is a great diversity within the different types of alcohol ink so there is a great deal of experimentation, practise and skill needed to create what I want.’ After using the alcohol ink Sharlene adds the alcohol to create a type of flowing movement and here experience and expertise is needed to curb the flow, let it ‘take off ’ or settle. It all happens very quickly at this stage. Metallic inks create a whole different effect and dimension. “They have a completely different intensity, they certainly don’t move as much, and again experience and knowledge is needed to control the effect. “I often create flowers on Yupo paper, it has a type of plastic feel and dries quickly with the alcohol ink. Sometimes I work on tiles for coasters or a series of tiles to create an effect. These are very big sellers for me. They are painted in the alcohol

PAINT WITH ALCOHOL INK

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’TIS THE SEASON

With Green Connect Fair Food Coordinator Kristin Watson

It’s been a tumultuous month for us all, that’s for sure. At Green Connect we’ve lost all our event and zero waste work for the unforeseeable future. But we are so grateful that our veg box sales have doubled, which has helped us stay afloat. In these uncertain times, we have been lifted by positive stories of people starting to eat more locally grown food and doing their best to support local businesses. We also want to support those businesses that have been affected, so this past month we have partnered up with Millers Bakehouse and Kangaroo Valley Eggs to help us supply freshly baked bread and eggs in our veg boxes. We are also looking to expand our “add-ons” to support other businesses in the area and help

GET A GREEN CONNECT VEG BOX

our customers to access local produce. Please feel free to contact us if you want to get involved. As we are going into cooler and darker months we are slowly transitioning into our root vegetables and this month we are hoping to see some Jerusalem artichoke, kohlrabi, beetroot and turnips in our boxes, but also some favourites like broccoli and fennel and, as always, plenty of leafy greens. If you are one of those who have finally taken up gardening in your isolation – good on you! Here is a list of what our farm manager Callum is planting this month: Carrot, Fennel, Celery, Oak Lettuce, Kale, Broccoli, Cauliflower, Cabbage, Wombok, Kohlrabi, Bok choi, Radish, Turnip, Daikon, Rocket, Chard, Radicchio, Silverbeet, Endive, Snow Peas and Broadbeans. It’s been hard on our community these past weeks, and some have been more affected than others. Remember to be kind, keep smiling and be grateful for the beautiful place we live in. BEETROOT RISOTTO 3 medium-sized beetroots, peeled and grated 2 shallot onions, finely diced 1 clove garlic 2 fresh sprigs of dill 2 tbsp olive oil 300g Arborio rice 100ml white wine 1 tbsp Balsamic vinegar 2 cups vegetable stock Goats cheese to serve METHOD: Sauté your onions and garlic on medium heat in a heavy-based saucepan. Add the Arborio rice and cook until the grains are slightly translucent. Add the grated beetroot and chopped up dill, stir to combine. Add in the white wine and cook under a lid for 5 min. Add the vegetable stock and balsamic and cook under a lid for 10-15 min, stirring every 5 min. Once the rice is cooked and has the desired consistency, season with salt and pepper and add more vinegar if you think it needs it. Serve with generous dollops of goat cheese. 2515

Packed with fresh produce from the urban farm in Warrawong, Green Connect’s weekly veg boxes are available for pick up at Flame Tree Co-op and at Taylor’s Healthy Grocers in Thirroul. To order, visit www.green-connect-vegbox.com.au

MAY / 2515 / 25


THEN & NOW

Dr Lorraine Jones presents similarities and differences between COVID-19 and the 1919 influenza pandemic. When the 1919 influenza pandemic occurred, it was not known at that time that the illness was caused by a virus. That particular virus was not identified until 1933. Virologists at the Doherty Institute isolated COVID-19 in January 2020. There was no vaccine for the influenza virus in 1919. Vaccines were later developed and the vaccine for the current strain of influenza is now available at your family practitioner. The influenza virus is constantly changing, which is why you need a new vaccine each year. Scientists worldwide are working feverishly to develop a COVID-19 vaccine. In 1919 schools, theatres, racetracks and churches were closed. Church services were held outdoors. Helensburgh School was used as a hospital facility and as a place for the cooking of food for distribution to those too ill to look after themselves. People were admitted to Coledale Hospital, but there were no intensive care units. People died at home. After isolation measures were lifted on March 1 1919, a fresh, more severe wave of influenza occurred. The death rate for the 1919 pandemic in Australia was the second lowest in the world.

However, in a reflection of modern times, the undertaker in Helensburgh had to employ carpenters to make coffins as he could not buy enough from Sydney. People needed a medical certificate indicating that they were free of influenza to travel further than Mount Victoria, Picton or Wollongong. Lockdowns to the present level of severity did not occur. Herd immunity, the immunity people had obtained from past influenza infections, stopped that epidemic. There had been severe outbreaks of influenza in 1890-91, and 1894-95. This protected the older community members from severe influenza and death. Unfortunately, there is no herd immunity to COVID-19. Consequently, the present message is to continue distancing, hand-washing and isolation. The end will be in sight when a vaccine is developed. Let us hope that happens in the very near future. 2515 The 1919 Influenza Epidemic booklet by Dr Jones is $10 plus $5 postage. Visit https:// historichelensburgh.org.au, email info@historichelensburgh.org.au or call Jan Lee on 0418 681 384.

In 1919, people were admitted to Coledale Hospital (pictured here circa 1928), but there were no intensive care units. People died at home. Photo: Trove

26­ / 2515­/ MAY


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1.44 0.25 1.32 1.59 0308 0.40 0420 0.47 0438 0.26 1.57 0205 0320 0332 0343 0.24 0407 0.35 0604 1 0150 16 1010 1 25 16 1036 10 1040 10 1207 22 7 0153 0.537 1.37 0.547 0859 0.48 0757 1017 0.35 0902 1.28 0755 1.65 22 0930 1.36 1005 1.29 1.37 1633 1.30 1710 1.49 1515 1.22 1643 1.54

0.62 1458 FR 0.30 FR 1342 SA 0.52 MO 0.53 TU 0.56 WE 1719 SU 1610 MO 1530 TH 1357 SU 0.55 MO 1428 TU 0.79 1.88 0.68 0.57 2102 1.79 2330 1.74 2241 2019 2036 1.91 0.76 2011 2213 2131 2245 1.95 2202 1.86 2347 1.42 0.31 1.30 1.58 0351 0.41 0514 0247 0301 0.22 1.59 0245 0418 0424 0445 0.26 0452 0.32 0652 0.43 0535 17 17 2 2 11 11 26 23 8 1000 0.41 0838 1106 0.34 0949 1052 0.528 1.28 1115 0.548 1300 1137 1.26 0849 1.57 23 1023 1.31 1053 1.29 1.35 PORT KEMBLA –1716 NEW WALES 1618 1.32 1733 1.67 1.38 SOUTH 1750 1.57

PORT KEMBLA TIDAL CHART 2020 SA 0.36 FR 1441

0.66 1544 SU 0.55 WE 0.58 TU 0.60 TH 1812 MO 1657 TU 1613 MO 0.65 TU 1513 WE SA 1415

0.73 1.79 2349 0.47 1.76 1.87 1.94 2216 1.88 2045 1.78 2329 PORT KEMBLA –2106 NEW2152 SOUTH WALES LAT 0.68 34° 29’ S2312 LONG 150° 55’2245 E 2145

MAY

Time

m

LAT 34° 29’ S LONG 150° 55’ E 0343 0410 0.22 1.64 0324 0509 0.41 Times and Heights of High and Low Waters 1130 1053 0944 1.47 0.34 0920 1.32 JUNE JULY

MAY Time m

Time 1.57 TIME 0320m M1.44 1 0150 0859 0.48 16 1010 0.53

1.41 and 0.60 0545 1.56 0437 0.39 0542 0.42 0020 0515Low 0.32Waters 0.31 0035 Heights of High MAYand 2020 18JUNE 18JULY 3 27 12 0633 12 0740 9 3Times 24 24 0.519 1.22 0602 1.309 1153 0.34 1038 1236 1.23 1115 1.26 1145 1.28 1756 1.47 1152 0.54 1712 1.44 1822 1.79

1 1017

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1

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0410 1053 SU 1712 2259

2

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3

0.45 1.71 0.25 1.71

6

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21 0717

1.39

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0247 0849 FR 1441 2106

6 0835

1.42

0.22 1.57 0.36 1.94

0245 0838 SA 1415 2045

23 5 0000 0606

0.43

SA 1525 0.45 2153 1.94

SU 1451 0.58 2122 1.79

0.42

16 1029

0.57

1 0630

1.23

16 0605

1.17

0020 0.60

18 06020000 1.42 1.30 0535 0.31 TH 1152 0.54 0.52 1137 1.28 18280606 1.65 1.38 1229 1657 TU TU 0104 0.65 0.53 19 06481847 1.29 0.73 2329 1.79 1230 0.54

0045 0.37

0041 0.50

0215 0.27

0142 0.25

SA 1302 0.48 1941 1.92

SU 1241 0.53 1918 1.79

TU 1419 0.48 2051 1.80

WE 1359 0.35 2026 1.91

FR

1905 1.72

1.4101450057 0633 0.39 0.46 20 07330700 0.51 1.29 1236 1.22 1306 0.55 SA 1.47 1747 0.74 WE WE 19431313 1.79 02271933 0.40

0230 0823 SU 1349 2027

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0206 0758 MO 1325 2001

0.33 1.27 0.50 1.86

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0.28 1.30 0.50 1.75

0306 0906 TH 1448 2112

0.12 1.42 0.32 1.91

6 0912

1.30

21 0843

1.30

6 1008

1.30

21 0952

1.47

18 0737 3 06330452 0514 1.30 0445 1.5818 0532 1.37 0145 0045 0.59 3 1.57 0.45 0145 0.29 0625 1.21 0808 1.28 1.30 0615 1.34 0116 0028 1.68 0652 0.45 0.33 0.41 1157 0.55 1336 0.48 TU 1310 0.41 FR 1214 0.46 1106 0.34SA 1125 0.43 0733 1115 0.54 0636 1.41MO 0.51 1.71 0740 1.47 0830 0732 0.43 1300 1.221941 1.30 1.26 1836 1.71 2010 1.83 1.87 1225 18521053 1.87 1733 1.67 1802 1.80 1750 1.57 0.49 0.25 0.41 1444 1346 1.25 1812 0.78 0.64 0.66 WE FR TH0224 WE 1238 SA 1306 FR0.261325 TH 0.41 FR SU TH 1.20 FR TU 01401613 0.30 0124 0257 0.17 1751 4 07302245 19 0821 1.33 0713 1.24 0850 1.29 1.36 0.75 1943 2349 0.4719 1.71 1958 1.95 1904 1.62 4 0.84 1953 1906 1.76

1446 FR 2353 1.72 2017

1538 SA 1.79 2127

21 0817

1.29

1.32 1353 TH SA 1626 FR1449 TH 0.70 SA 1.23 SU 1.34 FR 1543 SA MO FR 1.24 SA 1322 SU WE 1702 1828 1.65 1836 1852 1.87 2021 1937 1.69 0.83 1.82 2045 1.97 1.83 2105 2020 0.73 1911 0.810348 0.66 2232 1.72 03172333 0.25 0248 0.26 0409 0.31 0.11 1855

0.35 19 13 7 4 28 22 19 13 7 314 28 22 19 0124 13 0713 1.29 1241 0.56 0424 0.26

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8

1 1034

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0.50 0.47 TH 1310 SA 1411 0001 0510 1.68 1937 1.69 2045 1.97 0554 1143 0.28 0.47 0.24 0.26 22 0205 7 0332 7 0153 1205 1800 1.58 0757 1.37 TU 0930 1.36 0755 MO1.65 WE SU 1458 0.53 TH 1357 0.30 FR 1342 0.52 1830 2011 1.74 2131 1.95 2019 1.91

4

0.54

1.49 1200 0.51 SU 1133 0.54 1710 1.70 TH 1710 1.54 TU 17100510 WE 1.44 0420 1.32 0343 1.59 0001 0428 1.41 0104 0.66 SA 1.68 1.68 0048 0.37 0020 0635 0.43 0438 0604 0.391810 0.31 0.40 2330 0.25 0.68 2353 0.59 1840 1.79 1.68 0525 23440407 0.46 0.53 1036 0.54 1017 0.35 1034 0.42 0648 0554 1.41 1143 0.28 06441243 1.52 0732 0.46 1.23 1040 1207 1.29 1.28 0514 1.37 1.30 0533 1.19 0131 0.301.230100 0.34 1130 05321005 1.37 2 1.19 17 17MO 2MO 11151800 0.54 1114 0722 1.23 1654 11251530 0.43 1.30 1710 1.49 1.54 1710 1.70 1205 0.50 1.58 0.37 1339 1800 0.73 1610 0.55 1719 0.73 0.62 0.62 MO 1643 TU 0.57 WE0652 TH TU17 FR 1230 TH1.251240 WE TH SA WE TH WE 1750 1.57 SU 1249 0.49 MO 1222 0.48 TH 1802 1.80 FR 1754 1.63 0.79 1.88 2245 2202 2330 0.68 0.57 1830 2344 0.46 1905 1.55 0.80 1910 1.89 2241 2347 1.681856 1.79 1.79 1845 1927 1.82 1.78 2320

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0000 0606 TU 1229 1847

16 1036

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Local Time AUGUST

1702 0.70 1630 0.58 MO TH 0.59 SU WEm 0.67 TU 1747 FR 1353 WE Time WEm 1601 TH SU Time 0.45 m Time m TU 0.74 Time SA m 1525 Time Time1451 m 1.65 0.57 2333 1.72 1.94 1.84 1911 1.79 Time m 04202259 Time m 0.361.790015 Time m TIME Time 0.45 2231 1.32 0436 1.19 0042 0343 1.59 2153 04282122 1.41 TIME M Time M 2302 TIME Mm 1828

0.55 1436 0.53 1412 0.47 1541 0.52 FR 1540 0.31 0.30 SU 13450153 MO 0.66 0104 0.53 0048 0.37TU 0140 0205 0.47 TH 0126 0.26 0332 0.24 0236 1.61 0308 0020 0.43 1.472200 1.63 2021 1.68 1.83 21110635 1.89 2045 1.90 2205 1.67 1.85 0110 1.4103080755 0648 1.29 0644 1.52 0730 1.33 0902 0757 1.37 1.65 0930 1.36 0926 0.38 0732 0.46 1243 1.23 0826 0.53 0800 0.36 0.35 0402 0.27 0331 0.22 0443 0.35 0432 0.14 22TH 7TH 7 1446 22 0.50 1230 0.54 0.37 1302 0.48 09021357 1.29 09591800 1.28 0930 1045 1.51 1421 1342 0.52 0.30 1458 0.53 1548 1.42 1339 1.19 0.73 1.27 1.40 FR 1.33 SU TH 1240 SA1041 FR22 SU1.30 MO 1428 SU SA SU 1428 0.56 1521 0.57 1500 0.46 1621 0.55 1634 0.33 MO TU SA 1.55 1905 1.72 1910 1.89WE 1941 1.92 2102 2131 1.95 2011 1.74 FR 2017 1.91 2134 0.67 1845 0.80 0.83 0.66 21022019 1.86 2154 1.83 2130 1.91 2241 1.58 2249 1.74 2006 0351 0949 TU 1513 2145

0.32 1.29 0.58 1.87

0445 1044 WE 1605 2234

0.32 1.27 0.61 1.75

0415 1017 TH 1551 2216

0.20 1.35 0.46 1.88

0515 1124 SA 1704 2316

0.40 1.31 0.60 1.48

0516 1130 SU 1733 2342

MO 1918 1.86

0.21 1.53 0.38 1.58

0.59 0.46 0424 0.2923 0.26 0351 23 0230 23 0247 8 0028 0.26 0214 0.32 0.22 0245 0.43 8 0223 1.57 0145 1.68 0145 1.40 1.55 0206 20 14 0116 20 20Australi 5 29 5 29 8Commonwealth 23 8 0849 23 14 14  Copyright of 0733 1.29 0758 1.41 0740 1.47 0838 0823 1.31 0949 1.35 1023 1.31 0852 1.29 1.57 0732 0830 0.51 0.43 0911 0.54 0.38 0.49 1441 1325 0.55 0.55 1544 1349 0.60 0.50 1513 1325 0.58 0.36 0.41 1415 1306 TU 1630 0.67 2302 1.79

PORT KEMBLA – NEW SOUTH WALES

1444 1346 1538 SA MO FR FR SU MO MO0.451.33 TU 1.49 FR 1.20 SA 1.25 TU 0.31 0.31 0.37 0501 0.21 SUof0549 Datum Predictions is1519 Lowest Astrono 24 0602 24 0437 9 0526 1205 1.31 1224 1.54 2121 10382106 1.28 11281906 1.26 1107 1.38 1943 1.79 1958 1.9524 1.62 2027 1.92 2145 2045 1.78 9 2127 2216 1.88 1.87 1.94 1953 0.84 0.75 0.81 0.62 2001 WE 1601 0.59 2231 1.84

TH 1649 0.65 2314 1.65

1751 0.64 MO 1837 0.44 Times SU are local standard time (UTC + 2357in1.38

FR 1645 0.48 2305 1.80

LAT0129 34°0324 29’ S0227 150° 55’0321 E 0437 0126 0217 0.5305250343 0057 0407 0.35 0240 0.24 0.40 0317 0.25 0.22 0515 0.32 0.41 LONG 1.49 1.63 0323 1.350040 1.47 0248 0604 0.39 0.31 0605 0.43 0548 0.24 0625 0.50 1.41 0.25 0.40 Moon Phase Symbols New0.31 Moo 10 10 0438 25 1005 25 11300944 10 25 0651 0717 1.39 0700 1.70 0835 1.4225 0817 1.29 0912 1.30 1038 1.47 1115 1.26 1.28 0920 1.32 1.23 0923 1.29Times 12120830 1.25 1200 1.40 1250 1.33 0.41 1040 1.37 1.28 10 1207 0.53 0.41 0955 0.54 0944 0.40 0843 and Heights of High and Low Waters 0.73 TH 1654 0.62 1736 0.70 SA 1742 0.51 1846 0.68 TU 1321 1.54 0.62 WE 1719 FR MO 0.55 SU 1610 0.55 MO 1530 1310 0.50 1313 0.26 1411 0.47 1345 1436 0.53 1412 1525 0.45 1630 0.67 1601 0.59 1451 0.58 1543 1.24 1449 1.32 1626 1.40 1615 1.59 WE1.88 SA SA SU 1.69 MO TU MO1951 TU TU WE SA WE SU 2357 1.68 2320 1.79 2354 1.54 0.48 2241 2202 1.79 TH 2347 FR MAY JUNE JULY 1937 1.6906152153 1933 0452 1.82 2045 1.97 2122 2021 1.83 2045 1.94 2302 2111 1.79 1.89 2231 1.84 1.79 2232 0.83 0.73 0043 1.270.750146 1.26 2235 0.55 0.31 0.41 0652 0.45 2105 0.33 06452020 0.48 0636 0.29 11 0535 26 11 26 11 26 11 26 0706 0.54 m 0745 0.50 Time 1137 1.28 1053 1.26 1300 1.22 Time 1225 1.30 1259 Time 1.26 1254 1.43 Time T m m Time m m 1340 1.34 0.66 0.78 0.47 0.64 1828 0.74 1845 0.55 1.55 0.27 0525 0331 MO 1657 0.65 TU 1613 TH 1812 FR 17510438 SA WE 1425 0205 0332 0.24SU 0308 0402 0153 0.26 0.25 0604 0.39 0.31 0407 0.40 TU 0.35 0236 1.61 1952 0.70 2329 1.79 2245 1.76 2113 0.49 0420 1.32 0320 1.44 0150 1.57 0343 1.59 0428 1.41 0757 1.3700131040 0930 1.36 1005 0902 0959 1.28 1130 0930 0755 0542 1.65 1.37 12070304 1.23 1.29 0 1.28 1.29 0926 0.38 0.39 0.42 0035 1.57 1.72 0038 1.44 0053 1.55 0140 1.18 1.16 0.54 0.53 0859 1017 0.35 0.42 12 0633 12 27SU 27 1145 27 1342 0.52 1458 0.53 1428 0.56 1521 0.57 1357 0.30 0.55 0.73 0.62 1 1530 0.62121036 1236 1.23 0.48 0.50 1010 07071610 0.34 07251548 0.51 0726 0754 0.56 1034 1.42 FR 0740 SU12 MO 0.36 TU0848 WE 1500 TH1.22 WE0.591719 TH 1654 MO27 SU 0.70 1.22 1.23 1633 1.34 1347 1643 1.29 MO 1.54 1351 1.48 1435 1.371.49 1.57 1710 1.70 TU 1747 0.74 WE 1702 FR 1353 SA 13222241 SU WE1710 TH 1532 1.30 1515 2011 1.74 2131 1.95 2102 1.86 2154 1.83 2130 2019 1.91 SA MO FR TU WE TH 1 1.88 2347 1.68 2320 1.79 2202 1.79 2134 0.67 2333 1.72 1911 0.81 1855 0.66 1928 0.77 1957 0.57 2108 0.69 2231 0.46 2330 0.68 2 2213 0.79 2036 0.76 2245 0.57 2344 0.46 0020 1.68 0635 0.43 0126 1.47 0110 1.63 0128 1.35 0156 1.41 0249 1.12 0425 1.13 0424 0.2628 0351 0.22 0245 0.31 0652 0.45 0.33 0452 0.4113 0.32 13 0732 0.460247 28 1243 28 08000535 28 09550445 1.23 13 0826 0.53 0.43 0.36 13 0809 0.54 0818 0.42 0848 0.62 0.58 0.32 0615 0415 0.73 1.59 1.27 Copyright 1.40 Commonwealth 1439 0445 1.33 1451 1.53 1533 1.42 1638 1.60 WE 1339 1.19 TH 1800 SA 1446 SU 14211137 MO TH0514 FR 0418 1.42 1.30 0301 1.58 0532 1.37 1023 1.31TU 0949 1.29 1044 1.27 1225 1017 0849 1.57 0838 1.35  of Australia 2019, Bureau of Meteo 1.28 1300 1.22 1.30 0 1053 1.26 1845 0.80 2017 0.83 2006 0.66 2037 0.77 2115 0.56 2222 0.64 2338 0.40 1052 0.52 1115 0.54 1000 0.41 1106 0.34 1125 0.43 1544 0.60 0.58 1605 0.61 0.36 1415 0.55 1657 0.65 1812 0.78 0.64 1 0.66Astronomical MO TU 1513 WE TH 1551 FR 1441 0028 SA 0223 MO TH1.10 FR 1751 TUis1613 TIMES AND 0116 1.57 1.68 0307 1.30 0404 0532 HEIGHTS 1.15 1.40 0214 1.55 0227 1.27 Datum of Predictions Lowest Tide 1.38 1618 1.67 14 0830 0.512106 29 141750 29 14 0911 29 08522329 2216 1.8829 2145 1.87 2234 1.75 1.80 2216 1.94 2045 1.78 SU WE FR 1 SA0732 TU 1733 TH 1802 1.79 2245 1.76 0.43 1.32 0914 0.47 0946 0.621.57 1058 0.57 0.54 1716 0.38 14 0855 0.56 OF HIGH AND1.65 LOW 1.25 0.68 1552 1.60 1630 1.49 1.33 2312 1.49 1.39 WE 0.47 TH 1444 1.20 FR 1346 SA 1737 SU 1538 Times MO 1519 TU 1532 standard 0.73 2152 2349 are in local timeFR(UTC +10:00) or daylight saving 1953 0.84 1906 0.75 2233 0.51 2324 0.55 2127 0.81 2121 0.62 2150 0.74 WATERS 0526 0343 0.22 0324 0.41 0633 0515 0.39 0.32 0542 0437 1.57 0.37 0013 0501 1.72 0.42 0.31 0035 1.49 1.63 1.35 1.47 0332 1.21 0421 1.24 New 0511 1.12 0030 0.34 Moon Phase Symbols Moon First Quar0 1.41 0.60 0410 1.56 0.37 1107 0 1.20 0045 1115 1.2630 1038 1.28 0944 1.47 0920 1.32 1.22 0740 0.50 0.34 1145 1.23150020 15 0217 30 0129 15 0323 30 0321 30 0923 0.53 0830 0.41 1.64 0955 0.54 0509 09441236 0.40 15 0943 0545 0.57 1010 0.50 1042 0.59 LAT0625 341128 29’ 1.26 0707 1449 1.32 1626 1.40 1615 1.59 1622 1.46 1652 1.67 1722 1.58 1153 0.53 FR 1543 1.24 SA MO TU WE TH SA SU 1130 0.51 0602 1.30 0 1053 0.34 1153 0.34 0633 1.34 1630 0.67 1601 0.59 1649 0.65 1645 1525 0.45 1451 0.58 1747 0.74 1353 1.23 1322 1.34 1702 0.70 0 TU WE TH FR SA SU TU FR SA WE 2105 0.83 2020 0.73 2232 0.75 2235 0.55 2257 0.68 2343 0.43 LONG1827 150 1.69 55’ 0.54 1712 1.44 2122 1.79 2231 0.46 2305 2153 1.94 1.79 2333 1.84 1911 2314 1.65 1855 1.79 1.47 2302 MO 1756 TH 1152 SA 1 SU0236 WE 1822 FR 1214 1.72 0.81 0.66 1.61 0530 1.22 0115 0.30 1 2259 31 0926 31 1106 0.51 1828 1.65 31 0709 1.25 1852 1.87 0.38 0.57 1.42 1748 1.74 0.48 0.43 0110 0548 SU 1548 MO 1242 0525 0605 0438 0.25 0407 0.40 0020 0604 1.68 0.39FR 0635 0.43 0.31 0126 1.47 1.63 2134 0.67 1912 1.71 0.66 1207 0.53 1212 0.37 1130 0.30 1200 1.23 1243 1.29 0826 1.25 0800 1040 0510 1.37 1.68 1005 0001 1.28 0732 0.46 0048 1.23 0104 0.53 0140 0.36 0 0554 1.41 1.29 1143 1.52 1.33 1719 0.73 0.62 0.70 0.55 0.28 15302019, 0.62 1339 1.19 0644 0.73 0648 1.27 0730 1.40 0  Copyright Commonwealth of Australia Bureau of Meteorology WE TH 1654 FR 1736 SA 1742 SU 1610 MO WE TH 1800 SA 1446 SU 1421 0.50 2347 0.54 2354 1.58 0.48 2357 Datum of Predictions is Lowest Astronomical Tide 1845 1.68 0.37 2320 1.79 2017 1.54 2006 2241 1.88 2202 1.79 TU 1205 FR 1230 SU 1 MO 1800 TH 1240 SA 1302 0.80 0.83 0.66 Times are in local standard time (UTC +10:00) or daylight (UTC +11:00) effect 1.72 1830 1.55 savings time1910 1 1.89 when in 1905 1941 1.92 Moon Phase Symbols New0452 Moon 0.41 0116 First Quarter Full Moon Last Quarter 0652 0615 0645 0535 0.31 1.57 0.45 0028 1.68 0.33 0223 1.40 0.48 0214 0636 1.55 0.59 1300 0.46 1259 0.29 1225 0145 0230 0.26 1254 1.22 1.30 0911 1.26 0852 1137 0000 1.28 0.45 1053 0045 1.26 0830 0.51 or0145 0.38 0 The Bureau of Meteorology gives no warranty of any kind whether express, implied, statutory otherwise0732 in respect to0.43 the availability, accuracy, currency,0.54 completeness, 1.41 0733 1.29 0740 1.47 1.31 1812 0.78 1751 0.64 1828 0.74 1657 0.65 0.66 1444 1.20 1346 1.25 1.33 0823 1.49 0 TH FR any SA rights. SU 1845 FR SU 1538 MO 1519 qualityMO or reliability of the0606 information 1.71 orTU that the1613 information0636 willTH be fit for any particular purpose or will not infringe third party Intellectual Property 1238 0.49 1306 2127 0.55 0.81 1229 0.25 or WE 0.41 0.50 0.62 2329 1.79 SA MO 1 TU FRon,1325 SU 1349 2121 1953 1906 0.75 The Bureau’s liability for any loss, damage, cost2245 expense 1.76 resulting from use of, or0.84 reliance the information is entirely excluded. 1904 1.62 1943 1.79 2 1847 1.71 1958 1.95 2027 1.92 0542 0.42 0217 0035 1.49 1.57 0129 0013 1.63 1.72 0323 0038 1.35 1.44 0321 0053 1.47 30­ / 2515­0633 / MAY 0.39 0.53 0740 0.24 0707 0.40 0725 0.25 0726 1236 0057 1.22 0.35 1145 0126 0.50 0830 0.34 0955 0.51 0944 1.23 0923 0.53 0240 0.41 0227 0.54 0317 0.40 0 1.39 1.42 1.29 1.30 0.74 1.70 1.23 1.34 1.29 0.70 1.24 0835 1.32 0817 1.40 0912 1.59 0 TU 1747 0700 FR 1353 SA 1322 SU 1347 WE 1702 0717 MO 1351 FR 1543 SA 1449 MO 1626 TU 1615 0.50 1911 0.47 1855 0.55 1928 0.53 1957 0.81 2020 0.66 2232 0.77 2235 1.72 2105 TH 1310 WE 1313 0.26 2333 SA 1411 SU 1345 MO 1436 TU 1 0.83 0.73 0.75 0.55 1937 1.69 1933 1.82 2045 1.97 2021 1.83 2111 1.89 2 0020 1.68 0635 0.43 0126 1.47 0236 0110 0128 1.35 0156 1.61 1.63

6

21 15 9 6 30 24 21 15 9 6 30 24 21 15

7 1

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COVID-19 HALTS AUSTRALIAN BASKETBALL DREAM The global coronavirus pandemic has forced a budding young local athlete to put his dreams of sporting glory on hold – for now. Thirroul student Mason Broadhead, 14, was due to represent Australian Country at the Mel Young Easter Classic in New Zealand over the Easter break. COVID-19 put a halt to this and, with the borders closed, the tournament was cancelled. This left Mason among many athletes now wondering when they can play the game they love. Training is the only option at the moment and a popular app called HomeCourt is being used around the world. Mason has also been fortunate to be training via a virtual basketball gym with coach Adam Marjoram and his Ba11er Elite concept, a series of online basketball challenges. Mason’s hoping to take to the court again one day soon. 2515

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