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JANUARY 2020

www.2515mag.com.au

5 1 COAST NEWS

AUSTI CUBS BE PREPARED FOR ADVENTURES!

Clifton | Scarborough | Wombarra | Coledale | Austinmer | Thirroul


HELLO, NET ZERO

Friday. Last month, our Council voted unanimously to adopt an emissions reduction target of net How good is a pledge? zero emissions by 2030. And if a local council can do it, so can we. Dear readers, Our first step to decrease 2515’s We have a New Year’s resolution: to take 2515 mag to environmental footprint is the net zero emissions by 2030. Forest Stewardship CouncilWe’re tired of waiting for certified paper our mags are politicians to act. For my son printed on – it’s thinner (fewer with asthma, summer 2019 was trees) and an uncoated stock (less the one he spent break-times in chemicals). We’re also reducing the library. For my sport-loving energy use, slashing car travel, daughter, it was the term PSSA spending money with companies was cancelled. For us, it was the committed to clean energy, and summer we stopped incessantly looking to learn from the likes of checking Fires Near Me and global non-profit coalition We air-quality apps, and made a Mean Business and pledge: Net Zero, here we come. ClimateWorks Australia’s Net We have 10 years in which to Zero Momentum Tracker. achieve our goal, and we’re What are you or your business confident we can get there. doing to go Net Zero? Especially in such a community: This is an exciting time for the Illawarra is already home to grassroots innovation. Tell us award-winning social enterprise your stories and we’ll share them Green Connect; the Make-Do in our new Net Zero column in Library of Things and Ocean 2020. There’s a long road ahead Plastic Patrol, the Austinmer kids – let’s travel it together. who clear the beach of litter each Gen & Marcus, co-editors 2515

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COAST NEWS

EDITORS Gen Swart, Marcus Craft CONTACT editor@2515mag.com.au Ph: 0432 612 168 2515mag PO Box 248, Helensburgh, 2508. ADVERTISING Karen, 0403 789 617. www.2515mag.com.au. T&Cs apply. DEADLINE 15th of month prior. COVER Austinmer Cub Scouts, by Anthony Warry Photography. 2515 is hand-delivered in the first week of each month. By The Word Bureau, your local independent magazine publisher. ABN 31 692 723 477.

Disclaimer: All content and images remain the property of 2515 Coast News unless otherwise supplied. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. Views expressed do not reflect those of the publisher. Articles of a general nature only; seek specific advice on an individual basis.

Cover image by Anthony Warry; story p16

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STAYCATION SPECIAL FEATURE

A TASTE SENSATION!

Sunny days – plus meticulous water and tree management – have helped produce delicious fruit at Darkes Glenbernie Orchard. This month, white peaches and royal gala apples will be ripe to pick, Jo Fahey reports.

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Any tips for using soft peaches and nectarines? A great school holiday project is to blitz soft peaches or nectarines in your bullet blender. You can add a sprig of mint and then pour into ice-block trays or cups. These small ice blocks can be put into other drinks to jazz them up. Use the frozen purée to make a slushy or smoothie. Pour over the top of ice-cream. Once frozen, it will keep for up to 12 months, so you can enjoy during winter as well.

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What’s the next fruit you’ll be picking? January is white peach time and at the end of January after Australia Day we should start picking apples. They will be royal gala, which are a small red apple perfect for children going back to school. Hop onto our Glenbernie Orchard Facebook page or darkes.com.au to book a picking session in the holidays.

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What are the current challenges on the farm? Water use and conservation is our biggest challenge at the moment. We’ve put in thousands of dollars worth of new infrastructure to help us save water. Every drop is precious. In particular, we have invested in electronic systems to turn the water on and off. We use sensor equipment to tell us how much water is in the soil at any particular time and how far down the soil profile the water has moved. We can see if the tree is drinking and needing water. We can’t waste a drop. We have removed a lot of trees this year in our replanting program. We have planted heritage apple trees and grafted some cider-specific varieties onto some of our old trees. The cider apple varieties come from France and England. Reducing the number of trees and mature trees that we have on the farm has made it a little easier with water demand. We need less water! It has helped us to look after the other trees. We have had good sized and big fruit, while other farms in other areas haven’t. Our fruit is tasting incredibly good and that’s because of the warm sunny days we’ve been having, along with reduced rainfall. And, whilst we still have water in our dams, we can control exactly what our trees need.


STAYCATION SPECIAL FEATURE

AIM FOR AQUATHON It’s back this Australia Day, writes Lydia Bruce.

Local Austinmer family, the Blanchs, love taking part in the MMJ Australia Day Aquathon each year. After watching her nine-year-old son Jesse participate in the 2019 Australia Day Aquathon, Jodie-Lea Blanch has been inspired to enter the 2020 Australia Day Aquathon as a Relay Team with her husband, Damien. “Jesse participated in the 2019 Australia Day Aquathon,” Jodie-Lea said. “It was his first Aquathon, he was only nine but absolutely loved it. The whole family went down to cheer him on – it was a lovely way to start the day. “He did the kids’ event:140m swim, 2km run. “Jesse felt an amazing sense of achievement, he swam and ran the whole course with a friend. It has now inspired my husband and I to enter 2020 as a team. We all had such a great time I think it will now be our new tradition on Australia Day.” Each year hundreds of people take part in the Illawarra’s community fitness event. Participants enjoy a swim in protected Wollongong Harbour and a scenic coastal run taking in the Blue Mile. There is a distance for everyone – from the Long Aqua to the all-abilities 4km Warrigal Walk, Run, Roll. Last month the Blanch family were getting set for 2020. “We are doing runs together on Thirroul beach and just general fitness,” Jodie-Lea said. See you there: Sunday, 26 January, 8-11.30am at Wollongong Harbour. www.aquathon.com.au. 2515

SUMMER READS

Jodie-Lea Blanch and her son Jesse at the 2019 Aquathon.

MOVIE PG, Thurs, 9 January

11am. Come and find out what your pet gets up to when you Thirroul Library reopens on Thurs, 2 Jan 2020 at 9.30am. are out all day. Popcorn provided. Ages 5+. Bookings LIBRARIANS’ CHOICE SUMMER READS essential via Eventbrite • • The Library Book by Susan Orlean MAKE IT AND TAKE IT DROP • The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek IN CRAFT Wed 15 January by Kim Michele Richardson 10.30am. Feathers, sticky paper, lolly pop • Daisy Jones & The Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid sticks – come and get crafty. • ACROBATIC & • The Dutch House by Ann Patchett • Evvie Drake Starts Over by Linda Holmes PARKOUR WORKSHOP Friday 17 January 10.30am. • The Flatshare by Beth O’Leary Learn the basics from the team at Action Reaction • My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite Entertainment! 8-12 years, bookings essential via • The Nickel Boys by Colson Whitehead Eventbrite • CUPCAKE DECORATING Wed 21 January • Red, White & Royal Blue by Casey McQuiston 10.30am. Ice cupcakes with pet themed decorations • The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides - Ages 5+ Bookings essential via Eventbrite. HARRY POTTER TRIVIA - Wednesday 23rd January JANUARY SCHOOL HOLIDAY FUN 10.30am. How well do you know Harry and friends? Check out the Library website for bookings. 8-12 yrs. Bookings essential via Eventbrite. 2515

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Kate and a group from Burgh Healthy Hub recently walked up to Mt Mitchell. The view (inset) was worth it!

STAYCATION SPECIAL FEATURE

WONDER WALKS

Kate Barter, manager of Burgh Healthy Hub in Helensburgh, shares three of her favourite hikes. Bush walks are a great way to connect with family and friends, while getting fresh air and exercise. What more could you want? We are lucky enough to have a number of walks, suitable for a variety of ages and fitness levels, on our doorstep. Here are three I like.

The Coastal Track runs all the way to Bundeena too, so you can hike until your heart’s content on this track. Note: check for fires, closures and fire bans before visiting NSW National Parks. Stay up to date using the Fires Near Me app.

THE WODI WODI TO MT MITCHELL Just off Lawrence Hargrave Drive, half-way between Stanwell Park and Coalcliff, is the Wodi Wodi Track. Walking underneath the giant Eucalyptus trees is truly humbling and you can’t beat the view of Stanwell Park beach from the top, after following the signs to the Forest Walk. While there are some steps in this one, anyone over the age of five or who walks semi-regularly should be able to complete this walk, even if at a slower pace. Hike on an extra five minutes after you reach the top, and you’ll be rewarded with another great view of different local beach: Coalcliff. Note: The Wodi Wodi path splits after the first section from Lawrence Hargrave Drive. A left takes you up Mt Mitchell; the right fork carries on for a challenging trek to Stanwell Park Station.

SUBLIME POINT LOOKOUT For those looking for a high-intensity activity, Sublime Point will get your legs working and your heart pumping. You can start at the bottom at Austinmer or at the top – from Helensburgh, take the Old Highway past Boomerang Golf Course to Sublime Point Lookout. A well-maintained path weaves through what feels like dense rainforest with five pit-stop chairs along the way, and the view at the top is the best reward of all. At Burgh Healthy Hub, our social walks are a great way to see new places and meet new people. They are open to members and non-members alike and are completely free. Our next walk will be back to the Wodi Wodi Track again, on Saturday, 11 January at 9am. Follow Burgh Healthy Hub on Facebook or visit https://burgh.com.au. 2515

THE COASTAL TRACK, ROYAL NATIONAL PARK For those more adventurous, or experienced, the Coastal Track is a must-do. Starting just near Otford Pantry, and Otford Lookout, a 1.5hr walk will take you to Burning Palms, along predominantly raised footpaths. If the tide is right, you can walk along the rock face and check out the Figure 8 Pools, but definitely check the tides on the National Park’s website before you go.

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Kate Barter is a born-and-bred local of 26 years. She is currently studying law and has been the manager of Burgh Healthy Hub for nearly three years. You will often catch her on a local bush walk, at one of the ocean pools or taking a fitness class.


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FREE CHILDREN’S BOOK FEST

Thanks to the Children’s Book Council of Australia - Illawarra South Coast Branch, the annual Kids Day Out (KDO) will be back on Thursday, January 16. 2515 asked five of this year’s presenters to tell us about book heroes and authors they loved as children, and what inspires their writing today. CLAIRE ZORN

My childhood book-hero was the hippo in There’s a Hippopotamus on Our Roof Eating Cake (written by Hazel Edwards and illustrated by Deborah Niland). I love eating cake and I was entranced by the possibility of a friendly hippo hanging out on my roof. Hazel has an uncanny ability to step into a child’s imagination — a whimsical place where all things are possible — which is surely the most important thing a children’s writer can hope for. Deborah’s seemingly simple illustrations perfectly evoke the child’s imaginative world. And any illustrator knows that simplicity is no easy feat! AT KDO: Claire, author of No Place for an Octopus, will give a workshop for ages 4-7. Learn all about octopuses and make one of your own. clairezorn.com KATE SIMPSON Glenda Millard inspires my writing every time I pick up one of her books. She makes words sing in ways I can only dream of and stirs emotion on every page. Her books are sophisticated, even those for the youngest readers. She seems to know that children understand more than many adults give them credit for. I love to read to set the mood for my own writing. Picking up a book helps me find that place in myself where the words flow. Glenda’s books, with her mastery of language and emotion, are the perfect inspiration. A KDO: Kate, author of Dear Grandpa, will host a story time and science session; www.katesimpsonbooks.com DIANNE ELLIS Children inspire me to write. They are so interesting and their imaginations far outreach the boundaries of sensibility. When a child remarks that he or she has loved reading one of my books, it makes my heart sing and gives me the confidence to continue my writing journey. In the Illawarra region, I’m fortunate to be surrounded and supported by many great writers, particularly

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Di Bates and Bill Condon, who continue to guide and encourage new writers with their knowledge. They inspire me to become the best writer I can be. AT KDO: Dianne, author of Kingsley The Cross-Eyed Kookaburra, will show kids how to make kookaburra craft; www.diannellisbooks.com SANDI WOOTON

Science fiction and fantasy are special interests, so many of my stories explore themes within these genres. The one children’s author who has probably inspired me the most is Madeleine L’Engle. She wrote the young adult novel, A Wrinkle in Time. The main characters are whisked away on a journey through space and time to rescue their scientist father who mysteriously disappeared. The novel was quite an achievement for its time, winning the 1963 Newberry Medal. It’s still very popular today. At KDO: Sandi, author of Paint with Magic, will lead a storytime and painting workshop; sandiwooton.com PAT SIMMONS

Lynley Dodd and Julia Donaldson are my inspiration. Their rhyme is a joy to read aloud. It’s bouncy and it’s fun. Who doesn’t love Lynley Dodd’s Hairy Maclary or Julia Donaldson’s Gruffalo? When asked where the inspiration for the Gruffalo came from, Julia Donaldson said: “The book was going to be about a tiger but I couldn’t get anything to rhyme with tiger. Then I thought up the lines: Silly old Fox, doesn’t he know/There’s no such thing as a … and somehow the word Gruffalo came to mind to fill the gap.” Oh, to have that Gruffalo moment! At KDO: Pat, author of George, will read her picture book and lead craft activities; www.patsimmonswriter.com.au n Kids Day Out is a free event for ages 3-13, with author and illustrator workshops, poetry, craft, storytelling and book sales. Thursday, January 16, 10am-2pm at Dapto Ribbonwood Centre & Library. Book at wollongongcitylibraries.eventbrite. com or call Dapto Library on 4227 8555. 2515


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BLUE FUTURE OF TOURISM

As the coast’s popularity soars, we need to look at the four S’s – Sun, Sand, Sea and Sustainability – to develop a plan to cope with future tourism. By Dr Anna Lewis, of the Australian National Centre for Ocean Resources and Security at the University of Wollongong. Think of a location on the South Coast of NSW (from Sydney to the Victorian border) that you love to visit. Picture it then and now – if you feel there are more visitors today, you’re right. The South Coast of NSW is the most visited tourist destination in NSW outside of Sydney. Tourism is a key industry for the South Coast economy, and sustainable visitation growth is vital. The region’s popularity is underpinned by natural assets, such as clean, uncrowded beaches and natural beauty. However, its popularity has been in the media recently, due to the strain on infrastructure and services. The “loving-it-todeath” phenomenon can lead to visitor dissatisfaction, community frustration and degradation of the natural environment that attracts visitors in the first place. Short-term solutions may include warning of visitor capacity limits on social media, turning cars away or utilising shuttle buses. These actions, however, have high costs, in terms of staff hours and services provided. Longer-term, strategic solutions are critical for both locals and tourists. ENTER THE S4 MODEL A team from the University of Wollongong, funded through UOW Global Challenges, in partnership with Shoalhaven City Council, has developed the Sun, Sand, Sea and Sustainability (S4) Model as a novel and integrated decision-support tool that can inform strategic planning for coastal destinations. The S4 model draws on interdisciplinary bodies of existing work to develop a framework for

‘The White Box’ artwork courtesy of local painter Jaqueline Burgess, visit Sketch Coffee & Art in Towradgi or www.jaquelineburgessart.com

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strategic tourism planning and destination management on a community scale. NO ONE SIZE FITS ALL The South Coast comprises diverse communities, so cannot be managed through a ‘one size fits all’ approach. So the classification of communities is a first step towards managing this diversity. Workshops and focus groups with the council and other stakeholders were held to determine relevant and appropriate elements of sustainable tourist communities within seven categories. These were: governance and engagement, economy, transport, services, built environment, natural environment, and culture and society. The S4 model is designed to complement and build on existing tourism-planning processes at regional councils, while also tapping into the considerable expertise and knowledge that exists among council staff and stakeholders. Tailored plans are vital as, for example, a remote village surrounded by bushland would have very different needs to a busy coastal town. Two pre-tests have been conducted with Shoalhaven City Council, and future research will pilot the methodology by using it to classify communities within the South Coast region. Strategic infrastructure decisions may then be made, and will ultimately assist council to tailor tourism planning, marketing and service provision to meet the needs of different ‘types’ of coastal communities. While this research is based locally, the tool developed will be applicable in many other coastal regions of Australia and internationally. 2515


BACKYARD ZOOLOGY With Amanda De George

Summer is the perfect season to start exploring rock pools as two of my favourite inhabitants are out and about, making babies and laying noodle-like ribbons of eggs. The Rose Petal Bubble Snail and the Red-Lined Bubble Snail both live in rock pools around Sandon Point. Aside from being carnivorous and eating marine worms, they don’t look that different to snails we have in the garden. Instead of eyes mounted on the end of long stalks, these two species have eye spots, which are simple eyes, used not for seeing actual objects but for recognising the difference between light and dark. Those little eye spots make them look not only ridiculously cute but also a tad hilarious. While garden snails and these marine snails both have shells, the Bubble Snails can’t retract into their paper-thin shell. In a way, this makes them quite vulnerable to predation, their soft, brightly coloured bodies spilling out the sides, as they glide across the sandy floor. But they have developed a few defence mechanisms that can save them from any hungry fish and crabs. They can burrow under the sand,

Found in Sandon Point rock pools, carnivorous bubble snails eat marine worms.

which they do to not only find food but to hide from any potential predators. Along with that, they taste bad! Their bright colours advertise this. And also make them easier for me to spot! Now, if you happen to see two (or more!) huddled together from summer through to early autumn, guess what? That’s not just a huddle! Bubble snails are hermaphrodites, so they have both male and female reproductive organs. They still need to mate but essentially they are impregnating each other at the same time and each individual then produces their own egg mass which makes them, in my opinion, one of the prettiest and also one of the most efficient rock-pool critters around. Follow Amanda’s Facebook blog @BackyardZoology 2515

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STAYCATION SPECIAL FEATURE

ARCHI GAMES FOR KIDS

Local architect Ben Wollen suggests three games to play in the summer school holidays. At the age of nine, Frank Lloyd Wright was given a box of wooden blocks called Froebel gifts. They were a set of different shaped wooden blocks that, according to his autobiography, allowed him to learn the “rhythmic structures in Nature”. Before you run to Amazon or Ebay to buy yourself a set of Froebel gifts to nourish the next generation of world-famous architects, there are some much easier and cheaper ways for kids to gain a basic understanding of the geometry of architecture. Here are three: GIANT JENGA While you can buy a set for about $150 and have it delivered, that kind of robs you of the opportunity to build one yourself with your kids to help out along the way. All you need is some dressed pine lengths of timber 70 x 35mm. The blocks are stacked in alternating directions making square on square. That means there’s some maths in there to figure out what length to cut the jenga blocks into as well as to calculate how many lengths of timber you will need. I’m not going to spoil your fun and give you the dimensions! Don’t have a drop-saw to cut the timber? No worries – head down to Bulli’s Make-Do Library of Things and borrow theirs!

Giant Jenga – think about making your own with some dressed pine lengths. Photos: Ben Wollen

CUBBY HOUSES Leftover large boxes post-Christmas? Don’t recycle them yet! If they’re big enough for a kid to jump inside, they’re good to keep them occupied for a whole morning at least. With some adult supervision cut some windows in them (cut only three edges so the window can open and close like a door). Get the kids to decorate them with smaller boxes or pieces of cardboard. Got more boxes? Join them together to form tunnels or villages. TOWER BLOCK BUILDING Any timber off-cuts leftover from your last DIY project? Grab about a small wheelie bin full and ask the kids to build the tallest tower they can. They’ll quickly learn the importance of setting up a steady and sturdy base from which to build from. Extra points for elegant or architecturally gymnastic forms. This one definitely needs adult supervision, especially when the towers get taller than the kids, but try not to intervene in their constructions – the whole idea is for them to learn from their failures. A good lesson in life, not just tower building! 2515

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Ben Wollen is the director of Wollen Architecture, an architecture studio with a focus on sustainable design. “Only build what you need to” is one of his driving mantras. He feels deeply his accountability, as an architect and environmental scientist, to work towards a sustainable future. When Ben isn’t designing buildings, you’ll catch him enjoying the natural wonders of the Illawarra escarpment with his wife and kids.


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COVER FEATURE

SALUTE TO AUSTI CUBS Adventure, teamwork and lasting friendships – just three of the many reasons to join 1st Austinmer Scout Group. 2515 reports.

Be prepared! Scouts from all over the state are about to descend on Appin from 5 to 9 January for the 7th annual Cuboree at Cataract Scout Park. Ahead of this huge camp – which will include exciting outdoor activities such as archery, climbing walls and forest obstacle trails – 2515 caught up with our local troop at the 1st Austinmer Scout Hall on Moore Street. If smiles are any measure of success – and they generally are – then the 1st Austinmer Scout Group is doing extremely well, thank you very much.

Some of the 1st Austinmer Scout Group Cubs who will attend the 2020 Cuboree: (from left to right) Tim, John, Jeremy, Emily and Tara.

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When 2515 and our photographer attend a Wednesday night meeting of the Cub Scouts (eight- to 11-year-old girls and boys), there are ear-to-ear smiles on all participants. They obviously and absolutely love being here. The Cubs are having a rowdy fun time – playing games, doing arts and crafts – it’s almost Christmas after all. They’re also learning how to work with each other, how to be adaptable, adventurous and resilient. All increasingly valuable life skills in the challenging 21st century.


Photos: Anthony Warry Photography

Scouts Australia NSW has more than 17,000 youth and adult members from various cultural and religious backgrounds and with varying abilities. There are five age groups: Joeys is for ages 5 to 8; Cub Scouts for ages 8-11; Scouts for ages 11-14; Venturers for ages 14-17; and Rovers, for ages 18-25, by which stage adventures outdoors might include anything from bush walking and canoeing, to caving, ski-touring, canyoning, four-wheel driving, rock-climbing and scuba diving. Scouts Australia NSW also involves adult leaders and volunteers. The 1st Austinmer Scout Group has a rich history – on 16 November 2018 the group celebrated 95 years of scouting at Austinmer. In an article published in 2515 Coast News at the time, committee member Ron Witton wrote: “1st Austinmer is now the longest continuallyfunctioning scout troop in the Illawarra, its scout

and guide members having many years ago been merged into the one troop.” 2020 is set to be another massive year for the group: there is a drive to recruit more Venturers and Leaders; and several Cubs will attend the upcoming 7th NSW Cuboree at Cataract Scout Park. A Cuboree is a five-day standing camp for Cub Scouts that brings together Cub Scouts from throughout NSW, giving them the opportunity to develop their teamwork, independence and leadership skills, while having fun and making new friends. This year’s Cuboree theme is “What On Earth” and the event will include Activity Bases modelled on ecosystems from around the world. Activities will include archery, climbing walls, forest obstacle trails, giant water slides – and even a taste of bungee jumping and hot air ballooning. Stephen Turner, Group Leader of 1st Austinmer Scout Group, has been involved in Scouts for more

JANUARY / 2515 / 17


than 60 years and is an authority on the Scouting community. Stephen kindly took time out of his busy schedule to answer our questions. Please tell us a little about your history with the Scouts. My family has been involved with scouts since 1956 with my older brother starting Wolf Cubs and my parents as Committee Members with various roles: my father as President, and my mother as Treasurer of 1st Austinmer Group up until the mid- to late 90s. I started with 1st Austinmer Scout Group as a Wolf Cub in 1958. My first Jamboree was in Dandenong, Victoria 1964. I left the movement for a few years after Senior Scouts in 1967 and returned in 1991 as a Group Leader of 1st Austinmer Group, and have been group leader since.   Why has Scouts been so important to your life? As a young boy of eight, I remember walking to the Scout Hall in Moore Street for Cub Pack meetings, playing games, learning bushcraft skills and making new friends. This continued through Scouts and Senior Scouts and the journey through each sections from 8-18 years gave me self-confidence, bushcraft, mapping navigation, and leadership skills to name a few. These skills formed the foundations for my career path through engineering and management. The group needed a Group Leader in 1991 and I was approached by the District Commissioner to see if I could help out and – remembering what I gained from Scouting – I didn’t hesitate to re-join the movement.   What are some of the most popular activities with the kids?  All sections feature swimming, skiing, hiking, camping, including competitions with other groups, and playing skill games using their senses. The older youth enjoy canoeing, abseiling and caving.   What real-life skills do kids learn in scouts? Spending a lot of time outdoors, learning the importance of teamwork, building friendships and

18­ / 2515­/ JANUARY

What do you like about Cubs? BAXTER MALLON, AGE 9 I like doing outdoor activities. I like meeting new people. ARLO WALKLEY, AGE 10 I like that we learn about medical things. That there are lots of kids who go. I like that the leaders are nice and that we cook and we do activities at the beach. TIM AYLING, AGE 9 At the start we play games and you can work to get a leadership position such as assistant patrol leader and patrol leader. gaining resilience. Scouts take charge of their own expeditions, cook meals, and learn to safely plan their own adventures. Scouts actively develop leadership and outdoor survival skills and learn how to pass these skills onto others. They have plenty of opportunity to explore their sense of self and feel proud of their achievements. What would you say to convince a parent to let their child try Scouting? Scouting empowers young people to take an active role, they get exactly what they want out of their time at Scouts – safely and at their own pace. I think it’s the adventure, the journey, learning so many new skills, as well as working as a team. Scouting is a diverse and inclusive community where the whole community can safely come together and will take away life-long skills, make lasting friendships, and can continue to stay connected to the over two million Australians who have been a Scout before them. n For more details on the 1st Austinmer Scout Group, visit their hall at 20 Moore Street, Austinmer and check the sign for meeting times. Also visit https://www.nsw.scouts.com.au, and https://cuboree.nsw.scouts.com.au. 2515


SHOULDER TO SHOULDER WITH DENILIQUIN SHED By Bob Ascoli, president of Thirroul Men’s Shed

The devastation of the “worst drought of the century”, coupled with extreme uncontrollable bushfires throughout New South Wales, prompted the Thirroul Men’s Shed executive team to give serious thought to how we could help rural people facing such dire situations. Thirroul Men’s Shed members raised $2000 at a Bunnings BBQ in early November and we were then faced with a dilemma: “How do we get this donation to ensure it can give direct benefits to farmers and the farming community?” The Thirroul Men’s Shed vice-president contacted the IGA Store in Deniliquin, who in turn referred the matter to the president of Deniliquin Men’s Shed who decided to give $200 IGA vouchers to 10 local drought-affected farmers. The money being spent in the local town was paramount to the Thirroul Men’s Shed’s decision. This became a “win-win” for the farmers and the local farming community with the money being spent locally and distribution by Deniliquin Men’s Shed who will conduct a ballot of deserving farmers and allocate the $200 vouchers accordingly. The president of Deniliquin Men’s Shed felt there was a gap in understanding between city and country but realised that through this donation by Thirroul Men’s Shed that people do have a better understanding of the issues. I recently toured this area of the Riverina and saw first-hand the devastation caused by the drought: many paddocks are now almost sand hills and plains, extreme dust storms and paddocks virtually empty of stock. Shopping centres have many vacant shops, indicating the dire impact on those rural communities as the drought reaches more widely into country business and commercial aspects. This small donation by the members of Thirroul Men’s Shed may help in some way and we are happy to provide this support. The motto of Australian Men’s Shed Association and Men’s Sheds in general is that men work “shoulder to shoulder” and this is very evident in the way Deniliquin Men’s Shed president and members responded to our offer. 2515

SINGERS TO THE RESCUE!

Team Rescue and Horizon Bank are working together to deliver safety messages through song. Team Rescue is a super hero entertainment group representing the different arms of emergency response services including police, fire fighters, paramedics and lifeguards. The group, brainchild of firefighter Tony Chicco, delivers empowering safety messages through song for preschool and young primary school-aged children. “Team Rescue is a child’s best friend for ensuring that they understand basic safety principles in a fun, musical way,” Tony said. Their songs are written by the original Yellow Wiggle, Greg Page, so with that track record, the messages are bound to resonate with children. Every year in Australia, as a result of preventable accidents, 350 children lose their lives, and more than 5000 require hospital treatment. In a bid to help spread the word, Horizon Bank is partnering with Team Rescue to help keep children safe. Horizon has described their partnership with Team Rescue as a meaningful way of giving back to the communities in which they operate. “Recalling what to do when an unforeseen event occurs enables children to be their own superheroes and prevent injury or worse,” Horizon Bank’s CEO Jon Stanfield said. Team Rescue premiered on ABC Kids iView and ABC Kids free-to-air TV in June 2019. And now, with the help of Horizon Bank, Team Rescue will help keep the South Coast community much safer. Each month, Horizon will share information from Team Rescue with their customers and community, including safety tips and great songs about safety issues to keep children much safer. Team Rescue will also perform a new song for Horizon Bank to help children understand that saving money is part of being financially safe and secure. 2515

JANUARY / 2515 / 19


STAYCATION SPECIAL FEATURE

LEAD THE WAY!

Get off the couch and discover three great walks for you and your dog, writes Philip Comans, of Bark Busters Illawarra & Southern Highlands. One of the reasons we love the Illawarra is our largely unspoiled natural environment and the outdoor lifestyle this encourages. Owning a dog also encourages outdoor activity and provides a great excuse for getting outside and off the couch. So, over the summer, pop a lead on Rover or Bella, grab the kids (and poo bags for the dog!) and explore new walks nearby. Here are my top 3 dog-friendly walks, plus where to grab a snack or drink en route. All are dog-friendly cafes, but do remember to keep your dog on its lead and always respect that other diners may not love your dog as much as you do. Well-loved, well-behaved and well-trained: that’s what makes for happy pets when out in public. STANWELL PARK TO CLIFTON, 9KM RETURN Now that the long-anticipated pedestrian path has opened, a truly spectacular walk is yours to enjoy. Start with breakfast at the Palms Cafe, Hargraves Cafe, Loaf Kitchen or Uluwatu Blue in Stanwell Park then head south. Parts of the new walk are cantilevered ocean side and offer superb ocean, escarpment and beach views. Continue over Sea Cliff Bridge and stop again for a coffee at the Scarborough Hotel if you walk that far (5.8km). Otherwise turn back at the historic 1911 Clifton School of Arts for a 9km round trip. Allow two hours for a leisurely pace. MCCAULEYS BEACH TO SANDON POINT, 1.4KM ONE WAY One of our favourite walks. Start at Corbett Avenue, Thirroul and descend onto leash-free McCauleys Beach. Frolic off-leash in the shore break and on the sand as you stroll south, ending

your playtime at Sandon Point. Sit and watch the expert surfers off the Point. Make it a round trip by walking up off the beach and promenading with your pooch (on-leash) back to your car, following the footpath past multi-million dollar homes. Allow 20 minutes if you’re on a mission, or up to an hour if you take your time. HEADLANDS HOTEL TO COLEDALE, 1.3KM ONE WAY After a cold beer, strong coffee or even a meal, head north, sticking to the ocean-front to walk along leash-free Sharkeys Beach. This is a truly beautiful reef beach, popular with surfers but not lifeguard patrolled. The views north are among the best in the Illawarra. Keep walking north and soon you’ll be in quaint Coledale where a great coffee, cake or meal can be enjoyed at Earth Walker cafe, or across the road at Mr & Mrs Smith. This is 1.3km one-way and an easy walk. Allow half an hour, although you could do this walk in 20 minutes. Coalcliff resident Philip Comans runs Bark Busters Illawarra & Southern Highlands, phone 1800 067 710. 2515

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SHARING THE JOY OF SURFING

Crawchy’s Swim School owner Mel Whiteside reports on a great day in the waves at Thirroul Beach. A crew from Crawchy’s Starfish Club and the Helensburgh Tigers and Tigerlillies, who volunteered for the first time, headed down to Thirroul on Saturday, 7 December to help out at the Disabled Surfers Association (DSA) South Coast event. There were 297 people involved: 47 brave participants, and the rest were volunteers. The surf was warm but a bit hectic in size, with rips making for some interesting wipe-outs.

We started with paddle races in Thirroul ocean pool then took on what Huey gave us in the surf. Thank you to Ian Picton and his crew for putting in another excellent day! I’m sure we’ll all be at Gerroa in March. Check out the DSA South Coast Facebook page if you would like to be involved as a disabled surfer or as a volunteer – you don’t need to know how to surf, just how to smile and have fun. 2515

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’TIS THE SEASON

To explore Green Connect’s urban farm! With activity coordinator Vanessa Fookes

At Green Connect, we think it’s important for kids to know where their food comes from and the work that goes into producing it. The Green Connect farm uses permaculture and organic principles to produce fruit, vegetables, herbs, eggs, honey and free-range meat. It has been operating since 2013 and we are proud to say that we have transformed an urban piece of overgrown and forgotten wasteland into a luscious, thriving permaculture farm, just behind Warrawong High School. We have been making the farm a productive permaculture paradise for a while now and the next stage is to turn it into a demonstration site that delights and inspires people. We want to fully develop the farm in order to:

• Create more jobs and employment pathways in a region with too few; • Fully utilise the land, activating the farm as a space in which the community can engage; • Expand our impact by sharing what we do (showing people what is possible and teaching and inspiring them to reduce waste and grow fair food themselves). In order to expand our impact, these school holidays we are inviting kids to the Green Connect farm for a fun and educational farm tour where they can touch, smell and taste their way through our unique urban farm. Come meet our pretty pigs, cheeky chickens and shy sheep! The farm is on land behind Warrawong High School. Entry to the Green Connect farm is via the laneway at 11 Weringa Avenue, Lake Heights. We’d love to see you there. Book a kid-friendly tour for the whole family this January school holidays via our website: https://green-connect.com.au/product/ farm-experience-for-kids/ 2515

FUN FACT:

The farm is so big that from any one point on the farm you can only see about a third of it!

give you a summer glow and allow you to enjoy the vitality of the season.

ALKALISING GREEN SMOOTHIE By Stephanie Meades

One of the best ways to recover after the overindulgences of the festive season is to include a delicious, hydrating, alkalising and nourishing detox smoothie into your daily diet. Smoothies are an awesome way of providing the body with heaps of nutrients and they also provide your system with a well-earned digestion break from the heavy foods we typically consume over Christmas. Here is one of my favourite green smoothie recipes that will

22­ / 2515­/ JANUARY

INGREDIENTS: 2/3 cup of almond/coconut milk 3/4 cup of ice 1 cup kale or spinach (roughly chopped) 2 stalks of celery (roughly chopped) 1 green apple (cored and chopped) 1 tbsp flaxseed (ground) 1 tsp raw honey METHOD: Put all ingredients in a blender or food processor and blitz to a smooth, creamy consistency – and enjoy straight away. For those who want a little extra fibre to start their day, add half an avocado to the mix or a tablespoon of chia seeds for added nourishment and additional anti-inflammatory boost. 2515


THE TORSOS: “These are Scribbly Bark gums photographed mainly in the areas of The Royal National Park and around Appin. The trees in this series have a strong relationship to human shapes, made more interesting by the intricate patterns formed by the larvae burrowing out from under the bark.” Bulli local Chris Duczynski is an award-winning photographer and filmmaker who has been in the business for over 40 years. Chris is currently working on a new series looking at human shapes and Aboriginal designs in the scribbly barks, visit www.malibumedia.com.au or email chris@malibumedia.com.au 2515

COUNCIL TO GO NET ZERO

On Monday, December 9, Wollongong City Council voted unanimously to adopt an emissions reduction target of net zero emissions by 2030 for its own operations. Wollongong City Lord Mayor Councillor Gordon Bradbery AM said: “This target demonstrates leadership and supports Council’s recent recognition that we are in a State of Climate Emergency that requires urgent action by all levels of government.” WCC is one of 26 Councils in Australia to commit to greenhouse gas reduction through the Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy (GCoM). Council also voted to adopt a target of net zero emissions by 2050 for the City of Wollongong, to be reviewed in five years with a view to reducing the timeline from 2050 to 2030 in line with Council’s target. Industry is the key contributor to greenhouse gas emissions in Wollongong, at 70 per cent, while residential accounts for 25 per cent and Council 5 per cent. To meet its aspirational 2030 target, Council will

pursue activities to reduce landfill emissions, which account for 85 per cent of Council’s emissions, including the Whytes Gully Renewable Energy Facility and a possible roll-out of FOGO across the city. Council predicts a 45 per cent emissions reduction in the next 10 years through planned activities. Consideration of additional initiatives such as a second 1MW renewable energy unit at Whytes Gully, replacement of high-wattage street lighting, solar panels on Council buildings and alternate fuel vehicles could achieve an 88 per cent reduction. Technological developments over the next 10 years will help Council reach 100 per cent. Council will also join the Cities Power Partnership Program, a network of local government organisations working together to transition to a clean energy future and administered by the Climate Council, to help meet its obligations under the GCoM. 2515

JANUARY / 2515 / 23


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The holiday season is a great time to wander the local markets. Make a day trip of it and pack a picnic blanket! Lara McCabe presents a list. • Kiama Farmers Market @ Surf Beach Kiama, every Wednesday, summer hours are back: 3-6pm. • Foragers Market, Bulli Showground, 2nd Sunday of the month. • The Farms Market @ Killalea State Park, Shell Cove, 1st Sunday of the month 10am-3pm. Note: no dogs but picnic blankets are welcome! • Coledale Public School Markets, 4th Sunday of the month, craft and clothes stalls, music and food. • Eat St Markets, Thursday from 5-9pm, Crown St Mall, Wollongong. Get dinner while you shop! • Warrawong Markets, Saturdays, 7am-1pm by the Lake, Northcliff Drive, Warrawong. An eclectic mix of food and gift stalls, something for everyone. • Kangaroo Valley Farmers Markets, 2nd Sunday of the month, 165 Moss Vale Road, Kangaroo Valley. • Berry Produce Market, 2nd Saturday and 4th Sunday of the month, Andrew Place Park, Berry. • Gerringong Village Markets, 3rd Saturday of the month, 8.30am-1.30pm @ Gerringong Town Hall and Old School Park, Fern Street, Gerringong. • Friday Forage, Fridays 9am-2pm, farm fresh market, Crown St Mall, Wollongong. Note: market times may change over the holidays, please check the market’s social media page before you set off.

FESTIVAL FUN

Illawarra Folk Festival Bulli Showground, January 16-19. The annual festival is four exciting summer days of folk, world, roots, bluegrass, gypsy and Celtic music, as well as poetry, comedy and dance. Expect superb music from more than 150 international, national and local artists. www.illawarrafolkfestival.com.au or 1300 887 034. HONK! Oz Festival of Street Music Wollongong, 9-11 January. Highlights include roving street music and a lantern parade in conjunction with Eat Street Markets on 9 Jan in Crown Street Mall (4.30pm9pm), and a community parade and performances on 10 Jan (4.30pm-9pm). The festival finishes on Saturday, 11 January with a chilled selection of performances in the Arts Precinct, 10am-3pm, www.honkfest.org.au. 2515

JANUARY / 2515 / 27


1.36 0053 1.51 0 1.28 0202 0.44 0205 0.48 0257 0.48 0202 0.50 0256 0.51 0325 1.51 1.18 0038 0130 1 25 16 0714 1 0123 16 0926 10 10 22 7 0629 7 70 0.49 0.52 0644 0.66 0719 0756 0.68 0832 0952 0838 1.81 1.77 0730 1.72 0930 1.69 1307 0.53 22 1.70 1328 1.64 1518 1.23 1304 1.48 1355 1.28

0.24 0.27 SA 0.30 TH 0.35 WE 1.19 WE 1410 SU 0.32 FR 1524 SA 1615 MO 1633 FR 1418 SA 1515 TU 1850 SA 1 0.27 2012 0.52 1 1958 0.44 1959 2009 0.52 2108 1.27 2024 1.25 2120 1.20 2117 1.25 2208 1.29 2233

1.52 0 1.39 0144 1.31 0243 0.42 0258 0.48 0400 0.48 0416 0.48 0248 0.44 0336 0.49 1.19 0128 0229 17 1047 2 0212 17 0819 2 26 11 11 23 8 8 0034 80 0.53 0737 0.71 0807 0.54 0902 0.70 0910 0922 1.88 1.75 1041 1.74 1.69 0817 1.83 1008 0712 1.61 23 1637 1.14 1349 1.39 1427 1.49 1451 1.19

PORT KEMBLA – NEW SOUTH WALES PORT KEMBLA TIDAL CHART 2020

0.17 0.28 MO 0.31 TH 0.43 TH 1457 FR 0.30 SU 0.19 TU 1717 SA 1609 SU 1651 SU 1546 SA 1504 WE 1355 SU 1 0.58 2 0.34 2100 0.56 2143 1.30 2113 1.26 2222 1.22 2204 1.32 2321 1.32 2245 1942 2042 1.21 0.47 2046 2101

LAT 34° 29ʼ S PORT KEMBLA – NEW SOUTH WALES

LONG 150° 55ʼ E 1.54 1.43 and 0354 1.34 0320 0415 0.49 0507 0336 0.40Low 0234 0.37Waters 0.47 0509 Times and Heights of High JANUARY 2020 0.49 0.56 0904 1019 0.69 0945 1044 1.71 1205 1008 1.92 Local Time 1.92 1.68 1130 1.12 1.36 1601 1.12 FEBRUARY1655 MARCH 0.31 0.13 JANUARYJANUARY 0.11 0.31 TU 1756 MOAPRIL MO 1725 WE 1802 MO SU 1548 MO 1617 Time m m 2215 Time 1.24 m Time m2254 Time m 2030 Time 2129 m Time m Time m 2208 0.60 0.40 2146 0.58 0.49 2322 1.26 1.32 1.24 1.38Time 1.34 Time Time m0257 2130 Time m Time m 2156 Time TIME 0130m M1.36 M Time TIME TIME Mm 2326 0304 1.50 1.51 0224 1.58 M 0213 1.48 0123 1.18 0205 1.28 TIME 0114 1.39 0305 1.22 0.48 0.46 LAT 34° 29ʼ S 0117 LONG 150° 55ʼ E 0214 0329 Times and Heights0755 of High 0841 and Low 0.73 Waters 0850 0934 1.77 1.72 FEBRUARY MARCH 0.27 0.33 1.30 SA 1532 FR 1443 SU FR 1538 TH 1440

24 18 12 9 3 27 24 18 12 9 00

9 3

1

0644 0.66 WE 1304 1.48 1958 0.44

16 07141.18 0.49

1 0123 0644

TH 1328 1.64 2009 0.27

0.66 1.39 1304 0229 1.48 WE1.19 2 0212 0737 0.71 17 0819 0.54 1.49 1958 0.44 FR 1427 TH 1349 1.39 2042 0.47

2101 0.34

1.43 0212 1.19 18 0329 0934 0.56 0737 0.71 1.36 SA 1532 0.40 1.39 TH 1349 2156 0430 1.49 0400 1.26 19 10540.47 4 0953 0.742042 0.55

3 0305 0841

1.22 0.73 FR 1443 1.30 2130 0.49

2

SA 1545 1.23 2218 0.51

SU 1645 1.26

1

0544 1212 MO 1754 2351

6

1.42 0.62 1.18 0.50

21 0628

1.63

0.52 SU 1518 1.23 2120 0.52

0726 0.61 SU 1322 1.25 1926 0.57

2113 0.56

2222 0.58

MO 1601 1.12

TU 1717 1.10

0756 0.68 SA 1355 1.28 2024 0.52

1959 1.20

0.49 1.61 0.43 1.21

5

TH 1440 0.33 2030 1.24

FR 1538 0.27

1

16 1012

0.51 TH 1627 1.19 2144 0.79

0.49 MO 1512 1.16 2046 0.65

0913 0.59 WE 1511 1.11 2037 0.74

2014 0.63

2157 0.71

2157 0.73

2250 0.74

TU 1756 1.12

TU 1527 1.09

WE 1750 1.13

FR 1745 1.21

SA 1800 1.33

WE 1900 1.15

WE 1651 1.09 2226 0.66

TH 1847 1.19

SA 1840 1.32

SU 1836 1.40

0025 0.58 0704 1.63

0508 1.50 1207 0.51

0013 0.67 0642 1.55

0016 0.56 0537 1.73

0029 0.61 0634 1.51

1.34 0248 0507 0454 1.54 0440 1.52 1.49 0433 0257 0336 1.39 1.56 0416 1.49 0518 0.411.540548 0531 0.55 0.300506 0.47 0.42 0.48 0229 1.39 0258 1.31 0530 0400 1.52 0201 1.39 0025 3 0354 31.33 3 0432 1019 0.69 18 1205 0.49 1133 0.46 18 1145 0.48 0940 0.65 18 1146 0.50 0.70 0.49 1041 0.53 1051 1144 1.87 1238 1.57 1.94 1153 1.60 1.88 0902 1008 1.75 1047 0819 0922 0.54 1106 0.70 1211 0.53 0827 0.65 0704

0.58 0 0102 0330 1 20 17 5 292 26 20 17 14 14 26 11 11 17 11 16095 1651 2 1.63 0704 1 1035 0 0.38 1 1.20 1717 1.13 1716 0.15 1825 0.38 1357 0.08 1830 0.36 1313 0.17 1.19 1651 1758 0.28 1830

0.58 2326 0.60 0.66 2344 0.67 2115 0.67 1427 1.49 1.19 1637 1.14 1416 TH TU SU MO 2309 WE FR 1634 TU0.71 WE TU 2312 WE 1.16 SA SU WE 1 FR2208 SU 1451 MO MO 1.41 2204 0610 2305 1.58 0546 1.53 0539 1.63 1.470553 1.50 2321 0401 2245 1.43 1.20 2 0.51 2345 0.474 2321 1934 1.38 2157 1.30 1.26 2101 0.34 2113 0.56 2222 0.58 0 2014 0.63 1950 19 4 0452 19 19 4 1135 0.63 1059 0.60 1308 0.44 1244 0.47 1229 0.36 1223 0.46

1.63 0509 0.55 0511 0.55 0 1.42 0415 0036 1.34 0000 1.26 0158 0.49 0507 0.30 0037 0.49 0440 0336 0.40 0354 1.54 1 1.43 0544 1.34 0628 0257 1.39 0117 21 6 21 30 15 15 27 12 27 12 18 18 18 12 20 3 3 1316 0.42 0641 1.60 1125 0751 1.66 0.62 1044 0614 0.45 0614 0.59 0810 1.71 1130 1.87 1.53 1 1008 1.92 1205 0.49 1146 0 0.566 1212 1019 0.69 0940 0.65 5 20 5 20 1.19 1802 0.41 1745 0.34 1 1.77 1331 1.48 1438 0.31 1234 0.13 1229 0.40 1411 1655 1754 0.13 1.18 1725 1902

6 0000

0.55

1756 1.12 1.36 1601 1.12 1527 1.09 TUFR 1330 TH FR WE 1357 0.38 0.26 TH 1256 0.44 1805 1.14 WE0.43 SA 1750 MO WE TH TH 1 TU MO TH TU THMO SU 1218 MO 1950 2351 1.20 1931 1.25 1.47 2356 2333 2322 0.62 1.19 1.24 2 0.50 1919 1828 0.201.4519221909 1904 0.43 2025 1.39 2309 2254 1.32 2326 0.60 0 0.40 2208 0.58 1.26 2115 0.67 2031

0117 0.55 0105 0.61 0014 0.44 0108 0.55 0609 1.61 21 61.51 0751 1.66 0630 1.80 21 0712 1.51 1302 0.39 21 0728 1.58 0.486 0011 0.50 0551 0629 1.27 0452 0.51 0610 1.49 0119 0.52 0426 0.40 0452 1.58 0053 1.49 1.41 0038 0401 1.43 0202

0.51 0 0546 1 22 22 28 13 28 13 19 19 19 13 1055 4 4 1.69 1.70 0730 1.72 1200 0.53 1118 0700 0.63 1.65 0604 0.34 1.44 1 1.92 1308 0.447 31 1244 0 0.557 1307 1135 0.63 0719 1059 0.60 0832 0.30 1815 1.38 1515 0.34 0.35 1219 1418 1.73 1309 0.45 0.32 1 1742 1850 0.13 1.19 1758 1410 2012 1.25

FR 1438 0.34 2031 1.24

FR 1903 1.23

SA 1406 0.40 2008 1.32

MO 1304 0.19 1914 1.57

TU 1326 0.43 1940 1.54

SA 1515 0.32 2108 1.29

SA 1351 0.27 1952 1.33

SU 1440 0.38 2042 1.37

TU 1348 0.15 1959 1.69

WE 1355 0.44 2011 1.59

0243 0910 SU 1546 2143

0129 0755 SU 1437 2038

0228 0844 MO 1510 2114

0202 0814 WE 1431 2045

0223 0824 TH 1424 2042

0202 0.51 0.33 FR0146 0.50 0034 0.53 1900 1.15 1.26 1.10 1.09 SA TH 1847 WE 0148 FR TU TH7 0109 FR FR WE0.55 TU 1717 WE 1651 22 7TU 0832 1.69 0722 1.84 22 0747 1.50 0704 1.73 22 0807 1.60 1.25 0.47 1.26 1.20 1848 2012 0.22 1942 2344 0.45 1.33 2305 2359 0.58 1959 2226 0.66 2108 1.29

1

0.48 0 0.48 0102 0.44 0033 1.50 0508 1.40 0013 0531 0.55 0025 0518 0.41 0548 1.56 0034 1.49 0.58 0144 1.50 0243 230128 80.49 8 0704 235 29 23 23 14 14 01 29 20 14 23 5 20 20  Copyright of Australi 1.69 1.74 0817 1.83CITY 1.61 1153 0.40 0635 0.57 1.57 1144 1.87 0.498 0712 1238 0.53 0807 0704 1.638 Commonwealth 0642 1207 0.51 0910 WOLLONGONG PORT NEW WALES 1546 0.30 1504 1355 0.43 1830 1457 1313 SOUTH 1.56 0.19 1238 1.34 0.31 1 0.38 – 1830 0.15 KEMBLA

0.48 0.44 0530 0454 1.33 8 23 0128 8 0144 0807 1.74 0817 1.83 1211 1106 0.70 0.30 0.19 TH 1457 SA 1504 1.22 1.32 1758 1.19 TU MO2100 SU 1651 2046 0214 0.48 0117 0.46 0234 0.37 2345 2305 0.51 9 0755 1.72 24 0850 1.77 9 0904 1.92

0034 0712 WE 1355 1942

16 0917

1.48 1.31 1.64 0400 1.52 1.49 TU0410 0201 1.39 1518 1.23 1328 1.28 1322 1.25 WE MO SU 0330 TU SA TH 1512 MO1.54 FR SA MO2 0319 TU TU 1 SU SA 1355 TH SU 2 0258 20.51 1103 0.50 0827 0.65 17 1035 0902 0.70 17 1047 0.53 0.51 1027 0.55 17 0.45TH 2233 0.58 1848 2 2359 1.26 2344 1.331.132305 1.27 1.25 1.43 1.25 2248 1416 2208 1.16 1.19 2117 1.14 1634 1.11 1633 2120 0.52 0 2009 0.27 2024 0.52TU2251 1926 0.57 1.36 2046 FR 1718 SU 1451 MO 1637 2218 MO

1316 0.42 0641 1.60 0400 1.26 0430 1.19 0.41 TU 1902 TH 1331 1922 1.19 0953 0.74 1054 0.48 0053 0.50 1545 0038 1.23 1645 MO SA1.51 SU 7 7 0629 1307 0.53 22 0719 1.70 0730 1.72 2218 0.51 2251 0.35 0.30 TU 1850 1.19 WE 1410 FR 1418

4

1

1.58 0 1.41 0357 1.26 0256 1.49 0325 0011 0426 0.40 0452 0.51 0.48 0257 0.32 0452 0.46 0224 0.44 0205 1.36 0400 1.51 1 1.28 0430 0114 1.39 0610 19 19 4 28 13 13 10 0202 25 10 25 10 1 1 16 0130 16 16 0.44 0.55 1135 0.63 1018 0.74 0930 0604 1118 1.65 1055 1.92 0838 1.81 1.77 0952 1.96 1.65 0 0926 0.52 0917 0714 0.494 0953 0756 0.68 1054 0726 0.61 1308 1.15 1 1.26 1633 1.10 1647 0.34 1900 0.13 1717 1524 1545 0.24 1.23 1615 1645 0.27 1742 0.08 1758 0.33 1219

0.45 2305 0.58 0329 0305 2251 1.22 0530 1.56 0548 1.49 0454 1.33 0934 0841 0.73 5 1106 0.701443 20 12111.30 5 1238 0.49 0.53 1532 1.20 1.13 SU SA FR1.19 MO 1758 WE 1825 SU 1651 2305 0.51 0.47 2156 2130 2345 0.49

3

16 0926

1 2

SU 1548 0.11

1.20 WE

0.48 1.69 0.31 1.32

0.43 1.84 0.17 1.43

TH WE 1.13 WE 1825

0.51 1.60 0.37 1.42

0.25 1.82 0.17 1.77

0.47 1.47 0.46 1.64

1357 0.38 1330 SU FRAstrono SA COUNCIL FR of SAisALL1.14 SA 0 TH TH 1805 ASKS Datum Predictions Lowest

0221 0.34 0320 1942 0.47 0304 0.48 0256 0.212100 0300 0.45 1848 2143 1.32 1 1.229 1934 1.32 0.32 0.51 1931 0.47 1950 1.20 2333 91.21 24 242046 24150° LAT 34° 29ʼ LONG 55ʼTO0.62 E time 0845 1.91 0905 1.74 BEACH 0900 1.43 0945 1.68 0918 S 1.59 GOERS Times are in local standard (UTC + MO 1617 0.31

MO 1521 0.10

TU 1539 0.37

TH 1515 0.23

FR 1453 0.49

2124 0037 1.52 2130 1.67Waters 1.24 2146 1.38 0036 2215 0117 1.34 Times 2144 1.47 0.46 0214 0.48 0234 0.37 0.47 0 SWIM BETWEEN THE 1.26 0158 1.512115 1.34 0117 0.551.83and 0105 0628 1.63 0000 0.55Heights 0544 2129 1.42 0609 1.61 0320 and of High Low New Moo01 Moon Symbols 1.72 1.77Phase 0904 1.92 1.68 0.44 0325 0.32 0614 0357 0755 0.46 0340 0.46 0351 0.44 0.48 0314 0614 0.26 0.59 0810 0.470340 0.45 0751 1.660.21FLAGS 1316 0.42 0641 1.60 0850 1212 0256 0.62 –1302 NO FLAGS0.39 0945 0728 10 0202 10 10 25 0952 1.96 25 1018 1.65 10 0933 1.93 25 0951 1.56 0958 1.62 0939 1.37 0838 1.81 25 0930 1.77 JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH 1440 0.33 1538 0.27 1548 0.11 1617 0.31 1229 1.48 1411 1.39 1234 1.77 1438 0.34 1406 0 1902 1.19 1331 0.41 1754 1.18 1903 1.23 TH FR SU MO SU 1 0.08 TU 1647 0.33 1523 1605 0.09 WE 1607 FR0.38 SA SA TH TUTH MO0.24 SA 1615 0.27 TU FR FR 1524 MO 1633 WE FR 1558 0.32 MEANS SA NO0.54 SWIM. 2248 2030 1.36 2215 1.50 2217 1.69 1.25 2210 1904 1.60 2117 1.27 1.24 1.24 Time 1.34 T 0.20 0.43 2025 0.43 1 1.241.842146 1.19 2129 2351 2208 0.50 m 21471.38 Time 2215 m 2008 Time m 1922 Time m 2031 Time m 2233 1.43 1919

6

11 0248 0922

0.42 1.88 SA 1609 0.17 2204 1.30

0336 0.48

26 1008 1.75 0123 0629 1.51 SU 1651 0.28 1.26 0644 1307 2245 0.53 1304 0336 0.40 0415 0.49 1850 1.19 WE TU 12 1008 1.92 27 1044 1.71 1958 SU 1655 0.13 MO 1725 0.31

7 1

2322 1.26

21 15 9 6 30 24 21 15 9 6 0416 0.30

11 1041 1.94 1.18 0038 TU 1717 0.08 1.47 0.662321 0719 1.48 0509 0.30 1410 TH WE 12 1130 1.87 0.44 1959 0.13 WE 1802

24 21 15

0433 0.47 0416 0.45 0448 0.25 0.45 0406 0.23 YOU CAN0.32 ALWAYS 26 260256 11 0257 26 0420 1051 0202 1.60 11 1026 1052 1.480325 1020 1.32 0114 0357 1023 1.88 0130 1.36 0205 1.281.52 0.44 0.48 0.46 0119 1.27 0202 0.51 1.51 0.48 0053 0.50 0034 0.53 1.39 0148

0 SPEAK TO ONE OF25 10700 1 16 0926 16 10 0838 25 10 COUNCIL’S 31 22 22 22 16 0714 7 7 0.52 01 0.49 0756 0.68 0832 0726 0.61 0807 1.81 1.77 0952 1.96 1.65 0.63 1.69 1.70 0730 1.72 0930 0704 1.73 1018 FRIENDLY 1.23 0.08 1328 1524 1.64 0.24 1309 1355 1615 1.28 0.27 1518 1633 1322 1647 1.25 0.33 1 1.38 WE 1716 0.36 2321 1.38

WE 1648 0.12 2257 1.65

TH 1634 0.42 2246 1.53

SA 1641 0.44 2306 1.80

SU 1556 0.59 2224 1.68

TH 1745 0.40 2356 1.39

TH 1731 0.20 2345 1.67

FR 1703 0.46 2319 1.55

SU 1726 0.56 2357 1.73

MO 1632 0.64

0511 0.49 0.32 0504 0.47 0500 1515 0.32 0.35 0.30 1351 SU 0.27 SA 0.23 SU 0548 MO 0 FR SA 0455 MO TU SU 1440 FR SA0.46 FR 1418 SA 27 1125 1.53 12 1114 1.77 27 1100 1.45 12 1149 1.34 27 1104 1.26 0.52 2009 0.27 2012 2024 0.52 2108 0.57 2042 1.27 1942 1.25 2120 1.43TO 1926 1.36 21 0.47 LIFEGUARDS 1.29 2233 1.20 2117 1.25 2208 1952 1.33 2248

2304 1.66 DISCUSS CONDITIONS 1.39 0258 1.310.48 1.520554 0212 1.39 0228 0.48 0400 0.30 0.47 0 0.42 0652 0.50 0201 0.40 0.51 1.19 0011 1.49 0229 0551 0248 0.52 0557 0.27 0534 0144 0.44 0336 0243 0.480.400416 0034 0452 0.49 0128 0.48 0129 0.43 0433 13 28 13 28 13 28 1252 1.22 1154 1.21Bureau 1.92 28 1118 1.65 0604 0.34 1200 1.44 1205 1.62 1137 1.38 AT THE BEACH. 0819 0.54 0902 0.70 1047 0.53 0737 0.71 0827 0.65 1008 1.75 1041 1.94 1.60 1 0922 1.88  Copyright Commonwealth of Australia 2019, of Meteor 0817 1.83 0910 1.69 0844 0712 1.61 0807 1.74 0755 1.84 1051 1816 0.67 1715 0.70 0.13 1758 0.34 1219 1.73 1815 0.45 1815 0.31 1732 0.51 MO TU TU TH FR FR SA

2254 1.32

17 11 8 2 26 23 17 11 8 2 26 23 17 8 2 1349 23 1427 1609 1.49 0.17 1451 1651 1.19 0.28 1637 1717 1.14 0.08 1416 1716 1.39 1.16 0.36 1

13 0426 1055

MO 1742 2344 1.33

2350 1.62 1.26 0.22 0.30 2355 1.54 0.31 0.43 1457 1437 FR SU 0.19 MO TU 0 TH2359 MO 0.17 SUis Lowest TU SU WE MO 1510 SAof Predictions SA 1504 SU 1546 WE 1355 TH1848 Datum Astronomical Tide 0.34 2113 0.560.52 0.580650 2042 0.63 2114 1.26 2222 2321 1.47 1.38 21 1.30 1.50 2101 0033 2204 1.40 0034 1.67 0617 0.52 2014 0.41 0.55 0.47 2100 1.32 2143 1.321.65TIMES 1942 1.21 2046 1.22 1.43 2321 HEIGHTS 14 0052 29 0531 14 0102 29 14 292245 29 AND2038

14 0518 1144

1.87 TU 1830 0.15

1153 1.57 WE 1830 0.38

0117 0305 0.46 0841 0036 1.34 1.26 0755 0037 1.72 15 0614TH0.451440 30 0614 0.59 1443 0.33 1.48 WE 1234 1.77 FR TH 1229 1919 0.20 0.43 2130 2030 1904 1.24

9 3

0119 1.27

0635 0.57 0657 0.35 1217 1.29 0800 0.46 1252 1.17 Times are in local standard timeTU(UTC or daylight saving 1402 1.15+10:00) SA 1238 1.34 SA 1300 1.44 SU 1804 0.58 WE 1809 0.75

0704 0.40 FR 1313 1.56

OF HIGH0221 AND 1.43 0354 1.34 0320 1.54 1.221934 1.39 0304 0.30LOW0257 0.49 0 0.40 0.49 0507 0.32 0329 1848 0336 0.51 1900 0.43 1916 0.760509 0214 0.48 0.34 0511 0234 0.37 0415 0.47 New1205 Moon First Quart1 Moon Phase 0.56 Symbols 1019 0.691.53 0.49WATERS 0.730158 0.65 0918 1.87 1.53 1.92 1.71 0045 1.59 0940 1.51 0934 0127 1.63 0033 0155 0850 1.77 1008 0845 1.91 1125 0904 1.92 1044 0945 1.681.561130 15 30 30 0753 00.51 1527 1.09 0810 0.47 1532 1.36 15 0803 0.42 0706 0.55 15 1756 0909 0.50 1.12 1601 1.12 1.30 1802 0.13 1745 0.40 1655 0.13 1725 0.31 1538 1521 1548 0.11 1617 0.31 SA MO 1.28 TU WE 10 TU 0.10 WE TH TU 1539 SU SU SU MOMO 1303 29’ LAT 34 FR MO1.21 1401 1.17 1.39 0.27 1400 1.14 MO TH SA 1411 WE 1519 1917 0.78 0.43 2156 1948 0.56 1843 2029 0.40 2146 2208 0.580.64 21 0.492025 2115 0.67 2356 1.39 1.32 1.26 2326 0 2129 1.24 2254 2124 1.52 1.38 2322 2215 1.340.80 0.60 2144 LONG 150 55’

24 18 12 9 3 27 24 18 12 9 3 27 24 18 0117 1.50

31 0700 310452 0.63 1.26 0804 0400 1.49 0325 1.410.59 0.40 0452 0.51 0202 0.44 0256 0430 0.48 0426 0.32 0357 FR 1309 1.38 TU 1400 1.15 0953 0.55 0952 0.630.70 0.47 0.74 0930 1054 1930 1.92 1135 1.65 0838 1942 1.81 1.77 1055 1.96 1118 1018 1.26 1.10 0.13 0.34 0.24 1.23 1615 0.27 1633 0.08 WE SA 1545 SU 1645 TU 1717 MO 1742 TU 1758 FR 1524 SA MO TU 1647  Copyright Commonwealth of Australia 2019, Bureau of Meteorology 0.45 2233 0.58 2248 1.33 2305 1.26 2117 2218 1.27 0.51 2208 2251 1.25 2344 1.43 2359 Datum of Predictions is Lowest Astronomical Tide

10 4

1.58 0314 1.43 0340 1.49 0401 0.52 0 0.46 0011 0.26 0551 19 1 4 28 13 0604 25 19 13 10 4 28 25 19 0610 10 25 1308 0.44 1059 0.60 0951 0.34 1.44 1.65 0933 1.93 1200 1900 1219 1.15 1.73 1651 1815 1.09 0.45 1

0.33 TH 0 WE 0.09 TH TU 1605 FR WE 1607 0.22 2226 1.36 1848 2210 1.60 0.66 2215 1

Times are in local standard time (UTC +10:00) or daylight savings time (UTC +11:00) when in effect 0530 0518 1.56 0416 1.49 0433 0.58 0406 0454 0.55 0025 0102 1.50 0.41 0548 0.30 0531 0.47 Last 0248 0.42 1.33 Moon Phase Symbols New 0336 Moon 0.48 First Quarter Full Moon Quarter

0508 1.50 0416 1.40 0 0.23 0033 20 1211 5 29 20 0704 20 01 5 29 14 1144 14 0704 11 26 26 11 09225 1106 11 0.49 1238 0.53 1051 1.63 0.70 1008 1207 0.51 1026 1.57 0.40 0.57 1.87 1041 1.94 1153 1.60 1.88 26 1.75 1023 1.88 0635 1758 1830 1.20 0.15 1825 1830 1.13 0.38 1357 1313 0.38 1.56 1805 1238 1651 1.19 1.14 1.34 1

0.36 0.28 1648 WEor 0.08 FR SU 0.17 TH 0.12 WE inWE FR SA TH 1634 TU The Bureau Meteorology gives no warranty anyMO kind whether express, implied, statutory otherwise respect1716 to theTH availability, accuracy,WE currency, completeness, TU 1717 SAof 1609 SUof1651 0.47 1950 1.20 2305 0.62 2246 1934 0.32 2333 0.51 quality or reliability of the information that the2245 information2345 will be fit for any particular purpose1.47 or will not infringe 2321 any third party Intellectual Property2257 rights. 2321 1.38 2204 1.30 or0.51 1.26 1.65 1848 The Bureau’s liability for any loss, damage, cost or expense resulting from use of, or reliance on, the information is entirely excluded.

0 1

1.63 0509 0.55 0511 0.55 0500 1.61 0455 0 1.26 0117 1.51 0609 1.34 0000 0.30 0037 0.40 1.42 0415 0628 21 0.49 6 30 21 0.49 21 6 0.23 27 15 0158 15 0036 27 12 27 12 12 03366 0544 1902 1234 1.19 1.77 1331 1229 0.41 1.48 1438 1411 0.34 1.39 1903 1.23 1 1754 1.18

0.42 1130 1.60 1125 1.66 1114 1212 0.59 0751 0.47 1302 0.45 0641 28­ / 2515­1008 / JANUARY 1.71 0614 1.87 0614 1.53 0810 1.77 0.39 1100 01 1.92 0.62 1044 1316 TU 0.31 TH 0.13 FR 0.40 MO 0.13 MO 1725 FR 0.20 TH TH 1745 SA TH 1731 WE WE 1802 SU 1655 1.19 2356 1.24 2345 0.43 2031 0.43 1.67 1.39 2025 2254 2351 1.32 0.50 2322 1.26 1919 0.20 1922 1904

SA 0 FR 1703 2319 21

0.50 0551 1.27 0202 0.51 0.48 0011 0053 1.49 0119 0.52 0.51 0557 0034 0.27 0.53 0534 0 0.40 1.51 0452 0038 22 0832 13 7 31 28 13 7 0704 28 13 04267 0629 1.69 1307 28 0.53 22 0719 1.70 0730 0700 1.72 0.63 1.73 22 0


Photos: Surfing Australia & Nick McLaren / Scarborough Boardriders

Clockwise from top left: Fin McLaren, Shyla Short and Scarborough Boardriders’ stand-out surfer Zahlia Short.

JUNIORS HIT OUT AT AUSSIE TITLES The Scarborough Boardriders report.

The main break at Surfer’s Point near Margaret River is one of those iconic waves, like the Bowl at Bells Beach, or Snapper Rocks on the Gold Coast. Like Snapper it is also currently home to a top-level World Surf League event, so this acted to ramp up the enthusiasm for four Scarborough Boardriders juniors as they competed in the Australian Junior Surfing Titles from November 30 to December 7. More than 250 surfers were faced with consistent 2- to 4-foot waves throughout the week, with Zahlia Short our stand-out surfer, finishing with a 2nd in the under 14 Grommet Girls with a punchy performance on steep rights running towards the rocks on the final day. Showing her depth as a young surfer, Zahlia also backed up with a 3rd place in the MR Shield Under 16 division surfing with Bodhi Simon for Illawarra Sports High. Zahlia’s younger sister, Shyla, also started strong with 1st placings in Round 1 and 2, advancing through Round 3 with a third place, then coming unstuck in the quarters, but showing a maturity well beyond her years. In the U18s junior men, Fin McLaren racked up a 14-point heat total in round 1 but that wasn’t

enough to get him through with two competitors scoring 9s in a high-performance heat. In the repechage Round 2, Fin scored an 8 on a searing left with a back-up score putting him into Round 3, but once again, despite a respectable heat total of 13.90, it wasn’t enough to get him through to the quarter-finals and he bowed out. Kasey Hargreaves in the U18s junior women surfed through Round 1 with a second, then put on a searing display of power turns on a couple of the larger sets of the day, scoring a 7 and a 6 to put her into Round 3, where her campaign came to an end. It was a great experience for the Scarborough Boardriders juniors to compete against the best in the country and potentially some of the best in the world in epic conditions on a totally pristine section of the Australian coast. While Fin McLaren will now move on to surfing Pro Juniors, hopefully Zahlia, Shyla and Kasey will be back with more experience for another shot at becoming an Aussie junior champion in 2020. n Scarborough Boardriders club registration will open mid-January, watch out for announcements on Facebook and Instagram. First pointscore will be held on February 2. 2515

JANUARY / 2515 / 29


One of Michael Mucci’s favourite quotes: “You can’t stop the waves, but you can learn to surf.” – Jon Kabat-Zinn

MOOCH MOVES ON By Heather Eiszele

The night celebrated artist Michael Mucci died, succumbing to the brain tumour that had been his companion for 18 months, he surprised his wife of 35 years with a last dance in their bedroom. “He grabbed me, laughed loudly and danced with me ever so briefly,” Tina Mucci told more than 1000 mourners at a celebration of Michael’s life at the Stanwell Tops Conference Centre on December 5. “He twirled me around one last time and was gone.” Tina said the encounter had given her a strong sense of peace. “Michael was free from his earthly body, he had fulfilled his life’s purpose and had made the most of his life on this earth,” she said in her eulogy, surrounded by her four children Kiara, Nathan, Joel and Melina. The two-hour service was hosted by life-long friend and TV celebrity gardener Costa Georgiadis

30­ / 2515­/ JANUARY

who voiced the palpable mood in the room that it was wrong; they shouldn’t be farewelling a 57-year-old man who had so much talent, so much empathy and so much wisdom. “What’s order, though?” Costa asked. “Michael was always challenging, seeking questions but not necessarily answers. We celebrate that restless inquisition. You could not hide from Michael. He gently exposed anything that needed exposing, put it on the table and moved on.” The service featured a rolling spool of ‘Mooch’s’ work from his 30-plus years as a Fairfax illustrator and portrait artist, including one of Costa and another of fellow Waverley College old boy, Scott Cam. Mooch was awarded the Packing Room Prize at the 2006 Archibalds for his rendition of Cam, his TV personality mate. Michael Mucci was born on August 9, 1962 in Torre del Greco, Naples, and moved to Australia in 1968. He met Tina at Art College and they were engaged a week after their first date. They were married within a year. “I’m so glad we didn’t waste any time,” Tina said.


Pictured left: About 200 people gathered for a paddle-out at Sharkeys Beach at Coledale on Sunday, December 15, to scatter Mooch’s ashes. A huge circle of friends and family held hands as flowers, petals and tears were tossed to the sea. Photos: Tina Mucci (inset) and Mitch Loveday (main photo).

Last year they purchased the Sculpture Garden in Wombarra and the family lived together during Michael’s illness, helping him with physio exercises, taking him on country drives and leaving him in no doubt that he was loved. Eldest son Nathan told mourners his father was like a Chieftain, creating rituals of meaning, and his family was his tribe. “Our rituals showed that life is a practice, it is mysterious and the joy is in the simple,” he said. Vale Michael Mucci: 9.8.1962 – 26.11.2019. 2515

‘LOVE IS OUR IMMORTALITY’ By Wombarra artist Terri Ayliffe

Michael Mucci left us in November 2019, and the community mourns his loss. We meet many people in our lives, some slip through the waters of us without creating a ripple, others fall into our pond and change the shape of us. Michael shifted us, not by force but with love.

A few years ago, Michael agreed to teach me painting techniques. He was a talented artist who I admired; I felt privileged to stand alongside him. He took my average talent and tried to mould it into something new. I learned much standing beside Michael at the easel in his studio, about painting yes, but more so about life. Michael was still, like a century-old tree that had taken root on the coast. His branches moved with life but his roots held firm. He accepted and appreciated himself and he lived life by its terms. Michael and I discussed many things as we dipped our brushes in paint and listened to classical music. He and I understood that control was an illusion and the best course of action was to flow rather than resist. His illness did not change his Zen-like approach to life. He took a deep breath and went with it. Michael taught me that acceptance starts with ourselves. And our immortality is in the love we give to others. Love is the most apt memory-maker, it sinks into us as though we are play dough, hollowing out parts of us and filling the spaces with warmth. Michael was a memory-maker. To live with love as a memory is grief, the depth of love we received carves out a cavern our sorrow sits in, the more we are loved, the deeper the despair. Michael’s family understand this for they could not have been loved better. 2515 Licence No. 95628C / ARC Licence No. AU09136 ABN 62 078 105 978

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2515 JANUARY 2020  

Independent local news for Thirroul and the Illawarra coast

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