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NOVEMBER 2019

www.2515mag.com.au

5 1 COAST NEWS KYLIE FLAMENT

WORKING WONDERS WITH WASTE AT GREEN CONNECT

Clifton | Scarborough | Wombarra | Coledale | Austinmer | Thirroul


Wombarra Bowlo 578 Lawrence Hargrave Drive

Wombarra (02) 4267 2139

All Bowlers Welcome

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EDITORS Gen Swart, Marcus Craft / CONTACT editor@2515mag.com.au. Ph: 0432 612 168 2515mag PO Box 248, Helensburgh, 2508. / ADVERTISING Karen, 0403 789 617. www.2515mag.com.au. T&Cs apply. / DEADLINE 15th of month prior. / COVER Kylie Flament, photo by Unicorn Studios. / 2515 is hand delivered in the first week of each month. By The Word Bureau, your local independent magazine publisher. ABN 31 692 723 477. Disclaimer: All content and images remain the property of 2515 Coast News unless otherwise supplied. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. Views expressed do not reflect those of the publisher. Articles of a general nature only; seek specific advice on an individual basis.

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COAST NEWS

THANKS TO OUR CONTRIBUTORS

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t s e b on z o i/ a h t t the coas

JANICE CREENAUNE is a retired English teacher of 35 years, who has lived and worked in the Illawarra. A wife and mother of three, she sees the life of a retiree as an evolution, something to be cherished, enjoyed. Janice is a volunteer for PKD Australia. LARA MCCABE worked in marketing for more than 20 years but wanted more creativity. Since studying photography at Ultimo Sydney Institute, Lara has worked as a freelance photographer for the past 10 years. She lives in Coledale with her husband and three children. STEPHANIE MEADES is an integrative nutritionist and certified GAPS (Gut & Psychological Syndrome) practitioner, author, keynote speaker and founder of Life Wellness Co. Stephanie works in Thirroul.

Cover image by Unicorn Studios; story p16

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DINO ZOO ROARS INTO AUSTINMER By Liz Armitage

Recently performed at the Sydney Opera House, Erth’s Dinosaur Zoo will be the headline act at the Austinmer Public School community fete on Sunday, November 10. The widely acclaimed show combines science and spectacle, using the ‘Bunraku’ style of puppetry, which originated in Japan more than 400 years ago. In Bunraku there are several puppeteers who manipulate the puppet and are visible throughout the show, each of them moving a different part of the body. Children can journey back in time and meet prehistoric creatures, from cute baby dinos to some of the largest carnivores and herbivores that have ever walked the planet. An Afternoon on the Green will also feature rides, an art workshop in which students can create collage artworks on canvas using found beach plastic, musical performances, art displays, food and drink stalls, clothing and book stalls and more. The fete will be an eco-friendly and minimal waste event. Organisers are asking fete-goers to avoid bringing disposable items and to bring their own water bottles as there will be a water-bottle refill station at the school. A sustainability and

waste-management plan is in place. There will be three sessions of Erth’s Dinosaur Zoo in the afternoon. The show has been touring Australia and overseas since 2009 and was voted Best Children’s Show at the Adelaide Fringe Festival. The New York Times said in a review: “Erth’s Dinosaur Zoo delivers solid science as well as an extraordinary spectacle.” Artistic director Scott Wright describes the show as “funny and educational”, promoting Australia’s prehistoric natural history. “Erth’s Dinosaur Zoo is presented as a live animal display, like Steve Irwin would have done at Australia Zoo, but instead of crocodiles and snakes we have dinosaurs. “All the dinosaurs and prehistoric creatures are Australian and during the show we let kids come up and pat them. “We have a team of amazing artists in Erth’s Studio where everything is created for the show, from making the puppets to creating the sound effects for each dinosaur.” Tickets are $10 for each child (adults are free) and can be purchased online at: www.trybooking. com/BGDAC Tickets for the beach plastic art workshop are on sale at the same site for $5. To book tickets for rides before the fete at a reduced cost, visit www.trybooking.com/BFVQD REDUCE, REUSE AND RECYCLE AT FETE Austinmer school community supports the reduce, reuse and recycle theme. • No plastic water bottles will be sold at the fete. • Bring your own camping plates, cutlery and cups to reduce waste. • There will be extra red/yellow and green bins, kindly provided by Wollongong Council and Remondis. 2515

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COME TO NINA’S OPEN DAY NINA would like to invite anyone over the age of 65 from the 2508 and 2515 area to an open day at NINA’s Café Club. There will be a free morning tea for everyone that attends and lots of fun to be had seeing all the great activities we have and a chance to see if you would like to attend. This program is to promote physical activity, cognitive stimulation and emotional wellbeing for people over the age of 65.

TRADIES HELENSBURGH

21 November 2019 at 10.30am-12.30pm TRANSPORT CAN BE PROVIDED BY CALLING 4294 1900


SPECIAL FEATURE / CELEBRATIONS

VEGAN FALAFEL SALAD

If Burger King can introduce a meat-free meal, so can you! Local nutritionist Stephanie Meades presents a filling summer salad.

BEST BOOKS FOR PARTY SEASON

Find these at Collins Booksellers Thirroul: • Bake Australia Great, by Katherine Sabbath. • Let’s Party: Unique Kids’ Birthday Party Ideas by Martine Lleonart • Beautiful Boards: 50 Amazing Snack Boards by Maegan Brown. • Chyka Celebrate: Inspired Entertaining for Every Occasion by Chyka Keebaugh. We are celebrating our 1st Birthday and would like to thank all our customers for their wonderful support. Look forward to seeing you in store soon. – Amanda

Deb Laura & Angus, Collins Booksellers Thirroul 2515

COLLINS BOOKSELLERS THIRROUL Locally Owned & Operated

Books for everyone Stationery & Gifts Educational Toys & Games Gift vouchers available Under Anita’s Theatre, King Street, Thirroul 4267 1408 | Open 7 days LIKE US ON FACEBOOK AND FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM

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I’m a huge fan of having a few “meat-free” nights each week, and this is one of my family's favourite meat-free go-to meals. Packed with nutrition and delicious spices, this salad will leave you feeling light and fresh, yet satiated. It is a quirky take on the traditional falafel, replacing chickpeas with carrots and pepita seeds, making it easier to digest and super nutrient-dense, providing loads of antioxidants, vitamins and minerals to make you feel fantastic. It’s a great summer salad to add to your weekly repertoire. INGREDIENTS: Falafel Balls (makes about 20): 2 cups of chopped carrots 1 cup pepita seeds 1/4 cup chia seeds 1 garlic clove, crushed 1 tsp ground cumin 1/2 cup of sesame seeds Salt to taste Base Salad: Baby spinach or rocket leaves, roughly chopped cherry tomatoes, pitted olives, diced cucumber, basil leaves, cashew cheese (the vegan alternative to cheese) or nuts of your choice. Lemon, olive oil and salt to dress the salad. METHOD: 1. Put the carrots into a food processor and blitz until they are ground down into a paste-like consistency. 2. Add remaining ingredients (except sesame seeds) to the food processor and blend well. 3. Roll the mixture into small balls, 1 tbsp at a time, and coat with sesame seeds. 4. Place the balls on a baking tray, lined with baking paper, and drizzle with some olive oil or coconut oil to assist them crisp up, before cooking for 35-40 minutes in a moderate oven (180°C), turning halfway through cook time. 5. While falafels are cooking, prepare base salad. 6. Top the salad with 4-6 falafel balls and drizzle with lemon, olive oil and salt to finish. 2515


SPECIAL FEATURE / PETS

LOCAL DOG TRAINER OFFERS NEW CLASSES Purchase a multi-class pass and train as often as you like on Saturdays that suit you. Your pass includes a clicker and treat pouch, plus weekly emails to help you practise at home. All Rescue dogs receive a 15% discount. For enquiries and to book head to www.soniasayssit.com.au Local vet nurse Sonia Gregson started a puppy preschool at the Helensburgh vet more than 10 years ago and now runs a successful dog-training business, Sonia Says Sit. “My aim is to help reduce the number of young healthy dogs being surrendered to shelters due to unwanted behaviours,” Sonia said. “We have recently introduced open enrolment to our Saturday morning group classes. These flexible group lessons are self-paced learning; designed to improve your dog’s manners (name recognition, sit, drop, give, etc) and practise in a real-life environment with distractions.” Classes consist of a maximum of eight dogs, aged from six months, and are held at Coledale Public School. The classes are appropriate for retraining dogs with undesirable behaviours – such as barking, jumping, pulling on lead, not coming back and more. “Training has been shown to be the single most important thing that keeps dogs with their original family for life,” Sonia said. Upcoming workshops will focus on Loose Lead Walking, Recall and Dog Social Skills. Both the workshops and group classes use force-free training methods to help families to resolve unwanted behaviours. 2515

ARTIST OPENS COLEDALE STUDIO FOR BUBBLES AND BARGAINS

Artist Moira Kirkwood is awash in a sea of art. “Space is the issue… I’ve just got to clear out some of my pieces.”

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Moira has been working from her Coledale studio for the past 20 years. Despite regular sales of her abstract paintings she still finds herself with paintings stacked against every available wall in her home. “An artist rarely sells everything they create. Eventually everyone needs to have a fire sale!” An Open Studio and Sale weekend is the answer. Moira will open her studio on the weekend of 9 and 10 November from 9am till 4pm. “There are older pieces going for crazy prices, as well as current works, big and small. I’ve got some tiny pieces for as low as $20. Come in, enjoy a glass of bubbles and have a look!” Go to 32a Squires Cres, Coledale, 0400 374 362 (ring beforehand for disabled access). 2515


Orlando Norrish at his Timber Mill studio. Photo: Unicorn Studios

MAN OF STEEL

A Thirroul artist has built an epic sculpture now gracing a roof in Shellharbour. 2515 chats to Orlando Norrish. Orlando Norrish has completed the biggest job of his solo career. It’s a 15m-long silver sculpture atop Shellharbour Village Exhibition Space – half school of fish, half flock of seagulls, totally amazing artwork in marine-grade stainless-steel. It’s called Fluidity and made of steel sheets folded into geometric shapes. “I did the drawings back in April and have pretty much been working on it solidly since,” said Orlando, who has a studio at the back of Bulli’s old Timber Mill. “It was pretty much six months of work. “It was a huge job. All in stainless-steel – and it’s got to be marine-grade stainless-steel because it’s near the ocean – and lots of polishing and welding and fabricating and planning. “I did use other local small industries to help me. It’s got some stainless-steel cabling, structural supports, and there’s a lovely guy in the yacht shop in Shellharbour who helped me do that. He did all the cabling for me in his little hydraulic press. “It was an extensive project, but it was a pretty cool and interesting job. Both artistically and technically, it was very challenging and rewarding. “Because it’s up on the roof and the winds get pretty full on down there in Shellharbour – I think the engineers have got to allow for something like 150km an hour winds – so all the structural mounts and everything like that had to be taken into consideration. The thing’s not going anywhere in a million years now. “It’s really bolted down.” Orlando took inspiration from human history and natural changes. “I was thinking about the Shellharbour area and throughout history how that’s changed over a long time and, with more

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people moving into the area, it’s just continuing to grow and change. “It’s like a celebration of change and movement in nature and in society. “Aesthetically, it’s loosely based off a school of fish – that fluid kind of movement, it’s kind of like a stream of fish – and it transforms at the tail end into a flock of birds. “It’s an abstract piece as well.” In fact, Orlando jokes, it may all have come about thanks to a chip-stealing flock of seagulls in the village. “This huge flock just blasted in there and stole the chips. It was really quite a dramatic, funny sort of moment. Maybe subconsciously, when I thought about Shellharbour, that was one of the images that came to me.” Orlando’s background is in making props for theatre and film and TV. “I trained at Sydney College of the Arts and then I studied at NIDA. “I’ve done so many strange props. I’ve worked for the opera for years, lots of TV shows – used to do the props for Hi-5, the kids’ TV show; lots of stage knives for opera. “It’s been helpful with my sculpture work because I work across such a range of materials and contexts. The pattern-making techniques that I’ve used for this project are things that I learnt using other materials in theatre shows. “I’ve worked in some massive projects, but always in big teams. This is the biggest project that I’ve done by myself. “This is my first piece of public art.” n Visit www.orlandonorrish.com or call Orlando Norrish on 0405 077 735. 2515


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AN ‘ARCHI-NOON’ IN THIRROUL

Local architects will give talks on housing affordability, plus there’ll be a block tower building comp for kids. The Sydney Architecture The afternoon will also Festival (SAF) is coming feature a tour of Takt to the Illawarra, thanks to Studio’s granny flat and a local architect Ben talk by a national expert Wollen, who has on CLT (“cross laminated organised a satellite event timber, it’s mass timber on Sunday, November 17 used as wall construction, at Thirroul Railway it’s like an Ikea flat pack, Institute Hall. but for a house”). Ben teaches at the “I’m going to be talking University of Technology, about little things that Sydney and does some architects do that can contract work, including make a new house or a accessible housing for the new build more affordable Disability Trust. He and in the sense that it’s his family moved from thermally efficient. Sydney to Coledale about “So, siting the building Architect Ben Wollen has three years ago and since to the north, as opposed organised a SAF satellite event then he knows of “at least to just addressing the in Thirroul, 2-7pm on half a dozen” other street. They’re the low November 17, with block architects who’ve made fruits – you go up to a building for kids and affordable the shift south. fruit tree, you’re going to housing talks for adults. “I think it’s for the same pick the lowest fruit. You reason. Affordability is the don’t want to climb up big one. And for what you do pay, you get a lot and grab the top one – which I see as things like more. It’s just suffering the commute times,” he active systems like super-efficient appliances or adds, laughing. solar panels or electric vehicles. Ben has lined up several local architects for the “Also, north-facing and covered glazing with a SAF satellite event in Thirroul. Over the past two thermally massive floor like concrete floor. So you years, the circle of architects has been meeting can use the sun’s energy to heat your house in “casually on a regular basis just to talk shop and winter and then block it in summer. Easy wins. But share war stories”. I think a lot of that isn’t publicly known. “Numbers have grown. We are trying to support “Every architect will roll their eyes. North facing. each other and the industry as a whole,” Ben says. Yeah, yeah, yeah. Glazing and shaded. It’s second “So the Sydney Architecture Festival thing, nature to us. But I think there’s still a lot of people I thought that was a good means to bring that that just don’t actually understand the benefits of architectural community more public. that and how much just those two moves can make “We’ve got a great line-up of speakers, mostly a house so much more thermally efficient and save architects, but not just architects, with a focus on them dollars down the track. ‘making housing affordable’. That’s the theme of “And not just save them dollars, be a delightful this year’s Sydney Architecture Festival. space to live in. “Our little festival I’ve titled, Cheaper Does Not “The talks will start at 2pm go till 7pm, there’ll Equal Affordable. The argument is that cheap be a panel session at the end where members of the housing can actually be the opposite to affordable, public can ask questions, ask an expert, so to speak. particularly if it’s badly designed and costly to heat, Then it’s beers from Coal Coast Brewery out on the it’s not good for the environment. lawn, while the kids can battle it out with giant Jenga. “There’s a whole spate of reasons why cheaper “It’s totally free. Everyone’s volunteering their doesn’t equal affordable, which we’ll go into time. No one’s getting paid. Acacia Windows are through a series of different panellists. sponsoring the blocks for the kids. One Agency are “We’ve also got One Agency Downie Denisonsponsoring signage and flyers. And I’m working on Pender, and we’ve got Dr Chantel Carr from the a sausage sizzle from the Lions Club.” 2515 University of Wollongong. We’ve also got Reece Turner from Harbour Energy, talking about all n Contact Ben at Wollen Architecture, 0407 928 things energy, and energy sustainability.” 870 or ben@wollenarchitecture.com.au

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Lucy and Rod are the husband-and-wife team behind Lulu Ceramics. Photos: Chaya Bratoeva

hand-building and pottery-wheel techniques to create vases, cups, mugs, planters, bowls, trinket plates and incense holders and adorn them in the colours of the ocean – deep blues, sea foam green, white and beige.

MADE WITH LOVE

Artist Lucy Lee and her zoologist husband Rod Armistead have teamed up to create Lulu Ceramics. Look out for the couple at Wollongong Makers Market on November 30. Please tell us a bit about yourself. I have always been a creative person, which led me to complete a Bachelor of Visual Arts at Curtin University in Perth 10 years ago. Since then, I have completed a few short courses in art and created The Art Box Studio, which encouraged children, including my own eight-year-old son, to be creative with a variety of different mediums. I am studying a Diploma in Ceramics at Gymea TAFE. At home, I have a small art studio where I create ceramic wares for TAFE assignments and for markets. I have a very well-balanced life as a full-time mother and partner, part-time artist, sales assistant and student. When did you start Lulu Ceramics? In 2017, I attended a few ceramics workshops. They were conducted by Emma Morris in her beautiful studio among the trees in Otford. After three workshops, I became absolutely hooked. I started Lulu Ceramics on Instagram at the end of 2018, after my first year at TAFE to keep in touch with friends and to share what we were creating over the holidays. It has turned into something I never would have expected. Via Instagram and by attending markets, I have been contacted by cafes, retail outlets, events and festivals, from people who are all interested in Lulu Ceramics. What do you make? Functional and sculptural ceramic wares, along with commissions and consignments. We use

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What inspires you? My childhood was spent playing in the bush of the Darlington hills east of Perth. We would spend hours making cubbies, catching tadpoles and going on bushwalks. I often collected gumnuts, flowers, sticks and feathers. I am drawn to and inspired by the natural world and to the medium of clay, which is essentially the earth. I am constantly inspired by nature and the colours of our beautiful coastline. Lulu Ceramics has a distinct colour palette of blues and greens. Customers often comment on how our ceramics reminds them of the ocean. I love the organic outcomes of hand-building techniques and I like how every piece looks handmade and not mass produced – they are imperfectly perfect. Your husband Rod is also involved - what does he do? Rod has always been a massive supporter of Lulu Ceramics, especially on market days. He became more involved when our pottery wheel was couriered up from Geelong. My dad loaded it into the back of his car and drove it to Helensburgh for us. We had been without the pottery wheel for about eight years. Rod too has an arts background and studied visual arts at TAFE in the early 90s. It was at TAFE where he developed an ability to use a pottery wheel. That was 30 years ago, and now he works full time as zoologist. He relishes the opportunity to be creative and clay is a perfect medium for him. Rod creates most of the wheel-thrown pottery. This includes our coffee and espresso cups, condiment and soup bowls for commissions and markets. Without his help, I would be behind, and I now consider Lulu Ceramics a ‘husband and wife’ team. What do you love about working with clay? I love the endless possibilities of different clays, glazes and firing techniques. Most of all, I love what clay has done for my mental health and wellbeing. I am generally a very anxious person and have bouts of depression. I love that working with clay has brought me some calm and healing. It has helped me to slow down, relax, breathe deeply and focus on what is in front of me. The change in my mental health has been incredible and I would recommend this medium to anyone who has anxiety or depression. n Contact Lucy via luluceramics17@gmail.com or Instagram @lu_lu_ceramics. 2515


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COVER FEATUR E

FACES OF GREEN CONNECT

Green Connect GM Kylie Flament takes 2515 inside the award-winning social enterprise.

Photo: Unicorn Studios

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Behind the scenes, at a vast warehouse in Bellambi, this is what zero waste management looks like: thousands of colourful cans and bottles, neatly tied up in clear bags, a huge, higgledy-piggldey pile, occasionally oozing sticky brown liquid. It looks like the leftovers of the Illawarra’s biggest party. “We managed the waste at Yours & Owls last weekend,” says Kylie Flament, general manager at Green Connect. “It was very exciting because in our eight and a half years of managing waste at festivals, it was the first time we’ve ever had to cancel skip bins because there was not enough waste, which is a massive win!” “[Yours & Owls] are really pushing the sustainable message. And their punters are really taking it on board. So there was very little that ended up going into landfill.” Camping festivals are much harder to clean up, Kylie says. “The amount of stuff left behind is huge – tents, Eskies, chairs, bean bags, inflatable pool toys. People just sit on them then leave them behind because they only cost $10.” One of the worst examples she’s seen was a glitter cannon that went off with a quick bang at midnight but had festival waste workers sifting through the grass for many hours afterwards. “Our commitment is to pick up every piece of waste, every cigarette butt, every polystyrene ball, every piece of glitter. We’ve brought all of the cans and bottles back here [to the Green Connect op shop at Bellambi] because we are a return-and-earn recycling point. They will go on to Cleanaway in Sydney for sorting.” GOALS OF GREEN CONNECT Green Connect is more than just a pretty farm at Warrawong. While many people know it as the source of fair food that turns up in veggie boxes at Thirroul’s Flame Tree Co-op, this social enterprise has spent nine years working towards two other major goals: creating jobs and reducing waste. Very successfully too. Last year, Green Connect kept 119 tonnes of waste out of landfill; grew and distributed 35,166kg of chemical-free food; and employed 122 former refugees and young people. And last month Green Connect won the Excellence in Sustainability prize at the Illawarra Business Awards ceremony in Wollongong. “It was a really good night,” Kylie said. “So many people mentioned climate change and sustainability. It gives me great hope.” Green Connect began in 2011 as a combination of two job-creation projects – a SCARF initiative to create jobs for former refugees and a community garden project that employed young people to work on land behind Warrawong High School. In February 2018 Green Connect merged again


and is now part of Community Resources Ltd, a national not-for-profit. “The three things that we do is create jobs, reduce waste and grow fair food,” Kylie says. “In April this year we took on the op shop in Bellambi as our fourth business arm.” SUSTAINABLE PASSION An Austinmer resident since 2017, Kylie is passionate about sustainability. Case in point: for our cover shoot this 34-year-old business leader wears a crisp Dorothy Perkins number, sourced from the op shop by a sustainable fashion stylist. Outside office hours, Kylie has set up the Sustainable Illawarra Facebook and is one of the Flame Tree Co-op’s directors. At work, in less than two years, she’s overseen several new initiatives for customers and staff, from tours and workshops at the Warrawong farm to social lunch hours for staff. Born in New Zealand, Kylie did a Bachelor of Commerce, majoring in International Business at Otago. “Then I went to France as part of that on exchange… I fell in love and never went back.” Kylie, her French husband Nico and their two children – aged two and four – now live in Austinmer. Before her current job, Kylie was cardiac services manager for the Sydney Children’s Hospitals Network, working at Westmead and Randwick. The appeal of a social enterprise brought her to Green Connect. “I’d studied social enterprise as part of my MBA [at Macquarie Graduate School of Management] and saw it as an amazing model taking the best of the not-for-profit world and the business world. You’re doing things for good, but with commercial funding. Amazing. “Leading a social enterprise you have to be like a human Swiss army knife because you have to have marketing and finance and accounting and PR and fundraising and public speaking skills… If there’s a problem on the website I’ll jump in and fix it, then I’ll be in meetings with the Governor-General – stuff like that. Every skill has to be there. “I’m really proud of the personal stuff. So I recently went to the house-warming of two of our staff – both of them have been working for us for about five years and are incredibly warm and giving and hardworking Karenni people. The fact that they could buy their own house just fills me with joy and I go, ‘This is why we do this.’” In the Illawarra, Kylie enjoys the “immediate trust” generated by operating in a small community, where business people are as likely to bump into each other at the beach as in the boardroom. While “pretty organised”, Kylie admits it can be hard to balance work and family, which is why she works a four-day week. “My husband’s amazing and does 50%.” Nevertheless being a public leader in sustainability can put pressure on

private life and she has gone through the stages of grief for the world: despair, evangelism and, eventually, acceptance. “I don’t live a plastic-free life. We do own a car. Our families are in New Zealand and France. So, yes, I do get on a plane sometimes. You can’t live a perfect environmental life. “I’ve stopped beating myself up. Like, chocolate uses a lot of water, either comes in plastic or from overseas countries or both. Chocolate is not a necessity. But every now and then I go, ‘Oh, I just need a block of Cadbury’…” VISION FOR GREEN INDUSTRIES “I want this region to be the leader in sustainability in Australia, in the world,” Kylie says. “We’ve got a council who is more and more behind it. We’ve got the community behind it. We’ve got beautiful natural resources. And we’ve got this dying manufacturing industry that is perfect to then do re-manufacturing – we’ve got the empty warehouses and the know-how. “We could be taking recycled goods and turning them into something new. “I’m pushing for us as a community to look at green industries because we’ve got a community that’s seen the negative impacts of big mining and manufacturing. Little bit of incentive from government, from council, and businesses will spring up here to employ all of those people and to offer something great out of the glass, the plastic and the cans, the wood, the construction waste that makes up 40% of landfill. We could be doing better and we’ve got everything we need right here in the Illawarra to do it.” Left to right: Su Meh, Jacob Waddell, Natasha Willmer, Ama Folly Bebe

NOVEMBER / 2515 / 17


Many people know about Green Connect’s urban farm at Warrawong – it’s certainly the most picturesque part of the organisation. But Green Connect is also about zero waste, employment, labour hire and, most recently, an op shop at Bellambi. GM Kylie Flament kindly took time to explain the five faces of Green Connect. Plus, five staff members share what they do, and why it matters.

Photos: Anthony Warry

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LABOUR HIRE

1

Green Connect offers recruitment and labour hire services, so that local businesses and residents can get hardworking, reliable staff at short notice, knowing that they will be well paid and looked after, which connects the young people and former refugees Green Connect employs to other businesses, industries and opportunities. Some of the work Green Connect does includes cleaning, gardening, composting, litter picking, farm labouring and general labouring. Natasha Willmer: I came to Green Connect through doing placement hours for my Community Services Diploma. I volunteered for Green Connect for a long time, did some training in Microsoft Office and business skills, and then they employed me in 2018. If it wasn’t for Green Connect I wouldn’t be working. It’s my first official part-time gig, I’ve never had a part-time gig before, only casual. I am the Administration Officer at Green Connect and I book people to work in our Staffing Solutions department, doing labour hire with businesses that need great staff for a short period of time, and that’s the best feeling to give someone paid work. Green Connect is the best organisation for people and for the planet. It’s the reason I get up in the morning.

ZERO WASTE

2

Green Connect works with businesses, schools and events to minimise the waste they send to landfill. They do consulting, waste audits, and waste management. You’ll see them at big music festivals like the recent Yours & Owls festival in Wollongong, as the only waste management service in NSW that sorts waste by hand to ensure the maximum amount of compost and recycling at each event. Ama Folly Bebe: I came to Green Connect through SCARF in 2011. I come from Togo but I am a refugee from Ghana. New country, new language, new culture. And I am a mum. I do lots of things at Green Connect like cleaning, farming and working in the zero-waste team. Why it matters: to help the environment to be more clean and safe to live in, to be able to grow and develop new crops ourselves, to reduce waste, and to help people who need help.


EMPLOYMENT

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Everything Green Connect does creates jobs, particularly for young people and refugees (the two groups with the highest unemployment rates in the Illawarra), and does great things for the community and the planet. The vast majority of staff at Green Connect have never had or kept a job in Australia before and there is a lot to learn. Through the training, support and paid work we offer, those staff gain skills, experience and confidence, and many go on to secure meaningful longterm employment. Jacob Waddell: I’ve been part of Green Connect’s youth employment program. Before I came here, I was disenchanted with school and the idea of work, but I came to the Green Connect farm and found myself falling in love every time I came here. It’s like a slice of paradise, with great camaraderie and community spirit. I started doing work experience with Green Connect, then did a bit of labour hire, and now I’m doing a Cert II and I’ve got regular work as a Junior Farm Hand at Green Connect. We’re all about sustainability – we’re growing food using permaculture instead of monoculture, fresh food that’s grown seasonally, and providing healthy food to the community. And the youth program is changing people’s lives, including mine. It’s a really good thing.

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The Green Connect farm is 11 acres of permaculture market gardens and food forests. The farm grows 55 varieties of fruit, vegetables and herbs using organic principles. It’s also home to sheep, pigs, chickens and bees. Green Connect has started offering farm tours and workshops to the public. Bookings essential. Su Meh: I am Karenni, from Burma. I come to Australia, come to Green Connect, like the farm. Interested in how to grow it, how the vegetable grows up, how to plant, how we can help the fruits. I am Senior Farm Hand at Green Connect with Shay Reh and Eh Moo too. All Karenni. We look after plants and animals, grow food for local people, show other refugees and also young people how to grow food. I am very proud of this farm and what we do here. I want my children to come here, and one day their children. I want them to see what we built here, to be a part of it when their turn comes, and to love it as much as I do.

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In April 2019, Green Connect took on the huge op shop in Bellambi, and has been slowly transforming it into the socially inclusive and environmentally responsible shop we know it can be. We have partnered with a range of local businesses to recycle and re-purpose items that cannot be sold in the shop – including donating excess books to Aussie Books for Zim, who set up libraries in Zimbabwe. Mark Burnes: Unlike most of the staff, I didn’t come to Green Connect – Green Connect came to me! I was working at the Bellambi op shop when Green Connect took it on in April 2019 and so now I’m part of the team. I run the op shop and supervise the volunteers. I love my job. I love coming here and getting to know different people that I work with, learning about different cultures and backgrounds, and interacting with customers. Some customers come in every week or even every day so we have a chat and get to know each other. I love op shops. I tried for years to get in to op shops and I don’t think I could work in standard retail now – I would be bored. I love being part of the community, part of a community project, the diversity of people from different walks of life, and how the work we do at the op shop gives back to the community and keeps great items out of landfill. 2515

NOVEMBER / 2515 / 19


FILM BY THE COAST A SOLD-OUT SENSATION The second annual Film By the Coast competition was a hit with Illawarra kids, 2515 reports.

Entries numbers doubled, an extra matinee was scheduled and a total of 840 people attended 2019’s Film By the Coast screenings at Thirroul’s Anita’s Theatre in October. “Last year we had maybe 35 films. This year we ended up having just over 70 films,” said Otford Public School principal Bec Stone, one of a team of five local teachers who organised the event. “It took a long time to go through them,” she added, laughing. “On two different days, the team went through all the films and rated them on things like sound quality, picture quality, storyboarding and narrative ideas, and persuasive devices.” A Wollongong Public School entry won the People’s Choice award, receiving a $480 voucher from local company Pipewolf Media for People in the Playground. “It was a really interesting film, characterising the different kinds of people that you find in the playground,” Ms Stone said. Film By, an initiative of the NSW Government’s Arts Unit, runs competitions in schools around the state; 2019’s is the second event in the Illawarra. “We had a range of films this year,” Ms Stone said. “We had animations, we had stop-animations, we had one that filmed the story in Minecraft. There was some clever uses of green screening. “We had entries from kindergarten to year six classes. The furthest school came from Wombat Public School, about three and a half hours’ drive away. They drove up for the premiere and were one of the schools we gave encouragement awards to.” Other schools that received encouragement awards were Stanwell Park, Coledale, Helensburgh and Windang. Challenges for aspiring young filmmakers included keeping to the three and a half minute limit and (typically for boys) featuring less shouting and chasing, and more storytelling. Film By’s aim is improve literacy using 21st-century skills, Ms Stone said. “21st century kids – half the kids want to be famous YouTubers when they grow up. It’s such a strong medium, but there’s skills that go along with those technologies. “And for them to realise that you’re telling a story that can be really emotive and it can change people’s thinking. There was a fabulous little film called the Little Shops of Horrors and it was using all those horrible plastic mini things at Coles.

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Edie and Jacqueline Ives, makers of ‘Little Shops of Horrors’.

“It was a message about sustainability.” Film By the Coast is a non-profit event and the $7500 raised from ticket sales will go towards paying Anita’s Theatre, buying equipment, prizes and professional learning workshops for teachers. Organisers would like to thank event sponsor Pipewolf Media. Follow “Film by the Coast” on Facebook for event news and photos. 2515

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Last year’s Wipeout team: Back, from left to right: Peter Clemesha, George Sharpe, Badier Kubis, Dave Scardoni, Jeff Moxham. Front: Ali Clemesha, Joel Ducey, Wayne "Rabbit" Bartholomew - 1978 world campion.

WIPEOUT DEMENTIA Thirroul local George Sharpe is part of a team of property professionals raising funds for research.

Motivated by having seen his grandmother and a family friend suffer from dementia, George Sharpe will take part in his third Wipeout Dementia fundraiser on November 22 at Bondi Beach. “Having people you’ve known your whole life forget your name, and seeing the effect that it has on friends and family, especially as it worsens, I thought it would be a pretty nice thing to help out with if you could,” he said. Founded in 2015, Wipeout Dementia is a corporate surfing fundraiser hosted by the Centre

for Healthy Brain Ageing (CHeBA), UNSW. It raises funds for critical research into dementia, now the second leading cause of death in Australia. On November 22, five teams of property professionals, will surf in the tag-team event. “A big thing from all this research is they’ve realised how much exercise can help keep your brain healthy basically and mitigate the risk of dementia. So it’s about promoting that at the same time as raising money for the research. It’s a good fun day.” “I’ve got a few architects and project managers involved, who are a bit older than me, dusting the board off for the first time in eight years. Seeing that stoke reignited in those guys, that’s been really nice to see.” Originally from the UK, George is a builder broker who runs his own company, Haigs. He lived in Bondi before moving to Thirroul a year ago, attracted by the friendly locals, the escarpment’s “magic energy” and the surf spots. “Sandon Point has always been a favourite of mine.” n Since launching in 2015, the Wipeout Dementia campaign has raised over $1 million for research at CHeBA. Visit https://cheba.unsw. edu.au/wipeout-dementia. 2515

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‘ALL LIT UP’ AT WOLLONGONG WRITERS FESTIVAL By Sarah McKenzie Wollongong Writers Festival is back! The annual event – now in its seventh year – will be held from Friday 22 to Sunday 24 November. The festival has grown from humble beginnings into a major literary event. This year’s theme is ‘All Lit Up’, with the aim of illuminating topics that have long been silenced and stigmatised. Chloe Higgins, festival director and founder, has curated an exciting line-up for the weekend, featuring provocative authors such as Charlotte Wood, Behrouz Boochani, Ruby Hamad, Clementine Ford and Bri Lee. She says no topic is taboo or off-limits. “These vital writers take bold risks in sharing their thoughts and ideas on what they see and experience in themselves and the world,” Chloe says. “In doing so, [they] help us to make better sense of our own experience.” The program includes workshops, panels and readings with awardwinning authors, academics,

Clementine Ford, Benjamin Law and Behrouz Boochani are three authors who will feature at the 2019 event.

ASK BOHMER Q: What’s the dollar value of a tree?

There was uproar recently over vandalised trees at Corrimal’s Underwood St Reserve – trees planted by Council to allow for the enjoyment of the tax-paying public. The response came from two parties – those who were devastated about the loss and immediate impact it had on them and their community, and those who felt that the response from the law was too ‘OTT’. Hypothetically, let’s suppose that each tree destroyed had a dollar value of $1000. It sounds like a lot of money doesn’t it? However, from seed to the present day, a significant amount of hours have been invested into maintaining those trees. Consider that over several years the trees have been planted and

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journalists and poets. Some of the many highlights are: • Lee Kofman’s ‘Writing Shame’ workshop (Friday 22, 2-5pm) • A conversation with First Nations writers Kirli Saunders, Tony Birch and Alison Wittaker on ‘Speaking Truth’ (Saturday 23, 3-3.55pm) • David Stavanger, Sam TwyfordMoore, Helena Fox and Quinn Eades discussing the boundaries between page and prescription in ‘Losing the Plot’ (Sunday 24, 3.30-4.25pm). The program also features several sit-down meals at local restaurants, including a dinner with Benjamin Law and his mother, Jenny Phang, as they discuss love, sex and dating in the modern world (Saturday 23rd, 6.30-8pm). Tickets for the festival are on sale now! To find out more and book your tickets, go to https:// wollongongwritersfestival.com. You can also follow the festival on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. 2515

maintained by a ‘grower’ (Wollongong City Council), who has paid people care for the trees. In addition to taxpayer-funded maintenance, locals have also spent time nurturing and maintaining the trees in their own time. Now, unfortunately, those same trees will have to be removed and replaced and the costly process starts all over again – with some time before the community can enjoy the shady beauties. Imagine if the individual who damaged these trees destroyed a taxpayer-funded ‘free bus’, or any other service that benefits our community. In this case, it would be easier to add up the actual dollar value of the vandalism and equate it to a ‘sentence’. So, while it’s hard to put a dollar value on a mature tree, it’s important that we remember to respect their total value. n See Bohmer’s Blog for more on Tree Vandalism incidents in our area – bohmerstreecare.com.au/ blog or follow Bohmer’s socials. 2515


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julie.york@helensburgh.rh.com.au

NOVEMBER / 2515 / 23


BE INSPIRED BY NATURE

Janice Creenaune meets Janine Bailey, a sculpture artist living in Thirroul. Always surrounded by the natural environment, she uses it as inspiration for her impressive felt works. Photos supplied.

Janine Bailey moved to Thirroul from Sydney two years ago but credits the area for continuing to inspire her. “I am here to find nature and I continue to be richly rewarded every day,” Janine says. “I love organic gardening, the sea and the escarpment, the birds, ecology and nature. I am particularly aware of the plight of insects too.” Janine studied at the Sydney College of the Arts. With etching, lithography, sculpture, drawing skills, Janine draw on many talents as she intricately develops her felt artworks. “I use 95% recycled materials, often from recycling centres in the Illawarra and Reverse Garbage in Sydney. The inside of my felt sculptures are made from a waste product used in the food-packing industry, a coarse wool from the belly of the sheep. The colourful outside of the birds are made from a hand-dyed merino wool called ‘roving’, which I blend to make the sculptures using a barbed needle.” Janine repeatedly stabs the wool to compress it and form the shape of the bird. “It is important that I try to capture the character of the bird or insect. I give each a name, a personality and try to capture that in the work. I give them adventures because it all has to be fun for me as I make them. Cockatoos are cheeky and naughty, so I try to capture that unique personality. “I focus on the birds of the Illawarra and there will be many to come in the future. “It is my passion.” Janine’s displays have been included in a ‘Nights

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on Crown’ event, at Wollongong’s Botanic Garden and in the Shoalhaven Sculpture Prize in the guise of giant insects made of recycled materials. “I created a giant insect hotel called “Insect Apocalypse”. I was trying to get people to think about ecology, creating habitats that may be beneficial to insects. What was really amazing for me – and maybe for others too – was the evolution of real insects ‘invading’ the installation insect hotel.” A great example of art and nature meeting. Janine’s work is intricate in its planning and evolution. “If I sketch it, I see it better. I look harder and feel I really understand the subject. Only after a thorough preparation of a subject do I try to further ‘breathe life’ into the felt. As long as it is fun for me I enjoy the process.” The future may hold a different focus for Janine. “I am looking at tools, for example, different textures of the adjustable wrench in etching and drawing. It is about seeing the detail and using the technical skills within a feminist context.” Janine’s works continue to inspire the viewer and she does make birds on commission. Visit www.janinebaileyartist.com or email duckie@ducksalad.com. n Writer Janice Creenaune is a volunteer for the PKD (Polycystic Kidney Disease) Foundation Australia helping to raise awareness. For more info, email janicecreenaune@gmail.com 2515


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Darkes Cider supports the Blue Datto Foundation, inspired by 17-year-old Philip Vassallo, who tragically lost his life in a road accident in 2014. For more details on Blue Datto, visit bluedatto.org.au or darkes.com.au. 2515

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When we started making our Little Blue NonAlcoholic cider it was because our own children wanted an alternative to alcohol to drink at parties and be safe. They were also wanting an alternative product that allowed them to be able to drive. We knew it would be popular but we had people telling us we’d flop making a non-alcoholic drink. We even attended some festivals where we only served our non-alcoholic product. In the beginning we did cop a bit of flack from some people – even from some bottle shops not wanting to stock it. How that has now turned around! Locally we are definitely finding huge support and it is stocked in all bottle shops that also have our alcoholic ciders. Many people don’t realise that from the beginning we have also chosen to be a major sponsor of the Blue Datto Foundation. Blue Datto’s Keeping Safe™ program is an award-winning road safety education program targeting young drivers and passengers. This year, for one of the major prizes at the annual Blue Datto Gala Dinner, we donated a year’s supply of Little Blue Cider and an orchard tour for 20 people with cider tasting.

CE WITH

Jo Fahey reports on a record charity auction result!

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DARKES CIDER DOES ITS BIT FOR ROAD SAFETY

It was auctioned off, achieving $3500 for continuing the program in 2020. This is a record for us and we couldn’t be more thrilled! The program is delivered in schools in an interactive analysis of travel safety risks and examines the influence of family, friends and the social environment on the choices young drivers make. Keeping Safe’s overall aim is to teach safe behaviours, encourage self-belief and empower young people to make better choices on the roads as drivers and passengers. Keeping Safe is suitable for schools, community, sporting or youth groups and can be delivered over a period of three to five hours. It is curriculumlinked and involves a combination of whole-group presentations and breakout sessions and features films, role plays, interactive activities and presentations. Activities are flexible, practical and, where appropriate, fun, to achieve the desired learning outcomes. As part of every program, participants complete a Personal Road Safety Plan considering strategies they will use to travel safely as both a driver and passenger. They also formalise their commitment in a Pledge, which Blue Datto emails to them every year for five years around their birthday as a reminder of the program and their promise. At Darkes Cider we’d like to see young people in the Illawarra accessing this program. It has already rolled out in Western Sydney and Newcastle in schools and community settings with great results.

NOVEMBER / 2515 / 25


SET FOR WINTER PARALYMPICS A local business is backing Sam Tait’s dream to go for gold at Beijing 2022.

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Local developer Andy Offord’s new business, HBP + Storage, has sponsored a young man’s Paralympic dream, contributing $7200 towards a custom-made sit-ski. It’s a unique piece of equipment for riding down the slopes, Sam Tait says. “It’s all custom-made to my weight, my height, and everything like that. They’re a one-off design for you, so quite expensive. My one was $14,000. “My one is a French model, made over in Europe, there’s nothing like it in Australia.” Sam, from Mittagong in the Southern Highlands, plans to use the sit-ski all over the world. “I’ll be taking this to the next Winter Paralympics. So Beijing 2022.” In his sit-ski Sam can travel at up to 120 or 125km per hour. “It’s scary, but I think when you’re skiing that fast, you don’t realise how fast you are actually going until you finish the race. “Once you push out of that starter gate, you let go of all the fear and you just kind of push yourself – I mean, you’re trying to win a gold medal. So you’re trying to push yourself as hard and as controlled as you can to cross the line – first.” Sam has his sights set on a gold medal at Beijing. Literature is full of stories of superheroes forged in adversity. Sam’s story is one of those. Born in 1991, he grew up in the Southern Highlands. “I went to school there, finished school… found an electrical apprenticeship that I loved, and that was going really good. That was at the age of 22. And then I bought a motorbike and had a motorbike accident. It was just near the Scarborough Hotel, before the Sea Cliff Bridge. That was 2013.” Sam broke his T11 vertebrae in the accident and, at age 22, became a paraplegic. Months in intensive rehabilitation followed. Before the crash, Sam had been a skiier – “nothing professional, just recreation, family holidays, just for fun really. Nothing to where I am today, for sure”. “Four months after my accident I was on the snow. A month out of rehab, I organised a ski trip down to Thredbo. “Two days in a sit-ski, I was like, ‘Yup, this is what I’m going to do’. “Skiing – it was a simple answer of ‘Yes, I’m doing this as a life choice and a professional sport.’ “In 2014, I moved down to Perisher to learn how to ski again, be independent and try and just get my foot in the door. “One day I was out skiing at Perisher and this Australian coach at the time came up to me and said, ‘Hey mate, do you want to come do a talent camp with some sit-skiiers and some other athletes.’ Everything went really well.” Sam joined the Australian Para-alpine skiing development squad.


Last year he got to know skiier Zali Offord. “She was on the team last season as a guide for a vision-impaired athlete. We all became really good friends and she’s close to where I live, so we catch up all the time. “I met [Zali’s dad] Andy after the international season. He watched all our races and he was really intrigued with sit-skiing, how it worked and the mechanics of a sit-ski. “Me and him got along really well. We just kind of clicked and became mates and then they offered to give me some money for my new sit-ski. I was blown away by that, because that was incredible.” Financing his sporting dream is his biggest challenge, Sam says, although he does also miss home when travelling for months at a time. “I travel with Pat Jensen, who is a visionimpaired skiier, he skis with a guide, Amelia; coach Brian Perle; and Zali Offord, who is our ski tech, she tunes our skis, waxes our skis, makes sure they are ready for competition and training. Having her on board is going to be really good this year; she knows a lot about skis.” Training in the Australian winter at Perisher starts about 6.45am, involves one or two morning sessions on the snow, and an afternoon in the gym: strength cardio or endurance training. “That’s six or seven days a week,” he says. Sam loves the freedom of skiing. “And the joy and happiness it brings me. You’re in the mountains and you can basically go anywhere you want once you’re at the top of the hill. You’re on the same playing field as everyone else. I don’t feel disabled when I’m skiing.” His new sit-ski is black with a kevlar, carbonfibre leg cover.“I got it in early August and I’ve skiied the last two months on it and it is amazing. “The way you can turn a corner is faster and a lot more controlled. You can get a lot more angles, which means you can create faster lines, accelerate out of the turn, quicker and sooner, and it would protect me if or when I have a crash. “It’s a really good ski. “I can definitely see myself winning and pushing the boundaries this season.” 2515

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NOVEMBER / 2515 / 27


Eastern Water Dragons: ‘The males are especially obvious with their red chest markings that become a brighter red as the breeding season continues.’ Photos by Amanda De George

BACKYARD ZOOLOGY

With Amanda De George

As the weather warms up, the reptiles come out to play. And by play I mean come out of brumation, which is like a reptile version of hibernation where animals slow down, eat less and move less over the cold winter. And when they wake up, they wake up hungry and on the lookout for a mate and this has lead to a bit of an influx of Eastern Water Dragon activity on our street. We live across from a creek and as these reptiles are adapted for the water, with their muscular tails perfect for swimming and their ability to stay submerged for up to an hour, we often hear them before we see them as they drop from overhanging tree branches into the safety of the water. Great for the lizards but terrifying for the more nervous amongst us (i.e. me). But during spring they spend a lot more time out in the open, the males especially obvious with their red chest markings that become a brighter red as the breeding season continues. When we first moved here, my husband and I lost many an afternoon chasing after these dramatically coloured animals, hoping to capture them and get them some help for their injuries. It wasn’t until we came

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across a third reptile, ‘bleeding’ in exactly the same location on their chest that the penny dropped! Males have a territory containing several females, which they will defend from other males if needed. If another male or say, a photographer trying to sneak up for a closer look, happens into their territory, then the dragon will make it clear that they’re not welcome through a series of head nodding, arm waving and throat puffing moves. And if that doesn’t do the trick (it always does for me; I hightail it out of there at the first sign of a bit of a nod), then the dragons will circle each other, biting at the neck and hip of the other animal until one stands down. Once mated, the female lays her eggs in a hole she has dug in the sandy soil along the waterway. After three months the most adorable little lizard babies hatch and crawl up and out into the world... often becoming a meal for the local kookaburras and their babies. Ah, the circle of life, and all unfolding on a suburban street. Follow Amanda’s Facebook blog @BackyardZoology 2515


can offer anyone else, anywhere at any time. Become a listener, not a responder. Offer a little compassion and it will be returned threefold. In turn, your powers of ‘de-escalation’ will grow and your anxiety will decrease.

MEDITATE ON THIS

What’s the best way managers can ensure their staff’s mental health is looked after? Managers need to look after themselves firstly and have a personal understanding and practice of wellness in order to then value it for their staff. In our age of anxiety, how can we stay calm at work? If managers develop their leadership skills and We only need to manage ourselves; when we can use those to manage, outcomes will be greatly do that, others will in turn manage themselves. improved. Even if others don’t, responding with similar Modern interpretations of leadership, including behaviour only makes the situation worse. The only sensible and sustainable solution is to refuse to get compassion and mindfulness, are conducive to workplace wellness. Look to management when upset. Don’t take anything personally. seeking to understand problems in the team; look Of course, it takes bravery and courage to truly to leadership when seeking to understand look at how we respond, without jumping to problems in management. justification for our own behavioural responses. For more about mindful and compassionate A state of anxiety will demand that you provide a leadership, browse our library. justification for it to remain in place. This sets a As part of Mental Health Month in October, pattern of thinking in train and provides a slippery Nan Tien Institute proudly launched its first highly slope. Anxiety is an essential emotion if there is a anticipated, accredited Mental Health Masters, real threat in the room, however, anxiety is also based on ‘False Evidence Appearing Real’ – FEAR. Diploma and Certificate in Mental Health, a course unlike any other. Visit www.nantien.edu.au and get There is an old saying that you should ‘take the in touch to organise a chat or personalised tour of cotton wool out of the ears and place it in the mouth’ – as listening is the most powerful thing we the study space. 2515 By Dr Susan Sumskis PhD, Nan Tien Institute Lecturer, Acting Head of Health & Social Wellbeing

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‘Beat the Bottle’ participants celebrate the clean-up.

ON BOARD WITH SURFRIDER By Coledale’s Susie Crick, chair of Surfrider Foundation Australia. Another busy month at Surfrider. Our interns from France, the USA and Wollongong have been growing the Ocean Friendly program, assisting with beach cleans, planning for campaigns and doing educational tours of schools. We’ve been running corporate beach cleans, which include presentations and microplastics surveys on beaches, for companies who want to increase their Corporate Social Responsibility. If your business wants to do a unique team-building exercise, please contact us at operations@surfrider.org.au to book a beach clean. It’s a fun day! BEAT THE BOTTLE Thanks to everyone who participated in the ‘Beat the Bottle’ clean-up where the message was simple: ditch single-use water bottles and go for tap refills. We collected over 41kg of small plastics. Special thanks to the Wollongong Uni Surfrider club for organising Hidden Harvest for the yummy breakfast, to @junkyard_beats for the jam and to all of the celebrities who supported us! I’m very proud to be a part of this community where we are very active in promoting ocean-friendly initiatives. HIGH TEA WITH THE G-G On a fancy note, we went to a High Tea with the Governor-General, Mrs Linda Hurley and Wollongong Lord Mayor Gordon Bradbery where we discussed environment and sustainability measures that our community is undertaking to ensure a brighter future for our region. It’s great to celebrate the wins and to be acknowledged. AT THE WORLD PLASTIC HEALTH SUMMIT Last month, I was invited to attend the inaugural World Plastic Health Summit in Amsterdam. Compelling research was presented on how tiny plastic particles find their way into our bodies.

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It’s disrupting our hormones, jumping through the brain-blood barrier, finding its way into our DNA and the freaky part is it can jump generations. Even more concerning is the fact that 40% of all plastic production is single-use. Plastic is a petrochemical (fossil fuel) therefore it affects climate change and 13-15% of our global heating comes from plastic production, so if we reduce the demand, we will keep our earth cool. My tip for this month: make better choices when shopping, because if we stop buying unnecessary plastic-packaged products, there won’t be demand. Buy in glass or cardboard. Every choice you make is a step in the right direction. The reality is that we’ll never be able to recycle our way out of this mess, so let’s shut down the polluters by refusing to buy their ‘packaged in plastic’ products. DECEMBER 1 IS OCEAN CARE DAY Ocean Care Day is on Sunday, December 1st, and we will hold a beach clean at Thirroul Beach and invite the community to join us from 10am. Everyone is welcome and let’s get our beach sparkly! Let’s make this the summer where we turn things around and keep the single-use plastic out of our lives and off our beaches. 2515

Become a member and get involved! For more info: www.surfrider.org.au


LIFEOLOGY

With Terri Ayliffe. This month: the culture of happiness. Somehow the idea that we deserve and can achieve a state of euphoria in every moment has taken hold in our culture. The number of books, podcasts and courses available to us to ensure we find happiness is staggering. While we can find happiness, fleetingly, it is not a feeling we can manifest in every moment of our lives. What is happiness? Biochemists will tell you it is an exciting sensation produced by chemical reactions in our brain in response to a stimulus? The euphoric feeling is short-lived as all emotional sensations are but our want to harness it can become addictive. Seeking euphoria as a permanent state of being is the underpinning of drug and alcohol addiction. What if we could achieve permanent happiness? It is likely we would have a blissful but, eventually, unsatisfying and perhaps short existence. Our motivation would wane, we would sit in the one spot without the desire to do anything else. Negative feelings serve a vital purpose in our

lives, they encourage us to move in a new direction to push for more, to achieve. Imagine life without achievement or something to strive for. I know it would bore me in a very short time if I could only experience one blissful state of being. The million-dollar industry created from our want to be happy feeds off our natural inability to achieve it and we often find it unacceptable that we can’t reach Nirvana. This makes us unhappy and so we buy into more happiness culture and around we go again. What a paradox that is. Happiness is much more likely to be found in accepting that joy is fleeting, like all emotions. Chasing happiness is akin to trying to catch the wind in a net. n Read more at https://lifeology.blog 2515

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Photos: Unicorn Studios

recording studio with Fith Studio setting up in Thirroul earlier this year.

STRINGS ATTACHED

Coledale local Paul McGrath repairs and makes high-end instruments. He’s the founder of Tedwood Guitars – the name a tribute to his father, an Irish blacksmith and a largely self-taught engineer who could make almost anything from practically nothing. “Whenever my brother and I were struggling to make or repair something we would often ask ourselves: ‘What would Ted do?’ The name wrote itself.” Paul told 2515 more. You live in Coledale and have a workshop in Helensburgh. What brought you here and why do you love it? My wife and I were travelling back to Sydney from the far South Coast one day and took a detour to see the Sea Cliff Bridge. We were astonished by the beauty of the coastline, the beaches and the charming villages. We made several return trips and quickly fell in love with the relaxed way of life. There can’t be a better way to start the day than taking Mabel our dog for a walk along the coast road at 6am, collecting an excellent coffee at either Earth Walker or Mr and Mrs Smith. I also enjoy setting up, maintaining and repairing instruments, so the North Illawarra coast is a good place to be. The local music scene is definitely on the up. You can listen to live bands playing at The Beaches most weekends, Anita’s Theatre is hosting a wide range of local and international performers and bar/restaurant venues like Jose Jones often have local performers playing on Sunday afternoons. We even have a local

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How did you come to be a custom guitar maker? Growing up in the late 60s I had a passion for music and the belief that I could be a rock star. College years were spent in a band supporting great names of the time and playing in pubs and clubs to earn a crust. I also became just as passionate about understanding what made particular instruments play and sound the way it did. The dream of being a rock star was taken over by the dream of making the tools that rock stars use, and my first instruments saw the light of day. Earning a more substantial living began to take precedence and a career in the corporate world followed. But I continued to ‘earn my chops’ in the luthier* space, devoting as much time as I could to honing my craft. (* Someone who makes or repairs stringed instruments.) In 2015, after decades of ‘wanna do it’ I finally took the plunge and did it. Tedwood was born. What’s special about a custom-made guitar? A custom-made guitar is special in that it has been designed and constructed to produce the sound, the playing comfort and the look that matches the buyer’s idea of the perfect instrument. And with each component carefully chosen and crafted it will provide a lifetime of enjoyment. What’s the hardest part about your work? The most complex part of my work is ‘dialling in’ the instrument in the initial and final set-ups. I’m a bit of a perfectionist and spend a lot of time here as it’s the most important part of an instrument’s playability. The most time-consuming part of my work is the final finish. Many hours hand-rubbing and -buffing to achieve the best matte finish takes its toll on the hands and fingers. What do you love about it? That’s easy – listening to the instrument being played and making the sound I had in my head when the process began. What’s the starting price for a custom guitar? Around $3000. Next month: how a guitar is made. More info at https://tedwood.com.au 2515


WHAT’S ON

AT THIRROUL LIBRARY, CALL (02) 4227 8191 CODE CLUB Mon 4 Nov, 3.30pm – bookings required via Eventbrite. • LEGO CLUB 2nd & 4th Wednesday of the month at 3.30pm. Drop in and create. For 5-12 years. • STORYTIME & CRAFT. Fridays 8, 15, 22 Nov, 10.30am. Drop in. • MUSIC IN THE LIBRARY Saturday 2 Nov 11-noon. Musicians from Wollongong Conservatorium of Music. No bookings required. • COLOUR, COFFEE, CALMER. Wednesdays 6 & 20 Nov, 9.30am-noon. No bookings required. • KNIT, STITCH, YARN. Wednesday 6 Nov, 10.30 am. Drop In. • TECH HELP Please call library staff on (02) 4227 8191 to arrange a time. • THIRROUL POETRY CLUB 3rd Tuesday of the month at 4pm. Poets share work and receive feedback in a friendly space. No expertise required, just a passion for poetry. • COTA UNDERSTANDING AGED CARE SERVICES Monday 4 November – 5.30-6.30pm. Join COTA for a free, short talk to help you understand the aged care system. Find out how to get help to live at home as you get older and how to find a place in an aged care home. We can give you information for yourself or someone you care about. Bookings Required via Eventbrite. Refreshments served. • SEWING WORKSHOP – Reusable Snack Bags. Wednesday 13 November, 10am-noon. Get creative and learn something new. Learn to make reusable snack bags. A fantastic zero-waste alternative to disposable wrapping, these are soft, durable, and can be washed for reuse. Bookings required via Eventbrite.

Real estate update BY IAN PEPPER Five things to fix in your home before selling your property: 1. First impressions of your property count so make sure the entrance area is attractive, clean and freshly painted if necessary; 2. The walls inside your property should be clean and freshly painted if possible; 3. The floors should be clean and updated if necessary; 4. Fix any potential hazards or safety issues such as broken pavers, fencing or gates; 5. The roof should be checked for any cracks or leaks and fixed where necessary.

ART AT BELMORE BASIN Art with a difference – oils on porcelain, watercolours, silks, pastels, charcoals, acrylics, inks. Special guest Tony Hancox. Exquisite woodwork. All on sale @ the Old Courthouse, Belmore Basin, Wollongong, November 23-24, Saturday 9-5, Sunday 9-4pm. Enquiries Di Curtin 0417 223 291. GIVE RMS FEEDBACK BY NOVEMBER 8 Have your say on plans to improve traffic flow at Bulli and Thirroul, visit rms.nsw.gov.au/ bulliandthirroul. At press time, RMS could not give 2515 a date for updates on potential closures of Lawrence Hargrave Drive between Otford Road and Chellow Dene Avenue in 2020. A spokesperson said: “Transport for NSW is now reviewing all options. No final decision has been made on how or when the work will be carried out. 2515

Now selling Real Estate with Ray White For experienced and educated advice, call Ian today!

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NOVEMBER / 2515 / 33


VET AT WORK With Dr Matt O’Donnell. This month: your pet’s diet.

We get asked a lot of questions about what is the best diet for your dog or cat. It is hard to generalise too much as sometimes one diet is well tolerated by one individual but not by another. Here are a few tips that may help you in deciding what to feed. • If feeding a commercial diet, ensure it is a complete balanced diet not just a tasty treat that should only be fed on special occasions. In general the better quality dry foods do have better quality ingredients that are more nutritious and better for health. To some extent you get what you pay for. • There is no evidence that a raw diet is better than a cooked diet. Raw diets risk being contaminated with bacteria and parasites that cause disease. • Bones have to be given raw as cooked bones become hard, indigestible and can splinter and cause gut blockages or even perforations. • Raw bones are great at keeping our pet’s teeth clean, keeping them entertained and stimulated but are not without potential risks including

broken teeth, choking and obesity or constipation if fed in excess. • There is no evidence that a grain-free diet is better than the alternatives. There is evidence of some grain-free diets being associated with a serious heart disease known as dilated cardiomyopathy. • A home-prepared diet can be a great way to feed your pet but you do have to pay attention to the ratio of meat, fat and carbohydrate content as well as the levels of calcium and phosphorous, especially in growing puppies and kittens or breeding females. • Avoid rich foods such as fatty or preserved meat. Cheese may be tolerated in very small quantities but in some dogs and cats even this is a no-no. • The most common nutritional problem we see in dogs and cats is obesity, causing health issues such as arthritis, breathing problems, diabetes, pancreatitis and digestive complaints. In summary, there is no need to get too complicated with the diet, keep it simple, don’t make it too rich and don’t give too much! Rusty awaits a treat.

UPDATE ON RUSTY You may remember we did a story on Rusty an eight-year-old spoodle who has a form of cancer known as lymphoma. Rusty was struggling with breathing, toileting and infections when he was first diagnosed. Six months down the road I can report he is doing well. He is in full remission, he has no symptoms of the disease and has not suffered any serious side effects to his chemotherapy medication. Rusty is at home and comes in once every two weeks either for a blood test or a chemotherapy injection. He is very comfortable at our veterinary hospital thanks to all the cuddles, treats and affection he gets during his short stay. The rest of the time he is managed at home by his people with some oral medication. See how bright and well he looks in the photo where he is eagerly waiting for a treat! n Northern Illawarra Veterinary Hospital is at 332 Princes Highway, Bulli. Phone 4238 8575. 2515

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Hinterland, I was struck by a wedge-tailed eagle who ruined one perfectly good sail with his talons. I had one magical experience with a white-bellied sea eagle who hitched a ride during one of my tandem flights at Bald Hill.

Photos by Hangglide Oz

Strangest thing that’s happened on a flight? Bird strikes, a few marriage proposals which all ended successfully. There have been a few people in compromising positions on beaches and in bushland, thinking no one is flying above.

AIM FOR THE SKY

Wombarra local Tony Armstrong, chief instructor at HangglideOz, has been flying for 40 years. How did you get into hang gliding? I played rugby league for Wests, Canterbury, Cronulla and the Steelers before a knee injury ended my career in the 1980s. I was alway an avid surfer, however, after perforating my ear drum I needed to find another sport. I had watched hang-glider pilots flying at Bald Hill for a long time, when I surfed. It was like surfing the sky. So I just decided to buy a hang glider and went through the process of teaching myself how to fly. In those days hang gliding schools did not exist. What do you love about it? The freedom, serenity, and no one can drop in on you! The feeling of pure flight is truly exhilarating. Biggest challenges about the sport? The weather, without a doubt. What makes great hang gliding weather and what weather report do you follow? Optimal conditions for hang gliding at Stanwell Park are south-east winds at around 15 knots. No rain! I look at every computer-generated weather model, however, at the beginning and end of each day I look at the sky outside to see what is happening. Utilising my 40 years of weatherwatching, I try to form a picture.

How much does it cost to get started in hang gliding? We recommend people start with our 30-minute trial introductory flights (tandems), $260 mid-week and $285 on a weekend. We will also include free photos with our flights. For those people who have always dreamed of becoming a pilot, our licensed courses are $2900. What other wind sports do you enjoy? Skiff sailing, surfing , snow boarding, and now I have combined my surfing and flying and I kite surf. n For more info on hang gliding, contact tony@ hangglideoz.com.au, www.hangglideoz.com.au or 0417 939 200. 2515 The BOMBIE in conjunction with ULUWATU BLUE and SOL PRESENTS and on behalf of the STANWELL PARK CWA - Presents

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Do birds show any interest in the gliders? Yes, many times. I’ve had multiple strikes and it’s not fun. Flying inland at Canungra, in Gold Coast

NOVEMBER / 2515 / 35


FISHING FOR A BLUE FUTURE

UOW’s Blue Economy project leader Dr Michelle Voyer reports on the rise of sustainable, family-run fishing and aquaculture enterprises.

Above & below: Sea Urchin Harvest is considered a ‘zero impact fishery’. At left and inset: Bateman’s Bay company Region X offers Oyster Tasting Kayak Tours.

Arguably the original ‘Blue Economy’, fishing is an ancient social and economic activity that has been practised for millennia. Aboriginal fishers traded seafood products well before colonisation, and after white settlement were the backbone of the emerging commercial fishing industry in the early days of the colony. Today Indigenous fishers continue to play an active role in the industry, using methods very similar to their ancestors: Both commercial fishing and aquaculture have had a somewhat turbulent history on the South Coast. Despite its ups and downs, fishing and aquaculture have played an important role in the history of our region, including at important landmarks such as Wollongong Harbour. Local documentary-maker Sandra Pires recently captured some of the colour of the fishing industry in her short documentaries on Indigenous fishers on the South Coast and Wollongong-based fisherman Rocco Ianni. They can be found through her ‘Yesterdays Stories’ app, or search for “Moruya Fishing” on YouTube. Both the fishing and aquaculture sectors are now entering a new era, one in which rigorous management regimes and rising expectations of consumers is ushering in new models of doing business. Our research into the Blue Economy on the South Coast revealed a number of stand-out examples of businesses who are re-inventing the image of their sectors at a local and global scale.

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SEA URCHIN HARVEST

Capitalising on the pristine marine environment of the South Coast, with 35 years of diving experience and intimate knowledge of the waters of south coast, Sea Urchin Harvest serves local and international markets. The collection and selection of high-quality urchins (Centrostephanus rodgersii) is conducted by hand underwater and, as such, is considered a ‘zero impact fishery’. In recognition, the small, family-owned business was recently given the Sydney Fish Market “Excellence in Environmental Practices” award.  Harvesting and processing quality urchins is a labour-intensive endeavour and thus offers a range of employment opportunities in the collection, selection and processing of sea urchins at a nearby factory.  In collaboration with the Batemans Bay Marine Park Authority and under a specialised research permit, the company currently aims to further an understanding of environmental benefits of the urchin industry. Visit www.seaurchinharvest.com.au.


OYSTER FARMING INNOVATION

Aquaculture is increasingly capitalising on the ‘clean green’ image of the South Coast to develop innovative and collaborative brands which tap into niche markets, tourism opportunities and a growing interest in local foods. Examples of innovative approaches that have been developed on the far south coast include Australia’s first organic Sydney Rock oyster farm (http://wapengorocks. com.au), premium trademarked oysters grown to pair with distinct wines and cheese (http:// moonlightflatoysters.com.au/), and ‘farmgate’ and oyster bar tourism experiences (https:// broadwateroysters.com.au/). Far south coast oyster farmers also actively collaborate to act as advocates for water quality and environmentally sensitive catchment management. Wapengo Rocks (this photo and top right) is Australia’s first organic Sydney Rock oyster farm.

CHEERS TO OYSTERS Picpoul has endured since medieval times to become the default wine for local seafood in southern France. A NSW oyster company borrowed some cuttings to complement its Australian oyster portfolio. Today, the producers of Borrowed Cuttings, grown at the Central Ranges, say it “expresses a forward note of green melons & apples before a citrusy pucker, a soft round mouthfeel, then closes with a gentle aftertaste”. More info at www. borrowedcuttings.com.au and www.moonlightflatoysters.com.au

TOURISM POTENTIAL

Seafood businesses are increasingly tapping into the growing interest in food provenance and food tourism. To the south at Pambula Lake, one ecotourism operator is combining natural and cultural experiences with encounters with local oyster farmers (www.magicaloystertours.com.au). In Batemans Bay, one ecotourism operator is combining kayaking and local oyster farms (see photo at top left). Visitors can learn about innovations in modern aquaculture techniques for local gourmet and sustainable shellfish. Founder and tour guide Josh Waterson operates the company, Region X River & Ocean Expeditions, which has been awarded an adventure tourism award. Visit www.regionx.com.au. 2515

Captain Sponge’s Magical Oyster Tours mixes nature and culture.

NOVEMBER / 2515 / 37


SCARBOROUGH ART SHOW 2019

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OPENING NIGHT! Friday, Oct 11. Photos: Unicorn Studios 1. Meiling Mjoberg, Ashley Frost, Chris Ware and Jessica Whitmer  2. Artist Lynne Lyons and Anne Field  3. Artist Ben Sewell   4. Billy Cummings and Karen Yello  5. Shelly and Tom Summerhayes.  6. Emma Reid and Danielle Kennedy  7. Marion Gerard and artist Deborah Mattson  8. Lotus May Stubbles, Frank and Genevieve Nolan, Sandra Boyle and artist Tanya Stubbles.

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AT THE WEEKEND Saturday & Sunday, Oct 12 & 13. Photos: Lara McCabe 1. Jade Laflamme and Kerry Pedersen  2. Live music in the courtyard 3. Carol, Leon, Josh and Evie Lodge  4. Skye O’Shea and Rebecca Brennan  5. Vanessa Fookes  6. Andrew and Leanne Bridgford  7. Abbey Silk and Lisa Smith-Silk  8. Zoey Berinati  9. Steve and Leanne Martin.

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SCARBOROUGH ART SHOW 2019 NOVEMBER / 2515 / 39


Wonga vine seed pods, some with holes. Inset: Froglegged beetle in the sun

BEETLING ABOUT

With entomologist Dr Chris Reid. This month: a nice surprise. As far as we know our house was built on the corner of a small horse paddock (that is the paddock was small, but it might also have been for a small horse). The small ‘garden’ was certainly just an open patch of grass and weeds when we moved in. I was keen to turn it into something more natural, so we slowly filled it in with natives, not just natives to Australia but only natives to this area. The Sydney Wildflower Nursery at Heathcote has been very useful. We are only 300 metres from the edge of the Royal National Park as the Australian raven flies so we also hoped a few things from there might move in. It was a long process of trial and error. Firstly, discovering that coal waste and the rubbish that passes for landfill isn’t very good for natives. And then that flannel flowers and boronias and the like prefer drier soils. To start with, we had open woodland birds like blue-wrens and firetails and willie wagtails. They’ve all long gone, replaced by LBJs (little brown jobs) like scrubwrens and thornbills, plus bowerbirds. The bowerbirds are nice but a nuisance – they bring in heaps of weeds like lantana, privet and asparagus fern. We wonder if they ever eat native berries. In the past five years we’ve had lyrebirds and catbirds. The lyrebirds are interesting, feeding almost exclusively on the shrimp-like landhoppers in damp leaf-litter (but the drought has seen these off, so no more lyrebirds). However, never mind all this bird stuff, I was

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really keen to get some interesting insects. And they’ve come in. Perhaps the most exciting thing has been the discovery of a large red and black beetle in the garden and what it does for a living. This beetle, Mecynodera, is a member of the frog-legged beetles, a very small and select group with about half of all world species only in Australia. The group appears to be a Gondwanan relict, a leftover from 100 million years ago when Australia was joined to South America and Africa, as it only occurs in these areas. Adults are rarely seen and nothing was known about their life history in Australia. A few years ago my wife, not a biologist, asked me what was causing the large round holes in the seed pods of our wonga vine. I thought ‘moth caterpillar’ (i.e. “not my group”) and I forgot about it. Then a couple of years ago we seemed to have an epidemic of holes in the pods. I had a look and had a shock – it was a large beetle larva and it was a member of the frog-legged beetles. And rearing one through confirmed the identity. Now the whole story has been formally published in a scientific journal, Zootaxa (read online at https://mapress.com/j/zt/article/ view/zootaxa.4686.4.5). How little we know about our back garden wildlife. What else is out there? What have you got in your garden? Share your stories or ask Chris a question. Email editor@2515mag.com.au. 2515


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Nic Squiers bagged the $2500 prize money. Photos: Nick McLaren, Scarborough Boardriders Club.

SQUIERS TAKES DOWN OPPONENTS IN FIERY ILLAWARRA SURF BATTLE The Scarborough Boardriders report.

East Corrimal’s Nick Squiers had a fire deep in the belly that kept on burning right up until the last wave of the DP Battle Royale, held on Saturday, October 19 at Stanwell Park. One to three-foot waves with offshore conditions and excellent sandbanks greeted the 32 males and eight females who turned out for the event, run by Scarborough Boardriders. Squiers set the high standard early with a 17.50 total score out of 20 in round 1, eclipsing Rhys Bombaci with 16.00 in the same heat. Other first round stand outs included Stanwell Park local Kalani Ball with a 13.33 total, Jones Beach boardriders’ Brett Connellan with 13.16 and last year’s winner, Shane Campbell, with 12.70. Round 2 switched to man-on-man and Squiers continued to pile on the pressure powering into tricky lefts down the beach to rack up a heat total of 18.23, again the highest score of the round. Squiers went on to eliminate Shane Campbell in the quarter finals then edge out Kalani Ball in the semis. On the other side of the draw Dean Bowen, well known to Squiers through their shared goal of climbing up the world QS surf rankings, eliminated

Cronulla’s Jay Brown to set up a showdown with Squiers in the final. Squiers got out in front early but had to fight off a strong finishing Bowen who rode his last wave with just seconds to go. The surf coach and Scarborough Boardriders club member bagged the $2500 prize money, while Bowen walked away with $1500. In the women’s division Wollongong surfer Skye Burgess came out firing to post a heat total of 15.16 in the semi-finals with local Kasey Hargreaves finding her groove to win the other semi with a heat total of 14.93. In the final Burgess picked off the larger steeper waves while Darcy Air and Kasey Hargreaves battled it out for 2nd and 3rd with upcoming junior, Culburra’s Keira Buckpitt, surfing well beyond her years to finish 4th. The day went off with hardly a hitch. A small shower of rain arrived moments after the tents were pulled down but most were already on their way to Beaches Hotel in Thirroul for the post-event celebrations. Shane Campbell picked up the James Cruickshank Award for best recovery. Thanks to sponsors 4020Beer, Beaches Hotel, SisstrEvolution and DP Surfboards for making the day possible. 2515

NOVEMBER / 2515 / 45


20 0002 0.32 0443 0410 0104 0.38 0552 0451 0127 0.50 0548 0000 0115 1.24 0028 0129 1.170554 0342 0509 0.180337 0530 0029 0.500526 0.37 1.33 0.43 1.07 1.22 1.12 0.40 1.23 0.21 1.37 0.24 1.54 11 1 25 16 0.66 1 25 16 0.53 1 25 16 0.46 10 10 10 10 7 7 22 7 22 22 26 0559 1.42 1028 1.58 1122 1.71 0527 0.51 0543 0753 0.611215 0957 1044 1.700901 1200 0642 1.701116 0745 1.47 0745 1.16 0.51 0712 1.27 1.41 1.73 1133 0.67 1151 0.66 0959 0.71 62 23 0.41 1647 0.35 1809 0.31 1156 1.79 1215 1.64 1614 0.19 1852 0.31

0 1 0.46 0.58 1.67 0.55 0.40 0.25 44 TU 1.41 WE 1.51 FR 1.36 SA 1.54 SU 1.28 MO 1.36 SU 1356 TU 1416 0 TU 1127 WE 1712 TH 1255 FR 1232 MO 1418 TH 1743 SA 1744 SU 1808 MO 1635 TU 1532 FR 1725 34 1800 1.52 2336 2250 1910 1.36 1.48 0.23 1 0.37 1.47 1850 2005 2221 2358 1.552236 1.55 0.47 1846 2356 1.68 0.25 1953 1.40 1915 2015 0.23 0.37 52

0011 0159 1.20 0000 0117 0212 1.130013 0056 0150 1.23 50 0043 0.35 0545 0442 0139 0.42 0015 0424 0602 0.280450 0052 0115 1.180618 0.38 1.12 0.36 0.43 0.16 1.50 0.37 0.44 0.28 0.35 1.33 1.18 09 17 0.61 17 0.43 2 26 17 1.65 2 26 2 26 11 11 11 11 8 23 8 23 8 23 0537 0.56 0629 0838 0.670645 0622 0.55 00 0640 1.44 1104 1.59 1044 1144 1.691020 0615 0730 0.601222 1.22 0746 1.34 1.54 0818 1.55 1.80 0822 0.40 1108 0.68 0634 1.31 0630 1.42 63 1208 1.68 1259 1.54 1247 1.72 02 0.42 1730 0.37 1711 0.26 1247 1.61

0 1 0.53 0.49 0.29 0.40 0.19 1.78 48 SU 1.53 MO 0.58 TU 0.38 TH 1.56 WE 1.42 SA 0.60 WE 1214 FR 1337 SA 1330 MO 1435 TU 1511 WE 1458 0 TH 1807 TU 1736 WE 1645 FR 1228 SA 1825 SU 1245 MO 1318 0.33 1834 2003 2107 0.421908 1945 2048 0.25 1 10 1841 1.44 1.58 2315 1.392336 0.29 2331 1948 1.29 1830 1949 1939 0.39 1.70 1902 2031 1.51 1.38 1.39 1.28 1.42 1.32 45

2019 PORT KEMBLA TIDAL CHART 2019

NEW SOUTH WALES LONG 150° 55ʼ E

PORT KEMBLA – NEW SOUTH WALES

20 0.39 and 0516 0.48 0108Time 1.17 0039 0212 0254 1.120100 0507Waters 0.410550 0150 1.11 0118 0.35 Low 0212 0.34 0.14Local 0046 0.13 1.29 0230 0.37 0.43 0.33 0024 0.44 0.40 0.24 13 LAT 34° 29ʼ S 0053 LONG 150°0200 55ʼ E 0044 of High 36 0715 1.45 0632 1143and0819 1.58 0630 0851 0.61 0708 0722 0.720734 1132 0651 1.641130 0704 0.68 1.27 1.19 1.40 0815 1.65 1.62 1.44 Times 1.62 Local 0923 1.85 Heights of High 1.39 and Low Waters Time 0.52 0711 0706 1.51 59 45 0.45 1818 0.40 1300 1.63 1346 1.45 1812 0.34 1338 1.51 BER 0.48 0.43 0.21 1239 0.29 0.35 0.17 DECEMBER SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER 1749 1322 56 FR 1.63 MO 0.33 TU 0.49 WE TH 0.62 SU 0.53 TH 1255 SA 1415 SU 1424 FR TU 1514 WE 1601 WE 1206 TH NOVEMBER SA 1314 SU DECEMBER MO 1333 TU 1415 Time m2111 m 2004 Time m Time 2049 m Time m 2054Time Time 1859 m Time m 1914 Time1921 m 48 Time 1.36 1827 2002 0.34 1920 0.46 0.45 1918 1.60 2025 1.51 1.68 1.84 1.37 2159 1.35 34 Time m0410 1.40 Time m 1.28 m 1.45 Time m0.32 Time m 1.51 TIME 0320 M M 2030 TIME TIME M 0451 0.50 M 0000 1.24 0.38 0028 1.17 0330 0.05 0342 0.18 TIME 0530 0.50 10011 1 0957 11.08 1 0115 0543 0.61 16 0527 0.51 0935 1.55 16 0926 1.42 1.70 16 1028 1.58 1200 1.70 16 1122 1.71 53 0410 0.44 0104 0018 1.21 1.24 0256 0309 1.13 0212 1.16SU 0151 0.32 SU0.40 0242 0.32 0131 0.07 0301 0.391.640.42 0.15 0336 0.39 22 0451 0.50 0000 1.24 0.38 0028 1.17SA0.24 0530 0.50 1215 1809 0.31 1.79 0145 1523 0.410.21 0.35 0244 1530 0.22 0.19 0127 18520129 0.31 MO 1156 MO 0029 TU 1614 WE 1647 0.37 FR 1915 0.23 0821 2134 1.521.41 2250 1.47 1.36 0900 2148 1.86 1.55 0745 0733 0527 0.65 0745 15 1028 1.45 0712 0556 2221 0.54 0552 0.530642 0804 0.740753 08251850 0.75 0749 1.32 1.27 0851 1.46 0738 1.54 0925 1.670.371.60 1007 1.85 1.74 51 1122 1.71 0.51 1.58 1200 1.70 0543 0.61 1.73 0011 0117 1.130.41 1.23 1505 0350 0.350.40 0442 0.46 0.42 0415 0424 0.28 1356 00521418 1.18 1400 1.58 30 0.49 1227 1.55 1224 1.57 1436 1.43 1442 1.37 1332 0.44 1453 0.39 1332 0.21 1554 0.31 1651 0.19 0.16 67 1809 0.31 1156 1.79 0.35 1852 0.31 1215 1.64 SA TU 0.25 FR20.55 MO WE TH FR 1647 SU SA WE1.20 TH0056 MO TH 1255 FR 1232 SU MO TU2 1416 WE SA SU1517 MO WE FR0.10 2 2 0.56 0629 0.67 17 0622 0.55 1025 1.57 17 1000 1.44 1044 1.69 17 1104 1.59 0615 0.60 17 0537 31 2250 1.27 1910 1912 0.43 2106 0.34MO 2005 1916 0.42 2149 0.48 2145 0.48 1953 1.61MO1.48 2100 1.50 1949 1.850.421.68 2151 1.331.541.28 2248 1.28 1.61 23 1208 1.68 1259 1.72 2056 1626 0.25 0.26 1953 12472015 1.61 1602 0.37 2122 1850 0.23 1.36 1915 0.37SU1.47 TU 1247 TU 1846 TH 1730 1.40 WE 1711 SA

0156 0228 1.24 18 12 9 3 27 24 18 0.36 3 27 24 2019 12 9 3 27 24 18 12 9 NOVEMBER 12 0724 0.58 0900 1.73 1345 1.64

0 1 0 FR 2136 2220 0.30 1 1.28

30 0442 0.50 0221 33 58 1104 1.44 0821 40 25 0.53 1409 78 SA 1730 FR TH 2027 2331

0420 0.390.16 0500 0.20 0.41 0113 0507 1.15 0114 1.130115 0.30 30.36 0216 0.06 0311 0139 0011 0.42 0052 1.18 3 1132 1115 1.57 18 1036 1.45 1.64 0645 0.61 0644 0.63 1.36 TU1.34 0824 1.62 0922 0746 0537 1.59 0615 0.60 1645 0.451.54 1724 0.32 0.34 WE 0730 TH 1812 2248 1.36 2331 1.54 1318 1.52 1321 1.49 0.42 1426 0.16 1530 1337 0.37 1.61 SU 0.29 SA 0.49 SU MO MO SA 1330 SU 1208 SA 1247 0453 0.44 0546 0.32 0011 1.24 2015 0.45 2028 2039 0.47 1.60 41.51 1.80 2135 1948 1.29 1949 0.39 1.70 19 1939 4 1902

0 1 0 SA 2231 2309 0.32 1 1.26

22 0516 1.18 0251 13 13 1143 0.57 0854 44 48 1.43 1445 29 SU 1818 SA FR 30 2100 0.55 84

0.42 2331 1.270.14 0327 0300 1.070200 0219 1916 1.11 0.31 0.34 0.10 0340 0212 0.48 0108 0150 1.11 0530 0.501.65 0028 1.36 1.13 0846 0.690815 0745 0114 0.65 1.39 51.40 0910 1.68 0955 0819 1.58 0630 0704 0.68 5 0644 0633 0.43 20 1158 1.44 0.63 1527 1.44 1421 1.50 0.40 1519 0.15 1608 1415 0.40 1300 1338 1.51 SUTH0.43 MO 1825 0.530.21 1302 1.49 MO TU SUFR 1424 TU MO SU1.53 SA 1321 1936 0.47 0.47 2236 0.492030 2127 2028 0.43 1.57 1.51 2130 1.70 2211 2025 2002 2049 0.45 1.68

0 1 0.30 TH 1540 0 2041 2133 0.28 1 1.30

0258 0307 1.28 13 10 4 281 25 19 16 13 10 4 281 25 19 16 13 10 4 28 25 19 0.39 13 16 0832 0.60 0940 1.80 1446 1623 1.55 0.24 2239 1.72

2210 1.44

2315 1.39

1207 1.56 WE 1827 0.40

1115 1.45 TH 1730 0.49

0552 0.53 FR 1224 1.57

2331 1.29

1949 0.39

1902 0.33

2003 0.42

1945 0.25

SA 1227 1.55 1912 0.43

MO 1436 1.43 2149 0.48

TU 1400 1.58 2106 0.34

WE 1442 1.37 2145 0.48

TH 1446 1.55 2136 0.30

0113 0645 SU 1318 2015

0403 0916 TU 1542 2245

0322 0847 WE 1509 2208

0407 0936 TH 1544 2233

0400 0947 FR 1554 2231

0516 0.37 0.48 0326 0108 1.17 1.24 0230 01500212 1.11 0403 04070156 1.18 0322 1.19 0150 0.33 0.21 0335 0.421.120.42 0417 0.47 0159 1.20 0117 1.13 0.28 0056 1.23 3 0212 18 31.10 1143 1.58 0722 0.72 18 0724 0.58 0704 0.68 18 0630 0.61 0916 0.75 0936 0.75 0847 0.65TU 0822 1.51 1.79 1001 1.711.451.68 1050 1.81 0818 0.56 0629 0.67MO1.80 0622 0.55 0.40 0945 1300 1.63 1346 1.64 0905 13380838 1.51 FR 1818 1.55 WE 1345 SU 2002 0.34 2054 0.460.34 0.28 1552 20491511 0.45 1542 1.37 1544 1.32 1509 1.55 0.36 0.15 1635 0.29 1740 0.24 1435 1.68 1259 1.54 1.72 TU 0.40 TH FR WE 0.19 TU TH 1247 FR2041 WE 1458 TU TH MO1610 TU 0018 1.39 1.21 2213 0212 1.16 02562107 1.08 0309 1.131.28 0258 1.28 2145 2245 0.48 2233 0.47 2208 0.324 2048 1.47 1.51 2233 1.29 2338 1.22 2031 1.42 0.33 2003 0.42 1945 0.25 19 19 4 19 0556 0.54 0733 0.65 0804 0.74 0825 0.75 0832 0.60

0400 0350 1.34 14 11 5 29 26 20 0.42 14 14 11 5 292 26 20 17 14 11 5 292 26 20 17 17 0947 0.59 1022 1.83 1554 1710 1.47 0.22

0503 0407 1.150254 0428 0156 1.26 0228 0500 0500 1.250312 0459 0436 1.44 0.34 0.37 0.29 0411 0.45 0.42 0.54 0.45 1.17 0212 1.12 0.33 1.24 6 21 6 21 15 12 6 303 27 21 18 15 12 0230 30 15 30 15 27 12 27 18 3 18 1029 0.730923 1003 0.61 1047 1132 0.720947 1103 0.54 1.55 1030 1.80 1040 1.72 1.74 1108 0851 1.62 1.85 0900 1.75 1.83 0.61 0722 0.72 0724 0.58 20 51.361601 201619 1720 5 0.29 0.27 20 1.291636 1646 1703 1.54 1540 1646 1828 1702 1758 1.40 0.35 0.35 0.17 0.17 0.30 0.22 1514

26 07 10 54 50 21 SA 46 85

1.11 0018 0.62 0556 1.44 1227 SU 0.52 1912

0130 1.21

0022 1.18

0327 1.07

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19 13 7 4 28 22 19 13 7 314 28 22 19 13 7 2209 0.51

1.34 0.59 1.47 0.32

2236 0.37

0554 28 22 0.49 1215 1.79 1808

2356 0.25

45 0113 1.09 0311 0545 1.120326 0450 0545 1.18 0015 0618 1.50 0350 0000 0402 1.08 0245 1.090.21 1.12 0335 0450 0.42 1.18 00150417 0.43 0618 1.50 0000 00130.44 0.35 0434 06 1.15 80.33 0403 1.10 0322 1.19 0407 1.18 0.47 0400 1.340.440.45 WOLLONGONG’S 80.43 8 1022 0930 0.64 23 0821 0.63 1108 0.68 23 1020 0.61 0634 1.31 23 1222 0.43 0630 1.42 23 0645 1.65  Copyright ofTU8Australia 2018, of SA Meteorology 21 0.63 0922 1108 0.68 1020 0.61 0634 1.31 1222 0.43SU 0630 1.42 62 1.51 1.81 1.83 0645 0.61 SUCommonwealth 0916 0.75 0847 0.65 0936 0.75 0947 0.590.58SWIM 1614 1.49 1736 1.42 1001 1.56 Bureau 1825 1.53 1500 1.481.79 12281050 0.60 1245 0.38 1107 MO 0945 WE 1645 1.71 FR MO 1318 BEACHES ARE 2313 0.47 2336 0.29 0.29 2201 0.450.15 18301740 1.38 1834 1.280.21 1.32 1758 00 1.48 1736 1.42 1645 1.56 1228 0.60 1825 1.53 12451908 0.58 16 1530 1318 1.52 1.37 1509 1.55 1.32 1.47 TU 0.36 WE FR SA 0.24 SU MO MO of TUis1610 TH 1635 FR SA 1710 SU SU TU 1542 WEAstronomical TH 1544 FR 1554 Datum Predictions Lowest Tide PATROLLED FROM 0508 1.11 0024 0.44 2233 0550 1.29 1.29 00532338 0.40 0044 0.24 0039 0.431.25 01001.28 0.36 0404 1.131.51 01 2015 0.45 2135 2336 0.29 1830 1.38 1834 80 2213 1.22 2309 2356 0.45 91.47 2245 0.48 2208 0.32 2233 0.47 2231 0.32 24 9 24 9 24 9 24

0.25 1.21

14 8 5 29 23 20 14 8 5 29 23 20 14 8 20 A – NEW SOUTH WALES

0013 29 23 0.53 0645 1.73 1318

21 15 9 6 30 24 21 15 9 6 30 24 21 15 9

30 24

2019

1.54 0.46 1.36

0.35 1.65 0.30 0.38 1908 1.32 1.19

9ʼTimes S LONG 150° E 0.59time 0632 1032 0.62 55ʼ 1130 0.52 0711 1.39 0708 1.51 0734 1.73 0936 1.19 0706 1.62 are inMOlocal standard (UTC +10:00) orSAdaylight savings (UTCTU+11:00) START OF THE when in effect 1711 1.51 1314 0.53 SU 1415 0.30 1322 0.33 time WE 1206 0.62 TH 1749 1.63 MO 1333 0.49 THE TU 1610 1.56 19140500 1.40 1920 1.280.47 20040.43 1.30 0515 0.57 2304 0.340.29 1.45 0411 1921Local 1.51 0550 1827 1.29 0053 0500 0.40 0039 0.36 04 1.13 0024Low 0.44Waters 0044 0.24Time 10 0340 0.34 0407 0.45 0.54 0436 0503 1.15 1.25 0459 1.44 0219 1.11 0428 1.26 ights of High and SEPTEMBER SCHOOL New Moon First Quarter Moon Phase Symbols Full Moon 0100 1130 0104 0.52 0711 1.39 070801451.51 0734 1.73 36 0745 0.59 0955 0632 1.191030 0706 1.62 1108 0002 0.43 0509 1.221.80 0.40 1040 0029 1.72 0.21 01271132 0.37 0129 0.24 0115 0.39 1145 1.66 68 1.74 1.83 1029 0.73 1047 0.72 1103 0.540.42HOLIDAYS 0.65101.55 1003 0.61 25 10 25 10 25 10 25 UNTIL THE 0559 1.16 0712 1.27 0642 1.41 0753 1.73 1044 0.51 0745 1.47 0745 1.60 0821 1.80 CTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER 1749 1.63 1314 0.53 1333 0.49 1415 0.30 10 1421 1.56 1206 0.62 1322 0.33 15 0.30 1.36 1646 1.29 1702 1.40 1.50 1619 1.54 TH MO TU 0.35 WETU0.35 SUMO TU 1608 WE FR SA SU 1127 0.55 1720 1232 0.29 0.40 1418 1712 1.670.17 13561828 0.46 1416 0.410.21 0.24 1837 WE0.581646 FR SU SA0.25 MO TH WE 1703 TH 1255 FR SA TU 1758 WE 1505MO

END THE APRIL 1800 1.55 1.48 2320 1846 1.25 1.68 2015 1.47 2358 0.231.39 1910 1953 1.40 2005 2056 1.28 1914 1.40 1.28 04 0.34 2211 1827 1.452305 1.51 Time 70 0.46 0.46 1921 0.331.281920 0.43 1.42 0.28 m OF Time m 2333 Time m 2319 Time m 2323 m 2127 Time m 2304 0159 0043 0.38 0602 1.33 0.36 0115 0.16 26 0448 11 0139 26 1144 0.400029 0818 0640 1.220.40 0746 1.34 0451 0730 0.50 1.54 11 0410 0530 0.50 0104 0.21 0127 0.37 0.39 0552 1.23 0548 1.12110.38 0526 1.37

0150 0.42 SCHOOL 0212 0.28 0.42 HOLIDAYS. 260129 11 0000 26 0230 0822 1.681.24 0838 09050.42 1.83 0028 1.171.80 0.24 0039 1.33 0554 1.54 0115

WE 1214 0.53 1841 1.58

TH 1807 1.78

FR 1337 0.49 1948 1.51

SA 1330 0.29 1939 1.70

0.37 1.55 MO 1435 0.40 2031 1.39

1918 1.60

1859 1.84

2025 1.51

2030 1.68

2111 1.37

2004 1.30

.18 0337 0145 09 1.22 1.18 WOLLONGONG 16 1122 1 25 16 0527 16 1028 11115 10 1.58 25 10 1.71 10NORTH 25 31 7 7 22 22 22 0.51 0543 0.61 1215 .70 0901 1200 1.70 1116 0712 1.27 0642 1.41 0745 1.47 1.73 0745 31 1.600558 0821 44 0.51 0.62 1133 0.67 1.77 1151 0.66 0753 0.46 0.66 0.53 IS THE ONLY LOCAL 1.64 0.25 1156 1.79 .19 1.67 1647 0.35 1852 0.23 0.31 0.40 1809 0.31 1255 0.551757 1232 1356 0.46 1215 1418 1416 0.41 1505 12 1224 1.57

0.39 1.80 0.24 0118 0.35 0046 0.13 0212 0.34 1.54 0200 0.14 0230 0.37 0254 0.33 0228 0.42 0312 TU 0.45 1743 1.36 1744 1.28 1808 1.36 1725 SA SU MO WE 1.51 FR TH FR SU MO TU WE TH TH SA SU TU 1532 FR 121910 27 0947 0715 1.27 27 0651 1.44 12 0819 1.40 27 0815 1.65 12 0851 1.62 27 0923 1.85 12 0900 1.75 BEACH 1.83 PATROLLED 1915WE2015 0.370.171.47TH 1850 .55 2236 1846 1.68 1953 TU1.40 2005 1.28 2056 1.28 58 0.23 2250 0.37 TH1.36 2356 1239 0.291.28 1255 0.481.48 0.43 0.25 1514 0.35 1601 1540 0.270.23 FR 2358 SA 1415 SU 1424 0.21 FR 1636 0.22 1916 0.40 TU 1511 0.19 2107 1.42

WE 1458 0.34 2048 1.28

2159 1.35

2133 1.28

TH 1552 0.22 2145 1.26

2230 1.24 YEAR-ROUND.

0117 1.130.39 .28 0450 0052 1.180242 0159 0.37 015003540.42 02 1.33 0442 0.36 0131 0.16 0.28 0056 0151 0.32 0.070115 0.32 0011 0.49 0244 1.20 0.15 0301 0.39 0307 1.18 0.42 0015 0.43 0618 1.50 0000 0.44 0212 0013 0.350.431.23 130139 13 Meteorology 28Bureau 28 0336 13 0622 28 10291.68 28 0749 1.321.34 0738 1.540730 0851 1.46 0537 1.79 0900 0.56 1.74 13 0925 1.67 1007 0940 1.810.55 0629 0.671.85 1104 .69 1020 0615 0.60 0818 1.55 44 0.40 0746 1.54 1.80 alth of Australia 2018, of 0.61 FR1.59 0634 1.31 1222 0630 1.42TH0838 0645 1.650.230822 1332 0.44 0.21 0.39 0.43 1554 0.31 1651 0.19 SA 1332 SU 1453 SA 1717 0.25 MO 1517 0.16 WE FR 1623 1953 1.61 1949 1.851330 2100 1.50 1208 23140.34 1.21 2122 1.68 1.61 2151 1.33 2248 1.28 2220 1.271.72 1259 1.54 1247 1730 0.37 .26 1247 1.61 1435 0.40 1458 07 1.78 1337 0.49 0.29 1511 0.19 1645 1.56 1228 0.60 1825 1.53 1245 0.58 1318 0.38 SU MO TU TH SA MO WE FR SA TU TH WE FR Tide SA SU MO owest Astronomical TIMES AND1.28 HEIGHTS 2003 0.420.47 .39 2336 2331 1949 0.390311 2031 1.39 20480434 1948 1.51 0216 1.70 1.42 1945 0221 0.30 0.061939 0.33 1902 0326 0.33 0.21 0335 0.42 0417 0350 0.53 0.29 1.29 1830 1.38 1834 1.28 2107 1908 1.320.450.25

23 17 11 8 2 26 23 17 11 8 2 26 23 17 11

26 0230 0905

0.42 1.83 1552 0.22 2145 1.26

14+10:00) 29HIGH 0821 1.36 29 0824 1.62 14 0922 1.51 29 0945 1.79 14 1001 1.71 29 1050 1.81 14 1022 1.83 OF 1107AND 1.73LOW rd time (UTC or daylight savings time (UTC +11:00) when inSAeffect 1710 0.21 SU 1758 0.30 SA 1409 0.42 SU 1426 0.16 MO 1530 0.36 TU 1610 0.15 TH 1635 0.29 FR 1740 0.24 0212 1.121.22 0.48 .41 0550 0150 1.112135 46 0.13 0516 0212 0.34 2039 0.14 0.45 0230 0.37 0254 0.33 0156 0228WATERS 2027 1.60 1.800200 1.47 0108 2213 1.17 1.51 2233 1.29 2338 2309 1.251.24 23560.42 1.19 1.29 0053 0.40 0044 0.24 0039 0.43 0100 0.36 New1143 Moon First Quarter Last Quarter0312 Full Moon 0722 0.720.54 .64 1130 0704 0.680340 51 1.44 0819 1.40 0300 1.65 0947 1.83 0851 1.62 1.85 0724 0900 05151.75 0251 0.31 0.100815 0.34 0630 0407 0.61 0.29 0411 0.45 0500 0436 00.57 0.52 1.58 0711 1.39 0706 1.62 0708 1.51 0923 0734 1.730.470.58

18 12 9 303 27 24 18 3012 915 3 2730 24 1815 12 30LAT 34 29’ 27 24 15 0.21 1300 1.63 1.45 0.17 1345 1.64 .34 0.29 1818150.40 1.51 39 1415 0.43 1338 1424 1636 1514 0.35 1346 1601 1540 0.27

1145 1.66 1.39 0910 1.68 0955 1.55 1030 1.80 1040 1.72 1.74 1108 1.83 0.22 0.53 1322 1333 0.49 1415 0.30 MO TU 0.29 WE FR 1.63 SU SASU 0854 SU FR WESA 1132 TH TH 1749 SA0.401314 SU MO FR TU0.30 1445 0.15 0.35 0.33 1703 0.17 1720 1828 0.21 MO 1837 0.35 0 MO 1519 TU 1608 WE TU SU 1758 LONG 150 2100 1.57 1.702030 1.42 2002 2305 0.34 1.39 2320 1.25 2054 0.46 2004 2049 0.452211 59 1.84 2025 1.51 2130 1.68 2230 1.24 2111 1.37 1.35 2041 2133 1.2855’ 1914 1.40 1921 1.51 1920 1.28 2159 1.30 0.28

31 0448 1115

0.39 1.77 TH 1757 0.23 2358 1.28

1.18 31 0039 05580.43 0.62

1.08 0129 1.13 0145 0242 0127 0.32 0256 0.15 0212 0301 0115 0.39 0309 0.39 0258 0307 0.37 0244 0.42 0336 0.39 1.28 0.21 1.21 0.24 1.16 19 0733 4 28 4 28 19 0832 13 0.54 13 0.65 13 0.60 10 10 25 25 19 0018 25 0556 0804 0.74 0753 0825 0.75 0821 0851 1.46 1.74 0925 1.67 1.85 0940 0745 1.47 0900 0745 1.60 1007 1.80 1.41 1.73 1227 1.55 1.43 0.16 1400 1.58 1.37 0.19 1446 1.55 1453 0.39 1436 1517 1554 0.31 1442 1651 1623

.24 0029 31 0.07 .53 0642 38 1.54 .57 1232 32 0.21 SA FR .42 1846 49 1.85

TU 1224 1.57 1916 0.40

1.81 0.23 0.40 TU 0.25 MO 0.46 WE 0.41 TH 0.24 SU SU 1356 MO MO 1418 WE TU 1416 TH WE 1505 FR  Copyright Commonwealth of Australia 2018, Bureau of Meteorology 1912 0.43 0.48 2015 0.48 2056 2100 1953 1.50 2149 1.61 2106 2151 2005 1.33 2145 1.28 2136 2220 1.27 1.40 2122 1.28 2248 1.28 0.30 1.68 Datum 1.47 0.34 of Predictions is Lowest Astronomical Tide Times are in local standard time (UTC +10:00) or daylight savings time (UTC +11:00) when in effect Moon Phase Symbols New Moon First Quarter Full Moon

.13 0115 1.10 0212 1.18 0230 16 0.06 0113 0311 0159 0.33 0403 0.21 0322 0335 0150 0.42 0407 0.47 0400 0350 0.37 0326 0.42 0417 0.16 1.15 0.28 1.19 0.42 1.34 20 0645 5 29 20 0847 5 29 20 0947 14 0.61 14 0.65 14 0.59 11 11 26 26 26 .63 0730 0916 0.75 0838 0936 0.75 0905 24 1.62 0922 1.51 1.79 1001 1.71 1.81 1022 0818 1.55 0945 0822 1.68 1050 1.54 1.80 1.83 .49 0.16 1318 1.52 1.37 0.15 1509 1.55 1.32 0.24 1554 1.47 26 1530 0.36 1542 1610 1635 0.29 1544 1740 1710

28 0354 1029

0.49 1.79 SA 1717 0.25 2314 1.21

0.45 1.83 0.19 0.22 SU 0.29 TU 0.40 THor 0.34 MOThe Bureau TUno warranty TH FR in respect SA SU Meteorology gives anyWE kind whether express, WE implied,1458 statutory otherwise to theFR availability, accuracy, currency,0.21 completeness, MOof 1435 SA 1330 TUof1511 TH 1552 0.45 .47 1939 0.48 0.32 2233 0.47 2231 0.32 39 1.80 2015 2135 1.47 1.51 2233 1.29 2338 1.22 2309 1.25 or reliability of the 2245 information or that the2107 information2208 will be fit for any particular purpose or will not infringe 2145 any third party Intellectual Property rights. 2031 1.39 2213 2048 1.28 1.70 quality 1.42 1.26 Last Quarter

The Bureau’s liability for any loss, damage, cost or expense resulting from use of, or reliance on, the information is entirely excluded.

1.15 0254 1.25 0312 .07 0200 0411 0228 0.45 0500 0.54 0459 0436 00 0.10 0219 0340 0230 0.34 0503 0.29 0428 0.14 1.11 0.37 0407 0.33 1.26 0.42 0500 0.45 1.44 6 30 6 30 21 1103 21 0745 21 1003 1546­0.65 15 0.61 15 0.54 27 12 27 12 27 1029 0.73 0923 1047 0.72 0947 .69 0815 1040 1.72 1.74 1108 10 1.68 0955 1.80 / 2515­0851 /1.55 NOVEMBER 1.65 1.62 1030 1.85 0900 1.75 1132 1.83 1.36 0.17 1619 1.54 1.29 0.30 1702 1.40 .44 0.15 1421 1.50 1720 0.29 1646 1828 1758 19 1608 0.35 1646 1703

WE 0.35 FR 0.27 SA 0.22 MO 0.21 TH 0.17 FR TH 1540 SA FR 1636 SU TU TU 1514 WE WE 1601 SU 1424 0.46 2159 .49 2030 2320 2133 1.25 2319 30 1.70 2127 2211 2111 1.42 2333 1.39 2304 1.68 0.43 1.37 2305 1.35 0.28 1.28 0.46 2230 2323 1.24 0.33

1.23 0336 .07 0244 0337 0.39 0526 0.39 0448 0.39 1.37 0307 0548 0.43 1.33 0354 0554 0.49 0.15 1.12 0301 0552 22 1116 13 7 31 28 13 7 1151 28 28 1133 1115 0.67 1.77 0.66 22 1215 .71 22 0901 0.66 0.53

1.54 0.46

0.47 1.83 0.21

29 0434 1107

0.53 1.73 1758 0.30 2356 1.19

30 0515 1145

0.57 1.66 MO 1837 0.35

31 0039 0558

1.18 0.62

0 1 0


The Basketball Illawarra U14 Hawks team was: Remy Martin (Culburra), Kade Bradley (Shellharbour), Milo Fallows (Corrimal), Sam Brannon (Woonona), Riley Giles (Windang), Josh Spark (Balgownie), Riley Broadhead (Thirroul), Brad Ballinger (Shellharbour), Tyrone Young (Balgownie), and Tyson Bierman (Wollongong).

LOCAL B’BALL STARS IN NATIONAL CHAMPS 2515 reports. Thirroul’s Riley Broadhead and Sam Brannon of Woonona have impressed on court during the Basketball Illawarra U14 Hawks’ 2019 Australian Under-14 Club Champs campaign. The Hawks finished with a ninth placing. The competition was held from September 30 to October 5, in Ballarat, Victoria.

Coach Jaydon Beveridge said: “For this group of boys, from where they started at the start of the year, to what they achieved throughout the year and then to qualify for nationals as one of 24 teams in Australia was a really good feat for them and a credit to both Riley and Sam in particular. “Nearly every single game we had, we were competitive, which was a really good thing for the boys’ development.” He said the team’s performances were a sign of basketball’s growth and popularity in the region. “Basketball is just going to another level – we’re seeing a lot of talented kids coming through, with a lot of potential so … we can certainly see some future stars of the game here in our own backyard at the moment. “We have a saying that “basketball is a sport for everyone” because it is: boys, girls, no matter your age or ability, you have the capabilities to play the game and it’s a great game to be involved in.” Local businesses, including See Side Optical, Club Thirroul, and Novotel Hotels and Resorts, sponsored the team and helped to fund their uniform and travel costs. 2515 Licence No. 95628C / ARC Licence No. AU09136 ABN 62 078 105 978

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2515 NOVEMBER 2019  

Independent local news mag, hand delivered monthly to homes and businesses in the Thirroul postcode

2515 NOVEMBER 2019  

Independent local news mag, hand delivered monthly to homes and businesses in the Thirroul postcode

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