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MEET OUR CONTRIBUTORS AMANDA DE GEORGE is a naturalist, writer and photographer based in the Northern Illawarra. Her passion lies in discovering interesting critters in urban environments and bringing them to the followers of her Facebook and Instagram page Backyard Zoology. Oh, and adventures and naps and wine; she’s passionate about those things too!

JANICE CREENAUNE is a retired English teacher of 35 years, who has lived and worked in the Illawarra, and completed three year-long overseas teacher exchanges. A wife and mother of three, she sees the life of a retiree as an evolution, something to be cherished, enjoyed. Janice volunteers for PKD Australia. Her interests include travel, Letters-to-the Editor SMH, letterpress printing & film study.

ROB BRANDER – aka ‘Dr Rip’ – is a coastal geomorphologist and professor at the University of New South Wales in Sydney. A resident of Coalcliff, he’s been studying beaches for over 30 years, starting in Canada where water temperatures convinced him to come to Australia to do his PhD. He is an international expert on rip currents and runs a beach safety education program called The Science of the Surf (www.scienceofthesurf.com).

KRISTIN WATSON is Green Connect’s Fair Food Coordinator. She has worked in hospitality for 18 years and is passionate about food and the environment. Which is why she joined Green Connect in May 2018 as a fair food coordinator. In her career, which started out as a chef in London, she has worked mainly in fine dining restaurants, but since starting at Green Connect, she has found a new love for more simple, fresh and seasonal produces.

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Disclaimer: All content and images remain the property of 2515 Coast News unless otherwise supplied. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. Views expressed do not reflect those of the publisher. Articles of a general nature only; seek specific advice on an individual basis.

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FROM THE STAR OF PEACE TRAIN THE CAT STEVENS STORY

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‘YIELD IS THE REAPING, THE THINGS THAT MAN CAN TAKE FROM THE LAND’ Tara June Winch will be in Thirroul to talk about her new novel The Yield on Wednesday, July 10. 2515 reports.

Tara June Winch is a 35-year-old Wiradjuri author, born in Australia, now living in France (and sometimes North Wollongong). Her debut novel was 2006’s Swallow the Air, an award-winner that has been on the HSC syllabus for Standard and Advanced English. On July 2, Tara will publish her third book, The Yield, a novel spanning 200 years of Wiradjuri history. Her publishers bill it as “a devastating tour-de-force”; “at once a brutal reckoning of colonisation and a historical fable”. Tara will read from, discuss and answer audience questions about The Yield on July 10, 6-7.30pm at Thirroul District Community Centre. Tickets $15/$10, book via www.theneoperennialpress.com. Heroines Festival director Dr Sarah Nicholson has organised the talk ahead of 2019’s event, a festival of women writers telling women’s stories that will be held in Thirroul on September 15. Sarah is a big fan of Tara’s work: “She’s a very poetic writer, while being quite story driven. She’s tackled some really important things, but I think she’ll do it in a way that’s quite beautiful.” Tara kindly took time to answer questions. What does the word ‘heroine’ mean for you? It’s the instinctive voice for me. That woman narrating your world, ushering you from place to place. That voice that gives you the backbone and the guts.   Please describe the heroine in your new novel, The Yield. August Gondiwindi is like a injured bird that’s fallen from the nest. Sometimes if you don’t swoop in to rescue them, if you leave space around them, then they’ll heal and fly off on their own watch. I think she is like that. What did your research involve? A lot of years of non-fiction reading, travelling country NSW, birdwatching and lots and lots of thinking and daydreaming. What did you love most about writing this new book? Getting to the end. And, of course, getting to

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immerse myself in the Wiradjuri language. It was an experience I really loved. It was bittersweet producing The Yield – it took a lot of research to bring a story I would have loved to be told by my ancestors. What was the most challenging aspect? Always weaving the story so that it’s a page-turner, so that the reader wants to keep reading. That in itself takes time and real concentration.

The Yield’s publication coincides with UNESCO’s International Year of Indigenous Languages and you have woven a Wiradjuri dictionary through the narrative. Would you like to share a powerful word, one so wonderfully expressive there’s no real English translation? ‘Yindyamarra’ is beautiful – it’s respect, gentleness and kindness at once. That’s a beautiful word and I hope it encapsulates my intention behind the book. You grew up in Woonona and now live in France. What is life there like? The same as anywhere in many ways. We live in a normal house in the countryside, grow vegies, raise a couple of chickens, and our daughter loves her friends and school, so we are stuck here in a way. I don’t want to uproot her from her mates. The only difference is the language, the school systems, and that you get to experience seasons on an extreme level. I think it’s good for writers – experiencing seasons in their full intensity.   Anything you miss about Wollongong? The beaches! And the food and coffee, everywhere I go in Europe, people who’ve been to Australia rave about the food – it’s fresh, Asian inspired, healthy and yummy and just glorious. Our coffee is also to die for! Heaven is eating and drinking anything there by the beach. Also, the people – Aussies are happy-go-lucky – it’s so refreshing to be home and see people living joyously. 2515

WIN! The Yield (Hamish Hamilton, $32.99) is published on 2 July 2019. Tell us why you want to read it and the top three answers will each win a book! Email editor@2515mag.com.au

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There’s a new hashtag in town. Darkes Glenbernie Orchard’s Jo Fahey reports. Apple cider is so much more than what we think. If you associate it with ‘sweet and sickly’, just for teenagers, then we’d encourage you to rethink it and try local craft cider made from real apples! Give some craft cider a chance to show you its versatility and the difference that using fresh local apples makes! It will taste better and different from the cider you may have tried based on concentrates, added sugar and flavourings. LET’S CELEBRATE AND # RETHINKCIDER! • Our Darkes Cider Howler, for example, can be enjoyed at a number of small local restaurants and is especially nice fresh from tap. • Why not try it locally at Helensburgh Hotel or Reub Goldberg Brewing in Tarrawanna! • If you find an interesting cider fact about real cider and wish to share it on social media, we are encouraging people to use the hashtag #rethinkcider • Cider is awesome served in a beautiful glass rather than direct from the stubby. Try using a champagne glass.

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• Muddle other fresh fruit in your cider to add a different flavour, rather than buying premixed flavoured cider. • Try warmed cider with spice for a warming drink in winter – cinnamon, star anise, cardamom, vanilla pod and cloves work well. • Pair cider with a variety of foods. Try with pasta, pizza, Thai or Indian. • Try using cider in a cocktail. • There’s a cider for every occasion. Cider can be dry, sweet or medium. • Any apple can make cider – it’s the apples you choose that will determine what the final flavour will be like. SAVE THE DATE: COMING FARM EVENT DAYS Cider Sunday – postponed until September Apple Pie Day – 25 August 80 years of Orcharding Celebration Fest – November For more information, visit www.darkes.com.au 2515


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COMEDY NIGHT

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Out & about at the Thirroul Comedy Festival Showcase at Anita’s Theatre on June 1, 2019. Photos: Lara McCabe

1 Georgie Natts  2 Tina and Oethel Paningbaton  3 Corinna Lancaster, Angela Balfour, Maureen Harding, Simon Harding  4 Michael Wolter, Steve House, John Hubscher, Sherie Hubscher, Natalie Dowd  5 Emma, Kylie, Noah Nicastro  6 Michael and Michelle Wells  7 Cassandra Baird, Annalisa Brennan  8 Matt Forner, Tom Gerritsen 3

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SPECIAL FEATURE / SMALL BUSINESS

THE SUPER START-UP Thirroul’s Al Douglas launched a mobile detailing service, 2515 Auto Spa, just six weeks ago. His business is already motoring along, with about 30 regulars, plus ad hoc clients. And he’s looking for more! “I’ve always from the age of seven loved washing the car,” Al said. “I used to get up early in the morning and wash my parents’ cars while they were still asleep. And I’ve always had an interest in cars – well, I’ve owned more than 100 – mainly European but the odd American muscle car, and I’ve always had an interest in doing them up.”

In his corporate life, Al held various management roles, but it was the sales aspect he most enjoyed. “I just love being on the road, being out, having a chat, doing a deal.” So when he decided to leave the corporate world (and the commute), Al brought together his love of people and cars to create a local business. 2515 Auto Spa offers everything from a quick wash to superior interior detailing and hand-polishing. Al has brought the shine back to a range of vehicles, from a humble hatchback to a Lamborghini. Al has a detailing studio at the family home in Thirroul. His services have been very popular with people wanting to sell their cars. “Even though I’ve advertised as a mobile detailer, 60 percent come here.” Even Al is surprised by his rapid success, joking that soon he’ll need to buy another bucket! “I underestimated the fact of one, how many people don’t like washing their cars, and two, how time poor people are. Everyone has been so happy, they say it takes the stress off.” Set-up costs have been “minimal”. “My wife has been a huge help, she’s done the website through Weebly. We’ve got Vistaprint T-shirts, magnets – probably all up it cost $500.” His message for readers: “Come and get your car washed. Come and get it detailed. Enquire!” Call Al on 0424 431 212 or visit www.2515autospa.com.au. 2515

NEW INTERIORS STORE Two family-run Illawarra businesses – Pam and Shane King’s Urban Timber and Peter and Cindy Ayres’ PCA Furniture – teamed up to open King & Ayres Interiors in Wollongong in June.

Set in a renovated, post-industrial space at 3 Victoria Street, Wollongong, the new store features bespoke furniture, creative decor and art. The owners bring a impressive amount of talent and furniture-making experience to the new joint venture, their goal being to meet the growing market for creative interior design in Wollongong. For the past 20 years, Helensburgh’s Peter and Cindy Ayres have run PCA Furniture, from a Corrimal-based factory. Most PCA furniture pieces come from trees salvaged to prevent them from becoming firewood. Peter has 40 years’ experience as a cabinet maker and specialises in customdesigned furniture. Interior design specialist Cindy will be sourcing soft-furnishings and decor for King & Ayres. Also on the team is their son, Hayden, with expertise in shopfitting, detailed joinery, and contemporary furniture design.

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Cabinet maker Shane and artist Pam King launched Urban Timber, a bespoke furniture business, in Wollongong in 2016. Pam will be coordinating exhibiting artists at King & Ayres. Current artworks on display include Pam’s own work as well as pieces by Moira Kirkwood, Gail Wistow, Angela Forrest and Bob McRae. The furniture makers can design and create dining tables, vanities, sideboards, coffee tables, entertainment units and more. King & Ayres Interiors will be open Wednesdays to Saturdays and every second Sunday. 2515


SMALL BUSINESS / SPECIAL FEATURE

HAPPY 13TH BIRTHDAY! See Side Optical turned 13 years old in June. To celebrate, the Thirroul store gave customers a 13% discount. Thirteen years ago, local mum Sonya Broadhead was pushing a pram containing her baby son past building works at Anita’s Theatre when she had a brainwave – to open a local optometrist in the historic art deco building. A dispensing optician with management and training experience in the optical industry, Sonya put her business degree to good use, drawing up a new business plan. Former colleague Linda Simpson became her partner and the pair opened the doors to See Side Optical on 1 June 2006. Manuel Combes was their first optometrist. Sonya found a second optometrist, Nuong Turner, via the parents’ network – their sons did swimming together at Lawrence Hargrave Hospital. See Side Optical now employs a third optometrist, Manuel’s son, Elias, plus five qualified optical dispensers. It’s a family-friendly office and flexibility to attend school events is all in a day’s work. “All our staff have children, we are all similar ages – we are like-minded,” Sonya said. Expertise is See Side’s biggest point of difference. “Most of the chain stores now employ retail staff

See SeeSide Side See Side

See Side Optical’s Jackie Overton and Leah Windeyer.

to sell the optical instruments, where here we have optical dispensers,” Sonya said. “The benefit of that is we know what the lens is going to look like in the frame. We can look at the prescription and think, ‘OK, what’s going be best?’, not just trying to sell the dearest product, but a product that’s best suited for that person. “We’ve got people coming from Gerringong and Nowra because they know if they have a difficult prescription we can generally fill it.” Operating in a close-knit community, See Side Optical’s motto is to only sell products that staff are comfortable recommending. “We treat people like they’re long-term, not short-term customers.” 2515

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SPECIAL FEATURE / SMALL BUSINESS

GIVE YOUR BUSINESS A LEGAL HEALTH CHECK Local solicitor Michael Mobberley discusses why prevention is better than cure.

Running a small business is a full-time gig, and it can be easy to postpone the boring Amanda Isler, of Collins Booksellers Thirroul, bits like legal has put together a reading list for small business paperwork until you owners. have some free time 1. The E-Myth Revisited: Why Most Small (if such a thing even Businesses Don’t Work and What to Do About It, exists), but it is by Michael E Gerber. important that you ensure that you have the right 2. Traction: Get a Grip on Your Business, structures in place now to avoid headaches down by Gino Wickman. the track. 3. The 4-hour Work Week: Escape 9-5, Live Consider this: you are travelling home from Anywhere and Join the New Rich, work and are injured in a car accident. At hospital By Timothy Ferriss. you are placed into a coma and whilst you will 4. The Lean Startup: How Constant Innovation Creates Radically Successful Businesses, by Eric Ries. recover, you are unable to run your business for the foreseeable future. Your family wants to help and 5. Company of One: Why Staying Small is the tries to operate the business on your behalf until Next Big Thing for Business, by Paul Jarvis. you recover, but discover that they are legally 6. Small Business for Dummies, Australian & unauthorised to do so. New Zealand Edition, by Veechi Curtis. Appointing a power of attorney prior to the 7. Aimee Song’s two books: World of Style and accident could have ensured that trusted friends or Capture Your Style: Transform Your Instagram Images, Showcase Your Life, and Build the Ultimate family could step in when needed most. Or consider this: you have been operating your Platform business for some time and have come up with a 8. Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead, unique and well-recognised logo. You have been by Sheryl Sandberg. Collins Booksellers Thirroul also stock a range of too busy, however, to make the logo legally official. Suddenly a newly established competitor starts current general business and current affairs titles. trading with a very similar logo and customers are We are able to order any book with a fast disappearing. You suspect that your irregular turnaround time, including from overseas. 2515 customers are becoming confused between you and the other business. You ask the competitor to stop using the logo but they refuse. Registering your logo as a trademark early on would have helped prevent your competitor from using the similar logo and given you legal rights Locally Owned & Operated against your competitor if they continued to use it. Just from these examples, it is easy to see how Books for everyone small steps now can avoid having to deal with big steps later. So don’t put it off any longer – if your Stationery & Gifts business hasn’t had a legal check-up in a while (or ever), now is the time to do it!

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Michael Mobberley is an Associate with Kells and manages their Thirroul office branch. Kells provides a variety of legal services across their five branches, including business law, property law, family law, compensation and criminal law. 2515


SMALL BUSINESS / SPECIAL FEATURE

GREEN MACHINA LAWN CARE TIPS

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Now is the time to start your lawn care service. Whilst not only are winter weeds – such as clover, winter grass, sedges and more – prevalent, the reason to start now is grubs and pests. During winter they go dormant under the surface, with eggs and larvae waiting for the warmer weather of spring (late) and summer to emerge. By starting now, we can use products that are safe to stop these pests from ruining your lawn. I have noticed several areas on the coast that have had grub/pest problems and those lawns, side-walks etc are struggling to fight back. We use a product range for Diseases, Grubs, Pest & Weed management. To begin, we use organic fertilisers, fertilisers that help build the strength of your lawn and with a strong root system, your lawns will thrive. We use Seaweed & Kelp enhancers to bring the colour into your grass. Our products rid you of all your weeds, and there are several to combat the amount of weeds in Australia, and they’ve all been proven safe to use by Chemicals Australia. (See ad below for contact details.) 2515

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SPECIAL FEATURE / SMALL BUSINESS

TURNING A NEW PAGE IN THE GONG Member-run creative space Society City opened this year in Wollongong and is campaigning for funds to survive. Sarah McKenzie reports.

challenge the status quo, and listen to the voices of those not usually heard”. Sarah McKenzie, writer and LGBTIQ+ advocate from Thirroul, says: “I love Society City’s warm, welcoming environment. It brings like-minded In January 2019, a dedicated group of Illawarrapeople together in a safe space that celebrates based creatives came together to (literally) build diversity.” Society City, a new member-run space Berbel Franse, from Austinmer, is the founder of Wollongong’s CBD. After much tireless hard work Hidden Harvest, a local food waste education and renovations using recycled and donated initiative, which calls Society City home. materials, Society City opened its doors to the “Hidden Harvest aims to rethink how we community in April, and received a very consume food, both locally and globally,” she says. enthusiastic reception! “At Society City, we host our fortnightly ‘Wasted Located at 274 Crown St, Society City is the first Wednesday’ dinners using rescued food from local initiative facilitated by Renew Wollongong, a branch of Renew Australia, which aims to revitalise businesses, facilitate food workshops and spread urban spaces by negotiating short-term free leases the word for #MoreTasteLessWaste!” From Stanwell Park to Port Kembla, our diverse for disused shop fronts. With the support of our growing volunteer base group of members is passionately committed to their volunteer roles at Society City. Just a few of and affiliated organisations, such as Wollongong our Northern Illawarra volunteers include Jane Writers Festival, Enough Said Poetry Slam and Hidden Harvest, Society City has grown to become Crowley, literacy advocate from Coledale; Molly a hub for secondhand books, zines, pickles, poetry Lasker, freelance copywriter from Austinmer; and Ruby Claire, freelance writer from Wombarra. slams, dinners, film screenings, workshops, gigs, Sadly, the future of Society City is uncertain. and more! So, why are spaces like Society City so important With our Renew Wollongong tenure about to expire, we must become self-sufficient – and we for the cultural future of Wollongong? need your help! “Society City is about supporting grassroots We are currently campaigning to raise $12,000, communities. We’re Wollongong’s first communitywhich will help us to continue building creative owned and run space for creating and sharing communities in Wollongong and pay rent for the stories,” says Amy Fairall, researcher, activist and rest of 2019. Please help us help you in building a Society City member from Stanwell Park. culturally strong future for Wollongong! “You can also become a member for just $10 a You can donate to our campaign here: https:// month, and enjoy our co-working space!” chuffed.org/project/societycity Paddy Thomson, social worker from Find us on Facebook and Instagram @ Scarborough, says Society City is about societycitywollongong. 2515 “empowering ourselves and our community to

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SMALL BUSINESS / SPECIAL FEATURE

HOW TO SURVIVE WORKPLACE STRESS By Dr Susan Sumskis PhD, Nan Tien Institute Lecturer, Acting Head of Health & Social Wellbeing Remember that workplace stress is often a positive form of stress. It is stress associated with potential for personal growth and is also a great teacher in firstly managing ourselves and then managing others. If we believe stress is a positive thing, it releases a cascade of physiological processes that are protective of our health state, rather than damaging. However, if we believe that stress is bad for us, our body will respond as if attacked and the protective processes will be impaired. Think positively about what you can get out of the challenges that invoke stress. Stress is a cascade of responses and feelings in the body that can be interpreted as anxiety or excitement; threat or opportunity. It’s your choice! To learn more about the importance of perspectives on stress, watch Kelly McGonigal’s TED talk on how to make stress your friend.

STUDY

What do you think about the rise of shared offices and also group workspaces for entrepreneurs? Human beings are herd creatures. Safety in numbers is a deeply rooted bodily-based concept. If we are in a harmonious group, there are multiple health and wellbeing benefits. If we are in an inharmonious group, the challenges are very personally felt. The rise of shared offices/workspaces is usually an organisational choice. Having an individual choice to work in a shared or private space is important to the health of the individual. Extroverts and introverts in shared office spaces may prove challenging! Shared spaces, when collectively sought, offer spontaneity, creativity, humour and a more embodied experience at work. If you would like to learn more about humans as herd creatures, feeling safe in communities and how the state of our nation begins in our street, check out a podcast by Dr Hugh Mackay (a passionate advocate for what and how we teach at Nan Tien Institute) on Conversations with Richard Fidler, which is one of the most popular podcasts in Australia. Interested in academic study on these concepts? Email study@nantien.edu.au or visit nantien.edu. au. Now enrolling for Semester 2. 2515

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FLEETING NATURE OF LIFE AND FLOWERS Coledale textile artist Michele Elliot has rescued funeral bouquets otherwise destined for the bin and created a series of muslin artworks and future shrouds. The Tender Cloths exhibition at Wollongong’s Project Contemporary Artspace features a collection of about 25 muslins, dyed using rescued funeral flowers, by Coledale artist Michele Elliot. Showcasing the transformative power of art, the show is part of the REALM Artists in Residence Project, set up by a grant from Create NSW and featuring artists and musicians working with Tender Funeral families. Port Kembla-based Tender Funerals is a not-for-profit service, described as “part of the community movement towards reclaiming the rites around death and dying”. Jenny Briscoe-Hugh, who many locals will know as co-founder of Coledale Markets, is director and general manager at Tender. “I met Jenny at Coledale Markets,” Michele told 2515. “I was sitting and stitching on another project. She invited me to come to Port Kembla. “Jenny had been thinking about involving artists and musicians, creative people in the community, to find a way to be involved with Tender and to work with families to help them in finding a creative expression in their loss and bereavement.” Michele had lunch with Jenny. They talked. Ideas sparked and last month Tender Cloths opened, supported by an evening event on June 20 including talks about death, “the elephant in the room”. Tender Funerals’ Community Choir also launched a CD on the night, singing a mix of songs with themes of love and remembrance. It’s hoped the small show will spark a wider conversation about death, grief and the burial business. “It’s not only about dying, but it’s also about living well until that point; it’s about legacy creation, about end of life care and support.

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“I’ve always been interested in styles and clothing, and stitching because of its connection to the body and the way that clothes then work as a kind of second skin. Clothing, when we look at it on a hanger, you know, it really holds memories. I was interested in that sense of objects as keepsakes. “The main artworks are a collection of ephemeral textile pieces, they’re all made from muslin. I’m using muslin because that is the fabric that babies are often wrapped in when they are born. So it’s very soft and slightly transparent. “I wanted to bring that same softness and care for someone at the end of their life. “The cloth has been dyed using flowers donated from funeral services. I was a bit shocked to hear those flowers, which people spend time choosing, and at some cost, are generally just thrown away.” Michele started by taking petals off the stems of various flowers, including Australian natives. “Then the flowers are all laid out on the muslins and rolled up into a bundle and steamed. The colours and the texture and sometimes the prints from those flowers will then transfer onto the cloth. “Also in that process I would either make new prints on paper or dye a scarf, which would then go back to that family as a thank you.” Dyed delicate, botanical shades that fade with time, the cloths are varying lengths. “When people come to the gallery they will really see that ephemerality. It also captures something about the passing of time.” After the show muslins will be given to the mortuary at Tender Funerals – “so they can be used as wrapping cloths for people who may not have a lot, or don’t have family, or just need that extra sense of tenderness”. n Tender Cloths will be at Project Contemporary Artspace, 255 Keira Street, Wollongong until July 7. Gallery hours: Wed-Fri 11-5; Sat-Sun 12-4pm. 2515


SCAN ME

Julie York 0405 128 070

julie.york@helensburgh.rh.com.au

Youth & Experience = Just The Right Balance JULY / 2515 / 17


OCEAN PLASTIC PATROL A group of Austinmer Public School children are taking action to save our seas. 2515 reports.

Austinmer’s children are the heroes of today – and quite probably tomorrow too. In a time of climate crisis, when our seas are swamped in plastic, marine life is dying and many adults are paralysed by gloom, these youngsters are rising early every Friday and heading down to the beach to pick up rubbish before school. Ocean Plastic Patrol (or OPP as it’s affectionately known) was founded last year by Austinmer dad Paul Hoskins. Paul and his wife, Zeenath, are both GPs who work locally, and their children, Lucy and Sam, attend Austinmer Public School. OPP has grown to include more than 20 young members –and their parents. The kids have a logo, t-shirts and cloth bags. Their example has spawned four or five similar groups along our coast. OPP hosted a sell-out film night at Anita’s Theatre in April and in July they have organised a screening of 2040, the hybrid feature/documentary by director Damon Gameau that’s structured as a visual letter to his four-year-old daughter. OPP is a beacon of hope. Who knows what role these awesome kids will go on to play in solving the world’s problems? They’re certainly starting out right! Paul (and the children, see page 20) kindly took time to answer 2515’s questions. How did Ocean Plastic Patrol start? Well, along with overfishing and ocean warming, ocean plastic is one of the biggest threats to a healthy, functioning ocean. The OPP has always been about the local kids looking after their backyard. The first step to helping our planet is to look at what you can do in your own backyard. And if you’re going to look after your backyard you’ve got to be on patrol, hence the name.

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When was the first official patrol and how has it grown? That must have been sometime last year. The kids did a count a few weeks back and we think we’ve done about 64 clean-ups. Officially, we’re there every Friday there’s school, and during that time the weather has co-operated on all but two times. There’s been some cold feet in the middle of winter but the kids soldier on. What’s been great is not only more and more children and parents joining in, but how many now say that they couldn’t start their Friday any other way. Despite the cold feet. Please tell us about the community at Austinmer. What stands out for us about the Austi community, and obviously this is not unique, but the community values the importance of community. The OPP is part of that community and it’s the kids sitting front and centre. It’s their backyard and they want to look after it. One of the morning Austi pool swimmers said the other day that Fridays is her favourite day to swim because she loves seeing the OPP crew running around. That’s pretty cool. What kind of rubbish do you regularly find on the beach? Cigarette butts, polystyrene balls, plastic bags, food wrappers, lollipop sticks, and just lots of small bits of plastic on its way to becoming insidious microplastic. Many of us might have seen the impact of ingested plastic on large marine wildlife like birds and turtles and whales, it’s pretty horrific. But the effect of microplastic (the microscopic bits that marine plastic eventually breaks up into) may be next level. Researchers have shown that plankton ingest microplastic, and if we mess up plankton, the foundation of marine life, our oceans could be in big, big trouble. And without a healthy, functioning ocean a habitable planet might be off the cards.

Photos: Anthony Warry Photography

COVER FEATURE


Photos: Anthony Warry Photography

What’s the worst thing you’ve found? Thousands and thousands of polystyrene balls.

instead of 500ml bottles). We also bulk-buy 5kg of foods such as rice from Honest to Goodness.

And the weirdest? A horse blanket.

OPP held its first movie night in April, screening the documentary ‘BLUE’ in Thirroul - how did that go? We wanted to raise awareness about the impacts of ocean plastic locally and we thought this was a great way to do it. Tickets sold out and there was a wonderful sense of community on the day. It was quite confronting – but that’s the reality of what’s happening and awareness is the starting point.

Clean-ups are great for the environment - why are they also great for kids and families? It’s positive on so many different levels. Fresh air, morning sun, salty breeze, sand between the toes, no iPad and kids running around with a sense of purpose and giving back to nature. It’s pretty powerful and the parents see it. In the end it’s all about connection – fostering a connection with nature, fostering awareness, fostering a sense of responsibility and fostering a sense of purpose that is shared. I’d love to measure the levels of good brain chemicals in these kids when they’re running around the beach, but we don’t need to, their smiles tell us. How can a small group make a really big difference? Well, our small group has turned into groups at Woonona, Bulli and Coledale. Thirroul is next. I was in contact the other day with a keen parent from Cronulla. If we all did one positive thing for our planet each day, that’s 7 billion good deeds per day. Maybe I’m a little hopeful but you get the idea. It all adds up. And if we manage to foster a sense of respect for nature and its importance to us continuing to exist on planet earth, then maybe a lifetime of individual, positive decisions really start to add up.

On July 20, OPP will screen ‘2040’ at Anita’s Theatre. Tell us about this film and why you chose it. We chose it because it is all about positivity. BLUE was pretty confronting, which is important because the plight of oceans is serious. But 2040 is uplifting. It paints a great picture of what our world could look like by the year 2040 if we embraced the best solutions already available to us now. Will OPP be raising funds? This movie is hosted by Fanforce so we aren’t selling the tickets – but we facilitated the screening and are helping to promote it. We are hoping to host more events in the future and raise funds to support beach clean-ups, reduce single-use plastics and raise awareness. Where can readers book tickets? Bookings are only online. Go to www.fan-force. com/screenings/2040-anitas-theatre or Facebook.com/events/1458420094297624/ 2515

The community are doing a great job at Austi - any steps Council could take to help? It would be wonderful if Council would install recycling bins, cigarette butt bins and maybe some more active discussions to those using the beach as a bin. We try to teach the kids about positive persuasion and awareness. I mean if you knew that a cigarette filter breaks up into thousands of filaments in the ocean, that plankton probably eat some of those filaments, that something eats the plankton and then maybe we eat that something you might not want to do it, right? But sometimes you feel people need a sharp wake-up. Fines would work. If nothing else the kids of the OPP will probably not litter. Have you made any changes at home or work as a result of picking up plastic with OPP? Yes, taking on the mine-field of single-use plastics. It’s everywhere, and the kids certainly let us know. We no longer buy straws and water bottles. We recycle soft plastic. We buy bulk to reduce packaging (eg 20L of washing liquid via Ecostore,

Austinmer dad Paul Hoskins with his children, Lucy and Sam.

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THE CHILDREN SPEAK OUT

Why pick up plastic? Sam, 6 – Because we save the ocean together. Evelyn, 6 – Because it goes into the ocean and animals can die when they eat it. And we don’t want that. Lucien, 5 – Because we don't want it to blow into the ocean. Nilla, 6 – So the animals don’t die. Manon, 7 – Because it gets stuck into animal's throats and their bodies and they suffer and die. Felix, 4 – Don’t want the animals in the ocean to get sick or die! Hugh, 11 – We pick up plastic to save the environment and the marine life.

What is the worst piece of rubbish you've found? Lucien, 5 – Styrofoam Manon, 7 – Microplastics Evelyn, 6 – Cigarettes Keoki, 7 – A pretend plant Nilla, 6 – A fishing lure with hooks.

Have you ever turned something you've found into a toy? Or an artwork? Manon, 7 – I recycled plastic and bark and string to make figures into puppets. Lola, 7 – I made a fish drawing out of rubbish at the beach. Have you ever found treasure? How do you prevent waste at school? Nilla, 6 – I found a broken bird-feeder and turned Lucien, 5 – Not buying plastic things we have to it into a square (box) to hold things. throw away into landfill. Ethan, 11 – $20 note, cool flippers and a full-size Manon, 7 – I prevent waste at school by putting our road sign. scraps into our compost and worm farms, we Sam, 6 – Yes, a $5 note and coral in seaweed. re-use stuff to make into things we can play with. Lucy, 7 – We use reusable lunch boxes and don’t Have you changed the way you eat or shop since joining OPP?  take plastic to school. Manon, 7 – I say no to toys that have plastic and Finn, 7 – Bringing a stainless-steel lunch box. I avoid lollies or treats that have plastic on them. Hugh, 11 – I look for things that have less plastic

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around them and get milk in cardboard containers. Evelyn, 7 – Try and eat all the food Mum has packed for me. Use re-usable containers. We don’t use Glad Wrap any more. Keoki, 7 – We collect soft plastic now and take it to Coles/Woollies. Roxy, 9 – I don’t take any wrapping in my lunch box. I don’t use single-use plastic, such as straws and plastic bags. Nilla, 6 – Yes, we don’t use plastic straws anymore. What message would you like to send to beach goers? Sam, 6 – If you go to the beach with your water bottle please don’t leave it on the beach or sand or grass. Nilla, 6 – Don’t throw your rubbish on the ground. Take it back home or put it in the bin. Manon, 7 – Try to use things you can use again like keep cups, don't use single-use things, especially plastic! When you see a piece of rubbish, please remember to pick it up. Finn B, 9 – Think before you act and how it might affect sea life and how it will affect your children’s children. Sienna, 9 – If people want to enjoy the beach they better look after it otherwise it will be covered in plastic and there will be no wildlife. Please don’t

leave cigarette butts around, they are rubbish too. Keoki, 7 – Don’t litter on the beach anymore! Roxy, 7 – Take 3 for the sea and don’t leave rubbish! What vision do you have for the future? Manon, 7 – A wonderful world without plastic! No plastics in our oceans, not even a bottle lid. Lucy, 9 – There is no planet B so let’s do what we can to save our beautiful ocean and world. Lucien, 5 – I wish there was lots of bamboo for pandas... and no plastic in the ocean. Isla, 7 – I hope there is no plastic on the beach or in the water because it kills the sea life. Roxy, 9 – If more people form groups to prevent plastic being left on the beach I think we could make a change. Lola, 7 – We should ban plastic. Keoki, 7 – That people don’t litter anymore and that sea creatures don’t die from our rubbish. Hugh, 11 – I want the future to be to be free of plastic or all plastic is recycled and there is no single-use plastic. Want to start your own OPP? The best way to form a group is to join the Ocean Plastic Patrol Facebook Group and start networking from there. Please visit www.facebook.com/ oceanplasticpatrol 2515

JULY / 2515 / 21


SCOTT’S KOHLRABI SOUP

4 small kohlrabi peeled and sliced 1 onions sliced 3 garlic cloves, sliced 5 sprigs thyme 1 bay leaves 1 medium size potato, peeled and sliced 50g butter 200ml cream 100ml milk 1lt stock either chicken or vegetable Extra virgin olive oil to finish Salt and white pepper

’TIS THE SEASON ... to Slow Down. With the Green Connect team.

GROW & EAT SEASONAL

By Fair Food Coordinator Kristin Watson The Green Connect lunch room often is a great place for discussion of what is in season. Most of us gets the weekly veg boxes and we all love food, so the Green Connect produce reappear in all sorts of different lunch dishes. As we have moved in to winter most of us are eating soups and stews, which are both nutritious and warming. One vegetable that was new to most of us in the office last year was the kohlrabi, which had made a welcome return this year. Kohlrabi is a part of the Brassica family and is a biennial vegetable. It’s also called German turnip and is very popular in German cuisine, where they prepare it similarly to potato and use it for gratins, and rosties. Last year we had a pork dinner at Ruby’s in Mount Kembla, where chef Scott Woods made a delicious Kohlrabi soup for entrée. It had us all hooked and it has become a staple dish in my kitchen around this time of year. Other vegetables that are coming to season this month are cauliflower, broccoli and cabbages. We are still seeing a lot of leafy greens like lettuce, kale, chard, and bok choy on the farm and they grow really well this time of year as they prefer the cooler climate and shade. A good way to keep your garden greens free from pests is to make an organic white oil spray, and spray both sides of your leafy greens. White oil is simply made by mixing one cup of dish-washing liquid with two cups of sunflower oil and shake until white, then dilute one tablespoon of your white oil with one litre of water before you spray it onto your plants.

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Cook onion, garlic in 50g of butter in a pot until starting to caramelise. Add kohlrabi, potato, thyme, bay leaves and stock. Cook until tender on medium heat. Blend until smooth, add cream, milk and remaining butter. Season to taste.

WHAT’S ON IN JULY

10-17 July: School-holiday farm tours for kids of school age. 13 July: Conscious Foodie Tour, in-depth tour of the farm and the philosophy behind Green Connect, tastings and talks about food waste and how we can maximise our use of our vegetables. 26 July Dig Day: Volunteer at the farm and get your hands dirty. Visit www.green-connect-vegbox.com.au. 2515

GARDEN TIP

Make sure you have good soil in your garden. To prepare your garden bed, loosen the soil and water generously, add blood and bone and compost or manure. Cover with newspaper or cardboard boxes (non-waxy) and then water again and cover with mulch. This is will trap the moisture of the manure and compost in the soil so it’s not evaporating. Leave for a couple of weeks, before planting.


UPCYCLING IN THE SHED

Bohmer’s Tree Care regularly donates timber to Corrimal Men’s Shed, Clive Woodnutt (aka Bohmer) told 2515. “Any timber we can upcycle we give to them [the Men’s Shed] to reduce their outlay – because they’re self-funded and they have to raise funds, so we donate the material to them,” Bohmer said. Bohmer is pictured, at right, with Kevin Toombs, of Corrimal Men’s Shed, and one of their creations. “The piece, the objet d’art, which you saw was a piece of wood that we chopped down at a school and they [the Men’s Shed] made it into a shelf and we took it back to the school as a gift so they’ve got something to remember the tree by.” Bohmer’s Tree Care donates wood to the Men’s Shed on “a regular basis”, Bohmer said. “When we’ve got anything of interest or any unusual pieces or shapes. You can see in the photo of that one – and the material that they’ve got on the shelf – were all made out of recycled timber. We chopped down a jacaranda, we chopped down a eucalyptus and a patula, which is a Mexican pine, a weeping pine – so they’ve used three different types of timber on that. “We see each other two or three times a month – we might find something that’s pretty enough for them to use.” 2515

Bohmer with Kevin Toombs, of Corrimal Men’s Shed. Photo: Unicorn Studios

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COASTAL STYLE

This month 2515 found treasures in Thirroul. Thanks to Karen Jeffery of Cocoon and Unicorn Studios.

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13 11 1 Decorative resin horse $89  2 Medium Afri beads basket $49.95  3 Dusky Robin folio case $124.95  4 Handmade Moroccan leather shoes $110  5 Marble Buddha shrine $169, brass Buddha $15.95  6 Dusky Robin yellow purse $89, Oak timber sunglasses $119.95  7 Barska telescope $349  8 White marble bird $79.95  9 Small Afri beads basket $24.95  10 Brass Buddha lock $52.95, hand carved marble bowls $59.50 (small) and $95.50 (large)  11 Chunky teak bowl $75, handmade beads crafted in Kenya $115 12 African shell art necklace $229  13 Moroccan cactus silk cushion $120. Available at Cocoon, 2/357 Lawrence Hargrave Drive, Thirroul, 4267 1335, www.cocoontrading.com.au 2515

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THE ART OF WOOD The Coastal Woodworks exhibition is another exciting addition to the Illawarra Festival of Wood, which will be back at Bulli Showground on October 12 and 13. In addition to all the exciting family-friendly elements on offer at this year’s even bigger and better Festival of Wood, local festival organisers and lovers of all things wood Suzanne and Stuart Montague are bringing together some of the most talented South Coast furniture makers, wood carvers and sculptors to show their wonderful work to the world for the first ever Coastal Woodworks exhibition. All tickets to this year’s festival include an exclusive invite to get up close to the work of some Australia’s finest artisans working with wood who’ll welcome you into their skilled and super-talented worlds as part of the exhibition. A diverse range of coastal designers and makers will come together as part of the exhibition to promote and encourage the growing market of woodworkers south of Sydney. The aim of the festival, now in its third year and attended by thousands of people of all ages from all over Australia, is to celebrate, preserve and promote the traditions of working with wood and

Clockwise from top left: local organisers Stuart and Suzanne Montague; artist Elise Cameron Smith, welcome bench seat by Dane Bakarich, Drift coffee table by Leon Sadubin.

provide a family-friendly event the whole community can enjoy. A workshop highlight will be lessons with the South Coast’s Uncle Noel Butler, who runs ‘Nura Gunyu’, Aboriginal cultural teachings and enrichment programs, and will offer boomerang and traditional spearmaking workshops. Greg Miller from ‘Joy of Wood’ will travel from WA to host a children’s drum-making workshop. Check out the Facebook event page for full details on all workshops and exciting updates. Visit illawarrafestivalofwood.com. General entry will be free for children under 12. 2515

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JOIN THE JAMBOREE

Local not-for-profit social enterprise Rumpus is organising their fourth annual creative weekend at Mt Keira Scout Camp on October 18-20. 2515 spoke to Rumpus’s Caitlin Marshall to find out more. “Jamboree is a totally immersive creative explosion in the forest,” Caitlin says. “It is like having the volume turned up to 10 on a creative experience. It’s for if you’re needing that kind of unplugged reset, that creative kick-start … “The people who come are all so lovely. And so often people walk away with new friends as well.” This year’s workshop line-up features 14 presenters: from old favourites such as Narelle Happ, who educates people about bush foods (“that’s always really popular”) to newcomers such as Nin and Nate, a creative collaboration between Linda Kennedy (Yuin) and Nathan Leslie (Gamilaraay). Their ‘Mapping through Art’ workshop will focus on Aboriginal story-telling through drawing and iconography, dance and storytelling. “They came to my kids’ school and took a program. My kids started talking in Dharawal; they absolutely loved what they did,” Caitlin says. “Then we have a print artist from Vincentia, Helena Geiger, she’s indigenous-Austrian heritage, and she does batik. It’s Indonesian batik, but with this kind of indigenous Australian aesthetic. “We also have a visiting artist, Alice Spittle, who is a Maori weaver, she travels around Australia teaching craft. “That’s something we’re trying to really shift to – cultural craft traditions to be taught by people from those cultures.” The weekend is a welcome escape from today’s frantically busy society – Caitlin says they see a lot of “very busy, stressed people”.

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“The biggest comment that we get is not necessarily, ‘This workshop was amazing’ and ‘That dinner was amazing’, but ‘I’ve just realised I don’t give myself any time to do anything and I need to remember to do this more, it’s really important.’ “Something we’ve started is a Sunday morning Unfinished Projects Salon, where it’s really a free-for-all that’s being curated by Lizzie Dove and Michele Elliott, and Mel Young, three very prolific local artists and crafters. “Last year some people just brought their own knitting and sat in front of the fire – you can do that at home but people need all the conditions to be set to remember that they enjoy that, it makes them feel really good.” How do you set the conditions? “Phones off, fire on. Nice music, nice atmosphere, really encouraging vibe... Wine? “Definitely wine,” Caitlin laughs. “Lots of snacks, coffee. All those little treats. Lots of delicious afternoon tea that’s a bit next level. It’s about surprising people that usually are the ones organising everyone else’s surprises. “It kind of makes sense being in a Scout camp too because it’s trying to bring people back to the basics, of skills and being in nature and learning something you can take back to your daily life.” Accommodation is in tents or bunk-bed chalets. “You can choose: you can bring your own tent and camp in the beautiful big open grass flat where all the lyre birds hang out in the morning. They’re everywhere, beautiful. You can glamp. So we have


Avant-Garde Camping Co, who are a fantastic glamping company that come and set up these beautiful tents so you can turn up and your bed’s made and you have a hot-water bottle and fairy lights – it’s all very beautiful, really comfy beds. “Then there’s chalets, so they’re bunk rooms that are pretty cosy. They’ve got heaters and there’s only maximum four or five people in a room.” When Jamboree started four years ago, the focus was on craft but this has broadened to include storytelling, writing, songwriting and more. “Last year we had a cooking class, using foraged weeds. This year we have the editor of Dumbo Feather magazine coming. He runs this workshop called Storytelling As Therapy. “Over the years, we’ve just been bolder in branching out to trust that we could try a few other things and people would enjoy them.” n Make, learn, connect and dance! On the weekend of October 18-20, Jamboree 2019 is billed as an intimate, immersive weekend in the rainforest of Mt Keira. There’ll be workshops on visual arts, bush tucker, cooking, writing, dance, and nature. Plus a craft night, sunrise yoga and 1980s aerobics! Choose from glamping in twinshare bell tents, shared chalet accommodation or BYO tent. Last year’s Jamboree was sold out, attracting people from all over Australia. With numbers limited to about 90 people, local residents are encouraged to book soon via www.jamboreesouthcoast.com.au. Weekend tickets start at $655 and there is the option to donate $30 to fund two sponsored places for young indigenous artists to attend. 2515

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JULY / 2515 / 27


The Noisy Pitta. All photos by Amanda De George

BACKYARD ZOOLOGY Amanda De George reports.

the photo that the husband had snapped in the bush down the road and I knew we suddenly had one very, very close to home. Noisy Pittas occur in tropical and subtropical rainforests along the coast from islands in the Torres Strait (and Papa New Guinea) down to southern NSW. While these shy birds are fairly common, although easily overlooked, in Queensland, these birds are classed as being quite rare in NSW and hence my excitement at spotting one locally. Their movements aren’t particularly well known but it is believed that some birds move from the higher altitudes further inland down to the coast itself during the non-breeding winter and that’s what likely happened with ‘our’ bird. They tend to hang around on the ground, digging for worms and insects and grabbing snails and smashing their shells against a rock but this means they are often in the shadowy undergrowth of the forest leading to them being missed. And while they are not common locally, there have been several sightings, so next time you’re walking through the escarpment listen out for a bird hopping around on the ground or their distinctive walk-to-work call and hopefully you’ll get to see this stunningly coloured bird for yourself!

Full disclosure: this happened a year ago but I have everything crossed for a recurrence. I have this amazing husband who happens to walk to the train station each day which is perfect for me because I often get a text outlining something brilliant he’s found that he thinks I should see. Actual texts I have received include gems such as: ‘there’s a sleeping possum... I can hear him snoring!’ And ‘I found an echidna! Quick! Come look!’. But I’ve got to say, one of my absolute favourites was a text I received last August, of a grainy photo of a silhouette of a bird accompanied by a simple ‘who am I?’ That text got me dumping my coffee, throwing on some clothes and running out the door, camera in hand. Let me explain. One of my very favourite birds is the Noisy Pitta. Now, I’d never seen one previously, not in real life anyway, and always thought of them as a tropical bird, i.e. I’d have to be holidaying in some beautiful, tropical spot to stumble across one. But one look at Follow Amanda’s Facebook blog @BackyardZoology 2515

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VARIETY IS THE SPICE AT THIS CAFE

Uluwatu Blue is already a cafe, a gelato bar and a space for fashion, art and dreamcatcher workshops. Now owner Kat Erskine has even more exciting plans! Stanwell Park’s Uluwatu Blue is a laid-back cafe serving smoothie bowls, brunch, Mexican food, burgers, cakes, treats, gelato and, of course, coffee. Now Uluwatu Blue will stock general items too. “I miss having a general store in Stanwell Park,” Kat says. “So starting in July we will stock everyday essential items: milk, bread, groceries, whole foods, snack foods, washing powder, toiletries … sustainable products etc, local hot pies and sausage rolls, as well as beautiful free-spirited women’s clothing by Obsession & Tully Boutique.” On Friday, June 21, Uluwatu Blue held its first pop-up Indonesian Food night. “Thanks to the lovely Nani, our new Indonesian cook, it was successful, with the most delicious Beef Rendang I have had in Australia. YAY! So now I would like to do Indonesian food all the time. “To start with, it will be every Friday dinner and Saturday lunch and dinner.”

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Return of the general store: Uluwatu Blue owner Kat Erskine (left) and staff member Remi Daske. Photo: Unicorn Studios

Drumroll Coffee is new in store. “Our beautiful new mint-green coffee machine and the new coffee beans from Drumroll is amazing,” Kat says. “I am so happy with the coffee, it’s my favourite coffee bean AND they are an awesome local family.” On August 17, Uluwatu Blue will host an Aboriginal weaving workshop. Also coming up is 10 November’s CWA Festival of Flight, with food stalls, market stalls, artwork, rides and planes. Kat is a CWA member: “I am helping organise the music for the day, we have locked in Ray Beadle and are in talks with great bands to also come and play!” n Uluwatu Blue is open 9am-5pm on Wed, Thurs and Sun; 9am-8pm on Fri and Sat. 2515

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JULY / 2515 / 29


THE STREET TREE ISSUE It was perhaps fortuitous that Endeavour Energy’s tree-removal program in the Wollongong area took place in June. It was a safe month before National Tree Day, when schools, businesses, councils and communities get together to plant new trees (total 25 million since the first Tree Day in 1996). According to a statement issued by Endeavour Energy General Manager Asset Manager Ty Christopher last month: “Wollongong City has identified approximately 1300 trees as potential candidates to be removed. This number is based off an assessment undertaken by council’s senior arborist. Within council’s LGA this is broken down into the following areas: • Northern Ward – approximately 100 trees • Central Ward – approximately 400 trees • Southern Ward – approximately 800.” Residents whose street tree was marked for removal received a letter and had a chance to opt out. About 5 to 6% of residents did. As part of the offset program, Greening Australia was to start tree-planting work in the Wollongong area on July 1. “When Endeavour Energy trialled the program in 2018 we removed 767 trees and replanted 27,000 new ones, as well as a new community garden in Dapto,” Ty Christopher said. The 2019 program objectives included: “We need to manage 25 million trees growing near our network each year. “In doing so, it costs electricity customers millions of dollars each year to continuously prune the wrong trees planted in the wrong location to keep the community safe and the lights on. “We have asked council to identify unsuitable trees growing under powerlines that are either invasive species, badly misshapen or suffering from constant pruning.” Recent research points to street trees being key to a cooler city, effective in reducing urban heat through transpiration and shading, and reported to

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affect everything from suburban walkability to house prices (eg, urban design company AECOM research was published in a 2017 Sydney Morning Herald article titled “Houses on leafier streets in three Sydney suburbs worth $50,000 more: analysis”). So we asked a local expert. Dr Jennifer Atchison, Senior Lecturer in the School of Geography and Sustainable Communities, at the University of Wollongong, kindly took time to reply. Why are street trees so important? Street trees are increasingly recognised for the range of services and the significant biodiversity functions they provide, including the provision of habitat for birds, insects and mammals and increasingly important – the connectivity they provide between remnants or patches of more continuous forest and other vegetation. In terms of people and wellbeing, street trees also improve urban liveability by providing shade and reducing urban heat, and contributing to physical and mental health outcomes associated with living in proximity to nature. These services that urban trees provide are often referred to as ‘green infrastructure’ because they are as significant as other kinds of physical or build infrastructure to urban living and will be increasingly important under climate change. Perhaps under-recognised are the social and cultural values street trees hold for urban residents in terms of social outlet and cultural connectivity. Although particular trees may have authorised and formally recognised cultural and heritage values, street trees more broadly can have social and cultural values within the context of people’s everyday lives, such as getting to know the neighbours and forming connections where you live, emotional attachments to the place or environments in which people live and work,


foraging for food, nature enquiry, aesthetic value and so on. What is your opinion on Endeavour Energy's plan to remove up to 1300 street trees in the Wollongong LGA and offset that by planting many more trees elsewhere? Managing the multiple dimensions of risk that street trees are understood to represent is no easy task, but the scientific research on climate and urban change tells us that we need more trees in urban areas rather than less. Additionally, municipal councils and government authorities need to build in adequate ongoing budgets for tree maintenance and reconsider how other infrastructure, such as power, is delivered to urban residents. As we learn to recognise that street trees are a special part of urban infrastructure, we also need to think practically about how that tree infrastructure is managed and maintained for our own future wellbeing. The plan to plant more trees suggests that the need for more urban trees is being recognised by the authorities involved and this should be commended. There is, however, a risk in simplifying questions about where urban trees

should be, and what kinds of trees to plant, to a program of offsets. First, the dimensions of social and cultural values attributed to street trees, raises important questions about the way communities are involved and consulted in any plan to remove trees. All community members not only receive the benefits of urban trees – they will likely want to be involved in decision-making about the environment that is part of their lives. Second, people’s social and cultural attachments to urban trees should not be under-estimated in a program of removal and the idea that trees are being replaced risks diminishing and neglecting these values. Indeed, the emotional dimensions of tree removal has proved extremely controversial in other urban contexts where trees have been removed for built infrastructure projects and development. People’s concerns for and emotional connections to urban trees are an under-researched area, but the indications are that these dimensions are as important as other kinds of functional services because they are part of how people currently value and will want to care for urban trees both now and into the future. 2515

Our team cuts up to 300 branches from these plantations each week, of which our Koalas eat up to 500g of leaves each day. Despite popular belief Eucalypt does not make Koalas drunk. Eucalypt contains high levels of toxins which take longer to digest, and Koalas possess a special kind of bacteria in their stomach that helps break down these toxins. In addition to this Koalas are known as crepuscular, so you will find that they are more active during dusk and dawn and sleep the rest of the day. To ensure our harvest is sustainable as possible, after the koalas have eaten their leaves, the remaining branches are fed out to our browsing animals (Kangaroos, goats etc) then processed through our chipper to provide mulch on the By Jessica Harris gardens, or a bulking material for our compost. In light of National Tree Day, on July 28 , Symbio It takes approx. 3-5 years to grow consistent would like to raise awareness for how important trees to use for feed for the Koalas. As our Eucalypt trees are to one of our most iconic Native population grows, we are on the lookout for Koala animals the Koala. Not only do Eucalypt trees tree ‘Champions’ to allow us the use of their land provide a home for Koalas but they are also their (Over 1,000 sq/m) for us to maintain more main source of food. sustainable Koala Tree plantations – Please get in Symbio has 4 (soon to be 5) Eucalypt touch with us if you’d like to be one of those Plantations within a 45-minute radius which are champions! 2515 utilised to feed our 10 koalas here at Symbio. From these 4 plantations we have 900 trees which include over 20 species including key species such NATIONAL TREE DAY!  Sun, 28 July as Forest Red gum, Cabbage gum, Swamp Join in Australia’s biggest community Mahogany and Grey gum. With the introduction tree-planting and nature care event. of our 5th plantation we will gain an additional treeday.planetark.org 250 trees.

SYMBIO EXPANDS ITS KOALA PLANTATIONS

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Karen Bestel has been walking dogs around the district for 14 years. Photo: Unicorn Studios

THE PET SET

Heading away on holidays this winter? Helensburgh’s Karen Bestel offer a dog-walking service and also cares for all sorts of other pets, from cats to chooks. Here Karen shares some tips for owners. Since 2006, Karen’s Pet Care Service has been providing professional, quality care, giving your pets the care they deserve. Demand has greatly increased for our regular walking service as busy owners still want the best for their beloved family dog. On private walks we have an on-leash policy at all times and give each dog the attention or walking training they need. We use your walking equipment to ensure familiarity and comfort. It’s important to use correct and comfortable walking equipment. The balance harness is our pick. It offers flexible leash attachments, using front and back rings, with the front rings providing attachment under their chin, making it less strain on the carer and dog. They’re a comfortable and safe harness, with no pressure on the neck and can be bought via local trainer soniasayssit.com.au. I’m so often spotted walking that many aren’t aware I care for all pet types: chooks, birds, rabbits, guinea pigs, snakes are among our popular pets, to name a few! These animals and their enclosures are often impossible to transport, so home care is best. I care for many cats that have never been outdoors. At home they have their familiar surrounds, space to move freely and are not forced to interact with other animals or strange situations. For outdoor dogs or cats, we offer additional touches, for example, we’ll secure them inside at night and let them out the next morning. With 14 years’ experience, I take pride in how happy and settled animals are while in our care. A consultation before every new booking is included as part of our quality care. YOUR ESSENTIAL PET CHECKLIST PRIOR TO HOLIDAYS: • Ensure entry keys work and note any special entry/exit requirements, e.g. alarms • Ensure food is kept fresh and in an easily accessible area/away from sun or rain • Extra food and water bowls left with food • Correct, secure and undamaged walking equipment. • Existing health issues/habits/ anxieties we should be aware of • Emergency local contact, vet details and your best means of contact when away • Animal carriers for cats, rabbits etc for emergencies • Cleaning products where required. n Call Karen Bestel on 0419 432 482, visit www.karenspetcareservice.com.au and follow ‘Karen’s Pet Care Service’ on Facebook to stay in touch with your pets! 2515

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‘International Surfing Day’ beach clean held at Thirroul on June 15.

ON BOARD WITH SURFRIDER By Coledale’s Susie Crick, chair of Surfrider Foundation Australia. Welcome to Plastic Free July, what plastic are you giving up this month? In our 2515 community we are Ocean Friendly and for the most part, carry our own drink bottles and keep cups and are finding it easy to refuse plastic straws. The challenge in 2019 is to reduce the products that we buy packaged in plastic. When we collectively start to make noise and say “NO” to plastic, then the business end of town will listen. Last month, I was training with Al Gore in Brisbane where many environmentalists gathered from around the globe to participate in discussions with leading scientists, politicians and successful business leaders on actions and solutions to slow the problem of global heating. Al Gore showed slides of global weather events within the past month, of South Pacific islands being inundated by sea level rise, the Siberian tundra spewing methane gases, Greenland losing two billion tons of ice in one week, the Arctic Ocean ice cracking up, and the Antarctic where warming waters are causing ice to break away. We were lectured on the science, and the reality is that we have less than 11 years to turn off the heat. It’s no longer referred to as Global Warming – that term is way too warm and fuzzy – let’s just call it Global Heating. My hero is a Swedish teenager called Greta Thunberg, the kid who started the school strikes for the environment. My admiration for her is for her fierce words, her obvious truths, her transparency and her bold lack of fear towards authority and protocols. As I look out my window over the 2515 neighbourhood, I wonder what all of the panic is about. We have clean beaches, long stretches of sand and the weather is cool. Everything that we need is available locally and we are doing alright. However, as nearby as the Torres Strait, our neighbours, are being inundated by rising seas and

many islands can no longer support their cultural agriculture and feed themselves because the soils have become saline. Vanuatu is sinking at a rate of 1cm per year. All of this because we are reliant on fossil fuels. This is bigger than 2515, bigger than Australia, this is an international affair and we all live downstream. Something IS happening. Behaviours are shifting and people are waking up to the changes happening in the climate. Across the globe the majority of the populations voted in leaders who are reluctant to respond. The so-called leaders are not looking after the people but rather their own selfish hip pockets and the greedy corporates who fund them. Fortunately, the enlightened minority (that would be us) have the ability to USE our voices. It’s time for us to stop whining and start winning and, most importantly, get ORGANISED! We may be the minority but we clearly have more brains, so let’s use them. We can do this with our pens / our posts / our persuasion and our presence. Get involved, people. Do anything. Today I’m writing to Wollongong council (again) to persuade them to join with the 20 other councils across Australia who are declaring a climate emergency. We all have to do this so that our communities, our councils persuade our State Government and our Prime Minister to do the same. Your pen has power. Write to Wollongong City Council – via council@ wollongong.nsw.gov.au – and demand that it declares a Climate Emergency. We’ve got a responsibility to our children, ourselves, our country and the planet. The heat is on and it’s up to ALL of us to turn it off. We are always seeking volunteers. Please email me at: southcoastnsw@ surfrider.org.au. 2515

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PLAY AND MAKE GUITARS Janice Creenaune meets Ray Marshall, a fitter and turner by trade, who skilfully plays in Thirroul and builds the most beautiful musical instruments. Ray Marshall, 82, has spent a great part of his working life in the Illawarra – at BHP and Wollongong Engineering – but he gets a gentle twinkle in his eyes when explaining how his skills have kept him in good stead for his creative pursuit in the beauty of bluegrass sounds. Ray, self-taught on guitar at the age of 7, admits he must be ‘doing’ all the time. He bought his first guitar by mail-order, and eventually made his own. Creating music, jamming with others, and actually making instruments has become Ray’s life. It is the Dobro guitar, his favoured instrument of choice, and his love of Bluegrass music to which he substantially returns. “In the Illawarra groups where I play, we all love our music and it is never about money. We just enjoy jamming together. I have been with some friends now for 50 years. We know each other, almost like family really, with strong relationships and camaraderie,” Ray said. Ray regularly practices in Thirroul and plays monthly. “It is often age-related practice now, but still fulfilling. We also play at Sydney Bluegrass Festivals and in The Illawarra, Victoria and other folk festivals. It keeps us all going.” He began making Dobro guitars in 1991 after he retired and he recognises this decision as a real lifesaver for him. He had always worked with his hands and this gave him the confidence to begin. Learning from books, he began by building guitars, 55 in total, selling some, playing many, but purely for the joy of creation. Orders are never taken. He also builds magnificent mandolins and flutes. He builds from all-Australian exotic woods, mahogany rosewoods for the back and sides, king-billy and celery top pines for the top, just as examples. “Tone is created from so many parameters; the type of wood, its thickness, the shaping of the braces as well as the finishes involved. I have remained with the classical shapes, those already established in dimensions, tried and true,” Ray says, “but I mostly scrounge my materials from friends. It is a labour of love where I concentrate on one instrument at a time. “I work for about eight hours a day and it takes about six weeks for completion. I really enjoy playing with others, but I prefer isolation and a solitary environment when building instruments.”

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‘We just enjoy jamming together. I have been with some friends now for 50 years.’ – Ray Marshall Photos supplied

Ray uses fine inlay work with mother-of-pearl from crocus shells and abalone, as well as bone. “It can be very fine work and I use a magnifier. There is a great deal of accuracy needed in the woodwork, the carving, the inlay work and then the staining. I work mainly with the sunburst colour and try to bring out the natural colours of the woods.” Ray says the mandolin is the most difficult to build because of the concentration needed for the hand-carved work. And yet there are more strings to Ray’s bow: he makes miniature vintage cars (from scrounged materials) and paints landscapes. With a smile, he admits that his wife, Corry, is his most appreciated and constructive critic. “She has a hand in everything that happens in my construction work, especially with my use of colour choice. I am always grateful to her.” Ray is an important part of Thirroul’s bluegrass scene, but he also offers us insights into a life well-lived with a determination to excel. Ray Marshall plays with The Thirroul Pick at a monthly Bluegrass and Old-Time jam session on the 3rd Saturday of each month, except January and November. n Writer Janice Creenaune is a volunteer for the PKD (Polycystic Kidney Disease) Foundation Australia. Email: janicecreenaune@gmail.com 2515


‘A SCONE FOR A VOTE’

By Stanwell Park Arts Theatre communications officer Beth Farmer First, we would like to pay tribute to a true pillar of our community. She’s been local to Stanwell Park since the 1960s, and has seen generations of families come and, sometimes, go. Under her watchful gaze our town has grown to become a bustling, creative hotspot – home to a fantastic community, all of whom know her well and love her dearly. She supports every local venture: from theatre, music and pantomime, to markets, workshops, yoga and martial arts! She’s beautiful, charming and dignified. She brings joy to so many. Our CWA Hall. The beating heart of Stanwell Park. For a grand old dame she’s versatile – capable of hosting live music, yoga, a wedding and a play rehearsal, all in one weekend. She holds a special place in the history and heart of SPAT, having been our home since inception, and now we want to repay her years of loyal service. SPAT has sponsored an application for a My Community Grant to improve the amenity of the CWA Hall by: • adding a large, covered deck to the north side, that opens out onto the grassy area – perfect for those balmy summer evenings; • adding a mobility-accessible ramp around the

2 15 WHAT’S ON

COAST NEWS AT THIRROUL LIBRARY, CALL (02) 4227 8191

CODE CLUB Monday 1 July 3.30pm – Bookings via Eventbrite. • LEGO CLUB 4th Wednesday of the month at 3.30pm. Drop in and create with Lego. For 5-12 years. • STORYTIME & CRAFT. Fridays 5 & 26 July 10.30am. Drop in. • MUSIC IN THE LIBRARY Saturday 6 July 11-noon. Featuring musicians from the Wollongong Conservatorium of Music. No bookings required. • COLOUR, COFFEE, CALMER. Wednesdays 3 & 17 July, 9.30am-noon. No bookings required. • KNIT, STITCH, YARN. Wednesday 3 July, 10.30 am. Drop In. • TECH HELP Tuesdays 2, 9, 16, 23 & 30 July 1-2pm. Bookings required. Wednesdays 3, 10, 17, 24 & 31 July, 9.30-10.30am. Bookings required. • JULY SCHOOL HOLIDAY PROGRAM – Bookings required via Eventbrite. Finger painting: Tuesday 9 July, 10.30-11.30am. Magic Show: Thursday 11 July, 3-4pm. Winter Wonderland Storytime: Tuesday 16 July, 10.30-11.30am. Make a Robot: Wednesday 17 July, 2.30-3.30pm. Sand Art: Friday 19 July, 10.30-11.30am. • THIRROUL POETRY CLUB 3rd Tuesday of the month at 4pm. For local poets to share work and receive helpful feedback in a friendly space. NO expertise required, just a passion for poetry. • FILM FESTIVAL featuring Indigenous Voices from around the world. Bookings required via Eventbrite: Wednesday 10 July, 2pm – Gurrumul. Wednesday 17 July, 2pm – The Dark Horse. 2515

front of the hall to a new entry point – linking the entrance to the beautiful woodland setting; • adding new storage and a bigger backstage area with a new bathroom. The grants are allocated according to popularity within the State electorate (Heathcote), so if you live between Bulli, Bundeena and Menai we need you to vote. Voting is open between 15 July and 15 August. If you are aged 16+, get your Medicare Card (for proof of age), log in to your MyService NSW account and vote No.1 for Stanwell Park CWA project! You must choose 3-5 projects from an eligible list, but if you want Stanwell Park CWA project to win, you must give her your No.1 vote. Please vote – and remind your friends and family who live in the Heathcote electorate to vote as well! The CWA and SPAT will host an Open Day at the hall on Saturday, 27 July, 11am-1pm, with ‘a scone for a vote’! Take a peek at the plans, and get some delicious cakes and hot chocolate! 2515 The Illawarra Choral Society presents

The Sprig of Thyme New

Traditional folk songs arranged by John Rutter and various other folk songs

e! venu

2pm Saturday August 17th

Figtree Anglican Church, Figtree Tickets from: www.trybooking.com/497063 Or at the door

Adults: $30 Concession: $25 Groups 10+: $20 For information call: 0420 243 404 www.illawarrachoralsociety.org

.

Supported by Wollongong City Council

Proudly sponsored by Smile Team Orthodontics

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Daisy, age 18, before and after.

VET AT WORK With Dr Matt O’Donnell. This month: Daisy the cat.

This month we will talk about another Daisy, this time a dear 18-year-old cat, who has lead a long and adventurous life until her owners noticed she was acting strangely. She was becoming ravenously hungry, meowing constantly and keeping everyone awake at night with her restlessness. Despite her ravenous appetite, Daisy was losing weight, her coat was getting poor and she was becoming a very thin, old pussy cat. Understandably, Daisy’s owners were thinking things were going very wrong in one very old pussy cat and this could mean the end of a very long innings. Given her condition and age, they were not considering heroic treatment, but they were keen to do a blood test to see what was wrong. The results showed a very high level of thyroid hormone consistent with hyperthyroidism. This was good news for old Daisy as this illness can be easily treated and managed. Hyperthyroidism is a common disease in older cats and can be diagnosed with a blood test. Hyperthyroidism is caused by an increase in production of thyroid hormones, mostly from a

LIFEOLOGY

benign enlargement of the thyroid gland in a cat’s neck. There are four treatment options for feline hyperthyroidism; medication, radioactive iodine therapy, surgery and dietary therapy. Due to Daisy’s age, we elected to try her on a prescription diet that is specifically formulated to help with her disease. This is such an easy and affordable option for the right cat. There are no invasive procedures, no daily medications or extended hospital stays. A repeat blood test one month after starting her new diet shows that her thyroid level is almost completely back to normal. She is much happier in herself and has begun putting on weight again. She seems to love her new food and although this is the only thing she is allowed to eat, she seems to be purrfectly satisfied. n Northern Illawarra Veterinary Hospital is at 332 Princes Highway, Bulli. Phone 4238 8575. 2515

pushing us to engage with the stimuli again. In social media terms, this would be a post that produces validation, which motivates us to post again to seek additional reward. With Terri Ayliffe. This month: Adolescents seek external information to Is social media addictive? understand themselves and their place in the The technological changes in my lifetime have been world. The validation they receive from social media creates a dopamine surge. If the evaluation is astounding. I was 22 years old when the first negative, it may drive them to correct this computers made their way into the workplace: evaluation by seeking positive feedback with more a clunky DOS system used for accounting that none of us trusted. Today, we are connected to the vigour. Cyber bullies are also in this loop. Negative social media by an umbilical cord. It feeds into our behaviour can elicit a spike in dopamine. If people validate a bully’s behaviour through Likes or lives, often causing or exacerbating anxiety and comments, or if they produce fear, they gain power affecting our self-belief. and they seek more of the same. If we post on social media and receive positive Best to harness the happiness of dopamine feedback, we may find ourselves in a dopaminesurges with behaviours that benefit us and allow us driven loop. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter, which produces a feeling of reward and motivation to make self-evaluation based on achievement. And while social media may provide this in the for an action. On a primitive level, the system short term, the long-term effects are rarely worth assists us with survival. It motivates us to eat the it. I learned to love and support myself as I wanted correct foods, choose the right hunting grounds. others to do and I know, no matter what, I WILL In a modern society, doing something that allows be there for me and no one else needs to feel the us to feel good and encourages us to do it again is responsibility for my happiness. linked to addiction. And often if we cannot access the dopamine-providing stimuli we will feel an n Read more of Terri’s work at https://lifeology.blog 2515 overwhelming sense of anxiety, our behaviour

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EYE IN THE SKY BY CHRIS DUCZYNSKI

0422 865 648 robyn@beachframing.com 13 George St Thirroul NSW 2515

Thursday and Friday 9:30am - 5:30pm Saturday 9am - 12pm

‘FIRST LIGHT-SANDON POINT’ A surfer heads for an early-morning paddle at “The Point”. Behind him are the iconic Boatsheds, now Heritage listed and much photographed by tourists, camera buffs and wedding photographers. Originally, three of the sheds had been constructed by 1899 and in 1947 there were 10 in total. Today there are nine left and two channels directly in front make it easy to launch one of The Sheds’ small boats. At sunrise the sheds light up, giving us a unique view of Bulli and The Point. Prints available at www.malibumedia.com.au 2515 JULY / 2515 / 37


Adam Munn is an Otford-based stay-home dad, who likes to tinker with words in between chores. — TENDING THE LAWN — Otford poet Adam Munn.

POET’S CORNER Compiled by Karen Lane

MONTHLY TIP Drowning in writing advice from the internet? For the ‘best of the best’ free info, subscribe to: • A.W.C. (Australian Writers’ Centre) free weekly e-newsletter https://www.writerscentre. com.au/newsletter/?utm_source=boombar • A.S.A. (Australian Society of Authors) free fortnightly e-newsletter https://www.asauthors.org/ about-us/signup-to-our-newsletter • for fiction (short stories & novels) go to https:// www.helpingwritersbecomeauthors.com/ resources/ POETRY CLUB MEET AT THIRROUL LIBRARY 3rd Tuesday of the month (June 17), 4pm. No expertise required, just a passion for poetry. n If you’d like to list your writers’ group here at no cost, please email editor@2515mag.com.au. 2515

WRITERS’ BOOT CAMP (OTFORD) Karen Lane is a personal trainer for writers offering Private and Group Classes. Weekly Wednesday Writing Havens (Helensburgh/Sutherland) + Monthly Writers’ Meet-ups (WEA Illawarra & WEA Sydney) + Traditional and cutting-edge courses (Wollongong/Sydney/Bondi Junction College) E: WritersBootCampOtford@gmail.com F: facebook.com/WritingBootCamp W: WritersBootCampOtford.squarespace.com

M: 0412 787 873

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A good lawn is like a marriage it needs care, and attention it’s ok to let it grow a while but be mindful that with each passing morn those long dew-burdened swards eventually sodden the ankles when crossing the yard to check for eggs or to hang the washing. But even if the dampness leaves you with cold feet be careful not to prune too hard for if you scythe the blades too short those long-sheltered stalks lose all protection they wither in the sun and die yellow on the ground. Still, even if you’ve over-pruned perhaps of urgency for other chores or for want of more frivolous pursuits, remember even sparse dry runners can sprout new life with a little care, and attention. Perhaps a gentle airing’s all that’s needed a loosening of soil for water to seep deep, drawing life from lusher patches. Perhaps a deeper turning of the soil is needed to unearth the barren patches, and amputate those lifeless limbs, then re-seed with blood and sweat and bone and even seeming-dead parcels can be revived with a little care, and attention. So, for a lawn that grows strong and green and lush be mindful not to let it grow unchecked or to cut too deep when at last you pay attention and don’t ignore those dying patches for if the soil dries impenetrable no grass grows.


Interbane and (inset) Tilly Devine. Photos from the Collections of Wollongong City Libraries and Illawarra Historical Society

HIDDEN GEM: INTERBANE

On June 20, John Shipp, volunteer manager of the Illawarra Museum, gave a talk to the Helensburgh Historical Society titled Hidden Gems: Historic Houses of Wollongong. Missed it? John has kindly shared his presentation with 2515 Coast News. Interbane is a landmark Federation Queen Anne-style residence at 8 Lawrence Hargrave Drive, opposite Bald Hill. It has an interesting history. Completed in July 1917 by Thirroul builder W J Williams, it was built for William Goodman, of Sydney, for about £3,000. He was in the leather trade and built the home as a holiday getaway. Goodman fought in the Boer War during which he learnt a little Zulu. “Interbane” is derived from Zulu for “top of the hill.” Mr Goodman had a Japanese servant named Fakuda and xenophobic locals believed that he was a German spy, even though Japan was on our side. In their minds, the tower and its extensive sea view was an ideal place to signal German submarines. There is no evidence to corroborate these fears. Hard times during the Depression led to the Goodmans turning Interbane into a guesthouse run by their housekeeper and chauffeur, Gertrude and Gordon Fleming. In the NSW Tourist Guide of 1932, Interbane was listed as “an ideal accommodation house for a complete rest”. The tariff was 10 shillings and sixpence a day, or 50 shillings a week. The actor, Peter Finch, is reputed to have stayed in 1942. To help run the guest house, the Flemings hired

a local, Florence “Tootie” Harvey. She’d been living rough on Bald Hill after the break-up of her marriage. She had trained as a nurse and was the first nurse to serve at the Coledale Cottage Hospital. Her children, Heather, Isobel, Betty and Alan, helped with running the guesthouse. Following the death of Gordon Fleming in 1946, Interbane became a Tea Room and Tootie moved to Coalcliff. Failing health caused Mrs Fleming to close the Tea Rooms. In 1956, after her death, the Goodman’s, who still owned the home, sold it to Tootie Harvey for £1700. The building needed repair and was sold with “all faults”. It was during Tootie’s ownership that Interbane gained a salacious reputation. Tootie’s son, Alan Carrick, was involved with the Sydney underworld as a driver for Tilly Devine. Tilly ran brothels in Sydney and with Kate Leigh, one of the gangster queens of Sydney. She and her girls were regular visitors to Interbane, which gained a reputation for risqué parties and lewd behaviour. Disapproving locals referred to the house as the ‘Ball Hill Brothel’. One of Tilly’s girls, Dulcie Markham alias Pretty Dulcie, alias Dulcie Lewis, was known as the Angel of Death because eight of her boyfriends had met untimely deaths. Although immoral activities were assumed, there were few people who had a bad word for Tootie. In her later years she was known for her constant kindness and care toward others. Tootie sold Interbane in 1972 for $16,000. It became a private home and restoration work commenced. In 1988 the home was sold again and the new owners undertook extensive restoration work. The building celebrated its centenary in 2017.

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YOUR Letters BRING BACK FULL PAGE TIDES CHART! We enjoy getting and reading the 2515 magazine. We live opposite Sharkie Breach @ Coledale use the tide chart on the back page each day to guide when we walk on the beach. Up until now that chart has taken up the whole back page and we put it on our fridge. To get the magazine today and find the tide chart taking less than half the page and needing a magnifying glass to read the tide times means it is next to useless. Bring back the tide chart taking the whole back page! – Lucy, via email Editor’s note: Sorry, readers! You can put the magnifying glasses away – the full page Tides Chart is back on page 47. We are introducing an opportunity for businesses to sponsor this popular page. Interested? Email editor@2515mag.com.au or call Karen on 0403 789 617.

SCARF APPEALS FOR DONATIONS By Cristina Sacco, of SCARF Refugee Support.

Meet Eugenia. Eugenia and her five children were one of the first families to join SCARF in 2005. Arriving from Liberia, she faced many challenges that we take for granted – grocery shopping, transportation, communicating and helping her children with their schooling – all very different from her home in West Africa. “In 2005, I arrived in Australia with five young children on my own. Even though life seem to improve immediately, there were many challenges in a far away land. “My children needed me to be strong, they needed my assistance to help them cope with the transition from playing in the middle of a refugee

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GARRAWARRA – WORTHY OF HERITAGE OR DEMOLITION? Earlier this year the Helensburgh District Historical Society was advised that the old TB Garrawarra Hospital is proposed for demolition. The society was also advised that no public participation was sought under Notification of Activity issued pursuant to Clause 14 of the ISEPP (association with demolition of buildings at Garrawarra Centre). The society at that stage was advised that submissions questioning the proposal had been written by Wollongong City Council and the National Trust. At the time of this article going to press, no further information has been gained. Is it possible to preserve the heritage value of both the old TB Garrawarra Hospital buildings and cemetery, containing over 2000 graves? Public participation is needed for any action to conclude the stalemate, probably by forming a group “Friends of Garrawarra”. We don’t want significant local history wiped off the map. Come on, everyone – let’s save this important Garrawarra Hospital Precinct from the bulldozers! – Jim Powell, President of Helensburgh & District Historical Society Follow @2515mag on Facebook and Instagram. Email letters to editor@2515mag.com.au. 2515

camp to sitting in the classroom and catching up with all other students. “Did I have the educational ability to have helped these children with their assignments every evening? The answer is, no. So what would have happened then if there was no assistance available and they felt pressured, stressed or embarrassed because they could not cope with everything? They might not have made it even up to Year 10. “Thankfully SCARF was there. “From May of 2005 to December 2017 when my little Alphonso – who was nearly five on arrival – completed Year 12, SCARF has not given up. SCARF has made this journey easier for us. From homework sessions to one on one times with my children at home, they have done their best and they have made, so thank you.” – Eugenia There are many parents in the SCARF community that currently face the fear that Eugenia held for her children – that they are unable support their kids through the demands of their schooling in an unfamiliar education system. Here at SCARF we are committed to providing education and tutoring support to refugee children and youth to ensure they are able to achieve their potential, and live independent lives. Help us raise $20,000 to continue and expand our education and tutoring programs for refugee children, youth and adults in 2019. www.givenow.com.au/appeal 2515


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DR RIP’S SCIENCE OF THE SURF With Prof Rob Brander. This month: cliff erosion.

When most people think of the coast, they think of lovely, sandy beaches, yet much of our coastline, particularly in the Northern Illawarra, is dominated by rocky coasts that consist of cliffs, headlands and rock platforms. It makes for extremely dramatic and beautiful scenery, but how dynamic are rocky coasts? Do they change much? The answer is yes and no. The rocks that make up our coastline and the Illawarra Escarpment consist of sediments deposited millions of years ago by massive ancient rivers. The resulting sedimentary rock is mostly made up of different layers of sandstone, but with softer claystones, shale and, of course, some coal seams. Because the strength of these layers varies, so do the rates and causes of erosion. When we see massive eruptions of waves crashing against the rocks, it’s easy to assume that waves must be eroding our rocky coasts. But the rocks are remarkably resilient to wave action. What they don’t like is salt spray, which corrodes the rocks, making them weaker. One of the obvious signs of salt weathering are the honeycomb patterns you often see on sandstone. When salt spray weakens sandstone rocks on our headlands and sea cliffs, it helps create overhangs of stronger rock material, which eventually crack due to the jointed nature of sedimentary rocks and gravity, leading to rockfalls and landslides. These can be minor, but can also be major – they didn’t build the Sea Cliff Bridge just for tourists! So

all of our headlands and cliffs are eroding, but bit by bit, rather than continuously. There are also other forces at play weakening the rocks including the movement of freshwater and thermal expansion caused by heating and cooling (day and night) cycles. How often do landslides occur? According to a University of Wollongong database, there have been between 600-700 landslides since 1887. Most events are associated with long and heavy rain periods because the rocks are heavier and more prone to collapse. Long-time locals will tell you they never drove along the old Lawrence Hargrave Drive hugging the cliff during thunderstorms, in case a particularly loud rumble dislodged some rocks! The rock platforms we see are the remnant bases of old sea cliffs (or headlands) that have eroded back over millions of years. They are left behind because they’re mostly wet, which protects them from salt spray corrosion. As wave action only minimally erodes the platforms, present day erosion rates are only on the order of a millimetre (or less) per year both vertically and landward. So should you buy that cliff-top house? The good news is that geotechnical reports will tell you whether it’s safe or not. The bad news is that nature always wins…it just may take a very long time. Have a question for Dr Rip about the Science of the Surf? Email rbrander@unsw.edu.au. 2515

JULY / 2515 / 45


‘EPIC TUBE RIDES’ AT SHARKEYS Rod Morgan won the A grade final at Sharkeys. Scarborough Boardriders’ Ian Pepper reports.,

Rod Morgan from Stanwell Park. Photo: Nick McLaren

A busy month for Scarborough Boardriders kicked off with Pointscore No 6 on June 2 at Sharkeys Beach, Coledale. Following the success of the Illawarra Junior Regional Titles held there the previous month, Sharkeys proved a great location again with a solid south swell pounding the reef. Waves were in the 4-foot range with the occasional bigger set making it double and triple overhead for some of the juniors. The youngsters took it on and rose to the occasion with some impressive surfing and commitment. The A grade final was one for the memory bank with a couple of epic tube rides from Rod Morgan and Nic Squiers, but it was Rod who took it out and now sits top of the rankings for the year so far. The open women’s saw Talina Wilson taking first place with a seven-point ride and showing us how to surf her local break. On June 11, Scarborough Boardriders hosted the

46­ / 2515­/ JULY

Illawarra School Surfing Titles at Thirroul Beach with many of our junior members competing. High Schools from Bulli High in the north to Narooma High in the south sent their top two senior boys and girls and top two junior boys and girls to complete. About 100 surfers descended on Thirroul for the day and conditions were small but contestable under a bright sunny sky. Illawarra Sports High, not surprisingly, dominated the day with surfers in every final. The sports school has a dedicated surfing program, which many of our young members attend. The finalists from our club were Zahlia Short (2nd in Junior Girls), Kasey Hargreaves (2nd in Senior Girls) and Josh Pepper (4th in Senior Boys). Well done to all who competed. Next pointscore is after school holidays on July 28. 2515


0.38 0602 0.36 0046 56 0633 1.62 0526 0.32 0.15 0615 0.55 0552 0.42 0548 0.40 0041 1.57 0136 1.68 0103 1.44 0209 1.50 0221 1.32 0256 0.49 0412 0.45 0123 0.43 0209 1.51 0119 38 0.28 0012 0.22 0111 16 0726 1 25 16 0758 1 25 1 25 16 0850 10 10 10 10 22 7 22 7 22 7 1.36 1.25 13 1240 0.32 1.29 0817 1.37 1242 0630 1.40 1156 0651 1.32 1158 0842 0.39 1.25 0.53 0956 0819 0.35 0.53 0.52 1.22 1.27 1131 1.32 0720 1213 1.38 0806 1.35 0713 0.36 0754 26 1305 0.49 1324 0.54 36 1.70 1425 0.48 1354 0.36 1229 0.47 1231 0.47

1.50 0.69 1.19 1.38 1.29 1.35 66 SU 0.73 MO 0.54 TU 0.66 SA 0.61 TH 1.49 FR 0.63 FR 1803 SA 1329 SA 1640 MO 1439 TU 1430 WE 1510 TH 1427 TH 1847 SA 1711 MO 1730 WE 1338 FR 1658 SU 1748 1.84 0.68 1908 2006 1.78 1951 1.68 2.00 0.73 2052 2332 1.70 2336 1.83 2344 0.82 1941 0.80 2001 0.61 2025 2325 1857 1.84 1838 1.59 2017 1.50 2120 0.54 2030 74

51 0032 0.40 0623 0.32 0.09 0043 0.46 0634 0.35 0007 0.32 0627 0.34 0148 1.70 0125 1.50 0224 1.39 0309 1.60 0150 1.37 0248 1.24 0328 1.24 0518 0.30 0103 0.49 0230 0.47 0315 44 1.77 0209 1.35 0220 2 26 17 0925 2 26 17 0815 2 26 17 0840 11 11 11 11 23 8 23 23 8 8 49 0737 1.58 1.31 0909 1.41 0658 0715 1.40 1244 1.33 0743 1.34 1244 1.26 0915 0.37 0.53 0.54 0.41 0.55 0933 0.44 1050 0.53 1232 1.31 0812 1.23 1.28 22 0656 0.27 0853 0805 0.45 0843 57 0.34 1502 0.48 1447 0.34 1305 0.46 1346 0.52 1318 0.46 1404 0.55

2019 PORT KEMBLA TIDAL CHART 2019

NEW SOUTH WALES

1.46 1.35 1.41 1.25 1.21 1.56 73 SA 1.37 FR 1.50 SU 0.65 MO 0.76 TU 1.40 WE 0.70 SA 1348 SU 1428 TH 1608 SU 1734 TU 1538 WE 1522 FR 1520 FR 1333 SA 1758 SU 1801 TU 1821 MO 1311 TH 1439 20 1911 1.79 0.72 1935 1944 2.00 1954 1.79 0.84 2022 2131 1.85 1854 1.92 0.78 2040 2234 1.77 2109 0.57 2115 0.64 1953 0.68 2126 0.64 1.65 0.58 2116 66 0.56 2144

LONG 150° 55ʼ E

PORT KEMBLA – NEW SOUTH WALES

45 0.34 and 0.08 0144 0.34 0326 0.34 0259 0208 0.38 0021 0239 0.24 0336 1.54 1.32 0423 1.31 0358 1.20 0138 1.65Low 0201 1.44 0308 1.52 1.40Time 0021 1.77Waters 49 1.64 1.23 0328 LAT 34° 29ʼ S 0105 LONG 150°0310 55ʼ E 0028 of High Local 41 0843 1.53 0721 1000 1.44 0750 0900 1.30 1.26 0900 1.39 0719 1.36 0.48 Local 0.38 0939 0.53 0919 0934 0.54 0.40 0801 0.55 Times Heights0749 of High 0834 and Low Waters0709 Time 0.51and1006 0.50 1024 0.33 0903 19 0.34 0.52 38 0.39 1542 0.34 1426 0.57 0.56 0.47 0.45 JULY E AUGUST 1.63 1.55 1.43 1.50 1.29 1.26 JUNE JULY MAY AUGUST 1.25 1.31 1.33 78 1411 1.44 1.53 SA SU TU TH 1443 MO 1345 WE 1407 WE 1633 TH 1612 FR 1702 SA 1614 SU 1500 MO 1526 MO 1335 WE 1333 SU 1335 TU FR 1541 SA 1431 m 0.79 Time Time 0.61 m Time m2341 m 2111 m 2004 Time 1921 m Time 2056 m 1.86 Time m 2205 03 Time 1.84 1904 1.95 1.83 1.75 Time 2015 1.97 2243 0.58 0.72 0.51 2251 0.60 2028 0.72 0.83 1900 0.73 2226 0.54Time 0.68 m Time m0136 2041 Time m Time m Time m 2115 TIME 0556 M1.622101 M 2224 TIME TIME M 0.38 0209 0.36 M 0256 0.32 0221 0.15 0544 1.47 0041 0.55 TIME 0103 0.42 10.19 1 1.68 1 0630 1 0817 16 0850 1.29 1208 0.46 16 1213 0.32 1.40 16 0726 1.36 0651 1.32 16 0758 1.25 0.11 0.35 34 0136 0.31 0.38 0.32 0328 0.35TH 0439 1.49 0410 1.30 0526 1.271.37 0249 1.63WE0254 0305 1.40 0435 1.20 57 0412 1.16 0123 0111 1.44 1.32 0209 0209 0256 0.32 0221 0.15TU0401 0103 0.42 1.700350 0.49 1324 0.54 0.48 0259 1354 0.36 0445 1826 1.46 0.47 0.36 1231 0119 0.47 TH 1836 SA 1229 SU 1305 1.50 MO FR 1425 1941 0927 1.84 2001 1.78 1.68 0852 1.70 0842 1908 0754 1.83 1.46 1.26 2025 1.27 31 0726 1.46 1.36 1.38 0806 1.37 1055 0.40 1023 0.52 1112 0.502.001052 1026 0.52 0943 0.37 0850 0.54 53 0956 0.552052 0.39 0819 0.35 0951 0.53 1857 0.52 0850 1.29 0758 1.25 0651 1.32 0945 0817 1.37 0958 0.401505 0.32 1534 0224 1459 0.35 0248 0309 0.09 1638 0026 0125 0.46 0.54 0150 1427 0.32 0.37 0.57 0.61 17 1305 0.45 0.49 0.46 1725 1.64 1.52 1753 1.69 1706 1.61 1603 1.37 1617 1.33 19 1640 1.57 1510 1.50 1439 1.38 1430 1.29 1.35 1425 0.48 1324 1231 0.47 1354 0.36 SU MO WE FR 1521 TU21427 TH TH FR SA0.34 SU0328 MO TU SA MO 0.49 TU 0051 WE TH SU SU MO0.60 TU FR TH1658 2 2 2 0626 1.49 17 0649 1.58 0715 1.40 17 0815 1.33 0743 1.34 17 0840 1.26 0909 1.41 17 0925 1.31 1.84 1.71FR 1447 1.80 45 1941 1.86 1.84 1.90 1.99 2346 0.51 2323 0.63 2350 0.48 2144 0.66TH2058 2204 0.78 82 23320.342257 0.49 2120 0.61 2017 0.68 2006 0.80 0.73 0.342140 0.48 2225 1243 0.44 0.46 1.78 1318 2030 0.46 1346 2130 0.52 1404 0.55 2052 1.68 2001 1908 1.83 2025 2.00WE2151 FR 1257 SA 1502 MO SU 1305 TU

0.33 1.16 0027 JULY24 201918 12 9 3 27 24 18 0400 12 12 9 3 27 24 18 12 9 3 27 1000 1.32 0614 0.57 1540 0.49 1.41 MO 1141 2200 1.60 0.61 1821

0.36 1.12 0110 13 13 10 4 281 25 19 16 13 10 4 28 25 19 0430 13 10 4 281 25 19 16 16 1036 1.33 0700 0.58 1620 0.52 1.48 1228 1900 1.54

1920 1.79

1935 1.79

2022 1.85

1953 1.92

2040 1.77

2115 2.00

2126 1.65

TU 2235 1.53 0.53 1903

0.39 1.13 0148 14 11 5 29 26 20 0503 14 14 11 5 292 26 20 17 14 11 5 292 26 20 17 17 1115 1.34 0739 0.56 1703 0.55 1.58 1309

0.340431 0308 0418 0.34 0326 0.34 0.33 0416 0107 0.53 0.38 0.34 0239 0220 0.24 0.18 0.28 0145 0.38 0.37 0358 23 0224 0.31 0.35 0038 0.450.080534 0538 1.44 0507 1.30 0538 1.23 0357 1.63 30342 0404 1.39 50 0315 1.39 0518 1.15 0230 1.60 0209 1.37 1.24 0328 0248 0309 0.09 0436 0150 0.32 18 0400 3 0208 30.17 3 0.32 1000 1.32 0705 1.49 18 0741 1.53 0801 1.39 18 0900 1.30 0834 1.36 18 0919 1.26 1.47 1.36 1.25 1.37 1.26SA 1000 20 0815 1.39 1.33 0623 1.251.44 1140 0.42 1105 0.50 1118 0.49 1038 0.34FR0941 1035 0.52 55 0933 0.44 1050 0.56 0915 0.37 0853 0.53 0.54 0925 1.31 0840 0909 1.41TH1036 0743 1.34 0.391029 0.57 1443 0.56 1542 0.34 1145 0.49 0957 1315 0.43 0.47 1.26 1407 0843 0.45 SA 1338 TU 1426 1020 SU 1540 MO 1345 WE 1.841545 2101 1552 1.83 2115 1.75 1.95 1737 1.60 1636 1933 1.62 1.86 1608 2041 1520 1.97 0.42 0.52 0.65 0.47 0.60 57 0.52 1159 0.52 1813 1.73 1.62 1756 1.72 1659 1.48 1.42 21 1.56 1734 1.61 1538 1.46 1522 1.35 1.41 0.48 1404 1447 0.34 1318 0.46 TU MO WE 1513 TH FR SA 1601 SU 1502 FR2015 SA MO2200 TU 1346 WE TH 0.55 SU 2205 MO TU 0.52 WE 2003 FR SA MO WE FR1741 TU1702 0350 2220 0.35 0401 0.35 0.11 2350 04301.69 0.36 2328 0146 0.46 0234 0.312217 0254 0.32 1.77 0328 2144 0.19 1.92 1.74 1.96 2228 1.654 0445 27 2022 1.85 1.85 1839 1.74 2252 0.58 42144 2304 0.72 84 2234 0.57 2131 0.64 2116 0.78 0.68 2126 1.65 2040 2115 2.00 1953 1.92 19 19 19 19 4 4 0945 1.27 0958 1.26 0745 1.49 0850 1.38 0927 1.37 1052 1.46 1036 1.33 0831 1.46 SA 1346 0.43 2007 1.69

SU 1417 0.45 2045 1.86

TU 1427 0.49 2058 1.90

WE 1505 0.61 2140 1.80

TH 1459 0.46 2130 1.99

FR 1521 0.57 2151 1.71

SU 1638 0.37 2257 1.84

MO 1620 0.52 2235 1.53

0227 0.41 0825 1.47

0323 0.31 0920 1.39

0342 0.28 0941 1.36

0431 0.38 1029 1.25

0418 0.17 1020 1.37

0436 0.37 1036 1.26

0534 0.18 1145 1.47

0503 0.39 1115 1.34

0309 0.38

0411 0.34

0432 0.27

0512 0.42

0510 0.18

0512 0.40

0623 0.27

0537 0.44

2201 1.80

2246 1.74

2325 1.84

2336 1.59

2344 1.50

1951 0.54

WE 2313 1.44 0.41 1942

0.44 0.42 0.34 0.40 0.33 0.27 0523 0.27 0310 0.18 0328 11 0308 0.34 0.34 0127 0.39 0623 0045 0.44 0510 0.53 0.36 0537 0500 1.63 0432 1.39 0336 1.54 0458 1.32 0326 0423 1.31 0015 1.20 0400 0027 0.43 0043 1.19 0223 44 0358 0.08 0512 0239 0.24 0512 21 21 21 6 6530 6 15 30 15 30 15 15 12 27 12 27 12 27 3 18 18 18 3 1156 1.35 1112 1.23 1115 1.26 1241 1.48 1058 1035 1.34 0939 1115 1.37 0934 09 0900 1.32 0713 1.25 0633 1.40 0600 1.31 0634 1.27 1128 0.32 1115 0.49 0815 1006 0.38 0.53 1024 0.48 0.54 0614 1.17 0.50 55 1000 1.44 1000 1.32 1.30 0919 1.26 0834 1.36 5 0.69 20 50.50 1614 201.50 1243 5 0.53 1840 20 0.48 1733 20 1.51 1627 0.59 0.63 1141 0.56 1612 35 1749 0.59 1633 0.45 1649 0.49 1644 0.45 1751 1.59 1602 1.55 1743 1.43 1224 1702 1.63 1148 0.55 1210 1.70 1347 26

1542 0.34 1540 0.49 1443 1407 0.45 WE FR SUSA 1601 TU THSU 1420 0.42 TU 0.55 0.52 0.52 1552 0.47 1545 0.65 MO0.60 SA1513 SU WE 1426 TH TH WE 0.57 TH FR 0.56 SA MO SA FR SU TU TH WE0.44 TH SA MO 1737 TU 1703 TU MO 1457 WE 1.44 1.84 2354 2017 1.852256 1.92 2341 2220 2251 1.96 2217 2313 1.74 2228 1.65 2043 1.75 1.34 1.67 1.58 2350 1.90 2127 1.88 07 2101 1.80 1.83 1922 1.771.69 1.652313 1859 1.80 1824 1.73 1845 2354 0.48 2232 2355 0.63 2243 0.58 2224 0.72 2144 0.51 0.60 1821 83 2205 1.95 2304 2200 1.60 2115 1.75 2041 1.97

21 1156 6 1241 60526 6 1035 60.22 0908 1.43 21 1009 1.32 1.35 1.34 21 1112 1.23 1115 1.37 21 1115 1.26 0.45 0.43TU 1.51 0.38 0.35 0.28 0602 0132 0.24 0545 1.40 0439MO 1.49 0410 1.30 0526 1.27 SA 1.20 01101.48 0.39 0022 0430 0.36 0445 0.11SU0548 0350 0328 0.19 0401 1840 0.48 0046 1644 0.63 1456 0.47 0.590552 0.56 0.35 1649 0435 0.50 WE 1751 0.59 TU 1535 TH 1602 FR 1627 0.69 2256 1213 1.67 2304 1.58 2120 1.79 1.34 0619 1.801156 1.90 1.26 2313 1026 1.88 1.22 1.27 1.33 0.36 1.26 1.27 1.32 2207 1.38 0727 1.32 1152 0.48 1055 1131 0.40 1023 0.52 2232 1112 0.50 0.52 0700 0713 1.202354 1036 1052 1.46 1158 0945 0927 1.37 0958 0.49 1155 0.381711 0526 0.28 0552 1748 0.45 0602 1706 0.22 0548 0.43 0046 1.51 1338 0354 0.73 0.66 1.49 0.66 0.61 0.54 1301 0.40 1820 1.60 1725 1.64 1658 1.52 1753 1.69 1.61 1228 0.53 0.52 0.37 1505 1459 0.46 1521 TH SA MO 1730 WE FR71658 SU WE0615 FR TH 0.61 FR 0458 SA 0.57 SU TU WE MO 1620 SU 1638 TH0.36 FR 7 7 7 1131 1.32 22 1156 1.22 1213 1.38 22 1158 1.27 0713 0.36 22 1242 1.35 0954 1.39 22 1056 1.26 1.59 1.50WE 1338 0.54 1.74 1.80 1.84 1935 1.94 2346TU2325 0.51 2323 0.63 0.48 19031.491951 1.68 2235 1.53 2257 1.84MO2344 2140 2130 1.99 2151 0.63 1827 0.662336 0.61 1.71 1748 2350 0.54 1730 0.66 1534 0.52 TH 1847 WE 1615 FR 1658 SA 1711 0.73 SU

1.82

0.30 0544 0.49 0.47 0148 44 0431 0.44 0.38 1.24 0112 0.30 0.37 0634 0007 0.49 0007 0538 1.77 0627 0.47 0442 0.36 0.440634 0038 0.45 01481.350148 0.3500431.35 0538 0623 1.44 0507 1.30 0623 1.23 39 0503 0.39 0436 0534 0.18 0627 0418 0.17 23 06580.45 81.77 81232 8 0805 0656 0.27 23 1244 1.28 1044 1.34 23 1145 1.22 0.53 1232 1.31 23 1244 1.23  1029 Copyright ofSA8Australia 2018, of TU Meteorology 1.31 1.23 1244 1.28TH 45 1.22 1.25 0656 0.27 0623 07390.45 1.24 1140WECommonwealth 0.42 1105 0.50 0.49 52 1115 1.34 1036 1145 1.47 1020 1.37 1311 1118 1.40 1617 0.57 0.731244 1758 0.65 1.26 0.76 Bureau 1821 0.70 1439 1.50 0805 FR 1333 1.37 0710 SU 1801 1.25 MO TH 1656 1854 1756 0.58 2246 1.78 2328 1.661801 19541.50 0.64 1249 2109 0.56 1439 1758 0.65 0.76 1821 0.70 56 0.73 1311 1.40 1159 0.52 1309 0.51 1813 1.73 1741 1.62 1.72 42 1703 0.55 1545 0.65 1601 0.60 1737 0.42 1552 0.47 FR SA SU TU MO TH SU WE TH FR SA MO TU TH SA MO FR Datum of Predictions is0631Lowest Astronomical Tide0.58 0021 1854 1.52 0028 1.40 0.49 0021 1.77 1.65 0105 1.64 0259 1.23 2109 01440.56 1.16 1917 28 2217 1.66 1.74 9 0535 0.37 1839 1.74 1942 1.70 72 2313 1.44 2228 2350 1.69 2220 1.96 WOLLONGONG’S 24 9 24 24 9 9 24

0043 0.16 0658 1.36 1333 0.33 1954 1.92

0.28 19 13 7 314 28 22 19 13 7 4 28 22 19 13 7 31 28 22 0615 1242 1.27 1847 0.42

58 40 56 54 15 33 WE 46 78

14 8 5 29 23 20 14 8 5 29 23 20 14 8 20 A – NEW SOUTH WALES

29 23

21 15 9 6 30 24 21 15 9 6 30 24 21 15 9

30 24

2019

0.49 1.35 0.63 1.24 0.53 1.37 0.64

9ʼTimes S LONG 150° E 1.19time0721 1139 1.29 55ʼ 0.33 0900 0.52 0719 0.51 0709 0.50 1234 0749 0.34 0750 0.57 are inTHlocal standard (UTC +10:00) orTUdaylight savings time (UTC +11:00) when in effect 1706 0.63 1333 1.31 1411 1.44 WE FR 1742 0.78 SU 1335 1.33 MO 1335 1.25 FR 1541 1.53 SA 1431 1.41 BEACHES 2336 1.75 0.68 0.40 2226 1900 0105 0.79 1921Local 0.73 2004 0043 0.61 0.61 ARE 0021 1.77Waters 0021 1.52 0028 1.40 Time 31 0512 0.49 1.64 0259 1.23 0045 and 0.44 0015 0.53 1904 0127 0.39 0.36 39 02230.54SWIM 0.332111 0159 0144 0.08 1.16 0623 0.27 0537 0.44 0.42 0512 0510 0.18 eights of High Low New Moon First Quarter Moon Phase Symbols Full Moon PATROLLED FROM 34 1112 1.19 1.23 0.33 0012 0.51 0709 0.50 0412 0.34 0633 0.40 1.570719 0209 0634 1.50 02590.52 1.12 1.68 1.26 0111 0749 1.44 0119 1.32 0633 0721 1.40 0600 1.31 0123 0713 1.25 1.27 49 08151.160900 1.27 0759 0750 1.44 0.57 1241 1.48 1156 1.35 1115 1115 1.37 10 25 10 25 10 25 10 25 0842 0.39 0956 0.55 0852 0.58 0819 0.35 0806 0.53 0754 0.52 1240 1.25 0720 0.53 JULY JUNE AUGUST 42 0.78 1.33 1.25 1.31 1.44 1224 0.45 1148 0.49 1243 0.53 0.45 51 1347 0.49 1343 0.26 1.41 1840 0.48 1751 0.59 1627 1644 1649 0.50 SUFR1335 MO WETH1333 FR SA 1431 THE OF THE SA 0.69 SU MO TU TH FR 1510 1210 1.50 1.57 1541 15341.53 1.48 1.38 0.63 1430 1411 1.29 1427 1803 1.191335 TU WE WE1.35 FR SU SA0.69 SA 1329 SA 1640 SU START MO 1439 TU TU

2120 1845 0.61 0.53 2008 0.68 1.58 2006 2004 0.80 2030 0.73 0.821900 2226 0.68 1838 0.79 0.73 2332 0.61 1922 1.77 1859 1904 1.80 1824 1.73 1.84 63 20170.49SEPTEMBER 1.70 1.34 2304 1.88 Time m 2313 Time m 22250.54 m 2256 1.67 Time m 2017 Time m Time 1921 m 2354 SCHOOL 0103 1.50 0032 1.70 0315 1.39 0518 1.15 0416 1.13 0230 1.60 0209 1.37 0220 1.24 11 26 11 26 11 26 11 26 0.550111 0737 0.411.68 0812 0933 0.44 1050 0.56HOLIDAYS 09571.16 0.56 THE 0915 0.37 0209 0853 0209 0.53 0843 0.54 UNTIL 0136SA0123 0.38 0256 0.32 0.36 0221 0.15 0.55 0103 0.42 12 0552 1.57 0.45 0412 1.44 1.50 0119 1.32 0132 0.24 40 0245 0615 0.49 0046 1.51 0602 0.22 0548 0.43 1348 1.25 SU 1428 1.21 TH 1608 1.56 FR 1520 1.41 SU 1734 1.61 MO 1636 1.58 TU 1538 1.46 WE 1522 1.35 0.840806 1911 0.72 2234 0727 0.57 2328 0.41 0.64 1.27 2116 0842 0.78 2144 0726 0819 1.36 0850 0956 1.29 0758 1.25 0817 0754 1.370.68 1.40 0651 1.322131 END OF THE APRIL 20 1156 0.53 1.22 0.55 0.35 1944 0.53 0.39 0.52 1.35 1.32 48 0847 1242 0713 0.36 1213 1.38 1158 1305 0.49 1425 0.480523HOLIDAYS. 1324 0.54 1354 0.36 0.47 1231 0.470336 29 1711 1.19 1.57 1439 1.38 1.29 1.50 1.35 0423 1.31 0.43 1640 1.19 1436 0138 1.441430 1.54 0.66 0310 1510 1.32 0328 0.40 60 1847 0.63 1.49 1748 0.54 1730 SU 0.73 MO0201 TU FR 0027 TH1301 SA MO TU WE TH 1427 SU SCHOOL WE SA TH1.20 WE 1338 SA SU1.65 MO 12 0843 0.40 27 0903 0.55 12 1006 0.38 27 0939 0.53 12 1024 0.48 27 0934 0.54 12 0614 1.17 27 1058 0.50 1941SU2017 1.84 20520.55NORTH 1.68 2001 1.78 FR 2025SA2030 2.001.500.73MO 1141 1.70 1908 2006 1.83 38 2336 0.82 1.59 2332 0.49 0.80 2120 0.61 1.94 1951 0.54 2344 1.55 1.50 1614 1702 1935 1.63 1.70 2058 1500 1.290.68 TU 1733 MO 1526 1.26 WE 1633 TH 1612 1.43 WOLLONGONG

0.04 31 25 0259 0852 1.50 1534

22 16 10 7 1 25 22 16 10 7 311 25 22 16 10 2028 0.72

2056 0.83

2243 0.58

2224 0.72

2341 0.51

2251 0.60

2111 1.96 0.61

1821 1.65

IS THE0022 ONLY LOCAL 03280.390518 0.32 0224 0230 0.35 0248 0.34 0309 0220 0.091.20 0.46 0150 0.320439 03 0634 1.50 0.49 1.15 1.60 0305 1.37 1.39 1.24 0110 1.49 0.47 0410 0315 1.30 0526 1.27 0435 0.28 0249 1.63 1.400209 0043 1.24 0627 0007 1.77 0148 1.35 13 0700 28Bureau 13 280843 28 0619PATROLLED 1055 0.40 28 1023 0933 0.52 13 1112 0.50 1026 0.52 1.20 1050 1.27 09432018, 0.370.37 0951 0.540853 0925 1.31 081513 1.33 0840 1.26 0909 1.41 1.40 0743 1.34 12 1244 0.55 0.56 0915 0.53 0.44 0.54 alth of Australia of Meteorology BEACH 0658 0.53 1.23 1244 1.28 0656 0.27 0805 0.45 1725 1.64 1658 1.52 1753 1.69 1706 1.61 1228 0.53 1155 0.42 1603 1.37 1617 1.33 TH FR SA SU TU WE MO TU 0.51 0.70 2323 1608 0.63 2350 1.68 1734 18271.61 1.82 2144 0.66 0.781522 1502 0.48 1346 0.52 1404 0.55 1447 0.34 0.46 1318 0.46 28 1801 1.21 1.46 1.35 1.56 1.41 1333 1.37 0.76 1821 1.40 SA 1903 MO WE FR 1.50 TU2204 SU TU 1538 WE TH FR 1520 MO YEAR-ROUND. FR0.48 SU TU2346 MO 1311 TH 1439 Lowest Astronomical Tide 21260.35 1.650112 0.16 1.85 1.77 2115 2144 2.001.23 1.79 1953 1.920538 44 0.84 2022 2131 0.64 0404 0.78 0.57 0.68 0148 0038 0.45 0357 1.63 1.392116 1.44 2040 0507 2234 1.30 0538 1954 0.64 1854 0.58 2109 0.56

1.12 0.58 0.22 1.48 2225 1.94 0.53

26 0416 0957

23 17 11 8 2 26 23 17 11 8 2 26 23 17 11

1.13 0.56 1636 1.58 2328 0.41

14+10:00) 1038 0.34 29 1035 0.52 14 1140 0.42 29 1105 0.50 14 0623 1.25 29 1118 0.49 14 0739 1.24 29 0710 1.36 ard time (UTC or daylight savings time (UTC +11:00) when in effect SU 1159 0.52 MO 1756 1.72 WE 1309 0.51 TH 1249 0.33 TU 1659 1.48 WE 1702 1.42 FR 1813 1.73 SA 1741 1.62 04001.700027 0.3319170.43 0308 0336 0.34 0326 0423 0.34 0259 0358 0328 0.080144 0.38 0239 0.240028 1.31 0523 1.19 1.54 2304 1.32 1.40 1.20 1942 01 0021 1.44 1.52 1839 1.74 1.92 2252 0.58 0.720310 1.23 0105 1.64 1.16 New Moon First Quarter Quarter Full Moon AND 0.08 HEIGHTS 10000.33TIMES 1.32Last 0900 1006 1.30 0919 1.26 1000 0934 1.440.36 1.39 0834 1.360045 0.48 0614 1058 0.50 0.38 0458 0.53 0.54 0223 03 0719 0.55 0.51 0.44 0.50 0015 1024 0.53 0127 0.39 0043 0500 1.63 1.390939 01591.17 0709 0900 0.52 0749 0.34 0750 0.57

18 12 9 303 27 24 18 12 915 3 273024 18 12 30 27 24 15 1.43 30 15 1540 1141 OF HIGH 0.55 AND LOW 0.49 0.57 1.55 1407 1612 1443 1702 0.56 1.63 1542 1614 0.34 1.50 0.47 0.45 1733 26 1.26 1426151633

0633 1.40 0600 1.31 0713 1.25 1.27 1128 0.32 1115 0.49 0815 1.27 0759 1.44 1333 1541 1.53 1411 1.44 1431 1.41 SU TU 1.25 TH SA 0.53 WE MO WE TH SATU 0634 MO 1335 FR MO TU1.59 SA0.45 0.45 1.31 1148 0.49 1243 1210 1.51 WE 0.49 FR 1343 0.26 SA 1224 SU FR WE 1749 TH 1743 TH 1347 1.80 0.73 1824 2341 1.73 1922 1.77 1845 2354 0.48 0.632224 20081.65 1.96 2115 1.75 22001.701821 1.60WATERS 2101 2243 1.83 2205 2251 1.951.84 1.86 2041 1.971859 0.51 0.58 2355 0.72 0.60 2017 56 1900 0.83 0.79 1921 2226 0.54 2004 0.61 2111 0.61

31 0545 1152

1.40 0.48 FR 1820 1.60

31 0132 0727

0.24 1.32 WE 1301 0.40 1935 1.94

29’ 3400.04 31LAT0245 0847 1.50

TU

1.70

0445 0435 0.110259 0430 0110 0.36 0.39 0350 0439 0.35 0209 0328 0410 0.190119 0401 0526 0.35 0412 1.27 1.16 0022 1.49 1.50 1.30 1.32 1.20 1.12 4 28 19 0.58 4 28 19 0.52 13 1055 13 1112 13 0700 LONG 150 10 25 19 1.44 10 25 25 1052 1026 1.460852 1036 1.33 0945 1.27 0927 1023 1.370754 0958 1.26 0.50 1.2055’ 28 0619 0.40 0.52 0.52 0956 0.55 0.53 0842 0.39 0.37 1.61 1620 1228 0.52 0.53 1505 1725 0.61 1.64 1459 1658 0.46 1.52 1521 1753 0.57 1.69 1638 1706 1155

0.32 05 0111 1.40 1.38 51 0806 0.54 0.49 17 1430 1.33 WE TU 1.90 04 2006 0.78

SA 1436 0.22 0 2058 1.94

1.29 SU 1.57 MO 1.48 TH 1.50 FR 1.35 SA SA 1640 TU TH WE 1510 FR TH 1427 SU SU 1534 Copyright Commonwealth of Australia Bureau of Meteorology 2257 2350 2235 1903 1.53 1.68 2140 2346 1.80 2120 2130 2323 1.99 2151 1.71 0.51 0.632018, 0.48 0.53 2332 0.49 1.842225 0.80 0.61 2030 0.73 Datum of Predictions is Lowest Astronomical Tide Times are in local standard time (UTC +10:00) or daylight savings time (UTC +11:00) when in effect Moon Phase Symbols New Moon First Quarter Full Moon

0503 0148 0.39 0431 0538 0.38 0315 0436 0038 0.37 0518 0534 0538 0.180416 0.28 0418 0507 0.170220 1.44 1.39 1.30 1.24 0.45 1.15 1.23 1.13 04 0209 1.39 1.37 20 0.56 20 0.53 20 0.54 5 29 5 29 14 0623 14 0739 14 1140 11 11 26 26 26 1115 1.34 1029 1.25 1036 1.26 1145 1118 1.470957 1.36 1020 1105 1.370843 0.42 0.50 1.25 0.49 35 0853 0.52 0933 0.44 1050 0.56 0.55 0.65 1.73 1552 1741 0.60 0.52 1737 1756 0.42 1.72 1703 1309 0.52 0.47 1.62 1601 1159 02 1.42 1545 1813

0.28 1.27 0.42 WE 1827 1.82

0.35 1.24 1.58 1.41 TH 1.35 SAwhether MOor 1.61 FR 1.56 WE FRThe Bureau SAno warranty SU MO inMO TH Meteorology gives any kind express, implied, statutory otherwise respect1636 to theTU availability, accuracy, currency,0.51 completeness, THof 1608 SU 1734 WE 1522 FRof1520 2313 1.44 2217quality 1.74 2228 1.65 1.92 2220 or1.96 1942 1.70 1839 1.74 04 2116 0.72 0.78 or reliability of the information that the2144 information0.68 will be fit for any particular purpose2350 or will not 1.69 infringe 2328 any third party Intellectual Property rights. 2234 0.57 0.41 Last Quarter

The Bureau’s liability for any loss, damage, cost or expense resulting from use of, or reliance on, the information is entirely excluded.

29 0112 0710

0.16 1.36 1249 0.33 1917 1.92

0537 0223 0.44 0.33 0512 0045 0.42 0423 0512 0127 0.40 0027 0623 0043 0.270523 0.27 0510 0015 0.180328 0.44 1.31 0.53 1.20 0.39 0.43 0.36 1.19 58 0310 1.39 1.32 0159 21 0.50 21 0.53 21 0.54 6 30 6 30 15 0633 15 0713 15 0815 27 12 27 12 27 1156 1.35 1112 1.23 1115 1.26 1241 0634 1.481058 1.34 1115 0600 1.370934 1.40 1.31 1.25 1.27 15 0939 0.49 JULY1.27 / 251530 / 47 0759 1024 0.48 0614 1.17 0.59 0.49 0.69 0.45 1649 1148 0.63 0.53 1840 1210 0.48 0.45 1751 1347 0.56 0.50 0.49 1644 1243 43 1.51 1627 1224 1343

WE 1.70 FR 1.43 SU 1.50 TU 0.55 SA 1.63 SA FR 1702 SU SA 1614 MO MO 1141 TU TU 1733 TH TH 1612 1.34 1.70 2256 1859 1.67 2341 2304 1922 1.58 1821 1.90 2313 1824 1.882251 1.80 0.51 1.73 0.60 1.77 1.65 1845 1.84 2354 2017 55 2224 0.63 0.72

0.28 0.45 0526 1.27 0.220435 1.20 0548 0.43 0110 0.39 0046 0132 1.510022 0.24 0.28 45 0410 1.40 1.30 22 0615 22 0552 13 7 31 28 13 7 0602 28 1242 1.32 1156 1.22 1213 28 1.38 22 1158 1.27 0713 0727 0.36 1.32 52 0.48

0.49 1.35

0.08 1.44 0.26 FR 2008 1.96

31 0245 0847

0.04 1.50


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