Page 1

m a 1

ST

FIR

016 2 N UM T U A 26 # N HIO S A IN F

n ew seaso n fash i o n

with franny, beck, jeet, possum, alex & willow


m a 1

COVER STAR FRANNY COWAP @ IMG MODELS PHOTOGRAPHED BY SEUNG ROK BAEK wears I LOVE MR MITTENS knit top, PPLAY bottoms STORY PAGE 4

EDITOR/ CREATIVE DIRECTOR GLENN HUNT

PHOTOGRAPHERS SEUNG ROK BAEK AGNIESZKA CHABROS DAVID K SHIELDS NINA VAN LIER CARA O’DOWD FASHION ANGELA LIANG CHRIS LORIMER THALEA MV JANAI ANSELMI LAUREN DIETZE MAKEUP & HAIR JESS CHAPMAN LUKE NICHOLSON ZOE KARLIS PHOENIX LY MARGO REGAN CLAIRE THOMPSON FRANKIE ENDERSBEE WRITERS BARNEY MCDONALD

CLICK SUBS TO CRIBE TO 1 A M

Advertising and marketing enquires: Steve Richards 0467 668 888 steve@staticmove.com Editorial enquires: 1am@1am.co.nz www.1ammag.com © 2016 1AM Magazine. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior consent of the publisher. ABN 7681 586 2568


1 AM ISSUE 26 CONTENTS 04) 1 AM FRANNY 20) 1 AM BECK 40) 1 AM JEET 56) 1 AM POSSUM 66) 1 AM ALEX 78) 1 AM WILLOW


1 AM FRANNY FRANNY @ IMG MODELS Photographed by Seung Rok Baek fashion by Angela Liang makeup by Jess Chapman @ Network Agency hair by Luke Nicholson @ Debut Management using ORIBE Hair Care Australia


CHRISTIE NICOLE bralette, BASSIKE shirt, MARIPOSSA necklace.


FADDOUL jacket, KALIVER pants, REEBOK sneakers, DINOSAUR DESIGNS bangle.


ARNLEY dress, AU REVOIR LES FILLES ear cuff.


ACLER top, BASSIKE pants, EXTRAORDINARY ORDINARY DAY shoes.


IRO top, CHRISTIE NICOLE bralette, KATE SYLVESTER skirt, SOL SANA boots


KINGA CSILLA dress, BÚL shoes, MARIPOSSA bracelet.


BÚL shirt, BASSIKE zip top, MARIPOSSA earrings.


I LOVE MR MITTENS knit top, PPLAY bottoms.


INTERVAL top, PPLAY bottoms, SUSIE BARNES GLASS ARTIST necklace.


LILLIAN KHALLOUF bra top, MLM LABEL shirt, KINGA CSILLA pants, BÚL shoes.


1 AM beck BECK @ Azalea Models/ IMG Models Photographed bY Agnieszka Chabros fashion by Thalea MV makeup bY Zoe Karlis hair by Phoenix Ly Special thanks to Beet Retreat


PAGEANT STUDIO suit, FILES A PAPA dress from SLOW WAVES, UNDERCOVER shoes.


FILES A PAPA dress from SLOW WAVES, UNDERCOVER shoes.


FAUSTINE STEINMETZ jacket from SLOW WAVES, PERKS AND MINI dress, PAGEANT STUDIO pants.


PAGEANT STUDIO dress, MARYAM NASSIR ZADEH shoes.


PAGEANT STUDIO dress, FAUSTINE STEINMETZ pants, MARYAM NASSIR ZADEH shoes.


PAGEANT STUDIO dress, PERKS AND MINI skirt worn on top, NIKE shoes.


FAUSTINE STEINMETZ pants,


DAISY dress, stylists own shoes.


PERKS AND MINI dress, MARYAM NASSIR ZADEH shoes.


1 AM JEET JEET @ PRISCILLAS MODELS Photographed bY DAVID K SHIELDS fashion by CHRIS LORIMER makeup & HAIR by MARGO REGAN USING ELLIS FAAS & ORIBE HAIR CARE


T ZHIVAGO top, PAUL SEVILLE belt from BABY LOVES TO PONY.


CHROMAT mask from BABY LOVES TO PONY, JARRAD GODMAN jacket, DUSKII bodysuit.


DEBORAH SWEENEY poloneck, CHROMAT skirt from BABY LOVES TO PONY.


DSTM catsuit from BABY LOVES TO PONY, GIGI BURRIS MILLINERY headband from Matchesfashion.com


LILLIAN KHALLOUF top, BY NYE necklace.


ZHIVAGO top, PAUL SEVILLE belt from BABY LOVES TO PONY.


JOJO ROSS jacket, DSTM catsuit from BABY LOVES TO PONY.


JULIAN DANGER cape, DSTM bra and brief from BABY LOVES TO PONY.


BY NYE chocker, GEORGIA ALICE coat, COMPANY OF STRANGERS belt.


CRAIG GREEN top from Matchesfashion.com.


ZHIVAGO top, LA FILLE D’O bra from BABY LOVES TO PONY, JIMMY D trouser.


MONSTER ALPHABETS bolero, SILENCE WAS… dress, DUSKII bra top, TOMMY HILFIGER shoes.


M U S S O P 1 AM


LEVIS denim jacket, Possum’s own shirt, glasses, and earrings (worn throughout).

Could OPENSIDE’S POSSUM PLOWS be the new High Priestess of New Zealand pop-punk? She’s certainly one of the most charismatic singers to emerge from a movement that owes everything yet nothing to the spirit of punk. interview

BARNEY MCDONALD PHOTOGRAPHY NINA VAN LIER


I’m not really sure what pop-punk is. Surely the one cancels out the other. If punk is the antithesis of commercial popular culture, then pop is its nemesis. The glory days of anarchist bands like Flux of Pink Indians and Crass, not to mention the joyful rebellion of precursors like Sex Pistols, The Damned and Buzzcocks, and American counterparts like Iggy & the Stooges, New York Dolls and The Ramones, are a distant memory, and modern “post-punk” pop bands like Green Day have paved the way for the commodification of an ideal. But let’s not get too elitist or ahead of ourselves. Punk bands from the golden era wrote catchy songs, desired to get in the charts, even craved fame and acclaim. Sure, they occupied a parallel universe that ran adjacent to the music industry, but most punk musicians and songwriters wanted to make money and score birds. They just drank and drugged a lot along the way, not taking themselves or their “craft” too seriously, reveling in the moment as much, if not more, than the music. A decade or so later, Nirvana and the ethos and aesthetics of grunge felt like a marketable, bankable, commodity. The Riot Grrrl movement remained closer to the anarchic spirit of first generation punk, but once the Americans got their hands on punk (precluding the early 80s hardcore music of SST bands like Black Flag and Husker Du, nor lest we forget Jello Biafra’s Dead Kennedys), it had lost its revolutionary currency. Since the 80s, and most definitely the 90s, punk has become simply an extension of rock. And, by association, an extension of pop. Many would say the acid house underground then the jungle scene in Great Britain transplanted punk in the early 90s, though those scenes were quickly subsumed by the mainstream, with the masses being offered a diluted form of the original to be easily marketed and digested. Much like punk after the likes of EMI and Virgin got their mitts on it. Which brings us to Auckland “poppunk” band Openside. Performing at the inaugural Auckland City Limits festival on March 19 and a debut EP out soon, this polished four-piece has a strong pop sensibility, while certainly anchoring some of their approach in a punk aesthetic. They’re not going to change the world, but they promise to entertain you. They don’t scream “Destruction!”, instead offering “Creation!” Theirs is not a call to arms, yet they do want to touch an audience with the energy of their songs and live performances. And under the guidance of frontperson Possum Plows (name soon to be changed legally), they have a few messages to impart to the listener and the world at large. First and foremost, be yourself. Plows is certainly making conscious inroads on that basis herself. Let’s find out more, shall we?

As far as I can see, there's never been a more exciting time to be a pop artist. You've just got to really push yourself to innovate, within the bounds of the pop structure. First of all, what’s your birth name & where/when were you born? Born and raised in Auckland. I was fortunate enough to find a name in my teens that I feel fits me better than the one I was given at birth. After many cringe-inducing moments filling out forms and explaining my name to people, I’ve finally started the process of changing it legally. Where did you grow up, and what was that like for you? I spent most of my early years in Mt Eden and Epsom. I loved school and learning. My parents had enrolled us in just about every after-school activity: French lessons, tennis, ballet, netball, piano, swimming, drama classes… We got to travel a lot too. My parents wanted us to have a good snapshot of what was out there, to feel like the world was “open” to us, and I’m overwhelmingly grateful for that. When did you first fall in love with music, then decide it was what you wanted to do? When I was singing on the school bus aged 11, another kid’s mum overheard and enlisted me to join her son’s band. I feel like every interaction I’ve had with the music industry since has been some more grownup version of that same event. I didn’t really seek music out; it found me. How long before you arrived at Openside? Being in a band was a big part of my identity all the way through school. It felt safe, having a distinctive persona to hide behind while you’re figuring yourself out. Pop-punk was the genre I listened to the most in my formative years, so in a lot of ways joining Openside was like welcoming back an old friend you’d abandoned while you were off trying to be cool with the other kids. We played together for the first time in April 2014. Openside is a very polished band, with a number of tight songs already in its arsenal. Is this the result of intensive rehearsing over a lengthy period of time? Yeah, you’ve got to be prepared to practice hard and zoom in close to all the finer details, because those things add up when there’s four of you and you’re playing a 45-minute set. But that’s the same with anything. We try to do rehearsals on stage as often as we can, to emulate the conditions

of the real thing. Being in a rehearsal room is so different to being on a stage with the lights and the sound. Do the live shows contribute significantly to the sound and style the band is developing? The live set is where you get to see what people are connecting with, and that’s a really big part of it. You can sense pretty quickly which moments are working and which aren’t. When you tap into something great, and you’re there and the crowd is feeling it, it’s like we’re a part of something bigger and more important than the egos of the people on this stage. This is about the role that music plays in people’s lives and development. I know so many people who made their closest friendships in a crowd or in a line for a concert. It’s a powerful force and it’s fascinating. Where do you see the band fitting in the music scene & industry? It’s hard to know. I mean, could you compare us to other artists who are already out there being successful? Sure, of course, but that’s not really what it’s about. If you’re trying to make music that sits neatly in an already established box, your potential to succeed has a ceiling. And people see right through that anyway. The best we can do is make music that’s honest and innovative and interesting, because that’s what people respond to. And I think now more than ever the people get there first, and then the industry follows. Not the other way around. The band’s songs, shows & videos suggest plenty of ambition. What’s the 5-year plan? We haven’t got the specifics mapped out yet, but when the EP is finished we’ll be straight into writing for the album. What local bands do the members of Openside feel an affinity with? The all-ages music scene in Auckland seems to require constant CPR, and we’ve been fortunate enough to form alliances with bands like Fire For Glory and Flirting With Disaster to play shows with and keep the scene alive as best we can. On top of that, I love the presence of bands like Miss June, Courtney Hate and Siobhan Leilani, as far as what they offer to the cultural climate by being so unapologetically political.


STAPLE + CLOTH jacket, DR MARTEN boots, Possum’s own t-shirt and pants.


TOPMAN jacket, Possum’s own shirt.


ROLLAS denim jacket, JESSIE-LEE RADFORD jeans, DR MARTEN boots.


ADIDAS t-shirt, Possum’s own vest.


STAPLE + CLOTH dress, ROLLAS jacket.


It's one thing for me to identify as gender non-conforming in my personal life, but it's a totally different thing to own that as an artist. How about overseas bands? There are the genre-specific bands: Twenty One Pilots, All Time Low, Fall Out Boy, Motion City Soundtrack, The Story So Far, The Wonder Years, Man Overboard. This list could go on forever, but then there’s a lot of stuff that transcends genre. I just want to hear good songwriting with some personality. That’s all that really matters to me. You have a really powerful voice. Which singers, local or overseas, do you place on a pedestal? This is a big question. It’s that combination of skill and character. I like vocalists who find new and interesting ways of using their voices. It’s not all about holding the highest note for the longest time. Some of my idols in that respect would be Beyoncé, Rihanna, Sia and Bruno Mars. You’re also a dynamic front person. Do you model your look & performance on anyone or anything in particular? I love watching other artists perform. And I always do it in a very clinical way, trying to examine every creative decision they make about how they move and where they look, and when. In a live environment, the physical interpretation of the song becomes just as important as what’s going on in the music. When I’m onstage, I’m trying to figure out what’s working and do more of it. But as far as the actual style of how I perform and the way I move? That’s all derived for the hackneyed and cliché notion of “being yourself”. It took me a long time to figure out what that phrase actually means, but now that I’ve grasped it I can’t believe how important it is. Is it hard to be original in pop these days? I don’t think so. As far as I can see, there’s never been a more exciting time to be a pop artist. You’ve just got to really push yourself to innovate, within the bounds of the pop structure. Yeah, there are more people fighting for the spotlight, doing more and more outrageous things, but I see that as adding something to the pop climate. I’ve got nothing but love and respect for Top 40 because, at the end of the day, when you listen to the song at number one you know it’s there for a reason. How involved in the songwriting are you? Pedantically so. After going to music school I became such a prolific songwriter that I’ve really had to dial things back a bit when it comes to Openside to make sure it was a more collaborative experience. The songs are mostly co-written by guitarist PJ and me.

Have you identified any lyrical obsessions in your songs yet? With Openside, most of the songs I’ve written are either about a culture of community and empowerment, or feelings of total isolation, introspection and fear. Pretty much every song fits into one of those two categories. Which is funny, but I think that’s just the duality of being young and not having your shit together yet. You can look out at the world and all the crazy, confusing stuff that’s going on out there, and your response is usually one of those two things. It just depends on the day.

be harmful to my musical trajectory. But it’s important for everyone to challenge the confines of the gender binary and its place in modern society. The model is outdated and people are starting to realise that. This isn’t just about a small community of individuals. Rigid gender roles and expectations literally affect everyone. I see myself as part of a bigger effort to make the world of pop culture, and in particular music, more inclusive and accessible. It’s the same with lots of things in this industry: if you’re a member of a minority group, you’re a spokesperson by default. And I’m okay with that.

What do you hope to communicate with your words? I like songs that discuss things that a lot of people are too afraid to talk about. I feel like there are two ways to empower your listener, direct messages of reassurance being the most obvious, but also being totally honest about something you’re experiencing, even if it’s something dark or scary. A big part of the reason people really respond to artists like Twenty One Pilots is because of their authenticity of voice. They put all of their biggest fears and vulnerabilities in the foreground, and it’s such a powerful reminder that acknowledging these things isn’t the end of the world. In fact, it’s the opposite; it’s the only way to move forward and stop letting them define you.

People in the public eye often have ‘spokesperson’ or ‘role model’ thrust upon them. Do you feel any of that expectation or pressure? I definitely think it’s strange that artists, particularly female artists, are held to this high standard of role-model-hood while male sports stars, filmmakers and musicians get away with all sorts of outrageous shit. But as far as being a spokesperson goes, I mean, you don’t want it to interfere with your work too much. But I think that it’s good to feel a sense of responsibility when it comes to our art. When we’re putting content out there, we try to be mindful of the context through which it will be received. The public influence and interpretation of it is just as important as our intention

People have started to focus on this genderflux thing. Is that a bit of a red herring, or does it help describe you? I think it’s great that that message spoke to so many people. The fact that I ended up wearing that t-shirt in the Worth It video wasn’t planned at all. I’d worn it earlier to an appearance on the ZM night show and people on Instagram loved it. So when I was choosing clothes for the video, our manager Rachel suggested it on that basis. It was terrifying for me to even show up to the shoot with that t-shirt in my bag. It’s one thing for me to identify as gender non-conforming in my personal life, but it’s a totally different thing to own that as an artist. Suddenly you’re making a statement, whether you like it or not. But the response has been overwhelmingly positive and I’ve had so many people from the gender diverse community tell me how much it means to them to see someone like them performing on stage. And that is everything.

Besides music, what else fires your imagination & fuels your soul? There’s a really distinctive feeling you get in your stomach when a piece of art or something someone says connects. It doesn’t matter if it’s a depiction of joy, loneliness or isolation, for me the feeling is always the same. And that’s what I’m constantly seeking out in anything I watch or read, or any games I play. Video games are probably my favourite art form because of the way they put you right at the heart of the story. They have this ability to influence your emotions in such an intense way because you become truly involved in the outcome. In my opinion, video games are the most dynamic art form, and also the art of the future.

What do you hope people take from that, if anything? I mean, it’s still scary. I do worry that my being “out” as gender non-conforming could

Openside play the Auckland City Limits festival on March 19. Openside’s new single Branches from their forthcoming EP is out now on iTunes and Spotify. Watch Branches on YouTube


1 AM ALEX ALEX MUELLER @ IMG MODELS Photographed bY DAVID K SHIELDS fashion by JANAI ANSELMI


ALEX


opposite page: LACOSTE coat, G-STAR shirt and shoes, NEUW jeans; this page and previous spread: G-STAR jacket and shoes, SCOTCH & SODA blazer, HERMES necktie.


NEUW customised denim vest and jeans, LACOSTE shoes


NEUW jeans customised as top, BASSIKE jeans LACOSTE shirt (worn around waist).


WILSON NGUYEN coat worn over VANS cano jacket, BONDS shorts, PUMA leggings.


opposite page: ABRAND JEANS cardigan, LACOSTE shirt, BONDS shorts, PUMA leggings G-STAR shoes; this page: ROLLAS jackets LACOSTE trousers.


this page: G-STAR shirt, jacket, NEUW jeans; opposite page: NEUW bomber, ABRAND JEANS shirt, WILSON NGUYEN culottes and apron, G-STAR shoes.


M A 1 W O L L I W WILLOW @ IMG MODELS Photographed by CARA O'DOWD fashion by Lauren Dietze @ Viviens creative makeup by Claire Thompson @ company 1 HAIR by Frankie Endersbee @ district salon Stylist assistant Jem Taylor


W NOMIA linen jumpsuit at SHIFTING WORLDS.


opposite page: JONATHAN SIMKHAI dress at GRACE BOUTIQUE; this page: BIANCA SPENDER white jacket, NOMIA linen jumpsuit at SHIFTING WORLDS.


this page: ISSEY MIYAKE top at SHIFTING WORLDS, TIBI pants at FILY’S STABLE; opposite page: JACINTA JAMES black and navy dress, choker at PASSIONFRUIT SHOP, SUECOMMA shoes at LE HOOF, stylists own socks.


this spread: JACINTA JAMESÂ black leather top and pants.


BIANCA SPENDER black knit top, JACINTA JAMES silk pants.


this spread: JONATHAN SIMKHAI white shirt at GRACE BOUTIQUE, DANIEL AVAKIAN black pants, latex choker at PASSIONFRUIT SHOP.


this page: BEC & BRIDGE maroon dress worn over DANIEL AVAKIAN body suit; opposite page: ON PARKS asymmetric black knit top at FILY’S STABLE, KUWAI skirt.


1am

f o e r o M m A r fo ything 1 , s r e w ev ding ne s, u o l c e in ion, vid h s fa ries and o: t e l l o ga y pics g t r pa mag.com m a 1

1AM Issue 26  

Sexy new season fashion with rising model stars Franny, Beck, Jeet, Alex and Willow and NZ pop-punk priestess Possum Plows.

1AM Issue 26  

Sexy new season fashion with rising model stars Franny, Beck, Jeet, Alex and Willow and NZ pop-punk priestess Possum Plows.