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Introducing Sky Ferreira for Redken Hair by Jorge Joao, Redken Artist

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1AM JULY 2014 CONTENTS 08) 1 AM CAVEMAN 10) 1 AM ISMINI 12) 1 AM TEES 14) 1 AM KIMBRA 22) 1 AM CHECK OUT 36) 1 AM OWL EYES 40) 1 AM ROCKS OFF 48) 1 AM DARLING DANIEL 52) 1AM CABERET VOLTAIRE 62) 1 AM GET OUT GUIDE 64) 1 AM@1.00AM PARTY PICS


JULY COVER STAR: KIMBRA PHOTOGRAPHED IN LOS ANGELES BY KASSIA MEADOR. Kimbra wears AMEN bodysuit, SYREN STUDIOS skirt, FALGUNI & SHANE Peacock feather jacket. STORY PAGE 14

m a 1 PUBLISHER STATIC MOVE

CREATIVE DIRECTOR GLENN HUNT ADVERTISING DIRECTOR STEVE RICHARDS WRITERS JOEY FENAUGHTY THOM KERR ROSIE DALTON SARAH GOODING PHOTOGRAPHERS KASSIA MEADOR STEVEN POPOVICH CYBELE MALINOWSKI NICOLE MCCLUSKY RAPHAEL WALKER SARAH-JANE RUGG KITTY CALLAGHAN

S R O T U B I R T N CO

FASHION JANAI ANSELMI SARAH-JANE RUGG CAMILLE GARMENDINA AMELIAN KASHIRO HAMILTON NICOLE ADLER LENA JONES ALVIN MANALO MAKEUP & HAIR MARGO REGAN MIKAL SKY MARLEY GONZALEZ DALE DELAPORTE ANNA MILCZARCZYK SINDEN DENE KYYE REED

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Advertising and marketing enquires: Steve Richards 0467 668 888 steve@staticmove.com Editorial enquires: 1am@1am.co.nz www.1ammag.com © 2014 1AM Magazine. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior consent of the publisher. ABN 7681 586 2568


label.m Powder Pink Spray is available exclusively at all label.m Concept salons & TONI&GUY salons. To find your nearest stockist: www.labelm.com.au Follow us on :

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> 1ST UP PSYCHED OUT

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THE MASTERMIND OF SYDNEY’S HOTTEST PSYCHEDELIC CLUB NIGHTS IS ALSO THE TALENT BEHIND ITS SENSATIONAL POSTER ART. JOEY FENAUGHTY GOES CAVING WITH SEAN GALLAGHER.

TWO YEARS AGO THE VELVET CAVE WAS founded as the party destination for all psychedelic-inclined youths. Basing itself originally on the Cave Club in London, the semimonthly event is now the go-to night for fans of live music and especially the 60s psychedelic era. Anyone who has seen a poster for the Velvet Cave can attest to the fact that they are as visually impressive as the parties are sonically. I caught up with Velvet Cave mastermind Sean Gallagher to chat about his artistic process and the inspiration behind the Velvet Cave. 1AM: What was the inspiration to start the Velvet Cave? SEAN: The inspiration for the Velvet cave came from my time living in London. Dancing all the time at 60s freak-beat underground live music nights was a huge part of my entertainment whilst living there. I loved the outfits and the love of that era. Everyone was like a big family. I knew the whole psychedelic buzz was emerging here, so I wanted to put on a dedicated night to showcase that. 1AM: Did you originally intend it to be a one-off 8

event or was there always a plan to do more? SEAN: The first Velvet Cave took place when I came back to Australia on tour with my buddies The Horrors, so originally it was going to be just that one-off show. The first one was homage to their cult night in London called The Cave Club so that’s where the name came from. It was such a success I was inspired to make it a regular event. 1AM: Do you do different artwork for the posters depending on the bands that are playing? SEAN: The artwork is never really based around the bands playing. I come up with a theme for each event and the artwork always references that. The themes are normally taken from 60s psychedelic memorabilia. 1AM: Do you do the posters completely by hand and scan them in? What’s the process? SEAN: They are all done by hand in a number of layers and sections. It takes a very long time. I then individually scan each section in and bring it all together whilst experimenting with the colours. 1AM: Are there any particular artists that inspire your work?

SEAN: A range of artists inspire me. New artists and the old greats. I love expressive traditional oil painting. Another good source of inspiration is the collected series of original 60s psychedelic posters. The diversity in the artwork and how they seamlessly co-exist with so much typography is incredible. 1AM: Do you have any other plans to do another exhibition? SEAN: I’m too busy at the moment to do another exhibition but maybe in the near future. I’m currently working on a festival.
 1AM: What is your favourite album cover? SEAN: That’s a hard one but probably the self-titled Harumi record from 1968. He’s a Japanese Psychedelic babe. 1AM: Favourite Velvet Cave poster and why? SEAN: I think it would still have to be the detailed black and white one with all of the fauna and beautiful naked women. It was for The Living Eyes and The Bonniwells album release party. I think that one definitely resonated with people a lot. I also made it into a t-shirt. www.facebook.com/thevelvetcave


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> 1ST UP MODEL MEET ISMINI @ CHIC MODELS wears LONSDALE top, RAG & BONE pants.

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VISITING GREEK MODEL ISMINI PAPA INTERVIEWS HERSELF FOR 1AM’S ‘MEET THE MODEL’ PROFILE. PHOTOGRAPHY AND FASHION BY SARAH RUGG

My name: Ismini. My age: 24. My height: 1.79m. I am from: Athens, Greece. I live in: Manhattan, New York. I currently reside in: Sydney, Australia. I am here for: Modelling work but I also love spending time with my Aussie friends. My profession is: Model. I started modeling: while still in high school I was discovered one day after school. My passions are: Photography and film. Hobby: Photography. New hobbies: Surfing. Favourite activity: In Sydney is to wake up in the morning and go for a sauna and swim at The Icebergs. Favourite exercise: A nice balance between yoga and viper classes. Favourite TV shows: Boardwalk Empire, Modern Family, Arrested Development. Favourite movie: I can't think of just one but recently The Grand Budapest Hotel, Blue Jasmine, Dallas Buyers Club. Favourite song: All I need, by Air. Favourite band: Led Zeppelin. Favourite brands: Saint Laurent, Proenza Schouler, Isabel Marant, Rag & Bone and Maje. Favourite piece in my closet: My biker jacket from Rag&Bone and my Grandma's vintage embroidered jacket. Favourite ice-cream flavor: Pistachio. Favourite meal: Sunday brunch. Favourite season: Endless summer. Addictions: Nutella and shoes. Not combined. Morning ritual: I wash my face, brush my teeth and make a smoothie. I don't leave the house without: My phone.  Always in my bag: Sunglasses, keys, phone and lip balm. Beauty secret: A face scrub once a week (Cranberry Gomage by Arcona). Best vacation: Summers in the Greek Islands. Top 3 places I've visited: Sydney, Bali and Sardinia. Top 3 places I want to visit: Brazil, South Africa and Japan. My make-up every day: Moisturiser, lip balm, and concealer (if needed). My “night out” make up: Matte lipstick or eye tint in a cream form or High Beam by Becca for highlights. 10

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> 1ST UP DANCE DUO Liz Tillman (or Lizzy T, as I like to call her) has been a friend of mine for a number years now as well as my personal creative collaborator in many a drunken rap battle. She’s perhaps more well-known, however, for her musical contribution to Sydney psych darlings The Grease Arrestor. But she has also teamed up with Sean Duarte of the shoegaze band Virgo Rising to create dance duo TEES. Since the release of their videos for singles ‘Playground’ and ‘Live it Up’ the hype around TEES has been loud whilst word from the group themselves has remained very hush-hush. That is until now. TEES have announced their live debut will be at Sydney’s Club 77 this month. I spoke to Liz recently to try and figure out what drives the TEES machine. 1AM: So TEES are making their live debut this July. Why did you make us wait so fucking long? LIZ: Well, a combination of different things, really. Firstly, I think, like all good things, sometimes you just have to wait longer, to get the mouth salivating, you know, delayed gratification? Take slow-cooked beef for example. The longer it cooks, the tastier it is. So wouldn’t you rather wait that extra three months to guarantee a tender live set? Yes. On top of that, I was finishing uni, so my spare time was sparse for rehearsals. Now that the ball and chain of the institution has been cut, however, we will be spending the right amount of TEES time together. 1AM: How was your approach in songwriting and producing for TEES different to your other bands? LIZ: Well I guess to begin with, Sean’s original vision was to just produce and get various

m a 1 ES TE JOEY FENAUGHTY CHATS WITH LIZ TILLMAN OF SYDNEY DANCE DUO TEES ON THE EVE OF THEIR DEBUT LIVE PERFORMANCE.

TEES PHOTOGRAPHED BY KITTY CALLAGHAN

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vocalists on board to record his songs. But, once the first track ‘Playground’ came together, he couldn’t see the future of TEES any other way. So the first few songs were already written, and I just made up vocal melodies/lyrics. Now that we are rehearsing more though, we are writing more songs together, which is a lot of fun. Another main difference writing for TEES is that it’s just the two of us. And I guess because of that, it has been easier to formulate our different roles within the group, without having to discuss it and without worrying about everyone’s egos. 1AM: What are the future live plans after the debut? LIZ: Well, we have a few shows booked in, but I think we want to keep them fairly sparse as well. I guess it’s a different game to rock n roll. To keep its sincerity, we will have to limit the amount of shows we play. 1AM: Are you planning to release any more tracks this year? LIZ: Yeah, we are planning to release an album by the end of the year. We won’t do an EP though. We take an all or nothing approach to our music, which kind of answers the first question too - the live set had to be just right. 1AM: What sort of music genres or artists have influenced TEES? LIZ: I guess all the stuff that was coming out of Creation Records during the late ‘80s and early ‘90s has influenced our sound in lots of ways. Saint Etienne, Love Corporation and Primal Scream are huge influences, but we cant ignore all of the Chicago house that was coming out during the mid 80’s that has had a massive

influence on our sound. Production style, however, has also been a great interest to us in regards to changing or attempting to reimagine what dance music can be. 1AM: What sort of music did you grow up listening to?  LIZ: Like any kid growing up in the ‘90s with parents who grew up in the ‘60s and ‘70s I listened to bands like The Beatles, The Stranglers and The Cure. Mum always liked Oasis and we listened to heaps of classical music. Sean, being a bit older than me, grew up more with a dichotomy of grunge and dance music, when it was taboo to like both. Times have changed now, we hope.  1AM: Who are your favourite contemporary acts at the moment? LIZ: Lucy Cliché, Four Door, Hannah Lockwood and Moon Holiday. That’s just a few groups who I guess we feel are doing something similar to what we’re doing in our own music. However we aren’t all that narcissistic. Rainbow Chan was amazing at Vivd and even the new Low Life albums pretty sick. I guess we like lots of stuff really. Even Andras Fox and Michael Ozone are really cool. I just realised I’m being all local, haha, 1AM: Finally, what’s your favourite album ever? I don’t really know. There’s too many, I think. Brian Eno’s Discreet Music is definitely a favourite. It’s just such a beautiful trip between light and darkness.  Catch TEES’ debut performance at Club 77, Sydney on July 11. TEES on: Facebook Soundcloud YouTube


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NOW OPEN AT EMPORIUM MELBOURNE


WITH THE HIGHLY ANTICIPATED RELEASE OF KIMBRA’S SECOND ALBUM THE GOLDEN ECHO NEXT MONTH, PHOTOGRAPHER AND KIMBRA COLLABORATOR  THOM KERR SITS DOWN WITH OUR GRAMMY AWARD-WINNING COVER STAR FOR AN EXCLUSIVE INSIGHT INTO THE CREATIVE NARRATIVE OF HER CAREER. KIMBRA PHOTOGRAPHED IN LOS ANGELES FOR 1AM BY KASSIA MEADOR.

1am

FASHION BY CAMILLE GARMENDIA & AMELIAN KASHIRO HAMILTON MAKEUP BY MIKAL SKY HAIR BY MARLEY GONZALEZ FASHION ASSISTANT KAT HSU

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kimbra FEDERICA VACCARO dress, OPENING CEREMONY for ROBERT CLERGERIE shoes, LEG AVENUE socks.


“I LEARNED THAT YOU CAN’T EVER REALLY PREDICT AN OUTCOME FOR A PIECE OF ART. IT BECOMES ITS OWN ENTITY ONCE IT IS RELEASED TO THE WORLD”


BERNHARD WILLHELM top, LAQUAN SMITH bustier, G.V.G.V. skirt, UNIF shoes.


this page: LA RAP ( FREAK CITY) top and skirt, AISHA dress, ZARA BAYNE ring. opposite page: GENEVIEVE CLIFFORD skirt, ZARA BAYNE leather harness, LAQUAN SMITH bustier,MARIANA HARUTUNIAN rosary, VALERJ POBEGA shawl.

BORN IN NEW ZEALAND AND NOW BASED in Los Angeles (via a stint in Melbourne), Kimbra’s innovative and visionar y musical approach saw her awarded two Grammys last year, among many other accolades, following the release of her debut album Vows. With her highly anticipated follow-up album The Golden Echo due for release in August, we asked Thom Kerr, Sydney-based photographer and Kimbra’s Creative Director, to inter view Kimbra for us because of his valuable insight into her artistic development. Thom’s for ward-thinking concepts, with Kimbra’s collaboration, have translated through mediums that include music videos, tour set designs and album artwork. All of which are strong reflections of Kimbra as an artist. THOM: I remember discovering you, Kimbra, via the clip for Cameo Lover. A photographer friend of mine introduced me to the song and I had that jealous feeling of someone discovering something amazing before I did! Then I fell into a Kimbra spiral with the album Vows for quite some time – to the point where the people who shared my office with me were complaining that I needed to listen to something else for a while! How long did Vows take to write? KIMBRA: There were songs on Vows that I

wrote when I was about 16, like Settle Down and The Build Up. After moving to Melbourne I spent a lot of time fleshing out new songs in my bedroom and creating the sound worlds with François Tétaz and M-Phazes. I was 17 when I first moved to Melbourne and I feel as though I was working on the album from that day onward! I remember being very impatient throughout the process and wanting to get the work out sooner, but I was lucky to have a team who always advised me to be patient. Your first album is your first impression to the world, so I now realise how important it is to refine the body of work and let it evolve naturally, rather than rushing it. THOM: A lot of people ask me, so I wanted to ask you: how did you discover my photography? KIMBRA: I first came across your work when I was working with [fashion designer] Jaime Lee – I had seen a lot of her lookbooks that you shot and also came to know the designer Elliot WardFear, who you worked with. I was so intrigued by the other-worldly undertone to your images and the way they all took on a surreal angle that went beyond just making the subject look beautiful or refined. There was a punchiness and an intrigue to your work that I was instantly attracted to. I could see you were very drawn to set-ups that threw your subject into a juxtapos-

ing world, which is an idea I also like to embrace in music. I remember I was asked by my label to put together a list of photographers that I loved, in anticipation for an upcoming promo photo shoot. You were up top of that list. It just so happened that you were available and excited to shoot with me. It felt very serendipitous! THOM: Do you remember the first time we met in person? KIMBRA: Yes, it was in that apartment in Brooklyn! I remember you cracked a hilarious joke moments after walking in the door and I was instantly so relaxed with you. It’s an intimate exchange, working with a photographer that you have just met. But it actually felt more like we were embarking on a collaborative art project together, rather than a promo photo shoot. That was special to me. I also remember how tall you were and your outrageous laugh! THOM: I remember being super impressed by how motivated you were, because I knew you were operating on next to no sleep as you were touring. What do you remember most about that first photo shoot? KIMBRA: That amazing park in Brooklyn. It was wintertime in New York so all the trees were barren, and you set up next to this big expanse of dirt for our first shot. I remember thinking ‘How is this going to translate?’ I was


standing in this slippery mud in high heels and a long black Anna Langdon dress and starting to wonder if this had been the best decision. Then my jaw dropped when I saw the photos and how you had managed to frame the seemingly mundane backdrop into this Tim Burtonesque, Pan’s Labyrinth-type landscape. I hadn’t noticed, but there was amazing fog that was hovering just above the muddy ground and it made for the most beautiful, eerie photographs. It was in that moment that I knew what an incredible eye you had. THOM: For me that was an awesome day, knowing we were shooting amazing pictures. I think it was the beginning of a creative tangent! I remember that was the stage when Somebody That I Used to Know was clawing its way up the charts. Do you remember where you were and how you found out it had hit number one in the US? KIMBRA: I had just got to London when it hit number one. I remember standing in customs at Heathrow and thinking how crazy it all was and remembering the day we recorded those vocals in my bedroom with no idea it would reach this far! THOM: What do you feel you learned from that whole collaboration and roller-coaster ride? KIMBRA: I have felt an overwhelming sense of infinite possibility from the whole experience.

You never know how something will resonate once you put it out there for people. I learned that you can’t ever really predict an outcome for a piece of art. It becomes its own entity once it is released to the world, and there’s a surrender that takes place. You let go and see where it takes you. I sometimes felt like a spectator during the whole thing, almost observing from a distance while this song was taking off around the world. It was very strange and rewarding all at once. THOM: When we were shooting in Los Angeles a couple of months back, you heard your song Sally I Can See You come on my playlist. You were surprised because you hadn’t listened to it for so long. In fact, you commented that you don’t really listen to your music once you’ve released it. Why is that? KIMBRA: I become so deeply connected and attached to the work while I am making it. It is all-consuming. I dream of the songs, I think about them throughout the day, I construct and deconstruct elements of them meticulously till the early hours of the morning. It becomes very intense, so the moment I finish becomes the moment I also let go. This is never easy, but it’s imperative so that I keep moving forward and don’t become wrapped up in the constant analysis of work I have done. It’s like a cleansing

season. I’ve had my time with them and they were a gift I received and now have the honour of giving back. I like that idea of passing on art. Letting it be new and fresh for someone else and letting go after I have learned what I needed from it. THOM: What albums are you listening to on repeat? KIMBRA: I have been listening to Steve Reich’s Music for 18 Musicians a lot recently. I’m also a huge fan of Connan Mockasin’s album Caramel and the Last Dance EP from She’s So Rad. I’m keeping up to date with my New Zealand music! THOM: How did the idea and concept for The Golden Echo come to you? KIMBRA: The title came to me one night before I descended into a deep sleep. I started researching the words ‘golden echo’ to see where they led and I discovered a flower by the name of Narcissus Golden Echo. I became fascinated by its beauty and simplicity and also its connection to the Greek mythology of Narcissus, which became a theme for the imagery. There is also a poem of the same name by a Jesuit Monk, which became very influential during the writing of the record. It contained this quote: ‘How to keep beauty from vanishing away? To give beauty back, beauty back.’ I was struck by this >


“THE GOLDEN ECHO IS SYMBOLIC OF A SOUND THAT CALLS YOU TOWARD IT, A SIGNPOST THAT URGES ONE TO LISTEN DEEPER AND LOOK CLOSER” sentiment and this sense of being called outward, away from the constant projection of self, back in connection with the whole. The flower came to symbolise this for me and inspired the name of the album. THOM: How long have you been working on The Golden Echo? KIMBRA: I set up a studio a few hours out of Melbourne in January of last year and started putting together sketches and working with my band on some ideas. But it wasn’t until I moved to a farm in Silver Lake, Los Angeles (literally the day after the Grammys) that I started knuckling down on the writing and pre-production. It has felt like a really long time because of the intensity and amount of work created in such a short amount of time. I didn’t take any breaks, working on this album – I essentially came straight off tour and got started. But it meant there was a real momentum and sense of excitement about the project. THOM: Yesterday you went into the label headquarters to approve the final album artwork. What was it like seeing the packaging in the flesh? KIMBRA: It was pretty emotional, actually! For so long this album has been an idea in my head, a collection of songs that were slowly trying to find their role in some big abstract film, and at times I was unsure it would even get across the line to form a coherent picture. But to see it in its final form and see it as a whole piece of art was so rewarding. It was even more rewarding to know that every aspect of that album came from a loving and authentic place of creativity. The imagery, the music, the words; it all feels like a gift and expression of the soul, handcrafted for whoever will now receive it. It was like a chapter of my life closing, and I now feel excited to start the next. THOM: Do you have any songs on the album that are your favourites? I know you would love them all, but do any in particular really stand out to you? KIMBRA: As You Are is the most revealing and vulnerable song for me on the record. Working with Daniel Johns and Van Dyke Parks on that song was an amazing experience, they are two of my favourite people in the world and I think our energies together inhabit such a unique space. Rescue Him is another favourite of mine because I think it lyrically speaks to a side of the human character that we often find hard to

talk about or admit to. It’s quite a dark song… it explores a kind of hopeless romanticism and state of denial that people can fall into when they are blinded by love. Sonically it’s also one of my favourites, because there are so many lush textures and sounds. THOM: Who were some of the people you worked with on this album and why did you choose to bring them on board? KIMBRA: I wanted everyone who played on the album to bring a unique personality and perspective. I wanted nothing to feel ‘filler’ or without a purpose. I thought a lot about what emotion I wanted to convey for each song and who would be best to either intensify that or juxtapose it to create a new angle. Collaborating with Rich Costey (who co-produced the record with me) was already an interesting decision because this record is quite R&B-influenced, whereas Rich’s background is with bands like The Mars Volta, Muse, Interpol and Mew. He is known for creating amazing dimension with sound and I wanted this album to feel panoramic. Thundercat was another big influence on the record. He played on a lot of the songs and always brought a certain kind of swagger and abandon to the songs that became a recurring colour throughout the album. Every time I brought one of these musicians in, I would be challenged in some way to look at the songs differently, and that was invaluable. THOM: What was it like performing some of these songs live for the first time recently in Melbourne? Was it a challenge converting them to a live format? KIMBRA: It’s always a challenge translating my songs from the studio to the stage. But I enjoy it! I don’t really think about how I’m going to do it live when I’m in the studio – I don’t want that to stunt the creativity. I’m fascinated by the place where the voice breaks, finding that tension or that struggle where you push yourself past what you think you can do. It can be difficult when we rehearse and realise we simply can’t replicate all the sounds by ourselves, but I also think it forces the band and I to grow as live performers and think outside of the box. For example, we now have my guitarist Timon Martin working with a midi guitar, which triggers off preloaded samples from his guitar! This opens up a wide range of what we can pull off live. I also feel lucky that I have a fan base that expects to hear the songs played differently at our shows

– we’ve always done it that way and it keeps things feeling fresh. THOM: What do you hope people will take away from The Golden Echo? KIMBRA: I hope they will be drawn to live inside the music. I have created this body of work with a lot of love and care for detail; the words beneath the words, the sounds beneath the sounds. I want it to feel like a journey into the human experience; our search for self-identity and spiritual significance. The Golden Echo is symbolic of a sound that calls you toward it, a signpost that urges one to listen deeper and look closer. I hope this record will open that space for people – and maybe soundtrack a small part of their lives. THOM: What is the next project you are about to embark on? Can we expect a tour? KIMBRA: We are close to announcing tour dates, I can’t say too much yet! But I plan to travel a lot with this record and return to some of the amazing places I was lucky enough to play with my first album. I also have many exciting projects surrounding this album, including art exhibitions and creative endeavours providing platforms for fans and artists to echo the sentiment of the album: ‘to give beauty back’. THOM: What is your driving force for this next chapter of your life? KIMBRA: To bring these songs to people oneon-one and engage with the fans who have supported me in this next phase of music.  THOM: What words of wisdom would have for any artist who dances between the worlds of art and commerce? KIMBRA: Trust your instincts. It’s important to be aligned and strong in your vision as an artist first and foremost, then understand the commerce side as a vehicle to share your art. It doesn’t have to mean that you let go of your integrity, but it is a dance that requires practise and partnering with the right people.  THOM: And finally, what is one of your favourite quotes that you live by? KIMBRA: “One does not need to know precisely what is happening, or exactly where it is all going. What you need is to recognise the possibilities and challenges offered by the present moment, and to embrace them with courage, faith and hope.” – Thomas Merton. The Golden Echo is due to be released in New Zealand and Australia on August 15.


VALERJ POBEGA dress, G.V.G.V. bra, ZANA BAYNE corset, BERNHARD WILLHELM shoes.


1am check out

PHOTOGRAPHY BY STEVEN POPOVICH FASHION BY JANAI ANSELMI MAKEUP BY MARGO REGAN using ELLIS FAAS HAIR BY DALE DELAPORTE @ THE NAMES AGENCY FOR PREMA MODEL EVA DOWNEY @ THE AGENCY


MATICEVSKI top, LEXI leather skirt, ZAMBESI green leather jacket, ZAMBEST coat.


KATE SYLVESTER leather dress, NANUSHKA grey wool jacket, STRATEAS.CARLUCCI leather jacket, LONELY HEARTS shirt tied around waist, CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN boots.


ALEX PERRY leather dress, DION LEE x RM Williams boots.


GINGER & SMART dress.


SERPENT & THE SWAN mesh dress (worn underneath), MILK & THISTLE top, KARA LIU coat, ZIMMERMANN skirt.


STOLEN GIRLFRIENDS CLUB grey knitted dress and checked top, ZHIVAGO pencil skirt (worn underneath), ZAMBESI leather skirt, SKIN boots.


GINGER & SMART dress, SOPHIE COX heels.


ZAMBESI coat and skirt, BEC & BRIDGE leather jacket.


OUT INCORPORATED swimsuit, STRATEAS.CARLUCCI sleeveless blazer, LOBELIA COUTURE skirt, LIFEWITHBIRD coat, PUSHMATAAHA pendant.


MILK & THISTLE print dress, CAMILLA & MARC leather leggings.


ZIMMERMANN dress, BEAU COOPS boots, JOHN HARDY, STOLEN GIRLFRIENDS CLUB and 2BANDITS rings .


MATICEVSKI skirt worn over KATE SYLVESTER dress.


1am owl eyes FRESH OFF HER US TOUR, WHICH INCLUDED A SET AT COACHELLA, 1AM NABBED SINGER/SONWRITER BROOKE ADDAMO, AKA OWL EYES, FOR A SHOOT IN THE BLUE MOUNTAINS BEFORE SHE RETURNED TO MELBOURNE. Q&A BY ROSIE DALTON. PHOTOGRAPHY AND FASHION BY SARAH RUGG MAKEUP AND HAIR BY MARGO REGAN USING ELLIS FAAS AND ORIGINAL & MINERAL


LIMEDROP skirt, top & sleeveless blazer, MIU MIU sunglasses, LOVE OBSESSED necklace.


“I LIKE TO FEEL SEXY AND COMFORTABLE MELBOURNE-NATIVE BROOKE ADDAMO HAS come a long way since she first burst onto the music scene by way of Australian Idol. With her new album, Nightswim, out now on iTunes and a string of international festivals under her belt, Brooke’s career is on the up and up. Fresh from her US tour alongside Flight Facilities, the talented songstress fills me in on what it’s like to play Coachella and the story behind her welldocumented love of cats. 1AM: Where are you as you answer these questions? BROOKE: I’m in freezing cold Melbourne. 1AM: Can you tell me a little bit about your recent trip to the USA? BROOKE: This year has been pretty busy so far. I went over to the States earlier in the year and played SXSW festival, which was so crazy. Then I went back over to tour with Flight Facilities. All the shows were sold out and amazing, but my favourite experience was playing Coachella! 1AM: What is your favourite thing about arriving home after touring? BROOKE: Sleeping in my own bed for sure! 1AM: What do you love most about singing and which other musicians are you particularly inspired by? BROOKE: I just love music in general. I love writing and performing and I’m inspired by all types of artists and music. 1AM: How would you describe your personal style? 3

BROOKE: Feminine, effortless and chic. I like to feel sexy and comfortable in whatever I am wearing, especially when I’m on stage. I also wear a lot of black and white. 1AM: How do you think your style has evolved over the years? BROOKE: It has definitely been refined [laughs]. I used to wear a lot of colours and try different things on stage — I guess I was just experimenting, but I think I have found that keeping it simple works best for me. 1AM: What has been your biggest ‘pinch-me’ moment to date? BROOKE: Playing Coachella with Flight Facilities this year was pretty massive. 1AM: What is your ultimate guilty pleasure? BROOK: When I am hung over, it’s usually French Fries and post-mix coke. 1AM: How do you think your musical style has changed since your early beginnings as an artist? BROOKE: I guess that, just like my style, it has become more refined. Even with my newer, unreleased songs that I am writing, I try to keep everything simple and not over think it. 1AM: I’ve heard you are a devoted cat fan, do you own any cats? BROOKE: I do absolutely love cats; I used to own a beautiful little white one but I don’t anymore. I am away a lot and don’t have time for that kind of commitment at the moment, which is sad, but I hope I will in the future. 1AM: If you weren’t making music, where do you think you would be and what would you be doing?

BROOKE: I’m not really sure. I know I would always be doing something creative and I do love fashion, so maybe something in fashion. 1AM: How would you describe your day on-set for this shoot with 1AM Magazine? BROOKE: It was really fun and easy. A lot of shoots are tiring and long, but it was a team of three girls including me and we all worked really well together. Sarah shot on film as well, which was a bit different so it made the shoot more exciting. 1AM: What do you like most about the Australian music industry? BROOKE: I love being surrounded by amazing talent! 1AM: What are your greatest influences when writing music; are your lyrics informed mostly by life experience, or do you also find inspiration in film and art? BROOKE: I am a really visual person, so I find a lot of inspiration from film and pictures. I also listen to a lot of different types of music, but usually lyrics do come from some sort of personal experience. 1AM: And finally, what is your earliest musical memory? BROOKE: Probably my first singing concert, where I sang Alicia Keys and was so nervous that I didn’t open my eyes or move my feet for the entire song.

Nightswim on iTunes Owl Eyes on Facebook


IN WHATEVER I AM WEARING�

opposite page: BEC & BRIDGE blue dress, ZARA leather jacket, LOVE OBSESSED necklace, VERSACE glasses; this page, top: FREE PEOPLE checked pants & lace top, VERSACE glasses; bottom: stylist own vintage Jesus And Mary Chain tee, LOVE OBSESSED necklace, ZARA leather jacket.


PHOTOGRAPHY BY NICOLE MCCLUSKEY FASHION BY LENYA JONES HAIR AND MAKEUP BY SINDEN DENE  MODEL TEGAN @ THE AGENCY AUSTRALIA RETOUCHING TAMZEN APPUNN

1am rocks off


opposite page: BOOHOO pvc skirt, vintage fur jacket, studded arm piece created by stylist; this page: VANS top, A BRAND shorts, WANDERLUST silver stud and triangle rings (worn throughout).


RUBY SEES ALL leotard and leopard biker jacket, stylist’s own customised fishnet tights and studded necklace.


GUESS leather jacket, A BRAND shorts, customised fishnet tights worn as sleeves.


plastic wrap top by stylist, DANIEL AVAKIANÂ leather shorts, vintage fur collar.


stylists own fishnet tights.


BOOHOO sequin shorts, stylists own fishnet tights.


NEUW DENIM jeans worn over shoulders, AMY VIOLET floral crown.


1am darlin daniel LOCAL PSYCHEDELIC MUSIC LEGEND DANIEL DARLING HAS REINVENTED HIMSELF WITH HIS NEW BAND THE DANDELION. JOEY FENAUGHTY DELVES INTO THE PAST TO DISCOVER IT’S ALL JUST DANDY!

PHOTOGRAPHY BY RAPHAEL WALKER FASHION BY ALVIN MANALO HAIR BY KYYE REED MAKEUP BY MARGO REGAN using ELLIS FAAS

DISCOUNT UNIVERSE sequin bustier.


THE DOLLY ROCKER MOVEMENT WAS ONE OF THE most prominent bands of the early 2000s psychedelic music scene in Australia. Singer/ Guitarist Daniel Darling went on to front Kill City Creeps and has now launched his latest band, The Dandelion. Their new self-titled EP is sure to please 
fans of Daniel’s previous work, with its spooky vibes 
and rich psychedelic influences. I caught up with 
Daniel to talk about his history and the fresh start 
that is The Dandelion. 1AM: What sort of music did you grow up listening to? DANIEL: When I was young I used to get up in the morning and watch Video Hits on TV, and I think my favourite song at the time was ‘Bad Medicine’ by Bon Jovi. 1AM: When did you start playing music? DANIEL: I was given a guitar by my grandfather when I was eight years old. I got inspired to play it by seeing 
a folk band. We went on a family trip to a caravan park 
on the south coast – I think it was at Merry Beach – and there was a folk band playing melancholy sea shanties. As soon as we got back to Sydney I picked up the guitar and tried to play. I started getting lessons, but I think that because I was so young, it was hard to be enthusiastic about learning things like ‘Mary Had a Little 
Lamb’, even though I would probably like to learn those songs now [laughs]. It wasn’t until high school that I started a band [called Token] with some friends. At the time we were inspired by grunge and were really into the soundtracks of old bodyboarding and surfing movies. 1AM: They used to be pretty good!

1AM: After you finished school did you continue to play in bands? DANIEL: I played in this band for a while – I think we were just playing covers – I was just asked by the original drummer I played with in Token. But by that stage I had gotten really interested in electronic music. Then when I turned 18 I got into the club scene. 1AM: What sort of scene was it then? DANIEL: Oh god! It was like high-energy dance music, so I used to go to day clubs like Black Market in Chippendale. It’s funny to think of myself in that period, I was just like a kid in a candy store. 1AM: So did you play in any bands during that time? DANIEL: I was still strumming my guitar, but I was quite immersed in the club scene. But then I became really 
disenfranchised. For me it had become about how good the drugs were, rather than how good the music was. So I just started going through my old records and out of nowhere I discovered The Brian Jonestown Massacre. This was 2002, and I had already made the decision that I wanted to start a new band with the ‘60s in mind. Then I heard BJM and I was like,
‘Oh, I can do sixties music that’s still relevant today! I don’t have to try and play guitar like Jimi Hendrix or Jerry Garcia or something!’ So I started advertising in Drum Media and tried to get a band together, and that eventually became The Dolly Rocker Movement. 1AM: How long did you guys play together in Australia before you went to Los Angeles? DANIEL: Everything kicked off in 2003, and we played all the way up to 2009 and released three albums [Electric Sunshine, A Purple Journey

enced by my time in LA. Everything about that band reeked of LA [laughs]. 1AM: So what happened with Kill City Creeps? DANIEL: I had a spiritual awakening. Basically I needed to take some time out. I was very consumed by a lot of industry ideals, for quite a few years. I lost sight of the reason why I was actually doing it [making music]. That’s why at that time my recording output was quite low, because I needed to sort out a lot of stuff and I was going through a lot of changes. I was still a kid trying to figure out who I really was, and those bands
were the best outlet for me to explore myself. I needed a few months for time out. I realised I had so many things to work on, personally. It was around that time that I fell into a drug addiction. In saying that, it was a time when I was able to reflect on the past and mend a few things, but then I needed to move out of Sydney. So last year I moved up to the Blue Mountains for six months. 1AM: Was that a reaction to your drug addiction? DANIEL: Yeah, it was to clean myself up and also to 
reconnect with the earth. I was having these amazing connections with these ethereal beings but my connection
to Mother Earth was very little. I even went and had a shamanic healing and the shaman told me that all the activity was on top of my head but my body was withering away because I wasn’t balanced. I didn’t have that connection with God and Goddess and that connection with the earth. When I took that time out I was able to reconnect with the earth and the connection with my spiritual beings became a lot stronger. That’s when I started to record with The Dandelion.

“FOR ME IT HAD BECOME ABOUT HOW GOOD THE DRUGS DANIEL: Yeah! I figured out how to record from the VHS to my cassette tapes and I’d listen to that. It’s funny looking 
back, there were bands like Spiderbait and Gilgamesh and I would go to under-18 shows and see them play. Then we [Token] would play house parties until we slowly started getting into stuff like Deep Purple, Black Sabbath and stoner rock, and from that I sort of went into rewind.
 I started listening to early ‘70s stuff and watched a documentary on San Francisco and London in the ‘60s, and the birth of the so-called ‘psychedelic era’. That’s when I first heard of bands like Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane, early Pink Floyd and The Doors. I was obsessed with The Doors and more obscure stuff like Country Joe and the Fish. I really wanted our band to move in that direction, but it never happened. I guess we just sort of fell apart, and then school ended. 1AM: Were you singing and playing guitar at that stage? DANIEL: Yeah. There was another guy named Andrew Rugg, who was also singing and playing guitar, and my 
brother was on bass and Michael O’Connor was on drums. That was the first line-up. 1AM: What sort of songs would your grandfather play? DANIEL: He would play a lot of folk songs, Roy Orbison, Elvis – he used to sing a lot of that stuff. I remember when I was really little all the grandkids would sit around and my grandpa would play. I think I was one of the only grandkids out of my immediate family who ended up continuing to play the guitar.

Through 
the Mod Machine and Our Days Mind the Tyme]. 1AM: What sort of bands did you play with then? 
Are many of them still active? DANIEL: When we started there weren’t really any bands similar to us, except for a band called The Lovetones, who we supported once. Then I started meeting a few more people who were into The Brian Jonestown Massacre – this was before the Dig! movie came out. So there were just a few people who had started to form bands. That’s when The Astral Kaleidoscope, The Laurels, Belles Will Ring and a bunch of other bands started. I don’t really know what happened after that. I mean obviously The Laurels are still going and they have evolved – they totally have their own sound now. Then in 2008 I was asked to play guitar with The Lovetones on their American tour and Matt [the singer] introduced me to a bunch of people while I was over there. I was really keen to go back. 1AM: Then you went for a whole year. How long did 
it take you to start a band in Los Angeles? DANIEL: It didn’t take long at all, because I’d met a few people and there’s an abundance of musicians there. I tried out a few different bands. Although after a while I became more concerned with surviving and paying the rent. I was working full-time at a gas station and the wages were so low. 1AM: When you got back to Sydney did you continue to play gigs with The Dolly Rocker Movement or did you form Kill City Creeps straight away? DANIEL: I formed Kill City Creeps pretty much straight away. That band was definitely directly influ-

I decided to begin this completely new chapter and started to be a completely new person. 1AM: When you started The Dandelion, was that just you on the recordings? DANIEL: Yeah, I played all the instruments. It was a nice process, I’ve always preferred working like that, on my own in the studio. 1AM: Is the album The Strange Case of the Dandelion a digital-only release? DANIEL: Well first I just released the album myself, but then Bad Afro Records in Denmark, who released The Dolly Rocker Movement, wanted to release it. So we decided to do two EPs. The first EP is already out on vinyl, and the second one is coming out in October. It has some new songs on it that haven’t been released yet. 1AM: As you said, you needed The Dandelion to be a fresh band to mark your own fresh start. Do you think you have begun to achieve what you wanted to, both musically and personally, in terms of your 
spirituality? DANIEL: It’s difficult to say, really. I think the band is just an extension of my life, not my whole life, and me needing to move away was more than just for musical reasons. I guess The Strange Case of The Dandelion reflected the start of something new. But within that year and now moving back to Sydney, I feel like I’m a different person again. That’s life [laughs]. You just keep on changing. The Dandelion 12” is available now through Bad Afro Records. Dandelion on: Facebook Bandcamp


WERE, RATHER THAN HOW GOOD THE MUSIC WAS”

top: ZHIVAGO embellished gown, vintage fur coat and jewellery from ZOO EMPORIUM, DESERT DESIGNS silk scarf; bottom: ZHIVAGO sequinned dress, Zhivago; vintage fur coat and jewellery from ZOO EMPORIUM.


PHOTOGRAPHY BY CYBELE MALINOWSKI FASHION BY NICOLE ADLER MAKEUP BY ANNA MILCZARCZYK HAIR BY CELESTE RUSSO MODELS TEGAN @ THE AGENCY JACK @ LONDON MGT GROUP PHOTO ASSISTANT AMELIA JULIE DOWD

1am cabaret voltaire


opposite page: SCOTCH AND SODA shirt and jacket, LAGERFELD hat; this page: VIKTORIA + WOODS jumper, GUESS jacket, CHELSEA DE LUCA necklace.


vintage jacket, LONELY HEARTS dress, ZOE KARSSEN singlet, DUCHESSA necklace, CC SKYE ring from PIERRE WINTER FINE JEWELS.


SAXONY jacket, DR DENIM vest, THE CRITICAL SLIDE SOCIETY singlet, SCOTCH AND SODA pants.


DANIELA-STEPHANIE dress, ST XAVIER cuffs, LONELY lingerie set, stylist’s own hat and earrings.


Tegan wears JESSICA MARTINO jacket, RACHAEL ZOE necklace from PIERRE WINTER FINE JEWELS. Jack wears DANIN DILEMMA top from May Day Market.


JASON WU shirt and pants, DANIN DILEMMA leather jacket, TRANSFORMER earrings from PIERRE WINTER, CHELSEA DE LUCA rings, TRUFFLE shoes.


SAXONY jacket.


SAND suit. DR DENIM shirt.


DANIELA-STEPHANIE dress, LONELY bralet top, NYLONS earrings.


> 1AM GET OUT GUIDE

Tully Arnot Lonely Sculpture 2014

Sky Ferreira

Chris Hadfield

Beaches

Salman Rushdie Melbourne Writers Festival

SKY FERREIRA 23 July at Prince Bandroom, Melbourne (Oztix) 25 July at The Metro Theatre, Sydney (All Ages)

Skaters

LEAPS AND BOUNDS MUSIC FESTIVAL

MELBOURNE WRITERS FESTIVAL

From a preening MySpace artist to an internationally touring, major label-signed avant-pop singer and high fashion model, Sky Ferreira somehow still lingers on the edge of the stardom. Catch one of her Splendour in the Grass sideshows before she starts selling out stadiums, like recent tour mate Miley Cyrus.

Various venues, Melbourne 4 – 20 July For the second year Leaps and Bounds Music Festival celebrates the vibrant music scene in Melbourne’s inner north-east. Its epic list of gigs includes mostly local artists such as Beaches, Client Liaison and Primitive Calculators, plus other events like Open House, in which Melbourne institutions open their doors to the public. www.leapsandboundsmusicfestival.com/

Various venues, Melbourne 21 – 31 August Over 400 authors, thinkers, musicians and poets from around the world converge on Melbourne for the hugely popular Melbourne Writers Festival. The program of discussions, workshops and performances is available on 18 July, and with events including Nobel Prize-winners and New Yorker staffers, you’re going to want to book early. www.mwf.com.au/

#FOMO

FESTIVAL OF DANGEROUS IDEAS

SKATERS AND DARLIA

Artereal, 747 Darling Street, Rozelle, Sydney 3 July – 2 August Four of Australia’s most exciting emerging and established artists take a fun and fascinating look at FOMO (Fear Of Missing Out), the slang term that has come to define our common state. Tully Arnot, Liam Benson, Criena Court and Louise Zhang’s creations are both playful and pivotal. Don’t miss this! www.artereal.com.au/home/fomo

Sydney Opera House, Sydney 30 – 31 August With events including “Tackling the Narcissism Epidemic” and “Publish and Be Jailed”, The Festival of Dangerous Ideas addresses interesting and important issues of our time. Get ready to revel in the inspiration that comes from seeing Pussy Riot’s Masha Gessen and astronaut Chris Hadfield bring their ideas to life before your eyes. fodi.sydneyoperahouse.com/

24 July at Oxford Art Factory, Sydney (Moshtix) 26 July at The Corner Hotel, Melbourne

(Ticketek)

(Ticket Scout)

Exuding that kind of effortless cool that only New Yorkers can possess, Skaters play a peppy, poppy brand of rock and roll that puts a playful twist on the style popularised by The Strokes and The Walkmen. They’re joined by the equally exciting rising grunge band Darlia, from Blackpool, UK.


350 YeArs oF UnderweAr in FAshion

Bendigo Art Gallery 19 July – 26 october 2014 www.undressedbendigo.com • #undressedbgo Tickets 03 5434 6100 • Packages 1800 813 153 exhibition organised by the Victoria and Albert Museum, London Official Hotel Partner

@exploreBendigo @BgoArtGallery

Fashion photograph, John French, 1960s. Museum no. JF6076/5. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London


> 1AM PARTY PICS

1

1 @ am

m a .00

KOMONO X JEAN-MICHEL BASQUIAT LAUNCH @ DISTRICT O1, SYDNEY AND JESSE WILLESEE ‘CAM GIRLS’ LIVE @ THE DARLO, SYDNEY


SECRET SOUNDS PRESENTS BY ARRANGEMENT WITH ARTIST VOICE

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WED 17 SEPT C I V I C T H E AT R E , N E W C A S T L E

SUN 14 SEPT SYDNEY OPERA HOUSE , SYDNEY

FRI 26 SEPT PA L A I S T H E AT R E , M E L B O U R N E

W I T H S P E C I A L G U E S T S VA N C O U V E R S L E E P C L I N I C

TICKETS ON SALE NOW FROM USUAL OUTLETS NEW ALBUM OUT FRI 1 AUG

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1AM Issue 21 Music Special featuring Kimbra exclusive!  

1AM music special featuring an exclusive cover shoot and interview with the fab KIMBRA in LA on her highly anticipated forthcoming album and...

1AM Issue 21 Music Special featuring Kimbra exclusive!  

1AM music special featuring an exclusive cover shoot and interview with the fab KIMBRA in LA on her highly anticipated forthcoming album and...