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INSIDE! October 2013

Book Review 4 7 10

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 12

F R E E

NEW AND OF INTEREST

C H E C K

Children of the Jacaranda Tree Pollen and dust page 5

Whistle in the Dark

I T

A good day above ground page 8

Impossible Monsters

O U T

Things that go bump in the night and the daylight page 11

Secret Lives of Baked Goods

Doomed

By Chuck Palahniuk Doubleday, $24.95, 288 pages

Attend Chuck Palahniuk’s Pajama Party for Adults on Oct. 8 Details on Page 16

12

Readers acquainted with Palahniuk will instantly recognize his signature style. His novels, beginning with his debut Survivor to his indictment of celebrity worship in Tell All, runneth over with caustic deadpan narration, morally bankrupt characters and impending doom. Where he might be accused of lacking finesse, he makes up for it with white-knuckled rides careening through landscapes of degradation and excess. Although a few of his antisocial fantasies of ruin have offended stodgier critics, his le-

gions of fans keep his novels lodged firmly on the bestseller list. Doomed picks up where Damned left off. Madison, our 13 year-old hero, having navigated her way through hell — a terrain of toenail clipping mountains and rivers of scalding hot barf, populated by telemarketers and other undesireables — makes her way back to Earth as a ghost or a “post alive” being. The narrative alternates between her present mission of saving humanity from See Doomed, cont’d on page 11

Stories about and recipes for your favorite desserts page 13

The Human Spark A study of children’s early development page 14

47 Reviews INSIDE!


Book Reviews

MYSTERIES/THRILLERS Category

Mystery SNAP IT for additional book summaries.

The Devil’s Cave (Bruno, Chief of Police) By Martin Walker Knopf, $24.95, 352 pages Check this out! There are two protagonists in this book: Bruno and the region of St. Denis in France. Bruno is the police chief, wise in the ways of his town, proficient in digging out hidden secrets, a world-class cook and part-time lover. St. Denis has a way of life with its own rhythms, seeming unchangeable and vulnerable at the same time. The interplay between these protagonists is part of this book’s charm. The plot mixes together simple elements: a dead woman with no identification, a ruthless developer who wants to exploit the town, hidden agendas, people who are not what they seem. It is so easy to slip into this story with Bruno as he wrestles with his love life, trains a new basset hound and tenaciously pursues leads as the crime unravels. He is more than just the police chief; he is a human embodiment of his town. This is the second of Walker’s Bruno series I have read, and both are rich in detail and character. The plots are a bit similar, but that does not spoil the enjoyment of a well-paced detective story with protagonists that are both likable and plausible. Reviewed by Ralph Peterson Nemesis By Bill Pronzini Forge, $25.99, 320 pages Check this out! This is the fortieth in the Nameless Detective series and continues almost directly from the last book with Karen suffering post-traumatic stress disorder and our hero more or less committing himself to retirement to care for her. This leaves Jake Runyon taking on most of the new work. We’re particularly interested in a woman who reports what seems an attempted extortion. With Tamara looking into her background, Jake is almost immediately suspicious. When she’s

caught out in lies, he has no idea what’s happening but decides to continue, albeit cautiously. Unfor tunately, she ends up dead and there’s evidence linking Jake to the killing. As he languishes in jail, our hero has to leave home to investigate. What he finds is a woman with a serious psychological disorder who’s contrived to inspire a number of people with a desire for vengeance. Whether they would have had the nerve to carry it out is another matter. This is a fascinating novel with not just a pleasing puzzle for our hero to solve but some particularly great characterization. Nemesis carries the recurrent characters forward in an interesting way, making this one of the best of the recent novels in this series. Reviewed by David Marshall A Killing at Cotton Hill: A Samuel Craddock Mystery By Terry Shames Seventh Street Books, $15.95, 245 pages Check this out! A Killing at Cotton Hill is a first novel by Terry Shames, but I was plea sa nt ly surprised by how assured the writing is. Often firsttime authors focus on the plot, aiming to get that right, and leaving the prose and characterization on the back burner. This comes in with simple but elegant prose, pleasingly credible characters, and a really ingenious plot. The story could not be more straightforward. A retired chief of police in a small ruSee Cotton Hill, cont’d on page 9

Tulsa Book Review • October 2013• 2

COMING SOON

Search the library’s catalog at http://tulsalibrary.org to reserve your copies now.

Killing a Cold One

by Joseph Heywood Every fall in northern Michigan brings a spate of dogman sightings. A radio DJ’s invention, the dogman was created as an attention-getting joke. But millions of Michiganders believe in angels and vampires, werewolves, Bigfoot … and the dogman. Late summer, the horribly mutilated bodies of two Native American girls are found in a tent in a remote campground in the Huron Mountains. Grady Service, who wants nothing more than to return to patrolling his beloved Mosquito Wilderness, is called into the case. Strange animal tracks are found, mayhem ensues, a bloody trail of victims begins to accumulate, and the governor, in a political panic, and on her way out of office, orders Grady to hunt down and eliminate the killer – on her office’s dime. Grady Service does not believe in Easter bunnies, Santa Claus or dogmen, and the “monster” hunt that unfolds in Killing a Cold One builds to a violent finish in some of the Upper Peninsula’s harshest and deadliest terrain. Joseph Heywood’s legendary woods cop is called upon to use all of his investigative skills to sort fantasy from reality in order to do what the governor wants.

North Sea Requiem

by A.D. Scott When a smalltown Scottish woman discovers a severed leg in the boot of one of the local hockey player’s uniforms, it’s a big scoop for the Highland Gazette. But reporter Joanne Ross wants a front-page story of her own, and she hopes to find it in Mae Bell, an American jazz singer whose husband disappeared in an aircraft accident five years ago and who is searching the Highlands for her husband’s colleagues. Things take a very sinister turn when Nurse Urquhart, who discovered the limb, suffers a hideous and brutal attack. Even stranger, she was the recipient of letters warning her to keep her nose out of someone’s

business – letters that Mae Bell and the staff of the Highland Gazette also received. What could it all mean?

Plum Deadly

by Ellie Grant Unjustly accused of cooking the books, Maggie Grady is forced to retreat from her high-flying New York financial career to the town where she grew up. Her Aunt Clara greets her with open arms and a job at the family-owned business that has baked the best pies in the South for over 40 years. Unfortunately, while Maggie is determined to return to banking, her reputation there seems permanently in the pits. That is, until her old boss, Lou, visits with news that he’s found the real crook. Before he can reveal the details, though, Maggie finds his body right behind the pie shop. With only her own word that Lou planned to exonerate her, Maggie is now in the spotlight.

Aunty Lee’s Delights

by Ovidia Yu This delectable and witty mystery introduces Rosie “Aunty” Lee, feisty widow, amateur sleuth and proprietor of Singapore’s bestloved home-cooking restaurant. After losing her husband, Rosie Lee could have become one of Singapore’s “tai tai,” an idle rich lady. Instead she is building a culinary empire from her restaurant, Aunty Lee’s Delights, where spicy Singaporean meals are graciously served to locals and tourists alike. But when a body is found in one of Singapore’s tourist havens and one of her guests fails to show at a dinner party, Aunty Lee knows that the two events are likely connected. Wise, witty, and charming, Aunty Lee’s Delights is a spicy mystery about love, friendship and food in Singapore, where money flows freely and people of many religions and ethnicities coexist peacefully, but where tensions lurk just below the surface, sometimes with deadly consequences.


Tulsa

Book Review

IN THIS ISSUE Mystery.......................................................... 2

Tulsa City-County Library 400 Civic Center Tulsa, Oklahoma 74103 Ph. (918) 549-7323 EDITOR IN CHIEF Ross Rojek ross@1776productions.com

GRAPHIC DESIGN/LAYOUT James Rasmussen COPY EDITORS Lori Freeze Cathy Lim Karen Stevens Robyn Oxborrow Holly Scudero Kim Winterheimer Audrey Curtis Annie Peters Amy Simko Jamais Jochim EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS Adrian Gerth Alaa Shabouni Audrey Curts Christopher Hayden James Rasmussen Jonathon Howard Marie Clementi Megan Rynott Samantha Herman Toni B. Willis WEBSITE TulsaBookReview.com DISTRIBUTED BY Urban Tulsa Weekly

Fiction......................................................4 & 5 Picture Books................................................. 6 Kids’ Books..................................................... 7 Teen Scene...................................................... 8 Tween Reads................................................... 8 History & Current Events............................... 9 Science Fiction.............................................. 10 Fantasy......................................................... 10 Horror.......................................................... 11 Romance....................................................... 12 Cookbooks.................................................... 13

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We are so fortunate to live in Tulsa, Okla., a city with a great love of the arts, as well as the written word. This month, a parade of amazing authors will visit our fair city – certain to please every taste! On Oct. 1, novelist Mary Kay Zuravleff will be at Harwelden Mansion for the first-ever BookSmart Tulsa BBQ. On Oct. 3, Tulsa Reads welcomes Khaled Hosseini, world-renowned author of The Kite Runner, to the Greenwood Cultural Center. This is followed on Oct. 5 by BookSmart Tulsa’s presentation of biographer A. Scott Berg at the Charles Schusterman Jewish Community Center. Berg is the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Lindbergh, as well as Wilson and Kate Remembered, the biography of Katharine Hepburn. Fight Club author Chuck Palahniuk will be in town Oct. 8 when BookSmart Tulsa, the Tulsa Library Trust and Barnes & Noble host a fundraiser for the Central Library. Prepurchase of Palahniuk’s latest book Doomed at Barnes & Noble, 5231 E. 41st St. (starting Oct. 1) will gain you admission for two adults to a virtual spectacle of an evening at the recently closed Central Library. The book’s official national release date is the same day the author visits Tulsa, thus we are hosting the world premiere. Novelist Jonathan Lethem, author of the best-selling The Fortress of Solitude and Motherless Brooklyn, the latter which won the National Book Critics Circle Award, will be in town Oct. 24. Lethem, another BookSmart Tulsa author, will appear at Congregation B’Nai Emunah. Last, rumor has it BookSmart Tulsa also is bringing in legendary author of all things supernatural Anne Rice. Her Tulsa visit is to take place on All Hallows Eve. However, perhaps her appearance will just be an apparition, fitting I guess for Halloween. A big thanks to Tulsa Reads’ Teresa Miller, BookSmart Tulsa’s Jeff Martin and my colleagues at the Tulsa CityCounty Library for keeping the written word alive and well here in Tulsa. Warmest regards,

Home, Garden, & DIY................................... 13 Nature & Science.......................................... 14

The Tulsa Book Review is published monthly by 1776 Productions, LLC. The opinions expressed in these pages are those of the individual writers and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Tulsa Book Review or 1776 Productions advertisers. All images are copyrighted by their respective copyright holders.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

Biography & Memoir.................................... 15 Chuck Palahniuk’s Pajama Party.................. 16

Gary Shaffer Tulsa City-County Library CEO

Coming Up! Renowned children’s book author and illustrator Peter Brown is coming to Tulsa in November. The best-selling author of You Will Be My Friend! and other children’s books, Brown is this year’s featured illustrator for Tulsa City-County Library’s Books to Treasure celebration to be held Friday, Nov. 8 at 7 p.m. at Hardesty Regional Library.


Book Reviews Category

Fiction SNAP IT for additional book summaries.

The Miracles of Ordinary Men By Amanda Leduc ECW Press, $18.95, 325 pages Check this out! Sam is an English teacher who wakes up one day to discover that wings have started growing on his back. Over time the wings grow longer which makes Sam distressed and panicked as he grasps to understand what they mean and what he is supposed to do. Very few can see his wings and are witness to his transformation; those who can see the beauty in what they believe is a gift from God. The one person Lilah loves more than anyone is her little brother Timothy. Lilah’s strife comes from her strained relationship with her mother, an inability to understand why Timothy insists on living on the streets of Vancouver, and why she cannot escape the abusive relationship she has with her boss. Sam and Lilah learn to understand the importance of being patient and listening to miracles that manifest themselves in odd ways. Amanda Leduc’s prose expresses beauty in melancholy circumstances. In these stories where there is always more than meets the eye, I enjoyed the mysterious twists and connections between Lilah and Sam’s lives. This novel is written around an interesting idea and will be a good read for those who enjoy fiction about life experiences. Reviewed by Lenna Stites Flat Water Tuesday: A Novel By Ron Irwin Thomas Dunne Books, $24.99, 368 pages Check this out! Robert Carrey, a documentary filmmaker for National Geographic, receives a letter from an old friend named John Perry while on assignment in South Africa. On a plane

back to New York, he reads Perry’s letter and is forced to revisit his past as one of the best rowers on the Fenton School Boat Club. He looks back on the lessons he learned from his team in his transition from a single sculler to a team rower. Juxtaposed against his life in the present, we are taken back to Rob’s days at Fenton and what happened in that year that he and his teammates locked away as a secret of the past. Being able to live vicariously through the characters, to experience their dedication to rowing and to the importance of team bonding, was one of the things that made Flat Water Tuesday a great read. Irwin tells a good story, and the transitions between past and present were smooth. The flashbacks to Robert’s times at Fenton School were my favorite parts of the novel, and though it was somewhat sad in nature, I enjoyed the writing all the way through to the end. Reviewed by Lenna Stites

– a farmhouse that has been in his family over 140 years, and which is filled to the brim with secrets, history…. and murder. Once the wedding dust settles, Kate sees that things are not as idyllic as she had first imagined, and she begins to hear stories circulated through the small town about how Joe’s family is cursed. Can a family truly be cursed? Are the sins of the father always revisited upon the son? And will history be forced to repeat itself, sending an innocent woman to prison? Kate better pray the answer is no. This was an incredibly enjoyable read, full of suspense and intrigue, and had me guessing until the chilling end! Just when you think you have it figured out, author Jess McConkey throws another twist at you. The story begins in 1890 and then flipflops back and forth into modern day, which isn’t as confusing as you would think. The characters’ lives paralleled each other, and added color and depth that you wouldn’t have gotten otherwise. It also digs into the role of the female in pre-Suffrage Movement times, and is a fascinating portrayal of the strength you find when you truly need it. Reviewed by Stacy Sanford

The Village: A Novel By Nikita Lalwani Random House, $26.00, 256 pages Check this out! Ray Bhullar, a filmmaker for BBC, and her colleagues have a new a s s i g n me nt which takes them to the city of A shwer, India, to document the lives of the village inhabitants. But Ashwer is not an ordinary village. It is an open prison for felons convicted of murder and their families. This experiment in and of itself is a success story in that there are hardly any escape attempts and zero incidents of recidivism. Ray is excited to live amongst the community and present a video showcasing Ashwer as a system built on trust and tolerance; however, her need for a more dramatic plot line causes her to choose between her morals and the expectations of her career. The novel is told from the perspective of the filmmakers, which allowed the author

Looking for even MORE book reviews?

The Widows of Braxton County: A Novel By Jess McConkey William Morrow Paperbacks, $14.99, 384 pages Kate has finally found the man of her dreams on an online dating site, and she marries after a whirlwind courtship. Joe lives in rural Iowa and makes his living as a farmer; so once they are married, Kate and Joe travel back to Iowa to settle in his home Tulsa Book Review • October 2013 • 4

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Book Reviews to be detailed in descriptions of Ashwer’s residents, cultures, and sceneries, which I enjoyed. Ray’s inner conflict was apparent when having to decide between acting for the good of the team even if it meant undoing the friendships she has made, giving her emotional depth as a character. The Village is a heartwarming story that is told from the interesting perspective of investigative journalism, while providing insight into the lifestyle of Indian culture. Reviewed by Lenna Stites Me, Who Dove Into the Heart of the World: A Novel By Sabina Berman, Lisa Dillman (translator)  Picador, $15.00, 160 pages Check this out! Karen Nieto is autistic. In many ways, this is the focus of Sabina B e r m a n’s insightf u l and lyrical novel. The plot, involving Karen’s movement through life and interaction with people and animals, really just allows readers to get a feel for how this particular autistic person sees the natural world and the beings and things in it. Karen’s aunt, who raises her, runs the family’s tuna-canning business in Mexico, and Karen learns about the tuna and dolphins and eventually innovates methods to capture tuna in more humane and dolphinfriendly ways. It’s just fascinating, though, to get inside Karen’s head; she narrates the story, and it’s so interesting to appreciate the different ways she perceives everything around her. Her aunt teaches her how to behave more like others, to respond politely and “normally,” but she also allows her to be herself, to explore, to find things that make her happy and comfortable (enlightening and almost humorous is her love of donning a wetsuit and hanging in a fish harness when she’s feeling unmoored). The book also moralizes about humans relating to animals and the earth, etc., etc., but what I found more compelling and original was just Karen’s story. A fine novel. Reviewed by Cathy Carmode Lim Children of the Jacaranda Tree: A Novel By Sahar Delijani Atria Books, $25.99, 288 pages Check this out! In the final chapter of this book, Reza and Neda, young Iranis, new lovers, are eating cheese, drinking beer and sharing secrets at an Italian cafe. Reza tells Neda a fact that stuns her: his father was a founding member of the Revolutionary Guard, thus

Fiction shares responsibility for the imprisonment, torture and murder of t housands of protesters during the Irani Revolution of 1979. Ned a’s mother, Azar, was imprisoned in Tehran when Neda was born. Neda and her cousins Omid, Sara and Forugh lived with their grandparents until their parents returned from jail or were known to have been executed. Their family stories stitched a patchwork of bits of life behind bars, at the tender mercies of the Sisters and Brothers of the Revolution. Azar was interrogated as she labored, answering questions about her religious beliefs while doubled up with contractions. Sheida had always believed that her father had died of cancer, until the post-election demonstrations began, in 2009. Newscasters compared the riot control tactics to those used in 1979. Lists of the long dead - including her father - scrolled down Sheida’s computer screen. Confronted, Sheida’s mother finally tells the real story. The novel journeys back and forth in time. The cousins scatter to various corners of the world. Delijani is a fine and sensitive writer. Every scene pulsates with sensory information. Each character is deeply and lovingly depicted. The fact that Delijani is writing from her own experience adds profound poignancy. Reviewed by Elizabeth Benford Amy Falls Down: A Novel By Jincy Willett Thomas Dunne Books, $24.99, 336 pages Check this out! Amy Gallup has essentially been a hermit for the past year. She teaches writing to students online and pens the occasiona l book review, leaving the house as rarely as possible. If it weren’t for the visit of a local reporter, she’d have a routine day planned, when she steps outside to plant a tree, trips, and cracks her head on the birdbath. She revives long enough to tidy herself for the interview, but then blanks out when the interviewer actually arrives. She has no idea what she said. This

fateful encounter starts a surprising series of events and results in Amy’s rise from an out-of-print, obscure writer, to a coveted commentator on the state of modern literature. Jincy Willett has crafted an immediately memorable and thoroughly entertaining character in Amy Gallup. A serious and scholarly woman, Amy uses worry as a tool to ward off catastrophe, theorizing that one never imagines her own tragedies. Constantly misunderstood, Amy is funny unintentionally and even funnier when she allows her innate sarcasm free reign. Her comments on the abundance of the printed word and her hilarious run-in with a Limbaugh-esque radio host will stay with me long after I’ve forgotten the plot of the book. Reviewed by Tammy McCartney Love Bomb: A Novel By Lisa Zeidner Picador, $16.00, 272 pages Check this out! Tess and Gabe are about to get married and all of the eclectic personalties are in attendance: a room full of psychiatrists; an extended family consisting of multiple remarriages on the bride’s side of the family; and an uninvited guest donned in a wedding gown, complete with gas mask and bomb trigger attached to her arm. Furthermore,

the woman in the mask, referred to as the terrorist, demands justice for the way she has been treated, and is holding everybody hostage. The questions that arise are how she is related to the wedding, and from whom does she want an apology? Helen, the bride’s mother, seems to be the only one who acts level-headed as the other attendees panic, the family members bicker, and the psychiatrists try to diagnose the terrorist as though she is one of their patients. There are a lot of independent stories to keep track of in this huge cast of characters, but Love Bomb was an enjoyable read with very interesting, and sometimes comical, observations about the complicated nature of human relationships. Reviewed by Lenna Stites

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Tulsa Book Review • October 2013 • 5


Book Reviews Category

Picture Books SNAP IT for additional book summaries.

This School Year Will Be THE BEST! By Kay Winters, Renee Andriani (illustrator) Puffin, $6.99, 32 pages Check this out! Each new school year promises a new start for children, with both a little excitement and a little worry. Will this year be better than last year? Assigned seats on the bus, homework, school pictures, show-and-tell, sports, field trips, school plays, report cards and more are on their minds. If new to the school, will the child make friends with the other children? The author expresses all of these concerns, supported by excellent illustrations by Renee Andriani, keeping readers emerged in this book, recognizing their own anxieties, while seeing the potential ahead of them for not only a good school year, but for the best school year ever. What will especially appeal to children are the silly and fun desires the children in the book share. Wouldn’t it be fun if the water fountain squirted chocolate at lunch? How about having a skateboard day, with teachers and students skateboarding from class to class? Maybe there could be a reading challenge where if students read 100 books the principal will kiss a pig. The author creates a book that children will enjoy and remember, as they easily learn new words that help their reading skills. Reviewed by Angie Mangino Off We Go!: A Bear and Mole Story By Will Hillenbrand Holiday House, $16.95, 32 pages Check this out! Mole has made a big decision: today’s the day to ride his bike without training wheels! He and Bear remove the

training wheels, check the air pressure in the tires, and hoist a jaunty flag. Mole prepares with boots and helmet, and packs his books. He’s ready to ride! Unfortunately, his first ride isn’t as smooth as he had anticipated, and Mole is ready to quit. With a little reassurance from Bear, however, he tries again with better results. If only all those animals weren’t in the way! Off We Go! is a great resource to use when helping a child make the transition to riding a bike without training wheels. Bear’s gentle encouragement and Mole’s triumphant finish act as inspiration to reluctant riders. Mole’s comical near collisions with a variety of animals—and the startled expressions on their faces—made my son laugh and eased the anxiety of a first ride. The simple prose will appeal to beginning readers, and endearing illustrations will appeal to readers of all ages. Reviewed by Tammy McCartney

save her friendship with Anna? Can she and Maya solve their differences? Rebecca Janni’s sweet Cowgirl books are always a treasure. This is no exception. The charming illustrations by Lynne Avril are a delight. Very young girls will love this latest in the series. Reviewed by Rosi Hollinbeck Count the Monkeys By Mac Barnett, Kevin Cornell (illustrator) Disney-Hyperion, $16.99, 32 pages Check this out! Are you ready to count the mon keys? While it seems like a simple premise for a kids’ picture book, Mac Barnett and Kevin Cornell will surprise you with this delightful counting experience. It looks like a cobra has scared off the monkeys, but who will scare off the cobra? And will the monkeys ever come back so that we can finally count them? You’ll have to keep turning the pages to find out. This story speaks directly to children, keeping them fully engaged and eager to find out what happens next with bright illustrations that hold their attention. This

book is one that both parents and kids of all ages will enjoy, and one that you surely will want to come back to again and again. I love how, despite the fact that you can see how this one is going with just the first few pages, each number still manages to surprise readers with what comes next. I bet young readers will never get tired of Count the Monkeys! Reviewed by Holly Scudero Crankee Doodle By Tom Angleberger Clarion Books, $16.99, 32 pages Check this out! The midnight ride of Paul Revere didn’t exactly go as the poem would have you believe. George Washington never chopped down a cherry tree. It makes you wonder about the truth behind other famous patriotic legends we take for granted. So what’s the real story behind Yankee Doodle’s trip into town? And what’s up with that line about macaroni, anyway? See Crankee Doodle, cont’d on page 7

Every Cowgirl Goes to School By Rebecca Janni Dial, $16.99, 32 pages Check this out! Nellie Sue is back in all her cowgirl regalia. It is time for a new school year and Nellie Sue is ready. Her teacher had sent home a bag for Nellie Sue to fill with five things that will tell all about her. She is excited the first day, but finds out she can’t wear her cowboy hat or take her dog to school. When she gets onto the school bus, there is only one seat left. Her best friend, Anna, is sitting with someone Nellie Sue has never seen. When they all get off the bus, Anna introduces Nellie Sue to a new girl, Maya. Through the day, Maya seems to get in the way of Anna and Nellie Sue spending time together. Maya accidentally trips Nellie Sue, then she draws a picture of Nellie Sue as a cow! This day is not going Nellie Sue’s way. Can Nellie Sue

Hardesty Regional Library, Connor’s Cove • 8316 E. 93rd St. • 918.549.7550 A book signing will follow. Sponsored by the Tulsa Library Trust through a grant from the Anne and Henry Zarrow Foundation. “You Will Be My Friend!” by Peter Brown. Copyright © 2011.

Tulsa Book Review • October 2013 • 6


Book Reviews Category

Kids’ Books SNAP IT for additional book summaries.

Dixie and the Good Deeds (I Can Read Book 1) By Grace Gilman, Sarah McConnell (illustrator) HarperCollins, $16.99, 32 pages Check this out! This first level book in the I Can Read series shares with children aged four to eight to a delightful story of Emma and her dog, Dixie. The description of “Beginning Reading” books is for “short sentences, familiar words, and simple concepts for children eager to read on their own.” This reviewer believes the author delivers well on that promise. Pictures by Sarah McConnell enhance the story, keeping children reading to find out what will happen next with Emma and Dixie. Emma tries to do it all with a school project of doing good deeds. Her dog Dixie comes along, wanting to help, but prone to causing messes. Children will giggle at Dixie’s antics, but additionally relate to the dog’s love of Emma and to its good intentions. How Emma goes about the project, and Dixie’s involvement to the very end, both add up to a child friendly story that will give early readers the incentive to progress in their reading from the sheer joy of the story. Children will want to read the rest of the Dixie books in the series. Reviewed by Angie Mangino Dig, Scoop, Ka-Boom! (Step Into Reading) By Joan Holub, David Gordon (illustrator) Random House Books for Young Readers, $3.99, 24 pages Check this out! Beginning at a construction site, Dig, Scoop, Ka-Boom! tells its story in rhyme to further captivate children. Enjoying books is the first step to prepare children to

read. When children get involved in a story that they enjoy, it increasingly makes them ready to read on their own. Beautiful illu s t r at i o n s by David Gordon will add to children’s delight in this story. Children are fascinated with trucks, and these trucks will introduce new words in a fun way to move the story along for them. An added turn in the story is after seeing the trucks do the job, the page is turned to be told, “all are working like a team,” as the illustration now embellishes the story by showing children in the sand navigating the trucks. As a special treat to further engulf children into the story, two sticker sheets give children hands-on interaction with the book. This step 1 ready to read book, geared to children of preschool to kindergarten age, is a wonderful introduction to the world of reading. By making reading a fun experience, children begin on a path to lifelong enjoyment of books in the future. Reviewed by Angie Mangino Written in Stone By Rosanne Parry Random House Books for Young Readers, $16.99, 208 pages Check this out! When Pearl’s whaler father dies in a whale hunt, thirteen-year-old Pearl and her Makah village face a grim year without whale oil to trade. Commercial whalers are shooting whales in numbers, and no one in the village can replace her father’s skill as a harpooner. The Indian agent thinks Pearl should go to one of the missionary schools, but Pearl has other plans. She once wanted to be a whaler, like her father. Now she wants to be a weaver, like her mother, dead years ago from influenza. Pearl also conceives a short

term plan to help her people for the coming year: gathering clams to sell in Aberdeen. A letter arrives for Grandpa from someone who claims he’s a collector from The Art Institute in New York City and interested in buying their carved totem poles and masks. On arrival, he seems more interested in exploring property Indians consider off limits and writing something in a mysterious notebook. Once again, it is Pearl who, after recurring dreams about stone, stumbles onto a solution that will save her people. This beautifully written book conveys the dignity of Makah tradition and the importance of stories to preserve culture. Reviewed by Elizabeth Varadan

Princess Posey and the New First Grader By Stephanie Greene, Stephanie Sisson (illustrator) Putnam Juvenile, $12.99, 96 pages Check this out! Posey has a great imagination. While dressed as Princess Posey, she makes up a magic game and cannot wait to teach it to her two best friends, Nikki and Ava. They are such good friends Posey’s mother says they are three peas in a pod. When Posey arrives at school, she discovers a new girl, Grace, in her class. Nikki and Ava already like Grace. Posey doesn’t get to tell them about her new game. Miss Lee seats Grace next to Posey. When Posey wants to play with Nikki and Ava, Grace joins them. Grace changes the rules to their games. When Posey stops playing, the other girls go on without her. Posey does not like what’s happening. She liked the way things were, before Grace came along. Grace says something mean and hurts Posey’s feelings even more. When Miss Lee gets involved in their dispute, Posey discovers something pretty important. New kids are a fact of life, but when they show up, it changes everything. Stephanie Greene writes a charming story that deals with real problems young kids face. Enchanting illustrations by Stephanie Roth Sisson will delight young readers as much as the story. Reviewed by Rosi Hollinbeck

Every Day After By Laura Golden Delacorte Books for Young Readers, $15.99, 224 pages Check this out! The Great Depression comes to Bittersweet, Alabama. If into every life a little rain must fall, buckets of it start falling on eleven-yearold Lizzie Hawkins after Daddy leaves. Mama copes by going into a progresCrankee Doodle, cont’d from page 6 sively worsening depression. Lizzie cooks, cleans, takes care of Mama and tries to Crankee Doodle tackles the hard-hitting maintain her position of top student in her truth of Yankee Doodle’s infamous ride in class. Daddy has drummed into Lizzie that snarky, contrary, tongue-in-cheek, ridicushe was born to win and must always be the lous fashion. Immensely silly and great best. fun, this book passes all too quickly. I wish But being the best has earned Lizzie a I could have spent a little more time with formidable enemy. Erin Sawyer wants to Yankee Doodle’s pony—which is an awkbe number one, and Lizzie is in her way. ward sentence in retrospect. Erin knows Lizzie’s father is gone and that The art is simple and straightforward— her mother is ill and unable to take care of it’s hard to say who has the longer face, the her—two factors that could result in Mama pony or Yankee Doodle—offering a brightgoing to an asylum and Lizzie to an orphanness to offset Yankee Doodle’s dour nature age. When Lizzie refuses to back out of the and purposely drawing the eye back to the essay contest coming up, Erin plots to bring dialogue, which is the real centerpiece of the about the dreaded scenario with a meanness story. springing from a surprising source. And yes, despite the snarky nature of the Lizzie is an endearing character, by turns book, you do actually learn the truth behind feisty, stubborn, reactive, and quick-thinkthe song. (From the pony, no less!) Angleing—traits that work against her, until she berger has once again taken an old story and learns to forget Daddy’s advice and think for made it new. herself. The author’s sly wit enhances this Reviewed by Glenn Dallas fine story at every turn. Reviewed by Elizabeth Varadan

Tulsa Book Review • October 2013 • 7


Book Reviews Category

Teen Scene

Category

Tween Reads

SNAP IT for additional book summaries.

The Year of Luminous Love By Lurlene McDaniel Delacorte Press, $16.99, 384 pages Check this out! Ciana, Arie and Eden have always been best friends, and now it’s time to graduate high school and face the real world. Throughout life changes and circumstances, these girls expect to always be there for each other, but will their friendship outlast real life issues? Poverty, alcoholism, death and of course boys all begin to come between the three best friends. In order to escape the stress of their lives, and salvage their friendship, Ciana decides to take Arie and Eden to Italy for the summer. This was a very emotional and powerful book that tugged at the memory of the confusion and uncertainty of life after high school. This novel is a powerful example of friendship, grieving and most of all, love. The many different shades of love are explored deeply in this novel, whether it be loving a friend, a family member or a significant other, no aspect of love and relationships goes unrecognized in this novel. I highly recommend this story to anyone, young girls especially, and I can’t wait for the next installment. Reviewed by Amanda Roelofs

SNAP IT for additional book summaries.

ivia’s parents are way behind on bills and their restaura nt isn’t exactly booming. Her brother isn’t helping at all by getting into jail for the most silly things, and her best friend is slowly losing her mother to cancer. And to top it all of, Olivia decides now is the time to find her mom, who gave her up for adoption at the age of two days. The Secret Ingredient is the kind of book that rewards readers only if they have patience. It’s actually a decent read with sweet characters, but to get to the good stuff, readers have to endure a painful first third of the book. I honestly had to force myself to sit down and pick up the book for a couple of days. The book really picks up the pace and gets interesting later on. Characters do things you would never expect, and you get to see this whole other side of the main character. The book is very different from teen books these days and, thankfully, not as cliche and stereotypical. I just wish the beginning was as good as the rest of the book and feel sorry for any future readers who will get instantly bored and give up on the story. My advice: Keep going, because this is a wonderful book! Reviewed by Sarah Guller

Whistle in the Dark By Susan Hill Long Holiday House, $16.95, 192 pages Check this out! Clem has but one wish. For his thirteenth birthday he wants a dog. But that isn’t what he gets. He gets a miner’s cap. His life is about to change. He is expected to work in the lead mine, deep underground, and to help support the family. His grandfather has miner’s lung and cannot work. His Pap works every day, but it is never enough. Clem’s sister, Esther, has epilepsy and the doctor’s bills make it impossible for Pap to earn enough on his own. But this is not what Clem has in mind for his life. He hates the dark, claustrophobic, physical work. He wants to be

in school and able to make something more of his life. C l e m comes to know a girl from school, one who had been bullied by everyone, even Clem. Lindy is terribly scarred on half her face, and the kids call her Frankenstein. But when Clem disSee Whistle, cont’d on page 9

FOR TEENS

Saturday, Oct. 26 • 1-4 p.m.

Hardesty Regional Library • 8316 E. 93rd St.

F E AT U R I N G :

Author/Illustrator Ben Hatke, creator of “Zita the Spacegirl” comics including • Exhibitors, Asian products and anime clubs

• Cosplay contest • Candy sushi • And much more!

The Secret Ingredient By Stewart Lewis Delacorte Books for Young Readers, $17.99, 256 pages Check this out! Sixteen year old Olivia, who is amazingly talented in the kitchen, has always appreciated everything in her humble life. But lately she feels like her life is missing a secret ingredient. Olivia loves her two fathers to the moon and back. She would never want them think they aren’t enough for her, but she has a hunch the secret ingredient she’s lacking is a normal lifestyle. To add to this drama, Ol-

Sponsored by

Artwork by Ben Hatke from “Zita the Spacegirl.”

Tulsa Book Review • October 2013 • 8


TulsaLibrary.org

918.549.READ

O c to b e r 2 0 1 3

A free mo n t h ly g uide to your commu n ity library , its p ro g rams a n d ser v ices To search for events, scan this code using your mobile device and QR scanner app.

SEEK THE UNKNOWN Oct. 1-31

adult/teen events Bixby Library A-Book-A-Month Discussion Group Wednesday, Oct. 23 • 2-3 p.m. Read "Widower's Tale" by Julia Glass and then join us for this lively discussion. For adults.

Broken Arrow Library Read or Die Manga/Anime Club Saturday, Oct. 19 • 12:30-2 p.m. For ages 12-18. After-Hours Paranormal Investigation Friday, Oct. 25 • 6:30-8 p.m. We will use voice recorders, cameras and video cameras to seek the unknown and try to capture signs of the unexplainable. For ages 13-18. Registration is required. Call 918-549-7500 to register.

Broken Arrow Library/South Ballet Folklórico Tonatiuh Saturday, Oct. 5 • 2-3 p.m. Enjoy classical Mexican dances with the dynamic group Tonatiuh. For all ages. Sponsored by the Hispanic American Foundation, Tulsa Library Trust and Hispanic Resource Center.

LIBRARY CLOSINGS

Genealogy Center Now at Hardesty • Page 7

Prepare for College Page 8

Broken Arrow Great Decisions Wednesdays, Oct. 9, 23 12:30-2:30 p.m. • Are you interested in discussing current issues with other people in the community? If so, join us for this lively discussion! For adults.

Monica Drake and Chelsea Cain, who are fellow writers of their own dark-humored esteem, will join in! In keeping with the theme (who doesn't love a fun theme?), attendees are encouraged to wear their best sleepwear (appropriate pajama attire, please) and bring a pillow or stuffed animal to keep them feeling safe from the monsters that might be lurking in the shadows. This event also features live music, cash bar with themed drinks, eats and lots of surprises! All proceeds will benefit Tulsa City-County Library's and the Tulsa Library Trust's Central Library Renewed campaign. ADMISSION requires the purchase of Chuck Palahniuk's new novel, "Doomed." One book purchase allows for two guests. Books will go on sale at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 1 at Barnes & Noble at 41st and Yale. Attendees will be given a receipt and two wristbands. Books will be picked up the night of the event. You must bring your receipt and wristbands to claim your book and gain entry. Books and tickets also will be sold the day of the event at Central Library in Aaronson Auditorium, starting at 4 p.m. Palahniuk will sign books in advance instead of at the event. For ages 18 and older.

Open House Friday, Oct. 25 • 1:30-5:30 p.m. Join us for our open house and help us celebrate National Teen Read Month. This year's theme is "Seek the Unknown @ your Library."

Brookside Library Jewelry Craft for Teens Wednesday, Oct. 16 • 4:30-6 p.m. Helen Vaslavsky will show you how to make Fab & Fun Pop Bottle Resin Jewelry. For ages 10-18. Registration is required. Call 918-5497507 to register.

Central Library

(The recently closed Central Library will be open for this special spooky event!) Fundraiser: Chuck Palahniuk's Pajama Party for Adults Tuesday, Oct. 8 • 7 p.m. (doors open at 6 p.m.) • This is a themed event. Meet and mingle with Chuck Palahniuk, author of "Fight Club." In addition to the usual Chuckdirected fun (trivia prizes, toys, other shenanigans), two of his friends,

All Tulsa City-County Library locations will be closed on Monday, Oct. 14 for staff training.

Charles page Library Horrible Horror Movies Thursdays, Oct. 10, 24 • 4-7 p.m. Join us for some horrifically horrible horror movies! We'll

have snacks and drinks and plenty of scary books and movies for you to check out. Snarky commentary is greatly encouraged! For ages 10-18.

Collinsville Library Anime Club Wednesday, Oct. 9 • 3-4:30 p.m. Join other manga fans to discuss your favorite books, movies, characters and plot twists from this popular Japanese publishing trend. For ages 13-18. Sponsored by the Friends of the Collinsville Library. Seek the Unknown @ your library Thursday, Oct. 10 • 2:30-4:30 p.m. Join us for fun activities and crafts as we explore all the engaging materials and resources your library has to offer. For ages 1018. Sponsored by the Friends of the Collinsville Library. Job Lab Monday, Oct. 28 • 10 a.m.-noon Update your résumé, search for jobs online or explore a new career in this special computer lab just for job seekers. You will have access to Microsoft Office software and the Internet. USB flash drives are available for purchasing, or you can bring your own to save your work. Standard printing charges apply. Library staff and resources will be in the lab to provide assistance. Registration is required. Call 918-549-7528 to register. For adults.

Hispanic Heritage Month programs are marked with this icon.


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Hardesty Regional Library Minecraft Gaming Thursday, Oct. 3 • 6-8 p.m. Put your imagination to the test building your own world in the popular game Minecraft. For ages 1318. Class size is limited. Simple Steps for Starting Your Business: Start-Up Basics Thursday, Oct. 3 • 6:30-8:30 p.m. Want to start a business? Get the help you need with SCORE experts. Learn the essentials of business start-ups, get action steps for your business and receive one-to-one mentoring. SCORE is a nonprofit association of volunteer business experts. Registration is required. Go to www.tulsa.score.org to register. For adults. Louder Than a Bomb: Saturday Series Saturday, Oct. 5 • 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Rooted in the crafts of poetry, creative writing, spoken word and new journalism, these workshops will culminate in opportunities involving publication and portfolio development. Workshops are led by high-quality instructors and will focus on journalism from 10 a.m. to noon, and poetry and creative writing from 1 to 4 p.m. Visit http://teens.tulsalibrary.org or http://ahct.org/programs/ltab/ for more information. For teens and adults. Co-sponsored by the Arts and Humanities Council of Tulsa. My Beneficiary on My Insurance Policy Reads "Proceeds to My Estate" Wednesday, Oct. 9 • noon-1 p.m. Location: Pecan Room Join attorney Rita Foster as she discusses wills, revocable trusts, powers of attorney and other estateplanning documents. Plus, learn how to avoid probate. For adults. For more information or to reserve a seat at the seminar, call 918-398-6681. Sponsored by the Tulsa Library Trust. Beginning Genealogy Workshop Saturday, Oct. 12 • 9:30 a.m.-noon Location: Frossard Auditorium Learn how to start your family history research and discover the many resources and services available in the library's genealogy collection that can assist you. For adults. Are You a Fan of "CSI"? Saturday, Oct. 12 • 1-2 p.m. Location: Pecan Room Interested in forensics and crime solving? Join one of Tulsa's forensic scientists, Kelly Borycki, as she describes what it is like to work in a forensic lab. For ages 13-18.

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Start Your Research @ the Library Saturday, Oct. 12 • 1-2:30 p.m. Location: Frossard Auditorium Join us for an overview of all the useful resources and tools the library has to offer family history researchers. For adults. The 7 Costly Mistakes Families Make in Their Estate Plans Thursday, Oct. 17 • noon-1:30 p.m. Location: Pecan Room Will your family be one of those casualties? Join Karen L. Carmichael, estate-planning attorney, and discover how you can avoid mistakes in these key areas: (1) probate costs and delays; (2) nursing-home costs; (3) divorce; (4) remarriage; (5) creditor protection for children; (6) incapacity; and (7) loss of tax benefits. For adults. For more information or to reserve a seat at the seminar, call 918 398-6681. Sponsored by the Tulsa Library Trust. E-Reader Clinic Monday, Oct. 21 • 5:30-7 p.m. Drop by Hardesty's Wi-Fi bar with your e-reader, tablet or smartphone, and get assistance checking out and downloading eBooks from the library's digital collection. Registration is required. Call 918-549-7552 to register. For adults. Teen Halloween Party Tuesday, Oct. 22 • 6-8 p.m. Seek the unknown and have a howling good time with games, crafts and snacks. Anime Minicon Saturday, Oct. 26 • 1-4 p.m. Visit exhibitors including Asian products and anime clubs; enter the cosplay contest; make candy sushi; meet author Ben Hatke, creator of the "Zita the Spacegirl" comics; and much more! Sponsored by the Tulsa Library Trust. Theodore Roosevelt Comes Alive: Joe Wiegand as the Rough Rider President Tuesday, Oct. 29 • 7 p.m. Location: Connor's Cove Joe Wiegand is acclaimed as the nation's premiere Theodore Roosevelt repriser. He has portrayed the 26th U.S. president in all 50 states, plus was invited to come to the White House in 2008 as a part of the official White House celebration of the 150th anniversary of Roosevelt's birth and portray Theodore in the East Room. A political science graduate of the University of the South and a resident of Sewanee, Tenn., Wiegand also is a member and contributor to the

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Theodore Roosevelt Association, founded in 1919. Enjoy the most amazing theater show in years! For all ages. Sponsored by the Rotary Club of Tulsa. Intellectual Property 101: Preliminary Business and Intellectual Property Research Wednesday, Oct. 30 • 9:30 a.m.-noon Location: Computer Lab Do you have a new invention, product or service? The first step to developing your idea is to check existing intellectual property – patents, trademarks, copyrights – to see if your invention is already out there. Preliminary searching of U.S. patents, trademarks and copyrights, and exploration of business opportunities is something you can do for free on the Web or with resources from the library. This workshop will show you how to use keywords to start a preliminary patent search; locate U.S. classifications for your product area; search U.S. registered and pending trademarks; and explore the library's deep Web for business market, competition or other entrepreneurial resources. For adults. Registration is required. Class size is limited. Register at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/ intellectualproperty101. Co-sponsored by Oklahoma State University.

Helmerich Library Teen Advisory Meeting: Ductivities Tuesday, Oct. 8 • 4:30-5:45 p.m. Join teen volunteers and craft with duct tape. Make a key fob or bag – design your own style! Sponsored by the Friends of the Helmerich Library. Books People Are Talking About Wednesday, Oct. 16 • 12:15-1:15 p.m. "The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry" and "The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out a Window and Disappeared" will be our featured titles about fictional journeys. For adults. Light refreshments will be provided. Sponsored by the Friends of the Helmerich Library. Seek the Unknown in Your Library's Time Machine: Steampunk Installment Tuesday, Oct. 22 • 6-7:30 p.m. Join teens in vintage costume for a steampunk gathering. Design a time machine, explore alternative history, solve a Sherlockian mystery, share steamy snacks and more. Sponsored by the Friends of the Helmerich Library.

Jenks Library JTAG and Silhouette Art Thursday, Oct. 3 • 4-5 p.m. Join the Jenks Teen Advisory Group as we discuss how to improve library services for teens. We'll also have snacks and paint silhouette art. Jenks Library Book Discussion Group Thursday, Oct. 17 • 1:30-2:30 p.m. Participants should read the featured book prior to the program. Call 918549-7570 for book title. For adults. Story of a Costume Party Thursday, Oct. 31 • 4-5:30 p.m. Come dressed up as a character from a book, graphic novel, manga or other story, and compete in a costume contest, play games and enjoy snacks.

kendall-whittier library Get Your Game On Monday, Oct. 7 • 3:30-5:30 p.m. Test your gaming skills with the Wii and Xbox. For ages 10-18. Zombie Apocalypse Tuesday, Oct. 29 • 3-5 p.m. Zombies have invaded the library. Do you know how to survive or will you fall prey to the walking dead? Join us to see if you can make it through the Zombie Apocalypse. For ages 10-18.

Martin Regional Library Teen Time Wednesdays, Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 4-5 p.m. • Join us for Wii and board games, plus other fun activities and snacks. For tweens and teens. Monster Tracker Monday, Oct. 7 • 4-4:45 p.m. Join your fellow trackers as they discover and study fabulous beasts from around the world, like the phoenix and mermaid! Then create your own monster. For ages 10-15. Sponsored by the Tulsa Library Trust. An Evening With Cristina García Via Skype Thursday, Oct. 10 • 7-8 p.m. Cristina García is the author of six novels – "King of Cuba," "Dreaming in Cuban," "The Agüero Sisters," "Monkey Hunting," "A Handbook to Luck" and "The Lady Matador's Hotel." Join us for this discussion with García via Skype in

Hearing loop available. Switch hearing aid to T-coil.


a d u l t / t e e n preparation for her upcoming visit to Tulsa on Oct. 19 for the Nimrod International Journal's Conference for Readers and Writers. (The Nimrod conference will be held at the University of Tulsa in the Allen Chapman Activity Center. The conference will feature workshops on writing fiction, poetry, memoir and young adult fantasy; finding a literary agent; as well as one-to-one editing sessions, panel discussions and readings. For more information about the conference, visit www.utulsa.edu/ nimrod or call 918-631-3080.) For adults. Sponsored by the Hispanic American Foundation, Tulsa Library Trust, Hispanic Resource Center and Nimrod. ESL Literacy Tutor Training (Registration Deadline: Friday, Oct. 4) Saturdays, Oct. 12, 19 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. • Tulsa CityCounty Library's Ruth G. Hardman Adult Literacy Service needs volunteer tutors to help adults improve their reading and writing skills. This workshop is for those interested in working with English as a Second Language students specifically. Tutors must be 18 years of age or older and have graduated from high school. Each trained volunteer is matched with an adult student to provide oneto-one tutoring once or twice a week. Volunteers are asked to make a one-year commitment to tutor. Tutors must complete both sessions of this workshop. Registration is required. The registration deadline is Friday, Oct. 4. To register, call 918-549-7400 or click on www.tulsalibrary.org/literacy. Photographing Unknowables Wednesday, Oct. 16 • 4:30-5:30 p.m. Ghosts, fairies, UFOs, Bigfoot ... come and make your own photos of the unknowable! For tweens and teens. Manga Ai! Saturday, Oct. 19 • 2-3 p.m. Munch on pocky and meet up with other manga fans to discuss your favorite books and movies, characters and plot twists. For sixthgraders and up. Monster Tracker (The Next Level) Monday, Oct. 28 • 4-4:45 p.m. It's a MONSTER MASH! Wear your Halloween costume or turn yourself into a monster. Enjoy drinking something green and eating something frightening. Make your own green goo that oozes and grosses. For ages 10-15. Sponsored by the Tulsa Library Trust.

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maxwell park library Latin Rhythms and Drumming With John Dellavedova Wednesday, Oct. 2 • 4-5:30 p.m. Move to the Latin groove and experiment with some funky percussion instruments. For all ages. Sponsored by the Hispanic American Foundation, Tulsa Library Trust and Hispanic Resource Center.

nathan hale LIBRARY eBook and Audiobook Clinic Friday, Oct. 4 • 1:30-3:30 p.m. Bring your e-reader, tablet or smartphone, and get assistance checking out and downloading eBooks and audiobooks from the library's collection. For all ages. Get Your Game On @ the Library Friday, Oct. 11 • 3:30-4:45 p.m. Join us for Wii gaming. For ages 10-18. Nathan Hale Book Group Wednesday, Oct. 23 • 2-3 p.m. Read "Amity and Sorrow" by Peggy Riley and then join us for this lively discussion. For adults. Old Jack's Lantern Monday, Oct. 28 • 6-7:30 p.m. Join us for some pre-Halloween pumpkin carving, painting and decorating. Make your Jack-oLantern just in time for Halloween! For ages 10-18. Class size is limited.

Owasso Library Seeking the Unknown: Alien Edition Wednesday, Oct. 9 • 3:30-4:30 p.m. Join us for this program all about aliens! For ages 12-18.

Rudisill Regional Library Steps for Starting Your Business: Start-Up Basics Saturday, Oct. 19 • 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Location: Greenwood Room Want to start a business? Get the help you need with SCORE experts. Learn the essentials of business start-ups, get action steps for your business and receive one-to-one mentoring. SCORE is a nonprofit association of volunteer business experts. Registration is required. Go to www.tulsa.score.org to register. For adults. Job Lab Tuesday, Oct. 22 • 1-3 p.m. Update your résumé, search for jobs online or explore a new career

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in this special computer lab just for job seekers. You will have access to Microsoft Office software and the Internet. USB flash drives are available for purchasing, or you can bring your own to save your work. Standard printing charges apply. Library staff and resources will be in the lab to provide assistance. Registration is required. Call 918-549-7645 to register. For adults.

SCHUSTERMAN-BENSON Library Mystery Readers Roundtable Thursday, Oct. 3 • 2-3 p.m. Come for coffee and share what you've been reading. For adults. Books Sandwiched In Monday, Oct. 7 • 12:10-12:50 p.m. Location: Oklahoma Methodist Manor, Fleming Center, 4134 E. 31st St. Join Glenda Silvey, director of communications for OU-Tulsa and former KOTV news anchor/reporter, for a review of "Lady Almina and the Real Downton Abbey: The Lost Legacy of Highclere Castle" by Fiona, countess of Carnarvon. For adults. Sponsored by the Friends of the Tulsa City-County Libraries. You may bring your lunch (no sandwiches will be sold). Books Sandwiched In Monday, Oct. 14 • 12:10-12:50 p.m. Location: Oklahoma Methodist Manor, Fleming Center, 4134 E. 31st St. Join John Henshaw, department chair and Harry H. Rogers chair of mechanical engineering, University Tulsa, for a review of "Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work and Think" by Viktor MayerSchonberger and Kenneth Cukier. For adults. Sponsored by the Friends of the Tulsa City-County Libraries. You may bring your lunch (no sandwiches will be sold). Books Sandwiched In Monday, Oct. 21 • 12:10-12:50 p.m. Location: Oklahoma Methodist Manor, Fleming Center, 4134 E. 31st St. Join Brian Hosmer, H.G. Barnard chair of Western American history, University of Tulsa, for a review of "Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher" by Timothy Egan. For adults. Sponsored by the Friends of the Tulsa City-County Libraries. You may bring your lunch (no sandwiches will be sold). Books Sandwiched In Monday, Oct. 28 • 12:10-12:50 p.m. Location: Oklahoma Methodist Manor, Fleming Center, 4134 E. 31st St. Join Jane Wiseman, judge, Oklahoma Court of Civil Appeals, for a review of

"Gone Girl" by Gillian Flynn. For adults. Sponsored by the Friends of the Tulsa City-County Libraries. You may bring your lunch (no sandwiches will be sold).

Suburban Acres Library Spanish Flamenco Dance Saturday, Oct. 5 • 2-3 p.m. Reflejos Flamencos will dazzle you with this passionate cultural expression from Spain. For all ages. Seating is limited. Sponsored by the Hispanic American Foundation, Tulsa Library Trust and Hispanic Resource Center.

Zarrow Regional Library Beginning Osage Language Wednesdays, Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 6-7 p.m. • This class is presented by the Osage Nation Language Program. For all ages. Sponsored by the American Indian Resource Center. CSI: Library Saturday, Oct. 19 • 1-3 p.m. Ever wonder if what you see on television is what really happens in crime scene investigation? Curious about what kind of education is required to work in forensic science or criminal justice? Richard Stewart and Vanessa Ellison, instructors at Tulsa Technology Center, will walk you through a mock crime scene and demonstrate some tools of the trade. For ages 13-18. Minecraft Night Thursday, Oct. 24 • 6-8 p.m. Put your imagination to the test building your own world in the popular computer game Minecraft. For ages 13-18. Louder Than A Bomb: Saturday Series Saturday, Oct. 26 • 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Rooted in the crafts of poetry, creative writing, spoken word and new journalism, these workshops will culminate in opportunities involving publication and portfolio development. Workshops are led by high-quality instructors and include: journalism, 10 a.m.-noon, and poetry and creative writing, 1-4 p.m. For more information, visit teens.tulsalibrary.org or http://ahct.org/programs/ltab/. For teens and adults. Co-sponsored by the Arts and Humanities Council of Tulsa.

T u lsa c it y - c o u n t y li b r a r y e v e n t g u id e

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computer classes Hardesty Regional Library

CLASSES ARE limited to 18 on a first-come, first-served basis. Really Basic PC Class Tuesday, Oct. 1 • 9:30-11 a.m. This class is designed for new PC users who have little or no experience using Windows, a mouse or the Internet, and little knowledge of basic computer terms. MS Excel 1 Tuesdays, Oct. 1, 8 • 6-8 p.m. Learn how to create formulas, use automatic fill and change basic formatting. You should take an Intermediate MS Word class and have some experience using a mouse prior to taking this class. Online Health Resources Thursday, Oct. 3 • 9:30-11 a.m. Learn how to find reliable health information using the library's health databases and the Internet. We will research common diseases, prescription drugs and supplements; find medical articles; use an online medical dictionary; and learn how to evaluate Internet websites for credibility. You should have some experience using a Web browser, mouse and computer keyboard before taking this class. Internet @ the Library Saturday, Oct. 12 • 9:30-11 a.m. Did you know that as a library cardholder you can access over 100 premium content databases for free? Legal forms, an auto repair center, directories and magazine/ newspaper archives are just a few of our specialized databases. Also, learn how to search the online catalog successfully. MS Excel 2 Tuesday, Oct. 15 • 6-8 p.m. This class shows you how to create and edit formulas, apply functions, and apply advanced formatting to your spreadsheets and workbooks. You should take MS Excel 1 prior to taking this class. MS Excel 3 Tuesday, Oct. 22 • 6-8 p.m. This class teaches you how to use Excel to create visual representations of spreadsheet and workbook data. You'll learn how to create charts,

apply conditional formatting and control the appearance of printed spreadsheets. You should take MS Excel 2 prior to taking this class. Publisher 101 Tuesday, Oct. 29 • 6-8 p.m. This class shows how to create fun and colorful signs and fliers. You should take an advanced MS Word class prior to taking this class.

Martin Regional Library

CLASSES ARE LIMITED TO 12 ON A FIRST-COME, FIRST-SERVED BASIS. MS Word 1 Saturday, Oct. 5 • 10 a.m.-noon This class shows how to use toolbars and menus, set margins, apply spell check, and preview, save and print documents. You should have some experience using a computer keyboard and mouse prior to taking this class. MS Excel 1 Tuesday, Oct. 8 • 1:30-3:30 p.m. This class shows how to create formulas, use automatic fill and change basic formatting. You should take MS Word 2 and have some experience using a mouse prior to taking this class. MS Word 2 Saturday, Oct. 12 • 10 a.m.-noon This class shows how to create and format tables, use bulleted and numbered lists, and apply and format columns in a document. You should take MS Word 1 class prior to attending. Open Computer Help Lab Tuesdays, Oct. 15, 29 • 1:30-3:30 p.m. Having trouble printing emails? Confused about what a USB Stick is? Come to this relaxed and friendly lab where a trained professional will help find you find the answers. MS Word 3 Saturday, Oct. 19 • 10 a.m.-noon This class shows how to create and use borders and shading, headers and footers, page numbering and drawing tools. You should take MS Word 2 prior to taking this class. Really Basic Computer Class Tuesday, Oct. 22 • 1:30-3:30 p.m. This class is designed for new computer users who have little or no previous experience using computers, Windows, a mouse or the Internet, and little or no knowledge of basic computer terms.

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MS Word 4 Saturday, Oct. 26 • 10 a.m.-noon Explore mail merge, use tables to perform calculations and create onscreen forms. You should take MS Word 3 prior to taking this class.

children’s events Bixby Library My First Storytime Mondays, Oct. 7, 21, 28 10:30-10:45 a.m. • For newborns to 2-year-olds and their caregivers. Preschool Storytime Mondays • 11-11:30 a.m. For ages 2-5. An adult must accompany 2-year-olds. Oct. 7 • Dinosaurs Oct. 21 • Bears Oct. 28 • Favorites

Broken Arrow Library Preschool Storytime Tuesdays, Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 Wednesdays, Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 10:30-10:50 a.m. • For ages 3-5. Stay and Play Wednesdays, Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 11-11:30 a.m. • After our regularly scheduled storytime, join us for games, toys and activities that foster critical early literacy skills. For ages 3-5. My First Storytime Thursdays, Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31 Mondays, Oct. 7, 21, 28 10:30 a.m. • For newborns to 2-year-olds and their caregivers. PAWS for Reading Wednesday, Oct. 9 • 4-5 p.m. Registered therapy dogs are excellent listeners. Kids ages 7-12 are invited to read their favorite books to a furry, four-pawed friend. Each reader will receive a free book provided by the Tulsa Library Trust. Sign-ups will start at 3:45 p.m. on the day of the event. Fun With Paper Airplanes Thursday, Oct. 17 • 1:30-2:30 p.m. Fly into fall break by learning new paper airplane folds and taking part in a flight competition. For ages 7-12.

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Broken Arrow Library/South Family Storytime Tuesdays, Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 10:30-10:50 a.m. • Enjoy stories, action rhymes, fun flannel, music and bubbles. For ages 3-5. Stay and Play Tuesday, Oct. 1 • 11-11:30 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 16 • 11-11:30 a.m. For babies and toddlers, playing is learning! After our regularly scheduled storytime, join us for games, toys and activities that foster critical early literacy skills. For ages 5 and younger and their caregivers. My First Storytime Wednesdays, Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 10-10:20 a.m. • For newborns to 18-month-olds and their caregivers. Toddler Time Wednesdays, Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 10:30-10:50 a.m. • Share a story. Sing a song. We hope you'll come along! For 18- to 36-month-olds and their caregivers. Bilingual Storytime With Fidelia Thursdays, Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24, 30 10:30-10:50 a.m. • Enjoy stories in English and Spanish, plus a craft. For ages 5 and younger. PAWS for Reading Thursday, Oct. 10 • 6:45-7:45 p.m. Registered therapy dogs are excellent listeners. Kids ages 7-12 are invited to read their favorite books to a furry, four-pawed friend. Each reader will receive a free book provided by the Tulsa Library Trust. Registration is required. Call 918-549-7662 to register. Sensory Storytime Friday, Oct. 11 • 11 a.m. Does your child have difficulty sitting through storytime? If so, this inclusive, interactive program of stories, songs and activities may be just what you are looking for! Sensory Storytime focuses on learning with all five senses and is especially designed for children with a variety of learning styles or sensory integration challenges. Registration is required. Register online at http://kids.tulsalibrary.org/ sensorystorytime or by calling 918-5497662. For ages 1-7 and their caregivers.

Brookside Library Travels With Irina: Bilingual Storytime Tuesday, Oct. 1 • 6:30-7 p.m. Enjoy Latin American stories, rhymes and crafts in English and Spanish. For all ages.


c h i l d r e n ' s Preschool Storytime Wednesdays, Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 10:15-10:45 a.m. • For ages 2-5. An adult must accompany 2-year-olds. My First Storytime Wednesdays, Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 11-11:20 a.m. • For newborns to 24-month-olds and their caregivers. Bouncin' Beethovens Thursday, Oct. 3 • 10:15-10:45 a.m. Join the Midtown School of Performing Arts for lots of singing, dancing and fun. We'll have percussion instruments, egg shakers, colorful scarves and more. For ages 5 and younger. PAWS for Reading Thursday, Oct. 10 • 3:30-4:30 p.m. Registered therapy dogs are excellent listeners. Kids ages 7-12 are invited to read their favorite books to a furry, four-pawed friend. Each reader will receive a free book provided by the Tulsa Library Trust. Kids Craft: Halloween Monday, Oct. 28 • 4-4:45 p.m. Drop by the library and make a spooky handprint spider! For ages 5-12.

Collinsville Library Stories From the Rocking Chair Tuesdays, Oct. 1, 8, 15, 29 10:30-11 a.m. • Enjoy stories, songs, crafts and more. For newborns to 4-year-olds and caregivers. PAWS for Reading Wednesday, Oct. 9 • 3-4 p.m. Registered therapy dogs are excellent listeners. Kids ages 5-12 are invited to read their favorite books to a furry, four-pawed friend. Each reader will receive a free book provided by the Tulsa Library Trust.

glenpool Library Family Game Night Tuesday, Oct. 1 • 6:45-8 p.m. Play old-fashioned board games, go on an adventure with Mario using our Wii, plus build with our LEGOs. We also will provide popcorn and sodas. Bring a friend or your entire family! Ms. Tatiana's Family Storytime Wednesdays, Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 10:30-11 a.m. • Join us for songs, rhymes and books, and then stay after for toys and activities that foster early literacy. For ages 5 and younger.

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Hardesty Regional Library My First Storytime Tuesdays, Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 Wednesdays, Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 10-10:20 a.m. • For newborns to 2-year-olds and their caregivers. Toddler Time Tuesdays, Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 11-11:20 a.m. Mondays, Oct. 7, 21 • 10-10:20 a.m. Join Ms. Josie for stories, songs and finger plays. For ages 2-3 and their caregivers. Mr. Paul's Preschool Storytime Mondays, Oct. 7, 21, 28 11-11:30 a.m. • For ages 3-5. Marvelous Monday Stories Mondays, Oct. 7, 21, 28 6:30-7 p.m. • Join Ms. Karen for stories and other fun activities. For all ages. Preschool Storytime With Ms. Kristie Wednesdays, Oct. 9, 16, 23, 30 11-11:30 a.m. • Join us for stories, music and activities. For ages 3-5.

Helmerich Library Preschool Storytime Tuesdays, Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 10:30-10:55 a.m. • Join us for books, music and more! For ages 3-5. Family Storytime Thursday, Oct. 10 • 10:15-10:40 a.m. Join us for new books and old favorites, music and more! For all ages.

Herman and Kate Kaiser Library Preschool Storytime Wednesdays, Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 10:30-11 a.m. • For ages 3-5. My First Storytime Thursdays, Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31 10:30-11 a.m. • For newborns to 2-year-olds and their caregivers. Sensory Storytime Saturday, Oct. 19 • 10:30 a.m.-noon Does your child have difficulty sitting through storytime? If so, this inclusive, interactive program of stories, songs and activities may be just what you are looking for! Sensory Storytime focuses on learning with all five senses and is especially designed for children with a variety of learning styles or sensory integration challenges. Registration is required. Register online at http://kids.tulsalibrary.org/ sensorystorytime or by calling 918-5497542. For ages 1-7 and their caregivers.

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Jenks Library My First Storytime Wednesdays, Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 10-10:15 a.m. • For newborns to 2-year-olds and their caregivers. Preschool Storytime Wednesdays • 10:30-11 a.m. For ages 3-5. Oct. 2 • Silly Squirrels Oct. 9 • Happy Teeth Oct. 16 • Cars! Beep Beep! Oct. 23 • Pumpkins and More Oct. 30 • The Little Monsters! PAWS for Reading Tuesday, Oct. 15 • 4-5 p.m. Registered therapy dogs are excellent listeners. Kids ages 5-12 are invited to read their favorite books to a furry, fourpawed friend. Each reader will receive a free book provided by the Tulsa Library Trust. Registration is required. Class size is limited. Call 918-549-7570 to register.

Judy Z. Kishner library "Minute to Win It" for Families Thursday, Oct. 10 • 5:45-6:45 p.m. Families will compete with other families in "Minute to Win It" games. For all ages. Registration is required. Call 918-549-7577 to register.

kendall-whittier Library Bilingual Storytime Tuesdays, Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 10-10:45 a.m. • Enjoy stories in English and Spanish. For ages 3-5. Bilingual Storytime at the Health Department Thursday, Oct. 3 • 9-9:30 a.m. Location: Health Department, 315 S. Utica • Enjoy stories in English and Spanish. For all ages.

Librarium Family Storytime Tuesdays, Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 11-11:30 a.m. • For ages 5 and younger. PAWS for Reading Saturday, Oct. 12 • 11 a.m.-noon Registered therapy dogs are excellent listeners. Kids ages 5-12 are invited to read their favorite books to a furry, four-pawed friend. Each reader will receive a free book provided by the Tulsa Library Trust.

Game Time Thursday, Oct. 17 • 1-3 p.m. Play board, card and group games. Parents and caregivers are encouraged to join in. You may bring your owns games, but we have plenty! For ages 5-12.

Martin Regional Library Stay and Play Storytime Tuesdays, Oct. 1, 8, 22, 29 10-10:45 a.m. • For babies and toddlers, playing is learning! Enjoy storytime and then stay after for games, toys and activities that foster critical early literacy skills. For ages 1-5 and their caregivers. Bilingual Storytime Wednesdays, Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 6:30-7 p.m. Thursdays, Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31 10-10:30 a.m. Enjoy stories, songs and activities in English and Spanish. For ages 5 and younger. Book Buddies Thursdays, Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31 4-4:45 p.m. • Read books, play games and make crafts with Miss Heather! For second- through fourthgraders. Travels With Irina: Russian Bilingual Storytime Saturdays, Oct. 5, 12 • 10:30-11 a.m. Come and discover Russian language and culture through stories, rhymes, music and more! For all ages. Fun Fun Music! Monday, Oct. 7 • 10-11 a.m. Are you ready to sing, hop and jump to songs in Japanese and English? Join the Konnichiwa group for a fun-filled musical program. For ages 5 and younger. Monster Tracker Monday, Oct. 7 • 4-4:45 p.m. Join your fellow trackers as they discover and study fabulous beasts from around the world, like the phoenix and mermaid! Create your own monster. For ages 10-15. Sponsored by the Tulsa Library Trust. Storyteller Maestro Martín Guillermo Acosta Spinoza Tuesday, Oct. 15 • 10-11 a.m. This Mexican storyteller will delight young and old alike with his lively tales! For all ages. Sponsored by the Tulsa Library Trust; Casas Guanajuato, 2000 H.N.C. Farmacia Naturista; Hispanic American Foundation; and Hispanic Resource Center.

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Daring Young Scientists Thursday, Oct. 17 • 4-4:45 p.m. Join us in the Evil Genius Laboratory as we create top secret experiments. Shhh, don't tell, but one of them involves growing Frankenstein's hand! For ages 9-12. Class size is limited. Travels With Irina: Spanish Bilingual Storytime Saturdays, Oct. 19, 26 • 10:30-11 a.m. Enjoy stories, songs, and activities in English and Spanish. For ages 5 and younger. Phineas and Ferb Throw a Party! Saturday, Oct. 19 • 1-2 p.m. Make your own Perry the Platypus Inaction Figure, build Marshmallowand-Toothpick Sculptures, play "You're

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Busted!" Balloon Pop and visit the Ice Cream Station. For ages 5-12. Sponsored by the Tulsa Library Trust. Monster Tracker (The Next Level) Monday, Oct. 28 • 4-4:45 p.m. It's a MONSTER MASH! Wear your Halloween costume or turn yourself into a monster. Enjoy drinking something green and eating something frightening. Make your own green goo that oozes and grosses. For ages 10-15. Sponsored by the Tulsa Library Trust.

nathan hale Library Storytime With Miss Nha Thursdays, Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31 10:30-11 a.m. • Join us for stories, finger

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plays, Mother Goose rhymes and dancing. For ages 5 and younger. PAWS for Reading Saturday, Oct. 19 • 2-3 p.m. Registered therapy dogs are excellent listeners. Kids ages 5-12 are invited to read their favorite books to a furry, four-pawed friend. Each reader will receive a free book provided by the Tulsa Library Trust. Passport to Celle, Germany Friday, Oct. 25 • 3:30-4:30 p.m. Come and learn about Tulsa's sister city Celle, Germany with books, songs, crafts and fun. For ages 5-12. Sponsored by Tulsa Global Alliance.

My First Storytime Tuesdays, Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 Wednesdays, Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 9:30-9:50 a.m. • For newborns to 2-year-olds and their caregivers. Preschool Storytime Tuesdays, Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 Wednesdays, Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 10-10:30 a.m. • For ages 3-5. Stay and Play Tuesdays, Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 Wednesdays, Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 10:30-11 a.m. • After our regularly scheduled storytime, join us for games, toys and activities that foster critical early literacy skills. For ages 1-5 and their caregivers. (Owasso Library continued on Page 8)

tulsa city-county library locations 25 Bixby Library 20 E. Breckenridge, 74008 • 918-549-7514 M, 10-8; T-Th, 12-8; Fri., 12-6; Sat., 10-5 19 Broken Arrow Library 300 W. Broadway, 74012 • 918-549-7500 M-Th, 10-8; Fri., 10-6; Sat., 10-5 23 Broken Arrow Library/South 3600 S. Chestnut, 74011 • 918-549-7662 M-Th, 10-8; Fri.-Sat., 10-5 17 Brookside Library 1207 E. 45th Place, 74105 • 918-549-7507 M-Th, 10-8; Fri., 10-6; Sat., 10-5 9 Central Library Closed for renovation 400 Civic Center, 74103 • 918-549-7323 8 Charles Page Library 551 E. Fourth St., Sand Springs, 74063 918-549-7521 • M-Th, 10-8; Fri.-Sat., 10-5 2 Collinsville Library 1223 Main, 74021 • 918-549-7528 M-Th, 12-8; Fri., 12-5; Sat., 10-5 24 Glenpool Library 730 E. 141st St., 74033 • 918-549-7535 M-Th, 12-8; Fri., 12-5; Sat., 10-5 22 Hardesty Regional Library and Genealogy Center 8316 E. 93rd St., 74133 • 918-549-7550 M-Th, 9-9; Fri., 9-6; Sat., 9-5; Sun., 1-5 21 Helmerich Library 5131 E. 91st St., 74137 • 918-549-7631 M-Th, 10-8; Fri.-Sat., 10-5 18 Herman and Kate Kaiser Library 5202 S. Hudson Ave., Suite B, 74135 918-549-7542 • M-Th, 10-8; Fri., 10-6; Sat., 10-5 20 Jenks Library 523 W. B St., 74037 • 918-549-7570 M-T, 12-8; W-Th, 10-6; Fri., 12-5; Sat., 10-5 3 Judy Z. Kishner Library 10150 N. Cincinnati Ave. E., Sperry 74073 • 918-549-7577 M-T, 12-7; W, 10-5; Th, 12-7; Fri., 12-5; Sat., 10-5

Owasso Library

11 Kendall-Whittier Library 21 S. Lewis, 74104 • 918-549-7584 M-Th, 10-8; Fri.-Sat., 10-5 10 Librarium 1110 S. Denver Ave., 74119 • 918-549-7349 M-Th, 10-8; Fri., 10-6; Sat., 10-5 15 Martin Regional Library and Hispanic Resource Center 2601 S. Garnett Road, 74129 • 918-549-7590 M-Th, 9-9; Fri., 9-6; Sat., 9-5; Sun., 1-5 7 Maxwell Park Library 1313 N. Canton, 74115 • 918-549-7610 M-F, 10-6; Sat., 10-5 14 Nathan Hale Library 6038 E. 23rd St., 74114 • 918-549-7617 M, 10-8; T-Th, 10-6; Fri.-Sat., 10-5 4 Owasso Library 103 W. Broadway, 74055 • 918-549-7624 M-Th, 10-8; Fri., 10-6; Sat., 10-5 12 Pratt Library 3219 S. 113th W. Ave., Sand Springs, 74063 • 918-549-7638 M-Th, 10-8; Fri.-Sat., 10-5 6 Rudisill Regional Library and African-American Resource Center 1520 N. Hartford, 74106 • 918-549-7645 M-Th, 9-9; Fri.-Sat., 9-5; Sun., 1-5 13 Schusterman-Benson Library 3333 E. 32nd Place, 74135 918-549-7670 • M-Th, 10-8; Fri.-Sat., 10-5 1 Skiatook Library 316 E. Rogers, 74070 • 918-549-7676 M, 12-8; T-Th, 10-6; Fri.-Sat., 11-5 5 Suburban Acres Library 4606 N. Garrison, 74126 • 918-549-7655 M-Th, 10-6; Fri.-Sat., 11-5 16 Zarrow Regional Library and American Indian Resource Center 2224 W. 51st St., 74107 • 918-549-7683 M-Th, 9-9; Fri.-Sat., 9-5; Sun., 1-5

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WE HAVE MOVED! Genealogy Center Joins Hardesty Regional Library en español programas para adultos y adolescentes BIBLIOTECA BROKEN ARROW SUR Ballet Folklórico Tonatiuh Sábado, 5 de octubre • 2-3 p.m. Los invitamos a gozar los bailes clásicos de México presentados por este dinámico grupo folclórico. Para toda la familia. BIBLIOTECA REGIONAL MARTIN Una tarde con autora Cristina García (via Skype) Jueves, 10 de octubre • 7-8 p.m. Aprovecha esta oportunidad para platicar con esta escritora internacionalmente reconocida sobre su novela más reciente, King of Cuba [el rey de Cuba]. Ms. García estará en Tulsa a fin de mes para la conferencia Nimrod para Lectores y Escritores; informes sobre ese evento al (918) 631-3080, nimrod@ utulsa.edu, o en línea al www. utulsa.edu/nimrod. Sugerimos leer el libro antes de asistir al program. La fundación hispano-americana, el fideicomiso de la bibliotecas de Tulsa, el centro hispano y Nimrod. Club de lectura Jueves, 10, 17, 24, 31 de octubre 7-8 p.m. • ¿Te gusta leer? ¿Quieres discutir lo que aprendes en lo libros? ¿Te gustaría saber más de escritores? Únete a nuestro Club de Lectura. Trae tu libro favorito y dinos por qué te gusta tanto. Para los que les gusta leer y platicar. PregNot - ¡No! al embarazo y otras circunstancias inesperadas Miércoles, 23 de octubre • 4-7 p.m. Una clase para la prevención del embarazo y VIH en jóvenes. A través de charlas, actividades, películas y juegos, los facilitadores guiarán a los participantes a crear metas de largo plazo y estrategias de corto plazo para proteger su salud sexual, comunicar sus decisiones con otros,

Tulsa City-County Library’s Genealogy Center has outgrown its previous location and is now an exciting part of the Hardesty Regional Library. With this service you can research your family history with the help of friendly and well-trained staff. Look for this latest addition upstairs by the adult nonfiction collection.

Patrocinado por el Centro Hispano y el Fideicomiso de las Bibliotecas de Tulsa. Informes al 918-549-7597.

TulsaLibrary.org/hrc y planear para situaciones futuras en la vida reál. Habrá botanas y regalos para todos los participantes [tarjetas con valor de $20 válidos en QuikTrip o Walmart]. Para jóvenes de entre 11 y 19 años de edad.

clases de informática BIBLIOTECA REGIONAL MARTIN Computación para Principiantes: Aula de Práctica Miércoles, 2 de octubre 6:30-8:30 p.m. • Abrimos el salón de cómputo para los que quieran aprovechar el tiempo para practicar cómo usar el teclado, el ratón o para practicar el cómo navegar el Internet, llenar formularios o aplicaciones. La maestra estará presente como personal de apoyo. Para todas las edades. Aula de práctica Viernes, 4 de octubre 10:15 a.m.-12 p.m. • Abrimos el salón de cómputo para los que quieran aprovechar el tiempo para practicar con el teclado y con el ratón o para practicar navegar el Internet, llenar formularios o aplicaciones. La maestra estará presente como personal de apoyo. Para todas las edades. Correo Electrónico I: Herramienta #1 para Encontrar Trabajo Miércoles, 9 de octubre 6:30-8:30 p.m. • Les enseñaremos cómo crear una cuenta de correo electrónico y cómo usarla para enviar, recibir correo, comunicarse con empleadores potenciales. Para todas las edades. Microsoft Word para Principiantes Viernes, 11 de octubre 10:15 a.m.-12 p.m. • En esta clase te enseñaremos a usar el programa de Microsoft Word para formatear texto, escribir cartas y documentos. Para todas las edades.

Correo Electrónico II Miércoles, 16 de octubre 6:30-8:30 p.m. Viernes, 25 de octubre 10:15 a.m.-12 p.m. Les enseñaremos cómo usar el correo electrónico más eficientemente, creando carpetas,abriendo archivos, enviando currículum vitaes, guardando fotos. Para todas las edades. Correo Electrónico I Viernes, 18 de octubre 10:15 a.m.-12 p.m. • Les enseñaremos cómo crear una cuenta de correo electrónico y cómo usarla para enviar y recibir correo. Para todas las edades. Microsoft Word I Miércoles, 23 de octubre 6:30-8:30 p.m. • Aprende a usar Microsoft Word para formatear texto, escribir cartas, documentos y tu currículum. Para todas las edades. Haz Uso de tu Biblioteca en Línea y sus Servicios 24/7 Miércoles, 30 de octubre 6:30-8:30 p.m. • En esta clase aprenderás cómo navegar la página oficial de la Biblioteca, el Centro Hispano, encontrar tus libros, música, cómo estudiar para tu GED, mejorar tu inglés, practicar para tu examen de ciudadanía y mucho más. Para todas las edades.

programas infantiles BIBLIOTECA BROOKSIDE Viajes con Irina: Cuentos bilingües para mes de la herencia hispana Martes, 1 de octubre • 6:30-7 p.m. Celebramos el mes de la herencia hispana con cuentos, canciones y actividades en inglés y español. Para niños de todas las edades.

BIBLIOTECA REGIONAL MARTIN Cuentitos Bilingües Miércoles, 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 de octubre • 6:30-7 p.m. Jueves, 3, 10, 17, 24, 31 de octubre • 10-10:30 a.m. Disfruta cuentos, canciones, y actividades en inglés y español. Para niños de 0 a 5 años. Teatro infantil y juvenile Sábado, 5, 12, 19, 26 de octubre 2-3 p.m. • Únete al grupo de teatro de la Biblioteca Martin. Aprende dicción, movimiento escénico y técnicas de actuación. Para niños y jóvenes de cualquier edad. Cuentacuentos maestro Martín Martes, 15 de octubre • 10-11 a.m. Todos se divertirán con los cuentos de Martín; directo de México. Para toda la familia. Viajes con Irina: Cuentos Bilingües (Español) Sábado, 19, 26 de octubre 10:30-11 a.m. • Cuentos, canciones y actividades en inglés y español. Para niños de 0 a 5 años. BIBLIOTECA BROKEN ARROW SUR Diversión y Cuentos con Fidelia Jueves, 3, 10, 17, 24, 31 de octubre • 10:30-10:50 a.m. Cuentos en ingles y español con Fidelia. Para niños de 0 a 5 años. BIBLIOTECA REGIONAL ZARROW Cuentos mexicanos con Luna Miércoles, 9 de octubre 10:30-11 a.m. • Para niños de cualquier edad.

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Homeschool Storytime Tuesdays, Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 1:30-2:30 p.m. • Join us for stories and a craft. For ages 5-12. Mommy and Me Yoga Thursday, Oct. 3 • 10-10:30 a.m. Join yoga instructor Micah Davis for stories and yoga poses that you and your child can enjoy together. Please bring a yoga mat. For ages 2-5. Class size is limited. Sensory Storytime Friday, Oct. 4 • 4-5 p.m. Does your child have difficulty sitting through storytime? If so, this inclusive, interactive program of stories, songs and activities may be just what you are looking for! Sensory Storytime focuses on learning with all five senses and is especially designed for children with a variety of learning styles or sensory integration challenges. Registration is required. Register online at http://kids.tulsalibrary.org/ sensorystorytime or by calling 918-5497624. For ages 1-7 and their caregivers. Music and Motion: Shake Your Sillies Out! Monday, Oct. 7 • 6-6:30 p.m. Dance and sing with Miss Jennifer and musician Scott McQuade on guitar and accordion. For ages 1-5 and their caregivers. PAWS for Reading Thursday, Oct. 10 • 4-5 p.m. Registered therapy dogs are excellent listeners. Kids ages 5-12 are invited to read their favorite books to a furry, four-pawed friend. Each reader will receive a free book provided by the Tulsa Library Trust. Class size is limited. Owasso Mother-Daughter Book Club Thursday, Oct. 17 • 6-7 p.m. Girls ages 9-12 and their mothers are invited to join us to discuss a great read. Copies of the featured book are available at the library. Participants should read the selected book prior to the program. Registration is required. Call 918-5497624 to register.

pratt Library Preschool Storytime Thursdays • 10:30-11:30 a.m. For ages 5 and younger with an adult. Oct. 3 • Hooray for Bread! Oct. 10 • Birdie's Big Girl Dress Oct. 17 • Cats, Cats, Cats Oct. 24 • Halloween Crafts Oct. 31 • Halloween Parade and Party

Pick up a free copy of the 2013-14 College Planner, published by TulsaKids, at any Tulsa City-County Library. It's a Blast! Bottle Rockets Galore! Saturday, Oct. 5 • 1-2 p.m. It's Robert Goddard's birthday month and what better way to celebrate the Father of Rocketry's big day than with bottle rockets? Bring two empty 2-litre bottles for assembling your rockets. Then be ready to watch your rockets blast off into the sky! Sand Springs educator Lisa Seay will show us how to build the rockets and use the NASA rocket launcher. For ages 5-11. Registration is required. Call 918-5497638 to register.

My First Storytime Wednesdays, Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 10-10:20 a.m. • 10:30-10:50 a.m. For newborns to 2-year-olds and their caregivers.

11th Annual Halloween Parade and Party Day Thursday, Oct. 31 • 10:30-11:30 a.m. Children and adults may come dressed in costume. They may also bring treats to share. For ages 5 and younger with an adult.

I Scream Social Monday, Oct. 28 • 3:30-4:30 p.m. Join us for campfire fun as we share scary stories and ice cream. We also will reveal the winner of our spooky stories contest! For ages 5-12.

Schusterman-Benson Library Spooky Stories Contest Oct. 1-18 • Share your best scary or mysterious story with us for a chance to win a mint-condition set of Nancy Drew novels – 56 books in all! Entries will be accepted through Oct. 18. For third- through fifth-graders. Preschool Storytime Tuesdays, Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 10:30 a.m. • For ages 3-5. Stay and Play Tuesdays, Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 Wednesdays, Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 11-11:30 a.m. • For babies and toddlers, playing is learning! After our regularly scheduled storytime, join us for games, toys and activities that foster critical early literacy skills. For ages 5 and younger with an adult.

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PAWS for Reading Monday, Oct. 7 • 3:30-4:30 p.m. Registered therapy dogs are excellent listeners. Kids ages 5-12 are invited to read their favorite books to a furry, four-pawed friend. Each reader will receive a free book provided by the Tulsa Library Trust.

Zarrow Regional Library Stay and Play Storytime Wednesdays, Oct. 2, 16, 23 10:30-11:30 a.m. • Enjoy fun and imaginative stories and then stay after for games and activities that foster important early literacy skills. For ages 5 and younger. Mexican Folktales by Luna Wednesday, Oct. 9 • 10:30-11 a.m. For children of all ages. Seating is limited. Sponsored by the Hispanic American Foundation, Tulsa Library Trust and Hispanic Resource Center. Legos and Minecraft Saturday, Oct. 12 • 2-3 p.m. Have a block-filled blast playing Legos and the popular computer game Minecraft! For ages 5-12.

PAWS for Reading Saturday, Oct. 19 • 2-3 p.m. Registered therapy dogs are excellent listeners. Kids ages 5-12 are invited to read their favorite books to a furry, four-pawed friend. Each reader will receive a free book provided by the Tulsa Library Trust. Family Fun Night Tuesday, Oct. 29 • 6:30-7:30 p.m. Prepare for a fun and frightening time as we share spooky Halloween stories and then make some special Halloween decorations. For ages 5 and younger. Native American Tales Wednesday, Oct. 30 • 10:30-11:30 a.m. Join us for a very special storytime with guest storyteller Teddi Duncan who will read tales of the ancient Anasazi, the Chiricahua, and trickster coyotes. For ages 5 and younger. Sponsored by the American Indian Resource Center.

Free and Open to the Public If you are hearing-impaired and need a qualified interpreter, please call the library 48 hours in advance of the program. The Tulsa Book Review and Tulsa City-County Library Event Guide are printed on partially recycled paper.

The Tulsa City-County Library Event Guide is produced by the Public Relations Office of the Tulsa City-County Library. For questions or concerns, call 918-549-7389.


Book Reviews Category

History & Current Events SNAP IT for additional book summaries.

Bunker Hill: A City, a Siege, a Revolution By Nathaniel Philbrick Viking, $32.95, 416 pages Check this out! This is a most excellent book. Philbrick writes this narrative with just the correct mix of personal background of the major people involved, individual anecdotes, edgeof-seat battle descriptions, political ramifications and overall conclusions. I felt like I was there, in Boston, as the arguments of the loyalists and the patriots fought for the minds of men. The patriots used social tools such as the Committees of Correspondence,

THEODORE ROOSEVELT COMES ALIVE! Joe Wiegand as the

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Edmund Burke: The First Conservative By Jesse Norman Basic Books, $27.99, 336 pages Check this out! Edmund Burke, although now almost forgotten, was an incredibly influential thinker, writer, and politician whose views have shaped political thought for the last two centuries. Part one of the book is ‘Life:’

we learn that Burke served his entire life in British politics, working tirelessly for the good of his country. He advocated for the oppressed, whether they were slaves (he was an early proponent of abolition), Irish Catholics, Americans before and during the Revolutionary War, or Indians under the East India Company. He believed in limited government, ultimately responsible to the people, but with checks and balances to counter excesses of faction or privilege. His life was not easy; he was constantly in debt due to his generous nature and his high moral standard that prevented him from taking advantage of political corruption; his insistence on speaking only the truth lost him votes, sponsorships, and friends, but he never wavered from his core beliefs. Part two turns to Burke’s thoughts and their consistent influence following his death up through the twentieth century. It also explains why these ideas are still pertinent, perhaps even more than ever, today. The book is well-written, extensively researched, and easy and enjoyable to read. Never dry or boring, it brings the man to life and reaffirms his relevance. Reviewed by Gretchen Wagner

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Roosevelt’s Centurions: FDR and the Commanders He Led to Victory in World War II By Joseph E. Persico Random House, $35.00, 672 pages The ease with which Persico writes about the interaction of great military l e a d e r s during the Second World War offers refreshing insights into the oft banalized historical events. The issue at stake begins with a bald assessment of FDR’s overall abilities as commander-in-chief when compared to others such as Lincoln, Wilson, Johnson, Nixon, and other wartime presidents. In order to grade Roosevelt, Persico employs comparisons in three primary categories: recruiting military genius; strategizing how, when and where the war should be fought; and motivating as a home front leader. The subject matter might seem at first blush to be as dry as melba toast, but Persico’s vast knowledge of fine details keep the reader engaged through the power-plays, often revealing a twist to motivations missed by other accounts. The fact that Roosevelt supports his generals even when their conduct runs the risk of political ruin gives us insight into the psyche of the commanderin-chief who brought us through WWII’s toughest challenges. With five other major books to his credit on the subject, Roosevelt’s Centurions may very well become Persico’s crowning jewel. Reviewed by C.D. Quyn

c l a ndest i ne Cotton Hill, cont’d from page 2 meetings and ral town is shocked by the murder of a womtruly revoluan he met in high school. People in small tionary taccommunities always live in each other’s tics. Men like pockets, and our hero had many occasions Samuel Adto go out to that farm house. Her husband ams, Joseph was a violent man. No one was sad when he Warren, John died, except, because of the cost of treating Hancock, his illness, she was left in debt. Since monBenjamin ey was not the motive for the murder, the Church, Paul community is baffled as to motive. Sadly, Revere and the new chief of police is a lazy drunk, so others sought it falls to our hero to do justice for his longto extol, contime friend. The way it works out is clever, trol and direct the general discontent toalthough I think the revelation in the final wards Great Britain. General Gage sought to chapter slightly redundant. manage, pacify, and eventually tax the same Reviewed by David Marshall people. When the talking ceased and the muskets took up the arguments, the narrative intensifies. Lexington and Concord, the Battle of the Bridge, the evacuation and Siege of Boston, and finally the disastrous battle of Bunker Hill are told in absorbing Whistle, cont’d from page 8 detail. The mounting desperation of the covers she helped Ester when she had a fit, British troops in Boston leading to their he thinks differently of her. They become evacuation ends this opening chapter of friends, then more. the Revolutionary War. This book explores Susan Hill Long has created a time-and how the revolution was created and of the place-machine with this lovely comingactions of the men and women who lived, of-age story. She transports readers to the and in some cases died, in pursuit of liberty. Ozarks of the early 20th century with her Reviewed by Ralph Peterson compelling story. Reviewed by Rosi Hollinbeck

Rough Rider President Tuesday, Oct. 29 • 7 p.m. Hardesty Regional Library Connor’s Cove 8316 E. 93rd St.

Joe Wiegand is acclaimed as the nation’s premiere Theodore Roosevelt repriser. He has portrayed the 26th U.S. president in all 50 states, plus was invited to come to the White House in 2008 as a part of the official White House celebration of the 150th anniversary of Roosevelt’s birth and portray Theodore in the East Room. A political science graduate of the University of the South and a resident of Sewanee, Tenn., Wiegand also is a member and contributor to the Theodore Roosevelt Association, founded in 1919.

Enjoy the most amazing theater show in years!

Tulsa Book Review • October 2013 • 9

Sponsored by the Rotary Club of Tulsa.


Book Reviews Category

Category

Fantasy

Science Fiction SNAP IT for additional book summaries.

The World of the End By Ofir Touché Gafla Tor Books, $24.99, 368 pages Check this out! Ben Mendelssohn knows how to end things. It’s his job; he’s an epilogist. Sadly, he couldn’t handle any ending that he could not control. When his wife dies, he writes out his own ending with a gun and a bullet. Ben’s own death sends him to the Other World. The Other World is a place filled with celebrities and loved ones. He meets everyone, expect for his beloved wife, Marian; in fact, she might even be alive still. Ben might have to spend an eternity in his own private hell. Gafla isn’t afraid to approach issues in his book. In fact, he presses into taboo topics, like abuse and suicide, with wanton honesty. Gafla doesn’t allow these topics to overshadow the main plot: Marian and Ben’s marriage. Ben’s struggles are the heart and soul of the book. Adding onto that is how beautifully crafted each character is, and how they build off Ben and are not independent to the plot. The book doesn’t translate right, like some parts don’t work. I honestly can’t tell if this was the fault of the book or its translation it into English. At times, the book can be difficult to read; it is worth pursuing. Reviewed by Kevin Brown Neptune’s Brood By Charles Stross Ace, $25.95, 336 pages Check this out! Neptune’s Brood by Charles Stross is a sequel to Saturn’s Children and one of the best books Stross has written over the last ten years. It’s much in the style of Robert Heinlein and Mack Reynolds, exploring the economics when a planetary system invests the money to build and send out a slowerthan-light ship to colonize a nearby star system. The initial investment is massive and, with it taking centuries for ships to move

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from one star system to another, it could be five-hundred years before the debt is paid down to any extent. Of course this would all be a terrible challenge to humankind, but we’ve died out (three times) more or less completely. In our place stand new generations of metahumans who have evolved from the robots humanity built to help keep itself alive. They have most of the same psychological strengths and weaknesses as humans but are less fragile. Against this background, a young female, who’s interested in the history of accounting with a specialization in fraud, sets off to track down a longlost financial instrument. After being captured by piratical auditors and undergoing a major body restructuring, we discover slow money isn’t slow any more. Reviewed by David Marshall The Ocean at the End of the Lane By Neil Gaiman HarperCollins, $25.99, 192 pages Check this out! In the first novel from bestseller Neil Gaiman since 2005’s Anansi Boys, he creates a magic tale that straddles between a short story and novella that feels like a wonderful fairytale, possessing the magic and feel of The Graveyard Book with the wonder and beauty of Stardust. The story centers around a seven year-old boy who discovers down the road some neighbors – a girl, her mother and grandmother – who aren’t the sweet ladies they appear, but part of something immortal that has been around for a very long See Ocean, cont’d on page 11

Under a Graveyard Sky By John Ringo Baen, $25.00, 384 pages Check this out! Okay, this is a worlde nd s - w it h zombies story. Of course, with John Ringo writing it, it’s not your everyday witches’ brew. It has attractive and bloodthirsty teen girls, believable biology, with elaborations and permutations only this talented author could toss into the cauldron. Steven John “professor” Smith’s family has sound survivor attitudes regarding various disastrous scenarios, so when they receive advance word of a coming plague from Steve’s paramilitary brother, they disengage from everyday lives of employment and school to engage in adaptable bug-out strategies. Laws, regulations, and petty governmental authority are part of the problem. This only adds to the believability of the tale, as coping with other people and their attempts to control are problems everyone has actually encountered. Not only the permutations of PR but the vicissitudes of hapless governmental agencies are elicited. We have here a zombie possibility that manifests as credible. It is terrifying, entertaining, and certainly a credit to the increasing fame and standing of John Ringo.The maritime ordinariness of jargon, terms, and concerns add to the immediacy of this excellent dip into contemporary literary faddishness. I was appalled, fascinated, and repulsed. By all means, buy this book -- and any number of survival manuals to accompany it. Reviewed by David Lloyd Sutton The Mist-Torn Witches By Barb Hendee Roc, $7.99, 336 pages Check this out! Céline and Amelie Fawe, orphaned sisters, make ends meet by running the apothecary shop they inherited from their mother. Céline makes extra money by pretending to

Tulsa Book Review • October 2013 • 10

tell fortunes; her mother was a seer, and others readily believe she has the gift too. But one day, Céline has a true vision, and it forces her to ignore an order from a powerful warlord prince, which puts both women in danger. They find refuge in his brother, Anton, who offers them asylum if they can solve a mystery for him. Girls have been found murdered in their beds in recent weeks, and it is up to Céline and Amelie to find the killer. Barb Hendee’s new novel, The Mist-Torn Witches, is the start of a promising new series. Set in the world of the Noble Dead, which Hendee’s fans will already be familiar with, this story offers an interesting flavor of magic and likeable heroines, who readers will find themselves identifying with as they struggle to find their way in the new society they have been tossed into. I am definitely looking forward to the next volume! Reviewed by Holly Scudero Codex Born: Magic Ex Libris, Book 2 By Jim C. Hines DAW Books, $24.95, 326 pages Check this out! Libriomancy has taken over Isaac Vainio’s life once more. Not only is book magic responsible for his new secret a ssig nment working with Johannes G u t e n berg, but it’s brought him an amazing, complicated relationship with Lena, the dryad warrior with fictional origins. And now, it might take everything away again. A new threat appears, wielding See Codex cont’d on page 12


Book Reviews

Category

Al Sarrantonio, Charlaine Harris, and her father among them -- neatly balancing the book between different storytelling styles and moods, and offering a panoply of frights and creeps for any horror fan. Impossible Monsters is good, old-fashioned nightmare fuel. Reviewed by Glenn Dallas

Horror

Doomed, cont’d from cover

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Impossible Monsters Edited by Kasey Lansdale Subterranean, $35.00, 204 pages Check this out! A gruesome crime scene at a remote ranch takes a horrifying turn. A series of storage units conceals a mindbending horror. A werewolf on the prowl encounters an unexpected treat. A man grows obsessed with cleanliness. A bookstore owner takes a trip with his new business partner and the man’s peculiar daughter. An imaginary friend turns violent. Monsters bridge the gap between horror and fantasy, embodying our deepest fears - predators, the unknown, the intangible and bringing them to life in spine-chillingly palpable form. The monsters featured in

Impossible Monsters run the gamut from feral to cunning, from beasts and brutes to the insidious and seductive, and the stories presenting them are terribly effective. This book is Kasey Lansdale’s editing debut, and if this is any indication, she’s got a fine career ahead. She’s assembled an Olympic-level team of authors -- Neil Gaiman,

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eternal damnation and recalling the childhood events that led to her untimely death. With Doomed, Palahniuk settles back into the R-rated Judy Blume voice that marked Damned, the first in the Palahniuk Divine Comedy trilogy. Though the style is a major departure from most of his oeuvre, Palahniuk seems as relaxed as ever. It’s remarkable how committed and selfpossessed Palahniuk is crafting the voice of a precocious 13-year-old narrator. His vision of hell is consistent with what an adult might project for a teenage girl: spotty Wi-Fi and “Mean Girls” peers. Although Palahniuk admitted to reading Blume prior to the release of Damned, he seems to channel the irreverence of fellow blasphemer Christopher Moore in equal measure. The jokes are crude, the bodily fluids in abundance and the scatological humor ubiquitous. Where Palahniuk once seemed to revel bitterly in his own ability to string together line after line of gut-punching pithy obser-

vations, Doomed reads like Palahniuk is breaking out of his formula and having a ball doing so. Gone is the edge, contempt and disdain. Instead of Tyler Durden explaining in astringent deadpan the steps involved in cooking up do-it-yourself nitroglycerine, we have the precocious polysyllabic voice of Madison, who fake texts Jesus and plays pranks on her former schoolmates from beyond the grave. You can almost imagine a warm grin on Palahniuk’s face while he wrote this, as opposed to a twisted sneer. Reviewed by Nick Abrahamson

Ocean, cont’d from page 10 time. Soon he is whisked away on an unforgettable journey to take care of a little problem and ends up bringing something alien back into this world, and then everything starts to go wrong. The story is sweet and small, but also large and complex. It is classic Gaiman, mixing his unique blend of fairytale and mythology with real emotions and life choices that stick with the reader long after they have finished the book. The Ocean at the End of the Lane is an innocent-looking little story that soon sucks you in and shows its claws as well as its soft, warm spots, leaving you left full of wonder and thought. Reviewed by Alex Telander

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Tulsa Book Review • October 2013 • 11


Book Reviews Category

Romance SNAP IT for additional book summaries.

Tear You Apart By Megan Hart Harlequin MIRA, $14.95, 304 pages Check this out! Meet Elisabeth, your typical midforties American woman: married, two kids, full time job, a house – the usual. She doesn’t know it but she is terribly unhappy with her life. Elisabeth isn’t looking for an affair or for Will but nonetheless she ends up with both and she is changed irrevocably. Her affair with Will forces her to take a good long, hard look at her life. Once she does, she is distraught to find out that she has settled into contentment as opposed to striving for happiness. Tear You Apart is a story of a woman coming to grips with having an affair. Readers will find it easy to identify with Elisabeth and Will’s dilemma. They both acknowledge that what they are doing is wrong but seem powerless to stop. What do you do when you find out you’re unhappy with your life? Would you be able to sacrifice potential happiness for the good of your family? Megan Hart has written a cast of characters that are very likable in spite of their numerous flaws that make them more human. Readers will get pulled into the story simply to find out how it ends. It’s witty, romantic, devastating, and it will tear you apart right along with the characters. Reviewed by Jennifer Moss How to Tame Your Duke By Juliana Gray Berkley, $7.99, 320 pages Check this out! Princess Emilie is a quiet young woman who avoids action and adventure. Her world is turned on its head when a serious threat to the crown threatens the lives of her sisters and herself. Emilie’s uncle devises a plan to keep the young princess safe, disguising her

as a bearded male tutor in the household of the imposing Duke of Ashland. Emilie and the Duke meet on accident in town while she’s a female (and in a very compromising position!) and a complicated double life begins. The Duke begins searching for the wife who left him and Emilie’s charge, Freddie, discovers the truth about his tutor. Emilie finds herself increasingly in love with her reclusive, disfigured employer. He offers her adventure like no other. Yet can she keep her sisters and herself safe if she blows the charade? I love Juliana Gray’s books, and How to Tame Your Duke is an exciting introduction to her new trilogy. Highly steamy and a bit unusual with deep, interesting characters and multiple story lines, this is a summer read sure to rise the heat. Reviewed by Jennifer Melville Hot Summer Nights By Jaci Burton, Jessica Clare, Erin McCarthy, Carly Phillips Berkley, $7.99, 352 pages Check this out! Too hot not to cool down? Not this batch of stories, especially when the hottest is the final and shortest, titled “Ice Princess.” Erin McCarthy’s hysterically bawdy tale features a perky klutz and a former Olympian skier, now a ski instructor. There’s much more than just skiing going on here, and nearly every word is hilarious. The other three stories are summer tales, mostly set in small towns, with more laidback styles. They’re all enjoyable, and if you’re not familiar with any of the authors, these enjoyable appetizers will not discourage you from finding full-length books by any of them. Jaci Burton’s “Hope Smolders” features a not-so-young woman, mother of two, abandoned by her husband last year. His best friend realizes the emptiness

caused and steps in to help out. It’s a lovely and hopeful story, as is “Perfect Stranger” by Carly Phillips, in which a young woman who has been pushed into becoming a doctor by her doctor dad suddenly meets a football player whose life is much better balanced. Can he convince her to loosen up a bit and learn to share? Finally, “The Legend of Jane” by Jessica Clare is a sweet, loopy tale that’ll keep you laughing and turning pages! Reviewed by Kelly Ferjutz Finding Colin Firth: A Novel By Mia March Gallery Books, $16.00, 336 pages

reader can easily catch up with the romance-saturated background of Cupid, Texas. Chubby, fourteen-year-old Lace Bettingfield, who also stutters, is madly in love with football hero Pierce Hollister. But he pays no attention to her, whatsoever – he’s entirely focused on becoming the quarterback of the Dallas Cowboys. He does just that, but ten years later, in the SuperBowl, he suffers a possibly careerending injury and comes back home to Cupid to recuperate. Whoa, there! Who’s that gorgeous knockout over there? Why it’s none other than Lace, of his high school years. He’s immediately smitten; she wants little to do with him now. She’s achieved her life goal of a Ph.D in plant science, and is in charge of the Cupid Botanical Garden. Pierce cannot get Lace out of his mind and pursues her vigorously, with the resulting happy ending. In fact, she solves the mystery of his father’s strange illness! Author Wilde weaves myriad individual threads into a complex tapestry of people, personalities and pleasures in small-town Cupid. I predict this will be a long series! Reviewed by Kelly Ferjutz

So what would you do if rumor insisted Colin Firth was coming to your town to make a movie? Probably just what all the women in Boothbay Harbor do— go crazy! Bea Crane, Codex, cont’d from page 10 a year out of college, and orphaned, is left magic the Libriomancers have never seen, a letter one year after her mother died. Bea and Isaac and Lena find themselves directly was adopted! How could that be? Bea is fired in its crosshairs. As Lena’s back story unby her impatient boss in Boston. Off she folds, other secrets from the past emerge, goes to Maine to see if she can find her birth threatening to tear apart everything Gutenmother and father. berg has built ... for better or for worse. Veronica Russo is famous in Boothbay Codex Born is a worthy successor to the Harbor for her pies, while she works as a fun and fascinating first installment in the waitress in the town’s diner. On a whim, she Magic Ex Libris series, vastly expanding the signs on to be an “extra” in the film, never world and the history of the Libriomancers, imagining her only child will appear. peppering plot points with soul-searching And in New York City, Gemma Hendricks complications for Lena and Isaac. wants desperately to restart her career as a And while Isaac remains our narrator and journalist and is convinced an interview primary voice, Codex Born focuses on the with Mr. Firth will do it. And then she dismost interesting character from the origicovers she’s pregnant. nal, adding some intriguing wrinkles to LeThese three women meet and lend each na’s troubling sex-slave/sex-object story arc other strength while pursuing their goals. and granting her more ferocity and a greater The author weaves their stories in and sense of independence than ever before. around and through those of the village and More importantly, Codex Born changed its inhabitants, plus the visiting movie crew, the playing field so much that I can’t wait to in a most satisfying way. see what book three will bring us. Reviewed by Kelly Ferjutz Reviewed by Glenn Dallas All Out of Love: A Cupid, Texas Novel By Lori Wilde Avon, $7.99, 384 pages Check this out! By a quirk of fate, I read this book before the first in the series, but no problem. The

Tulsa Book Review • October 2013 • 12


Book Reviews Category

Cookbooks

Category

Home, Garden & DIY

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The Secret Lives of Baked Goods: Sweet Stories & Recipes for America’s Favorite Desserts By Jessie Oleson Moore Sasquatch Books, $24.95, 192 pages Check this out! I love to bake, and I love interesting but ultimately useless trivia. For me, this book is perfection. It delves into the histories of our favorite treats, explaining how they were created and how they became popular. Some have been around for a long time, modern variations on medieval dishes, whereas others are relatively new. For example, did you know that German chocolate cake has nothing to do with Germany? It was originally

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made using G e r m a n’s chocolate, from which it gets its name, but it was created by a Dallas homemaker in 1957. She sent her recipe into a newspaper, and it became an instant hit! Jessie Oleson Moore tells a story like that for each of the desserts she mentions, but See Baked Goods, cont’d on page 14

Knit Your Socks on Straight: A New and Inventive Technique With Just Two Needles By Alice Curtis Storey Publishing, LLC, $16.95, 144 pages Check this out! Socks are one of those projects knitters either love or hate; there are tons of patterns and beautiful yarns to make unique, comfortable creations, but the technique can be a bit daunting for some. If you’ve tended to shy away from double-pointed needles, don’t give up hope! Alice Curtis is here with Knit Your Socks on Straight, which will get you started knitting socks with regular straight needles. Yes, these socks have seams, but

don’t let that notion dissuade you. Curtis provides detailed descriptions of how to make smooth seams that don’t detract from comfort, as well as different types of toes and simple, straightforward heels. There are differences between left and right socks, but See Knit, cont’d on page 14

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Tulsa Book Review • October 2013 • 13


Book Reviews Category

Nature & Science SNAP IT for additional book summaries.

The Human Spark: The Science of Human Development By Jerome Kagan Basic Books, $28.99, 333 pages Check this out! Certainly not written for the casual reader, The Human Spark is a serious textbook on developmental p s y c h o l o g y. The volume is almost entirely text with occasional illustrations and tables, and Jerome Kagan’s writing is purely scientific—not easily readable for the nonscientists. Its stated purpose is to revise and add to Kagan’s previous book on the subject, The Nature of the Child, published in 1984. Within the text there are chapter by chapter footnotes that refer to the reference section at the end of the volume. Kagan’s contribution to developmental psychology is well-timed since the nurture vs. nature discussion of human child development has been in the forefront of this science for several decades. He divides this book into nine chapters according to the phases of human development starting from the embryonic stage, and discussing the influence of culture and history on that development. His treatment of how infants transform into children, children into adolescents and adults would likely interest many who are raising children of their own. Much of his insight is based on many decades of observing infants and children and controlled studies in laboratories. Readers having mentally ill children will be interested in his extensive chapter on the subject. Reviewed by George Erdosh Magnificent Mistakes in Mathematics By Alfred S. Posamentier, Ingmar Lehmann Prometheus Books, $24.00, 300 pages Alfred S. Posamentier and Ingmar Lehmann offer a playful journey through the punctilious world of amazing mathematical concepts, from Euclid and Pythagoras to recent mathematicians, René des Cartes and Carl Friedrich Gauss. One of the reasons

Posamentier and Lehmann called their book Magnificent Mistakes in M at he m atics is that it not only refers to famous mathe m at ic i a n s who are, t hemselves magnificent, but to the many new vistas they opened for mental exploration. In many of these cases, the authors revealed how these mathematicians’ shortcomings sealed their fate. At first, the reader is inclined to think that the book is filled with trivial classic arguments that most mathematically astute readers are well familiar with. But, as chapters advance, the theme into the book the aura takes on a deeper significance, exposing the more subtle concepts tucked away in lesser-known volumes by lesser-known mathematical craftsmen. This approach defines the book to be a much richer read than at first glance. I give high credit to Posamentier and Lehmann for understanding this reader concern, setting the stage for a more profound read. Magnificent Mistakes in Mathematics is a bold look at some incredibly profound concepts in all areas of mathematical literature, including arithmetic, algebraic, geometric, and statistical inquiries. Don’t be fooled by the title. The book will give you something very worthwhile to ponder, a joyful excursion into a world seldom written about. Reviewed by D. Wayne Dworsky How Math Works: A Guide to Grade School Arithmetic for Parents and Teachers By G. Arnell Williams Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, $46.00, 346 pages Check this out! I am a word person, but I’m also a homeschooling mom. I need to know my math. My husband, an engineer, likes to tease me when I get frustrated, “Don’t you see how the numbers dance into place?” I always reply that numbers don’t do any dancing for

me, but after Baked Goods, cont’d from page 13 reading the she does more than that. For each dessert, chapter called she also provides a recipe that stays close “Dance of the to the classic but includes slight modificaDigits” (on tions to make it easier for the home baker. multiple-digit Her recipes are delicious. I made the pinemu ltiplicaapple upside-down cake (for the first time) tion), I can at for my fiancé and future father-in-law, and least begin to they LOVED it. It was so easy to make and see where that so scrumptious that it is now a part of my strangely porepertoire. etic idea might The Secret Lives of Baked Goods is the come from. ideal book for any baking aficionado. It has How Math entertaining and interesting stories, beautiWorks delivers exactly what it promises: ful pictures, and great recipes. What’s not to an extremely thorough explanation of nulove? meration and the four basic operations. It’s Reviewed by Audrey Curtis completely fascinating, but informationdense and academic. It could serve as a text for a graduate-level course in the history of arithmetic. This is not a quick-reference Knit, cont’d from page 13 book to turn to when your child needs help instructions for both are provided in each with homework. All explanations are acpattern. The patterns themselves are darcompanied by detailed diagrams and mulling, and perusing these pages will have you tiple methods: a “coin system” (basically enitching to run to your nearest craft store to hanced tally marks), an abacus, and written pick up supplies for some new projects. The out in Arabic numerals (though you’ll learn pattern instructions are easy to understand, about Roman numerals, too). Learn how anand while you do need some knitting expericient Egyptians multiplied using doubling ence to work your way through, there are recharts. It’s pretty amazing. If you’ve always fresher instructions on things like swatchwanted to understand math but never quite ing and casting on. Happy knitting! grasped it, this book can help you see how Reviewed by Holly Scudero the numbers dance. Reviewed by Randy-Lynne Wach

Traveling the Mother Road this Fall?

Download the Guide to Diners, Drive-Ins & Dives for diners on this route and many others.

Tulsa Book Review • October 2013 • 14


Book Reviews Category

Biography & Memoir SNAP IT for additional book summaries.

The Good Life Lab: Radical Experiments in Hands-On Living By Wendy Jehanara Tremayne Storey Publishing, LLC, $18.95, 320 pages Check this out! The Good Life Lab is part spiritual and philosophical essay and part practical manual for living an uncommodified life in the waste stream to reclaim creativity. The author, Wendy Treymaine, and her partner, Mikey, left traditional jobs and lives in New York to live on a one-acre former RV park in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico. There, influenced by Sufism and a desire to regain lost skills, Wendy and Mikey create building from rebar and papercrete, repurpose waste to make new things, brew their own biofuel, make and grow a significant amount of their own food and medicine from their garden or foraging, design ingenious inventions from scratch, and give away those plans to the world as a gift. While some may have the impression that living off the grid is isolating, Wendy and Mikey are part of a vibrant community in real life and through the internet that thrives on barter, shared knowledge, and favors. The great majority of readers of The Good Life Lab will not take the radical steps that Wendy and Mikey took. Some may even question their sanity. Most, however, will find something to contemplate and take bits away to apply to their own lives. Reviewed by Annie Peters Rocket Girl: The Story of Mary Sherman Morgan, America’s First Female Rocket Scientist By George D. Morgan Prometheus Books, $18.00, 325 pages Check this out! Mary Sherman Morgan. That’s probably not a name you know, but you should, since America never would’ve reached space without her. Just like Rosalind Franklin’s name belongs next to those of Watson and Crick, Mary Morgan’s name belongs next

to Wernher von Braun in the field of rocketry. A lthough, truth be told, Mary Morgan might not be happy with the notoriety. Rocket Girl is her son George’s attempt to see credit where credit is due, chronicling his mother’s hard life, impressive career, and undeniable contributions to science. Part revisionist history, part creative nonfiction, Rocket Girl is an intriguing look at the opening salvos of the Space Race as well as an unappreciated pioneer in rocketry and chemistry. By telling his mother’s life story in parallel with those of rocketry luminaries Sergei Korolev and Wernher von Braun, Morgan offers crucial historical context to his mother’s accomplishments, even as he peppers the narrative with his own struggles to uncover his mother’s story and set the record straight. While his conversational inventions can be a little hokey -- he extrapolates what might have transpired, based on scanty evidence -- the author’s tribute to Mary Morgan is no less worthy or important. Reviewed by Glenn Dallas Bloodhound in Blue: The True Tales of Police Dog JJ and His Two-Legged Partner By Adam David Russ Lyons Press, $24.95, 288 pages Not just the story of a bloodhound, J.J.; his friend, trainer, and partner Mike Serio; and their entwined careers on the Salt Lake City Police Department, this tale is many things. Full of adventures and misadventures, achievements and frustrations, it is maturely and carefully written, with wry and unexpected vignettes of humor. Thoroughly researched, purely factual, it is nonetheless moving on several interweaving levels, like the finely told tale it is. On the professional level, we see a recounting of the difficulties of dealing with institutional inertia, with individual preju-

dices, and the patience required to overcome those obstacles. The police K9 folk liked their “c h a i n s a w s on leashes,” their German Shepherds, and thought the gangly bloodhound their fellow officer Serio was touting was ridiculous. The big-eared goof even required a shepherd as backup on pursuits of dangerous people because, friendly to a fault, he followed trails, not perceived enemies. Following Serio’s quest to show J.J.’s real utility is a profound lesson in prolonged tact and inoffensive persistence. Bloodhounds are known to be good at smelling, specifically at trailing. But they have, as Mr. Russ points out to our immense entertainment, other talents. They can sleep through a lot. They slobber better than any other creature on the planet. And they have the ability to ingest almost anything that will require veterinarian care. Even when their inhalations don’t require medical intervention, the aftereffects can be logistically and olfactorily overwhelming! One thing that struck me in reading

this was author Russ’s finesse in wording. Though it necessitated frequently describing criminal offenses against basic decency, I would not hesitate to hand this eminently readable book to a twelve year old child. Which brings me to a core value for readers in Bloodhound in Blue. Police, through the emotions of Mike Serio, are shown to be sincerely desirous of aiding the hurt, restoring justice, and protecting the helpless. We have here a work that treats them sympathetically and honestly. Of course, most cops are cops because they want to protect and serve. They are consciously white hats. That is all too easy to lose sight of in an era when media frequently portrays them as a danger to society. Despite the many thousands of officers bolstering our safety and the security of our persons, the lurid bad examples get the publicity. This story is refreshing, portraying the decent intensity of a good officer. Those vignettes of humor I mentioned include J.J.’s reaction to hot dog bribes from a Schutzen “trainer,” the undignified methodology needed to get the big fellow over backyard fences, and his unabashed howled bragging at the ends of successful traces. You come away from this book with a sense of having been there, of having slobber on your clothes, and the memory of immense silky ears between your fingers. Reviewed by David Lloyd Sutton

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Tulsa Book Review • October 2013 • 15


BOOK SMART TULSA AND THE TULSA LIBRARY TRUST PRESENT …

FEATURING: • Meet and mingle with Chuck Palahniuk, author of “Fight Club” • Live music • Cash bar with themed drinks • Eats • Lots of surprises!

This is a themed event. In addition to the usual Chuck-directed fun (trivia prizes, toys, other shenanigans), two of his friends, Monica Drake and Chelsea Cain, who are fellow writers of their own dark-humored esteem, will join in! In keeping with the theme (who doesn’t love a fun theme?), attendees are encouraged to wear their best sleepwear** and bring a pillow or stuffed animal to keep them feeling safe from the monsters that might be lurking in the shadows. NOTE: In order to have a long, fantastically rich event and save you the trouble of waiting in line for hours, Chuck will sign books in advance instead of at the event. *ADMISSION requires the purchase of Chuck Palahniuk’s new novel, “Doomed.” One book purchase allows for two guests. Books will go on sale at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 1 at Barnes & Noble at 41st and Yale. Attendees will be given a receipt and two wristbands. Books will be picked up the night of the event. You must bring your receipt and wristbands to claim your book and gain entry. Books and tickets also will be sold the day of the event at Central Library in Aaronson Auditorium, starting at 4 p.m. All proceeds will benefit Tulsa City-County Library’s and the Tulsa Library Trust’s Central Library Renewed campaign. **Appropriate pajama attire, please – it’s still a library after all!


Tulsa Book Review October 2013