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June 2018

The Luckiest Unlucky Man pg 12

REPAIR OPPORTUNITIES AT THE145.COM

Winner Winner, Chicken Dinner!


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© 2016 Delta TechOps

ONLY ONE MRO CAN TREAT YOU LIKE THE WORLD’S #1 AIRLINE.

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Editor’s Letter Hey there 145 readers! Does everyone have fun summer plans they’re looking forward to? I feel like for the first time in a long time we have a summer with no vacations planned, and to be honest, I’m really looking forward to it! It’ll be fun to stay home, have some BBQ’s, roast smore’s up the canyon and enjoy the beautiful Utah summer! We’re always go go going, so I can’t wait to just sit back and relax. Well, we’ve got some great content for you to kick off your summer. Lots of good stuff in this issue, from drag racing to learning about the most lucky, unlucky man on earth. We even have a new scetion for you Repair Centers out there, to help you develop some new repair capabilities. Just a reminder, we love when readers send in content for our magazines. You guys have the best stories! So keep em’ coming! We look forward to featuring many more of you in upcoming issues! So, if you have an awesome story, a cool hobby, or want to share your start up story, then let us know, we’d love to have you! Enjoy the read, Editor-in-Chief

Ashley Fox

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June Volume 5 Issue 3

CONTENTS 6

Aviation History

8

New Engine Shop in Europe

12

The Luckiest, Unluck Man

14

Repair Opportunities

17

Winner, Winner Chicken Dinner

21

Super Sonic Transportation

26

2018 Top Shop Winners

28

Name that Airport

Email: taylor@the145.com Tel: +1.888.820.8551 Ext. 704 Fax: +1.801.772.1947

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• Avionics, Instruments & Radio • Electromechanical • Fuel

www.PowerAA.com 2550 N.W. 4th Court

Fort Lauderdale, FL 33311 info@PowerAA.com

• Hydraulics

(305) 599-7745

• Pneumatics

(305) 599-1336


AVIATION HISTORY Last month marked the 90th anniversary of when Lt. Julian Dexter of the Air Corps Reserves completed the herculean task of aerial mapping the Florida Everglades. His endeavor took over 65 hours in the air spread over 2 months and mapped an area of over 3,000 square miles. This accomplishment is definitely something we take for granted with the ease of satellite photos and GPS mapping, but the progression of aerial mapping over the years has been a valuable tool for mankind to gage its surroundings. Aerial photography has developed through the years. The process started by taking pictures from balloons and evolved to using kites and even pigeons with attached cameras to take pictures. This progressed to the use of rockets. In fact, the first person associated with using a camera strapped to a rocket for the purpose of taking aerial photographs was Alfred Nobel, as in, the man who founded the Nobel Prize. He tinkered with aerial photography toward the end of his life. It wasn’t until the end of World War I when the usefulness of aerial photographs became apparent. During the last years of the war (1918) both sides in the conflict were taking aerial photographs on a daily basis. Following the end of the war, aerial photogr aphy presented itself as the ideal way to map hard-to-reach places. The US Coast and Geodetic Survey (USCGS) saw this as an opportunity to effectively map the Florida Everglades (south tip of Florida), which they successfully completed in 1928. The USCGS was originally formed by Thomas Jefferson in 1807 with the purpose of mapping the coastline to create nautical charts. The use of aerial photography allowed for a better understanding of the topography of the area. The USGCS subsequently mapped the Everglades periodically throughout the next 40 years, before being re-

145 Magazine

organized into the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the US agency tasked with monitoring the environment. Aerial photography is still a useful means to size up the surface of the earth, however, satellite imagery has supplanted it as the main means by which we study the world around us. There can be no doubt that we as a society have benefitted through the countless hours people spent mapping the surface of the earth from an airplane.


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NEW ENGINE SHOP IN EUROPE - EFTEC Aviation Group and Engine Support Baltic “Engine Support Baltic” (ESB), is a newly established, and rapidly expanding, engine repair center which opened in May 2017. In less than a year, EBS setup the shop, undertook the repair of ten engines, and created full repair capability for CF34-3 engine overhauls.

Engine Support Baltic has invested heavily in tooling and machinery, and is in the process of installing the following new equipment in its facility: • Equipment for the certification of the engine parts • Low speed grinding machine • Balancing machine

The majority of EBS’ work is performed by a group of highly trained and experienced repair technicians, with a handful of specialty services being sent out to subcontractors. The company has installed state-of-the-art repair equipment, which is required to perform major engine overhauls. As part of their developing engine repair program, EBS consistently reviews customer demand and adds additional advanced tooling and machines as needed.

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Konstantin Mekhonoshin, a major stakeholder in the ESB facility, expresses his confidence in the capability of the new facility: "We currently have four engines in our shop for repair and maintenance, however, once we complete the installation of additional equipment and start working at full capacity, this number will increase to over twenty engines a year. If all goes according to plan, we should hit our target of sixty engines per year within the next three years." The engine shop operates under EASA Part 145 accreditation. A major benefit of the ESB facility is the ability to offer its clients considerable flexibility in terms of both price and lead-time for repairs and maintenance. The quality of our ESB’s service speak for itself, since the majority of clients are repeat customers entrusting them with more complex repair and maintenance requirements.

This installation program will help improve lead times and will have a positive impact on cost reduction for clients. Additionally, to the equipment described above, will enhance the company’s capabilities Combustion Chamber repair capabilities, which is planned for completion by midsummer 2019. “ESB plans to increase shop capacity to meet the service requirements of its clients”, says Ivan Litvin, Manager of Shop Development. The new facility is capable of undertaking “on wing repairs” and boasts a team of highly skilled, highly qualified repair experts.

EFTEC Aviation Group, as a dedicated partner of ESB, is responsible for marketing the capabilities and available expertise, taking on the responsibility for attracting customers and establishing the client base. Since EFTEC serves 30% of the world's CRJ operators the company has a large pool of clients interested specifically in CF34 engine types. Working in synergy with EFTEC and Engine Support Baltic provides clients with expertise and advice, 24/7 support, establishing flexible lead times, and ensuring the highest standards of quality workmanship at the most competitive prices. EFTEC Aviation Group is a global supplier to the aviation industry, with offices in the United Kingdom, USA, and Russia. Established in 2012, the group provides a wide range of services including, but not limited to, spare parts supplies, aircraft teardown, components repair, MRO and maintenance facilities, engine and APU repairs, logistics and customs clearance services.

145 Magazine

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THE LUCKIEST UNLUCKY MAN

Only a few years after that, a second car Frane was driving suffered a faulty fuel pump, dousing the engine with oil and sending flames through the air vents with Frane behind the wheel. Frane was relatively unharmed by the incident but his hair was completely singed off. a

The story of Frane Selak is so unbelievable, you’d likely walk away from a documentary about his life thinking you’d just seen a Die Hard movie. That’s because Frane Selak, the seemingly simple Croatian music teacher, has cheated death seven times. That’s right; seven. Disclaimer*** The following series of events are unverified by public Croatian record. These stories are passed along by Frane Selak, his family, and his friends. We'll let you decide what's fact or fiction but one thing is beyond a doubt; Frane has quite a tale to tell. Frane Selaks’s first brush with death occurred in 1962 when a train he was riding while traveling through a cold and slippery canyon, leaped the tracks and plummeted into a river in the middle of winter. The accident claimed lives of 17 passengers but not Selak; who was pulled from the wreckage suffering only a broken arm and hypothermia. Frane’s next act of invincibility would make even James Bond blush. Only one year following the train wreck, while on his first and last airplane ride, Frane was sucked out of a malfunctioning door. The plane is reported to have crashed killing 19 people. Frane survived by landing on a hillside haystack. (There is no record of a plane crash in Croatia in 1963). Fast forward 3 years to 1966, where a bus Frane was riding skidded off the road and into a river (different from the first river). Four people drowned but Selak managed to swim to shore with sustaining minor injuries. In 1970 Frane’s car caught fire. He was able to tuck and roll from the vehicle before the fuel tank caused the car to explode.

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In

1995, Frane was hit by bus but walked away.

The next year, 1996, Frane narrowly avoided a head-on collision with a truck while driving through a mountain range only to swerve into the canyon guardrail. The car broke through the guardrail and was completely obliterated, falling over 300 vertical feet. Frane, who was ejected from the car on impact with the guardrail, was found clinging to a tree only a few feet below on the mountainside. If you’re still on the fence as to whether these events make Frane Selak the worlds luckiest or unluckiest man, consider this; in 2003, Selak won the US equivalent of $1,110,000 in the Croatian lottery. Call it divine intervention, lady luck or mere coincidence; Frane Selak has had a blessed life – and he’s deserving of the karma… The last incredible chapter in Frane’s story came two years after the lottery when he gave away his money in order to return to his humble lifestyle. When asked why he gave away all his winnings, Frane stated, “Money cannot buy happiness.”


Reaching higher With an installed base of more than 30,000 engine controls, groundbreaking flight and pilot controls, cabin systems, and dedicated service and support to more than 300 airlines, providing the products and support that help make air travel better is what really matters.

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REPAIR OPPORTUNITIES To the right is a partial list of part numbers recently searched on The145.com with NO repair sources found. All parts were searched and broadcasted on the system by airlines and suppliers looking for repair sources. Airlines and Suppliers Besides giving you the most comprehensive repair capability database in the aviation industry, we can also help you source hard to find repair capabilities. Repair Centers We offer you so much more than just advertising your repair capabilities. We help you develop repair capabilities, source repair support service providers, inventory sourcing, manage audits and more. If you want to receive notifications for parts with no repair sources found, register for a free trial today. Register now for a FREE trial at www.the145.com

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145 Magazine


Part Number OEM

Description

0503KHSA3 MEGGITT 14157012-6 BAE 149A4000-167 BOEING 149A7561-6 BOEING 162LC102 LEWIS ENGINEERING 1701321D EMBRAER 195000-17 747-300 200671-001 SMITHS AEROSPACE 2015G2H2H-9 UTAS 2080M12G02 GE 2124M62P04 SAFRAN 251456001 MESSIER 26012423-105 TRADE AIR CORPORATE 260689871-0101 SAGEM 274T4630-20 WHITAKER 2952-02 AERFIN 2980442100000 ADAMS RITE 2LA003849-50 GOODRICH 33-06710 CRANE 343500M00 SARMA 35-0L5-1107-08 UNKN 3549432-1 BOEING 417W1101-6G BOEING 4572104-034 SATAIR 475928-01 WALTER-KIDDE 4951745 HAMILTON SUNDSTRAND 4E3437-7 GOODRICH 5002424-01 PRATT 513738-513 OECO, LLC 568-1-27202- EATON 63292070-3 HONEYWELL 70720860-1 HONEYWELL 712415-3 MILTOPE 742243-1-1 AIRBUS 742243-1-1 ZODIAC AEROSPACE 782490-47 HAMILTON SUNDSTRAND 815500-5 RATIER 960280-3 CARGO ITALIA A157451-5 TRIUMPH A38003-30 BOEING AAC4-02 MGS MODULAR GALLEY SYSTEMS C419754-101 BOEING CN1036-1215 71785 D2907017300000 AIRBUS SAS F223100-105 C &D ZODIAC F5745012300300Z AIRBUS FD94-0100 AIM HG2100AB04 HONEYWELL LM431-98-V LORD CORP RD-AX8312 PANASONIC

HARNESS T48 LH FLANGE CLIP AY DOOR ASSY-FAIRING BRAKE ACCUMULATOR AFT INDICATOR, TEMPERATURE ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE CONTROL GENERATOR EFIS-PANEL HUB INTEGRATED PITOT/STATIC/AOA SENSOR NOZZLE FADEC FAN NLG IRS BLOWER FAN BOARD VALVE CRC TEMP SENSOR FAUCET STROBE LIGHT HOUSING TRAVEL LIMITER BCL DUCT GRILLE ASSY OXYPNL COMPARTMENT OVERHEAT DETECTION MODULE DIVIDER FLOW FOR APU CONTROLLER FAIRING SATCOM ANTENNA FUEL BOOST PUMP VALVE, FAN AIR MODULATING PRECOOLER CONTROLLER PANEL CONTROL VALVE SAFETY COCKPIT MULTI TANK INDICATOR COCKPIT MULTI TANK INDICATOR (M.T.I) PCU, WITH TORQUE MOTOR PROP RING, PISTON FILTER BLOCKAGE REMOVER OVEN NET HARNESS MANIFOLD PSU GLAZING LIGHT ASSY IRU-INERTIAL REFERENCE UNIT TORQUE TUBE CD ENCODER

145 Magazine

ATA Chapter

Eligibility

JETSTREAM 41 52 24 34

B737-900ER E-6, 707 E170 BOEING

34

E190/E175 CF34

32

767

38 33

B757 JETSTREAM41

29 21

A320 767 B777-300ER

36 49

737 717 B777 B777

36 49

737-8 MAX B737-SERIES

28

A319-CFM56 A319 DHC8 300 MD11

25 29 AIRBUS A330

DHC

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A

little more than three years ago, 145 Magazine published an article about Mike McCune, Director of Inventory Sales at AvAir, and his passion for drag racing. If you read the article, you may recall that Mike was an avid participant in drag racing during the 70’s and the 80’s, but he had to take a twenty-year hiatus from the sport because it had become too expensive for him.

“I have a routine that helps me stay focused. Before I go in the water box to heat the tires up, I tell myself to focus first on the light than on the win. If I say that once, I say it at least ten times before the race begins. Once I’ve done the burnout to heat up the tires I come out of the box 20-30 feet where the coolness of the track will grab the tires. I usually do a dry hop to make sure there’s no water on the tires and then I’ll stage the car.”

The last time Mike won a race was 1985 while competing in the Super Chevy Show at Palm Beach International Raceway. He won his class in his very own 1965 California Coup Corvette that ran 140 mph in 9.6 seconds! For the past four years now, Mike has been actively competing in the sport again. He drives a 1974 Mach 1 Ford Mustang, full chassis race car with a 383 small block Chevy engine. He recently contacted us here at 145 Magazine to say that he had won his first drag race in 33 years.

If you’re not familiar to drag racing jargon, to stage the car refers to the light system known as a Christmas tree. The Christmas tree consists of a column of lights for each driver, and two light beam sensors per lane on the track at the starting line. When the first light beam is broken by a vehicle's front tire or tires, the vehicle is "pre-staged" (about 7 inches from the starting line) and the pre-stage indicator light on the tree is lit. When the second light beam is broken, the vehicle is "staged", and the stage indicator on the tree is lit. At this point, the only thing left to do is wait for the large yellow lights to begin counting down.

When we asked Mike to tell us a little bit about what he’s learned over the past four years and what he believes contributed to his win in May, he explained the biggest factor has been his routine.

Winner Winner, Chicken Dinner

Mike McCune wins his first drag race in thirty-three years 17


Mike says, “For whatever reason, I like to stage my car before the other guy, just because I like to be first. It's part of my routine. Once the car is staged and the big yellow lights begin illuminating, I just focus on the third yellow light the whole time. Once the last yellow light is at its brightest, that’s when I put things in motion.” Mike says you have to put things in motion before the green light comes on: “If you leave on the green, you’re gonna lose. Mike explains that reaction time is 75% of the race and begins at the starting line, and 25% is at the finish line. “The equipment has to work,” Mike says, “but reaction time is key. I’ve lost races by 30,000th and 70,000th of a second. If my reaction time is better than my competitor’s I have a good chance of winning.” Mike likes 1/8-mile bracket racing. That’s where the losing car and driver are eliminated from the event while the winner advances to the next round until a champion is crowned. Most racing events are at least seven rounds but can be more depending on the size of the event. “I’ve been very blessed to be able to participate in this sport once again. My wife, Melissa, said to me recently that she liked seeing me out there doing the thing I love. I couldn’t agree more. Drag racing is a rush like none other, and I’m very grateful to be involved in it.”

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SUPER SONIC TRANSPORTATION

B

ack in April, my Father-inlaw passed away, and as with any passing, the time following is a period of reflection. As we poured over a lifetime of memories, we came to a couple of pictures showing an odd-looking airplane. My mother-inlaw remembered seeing it at an air show in Southern California in the late 1960s, but that was all she remembered. She asked if I could find out more information, or at least the name of the plane. Asking the right questions to the right people led me to look under the United States Government’s supersonic bomber program back in the 1960s. I learned that the identity of the aircraft in the picture was an XB-70 Valkyrie. The XB-70 was an attempt to build a long-range bomber that could fly at an altitude of over 70,000 feet at supersonic speeds. This, of course, came during the time when supersonic transportation appeared to be the future of aviation. The excitement over supersonic passenger transportation originally happened several generations ago but, on the surface, the reasons for its failure seemed to be nothing more than a missed opportunity. Who wouldn’t want to travel from city to city at Mach 1 or 2? It turns out it was a little more complicated than that. In the 1950s there was excitement over the possibility of supersonic transport (SST). At first, there seemed like no reason why the United States couldn’t produce a line of superson-

ic transports. With the development of the Concorde, a panic seemed to spread through developers worldwide with the fear that the Concorde’s design would be the SST design dominating the industry. The United States government, given their influence on commerce at the time, asked the aviation industry to develop an SST similar to the Concorde, only bigger, faster, and with the ability to fly farther. The SST Industry was fighting an uphill battle from the beginning. They faced a backlash over sonic booms from the environmentalists over the potential for ozone disruption, and even the laws of physics were against them. SST’s had an unfavorable liftto-drag ratio and fuel efficiency was significantly lower than subsonic aircraft, along with an increased exterior temperature while flying. The majority of all SST’s were out of business or scrapped before the 1960s were over, however, the Concorde continued to fly routes until 2003, barely earning a profit during its lifetime.

145 Magazine

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At one point in the late 90’s Boeing was considering resurrecting SST’s, but instead opted to turn their attention to subsonic transportation where they could transport the most people for the lowest marginal costs per passenger. Over time this led to advances, culminating in the Boeing 787 – Dreamliner, the first commercial aircraft in which major structural elements of the aircraft were made of composites rather than aluminum alloys. The first obvious advantage of shifting to composite materials was a reduction in weight. This, coupled with an increase in corrosion resistance, made composites seem like the material of the future. However, aluminum still has its advantages, with it being cheaper and easier to manufacture, mold, and repair.

for the inclusion of an SST carrier, or two, in the market seems reasonable. Analysts predict that by 2020 or 2025 there could be several SST carriers on the market as more of a high-end means of transportation. Also, we can’t forget the potential for hypersonic transports up to Mach 5 or 6, but that’s a little way down the road. Coming back to the picture that led to a look back through SST history; with the way, the world and business are shifting, and the desire to spend as little time commuting as possible, maybe the idea of a successful SST aircraft has finally come into its own. For regular passengers, we can take comfort in knowing that aircraft are being made lighter and more efficient. It’s an exciting time to be part of an industry that has seen so much growth in recent years and is projected to see even more growth in the years to come. By the way, in case you’re interested, the last remaining XB-70 Valkyrie is housed at the National Museum of the United States Air Force in Dayton, Ohio. A reminder of the past when supersonic transports were the wave of the future.

Composites are not the cure-all for the industry, but they are a definite improvement on past designs, with the Dreamliner showing a potential 20% reduction in fuel costs over the course of a 10,000 km flight. Over time these savings will add up. The use of composites will also cause a shift in the way some parts are repaired in the industry, and repair shops will adjust accordingly. It should be pointed out that there has been a recent shift back towards the inclusion of SST aircraft. With so many people making long-haul trips for business or pleasure, the potential

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Contact Taylor Fox at 1-888-820-8551 Ext. 709, or email him at taylor@the145.com


A look at 2018’s TopShop Winners!

Best Engine Components Repair

Best Safety Equipment Repair

Lufthansa Technik

HRD

Best OEM Repair

Best Interiors Repair & Best Pneumatics Repair

Honeywell

First Choice

Best Galley Product Repair

Best Engine Accessories Repair StandardAero

Camtronics

Best Avionics and Instruments Repair Aero Instruments & Avionics

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Best Total Solutions Provider 145 Magazine

Delta TechOps


Best Lavatory / Sanitation Components Repair

Best Electro-Mechanical Repair

Soundair Aviation Serivces

Best Accessories Class I, II and II

Aero Accessories

PHS/MWA Aviation Services

Best Hydraulics Repair

Best Wheel and Brake Repair

Silver Wings

Dallas Centerline

Best Fuel Systems and Fuel Accessories Repair

Best Gyro Repair

Safe Fuel Systems

Best Airframe / Aerostructures Repair

A.I.R.S

Best APU Overhaul and Repair & Best Landing Gear Repair Dublin Aerospace

Air Transport Components

Best In-Flight Entertainment System Repair

Best Heat Transfer Repair American Cooler

Mekco

145 Magazine

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The airports on Westray and Papa Westray are 1.7 miles (2.7 km) apart and a flight between the two lasts about 1 to 2 minutes. Contrast this with the hour it takes to drive to the dock in Papa Westray, take a ferry, and then drive to Westray. In November, 2016, the Westray/ Papa Westray route celebrated its 1,000,000th passenger, which is impressive considering the planes making the jaunt are 8-10 seater aircraft.

WHICH AIRPORTS: - Are 1.7 miles (2.7 km) apart? - Are connected by the shortest scheduled flight in the world? - Have scheduled flights multiple times per day? Answer: Westray and Papa Westray in Scotland

One has to wonder why it is that two islands with only 700 total residents makes for such a popular route. The flight costs only 1721£ and is used for people on Papa Westray to commute to work and school. The return flight to Papa Westray is used heavily by archaeologists and students to study the history found on the island. There is a nature preserve on the north part of Papa Westray and the archaeological site of the Knap of Howar in the middle part of the island. Currently Loganair is the airline that services this route. It’s obvious just how popular the route is, given the fact there was a bidding war between three airlines to make the 2 minute jump 6 times a week. There is, however, talk of building bridges between several of the Scottish Isles. How that will affect the world’s shortest flight will remain to be seen.

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145 Magazine Vol.5 Issue 3, June Issue  

145 is a lifestyle magazine dedicated to people in the aviation industry.

145 Magazine Vol.5 Issue 3, June Issue  

145 is a lifestyle magazine dedicated to people in the aviation industry.