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Welcome to  the  *irst  issue  of  “Quick!  Plant  Something!” Keep  an  eye  out  for  “Easter  Egg  Links”  throughout  this  issue  as  well  as  links  to  our   products  page.     Don’t  see  something  you’d  like  to  have?    Email  us! Share  with  your  fellow  survivors  by  liking  us  on  facebook,  or  sharing  the  link  to  our   website:  http://www.zombievictorygardens.com,  or  sharing  the  link  to  this  document.

Together, we  can  save  the  world,  one  garden  at  a  time.

Quick! Plant  Something!  Issue  1:    Raised  Beds  Copyright  (c)  2012  by  Kathy  Voth  and  Leah  Ashley   Esser,  Zombie  Victory  Gardens,  LLC All  rights  reserved.     This  document  is  protected  under  the  copyright  laws  of  the  United  States  and  other  countries.    This   publication  is  for  home  use  only  and  all  other  rights  are  expressly  reserved  by  the  copyright  owner.  


THE ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE HAS TAKEN ITS TOLL.

CITIES AND TOWNS HAVE GONE DARK.

FRIENDS AND FAMILY, AND ANNOYING PEOPLE TOO, HAVE DISAPPEARED, ONLY TO BE FOUND AGAIN, ROAMING THE STREETS LOOKING FOR BRAINS.

NO LIGHTS.... NO PHONE.... NO FACEBOOK.... BUT IN AT LEAST ONE, WELL-FORTIFIED HOUSEHOLD, TWO SURVIVORS ARE COUNTING THEIR BLESSINGS.

NO INTERNET....

Hey, Kathy Sue..what’s for breakfast?

Hey, Les. The usual - ramen or tomato soup.

I am so SICK of Tomato Soup from a can!


I used to just love tomatœs off the vine... You know, I had this friend before all this happened. Janet, could do ANYTHING with tools. She hated tomatœs. But then she started gardening. She even grew tomatœs. Aſter she ate her first, real-live, vineripened tomato - not like those fake ones at the grocery store - she found out she loved tomatœs. I wonder what happened to Janet? I hope she’s not one of those undead things hanging out on the other side of the fence!


Strawberries... I used to just love fresh strawberries!

And Greenbeans!

Kathy Sue, It’s time we started doing something more than just surviving!

Check out this book I’ve been reading. This guy, Mel Bartholomew, writes all about how to grow food in raised beds. I’ve got a bunch of other books too. You are absolutely right, Les! What this apocalypse needs is a little farming! Quick! Let’s plant something!

But not together!


I’ll get the machete. And I can set up a And it’s close to the Well, here’s what You get the drill and a watering system of house for quick access, we’ve got to work board for repairs. some kind. Hey with. Looks like and safety. If we make it there’s an we’ll have compact, it will arm reaching the 6 to 8 be a lot less thru’ the hours of sun work. fence. We we need. better take care of that.

THWACK!

But I hate digging! How are we going to get the soil we need to fill the beds?

ZzzzT! ZzzzT!

There! That should keep ‘em out!

SURVIVAL TIP: KEEP YOUR DRILL BATTERIES CHARGED AND READY FOR QUICK REPAIRS.

We’re not going to dig! We’re going to make our own soil from the best stuff out there. That’s the joy of raised beds!

STAY TUNED FOR: OUR ISSUE ON TURNING DECOMPOSING THINGS INTO ENERGY. BROUGHT TO YOU BY ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE POWER (ZAP!)


THE INGREDIENTS FOR GOOD SOIL

1/3

1/3

1/3

THIS IS “MEL’S MIX.” IT IS LIGHT, SO A PLANT’S ROOTS CAN GROW EASILY AND IT’S EASY TO WEED, IS RICH IN NUTRIENTS, AND MANAGES MOISTURE WELL.

Soil Math Recipe (How Much Should We Get?) Figure out the square footage of your bed (length x width). Divide that in half to get the number of cubic feet necessary for 6 inch deep soil. Di vid e THAT number by 3 for quantity of each ingredient.

1 cubic ya rd = 27 cubic feet. You might n eed to k no w this if you’r e getting things in b ulk.

So... 4x4 foot bed = 16 sq. feet Half of that is 8, so we need 8 cubic feet per bed. 8 divided by 3 = almost 2 and 2/3 cubic feet per ingredient. Round up to 3 each. It’s easier.

SURVIVAL TIP: PAY ATTENTION IN SCHOOL. YOU NEVER KNOW WHAT MIGHT COME IN HANDY.


How about if we call it a day so we can get an early start on shopping in the morning?

Thanks for the sirloin, Les. See you in the morning!

GRRR...ARGH...

Yeah. Besides, it’s harder to see the creatures at night, so we might as well go inside. Hey, I saved a can of Sirloin Burger soup. How about dinner?

G’night. I might head out early because I’ve got a lot to load. I’ll take the truck. You take the Prius.

THE GENTLE SOUNDS OF ZOMBIES WAKE LES AT DAWN. HE TAKES CARE OF HIS MORNING CHORE, CLEANING THE FENCE LINE OF CREATURES, AND THEN WRITES A QUICK NOTE.


Kathy Sue,

post, m o c t e g o t early g Headed out d vermiculite. Puttin n peat moss a of what to put it in. e you in charg at the ranch this k See you bac afternoon. Les Undead blessing of the day - I get to drive heavy machinery now. And if I dent the truck, I can get a new one!

SURVIVAL TIP: WHEN YOU ENCOUNTER THE UNDEAD IN THE STREETS, PUTTING YOUR VEHICLE IN 4 WHEEL DRIVE PREVENTS SLIPPING.


Undead blessing of the day - I always get the be parking space!

AFTER A HEARTY BREAKFAST OF RAMEN COOKED IN TOMATO SOUP AND MOTIVATED BY DREAMS OF FRESH FOOD, KATHY SUE HEADS OUT TO PICK UP VICTORY GARDEN SUPPLIES, A FEW SURPRISES FOR LES....

Victory Garden Supplies Hardware Store Pots Drill & Batteries Tape measure nails wheelbarrow

2x8s Screws weed mat hammer (pink if possible) Shovel

Craft Store cute fabric sewing machine magic markers string apron pattern

beads thread blinds for plant markers pins scissors

Bookstore anything on gardening sewing books jewelry making book/magazine journal

...AND TAKES CARE OF A FEW OF THE UNDEAD ALONG THE WAY.


or KS Notes f building raised successful Mel’s beds from ua re All New Sq ning. Foot Ga rde

No wider th a n 4 ft. Mel says t he avg. person ca n reach 2 ft, so our 4 ft. beds mea n we ca n reach everything in them without hav ing to step in the m.

Most pla nts only need 6 inch es of soil so I ca n sav e time a nd materi al by only filling bed s 6 inches deep.

Leave aisles wide enough to move the wheelba rrow through easily. Good for harvesting & for bringing in soil materials

6 to 8 hours

of sunshine

(But Leafy G reens a nd herbs like s ome shade.)

Cover the ground under your beds with weed mat to keep weeds and grass from invading.

en nea r Put the ga rd for its the house yours. It safety a nd asier to ma kes it e ha rvest... water a nd

...REMEMBER - we don’t wa nt de ad things in the ga rden!

!


Nice job on the beds! What are you doing in the house?

I’M MAKING US PRETTY AND USEFUL STUFF!! WANNA SEE?

Since we’re growing Victory Gardens, I made you an OFFICIAL Zombie Apocalypse Farmer Badge!...

... AND I made myself earrings! I’m sick of everything being dark and depressing... we’re still alive and I think life should always be beautiful!

You were gone a long time and I found work aprons! I decorated them too!...

... They have pockets for holding seeds and tools! They can even hold our machetes...


I’m going back outside to make soil... ... I am not wearing an apron...

Now we need to mix all these things together and get them in the beds. Any thoughts on how to make that easy?

My old friend Janet mixed her own soil for her beds... She started out mixing on a tarp but then figured out a more efficient way....


What Would Janet Do?

Our wheelbarrow is a great place to mix the soil ingredients, and our shovel is the “measuring cup.” We put the same number of shovelsfull of each ingredient into the wheelbarrow. Each ingredient has a different weight, but we’re mixing for volume, so it’s only the size of your shovel full that matters.

We stir the ingredients up and then push the wheelbarrow to our beds. Rake it smooth and TA DA! We’re done!

SPECIAL PEAT MOSS NOTE: It has a lot of moisture in it, and early in the spring it can actually freeze into a block. So, first set bags in the sun to warm. Then,just before opening a bag, sit on it and bounce up and down to break it up. That way it’s easier to shovel.


Well done! Now we just need to get some seeds and plants

Well, I know we can put a lot of stuff in one square foot with this method. So, let’s go plan it out before you work yourself to death.

What Would Janet Do?

Plastic Pots and food containers

I don’t know, Les, but I don’t think we have nearly enough beds for all the things I want to plant...

Maybe so...and instead of more beds, there are lots of things I could plant in. Then we could use the patio and other small spots all over our yard for growing things too! Like the stuff I remember at Janet’s place...

Empty pop bottles in wire hangers

Empty chicken feed sacks, canvas shopping bags, hanging tomato and pepper bags from the dollar store. Storage tubs and kiddie pools


UH-OH! LES! DUCK!

SNICKER! SNACK !

EWWW! I got it on me. I think the solar shower should be warm. I’m going to go wash this off!

Thanks for picking up this shower shelter, Les. It’s so much better than the hose!

Glad you like it! Hey, when you’re done, maybe we can think of something useful to do with all these body parts that are piling up. STAY TUNED FOR: OUR NEXT ISSUE “QUICK! PLANT TOMATOES!” AND LES WEARING AN APRON!

TAKE YOUR FREE TEAR OUT INSTRUCTIONS WITH YOU AS YOU START YOUR OWN ZOMBIE VICTORY GARDEN! ZAF CORPS HOE!


Quick!  Get  your  raised  bed  going!

(Our job  is  to  make  it  simple.    Your  job  is  to  take  a  leap  of  faith  and  try.)

BRAINS REQUIRED  (Dif]iculty):                                                                            BODIES  REQUIRED:

1. Your  Frame     Beds  should  never  be  wider  than  4  feet.    This   is  because  the  average  person  can  only  reach   2  feet.    With  a  4  foot  wide  bed  you  can  reach   your  whole  garden  without  ever  stepping  on   the  soil.    Stepping  in  your  bed  compacts  the   soil  (making  weeding  more  dif]icult)  and  is   dangerous  to  small  growing  things.    Take  a   tip  from  the  masters  and  keep  it  4  feet  wide.   We  prefer  our  beds  to  be  4X4  or  4X6,  but  the   length  is  up  to  you!  If  you’re  planning  on   putting  a  bed  next  to  a  fence  or  house,  just   build  it  2  ft  wide  since  you  can  only  reach  in   from  one  direction.  

How to  build  a  4x4  bed  frame a. Get  two  2x8x8ft  boards.     b. Cut  in  half.    (Most  home   improvement  stores  will  do   this  for  you.) c. Mark  your  ends  with   crayons  or  markers  (]igure   1)

Figure 1

d. Lay out  boards.    Blue  sides   cover  red  ends.  (]igure  2)

e. Join, using  3”  wood  screws,   If  you’re  extra  thrifty  and  imaginative,   2  per  joint  to  create  a   consider  recycled  wood.    Some  towns  have   stable,  square  bed.  (Your   recycling  centers  where  folks  drop  off  wood   1/2  person  can  help  by   of  all  kinds  that  you  can  repurpose  into  beds.   holding  parts  in  place.) Make  sure  you  ]ind  untreated  wood  as   treated  wood  can  leach  chemicals  into  your   soil.  Beds  you  build  out  of  recycled  materials   may  not  be  give  you  exact  square  foot  dimensions,  but   that’s  ]ine.    You  just  make  some  minor  adjustments   when  you’re  planting.    (And  we’ll  tell  you  how  when   the  time  comes.)  

Figure 2

If you’re  not  up  for  fabricating  your  own  bed,  you  can   always  use  a  pre-­‐fab  design.  Beds  kits  can  be  found  at   most  home  improvement  stores.  Pallet  collars  also   work  well  (although  they’re  not  in  even  square  foot   dimensions-­‐  it’s  okay,  don’t  worry!). 2.   Place  Your  Beds   Make  sure  you  put  your  beds  where  they’ll  get  6  to  8   hours  of  sun  each  day.    The  nearer  your  beds  are  to   your  house,  the  easier  it  will  be  to  water  and  harvest.     When  you  place  your  beds,  make  sure  you  leave  aisles   so  that  you  can  push  your  wheelbarrow  and   lawnmower  between  them.    

Here’s an  example  of  what  you  might  ]ind  at  a   recycling  center.


Give a  little  thought  to  what  you’ll  grow  in  your  beds.  Put  tall  things,  and  things  that  climb,  like  pole   beans,  peas,  tomatoes  and  squash,  where  they  won’t  shade  other  veggies  you’re  growing  in  the  same   bed.

This is  a  bed  of  edamame  with  each  row   planted  about  a  week  apart  for  a   continuous  harvest  through  the  summer.     The  gardener  started  on  the  north  end  of   the  bed  so  older  rows  wouldn’t  shade   the  newer  ones.

This gardener  placed  trellises  at  the  north  end  of  all  her  4x6  foot   beds,  and  then  planted  her  vining  and  tall  veggies  there.    Shorter   plants  grow  in  the  other  parts  of  the  bed.    Because  her  beds  were   longer  than  they  were  wide,  she  had  to  leave  aisles  between  each   bed  so  that  she  would  still  be  able  to  reach  in.

This gardener  planted  tall  tomatoes   on  the  north  side  of  these  two  rows  of   pallet  collar  beds  and  shorter   vegetables  (cabbage  and  peppers)  on   the  south  sides.    The  aisle  between  the   beds  gives  enough  room  so  shade  is   not  a  problem.    

3. Add  Weed  Mat   Weed  mat  keeps  your  good  soil  in  the  frame  and  the  weeds   from  coming  up  through  the  bottom.    Don’t  use  black  plastic   as  your  weed  mat.    It  deteriorates,  and  it’s  made  from  oil.     We  have  better  uses  for  oil.    Buy  real  (cloth-­‐like)  weed  mat.     It’s  worth  the  investment  because  you  don’t  want  to  have  to   start  over. Help  your  weed  mat  be  successful.    Cut  it  larger  than  your   pallet  or  frame  so  that  weeds  and  grass  can’t  sneak  in  up  the   sides.    Feel  free  to  staple  it  to  the  frame,  but  you  don’t  have   to.  


4. Mix  your  soil This  is  what  your  plants  will  be  eating  so  that  they  can  feed  you.    Don’t  skimp  here!    A  bit  of  an   investment  now  will  pay  off  for  years  and  years!     If  you’re  thinking  of  buying  topsoil,  think  of  this-­‐    It’s  no  better  than  whatever  you  have  right  now.     Most  gardeners  spend  8  to  10  years  getting  their  soil  just  right  so  that  they  can  have  excellent   harvests.    By  mixing  your  own,  you  skip  that  8  to  10  years.    There’s  something  to  be  said  for  this  kind   of  “instant  grati]ication.”  Plus,  topsoil  is  very  heavy...  it’s  hard  on  the  plants  trying  to  grow  through  it   and  hard  on  your  back  when  you’re  trying  to  get  it  into  your  bed. Use  Mel’s  Mix  from  the  “All  New  Square  Foot  Gardening”  Book:    1/3  peat  moss,  1/3  vermiculite  and   1/3  bio-­‐compost.    It’s  GREAT!    For  every  new  planting  you  do  in  a  square  foot,  add  two  handfuls  of   bio-­‐compost  to  keep  nutrients  up. These  items  sell  in  cubic  feet.  To  ]igure  out  how  much  you’ll  need: Take  the  square  footage  of  your  bed  (length  times  width)  and  divide  by  2.    That’s  the  cubic  feet  you   will  need  for  a  6  inch  deep  garden.    Divide  that  number  by  3  to  ]ind  out  how  much  of  each  ingredient   you  need.   If  you’re  buying  in  large  quantities,  you’ll  probably  buy  bio-­‐compost  by  the  yard.    There  are  27  cubic   feet  to  a  yard. We’ve  found  it  easy  to  mix  by  shovel  full  from  the  bags  into  a  wheelbarrow  and  then  driving  the   wheelbarrow  over  to  our  beds.  Remember,  we’re  mixing  soil  parts  by  volume  (not  weight).   5.   Fill  your  raised  bed.     It  only  needs  to  be  ]illed  to  6”  deep.    Yes,  this  is  hard  to  believe,  but  non-­‐root  veggies  don’t  need   deeper  soil  than  that.    I  also  successfully  grew  carrots  in  only  6”  of  soil.    They  were  just  a  little  shorter.   Adding  more  soil  than  this  just  wastes  time  and  money,  so  keep  it  simple,  make  you’re  life  easier  and   just  do  6  inches!   6.   Mark  off  your  squares It’s  easier  to  see  where  you’re  planting  each  item  if  you  can  see  the   square  itself.    Mel  recommends  lath,  but  I’ve  found  that’s  only  necessary  if   you’re  an  engineer  like  him.    For  the  rest  of  us  string  and  nails  is  just  ]ine. You’ll  need  6  nails,  a  hammer  and  some  string.    Starting  on  the  long  sides   of  the  box,  pound  a  nail  in  every  foot.    Don’t  pound  it  all  the  way  in   because  you  want  to  be  able  to  tie  your  string  to  it.    When  you  have  your   nails  pounded  in  on  each  side,  tie  the  string  to  one  nail,  stretch  it  across  to   the  other  side,  and  tie  it  off.    Then  do  the  same  on  the  short  sides  of  the   box.  Our  example  box  is  a  2’  X  3’  bed.   Done!    You’re  ready  to  plant!

Nail

String

Quick! Plant Something! Issue 1: Raised Beds  

Meet our brave survivors, Les and Kathy Sue, as they fight off zombies and get going growing fresh food!

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