Page 1

More than Words Can Say Report on the evaluation of materials translated by the BAMER Outreach Project. By Sue Lukes and Zafir Behlic December 2009                    


MigrationWork CIC │ More than Words Can Say │ 2009

   

Contents

1. Background ...........................................................................................3 2. Working with small BAMER groups.......................................................5 3. Translating: not a simple question........................................................8 4. How useful were the translations? .....................................................12 5. Other views.........................................................................................21 6. Conclusions and recommendations....................................................24 Acknowledgements ................................................................................26     

2


MigrationWork CIC │ More than Words Can Say │ 2009

1. Background The London Voluntary Service Council is the “network of networks” for London   and offers support and advice on employment issues via the PEACe service  (Personnel, Employment, Advice and Conciliation).  The service can be used by  voluntary sector employers, development workers and advisors in London.   PEACe secured three year funding from the Big Lottery Fund to set up an  outreach project to offer tailored intensive support to small Black Asian  Minority Ethnic and Refugee (BAMER) organisations to ensure that they were  developing good employment practice.      The BAMER project:  • • • • •

provided 37 organisations with intensive consultancy support   advised 224 groups accessing telephone and face‐to‐face advice   trained 145 BAMER organisations on employment law issues   translated  a  range  of  employment  law  resources  into  Somali,  French,  Arabic, Turkish and Polish.  ensured that BAMER groups linked into the PEACe service.   

The written resources centred on the publication of the Essential Employment  Menu, which covers recruitment, disciplinary and grievance and dismissals as  well as signposts to other resources.  This was translated initially into Somali  and French, and later into Arabic and Turkish.  A second publication on  employment rights, employment status and contracts called “Employing Your  Staff” was translated into Polish.    An evaluation of the service reported in early 2009, concluding that:      “the PEACe BAMER Outreach project has an excellent record to date, well on its  way to meet most of its target outputs and outcomes. This evaluation urges the  project to build on its success to embed further good HR practice within small  BAMER led organisations. Its model of operation – providing services to a group  with special needs within a mainstream service – appears proven, and  potentially replicable with other target audiences. “1   

                                                  1

PEACe BAMER Outreach Project Evaluation Report January 2009, Dr Tanya Murphy   

3


MigrationWork CIC │ More than Words Can Say │ 2009

It did, however, pose questions about the written materials:    “It would be helpful to assess the extent to which the project’s printed materials  are being used.  Are the Employment Menu copies sitting under stacks of paper  or are they being referred to? One second tier advisor, an advisory group  member, feared that perhaps without a full introduction to the contents, the  guide could end up on the shelf.     Similarly, how helpful are the resources translated into community languages?  The project could benefit as it continues its translation programme to gather  evidence about the extent to which the translated documents are helpful and  necessary.”2      A small piece of work was duly commissioned, to seek answers to these  questions, and this report is the result.   

                                                  2

ibid 

4


MigrationWork CIC │ More than Words Can Say │ 2009

2. Working with small BAMER groups Local infrastructure organisations (LIOs) such as voluntary service councils have  a mixed track record on engaging with smaller BAMER organisations.  One guide  for working with refugee organisations researched the involvement of LIOs in  various parts of the UK and found, for example    “‘Anybody can access our current outreach and capacity‐building programme –  our doors are open to all. Refugees get included in our general BME work and  that seems to work.’ This was the view of the local CVS. However, an RCO in the  same area working to deliver advice, education and lobbying work had never  heard of the CVS and did not know that they could access any support at all:  ‘We’ve just tried to do it ourselves.’”3    Typically, some small community organisations may eventually get funding to  employ staff, often on a  part time or sessional basis, providing direct services  such as supplementary schools, advice or cultural development.  The  organisations themselves usually start as unconstituted associations with  charitable aims, and may then move to develop a more formal structure, with a  management committee or trustees.  The challenge is to retain the  accountability to the community while developing services which require  regulation, such as providing immigration advice or looking after children.  A key  to this is ensuring that trustees or management committee members continue  to represent the community and its needs and aspirations.  Often they may be  people with wide ranging professional and managerial experience and their  experience may not have been gained in the UK. Another issue for those  recently arrived  may be a limited level of English.    One of the stated aims of the BAMER project was to provide resources to  enable second tier organisations to work better with BAMER groups.  It kept  them informed of all activities and resources via the second tier advisers  network run by LVSC and various other networks, briefings etc.  It also  maintained contact with a range of refugee and migrant specialist organisations  who function as development agencies for many BAMER groups.    At the time of the evaluation, the project had reported problems in engaging  the second tier advisers. Even some of those in regular contact, it seemed,  tended to use the project as a place to “park” the HR issues faced by small  BAMER organisations with which they worked.  At that point,  the BAMER  project was more frequently contacted directly by BAMER organisations than by                                                     3 Working with refugee community organisations ‐ a guide for local infrastructure  organisations By Ceri Hutton and Sue Lukes CES 2008  www.ces‐vol.org.uk    

5


MigrationWork CIC │ More than Words Can Say │ 2009

second tier or development organisations.  The project worker, however, was  very proactive in publicising the work via newsletters, conferences and  networking activities.    In the first two years of existence, the BAMER project appears to have had  considerable success in engaging BAMER groups.  The evaluation reported:    Direct intensive support for 49 BAMER organisations via its helpline with  employment issues such as sickness absence, HR policies, recruitment  processes, job descriptions and grievance procedures. Of these 49, 22 received  face‐to‐face consultancy – an HR health check and support to deal with  priorities, such as establishing HR policies and setting up appropriate job  contracts. In addition, 78 members of BAMER organisations received  employment training.4      This involved some quite intensive work, often using a “health check” model to  interrogate what organisations were doing and their policies, procedures and  governance in order to make specific recommendations to improve practice.   Because of the scope of this work, it has to involve both paid staff and trustees  or management committee members, who have the ultimate legal  responsibility for ensuring proper employment procedures and processes are in  place.  The latter were identified as a prime audience for the materials  produced by the project.    The translated materials were a development of this work.  The two guides,  both written in plain English, differ in content: the Essential Employment Menu  “covers key HR topics such as recruitment, disciplinary and grievance and  dismissals. It also includes details of where to get further information”.   Employing Your Staff “covers all the key information needed for voluntary  sector employers, including employment status , employment rights and  employers' responsibilities, a basic model contract of employment, a contract  for self‐employed staff, and a contract to use for casual workers.5”.  Both  documents are based on material produced for the wider PEACe service.    The selection of languages for translation was guided by: the spread of  organisations in touch with the project, knowledge of significant populations in  London at the time, knowledge of recently arrived communities and knowledge  of different communities’ access to English. Based on those criteria, it was                                                     4

PEACe BAMER Outreach Project Evaluation Report January 2009, Dr Tanya Murphy   

5

From the LVSC website  6


MigrationWork CIC │ More than Words Can Say │ 2009

decided to translate the Essential Employment Menu into Somali, French, Arabic  and Turkish.  Later, Employing Your Staff was translated into Polish.  These were  distributed to the organisations on the PEACe database, both frontline BAMER  groups and second tier and development organisations.   

7


MigrationWork CIC │ More than Words Can Say │ 2009

3. Translating: not a simple question What was not discussed in the evaluation of the project was the current debate  in the UK about the value of translating materials.  This has become a sharply  contested area recently.  The BBC, for example, reported in December 2006:   “It is a lot of money in anyone's language. The cost of translating and  interpreting for UK residents who don't speak English is rising sharply. Our  research has identified expenditure of at least £100m in the past year, but the  true figure is likely to be much more. Local councils spend at least £25m; the  police £21m; the courts system spends more than £10m without accounting for  the cost of legal aid; and the NHS ‐ a conservative estimate is £55m6.”  This report (which made no distinction between interpreting and translation)  formed part of a public debate stimulated in part by the Commission on  Integration and Cohesion, which reported in 2007, but issued interim findings  earlier, along with various statements by its Chair, which questioned the value  of some of the translations that local authorities, in particular, had  commissioned.      “Although such translation may be well intentioned and an important step  towards learning English, it might actually be working against wider goals of  integration and cohesion.”    Two examples from the Daily Mail were cited “anecdotally” in support of this  suggestion, along with comments about “taxpayers footing the bill”.7  The  Commission came to a more nuanced view, highlighting “both the importance  of translation in some areas, but also the need to link it with wider English  language provision, and ESOL support in particular.”  They expressed concern  that, while some translations were proactive, in that the need for them had  been assessed and questioned, and their effectiveness evaluated, some were  reactive, and had not been produced with sufficient thought as to the use,  audience or effect.  They recommended that the Department for Communities  and Local Government be asked to produce guidance for local authorities to  avoid this in future.  It should be noted that, by this stage, the Commission had  made a clear distinction between translation of written materials and the  provision of face to face interpreting.      The guidance was produced at the end of 2007.  It recommended “thinking  twice” about translating any materials but noted:                                                     6

BBC website 12th December 2006 accessed 7th December 2009    The Practical Impacts of Translation: Findings and Recommendations COI Diversity published  by the Commission on Integration and Cohesion.    7

8


MigrationWork CIC │ More than Words Can Say │ 2009

  "Opinion is divided as to whether translation is a barrier to integration, or  whether it is a stepping stone to better language skills. Our position is that it  depends on the individual: where migrants from the past are still relying on  community languages, then translations from English are likely to extend their  reliance on their mother tongue; where new migrants do not speak English then  clearly they need initial information in appropriate languages. Local authorities  will judge what is best – but our working assumption is that heading for the  translators should not be an automatic first step in all cases."8    The core recommendation was to reduce translation except where it builds  cohesion and/or integration.  Even where translation is necessary, such as in  welcome packs for new migrants, they recommend:     "Translate in a targeted way that encourages learning of English.  As our  guidance translation makes clear, we believe translation needs to be targeted  and evidence based; and provide a stepping stone to learning English. So we  would expect areas to find out whether new migrants can speak English, only  translate where they cannot and then make information packs bilingual or be  clear about how people can learn English. Cornwall have been through this  process and decided to produce their information pack just in English and three  other languages."9    Also  a focus of concern is the potential for waste in translating, and the need  for all agencies to cooperate in producing translations of key resources such as  welcome packs.      Others, however, have taken a much more positive view of the uses of  translated materials.  Age Concern England reviewed practices in many projects  across the country and concluded that:      “Consideration should be given at an early stage to communicating effectively  with diverse communities as part of a wider communication strategy that  reflects the organisation's commitment to valuing diversity and to being  inclusive. Evidence has shown that providing some brief translated material (e.g.  bi‐lingual leaflets) in community languages has been very useful to those                                                     8

Guidance for Local Authorities on Translation of Publications DCLG 2007  

9 Communicating important information to new local residents DCLG 2008   

9


MigrationWork CIC │ More than Words Can Say │ 2009

communities and the people who work with them. Other means of  communicating information should also be considered at an early stage (e.g.  audio and video cassettes or word of mouth).”10   On a more theoretical plane, translation is sometimes the object of  anthropological or ethnographic enquiry, and now has its own field of  Translation Studies.  Some of this, in particular the references to knowledge  transfer being, in part, cultural transfer11, are actually about the interpreting  process.  The anthropological take on the importance of translation is illustrated  by Moore et al       Translation thus involves power relations in terms of the control of  knowledge and symbols, and interpretation in both the literal and figurative  senses, making it a site of status and identity negotiation.12    Translation studies also tackle the issue of power directly:      General questions of ideology in translation are constantly tied up with the  relative power of different languages (Greek and Latin in Classical times, English  today) and of the participants, which has an important effect on what is  translated and how translation takes place. The consequences of such  imbalances of power and the way they convey and frame ideology have  attracted growing interest within translation studies in the first decade of the  twenty‐first century,13    Returning to the empirical level, the provision of translated material is often a  simple sign that an organisation takes the needs of a linguistic community  seriously.  The preponderance of English on a world scale, its origin in a small  island, and a certain cultural suspicion of any facility in other modern languages  can sometimes override the fact that it is simple good manners to communicate  as effectively as possible.  Providing translated materials gives evidence of                                                     10 11

Communicating with Diverse Audiences Age Concern England 2006 

Holden, N Cross‐Cultural Management: a knowledge management perspective cited in Moore, Lowe  and Hwang Language, Power and Integration: The Translator as Gatekeeper in the Korean Business  Community in London (UK)     12

Language, Power and Integration: The Translator as Gatekeeper in the Korean  Business Community in London (UK) Fiona Moore Sid Lowe and Ki Soon Hwang RHUL London   13  The study of ideology in translation studies Jeremy Munday University of Leeds lecture  abstract    

10


MigrationWork CIC │ More than Words Can Say │ 2009

goodwill and the intention to make that effort. It also tells minority linguistic  communities that their own language abilities are appreciated and that the new  languages they bring to the UK may be an asset not an encumbrance.    Language, however, also provides power within linguistic minorities14.  Often  those who speak English are able to use this to get work, raise their status or  achieve positions of authority within community organisations.  The use of  children as interpreters is often commented on as undesirable precisely because  it gives them inappropriate power within families.  On the other hand, the  ‘power’ of language puts a burden on children since they inevitably end up  dealing with ‘adult’ matters not suitable for their age.   Providing translated materials can “even out” power imbalances within groups,  enabling those who do not have as much English to understand more about  their roles and responsibilities and participate in decision‐making.  These  imbalances often occur along gender divides, and also between older and  younger people, with older people and women less likely to be able to  communicate well in English.  Reducing their disadvantage must form part of  any equalities based practice.   Lastly, the provision of translated materials may reduce the use of other  services, as people find it easier or better to look things up rather than  telephone to seek advice.  On the other hand, second tier advisers often report  that many people prefer to check information and discuss it with a trusted  individual.  The provision of written material also does not deal with a different  power imbalance, that between the literate and illiterate.  This issue is  recognised by the DCLG in their checklist    “Are you confident that people across all communities will have the literacy  skills to understand this document?  Should it first be simplified into a plain English version?  Would a short summary do with signposting to further information? – or could  it be translated on request rather than proactively?”15   

                                                  14

As noted by Moore et al in their study of Korean translation in south London cited above    Guidance for Local Authorities on Translation of Publications DCLG 2007  

15

11


MigrationWork CIC │ More than Words Can Say │ 2009

4. How useful were the translations? We were commissioned to find out how useful the translations LVSC produced  were for organisations and especially for their trustees, by asking a range of  organisations:      5 Somali , 3 Turkish, 3 Arabic‐speaking, 3 French‐speaking, 3 Polish, and 3  Chinese and 3 Spanish (we have not as yet produced any translated materials  for the last two) organisations with a specific contact person for us to interview  in‐depth plus 5 refugee/migrant specific second‐tier organisations and 7  mainstream ones16.         These organisations were identified as being on the PEACe database, and  already in contact with the project.  Somali and French speaking organisations  had received the printed versions of the relevant materials some time ago, and  Polish, Arabic and Turkish speaking organisations were sent pdfs just before we  contacted them.  All second tier advisers in contact with the project also  received all translated versions of the materials and were notified of projected  publication dates in advance.  They were also contacted and asked to respond  to the survey.  In addition, a notice about the survey was sent to the Second Tier  Advisers Network with a request that members respond to the web based  survey.  Community organisations were contacted individually and specifically  asked to respond as project users.      In the charts below we have grouped all the second and first tier organisations:  those described as first tier/community include those who identified themselves  as community or voluntary organisations, the second tier includes those who  described themselves as refugee or migrant agencies.     

                                                  16

From the project brief  

12


MigrationWork CIC │ More than Words Can Say │ 2009

Figure 1. Breakdown of those who responded by frontline vs second tier.   90 80 10

70 60

Responded

50

Contacted

40 68

30 20

10

10

13

0

Community Organisations

Second‐tier agencies

Potential respondents were offered a choice of methods: a web based survey, a  telephone call or an email response.  All second‐tier and majority of frontline  community organisations opted for online survey.  Some responses were  followed up with further telephone calls, and finally three respondents did more  detailed interview.    Each organisation was contacted at least three times: twice by email and once  by phone.  The response rate was not terrific, a total of 22 were eventually  secured (some did not provide full responses), and there was no correlation  between those who had received the materials and those who responded: in  fact those who had had no translations done at all (Spanish speakers) proved  more willing to engage, although this may be influenced by the fact that both  the project worker and one of our team have a long history of work with this  community.      Figure 2. Breakdown of frontline community organisations by languages   Spanish, 3,  30% Turkish, 1,  10% Chinese, 2,  20%

Somali, 1, 10%

Francophone, 1, 10%

Polish, 2, 20%

 

13


MigrationWork CIC │ More than Words Can Say │ 2009

Respondents were a mix of managers and workers, although it was apparent  from the telephone interviews later that one at least was actually a trustee as  well.  As we expected, the great majority of those responding from community  organisations were managers (in practice many are often sole workers) and the  great majority of those from second tier agencies were workers.      Figure 3. Breakdown of respondents by role or job  10 9 8

1

7

Community orgs

6

Second‐tier agencies

5

8

4

7

3 2

0

1

2

1

0

0

Manager

Worker

Volunteer

Trustee

Given that most had been contacted because of their involvement with the  project, the results of our questions about receipt and use of the employment  materials were surprising.      Figure 4. Which publications had respondents received?   12 10

Second‐Tier orgs Community orgs

3

8 6 4

7

7

2 0

0 1 Employing Your Staff ‐ Polish

0 3

0

1 0

Essential Employment Menu – Somali and French

Essential Employment Menu – Turkish and Arabic

None received

Not recorded

  All those that had received the essential employment menu in all four languages  were second tier agencies.  Most of those that had received the materials had  asked for them.  Since the materials had been sent out to relevant frontline or   

14


MigrationWork CIC │ More than Words Can Say │ 2009

community organisations automatically, again this raises concerns that receiving  the materials has not necessarily increased engagement or knowledge unless  there was further work done with the organisation concerned.      Figure 5. How had the publications been used?  9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

Community orgs. Second Tier orgs. 4 3

0

1 3

6

3

2

As a basis for As a tool for developing training new policy and trustees, practice members or volunteers

3

2

4

3

1 As a tool in managing staff

As a tool in Read them to managing the increase their organisation knowledge and awareness

Other use

2 not recorded

Since few of the frontline/community organisations believed they had received  the publications, the responses here from them are actually mostly about their  use of the English language publications.  There are no significant differences  here in how the different types of organisations had used the publications. Most  had used them in at least two different ways.      Of those who had received the translated materials, however, the majority  found them either useful or essential in their work (three useful and two  essential out of seven respondents).  People who had not received the materials  also told us that they found them useful or essential, however, a total of four  useful and one essential.      Asked to identify which aspects were most useful, people identified various  aspects:    Functionality   • They do represent as clear and concise an explanation of HR issues for  small organisations as you will get.      • Some of the trustees I worked with did not speak fluent English and  reading about Employment in Somali meant they were able to  understand the concepts/legalities etc  • Useful for increasing knowledge and awareness, managing staff etc.  • Trustees can use it as a tool in managing staff and the organisation.  • Important information on recruitment, probation, redundancy &  contracts would be most useful for our trustees ‐ however probably as a  dip‐in guide for as and when needed. The most detailed information is   

15


MigrationWork CIC │ More than Words Can Say │ 2009

more important for the managers / people carrying out the day‐to‐day  work and instructions of the trustees; our trustees are mostly interested  in receiving a general guide or dos and don’ts.  • An overview of Employment Rights. An overview of Employers liabilities.    Good use of language   • Clearly written, available in translation, can be shared with all members  of the MC and staff  • Accessibility and simplicity of language  • Easy way written down; understandable by all staff, volunteers and  potential workers    Use in combination with other resources/work  • Link in to LVSCs other work notably PEACe  • Useful to have training material in other languages  • As with all good resource material, it is of most benefit when it is given to  groups at the point when they are motivated to make use of it.    This  could be when keen new trustees are being inducted, or when a problem  arises that has to be dealt with, or a funder is insisting that a particular  policy is developed.     • As a second tier advisor it is very useful to be able to give groups this type  of targeted material at the relevant time.    However, 2nd tier workers  are not always in the right place at the right time to give out the  information.    We asked what they found least useful and most simply did not respond.  Those  that did identified:  • long (but then that is necessary I just think some organisations don’t open  them, perhaps a summary sheet on card that could be stuck on the wall in  their office...)  • a bit too long document  • As with any resource material it does get out of date.    • Small organisations, whether requiring translated material or not, often  need a lot of one‐to‐one support to put increased knowledge from such  materials into practice.      Just over half the respondents said they needed other materials in translation as  well.   

16


MigrationWork CIC │ More than Words Can Say │ 2009

Figure 6. Need for further materials to be translated  10 8 6

Yes

No

5 2

4 2

4

4

Second Tier orgs.

Community orgs.

0

  Asked to identify potential topics for more translated materials, they offered:  • health and safety (twice)  • written statements  • recruitment policy  • Chinese version for employment  • redundancy and ending contracts  • MC roles  • safeguarding  • disciplinary and grievance procedures with guidance notes and another  simply disciplinary  • contracts and different types of employment  • MC fundraising strategy  • supervision and appraisal with guidance notes  • managing staff    In an interview, one also suggested that it would be very useful to have the  voluntary sector compact translated so that BAMER organisations could become  more aware of it and use it.  Safeguarding, which has been the subject of a lot of  concern recently, was particularly highlighted as an area of need, given the  range of services community organisations offer.      Reasons for these choices included:      I know that many supplementary schools find it enormously difficult to share  the burden of responsibility for the safe and good running of their schools with  other members of the MC and the community, and part of the reason for that is  the lack of availability of clear, concise, practical guidelines in these different  areas.     

17


MigrationWork CIC │ More than Words Can Say │ 2009

  Written statements and discipline and grievance procedures are legal  requirements and all employers need to have some guidance in recognising a  discipline and grievance situation and taking some action to deal with it.    The  current Essential Employment Menu publication explains this, but doesn’t  include these example polices and procedures.        Although not a legal requirement,  using supervisions and appraisals are good at  preventing problems getting out of hand.          Redundancy has been a key result of the recession; many funding contracts will  be ending and not being renewed for similar reasons. As fixed term contracts  still require giving notice / redundancy its important to understand this process.    We discovered there was a lot of uncertainty /ignorance around types of  contract when reviewing ours, especially with casual workers, part‐timers and  consultants. Fixed term contracts (given their name) are difficult to understand       Given the wide mix of organisations, it is not surprising that when asked to  suggest other languages for future materials, the responses ranged widely:   

18


MigrationWork CIC │ More than Words Can Say │ 2009

Figure 7. Priority languages suggested   5

6

4

5

3

4

3 2

3

2

2 1

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

ia Ti gr yn

lis h Po

Ar ab ic Tu rk i sh Ku Fr rd en ish ch la   ng ua ge Po s rtu gu es e Am ha ric Be ng ali Ch in es e En gl ish

ali m So

Sp

an ish

0

It should be noted, however, that most languages proposed by more than one  respondent were proposed by a mix of second tier and frontline agencies.      Asked about how they preferred to receive their materials, there was a slight  preference for printed formats.      Figure 8. Preferred format for translated materials     12

Community orgs.

10

Second Tier orgs.

8 6

2

7

5

4

2

4 4

4

4

0 Internet as Word Internet as PDF or rtf  format

Printed copy

0 1 Braille document

4 not recorded

  Most respondents did not produce other materials in translation themselves.   One issued family learning materials and another said they produced publicity  materials.  Languages offered were Bengali, Arabic, Gujerati, French, Spanish  and Portuguese.  Only one of these told us about the selection criteria used: the  number of community organisations in existence.    Only four organisations do anything else to help trustees with legal  responsibilities:  • We send out a monthly e‐bulletin …. with updates on relevant legislation,  we are in partnership with NCVO who offer free membership of NCVO  when …..(organisations join us)  (which is also free). We provide updated 

19


MigrationWork CIC │ More than Words Can Say │ 2009

• • •

templates and information relating to quality assurance and good  governance on our website for member organisations.  Give 1‐2‐1 advice and tailor made training.  ensuring overall understanding of governance issues   A number of jobs at (organisation) with a strong outreach element to  small BAMER groups, which involves meeting with workers and/or  trustees, discussing needs, and then organising one to one support, or  training on that particular issue. (often focussing on a particular subject ,  e.g.  “safeguarding children”).     

20


MigrationWork CIC │ More than Words Can Say │ 2009

5. Other views We followed up three responses from people who had been identified by staff  as having been particularly engaged with the project.  All were women working  with communities for whom materials had been translated.  Although each  works with an organisation we had identified as “front line”, in fact they all  regarded themselves as having a development role as well.  One promotes the  role of women within their communities, another runs a network of Saturday  schools and the other had moved her organisation from being a mother and  children’s project to being effectively a development agency for the community  in the borough, taking on a name that meant “unifier”.      One had worked with the BAMER Outreach project before.  Another had been  trained on the project and proof read one of the translations as well as using the  project:      “Stefanie was  really helpful.  We were confused about policies and she helped  us a lot.  We will update our policies soon and she set up the contracts for us  and amended and emailed them to us.  It was really useful and helpful.  Now we  know where to go, it is great to have an HR service there.”          Only one of the three had seen the translated materials yet, and they had just  arrived.  “They will be really useful as some did not know about the law in  English: it makes it easier”.  She hoped to distribute it to the network of  organisations she works with, but emphasised that more needed to be done;     “We wanted to have a meeting with Stefanie and have an arrangement to  discuss how to make it more useful, maybe via a meeting and mention in other  meetings.  Also to get in touch with those who are interested and give it to  them.”      One hoped to use the materials (although they had been available for some  time).      “We use to inform the  community.  If it is based on an organisational level that  is fine but for (our)  people even if you produce guidelines they are difficult to  follow.  My organisation had just a basic contract when I became a trustee.  It  was the only one available.  As trustees we said we need to develop policies but  only a few people understand.  It is not the material: what they need is training 

21


MigrationWork CIC │ More than Words Can Say │ 2009

not just guidelines, you need to give them information during training, they will  not read unless in training.  The materials are very useful with workshops.        Another agreed      “It is difficult for management committee  members to use unless you have a  worker guiding them to use it.   I …. Took it with me to MC members and  depending on the issue showed them, how to use it.  It needs to be introduced  by CVS workers or a worker like Stefanie to work with MC to show them how to  use…half a day training….. needs personal contact and guidance.    Or train the paid workers of organisations, the managers, to guide their MC  members to use the materials. “      We discussed what they knew about trustees own knowledge of employment  and their ability to use available materials in English.      One worker was sure her trustees would have no problems: her management  committee all worked in the statutory, health or voluntary sectors and so were  aware of their responsibilities as employers.  She was, however, keen to  develop user involvement and hoped to use the materials with the user group  she had developed, who had few language skills.      A second interviewee was concerned that her trustees may “struggle” with their  roles and responsibilities, and believed that the published materials would make  things easier for them, and “staff will be safer and in a better position because  people really are not aware of the law.” Only one trustee felt confident in  English, the other four spoke only their mother tongue.      The third described her ten trustees as a mixed group of people      “some work for local organisations, one for (a national NGO), one is a social  worker, another a community worker, one is a housewife.  Two trustees also  speak English and we communicate in English and (mother tongue) in  meetings.”     

22


MigrationWork CIC │ More than Words Can Say │ 2009

Language, however, is not the only problem.        “The majority of our community don’t write or read in (mother tongue).  Some  are illiterate, especially the first generation.  Maybe the majority.  There is a  lady doctor in economics fluent in (a European language) and (mother tongue).   It is a real mix.  They do understand the community and are part of it and a little  help will encourage them.  Maybe it is better to produce DVDs or recordings.”        Trustees are not a homogenous group.  Workers mentioned several people with  high level qualifications, and often a preponderance of women.  Language,  however, often determined access to decision‐making and “older people and  women are less likely to speak English”.  Language itself was not a single issue  either: minority languages within communities complicated the picture as well  as literacy.  Even those who spoke and wrote English sometimes found technical  terms and jargon difficult and welcomed the availability of written material that  explained them.      All three organisations were part of wider networks: a local development trust,  the LVSC, the Evelyn Oldfield Unit (a specialist unit working with refugee  community organisations), the local CVS, a migrant resource centre.      We discussed the possibility of providing web based resources.  All three were  in favour and used the web a lot for reference and research.  “View any time  and not stuck in a file.  Much easier.” Was one comment.  All three, however  emphasised the need for human contact and engagement as a prerequisite to  getting anything used effectively.      “It needs a person”, we were told.  Verbal communication was as important as  writing, whatever the medium.  One pointed out that now we have a manual  that includes all the areas to be covered in English, it is possible to identify  which organisation needs what and produce according to need.          “But it depends on the second tier: some are proactive and some want  everything done first before they provide solutions.”     

23


MigrationWork CIC │ More than Words Can Say │ 2009

6. Conclusions and recommendations We were asked to find out about how useful the translated materials were, how  they were being used, and what languages might be added in future.    What is clear is that the translated materials have provided a demonstration of  the good faith of the BAMER project, along with the energetic approach of its  staff.  Generally, frontline agencies approved of the idea of having material  available in the mother tongue.  In the context of ensuring that trustees knew  about their legal responsibilities the materials had the potential to help with  this, and their availability was more significant for some trustees who were less  likely to speak English, such as the first generation, older people and women.   For some communities, however, precisely these groups of people actually  benefited less from written communication because of lower levels of literacy:  in fact they would find it easier to use recording or film in the relevant language.    It is the case, however, that many of the agencies for whom this material was  targeted did not respond to the survey, and that those that did generally told us  about use of the material in context, i.e. alongside other initiatives to train or  support trustees.  The translations work well when used by a trusted person as  part of an intervention.  By themselves, they do indeed sit on shelves.  Some  users suggested that shorter texts might be more effective, and several believed  the current texts too long to be accessible for some users.  But many told us  that what they valued most was the work that was done and the support for  that work represented by the existence of the translated materials.  The  problem is, however, that second tier workers are often not resourced or  trained to deal with HR issues.    There was wide awareness and approval of the basic texts in English, but  absolutely no consensus on any languages that could usefully be added to the  repertoire or on any method that could be used to identify them.  There was,  however, concern that translated materials might date quite quickly.  There was  also the fact that some potential end users might not be sufficiently literate in  their mother tongue to use written materials well, and this points to a need for  oral or visual presentations of the information.  Again, this is not feasible for  long texts.    Finally, there were some requests for new material to be added to the stock  available, particularly  on health and safety and on safeguarding children and  vulnerable adults.   

24


MigrationWork CIC │ More than Words Can Say │ 2009

There are thus some simple recommendations to make.    •

A review of the materials on health and safety and safeguarding on the  PEACe website with a view to ensuring they are accessible and known to  BAMER organisations 

The updating of the plain English materials on a regular basis 

We would, however, make a specific and detailed set of recommendations  about the development of the BAMER project and PEACe’s work with BAMER  groups on translated materials.    •

Securing continuing funding for outreach work to BAMER community  groups by PEACe.   

A focus by PEACe on equipping and encouraging all relevant second tier  workers to engage successfully with BAMER groups on the issues of good  employment practices  

The establishment of a translation budget to be used for all items currently  on the website.  

This to include the production of guidelines on how to ask for and offer  translations of short pieces of information into relevant languages and  formats 

Translations to be produced “on demand” in response to requests from  second tier advisers, with selection simply being determined by the  strength of demand from advisers 

Translations to be on relevant topics and no longer than four sides of A4. 

“translations” to be available as sound recordings and short podcasts  where needed 

The establishment of a new section of the website to “hold” translated  materials 

Publicity for this at all levels, and the consideration of rolling this out as a  national service in partnership with other relevant organisations  

25


MigrationWork CIC │ More than Words Can Say │ 2009

Acknowledgements Thank you to Stefanie Borkum and Rahel Geffen for their help in commissioning,  supporting and commenting on this report.  Our thanks also to the organisations  who responded to our surveys or were interviewed for this work.     

AdviceUK Azza Supplementary School  Chinese Information and Advice Centre  Chinese Mental Health Association  ContinYou, The National resource Centre for Supplementary Education  East European Advice Centre  IMECE ‐ Turkish Speaking Group  Islington Voluntary Action Centre   Latin American Association  Latin American Disabled People's Project  Latin American Women's Rights Service  MIDAYE Somali Development Network  Migrant & Refugee Communities Forum  Migrant Organisations' Development Agency (MODA)  PEEC Family Centre   Refugees into Effective Partnership REAP  Southwark Action for Voluntary Organisations   Voluntary Action Camden  Wandsworth Voluntary Sector Development Agency  Womens Resource Centre   

26

LVSC Translations report  

Report on the evaluation of materials translated for trustees of small community organisations.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you