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boo! No tricks here. Just a big ole treat for our friends and listeners - thanks for picking up our second-ever issue of Yum Cha zine! Though it feels like this summer might never end (considering it is now early October and still in the mid-eighties here in NYC), we’re more than ready for the best of fall: stuffing our faces with pies, crisp days just cold enough that you don’t feel guilty for sitting on your couch all day, and of course Halloween (also known in our world as Thot Pride Parade, Wig Appreciation Day, or Candygiving). For our fall issue, our cover star is mooncake, and we made sure this zine was just as dense and sweet as the harvest snack. Inside you’ll find seasonally appropriate brain candy, like our last minute costume ideas, Lala’s mom’s famous pecan tassie recipe (it’s a tiny pecan pie!), and our favorite foliage-friendly tunes. We also talked to a couple of painters we admire, tackle the cheongsam trend, and give you part two of our hometown tour. Enjoy!

LOVE,


FALL PLAYLIST Velvet Morning - The Verve Frontline - Kelela Halogen - Show Me The Body ft. Mal Devisa Perspective - Kamasi Washington Changes - Dej Loaf Dum Surfer - King Krule First Taste - Fiona Apple Thorn - Alex G Painting of Blue - Forth Wanderers Wasted Acres - Grizzly Bear EMT Police and the Fire Department - Shilpa Ray Brujas - Princess Nokia Baby Luv - Nilüfer Yanya Se Preparó - Ozuna Los Ageless - St. Vincent I Wanna Be Like You - Ibeyi 911 / Mr. Lonely - Tyler, The Creator Needy Bees - Nick Hakim Bike Dream - Rostam Normal Girl - SZA


ASK YUM CHA

Q

I love the look of Chinese brocade dresses, and I keep seeing them in thrift stores and cheap shops in Chinatown. I feel like I could rock it, but I’m worried about cultural appropriation. Is it cool to wear if you’re not Asian?

A

The fact that you’re asking means you’re being thoughtful so good start! Questions of cultural appropriation are tricky, because it’s subjective and sensitive. Even if some people from that culture are cool with it, doesn’t mean everyone will be. (See: Jeremy Lin’s op-ed on getting dreads). We think fashion can be a part of cultural exchange - but the difference between exchange and appropriation is that you’re engaging, learning, and appreciating ... not wearing a costume (it’s a HARD NO on Halloween). You can also work elements you admire (textiles, cuts) into your look without copping the specific piece, especially if it has a special meaning in that culture! So instead of giving you a hard and fast answer, here’s some questions you might want to consider before you wear it. Cheongsam (Mandarin: Qi Pao) From: China Made fashionable in 1920s Shanghai Ao Dai From: Vietnam, Tradtitional wear since 1700s

Hanbok From: Korea

Shown here in a casual modern design, but the classic version is usually worn for formal or festive events.

Check yaself before U wreck yaself:

Y

N

Do you know what culture (not continent) it’s from and what it’s called?

1

0

Did you purchase/receive it from a person of that culture?

1

0

Does it have a traditional, ritual, or religious meaning?

0

1

Have you talked to your friends from that culture about you wearing it? (If you don’t have any, maybe just don’t).

1

0

When people of that culture wear the style, do they get mocked or exoticized? (Again, ask your friend).

0

1

Are you accessorizing in a way that perpetuates caricatures/stereotypes?

0

1

The more points you have, the more it seems like you’re appreciating, not appropriating! But remember: if someone calls you out, don’t get defensive. Listen to why they’re feeling hurt and think about it before you wear it again. It’s okay that not everything is for everyone.


WE GOTCHU In need of a last minute Halloween costume? Don’t worry, we figured it out for you.


say HELLO: kevin sabo AGE: 24 CURRENT CITY: Richmond, VA How would you describe your painting in three words? Impatient Flirty Gestural FOLLOW: @bb_kv

YUM CHA: Can you tell us about how moving from Harrisonburg, Virginia to Richmond has affected your body of work? KEVIN: I think moving had less impact on my work than just basically growing up. I’ve matured a bit, my anxiety is a lot lower and I’m really focused on the transition from viewing art as a passion and a scholarly major into a practice that requires discipline. Painting has been my full time job- and it’s getting me where I want to be. So I’m thankful I’ve stuck with it- and moving locations definitely solidifies my intention of wherever I’ll be— my art will be too.


YUM CHA: One of your older pieces, “YAS QUEEN”, is a painting of just female musicians that ranges from Lil’ Kim to Madonna to Junglepussy. How does music come into play with your artmaking? KEVIN: OMGsh, music is almost always a must in the studio. I think I used to make a lot of work that referenced my love for Women or Femme people in Music. That print was definitely an ode to all the girls I love. Also— two or three of those women in that print now own a painting of mine ! Heyyy. YUM CHA: How has the current political climate influenced your recent body of work, and specifically what was the inspiration behind “Make America Femme For Once”? KEVIN: My work can definitely reference politics- especially out of frustration. I just got done making a painting with hidden guns and bombs. I guess the irony is that most of my work initially might look like a bunch of flirty faces just having fun- but there’s always clues between the characters i paint that hint to a dismal climate. As far as the Tr*mp print- I was basically showing my anger towards how unapologetically destructive and offensive this President is- so that was my attempt at offending him.


say HELLO: sam moyer - kardos AKA: DOUBLE DENIM DUDE CURRENT CITY: Richmond, VA How would you describe your work in three words? Queer Hometeam Dude FOLLOW: @doubledenimdude YUM CHA: What prompted you to shift away from painting and start your own business? SAM: I started Double Denim Dude while I was in school as a fun way to make a little bit of $$$. I started getting really interested in a personal brand and tiny objects that reflect my interests and identity. YUM CHA: How has Richmond’s creative community helped to sustain your work? SAM: People in Richmond get excited about supporting local artists. There’s a bunch of art shows and markets around that are dedicated to showcasing local artists. YUM CHA: You’ve illustrated celebrities, athletes, and politicians. What draws you to pop culture as a subject and who has been your favorite icon to portray? SAM: When I was painting, I would lean towards reconizable “characters” that I felt portrayed parts of my identity. It was a lot of fun and nostalgic, but more recently I don’t use pop culture as a tool in my work.


First off, I’ve been hit with cease and desist letters, so as an artist I need to protect myself and not infringe on the work of others even though pop culture related work is so freaking popular and the quickest way to gain “followers”. In that same vein, I love creating work that is more original and on-point with my brand and still representative of my identity. But Michael Jordan still influences some of my recent work that is soon to be released. I’m super into that sports aesthetic. YC: Who are some other LGBTQIA+ artists or artisans whose work you recommend (or who you’d like to collaborate with)? SMK: Carra Sykes, awesome designer and owner of Of Our Youth. I feel super connected to her work and she makes amazing banners. I think both of our styles could work well together and we might actually be collaborating in the future, so stay tuned! YC: Though you’re currently focusing on Double Denim Dude, I’m a huge fan of your paintings. Can you tell us about the inspiration behind of your approach to portraiture of queer people in intimate moments? CS: I painted queer people because I wanted to see more queer people in contemporary portraiture. I wanted to represent the many different identities of the LGBTQ+ culture. My queer identity definitely shaped that decision. Even though I’m not actively painting, I do see myself coming back to painting in the future. I feel as though I’ve lost my voice in painting and wanted to find it within Double Denim Dude, which is why DDD is my main priority right now. Shop at doubledenimdude.com or on Etsy!


YUM CHA DOES NORTHERN

VA


CUTIE PIE

TINY. PECAN. PIES. All the gooey southern goodness in a lil bite sized package! Treat yaself to some of lala’s mom’s world famous...

T A S N S A I ES C E P Ingredients: (makes 24 tassies) Pastry dough: 1/2 cup (1 stick) softened butter 3 oz softened cream cheese 1 cup flour 1 to 2 tablespoons of cold water Pecan filling: 1 beaten egg 1 cup brown sugar 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 1 tablespoon melted butter 1 cup coarsely chopped pecans and... a muffin tray!

Instructions: To make the pastry, beat butter and cream cheese together in a mixing bowl. Fold in flour and add cold water to form a dough. Let chill in the fridge for 20 minutes. Preheat your oven to 350F. Divide the dough into quarters, then divide each of those portions into six balls (you’ll have 24 total). Lightly coat each ball in flour and pop into a seat in the tray. Use a pestle (or teaspoon) to press the dough into the tray so it’s a shell. Fill shell with 1 teaspoon of pecan mixture and bake for 25-30 minutes.


Yum Cha Zine #2  

A halloween zine! For a physical copy, email dumplingwhisperers@gmail.com • Fall tunes for ya • Can I wear that cheongsam or nah? Some advic...

Yum Cha Zine #2  

A halloween zine! For a physical copy, email dumplingwhisperers@gmail.com • Fall tunes for ya • Can I wear that cheongsam or nah? Some advic...

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