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PORTFOLIO U N I V E R S I T Y O F C I N C I N N AT I | D A A P MASTER OF COMMUNITY PLANNING

|

URBAN DESIGN

YO O N

SUN CHANG


YO O N

SUN

RESUME

CHANG

Education

UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI, DAAP | CINCINNATI, OH Master of Community Planning: Urban Design

09. 2010 - 08. 2012

UNIVERSITY OF AKRON | AKRON, OH Exchange Student: Graphic Design

01. 2008 - 08. 2008

KYUNG-HEE UNIVERSITY | SEOUL, KOREA Bachelor of Fine Arts: Visual Information Design

Work Experience

03. 2005 - 02. 2010

NIEHOFF URBAN STUDIO + COMMUNITY DESIGN CENTER | CINCINNATI, OH Graphic and Urban Design Intern

01. 2011 - Present

SAMSUNG HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT CENTER | SUWON, KOREA Graphic Design Intern

01. 2010 - 05. 2010

KOREA TELECOM | SEOUL, KOREA Freelance Graphic Designer

11. 2009 - 12. 2009

2009 SEOUL DESIGN OLYMPIAD | SEOUL, KOREA Public Relation Team Video Graphic Design Intern

08. 2009 - 10. 2009

SMILEY HANCHULAK MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS | AKRON, OH Graphic Design Intern

06. 2008 - 09. 2009

+ Cincinnati Casino District Study: Partnered with nonprofit Bridging Broadway to analyze areas surrounding the proposed Horseshoe Casino and how they connect with each other + East Third Dayton, Ohio Urban Design Charrette: Collaborated with local stakeholders in Dayton, Ohio to develop an urban design vision for city’s Third Street corridor + Infographic Design: Partnered with the University of Cincinnati Economic Center and analyzed economic impact of Cincinnati Reds, Western & Southern Open and Cincinnati Music Hall + Event Graphic Design: Do It Yourself Urbanism, Broadway Commons District Study Exhibit and Greater Cincinnati Regional Food Congress + Others: Designed maps, reports, posters, brochures and books for the Niehoff Urban Studio, Gabriel’s Place Community, Urban Agriculture Campus and Vertical Integrated Urban Farm

+ Designed presentation materials that were used for educating Samsung employees on the importance of creativity, passion, and challenges

+ Designed layouts for the “War Room”, a virtual interface that monitors various information about Korea Telecom’s economic activities

+ Designed videos to advertise the event

+ Designed website layouts, E-newsletters, posters, labels and brochures


Activities and Honors

GOOD IDEAS FOR CITIES | CINCINNATI, OH Student Volunteer

05. 2012

THE OHIO PLANNERS NEWS | CINCINNATI, OH Contributor

12. 2011

48HR INCLUSIVE DESIGN CHALLENGE | SEOUL, KOREA Awarded “Best Idea”

10. 2009

HURRICANE KATRINA VOLUNTEER | NEW ORLEANS, LA University of Akron, Campus Focus Member

03. 2008

NEO-RENAISSANCE SCHOLARSHIP | LONDON, UK Student Researcher: Inclusive Design

07. 2007

KYUNG-HEE UNIVERSITY OVERSEAS TRAINING SCHOLARSHIP | GREECE, TURKEY Scholarship Recipient

07. 2006

+ Helped organizie the event

+ Graphics from Bridging Broadway study were included in the Ohio APA December newsletter

+ Given by the British Council, Royal College of Art, Seoul Design Foundation

+ Helped recovering the damage of Hurricane Katrina during spring break

+ Researched Inclusive Design by visiting London,UK

+ Studied Classical Architecture by visiting Greece and Turkey

Computer Skills

Adobe® Creative Suite, ArcGIS 10, AutoCAD®, Google Sketchup, Microsoft® Office®

YOONSUN CHANG

3019 Cohoon St. #2 Cincinnati OH 45208 +1 513 828 9468 | yoonsun.sun.chang@gmail.com


01

URBAN PLANNING

/

DESIGN

PROFESSIONAL WORK


O F T H E R E V I TA L I Z E D M U S I C H A L L

URBAN ENVIRONMENT

GROUP PROJECT COMMUNITY DESIGN CENTER

Music Hall enjoys a key geographic location in the urban basin and will continue to benefit from this changing environment. This location puts it in proximity to existing and emerging vibrant arts and entertainment districts. This linkage will only grow stronger with the implementation of the connecting Cincinnati Streetcar Line.

Stable residential

areas exist that support Music Hall and

MUSIC HALL

that will tangibly impact Washington Park itself.

I-7 5

L O C AT I O N

AUBURN

C I N C I N N AT I ’ S G R E AT E S T C U LT U R A L T R E A S U R E

improved areas are planned and in progress

The proposed revitalization and future operations of Cincinnati’s famed Music Mt. Auburn I- 7

Hall will have a considerable impact on the Greater Cincinnati regional economy.

1

i le

. 5 mil

e

FINDL AY

M CM IC KE N

The first part of this project studies the economic impact of renovation

1m

DESIGN

/ URBAN PLANNING

MUSIC HALL’ S CHANGING

E C O N O M I C A N D C O M M U N I T Y I M PA C T S

expenditures, anticipated operations of Music Hall in 2015, as well as the fiscal

Over the Rhine

LIBER TY

LINN

impacts generated from both. The operations impact is measured from the projected operating expenditures of the four resident companies- Cincinnati

West End

MUSIC HALL

EZZA RD CHAR LES

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MA IN

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CEN TRA

Pendleton

13T H

WA LN

VIN E

EL M

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CO UR T

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The second part details the position of Music Hall as an influential anchor within

I-7

12T H

RA CE

CE NT RA

Ballet, Cincinnati Opera, Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, and May Festival. 5

9TH

its urban context. The location of Music Hall is shown in relation to other arts

8TH 7TH

institutions and to the substantial investment in the area. Changing demographic

0.5

0.75

1 Miles

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0.25

SYCA MO

0.125

UT

0

MA IN

revenue, and employment measures.

VIN E

understood in relative terms to other arts organizations in attendance,

EL M

3RD

arts, entertainment, and cultural clusters within the area. Finally Music Hall is

RA CE

4TH

PLUM

Connectivity is analyzed between Music Hall and the existing and proposed

WA LN

5TH

AY BR OA DW

CBD

6TH

and social indicators are illustrated and discussed relative to Music Hall.


The Banks

Main Street

Back Stage

Vine Street

Fountain Square

Findlay Market

DISTRICT CONNECTIVITY

HOUSING DEVELOPMENT

Prospect Hill

Betts Longworth

Central Parkway Lofts

New Residential Construction on Vine

CityWest

Infill Single Family Housing on Pleasant Street


HOUSING

/

DEMOGRAPHIC TRENDS

West End

URBAN PLANNING

P O P U L AT I O N A N D INCOME CHANGE

CBD Phase V: Gateway Quarter and Findlay to the Present

Phase IV: CityWest and the Duke Energy Convention Center expansion

Phase VI: Washington Park, the Streetcar and the Brewery District

$5,001

$28,030

Mt. Auburn

Phase III: Condos on Main and Central

$15,115

Phase II: Garfield Place and Betts Longworth

OTR

Phase I: Affordable housing development 1985

$15,149

$16,710

Pendleton

DESIGN

DEVELOPMENT TRENDS

$4,999

$14,535

$33,013

$29,450

$13,397


M U S I C H A L L A S T H E A X I S O F A R T S , C U LT U R E

&

E N T E R TA I N M E N T

As t he Ci t y ’s center resum es it s p o si t io n as a

Cincinnati Museum Center to the Pendleton Arts

regional entertainment, arts, and cultural destination,

Center. Music Hall is also integral to the seemingly

M usi c Hall will b e ab le to t ake advant age o f i t s

scattered arts institutions in Over-the -Rhine.

lo c at i o n to draw visi to r s f ro m o t her sy nergi st i c ar t s

1990

2000

2010

10607

8115

5820

8381

6497

6064

4601

3189

7542

6516

4904

1191

1141

900

5657

and enter t ai nm ent venues.

Ultimately, relative employment, revenue, and attendance figures indicate that Music Hall participates in and

Music Hall is nearly at the geographic center of an

materially supports a creative economy. Its role in the

axis of the arts within the basin which stretches from

vibrant cultural environment makes it a critical asset

the Freedom Center to Findlay Market, and from the

for the city and region.


DESIGN

/ URBAN PLANNING

Aronoff Center

Contemporary Arts Center

Art Academy of Cincinnati

The Ensemble Theater

ARTS CONNECTIVITY

The Know Theater

School for the Creative and Performing Arts


NIGHTLIFE CONNECTIVITY ARTS CONNECTIVITY

NIGHTLIFE CONNECTIVITY

The location of art and design related retail, design

Nightime arts and entertainment are key urban attractions

studios, art support organizations like Arts Wave,

for the region. The existance of arts and entertainment

cultural venues like Findlay Market and other related

venues, restaurants, and bars indicates that Music Hall

uses capitalize upon the proximity to Music Hall and the

already has significant linkages to nearby entertainment

all-encompassing urban fabric of arts and culture. Main

areas. This is particularly true concerning the Gateway

Street, with its eclectic arts and design cluster, is well

district, centered at 12th and Vine, which boasts a very

known and appreciated. The 12th Street and Vine Street

popular cluster of restaurants. Again, the Main Street

area is becoming a destination for theater and design arts.

arts and entertainment area with art galleries and bars is

The Washington Park district with the SCPA, venues in

relatively close along 12th and 13th Streets. It is reasonable

Memorial Hall and Music Hall, as well as the forthcoming

to envision that when Music Hall is hosting robust

programming of Washington Park for outdoor entertainment,

nightime programming and Washington Park itself is the

promises to make this area a hub of activity. The important

site of active outdoor events, that it will form the

linkage between these clusters along 12th and 13th Streets

western anchor of this three cluster linkage.

is very clear, and will credibly strengthen as each one draws visitors that seek experiences among the others.


DESIGN

/

CA S I N O D I S T R I C T S T U DY GROUP PROJECT C O M M U N I T Y D E S I G N C E N T E R , B R I D G I N G B R O A D WAY

ME THODOLOGY

FOCUS This report summarizes a one-year investigation into this and related questions, fo c u s i n g g e o gr aph ic ally o n t h e im pact a r ea s t ha t s u r r ou n d t he c a s i n o s i te , rat h e r t h a n t h e d e s i g n o f t h e c a s i n o s it e it s e lf. Th e s t u d y id e n t ifie s Four Focus Areas—the Casino Fringe, Justice Zone, Main Street (OTR) and Pendleton—as a r e a s m o s t d i r e c t l y i m p a ct in g an d imp act e d b y t h e cas in o d e ve l opm e n t . T h e s t u d y a l s o i d e n t i f i e s k e y c o r r i d o r s t h a t l i n k t h e casino development to other downtown destinations and amenities.

G

STR MAIN EET

WAY CORRIDO ATE

R

URBAN PLANNING

B R O A D WAY C O M M O N S

NTAIN SQUARE OU

F

In collaboration with the Community Design Center at the University of Cincinnati, Bridging Broadway has served as the primary conduit for community engagement to collect and synthesize the concerns and aspirations of center city residents and stakeholders. This study summarizes the outcomes from three Bridging Broadway Dialogues, conducted to engage the public in identifying concerns and opportunities (“Block Walk”), creating a vision plan for the area (“Visioning”), and developing strategies for implementation (“Implementation and Management”). Bridging Broadway also initiated the Pendleton Neighborhood Development Roundtable, to more directly engage the neighborhood’s key property owners and the Pendleton Neighborhood Council. The study also incorporates case studies from other US cities, and best practices in contemporary community development, urban design and public policy.

DLETON ARTS PEN

RIVERFRONT


MCMILLAN

REA

AUB URN

L O C AT I O N

DIN G

GI

LB

ER

T

Mt. Auburn

CM

M IC N

SYC AM OR

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E

Over the Rhine

LIB ERTY

15TH 14TH

Pendleton ING

MAIN

Casino

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PLUM

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RACE

L 12TH

VINE

CENTRA

. 25 m

AD

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T

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12TH

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COURT

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8T H le

9T H

8T H

CBD

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7T H

Mt. Adams

N

. 25

13TH

LB ER

13TH

14TH

AY

B LO C K WA L K

.25 m i le

BROADW

14TH

15TH

CO

LU

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A BI

6T H

7T H 5T H

6T H

AY

3RD

BROADW

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MAIN

VINE

RACE

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4T H

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VISIONING

2ND

3RD

2ND

EL M

Six Guiding Principles 1. Avoid the casino “island effect” by blending into the adjacent area 2. Create a multi-use destination that has more appeal than a single gaming facility 3. Tighten the urban fabric by eliminating the edges of downtown's districts 4. Close the gaps that are void of light and activity 5. Encourage visitor mobility with great street design and complementary businesses 6. Find opportunities for new workforce housing that can accommodate casino employees living in the neighborhood


F O U N TA I N SQUARE

MAIN STREET

CENTRAL P A R K W AY

PENDLETON CORRIDOR

R E C O M M E N D AT

IONS

DESIGN

/ URBAN PLANNING

URBAN ENVIRONMENT AND CONNECTIVITY


A D M I N I S T R AT I O N

URBAN DESIGN Improve the public realm and promote synergistic infill

Creation of a nonprofit Community Development Corporation (CDC) to focus

• Streetscape improvements along key corridors

Management entity for a Special Improvement District (SID) serving the casino

on work-force housing and non-market driven development

development via:

impact area

• Potential sites for expanding the supply of quality workforce housing

• New public open space, including a pedestrian plaza

• Sites for neighborhood- and region-serving services/ businesses

• A major gateway at Liberty and Reading, and a secondary gateway

at Pendleton Street and Reading to adequately welcome visitors to

PUBLIC POLICY

the area and attract them to the Pendleton Arts Center

Five primary corridors identified to maximize multi-modal

A Community Benefits Agreement (CBA), linking the casino operator, the City,

connectivity enhanced via:

and community stakeholders to create an ongoing funding stream which supports

• “Complete Street” design

neighborhood-serving activities and improvements in the impact area

• Public art

Casino overlay district which can enhance the entertainment character and

• Programming that activates street life

activities of the area while protecting the residential lifestyle around it

Complementary infill development to benefit existing uses, encourage

mobility, and enhance the appeal of the new entertainment district via: • Development sites for new casino work-force

CENTRAL PKWY

• Retail space for complementary businesses

Capture critical mass of visitors at the south end of the Casino via: • Short Reading redesigned as a pedestrian

8TH

plaza with existing uses converted to night

9TH

MAIN

7

10

SYCAMORE

9

• The installation of a pocket park to the

G IN

13

4

14

CO U

urban fabric

E

RT

13

LB

7 Apartments over 1st floor retail/grocery 8 Pedestrian Plaza 9 Landscape / Art Screen 10 Green Connector 11 Retail Development

12 Pocket Park 13 Boulevard 14 Multi-story Parking with 1st floor commercial 15 Maintain contiguous street face

ER

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13

13TH

GI

15 TY

N TO

ES

L GG

13

2

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• Art screen for the jail to mobilize visitors,

4

3

AD

County buildings

RE

12

improve sightlines, and tighten the

SYCAMORE

BROADWAY

BROADWAY

• New landscaped pathway between the

Regional Gateway Neighborhood Gateway Festival / Market Place Primary Arteries School or Residential Townhouses

8

11

south-east

1 2 3 4 5 6

13

5 6

LIB

time entertainment options

MAIN

1


DESIGN

/ URBAN PLANNING

URBAN DE SIGN CHARRETTE

E A S T T H I R D S T R E E T D AY T O N , O H I O

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

GROUP PROJECT COMMUNITY DESIGN CENTER

OVERALL PLAN

CELEBRATING This project concerns the redevelopment of the Third St Corridor, one of Dayton’s important radial streets. At one time, Third St was an important commercial street connecting both sides of the city to the central business district and anchoring stable residential neighborhoods. Today, the Eastern part of the corridor (East Third) suffers from significant blight, vacancy, and economic decline.

+

CONNECTING

+


3

VISION

• Celebrating: diversit y, young & old, multi- cultural, traditional & progressive • Connec ting: communit y, technology, innovation, jobs, ar t • Leading: rapid transit, incentives, green infrastruc ture

BRT

LEADING

COMPLETE STREETS

KEY Gateway Elements Minor Repairs

Separated Bikeway

Substantial Repairs

Bike Path to River

Complete Renovation

Bike Path in Roadway

Intentional Artist Community


DESIGN

/ URBAN PLANNING

GOALS OF THE PROJECT

01

S ust a i n th e E a s t Th i rd St co r r i d o r a s t he m ai n co nnec to r from the

02

Use t he re d e ve l o pm e nt pl a n fo r th e co r r ido r as a m eans o f

CORRID

East end of Dayton to Downtown

promoting a revitalized neighborhood business center and focus for community uses.

F I N D L AY C R O S S I N G

G at eway si gnage

B ike f r i endly

Streets cape


OR IMPROVEMENTS LINDEN/ SPRINGFIELD

K E O W E E G AT E WAY

W a te r Fe a tu re

Plaz a

St r eet F estiv a l

Ou tdoor Seating

Lig hting


02

URBAN PLANNING

/

DESIGN

ACADEMIC WORK


C OV I N GTO N , K E N T U C K Y

C E N T E R C I T Y AC T I O N P L A N

GROUP PROJECT URBAN DESIGN WORKSHOP Existing Greenspace Existing Housing

DESIGN

4

DESIG

US N FOC

Proposed Greenspace Proposed Housing

/

ST E 4TH

URBAN PLANNING

W 4TH ST ST E 5TH

Proposed Major Gateway

2

W 5TH ST

E 6TH

ST

Proposed Minor Gateway

1

W 6TH ST

Proposed Bike Paths

ST E 7TH

MAIN ST

N

FO

C

U

S

INS ROBB

P ST

3

H ST W 9T

Gateway College Proposed Minor Complete Street / Great Streets

NU GREE

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KE

T ST SCOT

D

ES

PI

E ON AV MADIS

PHILADELPHIA ST

W

ST

T INS S

ROBB

The underlying framework of this project seeks to join various independent areas located in Covington by systematically

ST

identifying major destinations and corridors that allow for more interconnected and vibrant NU GREE

LVD

P ST

E ON AV MADIS

W 12

B ING JR HER K IN LUT /MART T S H T

communities. This

500

1,000

2,000 Feet

will

the study area and provide options that allow for an improved quality of life for current and future citizens of Covington.

0

strategy

address the comprehensive needs found in


V I S I O N S TAT E M E N T Complete streets would create a multi-modal network of connectivity for the City of Covington. Improved gateways, shared right-of-ways, residential infill and increased greenspace form a centralized triangle that connects residents and visitors alike to anchoring institutions, and increase their access and mobility to and from work, home and play.

HOUSING

COMMERCIAL

TRANSIT

E 4TH E 4TH

GREEN

ST

E 4TH

ST

E 4TH

ST

ST

W 4TH ST

W 4TH ST

W 4TH ST

ST E 5TH

W 4TH ST

ST E 5TH

E 5TH

ST

ST E 5TH

ST

PHILADELPHIA ST

ROBBINS

P ST

W 9TH

ST

ST

ST

ST

GREENU

MAIN ST

ST

E 7TH

ST

N AVE MADISO

ROBBINS

ROBBINS

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SCOTT

ST

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W 9TH

P ST

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ST

GREENU

PHILADELPHIA ST

W

N AVE MADISO

MAIN ST

ST

SCOTT

ROBBINS

E PIK

ST

ROBBINS

ST

ST

ST

D JR BLV

BEFORE

BEFORE

AFTER

AFTER

AFTER

COMPLETE STREET

G AT E WAY P L A Z A

3

RESIDENTIAL SPINE

LUT ARTIN

HER KING

D JR BLV

P ST

P ST

BEFORE

2

H ST/M W 12T

GREENU

HER KING

N AVE MADISO

LUT ARTIN

P ST

H ST/M W 12T

GREENU

HER KING

N AVE MADISO

LUT ARTIN

P ST

H ST/M W 12T

GREENU

D JR BLV

D JR BLV

N AVE MADISO

HER KING

GREENU

LUT ARTIN

N AVE MADISO

H ST/M W 12T

P ST

ST

GREENU

W 9TH

ST

ST

ROBBINS ROBBINS

W

N AVE MADISO

ST

P ST

ROBBINS

E 6TH

W 6TH ST E 7TH

ST

SCOTT

GREENU

ST

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ST

PHILADELPHIA ST

W

ST

N AVE MADISO

W 9TH

1

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W

W 5TH ST

ST E 6TH

W 6TH ST E 7TH

E 7TH

W 5TH ST

ST E 6TH

W 6TH ST

MAIN ST

ST E 6TH

W 6TH ST

MAIN ST

W 5TH ST W 5TH ST

BEFORE

4

AFTER GREEN SPINE


3

RE SIDENTIAL SPINE

CONNECTIVITY ISSUES Disconnection among the residential areas

BEFORE AFTER

Commercial

Office

Residential

Industrial

Institutional

Public Use

Green

Art

RESIDENTIAL SPINE

URBAN PLANNING

/

DESIGN

from west to east and with commercial areas.

The spine will enhance connectivity for the east and west residential areas and also with the Gateway College and Commercial districts. It will become a live and work area that contains

PIKESTREET Residential Spine LIVE+WORK

art activity and space for student exhibition. The green complete street will increase social gathering capacity for the younger generation.

BIKE PATH

GREEN MEDIAN 4’

10’

12’ 40’

10’

4’


M I X E D - U S E A N D VAC A N T

PIKE STREET

S T R E E T PA R K I N G

NEW RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT

COMMERCIAL+OFFICE+VACANT

LIVE+WORK+ART+SOCIAL GATHERING ART GALLERIES

+ G AT E WAY C O L L E G E S T U D E N T S

WORK STUDIOS

YOUNG PROFESSIONAL WORKERS

COMPLETE STREETS G R E AT S T R E E T S

B I K E PAT H

GREEN MEDIAN


URBAN PLANNING

/

DESIGN

4

GREEN SPINE

A

0

200

400

800

Feet


EXTENSION

Careful curation of activitites and citizen adaption of activities

RECLAIMING THE RIVERFRONT URBAN DESIGN PROJECT

Expansion of the green network to refurbish the whole region Natural ecologies of place not only play a major role in determining micro

REJUVENATION

7.3 acres of river front park will be dedicated to replenish Variety of flora and fauna flourishes in the riparian zone Connective island mounds will act as flood barriers and bike paths Tourism and boating to support economic vitality

climate and environmental systems, but also in enhancing the economic vitality of a region. Understanding and curating these urban ecologies through a a process of careful staging and laying, rather than using a rigid plan, will generate overwhelmingly positive results. Adaptation and hybridization have shown enormous benefits in attracting capital, as well as spurring economic growth. This hybridization also produces a positive unity in communities that are physically divided.

INITIATION

This urban design project will focus on reclaiming the riverfront trough a process

Demolition of IRS Building

curated human activities and the riparian zone. Additionally, it will densify the

4 complexes at 20 stories each

City's downtown core through the creation of 3 city blocks; this addition will

3 milion sq/ft of office space added in first stage

support more social interaction through the restriction of automobile usage, as

based ecological approach, one that supports an ecosystem that contains both

well as flexibly programming spaces. The design process will take part in the

DENSIFICATION

stages of INITIATION, DENSIFICATION, REJUVENATION and EXTENSION to address

3 additional city blocks with 30 story building

Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. Furthermore, the riverfront park located in

12 million sq/ft of mixed-use, residential space

Covington will complement the newly designed and currently under construction

Russell Street extends to the river front, creating a stronger axis

riverfront park located in Cincinnati.

the complex urban ecology in the City of Covington, as well as the sub-region of

Section through DENSIFIED DOWNTOWN CORE

A B I K E PAT H S

SOCIAL ACITIVITIES R E P L E N I S H E D R I PA R I A N Z O N E

I N C R E M E N TA L M O U N D S


L O C AT I O N

PUBLIC DE SIGN

CHUNGMU- RO PET STRE ET GROUP PROJECT V I S U A L I Z AT I O N D E S I G N

1969

First Petshop opened on the street

1988

The 1988 S eoul Olymic encouraged 30 more Petshops to open on the street

2009

48 Petshops are located on the street

URBAN PLANNING

/

DESIGN

HISTORY

GOALS OF THE PROJECT

01

Changing the street into a public space that people and pets can enjoy together

02

I mproving the sur rounding environment of the street

03

Transfor ming the street into a destination that includes cultural attrac tion

CURRENT S I T U AT I O N


PROPOSED 동물 종합병원

Animal gene ral hospital

동물 종합병원 Animal general hospital

BENCH FOR PETS AND PEOPLE

WAT E R F O U N TA I N

CLEAN SIGNAGE

PEDESTRIAN ROAD WITH IDENTITY

SPECIAL TRASH F E AT U R E


03

GRAPHIC DESIGN


I N F O R M AT I C D E S I G N F O R P L A N N I N G

IL

HI

IN KY

20

LA

GA FL

ME 15

CO

MA

10

CA

MI

AR

MS

5

AK

MT 20

10

15

5

5

10

15

20 NE

AL

5

NV

WY

10

WI

NH

WA

NJ 15 NY

VA OH

UT

20

TX

RI

OK PA

GUN LAWS Tournament Expenditures

New Money

Indirect Spending Right Infringed / Non-Issue WY

$30

Capital Expansion

Operations

Non-local Spending

GRAPHIC DESIGN

7.9

National Sponsorships

Indirect Spending

28.7

Rights Restricted Very Limited Issue

IL CA

Shall Issue

13.4

No Permit Required

AK

1.4

$0 million

GUN OWNERSHIP

GUN DEATH RATE 6.8

$10

$14.5

01

NY

17.9

$20 $10

Participant, Media and Visitor Spending

WI

million

E C O N O M I C I M PA C T O F T H E + PROFESSIONAL WORK

Yearly Percentage

$19.3 2011

million

$28.7

million

WESTERN AND SOUTHERN OPEN

Low

02

High

G U N D E AT H R AT E S I N A M E R I C A + ACADEMIC WORK


NEIGHBORHOODS

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Into the Streets

Keep Cincinnati Beautiful organized a cleanup drive for Short Vine in Corryville with University of Cincinnati Cincinnatus volunteers on Saturday, the 2nd of October. The students were seen in their red volunteer t-shirts cleaning up the neighborhood around Short Vine and also spreading security awareness by surveying parked cars and leaving flyers with the cars that alerted owners of security hazards such as unlocked doors and valuables. The students gathered afterward with Linda Holterhoff of Keep Cincinnati Beautiful at the Niehoff Urban Studio for a short summary of what they had achieved in course of the morning and the significance of it. The event was immediately followed by the unveiling of the Eco-Art Walk on Short Vine organized by Future Blooms, also a Keep Cincinnati Beautiful enterprise.

Cincinnati’s private and corporate philanthropists have provided extensive benefits for the city’s social, civic, economic, and physical infrastructure. The January 5th panel explored innovative ways of supporting urban projects and how to maintain and increase these investments. A crowd of nearly 200 heard invited speakers Dave Abbott (The Gund Foundation) Beth Gottfried (Fuel Cincinnati), H.C. Buck Niehoff (Harriet R. Williams Downey Fund), and Sean Parker (Ohio Government & Community Relations at P&G). Eric Avner of the Haile Foundation moderated the panel. Attendees of the event had the opportunity to submit a grant application of up to $2500 offered by Fuel Cincinnati.

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Vision 2015 and Agenda 360, Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky’s strategic community plans to transform our region, unveiled a report at the Studio that reveals challenges for every part of our metropolitan area. This analysis is a fact -based, fact-driven comparison of our community against eleven other areas with which we compete for companies, jobs and residents. This report provides reliable information for all community leaders in Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky that will allow us to make better policy decisions and chart regional progress over time.

The AIA keynote lecture was given by Scott Bernhard, Director of the Tulane City Center at the Tulane University, Louisiana. The presentation exposed the impacts of Hurricane Katrina on New Orleans architecture and urbanism scene. Furthermore, Bernhard presented some projects by the Tulane City Center, a research and outreach program that intends to engage architecture students and community organizations in experimental architecture projects that serve as a showcase of new technologies and alternatives for revitalizing New Orleans.

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Distribution

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Office of the Senior Vice President and Provost University of Cincinnati Office of the Dean College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning School of Planning College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning School of Architecture and Interior Design College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning School of Advanced Structures College of Engineering and Applied Science

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Food Congress 2011 is a forum for the discussion of Cincinnati’s local food system. This third annual meeting builds on the outcomes of previous years which included visioning on how to improve the local food system and scrutinzing the disparities in access to healthy, fresh and local food. This year’s event will focus on the capacity of our local food system for job creation; including several panel discussions that highlight key components of the food system, such as production, processing, distribution and waste. Come join more than thirty food related organizations for a stimulating dialog about our region’s economic and social food futures. Follow our website at www.uc.edu/cdc for program development.

Frank Russell, AIA Director and Adjunct Assistant Professor

GRAPHIC DESIGN

Graduate Assistants, Coops and Student Helpers Clare Norwood Food Congress Coordinator Leila Loezer Architectural Designer Dugan Murphy Planner Aaron Olson Planner Adrian Vainisi Planner Dominque Delucia Planner Naomi Ng Food Project Researcher Yoonsun Chang Graphic Designer

Graduate Assistants, Coops and Student Helpers Consultants Carolina Segura Planner and Landscape Designer (East Third) Juliana Silveira Planner and Urban Designer (East Third) Stephen Samuels Planner and Facilitator (Casino District Study and East Third)

Consultants

Faculty Dr Richard Miller Professor, Civil Engineering (all studios) Frank Russell Studio Coordinator, Adj, Assoc. Professor, Urban Planning (all studios, seminars) Michael Zaretsky Assistant Professor, Architecture (studio Fall 2010) Terry Grundy Resident Urbanist, Adj, Assoc. Professor, Urban Planning

To register or for questions please contact Clare Norwood at food.project@uc.edu or 513.556.3282

Faculty

Community Cincinnati Museum Center and prof. consultants

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LISC of Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky

Episcopal Diocese of Southwest Ohio

Human Nature Inc. Landscape Architects

Kinselman Kline Gossman Urban Design

Cincinnati-Hamilton Co Community Action Agency

Cincinnati Dept of Transportation and Engineering

Wright State University Ctr for Urban and Public Affairs

Nutrition Council of Greater Cincinnati

Northern Kentucky Vision 2015

Dayton CountyCorp

Architectural Foundation of Cincinnati

Campbell County Planning

City of Dayton Planning and Community Development

US Environmental Protection Agency

Bridging Broadway

Corporation for Findlay Market

UC Economics Center

Pendleton Community Council

Soapbox Cincinnati

Place Matters - Do Right

City of Cincinnati Planning Department

Cincinnati American Institute of Architects

Avondale Community Council

City of Covington and consultants

Cincinnati Regional Food Policy Council

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Portfolio | Yoonsun Chang